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object:Johannes Kepler
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class:Mathematics
class:Astronomy


--- WIKI
Johannes Kepler ( 27 December 1571 15 November 1630) was a German astronomer, mathematician, and astrologer. He is a key figure in the 17th-century scientific revolution, best known for his laws of planetary motion, and his books Astronomia nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome Astronomiae Copernicanae. These works also provided one of the foundations for Newton's theory of universal gravitation. Kepler was a mathematics teacher at a seminary school in Graz, where he became an associate of Prince Hans Ulrich von Eggenberg. Later he became an assistant to the astronomer Tycho Brahe in Prague, and eventually the imperial mathematician to Emperor Rudolf II and his two successors Matthias and Ferdin and II. He also taught mathematics in Linz, and was an adviser to General Wallenstein. Additionally, he did fundamental work in the field of optics, invented an improved version of the refracting (or Keplerian) telescope, and was mentioned in the telescopic discoveries of his contemporary Galileo Galilei. He was a corresponding member of the Accademia dei Lincei in Rome. Kepler lived in an era when there was no clear distinction between astronomy and astrology, but there was a strong division between astronomy (a branch of mathematics within the liberal arts) and physics (a branch of natural philosophy). Kepler also incorporated religious arguments and reasoning into his work, motivated by the religious conviction and belief that God had created the world according to an intelligible plan that is accessible through the natural light of reason. Kepler described his new astronomy as "celestial physics", as "an excursion into Aristotle's Metaphysics", and as "a supplement to Aristotle's On the Heavens", transforming the ancient tradition of physical cosmology by treating astronomy as part of a universal mathematical physics.

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IN CHAPTERS TEXT
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes
1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self
1.14_-_Bibliography
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
The_Act_of_Creation_text

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author
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SIMILAR TITLES
Johannes Kepler

DEFINITIONS



QUOTES [5 / 5 - 144 / 144]


KEYS (10k)

   4 Johannes Kepler
   1 Mortimer J Adler

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  122 Johannes Kepler
   6 Johannes Kepler
   2 Carl Sagan

1:I much prefer the sharpest criticism of a single intelligent man to the thoughtless approval of the masses. ~ Johannes Kepler,
2:When ships to sail the void between the stars have been built, there will step forth men to sail these ships. ~ Johannes Kepler,
3:Temporis filia veritas; cui me obstetricari non pudet. (Truth is the daughter of time, and I feel no shame in being her midwife.) ~ Johannes Kepler,
4:I too play with symbols... but I play in such a way that I do not forget that I am playing. For nothing is proved by symbols... unless by sure reasons it can be demonstrated that they are not merely symbolic but are descriptions of the ways in which the two things are connected and of the causes of this connection. ~ Johannes Kepler,
5:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Eyesight should learn from reason. ~ Johannes Kepler
2:Nature loves simplicity and unity. ~ Johannes Kepler
3:Where there is matter, there is geometry. ~ Johannes Kepler
4:Why are things as they are and not otherwise? ~ Johannes Kepler
5:Nature uses as little as possible of anything. ~ Johannes Kepler
6:Without proper experiments I conclude nothing. ~ Johannes Kepler
7:On how the motion of a planet defines its sphere: ~ Johannes Kepler
8:Sky-bound was the mind, Earth-bound the body rests ~ Johannes Kepler
9:Planets move in ellipses with the Sun at one focus. ~ Johannes Kepler
10:Geometry is the archetype of the beauty of the world. ~ Johannes Kepler
11:Geometry is one and eternal shining in the mind of God ~ Johannes Kepler
12:The radius vector describes equal areas in equal times. ~ Johannes Kepler
13:Do we ask what profit the little bird hopes for in singing? ~ Johannes Kepler
14:Science is the process of thinking God's thoughts after Him. ~ Johannes Kepler
15:[God] is the kind Creator who brought forth nature out of nothing. ~ Johannes Kepler
16:O God, I am thinking Thy thoughts after Thee. ~ Johannes Kepler, when studying astronomy
17:before the origin of things, geometry was coeternal with the Divine Mind ~ Johannes Kepler
18:Truth is the daughter of time, and I feel no shame in being her midwife. ~ Johannes Kepler
19:O telescope, instrument of much knowledge, more precious than any sceptre! ~ Johannes Kepler
20:Discover the force of the skies O Men: once recognised it can be put to use. ~ Johannes Kepler
21:The orbit of every planet is an ellipse with the sun at one of the two foci. ~ Johannes Kepler
22:I am a Lutheran astrologer, I throw away the nonsense and keep the hard kernel. ~ Johannes Kepler
23:Once miracles are admitted, every scientific explanation is out of the question. ~ Johannes Kepler
24:Wherever there are qualities there are likewise quantities, but not always vice versa. ~ Johannes Kepler
25:I believe only and alone in the service of Jesus Christ. In him is all refuge and solace. ~ Johannes Kepler
26:The squares of the periodic times are proportional to the cubes of the mean distances from the sun. ~ Johannes Kepler
27:I measured the skies, now the shadows I measure. Sky-bound was the mind, Earth-bound the body rests. ~ Johannes Kepler
28:It may be well to wait a century for a reader, as God has waited six thousand years for an observer. ~ Johannes Kepler
29:In theology we must consider the predominance of authority; in philosophy the predominance of reason. ~ Johannes Kepler
30:God gives every animal the means of saving its life-why object if he gives astrology to the astronomer? ~ Johannes Kepler
31:I much prefer the sharpest criticism of a single intelligent man to the thoughtless approval of the masses. ~ Johannes Kepler
32:I much prefer the sharpest criticism of a single intelligent man to the thoughtless approval of the masses. ~ Johannes Kepler,
33:The Earth is round, and is inhabited on all sides, is insignificantly small, and is borne through the stars. ~ Johannes Kepler
34:When ships to sail the void between the stars have been built, there will step forth men to sail these ships. ~ Johannes Kepler
35:Astronomy would not provide me with bread if men did not entertain hopes of reading the future in the heavens. ~ Johannes Kepler
36:When ships to sail the void between the stars have been built, there will step forth men to sail these ships. ~ Johannes Kepler,
37:The treasures hidden in the heavens are so rich that the human mind shall never be lacking in fresh nourishment. ~ Johannes Kepler
38:If God himself has waited six thousand years for someone to contemplate his works, my book can wait for a hundred. ~ Johannes Kepler
39:I used to measure the skies, now I measure the shadows of Earth.
Sky-bound was the mind, earthbound the body rests. ~ Johannes Kepler
40:I measured the skies, now the shadows I measure, Sky-bound was the mind, earth-bound the body rests. [Kepler's epitaph] ~ Johannes Kepler
41:[Quantity is the fundamental feature of things,] the 'primarium accidens substantiae,' ...prior to the other categories. ~ Johannes Kepler
42:So long as the mother, Ignorance, lives, it is not safe for Science the offspring, to divulge the hidden causes of things. ~ Johannes Kepler
43:I used to measure the Heavens, now I measure the shadows of Earth. The mind belonged to Heaven, the body's shadow lies here. ~ Johannes Kepler
44:Geometry existed before the creation. It is co-eternal with the mind of God...Geometry provided God with a model for the Creation. ~ Johannes Kepler
45:Temporis filia veritas; cui me obstetricari non pudet. (Truth is the daughter of time, and I feel no shame in being her midwife.) ~ Johannes Kepler,
46:...for a long time I wanted to become a theologian... now, however, behold how through my efforts God is being debated in astronomy. ~ Johannes Kepler
47:It may be well to wait a century for a reader, as God has waited six thousand years for an observer. ~ Johannes Kepler, In Martyrs of Science, p. 197.
48:I used to measure the heavens
Now the Earth's shadows I measure
My mind was in the heavens,
Now the shadow of my body rests here ~ Johannes Kepler
49:The Creator, the fountain of all wisdom, the approver of perpetual order, the eternal and superessential spring of geometry and harmonics. ~ Johannes Kepler
50:If the earth should cease to attract its waters to itself all the waters of the sea would be raised and would flow to the body of the moon. ~ Johannes Kepler
51:Geometry is one and eternal shining in the mind of God. That share in it accorded to men is one of the reasons that Man is the image of God. ~ Johannes Kepler
52:Now, as God the maker play'd he taught the game to Nature whom he created in his image; taught her the selfsame game which he played to her. ~ Johannes Kepler
53:The roads by which men arrive at their insights into celestial matters seem to me almost as worthy of wonder as those matters in themselves. ~ Johannes Kepler
54:Temporis filia veritas; cui me obstetricari non pudet.

Truth is the daughter of time, and I feel no shame in being her midwife. ~ Johannes Kepler
55:My greatest desire is that I may perceive the God whom I find everywhere in the external world, in like manner also within and inside myself. ~ Johannes Kepler
56:wheresoever the earth may be placed, or whithersoever it may be carried by its animal faculty, heavy bodies will always be carried towards it. ~ Johannes Kepler
57:Just as the eye was made to see colours, and the ear to hear sounds, so the human mind was made to understand, not whatever you please, but quantity. ~ Johannes Kepler
58:Ships and sails proper for the heavenly air should be fashioned. Then there will also be people, who do not shrink from the dreary vastness of space. ~ Johannes Kepler
59:I believe the geometric proportion served the creator as an idea when He introduced the continuous generation of similar objects from similar objects. ~ Johannes Kepler
60:The sun alone appears, by virtue of his dignity and power, suited for this motive duty (of moving the planets) and worthy to become the home of God himself. ~ Johannes Kepler
61:Wer aber soll hausen in jenen Welten, wenn sie bewohnt sein sollten? ... Sind wir oder sie die Herren des Alls? ... Und ist dies alles dem Menschen gemacht? ~ Johannes Kepler
62:I had the intention of becoming a theologian...but now I see how God is, by my endeavors, also glorified in astronomy, for 'the heavens declare the glory of God.' ~ Johannes Kepler
63:I also ask you my friends not to condemn me entirely to the mill of mathematical calculations, and allow me time for philosophical speculations, my only pleasures. ~ Johannes Kepler
64:And I cherish more than anything else the Analogies, my most trustworthy masters. They know all the secrets of Nature, and they ought to be least neglected in Geometry. ~ Johannes Kepler
65:If the earth were not round, heavy bodies would not tend from every side in a straight line towards the center of the earth, but to different points from different sides. ~ Johannes Kepler
66:Geometry existed before the Creation. It is co-eternal with the mind of God... Geometry provided God with a model for the creatin... Geometry is God Himself.
Johannes Kepler ~ Carl Sagan
67:The harnessing to a rational pursuit of the immense psychic energies derived from an irrational obsession seems to be another secret of genius, at least of genius of a certain type. ~ Johannes Kepler
68:A most unfailing experience... of the excitement of sublunary (that is, human) natures by the conjunctions and aspects of the planets has instructed and compelled my unwilling belief. ~ Johannes Kepler
69:The diversity of the phenomena of nature is so great, and the treasures hidden in the heavens so rich, precisely in order that the human mind shall never be lacking in fresh nourishment. ~ Johannes Kepler
70:When things are in order, if the cause of the orderliness cannot be deduced from the motion of the elements or from the composition of matter, it is quite possibly a cause possessing a mind. ~ Johannes Kepler
71:Since we astronomers are priests of the highest God in regard to the book of nature, it befits us to be thoughtful, not of the glory of our minds, but rather, above all else, of the glory of God. ~ Johannes Kepler
72:The heavenly motions... are nothing but a continuous song for several voices, perceived not by the ear but by the intellect, a figured music which sets landmarks in the immeasurable flow of time. ~ Johannes Kepler
73:So, Fabricius, I already have this: that the most true path of the planet [Mars] is an ellipse, which Dürer also calls an oval, or certainly so close to an ellipse that the difference is insensible. ~ Johannes Kepler
74:Every corporeal substance, so far forth as it is corporeal, has a natural fitness for resting in every place where it may be situated by itself beyond the sphere of influence of a body cognate with it. ~ Johannes Kepler
75:Gravity is a mutual affection between cognate bodies towards union or conjunction (similar in kind to the magnetic virtue), so that the earth attracts a stone much rather than the stone seeks the earth. ~ Johannes Kepler
76:The chief aim of all investigations of the external world should be to discover the rational order and harmony which has been imposed on it by God and which He revealed to us in the language of mathematics. ~ Johannes Kepler
77:I used to measure the skies, now I measure the shadows of Earth.
Although my mind was sky-bound, the shadow of my body lies here.

[Epitaph he composed for himself a few months before he died] ~ Johannes Kepler
78:The moon... is a mass, akin to the mass of the earth, attracts the waters by a magnetic force, not because they are liquid, but because they possess earthy substance, and so share in the movements of a heavy body. ~ Johannes Kepler
79:We do not ask for what useful purpose the birds do sing, for song is their pleasure since they were created for singing. Similarly, we ought not to ask why the human mind troubles to fathom the secrets of the heavens. ~ Johannes Kepler
80:Geometry has two great treasures; one is the Theorem of Pythagoras; the other, the division of a line into extreme and mean ratio. The first we may compare to a measure of gold; the second we may name a precious jewel. ~ Johannes Kepler
81:The soul of the newly born baby is marked for life by the pattern of the stars at the moment it comes into the world, unconsciously remembers it, and remains sensitive to the return of configurations of a similar kind. ~ Johannes Kepler
82:Repudiating the sensible world, which he neither sees himself nor believes from those who have, the Peripatetic joins combat by childish quibbling in a world on paper, and denies the Sun shines because he himself is blind. ~ Johannes Kepler
83:We find, therefore, under this orderly arrangement, a wonderful symmetry in the universe, and a definite relation of harmony in the motion and magnitude of the orbs, of a kind that is not possible to obtain in any other way. ~ Johannes Kepler
84:Johannes Kepler published his book Harmonices Mundi in 1619. In it he proposed that it was the Creator who “decorated” the whole world, using mathematical and musical harmonic proportions. The spiritual and the physical are united. ~ David Byrne
85:Thus God himself was too kind to remain idle and began to play the game of signatures signing his likeness unto the world: therefore I chance to think that all nature and the graceful sky are symbolized in the art of Geometria. ~ Johannes Kepler
86:If there is anything that can bind the mind of man to this dreary exile of our earthly home and can reconcile us with our fate so that one can enjoy living,—then it is verily the enjoyment of the mathematical sciences and astronomy. ~ Johannes Kepler
87:Since geometry is co-eternal with the divine mind before the birth of things, God himself served as his own model in creating the world (for what is there in God which is not God?), and he with his own image reached down to humanity. ~ Johannes Kepler
88:A mind is accustomed to mathematical deduction, when confronted with the faulty foundations of astrology, resists a long, long time, like an obstinate mule, until compelled by beating and curses to put its foot into that dirty puddle. ~ Johannes Kepler
89:Priusquam autem ad creationem, hoc est ad finem omnis disputationis, veniamus: tentanda omnia existimo.

However, before we come to [special] creation, which puts an end to all discussion: I think we should try everything else. ~ Johannes Kepler
90:If there is anything that can bind the heavenly mind of man to this dreary exile of our earthly home and can reconcile us with our fate so that one can enjoy living,-then it is verily the enjoyment of the mathematical sciences and astronomy. ~ Johannes Kepler
91:As soon as somebody demonstrates the art of flying, settlers from our species of man will not be lacking on the moon and Jupiter... Given ships or sails adapted to the breezes of heaven, there will be those who will not shrink from even that vast expanse. ~ Johannes Kepler
92:We ought not to ask why the human mind troubles to fathom the secrets of the universe. The diversity of the phenomena of nature is so great, and the treasures hidden in the skies so rich, precisely in order that the human mind shall never be lacking in fresh nourishment. ~ Johannes Kepler
93:The sphere of the attractive virtue which is in the moon extends as far as the earth, and entices up the waters; but as the moon flies rapidly across the zenith, and the waters cannot follow so quickly, a flow of the ocean is occasioned in the torrid zone towards the westward. ~ Johannes Kepler
94:If two stones were placed... near each other, and beyond the sphere of influence of a third cognate body, these stones, like two magnetic needles, would come together in the intermediate point, each approaching the other by a space proportional to the comparative mass of the other. ~ Johannes Kepler
95:I have consummated the work to which I pledged myself, using all the abilities that You (God) gave me; I have shown the glory of Your works to men, but if I have pursued my own glory among men while engaged in a work intended for Your glory, be merciful, be compassionate, and forgive. ~ Johannes Kepler
96:I believe Divine Providence arranged matters in such a way that what I could not obtain with all my efforts was given to me through chance; I believe all the more that this is so as I have always prayed to God that he should make my plan succeed, if what Copernicus had said was the truth. ~ Johannes Kepler
97:Yet in this my stars were not Mercury as morning star in the angle of the seventh house, in quartile with Mars, but they were Copernicus, they were Tycho Brahe, without whose books of observations everything which has now been brought by me into the brightest daylight would lie buried in darkness. ~ Johannes Kepler
98:Great is God our Lord, great is His power and there is no end to His wisdom. Praise Him you heavens, glorify Him, sun and moon and you planets. For out of Him and through Him, and in Him are all things..... We know, oh, so little. To Him be the praise, the honor and the glory from eternity to eternity. ~ Johannes Kepler
99:There will certainly be no lack of human pioneers when we have mastered the art of flight....Let us create vessels and sails justed to the heavenly ether, and there will be plenty of people unafraid of the empty wastes. In the meantime we shall prepare, for the brave sky-travelers, maps of the celestial bodies. ~ Johannes Kepler
100:The wisdom of the Lord is infinite as are also His glory and His power. Ye heavens, sing His praises; sun, moon, and planets, glorify Him in your ineffable language! Praise Him, celestial harmonies, and all ye who can comprehend them! And thou, my soul, praise thy Creator! It is by Him and in Him that all exist. ~ Johannes Kepler
101:I too play with symbols... but I play in such a way that I do not forget that I am playing. For nothing is proved by symbols... unless by sure reasons it can be demonstrated that they are not merely symbolic but are descriptions of the ways in which the two things are connected and of the causes of this connection. ~ Johannes Kepler
102:Some of what these pamphlets [of astrological forecasts] say will turn out to be true, but most of it time and experience will expose as empty and worthless. The latter part will be forgotten literally: written on the winds while the former will be carefully entered in people's memories, as is usual with the crowd. ~ Johannes Kepler
103:I too play with symbols... but I play in such a way that I do not forget that I am playing. For nothing is proved by symbols... unless by sure reasons it can be demonstrated that they are not merely symbolic but are descriptions of the ways in which the two things are connected and of the causes of this connection. ~ Johannes Kepler,
104:Geometry, which before the origin of things was coeternal with the divine mind and is God himself (for what could there be in God which would not be God himself?), supplied God with patterns for the creation of the world, and passed over to Man along with the image of God; and was not in fact taken in through the eyes. ~ Johannes Kepler
105:Even Johannes Kepler, Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin, Gregor Mendel, and Albert Einstein made serious mistakes. But the scientific enterprise arranges things so that teamwork prevails: What one of us, even the most brilliant among us, misses, another of us, even someone much less celebrated and capable, may detect and rectify. ~ Carl Sagan
106:Why waste words? Geometry existed before the Creation, is co-eternal with the mind of God, is God himself (what exists in God that is not God himself?): geometry provided God with a model for the Creation and was implanted into man, together with God's own likeness - and not merely conveyed to his mind through the eyes. ~ Johannes Kepler
107:Geometry has two great treasures; one is the Theorem of Pythagoras; the other, the division of a line into extreme and mean ratio. The first we may compare to a measure of gold; the second we may name a precious jewel. ~ Johannes Kepler
108:...Those laws are within the grasp of the human mind. God wanted us to recognize them by creating us after his own image so that we could share in his own thoughts... and if piety allow us to say so, our understanding is in this respect of the same kind as the divine, at least as far as we are able to grasp something of it in our mortal life. ~ Johannes Kepler
109:My aim is to say that the machinery of the heavens is not like a divine animal but like a clock (and anyone who believes a clock has a soul gives the work the honour due to its maker) and that in it almost all the variety of motions is from one very simple magnetic force acting on bodies, as in the clock all motions are from a very simple weight. ~ Johannes Kepler
110:If the moon and earth were not retained in their orbits by their animal force or some other equivalent, the earth would mount to the moon by a fifty-fourth part of their distance, and the moon fall towards the earth through the other fifty-three parts, and they would there meet, assuming, however, that the substance of both is of the same density. ~ Johannes Kepler
111:If my false figures came near to the facts, this happened merely by chance....These comments are not worth printing. Yet it gives me pleasure to remember how many detours I had to make, along how many walls I had to grope in the darkness of my ignorance until I found the door which lets in the light of truth....In such manner did I dream of the truth. ~ Johannes Kepler
112:If my false figures came near to the facts, this happened merely by chance ... These comments are not worth printing. Yet it gives me pleasure to remember how many detours I had to make, along how many walls I had to grope in the darkness of my ignorance until I found the door which lets in the light of the truth ... In such manner did I dream of the truth. ~ Johannes Kepler
113:But more important, for what useful purpose do birds sing? Johannes Kepler responded to the last question in his book Mysterium Cosmographicum (The Cosmic Mystery) more than 400 years ago. “We do not ask for what useful purpose the birds do sing, for song is their pleasure,” he wrote. “Similarly we ought not ask why the human mind troubles to fathom the secrets of the heavens. ~ Anonymous
114:There must be some definite cause why, whenever snow begins to fall, its initial formation invariably displays the shape of a six-cornered starlet. For if it happens by chance, why do they not fall just as well with five corners or with seven? . . . Who carved the nucleus, before it fell, into six horns of ice? —From “On the Six-Cornered Snowflake,” by Johannes Kepler, 1610 ~ Anthony Doerr
115:Either... the moving intelligences of the planets are weakest in those that are farthest from the sun, or... there is one moving intelligence in the sun, the common center, forcing them all round, but those most violently which are nearest, and that it languishes in some sort and grows weaker at the most distant, because of the remoteness and the attenuation of the virtue. ~ Johannes Kepler
116:He who will please the crowd and for the sake of the most ephemeral renown will either proclaim those things which nature does not display or even will publish genuine miracles of nature without regard to deeper causes is a spiritually corrupt person... With the best of intentions I publicly speak to the crowd (which is eager for things new) on the subject of what is to come. ~ Johannes Kepler
117:If this [the Mysterium cosmographicum] is published, others will perhaps make discoveries I might have reserved for myself. But we are all ephemeral creatures (and none more so than I). I have, therefore, for the Glory of God, who wants to be recognized from the book of Nature, that these things may be published as quickly as possible. The more others build on my work the happier I shall be. ~ Johannes Kepler
118:We do not ask for what useful purpose the birds do sing, for song is their pleasure since they were created for singing. Similarly, we ought not to ask why the human mind troubles to fathom the secrets of the heavens. The diversity of the phenomena of Nature is so great, and the treasures hidden in the heavens so rich, precisely in order that the human mind shall never be lacking in fresh nourishment. ~ Johannes Kepler
119:Contemporaries only know the authority figures and the loudmouths. And the people born into power. But it takes perspective to know who's carrying the load. Nobody here has a clue who Johannes Kepler is. All they know about Galileo is that he's a teacher who got in trouble with the Inquisition. I doubt anyone's heard of Francis Bacon. Even in Britain, nobody really knows him. He's just a guy with a funny name. ~ Jack McDevitt
120:I am much occupied with the investigation of the physical causes [of motions in the Solar System]. My aim in this is to show that the celestial machine is to be likened not to a divine organism but rather to a clockwork ... insofar as nearly all the manifold movements are carried out by means of a single, quite simple magnetic force. This physical conception is to be presented through calculation and geometry. ~ Johannes Kepler
121:As soon as somebody demonstrates the art of flying, settlers from our species of man will not be lacking on the Moon and Jupiter. Who would have believed that a huge ocean could be crossed more peacefully and safely than the the narrow expanse of the Adriatic, the Baltic Sea or the English Channel? Given ships or sails adapted to the breezes of heaven, there will be those who will not shrink from even that vast expanse. ~ Johannes Kepler
122:It is a right, yes a duty, to search in cautious manner for the numbers, sizes, and weights, the norms for everything [God] has created. For He himself has let man take part in the knowledge of these things ... For these secrets are not of the kind whose research should be forbidden; rather they are set before our eyes like a mirror so that by examining them we observe to some extent the goodness and wisdom of the Creator. ~ Johannes Kepler
123:I myself, a professional mathematician, on re-reading my own work find it strains my mental powers to recall to mind from the figures the meanings of the demonstrations, meanings which I myself originally put into the figures and the text from my mind. But when I attempt to remedy the obscurity of the material by putting in extra words, I see myself falling into the opposite fault of becoming chatty in something mathematical. ~ Johannes Kepler
124:In what manner does the countenace of the sky at the moment of a man's birth determine his character? It acts on the person during his life in the manner of the loops which a peasant ties at random around the pumpkins in his field: they do not cause the pumpkin to grow, but they determine its shape. The same applies to the sky: it does not endow man with his habits, history, happiness, children, riches, or a wife, but it moulds his condition.... ~ Johannes Kepler
125:But although the attractive virtue of the earth extends upwards, as has been said, so very far, yet if any stone should be at a distance great enough to become sensible compared with the earth's diameter, it is true that on the motion of the earth such a stone would not follow altogether; its own force of resistance would be combined with the attractive force of the earth, and thus it would extricate itself in some degree from the motion of the earth. ~ Johannes Kepler
126:…   not my own opinion, but my wife’s: Yesterday, when weary with writing, I was called to supper, and a salad I had asked for was set before me. ‘It seems then,’ I said, ‘if pewter dishes, leaves of lettuce, grains of salt, drops of water, vinegar, oil and slices of eggs had been flying about in the air for all eternity, it might at last happen by chance that there would come a salad.’ ‘Yes,’ responded my lovely, ‘but not so nice as this one of mine. ~ Johannes Kepler
127:I am stealing the golden vessels of the Egyptians to build a tabernacle to my God from them, far far away from the boundaries of Egypt. If you forgive me, I shall rejoice; if you are enraged with me, I shall bear it. See, I cast the die, and I write the book. Whether it is to be read by the people of the present or of the future makes no difference: let it await its reader for a hundred years, if God himself has stood ready for six thousand years for one to study him. ~ Johannes Kepler
128:The cause of the six-sided shape of a snowflake is none other than that of the ordered shapes of plants and of numerical constants; and since in them nothing occurs without supreme reason-not, to be sure, such as discursive reasoning discovers, but such as existed from the first in the Creators's design and is preserved from that origin to this day in the wonderful nature of animal faculties, I do not believe that even in a snowflake this ordered pattern exists at random. ~ Johannes Kepler
129:The German astronomer Johannes Kepler coined the term “camera obscura” in the early seventeenth century, but by then the phenomenon had been known for millennia; in fact, it is perhaps the oldest known optical illusion. Some form of camera obscura was most likely behind a popular illusion performed in ancient Greece and Rome, in which spectral images were cast upon the smoke of burning incense by performers using concave metal mirrors—hence the expression “smoke and mirrors. ~ Jennifer Ouellette
130:Nothing which consists of corporeal matter is absolutely light, but that is comparatively lighter which is rarer, either by its own nature, or by accidental heat. And it is not to be thought that light bodies are escaping to the surface of the universe while they are carried upwards, or that they are not attracted by the earth. They are attracted, but in a less degree, and so are driven outwards by the heavy bodies; which being done, they stop, and are kept by the earth in their own place. ~ Johannes Kepler
131:The heavenly bodies are nothing but a continuous song for several voices (perceived by the intellect, not by the ear); a music which... sets landmarks in the immeasurable flow of time. It is therefore, no longer surprising that man, in imitation of his creator, has at last discovered the art of figured song, which was unknown to the ancients. Man wanted to reproduce the continuity of cosmic time... to obtain a sample test of the delight of the Divine Creator in His works, and to partake of his joy by making music in the imitation of God. ~ Johannes Kepler
132:As Galileo said in a letter to the German mathematician Johannes Kepler:   My dear Kepler, I wish that we might laugh at the remarkable stupidity of the common herd. What do you have to say about the principal philosophers of this academy who are filled with the stubbornness of an asp and do not want to look at either the planets, the moon or the telescope, even though I have freely and deliberately offered them the opportunity a thousand times? Truly, just as the asp stops its ears, so do these philosophers shut their eyes to the light of truth. ~ Matthew Syed
133:After the birth of printing books became widespread. Hence everyone throughout Europe devoted himself to the study of literature... Every year, especially since 1563, the number of writings published in every field is greater than all those produced in the past thousand years. Through them there has today been created a new theology and a new jurisprudence; the Paracelsians have created medicine anew and the Copernicans have created astronomy anew. I really believe that at last the world is alive, indeed seething, and that the stimuli of these remarkable conjunctions did not act in vain. ~ Johannes Kepler
134:We do not ask what hope of gain makes a little bird warble, since we know that it takes delight in singing because it is for that very singing that the bird was made, so there is no need to ask why the human mind undertakes such toil in seeking out these secrets of the heavens. ... And just as other animals, and the human body, are sustained by food and drink, so the very spirit of Man, which is something distinct from Man, is nourished, is increased, and in a sense grows up on this diet of knowledge, and is more like the dead than the living if it is touched by no desire for these things. ~ Johannes Kepler
135:After the birth of printing books became widespread. Hence everyone throughout Europe devoted himself to the study of literature... Every year, especially since 1563, the number of writings published in every field is greater than all those produced in the past thousand years. The Paracelsians have created medicine anew and the Copernicans have created astronomy anew. I really believe that at last the world is alive, indeed seething, and that the stimuli of these remarkable conjunctions did not act in vain. ~ Johannes Kepler
136:Some of the greatest mathematical minds of all ages, from Pythagoras and Euclid in ancient Greece, through the medieval Italian mathematician Leonardo of Pisa and the Renaissance astronomer Johannes Kepler, to present-day scientific figures such as Oxford physicist Roger Penrose, have spent endless hours over this simple ratio and its properties. But the fascination with the Golden Ratio is not confined just to mathematicians. Biologists, artists, musicians, historians, architects, psychologists, and even mystics have pondered and debated the basis of its ubiquity and appeal. In fact, it is probably fair to say that the Golden Ratio has inspired thinkers of all disciplines like no other number in the history of mathematics. ~ Mario Livio
137:Now because 18 months ago the first dawn, 3 months ago broad daylight but a very few days ago the full sun of the most highly remarkable spectacle has risen — nothing holds me back. I can give myself up to the sacred frenzy, I can have the insolence to make a full confession to mortal men that I have stolen the golden vessel of the Egyptians to make from them a tabernacle for my God far from the confines of the land of Egypt. If you forgive me I shall rejoice; if you are angry, I shall bear it; I am indeed casting the die and writing the book, either for my contemporaries or for posterity to read, it matters not which: let the book await its reader for a hundred years; God himself has waited six thousand years for his work to be seen. ~ Johannes Kepler
138:THE DANGEROUS VICE OF ASKING Which is worth more? Experience or doctrine? By dropping stones and pebbles, big balls and little balls, Galileo Galilei proved that velocity remains the same no matter the weight. Aristotle was wrong, and for nineteen centuries no one had noticed. Johannes Kepler, another curious fellow, discovered that plants do not rotate in circles when they follow the light over the course of a day. Wasn’t the circle supposed to be the perfect path of everything that revolves? Wasn’t the universe supposed to be the perfect work of God? “This world is not perfect, not nearly,” Kepler concluded. “Why should its paths be perfect?” His reasoning seemed suspicious to Lutherans and Catholics alike. Kepler’s mother had spent four years in prison accused of practicing witchcraft. They must have been up to something. But ~ Eduardo Galeano
139:In this book, you will encounter various interesting geometries that have been thought to hold the keys to the universe. Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) suggested that "Nature's great book is written in mathematical symbols." Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) modeled the solar system with Platonic solids such as the dodecahedron. In the 1960s, physicist Eugene Wigner (1902-1995) was impressed with the "unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in the natural sciences." Large Lie groups, like E8-which is discussed in the entry "The Quest for Lie Group E8 (2007)"- may someday help us create a unified theory of physics. in 2007, Swedish American cosmologist Max Tegmark published both scientific and popular articles on the mathematical universe hypothesis, which states that our physical reality is a mathematical structure-in other words, our universe in not just described by mathematics-it is mathematics. ~ Clifford A Pickover
140:PREFACE Cosmology is the study of the universe as a whole, including its birth and perhaps its ultimate fate. Not surprisingly, it has undergone many transformations in its slow, painful evolution, an evolution often overshadowed by religious dogma and superstition. The first revolution in cosmology was ushered in by the introduction of the telescope in the 1600s. With the aid of the telescope, Galileo Galilei, building on the work of the great astronomers Nicolaus Copernicus and Johannes Kepler, was able to open up the splendor of the heavens for the first time to serious scientific investigation. The advancement of this first stage of cosmology culminated in the work of Isaac Newton, who finally laid down the fundamental laws governing the motion of the celestial bodies. Instead of magic and mysticism, the laws of heavenly bodies were now seen to be subject to forces that were computable and reproducible. A second revolution in cosmology was initiated by the introduction of the great telescopes of the twentieth century, such as the one at Mount Wilson with its huge 100-inch reflecting mirror. In the 1920s, astronomer Edwin Hubble used this giant telescope to overturn centuries of dogma, which stated that the universe was static and eternal, by demonstrating that the galaxies in the heavens are moving away ~ Michio Kaku
141:The immediate catalyst for the emergence of the Enlightenment in the eighteenth century was the scientific revolution of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, which included three momentous discoveries in astronomy: Johannes Kepler delineated the rules that govern the movement of the planets, Galileo Galilei placed the sun at the center of the universe, and Isaac Newton discovered the force of gravity, invented calculus (Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz independently discovered it at the same time), and used it to describe the three laws of motion. In so doing, Newton joined physics and astronomy and illustrated that even the deepest truths in the universe could be revealed by the methods of science. These contributions were celebrated in 1660 with the formation of the first scientific society in the world: the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, which elected Isaac Newton as its president in 1703. The founders of the Royal Society thought of God as a mathematician who had designed the universe to function according to logical and mathematical principles. The role of the scientist—the natural philosopher—was to employ the scientific method to discover the physical principles underlying the universe and thereby decipher the codebook that God had used in creating the cosmos. Success in the realm of science led eighteenth-century thinkers to assume that other aspects of human action, including political behavior, creativity, and art, could be improved by the application of reason, leading ultimately to an improved society and better conditions for all humankind. This confidence in reason and science affected all aspects of political and social life in Europe and soon spread to the North American colonies. There, the Enlightenment ideas that society can be improved through reason and that rational people have a natural right to the pursuit of happiness are thought to have contributed to the Jeffersonian democracy that we enjoy today in the United States. ~ Eric R Kandel
142:Music of the Grid:

A Poem in Two Equations
            

The masses of particles sound the frequencies with which space vibrates, when played. This Music of the Grid betters the old mystic mainstay, "Music of the Spheres," both in fantasy and in realism.

LET US COMBINE Einstein's second law

m=E/C^2 (1)

with another fundamental equation, the Planck-Einstein-Schrodinger formula

E = hv

The Planck-Einstein-Schrodinger formula relates the energy E of a quantum-mechanical state to the frequency v at which its wave function vibrates. Here h is Planck's constant. Planck introduced it in his revolutionary hypothesis (1899) that launched quantum theory: that atoms emit or absorb light of frequency v only in packets of energy E = hv. Einstein went a big step further with his photon hypothesis (1905): that light of frequency v is always organized into packets with energy E = hv. Finally Schrodinger made it the basis of his basic equation for wave functions-the Schrodinger equation (1926). This gave birth to the modern, universal interpretation: the wave function of any state with energy E vibrates at a frequency v given by v = E/h.

By combining Einstein with Schrodinger we arrive at a marvelous bit of poetry:

(*) v = mc^2/h (*)

The ancients had a concept called "Music of the Spheres" that inspired many scientists (notably Johannes Kepler) and even more mystics. Because periodic motion (vibration) of musical instruments causes their sustained tones, the idea goes, the periodic motions of the planets, as they fulfill their orbits, must be accompanied by a sort of music. Though picturesque and soundscape-esque, this inspiring anticipation of multimedia never became a very precise or fruitful scientific idea. It was never more than a vague metaphor, so it remains shrouded in equation marks: "Music of the Spheres."

Our equation (*) is a more fantastic yet more realistic embodiment of the same inspiration. Rather than plucking a string, blowing through a reed, banging on a drumhead, or clanging a gong, we play the instrument that is empty space by plunking down different combinations of quarks, gluons, electrons, photons,... (that is, the Bits that represent these Its) and let them settle until they reach equilibrium with the spontaneous activity of Grid. Neither planets nor any material constructions compromise the pure ideality of our instrument. It settles into one of its possible vibratory motions, with different frequencies v, depending on how we do the plunking, and with what. These vibrations represent particles of different mass m, according to (*). The masses of particles sound the Music of the Grid. ~ Frank Wilczek
143:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer – Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus – Tragedies
4. Sophocles – Tragedies
5. Herodotus – Histories
6. Euripides – Tragedies
7. Thucydides – History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates – Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes – Comedies
10. Plato – Dialogues
11. Aristotle – Works
12. Epicurus – Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid – Elements
14. Archimedes – Works
15. Apollonius of Perga – Conic Sections
16. Cicero – Works
17. Lucretius – On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil – Works
19. Horace – Works
20. Livy – History of Rome
21. Ovid – Works
22. Plutarch – Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus – Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa – Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus – Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy – Almagest
27. Lucian – Works
28. Marcus Aurelius – Meditations
29. Galen – On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus – The Enneads
32. St. Augustine – On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njál
36. St. Thomas Aquinas – Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri – The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer – Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci – Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli – The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus – The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus – On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More – Utopia
44. Martin Luther – Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais – Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin – Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne – Essays
48. William Gilbert – On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser – Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon – Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare – Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei – Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler – Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey – On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes – Leviathan
57. René Descartes – Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton – Works
59. Molière – Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal – The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens – Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza – Ethics
63. John Locke – Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine – Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton – Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz – Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67. Daniel Defoe – Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift – A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve – The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley – Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope – Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu – Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire – Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding – Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson – The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets ~ Mortimer J Adler
144:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,

IN CHAPTERS



   1 Integral Yoga


   2 Carl Jung


   2 Aion


1.06 - Being Human and the Copernican Principle, #Preparing for the Miraculous, #George Van Vrekhem, #Integral Yoga
  great revolution in physics that we associate with the names
  of Galileo, Johannes Kepler, and Isaac Newton. The so-called
  Copernican revolution was really a later revolution of Gali

1.06 - The Sign of the Fishes, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  the middle of the 9th cent., more particularly by Messahala. Cf. Strauss, Die
  Astrologie des Johannes Kepler.
  

1.14 - Bibliography, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  
  Strauss, Heinz Arthur. Die Astrologie des Johannes Kepler. Munich
  and Berlin, 1926.

Book of Imaginary Beings (text), #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  with reason. At the beginning of the seventeenth century,
  the German astronomer Johannes Kepler debated with the
  English mystic Robert Fludd which of them had first conceived the notion of the earth as a living monster, whose

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun johannes_kepler

The noun johannes kepler has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
              
1. Kepler, Johannes Kepler, Johan Kepler ::: (German astronomer who first stated laws of planetary motion (1571-1630))




--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun johannes_kepler

1 sense of johannes kepler                      

Sense 1
Kepler, Johannes Kepler, Johan Kepler
   INSTANCE OF=> astronomer, uranologist, stargazer
     => physicist
       => scientist
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity




--- Hyponyms of noun johannes_kepler
                                    




--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun johannes_kepler

1 sense of johannes kepler                      

Sense 1
Kepler, Johannes Kepler, Johan Kepler
   INSTANCE OF=> astronomer, uranologist, stargazer










--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun johannes_kepler

1 sense of johannes kepler                      

Sense 1
Kepler, Johannes Kepler, Johan Kepler
  -> astronomer, uranologist, stargazer
   => astrophysicist
   => cosmologist
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alhazen, Alhacen, al-Haytham, Ibn al-Haytham, Al-Hasan ibn al-Haytham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaximander
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aristarchus of Samos
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bessel, Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bowditch, Nathaniel Bowditch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brahe, Tycho Brahe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Celsius, Anders Celsius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Copernicus, Nicolaus Copernicus, Mikolaj Kopernik
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eddington, Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eratosthenes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Galileo, Galileo Galilei
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hale, George Ellery Hale
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hall, Asaph Hall
   HAS INSTANCE=> Halley, Edmond Halley, Edmund Halley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herschel, William Herschel, Sir William Herschel, Sir Frederick William Herschel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herschel, John Herschel, Sir John Herschel, Sir John Frederick William Herschel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hipparchus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Huggins, Sir William Huggins
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hypatia
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kepler, Johannes Kepler, Johan Kepler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kuiper, Gerard Kuiper, Gerard Peter Kuiper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Langley, Samuel Pierpoint Langley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Laplace, Marquis de Laplace, Pierre Simon de Laplace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lovell, Sir Bernard Lovell, Sir Alfred Charles Bernard Lovell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowell, Percival Lowell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitchell, Maria Mitchell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Muller, Johann Muller, Regiomontanus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Newcomb, Simon Newcomb
   HAS INSTANCE=> Omar Khayyam
   HAS INSTANCE=> Oort, Jan Hendrix Oort
   HAS INSTANCE=> Peirce, Benjamin Peirce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ptolemy, Claudius Ptolemaeus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rittenhouse, David Rittenhouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, Henry Russell, Henry Norris Russell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schiaparelli, Giovanni Virginio Schiaparelli
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shapley, Harlow Shapley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sitter, Willem de Sitter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thales, Thales of Miletus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tombaugh, Clyde Tombaugh, Clyde William Tombaugh










--- Grep of noun johannes_kepler
johannes kepler





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Wikipedia - Gurukul Pratishthan -- Institute promoting Indian classical music and other forms of art, based in Mumbai, India
Wikipedia - Hayg Boyadjian -- American composer of classical music
Wikipedia - Henley Festival -- Classical music festival in England
Wikipedia - Henri Temianka -- American classical musician (1906-1992)
Wikipedia - Hindustani classical music -- Art music of northern regions of the Indian subcontinent
Wikipedia - Historically informed performance -- Approach to the performance of classical music
Wikipedia - HM-CM-$ndel-Festspiele Karlsruhe -- Classical music German festival
Wikipedia - Hugo Lambrechts Music Centre -- Centre for the study of classical music for school-going pupils
Wikipedia - IDAGIO -- German classical music streaming service
Wikipedia - Impressionism in music -- Movement in Western classical music
Wikipedia - Indian classical music -- Classical music from the Indian subcontinent
Wikipedia - Indianist movement -- Movement in American classical music (1880s-1920s)
Wikipedia - Internationale HM-CM-$ndel-Akademie -- German classical music institution
Wikipedia - Joelle Khoury -- Jazz and classical musician and composer
Wikipedia - K297BI -- Classical music radio station in St. Louis
Wikipedia - Karola Obermueller -- German classical music composer (born 1977)
Wikipedia - KBAQ -- Classical music public radio station in Phoenix
Wikipedia - KBYU-FM -- Classical music radio station in Salt Lake City
Wikipedia - KCNV -- Classical music public radio station in Las Vegas
Wikipedia - KDFG -- KDFC classical music public radio station in Seaside, California
Wikipedia - KDSC -- KUSC classical music public radio station in Thousand Oaks, California
Wikipedia - KFUO-FM -- Former classical music radio station in St. Louis
Wikipedia - KHFM -- Classical music radio station in Santa Fe, New Mexico
Wikipedia - Kinds of Kings -- Contemporary classical music composer collective
Wikipedia - KING-FM -- Classical music public radio station in Seattle
Wikipedia - Klasik -- Classical music of Afghanistan
Wikipedia - KMFA -- Classical music radio station in Austin, Texas
Wikipedia - KOSC -- KDFC classical music public radio station in Angwin, California
Wikipedia - KPSC (FM) -- KUSC classical music public radio station in Palm Springs, California
Wikipedia - KVNO -- Classical music public radio station in Omaha, Nebraska
Wikipedia - KVOD -- Classical music radio station in Lakewood-Denver, Colorado
Wikipedia - KWAX -- Classical music station in Eugene, Oregon
Wikipedia - KWTU -- Classical music radio station in Tulsa
Wikipedia - KXPR -- Public classical music station in Sacramento, California
Wikipedia - Lao classical music
Wikipedia - La Stagione Frankfurt -- German baroque and classical music ensemble
Wikipedia - Leeds Festival (classical music)
Wikipedia - Lee Hanee -- South Korean actress, model, classical musician, gayageum player and beauty queen
Wikipedia - Lina Ramann -- German 19th century classical music biographer
Wikipedia - List of African-American women in classical music -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of baritones in non-classical music -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of classical music competitions -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of classical music composers by era -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of classical music composers
Wikipedia - List of classical music in literature -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of classical music sub-titles, nicknames and non-numeric titles -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of contraltos in non-classical music -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Mexican composers of classical music -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of mezzo-sopranos in non-classical music
Wikipedia - List of Ragas in Hindustani classical music -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of tenors in non-classical music -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - Lorne Munroe -- American classical musician
Wikipedia - Luca Belcastro -- Italian composer of classical music
Wikipedia - Marilyn Horne Song Competition -- Classical music competition
Wikipedia - Mark Abel -- American composer of classical music
Wikipedia - Mark Bowden (composer) -- British composer of classical music
Wikipedia - Maximilian Steinberg -- Russian classical music composer (1883-1946)
Wikipedia - Meet the Masters -- American classical music television program
Wikipedia - Meikyoku kissa -- Japanese classical music cafe
Wikipedia - Meriem Beldi -- Algerian Andalusian classical musician
Wikipedia - Mezzo TV -- Classical music television channel
Wikipedia - Mohan Sundar Deb Goswami -- Odissi classical musician, Guru of traditional Odisha Rasa theatre, Indian film director
Wikipedia - Munir Nurettin Selcuk -- Turkish classical musician and tenor singer
Wikipedia - Musical America -- American magazine on classical music
Wikipedia - Music of Remembrance -- Classical music ensemble
Wikipedia - Narendra Nath Dhar -- Indian classical musician
Wikipedia - Orchestral Suite in G minor, BWV 1070 -- Classical music work by an unknown composer
Wikipedia - Ottoman classical music
Wikipedia - Pentatone (record label) -- International classical music record label
Wikipedia - Peter G. Davis -- American opera and classical music critic
Wikipedia - Portal:Classical music
Wikipedia - Prayag Sangeet Samiti -- Indian classical music institute
Wikipedia - Radio Clasica -- Spanish national classical music radio station
Wikipedia - Radiro - International Radio Orchestras Festival -- Romanian classical music festival
Wikipedia - RCA Victrola -- American classical music label; budget label operated by RCA Victor
Wikipedia - Robert Fokkens -- South African classical music composer
Wikipedia - Ronald Caravan -- American classical musician
Wikipedia - RTE lyric fm -- Irish classical-music and arts radio station
Wikipedia - Russian classical music -- Genre of classical music
Wikipedia - Sanam (band) -- I-pop (Indian classical music in pop style)
Wikipedia - Sara Groenevelt -- American litterateur and classical musician
Wikipedia - Shrutinandan -- Indian classical music academy, India
Wikipedia - Steven Fox -- American conductor of classical music
Wikipedia - Stingray Classica -- Classical music television channel
Wikipedia - Sunil Dhar -- Bangladeshi classical musician
Wikipedia - Sunil Edirisinghe -- Sri Lankan classical musician
Wikipedia - Sunleif Rasmussen -- Faroese composer of classical music
Wikipedia - Svara -- Note in the octave (Indian classical music)
Wikipedia - Symphonic metal -- Music genre that blends heavy metal with classical music
Wikipedia - Symphony Hall (Sirius XM) -- Classical music Sirius XM Radio station
Wikipedia - Tansen -- 16th century Hindustani classical musician and composer
Wikipedia - Tarun Bhattacharya -- Indian classical musician
Wikipedia - The Cat and the Mouse -- Composition by the American classical music composer Aaron Copland
Wikipedia - The Magic of Music -- Canadian children's classical music television series
Wikipedia - The Proms -- Summer season of daily orchestral classical music concerts in London, UK
Wikipedia - Tom Service -- British classical music presenter and journalist
Wikipedia - Turkish music (style) -- Music used during the Classical music period
Wikipedia - Tushar Dutta -- Hindustani classical music vocalist
Wikipedia - TwoSet Violin -- Youtube comedy duo and classical musicians
Wikipedia - Unsuk Chin -- South Korean composer of classical music
Wikipedia - Video Artists International -- American classical music label
Wikipedia - WBACH -- Former classical music radio network in Maine
Wikipedia - WCNY-FM -- Classical music public radio station in Syracuse, New York, United States
Wikipedia - WCPE -- Classical music public radio station in Raleigh, North Carolina
Wikipedia - WDAV -- Classical music radio station in Davidson-Charlotte, North Carolina
Wikipedia - Western classical music
Wikipedia - WFMT -- Classical music radio station in Chicago
Wikipedia - WGMS (Washington) -- Former classical music radio station in Washington, D.C.
Wikipedia - WHIL (FM) -- Classical music public radio station in Mobile, Alabama
Wikipedia - Wikipedia:WikiProject Classical music/Contemporary music task force -- Sub-project of WikiProject Classical music
Wikipedia - Wikipedia:WikiProject Classical music -- Wikimedia subject-area collaboration
Wikipedia - WIPR-FM -- Classical music radio station in San Juan, Puerto Rico
Wikipedia - World Classical Network -- Classical music radio network
Wikipedia - WQXR-FM -- Classical music public radio station in Newark, New Jersey (New York City)
Wikipedia - WQXW -- WQXR classical music public radio station in Ossining, New York
Wikipedia - WSMC-FM -- Classical music radio station in Collegedale-Chattanooga, Tennessee
Wikipedia - Yella Venkateswara Rao -- An Indian classical musician and percussionist
Little Einsteins (2005 - 2009) - Leo, Annie, Quincy and June are the Little Einsteins. This preschool series is full of adventures that introduce kids to nature, world cultures and the arts. Each episode has a mission and journey of discovery that incorporates a celebrated piece of classical music and a renowned work of art or worl...
Fantasia(1940) - Disney animators set pictures to classical music as Leopold Stokowski conducts the Philadelphi
Fantasia 2000(1999) - A sequel to the 1940 classic, Fantasia 2000 continued the original concept Walt Disney had for a series of Fantasia films. It shares the same ideals of the original film combining animation with classical music including the returning short The Sorcerer's Apprentice featuring Mickey Mouse. This time...
It Was a Short Summer, Charlie Brown(1969) - School is out for the summer and Charlie Brown, Linus, Schroeder and Pig Pen are planning to spend it reading every comic book, watching television, playing baseball, and playing classical music. However, Lucy tells them that she signed them up for camp. The girls are eager to go, but the boys hate...
Fantasia (1940) ::: 7.7/10 -- G | 2h 5min | Animation, Family, Fantasy | 19 September 1941 (USA) -- A collection of animated interpretations of great works of Western classical music. Directors: James Algar (uncredited), Samuel Armstrong (uncredited) | 10 more credits Writers:
Fantasia 2000 (1999) ::: 7.2/10 -- G | 1h 15min | Animation, Comedy, Family | 16 June 2000 (USA) -- An update of the original film with new interpretations of great works of classical music. Directors: James Algar, Gatan Brizzi | 6 more credits Writers: Eric Goldberg (story), Joe Grant (original concept) | 10 more credits
Humoresque (1946) ::: 7.3/10 -- Approved | 2h 5min | Drama, Music, Romance | 25 January 1947 (USA) -- A classical musician from the slums is sidetracked by his love for a wealthy, neurotic socialite. Director: Jean Negulesco Writers: Clifford Odets (screenplay), Zachary Gold (screenplay) | 1 more
Pirate Radio (2009) ::: 7.4/10 -- The Boat That Rocked (original title) -- Pirate Radio Poster -- A band of rogue DJs that captivated Britain, playing the music that defined a generation and standing up to a government that wanted classical music, and nothing else, on the airwaves. Director: Richard Curtis Writer:
The Ladykillers (1955) ::: 7.7/10 -- Not Rated | 1h 31min | Comedy, Crime | April 1956 (Canada) -- Five oddball criminals planning a bank robbery rent rooms on a cul-de-sac from an octogenarian widow under the pretext that they are classical musicians. Director: Alexander Mackendrick Writers:
https://heavenmusic.fandom.com/wiki/Classical_music
https://memory-alpha.fandom.com/wiki/Classical_music
https://memory-alpha.fandom.com/wiki/European_classical_music
Kiniro no Corda: Primo Passo -- -- Yumeta Company -- 25 eps -- Visual novel -- Harem Music Comedy Drama Magic Romance School Shoujo -- Kiniro no Corda: Primo Passo Kiniro no Corda: Primo Passo -- Seiso Academy is a prestigious high school that sorts students into two majors: General Studies, characterized by distinct grey uniforms, and Music Studies, characterized by pristine white uniforms. While rushing to class one morning, General Studies student Kahoko Hino has a chance encounter with Lili, a small fairy searching for someone with the ability to see her. Lili flies away, and Kahoko, puzzled by their meeting, continues on her way. -- -- Later that day, the participants of a school-wide music competition are announced, and all of them are, unsurprisingly, Music Studies students—at least until Kahoko's name is read out. Immediately tracking down Lili, the small fairy gifts Kahoko a magical violin and convinces her to participate in the competition. -- -- Kiniro no Corda: Primo Passo follows Kahoko's endeavors alongside Lili, as the young student must now face the challenges of competition and go head-to-head against her competitors while navigating a new world of classical music. -- -- TV - Oct 2, 2006 -- 87,783 7.46
2009 in classical music
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20th-century classical music
21st-century classical music
American Classical Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Andalusian classical music
Anthology of Indian Classical Music A Tribute to Alain Danilou
Arabesque (classical music)
Australian classical music
Azerbaijani classical music
Ballade (classical music)
Bengal Classical Music Festival
Canadian classical music
Category:Classical music lists
Classical music
Classical music blog
Classical music in Kosovo
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Classical Music (magazine)
Classical music of the United Kingdom
Contemporary classical music
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Faking (Western classical music)
Gramophone Classical Music Awards
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Italian classical music
Leeds Festival (classical music)
List of classical music competitions
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List of contraltos in non-classical music
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Offstage instrument or choir part in classical music
Pakistani semi-classical music
Portal:Classical music
Portal:Classical music/Related
Portal:Classical music/Topics
Stephen Fry's Incomplete and Utter History of Classical Music
The Penguin Guide to Recorded Classical Music
Wayne Marshall (classical musician)


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last updated: 2021-08-18 18:20:11
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