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object:Richard P Feynman
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Richard P Feynman

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QUOTES [17 / 17 - 394 / 394]


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   16 Richard P Feynman
   1 Editors of Discovery Magazine

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  377 Richard P Feynman
   16 Richard P Feynman

1:I'm smart enough to know that I'm dumb. ~ Richard P Feynman,
2:What I cannot create, I do not understand. ~ Richard P Feynman,
3:The game I play is a very interesting one. It's imagination, in a tight straightjacket. ~ Richard P Feynman,
4:I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned. ~ Richard P Feynman,
5:The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool. ~ Richard P Feynman,
6:Study hard what interests you the most in the most undisciplined, irreverent and original manner possible.
   ~ Richard P Feynman, [T5],
7:Scientific knowledge is a body of statements of varying degrees of certainty -- some most unsure, some nearly sure, none absolutely certain. ~ Richard P Feynman,
8:Mathematics is a language plus reasoning; it is like a language plus logic. Mathematics is a tool for reasoning. ~ Richard P Feynman, The Character of Physical Law,
9:Nature uses only the longest threads to weave her patterns, so each small piece of her fabric reveals the organization of the entire tapestry.
   ~ Richard P Feynman,
10:(Joan,1941) She wrote me a letter asking,"How can I read it?,Its so hard." I told her to start at the beginning and read as far as you can get until you're lost. Then start again at the beginning and keep working through until you can understand the whole book. And thats what she did ~ Richard P Feynman,
11:What do I advise? Forget it all. Don't be afraid. Do what you get the most pleasure from. Is it to build a cloud chamber? Then go on doing things like that. Develop your talents wherever they may lead. Damn the torpedoes - full speed ahead!
   If you have any talent, or any occupation that delights you, do it, and do it to the hilt ~ Richard P Feynman,
12:I can live with doubt and uncertainty and not knowing. I think it is much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers that might be wrong. If we will only allow that, as we progress, we remain unsure, we will leave opportunities for alternatives. We will not become enthusiastic for the fact, the knowledge, the absolute truth of the day, but remain always uncertain ... In order to make progress, one must leave the door to the unknown ajar. ~ Richard P Feynman,
13:Fall in love with some activity, and do it! Nobody ever figures out what life is all about, and it doesn't matter. Explore the world. Nearly everything is really interesting if you go into it deeply enough. Work as hard and as much as you want to on the things you like to do the best. Don't think about what you want to be, but what you want to do. Keep up some kind of a minimum with other things so that society doesn't stop you from doing anything at all. ~ Richard P Feynman,
14:No government has the right to decide on the truth of scientific principles, nor to prescribe in any way the character of the questions investigated. Neither may a government determine the aesthetic value of artistic creations, nor limit the forms of literacy or artistic expression. Nor should it pronounce on the validity of economic, historic, religious, or philosophical doctrines. Instead it has a duty to its citizens to maintain the freedom, to let those citizens contribute to the further adventure and the development of the human race. ~ Richard P Feynman,
15:I have a friend who's an artist and has sometimes taken a view which I don't agree with very well. He'll hold up a flower and say "look how beautiful it is," and I'll agree. Then he says "I as an artist can see how beautiful this is but you as a scientist take this all apart and it becomes a dull thing," and I think that he's kind of nutty. First of all, the beauty that he sees is available to other people and to me too, I believe. Although I may not be quite as refined aesthetically as he is ... I can appreciate the beauty of a flower. At the same time, I see much more about the flower than he sees. I could imagine the cells in there, the complicated actions inside, which also have a beauty. I mean it's not just beauty at this dimension, at one centimeter; there's also beauty at smaller dimensions, the inner structure, also the processes. The fact that the colors in the flower evolved in order to attract insects to pollinate it is interesting; it means that insects can see the color. It adds a question: does this aesthetic sense also exist in the lower forms? Why is it aesthetic? All kinds of interesting questions which the science knowledge only adds to the excitement, the mystery and the awe of a flower. It only adds. I don't understand how it subtracts. ~ Richard P Feynman,
16:A poet once said, 'The whole universe is in a glass of wine.' We will probably never know in what sense he meant it, for poets do not write to be understood. But it is true that if we look at a glass of wine closely enough we see the entire universe. There are the things of physics: the twisting liquid which evaporates depending on the wind and weather, the reflection in the glass; and our imagination adds atoms. The glass is a distillation of the earth's rocks, and in its composition we see the secrets of the universe's age, and the evolution of stars. What strange array of chemicals are in the wine? How did they come to be? There are the ferments, the enzymes, the substrates, and the products. There in wine is found the great generalization; all life is fermentation. Nobody can discover the chemistry of wine without discovering, as did Louis Pasteur, the cause of much disease. How vivid is the claret, pressing its existence into the consciousness that watches it! If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts -- physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on -- remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure; drink it and forget it all! ~ Richard P Feynman,
17:science reading list :::
   1. and 2. The Voyage of the Beagle (1845) and The Origin of Species (1859) by Charles Darwin [tie
   3. Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy) by Isaac Newton (1687)
   4. Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems by Galileo Galilei (1632)
   5. De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres) by Nicolaus Copernicus (1543)
   6. Physica (Physics) by Aristotle (circa 330 B.C.)
   7. De Humani Corporis Fabrica (On the Fabric of the Human Body) by Andreas Vesalius (1543)
   8. Relativity: The Special and General Theory by Albert Einstein (1916)
   9. The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins (1976)
   10. One Two Three . . . Infinity by George Gamow (1947)
   11. The Double Helix by James D. Watson (1968)
   12. What Is Life? by Erwin Schrodinger (1944)
   13. The Cosmic Connection by Carl Sagan (1973)
   14. The Insect Societies by Edward O. Wilson (1971)
   15. The First Three Minutes by Steven Weinberg (1977)
   16. Silent Spring by Rachel Carson (1962)
   17. The Mismeasure of Man by Stephen Jay Gould (1981)
   18. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales by Oliver Sacks (1985)
   19. The Journals of Lewis and Clark by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark (1814)
   20. The Feynman Lectures on Physics by Richard P Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, and Matthew Sands (1963)
   21. Sexual Behavior in the Human Male by Alfred C. Kinsey et al. (1948)
   22. Gorillas in the Mist by Dian Fossey (1983)
   23. Under a Lucky Star by Roy Chapman Andrews (1943)
   24. Micrographia by Robert Hooke (1665)
   25. Gaia by James Lovelock (1979)
   ~ Editors of Discovery Magazine, Website,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Science is uncertain. ~ Richard P Feynman
2:All mass is interaction. ~ Richard P Feynman
3:Nature...cannot be fooled! ~ Richard P Feynman
4:Everything is made of atoms. ~ Richard P Feynman
5:The exception tests the rule. ~ Richard P Feynman
6:Teach principles not formulas. ~ Richard P Feynman
7:This is not yet a scientific age. ~ Richard P Feynman
8:What did you ASK at school today? ~ Richard P Feynman
9:Thank you very Much, I enjoyed myself ~ Richard P Feynman
10:There's plenty of room at the bottom. ~ Richard P Feynman
11:I'd hate to die twice. It's so boring. ~ Richard P Feynman
12:What I can't create I don't understand ~ Richard P Feynman
13:I'm smart enough to know that I'm dumb. ~ Richard P Feynman
14:It is simple, therefore it is beautiful ~ Richard P Feynman
15:All we know so far is what doesn't work. ~ Richard P Feynman
16:I'm smart enough to know that I'm dumb. ~ Richard P Feynman,
17:The test of all knowledge is experiment. ~ Richard P Feynman
18:What Do You Care What Other People Think? ~ Richard P Feynman
19:The same equations have the same solutions ~ Richard P Feynman
20:What I cannot create, I do not understand. ~ Richard P Feynman
21:Nature's imagination far surpasses our own. ~ Richard P Feynman
22:What I cannot create, I do not understand. ~ Richard P Feynman,
23:If it disagrees with experiment, it's wrong. ~ Richard P Feynman
24:No one really understands quantum mechanics. ~ Richard P Feynman
25:I don't feel frightened by not knowing things. ~ Richard P Feynman
26:I love only nature, and I hate mathematicians. ~ Richard P Feynman
27:Science is a way for us to not fool ourselves. ~ Richard P Feynman
28:The world is a dynamic mess of jiggling things ~ Richard P Feynman
29:Today's brains are yesterday's mashed potatoes. ~ Richard P Feynman
30:A great deal more is known than has been proved. ~ Richard P Feynman
31:I, a universe of atoms, an atom in the universe. ~ Richard P Feynman
32:Science is a way of trying not to fool yourself. ~ Richard P Feynman
33:Work hard to find something that fascinates you. ~ Richard P Feynman
34:I don't believe I can really do without teaching. ~ Richard P Feynman
35:Physics is not the most important thing. Love is. ~ Richard P Feynman
36:I wonder why. I wonder why. I wonder why I wonder. ~ Richard P Feynman
37:Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts. ~ Richard P Feynman
38:You do not know anything until you have practiced. ~ Richard P Feynman
39:Scientists are explorers. Philosophers are tourists. ~ Richard P Feynman
40:Know how to solve every problem that has been solved. ~ Richard P Feynman
41:Science is of value because it can produce something. ~ Richard P Feynman
42:Physics is to mathematics what sex is to masturbation. ~ Richard P Feynman
43:There is no authority who decides what is a good idea. ~ Richard P Feynman
44:We've learned from experience that the truth will out. ~ Richard P Feynman
45:Don't worry about anything. Go out and have a good time. ~ Richard P Feynman
46:Phenomena complex-laws simple....Know what to leave out. ~ Richard P Feynman
47:Science is what we do to keep us from lying to ourselves ~ Richard P Feynman
48:Don't pay attention to "authorities," think for yourself. ~ Richard P Feynman
49:Experiment is the sole judge of the validity of any idea. ~ Richard P Feynman
50:Few people realize the number of things that are possible. ~ Richard P Feynman
51:The truth always turns out to be simpler than you thought. ~ Richard P Feynman
52:What is not surrounded by uncertainty cannot be the truth. ~ Richard P Feynman
53:Nature has a great simplicity and therefore a great beauty. ~ Richard P Feynman
54:You can always recognize truth by its beauty and simplicity. ~ Richard P Feynman
55:Progress in science comes when experiments contradict theory. ~ Richard P Feynman
56:But logic is not all, one needs one's heart to follow an idea. ~ Richard P Feynman
57:I always do that, get into something and see how far I can go. ~ Richard P Feynman
58:Religion is a culture of faith; science is a culture of doubt. ~ Richard P Feynman
59:As revealed by physics, the truth is so remarkable, so amazing! ~ Richard P Feynman
60:I don't have to be good because they think I'm going to be good. ~ Richard P Feynman
61:We never are definitely right, we can only be sure we are wrong. ~ Richard P Feynman
62:A very great deal more truth can become known than can be proven. ~ Richard P Feynman
63:It turns out that all life is interconnected with all other life. ~ Richard P Feynman
64:Nature does not care what we call it, she just keeps on doing it. ~ Richard P Feynman
65:The inside of a computer is as dumb as hell but it goes like mad! ~ Richard P Feynman
66:The thing that doesn't fit is the thing that is most interesting. ~ Richard P Feynman
67:I have to disregard everybody else, and then I can do my own work. ~ Richard P Feynman
68:I'm trying to find out NOT how Nature could be, but how Nature IS. ~ Richard P Feynman
69:I think I can safely say that nobody understands Quantum Mechanics. ~ Richard P Feynman
70:To not know math is a severe limitation to understanding the world. ~ Richard P Feynman
71:Do not read so much, look about you and think of what you see there. ~ Richard P Feynman
72:I am not interested in what today's mathematicians find interesting. ~ Richard P Feynman
73:Learn what the rest of the world is like. The variety is worthwhile. ~ Richard P Feynman
74:Maybe that is why young people make success. They don't know enough. ~ Richard P Feynman
75:You can’t say A is made of B or vice versa. All mass is interaction. ~ Richard P Feynman
76:To develop working ideas efficiently, I try to fail as fast as I can. ~ Richard P Feynman
77:This is not very important what I'm doing. I'm just proving something. ~ Richard P Feynman
78:I think we can safely assume that no one understands quantum mechanics. ~ Richard P Feynman
79:It is our responsibility to leave the people of the future a free hand. ~ Richard P Feynman
80:Turbulence is the most important unsolved problem of classical physics. ~ Richard P Feynman
81:Science is the organized skepticism in the reliability of expert opinion ~ Richard P Feynman
82:We are lucky to live in an age in which we are still making discoveries. ~ Richard P Feynman
83:Energy is a very subtle concept. It is very, very difficult to get right. ~ Richard P Feynman
84:I have a limited intelligence and I've used it in a particular direction. ~ Richard P Feynman
85:Science is what we have learned about how to keep from fooling ourselves. ~ Richard P Feynman
86:What we need is imagination, but imagination in a terrible strait-jacket. ~ Richard P Feynman
87:The fundamental principle of science, the definition almost, is this: the ~ Richard P Feynman
88:There in wine is found the great generalization: all life is fermentation. ~ Richard P Feynman
89:Another thing I must point out is that you cannot prove a vague theory wrong. ~ Richard P Feynman
90:Mathematics is not just a language. Mathematics is a language plus reasoning. ~ Richard P Feynman
91:No problem is too small or too trivial if we can really do something about it. ~ Richard P Feynman
92:Work as hard and as much as you want to on the things you like to do the best. ~ Richard P Feynman
93:Observation, reason, and experiment make up what we call the scientific method. ~ Richard P Feynman
94:What would happen if we could arrange the atoms one by one the way we want them? ~ Richard P Feynman
95:If all of mathematics disappeared, physics would be set back by exactly one week. ~ Richard P Feynman
96:All theoretical chemistry is really physics; and all theoretical chemists know it. ~ Richard P Feynman
97:I have to keep going to find out ultimately what is the matter with it in the end. ~ Richard P Feynman
98:Philosophy of science is about as useful to scientists as ornithology is to birds. ~ Richard P Feynman
99:The real problem in speech is not precise language. The problem is clear language. ~ Richard P Feynman
100:If you thought that science was certain - well, that is just an error on your part. ~ Richard P Feynman
101:But there is nothing in biology yet found that indicates the inevitability of death. ~ Richard P Feynman
102:No man is rich who is unsatisfied, but who wants nothing possess his heart's desire. ~ Richard P Feynman
103:The highest forms of understanding we can achieve are laughter and human compassion. ~ Richard P Feynman
104:I was born not knowing and have had only a little time to change that here and there. ~ Richard P Feynman
105:The electron is a theory. But the theory is so good we can almost consider them real. ~ Richard P Feynman
106:If you think you understand quantum mechanics, you don't understand quantum mechanics. ~ Richard P Feynman
107:The only way to deep happiness is to do something you love to the best of your ability ~ Richard P Feynman
108:There is no learning without having to pose a question. And a question requires doubt. ~ Richard P Feynman
109:But see that the imagination of nature is far, far greater than the imagination of man. ~ Richard P Feynman
110:If a guy tells me the probability of failure is 1 in 100,000, I know he's full of crap. ~ Richard P Feynman
111:That is the logical tight-rope on which we have to walk if we wish to interpret nature. ~ Richard P Feynman
112:The game I play is a very interesting one. It's imagination, in a tight straightjacket. ~ Richard P Feynman
113:If I could explain it to the average person, I wouldn't have been worth the Nobel Prize. ~ Richard P Feynman
114:It is important to realize that in physics today, we have no knowledge of what energy is ~ Richard P Feynman
115:Some people think Wheeler's gotten crazy in his later years, but he's always been crazy. ~ Richard P Feynman
116:The game I play is a very interesting one. It's imagination, in a tight straightjacket. ~ Richard P Feynman,
117:If you don't like it, go somewhere else, to another universe where the rules are simpler. ~ Richard P Feynman
118:Since then I never pay attention to anything by "experts". I calculate everything myself. ~ Richard P Feynman
119:The test of all knowledge is experiment. Experiment is the sole judge of scientific truth. ~ Richard P Feynman
120:I think Nature's imagination is so much greater than man's, she's never gonna let us relax! ~ Richard P Feynman
121:I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned. ~ Richard P Feynman
122:Physics is like sex: sure, it may give some practical results, but that's not why we do it. ~ Richard P Feynman
123:The fact that you are not sure means that it is possible that there is another way someday. ~ Richard P Feynman
124:Winning a Nobel Prize is no big deal, but winning it with an IQ of 124 is really something. ~ Richard P Feynman
125:Agnostic for me would be trying to weasel out and sound a little nicer than I am about this. ~ Richard P Feynman
126:If you can't explain something to a first year student, then you haven't really understood . ~ Richard P Feynman
127:I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned. ~ Richard P Feynman,
128:The present situation in physics is as if we know chess, but we don't know one or two rules. ~ Richard P Feynman
129:There is enough energy in a single cubic meter of space to boil all the oceans in the world. ~ Richard P Feynman
130:We need to teach how doubt is not to be feared but welcomed. It's OK to say, "I don't know." ~ Richard P Feynman
131:I believe that a scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy. ~ Richard P Feynman
132:Outside of their particular area of expertise scientists are just as dumb as the next person. ~ Richard P Feynman
133:An ordinary fool isn't a faker; an honest fool is all right. But a dishonest fool is terrible! ~ Richard P Feynman
134:The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool. ~ Richard P Feynman
135:I learned from her that every woman is worried about her looks, no matter how beautiful she is. ~ Richard P Feynman
136:The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool. ~ Richard P Feynman,
137:I don't think that the laws can be considered to be like God because they have been figured out. ~ Richard P Feynman
138:I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something. ~ Richard P Feynman
139:It is not unscientific to make a guess, although many people who are not in science think it is. ~ Richard P Feynman
140:So far as we know, all the fundamental laws of physics, like Newton's equations, are reversible. ~ Richard P Feynman
141:The "paradox" is only a conflict between reality and your feeling of what reality "ought to be." ~ Richard P Feynman
142:There is no harm in doubt and skepticism, for it is through these that new discoveries are made. ~ Richard P Feynman
143:Words can be meaningless. If they are used in such a way that no sharp conclusions can be drawn. ~ Richard P Feynman
144:But the real glory of science is that we can find a way of thinking such that the law is evident. ~ Richard P Feynman
145:I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong. ~ Richard P Feynman
146:The Quantum Universe has a quotation from me in every chapter - but it's a damn good book anyway. ~ Richard P Feynman
147:We are not to tell nature what she’s gotta be... She's always got better imagination than we have. ~ Richard P Feynman
148:Victory usually goes to those green enough to underestimate the monumental hurdles they are facing. ~ Richard P Feynman
149:Our responsibility is to do what we can, learn what we can, improve the solutions, and pass them on. ~ Richard P Feynman
150:People who wish to analyze nature without using mathematics must settle for a reduced understanding. ~ Richard P Feynman
151:I'm going to play with physics, whenever I want to, without worrying about any importance whatsoever. ~ Richard P Feynman
152:Science is like sex: sometimes something useful comes out, but that is not the reason we are doing it ~ Richard P Feynman
153:We have this terrible struggle to try to explain things to people who have no reason to want to know. ~ Richard P Feynman
154:Physicists like to think that all you have to do is say, these are the conditions, now what happens next? ~ Richard P Feynman
155:Tell your son to stop trying to fill your head with science - for to fill your heart with love is enough! ~ Richard P Feynman
156:Study hard what interests you the most in the most undisciplined, irreverent and original manner possible. ~ Richard P Feynman
157:If we want to solve a problem that we have never solved before, we must leave the door to the unknown ajar. ~ Richard P Feynman
158:If we will only allow that, as we progress, we remain unsure, we will leave opportunities for alternatives. ~ Richard P Feynman
159:For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled. ~ Richard P Feynman
160:We are trying to prove ourselves wrong as quickly as possible, because only in that way can we find progress. ~ Richard P Feynman
161:[B]eyond poverty, beyond the point that the material needs are reasonably satisfied, only from within is peace. ~ Richard P Feynman
162:God was invented to explain mystery. God is always invented to explain those things that you do not understand. ~ Richard P Feynman
163:Mathematics is a language plus reasoning. It's like a language plus logic. Mathematics is a tool for reasoning. ~ Richard P Feynman
164:If all of this, all the life of a stream of water, can be nothing but a pile of atoms, how much more is possible? ~ Richard P Feynman
165:Fall in love with some activity, and do it! Nobody ever figures out what life is all about, and it doesn't matter. ~ Richard P Feynman
166:It is the fact that the electrons cannot all get on top of each other that makes tables and everything else solid. ~ Richard P Feynman
167:Study hard what interests you the most in the most undisciplined, irreverent and original manner possible.
   ~ Richard P Feynman, [T5],
168:The basis of action on love, the brotherhood of all men, the value of the individual... the humility of the spirit. ~ Richard P Feynman
169:I couldn't claim that I was smarter than sixty-five other guys--but the average of sixty-five other guys, certainly! ~ Richard P Feynman
170:The unanswerable mysteries... the attitude that all is uncertain... to summarize it - the humility of the intellect. ~ Richard P Feynman
171:To test whether you have learned an idea or a definition, rephrase what you just learned without using the new word. ~ Richard P Feynman
172:People often think I'm a faker, but I'm usually honest, in a certain way--in such a way that often nobody believes me! ~ Richard P Feynman
173:It's amazing how many people even today use a computer to do something you can do with a pencil and paper in less time. ~ Richard P Feynman
174:Of course, you only live one life, and you make all your mistakes, and learn what not to do, and that's the end of you. ~ Richard P Feynman
175:The electron is a theory we use; it is so useful in understanding the way nature works that we can almost call it real. ~ Richard P Feynman
176:As usual, nature's imagination far surpasses our own, as we have seen from the other theories which are subtle and deep. ~ Richard P Feynman
177:It is impossible, by the way, when picking one example of anything, to avoid picking one which is atypical in some sense. ~ Richard P Feynman
178:Scientific knowledge is an enabling power to do either good or bad — but it does not carry instructions on how to use it. ~ Richard P Feynman
179:When you get as old as I am, you start to realize that you've told most of the good stuff you know to other people anyway. ~ Richard P Feynman
180:A scientist is never certain. ... We absolutely must leave room for doubt or there is no progress and there is no learning. ~ Richard P Feynman
181:All the time you're saying to yourself, 'I could do that, but I won't,'--which is just another way of saying that you can't. ~ Richard P Feynman
182:We have found it of paramount importance that in order to progress, we must recognize our ignorance and leave room for doubt. ~ Richard P Feynman
183:As you know, a theory in physics is not useful unless it is able to predict underlined effects which we would otherwise expect. ~ Richard P Feynman
184:To decide upon the answer is not scientific. In order to make progress, one must leave the door to the unknown ajar ajar only. ~ Richard P Feynman
185:You see, I get such fun out of thinking that I don't want to destroy this most pleasant machine that makes life such a big kick. ~ Richard P Feynman
186:Doubt is clearly a value in science. It is important to doubt and that the doubt is not a fearful thing, but a thing of great value. ~ Richard P Feynman
187:If you know that you are not sure, you have a chance to improve the situation. I want to demand this freedom for future generations. ~ Richard P Feynman
188:Science is a process for learning about nature in which competing ideas about how the world works are measured against observations. ~ Richard P Feynman
189:While I am describing to you how Nature works, you won't understand why Nature works that way. But you see, nobody understands that. ~ Richard P Feynman
190:It doesn't matter how beautiful your theory is, it doesn't matter how smart you are. If it doesn't agree with experiment, it's wrong. ~ Richard P Feynman
191:If an apple was magnified to the size of the Earth, then the atoms in the apple would be approximately the size of the original apple. ~ Richard P Feynman
192:It is scientific only to say what is more likely and what less likely, and not to be proving all the time the possible and impossible. ~ Richard P Feynman
193:Einstein was a giant. His head was in the clouds, but his feet were on the ground. But those of us who are not that tall have to choose! ~ Richard P Feynman
194:The problem of creating something new, but which is consistent with everything which has been seen before, is one of extreme difficulty. ~ Richard P Feynman
195:It is necessary for the very existence of science that minds exist which do not allow that nature must satisfy some preconceived conditions. ~ Richard P Feynman
196:Scientific knowledge is a body of statements of varying degrees of certainty -- some most unsure, some nearly sure, none absolutely certain. ~ Richard P Feynman
197:Some things that satisfy the rules of algebra can be interesting to mathematicians even though they don't always represent a real situation. ~ Richard P Feynman
198:Scientific knowledge is a body of statements of varying degrees of certainty -- some most unsure, some nearly sure, none absolutely certain. ~ Richard P Feynman,
199:If you have any talent, or any occupation that delights you, do it, and do it to the hilt. Don't ask why, or what difficulties you may get into. ~ Richard P Feynman
200:Mathematics is a language plus reasoning; it is like a language plus logic. Mathematics is a tool for reasoning. ~ Richard P Feynman, The Character of Physical Law,
201:It's because somebody knows something about it that we can't talk about physics. It's the things that nobody knows anything about we can discuss. ~ Richard P Feynman
202:Nature uses only the longest threads to weave her patterns, so each small piece of her fabric reveals the organization of the entire tapestry.
   ~ Richard P Feynman,
203:We can deduce, often, from one part of physics like the law of gravitation, a principle which turns out to be much more valid than the derivation. ~ Richard P Feynman
204:For those who want some proof that physicists are human, the proof is in the idiocy of all the different units which they use for measuring energy. ~ Richard P Feynman
205:I think a power to do something is of value. Whether the result is a good thing or a bad thing depends on how it is used, but the power is a value. ~ Richard P Feynman
206:Light is something like raindrops each little lump of light is called a photon and if the light is all one color, all the "raindrops" are the same. ~ Richard P Feynman
207:Nature uses only the longest threads to weave her patterns, so that each small piece of her fabric reveals the organization of the entire tapestry. ~ Richard P Feynman
208:There is one simplification at least. Electrons behave ... in exactly the same way as photons; they are both screwy, but in exactly in the same way. ~ Richard P Feynman
209:There are all kinds of interesting questions that come from a knowledge of science, which only adds to the excitement and mystery and awe of a flower. ~ Richard P Feynman
210:A philosopher once said, 'It is necessary for the very existence of science that the same conditions always produce the same results.' Well, they don't! ~ Richard P Feynman
211:Philosophers say a great deal about what is absolutely necessary for science, and it is always, so far as one can see, rather naive, and probably wrong. ~ Richard P Feynman
212:Have no respect whatsoever for authority; forget who said it and instead look what he starts with, where he ends up, and ask yourself, "Is it reasonable?" ~ Richard P Feynman
213:In fact the total amount that a physicist knows is very little. He has only to remember the rules to get him from one place to another and he is all right. ~ Richard P Feynman
214:There is nothing that living things do that cannot be understood from the point of view that they are made of atoms acting according to the laws of physics. ~ Richard P Feynman
215:Strange! I don't understand how it is that we can write mathematical expressions and calculate what the thing is going to do without being able to picture it. ~ Richard P Feynman
216:Start out understanding religion by saying everything is possibly wrong... As soon as you do that, you start sliding down an edge which is hard to recover from. ~ Richard P Feynman
217:One cannot understand... the universality of laws of nature, the relationship of things, without an understanding of mathematics. There is no other way to do it. ~ Richard P Feynman
218:The theoretical broadening which comes from having many humanities subjects on the campus is offset by the general dopiness of the people who study these things. ~ Richard P Feynman
219:I don't know what's the matter with people: they don't learn by understanding, they learn by some other way — by rote or something. Their knowledge is so fragile! ~ Richard P Feynman
220:Nobody ever figures out what life is all about, and it doesn't matter. Explore the world. Nearly everything is really interesting if you go into it deeply enough. ~ Richard P Feynman
221:Our imagination is stretched to the utmost, not, as in fiction, to imagine things which are not really there, but just to comprehend those things which are there. ~ Richard P Feynman
222:If there is something very slightly wrong in our definition of the theories, then the full mathematical rigor may convert these errors into ridiculous conclusions. ~ Richard P Feynman
223:Every instrument that has been designed to be sensitive enough to detect weak light has always ended up discovering that the same thing: light is made of particles. ~ Richard P Feynman
224:From a long view of the history of mankind the most significant event of the nineteenth century will be judged as Maxwell's discovery of the laws of electrodynamics. ~ Richard P Feynman
225:We scientists are clever — too clever — are you not satisfied? Is four square miles in one bomb not enough? Men are still thinking. Just tell us how big you want it! ~ Richard P Feynman
226:Science alone of all the subjects contains within itself the lesson of the danger of belief in the infallibility of the greatest teachers of the preceding generation. ~ Richard P Feynman
227:To guess what to keep and what to throw away takes considerable skill. Actually it is probably merely a matter of luck, but it looks as if it takes considerable skill. ~ Richard P Feynman
228:There are thousands of years in the past, and there is an unknown amount of time in the future. There are all kinds of opportunities, and there are all kinds of dangers. ~ Richard P Feynman
229:Everybody who reasons carefully about anything is making a contribution ... and if you abstract it away and send it to the Department of Mathematics they put it in books. ~ Richard P Feynman
230:One does not, by knowing all the physical laws as we know them today, immediately obtain an understanding of anything much. I love only nature, and I hate mathematicians. ~ Richard P Feynman
231:Poets say science takes away from the beauty of the stars - mere globs of gas atoms. I, too, can see the stars on a desert night, and feel them. But do I see less or more? ~ Richard P Feynman
232:Some people say, "How can you live without knowing?" I do not know what they mean. I always live without knowing. That is easy. How you get to know is what I want to know. ~ Richard P Feynman
233:You see, the chemists have a complicated way of counting: instead of saying "one, two, three, four, five protons", they say, "hydrogen, helium, lithium, beryllium, boron." ~ Richard P Feynman
234:Don't think about what you want to be, but what you want to do. Keep up some kind of a minimum with other things so that society doesn't stop you from doing anything at all. ~ Richard P Feynman
235:In physics the truth is rarely perfectly clear, and that is certainly universally the case in human affairs. Hence, what is not surrounded by uncertainty cannot be the truth. ~ Richard P Feynman
236:My rule is, when you are unhappy, think about it. But when you're happy, don't. Why spoil it? You're probably happy for some ridiculous reason and you'd just spoil it to know it. ~ Richard P Feynman
237:When things are going well, something will go wrong. / When things just can't get any worse, they will. / Anytime things appear to be going better, you have overlooked something. ~ Richard P Feynman
238:[Quantum mechanics] describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd. ~ Richard P Feynman
239:I love to think. I once considered taking drugs as an attempt to better understand an altered state of mind; however, I decided not to. I didn't want to chance ruining the machine. ~ Richard P Feynman
240:If you can find any other view of the world which agrees over the entire range where things have already been observed, but disagrees somewhere else, you have made a great discovery. ~ Richard P Feynman
241:Know your place in the world and evaluate yourself fairly, not in terms of the naïve ideals of your own youth, nor in terms of what you erroneously imagine your teacher's ideals are. ~ Richard P Feynman
242:Ordinarily it would take me about fifteen minutes to get a hallucination going," wrote Feynman, "but on a few occasions, when I smoked some marijuana beforehand, it came very quickly. ~ Richard P Feynman
243:You have no responsibility to live up to what other people think you ought to accomplish. I have no responsibility to be like they expect me to be. It's their mistake, not my failing. ~ Richard P Feynman
244:I find that teaching and the students keep life going, and I would never accept any position in which somebody has invented a happy situation for me where I don't have to teach. Never. ~ Richard P Feynman
245:There are theoretical physicists who imagine, deduce, and guess at new laws, but do not experiment; and then there are experimental physicists who experiment, imagine, deduce, and guess. ~ Richard P Feynman
246:The idea that no one really knew how to run a government led to the idea that we should arrange a system by which new ideas could be developed, tried out, and tossed out if necessary, with ~ Richard P Feynman
247:The idea is to try to give all the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgment in one particular direction or another. ~ Richard P Feynman
248:Nature isn't classical, dammit, and if you want to make a simulation of nature, you'd better make it quantum mechanical, and by golly it's a wonderful problem, because it doesn't look so easy. ~ Richard P Feynman
249:The most important thing I found out from my father is that if you asked any question and pursued it deeply enough, then at the end there was a glorious discovery of a general and beautiful kind. ~ Richard P Feynman
250:I don't feel frightened by not knowing things, by being lost in the mysterious universe without any purpose - which is the way it really is, as far as I can tell. Possibly. It doesn't frighten me. ~ Richard P Feynman
251:I don't like honors. ... I've already got the prize: the prize is the pleasure of finding the thing out, the kick in the discovery, the observation that other people use it. Those are the real things. ~ Richard P Feynman
252:People may come along and argue philosophically that they like one better than another; but we have learned from much experience that all philosophical intuitions about what nature is going to do fail. ~ Richard P Feynman
253:The worthwhile problems are the ones you can really solve or help solve, the ones you can really contribute something to... No problem is too small or too trivial if we can really do something about it. ~ Richard P Feynman
254:We decided that 'trivial' means 'proved'. So we joked with the mathematicians: We have a new theorem- that mathematicians can prove only trivial theorems, because every theorem that's proved is trivial. ~ Richard P Feynman
255:Everything we know is only some kind of approximation, because we know that we do not know all the laws yet. Therefore, things must be learned only to be unlearned again or, more likely, to be corrected. ~ Richard P Feynman
256:I have argued flying saucers with lots of people. I was interested in possible. They do not appreciate that the problem is not to demonstrate whether it's possible or not but whether it's going on or not. ~ Richard P Feynman
257:Therefore psychologically we must keep all the theories in our heads, and every theoretical physicist who is any good knows six or seven different theoretical representations for exactly the same physics. ~ Richard P Feynman
258:Although it is uncertain, it is necessary to make science useful. Science is only useful if it tells you about some experiment that has not been done; it is not good if it only tells you what just went on. ~ Richard P Feynman
259:The beauty that is there is also available for me, too. But I see a deeper beauty that isn't so readily available to others.... I don't see how studying a flower ever detracts from its beauty. It only adds ~ Richard P Feynman
260:By honest I don't mean that you only tell what's true. But you make clear the entire situation. You make clear all the information that is required for somebody else who is intelligent to make up their mind. ~ Richard P Feynman
261:There is a computer disease that anybody who works with computers knows about. It's a very serious disease and it interferes completely with the work. The trouble with computers is that you 'play' with them! ~ Richard P Feynman
262:There’s so much distance between the fundamental rules and the final phenomenon, that it’s almost unbelievable that the final variety of phenomenon can come from such a steady operation of such simple rules. ~ Richard P Feynman
263:It is odd, but on the infrequent occasions when I have been called upon in a formal place to play the bongo drums, the introducer never seems to find it necessary to mention that I also do theoretical physics. ~ Richard P Feynman
264:... it is impossible to explain honestly the beauties of the laws of nature in a way that people can feel, without their having some deep understanding of mathematics. I am sorry, but this seems to be the case. ~ Richard P Feynman
265:You see, one thing is, I can live with doubt and uncertainty and not knowing. I have approximate answers and possible beliefs and different degrees of certainty about different things... It doesn't frighten me. ~ Richard P Feynman
266:Once we were driving in the midwest and we pulled into a McDonald's. Someone came up to me and asked me why I have Feynman diagrams all over my van. I replied, "Because I am Feynman!" The young man went, "Ahhhhh!" ~ Richard P Feynman
267:So this piece of dirt waits four and a half billion years and evolves and changes, and now a strange creature stands here with instruments and talks to the strange creatures in the audience. What a wonderful world! ~ Richard P Feynman
268:You can recognize truth by its beauty and simplicity. When you get it right, it is obvious that it is right -- at least if you have any experience -- because usually what happens is that more comes out than goes in. ~ Richard P Feynman
269:Unless a thing can be defined by measurement, it has no place in a theory. And since an accurate value of the momentum of a localized particle cannot be defined by measurement it therefore has no place in the theory. ~ Richard P Feynman
270:When a scientist doesn't know the answer to a problem, he is ignorant. When he has a hunch as to what the result is, he is uncertain. And when he is pretty darn sure of what the result is going to be, he is in some doubt. ~ Richard P Feynman
271:We absolutely must leave room for doubt or there is no progress and no learning. There is no learning without having to pose a question. And a question requires doubt. People search for certainty. But there is no certainty. ~ Richard P Feynman
272:When the problem [quantum chromodynamics] is finally solved, it will all be by imagination. Then there will be some big thing about the great way it was done. But it's simple -it will all be by imagination, and persistence. ~ Richard P Feynman
273:You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts. ~ Richard P Feynman
274:It does not make any difference how beautiful your guess is. It does not make any difference how smart you are, who made the guess, or what his name is if it disagrees with experiment it is wrong. That is all there is to it. ~ Richard P Feynman
275:There are 10^11 stars in the galaxy. That used to be a huge number. But it's only a hundred billion. It's less than the national deficit! We used to call them astronomical numbers. Now we should call them economical numbers. ~ Richard P Feynman
276:It is the facts that matter, not the proofs. Physics can progress without the proofs, but we can't go on without the facts ... if the facts are right, then the proofs are a matter of playing around with the algebra correctly. ~ Richard P Feynman
277:The whole question of imagination in science is often misunderstood by people in other disciplines. ... They overlook the fact that whatever we are allowed to imagine in science must be consistent with everything else we know. ~ Richard P Feynman
278:When a photon comes down, it interacts with electrons throughout the glass, not just on the surface. The photon and electrons do some kind of dance, the net result of which is the same as if the photon hit only on the surface. ~ Richard P Feynman
279:Just as a poet often has license from the rules of grammar and pronunciation, we should like to ask for 'physicists' license from the rules of mathematics in order to express what we wish to say in as simple a manner as possible. ~ Richard P Feynman
280:If the professors of English will complain to me that the students who come to the universities, after all those years of study, still cannot spell 'friend,' I say to them that something's the matter with the way you spell friend. ~ Richard P Feynman
281:This attitude of mind - this attitude of uncertainty - is vital to the scientist, and it is this attitude of mind which the student must first acquire. It becomes a habit of thought. Once acquired, we cannot retreat from it anymore. ~ Richard P Feynman
282:We find that the statements of science are not of what is true and what is not true, but statements of what is known with different degrees of certainty: "It is very much more likely that so and so is true than that it is not true". ~ Richard P Feynman
283:It does not matter who you are, or how smart you are, or what title you have, or how many of you there are, and certainly not how many papers your side has published, if your prediction is wrong then your hypothesis is wrong. Period. ~ Richard P Feynman
284:There was a time when the newspapers said that only twelve men understood the theory of relativity. I do not believe there ever was such a time ... On the other hand, I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics. ~ Richard P Feynman
285:[When a young person loses faith in his religion because he begins to study science and its methodology] it isn't that [through the obtaining of real knowledge that] he knows it all, but he suddenly realizes that he doesn't know it all. ~ Richard P Feynman
286:I have the advantage of having found out how hard it is to get to really know something. How careful you have to be about checking your experiments. How easy it is to make mistakes and fool yourself. I know what it means to know something. ~ Richard P Feynman
287:Scientific views end in awe and mystery, lost at the edge in uncertainty, but they appear to be so deep and so impressive that the theory that it is all arranged as a stage for God to watch man's struggle for good and evil seems inadequate. ~ Richard P Feynman
288:There is nothing in biology yet found that indicates the inevitability of death. This suggests to me that it is not at all inevitable and that it is only a matter of time before biologists discover what it is that is causing us the trouble. ~ Richard P Feynman
289:People are always asking for the latest developments in the unification of this theory with that theory, and they don't give us a chance to tell them anything about what we know pretty well. They always want to know the things we don't know. ~ Richard P Feynman
290:In its efforts to learn as much as possible about nature, modern physics has found that certain things can never be "known" with certainty. Much of our knowledge must always remain uncertain. The most we can know is in terms of probabilities. ~ Richard P Feynman
291:The female mind is capable of understanding analytic geometry... The difficulty may just be that we have never yet discovered a way to communicate with the female mind. If it is done in the right way, you may be able to get something out of it. ~ Richard P Feynman
292:A person talks in such generalities that everyone can understand him and it's considered to be some deep philosophy. However, I would like to be very rather more special and I would like to be understood in an honest way, rather than in a vague way. ~ Richard P Feynman
293:Our poets do not write about it; our artists do not try to portray this remarkable thing. I don't know why. Is nobody inspired by our present picture of the universe? The value of science remains unsung by singers... This is not yet a scientific age. ~ Richard P Feynman
294:A poet once said, "The whole universe is in a glass of wine." We will probably never know in what sense he meant that, for poets do not write to be understood. But it is true that if we look at a glass of wine closely enough we see the entire universe. ~ Richard P Feynman
295:To those who do not know mathematics it is difficult to get across a real feeling as to the beauty, the deepest beauty, of nature ... If you want to learn about nature, to appreciate nature, it is necessary to understand the language that she speaks in. ~ Richard P Feynman
296:When a Caltech student asked the eminent cosmologist Michael Turner what his "bias" was in favoring one or another particle as a likely candidate to compromise dark matter in the universe, Feynmann snapped, "Why do you want to know his bias? Form your own bias!" ~ Richard P Feynman
297:The scale of light can be described by numbers called the frequency and as the numbers get higher, the light goes from red to blue to ultraviolet. We can't see ultraviolet light, but it can affect photographic plates. It's still light only the number is different. ~ Richard P Feynman
298:Computer science is not as old as physics; it lags by a couple of hundred years. However, this does not mean that there is significantly less on the computer scientist's plate than on the physicist's: younger it may be, but it has had a far more intense upbringing! ~ Richard P Feynman
299:For far more marvelous is the truth than any artists of the past imagined it. Why do the poets of the present not speak of it? What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent? ~ Richard P Feynman
300:If you keep proving stuff that others have done, getting confidence, increasing the complexities of your solutions - for the fun of it - then one day you'll turn around and discover that nobody actually did that one! And that's the way to become a computer scientist. ~ Richard P Feynman
301:Only realistic flight schedules should be proposed, schedules that have a reasonable chance of being met. If in this way the government would not support them, then so be it. NASA owes it to the citizens from whom it asks support to be frank, honest, and informative. ~ Richard P Feynman
302:We are at the very beginning of time for the human race. It is not unreasonable that we grapple with problems. But there are tens of thousands of years in the future. Our responsibility is to do what we can, learn what we can, improve the solutions, and pass them on. ~ Richard P Feynman
303:It is in the admission of ignorance and the admission of uncertainty that there is a hope for the continuous motion of human beings in some direction that doesn't get confined, permanently blocked, as it has so many times before in various periods in the history of man. ~ Richard P Feynman
304:If science is to progress, what we need is the ability to experiment, honesty in reporting results—the results must be reported without somebody saying what they would like the results to have been—and finally—an important thing—the intelligence to interpret the results. ~ Richard P Feynman
305:The first principle is that you must not fool yourself—and you are the easiest person to fool. So you have to be very careful about that. After you’ve not fooled yourself, it’s easy not to fool other scientists. You just have to be honest in a conventional way after that. ~ Richard P Feynman
306:Whenever you see a sweeping statement that a tremendous amount can come from a very small number of assumptions, you always find that it is false. There are usually a large number of implied assumptions that are far from obvious if you think about them sufficiently carefully. ~ Richard P Feynman
307:If I say [electrons] behave like particles I give the wrong impression; also if I say they behave like waves. They behave in their own inimitable way, which technically could be called a quantum mechanical way. They behave in a way that is like nothing that you have seen before. ~ Richard P Feynman
308:This is the key of modern science and is the beginning of the true understanding of nature. This idea. That to look at the things, to record the details, and to hope that in the information thus obtained, may lie a clue to one or another of a possible theoretical interpretation. ~ Richard P Feynman
309:I don't believe I can really do without teaching. The reason is, I have to have something so that when I don't have any ideas and I'm not getting anywhere, I can say to myself, "At least I'm living; at least I'm doing something. I'm making some contribution." It's just psychological. ~ Richard P Feynman
310:(Joan,1941) She wrote me a letter asking,"How can I read it?,Its so hard." I told her to start at the beginning and read as far as you can get until you're lost. Then start again at the beginning and keep working through until you can understand the whole book. And thats what she did ~ Richard P Feynman
311:It appears that there are enormous differences of opinion as to the probability of a failure with loss of vehicle and of human life. The estimates range from roughly 1 in 100 to 1 in 100,000. The higher figures come from the working engineers, and the very low figures from management. ~ Richard P Feynman
312:(Joan,1941) She wrote me a letter asking,"How can I read it?,Its so hard." I told her to start at the beginning and read as far as you can get until you're lost. Then start again at the beginning and keep working through until you can understand the whole book. And thats what she did ~ Richard P Feynman,
313:When I found out that Santa Claus wasn't real, I wasn't upset; rather, I was relieved that there was a much simpler phenomenon to explain how so many children all over the world got presents on the same night! The story had been getting pretty complicated -- it was getting out of hand. ~ Richard P Feynman
314:I do believe that there is a conflict between science and religion ... the spirit or attitude toward the facts is different in religion from what it is in science. The uncertainty that is necessary in order to appreciate nature is not easily correlated with the feeling of certainty in faith. ~ Richard P Feynman
315:In a way, the Nobel Prize has been something of a pain in the neck, though there was at least one time that I got some fun out of it, Shortly after I won the Prize, Gweneth and I received an invitation from the Brazilian government to be the guests of honor at the Carnaval celebrations in Rio. ~ Richard P Feynman
316:Our freedom to doubt was born out of a struggle against authority in the early days of science. It was a very deep and strong struggle: permit us to question - to doubt - to not be sure. I think that it is important that we do not forget this struggle and thus perhaps lose what we have gained. ~ Richard P Feynman
317:The real question of government versus private enterprise is argued on too philosophical and abstract a basis. Theoretically, planning may be good. But nobody has ever figured out the cause of government stupidity—and until they do (and find the cure), all ideal plans will fall into quicksand. ~ Richard P Feynman
318:I am going to tell you what nature behaves like. If you will simply admit that maybe she does behave like this, you will find her a delightful, entrancing thing. Do not keep saying to yourself, if you can possibly avoid it, 'But how can it be like that?' ...Nobody knows how it can be like that. ~ Richard P Feynman
319:It requires a much higher degree of imagination to understand the electromagnetic field than to understand invisible angels. ... I speak of the E and B fields and wave my arms and you may imagine that I can see them ... [but] I cannot really make a picture that is even nearly like the true waves. ~ Richard P Feynman
320:Listen, I mean that from my knowledge of the world that I see around me, I think that it is much more likely that the reports of flying saucers are the results of the known irrational characteristics of terrestrial intelligence than of the unknown rational efforts of extra-terrestrial intelligence. ~ Richard P Feynman
321:What I am going to tell you about is what we teach our physics students in the third or fourth year of graduate school... It is my task to convince you not to turn away because you don't understand it. You see my physics students don't understand it... That is because I don't understand it. Nobody does. ~ Richard P Feynman
322:So I have just one wish for you – the good luck to be somewhere where you are free to maintain the kind of integrity I have described, and where you do not feel forced by a need to maintain your position in the organization, or financial support, or so on, to lose your integrity. May you have that freedom. ~ Richard P Feynman
323:The work I have done has, already, been adequately rewarded and recognized. Imagination reaches out repeatedly trying to achieve some higher level of understanding, until suddenly I find myself momentarily alone before one new corner of nature's pattern of beauty and true majesty revealed. That was my reward. ~ Richard P Feynman
324:I was terrible in English. I couldn't stand the subject. It seemed to me ridiculous to worry about whether you spelled something wrong or not, because English spelling is just a human convention--it has nothing to do with anything real, anything from nature. Any word can be spelled just as well a different way. ~ Richard P Feynman
325:You know how it always is, every new idea, it takes a generation or two until it becomes obvious that there's no real problem. It has not yet become obvious to me that there's no real problem. I cannot define the real problem, therefore I suspect there's no real problem, but I'm not sure there's no real problem. ~ Richard P Feynman
326:In any organization there ought to be the possibility of discussion... fence sitting is an art, and it's difficult, and it's important to do, rather than to go headlong in one direction or the other. It's just better to have action, isn't it than to sit on the fence? Not if you're not sure which way to go, it isn't. ~ Richard P Feynman
327:During the Middle Ages there were all kinds of crazy ideas, such as that a piece of rhinoceros horn would increase potency. Then a method was discovered for separating the ideas - which was to try one to see if it worked, and if it didn't work, to eliminate it. This method became organized, of course, into science. ~ Richard P Feynman
328:Science is a way to teach how something gets to be known, what is not known, to what extent things are known (for nothing is known absolutely), how to handle doubt and uncertainty, what the rules of evidence are, how to think about things so that judgments can be made, how to distinguish truth from fraud, and from show. ~ Richard P Feynman
329:We cannot define anything precisely. If we attempt to, we get into the paralysis of thought that comes to philosophers, who sit opposite each other, one saying to the other, "You don't know what you are talking about!" The second one says, "What do you mean by know? What do you mean by talking? What do you mean by you?" ~ Richard P Feynman
330:The only way to have real success in science, the field I'm familiar with, is to describe the evidence very carefully without regard to the way you feel it should be. If you have a theory , you must try to explain what's good and what's bad about it equally. In science, you learn a kind of standard integrity and honesty . ~ Richard P Feynman
331:What do I advise? Forget it all. Don't be afraid. Do what you get the most pleasure from. Is it to build a cloud chamber? Then go on doing things like that. Develop your talents wherever they may lead. Damn the torpedoes - full speed ahead!If you have any talent,or any occupation that delights you,do it, and do it to the hilt ~ Richard P Feynman
332:If you thought you were trying to find out more about it because you're gonna get an answer to some deep philosophical question...you may be wrong! It may be that you can't get an answer to that particular question by finding out more about the character of nature. But my interest in science is to simply find out about the world. ~ Richard P Feynman
333:The game I play is a very interesting one. It's imagination in a straightjacket, which is this: that it has to agree with the known laws of physics. ... It requires imagination to think of what's possible, and then it requires an analysis back, checking to see whether it fits, whether its allowed, according to what's known, okay? ~ Richard P Feynman
334:What do I advise? Forget it all. Don't be afraid. Do what you get the most pleasure from. Is it to build a cloud chamber? Then go on doing things like that. Develop your talents wherever they may lead. Damn the torpedoes - full speed ahead!
   If you have any talent, or any occupation that delights you, do it, and do it to the hilt ~ Richard P Feynman,
335:Ordinary fools are all right; you can talk to them, and try to help them out. But pompous fools-guys who are fools and are covering it all over and impressing people as to how wonderful they are with all this hocus pocus-THAT, I CANNOT STAND! An ordinary fool isn't a faker; an honest fool is all right. But a dishonest fool is terrible! ~ Richard P Feynman
336:Why make yourself miserable saying things like, "Why do we have such bad luck? What has God done to us? What have we done to deserve this?" - all of which, if you understand reality and take it completely into your heart, are irrelevant and unsolvable. They are just things that nobody can know. Your situation is just an accident of life. ~ Richard P Feynman
337:John von Neumann gave me an interesting idea: that you don't have to be responsible for the world that you're in. So I have developed a very powerful sense of social irresponsibility as a result of von Neumann's advice. It's made me a very happy man ever since. But it was von Neumann who put the seed in that grew into my active irresponsibility! ~ Richard P Feynman
338:All things are made of atoms - little particles that move around in perpetual motion, attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another. In that one sentence, you will see, there is an enormous amount of information about the world, if just a little imagination and thinking are applied. ~ Richard P Feynman
339:We are very lucky to be living in an age in which we are still making discoveries. It is like the discovery of America-you only discover it once. The age in which we live is the age in which we are discovering the fundamental laws of nature, and that day will never come again. It is very exciting, it is marvelous, but this excitement will have to go. ~ Richard P Feynman
340:My friends and I had taken dancing lessons, although none of us would ever admit it. In those depression days, a friend of my mother was trying to make a living by teaching dancing in the evening, in an upstairs dance studio. There was a back door to the place, and she arranged it so the young men could come up through the back way without being seen. ~ Richard P Feynman
341:It is our responsibility as scientists, knowing the great progress which comes from a satisfactory philosophy of ignorance, the great progress which is the fruit of freedom of thought, to proclaim the value of this freedom; to teach how doubt is not to be feared but welcomed and discussed; and to demand this freedom as our duty to all coming generations. ~ Richard P Feynman
342:If you're doing an experiment, you should report everything that you think might make it invalid - not only what you think is right about it; other causes that could possibly explain your results; and things you thought of that you've eliminated by some other experiment, and how they worked -to make sure the other fellow can tell they have been eliminated. ~ Richard P Feynman
343:You should not fool the laymen when you're talking as a scientist... . I'm talking about a specific, extra type of integrity that is not lying, but bending over backwards to show how you're maybe wrong, [an integrity] that you ought to have when acting as a scientist. And this is our responsibility as scientists, certainly to other scientists, and I think to laymen. ~ Richard P Feynman
344:The other thing that gives a scientific man the creeps in the world today are the methods of choosing leaders - in every nation. Today, for example, in the United States, the two political parties have decided to employ public relations men, that is, advertising men, who are trained in the necessary methods of telling the truth or lying in order to develop a product. ~ Richard P Feynman
345:Any schemes - such as 'think of symmetry laws', or 'put the information in mathematical form', or 'guess equations'- are known to everybody now, and they are all tried all the time. When you are stuck, the answer cannot be one of these, because you will have tried these right away...The next scheme, the new discovery, is going to be made in a completely different way. ~ Richard P Feynman
346:From a long view of the history of mankind, seen from, say, ten thousand years from now, there can be little doubt that the most significant event of the 19th century will be judged as Maxwell's discovery of the laws of electrodynamics. The American Civil War will pale into provincial insignificance in comparison with this important scientific event of the same decade. ~ Richard P Feynman
347:I am a successful lecturer in physics for popular audiences. The real entertainment gimmick is the excitement, drama and mystery of the subject matter. People love to learn something, they are 'entertained' enormously by being allowed to understand a little bit of something they never understood before. One must have faith in the subject and in people's interest in it. ~ Richard P Feynman
348:In those days, in Far Rockaway, there was a youth center for Jewish kids at the temple.... Somebody nominated me for president of the youth center. The elders began getting nervous, because I was an avowed atheist by that time.... I thought nature itself was so interesting that I didn't want it distorted like that. And so I gradually came to disbelieve the whole religion. ~ Richard P Feynman
349:Another of the qualities of science is that it teaches the value of rational thought, as well as the importance of freedom of thought; the positive results that come from doubting that all the lessons are true... Learn from science that you must doubt the experts. As a matter of fact, I can also define science another way: Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts. ~ Richard P Feynman
350:The chance is high that the truth lies in the fashionable direction. But, on the off-chance that it is in another direction - a direction obvious from an unfashionable view of field theory - who will find it? Only someone who has sacrificed himself by teaching himself quantum electrodynamics from a peculiar and unusual point of view; one that he may have to invent for himself. ~ Richard P Feynman
351:Poets say science takes away from the beauty of stars-mere globs of gas atoms. Nothing is "mere". I too see the stars on a desert night, and feel them. But do I see less or more? ...What is the pattern, or the meaning, or the why? It does not do harm to the mystery to know a little more about it. For far more marvelous is the truth than any artists of the past imagined it. ~ Richard P Feynman
352:One of the ways of stopping science would be only to do experiments in the region where you know the law. But experimenters search most diligently, and with the greatest effort, in exactly those places where it seems most likely that we can prove our theories wrong. In other words, we are trying to prove ourselves wrong as quickly as possible, because only in that way can we find progress. ~ Richard P Feynman
353:First you guess. Don't laugh, this is the most important step. Then you compute the consequences. Compare the consequences to experience. If it disagrees with experience, the guess is wrong. In that simple statement is the key to science. It doesn't matter how beautiful your guess is or how smart you are or what your name is. If it disagrees with experience, it's wrong. That's all there is to it. ~ Richard P Feynman
354:Looking back at the worst times, it always seems that they were times in which there were people who believed with absolute faith and absolute dogmatism in something. And they were so serious in this matter that they insisted that the rest of the world agree with them. And then they would do things that were directly inconsistent with their own beliefs in order to maintain that what they said was true. ~ Richard P Feynman
355:So, ultimately, in order to understand nature it may be necessary to have a deeper understanding of mathematical relationships. But the real reason is that the subject is enjoyable, and although we humans cut nature up in different ways, and we have different courses in different departments, such compartmentaliz ation is really artificial, and we should take our intellectual pleasures where we find them. ~ Richard P Feynman
356:It doesn't seem to me that this fantastically marvelous universe, this tremendous range of time and space and different kinds of animals, and all the different planets, and all these atoms with all their motions, and so on, all this complicated thing can merely be a stage so that God can watch human beings struggle for good and evil - which is the view that religion has. The stage is too big for the drama. ~ Richard P Feynman
357:We have a habit in writing articles published in scientific journals to make the work as finished as possible, to cover up all the tracks, to not worry about the blind alleys or describe how you had the wrong idea first, and so on. So there isn't any place to publish, in a dignified manner, what you actually did in order to get to do the work, although, there has been in these days, some interest in this kind of thing. ~ Richard P Feynman
358:When it came time for me to give my talk on the subject, I started off by drawing an outline of the cat and began to name the various muscles. The other students in the class interrupt me: "We *know* all that!" "Oh," I say, "you *do*? Then no *wonder* I can catch up with you so fast after you've had four years of biology." They had wasted all their time memorizing stuff like that, when it could be looked up in fifteen minutes. ~ Richard P Feynman
359:No! Not for a second! I immediately began to think how this could have happened. And I realized that the clock was old and was always breaking. That the clock probably stopped some time before and the nurse coming in to the room to record the time of death would have looked at the clock and jotted down the time from that. I never made any supernatural connection, not even for a second. I just wanted to figure out how it happened. ~ Richard P Feynman
360:What is the fundamental hypothesis of science, the fundamental philosophy? We stated it in the first chapter: the sole test of the validity of any idea is experiment. ... If we are told that the same experiment will always produce the same result, that is all very well, but if when we try it, it does not, then it does not. We just have to take what we see, and then formulate all the rest of our ideas in terms of our actual experience. ~ Richard P Feynman
361:It is to be emphasized that no matter how many [amplitude] arrows we draw, add, or multiply, our objective is to calculate a single final arrow for the event . Mistakes are often made by physics students at first because they do not keep this important point in mind. They work for so long analyzing events involving a single photon that they begin to think that the arrow is somehow associated with the photon [rather than with the event]. ~ Richard P Feynman
362:When you're thinking about something that you don't understand, you have a terrible, uncomfortable feeling called confusion... Now, is the confusion's because we're all some kind of apes that are kind of stupid working against this, trying to figure out [how] to put the two sticks together to reach the banana and we can't quite make it... So I always feel stupid. Once in a while, though, the sticks go together on me and I reach the banana. ~ Richard P Feynman
363:It is surprising that people do not believe that there is imagination in science. It is a very interesting kind of imagination, unlike that of the artist. The great difficulty is in trying to imagine something that you have never seen, that is consistent in every detail with what has already been seen, and that is different from what has been thought of; furthermore, it must be definite and not a vague proposition. That is indeed difficult. ~ Richard P Feynman
364:On the contrary, it's because somebody knows something about it that we can't talk about physics . It's the things that nobody knows anything about that we can discuss. We can talk about the weather; we can talk about social problems; we can talk about psychology; we can talk about international finance gold transfers we can't talk about, because those are understood so it's the subject that nobody knows anything about that we can all talk about! ~ Richard P Feynman
365:In fact, the science of thermodynamics began with an analysis, by the great engineer Sadi Carnot, of the problem of how to build the best and most efficient engine, and this constitutes one of the few famous cases in which engineering has contributed to fundamental physical theory. Another example that comes to mind is the more recent analysis of information theory by Claude Shannon. These two analyses, incidentally, turn out to be closely related. ~ Richard P Feynman
366:I can live with doubt and uncertainty and not knowing. I think it is much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers that might be wrong. If we will only allow that, as we progress, we remain unsure, we will leave opportunities for alternatives. We will not become enthusiastic for the fact, the knowledge, the absolute truth of the day, but remain always uncertain … In order to make progress, one must leave the door to the unknown ajar. ~ Richard P Feynman
367:Thus we can get the correct answer for the probability of partial reflection by imagining (falsely) that all reflection comes from only the front and back surfaces. In this intuitively easy analysis, the 'front surface' and 'back surface' arrows are mathematical constructions that give us the right answer, whereas .... a more accurate representation of what is really going on: partial reflection is the scattering of light by electrons inside the glass. ~ Richard P Feynman
368:I can live with doubt and uncertainty and not knowing. I think it is much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers that might be wrong. If we will only allow that, as we progress, we remain unsure, we will leave opportunities for alternatives. We will not become enthusiastic for the fact, the knowledge, the absolute truth of the day, but remain always uncertain ... In order to make progress, one must leave the door to the unknown ajar. ~ Richard P Feynman,
369:Fall in love with some activity, and do it! Nobody ever figures out what life is all about, and it doesn't matter. Explore the world. Nearly everything is really interesting if you go into it deeply enough. Work as hard and as much as you want to on the things you like to do the best. Don't think about what you want to be, but what you want to do. Keep up some kind of a minimum with other things so that society doesn't stop you from doing anything at all. ~ Richard P Feynman
370:Fall in love with some activity, and do it! Nobody ever figures out what life is all about, and it doesn't matter. Explore the world. Nearly everything is really interesting if you go into it deeply enough. Work as hard and as much as you want to on the things you like to do the best. Don't think about what you want to be, but what you want to do. Keep up some kind of a minimum with other things so that society doesn't stop you from doing anything at all. ~ Richard P Feynman,
371:'Conservation' (the conservation law) means this ... that there is a number, which you can calculate, at one moment-and as nature undergoes its multitude of changes, this number doesn't change. That is, if you calculate again, this quantity, it'll be the same as it was before. An example is the conservation of energy: there's a quantity that you can calculate according to a certain rule, and it comes out the same answer after, no matter what happens, happens. ~ Richard P Feynman
372:The shell game that we play ... is technically called 'renormalization'. But no matter how clever the word, it is still what I would call a dippy process! Having to resort to such hocus-pocus has prevented us from proving that the theory of quantum electrodynamics is mathematically self-consistent. It's surprising that the theory still hasn't been proved self-consistent one way or the other by now; I suspect that renormalization is not mathematically legitimate. ~ Richard P Feynman
373:So my antagonist said, "Is it impossible that there are flying saucers? Can you prove that it's impossible?" "No," I said, "I can't prove it's impossible. It's just very unlikely." At that he said, "You are very unscientific. If you can't prove it impossible then how can you say that it's unlikely?" But that is the way that is scientific. It is scientific only to say what is more likely and what less likely, and not to be proving all the time the possible and impossible. ~ Richard P Feynman
374:It is going to be necessary that everything that happens in a finite volume of space and time would have to be analyzable with a finite number of logical operations. The present theory of physics is not that way, apparently. It allows space to go down into infinitesimal distances, wavelengths to get infinitely great, terms to be summed in infinite order, and so forth; and therefore, if this proposition [that physics is computer-simulatable] is right, physical law is wrong. ~ Richard P Feynman
375:You say you are a nameless man. You are not to your wife and to your child. You will not long remain so to your immediate colleagues if you can answer their simple questions when they come into your office. You are not nameless to me. Do not remain nameless to yourself — it is too sad a way to be. Know your place in the world and evaluate yourself fairly, not in terms of the naïve ideals of your own youth, nor in terms of what you erroneously imagine your teacher's ideals are. ~ Richard P Feynman
376:What is necessary for 'the very existence of science,' and what the characteristics of nature are, are not to be determined by pompous preconditions, they are determined always by the material with which we work, by nature herself. We look, and we see what we find, and we cannot say ahead of time successfully what it is going to look like. ... It is necessary for the very existence of science that minds exist which do not allow that nature must satisfy some preconceived conditions. ~ Richard P Feynman
377:I don't like honors. I'm appreciated for the work that I did, and for people who appreciate it, and I notice that other physicists use my work. I don't need anything else. I don't think there's any sense to anything else.... I've already got the prize. The prize is the pleasure of finding the thing out, the kick in the discovery, the observation that other people use it. Those are the real things. The honors are unreal to me. I don't believe in honors... I can't stand it, it hurts me. ~ Richard P Feynman
378:I learned a lot of different things from different schools. MIT is a very good place…. It has developed for itself a spirit, so that every member of the whole place thinks that it’s the most wonderful place in the world—it’s the center, somehow, of scientific and technological development in the United States, if not the world … and while you don’t get a good sense of proportion there, you do get an excellent sense of being with it and in it, and having motivation and desire to keep on ~ Richard P Feynman
379:When a scientist doesn't know the answer to a problem, he is ignorant. When he has a hunch as to what the result is, he is uncertain. And when he is pretty darn sure of what the result is going to be, he is still in some doubt. We have found it of paramount importance that in order to progress we must recognize our ignorance and leave room for doubt. Scientific knowledge is a body of statements of varying degrees of certainty - some most unsure, some nearly sure, but none absolutely certain. ~ Richard P Feynman
380:To do any important work in physics a very good mathematical ability and aptitude are required. Some work in applications can be done without this, but it will not be very inspired. If you must satisfy your "personal curiosity concerning the mysteries of nature" what will happen if these mysteries turn out to be laws expressed in mathematical terms (as they do turn out to be)? You cannot understand the physical world in any deep or satisfying way without using mathematical reasoning with facility. ~ Richard P Feynman
381:We have been led to imagine all sorts of things infinitely more marvelous than the imagining of poets and dreamers of the past. It shows that the imagination of nature is far, far greater than the imagination of man. For instance, how much more remarkable it is for us all to be stuck-half of us upside down-by a mysterious attraction, to a spinning ball that has been swinging in space for billions of years, than to be carried on the back of an elephant supported on a tortoise swimming in a bottomless sea. ~ Richard P Feynman
382:I have a friend who's an artist, and he sometimes takes a view which I don't agree with. He'll hold up a flower and say, "Look how beautiful it is," and I'll agree. But then he'll say, "I, as an artist, can see how beautiful a flower is. But you, as a scientist, take it all apart and it becomes dull." I think he's kind of nutty. [...] There are all kinds of interesting questions that come from a knowledge of science, which only adds to the excitement and mystery and awe of a flower. It only adds. I don't understand how it subtracts. ~ Richard P Feynman
383:No government has the right to decide on the truth of scientific principles, nor to prescribe in any way the character of the questions investigated. Neither may a government determine the aesthetic value of artistic creations, nor limit the forms of literacy or artistic expression. Nor should it pronounce on the validity of economic, historic, religious, or philosophical doctrines. Instead it has a duty to its citizens to maintain the freedom, to let those citizens contribute to the further adventure and the development of the human race. ~ Richard P Feynman
384:No government has the right to decide on the truth of scientific principles, nor to prescribe in any way the character of the questions investigated. Neither may a government determine the aesthetic value of artistic creations, nor limit the forms of literacy or artistic expression. Nor should it pronounce on the validity of economic, historic, religious, or philosophical doctrines. Instead it has a duty to its citizens to maintain the freedom, to let those citizens contribute to the further adventure and the development of the human race. ~ Richard P Feynman,
385:We've learned from experience that the truth will out. Other experimenters will repeat your experiment and find out whether you were wrong or right. Nature's phenomena will agree or they'll disagree with your theory. And, although you may gain some temporary fame and excitement, you will not gain a good reputation as a scientist if you haven't tried to be very careful in this kind of work. And it's this type of integrity, this kind of care not to fool yourself, that is missing to a large extent in much of the research in Cargo Cult Science. ~ Richard P Feynman
386:I think, however, that there isn't any solution to this problem of education other than to realize that the best teaching can be done only when there is a direct individual relationship between a student and a good teacher - a situation in which the student discusses the ideas, thinks about the things, and talks about the things. It's impossible to learn very much by simply sitting in a lecture, or even by simply doing problems that are assigned. But in our modern times we have so many students to teach that we have to try to find some substitute for the ideal. ~ Richard P Feynman
387:We absolutely must leave room for doubt or there is no progress and there is no learning. There is no learning without having to pose a question. And a question requires doubt. People search for certainty. But there is no certainty. People are terrified — how can you live and not know? It is not odd at all. You only think you know, as a matter of fact. And most of your actions are based on incomplete knowledge and you really don’t know what it is all about, or what the purpose of the world is, or know a great deal of other things. It is possible to live and not know. ~ Richard P Feynman
388:The principle of science, the definition, almost, is the following: The test of all knowledge is experiment. Experiment is the sole judge of scientific "truth." But what is the source of knowledge? Where do the laws that are to be tested come from? Experiment, itself, helps to produce these laws, in the sense that it gives us hints. But also needed is imagination to create from these hints the great generalizations--to guess at the wonderful, simple, but very strange patterns beneath them all, and then to experiment to check again whether we have made the right guess. ~ Richard P Feynman
389:The difficulty really is psychological and exists in the perpetual torment that results from your saying to yourself, "But how can it be like that?" which is a reflection of uncontrolled but utterly vain desire to see it in terms of something familiar. ... If you will simply admit that maybe Nature does behave like this, you will find her a delightful, entrancing thing. Do not keep saying to yourself, if you can possible avoid it, "But how can it be like that?" because you will get 'down the drain', into a blind alley from which nobody has escaped. Nobody knows how it can be like that. ~ Richard P Feynman
390:A poet once said, "The whole universe is in a glass of wine." We will probably never know in what sense he meant that, for poets do not write to be understood... How vivid is the claret, pressing its existence into the consciousness that watches it! If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts - physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on - remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all! ~ Richard P Feynman
391:I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong. I have approximate answers, and possible beliefs, and different degrees of uncertainty about different things, but I am not absolutely sure of anything. There are many things I don't know anything about, such as whether it means anything to ask "Why are we here?" I might think about it a little bit, and if I can't figure it out then I go on to something else. But I don't have to know an answer. I don't feel frightened by not knowing things, by being lost in the mysterious universe without having any purpose - which is the way it really is, as far as I can tell. ~ Richard P Feynman
392:I have a friend who's an artist and has sometimes taken a view which I don't agree with very well. He'll hold up a flower and say "look how beautiful it is," and I'll agree. Then he says "I as an artist can see how beautiful this is but you as a scientist take this all apart and it becomes a dull thing," and I think that he's kind of nutty. First of all, the beauty that he sees is available to other people and to me too, I believe. Although I may not be quite as refined aesthetically as he is ... I can appreciate the beauty of a flower. At the same time, I see much more about the flower than he sees. I could imagine the cells in there, the complicated actions inside, which also have a beauty. I mean it's not just beauty at this dimension, at one centimeter; there's also beauty at smaller dimensions, the inner structure, also the processes. The fact that the colors in the flower evolved in order to attract insects to pollinate it is interesting; it means that insects can see the color. It adds a question: does this aesthetic sense also exist in the lower forms? Why is it aesthetic? All kinds of interesting questions which the science knowledge only adds to the excitement, the mystery and the awe of a flower. It only adds. I don't understand how it subtracts. ~ Richard P Feynman,
393:A poet once said, 'The whole universe is in a glass of wine.' We will probably never know in what sense he meant it, for poets do not write to be understood. But it is true that if we look at a glass of wine closely enough we see the entire universe. There are the things of physics: the twisting liquid which evaporates depending on the wind and weather, the reflection in the glass; and our imagination adds atoms. The glass is a distillation of the earth's rocks, and in its composition we see the secrets of the universe's age, and the evolution of stars. What strange array of chemicals are in the wine? How did they come to be? There are the ferments, the enzymes, the substrates, and the products. There in wine is found the great generalization; all life is fermentation. Nobody can discover the chemistry of wine without discovering, as did Louis Pasteur, the cause of much disease. How vivid is the claret, pressing its existence into the consciousness that watches it! If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts -- physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on -- remember that nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure; drink it and forget it all! ~ Richard P Feynman,
394:science reading list :::
   1. and 2. The Voyage of the Beagle (1845) and The Origin of Species (1859) by Charles Darwin [tie
   3. Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy) by Isaac Newton (1687)
   4. Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems by Galileo Galilei (1632)
   5. De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres) by Nicolaus Copernicus (1543)
   6. Physica (Physics) by Aristotle (circa 330 B.C.)
   7. De Humani Corporis Fabrica (On the Fabric of the Human Body) by Andreas Vesalius (1543)
   8. Relativity: The Special and General Theory by Albert Einstein (1916)
   9. The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins (1976)
   10. One Two Three . . . Infinity by George Gamow (1947)
   11. The Double Helix by James D. Watson (1968)
   12. What Is Life? by Erwin Schrodinger (1944)
   13. The Cosmic Connection by Carl Sagan (1973)
   14. The Insect Societies by Edward O. Wilson (1971)
   15. The First Three Minutes by Steven Weinberg (1977)
   16. Silent Spring by Rachel Carson (1962)
   17. The Mismeasure of Man by Stephen Jay Gould (1981)
   18. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales by Oliver Sacks (1985)
   19. The Journals of Lewis and Clark by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark (1814)
   20. The Feynman Lectures on Physics by Richard P Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, and Matthew Sands (1963)
   21. Sexual Behavior in the Human Male by Alfred C. Kinsey et al. (1948)
   22. Gorillas in the Mist by Dian Fossey (1983)
   23. Under a Lucky Star by Roy Chapman Andrews (1943)
   24. Micrographia by Robert Hooke (1665)
   25. Gaia by James Lovelock (1979)
   ~ Editors of Discovery Magazine, Website,

IN CHAPTERS









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IN WEBGEN [10000/4]

Goodreads author - Velimir_Khlebnikov
Wikipedia - Zangezi -- poetic work written by Velimir Khlebnikov
https://allpoetry.com/Velimir-Khlebnikov
Velimir Khlebnikov


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