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object:Beauty
class:aspect
class:power

class:favorites

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
A_Garden_of_Pomegranates_-_An_Outline_of_the_Qabalah
A_Treatise_on_Cosmic_Fire
Blazing_the_Trail_from_Infancy_to_Enlightenment
DND_DM_Guide_5E
Epigrams_from_Savitri
Essays_Divine_And_Human
Evolution_II
Faust
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Heart_of_Matter
Journey_to_the_Lord_of_Power_-_A_Sufi_Manual_on_Retreat
Letters_On_Poetry_And_Art
Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
On_Interpretation
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_01
Process_and_Reality
Questions_And_Answers_1950-1951
Questions_And_Answers_1953
Questions_And_Answers_1955
Savitri
The_Act_of_Creation
the_Book_of_God
the_Book_of_Wisdom2
The_Divine_Companion
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Heros_Journey
The_Human_Cycle
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Integral_Yoga
The_Prophet
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_World_as_Will_and_Idea
The_Yoga_Sutras
Toward_the_Future
Words_Of_The_Mother_III

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
05.04_-_Of_Beauty_and_Ananda
1.14_-_The_Suprarational_Beauty
12.05_-_Beauty
1.24_-_On_Beauty
1951-01-25_-_Needs_and_desires._Collaboration_of_the_vital,_mind_an_accomplice._Progress_and_sincerity_-_recognising_faults._Organising_the_body_-_illness_-_new_harmony_-_physical_beauty.
1951-03-01_-_Universe_and_the_Divine_-_Freedom_and_determinism_-_Grace_-_Time_and_Creation-_in_the_Supermind_-_Work_and_its_results_-_The_psychic_being_-_beauty_and_love_-_Flowers-_beauty_and_significance_-_Choice_of_reincarnating_psychic_being
1951-05-12_-_Mahalakshmi_and_beauty_in_life_-_Mahasaraswati_-_conscious_hand_-_Riches_and_poverty
1955-06-01_-_The_aesthetic_conscience_-_Beauty_and_form_-_The_roots_of_our_life_-_The_sense_of_beauty_-_Educating_the_aesthetic_sense,_taste_-_Mental_constructions_based_on_a_revelation_-_Changing_the_world_and_humanity
1956-07-11_-_Beauty_restored_to_its_priesthood_-_Occult_worlds,_occult_beings_-_Difficulties_and_the_supramental_force
1.fua_-_How_long_then_will_you_seek_for_beauty_here?
1.hcyc_-_22_-_I_have_entered_the_deep_mountains_to_silence_and_beauty_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hs_-_Beauty_Radiated_in_Eternity
1.ia_-_Oh-_Her_Beauty-_The_Tender_Maid!
1.jk_-_A_Thing_Of_Beauty_(Endymion)
1.jr_-_The_Beauty_Of_The_Heart
1.kaa_-_The_Beauty_of_Oneness
1.pbs_-_Beautys_Halo
1.pbs_-_Hymn_to_Intellectual_Beauty
1.rt_-_Poems_On_Beauty
1.rwe_-_Beauty
1.rwe_-_Ode_To_Beauty
1.sjc_-_Not_for_All_the_Beauty
1.srm_-_Disrobe,_show_Your_beauty_(from_The_Marital_Garland_of_Letters)
1.stav_-_Oh_Exceeding_Beauty
1.wby_-_He_Remembers_Forgotten_Beauty
1.wby_-_He_Tells_Of_The_Perfect_Beauty
1.wby_-_The_Living_Beauty
1.wby_-_To_A_Young_Beauty
2.06_-_On_Beauty
ENNEAD_01.06_-_Of_Beauty.
ENNEAD_05.08_-_Concerning_Intelligible_Beauty.

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
00.04_-_The_Beautiful_in_the_Upanishads
00.05_-_A_Vedic_Conception_of_the_Poet
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.03_-_Letters_to_My_little_smile
0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life
0.06_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Sadhak
0.07_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.09_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Teacher
01.01_-_A_Yoga_of_the_Art_of_Life
01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn
01.02_-_Natures_Own_Yoga
01.02_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_Ahana_and_Other_Poems
01.02_-_The_Issue
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release
01.04_-_Motives_for_Seeking_the_Divine
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge
01.05_-_Rabindranath_Tagore:_A_Great_Poet,_a_Great_Man
01.05_-_The_Nietzschean_Antichrist
01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness
01.06_-_Vivekananda
01.08_-_Walter_Hilton:_The_Scale_of_Perfection
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.12_-_Goethe
01.13_-_T._S._Eliot:_Four_Quartets
01.14_-_Nicholas_Roerich
0.12_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0_1957-12-13
0_1958-02-25
0_1958-09-16_-_OM_NAMO_BHAGAVATEH
0_1959-07-14
0_1959-10-06_-_Sri_Aurobindos_abode
0_1960-10-02b
0_1960-11-08
0_1960-11-15
0_1960-12-17
0_1961-01-10
0_1961-01-22
0_1961-03-11
0_1961-03-25
0_1961-05-12
0_1961-07-18
0_1961-07-28
0_1961-10-30
0_1961-12-20
0_1962-01-12_-_supramental_ship
0_1962-02-03
0_1962-02-27
0_1962-03-11
0_1962-05-29
0_1962-05-31
0_1962-06-27
0_1962-07-25
0_1962-09-18
0_1962-11-27
0_1963-01-30
0_1963-02-15
0_1963-03-06
0_1963-07-03
0_1963-07-24
0_1963-08-07
0_1963-11-27
0_1963-12-31
0_1964-01-04
0_1964-01-18
0_1964-07-22
0_1964-08-11
0_1964-11-14
0_1964-12-02
0_1965-04-21
0_1965-06-18_-_supramental_ship
0_1965-09-29
0_1965-11-27
0_1966-04-27
0_1966-05-18
0_1966-07-27
0_1966-08-31
0_1966-09-07
0_1966-10-08
0_1966-11-19
0_1966-11-26
0_1966-12-21
0_1967-01-14
0_1967-02-21
0_1967-02-25
0_1967-03-04
0_1967-04-15
0_1967-07-05
0_1967-08-12
0_1967-09-23
0_1967-11-22
0_1967-11-Prayers_of_the_Consciousness_of_the_Cells
0_1968-02-07
0_1968-05-22
0_1968-05-29
0_1968-09-21
0_1968-10-09
0_1968-11-09
0_1969-01-18
0_1969-04-09
0_1969-05-24
0_1969-05-31
0_1969-07-30
0_1970-01-03
0_1970-01-28
0_1970-02-07
0_1970-03-14
0_1970-03-25
0_1970-07-04
0_1970-11-28
0_1970-12-02
0_1971-10-20
0_1971-11-27
0_1971-12-11
0_1972-04-04
0_1972-07-19
0_1972-09-06
0_1973-04-07
0_1973-04-14
02.01_-_The_World-Stair
02.02_-_Lines_of_the_Descent_of_Consciousness
02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter
02.03_-_The_Glory_and_the_Fall_of_Life
02.03_-_The_Shakespearean_Word
02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life
02.05_-_Robert_Graves
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_Boris_Pasternak
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.07_-_George_Seftris
02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night
02.08_-_Jules_Supervielle
02.09_-_The_Paradise_of_the_Life-Gods
02.09_-_Two_Mystic_Poems_in_Modern_French
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.11_-_Hymn_to_Darkness
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
02.12_-_Mysticism_in_Bengali_Poetry
02.12_-_The_Heavens_of_the_Ideal
02.13_-_On_Social_Reconstruction
02.14_-_Appendix
02.14_-_Panacea_of_Isms
02.14_-_The_World-Soul
02.15_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Greater_Knowledge
03.01_-_The_Malady_of_the_Century
03.02_-_The_Adoration_of_the_Divine_Mother
03.02_-_The_Philosopher_as_an_Artist_and_Philosophy_as_an_Art
03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation
03.04_-_The_Body_Human
03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon
03.05_-_The_Spiritual_Genius_of_India
03.08_-_The_Standpoint_of_Indian_Art
03.09_-_Art_and_Katharsis
03.10_-_Hamlet:_A_Crisis_of_the_Evolving_Soul
03.11_-_Modernist_Poetry
03.12_-_TagorePoet_and_Seer
03.14_-_Mater_Dolorosa
03.15_-_Origin_and_Nature_of_Suffering
04.01_-_The_Birth_and_Childhood_of_the_Flame
04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame
04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest
04.04_-_A_Global_Humanity
04.04_-_The_Quest
04.05_-_To_the_Heights_V
04.08_-_To_the_Heights_VIII_(Mahalakshmi)
04.22_-_To_the_Heights-XXII
04.34_-_To_the_Heights-XXXIV
05.01_-_The_Destined_Meeting-Place
05.02_-_Gods_Labour
05.02_-_Satyavan
05.03_-_Of_Desire_and_Atonement
05.03_-_Satyavan_and_Savitri
05.04_-_Of_Beauty_and_Ananda
05.05_-_In_Quest_of_Reality
05.05_-_Man_the_Prototype
05.05_-_Of_Some_Supreme_Mysteries
05.06_-_The_Role_of_Evil
05.11_-_The_Soul_of_a_Nation
05.12_-_The_Soul_and_its_Journey
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain
06.15_-_Ever_Green
06.18_-_Value_of_Gymnastics,_Mental_or_Other
06.21_-_The_Personal_and_the_Impersonal
06.26_-_The_Wonder_of_It_All
06.30_-_Sweet_Holy_Tears
07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge
07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul
07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries
07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces
07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.07_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Cosmic_Spirit_and_the_Cosmic_Consciousness
07.41_-_The_Divine_Family
07.42_-_The_Nature_and_Destiny_of_Art
08.03_-_Death_in_the_Forest
08.14_-_Poetry_and_Poetic_Inspiration
08.16_-_Perfection_and_Progress
08.18_-_The_Origin_of_Desire
08.19_-_Asceticism
08.21_-_Human_Birth
08.24_-_On_Food
09.01_-_Towards_the_Black_Void
09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness
09.05_-_The_Story_of_Love
10.01_-_Cycles_of_Creation
1.001_-_The_Aim_of_Yoga
10.01_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Ideal
10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal
10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00d_-_Introduction
1.00e_-_DIVISION_E_-_MOTION_ON_THE_PHYSICAL_AND_ASTRAL_PLANES
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PREFACE
1.00_-_Preface
1.00_-_PROLOGUE_IN_HEAVEN
1.00_-_The_Constitution_of_the_Human_Being
1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come
10.11_-_Beyond_Love_and_Hate
10.14_-_Night_and_Day
1.016_-_The_Bee
10.17_-_Miracles:_Their_True_Significance
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_BOOK_THE_FIRST
1.01_-_Description_of_the_Castle
1.01_-_Economy
1.01f_-_Introduction
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_MASTER_AND_DISCIPLE
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine
1.01_-_The_Divine_and_The_Universe
1.01_-_The_King_of_the_Wood
1.01_-_The_Mental_Fortress
1.01_-_The_Rape_of_the_Lock
1.01_-_The_Science_of_Living
1.01_-_The_Unexpected
1.01_-_Who_is_Tara
1.020_-_The_World_and_Our_World
10.23_-_Prayers_and_Meditations_of_the_Mother
10.24_-_Savitri
1.024_-_The_Light
1.027_-_The_Ant
1.02_-_BEFORE_THE_CITY-GATE
1.02_-_BOOK_THE_SECOND
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Authors_second_meeting,_March_1921
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics
1.02_-_The_Human_Soul
1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND
1.02_-_The_Philosophy_of_Ishvara
1.02_-_The_Recovery
1.02_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Call
1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation
1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds
1.02_-_THE_WITHIN_OF_THINGS
10.31_-_The_Mystery_of_The_Five_Senses
10.32_-_The_Mystery_of_the_Five_Elements
1.033_-_The_Confederates
10.35_-_The_Moral_and_the_Spiritual
1.037_-_The_Aligners
1.03_-_A_Sapphire_Tale
1.03_-_BOOK_THE_THIRD
1.03_-_Hymns_of_Gritsamada
1.03_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_World.
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers
1.03_-_Reading
1.03_-_Supernatural_Aid
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.03_-_The_House_Of_The_Lord
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Exorcism)
1.03_-_YIBHOOTI_PADA
1.04_-_ADVICE_TO_HOUSEHOLDERS
1.04_-_Body,_Soul_and_Spirit
1.04_-_BOOK_THE_FOURTH
1.04_-_Descent_into_Future_Hell
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_The_33_seven_double_letters
1.04_-_The_Aims_of_Psycho_therapy
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Crossing_of_the_First_Threshold
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Paths
1.04_-_The_Praise
1.04_-_The_Qabalah__The_Best_Training_for_Memory
1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Compact)
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.057_-_The_Four_Manifestations_of_Ignorance
1.05_-_BOOK_THE_FIFTH
1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women
1.05_-_Hymns_of_Bharadwaja
1.05_-_On_the_Love_of_God.
1.05_-_Prayer
1.05_-_Problems_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.05_-_Qualifications_of_the_Aspirant_and_the_Teacher
1.05_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_-_The_Psychic_Being
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Universe__The_0_=_2_Equation
1.05_-_True_and_False_Subjectivism
1.06_-_BOOK_THE_SIXTH
1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi
1.06_-_Hymns_of_Parashara
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_Psychic_Education
1.06_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_2_The_Works_of_Love_-_The_Works_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Four_Powers_of_the_Mother
1.06_-_The_Greatness_of_the_Individual
1.06_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES
1.06_-_The_Objective_and_Subjective_Views_of_Life
1.06_-_WITCHES_KITCHEN
1.078_-_Kumbhaka_and_Concentration_of_Mind
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_On_mourning_which_causes_joy.
1.07_-_Savitri
1.07_-_Standards_of_Conduct_and_Spiritual_Freedom
1.07_-_The_Fire_of_the_New_World
1.07_-_The_Ideal_Law_of_Social_Development
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.07_-_The_Plot_must_be_a_Whole.
1.07_-_The_Psychic_Center
1.07_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_2
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.08a_-_The_Ladder
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_Civilisation_and_Barbarism
1.08_-_EVENING_A_SMALL,_NEATLY_KEPT_CHAMBER
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_THINGS_THE_GERMANS_LACK
1.09_-_ADVICE_TO_THE_BRAHMOS
1.09_-_A_System_of_Vedic_Psychology
1.09_-_BOOK_THE_NINTH
1.09_-_Civilisation_and_Culture
1.09_-_Equality_and_the_Annihilation_of_Ego
1.09_-_Legend_of_Lakshmi
1.09_-_Man_-_About_the_Body
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE
1.09_-_Talks
1.09_-_The_Greater_Self
1.09_-_The_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.09_-_To_the_Students,_Young_and_Old
1.1.01_-_Seeking_the_Divine
11.01_-_The_Eternal_Day__The_Souls_Choice_and_the_Supreme_Consummation
11.07_-_The_Labours_of_the_Gods:_The_five_Purifications
1.10_-_Aesthetic_and_Ethical_Culture
1.10_-_BOOK_THE_TENTH
1.10_-_Harmony
1.10_-_Life_and_Death._The_Greater_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.10_-_Theodicy_-_Nature_Makes_No_Mistakes
1.10_-_The_Three_Modes_of_Nature
1.1.1.01_-_Three_Elements_of_Poetic_Creation
11.15_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.11_-_BOOK_THE_ELEVENTH
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_Powers
1.11_-_The_Change_of_Power
1.11_-_The_Master_of_the_Work
1.11_-_The_Reason_as_Governor_of_Life
1.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.12_-_BOOK_THE_TWELFTH
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Solution
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Left-Hand_Path_-_The_Black_Brothers
1.12_-_The_Office_and_Limitations_of_the_Reason
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1.13_-_A_Dream
1.13_-_BOOK_THE_THIRTEENTH
1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self
1.13_-_Reason_and_Religion
1.13_-_SALVATION,_DELIVERANCE,_ENLIGHTENMENT
1.13_-_THE_MASTER_AND_M.
1.13_-_Under_the_Auspices_of_the_Gods
1.14_-_INSTRUCTION_TO_VAISHNAVS_AND_BRHMOS
1.14_-_The_Succesion_to_the_Kingdom_in_Ancient_Latium
1.14_-_The_Suprarational_Beauty
1.15_-_In_the_Domain_of_the_Spirit_Beings
1.15_-_On_incorruptible_purity_and_chastity_to_which_the_corruptible_attain_by_toil_and_sweat.
1.15_-_Prayers
1.15_-_The_Suprarational_Good
1.15_-_The_Transformed_Being
1.15_-_The_world_overrun_with_trees;_they_are_destroyed_by_the_Pracetasas
1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being
1.16_-_The_Season_of_Truth
1.16_-_The_Suprarational_Ultimate_of_Life
1.17_-_Legend_of_Prahlada
1.17_-_Religion_as_the_Law_of_Life
1.17_-_The_Divine_Birth_and_Divine_Works
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_Hiranyakasipu's_reiterated_attempts_to_destroy_his_son
1.18_-_The_Infrarational_Age_of_the_Cycle
1.18_-_The_Perils_of_the_Soul
1.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_HIS_INJURED_ARM
1.19_-_The_Practice_of_Magical_Evocation
1.201_-_Socrates
12.01_-_The_Return_to_Earth
12.04_-_Love_and_Death
12.05_-_Beauty
1.2.06_-_Rejection
12.06_-_The_Hero_and_the_Nymph
12.09_-_The_Story_of_Dr._Faustus_Retold
1.20_-_Equality_and_Knowledge
1.20_-_Visnu_appears_to_Prahlada
1.2.1.06_-_Symbolism_and_Allegory
1.2.1.11_-_Mystic_Poetry_and_Spiritual_Poetry
1.2.1.12_-_Spiritual_Poetry
1.2.1_-_Mental_Development_and_Sadhana
1.21_-_The_Spiritual_Aim_and_Life
1.2.2.01_-_The_Poet,_the_Yogi_and_the_Rishi
1.22_-_ADVICE_TO_AN_ACTOR
1.22_-_The_Necessity_of_the_Spiritual_Transformation
1.23_-_Conditions_for_the_Coming_of_a_Spiritual_Age
1.23_-_FESTIVAL_AT_SURENDRAS_HOUSE
1.23_-_Improvising_a_Temple
1.23_-_On_mad_price,_and,_in_the_same_Step,_on_unclean_and_blasphemous_thoughts.
1.23_-_The_Double_Soul_in_Man
1.24_-_On_Beauty
1.24_-_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_On_the_destroyer_of_the_passions,_most_sublime_humility,_which_is_rooted_in_spiritual_feeling.
1.25_-_SPIRITUAL_EXERCISES
1.25_-_The_Knot_of_Matter
1.26_-_FESTIVAL_AT_ADHARS_HOUSE
1.27_-_Structure_of_Mind_Based_on_that_of_Body
1.28_-_On_holy_and_blessed_prayer,_mother_of_virtues,_and_on_the_attitude_of_mind_and_body_in_prayer.
1.29_-_Concerning_heaven_on_earth,_or_godlike_dispassion_and_perfection,_and_the_resurrection_of_the_soul_before_the_general_resurrection.
1.29_-_The_Myth_of_Adonis
1.29_-_What_is_Certainty?
1.2_-_Katha_Upanishads
1.30_-_Concerning_the_linking_together_of_the_supreme_trinity_among_the_virtues.
1.31_-_Adonis_in_Cyprus
1.3.4.04_-_The_Divine_Superman
1.35_-_Describes_the_recollection_which_should_be_practised_after_Communion._Concludes_this_subject_with_an_exclamatory_prayer_to_the_Eternal_Father.
1.36_-_Quo_Stet_Olympus_-_Where_the_Gods,_Angels,_etc._Live
1.37_-_Death_-_Fear_-_Magical_Memory
1.4.01_-_The_Divine_Grace_and_Guidance
14.05_-_The_Golden_Rule
14.06_-_Liberty,_Self-Control_and_Friendship
14.08_-_A_Parable_of_Sea-Gulls
1.43_-_Dionysus
1.44_-_Serious_Style_of_A.C.,_or_the_Apparent_Frivolity_of_Some_of_my_Remarks
1.46_-_Selfishness
15.03_-_A_Canadian_Question
15.08_-_Ashram_-_Inner_and_Outer
15.09_-_One_Day_More
1.53_-_The_Propitation_of_Wild_Animals_By_Hunters
1.54_-_On_Meanness
1.58_-_Do_Angels_Ever_Cut_Themselves_Shaving?
1.59_-_Killing_the_God_in_Mexico
1.62_-_The_Fire-Festivals_of_Europe
1.63_-_Fear,_a_Bad_Astral_Vision
1.66_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Tales
17.02_-_Hymn_to_the_Sun
1.71_-_Morality_2
1.72_-_Education
1.74_-_Obstacles_on_the_Path
1.75_-_The_AA_and_the_Planet
1.78_-_Sore_Spots
18.01_-_Padavali
18.02_-_Ramprasad
18.03_-_Tagore
18.04_-_Modern_Poems
18.05_-_Ashram_Poets
1.83_-_Epistola_Ultima
19.04_-_The_Flowers
19.08_-_Thousands
1913_02_12p
1913_06_27p
1913_07_23p
1914_01_07p
1914_01_11p
1914_01_13p
1914_03_01p
1914_03_06p
1914_03_19p
1914_03_23p
1914_07_04p
1914_07_19p
1914_07_25p
1914_08_06p
1914_08_21p
1914_09_10p
1914_12_10p
1915_11_07p
1916_06_07p
1917_01_14p
1917_01_23p
1917_01_29p
1917_03_31p
1929-04-28_-_Offering,_general_and_detailed_-_Integral_Yoga_-_Remembrance_of_the_Divine_-_Reading_and_Yoga_-_Necessity,_predetermination_-_Freedom_-_Miracles_-_Aim_of_creation
1929-05-26_-_Individual,_illusion_of_separateness_-_Hostile_forces_and_the_mental_plane_-_Psychic_world,_psychic_being_-_Spiritual_and_psychic_-_Words,_understanding_speech_and_reading_-_Hostile_forces,_their_utility_-_Illusion_of_action,_true_action
1929-06-02_-__Divine_love_and_its_manifestation_-_Part_of_the_vital_being_in_Divine_love
1929-07-28_-_Art_and_Yoga_-_Art_and_life_-_Music,_dance_-_World_of_Harmony
1951-01-11_-_Modesty_and_vanity_-_Generosity
1951-01-25_-_Needs_and_desires._Collaboration_of_the_vital,_mind_an_accomplice._Progress_and_sincerity_-_recognising_faults._Organising_the_body_-_illness_-_new_harmony_-_physical_beauty.
1951-02-17_-_False_visions_-_Offering_ones_will_-_Equilibrium_-_progress_-_maturity_-_Ardent_self-giving-_perfecting_the_instrument_-_Difficulties,_a_help_in_total_realisation_-_paradoxes_-_Sincerity_-_spontaneous_meditation
1951-02-26_-_On_reading_books_-_gossip_-_Discipline_and_realisation_-_Imaginary_stories-_value_of_-_Private_lives_of_big_men_-_relaxation_-_Understanding_others_-_gnostic_consciousness
1951-03-01_-_Universe_and_the_Divine_-_Freedom_and_determinism_-_Grace_-_Time_and_Creation-_in_the_Supermind_-_Work_and_its_results_-_The_psychic_being_-_beauty_and_love_-_Flowers-_beauty_and_significance_-_Choice_of_reincarnating_psychic_being
1951-03-26_-_Losing_all_to_gain_all_-_psychic_being_-_Transforming_the_vital_-_physical_habits_-_the_subconscient_-_Overcoming_difficulties_-_weakness,_an_insincerity_-_to_change_the_world_-_Psychic_source,_flash_of_experience_-_preparation_for_yoga
1951-04-09_-_Modern_Art_-_Trend_of_art_in_Europe_in_the_twentieth_century_-_Effect_of_the_Wars_-_descent_of_vital_worlds_-_Formation_of_character_-_If_there_is_another_war
1951-04-12_-_Japan,_its_art,_landscapes,_life,_etc_-_Fairy-lore_of_Japan_-_Culture-_its_spiral_movement_-_Indian_and_European-_the_spiritual_life_-_Art_and_Truth
1951-04-17_-_Unity,_diversity_-_Protective_envelope_-_desires_-_consciousness,_true_defence_-_Perfection_of_physical_-_cinema_-_Choice,_constant_and_conscious_-_law_of_ones_being_-_the_One,_the_Multiplicity_-_Civilization-_preparing_an_instrument
1951-04-26_-_Irrevocable_transformation_-_The_divine_Shakti_-_glad_submission_-_Rejection,_integral_-_Consecration_-_total_self-forgetfulness_-_work
1951-05-11_-_Mahakali_and_Kali_-_Avatar_and_Vibhuti_-_Sachchidananda_behind_all_states_of_being_-_The_power_of_will_-_receiving_the_Divine_Will
1951-05-12_-_Mahalakshmi_and_beauty_in_life_-_Mahasaraswati_-_conscious_hand_-_Riches_and_poverty
1953-05-13
1953-06-10
1953-06-17
1953-08-26
1953-10-21
1953-10-28
1955-02-09_-_Desire_is_contagious_-_Primitive_form_of_love_-_the_artists_delight_-_Psychic_need,_mind_as_an_instrument_-_How_the_psychic_being_expresses_itself_-_Distinguishing_the_parts_of_ones_being_-_The_psychic_guides_-_Illness_-_Mothers_vision
1955-02-23_-_On_the_sense_of_taste,_educating_the_senses_-_Fasting_produces_a_state_of_receptivity,_drawing_energy_-_The_body_and_food
1955-05-25_-_Religion_and_reason_-_true_role_and_field_-_an_obstacle_to_or_minister_of_the_Spirit_-_developing_and_meaning_-_Learning_how_to_live,_the_elite_-_Reason_controls_and_organises_life_-_Nature_is_infrarational
1955-06-01_-_The_aesthetic_conscience_-_Beauty_and_form_-_The_roots_of_our_life_-_The_sense_of_beauty_-_Educating_the_aesthetic_sense,_taste_-_Mental_constructions_based_on_a_revelation_-_Changing_the_world_and_humanity
1955-10-12_-_The_problem_of_transformation_-_Evolution,_man_and_superman_-_Awakening_need_of_a_higher_good_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_earths_history_-_Setting_foot_on_the_new_path_-_The_true_reality_of_the_universe_-_the_new_race_-_...
1955-11-02_-_The_first_movement_in_Yoga_-_Interiorisation,_finding_ones_soul_-_The_Vedic_Age_-_An_incident_about_Vivekananda_-_The_imaged_language_of_the_Vedas_-_The_Vedic_Rishis,_involutionary_beings_-_Involution_and_evolution
1955-12-07_-_Emotional_impulse_of_self-giving_-_A_young_dancer_in_France_-_The_heart_has_wings,_not_the_head_-_Only_joy_can_conquer_the_Adversary
1955-12-28_-_Aspiration_in_different_parts_of_the_being_-_Enthusiasm_and_gratitude_-_Aspiration_is_in_all_beings_-_Unlimited_power_of_good,_evil_has_a_limit_-_Progress_in_the_parts_of_the_being_-_Significance_of_a_dream
1956-01-11_-_Desire_and_self-deception_-_Giving_all_one_is_and_has_-_Sincerity,_more_powerful_than_will_-_Joy_of_progress_Definition_of_youth
1956-04-11_-_Self-creator_-_Manifestation_of_Time_and_Space_-_Brahman-Maya_and_Ishwara-Shakti_-_Personal_and_Impersonal
1956-04-18_-_Ishwara_and_Shakti,_seeing_both_aspects_-_The_Impersonal_and_the_divine_Person_-_Soul,_the_presence_of_the_divine_Person_-_Going_to_other_worlds,_exteriorisation,_dreams_-_Telling_stories_to_oneself
1956-06-27_-_Birth,_entry_of_soul_into_body_-_Formation_of_the_supramental_world_-_Aspiration_for_progress_-_Bad_thoughts_-_Cerebral_filter_-_Progress_and_resistance
1956-07-11_-_Beauty_restored_to_its_priesthood_-_Occult_worlds,_occult_beings_-_Difficulties_and_the_supramental_force
1956-07-25_-_A_complete_act_of_divine_love_-_How_to_listen_-_Sports_programme_same_for_boys_and_girls_-_How_to_profit_by_stay_at_Ashram_-_To_Women_about_Their_Body
1956-08-15_-_Protection,_purification,_fear_-_Atmosphere_at_the_Ashram_on_Darshan_days_-_Darshan_messages_-_Significance_of_15-08_-_State_of_surrender_-_Divine_Grace_always_all-powerful_-_Assumption_of_Virgin_Mary_-_SA_message_of_1947-08-15
1956-09-05_-_Material_life,_seeing_in_the_right_way_-_Effect_of_the_Supermind_on_the_earth_-_Emergence_of_the_Supermind_-_Falling_back_into_the_same_mistaken_ways
1956-09-19_-_Power,_predominant_quality_of_vital_being_-_The_Divine,_the_psychic_being,_the_Supermind_-_How_to_come_out_of_the_physical_consciousness_-_Look_life_in_the_face_-_Ordinary_love_and_Divine_love
1957-03-27_-_If_only_humanity_consented_to_be_spiritualised
1957-04-03_-_Different_religions_and_spirituality
1957-05-01_-_Sports_competitions,_their_value
1957-07-17_-_Power_of_conscious_will_over_matter
1957-07-24_-_The_involved_supermind_-_The_new_world_and_the_old_-_Will_for_progress_indispensable
1957-07-31_-_Awakening_aspiration_in_the_body
1957-12-04_-_The_method_of_The_Life_Divine_-_Problem_of_emergence_of_a_new_species
1957-12-18_-_Modern_science_and_illusion_-_Value_of_experience,_its_transforming_power_-_Supramental_power,_first_aspect_to_manifest
1958-02-19_-_Experience_of_the_supramental_boat_-_The_Censors_-_Absurdity_of_artificial_means
1958-04-09_-_The_eyes_of_the_soul_-_Perceiving_the_soul
1958-09-17_-_Power_of_formulating_experience_-_Usefulness_of_mental_development
1958_10_10
1958-10-29_-_Mental_self-sufficiency_-_Grace
1958-11-12_-_The_aim_of_the_Supreme_-_Trust_in_the_Grace
1960_02_17
1960_02_24
1960_06_16
1960_11_11?_-_48
1960_11_12?_-_49
1962_01_12
1962_02_27
1966_07_06
1970_01_23
1970_02_05
1970_03_12
1.ac_-_The_Priestess_of_Panormita
1.ac_-_The_Quest
1.ami_-_Bright_are_Thy_tresses,_brighten_them_even_more_(from_Baal-i-Jibreel)
1.ami_-_Selfhood_can_demolish_the_magic_of_this_world_(from_Baal-i-Jibreel)
1.ami_-_To_the_Saqi_(from_Baal-i-Jibreel)
1.anon_-_Less_profitable
1.anon_-_The_Poem_of_Antar
1.anon_-_The_Poem_of_Imru-Ul-Quais
1.asak_-_My_Beloved-_this_torture_and_pain
1.asak_-_Whatever_road_we_take_to_You,_Joy
1.bs_-_The_soil_is_in_ferment,_O_friend
1.da_-_Lead_us_up_beyond_light
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Azathoth
1f.lovecraft_-_Beyond_the_Wall_of_Sleep
1f.lovecraft_-_Celephais
1f.lovecraft_-_Discarded_Draft_of
1f.lovecraft_-_Ex_Oblivione
1f.lovecraft_-_Facts_concerning_the_Late
1f.lovecraft_-_He
1f.lovecraft_-_Herbert_West-Reanimator
1f.lovecraft_-_Hypnos
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Walls_of_Eryx
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_Pickmans_Model
1f.lovecraft_-_Poetry_and_the_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_Sweet_Ermengarde
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Crawling_Chaos
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Diary_of_Alonzo_Typer
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Doom_That_Came_to_Sarnath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Haunter_of_the_Dark
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hoard_of_the_Wizard-Beast
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Man_of_Stone
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Music_of_Erich_Zann
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Night_Ocean
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Quest_of_Iranon
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Unnamable
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_The_White_Ship
1.fs_-_Honor_To_Woman
1.fs_-_Melancholy_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_Pompeii_And_Herculaneum
1.fs_-_The_Antique_To_The_Northern_Wanderer
1.fs_-_The_Artists
1.fs_-_The_Assignation
1.fs_-_The_Celebrated_Woman_-_An_Epistle_By_A_Married_Man
1.fs_-_The_Fairest_Apparition
1.fs_-_The_Fortune-Favored
1.fs_-_The_Four_Ages_Of_The_World
1.fs_-_The_Gods_Of_Greece
1.fs_-_The_Ideal_And_The_Actual_Life
1.fs_-_The_Infanticide
1.fs_-_The_Lay_Of_The_Mountain
1.fs_-_The_Power_Of_Woman
1.fs_-_The_Sexes
1.fs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Love
1.fs_-_The_Two_Guides_Of_Life_-_The_Sublime_And_The_Beautiful
1.fs_-_The_Walk
1.fs_-_The_Words_Of_Error
1.fs_-_To_Minna
1.fs_-_To_My_Friends
1.fs_-_Variety
1.fs_-_Written_In_A_Young_Lady's_Album
1.fua_-_All_who,_reflecting_as_reflected_see
1.fua_-_How_long_then_will_you_seek_for_beauty_here?
1.fua_-_The_angels_have_bowed_down_to_you_and_drowned
1.fua_-_The_Birds_Find_Their_King
1.fua_-_The_Hawk
1.fua_-_The_Nightingale
1.fua_-_The_Simurgh
1.hcyc_-_22_-_I_have_entered_the_deep_mountains_to_silence_and_beauty_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hs_-_Beauty_Radiated_in_Eternity
1.hs_-_Bold_Souls
1.hs_-_Cypress_And_Tulip
1.hs_-_Lady_That_Hast_My_Heart
1.hs_-_Spring_and_all_its_flowers
1.hs_-_Streaming
1.hs_-_The_Glow_of_Your_Presence
1.hs_-_The_Lute_Will_Beg
1.hs_-_The_Secret_Draught_Of_Wine
1.ia_-_In_Memory_Of_Those
1.ia_-_In_Memory_of_Those_Who_Melt_the_Soul_Forever
1.ia_-_Oh-_Her_Beauty-_The_Tender_Maid!
1.ia_-_Reality
1.ia_-_When_We_Came_Together
1.ia_-_When_we_came_together
1.is_-_Love
1.jda_-_You_rest_on_the_circle_of_Sris_breast_(from_The_Gitagovinda)
1.jk_-_An_Extempore
1.jk_-_A_Thing_Of_Beauty_(Endymion)
1.jk_-_Calidore_-_A_Fragment
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_I
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_My_Brother_George
1.jk_-_Extracts_From_An_Opera
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_II
1.jk_-_Isabella;_Or,_The_Pot_Of_Basil_-_A_Story_From_Boccaccio
1.jk_-_I_Stood_Tip-Toe_Upon_A_Little_Hill
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_II
1.jk_-_Lines_On_Seeing_A_Lock_Of_Miltons_Hair
1.jk_-_Ode_On_A_Grecian_Urn
1.jk_-_Ode_On_Melancholy
1.jk_-_Ode_To_A_Nightingale
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_On_Visiting_The_Tomb_Of_Burns
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_II
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_III
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_IV
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_V
1.jk_-_Sleep_And_Poetry
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_Oh!_How_I_Love,_On_A_Fair_Summers_Eve
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_A_Picture_Of_Leander
1.jk_-_Sonnet._The_Day_Is_Gone
1.jk_-_Sonnet._The_Human_Seasons
1.jk_-_Sonnet._To_A_Lady_Seen_For_A_Few_Moments_At_Vauxhall
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Why_Did_I_Laugh_Tonight?
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Page_In_Shakespeares_Poems,_Facing_A_Lovers_Complaint
1.jk_-_Spenserian_Stanzas_On_Charles_Armitage_Brown
1.jk_-_The_Cap_And_Bells;_Or,_The_Jealousies_-_A_Faery_Tale_.._Unfinished
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_St._Agnes
1.jk_-_To_Charles_Cowden_Clarke
1.jk_-_Translated_From_A_Sonnet_Of_Ronsard
1.jk_-_What_The_Thrush_Said._Lines_From_A_Letter_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Woman!_When_I_Behold_Thee_Flippant,_Vain
1.jlb_-_The_Recoleta
1.jr_-_Ah,_what_was_there_in_that_light-giving_candle_that_it_set_fire_to_the_heart,_and_snatched_the_heart_away?
1.jr_-_All_Through_Eternity
1.jr_-_A_Moment_Of_Happiness
1.jr_-_A_World_with_No_Boundaries_(Ghazal_363)
1.jr_-_By_the_God_who_was_in_pre-eternity_living_and_moving_and_omnipotent,_everlasting
1.jr_-_I_Closed_My_Eyes_To_Creation
1.jr_-_I_Swear
1.jr_-_Now_comes_the_final_merging
1.jr_-_Rise,_Lovers
1.jr_-_The_Beauty_Of_The_Heart
1.jr_-_There_Are_A_Hundred_Kinds_Of_Prayer
1.jr_-_Today,_like_every_other_day,_we_wake_up_empty
1.jr_-_Weary_Not_Of_Us,_For_We_Are_Very_Beautiful
1.jr_-_You_are_closer_to_me_than_myself_(Ghazal_2798)
1.jr_-_Zero_Circle
1.jt_-_As_air_carries_light_poured_out_by_the_rising_sun
1.jwvg_-_By_The_River
1.jwvg_-_The_Reckoning
1.kaa_-_A_Path_of_Devotion
1.kaa_-_Devotion_for_Thee
1.kaa_-_The_Beauty_of_Oneness
1.kbr_-_Do_Not_Go_To_The_Garden_Of_Flowers
1.kbr_-_Do_not_go_to_the_garden_of_flowers!
1.lb_-_Looking_For_A_Monk_And_Not_Finding_Him
1.lb_-_The_River-Captains_Wife__A_Letter
1.lb_-_To_Tan-Ch'iu
1.lb_-_Waking_from_Drunken_Sleep_on_a_Spring_Day_by_Li_Po
1.lla_-_Dance,_Lalla,_with_nothing_on
1.lla_-_Forgetful_one,_get_up!
1.lla_-_Just_for_a_moment,_flowers_appear
1.lovecraft_-_An_Epistle_To_Rheinhart_Kleiner,_Esq.,_Poet-Laureate,_And_Author_Of_Another_Endless_Day
1.lovecraft_-_Astrophobos
1.lovecraft_-_Ex_Oblivione
1.lovecraft_-_Fungi_From_Yuggoth
1.lovecraft_-_Laeta-_A_Lament
1.lovecraft_-_Nathicana
1.lovecraft_-_Waste_Paper-_A_Poem_Of_Profound_Insignificance
1.nb_-_A_Poem_for_the_Sefirot_as_a_Wheel_of_Light
1.nmdv_-_He_is_the_One_in_many
1.pbs_-_A_Bridal_Song
1.pbs_-_Adonais_-_An_elegy_on_the_Death_of_John_Keats
1.pbs_-_Alastor_-_or,_the_Spirit_of_Solitude
1.pbs_-_A_Vision_Of_The_Sea
1.pbs_-_Beautys_Halo
1.pbs_-_Charles_The_First
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_(Excerpt)
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_-_Passages_Of_The_Poem,_Or_Connected_Therewith
1.pbs_-_Epithalamium
1.pbs_-_Epithalamium_-_Another_Version
1.pbs_-_Fiordispina
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_The_Elegy_On_The_Death_Of_Adonis
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Of_An_Unfinished_Drama
1.pbs_-_Ginevra
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_The_Moon
1.pbs_-_Hymn_to_Intellectual_Beauty
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Letter_To_Maria_Gisborne
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Naples
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_On_The_Medusa_Of_Leonardo_da_Vinci_In_The_Florentine_Gallery
1.pbs_-_Orpheus
1.pbs_-_Prince_Athanase
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_I.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_V.
1.pbs_-_Scenes_From_The_Faust_Of_Goethe
1.pbs_-_The_Birth_Place_of_Pleasure
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Sensitive_Plant
1.pbs_-_The_Tower_Of_Famine
1.pbs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Life
1.pbs_-_The_Witch_Of_Atlas
1.pbs_-_The_Zucca
1.pbs_-_Time_Long_Past
1.pbs_-_To_Ireland
1.pbs_-_To_The_Queen_Of_My_Heart
1.pbs_-_To--_Yet_look_on_me
1.poe_-_Al_Aaraaf-_Part_1
1.poe_-_Al_Aaraaf-_Part_2
1.poe_-_A_Paean
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_For_Annie
1.poe_-_In_Youth_I_have_Known_One
1.poe_-_Israfel
1.poe_-_Tamerlane
1.poe_-_The_Haunted_Palace
1.poe_-_The_Sleeper
1.poe_-_The_Village_Street
1.poe_-_To_Frances_S._Osgood
1.poe_-_To_Helen_-_1831
1.poe_-_To_Helen_-_1848
1.poe_-_To_The_River
1.poe_-_Ulalume
1.rb_-_Abt_Vogler
1.rb_-_Andrea_del_Sarto
1.rb_-_Any_Wife_To_Any_Husband
1.rb_-_A_Pretty_Woman
1.rb_-_Cleon
1.rb_-_Fra_Lippo_Lippi
1.rb_-_In_A_Year
1.rbk_-_Epithalamium
1.rb_-_Old_Pictures_In_Florence
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_III_-_Paracelsus
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_II_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_IV_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_V_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pauline,_A_Fragment_of_a_Question
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_II_-_Noon
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_I_-_Morning
1.rb_-_Popularity
1.rb_-_Protus
1.rb_-_Rhyme_for_a_Child_Viewing_a_Naked_Venus_in_a_Painting_of_'The_Judgement_of_Paris'
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fifth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_First
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Second
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Sixth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Third
1.rb_-_The_Englishman_In_Italy
1.rb_-_The_Flight_Of_The_Duchess
1.rb_-_The_Glove
1.rb_-_The_Guardian-Angel
1.rb_-_Women_And_Roses
1.rmpsd_-_Why_disappear_into_formless_trance?
1.rmr_-_Elegy_I
1.rmr_-_God_Speaks_To_Each_Of_Us
1.rt_-_Fireflies
1.rt_-_Gitanjali
1.rt_-_I_Cast_My_Net_Into_The_Sea
1.rt_-_I_Found_A_Few_Old_Letters
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_LIV_-_In_The_Beginning_Of_Time
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_LVI_-_The_Evening_Was_Lonely
1.rt_-_Poems_On_Beauty
1.rt_-_Poems_On_Life
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_01_-_10
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_21_-_30
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_61_-_70
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_71_-_80
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_LIX_-_O_Woman
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_LXVIII_-_None_Lives_For_Ever,_Brother
1.rwe_-_Beauty
1.rwe_-_Boston_Hymn
1.rwe_-_Dmonic_Love
1.rwe_-_Each_And_All
1.rwe_-_Freedom
1.rwe_-_From_the_Persian_of_Hafiz_I
1.rwe_-_In_Memoriam
1.rwe_-_Manners
1.rwe_-_May-Day
1.rwe_-_Musketaquid
1.rwe_-_Ode_To_Beauty
1.rwe_-_Saadi
1.rwe_-_The_Adirondacs
1.rwe_-_The_Days_Ration
1.rwe_-_The_Enchanter
1.rwe_-_The_Problem
1.rwe_-_The_Rhodora_-_On_Being_Asked,_Whence_Is_The_Flower?
1.rwe_-_The_Romany_Girl
1.rwe_-_Threnody
1.rwe_-_To_Laugh_Often_And_Much
1.rwe_-_To_Rhea
1.rwe_-_Uriel
1.rwe_-_Wakdeubsankeit
1.rwe_-_Woodnotes
1.sca_-_Happy,_indeed,_is_she_whom_it_is_given_to_share_this_sacred_banquet
1.sfa_-_The_Praises_of_God
1.shvb_-_Ave_generosa_-_Hymn_to_the_Virgin
1.shvb_-_O_ignis_Spiritus_Paracliti
1.sig_-_Thou_art_the_Supreme_Light
1.sig_-_Who_can_do_as_Thy_deeds
1.sig_-_Who_could_accomplish_what_youve_accomplished
1.sjc_-_Not_for_All_the_Beauty
1.snk_-_In_Praise_of_the_Goddess
1.snt_-_By_what_boundless_mercy,_my_Savior
1.snt_-_In_the_midst_of_that_night,_in_my_darkness
1.srd_-_Krishna_Awakes
1.srd_-_Shes_found_him,_she_has,_but_Radha_disbelieves
1.srm_-_Disrobe,_show_Your_beauty_(from_The_Marital_Garland_of_Letters)
1.srm_-_The_Marital_Garland_of_Letters
1.stav_-_My_Beloved_One_is_Mine
1.stav_-_Oh_Exceeding_Beauty
1.sv_-_In_dense_darkness,_O_Mother
1.tr_-_Orchid
1.wby_-_A_Dream_Of_A_Blessed_Spirit
1.wby_-_All_Souls_Night
1.wby_-_A_Man_Young_And_Old_-_Complete
1.wby_-_A_Man_Young_And_Old_-_I._First_Love
1.wby_-_A_Man_Young_And_Old_-_VI._His_Memories
1.wby_-_Among_School_Children
1.wby_-_Anashuya_And_Vijaya
1.wby_-_An_Image_From_A_Past_Life
1.wby_-_A_Prayer_For_My_Daughter
1.wby_-_Broken_Dreams
1.wby_-_Colonus_Praise
1.wby_-_Easter_1916
1.wby_-_Her_Anxiety
1.wby_-_He_Remembers_Forgotten_Beauty
1.wby_-_He_Tells_Of_The_Perfect_Beauty
1.wby_-_Meditations_In_Time_Of_Civil_War
1.wby_-_Men_Improve_With_The_Years
1.wby_-_No_Second_Troy
1.wby_-_On_A_Political_Prisoner
1.wby_-_Symbols
1.wby_-_The_Arrow
1.wby_-_The_Countess_Cathleen_In_Paradise
1.wby_-_The_Folly_Of_Being_Comforted
1.wby_-_The_Gift_Of_Harun_Al-Rashid
1.wby_-_The_Gyres
1.wby_-_The_Living_Beauty
1.wby_-_The_Lover_Pleads_With_His_Friend_For_Old_Friends
1.wby_-_The_Old_Age_Of_Queen_Maeve
1.wby_-_The_Phases_Of_The_Moon
1.wby_-_The_Rose_Of_Battle
1.wby_-_The_Rose_Of_The_World
1.wby_-_The_Scholars
1.wby_-_The_Secret_Rose
1.wby_-_The_Tower
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_III
1.wby_-_The_Wild_Swans_At_Coole
1.wby_-_To_A_Wealthy_Man_Who_Promised_A_Second_Subscription_To_The_Dublin_Municipal_Gallery_If_It_Were_Prove
1.wby_-_To_A_Young_Beauty
1.wby_-_To_The_Rose_Upon_The_Rood_Of_Time
1.wby_-_Under_The_Moon
1.wby_-_Upon_A_Dying_Lady
1.wby_-_When_Helen_Lived
1.wby_-_When_You_Are_Old
1.whitman_-_Apostroph
1.whitman_-_A_Riddle_Song
1.whitman_-_As_I_Ponderd_In_Silence
1.whitman_-_Assurances
1.whitman_-_Delicate_Cluster
1.whitman_-_Eidolons
1.whitman_-_I_Sing_The_Body_Electric
1.whitman_-_Not_Youth_Pertains_To_Me
1.whitman_-_Now_List_To_My_Mornings_Romanza
1.whitman_-_Of_The_Visage_Of_Things
1.whitman_-_Old_Ireland
1.whitman_-_O_Star_Of_France
1.whitman_-_Passage_To_India
1.whitman_-_Poems_Of_Joys
1.whitman_-_Proud_Music_Of_The_Storm
1.whitman_-_Song_At_Sunset
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXXIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Broad-Axe
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Exposition
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Open_Road
1.whitman_-_The_City_Dead-House
1.whitman_-_The_Indications
1.whitman_-_The_Sleepers
1.whitman_-_To_A_Locomotive_In_Winter
1.whitman_-_When_Lilacs_Last_in_the_Dooryard_Bloomd
1.whitman_-_With_All_Thy_Gifts
1.ww_-_3-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_Address_To_Kilchurn_Castle,_Upon_Loch_Awe
1.ww_-_Address_To_My_Infant_Daughter
1.ww_-_A_Fact,_And_An_Imagination,_Or,_Canute_And_Alfred,_On_The_Seashore
1.ww_-_A_Jewish_Family_In_A_Small_Valley_Opposite_St._Goar,_Upon_The_Rhine
1.ww_-_A_Narrow_Girdle_Of_Rough_Stones_And_Crags,
1.ww_-_Anecdote_For_Fathers
1.ww_-_An_Evening_Walk
1.ww_-_A_Whirl-Blast_From_Behind_The_Hill
1.ww_-_A_Wren's_Nest
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Book_Eleventh-_France_[concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_First_[Introduction-Childhood_and_School_Time]
1.ww_-_Book_Fourteenth_[conclusion]
1.ww_-_Book_Fourth_[Summer_Vacation]
1.ww_-_Book_Ninth_[Residence_in_France]
1.ww_-_Book_Second_[School-Time_Continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Seventh_[Residence_in_London]
1.ww_-_Book_Sixth_[Cambridge_and_the_Alps]
1.ww_-_Book_Third_[Residence_at_Cambridge]
1.ww_-_By_The_Seaside
1.ww_-_Composed_By_The_Sea-Side,_Near_Calais,_August_1802
1.ww_-_Composed_Upon_Westminster_Bridge,_September_3,_1802
1.ww_-_Dion_[See_Plutarch]
1.ww_-_Elegiac_Stanzas_In_Memory_Of_My_Brother,_John_Commander_Of_The_E._I._Companys_Ship_The_Earl_Of_Aber
1.ww_-_From_The_Cuckoo_And_The_Nightingale
1.ww_-_From_The_Italian_Of_Michael_Angelo
1.ww_-_Hart-Leap_Well
1.ww_-_Her_Eyes_Are_Wild
1.ww_-_Lament_Of_Mary_Queen_Of_Scots
1.ww_-_Laodamia
1.ww_-_Lines_Composed_a_Few_Miles_above_Tintern_Abbey
1.ww_-_Lines_Left_Upon_The_Seat_Of_A_Yew-Tree,
1.ww_-_Maternal_Grief
1.ww_-_Memorials_of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803_I._Departure_From_The_Vale_Of_Grasmere,_August_1803
1.ww_-_Methought_I_Saw_The_Footsteps_Of_A_Throne
1.ww_-_Most_Sweet_it_is
1.ww_-_The_Birth_Of_Love
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_II-_Book_First-_The_Wanderer
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IV-_Book_Third-_Despondency
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IX-_Book_Eighth-_The_Parsonage
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_VII-_Book_Sixth-_The_Churchyard_Among_the_Mountains
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_X-_Book_Ninth-_Discourse_of_the_Wanderer,_and_an_Evening_Visit_to_the_Lake
1.ww_-_The_French_Revolution_as_it_appeared_to_Enthusiasts
1.ww_-_The_Longest_Day
1.ww_-_The_Pet-Lamb
1.ww_-_The_Prelude,_Book_1-_Childhood_And_School-Time
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
1.ww_-_There_Was_A_Boy
1.ww_-_The_Shepherd,_Looking_Eastward,_Softly_Said
1.ww_-_Three_Years_She_Grew_in_Sun_and_Shower
1.ww_-_To_a_Highland_Girl_(At_Inversneyde,_upon_Loch_Lomond)
1.ww_-_To_Joanna
1.ww_-_To_Mary
1.ww_-_To_May
1.ww_-_To_Sir_George_Howland_Beaumont,_Bart_From_the_South-West_Coast_Or_Cumberland_1811
1.ww_-_To_The_Same_(John_Dyer)
1.ww_-_Vaudracour_And_Julia
1.ww_-_We_Are_Seven
1.ww_-_With_How_Sad_Steps,_O_Moon,_Thou_Climb'st_the_Sky
1.ww_-_Written_in_London._September,_1802
1.ww_-_Yarrow_Revisited
20.01_-_Charyapada_-_Old_Bengali_Mystic_Poems
20.03_-_Act_I:The_Descent
2.01_-_Indeterminates,_Cosmic_Determinations_and_the_Indeterminable
2.01_-_Mandala_One
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_The_Mother
2.01_-_The_Object_of_Knowledge
2.01_-_The_Picture
2.01_-_The_Road_of_Trials
2.01_-_The_Yoga_and_Its_Objects
2.02_-_Brahman,_Purusha,_Ishwara_-_Maya,_Prakriti,_Shakti
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind
2.02_-_Meeting_With_the_Goddess
2.02_-_The_Bhakta.s_Renunciation_results_from_Love
2.02_-_THE_DURGA_PUJA_FESTIVAL
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.02_-_THE_SCINTILLA
2.02_-_The_Status_of_Knowledge
2.02_-_UPON_THE_BLESSED_ISLES
2.02_-_Yoga
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_The_Christian_Phenomenon_and_Faith_in_the_Incarnation
2.03_-_The_Eternal_and_the_Individual
2.03_-_THE_MASTER_IN_VARIOUS_MOODS
2.03_-_The_Pyx
2.04_-_On_Art
2.04_-_ON_PRIESTS
2.04_-_The_Divine_and_the_Undivine
2.05_-_Apotheosis
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.05_-_ON_THE_VIRTUOUS
2.05_-_Renunciation
2.05_-_VISIT_TO_THE_SINTHI_BRAMO_SAMAJ
2.06_-_On_Beauty
2.06_-_Reality_and_the_Cosmic_Illusion
2.06_-_The_Wand
2.06_-_Works_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.07_-_BANKIM_CHANDRA
2.07_-_I_Also_Try_to_Tell_My_Tale
2.07_-_On_Congress_and_Politics
2.07_-_ON_THE_TARANTULAS
2.07_-_The_Mother__Relations_with_Others
2.07_-_The_Supreme_Word_of_the_Gita
2.07_-_The_Triangle_of_Love
2.08_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE_(II)
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.09_-_Human_representations_of_the_Divine_Ideal_of_Love
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.09_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY
2.09_-_THE_NIGHT_SONG
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
21.01_-_The_Mother_The_Nature_of_Her_Work
2.1.02_-_Love_and_Death
2.1.02_-_Nature_The_World-Manifestation
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
2.10_-_Conclusion
2.10_-_THE_MASTER_AND_NARENDRA
2.10_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_Time_the_Destroyer
2.11_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_The_Double_Aspect
2.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_IN_CALCUTTA
2.12_-_THE_MASTERS_REMINISCENCES
2.1.2_-_The_Vital_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
2.1.3.4_-_Conduct
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.13_-_ON_THOSE_WHO_ARE_SUBLIME
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.14_-_The_Origin_and_Remedy_of_Falsehood,_Error,_Wrong_and_Evil
2.1.5.2_-_Languages
2.1.5.4_-_Arts
2.15_-_CAR_FESTIVAL_AT_BALARMS_HOUSE
2.15_-_ON_IMMACULATE_PERCEPTION
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.16_-_Oneness
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.16_-_The_Integral_Knowledge_and_the_Aim_of_Life;_Four_Theories_of_Existence
2.16_-_VISIT_TO_NANDA_BOSES_HOUSE
2.1.7.05_-_On_the_Inspiration_and_Writing_of_the_Poem
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.17_-_December_1938
2.17_-_ON_POETS
2.17_-_THE_MASTER_ON_HIMSELF_AND_HIS_EXPERIENCES
2.17_-_The_Progress_to_Knowledge_-_God,_Man_and_Nature
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_ON_GREAT_EVENTS
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.19_-_Out_of_the_Sevenfold_Ignorance_towards_the_Sevenfold_Knowledge
2.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_DR._SARKAR
2.2.03_-_The_Divine_Force_in_Work
2.2.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
2.20_-_The_Infancy_and_Maturity_of_ZO,_Father_and_Mother,_Israel_The_Ancient_and_Understanding
2.20_-_THE_MASTERS_TRAINING_OF_HIS_DISCIPLES
2.2.1.01_-_The_World's_Greatest_Poets
2.21_-_1940
2.21_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.21_-_The_Order_of_the_Worlds
2.2.1_-_The_Prusna_Upanishads
2.22_-_Rebirth_and_Other_Worlds;_Karma,_the_Soul_and_Immortality
2.22_-_THE_MASTER_AT_COSSIPORE
2.23_-_A_Virtuous_Woman_is_a_Crown_to_Her_Husband
2.2.3_-_Depression_and_Despondency
2.23_-_The_Core_of_the_Gita.s_Meaning
2.23_-_THE_MASTER_AND_BUDDHA
2.24_-_Gnosis_and_Ananda
2.25_-_List_of_Topics_in_Each_Talk
2.25_-_The_Higher_and_the_Lower_Knowledge
2.25_-_The_Triple_Transformation
2.26_-_The_Ascent_towards_Supermind
2.2.7.01_-_Some_General_Remarks
2.27_-_The_Gnostic_Being
2.28_-_The_Divine_Life
2.2.9.02_-_Plato
2.3.01_-_The_Planes_or_Worlds_of_Consciousness
2.3.02_-_Mantra_and_Japa
2.3.02_-_The_Supermind_or_Supramental
2.3.03_-_Integral_Yoga
2.3.04_-_The_Higher_Planes_of_Mind
2.3.04_-_The_Mother's_Force
2.3.07_-_The_Mother_in_Visions,_Dreams_and_Experiences
2.3.07_-_The_Vital_Being_and_Vital_Consciousness
2.4.01_-_Divine_Love,_Psychic_Love_and_Human_Love
2.4.1_-_Human_Relations_and_the_Spiritual_Life
25.03_-_Songs_of_Ramprasad
25.07_-_TEARS_OF_GRIEF
27.02_-_The_Human_Touch_Divine
2_-_Other_Hymns_to_Agni
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.02_-_Greek_Drama
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.03_-_Spirituality_in_Art
30.04_-_Intuition_and_Inspiration_in_Art
30.05_-_Rhythm_in_Poetry
30.06_-_The_Poet_and_The_Seer
30.07_-_The_Poet_and_the_Yogi
30.08_-_Poetry_and_Mantra
30.09_-_Lines_of_Tantra_(Charyapada)
3.00_-_Introduction
3.00_-_The_Magical_Theory_of_the_Universe
30.10_-_The_Greatness_of_Poetry
30.11_-_Modern_Poetry
30.12_-_The_Obscene_and_the_Ugly_-_Form_and_Essence
30.13_-_Rabindranath_the_Artist
30.14_-_Rabindranath_and_Modernism
30.15_-_The_Language_of_Rabindranath
30.17_-_Rabindranath,_Traveller_of_the_Infinite
30.18_-_Boris_Pasternak
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.01_-_Towards_the_Future
3.02_-_Mysticism
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret
3.03_-_ON_INVOLUNTARY_BLISS
3.03_-_The_Ascent_to_Truth
3.03_-_The_Consummation_of_Mysticism
3.03_-_The_Godward_Emotions
3.04_-_BEFORE_SUNRISE
3.04_-_The_Way_of_Devotion
3.05_-_The_Divine_Personality
3.06_-_The_Delight_of_the_Divine
3.06_-_Thought-Forms_and_the_Human_Aura
3.07_-_The_Ananda_Brahman
3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail
3.08_-_Purification
3.08_-_The_Mystery_of_Love
3.08_-_The_Thousands
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
3.09_-_The_Return_of_the_Soul
31.01_-_The_Heart_of_Bengal
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
31.02_-_The_Mother-_Worship_of_the_Bengalis
3.1.02_-_Who
31.03_-_The_Trinity_of_Bengal
31.05_-_Vivekananda
3.1.09_-_Revelation
3.10_-_Punishment
31.10_-_East_and_West
3.1.23_-_The_Rishi
3.1.24_-_In_the_Moonlight
3.16_-_THE_SEVEN_SEALS_OR_THE_YES_AND_AMEN_SONG
32.05_-_The_Culture_of_the_Body
3.2.06_-_The_Adwaita_of_Shankaracharya
32.06_-_The_Novel_Alchemy
32.07_-_The_God_of_the_Scientist
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
3.2.09_-_The_Teachings_of_Some_Modern_Indian_Yogis
3.20_-_Of_the_Eucharist
3.2.10_-_Christianity_and_Theosophy
3.2.3_-_Dreams
3.2.4_-_Sex
33.01_-_The_Initiation_of_Swadeshi
3.3.03_-_The_Delight_of_Works
33.08_-_I_Tried_Sannyas
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.15_-_My_Athletics
33.16_-_Soviet_Gymnasts
33.17_-_Two_Great_Wars
33.18_-_I_Bow_to_the_Mother
3.3.1_-_Agni,_the_Divine_Will-Force
34.03_-_Hymn_To_Dawn
3.4.1.06_-_Reading_and_Sadhana
34.10_-_Hymn_To_Earth
3.5.02_-_Thoughts_and_Glimpses
35.05_-_Hymn_To_Saraswati
3.6.01_-_Heraclitus
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
37.01_-_Yama_-_Nachiketa_(Katha_Upanishad)
37.02_-_The_Story_of_Jabala-Satyakama
3.7.1.01_-_Rebirth
3.7.1.07_-_Involution_and_Evolution
3.7.2.01_-_The_Foundation
3.7.2.02_-_The_Terrestial_Law
3.7.2.03_-_Mind_Nature_and_Law_of_Karma
3.7.2.04_-_The_Higher_Lines_of_Karma
3.7.2.05_-_Appendix_I_-_The_Tangle_of_Karma
38.03_-_Mute
38.06_-_Ravana_Vanquished
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
4.01_-_Prayers_and_Meditations
4.01_-_Sweetness_in_Prayer
4.01_-_The_Presence_of_God_in_the_World
4.02_-_BEYOND_THE_COLLECTIVE_-_THE_HYPER-PERSONAL
4.02_-_The_Integral_Perfection
4.03_-_Prayer_of_Quiet
4.03_-_The_Meaning_of_Human_Endeavor
4.04_-_In_the_Total_Christ
4.04_-_THE_REGENERATION_OF_THE_KING
4.04_-_Weaknesses
4.05_-_THE_DARK_SIDE_OF_THE_KING
4.06_-_Purification-the_Lower_Mentality
4.07_-_Purification-Intelligence_and_Will
4.09_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Nature
4.0_-_NOTES_TO_ZARATHUSTRA
4.1.01_-_The_Intellect_and_Yoga
4.1.1_-_The_Difficulties_of_Yoga
4.11_-_The_Perfection_of_Equality
4.11_-_THE_WELCOME
4.1.2_-_The_Difficulties_of_Human_Nature
4.1.3_-_Imperfections_and_Periods_of_Arrest
4.15_-_Soul-Force_and_the_Fourfold_Personality
4.18_-_Faith_and_shakti
4.1_-_Jnana
4.2.01_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams
4.2.02_-_An_Image
4.2.1.01_-_The_Importance_of_the_Psychic_Change
4.2_-_Karma
4.42_-_Chapter_Two
4.43_-_Chapter_Three
5.01_-_On_the_Mysteries_of_the_Ascent_towards_God
5.02_-_Perfection_of_the_Body
5.03_-_The_Divine_Body
5.04_-_Supermind_and_the_Life_Divine
5.04_-_THE_POLARITY_OF_ADAM
5.06_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION
5.07_-_Beginnings_Of_Civilization
5.08_-_ADAM_AS_TOTALITY
5.1.01.1_-_The_Book_of_the_Herald
5.1.01.2_-_The_Book_of_the_Statesman
5.1.01.3_-_The_Book_of_the_Assembly
5.1.01.4_-_The_Book_of_Partings
5.1.01.5_-_The_Book_of_Achilles
5.1.01.6_-_The_Book_of_the_Chieftains
5.1.01.7_-_The_Book_of_the_Woman
5.1.01.8_-_The_Book_of_the_Gods
5.1.01.9_-_Book_IX
5.1.02_-_Ahana
5.2.01_-_The_Descent_of_Ahana
5.2.02_-_The_Meditations_of_Mandavya
5.3.05_-_The_Root_Mal_in_Greek
5.4.01_-_Notes_on_Root-Sounds
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
7.04_-_The_Vital
7.11_-_Building_and_Destroying
7.13_-_The_Conquest_of_Knowledge
7.3.13_-_Ascent
7.3.14_-_The_Tiger_and_the_Deer
7.5.29_-_The_Universal_Incarnation
7.5.31_-_The_Stone_Goddess
7.5.32_-_Krishna
7.5.61_-_Because_Thou_Art
7.5.62_-_Divine_Sight
7.5.65_-_Form
7.6.01_-_Symbol_Moon
7.6.09_-_Despair_on_the_Staircase
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
Aeneid
Big_Mind_(ten_perfections)
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
BOOK_IX._-_Of_those_who_allege_a_distinction_among_demons,_some_being_good_and_others_evil
Book_of_Exodus
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XII._-_Of_the_creation_of_angels_and_men,_and_of_the_origin_of_evil
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
Chapter_III_-_WHEREIN_IS_RELATED_THE_DROLL_WAY_IN_WHICH_DON_QUIXOTE_HAD_HIMSELF_DUBBED_A_KNIGHT
Chapter_II_-_WHICH_TREATS_OF_THE_FIRST_SALLY_THE_INGENIOUS_DON_QUIXOTE_MADE_FROM_HOME
Chapter_I_-_WHICH_TREATS_OF_THE_CHARACTER_AND_PURSUITS_OF_THE_FAMOUS_GENTLEMAN_DON_QUIXOTE_OF_LA_MANCHA
COSA_-_BOOK_II
COSA_-_BOOK_III
COSA_-_BOOK_IV
COSA_-_BOOK_VI
COSA_-_BOOK_VII
COSA_-_BOOK_VIII
COSA_-_BOOK_X
COSA_-_BOOK_XII
COSA_-_BOOK_XIII
Cratylus
Diamond_Sutra_1
ENNEAD_01.03_-_Of_Dialectic,_or_the_Means_of_Raising_the_Soul_to_the_Intelligible_World.
ENNEAD_01.04_-_Whether_Animals_May_Be_Termed_Happy.
ENNEAD_01.06_-_Of_Beauty.
ENNEAD_01.08_-_Of_the_Nature_and_Origin_of_Evils.
ENNEAD_02.03_-_Whether_Astrology_is_of_any_Value.
ENNEAD_02.04a_-_Of_Matter.
ENNEAD_02.06_-_Of_Essence_and_Being.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.01_-_Concerning_Fate.
ENNEAD_03.02_-_Of_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.05_-_Of_Love,_or_Eros.
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Entities_(Soul_and_and_Matter).
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_03.08b_-_Of_Nature,_Contemplation_and_Unity.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.07_-_Of_the_Immortality_of_the_Soul:_Polemic_Against_Materialism.
ENNEAD_04.08_-_Of_the_Descent_of_the_Soul_Into_the_Body.
ENNEAD_05.01_-_The_Three_Principal_Hypostases,_or_Forms_of_Existence.
ENNEAD_05.05_-_That_Intelligible_Entities_Are_Not_External_to_the_Intelligence_of_the_Good.
ENNEAD_05.07_-_Do_Ideas_of_Individuals_Exist?
ENNEAD_05.08_-_Concerning_Intelligible_Beauty.
ENNEAD_05.09_-_Of_Intelligence,_Ideas_and_Essence.
ENNEAD_06.01_-_Of_the_Ten_Aristotelian_and_Four_Stoic_Categories.
ENNEAD_06.02_-_The_Categories_of_Plotinos.
ENNEAD_06.03_-_Plotinos_Own_Sense-Categories.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.06_-_Of_Numbers.
ENNEAD_06.07_-_How_Ideas_Multiplied,_and_the_Good.
ENNEAD_06.09_-_Of_the_Good_and_the_One.
Euthyphro
Ex_Oblivione
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
Ion
IS_-_Chapter_1
Jaap_Sahib_Text_(Guru_Gobind_Singh)
Liber
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
Medea_-_A_Vergillian_Cento
Meno
MoM_References
Phaedo
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1912_01_13
r1912_07_13
r1912_07_15
r1912_07_18
r1913_09_16
r1913_12_14
r1914_03_26
r1914_04_13
r1914_04_19
r1914_05_27
r1914_07_10
r1914_12_19
r1915_01_13
r1916_03_13
r1917_01_13
r1917_02_05
r1917_02_11
r1917_03_08
r1917_03_12
r1917_03_13
r1917_03_17
r1919_07_18
r1920_02_08
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_026-050
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Book_of_Job
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Isaiah
The_Book_of_Wisdom
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Divine_Names_Text_(Dionysis)
The_Dream_of_a_Ridiculous_Man
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Epistle_of_James
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Five,_Ranks_of_The_Apparent_and_the_Real
The_Gold_Bug
The_Golden_Sentences_of_Democrates
The_Hidden_Words_text
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_One_Who_Walks_Away
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Poems_of_Cold_Mountain
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Zahir
Timaeus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

aspect
favorites
power
SIMILAR TITLES
Beauty
Beauty of God
the Divine Beauty

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Beauty ::: Beauty is the special divine Manifestation in the physical as Truth is in the mind, Love in the heart, Power in the vital. Beauty is the way in which the physical expresses the Divine— but the principle and law of Beauty is something inward and spiritual which expresses itself through the form.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 27, Page: 699


Beauty (tiferet) ::: /div>

BEAUTY. ::: Beauty is as much an expression of the Divine as Knowledge, Power or Ananda.
"To find highest beauty is to find God ; to reveal, to embody, to create as we say, highest beauty is to bring out of our souls the living image and power of God.


beauty :::Beauty is the special divine Manifestation in the physical as Truth is in the Mind, Love in the heart, Power in the vital.” The Future Poetry

beauty ::: n. --> An assemblage or graces or properties pleasing to the eye, the ear, the intellect, the aesthetic faculty, or the moral sense.
A particular grace, feature, ornament, or excellence; anything beautiful; as, the beauties of nature.
A beautiful person, esp. a beautiful woman.
Prevailing style or taste; rage; fashion.


beauty”)—the angelic prince of the Torah.

beauty ::: the quality present in a thing or person that gives intense pleasure or deep satisfaction to the mind, whether arising from sensory manifestations (as shape, colour, sound, etc.), a meaningful design or pattern, or something else, (as a personality in which high spiritual qualities are manifest). Beauty, beauty"s, Beauty"s, beauty-drenched, earth-beauty"s.


TERMS ANYWHERE

6. Tiphereth (beauty), 7. Netzach(victory), 8. Hod

absolute ::: a. --> Loosed from any limitation or condition; uncontrolled; unrestricted; unconditional; as, absolute authority, monarchy, sovereignty, an absolute promise or command; absolute power; an absolute monarch.
Complete in itself; perfect; consummate; faultless; as, absolute perfection; absolute beauty.
Viewed apart from modifying influences or without comparison with other objects; actual; real; -- opposed to relative and


"Action is a resultant of the energy of the being, but this energy is not of one sole kind; the Consciousness-Force of the Spirit manifests itself in many kinds of energies: there are inner activities of mind, activities of life, of desire, passion, impulse, character, activities of the senses and the body, a pursuit of truth and knowledge, a pursuit of beauty, a pursuit of ethical good or evil, a pursuit of power, love, joy, happiness, fortune, success, pleasure, life-satisfactions of all kinds, life-enlargement, a pursuit of individual or collective objects, a pursuit of the health, strength, capacity, satisfaction of the body.” The Life Divine*

“Action is a resultant of the energy of the being, but this energy is not of one sole kind; the Consciousness-Force of the Spirit manifests itself in many kinds of energies: there are inner activities of mind, activities of life, of desire, passion, impulse, character, activities of the senses and the body, a pursuit of truth and knowledge, a pursuit of beauty, a pursuit of ethical good or evil, a pursuit of power, love, joy, happiness, fortune, success, pleasure, life-satisfactions of all kinds, life-enlargement, a pursuit of individual or collective objects, a pursuit of the health, strength, capacity, satisfaction of the body.” The Life Divine

adonic ::: a. --> Relating to Adonis, famed for his beauty. ::: n. --> An Adonic verse.

adonis ::: n. --> A youth beloved by Venus for his beauty. He was killed in the chase by a wild boar.
A preeminently beautiful young man; a dandy.
A genus of plants of the family Ranunculaceae, containing the pheasant&


adoration ::: 1. The act of paying honour, as to a divine being; worship. 2. Reverent homage. 3. Fervent and devoted love. **adoration"s.*Sri Aurobindo: "Especially in love for the Divine or for one whom one feels to be divine, the Bhakta feels an intense reverence for the Loved, a sense of something of immense greatness, beauty or value and for himself a strong impression of his own comparative unworthiness and a passionate desire to grow into likeness with that which one adores.” Letters on Yoga*

ADORATION. ::: In Love for the Divine or for one whom one feels to be divine, the Bhakta feels an intense reverence for the Lord, a sense of something of immense greatness, beauty or value and for himself a strong impression of his own comparative unworthiness and a passionate desire to grow into likeness with that which one adores.

adorn ::: to beautify as an ornament does; decorate; to add beauty or lustre to. adorned.

aerial ::: 1. Having a light and graceful beauty; airy; ethereal; unsubstantial, intangible; hence, immaterial, ideal, imaginary. 2. Biol. Growing in the air.

AESTHESIS. ::: The highest aim of aesthetic being is to find the Divine through beauty.

"Aesthesis therefore is of the very essence of poetry, as it is of all art. But it is not the sole element and aesthesis too is not confined to a reception of poetry and art; it extends to everything in the world: there is nothing we can sense, think or in any way experience to which there cannot be an aesthetic reaction of our conscious being. Ordinarily, we suppose that aesthesis is concerned with beauty, and that indeed is its most prominent concern: but it is concerned with many other things also. It is the universal Ananda that is the parent of aesthesis and the universal Ananda takes three major and original forms, beauty, love and delight, the delight of all existence, the delight in things, in all things.” Letters on Savitri

“Aesthesis therefore is of the very essence of poetry, as it is of all art. But it is not the sole element and aesthesis too is not confined to a reception of poetry and art; it extends to everything in the world: there is nothing we can sense, think or in any way experience to which there cannot be an aesthetic reaction of our conscious being. Ordinarily, we suppose that aesthesis is concerned with beauty, and that indeed is its most prominent concern: but it is concerned with many other things also. It is the universal Ananda that is the parent of aesthesis and the universal Ananda takes three major and original forms, beauty, love and delight, the delight of all existence, the delight in things, in all things.” Letters on Savitri

Aesthetic Judgment: (German aesthetische Urteilskraft) The power of judgment exercised upon data supplied by the feeling or sense of beauty. Kant devotes the first half of the Critique of Judgment to a "Critique of Aesthetic Judgment." (See Kantianism and Feeling.) -- O.F.K.

aesthetic ::: pertaining to a sense of the beautiful or pleasing; characterized by a love of beauty; tasteful, of refined taste.

Aesthetics: (Gr. aesthetikos, perceptive) Traditionally, the branch of philosophy dealing with beauty or the beautiful, especially in art, and with taste and standards of value in judging art. Also, a theory or consistent attitude on such matters. The word aesthetics was first used by Baumgarten about 1750, to imply the science of sensuous knowledge, whose aim is beauty, as contrasted with logic, whose aim is truth. Kant used the term transcendental aesthetic in another sense, to imply the a priori principles of sensible experience. Hegel, in the 1820's, established the word in its present sense by his writings on art under the title of Aesthetik.

aesthetics: The appreciation and analysis of beauty. See aestheticism.

alaks.mi-Mahakali (Mahalaxmi-Mahakali) ::: the combination of Mahalaks.mi (bhava) and Mahakali (bhava), in which Mahalaks.mi"teaches to strength and force the rhythm that keeps the might of their acts harmonious and in measure" and Mahakali "brings to beauty and harmony a high and mounting movement".Mah Mahalaksmi-Mahasarasvati

Al-Badee ::: The incomparable beauty and the originator of beautiful manifestation! The One who originates innumerable manifestations, all with unique and exclusive qualities, and without any example, pattern, specimen etc.

ALIEN BEINGS. ::: No trust can be put on the beauty of the eyes or the face. There are many Beings of the inferior planes who have a captivating beauty and can enthrall with it and they can give too an Ananda which is not of the highest and may on the contrary by its lure take away from the path altogether.

Al-Mughni ::: The One who enriches individuals and raises them above others in wealth and emancipates them. The One who enriches with His own riches. The One who grants the beauty of infinity (baqa) which results from ‘fakr’ (nothingness).

Amal: “It seems to represent the aspect of Beauty which is the ultimate Adversary poised in the way of the seeker of God’s truth.”

Amal: “‘The deathless Rose’ is one side of the highest mental plane. The other side is the deathless Flame. They seem to represent, respectively, the aspect of Beauty and the aspect of Power.”

Amal: “There are two realities on the way from mind to Supermind. One is: ‘The lovely Kingdoms of the deathless Rose’ and the other, ‘The mighty kingdoms of the deathless Flame’. They represent the Beauty and the Power above the mental plane.”

amaryllis ::: n. --> A pastoral sweetheart.
A family of plants much esteemed for their beauty, including the narcissus, jonquil, daffodil, agave, and others.
A genus of the same family, including the Belladonna lily.


Analogy: Originally a mathematical term, Analogia, meaning equality of ratios (Euclid VII Df. 20, V. Dfs. 5, 6), which entered Plato's philosophy (Republic 534a6), where it also expressed the epistemological doctrine that sensed things are related as their mathematical and ideal correlates. In modern usage analogy was identified with a weak form of reasoning in which "from the similarity of two things in certain particulars, their similarity in other particulars is inferred." (Century Dic.) Recently, the analysis of scientific method has given the term new significance. The observable data of science are denoted by concepts by inspection, whose complete meaning is given by something immediately apprehendable; its verified theory designating unobservable scientific objects is expressed by concepts by postulation, whose complete meaning is prescribed for them by the postulates of the deductive theory in which they occur. To verify such theory relations, termed epistemic correlations (J. Un. Sc. IX: 125-128), are required. When these are one-one, analogy exists in a very precise sense, since the concepts by inspection denoting observable data are then related as are the correlated concepts by postulation designating unobservable scientific objects. -- F.S.C.N. Analogy of Pythagoras: (Gr. analogia) The equality of ratios, or proportion, between the lengths of the strings producing the consonant notes of the musical scale. The discovery of these ratios is credited to Pythagoras, who is also said to have applied the principle of mathematical proportion to the other arts, and hence to have discovered, in his analogy, the secret of beauty in all its forms. -- G.R.M.

IDEAS OF THE CAUSAL WORLD
The ideas of the world of ideas are objective forms as well as being subjective, and thus the ideas are faithful representations of enduring objective and subjective realities. Every intuition corresponds to a mental system of reality ideas. Lower worlds exist in the ideas of the world of ideas and thus the knowledge of these lower worlds is contained in the idea systems of the intuitions. &


ananda (indriya-ananda; indriya ananda) ::: sense-delight; the ananda of the indriyas in general or of any particular indriya, "a beatitude of the senses perceiving and meeting the One [eka1] everywhere, perceiving as their normal aesthesis of things a universal beauty [sarvasaundarya] and a secret harmony of creation"; the sahaituka form of vis.ayananda.

An examination of desire and will leads to the same conclusion. These, too, betoken a self which fulfills itself in attaining an ideal. This ideal can be found only in the Absolute, revealed now not only as an absolute mind but as an absolute moral person, enshrining goodness and beauty as well as truth -- that is as God. -- B.A.G.F.

Aphrodite: Greek goddess of love and beauty.

Aphrodite (Greek) Greek Goddess of love and beauty, in older times regarded as signifying the harmony of cosmos. Originally the daughter of Zeus and Dione, a lunar deity like Aphrodite, both being represented with the horns of the moon or of the zodiacal sign Taurus; but the same deity in ancient mystical philosophy may be at once mother, wife, and daughter — so difficult is it to find among our common notions a symbolism that will convey the full meaning anciently intended. Later, under Eastern influence, she was said to have been born from the sea foam and to have landed in a seashell on the isle of Cythera. A sea goddess as well as an earth goddess of gardens, groves, and springtime, she was the wife of Hephaestus and connected also with Ares and Adonis; mother of Eros. As Aphrodite Urania, she was identified with the goddess of heaven Astarte, and later under Platonic influence came to represent spiritual love as opposed to earthly love, represented by Aphrodite Pandemos. Among her analogs are Isis, Ishtar, Mylitta, Eve, Vach, etc., all the mother of all living beings and of the gods, cosmically. The Romans identified Aphrodite with Venus, and the Egyptians with Hathor.

apollo ::: n. --> A deity among the Greeks and Romans. He was the god of light and day (the "sun god"), of archery, prophecy, medicine, poetry, and music, etc., and was represented as the model of manly grace and beauty; -- called also Phebus.

Apsaras ::: Sri Aurobindo: “The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana.

apsaras ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana.

Apsaras ::: “The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana.

Architecture [from Latin architectura from Greek architekton master-builder] Signifies not building in itself, but the science or art of building in accordance with certain principles or rules which endure through the ages, because rooted in cosmic order and beauty. Architecture is reckoned as one of the five great arts, and the monuments of antiquity in whatever land show clearly that those who designed them had, besides a knowledge of materials and the technique of using them, some knowledge at least of the great cosmic laws of harmony and beauty, and their derivative, proportion.

argent ::: n. --> Silver, or money.
Whiteness; anything that is white.
The white color in coats of arms, intended to represent silver, or, figuratively, purity, innocence, beauty, or gentleness; -- represented in engraving by a plain white surface. ::: a.


argus ::: n. --> A fabulous being of antiquity, said to have had a hundred eyes, who has placed by Juno to guard Io. His eyes were transplanted to the peacock&

"Art is a living harmony and beauty that must be expressed in all the movements of existence. This manifestation of beauty and harmony is part of the Divine realisation upon earth, perhaps even its greatest part.” Questions and Answers, MCW Vol. 3.

“Art is a living harmony and beauty that must be expressed in all the movements of existence. This manifestation of beauty and harmony is part of the Divine realisation upon earth, perhaps even its greatest part.” Questions and Answers, MCW Vol. 3.

art ::: “The highest aim of the aesthetic being is to find the Divine through beauty; the highest Art is that which by an inspired use of significant and interpretative form unseals the doors of the spirit.” The Human Cycle etc.

asaundarya (asaundarya; asaundaryam) ::: absence of beauty; ugliness; the negation of saundarya.

asphodel ::: n. --> A general name for a plant of the genus Asphodelus. The asphodels are hardy perennial plants, several species of which are cultivated for the beauty of their flowers.

As Sri Aurobindo once wrote to Dilip Kumar Roy, (I paraphrase) ‘ The earth is a conscious being and the world is only the form it takes to manifest.’ This statement of the Avatar, predating the GAIA theory by many years and far surpassing it in its infinite scope, promises an earth returned to beauty to manifest, unknown to man, an inconceivable perfection. I once wrote to Mother with a question about what would happen to plants and flowers in the New Creation. Her reply filled me with joy and gratitude for She said that the flowers would be among the first to change (be transformed) because their entire life is an aspiration for light. Imagine the beauty to come with flowers brilliant with the Divine Light, colours such as never seen before, fragrances that can transofrm suffering and sorrow into a life free of pain and filled with joy.

asundara (asundara; asundaram) ::: not beautiful; absence of beauty; the sense of ugliness.

Asvins, Asvinau (Sanskrit) Asvin-s, Asvinau The two horsemen; two Vedic divinities which in some respects parallel the Greek Dioscuri, Pollux and Castor. Harbingers of Ushas (the dawn), they are represented as twin horsemen, appearing in the sky in a golden chariot drawn by horses or birds. One myth gives their origin as children of the sun by a nymph, Asvini, who concealed herself in the form of a mare; another myth makes Asvini their wife. Since they precede the sun’s rising they are called the parents of the sun’s form, Pushan. They are also the parents of Nakula and Sahadeva, Arjuna’s brothers by Madri. Many Vedic hymns are addressed to them; their attributes pertain to youth and beauty, to speed, and to duality. They bring treasures to mankind, averting misfortune and sickness, for they are the two physicians of heaven (svar-vaidyau). Yaska, the earliest known commentator on the Vedas, in his Nirukta writes that the Asvinau represent the transition from darkness to light and are identified with heaven and earth.

a ::: the urge towards beauty, an element of Mahalaks.mi bhava.

At-Tawwab ::: The One who guides individuals to their essence by enabling them to perceive and comprehend the reality. The One who allows individuals to repent, that is, to abandon their misdoings and to compensate for any harm that may have been caused. The activation of this Name triggers the name Rahim, and thus benevolence and beauty is experienced.

At the beginning the soul in Nature, the psychic entity, whose unfolding is the first step towards a spiritual change, is an entirely veiled part of us, although it is that by which we exist and persist as individual beings in Nature. The other parts of our natural composition are not only mutable but perishable; but the psychic entity in us persists and is fundamentally the same always: it contains all essential possibilities of our manifestation but is not constituted by them; it is not limited by what it manifests, not contained by the incomplete forms of the manifestation, not tarnished by the imperfections and impurities, the defects and depravations of the surface being. It is an ever-pure flame of the divinity in things and nothing that comes to it, nothing that enters into our experience can pollute its purity or extinguish the flame. This spiritual stuff is immaculate and luminous and, because it is perfectly luminous, it is immediately, intimately, directly aware of truth of being and truth of nature; it is deeply conscious of truth and good and beauty because truth and good and beauty are akin to its own native character, forms of something that is inherent in its own substance. It is aware also of all that contradicts these things, of all that deviates from its own native character, of falsehood and evil and the ugly and the unseemly; but it does not become these things nor is it touched or changed by these opposites of itself which so powerfully affect its outer instrumentation of mind, life and body. For the soul, the permanent being in us, puts forth and uses mind, life and body.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 924-25


attraction ::: n. --> An invisible power in a body by which it draws anything to itself; the power in nature acting mutually between bodies or ultimate particles, tending to draw them together, or to produce their cohesion or combination, and conversely resisting separation.
The act or property of attracting; the effect of the power or operation of attraction.
The power or act of alluring, drawing to, inviting, or engaging; an attractive quality; as, the attraction of beauty or


Aufklärung: In general, this German word and its English equivalent Enlightenment denote the self-emancipation of man from mere authority, prejudice, convention and tradition, with an insistence on freer thinking about problems uncritically referred to these other agencies. According to Kant's famous definition "Enlightenment is the liberation of man from his self-caused state of minority, which is the incapacity of using one's understanding without the direction of another. This state of minority is caused when its source lies not in the lack of understanding, but in the lack of determination and courage to use it without the assistance of another" (Was ist Aufklärung? 1784). In its historical perspective, the Aufklärung refers to the cultural atmosphere and contrlbutions of the 18th century, especially in Germany, France and England [which affected also American thought with B. Franklin, T. Paine and the leaders of the Revolution]. It crystallized tendencies emphasized by the Renaissance, and quickened by modern scepticism and empiricism, and by the great scientific discoveries of the 17th century. This movement, which was represented by men of varying tendencies, gave an impetus to general learning, a more popular philosophy, empirical science, scriptural criticism, social and political thought. More especially, the word Aufklärung is applied to the German contributions to 18th century culture. In philosophy, its principal representatives are G. E. Lessing (1729-81) who believed in free speech and in a methodical criticism of religion, without being a free-thinker; H. S. Reimarus (1694-1768) who expounded a naturalistic philosophy and denied the supernatural origin of Christianity; Moses Mendelssohn (1729-86) who endeavoured to mitigate prejudices and developed a popular common-sense philosophy; Chr. Wolff (1679-1754), J. A. Eberhard (1739-1809) who followed the Leibnizian rationalism and criticized unsuccessfully Kant and Fichte; and J. G. Herder (1744-1803) who was best as an interpreter of others, but whose intuitional suggestions have borne fruit in the organic correlation of the sciences, and in questions of language in relation to human nature and to national character. The works of Kant and Goethe mark the culmination of the German Enlightenment. Cf. J. G. Hibben, Philosophy of the Enlightenment, 1910. --T.G. Augustinianism: The thought of St. Augustine of Hippo, and of his followers. Born in 354 at Tagaste in N. Africa, A. studied rhetoric in Carthage, taught that subject there and in Rome and Milan. Attracted successively to Manicheanism, Scepticism, and Neo-Platontsm, A. eventually found intellectual and moral peace with his conversion to Christianity in his thirty-fourth year. Returning to Africa, he established numerous monasteries, became a priest in 391, Bishop of Hippo in 395. Augustine wrote much: On Free Choice, Confessions, Literal Commentary on Genesis, On the Trinity, and City of God, are his most noted works. He died in 430.   St. Augustine's characteristic method, an inward empiricism which has little in common with later variants, starts from things without, proceeds within to the self, and moves upwards to God. These three poles of the Augustinian dialectic are polarized by his doctrine of moderate illuminism. An ontological illumination is required to explain the metaphysical structure of things. The truth of judgment demands a noetic illumination. A moral illumination is necessary in the order of willing; and so, too, an lllumination of art in the aesthetic order. Other illuminations which transcend the natural order do not come within the scope of philosophy; they provide the wisdoms of theology and mysticism. Every being is illuminated ontologically by number, form, unity and its derivatives, and order. A thing is what it is, in so far as it is more or less flooded by the light of these ontological constituents.   Sensation is necessary in order to know material substances. There is certainly an action of the external object on the body and a corresponding passion of the body, but, as the soul is superior to the body and can suffer nothing from its inferior, sensation must be an action, not a passion, of the soul. Sensation takes place only when the observing soul, dynamically on guard throughout the body, is vitally attentive to the changes suffered by the body. However, an adequate basis for the knowledge of intellectual truth is not found in sensation alone. In order to know, for example, that a body is multiple, the idea of unity must be present already, otherwise its multiplicity could not be recognized. If numbers are not drawn in by the bodily senses which perceive only the contingent and passing, is the mind the source of the unchanging and necessary truth of numbers? The mind of man is also contingent and mutable, and cannot give what it does not possess. As ideas are not innate, nor remembered from a previous existence of the soul, they can be accounted for only by an immutable source higher than the soul. In so far as man is endowed with an intellect, he is a being naturally illuminated by God, Who may be compared to an intelligible sun. The human intellect does not create the laws of thought; it finds them and submits to them. The immediate intuition of these normative rules does not carry any content, thus any trace of ontologism is avoided.   Things have forms because they have numbers, and they have being in so far as they possess form. The sufficient explanation of all formable, and hence changeable, things is an immutable and eternal form which is unrestricted in time and space. The forms or ideas of all things actually existing in the world are in the things themselves (as rationes seminales) and in the Divine Mind (as rationes aeternae). Nothing could exist without unity, for to be is no other than to be one. There is a unity proper to each level of being, a unity of the material individual and species, of the soul, and of that union of souls in the love of the same good, which union constitutes the city. Order, also, is ontologically imbibed by all beings. To tend to being is to tend to order; order secures being, disorder leads to non-being. Order is the distribution which allots things equal and unequal each to its own place and integrates an ensemble of parts in accordance with an end. Hence, peace is defined as the tranquillity of order. Just as things have their being from their forms, the order of parts, and their numerical relations, so too their beauty is not something superadded, but the shining out of all their intelligible co-ingredients.   S. Aurelii Augustini, Opera Omnia, Migne, PL 32-47; (a critical edition of some works will be found in the Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum, Vienna). Gilson, E., Introd. a l'etude de s. Augustin, (Paris, 1931) contains very good bibliography up to 1927, pp. 309-331. Pope, H., St. Augustine of Hippo, (London, 1937). Chapman, E., St. Augustine's Philos. of Beauty, (N. Y., 1939). Figgis, J. N., The Political Aspects of St. Augustine's "City of God", (London, 1921). --E.C. Authenticity: In a general sense, genuineness, truth according to its title. It involves sometimes a direct and personal characteristic (Whitehead speaks of "authentic feelings").   This word also refers to problems of fundamental criticism involving title, tradition, authorship and evidence. These problems are vital in theology, and basic in scholarship with regard to the interpretation of texts and doctrines. --T.G. Authoritarianism: That theory of knowledge which maintains that the truth of any proposition is determined by the fact of its having been asserted by a certain esteemed individual or group of individuals. Cf. H. Newman, Grammar of Assent; C. S. Peirce, "Fixation of Belief," in Chance, Love and Logic, ed. M. R. Cohen. --A.C.B. Autistic thinking: Absorption in fanciful or wishful thinking without proper control by objective or factual material; day dreaming; undisciplined imagination. --A.C.B. Automaton Theory: Theory that a living organism may be considered a mere machine. See Automatism. Automatism: (Gr. automatos, self-moving) (a) In metaphysics: Theory that animal and human organisms are automata, that is to say, are machines governed by the laws of physics and mechanics. Automatism, as propounded by Descartes, considered the lower animals to be pure automata (Letter to Henry More, 1649) and man a machine controlled by a rational soul (Treatise on Man). Pure automatism for man as well as animals is advocated by La Mettrie (Man, a Machine, 1748). During the Nineteenth century, automatism, combined with epiphenomenalism, was advanced by Hodgson, Huxley and Clifford. (Cf. W. James, The Principles of Psychology, Vol. I, ch. V.) Behaviorism, of the extreme sort, is the most recent version of automatism (See Behaviorism).   (b) In psychology: Psychological automatism is the performance of apparently purposeful actions, like automatic writing without the superintendence of the conscious mind. L. C. Rosenfield, From Beast Machine to Man Machine, N. Y., 1941. --L.W. Automatism, Conscious: The automatism of Hodgson, Huxley, and Clifford which considers man a machine to which mind or consciousness is superadded; the mind of man is, however, causally ineffectual. See Automatism; Epiphenomenalism. --L.W. Autonomy: (Gr. autonomia, independence) Freedom consisting in self-determination and independence of all external constraint. See Freedom. Kant defines autonomy of the will as subjection of the will to its own law, the categorical imperative, in contrast to heteronomy, its subjection to a law or end outside the rational will. (Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals, § 2.) --L.W. Autonomy of ethics: A doctrine, usually propounded by intuitionists, that ethics is not a part of, and cannot be derived from, either metaphysics or any of the natural or social sciences. See Intuitionism, Metaphysical ethics, Naturalistic ethics. --W.K.F. Autonomy of the will: (in Kant's ethics) The freedom of the rational will to legislate to itself, which constitutes the basis for the autonomy of the moral law. --P.A.S. Autonymy: In the terminology introduced by Carnap, a word (phrase, symbol, expression) is autonymous if it is used as a name for itself --for the geometric shape, sound, etc. which it exemplifies, or for the word as a historical and grammatical unit. Autonymy is thus the same as the Scholastic suppositio matertalis (q. v.), although the viewpoint is different. --A.C. Autotelic: (from Gr. autos, self, and telos, end) Said of any absorbing activity engaged in for its own sake (cf. German Selbstzweck), such as higher mathematics, chess, etc. In aesthetics, applied to creative art and play which lack any conscious reference to the accomplishment of something useful. In the view of some, it may constitute something beneficent in itself of which the person following his art impulse (q.v.) or playing is unaware, thus approaching a heterotelic (q.v.) conception. --K.F.L. Avenarius, Richard: (1843-1896) German philosopher who expressed his thought in an elaborate and novel terminology in the hope of constructing a symbolic language for philosophy, like that of mathematics --the consequence of his Spinoza studies. As the most influential apostle of pure experience, the posltivistic motive reaches in him an extreme position. Insisting on the biologic and economic function of thought, he thought the true method of science is to cure speculative excesses by a return to pure experience devoid of all assumptions. Philosophy is the scientific effort to exclude from knowledge all ideas not included in the given. Its task is to expel all extraneous elements in the given. His uncritical use of the category of the given and the nominalistic view that logical relations are created rather than discovered by thought, leads him to banish not only animism but also all of the categories, substance, causality, etc., as inventions of the mind. Explaining the evolution and devolution of the problematization and deproblematization of numerous ideas, and aiming to give the natural history of problems, Avenarius sought to show physiologically, psychologically and historically under what conditions they emerge, are challenged and are solved. He hypothesized a System C, a bodily and central nervous system upon which consciousness depends. R-values are the stimuli received from the world of objects. E-values are the statements of experience. The brain changes that continually oscillate about an ideal point of balance are termed Vitalerhaltungsmaximum. The E-values are differentiated into elements, to which the sense-perceptions or the content of experience belong, and characters, to which belongs everything which psychology describes as feelings and attitudes. Avenarius describes in symbolic form a series of states from balance to balance, termed vital series, all describing a series of changes in System C. Inequalities in the vital balance give rise to vital differences. According to his theory there are two vital series. It assumes a series of brain changes because parallel series of conscious states can be observed. The independent vital series are physical, and the dependent vital series are psychological. The two together are practically covariants. In the case of a process as a dependent vital series three stages can be noted: first, the appearance of the problem, expressed as strain, restlessness, desire, fear, doubt, pain, repentance, delusion; the second, the continued effort and struggle to solve the problem; and finally, the appearance of the solution, characterized by abating anxiety, a feeling of triumph and enjoyment.   Corresponding to these three stages of the dependent series are three stages of the independent series: the appearance of the vital difference and a departure from balance in the System C, the continuance with an approximate vital difference, and lastly, the reduction of the vital difference to zero, the return to stability. By making room for dependent and independent experiences, he showed that physics regards experience as independent of the experiencing indlvidual, and psychology views experience as dependent upon the individual. He greatly influenced Mach and James (q.v.). See Avenarius, Empirio-criticism, Experience, pure. Main works: Kritik der reinen Erfahrung; Der menschliche Weltbegriff. --H.H. Averroes: (Mohammed ibn Roshd) Known to the Scholastics as The Commentator, and mentioned as the author of il gran commento by Dante (Inf. IV. 68) he was born 1126 at Cordova (Spain), studied theology, law, medicine, mathematics, and philosophy, became after having been judge in Sevilla and Cordova, physician to the khalifah Jaqub Jusuf, and charged with writing a commentary on the works of Aristotle. Al-mansur, Jusuf's successor, deprived him of his place because of accusations of unorthodoxy. He died 1198 in Morocco. Averroes is not so much an original philosopher as the author of a minute commentary on the whole works of Aristotle. His procedure was imitated later by Aquinas. In his interpretation of Aristotelian metaphysics Averroes teaches the coeternity of a universe created ex nihilo. This doctrine formed together with the notion of a numerical unity of the active intellect became one of the controversial points in the discussions between the followers of Albert-Thomas and the Latin Averroists. Averroes assumed that man possesses only a disposition for receiving the intellect coming from without; he identifies this disposition with the possible intellect which thus is not truly intellectual by nature. The notion of one intellect common to all men does away with the doctrine of personal immortality. Another doctrine which probably was emphasized more by the Latin Averroists (and by the adversaries among Averroes' contemporaries) is the famous statement about "two-fold truth", viz. that a proposition may be theologically true and philosophically false and vice versa. Averroes taught that religion expresses the (higher) philosophical truth by means of religious imagery; the "two-truth notion" came apparently into the Latin text through a misinterpretation on the part of the translators. The works of Averroes were one of the main sources of medieval Aristotelianlsm, before and even after the original texts had been translated. The interpretation the Latin Averroists found in their texts of the "Commentator" spread in spite of opposition and condemnation. See Averroism, Latin. Averroes, Opera, Venetiis, 1553. M. Horten, Die Metaphysik des Averroes, 1912. P. Mandonnet, Siger de Brabant et l'Averroisme Latin, 2d ed., Louvain, 1911. --R.A. Averroism, Latin: The commentaries on Aristotle written by Averroes (Ibn Roshd) in the 12th century became known to the Western scholars in translations by Michael Scottus, Hermannus Alemannus, and others at the beginning of the 13th century. Many works of Aristotle were also known first by such translations from Arabian texts, though there existed translations from the Greek originals at the same time (Grabmann). The Averroistic interpretation of Aristotle was held to be the true one by many; but already Albert the Great pointed out several notions which he felt to be incompatible with the principles of Christian philosophy, although he relied for the rest on the "Commentator" and apparently hardly used any other text. Aquinas, basing his studies mostly on a translation from the Greek texts, procured for him by William of Moerbecke, criticized the Averroistic interpretation in many points. But the teachings of the Commentator became the foundation for a whole school of philosophers, represented first by the Faculty of Arts at Paris. The most prominent of these scholars was Siger of Brabant. The philosophy of these men was condemned on March 7th, 1277 by Stephen Tempier, Bishop of Paris, after a first condemnation of Aristotelianism in 1210 had gradually come to be neglected. The 219 theses condemned in 1277, however, contain also some of Aquinas which later were generally recognized an orthodox. The Averroistic propositions which aroused the criticism of the ecclesiastic authorities and which had been opposed with great energy by Albert and Thomas refer mostly to the following points: The co-eternity of the created word; the numerical identity of the intellect in all men, the so-called two-fold-truth theory stating that a proposition may be philosophically true although theologically false. Regarding the first point Thomas argued that there is no philosophical proof, either for the co-eternity or against it; creation is an article of faith. The unity of intellect was rejected as incompatible with the true notion of person and with personal immortality. It is doubtful whether Averroes himself held the two-truths theory; it was, however, taught by the Latin Averroists who, notwithstanding the opposition of the Church and the Thomistic philosophers, gained a great influence and soon dominated many universities, especially in Italy. Thomas and his followers were convinced that they interpreted Aristotle correctly and that the Averroists were wrong; one has, however, to admit that certain passages in Aristotle allow for the Averroistic interpretation, especially in regard to the theory of intellect.   Lit.: P. Mandonnet, Siger de Brabant et l'Averroisme Latin au XIIIe Siecle, 2d. ed. Louvain, 1911; M. Grabmann, Forschungen über die lateinischen Aristotelesübersetzungen des XIII. Jahrhunderts, Münster 1916 (Beitr. z. Gesch. Phil. d. MA. Vol. 17, H. 5-6). --R.A. Avesta: See Zendavesta. Avicehron: (or Avencebrol, Salomon ibn Gabirol) The first Jewish philosopher in Spain, born in Malaga 1020, died about 1070, poet, philosopher, and moralist. His main work, Fons vitae, became influential and was much quoted by the Scholastics. It has been preserved only in the Latin translation by Gundissalinus. His doctrine of a spiritual substance individualizing also the pure spirits or separate forms was opposed by Aquinas already in his first treatise De ente, but found favor with the medieval Augustinians also later in the 13th century. He also teaches the necessity of a mediator between God and the created world; such a mediator he finds in the Divine Will proceeding from God and creating, conserving, and moving the world. His cosmogony shows a definitely Neo-Platonic shade and assumes a series of emanations. Cl. Baeumker, Avencebrolis Fons vitae. Beitr. z. Gesch. d. Philos. d. MA. 1892-1895, Vol. I. Joh. Wittman, Die Stellung des hl. Thomas von Aquino zu Avencebrol, ibid. 1900. Vol. III. --R.A. Avicenna: (Abu Ali al Hosain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina) Born 980 in the country of Bocchara, began to write in young years, left more than 100 works, taught in Ispahan, was physician to several Persian princes, and died at Hamadan in 1037. His fame as physician survived his influence as philosopher in the Occident. His medical works were printed still in the 17th century. His philosophy is contained in 18 vols. of a comprehensive encyclopedia, following the tradition of Al Kindi and Al Farabi. Logic, Physics, Mathematics and Metaphysics form the parts of this work. His philosophy is Aristotelian with noticeable Neo-Platonic influences. His doctrine of the universal existing ante res in God, in rebus as the universal nature of the particulars, and post res in the human mind by way of abstraction became a fundamental thesis of medieval Aristotelianism. He sharply distinguished between the logical and the ontological universal, denying to the latter the true nature of form in the composite. The principle of individuation is matter, eternally existent. Latin translations attributed to Avicenna the notion that existence is an accident to essence (see e.g. Guilelmus Parisiensis, De Universo). The process adopted by Avicenna was one of paraphrasis of the Aristotelian texts with many original thoughts interspersed. His works were translated into Latin by Dominicus Gundissalinus (Gondisalvi) with the assistance of Avendeath ibn Daud. This translation started, when it became more generally known, the "revival of Aristotle" at the end of the 12th and the beginning of the 13th century. Albert the Great and Aquinas professed, notwithstanding their critical attitude, a great admiration for Avicenna whom the Arabs used to call the "third Aristotle". But in the Orient, Avicenna's influence declined soon, overcome by the opposition of the orthodox theologians. Avicenna, Opera, Venetiis, 1495; l508; 1546. M. Horten, Das Buch der Genesung der Seele, eine philosophische Enzyklopaedie Avicenna's; XIII. Teil: Die Metaphysik. Halle a. S. 1907-1909. R. de Vaux, Notes et textes sur l'Avicennisme Latin, Bibl. Thomiste XX, Paris, 1934. --R.A. Avidya: (Skr.) Nescience; ignorance; the state of mind unaware of true reality; an equivalent of maya (q.v.); also a condition of pure awareness prior to the universal process of evolution through gradual differentiation into the elements and factors of knowledge. --K.F.L. Avyakta: (Skr.) "Unmanifest", descriptive of or standing for brahman (q.v.) in one of its or "his" aspects, symbolizing the superabundance of the creative principle, or designating the condition of the universe not yet become phenomenal (aja, unborn). --K.F.L. Awareness: Consciousness considered in its aspect of act; an act of attentive awareness such as the sensing of a color patch or the feeling of pain is distinguished from the content attended to, the sensed color patch, the felt pain. The psychologlcal theory of intentional act was advanced by F. Brentano (Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkte) and received its epistemological development by Meinong, Husserl, Moore, Laird and Broad. See Intentionalism. --L.W. Axiological: (Ger. axiologisch) In Husserl: Of or pertaining to value or theory of value (the latter term understood as including disvalue and value-indifference). --D.C. Axiological ethics: Any ethics which makes the theory of obligation entirely dependent on the theory of value, by making the determination of the rightness of an action wholly dependent on a consideration of the value or goodness of something, e.g. the action itself, its motive, or its consequences, actual or probable. Opposed to deontological ethics. See also teleological ethics. --W.K.F. Axiologic Realism: In metaphysics, theory that value as well as logic, qualities as well as relations, have their being and exist external to the mind and independently of it. Applicable to the philosophy of many though not all realists in the history of philosophy, from Plato to G. E. Moore, A. N. Whitehead, and N, Hartmann. --J.K.F. Axiology: (Gr. axios, of like value, worthy, and logos, account, reason, theory). Modern term for theory of value (the desired, preferred, good), investigation of its nature, criteria, and metaphysical status. Had its rise in Plato's theory of Forms or Ideas (Idea of the Good); was developed in Aristotle's Organon, Ethics, Poetics, and Metaphysics (Book Lambda). Stoics and Epicureans investigated the summum bonum. Christian philosophy (St. Thomas) built on Aristotle's identification of highest value with final cause in God as "a living being, eternal, most good."   In modern thought, apart from scholasticism and the system of Spinoza (Ethica, 1677), in which values are metaphysically grounded, the various values were investigated in separate sciences, until Kant's Critiques, in which the relations of knowledge to moral, aesthetic, and religious values were examined. In Hegel's idealism, morality, art, religion, and philosophy were made the capstone of his dialectic. R. H. Lotze "sought in that which should be the ground of that which is" (Metaphysik, 1879). Nineteenth century evolutionary theory, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and economics subjected value experience to empirical analysis, and stress was again laid on the diversity and relativity of value phenomena rather than on their unity and metaphysical nature. F. Nietzsche's Also Sprach Zarathustra (1883-1885) and Zur Genealogie der Moral (1887) aroused new interest in the nature of value. F. Brentano, Vom Ursprung sittlicher Erkenntnis (1889), identified value with love.   In the twentieth century the term axiology was apparently first applied by Paul Lapie (Logique de la volonte, 1902) and E. von Hartmann (Grundriss der Axiologie, 1908). Stimulated by Ehrenfels (System der Werttheorie, 1897), Meinong (Psychologisch-ethische Untersuchungen zur Werttheorie, 1894-1899), and Simmel (Philosophie des Geldes, 1900). W. M. Urban wrote the first systematic treatment of axiology in English (Valuation, 1909), phenomenological in method under J. M. Baldwin's influence. Meanwhile H. Münsterberg wrote a neo-Fichtean system of values (The Eternal Values, 1909).   Among important recent contributions are: B. Bosanquet, The Principle of Individuality and Value (1912), a free reinterpretation of Hegelianism; W. R. Sorley, Moral Values and the Idea of God (1918, 1921), defending a metaphysical theism; S. Alexander, Space, Time, and Deity (1920), realistic and naturalistic; N. Hartmann, Ethik (1926), detailed analysis of types and laws of value; R. B. Perry's magnum opus, General Theory of Value (1926), "its meaning and basic principles construed in terms of interest"; and J. Laird, The Idea of Value (1929), noteworthy for historical exposition. A naturalistic theory has been developed by J. Dewey (Theory of Valuation, 1939), for which "not only is science itself a value . . . but it is the supreme means of the valid determination of all valuations." A. J. Ayer, Language, Truth and Logic (1936) expounds the view of logical positivism that value is "nonsense." J. Hessen, Wertphilosophie (1937), provides an account of recent German axiology from a neo-scholastic standpoint.   The problems of axiology fall into four main groups, namely, those concerning (1) the nature of value, (2) the types of value, (3) the criterion of value, and (4) the metaphysical status of value.   (1) The nature of value experience. Is valuation fulfillment of desire (voluntarism: Spinoza, Ehrenfels), pleasure (hedonism: Epicurus, Bentham, Meinong), interest (Perry), preference (Martineau), pure rational will (formalism: Stoics, Kant, Royce), apprehension of tertiary qualities (Santayana), synoptic experience of the unity of personality (personalism: T. H. Green, Bowne), any experience that contributes to enhanced life (evolutionism: Nietzsche), or "the relation of things as means to the end or consequence actually reached" (pragmatism, instrumentalism: Dewey).   (2) The types of value. Most axiologists distinguish between intrinsic (consummatory) values (ends), prized for their own sake, and instrumental (contributory) values (means), which are causes (whether as economic goods or as natural events) of intrinsic values. Most intrinsic values are also instrumental to further value experience; some instrumental values are neutral or even disvaluable intrinsically. Commonly recognized as intrinsic values are the (morally) good, the true, the beautiful, and the holy. Values of play, of work, of association, and of bodily well-being are also acknowledged. Some (with Montague) question whether the true is properly to be regarded as a value, since some truth is disvaluable, some neutral; but love of truth, regardless of consequences, seems to establish the value of truth. There is disagreement about whether the holy (religious value) is a unique type (Schleiermacher, Otto), or an attitude toward other values (Kant, Höffding), or a combination of the two (Hocking). There is also disagreement about whether the variety of values is irreducible (pluralism) or whether all values are rationally related in a hierarchy or system (Plato, Hegel, Sorley), in which values interpenetrate or coalesce into a total experience.   (3) The criterion of value. The standard for testing values is influenced by both psychological and logical theory. Hedonists find the standard in the quantity of pleasure derived by the individual (Aristippus) or society (Bentham). Intuitionists appeal to an ultimate insight into preference (Martineau, Brentano). Some idealists recognize an objective system of rational norms or ideals as criterion (Plato, Windelband), while others lay more stress on rational wholeness and coherence (Hegel, Bosanquet, Paton) or inclusiveness (T. H. Green). Naturalists find biological survival or adjustment (Dewey) to be the standard. Despite differences, there is much in common in the results of the application of these criteria.   (4) The metaphysical status of value. What is the relation of values to the facts investigated by natural science (Koehler), of Sein to Sollen (Lotze, Rickert), of human experience of value to reality independent of man (Hegel, Pringle-Pattlson, Spaulding)? There are three main answers:   subjectivism (value is entirely dependent on and relative to human experience of it: so most hedonists, naturalists, positivists);   logical objectivism (values are logical essences or subsistences, independent of their being known, yet with no existential status or action in reality);   metaphysical objectivism (values   --or norms or ideals   --are integral, objective, and active constituents of the metaphysically real: so theists, absolutists, and certain realists and naturalists like S. Alexander and Wieman). --E.S.B. Axiom: See Mathematics. Axiomatic method: That method of constructing a deductive system consisting of deducing by specified rules all statements of the system save a given few from those given few, which are regarded as axioms or postulates of the system. See Mathematics. --C.A.B. Ayam atma brahma: (Skr.) "This self is brahman", famous quotation from Brhadaranyaka Upanishad 2.5.19, one of many alluding to the central theme of the Upanishads, i.e., the identity of the human and divine or cosmic. --K.F.L.

ava (Mahalakshmi bhava; Mahaluxmi bhava) ::: the Mahalaks.mi aspect of devibhava; the temperament of Mahalaks.mi, the personality of the sakti or devi who "is vivid and sweet and wonderful with her deep secret of beauty and harmony and fine rhythm, her intricate and subtle opulence, her compelling attraction and captivating grace".Mah Mahalaksmi-Mahakali

ava-saundarya (bhava-saundarya; bhava saundarya) ::: beauty in the state of mind and feeling; inner beauty.

Baumgarten, Alexander Gottlieb: (1714-1762) A German thinker of the pre-Kantian period and disciple of Christian Wolff whose encyclopaedic work he tried to continue. Among his works the best known is Aesthetica in which he analyzes the problem of beauty regarded by him as recognition of perfection by means of the senses. The name of aesthetics, as the philosophy of beauty and art, was introduced by him for the first time. -- R.B.W.

Beauty ::: Beauty is the special divine Manifestation in the physical as Truth is in the mind, Love in the heart, Power in the vital. Beauty is the way in which the physical expresses the Divine— but the principle and law of Beauty is something inward and spiritual which expresses itself through the form.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 27, Page: 699


(Beauty) in the Briatic world of the cabala. [Rf.

   "Beauty is Ananda taking form — but the form need not be a physical shape. One speaks of a beautiful thought, a beautiful act, a beautiful soul. What we speak of as beauty is Ananda in manifestation; beyond manifestation beauty loses itself in Ananda or, you may say, beauty and Ananda become indistinguishably one.” The Future Poetry

Beauty is Ananda taking form—but the form need not be a physical shape. One speaks of a beautiful thought, a beautiful act, a beautiful soul. What we speak of as beauty is Ananda in manifestation; beyond manifestation beauty loses itself in Ananda or, you may say, beauty and Ananda become indistinguishably one.” The Future Poetry

"Beauty is not the same as Delight, but like love it is an expression, a form of Ananda, created by Ananda and composed of Ananda.” The Future Poetry

Beauty is not the same as Delight, but like love it is an expression, a form of Ananda, created by Ananda and composed of Ananda.” The Future Poetry

   "Beauty is the way in which the physical expresses the Divine – but the principle and law of Beauty is something inward and spiritual and expresses itself through the form.” *The Future Poetry

Beauty is the way in which the physical expresses the Divine—but the principle and law of Beauty is something inward and spiritual and expresses itself through the form.” The Future Poetry

Beauty (tiferet) ::: /div>

beau ideal ::: --> A conception or image of consummate beauty, moral or physical, formed in the mind, free from all the deformities, defects, and blemishes seen in actual existence; an ideal or faultless standard or model.

beauteous ::: a. --> Full of beauty; beautiful; very handsome.

beautie ::: pl. --> of Beauty

beautiful ::: a. --> Having the qualities which constitute beauty; pleasing to the sight or the mind.

beautify ::: v. t. --> To make or render beautiful; to add beauty to; to adorn; to deck; to grace; to embellish. ::: v. i. --> To become beautiful; to advance in beauty.

beautiless ::: a. --> Destitute of beauty.

BEAUTY. ::: Beauty is as much an expression of the Divine as Knowledge, Power or Ananda.
"To find highest beauty is to find God ; to reveal, to embody, to create as we say, highest beauty is to bring out of our souls the living image and power of God.


beauty :::Beauty is the special divine Manifestation in the physical as Truth is in the Mind, Love in the heart, Power in the vital.” The Future Poetry

beauty ::: n. --> An assemblage or graces or properties pleasing to the eye, the ear, the intellect, the aesthetic faculty, or the moral sense.
A particular grace, feature, ornament, or excellence; anything beautiful; as, the beauties of nature.
A beautiful person, esp. a beautiful woman.
Prevailing style or taste; rage; fashion.


beauty”)—the angelic prince of the Torah.

beauty ::: the quality present in a thing or person that gives intense pleasure or deep satisfaction to the mind, whether arising from sensory manifestations (as shape, colour, sound, etc.), a meaningful design or pattern, or something else, (as a personality in which high spiritual qualities are manifest). Beauty, beauty"s, Beauty"s, beauty-drenched, earth-beauty"s.

belle ::: n. --> A young lady of superior beauty and attractions; a handsome lady, or one who attracts notice in society; a fair lady.

bellibone ::: n. --> A woman excelling both in beauty and goodness; a fair maid.

belongs to the Divine Truth, Good, Beauty, rejection of all that is false, evD, ugly, discordant, union through love and sympathy wth all existence, openness to the Truth of the Self and the

beryl ::: n. --> A mineral of great hardness, and, when transparent, of much beauty. It occurs in hexagonal prisms, commonly of a green or bluish green color, but also yellow, pink, and white. It is a silicate of aluminium and glucinum (beryllium). The aquamarine is a transparent, sea-green variety used as a gem. The emerald is another variety highly prized in jewelry, and distinguished by its deep color, which is probably due to the presence of a little oxide of chromium.

bloom ::: n. **1. The flower of a plant. 2. Fig. A condition or time of vigour, freshness, and beauty; prime. 3. Fig. Glowing charm; delicate beauty. blooms. v. 4. To bear flowers; to blossom. Also fig. 5. To be in a healthy, glowing, or flourishing condition. 6. To flourish or grow. 7. To cause to flourish or grow; to flourish. Chiefly fig. blooms, bloomed.**

bloom ::: n. --> A blossom; the flower of a plant; an expanded bud; flowers, collectively.
The opening of flowers in general; the state of blossoming or of having the flowers open; as, the cherry trees are in bloom.
A state or time of beauty, freshness, and vigor; an opening to higher perfection, analogous to that of buds into blossoms; as, the bloom of youth.
The delicate, powdery coating upon certain growing or


B. Lotze, Rudolph Hermann: (1817-1881) Empiricist in science, teleological idealist in philosophy, theist in religion, poet and artist at heart, Lotze conceded three spheres; Necessary truths, facts, and values. Mechanism holds sway in the field of natural science; it does not generate meaning but is subordinated to value and reason which evolved a specific plan for the world. Lotze's psycho-physically oriented medical psychology is an applied metaphysics in which the concept soul stands for the unity of experience. Science attempts the demonstration of a coherence in nature; being is that which is in relationship; "thing" is not a conglomeration of qualities but a unity achieved through law; mutual effect or influence is as little explicable as being: It is the monistic Absolute working upon itself. The ultimate, absolute substance, God, is the good and is personal, personality being the highest value, and the most valuable is also the most real. Lotze disclaimed the ability to know all answers: they rest with God. Unity of law, matter, force, and all aspects of being produce beauty, while aesthetic experience consists in Einfühlung. Main works: Metaphysik, 1841; Logik, 1842; Medezinische Psychologie, 1842; Gesch. der Aesthetik im Deutschland, 1868; Mikrokosmos, 3 vols., 1856-64 (Eng. tr. 1885); Logik 1874; Metaphysik, 1879 (Eng. tr. 1884). --K. F. L. Love: (in Max Scheler) Giving one's self to a "total being" (Gesamtwesen); it therefore discloses the essence of that being; for this reason love is, for Scheler, an aspect of phenomonelogical knowledge. -- P. A.

Butterfly The butterfly, because of its short life, its physical beauty, and its fluttering from flower to flower seeking nectar, has among many ancient peoples been regarded as an emblem of the impermanent, unstable characteristics of the lower human soul. For it is through the merely human soul that the person learns and gathers into the reincarnating ego the nectar or honey of wisdom through experience. Likewise the psyche in occult Greek philosophy was the organ or vehicle of the nous, the higher ego or reimbodying monad. The caterpillar lives its period, making for itself a chrysalis, which after a stage of dormancy is broken by the emerging butterfly. This suggests the idea of the less becoming the greater, of an earthy entity becoming aerial. These thoughts led the ancient Greeks to use the butterfly as a symbol of the human soul (psyche); and in their mythology Psyche was in consequence represented in art with butterfly wings.

“But when I speak of the Divine Will, I mean something different,—something that has descended here into an evolutionary world of Ignorance, standing at the back of things, pressing on the Darkness with its Light, leading things presently towards the best possible in the conditions of a world of Ignorance and leading it eventually towards a descent of a greater power of the Divine, which will be not an omnipotence held back and conditioned by the law of the world as it is, but in full action and therefore bringing the reign of light, peace, harmony, joy, love, beauty and Ananda, for these are the Divine Nature.” Letters on Yoga

By the year 200 of the Hejira a definite sect of mystics had arisen, and following the instructions of a prominent member, Abu Said, his disciples forsook the world and entered the mystic life with a view of pursuing contemplation and meditation. These disciples wore a garment of wool, and from this received their name. Sufiism spread rapidly in Persia, and all Moslem philosophers were attracted to this sect, as great latitude in the beliefs of its followers was at first permitted, until in the reign of Moktadir, a Persian Sufi named Hallaj was tortured and put to death for teaching publicly that every man is God. After this the Sufis veiled their teachings, and especially in their poetry used amorous language and sang of the delights of the wine cup. In spite of the amorous trend of poetry followed by the Sufis, to the observing eye there appears a beauty and a spirituality of thought which has found many devotees. Ideas of pantheism abound, for God is held to be immanent in all things, expresses itself through all things, and is the transcendent essence of every human soul. For a person to know God is to see that God is immanent in himself.

campanula ::: n. --> A large genus of plants bearing bell-shaped flowers, often of great beauty; -- also called bellflower.

captive ::: n. 1. One, such as a prisoner of war, who is forcibly confined, subjugated, or enslaved. captives. v. 2. Those taken and held as a prisoners. captived. adj. 3. Kept under restraint or control; confined. 4. Enraptured, as by beauty; captivated.

cathedral ::: 1. A large and important church of imposing architectural beauty. 2. Of, relating to, or resembling a cathedral.

Characteristic: Pertaining to the starting point of the artist in his quest for beauty. (Goethe). -- L.V.

Ch'i wu: The equality of things and opinions, the identity of contraries. "Viewed from the standpoint of Tao, a beam and a pillar are identical. So are ugliness and beauty, greatness, wickedness, perverseness, and strangeness. Separation is the same as construction; construction is the same as destruction." Therefore the sages harmonize the systems of right and wrong, and rest in the equilibrium of nature (t'ien chun). "This is called following two courses at the same time." (Chuang Tzu, between 399 and 295 B.C.) -- W.T.C.

claytonia ::: n. --> An American genus of perennial herbs with delicate blossoms; -- sometimes called spring beauty.

Contrast: In aesthetics: the term may refer either to the presence in the object contemplated of contrasting elements (colors, sounds, characters, etc.), or to the principle that the presence of such contrasting elements is a common feature of beautiful objects which, within limits, enhances their beauty. -- W.K.F.

cosmetical ::: a. --> Imparting or improving beauty, particularly the beauty of the complexion; as, a cosmetical preparation.

crinum ::: n. --> A genus of bulbous plants, of the order Amaryllidace/, cultivated as greenhouse plants on account of their beauty.

Criterion: Broadly speaking, any ground, basis, or means of judging anything as to its quality. Since validity, truth, goodness, justice, virtue, and beauty are some of the most fundamental qualities for philosophic enquiry, criteria for these are embodied in almost all philosophies and are either assumed or derived. In logic, consistency is a generally recognized criterion; in epistemology, evidence of the senses, comparison, or reason may be regarded as criteria; in metaphysical speculation have been suggested. as criteria for truth, among others, correspondence, representation, practicability, and coherence; in religion, evidences of faith, revelation or miracle; in ethics, pleasure, desirability, utility, self-determination of the will, duty, conscience, happiness, are among common criteria, while in aesthetics there have been cited interest, satisfaction, enjoyment, utility, harmony. -- K.F.L.

crowfoot ::: n. --> The genus Ranunculus, of many species; some are common weeds, others are flowering plants of considerable beauty.
A number of small cords rove through a long block, or euphroe, to suspend an awning by.
A caltrop.
A tool with a side claw for recovering broken rods, etc.


crown ::: n. **1. An ornament worn on the head by kings and those having sovereign power, often made of precious metal and ornamented with gems. 2. A wreath or garland for the head, awarded as a sign of victory, success, honour, etc. 3. The distinction that comes from a great achievement; reward, honour. 4. The top or summit of something, esp. of a rounded object. etc. 5. The highest or more nearly perfect state of anything. 6. An exalting or chief attribute. 7. The acme or supreme source of honour, excellence, beauty, etc. v. 8. To put a crown on the head of, symbolically vesting with royal title, powers, etc. 9. To place something on or over the head or top of. crowns, crowned.**

darsana (sarvasaundarya darshana) ::: the vision of universal beauty, "an aesthesis and sensation of beauty and delight universal and multitudinous in detail".

&

The text of Birkat Kohanim is often regarded as the &

defaced ::: marred or spoiled the appearance, beauty or surface of; disfigured.

deflour ::: v. t. --> To deprive of flowers.
To take away the prime beauty and grace of; to rob of the choicest ornament.
To deprive of virginity, as a woman; to violate; to ravish; also, to seduce.


deformity ::: a. --> The state of being deformed; want of proper form or symmetry; any unnatural form or shape; distortion; irregularity of shape or features; ugliness.
Anything that destroys beauty, grace, or propriety; irregularity; absurdity; gross deviation from order or the established laws of propriety; as, deformity in an edifice; deformity of character.


deform ::: to spoil the natural form of; misshape; to spoil the beauty or appearance of; disfigure. deformed, deforming.

::: "Delight is the soul of existence, beauty the intense expression, the concentrated form of delight.” The Future Poetry*

“Delight is the soul of existence, beauty the intense expression, the concentrated form of delight.” The Future Poetry

deodar ::: n. --> A kind of cedar (Cedrus Deodara), growing in India, highly valued for its size and beauty as well as for its timber, and also grown in England as an ornamental tree.

destroy ::: v. t. --> To unbuild; to pull or tear down; to separate virulently into its constituent parts; to break up the structure and organic existence of; to demolish.
To ruin; to bring to naught; to put an end to; to annihilate; to consume.
To put an end to the existence, prosperity, or beauty of; to kill.


devenustate ::: v. t. --> To deprive of beauty or grace.

disfigured ::: marred or spoiled the beauty, appearance or shape of; deformed.

DIVINE LOVE. ::: Love comes to us in many ways ; it may come as an awakening to the beauty of the Lover, by the sight of an ideal face and image of him, by his mysterious hints to us of himself behind the thousand faces of things in the world, by a slow or sudden need of the heart, by a vague thirst in the soul, by the sense of someone near us drawing us or pursuing us with love or of someone blissful and beautiful whom we must discover.

Divine Will is something that has descended here into an evolutionary world of Ignorance, standing at the back of things, pressing on the ‘Darkness with its Light, leading things presently towards the best possible in the conditions of a world of Ignorance and leading it eventually towards a descent of a greater power of the Divine, which will be not an omnipotence held back and conditioned by the law of the world as it is, but in full action and therefore bringing the reign of light, peace, harmony, joy, love, beauty, and Ananda, for these arc the Divine Nature.

earth ::: 1. The realm of mortal existence; the temporal world. 2. The softer, friable part of land; soil, especially productive soil. **Earth, earth"s, earth-beauty"s, earth-being"s, earth-beings, earth-bounds, earth-bride, earth-fact, earth-force, Earth-Goddess, earth-hearts, earth-habit"s, earth-heart, earth-instruments, earth-kind, earth-life, earth-light, earth-made, earth-matter"s, earth-mind, earth-mind"s, earth-myth, earth-nature, earth-nature"s, Earth-Nature"s, earth-nursed, earth-pain, Earth-plasm, earth-poise, earth-scene, earth-scene"s, earth-seat, earth-shapes, earth-stage, earth-stuff, earth-time, earth-time"s, earth-use, earth-vision, earth-ways, summer-earth.

eclogite ::: n. --> A rock consisting of granular red garnet, light green smaragdite, and common hornblende; -- so called in reference to its beauty.

Ecstasy: (aesthetics) The contemplation of absolute beauty purified of any sensory experience. (Plotinus.) -- L.V.

effective ::: (vak) having the qualities of the second level of style, more dynamic and powerfully expressive than the adequate style and characterised by "aptness and vividness and richness and beauty of phrase".

elegancy ::: n. --> The state or quality of being elegant; beauty as resulting from choice qualities and the complete absence of what deforms or impresses unpleasantly; grace given by art or practice; fine polish; refinement; -- said of manners, language, style, form, architecture, etc.
That which is elegant; that which is tasteful and highly attractive.


elegant ::: a. --> Very choice, and hence, pleasing to good taste; characterized by grace, propriety, and refinement, and the absence of every thing offensive; exciting admiration and approbation by symmetry, completeness, freedom from blemish, and the like; graceful; tasteful and highly attractive; as, elegant manners; elegant style of composition; an elegant speaker; an elegant structure.
Exercising a nice choice; discriminating beauty or sensitive to beauty; as, elegant taste.


embellishment ::: n. --> The act of adorning, or the state of being adorned; adornment.
That which adds beauty or elegance; ornament; decoration; as, pictorial embellishments.


  “endowed with the sacred fire from the spark of higher and then independent Beings, who were the psychic and spiritual parents of Man, as the lower Pitar Devata (the Pitris) were the progenitors of his physical body. That Third and holy Race consisted of men who, at their zenith, were described as, ‘towering giants of godly strength and beauty, and the depositaries of all the mysteries of Heaven and Earth.’ . . .

enhanced ::: made greater, increased or intensified, as in value, beauty, or effectiveness; augmented.

enhance ::: v. t. --> To raise or lift up; to exalt.
To advance; to augment; to increase; to heighten; to make more costly or attractive; as, to enhance the price of commodities; to enhance beauty or kindness; hence, also, to render more heinous; to aggravate; as, to enhance crime. ::: v. i.


esthetics ::: n. --> The theory or philosophy of taste; the science of the beautiful in nature and art; esp. that which treats of the expression and embodiment of beauty by art.
Same as Aesthete, Aesthetic, Aesthetical, Aesthetics, etc.


Eumenides (Greek) [from eumenides beneficent or gracious ones]. Beneficent deities; they appear in the famous Greek tragedy The Eumenidies by Aeschylus. Originally karmic agents, called by the ancient Greeks avenging Erinyes (Furies), whose functions it is to attend upon human acts such as crimes and to bring about the reestablishment of the broken harmony, immediately after which they are seen in their real character: divinities of beneficence and beauty. See also ERINYES

exaggeration ::: n. --> The act of heaping or piling up.
The act of exaggerating; the act of doing or representing in an excessive manner; a going beyond the bounds of truth reason, or justice; a hyperbolical representation; hyperbole; overstatement.
A representation of things beyond natural life, in expression, beauty, power, vigor.


Expressionism: In aesthetics, the doctrine that artistic creation is primarily an expressive act, a process of clarifying and manifesting the impressions, emotions, intuitions, and attitudes of the artist. Such theories hold that art has its foundation in the experiences and feelings of its creator; it is a comment on the artist's soul, not on any external object, and its value depends on the freshness and individuality of this creative spirit. The artist is he who feels strongly and clearly; his art is a record of what he has felt. It is maintained that the artist has no responsibility to respect reality nor to please an audience, and the primary synonyms of beauty become sincerity, passion, and originality. -- J.J.

fairhood ::: n. --> Fairness; beauty.

Finally, intellect and will are brought into meaningful relation (Critique of Judgment, 1789-1793) in the feelings of aesthetic (i.e., "artistic") enjoyment and natural purposiveness. The appreciation of beauty, "aesthetic judgment", arises from the harmony of an object of cognition with the forms of knowledge; the perfect compatibility, in other words, of Nature and freedom, best exemplified in genius. Natural purposiveness, on the other hand, is not necessarily a real attribute of Nature, but an a priori, heuristic principle, an irresistible hypothesis, by which we regard Nature as a supreme end or divine form in order to give the particular contents of Nature meaning and significance.

Fine Arts: Opposite of mechanical arts. Distinction of the arts whose principle is based on beauty (poetry, painting, sculpture, architecture, music). -- L.V.

finery ::: n. --> Fineness; beauty.
Ornament; decoration; especially, excecially decoration; showy clothes; jewels.
A charcoal hearth or furnace for the conversion of cast iron into wrought iron, or into iron suitable for puddling.


florin ::: n. --> A silver coin of Florence, first struck in the twelfth century, and noted for its beauty. The name is given to different coins in different countries. The florin of England, first minted in 1849, is worth two shillings, or about 48 cents; the florin of the Netherlands, about 40 cents; of Austria, about 36 cents.

for Tiphereth (Beauty)

freya ::: n. --> The daughter of Njord, and goddess of love and beauty; the Scandinavian Venus; -- in Teutonic myths confounded with Frigga, but in Scandinavian, distinct.

Freya, the goddess of love and beauty, corresponds to the Greek Aphrodite and the Roman Venus. As the higher intelligence of the planet Earth, she is the sponsor and supporter of motherhood, the family, and of the human race. She wears on her breast the “fiery jewel” Brisingamen, representing humanity’s finest characteristics. Often confused with Frigga, she is in certain respects interchangeable with her, inasmuch as the divinities of the solar system have strong correspondences with one another. Sacred to Freya is Friday (as Vendredi is to Venus).

gandharva (gandharva; gundharva) ::: a kind of supernatural being, traditionally a celestial musician, belonging to a world of beauty and enjoyment; in the evolutionary scale, a sub-type of the deva type, imparting grace and refinement to lower types with which it is combined. gandharva-pasu

gem ::: 1. A pearl or mineral that has been cut and polished for use as an ornament. 2. Something that is valued for its beauty or perfection. gems.

gem ::: n. --> A bud.
A precious stone of any kind, as the ruby, emerald, topaz, sapphire, beryl, spinel, etc., especially when cut and polished for ornament; a jewel.
Anything of small size, or expressed within brief limits, which is regarded as a gem on account of its beauty or value, as a small picture, a verse of poetry, a witty or wise saying.


gladiolus ::: n. --> A genus of plants having bulbous roots and gladiate leaves, and including many species, some of which are cultivated and valued for the beauty of their flowers; the corn flag; the sword lily.
The middle portion of the sternum in some animals; the mesosternum.


glamour ::: 1. Charm and allure; fascination. 2. The often false or superficial beauty or charm which attracts. glamorous.

gleam ::: n. **1. A brief beam or flash of light. 2. A brief or dim indication; a trace. 3. The appearance of radiant beauty. Gleam, gleams. v. 4. To emit a gleam; flash or glow briefly or faintly. gleams, gleamed, gleaming, gleam-ridge. ::: *

glory ::: n. 1. Majestic and radiant beauty and splendour; resplendence. 2. Great honour, praise, or distinction accorded by common consent; renown. 3. A state of extreme happiness or exaltation. 4. A state of absolute happiness; gratification. Glory, glory"s, glories, self-glory. v. 5. Rejoice proudly (usually followed by in). glories, gloried, glorying.

Gnome [from Greek gnome thought, intelligence; or gnomon one who knows, an instructor, interpreter, guardian] Coined by Paracelsus for the elemental beings pertaining to the element earth, hence popularly believed in Medieval Europe to inhabit mines and caves, pictured as very small men, ugly and often misshapen. The females, called gnomides, were supposed to be of extreme beauty and goodness, being the especial guardians of diamonds. Elemental beings generally “are the Soul of the elements, the capricious forces in Nature, acting under one immutable Law, inherent in these Centres of Force, with undeveloped consciousness and bodies of plastic mould, which can be shaped according to the conscious or unconscious will of the human being who puts himself en rapport with them” (BCW 6:189). They belong to the three elemental kingdoms below the mineral kingdom.

Gobineau, Arthur de: (1816-1882) A French nobleman and author of Essay on the Inequality of Human Races, in which he propounds the doctrine of "nordic supremacy". According to him, "the white race originally possessed the monopoly of beauty, intelligence and stiength. By its union with other varieties hybrids were created, which were beautiful without strength. strong without intelligence, or, if intelligent, both weak and ugly." -- R.B.W.

goloka ::: the Vaishnava heaven of eternal beauty and bliss.

.GOLOKA. ::: Vaikuntha and Goloka arc human conceptions of states of being that arc be)ond humanity. Goloka is evidently a world of Love, Beauty and Ananda full of spiritual radiances

goloka ::: world of Love, beauty and ananda full of spiritual radiances; the vaisnava heaven of eternal Beauty and Bliss.

goodliness ::: n. --> Beauty of form; grace; elegance; comeliness.

graceful ::: a. --> Displaying grace or beauty in form or action; elegant; easy; agreeable in appearance; as, a graceful walk, deportment, speaker, air, act, speech.

grace ::: n. **1. Elegance or beauty of form, manner, motion, or action. 2. Favour or goodwill. 3. A manifestation of favour, especially by a superior. 4. Theol. a. The freely given, unmerited favour and love of God. b. The influence or spirit of God operating in humans to regenerate or strengthen them. c. A virtue or excellence of divine origin. d. The condition of being in God"s favour or one of the elect. 5. Divine love and protection bestowed freely on people. v. 6. To lend or add grace to; adorn. graced, graceful, graceless.**

gracious ::: a. --> Abounding in grace or mercy; manifesting love,. or bestowing mercy; characterized by grace; beneficent; merciful; disposed to show kindness or favor; condescending; as, his most gracious majesty.
Abounding in beauty, loveliness, or amiability; graceful; excellent.
Produced by divine grace; influenced or controlled by the divine influence; as, gracious affections.


Grotesque: (It. grottesca, from grotta, grotto) The idealized ugly. In aesthetics, the beauty of fantastic exaggeration, traditionally achieved by combining foliate and animal or human figures, as for example those found in the classic Roman and Pompeiian palaces and reproduced by Raphael in the Vatican. -- J.K.F.

guide ::: “The first is the discovery of the soul, not the outer soul of thought and emotion and desire, but the secret psychic entity, the divine element within us. When that becomes dominant over the nature, when we are consciously the soul and when mind, life and body take their true place as its instruments, we are aware of a guide within that knows the truth, the good, the true delight and beauty of existence, controls heart and intellect by its luminous law and leads our life and being towards spiritual completeness.” The Life Divine

heath ::: n. --> A low shrub (Erica, / Calluna, vulgaris), with minute evergreen leaves, and handsome clusters of pink flowers. It is used in Great Britain for brooms, thatch, beds for the poor, and for heating ovens. It is also called heather, and ling.
Also, any species of the genus Erica, of which several are European, and many more are South African, some of great beauty. See Illust. of Heather.
A place overgrown with heath; any cheerless tract of country


hebe ::: n. --> The goddess of youth, daughter of Jupiter and Juno. She was believed to have the power of restoring youth and beauty to those who had lost them.
An African ape; the hamadryas.


Hedonistic Aesthetics: Theories reducing beauty to the pleasure of seeing, hearing and playing, to the satisfaction of sensual enjoyment. -- L.V.

heighten ::: v. t. --> To make high; to raise higher; to elevate.
To carry forward; to advance; to increase; to augment; to aggravate; to intensify; to render more conspicuous; -- used of things, good or bad; as, to heighten beauty; to heighten a flavor or a tint.


*He wishes to be taken (gathered) into a world or art, of beauty and of lasting (eternal) form, not subject to decay and death and the ugliness of the world. It is a unique use of artifice.

Hod ::: Eighth of the sefirot, hod means “splendor.” It is associated with inspiration, suppleness, and transitory beauty. It is, as it were, the principle of hesed translated into action. Hod is balanced by Netzach.

homeliness ::: n. --> Domesticity; care of home.
Familiarity; intimacy.
Plainness; want of elegance or beauty.
Coarseness; simplicity; want of refinement; as, the homeliness of manners, or language.


honeysuckle ::: n. --> One of several species of flowering plants, much admired for their beauty, and some for their fragrance.

honiton lace ::: --> A kind of pillow lace, remarkable for the beauty of its figures; -- so called because chiefly made in Honiton, England.

Hughes, Ted: Born on 17 August 1930 in Yorkshire, England, Ted Hughes was a celebrated poet and writer of children’s books. The struggle between the beauty and violence in the natural world was a concern which Hughes explored in his work. His work includes the Crow (1970) and The Iron Man (1968). He died on 28 October 1998. He was married to SylviaPlath.

Hutcheson, Francis: (1694-1746) A prominent Scottish philosopher. Born in Drumalig, Ulster, educated at Glasgow, died in Dublin. The influence of his doctrine of "moral sense," stressing inborn conscience, or "moral feeling," was very wide, he was also the original author of the phrase "the greatest happiness for the greatest number," utilized by J. Bentham (q.v.) for the development of utilitarianism (q.v.) His principal work is Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of Beauty and Virtue. -- R.B.W.

hyperion ::: n. --> The god of the sun; in the later mythology identified with Apollo, and distinguished for his beauty.

ideal ::: a. --> Existing in idea or thought; conceptional; intellectual; mental; as, ideal knowledge.
Reaching an imaginary standard of excellence; fit for a model; faultless; as, ideal beauty.
Existing in fancy or imagination only; visionary; unreal.
Teaching the doctrine of idealism; as, the ideal theory or philosophy.
Imaginary.


ideality ::: n. --> The quality or state of being ideal.
The capacity to form ideals of beauty or perfection.
The conceptive faculty.


If the sex is active (instead of giving place to Beauty and

ill-favored ::: a. --> Wanting beauty or attractiveness; deformed; ugly; ill-looking.

(In Aesthetics): A movement in both art and general aesthetic theory which was particularly widespread and influential in the last years of the 18th and the first half of the 19th centuries. So interpreted, it is especially associated with Novalis, the Schlegels, and Jean Paul Richter in Germany, Rousseau, Chateaubriand, Hugo, Lamartine in France; Blake, Scott, the Lake Poets, Shelley, and Byron in England. As a general attitude toward art and its function, as an interpretation of the goodness, beauty, and purpose of life, romanticism has always existed and can be confined to no one period. The essence of romanticism, either as an attitude or as a conscious program, is an intense interest in nature, and an attempt to seize natural phenomena in a direct, immediate, and naive manner. Romanticism thus regards all forms, rules, conventions, and manners as artificial constructs and as hindrances to the grasp, enjoyment, and expression of nature, hence its continual opposition to any kind of classicism (q.v.), whose formalities it treats as fetters. Romanticism stresses the values of sincerity, spontaneity, and passion, as against the restraint and cultivation demanded by artistic forms and modes. It reasserts the primacy of feeling, imagination, and sentiment, as opposed to reason. It maintains that art should concern itself with the particular and the concrete, observing and reporting accurately the feelings aroused by nature, with no idealization or generalization. It commands the artist to feel freely and deeply, and to express what he has felt with no restraints, either artistic or social. It seeks in works of art a stimulus to imagination and feeling, a point of departure for free activity, rather than an object that it can accept and contemplate.

Indian Aesthetics: Art in India is one of the most diversified subjects. Sanskrit silpa included all crafts, fine art, architecture and ornament, dancing, acting, music and even coquetry. Behind all these endeavors is a deeprooted sense of absolute values derived from Indian philosophy (q.v.) which teaches the incarnation of the divine (Krsna, Shiva, Buddha), the transitoriness of life (cf. samsara), the symbolism and conditional nature of the phenomenal (cf. maya). Love of splendour and exaggerated greatness, dating back to Vedic (q.v.) times mingled with a grand simplicity in the conception of ultimate being and a keen perception and nature observation. The latter is illustrated in examples of verisimilous execution in sculpture and painting, the detailed description in a wealth of drama and story material, and the universal love of simile. With an urge for expression associated itself the metaphysical in its practical and seemingly other-worldly aspects and, aided perhaps by the exigencies of climate, yielded the grotesque as illustrated by the cave temples of Ellora and Elephanta, the apparent barbarism of female ornament covering up all organic beauty, the exaggerated, symbol-laden representations of divine and thereanthropic beings, a music with minute subdivisions of scale, and the like. As Indian philosophy is dominated by a monistic, Vedantic (q.v.) outlook, so in Indian esthetics we can notice the prevalence of an introvert unitary, soul-centric, self-integrating tendency that treats the empirical suggestively and by way of simile, trying to stylize the natural in form, behavior, and expression. The popular belief in the immanence as well as transcendence of the Absolute precludes thus the possibility of a complete naturalism or imitation. The whole range of Indian art therefore demands a sharing and re-creation of absolute values glimpsed by the artist and professedly communicated imperfectly. Rules and discussions of the various aspects of art may be found in the Silpa-sastras, while theoretical treatments are available in such works as the Dasarupa in dramatics, the Nrtya-sastras in dancing, the Sukranitisara in the relation of art to state craft, etc. Periods and influences of Indian art, such as the Buddhist, Kushan, Gupta, etc., may be consulted in any history of Indian art. -- K.F.L.

Indifferents: (Gr. adiaphora) In Stoic ethics those things which are in themselves neither good nor bad, as producing neither virtue nor vice; such as life, health, pleasure, beauty, wealth, noble birth, and their contraries. The Stoics further distinguished between indifferents that are to be preferred (proegmena) and those that are not to be preferred (apoproegmena). The former, though not goods, have a certain value and are the objects of natural inclination. -- G.R.M.

inelegancy ::: n. --> The quality of being inelegant; want of elegance or grace; want of refinement, beauty, or polish in language, composition, or manners.
Anything inelegant; as, inelegance of style in literary composition.


inelegant ::: a. --> Not elegant; deficient in beauty, polish, refinement, grave, or ornament; wanting in anything which correct taste requires.

ing “beauty”), according to Pistorius. Adam’s

Inner sense: The capacity of feeling immediately, (i.e. unconditioned by the knowledge of principles, causes, or advantages) the beauty and harmony (or their opposites) of material objects. (Francis Hutcheson.) -- K.E.G.

In organic bodies matter may become conscious. Mind, being an activity of the body, and unsubstantial, is not causally effective, but simply entertains and contemplates essences both enacted and unenacted. Its registration of the natural functions and drives of the body of which it is the aura, is desire, which gives values like truth, goodness, and beauty to the essences entertained. The desire to know, satisfied by intelligibility, creates science, which is investigation of the world of enacted essences, where alone the explanation of things is to be found.The natural desire to experience social harmony and to contemplate beauty creates morality, art, poetry and religion, which entertain in imagination and seek to make concrete by action, combinations of essences, often unenacted and purely ideal.

inspired ::: having the nature of inspiration (sruti), as it acts on the level of inspired logistis or another level of ideality or intuitive mind, often in combination with intuition or revelation; (vak) having the qualities of the fourth level of style, which "brings to us not only pure light and beauty and inexhaustible depth, but a greater moved ecstasy of highest or largest thought and sight and speech".

Intellectualism: (aesthetics) a. The "Intellectual Principle" is supreme beauty (Plotinus).

In the Avesta (Yasht 22), on the fourth day after death, the soul of the defunct finds itself in the presence of a maid of divine beauty or of fiendish ugliness according as he himself was good or bad, and she leads him into heaven or hell. This holy bridge and this maid are naught but karma; and as a person is essentially his own karma, the maid he meets after death is himself, divine in beauty or fiendish in ugliness; or again his constitution itself after death is the holy bridge which in the good and noble person can be traversed safely, but in the case of the wicked person who has starved his spiritual nature to a mere thread, his constitution becomes like the edge of a razor, and if there is not sufficient good and decency in the defunct to traverse this razor bridge, he falls into the lower regions.

Iofiel (“beauty of God”—Iophiel, Zophiel,

Irregularity, (Theory of): In art as in nature all beauty is irregular (Renoir).- -- L.V.

Ishtar (Chaldean) Ancient Babylonian deity, eldest of heaven and earth, daughter of Anu (the lord of the heavens). Her worship was fervently pursued by the multitude both in Babylonia and Assyria, although she was known under various names in different localities — Anunit, Nina, Nanna, Innanna, Atar — even when represented as the consort of Marduk (Babylonia) and of Assur (Assyria). In popular conception, she was the bounteous nature goddess, queen of beauty and joyousness, equivalent to Aphrodite or Venus, however, rather than Ceres, although synthesizing certain attributes of both these goddesses. Her other aspect is as the grim, stern harvester, withdrawing the life-forces so that everything during this period shall have sleep and rest. This aspect was stressed by the warlike Assyrians, who represented her as armed with bow and arrows, and hence she becomes their chief goddess of battles; whereas the Babylonians stressed the mother and child idea. Her symbol was an eight-rayed star.

“It is indeed as a result of our evolution that we arrive at the possibility of this transformation. As Nature has evolved beyond Matter and manifested Life, beyond Life and manifested Mind, so she must evolve beyond Mind and manifest a consciousness and power of our existence free from the imperfection and limitation of our mental existence, a supramental or truth-consciousness and able to develop the power and perfection of the spirit. Here a slow and tardy change need no longer be the law or manner of our evolution; it will be only so to a greater or less extent so long as a mental ignorance clings and hampers our ascent; but once we have grown into the truth-consciousness its power of spiritual truth of being will determine all. Into that truth we shall be freed and it will transform mind and life and body. Light and bliss and beauty and a perfection of the spontaneous right action of all the being are there as native powers of the supramental truth-consciousness and these will in their very nature transform mind and life and body even here upon earth into a manifestation of the truth-conscious spirit. The obscurations of earth will not prevail against the supramental truth-consciousness, for even into the earth it can bring enough of the omniscient light and omnipotent force of the spirit conquer. All may not open to the fullness of its light and power, but whatever does open must that extent undergo the change. That will be the principle of transformation.” The Supramental Manifestation

It is indeed as a result of our evolution that we arrive at the possibility of this transformation. As Nature has evolved beyond Matter and manifested Life, beyond Life and manifested Mind, so she must evolve beyond Mind and manifest a consciousness and power of our existence free from the imperfection and limitation of our mental existence, a supramental or truthconsciousness, and able to develop the power and perfection of the spirit. Here a slow and tardy change need no longer be the law or manner of our evolution; it will be only so to a greater or less extent so long as a mental ignorance clings and hampers our ascent; but once we have grown into the truthconsciousness its power of spiritual truth of being will determine all. Into that truth we shall be freed and it will transform mind and life and body. Light and bliss and beauty and a perfection of the spontaneous right action of all the being are there as native powers of the supramental truth-consciousness and these will in their very nature transform mind and life and body even here upon earth into a manifestation of the truth-conscious spirit. The obscurations of earth will not prevail against the supramental truth-consciousness, for even into the earth it can bring enough of the omniscient light and omnipotent force of the spirit to conquer. All may not open to the fullness of its light and power, but whatever does open must to that extent undergo the change. That will be the principle of transformation.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 13, Page: 536-37


It is one of the greatest weapons of the Asura at work when you are taught to shun beauty. It has been the ruin of India. The Divine manifests in the psychic as love, in the mind as knowledge, in the vital as power and in the physical as beauty. If you discard beauty it means that you are depriving the Divine of this manifestation in the material and you hand over that part to the Asura.

jamal :::   mercy; beauty

JAPA. ::: Japa is usually successful only on one of two condi- tions ::: if it is repeated with a sense of its significance, a dwelling of something in the mind on the nature, power, beauty, attrac- tion of the Godhead it signifies and is to bring into the cons- ciousness, — - that is the mental way ; or if it comes up from the heart or rings in it with a certain sense or feeling of bhak'ti making it alive, — that is the emotional way. Either the mind or the vital has to give it support or sustenance. But if it makes the mind dry and the vital restless, it must be missing that sup- port and sustenance. There « of course a third way, the reliance on the power of the Mantra or name in itself ; but then one has to go on till that power has sufficiently impressed its vibra- tion on the inner being to make it at a given moment suddenly open to the Presence or the Touch. But Jf there is a struggling or insistence for the result, then this c/Tect which needs a quiet receptivity In the mind is impeded.

kimnara (Kinnara) ::: [a type of mythological being, centaur], a being of superhuman beauty, unearthly sweetness of voice and wild freedom.

Lakshmi ::: “… in Hindu mythology, the goddess of wealth and good fortune, consort of Vishnu. According to a legend she sprang from the froth of the Ocean when it was churned, in full beauty, with a lotus in her hand. (Dow). Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo’s Works

lakshmi ::: ". . . in Hindu mythology, the goddess of wealth and good fortune, consort of Vishnu. According to a legend she sprang from the froth of the Ocean when it was churned, in full beauty, with a lotus in her hand. (Dow.)” *Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo"s Works

Lakshmi (Sanskrit) Lakṣmī Prosperity, happiness; the Hindu Venus, goddess of fortune and beauty who sprang with other precious things from the foam of the ocean when churned by the gods and demons for the recovery of the amrita. She is variously regarded as the wife or sakti of several of the great gods, notably Vishnu.

Lakshmi: The Hindu goddess of fortune and beauty, wife of Vishnu.

Laksmi (Lakshmi, Laxmi, Luxmi) ::: [the goddess of beauty and fortune]; Prosperity, Wealth.

Laks.mi (Luxmi) ::: the goddess of beauty and prosperity.Laksmi

lavanya ::: beauty; [one of the sadanga]: the seeking of beauty and charm for the satisfaction of the aesthetic spirit.

lilac ::: n. --> A shrub of the genus Syringa. There are six species, natives of Europe and Asia. Syringa vulgaris, the common lilac, and S. Persica, the Persian lilac, are frequently cultivated for the fragrance and beauty of their purplish or white flowers. In the British colonies various other shrubs have this name.
A light purplish color like that of the flower of the purplish lilac.


Line of Beauty: Title given by Wm. Hogarth to an undulating line supposedly containing the essence of the graphically beautiful, and so regarded as both the cause and the criterion of beauty; particular lines and paintings become beautiful as and because they exhibit this line. According to Hogarth, such lines must express "symmetry, variety, uniformity, simplicity, intricacy, and quantity". (Analysis of Beauty, London, 1753, p. 47.) -- I.J.

literature ::: n. --> Learning; acquaintance with letters or books.
The collective body of literary productions, embracing the entire results of knowledge and fancy preserved in writing; also, the whole body of literary productions or writings upon a given subject, or in reference to a particular science or branch of knowledge, or of a given country or period; as, the literature of Biblical criticism; the literature of chemistry.
The class of writings distinguished for beauty of style


logie as Iofi El (“beauty of God”), which would

Lorelei The legendary maiden who sat on a rock in the Rhine between Bingen and Coblentz, combing her beautiful hair and by her entrancing song bewitching sailors on the river to their doom. She belongs to a numerous class of such mythologic maidens, representing mainly the fascinating powers of the astral light over the unwary pilgrim in search of knowledge. The astral light partakes of the “watery” cosmic element, and the nature spirits pertaining to water on this plane were called by medieval European mystics the undines, of whose entrancing beauty and singing many tales are told, such as that of Odysseus and the sirens, or the Scandinavian lake maiden.

lovely ::: 1. Having a beauty that appeals to the heart or mind as well as to the eye; charmingly or exquisitely beautiful. 2. Of a great spiritual beauty. lovelier, loveliness.

luculent ::: a. --> Lucid; clear; transparent.
Clear; evident; luminous.
Bright; shining in beauty.


lustre ::: 1. Reflected light; sheen; gloss. 2. Radiance or brilliance of light. 3. Great splendour of the countenance. beauty, etc. lustres.

Mabinogion (Welsh) A plural form invented by Lady Charlotte Guest and applied to the Mabinogi and other medieval or earlier romances which she translated from Welsh to English. The Mabinogi proper has four branches: the stories of Pwyll Pendefig Dyfed (Pwyll prince of Dyfed); Manawyddan fab Llyr (Manawyddan son of Llyr); Branwen ferch Llyr (Branwen daughter of Llyr); and Math fab Mathonwy. The tales as they come down to us were written down in South Wales some time before the Conquest — in the last two centuries of Welsh independence — and are marked by great beauty of style and literary finish. Matthew Arnold compares them to “peasants’ huts built of the stones of Ephesus”: the substance of them comes from a profound antiquity which, with its wisdom, the latest tellers of them did not fully understand. As to that antiquity: when Bran the Blessed invaded Ireland, we are told, there was no sea between Wales and Ireland, but only two small rivers. These being unbridged, the question arose, how should the hosts of the Island of the Mighty cross them? A question Bran solved by laying down his body from bank to bank, saying: “He who is Chief, let him be the Bridge,” a saying that contains a great part of the secret wisdom of the Druids.

Madhav: “Aswapathy is in the mid-world. He is neither in the nether realms of struggle and obscurity nor in the brighter worlds above of power and rapture. He is in realms of Beauty that point to still happier altitudes. The Birds of Wonder are the marvellous beings of that region, the angels, who call upon the higher worlds of Light to manifest in their world.” The Book of the Divine Mother

magnificent ::: 1. Making a splendid appearance or show; of exceptional beauty, size, etc. 2. Extraordinarily fine; superb. 3. Noble; sublime. magnificently.

MAHALAKSHMI ::: Goddess of the supreme love and delight ; her gifts are the spirits grace and the charm and beauty of the Ananda and protection and every divine and human blessing.

Mahalaks.mi (Mahalakshmi; Mahalaxmi; Mahaluxmi) ::: one of the Mahalaksmi four personalities of the sakti or devi: the goddess of beauty, love and delight, whose manifestation in the temperament (Mahalaks.mi bhava) gives its "colouring" to the combination of the aspects of daivi prakr.ti;.. sometimes short for Mahalaks.mi bhava..Mah Mahalaksmi alaks.mi bh bhava

Main works: Sense and Beauty, 1896; Interpret. of Poetry and Religion, 1900; Life of Reason, 5 vols , 1905-6 (Reason in Common Sense, Reason in Society, Reason in Religion, Reason in Art, Reason in Science); Winds of Doctrine, 1913; Egotism in German Philosophy, 1915; Character and Opinion in the U. S., 1920; Skepticism and Animal Faith, 1923; Realms of Being, 4 vols., 1927-40 (Realm of Essence, Realm of Matter, Realm of Truth, Realm of Spirit). -- B.A.G.F. Sarva-darsana-sangraha: (Skr.) A work by Madhvavacarya, professing to be a collection (sangraha) of all (sarva) philosophic views (darsana) or schools. It includes systems which acknowledge and others which reject Vedic (s.v.) authority, such as the Carvaka, Buddhist and Jaina schools (which see). -- K.F.L.

"Man is a transitional being, he is not final. He is too imperfect for that, too imperfect in capacity for knowledge, too imperfect in will and action, too imperfect in his turn towards joy and beauty, too imperfect in his will for freedom and his instinct for order. Even if he could perfect himself in his own type, his type is too low and small to satisfy the need of the universe. Something larger, higher, more capable of a rich all embracing universality is needed, a greater being, a greater consciousness summing up in itself all that the world set out to be. He has, as was pointed out by a half blind seer, to exceed himself; man must evolve out of himself the divine superman: he was born for transcendence. Humanity is not enough, it is only a strong stepping stone; the need of the world is a superhuman perfection of what the world can be, the goal of consciousness is divinity. The inmost need of man is not to perfect his humanity, but to be greater than himself, to be more than man, to be divine, even to be the Divine.” Essays Divine and Human

“Man is a transitional being, he is not final. He is too imperfect for that, too imperfect in capacity for knowledge, too imperfect in will and action, too imperfect in his turn towards joy and beauty, too imperfect in his will for freedom and his instinct for order. Even if he could perfect himself in his own type, his type is too low and small to satisfy the need of the universe. Something larger, higher, more capable of a rich all embracing universality is needed, a greater being, a greater consciousness summing up in itself all that the world set out to be. He has, as was pointed out by a half blind seer, to exceed himself; man must evolve out of himself the divine superman: he was born for transcendence. Humanity is not enough, it is only a strong stepping stone; the need of the world is a superhuman perfection of what the world can be, the goal of consciousness is divinity. The inmost need of man is not to perfect his humanity, but to be greater than himself, to be more than man, to be divine, even to be the Divine.” Essays Divine and Human

millihelen "unit, humour" The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. (2002-03-19)

millihelen ::: (unit, humour) The amount of beauty required to launch one ship.(2002-03-19)

minnesinger ::: n. --> A love-singer; specifically, one of a class of German poets and musicians who flourished from about the middle of the twelfth to the middle of the fourteenth century. They were chiefly of noble birth, and made love and beauty the subjects of their verses.

Modern Period. In the 17th century the move towards scientific materialism was tempered by a general reliance on Christian or liberal theism (Galileo, Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Gassendi, Toland, Hartley, Priestley, Boyle, Newton). The principle of gravitation was regarded by Newton, Boyle, and others, as an indication of the incompleteness of the mechanistic and materialistic account of the World, and as a direct proof of the existence of God. For Newton Space was the "divine sensorium". The road to pure modern idealism was laid by the epistemological idealism (epistemological subjectivism) of Campanella and Descartes. The theoretical basis of Descartes' system was God, upon whose moral perfection reliance must be placed ("God will not deceive us") to insure the reality of the physical world. Spinoza's impersonalistic pantheism is idealistic to the extent that space or extension (with modes of Body and Motion) is merely one of the infinity of attributes of Being. Leibniz founded pure modern idealism by his doctrine of the immateriality and self-active character of metaphysical individual substances (monads, souls), whose source and ground is God. Locke, a theist, gave chief impetus to the modern theory of the purely subjective character of ideas. The founder of pure objective idealism in Europe was Berkeley, who shares with Leibniz the creation of European immaterialism. According to him perception is due to the direct action of God on finite persons or souls. Nature consists of (a) the totality of percepts and their order, (b) the activity and thought of God. Hume later an implicit Naturalist, earlier subscribed ambiguously to pure idealistic phenomenalism or scepticism. Kant's epistemological, logical idealism (Transcendental or Critical Idealism) inspired the systems of pure speculative idealism of the 19th century. Knowledge, he held, is essentially logical and relational, a product of the synthetic activity of the logical self-consciousness. He also taught the ideality of space and time. Theism, logically undemonstrable, remains the choice of pure speculative reason, although beyond the province of science. It is also a practical implication of the moral life. In the Critique of Judgment Kant, marshalled facts from natural beauty and the apparent teleological character of the physical and biological world, to leave a stronger hint in favor of the theistic hypothesis. His suggestion thit reality, as well as Mind, is organic in character is reflected in the idealistic pantheisms of his followers: Fichte (abstract personalism or "Subjective Idealism"), Schellmg (aesthetic idealism, theism, "Objective Idealism"), Hegel (Absolute or logical Idealism), Schopenhauer (voluntaristic idealism), Schleiermacher (spiritual pantheism), Lotze ("Teleological Idealism"). 19th century French thought was grounder in the psychological idealism of Condillac and the voluntaristic personalism of Biran. Throughout the century it was essentially "spiritualistic" or personalistic (Cousin, Renouvier, Ravaisson, Boutroux, Lachelier, Bergson). British thought after Hume was largely theistic (A. Smith, Paley, J. S. Mill, Reid, Hamilton). In the latter 19th century, inspired largely by Kant and his metaphysical followers, it leaned heavily towards semi-monistic personalism (E. Caird, Green, Webb, Pringle-Pattison) or impersonalistic monism (Bradley, Bosanquet). Recently a more pluralistic personalism has developed (F. C. S. Schiller, A. E. Taylor, McTaggart, Ward, Sorley). Recent American idealism is represented by McCosh, Howison, Bowne, Royce, Wm. James (before 1904), Baldwin. German idealists of the past century include Fechner, Krause, von Hartmann, H. Cohen, Natorp, Windelband, Rickert, Dilthey, Brentano, Eucken. In Italy idealism is represented by Croce and Gentile, in Spain, by Unamuno and Ortega e Gasset; in Russia, by Lossky, in Sweden, by Boström; in Argentina, by Aznar. (For other representatives of recent or contemporary personalism, see Personalism.) -- W.L.

mooned ::: Her body of beauty mooned the seas of bliss

Mother, four of her leading Powers and Personalities have stood in front in her guidance of this Universe and in her dealings with the terrestrial play. One is her personality of calm wideness and comprehending wisdom and tranquil benignity and inexhaustible compassion and sovereign and surpassing majesty and all-ruling greatness. Another embo&es her power of splendid strength and irresistible passion, her warrior mood, her overwhelming will, her impetuous swiftness and world-shaking force. A third is vivid and sweet and wonderful with her deep secret of beauty and harmony and fine rhythm, her intricate and subtle opulence, her compelling attraction and captivating grace. The fourth is equipped with her close and profound capacity of intimate knowledge and careful flawless work and quiet and exact per- fection in all things. Wisdom, Strength, Harmony, Perfection are their several attributes and it Is these powers that they bring with them into the world. To the four we give the four great names, Maheshvari, Mahakali, Mabalakshmi, Mahasarasvati.

mukhasri ::: facial beauty. mukhasri mukhya pr prana

murrhine ::: a. --> Made of the stone or material called by the Romans murrha; -- applied to certain costly vases of great beauty and delicacy used by the luxurious in Rome as wine cups; as, murrhine vases, cups, vessels.

Mysteries ::: The Mysteries were divided into two general parts, the Less Mysteries and the Greater.The Less Mysteries were very largely composed of dramatic rites or ceremonies, with some teaching; theGreater Mysteries were composed of, or conducted almost entirely on the ground of, study; and thedoctrines taught in them later were proved by personal experience in initiation. In the Greater Mysterieswas explained, among other things, the secret meaning of the mythologies of the old religions, as, forinstance, the Greek.The active and nimble mind of the Greeks produced a mythology which for grace and beauty is perhapswithout equal, but it nevertheless is very difficult to explain; the Mysteries of Samothrace and of Eleusis-- the greater ones -- explained among other things what these myths meant. These myths formed thebasis of the exoteric religions; but note well that exotericism does not mean that the thing which is taughtexoterically is in itself false, but merely that it is a teaching given without the key to it. Such teaching issymbolic, illusory, touching on the truth -- the truth is there, but without the key to it, which is theesoteric meaning, it yields no proper sense.We have the testimony of the Greek and Roman initiates and thinkers that the ancient Mysteries ofGreece taught men, above everything else, to live rightly and to have a noble hope for the life after death.The Romans derived their Mysteries from those of Greece.The mythological aspect comprises only a portion -- and a relatively small portion -- of what was taughtin the Mystery schools in Greece, principally at Samothrace and at Eleusis. At Samothrace was taught thesame mystery-teaching that was current elsewhere in Greece, but here it was more developed andrecondite, and the foundation of these mystery-teachings was morals. The noblest and greatest men ofancient times in Greece were initiates in the Mysteries of these two seats of esoteric knowledge.In other countries farther to the east, there were other Mystery schools or "colleges," and this wordcollege by no means necessarily meant a mere temple or building; it meant association, as in our modernword colleague, "associate." The Teutonic tribes of northern Europe, the Germanic tribes, whichincluded Scandinavia, had their Mystery colleges also; and teacher and neophytes stood on the bosom ofMother Earth, under Father Ether, the boundless sky, or in subterranean receptacles, and taught andlearned. The core, the heart, the center, of the teaching of the ancient Mysteries was the abstruseproblems dealing with death. (See also Guru-parampara)

Nama-rupa: (Skr.) "Name and form", a stereotyped formula for the phenomenal world, or its conceptual and material aspects; also: "word and beauty", as forms of manifestation. See Rupa. -- K.F.L.

Nirmanakaya(Sanskrit) ::: A compound of two words: nirmana, a participle meaning "forming," "creating"; kaya, a wordmeaning "body," "robe," "vehicle"; thus, nirmanakaya means "formed-body." A nirmanakaya, however,is really a state assumed by or entered into by a bodhisattva -- an individual man made semi-divine who,to use popular language, instead of choosing his reward in the nirvana of a less degree, remains on earthout of pity and compassion for inferior beings, clothing himself in a nirmanakayic vesture. When thatstate is ended the nirmanakaya ends.A nirmanakaya is a complete man possessing all the principles of his constitution except the linga-sariraand its accompanying physical body. He is one who lives on the plane of being next superior to thephysical plane, and his purpose in so doing is to save men from themselves by being with them, and bycontinuously instilling thoughts of self-sacrifice, of self-forgetfulness, of spiritual and moral beauty, ofmutual help, of compassion, and of pity.Nirmanakaya is the third or lowest, exoterically speaking, of what is called in Sanskrit trikaya or "threebodies." The highest is the dharmakaya, in which state are the nirvanis and full pratyeka buddhas, etc.;the second state is the sambhogakaya, intermediate between the former and, thirdly, the nirmanakaya.The nirmanakaya vesture or condition enables one entering it to live in touch and sympathy with theworld of men. The sambhogakaya enables one in that state to be conscious indeed to a certain extent ofthe world of men and its griefs and sorrows, but with little power or impulse to render aid. Thedharmakaya vesture is so pure and holy, and indeed so high, that the one possessing the dharmakaya orwho is in it, is virtually out of all touch with anything inferior to himself. It is, therefore, in thenirmanakaya vesture if not in physical form that live and work the Buddhas of Compassion, the greatestsages and seers, and all the superholy men who through striving through ages of evolution bring forthinto manifestation and power and function the divinity within. The doctrine of the nirmanakayas is one ofthe most suggestive, profound, and beautiful teachings of the esoteric philosophy. (See also Dharmakaya,Sambhogakaya)

Nirmanakaya (Sanskrit) Nirmāṇakāya [from nirmāṇa forming, creating + kāya body, robe, vehicle] Appearance body; the lowest of the trikaya, followed by sambhogakaya and dharmakaya. A state assumed by a bodhisattva who, instead of entering nirvana, remains on earth to help inferior beings. “A Nirmanakaya is a complete man possessing all the principles of his constitution except the Linga-sarira, and its accompanying physical body. He is one who lives on the plane of being next superior to the physical plane, and his purpose in so doing is to save men from themselves by being with them, and by continuously instilling thoughts of self-sacrifice, of self-forgetfulness, of spiritual and moral beauty, of mutual help, of compassion, and of pity” (OG 114). Beings in this state make a wall of protection around mankind, which shields humanity from evils.

Norm: (Lat. norma, rule) General: Standard for measure. Pattern. Type. In ethics: Standard for proper conduct. Rule for right action. In axiology: Standard for judging value or evaluation. In aesthetics: Standard for judging beauty or art. Basis for criticism, In logic: Rule for valid inference. In psychology: Class average test score.

“ Now, that a conscious Infinite is there in physical Nature, we are assured by every sign, though it is a consciousness not made or limited like ours. All her constructions and motions are those of an illimitable intuitive wisdom too great and spontaneous and mysteriously self-effective to be described as an intelligence, of a Power and Will working for Time in eternity with an inevitable and forecasting movement in each of its steps, even in those steps that in their outward or superficial impetus seem to us inconscient. And as there is in her this greater consciousness and greater power, so too there is an illimitable spirit of harmony and beauty in her constructions that never fails her, though its works are not limited by our aesthetic canons. An infinite hedonism too is there, an illimitable spirit of delight, of which we become aware when we enter into impersonal unity with her; and even as that in her which is terrible is a part of her beauty, that in her which is dangerous, cruel, destructive is a part of her delight, her universal Ananda. Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

occidental ::: a. --> Of, pertaining to, or situated in, the occident, or west; western; -- opposed to oriental; as, occidental climates, or customs; an occidental planet.
Possessing inferior hardness, brilliancy, or beauty; -- used of inferior precious stones and gems, because those found in the Orient are generally superior.


ordinary ::: a. --> According to established order; methodical; settled; regular.
Common; customary; usual.
Of common rank, quality, or ability; not distinguished by superior excellence or beauty; hence, not distinguished in any way; commonplace; inferior; of little merit; as, men of ordinary judgment; an ordinary book.


ornament ::: n. --> That which embellishes or adorns; that which adds grace or beauty; embellishment; decoration; adornment. ::: v. t. --> To adorn; to deck; to embellish; to beautify; as, to ornament a room, or a city.

overmind ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The overmind is a sort of delegation from the supermind (this is a metaphor only) which supports the present evolutionary universe in which we live here in Matter. If supermind were to start here from the beginning as the direct creative Power, a world of the kind we see now would be impossible; it would have been full of the divine Light from the beginning, there would be no involution in the inconscience of Matter, consequently no gradual striving evolution of consciousness in Matter. A line is therefore drawn between the higher half of the universe of consciousness, parardha , and the lower half, aparardha. The higher half is constituted of Sat, Chit, Ananda, Mahas (the supramental) — the lower half of mind, life, Matter. This line is the intermediary overmind which, though luminous itself, keeps from us the full indivisible supramental Light, depends on it indeed, but in receiving it, divides, distributes, breaks it up into separated aspects, powers, multiplicities of all kinds, each of which it is possible by a further diminution of consciousness, such as we reach in Mind, to regard as the sole or the chief Truth and all the rest as subordinate or contradictory to it.” *Letters on Yoga

   "The overmind is the highest of the planes below the supramental.” *Letters on Yoga

"In its nature and law the Overmind is a delegate of the Supermind Consciousness, its delegate to the Ignorance. Or we might speak of it as a protective double, a screen of dissimilar similarity through which Supermind can act indirectly on an Ignorance whose darkness could not bear or receive the direct impact of a supreme Light.” The Life Divine

"The Overmind is a principle of cosmic Truth and a vast and endless catholicity is its very spirit; its energy is an all-dynamism as well as a principle of separate dynamisms: it is a sort of inferior Supermind, — although it is concerned predominantly not with absolutes, but with what might be called the dynamic potentials or pragmatic truths of Reality, or with absolutes mainly for their power of generating pragmatic or creative values, although, too, its comprehension of things is more global than integral, since its totality is built up of global wholes or constituted by separate independent realities uniting or coalescing together, and although the essential unity is grasped by it and felt to be basic of things and pervasive in their manifestation, but no longer as in the Supermind their intimate and ever-present secret, their dominating continent, the overt constant builder of the harmonic whole of their activity and nature.” The Life Divine

   "The overmind sees calmly, steadily, in great masses and large extensions of space and time and relation, globally; it creates and acts in the same way — it is the world of the great Gods, the divine Creators.” *Letters on Yoga

"The Overmind is essentially a spiritual power. Mind in it surpasses its ordinary self and rises and takes its stand on a spiritual foundation. It embraces beauty and sublimates it; it has an essential aesthesis which is not limited by rules and canons, it sees a universal and an eternal beauty while it takes up and transforms all that is limited and particular. It is besides concerned with things other than beauty or aesthetics. It is concerned especially with truth and knowledge or rather with a wisdom that exceeds what we call knowledge; its truth goes beyond truth of fact and truth of thought, even the higher thought which is the first spiritual range of the thinker. It has the truth of spiritual thought, spiritual feeling, spiritual sense and at its highest the truth that comes by the most intimate spiritual touch or by identity. Ultimately, truth and beauty come together and coincide, but in between there is a difference. Overmind in all its dealings puts truth first; it brings out the essential truth (and truths) in things and also its infinite possibilities; it brings out even the truth that lies behind falsehood and error; it brings out the truth of the Inconscient and the truth of the Superconscient and all that lies in between. When it speaks through poetry, this remains its first essential quality; a limited aesthetical artistic aim is not its purpose.” *Letters on Savitri

"In the overmind the Truth of supermind which is whole and harmonious enters into a separation into parts, many truths fronting each other and moved each to fulfil itself, to make a world of its own or else to prevail or take its share in worlds made of a combination of various separated Truths and Truth-forces.” Letters on Yoga

*Overmind"s.


paradise ::: 1. The abode of righteous souls after death; heaven. 2. A place of ideal beauty or loveliness. 3. Fig A state of delight. Paradise, paradisal.

paragon ::: n. --> A companion; a match; an equal.
Emulation; rivalry; competition.
A model or pattern; a pattern of excellence or perfection; as, a paragon of beauty or eloquence.
A size of type between great primer and double pica. See the Note under Type. ::: v. t.


patch ::: n. --> A piece of cloth, or other suitable material, sewed or otherwise fixed upon a garment to repair or strengthen it, esp. upon an old garment to cover a hole.
A small piece of anything used to repair a breach; as, a patch on a kettle, a roof, etc.
A small piece of black silk stuck on the face, or neck, to hide a defect, or to heighten beauty.
A piece of greased cloth or leather used as wrapping for a


philosophy: is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty, validity, mind, and language.

picturesque ::: a. --> Forming, or fitted to form, a good or pleasing picture; representing with the clearness or ideal beauty appropriate to a picture; expressing that peculiar kind of beauty which is agreeable in a picture, natural or artificial; graphic; vivid; as, a picturesque scene or attitude; picturesque language.

picturesque: A preoccupation in 18th century literature where many poets, such as Addison and Pope, sought out the beauty in nature to incorporate it in their writing. Picturesque is related to romanticism, however some critics imply that the picturesque – because of the absence of a deeper engagement with nature - is a superficial sibling of romanticism.

plants ::: [The Algorithmic Beauty of Plants, Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz, Aristid Lindenmayer. New York: Springer-Verlag, 1990. 3-54097297-8].

plants ["The Algorithmic Beauty of Plants", Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz, Aristid Lindenmayer. New York: Springer-Verlag, 1990. 3-54097297-8].

Plato's theory of knowledge can hardly be discussed apart from his theory of reality. Through sense perception man comes to know the changeable world of bodies. This is the realm of opinion (doxa), such cognition may be more or less clear but it never rises to the level of true knowledge, for its objects are impermanent and do not provide a stable foundation for science. It is through intellectual, or rational, cognition that man discovers another world, that of immutable essences, intelligible realities, Forms or Ideas. This is the level of scientific knowledge (episteme); it is reached in mathematics and especially in philosophy (Repub. VI, 510). The world of intelligible Ideas contains the ultimate realities from which the world of sensible things has been patterned. Plato experienced much difficulty in regard to the sort of existence to be attributed to his Ideas. Obviously it is not the crude existence of physical things, nor can it be merely the mental existence of logical constructs. Interpretations have varied from the theory of the Christian Fathers (which was certainly not that of Plato himself) viz , that the Ideas are exemplary Causes in God's Mind, to the suggestion of Aristotle (Metaphysics, I) that they are realized, in a sense, in the world of individual things, but are apprehended only by the intellect The Ideas appear, however, particularly in the dialogues of the middle period, to be objective essences, independent of human minds, providing not only the foundation for the truth of human knowledge but afso the ontological bases for the shadowy things of the sense world. Within the world of Forms, there is a certain hierarchy. At the top, the most noble of all, is the Idea of the Good (Repub. VII), it dominates the other Ideas and they participate in it. Beauty, symmetry and truth are high-ranking Ideas; at times they are placed almost on a par with the Good (Philebus 65; also Sympos. and Phaedrus passim). There are, below, these, other Ideas, such as those of the major virtues (wisdom, temperance, courage, justice and piety) and mathematical terms and relations, such as equality, likeness, unlikeness and proportion. Each type or class of being is represented by its perfect Form in the sphere of Ideas, there is an ideal Form of man, dog, willow tree, of every kind of natural object and even of artificial things like beds (Repub. 596). The relationship of the "many" objects, belonging to a certain class of things in the sense world, to the "One", i.e. the single Idea which is their archetype, is another great source of difficulty to Plato. Three solutions, which are not mutually exclusive, are suggested in the dialogues (1) that the many participate imperfectly in the perfect nature of their Idea, (2) that the many are made in imitation of the One, and (3) that the many are composed of a mixture of the Limit (Idea) with the Unlimited (matter).

Pleasures of the imagination: The moderate, healthful, and agreeable stimulus to the mind, resulting (in the primary class) from the properties of greatness, novelty, and beauty (kinship, color, proportionality, etc. ) in objects actually seen; (in the secondary class) from the processes of comparison, association, and remodelling set up in the mind by the products of art or by the recollection of the beauties of nature. (Addison.) -- K.E.G.

portulacaceous ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to a natural order of plants (Portulacaceae), of which Portulaca is the type, and which includes also the spring beauty (Claytonia) and other genera.

positive ::: a. --> Having a real position, existence, or energy; existing in fact; real; actual; -- opposed to negative.
Derived from an object by itself; not dependent on changing circumstances or relations; absolute; -- opposed to relative; as, the idea of beauty is not positive, but depends on the different tastes individuals.
Definitely laid down; explicitly stated; clearly expressed; -- opposed to implied; as, a positive declaration or


prema bhavasamr.ddhih. saundaryalipsa snehahasyam ::: love, richness of feeling, the urge towards beauty, laughter of affection (the attributes of Mahalaks.mi).

Prema Nandakumar: “The title itself, at any rate to Hindu ears, is charged with untold significance. A very gem of a title, Savitri has a self-sufficing beauty of its own; trisyllabic, trinitarian, a union of light, strength and silence, three circles radiating from one centre, Love. Again, ‘Savitri’, being the other name of the holiest and hoariest of the Vedic mantras—the Gayatri—which for some thousands of years Hindus have chanted morning, noon and evening, at once starts psychic vibrations of incommensurable potency.” A Study of Savitri

pretty ::: superl. --> Pleasing by delicacy or grace; attracting, but not striking or impressing; of a pleasing and attractive form a color; having slight or diminutive beauty; neat or elegant without elevation or grandeur; pleasingly, but not grandly, conceived or expressed; as, a pretty face; a pretty flower; a pretty poem.
Moderately large; considerable; as, he had saved a pretty fortune.
Affectedly nice; foppish; -- used in an ill sense.


pride ::: n. --> A small European lamprey (Petromyzon branchialis); -- called also prid, and sandpiper.
The quality or state of being proud; inordinate self-esteem; an unreasonable conceit of one&


pulchritude ::: n. --> That quality of appearance which pleases the eye; beauty; comeliness; grace; loveliness.
Attractive moral excellence; moral beauty.


quaintise ::: n. --> Craft; subtlety; cunning.
Elegance; beauty.


Rasa ::: Aesthetics is concerned mainly with beauty, but more generally with rasa, the response of the mind, the vital feeling and the sense to a certain "taste" in things which often may be but is not necessarily a spiritual feeling.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 27, Page: 27


Rasa: (Skr. sap, juice, nectar, essence, flavor, etc.) In Indian aesthetics (q.v.), pleasure, enjoyment, love, charm, grace, elegance, taste, emotion, sentiment, spirit, passion, beauty etc. -- K.F.L.

rhododendron ::: n. --> A genus of shrubs or small trees, often having handsome evergreen leaves, and remarkable for the beauty of their flowers; rosebay.

roseate ::: a. --> Full of roses; rosy; as, roseate bowers.
resembling a rose in color or fragrance; esp., tinged with rose color; blooming; as, roseate beauty; her roseate lips.


rose ::: “The rose is not the only beautiful flower, there are hundreds of others; most flowers are beautiful. There are degrees and kinds of beauty, that is all. The rose is among the first of flowers because of the richness of its colour, the intensity of sweetness of its scent and the grace and magnificence of its form.” Letters on Yoga , Volume—22 , SABCL

rubiaceous ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to a very large natural order of plants (Rubiaceae) named after the madder (Rubia tinctoria), and including about three hundred and seventy genera and over four thousand species. Among them are the coffee tree, the trees yielding peruvian bark and quinine, the madder, the quaker ladies, and the trees bearing the edible fruits called genipap and Sierre Leone peach, besides many plants noted for the beauty or the fragrance of their blossoms.

sarvasaundaryabodha ::: the sense of universal beauty, "a delightperception and taste of the absolute reality all-beautiful in everything". sarvasaundarya darsana

sarvasaundarya (sarvasaundarya; sarva-saundarya; sarvasaundaryam) ::: all-beauty; the "universal Beauty which we feel in Nature . and man and in all that is around us", reflecting "some transcendent Beauty of which all apparent beauty here is only a symbol"; short for sarvasaundaryabodha or sarvasaundarya darsana.

sasin ::: n. --> The Indian antelope (Antilope bezoartica, / cervicapra), noted for its beauty and swiftness. It has long, spiral, divergent horns.

saundaryabodha (saundaryabodha; saundarya bodha) ::: the awareness of beauty in all things.

saundarya-buddhi ::: the sense of beauty in all things.

saundaryam ::: [beauty].

saundarya (saundarya; saundaryam) ::: beauty; physical beauty as part of the perfection of the body, the third member of the sarira catus.t.aya, involving an attempt "of the psychic body to alter by mental force the physical sheath into its own image"; beauty in the world; short for . saundaryabodha.

saundaryasiddhi ::: perfection of physical beauty through "conscious action by the Will on the formed body", part of sarirasiddhi.

scenery ::: n. --> Assemblage of scenes; the paintings and hangings representing the scenes of a play; the disposition and arrangement of the scenes in which the action of a play, poem, etc., is laid; representation of place of action or occurence.
Sum of scenes or views; general aspect, as regards variety and beauty or the reverse, in a landscape; combination of natural views, as woods, hills, etc.


Schelling, Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von (1775-1854) Founder of the philosophy of identity which holds that subject and object coincide in the Absolute, a state to be realized in intellectual intuition. Deeply involved in romanticism, Schelling's philosophy of nature culminates in a transcendental idealism where nature and spirit are linked in a series of developments by unfolding powers or potencies, together forming one great organism in which nature is dynamic visible spirit and spirit invisible nature. Freedom and necessity are different refractions of the same reality. Supplementing science -- which deals with matter as extinguished spirit and endeavors to rise from nature to intelligence -- philosophy investigates the development of spirit, theoretically practically, and artistically, converts the subjective into the objective, and shows how the world soul or living principle animates the whole. Schelling's monism recognizes nature and spirit as real and ideal poles respectively, the latter being the positive one. It is pantheistic and aesthetic in that it allows the world process to create with free necessity unconsciously at first in the manner of an artist. Art is perfect union of freedom and necessity, beauty reflects the infinite in the finite. History is the progressive revelation of the Absolute. The ultimate thinking of Schelling headed toward mysticism in which man, his personality expanded into the infinite, becomes absorbed into the absolute self, free from necessity, contingency, consciousness, and personality. Sämmtliche Werke, 14 vols. (1856, re-edited 1927). Cf. Kuno Fischer, Schellings Leben, Werke und Lehre; E. Brehier, Schelling, 1912; V. Jankelevitch, L'Odysee de la conscience dans la derniere philosophie de Schelling, 1933. -- K.F.L.

Second Death ::: This is a phrase used by ancient and modern mystics to describe the dissolution of the principles of manremaining in kama-loka after the death of the physical body. For instance, Plutarch says: "Of the deathswe die, the one makes man two of three, and the other, one out of two." Thus, using the simple divisionof man into spirit, soul, and body: the first death is the dropping of the body, making two out of three; thesecond death is the withdrawal of the spiritual from the kama-rupic soul, making one out of two.The second death takes place when the lower or intermediate duad (manas-kama) in its turn separatesfrom, or rather is cast off by, the upper duad; but preceding this event the upper duad gathers unto itselffrom this lower duad what is called the reincarnating ego, which is all the best of the entity that was, allits purest and most spiritual and noblest aspirations and hopes and dreams for betterment and for beautyand harmony. Inherent in the fabric, so to speak, of the reincarnating ego, there remain of course theseeds of the lower principles which at the succeeding rebirth or reincarnation of the ego will develop intothe complex of the lower quaternary. (See also Kama-Rupa)

Sephiroth: A Hebrew term for “the mystical and organically related hierarchy of the ten creative powers emanating from God, constituting, according to the kabalistic system, the foundation of the existence of the world.” (M. Buber: Tales of the Hasidim.) The ten Sephiroth are: 1. The Divine Crown (Kether); 2. The Divine Wisdom (Hokhmah); 3. The Intelligence of God (Binah); 4. The Divine Love or Mercy (Hesed); 5. The Divine Power of judgment and retribution (Gevurah or Din); 6. The Divine Compassion (Rahamin) which mediates between God’s Power of judgment and His Mercy; 7. The Lasting Endurance or Firmness of God (Netsah); 8. God’s Majesty or Splendor (Hod); 9. The Foundation of all active forces in God (Yesod); 10. The Kingdom of God (Malkhuth), which the Zohar usually describes as the mystical archetype of Israel’s community. (The above terms are based on the interpretations given by G. G. Scholem in Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism. Other authorities occasionally adopt different terminologies. Thus, the fourth of the Sephiroth is frequently called Tiphereth, Beauty.)

Sephiroth (Hebrew) Sĕfīrōth [plural of sĕfīrāh] Emanations; applicable to the ten powers or potencies which compose the Qabbalistic Tree of Life, named Kether (the Crown); Hochmah (wisdom); Binah (understanding); Hesed (compassion); Geburah (strength); Tiph’ereth (beauty); Netsah (triumph); Hod (majesty); Yesod (foundation); and Malchuth (kingdom). The higher ones of this series of cosmic emanations imbody functions in cosmogony which exactly parallel the functions and attributes of the lipika in theosophical thought.

shine ::: v. i. --> To emit rays of light; to give light; to beam with steady radiance; to exhibit brightness or splendor; as, the sun shines by day; the moon shines by night.
To be bright by reflection of light; to gleam; to be glossy; as, to shine like polished silver.
To be effulgent in splendor or beauty.
To be eminent, conspicuous, or distinguished; to exhibit brilliant intellectual powers; as, to shine in courts; to shine in


Shruti: “The sanctum sanctorum of the consciousness where the truth resides. It is the representation of the Divine within us, the space we enter when we have left the corridors of time and space, where the leader of the sacrifice, Agni, resides. The words describe the beauty of that space we enter when we leave all else behind.”

&

. s.n.a (lilamaya Krishna) ::: Kr.s.n.a as the lilamaya isvara / purus.a, "the eternal Child frolicing in the Universe, the Playmate,Lover, Master, Teacher and Friend of all His creations", he "who draws all of us to him by his love, compels all of us by his masteries and plays his eternal play of joy and strength and beauty in the manifold world". lil lilamaya amaya N Narayana

snowdrop ::: n. --> A bulbous plant (Galanthus nivalis) bearing white flowers, which often appear while the snow is on the ground. It is cultivated in gardens for its beauty.

Sphere ::: Refers to both the planets as well as the Sephiroth. This also refers to the geometric shape of the same name: one of primordial and profound beauty and function within the Universe.

spirit of Delight ::: Sri Aurobindo: " Now, that a conscious Infinite is there in physical Nature, we are assured by every sign, though it is a consciousness not made or limited like ours. All her constructions and motions are those of an illimitable intuitive wisdom too great and spontaneous and mysteriously self-effective to be described as an intelligence, of a Power and Will working for Time in eternity with an inevitable and forecasting movement in each of its steps, even in those steps that in their outward or superficial impetus seem to us inconscient. And as there is in her this greater consciousness and greater power, so too there is an illimitable spirit of harmony and beauty in her constructions that never fails her, though its works are not limited by our aesthetic canons. An infinite hedonism too is there, an illimitable spirit of delight, of which we become aware when we enter into impersonal unity with her; and even as that in her which is terrible is a part of her beauty, that in her which is dangerous, cruel, destructive is a part of her delight, her universal Ananda. Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

splendid ::: 1. Glorious or illustrious; having great beauty and splendour. 2. Distinguished or glorious, as a name, reputation, victory, etc. 3. Imposing by reason of showiness or grandeur; magnificent. 4. Brilliant with light or colour; radiant. (Sometimes used, by way of contrast, to qualify nouns having an opposite or different connotation.) splendidly.

Sri Aurobindo: "Beauty is the special divine Manifestation in the physical as Truth is in the Mind, Love in the heart, Power in the vital.” *The Future Poetry

Sri Aurobindo: "But when I speak of the Divine Will, I mean something different, — something that has descended here into an evolutionary world of Ignorance, standing at the back of things, pressing on the Darkness with its Light, leading things presently towards the best possible in the conditions of a world of Ignorance and leading it eventually towards a descent of a greater power of the Divine, which will be not an omnipotence held back and conditioned by the law of the world as it is, but in full action and therefore bringing the reign of light, peace, harmony, joy, love, beauty and Ananda, for these are the Divine Nature.” *Letters on Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: "The first is the discovery of the soul, not the outer soul of thought and emotion and desire, but the secret psychic entity, the divine element within us. When that becomes dominant over the nature, when we are consciously the soul and when mind, life and body take their true place as its instruments, we are aware of a guide within that knows the truth, the good, the true delight and beauty of existence, controls heart and intellect by its luminous law and leads our life and being towards spiritual completeness.” *The Life Divine

*Sri Aurobindo: "The highest aim of the aesthetic being is to find the Divine through beauty; the highest Art is that which by an inspired use of significant and interpretative form unseals the doors of the spirit.” The Human Cycle etc.*

sri ::: glory, splendour, beauty, prosperity; creation of prosperity and sri beauty in the world, part of Sri Aurobindo"s karma or life-work.

Sri (Sanskrit) Śrī [from the verbal root śri to honor, be devoted] Light, luster, radiance, glory, beauty; prosperity, success, high rank. As a proper noun, Lakshmi as goddess of prosperity or beauty. Also commonly used as an honorary prefix, equivalent to holy, sacred, e.g., Sri Sankaracharya.

statuesque ::: like or suggesting a statue, as in massive or majestic dignity, grace, or beauty. statuesques. (Sri Aurobindo employs the word as a v.)

. s.t.ih. ::: vision of beauty, an element of Mahalaks.mi bhava.

suddhananda (shuddhananda; suddhananda) ::: pure ananda, "the suddhananda pure delight of the Infinite"; the form of subjective ananda corresponding to the plane of transcendent bliss (anandaloka) or to the sub-planes created by the "repetition of the Ananda plane in each lower world of consciousness". It brings the "sense of Supreme Beauty in all things" (sarvasaundarya), differing from cidghanananda in that it "transcends or contains" the beauty of gun.a (quality) proper to vijñana, depending "not on knowledge-perception of the separate guna & yatharthya [truth] of things, but on being-perception in chit of the universal ananda of things"; its highest intensities are experienced when the soul "casts itself into the absolute existence of the spirit and is enlarged into its own entirely self-existent bliss infinitudes". suddha pravr suddha pravrtti

Supermind feeling and emotion do not depart from their truth, make no slips or mistakes, do not swerve from the right and the real, cannot misuse beauty and delight or twist away from a divine rectitude. In the Superniind sense cannot mislead or deviate into the grossnesses which are here its natural Imperfec- tions and the cause of reproach, distrust and misuse by our ignorance. Even an incomplete statement made by the Super- mind is a truth leading to a further truth, its incomplete action a step towards completeness. All the life and action and leading of the Supermind is guarded in its very nature from the false- hoods and uncertainties that are our lot ; it moves in safety towards its perfection. Once the tnith

Supermind ::: The Supermind [Supramental consciousness] is in its very essence a truth-consciousness, a consciousness always free from the Ignorance which is the foundation of our present natural or evolutionary existence and from which nature in us is trying to arrive at self-knowledge and world-knowledge and a right consciousness and the right use of our existence in the universe. The Supermind, because it is a truth-consciousness, has this knowledge inherent in it and this power of true existence; its course is straight and can go direct to its aim, its field is wide and can even be made illimitable. This is because its very nature is knowledge: it has not to acquire knowledge but possesses it in its own right; its steps are not from nescience or ignorance into some imperfect light, but from truth to greater truth, from right perception to deeper perception, from intuition to intuition, from illumination to utter and boundless luminousness, from growing widenesses to the utter vasts and to very infinitude. On its summits it possesses the divine omniscience and omnipotence, but even in an evolutionary movement of its own graded self-manifestation by which it would eventually reveal its own highest heights, it must be in its very nature essentially free from ignorance and error: it starts from truth and light and moves always in truth and light. As its knowledge is always true, so too its will is always true; it does not fumble in its handling of things or stumble in its paces. In the Supermind feeling and emotion do not depart from their truth, make no slips or mistakes, do not swerve from the right and the real, cannot misuse beauty and delight or twist away from a divine rectitude. In the Supermind sense cannot mislead or deviate into the grossnesses which are here its natural imperfections and the cause of reproach, distrust and misuse by our ignorance. Even an incomplete statement made by the Supermind is a truth leading to a further truth, its incomplete action a step towards completeness. All the life and action and leading of the Supermind is guarded in its very nature from the falsehoods and uncertainties that are our lot; it moves in safety towards its perfection. Once the truth-consciousness was established here on its own sure foundation, the evolution of divine life would be a progress in felicity, a march through light to Ananda. Supermind is an eternal reality of the divine Being and the divine Nature. In its own plane it already and always exists and possesses its own essential law of being; it has not to be created or to emerge or evolve into existence out of involution in Matter or out of non-existence, as it might seem to the view of mind which itself seems to its own view to have so emerged from life and Matter or to have evolved out of an involution in life and Matter. The nature of Supermind is always the same, a being of knowledge, proceeding from truth to truth, creating or rather manifesting what has to be manifested by the power of a pre-existent knowledge, not by hazard but by a self-existent destiny in the being itself, a necessity of the thing in itself and th
   refore inevitable. Its -manifestation of the divine life will also be inevitable; its own life on its own plane is divine and, if Supermind descends upon the earth, it will bring necessarily the divine life with it and establish it here. Supermind is the grade of existence beyond mind, life and Matter and, as mind, life and Matter have manifested on the earth, so too must Supermind in the inevitable course of things manifest in this world of Matter. In fact, a supermind is already here but it is involved, concealed behind this manifest mind, life and Matter and not yet acting overtly or in its own power: if it acts, it is through these inferior powers and modified by their characters and so not yet recognisable. It is only by the approach and arrival of the descending Supermind that it can be liberated upon earth and reveal itself in the action of our material, vital and mental parts so that these lower powers can become portions of a total divinised activity of our whole being: it is that that will bring to us a completely realised divinity or the divine life. It is indeed so that life and mind involved in Matter have realised themselves here; for only what is involved can evolve, otherwise there could be no emergence. The manifestation of a supramental truth-consciousness is th
   refore the capital reality that will make the divine life possible. It is when all the movements of thought, impulse and action are governed and directed by a self-existent and luminously automatic truth-consciousness and our whole nature comes to be constituted by it and made of its stuff that the life divine will be complete and absolute. Even as it is, in reality though not in the appearance of things, it is a secret self-existent knowledge and truth that is working to manifest itself in the creation here. The Divine is already there immanent within us, ourselves are that in our inmost reality and it is this reality that we have to manifest; it is that which constitutes the urge towards the divine living and makes necessary the creation of the life divine even in this material existence. A manifestation of the Supermind and its truth-consciousness is then inevitable; it must happen in this world sooner or later. But it has two aspects, a descent from above, an ascent from below, a self-revelation of the Spirit, an evolution in Nature. The ascent is necessarily an effort, a working of Nature, an urge or nisus on her side to raise her lower parts by an evolutionary or revolutionary change, conversion or transformation into the divine reality and it may happen by a process and progress or by a rapid miracle. The descent or self-revelation of the Spirit is an act of the supreme Reality from above which makes the realisation possible and it can appear either as the divine aid which brings about the fulfilment of the progress and process or as the sanction of the miracle. Evolution, as we see it in this world, is a slow and difficult process and, indeed, needs usually ages to reach abiding results; but this is because it is in its nature an emergence from inconscient beginnings, a start from nescience and a working in the ignorance of natural beings by what seems to be an unconscious force. There can be, on the contrary, an evolution in the light and no longer in the darkness, in which the evolving being is a conscious participant and cooperator, and this is precisely what must take place here. Even in the effort and progress from the Ignorance to Knowledge this must be in part if not wholly the endeavour to be made on the heights of the nature, and it must be wholly that in the final movement towards the spiritual change, realisation, transformation. It must be still more so when there is a transition across the dividing line between the Ignorance and the Knowledge and the evolution is from knowledge to greater knowledge, from consciousness to greater consciousness, from being to greater being. There is then no longer any necessity for the slow pace of the ordinary evolution; there can be rapid conversion, quick transformation after transformation, what would seem to our normal present mind a succession of miracles. An evolution on the supramental levels could well be of that nature; it could be equally, if the being so chose, a more leisurely passage of one supramental state or condition of things to something beyond but still supramental, from level to divine level, a building up of divine gradations, a free growth to the supreme Supermind or beyond it to yet undreamed levels of being, consciousness and Ananda.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 13, Page: 558-62


Symbolism: An artistic trend flourishing at the end of the XIXth century in reaction to faith in the beauty of nature, and endeavoring to represent spiritual values by means of abstract signs. -- L.V.

Tehmi: “The deathless rose is ideal beauty. The deathless flame symbolises the supreme good.”

the angel Gevurael or Gevirion. Tiphereth (meaning beauty) provided the basis for the sefira

The Apsaras then are the divine Hetairae of Paradise, beautiful singers and actresses whose beauty and art relieve the arduous and world-long struggle of the Gods against the forces that tend towards disruption by the Titans who would restore Matter to its original atomic condition or of dissolution by the sages and hermits who would make phenomena dissolve prematurely into the One who is above phenomena. They rose from the Ocean, says Valmiki, seeking who should choose them as brides, but neither the Gods nor the Titans accepted them, therefore are they said to be common or universal. The Harmony of Virtue

The beauty and greatness by his genius wrought

The bodily frame. That beauty is laid low

The end of the world is vividly portrayed in the foremost poem of the Elder Edda, Voluspa, which depicts horrors presaging the departure of the gods from this sphere of life. However, this is by no means the end for it is followed by a new creation, when a reborn earth is seen arising in serene beauty and contentment.

"The general power of Delight is love and the special mould which the joy of love takes is the vision of beauty.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

“The general power of Delight is love and the special mould which the joy of love takes is the vision of beauty.” The Synthesis of Yoga

The Greeks identified Hathor with Aphrodite, for she was the patron deity of beauty and joy in life, of artists and their creative work as was the celestial and earthly Venus. Her chief position, however, was goddess of the Underworld, providing the deceased with food and drink.

The Idea of Beauty is one and perfect according to Plotinus. All lesser beauties, spiritual and physical, are participations in the one, supreme Beauty. The attribute of the beautiful which is most stressed is splendor, it consists of a shining-forth of the spiritual essence of the beautiful thing.

The marriage of Orpheus to Eurydice is but one of many similar allegories of the union of the initiate with the esoteric truth he has won after heavy trial. Soon after her marriage, Eurydice was seen and pursued by Aristaeus who was enamored of her beauty, and she consequently died of a serpent’s bite. “Aristaeus is brutal power, pursuing Eurydike, the esoteric doctrine, into the woods where the serpent (emblem of every sun-god . . .) kills her; i.e., forces truth to become still more esoteric, and seek shelter in the Underworld, which is not the hell of our theologians” (IU 2:l29-30).

   The Mother: "In the physical world, of all things it is beauty that expresses best the Divine. the physical world is the world of form and the perfection of form is beauty. Beauty interprets, expresses, manifests the Eternal. Its role is to put all manifested nature in contact with the Eternal through the perfection of form, through harmony and a sense of the ideal which uplifts and leads towards something higher. On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

The Mother: “In the physical world, of all things it is beauty that expresses best the Divine. the physical world is the world of form and the perfection of form is beauty. Beauty interprets, expresses, manifests the Eternal. Its role is to put all manifested nature in contact with the Eternal through the perfection of form, through harmony and a sense of the ideal which uplifts and leads towards something higher. On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

::: The Mother: "True art means the expression of beauty in the material world. In a world wholly converted, that is to say, expressing integrally the divine reality, art must serve as the revealer and teacher of this divine beauty in life.” On Education, MCW Vol. 12.

The Mother: “True art means the expression of beauty in the material world. In a world wholly converted, that is to say, expressing integrally the divine reality, art must serve as the revealer and teacher of this divine beauty in life.” On Education, MCW Vol. 12.**

The musician and the poet stand for a truth, it is the truth of the expression of the Spirit through beauty.

“The Overmind is essentially a spiritual power. Mind in it surpasses its ordinary self and rises and takes its stand on a spiritual foundation. It embraces beauty and sublimates it; it has an essential aesthesis which is not limited by rules and canons, it sees a universal and an eternal beauty while it takes up and transforms all that is limited and particular. It is besides concerned with things other than beauty or aesthetics. It is concerned especially with truth and knowledge or rather with a wisdom that exceeds what we call knowledge; its truth goes beyond truth of fact and truth of thought, even the higher thought which is the first spiritual range of the thinker. It has the truth of spiritual thought, spiritual feeling, spiritual sense and at its highest the truth that comes by the most intimate spiritual touch or by identity. Ultimately, truth and beauty come together and coincide, but in between there is a difference. Overmind in all its dealings puts truth first; it brings out the essential truth (and truths) in things and also its infinite possibilities; it brings out even the truth that lies behind falsehood and error; it brings out the truth of the Inconscient and the truth of the Superconscient and all that lies in between. When it speaks through poetry, this remains its first essential quality; a limited aesthetical artistic aim is not its purpose.” Letters on Savitri

The Platonic philosophy of art and aesthetics stresses, as might be expected, the value of the reasonable imitation of Ideal realities rather than the photographic imitation of sense things and individual experiences. All beautiful things participate in the Idea of beauty (Symposium and Phaedrus). The artist is frequently described as a man carried away by his inspiration, akin to the fool; yet art requires reason and the artist must learn to contemplate the world of Ideas. Fine art is not radically distinguished from useful art. In both the Republic and the Laws, art is subordinated to the good of the state, and those forms of art which are effeminate, asocial, inimical to the morale of the citizens, are sternly excluded from the ideal state.

The search for beauty is only in its beginning a satisfaction in the beauty of form, the beauty which appeals to the physical senses and the vital impressions, impulsions, desires. It is only in the middle a satisfaction in the beauty of the ideas seized, the emotions aroused, the perception of perfect process and harmonious combination. Behind them the soul of beauty in us desires the contact, the revelation, the uplifting delight of an absolute beauty in all things which it feels to be present, but which neither the senses and instincts by themselves can give, though they may be its channels,—for it is suprasensuous,—nor the reason and intelligence, though they too are a channel,—for it is suprarational, supra-intellectual,— but to which through all these veils the soul itself seeks to arrive. When it can get the touch of this universal, absolute beauty, this soul of beauty, this sense of its revelation in any slightest or greatest thing, the beauty of a flower, a form, the beauty and power of a character, an action, an event, a human life, an idea, a stroke of the brush or the chisel or a scintillation of the mind, the colours of a sunset or the grandeur of the tempest, it is then that the sense of beauty in us is really, powerfully, entirely satisfied. It is in truth seeking, as in religion, for the Divine, the All-Beautiful in man, in nature, in life, in thought, in art; for God is Beauty and Delight hidden in the variation of his masks and forms.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 25, Page: 144-45


These desires and drives, however, tend to stray beyond their proper provinces and to become intermingled and confused in attempts to identify truth, goodness, and beauty, to turn justifications into explanations, to regard subsistent ideals as concretely existent facts, and to distort facts into accordance with desired ideals. It is the business of reason and philosophy to clear up this confusion by distinguishing human drives and interests from one another, indicating to each its proper province and value, and confining each to the field in which it is valid and in which its appropriate satisfaction may be found. By so doing, they dispel the suspicion and antagonism, with which the scientist, the moralist, the artist, and the theologian are wont to view one another, and enable a mind at harmony with itself to contemplate a world in which subsistent and the existent form a harmonious whole. --

Thesmophoria (Greek) [from thesmophoros law-giving] A Mystery festival celebrated at Athens, Abdera, and possibly also in Sparta, in honor of Demeter-Thesmophoros, as goddess of justice, law, and order. During its celebration, prisoners were released, the law courts of the city-state were closed, and the senate did not meet. Celebrated by women only, it took place on three days, beginning with the 11th of Pyanepsion — October 24-26. The first day was called Anodos (the way up), but also Kathodos (the way down, the descent). It celebrated with a great processional the return of Demeter with her daughter Persephone from the underworld, and as Kathodos, her descent into it. The second day was Kalligeneia (mother of beauty); and third was Nesteia (the fast), passed by the women in silence and fasting, sitting on the ground to celebrate Demeter’s sorrow. There is no information as to the rites of the second day, and nothing is actually known of the private ritual of any of the three days.

"The Supermind is in its very essence a truth-consciousness, a consciousness always free from the Ignorance which is the foundation of our present natural or evolutionary existence and from which nature in us is trying to arrive at self-knowledge and world-knowledge and a right consciousness and the right use of our existence in the universe. The Supermind, because it is a truth-consciousness, has this knowledge inherent in it and this power of true existence; its course is straight and can go direct to its aim, its field is wide and can even be made illimitable. This is because its very nature is knowledge: it has not to acquire knowledge but possesses it in its own right; its steps are not from nescience or ignorance into some imperfect light, but from truth to greater truth, from right perception to deeper perception, from intuition to intuition, from illumination to utter and boundless luminousness, from growing widenesses to the utter vasts and to very infinitude. On its summits it possesses the divine omniscience and omnipotence, but even in an evolutionary movement of its own graded self-manifestation by which it would eventually reveal its own highest heights it must be in its very nature essentially free from ignorance and error: it starts from truth and light and moves always in truth and light. As its knowledge is always true, so too its will is always true; it does not fumble in its handling of things or stumble in its paces. In the Supermind feeling and emotion do not depart from their truth, make no slips or mistakes, do not swerve from the right and the real, cannot misuse beauty and delight or twist away from a divine rectitude. In the Supermind sense cannot mislead or deviate into the grossnesses which are here its natural imperfections and the cause of reproach, distrust and misuse by our ignorance. Even an incomplete statement made by the Supermind is a truth leading to a further truth, its incomplete action a step towards completeness.” The Supramental Manifestation

“The Supermind is in its very essence a truth-consciousness, a consciousness always free from the Ignorance which is the foundation of our present natural or evolutionary existence and from which nature in us is trying to arrive at self-knowledge and world-knowledge and a right consciousness and the right use of our existence in the universe. The Supermind, because it is a truth-consciousness, has this knowledge inherent in it and this power of true existence; its course is straight and can go direct to its aim, its field is wide and can even be made illimitable. This is because its very nature is knowledge: it has not to acquire knowledge but possesses it in its own right; its steps are not from nescience or ignorance into some imperfect light, but from truth to greater truth, from right perception to deeper perception, from intuition to intuition, from illumination to utter and boundless luminousness, from growing widenesses to the utter vasts and to very infinitude. On its summits it possesses the divine omniscience and omnipotence, but even in an evolutionary movement of its own graded self-manifestation by which it would eventually reveal its own highest heights it must be in its very nature essentially free from ignorance and error: it starts from truth and light and moves always in truth and light. As its knowledge is always true, so too its will is always true; it does not fumble in its handling of things or stumble in its paces. In the Supermind feeling and emotion do not depart from their truth, make no slips or mistakes, do not swerve from the right and the real, cannot misuse beauty and delight or twist away from a divine rectitude. In the Supermind sense cannot mislead or deviate into the grossnesses which are here its natural imperfections and the cause of reproach, distrust and misuse by our ignorance. Even an incomplete statement made by the Supermind is a truth leading to a further truth, its incomplete action a step towards completeness.” The Supramental Manifestation

The Theosophical Societies at present existing in the world are parts of a spiritual and intellectual movement which, known or unknown, has been active in all ages. Indeed, this movement took its rise in the earliest origins of self-conscious humanity. At times this movement has disappeared from sight, during “periods of spiritual barrenness,” as Plato expressed it, yet its work continues, although not always recognized and known. The aims and purposes of the Society are religious, philosophical, and scientific, as well as distinctly humanitarian or philanthropic: it aims to restore to mankind its ancient heritage of wisdom — knowledge of the truths of being — and to inculcate in human hearts and minds the great worth and intrinsic beauty of its lofty ethical code. The Theosophical Society is nonpolitical and nonsectarian. It has members belonging to different races who may or may not be likewise members of other religious or philosophical bodies. It has no creed or dogmas in the modern sense, and its members are essentially searchers and lovers of truth.

:::   "The third step is to know the Divine Being who is at once our supreme transcendent Self, the Cosmic Being, foundation of our universality, and the Divinity within of which our psychic being, the true evolving individual in our nature, is a portion, a spark, a flame growing into the eternal Fire from which it was lit and of which it is the witness ever living within us and the conscious instrument of its light and power and joy and beauty.” *The Life Divine

“The third step is to know the Divine Being who is at once our supreme transcendent Self, the Cosmic Being, foundation of our universality, and the Divinity within of which our psychic being, the true evolving individual in our nature, is a portion, a spark, a flame growing into the eternal Fire from which it was lit and of which it is the witness ever living within us and the conscious instrument of its light and power and joy and beauty.” The Life Divine

"The whole nature of man is to become more than himself. He was the man-animal, he has become more than the animal man. He is the thinker, the craftsman, the seeker after beauty. He shall be more than the thinker, he shall be the seer of knowledge; he shall be more than the craftsman, he shall be the creator and master of his creation; he shall be more than the seeker of beauty, for he shall enjoy all beauty and all delight. Physical he seeks for this immortal substance; vital he seeks after immortal life and the infinite power of his being; mental and partial in knowledge, he seeks after the whole light and the utter vision.

“The whole nature of man is to become more than himself. He was the man-animal, he has become more than the animal man. He is the thinker, the craftsman, the seeker after beauty. He shall be more than the thinker, he shall be the seer of knowledge; he shall be more than the craftsman, he shall be the creator and master of his creation; he shall be more than the seeker of beauty, for he shall enjoy all beauty and all delight. Physical he seeks for this immortal substance; vital he seeks after immortal life and the infinite power of his being; mental and partial in knowledge, he seeks after the whole light and the utter vision.

::: "This conception of the Person and Personality, if accepted, must modify at the same time our current ideas about the immortality of the soul; for, normally, when we insist on the soul"s undying existence, what is meant is the survival after death of a definite unchanging personality which was and will always remain the same throughout eternity. It is the very imperfect superficial I'' of the moment, evidently regarded by Nature as a temporary form and not worth preservation, for which we demand this stupendous right to survival and immortality. But the demand is extravagant and cannot be conceded; theI"" of the moment can only merit survival if it consents to change, to be no longer itself but something else, greater, better, more luminous in knowledge, more moulded in the image of the eternal inner beauty, more and more progressive towards the divinity of the secret Spirit. It is that secret Spirit or divinity of Self in us which is imperishable, because it is unborn and eternal. The psychic entity within, its representative, the spiritual individual in us, is the Person that we are; but the I'' of this moment, theI"" of this life is only a formation, a temporary personality of this inner Person: it is one step of the many steps of our evolutionary change, and it serves its true purpose only when we pass beyond it to a farther step leading nearer to a higher degree of consciousness and being. It is the inner Person that survives death, even as it pre-exists before birth; for this constant survival is a rendering of the eternity of our timeless Spirit into the terms of Time.” The Life Divine

“This conception of the Person and Personality, if accepted, must modify at the same time our current ideas about the immortality of the soul; for, normally, when we insist on the soul’s undying existence, what is meant is the survival after death of a definite unchanging personality which was and will always remain the same throughout eternity. It is the very imperfect superficial I’’ of the moment, evidently regarded by Nature as a temporary form and not worth preservation, for which we demand this stupendous right to survival and immortality. But the demand is extravagant and cannot be conceded; theI’’ of the moment can only merit survival if it consents to change, to be no longer itself but something else, greater, better, more luminous in knowledge, more moulded in the image of the eternal inner beauty, more and more progressive towards the divinity of the secret Spirit. It is that secret Spirit or divinity of Self in us which is imperishable, because it is unborn and eternal. The psychic entity within, its representative, the spiritual individual in us, is the Person that we are; but the I’’ of this moment, theI’’ of this life is only a formation, a temporary personality of this inner Person: it is one step of the many steps of our evolutionary change, and it serves its true purpose only when we pass beyond it to a farther step leading nearer to a higher degree of consciousness and being. It is the inner Person that survives death, even as it pre-exists before birth; for this constant survival is a rendering of the eternity of our timeless Spirit into the terms of Time.” The Life Divine

"This universal aesthesis of beauty and delight does not ignore or fail to understand the differences and oppositions, the gradations, the harmony and disharmony obvious to the ordinary consciousness; but, first of all, it draws a Rasa from them and with that comes the enjoyment, Bhoga. and the touch or the mass of the Ananda. It sees that all things have their meaning, their value, their deeper or total significance which the mind does not see, for the mind is only concerned with a surface vision, surface contacts and its own surface reactions. When something expresses perfectly what it was meant to express, the completeness brings with it a sense of harmony, a sense of artistic perfection; it gives even to what is discordant a place in a system of cosmic concordances and the discords become part of a vast harmony, and wherever there is harmony, there is a sense of beauty. ” Letters on Savitri*

“This universal aesthesis of beauty and delight does not ignore or fail to understand the differences and oppositions, the gradations, the harmony and disharmony obvious to the ordinary consciousness; but, first of all, it draws a Rasa from them and with that comes the enjoyment, Bhoga. and the touch or the mass of the Ananda. It sees that all things have their meaning, their value, their deeper or total significance which the mind does not see, for the mind is only concerned with a surface vision, surface contacts and its own surface reactions. When something expresses perfectly what it was meant to express, the completeness brings with it a sense of harmony, a sense of artistic perfection; it gives even to what is discordant a place in a system of cosmic concordances and the discords become part of a vast harmony, and wherever there is harmony, there is a sense of beauty.” Letters on Savitri

. ti (daivi prakriti) ::: divine nature, the third member of the sakti catus.t.aya, also called devibhava or (at an earlier stage)Can.d.ibhava; the divinising of human nature by calling in the divine Power (sakti) "to replace our limited human energy so that this may be shaped into the image of and filled with the force of a greater infinite energy". In this process, four aspects of the sakti are manifested and combined: Mahesvari, the sakti of wideness and calm; Mahakali, the sakti of strength and swiftness; Mahalaks.mi, the sakti of beauty, love and delight; and Mahasarasvati, the sakti of skill and work.

Tiferet ::: Sixth of the sefirot, Tiferet means “beauty.” It is the balance point between hesed and gevurah, and the seat of compassion. Tiferet is regarded as the center of the sefirot, and is sometimes depicted as the center of a wheel.

Tiferet (&

tiferet (&

Tiphareth (Heb.): The Sixth and central Sephira of the Tree of Life. The Sphere of the Sun, i.e. the Holy Guardian Angel. Tiphareth means "Beauty".

tiphareth ::: Tiphareth Tiphareth is the 6th Sphere (Sephirah) of divine emanation according to Kabbalah. The word Tiphareth means beauty. See also The Sephiroth.

Tiphereth (beauty); 7. Haniel, for Netzach

Tiph’ereth (Hebrew) Tif’ereth Beauty, glory, honor; the sixth Sephiroth which according to the Qabbalah is emanated from the five preceding Sephiroth, although this Sephirah is particularly regarded as the union of the two immediately preceding — Mercy or Love, and Power or Judgment. These three form the second triad or face, the so-called Microprosopus or Inferior Countenance, called in the Qabbalah Ze‘eyr ’Anpin. Being thus regarded as the union of the masculine and feminine potencies, Beauty — excluding Kether (Crown) — forms the head of the central Pillar of the Sephirothal Tree. Its Divine Name is commonly given as ’Elohim; in the Angelic Order it is represented as the Shin’annim. In its application to the human body, as corresponding to the Heavenly Man or ’Adam Qadmon, Tiph’ereth is regarded as the chest or region immediately beneath the heart, the second great center following upon the first, or that of the head, Kether. In its application to the seven globes of our planetary chain it corresponds to globe F (SD 1:200). From this Sephirah is emanated the seventh, Netsah.

Tiphereth ::: Translated as "Beauty" in Hebrew. The sixth Sephirah of the Kabbalah. It is representative of the first stable stage of dualistic consciousness as emanated from the Causal and Non-Dual. Existing along the Middle Pillar, Tiphereth is the first dualistic echo of Kether (as a stage of stable consciousness). Along with Chesed and Geburah, Tiphereth is associated with the Ethical Triad and the Mental Plane (i.e the Second World) and is the fulcrum of the force-form dynamics of Chesed-Geburah as they stabilized to form Solar Consciousness. Associated with the sphere of Sol (the Sun) in the planetary magic paradigm.

To fill with beauty his adorer’s hours,

"To find highest beauty is to find God; to reveal, to embody, to create, as we say, highest beauty is to bring out of our souls the living image and power of God.” The Human Cycle

“To find highest beauty is to find God; to reveal, to embody, to create, as we say, highest beauty is to bring out of our souls the living image and power of God.” The Human Cycle

traces of his original virtue and beauty and the

transformation ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Transformation means that the higher consciousness or nature is brought down into the mind, vital and body and takes the place of the lower. There is a higher consciousness of the true self, which is spiritual, but it is above; if one rises above into it, then one is free as long as one remains there, but if one comes down into or uses mind, vital or body — and if one keeps any connection with life, one has to do so, either to come down and act from the ordinary consciousness or else to be in the self but use mind, life and body, then the imperfections of these instruments have to be faced and mended — they can only be mended by transformation.” *Letters on Yoga

  "‘Transformation" is a word that I have brought in myself (like ‘supermind") to express certain spiritual concepts and spiritual facts of the integral yoga. People are now taking them up and using them in senses which have nothing to do with the significance which I put into them. Purification of the nature by the ‘influence" of the Spirit is not what I mean by transformation; purification is only part of a psychic change or a psycho-spiritual change — the word besides has many senses and is very often given a moral or ethical meaning which is foreign to my purpose.” *Letters on Yoga

"It is indeed as a result of our evolution that we arrive at the possibility of this transformation. As Nature has evolved beyond Matter and manifested Life, beyond Life and manifested Mind, so she must evolve beyond Mind and manifest a consciousness and power of our existence free from the imperfection and limitation of our mental existence, a supramental or truth-consciousness and able to develop the power and perfection of the spirit. Here a slow and tardy change need no longer be the law or manner of our evolution; it will be only so to a greater or less extent so long as a mental ignorance clings and hampers our ascent; but once we have grown into the truth-consciousness its power of spiritual truth of being will determine all. Into that truth we shall be freed and it will transform mind and life and body. Light and bliss and beauty and a perfection of the spontaneous right action of all the being are there as native powers of the supramental truth-consciousness and these will in their very nature transform mind and life and body even here upon earth into a manifestation of the truth-conscious spirit. The obscurations of earth will not prevail against the supramental truth-consciousness, for even into the earth it can bring enough of the omniscient light and omnipotent force of the spirit conquer. All may not open to the fullness of its light and power, but whatever does open must that extent undergo the change. That will be the principle of transformation.” The Supramental Manifestation

The Mother: "Transformation. The change by which all the elements and all the movements of the being become ready to manifest the supramental Truth.”

"One thing you must know and never forget: in the work of transformation all that is true and sincere will always be kept; only what is false and insincere will disappear.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 15.


Transmutation of the body: The supreme goal of alchemy, the restoration of man to the state of beauty, perfection and physical immortality.

TURBS beauty 191

Two contrasts in which the term "value" occurs remain to be mentioned. (1) "Value" is sometimes contrasted with "fact" or "existence". Here the contrast intended is that of the "ought" versus the "is", and the term "value" is used to cover not only the various kinds of goodness, but also beauty and rightness. And the main problem is that of the relation of value and existence. (2) "Value" is also used more narrowly, being contrasted with rightness. Here the distinction intended is within the "ought" as opposed to the "is" and is between the "good" and the "right", with "value" taken as equivalent to "goodness". Then the main problem concerns the relation of value and obligation. In the sense of value involved in the former contrast value-theory will include ethics. In the latter it will not. See Axiology, Ethics, Obligation. -- W.K.F.

ugly ::: superl. --> Offensive to the sight; contrary to beauty; being of disagreeable or loathsome aspect; unsightly; repulsive; deformed.
Ill-natured; crossgrained; quarrelsome; as, an ugly temper; to feel ugly.
Unpleasant; disagreeable; likely to cause trouble or loss; as, an ugly rumor; an ugly customer. ::: n.


unfair ::: v. t. --> To deprive of fairness or beauty. ::: a. --> Not fair; not honest; not impartial; disingenuous; using or involving trick or artifice; dishonest; unjust; unequal.

ungraceful ::: a. --> Not graceful; not marked with ease and dignity; deficient in beauty and elegance; inelegant; awkward; as, ungraceful manners; ungraceful speech.

uniformity ::: n. --> The quality or state of being uniform; freedom from variation or difference; resemblance to itself at all times; sameness of action, effect, etc., under like conditions; even tenor; as, the uniformity of design in a poem; the uniformity of nature.
Consistency; sameness; as, the uniformity of a man&


Un-nefer (Egyptian) Un-nefer [from un to make manifest + nefer beauty] The name of Osiris (Asar in Egyptian) in his aspect of the Lord of Amenti (the underworld); also used in late dynastic times in place of Asar.

Urvasi (Sanskrit) Urvaśī [from uru wide, broad + the verbal root aś to pervade] Widely extending; in the Rig-Veda a beautiful divine nymph who, cursed by the gods, settled on earth and became the wife of Pururavas, the grandson of Soma (the moon) and son of Budha (esoteric wisdom, Mercury). Their love is the subject of Kalidasa’s drama, the Vikramorvasi. Urvasi originated in teachings connected with the human buddhi principle, the center and source or mother of all spiritual and intellectual beauty in the human constitution; cosmically therefore Urvasi is mahabuddhi (cosmic buddhi).

utilitarian ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to utility; consisting in utility; /iming at utility as distinguished from beauty, ornament, etc.; sometimes, reproachfully, evincing, or characterized by, a regard for utility of a lower kind, or marked by a sordid spirit; as, utilitarian narrowness; a utilitarian indifference to art.
Of or pertaining to utilitarianism; supporting utilitarianism; as, the utilitarian view of morality; the Utilitarian Society.


venus ::: n. --> The goddess of beauty and love, that is, beauty or love deified.
One of the planets, the second in order from the sun, its orbit lying between that of Mercury and that of the Earth, at a mean distance from the sun of about 67,000,000 miles. Its diameter is 7,700 miles, and its sidereal period 224.7 days. As the morning star, it was called by the ancients Lucifer; as the evening star, Hesperus.
The metal copper; -- probably so designated from the ancient


Venus: The Italic goddess of gardens who was later identified with the Greek Aphrodite as the goddess of beauty.

verbenaceous ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to a natural order (Verbenaceae) of gamopetalous plants of which Verbena is the type. The order includes also the black and white mangroves, and many plants noted for medicinal use or for beauty of bloom.

verbena ::: n. --> A genus of herbaceous plants of which several species are extensively cultivated for the great beauty of their flowers; vervain.

vision ::: 1. The mystical experience of seeing as if with the eyes the supernatural or a supernatural being. 2. A mystical insight. 3. Ability to see or conceive what might be attempted or achieved. 4. The faculty of sight; eyesight. 5. Something that is or has been seen. 6. A person, scene, etc., of extraordinary beauty. **Vision, vision"s, Vision"s, visions, All-vision, earth-vision, God-vision"s, seer-vision"s, self-vision, soul-vision, stress-vision, vision-plans.

Vrndavana (Vrindavan, Brindavan, Brindaban) ::: [the place on earth (near Mathura) where Krsna danced with the gopis]; the vaisnava heaven of eternal Beauty and Bliss.

*What is meant here is the Divine in its essential manifestation which reveals itself to us as Light and Consciousness, Power, Love and Beauty. But in its actual cosmic manifestation the Supreme, being the Infinite and not bound by any limitation, can manifest in itself, in its consciousness of innumerable possibilities, something that seems to be the opposite of itself, something in which there can be Darkness, Inconscience, Inertia, Insensibility, Disharmony and Disintegration. It is this that we see at the basis of the material world and speak of nowadays as the Inconscient—the inconscient Ocean of the Rigveda in which the One was hidden and arose in the form of this Universe,— or, as it is sometimes called, the non-being, Asat. The Ignorance which is the characteristic of our mind and life is the result of this origin in the Inconscience. Moreover, in the evolution out of inconscient existence there rise up naturally powers and beings which are interested in the maintenance of all negations of the Divine, error and unconsciousness, pain, suffering, obscurity, death, weakness, illness, disharmony, evil. Hence the perversion of the manifestation here, its inability to reveal the true essence of the Divine. Yet in the very base of this evolution all that is divine is there involved and pressing to evolve, Light, Consciousness, Power, Perfection, Beauty, Love. For in the Inconscient itself and behind the perversions of the Ignorance Divine Consciousness lies concealed and works and must more and more appear, throwing off in the end its disguises. That is why it is said that the world is called to express the Divine.

While not abandoning its interest in beauty, artistic value, and other normative concepts, recent aesthetics has tended to lay increasing emphasis on a descriptive, factual approach to the phenomena of art and aesthetic experience. It differs from art history, archeology, and cultural history in stressing a theoretical organization of materials in terms of recurrent types and tendencies, rather than a chronological or genetic one. It differs from general psychology in focusing upon certain selected phases in psycho-physical activity, and on their application to certain types of objects and situations, especially those of art. It investigates the forms and characteristics of art, which psychology does not do. It differs from art criticism in seeking a more general, theoretical understanding of the arts than is usual in that subject, and in attempting a more consistently objective, impersonal attitude. It maintains a philosophic breadth, in comparing examples of all the arts, and in assembling data and hypotheses from many sources, including philosophy, psychology, cultural history, and the social sciences. But it is departing from traditional conceptions of philosophy in that writing labelled "aesthetics" now often includes much detailed, empirical study of particular phenomena, instead of restricting itself as formerly to abstract discussion of the meaning of beauty, the sublime, and other categories, their objective or subjective nature, their relation to pleasure and moral goodness, the purpose of art, the nature of aesthetic value, etc. There has been controversy over whether such empirical studies deserve to be called "aesthetics", or whether that name should be reserved for the traditional, dialectic or speculative approach; but usage favors the extension in cases where the inquiry aims at fairly broad generalizations.

who led the angels astray with her beauty.” The

Will (Divine) ::: something that has descended here into an evolutionary world of Ignorance, standing at the back of things, pressing on the Darkness with its Light, leading things presently towards the best possible in the conditions of a world of Ignorance and leading it eventually towards a descent of a greater power of the Divine, which will not be an omnipotence held back and conditioned by the world as it is, but in full action and therefore bringing the reign of light, peace, harmony, joy, love, beauty and Ananda.

:::   "Yet the highest power and manifestation is only a very partial revelation of the Infinite; even the whole universe is informed by only one degree of his greatness, illumined by one ray of his splendour, glorious with a faint hint of his delight and beauty.” *Essays on the Gita

“Yet the highest power and manifestation is only a very partial revelation of the Infinite; even the whole universe is informed by only one degree of his greatness, illumined by one ray of his splendour, glorious with a faint hint of his delight and beauty.” Essays on the Gita



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   90 Sri Aurobindo
   11 The Mother
   7 Albert Einstein
   6 Jalaluddin Rumi
   3 Ken Wilber
   3 Baha-ullah
   3 Sri Ramakrishna
   3 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   2 Rainer Maria Rilke
   2 Rabia al-Adawiyya
   2 Joseph Campbell
   2 Hermes
   2 Edgar Allan Poe
   2 Book of Wisdom
   2 Anonymous
   2 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   2 Plotinus
   2 Kabir
   2 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   2 ?
   1 William-Adolphe Bouguereau
   1 Werner Karl Heisenberg (1901-1976)
   1 Voltaire
   1 The Hashish Eater
   1 that engendered religion. A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate
   1 Swami Akhandananda
   1 Stratford Caldecott
   1 Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
   1 Socrates
   1 Sir D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson
   1 Sidney Jourard
   1 Shabistari
   1 Saul Williams
   1 Sarah McLachlan
   1 Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina
   1 Saint Basil the Great
   1 Saint Basil of Caesarea
   1 Rowan Williams https://newstatesman.com/politics/religion/2020/08/covid-and-confronting-our-own-mortality
   1 Robert Anton Wilson
   1 Richard P Feynman
   1 R Buckminster Fuller
   1 Ramakrishna
   1 Rabindranath Tagore
   1 Quetzalcoatl
   1 Ps.-Dionysius the Areopagite
   1 Pavel Florensky
   1 Paramahamsa Yogananda
   1 Owen Barfield
   1 Oriah Mountain Dreamer
   1 no place at all.
   1 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   1 Nirodbaran
   1 Neil Gaiman
   1 Native American Proverb
   1 Nandita Chatterjee
   1 Mufti Ismail Menk
   1 Molière
   1 Michelangelo
   1 Maya Angelou
   1 Maximus the Confessor
   1 Marcus Aurelius
   1 Manly P. Hall (Horizon August 1941 p. 7)
   1 Manly P Hall
   1 Mahabharata
   1 Macrina Wiederkehr
   1 Lewis Mumford
   1 Leo Tolstoy
   1 Khail Gibran
   1 John Keats
   1 Job
   1 Jiddu Krishnamurti
   1 Jalaluddin Rumi
   1 it flows with resistless force and brings beauty with it.
   1 Israel Regardie
   1 id
   1 Hermes: The Key
   1 Hermann Hesse
   1 Henry David Thoreau
   1 Hazrat Inayat K
   1 Goethe
   1 GK Chesterton
   1 Giordano Bruno
   1 Ghalib
   1 George W. Hegel
   1 George Grant
   1 George Eliot
   1 Georg C Lichtenberg
   1 Friedrich Nietzsche
   1 Frederick Lenz
   1 Franz Kafka
   1 Francis Bacon
   1 Foshu-hing-tsan-king
   1 Fo-shu-hing-tsan-king
   1 Fo-sho-hing-tsan-king
   1 Fakhr al-Dīn Ibrahīm 'Irāqī
   1 Emerson
   1 Ella Wheeler Wilcox
   1 Eleanor Roosevelt
   1 Eknath Easwaran
   1 Dr Robert A Hatch
   1 Dr E.V. Kenealy
   1 Dr Alok Pandey
   1 Dionysius the Areopagite
   1 Didymus of Alexandria
   1 Dante Alighieri
   1 Confucius?
   1 collab summer & fall 2011
   1 Christos Yannaras
   1 Charles Baudelaire
   1 Carl Sagan
   1 Buddhacharita
   1 Bonaventure
   1 Bob Ross
   1 Bessie Anderson Stanley
   1 Basil of Cesarea
   1 Bahaullah
   1 Attar of Nishapur
   1 Arundhati Roy
   1 Archimedes
   1 Anne Frank
   1 Swami Vivekananda
   1 Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
   1 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   1 Saadi
   1 Plato
   1 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   1 Matsuo Basho
   1 Leonardo da Vinci
   1 Heraclitus
   1 Aleister Crowley
   1 Abū Saʿīd Abū'l-Khayr
   1 Abul Qasim al-Qushayri (r)
   1 2nd century sermon

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   26 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   20 Rumi
   17 Anonymous
   15 William Shakespeare
   14 Bryant McGill
   12 Paulo Coelho
   11 Amit Ray
   9 Plato
   9 Oscar Wilde
   9 Cassandra Clare
   8 Socrates
   8 Ovid
   8 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   8 Donna Tartt
   7 M F Moonzajer
   7 Mehmet Murat ildan
   6 Toba Beta
   6 Stendhal
   6 Nina Lane
   6 Mason Cooley

1:Beauty awakens the soul to act. ~ Dante Alighieri,
2:Beauty is the purgation of superfluities. ~ Michelangelo,
3:Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it.
   ~ Confucius?,
4:The essence of God, if at all God has an essence, is Beauty. ~ Hermes,
5:Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy. ~ Anne Frank,
6:Wisdom is full of light and her beauty is not withered. ~ Book of Wisdom,
7:What is more magnificent than the beauty of God? ~ Saint Basil of Caesarea,
8:Beauty without intelligence is like a hook without bait. ~ Molière, Tartuffe,
9:We just let it happen… and that's the beauty of this technique." ~ Bob Ross,
10:What a strange illusion it is to suppose that beauty is goodness. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
11:Beauty is the bait which with delight allures man to enlarge his kind.
   ~ Socrates,
12:wildflower growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day." ~ Native American Proverb,
13:The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt,
14:A lily or a rose never pretends, and its beauty is that it is what it is." ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
15:A new day is coming, the magnificent day of radiant beauty when I return to myself. ~ Quetzalcoatl,
16:Beauty is truth's smile when she beholds her own face in a perfect mirror.
   ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
17:The while amazed between His Beauty and His Majesty I stood in silent ecstasy. ~ Rabia al-Adawiyya,
18:Dwell on the beauty of life. Watch the stars, and see yourself running with them." ~ Marcus Aurelius,
19:hen in the glass of Beauty I behold, The Universe my image doth enfold." ~ Fakhr al-Dīn Ibrahīm 'Irāqī,
20:Beauty is everywhere a welcome guest. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
21:Beauty is eternity gazing at itself in a mirror. But you are eternity and you are the mirror." ~ Khail Gibran,
22:It is not sufficient to see and to know the beauty of a work. We must feel and be affected by it.
   ~ Voltaire,
23:Mathematics reveals its secrets only to those who approach it with pure love, for its own beauty. ~ Archimedes,
24:Beauty can never really understand itself. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
25:The essence of God, if at all God has an essence, is Beauty. ~ id, the Eternal Wisdom
26:Beauty of whatever kind, in its supreme development, invariably excites the sensitive soul to tears. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
27:Take your seat on the thousand petals of the lotus, and there gaze on the Infinite Beauty." ~ Kabir,
28:Wisdom is full of light and her beauty is not withered. ~ Book of Wisdom, the Eternal Wisdom
29:Descending to the earth, That strange intoxicating beauty of the Unseen world Lurks in the elements of Nature." ~ Shabistari,
30:Characteristics which define beauty are wholeness, harmony and radiance. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
31:We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty. ~ Maya Angelou,
32:God is love and beauty as well as purity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, Religion as the Law of Life,
33:No compromises; to live resolutely in integrity, plenitude and beauty. ~ Goethe, the Eternal Wisdom
34:Youth is happy because it has the capacity to see beauty. Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old.
   ~ Franz Kafka,
35:By itself the intelligence can only achieve talent. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, The Suprarational Beauty,
36:Only from his own soul can he demand the secret of eternal beauty. ~ Attar of Nishapur, the Eternal Wisdom
37:Sin destroys virtue and spiritual beauty ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on Colossians 3, lect. 2).,
38:It is the soul in us which turns always towards Truth, Good and Beauty.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, [T5],
39:The ground's generosity takes in our compost and grows beauty! Try to be more like the ground. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
40:Deck thyself now with majesty and excellence and array thyself with glory and beauty. ~ Job, the Eternal Wisdom
41:Let the beauty we love be what we do. There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground.
   ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
42:Few aspire for the higher things! They are attracted by physical beauty, money, honor, and titles. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
43:Beauty of our dim soul is amorous. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Our godhead calls us,
44:Every saint who has made exemplary progress in beauty is thereby said to be a type of God the giver…. ~ Maximus the Confessor, Amb. 10.20a [1141c],
45:Human feeling is like the mighty rivers that bless the earth: it does not wait for beauty ~ it flows with resistless force and brings beauty with it. ,
46:Only one or two look for its owner. People enjoy the beauty of the world; they do not seek it's owner. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
47:Religion is the seeking after the spiritual, the suprarational. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, The Suprarational Beauty,
48:Delight, God's sweetest sign and Beauty's twin. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Debate of Love and Death,
49:In God's simple and supernatural nature itself all beauty and every beautiful of all beautiful things derived from it preexist. ~ Dionysius the Areopagite,
50:When we have the eyes to see, the ears to hear, or an open heart to witness, Great Beauty will reveal itself in all living and created things ~ Ken Wilber,
51:The supreme greatness cannot come in poetry without the supreme beauty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Victorian Poets,
52:If you look into the subatomic realm, you discover that our world consists of spiritual structures of incredible beauty. ~ Werner Karl Heisenberg (1901-1976),
53:[What is the main reason that humans are not making more spiritual progress?] "The sense of beauty is being sacrificed to commercialism…" ~ Hazrat Inayat K,
54:In God's simple and supernatural nature itself all beauty and every beautiful of all beautiful things derived from it preexist. ~ Ps.-Dionysius the Areopagite,
55:If the world could see the beauty of a soul without sin, all sinners, all non-believers would instantly convert (their lives). ~ Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina,
56:God is Beauty and Delight hidden in the variation of his masks and forms. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, The Suprarational Beauty,
57:Every serious student of the spiritual sciences should realize the full import of beauty as a ministering force in life. ~ Manly P. Hall (Horizon August 1941 p. 7)
58:Beauty is merely the spiritual making itself known sensuously." ~ George W. Hegel, (1770 -1831) German philosopher, important figure of German idealism, Wikipedia.,
59:More primordial than any idea, beauty will be manifest as the herald and generator of ideas. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
60:People enjoy the beauty of the world; they do not seek its owner. God alone is real, all else is illusory, magician alone is real, magic is illusory. ~ Ramakrishna,
61:The ideals which have lighted my way, and time after time have given me new courage to face life cheerfully have been kindness, beauty, and truth ~ Albert Einstein,
62:The plants are very psychic, but they can express it only by silence and beauty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I, Science and Yoga,
63:a silk tree
beauty in the rain
a sleeping flower
~ Matsuo Basho, @BashoSociety
64:Human feeling is like the mighty rivers that bless the earth: it does not wait for beauty ~ it flows with resistless force and brings beauty with it. ~ George Eliot,
65:Poetry too is an interpreter of truth, but in the forms of an innate beauty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, New Birth or Decadence?,
66:There is no such thing as 'I'. See the beauty of it! Where there is no 'I', who is the doer and what is done? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
67:In your light I learn how to love. In your beauty, how to make poems. You dance inside my chest, where no one sees you. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
68:It's the beauty within us that makes it possible for us to recognize the beauty around us. The question is not what you look at but what you see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
69:To the natural unredeemed economic man beauty is a thing otiose or a nuisance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, Civilisation and Barbarism,
70:She must change the rags of the past so that her beauty may be readorned. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II, Swaraj and the Coming Anarchy,
71:Beauty is a sweet difference of the Same. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Yoga of the King, The Yoga of the Soul's Release,
72:When I am working on a problem, I never think about beauty........ but when I have finished, if the solution is not beautiful, I know it is wrong.
   ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
73:Taoism has no rules. It's a suggestion for perceiving life in its wholeness, without unnecessary categorization, yet enjoying the beauty of categorization." ~ Frederick Lenz,
74:Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole nature in its beauty." ~ Albert Einstein,
75:O friends, despise not the eternal Beauty for the mortal beauty, and be not held back by the things of the earth. ~ Bahaullah, the Eternal Wisdom
76:An opulent beauty of passionate difference
The recurring beat that moments God in Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The World-Stair,
77:The poet's first concern and his concern always is with living beauty and reality, with life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Breath of Greater Life,
78:Youth, beauty, life, riches, health, friends are things that pass; let not the wise man attach himself at all to these. ~ Mahabharata, the Eternal Wisdom
79:Beauty and happiness are her native right,
And endless Bliss is her eternal home. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Glory and Fall of Life,
80:God as beauty, Srikrishna in Brindavan, Shyamasundara, is not only Beauty, He is also Love. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings, The National Value of Art,
81:Courtesy is the most precious of jewels. The beauty that is not perfected by courtesy is like a garden without a flower. ~ Buddhacharita, the Eternal Wisdom
82:Beauty and Mirror and the Eyes which see." ~ Abū Saʿīd Abū'l-Khayr, (967 - 1049), famous Persian Sufi and poet who contributed extensively to the evolution of Sufi tradition, Wikipedia.,
83:Fear and greed cause the misuse of the mind. The right use of mind is in the service of love, of life, of truth, of beauty. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
84:There's beauty everywhere. There are amazing things happening everywhere, you just have to be able to open your eyes and witness it. Some days, that's harder than others." ~ Sarah McLachlan,
85:That which God said to the rose, and caused it to laugh in full-blown beauty, He said to my heart, and made it a hundred times more beautiful. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
86:The nature of art is to strive after a nobler beauty and more sustained perfection than life can give. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Recent English Poetry - I,
87:Genius can preserve its power even when it labours in shackles and refuses to put forth all its resources. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, The Suprarational Beauty,
88:The nearer we get to the absolute Ananda, the greater becomes our joy in man and the universe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Soul of Poetic Delight and Beauty,
89:Attitude can take away your beauty no matter how good looking you are or it could enhance your beauty, making you adorable. ~ Mufti Ismail Menk, @Sufi_Path
90:The expression of the spiritual through the aesthetic sense is the constant sense of Indian art. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Soul of Poetic Delight and Beauty,
91:The life values are only poetic when they have come out heightened and changed into soul values. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Soul of Poetic Delight and Beauty,
92:Beauty is always seducing while justice often appears unattractive. If in this world we could see justice as it is in itself, it would engulf us in loveliness. ~ George Grant, "Justice and Technology",
93:Delight is the soul of existence, beauty the intense impression, the concentrated form of delight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Soul of Poetic Delight and Beauty,
94:Look at light and admire its beauty. Close your eyes, and then look again: what you saw is no longer there; and what you will see later is not yet." ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
95:Out of the ineffable hush it hears them come
Trembling with the beauty of a wordless speech. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Paradise of the Life-Gods,
96:The day when we get back to the ancient worship of delight and beauty, will be our day of salvation ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Soul of Poetic Delight and Beauty,
97:To Him belong Beauty, Majesty and Perfection. His Perfection can be attained only by whose imperfection has passed away. ~ Abul Qasim al-Qushayri (r), @Sufi_Path
98:Within man is the soul of the whole, the wise silence, the universal beauty to which every part and particle is equally related, the eternal ONE. ~ Emerson, the Eternal Wisdom
99:Without perfect love there cannot be perfect beauty, and without perfect beauty there cannot be perfect delight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings, The National Value of Art,
100:All mathematical laws which we find in Nature are always suspect to me, in spite of their beauty. They give me no pleasure. They are merely auxiliaries. At close range it is all not true. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
101:The enlightening power of the poet's creation is vision of truth, its moving power is a passion of beauty and delight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, The Breath of Greater Life,
102:The harmony of the world is made manifest in form and number, and the heart and soul and all the poetry of natural philosophy are embodied in the concept of mathematical beauty. ~ Sir D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson,
103:The most beautiful ape is ugly when compared to a human. The wisest human will seem like an ape when compared to a god with respect to wisdom, beauty, and everything else. ~ Heraclitus,
104:New sentient creatures filled the unseen depths,
Life's glory and swiftness ran in the beauty of beasts, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Glory and Fall of Life,
105:A day spent without the sight or sound of beauty, the contemplation of mystery, or the search of truth or perfection is a poverty-stricken day; and a succession of such days is fatal to human life. ~ Lewis Mumford,
106:When thou lookest up to heaven and gazest at the beauty of the stars, pray to the Lord of the visible world; pray to God the Arch-artificer of the universe, Who in wisdom hath made them all. ~ Saint Basil the Great,
107:I strive to attain the happiness which does not pass away nor perish and which has not its source in riches or beauty nor depends upon them. ~ Foshu-hing-tsan-king, the Eternal Wisdom
108:Although I am a typical loner in my daily life, my awareness of belonging to the invisible community of those who strive for truth, beauty, and justice has prevented me from feelings of isolation.
   ~ Albert Einstein,
109:If thou canst comprehend God, thou shalt comprehend the Beautiful and the Good, the pure radiance, the incomparable beauty, the good that has not its like. ~ Hermes, the Eternal Wisdom
110:It is when you feel the universal or divine beauty or presence in things that the senses are open to the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - III, The Universal or Cosmic Consciousness,
111:The reason why in his Church he made some apostles, some confessors, and others martyrs, is for the beauty and completion of the Church ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on John 6).,
112:In your light I learn how to love. In your beauty, how to make poems. You dance inside my chest where no-one sees you, but sometimes I do, and that sight becomes this art. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
113:Wisdom fears no thing, but still bows humbly to its own source, with its deeper understanding, loves all things, for it has seen the beauty, the tenderness, and the sweetness which underlie Life's mystery ~ Manly P Hall,
114:One has to seek Beauty and Truth... As I always say to my pupils, you have to work to the finish. There's only one kind of painting. It is the painting that presents the eye with perfection... ~ William-Adolphe Bouguereau,
115:The world is no more than the Beloved single face; In the desire of the One to know its own beauty, we exist." ~ Ghalib, (1797 - 1869) prominent Urdu and Persian poet during the last years of the Mughal Empire, Wikipedia.,
116:Beauty is Truth, Truth Beauty — that is all you know on earth, and all you need to know." ~ John Keats, (1795 - 1821), English Romantic poet, one of the main figures of the second generation of Romantic poets, Wikipedia.,
117:When, indeed, men speak of Beauty, they mean, precisely, not a quality, as is supposed, but an effect - they refer, in short, just to that intense and pure elevation of soul - not of intellect, or of heart. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
118:Lord, without Thee life is a monstrosity. Without Thy Light, Thy Consciousness, Thy Beauty and Thy Force, all existence is a sinister and grotesque comedy.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III, 240,
119:Late have I loved you, O Beauty ever ancient, ever new, late have I loved you! You were within me, but I was outside, and it was there that I searched for you.
   ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
120:Genius, the true creator, is always suprarational in its nature and its instrumentation even when it seems to be doing the work of the reason. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, The Suprarational Beauty,
121:We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty. You only are free when you realize you belong no place ~ you belong every place ~ no place at all. ~ Maya Angelou,
122:An inner law of beauty shapes our lives;
Our words become the natural speech of Truth,
Each thought is a ripple on a sea of Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Finding of the Soul,
123:When his mind shall be enfranchised from human things, then shall he enter into the city of marvellous wisdom which ever renews itself and grows in beauty from age to age. ~ Baha-ullah, the Eternal Wisdom
124:An invisible Beauty, goal of the world's desire,
A Sun of which all knowledge is a beam,
A Greatness without whom no life could be. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Finding of the Soul,
125:21. God had opened my eyes; for I saw the nobility of the vulgar, the attractiveness of the repellent, the perfection of the maimed and the beauty of the hideous.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human, Jnana,
126:A veil is kept, something is still held back,
Lest, captives of the beauty and the joy,
Our souls forget to the Highest to aspire. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdom of Subtle Matter,
127:On the physical plane the Divine expresses himself through beauty, on the mental plane through knowledge, on the vital plane through power and on the psychic plane through love.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III,
128:Who help men's drab and heavy ignorant lives
To wake to beauty and the wonder of things
Touching them with glory and divinity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Entry into the Inner Countries,
129:Actualization of self cannot be sought as a goal in its own right. . . . Rather, it seems to be a by-product of active commitment of one's talents to some cause, outside the self, such as the quest for beauty, truth, or justice. ~ Sidney Jourard,
130:It was not death they saw, not a resurrection, nor a withdrawal into Nirvana but a grand repose, a death that was pulsating with power, light and beauty in every limb as if death had become immortal in the body of the King of kings. ~ Nirodbaran,
131:Once you realize that the road is the goal and that you are always on the road, not to reach a goal, but to enjoy its beauty and its wisdom, life ceases to be a task and becomes natural and simple, in itself an ecstasy. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
132:His fires of grandeur burn in the great sun,
He glides through heaven shimmering in the moon;
He is beauty carolling in the fields of sound; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Debate of Love and Death,
133:Is not the world his disguise? when that cloak is tossed back from his shoulders,
Beauty looks out like a sun on the hearts of the ravished beholders. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ahana,
134:A march of his greatness are the wheeling stars.
His laughter of beauty breaks out in green trees,
His moments of beauty triumph in a flower; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Debate of Love and Death,
135:Progress consists not in rejecting beauty and delight, but in rising from the lower to the higher, the less complete to the more complete beauty and delight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings, The National Value of Art,
136:The pilgim should never be discouraged; though he should struggle for a hundred thousand years without success to behold the beauty of the Beloved, still he should not give way to despair. ~ Baha-ullah, the Eternal Wisdom
137:Never regard study as a duty, but as the enviable opportunity to learn to know the liberating influence of beauty in the realm of the spirit for your own personal joy and to the profit of the community to which your later work belongs.
   ~ Albert Einstein,
138:Whoever gives himself up to rational meditations, finds very soon the joy in all that is good. He sees that riches and beauty are impermanent and wisdom the most precious of jewels. ~ Fo-shu-hing-tsan-king, the Eternal Wisdom
139:Appealing to the soul and not the eye
Beauty lived there at home in her own house,
There all was beautiful by its own right
And needed not the splendour of a robe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The World-Soul,
140:When they hear the words of God on our lips, unbelievers are amazed at their beauty and power, but when they see that those words have no effect in our lives, their admiration turns to scorn, and they dismiss such words as myths and fairy tales. ~ 2nd century sermon,
141:For us, philosophy has become something like an intellectual exercise; for the Greeks it was not an external decoration of life but the inner beauty of the latter and an elucidation of it psychophysical and social structure. ~ Pavel Florensky, The Meaning of Idealism,
142:Whoever applies himself intelligently to profound meditation, soon finds joy in what is good; he becomes conscious that beauty and riches are transient things and wisdom the fairest ornament. ~ Fo-sho-hing-tsan-king, the Eternal Wisdom
143:There is a place where words are born of silence,
A place where the whispers of the heart arise.

There is a place where voices sing your beauty,
A place where every breath
carves your image
in my soul. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
144:Live each present moment completely and the future will take care of itself. Fully enjoy the wonder and beauty of each instant. Practice the presence of peace. The more you do that, the more you will feel the presence of that power in your life. ~ Paramahamsa Yogananda,
145:O Lord, if I worship You because of Fear of Hell,
then burn me in Hell;

If I worship You because I desire Paradise,
then exclude me from Paradise;

But if I worship You for Yourself alone,
then deny me not your Eternal Beauty ~ Rabia al-Adawiyya,
146:Beatrice is to be loved because she is beautiful; but she is beautiful because there is behind her a many-sided mystery of beauty, to be seen also in the grass and the sea, and even in the dead gods. There is a promise in and yet beyond all such pictures. ~ GK Chesterton,
147:O indescribable beauty... and purest radiance of eternal light! Life that gives all life, light that is the source of every other light, preserving in everlasting splendor the myriad flames that have shone before the throne of your divinity from the dawn of time! ~ Bonaventure,
148:Wast thou not made in the shape of a woman? Sweetness and beauty
Move like a song of the gods in thy limbs and to love is thy duty
Graved in thy heart as on tablets of fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ahana,
149:There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion." ~ Francis Bacon, (1561 - 1626), English philosopher and statesman. His works are credited with developing the scientific method and remained influential through the scientific revolution, Wikipedia.,
150:[T]he archaic understanding of the presuppositions of life… are the order and harmony of beauty. The cosmos exists not because it represents an objective something but because it constitutes a how, a mode of harmony and decorum. ~ Christos Yannaras, The Schism in Philosophy, 5,
151:The Holy Spirit renews us in baptism through his godhead, which he shares w/ the Father and the Son. Finding us in a state of deformity, the Spirit restores our original beauty and fills us with his grace, leaving no room for anything unworthy of our love. ~ Didymus of Alexandria,
152:We were made in the image and likeness of our Creator, endowed with intellect and reason… In this way, continuously contemplating the beauty of creatures, through them as if they were letters and words, we could read God's wisdom and providence over all things. ~ Basil of Cesarea,
153:What distinguishes a warrior from a soldier is that a warrior is a mystic, a lover, one possessed by beauty, one alive with radical amazement, one seized by the Cataphatic divinity, the God of Light and Creation." Mathew Fox, from "Meister Eckhart: A Mystic Warrior of Our Times" ~ ?,
154:A summons to faith, courage and energy in the face of death isn't a call to heroics for the ego. It is an invitation to attend, to be absorbed in value, depth and beauty not our own. ~ Rowan Williams https://newstatesman.com/politics/religion/2020/08/covid-and-confronting-our-own-mortality,
155:In that fair subtle realm behind our own
The form is all, and physical gods are kings.
The inspiring Light plays in fine boundaries;
A faultless beauty comes by Nature's grace; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdom of Subtle Matter,
156:Winter and Dew-time laid their calm cool hands
On Nature's bosom still in a half sleep
And deepened with hues of lax and mellow ease
The tranquil beauty of the waning year. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Birth and Childhood of the Flame,
157:All music is only the sound of His laughter,
All beauty the smile of His passionate bliss;
Our lives are His heart-beats, our rapture the bridal
Of Radha and Krishna, our love is their kiss. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Who,
158:Desire to have Him. Be angry with Him. Ask Him, 'Why are You not coming to me?' Direct all emotions - love, anger, etc., towards Him. Be greedy to taste His playful life, His name and form. Be infatuated with His beauty. Feel proud that you have loved Him and got His assurance ~ Swami Akhandananda,
159:In its vast ambit of ideal Space
Where beauty and mightiness walk hand in hand,
The Spirit's truths take form as living Gods
And each can build a world in its own right. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
160:Our mind is a glimmering curtain of that Ray,
Our strength a parody of the Immortal's power,
Our joy a dreamer on the Eternal's way
Hunting the unseizable beauty of an hour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, The Universal Incarnation,
161:Beloved Pan, and all ye other gods who haunt this place, give me beauty in the inward soul; and may the outward and inward man be at one. May I reckon the wise to be the wealthy, and may I have such a quantity of gold as none but the temperate can carry. ~ Plato, Phaedrus, sec. 279,
162:Your beauty should not come from outward adornment, such as elaborate hairstyles and the wearing of gold jewelry or fine clothes. Rather, it should be that of your inner self, the unfading beauty of a gentle and quiet spirit, which is of great worth in God's sight. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, 1 Peter, 3:3-4,
163:Nude, unashamed, exulting she upraised.
Her evil face of perilous beauty and charm.
And, drawing panic to a shuddering kiss.
Twixt the magnificence of her fatal breasts.
Allured to their abyss the spirit's f ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Descent into Night,
164:I found the spot where truth echoes and know each beauty mark by heart.
But I just can't keep her still enough to render perfect art.
'Cause the truth is ever changing and although she loves my touch,
I've had my way, but I when I pray, she kisses back too much. ~ Saul Williams, Surrender (A Second to Think),
165:Traveller on plateau and on musing ridge,
As one who sees in the World-Magician's glass
A miracled imagery of soul-scapes flee
He traversed scenes of an immortal joy
And gazed into abysms of beauty and bliss. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Paradise of the Life-Gods,
166:She knew herself the Beloved of the Supreme:
These Gods and Goddesses were he and she:
The Mother was she of Beauty and Delight,
The Word in Brahma's vast creating clasp,
The World-Puissance on almighty Shiva's lap, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Finding of the Soul,
167:The shining Edens of the vital gods
Received him in their deathless harmonies.
All things were perfect there that flower in Time;
Beauty was there creation's native mould,
Peace was a thrilled voluptuous purity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Paradise of the Life-Gods,
168:The internal purification is a task more severe. It consists in speaking the truth, sensing the poor, helping the needy, etc. One who has cleansed both the inner & the outer self is alone capable of Bhakti. But the beauty is that Bhakti itself cleanses the mind to a great extent ~ Swami Vivekananda,
169:The eyes of our mentality are incapable as yet of contemplating the incorruptible and incomprehensible Beauty...Thou shalt see it when thou hast nothing to say concerning it; for knowledge, for contemplation are silence, are the sinking to rest of all sensation. ~ Hermes: The Key, the Eternal Wisdom
170:The world's senseless beauty mirrors God's delight.
That rapture's smile is secret everywhere;
It flows in the wind's breath, in the tree's sap,
Its hued magnificence blooms in leaves and flowers. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 02.04
171:He who suffers himself to be transported by the love of things on high, who drinks at the sources of eternal beauty, who lives by the Infinite and combats for the ideal of all virtue and all knowledge, who shows for that cult an enthusiasm pushed to a very fury,-he is the hero. ~ Giordano Bruno, the Eternal Wisdom
172:Thus we draw near to the All-Wonderful
Following his rapture in things as sign and guide;
Beauty is his footprint showing us where he has passed,
Love is his heart-beats' rhythm in mortal breasts,
Happiness the smile on his adorable face. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdom of Subtle Matter,
173:When He calls me I start a self-inspection: 'Am I fair or will my looks earn rejection? If a fine beauty leads a beast along, She's only mocking what does not belong! To see my own face can there be a way? Is my complexion now like night or day?' I searched for my soul's form in everyone, But it did not reflect in anyone. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi, The Masnavi,
174:Don't go outside your house to see the flowers.
My friend, don't bother with that excursion.
Inside your body there are flowers.
One flower has a thousand petals.
That will do for a place to sit.
Sitting there you will have a glimpse of beauty
inside the body and out of it,
before gardens and after gardens. ~ Kabir,
175:These Gods and Goddesses were he and she:
The Mother was she of Beauty and Delight,
The Word in Brahma's vast creating clasp,
The World-Puissance on almighty Shiva's lap,—
The Master and the Mother of all lives
Watching the worlds their twin reg ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Finding of the Soul,
176:We live in a world of theophanies. Holiness comes wrapped in the ordinary. There are burning bushes all around you. Every tree is full of angels. Hidden beauty is waiting in every crumb. Life wants to lead you from crumbs to angels, but this can only happen if you are willing to unwrap the ordinary by staying with it long enough to harvest its treasure. ~ Macrina Wiederkehr,
177:But not the utter vision and delight.
A veil is kept, something is still held back,
Lest, captives of the beauty and the joy,
Our souls forget to the Highest to aspire.
In that fair subtle realm behind our own
The form is all, and physical gods are kings.
~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdom of Subtle Matter,
178:Accepting the universe as her body of woe,
The Mother of the seven sorrows bore
The seven stabs that pierced her bleeding heart:
The beauty of sadness lingered on her face,
Her eyes were dim with the ancient stain of tears.
Her heart was riven wi ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
179:To love. To be loved. To never forget your own insignificance. To never get used to the unspeakable violence and the vulgar disparity of life around you. To seek joy in the saddest places. To pursue beauty to its lair. To never simplify what is complicated or complicate what is simple. To respect strength, never power. Above all, to watch. To try and understand. To never look away. And never, never to forget. ~ Arundhati Roy,
180:Above them is the miracle of eternal beauty, an unseizable secret of divine harmonies, the compelling magic of an irresistible universal charm and attraction that draws and holds things and forces and beings together and obliges them to meet and unite that a hidden Ananda may play from behind the veil and make of them its rhythms and its figures.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother,
181:The story of Christ, as it has been told, is the concrete and dramatic enactment of the divine sacrifice: the Supreme Lord, who is All-Light, All-Knowledge, All-Power, All-Beauty, All-Love, All-Bliss, accepting to assume human ignorance and suffering in matter, in order to help men to emerge from the falsehood in which they live and because of which they die.
   ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms, 16 June 1960,
182:The born lover... has a certain memory of beauty but severed from it now, he longer comprehends it; spellbound by visible loveliness he clings amazed about that. His lesson must be to fall down no longer in bewildered delight before some, one embodied form, he must be led under a system of mental discipline, to beauty everywhere and made to discern the One Principle underlying all."
   ~ Plotinus, 1st Ennead, 3 tractate,
183:As comes a goddess to a mortal's breast
And fills his days with her celestial clasp,
She stooped to make her home in transient shapes;
In Matter's womb she cast the Immortal's fire,
In the unfeeling Vast woke thought and hope,
Smote with her charm and beauty flesh and nerve
And forced delight on earth's insensible frame.
~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Glory and the Fall of Life,
184:In the Confucian tradition is a simple formula that appeals to me deeply: 'If there is righteousness in the heart, there will be beauty in the character. If there is beauty in the character, there will be harmony in the home. If there is harmony in the home, there will be order in the nation. If there is order in the nation, there will be peace in the world.' I urge everyone to reflect deeply on these words, as simple as they are profound. ~ Eknath Easwaran,
185:Spirit's joy
Across the covert air the spirit breathes,
A body of the cosmic beauty and joy
Unseen, unguessed by the blind suffering world, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Heavens of the Ideal
Spirit's joy
The spiritual life is the flower not of a featureless but a conscious and diversified oneness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, Conditions for the Coming of a Spiritual Age,
186:A human being is a part of the whole called by us universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feeling as something separated from the rest, a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. ~ Albert Einstein,
187:A human being is part of a whole, called by us the 'Universe' -a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts, and feelings, as something separated from the rest-a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circles of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.
   ~ Albert Einstein,
188:To laugh often and love much; to win the respect of intelligent persons and the affection of children; to earn the approbation of honest citizens and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty; to find the best in others; to give of one's self; to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to have played and laughed with enthusiasm and sung with exultation; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived~this is to have succeeded. ~ Bessie Anderson Stanley,
189:Tell me, enigmatical man, whom do you love best, your father,
Your mother, your sister, or your brother?
I have neither father, nor mother, nor sister, nor brother.
Your friends?
Now you use a word whose meaning I have never known.
Your country?
I do not know in what latitude it lies.
Beauty?
I could indeed love her, Goddess and Immortal.
Gold?
I hate it as you hate God.
Then, what do you love, extraordinary stranger?
I love the clouds the clouds that pass up there
Up there the wonderful clouds!
   ~ Charles Baudelaire,
190:To take symbolism seriously is to accept the 'analogy of being' between different levels of reality... More than the sum of its parts, the figure is the appearing-to-us of an infinite depth that cannot be fully revealed in time. Every symbol is a kind of gestalt, in which a universal meaning can be glimpsed. Eventually, every created thing can be seen as a manifestation of its own interior essence, and the world is transformed into a radiant book to be read with eyes sensitive to spiritual light. ~ Stratford Caldecott, Beauty for Truth's Sake: On the Re-enchantment of Education,
191:O son of earth, be blind and thou shalt see My beauty; be deaf and thou shalt hear My sweet song, My pleasant melody; be ignorant and thou shalt partake My knowledge; be in distress and thou shalt have an eternal portion of the infinite ocean of My riches:-blind to all that is not My beauty, deaf to all that is not My word, ignorant of all that is not My knowledge. Thus with a gaze that is pure, a spirit without stain, an understanding refined, thou shalt enter into my sacred presence. ~ Baha-ullah, "The Hidden Words in Persian.", the Eternal Wisdom
192:All was found there the Unique has dreamed and made
   Tinging with ceaseless rapture and surprise
   And an opulent beauty of passionate difference
   The recurring beat that moments God in Time.
   Only was missing the sole timeless Word
   That carries eternity in its lonely sound,
   The Idea self-luminous key to all ideas,
   The integer of the Spirit's perfect sum
   That equates the unequal All to the equal One,
   The single sign interpreting every sign,
   The absolute index to the Absolute.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The World-Stair,
193:That all-pervading Beauty is not an exercise in creative imagination. It is the actual structure of the universe. That all-pervading Beauty is in truth the very nature of the Kosmos right now. It is not something you have to imagine, because it is the actual structure of perception in all domains. If you remain in the eye of Spirit, every object is an object of radiant Beauty. If the doors of perception are cleansed, the entire Kosmos is your lost and found Beloved, the Original Face of primordial Beauty, forever,and forever, and endlessly forever. ~ Ken Wilber, The Eye Of Spirit, p. 138,
194:Everybody has certain ideals which determine the direction of his endeavors and his judgments. In this sense I have never looked upon ease and happiness as ends in themselves - such an ethical basis I call more proper for a herd of swine. The ideals which have lighted me on my way and time after time given me new courage to face life cheerfully, have been Truth, Goodness, and Beauty. Without the sense of fellowship with men of like mind, of preoccupation with the objective, the eternally unattainable in the field of art and scientific research, life would have seemed to me empty. ~ Albert Einstein,
195:There are not many, those who have no secret garden of the mind. For this garden alone can give refreshment when life is barren of peace or sustenance or satisfactory answer. Such sanctuaries may be reached by a certain philosophy or faith, by the guidance of a beloved author or an understanding friend, by way of the temples of music and art, or by groping after truth through the vast kingdoms of knowledge. They encompass almost always truth and beauty, and are radiant with the light that never was on sea or land. - Clare Cameron, Green Fields of England ~ Israel Regardie, A Garden Of Pomegranates,
196:The Good, the True, and the Beautiful, then, are simply the faces of Spirit as it shines in this world. Spirit seen subjectively is Beauty, and I of Spirit. Spirit seen intersubjectively is the Good, the We of Spirit. And Spirit seen objectively is the True, the It of Spirit....And whenever we pause, and enter the quiet, and rest in the utter stillness, we can hear that whispering voice calling to us still: never forgot the Good, and never forgot the True, and never forget the Beautiful, for these are the faces of your own deepest Self, freely shown to you. ~ Ken Wilber, Marriage of Sense and Soul, p. 201,
197:As in a mystic and dynamic dance
   A priestess of immaculate ecstasies
   Inspired and ruled from Truth's revealing vault
   Moves in some prophet cavern of the gods
   A heart of silence in the hands of joy
   Inhabited with rich creative beats
   A body like a parable of dawn
   That seemed a niche for veiled divinity
   Or golden temple-door to things beyond.
   Immortal rhythms swayed in her time-born steps;
   Her look, her smile awoke celestial sense
   Even in earth-stuff, and their intense delight
   Poured a supernal beauty on men's lives.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Issue,
198:High priests of wisdom, sweetness, might and bliss,
Discoverers of beauty's sunlit ways
And swimmers of Love's laughing fiery floods
And dancers within rapture's golden doors,
Their tread one day shall change the suffering earth
And justify the light on Nature's face.
Although Fate lingers in the high Beyond
And the work seems vain on which our heart's force was spent,
All shall be done for which our pain was borne.
Even as of old man came behind the beast
This high divine successor surely shall come
~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Vision and the Boon,
199:That status of knowledge is then the aim of this path and indeed of all paths when pursued to their end, to which intellectual discrimination and conception and all concentration and psychological self-knowledge and all seeking by the heart through love and by the senses through beauty and by the will through power and works and by the soul through peace and joy are only keys, avenues, first approaches and beginnings of the ascent which we have to use and to follow till the wide and infinite levels are attained and the divine doors swing open into the infinite Light.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga,
200:Who, if I cried out, would hear me among the angels' hierarchies?
And even if one of them pressed me suddenly against his heart:
I would be consumed in that overwhelming existence.
For beauty is nothing but the beginning of terror, which we are still just able to endure,
And we are so awed because it serenely disdains to annihilate us.
Every angel is terrifying.
And so I hold myself back and swallow the call-note of my dark sobbing.
Ah, whom can we ever turn to in our need?
Not angels, not humans, and already the knowing animals are aware
That we are not really at home in our interpreted world. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
201:For the conscious appreciation of beauty reaches its height of enlightenment and enjoyment not by analysis of the beauty enjoyed or even by a right and intelligent understanding of it, - these things are only a preliminary clarifying of our first unenlightened sense of the beautiful, - but by an exaltation of the soul in which it opens itself entirely to the light and power and joy of the creation. The soul of beauty in us identifies itself with the soul of beauty in the thing created and feels in appreciation the same divine intoxication and uplifting which the artist felt in creation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle,
202:Inside the temple Richard found a life waiting for him, all ready to be worn and lived, and inside that life, another. Each life he tried on, he slipped into and it pulled him farther in, farther away from the world he came from; one by one, existence following existence, rivers of dreams and fields of stars, a hawk with a sparrow clutched in its talons flies low above the grass, and here are tiny intricate people waiting for him to fill their heads with life, and thousands of years pass and he is engaged in strange work of great importance and sharp beauty, and he is loved, and he is honored, and then a pull, a sharp tug, and it's... ~ Neil Gaiman,
203:Bride of the Fire :::

Bride of the Fire, clasp me now close, -
Bride of the Fire!
I have shed the bloom of the earthly rose,
I have slain desire.

Beauty of the Light, surround my life, -
Beauty of the Light!
I have sacrificed longing and parted from grief,
I can bear thy delight.

Image of Ecstasy, thrill and enlace, -
Image of Bliss!
I would see only thy marvellous face,
Feel only thy kiss.

Voice of Infinity, sound in my heart, -
Call of the One!
Stamp there thy radiance, never to part,
O living sun. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems,
204:Withdraw into yourself and look. And if you do not find yourself beautiful yet, act as does the creator of a statue that is to be made beautiful: he cuts away here, he smoothes there, he makes this line lighter, this other purer, until a lovely face has grown upon his work. So do you also: cut away all that is excessive, straighten all that is crooked, bring light to all that is overcast, labour to make all one glow of beauty and never cease chiselling your statue, until there shall shine out on you from it the godlike splendour of virtue, until you shall see the perfect goodness surely established in the stainless shrine. ~ Plotinus, The Enneads,
205:Gird up thy loins now like a man; I will demand of thee, and declare thou unto me. Wilt thou also disannul my judgment? Wilt thou condemn me, that thou mayst be righteous? Hast thou an arm like God? or canst thou thunder with a voice like him? Deck thyself now with majesty and excellency; and array thyself with glory and beauty. Cast abroad the rage of thy wrath: and behold every one that is proud and abase him. Look on every one that is proud, and bring him low; and tread down the wicked in their place. Hide them in the dust together; and bind their faces in secret. Then I will also confess unto thee that thine own hand can save thee. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Job, 40:7-14,
206:Practical Review Tools ::: Flash cards, Chapter Outlines, 4x6 Summaries: You need to find ways to repeat and rehearse information and ideas that work for you. Any number of creative tools can be used to help you organize and remember information and make it manageable. I like 4x6 cards. They are sturdy, large enough to hold succinct information, and you can scribble ideas that jog the memory. The beauty 4x6's is that they can be carried anywhere. You can study them at the library, laundry, or lavatory. They travel on the bus, they can save you from a boring date, they can be thrown away immediately without guilt or survive years of faithful service. ~ Dr Robert A Hatch, How to Study,
207:Krishna:::
At last I find a meaning of soul's birth
Into this universe terrible and sweet,
I who have felt the hungry heart of earth
Aspiring beyond heaven to Krishna's feet.

I have seen the beauty of immortal eyes,
And heard the passion of the Lover's flute,
And known a deathless ecstasy's surprise
And sorrow in my heart for ever mute.

Nearer and nearer now the music draws,
Life shudders with a strange felicity;
All Nature is a wide enamoured pause
Hoping her lord to touch, to clasp, to be.

For this one moment lived the ages past;
The world now throbs fulfilled in me at last. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems,
208:Alas! I find no customers who want anything better than kalai pulse. No one wants to give up 'woman and gold'. Man, deluded by the beauty of woman and the power of money, forgets God. But to one who has seen the beauty of God, even the position of Brahma, the Creator, seems insignificant.
A man said to Ravana, 'You have been going to Sita in different disguises; why don't you go to her in the form of Rama?' 'But', Ravana replied, 'when I meditate on Rama in my heart, the most beautiful women - celestial maidens like Rambha and Tilottama - appear no better than ashes of the funeral pyre. Then even the position of Brahma appears trivial to me, not to speak of the beauty of another man's wife.' ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
209:Because Thou Art :::

Because Thou art All-beauty and All-bliss,
My soul blind and enamoured yearns for Thee;
It bears thy mystic touch in all that is
And thrills with the burden of that ecstasy.

Behind all eyes I meet Thy secret gaze
And in each voice I hear Thy magic tune:
Thy sweetness haunts my heart through Nature's ways
Nowhere it beats now from Thy snare immune.

It loves Thy body in all living things;
Thy joy is there in every leaf and stone:
The moments bring thee on their fiery wings;
Sight's endless artistry is Thou alone.

Time voyages with Thee upon its prow
And all the futures passionate hope is Thou.
~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems,
210:The messengers of the Incommunicable,
The architects of immortality.
Into the fallen human sphere they came,
Faces that wore the Immortal's glory still,
Voices that communed still with the thoughts of God,
Bodies made beautiful by the spirit's light,
Carrying the magic word, the mystic fire,
Carrying the Dionysian cup of joy,
Approaching eyes of a diviner man,
Lips chanting an unknown anthem of the soul,
Feet echoing in the corridors of Time.
High priests of wisdom, sweetness, might and bliss,
Discoverers of beauty's sunlit ways
And swimmers of Love's laughing fiery floods
And dancers within rapture's golden doors,
Their tread one day shall change the suffering earth
And justify the light on Nature's face. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 3:4,
211:Only, in all he sees God, sees the supreme reality, and his motive of work is to help mankind towards the knowledge of God and the possession of the supreme reality. He sees God through the data of science, God through the conclusions of philosophy, God through the forms of Beauty and the forms of Good, God in all the activities of life, God in the past of the world and its effects, in the present and its tendencies, in the future and its great progression. Into any or all of these he can bring his illumined vision and his liberated power of the spirit. The lower knowledge has been the step from which he has risen to the higher; the higher illumines for him the lower and makes it part of itself, even if only its lower fringe and most external radiation.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Higher and the Lower Knowledge,
212:We have no reason to harbor any mistrust against our world, for it is not against us. If it has terrors, they are our terrors; if it has abysses, these abysses belong to us; if there are dangers, we must try to love them. And if only we arrange our life in accordance with the principle which tells us that we must always trust in the difficult, then what now appears to us as the most alien will become our most intimate and trusted experience. How could we forget those ancient myths that stand at the beginning of all races, the myths about dragons that at the last moment are transformed into princesses? Perhaps all the dragons in our lives are princesses who are only waiting to see us act, just once, with beauty and courage. Perhaps everything that frightens us is, in its deepest essence, something helpless that wants our love. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet,
213:the soul alone ensures sincerity :::
   It is here that the emergence of the secret psychic being in us as the leader of the sacrifice is of the utmost importance; for this inmost being alone can bring with it the full power of the spirit in the act, the soul in the symbol. It alone can assure, even while the spiritual consciousness is incomplete, the perennial freshness and sincerity and beauty of the symbol and prevent it from becoming a dead form or a corrupted and corrupting magic; it alone can preserve for the act its power with its significance. All the other members of our being, mind, life-force, physical or body consciousness, are too much under the control of the Ignorance to be a sure instrumentation and much less can they be a guide or the source of an unerring impulse. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 2, 166,
214:January 7, 1914
GIVE them all, O Lord, Thy peace and light, open their blinded eyes and their darkened understanding; calm their futile worries and their vain anxieties. Turn their gaze away from themselves and give them the joy of being consecrated to Thy work without calculation or mental reservation. Let Thy beauty flower in all things, awaken Thy love in all hearts, so that Thy eternally progressive order may be realised upon earth and Thy harmony be spread until the day all becomes Thyself in perfect purity and peace.

Oh! let all tears be wiped away, all suffering relieved, all anguish dispelled, and let calm serenity dwell in every heart and powerful certitude strengthen every mind. Let Thy life flow through all like a regenerating stream that all may turn to Thee and draw from that contemplation the energy for all victories. ~ The Mother, Prayers And Meditations,
215:
   Often, when I read Sri Aurobindo's works or listen to His words, I am wonderstruck: how can this eternal truth, this beauty of expression escape people? It is really strange that He is not yet recognised, at least as a supreme creator, a pure artist, a poet par excellence! So I tell myself that my judgments, my appreciations are influenced by my devotion for the Master - and everyone is not devoted. I do not think this is true. But then why are hearts not yet enchanted by His words?

Who can understand Sri Aurobindo? He is as vast as the universe and his teaching is infinite...
   The only way to come a little close to him is to love him sincerely and give oneself unreservedly to his work. Thus, each one does his best and contributes as much as he can to that transformation of the world which Sri Aurobindo has predicted. 2 December 1964
   ~ The Mother, On Education, 396,
216:The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion that stands at the cradle of true art and true science. Whoever does not know it and can no longer wonder, no longer marvel, is as good as dead, and his eyes are dimmed. It was the experience of mystery ~ even if mixed with fear ~ that engendered religion. A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, our perceptions of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty, which only in their most primitive forms are accessible to our minds: it is this knowledge and this emotion that constitute true religiosity. In this sense, and only this sense, I am a deeply religious man... I am satisfied with the mystery of life's eternity and with a knowledge, a sense, of the marvelous structure of existence ~ as well as the humble attempt to understand even a tiny portion of the Reason that manifests itself in nature.,
217:I have said that from a young age children should be taught to respect good health, physical strength and balance. The great importance of beauty must also be emphasised. A young child should aspire for beauty, not for the sake of pleasing others or winning their admiration, but for the love of beauty itself; for beauty is the ideal which all physical life must realise. Every human being has the possibility of establishing harmony among the different parts of his body and in the various movements of the body in action. Every human body that undergoes a rational method of culture from the very beginning of its existence can realise its own harmony and thus become fit to manifest beauty. When we speak of the other aspects of an integral education, we shall see what inner conditions are to be fulfilled so that this beauty can one day be manifested. ~ The Mother, On Education, Physical Education,
218:Here where one knows not even the step in front
And Truth has her throne on the shadowy back of doubt,
On this anguished and precarious field of toil
Outspread beneath some large indifferent gaze,
Impartial witness of our joy and bale,
Our prostrate soil bore the awakening ray.
Here too the vision and prophetic gleam
Lit into miracles common meaningless shapes;
Then the divine afflatus, spent, withdrew,
Unwanted, fading from the mortal's range.
A sacred yearning lingered in its trace,
The worship of a Presence and a Power
Too perfect to be held by death-bound hearts,
The prescience of a marvellous birth to come.
Only a little the god-light can stay:
Spiritual beauty illumining human sight
Lines with its passion and mystery Matter's mask
And squanders eternity on a beat of Time.
~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Symbol Dawn,
219:Drugs are able to bring humans into the neighborhood of divine experience and can thus carry us up from our personal fate and the everyday circumstances of our life into a higher form of reality. It is, however, necessary to understand precisely what is meant by the use of drugs. We do not mean the purely physical craving...That of which we speak is something much higher, namely the knowledge of the possibility of the soul to enter into a lighter being, and to catch a glimpse of deeper insights and more magnificent visions of the beauty, truth, and the divine than we are normally able to spy through the cracks in our prison cell. But there are not many drugs which have the power of stilling such craving. The entire catalog, at least to the extent that research has thus far written it, may include only opium, hashish, and in rarer cases alcohol, which has enlightening effects only upon very particular characters. ~ The Hashish Eater, (1857) pg. 181
220:Spirit comes from the Latin word to breathe. What we breathe is air, which is certainly matter, however thin. Despite usage to the contrary, there is no necessary implication in the word spiritual that we are talking of anything other than matter (including the matter of which the brain is made), or anything outside the realm of science. On occasion, I will feel free to use the word. Science is not only compatible with spirituality; it is a profound source of spirituality. When we recognize our place in an immensity of light years and in the passage of ages, when we grasp the intricacy, beauty and subtlety of life, then that soaring feeling, that sense of elation and humility combined, is surely spiritual. So are our emotions in the presence of great art or music or literature, or of acts of exemplary selfless courage such as those of Mohandas Gandhi or Martin Luther King Jr. The notion that science and spirituality are somehow mutually exclusive does a disservice to both. ~ Carl Sagan,
221:7. The Meeting with the Goddess:The ultimate adventure, when all the barriers and ogres have been overcome, is commonly represented as a mystical marriage of the triumphant hero-soul with the Queen Goddess of the World. This is the crisis at the nadir, the zenith, or at the uttermost edge of the earth, at the central point of the cosmos, in the tabernacle of the temple, or within the darkness of the deepest chamber of the heart. The meeting with the goddess (who is incarnate in every woman) is the final test of the talent of the hero to win the boon of love (charity: amor fati), which is life itself enjoyed as the encasement of eternity. And when the adventurer, in this context, is not a youth but a maid, she is the one who, by her qualities, her beauty, or her yearning, is fit to become the consort of an immortal. Then the heavenly husband descends to her and conducts her to his bed-whether she will or not. And if she has shunned him, the scales fall from her eyes; if she has sought him, her desire finds its peace. ~ Joseph Campbell,
222:Four Powers Of The Mother
   In talking about the four powers of the Mother, it helps to know that in India, traditionally, the evolutionary principle of creation is approached, and adored, as the great Mother. Sri Aurobindo distinguishes four main powers and personalities through which this evolutionary force manifests.
   Maheshwari - One is her personality of calm wideness and comprehending wisdom and tranquil benignity and inexhaustible compassion and sovereign and surpassing majesty and all-ruling greatness.
   Mahakali - Another embodies her power of splendid strength and irresistible passion, her warrior mood, her overwhelming will, her impetuous swiftness and world-shaking force.
   Mahalakshmi - A third is vivid and sweet and wonderful with her deep secret of beauty and harmony and fine rhythm, her intricate and subtle opulence, her compelling attraction and captivating grace.
   Mahasaraswati - The fourth is equipped with her close and profound capacity of intimate knowledge and careful flawless work and quiet and exact perfection in all things.
   ~ ?, https://www.auroville.com/silver-ring-mother-s-symbol.html,
223:[...]For these are aspects of the Divine Nature, powers of it, states of his being, - but the Divine Himself is something absolute, someone self-existent, not limited by his aspects, - wonderful and ineffable, not existing by them, but they exist because of Him. It follows that if he attracts by his aspects, all the more he can attract by his very absolute selfness which is sweeter, mightier, profounder than any aspect. His peace, rapture, light, freedom, beauty are marvellous and ineffable, because he is himself magically, mysteriously, transcendently marvellous and ineffable. He can then be sought after for his wonderful and ineffable self and not only for the sake of one aspect of another of his. The only thing needed for that is, first, to arrive at a point when the psychic being feels this pull of the Divine in himself and, secondly, to arrive at the point when the mind, vital and each thing else begins to feel too that that was what it was wanting and the surface hunt after Ananda or what else was only an excuse for drawing the nature towards that supreme magnet. ...
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II,
224:O soul, it is too early to rejoice!
Thou hast reached the boundless silence of the Self,
Thou hast leaped into a glad divine abyss;
But where hast thou thrown Self's mission and Self's power?
On what dead bank on the Eternal's road?
One was within thee who was self and world,
What hast thou done for his purpose in the stars?
Escape brings not the victory and the crown!
Something thou cam'st to do from the Unknown,
But nothing is finished and the world goes on
Because only half God's cosmic work is done.
Only the everlasting No has neared
And stared into thy eyes and killed thy heart:
But where is the Lover's everlasting Yes,
And immortality in the secret heart,
The voice that chants to the creator Fire,
The symbolled OM, the great assenting Word,
The bridge between the rapture and the calm,
The passion and the beauty of the Bride,
The chamber where the glorious enemies kiss,
The smile that saves, the golden peak of things?
This too is Truth at the mystic fount of Life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
225:A major part of the book is devoted to poetry. It opens with Sri Aurobindo's Savitri. The author has a novel way of appreciating this most wonderful epic, which continually overwhelms and bewilders us. He has taken this bewilderment as the subject of the chapter "An Uninitiated Reader's Response to Savitri". This is a rarely explored area, namely the magical poetic beauty of Savitri that casts a spell on the reader even when he does not always understand its content. For the lover of poetry is attracted by its "beauty and strength", "he is overawed by the grandeur of the animated spirituality". Any time spent with Savitri thus becomes a special moment in his life. Later in the book we find another kind of appreciation of the epic in the chapter on K. D. Sethna as a "crusader of aesthetic yoga". There the author calls Savitri the "Odyssey of Integral Yoga" where yoga and poetry come together. He also appreciates the "sensitive analysis of stylistic effect" by Sethna, who uses wonderful quotations from Savitri as examples of adequate style, effective style, illumined style, etc. (From the Near to Far by Dr. Saurendranth Basu) ~ Nandita Chatterjee, review of the book,
226:It proceeds by a personal effort to a conversion through a divine influence and possession; but this divine grace, if we may so call it, is not simply a mysterious flow or touch coming from above, but the all-pervading act of a divine presence which we come to know within as the power of the highest Self and Master of our being entering into the soul and so possessing it that we not only feel it close to us and pressing upon our mortal nature, but live in its law, know that law, possess it as the whole power of our spiritualised nature. The conversion its action will effect is an integral conversion of our ethical being into the Truth and Right of the divine nature, of our intellectual into the illumination of divine knowledge, our emotional into the divine love and unity, our dynamic and volitional into a working of the divine power, our aesthetic into a plenary reception and a creative enjoyment of divine beauty, not excluding even in the end a divine conversion of the vital and physical being. It regards all the previous life as an involuntary and unconscious or half-conscious preparatory growing towards this change and Yoga as the voluntary and conscious
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga,
227:I have a friend who's an artist and has sometimes taken a view which I don't agree with very well. He'll hold up a flower and say "look how beautiful it is," and I'll agree. Then he says "I as an artist can see how beautiful this is but you as a scientist take this all apart and it becomes a dull thing," and I think that he's kind of nutty. First of all, the beauty that he sees is available to other people and to me too, I believe. Although I may not be quite as refined aesthetically as he is ... I can appreciate the beauty of a flower. At the same time, I see much more about the flower than he sees. I could imagine the cells in there, the complicated actions inside, which also have a beauty. I mean it's not just beauty at this dimension, at one centimeter; there's also beauty at smaller dimensions, the inner structure, also the processes. The fact that the colors in the flower evolved in order to attract insects to pollinate it is interesting; it means that insects can see the color. It adds a question: does this aesthetic sense also exist in the lower forms? Why is it aesthetic? All kinds of interesting questions which the science knowledge only adds to the excitement, the mystery and the awe of a flower. It only adds. I don't understand how it subtracts. ~ Richard P Feynman,
228:The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
229:Art is the human language of the nervous plane, intended to express and communicate the Divine, who in the domain of sensation manifests as beauty.

   The purpose of art is therefore to give those for whom it is meant a freer and more perfect communion with the Supreme Reality. The first contact with this Supreme Reality expresses itself in our consciousness by a flowering of the being in a plenitude of vast and peaceful delight. Each time that art can give the spectator this contact with the infinite, however fleetingly, it fulfils its aim; it has shown itself worthy of its mission. Thus no art which has for many centuries moved and delighted a people can be dismissed, since it has at least partially fulfilled its mission - to be the powerful and more or less perfect utterance of that which is to be expressed. What makes it difficult for the sensibility of a nation to enjoy the delight that another nation finds in one art or another is the habitual limitation of the nervous being which, even more than the mental being, is naturally exclusive in its ability to perceive the Divine and which, when it has entered into relation with Him through certain forms, feels an almost irresistible reluctance to recognise Him through other forms of sensation. ~ The Mother, Words Of Long Ago, 122,
230:Many are God's forms by which he grows in man;
   They stamp his thoughts and deeds with divinity,
   Uplift the stature of the human clay
   Or slowly transmute it into heavens gold.
   He is the Good for which men fight and die,
   He is the war of Right with Titan wrong;
   He is Freedom rising deathless from her pyre;
   He is Valour guarding still the desperate pass
   Or lone and erect on the shattered barricade
   Or a sentinel in the dangerous echoing Night.
   He is the crown of the martyr burned in flame
   And the glad resignation of the saint
   And courage indifferent to the wounds of Time
   And the heros might wrestling with death and fate.
   He is Wisdom incarnate on a glorious throne
   And the calm autocracy of the sages rule.
   He is the high and solitary Thought
   Aloof above the ignorant multitude:
   He is the prophets voice, the sight of the seer.
   He is Beauty, nectar of the passionate soul,
   He is the Truth by which the spirit lives.
   He is the riches of the spiritual Vast
   Poured out in healing streams on indigent Life;
   He is Eternity lured from hour to hour,
   He is infinity in a little space:
   He is immortality in the arms of death.
   These powers I am and at my call they come.
   Thus slowly I lift mans soul nearer the Light.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
231:38 - Strange! The Germans have disproved the existence of Christ; yet his crucifixion remains still a greater historic fact than the death of Caesar. - Sri Aurobindo.

To what plane of consciousness did Christ belong?

In the Essays on the Gita Sri Aurobindo mentions the names of three Avatars, and Christ is one of them. An Avatar is an emanation of the Supreme Lord who assumes a human body on earth.

I heard Sri Aurobindo himself say that Christ was an emanation of the Lord's aspect of love.

The death of Caesar marked a decisive change in the history of Rome and the countries dependent on her. It was therefore an important event in the history of Europe.

But the death of Christ was the starting-point of a new stage in the evolution of human civilisation. This is why Sri Aurobindo tells us that the death of Christ was of greater historical significance, that is to say, it has had greater historical consequences than the death of Caesar. The story of Christ, as it has been told, is the concrete and dramatic enactment of the divine sacrifice: the Supreme Lord, who is All-Light, All-Knowledge, All-Power, All-Beauty, All-Love, All-Bliss, accepting to assume human ignorance and suffering in matter, in order to help men to emerge from the falsehood in which they live and because of which they die.

16 June 1960 ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms, volume-10, page no.61-62),
232:The Supreme Mind
'O God! we acknowledge Thee to be the Supreme Mind
Who hast disposed and ordered the Universe;
Who gave it life and motion at the first,
And still continuest to guide and regulate it.
From Thee was its primal impulsion;
Thou didst bestow on thine Emanated Spirit of Light,
Divine wisdom and various power
To stablish and enforce its transcendent orbits.
Thou art the Inconceivable Energy
Which in the beginning didst cause all things;
Of whom shall no created being ever know
A millionth part of thy divine properties.
But the Spirit was the Spirit of the Universe-
Sacred, Holy, Generating Nature;
Which, obedient unto thy will,
Preserves and reproduces all that is in the Kosmos.
Nothing is superior to the Spirit
But Thou, alone, O God! who art the Creator and Lord;
Thou madest the Spirit to be thy servitor,
But this thy Spirit transcends all other creatures;
This is the Spirit which is in the highest heavens;
Whose influence permeates all that lives;
As a beautiful Flower diffuses fragrances
But is not diminished in aught thereby.
For all divine essences are the same,
Differing only in their degree and power and beauty;
But in no wise differing in their principle,
Which is the fiery essence of God himself.
Such is the animating flame of every existence
Being in God, purely perfect;
But in all other living things
Only capable of being made perfect.' ~ Dr E.V. Kenealy, The Book of Fo.
The Supreme Mind. from path of regeneration,
233:The Quest
A part, immutable, unseen,
Being, before itself had been,
Became. Like dew a triple queen
Shone as the void uncovered:
The silence of deep height was drawn
A veil across the silver dawn
On holy wings that hovered.
The music of three thoughts became
The beauty, that is one white flame,
The justice that surpasses shame,
The victory, the splendour,
The sacred fountain that is whirled
From depths beyond that older world
A new world to engender.
The kingdom is extended. Night
Dwells, and I contemplate the sight
That is not seeing, but the light
That secretly is kindled,
Though oft-time its most holy fire
Lacks oil, whene'er my own Desire
Before desire has dwindled.
I see the thin web binding me
With thirteen cords of unity
Toward the calm centre of the sea.
(O thou supernal mother!)
The triple light my path divides
To twain and fifty sudden sides
Each perfect as each other.
Now backwards, inwards still my mind
Must track the intangible and blind,
And seeking, shall securely find
Hidden in secret places
Fresh feasts for every soul that strives,
New life for many mystic lives,
And strange new forms and faces.
My mind still searches, and attains
By many days and many pains
To That which Is and Was and reigns
Shadowed in four and ten;
And loses self in sacred lands,
And cries and quickens, and understands
Beyond the first Amen.
~ Aleister Crowley,
234:On a thousand bridges and paths they shall throng to the future, and ever more war and inequality shall divide them: thus does my great love make me speak.

In their hostilities they shall become inventors of images and ghosts, and with their images and ghosts they shall yet fight the highest fight against one another. Good and evil, and rich and poor, and high and low, and all the names of values-arms shall they be and clattering signs that life must overcome itself again and again.

Life wants to build itself up into the heights with pillars and steps; it wants to look into vast distances and out toward stirring beauties: therefore it requires height. And because it requires height, it requires steps and contradiction among the steps and the climbers.

Life wants to climb and to overcome itself climbing.

And behold, my friends: here where the tarantula has its hole, the ruins of an ancient temple rise; behold it with enlightened eyes Verily, the man who once piled his thoughts to the sky in these stones-he, like the wisest, knew the secret of all life. That struggle and inequality are present even in beauty, and also war for power and more power: that is what he teaches us here in the plainest parable. How divinely vault and arches break through each other in a wrestling match; how they strive against each other with light and shade, the godlike strivers-with such assurance and beauty let us be enemies too, my friends Let us strive against one another like gods. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, trans. Fred Kaufmann,
235:In the name of Him Who created and sustains the world, the Sage Who endowed tongue with speech.
He attains no honor who turns the face from the doer of His mercy.
The kings of the earth prostate themselves before Him in supplication.
He seizes not in haste the disobedient, nor drives away the penitent with violence. The two worlds are as a drop of water in the ocean of His knowledge.
He withholds not His bounty though His servants sin; upon the surface of the earth has He spread a feast, in which both friend and foe may share.
Peerless He is, and His kingdom is eternal. Upon the head of one He placed a crown another he hurled from the throne to the ground.
The fire of His friend He turned into a flower garden; through the water of the Nile He sended His foes to perdition.
Behind the veil He sees all, and concealed our faults with His own goodness.

He is near to them that are downcast, and accepts the prayers of them that lament.
He knows of the things that exist not, of secrets that are untold.
He causes the moon and the sun to revolve, and spreads water upon the earth.
In the heart of a stone hath He placed a jewel; from nothing had He created all that is.
Who can reveal the secret of His qualities; what eye can see the limits of His beauty?
The bird of thought cannot soar to the height of His presence, nor the hand of understanding reach to the skirt of His praise.
Think not, O Saadi, that one can walk in the road of purity except in the footsteps of Mohammed (Peace and Blessings be Upon Him)
~ Saadi, The Bustan of Sa'di,
236:need for the soul's spiritualization :::
   And yet even the leading of the inmost psychic being is not found sufficient until it has succeeded in raising itself out of this mass of inferior Nature to the highest spiritual levels and the divine spark and flame descended here have rejoined themselves to their original fiery Ether. For there is there no longer a spiritual consciousness still imperfect and half lost to itself in the thick sheaths of human mind, life and body, but the full spiritual consciousness in its purity, freedom and intense wideness. There, as it is the eternal Knower that becomes the Knower in us and mover and user of all knowledge, so it is the eternal All-Blissful who is the Adored attracting to himself the eternal divine portion of his being and joy that has gone out into the play of the universe, the infinite Lover pouring himself out in the multiplicity of his own manifested selves in a happy Oneness. All Beauty in the world is there the beauty of the Beloved, and all forms of beauty have to stand under the light of that eternal Beauty and submit themselves to the sublimating and transfiguring power of the unveiled Divine Perfection. All Bliss and Joy are there of the All-Blissful, and all inferior forms of enjoyment, happiness or pleasure are subjected to the shock of the intensity of its floods or currents and either they are broken to pieces as inadequate things under its convicting stress or compelled to transmute themselves into the forms of the Divine Ananda. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 2, 168,
237:Received him in their deathless harmonies.
   All things were perfect there that flower in Time;
   Beauty was there creation's native mould,
   Peace was a thrilled voluptuous purity.
   There Love fulfilled her gold and roseate dreams
   And Strength her crowned and mighty reveries;
   Desire climbed up, a swift omnipotent flame,
   And Pleasure had the stature of the gods;
   Dream walked along the highways of the stars;
   Sweet common things turned into miracles:
   Overtaken by the spirit's sudden spell,
   Smitten by a divine passion's alchemy,
   Pain's self compelled transformed to potent joy
   Curing the antithesis twixt heaven and hell.
   All life's high visions are embodied there,
   Her wandering hopes achieved, her aureate combs
   Caught by the honey-eater's darting tongue,
   Her burning guesses changed to ecstasied truths,
   Her mighty pantings stilled in deathless calm
   And liberated her immense desires.
   In that paradise of perfect heart and sense
   No lower note could break the endless charm
   Of her sweetness ardent and immaculate;
   Her steps are sure of their intuitive fall.
   After the anguish of the soul's long strife
   At length were found calm and celestial rest
   And, lapped in a magic flood of sorrowless hours,
   Healed were his warrior nature's wounded limbs
   In the encircling arms of Energies
   That brooked no stain and feared not their own bliss.
   In scenes forbidden to our pallid sense
   Amid miraculous scents and wonder-hues
   He met the forms that divinise the sight,
   To music that can immortalise the mind
   And make the heart wide as infinity
   Listened, and captured the inaudible
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Paradise of the Life-Gods,
238:Sweet Mother, You have asked the teachers "to think with ideas instead of with words".4 You have also said that later on you will ask them to think with experiences. Will you throw some light on these three ways of thinking?
Our house has a very high tower; at the very top of this tower there is a bright and bare room, the last before we emerge into the open air, into the full light.

   Sometimes, when we are free to do so, we climb up to this bright room, and there, if we remain very quiet, one or more visitors come to call on us; some are tall, others small, some single, others in groups; all are bright and graceful.

   Usually, in our joy at their arrival and our haste to welcome them, we lose our tranquillity and come galloping down to rush into the great hall that forms the base of the tower and is the storeroom of words. Here, more or less excited, we select, reject, assemble, combine, disarrange, rearrange all the words in our reach, in an attempt to portray this or that visitor who has come to us. But most often, the picture we succeed in making of our visitor is more like a caricature than a portrait.

   And yet if we were wiser, we would remain up above, at the summit of the tower, quite calm, in joyful contemplation.

   Then, after a certain length of time, we would see the visitors themselves slowly, gracefully, calmly descend, without losing anything of their elegance or beauty and, as they cross the storeroom of words, clothe themselves effortlessly, automatically, with the words needed to make themselves perceptible even in the material house.

   This is what I call thinking with ideas.

   When this process is no longer mysterious to you, I shall explain what is meant by thinking with experiences. ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother,
239:19 - When I had the dividing reason, I shrank from many things; after I had lost it in sight, I hunted through the world for the ugly and the repellent, but I could no longer find them. - Sri Aurobindo

Is there really nothing ugly and repellent in the world? Is it our reason alone that sees things in that way?

To understand truly what Sri Aurobindo means here, you must yourself have had the experience of transcending reason and establishing your consciousness in a world higher than the mental intelligence. For from up there you can see, firstly, that everything that exists in the universe is an expression of Sachchidananda (Being-Consciousness-Bliss) and therefore behind any appearance whatever, if you go deeply enough, you can perceive Sachchidananda, which is the principle of Supreme Beauty.

Secondly, you see that everything in the manifested universe is relative, so much so that there is no beauty which may not appear ugly in comparison with a greater beauty, no ugliness which may not appear beautiful in comparison with a yet uglier ugliness.

When you can see and feel in this way, you immediately become aware of the extreme relativity of these impressions and their unreality from the absolute point of view. However, so long as we dwell in the rational consciousness, it is, in a way, natural that everything that offends our aspiration for perfection, our will for progress, everything we seek to transcend and surmount, should seem ugly and repellent to us, since we are in search of a greater ideal and we want to rise higher.

And yet it is still only a half-wisdom which is very far from the true wisdom, a wisdom that appears wise only in the midst of ignorance and unconsciousness.

In the Truth everything is different, and the Divine shines in all things. 17 February 1960 ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms,
240:Man's refusal of the Divine Grace has been depicted very beautifully and graphically in a perfect dramatic form by Sri Aurobindo in Savitri. The refusal comes one by one from the three constituent parts of the human being. First of all man is a material being, a bodily creature, as such he is a being of ignorance and misery, of brutish blindness . He does not know that there is something other than his present state of misfortune and dark fate. He is not even aware that there may be anything higher or nobler than the ugliness he is steeped in. He lives on earth-life with an earth-consciousness, moves mechanically and helplessly through vicissitudes over which he has no control. Even so the material life is not a mere despicable thing; behind its darkness, behind its sadness, behind all its infirmities, the Divine Mother is there upholding it and infusing into it her grace and beauty. Indeed, she is one with this world of sorrows, she has in effect become it in her infinite pity and love so that this material body of hers may become conscious of its divine substance and manifest her true form. But the human being individualised and separated in egoistic consciousness has lost the sense of its inner reality and is vocal only in regard to its outward formulation. It is natural for physical man therefore to reject and deny the physical Godhead in him, he even curses it and wants to continue as he is.
He yells therefore in ignorance and anguish:
I am the Man of Sorrows, I am he
Who is nailed on the wide cross of the Universe . . .
I toil like the animal, like the animal die.
I am man the rebel, man the helpless serf...
I know my fate will ever be the same.
It is my Nature' s work that cannot change . . .
I was made for evil, evil is my lot;
Evil I must be and by evil live;
Nought other can I do but be myself;
What Nature made, that I must remain.2' ~ Nolini Kanta Gupta, On Savitri, 13,
241:It doesnt interest me what you do for a living. I want to know what you ache for, and if you dare to dream of meeting your hearts longing. It doesnt interest me how old you are. I want to know if you will risk looking like a fool for love, for your dream, for the adventure of being alive. It doesnt interest me what planets are squaring your moon. I want to know if you have touched the center of your own sorrow, if you have been opened by lifes betrayals or have become shriveled and closed from fear of further pain!I want to know if you can sit with pain, mine or your own, without moving to hide it or fade it, or fix it. I want to know if you can be with joy, mine or your own, if you can dance with wildness and let the ecstasy fill you to the tips of your fingers and toes without cautioning us to be careful, to be realistic, to remember the limitations of being human. It doesnt interest me if the story you are telling me is true. I want to know if you can disappoint another to be true to yourself; if you can bear the accusation of betrayal and not betray your own soul; if you can be faithlessand therefore trustworthy. I want to know if you can see beauty even when its not pretty, every day,and if you can source your own life from its presence. I want to know if you can live with failure, yours and mine, and still stand on the edge of the lake and shout to the silver of the full moon, Yes! It doesnt interest me to know where you live or how much money you have. I want to know if you can get up, after the night of grief and despair, weary and bruised to the bone, and do what needs to be done to feed the children. It doesnt interest me who you know or how you came to be here. I want to know if you will stand in the center of the fire with me and not shrink back. It doesnt interest me where or what or with whom you have studied. I want to know what sustains you, from the inside, when all else falls away. I want to know if you can be alone with yourself and if you truly like the company you keep in the empty moments.
   ~ Oriah Mountain Dreamer,
242:I know some individuals who make this their daily practice: starting at the beginning and reading a canto or half a canto every day till they reach the end and then starting at the beginning again, and in that way they have gone through the whole of Savitri many times. When this is done in groups there's really no doubt that by this going through the whole soundbody of the epic from beginning to end aloud, there must be built up a very strong force field of vibrations. It is definitely of benefit to the people who participate in it. But again I would say that the effect or benefit of this sacrifice will be richer to the extent that the reading is done with understanding and above all with soul surrender. It shouldn't become a mere ritual.
Sri Aurobindo's mantric lines, repeated one after the other, will always have their power; but the power will be much greater if the mind can participate, and the will and the heart.
I have also heard of some groups who select one line that seems to have a particular mantric power and then within the group they chant that line many, many times. They concentrate on that one special line, and try to take its vibrations deep into themselves. Again I am sure that this is very beneficial to those who practice it.
In that way the words enter very deeply into the consciousness. There they resonate and do their work, and perhaps not just the surface meaning but the deeper meaning and the deeper vibrations may reveal their full depth to those who undertake this exercise if it is done with self-dedication, with a true aspiration to internalise the heart of the meaning, not just as a mere repetition.
At another end of the spectrum of possible approaches to Savitri, we can say there would be the aesthetic approach, the approach of enjoying it for its poetic beauty. I met a gentleman a couple of months ago, who told me, "We have faith in Sri Aurobindo, but it is so difficult to understand his books. We tried with The Life Divine, we tried with The Synthesis of Yoga but we found them so difficult. ~ collab summer & fall 2011,
243:The way of integral knowledge supposes that we are intended to arrive at an integral self-fulfilment and the only thing that is to be eliminated is our own unconsciousness, the Ignorance and the results of the Ignorance. Eliminate the falsity of the being which figures as the ego; then our true being can manifest in us. Eliminate the falsity of the life which figures as mere vital craving and the mechanical round of our corporeal existence; our true life in the power of the Godhead and the joy of the Infinite will appear. Eliminate the falsity of the senses with their subjection to material shows and to dual sensations; there is a greater sense in us that can open through these to the Divine in things and divinely reply to it. Eliminate the falsity of the heart with its turbid passions and desires and its dual emotions; a deeper heart in us can open with its divine love for all creatures and its infinite passion and yearning for the responses of the Infinite. Eliminate the falsity of the thought with its imperfect mental constructions, its arrogant assertions and denials, its limited and exclusive concentrations; a greater faculty of knowledge is behind that can open to the true Truth of God and the soul and Nature and the universe. An integral self-fulfilment, - an absolute, a culmination for the experiences of the heart, for its instinct of love, joy, devotion and worship; an absolute, a culmination for the senses, for their pursuit of divine beauty and good and delight in the forms of things; an absolute, a culmination for the life, for its pursuit of works, of divine power, mastery and perfection; an absolute, a culmination beyond its own limits for the thought, for its hunger after truth and light and divine wisdom and knowledge. Not something quite other than themselves from which they are all cast away is the end of these things in our nature, but something supreme in which they at once transcend themselves and find their own absolutes and infinitudes, their harmonies beyond measure.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Object of Knowledge,
244:At the basis of this collaboration there is necessarily the will to change, no longer to be what one is, for things to be no longer what they are. There are several ways of reaching it, and all the methods are good when they succeed! One may be deeply disgusted with what exists and wish ardently to come out of all this and attain something else; one may - and this is a more positive way - one may feel within oneself the touch, the approach of something positively beautiful and true, and willingly drop all the rest so that nothing may burden the journey to this new beauty and truth.

   What is indispensable in every case is the ardent will for progress, the willing and joyful renunciation of all that hampers the advance: to throw far away from oneself all that prevents one from going forward, and to set out into the unknown with the ardent faith that this is the truth of tomorrow, inevitable, which must necessarily come, which nothing, nobody, no bad will, even that of Nature, can prevent from becoming a reality - perhaps of a not too distant future - a reality which is being worked out now and which those who know how to change, how not to be weighed down by old habits, will surely have the good fortune not only to see but to realise. People sleep, they forget, they take life easy - they forget, forget all the time.... But if we could remember... that we are at an exceptional hour, a unique time, that we have this immense good fortune, this invaluable privilege of being present at the birth of a new world, we could easily get rid of everything that impedes and hinders our progress.

   So, the most important thing, it seems, is to remember this fact; even when one doesn't have the tangible experience, to have the certainty of it and faith in it; to remember always, to recall it constantly, to go to sleep with this idea, to wake up with this perception; to do all that one does with this great truth as the background, as a constant support, this great truth that we are witnessing the birth of a new world.

   We can participate in it, we can become this new world. And truly, when one has such a marvellous opportunity, one should be ready to give up everything for its sake. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958, [T1],
245:The Absolute is beyond personality and beyond impersonality, and yet it is both the Impersonal and the supreme Person and all persons. The Absolute is beyond the distinction of unity and multiplicity, and yet it is the One and the innumerable Many in all the universes. It is beyond all limitation by quality and yet it is not limited by a qualityless void but is too all infinite qualities. It is the individual soul and all souls and more of them; it is the formless Brahman and the universe. It is the cosmic and the supracosmic spirit, the supreme Lord, the supreme Self, the supreme Purusha and supreme shakti, the Ever Unborn who is endlessly born, the Infinite who is innumerably finite, the multitudinous One, the complex Simple, the many-sided Single, the Word of the Silence Ineffable, the impersonal omnipresent Person, the Mystery, translucent in highest consciousness to its own spirit, but to a lesser consciousness veiled in its own exceeding light and impenetrable for ever. These things are to the dimensional mind irreconcilable opposites, but to the constant vision and experience of the supramental Truth-Consciousness they are so simply and inevitably the intrinsic nature of each other that even to think of them as contraries is an unimaginable violence. The walls constructed by the measuring and separating Intellect have disappeared and the Truth in its simplicity and beauty appears and reduces all to terms of its harmony and unity and light. Dimensions and distinctions remain but as figures for use, not a separative prison for the self-forgetting Spirit.
2:In the ordinary Yoga of knowledge it is only necessary to recognise two planes of our consciousness, the spiritual and the materialised mental; the pure reason standing between these two views them both, cuts through the illusions of the phenomenal world, exceeds the materialised mental plane, sees the reality of the spiritual; and then the will of the individual Purusha unifying itself with this poise of knowledge rejects the lower and draws back to the supreme plane, dwells there, loses mind and body, sheds life from it and merges itself in the supreme Purusha, is delivered from individual existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis of Yoga, 2.01 - The Object of Knowledge,
246:And for the same reason, because that which we are seeking through beauty is in the end that which we are seeking through religion, the Absolute, the Divine. The search for beauty is only in its beginning a satisfaction in the beauty of form, the beauty which appeals to the physical senses and the vital impressions, impulsions, desires. It is only in the middle a satisfaction in the beauty of the ideas seized, the emotions aroused, the perception of perfect process and harmonious combination. Behind them the soul of beauty in us desires the contact, the revelation, the uplifting delight of an absolute beauty in all things which it feels to be present, but which neither the senses and instincts by themselves can give, though they may be its channels, - for it is suprasensuous, - nor the reason and intelligence, though they too are a channel, - for it is suprarational, supra-intellectual, - but to which through all these veils the soul itself seeks to arrive. When it can get the touch of this universal, absolute beauty, this soul of beauty, this sense of its revelation in any slightest or greatest thing, the beauty of a flower, a form, the beauty and power of a character, an action, an event, a human life, an idea, a stroke of the brush or the chisel or a scintillation of the mind, the colours of a sunset or the grandeur of the tempest, it is then that the sense of beauty in us is really, powerfully, entirely satisfied. It is in truth seeking, as in religion, for the Divine, the All-Beautiful in man, in nature, in life, in thought, in art; for God is Beauty and Delight hidden in the variation of his masks and forms. When, fulfilled in our growing sense and knowledge of beauty and delight in beauty and our power for beauty, we are able to identify ourselves in soul with this Absolute and Divine in all the forms and activities of the world and shape an image of our inner and our outer life in the highest image we can perceive and embody of the All-Beautiful, then the aesthetic being in us who was born for this end, has fulfilled himself and risen to his divine consummation. To find highest beauty is to find God; to reveal, to embody, to create, as we say, highest beauty is to bring out of our souls the living image and power of God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, 144,
247:The poet-seer sees differently, thinks in another way, voices himself in quite another manner than the philosopher or the prophet. The prophet announces the Truth as the Word, the Law or the command of the Eternal, he is the giver of the message; the poet shows us Truth in its power of beauty, in its symbol or image, or reveals it to us in the workings of Nature or in the workings of life, and when he has done that, his whole work is done; he need not be its explicit spokesman or its official messenger. The philosopher's business is to discriminate Truth and put its parts and aspects into intellectual relation with each other; the poet's is to seize and embody aspects of Truth in their living relations, or rather - for that is too philosophical a language - to see her features and, excited by the vision, create in the beauty of her image.

   No doubt, the prophet may have in him a poet who breaks out often into speech and surrounds with the vivid atmosphere of life the directness of his message; he may follow up his injunction "Take no thought for the morrow," by a revealing image of the beauty of the truth he enounces, in the life of Nature, in the figure of the lily, or link it to human life by apologue and parable. The philosopher may bring in the aid of colour and image to give some relief and hue to his dry light of reason and water his arid path of abstractions with some healing dew of poetry. But these are ornaments and not the substance of his work; and if the philosopher makes his thought substance of poetry, he ceases to be a philosophic thinker and becomes a poet-seer of Truth. Thus the more rigid metaphysicians are perhaps right in denying to Nietzsche the name of philosopher; for Nietzsche does not think, but always sees, turbidly or clearly, rightly or distortedly, but with the eye of the seer rather than with the brain of the thinker. On the other hand we may get great poetry which is full of a prophetic enthusiasm of utterance or is largely or even wholly philosophic in its matter; but this prophetic poetry gives us no direct message, only a mass of sublime inspirations of thought and image, and this philosophic poetry is poetry and lives as poetry only in so far as it departs from the method, the expression, the way of seeing proper to the philosophic mind. It must be vision pouring itself into thought-images and not thought trying to observe truth and distinguish its province and bounds and fences.

   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry,
248:As far as heaven, as near as thought and hope,
Glimmered the kingdom of a griefless life.
Above him in a new celestial vault
Other than the heavens beheld by mortal eyes,
As on a fretted ceiling of the gods,
An archipelago of laughter and fire,
Swam stars apart in a rippled sea of sky.
Towered spirals, magic rings of vivid hue
And gleaming spheres of strange felicity
Floated through distance like a symbol world.
On the trouble and the toil they could not share,
On the unhappiness they could not aid,
Impervious to life's suffering, struggle, grief,
Untarnished by its anger, gloom and hate,
Unmoved, untouched, looked down great visioned planes
Blissful for ever in their timeless right.
Absorbed in their own beauty and content,
Of their immortal gladness they live sure.
Apart in their self-glory plunged, remote
Burning they swam in a vague lucent haze,
An everlasting refuge of dream-light,
A nebula of the splendours of the gods
Made from the musings of eternity.
Almost unbelievable by human faith,
Hardly they seemed the stuff of things that are.
As through a magic television's glass
Outlined to some magnifying inner eye
They shone like images thrown from a far scene
Too high and glad for mortal lids to seize.
But near and real to the longing heart
And to the body's passionate thought and sense
Are the hidden kingdoms of beatitude.
In some close unattained realm which yet we feel,
Immune from the harsh clutch of Death and Time,
Escaping the search of sorrow and desire,
In bright enchanted safe peripheries
For ever wallowing in bliss they lie.
In dream and trance and muse before our eyes,
Across a subtle vision's inner field,
Wide rapturous landscapes fleeting from the sight,
The figures of the perfect kingdom pass
And behind them leave a shining memory's trail.
Imagined scenes or great eternal worlds,
Dream-caught or sensed, they touch our hearts with their depths;
Unreal-seeming, yet more real than life,
Happier than happiness, truer than things true,
If dreams these were or captured images,
Dream's truth made false earth's vain realities.
In a swift eternal moment fixed there live
Or ever recalled come back to longing eyes
Calm heavens of imperishable Light,
Illumined continents of violet peace,
Oceans and rivers of the mirth of God
And griefless countries under purple suns.
~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Glory and the Fall of Life,
249:requirements for the psychic :::
   At a certain stage in the Yoga when the mind is sufficiently quieted and no longer supports itself at every step on the sufficiency of its mental certitudes, when the vital has been steadied and subdued and is no longer constantly insistent on its own rash will, demand and desire, when the physical has been sufficiently altered not to bury altogether the inner flame under the mass of its outwardness, obscurity or inertia, an inmost being hidden within and felt only in its rare influences is able to come forward and illumine the rest and take up the lead of the sadhana. Its character is a one-pointed orientation towards the Divine or the Highest, one-pointed and yet plastic in action and movement; it does not create a rigidity of direction like the one-pointed intellect or a bigotry of the regnant idea or impulse like the one-pointed vital force; it is at every moment and with a supple sureness that it points the way to the Truth, automatically distinguishes the right step from the false, extricates the divine or Godward movement from the clinging mixture of the undivine. Its action is like a searchlight showing up all that has to be changed in the nature; it has in it a flame of will insistent on perfection, on an alchemic transmutation of all the inner and outer existence. It sees the divine essence everywhere but rejects the mere mask and the disguising figure. It insists on Truth, on will and strength and mastery, on Joy and Love and Beauty, but on a Truth of abiding Knowledge that surpasses the mere practical momentary truth of the Ignorance, on an inward joy and not on mere vital pleasure, -- for it prefers rather a purifying suffering and sorrow to degrading satisfactions, -- on love winged upward and not tied to the stake of egoistic craving or with its feet sunk in the mire, on beauty restored to its priesthood of interpretation of the Eternal, on strength and will and mastery as instruments not of the ego but of the Spirit. Its will is for the divinisation of life, the expression through it of a higher Truth, its dedication to the Divine and the Eternal.
   But the most intimate character of the psychic is its pressure towards the Divine through a sacred love, joy and oneness. It is the divine Love that it seeks most, it is the love of the Divine that is its spur, its goal, its star of Truth shining over the luminous cave of the nascent or the still obscure cradle of the new-born godhead within us.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 1,
250:The Mahashakti, the universal Mother, works out whatever is transmitted by her transcendent consciousness from the Supreme and enters into the worlds that she has made; her presence fills and supports them with the divine spirit and the divine all-sustaining force and delight without which they could not exist. That which we call Nature or Prakriti is only her most outward executive aspect; she marshals and arranges the harmony of her forces and processes, impels the operations of Nature and moves among them secret or manifest in all that can be seen or experienced or put into motion of life. Each of the worlds is nothing but one play of the Mahashakti of that system of worlds or universe, who is there as the cosmic Soul and Personality of the transcendent Mother. Each is something that she has seen in her vision, gathered into her heart of beauty and power and created in her Ananda.
   But there are many planes of her creation, many steps of the Divine Shakti. At the summit of this manifestation of which we are a part there are worlds of infinite existence, consciousness, force and bliss over which the Mother stands as the unveiled eternal Power. All beings there live and move in an ineffable completeness and unalterable oneness, because she carries them safe in her arms for ever. Nearer to us are the worlds of a perfect supramental creation in which the Mother is the supramental Mahashakti, a Power of divine omniscient Will and omnipotent Knowledge always apparent in its unfailing works and spontaneously perfect in every process. There all movements are the steps of the Truth; there all beings are souls and powers and bodies of the divine Light; there all experiences are seas and floods and waves of an intense and absolute Ananda. But here where we dwell are the worlds of the Ignorance, worlds of mind and life and body separated in consciousness from their source, of which this earth is a significant centre and its evolution a crucial process. This too with all its obscurity and struggle and imperfection is upheld by the Universal Mother; this too is impelled and guided to its secret aim by the Mahashakti.
   The Mother as the Mahashakti of this triple world of the Ignorance stands in an intermediate plane between the supramental Light, the Truth life, the Truth creation which has to be brought down here and this mounting and descending hierarchy of planes of consciousness that like a double ladder lapse into the nescience of Matter and climb back again through the flowering of life and soul and mind into the infinity of the Spirit. Determining all that shall be in this universe and in the terrestrial evolution by what she sees and feels and pours from her, she stands there... ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother,
251:Mother of Dreams :::

Goddess supreme, Mother of Dream, by thy ivory doors when thou standest,
Who are they then that come down unto men in thy visions that troop, group upon group, down the path of the shadows slanting?
Dream after dream, they flash and they gleam with the flame of the stars still around them;
Shadows at thy side in a darkness ride where the wild fires dance, stars glow and glance and the random meteor glistens;
There are voices that cry to their kin who reply; voices sweet, at the heart they beat and ravish the soul as it listens.

What then are these lands and these golden sands and these seas more radiant than earth can imagine?
Who are those that pace by the purple waves that race to the cliff-bound floor of thy jasper shore under skies in which mystery muses,
Lapped in moonlight not of our night or plunged in sunshine that is not diurnal?
Who are they coming thy Oceans roaming with sails whose strands are not made by hands, an unearthly wind advances?
Why do they join in a mystic line with those on the sands linking hands in strange and stately dances?

Thou in the air, with a flame in thy hair, the whirl of thy wonders watching,
Holdest the night in thy ancient right, Mother divine, hyacinthine, with a girdle of beauty defended.
Sworded with fire, attracting desire, thy tenebrous kingdom thou keepest,
Starry-sweet, with the moon at thy feet, now hidden now seen the clouds between in the gloom and the drift of thy tresses.
Only to those whom thy fancy chose, O thou heart-free, is it given to see thy witchcraft and feel thy caresses.

Open the gate where thy children wait in their world of a beauty undarkened.
High-throned on a cloud, victorious, proud I have espied Maghavan ride when the armies of wind are behind him;
Food has been given for my tasting from heaven and fruit of immortal sweetness;
I have drunk wine of the kingdoms divine and have healed the change of music strange from a lyre which our hands cannot master,
Doors have swung wide in the chambers of pride where the Gods reside and the Apsaras dance in their circles faster and faster.

For thou art she whom we first can see when we pass the bounds of the mortal;
There at the gates of the heavenly states thou hast planted thy wand enchanted over the head of the Yogin waving.
From thee are the dream and the shadows that seem and the fugitive lights that delude us;
Thine is the shade in which visions are made; sped by thy hands from celestial lands come the souls that rejoice for ever.
Into thy dream-worlds we pass or look in thy magic glass, then beyond thee we climb out of Space and Time to the peak of divine endeavour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems,
252:Worthy The Name Of Sir Knight
Sir Knight of the world's oldest order,
Sir Knight of the Army of God,
You have crossed the strange mystical border,
The ground floor of truth you have trod;
You have entered the sanctum sanctorum,
Which leads to the temple above,
Where you come as a stone, and a Christ-chosen one,
In the kingdom of Friendship and Love.
II
As you stand in this new realm of beauty,
Where each man you meet is your friend,
Think not that your promise of duty
In hall, or asylum, shall end;
Outside, in the great world of pleasure,
Beyond, in the clamor of trade,
In the battle of life and its coarse daily strife
Remember the vows you have made.
III
Your service, majestic and solemn,
Your symbols, suggestive and sweet,
Your uniformed phalanx in column
On gala days marching the street;
Your sword and your plume and your helmet,
Your 'secrets' hid from the world's sight;
These things are the small, lesser parts of the all
Which are needed to form the true Knight.
IV
The martyrs who perished rejoicing
In Templary's glorious laws,
Who died 'midst the fagots while voicing
The glory and worth of their cause-
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They honored the title of 'Templar'
No more than the Knight of to-day
Who mars not the name with one blemish of shame,
But carries it clean through life's fray.
To live for a cause, to endeavor
To make your deeds grace it, to try
And uphold its precepts forever,
Is harder by far than to die.
For the battle of life is unending,
The enemy, Self, never tires,
And the true Knight must slay that sly foe every day
Ere he reaches the heights he desires.
VI
Sir Knight, have you pondered the meaning
Of all you have heard and been told?
Have you strengthened your heart for its weaning
From vices and faults loved of old?
Will you honor, in hours of temptation,
Your promises noble and grand?
Will your spirit be strong to do battle with wrong,
'And having done all, to stand?'
VII
Will you ever be true to a brother
In actions as well as in creed?
Will you stand by his side as no other
Could stand in the hour of his need?
Will you boldly defend him from peril,
And lift him from poverty's curseWill the promise of aid which you willingly made,
Reach down from your lips to your purse?
VIII
The world's battle field is before you!
Let Wisdom walk close by your side,
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Let Faith spread her snowy wings o'er you,
Let Truth be your comrade and guide;
Let Fortitude, Justice and Mercy
Direct all your conduct aright,
And let each word and act tell to men the proud fact,
You are worthy the name of 'Sir Knight'.
~ Ella Wheeler Wilcox,
253:O Death, thou lookst on an unfinished world
Assailed by thee and of its road unsure,
Peopled by imperfect minds and ignorant lives,
And sayest God is not and all is vain.
How shall the child already be the man?
Because he is infant, shall he never grow?
Because he is ignorant, shall he never learn?
In a small fragile seed a great tree lurks,
In a tiny gene a thinking being is shut;
A little element in a little sperm,
It grows and is a conqueror and a sage.
Then wilt thou spew out, Death, God's mystic truth,
Deny the occult spiritual miracle?
Still wilt thou say there is no spirit, no God?
A mute material Nature wakes and sees;
She has invented speech, unveiled a will.
Something there waits beyond towards which she strives,
Something surrounds her into which she grows:
To uncover the spirit, to change back into God,
To exceed herself is her transcendent task.
In God concealed the world began to be,
Tardily it travels towards manifest God:
Our imperfection towards perfection toils,
The body is the chrysalis of a soul:
The infinite holds the finite in its arms,
Time travels towards revealed eternity.
A miracle structure of the eternal Mage,
Matter its mystery hides from its own eyes,
A scripture written out in cryptic signs,
An occult document of the All-Wonderful's art.
All here bears witness to his secret might,
In all we feel his presence and his power.
A blaze of his sovereign glory is the sun,
A glory is the gold and glimmering moon,
A glory is his dream of purple sky.
A march of his greatness are the wheeling stars.
His laughter of beauty breaks out in green trees,
His moments of beauty triumph in a flower;
The blue sea's chant, the rivulet's wandering voice
Are murmurs falling from the Eternal's harp.
This world is God fulfilled in outwardness.
His ways challenge our reason and our sense;
By blind brute movements of an ignorant Force,
By means we slight as small, obscure or base,
A greatness founded upon little things,
He has built a world in the unknowing Void.
His forms he has massed from infinitesimal dust;
His marvels are built from insignificant things.
If mind is crippled, life untaught and crude,
If brutal masks are there and evil acts,
They are incidents of his vast and varied plot,
His great and dangerous drama's needed steps;
He makes with these and all his passion-play,
A play and yet no play but the deep scheme
Of a transcendent Wisdom finding ways
To meet her Lord in the shadow and the Night:
Above her is the vigil of the stars;
Watched by a solitary Infinitude
She embodies in dumb Matter the Divine,
In symbol minds and lives the Absolute.
~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Debate of Love and Death,
254:The Absolute is in itself indefinable by reason, ineffable to the speech; it has to be approached through experience. It can be approached through an absolute negation of existence, as if it were itself a supreme Non-Existence, a mysterious infinite Nihil. It can be approached through an absolute affirmation of all the fundamentals of our own existence, through an absolute of Light and Knowledge, through an absolute of Love or Beauty, through an absolute of Force, through an absolute of peace or silence. It can be approached through an inexpressible absolute of being or of consciousness, or of power of being, or of delight of being, or through a supreme experience in which these things become inexpressibly one; for we can enter into such an ineffable state and, plunged into it as if into a luminous abyss of existence, we can reach a superconscience which may be described as the gate of the Absolute. It is supposed that it is only through a negation of individual and cosmos that we can enter into the Absolute. But in fact the individual need only deny his own small separate ego-existence; he can approach the Absolute through a sublimation of his spiritual individuality taking up the cosmos into himself and transcending it; or he may negate himself altogether, but even so it is still the individual who by self-exceeding enters into the Absolute. He may enter also by a sublimation of his being into a supreme existence or super-existence, by a sublimation of his consciousness into a supreme consciousness or superconscience, by a sublimation of his and all delight of being into a super-delight or supreme ecstasy. He can make the approach through an ascension in which he enters into cosmic consciousness, assumes it into himself and raises himself and it into a state of being in which oneness and multiplicity are in perfect harmony and unison in a supreme status of manifestation where all are in each and each in all and all in the one without any determining individuation - for the dynamic identity and mutuality have become complete; on the path of affirmation it is this status of the manifestation that is nearest to the Absolute. This paradox of an Absolute which can be realised through an absolute negation and through an absolute affirmation, in many ways, can only be accounted for to the reason if it is a supreme Existence which is so far above our notion and experience of existence that it can correspond to our negation of it, to our notion and experience of nonexistence; but also, since all that exists is That, whatever its degree of manifestation, it is itself the supreme of all things and can be approached through supreme affirmations as through supreme negations. The Absolute is the ineffable x overtopping and underlying and immanent and essential in all that we can call existence or non-existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, 2.06 - Reality and the Cosmic Illusion,
255:The modern distinction is that the poet appeals to the imagination and not to the intellect. But there are many kinds of imagination; the objective imagination which visualises strongly the outward aspects of life and things; the subjective imagination which visualises strongly the mental and emotional impressions they have the power to start in the mind; the imagination which deals in the play of mental fictions and to which we give the name of poetic fancy; the aesthetic imagination which delights in the beauty of words and images for their own sake and sees no farther. All these have their place in poetry, but they only give the poet his materials, they are only the first instruments in the creation of poetic style. The essential poetic imagination does not stop short with even the most subtle reproductions of things external or internal, with the richest or delicatest play of fancy or with the most beautiful colouring of word or image. It is creative, not of either the actual or the fictitious, but of the more and the most real; it sees the spiritual truth of things, - of this truth too there are many gradations, - which may take either the actual or the ideal for its starting-point. The aim of poetry, as of all true art, is neither a photographic or otherwise realistic imitation of Nature, nor a romantic furbishing and painting or idealistic improvement of her image, but an interpretation by the images she herself affords us, not on one but on many planes of her creation, of that which she conceals from us, but is ready, when rightly approached, to reveal.

   This is the true, because the highest and essential aim of poetry; but the human mind arrives at it only by a succession of steps, the first of which seems far enough from its object. It begins by stringing its most obvious and external ideas, feelings and sensations of things on a thread of verse in a sufficient language of no very high quality. But even when it gets to a greater adequacy and effectiveness, it is often no more than a vital, an emotional or an intellectual adequacy and effectiveness. There is a strong vital poetry which powerfully appeals to our sensations and our sense of life, like much of Byron or the less inspired mass of the Elizabethan drama; a strong emotional poetry which stirs our feelings and gives us the sense and active image of the passions; a strong intellectual poetry which satisfies our curiosity about life and its mechanism, or deals with its psychological and other "problems", or shapes for us our thoughts in an effective, striking and often quite resistlessly quotable fashion. All this has its pleasures for the mind and the surface soul in us, and it is certainly quite legitimate to enjoy them and to enjoy them strongly and vividly on our way upward; but if we rest content with these only, we shall never get very high up the hill of the Muses.

   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry,
256:Apotheosis ::: One of the most powerful and beloved of the Bodhisattvas of the Mahayana Buddhism of Tibet, China, and Japan is the Lotus Bearer, Avalokiteshvara, "The Lord Looking Down in Pity," so called because he regards with compassion all sentient creatures suffering the evils of existence. To him goes the millionfold repeated prayer of the prayer wheels and temple gongs of Tibet: Om mani padme hum, "The jewel is in the lotus." To him go perhaps more prayers per minute than to any single divinity known to man; for when, during his final life on earth as a human being, he shattered for himself the bounds of the last threshold (which moment opened to him the timelessness of the void beyond the frustrating mirage-enigmas of the named and bounded cosmos), he paused: he made a vow that before entering the void he would bring all creatures without exception to enlightenment; and since then he has permeated the whole texture of existence with the divine grace of his assisting presence, so that the least prayer addressed to him, throughout the vast spiritual empire of the Buddha, is graciously heard. Under differing forms he traverses the ten thousand worlds, and appears in the hour of need and prayer. He reveals himself in human form with two arms, in superhuman forms with four arms, or with six, or twelve, or a thousand, and he holds in one of his left hands the lotus of the world.

Like the Buddha himself, this godlike being is a pattern of the divine state to which the human hero attains who has gone beyond the last terrors of ignorance. "When the envelopment of consciousness has been annihilated, then he becomes free of all fear, beyond the reach of change." This is the release potential within us all, and which anyone can attain-through herohood; for, as we read: "All things are Buddha-things"; or again (and this is the other way of making the same statement) : "All beings are without self."

The world is filled and illumined by, but does not hold, the Bodhisattva ("he whose being is enlightenment"); rather, it is he who holds the world, the lotus. Pain and pleasure do not enclose him, he encloses them-and with profound repose. And since he is what all of us may be, his presence, his image, the mere naming of him, helps. "He wears a garland of eight thousand rays, in which is seen fully reflected a state of perfect beauty.

The color of his body is purple gold. His palms have the mixed color of five hundred lotuses, while each finger tip has eighty-four thousand signet-marks, and each mark eighty-four thousand colors; each color has eighty-four thousand rays which are soft and mild and shine over all things that exist. With these jewel hands he draws and embraces all beings. The halo surrounding his head is studded with five hundred Buddhas, miraculously transformed, each attended by five hundred Bodhisattvas, who are attended, in turn, by numberless gods. And when he puts his feet down to the ground, the flowers of diamonds and jewels that are scattered cover everything in all directions. The color of his face is gold. While in his towering crown of gems stands a Buddha, two hundred and fifty miles high." - Amitayur-Dhyana Sutra, 19; ibid., pp. 182-183. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces, Apotheosis,
257:Talk 26

...

D.: Taking the first part first, how is the mind to be eliminated or relative consciousness transcended?

M.: The mind is by nature restless. Begin liberating it from its restlessness; give it peace; make it free from distractions; train it to look inward; make this a habit. This is done by ignoring the external world and removing the obstacles to peace of mind.

D.: How is restlessness removed from the mind?

M.: External contacts - contacts with objects other than itself - make the mind restless. Loss of interest in non-Self, (vairagya) is the first step. Then the habits of introspection and concentration follow. They are characterised by control of external senses, internal faculties, etc. (sama, dama, etc.) ending in samadhi (undistracted mind).

Talk 27.

D.: How are they practised?

M.: An examination of the ephemeral nature of external phenomena leads to vairagya. Hence enquiry (vichara) is the first and foremost step to be taken. When vichara continues automatically, it results in a contempt for wealth, fame, ease, pleasure, etc. The 'I' thought becomes clearer for inspection. The source of 'I' is the Heart - the final goal. If, however, the aspirant is not temperamentally suited to Vichara Marga (to the introspective analytical method), he must develop bhakti (devotion) to an ideal - may be God, Guru, humanity in general, ethical laws, or even the idea of beauty. When one of these takes possession of the individual, other attachments grow weaker, i.e., dispassion (vairagya) develops. Attachment for the ideal simultaneously grows and finally holds the field. Thus ekagrata (concentration) grows simultaneously and imperceptibly - with or without visions and direct aids.

In the absence of enquiry and devotion, the natural sedative pranayama (breath regulation) may be tried. This is known as Yoga Marga. If life is imperilled the whole interest centres round the one point, the saving of life. If the breath is held the mind cannot afford to (and does not) jump at its pets - external objects. Thus there is rest for the mind so long as the breath is held. All attention being turned on breath or its regulation, other interests are lost. Again, passions are attended with irregular breathing, whereas calm and happiness are attended with slow and regular breathing. Paroxysm of joy is in fact as painful as one of pain, and both are accompanied by ruffled breaths. Real peace is happiness. Pleasures do not form happiness. The mind improves by practice and becomes finer just as the razor's edge is sharpened by stropping. The mind is then better able to tackle internal or external problems. If an aspirant be unsuited temperamentally for the first two methods and circumstantially (on account of age) for the third method, he must try the Karma Marga (doing good deeds, for example, social service). His nobler instincts become more evident and he derives impersonal pleasure. His smaller self is less assertive and has a chance of expanding its good side. The man becomes duly equipped for one of the three aforesaid paths. His intuition may also develop directly by this single method. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi, Sri Ramanasramam,
258:On that spring day in the park I saw a young woman who attracted me. She was tall and slender, elegantly dressed, and had an intelligent and boyish face. I liked her at once. She was my type and began to fill my imagination. She probably was not much older than I but seemed far more mature, well-defined, a full-grown woman, but with a touch of exuberance and boyishness in her face, and this was what I liked above all .

   I had never managed to approach a girl with whom I had fallen in love, nor did I manage in this case. But the impression she made on me was deeper than any previous one had been and the infatuation had a profound influence on my life.

   Suddenly a new image had risen up before me, a lofty and cherished image. And no need, no urge was as deep or as fervent within me as the craving to worship and admire. I gave her the name Beatrice, for, even though I had not read Dante, I knew about Beatrice from an English painting of which I owned a reproduction. It showed a young pre-Raphaelite woman, long-limbed and slender, with long head and etherealized hands and features. My beautiful young woman did not quite resemble her, even though she, too, revealed that slender and boyish figure which I loved, and something of the ethereal, soulful quality of her face.

   Although I never addressed a single word to Beatrice, she exerted a profound influence on me at that time. She raised her image before me, she gave me access to a holy shrine, she transformed me into a worshiper in a temple.

   From one day to the next I stayed clear of all bars and nocturnal exploits. I could be alone with myself again and enjoyed reading and going for long walks.

   My sudden conversion drew a good deal of mockery in its wake. But now I had something I loved and venerated, I had an ideal again, life was rich with intimations of mystery and a feeling of dawn that made me immune to all taunts. I had come home again to myself, even if only as the slave and servant of a cherished image.

   I find it difficult to think back to that time without a certain fondness. Once more I was trying most strenuously to construct an intimate "world of light" for myself out of the shambles of a period of devastation; once more I sacrificed everything within me to the aim of banishing darkness and evil from myself. And, furthermore, this present "world of light" was to some extent my own creation; it was no longer an escape, no crawling back to -nether and the safety of irresponsibility; it was a new duty, one I had invented and desired on my own, with responsibility and self-control. My sexuality, a torment from which I was in constant flight, was to be transfigured nto spirituality and devotion by this holy fire. Everything :brk and hateful was to be banished, there were to be no more tortured nights, no excitement before lascivious picures, no eavesdropping at forbidden doors, no lust. In place of all this I raised my altar to the image of Beatrice, :.. and by consecrating myself to her I consecrated myself to the spirit and to the gods, sacrificing that part of life which I withdrew from the forces of darkness to those of light. My goal was not joy but purity, not happiness but beauty, and spirituality.

   This cult of Beatrice completely changed my life.

   ~ Hermann Hesse, Demian,
259:HOW CAN I READ SAVITRI?
An open reply by Dr Alok Pandey to a fellow devotee

A GIFT OF LOVE TO THE WORLD
Most of all enjoy Savitri. It is Sri Aurobindo's gift of Love to the world. Read it from the heart with love and gratitude as companions and drown in its fiery bliss. That is the true understanding rather than one that comes by a constant churning of words in the head.

WHEN
Best would be to fix a time that works for you. One can always take out some time for the reading, even if it be late at night when one is done with all the daily works. Of course, a certain receptivity is needed. If one is too tired or the reading becomes too mechanical as a ritual routine to be somehow finished it tends to be less effective, as with anything else. Hence the advice is to read in a quiet receptive state.

THE PACE
As to the pace of reading it is best to slowly build up and keep it steady. To read a page or a passage daily is better than reading many pages one day and then few lines or none for days. This brings a certain discipline in the consciousness which makes one receptive. What it means is that one should fix up that one would read a few passages or a page or two daily, and then if an odd day one is enjoying and spontaneously wants to read more then one can go by the flow.

COMPLETE OR SELECTIONS?
It is best to read at least once from cover to cover. But if one is not feeling inclined for that do read some of the beautiful cantos and passages whose reference one can find in various places. This helps us familiarise with the epic and the style of poetry. Later one can go for the cover to cover reading.

READING ALOUD, SILENTLY, OR WRITING DOWN?
One can read it silently. Loud reading is needed only if one is unable to focus with silent reading. A mantra is more potent when read subtly. I am aware that some people recommend reading it aloud which is fine if that helps one better. A certain flexibility in these things is always good and rigid rules either ways are not helpful.

One can also write some of the beautiful passages with which one feels suddenly connected. It is a help in the yoga since such a writing involves the pouring in of the consciousness of Savitri through the brain and nerves and the hand.

Reflecting upon some of these magnificent lines and passages while one is engaged in one\s daily activities helps to create a background state for our inner being to get absorbed in Savitri more and more.

HOW DO I UNDERSTAND THE MEANING? DO I NEED A DICTIONARY?
It is helpful if a brief background about the Canto is known. This helps the mind top focus and also to keep in sync with the overall scene and sense of what is being read.

But it is best not to keep referring to the dictionary while reading. Let the overall sense emerge. Specifics can be done during a detailed reading later and it may not be necessary at all. Besides the sense that Sri Aurobindo has given to many words may not be accurately conveyed by the standard dictionaries. A flexibility is required to understand the subtle suggestions hinted at by the Master-poet.

In this sense Savitri is in the line of Vedic poetry using images that are at once profound as well as commonplace. That is the beauty of mystic poetry. These are things actually experienced and seen by Sri Aurobindo, and ultimately it is Their Grace that alone can reveal the intrinsic sense of this supreme revelation of the Supreme. ~ Dr Alok Pandey,
260:The supreme Form is then made visible. It is that of the infinite Godhead whose faces are everywhere and in whom are all the wonders of existence, who multiplies unendingly all the many marvellous revelations of his being, a world-wide Divinity seeing with innumerable eyes, speaking from innumerable mouths, armed for battle with numberless divine uplifted weapons, glorious with divine ornaments of beauty, robed in heavenly raiment of deity, lovely with garlands of divine flowers, fragrant with divine perfumes. Such is the light of this body of God as if a thousand suns had risen at once in heaven. The whole world multitudinously divided and yet unified is visible in the body of the God of Gods. Arjuna sees him, God magnificent and beautiful and terrible, the Lord of souls who has manifested in the glory and greatness of his spirit this wild and monstrous and orderly and wonderful and sweet and terrible world, and overcome with marvel and joy and fear he bows down and adores with words of awe and with clasped hands the tremendous vision. "I see" he cries "all the gods in thy body, O God, and different companies of beings, Brahma the creating lord seated in the Lotus, and the Rishis and the race of the divine Serpents. I see numberless arms and bellies and eyes and faces, I see thy infinite forms on every side, but I see not thy end nor thy middle nor thy beginning, O Lord of the universe, O Form universal. I see thee crowned and with thy mace and thy discus, hard to discern because thou art a luminous mass of energy on all sides of me, an encompassing blaze, a sun-bright fire-bright Immeasurable. Thou art the supreme Immutable whom we have to know, thou art the high foundation and abode of the universe, thou art the imperishable guardian of the eternal laws, thou art the sempiternal soul of existence."

But in the greatness of this vision there is too the terrific image of the Destroyer. This Immeasurable without end or middle or beginning is he in whom all things begin and exist and end.

This Godhead who embraces the worlds with his numberless arms and destroys with his million hands, whose eyes are suns and moons, has a face of blazing fire and is ever burning up the whole universe with the flame of his energy. The form of him is fierce and marvellous and alone it fills all the regions and occupies the whole space between earth and heaven. The companies of the gods enter it, afraid, adoring; the Rishis and the Siddhas crying "May there be peace and weal" praise it with many praises; the eyes of Gods and Titans and Giants are fixed on it in amazement. It has enormous burning eyes; it has mouths that gape to devour, terrible with many tusks of destruction; it has faces like the fires of Death and Time. The kings and the captains and the heroes on both sides of the world-battle are hastening into its tusked and terrible jaws and some are seen with crushed and bleeding heads caught between its teeth of power; the nations are rushing to destruction with helpless speed into its mouths of flame like many rivers hurrying in their course towards the ocean or like moths that cast themselves on a kindled fire. With those burning mouths the Form of Dread is licking all the regions around; the whole world is full of his burning energies and baked in the fierceness of his lustres. The world and its nations are shaken and in anguish with the terror of destruction and Arjuna shares in the trouble and panic around him; troubled and in pain is the soul within him and he finds no peace or gladness. He cries to the dreadful Godhead, "Declare to me who thou art that wearest this form of fierceness. Salutation to thee, O thou great Godhead, turn thy heart to grace. I would know who thou art who wast from the beginning, for I know not the will of thy workings." ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays On The Gita, 2.10_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_Time_the_Destroyer,
261:For instance, a popular game with California occultists-I do not know its inventor-involves a Magic Room, much like the Pleasure Dome discussed earlier except that this Magic Room contains an Omniscient Computer.
   To play this game, you simply "astrally project" into the Magic Room. Do not ask what "astral projection" means, and do not assume it is metaphysical (and therefore either impossible, if you are a materialist, or very difficult, if you are a mystic). Just assume this is a gedankenexperiment, a "mind game." Project yourself, in imagination, into this Magic Room and visualize vividly the Omniscient Computer, using the details you need to make such a super-information-processor real to your fantasy. You do not need any knowledge of programming to handle this astral computer. It exists early in the next century; you are getting to use it by a species of time-travel, if that metaphor is amusing and helpful to you. It is so built that it responds immediately to human brain-waves, "reading" them and decoding their meaning. (Crude prototypes of such computers already exist.) So, when you are in this magic room, you can ask this Computer anything, just by thinking of what you want to know. It will read your thought, and project into your brain, by a laser ray, the correct answer.
   There is one slight problem. The computer is very sensitive to all brain-waves. If you have any doubts, it registers them as negative commands, meaning "Do not answer my question." So, the way to use it is to start simply, with "easy" questions. Ask it to dig out of the archives the name of your second-grade teacher. (Almost everybody remembers the name of their first grade teacher-imprint vulnerability again-but that of the second grade teacher tends to get lost.)
   When the computer has dug out the name of your second grade teacher, try it on a harder question, but not one that is too hard. It is very easy to sabotage this machine, but you don't want to sabotage it during these experiments. You want to see how well it can be made to perform.
   It is wise to ask only one question at a time, since it requires concentration to keep this magic computer real on the field of your perception. Do not exhaust your capacities for imagination and visualization on your first trial runs.
   After a few trivial experiments of the second-grade-teacher variety, you can try more interesting programs. Take a person toward whom you have negative feelings, such as anger, disappointment, feeling-of-betrayal, jealousy or whatever interferes with the smooth, tranquil operation of your own bio-computer. Ask the Magic Computer to explain that other person to you; to translate you into their reality-tunnel long enough for you to understand how events seem to them. Especially, ask how you seem to them.
   This computer will do that job for you; but be prepared for some shocks which might be disagreeable at first. This super-brain can also perform exegesis on ideas that seem obscure, paradoxical or enigmatic to us. For instance, early experiments with this computer can very profitably turn on asking it to explain some of the propositions in this book which may seem inexplicable or perversely wrong-headed to you, such as "We are all greater artists than we realize" or "What the Thinker thinks, the Prover proves" or "mind and its contents are functionally identical."
   This computer is much more powerful and scientifically advanced than the rapture-machine in the neurosomatic circuit. It has total access to all the earlier, primitive circuits, and overrules any of them. That is, if you put a meta-programming instruction into this computer; it will relay it downward to the old circuits and cancel contradictory programs left over from the past. For instance, try feeding it on such meta-programming instructions as: 1. I am at cause over my body. 2. I am at cause over my imagination. 3.1 am at cause over my future. 4. My mind abounds with beauty and power. 5.1 like people, and people like me.
   Remember that this computer is only a few decades ahead of present technology, so it cannot "understand" your commands if you harbor any doubts about them. Doubts tell it not to perform. Work always from what you can believe in, extending the area of belief only as results encourage you to try for more dramatic transformations of your past reality-tunnels.
   This represents cybernetic consciousness; the programmer becoming self-programmer, self-metaprogrammer, meta-metaprogrammer, etc. Just as the emotional compulsions of the second circuit seem primitive, mechanical and, ultimately, silly to the neurosomatic consciousness, so, too, the reality maps of the third circuit become comic, relativistic, game-like to the metaprogrammer. "Whatever you say it is, it isn't, " Korzybski, the semanticist, repeated endlessly in his seminars, trying to make clear that third-circuit semantic maps are not the territories they represent; that we can always make maps of our maps, revisions of our revisions, meta-selves of our selves. "Neti, neti" (not that, not that), Hindu teachers traditionally say when asked what "God" is or what "Reality" is. Yogis, mathematicians and musicians seem more inclined to develop meta-programming consciousness than most of humanity. Korzybski even claimed that the use of mathematical scripts is an aid to developing this circuit, for as soon as you think of your mind as mind 1 , and the mind which contemplates that mind as mind2 and the mind which contemplates mind2 contemplating mind 1 as mind3, you are well on your way to meta-programming awareness. Alice in Wonderland is a masterful guide to the metaprogramming circuit (written by one of the founders of mathematical logic) and Aleister Crowley soberly urged its study upon all students of yoga. ~ Robert Anton Wilson, Prometheus Rising,
262:The Supermind [Supramental consciousness] is in its very essence a truth-consciousness, a consciousness always free from the Ignorance which is the foundation of our present natural or evolutionary existence and from which nature in us is trying to arrive at self-knowledge and world-knowledge and a right consciousness and the right use of our existence in the universe. The Supermind, because it is a truth-consciousness, has this knowledge inherent in it and this power of true existence; its course is straight and can go direct to its aim, its field is wide and can even be made illimitable. This is because its very nature is knowledge: it has not to acquire knowledge but possesses it in its own right; its steps are not from nescience or ignorance into some imperfect light, but from truth to greater truth, from right perception to deeper perception, from intuition to intuition, from illumination to utter and boundless luminousness, from growing widenesses to the utter vasts and to very infinitude. On its summits it possesses the divine omniscience and omnipotence, but even in an evolutionary movement of its own graded self-manifestation by which it would eventually reveal its own highest heights, it must be in its very nature essentially free from ignorance and error: it starts from truth and light and moves always in truth and light. As its knowledge is always true, so too its will is always true; it does not fumble in its handling of things or stumble in its paces. In the Supermind feeling and emotion do not depart from their truth, make no slips or mistakes, do not swerve from the right and the real, cannot misuse beauty and delight or twist away from a divine rectitude. In the Supermind sense cannot mislead or deviate into the grossnesses which are here its natural imperfections and the cause of reproach, distrust and misuse by our ignorance. Even an incomplete statement made by the Supermind is a truth leading to a further truth, its incomplete action a step towards completeness. All the life and action and leading of the Supermind is guarded in its very nature from the falsehoods and uncertainties that are our lot; it moves in safety towards its perfection. Once the truth-consciousness was established here on its own sure foundation, the evolution of divine life would be a progress in felicity, a march through light to Ananda. Supermind is an eternal reality of the divine Being and the divine Nature. In its own plane it already and always exists and possesses its own essential law of being; it has not to be created or to emerge or evolve into existence out of involution in Matter or out of non-existence, as it might seem to the view of mind which itself seems to its own view to have so emerged from life and Matter or to have evolved out of an involution in life and Matter. The nature of Supermind is always the same, a being of knowledge, proceeding from truth to truth, creating or rather manifesting what has to be manifested by the power of a pre-existent knowledge, not by hazard but by a self-existent destiny in the being itself, a necessity of the thing in itself and therefore inevitable. Its -manifestation of the divine life will also be inevitable; its own life on its own plane is divine and, if Supermind descends upon the earth, it will bring necessarily the divine life with it and establish it here. Supermind is the grade of existence beyond mind, life and Matter and, as mind, life and Matter have manifested on the earth, so too must Supermind in the inevitable course of things manifest in this world of Matter. In fact, a supermind is already here but it is involved, concealed behind this manifest mind, life and Matter and not yet acting overtly or in its own power: if it acts, it is through these inferior powers and modified by their characters and so not yet recognisable. It is only by the approach and arrival of the descending Supermind that it can be liberated upon earth and reveal itself in the action of our material, vital and mental parts so that these lower powers can become portions of a total divinised activity of our whole being: it is that that will bring to us a completely realised divinity or the divine life. It is indeed so that life and mind involved in Matter have realised themselves here; for only what is involved can evolve, otherwise there could be no emergence. The manifestation of a supramental truth-consciousness is therefore the capital reality that will make the divine life possible. It is when all the movements of thought, impulse and action are governed and directed by a self-existent and luminously automatic truth-consciousness and our whole nature comes to be constituted by it and made of its stuff that the life divine will be complete and absolute. Even as it is, in reality though not in the appearance of things, it is a secret self-existent knowledge and truth that is working to manifest itself in the creation here. The Divine is already there immanent within us, ourselves are that in our inmost reality and it is this reality that we have to manifest; it is that which constitutes the urge towards the divine living and makes necessary the creation of the life divine even in this material existence. A manifestation of the Supermind and its truth-consciousness is then inevitable; it must happen in this world sooner or lateR But it has two aspects, a descent from above, an ascent from below, a self-revelation of the Spirit, an evolution in Nature. The ascent is necessarily an effort, a working of Nature, an urge or nisus on her side to raise her lower parts by an evolutionary or revolutionary change, conversion or transformation into the divine reality and it may happen by a process and progress or by a rapid miracle. The descent or self-revelation of the Spirit is an act of the supreme Reality from above which makes the realisation possible and it can appear either as the divine aid which brings about the fulfilment of the progress and process or as the sanction of the miracle. Evolution, as we see it in this world, is a slow and difficult process and, indeed, needs usually ages to reach abiding results; but this is because it is in its nature an emergence from inconscient beginnings, a start from nescience and a working in the ignorance of natural beings by what seems to be an unconscious force. There can be, on the contrary, an evolution in the light and no longer in the darkness, in which the evolving being is a conscious participant and cooperator, and this is precisely what must take place here. Even in the effort and progress from the Ignorance to Knowledge this must be in part if not wholly the endeavour to be made on the heights of the nature, and it must be wholly that in the final movement towards the spiritual change, realisation, transformation. It must be still more so when there is a transition across the dividing line between the Ignorance and the Knowledge and the evolution is from knowledge to greater knowledge, from consciousness to greater consciousness, from being to greater being. There is then no longer any necessity for the slow pace of the ordinary evolution; there can be rapid conversion, quick transformation after transformation, what would seem to our normal present mind a succession of miracles. An evolution on the supramental levels could well be of that nature; it could be equally, if the being so chose, a more leisurely passage of one supramental state or condition of things to something beyond but still supramental, from level to divine level, a building up of divine gradations, a free growth to the supreme Supermind or beyond it to yet undreamed levels of being, consciousness and Ananda.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, 558,
263:The Science of Living

To know oneself and to control oneself

AN AIMLESS life is always a miserable life.

Every one of you should have an aim. But do not forget that on the quality of your aim will depend the quality of your life.

   Your aim should be high and wide, generous and disinterested; this will make your life precious to yourself and to others.

   But whatever your ideal, it cannot be perfectly realised unless you have realised perfection in yourself.

   To work for your perfection, the first step is to become conscious of yourself, of the different parts of your being and their respective activities. You must learn to distinguish these different parts one from another, so that you may become clearly aware of the origin of the movements that occur in you, the many impulses, reactions and conflicting wills that drive you to action. It is an assiduous study which demands much perseverance and sincerity. For man's nature, especially his mental nature, has a spontaneous tendency to give a favourable explanation for everything he thinks, feels, says and does. It is only by observing these movements with great care, by bringing them, as it were, before the tribunal of our highest ideal, with a sincere will to submit to its judgment, that we can hope to form in ourselves a discernment that never errs. For if we truly want to progress and acquire the capacity of knowing the truth of our being, that is to say, what we are truly created for, what we can call our mission upon earth, then we must, in a very regular and constant manner, reject from us or eliminate in us whatever contradicts the truth of our existence, whatever is opposed to it. In this way, little by little, all the parts, all the elements of our being can be organised into a homogeneous whole around our psychic centre. This work of unification requires much time to be brought to some degree of perfection. Therefore, in order to accomplish it, we must arm ourselves with patience and endurance, with a determination to prolong our life as long as necessary for the success of our endeavour.

   As you pursue this labour of purification and unification, you must at the same time take great care to perfect the external and instrumental part of your being. When the higher truth manifests, it must find in you a mind that is supple and rich enough to be able to give the idea that seeks to express itself a form of thought which preserves its force and clarity. This thought, again, when it seeks to clothe itself in words, must find in you a sufficient power of expression so that the words reveal the thought and do not deform it. And the formula in which you embody the truth should be manifested in all your feelings, all your acts of will, all your actions, in all the movements of your being. Finally, these movements themselves should, by constant effort, attain their highest perfection.

   All this can be realised by means of a fourfold discipline, the general outline of which is given here. The four aspects of the discipline do not exclude each other, and can be followed at the same time; indeed, this is preferable. The starting-point is what can be called the psychic discipline. We give the name "psychic" to the psychological centre of our being, the seat within us of the highest truth of our existence, that which can know this truth and set it in movement. It is therefore of capital importance to become conscious of its presence in us, to concentrate on this presence until it becomes a living fact for us and we can identify ourselves with it.

   In various times and places many methods have been prescribed for attaining this perception and ultimately achieving this identification. Some methods are psychological, some religious, some even mechanical. In reality, everyone has to find the one which suits him best, and if one has an ardent and steadfast aspiration, a persistent and dynamic will, one is sure to meet, in one way or another - outwardly through reading and study, inwardly through concentration, meditation, revelation and experience - the help one needs to reach the goal. Only one thing is absolutely indispensable: the will to discover and to realise. This discovery and realisation should be the primary preoccupation of our being, the pearl of great price which we must acquire at any cost. Whatever you do, whatever your occupations and activities, the will to find the truth of your being and to unite with it must be always living and present behind all that you do, all that you feel, all that you think.

   To complement this movement of inner discovery, it would be good not to neglect the development of the mind. For the mental instrument can equally be a great help or a great hindrance. In its natural state the human mind is always limited in its vision, narrow in its understanding, rigid in its conceptions, and a constant effort is therefore needed to widen it, to make it more supple and profound. So it is very necessary to consider everything from as many points of view as possible. Towards this end, there is an exercise which gives great suppleness and elevation to the thought. It is as follows: a clearly formulated thesis is set; against it is opposed its antithesis, formulated with the same precision. Then by careful reflection the problem must be widened or transcended until a synthesis is found which unites the two contraries in a larger, higher and more comprehensive idea.

   Many other exercises of the same kind can be undertaken; some have a beneficial effect on the character and so possess a double advantage: that of educating the mind and that of establishing control over the feelings and their consequences. For example, you must never allow your mind to judge things and people, for the mind is not an instrument of knowledge; it is incapable of finding knowledge, but it must be moved by knowledge. Knowledge belongs to a much higher domain than that of the human mind, far above the region of pure ideas. The mind has to be silent and attentive to receive knowledge from above and manifest it. For it is an instrument of formation, of organisation and action, and it is in these functions that it attains its full value and real usefulness.

   There is another practice which can be very helpful to the progress of the consciousness. Whenever there is a disagreement on any matter, such as a decision to be taken, or an action to be carried out, one must never remain closed up in one's own conception or point of view. On the contrary, one must make an effort to understand the other's point of view, to put oneself in his place and, instead of quarrelling or even fighting, find the solution which can reasonably satisfy both parties; there always is one for men of goodwill.

   Here we must mention the discipline of the vital. The vital being in us is the seat of impulses and desires, of enthusiasm and violence, of dynamic energy and desperate depressions, of passions and revolts. It can set everything in motion, build and realise; but it can also destroy and mar everything. Thus it may be the most difficult part to discipline in the human being. It is a long and exacting labour requiring great patience and perfect sincerity, for without sincerity you will deceive yourself from the very outset, and all endeavour for progress will be in vain. With the collaboration of the vital no realisation seems impossible, no transformation impracticable. But the difficulty lies in securing this constant collaboration. The vital is a good worker, but most often it seeks its own satisfaction. If that is refused, totally or even partially, the vital gets vexed, sulks and goes on strike. Its energy disappears more or less completely and in its place leaves disgust for people and things, discouragement or revolt, depression and dissatisfaction. At such moments it is good to remain quiet and refuse to act; for these are the times when one does stupid things and in a few moments one can destroy or spoil the progress that has been made during months of regular effort. These crises are shorter and less dangerous for those who have established a contact with their psychic being which is sufficient to keep alive in them the flame of aspiration and the consciousness of the ideal to be realised. They can, with the help of this consciousness, deal with their vital as one deals with a rebellious child, with patience and perseverance, showing it the truth and light, endeavouring to convince it and awaken in it the goodwill which has been veiled for a time. By means of such patient intervention each crisis can be turned into a new progress, into one more step towards the goal. Progress may be slow, relapses may be frequent, but if a courageous will is maintained, one is sure to triumph one day and see all difficulties melt and vanish before the radiance of the truth-consciousness.

   Lastly, by means of a rational and discerning physical education, we must make our body strong and supple enough to become a fit instrument in the material world for the truth-force which wants to manifest through us.

   In fact, the body must not rule, it must obey. By its very nature it is a docile and faithful servant. Unfortunately, it rarely has the capacity of discernment it ought to have with regard to its masters, the mind and the vital. It obeys them blindly, at the cost of its own well-being. The mind with its dogmas, its rigid and arbitrary principles, the vital with its passions, its excesses and dissipations soon destroy the natural balance of the body and create in it fatigue, exhaustion and disease. It must be freed from this tyranny and this can be done only through a constant union with the psychic centre of the being. The body has a wonderful capacity of adaptation and endurance. It is able to do so many more things than one usually imagines. If, instead of the ignorant and despotic masters that now govern it, it is ruled by the central truth of the being, you will be amazed at what it is capable of doing. Calm and quiet, strong and poised, at every minute it will be able to put forth the effort that is demanded of it, for it will have learnt to find rest in action and to recuperate, through contact with the universal forces, the energies it expends consciously and usefully. In this sound and balanced life a new harmony will manifest in the body, reflecting the harmony of the higher regions, which will give it perfect proportions and ideal beauty of form. And this harmony will be progressive, for the truth of the being is never static; it is a perpetual unfolding of a growing perfection that is more and more total and comprehensive. As soon as the body has learnt to follow this movement of progressive harmony, it will be possible for it to escape, through a continuous process of transformation, from the necessity of disintegration and destruction. Thus the irrevocable law of death will no longer have any reason to exist.

   When we reach this degree of perfection which is our goal, we shall perceive that the truth we seek is made up of four major aspects: Love, Knowledge, Power and Beauty. These four attributes of the Truth will express themselves spontaneously in our being. The psychic will be the vehicle of true and pure love, the mind will be the vehicle of infallible knowledge, the vital will manifest an invincible power and strength and the body will be the expression of a perfect beauty and harmony.

   Bulletin, November 1950

   ~ The Mother, On Education,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Beauty is a frail good. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
2:Beauty is a fragile gift. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
3:Exuberance is beauty. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
4:Beauty is the gift of God. ~ aristotle, @wisdomtrove
5:Exhuberance is Beauty. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
6:Beauty is the flower of virtue. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
7:Beauty is truth, truth beauty ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
8:Life is beauty, admire it. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
9:Beauty is a short-lived tyranny. ~ socrates, @wisdomtrove
10:To love beauty is to see light. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
11:Beauty crowds me till I die. ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
12:Beauty is not caused. It is. ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
13:Beauty will save the world ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
14:Fills The air around with beauty. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
15:Catch the beauty of the moment! ~ leo-buscaglia, @wisdomtrove
16:the beauty of doing nothing ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
17:A thing of beauty is a joy forever. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
18:Beauty would save the world. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
19:Dear to girls' hearts is their own beauty. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
20:Love is the beauty of the soul. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
21:Beauty is God's handwriting. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
22:Beauty is objectified pleasure. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
23:Beauty is the promise of happiness. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
24:Are not beauty and delicacy the same? ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
25:Beauty- it was a favor bestowed by the gods. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
26:Beauty is the brilliance of truth. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
27:Truth reveals itself in beauty. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
28:Beauty is a short-lived tyranny. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
29:Great is the strife between beauty and modesty. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
30:The world will be saved by beauty. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
31:Beauty should be edible, or not at all. ~ salvador-dali, @wisdomtrove
32:The World is Large - Its beauty indescrible. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
33:Beauty and folly are old companions. ~ benjamin-franklin, @wisdomtrove
34:Beauty is the illumination of your soul. ~ john-odonohue, @wisdomtrove
35:Beauty is the purgation of superfluities. ~ michelangelo, @wisdomtrove
36:Oh, beauty, ever ancient and ever new. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
37:To draw true beauty shows a master's hand. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
38:Beauty is in the eye of the Creator. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
39:Beauty is meaningless until it is shared. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
40:Beauty is quietly woven through our days. ~ john-odonohue, @wisdomtrove
41:Health and cheerfulness make beauty ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
42:Nonsense and beauty have close connections. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
43:Science grows and Beauty dwindles. ~ alfred-lord-tennyson, @wisdomtrove
44:Beauty without expression is boring. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
45:The only lasting beauty is the beauty of the heart. ~ rumi, @wisdomtrove
46:The soul that beholds beauty becomes beautiful. ~ plotinus, @wisdomtrove
47:The world's crazy, when it comes to beauty. ~ richard-bach, @wisdomtrove
48:hate contains truth. beauty is a facade. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
49:Age before beauty, and pearls before swine. ~ dorothy-parker, @wisdomtrove
50:Dear God! how beauty varies in nature and art. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
51:Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
52:There is no beauty without some strangeness ~ edgar-allan-poe, @wisdomtrove
53:Elegance is the only beauty that never fades. ~ audrey-hepburn, @wisdomtrove
54:I feel that beauty and femininity are ageless ~ marilyn-monroe, @wisdomtrove
55:As we grow old, the beauty steals inward. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
56:Be like a lotus. Let the beauty of your heart speak. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
57:Dear to the heart of a girl is her own beauty and charm. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
58:Beauty is heaven's gift, and how few can boast of beauty. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
59:Everything has its beauty, but not everyone sees it. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
60:I have loved the principle of beauty in all things. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
61:The pain passes, but the beauty remains. ~ pierre-auguste-renoir, @wisdomtrove
62:At the heart of all beauty lies something inhuman. ~ albert-camus, @wisdomtrove
63:Beauty arises in the stillness of one's presence. ~ eckhart-tolle, @wisdomtrove
64:Love gives beauty to everything it touches. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
65:May you know the beauty of your own true nature. ~ jack-kornfield, @wisdomtrove
66:True beauty in a woman is reflected in her soul. ~ audrey-hepburn, @wisdomtrove
67:What the imagination seizes as beauty must be truth. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
68:Beauty is everywhere a welcome guest. ~ johann-wolfgang-von-goethe, @wisdomtrove
69:Beauty walks a razors edge, someday I'll make it mine. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
70:Beauty without intelligence is like a hook without bait. ~ moliere, @wisdomtrove
71:Color exists in itself, possessing its own beauty. ~ henri-matisse, @wisdomtrove
72:Art can never exist without naked beauty displayed. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
73:To experience beauty is to have your life enlarged. ~ john-odonohue, @wisdomtrove
74:Beauty in distress is much the most affecting beauty. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
75:I have not seen one who loves virtue as he loves beauty. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
76:Judgement of beauty can err, what with the wine and the dark. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
77:Seek beauty and miss love. But seek love and find both. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
78:The essence of all beauty, I call love. ~ elizabeth-barrett-browning, @wisdomtrove
79:When beauty fires the blood, how love exalts the mind! ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
80:Beauty is the sole legitimate province of the poem. ~ edgar-allan-poe, @wisdomtrove
81:But beauty must be broken daily to remain beautiful. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
82:Riches, understanding, beauty, are fair gifts of God. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
83:The child should live in an environment of beauty. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
84:Italia! O Italia! thou who hast The fatal gift of beauty. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
85:Those who create beauty are also they who possess it. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
86:We have exiled beauty; the Greeks took up arms for her. ~ albert-camus, @wisdomtrove
87:Being The Best, Beauty On The Inside, Beautiful Inside ~ audrey-hepburn, @wisdomtrove
88:Poetry is the rhythmical creation of beauty in words. ~ edgar-allan-poe, @wisdomtrove
89:The beauty of a great idea lies in the art of using it. ~ thomas-edison, @wisdomtrove
90:The human soul needs actual beauty even more than bread. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
91:Youth is happy because it has the capacity to see beauty. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
92:Beauty itself is but the sensible image of the Infinite. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
93:Beauty without grace is the hook without the bait. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
94:There's a great and unutterable beauty in all this. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
95:Beauty, if you do not open your doors, takes age from lack of use. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
96:Beauty in things exists in the mind which contemplates them. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
97:Beauty is not the cause of something, it is what it is. ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
98:Beauty is simply reality seen with the eyes of love ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
99:To virginity is awarded the tribute of the highest beauty ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
100:We need beauty because it makes us ache to be worthy of it. ~ mary-oliver, @wisdomtrove
101:And the beauty of a woman, with passing years only grows! ~ audrey-hepburn, @wisdomtrove
102:Beauty is not in the face; beauty is a light in the heart. ~ kahlil-gibran, @wisdomtrove
103:Beauty may be said to be God's trademark in creation. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
104:Folly is the direct pursuit of happiness and beauty. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
105:If peace is not In Nature's beauty, Then where is it, where? ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
106:To virginity is awarded the tribute of the highest beauty ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
107:Beauty is an ecstasy; it is as simple as hunger. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
108:Beauty, without kindness, dies unenjoyed and undelighting. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
109:Just one smile Immensely increases the beauty Of the universe. ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
110:There is beauty in everything, even in silence and darkness. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
111:The war made me poignantly aware of the beauty of the world. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
112:When you see beauty anywhere, it’s a reflection of yourself. ~ shakti-gawain, @wisdomtrove
113:Beauty is not required. Beauty is accuracy's distraction. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
114:Everything is beautiful in its own way. Exuberance is beauty. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
115:If beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so is ugliness. ~ rodney-dangerfield, @wisdomtrove
116:It's not beauty but fine qualities, my girl, that keep a husband. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
117:Love of beauty is taste. The creation of beauty is art. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
118:She who is born with beauty is born with a sorrow for many a man. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
119:The best part of beauty is that which no picture can express. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
120:The terrifying and edible beauty of Art Nouveau architecture. ~ salvador-dali, @wisdomtrove
121:What would be ugly in a garden constitutes beauty in a mountain. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
122:I got saved by poetry and I got saved by the beauty of the world. ~ mary-oliver, @wisdomtrove
123:Pride is innate in beauty, and haughtiness is the companion of the fair. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
124:To keep beauty in its place is to make all things beautiful. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
125:We call beauty that which supplies us with a particular pleasure. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
126:What a strange illusion it is to suppose that beauty is goodness. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
127:Beauty is established in multitude when the many is reduced into one. ~ plotinus, @wisdomtrove
128:Beauty means the scent of roses and then the death of roses ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
129:For the eye has this strange property: it rests only on beauty. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
130:It is not beauty that endears, it's love that makes us see beauty. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
131:Looking beauty in the world, is the first step of purifying the mind. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
132:There's more beauty in the truth even if it is dreadful beauty. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
133:The soul that sees beauty may sometimes walk alone. ~ johann-wolfgang-von-goethe, @wisdomtrove
134:It is amazing how complete is the delusion that beauty is goodness. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
135:Once destroyed, nature's beauty cannot be repurchased at any price. ~ amsel-adams, @wisdomtrove
136:So bright the tear in Beauty's eye, Love half regrets to kiss it dry. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
137:Beauty is . . . a valuable asset if you're poor or haven't any sense. ~ kin-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
138:Every thoughtful pin on pinterest has beauty. But not everyone can see. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
139:Looking at beauty in the world, is the first step of purifying the mind. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
140:The ideal has many names, and beauty is but one of them. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
141:Wives rarely fuss about their beauty To guarantee their mate's affection. ~ moliere, @wisdomtrove
142:Beauty is essentially spiritual. The authentic beauty lies in the heart. ~ sivananda, @wisdomtrove
143:I will never give up. I am in my 14th year of a 10-day beauty plan. ~ phyllis-diller, @wisdomtrove
144:Too much beauty, I reckon, is nothing but too much sun. ~ elizabeth-barrett-browning, @wisdomtrove
145:Beauty surrounds us, but usually we need to be walking in a garden to know it. ~ rumi, @wisdomtrove
146:Beauty, whether moral or natural, is felt, more properly than perceived. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
147:But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for. ~ robin-williams, @wisdomtrove
148:The act of facing overwhelming odds produces greatness and beauty. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
149:Beauty, find thyself in love, not in the flattery of thy mirror. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
150:Beauty is a mystery. You can neither eat it nor make flannel out of it. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
151:Each thing in the universe is a vessel full to the brim with wisdom and beauty. ~ rumi, @wisdomtrove
152:Meditation is realizing and expanding your inner beauty in every direction. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
153:Old as I am, for ladies' love unfit, The power of beauty I remember yet. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
154:This is *our* Universe, our museum of wonder and beauty, our cathedral. ~ john-wheeler, @wisdomtrove
155:Anybody who preserves the ability to recognize beauty will never get old. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
156:Beauty is being the best possible version of yourself, inside and out. ~ audrey-hepburn, @wisdomtrove
157:Most people get an appointment at a beauty parlor... I was committed! ~ phyllis-diller, @wisdomtrove
158:Next to this, we must consider the soul receiving its beauty from intellect, ~ plotinus, @wisdomtrove
159:Those persons who have perceptive eyes enjoy beauty everywhere. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
160:Characteristics which define beauty are wholeness, harmony and radiance. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
161:I spent seven hours in a beauty shop... and that was for the estimate. ~ phyllis-diller, @wisdomtrove
162:Love adorns itself; it seeks to prove inward joy by outward beauty ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
163:By plucking her petals, you do not gather the beauty of the flower. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
164:Characteristics which define beauty are wholeness, harmony and radiance. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
165:The soul is that which beholds beauty even when the mind denies it. ~ neale-donald-walsch, @wisdomtrove
166:Beauty is the purest feeling of the soul. Beauty arises when soul is satisfied. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
167:I slept and dreamt that life was beauty; I woke and found that life was duty. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
168:Sex is the root of which intuition is the foliage and beauty is the flower. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
169:Sometimes beauty needs a bit of ignoring, to properly come into being. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
170:Beauty and anguish walking hand in hand the downward slope to death. ~ alfred-lord-tennyson, @wisdomtrove
171:Beauty is not democratic; she reveals herself more to the few than to the many. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
172:Beauty is the virtue of the body as virtue is the beauty of the soul. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
173:God tells me that My happy heart Increases the beauty Of His universal Heart. ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
174:I look forward to an America which will not be afraid of grace and beauty. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
175:The beauty of enmity is insecurity; the beauty of friendship is in security. ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
176:The beauty of life, is that you don't have to be modernly beautiful to live it. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
177:The satisfaction of life May not be ours, But the beauty of hope Is all ours. ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
178:An appearance of delicacy, and even fragility, is almost essential to beauty. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
179:But there is much beauty here, because there is much beauty everywhere. ~ rainer-maria-rilke, @wisdomtrove
180:How beautiful, if sorrow had not made Sorrow more beautiful than Beauty's self. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
181:If eyes were made for seeing, then Beauty is its own excuse for being. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
182:Whenever you are creating beauty around you, you are restoring your own soul. ~ alice-walker, @wisdomtrove
183:Beauty is just a light switch away... 'click!' Beauty is not caused. It is. ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
184:Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
185:Oh, what a vileness human beauty is; corroding, corrupting everything it touches. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
186:Then I grew up, and the beauty of succulent illusions fell away from me. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
187:A lily or a rose never pretends, and its beauty is that it is what it is. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
188:Beauty is merely the Spiritual making itself known sensuously. ~ georg-wilhelm-friedrich-hegel, @wisdomtrove
189:Beauty, n: the power by which a woman charms a lover and terrifies a husband. ~ ambrose-bierce, @wisdomtrove
190:I never can feel certain of any truth, but from a clear perception of its beauty. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
191:Space and stillness is the light that illuminates the beauty of our soul's being. ~ adyashanti, @wisdomtrove
192:To experience beauty, love, truth and peace, or God, your mind has to be stilled. ~ barry-long, @wisdomtrove
193:Universal happiness keeps the wheels steadily turning, truth and beauty can't. ~ aldous-huxley, @wisdomtrove
194:It's a good thing that beauty is only skin deep, or I'd be rotten to the core. ~ phyllis-diller, @wisdomtrove
195:Truth, and goodness, and beauty are but different faces of the same all.  ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
196:All my own small perception of beauty both in majesty and simplicity is founded. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
197:Beauty is a very handy thing to have, especially for a woman who ain't handsome. ~ josh-billings, @wisdomtrove
198:Beauty is truth's smile when she beholds her own face in a perfect mirror. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
199:Mona Lisa is the only beauty who went through history and retained her reputation. ~ will-rogers, @wisdomtrove
200:Secrecy is the element of all goodness; even virtue, even beauty is mysterious. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
201:The beauty of love. The love of beauty. The greener you are, the wiser you will be. ~ bob-marley, @wisdomtrove
202:To love someone is to show to them their beauty, their worth and their importance. ~ jean-vanier, @wisdomtrove
203:Yoga means addition - addition of energy, strength and beauty to body, mind and soul. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
204:Beauty is at once the ultimate principle and the highest aim of art. ~ johann-wolfgang-von-goethe, @wisdomtrove
205:Mere enthusiasm is the all in all... / Passion and expression are beauty itself. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
206:The pride of youth is in strength and beauty, the pride of old age is in discretion. ~ democritus, @wisdomtrove
207:Beauty is not caused, it is; Chase it and it ceases, Chase it not and it abides. ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
208:Beauty is truth, truth beauty,-that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
209:Great perils have this beauty, that they bring to light the fraternity of strangers. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
210:If every one were cast in the same mould, there would be no such thing as beauty. ~ charles-darwin, @wisdomtrove
211:Look, up at the sky. There is a light, a beauty up there, that no shadow can touch ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
212:A frail gift is beauty, which grows less as time draws on, and is devoured by its own years. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
213:Dwell on the beauty of life. Watch the stars, and see yourself running with them. ~ marcus-aurelius, @wisdomtrove
214:I learned about love from your perfection. I learned about poetry and song from your beauty. ~ rumi, @wisdomtrove
215:Since love grows within you, so beauty grows. For love is the beauty of the soul. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
216:The child is the beauty of God present in the world, that greatest gift to a family ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
217:All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
218:Youth, beauty, graceful action, seldom fail:/ But common interest always will prevail. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
219:Beauty is rather a light that plays over the symmetry of things than that symmetry itself. ~ plotinus, @wisdomtrove
220:The joy of living, its beauty, is all bound up in the fact that life can surprise you. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
221:Whatever the imagination seizes as Beauty must be truth -whether it existed before or not ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
222:... yes, in spite of all, Some shape of beauty moves away the pall From out dark spirits. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
223:I think permitting the game to become too physical takes away a little bit of the beauty. ~ john-wooden, @wisdomtrove
224:My dear, beautiful and imaginative things can be destroyed. Beauty and imagination cannot. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
225:She was dazzling&
226:Those that have an attitude of service towards others are the beauty of society. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
227:Wisdom is the abstract of the past, but beauty is the promise of the future. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-sr, @wisdomtrove
228:Beauty is only skin deep, but it's a valuable asset if you're poor or haven't any sense. ~ vernon-howard, @wisdomtrove
229:Ease and speed in doing a thing do not give the work lasting solidity or exactness of beauty. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
230:In a world of disorder and disaster and fraud, sometimes only beauty can be trusted. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
231:When we awaken to the call of Beauty, we become aware of new ways of being in the world. ~ john-odonohue, @wisdomtrove
232:If there be any one whose power is in beauty, in purity, in goodness, it is a woman. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
233:If your eyes are blinded with your worries, you cannot see the beauty of the sunset. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
234:Not only does beauty fade, but it leaves a record upon the face as to what became of it. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
235:Our lives are structured around power symbols: money, authority, title, beauty, security. ~ caroline-myss, @wisdomtrove
236:The echoes of beauty you've seen transpire, Resound through dying coals of a campfire. ~ ernest-hemingway, @wisdomtrove
237:The head Sublime, the heart Pathos, the genitals Beauty, the hands & feet Proportion. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
238:Exhaustion pays no mind to age or beauty. Like rain and earthquakes and hail and floods. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
239:Wisdom is neither gold, nor silver, nor fame, nor wealth, nor health, nor strength, nor beauty. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
240:Being is desirable because it is identical with Beauty, and Beauty is loved because it is Being. ~ plotinus, @wisdomtrove
241:Every man had his personal habits, passions, and impulses toward goodness, beauty, and truth. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
242:Life is not always perfect. Like a road, it has many bends, ups and down, but that's its beauty. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
243:Life is not always perfect. Like a road, it has many bends, ups and down, but that’s its beauty. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
244:She had gained a reputation for beauty, and (which is often another thing) was beautiful. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
245:Women play with their beauty as children do with their knives. They wound themselves with it. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
246:&
247:For lovers, the beauty of the beloved is their teacher. His face is their syllabus, lesson, and book. ~ rumi, @wisdomtrove
248:It is a high distinction for a homely woman to be loved for her character rather than for beauty. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
249:She, though in full-blown flower of glorious beauty, Grows cold even in the summer of her age. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
250:Audrey Hepburn quote: Beauty is being the best possible version of yourself, inside and out. ~ audrey-hepburn, @wisdomtrove
251:Every significant artist is a metaphysician, a propounder of beauty-truths and form-theories. ~ aldous-huxley, @wisdomtrove
252:I do not have much patience with a thing of beauty that must be explained to be understood. ~ charlie-chaplan, @wisdomtrove
253:Let the beauty of what you love be what you do. There are a thousand ways to kneel and kiss the earth. ~ rumi, @wisdomtrove
254:That fair face will as years roll on lose its beauty, and old age will bring its wrinkles to the brow. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
255:We must take care of our minds because we cannot benefit from beauty when our brains are missing. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
256:A lifetime isn't long enough for the beauty of this world and the responsibilities of your life. ~ mary-oliver, @wisdomtrove
257:Let us come alive to the splendor that is all around us and see the beauty in ordinary things. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
258:... The human perception of this energy first begins with a heightened sensitivity to beauty. ~ james-redfield, @wisdomtrove
259:When one individual writer sings her song of beauty, she changes the lives of a million others. ~ richard-bach, @wisdomtrove
260:Any action done with beauty and purity, and in complete harmony of body, mind and soul, is Art. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
261:A thing of beauty is a joy forever: its loveliness increases; it will never pass into nothingness. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
262:If your eyes were open to all the beauty in the world, you would be overwhelmed with joy. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
263:Never lose an opportunity for seeing something beautiful for beauty is God's handwriting. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
264:The beauty and variety of the natural world are merely the visible legacies of endless war. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
265:Heaven is beautiful because it is the expression of that which is the perfection of beauty. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
266:Life is an opportunity, benefit from it. Life is beauty, admire it.  Life is a dream, realize it ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
267:Our lives are structured around power symbols: money, authority, title, beauty, security. ~ norman-vincent-peale, @wisdomtrove
268:she was consumed by 3 simple things: drink, despair, loneliness; and 2 more: youth and beauty ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
269:Women show men beauty in things beyond their ambitions. Women tell men to stop and smell the roses. ~ criss-jami, @wisdomtrove
270:A person's beauty is sophisticated and sacred and is far beyond image, appearance or personality. ~ john-odonohue, @wisdomtrove
271:Be like a lotus. Let the beauty of your heart speak. Be grateful to the mud, water, air and the light. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
272:I never found beauty in longing for the impossible and never found the possible to be beyond my reach. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
273:It's funny how the beauty of art has so much more to do with the frame than the artwork itself. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
274:Beauty as we feel it is something indescribable; what it is or what it means can never be said. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
275:Our brokenness has no other beauty but the beauty that comes from the compassion that surrounds it. ~ henri-nouwen, @wisdomtrove
276:The beauty of genuine brotherhood and peace is more precious than diamonds or silver or gold. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
277:Flowers are a proud assertion that a ray of beauty out-values all the utilities of the world. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
278:Only when the mind is completely alone can it know what is beauty, and not in any other state. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
279:The beautiful seems right by force of beauty and the feeble wrong because of weakness. ~ elizabeth-barrett-browning, @wisdomtrove
280:The same know contentment, for beauty is their lover, and beauty is never absent from this world. ~ teresa-of-avila, @wisdomtrove
281:The splendor of a soul in grace is so seductive that it surpasses the beauty of all created things. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
282:Whatever you may look like, marry a man your own age - as your beauty fades, so will his eyesight. ~ phyllis-diller, @wisdomtrove
283:The beauty of You delights me. The sight of You amazes me. For the Pearl does this… and the Ocean does that. ~ hafez, @wisdomtrove
284:The splendor of a soul in grace is so seductive that it surpasses the beauty of all created things. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
285:Beauty does not bring happiness to the one who possesses it, but to the one who loves and admires it. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
286:Life is a mystery- mystery of beauty, bliss and divinity. Meditation is the art of unfolding that mystery. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
287:The beauty of a living thing is not the atoms that go into it, but the way those atoms are put together. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
288:We ourselves possess Beauty when we are true to our own being; ugliness is in going over to another order. ~ plotinus, @wisdomtrove
289:Beauty of whatever kind, in its supreme development, invariably excites the sensitive soul to tears. ~ edgar-allan-poe, @wisdomtrove
290:In every change, in every falling leaf there is some pain, some beauty. And that's the way new leaves grow. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
291:I was in a beauty contest once. I not only came in last, I was hit in the mouth by Miss Congeniality. ~ phyllis-diller, @wisdomtrove
292:Life is a mystery - mystery of beauty, bliss and divinity. Meditation is the art of unfolding that mystery. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
293:As soon as beauty is sought not from religion and love, but for pleasure, it degrades the seeker. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
294:Beauty is an outward gift, which is seldom despised, except by those to whom it has been refused. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
295:I believe in beauty. I believe in stones and water, air and soil, people and their future and their fate. ~ amsel-adams, @wisdomtrove
296:When our universe is in harmony with man, the eternal, we know it as truth, we feel it as beauty. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
297:By its very nature the beautiful is isolated from everything else. From beauty no road leads to reality. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
298:It is well known that Beauty does not look with a good grace on the timid advances of Humour. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
299:Love is the experience that others are not others. Beauty is the experience that objects are not objects. ~ rupert-spira, @wisdomtrove
300:New sentient creatures filled the unseen depths, Life's glory and swiftness ran in the beauty of beasts. ~ sri-aurobindo, @wisdomtrove
301:We find delight in the beauty and happiness of children that makes the heart too big for the body. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
302:Enhance and intensify one's vision of that synthesis of truth and beauty which is the highest and deepest reality. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
303:The beauty of meditation is that you never know where you are, where you are going, what the end is. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
304:Beauty presents an indeterminate concept of Understanding, the sublime an indeterminate concept of Reason. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
305:But I think it is a serious issue to wonder about the other platonic absolutes of say beauty and morality. ~ roger-penrose, @wisdomtrove
306:Don't practice for cosmetic beauty, practice for cosmic beauty. Practice for inner beauty and inner light. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
307:Nobody ever discovered ugliness through photographs. But many, through photographs, have discovered beauty. ~ susan-sontag, @wisdomtrove
308:Teach us that wealth is not elegance, that profusion is not magnificence, that splendor is not beauty. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
309:When I go to the beauty parlor, I always use the emergency entrance. Sometimes I just go for an estimate. ~ phyllis-diller, @wisdomtrove
310:Beauty crowds me till I die. Beauty, mercy have on me! Yet if I expire to-day Let it be in sight of thee! ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
311:Her beauty climbed the rolling slope, it came into the room, rustling ghost-like through the curtains. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
312:If a man cannot understand the beauty of life, it is probably because life never understood the beauty in him. ~ criss-jami, @wisdomtrove
313:If there is no meditation, then you are like a blind man in a world of great beauty, light and colour. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
314:One would give generous alms if one had the eyes to see the beauty of a cupped receiving hand. ~ johann-wolfgang-von-goethe, @wisdomtrove
315:Prosperity isn't defined by money alone; it encompasses time, love, success, joy, comfort, beauty, and wisdom. ~ louise-hay, @wisdomtrove
316:Consciousness equals energy = love = awareness = light = wisdom = beauty = truth = purity. It's all the same trip. ~ ram-das, @wisdomtrove
317:Next to invention is the power of interpreting invention; next to beauty the power of appreciating beauty. ~ margaret-fuller, @wisdomtrove
318:The potential beauty of human life is constantly made ugly by man's ever-recurring song of retaliation. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
319:What is beautiful? Whatever is perceived blissfully is beautiful. Bliss is the essence of beauty. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
320:What seems nasty, painful, evil can become a source of beauty, joy, and strength, if faced with an open mind. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
321:If we choose to journey on the path of truth, it then becomes a sacred duty to walk hand in hand with beauty. ~ john-odonohue, @wisdomtrove
322:I would that you were either less beautiful, or less corrupt. Such perfect beauty does not suit such imperfect morals. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
323:Live quietly in the moment and see the beauty of all before you. The future will take care of itself. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
324:What place is so rugged and so homely that there is no beauty; if you only have a sensibility to beauty? ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
325:Did you ever sit quietly with your back straight, not moving, just only cherishing the beauty of silence? ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
326:Beauty is nothing else but a just accord and mutual harmony of the members, animated by a healthful constitution. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
327:Everything has its beauty but not everyone sees it. To see it a person only needs to imagine how it could be worse. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
328:If you tell an ugly woman that she is beautiful, you offer her the great homage of corrupting the concept of beauty. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
329:Make the most of every sense; glory in all the facets of pleasure and beauty which the world reveals to you... ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
330:The serene, silent beauty of a holy life is the most powerful influence in the world, next to the night of God. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
331:A person's utmost art and industry can never equal the meanest of nature's productions, either for beauty or value. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
332:Art is a divine thing. It can only be rightly expressed if opposed, to bring out its inner beauty that lies behind. ~ meher-baba, @wisdomtrove
333:As you awaken to your divine nature, you'll begin to appreciate beauty in everything you see, touch and experience. ~ wayne-dyer, @wisdomtrove
334:Beauty is a harmonious relation between something in our nature and the quality of the object which delights us. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
335:Everyone therefore must become divine, and of godlike beauty, before he can gaze upon a god and the beautiful itself. ~ plotinus, @wisdomtrove
336:Genius lasts longer than Beauty. That accounts for the fact that we all take such pains to over-educate ourselves. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
337:Life's errors cry for the merciful beauty that can modulate their isolation into a harmony with the whole. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
338:Only spread a fern-frond over a man's head and worldly cares are cast out, and freedom and beauty and peace come in. ~ john-muir, @wisdomtrove
339:Sleep, sleep, beauty bright,Dreaming in the joys of night;Sleep, sleep; in thy sleepLittle sorrows sit and weep. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
340:The house, the stars, the desert - what gives them their beauty is something that is invisible! ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
341:The singular multiplicity of this universe draws my deepest attention. It is a thing of ultimate beauty. Leto II ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
342:When I admire the wonders of a sunset or the beauty of the moon, my soul expands in the worship of the creator. ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
343:With a great poet the sense of Beauty overcomes every other consideration, or rather obliterates all consideration. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
344:I am still yours, Allie, my queen, my timeless beauty. You are, and always have been, the best thing in my life ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
345:Never follow the crowd in what you do; the crowd has never produced anything of lasting quality, value or beauty. ~ denis-waitley, @wisdomtrove
346:Of all these the richest in beauty is the beautiful life. That is the perfect work of art. ~Waddington ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
347:The six great gifts of an Irish girl are beauty, soft voice, sweet speech, wisdom, needlework, and chastity. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
348:I define nothing. Not beauty, not patriotism. I take each thing as it is, without prior rules about what it should be. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
349:Sleep, sleep, beauty bright,Dreaming o'er the joys of night.Sleep, sleep: in thy sleepLittle sorrows sit and weep. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
350:The beauty of a woman is not in the clothes she wears, the figure that she carries or the way she combs her hair. ~ audrey-hepburn, @wisdomtrove
351:We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
352:Youth is happy because it has the ability to see beauty. Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
353:A successful work will draw out the features capable of exciting a sense of beauty and interest in the spectator. ~ alain-de-botton, @wisdomtrove
354:Great beauty, great strength, and great riches are really and truly of no great use; a right heart exceeds all. ~ benjamin-franklin, @wisdomtrove
355:No sooner have you feasted on beauty with your eyes than your mind tells you that beauty is vain and beauty passes ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
356:Sleep, sleep, beauty bright, Dreaming in the joys of night; Sleep, sleep; in thy sleep Little sorrows sit and weep. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
357:Awareness is a mirror reflecting the four elements. Beauty is a heart that generates love and a mind that is open. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
358:It is generally a feminine eye that first detects the moral deficiencies hidden under the &
359:The genitals themselves have not undergone the development of the rest of the human form in the direction of beauty. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
360:The imagination disposes of everything. It creates beauty, justice, and happiness, which are the whole of the world. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
361:With the possible exception of clothes, beauty salons and Frank Sinatra, there are few subjects all women agree upon. ~ groucho-marx, @wisdomtrove
362:A great deal of beauty is rapture. A circle is a necessity. Otherwise you would see no one. We each have our circle. ~ gertrude-stein, @wisdomtrove
363:Kindness and awareness work together. Through awareness we understand the underlying beauty of everything and every being. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
364:Of life's two chief prizes, beauty and truth, I found the first in a loving heart and the second in a laborer's hand. ~ kahlil-gibran, @wisdomtrove
365:The ivory tower of the artist may be the only stronghold left for human values, cultural treasures, man’s cult of beauty. ~ anais-nin, @wisdomtrove
366:The pursuit of truth and beauty is a sphere of activity in which we are permitted to remain children all our lives. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
367:Why don’t I see goodness and beauty everywhere? Because you cannot see outside of you what you fail to see inside. ~ anthony-de-mello, @wisdomtrove
368:Beauty has no obvious use; nor is there any clear cultural necessity for it. Yet civilization could not do without it. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
369:Beauty is a manifestation of secret natural laws, which otherwise would have been hidden from us forever. ~ johann-wolfgang-von-goethe, @wisdomtrove
370:Guided by my heritage of a love of beauty and a respect for strength - in search of my mother's garden, I found my own. ~ alice-walker, @wisdomtrove
371:Mathematics possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty - a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
372:One man's justice is another's injustice; one man's beauty another's ugliness; one man's wisdom another's folly. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
373:When passion is dead, or absent, then the magnificent throb of beauty is incomprehensible and even a little despicable. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
374:Warriors of the light are not perfect. Their beauty lies in accepting this fact and still desiring to grow and to learn. ~ paulo-coelho, @wisdomtrove
375:When beauty is universal, it loses its power to move the heart, and only its absence can produce any emotional effect. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
376:[After she and Clare Boothe Luce met in a doorway and the latter said, &
377:As we open our hearts to others, we begin to discover the truth of our own inner beauty, inner strength and inner light. ~ susan-jeffers, @wisdomtrove
378:Beauty is mysterious as well as terrible. God and devil are fighting there, and the battlefield is the heart of man. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
379:Beauty was not everything. Beauty had this penalty it came too readily, came too completely. It stilled life  froze it. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
380:I don’t trust a theologian who dismisses the beauty of science or a scientist who doesn’t believe in the power of mystery. ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
381:I had a microscopic eye for the blemish, for the grain of ugliness which to me constituted the sole beauty of the object. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
382:There is beauty to be found in the changing of the earth’s seasons, and an inner grace in honouring the cycles of life. ~ jack-kornfield, @wisdomtrove
383:We do not want to merely “see” beauty. We want to be united with it, to receive it into ourselves, to become part of it. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
384:The Christian must be consumed by the conviction of the infinite beauty of holiness and the infinite damnability of sin. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
385:But beauty itself is not given to us by anyone; it is a power we have within us from the gate, a radiance inside us. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
386:sweet spontaneous earth how often has the naughty thumb of science prodded thy beauty thou answereth them only with spring. ~ e-e-cummings, @wisdomtrove
387:Beauty depends on purpose. It is in the elements best suited to their purpose or aim that beauty shines forth most strongly. ~ michelangelo, @wisdomtrove
388:On the way to God you have to pass through beauty, pure beauty. If you do not pass through beauty it is not God that you find. ~ barry-long, @wisdomtrove
389:The beauty of a lake reflects the beauty around it. When the mind is still, the beauty of the Self is seen reflected in it. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
390:Well I'm living in a foreign country but I'm bound to cross the line. Beauty walks a razor's edge... someday I'll make it mine. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
391:Abstinence sows sand all over The ruddy limbs and flaming hair, But desire gratified Plants fruits of life and beauty there. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
392:Beauty is indeed a good gift of God; but that the good may not think it a great good, God dispenses it even to the wicked. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
393:Living in the present is the instant perception of beauty and the great delight in it without seeking pleasure from it. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
394:Part of the particular interest and beauty of science fiction and fantasy: writer and reader collaborate in world-making. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
395:Remain quiet. Don't feel you have to talk all the time. Go within and you will see the Loveliness behind all beauty. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
396:Drink in the beauty of friendship. In this world of constant change, we need the comfort of friendship more than ever before. ~ susan-jeffers, @wisdomtrove
397:Subtle astral colors... are hidden in everything around you. Could you but see, you would be amazed at their beauty. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
398:The beauty of a woman must be seen from in her eyes, because that is the doorway to her heart, the place where love resides. ~ audrey-hepburn, @wisdomtrove
399:We especially need imagination in science. It is not all mathematics, nor all logic, but it is somewhat beauty and poetry. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
400:Konstantin Levin did not like talking and hearing about the beauty of nature. Words for him took away the beauty of what he saw. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
401:The man who lives without conflict, who lives with beauty and love, is not frightened of death because to love is to die. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
402:A lump rises in our throat at the sight of beauty from an implicit knowledge that the happiness it hints at is the exception. ~ alain-de-botton, @wisdomtrove
403:In this universe it is Love that binds everything together. Love is the very foundation, beauty and fulfillment of life. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
404:My Emma, does not every thing serve to prove more and more the beauty of truth and sincerity in all our dealings with each other? ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
405:If we know how to create the energy of love, understanding, compassion, and beauty, then we can contribute a lot to the world. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
406:The beauty of the world, which is so soon to perish, has two edges, one of laughter, one of anguish, cutting the heart asunder. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
407:The root of things, what they were all afraid of saying, was that happiness is dirt cheap. You can have it for nothing. Beauty. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
408:When a man becomes a writer, I think he takes on a sacred obligation to produce beauty and enlighenment and comfort at top speed ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
409:You tend to close your eyes to truth, beauty and goodness because they give no scope to your sense of the ridiculous. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
410:Dear God! how beauty varies in nature and art. In a woman the flesh must be like marble; in a statue the marble must be like flesh. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
411:If you need something to worship, then worship life - all life, every last crawling bit of it! We're all in this beauty together! ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
412:As the excellence of steel is strength, and the excellence of art is beauty, so the excellence of mankind is moral character. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
413:Embracing your true self radiates a natural beauty that cannot be diluted or ignored. Confident, powerful, untamable, badass you! ~ steve-maraboli, @wisdomtrove
414:God is the most beautiful, and beauty is the expression of God. If you can't appreciate beauty in the world how can you understand God? ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
415:It is part and parcel of every man's life to develop beauty in himself. All perfect things have in them an element of beauty. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
416:All kinds of beauty do not inspire love; there is a kind which only pleases the sight, but does not captivate the affections. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
417:Praise or blame has but a momentary effect on the man whose love of beauty in the abstract makes him a severe critic on his own works. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
418:Some people like destroying for the hell of it; they love destroying beauty; they try to feel those people and then crack the egg. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
419:Then read from the treasured volume the poem of thy choice, and lend to the rhyme of the poet the beauty of thy voice. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
420:The reason for the unreason with which you treat my reason , so weakens my reason that with reason I complain of your beauty. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
421:My idea of man's chief end was to enrich the world with things of beauty, and have a fairly good time myself while doing so. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
422:That which God said to the rose, and caused it to laugh in full-blown beauty, He said to my heart, and made it a hundred times more beautiful. ~ rumi, @wisdomtrove
423:The ideal and the beautiful are identical; the ideal corresponds to the idea, and beauty to form; hence idea and substance are cognate. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
424:By seeing the beauty in every face we lift others into their wisest self and increase the chances of hearing a synchronistic message. ~ james-redfield, @wisdomtrove
425:I am very fond of the company of ladies. I like their beauty, I like their delicacy, I like their vivacity, and I like their silence. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
426:Sound has spoiled the most ancient of the world's arts, the art of pantomime, and has canceled out the great beauty that is silence. ~ charlie-chaplan, @wisdomtrove
427:Beauty is something wonderful and strange that the artist fashions out of the chaos of the world in the torment of his soul. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
428:Fear has the role we give it. We are able to empower or poison ourselves to whatever degree we want. This is the beauty of our design. ~ steve-maraboli, @wisdomtrove
429:The elms of New England! They are as much a part of her beauty as the columns of the Parthenon were the glory of its architecture. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
430:What ever beauty may be it has for its basis order and for its essence unity Beauty is only skin deep, but ugly goes clean to the bone. ~ dorothy-parker, @wisdomtrove
431:When we recognise the virtues, the talent, the beauty of Mother Earth, something is born in us, some kind of connection, love is born. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
432:Beauty is no quality in things themselves: It exists merely in the mind which contemplates them; and each mind perceives a different beauty. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
433:Give time, give space to sprout your potential. Awaken the beauty of your heart – the beauty of your spirit. There are infinite possibilities. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
434:Knowledge of ideal beauty is not to be acquired. It is born with us. Innate ideas are in every man, born with him; theyare truly himself. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
435:Yet some say Love by being thrall And simply staying possesses all In several beauty that Thought fares far To find fused in another star. ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
436:He said, if you allow yourself to be enchanted by the beauty to be seen in even ordinary things, then all things proved to be extraordinary. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
437:Every beauty which is seen here by persons of perception resembles more than anything else that celestial source from which we all are come. ~ michelangelo, @wisdomtrove
438:He looked at her as a man looks at a faded flower he has gathered , with difficulty recognizing the beauty for which he picked and ruined it. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
439:I pity the Hindu who does not see the beauty in Jesus Christ's character. I pity the Christian who does not reverence the Hindu Christ. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
440:The prince says that the world will be saved by beauty! And I maintain that the reason he has such playful ideas is that he is in love. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
441:Whatever's merely willful, and not miraculous (be never it so skilful) must wither fail and cease - but better than to grow beauty knows no. ~ e-e-cummings, @wisdomtrove
442:Goodness and love mould the form into their own image, and cause the joy and beauty of love to shine forth from every part of the face. ~ emanuel-swedenborg, @wisdomtrove
443:I know that I am one with beauty and that my comrades are one. Let our souls be mountains, Let our spirits be stars, Let our hearts be worlds. ~ amsel-adams, @wisdomtrove
444:Never did eye see the sun unless it had first become sun-like, and never can the soul have vision of the First Beauty unless itself be beautiful. ~ plotinus, @wisdomtrove
445:She's beautiful,' he murmured. &
446:Would you believe that I once entered a beauty contest? I must have been out of my mind. I not only came in last, I got 361 get-well cards. ~ phyllis-diller, @wisdomtrove
447:Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where Nature may heal and cheer and give strength to body and soul alike. ~ john-muir, @wisdomtrove
448:When feeling is divested of the feeler and the felt, it shines as love; when seeing is divested of the seer and the seen, it shines as beauty. ~ rupert-spira, @wisdomtrove
449:Beauty is a pledge of the possible conformity between the soul and nature, and consequently a ground of faith in the supremacy of the good. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
450:Find a teacher of Tantric Zen and study with them because it is transference of awareness, a sharing of the perception of the beauty of life. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
451:Home Run portrays the church in its beauty&
452:She walks in beauty, like the night Of cloudless climes and starry skies; And all that's best of dark and bright Meet in her aspect and her eyes. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
453:All these attributes; being, consciousness, love and beauty are reflections of the real in the world. No real - no reflection. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
454:This round of green, this orb of flame, Fantastic beauty; such as lurks In some wild poet, when he works Without a conscience or an aim. ~ alfred-lord-tennyson, @wisdomtrove
455:Doth perfect beauty stand in need of praise at all? Nay; no more than law, no more than truth, no more than loving kindness, nor than modesty. ~ marcus-aurelius, @wisdomtrove
456:Too late came I to love you, O Beauty both so ancient and so new! Too late came I to love you - and behold you were with me all the time . . . ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
457:Is a diamond less valuable because it is covered with mud? God sees the changeless beauty of our souls. He knows we are not our mistakes. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
458:Oh! snatched away in beauty's bloom, On thee shall press no ponderous tomb; But on thy turf shall roses rear Their leaves, the earliest of the year. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
459:Beauty is nothing, beauty won’t stay. You don’t know how lucky you are to be ugly, because if people like you, you know it’s for something else. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
460:The career of a movie star consists of helping everyone else forget their troubles. Using charm and beauty and good cheer to make life look easy. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
461:There must be provision for the child to have contact with nature; to understand and appreciate the order, the harmony and the beauty in nature. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
462:What do you think of that? It’s stopped raining." I’m glad Jay." Her throat, full of aching, grieving beauty, told only of her unexpected joy. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
463:Accuracy is, in every case, advantageous to beauty, and just reasoning to delicate sentiment. In vain would we exalt the one by depreciating the other. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
464:I hope that my work will encourage self expression in others and stimulate the search for beauty and creative excitement in the great world around us. ~ amsel-adams, @wisdomtrove
465:Meditation is one of the greatest arts in life - perhaps the greatest, and one cannot possibly learn it from anybody, that is the beauty of it. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
466:He who only does not appreciate floral beauty is to be pitied like any other man who is born imperfect. It is a misfortune not unlike blindness. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
467:In some not too distant tomorrow the radiant stars of love and brotherhood will shine over our great nation with all their scintillating beauty. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
468:It is in rare and scattered instants that beauty smiles even on her adorers, who are reduced for habitual comfort to remembering her past favours. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
469:Open your eyes to the beauty around you, open your mind to the wonders of life, open your heart to those who love you, and always be true to yourself. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
470:The ideals which have lighted me on my way and time after time given me new courage to face life cheerfully, have been Truth, Goodness, and Beauty. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
471:The lover knows much more about absolute good and universal beauty than any logician or theologian, unless the latter, too, be lovers in disguise. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
472:To the person who desires nothing and does not get entangled in desires, the manifold changes of nature are one panorama of beauty and sublimity. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
473:We are often taught to look for the beauty in all things, so in finding it, the layman asks the philosopher while the philosopher asks the photographer. ~ criss-jami, @wisdomtrove
474:There is nothing more practical than the preservation of beauty, than the preservation of anything that appeals to the higher emotions of mankind ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
475:When one begins to really feel into the spiritual dimension of their beings, they bump into love. They bump into compassion. They bump into beauty. ~ michael-beckwith, @wisdomtrove
476:No town can fail of beauty, though its walks were gutters and its houses hovels, if venerable trees make magnificent colonnades along its streets. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
477:The excellence of every art is its intensity, capable of making all disagreeables evaporate, from their being in close relationship with beauty and truth. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
478:Beauty is an omnipresence of death and loveliness, a smiling sadness that we discern in nature and all things, a mystic communion that the poet feels. ~ charlie-chaplan, @wisdomtrove
479:It was when I was happiest that I longed most... The sweetest thing in all my life has been the longing... to find the place where all the beauty came from. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
480:The purpose of soul questions is to open yourself deeper and deeper until all that is left is the power and beauty you are bringing to the lives of others. ~ gary-zukav, @wisdomtrove
481:Beauty is unbearable, drives us to despair, offering us for a minute the glimpse of an eternity that we should like to stretch out over the whole of time. ~ albert-camus, @wisdomtrove
482:Beauty lies in harmony, not in contrast; and harmony is refinement; therefore, there must be a fineness of the senses if we are to appreciate harmony. ~ maria-montessori, @wisdomtrove
483:If we have youth, beauty, blessed gifts, strength, if we find fame, fortune, favor, fulfillment, it is easy to be nice, to turn a warm heart to the world. ~ oliver-sacks, @wisdomtrove
484:Sometimes the greatest storms bring out the greatest beauty... Life can be a storm, but your hope is a rainbow and your friends and family are the gold. ~ steve-maraboli, @wisdomtrove
485:The Universe, so far as we can observe it, is a wonderful and immense engine; its extent, its order, its beauty, its cruelty, makes it alike impressive. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
486:The world is as you perceive it to be. For me, clarity is a word for beauty. It’s what I am. And when I’m clear, I see only beauty. Nothing else is possible. ~ byron-katie, @wisdomtrove
487:Beauty comes from the balance between two and three dimensions, between abstraction and representation - I seek the equilibrium behind changing appearances. ~ henri-matisse, @wisdomtrove
488:The beauty and charm of the wilderness are his for the asking, for the edges of the wilderness lie close beside the beaten roads of the present travel. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
489:What we seek, at the deepest level, is inwardly to resemble, rather than physically to possess, the objects and places that touch us through their beauty. ~ alain-de-botton, @wisdomtrove
490:If you permit your thoughts to dwell on evil you yourself will become ugly. Look only for the good in everything so you absorb the quality of beauty. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
491:Praise is the beauty of a Christian. What wings are to a bird, what fruit is to the tree, what the rose is to the thorn, that is praise to a child of God. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
492:To become balanced, meditate on the heart center in the center of the chest. There you will experience happiness, refinement, sensitivity, beauty, laughter. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
493:We do not understand that life is paradise, for it suffices only to wish to understand it, and at once paradise will appear in front of us in its beauty. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
494:We may speak about a place where there are no tears, no death, no fear, no night; but those are just the benefits of heaven. The beauty of heaven is seeing God. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
495:Any idol, regardless of its beauty or usefulness or original purpose, is to be set aside so that Christ might reign supreme, without a single competitor. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
496:Are you trying to grasp the quality of intelligence, compassion, the immense sense of beauty, the perfume of love and that truth which has no path to it? ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
497:Beauty is something we can affirm and intend to have more of. What happens then is our perceptual ability, no matter where we are, expands in that direction. ~ james-redfield, @wisdomtrove
498:Flowers and fruits are always fit presents, -flowers, because they are a proud assertion that a ray of beauty out-values all the utilities of the world. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
499:The world is a dream, you say, and it’s lovely, sometimes. Sunset. Clouds. Sky.‚Äù ‚ÄúNo. The image is a dream. The beauty is real. Can you see the difference? ~ richard-bach, @wisdomtrove
500:If everyone were not so indolent they would realise that beauty is beauty even when it is irritating and stimulating not only when it is accepted and classic. ~ gertrude-stein, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Beauty is everything. ~ Jorja Fox,
2:Beauty is fame. ~ Carol Ann Duffy,
3:Beauty is geometry. ~ J K Rowling,
4:Let me walk in beauty. ~ P C Cast,
5:Beauty is harsh. ~ Cassandra Clare,
6:Beauty, wit, ~ William Shakespeare,
7:For this beauty, ~ Hilda Doolittle,
8:Let peace and beauty reign. ~ Moby,
9:She's no beauty, mate ~ Libba Bray,
10:Beauty trumps everything. ~ Jo Nesb,
11:Soap shining beauty. ~ Walker Percy,
12:Beauty is a gift of God. ~ Aristotle,
13:The beauty! The beauty! ~ Junot D az,
14:Zits are beauty marks. ~ Kurt Cobain,
15:Beauty is the gift of God ~ Aristotle,
16:Exuberance is beauty. ~ William Blake,
17:. . . for beauty stands ~ John Milton,
18:, ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,#beauty,#love,#do,
19:Look on beauty, ~ William Shakespeare,
20:A terrible beauty is born. ~ W B Yeats,
21:Beauty is where you find it. ~ Madonna,
22:Don't be fooled by my beauty - ~ Rumi,
23:, ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,#beauty,#love,#do,
24:Beauty is a riddle ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
25:I am a thing of beauty. ~ Frank Sinatra,
26:Real beauty is my aim. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
27:Seek beauty and miss love. ~ Max Lucado,
28:The beauty of darkness ~ Adrienne Rich,
29:Beauty is a natural superiority. ~ Plato,
30:Beauty is not pretty. ~ Erwin Blumenfeld,
31:Beauty is the splendour of truth ~ Plato,
32:From out of pain, beauty. ~ Irving Stone,
33:Her beauty saddened me. ~ Henri Barbusse,
34:The beauty is in the giving. ~ Anonymous,
35:The beauty is the balance. ~ Frazey Ford,
36:Beauty is our business. ~ Edsger Dijkstra,
37:Beauty just implies truth. ~ Merce Cardus,
38:I am a parasite off beauty. ~ Peter Beard,
39:In your beauty, how to make poems. ~ Rumi,
40:Life is beauty admire it! ~ Mother Teresa,
41:May you walk in beauty. ~ Sonia Choquette,
42:The beauty's in the scars. ~ Joshua Homme,
43:The truest protest is beauty. ~ Phil Ochs,
44:Beauty is a mute deception. ~ Theophrastus,
45:Beauty is a short-lived tyranny ~ Socrates,
46:Beauty is never private. ~ Mallory Ortberg,
47:Beauty is not just physical. ~ Halle Berry,
48:Beauty is the flower of virtue. ~ Plutarch,
49:Beauty is truth, truth beauty ~ John Keats,
50:But beauty is set apart, ~ Hilda Doolittle,
51:Integrity reveals beauty. ~ Thomas Leonard,
52:I took her beauty personally. ~ Emma Cline,
53:Life is beauty, admire it. ~ Mother Teresa,
54:May you always walk in Beauty. ~ Black Elk,
55:The beauty calms the beast? ~ Kresley Cole,
56:And what is beauty?” “Terror. ~ Donna Tartt,
57:Beauty attracts beauty. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
58:Beauty is a full-time job. ~ Soman Chainani,
59:Beauty is a short-lived tyranny. ~ Socrates,
60:Beauty is God's handwriting. ~ Jandy Nelson,
61:Beauty is whatever gives joy. ~ Hugh Nibley,
62:Beauty only happens once. ~ Jacques Derrida,
63:I have perceived much beauty ~ Wilfred Owen,
64:In naked beauty most adorned. ~ John Milton,
65:My mother is a beauty. ~ Mary Louise Parker,
66:You are the mirror of divine beauty. ~ Rumi,
67:You rhapsodize about beauty, ~ Ani DiFranco,
68:All beauty contains darkness. ~ Daniel Odier,
69:Death is the mother of beauty. ~ Donna Tartt,
70:Helen, thy beauty is to me ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
71:Inner beauty is for amateurs. ~ Anne Taintor,
72:Let the beauty we love be what we do. ~ Rumi,
73:Let the beauty we love do what we do. ~ Rumi,
74:Poetry is the breath of beauty. ~ Leigh Hunt,
75:She is rich in beauty. ~ William Shakespeare,
76:Virtue is the beauty of the soul. ~ Socrates,
77:Welcome back,sleeping beauty. ~ Julie Kagawa,
78:Beauty and Love are as body and soul. ~ Rumi,
79:Beauty comes from the inside. ~ Kathy Ireland,
80:Beauty draws more than oxen. ~ George Herbert,
81:Beauty Is More Than Skin Deep ~ Maxwell Maltz,
82:Beauty is the child of love. ~ Havelock Ellis,
83:Could beauty be beaten out, ~ Hilda Doolittle,
84:Distance is the soul of beauty. ~ Simone Weil,
85:Every season has its beauty. ~ Nancy E Turner,
86:Genius lasts longer than beauty ~ Oscar Wilde,
87:I don't understand beauty. ~ Douglas Coupland,
88:Look for the beauty in things. ~ Maya Angelou,
89:People always get used to beauty, ~ Anonymous,
90:People always get used to beauty ~ John Green,
91:There is beauty when something ~ Jonathan Ive,
92:To love beauty is to see light. ~ Victor Hugo,
93:Beauty crowds me till I die. ~ Emily Dickinson,
94:Beauty drawes more then oxen. ~ George Herbert,
95:Beauty is a horrible power. ~ Faina Ranevskaya,
96:Beauty is not caused. It is. ~ Emily Dickinson,
97:Beauty is the lover's gift. ~ William Congreve,
98:Beauty is the promise of happiness. ~ Stendhal,
99:Beauty is where you find it. ~ Madonna Ciccone,
100:Beauty will save the world ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
101:Be Brave in the pursuit of beauty ~ Shu Uemura,
102:Death is the mother of beauty. ~ Denis Johnson,
103:Earth in beauty dressed ~ William Butler Yeats,
104:Everyone can use a little beauty. ~ Alex Flinn,
105:Fills The air around with beauty. ~ Lord Byron,
106:Hatred smothers all beauty. ~ Melina Marchetta,
107:How goodness heightens beauty! ~ Milan Kundera,
108:I didn’t feel I owed him beauty. ~ Naomi Novik,
109:I like to admire. I'm a fan of beauty. ~ Kesha,
110:In art economy is always beauty. ~ Henry James,
111:I wish I understood the beauty ~ David Ignatow,
112:love, beauty, and peace. To ~ Vincent Bugliosi,
113:Small price to pay for beauty. ~ Butch Cassidy,
114:Sometimes beauty can be a trap. ~ Peter Webber,
115:Sometimes beauty is like curse, ~ Amitav Ghosh,
116:The beauty of life is not knowing. ~ Matisyahu,
117:True beauty lies in true education. ~ Sai Baba,
118:What did beauty matter, anyway? ~ Paul Russell,
119:What is beauty? It's what you love. ~ Yoko Ono,
120:Who gave thee, O Beauty, ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
121:Beauty comes from inside, not out. ~ Elle Casey,
122:Beauty is a sign of intelligence. ~ Andy Warhol,
123:Beauty is a social necessity. ~ James Goldsmith,
124:Beauty isn't made of sugar. ~ Diana Wynne Jones,
125:Beauty is the worst kind of lie. ~ Beth Kephart,
126:Beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder ~ Plato,
127:Beauty stands and waits ~ Lawrence Ferlinghetti,
128:Beauty will save the world ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
129:Europe. That's where the beauty is. ~ Anonymous,
130:I love the excesses of beauty, ~ Eric Gamalinda,
131:the beauty of doing nothing ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
132:When I say truth, I mean beauty. ~ Stephen King,
133:Your arrogance lessens your beauty. ~ Toba Beta,
134:All beauty, resonance, integrity, ~ John Ashbery,
135:A thing of beauty is a joy forever. ~ John Keats,
136:beauty alters the grain of reality ~ Donna Tartt,
137:Beauty can inspire miracles. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
138:Beauty comes when fashion succeeds ~ Coco Chanel,
139:Beauty is more than skin deep. ~ Charlize Theron,
140:Beauty is the harvest of presence. ~ David Whyte,
141:Beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder. ~ Plato,
142:Beauty that arose out of pain. ~ Suzanne Collins,
143:Beauty will save the world. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
144:Beauty would save the world. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
145:Find some beauty along the way. ~ Susan Vreeland,
146:Hold fast to youth and beauty. ~ Elizabeth Arden,
147:I find beauty in melancholy. ~ Alexander McQueen,
148:In every bit of beauty, I see you. ~ Julie Berry,
149:In youth and beauty, wisdom is but rare! ~ Homer,
150:Let me learn now where Beauty is; ~ Anne Spencer,
151:O, if so much beauty doth reveal ~ Esaias Tegner,
152:on the way to the beauty parlor. ~ Gillian Flynn,
153:Proportion is the heart of beauty. ~ Ken Follett,
154:There is beauty in the written word, ~ T J Klune,
155:There is beauty in the written word. ~ T J Klune,
156:you know you’ll always be my beauty. ~ Nina Lane,
157:As long as I love Beauty I am young. ~ W H Davies,
158:Beauty alters the grain of reality. ~ Donna Tartt,
159:Beauty always wins friends. ~ Emma Frances Dawson,
160:Beauty awakens the soul to act. ~ Dante Alighieri,
161:Beauty is in all shapes and sizes ~ Holland Roden,
162:Beauty is the only master to serve. ~ Jack London,
163:Beauty- it was a glorious gift of nature. ~ Homer,
164:BEAUTY LIES IN THE EYES OF A BEHOLDER ~ Anonymous,
165:Beauty lives with kindness. ~ William Shakespeare,
166:Beauty remains; pain ends up passing. ~ Anonymous,
167:Bid amaranthus all his beauty shed, ~ John Milton,
168:Dear to girls' hearts is their own beauty. ~ Ovid,
169:Each season has its own beauty. ~ Thich Thien An,
170:Judge the moth by the beauty of the candle ~ Rumi,
171:Love has perfect eyes for beauty. ~ Bryant McGill,
172:Love is the beauty of the soul. ~ Saint Augustine,
173:Love is the recognition of beauty. ~ John Welwood,
174:My beauty icon is Angelina Jolie. ~ Ashley Benson,
175:Oh! snatched away in beauty's bloom, ~ Lord Byron,
176:Rare is the union of beauty and purity. ~ Juvenal,
177:Train like a beauty look like a beast ~ Cassey Ho,
178:We all have a weakness for beauty. ~ Albert Camus,
179:We ever long for visions of beauty, ~ Maxim Gorky,
180:What made the beauty of the moon? ~ Anis Mojgani,
181:Whenever Beauty looks, Love is also there. ~ Rumi,
182:Women are slaves to their beauty. ~ Doris Lessing,
183:A thing of beauty is a job forever. ~ Milton Berle,
184:Beauty awakens the soul to act. ~ Dante Alighieri,
185:Beauty brings us back to the now. ~ Allan G Hunter,
186:Beauty holds more worth than gold. ~ Robert Jordan,
187:Beauty is cruel, cruelty is beautiful. ~ Kate Cann,
188:Beauty is in the eye of the beholder… ~ Lora Leigh,
189:Beauty is no guarantee of goodness. ~ Claudia Gray,
190:Beauty is objectified pleasure. ~ George Santayana,
191:Beauty is the promise of happiness. ~ Edmund Burke,
192:Beauty maybe attractive, vanity is not ~ Anonymous,
193:beauty of life never lay in logic. ~ Smita Kaushik,
194:Beauty remains,pain ends up passing ~ Paulo Coelho,
195:Beauty rests on necessities. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
196:I’ll be here, beauty. Waiting for you. ~ Nina Lane,
197:I love her beauty, but I fear her mind. ~ Stendhal,
198:Junie B. Jones Is a Beauty Shop Guy ~ Barbara Park,
199:Live the beauty or your own reality. ~ Tom Robbins,
200:Look not thou on beauty's charming; ~ Walter Scott,
201:Real beauty has no boundaries’. ~ Prajakta Mhadnak,
202:She found beauty in the children. ~ Sinclair Lewis,
203:Style is to see beauty in modesty. ~ Andree Putman,
204:that I could get my beauty rest. ~ Camille Di Maio,
205:Welcome Beauty, banish fear. ~ Francesca Lia Block,
206:All powerful money gives birth and beauty. ~ Horace,
207:all to no end save beauty ~ William Carlos Williams,
208:Are not beauty and delicacy the same? ~ E M Forster,
209:Beauty and wisdom are rarely conjoined. ~ Petronius,
210:Beauty comes from the happiness within. ~ Liv Tyler,
211:Beauty is a promise of happiness. ~ Alain de Botton,
212:Beauty is a rebellion against time. ~ Milan Kundera,
213:Beauty is in the heart of the beholder. ~ H G Wells,
214:Beauty- it was a favor bestowed by the gods. ~ Ovid,
215:Beauty will no longer be forbidden. ~ H l ne Cixous,
216:Beauty will save the world ~ Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn,
217:brains last, beauty doesn't. ~ Lucy Maud Montgomery,
218:Can you see the beauty in a cockroach? ~ Wayne Dyer,
219:I died for Beauty--but was scarce ~ Emily Dickinson,
220:Newness hath an evanescent beauty. ~ Heinrich Heine,
221:Put yourself in the way of beauty. ~ Cheryl Strayed,
222:The beauty you see me is reflection of you.. ~ Rumi,
223:There is no shame in black beauty. ~ Lupita Nyong o,
224:Too much beauty can be hard to bear. ~ Nancy Garden,
225:Without emotion there is no beauty ~ Diana Vreeland,
226:A compassionate soul is inner beauty. ~ Keiko Fukuda,
227:Beauty draws us with a single hair. ~ Alexander Pope,
228:Beauty is in the eye of the gazer. ~ Charlotte Bront,
229:Beauty is the brilliance of truth. ~ Saint Augustine,
230:Beauty is the PR campaign of the soul. ~ Alex Shakar,
231:Beauty like hers is genius. ~ Dante Gabriel Rossetti,
232:Beauty loses its meaning when you’re ~ Dot Hutchison,
233:Beauty too often sacrifices to fashion. ~ Leigh Hunt,
234:Death is the mother of all beauty. ~ Cassandra Clare,
235:Do not doubt the beauty of your heart. ~ Dean Koontz,
236:Education beats the beauty and the youth. ~ Chanakya,
237:Everybody needs beauty as well as bread. ~ John Muir,
238:For Nicole, my idea of beauty ~ Jonathan Safran Foer,
239:Goodness, Truth and Beauty come first ~ Muriel Spark,
240:Great sport has intellectual beauty. ~ Rick Carlisle,
241:I am a lover of beauty, he of humanity. ~ Ted Chiang,
242:If love is a sin, then beauty is a crime ~ Bob Dylan,
243:I like creating beauty out of scary things. ~ Grimes,
244:people always get used to beauty though ~ John Green,
245:Some people find beauty in chaos. ~ Tera Lynn Childs,
246:Their is beauty everywhere on earth. ~ Josef kvoreck,
247:Wherever there is number, there is beauty. ~ Proclus,
248:You don't see your own face, your own beauty ~ Rumi,
249:A little beauty is preferable to much wealth. ~ Saadi,
250:A queen, devoid of beauty is not queen; ~ Victor Hugo,
251:Beauty has a lot to do with character. ~ Kevyn Aucoin,
252:Beauty is in the eye of the gazer. ~ Charlotte Bronte,
253:Beauty is in the heart of the beholder. ~ Suzy Kassem,
254:Beauty is the greatest seducer of man. ~ Paulo Coelho,
255:Beauty is the greatest seducer of men. ~ Paulo Coelho,
256:Beauty is the promise of happiness. ~ Alain de Botton,
257:Beauty through my senses stole; ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
258:Happiness is the true beauty weapon. ~ Susan Sarandon,
259:Help, love, forgive, and create beauty. ~ Misty Upham,
260:I always say the beauty is in the mix. ~ Nancy Pelosi,
261:People always get used to beauty though. ~ John Green,
262:Playing guitar is not a beauty contest. ~ Ernie Isley,
263:So beauty is, where you are not. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
264:There is a beauty in every hell! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
265:Truth reveals itself in beauty. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
266:until only infinity remained of beauty ~ John Ashbery,
267:Why should beauty be suspect? ~ Pierre Auguste Renoir,
268:You can't see beauty with miserable eyes. ~ H G Wells,
269:Accuracy is essential to beauty. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
270:All beauty is sad. [...] For it fades. ~ David Gemmell,
271:A thing of beauty is a boy forever. ~ Carl Van Vechten,
272:A women's greatest asset is her beauty. ~ Alex Comfort,
273:Beauty is always queen. ~ Joseph II Holy Roman Emperor,
274:Beauty is lyrical. Ugliness is elegiac. ~ Mason Cooley,
275:Beauty should be edible, or not at all. ~ Salvador Dal,
276:Beauty will be convulsive or not at all. ~ Andr Breton,
277:Elided ~ Unthreaded beauty in the old forest. ~ Rose 🌹,
278:…for what after all is Youth and Beauty? ~ Jane Austen,
279:Genuine beauty is always quite alarming. ~ Donna Tartt,
280:God made beauty and love from ashes. ~ Kathleen Fuller,
281:Great is the strife between beauty and modesty. ~ Ovid,
282:Let the beauty of what you love be what you do. ~ Rumi,
283:Like beauty, stardom too is skin-deep. ~ Shahrukh Khan,
284:Lying – remembering beauty in truth. ~ Beatrice Sparks,
285:People always get used to beauty, though. ~ John Green,
286:Perfection doesn’t exist, but beauty does ~ L H Cosway,
287:suffering that brings with it beauty? ~ Stacy Pershall,
288:The beauty of me is that I'm very rich. ~ Donald Trump,
289:The foundation of beauty is the body. ~ Azzedine Alaia,
290:The world will be saved by beauty. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
291:Too much beauty, it corrupts things. ~ Khaled Hosseini,
292:War, my friends, is a thing of beauty. ~ Mark Lawrence,
293:We’re kind of like Beauty and the Beast. ~ R J Palacio,
294:We've got an airborne Sleeping Beauty ~ Seanan McGuire,
295:Where there’s beauty, there’s also pain. ~ A L Jackson,
296:Wherever there is a number, there is beauty. ~ Proclus,
297:Beauty and delight are inseparable powers. ~ The Mother,
298:Beauty and fear make uneasy companions ~ Cornelia Funke,
299:Beauty fades, but cooking is eternal. ~ Cassandra Clare,
300:Beauty fades. Your spirit is forever. ~ Beyonce Knowles,
301:Beauty gives a person power. And camouflage. ~ Ali Land,
302:Beauty is a whore. I prefer money. ~ Michael Cunningham,
303:Beauty is health. Health is beauty. ~ Andre Leon Talley,
304:Beauty is the door to another world. ~ Wojciech Kurtyka,
305:Beauty is truth, truth beauty,-that is all ~ John Keats,
306:Beauty should be edible, or not at all. ~ Salvador Dali,
307:Beauty soaks reality as water fills a rag. ~ Chet Raymo,
308:Every life has its radiance and beauty. ~ Hermann Hesse,
309:Find beauty. Try to understand. Survive. ~ James Sallis,
310:Find beauty, try to understand, survive. ~ James Sallis,
311:I admire natural, untouched beauty. ~ Theophilus London,
312:I am a lady young in beauty waiting ~ John Crowe Ransom,
313:I’m using beauty to subvert the system. ~ Georgia Clark,
314:I never saw true beauty till this night. ~ Lisa Kessler,
315:In every heartbreak beauty intrudes. ~ Roger Rosenblatt,
316:In this world, beauty is so common. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
317:It's the flaw that brings out the beauty. ~ Holly Black,
318:Modest humility is beauty's crown. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
319:My beauty simply shines forth like the sun! ~ Valentina,
320:No synonym for God is so perfect as Beauty. ~ John Muir,
321:Pain and beauty, our constant bedfellows ~ Nick Bantock,
322:The beauty you see in me is a reflection of you. ~ Rumi,
323:The best beauty secret is sunblock. ~ Christie Brinkley,
324:The pain passes, but the beauty remains ~ Jillian Stone,
325:‎There is a place where voices sing your beauty, ~ Rumi,
326:There's no tiling moral about beauty. ~ Nadine Gordimer,
327:The sky will bow down to your beauty, if you do. ~ Rumi,
328:The world will be saved by beauty. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
329:Beauty and folly are old companions. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
330:Beauty compels us; reason merely cajoles. ~ Mason Cooley,
331:Beauty is beauty it doesn’t have a size. ~ Jordan Silver,
332:Beauty is nothing but a promise of happiness. ~ Stendhal,
333:beauty is the currency of betrayal! ~ Eric Jerome Dickey,
334:Beauty is the harmony of purpose and form. ~ Alvar Aalto,
335:Beauty is the purgation of superfluities. ~ Michelangelo,
336:Beauty like hers had no place in his life. ~ Kelly Moran,
337:Culture opens the sense of beauty. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
338:Enjoy the power and beauty of your youth. ~ Baz Luhrmann,
339:Everything changes, but beauty remains. ~ Kelly Clarkson,
340:Finding beauty in the dissonance. ~ Maynard James Keenan,
341:I'm drunk on the fiery elixer of beauty. ~ Everett Ruess,
342:I'm not a great beauty. That's not me. ~ Anne Marie Duff,
343:I understood early that beauty was power. ~ Kevyn Aucoin,
344:Love built on beauty, soon as beauty, dies. ~ John Donne,
345:My mother was my beauty icon my whole life. ~ Gigi Hadid,
346:My responsibility is to truth and beauty. ~ Amiri Baraka,
347:My rosebush shouts beauty to the world. ~ Nancy E Turner,
348:Oh, beauty, ever ancient and ever new. ~ Saint Augustine,
349:recognize the beauty in truth and tenacity. ~ Bren Brown,
350:She is a peacock in everything but beauty! ~ Oscar Wilde,
351:The baby's beauty lies on its' pure-hearted. ~ Toba Beta,
352:The beauty here was luring but deceptive. ~ Karen Harper,
353:The image is a dream. The beauty is real. ~ Richard Bach,
354:There is no simple beauty in perfection. ~ Rebecca Serle,
355:To draw true beauty shows a master's hand. ~ John Dryden,
356:Art is the only beauty that never dies. ~ Sylvain Reynard,
357:Beauty and sadness always go together. ~ George MacDonald,
358:Beauty is boring because it is predictable. ~ Umberto Eco,
359:Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder. ~ Kinky Friedman,
360:beauty is in the eye of the gazer.”  My ~ Charlotte Bront,
361:Beauty is in the eyes of the beer holder ~ Haresh Daswani,
362:Beauty is its own excuse for being. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
363:Beauty is meaningless until it is shared. ~ George Orwell,
364:Beauty is the illumination of your soul. ~ John O Donohue,
365:Beauty is the promise of happiness . . . ~ Hanif Kureishi,
366:Beauty is the purgation of superfluities. ~ Michelangelo,
367:Beauty when unadorned is adorned the most. ~ Saint Jerome,
368:Beholding beauty with the eye of the mind. ~ Lauren Royal,
369:blind love finds ideal beauty everywhere. ~ Anton Chekhov,
370:EPILOGUE THE BEAUTY OF A THOUSAND STARS ~ Cassandra Clare,
371:Health and cheerfulness make beauty ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
372:I always say beauty is only sin deep. ~ Hector Hugh Munro,
373:I am a lover of beauty, he of humanity. Each ~ Ted Chiang,
374:I do not believe in the beauty of falling. ~ Mary Szybist,
375:I do not see any beauty in self-restraint. ~ Mary MacLane,
376:If everybody's not a beauty, then nobody is ~ Andy Warhol,
377:I love my beauty. It's not my fault. ~ Valentino Garavani,
378:I'm no beauty queen, I'm just beautiful me ~ Selena Gomez,
379:I think beauty is an expression of love. ~ Lupita Nyong o,
380:Let the beauty we love be what we do. —RUMI ~ Scott Jurek,
381:Let truth, beauty and love be your guide. ~ Bryant McGill,
382:Love, built on beauty, soon as beauty, dies. ~ John Donne,
383:Love is the beauty of the soul ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
384:Meaning, not beauty, is what we are after. ~ Peter London,
385:Motion is beauty and beauty is motionsless. ~ Tim Sanders,
386:Music is the tonal reflection of beauty. ~ Duke Ellington,
387:Nonsense and beauty have close connections. ~ E M Forster,
388:Outer beauty is inner beauty made visible. ~ Paulo Coelho,
389:Science grows and Beauty dwindles. ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
390:The joy sometimes is in the simple beauty. ~ Frank Deford,
391:The only lasting beauty is the beauty of the heart ~ Rumi,
392:True beauty consists of purity of heart. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
393:True beauty dwells in deep retreats, ~ William Wordsworth,
394:True beauty lies in purity of the heart. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
395:We see the beauty within and cannot say no. ~ Dave Eggers,
396:With God in the Joy of Beauty and Youth ~ Barbara La Marr,
397:You must appreciate beauty for it to endure. ~ Pat Conroy,
398:Youth and beauty are not accomplishments. ~ Carrie Fisher,
399:After you then, buddy. Youth before beauty ~ Justin Somper,
400:Beauty brings copies of itself into being. ~ Elaine Scarry,
401:Beauty is the arrowhead of evangelization. ~ Robert Barron,
402:Beauty is the object of all my efforts. ~ Gustave Flaubert,
403:Beauty is the promise of happiness.”—Stendhal ~ Ted Chiang,
404:Beauty seen is only eclipsed by beauty unseen ~ John Green,
405:Beauty without expression is boring. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
406:Danger hides in beauty and beauty in danger. ~ Belva Plain,
407:Death is the mother of beauty, mystical, ~ Wallace Stevens,
408:Everyone has something of beauty about them. ~ Ally Condie,
409:Her death was a foul corruption of her beauty. ~ Anonymous,
410:I believe that beauty is a basic service. ~ Theaster Gates,
411:Imperfection is beauty, madness is genius ~ Marilyn Monroe,
412:Inner beauty is never found in the mirror. ~ Chloe Thurlow,
413:I think there is beauty in everything. ~ Alexander McQueen,
414:Life, a beauty chased by tragic laughter. ~ John Masefield,
415:Pay attention to the beauty surrounding you. ~ Anne Lamott,
416:She walked in beauty, She sleeps in peace. ~ Courtney Cole,
417:The beauty of a lovely woman is like music. ~ George Eliot,
418:The beauty of things must be that they end. ~ Jack Kerouac,
419:The lure of flying is the lure of beauty. ~ Amelia Earhart,
420:The only lasting beauty is the beauty of the heart. ~ Rumi,
421:There is no reason for beauty. It just is. ~ Erin Kellison,
422:The soul that beholds beauty becomes beautiful. ~ Plotinus,
423:The very definition of 'beauty' is outside. ~ Adam Carolla,
424:The world's crazy, when it comes to beauty. ~ Richard Bach,
425:We didn't have a beauty shop as I grew up. ~ Jenifer Lewis,
426:Without transcendence, life has no beauty. ~ Deepak Chopra,
427:You manufacture beauty with your mind ~ Augusten Burroughs,
428:As a mom, I don't have much time for beauty. ~ Idina Menzel,
429:A thing of beauty is a joy till sunrise. ~ Harvey Fierstein,
430:beautiful in a way that made beauty hideous. ~ Laini Taylor,
431:Beauty is a behavior. As is ugliness. ~ Richelle E Goodrich,
432:Beauty is found in the way you treat others. ~ Olivia Culpo,
433:Beauty is much more intimidating than brutality. ~ Edi Rama,
434:Beauty is not extravagance; beauty is life. ~ Imelda Marcos,
435:Beauty is the oracle that speaks to us all. ~ Luis Barragan,
436:Beauty is the vocation of the earth. ~ William Bryant Logan,
437:Happiness and Beauty are by-products. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
438:hate contains truth. beauty is a facade. ~ Charles Bukowski,
439:It was a landscape of describable beauty. ~ Terry Pratchett,
440:Lou Reed: I am so susceptible to beauty. ~ Anthony DeCurtis,
441:Nothing negated beauty faster than boredom. ~ Susan Dennard,
442:Oh, Jo, how could you? Your one beauty. ~ Louisa May Alcott,
443:Solitude has its own very strange beauty to it. ~ Liv Tyler,
444:Take a stand: live for love, truth, beauty! ~ Bryant McGill,
445:That rarest gift to Beauty, Common Sense! ~ George Meredith,
446:The human soul needs beauty more than bread. ~ D H Lawrence,
447:This thing of Beauty is a Guilt forever. ~ Ir ne N mirovsky,
448:Ugliness sees ugliness; beauty sees beauty. ~ Bryant McGill,
449:Well I've written four beauty books as well. ~ Joan Collins,
450:Whoever said "beauty is pain" is right. ~ Elizabeth Eulberg,
451:Wisdom and beauty form a very rare combination. ~ Petronius,
452:You can’t eat beauty. It doesn’t feed you. ~ Lupita Nyong o,
453:Your beauty questions the beauty of nature. ~ M F Moonzajer,
454:Age before beauty, and pearls before swine. ~ Dorothy Parker,
455:Ay; beauty's princely majesty is such, ~ William Shakespeare,
456:Beauty always takes place in the particular. ~ Elaine Scarry,
457:Beauty doesn't last. It's bound to be destroyed. ~ Liao Yiwu,
458:Beauty is a whore, I like money better. ~ Michael Cunningham,
459:Beauty is first and foremost an emotion. ~ Tahar Ben Jelloun,
460:Beauty is how objects end. Beauty is death. ~ Timothy Morton,
461:Beauty is not defined by the size of your jeans. ~ Liv Tyler,
462:Beauty is the pilot of the young soul. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
463:Beauty scatters the seeds of hope in us. ~ Joan D Chittister,
464:Beauty you're born with, but brains you earn. ~ Jay Kristoff,
465:Dear God! how beauty varies in nature and art. ~ Victor Hugo,
466:Elegance and beauty have been banished. ~ Yves Saint Laurent,
467:Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it. ~ Confucius,
468:Goodness is beauty in its best mistake ~ Christopher Marlowe,
469:Goodness is beauty in the best estate. ~ Christopher Marlowe,
470:Her beauty completely erased by jealousy. ~ Philippa Gregory,
471:In life beauty perishes, but not in art. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
472:It blistered the eyes , beauty like hers . ~ Khaled Hosseini,
473:It's a rare man who can guard against beauty. ~ Anthony Ryan,
474:Let the beauty of what you love be what you do. ~ Emma Scott,
475:Let us live for the beauty of our own reality. ~ Tom Robbins,
476:Now, go forth and spread beauty and light. ~ Elizabeth LaBan,
477:Once I only saw her beauty, now I feel it. ~ Charlotte Bront,
478:Order is the shape upon which beauty depends. ~ Pearl S Buck,
479:Out of these ashes beauty will rise. ~ Steven Curtis Chapman,
480:Sometimes beauty is best when it’s distant. ~ David Levithan,
481:strength and beauty must go hand in hand ~ Louisa May Alcott,
482:The beauty of art is the art of beauty! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
483:the dead flesh of the beauty of his dreams (49) ~ mile Zola,
484:The goddess of beauty is the goddess Kitsch. ~ Hermann Broch,
485:The homely beauty of the good old cause ~ William Wordsworth,
486:There is beauty in the written word.'"
-Kevin ~ T J Klune,
487:There is something divine in mindless beauty. ~ Albert Camus,
488:They wore their strange beauty like war paint. ~ Holly Black,
489:True beauty dwells on high: ours is a flame ~ George Herbert,
490:When beauty breathes life back into the broken ~ A L Jackson,
491:Without the smile from partial beauty won, ~ Thomas Campbell,
492:You and me, professor.”
“You and me, beauty. ~ Nina Lane,
493:You can create art and beauty with a computer. ~ Steven Levy,
494:Your life is meant to be filled with beauty. ~ Bryant McGill,
495:A physical law must possess mathematical beauty. ~ Paul Dirac,
496:Beauty and folly are generally companions. ~ Baltasar Gracian,
497:Beauty can only fight the truth for so long. ~ Soman Chainani,
498:Beauty fades, but a pain in the ass is forever ~ Ren e Ahdieh,
499:Beauty has a persuasive power all its own. ~ Janette Rallison,
500:Beauty is about perception, not about make-up. ~ Kevyn Aucoin,
501:Beauty is not diminished by being shared. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
502:Beauty is the only thing that time cannot harm. ~ Oscar Wilde,
503:Beauty is whatever anyone thinks is beautiful. ~ Rei Kawakubo,
504:Beauty will be convulsive or will not be at all ~ Andr Breton,
505:Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it. ~ Marie Hall,
506:Grace in women has more effect than beauty. ~ William Hazlitt,
507:Heaven forbid if beauty were to have substance. ~ Osamu Dazai,
508:I'm not ugly, but my beauty is a total creation. ~ Tyra Banks,
509:Imperfections equal beauty.We're all imperfect. ~ Miley Cyrus,
510:I think all women have some sort of beauty in them. ~ The Miz,
511:Let us live for the beauty of our own reality. ~ Charles Lamb,
512:Mega-national defense ang beauty ko sa korona ~ Eros S Atalia,
513:Modesty is a diamond setting to female beauty. ~ Fanny Kemble,
514:No woman can be a beauty without a fortune. ~ George Farquhar,
515:O world, as God has made it! All is beauty. ~ Robert Browning,
516:pure beauty, shining among the other girls ~ Philippa Gregory,
517:Real beauty knocks you a little bit off kilter. ~ David Byrne,
518:Sometimes there is such beauty in awkwardness. ~ Ruta Sepetys,
519:The beauty of art is that it comes from the heart. ~ T A Uner,
520:The highest Beauty should be plain set. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
521:their concept of beauty is manufactured. Iam not. ~ Rupi Kaur,
522:The morality of art is in its very beauty. ~ Gustave Flaubert,
523:There is no beauty without some strangeness ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
524:When I make a mistake, it's a beauty! ~ Fiorello H La Guardia,
525:You walk on corpses, beauty, undismayed. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
526:A Beauty So Beastly (the Beastly series #1) ~ RaShelle Workman,
527:Art is to beauty what honor is to honesty. ~ Winston Churchill,
528:Beauty and the devil are the same thing. ~ Robert Mapplethorpe,
529:Beauty fades. But a pain in the ass is forever. ~ Ren e Ahdieh,
530:Beauty has no relation to price, rarity, or age. ~ John Cotton,
531:Beauty has rights that plainness never will. ~ Kristin Cashore,
532:Beauty is everlasting And dust is for a time. ~ Marianne Moore,
533:Beauty is God's handwriting-a wayside sacrament. ~ John Milton,
534:Beauty is nature’s way of acting at a distance. ~ Denis Dutton,
535:Beauty is the mark God sets upon virtue. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
536:Beauty lies between the erotic and the tragic. ~ Chloe Thurlow,
537:Beauty shall rise with the dawn from the east. ~ Khalil Gibran,
538:Beauty will be convulsive or will not be at all. ~ Andr Breton,
539:Beauty with innocence is a double beauty! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
540:Elegance is the only beauty that never fades. ~ Audrey Hepburn,
541:Existence will not stop until it gets to beauty. ~ Anne Carson,
542:Her people would kill one beauty to make another. ~ Greg Keyes,
543:I feel that beauty and femininity are ageless ~ Marilyn Monroe,
544:If only beauty could explain the world away. ~ Gary Shteyngart,
545:If you got beauty, beauty, just raise em up. ~ Meghan Trainor,
546:I have to confess, there is no limit in beauty ~ M F Moonzajer,
547:Imperfectios equal beauty. We are all imperfect. ~ Miley Cyrus,
548:It adds a little wonder and beauty to the world. ~ Neil Gaiman,
549:I think everybody should focus on inner beauty. ~ Paloma Faith,
550:It's amazing how beauty can mask so many flaws ~ Lucinda Riley,
551:It's like your beauty is wasted on my eyeballs. ~ Alanea Alder,
552:Life’s beauty is inseparable from its fragility. ~ Susan David,
553:Like pleasure, beauty should be savored and enjoyed ~ P C Cast,
554:One is apt to overestimate beauty when it is rare ~ Mark Twain,
555:...smiles are the foundation of beauty. ~ Edgar Rice Burroughs,
556:Some beauty is fleeting, some lasts a lifetime. ~ Holly Martin,
557:Stay close by the door, if you desire all beauty ~ Rabia Basri,
558:SUBLIME: The Beauty of Code, the Code of Beauty.By ~ Anonymous,
559:The essence of beauty is unity in variety. ~ Felix Mendelssohn,
560:There is a great beauty in little things. ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
561:There is no beauty without some strangeness. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
562:there is no beauty without some strangeness. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
563:There's more beauty on Earth than I can bear. ~ Marilyn Nelson,
564:There’s too much beauty upon this earth ~ Richard Le Gallienne,
565:Truth needs no color; beauty, no pencil. ~ William Shakespeare,
566:We are all in the middle of nature beauty contest. ~ Toba Beta,
567:What is beauty, but an extension of modesty? ~ Boonaa Mohammed,
568:Who would not give up wit for power and beauty? ~ Mason Cooley,
569:your hands
humming hurricanes
of beauty. ~ Sonia Sanchez,
570:Youth and beauty fade. Human decency doesn’t. ~ Colleen Hoover,
571:A dove has great beauty, but is easily broken. ~ Kristen Ashley,
572:An unresolved past erodes beauty in the present. ~ Romany Malco,
573:A still heart quickens as beauty graces the foul. ~ A L Jackson,
574:As we grow old, the beauty steals inward. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
575:Beauty always promises, but never gives anything. ~ Simone Weil,
576:BEAUTY ARISES IN THE STILLNESS OF YOUR PRESENCE ~ Eckhart Tolle,
577:Beauty crowds me till I die." Emily Dickinson ~ Emily Dickinson,
578:Beauty does not need a reason,” Okwu responded ~ Nnedi Okorafor,
579:Beauty exists not in sameness but in difference. ~ Paulo Coelho,
580:Beauty is also submitted to the taste of time. ~ Karl Lagerfeld,
581:Beauty is a radiance that orginates from within. ~ Jane Seymour,
582:Beauty is bought by judgement of the eye. ~ William Shakespeare,
583:Beauty is life when life unveils her holy face. ~ Khalil Gibran,
584:Beauty is Soul Deep - Beautiful Girl by Kailin Gow ~ Kailin Gow,
585:Beauty will be convulsive or will not be at all. ~ Andre Breton,
586:Be like a lotus. Let the beauty of your heart speak. ~ Amit Ray,
587:Dear to the heart of a girl is her own beauty and charm. ~ Ovid,
588:Everything has beauty, but not everyone can see it. ~ Confucius,
589:I have seen almost more beauty than I can bear. ~ Everett Ruess,
590:joe hardy to frank hardy: "age before beauty ~ Franklin W Dixon,
591:Love God, Embrace beauty, Live life to the fullest. ~ Kyle Lake,
592:Love is a beautiful liar? Beauty was a liar too. ~ Paula McLain,
593:Music, art, theater. I'm just a big fan of beauty. ~ Jerry Hall,
594:nature’s beauty was a powerful balm for the mind. ~ Sara Foster,
595:One is apt to overestimate beauty when it is rare. ~ Mark Twain,
596:The beauty of me being on stage is I have a voice. ~ Kevin Hart,
597:The perception of beauty is a moral test. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
598:Time can but make her beauty over again. ~ William Butler Yeats,
599:True beauty is what you see with the eyes of love, ~ Ted Chiang,
600:Virtue is beauty, but the beauteous evil. ~ William Shakespeare,
601:Whats beauty anyway but ugliness if it hurts you? ~ Jean Toomer,
602:Your beauty lights up the darkest night,” he said. ~ Fiona Paul,
603:After all, he says, “beauty attracts beauty. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
604:All high beauty has a moral element in it. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
605:A poore beauty finds more lovers then husbands. ~ George Herbert,
606:As we grow old...the beauty steals inward. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
607:Beauty exists not in sameness but in difference". ~ Paulo Coelho,
608:Beauty is eternity gazing at itself in a mirror. ~ Khalil Gibran,
609:Beauty is heaven's gift, and how few can boast of beauty. ~ Ovid,
610:Beauty is nothing without brains & heart. ~ Karen Salmansohn,
611:Beauty is very much in the mind of the beholder. ~ Michael Kenna,
612:Beauty provoketh thieves sooner than gold. ~ William Shakespeare,
613:Beauty vanishes; virtue is lasting. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
614:Beauty will save the world"
- The Idiot ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
615:Beauty within itself should not be wasted. ~ William Shakespeare,
616:Caprice in woman is the antidote to beauty. ~ Jean de la Bruyere,
617:Each moment of the year has its own beauty ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
618:Even beauty, in abundance, turns creepy. ~ Karen Thompson Walker,
619:Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it.
   ~ Confucius?,
620:Everything has its beauty but not everyone sees it. ~ Eric Blehm,
621:For him words took away the beauty of what he saw. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
622:For who can be ashamed to lose to such beauty? ~ Madeline Miller,
623:I have learned that acting is not about beauty. ~ Vincent Cassel,
624:I have loved the principle of beauty in all things. ~ John Keats,
625:I just said it for the beauty of the style. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
626:In such ugly times, the only true protest is beauty. ~ Phil Ochs,
627:I reflect that all art, all beauty, is reflection. ~ Adam Begley,
628:Joy and sorrow, beauty and deformity, equally pass away. ~ Saadi,
629:The absence of flaw in beauty is itself a flaw. ~ Havelock Ellis,
630:The Folk love nothing more than mortal beauty. ~ Cassandra Clare,
631:The only real beauty is order and love and light. ~ Stephen King,
632:The pain passes, but the beauty remains. ~ Pierre Auguste Renoir,
633:There is no cosmetic for beauty like happiness. ~ Maria Mitchell,
634:The true beauty of music is that it connects people. ~ Roy Ayers,
635:Through Love and through Beauty, we achieve immortality. ~ Jewel,
636:Truth, like beauty, is neither created nor lost. ~ Nicanor Parra,
637:At the heart of all beauty lies something inhuman. ~ Albert Camus,
638:Bad deeds like beauty, are in the eye of the beholder. ~ J R Ward,
639:Beauty begins the moment you decide to be yourself. ~ Coco Chanel,
640:Beauty cannot be recognized with a cursory glance. ~ Jean Cocteau,
641:Beauty exists where you least expect to find it. ~ Gail Tsukiyama,
642:Beauty' is a currency system like the gold standard. ~ Naomi Wolf,
643:Beauty is a pair of shoes that makes you wanna die. ~ Frank Zappa,
644:Beauty is no handicap if you don't think about it. ~ Sophia Loren,
645:Beauty is nothing other than the promise of happiness. ~ Stendhal,
646:Beauty is only the start of bearable terror. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
647:Bliss, Eternal Harmony, and Indescribable Beauty. ~ Joseph Murphy,
648:Consider for a moment any beauty in the name Ralph. ~ Frank Zappa,
649:Depression opens the door to beauty of some kind. ~ James Hillman,
650:Each moment of the year has its own beauty. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
651:Everyone loves beauty, even the ugliest creature. ~ M F Moonzajer,
652:everything has it's beauty but not everyone sees it ~ Andy Warhol,
653:Few things rivet me like the beauty of moving water. ~ Pat Conroy,
654:For Beauty's tears are lovelier than her smile. ~ Thomas Campbell,
655:guess all that sinuous grace and exotic beauty can ~ Lisa Shearin,
656:Her throat, full of aching, grieving beauty. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
657:I am beautiful and beauty is my reason for living. ~ Paulo Coelho,
658:I am not your lover, but a victim of your beauty. ~ M F Moonzajer,
659:It’s funny how beauty rides the back of pain .  ~ Patricia Harman,
660:Love gives beauty to everything it touches. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
661:Love is the gentle smile upon the lips of beauty. ~ Khalil Gibran,
662:May you know the beauty of your own true nature. ~ Jack Kornfield,
663:Outer beauty attracts, but inner beauty captivates. ~ Kate Angell,
664:[...] smiles are the foundation of beauty. ~ Edgar Rice Burroughs,
665:The essence of God, if at all God has an essence, is Beauty. ~ id,
666:The illusion of beauty - the rule of comparisons. ~ Lesley Pearse,
667:The opening to reality, as it really is, is beauty. ~ Byron Katie,
668:There is a role and function for beauty in our time. ~ Tadao Ando,
669:There is beauty, heartbreaking beauty, everywhere. ~ Edward Abbey,
670:There is beauty in the least beautiful of things. ~ Alan Brennert,
671:Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and white ~ William Shakespeare,
672:True beauty in a woman is reflected in her soul. ~ Audrey Hepburn,
673:Variety of uniformities makes complete beauty. ~ Christopher Wren,
674:When everyone in the world sees beauty, then ugly exists. ~ Laozi,
675:When the world knows beauty as beauty, ugliness arises. ~ Lao Tzu,
676:You are horror and beauty in rare combination. ~ Octavia E Butler,
677:You make beauty and it disappears, I love that. ~ Caryl Churchill,
678:A city is judged by the beauty of the children's parks. ~ Amit Ray,
679:After-comers cannot guess the beauty been. ~ Gerard Manley Hopkins,
680:Beauty beheld in solitude is even more lethal. ~ Witold Gombrowicz,
681:Beauty is everywhere a welcome guest. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
682:Beauty is like success: we can't love it for long. ~ Graham Greene,
683:Beauty is within; you just have to bring it out. ~ Fatema Mernissi,
684:Beauty loses its relish; the graces never. ~ Henry Home Lord Kames,
685:Beauty should be shared for it enhances our joys. ~ Joseph Cornell,
686:Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear. ~ William Shakespeare,
687:Beauty walks a razors edge, someday I'll make it mine. ~ Bob Dylan,
688:Beauty without intelligence is like a hook without bait. ~ Moliere,
689:Beauty without intelligence is like a hook without bait. ~ Moli re,
690:But the beauty of grace is that it makes life not fair ~ Relient K,
691:Color exists in itself, possessing its own beauty. ~ Henri Matisse,
692:I am a walking disaster held together with beauty. ~ Bryant McGill,
693:In diversity there is beauty and there is strength. ~ Maya Angelou,
694:I've never met a person I've couldn't call a beauty. ~ Andy Warhol,
695:I will call you Beauty, for that is what you are. ~ Meagan Spooner,
696:Madame de Stael talks herself into a beauty. ~ John Philpot Curran,
697:Not being a poet, I prize truth above beauty. ~ Judith Rich Harris,
698:Nothing is more powerful than beauty in a wicked world. ~ Amos Lee,
699:One does not see anything until one sees its beauty. ~ Oscar Wilde,
700:That's the beauty of the future. We get to change it. ~ Mira Grant,
701:The beauty of a landscape resides in its melancholy. ~ Ahmet Rasim,
702:The beauty of inspiration is its unpredictable timing. ~ T F Hodge,
703:The business of beauty isn't a natural model; ~ Immortal Technique,
704:The contemplation of beauty causes the soul to grow wings. ~ Plato,
705:The ideal beauty is a fugitive which is never found. ~ Joan Rivers,
706:There is no beauty in sameness, only in difference. ~ Paulo Coelho,
707:You ain't a beauty but, hey, you're all right. ~ Bruce Springsteen,
708:You have to look past the beauty to see the ugliness. ~ Nath Jones,
709:A beautiful woman should wear beauty to her bed. ~ Yasmine Galenorn,
710:All beauty that surrounds us must one day perish. ~ Jostein Gaarder,
711:All that remains of me now is a rumour of beauty. ~ Sebastian Barry,
712:A man can be pulled in by beauty and not see beneath it. ~ J D Robb,
713:An university is judged by the beauty of its tree lines. ~ Amit Ray,
714:Anything can happen. That's the beauty of creating. ~ Ernie Harwell,
715:Art can never exist without naked beauty displayed. ~ William Blake,
716:Beauty is almost no longer possible if it is not a lie. ~ R D Laing,
717:Beauty is everywhere a welcome guest. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
718:Beauty is nothing but the beginning of terror. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
719:Beauty is the attractive power of perfection. ~ Ananda Coomaraswamy,
720:Beauty is the purgation of superfluities. ~ Michelangelo Buonarroti,
721:Beauty is transient and changes with time. ~ Aishwarya Rai Bachchan,
722:Beauty speaks to us in moments, and then we forget. ~ Bryant McGill,
723:Beauty takes courage. Courage itself takes courage. ~ Carol Shields,
724:Beauty with character ages better than perfection. ~ Karl Lagerfeld,
725:Energy is more attractive than beauty in a man. ~ Louisa May Alcott,
726:Even beauty cannot always palliate eccentricity. ~ Honore de Balzac,
727:Genuine beauty is always meaningless, without virtue. ~ Osamu Dazai,
728:Good idea, Beauty Queen,’ Leo lied. ‘I nominate you. ~ Rick Riordan,
729:I am jealous of everything whose beauty does not die. ~ Oscar Wilde,
730:I miss her face, its beauty, and its beauty lost. ~ Sebastian Barry,
731:I'm weak-kneed in love with beauty every single day. ~ Cath Crowley,
732:I think there can always be beauty in struggle. ~ Patricia Arquette,
733:I wanted to make a horror film about beauty. ~ Nicolas Winding Refn,
734:Look for the beauty you seek first within yourself. ~ Bryant McGill,
735:Moments of beauty sustain us through hours of ugliness, ~ Anonymous,
736:My beautiful professor...I want to bath in your beauty. ~ Anonymous,
737:She's beauty and she's the beast, rolled into one. ~ Gena Showalter,
738:That beauty has a bitch streak as wide as ten rivers. ~ Scott Lynch,
739:The beauty is in the eye of the beholder. ~ William Carlos Williams,
740:The beauty of being foreign is that it snaps you awake. ~ Pico Iyer,
741:their concept of beauty
is manufactured
i am not ~ Rupi Kaur,
742:The real beauty of life is in orderliness. ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
743:„There is no beauty in sameness, only in difference. ~ Paulo Coelho,
744:True beauty after all consists in purity of heart. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
745:Who dreamed that beauty passes like a dream? ~ William Butler Yeats,
746:You can only possess beauty through understanding it. ~ John Ruskin,
747:All the freaky people make the beauty of the world. ~ Michael Franti,
748:And there is a beauty that brevity alone provides. ~ Cassandra Clare,
749:A well-made sentence, I think, is a thing of beauty. ~ Wendell Berry,
750:Beauty in distress is much the most affecting beauty. ~ Edmund Burke,
751:Beauty is perhaps a dangerous possession,’ I said. ~ Agatha Christie,
752:Beauty is the name of something that doesn’t exist ~ Fernando Pessoa,
753:Beauty is the ultimate defense against complexity. ~ David Gelernter,
754:Beauty perishes in life, but is immortal in art. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
755:Beauty's easy. Modeling is not just about being pretty. ~ Tyra Banks,
756:By means of beauty all beautiful things become beautiful. ~ Socrates,
757:Great beauty is often perceived by human senses as pain. ~ Susan Kay,
758:I have not seen one who loves virtue as he loves beauty. ~ Confucius,
759:In so many senseless deaths, beauty is to blame. ~ Suzanne Finnamore,
760:It is through beauty that we arrive at freedom. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
761:It is up to you to find the beauty in the ugliest days ~ R J Palacio,
762:Judgement of beauty can err, what with the wine and the dark. ~ Ovid,
763:Let the others have beauty. I've got the charisma. ~ Carine Roitfeld,
764:Loss could be used as a measure of beauty in a woman. ~ Alice Sebold,
765:One cannot grow beauty in the soil of hate and pain. ~ Rick Remender,
766:Only bugs can truly appreciate the beauty of flowers. ~ Dov Davidoff,
767:The absence of a flaw in beauty is itself a flaw. ~ H Havelock Ellis,
768:The essence of all beauty, I call love. ~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning,
769:...their heathen fingers understand truth and beauty. ~ Sarah Dunant,
770:The king is enthralled by your beauty. (Psalm 45:11) ~ Angela Thomas,
771:Time erodes gratitude more quickly than it does beauty! ~ Mario Puzo,
772:Unexpected intrusions of beauty. This is what life is. ~ Saul Bellow,
773:We're all damaged somehow."-A Great and Terrible Beauty ~ Libba Bray,
774:When beauty fires the blood, how love exalts the mind! ~ John Dryden,
775:When would insight, knowledge, hope, and beauty meld? ~ Larry Kramer,
776:With age, comfort becomes more seductive than beauty. ~ Mason Cooley,
777:You have to look passed the beauty to see the ugliness. ~ Nath Jones,
778:All my A dove has great beauty, but is easily broken ~ Kristen Ashley,
779:And these are joys, like beauty, but skin deep. ~ Philip James Bailey,
780:And they would all smile at the beauty of destruction. ~ Markus Zusak,
781:A woman's beauty is one of her great missions. ~ Richard Le Gallienne,
782:Beauty is an ecstasy; it is as simple as hunger. ~ W Somerset Maugham,
783:Beauty is an expression of that rapture of being alive. ~ Bill Moyers,
784:Beauty is the sole legitimate province of the poem. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
785:Beauty may be skin deep, but ugly goes clear to the bone. ~ Redd Foxx,
786:Beauty's of a fading nature. Has a season and is gone! ~ Robert Burns,
787:Beauty was power, and Bethie wanted her power back. ~ Jennifer Weiner,
788:Be kind to one another and seek beauty in all you do. ~ Bryant McGill,
789:But beauty must be broken daily to remain beautiful. ~ Virginia Woolf,
790:By means of beauty, all beautiful things become beautiful. ~ Socrates,
791:...for the object of education is to teach us to love beauty. ~ Plato,
792:Get at least 8 hours of beauty sleep. 9 if you're ugly. ~ Betty White,
793:I have found, beauty is the illumination of the mind. ~ John J Geddes,
794:I naturally prefer and capture the beauty in life. ~ Leni Riefenstahl,
795:In naked beauty more adorn'd, More lovely than Pandora. ~ John Milton,
796:khalepa ta kala, greek. It means 'beauty is harsh'. ~ Cassandra Clare,
797:Know there's beauty in the words you leave out ~ Kelli Russell Agodon,
798:Let everything happen to you: beauty and terror. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
799:Let you hold in mind, girls, that your beauty must pass ~ X J Kennedy,
800:Moments of beauty sustain us through hours of ugliness, ~ Brent Weeks,
801:Moments of beauty sustain us through hours of ugliness. ~ Brent Weeks,
802:Riches, understanding, beauty, are fair gifts of God. ~ Martin Luther,
803:Smiling is definitely one of the best beauty remedies ~ Rashida Jones,
804:Strangeness is a necessary ingredient in beauty. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
805:Strangeness is a necessary ingredient in beauty. ~ Krystal Sutherland,
806:The beauty of America is people can do what they like. ~ Ivanka Trump,
807:The beauty of simplicity is the complexity it attracts. ~ Tom Robbins,
808:The British love permanence more than they love beauty. ~ Hugh Casson,
809:The child should live in an environment of beauty. ~ Maria Montessori,
810:The pageant of a former hour, Is Beauty in the Grave. ~ Roger Scruton,
811:There is a terrible weight in all kinds of beauty ~ Joyce Carol Oates,
812:There is no doubt that genius lasts longer than beauty. ~ Oscar Wilde,
813:Thou Wonder, and thou Beauty, and thou Terror! ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley,
814:We find beauty in poison, and we love the bitter taste. ~ Cole McCade,
815:Who could forget him? Zachariah was a thing of beauty. ~ Sarina Bowen,
816:you. are your own standard of beauty. – mirror work ~ Nayyirah Waheed,
817:Your face is lined with beauty from laughter and tears ~ Lynsay Sands,
818:A life of success comes from seeking a life of beauty. ~ Bryant McGill,
819:aware of her beauty and ignorant of her love. Coquettish ~ Victor Hugo,
820:Beauty and the lust for learning have yet to be allied. ~ Max Beerbohm,
821:Beauty doesn't make happiness; it only comes to the happy. ~ H G Wells,
822:Beauty found a way to grow in the ugliest of places. ~ Christie Watson,
823:Beauty, without expression, tires. ” - Ralph Waldo Emerson ~ Anonymous,
824:Bel far niente means “the beauty of doing nothing. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
825:I am learning to live, and to see beauty in everything. ~ Cass Gilbert,
826:I am now willing to see my own beauty and magnificence. ~ Louise L Hay,
827:I find beauty in the grotesque, like most artists. ~ Alexander McQueen,
828:If Jack's in love, he's no judge of Jill's beauty. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
829:Is beauty enhanced or adulterated by utility?
~ Sena Jeter Naslund,
830:Italia! O Italia! thou who hast The fatal gift of beauty. ~ Lord Byron,
831:It is hard to find beauty in the art of self expression. ~ Elizabeth I,
832:It was the kind of beauty that made you shit your pants. ~ Brent Weeks,
833:I well know the sight of beauty is a real gratification. ~ Jane Austen,
834:Let witchcraft join with beauty, lust with both! ~ William Shakespeare,
835:Love beauty it is the shadow of God on the universe ~ Gabriela Mistral,
836:Physical beauty is like athletic skill: it peaks young. ~ Nancy Etcoff,
837:Strangeness is an ingredient necessary in beauty. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
838:Strength in the vital likes to show its beauty and power. ~ The Mother,
839:That's the beauty of the future. We get to change it. ~ Seanan McGuire,
840:The beauty of stature is the only beauty of men. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
841:The essence of God, if at all God has an essence, is Beauty. ~ Hermes,
842:The eye encompasses the beauty of the whole world. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
843:The key to education is the experience of beauty. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
844:The only enemy of innocence and beauty is time. ~ William Butler Yeats,
845:The rose that grows in grace will blossom into beauty ~ Nancy B Brewer,
846:Those who create beauty are also they who possess it. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
847:True beauty must come, must be grown, from within. ~ Ralph Waldo Trine,
848:Virtue is a kind of health, beauty and good habit of the soul. ~ Plato,
849:Whenever I meet a beauty, I escape or hide in the corner. ~ Thom Yorke,
850:Why was it I was seeing beauty in death rather than life? ~ Sui Ishida,
851:You have this ability to find beauty in weird places. ~ Kamila Shamsie,
852:You know what lasts longer than beauty? Being smart. ~ Gabrielle Union,
853:All changed, changed utterly:
A terrible beauty is born. ~ W B Yeats,
854:A thing of beauty is never perfect.” —Egyptian Proverb ~ Hourly History,
855:Beauty can never really understand itself. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
856:Beauty is a miracle of things going together imperfectly. ~ Anne Lamott,
857:Beauty is and always will be blue skies and open highway. ~ Dave Hickey,
858:Beauty is everywhere a very welcome guest. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
859:Beauty is the moment when time vanishes and eternity arises. ~ Amit Ray,
860:But time erodes gratitude more quickly than it does beauty. ~ Anonymous,
861:But we do find answers in beauty, more often then others. ~ Ally Condie,
862:Despite everything, life is full of beauty and meaning. ~ Etty Hillesum,
863:Every beauty, when out of it's place, is a beauty no longer. ~ Voltaire,
864:Every performance is different. That's the beauty of it. ~ Van Morrison,
865:False is the body, false are the clothes; false is beauty. ~ Guru Nanak,
866:For beauty is nothing but the beginning of terror. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
867:From the elitism of luxury to the democracy of beauty. ~ Giorgio Armani,
868:Geometry is the archetype of the beauty of the world. ~ Johannes Kepler,
869:Her beauty took one’s breath away, like a sudden pain. ~ Cornelia Funke,
870:I am among those who think that science has great beauty. ~ Marie Curie,
871:I believe that beauty lies in what makes you feel happy. ~ Katrina Kaif,
872:I'm not one of those women who thinks beauty is a curse. ~ Diane Kruger,
873:In a world of extreme beauty, anyone normal is ugly. ~ Scott Westerfeld,
874:innocence is beauty.
ignorance is death. -Kuroshitsuji ~ Yana Toboso,
875:Love beauty; it is the shadow of God on the universe ~ Gabriela Mistral,
876:My soul grazes like a lamb on the beauty of indrawn tides. ~ Pat Conroy,
877:New Orleans is a city of elegance, beauty, and refinement. ~ Tom Piazza,
878:Organized religion kills the living beauty of God. ~ Malcolm Muggeridge,
879:Poetry is the rhythmical creation of beauty in words. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
880:strength has always been the marker of beauty in my eyes. ~ N K Jemisin,
881:The beauty of Catholicism is every human being's right. ~ Matthew Kelly,
882:The beauty of the Internet is that there's no space limit. ~ David Tang,
883:The human soul needs actual beauty even more than bread. ~ D H Lawrence,
884:There is beauty in everything, Just not everybody sees it ~ Andy Warhol,
885:There is real beauty in my eyes when I lose my mind. ~ Jessica Hagedorn,
886:They confused beauty with innocence and harmlessness. ~ Cassandra Clare,
887:To achieve beauty, a woman must first achieve health. ~ Elizabeth Arden,
888:To suffer together is to suffer
with beauty, ~ Kelli Russell Agodon,
889:Were it not for shadows, there would be no beauty. ~ Junichiro Tanizaki,
890:Were it not for shadows, there would be no beauty. ~ Jun ichir Tanizaki,
891:We relax in the grand beauty of God’s perfect promises. ~ Andrew Farley,
892:You don’t understand the unbearable beauty of being you. ~ Amie Kaufman,
893:You paid for every second of beauty you managed to steal. ~ Janet Fitch,
894:Youth is happy because it has the capacity to see beauty. ~ Franz Kafka,
895:A frowning face can't bring out the beauty that you are. ~ Stevie Wonder,
896:All is changed, changed utterly
A terrible beauty is born ~ W B Yeats,
897:And I find perfect beauty excessively boring, don't you? ~ Gail Carriger,
898:Art evokes emotion. It doesn't have to be a thing of beauty. ~ Eli Broad,
899:Beauty can never really understand itself. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
900:Beauty in mathematics is seeing the truth without effort. ~ George P lya,
901:Beauty in mathematics is seeing the truth without effort. ~ George Polya,
902:Beauty in things exists in the mind that contemplates them. ~ David Hume,
903:Beauty in things exists in the mind which contemplates them ~ David Hume,
904:Beauty is in being who God made you to be with confidence. ~ Joel Osteen,
905:Beauty isn’t everything, stick. At least I like to eat. ~ Kim Richardson,
906:Beauty itself is but the sensible image of the Infinite. ~ Francis Bacon,
907:Beauty, it would seem, was both a blessing and a curse. ~ Bertrice Small,
908:Beauty made you love, and love made you beautiful. ~ Elizabeth von Arnim,
909:Beauty without grace is the hook without the bait. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
910:Beauty, you can find it here if you look hard enough. ~ Julianna Baggott,
911:Death is the mother of Beauty. And what is Beauty? Terror. ~ Donna Tartt,
912:dreaming your x-ray vision could see the beauty in me. ~ Lucille Clifton,
913:I am the lover of uncontained and immortal beauty. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
914:‎If heart filled with purity,
then mind found the beauty. ~ Toba Beta,
915:If there is a fruit that can be eaten raw, it is beauty. ~ Alphonse Karr,
916:If you speak of beauty, you are at once suspected of...kitsch. ~ Balthus,
917:I have been told that beauty is the great seducer of men. ~ Paulo Coelho,
918:I'm very low-maintenance when it comes to my beauty routine. ~ Eva Green,
919:In the face of immense tragedy—yet again—unexpected beauty. ~ Sara Baume,
920:I was a newborn vampire, weeping at the beauty of the night. ~ Anne Rice,
921:Life is lousy with hurt but it also shimmers with beauty. ~ James O Barr,
922:Money glitters, beauty sparkles, and intelligence shines. ~ Adolf Hitler,
923:Much of the beauty of light owes its existence to the dark. ~ Bren Brown,
924:O Death, made proud with pure and princely beauty! ~ William Shakespeare,
925:Our own Sleeping Beauty. Who finally kissed you awake? ~ Cassandra Clare,
926:Perfect beauty is so rare, its effect so magical! ~ Anna Katharine Green,
927:Romanticism is beauty without bounds-the beautiful infinite. ~ Jean Paul,
928:Sometimes darkness
is the beauty I am made of— ~ Kelli Russell Agodon,
929:The best part of beauty is that which no picture can express. ~ P C Cast,
930:The line of beauty is the line of perfect economy. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
931:There's a great and unutterable beauty in all this. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
932:The things I'm passionate about are beauty and fashion. ~ Kim Kardashian,
933:The world's biggest power is the youth and beauty of a woman. ~ Chanakya,
934:Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy. ~ Anne Frank,
935:True beauty after all consists in purity of heart. With ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
936:When it comes to beauty, I'm all about lashes right now. ~ Ashley Greene,
937:Wisdom is full of light and her beauty is not withered. ~ Book of Wisdom,
938:You cannot perceive beauty but with a serene mind. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
939:A song should have all the color and beauty of every rose. ~ Quincy Jones,
940:At some point in life, the world's beauty becomes enough. ~ Toni Morrison,
941:A witty woman is a treasure; a witty beauty is a power. ~ George Meredith,
942:Beauty and health are the chief sources of happiness. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
943:Beauty becomes alive and interesting when it’s habited. ~ Monica Bellucci,
944:Beauty comes first. Victory is secondary. What matters is joy. ~ Socrates,
945:Beauty, if you do not open your doors, takes age from lack of use. ~ Ovid,
946:Beauty in things exists in the mind which contemplates them. ~ David Hume,
947:Beauty is not the cause of something, it is what it is. ~ Emily Dickinson,
948:Beauty is simply reality seen with the eyes of love ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
949:Beauty is vain. It appears and like the wind, it's gone ~ Sylvain Reynard,
950:By God, when you see your beauty you will be the idol of yourself. ~ Rumi,
951:Design is the beauty of turning constraints into advantages. ~ Aza Raskin,
952:Even the moon was embarrassed by the beauty of Barcelona. ~ Andrew Barger,
953:Every experience of beauty points to [eternity]. ~ Hans Urs von Balthasar,
954:His beauty hurt, but it was the pain that made it beautiful ~ S Jae Jones,
955:If one truly loves nature one finds beauty everywhere. ~ Vincent Van Gogh,
956:I liked being adrift in symbols, beauty for beauty’s sake. ~ Paul Monette,
957:I'm really lucky because my mom is a good beauty muse. ~ Elizabeth Jagger,
958:I prefer ugliness to beauty, because ugliness endures. ~ Serge Gainsbourg,
959:I pretty much borrow my entire beauty regime from my mom. ~ Rashida Jones,
960:I stalked her for her beauty but mostly for her bravery ~ Debra Anastasia,
961:It didn’t matter that it wouldn’t last. Beauty never did. ~ Walter Mosley,
962:I think beauty can be a great lie. Sometimes the greatest lie. ~ M J Rose,
963:It is a terrible, terrible beauty that I do not understand. ~ Joseph Fink,
964:It is important to appreciate beauty, even when it is evil. ~ N K Jemisin,
965:It is kindness in a person, not beauty that wins our love ~ Jack Canfield,
966:I wax poetic On the beauty of sewers Real short poem. Done ~ Rick Riordan,
967:Love is an unpredictable thing. It is beauty and tragedy. ~ Heather Burch,
968:My soul grazes like a lamb on the beauty of an indrawn tide. ~ Pat Conroy,
969:Never underestimate the healing effects of beauty. ~ Florence Nightingale,
970:No cheerleader, no pastor’s wife compared to her beauty. ~ Pepper Winters,
971:That's the beauty of love. Sometimes you don't have to say nothing. ~ RZA,
972:The ancients called beauty the flowering of virtue. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
973:The beauty of a great idea lies in the art of using it. ~ Thomas A Edison,
974:The beauty of artifacts is in how they reassure us we’re ~ Simon Van Booy,
975:The beauty of life is in small details, not in big events. ~ Jim Jarmusch,
976:The beauty of shadow comes from the beauty of light! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
977:The whole point about beauty is its imperfection. ~ Diane von Furstenberg,
978:Too exact, and studious of similitude rather than of beauty. ~ Quintilian,
979:To suffer together is to suffer
with beauty... ~ Kelli Russell Agodon,
980:True beauty is to behold and reflect the beauty of God. ~ Carolyn Mahaney,
981:We are an integral part of beauty, not something separate. ~ Dewitt Jones,
982:We need beauty because it makes us ache to be worthy of it. ~ Mary Oliver,
983:Why do progress and beauty have to be so opposed? ~ Anne Morrow Lindbergh,
984:Wisdom is full of light and her beauty is not withered. ~ Book of Wisdom,
985:with one image he would make that beauty explode into me. ~ Marcel Proust,
986:And Kotick curled up his mustache (it was a beauty) ========== ~ Anonymous,
987:And the beauty of a woman, with passing years only grows! ~ Audrey Hepburn,
988:Beauty always had a purpose: to be of service to life. ~ Nikos Kazantzakis,
989:Beauty is a question of optics. All sight is illusion. ~ Joyce Carol Oates,
990:Beauty is intellectually confusing; it sabotages common sense. ~ P D James,
991:Beauty is not in the face; beauty is a light in the heart. ~ Kahlil Gibran,
992:Beauty is not in the face; beauty is a light in the heart. ~ Khalil Gibran,
993:Beauty is something that burns the hand when you touch it. ~ Yukio Mishima,
994:Beauty is vain. It appears and, like the wind, it's gone ~ Sylvain Reynard,
995:Beauty may be said to be God's trademark in creation. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
996:Beauty really has to do with the way a person carries it off ~ Andy Warhol,
997:Beauty seems to strike some people as a personal affront. ~ Claude Debussy,
998:Beauty seen makes the one who sees it more beautiful. ~ David Steindl Rast,
999:Because beauty isn't enough, there must be something more. ~ Eva Herzigova,
1000:But I'm your beast, and baby... every Beauty needs a Beast. ~ Harper Sloan,
1001:Does the emerald lose its beauty for lack of admiration? ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1002:Endurance is nobler than strength, and patience than beauty. ~ John Ruskin,
1003:Finding beauty in the common is the sign of a gifted mind. ~ Bryant McGill,
1004:For it is only framed in space that beauty blooms. ~ Anne Morrow Lindbergh,
1005:If peace is not In Nature's beauty, Then where is it, where? ~ Sri Chinmoy,
1006:love that you love me, professor.” “I love loving you, beauty. ~ Nina Lane,
1007:Nothing, not even time, will mar your beauty in my eyes. ~ Linda Robertson,
1008:Out of the chaos, the future emerges in harmony and beauty. ~ Emma Goldman,
1009:People always equate beauty with good, but it just ain't so. ~ Jim Butcher,
1010:richness of inner, rational beauty always spreads and deepens, ~ Anonymous,
1011:Style is about confidence. That's the real beauty. ~ Diane von Furstenberg,
1012:That's what you get for ignoring the beauty of Tupperware. ~ Nick Harkaway,
1013:the most immense thing about beauty is finding it gone. ~ Charles Bukowski,
1014:The real beauty in life is that beauty can sometimes occur. ~ Colum McCann,
1015:The truth isn't always beauty, but the hunger for it is. ~ Nadine Gordimer,
1016:The world is a hungry place, and Anna will feed it beauty. ~ Laurel Snyder,
1017:This lake exceeds anything I ever beheld in beauty. ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley,
1018:this woman is a genius in the day time and a beauty at night ~ Oscar Wilde,
1019:Truth is found in the exaltation and protection of beauty. ~ Bryant McGill,
1020:Truth, like beauty, is in the eyes of the beholder. ~ Michelle Sagara West,
1021:Ugliness is superior to beauty because it lasts longer. ~ Serge Gainsbourg,
1022:All beauty comes from beautiful blood and a beautiful brain. ~ Walt Whitman,
1023:All beauty has a dark side. Heaven can't exist without hell. ~ Gemma Malley,
1024:Artists are people who create beauty. That's the bottom line. ~ Wayne White,
1025:Beauty can blind you.” “But it shouldn’t make you stupid. ~ Beverly Jenkins,
1026:Beauty fades, a good personality and chemistry doesn’t. “I ~ Mariana Zapata,
1027:Beauty is a problem in that it imparts a kind of hope. ~ Karl Ove Knausg rd,
1028:Beauty is only skin deep, but ugly goes clean to the bone. ~ Dorothy Parker,
1029:Beauty is only skin deep; ugliness goes all the way through. ~ Edward Abbey,
1030:Beauty of blood. Innocent beauty flowering in my weeping. ~ Julia de Burgos,
1031:Beauty tips. How to look younger: Don't be born so soon. ~ Charles M Schulz,
1032:Beauty, without kindness, dies unenjoyed and undelighting. ~ Samuel Johnson,
1033:Bright unused beauty still plaugued her in the mirror. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
1034:Failure is relative. Life is adventure. Everything has beauty. ~ Debby Ryan,
1035:Football at it's best is a game of beauty and intelligence. ~ Ron Greenwood,
1036:God is glorious, he is indestructible truth, eternal beauty. ~ Benedict XVI,
1037:If beauty is only skin deep, look really, really hard. ~ Virginia Heffernan,
1038:I'm getting housemaid's knee kneeling here gulping beauty. ~ Amelia Earhart,
1039:It is not good for beauty that it should be a profession. ~ Julia Ward Howe,
1040:It's nice to just embrace the natural beauty within you. ~ Victoria Justice,
1041:It's the Joshua tree's struggle that gives it its beauty. ~ Jeannette Walls,
1042:My vicious Sleeping Beauty. This is our violent fairytale. ~ Laura Thalassa,
1043:No age is compelled to take its beauty from preceding epochs. ~ Willis Polk,
1044:Once wealth and beauty are gone, there is always rural life. ~ Mason Cooley,
1045:People come to see beauty, and I dance to give it to them. ~ Judith Jamison,
1046:Perhaps this Beauty might just be willing to love her Beast. ~ Nalini Singh,
1047:Personally I think that grammar is a way to attain beauty. ~ Muriel Barbery,
1048:the beauty of poetic apprehension, the infinite joy of reason. ~ Ian McEwan,
1049:The beauty of sorrow is superior to the beauty of life. ~ Georges Rodenbach,
1050:The idea that beauty is unimportant is the real beauty myth. ~ Nancy Etcoff,
1051:The noble grotesque involves the true appreciation of beauty. ~ John Ruskin,
1052:The rain had washed the sunset time to a lambent beauty. ~ John D MacDonald,
1053:There is beauty in everything, even in silence and darkness. ~ Helen Keller,
1054:there is beauty in stillness and grace in acceptance. ~ Katherine Applegate,
1055:There's beauty in anger, and anger for me is a passion. ~ Alexander McQueen,
1056:There's so much beauty in Africa, but it's not endless. ~ Veronika Varekova,
1057:They are the elect to whom beautiful things mean only Beauty. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1058:Whence arises all that order and beauty we see in the world? ~ Isaac Newton,
1059:When Sleeping Beauty wakes up, she is almost fifty years old ~ Maxine Kumin,
1060:When the world of man collapses in ruin, beauty will take over. ~ Anonymous,
1061:age has its own glory, beauty, and wisdom that belong to it. ~ Joseph Murphy,
1062:ahhh the beauty of annihilation. There's nothing like it. ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1063:A milli-Helen is enough beauty to launch exactly one ship ~ Scott Westerfeld,
1064:Are men shallow? Should we be looking for inner beauty? Ha, ha. ~ Tom Leykis,
1065:A ship is a beauty and a mystery wherever we see it. ~ Harriet Beecher Stowe,
1066:Beauty and grace are performed whether or not we sense them. ~ Annie Dillard,
1067:Beauty exists irrespective of financial circumstances. ~ Frances Moore Lappe,
1068:Beauty is a fruit which we look at without trying to seize it. ~ Simone Weil,
1069:Beauty is not in the face; beauty is the light in the heart. ~ Kahlil Gibran,
1070:Beauty is terror. Whatever we call beautiful, we quiver before ~ Donna Tartt,
1071:Beauty is that in the presence of which we feel more alive. ~ Krista Tippett,
1072:Beauty, to me is about being comfortable in your own skin. ~ Gwyneth Paltrow,
1073:Beauty was all the brighter against a background of briars. ~ Seanan McGuire,
1074:but beauty may be often associated with falsehood. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
1075:By seeing the beauty of nature you touch the eternity within you. ~ Amit Ray,
1076:Cupid is naked and does not like artifices contrived by beauty. ~ Propertius,
1077:Do you come from Heaven or rise from the abyss, Beauty? ~ Charles Baudelaire,
1078:Even now, I still believe metamorphosis is the greatest beauty. ~ David Vann,
1079:Expression is the mystery of beauty. ~ Edward Bulwer Lytton 1st Baron Lytton,
1080:Faced with an excess of beauty the mind can often only drink. ~ Jim Grimsley,
1081:Georg always looks beautiful! He wakes up like beauty himself ~ Bill Kaulitz,
1082:He’s always with me, he and all his beauty and his cruelty. ~ Dorothy Parker,
1083:How but in custom and in ceremony are innocence and beauty born? ~ W B Yeats,
1084:I admire her beauty, but I fear her intelligence. MERIMEE     Had ~ Stendhal,
1085:If kindness is beauty, patience is disarming elegance. ~ Richelle E Goodrich,
1086:I love that you love me, professor.” “I love loving you, beauty. ~ Nina Lane,
1087:Just one smile Immensely increases the beauty Of the universe. ~ Sri Chinmoy,
1088:Life deprived of beauty is not worthy of being called human. ~ Luis Barragan,
1089:My definition of beauty is strength and personality. ~ Diane Von Furstenberg,
1090:Oh, that's the beauty of the rose, that it blossoms and dies. ~ Willa Cather,
1091:Rarely do great beauty and great virtue dwell together. ~ Francesco Petrarca,
1092:Smoke follows beauty. Smoke follows beauty. Smoke follows beauty. ~ Amy Reed,
1093:The beauty of age is we grow, we learn. We have more wisdom. ~ Sherilyn Fenn,
1094:The history of soccer is a sad voyage from beauty to duty. ~ Eduardo Galeano,
1095:The one-eyed is always beauty in the land of the blind. ~ Randa Abdel Fattah,
1096:The quality of beauty lies on
how beholder values an object. ~ Toba Beta,
1097:There are many kinds of beauty as people who possess it. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
1098:There's more beauty in truth, even if it is dreadful beauty ~ John Steinbeck,
1099:The war made me poignantly aware of the beauty of the world. ~ J R R Tolkien,
1100:True beauty happens when two worlds collide and become one. ~ Imania Margria,
1101:True beauty is a ray that springs from the sacred depths of the soul. ~ Rumi,
1102:True beauty springs from the heart and dwells in the eyes. ~ Judith McNaught,
1103:When you are reluctant to change, think of the beauty of autumn. ~ V V Brown,
1104:When you see beauty anywhere, it's a reflection of yourself. ~ Shakti Gawain,
1105:Women's modesty generally increases with their beauty. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1106:All I have going is my looks. When my beauty goes, I'm through. ~ Ava Gardner,
1107:A lovely lady, garmented in light From her own beauty. ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley,
1108:And therein lay its beauty. Set down the hammer, she thought. ~ Robert Beatty,
1109:Beauty and ingenuity beat perfection hands down, every time. ~ Nalo Hopkinson,
1110:Beauty, he found, comes with the exercise of freedom within ~ Terryl L Givens,
1111:Beauty is my heritage, but home decor is very much my passion. ~ Aerin Lauder,
1112:Beauty is not required. Beauty is accuracy's distraction. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
1113:Beauty is not required. Beauty is accuracy’s distraction. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
1114:Beauty is only skin deep but deception goes right to the core. ~ Jayce O Neal,
1115:Beauty is the mark God sets upon virtue. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature (1836),
1116:Beauty is to enthuse us for work, and work is to raise us up ~ Cyprian Norwid,
1117:Beauty lay not in the thing, but in what the thing symbolized. ~ Thomas Hardy,
1118:Beauty Lures the Stranger More Easily into Danger -Septimus Heap ~ Angie Sage,
1119:Beauty means the agony of sacrifice and the end of agony ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
1120:Beauty stands In the admiration only of weak minds Led captive. ~ John Milton,
1121:Beauty was just another way to discount her, to not see her. ~ Kristin Hannah,
1122:Beauty, when it is not a promise of happiness, must be destroyed. ~ Ken Knabb,
1123:Beauty without intelligence is like a hook without bait. ~ Molière, Tartuffe,
1124:books were not only important, they were also objects of beauty. ~ Dan Rather,
1125:Damaged souls have their own beauty. A dark, terrifying beauty. ~ A Zavarelli,
1126:Dark and light. Horror and beauty. Everything is extremes. ~ Sarah Pinborough,
1127:everything in the universeis a pitcherbrimming with wisdom and beauty. ~ rumi,
1128:Everything is beautiful in its own way. Exuberance is beauty. ~ William Blake,
1129:Her beauty is a symptom of her disorder, of her soullessness. ~ Angela Carter,
1130:Beauty can only fight the truth for so long... ~ Soman Chainani,
1131:I cannot speak truth without poetry, because truth is beauty. ~ Bryant McGill,
1132:If beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so is ugliness. ~ Rodney Dangerfield,
1133:If you look after truth and goodness, beauty looks after herself. ~ Eric Gill,
1134:If you truly love nature, you will find beauty everywhere. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
1135:In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea, ~ Julia Ward Howe,
1136:I often look for beauty in form and structure, and for ideas. ~ Will Gompertz,
1137:I slept and dreamt life is beauty, I woke and found life is duty. ~ Confucius,
1138:I think most beauty tips that work and last are kind of old. ~ Cate Blanchett,
1139:It's Hard to Stay Mad When There's So Much Beauty in the World ~ Kevin Spacey,
1140:It's not beauty but fine qualities, my girl, that keep a husband. ~ Euripides,
1141:It's not fair the emphasis put on beauty, or on sexuality. ~ Rosanna Arquette,
1142:I’ve known a boy. I’ve measured beauty. What more do I want? ~ Gordon Merrick,
1143:Love of beauty is taste. The creation of beauty is art. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1144:My wife, ladies and gentlemen. Beauty, brains, and now brawn. ~ Richelle Mead,
1145:Outer beauty pleases the EYE. Inner beauty captivates the HEART. ~ Mandy Hale,
1146:People want view of beauty. Pfft. I say, do not give me lies. ~ Carolyn Crane,
1147:She who is born with beauty is born with a sorrow for many a man. ~ Confucius,
1148:the beauty of America, neither cool jazz nor devoured Egyptian ~ Frank O Hara,
1149:The beauty of me is I'm always going to ask. I'll never not ask. ~ Kevin Hart,
1150:The beauty of playing together is meeting in the One. ~ Stephen Nachmanovitch,
1151:The best part of beauty is that which no picture can express. ~ Francis Bacon,
1152:The ideal has many names, and beauty is but one of them. ~ W Somerset Maugham,
1153:The impulse of modern art was this desire to destroy beauty. ~ Barnett Newman,
1154:their concept of beauty
is manufactured
i am not
- human ~ Rupi Kaur,
1155:The older I get, the more beauty I see in the word renunciation. ~ Robert Bly,
1156:The rarest, truest beauty is visible only to the heart. ~ Richelle E Goodrich,
1157:There are only two things in life,' Bergé said. 'Love and beauty. ~ Mark Zero,
1158:There's more beauty in truth, even if it is dreadful beauty. ~ John Steinbeck,
1159:The terrifying and edible beauty of Art Nouveau architecture. ~ Salvador Dali,
1160:Truth exists for the wise, beauty for the feeling heart. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
1161:Why did everyone think it all came down to beauty? Maybe it did. ~ Kiera Cass,
1162:Beauty can be had by any fool. True strength is far more elusive. ~ Ruby Dixon,
1163:Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, get it out with Optrex. ~ Spike Milligan,
1164:Beauty is only temporary, but your mind lasts you a lifetime. ~ Alicia Machado,
1165:Beauty is the sole ambition, the exclusive goal of Taste. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
1166:Beauty is what you make of it. It is undefined and limitless. ~ Imania Margria,
1167:Beauty lies mainly, above all, in personality, not in the skin. ~ Eva Longoria,
1168:beauty of heart is much more valuable than a pretty face. ~ Constance O Banyon,
1169:Drink in the beauty and wonder at the meaning of what you see. ~ Rachel Carson,
1170:Even from the darkest night songs of beauty can be born. ~ Mary Anne Radmacher,
1171:Everybody has their own opinion and own ideas of what beauty is. ~ Rick Genest,
1172:Evil wears many disguises, some that can be mistaken for beauty. ~ David Estes,
1173:Forgiveness is the ultimate expression of God's unique beauty. ~ Matt Chandler,
1174:Having an eye for beauty isn't the same thing as a weakness. ~ Suzanne Collins,
1175:I didn’t understand yet that the beauty was part of the boredom. ~ Zadie Smith,
1176:I saw wild, dangerous beauty. I saw devotion. I saw you. ~ Nalini Singh,
1177:It's just poetry, beauty and love. How hard can that be to act? ~ Robin Wright,
1178:Leave no stone unturned. Deeply explore the beauty of your life. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1179:Like beauty, desperation and fear were as common as breathing. ~ Dot Hutchison,
1180:Make holy garments b for your brother Aaron, for glory and beauty. ~ Anonymous,
1181:My body is an ugly masterpiece that lives off the beauty of sound. ~ Chad Sugg,
1182:...Our beauty lies in this extended capacity for convolution. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
1183:Our Mother Mary is full of beauty because she is full of grace. ~ Pope Francis,
1184:Poetry, is a life long war waged
against ineffable beauty. ~ Atticus Poetry,
1185:Practice random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty. ~ Jack Canfield,
1186:Relax. You are beautiful, and everyone wants some of that beauty. ~ Julie Metz,
1187:religion, like beauty, cannot be experienced in cold blood. ~ Evelyn Underhill,
1188:Royal Young's writing is that rare blend of irony and beauty. ~ Simon Van Booy,
1189:She’s beauty for my ashes. And I’m hope for her heartache. ~ Michelle Leighton,
1190:She started converting objects of beauty into objects of value. ~ Steve Martin,
1191:[...] Sought less to praise his own beauty than to master it. ~ Eleanor Catton,
1192:Strangeness is the indispensable condiment of all beauty. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
1193:The average man thinks that a little falseness goes with beauty. ~ Thomas Mann,
1194:The death of our world painted in spectacular beauty on the sky. ~ Bobby Adair,
1195:The only way to rise to the beauty of love is to rise and serve. ~ Ann Voskamp,
1196:The poet is the sayer, the namer, and represents beauty. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1197:the power of beauty:what must the world be like for ugly women? ~ Paulo Coelho,
1198:There's a divinity that shapes beauty from our rough hewn lives. ~ Brent Weeks,
1199:The worse they are the more they see beauty in each other. ~ Alan Hollinghurst,
1200:This was beauty too. Was there anything in nature that wasn't? ~ Kate Atkinson,
1201:Trouble, after all, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder ~ P G Wodehouse,
1202:We are faith. We speak all languages of beauty and hardship. ~ G Willow Wilson,
1203:We live only to discover beauty. All else is a form of waiting ~ Khalil Gibran,
1204:What beauty is, I know not, though it adheres to many things. ~ Albrecht Durer,
1205:What would be ugly in a garden constitutes beauty in a mountain. ~ Victor Hugo,
1206:When you are seven, beauty is an abstraction, not an imperative. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1207:Why don't somebody wake up to the beauty of old women? ~ Harriet Beecher Stowe,
1208:Women are the life force we look at for their beauty. ~ Philip Seymour Hoffman,
1209:Women go to beauty parlors for the unmussed look men hate. ~ Mignon McLaughlin,
1210:You can only perceive real beauty in a person as they get older. ~ Anouk Aimee,
1211:Aging has a wonderful beauty and we should have respect for that. ~ Eartha Kitt,
1212:An artist's concern is to capture beauty wherever he finds it. ~ Kazuo Ishiguro,
1213:Beauty in things exits merely in the mind which contemplates them. ~ David Hume,
1214:Beauty of expression is so akin to the voice of the sea. ~ George Matthew Adams,
1215:Beauty! Terrible Beauty! A deathless Goddess-- so she strikes our eyes! ~ Homer,
1216:Beauty, you make me want to stop time so I can look at you forever. ~ Nina Lane,
1217:Everything in the universe is a pitcher brimming with wisdom and beauty. ~ Rumi,
1218:Familiarity is a magician that is cruel to beauty but kind to ugliness. ~ Ouida,
1219:God’s Word is the ultimate beauty treatment for every woman. ~ Elizabeth George,
1220:I do not doubt but the majest and beauty of the world are latent ~ Walt Whitman,
1221:I'm not in the fashion business; I'm in the beauty business. ~ Carolina Herrera,
1222:It requires a certain kind of mind to see beauty in a hamburger bun. ~ Ray Kroc,
1223:It's not all about beauty! It's also about a sense of humor. ~ Carolina Herrera,
1224:It was the beauty that caught me and held my soul hostage... ~ Ghostface Killah,
1225:Love develops into harmony, and of harmony is born beauty. ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan,
1226:Love is not a desire for beauty; it is a yearning for completion. ~ Octavio Paz,
1227:My everyday beauty routine is always rushed and pretty simple. ~ Cate Blanchett,
1228:Natural beauty takes at least two hours in front of a mirror. ~ Pamela Anderson,
1229:Nature admits no hierarchy of beauty or usefulness or importance. ~ Stephen Fry,
1230:Nature has a great simplicity and therefore a great beauty. ~ Richard P Feynman,
1231:No compromises; to live resolutely in integrity, plenitude and beauty. ~ Goethe,
1232:Oh, the beauty of it, how to deal with it? How to meet it? ~ Karl Ove Knausg rd,
1233:Outward beauty is the frame for the masterpiece of your soul. ~ Shannon L Alder,
1234:People who sacrifice beauty for efficiency get what they deserve. ~ Tom Robbins,
1235:Pride is innate in beauty, and haughtiness is the companion of the fair. ~ Ovid,
1236:She was terrifying in her beauty, bright like a devouring star. ~ Leigh Bardugo,
1237:Suspicion, like beauty, lies in the eye of the beholder, ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
1238:Tabbe took Susan to the jail beauty shop for a wash and set. ~ Vincent Bugliosi,
1239:The beauty of poetry is that the creation transcends the poet. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1240:The beauty of the loved woman exists in the beauties of Nature. ~ Joseph Conrad,
1241:The beauty of women was the first expression of my photography. ~ Alberto Korda,
1242:The ideal of beauty is simplicity and tranquility. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
1243:The seventies is what I love. Soft, touchable beauty is what I love. ~ Tom Ford,
1244:The ugly can achieve an absoluteness beyond the reach of beauty. ~ Mason Cooley,
1245:The world is a mirror of infinite beauty, yet no man sees it. ~ Thomas Traherne,
1246:To keep beauty in its place is to make all things beautiful. ~ George Santayana,
1247:True definition of science: the study of the beauty of the world. ~ Simone Weil,
1248:We call beauty that which supplies us with a particular pleasure. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
1249:Well, I've never looked upon myself as being a beauty, per se. ~ Cate Blanchett,
1250:We’ve got beauty, we’ve got class, the other team can kiss our … ~ Sara Shepard,
1251:What a strange illusion it is to suppose that beauty is goodness. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
1252:You don’t need anything big; each moment has a beauty all its own. ~ Adyashanti,
1253:You’ve got pharmaceutical-grade beauty, the cocaine of good looks. ~ Ted Chiang,
1254:All of humanity is searching for truth, justice, and beauty. ~ Miguel Angel Ruiz,
1255:Allow beauty and sadness to touch you. This is love, not fear. ~ Colleen Saidman,
1256:and no race has a monopoly on beauty, on intelligence, on strength ~ Aim C saire,
1257:At that moment, beauty itself struck me as a kind of melancholy. ~ Arthur Golden,
1258:Beauty is gloriously useless; it has no purpose but itself. ~ David Bentley Hart,
1259:Beauty is only skin-deep, and ugly goes straight to the bone. ~ Christina Lauren,
1260:Beauty is part of the finished language by which goodness speaks. ~ George Eliot,
1261:Beauty is terror. Whatever we call beautiful, we quiver before it. ~ Donna Tartt,
1262:Beauty means the scent of roses and then the death of roses ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
1263:Beauty might bring happiness, but happiness always brings beauty. ~ Kevyn Aucoin,
1264:Beauty was where you found it, and it was always comforting to see. ~ Donna Leon,
1265:Champagne is the only wine that enhances a woman's beauty. ~ Madame de Pompadour,
1266:Creation and destruction are one, to the eyes who can see beauty. ~ Savitri Devi,
1267:... each with its own beauty, and each with a story to tell. ~ Stephen Jay Gould,
1268:For the eye has this strange property: it rests only on beauty. ~ Virginia Woolf,
1269:Grace is the beauty of form under the influence of freedom. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
1270:Gratitude is the closest thing to beauty manifested in an emotion ~ Mindy Kaling,
1271:I am corrupted to the bone with the beauty of this forsaken world. ~ J M Coetzee,
1272:I am very passionate about non-toxic food and beauty and home. ~ Gwyneth Paltrow,
1273:I couldn't imagine owning beauty like my mothers. I wouldn't dare. ~ Janet Fitch,
1274:If they love you for anything, it will be for your beauty. ~ Melissa Bashardoust,
1275:I got saved by poetry. And I got saved by the beauty of the world. ~ Mary Oliver,
1276:I had put on beauty as a hermit crab puts on a discarded shell. ~ Nalo Hopkinson,
1277:I have look'd on Worlds far distant, their Beauty how pitiless. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
1278:I love classic beauty. It’s an idea of beauty with no standard. ~ Karl Lagerfeld,
1279:It is not beauty that endears, it's love that makes us see beauty. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
1280:Looking beauty in the world, is the first step of purifying the mind. ~ Amit Ray,
1281:Love can see the limitless beauty within self and within others. ~ Bryant McGill,
1282:Love's a fire that needs renewal Of fresh beauty for its fuel. ~ Thomas Campbell,
1283:Mathematics and poetry are the two ways to drink the beauty of truth. ~ Amit Ray,
1284:...maybe that's art. Seeing beauty others miss and capturing it. ~ Jules Barnard,
1285:Once destroyed, nature's beauty cannot be repurchased at any price ~ Ansel Adams,
1286:Soul is not about function; it's about beauty, form, and memory. ~ Julia Cameron,
1287:That’s the beauty of the universe. There’s always a new mystery. ~ James Rollins,
1288:The beauty of ruins? That they’re no longer good for anything. ~ Fernando Pessoa,
1289:The beauty of truth: whether it is bad or good, it is liberating. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1290:The beauty of your passion is in the colours of your belief. ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
1291:The fear of God reigning in the heart is the beauty of the soul. ~ Matthew Henry,
1292:The life and simple beauty of it is too good to pass up ~ Christopher McCandless,
1293:There are as many styles of beauty as there are visions of happiness. ~ Stendhal,
1294:There is so much beauty here, and yet it's hardly even acknowledged. ~ Sarah Jio,
1295:There's more beauty in the truth even if it is dreadful beauty. ~ John Steinbeck,
1296:There’s more beauty in the truth even if it is dreadful beauty. ~ John Steinbeck,
1297:The soul that sees beauty may sometimes walk alone. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
1298:To virginity is awarded the tribute of the highest beauty ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
1299:True beauty is doing the right thing when you know no one is looking, ~ Joe Hart,
1300:True beauty lives on high. Ours is but a flame borrowed thence. ~ George Herbert,
1301:Walter Pater defined Romanticism as adding strangeness to beauty. ~ Harold Bloom,
1302:We lose ourselves in stories; that's the beauty of literary art. ~ Siri Hustvedt,
1303:We talked about this before. The rare beauty of nonattachment. ~ William Lashner,
1304:What a strange illusion it is to suppose that beauty is goodness. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
1305:With genius, as with beauty -- all, well almost all, is forgiven. ~ Susan Sontag,
1306:You act like beauty is the only thing that makes us worthy of love. ~ Amy Harmon,
1307:You can always recognize truth by its beauty and simplicity. ~ Richard P Feynman,
1308:You don't gather the beauty of a flower by plucking her petals. ~ Gautama Buddha,
1309:You showed me beauty in survival. I’ll show you strength in healing ~ Pam Godwin,
1310:A picture's beauty does not depend on the things portrayed in it. ~ Marcel Proust,
1311:A picture’s beauty does not depend on the things portrayed in it. ~ Marcel Proust,
1312:Artists create things that point us to beauty, to truth, to God. ~ Katherine Reay,
1313:Beauty depends on the unseen, the visible upon the invisible ~ Elizabeth Brundage,
1314:Beauty is an enormous, unmerited gift given randomly, stupidly. ~ Khaled Hosseini,
1315:Beauty is no accomplishment on its own. It's what you do with it. ~ Padma Lakshmi,
1316:Beauty is one of the rare things that do not lead to doubt of God. ~ Jean Anouilh,
1317:Beauty is the bait which with delight allures man to enlarge his kind. ~ Socrates,
1318:Beauty is the radiance of truth, and the frangrance of goodness. ~ Vincent McNabb,
1319:...drink in the beauty and wonder at the meaning of what you see. ~ Rachel Carson,
1320:Glamour is beyond beauty and beyond age. It's like sex appeal. ~ Carolina Herrera,
1321:Heat cannot be separated from fire, or beauty from The Eternal. ~ Dante Alighieri,
1322:I am awestruck that life can give us such breathtaking beauty. ~ Carrie Firestone,
1323:I don’t trust beauty anymore / when will I stop believing it? ~ Reginald Shepherd,
1324:If I were born with such beauty I would have claimed God’s throne ~ M F Moonzajer,
1325:i found beauty in my brokenness i found self love in my darkness ~ Gretchen Gomez,
1326:In beauty faults conspicuous grow; The smallest speck is seen on snow. ~ John Gay,
1327:I think beauty has a lot to do with class. A bit of mystery. Rarity. ~ Debby Ryan,
1328:It is amazing how complete is the delusion that beauty is goodness. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
1329:It is a testament to the sharp beauty of a life lived in extremes. ~ Terri Cheney,
1330:It is through the Incarnation that glory and beauty save the world. ~ Brian Zahnd,
1331:masterpieces of beauty, craftsmanship, and stability, all erected ~ Robert Greene,
1332:Modesty is the way you deal with beauty not the way you avoid it. ~ Tariq Ramadan,
1333:My beauty doesn't come from a mirror. Never has and never will. ~ Gabourey Sidibe,
1334:my issue with what they consider beautiful is their concept of beauty ~ Rupi Kaur,
1335:My mother taught me beauty really lives in places like a smile. ~ Whitney Houston,
1336:Painting is about the beauty of space and the power of containment. ~ Sam Francis,
1337:Pale beauty stands aghast,” he said, “at the vulgar ugliness of men. ~ Tanith Lee,
1338:People think they’re just beauty marks, but beauty can kill you. ~ Chloe Benjamin,
1339:Thats the beauty of sport. Sometimes you laugh, sometimes you cry ~ Pep Guardiola,
1340:The beauty of a Jewish education is that you learn how to argue. ~ Andrea Dworkin,
1341:The beauty of any first time is that it leads to a thousand others... ~ Pico Iyer,
1342:the beauty of the creative gesture is wild, unwilling and painful. ~ Stefan Zweig,
1343:The open heart sees, feels and absorbs the beauty of the world. ~ Sonia Choquette,
1344:There is beauty not only in that things work, but how they work. ~ Bernd Heinrich,
1345:There's beauty in everything, but not everyone is able to feel it. ~ Anis Mansour,
1346:There was objective beauty, which meant there was objective ugliness, ~ C D Reiss,
1347:there would always be flashes of beauty even in the midst of pain ~ Laila Ibrahim,
1348:The Robust Beauty of Improper Linear Models in Decision Making. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
1349:The sight of such aching beauty would infuse his soul with pain. ~ Tabitha Suzuma,
1350:This beauty would remain whether he was here to see it or not. ~ Scott Westerfeld,
1351:We strive for beauty and balance, the sensual over the sentimental. ~ Janet Fitch,
1352:What delights us in visible beauty is the invisible. ~ Marie von Ebner Eschenbach,
1353:When beauty is universal, it loses its power to move the heart, ~ Arthur C Clarke,
1354:When I feel the beauty in words,
I am sensing the logic of heart. ~ Toba Beta,
1355:Why do you think Beauty picked the Beast? It was the library. ~ Chelsea M Cameron,
1356:Apply the way of karate to all things. Therein lies its beauty. ~ Gichin Funakoshi,
1357:a Sleeping Beauty waiting for the awakening kiss of her prince. ~ Katherine Allred,
1358:A truly beautiful person is one who is good at discovering beauty. ~ Daisaku Ikeda,
1359:Authenticity and happiness are the best beauty products out there ~ Katrina Kittle,
1360:Beauty comes naturally, but it's hard to be stunning by accident. ~ David Levithan,
1361:Beauty is in you and is reflected in your eyes. It is not material. ~ Sophia Loren,
1362:Beauty is only skin deep but evil cuts straight through the soul. ~ Lauren Hammond,
1363:Beauty is wishing for loneliness without any regret and complains. ~ M F Moonzajer,
1364:Beauty loses its meaning when you’re surrounded by too much of it. ~ Dot Hutchison,
1365:Beauty of style and harmony and grace and good rhythm depend on simplicity ~ Plato,
1366:Beauty without colour seems somehow to belong to another world. ~ Murasaki Shikibu,
1367:Christmas hath a beauty ... lovelier than the world can show. ~ Christina Rossetti,
1368:Clearly my stunning beauty has clouded your mind." - Rose Hathaway ~ Richelle Mead,
1369:Fill the canvas of life with the colors of peace bliss beauty and love. ~ Amit Ray,
1370:God loves us. May we discover the beauty of loving and being loved. ~ Pope Francis,
1371:God makes beauty from ashes. But first everything has to burn down. ~ Melanie Dale,
1372:I don't have any beauty shop memories. I remember the barber shop. ~ Jenifer Lewis,
1373:I don't think of all the misery but of the beauty that still remains. ~ Anne Frank,
1374:If he could not find beauty, nothing else would be worth finding. ~ Stephen Dobyns,
1375:If music stops, and art ceases, and beauty fades, what have we then? ~ Julie Berry,
1376:If you look after goodness and truth, beauty will take care of itself. ~ Eric Gill,
1377:I knew beauty for me would only ever be derived from loss. ~ Hannah Lillith Assadi,
1378:I love fashion, beauty, glamour. It's the mark of civilisation. ~ David LaChapelle,
1379:Let us worry about beauty first, and truth will take care of itself. ~ Anthony Zee,
1380:Light, God's eldest daughter, is a principal beauty in a building. ~ Thomas Fuller,
1381:Maybe you don't need beauty sleep, but some of us aren't so lucky. ~ Richelle Mead,
1382:Men can not stand the explosive mixture of beauty and intelligence. ~ Sharon Stone,
1383:Never miss an opportunity of noticing anything of beauty ... ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1384:Not in nature but in man is all the beauty and worth he sees ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1385:So bright the tear in Beauty's eye, Love half regrets to kiss it dry. ~ Lord Byron,
1386:Sometimes something awful could break your heart with beauty. ~ Jean Reynolds Page,
1387:The beauty and music...It is a call...And some are not strong. ~ Richard Llewellyn,
1388:The beauty of a place is increased by the company you have to admire it. ~ Praveer,
1389:There is no such thing as beauty, especially in the human face. ~ Charles Bukowski,
1390:There was a certain beauty in the chaos, a certain order in the mess. ~ Sarah Fine,
1391:Tibetan thangka paintings and derive strength from their beauty. ~ Sogyal Rinpoche,
1392:Ugliness has its own splendor when it houses a soul of beauty. ~ James L Farmer Jr,
1393:Win them with your beauty, but catch them off guard with your soul. ~ Lorrie Moore,
1394:You could appreciate the beauty of the world by trying to paint it. ~ Evelyn Waugh,
1395:Appreciate her beauty, love her uniqueness and respect her reality. ~ M F Moonzajer,
1396:Beauty can help fill the cracks in people’s hearts and comfort their ~ Lesley Kagen,
1397:Beauty comes in all shapes and sizes. Our goal should be health and stamina. ~ Emme,
1398:Beauty of style and harmony and grace and good rhythm depend on Simplicity. ~ Plato,
1399:Beauty puts a fine point on grief, shoots bull’s-eye into the heart. ~ Lauren Groff,
1400:Beauty's where you find it; not just where you bump and grind it. ~ Madonna Ciccone,
1401:Beauty! Terrible Beauty!
A deathless Goddess-- so she strikes our eyes! ~ Homer,
1402:Be present or you never know the beauty of everything you’ve missed. ~ Meghan March,
1403:But maybe if we are surrounded in beauty Someday we will become what we see ~ Jewel,
1404:delicate beauty can be created by those who have known only hardship ~ Hazel Gaynor,
1405:Every thoughtful pin on pinterest has beauty. But not everyone can see. ~ Confucius,
1406:For the Greeks, beauty is truth; for the Hebrews, truth is beauty. ~ Heinrich Heine,
1407:History dressed up in the glow of love’s kiss turned grief into beauty. ~ Aberjhani,
1408:I didn’t know about beauty, he had thought. Nobody ever told me. ~ Mordecai Richler,
1409:I don't get anything for free. I pay for all my beauty treatments. ~ Jennifer Lopez,
1410:I had no idea words could have so much power and beauty. ~ Michelle Cohen Corasanti,
1411:I have always believed that good is only beauty put into practice. ~ Henri Rousseau,
1412:...I learned that beauty exists where you least expect to find it. ~ Gail Tsukiyama,
1413:It started with nothing more than a yearning for nicotine and beauty. ~ J K Rowling,
1414:I would like to say that your beauty made it difficult to breathe. ~ Waylon H Lewis,
1415:Just one smile
Immensely increases the beauty
Of the universe. ~ Sri Chinmoy,
1416:Life is strong, and life is fragile. It is beauty, and it is pain. ~ Lauren Blakely,
1417:Looking at beauty in the world, is the first step of purifying the mind. ~ Amit Ray,
1418:Mindfulness is observing the beauty of every moment unfolding before us. ~ Amit Ray,
1419:Never was living beauty so enchanting as a dying Saviour. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
1420:Nobody makes us buy shoes.  We covet them and their precious beauty. ~ Debora Geary,
1421:No life is well-rounded without the subtle inspiration of beauty. ~ Beatrix Farrand,
1422:Only morality in our actions can give beauty and dignity to life. ~ Albert Einstein,
1423:Praise adds nothing to beauty--makes it neither better nor worse. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1424:Quite simply, when we deny our children nature, we deny them beauty. ~ Richard Louv,
1425:She moves like an animal in a woman’s body. She moves like beauty. ~ Meagan Spooner,
1426:She was so gorgeous, her beauty deserved the f-bomb used as an adverb. ~ Penny Reid,
1427:Strangeness is the form taken by beauty when beauty has no hope. ~ Antoine Volodine,
1428:The beauty is in finding, not in what you find ; that is just an excuse. ~ Rajneesh,
1429:The beauty of the earth is but a breath, and man is but a shadow. ~ Charles Dickens,
1430:The beauty of winter is that it makes you appreciate spring. ~ Lucy Maud Montgomery,
1431:The Enchantress,” Sleeping Beauty whispered to herself. “She’s back. ~ Chris Colfer,
1432:There is not one standard definition of beauty or one perfect size. ~ Ashley Graham,
1433:Thy beauty filleth the very air,
Never saw I a woman so fair. ~ George MacDonald,
1434:To grow in unconditional love and in beauty is spirituality. ~ Sri Sri Ravi Shankar,
1435:Truth and Good are one; and Beauty dwells in them, and they in her. ~ Mark Akenside,
1436:We are immensed in beauty, but our eyes have no clear vision. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1437:We are immersed in beauty, but our eyes have no clear vision. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1438:We make such terrible mistakes with visual choices about beauty. ~ Marina Abramovic,
1439:When the beauties come together, there emerges a super beauty! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
1440:Wives rarely fuss about their beauty To guarantee their mate's affection. ~ Moliere,
1441:A girl needs her beauty rest; all ten to twelve to fourteen hours of it. ~ Anonymous,
1442:And a flower, doesn't even know it's own beauty it's entire life. Sad, huh? ~ Miyavi,
1443:Beauty is essentially spiritual. The authentic beauty lies in the heart. ~ Sivananda,
1444:Beauty is only a look. It has nothing to do with what I'm like inside. ~ Sharon Tate,
1445:Beauty is the bait which with delight allures man to enlarge his kind.
   ~ Socrates,
1446:Beauty knows no time', he said softly, rising, and kissing her hand. ~ Jude Deveraux,
1447:Beauty Lures the Stranger More Easily into Danger

-Septimus Heap ~ Angie Sage,
1448:Beauty makes one lose one's head. Poetry is born of this decapitation ~ Jean Cocteau,
1449:But beauty, real beauty, ends where an intellectual expression begins. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1450:Character. Intelligence. Strength. Style. That makes beauty. ~ Diane Von Furstenberg,
1451:Could beauty, my lord, have better commerce than with honesty? ~ William Shakespeare,
1452:Each moment has different flavor, different beauty and different texture. ~ Amit Ray,
1453:For Marc, books were objects of beauty, to be loved, not just read. ~ Martin Edwards,
1454:I am everywhere and I am nowhere. That's the beauty of the Internet Age. ~ Ai Weiwei,
1455:I felt beauty was a magnet for abuse, and I had suffered greatly for it. ~ Pam Grier,
1456:I'm not traditionally a beauty, but apparently people think I'm alright. ~ Kate Moss,
1457:I saw your smile and my mind could not erase the beauty of your face. ~ Richard Marx,
1458:It signifies joy, purity, beauty, and when given as a gift, secret love. ~ Sieni A M,
1459:I will never give up. I am in my 14th year of a 10-day beauty plan. ~ Phyllis Diller,
1460:Kids are something. All they can see is the beauty in a moment. ~ Jacqueline Woodson,
1461:Let everything happen to you: beauty and terror,” Rilke wrote. Nearly ~ Dani Shapiro,
1462:Let the beauty radiate from inside your heart to the outside world. ~ Imania Margria,
1463:Life is a series of trials, all strung together by moments of beauty. ~ Kelli Stuart,
1464:Love is the attempt to form a friendship inspired by beauty. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
1465:Math is the only place where truth and beauty mean the same thing. ~ Danica McKellar,
1466:My beauty routine is basically plenty of sleep and lots of water. ~ Rebecca Gayheart,
1467:Nature is painting for us, day after day, pictures of infinite beauty. ~ John Ruskin,
1468:physical beauty should have no importance in a lasting relationship. ~ Julie Garwood,
1469:Possibility of everything is the greatest beauty of the future! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
1470:The beauty of nature has been one of the great inspirations in my life. ~ Jim Henson,
1471:The best computer scientists are...technologists who crave beauty. ~ David Gelernter,
1472:The framing of what there is by the mind is what you call beauty. ~ U G Krishnamurti,
1473:The image is a dream. The beauty is real. Can you see the difference? ~ Richard Bach,
1474:There is a secret beauty in everything, for those willing to see it, ~ Bella Forrest,
1475:There's a different kind of beauty that comes with humility and honesty ~ Kiera Cass,
1476:Tidiness is a virtue, symmetry is often a constituent of beauty. ~ Winston Churchill,
1477:Too much beauty, I reckon, is nothing but too much sun. ~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning,
1478:True beauty is not the absence of ugliness, but the acceptance of it. ~ Terri Cheney,
1479:When you say ugly you mean your beauty is not now in style. ~ H ctor Abad Faciolince,
1480:Wherever there is anything to love, there is beauty in some form. ~ George MacDonald,
1481:Women are seldom silent. Their beauty is forever speaking for them. ~ Philip Moeller,
1482:Your personality - the real you inside - was the price of beauty. ~ Scott Westerfeld,
1483:Adventure, like beauty, is very much in the eye of the beholder. ~ Victoria Alexander,
1484:Back to basics Rock & Roll capturing the beauty and simplicity of punk ~ Gary Crowley,
1485:Banshee. Beauty. And, well, badass. He always knew she had it in her. ~ Erin Kellison,
1486:Beauty is a genetic device: trickery that instigates competition. ~ Randy Wayne White,
1487:Beauty is nonconceptual. Nothing in the object directly explains it. ~ Timothy Morton,
1488:Beauty often fades, but seldom so swiftly as the joy it gives us. ~ Mignon McLaughlin,
1489:Beauty reveals itself in the course of an experience with an object. ~ Howard Gardner,
1490:Beauty surrounds us, but usually we need to be walking in a garden to know it. ~ Rumi,
1491:Beauty, whether moral or natural, is felt, more properly than perceived. ~ David Hume,
1492:But if she can marry blood, beauty, and bravery—the sooner the better. ~ George Eliot,
1493:But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for. ~ Robin Williams,
1494:Dour music has its own beauty, for the song of ruin is most fertile. ~ Steven Erikson,
1495:Do what you can't and experience the beauty of the mistakes you make. ~ Daniel H Pink,
1496:For love and beauty and delight, there is no death nor change. ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley,
1497:Hollywood needs to recognise all shades of African American beauty. ~ Gabrielle Union,
1498:How easy to be electrocuted. How fine the line between beauty and peril. ~ Sara Baume,
1499:I have beauty, intelligence, individuality, sensuality and sexuality. ~ Shannon Tweed,
1500:I have no right to beauty. I had been condemned to masculine ugliness. ~ Renee Vivien,

IN CHAPTERS [300/1422]



  483 Poetry
  470 Integral Yoga
   84 Philosophy
   73 Fiction
   70 Christianity
   54 Mysticism
   51 Occultism
   47 Yoga
   24 Philsophy
   21 Psychology
   18 Mythology
   10 Sufism
   9 Education
   7 Hinduism
   6 Baha i Faith
   5 Islam
   4 Theosophy
   4 Integral Theory
   3 Buddhism
   2 Science
   1 Zen
   1 Alchemy


  296 Sri Aurobindo
  199 The Mother
  142 Nolini Kanta Gupta
  107 Satprem
   63 William Wordsworth
   42 H P Lovecraft
   40 William Butler Yeats
   39 John Keats
   38 Percy Bysshe Shelley
   35 Sri Ramakrishna
   31 Plotinus
   28 Robert Browning
   26 Walt Whitman
   25 Aleister Crowley
   24 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   24 Friedrich Schiller
   23 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   17 Edgar Allan Poe
   16 Friedrich Nietzsche
   15 Jalaluddin Rumi
   14 A B Purani
   13 Rabindranath Tagore
   12 Ovid
   12 Carl Jung
   11 Plato
   11 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   11 James George Frazer
   10 Swami Vivekananda
   8 Saint John of Climacus
   8 Nirodbaran
   8 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   7 Saint Teresa of Avila
   7 Hafiz
   7 Farid ud-Din Attar
   7 Baha u llah
   7 Anonymous
   7 Aldous Huxley
   6 Rudolf Steiner
   6 Joseph Campbell
   6 Ibn Arabi
   5 Vyasa
   5 Muhammad
   5 Al-Ghazali
   4 Swami Krishnananda
   4 Li Bai
   4 Jorge Luis Borges
   4 Jordan Peterson
   3 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   3 Solomon ibn Gabirol
   3 Lalla
   3 Khwaja Abdullah Ansari
   3 George Van Vrekhem
   3 Franz Bardon
   3 Bokar Rinpoche
   3 Allama Muhammad Iqbal
   2 Thubten Chodron
   2 Symeon the New Theologian
   2 Surdas
   2 Saint Hildegard von Bingen
   2 Rainer Maria Rilke
   2 Kabir
   2 Henry David Thoreau
   2 Dionysius the Areopagite
   2 Abu-Said Abil-Kheir


   63 Wordsworth - Poems
   46 Savitri
   45 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   42 Lovecraft - Poems
   40 Yeats - Poems
   39 Keats - Poems
   38 Shelley - Poems
   34 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   33 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07
   28 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02
   28 Collected Poems
   28 Browning - Poems
   26 Whitman - Poems
   24 Schiller - Poems
   24 Emerson - Poems
   23 Record of Yoga
   23 Prayers And Meditations
   21 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04
   18 Magick Without Tears
   17 The Life Divine
   17 The Human Cycle
   17 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03
   16 Poe - Poems
   16 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05
   15 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   14 Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   14 City of God
   13 Tagore - Poems
   13 Questions And Answers 1957-1958
   13 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01
   12 Thus Spoke Zarathustra
   12 Questions And Answers 1950-1951
   12 Metamorphoses
   11 The Golden Bough
   11 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 01
   11 On Thoughts And Aphorisms
   11 On Education
   11 Letters On Poetry And Art
   10 Letters On Yoga II
   10 Agenda Vol 08
   10 Agenda Vol 03
   9 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   9 Questions And Answers 1956
   9 On the Way to Supermanhood
   9 Letters On Yoga IV
   9 Agenda Vol 07
   9 Agenda Vol 02
   9 Agenda Vol 01
   9 5.1.01 - Ilion
   8 Twelve Years With Sri Aurobindo
   8 The Ladder of Divine Ascent
   8 Rumi - Poems
   8 Questions And Answers 1955
   8 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 02
   8 Essays On The Gita
   8 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 08
   8 Agenda Vol 11
   8 Agenda Vol 04
   7 The Perennial Philosophy
   7 Liber ABA
   7 Letters On Yoga I
   6 Vedic and Philological Studies
   6 The Hero with a Thousand Faces
   6 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   6 Some Answers From The Mother
   6 Questions And Answers 1953
   6 Questions And Answers 1929-1931
   6 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 04
   6 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 03
   6 Mysterium Coniunctionis
   6 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   6 Hymn of the Universe
   6 Faust
   6 Essays Divine And Human
   6 Bhakti-Yoga
   6 Agenda Vol 09
   6 Agenda Vol 05
   5 Words Of Long Ago
   5 Vishnu Purana
   5 The Bible
   5 The Alchemy of Happiness
   5 Quran
   5 Agenda Vol 13
   5 Agenda Vol 10
   4 Twilight of the Idols
   4 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   4 The Practice of Psycho therapy
   4 The Interior Castle or The Mansions
   4 Maps of Meaning
   4 Li Bai - Poems
   4 Hafiz - Poems
   4 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 06
   4 Arabi - Poems
   4 Agenda Vol 06
   4 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah
   3 Words Of The Mother III
   3 Words Of The Mother II
   3 The Secret Doctrine
   3 The Phenomenon of Man
   3 Theosophy
   3 The Mother With Letters On The Mother
   3 The Book of Certitude
   3 Tara - The Feminine Divine
   3 Preparing for the Miraculous
   3 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   3 Kena and Other Upanishads
   3 Anonymous - Poems
   3 Agenda Vol 12
   2 Words Of The Mother I
   2 Walden
   2 The Red Book Liber Novus
   2 The Practice of Magical Evocation
   2 The Integral Yoga
   2 Symposium
   2 Rilke - Poems
   2 Raja-Yoga
   2 Let Me Explain
   2 Isha Upanishad
   2 How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator
   2 Goethe - Poems
   2 Crowley - Poems


00.04 - The Beautiful in the Upanishads, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Only, to some perhaps the Beauty may not appear as evident and apparent. The Spirit of Beauty that resides in the Upanishadic consciousness is more retiring and reticent. It dwells in its own privacy, in its own home, as it were, and therefore chooses to be bare and austere, simple and sheer. Beauty means usually the Beauty of form, even if it be not always the decorative, ornamental and sumptuous form. The early Vedas aimed at the perfect form (surpaktnum), the faultless expression, the integral and complete embodiment; the gods they envisaged and invoked were gleaming powers carved out of harmony and Beauty and figured close to our modes of apprehension (spyan). But the Upanishads came to lay stress upon what is beyond the form, what the eye cannot see nor the vision reflect:
   na sandi tihati rpamasya
  --
   The form of a thing can be beautiful; but the formless too has its Beauty. Indeed, the Beauty of the formless, that is to say, the very sum and substance, the ultimate essence, the soul of Beauty that is what suffuses, with in-gathered colour and enthusiasm, the realisation and poetic creation of the Upanishadic seer. All the forms that are scattered abroad in their myriad manifest Beauty hold within themselves a secret Beauty and are reflected or projected out of it. This veiled Name of Beauty can be compared to nothing on the phenomenal hemisphere of Nature; it has no adequate image or representation below:
   na tasya pratimsti
  --
   And what else is the true character, the soul of Beauty than light and delight? "A thing of Beauty is a joy for ever." And a thing of joy is a thing of light. Joy is the radiance rippling over a thing of Beauty. Beauty is always radiant: the charm, the loveliness of an object is but the glow of light that it emanates. And it would not be a very incorrect mensuration to measure the degree of Beauty by the degree of light radiated. The diamond is not only a thing of value, but a thing of Beauty also, because of the concentrated and undimmed light that it enshrines within itself. A dark, dull and dismal thing, devoid of interest and attraction becomes aesthetically precious and significant as soon as the artist presents it in terms of the values of light. The entire art of painting is nothing but the expression of Beauty, in and through the modalities of light.
   And where there is light, there is cheer and joy. Rasamaya and jyotirmayaare thus the two conjoint characteristics fundamental to the nature of the ultimate reality. Sometimes these two are named as the 'solar and the lunar aspect. The solar aspect refers obviously to the Light, that is to say, to the Truth; the lunar aspect refers to the rasa (Soma), to Immortality, to Beauty proper,
   yatte suamam hdayam adhi candramasi ritam
  --
   O Lord of Immortality! Thy' heart of Beauty that is sheltered in the moon
   or, as the Prasna Upanishad has it,
  --
   The perception of Beauty in the Upanishadic consciousness is something elemental-of concentrated essence. It silhouettes the main contour, outlines the primordial gestures. Pregnant and pulsating with the burden of Beauty, the mantra here reduces its external expression to a minimum. The body is bare and unadorned, and even in its nakedness, it has not the emphatic and vehement musculature of an athlete; rather it tends to be slim and slender and yet vibrant with the inner nervous vigour and glow. What can be more bare and brief and full to the brim of a self-gathered luminous energy than, for example:
   yat prena na praiti yena pra
  --
   The rich and sensuous Beauty luxuriating in high colour and ample decoration that one meets often in the creation of the earlier Vedic seers returned again, in a more chiselled and polished and stylised manner, in the classical poets. The Upanishads in this respect have a certain kinship with the early poets of the intervening ageVyasa and Valmiki. Upam KlidsasyaKalidasa revels in figures and images; they are profusely heaped on one another and usually possess a complex and composite texture. Valmiki's images are simple and elemental, brief and instinct with a vast resonance, spare and full of power. The same brevity and simplicity, vibrant with an extraordinary power of evocation, are also characteristic of the Upanishadic mantra With Valmiki's
   kamiva dupram
  --
   Art at its highest tends to become also the simplest and the most unconventional; and it is then the highest art, precisely because it does not aim at being artistic. The aesthetic motive is totally absent in the Upanishads; the sense of Beauty is there, but it is attendant upon and involved in a deeper strand of consciousness. That consciousness seeks consciousness itself, the fullness of consciousness, the awareness and possession of the Truth and Reality,the one thing which, if known, gives the knowledge of all else. And this consciousness of the Truth is also Delight, the perfect Bliss, the Immortality where the whole universe resolves itself into its original state of rasa, that is to say, of essential and inalienable harmony and Beauty.
   ***

00.05 - A Vedic Conception of the Poet, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   'Kavi' is an invariable epithet of the gods. The Vedas mean by this attribute to bring out a most fundamental character, an inalienable dharma of the heavenly host. All the gods are poets; and a human being can become a poet only in so far as he attains to the nature and status of a god. Who is then a kavi? The Poet is he who by his poetic power raises forms of Beauty in heavenkavi kavitv divi rpam sajat.1Thus the essence of poetic power is to fashion divine Beauty, to reveal heavenly forms. What is this Heaven whose forms the Poet discovers and embodies? HeavenDyaushas a very definite connotation in the Veda. It means the luminous or divine Mind 2the mind purified of its obscurity and limitations, due to subjection to the external senses, thus opening to the higher Light, receiving and recording faithfully the deeper and vaster movements and vibrations of the Truth, giving them a form, a perfect body of the right thought and the right word. Indra is the lord of this world and he can be approached only with an enkindled intelligence, ddhay man,3a faultless understanding, sumedh. He is the supreme Artisan of the poetic power,Tash, the maker of perfect forms, surpa ktnum.4 All the gods turn towards Indra and become gods and poets, attain their Great Names of Supreme Beauty.5 Indra is also the master of the senses, indriyas, who are his hosts. It is through this mind and the senses that the poetic creation has to be manifested. The mind spreads out wide the Poet's weaving;6 the poet is the priest who calls down and works out the right thinking in the sacrificial labour of creation.7 But that creation is made in and through the inner mind and the inner senses that are alive to the subtle formation of a vaster knowledge.8 The poet envisages the golden forms fashioned out of the very profundity of the consciousness.9 For the substance, the material on which the Poet works, is Truth. The seat of the Truth the poets guard, they uphold the supreme secret Names.10 The poet has the expressive utterance, the creative word; the poet is a poet by his poetic creation-the shape faultlessly wrought out that unveils and holds the Truth.11The form of Beauty is the body of the Truth.
   The poet is a trinity in himself. A triune consciousness forms his personality. First of all, he is the Knower-the Seer of the Truth, kavaya satyadrara. He has the direct vision, the luminous intelligence, the immediate perception.12 A subtle and profound and penetrating consciousness is his,nigam, pracetas; his is the eye of the Sun,srya caku.13 He secures an increased being through his effulgent understanding.14 In the second place, the Poet is not only Seer but Doer; he is knower as well as creator. He has a dynamic knowledge and his vision itself is power, ncak;15 he is the Seer-Will,kavikratu.16 He has the blazing radiance of the Sun and is supremely potent in his self-Iuminousness.17 The Sun is the light and the energy of the Truth. Even like the Sun the Poet gives birth to the Truth, srya satyasava, satyya satyaprasavya. But the Poet as Power is not only the revealer or creator,savit, he is also the builder or fashioner,ta, and he is the organiser,vedh is personality. First of all, he is the Knower-the Seer of the Truth, kavaya satyadrara, of the Truth.18 As Savita he manifests the Truth, as Tashta he gives a perfected body and form to the Truth, and as Vedha he maintains the Truth in its dynamic working. The effective marshalling and organisation of the Truth is what is called Ritam, the Right; it is also called Dharma,19 the Law or the Rhythm, the ordered movement and invincible execution of the Truth. The Poet pursues the Path of the Right;20 it is he who lays out the Path for the march of the Truth, the progress of the Sacrifice.21 He is like a fast steed well-yoked, pressing forward;22 he is the charger that moves straight and unswerving and carries us beyond 23into the world of felicity.
   Indeed delight is the third and the supremely intimate element of the poetic personality. Dear and delightful is the poet, dear and delightful his works, priya, priyi His hand is dripping with sweetness,kavir hi madhuhastya.24 The Poet-God shines in his pristine Beauty and is showering delight.25 He is filled with utter ecstasy so that he may rise to the very source of the luminous Energy.26? Pure is the Divine Joy and it enters and purifies all forms as it moves to the seat of the Immortals.27Indeed this sparkling Delight is the Poet-Seer and it is that that brings forth the creative word, the utterance of Indra.28
   The solar vision of the Poet encompasses in its might the wide Earth and Heaven, fuses them in supreme Delight in the womb of the Truth.29 The Earth is lifted up and given in marriage to Heaven in the home of Truth, for the creation and expression of the Truth in its varied Beauty,cru citram.
   The Poet creates forms of Beauty in Heaven; but these forms are not made out of the void. It is the Earth that is raised to Heaven and transmuted into divine truth forms. The union of Earth and Heaven is the source of the Joy, the Ananda, that the Poet unseals and distributes. Heaven and Earth join and meet in the world of Delight; between them they press out Soma, the drink of the gods.
   The Mind and the Body are held together by means of the Life, the mid-world. The Divine Mind by raising the body-consciousness into itself gathers up too, by that act, the delight of life and releases the fountain of immortal Bliss. That is the work and achievement of the gods as poets.
  --
   All the gods are poetstheir forms are perfect, surpa, suda, their Names full of Beauty,cru devasya nma.31 This means also that the gods embody the different powers that constitute the poetic consciousness. Agni is the Seer-Will, the creative vision of the Poet the luminous energy born of an experience by identity with the Truth. Indra is the Idea-Form, the architectonic conception of the work or achievement. Mitra and Varuna are the large harmony, the vast cadence and sweep of movement. The Aswins, the Divine Riders, represent the intense zest of well-yoked Life-Energy. Soma is Rasa, Ananda, the Supreme Bliss and Delight.
   The Vedic Poet is doubtless the poet of Life, the architect of Divinity in man, of Heaven upon earth. But what is true of Life is fundamentally true of Art tooat least true of the Art as it was conceived by the ancient seers and as it found expression at their hands.32

0.00 - INTRODUCTION, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
   At the age of six or seven Gadadhar had his first experience of spiritual ecstasy. One day in June or July, when he was walking along a narrow path between paddy-fields, eating the puffed rice that he carried in a basket, he looked up at the sky and saw a beautiful, dark thunder-cloud. As it spread, rapidly enveloping the whole sky, a flight of snow-white cranes passed in front of it. The Beauty of the contrast overwhelmed the boy. He fell to the ground, unconscious, and the puffed rice went in all directions. Some villagers found him and carried him home in their arms. Gadadhar said later that in that state he had experienced an indescribable joy.
   Gadadhar was seven years old when his father died. This incident profoundly affected him. For the first time the boy realized that life on earth was impermanent. Unobserved by others, he began to slip into the mango orchard or into one of the cremation grounds, and he spent hours absorbed in his own thoughts. He also became more helpful to his mother in the discharge of her household duties. He gave more attention to reading and hearing the religious stories recorded in the Puranas. And he became interested in the wandering monks and pious pilgrims who would stop at Kamarpukur on their way to Puri. These holy men, the custodians of India's spiritual heritage and the living witnesses of the ideal of renunciation of the world and all-absorbing love of God, entertained the little boy with stories from the Hindu epics, stories of saints and prophets, and also stories of their own adventures. He, on his part, fetched their water and fuel and
  --
   Sri Ramakrishna set himself to the task of practising the disciplines of Tantra; and at the bidding of the Divine Mother Herself he accepted the Brahmani as his guru. He performed profound and delicate ceremonies in the Panchavati and under the bel-tree at the northern extremity of the temple compound. He practised all the disciplines of the sixty-four principal Tantra books, and it took him never more than three days to achieve the result promised in any one of them. After the observance of a few preliminary rites, he would be overwhelmed with a strange divine fervour and would go into samadhi, where his mind would dwell in exaltation. Evil ceased to exist for him. The word "carnal" lost its meaning. The whole world and everything in it appeared as the lila, the sport, of Siva and Sakti. He beheld held everywhere manifest the power and Beauty of the Mother; the whole world, animate and inanimate, appeared to him as pervaded with Chit, Consciousness, and with Ananda, Bliss.
   He saw in a vision the Ultimate Cause of the universe as a huge luminous triangle giving birth every moment to an infinite number of worlds. He heard the Anahata Sabda, the great sound Om, of which the innumerable sounds of the universe are only so many echoes. He acquired the eight supernatural powers of yoga, which make a man almost omnipotent, and these he spurned as of no value whatsoever to the Spirit. He had a vision of the divine Maya, the inscrutable Power of God, by which the universe is created and sustained, and into which it is finally absorbed. In this vision he saw a woman of exquisite Beauty, about to become a mother, emerging from the Ganges and slowly approaching the Panchavati. Presently she gave birth to a child and began to nurse it tenderly. A moment later she assumed a terrible aspect, seized the child with her grim jaws, and crushed it. Swallowing it, she re-entered the waters of the Ganges.
   But the most remarkable experience during this period was the awakening of the Kundalini Sakti, the "Serpent Power". He actually saw the Power, at first lying asleep at the bottom of the spinal column, then waking up and ascending along the mystic Sushumna canal and through its six centres, or lotuses, to the Sahasrara, the thousand-petalled lotus in the top of the head. He further saw that as the Kundalini went upward the different lotuses bloomed. And this phenomenon was accompanied by visions and trances. Later on he described to his disciples and devotees the various movements of the Kundalini: the fishlike, birdlike, monkeylike, and so on. The awaken- ing of the Kundalini is the beginning of spiritual consciousness, and its union with Siva in the Sahasrara, ending in samadhi, is the consummation of the Tantrik disciplines.
  --
   He said later on: "It is impossible to describe the heavenly Beauty and sweetness of Radha. Her very appearance showed that she had completely forgotten herself in her passionate attachment to Krishna. Her complexion was a light yellow."
   Now one with Radha, he manifested the great ecstatic love, the mahabhava, which had found in her its fullest expression. Later Sri Ramakrishna said: "The manifestation in the same individual of the nineteen different kinds of emotion for God is called, in the books on bhakti, mahabhava. An ordinary man takes a whole lifetime to express even a single one of these. But in this body [meaning himself] there has been a complete manifestation of all nineteen."
  --
   The real organizer of the Samaj was Devendranath Tagore (1817-1905), the father of the poet Rabindranath. His physical and spiritual Beauty, aristocratic aloofness, penetrating intellect, and poetic sensibility made him the foremost leader of the educated Bengalis. These addressed him by the respectful epithet of Maharshi, the "Great Seer". The Maharshi was a Sanskrit scholar and, unlike Raja Rammohan Roy, drew his inspiration entirely from the Upanishads. He was an implacable enemy of image worship ship and also fought to stop the infiltration of Christian ideas into the Samaj. He gave the movement its faith and ritual. Under his influence the Brahmo Samaj professed One Self-existent Supreme Being who had created the universe out of nothing, the God of Truth, Infinite Wisdom, Goodness, and Power, the Eternal and Omnipotent, the One without a Second. Man should love Him and do His will, believe in Him and worship Him, and thus merit salvation in the world to come.
   By far the ablest leader of the Brahmo movement was Keshab Chandra Sen (1838-1884). Unlike Raja Rammohan Roy and Devendranath Tagore, Keshab was born of a middle-class Bengali family and had been brought up in an English school. He did not know Sanskrit and very soon broke away from the popular Hindu religion. Even at an early age he came under the spell of Christ and professed to have experienced the special favour of John the Baptist, Christ, and St. Paul. When he strove to introduce Christ to the Brahmo Samaj, a rupture became inevitable with Devendranath. In 1868 Keshab broke with the older leader and founded the Brahmo Samaj of India, Devendra retaining leadership of the first Brahmo Samaj, now called the Adi Samaj.

0.03 - Letters to My little smile, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  "Supramental Beauty in the physical"3 - what does
  it mean? All these things - all the arts, the beautiful
  --
  supramental Beauty in the physical?
  No, all that is only the manifestation of a universal harmony
  --
  supramental Beauty is something much higher and more perfect;
  it is a Beauty untainted by any ugliness and it does not need the
  proximity of ugliness in order to look beautiful.
  --
  to manifest, this perfect Beauty will express itself quite naturally
  and spontaneously in all forms.
  --
  "Aristocracy of Beauty". It is a noble flower which stands upright on its stalk. Its form has been stylised in the fleur-de-lis,
  emblem of the kings of France.
  --
  That is not true; each has its own particular Beauty and style.
  The bird-of-paradise is a very beautiful sari.
  --
  the embroidered saris has its own Beauty; but it is true that this
  blouse is very beautiful.

0.03 - The Threefold Life, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The mental life concentrates on the aesthetic, the ethical and the intellectual activities. Essential mentality is idealistic and a seeker after perfection. The subtle self, the brilliant Atman,1 is ever a dreamer. A dream of perfect Beauty, perfect conduct, perfect Truth, whether seeking new forms of the Eternal or revitalising the old, is the very soul of pure mentality. But it knows not how to deal with the resistance of Matter. There it is hampered and inefficient, works by bungling experiments and has either to withdraw from the struggle or submit to the grey actuality. Or else, by studying the material life and accepting the conditions of the contest, it may succeed, but only in imposing temporarily some artificial system which infinite Nature either rends and casts aside or disfigures out of recognition or by withdrawing her assent leaves as the corpse of a dead ideal. Few and far between have been those realisations of the dreamer in Man which the world has gladly accepted, looks back to with a fond memory and seeks, in its elements, to cherish.
  1 Who dwells in Dream, the inly conscious, the enjoyer of abstractions, the Brilliant.
  --
  This mixing with life may, however, be pursued for the sake of the individual mind and with an entire indifference to the forms of the material existence or the uplifting of the race. This indifference is seen at its highest in the Epicurean discipline and is not entirely absent from the Stoic; and even altruism does the works of compassion more often for its own sake than for the sake of the world it helps. But this too is a limited fulfilment. The progressive mind is seen at its noblest when it strives to elevate the whole race to its own level whether by sowing broadcast the image of its own thought and fulfilment or by changing the material life of the race into fresh forms, religious, intellectual, social or political, intended to represent more nearly that ideal of truth, Beauty, justice, righteousness with which the man's own soul is illumined. Failure in such a field matters little; for the mere attempt is dynamic and creative. The struggle of Mind to elevate life is the promise and condition of the conquest of life by that which is higher even than Mind.
  That highest thing, the spiritual existence, is concerned with what is eternal but not therefore entirely aloof from the transient. For the spiritual man the mind's dream of perfect Beauty is realised in an eternal love, Beauty and delight that has no dependence and is equal behind all objective appearances; its dream of perfect Truth in the supreme, self-existent, self-apparent and eternal Verity which never varies, but explains and is the secret of all variations and the goal of all progress; its dream of perfect action in the omnipotent and self-guiding Law that is inherent for ever in all things and translates itself here in the rhythm of the worlds. What is fugitive vision or constant effort of creation in the brilliant Self is an eternally existing Reality in the Self that knows2 and is the Lord.
  But if it is often difficult for the mental life to accommodate itself to the dully resistant material activity, how much more difficult must it seem for the spiritual existence to live on in a world that appears full not of the Truth but of every lie and illusion, not of Love and Beauty but of an encompassing discord and ugliness, not of the Law of Truth but of victorious selfishness and sin? Therefore the spiritual life tends easily in the saint and Sannyasin to withdraw from the material existence and reject it either wholly and physically or in the spirit. It sees this world as the kingdom of evil or of ignorance and the eternal and divine either in a far-off heaven or beyond where there is no world and no life. It separates itself inwardly, if not also physically, from the world's impurities; it asserts the spiritual reality in a spotless isolation. This withdrawal renders an invaluable service to the material life itself by forcing it to regard and even to bow down to something that is the direct negation of its own petty ideals, sordid cares and egoistic self-content.
  But the work in the world of so supreme a power as spiritual force cannot be thus limited. The spiritual life also can return upon the material and use it as a means of its own greater fullness. Refusing to be blinded by the dualities, the appearances, it can seek in all appearances whatsoever the vision of the same Lord, the same eternal Truth, Beauty, Love, Delight. The
  Vedantic formula of the Self in all things, all things in the Self and all things as becomings of the Self is the key to this richer and all-embracing Yoga.

0.06 - Letters to a Young Sadhak, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  It is not a book of ideas; it is only for the Beauty of its form and
  style that it is remarkable.

0.07 - Letters to a Sadhak, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  its enrapturing Beauty and goodness and sweetness, so
  that all my impurities be washed out, and restlessness

0.09 - Letters to a Young Teacher, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  anything of their elegance or Beauty and, as they cross the
  storeroom of words, clothe themselves effortlessly, automatically, with the words needed to make themselves perceptible

01.01 - A Yoga of the Art of Life, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   From a certain point of view, from the point of view of essentials and inner realities, it would appear that spirituality is, at least, the basis of the arts, if not the highest art. If art is meant to express the soul of things, and since the true soul of things is the divine element in them, then certainly spirituality, the discipline of coming in conscious contact with the Spirit, the Divine, must be accorded the regal seat in the hierarchy of the arts. Also, spirituality is the greatest and the most difficult of the arts; for it is the art of life. To make of life a perfect work of Beauty, pure in its lines, faultless in its rhythm, replete with strength, iridescent: with light, vibrant with delightan embodiment of the Divine, in a wordis the highest ideal of spirituality; viewed the spirituality that Sri Aurobindo practisesis the ne plus ultra of artistic creation
   The Gita, II. 40

01.01 - The Symbol Dawn, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And Beauty and wonder disturbed the fields of God.
  1.21
  --
  Interpreting a recondite Beauty and bliss
  In colour's hieroglyphs of mystic sense,
  --
  Spiritual Beauty illumining human sight
  Lines with its passion and mystery Matter's mask
  --
  The excess of Beauty natural to god-kind
  Could not uphold its claim on time-born eyes;
  --
  And, lured by the Beauty of the apparent ways,
  Acclaimed their portion of ephemeral joy.

01.02 - Natures Own Yoga, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   In the Supermind things exist in their perfect spiritual reality; each is consciously the divine reality in its transcendent essence, its cosmic extension, its, spiritual individuality; the diversity of a manifested existence is there, but the mutually exclusive separativeness has not yet arisen. The ego, the knot of separativity, appears at a later and lower stage of involution; what is here is indivisible nexus of individualising centres of the one eternal truth of being. Where Supermind and Overmind meet, one can see the multiple godheads, each distinct in his own truth and Beauty and power and yet all together forming the one supreme consciousness infinitely composite and inalienably integral. But stepping back into Supermind one sees something moreOneness gathering into itself all diversity, not destroying it, but annulling and forbidding the separative consciousness that is the beginning of Ignorance. The first shadow of the Illusory Consciousness, the initial possibility of the movement of Ignorance comes in when the supramental light enters the penumbra of the mental sphere. The movement of Supermind is the movement of light without obscurity, straight, unwavering, unswerving, absolute. The Force here contains and holds in their oneness of Reality the manifold but not separated lines of essential and unalloyed truth: its march is the inevitable progression of each one assured truth entering into and upholding every other and therefore its creation, play or action admits of no trial or stumble or groping or deviation; for each truth rests on all others and on that which harmonises them all and does not act as a Power diverging from and even competing with other Powers of being. In the Overmind commences the play of divergent possibilities the simple, direct, united and absolute certainties of the supramental consciousness retire, as it were, a step behind and begin to work themselves out through the interaction first of separately individualised and then of contrary and contradictory forces. In the Overmind there is a conscious underlying Unity but yet each Power, Truth, Aspect of that Unity is encouraged to work out its possibilities as if it were sufficient to itself and the others are used by it for its own enhancement until in the denser and darker reaches below Overmind this turns out a thing of blind conflict and battle and, as it would appear, of chance survival. Creation or manifestation originally means the concretisation or devolution of the powers of Conscious Being into a play of united diversity; but on the line which ends in Matter it enters into more and more obscure forms and forces and finally the virtual eclipse of the supreme light of the Divine Consciousness. Creation as it descends' towards the Ignorance becomes an involution of the Spirit through Mind and Life into Matter; evolution is a movement backward, a return journey from Matter towards the Spirit: it is the unravelling, the gradual disclosure and deliverance of the Spirit, the ascension and revelation of the involved consciousness through a series of awakeningsMatter awakening into Life, Life awakening into Mind and Mind now seeking to awaken into something beyond the Mind, into a power of conscious Spirit.
   The apparent or actual result of the movement of Nescienceof Involutionhas been an increasing negation of the Spirit, but its hidden purpose is ultimately to embody the Spirit in Matter, to express here below in cosmic Time-Space the splendours of the timeless Reality. The material body came into existence bringing with it inevitably, as it seemed, mortality; it appeared even to be fashioned out of mortality, in order that in this very frame and field of mortality, Immortality, the eternal Spirit Consciousness which is the secret truth and reality in Time itself as well as behind it, might be established and that the Divine might be possessed, or rather, possess itself not in one unvarying mode of the static consciousness, as it does even now behind the cosmic play, but in the play itself and in the multiple mode of the terrestrial existence.

01.02 - Sri Aurobindo - Ahana and Other Poems, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   What is the world that Sri Aurobindo sees and creates? Poetry is after all passion. By passion I do not mean the fury of emotion nor the fume of sentimentalism, but what lies behind at their source, what lends them the force they have the sense of the "grandly real," the vivid and pulsating truth. What then is the thing that Sri Aurobindo has visualised, has endowed with a throbbing life and made a poignant reality? Victor Hugo said: Attachez Dieu au gibet, vous avez la croixTie God to the gibbet, you have the cross. Even so, infuse passion into a thing most prosaic, you create sublime poetry out of it. What is the dead matter that has found life and glows and vibrates in Sri Aurobindo's passion? It is something which appears to many poetically intractable, not amenable to aesthetic treatment, not usually, that is to say, nor in the supreme manner. Sri Aurobindo has thrown such a material into his poetic fervour and created a sheer Beauty, a stupendous reality out of it. Herein lies the greatness of his achievement. Philosophy, however divine, and in spite of Milton, has been regarded by poets as "harsh and crabbed" and as such unfit for poetic delineation. Not a few poets indeed foundered upon this rock. A poet in his own way is a philosopher, but a philosopher chanting out his philosophy in sheer poetry has been one of the rarest spectacles.1 I can think of only one instance just now where a philosopher has almost succeeded being a great poet I am referring to Lucretius and his De Rerum Natura. Neither Shakespeare nor Homer had anything like philosophy in their poetic creation. And in spite of some inclination to philosophy and philosophical ideas Virgil and Milton were not philosophers either. Dante sought perhaps consciously and deliberately to philosophise in his Paradiso I Did he? The less Dante then is he. For it is his Inferno, where he is a passionate visionary, and not his Paradiso (where he has put in more thought-power) that marks the nee plus ultra of his poetic achievement.
   And yet what can be more poetic in essence than philosophy, if by philosophy we mean, as it should mean, spiritual truth and spiritual realisation? What else can give the full breath, the integral force to poetic inspiration if it is not the problem of existence itself, of God, Soul and Immortality, things that touch, that are at the very root of life and reality? What can most concern man, what can strike the deepest fount in him, unless it is the mystery of his own being, the why and the whither of it all? But mankind has been taught and trained to live merely or mostly on earth, and poetry has been treated as the expression of human joys and sorrows the tears in mortal things of which Virgil spoke. The savour of earth, the thrill of the flesh has been too sweet for us and we have forgotten other sweetnesses. It is always the human element that we seek in poetry, but we fail to recognise that what we obtain in this way is humanity in its lower degrees, its surface formulations, at its minimum magnitude.
  --
   The heart and its urges, the vital and its surges, the physical impulsesit is these of which the poets sang in their infinite variations. But the mind proper, that is to say, the higher reflective ideative mind, was not given the right of citizenship in the domain of poetry. I am not forgetting the so-called Metaphysicals. The element of metaphysics among the Metaphysicals has already been called into question. There is here, no doubt, some theology, a good dose of mental cleverness or conceit, but a modern intellectual or rather rational intelligence is something other, something more than that. Even the metaphysics that was commandeered here had more or less a decorative value, it could not be taken into the pith and substance of poetic truth and Beauty. It was a decoration, but not unoften a drag. I referred to the Upanishads, but these strike quite a different, almost an opposite line in this connection. They are in a sense truly metaphysical: they bypass the mind and the mental powers, get hold of a higher mode of consciousness, make a direct contact with truth and Beauty and reality. It was Buddha's credit to have forged this missing link in man's spiritual consciousness, to have brought into play the power of the rational intellect and used it in support of the spiritual experience. That is not to say that he was the very first person, the originator who initiated the movement; but at least this seems to be true that in him and his au thentic followers the movement came to the forefront of human consciousness and attained the proportions of a major member of man's psychological constitution. We may remember here that Socrates, who started a similar movement of rationalisation in his own way in Europe, was almost a contemporary of the Buddha.
   Poetry as an expression of thought-power, poetry weighted with intelligence and rationalised knowledge that seems to me to be the end and drive, the secret sense of all the mystery of modern technique. The combination is risky, but not impossible. In the spiritual domain the Gita achieved this miracle to a considerable degree. Still, the power of intelligence and reason shown by Vyasa is of a special order: it is a sublimated function of the faculty, something aloof and other-worldly"introvert", a modern mind would term it that is to say, something a priori, standing in its own au thenticity and self-sufficiency. A modern intelligence would be more scientific, let us use the word, more matter-of-fact and sense-based: the mental light should not be confined in its ivory tower, however high that may be, but brought down and placed at the service of our perception and appreciation and explanation of things human and terrestrial; made immanent in the mundane and the ephemeral, as they are commonly called. This is not an impossibility. Sri Aurobindo seems to have done the thing. In him we find the three terms of human consciousness arriving at an absolute fusion and his poetry is a wonderful example of that fusion. The three terms are the spiritual, the intellectual or philosophical and the physical or sensational. The intellectual, or more generally, the mental, is the intermediary, the Paraclete, as he himself will call it later on in a poem9 magnificently exemplifying the point we are trying to make out the agent who negotiates, bridges and harmonises the two other firmaments usually supposed to be antagonistic and incompatible.
  --
   The Greek sings of the humanity of man, the Indian the divinity of man. It is the Hellenic spirit that has very largely moulded our taste and we have forgotten that an equally poetic world exists in the domain of spiritual life, even in its very severity, as in that of earthly life and its sweetness. And as we are passionate about the earthly life, even so Sri Aurobindo has made a passion of the spiritual life. Poetry after all has a mission; the phrase "Art for Art's sake" may be made to mean anything. Poetry is not merely what is pleasing, not even what is merely touching and moving but what is at the same time, inspiring, invigorating, elevating. Truth is indeed Beauty but it is not always the Beauty that captivates the eye or the mere aesthetic sense.
   And because our Vedic poets always looked beyond humanity, beyond earth, therefore could they make divine poetry of humanity and what is of earth. Therefore it was that they were pervadingly so grandiose and sublime and puissant. The heroic, the epic was their natural element and they could not but express themselves in the grand manner Sri Aurobindo has the same outlook and it is why we find in him the ring of the old-world manner.
  --
   And if there is something in the creative spirit of Sri Aurobindo which tends more towards the strenuous than the genial, the arduous than the mellifluous, and which has more of the austerity of Vyasa than the easy felicity of Valmiki, however it might have affected the ultimate value of his creation, according to certain standards,14 it has illustrated once more that poetry is not merely Beauty but power, it is not merely sweet imagination but creative visionit is even the Rik, the mantra that impels the gods to manifest upon earth, that fashions divinity in man.
   James H. Cousins in his New Ways in English Literature describes Sri Aurobindo as "the philosopher as poet."

01.02 - The Issue, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  In the closed Beauty of the inhuman wilds.
  3.19
  --
  Poured a supernal Beauty on men's lives.
  3.35
  --
  Remembered Beauty death-claimed lids ignore
  And wondered at this world of fragile forms

01.03 - Mystic Poetry, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   I have gazed upon Beauty from my very birth
   and yet my eyes
  --
   To sum up and recapitulate. The evolution of the poetic expression in man has ever been an attempt at a return and a progressive approach to the spiritual source of poetic inspiration, which was also the original, though somewhat veiled, source from the very beginning. The movement has followed devious waysstrongly negative at timeseven like man's life and consciousness in general of which it is an organic member; but the ultimate end and drift seems to have been always that ideal and principle even when fallen on evil days and evil tongues. The poet's ideal in the dawn of the world was, as the Vedic Rishi sang, to raise things of Beauty in heaven by his poetic power,kavi kavitv divi rpam sajat. Even a Satanic poet, the inaugurator, in a way, of modernism and modernistic consciousness, Charles Baudelaire, thus admonishes his spirit:
   "Flyaway, far from these morbid miasmas, go and purify yourself in the higher air and drink, like a pure and divine liquor, the clear fire that fills the limpid spaces."18

01.03 - The Yoga of the King - The Yoga of the Souls Release, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Artist of his own Beauty and delight,
  Immortal in our mortal poverty.
  --
  A consciousness of Beauty and of bliss,
  A knowledge which became what it perceived,
  --
  And all the Beauty that will never be.
  Inaudible to our deaf mortal ears
  --
  And sweet temptations stole from Beauty's realms
  And sudden ecstasies from a world of bliss.
  --
  There the eyes gazed no more on Beauty's shape.
  In rare and lucent intervals of hush
  --
  And Beauty is a sweet difference of the Same
  And oneness is the soul of multitude.
  --
  Visits of Beauty, storm-sweeps of delight
  Rained from the all-powerful Mystery above.
  --
  The Beauty and the ceaseless miracle
  Let in a glow of the Unmanifest:

01.04 - Motives for Seeking the Divine, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  That involves something which throws all your reasoning out of gear. For these are aspects of the Divine Nature, powers of it, states of his being, - but the Divine Himself is something absolute, someone self-existent, not limited by his aspects, - wonderful and ineffable, not existing by them, but they existing because of him. It follows that if he attracts by his aspects, all the more he can attract by his very absolute selfness which is sweeter, mightier, profounder than any aspect. His peace, rapture, light, freedom, Beauty are marvellous and ineffable, because he is himself magically, mysteriously, transcendently marvellous and ineffable. He can then be sought after for his wonderful and ineffable self and not only for the sake of one aspect or another of him. The only thing needed for that is, first, to arrive at a point when the psychic being feels this pull of the Divine in himself and, secondly, to arrive at the point when the mind, vital and each thing else begins to feel too that that was what it was wanting and the surface hunt after Ananda or what else was only an excuse for drawing the nature towards that supreme magnet.
  Your argument that because we know the union with the
  Divine will bring Ananda, therefore it must be for the Ananda that we seek the union, is not true and has no force. One who loves a queen may know that if she returns his love it will bring him power, position, riches and yet it need not be for the power, position, riches that he seeks her love. He may love her for herself and could love her equally if she were not a queen; he might have no hope of any return whatever and yet love her, adore her, live for her, die for her simply because she is she. That has happened and men have loved women without any hope of enjoyment or result, loved steadily, passionately after age has come and Beauty has gone. Patriots do not love their country only when she is rich, powerful, great and has much to give them; their love for country has been most ardent, passionate, absolute when the country was poor, degraded, miserable, having nothing to give but loss, wounds, torture, imprisonment, death as the wages of her service; yet even knowing that they would never see her free, men have lived, served and died for her - for her own sake, not for what she could give. Men have loved Truth for her own sake and for what they could seek or find of her, accepted poverty, persecution, death itself; they have been content even to seek for her always, not finding, and yet never given up the search.
  That means what? That men, country, Truth and other things besides can be loved for their own sake and not for anything else, not for any circumstance or attendant quality or resulting enjoyment, but for something absolute that is either in them or behind their appearance and circumstance. The Divine is more than a man or woman, a stretch of land or a creed, opinion, discovery or principle. He is the Person beyond all persons, the

01.04 - The Poetry in the Making, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   But the Yogi is a wholly conscious being; a perfect Yogi is he who possesses a conscious and willed control over his instruments, he silences them, as and when he likes, and makes them convey and express with as little deviation as possible truths and realities from the Beyond. Now the question is, is it possible for the poet also to do something like that, to consciously create and not to be a mere unconscious or helpless channel? Conscious artistry, as we have said, means to be conscious on two levels of consciousness at the same time, to be at home in both equally and simultaneously. The general experience, however, is that of "one at a time": if the artist dwells more in the one, the other retires into the background to the same measure. If he is in the over-consciousness, he is only half-conscious in his brain consciousness, or even not conscious at allhe does not know how he has created, the sources or process of his creative activity, he is quite oblivious of them" gone through them all as if per saltum. Such seems to have been the case with the primitives, as they are called, the elemental poetsShakespeare and Homer and Valmiki. In some others, who come very near to them in poetic genius, yet not quite on a par, the instrumental intelligence is strong and active, it helps in its own way but in helping circumscribes and limits the original impulsion. The art here becomes consciously artistic, but loses something of the initial freshness and spontaneity: it gains in correctness, polish and elegance and has now a style in lieu of Nature's own naturalness. I am thinking of Virgil and Milton and Kalidasa. Dante's place is perhaps somewhere in between. Lower in the rung where the mental medium occupies a still more preponderant place we have intellectual poetry, poetry of the later classical age whose representatives are Pope and Dryden. We can go farther down and land in the domain of versificationalthough here, too, there can be a good amount of Beauty in shape of ingenuity, cleverness and conceit: Voltaire and Delille are of this order in French poetry.
   The three or four major orders I speak of in reference to conscious artistry are exampled characteristically in the history of the evolution of Greek poetry. It must be remembered, however, at the very outset that the Greeks as a race were nothing if not rational and intellectual. It was an element of strong self-consciousness that they brought into human culture that was their special gift. Leaving out of account Homer who was, as I said, a primitive, their classical age began with Aeschylus who was the first and the most spontaneous and intuitive of the Great Three. Sophocles, who comes next, is more balanced and self-controlled and pregnant with a reasoned thought-content clothed in polished phrasing. We feel here that the artist knew what he was about and was exercising a conscious control over his instruments and materials, unlike his predecessor who seemed to be completely carried away by the onrush of the poetic enthousiasmos. Sophocles, in spite of his artistic perfection or perhaps because of it, appears to be just a little, one remove, away from the purity of the central inspiration there is a veil, although a thin transparent veil, yet a veil between which intervenes. With the third of the Brotherhood, Euripides, we slide lower downwe arrive at a predominantly mental transcription of an experience or inner conception; but something of the major breath continues, an aura, a rhythm that maintains the inner contact and thus saves the poetry. In a subsequent age, in Theocritus, for example, poetry became truly very much 'sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought', so much of virtuosity and precocity entered into it; in other words, the poet then was an excessively self-conscious artist. That seems to be the general trend of all literature.
  --
   The consciously purposive activity of the poetic consciousness in fact, of all artistic consciousness has shown itself with a clear and unambiguous emphasis in two directions. First of all with regard to the subject-matter: the old-world poets took things as they were, as they were obvious to the eye, things of human nature and things of physical Nature, and without questioning dealt with them in the Beauty of their normal form and function. The modern mentality has turned away from the normal and the obvious: it does not accept and admit the "given" as the final and definitive norm of things. It wishes to discover and establish other norms, it strives to bring about changes in the nature and condition of things, envisage the shape of things to come, work for a brave new world. The poet of today, in spite of all his effort to remain a pure poet, in spite of Housman's advocacy of nonsense and not-sense being the essence of true Art, is almost invariably at heart an incorrigible prophet. In revolt against the old and established order of truths and customs, against all that is normally considered as beautiful,ideals and emotions and activities of man or aspects and scenes and movements of Natureagainst God or spiritual life, the modern poet turns deliberately to the ugly and the macabre, the meaningless, the insignificant and the triflingtins and teas, bone and dust and dustbin, hammer and sicklehe is still a prophet, a violent one, an iconoclast, but one who has his own icon, a terribly jealous being, that seeks to pull down the past, erase it, to break and batter and knead the elements in order to fashion out of them something conforming to his heart's desire. There is also the class who have the vision and found the truth and its solace, who are prophets, angelic and divine, messengers and harbingers of a new Beauty that is to dawn upon earth. And yet there are others in whom the two strains mingle or approach in a strange way. All this means that the artist is far from being a mere receiver, a mechanical executor, a passive unconscious instrument, but that he is supremely' conscious and master of his faculties and implements. This fact is doubly reinforced when we find how much he is preoccupied with the technical aspect of his craft. The richness and variety of patterns that can be given to the poetic form know no bounds today. A few major rhythms were sufficient for the ancients to give full expression to their poetic inflatus. For they cared more for some major virtues, the basic and fundamental qualitiessuch as truth, sublimity, nobility, forcefulness, purity, simplicity, clarity, straightforwardness; they were more preoccupied with what they had to say and they wanted, no doubt, to say it beautifully and powerfully; but the modus operandi was not such a passion or obsession with them, it had not attained that almost absolute value for itself which modern craftsmanship gives it. As technology in practical life has become a thing of overwhelming importance to man today, become, in the Shakespearean phrase, his "be-all and end-all", even so the same spirit has invaded and pervaded his aesthetics too. The subtleties, variations and refinements, the revolutions, reversals and inventions which the modern poet has ushered and takes delight in, for their own sake, I repeat, for their intrinsic interest, not for the sake of the subject which they have to embody and clothe, have never been dream by Aristotle, the supreme legislator among the ancients, nor by Horace, the almost incomparable craftsman among the ancients in the domain of poetry. Man has become, to be sure, a self-conscious creator to the pith of his bone.
   Such a stage in human evolution, the advent of Homo Faber, has been a necessity; it has to serve a purpose and it has done admirably its work. Only we have to put it in its proper place. The salvation of an extremely self-conscious age lies in an exceeding and not in a further enhancement or an exclusive concentration of the self-consciousness, nor, of course, in a falling back into the original unconsciousness. It is this shift in the poise of consciousness that has been presaged and prepared by the conscious, the scientific artists of today. Their task is to forge an instrument for a type of poetic or artistic creation completely new, unfamiliar, almost revolutionary which the older mould would find it impossible to render adequately. The yearning of the human consciousness was not to rest satisfied with the familiar and the ordinary, the pressure was for the discovery of other strands, secret stores of truth and reality and Beauty. The first discovery was that of the great Unconscious, the dark and mysterious and all-powerful subconscient. Many of our poets and artists have been influenced by this power, some even sought to enter into that region and become its denizens. But artistic inspiration is an emanation of Light; whatever may be the field of its play, it can have its origin only in the higher spheres, if it is to be truly beautiful and not merely curious and scientific.
   That is what is wanted at present in the artistic world the true inspiration, the breath from higher altitudes. And here comes the role of the mystic, the Yogi. The sense of evolution, the march of human consciousness demands and prophesies that the future poet has to be a mysticin him will be fulfilled the travail of man's conscious working. The self-conscious craftsman, the tireless experimenter with his adventurous analytic mind has sharpened his instrument, made it supple and elastic, tempered, refined and enriched it; that is comparable to what we call the aspiration or call from below. Now the Grace must descend and fulfil. And when one rises into this higher consciousness beyond the brain and mind, when one lives there habitually, one knows the why and the how of things, one becomes a perfectly conscious operator and still retains all spontaneity and freshness and wonder and magic that are usually associated with inconscience and irreflection. As there is a spontaneity of instinct, there is likewise also a spontaneity of vision: a child is spontaneous in its movements, even so a seer. Not only so, the higher spontaneity is more spontaneous, for the higher consciousness means not only awareness but the free and untrammelled activity and expression of the truth and reality it is.
   Genius had to be generally more or less unconscious in the past, because the instrument was not ready, was clogged as it were with its own lower grade movements; the higher inspiration had very often to bypass it, or rob it of its serviceable materials without its knowledge, in an almost clandestine way. Wherever it was awake and vigilant, we have seen it causing a diminution in the poetic potential. And yet even so, it was being prepared for a greater role, a higher destiny it is to fulfil in the future. A conscious and full participation of a refined and transparent and enriched instrument in the delivery of superconscious truth and Beauty will surely mean not only a new but the very acme of aesthetic creation. We thus foresee the age of spiritual art in which the sense of creative Beauty in man will find its culmination. Such an art was only an exception, something secondary or even tertiary, kept in the background, suggested here and there as a novel strain, called "mystic" to express its unfamiliar nature-unless, of course, it was openly and obviously scriptural and religious.
   I have spoken of the source of inspiration as essentially and originally being a super-consciousness or over-consciousness. But to be more precise and accurate I should add another source, an inner consciousness. As the super-consciousness is imaged as lying above the normal consciousness, so the inner consciousness may be described as lying behind or within it. The movement of the inner consciousness has found expression more often and more largely than that of over-consciousness in the artistic creation of the past : and that was in keeping with the nature of the old-world inspiration, for the inspiration that comes from the inner consciousness, which can be considered as the lyrical inspiration, tends to be naturally more "spontaneous", less conscious, since it does not at all go by the path of the head, it evades that as much as possible and goes by the path of the heart.
  --
   Ifso long the poet was more or less a passive, a half-conscious or unconscious intermediary between the higher and the lower lights and delights, his role in the future will be better fulfilled when he becomes fully aware of it and consciously moulds and directs his creative energies. The poet is and has to be the harbinger and minstrel of unheard-of melodies: he is the fashioner of the creative word that brings down and embodies the deepest aspirations and experiences of the human consciousness. The poet is a missionary: he is missioned by Divine Beauty to radiate upon earth something of her charm and wizardry. The fullness of his role he can only play up when he is fully conscious for it is under that condition that all obstructing and obscuring elements lying across the path of inspiration can be completely and wholly eradicated: the instrument purified and tempered and transmuted can hold and express golden truths and beauties and puissances that otherwise escape the too human mould.
   "The Last Voyage" by Charles Williams-A Little Book of Modern Verse, (Faber and Faber).

01.04 - The Secret Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A grace and Beauty of spiritual light,
  The murmuring tongue of a celestial fire.
  --
  Invades from all this Beauty that must die.
  Alarmed by the sorrow dragging at her feet
  --
  And Beauty conquer the resisting world,
  The Truth-Light capture Nature by surprise,
  --
  Of all the marvel and Beauty that are hers,
  Only a darkened little we can feel.

01.05 - Rabindranath Tagore: A Great Poet, a Great Man, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Tagore is in direct line with those bards who have sung of the Spirit, who always soared high above the falsehoods and uglinesses of a merely mundane life and lived in the undecaying delights and beauties of a diviner consciousness. Spiritual reality was the central theme of his poetic creation: only and naturally he viewed it in a special way and endowed it with a special grace. We know of another God-intoxicated man, the Jewish philosopher Spinoza, who saw things sub specie aeternitatis, under the figure or mode of eternity. Well, Tagore can be said to see things, in their essential spiritual reality, under the figure or mode of Beauty. Keats indeed spoke of truth being Beauty and Beauty truth. But there is a great difference in the outlook and inner experience. A worshipper of Beauty, unless he rises to the Upanishadic norm, is prone to become sensuous and pagan. Keats was that, Kalidasa was that, even Shelley was not far different. The spiritual vein in all these poets remains secondary. In the old Indian master, it is part of his intellectual equipment, no doubt, but nothing much more than that. In the other two it comes in as strange flashes from an unknown country, as a sort of irruption or on the peak of the poetic afflatus or enthousiasmos.
   The world being nothing but Spirit made visible is, according to Tagore, fundamentally a thing of Beauty. The scars and spots that are on the surface have to be removed and mankind has to repossess and clo the itself with that mantle of Beauty. The world is beautiful, because it is the image of the Beautiful, because it harbours, expresses and embodies the Divine who is Beauty supreme. Now by a strange alchemy, a wonderful effect of polarisation, the very spiritual element in Tagore has made him almost a pagan and even a profane. For what are these glories of Nature and the still more exquisite glories that the human body has captured? They are but vibrations and modulations of Beauty the delightful names and forms of the supreme Lover and Beloved.
   Socrates is said to have brought down Philosophy from Heaven to live among men upon earth. A similar exploit can be ascribed to Tagore. The Spirit, the bare transcendental Reality contemplated by the orthodox Vedantins, has been brought nearer to our planet, close to human consciousness in Tagore's vision, being clothed in earth and flesh and blood, made vivid with the colours and contours of the physical existence. The Spirit, yes and by all means, but not necessarily asceticism and monasticism. So Tagore boldly declared in those famous lines of his:
  --
   The spirit of the age demands this new gospel. Mankind needs and awaits a fresh revelation. The world and life are not an illusion or a lesser reality: they are, if taken rightly, as real as the pure Spirit itself. Indeed, Spirit and Flesh, Consciousness and Matter are not antinomies; to consider them as such is itself an illusion. In fact, they are only two poles or modes or aspects of the same reality. To separate or divide them is a one-sided concentration or abstraction on the part of the human mind. The fulfilment of the Spirit is in its expression through Matter; human life too reaches its highest term, its summum bonum, in embodying the spiritual consciousness here on earth and not dissolving itself in the Transcendence. That is the new Dispensation which answers to the deepest aspiration in man and towards which he has been travelling through the ages in the course of the evolution of his consciousness. Many, however, are the prophets and sages who have set this ideal before humanity and more and more insistently and clearly as we come nearer to the age we live in. But none or very few have expressed it with such Beauty and charm and compelling persuasion. It would be carping criticism to point out-as some, purists one may call them, have done-that in poetising and aesthetising the spiritual truth and reality, in trying to make it human and terrestrial, he has diminished and diluted the original substance, in endeavouring to render the diamond iridescent, he has turned it into a baser alloy. Tagore's is a poetic soul, it must be admitted; and it is not necessary that one should find in his ideas and experiences and utterances the cent per cent accuracy and inevitability of a Yogic consciousness. Still his major perceptions, those that count, stand and are borne out by the highest spiritual realisation.
   Tagore is no inventor or innovator when he posits Spirit as Beauty, the spiritual consciousness as the ardent rhythm of ecstasy. This experience is the very core of Vaishnavism and for which Tagore is sometimes called a Neo-Vaishnava. The Vaishnava sees the world pulsating in glamorous Beauty as the Lila (Play) of the Lord, and the Lord, God himself, is nothing but Love and Beauty. Still Tagore is not all Vaishnava or merely a Vaishnava; he is in addition a modern (the carping voice will say, there comes the dilution and adulteration)in the sense that problems exist for himsocial, political, economic, national, humanitarianwhich have to be faced and solved: these are not merely mundane, but woven into the texture of the fundamental problem of human destiny, of Soul and Spirit and God. A Vaishnava was, in spite of his acceptance of the world, an introvert, to use a modern psychological phrase, not necessarily in the pejorative sense, but in the neutral scientific sense. He looks upon the universe' and human life as the play of the Lord, as an actuality and not mere illusion indeed; but he does not participate or even take interest in the dynamic working out of the world process, he does not care to know, has no need of knowing that there is a terrestrial purpose and a diviner fulfilment of the mortal life upon earth. The Vaishnava dwells more or less absorbed in the Vaikuntha of his inner consciousness; the outer world, although real, is only a symbolic shadowplay to which he can but be a witness-real, is only a nothing more.
   A modern idealist of the type of a reformer would not be satisfied with that role. If he is merely a moralist reformer, he will revolt against the "witness business", calling it a laissez-faire mentality of bygone days. A spiritual reformer would ask for morea dynamic union with the Divine Will and Consciousness, not merely a passive enjoyment in the Bliss, so that he may be a luminous power or agent for the expression of divine values in things mundane.
  --
   Both the poets were worshippers, idolaters, of Beauty, especially of natural physical Beauty, of Beauty heaped on Beauty, of Beauty gathered, like honey from all places and stored and ranged and stalled with the utmost decorative skill. Yet the difference between the two is not less pronounced. A philosopher is reminded of Bergson, the great exponent of movement as reality, in connection with certain aspects of Tagore. Indeed, Beauty in Tagore is something moving, flowing, dancing, rippling; it is especially the Beauty which music embodies and expresses. A Kalidasian Beauty, on the contrary, is statuesque and plastic, it is to be appreciated in situ. This is, however, by the way.
   Sri Aurobindo: "Ahana", Collected Poems & Plays, Vol. 2

01.05 - The Nietzschean Antichrist, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   This is the Nietzsche we all know. But there is another aspect of his which the world has yet been slow to recognise. For, at bottom, Nietzsche is not all storm and fury. If his Superman is a Destroying Angel, he is none the less an angel. If he is endowed with a supreme sense of strength and power, there is also secreted in the core of his heart a sense of the beautiful that illumines his somewhat sombre aspect. For although Nietzsche is by birth a Slavo-Teuton, by culture and education he is pre-eminently Hellenic. His earliest works are on the subject of Greek tragedy and form what he describes as an "Apollonian dream." And to this dream, to this Greek aesthetic sense more than to any thing else he sacrifices justice and pity and charity. To him the weak and the miserable, the sick and the maimed are a sort of blot, a kind of ulcer on the beautiful face of humanity. The herd that wallow in suffering and relish suffering disfigure the aspect of the world and should therefore be relentlessly mowed out of existence. By being pitiful to them we give our tacit assent to their persistence. And it is precisely because of this that Nietzsche has a horror of Christianity. For compassion gives indulgence to all the ugliness of the world and thus renders that ugliness a necessary and indispensable element of existence. To protect the weak, to sympathise with the lowly brings about more of weakness and more of lowliness. Nietzsche has an aristocratic taste par excellencewhat he aims at is health and vigour and Beauty. But above all it is an aristocracy of the spirit, an aristocracy endowed with all the richness and Beauty of the soul that Nietzsche wants to establish. The beggar of the street is the symbol of ugliness, of the poverty of the spirit. And the so-called aristocrat, die millionaire of today is as poor and ugly as any helpless leper. The soul of either of them is made of the same dirty, sickly stuff. The tattered rags, the crouching heart, the effeminate nerve, the unenlightened soul are the standing ugliness of the world and they have no place in the ideal, the perfect humanity. Humanity, according to Nietzsche, is made in order to be beautiful, to conceive the beautiful, to create the beautiful. Nietzsche's Superman has its perfect image in a Grecian statue of Zeus cut out in white marble-Olympian grandeur shedding in every lineament Apollonian Beauty and Dionysian vigour.
   The real secret of Nietzsche's philosophy is not an adoration of brute force, of blind irrational joy in fighting and killing. Far from it, Nietzsche has no kinship with Treitschke or Bernhard. What Nietzsche wanted was a world purged of littleness and ugliness, a humanity, not of saints, perhaps, but of heroes, lofty in their ideal, great in their achievement, majestic in their empirea race of titanic gods breathing the glory of heaven itself.

01.05 - The Yoga of the King - The Yoga of the Spirits Freedom and Greatness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Flamings of Beauty into earthly shapes,
  Love's broken reflexes of unity
  --
  A Beauty half-visible with deathless eyes,
  A violent Ecstasy, a Sweetness dire,
  --
  And packed with the Beauty of Matter's shapes and hues
  Climbed back from Time into undying Self,
  --
  Homelands of Beauty shut to human eyes,
  Half-seen at first through wonder's gleaming lids,

01.06 - Vivekananda, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The gospel of strength that Vivekananda spread was very characteristic of the man. For it is not mere physical or nervous bravery, although that too is indispensable, and it is something more than moral courage. In the speeches referred to, the subject-matter (as well as the manner to a large extent) is philosophical, metaphysical, even abstract in outlook and treatment: they are not a call to arms, like the French National Anthem, for example; they are not merely an ethical exhortation, a moral lesson either. They speak of the inner spirit, the divine in man, the supreme realities that lie beyond. And yet the words are permeated through and through with a vibration life-giving and heroic-not so much in the explicit and apparent meaning as in the style and manner and atmosphere: it is catching, even or precisely when he refers, for example, to these passages in the Vedas and the Upanishads, magnificent in their poetic Beauty, sublime in their spiritual truth,nec plus ultra, one can say, in the grand style supreme:
   Yasyaite himavanto mahitv

01.08 - Walter Hilton: The Scale of Perfection, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The characteristic then of the path is a one-pointed concentration. Great stress is laid upon "oneliness", "onedness":that is to say, a perfect and complete withdrawal from the outside and the world; an unmixed solitude is required for the true experience and realisation to come. "A full forsaking in will of the soul for the love of Him, and a living of the heart to Him. This asks He, for this gave He." The rigorous exclusion, the uncompromising asceticism, the voluntary self-torture, the cruel dark night and the arid desert are necessary conditions that lead to the "onlyness of soul", what another prophet (Isaiah, XXIV, 16) describes as "My privity to me". In that secreted solitude, the "onlistead"the graphic language of the author calls itis found "that dignity and that ghostly fairness which a soul had by kind and shall have by grace." The utter Beauty of the soul and its absolute love for her deity within her (which has the fair name of Jhesu), the exclusive concentration of the whole of the being upon one point, the divine core, the manifest Grace of God, justifies the annihilation of the world and life's manifold existence. Indeed, the image of the Beloved is always within, from the beginning to the end. It is that that keeps one up in the terrible struggle with one's nature and the world. The image depends upon the consciousness which we have at the moment, that is to say, upon the stage or the degree we have ascended to. At the outset, when we can only look through the senses, when the flesh is our master, we give the image a crude form and character; but even that helps. Gradually, as we rise, with the clearing of our nature, the image too slowly regains its original and true shape. Finally, in the inmost soul we find Jesus as he truly is: "an unchangeable being, a sovereign might, a sovereign soothfastness, sovereign goodness, a blessed life and endless bliss." Does not the Gita too say: "As one approaches Me, so do I appear to him."Ye yath mm prapadyante.
   Indeed, it would be interesting to compare and contrast the Eastern and Western approach to Divine Love, the Christian and the Vaishnava, for example. Indian spirituality, whatever its outer form or credal formulation, has always a background of utter unity. This unity, again, is threefold or triune and is expressed in those great Upanishadic phrases,mahvkyas,(1) the transcendental unity: the One alone exists, there is nothing else than theOneekamevdvityam; (2) the cosmic unity: all existence is one, whatever exists is that One, thereare no separate existences:sarvam khalvidam brahma neha nnsti kincaa; (3) That One is I, you too are that One:so' ham, tattvamasi; this may be called the individual unity. As I have said, all spiritual experiences in India, of whatever school or line, take for granted or are fundamentally based upon this sense of absolute unity or identity. Schools of dualism or pluralism, who do not apparently admit in their tenets this extreme monism, are still permeated in many ways with that sense and in some form or other take cognizance of the truth of it. The Christian doctrine too says indeed, 'I and my Father in Heaven are one', but this is not identity, but union; besides, the human soul is not admitted into this identity, nor the world soul. The world, we have seen, according to the Christian discipline has to be altogether abandoned, negatived, as we go inward and upward towards our spiritual status reflecting the divine image in the divine company. It is a complete rejection, a cutting off and casting away of world and life. One extreme Vedantic path seems to follow a similar line, but there it is not really rejection, but a resolution, not the rejection of what is totally foreign and extraneous, but a resolution of the external into its inner and inmost substance, of the effect into its original cause. Brahman is in the world, Brahman is the world: the world has unrolled itself out of the Brahmansi, pravttiit has to be rolled back into its, cause and substance if it is to regain its pure nature (that is the process of nivitti). Likewise, the individual being in the world, "I", is the transcendent being itself and when it withdraws, it withdraws itself and the whole world with it and merges into the Absolute. Even the Maya of the Mayavadin, although it is viewed as something not inherent in Brahman but superimposed upon Brahman, still, has been accepted as a peculiar power of Brahman itself. The Christian doctrine keeps the individual being separate practically, as an associate or at the most as an image of God. The love for one's neighbour, charity, which the Christian discipline enjoins is one's love for one's kind, because of affinity of nature and quality: it does not dissolve the two into an integral unity and absolute identity, where we love because we are one, because we are the One. The highest culmination of love, the very basis of love, according to the Indian conception, is a transcendence of love, love trans-muted into Bliss. The Upanishad says, where one has become the utter unity, who loves whom? To explain further our point, we take two examples referred to in the book we are considering. The true Christian, it is said, loves the sinner too, he is permitted to dislike sin, for he has to reject it, but he must separate from sin the sinner and love him. Why? Because the sinner too can change and become his brother in spirit, one loves the sinner because there is the possibility of his changing and becoming a true Christian. It is why the orthodox Christian, even such an enlightened and holy person as this mediaeval Canon, considers the non-Christian, the non-baptised as impure and potentially and fundamentally sinners. That is also why the Church, the physical organisation, is worshipped as Christ's very body and outside the Church lies the pagan world which has neither religion nor true spirituality nor salvation. Of course, all this may be symbolic and it is symbolic in a sense. If Christianity is taken to mean true spirituality, and the Church is equated with the collective embodiment of that spirituality, all that is claimed on their behalf stands justified. But that is an ideal, a hypothetical standpoint and can hardly be borne out by facts. However, to come back to our subject, let us ow take the second example. Of Christ himself, it is said, he not only did not dislike or had any aversion for Judas, but that he positively loved the traitor with a true and sincere love. He knew that the man would betray him and even when he was betraying and had betrayed, the Son of Man continued to love him. It was no make-believe or sham or pretence. It was genuine, as genuine as anything can be. Now, why did he love his enemy? Because, it is said, the enemy is suffered by God to do the misdeed: he has been allowed to test the faith of the faithful, he too has his utility, he too is God's servant. And who knows even a Judas would not change in the end? Many who come to scoff do remain to pray. But it can be asked, 'Does God love Satan too in the same way?' The Indian conception which is basically Vedantic is different. There is only one reality, one truth which is viewed differently. Whether a thing is considered good or evil or neutral, essentially and truly, it is that One and nothing else. God's own self is everywhere and the sage makes no difference between the Brahmin and the cow and the elephant. It is his own self he finds in every person and every objectsarvabhtsthitam yo mm bhajati ekatvamsthitah"he has taken his stand upon oneness and loves Me in all beings."2

0.10 - Letters to a Young Captain, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  truth, this Beauty of expression escape people! It is really
  strange that he is not yet recognised, at least as a supreme
  --
  thing that contains such a concentration of spontaneous Beauty
  - not man-made: spontaneous, a blossoming; one has only to

01.12 - Goethe, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The year 1949 has just celebrated the 200th anniversary of the birth of the great force of light that was Goethe. We too remember him on the occasion, and will try to present in a few words, as we see it, the fundamental experience, the major Intuition that stirred this human soul, the lesson he brought to mankind. Goe the was a great poet. He showed how a language, perhaps least poetical by nature, can be moulded to embody the great Beauty of great poetry. He made the German language sing, even as the sun's ray made the stone of Memnon sing when falling upon it. Goe the was a man of consummate culture. Truly and almost literally it could be said of him that nothing human he considered foreign to his inquiring mind. And Goe the was a man of great wisdom. His observation and judgment on thingsno matter to whatever realm they belonghave an arresting appropriateness, a happy and revealing insight. But above all, he was an aspiring soulaspiring to know and be in touch with the hidden Divinity in man and the world.
   Goe the and the Problem of Evil

01.13 - T. S. Eliot: Four Quartets, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   It is the song of redemption, of salvation achieved, of Paradise regained. The full story of the purgatory, of man's calvary is beautifully hymned in these exquisite lines of a haunting poetic Beauty married to a real mystic sense:
   The dove descending breaks the air
  --
   Yes, that is the condition demanded, an entire vacuity in which nothing moves. That is the real Dark Night of the Soul. It is then only that the Grace leans down and descends, then only beams in the sweet Light of lights. Eliot has expressed the experience in these lines of rare Beauty and sincerity :
   Time and the bell have buried the day,
  --
   Our poet is too self-conscious, he himself feels that he has not the perfect voice. A Homer, even a Milton possesses a unity of tone and a wholeness of perception which are denied to the modern. To the modern, however, the old masters are not subtle enough, broad enough, psychological enough, let us say the word, spiritual enough. And yet the poetic inspiration, more than the religious urge, needs the injunction not to be busy with too many things, but to be centred upon the one thing needful, viz., to create poetically and not to discourse philosophically or preach prophetically. Not that it is impossible for the poet to swallow the philosopher and the prophet, metabolising them into the substance of his bone and marrow, of "the trilling wire in his blood", as Eliot graphically expresses. That perhaps is the consummation towards which poetry is tending. But at present, in Eliot, at least, the strands remain distinct, each with its own temper and rhythm, not fused and moulded into a single streamlined form of Beauty. Our poet flies high, very high indeed at times, often or often he flies low, not disdaining the perilous limit of bathos. Perhaps it is all wilful, it is a mannerism which he cherishes. The mannerism may explain his psychology and enshrine his philosophy. But the poet, the magician is to be looked for elsewhere. In the present collection of poems it is the philosophical, exegetical, discursive Eliot who dominates: although the high lights of the subject-matter may be its justification. Still even if we have here doldrums like
   That the past has another pattern, and ceases to be a mere sequence

01.14 - Nicholas Roerich, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Ex oriente lux. Out of the East the Light, and that light is of the nature and substance of Beauty, of creative and dynamic Beauty in the life the spirit. This, I suppose, is Roerich's message in a nutshell. The Light of the East is always the light of the ample consciousness that dwells on the heights of our being in God.
   The call that stirred a Western soul, made him a wanderer over the world in quest of the Holy Grail and finally lodged him in the Home of the Snows is symbolic of a more than individual destiny. It is representative of the secret history of a whole culture and civilisation that have been ruling humanity for some centuries, its inner want and need and hankering and fulfilment. The West shall come to the East and be reborn. That is the prophecy of occult seers and sages.
  --
   Roerich is one of the prophets and seers who have ever been acclaiming and preparing the Golden Age, the dream that humanity has been dreaming continuously since its very childhood, that is to say, when there will be peace and harmony on earth, when racial, cultural or ideological egoism will no longer divide man and mana thing that seems today a chimera and a hallucinationwhen there will be one culture, one civilisation, one spiritual life welding all humanity into a single unit of life luminous and beautiful. Roerich believes that such a consummation can arrive only or chiefly through the growth of the sense of Beauty, of the aesthetic temperament, of creative labour leading to a wider and higher consciousness. Beauty, Harmony, Light, Knowledge, Culture, Love, Delight are cardinal terms in his vision of the deeper and higher life of the future.
   The stress of the inner urge to the heights and depths of spiritual values and realities found special and significant expression in his paintings. It is a difficult problem, a problem which artists and poets are tackling today with all their skill and talent. Man's consciousness is no longer satisfied with the customary and the ordinary actions and reactions of life (or thought), with the old-world and time-worn modes and manners. It is no more turned to the apparent and the obvious, to the surface forms and movements of things. It yearns to look behind and beyond, for the secret mechanism, the hidden agency that really drives things. Poets and artists are the vanguards of the age to come, prophets and pioneers preparing the way for the Lord.

0.12 - Letters to a Student, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  But if one deeply feels the Beauty of Nature and communes
  with her, that can help in widening the consciousness.

0 1957-12-13, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   Sweet Mother, this is what is rising from my soul: I feel in me something unemployed, something seeking to express itself in life. I want to be like a knight, your knight, and go off in search of a treasure that I could bring back to you. The world has lost all sense of the wonderful, all Beauty of Adventure, this quest known to the knights of the Middle Ages. It is this that calls so relentlessly within me, this need for a quest in the world and for a beautiful Adventure which at the same time would be an adventure of the soul. How I wish that the two things, inner and outer, be JOINED, that the joy of action, of the open road and the quest help the souls blossoming, that they be like a prayer of the soul expressed in life. The knights of the Middle Ages knew this. Perhaps it is all childish and absurd in the midst of this 20th century, but this is what I feel, this that is summoning me to leavenot anything base, not anything mediocre, only a need for something in me to be fulfilled. If only I could bring you back a beautiful treasure!
   After that, perhaps I would be riper to accept the everyday life of the Ashram, and know how to give myself better.

0 1958-02-25, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   The only thing in the world that still appears intolerable to me now is all physical deterioration, physical suffering, the ugliness the powerlessness to express this capacity of Beauty inherent in every being. But this, too, will be conquered one day. Here, too the power will come one day to shift the needle a little. Only, one has to climb higher in consciousness: the deeper into matter you want to descend, the higher must you ascend in consciousness.
   It will take time. Sri Aurobindo was surely right when he spoke of a few centuries.

0 1958-09-16 - OM NAMO BHAGAVATEH, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   Lord, God of Beauty and harmony
   Lord, God of power and realization

0 1959-07-14, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   Mother, my whole soul writes you this. I swear there is in me a single great need of Love, Beauty, nobility, purity. And we would work for you together in joy at last.1
   Your anxious child,

0 1959-10-06 - Sri Aurobindos abode, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   And Sri Aurobindo was there, with a majesty, a magnificent Beauty. He had all his beautiful hair as before. It was all so concrete, so substantialhe was even being served some kind of food. I remained there for one hour (I had looked at my watch before and I looked at it afterwards). I spoke to Sri Aurobindo, for I had some important questions to ask him about the way certain things are to be realized. He said nothing. He listened to me quietly and looked at me as if all my words were useless: he understood everything at once. And he answered me with a gesture and two expressions on his face, an unexpected gesture that did not at all correspond to any thought of mine; for example, he picked up three combs that were lying near the mirror (combs similar to those I use here, but larger) and he put them in his hair. He planted one comb in the middle of his head and the two others on each side, as if to gather all his hair over his temples. He was literally COIFFED with these three combs, which gave him a kind of crown. And I immediately understood that by this he meant that he was adopting my conception: You see, I embrace your conception of things, and I coif myself with it; it is my will. Anyway, I remained there for one hour.
   And when I awoke, I didnt have this feeling of returning from afar and of having to re-enter my body, as I usually do. No, it was simply as though I were in this other world, then I took a step backwards and found myself here again. It took me a good half an hour to understand that this world here existed as much as the other and that I was no longer on the other side but here, in the world of falsehood. I had forgotten everythingpeople, things, what I had to do; everything had gone, as if it had no reality at all.

0 1960-10-02b, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   A somewhat mocking '!' is missing. This note was accompanied by a flower: 'Aristocracy of Beauty'.
   ***

0 1960-11-08, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   This is what you see in life, its all like thateach thing has its place and its necessity. This has made me see a whole current of life I was very, very involved with people from this milieu during a whole period of my existence and in fact, its the first approach to Beauty. But it gets mixed.
   (Mother remains silent a moment)
  --
   Its an approach which is not at all mental nor intellectual nor (God knows!) moral in the leastno notion of Good or Evil nor any of those things, absolutely none of that. Theres a moment in life when you begin thinking a little and you see all this from an overall or universal point of view in which all moral notions completely disappearFOR ANOTHER REASON. This experience with Z reminded me of a certain way of approaching Beauty that enables you even to find it in what appears dirty and ugly to the common vision. It is She trying to express herself in this something which to the common vision is ugly, dirty, hypocritical. But of course, if you yourself have striven assiduously and have greatly held yourself in, then you look at it reprovingly.
   From my earliest childhood, instinctively, I have never felt the slightest contempt or how should I say (well, well! I was thinking in English) shrinking or disapproval, severe criticism or disgust for the things people call vice.

0 1960-11-15, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   While it was all coming up, I thought, How is this possible? For during those years of my life (Im now outside things; I do them but Im entirely outside, so they dont involve mewhether its like this or like that makes no difference to me; Im only doing my work, thats all), I was already conscious, but nevertheless I was IN what I was doing to a certain extent; I was this web of social life (but thank God it wasnt here in India, for had it been here I could not have withstood it! I think that even as a child I would have smashed everything, because here its even worse than over there). You see, there its its a bit less constricting, a bit looser, you can slip through the mesh from time to time to brea the some air. But here, according to what Ive learned from people and what Sri Aurobindo told me, its absolutely unbearable (its the same in Japan, absolutely unbearable). In other words, you cant help but smash everything. Over there, you sometimes get a breath of air, but still its quite relative. And this morning I wondered (you see, for years I lived in that way for years and years) just as I was wondering, How was I ABLE to live that and not kick out in every direction?, just as I was looking at it, I saw up above, above this (it is worse than horrible, it is a kind of Oh, not despair, for there isnt even any sense of feeling there is NOTHING! It is dull, dull, dull gray, gray, gray, clenched tight, a closed web that lets through neither air nor life nor lightthere is nothing) and just then I saw a splendor of such sweet light above itso sweet, so full of true love, true compassion something so warm, so warm the relief, the solace of an eternity of sweetness, light, Beauty, in an eternity of patience which feels neither the past nor the inanity and imbecility of thingsit was so wonderful! That was entirely the feeling it gave, and I said to myself, THAT is what made you live, without THAT it would not have been possible. Oh, it would not have been possible I would not have lived even three days! THAT is there, ALWAYS there, awaiting its hour, if we would only let it in.
   (silence)

0 1960-12-17, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   Yes, I have always felt that in Nature one can live in Beauty, always. But then once man shows up, something gets thrown out of joint. Its the mind, actually. What gives birth to ugliness is really the intrusion of the mind in life. I wonder if it was necessary, if it could not have been immediately harmonious. But it appears not.
   Even stones are beautiful; they are always beautiful in one way or another. When life appeared, there were some forms that were a little difficult, but not to that extent, not like certain human mental creations. Of course, there may have been some animal species which were rather but they were more monstrous than actually ugly. And most probably, it only seems like that to our consciousness. But the mind And its the same for all these ideas of sin, of wrong, of all thatits a falsehood. But it was man who invented falsehood, wasnt it? The mind invented falsehood: to deceive! to deceive! And its a curious fact that animals domesticated by man have also learned to lie!

0 1961-01-10, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   49To feel and love the God of Beauty and good in the ugly and the evil, and still yearn in utter love to heal it of its ugliness and its evil, this is real virtue and morality.1
   Do you have a question?
  --
   To begin with, theres what could be called a negative way, the way expounded by Buddhism and similar religions: the refusal to see. To be in a state of such purity and Beauty that there is no perception of evil and ugliness. Its like something that doesnt touch you because it doesnt exist in you. This is the perfection of the negative method.
   It is quite elementary: never take notice of evil, never speak of the evil present in others, never perpetuate the vibrations of evil by observation, criticism or giving undue attention to the evil deed. This is what Buddha taught: each time you mention an evil you help spread it.
  --
   The second step is to be POSITIVELY conscious of the supreme Goodness and Beauty behind all things and supporting all things, permitting them to exist. Once you have seen Him, you can perceive Him behind the mask and the distortioneven ugliness, even cruelty, even evil are a disguise for that Something which is essentially good or beautiful, luminous, pure.
   With this comes TRUE collaboration. For when you have this vision, this awareness, when you live in this consciousness, you also get the power to PULL That into the manifestation on earth and put it into contact with what, for the time being, distorts and disguises; thus the deformation and disguise are gradually transformed by the influence of the Truth behind.

0 1961-01-22, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I simply consented to stay there. You will have all you need, stay here quietly. And what beautiful things she had, lovely things! They were unused and dusty. (It was surely the symbol of ancient realizationsrealizations of the ancient Rishis, things like that. Who knows?) They were first class, but completely neglected and thick with dust, like material objects left unusedwhich no one knew HOW to use. She put them at my disposal: Look, look, let me show you! There was a tremendous accumulation of things, piled in such great confusion that one couldnt see. Yet the marvel of it was that when she led me to a corner to show me something, everything immediately moved aside and order was restored, so that the object she wanted to show me stood out all by itself. And oh, a thing of Beauty! Made of pink marble! A pink marble bathtub of a shape I didnt recognizenot Roman, not antique (not modern, far from it!)how beautiful it was! And whenever she wanted to show me something in this untidy and cluttered room full of objects piled one on top of another, they would organize themselves, take their proper place, and all became neat. You will just have to dust them off a bit, she said. (Mother laughs)
   But Im not surprised it came down on you.

0 1961-03-11, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Oh! (Mother notices the flowers in her hands) This is Supramental Beauty,2 this is Supramental Victory and this is the Endurance3 needed to get there and the Promise.4 Then this one is a lily that grows here (Mother looks at it for a long time) and inside I have put Attachment for the Divine5I brought it for you because its so lovely.
   What are we working on today? (Mother looks at Sri Aurobindos Aphorisms) Ive already begun replying!

0 1961-03-25, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   It was mainly on your right side I banged on it. But strangely enough, it didnt break it became supple, but then it lost its Beauty. (It was so beautiful, as though sculptured!) I tried to pass through it, but to do so (this is what I found interesting), instead of passing through at this level (the chest), the psychic plane the level of the souls vibration I had to climb up above and then descend; and finally, without even realizing it, I found myself inside I had entered through sheer force of concentration. There, at the vital level, the emotional vital (solar plexus), I put two flowers: one very large Endurance in the Most Material Vital [zinnia] and another flower like the one X just gave me [cosmos] but bigger and pure white (it concerns sexual movements, light in sexual movements). But curiously enough, I passed inside through a trance; I was quite busy trying to make it more fluid when all at once, poof! I found myself inside. But since I entered through a trance it became completely objective: no more thought, nothing. And I saw I had put these two flowers there (at the levels of the abdomen and chest), one more active, a very large, dark purple Endurance flower, and another much smaller, pure white, slightly lower down. While I was watching this I think the clock must have struck something pulled me and it all faded away.
   And I found it interesting that when I received your letter yesterday evening I concentrated for a moment, almost out of curiosity: Why doesnt he ever feel he has an experience? Why doesnt he feel anything? I wanted to know precisely what type of experience would give you the feeling of having an experience!

0 1961-05-12, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   But its a wide physical life, and not without its Beauty!
   The physical lifeyes, its nothing at all. All these things of the physical lifenothing at all, nothing at all! Its childish, not worth thinking about for a second.

0 1961-07-18, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   No, the only solution is occult power. But that. Before anything at all can be done, it already demands a certain number of individuals who have reached a great perfection of realization. Granting this, a place is conceivable (set apart from the outside worldno actual contacts) where each thing is exactly in its place, setting an example. Each thing exactly in its place, each person exactly in his place, each movement in its place, and all in its place in an ascending, progressive movement without relapse (that is, the very opposite of what goes on in ordinary life). Naturally, this also means a sort of perfection, it means a sort of unity; it means that the different aspects of the Supreme can be manifested; and, necessarily, an exceptional Beauty, a total harmony; and a power sufficient to keep the forces of Nature obedient: even if this place were encircled by destructive forces, for example, these forces would be powerless to act the protection would be sufficient.
   It would all require the utmost perfection in the individuals organizing such a thing.

0 1961-07-28, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   All at once, as I gaze above me, I glimpse something roseate; I draw nearer and discern what appears to be a shrub, as large as a tree, held fast to a blue reef. The denizens of the waters glide to and fro, myriad and diverse. Now I find myself standing upon fine, shining sand. I gaze about me in wonder. There are mountains and valleys, fantastic forests, strange flowers that could as well be animals, and fish that might be flowersno separation, no gap is there between stationary beings and mobile. Colors everywhere, brilliant and shimmering, or subdued, but always harmonious and refined. I walk upon the golden sands and contemplate all this Beauty bathed in a soft, pale blue radiance, tiny, luminous spheres of red, green and gold circulating through it.
   How marvelous are the depths of the sea! Everywhere the presence of the One in whom all harmonies reside is felt!
  --
   Now I see that these rays emanate from a recumbent oval of white light encircled by a superb rainbow, and I sense that the one whom the light hides from my view is plunged into a profound repose. For long I remain at the outer edge of the rainbow, trying to pierce through the light and see the one who is sleeping encircled by such splendor. Unable to discern anything, I enter the rainbow, and thence into the white and shining oval. Here I see a marvelous being: stretched on what seems to be a mass of white eiderdown, his supple body, of incomparable Beauty, is garbed in a long, white robe. His head rests on his folded arm, but of that I can see only his long hair, the hue of ripened wheat, flowing over his shoulders. A great and gentle emotion sweeps through me at this magnificent spectacle, and a deep reverence as well.
   Has the sleeper sensed my presence? For now he awakens and rises in all his grace and Beauty. He turns towards me and his eyes meet mine, mauve and luminous eyes with a gentle, an infinitely tender expression. Wordlessly he bids me a sublime welcome and my whole being joyously responds. Taking my hand, he leads me to the couch he has just left. I stretch out on this downy whiteness, and his harmonious visage bends over me; a sweet current of force enters wholly into me, invigorating, revitalizing each cell.
   Then, wreathed by the splendid colors of the rainbow, enveloped by lulling melodies and exquisite perfumes, beneath his gaze so powerful, so tender, I drift into a beatific repose. And during my sleep I learn many beautiful and useful things.
  --
   Wherever there is Beauty, wherever there is radiance, wherever there is progress towards perfection, whether in the Heaven of the heights or of the depths, there, assuredly, is found the form and similitude of man-man, the supreme terrestrial evolutor.6
   Sachchidananda is the Supreme Consciousness in its triple aspect of Existence (Sat), Consciousness (Chit) and Bliss (Ananda).

0 1961-10-30, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Nor was it insignificant that fire, Agni, was the core of the Vedic mysteries: Agni, the inner flame, the soul within us (for who can deny that the soul is fire?), the innate aspiration drawing man towards the heights; Agni, the ardent will within us that sees, always and forever, and remembers; Agni, the priest of the sacrifice, the divine worker, the envoy between earth and heaven (Rig-veda III, 3.2) he is there in the middle of his house (I.70.2). The Fathers who have divine vision set him within as a child that is to be born (IX.83.3). He is the boy suppressed in the secret cavern (V.2.1). He is as if life and the breath of our existence, he is as if our eternal child (I.66.1). O Son of the body (III.4.2), O Fire, thou art the son of heaven by the body of the earth (III.25.1). Immortal in mortals (IV.2. 1), old and outworn he grows young again and again (II.4.5). When he is born he becomes one who voices the godhead: when as life who grows in the mother he has been fashioned in the mother he becomes a gallop of wind in his movement (III.29.11). O Fire, when thou art well borne by us thou becomest the supreme growth and expansion of our being, all glory and Beauty are in thy desirable hue and thy perfect vision. O Vastness, thou art the plenitude that carries us to the end of our way; thou art a multitude of riches spread out on every side (II.1.12). O Fire brilliant ocean of light in which is divine vision (III.22.2), the Flame with his hundred treasures O knower of all things born(I.59).
   But the divine fire is not our exclusive privilegeAgni exists not only in man: He is the child of the waters, the child of the forests, the child of things stable and the child of things that move. Even in the stone he is there (I.70.2).

0 1961-12-20, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   And mind you, it can be very beautiful in its simplicity, a Beauty sorrowful people can feel, people who are tired of life, people whose heads are sick of all these arguments and dogmaspeople who are tired of thinking too many great thoughts.
   And I am the first among them! Nothing tires me more than philosophers.

0 1962-01-12 - supramental ship, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   For thought, its elementary, very simple. Its not difficult for the feelings either; for the heart, the emotional being, to expand to the dimensions of the Supreme is relatively easy. But this body! Its very difficult, very difficult to do without the body losing its center (how can I put it?) its center of coagulationwithout it dissolving into the surrounding mass. Although, if one were in a natural environment, with mountains and forests and rivers, with lots of space and lots of natural Beauty, it could be rather pleasant! But its physically impossible to take a single step outside ones body without meeting unpleasant, painful things. At times you come in contact with a pleasant substance, something harmonious, warm, vibrating with a higher light; it happens. But its rare. Flowers, yes, sometimes flowers sometimes, not always. But this material world, oh! It batters you from all sides; it claws you, mauls youyou get clawed and scraped and battered by all sorts of things which which just dont blossom. How hard it all is! Oh, how closed human life is! How shriveled, hardened, without light, without warmth let alone joy.
   While sometimes, when you see water flowing along, or a ray of sunlight in the treesoh, how it sings! The cells sing, they are happy.

0 1962-02-03, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   And so according to your mission in the world, you have to find for yourself the right proportion between this work and external, intellectual or organizational work; and then there are the bodys needs, which can be met in the same way, trying to make it possible for the Lord to take delight in them. I have seen this for trivial things: for example, making your bath a pleasant experience, or caring for your hair, or whatever (of course, its been a long time since there have been any of those stupid, petty ideas of personal pleasure), so that these things arent done indifferently, out of habit and necessity, but with a touch of Beauty, a touch of charm and delight for the Lord.
   There, thats all.

0 1962-02-27, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   This type of thing has happened to me very, very oftenfour times with snakes. There was one incident here near the fishing village of Ariankuppam, a place where a river empties into the sea. Night had fallen swiftly, it was pitch dark, and I was walking along a road when right in the middle of a step (I had already lifted my foot and was about to lower it), I distinctly heard a voice in my ear: Watch out! Yet no one had spoken. So I looked, and just as my foot was about to touch the ground, I saw an enormous black cobra right where I was casually going to put my foot. Those fellows dont like that sort of thing! It slithered away and swam across the waterwhat a Beauty, mon petit! Hood wide open, head held high, he swam across like a king. I would certainly have been punished for my impertinence!
   I have had hundreds and hundreds of experiences like thatinformed just at the last moment (not one second too soon)and in very different circumstances. Once in Paris I was crossing the Boulevard Saint Michel (I had resolved to attain union with the psychic presence, the inner Divine, within a certain number of months, and these were the last weeks I was thinking of nothing but that, engrossed in that alone). I lived near the Luxembourg Gardens and was going there for a stroll, to sit in the gardens that eveningstill indrawn. I came to a kind of intersectionnot a very sensible place to cross when youre interiorized! So, in that state, I started to cross when all of a sudden I had a shock, as if something had hit me, and I instinctively jumped back. As I jumped back a streetcar rushed by. I had felt the streetcar at a little more than arms length. It had touched my aura, the protective aura (that aura was very strong at the time I was deep into occultism and knew how to maintain it). My protective aura was touched, and it literally threw me backwards, just like a physical shock. Accompanied by the drivers insults!

0 1962-03-11, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   To begin with, I said that the vital is peopled by small entities, small formations, the remnants of human beings who have died. But there is a whole vital world which has nothing to do with that one, a world peopled by beings of the vital proper, beings of great power and even great Beauty. Most people who dabble in occultism without having a deep enough spiritual life are immediately deluded by themsome even take them as the supreme God and worship them. Thats generally how religions are created. They are a great success. They are the supreme God of many a religion they are beings of the vital world, and can assume an appearance of overwhelming Beauty. They are the biggest impostors in the world, and dangerous at that; it takes the spiritual instinct, the instinct of true spiritual purity, not to be deceived by them. Many religions and sects are founded on revelations and miracles, and every bit of it comes from vital beings.
   Its one of the greatest problems in human life; I dont mean spiritual life, but the life of people who deal with the beyond.

0 1962-05-29, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Splendid. I am infinitely grateful to her. My body has never asked for fun or well-being or anything else. Thats life, it said, and you just have to take it as it is. And thats why when I first met someone who told me it could be otherwise (I was already past twenty), I said, Oh, really? Is that so? (Mother laughs) And then when he told me all about Thons teachings and The Cosmic Life and about the inner God and a new world that would be a world of Beauty and (at least) of peace and light well, I rushed into it headlong.
   But even then I was told: It depends on YOU alone, not on circumstancesabove all, dont blame circumstances; you must find it in yourself, the transformative element is within you. And you can do it wherever you are, even in a cell at the bottom of a hole. The groundwork was already done, you see, since the body never asked for anything.

0 1962-05-31, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   And its the same thing: whats needed is the path of vastness, widening, relaxation, ease, of BLOSSOMING in the vitalnot so much a censorial vital as as gentleness, a certain sweetness. The vital blossoming into Beauty: sweetness and Beauty. I dont want to speak of sentiments because oh, that lands us right in a quagmire! No, but a sweetness and charm and Beauty but not there (in the head): here. And then restnot a stiff and stony and stagnant rest, a rest within the undulation. You let yourself float.3
   (silence)

0 1962-06-27, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   A whiteness and a strength is in the skies... Virgin formidable In Beauty, disturber of the ancient world!... How art thou white and beautiful and calm, Yet clothed in tumult! Heaven above thee shakes Wounded with lightnings, goddess, and the sea Flees from thy dreadful tranquil feet.
   Perseus the Deliverer, Cent. Ed., VI. 6.

0 1962-07-25, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   But whenever there was unpleasantness with my relatives, with playmates or friends, I would feel all the nastiness or bad willall sorts of pretty ugly things that came (I was rather sensitive, for I instinctively nurtured an ideal of Beauty and harmony, which all the circumstances of life kept denying) so whenever I felt sad, I was most careful not to say anything to my mother or father, because my father didnt give a hoot and my mother would scold me that was always the first thing she did. And so I would go to my room and sit down in my little armchair, and there I could concentrate and try to understand in my own way. And I remember that after quite a few probably fruitless attempts I wound up telling myself (I always used to talk to myself; I dont know why or how, but I would talk to myself just as I talked to others): Look here, you feel sad because so-and-so said something really disgusting to you but why does that make you cry? Why are you so sad? Hes the one who was bad, so he should be crying. You didnt do anything bad to him. Did you tell him nasty things? Did you fight with her, or with him? No, you didnt do anything, did you; well then, you neednt feel sad. You should only be sad if youve done something bad, but. So that settled it: I would never cry. With just a slight inward movement, or something that said, Youve done no wrong, there was no sadness.
   But there was another side to this someone: it was watching me more and more, and as soon as I said one word or made one gesture too many, had one little bad thought, teased my brother or whatever, the smallest thing, it would say (Mother takes on a severe tone), Look out, be careful! At first I used to moan about it, but by and by it taught me: Dont lamentput right, mend. And when things could be mendedas they almost always could I would do so. All that on a five to seven-year-old childs scale of intelligence.
  --
   Then at a very young age (about eight or ten), along with my studies I began to paint. At twelve I was already doing portraits. All aspects of art and Beauty, but particularly music and painting, fascinated me. I went through a very intense vital development during that period, with, just like in my early years, the presence of a kind of inner Guide; and all centered on studies: the study of sensations, observations, the study of technique, comparative studies, even a whole spectrum of observations dealing with taste, smell and hearinga kind of classification of experiences. And this extended to all facets of life, all the experiences life can bring, all of themmiseries, joys, difficulties, sufferings, everythingoh, a whole field of studies! And always this presence within, judging, deciding, classifying, organizing and systematizing everything.
   Then conscious yoga made a sudden entry into the picture when I met Thon; I must have been about twenty-one. Lifes orientation changed, a whole series of experiences took place, with the development of the vital giving interesting occult results.

0 1962-09-18, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I dont have anything in mind. All I know is that being in that light above gives me great joy. For it is a supramental lighta supramental light of aesthetic Beauty, and very, very harmonious.
   So now I dont mind finishing The Synthesis. I was a little bothered because I have no other books by Sri Aurobindo to translate that can help me in my sadhana: there was only The Synthesis. As I said, it always came right on time, just when it was needed for a particular experience.

0 1962-11-27, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   How lovely it was! The sense of delicate Beauty in things.
   And then the whole time, the bodys sensation was. You see, it no longer has the sense of its separate form is reduced to a minimum (Mother touches her hands as if seeking the bodys limits), but in that experience it had completely vanished. There wasnt even the sense of identity with the cube, because it was self-evidenteverything was self-evident. I cant even say I was lookingnothing was looking, everything was self-evident.5

0 1963-01-30, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Here there were a few more erasures. It will probably go on improving. But what a wonder, this passage, what Beauty!
   (Mother reads aloud her translation up to: God shall grow up while the wise men talk and sleep)

0 1963-02-15, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   And, I must say, I was observing this because, originally, the first time I heard of it, this conception shocked me, in the sense that (I dont know, it wasnt an idea, it was a feeling), as though it meant lending reality to something which in my consciousness, for a very long time (at least millennia perhaps, I dont know), had been the Falsehood to be conquered. The Falsehood that must cease to exist. Its the aspect of Truth that must manifest itself, its not all that: doing anything whatsoever just for the fun of it, simply because you have the full power. You have the power to do everything, so you do everything, and knowing that there is a Truth behind, you dont give a damn about consequences. That was something something which, as far back as I can remember, I have fought against. I have known it, but it seems to me it was such a long, long time ago and I rejected it so strongly, saying, No, no! and implored the Lord so intensely that things may be otherwise, beseeched Him that his all-powerful Truth, his all-powerful Purity and his all-powerful Beauty may manifest and put an end to all that mess. And at first I was shocked when Sri Aurobindo told me that; previously, in this life, it hadnt even crossed my mind. In that sense Theons explanation had been much more (what should I say?) useful to me from the standpoint of action: the origin of disorder being the separation of the primal Powers but thats not it! HE is there, blissfully worshipping all this confusion!
   And naturally this time around, when I started translating it came back. At first there was a shudder (Mother makes a gesture of stiffening). Then I told myself, Havent you got beyond that! And I let myself flow into the thing. Then I had a series of nights with Sri Aurobindo so marvelous! You understand, I see him constantly and I go into that subtle physical world where he has his abode; the contact is almost permanent (at any rate, thats how I spend all my nights: he shows me the work, everything), but still, after this translation of Savitri he seemed to be smiling at me and telling me, At last you have understood! (Mother laughs) I said, It isnt that I didnt understand, its that I didnt want it! I didnt want, I dont WANT things to be like that any more, for thousands of years I have wanted things to be otherwise!

0 1963-03-06, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   It will be transformed and will be an outline, as it were, of the new one. When this outline comes into being, the other, the perfect form, will appear. Because both have their own Beauty and purpose, and so both will be there.
   The mind always tries to make an exclusive choice or decision thats not the way. Even the totality of what we are able to imagine is very little compared to what will be. The truth is, everyone with an intense aspiration and inner certitude will be called to realize it.

0 1963-07-03, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Another time, when I was younger, I was in Italy, in Venice, painting in a corner of St. Marks Cathedral (a marvelous place of great Beauty), and I happened to be sitting right next to a confessional. One day, as I sat there painting, I saw the priest arrive and enter the confessional that man completely black, tall, thin, the very face of wickedness and hardness: a pitiless wickedness. He closeted himself in there. After a short while there came a rather young woman, perhaps thirty years old, gentle, very sweetnot intelligent but very sweetentirely dressed in black. She entered the box (he was already shut in and could no longer be seen), and they spoke through a grille. I should add that its far more medieval than in France, it was really it was almost theatrical. She knelt down there, I saw her long gown flowing out, and she was speaking. (I couldnt hear, she was whispering; besides, both of them spoke in Italian, although I understand Italian.) The voices were barely audible, there was no sound. Then all at once, I heard the woman sobbing (she was sobbing in spasms), and it went on till suddenlya collapse: she crumpled in a heap on the floor. Then that man opened the door, shoving aside her body with the door and he strode away without a backward glance. I was young, you know, and if I could have, I would have killed him. What he had just done was monstrous. And he was going away it was a chunk of steel that walked out.
   Incidents of that sort have left me with a peculiar impression. The stories of the Inquisition had already given me a sufficient Now, of course, youve heard what I told you [the story of the Asura], and thats really my way of seeing the thing. But there was a time when I might have said, No religion has done more evil in the world than this one.

0 1963-07-24, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   To bring the Divine Love and Beauty and Ananda into the world is, indeed, the whole crown and essence of our yoga. But it has always seemed to me impossible unless there comes as its support and foundation and guard the Divine Truthwhat I call the supramental and its Divine Power.
   (XXIII.753)

0 1963-08-07, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Theyve learned so much from the Americansit has warped their taste, but now its beginning to come back. Also, all that theyve learned helps them. And theyve converted America to the sense of Beauty!
   Its odd, last night, it was all Japanese.
  --
   We have the mental habit of wanting to order, classify and regulate everything: we always want to have ordera mental order. But thats For example, in those places untouched by men, such as virgin forests, there is a Beauty you dont find in life, and its a vital, unruly Beauty which doesnt satisfy mental reason, yet contains a far greater wealth than anything the mind conceives and organizes.
   But in the meantime, life is beleaguered by thousands of insectsmillions of insects

0 1963-11-27, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   In Beauty she treasures the sunlight of his smile.
   Ashamed of her rich cosmic poverty.

0 1963-12-31, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Approached him armed with Beauty like a snare,
   But hid a fatal meaning in each line
  --
   A Beauty unreal graced a glamour face.
   Nothing could be relied on to remain:

0 1964-01-04, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   There are four aspects or "sides" of the universal Mother: Maheshwari (the supreme Mother), Mahakali (the warrior aspect and the aspect of love), Mahalakshmi (the aspect of harmony and Beauty), and Mahasaraswati (perfection in the arts and in work).
   We give the complete passage in Addendum.

0 1964-01-18, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   There should be somewhere upon earth a place that no nation could claim as its own, a place where every human being of goodwill, sincere in his aspiration, could live freely as a citizen of the world, obeying one single authority, that of the supreme Truth; a place of peace, concord, harmony, where all the fighting instincts of man would be used exclusively to conquer the causes of his sufferings and miseries, to surmount his weakness and ignorance, to triumph over his limitations and incapacities; a place where the needs of the spirit and the concern for progress would take precedence over the satisfaction of desires and passions, the search for pleasures and material enjoyment. In this place, children would be able to grow and develop integrally without losing contact with their souls; education would be given not with a view to passing examinations or obtaining certificates and posts, but to enrich ones existing faculties and bring forth new ones. In this place, titles and positions would be replaced by opportunities to serve and organize; everyones bodily needs would be provided for equally, and in the general organization, intellectual, moral and spiritual superiority would be expressed not by increased pleasures and powers in life, but by greater duties and responsibilities. Beauty in all its art formspainting, sculpture, music, literaturewould be accessible to all equally, the ability to share in the joys it brings being limited solely by ones capacities and not by social or financial position. For in this ideal place, money would no longer be the sovereign lord; individual worth would have a far greater importance than that of material wealth and social position. There, work would not be for earning ones living, but the means to express oneself and develop ones capacities and possibilities, while at the same time being of service to the group as a whole, which would in turn provide for everyones subsistence and field of action. In short, it would be a place where human relationships, ordinarily based almost exclusively on competition and strife, would be replaced by relationships of emulation in trying to do ones best, of collaboration and real brotherhood.
   The earth is not ready to realize such an ideal, for humanity does not yet possess either the knowledge necessary to understand and adopt it or the conscious force indispensable for its execution. This is why I call it a dream.

0 1964-07-22, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   And the physical world is made to express Beauty; if it became harmonious instead of being the ignoble thing it is, if it became harmonious, it would have an exceptional vibratory quality! Its rather curious: the vital world is magnificent, the mental world has its splendors, the overmental world with all its gods (who are existing beings, I know them well) is truly very beautiful; but I tell you, since I had that Contact, I have found all that hollowhollow and lacking the essential.
   And that essential thing, in its principle, is here, on earth.

0 1964-08-11, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   But outwardly, that sort of film its like a thin film of difficulties, of complications, added on by the human consciousness (its much stronger with man than with the animal; the animal doesnt have that, very littleit has it more and more because of man, but very little; its something specific to man and the menta