classes ::: author, Philosophy, Poetry,
children :::
branches :::

bookmarks: Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:Henry David Thoreau
class:author
subject class:Philosophy
subject class:Poetry

Goodreads - Thoreau
Wikipedia - Thoreau
Gutenberg - Thoreau

Influences [GR] ::: Robert Ingersoll, Charles Darwin, John Burroughs, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, Ennius, John Locke, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Alexander von Humboldt, John Muir
Influences [W] ::: Indian philosophy, Aristotle, Homer, Aeschylus, Pindar, Cato the Elder, Étienne de La Boétie, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Thomas Carlyle, Charles Darwin, Alexander von Humboldt

Influenced [W] ::: Mahatma Gandhi, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr., Walt Whitman, Leo Tolstoy, Marcel Proust, W. B. Yeats, Sinclair Lewis, Ernest Hemingway, Upton Sinclair, Emma Goldman, E. B. White, E. O. Wilson, Christopher McCandless, B. F. Skinner, George Bernard Shaw, John Zerzan, John Muir, Glenn Gould

--- WIKIPEDIA
Henry David Thoreau (see name pronunciation; July 12, 1817 May 6, 1862) was an American essayist, poet, and philosopher. A leading transcendentalist, he is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay "Civil Disobedience" (originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government"), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state. Thoreau's books, articles, essays, journals, and poetry amount to more than 20 volumes. Among his lasting contri butions are his writings on natural history and philosophy, in which he anticipated the methods and findings of ecology and environmental history, two sources of modern-day environmentalism. His literary style interweaves close observation of nature, personal experience, pointed rhetoric, symbolic meanings, and historical lore, while displaying a poetic sensibility, philosophical austerity, and attention to practical detail. He was also deeply interested in the idea of survival in the face of hostile elements, historical change, and natural decay; at the same time he advocated abandoning waste and illusion in order to discover life's true essential needs. He was a lifelong abolitionist, delivering lectures that attacked the Fugitive Slave Law while praising the writings of Wendell Phillips and defending the abolitionist John Brown. Thoreau's philosophy of civil disobedience later influenced the political thoughts and actions of such notable figures as Leo Tolstoy, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King Jr. Thoreau is sometimes referred to as an anarchist. Though "Civil Disobedience" seems to call for improving rather than abolishing government"I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government" the direction of this improvement contrarily points toward anarchism: "'That government is best which governs not at all;' and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have."




see also :::

questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or
join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers



now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Infinite_Library
Walden,_and_On_The_Duty_Of_Civil_Disobedience

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1.01_-_Economy
1.02_-_Where_I_Lived,_and_What_I_Lived_For
1.03_-_Reading
1.04_-_Sounds
1.05_-_Solitude
1.11_-_Higher_Laws
1.12_-_Brute_Neighbors

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
1.01_-_Economy
1.02_-_Where_I_Lived,_and_What_I_Lived_For
1.03_-_Reading
1.04_-_Sounds
1.05_-_Solitude
1.11_-_Higher_Laws
1.12_-_Brute_Neighbors
2.01_-_Habit_1__Be_Proactive

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
Henry David Thoreau

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH


TERMS ANYWHERE

Three senses of "Ockhamism" may be distinguished: Logical, indicating usage of the terminology and technique of logical analysis developed by Ockham in his Summa totius logicae; in particular, use of the concept of supposition (suppositio) in the significative analysis of terms. Epistemological, indicating the thesis that universality is attributable only to terms and propositions, and not to things as existing apart from discourse. Theological, indicating the thesis that no tneological doctrines, such as those of God's existence or of the immortality of the soul, are evident or demonstrable philosophically, so that religious doctrine rests solely on faith, without metaphysical or scientific support. It is in this sense that Luther is often called an Ockhamist.   Bibliography:   B. Geyer,   Ueberwegs Grundriss d. Gesch. d. Phil., Bd. II (11th ed., Berlin 1928), pp. 571-612 and 781-786; N. Abbagnano,   Guglielmo di Ockham (Lanciano, Italy, 1931); E. A. Moody,   The Logic of William of Ockham (N. Y. & London, 1935); F. Ehrle,   Peter von Candia (Muenster, 1925); G. Ritter,   Studien zur Spaetscholastik, I-II (Heidelberg, 1921-1922).     --E.A.M. Om, aum: (Skr.) Mystic, holy syllable as a symbol for the indefinable Absolute. See Aksara, Vac, Sabda. --K.F.L. Omniscience: In philosophy and theology it means the complete and perfect knowledge of God, of Himself and of all other beings, past, present, and future, or merely possible, as well as all their activities, real or possible, including the future free actions of human beings. --J.J.R. One: Philosophically, not a number but equivalent to unit, unity, individuality, in contradistinction from multiplicity and the mani-foldness of sensory experience. In metaphysics, the Supreme Idea (Plato), the absolute first principle (Neo-platonism), the universe (Parmenides), Being as such and divine in nature (Plotinus), God (Nicolaus Cusanus), the soul (Lotze). Religious philosophy and mysticism, beginning with Indian philosophy (s.v.), has favored the designation of the One for the metaphysical world-ground, the ultimate icility, the world-soul, the principle of the world conceived as reason, nous, or more personally. The One may be conceived as an independent whole or as a sum, as analytic or synthetic, as principle or ontologically. Except by mysticism, it is rarely declared a fact of sensory experience, while its transcendent or transcendental, abstract nature is stressed, e.g., in epistemology where the "I" or self is considered the unitary background of personal experience, the identity of self-consciousness, or the unity of consciousness in the synthesis of the manifoldness of ideas (Kant). --K.F.L. One-one: A relation R is one-many if for every y in the converse domain there is a unique x such that xRy. A relation R is many-one if for every x in the domain there is a unique y such that xRy. (See the article relation.) A relation is one-one, or one-to-one, if it is at the same time one-many and many-one. A one-one relation is said to be, or to determine, a one-to-one correspondence between its domain and its converse domain. --A.C. On-handedness: (Ger. Vorhandenheit) Things exist in the mode of thereness, lying- passively in a neutral space. A "deficient" form of a more basic relationship, termed at-handedness (Zuhandenheit). (Heidegger.) --H.H. Ontological argument: Name by which later authors, especially Kant, designate the alleged proof for God's existence devised by Anselm of Canterbury. Under the name of God, so the argument runs, everyone understands that greater than which nothing can be thought. Since anything being the greatest and lacking existence is less then the greatest having also existence, the former is not really the greater. The greatest, therefore, has to exist. Anselm has been reproached, already by his contemporary Gaunilo, for unduly passing from the field of logical to the field of ontological or existential reasoning. This criticism has been repeated by many authors, among them Aquinas. The argument has, however, been used, if in a somewhat modified form, by Duns Scotus, Descartes, and Leibniz. --R.A. Ontological Object: (Gr. onta, existing things + logos, science) The real or existing object of an act of knowledge as distinguished from the epistemological object. See Epistemological Object. --L.W. Ontologism: (Gr. on, being) In contrast to psychologism, is called any speculative system which starts philosophizing by positing absolute being, or deriving the existence of entities independently of experience merely on the basis of their being thought, or assuming that we have immediate and certain knowledge of the ground of being or God. Generally speaking any rationalistic, a priori metaphysical doctrine, specifically the philosophies of Rosmini-Serbati and Vincenzo Gioberti. As a philosophic method censored by skeptics and criticists alike, as a scholastic doctrine formerly strongly supported, revived in Italy and Belgium in the 19th century, but no longer countenanced. --K.F.L. Ontology: (Gr. on, being + logos, logic) The theory of being qua being. For Aristotle, the First Philosophy, the science of the essence of things. Introduced as a term into philosophy by Wolff. The science of fundamental principles, the doctrine of the categories. Ultimate philosophy; rational cosmology. Syn. with metaphysics. See Cosmology, First Principles, Metaphysics, Theology. --J.K.F. Operation: "(Lit. operari, to work) Any act, mental or physical, constituting a phase of the reflective process, and performed with a view to acquiring1 knowledge or information about a certain subject-nntter. --A.C.B.   In logic, see Operationism.   In philosophy of science, see Pragmatism, Scientific Empiricism. Operationism: The doctrine that the meaning of a concept is given by a set of operations.   1. The operational meaning of a term (word or symbol) is given by a semantical rule relating the term to some concrete process, object or event, or to a class of such processes, objectj or events.   2. Sentences formed by combining operationally defined terms into propositions are operationally meaningful when the assertions are testable by means of performable operations. Thus, under operational rules, terms have semantical significance, propositions have empirical significance.   Operationism makes explicit the distinction between formal (q.v.) and empirical sentences. Formal propositions are signs arranged according to syntactical rules but lacking operational reference. Such propositions, common in mathematics, logic and syntax, derive their sanction from convention, whereas an empirical proposition is acceptable (1) when its structure obeys syntactical rules and (2) when there exists a concrete procedure (a set of operations) for determining its truth or falsity (cf. Verification). Propositions purporting to be empirical are sometimes amenable to no operational test because they contain terms obeying no definite semantical rules. These sentences are sometimes called pseudo-propositions and are said to be operationally meaningless. They may, however, be 'meaningful" in other ways, e.g. emotionally or aesthetically (cf. Meaning).   Unlike a formal statement, the "truth" of an empirical sentence is never absolute and its operational confirmation serves only to increase the degree of its validity. Similarly, the semantical rule comprising the operational definition of a term has never absolute precision. Ordinarily a term denotes a class of operations and the precision of its definition depends upon how definite are the rules governing inclusion in the class.   The difference between Operationism and Logical Positivism (q.v.) is one of emphasis. Operationism's stress of empirical matters derives from the fact that it was first employed to purge physics of such concepts as absolute space and absolute time, when the theory of relativity had forced upon physicists the view that space and time are most profitably defined in terms of the operations by which they are measured. Although different methods of measuring length at first give rise to different concepts of length, wherever the equivalence of certain of these measures can be established by other operations, the concepts may legitimately be combined.   In psychology the operational criterion of meaningfulness is commonly associated with a behavioristic point of view. See Behaviorism. Since only those propositions which are testable by public and repeatable operations are admissible in science, the definition of such concepti as mind and sensation must rest upon observable aspects of the organism or its behavior. Operational psychology deals with experience only as it is indicated by the operation of differential behavior, including verbal report. Discriminations, or the concrete differential reactions of organisms to internal or external environmental states, are by some authors regarded as the most basic of all operations.   For a discussion of the role of operational definition in phvsics. see P. W. Bridgman, The Logic of Modern Physics, (New York, 1928) and The Nature of Physical Theory (Princeton, 1936). "The extension of operationism to psychology is discussed by C. C. Pratt in The Logic of Modem Psychology (New York. 1939.)   For a discussion and annotated bibliography relating to Operationism and Logical Positivism, see S. S. Stevens, Psychology and the Science of Science, Psychol. Bull., 36, 1939, 221-263. --S.S.S. Ophelimity: Noun derived from the Greek, ophelimos useful, employed by Vilfredo Pareto (1848-1923) in economics as the equivalent of utility, or the capacity to provide satisfaction. --J.J.R. Opinion: (Lat. opinio, from opinor, to think) An hypothesis or proposition entertained on rational grounds but concerning which doubt can reasonably exist. A belief. See Hypothesis, Certainty, Knowledge. --J.K.F- Opposition: (Lat. oppositus, pp. of oppono, to oppose) Positive actual contradiction. One of Aristotle's Post-predicaments. In logic any contrariety or contradiction, illustrated by the "Square of Opposition". Syn. with: conflict. See Logic, formal, § 4. --J.K.F. Optimism: (Lat. optimus, the best) The view inspired by wishful thinking, success, faith, or philosophic reflection, that the world as it exists is not so bad or even the best possible, life is good, and man's destiny is bright. Philosophically most persuasively propounded by Leibniz in his Theodicee, according to which God in his wisdom would have created a better world had he known or willed such a one to exist. Not even he could remove moral wrong and evil unless he destroyed the power of self-determination and hence the basis of morality. All systems of ethics that recognize a supreme good (Plato and many idealists), subscribe to the doctrines of progressivism (Turgot, Herder, Comte, and others), regard evil as a fragmentary view (Josiah Royce et al.) or illusory, or believe in indemnification (Henry David Thoreau) or melioration (Emerson), are inclined optimistically. Practically all theologies advocating a plan of creation and salvation, are optimistic though they make the good or the better dependent on moral effort, right thinking, or belief, promising it in a future existence. Metaphysical speculation is optimistic if it provides for perfection, evolution to something higher, more valuable, or makes room for harmonies or a teleology. See Pessimism. --K.F.L. Order: A class is said to be partially ordered by a dyadic relation R if it coincides with the field of R, and R is transitive and reflexive, and xRy and yRx never both hold when x and y are different. If in addition R is connected, the class is said to be ordered (or simply ordered) by R, and R is called an ordering relation.   Whitehcid and Russell apply the term serial relation to relations which are transitive, irreflexive, and connected (and, in consequence, also asymmetric). However, the use of serial relations in this sense, instead ordering relations as just defined, is awkward in connection with the notion of order for unit classes.   Examples: The relation not greater than among leal numbers is an ordering relation. The relation less than among real numbers is a serial relation. The real numbers are simply ordered by the former relation. In the algebra of classes (logic formal, § 7), the classes are partially ordered by the relation of class inclusion.   For explanation of the terminology used in making the above definitions, see the articles connexity, reflexivity, relation, symmetry, transitivity. --A.C. Order type: See relation-number. Ordinal number: A class b is well-ordered by a dyadic relation R if it is ordered by R (see order) and, for every class a such that a ⊂ b, there is a member x of a, such that xRy holds for every member y of a; and R is then called a well-ordering relation. The ordinal number of a class b well-ordered by a relation R, or of a well-ordering relation R, is defined to be the relation-number (q. v.) of R.   The ordinal numbers of finite classes (well-ordered by appropriate relations) are called finite ordinal numbers. These are 0, 1, 2, ... (to be distinguished, of course, from the finite cardinal numbers 0, 1, 2, . . .).   The first non-finite (transfinite or infinite) ordinal number is the ordinal number of the class of finite ordinal numbers, well-ordered in their natural order, 0, 1, 2, . . .; it is usually denoted by the small Greek letter omega. --A.C.   G. Cantor, Contributions to the Founding of the Theory of Transfinite Numbers, translated and with an introduction by P. E. B. Jourdain, Chicago and London, 1915. (new ed. 1941); Whitehead and Russell, Princtpia Mathematica. vol. 3. Orexis: (Gr. orexis) Striving; desire; the conative aspect of mind, as distinguished from the cognitive and emotional (Aristotle). --G.R.M.. Organicism: A theory of biology that life consists in the organization or dynamic system of the organism. Opposed to mechanism and vitalism. --J.K.F. Organism: An individual animal or plant, biologically interpreted. A. N. Whitehead uses the term to include also physical bodies and to signify anything material spreading through space and enduring in time. --R.B.W. Organismic Psychology: (Lat. organum, from Gr. organon, an instrument) A system of theoretical psychology which construes the structure of the mind in organic rather than atomistic terms. See Gestalt Psychology; Psychological Atomism. --L.W. Organization: (Lat. organum, from Gr. organon, work) A structured whole. The systematic unity of parts in a purposive whole. A dynamic system. Order in something actual. --J.K.F. Organon: (Gr. organon) The title traditionally given to the body of Aristotle's logical treatises. The designation appears to have originated among the Peripatetics after Aristotle's time, and expresses their view that logic is not a part of philosophy (as the Stoics maintained) but rather the instrument (organon) of philosophical inquiry. See Aristotelianism. --G.R.M.   In Kant. A system of principles by which pure knowledge may be acquired and established.   Cf. Fr. Bacon's Novum Organum. --O.F.K. Oriental Philosophy: A general designation used loosely to cover philosophic tradition exclusive of that grown on Greek soil and including the beginnings of philosophical speculation in Egypt, Arabia, Iran, India, and China, the elaborate systems of India, Greater India, China, and Japan, and sometimes also the religion-bound thought of all these countries with that of the complex cultures of Asia Minor, extending far into antiquity. Oriental philosophy, though by no means presenting a homogeneous picture, nevertheless shares one characteristic, i.e., the practical outlook on life (ethics linked with metaphysics) and the absence of clear-cut distinctions between pure speculation and religious motivation, and on lower levels between folklore, folk-etymology, practical wisdom, pre-scientiiic speculation, even magic, and flashes of philosophic insight. Bonds with Western, particularly Greek philosophy have no doubt existed even in ancient times. Mutual influences have often been conjectured on the basis of striking similarities, but their scientific establishment is often difficult or even impossible. Comparative philosophy (see especially the work of Masson-Oursel) provides a useful method. Yet a thorough treatment of Oriental Philosophy is possible only when the many languages in which it is deposited have been more thoroughly studied, the psychological and historical elements involved in the various cultures better investigated, and translations of the relevant documents prepared not merely from a philological point of view or out of missionary zeal, but by competent philosophers who also have some linguistic training. Much has been accomplished in this direction in Indian and Chinese Philosophy (q.v.). A great deal remains to be done however before a definitive history of Oriental Philosophy may be written. See also Arabian, and Persian Philosophy. --K.F.L. Origen: (185-254) The principal founder of Christian theology who tried to enrich the ecclesiastic thought of his day by reconciling it with the treasures of Greek philosophy. Cf. Migne PL. --R.B.W. Ormazd: (New Persian) Same as Ahura Mazdah (q.v.), the good principle in Zoroastrianism, and opposed to Ahriman (q.v.). --K.F.L. Orphic Literature: The mystic writings, extant only in fragments, of a Greek religious-philosophical movement of the 6th century B.C., allegedly started by the mythical Orpheus. In their mysteries, in which mythology and rational thinking mingled, the Orphics concerned themselves with cosmogony, theogony, man's original creation and his destiny after death which they sought to influence to the better by pure living and austerity. They taught a symbolism in which, e.g., the relationship of the One to the many was clearly enunciated, and believed in the soul as involved in reincarnation. Pythagoras, Empedocles, and Plato were influenced by them. --K.F.L. Ortega y Gasset, Jose: Born in Madrid, May 9, 1883. At present in Buenos Aires, Argentine. Son of Ortega y Munillo, the famous Spanish journalist. Studied at the College of Jesuits in Miraflores and at the Central University of Madrid. In the latter he presented his Doctor's dissertation, El Milenario, in 1904, thereby obtaining his Ph.D. degree. After studies in Leipzig, Berlin, Marburg, under the special influence of Hermann Cohen, the great exponent of Kant, who taught him the love for the scientific method and awoke in him the interest in educational philosophy, Ortega came to Spain where, after the death of Nicolas Salmeron, he occupied the professorship of metaphysics at the Central University of Madrid. The following may be considered the most important works of Ortega y Gasset:     Meditaciones del Quijote, 1914;   El Espectador, I-VIII, 1916-1935;   El Tema de Nuestro Tiempo, 1921;   España Invertebrada, 1922;   Kant, 1924;   La Deshumanizacion del Arte, 1925;   Espiritu de la Letra, 1927;   La Rebelion de las Masas, 1929;   Goethe desde Adentio, 1934;   Estudios sobre el Amor, 1939;   Ensimismamiento y Alteracion, 1939;   El Libro de las Misiones, 1940;   Ideas y Creencias, 1940;     and others.   Although brought up in the Marburg school of thought, Ortega is not exactly a neo-Kantian. At the basis of his Weltanschauung one finds a denial of the fundamental presuppositions which characterized European Rationalism. It is life and not thought which is primary. Things have a sense and a value which must be affirmed independently. Things, however, are to be conceived as the totality of situations which constitute the circumstances of a man's life. Hence, Ortega's first philosophical principle: "I am myself plus my circumstances". Life as a problem, however, is but one of the poles of his formula. Reason is the other. The two together function, not by dialectical opposition, but by necessary coexistence. Life, according to Ortega, does not consist in being, but rather, in coming to be, and as such it is of the nature of direction, program building, purpose to be achieved, value to be realized. In this sense the future as a time dimension acquires new dignity, and even the present and the past become articulate and meaning-full only in relation to the future. Even History demands a new point of departure and becomes militant with new visions. --J.A.F. Orthodoxy: Beliefs which are declared by a group to be true and normative. Heresy is a departure from and relative to a given orthodoxy. --V.S. Orthos Logos: See Right Reason. Ostensible Object: (Lat. ostendere, to show) The object envisaged by cognitive act irrespective of its actual existence. See Epistemological Object. --L.W. Ostensive: (Lat. ostendere, to show) Property of a concept or predicate by virtue of which it refers to and is clarified by reference to its instances. --A.C.B. Ostwald, Wilhelm: (1853-1932) German chemist. Winner of the Nobel prize for chemistry in 1909. In Die Uberwindung des wissenschaftlichen Materialistmus and in Naturphilosophie, his two best known works in the field of philosophy, he advocates a dynamic theory in opposition to materialism and mechanism. All properties of matter, and the psychic as well, are special forms of energy. --L.E.D. Oupnekhat: Anquetil Duperron's Latin translation of the Persian translation of 50 Upanishads (q.v.), a work praised by Schopenhauer as giving him complete consolation. --K.F.L. Outness: A term employed by Berkeley to express the experience of externality, that is the ideas of space and things placed at a distance. Hume used it in the sense of distance Hamilton understood it as the state of being outside of consciousness in a really existing world of material things. --J.J.R. Overindividual: Term used by H. Münsterberg to translate the German überindividuell. The term is applied to any cognitive or value object which transcends the individual subject. --L.W. P



QUOTES [33 / 33 - 1500 / 4235]


KEYS (10k)

   32 Henry David Thoreau
   1 Tom Butler-Bowdon

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

1480 Henry David Thoreau
   2 Timothy Ferriss
   2 Robyn Carr

1:To be awake is to be alive. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
2:To be awake is to be alive." ~ Henry David Thoreau,
3:Dreams are the touchstones of our characters. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
4:It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
5:Not until we are lost do we begin to understand ourselves. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
6:Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth. ~ Henry David Thoreau, Walden,
7:To affect the quality of the day, that is the highest of arts.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau, [T5],
8:I never found the companion that was (is) so companionable as solitude.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
9:Knowledge does not come to us by details, but in flashes of light from heaven. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
10:Whatever sentence will bear to be read twice, we may be sure was thought twice.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
11:How many a man has dated a new era in his life from the reading of a book. ~ Henry David Thoreau, Walden
12:Friends... they cherish one another's hopes. They are kind to one another's dreams." ~ Henry David Thoreau,
13:There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
14:Pursue some path, however narrow and crooked, in which you can walk with love and reverence. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
15:Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them. ~ Henry David Thoreau, Walden
16:Books are the treasured wealth of the world and the fit inheritance of generations and nations. ~ Henry David Thoreau, Walden
17:Superfluous wealth can buy superfluities only. Money is not required to buy one necessary of the soul.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
18:Nothing goes by luck in composition. It allows of no tricks. The best you can write will be the best you are.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
19:I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestionable ability of man to elevate his life by a conscious endeavor.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
20:It's the beauty within us that makes it possible for us to recognize the beauty around us. The question is not what you look at but what you see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
21:If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
22:Make the most of your regrets; never smother your sorrow, but tend and cherish it till it comes to have a separate and integral interest. To regret deeply is to live afresh.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
23:There is only one path to Heaven. On Earth we call it Love." ~ Henry David Thoreau, (1817 - 1862) American essayist, poet, and philosopher. A leading transcendentalist, best known for his book "Walden", Wikipedia,
24:The youth gets together his materials to build a bridge to the moon, or, perchance, a palace or temple on the earth, and, at length, the middle-aged man concludes to build a woodshed with them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
25:I find it wholesome to be alone the greater part of the time. To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome and dissipating. I love to be alone. I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
26:You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment. Fools stand on their island of opportunities and look toward another land. There is no other land; there is no other life but this. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
27:You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment. Fools stand on their island of opportunities and look toward another land. There is no other land; there is no other life but this.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
28:We are constantly invited to be what we are." ~ Henry David Thoreau, (1817 -1862) American essayist, poet, and philosopher, leading transcendentalist, best known for his book "Walden," a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, Wikipedia.,
29:As a single footstep will not make a path on the earth, so a single thought will not make a pathway in the mind. To make a deep physical path, we walk again and again. To make a deep mental path, we must think over and over the kind of thoughts we wish to dominate our lives.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
30:The book exists for us perchance which will explain our miracles and and reveal new ones. The at present unutterable things we may find somewhere uttered. These same questions that disturb and puzzle and confound us have in their turn occurred to all the wise men; not one has been omitted; and each has answered them, according to his ability, by his words and his life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
31:A truly good book is something as natural, and as unexpectedly and unaccountably fair and perfect, as a wild flower discovered on the prairies of the West or in the jungles of the East. Genius is a light which makes the darkness visible, like the lightning's flash, which perchance shatters the temple of knowledge itself,--and not a taper lighted at the hearth-stone of the race, which pales before the light of common day. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
32:Why level downward to our dullest perception always, and praise that as common sense? The commonest sense is the sense of men asleep, which they express by snoring. Sometimes we are inclined to class those who are once-and-a-half witted with the half-witted, because we appreciate only a third part of their wit. Some would find fault with the morning-red, if they ever got up early enough. "They pretend," as I hear, "that the verses of Kabir have four different senses; illusion, spirit, intellect, and the exoteric doctrine of the Vedas;" but in this part of the world it is considered a ground for complaint if a man's writings admit of more than one interpretation. While England endeavors to cure the potato-rot, will not any endeavor to cure the brain-rot, which prevails so much more widely and fatally? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
33:reading :::
   Self-Help Reading List:
   James Allen As a Man Thinketh (1904)
   Marcus Aurelius Meditations (2nd Century)
   The Bhagavad-Gita
   The Bible
   Robert Bly Iron John (1990)
   Boethius The Consolation of Philosophy (6thC)
   Alain de Botton How Proust Can Change Your Life (1997)
   William Bridges Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes (1980)
   David Brooks The Road to Character (2015)
   Brené Brown Daring Greatly (2012)
   David D Burns The New Mood Therapy (1980)
   Joseph Campbell (with Bill Moyers) The Power of Myth (1988)
   Richard Carlson Don't Sweat The Small Stuff (1997)
   Dale Carnegie How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936)
   Deepak Chopra The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success (1994)
   Clayton Christensen How Will You Measure Your Life? (2012)
   Paulo Coelho The Alchemist (1988)
   Stephen Covey The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (1989)
   Mihaly Cziksentmihalyi Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience (1991)
   The Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler The Art of Happiness (1999)
   The Dhammapada (Buddha's teachings)
   Charles Duhigg The Power of Habit (2011)
   Wayne Dyer Real Magic (1992)
   Ralph Waldo Emerson Self-Reliance (1841)
   Clarissa Pinkola Estes Women Who Run With The Wolves (1996)
   Viktor Frankl Man's Search For Meaning (1959)
   Benjamin Franklin Autobiography (1790)
   Shakti Gawain Creative Visualization (1982)
   Daniel Goleman Emotional Intelligence (1995)
   John Gray Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus (1992)
   Louise Hay You Can Heal Your Life (1984)
   James Hillman The Soul's Code: In Search of Character and Calling (1996)
   Susan Jeffers Feel The Fear And Do It Anyway (1987)
   Richard Koch The 80/20 Principle (1998)
   Marie Kondo The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up (2014)
   Ellen Langer Mindfulness: Choice and Control in Everyday Life (1989)
   Lao-Tzu Tao-te Ching (The Way of Power)
   Maxwell Maltz Psycho-Cybernetics (1960)
   Abraham Maslow Motivation and Personality (1954)
   Thomas Moore Care of the Soul (1992)
   Joseph Murphy The Power of Your Subconscious Mind (1963)
   Norman Vincent Peale The Power of Positive Thinking (1952)
   M Scott Peck The Road Less Traveled (1990)
   Anthony Robbins Awaken The Giant Within (1991)
   Florence Scovell-Shinn The Game of Life and How To Play It (1923)
   Martin Seligman Learned Optimism (1991)
   Samuel Smiles Self-Help (1859)
   Pierre Teilhard de Chardin The Phenomenon of Man (1955)
   Henry David Thoreau Walden (1854)
   Marianne Williamson A Return To Love (1993)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Self-Help,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:I became convinced that noncooperation with evil is as much a moral obligation as is cooperation with good. No other person has been more eloquent and passionate in getting this idea across than Henry David Thoreau. As a result of his writings and personal witness, we are the heirs of a legacy of creative protest. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Simplify, simplify. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
2:And by another year, ~ Henry David Thoreau,
3:I say, break the law. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
4:I am a majority of one. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
5:Now comes good sailing. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
6:Nature abhors repetition ~ Henry David Thoreau,
7:Oh, one world at a time! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
8:The only wealth is life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
9:I would stand upon facts. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
10:Trees indeed have hearts. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
11:Birds never sing in caves. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
12:I stand in awe of my body. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
13:There is no life but this. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
14:Do not read the newspapers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
15:If I am not I, who will be? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
16:It's not enough to be busy. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
17:To be awake is to be alive. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
18:We are a race of tit-men... ~ Henry David Thoreau,
19:I am freighted with thought. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
20:If you want to be happy, be! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
21:I was not born to be forced. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
22:The world laughs in flowers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
23:Truth is always paradoxical. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
24:You conquer fate by thought. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
25:AN ARTIST IS FIRST AN AMATEUR ~ Henry David Thoreau,
26:Being is the great explainer. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
27:Cowards suffer, heroes enjoy. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
28:If the work is high and far, ~ Henry David Thoreau,
29:I have great faith in a seed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
30:It is a great art to saunter. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
31:Live the life you've dreamed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
32:Simplify, simplify, simplify. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
33:We bless and curse ourselves. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
34:Here or nowhere is our heaven. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
35:It is a great art to saunter ! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
36:Love your life, poor as it is. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
37:Society is commonly too cheap. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
38:The most alive is the wildest. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
39:The sun is but a morning star. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
40:The world rests on principles. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
41:We need the tonic of wildness. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
42:Faith never makes a confession. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
43:Hate can pardon more than love. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
44:I am very little of a traveler. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
45:I was determined to know beans. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
46:Politics is but a narrow field. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
47:Still we live meanly like ants. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
48:Things don't change. We change. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
49:Why look in the dark for light? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
50:Write while the heat is in you. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
51:A fact may blossom into a truth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
52:A man can suffocate on courtesy. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
53:I have no time to be in a hurry. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
54:Nature is goodness crystallized. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
55:The body can feed the body only. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
56:There is no beginning too small. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
57:Things do not change. We change. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
58:Things do not change; we change. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
59:We might climb a tree, at least. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
60:find your eternity in each moment ~ Henry David Thoreau,
61:How godlike, how immortal, is he? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
62:I hear beyond the range of sound, ~ Henry David Thoreau,
63:I love a broad margin to my life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
64:Love does not analyze its object. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
65:New earths, new themes expect us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
66:That grand old poem called Winter ~ Henry David Thoreau,
67:The eye is the jewel of the body. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
68:A goal is a dream taken seriously. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
69:All good things are wild and free. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
70:Blue is light seen through a veil. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
71:Dissent without action is consent. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
72:Grow wild according to thy nature. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
73:Is not this the broad earth still? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
74:Objects of charity are not guests. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
75:Renew thyself completely each day. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
76:Talk of heaven! ye disgrace earth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
77:'Tis healthy to be sick sometimes. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
78:Tis now the twenty-third of march, ~ Henry David Thoreau,
79:When a man dies he kicks the dust. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
80:At least let us have healthy books. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
81:Every child begins the world again. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
82:He who owns little is little owned. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
83:I love a life whose plot is simple. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
84:I love the broad margin to my life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
85:lET HIM MARCH TO THE MUSIC HE HEARS ~ Henry David Thoreau,
86:Man is but the place where I stand. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
87:Poetry is the mysticism of mankind. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
88:Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
89:The heart is forever inexperienced. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
90:There is ripe fruit over your head. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
91:To regret deeply is to live afresh. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
92:We can never have enough of Nature. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
93:Who hears the fishes when they cry? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
94:A man sits as many risks as he runs. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
95:Any sincere thought is irresistible. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
96:I love reform better than its modes. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
97:I need thy hate as much as thy love. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
98:Law never made men a whit more just. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
99:Morning brings back the heroic ages. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
100:Spring-an experience in immortality. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
101:Surely joy is the condition of life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
102:The devil finds work for idle hands. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
103:Things do not change; people change. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
104:We live but a fraction of our lives. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
105:Your religion is where your love is. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
106:As a man thinks of himself, so he is. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
107:For things to change, we must change. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
108:He who walks alone, waits for no-one. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
109:Men are born to succeed, not to fail. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
110:Our life is frittered away by detail. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
111:Poetry is nothing but healthy speech. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
112:The Library is a wilderness of books. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
113:Those who work much do not work hard. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
114:We have become the tool of our tools. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
115:As for health, consider yourself well. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
116:Coming out of town—willingly as usual. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
117:Enthusiasm is a supernatural serenity. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
118:Even trees do not die without a groan. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
119:Fire is the most tolerable third party ~ Henry David Thoreau,
120:March to the beat of your own drummer. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
121:Much is published, but little printed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
122:Music is the crystallization of sound. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
123:Nature is an admirable schoolmistress. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
124:Sell your clothes- keep your thoughts. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
125:Slow are the beginnings of philosophy. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
126:With wisdom we shall learn liberality. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
127:En tuant le temps on blesse l’éternité. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
128:Men reverence one another, not yet God. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
129:Simplicity is the peak of civilization. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
130:The only sin in the world is ignorance. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
131:What is man but a mass of thawing clay? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
132:What is once well done is done forever. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
133:Why will we be imposed on by antiquity? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
134:All men are children, and of one family. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
135:Genius is not a retainer to any emperor. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
136:Heal yourselves, doctors; by God I live. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
137:I have travelled a good deal in Concord. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
138:Life in us is like the water in a river. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
139:My life is like a stroll upon the beach. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
140:Nothing is so much to be feared as fear. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
141:Readers are plentiful; thinkers are rare ~ Henry David Thoreau,
142:Read not the Times, read the Eternities. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
143:Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in ~ Henry David Thoreau,
144:Truths and roses have thorns about them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
145:We do not live by justice, but by grace. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
146:When a dog runs at you, whistle for him. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
147:A written word is the choicest of relics. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
148:Let go of the past and go for the future. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
149:Men have become the tools of their tools. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
150:Non lessi la prima estate, zappai fagioli ~ Henry David Thoreau,
151:The bluebird carries the sky on his back. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
152:The improved means to the unimproved end. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
153:The only remedy for love is to love more. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
154:The perception of beauty is a moral test. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
155:Time is but the stream I go a-fishing in. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
156:We are older by faith than by experience. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
157:We are superior to the joy we experience. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
158:We hate the kindness which we understand. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
159:A gun will give you the body, not the bird ~ Henry David Thoreau,
160:All great enterprises are self-supporting. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
161:As if there were safety in stupidity alone ~ Henry David Thoreau,
162:Be not merely good. Be good for something. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
163:Be not simply good; be good for something. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
164:Heroes are often the most ordinary of men. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
165:I did not know that we had ever quarreled. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
166:If you give money, spend yourself with it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
167:I have a room all to myself; it is nature. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
168:I make myself rich by making my wants few. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
169:It is tranquil people who accomplish much. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
170:Man is the artificer of his own happiness. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
171:Only that day dawns to which we are awake. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
172:Only the defeated and deserters go to war. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
173:People seldom hit what they do not aim at. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
174:Surely the apple is the noblest of fruits. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
175:The rarest quality in an epitaph is truth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
176:The voice of nature is always encouraging. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
177:We must have infinite faith in each other. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
178:We must look a long time before we can see ~ Henry David Thoreau,
179:Wildness is the preservation of the World. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
180:A hero's love is as delicate as a maiden's. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
181:As if there were safety in stupidity alone. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
182:Be it life or death, we crave only reality. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
183:Books are the treasured wealth of the world ~ Henry David Thoreau,
184:Improve every opportunity to be melancholy. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
185:In order to die, you must first have lived. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
186:It is best to avoid the beginnings of evil. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
187:Let nothing come between you and the light. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
188:Nature is full of genius, full of divinity. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
189:Nothing can shock a brave man but dullness. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
190:Our sadness is not sad, but our cheap joys. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
191:Some creatures are made to see in the dark. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
192:Thank God, they cannot cut down the clouds! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
193:The rule is to carry as little as possible. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
194:The stars are the apexes of what triangles! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
195:The universe is wider than our views of it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
196:The written word is the choicest of relics. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
197:We are constantly invited to be who we are. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
198:Your church is a baby-house made of blocks. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
199:A little thought is sexton to all the world. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
200:Books are the treasured wealth of the world. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
201:Commerce is really as interesting as nature. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
202:Dreams are the touchstones of our character. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
203:Endeavor to live the life you have imagined. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
204:Give me the poverty that enjoys true wealth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
205:In short, all good things are wild and free. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
206:In the long run, we only hit what we aim at. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
207:In the winter, warmth stands for all virtue. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
208:My life has been the poem I would have writ, ~ Henry David Thoreau,
209:Nature has left nothing to the mercy of man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
210:People die of fright and live of confidence. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
211:That government is best which governs least. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
212:The highest condition of art is artlessness. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
213:The poet writes the history of his own body. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
214:There is no remedy for love but to love more ~ Henry David Thoreau,
215:The savage in man is never quite eradicated. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
216:The seasons and all their changes are in me. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
217:The soul grows by subtraction, not addition. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
218:The world is but a canvas to our imagination ~ Henry David Thoreau,
219:Tough times don't last but tough people do. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
220:We are constantly invited to be what we are. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
221:At present our only true names are nicknames. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
222:Dreams are the touchstones of our characters. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
223:In my walks I would fain return to my senses. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
224:In wildness is the preservation of the world. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
225:men have become the tools of their tools. The ~ Henry David Thoreau,
226:My practice is “nowhere”, my opinion is here. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
227:Rescue the drowning and tie your shoestrings. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
228:Say what you have to say, not what you ought. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
229:There is no history of how bad became better. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
230:There is no just and serene criticism as yet. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
231:There is no remedy for love but to love more. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
232:There never is but one opportunity of a kind. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
233:The world is but a canvas for our imagination ~ Henry David Thoreau,
234:This world is but canvas to our imaginations. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
235:Time cannot bend the line which God has writ. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
236:Truly, our greatest blessings are very cheap. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
237:Voting for the right is doing nothing for it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
238:We are more anxious to speak than to be heard ~ Henry David Thoreau,
239:We never conceive the greatness of our fates. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
240:What is religion? That which is never spoken. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
241:As long as possible live free and uncommitted. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
242:How meanly and grossly do we deal with nature! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
243:If you would be chaste, you must be temperate. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
244:I have not earned what I have already enjoyed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
245:In the long run, you hit only what you aim at. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
246:It is life near the bone where it is sweetest. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
247:La vie est trop courte pour qu'on soit pressé. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
248:Love must be as much a light as it is a flame. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
249:Moral reform is the effort to throw off sleep. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
250:My friend is one... who take me for what I am. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
251:My greatest skill has been to want but little. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
252:My profession is to always find God in nature. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
253:No hay otro remedio para el amor que amar más. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
254:Resign yourself to the influence of the earth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
255:Superfluous wealth can buy superfluities only. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
256:The Great Snow! How cheerful it is to hear of! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
257:Things do not change; we change. Henry David Thoreau ~ Mark Goulston,
258:This world is but a canvas to our imagination. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
259:We are all of us Apollos serving some Admetus. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
260:We are more anxious to speak than to be heard. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
261:You don't know your testament when you see it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
262:A man has not seen a thing who has not felt it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
263:Celui qui ne résiste pas ne sera jamais vaincu. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
264:Christ is the prince of Reformers and Radicals. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
265:Count your age with friends but not with years. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
266:Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
267:How can any man be weak who dares to be at all? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
268:However mean your life is, meet it and live it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
269:If a man constantly aspires is he not elevated. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
270:If a man constantly aspires is he not elevated? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
271:In the long run, you hit only what you aim for. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
272:I silently smiled at my incessant good fortune. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
273:It is never too late to give up our prejudices. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
274:It is never too late to give up your prejudices ~ Henry David Thoreau,
275:Let us spend one day as deliberately as Nature. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
276:let us spend one day as deliberately as Nature. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
277:Let your capital be simplicity and contentment. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
278:Our truest life is when we are in dreams awake. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
279:Severe truth is expressed with some bitterness. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
280:The gifts of Heaven are never quite gratuitous. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
281:The greater number of men are merely corporals. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
282:Wealth is the ability to fully experience life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
283:We fritter away our energy and creativity . . . ~ Henry David Thoreau,
284:We loiter in winter while it is already spring. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
285:We must look for a long time before we can see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
286:We should be men first, and subjects afterward. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
287:What demon possessed me that I behaved so well? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
288:Whatever is, and is not ashamed to be, is good. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
289:An unclean person is universally a slothful one. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
290:Art may varnish and gild, but it can do no more. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
291:Cultivate poverty like a garden herb, like sage. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
292:Every poet has trembled on the verge of science. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
293:He has no time to be anything but a machine. How ~ Henry David Thoreau,
294:Hold fast to your most indefinite, waking dream. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
295:If Nature is our mother, then God is our father. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
296:In the wilderness is the salvation of the world. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
297:Let your walks now be a little more adventurous. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
298:Old deeds for old people, and new deeds for new. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
299:That government is best that governs not at all. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
300:That man is richest who's pleasure are cheapest. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
301:The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
302:The press is, almost without exception, corrupt. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
303:Things do not change; we change. —HENRY DAVID THOREAU ~ Kristin Hannah,
304:To a small man every greater is an exaggeration. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
305:To live a better life,--this surely can be done. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
306:What we need to know in any case is very simple. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
307:All good things are cheap: all bad are very dear. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
308:Be true to your work, your word, and your friend. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
309:Between whom there is hearty truth there is love. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
310:But lo! men have become the tools of their tools. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
311:Even the best things are not equal to their fame. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
312:Every sentence is the result of a long probation. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
313:For an impenetrable shield, stand inside yourself ~ Henry David Thoreau,
314:Go not to the object; let the object come to you. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
315:Goodness is the only investment that never fails. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
316:...how deep the ruts of tradition and conformity! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
317:Live your life, do your work, then take your hat. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
318:There's no new news, just old news with new dates ~ Henry David Thoreau,
319:Wealth can't buy heath, but heath can buy wealth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
320:We do not ride on the railroad; it rides upon us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
321:We should impart our courage and not our despair. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
322:What I began by reading, I must finish by acting. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
323:You cannot hear music and noise at the same time. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
324:You must not blame me if I do talk to the clouds. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
325:Your richest veins don't lie nearest the surface. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
326:All misfortune is but a stepping stone to fortune. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
327:But perhaps a man is not required to bury himself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
328:Distrust any enterprise that requires new clothes. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
329:Do not suffer your life to be taken by newspapers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
330:How imperceptibly the first springing takes place! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
331:It is not worth the while to live by rich cookery. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
332:I would that I were worthy to be any man's Friend. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
333:No man ever followed his genius til it misled him. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
334:Poetry cannot breathe in the scholar's atmosphere. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
335:That man is rich whose pleasures are the cheapest. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
336:The fault-finder will find fault even in paradise. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
337:The faultfinder will find faults even in paradise. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
338:The gods cannot misunderstand, man cannot explain. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
339:The only danger in Friendship is that it will end. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
340:The tavern will compare favorably with the church. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
341:The wind that blows
Is all that any body knows. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
342:To see wild life you must go forth at wild season. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
343:Whatever we leave to God, God does and blesses us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
344:Who is old enough to have learned from experience? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
345:You cannot perceive beauty but with a serene mind. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
346:A man's riches are based on what he can do without. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
347:A man's wealth is measured by what he doesn't need. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
348:Be true to your work, your word, and you're friend. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
349:Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
350:Do not engage to find things as you think they are. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
351:Every man must walk to the beat of his own drummer. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
352:Every people have gods to suit their circumstances. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
353:Go confidently ... Live the life that you imagined. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
354:Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
355:Here is this vast, savage, howling mother of ours, ~ Henry David Thoreau,
356:Humility like darkness reveals the heavenly lights. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
357:If misery loves company, misery has company enough. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
358:I have not the most definite designs on the future. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
359:In Literature it is only the wild that attracts us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
360:In literature it is only the wild that attracts us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
361:In their daily life, all are braver than they know. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
362:. . . in Wildness is the preservation of the World. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
363:I saw a delicate flower had grown up two feet high ~ Henry David Thoreau,
364:Keep up the fires of thought, and all will go well. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
365:Lose the world, get lost in it, and find your soul. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
366:Morning is when I'm awake, and there is dawn in me. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
367:Nature has no human inhabitant who appreciates her. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
368:No man ever followed his genius till it misled him. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
369:not to your hospitality, but to your hospitalality; ~ Henry David Thoreau,
370:Of what significance are the things you can forget. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
371:The eye may see for the hand, but not for the mind. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
372:The fault-finder will find faults even in paradise. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
373:Tradition is a more interrupted and feebler memory. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
374:We must learn to reawaken and keep ourselves awake. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
375:Who shall say what prospect life offers to another? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
376:After the first blush of sin comes its indifference. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
377:Any fool can make a rule, and any fool will mind it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
378:As if you could kill time without injuring eternity. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
379:Eastward I go only by force; but westward I go free. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
380:Few, if any, creatures are equally active all night. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
381:La nostra vera vita è quando siamo svegli nei sogni. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
382:Live your beliefs and you can turn the world around. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
383:Only lovers know the value and magnanimity of truth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
384:The greatest art is to shape the quality of the day. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
385:The Heavens are as deep as our aspirations are high. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
386:The highest law gives a thing to him who can use it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
387:The light which puts out our eyes is darkness to us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
388:The squirrel that you kill in jest, dies in earnest. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
389:Truly the stars were given for a consolation to man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
390:Unjust laws exist: shall we be content to obey them? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
391:We are all of us more or less active physiognomists. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
392:We are born as innocents. We are polluted by advice. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
393:("what danger is there if you don't think of any?"), ~ Henry David Thoreau,
394:What is called resignation is confirmed desperation. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
395:What is sour in the house a bracing walk makes sweet ~ Henry David Thoreau,
396:When were the good and the brave ever in a majority? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
397:Wherever men have lived, there is a story to be told ~ Henry David Thoreau,
398:Every man is the builder of a temple called his body. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
399:Everything may serve a lower as well as a higher use. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
400:...for my greatest skill has been to want but little. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
401:Friends will not only live in harmony, but in melody. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
402:Heaven might be defined as the place which men avoid. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
403:I am never rich in money, and I am never meanly poor. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
404:Invariably our best nights were those when it rained. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
405:It is the man determines what is said, not the words. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
406:Morning is when I am awake and there is a dawn in me. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
407:Remember that you need not eat unless you are hungry. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
408:The language of friendship is not words but meanings. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
409:The only way to speak the truth is to speak lovingly. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
410:The question is not what you look at…but what you see ~ Henry David Thoreau,
411:There is but one stage for the peasant and the actor. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
412:There is nothing more difficult to find than oneself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
413:The researcher is more memorable than the researched. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
414:This life is not for complaint, but for satisfaction. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
415:To be right is more honorable than to be law abiding. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
416:We cannot but pity the boy who has never fired a gun, ~ Henry David Thoreau,
417:We hear and apprehend only what we already half know. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
418:We know but few man, a great many coats and breeches. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
419:. . . we should be men first, and subjects afterward. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
420:Whate'er we leave to God,
God does and blesses us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
421:Why should we live with such hurry and waste of life? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
422:You must speak loud to those who are hard of hearing. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
423:You never gain something but that you lose something. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
424:A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of feeble minds ~ Henry David Thoreau,
425:A nation may be ever so civilized and yet lack wisdom. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
426:An early-morning walk is a blessing for the whole day. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
427:Any fool can make a rule
And any fool will mind it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
428:I believe that water is the only drink for a wise man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
429:In the student sensuality is a sluggish habit of mind. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
430:Is there any such thing as wisdom not applied to life? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
431:It is not all books that are as dull as their readers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
432:Methinks my own soul must be a bright invisible green. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
433:Nature spontaneously keeps us well. Do not resist her! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
434:Never look back unless you are planning to go that way ~ Henry David Thoreau,
435:None are so old as those who have outlived enthusiasm. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
436:None can lead this life who are not almost amphibious. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
437:Say, Not so, and you will out circle the philosophers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
438:Shall a man not have his spring as well as the plants? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
439:The best way to correct a mistake is to make it right. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
440:The community has no bribe that will tempt a wise man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
441:The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
442:The language of Friendship is not words, but meanings. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
443:There is no treatment for adore, but to love far more. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
444:To the innocent there are neither cherubim nor angels. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
445:We do not enjoy poetry unless we know it to be poetry. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
446:We have not so good a right to hate any as our Friend. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
447:What if we feel a yearning to which no breast answers? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
448:When you knock, ask to see God — none of the servants. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
449:All perception of truth is the detection of an analogy. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
450:I begin to see an object when I cease to understand it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
451:Instead of noblemen, let us have noble villages of men. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
452:I will not through humility become the devil's attorney ~ Henry David Thoreau,
453:Let your condiments be in the condition of your senses. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
454:Maturity is when all of your mirrors turn into windows. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
455:Men are as innocent as the morning to the unsuspicious. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
456:Money is not required to buy one necessity of the soul. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
457:Never look back unless you are planning to go that way. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
458:One cannot too soon forget his errors and misdemeanors. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
459:Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
460:The hero is commonly the simplest and obscurest of men. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
461:The question is not what you look at, but what you see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
462:The unconsciousness of man is the consciousness of God. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
463:To forget all about your mistakes adds to them perhaps. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
464:We know but a few men, a great many coats and breeches. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
465:When I hear music, I fear no danger. I am invulnerable. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
466:When my legs begin to move, the thoughts begin to flow. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
467:you must everywhere build on piles of your own driving. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
468:City life is millions of people being lonesome together. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
469:Disobedience is the foundation of liberty. —Henry David Thoreau ~ Jodi Daynard,
470:Haste makes waste, no less in life than in housekeeping. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
471:I think we may safely trust a good deal more than we do. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
472:I would not run round a corner to see the world blow up. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
473:Let your life be a counter friction to stop the machine. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
474:News Coverage!! As news expose rather than cover events. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
475:Night is certainly more novel and less profane than day. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
476:No domain of nature is quite closed to man at all times. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
477:Noi non veneriamo né le Grazie né le Parche, ma la Moda. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
478:The most I can do for my friend is simply be his friend. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
479:The newest is but the oldest made visible to our senses. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
480:What can be expressed in words can be expressed in life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
481:A single gentle rain makes the grass many shades greener. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
482:A taste for the beautiful is most cultivated out of doors ~ Henry David Thoreau,
483:But, commonly, men are as much afraid of love as of hate. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
484:Do not entertain doubts if they are not agreeable to you. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
485:Going from--toward; it is the history of every one of us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
486:He who cannot exaggerate is not qualified to utter truth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
487:In a pleasant spring morning all men's sins are forgiven. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
488:In a pleasant spring morning all men’s sins are forgiven. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
489:Music is perpetual, and only the hearing is intermittent. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
490:Our life is frittered away by detail. Simplify, simplify. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
491:Real power is measured by how much you can let things be. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
492:Rise free from care before the dawn, and seek adventures. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
493:Silence is the communing of a conscious soul with itself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
494:That man is the richest whose pleasures are the cheapest. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
495:The civilized man is a more experienced and wiser savage. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
496:The man who is dissatisfied with himself, what can he do? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
497:There is more day to dawn; the sun is but a morning star. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
498:Where there is a lull in truth an institution springs up. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
499:A minority is powerless while it conforms to the majority. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
500:A minority is powerless while it conforms to the majority; ~ Henry David Thoreau,
501:A modern author would have died in infancy in a ruder age. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
502:But worst of all when you are the slave-driver of yourself ~ Henry David Thoreau,
503:Every man looks at his wood-pile with a kind of affection. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
504:Fame itself is but an epitaph; as late, as false, as true. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
505:Give me a wildness whose glance no civilization can endure ~ Henry David Thoreau,
506:I have learned that even the smallest house can be a home. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
507:It is good even to be a fisherman in summer and in winter. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
508:It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
509:It's not what you look at that matters; it's what you see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
510:It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
511:I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
512:I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
513:Not until we are lost do we begin to understand ourselves. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
514:Thank God, they cannot cut down the clouds! —HENRY DAVID THOREAU ~ Sean Prentiss,
515:The brave man braves nothing, nor knows he of his bravery. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
516:The cart before the horse is neither beautiful nor useful. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
517:The dinner even is only the parable of a dinner, commonly. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
518:The poet is blithe and cheery ever, and as well as nature. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
519:There is but little virtue in the action of masses of men. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
520:What are the libraries of science but files of newspapers? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
521:What fire could ever equal the sunshine of a winter's day? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
522:What is called genius is the abundance of life and health. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
523:You need not rest your reputation on the dinners you give. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
524:A very few, as heroes, patriots, martyrs, reformers in the ~ Henry David Thoreau,
525:Explore thyself. Herein are demanded the eye and the nerve. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
526:Give me a Wildness whose glance no civilization can endure. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
527:I did not know that mankind was suffering for want of gold. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
528:In sane moments we regard only the facts, the case that is. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
529:It's only by forgetting yourself that you draw near to God. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
530:Le gouvernement le meilleur est celui qui gouverne le moins ~ Henry David Thoreau,
531:Not until we are lost do we begin to understand ourselves. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
532:Our life is frittered away by detail... simplify, simplify. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
533:Politics is the gizzard of society, full of gut and gravel. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
534:Poverty ... It is life near the bone, where it is sweetest. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
535:Sweep away the clutter of things that complicate our lives. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
536:The most I can do for my friend is simply to be his friend. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
537:This world is a place of business. What an infinite bustle! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
538:Time hides no treasures; we want not its then, but its now. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
539:We are ever dying to one world and being born into another. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
540:We are happy in proportion to the things we can do without. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
541:We cannot write well or truly but what we write with gusto. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
542:What right have I to grieve, who have not ceased to wonder? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
543:What we call wildness is a civilization other than our own. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
544:Why should not a poet's cat be winged as well as his horse? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
545:Beware of any profession for which you must buy new clothes. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
546:By turns our purity inspires and our impurity casts us down. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
547:Education makes a straight ditch of a free meandering brook. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
548:English sense has toiled, but Hindoo wisdom never perspired. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
549:Even the elephant carries but a small trunk on his journeys. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
550:Every man looks upon his wood pile with a sort of affection. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
551:I am grateful for what I have. My thanksgiving is perpetual. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
552:I come to my solitary woodland walk as the homesick go home. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
553:I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
554:I have been as sincere a worshipper of Aurora as the Greeks. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
555:I never knew, and never shall know, a worse man than myself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
556:It is a characteristic of wisdom not to do desperate things. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
557:it is a characteristic of wisdom not to do desperate things. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
558:It is only when we forget our learning, do we begin to know. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
559:It is pleasant to have been to a place the way a river went. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
560:I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately... ~ Henry David Thoreau,
561:Le gouvernement le meilleur est celui qui gouverne le moins. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
562:Man flows at once to God when the channel of purity is open. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
563:My enemies are worms, cool days, and most of all woodchucks. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
564:Per noi spunta solo quel giorno al cui sorgere siamo svegli. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
565:There are many skillful apprentices, but few master workmen. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
566:There are times when we have had enough even of our Friends. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
567:There is absolutely no common sense, it is common non-sense. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
568:There is only one path to Heaven. On Earth, we call it Love. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
569:We are more of the earth,
Farther from heaven these days. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
570:We need only travel enough to give our intellects an airing. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
571:Yet we do not treat ourselves nor one another thus tenderly. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
572:A man may travel fast enough and earn his living on the road. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
573:A man thinks as well through his legs and arms as this brain. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
574:Do what nobody else can do for you. Omit to do anything else. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
575:Good deeds are no less good because their object is unworthy. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
576:I am not afraid of praise, for I have practiced it on myself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
577:I cannot make my days longer so I strive to make them better. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
578:In an unjust society the only place for a just man is prison. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
579:I took a walk in the woods and came out taller than the trees ~ Henry David Thoreau,
580:It’s not what you look at that matters,
It’s what you see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
581:Le mieux que je puisse faire pour mon ami est d'être son ami. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
582:Les détails nous empoisonnent la vie. Simplifiez, simplifiez. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
583:Man's moral nature is a riddle which only eternity can solve. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
584:Measure your health by your sympathy with morning and Spring. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
585:Nature is as well adapted to our weakness as to our strength. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
586:Now-a-days, men wear a fool's cap, and call it a liberty cap. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
587:The little things in life are as interesting as the big ones. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
588:There are many fine things we cannot say if we have to shout. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
589:This whole earth in which we inhabit is but a point is space. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
590:What is the price-current of an honest man and patriot today? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
591:What people say you cannot do, you try and find that you can. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
592:Why should I feel lonely? is not our planet in the Milky Way? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
593:Yet we must try the harder, the less the prospect of success. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
594:A sufficiently great and generous trust could never be abused. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
595:I am sure that I never read any memorable news in a newspaper. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
596:I have much to learn of the Indian, nothing of the missionary. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
597:I never was so rapid in my virtue but my vice kept up with me. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
598:I took a walk in the woods and came out taller than the trees. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
599:I was daily intoxicated, yet no man could call me intemperate. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
600:Nature puts no question and answers none which we mortals ask. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
601:No man loses ever on a lower level by magnanimity on a higher. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
602:There are sure to be two prescriptions diametrically opposite. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
603:There is more day left to dawn. The sun is but a morning star. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
604:The tree of Knowledge is a Tree of Knowledge of good and evil. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
605:The violence of love is as much to be dreaded as that of hate. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
606:The virtue which we appreciate, we to some extent appropriate. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
607:To affect the quality of the day, that is the highest of arts. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
608:We slander the hyena; man is the fiercest and cruelest animal. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
609:What is the price-current of an honest man and patriot to-day? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
610:Books of natural history make the most cheerful winter reading. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
611:Don't be too moral. You may cheat yourself out of much life so. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
612:Everyone must believe in something. I believe I'll go canoeing. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
613:have learned that the swiftest traveller is he that goes afoot. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
614:Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads. —Henry David Thoreau ~ Robyn Carr,
615:I am a parcel of vain strivings tied by a chance bond together. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
616:If you would get exercise, go in search of the springs of life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
617:I have found that hollow, which even I had relied on for solid. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
618:I see less difference between a city and a swamp than formerly. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
619:It's circumstantial evidence, like finding a trout in the milk. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
620:May we so love as never to have occasion to repent of our love! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
621:Much of our poetry has the very best manners, but no character. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
622:One is wise to cultivate the tree that bears fruit in our soul. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
623:Shall the world be confined to one Paris or one Oxford forever? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
624:Simplicity is the law of nature for men as well as for flowers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
625:The Ethiopian cannot change his skin nor the leopard his spots. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
626:The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it ~ Henry David Thoreau,
627:The wildest sound ever heard makes the woods ring far and wide. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
628:We see only the flowers that are under our feet in the meadows. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
629:What the first philosopher taught the last will have to repeat. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
630:What would human life be without forests, those natural cities? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
631:But it is a characteristic of wisdom not to do desperate things. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
632:Do not be too moral. You may cheat yourself out of much life so. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
633:God is only the president of the day, and Webster is his orator. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
634:I have lately got back to that glorious society called Solitude. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
635:I have learned that the swiftest traveler is he that goes afoot. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
636:I never found a companion that was so companionable as solitude. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
637:I would not have any one adopt my mode of living on any account. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
638:My greatest skill has been to want little. —HENRY DAVID THOREAU, WALDEN A ~ Rolf Potts,
639:Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth. ~ Henry David Thoreau, Walden,
640:The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
641:The value of a man is not in his skin, that we should touch him. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
642:The way you spend Christmas is far more important than how much. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
643:The world is a strange place for a playhouse to stand within it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
644:To have done anything just for money is to have been truly idle. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
645:We are always paid for our suspicion by finding what we suspect. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
646:what a rich book might be made about buds and, perhaps, sprouts! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
647:What have I to do with plows? I cut another furrow than you see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
648:When it is time to die, let us not discover that we never lived. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
649:You fail in your thoughts, or you prevail in your thoughts only. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
650:You must have a genius for charity as well as for anything else. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
651:As for Doing-good, that is one of the professions which are full. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
652:He enjoys true leisure who has time to improve his soul's estate. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
653:He who cuts down woods beyond a certain limit exterminates birds. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
654:I have learned that the swiftest traveller is he that goes afoot. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
655:In my opinion, the sun was made to light worthier toil than this. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
656:It is, after all, with men and not with parchment that I quarrel. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
657:It is only when we forget all our learning that we begin to know. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
658:It requires a direct dispensation from Heaven to become a walker. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
659:Morning glory is the best name, it always refreshes me to see it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
660:Music never stops; it is only the listening that is intermittent. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
661:Nor wars did men molest, When only beechen bowls were in request. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
662:Not only must we be good, but we must also be good for something. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
663:Our manners have been corrupted by communication with the saints. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
664:The laboring man has not leisure for a true integrity day by day. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
665:The lover wants no partiality. He says, Be so kind as to be just. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
666:There are nowadays professors of philosophy, but not philosophers ~ Henry David Thoreau,
667:The scenery when it is truly seen reacts on the life of the seer. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
668:Thought is the sculptor who can create the person you want to be. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
669:When we bring what is within out into the world, miracles happen. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
670:All things in this world must be seen with youthful, hopeful eyes. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
671:Dwell as near as possible to the channel in which your life flows. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
672:Experience is in the fingers and head. The heart is inexperienced. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
673:I am of the nature of Stone. It takes the summer’s sun to warm it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
674:I do not wish to be any more busy with my hands than is necessary. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
675:I feel as if my life had grown more outward when I can express it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
676:If we stay at home and mind our business, who will want railroads? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
677:I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
678:It is the greatest of all advantages to enjoy no advantage at all. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
679:Keep pace with the drummer you hear, however measured or far away. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
680:Many men walk by day; few walk by night. It is a different season. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
681:Mathematics should be mixed not only with physics but with ethics. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
682:One chair for solitude, two for friendship, and three for society. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
683:Read your fate, see what is before you, and walk on into futurity. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
684:Scholars are wont to sell their birthright for a mess of learning. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
685:The greatest gains and values are farthest from being appreciated. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
686:There are nowadays professors of philosophy, but not philosophers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
687:Those whom we can love, we can hate; to others we are indifferent. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
688:What is sour in the house a bracing walk in the woods makes sweet. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
689:Wherever you have planted a seed, I am prepared to expect wonders. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
690:All expression of truth does at length take this deep ethical form. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
691:As I love nature, as I love singing birds...I love thee, my friend. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
692:Don't get to the end of your life and realize you have never lived. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
693:Every man should stand for a force which is perfectly irresistible. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
694:He who rides and keeps the beaten track studies the fences chiefly. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
695:I do not believe there are eight hundred human beings on the globe. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
696:It is what a man thinks of himself that really determines his fate. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
697:It takes two to speak the truth - one to speak and another to hear. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
698:It takes two to speak the truth: one to speak, and another to hear. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
699:Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth. —Henry David Thoreau ~ Robyn Carr,
700:The house is still but a sort of porch at the entrance of a burrow. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
701:The life which men praise and regard as successful is but one kind. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
702:There is no odor so bad as that which arises from goodness tainted. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
703:The Slothful do not have the time to become virtuous or despicable. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
704:To act collectively is according to the spirit of our institutions. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
705:To affect the quality of the day - that is the highest of the arts. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
706:To the SICK the doctors wisely recommed a change of air and scenery ~ Henry David Thoreau,
707:We perceive and are affected by changes too subtle to be described. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
708:What exercise is to the body, employment is to the mind and morals. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
709:Exaggerated history is poetry, and truth referred to a new standard. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
710:How can you expect the birds to sing when their groves are cut down? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
711:I made a study of the ancient and indispensable art of bread-making, ~ Henry David Thoreau,
712:In a world of peace and love, music would be the universal language. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
713:It is darker in the woods, even in common nights, than most suppose. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
714:Justice is sweet and musical; but injustice is harsh and discordant. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
715:La abundancia de una clase se compensa con la indigencia de la otra. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
716:My Friend is that one whom I can associate with my choicest thought. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
717:No mortal is alert enough to be present at the first dawn of spring. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
718:Oh to reach the point of death and realize one has not lived at all. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
719:One is not born into the world to do everything but to do something. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
720:Quelle flamme pourrait égaler le rayon de soleil d’un jour d’hiver ? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
721:Siempre he deplorado no ser tan sabio como lo era el día en que nací ~ Henry David Thoreau,
722:The rich man is always sold to the institution which makes him rich. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
723:Wealth is measured by the level of experience in all aspects of life ~ Henry David Thoreau,
724:When it's time to die, let us not discover that we have never lived. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
725:Why should they begin digging their graves as soon as they are born? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
726:Wir haben heute Professoren der Philosophie, aber keine Philosophen. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
727:Fresh curls spring from the baldest brow. There is nothing inorganic. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
728:Heaven is not one of your fertile Ohio bottoms, you may depend on it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
729:He listens equally to the prayers of the believer and the unbeliever. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
730:I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government ~ Henry David Thoreau,
731:It is after we get home that we really go over the mountain, if ever. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
732:It is hard to forget that which it is worse than useless to remember. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
733:It is not worth the while to let our imperfections disturb us always. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
734:Love is an attempt to change a piece of a dream-world into a reality. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
735:One revelation has been made to the Indian, another to the white man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
736:Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
737:Thank God men cannot fly, and lay waste the sky as well as the earth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
738:The fire is the main comfort of the camp, whether in summer or winter ~ Henry David Thoreau,
739:The greatest gains and values are farthest from being appreciated. We ~ Henry David Thoreau,
740:The path of least resistance leads to crooked rivers and crooked men. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
741:The vessel, though her masts be firm,Beneath her copper bears a worm. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
742:To the sick the doctors wisely recommend a change of air and scenery. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
743:We begin to praise when we begin to see a thing needs our assistance. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
744:We must heap up a great pile of doing, for a small diameter of being. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
745:Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
746:Commonly men will only be brave as their fathers were brave, or timid. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
747:Every oak tree started out as a couple of nuts who stood their ground. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
748:I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
749:If a plant cannot live according to its nature, it dies; and so a man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
750:Let us not play at kittly-benders. There is a solid bottom everywhere. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
751:Nothing can rightly compel a simple and brave man to a vulgar sadness. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
752:Poetry implies the whole truth. Philosophy expresses a particle of it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
753:Public opinion is a weak tyrant compared with our own private opinion. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
754:Sobre todo, no podemos permitirnos el lujo de no vivir en el presente. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
755:The most difficult thing to understand during conversation is silence. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
756:The ways by which you get money almost without exception lead downward ~ Henry David Thoreau,
757:We have the St. Vitus' dance, and cannot possibly keep our heads still ~ Henry David Thoreau,
758:We shall be reduced to gnaw the very crust of the earth for nutriment. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
759:We shall see but a little way if we require to understand what we see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
760:When a soldier is hit by a cannonball, rags are as becoming as purple. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
761:Work your vein till it is exhausted, or conducts you to a broader one. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
762:A broad margin of leisure is as beautiful in a man's life as in a book. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
763:All this worldly wisdom was once the unamiable heresy of some wise man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
764:Books must be read as deliberately and reservedly as they were written. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
765:Faith, indeed, is all the reform that is needed; it is itself a reform. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
766:How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
767:Humor, however broad and genial, takes a narrower view than enthusiasm. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
768:I was never molested by any person but those who represented the State. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
769:Let things alone; let them weigh what they will; let them soar or fall. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
770:Reform keeps many scores of newspapers in its service, but not one man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
771:The great poem must have the stamp of greatness as well as its essence. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
772:There is a low mist in the woods—
It is a good day to study lichens. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
773:There is no remedy for love but to love more."
- Henry David Thoreau ~ Henry David Thoreau,
774:Thu luxury of one class is counterbalanced by the indigence of another. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
775:To affect the quality of the day, that is the highest of arts.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau, [T5],
776:To inherit property is not to be born - it is to be still-born, rather. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
777:We cannot well do without our sins; they are the highway of our virtue. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
778:A good book is the plectrum with which our else silent lyres are struck. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
779:All fables, indeed, have their morals; but the innocent enjoy the story. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
780:As long as there is satire, the poet is, as it were, particeps criminis. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
781:Before printing was discovered, a century was equal to a thousand years. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
782:Cuán vano es sentarse a escribir cuando aún no te has parado para vivir. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
783:How can a man be satisfied to entertain an opinion merely, and enjoy it? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
784:I never read a novel, they have so little real life and thought in them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
785:. . . I was rich, if not in money, in sunny hours and summer days. . . . ~ Henry David Thoreau,
786:Let go of the past and live the future . . . Live the life you imagined. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
787:Nicht wir fahren auf den Eisenbahnschienen; die Eisenbahn fährt auf uns. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
788:One may be drunk with love without being any nearer to finding his mate. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
789:The pleasure we feel in music springs from the obedience which is in it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
790:The question is not what you look at, but what you see. —Henry David Thoreau ~ Robert I Sutton,
791:There are more consequences to a shipwreck than the underwriters notice. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
792:To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome and dissipating. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
793:To have made even one person's life a little better, that is to succeed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
794:A man thinking or working will always be alone, let him be where he will. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
795:A simple and independent mind does not toil at the bidding of any prince. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
796:Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
797:By one bait or another, Nature allures inhabitants into all her recesses. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
798:Every walk is a sort of crusade, preached by some Peter the Hermit in us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
799:I lingered most about the fireplace, as the most vital part of the house. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
800:It is surprising how many great men and women a small house will contain. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
801:Let every one mind his own business, and endeavor to be what he was made. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
802:Men are not so much the keepers of herds as herds are the keepers of men. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
803:One generation abandons the enterprises of another like stranded vessels. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
804:The country is an archipelago of lakes,--the lake-country of New England. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
805:The experience of every past moment but belies the faith of each present. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
806:The man I meet with is not often so instructive as the silence he breaks. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
807:There is in my nature, methinks, a singular yearning toward all wildness. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
808:There must be some nerve and heroism in our love, as of a winter morning. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
809:The sacredness, if there is any, is all in yourself and not in the place. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
810:Things do not change; we change. —Henry David Thoreau, writer and philosopher T ~ Marci Shimoff,
811:Think for yourself, or others will think for you without thinking of you. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
812:Thus we kept on like true idealists, rejecting the evidence of our senses ~ Henry David Thoreau,
813:To many creatures there is in this sense but one necessary of life, Food. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
814:A lawyer's truth is not Truth. It is consistency, or consistent expediency ~ Henry David Thoreau,
815:Associate reverently, and as much as you can, with your loftiest thoughts. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
816:Every path but your own is the path of fate. Keep on your own track, then. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
817:From exertion come wisdom and purity; from sloth ignorance and sensuality. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
818:Having each some shingles of thought well dried, we sat and whittled them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
819:How many a man has dated a new era in his life from the reading of a book! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
820:How many a man has dated a new era in his life from the reading of a book. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
821:Ignorance and bungling with love are better than wisdom and skill without. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
822:I never found the companion that was (is) so companionable as solitude.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
823:It is not in vain that man speaks to man. This is the value of literature. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
824:It is not worth while to go round the world to count the cats in Zanzibar. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
825:It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see. ~ Henry David Thoreau ~ Ruth Clampett,
826:Listen to music religiously, as if it were the last strain you might hear. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
827:Methinks that the moment my legs began to move, my thoughts began to flow. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
828:Methinks that the moment my legs begin to move, my thoughts begin to flow. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
829:One must maintain a little bittle of summer, even in the middle of winter. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
830:Only what is thought, said, or done at a certain rare coincidence is good. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
831:Our molting season, like that of the fouls, must be a crisis in our lives. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
832:the poem of the world is uninterrupted, but few are the ears that hear it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
833:The question is not what you look at – but how you look & whether you see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
834:The schools begin with what they call the elements, and where do they end? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
835:The squeaking of the pump sounds as necessary as the music of the spheres. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
836:The universe expects every man to do his duty in his parallel of latitude. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
837:When was it that men agreed to respect the appearance and not the reality? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
838:All the past is here, present to be tried; let it approve itself if it can. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
839:Be resolutely and faithfully what you are; be humbly what you aspire to be. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
840:Do not trouble yourself much to get new things, whether clothes or friends. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
841:Even poetry, you know, is in one sense an infinite brag & exaggeration. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
842:Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you imagined. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
843:I have always been regretting that I was not as wise as the day I was born. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
844:I live in the present. I only remember the past, and anticipate the future. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
845:I may add that I am enjoying existence as much as ever, and regret nothing. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
846:It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.”—Henry David Thoreau ~ Timothy Ferriss,
847:Nothing can be more useful to a man than a determination not to be hurried. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
848:No way of thinking or doing, however ancient, can be trusted without proof. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
849:On tops of mountains, as everywhere to hopeful souls, it is always morning. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
850:Our circumstances answer to our expectations and the demand of our natures. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
851:Take Time by the forelock. It is also the safest part to take a serpent by. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
852:The fate of the country does not depend on how you vote at the polls - the ~ Henry David Thoreau,
853:The first pleasant days of spring come out like a squirrel and go in again. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
854:The way by which you may get money almost without exception leads downward. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
855:They can do without architecture who have no olives nor wines in the cellar ~ Henry David Thoreau,
856:To be awake is to be alive. I have never yet met a man who was quite awake. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
857:To the sick, indeed, nature is sick, but to the well, a fountain of health. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
858:When a man truly commits, the universe will conspire to assure his success. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
859:Any man more right than his neighbors constitutes a majority of one already. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
860:Cast your whole vote, not a strip of paper merely, but your whole influence. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
861:Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
862:Don't be afraid that your life will end, be afraid that it will never begin! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
863:He who receives an injury is to some extent an accomplice of the wrong-doer. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
864:I am not responsible for the successful working of the machinery of society. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
865:It is as hard to see one's self as to look backwards without turning around. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
866:Men cannot conceive of a state of things so fair that it cannot be realized. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
867:Read the best books first, or you may not have a chance to read them at all. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
868:Roads are made for horses and men of business. I do not travel in them much. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
869:The first sparrow of spring! The year beginning with younger hope than ever! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
870:The lawyer's truth is not Truth, but consistency or a consistent expediency. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
871:There is a certain perfection in accident which we never consciously attain. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
872:The stars are God's dreams, thoughts remembered in the silence of his night. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
873:The thoughtful man becomes a hermit in the thoroughfares of the marketplace. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
874:The true price of anything you do is the amount of time you exchange for it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
875:The words of some men are thrown forcibly against you and adhere like burrs. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
876:They can do without architecture who have no olives nor wines in the cellar. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
877:This was that Earth of which we have heard, made out of Chaos and Old Night. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
878:What is commonly called friendship is only a little more honor among rogues. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
879:What is the value of any political freedom, but as a means to moral freedom? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
880:When a shadow flits across the landscape of the soul where is the substance? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
881:Where shall we look for standard English but to the words of a standard man? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
882:You must get your living by loving, or at least half your life is a failure. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
883:A man cannot be said to succeed in this life who does not satisfy one friend. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
884:Are not all finite beings better pleased with motions relative than absolute? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
885:Birds do not sing in caves, nor do doves cherish their innocence in dovecots. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
886:Every generation laughs at the old fashions, but follows religiously the new. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
887:Farmers are respectable and interesting to me in proportion as they are poor. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
888:Go confidently in the direction of your dreams! Live the life you've imagined ~ Henry David Thoreau,
889:Health requires this relaxation, this aimless life. This life in the present. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
890:I have a deep sympathy with war; it so apes the gait and bearing of the soul. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
891:It makes no odds where a man goes or stays, if he is only about his business. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
892:Let the beautiful laws prevail. Let us not weary ourselves by resisting them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
893:Most, it would seem to me, do not care for nature and would sell their share. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
894:Mythology is the crop which the Old World bore before its soil was exhausted. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
895:Our actual Friends are but distant relations of those to whom we are pledged. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
896:Renew thyself completely each day; do it again, and again, and forever again. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
897:Some do not walk at all; others walk in the highways; a few walk across lots. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
898:That aim in life is highest which requires the highest and finest discipline. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
899:There are nine hundred and ninety-nine patrons of virtue to one virtuous man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
900:There are none happy in the world but beings who enjoy freely a vast horizon. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
901:The startings and arrivals of the cars are now the epochs in the village day. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
902:The wise are not so much wiser than others as respecters of their own wisdom. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
903:Throw one arch at least over the darker gulf of ignorance which surrounds us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
904:We are the subjects of an experiment which is not a little interesting to me. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
905:WE begin to die not in our sense or extremities, but in our divine faculties. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
906:Where shall we look for standard English, but to the words of a standard man? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
907:Do not despair of your life. You have force enough to overcome your obstacles. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
908:Every little pine needle expanded and swelled with sympathy and befriended me. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
909:Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you've imagined. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
910:How many fine thoughts has every man had! How few fine thoughts are expressed! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
911:If ever I was sure that someone was coming to help me, I should run like hell. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
912:If we would aim at perfection in any thing, simplicity must not be overlooked. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
913:If you indulge in long periods, you must be sure to have a snapper at the end. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
914:I pray that the life of this spring and summer may ever lie fair in my memory. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
915:It is not worth the while to go round the world to count the cats in Zanzibar. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
916:I would fain keep sober always; and there are infinite degrees of drunkenness. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
917:Knowledge does not come to us by details, but in flashes of light from heaven. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
918:Knowledge does not come to us in details, but in flashes of light from heaven. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
919:Let us not underrate the value of a fact; it will one day flower into a truth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
920:Not that the story need to be long, but it will take a long time to shorten it ~ Henry David Thoreau,
921:The book has never been written which is to be accepted without any allowance. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
922:The commonest sense is the sense of men asleep, which they express by snoring. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
923:The law will never make men free; it is men who have got to make the law free. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
924:The only people who ever get anyplace interesting are the people who get lost. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
925:Through our own recovered innocence we discern the innocence of our neighbors. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
926:Výstrednosť, premrštenosť - tá predsa závislý od toho, aká ohrada vás zväzuje. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
927:We can conceive of nothing more fair than something which we have experienced. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
928:We inspire friendship in men when we have contracted friendship with the gods. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
929:We must take root; send out some little fibre at least, even every winter day. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
930:What is the use of a house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
931:While men believe in the infinite some ponds will be thought to be bottomless. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
932:A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
933:Faith keeps many doubts in her pay. If I could not doubt, I should not believe. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
934:Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined ~ Henry David Thoreau,
935:God reigns when we take a liberal view, when a liberal view is presented to us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
936:If you will not try, you will go to your grave with your song still inside you. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
937:Knowledge does not come to us by details, but in flashes of light from heaven. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
938:Lo que llamamos resignación no es más que una confirmación de la desesperación. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
939:Of all ebriosity, who does not prefer to be intoxicated by the air he breathes? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
940:One of the most attractive things about the flowers is their beautiful reserve. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
941:Sobriety, severity, and self-respect are the foundations of all true sociality. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
942:Some simple dishes recommend themselves to our imaginations as well as palates. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
943:Such a man has some right to fish, and I love to see nature carried out in him. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
944:The cost of a thing is something called life which is given in exchange for it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
945:The secret of achievement is to hold a picture of a successful outcome in mind. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
946:Whatever sentence will bear to be read twice, we may be sure was thought twice. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
947:What the banker sighs for, the meanest clown may have-leisure and a quiet mind. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
948:A grain of gold will gild a great surface, but not so much as a grain of wisdom. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
949:All men want, not something to do with, but something to do, or something to be. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
950:Always the laws of light are the same, but the modes and degrees of seeing vary. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
951:A man is wise with the wisdom of his time only, and ignorant with its ignorance. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
952:A man may esteem himself happy when that which is his food is also his medicine. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
953:A man's whole life is taxed for the least thing well done. It is its net result. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
954:Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
955:How can we expect a harvest of thought who have not had a seedtime of character? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
956:In the last stage of civilization, Poetry, Religion, and Philosophy will be one. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
957:Is a democracy, such as we know it, the last improvement possible in government? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
958:It is a little star-dust caught, a segment of the rainbow which I have clutched. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
959:It is in vain to dream of a wildness distant from ourselves. There is none such. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
960:I would fain keep sober always; and there are infinite degrees of drunkenness. I ~ Henry David Thoreau,
961:Not that the story need be long, but it will take a long while to make it short. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
962:Not till we are completely lost or turned around, do we begin to find ourselves. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
963:Our hymn-books resound with a melodious cursing of God and enduring Him forever. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
964:¡pues el hombre acepta no lo que es verdaderamente respetable sino lo respetado! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
965:Shams and delusions are esteemed for soundest truths, while reality is fabulous. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
966:The law will never make a man free; it is men who have got to make the law free. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
967:There is more of good nature than of good sense at the bottom of most marriages. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
968:We cannot put a noose around another man's neck without first hanging ourselves. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
969:A man of fine perceptions is more truly feminine than a merely sentimental woman. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
970:Be wary of technology; it is often merely an improved means to an unimproved end. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
971:Enemies publish themselves. They declare war. The friend never declares his love. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
972:How can we expect a harvest of thought who have not had a seed-time of character? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
973:If all were as it seems, and men made the elements their servants for noble ends! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
974:Is the babe young? When I behold it, it seems more venerable than the oldest man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
975:It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
976:Lee los mejores libros primero; lo más seguro es que no alcances a leerlos todos. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
977:My life is like a stroll upon the beach, as near to the ocean's edge as I can go. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
978:No face which we can give to a matter will stead us so well at last as the truth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
979:The constant abrasion and decay of our lives makes the soil of our future growth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
980:There is more religion in men's science, than there is science in their religion. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
981:There is none who does not lie hourly in the respect he pays to false appearance. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
982:What is morality but immemorial custom? Conscience is the chief of conservatives. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
983:Woe be to the generation that lets any higher faculty in its midst go unemployed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
984:A man will not need to study history to find out what is best for his own culture. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
985:Ce qu'un homme pense de lui-même, voilà ce qui règle ou plutôt indique son destin. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
986:In the production of the necessaries of life Nature is ready enough to assist man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
987:It is remarkable how many creatures live wild and free though secret in the woods. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
988:It requires more than a day's devotion to know and to possess the wealth of a day. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
989:Some circumstantial evidence is very strong, as when you find a trout in the milk. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
990:The art of life, of a poet's life, is, not having anything to do, to do something. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
991:The incessant anxiety and strain of some is a well-nigh incurable form of disease. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
992:The repugnance to animal food is not the effect of experience, but it is instinct. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
993:The secret of achievement is to hold a picture of a successful outcome in the mind ~ Henry David Thoreau,
994:The three-o'-clock in the morning courage, which Bonaparte thought was the rarest. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
995:To read well, that is, to read true books in a true spirit, is a noble exercise... ~ Henry David Thoreau,
996:Undoubtedly, in the most brilliant successes, the first rank is always sacrificed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
997:We commonly do not remember that it is … always the first person that is speaking. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
998:What business have I in the woods, if I am thinking of something out of the woods? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
999:Whatever sentence will bear to be read twice, we may be sure was thought twice.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1000:As long as I have the friendship of the sesasons life will never be a burden to me. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1001:Do not hire a man who does your work for money, but him who does it for love of it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1002:For the most part, the best man's spirit makes a fearful sprite to haunt his grave. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1003:Friends... they cherish one another's hopes. They are kind to one another's dreams. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1004:Glances of true beauty can be seen in the faces of those who live in true meekness. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1005:Go confidently in the direction of your dreams,
Live the life you have imagined. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1006:How sweet it would be to treat men and things, for an hour, for just what they are! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1007:I like sometimes to take rank hold on life and spend my day more as the animals do. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1008:In Adam's fall We sinned all. In the new Adam's rise, We shall all reach the skies. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1009:I turned my face more exclusively than ever to the woods, where I was better known. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1010:Spring. March fans it, April christens it, and May puts on its jacket and trousers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1011:The highest that we can attain to is not Knowledge, but Sympathy with Intelligence. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1012:The traveler must be born again on the road, and earn a passport from the elements. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1013:Thought is the sculptor who can create the person you want to be. — Henry David Thoreau ~ Craig Groeschel,
1014:Virtue does not remain as an abandoned orphan; it must of necessity have neighbors. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1015:Water is a pioneer which the settler follows, taking advantage of its improvements. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1016:Far travel, very far travel, or travail, comes near to the worth of staying at home. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1017:I have, as it were, my own sun and moon and stars, and a little world all to myself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1018:Insane!... Ask the tyrant who is his most dangerous foe, the sane man or the insane? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1019:In the meanest are all the materials of manhood, only they are not rightly disposed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1020:It enriches us infinitely to recognize greater qualities than we possess in another. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1021:It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants. What are you industrious about? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1022:Live in each season as it passes: breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1023:Man needs to know but little more than a lobster in order to catch him in his traps. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1024:Many have believed that Walden reached quite through to the other side of the globe. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1025:One piece of good sense would be more memorable than a monument as high as the moon. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1026:Philanthropy is almost the only virtue which is sufficiently appreciated by mankind. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1027:Say what you have to say, not what you ought. Any truth is better than make-believe. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1028:Sell your clothes and keep your thoughts. God will see that you do not want society. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1029:The poet is he who can write some pure mythology today without the aid of posterity. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1030:What a fool he must be who thinks that his El Dorado is anywhere but where he lives. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1031:What is called eloquence in the forum is commonly found to be rhetoric in the study. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1032:Where the most beautiful wild flowers grow, there mans spirit is fed and poets grow. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1033:While some men believe in the infinite, some ponds will be thought to be bottomless. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1034:Why should we leave it to Harper & Brothers and Redding & Co. to select our reading? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1035:A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1036:At the extreme north, the voyagers are obliged to dance and act plays for employment. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1037:Fame is not just. She never finely or discriminatingly praises, but coarsely hurrahs. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1038:How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live. —HENRY DAVID THOREAU ~ Josh Kaufman,
1039:I believe in the forest, and in the meadow, and in the night in which the corn grows. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1040:It appears to be a law that you cannot have a deep sympathy with both man and nature. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1041:It is a fool's life, as they will find when they get to the end of it, if not before. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1042:It is a fool’s life, as they will find when they get to the end of it, if not before. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1043:It is remarkable that such delicate flowers should here adorn these wilderness paths. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1044:It's not enough to be busy; so are the ants. The question is: what are we busy about? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1045:Most of the stone a nation hammers goes toward its tomb only. It buries itself alive. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1046:Perhaps the facts most astounding and most real are never communicated by man to man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1047:The frontiers are not east or west, north or south, but wherever a man fronts a fact. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1048:The intellect is a cleaver; it discerns and rifts its way into the secrets of things. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1049:We soon get through with nature. She excites an expectation which she cannot satisfy. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1050:When a man's conscience and the laws clash, it is his conscience that he must follow. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1051:When the reptile is attacked at one mouth of his burrow, he shows himself at another. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1052:Where there is a brave man, in the thickest of the fight, there is the post of honor. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1053:Writing may be either the record of a deed or a deed. It is nobler when it is a deed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1054:Anyone in a free society where the laws are unjust has an obligation to break the law. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1055:do not let your left hand know what your right hand does, for it is not worth knowing. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1056:He who cannot read is worse than deaf and blind, is yet but half alive, is still-born. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1057:He who hears the rippling of rivers in these degenerate days will not utterly despair. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1058:How could youths better learn to live than by at once trying the experiment of living? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1059:I have found that no exertion of the legs can bring two minds much nearer to the other ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1060:I love to be alone. I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1061:I should not talk so much about myself if there were anybody else whom I knew as well. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1062:It is not enough to be busy. So are the ants. The question is: What are we busy about? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1063:It is not enough to be busy; so are the ants. The question is: What are we busy about? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1064:It would be better if there were but one inhabitant to a square mile, as where I live. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1065:I value and trust those w^ho love and praise my aspiration rather than my performance. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1066:La mayoría de los hombres me parecen, a pesar de sus artes, inferiores a los animales. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1067:Most people dread finding out when they come to die that they have never really lived. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1068:My life has been the poem I could have writ
But I could not both live and utter it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1069:The meeting of two eternities, the past and future....is precisely the present moment. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1070:The most attractive sentences are not perhaps the wisest, but the surest and soundest. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1071:There are thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1072:There is a difference between eating and drinking for strength and from mere gluttony. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1073:There is commonly sufficient space about us. Our horizon is never quite at our elbows. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1074:To be awake is to be completely alive. I have never yet met a man who was quite awake. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1075:We are as much as we see. Faith is sight and knowledge. The hands only serve the eyes. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1076:What wealth is it to have such friends that we cannot think of them without elevation! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1077:Who knows what the human body would expand and flow out to under a more genial heaven? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1078:Winter is the time for study, you know, and the colder it is the more studious we are. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1079:All men want, not something to do with, but something to do, or rather something to be. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1080:Almost any man knows how to earn money, but not one in a million knows how to spend it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1081:Can there be any greater reproach than an idle learning? Learn to split wood, at least. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1082:Death is beautiful when seen to be a law, and not an accident. It is as common as life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1083:How many things are now at loose ends! Who knows which way the wind will blow tomorrow? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1084:I have received no more than one or two letters in my life that were worth the postage. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1085:I put a piece of paper under my pillow, and when I could not sleep I wrote in the dark. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1086:I rejoice that there are owls. Let them do the idiotic and maniacal hooting for men. It ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1087:I should not talk so much about myself if there were any body else whom I knew as well. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1088:It is not enought to be busy, so are the ants. The question is: What are we busy about? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1089:Our science, so called, is always more barren and mixed with error than our sympathies. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1090:Some men fish all their lives without knowing it is not really the fish they are after. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1091:The book exists for us, perchance, which will explain our miracles and reveal new ones. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1092:They required to be dusted daily, when the furniture of my mind was all undusted still. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1093:A bore is someone who takes away my solitude and doesn't give me companionship in return ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1094:Behave so the aroma of your actions may enhance the general sweetness of the atmosphere. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1095:be yourself- not your idea of what you think somebody else's idea of yourself should be. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1096:I had three chairs in my house; one for solitude, two for friendship, three for society. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1097:I have been breaking silence these twenty-three years and have hardly made a rent in it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1098:It is dry, hazy June weather. We are more of the earth, farther from heaven these days. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1099:It requires nothing less than a chivalric feeling to sustain a conversation with a lady. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1100:Nature would not appear so rich, the profusion so rich, if we knew a use for everything. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1101:One may almost doubt if the wisest man has learned anything of absolute value by living. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1102:The man whose horse trots a mile in a minute does not carry the most important messages. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1103:The movements of the eyes express the perpetual and unconscious courtesy of the parties. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1104:The pleasures of the intellect are permanent, the pleasures of the heart are transitory. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1105:There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1106:They who have been bred in the school of politics fail now and always to face the facts. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1107:True friendship can afford true knowledge. It does not depend on darkness and ignorance. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1108:We are all sculptors and painters, and our material is our own flesh and blood and bone. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1109:What does education often do? It makes a straight-cut ditch of a free, meandering brook. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1110:When will the world learn that a million men are of no importance compared with one man? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1111:Your scheme must be the framework of the universe; all other schemes will soon be ruins. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1112:A bore is someone who takes away my solitude and doesn't give me companionship in return. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1113:Asked whether or not he believed in an afterlife, Thoreau quipped, "One world at a time." ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1114:Despair and postponement are cowardice and defeat. Men were born to succeed, not to fail. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1115:Do what you love. Know your own bone; gnaw at it, bury it, unearth it, and gnaw it still. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1116:for I was rich, if not in money, in sunny hours and summer days, and spent them lavishly; ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1117:Furniture! Thank God, I can sit and I can stand without the aid of a furniture warehouse. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1118:He may travel who can subsist on the wild fruits and game of the most cultivated country. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1119:I doubted if the near neighborhood of man was not essential to a serene and healthy life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1120:If we will be quiet and ready enough, we shall find compensation in every disappointment. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1121:If you would convince a man that he does wrong, do right. Men will believe what they see. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1122:I have a great deal of company in my house; especially in the morning, when nobody calls. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1123:I have found that no exertion of the legs can bring two minds much nearer to one another. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1124:In the religion of all nations a purity is hinted at, which, I fear, men never attain to. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1125:It is remarkable how closely the history of the apple tree is connected with that of man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1126:Man emulates earth Earth emulates heaven Heaven emulates the Way The way emulates nature. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1127:Men are probably nearer the essential truth in their superstitions than in their science. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1128:Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1129:Summer passes into autumn in some unimaginable point of time, like the turning of a leaf. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1130:The great art of life is how to turn the surplus life of the soul into life for the body. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1131:The universe seems bankrupt as soon as we begin to discuss the characters of individuals. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1132:Those who have been bred in the school of politics fail now and always to face the facts. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1133:Time & Co. are, after all, the only quite honest and trustworthy publishers that we know. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1134:We now no longer camp as for a night, but have settled down on earth and forgotten heaven ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1135:What a man thinks of himself, that it is which determines, or rather indicates, his fate. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1136:What sort of space is that which separates a man from his fellows and makes him solitary? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1137:What we call knowledge is often our positive ignorance; ignorance our negative knowledge. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1138:When a noble deed is done, who is likely to appreciate it? They who are noble themselves. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1139:When our life ceases to be inward and private, conversation degenerates into mere gossip. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1140:All perception of truth is the detection of analogy; we reason from our hands to our head. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1141:As to conforming outwardly and living your own life inwardly, I do not think much of that. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1142:Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1143:Nature is a personality so vast and universal that we have never seen one of her features. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1144:That government is best which governs the least, because its people discipline themselves. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1145:That virtue we appreciate is as much ours as another s. We see so much only as we possess. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1146:That virtue we appreciate is as much ours as another's. We see so much only as we possess. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1147:The biggest happiness is when at the end of the year you feel better than at the beginning ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1148:The still youthful energies of the globe have only to be directed in their proper channel. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1149:We now no longer camp as for a night, but have settled down on earth and forgotten heaven. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1150:What a glorious time they must have in that wilderness, far from mankind and election day! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1151:Where the citizen uses a mere sliver or board, the pioneer uses the whole trunk of a tree. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1152:You cannot receive a shock unless you have an electric affinity for that which shocks you. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1153:Books that are books are all that you want, and there are but a half dozen in any thousand. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1154:But I would say to my fellows, once for all, As long as possible live free and uncommitted. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1155:did not for a moment feel confined, and the walls seemed a great waste of stone and mortar. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1156:I am a citizen of the world first, and of this country at a later and more convenient hour. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1157:If we dealt only with the false and dishonest, we should at last forget how to speak truth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1158:Live free, child of the mist—and with respect to knowledge we are all children of the mist. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1159:Nothing but great antiquity can make graveyards interesting to me. I have no friends there. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1160:Poet Henry David Thoreau once burned down 300 acres of forest trying to cook a fish. ~ Bathroom Readers Institute,
1161:The broadest and most prevalent error requires the most disinterested virtue to sustain it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1162:The imagination, give it the least license, dives deeper and soars higher than Nature goes. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1163:The mass of men serve the state thus, not as men mainly, but as machines, with their bodies ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1164:The only obligation which I have a right to assume is to do at any time what I think right. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1165:The truth is, there is money buried everywhere, and you have only to go to work to find it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1166:To enjoy a thing exclusively is commonly to exclude yourself from the true enjoyment of it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1167:To enjoy a thing exclusively is commonly to exlcude yourself from the true enjoyment of it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1168:Truth strikes us from behind and in the dark, as well as from before and in broad daylight. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1169:Und wirklich, je mehr er sich zu erniedrigen schien, desto mehr schien er erhöht zu werden. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1170:What avails it that another loves you, if he does not understand you? Such love is a curse. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1171:What is the singing of birds, or any natural sound, compared with the voice of one we love. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1172:When any real progress is made, we unlearned and learn anew what we thought we knew before. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1173:A journal is a record of experiences and growth, not a preserve of things well done or said. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1174:A man had better starve at once than lose his innocence in the process of getting his bread. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1175:A man who has to go to the village to get the news hasn't heard from himself in a long time. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1176:Amid a world of noisy, shallow actors it is noble to stand aside and say, 'I will simply be. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1177:And so the seasons went rolling on into summer, as one rambles into higher and higher grass. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1178:An efficient and valuable man does what he can, whether the community pay him for it or not. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1179:Books which are books are all that you want, and there are but half a dozen in any thousand. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1180:Henry David Thoreau wrote, “One is not born into the world to do everything, but to do something. ~ John C Maxwell,
1181:I am thinking by what long discipline and at what cost a man learns to speak simply at last. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1182:If some have the pleasure of riding on a rail, others have the misfortune to be ridden upon. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1183:...is not Nature, rightly read, that of which she is commonly taken to be the symbol merely? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1184:It is the luxurious and dissipated who set the fashions which the herd so diligently follow. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1185:It is well to have some water in your neighborhood, to give buoyancy to and float the earth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1186:It would be glorious to see mankind at leisure for once. It is nothing but work, work, work. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1187:Live free, child of the mist,- and with respect to knowledge we are allchildren of the mist. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1188:My themes will not be far-fetched. I will tell of homely every-day phenomena and adventures. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1189:New ideas come into this world somewhat like falling meteors, with a flash and an explosion. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1190:Pursue some path, however narrow and crooked, in which you can walk with love and reverence. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1191:Solitude is not measured by the miles of space that intervene between a man and his fellows. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1192:Still we live meanly like ants, though the fable tells us we were long ago changed into men. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1193:The mass of men serve the state thus, not as men mainly, but as machines, with their bodies. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1194:There are none happy in the world but beings who enjoy freely a vast horizon"—said Damodara, ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1195:There is a chasm between knowledge and ignorance which the arches of science can never span. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1196:There must be the... generating force of Love behind every effort destined to be successful. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1197:The stars are the jewels of the night, and perchance surpass anything which day has to show. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1198:They who are at work abroad are not cold, but rather it is they who sit shivering in houses. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1199:This life we live is a strange dream, and I don't believe at all any account men give of it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1200:Under a government which imprisons unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1201:We commonly do not remember that it is, after all, always the first person that is speaking. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1202:We make needless ado about capital punishment,--taking lives, when there is no life to take. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1203:Almost any mode of observation will be successful at last, for what is most wanted is method. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1204:Being a teacher is like being in jail; once it's on your record, you can never get rid of it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1205:Blessed are they who never read a newspaper, for they shall see Nature, and through her, God. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1206:Even in civilized communities, the embryo man passes through the hunter stage of development. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1207:Friends will be much apart. They will respect more each other's privacy than their communion. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1208:Front yards are not made to walk in, but, at most, through, and you could go in the back way. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1209:I derive no pleasure from talking with a young woman simply because she has regular features. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1210:It is not enough to be a hardworking person. Equally important is the job you are working at. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1211:It is not part of a true culture to tame tigers, any more than it is to make sheep ferocious. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1212:It often happens that a man is more humanely related to a cat or dog than to any human being. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1213:It takes two to speak the truth: one to speak, and another to hear. —Henry David Thoreau     CLAIRE ~ Aleatha Romig,
1214:Man is an animal who more than any other can adapt himself to all climates and circumstances. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1215:Tenía tres sillas en mi casa; una para la soledad, dos para la amistad, tres para la compañía ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1216:The news we hear, for the most part, is not news to our genius. It is the stalest repetition. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1217:The next time the novelist rings the bell I will not stir though the meeting-house burn down. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1218:The poet uses the results of science and philosophy, and generalizes their widest deductions. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1219:There are theoretical reformers at all times, and all the world over, living on anticipation. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1220:The works of great poets have never been read by mankind, for only great poets can read them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1221:To say that a man is your Friend means commonly no more than this, that he is not your enemy. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1222:To say that a man is your Friend, means commonly no more than this, that he is not your enemy ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1223:We can never have enough of nature. We must be refreshed by the sight of inexhaustible vigor. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1224:Deep are the foundations of sincerity. Even stone walls have their foundation below the frost. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1225:He is blessed over all mortals who loses no moment of the passing life in remembering the past ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1226:I have found it a singular luxury to talk across the pond to a companion on the opposite side. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1227:Nature is mythical and mystical always, and works with the license and extravagance of genius. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1228:Our houses are such unwieldy property that we are often imprisoned rather than housed by them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1229:Our houses are such unwieldy property that we are often imprisoned rather than housed in them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1230:Philosophy, having crept clinging to the rocks so far, puts out its feelers many ways in vain. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1231:Remember that the smallest seed of faith is of more worth than the largest fruit of happiness. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1232:So our human life but dies down to its root, and still puts forth its green blade to eternity. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1233:The largest pond is as sensitive to atmospheric changes as the globule of mercury in its tube. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1234:The oldest, wisest politician grows not more human so, but is merely a gray wharf rat at last. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1235:There is always a present and extant life, be it better or worse, which all combine to uphold. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1236:The young pines springing up in the corn-fields from year to year are to me a refreshing fact. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1237:Truth never turns to rebuke falsehood; her own straightforwardness is the severest correction. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1238:Under a goverment which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1239:What lies before us and what lies behind us are small matters compared to what lies within us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1240:While I enjoy the friendship of the seasons I trust that nothing can make life a burden to me. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1241:A healthy man, indeed, is the complement of the seasons, and in winter, summer is in his heart. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1242:Books are the treasured wealth of the world and the fit inheritance of generations and nations. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1243:Ciò che un uomo pensa di se stesso, è quello che determina, o piuttosto indica, il suo destino. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1244:Gardening is civil and social, but it wants the vigor and freedom of the forest and the outlaw. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1245:Government never furthered any enterprise but by the alacrity with which it got out of its way. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1246:If you're familiar with a principle you don't have to be familiar with all of its applications. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1247:Indeed, the Englishman's history of New England commences only when it ceases to be New France. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1248:It often happens that a human is more humanely related to a cat or dog than to any human being. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1249:It's too late to be studying Hebrew; it's more important to understand even the slang of today. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1250:I would rather sit on a pumpkin and have it all to myself, than be crowded on a velvet cushion. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1251:Life isn't about finding yourself; it's about creating yourself. So live the life you imagined. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1252:Most men I do not meet at all, for they seem not to have time; they are busy about their beans. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1253:Nothing is so much to be feared as fear. Atheism may comparatively be popular with God himself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1254:Our whole life is startlingly moral. There is never an instant's truce between virtue and vice. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1255:Si he de arrastrar mi trampa, me cuidaré de que sea ligera y no me pellizque en una parte vital ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1256:Some interests have got a footing on the earth which we have not made sufficient allowance for. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1257:The fibers of all things have their tension and are strained like the strings of an instrument. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1258:The head monkey at Paris puts on a traveller's cap, and all the monkeys in America do the same. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1259:You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1260:Alas! how little does the memory of these human inhabitants enhance the beauty of the landscape! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1261:Alas! the culture of an Irishman is an enterprise to be undertaken with a sort of moral bog hoe. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1262:All change is a miracle to contemplate, but it is a miracle which is taking place every instant. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1263:Could a greater miracle take place than for us to look through each other's eyes for an instant? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1264:Could a greater miracle take place than for us to look through each other’s eyes for an instant? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1265:Economy is a subject which admits of being treated with levity, but it cannot so be disposed of. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1266:Follow your genius closely enough, and it will not fail to show you a fresh prospect every hour. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1267:I am still a learner, not a teacher, feeding somewhat omnivorously, browsing both stalk & leaves ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1268:I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1269:If words were invented to conceal thought, newspapers are a great improvement of a bad invention ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1270:I have now a library of nearly nine hundred volumes, over seven hundred of which I wrote myself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1271:It is childish to rest in the discovery of mere coincidences, or of partial and extraneous laws. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1272:It is the art of mankind to polish the world, and every one who works is scrubbing in some part. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1273:I would rather sit on a pumpkin, and have it all to myself, than be crowded on a velvet cushion. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1274:La meta de un buen gobierno es darle más valor a la vida; la de un mal gobierno, restarle valor. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1275:My residence was more favorable, not only to thought, but to serious reading, than a university; ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1276:Se uma planta não pode viver de acordo com sua natureza, ela morre. O mesmo ocorre com um homem. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1277:Shall I not have intelligence with the earth? Am I not partly leaves and vegetable mould myself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1278:Shall I not rejoice also at the abundance of the weeds whose seeds are the granary of the birds? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1279:Shall we always study to obtain more of these things, and not sometimes to be content with less? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1280:Si una planta no puede vivir de acuerdo con su naturaleza muere, y lo mismo le ocurre al hombre. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1281:The dry grasses are not dead for me. A beautiful form has as much life at one season as another. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1282:The fishermen say that the "thundering of the pond" scares the fishes and prevents their biting. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1283:There is an incessant influx of novelty into the world, and yet we tolerate incredible dullness. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1284:There is no help for it; for he considers, not what is truly respectable, but what is respected. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1285:Those services which the community will most readily pay for, it is most disagreeable to render. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1286:To a philosopher all news is gossip, and they who edit and read it are old women over their tea. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1287:Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1288:We are double-edged blades, and every time we whet our virtue the return stroke strops our vice. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1289:We are made to exaggerate the importance of what work we do; and yet how much is not done by us! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1290:We are made to exaggerate the importance of what work we do; and yet how much is not done by us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1291:We cannot conceive of a greater difference than between the life of one man and that of another. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1292:We may not arrive at our port within a calculable period, but we would preserve the true course. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1293:What lies behind us and what lies ahead of us are tiny matters compared to what lives within us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1294:What sort of philosophers are we, who know absolutely nothing of the origin and destiny of cats? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1295:With all your science can you tell me how it is, and when it is, that light comes into the soul? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1296:A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone.” –Henry David Thoreau ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1297:A man might well pray that he may not taboo or curse any portion of nature by being buried in it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1298:Be not anxious to avoid poverty. In this way the wealth of the universe may be securely invested. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1299:Books can only reveal us to ourselves, and as often as they do us this service we lay them aside. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1300:Cultivate the habit of early rising. It is unwise to keep the head long on a level with the feet. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1301:Each thought that is welcomed and recorded is a nest egg, by the side of which more will be laid. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1302:I know a good woman who thinks that her son lost his life because he took to drinking water only. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1303:In the long run, men hit only what they aim at. Therefore, they had better aim at something high. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1304:In the unbending of the arm to do the deed there is experience worth all the maxims in the world. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1305:In winter we lead a more inward life. Our hearts are warm and cheery, like cottages under drifts. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1306:I say beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1307:It is too late to be studying Hebrew; it is more important to understand even the slang of today. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1308:I will not allow mere names to make distinctions for me, but still see men in herds for all them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1309:Nature is doing her best each moment to make us well. Why, nature is but another name for health. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1310:Staying in the house breeds a sort of insanity always. Every house is, in this sense, a hospital. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1311:The boy gathers materials for a temple, and then when he is thirty, concludes to build a woodshed ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1312:There is an incessant influx of novelty into the world, and yet we tolerate incredible dulness. I ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1313:We must walk consciously only part way toward our goal, and then leap in the dark to our success. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1314:With respect to wit, I learned that there was not much difference between the half and the whole. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1315:A howling wilderness does not howl: it is the imagination of the traveler that does the howling. - ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1316:For it matters not how small the beginning may seem to be: what is once done well is done forever. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1317:For it matters not how small the beginning may seem to be: what is once well done is done forever. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1318:I do not judge men by anything they can do. Their greatest deed is the impression they make on me. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1319:If a man doesn't keep pace with his companions, perhaps it's because he hears a different drummer. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1320:If I ever see more clearly at one time than at another, the medium through which I see is clearer. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1321:If there is innocence on Earth again, I tend to imagine it in more [Henry David]Thoreau sort of terms. ~ Quentin S Crisp,
1322:In my afternoon walk I would fain forget all my morning occupations and my obligations to society. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1323:I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1324:I was not born to be forced. I will breathe after my own fashion. Let us see who is the strongest. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1325:simple and sincere account of his own life, and not merely what he has heard of other men's lives; ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1326:The boy gathers materials for a temple, and then when he is thirty, concludes to build a woodshed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1327:There should always be some flowering and maturing of the fruits of nature in the cooking process. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1328:The silence sings. It is musical. I remember a night when it was audible. I heard the unspeakable. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1329:To him whose elastic and vigorous thought keeps pace with the sun, the day is a perpetual morning. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1330:We find it difficult to choose our direction because it does not yet exist distinctly in our idea. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1331:Why do you ever mend your clothes, unless that, wearing them, you may mend your ways. Let us sing. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1332:After all, the man whose horse trots a mile in a minute does not carry the most important messages; ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1333:All the events which make the annals of the nations are but the shadows of our private experiences. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1334:As the stars looked to me when I was a shepherd in Assyria, they look to me now as a New-Englander. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1335:But men labor under a mistake. The better part of the man is soon plowed into the soil for compost. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1336:In solitude especialy do we begin to appreciate the advantage of living with someone who can think. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1337:It is a surprising and memorable, as well as valuable experience, to be lost in the woods any time. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1338:It is pitiful when a man bears a name for convenience merely, who has earned neither name nor fame. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1339:I would give all the wealth of the world, and all the deeds of all the heroes, for one true vision. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1340:Let Harlequin be taken with a fit of the colic, and his trappings will have to serve that mood too. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1341:Nature abhors a vacuum, and if I can only walk with sufficient carelessness I am sure to be filled. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1342:Only the traveling is good which reveals to me the value of home and enables me to enjoy it better. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1343:Surely the writer is to address a world of laborers, and such therefore must be his own discipline. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1344:There is no ill which may not be dissipated, like the dark, if you let in a stronger light upon it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1345:The richest gifts we can bestow are the least marketable. We hate the kindness which we understand. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1346:The volatile truth of our words should continually betray the inadequacy of the residual statement. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1347:Time is like a handful of sand - the tighter you grasp it, the faster it runs through your fingers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1348:We are for the most part more lonely when we go abroad among men than when we stay in our chambers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1349:We have reason to be grateful for celestial phenomena, for they chiefly answer to the ideal in man. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1350:We live a short period of time in this world, but we live it according to the laws of eternal life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1351:What are these pines & these birds about? What is this pond a-doing? I must know a little more. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1352:Where there is an observatory and a telescope, we expect that any eyes will see new worlds at once. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1353:Any nobleness begins at once to refine a man's features, any meanness or sensuality to imbrute them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1354:A town is saved, not more by the righteous men in it, than by the woods and swamps that surround it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1355:Can we not do without the society of our gossip a little while, - have our own thoughts to cheer us? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1356:How many things there are concerning which we might well deliberate whether we had better know them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1357:I believe that it is in my power to elevate myself this very hour above the common level of my life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1358:I believe that men are generally still a little afraid of the dark, though the witches are all hung. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1359:If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1360:If there is any hell more unprincipled than our rulers, and we, the ruled, I feel curious to see it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1361:It is necessary not to be Christian to appreciate the beauty and significance of the life of Christ. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1362:I walk out into a nature such as the old prophets and poets, Menu, Moses, Homer, Chaucer, walked in. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1363:Nature is full of genius, full of the divinity; so that not a snowflake escapes its fashioning hand. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1364:Of a life of luxury the fruit is luxury, whether in agriculture, or commerce, or literature, or art. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1365:One man lies in his words, and gets a bad reputation; another in his manners, and enjoys a good one. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1366:Only that day dawns to which we are awake. There is more day to dawn. The sun is but a morning star. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1367:Our taste is too delicate and particular. It says nay to the poet's work, but never yea to his hope. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1368:Perfect sincerity and transparency make a great part of beauty, as in dewdrops, lakes, and diamonds. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1369:Since all things are good, men fail at last to distinguish which is the bane and which the antidote. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1370:The kind uncles and aunts of the race are more esteemed than its true spiritual fathers and mothers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1371:The purity men love is like the mists which envelope the earth, and not like the azure ether beyond. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1372:There is a slumbering subterranean fire in nature which never goes out, and which no cold can chill. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1373:The works of the great poets have never yet been read by mankind, for only great poets can read the. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1374:Those undeserved joys which come uncalled and make us more pleased than grateful are they that sing. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1375:Thus men will lie on their backs, talking about the fall of man, and never make an effort to get up. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1376:We are made to exaggerate the importance of what work we do; and yet how much is not done by us! or, ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1377:What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1378:As naturally as the oak bears an acorn and the vine a gourd, man bears a poem, either spoken or done. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1379:Especially the transcendental philosophy needs the leaven of humor to render it light and digestible. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1380:I cannot easily buy a blank-book to write thoughts in; they are commonly ruled for dollars and cents. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1381:I make my own time. I make my own terms. I cannot see how God or Nature can ever get the start of me. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1382:It’s not enough to be busy; so are the ants. The question is: What are we busy about?” —Henry David Thoreau ~ Brian P Moran,
1383:Let them wander and scrutinize the outlandish Australians. I have more of God, they more of the road. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1384:Nature puts no question and answers none which we mortals ask. She has long ago taken her resolution. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1385:The Indian's intercourse with Nature is at least such as admits of the greatest independence of each. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1386:The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation. What is called resignation is confirmed desperation. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1387:the mission of men there seems to be,like so many busy demons,to drive the forest out of the country. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1388:The only way to tell the truth is to speak with kindness. Only the words of a loving man can be heard ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1389:There is an orientalism in the most restless pioneer, and the farthest west is but the farthest east. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1390:There is no rule more invariable than that we are paid for our suspicions by finding what we suspect. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1391:This is the only way, we say; but there are as many ways as there can be drawn radii from one center. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1392:We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1393:We should endeavor practically in our lives to correct all the defects which our imagination detects. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1394:Who that has heard a strain of music feared then lest he should speak extravagantly any more forever? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1395:Every nail driven should be as another rivet in the machine of the universe, you carrying on the work. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1396:If a man does not march in step to his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1397:I have myself to respect, but to myself I am not amiable; but my friend is my amiableness personified. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1398:I have thought there was some advantage even in death, by which we mingle with the herd of common men. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1399:I think that Nature meant kindly when she made our brothers few. However, my voice is still for peace. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1400:I was not designed to be forced. I will breathe after my own fashion. Let us see who is the strongest. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1401:No very black melencholy can come to he who lives in the midst of nature and has his senses still..... ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1402:Superfluous wealth can buy superfluities only. Money is not required to buy one necessary of the soul. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1403:The effect of a good government is to make life more valuable; of a bad one, to make it less valuable. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1404:The most primitive places left with us are the swamps, where the spruce still grows shaggy with usnea. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1405:The only way to tell the truth is to speak with kindness. Only the words of a loving man can be heard. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1406:The opportunities of living are diminished in proportion as what are called the "means" are increased. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1407:The purity men love is like the mists which envelop the earth, and not like
the azure ether beyond. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1408:There are two classes of authors: the one write the history of their times, the other their biography. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1409:There is no more fatal blunderer than he who consumes the greater part of his life getting his living. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1410:The success of great scholars and thinkers is commonly a courtier-like success, not kingly, not manly. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1411:This is a delicious evening, when the whole body is one sense, and imbibes delight through every pore. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1412:Toda nuestra vida es sorprendentemente moral. No hay un instante de tregua entre la virtud y el vicio. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1413:A stranger may easily detect what is strange to the oldest inhabitant, for the strange is his province. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1414:Concord's little arch does not span all our fate, nor is what transpires under it law for the universe. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1415:De la literatura sólo nos atrae lo salvaje. El aburrimiento no es sino otro nombre para lo domesticado. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1416:Events, circumstances, etc., have their origin in ourselves. They spring from seeds which we have sown. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1417:Friendship is evanescent in every man's experience, and remembered like heat lightning in past summers. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1418:God is alone,-but the devil, he is far from being alone; he sees a great deal of company; he is legion. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1419:How can he remember well his ignorance—which his growth requires—who has so often to use his knowledge? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1420:If I have unjustly wrested a plank from a drowning man, I must restore it to him though I drown myself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1421:If I seem to boast more than is becoming, my excuse is that I brag for humanity rather than for myself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1422:I now first began to inhabit my house, I may say, when I began to use it for warmth as well as shelter. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1423:In what concerns you much, do not think that you have companions: know that you are alone in the world. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1424:Men do not fail commonly for want of knowledge, but for want of prudence to give wisdom the preference. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1425:Most men cry better than they speak. You get more nurture out of them by pinching than addressing them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1426:The ears were made, not for such trivial uses as men are wont to suppose, but to hear celestial sounds. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1427:The inhabitants of Canada appeared to be suffering between two fires,--the soldiery and the priesthood. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1428:The morning wind forever blows, the poem of creation is uninterrupted; but few are the ears to hear it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1429:There can be no very black melancholy to him who lives in the midst of Nature and has his senses still. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1430:There is no rule more invariable than that we are paid for our suspicions by finding what we suspected. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1431:Though I do not believe that a plant will spring up where no seed has been I have great faith in a seed ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1432:To know that we know what we know, and that we do not know what we do not know, that is true knowledge. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1433:Wealth cannot purchase any great private solace or convenience. Riches are only the means of sociality. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1434:What a healthy out-of-door appetite it takes to relish the apple of life, the apple of the world, then! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1435:What stuff is the man made of who is not coexistent in our thought with the purest and sublimest truth? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1436:As the least drop of wine tinges the whole goblet, so the least particle of truth colors our whole life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1437:It is not enough that we are truthful; we must cherish and carry out high purposes to be truthful about. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1438:It is said that some Western steamers can run on a heavy dew, whence we can imagine what a canoe may do. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1439:I will come to you, my friend, when I no longer need you. Then you will find a palace, not an almshouse. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1440:No face which we can give to a matter will stead us so well at last as the truth. This alone wears well. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1441:No man with a genius for legislation has appeared in America. They are rare in the history of the world. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1442:Open all your pores and bathe in all the tides of nature, in all her streams and oceans, at all seasons. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1443:Our village life would stagnate if it were not for the unexplored forests and meadows which surround it. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1444:Some of you, we all know, are poor, find it hard to live, are sometimes, as it were, gasping for breath. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1445:The chief want, in every state that I have been into, was a high and earnest purpose in its inhabitants. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1446:The language of excitement is at best picturesque merely. You must be calm before you can utter oracles. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1447:We must love our friend so much that she shall be associated with our purest and holiest thoughts alone. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1448:What a pity if we do not live this short time according to the laws of the long time,--the eternal laws! ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1449:Where there is not discernment, the behavior even of the purest soul may in effect amount to coarseness. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1450:A man may acquire a taste for wine or brandy, and so lose his love for water, but should we not pity him. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1451:At a certain season of our life we are accustomed to consider every spot as the possible site of a house. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1452:A traveler who looks at things with an impartial eye may see what the oldest inhabitant has not observed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1453:Duty is one and invariable; it requires no impossibilities, nor can it ever be disregarded with impunity. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1454:God himself culminates in the present moment, and will never be more divine in the lapse of all the ages. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1455:I am engaged to Concord and my own private pursuits by 10,000 ties, and it would be suicide to rend them. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1456:If the laborer gets no more than the wages which his employer pays him, he is cheated, he cheats himself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1457:If you see a man approaching you with the obvious intent of doing you good, you should run for your life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1458:It is the stars as not yet known to science that I would know, the stars which the lonely traveler knows. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1459:It is usually the imagination that is wounded first, rather than the heart; it being much more sensitive. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1460:It matters not where or how far you travel,--the farther commonly the worse,--but how much alive you are. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1461:I would rather sit in the open air, for no dust gathers on the grass, unless where man has broken ground. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1462:Men have a respect for scholarship and learning greatly out of proportion to the use they commonly serve. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1463:Nuestras casas son una propiedad tan aparatosa que a menudo estamos más encerrados que alojados en ellas. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1464:One cannot too soon forget his errors and misdemeanors. To dwell long upon them is to add to the offense. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1465:One little chore to do, one little commission to fulfil, one message to carry, would spoil heaven itself. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1466:Pity the man who has a character to support - it is worse than a large family - he is silent poor indeed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1467:Some are reputed sick and some are not. It often happens that the sicker man is the nurse to the sounder. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1468:Superfluous wealth can buy superfluities only. Money is not required to buy one necessary of the soul.
   ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1469:The front aspect of great thoughts can only be enjoyed by those who stand on the side whence they arrive. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1470:The monster is never just there where we think he is. What is truly monstrous is our cowardice and sloth. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1471:The scholar is not apt to make his most familiar experience come gracefully to the aid of his expression. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1472:The setting sun is reflected from the windows of the alms-house as brightly as from the rich man's abode. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1473:The virtue of making two blades of grass grow where only one grew before does not begin to be superhuman. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1474:They will wait, well disposed, for others to remedy evil, that they may no longer have have it to regret. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1475:To be a philosopher... is to solve some of the problems of life, not only theoretically, but practically. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1476:to stand on the meeting of two eternities, the past and future, which is precisely the present moment; to ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1477:Wir sind meistens einsamer, wenn wir uns unter Menschen begeben, als wenn wir in unseren Zimmern bleiben. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1478:A journal, is a book that shall contain a record of all your joy, your ecstasy, what you are grateful for. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1479:All change is a miracle to contemplate; but it is a miracle which is taking place every instant. Confucius ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1480:But I retained the landscape, and I have since annually carried off what it yielded without a wheelbarrow. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1481:I do not wish to flatter my townsmen, nor to be flattered by them, for that will not advance either of us. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1482:I have great faith in a seed. Convince me that you have a seed there, and I am prepared to expect wonders. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1483:I learned to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of nature, rather than a member of society. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1484:Il solo obbligo che ho il diritto di assumermi è di fare in ogni momento quello che penso sia giusto fare. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1485:I wish to learn what life has to teach, and not, when I come to die, discover that I have not truly lived. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1486:La seule obligation que j'aie le droit d'adopter, c'est d'agir à tout moment selon ce qui me paraît juste. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1487:Not till we are completely lost, or turned round, do we appreciate the vastness and strangeness of Nature. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1488:The church is a sort of hospital for men's souls and as full of quackery as the hospital for their bodies. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1489:The condition-of-England question is a practical one. The condition of England demands a hero, not a poet. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1490:The necessity of labor and conversation with many men and things to the scholar is rarely well remembered. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1491:The rays which stream through the shutter will be no longer remembered when the shutter is wholly removed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1492:The sea-shore is a sort of neutral ground, a most advantageous point from which to contemplate this world. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1493:Toda nuestra vida es de una moral sorprendente. Entre la virtud y el vicio jamás hay un instante de tregua ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1494:We must have infinite faith in each other. If we have not, we must never let it leak out that we have not. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1495:A man may grow rich in Turkey even, if he will be in all respects a good subject of the Turkish government. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1496:As Henry David Thoreau said, “It’s not enough to be busy, so are the ants. The question is, what are we busy about? ~ Gary Keller,
1497:...but why not even by their power of abstract thought, that nations should seek to commemorate themselves? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1498:Even Nature is observed to have her playful moods or aspects, of which man sometimes seems to be the sport. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1499:Friends are made for caring and sharing. Friends do not live in harmony merely, as some say, but in melody. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1500:Good religious men, with the love of men in their hearts, and the means to pay their toll in their pockets. ~ Henry David Thoreau,

IN CHAPTERS [1/1]









2.01 - Habit 1 Be Proactive, #The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, #Stephen Covey, #unset
  I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestionable ability of man to elevate his life by conscious endeavor. - Henry David Thoreau
  As you read this book, try to stand apart from yourself. Try to project your consciousness upward into a corner of the room and see yourself, in your mind's eye, reading. Can you look at yourself almost as though you were someone else?

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun henry_david_thoreau

The noun henry david thoreau has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
            
1. Thoreau, Henry David Thoreau ::: (United States writer and social critic (1817-1862))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun henry_david_thoreau

1 sense of henry david thoreau                    

Sense 1
Thoreau, Henry David Thoreau
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author
     => communicator
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun henry_david_thoreau
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun henry_david_thoreau

1 sense of henry david thoreau                    

Sense 1
Thoreau, Henry David Thoreau
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun henry_david_thoreau

1 sense of henry david thoreau                    

Sense 1
Thoreau, Henry David Thoreau
  -> writer, author
   => abstractor, abstracter
   => alliterator
   => authoress
   => biographer
   => coauthor, joint author
   => commentator, reviewer
   => compiler
   => contributor
   => cyberpunk
   => drafter
   => dramatist, playwright
   => essayist, litterateur
   => folk writer
   => framer
   => gagman, gagster, gagwriter
   => ghostwriter, ghost
   => Gothic romancer
   => hack, hack writer, literary hack
   => journalist
   => librettist
   => lyricist, lyrist
   => novelist
   => pamphleteer
   => paragrapher
   => poet
   => polemicist, polemist, polemic
   => rhymer, rhymester, versifier, poetizer, poetiser
   => scenarist
   => scriptwriter
   => space writer
   => speechwriter
   => tragedian
   => wordmonger
   => word-painter
   => wordsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aiken, Conrad Aiken, Conrad Potter Aiken
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alger, Horatio Alger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Algren, Nelson Algren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Andersen, Hans Christian Andersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anderson, Sherwood Anderson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aragon, Louis Aragon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Asch, Sholem Asch, Shalom Asch, Sholom Asch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Asimov, Isaac Asimov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Auchincloss, Louis Auchincloss, Louis Stanton Auchincloss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Austen, Jane Austen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baldwin, James Baldwin, James Arthur Baldwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baraka, Imamu Amiri Baraka, LeRoi Jones
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barth, John Barth, John Simmons Barth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barthelme, Donald Barthelme
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baum, Frank Baum, Lyman Frank Brown
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beauvoir, Simone de Beauvoir
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beckett, Samuel Beckett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beerbohm, Max Beerbohm, Sir Henry Maxmilian Beerbohm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Belloc, Hilaire Belloc, Joseph Hilaire Peter Belloc
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bellow, Saul Bellow, Solomon Bellow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benchley, Robert Benchley, Robert Charles Benchley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benet, William Rose Benet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bierce, Ambrose Bierce, Ambrose Gwinett Bierce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boell, Heinrich Boell, Heinrich Theodor Boell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bontemps, Arna Wendell Bontemps
   HAS INSTANCE=> Borges, Jorge Borges, Jorge Luis Borges
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boswell, James Boswell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boyle, Kay Boyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bradbury, Ray Bradbury, Ray Douglas Bradbury
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Charlotte Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Emily Bronte, Emily Jane Bronte, Currer Bell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Anne Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Browne, Charles Farrar Browne, Artemus Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Buck, Pearl Buck, Pearl Sydenstricker Buck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bunyan, John Bunyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burgess, Anthony Burgess
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burnett, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, Edgar Rice Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, William Burroughs, William S. Burroughs, William Seward Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Butler, Samuel Butler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cabell, James Branch Cabell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Caldwell, Erskine Caldwell, Erskine Preston Caldwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calvino, Italo Calvino
   HAS INSTANCE=> Camus, Albert Camus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Canetti, Elias Canetti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Capek, Karel Capek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cather, Willa Cather, Willa Sibert Cather
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chandler, Raymond Chandler, Raymond Thornton Chandler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chateaubriand, Francois Rene Chateaubriand, Vicomte de Chateaubriand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cheever, John Cheever
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chesterton, G. K. Chesterton, Gilbert Keith Chesterton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chopin, Kate Chopin, Kate O'Flaherty Chopin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Christie, Agatha Christie, Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Churchill, Winston Churchill, Winston S. Churchill, Sir Winston Leonard Spenser Churchill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clemens, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Mark Twain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cocteau, Jean Cocteau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Claudine Colette
   HAS INSTANCE=> Collins, Wilkie Collins, William Wilkie Collins
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conan Doyle, A. Conan Doyle, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conrad, Joseph Conrad, Teodor Josef Konrad Korzeniowski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cooper, James Fenimore Cooper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crane, Stephen Crane
   HAS INSTANCE=> cummings, e. e. cummings, Edward Estlin Cummings
   HAS INSTANCE=> Day, Clarence Day, Clarence Shepard Day Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Defoe, Daniel Defoe
   HAS INSTANCE=> De Quincey, Thomas De Quincey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dickens, Charles Dickens, Charles John Huffam Dickens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Didion, Joan Didion
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dinesen, Isak Dinesen, Blixen, Karen Blixen, Baroness Karen Blixen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Doctorow, E. L. Doctorow, Edgard Lawrence Doctorow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dos Passos, John Dos Passos, John Roderigo Dos Passos
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoevsky, Feodor Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Feodor Dostoevski, Fyodor Dostoevski, Feodor Dostoevsky, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dreiser, Theodore Dreiser, Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dumas, Alexandre Dumas
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, George du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, Daphne du Maurier, Dame Daphne du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Durrell, Lawrence Durrell, Lawrence George Durrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ehrenberg, Ilya Ehrenberg, Ilya Grigorievich Ehrenberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, George Eliot, Mary Ann Evans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ellison, Ralph Ellison, Ralph Waldo Ellison
   HAS INSTANCE=> Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Farrell, James Thomas Farrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ferber, Edna Ferber
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fielding, Henry Fielding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fitzgerald, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald
   HAS INSTANCE=> Flaubert, Gustave Flaubert
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fleming, Ian Fleming, Ian Lancaster Fleming
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ford, Ford Madox Ford, Ford Hermann Hueffer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Forester, C. S. Forester, Cecil Scott Forester
   HAS INSTANCE=> France, Anatole France, Jacques Anatole Francois Thibault
   HAS INSTANCE=> Franklin, Benjamin Franklin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fuentes, Carlos Fuentes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaboriau, Emile Gaboriau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Galsworthy, John Galsworthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gardner, Erle Stanley Gardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaskell, Elizabeth Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn Stevenson Gaskell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Geisel, Theodor Seuss Geisel, Dr. Seuss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gibran, Kahlil Gibran
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gide, Andre Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gjellerup, Karl Gjellerup
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gogol, Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol
   HAS INSTANCE=> Golding, William Golding, Sir William Gerald Golding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goldsmith, Oliver Goldsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gombrowicz, Witold Gombrowicz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Edmond de Goncourt, Edmond Louis Antoine Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Jules de Goncourt, Jules Alfred Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gordimer, Nadine Gordimer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gorky, Maksim Gorky, Gorki, Maxim Gorki, Aleksey Maksimovich Peshkov, Aleksey Maximovich Peshkov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grahame, Kenneth Grahame
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grass, Gunter Grass, Gunter Wilhelm Grass
   HAS INSTANCE=> Graves, Robert Graves, Robert Ranke Graves
   HAS INSTANCE=> Greene, Graham Greene, Henry Graham Greene
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grey, Zane Grey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Jakob Grimm, Jakob Ludwig Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Wilhelm Grimm, Wilhelm Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haggard, Rider Haggard, Sir Henry Rider Haggard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haldane, Elizabeth Haldane, Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hale, Edward Everett Hale
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haley, Alex Haley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hall, Radclyffe Hall, Marguerite Radclyffe Hall
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hammett, Dashiell Hammett, Samuel Dashiell Hammett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hamsun, Knut Hamsun, Knut Pedersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hardy, Thomas Hardy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Frank Harris, James Thomas Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Joel Harris, Joel Chandler Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harte, Bret Harte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hasek, Jaroslav Hasek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hawthorne, Nathaniel Hawthorne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hecht, Ben Hecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heinlein, Robert A. Heinlein, Robert Anson Heinlein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heller, Joseph Heller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hesse, Hermann Hesse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyse, Paul Heyse, Paul Johann Ludwig von Heyse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyward, DuBois Heyward, Edwin DuBois Hayward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Higginson, Thomas Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Storrow Higginson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoffmann, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Holmes, Oliver Wendell Holmes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Howells, William Dean Howells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoyle, Edmond Hoyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hubbard, L. Ron Hubbard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hughes, Langston Hughes, James Langston Hughes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hunt, Leigh Hunt, James Henry Leigh Hunt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, John Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, Washington Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Isherwood, Christopher Isherwood, Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jackson, Helen Hunt Jackson, Helen Maria Fiske Hunt Jackson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, Jane Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, W. W. Jacobs, William Wymark Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, Henry James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jensen, Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Dr. Johnson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jong, Erica Jong
   HAS INSTANCE=> Joyce, James Joyce, James Augustine Aloysius Joyce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kafka, Franz Kafka
   HAS INSTANCE=> Keller, Helen Keller, Helen Adams Keller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kerouac, Jack Kerouac, Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kesey, Ken Kesey, Ken Elton Kesey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kipling, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Rudyard Kipling
   HAS INSTANCE=> Koestler, Arthur Koestler
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Fontaine, Jean de La Fontaine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lardner, Ring Lardner, Ringgold Wilmer Lardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Rochefoucauld, Francois de La Rochefoucauld
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, D. H. Lawrence, David Herbert Lawrence
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, T. E. Lawrence, Thomas Edward Lawrence, Lawrence of Arabia
   HAS INSTANCE=> le Carre, John le Carre, David John Moore Cornwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leonard, Elmore Leonard, Elmore John Leonard, Dutch Leonard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lermontov, Mikhail Yurievich Lermontov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Doris Lessing, Doris May Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, C. S. Lewis, Clive Staples Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, Sinclair Lewis, Harry Sinclair Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> London, Jack London, John Griffith Chaney
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowry, Malcolm Lowry, Clarence Malcolm Lowry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lyly, John Lyly
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lytton, First Baron Lytton, Bulwer-Lytton, Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mailer, Norman Mailer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malamud, Bernard Malamud
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malory, Thomas Malory, Sir Thomas Malory
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malraux, Andre Malraux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mann, Thomas Mann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mansfield, Katherine Mansfield, Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp
   HAS INSTANCE=> Manzoni, Alessandro Manzoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marquand, John Marquand, John Philip Marquand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marsh, Ngaio Marsh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mason, A. E. W. Mason, Alfred Edward Woodley Mason
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maugham, Somerset Maugham, W. Somerset Maugham, William Somerset Maugham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maupassant, Guy de Maupassant, Henri Rene Albert Guy de Maupassant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mauriac, Francois Mauriac, Francois Charles Mauriac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maurois, Andre Maurois, Emile Herzog
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCarthy, Mary McCarthy, Mary Therese McCarthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCullers, Carson McCullers, Carson Smith McCullers
   HAS INSTANCE=> McLuhan, Marshall McLuhan, Herbert Marshall McLuhan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Melville, Herman Melville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Merton, Thomas Merton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Michener, James Michener, James Albert Michener
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Henry Miller, Henry Valentine Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Milne, A. A. Milne, Alan Alexander Milne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitchell, Margaret Mitchell, Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Nancy Mitford, Nancy Freeman Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Jessica Mitford, Jessica Lucy Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montaigne, Michel Montaigne, Michel Eyquem Montaigne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montgomery, L. M. Montgomery, Lucy Maud Montgomery
   HAS INSTANCE=> More, Thomas More, Sir Thomas More
   HAS INSTANCE=> Morrison, Toni Morrison, Chloe Anthony Wofford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Munro, H. H. Munro, Hector Hugh Munro, Saki
   HAS INSTANCE=> Murdoch, Iris Murdoch, Dame Jean Iris Murdoch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Musset, Alfred de Musset, Louis Charles Alfred de Musset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nabokov, Vladimir Nabokov, Vladimir vladimirovich Nabokov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nash, Ogden Nash
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nicolson, Harold Nicolson, Sir Harold George Nicolson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Norris, Frank Norris, Benjamin Franklin Norris Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Oates, Joyce Carol Oates
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Brien, Edna O'Brien
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Connor, Flannery O'Connor, Mary Flannery O'Connor
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Flaherty, Liam O'Flaherty
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Hara, John Henry O'Hara
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ondaatje, Michael Ondaatje, Philip Michael Ondaatje
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orczy, Baroness Emmusca Orczy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orwell, George Orwell, Eric Blair, Eric Arthur Blair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Page, Thomas Nelson Page
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parker, Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Rothschild Parker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pasternak, Boris Pasternak, Boris Leonidovich Pasternak
   HAS INSTANCE=> Paton, Alan Paton, Alan Stewart Paton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Percy, Walker Percy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Petronius, Gaius Petronius, Petronius Arbiter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plath, Sylvia Plath
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Elder, Gaius Plinius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Younger, Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Poe, Edgar Allan Poe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, William Sydney Porter, O. Henry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, Katherine Anne Porter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Post, Emily Post, Emily Price Post
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pound, Ezra Pound, Ezra Loomis Pound
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, John Cowper Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Theodore Francis Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Llewelyn Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pyle, Howard Pyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pynchon, Thomas Pynchon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rand, Ayn Rand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Richler, Mordecai Richler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roberts, Kenneth Roberts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roth, Philip Roth, Philip Milton Roth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Rousseau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Runyon, Damon Runyon, Alfred Damon Runyon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rushdie, Salman Rushdie, Ahmed Salman Rushdie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, George William Russell, A.E.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sade, de Sade, Comte Donatien Alphonse Francois de Sade, Marquis de Sade
   HAS INSTANCE=> Salinger, J. D. Salinger, Jerome David Salinger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sand, George Sand, Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin, Baroness Dudevant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sandburg, Carl Sandburg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Saroyan, William Saroyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sayers, Dorothy Sayers, Dorothy L. Sayers, Dorothy Leigh Sayers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schiller, Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scott, Walter Scott, Sir Walter Scott
   HAS INSTANCE=> Service, Robert William Service
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shelley, Mary Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mary Godwin Wollstonecraft Shelley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shute, Nevil Shute, Nevil Shute Norway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simenon, Georges Simenon, Georges Joseph Christian Simenon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sinclair, Upton Sinclair, Upton Beall Sinclair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Singer, Isaac Bashevis Singer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smollett, Tobias Smollett, Tobias George Smollett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Snow, C. P. Snow, Charles Percy Snow, Baron Snow of Leicester
   HAS INSTANCE=> Solzhenitsyn, Alexander Isayevich Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sontag, Susan Sontag
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spark, Muriel Spark, Dame Muriel Spark, Muriel Sarah Spark
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spillane, Mickey Spillane, Frank Morrison Spillane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stael, Madame de Stael, Baronne Anne Louise Germaine Necker de Steal-Holstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steele, Sir Richrd Steele
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stein, Gertrude Stein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steinbeck, John Steinbeck, John Ernst Steinbeck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stendhal, Marie Henri Beyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stephen, Sir Leslie Stephen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sterne, Laurence Sterne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stevenson, Robert Louis Stevenson, Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stockton, Frank Stockton, Francis Richard Stockton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoker, Bram Stoker, Abraham Stoker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Styron, William Styron
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sue, Eugene Sue
   HAS INSTANCE=> Symonds, John Addington Symonds
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Sir Rabindranath Tagore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tarbell, Ida Tarbell, Ida M. Tarbell, Ida Minerva Tarbell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thackeray, William Makepeace Thackeray
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thoreau, Henry David Thoreau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tocqueville, Alexis de Tocqueville, Alexis Charles Henri Maurice de Tocqueville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Toklas, Alice B. Toklas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolkien, J.R.R. Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolstoy, Leo Tolstoy, Count Lev Nikolayevitch Tolstoy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trollope, Anthony Trollope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Turgenev, Ivan Turgenev, Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Undset, Sigrid Undset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Untermeyer, Louis Untermeyer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Updike, John Updike, John Hoyer Updike
   HAS INSTANCE=> Van Doren, Carl Van Doren, Carl Clinton Van Doren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vargas Llosa, Mario Vargas Llosa, Jorge Mario Pedro Vargas Llosa
   HAS INSTANCE=> Verne, Jules Verne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vidal, Gore Vidal, Eugene Luther Vidal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Voltaire, Arouet, Francois-Marie Arouet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vonnegut, Kurt Vonnegut
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wain, John Wain, John Barrington Wain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walker, Alice Walker, Alice Malsenior Walker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wallace, Edgar Wallace, Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walpole, Horace Walpole, Horatio Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walton, Izaak Walton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ward, Mrs. Humphrey Ward, Mary Augusta Arnold Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Warren, Robert Penn Warren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Waugh, Evelyn Waugh, Evelyn Arthur Saint John Waugh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webb, Beatrice Webb, Martha Beatrice Potter Webb
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wells, H. G. Wells, Herbert George Wells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Welty, Eudora Welty
   HAS INSTANCE=> Werfel, Franz Werfel
   HAS INSTANCE=> West, Rebecca West, Dame Rebecca West, Cicily Isabel Fairfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wharton, Edith Wharton, Edith Newbold Jones Wharton
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, E. B. White, Elwyn Brooks White
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, Patrick White, Patrick Victor Martindale White
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wiesel, Elie Wiesel, Eliezer Wiesel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Sir Angus Wilson, Angus Frank Johnstone Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Harriet Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wister, Owen Wister
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wodehouse, P. G. Wodehouse, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Clayton Wolfe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Tom Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wood, Mrs. Henry Wood, Ellen Price Wood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Woolf, Virginia Woolf, Adeline Virginia Stephen Woolf
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wouk, Herman Wouk
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Richard Wright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Willard Huntington Wright, S. S. Van Dine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zangwill, Israel Zangwill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zweig, Stefan Zweig




--- Grep of noun henry_david_thoreau
henry david thoreau



IN WEBGEN [10000/38]

Wikipedia - Certificate revocation list -- In computing, a list of revoked certificates
Wikipedia - Enochian magic -- System of ceremonial magic based on the evocation and commanding of various spirits
Wikipedia - Evocation (disambiguation)
Wikipedia - Evocation
Wikipedia - Privilege revocation (computing)
Wikipedia - Revocation (band) -- American technical death metal band
Wikipedia - Revocation of the Edict of Nantes
Wikipedia - Revocation of the special status of Jammu and Kashmir -- 2019 Indian political incident
Wikipedia - Revocation -- The act of recall or annulment
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1449862.The_Enochian_Evocation_of_Dr_John_Dee
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2138816.Magickal_Evocation_Rituals
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23472957-aspects-of-evocation
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/337432.Roberte_Ce_Soir_and_The_Revocation_of_the_Edict_of_Nantes
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Music/Revocation
https://diablo.fandom.com/wiki/Evocation
https://dnd4.fandom.com/wiki/Evocation
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/Evocation
https://eq2.fandom.com/wiki/Revocation_of_Life
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Evocation
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Evocation_school
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Great_shout_(evocation)
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Insect_plague_(evocation)
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Invocation/Evocation
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Invocation/evocation
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Shadow_evocation
https://nwn.fandom.com/wiki/Evocation
https://umbrellaacademy.fandom.com/wiki/Evocation
https://wowwiki-archive.fandom.com/wiki/Evocation
Certificate revocation list
Evocation
Evocation I: The Arcane Dominion
Limitation and revocation procedures before the European Patent Office
List of revocations of appointments to orders and awarded decorations and medals of the United Kingdom
Pakistan's response to the revocation of the special status of Jammu and Kashmir
Revocation
Revocation (band)
Revocation of the special status of Jammu and Kashmir
Slania/Evocation I The Arcane Metal Hammer Edition



convenience portal:
recent: Section Maps - index table - favorites
Savitri -- Savitri extended toc
Savitri Section Map -- 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
authors -- Crowley - Peterson - Borges - Wilber - Teresa - Aurobindo - Ramakrishna - Maharshi - Mother
places -- Garden - Inf. Art Gallery - Inf. Building - Inf. Library - Labyrinth - Library - School - Temple - Tower - Tower of MEM
powers -- Aspiration - Beauty - Concentration - Effort - Faith - Force - Grace - inspiration - Presence - Purity - Sincerity - surrender
difficulties -- cowardice - depres. - distract. - distress - dryness - evil - fear - forget - habits - impulse - incapacity - irritation - lost - mistakes - obscur. - problem - resist - sadness - self-deception - shame - sin - suffering
practices -- Lucid Dreaming - meditation - project - programming - Prayer - read Savitri - study
subjects -- CS - Cybernetics - Game Dev - Integral Theory - Integral Yoga - Kabbalah - Language - Philosophy - Poetry - Zen
6.01 books -- KC - ABA - Null - Savitri - SA O TAOC - SICP - The Gospel of SRK - TIC - The Library of Babel - TLD - TSOY - TTYODAS - TSZ - WOTM II
8 unsorted / add here -- Always - Everyday - Verbs


change css options:
change font "color":
change "background-color":
change "font-family":
change "padding":
change "table font size":
last updated: 2022-04-29 19:26:13
19506 site hits