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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Lists_of_deities
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_knowledge_deities

https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_deities

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_demigods

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Aztec_gods_and_supernatural_beings

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_thunder_gods

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Maya_gods_and_supernatural_beings

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Lithuanian_gods_and_mythological_figures
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Lithuanian_gods


https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category:Lists_of_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category_talk:Lists_of_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_African_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Australian_Aboriginal_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Celtic_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_fertility_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Germanic_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Hindu_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Japanese_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_love_and_lust_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Mesopotamian_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Native_American_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_nature_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_night_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_people_who_have_been_considered_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Roman_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_sky_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Slavic_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_solar_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_war_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_water_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Yoruba_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:List_of_African_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:List_of_Australian_Aboriginal_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:List_of_deities
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:List_of_Native_American_deities

Wikipedia - Category:Lists of deities
Wikipedia - Common Germanic deities -- List article
Wikipedia - Dii Consentes -- A list of twelve major deities in the pantheon of Ancient Rome
Wikipedia - List of agricultural deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Anglo-Saxon deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of art deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Celtic deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of death deities -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of deities by classification -- Index to deities
Wikipedia - List of deities in fiction
Wikipedia - List of deities in Marvel Comics -- List of deities in Marvel Comics
Wikipedia - List of deities
Wikipedia - List of Dungeons & Dragons deities -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Dungeons > Dragons deities
Wikipedia - List of Egyptian deities -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of fertility deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Germanic deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Greyhawk deities -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of health deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Hindu deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of hunting deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Indonesian deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Japanese deities -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of knowledge deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Lakota deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of light deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of love and lust deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of lunar deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Mesopotamian deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Maori deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Mycenaean deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Native American deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of nature deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of night deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of people who have been considered deities -- Wikimedia list article
Wikipedia - List of pre-Islamic Arabian deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of rain deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Roman birth and childhood deities
Wikipedia - List of Roman deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of solar deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of tree deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of war deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of water deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of wind deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of Yoruba deities -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - Lists of deities by cultural sphere -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - Lists of deities -- Wikipedia list article
https://fireemblem.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_Deities_in_the_Fire_Emblem_Series
https://list.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_Dungeons_&_Dragons_dwarf_deities
https://list.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_Dungeons_&_Dragons_elf_deities
https://list.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_Dungeons_&_Dragons_goblinoid_deities
https://list.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_Dungeons_&_Dragons_orc_deities
https://list.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_Forgotten_Realms_deities
https://mythus.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_Norse_deities

see also ::: Deities, Deity, God,




see also ::: Deities, Deity, God

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
Bharati
Deities
Deities
Ila
Indra
Mahi
Saraswati
SEE ALSO

Deities
Deity
God

AUTH

BOOKS
Bhakti-Yoga
City_of_God
Collected_Poems
Enchiridion_text
Epigrams_from_Savitri
Heart_of_Matter
Hundred_Thousand_Songs_of_Milarepa
Kena_and_Other_Upanishads
Labyrinths
Letters_On_Yoga
Letters_On_Yoga_I
Liber_ABA
Life_without_Death
Magick_Without_Tears
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Process_and_Reality
Questions_And_Answers_1954
Savitri
Sri_Aurobindo_or_the_Adventure_of_Consciousness
The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh
The_Golden_Bough
The_Heros_Journey
The_Hero_with_a_Thousand_Faces
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Integral_Yoga
The_Odyssey
The_Power_of_Myth
The_Red_Book_-_Liber_Novus
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Secret_Of_The_Veda
The_Synthesis_Of_Yoga
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
Three_Books_on_Occult_Philosophy
Vedic_and_Philological_Studies
Words_Of_The_Mother_III

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
05.01_-_Man_and_the_Gods
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
11.07_-_The_Labours_of_the_Gods:_The_five_Purifications
1.10_-_Laughter_Of_The_Gods
1.13_-_Under_the_Auspices_of_the_Gods
1.36_-_Quo_Stet_Olympus_-_Where_the_Gods,_Angels,_etc._Live
1.50_-_Eating_the_God
1.59_-_Killing_the_God_in_Mexico
1.68_-_The_God-Letters
17.03_-_Agni_and_the_Gods
1.76_-_The_Gods_-_How_and_Why_they_Overlap
1954-08-11_-_Division_and_creation_-_The_gods_and_human_formations_-_People_carry_their_desires_around_them
1958-08-15_-_Our_relation_with_the_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_Poetry_and_the_Gods
1.fs_-_The_Gods_Of_Greece
1.jr_-_By_the_God_who_was_in_pre-eternity_living_and_moving_and_omnipotent,_everlasting
1.jwvg_-_The_Godlike
1.mm_-_Of_the_voices_of_the_Godhead
1.rwe_-_The_Gods_Walk_In_The_Breath_Of_The_Woods
1.snk_-_In_Praise_of_the_Goddess
2.02_-_Meeting_With_the_Goddess
2.08_-_The_God_of_Love_is_his_own_proof
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
29.06_-_There_is_also_another,_similar_or_parallel_story_in_the_Veda_about_the_God_Agni,_about_the_disappearance_of_this
3.03_-_The_Godward_Emotions
32.07_-_The_God_of_the_Scientist
5.1.01.8_-_The_Book_of_the_Gods
5.1.02_-_The_Gods
7.5.30_-_The_Godhead
Book_1_-_The_Council_of_the_Gods
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri
00.03_-_Upanishadic_Symbolism
00.04_-_The_Beautiful_in_the_Upanishads
00.05_-_A_Vedic_Conception_of_the_Poet
0.00a_-_Introduction
000_-_Humans_in_Universe
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature
0.05_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Systems
0.08_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
0.09_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Teacher
01.01_-_The_New_Humanity
01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn
01.02_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_Ahana_and_Other_Poems
01.02_-_The_Creative_Soul
01.02_-_The_Issue
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
01.03_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_his_School
01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release
01.04_-_The_Intuition_of_the_Age
01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge
01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness
01.09_-_The_Parting_of_the_Way
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.11_-_Aldous_Huxley:_The_Perennial_Philosophy
01.12_-_Three_Degrees_of_Social_Organisation
0.11_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0_1954-08-25_-_what_is_this_personality?_and_when_will_she_come?
0_1958-07-06
0_1958-07-19
0_1958-08-09
0_1958-11-04_-_Myths_are_True_and_Gods_exist_-_mental_formation_and_occult_faculties_-_exteriorization_-_work_in_dreams
0_1959-05-19_-_Ascending_and_Descending_paths
0_1959-06-03
0_1959-06-08
0_1959-06-17
0_1960-05-16
0_1960-10-19
0_1960-10-22
0_1960-11-12
0_1961-01-10
0_1961-01-22
0_1961-01-24
0_1961-02-11
0_1961-03-11
0_1961-04-18
0_1961-04-25
0_1961-04-29
0_1961-07-28
0_1961-08-02
0_1961-10-30
0_1961-11-05
0_1961-12-20
0_1962-01-27
0_1962-02-03
0_1962-03-11
0_1962-06-27
0_1962-06-30
0_1962-07-21
0_1962-09-08
0_1962-09-26
0_1962-10-06
0_1962-10-27
0_1962-10-30
0_1962-11-10
0_1962-12-22
0_1962-12-28
0_1963-05-11
0_1963-05-25
0_1963-09-25
0_1964-01-04
0_1964-07-18
0_1964-08-29
0_1964-10-24a
0_1964-10-30
0_1965-01-12
0_1965-05-29
0_1965-06-18_-_supramental_ship
0_1965-07-21
0_1965-10-16
0_1966-02-26
0_1966-04-27
0_1966-05-18
0_1967-02-15
0_1967-04-03
0_1967-07-05
0_1967-08-02
0_1967-08-12
0_1967-08-30
0_1967-10-11
0_1967-11-22
0_1968-02-20
0_1968-11-06
0_1969-01-22
0_1969-08-23
0_1969-08-30
0_1970-03-25
0_1970-04-22
0_1970-07-11
0_1970-09-19
0_1970-10-28
0_1971-12-11
0_1972-03-08
0_1972-03-29a
0_1972-04-15
02.01_-_A_Vedic_Story
02.01_-_The_World-Stair
02.01_-_The_World_War
02.02_-_Lines_of_the_Descent_of_Consciousness
02.02_-_Rishi_Dirghatama
02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter
02.03_-_The_Glory_and_the_Fall_of_Life
02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life
02.05_-_Robert_Graves
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night
02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness
02.09_-_The_Paradise_of_the_Life-Gods
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.11_-_Hymn_to_Darkness
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
02.13_-_On_Social_Reconstruction
02.14_-_Appendix
02.14_-_The_World-Soul
02.15_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Greater_Knowledge
03.01_-_The_New_Year_Initiation
03.01_-_The_Pursuit_of_the_Unknowable
03.02_-_The_Adoration_of_the_Divine_Mother
03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation
03.04_-_The_Body_Human
03.04_-_The_Other_Aspect_of_European_Culture
03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon
03.05_-_The_Spiritual_Genius_of_India
03.07_-_The_Sunlit_Path
03.08_-_The_Spiritual_Outlook
03.09_-_Buddhism_and_Hinduism
03.09_-_Sectarianism_or_Loyalty
03.10_-_The_Mission_of_Buddhism
03.12_-_Communism:_What_does_it_Mean?
03.12_-_TagorePoet_and_Seer
04.01_-_The_Birth_and_Childhood_of_the_Flame
04.02_-_A_Chapter_of_Human_Evolution
04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame
04.02_-_To_the_Heights_II
04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest
04.04_-_A_Global_Humanity
04.04_-_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
04.04_-_The_Quest
04.04_-_To_the_Heights_IV
04.05_-_The_Immortal_Nation
04.06_-_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Consciousness
04.06_-_To_Be_or_Not_to_Be
04.07_-_Readings_in_Savitri
04.09_-_Values_Higher_and_Lower
04.37_-_To_the_Heights-XXXVII
04.47_-_To_the_Heights-XLVII
05.01_-_Man_and_the_Gods
05.01_-_Of_Love_and_Aspiration
05.02_-_Gods_Labour
05.02_-_Satyavan
05.03_-_Satyavan_and_Savitri
05.04_-_The_Immortal_Person
05.05_-_Man_the_Prototype
05.05_-_Of_Some_Supreme_Mysteries
05.09_-_Varieties_of_Religious_Experience
05.12_-_The_Revealer_and_the_Revelation
05.12_-_The_Soul_and_its_Journey
05.20_-_The_Urge_for_Progression
05.28_-_God_Protects
05.32_-_Yoga_as_Pragmatic_Power
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain
06.05_-_The_Story_of_Creation
06.13_-_Body,_the_Occult_Agent
06.16_-_A_Page_of_Occult_History
06.21_-_The_Personal_and_the_Impersonal
06.24_-_When_Imperfection_is_Greater_Than_Perfection
07.01_-_Realisation,_Past_and_Future
07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge
07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul
07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries
07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces
07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul
07.07_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Cosmic_Spirit_and_the_Cosmic_Consciousness
07.31_-_Images_of_Gods_and_Goddesses
07.36_-_The_Body_and_the_Psychic
08.03_-_Death_in_the_Forest
09.01_-_Towards_the_Black_Void
09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness
09.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
10.01_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Ideal
10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal
1.002_-_The_Heifer
10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
10.04_-_Transfiguration
10.07_-_The_Demon
1.00a_-_Introduction
1.00c_-_DIVISION_C_-_THE_ETHERIC_BODY_AND_PRANA
1.00d_-_DIVISION_D_-_KUNDALINI_AND_THE_SPINE
1.00g_-_Foreword
1.00_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PRELUDE_AT_THE_THEATRE
1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come
10.11_-_Savitri
1.01_-_About_the_Elements
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_Asana
1.01_-_BOOK_THE_FIRST
1.01_-_Economy
1.01_-_Foreward
1.01_-_Isha_Upanishad
1.01_-_Maitreya_inquires_of_his_teacher_(Parashara)
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_NIGHT
1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita
1.01_-_Prayer
1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA
1.01_-_Soul_and_God
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.01_-_the_Call_to_Adventure
1.01_-_The_Cycle_of_Society
1.01_-_The_First_Steps
1.01_-_The_Four_Aids
1.01_-_The_Human_Aspiration
1.01_-_The_King_of_the_Wood
1.01_-_The_Mental_Fortress
1.01_-_The_Rape_of_the_Lock
1.01_-_The_Unexpected
1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa
1.01_-_Two_Powers_Alone
1.020_-_Ta-Ha
1.02.2.1_-_Brahman_-_Oneness_of_God_and_the_World
1.02.3.2_-_Knowledge_and_Ignorance
1.02.4.2_-_Action_and_the_Divine_Will
1.024_-_Affiliation_With_Larger_Wholes
10.24_-_Savitri
10.27_-_Consciousness
1.028_-_History
1.02.9_-_Conclusion_and_Summary
10.29_-_Gods_Debt
1.02_-_BOOK_THE_SECOND
1.02_-_In_the_Beginning
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Prana
1.02_-_Pranayama,_Mantrayoga
1.02_-_Prayer_of_Parashara_to_Vishnu
1.02_-_Priestly_Kings
1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA
1.02_-_Self-Consecration
1.02_-_Taras_Tantra
1.02_-_The_Child_as_growing_being_and_the_childs_experience_of_encountering_the_teacher.
1.02_-_The_Development_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Thought
1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher
1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics
1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND
1.02_-_The_Philosophy_of_Ishvara
1.02_-_THE_PROBLEM_OF_SOCRATES
1.02_-_THE_QUATERNIO_AND_THE_MEDIATING_ROLE_OF_MERCURIUS
1.02_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Call
1.02_-_The_Two_Negations_1_-_The_Materialist_Denial
10.31_-_The_Mystery_of_The_Five_Senses
10.34_-_Effort_and_Grace
10.35_-_The_Moral_and_the_Spiritual
10.36_-_Cling_to_Truth
1.037_-_Preventing_the_Fall_in_Yoga
1.038_-_Saad
1.03_-_APPRENTICESHIP_AND_ENCULTURATION_-_ADOPTION_OF_A_SHARED_MAP
1.03_-_BOOK_THE_THIRD
1.03_-_Concerning_the_Archetypes,_with_Special_Reference_to_the_Anima_Concept
1.03_-_Hymns_of_Gritsamada
1.03_-_Measure_of_time,_Moments_of_Kashthas,_etc.
1.03_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Meeting_with_others
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Sympathetic_Magic
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.03_-_The_Human_Disciple
1.03_-_THE_ORPHAN,_THE_WIDOW,_AND_THE_MOON
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii
1.03_-_VISIT_TO_VIDYASAGAR
1.040_-_Forgiver
1.040_-_Re-Educating_the_Mind
1.04_-_BOOK_THE_FOURTH
1.04_-_Descent_into_Future_Hell
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_Homage_to_the_Twenty-one_Taras
1.04_-_Hymns_of_Bharadwaja
1.04_-_KAI_VALYA_PADA
1.04_-_Magic_and_Religion
1.04_-_Narayana_appearance,_in_the_beginning_of_the_Kalpa,_as_the_Varaha_(boar)
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.04_-_The_Aims_of_Psycho_therapy
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching
1.04_-_The_Crossing_of_the_First_Threshold
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Origin_and_Development_of_Poetry.
1.04_-_The_Paths
1.04_-_The_Praise
1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.04_-_The_Self
1.04_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Compact)
1.04_-_Wake-Up_Sermon
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.04_-_Yoga_and_Human_Evolution
1.05_-_2010_and_1956_-_Doomsday?
1.05_-_Adam_Kadmon
1.05_-_BOOK_THE_FIFTH
1.05_-_CHARITY
1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self
1.05_-_Hymns_of_Bharadwaja
1.05_-_On_painstaking_and_true_repentance_which_constitute_the_life_of_the_holy_convicts;_and_about_the_prison.
1.05_-_Ritam
1.05_-_Solitude
1.05_-_Splitting_of_the_Spirit
1.05_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_-_The_Psychic_Being
1.05_-_The_Belly_of_the_Whale
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Magical_Control_of_the_Weather
1.05_-_True_and_False_Subjectivism
1.05_-_Vishnu_as_Brahma_creates_the_world
1.06_-_Agni_and_the_Truth
1.06_-_BOOK_THE_SIXTH
1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi
1.06_-_Hymns_of_Parashara
1.06_-_Incarnate_Teachers_and_Incarnation
1.06_-_Magicians_as_Kings
1.06_-_Man_in_the_Universe
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_Origin_of_the_four_castes
1.06_-_Psychic_Education
1.06_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_2_The_Works_of_Love_-_The_Works_of_Life
1.06_-_THE_FOUR_GREAT_ERRORS
1.06_-_The_Four_Powers_of_the_Mother
1.06_-_The_Literal_Qabalah
1.06_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES
1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes
1.06_-_Yun_Men's_Every_Day_is_a_Good_Day
1.07_-_BOOK_THE_SEVENTH
1.07_-_Bridge_across_the_Afterlife
1.07_-_Hymn_of_Paruchchhepa
1.07_-_Incarnate_Human_Gods
1.07_-_Note_on_the_word_Go
1.07_-_Production_of_the_mind-born_sons_of_Brahma
1.07_-_Raja-Yoga_in_Brief
1.07_-_Savitri
1.07_-_Standards_of_Conduct_and_Spiritual_Freedom
1.07_-_The_Fire_of_the_New_World
1.07_-_The_Ideal_Law_of_Social_Development
1.07_-_The_Literal_Qabalah_(continued)
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.08_-_Adhyatma_Yoga
1.08a_-_The_Ladder
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_Origin_of_Rudra:_his_becoming_eight_Rudras
1.08_-_RELIGION_AND_TEMPERAMENT
1.08_-_The_Change_of_Vision
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish
1.08_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY_CELEBRATION_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Discovery
1.09_-_BOOK_THE_NINTH
1.09_-_Concentration_-_Its_Spiritual_Uses
1.09_-_Equality_and_the_Annihilation_of_Ego
1.09_-_Legend_of_Lakshmi
1.09_-_Saraswati_and_Her_Consorts
1.09_-_SELF-KNOWLEDGE
1.09_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Big_Bang
1.09_-_Talks
1.09_-_The_Ambivalence_of_the_Fish_Symbol
1.09_-_The_Pure_Existent
1.09_-_The_Worship_of_Trees
1.09_-_To_the_Students,_Young_and_Old
11.01_-_The_Eternal_Day__The_Souls_Choice_and_the_Supreme_Consummation
11.01_-_The_Opening_Scene_of_Savitri
1.1.03_-_Man
1.1.04_-_Philosophy
11.04_-_The_Triple_Cord
11.06_-_The_Mounting_Fire
11.07_-_The_Labours_of_the_Gods:_The_five_Purifications
11.08_-_Body-Energy
1.10_-_BOOK_THE_TENTH
1.10_-_Concentration_-_Its_Practice
1.10_-_GRACE_AND_FREE_WILL
1.10_-_Laughter_Of_The_Gods
1.10_-_Relics_of_Tree_Worship_in_Modern_Europe
1.10_-_The_descendants_of_the_daughters_of_Daksa_married_to_the_Rsis
1.10_-_The_Image_of_the_Oceans_and_the_Rivers
1.10_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES_(II)
1.10_-_Theodicy_-_Nature_Makes_No_Mistakes
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.1.1.01_-_Three_Elements_of_Poetic_Creation
1.114_-_Mankind
1.11_-_BOOK_THE_ELEVENTH
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Problem
1.11_-_Higher_Laws
1.11_-_Legend_of_Dhruva,_the_son_of_Uttanapada
1.11_-_Oneness
1.1.1_-_Text
1.11_-_The_Change_of_Power
1.11_-_The_Kalki_Avatar
1.11_-_The_Master_of_the_Work
1.11_-_The_Reason_as_Governor_of_Life
1.11_-_The_Seven_Rivers
1.11_-_Works_and_Sacrifice
1.12_-_BOOK_THE_TWELFTH
1.12_-_Brute_Neighbors
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_Dhruva_commences_a_course_of_religious_austerities
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.12_-_Independence
1.12_-_The_Divine_Work
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Herds_of_the_Dawn
1.12_-_The_Sacred_Marriage
1.12_-_The_Significance_of_Sacrifice
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.13_-_And_Then?
1.13_-_BOOK_THE_THIRTEENTH
1.13_-_Dawn_and_the_Truth
1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self
1.13_-_Posterity_of_Dhruva
1.13_-_System_of_the_O.T.O.
1.13_-_The_Kings_of_Rome_and_Alba
1.13_-_The_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.13_-_THE_MASTER_AND_M.
1.13_-_Under_the_Auspices_of_the_Gods
1.14_-_Bibliography
1.14_-_BOOK_THE_FOURTEENTH
1.14_-_Descendants_of_Prithu
1.14_-_FOREST_AND_CAVERN
1.14_-_IMMORTALITY_AND_SURVIVAL
1.14_-_INSTRUCTION_TO_VAISHNAVS_AND_BRHMOS
1.14_-_The_Principle_of_Divine_Works
1.14_-_The_Secret
1.14_-_The_Structure_and_Dynamics_of_the_Self
1.14_-_The_Succesion_to_the_Kingdom_in_Ancient_Latium
1.14_-_The_Supermind_as_Creator
1.14_-_The_Victory_Over_Death
1.15_-_LAST_VISIT_TO_KESHAB
1.15_-_The_element_of_Character_in_Tragedy.
1.15_-_The_Possibility_and_Purpose_of_Avatarhood
1.15_-_The_Suprarational_Good
1.15_-_The_world_overrun_with_trees;_they_are_destroyed_by_the_Pracetasas
1.15_-_The_Worship_of_the_Oak
1.16_-_Dianus_and_Diana
1.16_-_Inquiries_of_Maitreya_respecting_the_history_of_Prahlada
1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being
1.16_-_PRAYER
1.16_-_The_Process_of_Avatarhood
1.16_-_The_Suprarational_Ultimate_of_Life
1.16_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.17_-_Astral_Journey__Example,_How_to_do_it,_How_to_Verify_your_Experience
1.17_-_God
1.17_-_Legend_of_Prahlada
1.17_-_M._AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.17_-_Practical_rules_for_the_Tragic_Poet.
1.17_-_SUFFERING
1.17_-_The_Burden_of_Royalty
1.17_-_The_Divine_Birth_and_Divine_Works
1.17_-_The_Divine_Soul
1.17_-_The_Seven-Headed_Thought,_Swar_and_the_Dashagwas
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_FAITH
1.18_-_Hiranyakasipu's_reiterated_attempts_to_destroy_his_son
1.18_-_The_Divine_Worker
1.18_-_THE_HEART_OF_THE_PROBLEM
1.18_-_The_Human_Fathers
1.18_-_The_Perils_of_the_Soul
1.19_-_Dialogue_between_Prahlada_and_his_father
1.19_-_Equality
1.19_-_Tabooed_Acts
1.19_-_The_Act_of_Truth
1.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_HIS_INJURED_ARM
1.19_-_The_Victory_of_the_Fathers
1.200-1.224_Talks
1.201_-_Socrates
12.01_-_The_Return_to_Earth
12.01_-_This_Great_Earth_Our_Mother
12.02_-_The_Stress_of_the_Spirit
12.03_-_The_Sorrows_of_God
12.04_-_Love_and_Death
12.06_-_The_Hero_and_the_Nymph
12.09_-_The_Story_of_Dr._Faustus_Retold
1.20_-_On_bodily_vigil_and_how_to_use_it_to_attain_spiritual_vigil_and_how_to_practise_it.
1.20_-_ON_CHILD_AND_MARRIAGE
1.20_-_Tabooed_Persons
1.20_-_The_Hound_of_Heaven
1.21_-_A_DAY_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.21_-_Families_of_the_Daityas
1.21__-_Poetic_Diction.
1.21_-_Tabooed_Things
1.21_-_The_Ascent_of_Life
1.21_-_The_Spiritual_Aim_and_Life
1.2.2.01_-_The_Poet,_the_Yogi_and_the_Rishi
1.22__-_Dominion_over_different_provinces_of_creation_assigned_to_different_beings
1.22_-_OBERON_AND_TITANIA's_GOLDEN_WEDDING
1.22_-_Tabooed_Words
1.22_-_THE_END_OF_THE_SPECIES
1.22_-_The_Problem_of_Life
1.23_-_Conditions_for_the_Coming_of_a_Spiritual_Age
1.23_-_FESTIVAL_AT_SURENDRAS_HOUSE
1.23_-_On_mad_price,_and,_in_the_same_Step,_on_unclean_and_blasphemous_thoughts.
1.23_-_Our_Debt_to_the_Savage
1.23_-_The_Double_Soul_in_Man
1.240_-_1.300_Talks
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.24_-_RITUAL,_SYMBOL,_SACRAMENT
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_ADVICE_TO_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.25_-_Critical_Objections_brought_against_Poetry,_and_the_principles_on_which_they_are_to_be_answered.
1.25_-_Describes_the_great_gain_which_comes_to_a_soul_when_it_practises_vocal_prayer_perfectly._Shows_how_God_may_raise_it_thence_to_things_supernatural.
1.25_-_On_the_destroyer_of_the_passions,_most_sublime_humility,_which_is_rooted_in_spiritual_feeling.
1.25_-_SPIRITUAL_EXERCISES
1.25_-_Temporary_Kings
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.26_-_Sacrifice_of_the_Kings_Son
1.27_-_CONTEMPLATION,_ACTION_AND_SOCIAL_UTILITY
1.27_-_The_Sevenfold_Chord_of_Being
1.28_-_Supermind,_Mind_and_the_Overmind_Maya
1.28_-_The_Killing_of_the_Tree-Spirit
1.29_-_The_Myth_of_Adonis
1.29_-_What_is_Certainty?
1.2_-_Katha_Upanishads
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
13.01_-_A_Centurys_Salutation_to_Sri_Aurobindo_The_Greatness_of_the_Great
13.02_-_A_Review_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Life
13.08_-_The_Return
1.30_-_Adonis_in_Syria
1.30_-_Do_you_Believe_in_God?
1.31_-_Adonis_in_Cyprus
1.31_-_The_Giants,_Nimrod,_Ephialtes,_and_Antaeus._Descent_to_Cocytus.
1.32_-_The_Ritual_of_Adonis
1.33_-_The_Gardens_of_Adonis
1.3.4.04_-_The_Divine_Superman
1.34_-_The_Myth_and_Ritual_of_Attis
1.34_-_The_Tao_1
1.3.5.01_-_The_Law_of_the_Way
1.3.5.03_-_The_Involved_and_Evolving_Godhead
1.35_-_Attis_as_a_God_of_Vegetation
1.36_-_Human_Representatives_of_Attis
1.36_-_Quo_Stet_Olympus_-_Where_the_Gods,_Angels,_etc._Live
1.37_-_Oriential_Religions_in_the_West
1.38_-_The_Myth_of_Osiris
1.39_-_Prophecy
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.3_-_Mundaka_Upanishads
1.400_-_1.450_Talks
14.01_-_To_Read_Sri_Aurobindo
14.03_-_Janaka_and_Yajnavalkya
14.04_-_More_of_Yajnavalkya
14.07_-_A_Review_of_Our_Ashram_Life
1.40_-_The_Nature_of_Osiris
1.41_-_Isis
1.42_-_This_Self_Introversion
1.439
1.43_-_Dionysus
1.43_-_The_Holy_Guardian_Angel_is_not_the_Higher_Self_but_an_Objective_Individual
1.44_-_Demeter_and_Persephone
1.450_-_1.500_Talks
1.45_-_Unserious_Conduct_of_a_Pupil
1.46_-_The_Corn-Mother_in_Many_Lands
1.47_-_Lityerses
1.48_-_The_Corn-Spirit_as_an_Animal
1.49_-_Ancient_Deities_of_Vegetation_as_Animals
1.50_-_A.C._and_the_Masters;_Why_they_Chose_him,_etc.
1.50_-_Eating_the_God
1.51_-_Homeopathic_Magic_of_a_Flesh_Diet
1.51_-_How_to_Recognise_Masters,_Angels,_etc.,_and_how_they_Work
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.53_-_The_Propitation_of_Wild_Animals_By_Hunters
1.54_-_Types_of_Animal_Sacrament
1.55_-_The_Transference_of_Evil
1.56_-_Marriage_-_Property_-_War_-_Politics
1.56_-_The_Public_Expulsion_of_Evils
1.57_-_Public_Scapegoats
1.58_-_Human_Scapegoats_in_Classical_Antiquity
1.59_-_Killing_the_God_in_Mexico
1.61_-_The_Myth_of_Balder
1.62_-_The_Fire-Festivals_of_Europe
1.63_-_Fear,_a_Bad_Astral_Vision
1.64_-_The_Burning_of_Human_Beings_in_the_Fires
1.65_-_Balder_and_the_Mistletoe
1.66_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Tales
1.68_-_The_God-Letters
1.68_-_The_Golden_Bough
17.01_-_Hymn_to_Dawn
17.02_-_Hymn_to_the_Sun
17.03_-_Agni_and_the_Gods
17.04_-_Hymn_to_the_Purusha
17.05_-_Hymn_to_Hiranyagarbha
17.06_-_Hymn_of_the_Supreme_Goddess
17.07_-_Ode_to_Darkness
17.08_-_Last_Hymn
17.11_-_A_Prayer
1.72_-_Education
1.73_-_Monsters,_Niggers,_Jews,_etc.
1.75_-_The_AA_and_the_Planet
1.76_-_The_Gods_-_How_and_Why_they_Overlap
18.01_-_Padavali
18.05_-_Ashram_Poets
1.80_-_Life_a_Gamble
1.81_-_Method_of_Training
1.83_-_Epistola_Ultima
19.02_-_Vigilance
19.04_-_The_Flowers
19.07_-_The_Adept
19.13_-_Of_the_World
1914_05_23p
1914_08_03p
19.14_-_The_Awakened
19.15_-_On_Happiness
19.17_-_On_Anger
1919_09_03p
19.25_-_The_Bhikkhu
19.26_-_The_Brahmin
1929-04-21_-_Visions,_seeing_and_interpretation_-_Dreams_and_dreaml_and_-_Dreamless_sleep_-_Visions_and_formulation_-_Surrender,_passive_and_of_the_will_-_Meditation_and_progress_-_Entering_the_spiritual_life,_a_plunge_into_the_Divine
1951-02-08_-_Unifying_the_being_-_ideas_of_good_and_bad_-_Miracles_-_determinism_-_Supreme_Will_-_Distinguishing_the_voice_of_the_Divine
1951-03-08_-_Silencing_the_mind_-_changing_the_nature_-_Reincarnation-_choice_-_Psychic,_higher_beings_gods_incarnating_-_Incarnation_of_vital_beings_-_the_Lord_of_Falsehood_-_Hitler_-_Possession_and_madness
1951-04-12_-_Japan,_its_art,_landscapes,_life,_etc_-_Fairy-lore_of_Japan_-_Culture-_its_spiral_movement_-_Indian_and_European-_the_spiritual_life_-_Art_and_Truth
1953-04-29
1953-09-16
1953-10-21
1953-10-28
1953-11-25
1954-02-17_-_Experience_expressed_in_different_ways_-_Origin_of_the_psychic_being_-_Progress_in_sports_-Everything_is_not_for_the_best
1954-06-30_-_Occultism_-_Religion_and_vital_beings_-_Mothers_knowledge_of_what_happens_in_the_Ashram_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Drawing_on_Mother
1954-08-11_-_Division_and_creation_-_The_gods_and_human_formations_-_People_carry_their_desires_around_them
1954-08-18_-_Mahalakshmi_-_Maheshwari_-_Mahasaraswati_-_Determinism_and_freedom_-_Suffering_and_knowledge_-_Aspects_of_the_Mother
1954-08-25_-_Ananda_aspect_of_the_Mother_-_Changing_conditions_in_the_Ashram_-_Ascetic_discipline_-_Mothers_body
1955-05-18_-_The_Problem_of_Woman_-_Men_and_women_-_The_Supreme_Mother,_the_new_creation_-_Gods_and_goddesses_-_A_story_of_Creation,_earth_-_Psychic_being_only_on_earth,_beings_everywhere_-_Going_to_other_worlds_by_occult_means
1955-07-20_-_The_Impersonal_Divine_-_Surrender_to_the_Divine_brings_perfect_freedom_-_The_Divine_gives_Himself_-_The_principle_of_the_inner_dimensions_-_The_paths_of_aspiration_and_surrender_-_Linear_and_spherical_paths_and_realisations
1956-01-25_-_The_divine_way_of_life_-_Divine,_Overmind,_Supermind_-_Material_body__for_discovery_of_the_Divine_-_Five_psychological_perfections
1956-03-07_-_Sacrifice,_Animals,_hostile_forces,_receive_in_proportion_to_consciousness_-_To_be_luminously_open_-_Integral_transformation_-_Pain_of_rejection,_delight_of_progress_-_Spirit_behind_intention_-_Spirit,_matter,_over-simplified
1956-04-11_-_Self-creator_-_Manifestation_of_Time_and_Space_-_Brahman-Maya_and_Ishwara-Shakti_-_Personal_and_Impersonal
1956-04-18_-_Ishwara_and_Shakti,_seeing_both_aspects_-_The_Impersonal_and_the_divine_Person_-_Soul,_the_presence_of_the_divine_Person_-_Going_to_other_worlds,_exteriorisation,_dreams_-_Telling_stories_to_oneself
1956-04-25_-_God,_human_conception_and_the_true_Divine_-_Earthly_existence,_to_realise_the_Divine_-_Ananda,_divine_pleasure_-_Relations_with_the_divine_Presence_-_Asking_the_Divine_for_what_one_needs_-_Allowing_the_Divine_to_lead_one
1956-05-23_-_Yoga_and_religion_-_Story_of_two_clergymen_on_a_boat_-_The_Buddha_and_the_Supramental_-_Hieroglyphs_and_phonetic_alphabets_-_A_vision_of_ancient_Egypt_-_Memory_for_sounds
1956-07-18_-_Unlived_dreams_-_Radha-consciousness_-_Separation_and_identification_-_Ananda_of_identity_and_Ananda_of_union_-_Sincerity,_meditation_and_prayer_-_Enemies_of_the_Divine_-_The_universe_is_progressive
1956-08-01_-_Value_of_worship_-_Spiritual_realisation_and_the_integral_yoga_-_Symbols,_translation_of_experience_into_form_-_Sincerity,_fundamental_virtue_-_Intensity_of_aspiration,_with_anguish_or_joy_-_The_divine_Grace
1956-08-08_-_How_to_light_the_psychic_fire,_will_for_progress_-_Helping_from_a_distance,_mental_formations_-_Prayer_and_the_divine_-_Grace_Grace_at_work_everywhere
1956-08-29_-_To_live_spontaneously_-_Mental_formations_Absolute_sincerity_-_Balance_is_indispensable,_the_middle_path_-_When_in_difficulty,_widen_the_consciousness_-_Easiest_way_of_forgetting_oneself
1957-01-09_-_God_is_essentially_Delight_-_God_and_Nature_play_at_hide-and-seek_-__Why,_and_when,_are_you_grave?
1957-05-15_-_Differentiation_of_the_sexes_-_Transformation_from_above_downwards
1957-07-10_-_A_new_world_is_born_-_Overmind_creation_dissolved
1958-07-16_-_Is_religion_a_necessity?
1958-08-15_-_Our_relation_with_the_Gods
1960_04_06
1960_06_08
1960_11_12?_-_49
1961_02_02
1961_03_11_-_58
1965_01_12
1969_08_15?_-_133
1969_09_26
1970_01_15
1970_03_24
1970_04_07
1970_04_10
1970_04_30
1970_05_12
1.A_-_ANTHROPOLOGY,_THE_SOUL
1.ac_-_Happy_Dust
1.ac_-_On_-_On_-_Poet
1.ac_-_The_Interpreter
1.ac_-_The_Titanic
1.ac_-_The_Twins
1.anon_-_Eightfold_Fence.
1.anon_-_Enuma_Elish_(When_on_high)
1.anon_-_If_this_were_a_world
1.anon_-_Others_have_told_me
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_II
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_IV
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_TabletIX
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_VII
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_X
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_XI_The_Story_of_the_Flood
1.anon_-_The_Seven_Evil_Spirits
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Celephais
1f.lovecraft_-_Facts_concerning_the_Late
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_Nyarlathotep
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_Poetry_and_the_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Challenge_from_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Crawling_Chaos
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Green_Meadow
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Man_of_Stone
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Other_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Quest_of_Iranon
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tomb
1f.lovecraft_-_The_White_Ship
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1.fs_-_A_Peculiar_Ideal
1.fs_-_Archimedes
1.fs_-_Cassandra
1.fs_-_Dithyramb
1.fs_-_Evening
1.fs_-_Fantasie_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_Feast_Of_Victory
1.fs_-_Genius
1.fs_-_Hero_And_Leander
1.fs_-_Hymn_To_Joy
1.fs_-_Melancholy_--_To_Laura
1.fs_-_Naenia
1.fs_-_Ode_To_Joy_-_With_Translation
1.fs_-_Pompeii_And_Herculaneum
1.fs_-_The_Artists
1.fs_-_The_Bards_Of_Olden_Time
1.fs_-_The_Celebrated_Woman_-_An_Epistle_By_A_Married_Man
1.fs_-_The_Complaint_Of_Ceres
1.fs_-_The_Cranes_Of_Ibycus
1.fs_-_The_Eleusinian_Festival
1.fs_-_The_Favor_Of_The_Moment
1.fs_-_The_Fortune-Favored
1.fs_-_The_Four_Ages_Of_The_World
1.fs_-_The_Gods_Of_Greece
1.fs_-_The_Hostage
1.fs_-_The_Ideal_And_The_Actual_Life
1.fs_-_The_Ideals
1.fs_-_The_Poetry_Of_Life
1.fs_-_The_Power_Of_Song
1.fs_-_The_Ring_Of_Polycrates_-_A_Ballad
1.fs_-_The_Secret
1.fs_-_The_Sexes
1.fs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Love
1.fs_-_The_Veiled_Statue_At_Sais
1.fs_-_The_Walk
1.fs_-_The_Words_Of_Belief
1.fs_-_The_Words_Of_Error
1.fs_-_To_A_Moralist
1.fs_-_To_Laura_(Mystery_Of_Reminiscence)
1.fs_-_To_Proselytizers
1.fs_-_Two_Descriptions_Of_Action
1.jda_-_When_spring_came,_tender-limbed_Radha_wandered_(from_The_Gitagovinda)
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jk_-_Fancy
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_II
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_III
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_II
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Psyche
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_V
1.jlb_-_Browning_Decides_To_Be_A_Poet
1.jlb_-_Remorse_for_any_Death
1.jlb_-_Rosas
1.jlb_-_Susana_Soca
1.jr_-_By_the_God_who_was_in_pre-eternity_living_and_moving_and_omnipotent,_everlasting
1.jwvg_-_Solitude
1.jwvg_-_The_Godlike
1.jwvg_-_The_Muses_Mirror
1.jwvg_-_To_The_Chosen_One
1.kbr_-_Poem_7
1.kbr_-_Tentacles_of_Time
1.lovecraft_-_Poemata_Minora-_Volume_II
1.lovecraft_-_The_Teutons_Battle-Song
1.lovecraft_-_To_Edward_John_Moreton_Drax_Plunkelt,
1.mm_-_Of_the_voices_of_the_Godhead
1.mm_-_Then_shall_I_leap_into_love
1.pbs_-_Charles_The_First
1.pbs_-_Chorus_from_Hellas
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_-_Passages_Of_The_Poem,_Or_Connected_Therewith
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_The_Moon
1.pbs_-_Hymn_To_Mercury
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_II.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VI.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_Vi_(Excerpts)
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_To_Byron
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Cyclops
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Witch_Of_Atlas
1.poe_-_Al_Aaraaf-_Part_1
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_The_Power_Of_Words_Oinos.
1.rajh_-_Intimate_Hymn
1.rb_-_Cleon
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_III_-_Paracelsus
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_II_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_I_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_IV_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_V_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_III_-_Evening
1.rb_-_Rhyme_for_a_Child_Viewing_a_Naked_Venus_in_a_Painting_of_'The_Judgement_of_Paris'
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Sixth
1.rmpsd_-_Conquer_Death_with_the_drumbeat_Ma!_Ma!_Ma!
1.rmpsd_-_Its_value_beyond_assessment_by_the_mind
1.rmpsd_-_Love_Her,_Mind
1.rmpsd_-_Ma,_Youre_inside_me
1.rmpsd_-_Meditate_on_Kali!_Why_be_anxious?
1.rmpsd_-_Who_is_that_Syama_woman
1.rmpsd_-_Why_disappear_into_formless_trance?
1.rmr_-_As_Once_the_Winged_Energy_of_Delight
1.rmr_-_You_Who_Never_Arrived
1.rt_-_Birth_Story
1.rt_-_Gitanjali
1.rt_-_Kinu_Goalas_Alley
1.rt_-_Lost_Star
1.rt_-_Religious_Obsession_--_translation_from_Dharmamoha
1.rt_-_The_Lost_Star
1.rwe_-_Alphonso_Of_Castile
1.rwe_-_Gnothi_Seauton
1.rwe_-_Initial_Love
1.rwe_-_May-Day
1.rwe_-_Merlin_I
1.rwe_-_Merops
1.rwe_-_Monadnoc
1.rwe_-_My_Garden
1.rwe_-_Ode_-_Inscribed_to_W.H._Channing
1.rwe_-_Quatrains
1.rwe_-_Song_of_Nature
1.rwe_-_Terminus
1.rwe_-_The_Apology
1.rwe_-_The_Gods_Walk_In_The_Breath_Of_The_Woods
1.rwe_-_The_Park
1.rwe_-_The_Past
1.rwe_-_To_Rhea
1.rwe_-_Uriel
1.rwe_-_Voluntaries
1.rwe_-_Woodnotes
1.sca_-_Place_your_mind_before_the_mirror_of_eternity!
1.sig_-_Ecstasy
1.snk_-_In_Praise_of_the_Goddess
1.vpt_-_All_my_inhibition_left_me_in_a_flash
1.vpt_-_The_moon_has_shone_upon_me
1.wby_-_Anashuya_And_Vijaya
1.wby_-_Baile_And_Aillinn
1.wby_-_Supernatural_Songs
1.wby_-_The_Grey_Rock
1.wby_-_The_Secret_Rose
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_II
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_III
1.whitman_-_Facing_West_From_Californias_Shores
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLI
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLIII
1.whitman_-_Starting_From_Paumanok
1.ww_-_7-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_Address_To_Kilchurn_Castle,_Upon_Loch_Awe
1.ww_-_Artegal_And_Elidure
1.ww_-_A_Whirl-Blast_From_Behind_The_Hill
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Book_Eleventh-_France_[concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_Fourth_[Summer_Vacation]
1.ww_-_Book_Seventh_[Residence_in_London]
1.ww_-_Book_Tenth_{Residence_in_France_continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Third_[Residence_at_Cambridge]
1.ww_-_Dion_[See_Plutarch]
1.ww_-_Extempore_Effusion_upon_the_Death_of_James_Hogg
1.ww_-_From_The_Cuckoo_And_The_Nightingale
1.ww_-_Guilt_And_Sorrow,_Or,_Incidents_Upon_Salisbury_Plain
1.ww_-_Laodamia
1.ww_-_Lines_Written_As_A_School_Exercise_At_Hawkshead,_Anno_Aetatis_14
1.ww_-_October,_1803
1.ww_-_Ode
1.ww_-_Ode_to_Duty
1.ww_-_O_Nightingale!_Thou_Surely_Art
1.ww_-_The_Birth_Of_Love
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_II-_Book_First-_The_Wanderer
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_V-_Book_Fouth-_Despondency_Corrected
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_X-_Book_Ninth-_Discourse_of_the_Wanderer,_and_an_Evening_Visit_to_the_Lake
1.ww_-_The_Passing_of_the_Elder_Bards
20.01_-_Charyapada_-_Old_Bengali_Mystic_Poems
20.03_-_Act_I:The_Descent
2.01_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE
2.01_-_Mandala_One
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_THE_ARCANE_SUBSTANCE_AND_THE_POINT
2.01_-_The_Object_of_Knowledge
2.01_-_The_Ordinary_Life_and_the_True_Soul
2.01_-_The_Path
2.01_-_The_Road_of_Trials
2.01_-_The_Two_Natures
2.01_-_The_Yoga_and_Its_Objects
2.02_-_Atomic_Motions
2.02_-_Brahman,_Purusha,_Ishwara_-_Maya,_Prakriti,_Shakti
2.02_-_Indra,_Giver_of_Light
2.02_-_Meeting_With_the_Goddess
2.02_-_On_Letters
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.02_-_The_Mother_Archetype
2.02_-_The_Synthesis_of_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.03_-_Atomic_Forms_And_Their_Combinations
2.03_-_Indra_and_the_Thought-Forces
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_On_Medicine
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.03_-_THE_MASTER_IN_VARIOUS_MOODS
2.03_-_The_Mother-Complex
2.03_-_The_Purified_Understanding
2.03_-_The_Supreme_Divine
2.04_-_ADVICE_TO_ISHAN
2.04_-_Agni,_the_Illumined_Will
2.04_-_Positive_Aspects_of_the_Mother-Complex
2.04_-_The_Divine_and_the_Undivine
2.04_-_The_Forms_of_Love-Manifestation
2.04_-_The_Living_Church_and_Christ-Omega
2.04_-_The_Secret_of_Secrets
2.05_-_Apotheosis
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.05_-_Renunciation
2.05_-_The_Divine_Truth_and_Way
2.05_-_VISIT_TO_THE_SINTHI_BRAMO_SAMAJ
2.06_-_Two_Tales_of_Seeking_and_Losing
2.06_-_WITH_VARIOUS_DEVOTEES
2.06_-_Works_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.07_-_BANKIM_CHANDRA
2.07_-_On_Congress_and_Politics
2.07_-_ON_THE_TARANTULAS
2.07_-_The_Knowledge_and_the_Ignorance
2.07_-_The_Supreme_Word_of_the_Gita
2.07_-_The_Upanishad_in_Aphorism
2.08_-_ALICE_IN_WONDERLAND
2.08_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE_(II)
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.08_-_On_Non-Violence
2.08_-_The_God_of_Love_is_his_own_proof
2.09_-_Human_representations_of_the_Divine_Ideal_of_Love
2.09_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
21.02_-_Gods_and_Men
2.1.02_-_Love_and_Death
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
21.03_-_The_Double_Ladder
2.10_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_Time_the_Destroyer
2.11_-_The_Crown
2.11_-_The_Modes_of_the_Self
2.11_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_The_Double_Aspect
2.1.2_-_The_Vital_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
2.12_-_The_Way_and_the_Bhakta
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.14_-_AT_RAMS_HOUSE
2.14_-_On_Movements
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.15_-_CAR_FESTIVAL_AT_BALARMS_HOUSE
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.15_-_The_Cosmic_Consciousness
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.16_-_VISIT_TO_NANDA_BOSES_HOUSE
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.17_-_The_Progress_to_Knowledge_-_God,_Man_and_Nature
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.19_-_Feb-May_1939
2.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_DR._SARKAR
22.04_-_On_The_Brink(I)
22.05_-_On_The_Brink(2)
2.20_-_THE_MASTERS_TRAINING_OF_HIS_DISCIPLES
2.20_-_The_Philosophy_of_Rebirth
2.21_-_1940
2.21_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.21_-_The_Order_of_the_Worlds
2.2.1_-_The_Prusna_Upanishads
2.21_-_Towards_the_Supreme_Secret
2.2.2_-_The_Mandoukya_Upanishad
2.22_-_The_Supreme_Secret
2.22_-_Vijnana_or_Gnosis
2.23_-_Man_and_the_Evolution
2.2.3_-_The_Aitereya_Upanishad
2.23_-_The_Core_of_the_Gita.s_Meaning
2.24_-_Gnosis_and_Ananda
2.2.4_-_Taittiriya_Upanishad
2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.25_-_List_of_Topics_in_Each_Talk
2.25_-_The_Higher_and_the_Lower_Knowledge
2.26_-_The_Ascent_towards_Supermind
2.28_-_The_Divine_Life
2.29_-_The_Worlds_of_Creation,_Formation_and_Action
2.3.02_-_Mantra_and_Japa
2.3.02_-_The_Supermind_or_Supramental
2.3.03_-_Integral_Yoga
2.3.07_-_The_Mother_in_Visions,_Dreams_and_Experiences
2.3.07_-_The_Vital_Being_and_Vital_Consciousness
2.3.1_-_Ego_and_Its_Forms
2.3.1_-_Svetasvatara_Upanishad
2.3.2_-_Chhandogya_Upanishad
2.4.02_-_Bhakti,_Devotion,_Worship
24.03_-_Notes_on_Savitri_II
25.02_-_HYMN_TO_DAWN
27.02_-_The_Human_Touch_Divine
28.01_-_Observations
29.05_-_The_Bride_of_Brahman
29.06_-_There_is_also_another,_similar_or_parallel_story_in_the_Veda_about_the_God_Agni,_about_the_disappearance_of_this
29.07_-_A_Small_Talk
2_-_Other_Hymns_to_Agni
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.02_-_Greek_Drama
30.03_-_Spirituality_in_Art
30.05_-_Rhythm_in_Poetry
30.06_-_The_Poet_and_The_Seer
30.07_-_The_Poet_and_the_Yogi
30.09_-_Lines_of_Tantra_(Charyapada)
3.00_-_Hymn_To_Pan
3.00_-_Introduction
3.00_-_The_Magical_Theory_of_the_Universe
30.10_-_The_Greatness_of_Poetry
30.13_-_Rabindranath_the_Artist
30.15_-_The_Language_of_Rabindranath
30.17_-_Rabindranath,_Traveller_of_the_Infinite
3.01_-_INTRODUCTION
3.01_-_The_Mercurial_Fountain
3.01_-_The_Principles_of_Ritual
3.02_-_King_and_Queen
3.02_-_Nature_And_Composition_Of_The_Mind
3.02_-_SOL
3.02_-_The_Formulae_of_the_Elemental_Weapons
3.02_-_The_Motives_of_Devotion
3.02_-_The_Psychology_of_Rebirth
3.03_-_The_Formula_of_Tetragrammaton
3.03_-_The_Godward_Emotions
3.04_-_LUNA
3.04_-_The_Flowers
3.04_-_The_Formula_of_ALHIM
3.04_-_The_Way_of_Devotion
3.05_-_ON_VIRTUE_THAT_MAKES_SMALL
3.05_-_SAL
3.05_-_The_Formula_of_I.A.O.
3.06_-_The_Delight_of_the_Divine
3.07_-_ON_PASSING_BY
3.07_-_The_Adept
3.07_-_The_Ananda_Brahman
3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail
3.08_-_Of_Equilibrium
3.08_-_ON_APOSTATES
3.08_-_Purification
3.08_-_The_Mystery_of_Love
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
3.09_-_The_Return_of_the_Soul
3.1.01_-_The_Marbles_of_Time
3.1.01_-_The_Problem_of_Suffering_and_Evil
3.1.02_-_A_Theory_of_the_Human_Being
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
31.02_-_The_Mother-_Worship_of_the_Bengalis
31.05_-_Vivekananda
31.10_-_East_and_West
3.11_-_Spells
3.1.23_-_The_Rishi
3.12_-_Of_the_Bloody_Sacrifice
3.13_-_THE_CONVALESCENT
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.15_-_Of_the_Invocation
3.16.1_-_Of_the_Oath
3.16.2_-_Of_the_Charge_of_the_Spirit
3.16_-_THE_SEVEN_SEALS_OR_THE_YES_AND_AMEN_SONG
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
3.19_-_Of_Dramatic_Rituals
3.2.01_-_On_Ideals
3.2.02_-_The_Veda_and_the_Upanishads
3.2.02_-_Yoga_and_Skill_in_Works
3.2.03_-_Conservation_and_Progress
32.03_-_In_This_Crisis
32.04_-_The_Human_Body
3.2.05_-_Our_Ideal
32.06_-_The_Novel_Alchemy
32.07_-_The_God_of_the_Scientist
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
32.08_-_Fit_and_Unfit_(A_Letter)
3.20_-_Of_the_Eucharist
3.21_-_Of_Black_Magic
3.3.01_-_The_Superman
3.3.02_-_All-Will_and_Free-Will
33.04_-_Deoghar
33.06_-_Alipore_Court
33.10_-_Pondicherry_I
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.14_-_I_Played_Football
33.17_-_Two_Great_Wars
3.3.1_-_Agni,_the_Divine_Will-Force
34.01_-_Hymn_To_Indra
34.02_-_Hymn_To_All-Gods
3.4.02_-_The_Inconscient
34.03_-_Hymn_To_Dawn
3.4.03_-_Materialism
34.04_-_Hymn_of_Aspiration
34.07_-_The_Bride_of_Brahman
34.09_-_Hymn_to_the_Pillar
34.10_-_Hymn_To_Earth
34.11_-_Hymn_to_Peace_and_Power
3.5.01_-_Aphorisms
35.02_-_Hymn_to_Hara-Gauri
35.03_-_Hymn_To_Bhavani
35.05_-_Hymn_To_Saraswati
35.06_-_Who_Seeks_Holy_Places?
3.6.01_-_Heraclitus
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
36.08_-_A_Commentary_on_the_First_Six_Suktas_of_Rigveda
36.09_-_THE_SIT_SUKTA
37.01_-_Yama_-_Nachiketa_(Katha_Upanishad)
37.03_-_Satyakama_And_Upakoshala
37.04_-_The_Story_Of_Rishi_Yajnavalkya
37.06_-_Indra_-_Virochana_and_Prajapati
37.07_-_Ushasti_Chakrayana_(Chhandogya_Upanishad)
3.7.1.02_-_The_Reincarnating_Soul
3.7.1.04_-_Rebirth_and_Soul_Evolution
3.7.1.08_-_Karma
3.7.1.09_-_Karma_and_Freedom
3.7.1.10_-_Karma,_Will_and_Consequence
3.7.1.11_-_Rebirth_and_Karma
3.7.2.02_-_The_Terrestial_Law
3.7.2.03_-_Mind_Nature_and_Law_of_Karma
3.7.2.04_-_The_Higher_Lines_of_Karma
38.06_-_Ravana_Vanquished
38.07_-_A_Poem
3.8.1.02_-_Arya_-_Its_Significance
3.8.1.05_-_Occult_Knowledge_and_the_Hindu_Scriptures
39.09_-_Just_Be_There_Where_You_Are
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
40.01_-_November_24,_1926
4.01_-_INTRODUCTION
4.01_-_Introduction
4.01_-_Sweetness_in_Prayer
4.01_-_The_Principle_of_the_Integral_Yoga
4.02_-_Autobiographical_Evidence
4.02_-_GOLD_AND_SPIRIT
4.02_-_The_Psychology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_Prayer_to_the_Ever-greater_Christ
4.03_-_The_Special_Phenomenology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION_OF_THE_KING
4.04_-_Conclusion
4.04_-_THE_REGENERATION_OF_THE_KING
4.05_-_THE_DARK_SIDE_OF_THE_KING
4.05_-_The_Passion_Of_Love
4.07_-_Purification-Intelligence_and_Will
4.07_-_THE_RELATION_OF_THE_KING-SYMBOL_TO_CONSCIOUSNESS
4.07_-_THE_UGLIEST_MAN
4.08_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Spirit
4.08_-_THE_RELIGIOUS_PROBLEM_OF_THE_KINGS_RENEWAL
4.1.1_-_The_Difficulties_of_Yoga
4.1.2_-_The_Difficulties_of_Human_Nature
4.14_-_THE_SONG_OF_MELANCHOLY
4.15_-_Soul-Force_and_the_Fourfold_Personality
4.18_-_Faith_and_shakti
4.19_-_The_Nature_of_the_supermind
4.1_-_Jnana
4.2.01_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams
4.2.03_-_The_Birth_of_Sin
4.2.04_-_Epiphany
4.20_-_The_Intuitive_Mind
4.2.2_-_Steps_towards_Overcoming_Difficulties
4.24_-_The_supramental_Sense
4.25_-_Towards_the_supramental_Time_Vision
4.2_-_Karma
4.3_-_Bhakti
4.41_-_Chapter_One
4.42_-_Chapter_Two
4.43_-_Chapter_Three
4.4.4.11_-_The_Flow_of_Amrita
5.01_-_ADAM_AS_THE_ARCANE_SUBSTANCE
5.01_-_EPILOGUE
5.01_-_On_the_Mysteries_of_the_Ascent_towards_God
5.01_-_Proem
5.02_-_Against_Teleological_Concept
5.02_-_THE_STATUE
5.03_-_ADAM_AS_THE_FIRST_ADEPT
5.03_-_The_Divine_Body
5.04_-_Supermind_and_the_Life_Divine
5.04_-_THE_POLARITY_OF_ADAM
5.05_-_Supermind_and_Humanity
5.05_-_THE_OLD_ADAM
5.06_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION
5.07_-_Beginnings_Of_Civilization
5.07_-_Mind_of_Light
5.07_-_ROTUNDUM,_HEAD,_AND_BRAIN
5.08_-_ADAM_AS_TOTALITY
5.1.01.1_-_The_Book_of_the_Herald
5.1.01.2_-_The_Book_of_the_Statesman
5.1.01.3_-_The_Book_of_the_Assembly
5.1.01.4_-_The_Book_of_Partings
5.1.01.5_-_The_Book_of_Achilles
5.1.01.6_-_The_Book_of_the_Chieftains
5.1.01.7_-_The_Book_of_the_Woman
5.1.01.8_-_The_Book_of_the_Gods
5.1.01.9_-_Book_IX
5.1.01_-_Terminology
5.1.02_-_Ahana
5.1.02_-_The_Gods
5.2.01_-_The_Descent_of_Ahana
5.2.02_-_The_Meditations_of_Mandavya
5.3.04_-_Roots_in_M
5.4.01_-_Notes_on_Root-Sounds
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.01_-_Proem
6.04_-_The_Plague_Athens
6.05_-_THE_PSYCHOLOGICAL_INTERPRETATION_OF_THE_PROCEDURE
6.07_-_THE_MONOCOLUS
6.08_-_THE_CONTENT_AND_MEANING_OF_THE_FIRST_TWO_STAGES
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
6.10_-_THE_SELF_AND_THE_BOUNDS_OF_KNOWLEDGE
7.02_-_Courage
7.08_-_Sincerity
7.14_-_Modesty
7.15_-_The_Family
7.16_-_Sympathy
7.2.03_-_The_Other_Earths
7.2.06_-_Rose_of_God
7.3.13_-_Ascent
7.5.20_-_The_Hidden_Plan
7.5.30_-_The_Godhead
7.5.31_-_The_Stone_Goddess
7.5.69_-_The_Inner_Fields
7.6.01_-_Symbol_Moon
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
9.99_-_Glossary
Aeneid
A_God's_Labour
Apology
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
Avatars_of_the_Tortoise
Averroes_Search
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Book_1_-_The_Council_of_the_Gods
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_III._-_The_external_calamities_of_Rome
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
BOOK_IX._-_Of_those_who_allege_a_distinction_among_demons,_some_being_good_and_others_evil
Book_of_Exodus
Book_of_Genesis
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Book_of_Psalms
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_VII._-_Of_the_select_gods_of_the_civil_theology,_and_that_eternal_life_is_not_obtained_by_worshipping_them
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XII._-_Of_the_creation_of_angels_and_men,_and_of_the_origin_of_evil
BOOK_XIV._-_Of_the_punishment_and_results_of_mans_first_sin,_and_of_the_propagation_of_man_without_lust
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
City_of_God_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_III
COSA_-_BOOK_IV
COSA_-_BOOK_IX
COSA_-_BOOK_V
COSA_-_BOOK_VI
COSA_-_BOOK_X
COSA_-_BOOK_XI
Cratylus
ENNEAD_01.02_-_Concerning_Virtue.
ENNEAD_01.07_-_Of_the_First_Good,_and_of_the_Other_Goods.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_06.03_-_Plotinos_Own_Sense-Categories.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
Epistle_to_the_Romans
Euthyphro
Gods_Script
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
Ion
IS_-_Chapter_1
Isha_Upanishads
I._THE_ATTRACTIVE_POWER_OF_GOD
Jaap_Sahib_Text_(Guru_Gobind_Singh)
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
LUX.03_-_INVOCATION
LUX.05_-_AUGOEIDES
Medea_-_A_Vergillian_Cento
Meno
Phaedo
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1912_12_05
r1912_12_07
r1913_01_07
r1914_04_05
r1914_04_13
r1914_06_11
r1914_06_12
r1914_06_14
r1914_06_26
r1914_07_10
r1914_07_11
r1914_07_19
r1914_07_20
r1914_07_21
r1914_07_23
r1914_08_05
r1915_05_12
r1917_01_09
r1917_03_06
Ragnarok
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Story_of_the_Warrior_and_the_Captive
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablet_1_-
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_026-050
Talks_151-175
Talks_500-550
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Book_of_Job
The_Book_of_Joshua
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Isaiah
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Micah
The_Book_of_Wisdom
The_Circular_Ruins
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Divine_Names_Text_(Dionysis)
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Ephesians
The_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Philippians
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Fearful_Sphere_of_Pascal
The_First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Corinthians
The_First_Epistle_of_Peter
The_Golden_Verses_of_Pythagoras
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Gospel_According_to_Mark
The_Gospel_According_to_Matthew
The_Immortal
The_Letter_to_the_Hebrews
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Lottery_in_Babylon
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Revelation_of_Jesus_Christ_or_the_Apocalypse
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Second_Epistle_of_Peter
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

SIMILAR TITLES
the Gods

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

The Gods are Personalities and Powers of the dynamic

The gods are the great undying Powers and immortal Personalities who consciously inform, constitute, preside over the subjective and objective forces of the cosmos.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 19, Page: 346


The Gods cannot be transformed, for they are typal and not evolutionary beings, they can come for conversion, that is to say, to ^ve up their own ideas and outlook on things and con- form themselves to the higher Will and Supramcntal Truth of the Divine.

The gods in (he ovcrmcntal plane have not many heads and arms ; this is a vital symbolism, it is not necessary in other planes.


TERMS ANYWHERE

According to one account, the creation of the world and especially of mankind is ascribed to Bel. He is also called father of the gods; and his consort, Belit, is called mother of the gods. His eldest son is Sin, god of the Moon. Bel also brings about the deluge which destroys humanity, showing his dual aspect of evolver and destroyer.

According to popular tale, Fenris grew so rapidly that the gods became alarmed lest he devour the sun prematurely and tried repeatedly to restrain him with heavy chains with no success. The dwarfs forged a magic thread, Gleipnir (lissom bond), with which the gods bound the wolf, but only when one of the gods, Tyr (Mars), agreed to hold his hand in its jaws. Tyr sacrificed his hand, so that Fenris would be harmless until the end of the cycle.

According to the Old Testament, the building of the temple was completed, but it was used for its high purposes only briefly. Allegorically this was during the Golden Age of the childhood of the human race — the building was complete only as regards childhood when the gods walked among mankind and were their divine instructors; but humanity was not yet truly human, for manas (mind) had not yet been awakened by the manasaputras of whom Hiram Abif was a type. It is here that Masonic tradition should be studied together with the Biblical account. Then with the awakening of manas, and the eating from the Tree of Knowledge and hence the power to choose between good and evil — in other words, with the beginning of self-directed evolution, the temple was desecrated again and again. “The building of the Temple of Solomon is the symbolical representation of the gradual acquirement of the secret wisdom, or magic; the erection and development of the spiritual from the earthly; the manifestation of the power and splendor of the spirit in the physical world, through the wisdom and genius of the builder. The latter, when he has become an adept, is a mightier king than Solomon himself, the emblem of the sun or Light himself — the light of the real subjective world, shining in the darkness of the objective universe. This is the ‘Temple’ which can be reared without the sound of the hammer, or any tool of iron being heard in the house while it is ‘in building’ ” (IU 2:391).

adhidaiva ::: that which pertains to the Gods (non-material powers) ; the subjective phenomenon of being.

ADHYATMA YOGA. ::: The principle of adhyātma yoga is, in knowledge, the realisation of all things that we see or do not see but are aware of, - men, things, ourselves, events, gods, titans, angels, - as one divine Brahman, and in action and attitude, an absolute self-surrender to the Paratpara Purusha, the transcendent, infinite and universal Personality who is at once personal and impersonal, finite and infinite, self-limiting and illimitable, one and many, and informs with his being not only the Gods above, but man and the worm and the cold below.

Aditi devatamayi ::: Aditi full of the gods. [cf. Katha 2.1.7]

Aditi (Sanskrit) Aditi [from a not + diti bound from the verbal root da to bind] Unbounded, free; as a noun, infinite and shoreless expanse. In the Vedas, Aditi is devamatri (mother of the gods) as from and in her cosmic matrix all the heavenly bodies were born. As the celestial virgin and mother of every existing form and being, the synthesis of all things, she is highest akasa. Aditi is identified in the Rig-Veda with Vach (mystic speech) and also with the mulaprakriti of the Vedanta. As the womb of space, she is a feminized form of Brahma. The line in the Rig-Veda: “Daksha sprang from Aditi and Aditi from Daksha” has reference to “the eternal cyclic re-birth of the same divine Essence” (SD 2:247n). In one of its most mystic aspects Aditi is divine wisdom.

Aditi ::: the indivisible conscious-force and ananda of the Supreme; the Mother; the infinite Mother of the gods; supreme Nature or infinite Consciousness.

Aditi: The name (Sanskrit for boundlessness) of a Vedic goddess, mother of the gods known as Adityas; she is identified at times with the earth, at times with the sky, and at other times is hailed as a cow.

Aditi ::: the Vedic goddess of infinite being, the mother of the gods, manifested here as the earth-goddess (Pr.thivi2); the adya-sakti, the indivisible consciousness (cit), force (tapas) and bliss (ananda) of the Supreme.

Adonis [from Hebrew ’ādōn lord] Title of the Babylonian god Tammuz, whose cult was imported into Asiatic Greece. A beautiful youth beloved of Aphrodite, he was killed by a boar. Aphrodite was so grief-stricken that the gods of the lower world allowed him to spend half of every year with her on earth. His death and resurrection were symbolized in annual festivals.

Adyo Sakti ; she is the Supreme Consciousness and Power above the universe and it is by her that all the Gods are manifested, and even the Supramental Ishvara comes into manifestation through her — the Supramental Purushottama of whom the Gods are Powers and Personalities.

Aegir represents the waters of space in all their various aspects. In Norse myths he is the giant who brews the mead for the gods when they feast at the stellar and planetary “tables” — when they imbody in worlds. He and his consort Ran have nine daughters who are the waves. Aegir has two servants, Eldr (fire) and Fimafeng or Funafeng (spark), possibly St. Elmo’s fire and phosphorescence in the sea. An aspect of Aegir is Hler (lee, shelter). Blavatsky regards Ogir (Aegir) or Hler as “the highest of the Water-gods, and the same as the Greek Okeanos” (TG 239).

Aeolus (Greek) In Greek and Roman mythology, son of Hippotes, appointed by Zeus as guardian of the winds. He lived on the island of Aeolia in the far west, its steep cliffs encircled by a brazen wall. There he kept the winds confined in a cave, letting them out as he pleased or as he was commanded by the gods. Later he was said to dwell on an island north of Sicily.

Aether, Ether (Greek) [from aitho shining, fire] The upper or purer air as opposed to aer, the lower air; the clear sky; the abode of the gods. In Classical antiquity it denoted primordial substance, Proteus or protyle, the unitary source both of all substances and energies, the mask of all kosmic phenomena. Often used loosely to embrace a domain which extends from the All-Father himself down to the atmosphere of our earth. Vergil speaks of “Jupiter omnipotens aether,” and Cicero describes aether as the ultimate zone of heaven encircling, embracing, and permeating all things. At one time a member of the pantheon and object of veneration, at another the quest of the alchemist in search of the “absolute element” which would give him power over nature, and finally a hypothetical medium of science for conveying light waves.

Again, Epicurus based everything on sensation in order to bring people back to actual experience, as opposed to vain outlooking speculation, as a solid foundation for an ethic. He was not an atheist in the modern sense, for he explicitly says that there are gods, but not the gods of the anthropomorphic religionists. In the same way, he did not teach a selfish individualism, but that the way to final freedom is within oneself; and when he depreciates the State and sundry social or political theories, he was merely opposing the futile abstractions then prevalent under these names.

Agneyastra (Sanskrit) Āgneyāstra [from āgneya fiery weapon from agni fire + astra missile weapon, arrow] Fiery weapon; one of the magic weapons used by some of the gods and heroes of the Mahabharata and Ramayana. The Vishnu-Purana (3:8) recounts that the agneyastra was given by the sage Aurva to his disciple King Sagara. A magic weapon said to have been “wielded by the adept-race (the fourth), the Atlanteans” (TG 9), and to have been built of “seven elements” (SD 2:629). It can signify a weapon of fiery character used in physical warfare, or on a cosmic scale can denote the employment of a force of nature by an intelligent being either for offensive or defensive purposes. In archaic thought fire, in its abstract sense, is almost equivalent to spirit, and permeates the sevenfold nature of the universe.

’Aher (Hebrew) ’Aḥēr To be after, behind, secondary, another; the plural ’aherim, especially when used in conjunction with ’elohim, means “other or strange gods,” which were supposed to be merely idols. As the Hebrew scriptures themselves show, the ancient Hebrews never at any time denied the existence of the gods of other peoples, but being utterly and strongly tribalistic, their own god Jehovah was to them supreme. Their tribal god is the regent of the planet Saturn, who was their planetary hierarch, and consequently, to them, the supreme god — the god over all other gods. Had the Jews been born as a people under the regent of some other planet, the hierarchical regent of this other planet would then have been in their opinion the supreme god.

Ahura (Avestan) [from the verbal root ahu conscious life; cf Sanskrit asura] The lord of life, the one life from whom all proceed; as daevas who were originally gods of the Aryans changed to demons among the Iranian branch of the Aryans, asura also changed to demons among the Indians. In the earlier Vedas, asura is especially used for Varuna, the ruler of the heavenly sphere. “The Mazdean Scriptures of the Zend Avesta, the Vendidad and others correct and expose the later cunning shuffling of the gods in the Hindu Pantheon, and restore through Ahura the Asuras to their legitimate place in Theogony . . .” (SD 2:60-1).

Airyanmen Vaeja, Airyena-Vaegah, Airyana-Vaeja (Avestan) Airyam-Veg (Pahlavi) “The Aryans (the noble ones) are said in the Avesta to have had their original home in the far land of Airyana Vaeja (the cradle land of the Aryans), the first among the lands created by Mazda. It was at the center of the earth and in its very center stood the mountain Harabareza. This corresponds with the Hindu descriptions of the Land of the Gods with Mount Meru at its center” (Taraporewala, The Religion of Zarathushtra). The Aryans divided the universe into seven regions or keshvars: 1) Arzah or Arzahe; 2) Shabah, Sava-Cavahe; 3) Fradadafsh, Fradadhfsha; 4) Vidadafsh, Vidadahfshu; 5) Vorubarst, Vourubaresti; 6) Vorugarst, Vourujaresti, Vouruzaresti; and 7) Khvanuras, Ganiratha, Hvaniratha. The seventh land is situated in the middle of the other six. According to the introduction of Abu-Mansouri’s Shah-Nameh (the older Shah-Nameh), the seventh land, which the kings named Iran-Shahr (Airya-Vaeja) is also in the middle of the other six.

“All this action and struggle and ascension is supported by Heaven our Father and Earth our Mother, Parents of the Gods, who sustain respectively the purely mental and psychic and the physical consciousness. Their large and free scope is the condition of our achievement.

Also a series of asterisms or lunar mansions placed in three classes: that of the gods, men, and rakshasas.

Although in Greek mythology the gods are said to dwell on Olympus, three of the main Olympian divinities, Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades (or Pluto), had their habitats respectively in what may be called heaven or the inmost world of spirit, the cosmic spaces or the waters of space, and the underworld of the universe. Yet these three same divinities, because of their permeant cosmic forces or energies, and strictly on the law of analogical reasoning, had the same functions and occupy the same relative places in the minor forms of their respective manifestations: as, Zeus in the sky, Poseidon in the oceans of the globe, and Hades or Pluto in the underworld of our earth. Or again, the twelve great gods of the Mediterranean peoples may be considered to be the twelve main cosmic and intelligent powers whose all-permeant nature and activity is as apparent in the universe itself as in every atom or minor division thereof.

Amal: “If nothing existed except the Gods there would be no mediating passage for the spirit awaking in matter and moving towards the higher regions and reaching the glory of the Oversoul after much labour and gradual process.”

Ambrosia (Greek) [from ambrotos immortal from a not + mortos or brotos mortal; cf Sanskrit amṛta from a not + the verbal root mṛ to die; Latin immortalus from in not + mors death] In Classical myths variously the food, drink, or unguent of the gods or divine wisdom, connected with nectar; anything that confers or promotes immortality. Equivalent to the Sanskrit amrita and soma and the northern European mead. In a Chinese allegory, the flying Dragon drinks of ambrosia and falls to earth with his host. The laws of evolution entail a so-called curse or fall upon virtually all the hosts of monads frequently called angels, whereby they are cast down to the nether pole and undergo peregrinations in the realms of matter; in the case of many such “fallen angels,” this involves imbodiment or incarnation on earth. Man himself at a stage of his evolution experiences a similar “descent” and speeding-up, due to the impulses of the immortal urge within his breast to grow, progress, evolve, and become cognizant of larger reaches of truth. This is evident in the highly mystical Hebrew story of the forbidden Tree and in the various legends pertaining to soma in Hindu literature.

ambrosia ::: n. --> The fabled food of the gods (as nectar was their drink), which conferred immortality upon those who partook of it.
An unguent of the gods.
A perfumed unguent, salve, or draught; something very pleasing to the taste or smell.
Formerly, a kind of fragrant plant; now (Bot.), a genus of plants, including some coarse and worthless weeds, called ragweed, hogweed, etc.


ambrosia ::: Something especially delicious or delightful to taste or smell, divinely sweet; in Classical Mythology, the food of the gods.

ambrosia ("s) ::: something especially delicious or delightful to taste or smell, divinely sweet; in Classical Mythology, the food of the gods.

Ambrosia: The food of the gods of Greek mythology.

Amenti, Amentet (Egyptian) Amenti, Ȧmentet. The underworld (Tuat), the hidden place or secret region. The 15th or last house (Aat) of the Tuat, called Amentet-nefert (beautiful Amenti) and described as the dwelling place of the gods, where they live upon cakes and ale — in this respect similar to the Scandinavian Valhalla, the heaven world or devachan. The afterworlds were also referred to as Sekhet-hetep or -hetepet (the fields of peace), called in Greece the Elysian Fields, under the dominion of Osiris, lord of Amenti. Some of the texts speak of Amenti as situated far to the north of Egypt, although it is more commonly referred to as the Silent Land of the West. Other texts place it either below or above the earth, and the deceased is pictured as needing a ladder to ascend to the region.

Ammon-Ra (Greek) Ámmōn-Rā Amen-Ra (Egyptian) Ȧmen-Rā. When the princes of Thebes had conquered all rival claimants to the sovereignty of Egypt and established themselves as rulers of the dual Empires, they followed in religious, mystical, and occult matters the thought of the powerful priesthood of Thebes. Thus after the 12th dynasty a new manner of visioning the ancient god Ammon came into prominence, under the name Ammon-Ra, although the latter’s preeminence as chief god of Egypt did not occur until the 17th dynasty. The attributes of the hidden deity Ammon were combined with the solar god Ra, and this deity was acclaimed by the priests as the chief of the gods of Egypt. Ammon-Ra seems to be devoid of most, at least, of the mystical symbols that are present in representations of the older deities, although the hymns to the god that were carefully prepared by the priests incorporated all the attributes and phraseology prevalent in the other scriptures.

Among the dwarf names in the Eddas are typical animal characteristics, such as Antlered or Speedy. There are also more general names such as Sindre (vegetation) and Brock (the mineral world). At the formation of our globe earth Sindre and Brock, sons of Ivaldi, regent of the former earth — now the moon — created suitable gifts for the gods Odin, Thor, and Frey in competition with Loki and Dvalin (human nature). Their respective gifts were:

Amon-Ra: The Egyptian king of the gods, creator of the universe; originally the god of Thebes, later supreme god of all Egypt.

Amrita (Sanskrit) Amṛta [from a not + mṛta dead from the verbal root mṛ to die] Immortality; the water of life or immortality, the ambrosial drink or spiritual food of the gods. According to the Puranas, Ramayana, and Mahabharata, amrita is the elixir of life produced during the contest between the devas and asuras when churning the “milky sea” (the waters of life). It has been stolen many times, but as often recovered, and it is still preserved carefully in devaloka.

Amrita: The drink or food of the gods of the Vedic myths. Identified with the soma drink (q.v.).

amrta (Amrita) ::: 1. immortality. ::: 2. the nectar of immortality, ambrosia, the food or drink of the gods; the immortalising delight of the divine ecstasy. ::: amrtam [nominative]

Amsa, Amsu (Sanskrit) Aṃśa, Aṃśu Fragment, particle, part; name of one of the adityas in the Mahabharata; also of Surya (the sun) whose solar energy was so tremendous that the divine architect Visvakarman cut off an eighth part of his glory. From the luminous fragments (amsa) which fell to earth, Visvakarman made a number of implements for the gods, including Vishnu’s discus and Siva’s trident. In the Bhagavad-Gita (15:7), Krishna emanates an amsa of himself which, becoming a jiva (monad) in the world of living beings, draws to itself manas (mind) and the five senses which originate in prakriti (nature).

Anaktes, Anakes (Greek) Also Anactes, Anaces. Kings, chiefs; applied by Homer and other Greeks to the gods, as for instance the Dioscuri. When used of creative powers, they are identified with the kabeiroi, corybantes, curetes, etc.

ananke ::: "In Greek mythology, personification of compelling necessity or ultimate fate to which even the gods must yield.” *Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo"s Works

Ananke ::: “In Greek mythology, personification of compelling necessity or ultimate fate to which even the gods must yield.” (Mother India) Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo’s Works

Anastasis (Greek) Rising up; used in referring to the dead and to resurrection. However, this ancient mystical term was originally used for the rising of the initiant when, having completed the dread trials of initiation, he rose a new man, one who was reborn, or what in India was called a dvija (twice-born). Another significance belonging from earliest times to the cycle of initiation is that when a person through severe training, initiation, and a complete turning away from things of matter to things of spirit, had succeeded in becoming at one with his inner god at least on occasions, he was then considered to have arisen or to have become resurrected out of all the lower ranges of kosmic life, and to have attained self-conscious existence in the spirit. Having attained anastasis, he took his place in the hierarchy of light or compassion as one of the co-laborers with the gods.

Anatum or Antum (Chaldean) Consort of the god of heaven, Anu, supreme god of the Assyro-Babylonian pantheon. Whereas Anu represented heaven and height, Anatum represented the earth and depth. She was regarded as the mother of the gods, as well as being the mother of the god Ea or Hea. “Astronomically she is Ishtar, Venus, the Ashtoreth of the Jews” (TG 21). Anu and Anatum correspond to Ouranos and Gaia in Hesiod, and therefore in one of her mystical significances Anatum corresponds with the Hindu prakriti.

an exceeding of the law of the physical body, ::: the conquest of death, an earthly immortality"; the "ambrosia of the gods", a rejuvenating "nectar" induced by certain practices of yoga to trickle down from a subtle centre in the head; identified with soma1, "the sweetness that comes flowing from the streams of the upper hidden world, . . . the divine delight hidden in all existence which, once manifest, supports all life"s crowning activities and is the force that finally immortalises the mortal".

Anu (Chaldean) Supreme god of the Babylonian pantheon, king of angels and spirits, ruler of destiny, lord of the city of Erech or Uruk — later Ur. One of the loftiest of Babylonian divinities, part of a trinity with Enlil and Ea, he was especially the god of heaven, creator of star spirits and of the demons of cold, rain, and darkness. His consort Antum or Anatum was mother of the gods. Anu was the concealed deity; in the Chaldean account of Genesis, he is the passive deity, however, “the primordial chaos, the god time and world at once, chronos, and kosmos, the uncreated matter issued from the one and fundamental principle of all things” (IU 2:423).

Anukis [Greek from Egyptian Ȧnqet from ȧnq to surround, embrace] Third of the triad of deities of Elephantine, consisting of Khnemu, Sati, and Anqet or Anukis. Her worship was common in northern Nubia, but later centered at Sahal, where her principal temple was situated. At Philae she was identified with Nephthys or Neith, it being common to regard Khnemu as a form of Osiris: hence Sati and Anqet became associated with Isis and Nephthys. However, Anqet is also represented with the disk and horned headdress of Isis and is called the lady of heaven, mistress of all the gods; giver of life and of all power, and of all health and joy of heart. The goddess is also associated with the embracing waters of the Nile, though the root itself shows that she is the embracing and all-surrounding cosmic life as well as it minor functions in manifestation. The ascriptions given to Anukis as the giver of life and of all power associate the goddess with the moon, whether in the cosmogonical or lower generative sense.

Anzu or Zu (Babylonian) The lion-headed eagle, often portrayed as “master of the animals.” Plotting to assume sovereignty and command the gods, he stole the Tablet of Destinies (DUB-šima-a-ti) from the empty throne of his master, the high god Enlil, then flew off to hide in the inaccessible mountain. Warrior-god Ninurta was sent to battle Anzu, slay him, and return the Tablet. George Smith’s 1875 translation (cited in SD 2:283n) was tentative at best and is now superseded by modern translations such as in Dalley, Myths from Mesopotamia, 1989.

Aphrodite (Greek) Greek Goddess of love and beauty, in older times regarded as signifying the harmony of cosmos. Originally the daughter of Zeus and Dione, a lunar deity like Aphrodite, both being represented with the horns of the moon or of the zodiacal sign Taurus; but the same deity in ancient mystical philosophy may be at once mother, wife, and daughter — so difficult is it to find among our common notions a symbolism that will convey the full meaning anciently intended. Later, under Eastern influence, she was said to have been born from the sea foam and to have landed in a seashell on the isle of Cythera. A sea goddess as well as an earth goddess of gardens, groves, and springtime, she was the wife of Hephaestus and connected also with Ares and Adonis; mother of Eros. As Aphrodite Urania, she was identified with the goddess of heaven Astarte, and later under Platonic influence came to represent spiritual love as opposed to earthly love, represented by Aphrodite Pandemos. Among her analogs are Isis, Ishtar, Mylitta, Eve, Vach, etc., all the mother of all living beings and of the gods, cosmically. The Romans identified Aphrodite with Venus, and the Egyptians with Hathor.

apotheosis ::: n. pl. --> The act of elevating a mortal to the rank of, and placing him among, "the gods;" deification.
Glorification; exaltation.


Apsu (Babylonian) Abzu (Sumerian) Also Ab Soo. The primordial deep; the waters of space in the Babylonian epic of creation Enuma Elish (when on high). From Apsu and Tiamat were born all the gods, man being fashioned from the clay of Apsu in a Sumerian version, and from the blood of Kingu, son and second consort of Tiamat, in Enuma Elish. The deep is the abode of Ea (wisdom) who saves humanity from destruction by Apsu, Apsu being transformed into still or stagnant subterranean waters.

Arachne (Greek) In Greek mythology the daughter of the dyer Idmon of Colophon, who was so skillful a weaver that she dared to challenge Athena to a competitive trial. Indignant because Arachne had presumed to depict the amours of the gods in her weaving, Athena tore her work, Arache hung herself, and Athena turned the presumptuous maiden into a spider, doomed to spin her web forever. The amours of the gods woven by Arachne signify the weaving of the marvelous web of manifested existence in all its intricate hierarchical structure.

Aries (The Ram): The first sign of the zodiac. Its symbol () represents the head and horns of the ram. In astrology, it is a symbol of offensive power—a weapon of the gods, hence an implement of the will. The Babylonians sacrificed rams during the period when the Sun occupied this sign, which occurs annually from March 21 to April 20. Astrologically and astronomically it is the first thirty-degree arc beginning at the point of the Spring Equinox. It is the “leading” quality of the element Fire: positive, diurnal, movable, dry, hot, fiery, choleric and violent. Ruler: Mars. Exaltation: Sun. Detriment: Venus. Fall: Saturn. Symbolic interpretation: Sprouting seed; fire in eruption; a fountain of water; a ram’s horns.

aruspex ::: n. --> One of the class of diviners among the Etruscans and Romans, who foretold events by the inspection of the entrails of victims offered on the altars of the gods.

arya (Aryan) ::: the good and noble man; the fighter; he who strives and overcomes all outside him and within him that stands opposed to the human advance; he who does the work of sacrifice, finds the sacred word of illumination, desires the gods and increases them and is increased by them into the largeness of the true existence; he is the warrior of the light and the traveller to the Truth.

As a proper noun, the name of a deity, also applied as a title to the gods Agni, Siva, and Rudra. See also ABHAVA

As Egypt was divided into the North and South, the deity took on two aspects: Hap-Reset, the North Nile, pictured with a cluster of papyrus plants upon his head, and Hap-Meht, the South Nile, depicted with lotus plants. He was called the vivifier, creator of things which exist, father of the gods. In one aspect, Hap was identified with Osiris, especially Osiris-Apis or Serapis; thus Isis came to be regarded as his consort. Likewise he had absorbed the attributes of Nu, the primeval watery abyss from which Ra, the sun god, emerged on the first day of the new world period; therefore he was designated the father of living things, for without the waters of Hap, all living things would perish. Blavatsky points to his psychopompic role and his equivalence with the angel Gabriel (BCW 10:55-6).

Asgard: In Norse mythology, Odin’s headquarters, home of the gods, also housing the Valhalla, hall of the chosen among those slain in battle.

Asoka (Sanskrit) Aśoka The name of two celebrated kings of the Maurya dynasty of Magadha. According to the chronicles of Northern Buddhism there were two Asokas: King Chandragupta, named by Max Muller the Constantine of India, and his grandson King Asoka. King Chandragupta was called Piyadasi (beloved of us, benignant), Devanam-piya (beloved of the gods), and Kalasoka (the Asoka who has come in time). His grandson received the name of Dharmasoka (the asoka of the Good Law) because of his devotion to Buddhism, his zealous support of it and its spreading. The second Asoka had never followed the Brahmanical faith, but was a Buddhist born. It was his grandfather who had been converted to the new teaching, after which he had a number of edicts inscribed on pillars and rocks, a custom followed also by his grandson; but it was the second Asoka who was the more zealous supporter of Buddhism. He is said to have maintained in his palace from 60,000 to 70,000 monks and priests, and erected 84,000 topes or stupas throughout the world. The inscriptions of various edicts published by him display most noble ethical sentiments, especially the edict found at Allahabad on the so-called Asoka’s column in the Fort.

As the progenitor of real physical man, Daksha was son of the Prachetasas and Marisha, the first of the “egg-born.” He “establishes the era of men engendered by sexual intercourse. But this mode of procreation did not occur suddenly, as one may think, and required long ages before it became the one ‘natural’ way. Therefore, his sacrifice to the gods is shown as interfered with by Siva, the destroying deity, evolution and progress personified, . . . Virabhadra, ‘abiding in the region of the ghosts (etherial men). . . . created from the pores of the skin (Romakupas), powerful Raumas, (or Raumyas).’ Now, however mythical the allegory, the Mahabharata, which is history as much as is the Iliad, shows the Raumyas [hairy ones] and other races, as springing in the same manner from the Romakupas, hair or skin pores. . . .

As the smith of the gods, he is related to the kabiri, the instructor of mankind in the metal arts. He made thunderbolts for Zeus, armor, jewelry, and other items for the gods, and is said to have molded the first woman, Pandora, which was sent to Epimetheus.

As time went on certain deities became more prominent in theological thought and speculation, acquiring celestial attributes as well as earthly ones, such as Ba‘al, Astarte (made equivalent to Isis by Plutarch), and the Tyrian Melqarth (associated with Herakles). Originally each masculine deity had the title Ba‘al (“lord,” equivalent to Babylonian Bel), and the feminine deities had the title of ’Amma (mother), just as the ancient Hebrews spoke of their ’em or ’ammah (fountain, beginning, womb, mother). The gods were called ’elomim or ’elim, from the original Shemetic root ’el. The god of the moon was Sin, the deity of the flame or lightning was Resh Reshuf and Eshmun was the god of vital force or healing (worshiped especially at Sidon) — clearly ’Eshmun is from the Shemitic verbal root ’esh (fire, cosmic fire or vitality) — cosmic vital electricity or fohat. Blavatsky states that the Phoenicians also propitiated the kabeiroi, deities of Samothrace.

Astraea (Greek) [from astr star] Star maiden; daughter of Astraeus and Eos, or of Zeus and Themis. Themis, born of Uranus and Gaia (heaven and earth), signifies law, order, equity, as does her daughter Astraea, who lived among men in the Golden Age as the goddess of justice. But when wickedness prevailed in the bronze age, she was the last of the gods to withdraw, with her sister Aidos (modesty), and is found among the stars of Virgo. Another myth says that Zeus, when he carried off Ganymedes, the personified object of lust, threw Astraea back on earth again, where she fell on her head. Ganymedes is Aquarius, and the astronomical meaning refers to an inversion of the poles, which brings Aquarius into the northern celestial hemisphere and places Virgo upside down in the southern half (SD 2:785).

As universal space, it is also known as Aditi, in which lies inherent the eternal and continuously active ideation of the universe producing its ever-changing aspects on the planes of matter and objectivity; and from this ideation radiates the First Logos. This is why the Puranas state that akasa has but one attribute, namely sound, for sound is but the translated symbol of logos (speech) in its mystic sense. Akasa as primordial spatial substance is thus the upadhi (vehicle) of divine thought. Further, it is the playground of all the intelligent and semi-intelligent forces in nature, the fountainhead of all terrestrial life, and the abode of the gods.

Asura: In Hindu mysticism, a fallen angel or demon, hostile to the gods (devas).

asura ::: n. --> An enemy of the gods, esp. one of a race of demons and giants.

Asura (Sanskrit) Asura [from the verbal root as to breathe] A title frequently given to the hierarch or supreme spirit of our universe, as being the primal “Breather”; also a class of spiritual-intellectual beings. In Hinduism it commonly signifies elemental and evil gods or demons. “Primarily in the Rig-Veda, the ‘Asuras’ are shown as spiritual divine beings; their etymology is derived from asu (breath), the ‘Breath of God,’ and they mean the same as the Supreme Spirit or the Zoroastrian Ahura. It is later on, for purposes of theology and dogma, that they are shown issuing from Brahma’s thigh, and that their name began to be derived from a privative, and sura, god (solar deities), or not-a-god, and that they became the enemies of the gods” (SD 2:59).

asura ::: [Ved.]: the Lord; used in the Veda as in the Avesta for the deva, but also for the gods, his manifestations; it is only in a few hymns that it is used for the dark Titans; [Later] : the strong or mighty one, Titan; a [hostile] being of the mentalised vital.

Asurendra (Sanskrit) Asurendra [from asura a class of deities + indra] The lord of the asuras; as Indra was popularly called the chief of the gods, so Asurendra is similarly the chief of the asuras.

Asvattha(Sanskrit) ::: The mystical tree of knowledge, the mystical tree of kosmical life and being, represented asgrowing in a reversed position: the branches extending downwards and the roots upwards. The branchestypify the visible kosmical universe, the roots the invisible world of spirit.The universe among the ancients of many nations was portrayed or figurated under the symbol of a tree,of which the roots sprang from the divine heart of things, and the trunk and the branches and thebranchlets and the leaves were the various planes and worlds and spheres of the kosmos. The fruit of thiskosmic tree contained the seeds of future "trees," being the entities which had attained through evolutionthe end of their evolutionary journey, such as men and the gods -- themselves universes in the small, anddestined in the future to become kosmic entities when the cycling wheel of time shall have turnedthrough long aeons on its majestic round. In fact, every living thing, and so-called inanimate things also,are trees of life, with their roots above in the spiritual realms, with their trunks passing through theintermediate spheres, and their branches manifesting in the physical realms.

Aten (Egyptian) Ȧten. The disk of the sun and its vivifying, light-giving beams. Extended during the 18th dynasty to become the basis of a new religion under Amenhetep III and his son Amenhetep IV. They endeavored to arouse a more devotional feeling in the life of the Egyptians in opposition to the rigorous formalistic worship prescribed by the priests of the time, with its animal sacrifices and rigid ceremonialism, stressing the most material aspect of the gods as represented in the popular mythology. Incense and flowers decked altars, instead of blood sacrifices; joyousness pervaded the new capital city, while architects and painters created new ideas in their works. However, his successor Tut-ankh-Amen, reinstated the worship of Amen-Ra under the direction of the priests. The worship of Amen or Ammon was an idea in conception far older than and philosophically and mystically superior to the conceptions which clustered about the newer worship of Aten. This newer worship, with the ideas woven into its meaning by the monarch and his wife, was not only a reform when contrasted with the rigid ritualism into which the worship of Amen had degenerated, but actually was an attempt to infill the minds of the Egyptian people with the joyousness of the solar orb itself as the vehicle of the recondite, secret, and highly mystical Amen, abstract and highly philosophical. This illustrates how a noble worship can become ritualistic and empty, and how a more sensuous but more joyous worship can be used in a revivalistic sense to awaken a new religious devotion in the hearts of the multitude.

Atharva Veda (Sanskrit) Atharva Veda One of the principal Vedas, commonly known as the fourth; attributed to Atharvan or Atharva. The Rig-Veda states that he was the first to “draw forth fire” and institute its worship, as well as the offering of soma and prayers. Mythologically, Atharvan is represented as a prajapati, Brahma’s eldest son, instructed by his father in brahma-vidya: thus was he inspired to compose the Veda bearing his name. At a later period he is associated with Angiras and called the father of Agni. The Atharva-Veda, considered of later origin than the other three Vedas, comprises about 6000 verses, 760 being hymns, consisting of formulas and spells or incantations for counteracting diseases and calamities. The hymns are of slightly different character from those in the other Vedas: in addition to reverencing the gods, the worshiper himself is exalted and is supposed to receive benefits by reciting the mantras.

Atmu, Atum (Egyptian) Ȧtmu, Ȧtum [from tem to make an end of, complete] Also Tem, Tum, Temu. A form of the sun god, represented as bringing the day to its close, thus associated with the evening sun — whether of our ordinary day, or of the ending of a manvantara. “I am the god Tem, the maker of the sky, the creator of things which are, who cometh forth from the earth, who made the seed of man to come into being, the Lord of things, who fashioned the gods, the Great Gods, who created himself, the Lord of Life, who made to flourish the Two Companies of the Gods. . . . My coming is like unto that god who eateth men, and who feedeth upon the gods” (Egyptian Book of the Dead, Budge 258-60).

Atonement Reconciliation brought about by a re-formation of the lower, so that it may become at one with the higher. Hence a number of Occidental mystics refer to the processes of atonement involving the foregoing idea as at-one-ment. In its best sense atonement means the becoming at one between the human ego and its spiritual counterpart, where the life or vitality of the lower personal man is offered up as a sacrifice, willing and utterly joyful, to the higher self. Thus the life which the hierophant is enjoined to offer is not his physical life, but the undesirable and imperfect life of his lower self, the selfish personality. The custom of sacrificing helpless animals — a custom protested against by Gautama Buddha in particular — is but an instance of the way in which lofty spiritual teachings or initiatory ceremonies can degenerate into repellent or cruel rites. Nevertheless, “the atonements by blood — blood-covenants and blood transferences from gods to men, and by men, as sacrifices to the gods — are the first keynote struck in every cosmogony and theogony; soul, life and blood were synonymous words in every language . . . The mystic meaning of the injunction, ‘Verily, verily, I say unto you, except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man and drink his blood, ye have not life in yourselves’ [John 6:53] . . . [has] to be interpreted with the help of three keys — one opening the psychic door, the second that of physiology, and the third that which unlocks the mystery of terrestrial being, by unveiling the inseparable blending of theogony with anthropology” (BCW 8:181-2).

Audlang (Icelandic) [from audr void + langr long] One of several heavens of the Norse Eddas; one of “the three gradually ascending planets of our ‘Chain’ ” (SD 2:100), these unseen globes usually designated E, F, and G in theosophical literature. Audlang is evidently one of the “shelves” (planes) of substances different from our matter, of which these unseen globes are built. Beyond Audlang lie other heavens: Grimnismal in the Edda enumerates twelve mansions of the gods on their appropriate shelves.

Avesta (Avest, Pers) Apstak, Avestak (Pahlavi) Law or the basic foundation, the sacred scriptures of the Mazdeans. The language of the ancient Aryans was the language of the Vedic hymns and also of the Gathic chants of Zoroaster, these being so close that a mere phonetic change often suffices to translate a passage from one into the other. Because of this connection “the Mazdean Scriptures of the Zend-Avesta, the Vendidad and others correct and expose the later cunning shuffling of the gods in the Hindu Pantheon, and restore through Ahura the Asuras to their legitimate place in theogony” (SD 2:60-1). Zend, on the other hand, traditionally designates the Pahlavi commentary on the Avesta. The Yasnas are the principal writings of the Zoroastrians; and in their oldest portion, the Gathas, the original philosophy of Mazdeism is expressed in a spirited poetic language. The Vispered (Pahlavi) or Visperataro (Avestan) [from vispe all + ratavo warriors, spiritual teachers] is an appendix to the later Yasnas which deals with the ritualistic aspects of the Mazdean faith.

Ayur Veda (Sanskrit) Āyurveda [from āyus life, health, vital power + veda knowledge] One of the minor Vedas, generally considered a supplement to the Atharva-Veda, one of the four principal Vedas. It treats of the science of health and medicine, and is divided into eight departments: 1) salya, surgery; 2) salakya, the science and cure of diseases of the head and its organs; 3) kaya-chikitsa, the cure of diseases affecting the whole body, or general medical treatment; 4) bhuta-vidya, the treatment of mental — and consequent physical — diseases supposed to be produced by bhutas (demons); 5) kaumara-bhritya, the medical treatment of children; 6) agada-tantra, the doctrine of antidotes; 7) rasayana-tantra, the doctrine of elixirs; and 8) vajikarana-tantra, the doctrine of aphrodisiacs. Medicine was regarded as one of the sacred sciences by all ancient peoples and in archaic ages was one of the knowledges or sciences belonging to the priesthood; and this list of subjects shows that the field covered by its practitioners was extensive. Its authorship is attributed by some to Dhanvantari, sometimes called the physician of the gods, who was produced by the mystical churning of the ocean and appeared holding a cup of amrita (immortality) in his hands.

Azure Seats [from Persian lazhward lapis lazuli] Azure means a blue color, also the sky, hence celestial, referring to the causal realms of being, where the gods of kosmic intelligences function. Thus the azure seats of the gods conveys the abode of the spiritual forces that govern the universe in its manifold operations.

Babylon [from Assyrian “gate of the gods”] An ancient, celebrated city on the Euphrates said to have been founded by the Assyrian monarch Ninus or his legendary wife Semiramis. In ancient times one foci through which Brahmanical esoteric wisdom from India was diffused in Asia Minor, and its cosmogony forms a link between those teachings and the cosmogony of the Hebraic Bible.

Bagavadam (Tamil) According to Blavatsky, a scripture on astronomy and kindred subjects (TG 48). The time periods in it differ from present-day reckonings: 15 solar days make a paccham; two paccham (30 days) make a month — equivalent to only one day of the pitris. Two of such months make a roodoo; three roodoo, an ayanam; two ayanam, a year. However, this year of mortals is but a day of the gods.

Balder, Baldr (Icelandic) The best, foremost; the sun god in Norse mythology, the son of Odin and Frigga and a favorite with gods and men. His mansion is Breidablick (broadview) whence he can keep watch over all the worlds. One of the lays of the Elder or Poetic Edda deals entirely with the death of the sun god, also mentioned in the principal poem Voluspa. Briefly stated: the gods were concerned when Balder was troubled with dreams of impending doom. Frigga therefore set out to exact a promise from all living things that none would harm Balder, and all readily complied. One thing only had been overlooked: the harmless-seeming mistletoe. Loki, the mischievous god (human mind), became aware of this, plucked the little plant, and from it fashioned a dart. He approached Hoder, the blind god (of darkness and ignorance) who was standing disconsolately by while the other gods were playfully hurling their weapons against the invulnerable sun god. Offering to guide his aim, Loki placed on Hoder’s bow the small but deadly “sorrow-dart.” Thus mind darkened by ignorance accomplished what nothing else could: the death of the bright deity of light. Balder must then travel to the house of Hel, queen of the realm of the dead. Odin, as Hermod, goes to plead with Hel for Balder’s return, and Hel agrees to release him on condition that all living things weep for him. Frigga resumes her weary round and implores all beings to mourn the sun god’s passing. All agree save one: Loki in the guise of an aged crone refuses to shed a tear. This single taint of perverseness in the human mind condemns Balder to remain in the realm of Hel until the following cycle is due to begin. Thus death is linked with the active human mind, Loki. As the bright sun god is placed on his pyre-ship, his loving wife Nanna (the moon goddess) dies of a broken heart and is placed beside him, but before the ship is set ablaze and cast adrift, Odin leaned over to whisper something in the dead sun god’s ear. This secret message must endure unknown to all until Balder’s return, when he and his dark twin Hoder will “build together on Ropt’s (Odin’s) sacred soil.”

balder ::: n. --> The most beautiful and beloved of the gods; the god of peace; the son of Odin and Freya.

Bali (Sanskrit) Bali Daitya king who through devotion and penance became ruler of the three worlds (heaven, the upper air, and patala). Vishnu as the dwarf avatara regains these for the gods by means of his three superhuman steps or strides. (BCW 13:158, 4:367). See also VAMANA-AVATARA

barhih. ::: in the Veda, the seat of sacred grass on which the gods are invited to sit at the sacrifice.

Belit, Belita (Bab, Chald, Assyr) Chief lady; a title applicable to any important goddess in the pantheon, applied especially to Nin-lil, consort of Bel (or En-lil) at Nippur, where she was known as mother of the gods, ruler of heaven and earth. The title was likewise later applied to Ishtar (Greek Beltis).

Bifrost, Bilrost, Bafrast (Icelandic, Scandinavian) [from bifast to tremble] Via tremula (the trembling way), the rainbow; the rainbow bridge in Norse mythology, also called the asbru (bridge of the aesir), separating the realm of the gods (Asgard) from that of men (Midgard), while giving access to it. Guarding the bridge is Heimdal, the whitest aesir, who will blow the gjallarhorn when the world comes to an end and the gods withdraw to their sacred ground (Ragnarok). Then Bifrost falls when the sons of Muspel storm over it. It is said that each day the gods cross Bifrost to meet in council at the fount of Urd (the norn that represents the past or causation), but Thor must ford the river, as his lightnings would set the bridge on fire.

Bod-lhas (Tibetan) [from bod (bö) Tibet + lha spirit, divine being (cf Sanskrit deva)] A name of the civil capital of Tibet, Lhasa [Tib lha-sa place of the gods].

Bragi is synonymous with spiritual intuition which, united with the mind (Loki), is the means of human liberation. His consort, the goddess Idun, daily gives the gods the apples of immortality.

Brahma devanam prathamah sambabhuva ::: Brahma first of the Gods was born. [Mund. 1.1.1]

Brahma “symbolizes personally the collective creators of the World and Men — the universe with all its numberless productions of things movable and (seemingly) immovable. He is collectively the Prajapatis, the Lords of Being; and the four bodies typify the four classes of creative powers or Dhyan Chohans . . .” (SD 2:60), these four bodies being ratri (night) associated with the creation of the asuras; ahan (day) associated with the gods; sandhya (evening twilight) associated with the pitris; and jyotsna (dawn or light) associated with the creation of men.

Brahmavidya (Sanskrit) Brahmavidyā Brahma-knowledge, divine knowledge; equivalent to theosophia, the wisdom of the gods. The secret or esoteric science or wisdom about the universe, its nature, laws, structure, and operations.

Brhaspati (Brihaspati) ::: [Ved.]: the Master of the creative Word (the stress in the name falling upon the potency of the Word rather than upon the thought of the general soul-power which is behind it). [Later]: spiritual teacher of the gods; guardian of the planet Jupiter; chief of the high priests of the world.

Brihaspati (Sanskrit) Bṛhaspati [from bṛh prayer + pati lord] Sometimes Vrihaspati. A Vedic deity, corresponding to the planet Jupiter, commonly translated lord of prayer, the personification of exoteric piety and religion, but mystically the name signifies lord of increase, of expansion, growth. He is frequently called Brahmanaspati, both names having a direct significance with the power of sound as uttered in mantras or prayer united with positive will. He is regarded in Hindu mythology as the chief offerer of prayers and sacrifices, thus representing the Brahmin or priestly caste, being the Purohita (family priest) of the gods, among other things interceding with them for mankind. He has many titles and attributes, being frequently designated as Jiva (the living), Didivis (the bright or golden-colored). In later times he became the god of exoteric knowledge and eloquence — Dhishana (the intelligent), Gish-pati (lord of invocations). In this aspect he is regarded as the son of the rishi Angiras, and hence bears the patronymic Angirasa, and the husband of Tara, who was carried off by Soma (the moon). Tara is

Brisingamen (Icelandic) [from brising fire + men jewel] In Norse myths the fire jewel represents the fire of enlightened intelligence in the human race, pictured as a gem which the goddess Freya wears on her bosom. She is the spiritual power imbodied in the planet Venus and the protectress of evolving, aspiring humanity. Her gem has on more than one occasion been stolen by Loki — the mischievous lower mind — which brought grief to the gods, who have the well-being of humanity at heart. Once the precious gem was in grave danger: the matter-giant Trym (our physical globe earth) stole Thor’s hammer of creation and destruction and hid it deep beneath the ground, and for its return he demanded that Freya become his wife. The story relates that she snorted with such fierce outrage that the gem was shattered.

Budha (Sanskrit) Budha [from the verbal root budh to awake] As an adjective, intelligent, wise, clever, fully awake; hence a wise or instructed person, a sage. In mythology, Budha is represented as the son of Tara (or Rohini), the wife of Brihaspati (the planet Jupiter). Tara was carried off by Soma (the Moon), which led to the Tarakamaya — the war in svarga (heaven) — between the gods and asuras (the latter siding with Soma against the divinities). The gods were victorious and Tara was returned to Brihaspati, but the parentage of the son she gave birth to was claimed both by Brihapati and Soma: he was so beautiful he was named Budha (cf SD 2:498-9). Upon Brahma’s demand, Tara admitted that Budha was the offspring of Soma. Budha became the god of wisdom and the husband of Ila (or Ida), daughter of Manu Vaivasvata, and in one sense stands for esoteric wisdom.

Bur (Icelandic) [from burdr birth] Emanation of Buri, primeval root of being in the Norse Eddas. From Bur sprang the creative trinity: Odin (Allfather), Vile (divine will), and Vi or Ve (awe, sanctity). These three forces produce the systems of worlds where the gods feast at the stellar and planetary tables on mead (experience of life).

Cadmus, Cadmilus (Greek) Son of Agenor, king of Phoenicia, and brother of Europa, husband of Harmonia, and father of Semele; legendary founder of Thebes, who slew the dragon, planted its teeth, and built the city with the help of some of the soldiers that sprang from the teeth. He and his wife were finally turned into serpents by the gods. Said to have introduced into Greece an alphabet, possibly based upon 16 characters derived from either Egypt or Phoenicia. He belongs to the class of heroes, who succeeded the reigns of the gods and demigods on earth and who were parents and instructors of mortals.

caduceus ::: n. --> The official staff or wand of Hermes or Mercury, the messenger of the gods. It was originally said to be a herald&

Caduceus: The wand of Hermes, or Mercury, the messenger of the gods. A cosmic, magic, or astronomical symbol; its significance changing with its application. Originally a triple-headed serpent, it is now a rod with two serpents twined around it, and two wings at the top. The entwined white and black serpents represent the struggle between good and evil—disease and cure. (Cf. Aaron’s Rod.)

Chaos(Greek) ::: A word usually thought to mean a sort of helter-skelter treasury of original principles and seedsof beings. Well, so it verily is, in one profound sense; but it is most decidedly and emphatically nothelter-skelter. It is properly the kosmic storehouse of all the latent or resting seeds of beings and thingsfrom former manvantaras. Of course it is this, simply because it contains everything. It means space, notthe highest mystical or actual space, not the parabrahma-mulaprakriti, the Boundless -- not that. But thespace of any particular hierarchy descending into manifestation, what space for it is at that particularperiod of its beginning of development. The directive principles in chaos are the gods when they awakenfrom their pralayic sleep. Chaos in one sense may very truly be called the condition of the space of asolar system or even of a planetary chain during its pralaya. When awakening to planetary action begins,chaos pari passu ceases.

Ch’i: Chinese for force, spirit. Used in esoteric terminology also for breath, the vital fluid. Also as the name of the Spirits of Earth (the gods of the ground and the grain, mountains, rivers and valleys).

Christianity, in addition to a great many so-called pagan ideas, also inherited and adapted Jewish sacrificial ideas, but the word became limited to the sacrifice of Christ for the sins of the world, and the sacrifice by man of his personal desires to the behests of his divinity. The true origin of the Christian atonement is in the Mysteries, when the hierophant offered his pure and sinless life as a sacrifice for his race to the gods whom he hoped to rejoin (IU 2:42). The general sense in theosophy is that of sacrificing one’s temporal interests to a lofty ideal.

Churning of the Ocean The agitation of milk, separating the uniform fluid into butter and buttermilk, is used as a figure with various applications, but chiefly to a stage in cosmogenesis when the one cosmic substance becomes differentiated into the “cosmic curds.” By this churning, according to the Hindu tale, is produced amrita, the cosmic soma, the fluid of immortality; but inevitably at the same time is produced visha (poison), this being the polar qualities in the cosmic forces, and likewise in ethics good and evil. The Ocean of Milk or Life, space, is churned by the gods; the radiant essence curdled and spread throughout the depths. It is said in the Satapatha-Brahmana that this took place in satya yuga, but the reference here is to cosmic yugas, a period before the earth’s earliest formation. The allegory however may apply to the initial stages of cycles of various magnitudes, and has also astronomical and geographical applications to the formation of world-stuff out of primary matter and to the dvipas or climatic zones, whether celestial or terrestrial, which are spoken of as seas of milk or of curds.

Cynocephalus [from Latin canus dog + cephalus head] The dog-headed ape (Simia hamadryas) which in Egyptian mythology was called Amemet (eater of the dead) whose master was Thoth or Tehuti. In the Judgment scene in The Egyptian Book of the Dead, Amemet is represented as seated by Thoth, ready to inform his master when the pointer marks the middle of the beam on the balance, when the heart is being weighed in the scales. After Thoth makes his announcement to the gods concerning the result of the weighing of the heart, the company of the gods decree that Amemet shall not be permitted to prevail over the successful candidate.

Dache-Dachus (Chaldean) “The dual emanation of Moymis, the progeny of the dual or androgynous World-Principle, the male Apason and female Tauthe. Like all theocratic nations possessing Temple mysteries, the Babylonians never mentioned the ‘One’ Principle of the Universe, nor did they give it a name. This made Damascius (Theogonies) remark that like the rest of ‘barbarians’ the Babylonians passed it over in silence. Tauthe was the mother of the gods, while Apason was her self-generating male power, Moymis, the ideal universe, being her only-begotten son, and emanating in his turn Dache-Dachus, and at last Belus, the Demiurge of the objective Universe” (TG 93).

Daemon or Demon [from Greek daimon, Latin daemon] A god, angel, or celestial power or spirit, of varying degrees of ethereality, and ranging from the supreme deity of the hierarchy, through the greater gods, down to mere genii and lemures. Originally the term applied to deity in general, but later it usually was referred to beings intermediate between the gods and mankind, representing the powers and functions of gods. The Greeks and Romans sometimes used the term for the human divine egos. Philsophers such as Plato divided the daemons into three classes, “the first two are invisible; their bodies are pure ether and fire (Planetary Spirits); the Daimons of the third class are clothed with vapoury bodies; they are usually invisible, but sometimes, making themselves concrete, become visible for a few seconds. These are the earthly spirits, or our astral souls” (BCW 6:187).

daitya ::: an enemy of the gods (devas), the "opposing or too violently forward-striving Titan"; any of the sons of Diti, meaning "the division, the separative consciousness", who is the mother of the Titans as Aditi is the mother of the gods.

  “Daksha typifies the early Third Race, holy and pure, still devoid of an individual Ego, and having merely the passive capacities. Brahma, therefore, commands him to create (in the exoteric texts; when, obeying the command, he made ‘inferior and superior’ (avara and vara) progeny (putra), Bipeds and quadrupeds; and by his will gave birth to females. . . . to the gods, the Daityas (giants of the Fourth Race), the snake-gods, animals, cattle and the Danavas (Titans and demon Magicians) and other beings.

Danava(s) (Sanskrit) Dānava-s Children of Danu (or Danayu) and Kasyapa, often identified with the daityas and asuras, and held to be enemies of the gods or devas. The titans and demon-magicians of the fourth root-race, almost identical with the daityas or giants and irreconcilable opponents of those groups of the fourth root-race who were the upholders of ritualism and idol-worship.

Danu (Sanskrit) Danu A daughter of Daksha; by Kasyapa, mother of the danavas, often called in Hindu story demons, giants, or titans because almost the same as the daityas. Opponents of the gods of mere ritual or ritualistic ceremonies.

Demon(s) [from Greek daimones, Latin daemons] In many of the later religions, such as Christianity, either the gods of rival religions, nature spirits of paganism, or the exuviae or shells of the dead. Actually demons are a relatively modern misapprehension of a large class of nature sprites which in ancient thought comprised a vast range of spiritual, semi-spiritual, and astral beings, existing in different degrees of evolutionary unfoldment, and therefore classified into groups from the fully self-conscious down to the only partly conscious elementals of the astral realms. The teaching regarding daimones was extremely recondite; the later medieval Christian Demonologies, however, dealt almost exclusively with beings of low grade and of an astral character lacking moral sense and self-consciousness, which for ages have been called in European countries by names such as fairies, sprites, goblins, hobgoblins, pixies, nixies, and brownies. See also DAEMON

"Destruction is always a simultaneous or alternate element which keeps pace with creation and it is by destroying and renewing that the Master of Life does his long work of preservation. More, destruction is the first condition of progress. Inwardly, the man who does not destroy his lower self-formations, cannot rise to a greater existence. Outwardly also, the nation or community or race which shrinks too long from destroying and replacing its past forms of life, is itself destroyed, rots and perishes and out of its debris other nations, communities and races are formed. By destruction of the old giant occupants man made himself a place upon earth. By destruction of the Titans the gods maintain the continuity of the divine Law in the cosmos. Whoever prematurely attempts to get rid of this law of battle and destruction, strives vainly against the greater will of the World-Spirit.” Essays on the Gita

“Destruction is always a simultaneous or alternate element which keeps pace with creation and it is by destroying and renewing that the Master of Life does his long work of preservation. More, destruction is the first condition of progress. Inwardly, the man who does not destroy his lower self-formations, cannot rise to a greater existence. Outwardly also, the nation or community or race which shrinks too long from destroying and replacing its past forms of life, is itself destroyed, rots and perishes and out of its debris other nations, communities and races are formed. By destruction of the old giant occupants man made himself a place upon earth. By destruction of the Titans the gods maintain the continuity of the divine Law in the cosmos. Whoever prematurely attempts to get rid of this law of battle and destruction, strives vainly against the greater will of the World-Spirit.” Essays on the Gita

deva ::: a god, a divinity; "a dynamic being manifested in Prakriti for the works of the plane to which he belongs"; any of the "cosmic godheads presiding over the action of cosmic principles", brahman "representing Itself in cosmic Personalities expressive of the one Godhead who, in their impersonal action, appear as the various play of the principles of Nature"; the Divine, the supreme and universal Deity (isvara, purus.a) "of whom all the gods are different Names and Powers"; the seventh of the ten types of consciousness (dasa-gavas) in the evolutionary scale: mind concentrated in vijñana, exceeding itself.

devabhasa ::: [the language of the gods, applied to the Sanskrit language].

devakridanudarsanam ::: as watching the sports of the gods. [Bhagavata Purana]

Devamatri (Sanskrit) Devamātṛ Mother of the gods; a title of Aditi, kosmic or mystic space. Aditi is the Vedic Goddess-Mother from whose matrix the sun and planets were born, identical with the higher ranges of akasa, the spiritual essence pervading the space of any solar system; primordial kosmic substance in its highest or spiritual parts. Aditi therefore is the mystic womb of nature out of which all comes for the period of a kosmic manvantara, and into which again all sinks after the kosmic period of evolution has ceased and pralaya begins.

Devanagari: Literally, the letters of the gods; the characters of the Sanskrit script.

devanam adabdha (adabdhani) vratani ::: [the inviolate laws of the working of the gods]. [Ved.]

devanam dhruva-vratani ::: [the fixed laws of working of the gods]. [Ved.]

devanam prathama vratani ::: [the first laws of working of the gods]. [Ved.]

devan devayajo yanti madbhakta yanti mam api ::: [they who worship the gods go to the gods, but My devotees come to Me]. [Gita 7.23]

devaputrah ::: sons of the gods.

Devasarga (Sanskrit) Devasarga [from deva divine + sarga emanation, emission, creation] Divine emanation or emission; the creation of the gods, the last of the first series of creations enumerated in the Vishnu-Purana. It “has a universal reference; namely, the Evolutions in general, not specifically to our Manvantara; but the latter begins with the same over and over again, showing that it refers to several distinct Kalpas. For it is said ‘at the close of the past (Padma) Kalpa the divine Brahma awoke from his night of sleep and beheld the universe void.’ Then Brahma is shown going once more over the ‘seven creations’ in the secondary stage of evolution, repeating the first three on the objective plane” (SD 1:454).

Devavardhaki (Sanskrit) Devavardhaki Architect of the gods; a title given to Visvakarman, who according to Hindu mythology was the cosmic demiurge or world-former.

devayana (Devayan) ::: a journeying of the gods or to the gods. ::: devayanah [plural]

Devayana (Sanskrit) Devayāna [from deva spiritual being + yāna path] The way of the gods.

Dhyana(Sanskrit) ::: A term signifying profound spiritualintellectual contemplation with utter detachment from allobjects of a sensuous and lower mental character. In Buddhism it is one of the six paramitas ofperfection. One who is adept or expert in the practice of dhyana, which by the way is a wonderfulspiritual exercise if the proper idea of it be grasped, is carried in thought entirely out of all relations withthe material and merely psychological spheres of being and of consciousness, and into lofty spiritualplanes. Instead of dhyana being a subtraction from the elements of consciousness, it is rather a throwingoff or casting aside of the crippling sheaths of ethereal matter which surround the consciousness, thusallowing the dhyanin, or practicer of this form of true yoga, to enter into the highest parts of his ownconstitution and temporarily to become at one with and, therefore, to commune with the gods. It is atemporary becoming at one with the upper triad of man considered as a septenary, in other words, withhis monadic essence. Man's consciousness in this state or condition becomes purely buddhi, or ratherbuddhic, with the highest parts of the manas acting as upadhi or vehicle for the retention of what theconsciousness therein experiences. From this term is drawn the phrase dhyani-chohans ordhyani-buddhas -- words so frequently used in theosophical literature and so frequently misconceived asto their real meaning. (See also Samadhi)

Dhyanipasa (Sanskrit) Dhyānipāśa [from dhyānin divine being + pāśa rope] The rope of the gods (dhyanis); another way of referring to a great Ring-pass-not which hedges off the phenomenal world from the noumenal kosmos.

dish ::: n. --> A vessel, as a platter, a plate, a bowl, used for serving up food at the table.
The food served in a dish; hence, any particular kind of food; as, a cold dish; a warm dish; a delicious dish. "A dish fit for the gods."
The state of being concave, or like a dish, or the degree of such concavity; as, the dish of a wheel.
A hollow place, as in a field.


Distinct from the living giants are the thurses or frost giants, symbolizing periods of nonlife when the gods are absent in their supernal heavens.

divine ::: a. --> Of or belonging to God; as, divine perfections; the divine will.
Proceeding from God; as, divine judgments.
Appropriated to God, or celebrating his praise; religious; pious; holy; as, divine service; divine songs; divine worship.
Pertaining to, or proceeding from, a deity; partaking of the nature of a god or the gods.
Godlike; heavenly; excellent in the highest degree;


dragon of the dark foundation ::: Sri Aurobindo: "All this action and struggle and ascension is supported by Heaven our Father and Earth our Mother, Parents of the Gods, who sustain respectively the purely mental and psychic and the physical consciousness. Their large and free scope is the condition of our achievement. Vayu, Master of life, links them together by the mid-air, the region of vital force. And there are other deities, — Parjanya, giver of the rain of heaven; Dadhikravan, the divine war-horse, a power of Agni; the mystic Dragon of the Foundations; Trita Aptya who on the third plane of existence consummates our triple being; and more besides.” The Secret of the Veda

Dragshed (Tibetan) drag dshed. “Wrathful” deities; protective deities in a terrifying form, represented as bearing the dorje, the diamond scepter of the gods. Also applied to high initiates who represent on the human plane the same type of power of a wholly beneficent character that the kindly and powerful divinities are supposed to wield.

Durga ::: “In Hindu religion, the goddess who is the Energy of Shiva and the conquering and protecting aspect of the Universal Mother. She is the slayer of many demons including Mahisasura. Durga is usually depicted in painting and sculpture riding a lion, having eight or ten arms, each holding the special weapon of one or another of the gods who gave them to her for her battles with demons. (A; Enc. Br). Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo’s Works.

durga ::: "In Hindu religion, the goddess who is the Energy of Shiva and the conquering and protecting aspect of the Universal Mother. She is the slayer of many demons including Mahisasura. Durga is usually depicted in painting and sculpture riding a lion, having eight or ten arms, each holding the special weapon of one or another of the gods who gave them to her for her battles with demons. (A; Enc. Br.)” *Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo"s Works.

Dvalin (Icelandic) [from dvala delay; or Swed dvala coma] A dwarf in ancient Norse mythology, the comatose or entranced human nature corresponding to the lesser elements of character; not entirely animal but not completely evolved as a human being, he accurately describes the imperfect, growing, and changing human self. Together with the skilled intelligence of Loki, Dvalin created appropriate gifts for the gods Odin, Thor, and Frey. See also DWARFS

Dyfed (Welsh) Modern Pembrokeshire, called Gwlad Hud a Lledrith (Land of Illusion and Phantasy). Closely associated with the family of gods, Pwyll, Rhianon, Pryderi — gods of the underworld or Otherworld — and in some way regarded as being close to the Otherworld. The builders of Stonehenge brought one of their circles of stones from the Preselen Mountains in Dyfed; one suspects their motive to have been to give a certain consecration to the place with stones from the Land of the Gods of the Otherworld.

Emanation ::: An emanation of the Mother is something of her consciousness and power put forth from her, which so long as it is in play is held in close connection with her and, when its play is no longer required, is withdrawn back into its source, but can always be put out and brought into play once more. But also the detaining thread of connection can be severed or loosened and that which came forth as an emanation can proceed on its way as an independent divine being with its own play in the world. All the Gods can put forth such emanations from their being, identical with them in essence of consciousness and power though not commensurate.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 105


Ephialtes (Greek) In Greek mythology a titan, son of Poseidon, who with his brother Otus makes war on Olympus and puts Ares in chains for l3 months. At the age of nine years each brother was 54 feet high and 36 feet broad. These two titans as types refer to the late Lemurians of the third root-race, and also to the earliest Atlanteans, known for their huge size, daring spirit, and their wars against the gods or Sons of Light. However, they were not demons in the Christian sense; for these early races were simply the gigantic early mankind in which self-consciousness expressed itself in high pride, the love of material power as compared with spiritual, and in works of material or physical achievement.

Eros (Greek) Love, desire; represented in the Hesiodic theogony as one of four self-existent deities, the others being Chaos, Gaia, and Erebos; otherwise as the son of Aphrodite by either Ares, Zeus, or Hermes. Eros is the cosmic force which causes the unmanifest to seek self-manifestation: it is divine love, will, desire; the desire to manifest in creative activity, and thus to give life and existence to all beings. This desire, which “arises first in It” (SD 2:578), is in the gods and in all nature. After the worlds have been manifested, Eros then becomes, under the form of fohat, the ever-active force which brings together and combines the elemental atoms. “Fohat, in his capacity of Divine Love (Eros), the electric Power of affinity and sympathy, is shown allegorically as trying to bring the pure Spirit, the Ray inseparable from the one absolute, into union with the Soul” (SD 1:119). Eros, like his synonyms kama, amor, and cupido, acts on many planes.

Ethics ::: The theosophical teachings are essentially and wholly ethical. It is impossible to understand the sublimewisdom of the gods, the archaic wisdom-religion of the ancients, without the keenest realization of thefact that ethics run like golden threads throughout the entire system or fabric of doctrine and thought ofthe esoteric philosophy. Genuine occultism, divorced from ethics, is simply unthinkable becauseimpossible. There is no genuine occultism which does not include the loftiest ethics that the moral senseof mankind can comprehend, and one cannot weigh with too strong an emphasis upon this great fact.Ethics in the theosophical philosophy are not merely the products of human thought existing as aformulation of conventional rules proper for human conduct. They are founded on the very structure andcharacter of the universe itself. The heart of the universe is wisdom-love, and these are intrinsicallyethical, for there can be no wisdom without ethics, nor can love be without ethics, nor can there be ethicsdeprived of either love or wisdom.The philosophic reason why the ancients set so much store by what was commonly known as virtusamong the Latins, from which we have our modern word "virtue," is because by means of the teachingoriginating in the great Mystery schools, they knew that virtues, ethics, were the offspring of the moralinstinct in human beings, who derived them in their turn from the heart of the universe -- from thekosmic harmony. It is high time that the Occidental world should cast forever into the limbo of explodedsuperstitions the idea that ethics is merely conventional morality, a convenience invented by man tosmooth the asperities and dangers of human intercourse.Of course every scholar knows that the words morals and ethics come from the Latin and Greekrespectively, as signifying the customs or habits which it is proper to follow in civilized communities.But this fact itself, which is unquestionable, is in a sense disgraceful, for it would almost seem that wehad not yet brought forth a word adequately describing the instinct for right and truth and troth andjustice and honor and wisdom and love which we today so feebly express by the words ethics or morals."Theosophist is who Theosophy does," wrote H. P. Blavatsky, and wiser and nobler words she neverwrote. No one can be a theosophist who does not feel ethic-ally and think ethically and live ethically inthe real sense that is hereinbefore described. (See also Morals)

euhemerism ::: n. --> The theory, held by Euhemerus, that the gods of mythology were but deified mortals, and their deeds only the amplification in imagination of human acts.

Euhemerism: The view that explains religious myths as traditional and partially distorted accounts of historical events and personages; from Euhemerus, Cyrenaic philosopher (c. 300 B.C.), who advanced the theory that the gods of mythology were deified heroes. -- G.R.M.

Euhemerization The theory of Euhemeros, a Greek of about 316 BC, that the ancient Greek myths were imaginative or allegorical renderings of historical events, the gods once having been mortals or men, and their deeds the poetized actions of archaic human worthies. Hence to euhemerize is to interpret myths as having been once historical events. It is sometimes used in The Secret Doctrine as equivalent to anthropomorphism. A great deal of archaic mythology, however, is the half-forgotten and often distorted racial tradition or memory of events in the lives of once semi-divine humans, who actually were in most cases the demigods, god-men, or initiates of the later third and early fourth root-races.

Euthanasia [from Greek eu well +thanatos death] Easy death, a painless death; used for the practice of mercifully killing people who would otherwise suffer a painful death. To decide if a person should or should not be kept alive by artificial means or a life ended by artificial means requires almost superhuman discernment. An individual is not his body nor even his mind, but fundamentally a spiritual being. Physical suffering from bodily ills, however unpleasant, provides an opportunity to meet and dispose of certain karmic causes, and thereby learn and grow. Aside from the difficulty of preventing abuses in legalized euthanasia, the ethical and spiritual questions surrounding artificial prolongation and shortening of life remain extremely complex. The Stoics held that life is a gift of the gods and therefore no person has the right to reject that gift — for oneself or another — until the gods themselves call it back.

Fate ::: Fate seems a more mysterious power imposing itself on men, despite all their will and endeavour, from outside them and above—daivam, a power from the Gods.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 5, Page: 353


Fate [from Latin fatum that which is divinely decreed from fari to speak] The regents of the kosmos, acting as karmic agents of past destiny, are said to be the establishers of fate or destiny for the world or universe then beginning its manvantaric evolution. They establish in the noumenal worlds the roots, and in the phenomenal worlds the fruits, of the essential laws of being. Fatalism is the belief that human beings have no free will; however, in actual fact, though perhaps we cannot maintain our own personal will against the laws of the universe except in very moderate degree, yet we have considerable latitude to make experiments and learn from our mistakes. The Latin fatum means the laws of nature or the will of the gods, personified as the Parcae or three Fates, the Greek Moirai. In the best sense therefore it means our lot, appointed by the destiny born of our own past thoughts, feelings, and acts. See also KARMA; MOIRA

Fimbulvetr (Icelandic) [from fimbul mighty + vetr winter] In Norse mythology, the immensely long period of nonlife intervening between cycles of universal existence, equivalent to the Sanskrit pralaya. In the Edda it is interchangeable with the frost giant Ymer or Ymir, who is “slain” by the gods at each new creation.

Fire is spoken of as the Primary in the Stanzas of Dzyan: “The Spirit, beyond manifested Nature, is the fiery breath in its absolute Unity. In the manifested Universe, it is the Central Spiritual Sun, the electric Fire of all Life. In our System it is the visible Sun, the Spirit of Nature, the terrestrial god. And in, on, and around the Earth, the fiery Spirit thereof — air, fluidic fire; water, liquid fire; Earth, solid fire. All is fire — ignis, in its ultimate constitution, or I, the root of which is 0 (nought) in our conceptions, the All in nature and its mind. Pro-Mater is divine fire. It is the Creator, the Destroyer, the Preserver. The primitive names of the gods are all connected with fire, from Agni, the Aryan, to the Jewish god who ‘is a consuming fire’ ” (ibid.).

First fruits: The offering of the first produce of the earth, the first animals killed or trapped in the hunting season, the firstlings of the flock, etc., to the gods most concerned with that particular activity which produced these first fruits, etc., or to the priests of those gods. In ancient days, the practice extended sometimes also to the first child of a man.

“For the gods are the guardians and increasers of the Truth, the powers of the Immortal, the sons of the infinite Mother; the way to immortality is the upward way of the gods, the way of the Truth, a journey, an ascent by which there is a growth into the law of the Truth, rtasya panthâh.” The Renaissance in India

For there is a continuous scale of the planes of consciousness, beginning with the psychical and other belts attached to and dependent on the earth plane and proceeding through the true independent vital and psychical worlds to the worlds of the gods and the highest supramental and spiritual planes of existence.

foundling ::: A foundling of the Gods she wanders here

frigga ::: n. --> The wife of Odin and mother of the gods; the supreme goddess; the Juno of the Valhalla. Cf. Freya.

Frost Giants, Rime Thurses In the Norse Eddas, the primeval hrimthurses [from Icelandic, Scandinavian hrim rime + thurs, thruse giant] or frost giants are ponderous, motionless, totally mindless and stupid, to illustrate that their characteristics are those of nonliving, inert matter, not formed or organized in any way. They are the equivalent of the Greek Chaos. They represent ages of nonlife between manifestations of universes, corresponding to the Sanskrit pralaya (dissolution). They depict graphically the stage of utter cold, unmoving “wavelessness” when no atoms move and therefore nothing exists. The frost giant from whose limbs the creative deities brought into being the spheres of life in the universe is named Ymir. His slaying marked the creation of worlds, when the gods “raised the tables” (spheres) where the deities feast on the mead of experience. The rime-thurses are said to be born from Ymir’s feet.

Gandharvas (Sanskrit) Gandharva-s Hindu devas or divinities called celestial singers or musicians. Esoterically they are intermediaries between the gods and mankind, and hence can be called the instructors of humanity in the secret science.

Ganesa (Sanskrit) Gaṇeśa The Hindu god of wisdom, son of Siva, who lost his human head which was replaced by that of an elephant. As he who removes obstacles, he is invoked at the commencement of any important undertaking, likewise at the beginning of books. In some respects he is thus equivalent to the Egyptian Thoth or Thoth-Hermes, the scribe of the gods. Ganesa is the chief or head of multitudes of subordinate spiritual entities — a necessity if as the god of wisdom he accomplishes his cosmic labors through subordinate hierarchies of intelligent and semi-intelligent beings, acting as their director or guide in forming and guiding nature.

garden of the Gods

Giant The universal tradition of gigantic human beings and beasts points back to the Lemurian and Atlantean races, which were physically gigantic as compared with humankind of today. Also often popularly used as an equivalent of demons, titans, daityas, asuras, danavas, gibborim, jotuns, etc., here having reference to the powers of earth who contended against the gods in the early periods of the formation of the globe and its populations.

God(s) and Goddess(es) A generalizing term signifying all self-conscious entities superior to humankind, most often restricted to the three dhyani-chohanic kingdoms. The gods have differing places in nature’s hierarchical scheme, running through innumerable grades of cosmic intelligences. Theosophy teaches that human beings who successfully reach the seventh round on this earth chain will pass, at the conclusion of this last round, into the kingdom superior to the human, that of the lowest dhyani-chohans.

Gods ::: It was the hour before the Gods awake.

gods ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The Gods are Brahman representing Itself in cosmic Personalities expressive of the one Godhead who, in their impersonal action, appear as the various play of the principles of Nature.” *The Upanishads

Gods ::: The Gods are Brahman representing Itself in cosmic Personalities expressive of the one Godhead who, in their impersonal action, appear as the various play of the principles of Nature.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 17, Page: 26


Gods ::: “The Gods are Brahman representing Itself in cosmic Personalities expressive of the one Godhead who, in their impersonal action, appear as the various play of the principles of Nature.” The Upanishads

gods "the necessary static elements, ::: Space, the ordered movements of the worlds, the ascending levels, the highest goal"; in later Hinduism, the Preserver of the world, one of the "three Powers and Personalities . of the One Cosmic Godhead", of which the other two are Brahma, the Creator, and Śiva or Rudra2, the Destroyer; also regarded as the Lord himself (isvara) who incarnates in the avataras, and the one deva of whom all the gods are manifestations; in the Record of Yoga, usually a subordinate aspect of Kr.s.n.a, sometimes identified with Pradyumna as the personality of the fourfold isvara whose sakti is Mahalaks.mi.Vis Visnu-Narayana

Gods ::: The old pantheons were builded upon an ancient and esoteric wisdom which taught, under the guise of apublic mythology, profound secrets of the structure and operations of the universe which surrounds us.The entire human race has believed in gods, has believed in beings superior to men; the ancients all saidthat men are the "children" of these gods, and that from these superior beings, existent in the azurespaces, men draw all that in them is; and, furthermore, that men themselves, as children of the gods, arein their inmost essence divine beings linked forever with the boundless universe of which each humanbeing, just as is the case with every other entity everywhere, is an inseparable part. This is a truly sublimeconception.One should not think of human forms when the theosophist speaks of the gods; we mean the arupa -- the"formless" -- entities, beings of pure intelligence and understanding, relatively pure essences, relativelypure spirits, formless as we physical humans conceive form. The gods are the higher inhabitants ofnature. They are intrinsic portions of nature itself, for they are its informing principles. They are as muchsubject to the wills and energies of still higher beings -- call these wills and energies the "laws" of higherbeings, if you will -- as we are, and as are the kingdoms of nature below us.The ancients put realities, living beings, in the place of laws which, as Occidentals use the term, are onlyabstractions -- an expression for the action of entities in nature; the ancients did not cheat themselves soeasily with words. They called them gods, spiritual entities. Not one single great thinker of the ancients,until the Christian era, ever talked about laws of nature, as if these laws were living entities, as if theseabstractions were actual entities which did things. Did the laws of navigation ever navigate a ship? Doesthe law of gravity pull the planets together? Does it unite or pull the atoms together? This word laws issimply a mental abstraction signifying unerring action of conscious and semi-conscious energies innature.

Golden Fleece In Greek mythology, the fleece of a ram sent by the gods to save Phrixus and Helle, son and daughter of Athamas and Nephele, from their stepmother Ino. Flying through the air, it bore them towards Asia Minor. Helle drowned in the sea (at the Hellespont), but Phrixus arrived at Colchis. There he sacrificed the ram to Zeus and presented the fleece to king Aeetes, who hung it in a grove of Ares. Later, a generation before the Trojan War, Jason and the Argonauts brought the fleece back to Greece with the aid of Aeetes’ daughter Medea.

Gorgon (Greek) In Greek mythology, three sisters with wings, brazen claws, enormous teeth, and serpents instead of hair on their heads. The one usually meant is the mortal Medusa, once a beautiful maiden turned into a gorgon by the gods. She was overcome by Perseus who avoided her fatal glance, which would have turned him to stone, by using a mirror. Pegasus, the winged horse, sprang from her severed neck. Evidently the gorgons represent one of the powers which rule the lower realms of nature which have to be overcome by the aspirant to wisdom in the initiatory trials.

Gullveig, Gultweig (Icelandic) [from gull gold + veig thirst, drink] The Norse Edda’s principal poem, Voluspa, contains a cryptic allusion to Gullveig as “thrice burned, thrice reborn, yet still she lives.” Speared by the gods, “thirst for gold” arose each time from her baptism of fire more beautiful than before. She was the cause of the first war in the world when the aesir (creative gods) were ousted from their heavenly abode by the vanir (superior gods), the latter remaining in Asgard.

Hathor (Greek) Het-Hert (Egyptian) Ḥet-Ḥert [from ḥet-ḥert the house above] One of the oldest known Egyptian deities. Het-Hert refers to the sky or heaven, known by the Greeks as Hathor. Originally, Hathor was a cosmic goddess, consort of Ra, mother of light — the production of which was considered the opening act in cosmogony, producer of the twin deities Shu and Tefnut (the sky and the moisture of the sky). Later she was regarded as the great Mother, bringing forth all the gods and goddesses — Mother Nature personified. She has been associated with all the goddesses of Egypt, partaking of all their attributes; but her principal title was Lady of Amentet (the Holy Land or underworld).

Havyavahana (Sanskrit) Havyavāhana The fire of the gods; the sacrificial fire which receives offerings to the gods. In the Puranas, Suchi, the solar fire, is made its parent.

Hel (Icelandic) [from helju hell, death] The mythical regent of the Norse realm of the dead, depicted as half black or blue and half flesh-colored. In myths the representative of death is usually said to be a child of mind: in the Edda she is the daughter of Loki (fire of mind) and of the giantess Angerboda (boder of regret). She rules the nine worlds of death which correspond to the nine worlds of life, and apportions to each arrival a domicile appropriate to that soul’s merit or demerit. Some may frolic in sunlit meadows, others suffer agony beneath the lower gates leading to Niflhel [from nifl cloud + hel death] where matter is ground to extinction. The realm of Hel with its varied accommodations resembles the Greek Hades more than the hell of popular belief where evil souls are sent for punishment. Rather, the kingdom of death is a restful interlude where souls spend a fitting time in their rightful environment. The Eddas relate that elves (human souls) sleep among the gods when they are feasting on the mead of a past period of life (experience); thus the resting souls are present in the divine spheres even through unconscious of their surroundings.

Heliopolis was the principal seat of his worship, it being held that at that spot, with his consort Nut, he produced the great Egg of Space, out of which emerged the sun god in the shape of a phoenix (bennu). Because of this he was styled the Great Cackler. Another of his titles was Erpat (chief of the gods), as he is more like the Hindu parabrahman than even Brahma, and hence the womb of cosmic being. A favorite representation of Seb is that of a prostrated man, one hand pointing to heaven, the other to earth — the prostrated form representing the earth — over whom bends a woman, Nut, her body being spangled with stars — representing the sky.

Hephaistos, Hephaestus (Greek) A fire god, child of Zeus and Hera, equivalent to the Latin Vulcanus or Vulcan. He is twice cast down from Olympus, to which however he returns; thus he is a messenger of the gods to earth, and appears on various planes as a manifestation of cosmic fire. He is a kabir, a cosmic teacher of men, whom he instructed in the use of fire and the metallurgic arts. Jupiter, or the four-faced or four-sided Brahma, partakes of all four elements and disputes his fiery function to Hephaistos. The volcanic island of Lemnos, on which Hephaistos is said to have fallen when cast from Olympus, was sacred to him.

Hera: In Greek mythology, the sister and wife of Zeus, queen of the gods, goddess of marriage.

Hermaphrodite [from Greek Hermes + Aphrodite] The form and typical nature of both the god and goddess in one individual. Androgyne also relates to a dual-sexed human being. Thus, the hermaphrodite imbodies nature’s universal polarity on its lower planes, which polarity is an emanation from the non-dual or non-bipolar mental and spiritual realms. In an abstract sense, this is a personification of the universal polarity in nature on its lower planes, wherein the so-called masculine and feminine principles are the opposing but coordinating agencies, often called positive and negative, in their creative and generative aspects. “The ancients taught the, so to speak, auto-generation of the Gods: the one divine essence, unmanifested, perpetually begetting a second-self, manifested, which second-self, androgynous in its nature, gives birth in an immaculate way to everything macro- and micro-cosmical in this universe” (SD 1:398).

Hermes (Greek) Greek god, son of Zeus and Maia, the third person in a triad of Father-Mother-Son, hence the formative Logos or Word. He is equivalent to the Hindu Budha, the Zoroastrian Mithra, the Babylonian Nebo — son of Zarpa-Nitu (moon) and Merodach (sun) — and the Egyptian Thoth with the ibis for his emblem; also to Enoch and the Roman Mercurius, son of Coelus and Lux (heaven and light). Among his emblems are the cross, the cubical shape, the serpent, and especially his wand, the caduceus, which combines the serpent and cross. The name has been used generically for many adepts. To Hermes were attributed many functions, such as that of inspiring eloquence and healing, and he is the patron of intellectual, artistic, and productively agricultural pursuits. The nature and functions of this divinity express themselves to our mind as light, wisdom, intelligence, and quickness — especially in an intellectual sense. He was the messenger of the gods, and also the psychopomp or conductor of souls to the netherworld. In his lower aspects he is often made to serve as the inspirer of gross misuses of intelligence such as clever theft — thus illustrating that even the noblest qualities have their dark side.

Hermes: The ancient Greek god of herds, guardian of travellers, messenger of the gods, conductor of the dead to the underworld. The Romans identified him with Mercury. In Egypt, he was identified with Hermanubis, and chiefly with Thoth, the god of learning, and in the Roman imperial period he was worshipped as a revealer of divine wisdom by which men may become a new man, a Son of God.

Hermod (Icelandic) [from her host, army + mod might, courage] A son of Odin in Norse mythology, equivalent to Hermes or Mercury, messenger of the gods. Best known for his memorable journey to the kingdom of Hel on behalf of the gods, when he was sent to entreat the queen of death to give up the sun god Balder whose death at the hands of his blind brother Hoder had been brought about by Loki (in some versions Odin himself undertakes the errand).

hero ::: n. --> An illustrious man, supposed to be exalted, after death, to a place among the gods; a demigod, as Hercules.
A man of distinguished valor or enterprise in danger, or fortitude in suffering; a prominent or central personage in any remarkable action or event; hence, a great or illustrious person.
The principal personage in a poem, story, and the like, or the person who has the principal share in the transactions related; as Achilles in the Iliad, Ulysses in the Odyssey, and Aeneas in the


Hiram Abif is a type-figure of all the saviors of humanity who sacrificed themselves for the salvation of mankind, a direct human representative of its prototype among the divinities, such as Odin and Visvakarman, the builder and artificer of the gods. Hiram Abif is also the type-figure of the individual’s inner god, crucified upon the cross of material existence.

Hlidskjalf (Icelandic) [from hlid side, gate; or from hlifd protection + skjalf shelf, bench, plane] The word may mean either that the gods are arrayed by our side in the struggle of life; or deriving it from the Scandinavian lida (to suffer), it could be by extension of meaning the “shelf of compassion,” whence their protection extends over the human race. In the Norse Edda, it is on Hlidskjalf that Odin is enthroned with his consort Frigga and whence he is able to survey all worlds. Frey, the deity of our terrestrial world, also oversees his domain from this vantage point.

Hoddmimir’s Holt (Icelandic) [from hodd treasury + Mimir, Mimer a giant, the root of matter + holt grove] In Norse myths the sacred grove where is guarded the treasury that is being sought by the gods in matter during manifestation. In that grove Lif and Lifthrasir, the immortal principles in humanity, are secreted when the world has ended its lifetime and before it is reborn.

Holy City Many spiritual traditions symbolize the goal of human attainment or the abode of the gods as a holy city. With the Hindus, Brahmapura is the capital of Brahma on Mt. Kailasa in the Himalayas or on Mt. Meru, as well as being the inmost chamber of the heart. According to the Chhandogya Upanishad (8:1:1), within the Brahmapura “is an abode, a small lotus-flower; within it is a small space (antarakasa). What is within that, should be searched out; that, assuredly, is what one should desire to understand.” Hiranyapura (golden city) stands for the sun and for the invisible, etheric regions of space; while the Siddhapura or White Island is both the indestructible home of adepts on earth and the poles of the earth or Mt. Meru.

Honer was sent as a hostage to the vanir at the battle of the gods (the war in heaven) and will remain captive until the final confrontation at Ragnarok, when the gods withdraw to their own spheres.

Hotar: Sanskrit for caller. Priest-magicians who invoke the gods by reciting ritual formulas and improvised chants.

hotr (Hotri) ::: the priest of the sacrifice, he who calls and brings the gods and gives them the offering. [Ved.] ::: hota [nominative]

Hotri (Sanskrit) Hotṛ An offerer of an oblation with fire, or burnt offering; hence a sacrificer, a priest. As used in the Rig-Veda, one of the four kinds of officiating priests at a sacrifice: he who invokes the gods by reciting the mantras from the Rig-Veda. In the Anugita the plural is used symbolically for the seven senses, which are represented as being seven priests: “the senses supply the fire of mind (i.e., desire) with the oblations of external pleasures.” Thus these seven are the causes of emancipation (cf TG 146).

Hrada (Sanskrit) Hrāda According to a legend in the Puranas, there was in the night of time a war between the gods and the asuras or daityas, beings who opposed ritualism and dogma, which lasted one divine year. On this occasion the gods were defeated by the daityas under the leadership of Hrada.

I Am That I Am (Hebrew) ’Ehyeh ’Asher ’Ehyeh A title given by Jehovah to himself, a variation of I-am-I, indicating that Jehovah, whatever he may claim to be, is merely one of the gods of the manifested world, a Demiourgos, and not the Supreme. See also ’EHYEH

ichor ::: n. --> An ethereal fluid that supplied the place of blood in the veins of the gods.
A thin, acrid, watery discharge from an ulcer, wound, etc.


Ida (Icelandic, Scandinavian) [from ida eddy, whirlpool] The restless, ever-moving; in the Norse Eddas the Field of Ida is the plain in the center of Asgard, abode of the gods, where the aesir assemble to hold counsel; comparable to the Vigridsslatt (plain of consecration) where human heroes struggle against the forces of darkness during their life cycle. Each plain is appropriate to the world and its denizens and each has its corresponding heavenly sphere above it (cf SD 2:100). The remaining aesir gods gather on the Field of Ida after Ragnarok, nothing else of Asgard having survived.

Ida or Ila (Sanskrit) Iḍā, Iḷā Refreshment, flow; the goddess of sacred speech, similar to Vach; in the Rig-Veda called the instructress of Manu, instituting the rules for the performing of sacrifices. The Satapatha-Brahmana represents Ida as arising from a sacrifice which Manu had performed for the purpose of obtaining offspring. Although claimed by the gods Mitra and Varuna, she became the wife of Manu, giving birth to the race of manus. In the Puranas, she is daughter of Vaivasvata-Manu, wife of Budha (wisdom), and mother of Pururavas. In some accounts she is born a woman, becomes a man named Sudyumna, then rebecomes a woman before finally becoming a man again. This refers to the androgynous third root-race, as well as to the later part of the second root-race.

I-em-hetep or Imhetep (Egyptian) I-em-ḥetep Imouthis, Imouthes (Greek) Also Imhotep, Imhot-pou. He who comes in peace; the Egyptian deity presiding over medicine, especially in connection with its learning and science; a son of Ptah who, with his brother Nefer-tem, was regarded as the third member of the great triad of gods at Memphis. The Greeks equated him with Aesculapius. He was regarded as the god of study and in later times took on some of the attributes of Thoth or Tehuti as the scribe of the gods. During their life he healed men’s bodies; after their death he superintended the preservation of their bodies, and was regarded as one of the protectors of the dead in the underworld. He is termed the Logos-Creator in conjunction with Kneph (SD 1:353).

Ifing (Icelandic, Scandinavian) [from if, ef doubt] In Norse mythology, a wide, ever-flowing river which runs between Asgard (court of the gods) and Jotunheim (home of the giants where the worlds of the living are formed). This river never freezes over to form an ice-bridge which might be traversed by the unworthy, but all human souls must eventually cross the river Doubt and also the river Time (Tund) in order to gain the realm of the gods.

If we regard the Powers of the Reality as so many Godheads, we can say that the Overmind releases a million Godheads into action, each empowered to create its own world, each world capable of relation, communication and interplay with the others. There are in the Veda different formulations of the nature of the Gods: it is said they are all one Existence to which the sages give different names; yet each God is worshipped as if he by himself is that Existence, one who is all the other Gods together or contains them in his being; and yet again each is a separate Deity acting sometimes in unison with companion deities, sometimes separately, sometimes even in apparent opposition to other Godheads of the same Existence. In the Supermind all this would be held together as a harmonised play of the one Existence; in the Overmind each of these three conditions could be a separate action or basis of action and have its own principle of development and consequences and yet each keep the power to combine with the others in a more composite harmony. As with the One Existence, so with its Consciousness and Force. The One Consciousness is separated into many independent forms of consciousness and knowledge; each follows out its own line of truth which it has to realise. The one total and many-sided Real-Idea is split up into its many sides; each becomes an independent Idea-Force with the power to realise itself. The one Consciousness-Force is liberated into its million forces, and each of these forces has the right to fulfil itself or to assume, if needed, a hegemony and take up for its own utility the other forces. So too the Delight of Existence is loosed out into all manner of delights and each can carry in itself its independent fullness or sovereign extreme. Overmind thus gives to the One Existence-Consciousness-Bliss the character of a teeming of infinite possibilities which can be developed into a multitude of worlds or thrown together into one world in which the endlessly variable…

Igigi: A Babylonian term for the gods or spirits of heaven in general, or specifically, for the gods or spirits embodied in those stars which were above the horizon at any one time.

In ancient Egypt there were thirty Dynasties of kings, as enumerated by the historian Manetho. But the Egyptian priests told Herodotus that there were three divine dynasties which preceded the reign of the human kings: that of the gods, of the demigods, and of the heroes. China too had its divine dynasties which preceded the human dynasties: thus the Chow rulers are placed at 1100 BC, but they were again preceded by the Sheng and the still earlier Hea (or Hia) dynasties. The Greeks taught the existence of divine dynasties followed by human, and Plato tells of divine and semi-divine instructors who first taught mankind the arts, sciences, and agriculture. The same general tradition is found in ancient America. The ancient Chaldeans used the figures 4 3 2 in their calculations concerning the time periods of their dynasties, which they said extended backwards from themselves for a length of 432,000 years.

  “In ancient times in India, and in the homeland of the Aryans before they reached India by way of Central Asia, this very early Aryan speech was used not only by the Aryan populace, but in the sanctuaries of the Temples was taken in hand and developed or composed or builded to be a far finer vehicle for expressing abstract religious and philosophic conceptions and thoughts. This tongue thus composed or developed by initiates of the Aryan stock, because of this formative work upon it was finally given the name Sanskrita, signifying an original natural language which had become perfected by initiates for the purpose of expressing far more subtle and profound distinctions than ordinary people would ever find needful. So great was the admiration in which the Sanskrit language thus perfected was held, that it was commonly said of it that it was the work of the Gods, because it had thus become capable of expressing godlike thoughts: profound spiritual subtleties and philosophical distinctions. Thus it was that Sanskrit is really the mystery-language of the initiates of the Aryan race; as the Senzar of very similar history was the mystery-language of the later Atlanteans; and is still used as the noblest mystery-language by the Mahatmas.

In another aspect the hippopotamus goddess was the female counterpart of Set and the mother of the sun god, whom she brought into the world at Ombos. “In Egyptian symbolism Typhon was called ‘the hippopotamus who slew his father and violated his mother,’ Rhea (mother of the gods). His father was Chronos. As applied therefore to Time and Nature (Chronos and Rhea), the accusation becomes comprehensible. The type of Cosmic Disharmony, Typhon, who is also Python, the monster formed of the slime of the Deluge of Deucalion, ‘violates’ his mother Primordial Harmony, whose beneficence was so great that she was called ‘The Mother of the Golden Age.’ It was Typhon, who put an end to the latter, i.e., produced the first war of the elements” (TG 142).

In connection with ’elohim, ruah denotes the rational and purposive mental quality of the gods — the mental breath or power appearing mainly in humans, feebly in animals. It was regarded in Genesis as moving over the chaos at the creation, and operating in and through the universe, producing that which is noble and good in man and leading him to virtue. Cosmic ruah is in many respects equivalent to the Third Logos of Greek philosophy. A similar meaning implied exceptional soul powers, as in the inspired ruler and the prophet; hence the prophetic spirit — which was often represented as passing from one person and resting in another.

Indra (Sanskrit) Indra Vedic god of the firmament, supporter or guardian of the eastern quarter of the visible kosmos, whose functions somewhat parallel those of the equivalent of the four Maharajas. Indra, Varuna, and Agni were considered among the three highest gods of the Vedas, although the triad of Vayu, Surya, and Agni is frequently mentioned, Indra often taking the place of Vayu. Indra is often described as the champion of all the gods and overthrower of their enemies, especially the conqueror of Vritra, the great cosmic serpent. Indra thus has numerous parallels with the St. Michael of the Occident, and some of his functions are identic with Karttikeya, the god of war.

"In Greek mythology, a giant with a hundred arms, a son of Uranus and Ge, who fought against the gods. He was hurled down by Athene and imprisoned beneath Mt. Aetna in Sicily. When he stirs, the mountain shakes; when he breathes, there is an eruption. (M.I.; Web.)” Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo"s Works

“In Greek mythology, a giant with a hundred arms, a son of Uranus and Ge, who fought against the gods. He was hurled down by Athene and imprisoned beneath Mt. Aetna in Sicily. When he stirs, the mountain shakes; when he breathes, there is an eruption. (M.I.; Web). Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo’s Works

In Hebrew allegory the connection among the ideas associated with Jehovah is this same archaic verity which in Hebrew Qabbalistic thought is exemplified as ’Adam Qadmon; and the word transliterated as Jehovah in a collective sense refers to the Benei ’Elohim (sons of the gods).

In Hindu literature the number seven continually appears: the saptarshis (the seven sages), the seven superior and inferior worlds, the seven hosts of deities, the seven holy cities, the seven holy islands, seas, or mountains, the seven deserts, the seven sacred trees, etc. In Greece seven was often connected with the gods and goddesses: Mars had seven attendants, seven was sacred to Pallas Athene and to Phoebus Apollo — the latter with his seven-stringed lyre playing hymns to septenary nature as well as to the seven-rayed sun; Niobe’s seven sons and seven daughters, etc.

In later mythology Surya is particularly identified with Savitri as one of the twelve adityas of the sun in the twelve months of the year, and his seven-horsed chariot is described as driven by Aruna (dawn). Surya was represented also as the husband of Sanjna (spiritual consciousness, cosmic or human), and the offspring of Aditi (space), mother of all the gods. One legend represents Surya as crucified on a lathe by Visvakarman — his father-in-law, the creator of gods and men, and their carpenter — and having an eighth part of his rays cut off, which deprives his head of its effulgency, creating round it a dark aureole — “a mystery of the last initiation, and an allegorical representation of it” (TG 313).

In legend, the seven daughters of Atlas (Maia, Electra, Taygeta, Asterope, Merope, Alcyone, and Celaeno), who complained to the gods because they were pursued by Orion and were then changed into pigeons or doves and made into a constellation. Atlas represents the Atlantean root-race, and the daughters are the seven subraces. They married gods and became the mothers of heroes and the founders of city-states. They are connected with the destiny of nations, which is shaped by the events of their past lives, so that truly our destiny is written in the stars. In India, as the Krittikas, they were the wives of the seven rishis, six visible, one concealed; and the function of the rishis is concerned with times and events.

In Norse mythology giants represent ages of manifest existence and each giant exhibits traits belonging to his particular eon. The giantesses who are his daughters represent lesser cycles of time within his longer age. Thurses are the gross, inert aspects of the elements which serve as vehicles for the imbodiments of conscious energies in worlds. They are represented as evil in most myths because their nature is opposed to the dynamism of the gods. Hence the gods and thurses or giants are constantly at war.

INTEGRAL YOGA ::: This yoga accepts the value of cosmic existence and holds it to be a reality; its object is to enter into a higher Truth-Consciousness or Divine Supramental Consciousness in which action and creation are the expression not of ignorance and imperfection, but of the Truth, the Light, the Divine Ānanda. But for that, the surrender of the mortal mind, life and body to the Higher Consciousnessis indispensable, since it is too difficult for the mortal human being to pass by its own effort beyond mind to a Supramental Consciousness in which the dynamism is no longer mental but of quite another power. Only those who can accept the call to such a change should enter into this yoga.

Aim of the Integral Yoga ::: It is not merely to rise out of the ordinary ignorant world-consciousness into the divine consciousness, but to bring the supramental power of that divine consciousness down into the ignorance of mind, life and body, to transform them, to manifest the Divine here and create a divine life in Matter.

Conditions of the Integral Yoga ::: This yoga can only be done to the end by those who are in total earnest about it and ready to abolish their little human ego and its demands in order to find themselves in the Divine. It cannot be done in a spirit of levity or laxity; the work is too high and difficult, the adverse powers in the lower Nature too ready to take advantage of the least sanction or the smallest opening, the aspiration and tapasyā needed too constant and intense.

Method in the Integral Yoga ::: To concentrate, preferably in the heart and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force transform the consciousness. One can concentrate also in the head or between the eye-brows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is the beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be. For the rest one must not depend on one’s own efforts only, but succeed in establishing a contact with the Divine and a receptivity to the Mother’s Power and Presence.

Integral method ::: The method we have to pursue is to put our whole conscious being into relation and contact with the Divine and to call Him in to transform Our entire being into His, so that in a sense God Himself, the real Person in us, becomes the sādhaka of the sādhana* as well as the Master of the Yoga by whom the lower personality is used as the centre of a divine transfiguration and the instrument of its own perfection. In effect, the pressure of the Tapas, the force of consciousness in us dwelling in the Idea of the divine Nature upon that which we are in our entirety, produces its own realisation. The divine and all-knowing and all-effecting descends upon the limited and obscure, progressively illumines and energises the whole lower nature and substitutes its own action for all the terms of the inferior human light and mortal activity.

In psychological fact this method translates itself into the progressive surrender of the ego with its whole field and all its apparatus to the Beyond-ego with its vast and incalculable but always inevitable workings. Certainly, this is no short cut or easy sādhana. It requires a colossal faith, an absolute courage and above all an unflinching patience. For it implies three stages of which only the last can be wholly blissful or rapid, - the attempt of the ego to enter into contact with the Divine, the wide, full and therefore laborious preparation of the whole lower Nature by the divine working to receive and become the higher Nature, and the eventual transformation. In fact, however, the divine strength, often unobserved and behind the veil, substitutes itself for the weakness and supports us through all our failings of faith, courage and patience. It” makes the blind to see and the lame to stride over the hills.” The intellect becomes aware of a Law that beneficently insists and a Succour that upholds; the heart speaks of a Master of all things and Friend of man or a universal Mother who upholds through all stumblings. Therefore this path is at once the most difficult imaginable and yet in comparison with the magnitude of its effort and object, the most easy and sure of all.

There are three outstanding features of this action of the higher when it works integrally on the lower nature. In the first place, it does not act according to a fixed system and succession as in the specialised methods of Yoga, but with a sort of free, scattered and yet gradually intensive and purposeful working determined by the temperament of the individual in whom it operates, the helpful materials which his nature offers and the obstacles which it presents to purification and perfection. In a sense, therefore, each man in this path has his own method of Yoga. Yet are there certain broad lines of working common to all which enable us to construct not indeed a routine system, but yet some kind of Shastra or scientific method of the synthetic Yoga.

Secondly, the process, being integral, accepts our nature such as it stands organised by our past evolution and without rejecting anything essential compels all to undergo a divine change. Everything in us is seized by the hands of a mighty Artificer and transformed into a clear image of that which it now seeks confusedly to present. In that ever-progressive experience we begin to perceive how this lower manifestation is constituted and that everything in it, however seemingly deformed or petty or vile, is the more or less distorted or imperfect figure of some elements or action in the harmony of the divine Nature. We begin to understand what the Vedic Rishis meant when they spoke of the human forefathers fashioning the gods as a smith forges the crude material in his smithy.

Thirdly, the divine Power in us uses all life as the means of this integral Yoga. Every experience and outer contact with our world-environment, however trifling or however disastrous, is used for the work, and every inner experience, even to the most repellent suffering or the most humiliating fall, becomes a step on the path to perfection. And we recognise in ourselves with opened eyes the method of God in the world, His purpose of light in the obscure, of might in the weak and fallen, of delight in what is grievous and miserable. We see the divine method to be the same in the lower and in the higher working; only in the one it is pursued tardily and obscurely through the subconscious in Nature, in the other it becomes swift and selfconscious and the instrument confesses the hand of the Master. All life is a Yoga of Nature seeking to manifest God within itself. Yoga marks the stage at which this effort becomes capable of self-awareness and therefore of right completion in the individual. It is a gathering up and concentration of the movements dispersed and loosely combined in the lower evolution.

Key-methods ::: The way to devotion and surrender. It is the psychic movement that brings the constant and pure devotion and the removal of the ego that makes it possible to surrender.

The way to knowledge. Meditation in the head by which there comes the opening above, the quietude or silence of the mind and the descent of peace etc. of the higher consciousness generally till it envelops the being and fills the body and begins to take up all the movements.
Yoga by works ::: Separation of the Purusha from the Prakriti, the inner silent being from the outer active one, so that one has two consciousnesses or a double consciousness, one behind watching and observing and finally controlling and changing the other which is active in front. The other way of beginning the yoga of works is by doing them for the Divine, for the Mother, and not for oneself, consecrating and dedicating them till one concretely feels the Divine Force taking up the activities and doing them for one.

Object of the Integral Yoga is to enter into and be possessed by the Divine Presence and Consciousness, to love the Divine for the Divine’s sake alone, to be tuned in our nature into the nature of the Divine, and in our will and works and life to be the instrument of the Divine.

Principle of the Integral Yoga ::: The whole principle of Integral Yoga is to give oneself entirely to the Divine alone and to nobody else, and to bring down into ourselves by union with the Divine Mother all the transcendent light, power, wideness, peace, purity, truth-consciousness and Ānanda of the Supramental Divine.

Central purpose of the Integral Yoga ::: Transformation of our superficial, narrow and fragmentary human way of thinking, seeing, feeling and being into a deep and wide spiritual consciousness and an integrated inner and outer existence and of our ordinary human living into the divine way of life.

Fundamental realisations of the Integral Yoga ::: The psychic change so that a complete devotion can be the main motive of the heart and the ruler of thought, life and action in constant union with the Mother and in her Presence. The descent of the Peace, Power, Light etc. of the Higher Consciousness through the head and heart into the whole being, occupying the very cells of the body. The perception of the One and Divine infinitely everywhere, the Mother everywhere and living in that infinite consciousness.

Results ::: First, an integral realisation of Divine Being; not only a realisation of the One in its indistinguishable unity, but also in its multitude of aspects which are also necessary to the complete knowledge of it by the relative consciousness; not only realisation of unity in the Self, but of unity in the infinite diversity of activities, worlds and creatures.

Therefore, also, an integral liberation. Not only the freedom born of unbroken contact of the individual being in all its parts with the Divine, sāyujya mukti, by which it becomes free even in its separation, even in the duality; not only the sālokya mukti by which the whole conscious existence dwells in the same status of being as the Divine, in the state of Sachchidananda ; but also the acquisition of the divine nature by the transformation of this lower being into the human image of the divine, sādharmya mukti, and the complete and final release of all, the liberation of the consciousness from the transitory mould of the ego and its unification with the One Being, universal both in the world and the individual and transcendentally one both in the world and beyond all universe.

By this integral realisation and liberation, the perfect harmony of the results of Knowledge, Love and Works. For there is attained the complete release from ego and identification in being with the One in all and beyond all. But since the attaining consciousness is not limited by its attainment, we win also the unity in Beatitude and the harmonised diversity in Love, so that all relations of the play remain possible to us even while we retain on the heights of our being the eternal oneness with the Beloved. And by a similar wideness, being capable of a freedom in spirit that embraces life and does not depend upon withdrawal from life, we are able to become without egoism, bondage or reaction the channel in our mind and body for a divine action poured out freely upon the world.

The divine existence is of the nature not only of freedom, but of purity, beatitude and perfection. In integral purity which shall enable on the one hand the perfect reflection of the divine Being in ourselves and on the other the perfect outpouring of its Truth and Law in us in the terms of life and through the right functioning of the complex instrument we are in our outer parts, is the condition of an integral liberty. Its result is an integral beatitude, in which there becomes possible at once the Ānanda of all that is in the world seen as symbols of the Divine and the Ānanda of that which is not-world. And it prepares the integral perfection of our humanity as a type of the Divine in the conditions of the human manifestation, a perfection founded on a certain free universality of being, of love and joy, of play of knowledge and of play of will in power and will in unegoistic action. This integrality also can be attained by the integral Yoga.

Sādhanā of the Integral Yoga does not proceed through any set mental teaching or prescribed forms of meditation, mantras or others, but by aspiration, by a self-concentration inwards or upwards, by a self-opening to an Influence, to the Divine Power above us and its workings, to the Divine Presence in the heart and by the rejection of all that is foreign to these things. It is only by faith, aspiration and surrender that this self-opening can come.

The yoga does not proceed by upadeśa but by inner influence.

Integral Yoga and Gita ::: The Gita’s Yoga consists in the offering of one’s work as a sacrifice to the Divine, the conquest of desire, egoless and desireless action, bhakti for the Divine, an entering into the cosmic consciousness, the sense of unity with all creatures, oneness with the Divine. This yoga adds the bringing down of the supramental Light and Force (its ultimate aim) and the transformation of the nature.

Our yoga is not identical with the yoga of the Gita although it contains all that is essential in the Gita’s yoga. In our yoga we begin with the idea, the will, the aspiration of the complete surrender; but at the same time we have to reject the lower nature, deliver our consciousness from it, deliver the self involved in the lower nature by the self rising to freedom in the higher nature. If we do not do this double movement, we are in danger of making a tamasic and therefore unreal surrender, making no effort, no tapas and therefore no progress ; or else we make a rajasic surrender not to the Divine but to some self-made false idea or image of the Divine which masks our rajasic ego or something still worse.

Integral Yoga, Gita and Tantra ::: The Gita follows the Vedantic tradition which leans entirely on the Ishvara aspect of the Divine and speaks little of the Divine Mother because its object is to draw back from world-nature and arrive at the supreme realisation beyond it.

The Tantric tradition leans on the Shakti or Ishvari aspect and makes all depend on the Divine Mother because its object is to possess and dominate the world-nature and arrive at the supreme realisation through it.

This yoga insists on both the aspects; the surrender to the Divine Mother is essential, for without it there is no fulfilment of the object of the yoga.

Integral Yoga and Hatha-Raja Yogas ::: For an integral yoga the special methods of Rajayoga and Hathayoga may be useful at times in certain stages of the progress, but are not indispensable. Their principal aims must be included in the integrality of the yoga; but they can be brought about by other means. For the methods of the integral yoga must be mainly spiritual, and dependence on physical methods or fixed psychic or psychophysical processes on a large scale would be the substitution of a lower for a higher action. Integral Yoga and Kundalini Yoga: There is a feeling of waves surging up, mounting to the head, which brings an outer unconsciousness and an inner waking. It is the ascending of the lower consciousness in the ādhāra to meet the greater consciousness above. It is a movement analogous to that on which so much stress is laid in the Tantric process, the awakening of the Kundalini, the Energy coiled up and latent in the body and its mounting through the spinal cord and the centres (cakras) and the Brahmarandhra to meet the Divine above. In our yoga it is not a specialised process, but a spontaneous upnish of the whole lower consciousness sometimes in currents or waves, sometimes in a less concrete motion, and on the other side a descent of the Divine Consciousness and its Force into the body.

Integral Yoga and other Yogas ::: The old yogas reach Sachchidananda through the spiritualised mind and depart into the eternally static oneness of Sachchidananda or rather pure Sat (Existence), absolute and eternal or else a pure Non-exist- ence, absolute and eternal. Ours having realised Sachchidananda in the spiritualised mind plane proceeds to realise it in the Supramcntal plane.

The suprcfhe supra-cosmic Sachchidananda is above all. Supermind may be described as its power of self-awareness and W’orld- awareness, the world being known as within itself and not out- side. So to live consciously in the supreme Sachchidananda one must pass through the Supermind.

Distinction ::: The realisation of Self and of the Cosmic being (without which the realisation of the Self is incomplete) are essential steps in our yoga ; it is the end of other yogas, but it is, as it were, the beginning of outs, that is to say, the point where its own characteristic realisation can commence.

It is new as compared with the old yogas (1) Because it aims not at a departure out of world and life into Heaven and Nir- vana, but at a change of life and existence, not as something subordinate or incidental, but as a distinct and central object.

If there is a descent in other yogas, yet it is only an incident on the way or resulting from the ascent — the ascent is the real thing. Here the ascent is the first step, but it is a means for the descent. It is the descent of the new coosdousness attain- ed by the ascent that is the stamp and seal of the sadhana. Even the Tantra and Vaishnavism end in the release from life ; here the object is the divine fulfilment of life.

(2) Because the object sought after is not an individual achievement of divine realisation for the sake of the individual, but something to be gained for the earth-consciousness here, a cosmic, not solely a supra-cosmic acbievement. The thing to be gained also is the bringing of a Power of consciousness (the Supramental) not yet organised or active directly in earth-nature, even in the spiritual life, but yet to be organised and made directly active.

(3) Because a method has been preconized for achieving this purpose which is as total and integral as the aim set before it, viz., the total and integral change of the consciousness and nature, taking up old methods, but only as a part action and present aid to others that are distinctive.

Integral Yoga and Patanjali Yoga ::: Cilia is the stuff of mixed mental-vital-physical consciousness out of which arise the movements of thought, emotion, sensation, impulse etc.

It is these that in the Patanjali system have to be stilled altogether so that the consciousness may be immobile and go into Samadhi.

Our yoga has a different function. The movements of the ordinary consciousness have to be quieted and into the quietude there has to be brought down a higher consciousness and its powers which will transform the nature.


In the ancient Scandinavian conception of the World Tree (Yggdrasil), the dew that fell from this cosmic tree was called honey-dew, and was gathered by the bees — the initiates who through successes in passing the rites are enabled to bring themselves into synchronous harmony with the different cosmic powers and planes, and thus become channels or interpreters of cosmic wisdom to humanity. The idea is akin to the real meaning of the ambrosia of the ancient Greeks, which was the food of the gods — standing for the ancient wisdom.

In the Eddas the aesir are in perpetual opposition to the jotunn (giants; Icelandic jotnar), as energy is opposed to inertia. When the gods withdraw at Ragnarok, the universe ceases to be. The aesir’s reign or life was preceded by a period of quiescence, during which nothing existed. This was Ymir, the frostgiant, the transformed Bargalmer (Icelandic Bergelmir), fruitage of a previous cycle of universal life, who was “saved on a boatkeel” or “ground on the mill” to furnish substance for the succeeding world. This was to be created by All-father Odin and his two brothers, Vile and Vi (or Ve). The frost giant is killed — transformed — by the three gods, and from his substance (Orgalmer) the worlds are created. They are sustained by Trudgalmer until the gods again withdraw. In his capacity of creator Odin is named Ofner (opener), energic counterpart of Orgalmer, while at the end of a cosmic life he becomes Svafner (closer) and paired with Bargalmer.

In The Egyptian Book of the Dead, the deceased must learn to master everything he encounters in the underworld, and does this through the instruction of Thoth, who also teaches the pilgrim the way of procedure. Finally when the deceased reaches the stage of judgment, it is Thoth who records the decree pointed out to him by the dog-headed ape on the balance, the scales of which weigh the heart against the feather. The gods receive the verdict from Thoth, who in turn announce it to Osiris, enabling the candidate to enter the realm of Osiris, as being one osirified. Thus Thoth is the inner spiritual recorder of the human constitution, who registers and records the karmic experiences and foretells the future destiny of the deceased, showing that each person is judged by himself — for Thoth here is the person’s own higher ego; as regards cosmic space, Thoth is not only the cosmic Logos, but its aspect as the intelligent creative urge inherent in that Intelligence.

  “In their most mystical meaning, the union of Swayambhuva Manu with Vach-Sata-Rupa, his own daughter (this being the first ‘euhemerization’ of the dual principle of which Vaivasvata Manu and Ila are a secondary and a third form), stands in Cosmic symbolism as the Root-life, the germ from which spring all the Solar Systems, the worlds, angels and the gods” (SD 2:148).

In the mystic language of ancient time, a holy mountain universally signified a school of esoteric teaching. Just as a mountain on earth raises its summits towards the free heaven, and therefore mystically towards spirit and the gods, so in the ancient esoteric schools the training and the initiations conducted raised the neophytes or initiants towards the spirit, both cosmically and inner, and hence likewise towards the gods. See also PARNASSUS

In the Qabbalah it is said that creation was accomplished during the twelve hours of a day: “The ‘twelve hours of the day’ are again the dwarfed copy, the faint, yet faithful, echo of primitive Wisdom. They are like the 12,000 divine years of the gods, a cyclic blind. Every ‘Day of Brahma’ has 14 Manus, which the Hebrew Kabalists, following, however, in this the Chaldeans, have disguised into 12 ‘Hours.’ The Nuctameron of Apollonius of Tyana is the same thing. ‘The Dodecahedron lies concealed in the perfect Cube,’ say the Kabalists. The mystic meaning of this is, that the twelve great transformations of Spirit into matter (the 12,000 divine years) take place during the four great ages, or the first Mahayuga” (SD 1:450).

“In the Rig Veda Indra is the highest and greatest of the Gods, and his Soma-drinking is allegorical of his highly spiritual nature. In the Puranas Indra becomes a profligate, a regular drunkard on the Soma juice, in the terrestrial way” (SD 2:378). Indra corresponds with the cosmic principle mahat and in the human constitution with its reflection, manas, in its dual aspect. At times he is connected with buddhi; at others he is dragged down by kama, the desire principle.

In The Secret Doctrine Omoroka (the moon) presides over the monstrous creation of nondescript beings slain by the dhyanis; and further, while the gods were generated in svabhavat (mother-space), the reflection of wisdom became on earth Omoroka — the Chaldean Thalatth, the Greek Thalassa.

In this simultaneous development of multitudinous independent or combined Powers or Potentials there is yet—or there is as yet—no chaos, no conflict, no fall from Truth or Knowledge. The Overmind is a creator of truths, not of illusions or falsehoods: what is worked out in any given overmental energism or movement is the truth of the Aspect, Power, Idea, Force, Delight which is liberated into independent action, the truth of the consequences of its reality in that independence. There is no exclusiveness asserting each as the sole truth of being or the others as inferior truths: each God knows all the Gods and their place in existence; each Idea admits all other ideas and their right to be; each Force concedes a place to all other forces and their truth and consequences; no delight of separate fulfilled existence or separate experience denies or condemns the delight of other existence or other experience. The Overmind is a principle of cosmic Truth and a vast and endless catholicity is its very spirit; its energy is an all-dynamism as well as a principle of separate dynamisms: it is a sort of inferior Supermind,—although it is concerned predominantly not with absolutes, but with what might be called the dynamic potentials or pragmatic truths of Reality, or with absolutes mainly for their power of generating pragmatic or creative values, although, too, its comprehension of things is more global than integral, since its totality is built up of global wholes or constituted by separate independent realities uniting or coalescing together, and although the essential unity is grasped by it and felt to be basic of things and pervasive in their manifestation, but no longer as in the Supermind their intimate and ever-present secret, their dominating continent, the overt constant builder of the harmonic whole of their activity and nature….

Into the elivagar massed in Ginnungagap (formless or sacred void) fell showers of sparks from Muspellsheim (home of fire), the energic counterpart of Niflheim (home of clouds, nebulae), creating a vapor — Ymir, the frost giant from which the gods created worlds. Ymir is then said to have given rise to the race of rime-thurses — matter giants, for “all their kin is ever evil.”

iris ::: n. --> The goddess of the rainbow, and swift-footed messenger of the gods.
The rainbow.
An appearance resembling the rainbow; a prismatic play of colors.
The contractile membrane perforated by the pupil, and forming the colored portion of the eye. See Eye.
A genus of plants having showy flowers and bulbous or


isvari (ishwari; iswari) ::: the all-ruling Goddess (devi), "the Worldisvari Mother, creatrix of the universe, putting forth the Gods and the worlds and all things and existences out of her spirit-substance".

It is only in this world that the action of fate seems extraneous to human will, for in reality we are the weaver of our own fates. The Morai are karmic agents or forces rather than karma, which is fundamentally the law governing universal equilibrium. In its essence the constant working of cosmic harmony, karma must of necessity manifest itself in multimyriad forms and manners — in and through multimyriad agents or forces. Karma being essentially the law of cosmic unity and concord, it is only the individuals which disturb this universal equilibrium who can feel the reaction therefrom, whether in one life or in a later one; but the karmic effects are by no means always identic with the originating causative action of the individual, because of the karmic agents of many kinds through which karma works. Thus, the gods, all human beings, the earth itself, and all its component forces and substances are karmic agents constantly interacting upon each other; so that while abstractly the action of karma is infallible and infinitely unerring and cannot ever be escaped or set aside, its reactions upon the individual who broke its laws may take place in diverse ways and usually through agents or instruments, since karma is no individual or cosmic god.

Ized, Izad (Pahlavi, Pers) A class of ancient Zoroastrian deities subordinate to Ahura-Mazda and carriers of his will. In the Avesta, the Yashts are addressed to the izeds. In the Bundahish, Neryosengh, the messenger of the gods, is referred to as an ized, as is Anahita, the goddess of the waters.

Janus (Latin) [from janua a gate] Oldest and most exalted of the Roman gods, he was called the oldest of the gods and the beginning of all things, the origin of all organic life and especially human life; from him sprang all wells and rivers, and he had power also on the seas. He had no Greek counterpart, and may originally have been a god of sun and light, who opened and closed the day; later he was especially the god of beginnings and endings, such as the closing and opening of cycles, symbolized in his statues by his having two faces, one before and one behind, visioning the future and the past; also of all doors, entrances, and passages, he being pictured as a porter with a staff and key. He was saluted every morning, at the beginning of all the months (calends), and at the first of the year. When the Romans began their year near the winter solstice (153 BC), they called the month Januarius, the month of Janus, as the end of one cycle and the beginning of another. They connected the name Janus with Dianus, one aspect of the divine sun, whose feminine is Diana, the moon.

japa. ::: incantation; a spiritual discipline involving the meditative repetition of the Lord's name or a mantra as a means to a continual recollection of His presence; uttering the names of the gods or sacred mantras, like OM, either mentally or spoken softly as a method of spiritual practice

Jehovah-Tzabaoth, -Tsebaoth, or -Sabbaoth The seventh Sephirah of the superior septenary, identified with Netsah (triumph), who “esoterically . . . corresponds with Haniel (human physical life), the androgyne Elohim, with Venus-Lucifer and Baal, and finally with the Letter Vau or Microprosopus, the Logos. All these belong to the formative world” — also with Siva, Saturn, and the angel Michael or Mikael; “Mikael and his angels, or Jehovah-Tzabaoth (the ‘Host’) who refused to create as the seven passionless, mind-born, sons of Brahma did, because they aspire to incarnate as men in order to become higher than the gods — fight the Dragon [of esoteric wisdom], conquer him, and the child of matter is born” (BCW 8:148). See also TSEBA’OTH (SD 1:459)

Jhumur: “The gods. From his (Death’s) point of view they are unreal. Because he wants to prove that he is the final arbiter and that all is bound by him, nothing else really matters. At this point in the argument this is what he wants to emphasize, that Savitri must accept her limitations.”

Jotunheim (Icelandic, Scandinavian) [from jotunn giant + heimar home, land] In Norse mythology, the home of the giants, one of the nine worlds of the Eddas, described as beyond the ocean which surrounds Midgard, and separated from the home of the gods (Asgard) by Ifing — the river which never freezes over. Jotunheim stands for the material spheres of life visited by the gods who gain the “mead” of wisdom by embodying in worlds. Such a sphere is the earth and so also are the other planets and celestial bodies, though of varying evolutionary status.

Jotunn, Jotun (Icelandic) Giant; in the Norse Edda the giants represent the material spheres in which gods embody, thus enlightening those dark worlds while gaining there the “mead” of experience. There are giants of varying types and degrees. The ultimate source of matter (Sanskrit mulaprakriti) is named Mimir in the Edda. Other giants represent periods during which the gods animate a world, race, or other living being. Each named giant is a life period or material embodiment of a god; it exists for as long as the energizing deity is embodied, and dies, slain by the hammer of Thor, at the end of that period. Within the long span of a giant’s life a number of giantesses, “daughters” of the giant, represent smaller cycles, races or subraces of the giant, their father. A giant is thus both a manifest entity and the lifetime of such an entity, thus paralleling the aeons of Greek mythology.

Juno: In Roman mythology, wife of Jupiter, queen of the gods, mistress of heaven and earth, patroness of marriage and female virtue.

Jupiter: Chief deity, lord of heaven and earth, king of the gods of the Romans. Identified with Zeus of the Greeks.

Ka (Egyptian) Ka plural kau. Equivalent to the astral double, model-body, or linga-sarira. The ancient Egyptians held that when a human being was born, the ka was born with him and remained with him throughout his life. Even after death it remained in the tomb with the corpse; it was popularly believed that the offerings placed on graves were made to perpetuate the ka. Furthermore, the gods possessed them, each deity being said to have many kau; thus in one text the god Ra is said to possess seven bau (souls) and 14 kau. Even cities were held to possess kau in the heaven world.

Kaf, Kaph, Ghaf (Persian) Kāf, Kaph, Ghāf, Kaofa (Avestan) Kaofā, Kafor (Pahlavi) Mountain; in Persian tradition the sacred mythological mountain, comparable in many respects to the Hindu Mount Meru; regarded as the abode of the gods and the place whither heroes travel in order to reach the sacred land beyond these mountains. Hushenk, the hero, rode there on his twelve-legged horse, while Tahmurath went on his winged steed. It is the abode of Simorgh or Angha, the legendary bird of knowledge. In the “Aghre-Sorkh” (Red Intellect) of 12th century mystic philosopher Sohrevardi, Ghaf is referred to as the abode of intellect, surrounding the world with eleven peaks that only initiates can pass through. He says that the Night-Lightener Jewel (Gohar-e-Shab Afrooz) can be found in Mount Ghaf. This jewel receives its brilliance from the tree of Touba which is on Mount Ghaf.

Kailasa (Kailas) ::: the mountain on whose summit Śiva is said to dwell, according to a popular tradition which translated inner truths "into terms familiar to our physical and objective experience, . . . turned the rarer heights of subtle substance into material heights and placed the abodes of the gods on the summits of physical mountains". kaivaly kaivalyananda

Kailasa (Sanskrit) Kailāsa A lofty mountain in the Himalayas; in mythology Siva’s paradise is placed upon Kailasa, north of Lake Manasasarovara. The god of wealth, Kuvera, also is said to have his palace there. Because of the occult history attached to Mount Kailasa, Hindu metaphysics not infrequently uses Kailasa for heaven or the abode of the gods.

Kamadhenu (Sanskrit) Kāmadhenu [from kāma desire, wish + dhenu milch cow] Also Kamaduha, Surabhi. The mythical cow belonging to the sage Vasishtha, produced by the gods at the churning of the cosmic ocean. She is supposed to grant all desires and hence is termed the cow of plenty. This allegory refers to the appearance of the earth in space as the mother of all that later is — at least so far as our globe is concerned — the earth being mythologically considered to be milked and thus producing food. Many archaic mythologies have such an emblem of generative fertility.

Kandu (Sanskrit) Kaṇḍu In the Puranas, a sage and yogi whose holiness and pious austerities awakened the jealousy of the gods. Kamadeva, as lord of the gods, sent one of his apsarasas, Pramlocha, to tempt the sage. He lived with her for several centuries, which seemed to him only as one day. Finally the sage, returning to his senses, repudiated her and chased her away, whereupon she gave birth to a daughter, Marisha, in an extraordinary manner. Blavatsky compares this legend to the temptation of Merlin by Vivien, and Sarah’s temptation of Pharaoh in the Old Testament (SD 2:174-5&n).

Karmabandha (Sanskrit) Karmabandha [from karma action, activity + bandha bond, fetter] The bonds of karma or action; the repeated existences of an entity brought about by the karmic bonds of continuation, born of thought, feeling, and action. A being which has no karmabandha has attained freedom from the enthralling chains and attractions of material existence; but such a jivanmukta nevertheless has karma belonging to and suitable to the plane on which it then is. Thus a jivanmukta can rise above karma relative to the lower realms of being; but as long as any entity, however high, endures as an individualized monadic center, it inevitably produces karma of some kind appropriate to its own high sphere of life and activity. For the meaning of karma is action or activity of any kind — spiritual, intellectual, psychological, astral, or physical. We human beings, living in the lower planes, produce karma corresponding to us and our environment; but the gods, because individualized and active beings in their own spheres, produce of necessity karma corresponding with their own lofty state.

Karma(Karman, Sanskrit) ::: This is a noun-form coming from the root kri meaning "to do," "to make." Literallykarma means "doing," "making," action. But when used in a philosophical sense, it has a technicalmeaning, and this technical meaning can best be translated into English by the word consequence. Theidea is this: When an entity acts, he acts from within; he acts through an expenditure in greater or lessdegree of his own native energy. This expenditure of energy, this outflowing of energy, as it impactsupon the surrounding milieu, the nature around us, brings forth from the latter perhaps an instantaneousor perhaps a delayed reaction or rebound. Nature, in other words, reacts against the impact; and thecombination of these two -- of energy acting upon nature and nature reacting against the impact of thatenergy -- is what is called karma, being a combination of the two factors. Karma is, in other words,essentially a chain of causation, stretching back into the infinity of the past and therefore necessarilydestined to stretch into the infinity of the future. It is unescapable, because it is in universal nature, whichis infinite and therefore everywhere and timeless; and sooner or later the reaction will inevitably be feltby the entity which aroused it.It is a very old doctrine, known to all religions and philosophies, and since the renascence of scientificstudy in the Occident has become one of the fundamental postulates of modern coordinated knowledge.If you toss a pebble into a pool, it causes ripples in the water, and these ripples spread and finally impactupon the bank surrounding the pool; and, so modern science tells us, the ripples are translated intovibrations, which are carried outward into infinity. But at every step of this natural process there is acorresponding reaction from every one and from all of the myriads of atomic particles affected by thespreading energy.Karma is in no sense of the word fatalism on the one hand, nor what is popularly known as chance, onthe other hand. It is essentially a doctrine of free will, for naturally the entity which initiates a movementor action -- spiritual, mental, psychological, physical, or other -- is responsible thereafter in the shape ofconsequences and effects that flow therefrom, and sooner or later recoil upon the actor or prime mover.Since everything is interlocked and interlinked and interblended with everything else, and no thing andno being can live unto itself alone, other entities are of necessity, in smaller or larger degree, affected bythe causes or motions initiated by any individual entity; but such effects or consequences on entities,other than the prime mover, are only indirectly a morally compelling power, in the true sense of the wordmoral.An example of this is seen in what the theosophist means when he speaks of family karma as contrastedwith one's own individual karma; or national karma, the series of consequences pertaining to the nationof which he is an individual; or again, the racial karma pertaining to the race of which the individual is anintegral member. Karma cannot be said either to punish or to reward in the ordinary meaning of theseterms. Its action is unerringly just, for being a part of nature's own operations, all karmic actionultimately can be traced back to the kosmic heart of harmony which is the same thing as saying pureconsciousness-spirit. The doctrine is extremely comforting to human minds, inasmuch as man may carvehis own destiny and indeed must do so. He can form it or deform it, shape it or misshape it, as he wills;and by acting with nature's own great and underlying energies, he puts himself in unison or harmonytherewith and therefore becomes a co-worker with nature as the gods are.

Karttikeya was born for the purpose of killing Taraka, the too holy and wise deva-daimon, who had obtained through austerity all the knowledge and yoga powers of the gods. Karttikeya is equivalent to Michael, Indra, and Apollo. See also GHARMA-JA

Kashaya-vastra (Sanskrit) Kaṣāya-vastra Red-colored cloth; in the Puranas, the rishi Vaisishtha was asked by the gods to bring the sun, Surya, to satyaloka. The sun told him the worlds would be destroyed if he left, but the sage offered to place his kashaya-vastra in place of the sun’s disk, which he did. This red-colored cloth is the visible body of the sun. Blavatsky comments that “the ascetic’s dress being, as all know, dyed expressly into a red-yellow hue, a colouring matter with pinkish patches on it, rudely representing the vital principle in man’s blood, — the symbol of the vital principle in the sun, or what is now called chromosphere” (BCW 5:157).

Kaspar One of the three Magi or wise men in Christian legend. In Egypt the scribe of the gods or the recorder was Tehuti (Thoth), who was also the god of wisdom, equivalent to Hermes or Mercury: always present at initiations, and the presiding influence, as initiator, at all ancient initiations. Looking at the Christian story in this context, infant is a name for a “newly born” initiate, who thus is a twice-born (Sanskrit dvija). The star refers to the esoteric wisdom which taught the wise men of the time that the cycle in its turning had brought about the birth of an avatara, a manifestation on this earth of a certain starry or solar divinity. See also BALTHAZAR; MELCHIOR

Kathenotheism: A term invented by Max Müller which literally denotes one at a time -- theism. It symbolizes the Vedic monotheistic practice according to which the position of the gods is so arranged that each God is supreme in turn, in which the titular god is always changing without entailing a denial that the other gods exist. -- H.H.

Khepera (Egyptian) Kheperȧ [from kheper to become, be born, arise into manifestation] Originally one of three aspects of the sun: “I am Khepera in the morning, and Ra at noon-day, and Temu in the evening.” Later each of these aspects developed into a separate deity. Khepera was the god of regeneration and development in growth, a spiritual power regulating reimbodiments and transmigrations and the deity presiding over the Egyptian form of the creation, where he is the only thing in existence besides the watery abyss, Nu. The deity of the universe, Nebertcher (a form of Ra) says: “I am he who came into being in the form of the god Khepera,” the hieroglyphic text representing the word by the scarab surmounted by a circle. The universe, then, is but the re-manifestation of a previous universe: the scarab standing for rebirth and regeneration, and the circle for karmic destiny in the universe as containing the seeds of life, brought into activity through reimbodiment or rebirth. The primeval deities Shu and Tefnut were brought forth by Khepera, who was the developer of everything which comes into manifested being from latency. In The Book of the Dead Khepera is called the father of the gods.

Kneph or Knouphis (Egyptian) Kneph or Knouphis. An alternative form of the deity Khnum or Khnemu, associated with Egyptian cosmogony. One of the gods of creative force: “as Chnoumis-Kneph, who represents the Indian Narayana, the Spirit of God moving on the waters of space, as Eichton or Ether he holds in his mouth an Egg, the symbol of evolution; and as Av he is Siva, the Destroyer and the Regenerator; for as Deveria explains: ‘His journey to the lower hemispheres appears to symbolize the evolutions of substances, which are born to die and to be reborn.’ Esoterically, however, . . . Chnoumis-Kneph was pre-eminently the god of reincarnation” (TG 82-3). All these solar gods are the personification of the attributes of one god, representing various aspects of the phases of generation and impregnation.

Kronos (Greek) In Greek mythology, the youngest of the titans, son of Ouranos (heaven) and Gaia (earth). His mother gave him a sickle, emblem of karmic reapings in the course of time, when he led the war against his father. After castrating his father, he became ruler of the gods and, so he would not suffer a similar fate, he swallowed all his children by his wife-sister, Rhea. Eventually, however, he was overthrown by his youngest son, Zeus. In some accounts he was imprisoned in Tartarus, in others he was reconciled with Zeus and reigned with Rhadamanthys on the Islands of the Blessed.

Kshira-samudra (Sanskrit) Kṣīra-samudra The ocean of milk, which was churned by the gods, according to Puranic legend. The sea of milk and curds is the Milky Way and the various congeries of nebulae. The allegory of the churning of the ocean of milk refers to a time before the kosmos was evolved. Vishnu, who here stands for aeonic preservation of karmically developed kosmic stuff or matter, is its intelligent preserver, and churns out of the primitive ocean (the chaos of a universe in pralaya) the amrita or immortal essence which is reserved only for the gods. See also KURMA-AVATARA

Kurma-avatara (Sanskrit) Kūrma-avatāra The Tortoise avatara; a descent of Vishnu, the sustainer of life, in the form of a tortoise. In the Puranas, a portion of cosmic Vishnu descended as the kurma to restore to mankind the mystic nectar (amrita), the essence of life and truth, as well as other holy and precious things needful to humanity, which had been lost. Vishnu ordered the gods to churn the sea of milk that they might procure once more these precious things, and he promised to become the tortoise on which the mountain Mandara as a churning stick should rest. Out of the sea of churned milk arose the 14 precious things, and with these the gods won their authority over the demons once more. Cosmically this churning of the sea of milk relates to a period before the earth’s formation, the sea of milk being the expanse of space populated by the nebulae and diffuse star-stuff, the seeds and substance of future worlds and their hierarchies.

Lakshmi (Sanskrit) Lakṣmī Prosperity, happiness; the Hindu Venus, goddess of fortune and beauty who sprang with other precious things from the foam of the ocean when churned by the gods and demons for the recovery of the amrita. She is variously regarded as the wife or sakti of several of the great gods, notably Vishnu.

LAMENTING AND COMPLAINING. ::: This is a icrapcra- ment which the gods will not help because they know that help is useless, for it will either not be received or will be spilled and wasted ; and all that is rdjasic and asiiric in the world despises and tramples upon this kind of nature.

Land of the Eternal Sun From immemorial time mystics and occult philosophers have consistently taught of the existence of a land where the sunshine is perpetual, the abode of the gods whose particular function it is to oversee the destinies, not only of mankind, but of other hierarchical groups occupying the earth. Any attempt to fix a geographical locality as this land of the eternal sun has never been successful, for it is no geographical locality, but a region mystically said to be at the top of Mount Meru or the north pole of the earth.

Les Dieux [French] ::: "The Gods", title of a book by Paul Richard.

Lhasa or Lhassa (Tibetan) lha sa [from lha gods + sa place] Place of the gods, equivalent of the Sanskrit deva-bhumi. The capital city of Tibet, situated on the banks of an important tributary of the Tsang-po River; hither converged trade routes from Turkestan, Siberia, Mongolia, China, and India, as well as from the other parts of Tibet. Though called the Forbidden City, it was only so to Europeans, very few of whom were ever permitted to penetrate into the interior of Tibet. As well as being the most flourishing and prosperous city, it was the abode of the Dalai Lama and his government before the conquest of Tibet by the Chinese. Before it became the capital, Lhasa was apparently known as Ra-sa, “place of the goats.”

Limbs The Qabbalah speaks of the limbs of Microprosopus, of ’Adam Qadmon (the Heavenly Man), and of the Sephiroth. In Hindu writings, especially the Puranas, the beings created from the limbs of Brahma remain without progeny, whereas his mind-born sons become the creators. In Egyptian mythology Osiris-Ptah or Ra creates his own limbs by creating the gods destined to personify his phases.

Madhav: “Here is the Mother of all the Gods and all the Powers; she is the mediatrix, standing between the Supreme above and the earth below and firmly linking the earth to the Supreme.” The Book of the Divine Mother

Madhav: “The allusion is to the Vedic legend which narrates how the dark powers of the nether regions, i.e. the subconscient—and the still below—steal and hide the riches of the Gods in their subterranean chambers. They are called the Panis, thieves.” The Book of the Divine Mother

Madhav: “The guardians of eternity, the gods, the higher gods, …” The Book of the Divine Mother

Madhav: “This creation is an ordered manifestation of the Divine. There is a central Will, expressing the originating Truth-vision, impelling the whole movement. But also there are special emanations from the Divine charged with specific tasks in the organisation and maintenance of the emerging creation. These are the gods and goddesses, deities, Powers and Personalities that are in charge of their respective domains, on different levels of existence. Each world has its own guardians entrusted by the Supreme Creative Spirit with the work of building and furthering the manifestation of the particular Truth-principle that pushes for expression in that world-formula.” Readings in Savitri Vol. I.

Magna Mater (Latin) The Great Mother, the mother of the gods, a title given to many Asiatic goddesses at the time when the Romans were in Asia; identified by the Greeks with Rhea, daughter of Ouranos and Gaia, wife of Kronos, and mother of Zeus and other gods. In Asia the name was given specially to Cybele, whose worship later became degraded into licentious rites. Every nation had its own chief goddess, or mother goddess, who was called Great Goddess, exactly as the Latins did with their own Magna Mater.

Mandara (Sanskrit) Mandara A sacred mountain which in Hindu mythology served the gods and asuras as a churning-stick on the occasion of the churning of the ocean for the recovery of the amrita and 13 other precious and holy things, which had been lost during the preceding deluge. See also KURMA-AVATARA

Marduk: In Babylonian mythology, the king of all the gods, determiner of destiny, god of magicians and magic arts.

mata devanam aditer anikam ::: Mother of the gods, force of the Infinite. [RV 1.113.19]

mercury ::: n. --> A Latin god of commerce and gain; -- treated by the poets as identical with the Greek Hermes, messenger of the gods, conductor of souls to the lower world, and god of eloquence.
A metallic element mostly obtained by reduction from cinnabar, one of its ores. It is a heavy, opaque, glistening liquid (commonly called quicksilver), and is used in barometers, thermometers, ect. Specific gravity 13.6. Symbol Hg (Hydrargyrum). Atomic weight 199.8. Mercury has a molecule which consists of only one atom. It was


Meruloka ::: the world of Meru, the mountain of the gods at the centre of the earth.

Midgard serpent: In Norse mythology, a great snake-like monster (Midgardsormr) which lies in the sea, coiled around the earth; one of the offspring of Loki. At the end of the world, the serpent will come out of the sea and join the attack of the other monsters and giants on the gods, and will kill Thor with its poisonous breath.

Mirku (Chaldean) Noble crown; the savior from death of the gods, regarded as the creator of the Dark Race (Zalmat-qaqadi). The class of intelligent beings in the universe who through evolution bring about progressive unfolding growth from within outwards of all beings and entities, who thus are at one stage of their evolution the Dark Race, because sunken in matter, but are saved by the germs of intelligence expanding into cosmic realization within themselves. Hence the describing of intellect or intelligence as noble crown.

Mixcoatl: An ancient Mexican god of war, thunder and hunting; according to the Aztec cosmology, one of the gods aiding in the creation of the world.

Muluk-taoos, Muluk-taus (Arabic, Yezidi) The lord peacock; symbol of the principal deity worshiped by the Yezidis, who is regarded as accomplishing the work of creation under the command of the supreme Deity. Although looked upon as a fallen angel and the source of all evil, he is not named the Devil, but is the emblem of intellectual pride on the one hand, and of hundred-eyed cosmic intelligence or intellect on the other: referring to the equivalent Persian legend of the creation of the peacock by the Evil One. The hundred-eyed peacock, however, may also stand for initiation, wisdom, the bird of the gods and goddesses connected with secret learning (SD 2:514; TG 218).

Mut, Mout (Egyptian) Mut, Mout. Mother; the second member of the triad of Thebean deities, generally known as the Lady of Thebes, and holding with Amen-Ra (Ammon-Ra) the principal position among the gods of the New Empire. Although mother of Khensu (or Khonsu — the third member of the triad) and wife of Amen-Ra, she is often called his mother. Her attributes are those of the world-mother, the inscriptions upon the ruins of her temple at Thebes address her as “Lady of Heaven, Queen of the Gods, she who giveth birth, but was herself not born.” Sometimes she is represented with androgynous aspects (with the head of a man and with the phallus). She is associated with Isis and Nekhebet, although more often made equivalent to Nut, goddess of the watery deep, mother of the gods, and of all that is. Mut also in many respects has the characteristics that were attributed to Hathor.

Myth: (Gr. mythes, legend) The truth, symbolically, or affectively, presented. Originally, the legends of the Gods concerning cosmogonical or cosmological questions. Later, a fiction presented as historically true but lacking factual basis; a popular and traditional falsehood. A presentation of cosmology, employing the affective method of symbolic representation in order to escape from the limitations of literal meaning. -- J.K.F.

mythology ::: n. --> The science which treats of myths; a treatise on myths.
A body of myths; esp., the collective myths which describe the gods of a heathen people; as, the mythology of the Greeks.


na hi te bhagavan vyaktim vidur deva na danavah ::: neither the gods nor the titans, O blessed Lord, know Thy manifestation. [Gita 10.14]

Name ::: “Name in its deeper sense is not the word by which we describe the object, but the total of power, quality, character of the reality which a form of things embodies and which we try to sum up by a designating sound, a knowable name, Nomen. Nomen in this sense, we might say, is Numen; the secret Names of the Gods are their power, quality, character of being caught up by the consciousness and made conceivable. The Infinite is nameless, but in that namelessness all possible names, Numens of the gods, the names and forms of all realities, are already envisaged and prefigured, because they are there latent and inherent in the All-Existence.” The Life Divine

name ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Name in its deeper sense is not the word by which we describe the object, but the total of power, quality, character of the reality which a form of things embodies and which we try to sum up by a designating sound, a knowable name, Nomen. Nomen in this sense, we might say, is Numen; the secret Names of the Gods are their power, quality, character of being caught up by the consciousness and made conceivable. The Infinite is nameless, but in that namelessness all possible names, Numens of the gods, the names and forms of all realities, are already envisaged and prefigured, because they are there latent and inherent in the All-Existence.” The Life Divine

Nanna The Norse goddess of the now-dead moon, wife of the sun god Balder. When Balder was slain by his blind brother Hoder with the fateful mistletoe twig, Nanna died of a broken heart and was placed beside her husband on his pyreship. Her half-sister is Idun, the present earth goddess corresponding to the Greek Gaia. Idun continues to carry out Nanna’s task of supplying the gods with the apples of immortality of which they must partake daily to preserve their youth.

nectar ::: 1. *Myth. The life-giving drink of the gods. 2. The juice of a fruit. 3. A delicious or invigorating drink. *nectar-cup.

nectar ::: n. --> The drink of the gods (as ambrosia was their food); hence, any delicious or inspiring beverage.
A sweetish secretion of blossoms from which bees make honey.


Nectar: The drink of the gods of Greek mythology.

Neith or Net (Egyptian) Neith or Net. One of the most ancient Egyptian deities, the Lady of the West. Her characteristic symbol is the arrow; later Greek writers equated her with Pallas Athene. In late dynastic times, Net was closely associated with Hathor, but in the earliest records she is connected with the primeval watery ocean or cosmic chaos, from which arose the sun god Ra. More often she was associated with Isis — her concrete or manifested self — being called “the great goddess, mother of all the gods, mistress of heaven who came into being in the beginning.” Net is portrayed as the virgin mother, suckling the infant Horus, similar to the representations of Isis. The famous passage given by Plutarch (Isis and Osiris ch 9) generally attributed to Isis, was said to have been found engraved upon a statue of Net. Plutarch also states that the Egyptians often called Isis Athene, signifying “I have come from myself” (ch 42).

Nekhebet (Egyptian) Nekhebet. A daughter of Ra, who in later texts becomes completely identified with Hathor, being styled the mother of the gods, she who brought forth light, etc. She and her sister Uatchit in the Underworld act as helpers of the dead. See also MUT

Nidhogg is also the devourer of the dead who sucks cadavers at the end of the world. When the gods leave for their own spheres at Ragnarok, Nidhogg absorbs the dregs of a defunct universe.

Niflheim (Icelandic), Nebelheim (German) [from nifl mist, nebula + heim home] In Norse mythology, the home of mists in which nebulae form. When the heat from Muspellsheim (home of fire) meets the mist-cold vapors of Niflheim in Ginnungagap (the gaping void), Ymer, the frost giant, comes into being. He is used by the gods to create “victory worlds” wherein souls can evolve. Niflheim has also been regarded as a Hades where the dead are sent, but this appears to refer to the disposition of the forms (bodies) of departed souls.

niobe ::: n. --> The daughter of Tantalus, and wife of Amphion, king of Thebes. Her pride in her children provoked Apollo and Diana, who slew them all. Niobe herself was changed by the gods into stone.

nr̄.h. (nrih) ::: (apparently the plural of nr., whose more regular forms nrh are narah. [nominative] or nr̄.n [accusative]) literally "men", a term used in the Veda for "the gods as the male powers or Purushas presiding over the energies of Nature".

Nuntius, Nuntium (Latin) Messenger; applied to Mercury as messenger of the gods. See also HERMES

Nut (Egyptian) Nut. Also Noot, Noun, Nout, Nu. Goddess of the sky or cosmic space — whether of the solar system or the galaxy — daughter of Shu and Tefnut, wife of Seb (the cosmic earth or outspread space), mother of Osiris and Isis, and of Set and Nephthys or Neith; the heavens personified. Some manuscripts distinguish between Nut, the day sky, and Naut, the night sky, although the two are but lower and higher aspects of one cosmic divinity. Her attributes partake of those of the other nature goddesses in the Egyptian pantheon: she is addressed as Lady of Heaven, who gave birth to all the gods. The favorite representation of Nut is of a woman bending so that her body forms a semicircle — a part of the endless circle of space — upon which the stars are portrayed, while her consort, Seb, prostrate beneath her, completes the circle. Again, the solar boat is represented sailing up over the lower limbs, in order to pursue its journey over the day sky; and sailing down her arms to complete its cycle in the night sky.

Odr (Icelandic) Mind, wit, soul, sense; in Norse mythology, cosmic mind, corresponding to the Sanskrit mahat. The name Odin is derived from it when Odin represents the Allfather. In one legend reminiscent of the Egyptian tale of Isis, Odr is the husband of Frigga, who weeps golden tears as she searches the worlds for him. Here he may stand for one of the divine ancestors of the human race, and his long journeys are the peregrinations made by the monad, Odr’s spiritual aspect, through the worlds of form and matter. Odr is used for song or poetry in many compound words such as odar-smidr (song smith), odar-ar (speech oar, the tongue), odraerir (inspirer of wisdom, the vessel containing the blood of Kvasir: inspiration brought to the gods from higher gods).

"Of course, the gods exist — that is to say, there are Powers that stand above the world and transmit the divine workings. It is the physical mind which believes only what is physical that denies them. There are also beings of other worlds — gods and Asuras, etc.” Letters on Yoga

“Of course, the gods exist—that is to say, there are Powers that stand above the world and transmit the divine workings. It is the physical mind which believes only what is physical that denies them. There are also beings of other worlds—gods and Asuras, etc.” Letters on Yoga

Ogygia An island inhabited by the nymph Calypso, far from Greece to the west, on which Odysseus was shipwrecked. Despite her promise of immortality if he stays, Odysseus wishes to leave, and the gods compel her to let him go after seven years.

olympic ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to Olympus, a mountain of Thessaly, fabled as the seat of the gods, or to Olympia, a small plain in Elis.

Olympus: A mountain in southern Thessaly; its perpetually cloud-capped peak (9,794 feet high) was believed to be the abode of the gods of the Greek-Roman pantheon.

Olympus (Greek) The abode of the great gods in Grecian mythology in Homer and Hesiod. Such heavenly abodes are usually associated with mountains, such as the Hindu Meru, the Greek Atlas, and the Hebrew Sinai; in this case the name was given to the summit of the range dividing Macedonia from Thessaly, but there were other mountains called Olympus. Later philosophers, perhaps more mystically minded, placed Olympus in the zenith, as the abode of the divinities. There were many Olympuses, the references in story occasionally being to the higher globes of the earth-chain, and in a cosmic sense the higher planes of the solar system. At one time in Greek legend both the gods and their abode had a character of voluptuousness, comparable with the Hebrew Eden (which means “delight”), the heaven of Indra, or the abode of the Arabian houris; but this was when degeneracy had set in and the people had forgotten the significance of the deities, and lost the key enabling them to interpret the myths and allegories forming their respective mythologic religions.

One aspect of its use by the gods is the purification that ensues in those against whom the bolt is cast, as well as the gods meting out justice by its means. A more mystical reference to dorje, however, alludes to the higher triad of the human constitution which, if continually held in view, purifies the lower quaternary as the thunderstorm does the earth’s atmosphere.

One is reminded of the Hebrew story in Genesis, where the ’elohim fear lest man, represented by Adam, should eat of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge and become like unto them. The conception behind these jealousies of divinities is a warning in popular form that while the noblest human duty is to become like the gods — our spiritual parents — yet before we can, we must have brought forth from within ourselves the divinity latent there, lest we bring disharmony and the selfish interests of the human material world into the serene and law-abiding cosmic spheres of the divinities.

On the cosmic scale Ragnarok brings to a close a universal cycle of activity. When a world dies the god Heimdal, guardian of the rainbow bridge between the realms of the gods and Midgard, domain of humanity, blows the Gjallarhorn, summoning the gods of life to the final battle against the forces of destruction. Lesser judgments take place when single world systems reach their term, as recorded in the “Lay of Odin’s Corpse” (Odins Korpgalder), which deals with a death of one planet, and relates the deities’ efforts to elicit from the planetary soul an accounting of its past cycle of activity.

On the next level Odin is again instrumental in creation. Here his brother creators are named Honir and Lodur. The gods of this second trinity correspond to the Hindu tattvas: Odin stands for air (breath, spirit), Honir for water (fluidity, intelligence), and Lodur for fire (energy, will and vital heat). They found on the earth “Ask (ash) and Embla (alder), indeterminate,” and gave to these vegetative life forms out of their own nature the properties needed to complete the human constitution.

Ovid tells that after Deukalion’s flood, Zeus ordered Prometheus and Athene to create a new race of men out of mud; he made them in the image of the gods with an upright posture, after Epimetheus had succeeded in fashioning only mindless creatures. This represents a stage in the history of the downward arc of evolution, which may be interpreted cosmically, geographically, and in relation to man. It is in one sense the descent of the manasaputras, agnishvattas, and other Sons of Flame, who endowed the mindless forms with the divine spark; so that Prometheus is Lucifer, Phosphoros, the Light-bringer, the serpent of Eden, etc.

Palaemon (Greek) palaimon. The wrestler; applied to Herakles and Melicertes, a name of Phoenician origin, taken from the Phoenician divinity Melcart. Ino, daughter of Cadmus and wife of Athamas, flying from her husband, sprang with her child Melicertes into the sea; the gods out of compassion made her a sea goddess and her son a god under the name of Palaemon.

Pandavarani (Sanskrit) Pāṇḍavāraṇi [from Pāṇḍava son of Pāṇḍu + araṇi figuratively mother] Matrix or mother of the Pandavas; a title given to Kunti in the Mahabharata. Similar to surarani (matrix or mother of the gods) because surarani is used for Aditi (space).

pandora ::: n. --> A beautiful woman (all-gifted), whom Jupiter caused Vulcan to make out of clay in order to punish the human race, because Prometheus had stolen the fire from heaven. Jupiter gave Pandora a box containing all human ills, which, when the box was opened, escaped and spread over the earth. Hope alone remained in the box. Another version makes the box contain all the blessings of the gods, which were lost to men when Pandora opened it.
A genus of marine bivalves, in which one valve is flat,


Pantheon (Greek) A temple dedicated to all the gods; also, figuratively, the totality of the gods.

pantheon ::: n. --> A temple dedicated to all the gods; especially, the building so called at Rome.
The collective gods of a people, or a work treating of them; as, a divinity of the Greek pantheon.


Pantheon: The collective name of all the gods of a tribe, race or nation. Also, a temple dedicated to all the gods.

Para handatar; para handandatar: A Hittite term for a special force through which the gods govern, individual to each god.

Patala (Sanskrit) Pātāla [possibly from the verbal root pat to sink, fly down or alight] Nethermost, farthest underneath; the reference being not so much to locality or position in space, as to quality — grossness, heaviness, or material substance. The seventh, lowest, and most material tala. It is used in Hindu literature to signify the hells, underworlds, or infernal regions, or the antipodes or Myalba. The corresponding loka or pole is bhurloka. “Meru — the abode of the gods — was placed . . . in the North Pole, while Patala, the nether region, was supposed to lie in the South. As each symbol in esoteric philosophy has seven keys, geographically, Meru and Patala have one significance and represent localities; while astronomically, they have another, and mean ‘the two poles,’ which meaning ended by their being often rendered in exoteric sectarianism — the ‘Mountain’ and the ‘Pit,’ or Heaven or Hell” (SD 2:357).

Peiru-un (Chinese) The traditional founder of China and progenitor of the Chinese peoples. According to legend this king, beloved of the gods, was warned by two oracles of the impending catastrophe awaiting the island-continent of Ma-li-ga-si-ma, which because of the iniquity of its giants sank to the bottom of the sea. He therefore set out with his family on the ocean and arrived on the shores of China. This is the Chinese version of the sinking of the continent of Atlantis.

Phanes, Phanes-Protogonos (Greek) [from phaino to make visible, appear, shine forth + protogonos first-born] In Orphic mythogony, Aether (the Father, spirit) and Chaos (the Mother, primordial matter) produce the world-egg, silvery and gleaming white, out of which Phanes, the Third Logos, is born. He is the Orphic counterpart of Eros, the divine love which sets the atoms of spirit in motion, and is both male and female, mythologically said to have golden wings which carry him everywhere and four eyes gazing in every direction. As Phanes, he is the first of the five cosmic rulers successively to appear; parent of the gods, the demiurge and creator of the world. Being thus the primordial father of gods, of the world, and hence of men, every such derivative offspring from Phanes contains Phanes in itself. Thus man, as an individual, contains Phanes as the primordial essence or original force of his own being. From another point of view, Phanes is equivalent to cosmic mahat, which as the universal formative spiritual power of the universe is at once the parent as well as the primordial substance of whatever is — as well as cosmic intelligence.

PISaCA. ::: Demon ; beings of Ihc lower vital planes, who arc in opposition to the Gods.

Polytheism The doctrine of and belief in a plurality of gods, cosmic spirits, or celestial entities under whatever name they may be described. The word came into use as a correlative of monotheism — the doctrine as of the Jews, Christians, and Moslems, of one and only one God. The unphilosophical nature of monotheism, which in the Occident is quite different from the significance of divine unity, is shown by the subterfuges resorted to in order to supply its deficiencies. As divinity cannot be successfully imagined as individually concerned with every operation in the universe, the general term nature is used to denote a kind of secondary god; while the progress of science has analyzed this into various laws and forces, which paradoxically enough perform somewhat the same functions as the gods of polytheism, except in their wrongly supposed lack of intelligence. Less sophisticated and more profound intellects have never ceased to believe in a whole range of cosmic hierarchies, running from divinity down to the so-called nature spirits, and traditional peoples have always looked upon these as powers which are often dreaded and can be propitiated. Even Christianity has its saints, and its theology speaks of Angels and Archangels, of Dominions and Thrones, etc. As soon as we depart from the simple primeval idea of a universe filled with intelligent beings — and indeed formed of these beings themselves — of numerous hierarchies, grades, and kinds, we land in a maze of abstractions and contradictions.

Porphyrion (Greek) Lurid, fiery; a gigante or giant born of the blood (vitality) of Ouranos (heaven) falling upon the earth. These giants were more human than the titans, and continued the war against the Olympian gods, which symbolizes the struggles which took place during the descending arc of evolution, cosmically and among the races of mankind, between the lower material forces and the celestial powers from above. Porphyrion is slain by the gods with the help of Hercules and buried in the abysses of earth.

Porphyry refers to the Magi as the learned men among the Persians who are in the service of the deity (Abst 4:16), while Philo Judaeus describes them as the most wonderful inquirers into the hidden mysteries of nature: holy men who set themselves apart from everything else on this earth, “contemplated the divine virtues and understood the divine nature of the gods and spirits, the more clearly; and so, initiated others into the same mysteries, which consist in one holding an uninterrupted intercourse with these invisible beings during life” (IU 1:94-5). It is likely that the use of the name and the order survived in times when their true dignity was no longer apparent.

Poseidon (Greek) One of the twelve great Olympian deities, a son of Ouranos and Gaia, brother of Zeus and Hades; represented by the Latins as Neptunus. The brothers Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades are respectively the gods of heaven, the intermediate world or water, and of the underworld; and these represent the three great generalized powers or forces, each one ruling or vitalizing his respective third of the seven manifest cosmic planes. Poseidon presides over water, especially the ocean, and over horses, which he brought forth by a stroke of his trident on the earth. His symbols are the dolphin, one of his executive ministers; the trident; and the horse. It is Poseidon who shakes the earth and raises and quells storms at sea. He had numerous offspring by many wives, both mortal and immortal; mostly of a violent unruly character like himself — titans and giants. He stands as a personation of the spirit and race of Atlantis; for he is lusty, sensual, and at war with heaven. To consummate his intrigues, he assumes the forms of various animals — a way of alluding to bestial Atlantean black magic. The symbol is complex, for he is also a dragon. He is related to the northern constellations of Draco, Delphinus, and Pegasus (or Equus, the horse). Equivalent to Chozzar of the Peratae Gnostics and the good serpent of the Nazarenes (cf SD 2:578). As god of the waters he parallels Idaspati, Narayana, Vishnu, and Varuna.

Powers of darkness, the Veilcrs in Night; beings of. the middle vital plane who are in opposition to the gods. ' • ^

powers ::: Sri Aurobindo: "These are the forces and beings that are interested in maintaining the falsehoods they have created in the world of the Ignorance and in putting them forward as the Truth which men must follow. In India they are termed Asuras, Rakshasas, Pishachas (beings respectively of the mentalised vital, middle vital and lower vital planes) who are in opposition to the Gods, the Powers of Light. These too are Powers, for they too have their cosmic field in which they exercise their function and authority and some of them were once divine Powers (the former gods, purve devah , as they are called somewhere in the Mahabharata) who have fallen towards the darkness by revolt against the divine Will behind the cosmos.” Letters on Yoga

powers ::: “These are the forces and beings that are interested in maintaining the falsehoods they have created in the world of the Ignorance and in putting them forward as the Truth which men must follow. In India they are termed Asuras, Rakshasas, Pishachas (beings respectively of the mentalised vital, middle vital and lower vital planes) who are in opposition to the Gods, the Powers of Light. These too are Powers, for they too have their cosmic field in which they exercise their function and authority and some of them were once divine Powers (the former gods, purve devah , as they are called somewhere in the Mahabharata) who have fallen towards the darkness by revolt against the divine Will behind the cosmos.” Letters on Yoga

Prasraya (Sanskrit) Praśraya [from pra-śri to approach, defer to, show respect towards] Respectful demeanor, civility; synonymous with vinaya. It is the “ ‘progenetrix of affection.’ A title bestowed upon the Vedic Aditi, the ‘Mother of the Gods’ ” (TG 260).

proceed on its way as an independent divine being with its own play in the world. All the Gods can put forth such emanations from their being, identified with them in essence of conscious- ness and power though not commensurate.

Puranas(Sanskrit) ::: A word which literally means "ancient," "belonging to olden times." In India the word isespecially used as a term comprehending certain well-known sacred scriptures, which popular and evenscholarly authorities ascribe to the poet Vyasa. The Puranas contain the entire body of ancient Indianmythology. They are usually considered to be eighteen in number, and each Purana, to be complete, issupposed to consist of five topics or themes. These five topics or themes are commonly enumerated asfollows: (1) the beginnings or "creation" of the universe; (2) its renewals and destructions, ormanvantaras and pralayas; (3) the genealogies of the gods, other divine beings, heroes, and patriarchs; (4)the reigns of the various manus; and (5) a resume of the history of the solar and lunar races. Practicallynone of the Puranas as they stand in modern versions contains all these five topics, except perhaps theVishnu-Purana, probably the most complete in this sense of the word; and even the Vishnu-Puranacontains a great deal of matter not directly to be classed under these five topics. All the Puranas alsocontain a great deal of symbolical and allegorical writing.

Purohita (Sanskrit) Purohita [from puras foremost, in front + hita from the verbal root dhā to place] One who has been placed foremost; a family priest or domestic chaplain. In Hindu myths the deity of the planet Jupiter, Brihaspati, was called the purohita of the Hindu Olympus and the spiritual guru of the gods.

Ragnarok (Icelandic) [from ragna plural of regin ruler + rok sentence, judgment, reason, ground, origin] In Norse mythology, the time when the ruling powers (gods) return to their ground, are reabsorbed in their divine origin. The judgment is their evaluation of the life that has just been completed. Ragnarok has commonly been called the twilight of the gods, probably because of confusion with rokkr (twilight). It has also been interpreted as they age of fire and smoke, because in Swedish rok means smoke. However, in Icelandic it has a more sacred meaning referring to wonders and signs, and the departure of the gods to their home ground, the source of their being.

Ragnarok: In Norse and Teutonic cosmogony, the end of the present state of the world, when a new age of righteousness on a new earth will be accomplished by a battle between the gods and the evil giants, in which evil will be overthrown.

Rahu: In Hindu mythology Rahu is a daitya (demon) who possessed an appendage like a dragon’s tail, and made himself immortal by stealing from the gods some amrita—elixir of divine life—which they obtained by churning an ocean of milk. Unable to deprive him of his immortality, Vishnu exiled him from Earth and made of him the constellation Draco: his head is called Rahu, and his tail Ketu. Using his appendage as a weapon, he has ever since waged a destructive war on the denouncers of his robbery, the Sun and the Moon, which he swallows during the eclipse. The fable is presumed to have a mystic or occult meaning.

Ray: In ancient Akkadian literature, the source or symbol of the divine power of the gods; the loss of the rays to another god meant loss of supernatural powers and functions.

R.bhus (Ribhus) ::: the name of three Vedic gods or demigods, the "arRbhus tisans of Immortality"; they "are represented as human beings who have attained to the condition of godhead by power of knowledge and perfection in their works" and act as "energies of formation and upward progress who assist the gods in the divinising of man".

  “Real Devanagari — non-phonetic characters — meant formerly the outward symbols, so to say, the signs used in the inter-communication between gods and initiated mortals. Hence their great sacredness and the silence maintained throughout the Vedic and the Brahmanical periods about any object concerned with, or referring to, reading and writing. It was the language of the gods” (ibid. 423).

Records of ancient medicine in Babylonia, Egypt, Greece, etc., tell of the temples being used as hospitals, with priest-physicians supported by the state giving every care to the sick who came, both rich and poor. In addition to material means of treatment — many of which we have rediscovered — these devotees of the gods of healing used special incense, prayers, the “temple sleep,” invocations, music, astrology, etc., which we regard as harmless superstition of an earlier day. However, such conditions, intelligently adapted to each case, in making a pure, serene, uplifting atmosphere around the sick person, would invoke the influences of wholeness within and without him. By putting the inner man in tune with his body, his disordered nature-forces manifesting as disease would tend to flow freely in the currents of health. Natural magic is as practical as the unknown alchemy which transmutes our digested daily bread into molecules of our living body.

Ribhu (Sanskrit) Ṛbhu Clever, skillful, inventive; applied to Indra, Agni, and the adityas in the Rig-Veda. As a noun, an artist, smith, builder. Also the name of three semi-divine beings, Ribhu, Vaja, and Vibhvan, the name of the first being applied to the three; “thought by some to represent the three seasons of the year, and celebrated for their skill as artists; they are supposed to dwell in the solar sphere, and are the artists who formed the horses of Indra, the carriage of the Asvins, and the miraculous cow of Brihaspati; they made their parents young, and performed other wonderful works; they are supposed to take their ease and remain idle for twelve days (the twelve intercalary days of the winter solstice) every year in the house of the Sun. (Agohya); after which they recommence working; when the gods heard of their skill, they sent Agni to them with the one cup of their rival Tvashtri, the artificer of the gods, bidding the Ribhus construct four cups from it; when they had successfully executed this task, the gods received the Ribhus amongst themselves and allowed them to partake of their sacrifices; they appear generally as accompanying Indra, especially at the evening sacrifice” (M-Wms Dict). In the Puranas, Ribhu is a son of Brahman, while Sankaracharya’s guru enumerates him as one of the seven kumaras (SD 1:457).

Rig Veda: The oldest part of the Vedas (q.v.), consisting of hymns to the gods.

Ropt (Icelandic) [from hroptr crier, prophet (cf hroptatyr crier of the gods), slandered, maligned] In Norse mythology, the name by which Odin is known in Valhalla where his heroes, the One-harriers, are brought by the Valkyries when they have been “slain” on the field of battle. As the initiator or higher self of any human aspirant, Odin is said to be maligned for he not only instructs and inspires, he also subjects the soul to the severe testing it must undergo before it can be admitted to the Hall of the Elect (Valhalla). Hence only the successful initiate recognizes Odin as Ropt.

Rulers, Divine The nations of antiquity, such as the Egyptians, Chaldeans, and Greeks, had traditions of early racial divine rulers and spiritual dynasties which preceded their human kings. In the later races, these rulers stood for the dynasties of the gods, rishis, pitris, manus, etc., who are said in theosophy to have incarnated themselves in the third root-race on this globe during our present round, and to be born again and again as spiritual teachers in succeeding cycles for the instruction of nations, among whom they appear from time to time.

Rupa(Sanskrit) ::: A word meaning "form," "image," "similitude," but this word is employed technically, andonly rarely in the popular sense in which it is commonly used in English. It signifies rather an atomic ormonadic aggregation about the central and indwelling consciousness, forming a vehicle or body thereof.Thus the rupa-lokas are lokas or worlds where the body-form or vehicle is very definitely outlined inmatter; whereas the arupa-lokas are worlds where the body-forms or "images" are outlined in a mannerwhich to us humans is much less definite. It should be noted that the word rupa applies with equal forceto the bodies or vehicles even of the gods, although these latter to us are purely subjective or arupa. (Seealso Loka)

Sacrifice The performance of sacred rites, but with the more restricted sense of ceremonies of invocation, communion, or propitiation between man and gods. Scholars, in studying these universal rites, are at a loss to find an essential significance by which to gather them all into one class, and as to which to include and which to exclude from such a class. Sacrifices may take the form of a meal offered to the gods or shared with them, an oblation of first fruits of the harvest or flocks, or a propitiation or act of atonement. The Romans dedicated a portion of food or a libation to the lares or other deities; the Hebrews offered the first fruits of the harvest or the yearlings of the flock. The word also has the meaning of an act of self-dedication for a noble cause.

Sadhya (Sanskrit) Sādhya [from the verbal root sādh to finish, complete, subdue, master] To be fulfilled, completed, attained; to be mastered, won, subdued. As a plural noun, a class of the gana-devatas (divine beings), specifically the jnana-devas (gods of wisdom). In the Satapatha-Brahmana of the Rig-Veda their world is said to be above the sphere of the gods, while Yaska (Nirukta 12:41) gives their locality as in Bhuvarloka. In The Laws of Manu (3:195), the sadhyas are represented as the offspring of the pitris called soma-sads who are offspring of Viraj; hence they are children of the lunar ancestors (pitris), evolved after the gods and possessing natures more fully unfolded; while in the Puranas they are the sons of Sadhya (a daughter of Daksha) and Dharma — hence called sadhyas — given variously as 12 or 17 in number. These various manners of describing the ancestry of the sadhyas originated in different ways of envisioning their origin. In later mythology they are superseded by the siddhas, the difference between sadhyas and siddhas being in many respects slight. Their mythological names are given as Manas, Mantri, Prana, Nara, Pana, Vinirbhaya, Naya, Dansa, Narayana, Vrisha, and Trabhu. Two of the names are two of the theosophic seven human principles — manas and prana; while Nara and Narayan, are other aspects of man, human or cosmic. Blavatsky terms the sadhyas divine sacrificers, “the most occult of all” the classes of the dhyanis (SD 2:605) — the reference being to the manasaputras, those intellectual beings who sacrificed themselves in order to quicken the fires of human intelligence during the third root-race. “The names of the deities of a certain mystic class change with every Manvantara” (SD 2:90); thus they are called ajitas, tushitas, satyas, haris, vaikuntas, adityas, and rudras. The key to the various names given to these higher beings lies in the composite nature of each one of them. In every manvantara and in each minor cycle of a manvantara, every being unfolds another aspect of itself, just as mankind unfolds new but latent powers and senses in each age. Special names were often given to each of the sevenfold, tenfold, or twelvefold aspects of these high beings.

Sakti(Sanskrit) ::: A term which may be briefly defined to mean one of what in modern Occultism are called theseven forces of nature, of which six are manifest and the seventh unmanifest, or only partly manifest.Sakti in general may be described as universal energy, and is, as it were, the feminine aspect of fohat. Inpopular Hinduism the various saktis are the wives or consorts of the gods, in other words, the energies oractive powers of the deities represented as feminine influences or energies.These anthropomorphic definitions are unfortunate, because misleading. The saktis of nature are reallythe veils, or sheaths, or vehicular carriers, through which work the inner and ever-active energies. Assubstance and energy, or force and matter, are fundamentally one, as modern science in its researches hasbegun to discover, it becomes apparent that even these saktis or sheaths or veils are themselves energic tolower spheres or realms through which they themselves work.The crown of the astral light, as H. P. Blavatsky puts it, is the generalized sakti of universal nature in so far as our solar system is concerned.

Sakti (Sanskrit) Śakti [from the verbal root sak to be powerful, energetic, have force] Universal energy, the feminine aspect of fohat; one of the seven forces of nature, of which six are manifest and the seventh partly manifest. It is energy that proceeds through itself, not being due to the active or conscious will of the one that produces it. Popularly, the wives or consorts of the gods — the energies or active powers of these deities represented as feminine influences.

Sakwala (Sinhalese, Cakkavāḷa in Pali) Gautama Buddha uttered this “word” (bana) in his oral instructions to denote “a solar system, of which there is an infinite number in the universe, and which denotes that space to which the light of every sun extends. Each Sakwala contains earths, hells and heavens (meaning good and bad spheres, our earth being considered as hell, in Occultism); attains its prime, then falls into decay and is finally destroyed at regularly recurring periods, in virtue of one immutable law. Upon the earth, the Master taught that there have been already four great ‘continents’ (the Land of the Gods, Lemuria, Atlantis, and the present ‘continent’ divided into five parts of the Secret Doctrine), and that three more have to appear. The former ‘did not communicate with each other,’ a sentence showing that Buddha was not speaking of the actual continents known in his day (for Patala or America was perfectly familiar to the ancient Hindus), but of the four geological formations of the earth, with their four distinct root-races which had already disappeared” (TG 285). See also SAHA

Sankhasura (Sanskrit) Śaṅkhāsura A daitya said in Hindu legend to have waged war against the gods and to have conquered them, upon which he stole the Vedas and hid them at the bottom of the sea, whence they were rescued by Vishnu in the form of a fish. There are also vague references in connection with one of the dvipas (Sankha-dvipa) and it is tempting to suppose that they are connected. Another Hindu legend mentions the killing of Sankhasura by Krishna — another instance of the way in which this avatara is placed in many different ages as the Krishna spirit in the world rather than as any incarnated avatara of that name: the death of Krishna is stated as having begun the kali yuga in 3102 BC, whereas Sankha-dvipa was one of the great islands of the Atlantean continental system of several million years ago.

Sarama (Sanskrit) Saramā [from the verbal root sṛ to run] The fleet one, the runner; the dog belonging to Indra and the gods, the divine watcher “over the golden flock of stars and solar rays.” She is the mother of the two dogs called Sarameyas. Some European etymologists connect the names of the Greek Hermes and Helena with Sarama or Sarameya. Sarama has certain elements of mystical similarity to Agathodaemon in Greek Gnosticism, and to the Egyptian Hermes-Anubis, one of the dogs (vigilance) which watch over the celestial flock (occult wisdom and its students) (cf SD 2:28).

Sarcophagus (Greek) Flesh-eating; limestone in Assus in the Troad had the property of consuming the bodies placed in coffins made of it, and so was called sarcophagos lithos (flesh-eating stone) or lapis Assius (stone of Assus), and the name came to be applied to stone coffins in general. A sarcophagus was placed in the adytum of a temple and mystically signified the matrix of nature and resurrection. In initiation ceremonies the candidate, representing the energizing ray, descended into the sarcophagus representing nature’s fecund womb, and emerged therefrom, which symbolized resurrection after death. In the King’s Chamber of the Great Pyramid, the candidate descended into the sarcophagus, where his body was entranced while his spiritual ego confabulated with the gods, descended into Amenti or the Underworld, and did works of charity to invisible beings; being carried during the night before the third day to the entrance of a gallery where the beams of the rising sun awoke him as an initiate.

Sastra-devatas (Sanskrit) Śastra-devatās [from śastra weapon + devatā celestial being, god] The gods of divine weapons; in the Mahabharata and Ramayana, the lords or conscious agents behind the mystical powers exercised by the great-souled heroes, rather than the weapons themselves. They are likewise in ancient Hindu conception the self-conscious, conscious, and quasi-conscious powers behind the forces of nature, especially those forces which can wreak injury or damage in the phenomenal world, such as earthquakes, tidal waves, storms of all kinds, and lightning.

Satya loka: In Hinduism and occult terminology, the world or plane of absolute purity and wisdom, the abode of the gods.

Sekhem (Egyptian) Sekhem. A shrine or sanctuary; the gods of the shrine; the vital power of a human being; any power, spiritual or physical; as a verb, to read, be strong, etc.

Serapis [from Greek Sarapis from Egyptian Ȧsȧr-Ḥāpi Osiris-Apis] The most important deity at Alexandria during the time of Ptolemy Soter, its worship spread throughout Egypt and into the Roman Empire, establishing itself firmly even in Rome. Plutarch recounts that Ptolemy Soter in his desire to make Alexandria the chief center of his empire, sought to unite Greeks and Egyptians in a common worship. He dreamed that a strange god appeared to him and, on telling his friends, one said that he had seen such a statue at Sinope. The king immediately imported this statue, the Greeks, declaring that it represented Pluto, ruler of the underworld, with his guardian dog Cerberus, while the Egyptians stated that it portrayed Asar-Hapi (Osiris in the underworld) with Anubis. Plutarch states that Osiris is the same as Sarapis, “this latter appellation having been given him, upon his being translated from the order of Genii to that of the Gods, Sarapis being none other than that common name by which all those are called, who have thus changed their nature, as is well known by those who are initiated into the mysteries of Osiris” (On Isis and Osiris, sec 28).

Shechinah is equivalent to Devamatri or Aditi — mother of the gods; to Vach; the music of the spheres of Pythagoras; and the Holy Ghost in the Christian Trinity. Shechinah is always regarded as feminine in the Qabbalah, “And so it is considered in the exoteric Puranas, for Shekinah is no more than Sakti — the female double or lining of any god, in such case. And so it was with the early Christians whose Holy Spirit, was feminine, as Sophia was with the Gnostics. But in the transcendental Chaldean Kabala or ‘Book of Numbers,’ ‘Shekinah’ is sexless, and the purest abstraction, a State, like Nirvana, not subject or object or anything except an absolute Presence.

Shen (Chinese) In Taoism, when employed in relation to yang, it refers to the celestial or spiritual, hence the gods; in relation to man it is generally translated soul. Yang is defined as a supreme, universal shen — living, creating, dividing itself into an infinite number of shen — depositing the shen in the various beings of the worlds. “The shen are omnipresent; it is they which perform the unfathomable work of the Yang and the Yin. These two vital breaths (of the universe) create the beings; their peregrinating hwun (or shen) are the causes of the changes (in nature), from which, accordingly, we may learn the actions and manners of the kwei and the shen” (I Ching, Hi-ts’ze 1).

Shinto (Japanese) [from shin god + to, tao way, path] The way of the gods; applied to the popular religion in Japan prior to Buddhism. Japan was considered to be the land of the gods — a conception current among nearly all ancient peoples, each one of which looked upon its own land as the land of the original divine incarnations — and the ruler (mikado) as the direct descendant and actual representative of the sun goddess (Tensho Daijin). Spiritual agencies were attributed to all the processes of nature, and a reverential feeling inculcated toward the dead. Hero worship took the direction in the prevalent belief that noble-minded warriors should be exalted nearly to the position of demigods.

Sibika or Sivika (Sanskrit) Śibikā, Śivikā The weapon of Kuvera, the Vedic god of wealth equivalent to the Greek Pluto; made out of the parts of the divine splendor of Vishnu, a sun god, and filed off by Visvakarman, the architect of the gods.

Sif (Icelandic) [plural sifjar affinity, kinship] Thor’s wife in Norse mythology; the singular form occurs only in the proper name of the goddess whose golden hair is the harvest, pride and joy of all the gods. Sif is guardian of the sanctity of marriage and the ancient law which forbade the union of any couple more closely related than through the fifth generation.

Silik-muludag (Akkad) The god among all the gods, offspring of the abstract divine wisdom — the great unseen divine, represented by the Akkadians as dwelling in the shoreless sea of space — cosmic spirit. In a more particular sense, referred to as the merciful guardian of humanity.

Siloam, The Sleep of [from Hebrew the verbal root shalam wholeness, completion, perfectness, peace, health] Used by one of the highest schools of initiates in Asia Minor, Syria, and upper Egypt for one of the processes of initiation. While the candidate was plunged in deep sleep, his spiritual ego was enabled to confabulate with the gods, descend into Hades, or perform works of divinely spiritual character. When the neophyte begins the holy sleep of Siloam, he leaves the body, and his consciousness enters into the river of Lethe, the pools of quiet, where the complete work or great work of inner understanding takes place. After this he is rendered whole or perfect, is completed and is safe, and is the master of the peace and quiet of inner unity — masterhood. The same holy event has been known in all times and among all peoples under various names.

Sin (Chaldean) The moon; also the Babylonian and Assyrian moon deity called Enzu (the lord of wisdom) and Nannar (the illuminer). The wisdom is that of the lower manas, the reflection of the higher, and this wisdom can all too often become the dark wisdom of evildoing and sorcery. Temples to Sin were erected in all the principal cities of the two empires, named E-gish-shir-gal (house of the great light). The worship of the moon deity predominated at Ur and Harran, and he was portrayed as an old man with flowing beard, having the crescent as his symbol and 30 as his number. Sin was known as father of the gods, creator of all things; and some of the ancient nations held that the moon was parent of the sun, and that the moon in its turn was once eons ago a sun itself.

Sisumara (Sanskrit) Śiśumāra [from śiśu child + māra killer] The child-killer; a group of stars and constellations said to resemble a dolphin, porpoise, or tortoise; held to be a form of Vishnu, and often considered as a representation of the great circle of time. As an imaginary belt, a symbolic representation of the celestial sphere, or a theoretical revolving zone or belt within which move the celestial bodies — which are the bodies of spiritual entities. This constellation has the “Cross placed on it by nature in its division and localisation of stars, planets and constellations. Thus in the Bhagavat Purana V., xxx., it is said that ‘at the extremity of the tail of that animal, whose head is directed toward the South and whose body is in the shape of a ring (Circle), Dhruva (the ex-pole star) is placed; and along that tail are the Prajapati, Agni, Indra, Dharma, etc.; and across its loins the Seven Rishis.’ This is then the first and earliest Cross and Circle, into the formation of which enters the Deity (symbolized by Vishnu), the Eternal Circle of Boundless Time, Kala, on whose plane lie crossways all the gods, creatures, and creations born in Space and Time; — who, as the philosophy has it, all die at the Mahapralaya” (SD 2:549).

Sisyphus The crafty; in Greek mythology, a son of Aeolus (the keeper of the winds), the most cunning of all men. He was punished in the underworld by being compelled to roll a heavy stone block up a hill, only upon reaching the summit to have it roll down again, where upon he repeats the processes endlessly. Some ancient authors say he had betrayed the Mysteries of the gods; so that one intent of the legend was to point out to the masses that betrayal of the secrets of initiation brings inevitable retribution. It also may illustrate the vanity of human ambitions, which flourish hopefully right up to the point of expected attainment, only to meet with disappointment; again it may refer to certain experiences of the disembodied relics of our personality, doomed to repeat vain acts until the energy which prompted them is worn out.

Skrymir and other giants exemplify also the gigantic forebears of our human race who inhabited the earth when forms were not yet coarse and weighty. Every mythic history contains references to giants: “in nearly every mythology — which after all is ancient history — the giants play an important part. In the old Norse mythology, the giants, Skrymir and his brethren, against whom the sons of the gods fought, were potent factors in the histories of deities and men” (SD 2:754).

Skrymir (Icelandic, Scandinavian) A Norse giant, also called Utgarda-Loki (Loki of the outermost court), representing the worlds of illusion (matter) in which the gods (consciousnesses) are misled. A well known tale relates how Thor, Loki, and Thor’s servant Tjalfi are subjected to a number of “eye-shines” (illusions) and ignominiously outperformed by the giants in a series of contests, all by means of deceptive appearances.

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"Soma is the Gandharva, the Lord of the hosts of delight, and guards the true seat of the Deva, the level or plane of the Ananda; gandharva itthâ padam asya rakshati. He is the Supreme, standing out from all other beings and over them, other than they and wonderful, adbhuta, and as the supreme and transcendent, present in the worlds but exceeding them, he protects in those worlds the births of the gods, pâti devânâm janimâni adbhutah. The ‘births of the gods" is a common phrase in the Veda by which is meant the manifestation of the divine principles in the cosmos and especially the formation of the godhead in its manifold forms in the human being.” The Secret of the Veda

“Soma is the Gandharva, the Lord of the hosts of delight, and guards the true seat of the Deva, the level or plane of the Ananda; gandharva itthâ padam asya rakshati. He is the Supreme, standing out from all other beings and over them, other than they and wonderful, adbhuta, and as the supreme and transcendent, present in the worlds but exceeding them, he protects in those worlds the births of the gods, pâti devânâm janimâni adbhutah. The ‘births of the gods’ is a common phrase in the Veda by which is meant the manifestation of the divine principles in the cosmos and especially the formation of the godhead in its manifold forms in the human being.” The Secret of the Veda

“Soma is the Gandharva, the Lord of the hosts of delight, and guards the true seat of the Deva, the level or plane of the Ananda; gandharvaitthâpadamasyarakshati. He is the Supreme, standing out from all other beings and over them, other than they and wonderful, adbhuta, and as the supreme and transcendent, present in the worlds but exceeding them, he protects in those worlds the births of the gods, pâtidevânâmjanimâniadbhutah. The ‘births of the gods’ is a common phrase in the Veda by which is meant the manifestation of the divine principles in the cosmos and especially the formation of the godhead in its manifold forms in the human being.” The Secret of the Veda

  “Soma was never given in days of old to the non-initiated Brahman — the simple Grihasta, or priest of the exoteric ritual. Thus Brihaspati — ‘guru of the gods’ though he was — still represented the dead-letter form of worship. It is Tara his wife — the symbol of one who, though wedded to dogmatic worship, longs for true wisdom — who is shown as initiated into his mysteries by King Soma, the giver of that Wisdom. Soma is thus made in the allegory to carry her away. The result of this is the birth of Budha — esoteric Wisdom — (Mercury, or Hermes in Greece and Egypt). He is represented as ‘so beautiful,’ that even the husband, though well aware that Budha is not the progeny of his dead-letter worship — claims the ‘new-born’ as his Son, the fruit of his ritualistic and meaningless forms. Such is, in brief, one of the meanings of the allegory” (SD 2:498-9).

  “Soma was never given in days of old to the non-initiated Brahman — the simple Grihasta, or priest of the exoteric ritual. Thus Brihaspati — ‘guru of the gods’ though he was — still represented the dead-letter form of worship. It is Tara his wife — the symbol of one who, though wedded to dogmatic worship, longs for true wisdom — who is shown as initiated into his mysteries by King Soma, the giver of that Wisdom. Soma is thus made in the allegory to carry her away. The result of this is the birth of Budha — esoteric Wisdom — (Mercury, or Hermes in Greece and Egypt.) He is represented as ‘so beautiful,’ that even the husband, though well aware that Budha is not the progeny of his dead-letter worship — claims the ‘new-born’ as his Son, the fruit of this ritualistic and meaningless forms. Such is, in brief, one of the meanings of the allegory” (SD 2:498-9).

stubh ::: the rhythm that affirms the gods; the Word considered as a power which affirms and confirms in the settled rhythm of things. [Ved.]

Suchi (Sanskrit) Śuci White, purified, resplendent; one of the three personified fires, whether in the kosmos or man, a son of Agni-abhimani and Svaha. Agni-Abhimani, his three sons — Pavaka, Pavamana, and Suchi — and their 45 sons, constitute the mystic 49 fires of occultism. Suchi, the solar fire or saurya [from surya the sun], is the parent to Havyavahana, the fire of the gods. Also a name of Indra. See also ABHIMANI

Suddhasattva (Sanskrit) Śuddhasattva [from śuddha pure + sattva goodness] Pure goodness, reality per se; a state of conscious spiritual egoity or egoship, and at the same time pure spiritual essence. Considered from the substance viewpoint, it is a supermaterial or ultramaterial essence or substance which to us is invisible, yet on its own plane luminous if not indeed light itself. Of this stuff or essence the bodies of the highest dhyanis and the gods are formed. It is spiritual substance without adulteration of the differentiated matters of the lower cosmic planes.

sudha ::: nectar or amrta; the food or drink of the gods.

Sudha (Sanskrit) Sudhā Welfare; the food and beverage of the gods, skin to amrita, the substance which gives immortality; equivalent to the ambrosia and nectar of ancient Greece.

Sunahsepha (Sanskrit) Śunaḥśepha In ancient Hindu legend, for instance in the Ramayana, the son of the sage Richika, corresponding in some ways with the Hebrew Isaac. His father “sold him for one hundred cows to King Ambarisha, for a sacrifice and ‘burnt offering’ to Varuna, as a substitute for the kings’ son Rohita, devoted by his father to the god. When already stretched on the altar Sunasepha is saved by Rishi Visvamitra, who calls upon his own hundred sons to take the place of victim, and upon their refusal degrades them to the condition of Chandalas. After which the Sage teaches the victim a mantram the repetition of which brings the gods to his rescue; he then adopts Sunasepha for his elder son” (TG 313).

Supramental Creation ::: Characteristically the old world, the creation of what Sri Aurobindo calls the Overmind, was an age of the gods, and consequently the age of religions. As I said, the flower of human effort towards what is above it gave rise to innumerable religious forms, to a religious relationship between the noble souls and the invisible world.And now, all these old things seem so old, so out-of-date, so arbitrary — such a travesty of the real truth. In the supramental creation there will no longer be any religions.The whole life will be the expression, the flowering into forms of the divine Unity manifesting in the world.
   Ref: CWM Vol.09, Page: 151


Surabhi (Sanskrit) Surabhi Sweetly-smelling, lovely, charming; a name for the earth, also for the mystical cow of plenty, Kamaduh, one of the 14 precious things yielded by the ocean of milk (space) when churned by the gods to produce the worlds. Among other meanings in all ancient lands, both bull and cow were emblems of the moon and of its manifold generative and productive influences.

Surarani (Sanskrit) Surāraṇi [from sura god, divinity + araṇi the disk in which fire is kindled] The matrix of the gods; applied to Aditi, the mother of the gods. A somewhat similar term, Suravani [from avani the earth, whether as the cosmic element or our grossly material globe] is applied to the earth as the mother of the gods or Aditi. The term sura, equivalent to deva, shows that these beings are in intimate connection with Surya (the sun), and thus are solar entities.

Surt (Scandinavian) Surtr (Icelandic) [from svartr the black] Also Surtur, Surter. A Norse fire giant, the world-destroyer in the Edda. In the Norse myths Surt will lead the hosts of Muspellsheim (home of fire) at Ragnarok, when the gods depart the realms of life, and the worlds perish in universal conflagration. Surt himself will slay Frey, the bright god, and when all the combatants are slain, Surt will fling his firebrand, and everything animate or inanimate will be plunged into an ocean of fire, and the nine homes will be no more. Surtarlogi (flame of Surt) represents the volcanic and cosmic forces which will cause the destruction of our world when its life is over. The world, universe, or solar system becoming an ocean of cosmic flame or light refers to the ending of a manvantara and the opening of pralaya. The ocean of fire is the passing of matter back into its primordial fiery spiritual nature and the nine homes are the nine or ten cosmic planes, the nine grades or divisions of the cosmic hierarchy.

Suttung, Suttungr (Icelandic) In the Norse Edda, a giant who guards the mead (of experience) in the depths of matter, where the gods must find it and raise it to higher levels. Odin is said to have enlisted the aid of a squirrel or bore to penetrate the mountain in which the mead was hidden, and to have entered through the borehole in the guise of a serpent. Once in, he seduced Suttung’s daughter into giving him a draft of the precious mead.

Svaha (Sanskrit) Svāhā [from su good, excellent, virtuous + the verbal root ah to speak, say] One of the daughters of Daksha and consort of Agni; also an exclamation used in making oblations to the gods, meaning Hail! May a blessing rest on! or So be it!

Svarloka (Sanskrit) Svarloka [from svar heaven + loka world, place] Heaven-world; the fifth counting downwards of the seven lokas. The corresponding tala and nether pole is talatala. Svarloka is also exoterically said to be a paradise situated on Mount Meru, the abode of Brahma and Vishnu, and the Hindu Olympus, “described geographically as ‘passing through the middle of the earth-globe, and protruding on either side.’ On its upper station are the gods, on the nether (or South pole) is the abode of the demons (hells)” (SD 2:404). The sphere of influence of svarloka is said to reach to the pole star. See also JANARLOKA

taliscd vita], middle vital and lower vital planes) who arc in opposition to the Gods, the Powers of Light. These too arc

Tantra(s)(Sanskrit) ::: A word literally meaning a "loom" or the warp or threads in a loom, and, by extension ofmeaning, signifying a rule or ritual for ceremonial rites. The Hindu Tantras are numerous works orreligious treatises teaching mystical and magical formulae or formularies for the attainment of magical orquasi-magical powers, and for the worship of the gods. They are mostly composed in the form of dialogsbetween Siva and his divine consort Durga, these two divinities being the peculiar objects of theadoration of the Tantrins.In many parts of India the authority of the Tantras seems almost to have superseded the clean andpoetical hymns of the Vedas.Most tantric works are supposed to contain five different subjects: (1) the manifestation or evolution ofthe universe; (2) its destruction; (3) the worship or adoration of the divinities; (4) the achievement orattainment of desired objects and especially of six superhuman faculties; (5) modes or methods of union,usually enumerated as four, with the supreme divinity of the kosmos by means of contemplativemeditation.Unfortunately, while there is much of interest in the tantric works, their tendency for long ages has beendistinctly towards what in occultism is known as sorcery or black magic. Some of the rites or ceremoniespracticed have to do with revolting details connected with sex.Durga, the consort of Siva, his sakti or energy, is worshiped by the Tantrins as a distinct personifiedfemale power.The origin of the Tantras unquestionably goes back to a very remote antiquity, and there seems to belittle doubt that these works, or their originals, were heirlooms handed down from originally debased ordegenerate Atlantean racial offshoots. There is, of course, a certain amount of profoundly philosophicaland mystical thought running through the more important tantric works, but the tantric worship in manycases is highly licentious and immoral.

Tantras (Sanskrit) Tantra-s Loom, the warp or threads in a loom; a rule or ritual for ceremonial rites. Religious treatises teaching mystical and magical formulas for the attainment of magical powers, and for the worship of the gods; treating of the evolution of the universe and its destruction; the adoration of the divinities; the attainment of desired objects, especially of six superhuman faculties; and methods of union (usually given as four) with the supreme divinity by contemplative meditation. They are mostly composed in the form of dialogues between Siva and his divine consort or sakti Durga, who is worshiped as a personified female power.

Tantra: That body of Hindu religious literature which is stated to have been revealed by Shiva as the specific scripture of the Kali Yuga (the present age). The Tantras were the encyclopedias of esoteric knowledge of their time; the topics of a Tantra are: the creation of the universe, worship of the gods, spiritual exercise, rituals, the six magical powers, and meditation.

Tara-daitya (Sanskrit) Tāra-daitya A daitya or danava described in the Puranas as practicing such severe spiritual and intellectual tapas as a yogi, that the gods feared lest he surpass them; therefore he was slain by Vishnu.

Tarakajit (Sanskrit) Tārakajit Conqueror of Taraka, name given to the Hindu god of war, Karttikeya, because he conquered Taraka, a daitya whose austerities had made him formidable to the gods — the daityas being those early beings or races who, because of their developing intellectual powers, were found to be identical with the asuras, who were opposed to the more or less passive spiritual forces — devas or suras. In another sense, because of this developing intellectuality, the daityas, somewhat like the Greek titans or giants, were the opponents of the gods of mere ritualistic or scholastic theory, and hence the enemies of puja (ritualistic sacrifices).

Tarakamaya, Taramaya (Sanskrit) Tārakāmaya, Tārāmaya The war in heaven; the struggle between the gods and the asuras for the rescue of Tara or Taraka, the wife of Brihaspati, who had been carried off by Soma. This war may be interpreted in many ways. Spiritually, the gods with Brihaspati as their head represented ritualistic, ceremonial, and exoteric worship, and the asuras were the allies of Soma who was the parent of esoteric wisdom (SD 2:498-9). See also TARA

Taraka (Sanskrit) Tāraka The daitya or giant-demon whose yoga austerities were so extraordinary that he had obtained all the divine knowledge of yoga-vidya and occult powers. The gods feared his superhuman powers and Skanda or Karttikeya, the god of war, was miraculously born to destroy him.

Tara’s abduction gave rise to the Tarakamaya — the first war in heaven. The earth was shaken to its very center and turned to Brahma requesting him to restore Tara to her husband, which request was granted. Soma had for his allies the Daityas and Danavas, whose leader is Usanas (Venus) and Rudra (Siva), while the gods who sided with Brihaspati were led by Indra.

Tara, Taraka (Sanskrit) Tārā, Tārakā The wife of Brihaspati (Jupiter). The Puranas relate that Soma, the moon, carried Tara off with him, which brought about the great war in heaven between the gods and the asuras. Brahma put an end to the war and had Tara restored to Brihaspati. She then gave birth to a son, Budha (esoteric wisdom), whom she claimed was the son of Soma.

Tehmi: “The hour just before dawn. The Gods awake with the dawn in the Veda. The Gods are called ‘Ushabuddha, ‘those who awake with the dawn’. All the gods are sons of light except Agni who burns also in the light and the darkness.”

Telchines (Greek) [from thelgo to enchant] A race of ethereal or semi-ethereal beings or genii, said in one legend to be descended from Poseidon, god of the sea — supposed to have lived especially in Crete, Cyprus, and Rhodes. They are represented as cultivators of the soil and ministers to the gods; as sorcerers and envious demons; and as teachers of metallurgy and other useful arts to mankind. They are in one aspect the kabeiroi and titans, in another the Atlanteans. The telchines have been connected mystically because of similar attributes with the Latin Vulcan and even with the Hebrew Tubal-cain.

Thalatth, Thallath (Chaldean) Thalassa (Greek) Sea, ocean; mystically the great generative principle of the spatial deeps. Thallath was the sea, personified as a goddess in the cosmogony of Berosus; used as one of the names of the great deep or abyss, Tiamat, or Chaos. It could breed only monsters, but was destroyed by Belus, and then the gods created heaven and earth. The reference is to the mystical waters of space, or the more concrete aspect of space itself, as the great source or womb of cosmic manifestation, out of which all things come and into which at the end of the cosmic manvantara all things again return. The moon is connected in its cosmogonical function with the waters of space.

  “The ancients believed in the power of man by magic practices to command the services of the gods: which gods, are in truth, but the occult powers or potencies of Nature, personified by the learned priests themselves, in which they reverenced only the attributes of the one unknown and nameless Principle. As Proclus the Platonist ably puts it: ‘Ancient priests, when they considered that there is a certain alliance and sympathy in natural things to each other, and of things manifest to occult powers, and discovered that all things subsist in all, fabricated a sacred science from this mutual sympathy and similarity. . . . and applied for occult purposes, both celestial and terrene natures, by means of which, through a certain similitude, they deduced divine virtues into this inferior abode.’ Magic is the science of communicating with and directing supernal, supramundane Potencies, as well as of commanding those of the lower spheres; a practical knowledge of the hidden mysteries of nature known to only the few, because they are so difficult to acquire, without falling into sins against nature” (TG 197).

"The animal is satisfied with a modicum of necessity; the gods are content with their splendours. But man cannot rest permanently until he reaches some highest good. He is the greatest of living beings because he is the most discontented, because he feels most the pressure of limitations. He alone, perhaps, is capable of being seized by the divine frenzy for a remote ideal.” The Life Divine

“The animal is satisfied with a modicum of necessity; the gods are content with their splendours. But man cannot rest permanently until he reaches some highest good. He is the greatest of living beings because he is the most discontented, because he feels most the pressure of limitations. He alone, perhaps, is capable of being seized by the divine frenzy for a remote ideal.” The Life Divine

The Apsaras then are the divine Hetairae of Paradise, beautiful singers and actresses whose beauty and art relieve the arduous and world-long struggle of the Gods against the forces that tend towards disruption by the Titans who would restore Matter to its original atomic condition or of dissolution by the sages and hermits who would make phenomena dissolve prematurely into the One who is above phenomena. They rose from the Ocean, says Valmiki, seeking who should choose them as brides, but neither the Gods nor the Titans accepted them, therefore are they said to be common or universal. The Harmony of Virtue

The arani (dual) represent the father and mother elements in nature, the creative, generative energy producing the offspring from the receiver, the mother. While the male/female metaphor has application physiologically, it may be interpreted cosmically: “this idea of the creative power of fire is explained at once by the ancient assimilation of the human soul to a celestial spark” (M. G. Dech 261); again “The ‘female Arani,’ the mistress of the race, is Aditi, the mother of the gods, or Shekinah, eternal light — in the world of Spirit, the ‘Great Deep’ and Chaos; or primordial Substance in its first remove from the Unknown, in the manifested Kosmos” (SD 2:527).

The Babylonian hero-creator is Marduk, whose prowess against the monstrous forces of Tiamat (matter) caused the gods to endow him with the power to overcome them and to complete the creation of heaven and earth.

The deceased, entering the domain as a khu, performs the same activities that he did on earth: plowing, reaping, sailing his boat, and making love. On entering Amenti, Anubis conducts the soul to the hall of Osiris where it is judged by the 42 judges and its heart is weighed against the feather of truth. If the soul passes the test, it goes to the fields of Aalu. If the names of the 15 Aats, the 7 Arrets (circles), the 21 Pylons, as well as the gods and guardians of these domains are all known, the deceased is enabled to pass from one mansion to the other, and finally to enter the Night Boat of the Sun, which passes through the Tuat on its way to arise in the heavens. The shades who miss this boat, the unprogressed egos, must remain in the afterworld or kama-loka, while those who enter the boat are carried to the heaven world or devachan where they wander about until they return to earth for rebirth. This refers to the passing from world to world by the ego proficient in knowledge of the “names,” and thereafter entering the secret or invisible pathways to the sun. The knowledge of the names indicates spiritual, intellectual, and psychic development, by which the ego of the defunct is no longer attracted to the lower spheres, but having knowledge of them correctly answers the challenges and thereafter follows the attraction upwards and onwards.

The Edda’s frost giants should not be confused with the giants and their daughter giantesses, or giant maidens, which represent periods of life and activity. The gods are energic consciousnesses (monads) at all-varying stages of evolution; the giants are their physical expressions or forms, whose lifetimes, however long, are limited. The giants’ daughters represent lesser life periods, several daughter races together comprising their father-race.

The Egyptian god Tem is connected by Blavatsky with fohat, for Tem is “spoken of as the Protean god who generates other gods and gives himself the form he likes; the ‘master of life’ ‘giving their vigour to the gods’ (chapter lxxiv.) He is the overseer of the gods, and he ‘who creates spirits and gives them shape and life’; he is ‘the north wind and the spirit of the west’; and finally the ‘Setting Sun of Life,’ or the vital electric force that leaves the body at death, wherefore the defunct begs that Toum [Tem] should give him the breath from his right nostril (positive electricity) that he might live in his second form” (SD 1:673-4).

The end of the world is vividly portrayed in the foremost poem of the Elder Edda, Voluspa, which depicts horrors presaging the departure of the gods from this sphere of life. However, this is by no means the end for it is followed by a new creation, when a reborn earth is seen arising in serene beauty and contentment.

:::   "The Gods are Personalities and Powers of the dynamic Divine.” *Letters on Yoga

“The Gods are Personalities and Powers of the dynamic Divine.” Letters on Yoga

The Gods are Personalities and Powers of the dynamic

"The Gods are the great undying Powers and immortal Personalities who consciously inform, constitute, preside over the subjective and objective forces of the cosmos.” Essays on the Gita

“The Gods are the great undying Powers and immortal Personalities who consciously inform, constitute, preside over the subjective and objective forces of the cosmos.” Essays on the Gita

The gods are the great undying Powers and immortal Personalities who consciously inform, constitute, preside over the subjective and objective forces of the cosmos.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 19, Page: 346


"The gods are the powers of Light, the children of Infinity, forms and personalities of the one Godhead who by their help and by their growth and human workings in man raise him to the truth and the immortality.” The Secret of the Veda

“The gods are the powers of Light, the children of Infinity, forms and personalities of the one Godhead who by their help and by their growth and human workings in man raise him to the truth and the immortality.” The Secret of the Veda

::: "The Gods, as has already been said, are in origin and essence permanent Emanations of the Divine put forth from the Supreme by the Transcendent Mother, the Adya Shakti; in their cosmic action they are Powers and Personalities of the Divine each with his independent cosmic standing, function and work in the universe. They are not impersonal entities but cosmic Personalities, although they can and do ordinarily veil themselves behind the movement of impersonal forces.” Letters on Yoga

“The Gods, as has already been said, are in origin and essence permanent Emanations of the Divine put forth from the Supreme by the Transcendent Mother, the Adya Shakti; in their cosmic action they are Powers and Personalities of the Divine each with his independent cosmic standing, function and work in the universe. They are not impersonal entities but cosmic Personalities, although they can and do ordinarily veil themselves behind the movement of impersonal forces.” Letters on Yoga

The Gods cannot be transformed, for they are typal and not evolutionary beings, they can come for conversion, that is to say, to ^ve up their own ideas and outlook on things and con- form themselves to the higher Will and Supramcntal Truth of the Divine.

The gods in (he ovcrmcntal plane have not many heads and arms ; this is a vital symbolism, it is not necessary in other planes.

"The Gods, who in their highest secret entity are powers of this Supermind, born of it, seated in it as in their proper home, are in their knowledge truth-conscious'' and in their action possessed of theseer-will"".” The Life Divine

“The Gods, who in their highest secret entity are powers of this Supermind, born of it, seated in it as in their proper home, are in their knowledge truth-conscious’’ and in their action possessed of theseer-will’’.” The Life Divine

The golden hawk was often identified with the bennu (the Egyptian phoenix), and there was also the hawk of the gods itself which was regarded as an offspring of the god Tem and associated with Horus in his aspect of the son of Osiris.

The Hindu rishi Narada, representing one of the most recondite and still living spiritual influences on earth, is said to have descended in bygone times into the regions of Patala, and to have been delighted with what he found there. On his return to the celestial regions, he gave to the gods a glowing account of the beauties of the hells, stating that they abounded in everything ministering to luxury and sensuous delight. For precisely these reasons, Patala as the lowest of the talas, has been called the infernal regions or hell. To beings evolving in the spheres of matter, these spheres are extremely pleasant despite the pain and suffering that invariably accompany sojourn in all astral spheres, which the talas are. What the evolving entities lose in spiritual power, intellectual bliss, and higher faculty, is compensated for by the attachments and bonds of a sensuous character, tying them temporarily to these realms.

The language of incantations or mantras is the element-language composed of sounds, numbers, and figures. He who knows how to blend the three will call forth the response from the regent-god of the specific element needed. For, in order to communicate with the gods, men must learn to address each one of them in the language of his element. Sound is “the most potent and effectual magic agent, and the first of the keys which opens the door of communication between Mortals and the Immortals” (SD 1:464).

The later Atlanteans were noted for their magic powers, wickedness, and defiance of the gods, and this tradition is preserved in many legends, such as the Biblical Tower of Babel, which derived from still older Chaldean scriptures. The legendary stories of wicked antediluvian giants warring against heaven are common in every mythology. The defeat of the giants, in some at least of these legends, results in the confusion of tongues — the break-up and dispersal of a great racial division of mankind.

The mystical drink has been known in all ages and among all peoples. The ancient Teutonic tribes, whether of the Germanic or Anglo-Saxons, spoke of their divine mead, the drink of the gods. The Hindus spoke of Soma, the direct distillation from the moon and from the overseeing and guiding eye of the sun; the Greeks of the Homeric age spoke of ambrosia or nectar, a drink of the gods which renewed their understanding and gave them inspiration as well. Another branch of the Greeks belonging to the Dionysian and Orphic branches of mystical thought, spoke equally mystically of the mystic wine, and also of the mystic cereal, partaken of during the Mysteries, and it is from this last that the mystical wine and cereal or bread of the Christians was taken over almost completely from the Dionysian Eucharist, only among Christians even from quite early times it became degraded into actual blood and flesh of Jesus.

theogony ::: n. --> The generation or genealogy of the gods; that branch of heathen theology which deals with the origin and descent of the deities; also, a poem treating of such genealogies; as, the Theogony of Hesiod.

The old Greeks said that a divine fluid or ichor ran in the veins of the gods. It is also our physical destiny in the far distant future to evolve into bodies without blood as we understand it, in which nobler currents of conscious life will circulate.

theomachist ::: n. --> One who fights against the gods; one who resists God of the divine will.

Theomachy: Battle against the gods; opposition to the divine will.

Theomachy [from Greek theomachia] Fighting against the gods, as the titans did; or a battle among the gods, as occurs in Homer.

Theomachy: (Gr. theoi, machein, battle against the gods), a term implying opposition to the divine will. -- K.F.L.

theomachy ::: n. --> A fighting against the gods, as the battle of the gaints with the gods.
A battle or strife among the gods.
Opposition to God or the divine will.


The opening words of the Bible refer directly to the activities of the ’elohim, for this is the sole divine name mentioned in Genesis 1:1-2. De Purucker translates these verses from the original Hebrew as: “In a host (or multitude), the gods (Elohim) formed themselves into the heavens and the earth. And the earth became ethereal. And darkness upon the face of the ethers. And the ruah (the spirit-soul) of the gods (of Elohim) fluttered or hovered, brooding” (cf Fund 99-100). He goes on to say that “we see that the Elohim evolved man, humanity, out of themselves, and told them to become, then to enter into and inform these other creatures. Indeed, these sons of the Elohim are, in our teachings, the children of light, the sons of light, which are we ourselves, and yet different from ourselves, because higher, yet they are our own very selves inwardly. In fact, the Elohim, became, evolved into, their own offspring, remaining in a sense still always the inspiring light within, or rather above . . . the Elohim projected themselves into the nascent forms of the then ‘humanity,’ which thenceforward were ‘men,’ however imperfect their development still was” (Fund 101-2).

Theophany [from Greek theophaneia from theos god + phainesthai to appear] The appearance of a god; a degree in the ancient Mysteries, where the candidate was illumined by his own inner god, and differing from epiphany in being of a more lasting nature. In Christian ecclesiasticism, used for the incarnation of the Christos. In the outer or Lesser Mysteries it meant the showing of representations of the gods to the people — as at the festivals held at Delphi. See also THEOPATHY; THEOPNEUSTY

The original from which the Hebrew Genesis was later compiled is lost. Yet even as the latter has reached us — first veiled, then probably remodeled by Ezra with shiftings that confuse the chronology — despite important words and clauses mistranslated by European scholars, its resemblance to the esoteric account is unmistakable. For Jehovah, who gave the human body and (physical) breath of life, is the hyparxis of Saturn and an earthly, not a celestial, hierarchy. The human mind and spirit are essentially emanations from the immortal spiritual monad coeval with the universe, and subsequent human evolutionary development was both from and aided by the elohim, a spiritual host. Adam and Eve, once mind appeared in them, enter the path of self-directed evolution, a reference to the second and third Eves mentioned above. The eating of the fruit of the tree is the awakening or lighting of mind in man. It shows Eve as consorting with spiritual, not demoniacal, forces and incidentally reconciles the two creation stories. Like the serpent, the tree is an ancient and universal symbol of sacred and esoteric knowledge. To eat of its fruit is to acquire the knowledge that only the gods possess, and the possession confers immortality under the law.

Theosophy or the wisdom-religion is the study of the ancient wisdom of the gods, and comprises in any one period that particular portion of knowledge which has been delivered to those who study it; whereas occultism in any age is that portion of the ancient wisdom dealing with matters which at such time are secret, hid, and unknown to the multitude. Thus occultism is that portion of theosophy which has not yet been openly and publicly promulgated. Occultism is founded on the principle that Divinity is concealed — transcendent yet immanent — within every living being. As a spiritual discipline occultism is the renunciation of selfishness; it is the “still small path” which leads to wisdom, to the right discrimination between good and evil, and the practice of altruism.

The overmind is the region of the gods, the beings of divine origin who have been charged with supervising, directing and organising the evolution of the universe; and more specifically, since the formation of the earth they have served as messengers and intermediaries to bring to the earth the aid of the higher regions and to preside over the formation of the mind and its progressive ascension. It is usually to the gods of the overmind that the prayers of the various religions are addressed. These religions most often choose, for various reasons, one of these gods and transform him for their personal use into the supreme God.

The overmind is the world of the gods.

  “The partaker of Soma finds himself both linked to his external body, and yet away from it in his spiritual form. The latter, freed from the former, soars for the time being in the ethereal higher regions, becoming virtually ‘as one of the gods,’ and yet preserving in his physical brain the memory of what he sees and learns. Plainly speaking, Soma is the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge forbidden by the jealous Elohim to Adam and Eve or Yah-ve, ‘lest Man should become as one of us’ ” (SD 2:498-9&n).

The primeval human deity worship degenerated during the fourth root-race (the Atlantean), the ideal at first becoming confused with the form, and the latter finally almost superseding the spirit — thus in the relatively complete materialization of idea into form, the later Atlanteans in time began to worship themselves, what was to them the powers of nature appearing through themselves as human beings; the degeneration of the ideal proceeding so far that ultimately the worst kind of idol worship became relatively universal, except for the seed of the newer and somewhat higher mankind of the fifth root-race then beginning. “The moderns are satisfied with worshipping the male heroes of the Fourth race, who created gods after their own sexual image, whereas the gods of primeval mankind were ‘male and female,’ ” i.e., hermaphrodite (SD 2:135). See also DEITY

There is an automatic phase of free will in the purposeful instinct which marks the various activities of even minute and lowly forms of life. The unself-conscious beasts are protected, and therefore guided, by the wills of celestial beings who make the so-called laws of nature, yet even the beasts instinctively choose to run true to their own inner types or svabhava. They unconsciously will to be themselves and to copy no other. They have free will exactly in proportion to their consciousness, just as any person has it in the higher degrees of his intelligence and more active intuition. Thus human beings have the power to work out their evolution, for the kingdom of heaven is taken by strength. The gods have gone ahead on the pathway towards omniscience — so far as our universe is concerned — by their own individual efforts consciously to act with an ever-enlarging measure of harmony with the one divine will. Thus the volume or power of free will is in strict proportion with the degree in which the entity has brought forth the central spark of divine willing fire which animates all that is. Nevertheless no single being or entity has completely unfettered and perfectly irresponsible free will, because of its relative imperfection and because of its inescapable subordination to greater wills, each such entity ever evolving from its stage of imperfection as it ascends along the scales of being: those on the higher rungs of the hierarchical ladder consciously willing in ever-enlarging degree to follow the greater divine will which holds all in its keeping.

There is only one psychic being for each human being, but the beings of the higher planes, eg. the Gods of the Overmind can manifest in more than one human body at a time by send- ing different emanations into different bodies.

The sagas depict Thor as blunt, hot-tempered, without fraud or guile, of few words and ready blows. His chariot, drawn by the two goats Toothcrusher and Toothgnasher, has an iron whiffletree, and sparks fly from its wheels and from the goats’ hooves. Thor’s fiery eyes color the scarlet clouds, his beard is red, on his brow he wears a crown of stars, and under his feet rests the earth whose defender he is. His chariot cannot cross the rainbow bridge, Bifrost, for its lightnings would set the bridge on fire, so the god daily fords the river beneath it when he attends the Thing (parliament) of the gods.

The Sama-Veda is mystically described as having come forth from or been inspired by the sun. It is said by Hindu Vedic specialists to have reference to the pitris (ancestors), while the Rig-Veda has the gods as its object, and the Yajur-Veda men as its object.

“These advanced entities are otherwise known as the Solar Lhas, as the Tibetans call them, the solar spirits, who were the men of a former kalpa, and who during the third Root-race thus sacrifice themselves in order to give us intellectual light — incarnating in those senseless psycho-physical shells in order to awaken the divine flame of egoity and self-consciousness in the sleeping egos which we then were. They are ourselves because belonging to the same spirit-ray that we do; yet we, more strictly speaking, were those half-unconscious, half-awakened egos whom they touched with the divine fire of their own being. This, our ‘awakening,’ was called by H. P. Blavatsky, the incarnation of the Manasaputras, or the Sons of Mind or Light. Had that incarnation not taken place, we indeed should have continued our evolution by merely ‘natural’ causes, but it would have been slow almost beyond comprehension, almost interminable; but that act of self-sacrifice, through their immense pity, their immense love, though, indeed, acting under Karmic impulse, awakened the divine fire in our own selves, gave us light and comprehension and understanding; and from that time we ourselves became ‘Sons of the Gods,’ the faculty of self-consciousness in us was awakened, our eyes were opened, responsibility became ours; and our feet were set then definitely upon the path, that inner path, quiet, wonderful, leading us inwards back to our spiritual home. . . .

These stories refer in part to an actual great deluge in the world’s history, mainly to the sinking of the great and smaller islands of the Atlantean continental stretches. In many if not all the versions, we find that a race had become so corrupt that nature or the gods would no longer tolerate it, and destroyed it and brought forth a new race. There is usually a type-figure, like the Hebrew Noah, who builds an ark or other vessel of salvation, thus saving from the waters the righteous few to be the seeds of the new race. In many versions are traditions of the destruction of the preceding root-race, Atlantis, by water, and of the saving of various groups of human remnants to found new civilizations on lands, then or shortly later geologically speaking, emerging from the ocean. But besides the particular application to this latest cataclysm in the earth’s history, the story refers to cataclysms in general, to the death of old races and the birth of new ones. The evolution of the earth goes on pari passu with that of the beings upon it. These stories are evidently allegorical as well, with reference to cosmological facts. See also ARK

The shield or protection of Ullr has a special meaning as he is the god of a “cold” (unformed) world: one of the most highly spiritual of the globes in our sun’s realm. The lay called Grimnismal promises that “the blessing of Ull and all the gods is his who first touches the fire” of this supernal sphere. The mansion of Ullr is named Ydalar — the primal dells of rain and storms, and the root and sacred source of earth’s existence.

Theurgy (Greek) theurgia [from theos god + ergon work] Mystery-term popularized by Iamblichus for a method of individual communion with the gods, or bringing the gods down to earth. It consisted in purifying the psycho-astral links between the mind and its divine counterpart, whereby the theurgist was not only brought into conscious communion with his own higher self, but also with other divine entities. The first school in the Christian period

theurgy ::: n. --> A divine work; a miracle; hence, magic; sorcery.
A kind of magical science or art developed in Alexandria among the Neoplatonists, and supposed to enable man to influence the will of the gods by means of purification and other sacramental rites.
In later or modern magic, that species of magic in which effects are claimed to be produced by supernatural agency, in distinction from natural magic.


The use of drugs in initiatory ceremonies of any kind, however, is a relatively late and degenerate practice, and has never at any time been, nor will it ever be, introduced by the Mother-Lodge coming down to us even from the middle of the third root-race. With it the old tradition burns more brightly than ever that the true soma, the true mead of the gods or wine of the spirit, is the raising of the human into the spiritual by aspiration, training, and strict following of the traditional laws of discipleship, so that finally the neophyte feels the sunlight from above stealing through the moon of his mind.

  “This Hindu sacred beverage answers to the Greek Ambrosia or nectar, drunk by the gods of Olympus. A cup of kykeon was also quaffed by the mysta at the Eleusinian initiation. He who drinks it easily reaches Brahma, or the place of splendor (Heaven). The soma-drink known to Europeans is not the genuine beverage, but its substitute; for the initiated priests alone can taste of the real soma; and even kings and rajas, when sacrificing, receive the substitute. . . . We were positively informed that the majority of the sacrificial priests of the Dekkan have lost the secret of the true soma. It can be found neither in the ritual books nor through oral information. The true followers of the primitive Vedic religion are very few; these are the alleged descendants from the Rishis, the real Agnihotris, the initiates of the great Mysteries. The soma-drink is also commemorated in the Hindu Pantheon, for it is called King-Soma. He who drinks of it is made to participate in the heavenly king, because he becomes filled with it, as the Christian apostles and their converts became filled with the Holy Ghost, and purified of their sins. The soma makes a new man of the initiate; he is reborn and transformed, and his spiritual nature overcomes the physical; it gives the divine power of inspiration, and develops the clairvoyant faculty to the utmost. According to the exoteric explanation the soma is a plant, but, at the same time it is an angel. It forcibly connects the inner, highest ‘spirit’ of man, which spirit is an angel like the mystical soma, with his ‘irrational soul,’ or astral body, and thus united by the power of the magic drink, they soar together above physical nature and participate during life in the beatitude and ineffable glories of Heaven.

This is what is termed the Adya Shakti; she is the Supreme Consciousness and Power above the universe and it is by her that all the Gods are manifested, and even the supramental Ishwara comes into manifestation through her—the supramental Purushottama of whom the Gods are Powers and Personalities.” Letters on Yoga

Thor (Scandinavian) Thorr (Icelandic) [from thonor thunder; cf Swedish tordon, German donner] Best known as the Norse god of thunder and lightning, champion of the gods and subduer of giants in the ongoing battle between these opposites: gods meaning energy and giants typifying inertia. Like the Latin Jupiter, Thor controls the weather and represents the planet Jupiter. The hair of his beautiful wife Sif represents the golden harvest, whether of grain or of experience — the mead or nectar of the gods.

Thoth, Thot (Greek) Tehuti (Egyptian) Teḥuti. Egyptian god of wisdom, equivalent to the Greek Hermes, Thoth was often represented as an ibis-headed deity, and also with a human head, especially in his aspect of Aah-Tehuti (the moon god), and as the god of Mendes he is depicted as bull-headed. Although best known in his character of the scribe or recorder of the gods, holding stylus and tablet, this is but another manner of showing that Thoth is the god of wisdom, inventor of science and learning; thus to him is attributed the establishment of the worship of the gods and the hymns and sacrifices, and the author of every work on every branch of knowledge both human and divine. He is described in the texts as “self-created, he to whom none hath given birth; the One; he who reckons in heaven, the counter of the stars; the enumerator and measurer of the earth [cosmic space] and all that is contained therein: the heart of Ra cometh forth in the form of the god Tehuti” — for he represents the heart and tongue of Ra, reason and the mental powers of the god and the utterer of speech. It has been suggested that Thoth is thus the equivalent of the Platonic Logos. Many are his epithets: his best known being “thrice greatest” — in later times becoming Hermes Trismegistus.

Thoth was also arbiter of the gods as in the battle between the god of light and the god of darkness, restoring the equilibrium which had been destroyed during the conflict. Similarly in the fights between Horus and Set, when the evil has a temporary ascendancy, Thoth restores harmony. Interestingly,

Thrud(r), Thrudgelmir (Icelandic) Trudgalmer (Swedish) [cf Greek gymnazein, Scandinavian idrott sport, German drude] The dynamic principle, Thor on a cosmic scale, where this dynamism is the primary force to emerge from the great Unknown at the start of any period of manifestation. In this capacity Thrud appears before any of the gods, as does the Hindu Kama and Greek Eros.

Thunderer ::: An epithet for Jupiter or the Deity. Jupiter (Latin: Iuppiter; /ˈjʊpɪtɛr/; genitive case: Iovis; /ˈjɔːvɪs/) or Jove is the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder in myth. Jupiter was the chief deity of Roman state religion throughout the Republican and Imperial eras, until Christianity became the dominant religion of the Empire. In Roman mythology, he negotiates with Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome, to establish principles of Roman religion such as sacrifice.

Thurse (Icelandic) [possibly related to Danish tosse fool] Giant; the difference between the giant and the thurse, as these terms are used in Norse mythology, is subtle. From the tales it would appear that giant is used most often to indicate the passage of a long time (cf Greek aeon), whereas the thurse aspect is accentuated to show the senselessness of matter uninspired by the gods.

Tiryaksrotas (Sanskrit) Tiryaksrotas [from tiryak horizontal, lying crosswise, crooked + srotas stream, current] Those animals in which the digestive canals are involved or crooked; according to the Puranas, the fifth of the seven creations of living beings by Brahma, the creation of sacred animals. “The esoteric meaning of the expression ‘animals’ is the germs of all animal life including man. Man is called a sacrificial animal, and an animal that is the only one among animal creation who sacrifices to the gods. Moreover, by the ‘sacred animals,’ the 12 signs of the zodiac are often meant in the sacred texts . . .” (SD 1:446n).

Titans: The giants of Greek mythology who made war on the gods.

To Xenophanes is due the saying: "The gods of the Ethiopians are dark-skinned and snub-nosed, the gods of the Thracians are fair and blue-eyed; if oxen could paint, their gods would be oxen."

Tradition has it that in the immemorial past, certain lower gods associated intimately with their children, humanity, on this globe; but as time went by and mankind became more immersed in material pursuits, people grew to become increasingly forgetful of their divine origin and of the presence of the shining divinities instructing and guiding their forebears, so that the gods and demigods were remembered only in mythologies and religious metaphors of the various races.

transcendent ::: Sri Aurobindo: "A Transcendent who is beyond all world and all Nature and yet possesses the world and its nature, who has descended with something of himself into it and is shaping it into that which as yet it is not, is the Source of our being, the Source of our works and their Master. But the seat of the Transcendent Consciousness is above in an absoluteness of divine Existence — and there too is the absolute Power, Truth, Bliss of the Eternal — of which our mentality can form no conception and of which even our greatest spiritual experience is only a diminished reflection in the spiritualised mind and heart, a faint shadow, a thin derivate. Yet proceeding from it there is a sort of golden corona of Light, Power, Bliss and Truth — a divine Truth-Consciousness as the ancient mystics called it, a Supermind, a Gnosis, with which this world of a lesser consciousness proceeding by Ignorance is in secret relation and which alone maintains it and prevents it from falling into a disintegrated chaos.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

"The Transcendent, the Universal, the Individual are three powers overarching, underlying and penetrating the whole manifestation; this is the first of the Trinities. In the unfolding of consciousness also, these are the three fundamental terms and none of them can be neglected if we would have the experience of the whole Truth of existence. Out of the individual we wake into a vaster freer cosmic consciousness; but out of the universal too with its complex of forms and powers we must emerge by a still greater self-exceeding into a consciousness without limits that is founded on the Absolute.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"We see then that there are three terms of the one existence, transcendent, universal and individual, and that each of these always contains secretly or overtly the two others. The Transcendent possesses itself always and controls the other two as the basis of its own temporal possibilities; that is the Divine, the eternal all-possessing God-consciousness, omnipotent, omniscient, omnipresent, which informs, embraces, governs all existences. The human being is here on earth the highest power of the third term, the individual, for he alone can work out at its critical turning-point that movement of self-manifestation which appears to us as the involution and evolution of the divine consciousness between the two terms of the Ignorance and the Knowledge.” The Life Divine

The Transcendent
This is what is termed the Adya Shakti; she is the Supreme Consciousness and Power above the universe and it is by her that all the Gods are manifested, and even the supramental Ishwara comes into manifestation through her — the supramental Purushottama of whom the Gods are Powers and Personalities.” Letters on Yoga
**Transcendent"s.**


Tvashtri (Sanskrit) Tvaṣṭṛ The divine artist and carpenter of the gods, father of the gods and of the sacred creative fire, and therefore equivalent to the Greek cosmic Demiurge. Maker of divine weapons, such as Indra’s Thunderbolt, and teacher of the ribhus or adityas, he was considered as the great patron of initiates. The Tvashtri of the Vedas is synonymous with the Visvakarman of the Puranas. Many of the functions ascribed in Hindu legend to Tvashtri are reminiscent of similar functions ascribed to the Greek Hephaestos or Latin Vulcan.

Twilight of the gods: In Norse mythology, the final battle between the gods and their enemies, the evil giants.

Typhoeus, Typhon (Greek) Typhoeus in Hesiodic theogony is a son of Tartarus and Gaia, a fire-breathing titan with a hundred heads and begetter of destructive hurricanes. He rebels against the gods and is killed by Zeus with a thunderbolt and buried under Mount Etna. Typhon was originally his son — post-type of himself — but the two were later identified. He represents the necessary counterpart of Zeus, as darkness is of light, Set of Osiris, or Satan of God. He is the Dragon Apophis, the Accuser in The Egyptian Book of the Dead, murderer of Osiris, destroyed by Horus; the dark side of Zeus, as Set is the dark side of Osiris, and night the dark side of day; Python, Loki, Rahu, and falling demons in general. In one form he is the dragon slain by St. Michael or St. George.

Uchchaih-sravas (Sanskrit) Uccaiḥ-śravas [from uccaiḥ aloft, high above + śravas ear] Long-eared, he who hears what is above, one having spiritual or inner hearing; the white horse of Indra, one of the 14 precious things that issued from the waters churned by the gods in Hindu legend, regarded as the prototype and king of horses. In this connection one is reminded of the many statues of the buddhas with pendant ears, symbolizing a spiritual power — he who hears the cries of all.

Veda an image of the Gods, the male power in Nature. Again, the bull is vihana • of Siva.

Vedas, dating from 2000 BC or earlier, consisting of several mythological and poetical accounts of the origin of the world, hymns praising the gods, and ancient prayers for life and prosperity; "praise verse"

Vedas, she is the Mother of the gods from whose cosmic matrix the heavenly bodies were born

visve devah (Vishwadevas) ::: the All-gods or all the Gods; the universal collectivity of the divine powers.

  “was founded by Iamblichus among certain Alexandrian Platonists. The priests, however, who were attached to the temples of Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia and Greece, and whose business it was to evoke the gods during the celebration of the Mysteries, were known by this name, or its equivalent in other tongues, from the earliest archaic period. Spirits (but not those of the dead, the evocation of which was called Necromancy) were made visible to the eyes of mortals. Thus a theurgist had to be a hierophant and an expert in the esoteric learning of the Sanctuaries of all great countries. The Neo-platonists of the school of Iamblichus were called theurgists, for they performed the so-called ‘ceremonial magic,’ and evoked the simulacra or the images of the ancient heroes, ‘gods,’ and daimonia (divine, spiritual entities). In the rare cases when the presence of a tangible and visible ‘spirit’ was required, the theurgist had to furnish the weird apparition with a portion of his own flesh and blood — he had to perform the theopaea, or the ‘creation of gods,’ by a mysterious process well known to the old, and perhaps some of the modern, Tantrikas and initiated Brahmans of India” (TG 329-30).

way, the upward ::: Sri Aurobindo: "For the gods are the guardians and increasers of the Truth, the powers of the Immortal, the sons of the infinite Mother; the way to immortality is the upward way of the gods, the way of the Truth, a journey, an ascent by which there is a growth into the law of the Truth, rtasya panthâh.” The Renaissance in India

What then is the explanation of the otherwise contradictory statements in the Bible regarding Solomon? Even from a historical and ethnological standpoint one may find a clue, for along purely exoteric lines there is nothing foreign in Solomon’s “idolatry” and his worship of other deities. The same racial strain ran through all the surrounding peoples as in Israel, and the respective worships, gods, and goddesses were all closely interrelated, derived from the same Babylonian concepts, appearing under different names — Blavatsky shows the identity of the mystery gods of the Phoenicians, Chaldeans, and Israelites (SD 2:3). The gods and goddesses of the nations surrounding the Jews were all theologically interrelated, aspects or permutations of the same basic idea; and, as worshiped by the people, all were variants and, in their exoteric forms, degradations of the original conception on which every great theogony and cosmogony was built (cf SD 2:535 et seq).

Wheel of life: (1) Samsara (q.v.)—(2) A wheel often depicted in Tibetan paintings, setting forth the basic beliefs in reincarnation found in Lamaism. The endless circumference of the wheel is symbolic of immortality; the three prominences of the hub symbolize the three great vices, ignorance, lust and anger, a lapse into which will make the wrongdoer reincarnate as an insect or other low life-form in his next life; the six spokes symbolize the six principle divisions of life and religion: the gods, the demigods, hell, the tortured souls, human beings, and animals.

When there is something in the nature that has to be got over, it is always drawing on itself incidents that put it to the test till the sadhaka has overcome and is free. At least it is a thing that often happens especially if the person is making a sincere effort to overcome. One docs not always know whether it is the hostiles who are trying to break the resolution or putting it to the test (for they claim the right to do it) or whether it is, let us say, the gods who are doing it so as to press and hasten the progress or insisting on the surety and thoroughness of the change aspired after. Perhaps it helps most when' one can take it from the latter standpoint.

Within its sacred precincts, the Aesir and Asynjor (gods and goddesses) meet to assess the previous life of the world tree and to determine their course for the future. The Lay of Odin’s Corpse give insight into the gods’ council following the death of a planet, and their difficulty in extracting the essence of that experience.

yajna ::: sacrifice; action consecrated to the gods, works; the Master of Works.

yajna &

Yet on the upward arc of an evolutionary cycle, partaking of this sacred ambrosial food signifies initiation, the partaking by the initiant in the Mysteries of the “drink” of spiritual immortality. This drink is symbolized by the cup and its contained liquid, but actually is the receiving into the consciousness from the inner nature of the life-giving streams, the draught of everlasting life, or the elixir of life. After partaking of this ambrosial elixir, brought about by lives of selflessness and by final initiation, the adept learns to live in the minor and intermediate spheres of the solar system as a fully self-conscious co-laborer with the gods in their cosmic work. Such are the higher nirmanakayas, true buddhas, etc.

Yggdrasil: The world-tree of Norse mythology, whose leaves are always green. Fire will destroy it in the twilight of the gods.

Zaotar: Ancient Persian for caller. Priest-magician who invokes the gods by reciting ritual formulas and improvised chants.



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1:Attribute all to the Gods. ~ Archilochus,
2:If it pleases the gods, so be it. ~ Epictetus,
3:Let us be silent, -- so we may hear the whisper of the gods. ~ Emerson,
4:When the gods want to punish us, they grant our desires." ~ Ancient Greek saying.,
5:The love of books is among the choicest gifts of the gods. ~ Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
6:Death is an evil; the gods have so judged; had it been good, they would die. ~ Sappho,
7:Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun." ~ Alan Watts,
8:sunrise
is where
the Gods live ~ Kobayashi Issa,
9:Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun.
   ~ Alan Watts,
10:The gods are immortal men, and men are mortal gods. ~ Heraclitus,
11:Mankind is poised midway between the gods and the beasts.
   ~ Plotinus,
12:It is the privilege of the gods to want nothing, and of godlike men to want little.
   ~ Diogenes,
13:absent of the Gods
it all goes to ruin
fallen leaves ~ Matsuo Basho,
14:on a journey
traveling with the gods
numbering the days ~ Matsuo Basho,
15:All the gods and goddesses are only varied aspects of the One. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
16:Never invoke the gods unless you really want them to appear. It annoys them very much." ~ Gilbert K. Chesterton,
17:Know thyself, and thou shalt know all the mysteries of the gods and the universe.
   ~ the Temple of Apollo at Delphi,
18:Prayer indeed is good, but while calling on the gods a man should himself lend a hand. ~ Hippocrates, Regimen, IV, 87,
19:The Ancestors fashioned the gods as a workman fashions iron. ~ Rig Veda, the Eternal Wisdom
20:They have all withdrawn, deserting shrine and altar, the gods by who this realm once stood firm. ~ Virgil, Aeneid II.351-52,
21:All the gods and goddesses are only varied aspects of the One. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
22:Love is the hoop of the gods
Hearts to combine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
23:The gods love what is mysterious and dislike what is evident." ~ "The Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, (about 700 BC) a treatise on Ātma,
24:That man to me seems equal to the gods,
the man who sits opposite you
and close by listens
to your sweet voice ~ Sappho,
25:If you knew what the Gods have in store for you, you would run naked and dance on the beach.
   ~ Vikings, The Seer to Rollo, Vikings,
26:The gods make use of our forgotten deeds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
27:The gods cannot, if they would, give themselves unasked. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I, Bhawani Mandir,
28:Charm is the seal of the gods upon woman. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
29:The gods have been created by Him, but of Him who knows the manner of His being? ~ Rig Veda, the Eternal Wisdom
30:The gods use instruments,
Not ask their consent. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Short Stories - I, Act Five,
31:True nature of the gods is that of magical images shaped out of the astral plane by mankind's thought and influenced by the mind
   ~ Dion Fortune,
32:And you sit in the lap of the Gods." ~ Arjuna Ardagh, (b. 1957), author & founder of the "Living Essence Foundation." See "How About Now?", (1999),
33:Know thyself and thou shalt know the universe and the gods. ~ Inscription of the Temple of Delphi, the Eternal Wisdom
34:To me a book is a message from the gods to mankind; or, if not, should never be published at all.
   ~ Aleister Crowley,
35:Of what use are the gods
If they crown not our just desires on earth? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
36:From light lips and casual thoughts
The gods speak best as if by chance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
37:And this is the life of the Gods, and of Godlike men, a life without love of the world, a flight of the Alone to the Alone. ~ Plotinus,
38:Mire is the man who hears not the gods when they cry to his bosom. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
39:this tree born
in the time of the gods
now in autumn
~ Matsuo Basho, @BashoSociety
40:trusting in the Gods
a little butterfly
in autumn
~ Kobayashi Issa, @BashoSociety
41:on a journey
traveling with the gods
numbering the days
~ Matsuo Basho, @BashoSociety
42:All the gods in a mortal body dwelt, bore a single name. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, A Strong Son of Lightning,
43:The realms of the gods and demons ~ heaven, purgatory, hell ~ are of the substance of dreams. Myth, in this view, is the dream of the world. ~ Joseph Campbell, Myths of Light,
44:The favours of the Gods are too awful to be coveted. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest, To His Sister,
45:Man is the creator of the gods whom he worships in his temples. Therefore humanity has made its gods in its own image. ~ Hermes, the Eternal Wisdom
46:The Gods prodigiously sometimes reverse
The common rule of Nature and compel
Matter with soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
47:There is always a reason to live. The Gods will set you on the proper path. There is a deeper purpose to the path you have been set upon, one that has yet to reveal itself.
   ~ Sura,
48:Who knows this ruler within, he knows the worlds and the gods and creatures and the Self, he knows all. ~ Mundaka Upanishad I.210., the Eternal Wisdom
49:This world is a people of friends, and these friends are first the gods and next men whom Nature has made for each other. ~ Epictetus, the Eternal Wisdom
50:He who thus knows, "I am the Eternal", the gods themselves cannot make him other, for he is their own self. ~ Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, the Eternal Wisdom
51:  And needed not the splendour of a robe.
  All objects were like bodies of the Gods,
  A spirit symbol environing a soul, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 02:14, The World-Soul,
52:Fear of the gods arose from man's ignorance of God and his ignorance of the laws that govern the world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Godward Emotions,
53:The reason meant for nearness to the gods
And uplift to heavenly scale by the touch of mind ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Descent into Night,
54:But like a shining answer from the gods
   Approached through sun-bright spaces Savitri.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Call to the Quest, [T5],
55:Pain is the hammer of the Gods to break
   A dead resistance in the mortals heart,
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
56:The dire delight that could shatter mortal flesh,
The rapture that the gods sustain he bore. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Paradise of the Life-Gods,
57:Forewilled by the gods, Alexander,
All things happen on earth and yet we must strive who are mortals, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
58:Love is a honey and poison in the breast
Drunk by it as the nectar of the gods. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Gospel of Death and Vanity of the Ideal,
59:Worshippers of the gods go to the gods,
worshippers of the ancestors go to the ancestors,
worshippers of the goblins go to the goblins,
worshippers of me also go to me.
~ Bhagavad Gita, 9, 25,
60:Always ascends the zigzag of the gods
And upward points the spirit's climbing Fire. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
61:He tore desire up from its bleeding roots
And offered to the gods the vacant place. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
62:Whether on earth or in the abodes of the gods, all beings are upon three evil paths; they are in thepower of existence, desire and ignorance. ~ Latita Vistara, the Eternal Wisdom
63:Count not life nor death, defeat nor triumph, Pyrrhus.
Only thy soul regard and the gods in thy joy or thy labour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
64:A screened Necessity drives even the gods.
Over human lives it strides to unseen ends;
Our tragic failures are its stepping-stones. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act IV,
65:A sole thing the Gods
Demand from all men living, sacrifice:
Nor without this shall any crown be grasped. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Love and Death,
66:Life and treasure and fame to cast on the wings of a moment,
Fiercer joy than this the gods have not given to mortals. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
67:He whose senses have become calm like horses perfectly tamed by a driver, who has rid himself of pride and concupiscence, the gods themselves envy his lot. ~ Dhammapada, the Eternal Wisdom
68:He saw a lone immense high-curved world-pile
Erect like a mountain-chariot of the Gods
Motionless under an inscrutable sky. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The World-Stair,
69:Speak the truth, do not abandon yourself to wrath, give of the little you have to those who seek your aid. By these three steps you shall approach the Gods. ~ Dhammapada, the Eternal Wisdom
70:The gods are the guardians and increasers of the Truth, the powers of the Immortal, the sons of the infinite Mother. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Renaissance in India, Indian Spirituality and Life - II,
71:This observe, thy task in thy destiny noble or fallen;
Time and result are the gods'; with these things be not thou troubled. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
72:We should not make comparisons between the gods. When a man has really seen a divinity, he knows that all divinities are manifestations of one and the same Brahman. ~ Ramakishna, the Eternal Wisdom
73:Not as the ways of other mortals are theirs who are guided,
They whose eyes are the gods and they walk by a light that is secret. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
74:The gods wrest our careful policies
To their own ends until we stand appalled
Remembering what we meant to do and seeing
What has been done. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act IV,
75:Only of one thing
Man can be sure, the will in his heart and his strength in his purpose:
This too is Fate and this too the gods ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
76:God's Desire
Lo, how all shakes when the gods tread too near!
All moves, is in peril, anguished, torn, upheaved. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
77:These sages breathed for God's delight in things.
Assisting the slow entries of the gods,
Sowing in young minds immortal thoughts they lived, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Quest,
78:Her pragmatism of the transcendent Truth
Fills silence with the voices of the gods, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 02.06,
79:Time's works
The giant's and the Titan's furious march
Climbs to usurp the kingdom of the gods
Or skirts the demon magnitudes of Hell; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
80:Too hard the gods are with man's fragile race;
In their large heavens they dwell exempt from Fate
And they forget the wounded feet of man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
81:For such a man, one who neglects no effort to set himself from now in the ranks of the best, is a priest, a minister of the gods, a friend of Him who dwells within him. ~ Marcus Aurelius, the Eternal Wisdom
82:Mind's voices mimicked inspiration's stress,
Its ictus of infallibility,
Its speed and lightning heaven-leap of the Gods. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Entry into the Inner Countries,
83:None has been able to hold all the gods in his bosom unstaggered,
All have grown drunken with force and have gone down to Hell and to Ate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
84:Pain is the hammer of the Gods to break
A dead resistance in the mortal's heart,
His slow inertia as of living stone. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
85:Free from the happiness desired by slaves, delivered from the gods and their adoration, fearless and terrible, grand and solitary is the will of the man of truth. ~ Nietzsche, Zarathoustra, the Eternal Wisdom
86:The animal is satisfied with a modicum of necessity; the gods are content with their splendours. But man cannot rest permanently until he reaches some highest good. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, Man in the Universe,
87:Walled from ours are other hearts:
For if life's barriers twixt our souls were broken,
Men would be free and one, earth paradise
And the gods live neglected. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
88:The beasts are mortal, but they do not know or fully understand that fact; the gods are immortal, and they know it - but poor man, up from beasts and not yet a god, was that unhappy mixture: he was mortal, and he knew it. ~ Ken Wilber, Up From Eden, p. x.,
89:fools! whose pride
Absurd the gods permit a little space
To please their souls with laughter, then replace
In the loud limbo of futilities. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Lines on Ireland,
90:Busy the gods are always, Thrasymachus son of Aretes,
Weaving Fate on their looms, and yesterday, now and tomorrow
Are but the stands they have made with Space and Time for their timber, ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Ilion,
91:Temple-ground
Man, shun the impulses dire that spring armed from thy nature's abysms!
Dread the dusk rose of the gods, flee the honey that tempts from its petals! ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
92:A man has certain debts to pay: his debts to the gods and rishis, and his debts to mother, father, and wife. He cannot achieve anything without paying the debt he owes to his parents. A man is indebted to his wife as well. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
93:Wise are the gods in their silence,
Wise when they speak; but their speech is other than ours and their wisdom
Hard for a mortal mind to hold and not madden or wander. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
94:Heed these Words, You who Wish to Probe the Depths of Nature: If You Do Not Find Within Yourself that Which You Seek, Neither will You Find it Outside. In You is Hidden the Treasure of Treasures. Know Thyself and You Will Know the Universe and the Gods. ~ The Oracle of Delphi,
95:Wast thou not made in the shape of a woman? Sweetness and beauty
Move like a song of the gods in thy limbs and to love is thy duty
Graved in thy heart as on tablets of fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ahana,
96:None is greater than he. The gods themselves will have to descend upon earth and it is in a human form that they will get their salvation. Man alone reaches the perfection of which the gods themselves are ignorant. ~ Vivekananda, the Eternal Wisdom
97:Obstructing the gods' open ways he makes
His own estate of the earth's air and light;
A monopolist of the world-energy,
He dominates the life of common men. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
98:A border sovereign is the occult Force.
A threshold guardian of the earth-scene's Beyond,
She has canalised the outbreaks of the Gods ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Yoga of the King, The Yoga of the Spirit's Freedom and Greatness,
99:It was the hour before the Gods awake.
   Across the path of the divine Event
   The huge foreboding mind of Night, alone
   In her unlit temple of eternity,
   Lay stretched immobile upon Silence marge.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 01.01,
100:Just as the fly settles now on an unclean sore and now on the sweetmeats offered to the gods, so a worldly man's thoughts stop for a moment on religious subjects and the next stray into the pleasures of luxury and lust. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
101:One on another we prey and one by another are mighty.
This is the world and we have not made it; if it is evil,
Blame first the gods; but for us, we must live by its laws or we perish. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
102:The dire delight that could shatter mortal flesh,
The rapture that the gods sustain he bore.
Immortal pleasure cleansed him in its waves
And turned his strength into undying power. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Paradise of the Life-Gods,
103:Life must be lived as play, playing certain games, making sacrifices, singing and dancing, and then a man will be able to propitiate the gods, and defend himself against his enemies, and win in the contest." ~ Plato, (428/427 or 424/423 - 348/347) Greek philosopher, Wikipedia.,
104:Though a man should have lived a hundred years consecrating his whole life to the performance of numerous sacrifices to the gods, all this is far from having the same worth as a single act of love which consists in succouring a life. ~ Fa-khen-pi-, the Eternal Wisdom
105:Just as a fly settles now on an unclean sore in the body, now on the offerings consecrated to the gods, so the mind of a worldly man stops for a moment upon religious ideas, but the next it strays away to the pleasures of luxury and lust. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
106:How shall they prosper who haste after auguries, oracles, whispers,
Dreams that walk in the night and voices obscure of the silence?
Touches are these from the gods that bewilder the brain to its ruin. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
107:Dead is the past; the void has possessed it; its drama is ended,
Finished its music. The future is dim and remote from our knowledge;
Silent it lies on the knees of the gods in their luminous stillness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
108:Man's house of life holds not the gods alone:
There are occult Shadows, there are tenebrous Powers,
Inhabitants of life's ominous nether rooms,
A shadowy world's stupendous denizens. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
109:Pride is not for our clay; the earth, not heaven was our mother
And we are even as the ant in our toil and the beast in our dying;
Only who cling to the hands of the gods can rise up from the earth-mire. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
110:Leave to the gods their godhead and, mortal, turn to thy labour;
Take what thou canst from the hour that is thine and be fearless in spirit;
This is the greatness of man and the joy of his stay in the sunlight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
111:The gods have invented
Only one way for a man through the world, O my slavegirl Briseis,
Valiant to be and noble and truthful and just to the humble,
Only one way for a woman, to love and serve and be faithful. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
112:I fear not for the angry frown of Heaven,
I flinch not from the red assault of Hell;
I crush the opposition of the gods,
Tread down a million goblin obstacles. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
113:Transient, we made not ourselves, but at birth from the first we were fashioned
Valiant or fearful and as was our birth by the gods and their thinkings
Formed, so already enacted and fixed by their wills are our fortunes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
114:2. O knower of all things born, high-kindled, iron-tusked, touch with thy ray the demon-sorcerers; do violence to them with thy tongue of flame, the gods who kill,28 the eaters of flesh, putting them off from us shut them into thy mouth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns To The Mystic Fire, 2 - Other Hymns,
115:Imperishable, a tongue of sacrifice,
It flamed unquenched upon the central hearth
Where burns for the high houselord and his mate
The homestead's sentinel and witness fire
From which the altars of the gods are lit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Debate of Love and Death,
116:Who can point out the way of the gods and the path of their travel,
Who shall impose on them bounds and an orbit? The winds have their treading,-
They can be followed and seized, not the gods when they move towards their purpose. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
117:Destiny is an absolutely definite and inexorable ruler. Physical ability and moral determination count for nothing. It is impossible to perform the simplest act when the gods say "no." I have no idea how they bring pressure to bear on such occasions; I only know that it is irresistible. ~ Aleister Crowley,
118:Then as now men walked in the round which the gods have decreed them
Eagerly turning their eyes to the lure and the tool and the labour.
Chained is their gaze to the span in front, to the gulfs they are blinded
Meant for their steps. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
119:In those days the world teemed, the people multiplied, the world bellowed like a wild bull, and the great god was aroused by the clamor. Enlil heard the clamor and he said to the gods in council, "The uproar of mankind is intolerable and sleep is no longer possible by reason of the babel." So the gods agreed to exterminate mankind. ~ Anonymous,
120:Such were a dream of some sage at night when he muses in fancy,
Imaging freely a flawless world where none were afflicted,
No man inferior, all could sublimely equal and brothers
Live in a peace divine like the gods in their luminous regions. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
121:The knowledge of mortals is bound unto blindness.
Either only they walk mid the coloured dreams of the senses
Treading the greenness of earth and deeming the touch of things real,
Or if they see, by the curse of the gods their sight into falsehood ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
122:All over earth men wept and bled and laboured, world-wide
Sowing Fate with their deeds and had other fruit than they hoped for,
Out of desires and their passionate griefs and fleeting enjoyments
Weaving a tapestry fit for the gods to admire, who in ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
123:Earth that was wakened by pain to life and by hunger to thinking
Left to her joys rests inert and content with her gains and her station.
But for the unbearable whips of the gods back soon to her matter
She would go glad and the goal would be missed ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
124:This is the burden of man that he acts from his heart and his passions,
Stung by the goads of the gods he hews at the ties that are dearest.
Lust was the guide they sent us, wrath was a whip for his coursers,
Madness they made the heart's comrade, r ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
125:Surely the gods protect, yet is Death too always mighty.
Most in his shadowy envy he strikes at the brave and the lovely,
Grudging works to abridge their days and to widow the sunlight.
Most, disappointed, he rages against the beloved of Heaven;
S ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
126:Though the people hear us not, yet are we bound to our nation:
Over the people the gods are; over a man is his country;
This is the deity first adored by the hearths of the noble.
For by our nation's will we are ruled in the home and the battle
An ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
127:Evil is worked, not justice, when into the mould of our thinkings
God we would force and enchain to the throb of our hearts the immortals,—
Justice and Virtue, her sister,—for where is justice mid creatures
Perfectly? Even the gods are betrayed by o ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
128:How soon is spent
This treasure wasted by the gods on man,
This happy closeness as of soul to soul,
This honey of the body's companionship,
This heightened joy, this ecstasy in the veins,
This strange illumination of the sense! ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Gospel of Death and Vanity of the Ideal,
129:The occult priest should be capable of instructing anyone in the procedures of emotional engineering. The main methods are the gnostic ones of casting oneself into a frenzied ecstacy, stilling the mind to a point of absolute quiescence, and evoking the laughter of the gods by combining laughter with the contemplation of paradox.
   ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null,
130:The gods who watch the earth with sleepless eyes
And guide its giant stumblings through the void,
Have given to man the burden of his mind;
In his unwilling heart they have lit their fires
And sown in it incurable unrest. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Journey in Eternal Night and the Voice of the Darkness,
131:God's Tread
Once we have chosen to be as the gods, we must follow that motion.
Knowledge must grow in us, might like a Titan's, bliss like an ocean,
Calmness and purity born of the spirit's gaze on the Real,
Rapture of his oneness embracing the soul in a clasp ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ahana,
132:Just as anyone who listens to the muse will hear, you can write out of your own intention or out of inspiration. There is such a thing. It comes up and talks. And those who have heard deeply the rhythms and hymns of the gods, can recite those hymns in such a way that the gods will be attracted. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero's Journey: Joseph Campbell on His Life & Works,
133:Suffering is the food of our strength and torture the bliss of our entrails.
We are pitiless, mighty and glad, the gods fear our laughter inhuman.
Our hearts are heroic and hard; we wear the belt of Orion:
Our will has the edge of the thunderbolt, o ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, The Children of Wotan,
134:All was gold and gold and gold, a torrent of golden light pouring down in an uninterrupted flow and bringing with it the consciousness that the path of the gods is a sunlit path in which difficulties lose all reality.
   Such is the path open before us if we choose to take it.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, The Path of Yoga, The Path, [T5],
135:To share the suffering of the world I came,
I draw my children's pangs into my breast.
I am the nurse of the dolour beneath the stars;
I am the soul of all who wailing writhe
Under the ruthless harrow of the Gods. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
136:'O strong forerunner, I have heard thy cry.
   One shall descend and break the iron Law,
   Change Nature's doom by the lone spirit's power.
   A limitless Mind that can contain the world,
   A sweet and violent heart of ardent calms
   Moved by the passions of the gods shall come.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Vision and the Boon,
137:The Transcendent
This is what is termed the Adya Shakti; she is the Supreme Consciousness and Power above the universe and it is by her that all the Gods are manifested, and even the supramental Ishwara comes into manifestation through her - the supramental Purushottama of whom the Gods are Powers and Personalities. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga,
138:The sorrow by which Nature's hunger is fed,
The oestrus which creates with fire of pain,
The fate that punishes virtue with defeat,
The tragedy that destroys long happiness,
The weeping of Love, the quarrel of the Gods,
Ceased in a truth which l ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Yoga of the King, The Yoga of the Soul's Release,
139:To me a book is a message from the gods to mankind; or, if not, should never be published at all. A message from the gods should be delivered at once. It is damnably blasphemous to talk about the autumn season and so on. How dare the author or publisher demand a price for doing his duty, the highest and most honorable to which a man can be called? ~ Aleister Crowley,
140:There are gods of the Overmind who are the great creators of the earth - until now. There are the gods of the Vedas who are mentioned in everything that has come down from the Rishis. And there are the gods of the Supermind, those who are going to manifest on earth, although of course they exist from all eternity on their own plane. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958,
141:He who knows that He is the supreme Lord, becomes that, and the gods themselves cannot prevent him...He who adores any other divinity, has not the knowledge. He is as cattle for the gods. Even as numerous cattle serve to nourish men, so each man serves to nourish the gods...That is why the gods love not that a man should know That. ~ Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, the Eternal Wisdom
142:The gods we worship write their names on our faces, be sure of that. And a man will worship something have no doubt about that, either. He may think that his tribute is paid in secret in the dark recesses of his heart, but it will out. That which dominates will determine his life and character. Therefore, it behooves us to be careful what we worship, for what we are worshipping we are becoming. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
143:But Indra does not turn back from the quest like Agni and Vayu; he pursues his way through the highest ether of the pure mentality and there he approaches the Woman, the manyshining, Uma Haimavati; from her he learns that this Daemon is the Brahman by whom alone the gods of mind and life and body conquer and affirm themselves, and in whom alone they are great. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Kena And Other Upanishads, 83,
144:The animal is satisfied with a modicum of necessity; the gods are content with their splendours. But man cannot rest permanently until he reaches some highest good. He is the greatest of living beings because he is the most discontented, because he feels most the pressure of limitations. He alone, perhaps, is capable of being seized by the divine frenzy for a remote ideal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, Man in the Universe,
145:...the conception of a Truth-consciousness supramental and divine, the invocation of the gods as powers of the Truth to raise man out of the falsehoods of the mortal mind, the attainment in and by this Truth of an immortal state of perfect good and felicity and the inner sacrifice and offering of what one has and is by the mortal to the Immortal as the means of the divine consummation.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret Of The Veda, [68],
146:Bjorn: I'm sorry to hear of Helga's death. We knew each other a long time. Since I was a boy.
   Floki: I too am dead, Bjorn. A part of me died with my daughter, Angrboda, a second part with Ragnar, and the last part of what was Floki died with my sweet, sad Helga. What I am now is nothing. And all this nothing I give to the gods to do with as they please. And I shall be an empty ship with no rudder set upon their endless sea. And where they take me, I shall go.
   ~ Vikings,
147:Humans are great experimenters, constantly exploring, searching, and struggling to gain power over themselves, over nature, even over the gods. Through this entire struggle and self-torture, we have also made ourselves "sick," and it is no wonder that we find the ascetic ideal springing up everywhere. Though it may seem to deny life, the ascetic ideal is supremely life affirming, as it says "yes" to life in the face of hardship and sickness. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morals,
148:To those who ask you, Where have you seen the gods, or how do you who are so devout know for sure that the gods exist? I answer, first of all, that even to the very eye, they are in some manner visible and apparent. Secondly, neither have I seen my own soul, and yet I respect and honour it. So then for the gods, by the daily experience that I have of their power and providence towards myself and others, I know certainly that they exist and therefore I worship them. ~ Marcus Aurelius, Meditations, 12, 21,
149:He tore desire up from its bleeding roots
   And offered to the gods the vacant place.
   Thus could he bear the touch immaculate.
   A last and mightiest transformation came.
   His soul was all in front like a great sea
   Flooding the mind and body with its waves;
   His being, spread to embrace the universe,
   United the within and the without To make of life a cosmic harmony,
   An empire of the immanent Divine.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
150:The Japanese have a proverb: "The gods only laugh when men pray to them for wealth." The boon bestowed on the worshiper is always scaled to his stature and to the nature of his dominant desire: the boon is simply a symbol of life energy stepped down to the requirements of a certain specific case. The irony, of course, lies in the fact that, whereas the hero who has won the favor of the god may beg for the boon of perfect illumination, what he generally seeks are longer years to live, weapons with which to slay his neighbor, or the health of his child. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces, The Ultimate Boon,
151:As in a mystic and dynamic dance
   A priestess of immaculate ecstasies
   Inspired and ruled from Truth's revealing vault
   Moves in some prophet cavern of the gods
   A heart of silence in the hands of joy
   Inhabited with rich creative beats
   A body like a parable of dawn
   That seemed a niche for veiled divinity
   Or golden temple-door to things beyond.
   Immortal rhythms swayed in her time-born steps;
   Her look, her smile awoke celestial sense
   Even in earth-stuff, and their intense delight
   Poured a supernal beauty on men's lives.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Issue,
152:In Plato's Symposium, the priestess Diotima teaches Socrates that love is not a deity, but rather a 'great daemon' (202d). She goes on to explain that 'everything daemonic is between divine and mortal' (202d-e), and she describes daemons as 'interpreting and transporting human things to the gods and divine things to men; entreaties and sacrifices from below, and ordinances and requitals from above...' (202e). In Plato's Apology of Socrates, Socrates claimed to have a daimonion (literally, a 'divine something')[16] that frequently warned him-in the form of a 'voice'-against mistakes but never told him what to do.
   ~ Wikipedia, Daemon,
153:13. The Magic Flight:If the hero in his triumph wins the blessing of the goddess or the god and is then explicitly commissioned to return to the world with some elixir for the restoration of society, the final stage of his adventure is supported by all the powers of his supernatural patron. On the other hand, if the trophy has been attained against the opposition of its guardian, or if the hero's wish to return to the world has been resented by the gods or demons, then the last stage of the mythological round becomes a lively, often comical, pursuit. This flight may be complicated by marvels of magical obstruction and evasion. ~ Joseph Campbell,
154:Vainly the sands of Time have been strewn with the ruins of empires,
Signs that the gods had left, but in vain. For they look for a nation,
One that can conquer itself having conquered the world, but they find none. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems: Ilion
Self-conquest
When one conquers a difficulty or goes forward, it creates a right current in the atmosphere. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV: The Right Attitude towards Difficulties
Self-Conquest
Self-denial is a necessary discipline for the soul of man, because his heart is ignorantly attached. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Renunciation,
155:If the magician wishes to put himself into or out of any emotional state, then he should be provided with the techniques to accomplish this. The process requires no justification
   - that he wills it is sufficient. One cannot escape emotional experience in a human incarnation, and it is preferable to adopt a master rather than a slave relationship to it. The occult priest should be capable of instructing anyone in the procedures of emotional engineering. The main methods are the gnostic ones of casting oneself into a frenzied ecstacy, stilling the mind to a point of absolute quiescence, and evoking the laughter of the gods by combining laughter with the contemplation of paradox. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null,
156:The realm of the gods is a forgotten dimension of the world we know. And the exploration of that dimension, either willingly or unwillingly, is the whole sense of the deed of the hero. The values and distinctions that in normal life seem important disappear with the terrifying assimilation of the self into what formerly was only otherness. As in the stories of the cannibal ogresses, the fearfulness of this loss of personal individuation can be the whole burden of the transcendental experience for unqualified souls. But the hero-soul goes boldly in-and discovers the hags converted into goddesses and the dragons into the watchdogs of the gods. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces, The Crossing of the Return Threshold,
157:Lila is by no means the last word. Passing through all these states, I said to the Divine Mother: 'Mother, in these states there is separation. Give me a state where there is no separation.' Then I remained for some time absorbed in the Indivisible Satchidananda. I removed the pictures of the gods and goddesses from my room. I began to perceive God in all beings. Formal worship dropped away. You see that bel-tree. I used to go there to pluck its leaves. One day, as I plucked a leaf, a bit of the bark came off. I round the tree full of Consciousness. I felt grieved because I had hurt the tree. One day I tried to pluck some durva grass, but I found I couldn't do it very well. Then I forced myself to pluck it. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
158:Thus slowly I lift man's soul nearer the Light.
   But human mind clings to its ignorance
   And to its littleness the human heart
   And to its right to grief the earthly life.
   Only when Eternity takes Time by the hand,
   Only when infinity weds the finite's thought,
   Can man be free from himself and live with God.
   I bring meanwhile the gods upon the earth;
   I bring back hope to the despairing heart;
   I give peace to the humble and the great,
   And shed my grace on the foolish and the wise.
   I shall save earth, if earth consents to be saved.
   Then Love shall at last unwounded tread earth's soil;
   Man's mind shall admit the sovereignty of Truth
   And body bear the immense descent of God."
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
159:11. The Ultimate Boon:The gods and goddesses then are to be understood as embodiments and custodians of the elixir of Imperishable Being but not themselves the Ultimate in its primary state. What the hero seeks through his intercourse with them is therefore not finally themselves, but their grace, i.e., the power of their sustaining substance. This miraculous energy-substance and this alone is the Imperishable; the names and forms of the deities who everywhere embody, dispense, and represent it come and go. This is the miraculous energy of the thunderbolts of Zeus, Yahweh, and the Supreme Buddha, the fertility of the rain of Viracocha, the virtue announced by the bell rung in the Mass at the consecration, and the light of the ultimate illumination of the saint and sage. Its guardians dare release it only to the duly proven. ~ Joseph Campbell,
160:The Gods, who in their highest secret entity are powers of this Supermind, born of it, seated in it as in their proper home, are in their knowledge 'truth-conscious' and in their action possessed of the 'seer-will'. Their conscious-force turned towards works and creation is possessed and guided by a perfect and direct knowledge of the thing to be done and its essence and its law, - a knowledge which determines a wholly effective will-power that does not deviate or falter in its process or in its result, but expresses and fulfils spontaneously and inevitably in the act that which has been seen in the vision. Light is here one with Force, the vibrations of knowledge with the rhythm of the will and both are one, perfectly and without seeking, groping or effort, with the assured result.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, Supermind as Creator 132,
161:   There are also female energies; for the Deva is both Male and Female and the gods also are either activising souls or passively executive and methodising energies. Aditi, infinite Mother of the Gods, comes first; and there are besides five powers of the Truthconsciousness, - Mahi or Bharati, the vast Word that brings us all things out of the divine source; Ila, the strong primal word of the Truth who gives us its active vision; Saraswati, its streaming current and the word of its inspiration; Sarama, the Intuition, hound of heaven who descends into the cavern of the subconscient and finds there the concealed illuminations; Dakshina, whose function is to discern rightly, dispose the action and the offering and distri bute in the sacrifice to each godhead its portion. Each god, too, has his female energy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns to the Mystic Fire, 1.02 - The Doctrine of the Mystics,
162:Above her little finite steps she feels,
Careless of knot or pause, worlds which weave out
A strange perfection beyond law and rule,
A universe of self-found felicity,
An inexpressible rhythm of timeless beats,
The many-movemented heart-beats of the One,
Magic of the boundless harmonies of self,
Order of the freedom of the infinite,
The wonder-plastics of the Absolute.
There is the All-Truth and there the timeless bliss.
But hers are fragments of a star-lost gleam,
Hers are but careless visits of the gods.
They are a Light that fails, a Word soon hushed
And nothing they mean can stay for long on earth.
There are high glimpses, not the lasting sight.
A few can climb to an unperishing sun,
Or live on the edges of the mystic moon
And channel to earth-mind the wizard ray. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Eternal Day,
163:At first cautiously, later indifferently, at last desperately, I wandered up the stairs and along the pavement of the inextricable palace. (Afterwards I learned that the width and height of the steps were not constant, a fact which made me understand the singular fatigue they produced). 'This palace is a fabrication of the gods,' I thought at the beginning. I explored the uninhabited interiors and corrected myself: ' The gods who built it have died.' I noted its peculiarities and said: 'The gods who built it were mad.' I said it, I know, with an incomprehensible reprobation which was almost remorse, with more intellectual horror than palpable fear...
   ...'This City' (I thought) 'is so horrible that its mere existence and perdurance, though in the midst of a secret desert, contaminates the past and the future and in some way even jeopardizes the stars.~ Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths, Selected Stories and Other Writings,
164:The earth too, one with the surrounding mass of darkness and inconscience is asleep and insentient. She has to wake up and start on her journey moving forward, unveiling her secret mysteries towards the supreme revelation, the Divine incarnation in matter. The Gods are awake, in order to awaken the earth. A first ray is sent down and it touches as it were the sleeping Mother. The Divine Ray is just like a finger of a child touching her mother trying, as it were, to persuade her to open her eyes and look at her child. The first ray, however, comes not as a caress to the inert being of darkness, it is a sharp prick, even a hard blow. Such is the first impact of light upon dead matter; and the light is thrown back, as an unwelcome intruder, into what it came from; and the darkness grovels in its old groove. The second stage comes when the impact is not felt as a pain or something totally foreign and strange; its touch is felt as something soothing, something that heals an eternal sore. But this too was not suffered long and the light has to go back again. ~ Nolini Kanta Gupta, On Savitri,
165:O King, thy fate is a transaction done
At every hour between Nature and thy soul
With God for its foreseeing arbiter.
Fate is a balance drawn in Destiny's book.
Man can accept his fate, he can refuse.
Even if the One maintains the unseen decree
He writes thy refusal in thy credit page:
For doom is not a close, a mystic seal.
Arisen from the tragic crash of life,
Arisen from the body's torture and death,
The spirit rises mightier by defeat;
Its godlike wings grow wider with each fall.
Its splendid failures sum to victory.
O man, the events that meet thee on thy road,
Though they smite thy body and soul with joy and grief,
Are not thy fate, - they touch thee awhile and pass;
Even death can cut not short thy spirit's walk:
Thy goal, the road thou choosest are thy fate.
On the altar throwing thy thoughts, thy heart, thy works,
Thy fate is a long sacrifice to the gods
Till they have opened to thee thy secret self
And made thee one with the indwelling God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 06:02 The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
166:If we regard the Powers of the Reality as so many Godheads, we can say that the Overmind releases a million Godheads into action, each empowered to create its own world, each world capable of relation, communication and interplay with the others.
There are in the Veda different formulations of the nature of the Gods: it is said they are all one Existence to which the sages give different names; yet each God is worshipped as if he by himself is that Existence, one who is all the other Gods together or contains them in his being; and yet again each is a separate Deity acting sometimes in unison with companion deities, sometimes separately, sometimes even in apparent opposition to other Godheads of the same Existence. In the Supermind all this would be held together as a harmonised play of the one Existence; in the Overmind each of these three conditions could be a separate action or basis of action and have its own principle of development and consequences and yet each keep the power to combine with the others in a more composite harmony. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, Supermind Mind and the Overmind Maya,
167:If we are religious-minded, perhaps we will see the gods who inhabit this world. Beings, forces, sounds, lights, and rhythms are just so many true forms of the same indefinable, but not unknowable, Essence we call God; we have spoken of God, and made temples, laws or poems to try to capture the one little pulsation filling us with sunshine, but it is free as the wind on foam-flecked shores. We may also enter the world of music, which in fact is not different from the others but a special extension of this same, great inexpressible Vibration. If once, only once, even for a few moments in a lifetime, we can hear that Music, that Joy singing above, we will know what Beethoven and Bach heard; we will know what God is because we will have heard God. We will probably not say anything grandiose; we will just know that That exists, whereupon all the suffering in the world will seem redeemed.
   At the extreme summit of the overmind, there only remain great waves of multi-hued light, says the Mother, the play of spiritual forces, which later translate - sometimes much later - into new ideas, social changes, or earthly events, after crossing one by one all the layers of consciousness and suffering a considerable distortion and loss of light...
   ~ Satprem, Sri Aurobindo Or The Adventure Of Consciousness,
168:To see life steadily and see it whole is only permitted to a Perfect and Infinite Consciousness standing outside Time, Space and Conditions. To such a divine Vision the working out of preordainment may present itself as a perfect, immediate and unhindered consummation. God said, 'Let there be Light' and, straightway,there was Light; and when the Light came into being, God saw that it was good. But to the imperfect finite consciousness, Light seems in its inception to have come into being by a slow material evolution completed by a fortuitous shock of forces; in its operation to be lavished with a prodigal wastefulness since only a small part is used for the purposes of life; in its presentation to be conveyed to a blinking and limited vision, hampered by obstacles and chequered with darkness. Limitation, imperfection, progression and retrogression are inseparable from phenomenal work, phenomenal intelligence, phenomenal pleasure and satisfaction. To Brahman the Will who measures all Time in a moment, covers all Space with one stride, embraces the whole chain of causation in one glance, there is no limitation, imperfection, progression or retrogression. He looks upon his work as a whole and sees that it is good. But the Gods cannot reach to His completeness, even though they toil after it; for ever He outruns their pursuit, moving far in front. Brahman, standing still, overtakes and passes the others as they run.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad,
169:37 - Some say Krishna never lived, he is a myth. They mean on earth; for if Brindavan existed nowhere, the Bhagavat (6) could not have been written. - Sri Aurobindo

Does Brindavan exist anywhere else than on earth?

The whole earth and everything it contains is a kind of concentration, a condensation of something which exists in other worlds invisible to the material eye. Each thing manifested here has its principle, idea or essence somewhere in the subtler regions. This is an indispensable condition for the manifestation. And the importance of the manifestation will always depend on the origin of the thing manifested.

In the world of the gods there is an ideal and harmonious Brindavan of which the earthly Brindavan is but a deformation and a caricature.

Those who are developed inwardly, either in their senses or in their minds, perceive these realities which are invisible (to the ordinary man) and receive their inspiration from them.

So the writer or writers of the Bhagavat were certainly in contact with a whole inner world that is well and truly real and existent, where they saw and experienced everything they have described or revealed.

Whether Krishna existed or not in a human form, living on earth, is only of very secondary importance (except perhaps from an exclusively historical point of view), for Krishna is a real, living and active being; and his influence has been one of the great factors in the progress and transformation of the earth.
8 June 1960

(6 The story of Krishna, as related in the Bhagavat Purana.) ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms, volume-10, page no.60-61),
170:Musa Spiritus :::

O Word concealed in the upper fire,
Thou who hast lingered through centuries,
Descend from thy rapt white desire,
Plunging through gold eternities.

Into the gulfs of our nature leap,
Voice of the spaces, call of the Light!
Break the seals of Matter's sleep,
Break the trance of the unseen height.

In the uncertain glow of human mind,
Its waste of unharmonied thronging thoughts,
Carve thy epic mountain-lined
Crowded with deep prophetic grots.

Let thy hue-winged lyrics hover like birds
Over the swirl of the heart's sea.
Touch into sight with thy fire-words
The blind indwelling deity.

O Muse of the Silence, the wideness make
In the unplumbed stillness that hears thy voice,
In the vast mute heavens of the spirit awake
Where thy eagles of Power flame and rejoice.

Out, out with the mind and its candles flares,
Light, light the suns that never die.
For my ear the cry of the seraph stars
And the forms of the Gods for my naked eye!

Let the little troubled life-god within
Cast his veils from the still soul,
His tiger-stripes of virtue and sin,
His clamour and glamour and thole and dole;

All make tranquil, all make free.
Let my heart-beats measure the footsteps of God
As He comes from His timeless infinity
To build in their rapture His burning abode.

Weave from my life His poem of days,
His calm pure dawns and His noons of force.
My acts for the grooves of His chariot-race,
My thoughts for the tramp of His great steeds' course! ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems,
171:Received him in their deathless harmonies.
   All things were perfect there that flower in Time;
   Beauty was there creation's native mould,
   Peace was a thrilled voluptuous purity.
   There Love fulfilled her gold and roseate dreams
   And Strength her crowned and mighty reveries;
   Desire climbed up, a swift omnipotent flame,
   And Pleasure had the stature of the gods;
   Dream walked along the highways of the stars;
   Sweet common things turned into miracles:
   Overtaken by the spirit's sudden spell,
   Smitten by a divine passion's alchemy,
   Pain's self compelled transformed to potent joy
   Curing the antithesis twixt heaven and hell.
   All life's high visions are embodied there,
   Her wandering hopes achieved, her aureate combs
   Caught by the honey-eater's darting tongue,
   Her burning guesses changed to ecstasied truths,
   Her mighty pantings stilled in deathless calm
   And liberated her immense desires.
   In that paradise of perfect heart and sense
   No lower note could break the endless charm
   Of her sweetness ardent and immaculate;
   Her steps are sure of their intuitive fall.
   After the anguish of the soul's long strife
   At length were found calm and celestial rest
   And, lapped in a magic flood of sorrowless hours,
   Healed were his warrior nature's wounded limbs
   In the encircling arms of Energies
   That brooked no stain and feared not their own bliss.
   In scenes forbidden to our pallid sense
   Amid miraculous scents and wonder-hues
   He met the forms that divinise the sight,
   To music that can immortalise the mind
   And make the heart wide as infinity
   Listened, and captured the inaudible
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Paradise of the Life-Gods,
172:The link between the spiritual and the lower planes of the mental being is that which is called in the old Vedantic phraseology the vijnana and which we may term the Truth-plane or the ideal mind or supermind where the One and the Many meet and our being is freely open to the revealing light of the divine Truth and the inspiration of the divine Will and Knowledge. If we can break down the veil of the intellectual, emotional, sensational mind which our ordinary existence has built between us and the Divine, we can then take up through the Truth-mind all our mental, vital and physical experience and offer it up to the spiritual -- this was the secret or mystic sense of the old Vedic "sacrifice" -- to be converted into the terms of the infinite truth of Sachchidananda, and we can receive the powers and illuminations of the infinite Existence in forms of a divine knowledge, will and delight to be imposed on our mentality, vitality, physical existence till the lower is transformed into the perfect vessel of the higher. This was the double Vedic movement of the descent and birth of the gods in the human creature and the ascent of the human powers that struggle towards the divine knowledge, power and delight and climb into the godheads, the result of which was the possession of the One, the Infinite, the beatific existence, the union with God, the Immortality. By possession of this ideal plane we break down entirely the opposition of the lower and the higher existence, the false gulf created by the Ignorance between the finite and the Infinite, God and Nature, the One and the Many, open the gates of the Divine, fulfil the individual in the complete harmony of the cosmic consciousness and realise in the cosmic being the epiphany of the transcendent Sachchidananda. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, 2.15,
173:Daemons
A daemon is a process that runs in the background, not connecting to any controlling terminal. Daemons are normally started at boot time, are run as root or some
other special user (such as apache or postfix), and handle system-level tasks. As a
convention, the name of a daemon often ends in d (as in crond and sshd), but this is
not required, or even universal.
The name derives from Maxwell's demon, an 1867 thought experiment by the physicist James Maxwell. Daemons are also supernatural beings in Greek mythology,
existing somewhere between humans and the gods and gifted with powers and divine
knowledge. Unlike the demons of Judeo-Christian lore, the Greek daemon need not
be evil. Indeed, the daemons of mythology tended to be aides to the gods, performing
tasks that the denizens of Mount Olympus found themselves unwilling to do-much
as Unix daemons perform tasks that foreground users would rather avoid.
A daemon has two general requirements: it must run as a child of init, and it must
not be connected to a terminal.
In general, a program performs the following steps to become a daemon:
1. Call fork( ). This creates a new process, which will become the daemon.
2. In the parent, call exit( ). This ensures that the original parent (the daemon's
grandparent) is satisfied that its child terminated, that the daemon's parent is no
longer running, and that the daemon is not a process group leader. This last
point is a requirement for the successful completion of the next step.
3. Call setsid( ), giving the daemon a new process group and session, both of
which have it as leader. This also ensures that the process has no associated controlling terminal (as the process just created a new session, and will not assign
one).
4. Change the working directory to the root directory via chdir( ). This is done
because the inherited working directory can be anywhere on the filesystem. Daemons tend to run for the duration of the system's uptime, and you don't want to
keep some random directory open, and thus prevent an administrator from
unmounting the filesystem containing that directory.
5. Close all file descriptors. You do not want to inherit open file descriptors, and,
unaware, hold them open.
6. Open file descriptors 0, 1, and 2 (standard in, standard out, and standard error)
and redirect them to /dev/null.
Following these rules, here is a program that daemonizes itself:
~ OReilly Linux System Programming,
174:As far as heaven, as near as thought and hope,
Glimmered the kingdom of a griefless life.
Above him in a new celestial vault
Other than the heavens beheld by mortal eyes,
As on a fretted ceiling of the gods,
An archipelago of laughter and fire,
Swam stars apart in a rippled sea of sky.
Towered spirals, magic rings of vivid hue
And gleaming spheres of strange felicity
Floated through distance like a symbol world.
On the trouble and the toil they could not share,
On the unhappiness they could not aid,
Impervious to life's suffering, struggle, grief,
Untarnished by its anger, gloom and hate,
Unmoved, untouched, looked down great visioned planes
Blissful for ever in their timeless right.
Absorbed in their own beauty and content,
Of their immortal gladness they live sure.
Apart in their self-glory plunged, remote
Burning they swam in a vague lucent haze,
An everlasting refuge of dream-light,
A nebula of the splendours of the gods
Made from the musings of eternity.
Almost unbelievable by human faith,
Hardly they seemed the stuff of things that are.
As through a magic television's glass
Outlined to some magnifying inner eye
They shone like images thrown from a far scene
Too high and glad for mortal lids to seize.
But near and real to the longing heart
And to the body's passionate thought and sense
Are the hidden kingdoms of beatitude.
In some close unattained realm which yet we feel,
Immune from the harsh clutch of Death and Time,
Escaping the search of sorrow and desire,
In bright enchanted safe peripheries
For ever wallowing in bliss they lie.
In dream and trance and muse before our eyes,
Across a subtle vision's inner field,
Wide rapturous landscapes fleeting from the sight,
The figures of the perfect kingdom pass
And behind them leave a shining memory's trail.
Imagined scenes or great eternal worlds,
Dream-caught or sensed, they touch our hearts with their depths;
Unreal-seeming, yet more real than life,
Happier than happiness, truer than things true,
If dreams these were or captured images,
Dream's truth made false earth's vain realities.
In a swift eternal moment fixed there live
Or ever recalled come back to longing eyes
Calm heavens of imperishable Light,
Illumined continents of violet peace,
Oceans and rivers of the mirth of God
And griefless countries under purple suns.
~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Glory and the Fall of Life,
175:Mother of Dreams :::

Goddess supreme, Mother of Dream, by thy ivory doors when thou standest,
Who are they then that come down unto men in thy visions that troop, group upon group, down the path of the shadows slanting?
Dream after dream, they flash and they gleam with the flame of the stars still around them;
Shadows at thy side in a darkness ride where the wild fires dance, stars glow and glance and the random meteor glistens;
There are voices that cry to their kin who reply; voices sweet, at the heart they beat and ravish the soul as it listens.

What then are these lands and these golden sands and these seas more radiant than earth can imagine?
Who are those that pace by the purple waves that race to the cliff-bound floor of thy jasper shore under skies in which mystery muses,
Lapped in moonlight not of our night or plunged in sunshine that is not diurnal?
Who are they coming thy Oceans roaming with sails whose strands are not made by hands, an unearthly wind advances?
Why do they join in a mystic line with those on the sands linking hands in strange and stately dances?

Thou in the air, with a flame in thy hair, the whirl of thy wonders watching,
Holdest the night in thy ancient right, Mother divine, hyacinthine, with a girdle of beauty defended.
Sworded with fire, attracting desire, thy tenebrous kingdom thou keepest,
Starry-sweet, with the moon at thy feet, now hidden now seen the clouds between in the gloom and the drift of thy tresses.
Only to those whom thy fancy chose, O thou heart-free, is it given to see thy witchcraft and feel thy caresses.

Open the gate where thy children wait in their world of a beauty undarkened.
High-throned on a cloud, victorious, proud I have espied Maghavan ride when the armies of wind are behind him;
Food has been given for my tasting from heaven and fruit of immortal sweetness;
I have drunk wine of the kingdoms divine and have healed the change of music strange from a lyre which our hands cannot master,
Doors have swung wide in the chambers of pride where the Gods reside and the Apsaras dance in their circles faster and faster.

For thou art she whom we first can see when we pass the bounds of the mortal;
There at the gates of the heavenly states thou hast planted thy wand enchanted over the head of the Yogin waving.
From thee are the dream and the shadows that seem and the fugitive lights that delude us;
Thine is the shade in which visions are made; sped by thy hands from celestial lands come the souls that rejoice for ever.
Into thy dream-worlds we pass or look in thy magic glass, then beyond thee we climb out of Space and Time to the peak of divine endeavour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems,
176:On that spring day in the park I saw a young woman who attracted me. She was tall and slender, elegantly dressed, and had an intelligent and boyish face. I liked her at once. She was my type and began to fill my imagination. She probably was not much older than I but seemed far more mature, well-defined, a full-grown woman, but with a touch of exuberance and boyishness in her face, and this was what I liked above all .

   I had never managed to approach a girl with whom I had fallen in love, nor did I manage in this case. But the impression she made on me was deeper than any previous one had been and the infatuation had a profound influence on my life.

   Suddenly a new image had risen up before me, a lofty and cherished image. And no need, no urge was as deep or as fervent within me as the craving to worship and admire. I gave her the name Beatrice, for, even though I had not read Dante, I knew about Beatrice from an English painting of which I owned a reproduction. It showed a young pre-Raphaelite woman, long-limbed and slender, with long head and etherealized hands and features. My beautiful young woman did not quite resemble her, even though she, too, revealed that slender and boyish figure which I loved, and something of the ethereal, soulful quality of her face.

   Although I never addressed a single word to Beatrice, she exerted a profound influence on me at that time. She raised her image before me, she gave me access to a holy shrine, she transformed me into a worshiper in a temple.

   From one day to the next I stayed clear of all bars and nocturnal exploits. I could be alone with myself again and enjoyed reading and going for long walks.

   My sudden conversion drew a good deal of mockery in its wake. But now I had something I loved and venerated, I had an ideal again, life was rich with intimations of mystery and a feeling of dawn that made me immune to all taunts. I had come home again to myself, even if only as the slave and servant of a cherished image.

   I find it difficult to think back to that time without a certain fondness. Once more I was trying most strenuously to construct an intimate "world of light" for myself out of the shambles of a period of devastation; once more I sacrificed everything within me to the aim of banishing darkness and evil from myself. And, furthermore, this present "world of light" was to some extent my own creation; it was no longer an escape, no crawling back to -nether and the safety of irresponsibility; it was a new duty, one I had invented and desired on my own, with responsibility and self-control. My sexuality, a torment from which I was in constant flight, was to be transfigured nto spirituality and devotion by this holy fire. Everything :brk and hateful was to be banished, there were to be no more tortured nights, no excitement before lascivious picures, no eavesdropping at forbidden doors, no lust. In place of all this I raised my altar to the image of Beatrice, :.. and by consecrating myself to her I consecrated myself to the spirit and to the gods, sacrificing that part of life which I withdrew from the forces of darkness to those of light. My goal was not joy but purity, not happiness but beauty, and spirituality.

   This cult of Beatrice completely changed my life.

   ~ Hermann Hesse, Demian,
177:The supreme Form is then made visible. It is that of the infinite Godhead whose faces are everywhere and in whom are all the wonders of existence, who multiplies unendingly all the many marvellous revelations of his being, a world-wide Divinity seeing with innumerable eyes, speaking from innumerable mouths, armed for battle with numberless divine uplifted weapons, glorious with divine ornaments of beauty, robed in heavenly raiment of deity, lovely with garlands of divine flowers, fragrant with divine perfumes. Such is the light of this body of God as if a thousand suns had risen at once in heaven. The whole world multitudinously divided and yet unified is visible in the body of the God of Gods. Arjuna sees him, God magnificent and beautiful and terrible, the Lord of souls who has manifested in the glory and greatness of his spirit this wild and monstrous and orderly and wonderful and sweet and terrible world, and overcome with marvel and joy and fear he bows down and adores with words of awe and with clasped hands the tremendous vision. "I see" he cries "all the gods in thy body, O God, and different companies of beings, Brahma the creating lord seated in the Lotus, and the Rishis and the race of the divine Serpents. I see numberless arms and bellies and eyes and faces, I see thy infinite forms on every side, but I see not thy end nor thy middle nor thy beginning, O Lord of the universe, O Form universal. I see thee crowned and with thy mace and thy discus, hard to discern because thou art a luminous mass of energy on all sides of me, an encompassing blaze, a sun-bright fire-bright Immeasurable. Thou art the supreme Immutable whom we have to know, thou art the high foundation and abode of the universe, thou art the imperishable guardian of the eternal laws, thou art the sempiternal soul of existence."

But in the greatness of this vision there is too the terrific image of the Destroyer. This Immeasurable without end or middle or beginning is he in whom all things begin and exist and end.

This Godhead who embraces the worlds with his numberless arms and destroys with his million hands, whose eyes are suns and moons, has a face of blazing fire and is ever burning up the whole universe with the flame of his energy. The form of him is fierce and marvellous and alone it fills all the regions and occupies the whole space between earth and heaven. The companies of the gods enter it, afraid, adoring; the Rishis and the Siddhas crying "May there be peace and weal" praise it with many praises; the eyes of Gods and Titans and Giants are fixed on it in amazement. It has enormous burning eyes; it has mouths that gape to devour, terrible with many tusks of destruction; it has faces like the fires of Death and Time. The kings and the captains and the heroes on both sides of the world-battle are hastening into its tusked and terrible jaws and some are seen with crushed and bleeding heads caught between its teeth of power; the nations are rushing to destruction with helpless speed into its mouths of flame like many rivers hurrying in their course towards the ocean or like moths that cast themselves on a kindled fire. With those burning mouths the Form of Dread is licking all the regions around; the whole world is full of his burning energies and baked in the fierceness of his lustres. The world and its nations are shaken and in anguish with the terror of destruction and Arjuna shares in the trouble and panic around him; troubled and in pain is the soul within him and he finds no peace or gladness. He cries to the dreadful Godhead, "Declare to me who thou art that wearest this form of fierceness. Salutation to thee, O thou great Godhead, turn thy heart to grace. I would know who thou art who wast from the beginning, for I know not the will of thy workings." ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays On The Gita, 2.10_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_Time_the_Destroyer,
178::::
   As an inner equality increases and with it the sense of the true vital being waiting for the greater direction it has to serve, as the psychic call too increases in all the members of our nature, That to which the call is addressed begins to reveal itself, descends to take possession of the life and its energies and fills them with the height, intimacy, vastness of its presence and its purpose. In many, if not most, it manifests something of itself even before the equality and the open psychic urge or guidance are there. A call of the veiled psychic element oppressed by the mass of the outer ignorance and crying for deliverance, a stress of eager meditation and seeking for knowledge, a longing of the heart, a passionate will ignorant yet but sincere may break the lid that shuts off that Higher from this Lower Nature and open the floodgates. A little of the Divine Person may reveal itself or some Light, Power, Bliss, Love out of the Infinite. This may be a momentary revelation, a flash or a brief-lived gleam that soon withdraws and waits for the preparation of the nature; but also it may repeat itself, grow, endure. A long and large and comprehensive working will then have begun, sometimes luminous or intense, sometimes slow and obscure. A Divine Power comes in front at times and leads and compels or instructs and enlightens; at others it withdraws into the background and seems to leave the being to its own resources. All that is ignorant, obscure, perverted or simply imperfect and inferior in the being is raised up, perhaps brought to its acme, dealt with, corrected, exhausted, shown its own disastrous results, compelled to call for its own cessation or transformation or expelled as worthless or incorrigible from the nature. This cannot be a smooth and even process; alternations there are of day and night, illumination and darkness, calm and construction or battle and upheaval, the presence of the growing Divine Consciousness and its absence, heights of hope and abysses of despair, the clasp of the Beloved and the anguish of its absence, the overwhelming invasion, the compelling deceit, the fierce opposition, the disabling mockery of hostile Powers or the help and comfort and communion of the Gods and the Divine Messengers. A great and long revolution and churning of the ocean of Life with strong emergences of its nectar and its poison is enforced till all is ready and the increasing Descent finds a being, a nature prepared and conditioned for its complete rule and its all-encompassing presence. But if the equality and the psychic light and will are already there, then this process, though it cannot be dispensed with, can still be much lightened and facilitated: it will be rid of its worst dangers; an inner calm, happiness, confidence will support the steps through all the difficulties and trials of the transformation and the growing Force profiting by the full assent of the nature will rapidly diminish and eliminate the power of the opposing forces. A sure guidance and protection will be present throughout, sometimes standing in front, sometimes working behind the veil, and the power of the end will be already there even in the beginning and in the long middle stages of the great endeavour. For at all times the seeker will be aware of the Divine Guide and Protector or the working of the supreme Mother-Force; he will know that all is done for the best, the progress assured, the victory inevitable. In either case the process is the same and unavoidable, a taking up of the whole nature, of the whole life, of the internal and of the external, to reveal and handle and transform its forces and their movements under the pressure of a diviner Life from above, until all here has been possessed by greater spiritual powers and made an instrumentation of a spiritual action and a divine purpose. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 2, 179,
179:The recurring beat that moments God in Time.
Only was missing the sole timeless Word
That carries eternity in its lonely sound,
The Idea self-luminous key to all ideas,
The integer of the Spirit's perfect sum
That equates the unequal All to the equal One,
The single sign interpreting every sign,
The absolute index to the Absolute.

There walled apart by its own innerness
In a mystical barrage of dynamic light
He saw a lone immense high-curved world-pile
Erect like a mountain-chariot of the Gods
Motionless under an inscrutable sky.
As if from Matter's plinth and viewless base
To a top as viewless, a carved sea of worlds
Climbing with foam-maned waves to the Supreme
Ascended towards breadths immeasurable;
It hoped to soar into the Ineffable's reign:
A hundred levels raised it to the Unknown.
So it towered up to heights intangible
And disappeared in the hushed conscious Vast
As climbs a storeyed temple-tower to heaven
Built by the aspiring soul of man to live
Near to his dream of the Invisible.
Infinity calls to it as it dreams and climbs;
Its spire touches the apex of the world;
Mounting into great voiceless stillnesses
It marries the earth to screened eternities.
Amid the many systems of the One
Made by an interpreting creative joy
Alone it points us to our journey back
Out of our long self-loss in Nature's deeps;
Planted on earth it holds in it all realms:
It is a brief compendium of the Vast.
This was the single stair to being's goal.
A summary of the stages of the spirit,
Its copy of the cosmic hierarchies
Refashioned in our secret air of self
A subtle pattern of the universe.
It is within, below, without, above.
Acting upon this visible Nature's scheme
It wakens our earth-matter's heavy doze
To think and feel and to react to joy;
It models in us our diviner parts,
Lifts mortal mind into a greater air,
Makes yearn this life of flesh to intangible aims,
Links the body's death with immortality's call:
Out of the swoon of the Inconscience
It labours towards a superconscient Light.
If earth were all and this were not in her,
Thought could not be nor life-delight's response:
Only material forms could then be her guests
Driven by an inanimate world-force.
Earth by this golden superfluity
Bore thinking man and more than man shall bear;
This higher scheme of being is our cause
And holds the key to our ascending fate;

It calls out of our dense mortality
The conscious spirit nursed in Matter's house.
The living symbol of these conscious planes,
Its influences and godheads of the unseen,
Its unthought logic of Reality's acts
Arisen from the unspoken truth in things,
Have fixed our inner life's slow-scaled degrees.
Its steps are paces of the soul's return
From the deep adventure of material birth,
A ladder of delivering ascent
And rungs that Nature climbs to deity.
Once in the vigil of a deathless gaze
These grades had marked her giant downward plunge,
The wide and prone leap of a godhead's fall.
Our life is a holocaust of the Supreme.
The great World-Mother by her sacrifice
Has made her soul the body of our state;
Accepting sorrow and unconsciousness
Divinity's lapse from its own splendours wove
The many-patterned ground of all we are.
An idol of self is our mortality.
Our earth is a fragment and a residue;
Her power is packed with the stuff of greater worlds
And steeped in their colour-lustres dimmed by her drowse;
An atavism of higher births is hers,
Her sleep is stirred by their buried memories
Recalling the lost spheres from which they fell.
Unsatisfied forces in her bosom move;
They are partners of her greater growing fate
And her return to immortality;
They consent to share her doom of birth and death;
They kindle partial gleams of the All and drive
Her blind laborious spirit to compose
A meagre image of the mighty Whole.
The calm and luminous Intimacy within
~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The World-Stair,
180:The ancient Mesopotamians and the ancient Egyptians had some very interesting, dramatic ideas about that. For example-very briefly-there was a deity known as Marduk. Marduk was a Mesopotamian deity, and imagine this is sort of what happened. As an empire grew out of the post-ice age-15,000 years ago, 10,000 years ago-all these tribes came together. These tribes each had their own deity-their own image of the ideal. But then they started to occupy the same territory. One tribe had God A, and one tribe had God B, and one could wipe the other one out, and then it would just be God A, who wins. That's not so good, because maybe you want to trade with those people, or maybe you don't want to lose half your population in a war. So then you have to have an argument about whose God is going to take priority-which ideal is going to take priority.

What seems to happen is represented in mythology as a battle of the gods in celestial space. From a practical perspective, it's more like an ongoing dialog. You believe this; I believe this. You believe that; I believe this. How are we going to meld that together? You take God A, and you take God B, and maybe what you do is extract God C from them, and you say, 'God C now has the attributes of A and B.' And then some other tribes come in, and C takes them over, too. Take Marduk, for example. He has 50 different names, at least in part, of the subordinate gods-that represented the tribes that came together to make the civilization. That's part of the process by which that abstracted ideal is abstracted. You think, 'this is important, and it works, because your tribe is alive, and so we'll take the best of both, if we can manage it, and extract out something, that's even more abstract, that covers both of us.'

I'll give you a couple of Marduk's interesting features. He has eyes all the way around his head. He's elected by all the other gods to be king God. That's the first thing. That's quite cool. They elect him because they're facing a terrible threat-sort of like a flood and a monster combined. Marduk basically says that, if they elect him top God, he'll go out and stop the flood monster, and they won't all get wiped out. It's a serious threat. It's chaos itself making its comeback. All the gods agree, and Marduk is the new manifestation. He's got eyes all the way around his head, and he speaks magic words. When he fights, he fights this deity called Tiamat. We need to know that, because the word 'Tiamat' is associated with the word 'tehom.' Tehom is the chaos that God makes order out of at the beginning of time in Genesis, so it's linked very tightly to this story. Marduk, with his eyes and his capacity to speak magic words, goes out and confronts Tiamat, who's like this watery sea dragon. It's a classic Saint George story: go out and wreak havoc on the dragon. He cuts her into pieces, and he makes the world out of her pieces. That's the world that human beings live in.

The Mesopotamian emperor acted out Marduk. He was allowed to be emperor insofar as he was a good Marduk. That meant that he had eyes all the way around his head, and he could speak magic; he could speak properly. We are starting to understand, at that point, the essence of leadership. Because what's leadership? It's the capacity to see what the hell's in front of your face, and maybe in every direction, and maybe the capacity to use your language properly to transform chaos into order. God only knows how long it took the Mesopotamians to figure that out. The best they could do was dramatize it, but it's staggeringly brilliant. It's by no means obvious, and this chaos is a very strange thing. This is a chaos that God wrestled with at the beginning of time.

Chaos is half psychological and half real. There's no other way to really describe it. Chaos is what you encounter when you're blown into pieces and thrown into deep confusion-when your world falls apart, when your dreams die, when you're betrayed. It's the chaos that emerges, and the chaos is everything it wants, and it's too much for you. That's for sure. It pulls you down into the underworld, and that's where the dragons are. All you've got at that point is your capacity to bloody well keep your eyes open, and to speak as carefully and as clearly as you can. Maybe, if you're lucky, you'll get through it that way and come out the other side. It's taken people a very long time to figure that out, and it looks, to me, that the idea is erected on the platform of our ancient ancestors, maybe tens of millions of years ago, because we seem to represent that which disturbs us deeply using the same system that we used to represent serpentile, or other, carnivorous predators. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series, 1,
181:To what gods shall the sacrifice be offered? Who shall be invoked to manifest and protect in the human being this increasing godhead?

Agni first, for without him the sacrificial flame cannot burn on the altar of the soul. That flame of Agni is the seven-tongued power of the Will, a Force of God instinct with Knowledge. This conscious and forceful will is the immortal guest in our mortality, a pure priest and a divine worker, the mediator between earth and heaven. It carries what we offer to the higher Powers and brings back in return their force and light and joy into our humanity.

Indra, the Puissant next, who is the power of pure Existence self-manifested as the Divine Mind. As Agni is one pole of Force instinct with knowledge that sends its current upward from earth to heaven, so Indra is the other pole of Light instinct with force which descends from heaven to earth. He comes down into our world as the Hero with the shining horses and slays darkness and division with his lightnings, pours down the life-giving heavenly waters, finds in the trace of the hound, Intuition, the lost or hidden illuminations, makes the Sun of Truth mount high in the heaven of our mentality.

Surya, the Sun, is the master of that supreme Truth, - truth of being, truth of knowledge, truth of process and act and movement and functioning. He is therefore the creator or rather the manifester of all things - for creation is out-bringing, expression by the Truth and Will - and the father, fosterer, enlightener of our souls. The illuminations we seek are the herds of this Sun who comes to us in the track of the divine Dawn and releases and reveals in us night-hidden world after world up to the highest Beatitude.

Of that beatitude Soma is the representative deity. The wine of his ecstasy is concealed in the growths of earth, in the waters of existence; even here in our physical being are his immortalising juices and they have to be pressed out and offered to all the gods; for in that strength these shall increase and conquer.

Each of these primary deities has others associated with him who fulfil functions that arise from his own. For if the truth of Surya is to be established firmly in our mortal nature, there are previous conditions that are indispensable; a vast purity and clear wideness destructive of all sin and crooked falsehood, - and this is Varuna; a luminous power of love and comprehension leading and forming into harmony all our thoughts, acts and impulses, - this is Mitra; an immortal puissance of clear-discerning aspiration and endeavour, - this is Aryaman; a happy spontaneity of the right enjoyment of all things dispelling the evil dream of sin and error and suffering, - this is Bhaga. These four are powers of the Truth of Surya. For the whole bliss of Soma to be established perfectly in our nature a happy and enlightened and unmaimed condition of mind, vitality and body are necessary. This condition is given to us by the twin Ashwins; wedded to the daughter of Light, drinkers of honey, bringers of perfect satisfactions, healers of maim and malady they occupy our parts of knowledge and parts of action and prepare our mental, vital and physical being for an easy and victorious ascension.

Indra, the Divine Mind, as the shaper of mental forms has for his assistants, his artisans, the Ribhus, human powers who by the work of sacrifice and their brilliant ascension to the high dwelling-place of the Sun have attained to immortality and help mankind to repeat their achievement. They shape by the mind Indra's horses, the chariot of the Ashwins, the weapons of the Gods, all the means of the journey and the battle. But as giver of the Light of Truth and as Vritra-slayer Indra is aided by the Maruts, who are powers of will and nervous or vital Force that have attained to the light of thought and the voice of self-expression. They are behind all thought and speech as its impellers and they battle towards the Light, Truth and Bliss of the supreme Consciousness.

There are also female energies; for the Deva is both Male and Female and the gods also are either activising souls or passively executive and methodising energies. Aditi, infinite Mother of the Gods, comes first; and there are besides five powers of the Truthconsciousness, - Mahi or Bharati, the vast Word that brings us all things out of the divine source; Ila, the strong primal word of the Truth who gives us its active vision; Saraswati, its streaming current and the word of its inspiration; Sarama, the Intuition, hound of heaven who descends into the cavern of the subconscient and finds there the concealed illuminations; Dakshina, whose function is to discern rightly, dispose the action and the offering and distribute in the sacrifice to each godhead its portion. Each god, too, has his female energy.

All this action and struggle and ascension is supported by Heaven our Father and Earth our Mother Parents of the Gods, who sustain respectively the purely mental and psychic and the physical consciousness. Their large and free scope is the condition of our achievement. Vayu, master of life, links them together by the mid-air, the region of vital force. And there are other deities, - Parjanya, giver of the rain of heaven; Dadhikravan, the divine war-horse, a power of Agni; the mystic Dragon of the Foundations; Trita Aptya who on the third plane of existence consummates our triple being; and more besides.

The development of all these godheads is necessary to our perfection. And that perfection must be attained on all our levels, - in the wideness of earth, our physical being and consciousness; in the full force of vital speed and action and enjoyment and nervous vibration, typified as the Horse which must be brought forward to upbear our endeavour; in the perfect gladness of the heart of emotion and a brilliant heat and clarity of the mind throughout our intellectual and psychical being; in the coming of the supramental Light, the Dawn and the Sun and the shining Mother of the herds, to transform all our existence; for so comes to us the possession of the Truth, by the Truth the admirable surge of the Bliss, in the Bliss infinite Consciousness of absolute being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns to the Mystic Fire, The Doctrine of the Mystics,
182:[The Gods and Their Worlds]

   [...] According to traditions and occult schools, all these zones of realities, these planes of realities have got different names; they have been classified in a different way, but there is an essential analogy, and if you go back far enough into the traditions, you see only the words changing according to the country and the language. Even now, the experiences of Western occultists and those of Eastern occultists offer great similarities. All who set out on the discovery of these invisible worlds and make a report of what they saw, give a very similar description, whether they be from here or there; they use different words, but the experience is very similar and the handling of forces is the same.

   This knowledge of the occult worlds is based on the existence of subtle bodies and of subtle worlds corresponding to those bodies. They are what the psychological method calls "states of consciousness", but these states of consciousness really correspond to worlds. The occult procedure consists then in being aware of these various inner states of being or subtle bodies and in becoming sufficiently a master of them so as to be able to go out of them successively, one after another. There is indeed a whole scale of subtleties, increasing or decreasing according to the direction in which you go, and the occult procedure consists in going out of a denser body into a subtler body and so on again, up to the most ethereal regions. You go, by successive exteriorisations, into bodies or worlds more and more subtle. It is somewhat as if every time you passed into another dimension. The fourth dimension of the physicists is nothing but the scientific transcription of an occult knowledge. To give another image, one can say that the physical body is at the centre - it is the most material, the densest and also the smallest - and the inner bodies, more subtle, overflow more and more the central physical body; they pass through it, extending themselves farther and farther, like water evaporating from a porous vase and forming a kind of steam all around. And the greater the subtlety, the more the extension tends to unite with that of the universe: one ends by universalising oneself. And it is altogether a concrete process which gives an objective experience of invisible worlds and even enables one to act in these worlds.

   There are, then, only a very small number of people in the West who know that these gods are not merely subjective and imaginary - more or less wildly imaginary - but that they correspond to a universal truth.

   All these regions, all these domains are filled with beings who exist, each in its own domain, and if you are awake and conscious on a particular plane - for instance, if on going out of a more material body you awake on some higher plane, you have the same relation with the things and people of that plane as you had with the things and people of the material world. That is to say, there exists an entirely objective relation that has nothing to do with the idea you may have of these things. Naturally, the resemblance is greater and greater as you approach the physical world, the material world, and there even comes a time when the one region has a direct action upon the other. In any case, in what Sri Aurobindo calls the overmental worlds, you will find a concrete reality absolutely independent of your personal experience; you go back there and again find the same things, with the differences that have occurred during your absence. And you have relations with those beings that are identical with the relations you have with physical beings, with this difference that the relation is more plastic, supple and direct - for example, there is the capacity to change the external form, the visible form, according to the inner state you are in. But you can make an appointment with someone and be at the appointed place and find the same being again, with certain differences that have come about during your absence; it is entirely concrete with results entirely concrete.

   One must have at least a little of this experience in order to understand these things. Otherwise, those who are convinced that all this is mere human imagination and mental formation, who believe that these gods have such and such a form because men have thought them to be like that, and that they have certain defects and certain qualities because men have thought them to be like that - all those who say that God is made in the image of man and that he exists only in human thought, all these will not understand; to them this will appear absolutely ridiculous, madness. One must have lived a little, touched the subject a little, to know how very concrete the thing is.

   Naturally, children know a good deal if they have not been spoilt. There are so many children who return every night to the same place and continue to live the life they have begun there. When these faculties are not spoilt with age, you can keep them with you. At a time when I was especially interested in dreams, I could return exactly to a place and continue a work that I had begun: supervise something, for example, set something in order, a work of organisation or of discovery, of exploration. You go until you reach a certain spot, as you would go in life, then you take a rest, then you return and begin again - you begin the work at the place where you left off and you continue it. And you perceive that there are things which are quite independent of you, in the sense that changes of which you are not at all the author, have taken place automatically during your absence.

   But for this, you must live these experiences yourself, you must see them yourself, live them with sufficient sincerity and spontaneity in order to see that they are independent of any mental formation. For you can do the opposite also, and deepen the study of the action of mental formation upon events. This is very interesting, but it is another domain. And this study makes you very careful, very prudent, because you become aware of how far you can delude yourself. So you must study both, the dream and the occult reality, in order to see what is the essential difference between the two. The one depends upon us; the other exists in itself; entirely independent of the thought that we have of it.

   When you have worked in that domain, you recognise in fact that once a subject has been studied and something has been learnt mentally, it gives a special colour to the experience; the experience may be quite spontaneous and sincere, but the simple fact that the subject was known and studied lends a particular quality. Whereas if you had learnt nothing about the question, if you knew nothing at all, the transcription would be completely spontaneous and sincere when the experience came; it would be more or less adequate, but it would not be the outcome of a previous mental formation.

   Naturally, this occult knowledge or this experience is not very frequent in the world, because in those who do not have a developed inner life, there are veritable gaps between the external consciousness and the inmost consciousness; the linking states of being are missing and they have to be constructed. So when people enter there for the first time, they are bewildered, they have the impression they have fallen into the night, into nothingness, into non-being!

   I had a Danish friend, a painter, who was like that. He wanted me to teach him how to go out of the body; he used to have interesting dreams and thought that it would be worth the trouble to go there consciously. So I made him "go out" - but it was a frightful thing! When he was dreaming, a part of his mind still remained conscious, active, and a kind of link existed between this active part and his external being; then he remembered some of his dreams, but it was a very partial phenomenon. And to go out of one's body means to pass gradually through all the states of being, if one does the thing systematically. Well, already in the subtle physical, one is almost de-individualised, and when one goes farther, there remains nothing, for nothing is formed or individualised.

   Thus, when people are asked to meditate or told to go within, to enter into themselves, they are in agony - naturally! They have the impression that they are vanishing. And with reason: there is nothing, no consciousness!

   These things that appear to us quite natural and evident, are, for people who know nothing, wild imagination. If, for example, you transplant these experiences or this knowledge to the West, well, unless you have been frequenting the circles of occultists, they stare at you with open eyes. And when you have turned your back, they hasten to say, "These people are cranks!" Now to come back to the gods and conclude. It must be said that all those beings who have never had an earthly existence - gods or demons, invisible beings and powers - do not possess what the Divine has put into man: the psychic being. And this psychic being gives to man true love, charity, compassion, a deep kindness, which compensate for all his external defects.

   In the gods there is no fault because they live according to their own nature, spontaneously and without constraint: as gods, it is their manner of being. But if you take a higher point of view, if you have a higher vision, a vision of the whole, you see that they lack certain qualities that are exclusively human. By his capacity of love and self-giving, man can have as much power as the gods and even more, when he is not egoistic, when he has surmounted his egoism.

   If he fulfils the required condition, man is nearer to the Supreme than the gods are. He can be nearer. He is not so automatically, but he has the power to be so, the potentiality.

   If human love manifested itself without mixture, it would be all-powerful. Unfortunately, in human love there is as much love of oneself as of the one loved; it is not a love that makes you forget yourself. - 4 November 1958

   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III, 355
,
183:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step.

But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort.

Savitri alone is sufficient to make you climb to the highest peaks. If truly one knows how to meditate on Savitri, one will receive all the help one needs. For him who wishes to follow this path, it is a concrete help as though the Lord himself were taking you by the hand and leading you to the destined goal. And then, every question, however personal it may be, has its answer here, every difficulty finds its solution herein; indeed there is everything that is necessary for doing the Yoga.

*He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection.

You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, *I am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: *I have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages.

In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything.

It may then be said that Savitri is a revelation, it is a meditation, it is a quest of the Infinite, the Eternal. If it is read with this aspiration for Immortality, the reading itself will serve as a guide to Immortality. To read Savitri is indeed to practice Yoga, spiritual concentration; one can find there all that is needed to realise the Divine. Each step of Yoga is noted here, including the secret of all other Yogas. Surely, if one sincerely follows what is revealed here in each line one will reach finally the transformation of the Supramental Yoga. It is truly the infallible guide who never abandons you; its support is always there for him who wants to follow the path. Each verse of Savitri is like a revealed Mantra which surpasses all that man possessed by way of knowledge, and I repeat this, the words are expressed and arranged in such a way that the sonority of the rhythm leads you to the origin of sound, which is OM.

My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga.

All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind.

These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconscience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness.

And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed.

And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen.

My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal.

Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic message Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967

~ The Mother, Sweet Mother, The Mother to Mona Sarkar, [T0],

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:The gods favor the bold. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
2:Even the gods love jokes. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
3:Leave the rest to the gods. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
4:The gods have their own laws. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
5:The gods have their own rules. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
6:Ask the gods nothing excessive. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
7:The gods behold all righteous actions. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
8:The deeds of men never escape the gods. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
9:The gods have become our diseases. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
10:Fear first created the gods. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
11:The gods help them who help themselves. ~ aesop, @wisdomtrove
12:The gods see the deeds of the righteous. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
13:The gods love those of ordered soul. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
14:Man is greater than the gods. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
15:Those whom the gods love grow young. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
16:Beauty- it was a favor bestowed by the gods. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
17:Take the goods the gods provide thee. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
18:Pray the gods do not envy your happiness! ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
19:Slow but sure moves the might of the gods. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
20:The worshiper is the father of the gods. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
21:If the gods do evil then they are not gods. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
22:Whom the gods destroy, they first make mad. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
23:Even the gods are moved by the voice of entreaty. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
24:It is said that gifts persuade even the gods. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
25:The gods' service is tolerable, man's intolerable. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
26:To live without evil belongs only to the gods. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
27:Let my heart be wise. It is the gods' best gift. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
28:Of all the gods only death does not desire gifts. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
29:We have complicated every simple gift of the gods. ~ diogenes, @wisdomtrove
30:The gods are immortal men, and men are mortal gods. ~ heraclitus, @wisdomtrove
31:A Letter is a Joy of Earth - It is denied the Gods ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
32:Mankind is poised midway between the gods and the beasts. ~ plotinus, @wisdomtrove
33:I wonder do the gods know what it feels like to be a man. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
34:The gods visit the sins of the fathers upon the children. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
35:Know we how many tomorrows the gods intend for our todays. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
36:The Gods cannot help those who do not seize opportunities. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
37:Mediocrity is not allowed to poets, either by the gods or men. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
38:Respect the gods and the devils but keep them at a distance ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
39:The friendship of a great man is a favor of the gods. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
40:Who knows whether the gods will add tomorrow to the present hour? ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
41:There is as much confusion in the world of the gods as in ours. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
42:The saying goes that the gods leave a town once it is captured. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
43:Whom the Gods love die young no matter how long they live. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
44:The gods plant reason in mankind, of all good gifts the highest. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
45:Respect the gods, but have as little to do with them as possible. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
46:The gods are fond of the cryptic and dislike the evident. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
47:When a man takes the road to destruction, the gods help him along. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
48:All the gods, all the heavens, all the hells, are within you. ~ joseph-campbell, @wisdomtrove
49:For by the will of the gods Fate hath held sway since ancient days. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
50:To be famous when you are young is the fortune of the gods. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
51:The gods bestowed on Max [Beerbohm] the gift of perpetual old age. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
52:If you don't know how to serve men, why worry about serving the gods? ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
53:Who, except the gods, can live time through forever without any pain? ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
54:Let us be silent, that we may hear the whispers of the gods. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
55:Ah! Do not judge the gods, young man, they have painful secrets. ~ jean-paul-sartre, @wisdomtrove
56:Perfection belongs to the Gods; the most we can hope for is excellence. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
57:Truth is the beginning of every good to the gods, and of every good to man. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
58:Were not the gods forms created like me and you, mortal, transient? ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
59:Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
60:Who apart from the gods is without pain for his whole lifetime's length? ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
61:Heaven rewards the pious; those who cherish the gods Themselves are cherished. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
62:It is vain to ask of the gods what man is capable of supplying for himself. ~ epicurus, @wisdomtrove
63:Love is the joy of the good, the wonder of the wise, the amazement of the Gods. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
64:The ways of the gods are long, but in the end they are not without strength. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
65:Friendship is the gift of the gods, and the most precious boon to man. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
66:We must believe in the gods no longer if injustice is to prevail over justice. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
67:Are the gods not just?' &
68:It is the privilege of the gods to want nothing, and of godlike men to want little. ~ diogenes, @wisdomtrove
69:Know yourself and fit yourself to new fashions. For there is a new ruler among the gods. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
70:Believe me, the gods spare the afflicted, and do not always oppress those who are unfortunate. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
71:Once freedom lights its beacon in man's heart, the gods are powerless against him. ~ jean-paul-sartre, @wisdomtrove
72:Quos vilt perdere dementat' Whome the gods wish to destroy, they first drive made (Latin). ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
73:For the gods, though slow to see, see well, whenever a man casting aside worship turns folly. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
74:It is folly for a man to pray to the gods for that which he has the power to obtain by himself. ~ epicurus, @wisdomtrove
75:When the anger of the gods is incurred, wealth or power only bring more devastating punishment. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
76:Once liberty has exploded in the soul of a man, the gods can do nothing against that man. ~ jean-paul-sartre, @wisdomtrove
77:It is said that men may not be the dreams of the god, but rather that the gods are the dreams of men. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
78:You have to decide to servant the gods of materialism all around us or the true and the living God. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
79:As long as we are lucky we attribute it to our smartness; our bad luck we give the gods credit for. ~ josh-billings, @wisdomtrove
80:Is it the gods who set this fire in our hearts, or do we each make our fierce desire into a god? ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
81:Eat and carouse with Bacchus, or munch dry bread with Jesus, but don't sit down without one of the gods. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
82:They are not wise, then, who stand forth to buffet against Love; for Love rules the gods as he will, and me. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
83:The Gods created certain kinds of beings to replenish our bodies; they are the trees and the plants and the seeds. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
84:That fear first created the gods is perhaps as true as anything so brief could be on so great a subject. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
85:What is to be taught I learn; what is to be discovered I seek; what is to be prayed for I sought from the gods. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
86:The ineffable joy of forgiving and being forgiven forms an ecstasy that might well arouse the envy of the gods. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
87:The gods at will can shape a gladder strain, and from the lamentations at the graveside, a song of triumph may arise. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
88:What is Death, so it be but glorious? &
89:Grateful for his mistakes, man should be the gods, because by overcoming the faults the stronger force is developed. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
90:A man's moral conscience is the curse he had to accept from the gods in order to gain from them the right to dream. ~ william-faulkner, @wisdomtrove
91:And this is the life of the Gods, and of Godlike men, a life without love of the world, a flight of the Alone to the Alone. ~ plotinus, @wisdomtrove
92:If a man loves the labour of his trade, apart from any question of success or fame, the gods have called him. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
93:Speak the truth, do not yield to anger; give, if thou art asked for little; by these three steps thou wilt go near the gods. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
94:When the gods know that a god hath fallen, With this kindly feeling They do encourage him&
95:Not all of life's roads are set fast, for a man may do this or a man may do that and not even the gods know the mind of a man. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
96:Only one accomplishment is beyond both the power and the mercy of the Gods. They cannot make the past as though it had never been. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
97:Before the gods that made the gods Had seen their sunrise pass, The White Horse of the White Horse Vale Was cut out of the grass. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
98:In the elder days of art Builders wrought with greatest care Each minute and unseen part, For the Gods are everywhere ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
99:When an oath is taken ... the mind is more attentive; for it guards against two things, the reproach of friends and offence against the gods. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
100:I talk about the gods, I am an atheist. But I am an artist too, and therefore a liar. Distrust everything I say. I am telling the truth. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
101:They are enlightened who join in this play knowing it as play, for people suffer only because they take as serious what the gods made for fun. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
102:The realms of the gods and demons - heaven, purgatory, hell - are of the substance of dreams. Myth, in this view, is the dream of the world. ~ joseph-campbell, @wisdomtrove
103:If all the world be worth thy winning. / Think, oh think it worth enjoying: / Lovely Thaïs sits beside thee, / Take the good the gods provide thee. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
104:There must, whether the gods see it or not, be something great in the mortal soul. For suffering, it seems, is infinite, and our capacity without limit. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
105:If you are going to try, go all the way or don't even start. If you follow it you will be alive with the gods. It is the only good fight there is. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
106:Do we, holding that the gods exist, deceive ourselves with insubstantial dreams and lies, while random careless chance and change alone control the world? ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
107:The gods have sent medicines for the venom of serpents, but there is no medicine for a bad woman. She is more noxious than the viper, or than fire itself. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
108:Pray all the time, read all the scriptures in the world, and worship all the gods there are ... but unless you realize the Truth, there is no freedom. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
109:It is not good to want a thing too much. It sometimes drives the luck away. You must want it just enough, and you must be very tactful with Gods or the gods. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
110:Perhaps the gods are kind to us, by making life more disagreeable as we grow older. In the end death seems less intolerable than the manifold burdens we carry ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
111:There is no happiness where there is no wisdom; No wisdom but in submission to the gods. Big words are always punished, And proud men in old age learn to be wise. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
112:The Gods occupy the loftiest regions, men the lowest, the demons the middle region... They have immortality of body, but passions of the mind in common with men. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
113:To give oneself ernestly to securing righteousness and justice among the people, and while respecting the gods and demons, to keep aloof from them, that may be called wisdom. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
114:Greece is the home of the gods; they may have died but their presence still makes itself felt. The gods were of human proportion: they were created out of the human spirit. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
115:The change which the writing wrought in me (and of which I did not write) was only a beginning; only to prepare me for the gods' surgery. They used my own pen to probe my wound. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
116:Best of children, sisters arm-in-arm, we must bear what the gods give us to bear&
117:Every evildoer began by despising the Gods; and one not previously corrupt, taking to this contempt, even though in other respects not wholly bad, becomes an evildoer by the very fact. ~ plotinus, @wisdomtrove
118:The gods, (if gods to goodness are inclined If acts of mercy touch their heavenly mind), And, more than all the gods, your generous heart, Conscious of worth, requite its own desert! ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
119:The world, an entity out of everything, was created by none of the gods or men, but was, is and will be eternally living fire, regularly becoming ignited and reg- ularly becoming extinguished. ~ heraclitus, @wisdomtrove
120:Naturally, since [the Sumerians] didn't know what caused the flood anymore than we do, they blamed the gods. (That's the advantage of religion. You're never short an explanation for anything.) ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
121:[Hermes addresses Prometheus :] To you, the clever and crafty, bitter beyond all bitterness, who has sinned against the gods in bestowing honors upon creatures of a day&
122:For every nation that lives peaceably, there will be many others to grow hard and push their arrogance to extremes; the gods attend to these things slowly. But they attend to those who put off God and turn to madness. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
123:Of all the gods, Death only craves not gifts: Nor sacrifice, nor yet drink-offering poured Avails; no altars hath he, nor is soothed By hymns of praise. From him alone of all The powers of heaven Persuasion holds aloof. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
124:Give your heart to the trade you have learnt, and draw refreshment from it. Let the rest of your days be spent as one who has whole-heartedly committed his all to the gods and is thenceforth no man's master or slave. ~ marcus-aurelius, @wisdomtrove
125:As those that pull down private houses adjoining to the temples of the gods, prop up such parts as are contiguous to them; so, in undermining bashfulness, due regard is to be had to adjacent modesty, good-nature and humanity. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
126:&
127:The gods should certainly be revered, but kept at a distance... . The way is not beyond man; he who creates a way outside of man cannot make it a true way. A good man is content with changing man, and that is enough for him. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
128:If you would cure anger, do not feed it. Say to yourself: &
129:thou that pinest in the imprisonment of the Actual, and criest bitterly to the gods for a kingdom wherein to rule and create, know this for a truth: the thing thou seekest is already here, "here or nowhere," couldst thou only see. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
130:If you're going to try, go all the way. There is no other feeling like that. You will be alone with the gods, and the nights will flame with fire. You will ride life straight to perfect laughter. It's the only good fight there is. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
131:John Galt is Prometheus who changed his mind. After centuries of being torn by vultures in payment for having brought to men the fire of the gods, he broke his chains—and he withdrew his fire—until the day when men withdraw their vultures. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
132:Now as of old the gods give men all good things, excepting only those that are baneful and injurious and useless. These, now as of old, are not gifts of the gods: men stumble into them themselves because of their own blindness and folly. ~ democritus, @wisdomtrove
133:If the gods have the will to remove evil and cannot, then they are not all-powerful. If they are neither able nor willing, they are neither all-powerful or benevolent. If they are both able and willing to annihilate evil, why does it exist? ~ epicurus, @wisdomtrove
134:The animal has its happiness in the senses, the human beings in their intellect, and the gods in spiritual contemplation. It is only to the soul that has attained to this contemplative state that the world really becomes beautiful. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
135:Gods should be iridescent, like the rainbow in the storm. Man creates a God in his own image, and the gods grow old along with the men that made them... But the god-stuff roars eternally, like the sea, with too vast a sound to be heard. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
136:Watchful are the Gods of all Hands with slaughter stained. The black Furies wait, and when a man Has grown by luck, not justice, great, With sudden overturn of chance They wear him to a shade, and, cast Down to perdition, who shall save him? ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
137:To the Greeks, the supreme function of music was to "praise the gods and educate the youth". In Egypt... Initiatory music was heard only in Temple rites because it carried the vibratory rhythms of other worlds and of a life beyond the mortal. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
138:The truth Has to be melted out of our stubborn lives By suffering. Nothing speaks the truth, Nothing tells us how things really are, Nothing forces us to know What we do not want to know Except pain. And this is how the gods declare their love. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
139:But &
140:It is not the rich man you should properly call happy, but him who knows how to use with wisdom the blessings of the gods, to endure hard poverty, and who fears dishonor worse than death, and is not afraid to die for cherished friends or fatherland. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
141:Man's highest blessedness, In wisdom chiefly stands; And in the things that touch upon the Gods, &
142:Since boredom advances and boredom is the root of all evil, no wonder, then, that the world goes backwards, that evil spreads. This can be traced back to the very beginning of the world. The gods were bored; therefore they created human beings. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
143:We should not speak of one that prospers well As happy, till his life have run its course, And reached its goal. An evil spirit's gift In shortest time has oft laid low the state Of one full rich in great prosperity, When the change comes, and so the Gods appoint. ~ sophocles, @wisdomtrove
144:Boileau said that Kings, Gods and Heroes only were fit subjects for literature. The writer can only write about what he admires. Present-day kings aren't very inspiring, the gods are on a vacation and about the only heroes left are the scientists and the poor. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
145:If you have no love, do what you will - go after all the gods on earth, do all the social activities, try to reform the poor, the politics, write books, write poems - you are a dead human being. Without love your problems will increase, multiply endlessly. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
146:Aegistheus, the kings have another secret... . Once liberty has exploded in the soul of a man, the Gods can do nothing against that man. It is a matter for men to handle amongst themselves, and it is up to other men and to them alone to let him flee or to destroy him. ~ jean-paul-sartre, @wisdomtrove
147:It is pathetic to observe how lowly the motives are that religion, even the highest, attributes to the deity... To be given the best morsel, to be remembered, to be praised, to be obeyed blindly and punctiliously - these have been thought points of honor with the gods. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
148:I have found that you have only to take that one step toward the gods, and they will then take ten steps toward you. That step, the heroic first step of the journey, is out of, or over the edge of, your boundaries, and it often must be taken before you know that you will. ~ joseph-campbell, @wisdomtrove
149:The gods retain their threefold task: they must exorcize the terrors of nature, they must reconcile men to the cruelty of Fate, particularly as it is shown in death, and they must compensate them for the sufferings and privations which a civilized life in common has imposed on them. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
150:Men! She could not understand why so many women feared them. Hadn't the gods made them with the most vurnerable part of their guts hanging right out of their bodies, like a misplaced bit of bowel? Kick them there and they curled up like snails. Caress them there and their brains melted. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
151:I know men; and I tell you that Jesus Christ is not a man. Superficial minds see a resemblance between Christ and the founders of empires, and the gods of other religions. That resemblance does not exist. There is between Christianity and whatever other religions the distance of infinity. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
152:The human condition is such that pain and effort are not just symptoms which can be removed without changing life itself; they are the modes in which life itself, together with the necessity to which it is bound, makes itself felt. For mortals, the easy life of the gods would be a lifeless life. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
153:Cease to brag to me of America, and its model institutions and constitutions. America, too, will have to strain its energies, crack its sinews, and all but break its heart, as the rest of us have had to do, in thousand-fold wrestle with the Pythons, and mud-demons, before it can become a babitation for the gods. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
154:I'm not going to get involved in a debate with you. Just remember this: the gods give, and the gods take away. Even if you are not aware of having been granted what you posses, the gods remember what they gave you. They don't forget a thing. You should use the abilities you have been granted with the utmost care. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
155:I pray the gods some respite from the weary task of this long year's watch that lying on the Atreidae's roof on bended arm, dog- like, I have kept, marking the conclave of all night's stars, those potentates blazing in the heavens that bring winter and summer to mortal men, the constellations, when they wane, when they rise. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
156:And in that far distant day when the gods become wholly beautiful, or we at last are shown how beautiful they always were, this will happen more and more. For mortals, as you said, will become more and more jealous. And mother and wife and child and friend will all be in league to keep a soul from being united with the Divine Nature. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
157:Faith, faith, faith in ourselves, faith, faith in God, this is the secret of greatness.If you have faith in all the three hundred and thirty millions of your mythological Gods, and in all the Gods which foreigners have now and again introduced into your midst, and still have no faith in yourselves, there is no salvation for you. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
158:An irreligious man is not one who denies the gods of the majority, but one who applies to the gods the opinions of the majority. For what most men say about the gods are not ideas derived from sensation, but false opinions, according to which the greatest evils come to the wicked, and the greatest blessings come to the good from the gods. ~ epicurus, @wisdomtrove
159:Truth alone triumphs, not untruth. Through truth alone lies the way to Devayana (the way to the gods). Those who think that a little sugar - coating of untruth helps the spread of truth are mistaken and will find in the long run that a single drop of poison poisons the whole mass ... The man who is pure, and who dares, does all things. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
160:Softly sweet, in Lydian measures, Soon he sooth'd his soul to pleasures. War, he sung, is toil and trouble; Honour but an empty bubble; Never ending, still beginning, Fighting still, and still destroying. If all the world be worth the winning, Think, oh think it worth enjoying: Lovely Thais sits beside thee, Take the good the gods provide thee. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
161:I sit here drunk now. I am a series of small victories and large defeats and I am as amazed as any other that I have gotten from there to here without committing murder or being murdered; without having ended up in the madhouse. as I drink alone again tonight my soul despite all the past agony thanks all the gods who were not there for me then. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
162:I pray the gods will give me some relief and end this weary job. One long full year I've been lying here, on this rooftop, the palace of the sons of Atreus, resting on my arms, just like a dog. I've come to know the night sky, every star, the powers we see glittering in the sky, bringing winter and summer to us all, as the constellations rise and sink. ~ aeschylus, @wisdomtrove
163:You may control a mad elephant; You may shut the mouth of the bear and the tiger; Ride the lion and play with the cobra; By alchemy you may learn your livelihood; You may wander through the universe incognito; Make vassals of the gods; be ever youthful; You may walk in water and live in fire; But control of the mind is better and more difficult. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
164:I do not pretend to be able to prove that there is no God. I equally cannot prove that Satan is a fiction. The Christian god may exist; so may the gods of Olympus, or of ancient Egypt, or of Babylon. But no one of these hypotheses is more probable than any other: they lie outside the region of even probable knowledge, and therefore there is no reason to consider any of them. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
165:Nature is what we know. We do not know the gods of religions. And nature is not kind, or merciful, or loving. If God made me - the fabled God of the three qualities of which I spoke: mercy, kindness, love - He also made the fish I catch and eat. And where do His mercy, kindness, and love for that fish come in? No; nature made us - nature did it all - not the gods of the religions. ~ thomas-edison, @wisdomtrove
166:The gods were bored and so they created man. Adam was bored because he was alone, so Eve was created.  Thus boredom entered the world, and increased in proportion to the increase in population.  Adam was bored alone, then Adam and Eve were bored together; them Adam and Eve and Cain and Abel were bored en famille; then the population of the world increased, and the people were bored en masse. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
167:The Aztec gods and goddesses are, as far as we have known anything about them, an unlovely and unlovable lot. In their myths there is no grace or charm, no poetry. Only this perpetual grudge, grudge, grudging, one god grudging another, the gods grudging men their existence, and men grudging the animals. The goddess of love is goddess of dirt and prostitution, a dirt-eater, a horror, without a touch of tenderness. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
168:It is evident, from their method of propagation, that a couple of cats, in fifty years, would stock a whole kingdom; and if that religious veneration were still paid them, it would, in twenty more, not only be easier in Egypt to find a god than a man, which Petronius says was the case in some parts of Italy; but the gods must at last entirely starve the men, and leave themselves neither priests nor votaries remaining. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
169:The ancient man approached God (or even the gods)as the accused person approaches his judge. For the modern man the roles are reversed. He is the judge: God is in the dock. He is quite a kindly judge: if God should have a reasonable defense for being the god who permits war, poverty, and disease, he is ready to listen to it. The trial may even end in God's acquittal. But the important thing is that Man is on the bench and God is in the dock. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
170:Oh, I can see it happening, age after age, and growing worse the more you reveal your beauty: the son turning his back on the mother and the bride on her groom, stolen away by this everlasting calling, calling, calling of the gods. Taken where we can't follow. It would be far better for us if you were foul and ravening. We'd rather you drank their blood than stole their hearts. We'd rather they were ours and dead than yours and made immortal. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
171:Think of all the years passed by in which you said to yourself I’ll do it tomorrow, and how the gods have again and again granted you periods of grace of which you have not availed yourself. It is time to realise that you are a member of the Universe, that you are born of Nature itself, and to know that a limit has been set to your time. Use every moment wisely, to perceive your inner refulgence, or ’twill be gone and nevermore within your reach.  ~ marcus-aurelius, @wisdomtrove
172:[Not parroting.] My old Master used to say, "It is all very good to teach the parrot to say, &
173:When the time comes to you at which you will be forced at last to utter the speech which has lain at the center of your soul for years, which you have, all that time, idiot-like, been saying over and over, you'll not talk about the joy of words. I saw well why the gods do not speak to us openly, nor let us answer. Till that word can be dug out of us, why should they hear the babble that we think we mean? How can they meet us face to face till we have faces? ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
174:This is what I believe: That I am I. That my soul is a dark forest. That my known self will never be more than a little clearing in the forest. That gods, strange gods, come forth from the forest into the clearing of my known self, and then go back. That I must have the courage to let them come and go. That I will never let mankind put anything over me, but that I will try always to recognize and submit to the gods in me and the gods in other men and women. There is my creed. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
175:Only a philosopher's mind grows wings, since its memory always keeps it as close as possible to those realities by being close to which the gods are divine. A man who uses reminders of these things correctly is always at the highest, most perfect level of initiation, and he is the only one who is perfect as perfect can be. He stands outside human concerns and draws close to the divine; ordinary people think he is disturbed and rebuke him for this, unaware that he is possessed by god. ~ plato, @wisdomtrove
176:There is no God separate from you, no God higher than you, the real "you." All the gods are little beings to you, all the ideas of God and Father in heaven are but your own reflection. God Himself is your image. “God created man after His own image." That is wrong. Man creates God after his own image. That is right. Throughout the universe we are creating gods after our own image. We create the god and fall down at his feet and worship him; and when this dream comes, we love it ! ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
177:The Laughing Heart your life is your life don’t let it be clubbed into dank submission. be on the watch. there are ways out. there is a light somewhere. it may not be much light but it beats the darkness. be on the watch. the gods will offer you chances. know them. take them. you can’t beat death but you can beat death in life, sometimes. and the more often you learn to do it, the more light there will be. your life is your life. know it while you have it. you are marvelous the gods wait to delight in you. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
178:Rosemary bubbled with delight at the trunks. Her naivete responded whole-heartedly to the expensive simplicity of the Divers, unaware of its complexity and its lack of innocence, unaware that it was all a selection of quality rather than quantity from the run of the world's bazaar; and that the simplicity of behavior also, the nursery-like peace and good will, the emphasis on the simpler virtues, was part of a desperate bargain with the gods and had been attained through struggles she could not have guessed at. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
179:. . .in August in Mississippi there’s a few days somewhere about the middle of the month when suddenly there’s a foretaste of fall, it’s cool, there’s a lambence, a soft, a luminous quality to the light, as though it came not from just today but from back in the old classic times. It might have fauns and satyrs and the gods and - from Greece, from Olympus in it somewhere. It lasts just for a day or two, then it’s gone. . .the title reminded me of that time, of a luminosity older than our Christian civilization. ~ william-faulkner, @wisdomtrove
180:At first, man was enslaved by the gods. But he broke their chains. Then he was enslaved by the kings. But he broke their chains. He was enslaved by his birth, by his kin, by his race. But he broke their chains. He declared to all his brothers that a man has rights which neither god nor king nor other men can take away from him, no matter what their number, for his is the right of man, and there is no right on earth above this right. And he stood on the threshold of freedom for which the blood of the centuries behind him had been spilled. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
181:When a child first catches adults out - when it first walks into his grave little head that adults do not always have divine intelligence, that their judgments are not always wise, their thinking true, their sentences just - his world falls into panic desolation. The gods are fallen and all safety gone. And there is one sure thing about the fall of gods: they do not fall a little; they crash and shatter or sink deeply into green muck. It is a tedious job to build them up again; they never quite shine. And the child's world is never quite whole again. It is an aching kind of growing. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
182:Ideas have become far more important to us than action - ideas so cleverly expressed in books by the intellectuals in every field. The more cunning, the more subtle, those ideas are the more we worship them and the books that contain them.  We are those books, we are those ideas, so heavily conditioned are we by them.  We are forever discussing ideas and ideals and dialectically offering opinions.  Every religion has its dogma, its formula, its own scaffold to reach the gods, and when inquiring into the beginning of thought we are questioning the importance of this whole edifice of ideas.  We have separated ideas from action because ideas are always of the past and action is always the present - that is, living is always the present.  We are afraid of living and therefore the past, as ideas, has become so important to us.       ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Even the Gods love jokes. ~ Plato,
2:Even the gods love jokes. ~ Plato,
3:The gods are leaving. ~ Jos Rizal,
4:The Gods have meant ~ Ruth St Denis,
5:Leave the rest to the gods. ~ Horace,
6:The gods have their own laws. ~ Ovid,
7:...the Gods too love a joke. ~ Plato,
8:Only the Gods are real. ~ Neil Gaiman,
9:The gods have their own rules. ~ Ovid,
10:All men have need of the gods. ~ Homer,
11:may the gods be with you ~ Rick Riordan,
12:Whom the gods love dies young. ~ Menander,
13:The Gods rank work above virtues. ~ Hesiod,
14:Ask the gods nothing excessive. ~ Aeschylus,
15:He whom the Gods love dies young. ~ Plautus,
16:What the Gods want happens soon ~ Petronius,
17:He whom the gods love dies young. ~ Menander,
18:Keep challenging the gods ~ Scott Westerfeld,
19:Let the gods speak softly of us ~ Ezra Pound,
20:the gods are created by poets" --Ovid ~ Ovid,
21:The gods don’t make mistakes. ~ Tomi Adeyemi,
22:The gods too are fond of a joke. ~ Aristotle,
23:If it pleases the gods, so be it. ~ Epictetus,
24:The gods behold all righteous actions. ~ Ovid,
25:The gods love to fuck with us. ~ Lauren Groff,
26:If it pleases the gods, so be it. ~ Epictetus,
27:Mathematics is the Life of the Gods. ~ Novalis,
28:The deeds of men never escape the gods. ~ Ovid,
29:The gods have become our diseases. ~ Carl Jung,
30:Uneven numbers are the gods' delight. ~ Virgil,
31:Fear first created the gods. ~ George Santayana,
32:Speak of the Gods as they are. ~ Bias of Priene,
33:The gods help them who help themselves. ~ Aesop,
34:The gods see the deeds of the righteous. ~ Ovid,
35:"The gods have become our diseases." ~ Carl Jung,
36:The gods help them that help themselves. ~ Aesop,
37:The gods love those of ordered soul. ~ Sophocles,
38:The gods play games with men as balls. ~ Plautus,
39:We are the playthings of the gods. ~ Roger Ebert,
40:Wi-Fi is a blessing from the gods. ~ Darren Shan,
41:Astrology reveals the will of the gods. ~ Juvenal,
42:Jacob was a gift from the gods. ~ Stephenie Meyer,
43:Man is greater than the gods. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
44:the gods play no
favorites. ~ Charles Bukowski,
45:How the gods must have laughed ~ Christian Cameron,
46:Take the good the gods provide thee. ~ John Dryden,
47:Those whom the gods love grow young. ~ Oscar Wilde,
48:What Were the Gods Thinking?” list. ~ Rick Riordan,
49:Whom the gods notice they destroy. ~ Philip K Dick,
50:Beauty- it was a favor bestowed by the gods. ~ Ovid,
51:Do the gods of different nations ~ Orson Scott Card,
52:Fear in the world first created the gods. ~ Statius,
53:It's up to poets to revive the gods. ~ Jim Harrison,
54:Lha Gyal Lo! (Victory to the gods) ~ Dalai Lama XIV,
55:Pray, for all men need the aid of the gods. ~ Homer,
56:The gods are on the side of the stronger. ~ Tacitus,
57:Thank the gods and pass the hot sause ~ Rick Riordan,
58:Who hearkens to the gods, the gods give ear. ~ Homer,
59:Perfection belongs to the Gods; the most ~ Carl Jung,
60:Pray the gods do not envy your happiness! ~ Euripides,
61:Pulque - lightning nectar for the Gods. ~ Steve Olson,
62:The sacrifice of Diogenes to all the gods. ~ Diogenes,
63:Not even the gods fight against necessity. ~ Simonides,
64:Slow but sure moves the might of the gods. ~ Euripides,
65:Sometimes the gods give you a break. ~ Richard Bachman,
66:Take the goods the gods provide you. ~ H Rider Haggard,
67:The gods need heroes. They always have. ~ Rick Riordan,
68:The worshiper is the father of the gods. ~ H L Mencken,
69:To hate excellence is to hate the gods. ~ Mary Renault,
70:Ah yes, the gods use us mortals as footballs! ~ Plautus,
71:Dancers are the messengers of the gods. ~ Martha Graham,
72:If the gods do evil then they are not gods. ~ Euripides,
73:I will storm the gods, and shake the universe. ~ Seneca,
74:Men create the gods after their own images. ~ Aristotle,
75:Nearer the gods no mortal may approach. ~ Edmond Halley,
76:Whom the gods destroy, they first make mad. ~ Euripides,
77:Even the gods are moved by the voice of entreaty. ~ Ovid,
78:I grew up in the arms of the gods. ~ Friedrich H lderlin,
79:I will storm the Gods and shake the Universe ~ Euripides,
80:Mercury ~ Messenger of the Gods shar.es/cL6M8 #astrology,
81:The gods are watching, but idly, yawning. ~ Mason Cooley,
82:I am old, but the Gods still love me. ~ Erich von Daniken,
83:It is said that gifts persuade even the gods. ~ Euripides,
84:The gods are what has failed to become of us ~ W S Merwin,
85:The gods thought otherwise.
Dis aliter visum. ~ Virgil,
86:A man takes what the gods thrust upon him. ~ David Gemmell,
87:And this stuff about the gods.” She grabbed my ~ Anonymous,
88:The gods' service is tolerable, man's intolerable. ~ Plato,
89:To live without evil belongs only to the gods. ~ Sophocles,
90:A culture finds the gods it needs. ~ Kevin Crossley Holland,
91:Heaven rewards the pious; those who cherish the gods ~ Ovid,
92:...humanity generally gets the Gods it deserves. ~ Tom Holt,
93:If any man obeys the gods, they listen to him also. ~ Homer,
94:In wondrous ways do the gods make sport with men. ~ Plautus,
95:The poets are only the interpreters of the Gods. ~ Socrates,
96:Calling to the gods, she's every inch a goddess. ~ E L James,
97:Let my heart be wise. It is the gods' best gift. ~ Euripides,
98:Men mock the gods until they need them, Kaz. ~ Leigh Bardugo,
99:The gods do not fight against necessity. ~ Simonides of Ceos,
100:The gods, not out of mercy, have made me strong. ~ C S Lewis,
101:Cheeseburgers,’ Percy said. ‘Food of the gods. ~ Rick Riordan,
102:Having the fewest wants, I am nearest to the gods. ~ Socrates,
103:It is dangerous for a woman to defy the gods; ~ Anne Spencer,
104:Makes you wonder if the gods are always right. ~ Janet Morris,
105:Of all the gods only death does not desire gifts. ~ Aeschylus,
106:Power came from the rituals, not from the gods. ~ Neil Gaiman,
107:Silence is of the gods; only monkeys chatter. ~ Buster Keaton,
108:Thank the Gods! My misery exceeds all my hopes! ~ Jean Racine,
109:the demons of to day are the gods od yesterday. ~ Jon Skovron,
110:The fewer our wants the more we resemble the Gods. ~ Socrates,
111:The gods are fugitive guests of literature. ~ Roberto Calasso,
112:The gods sustain and guide all their works. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
113:We have complicated every simple gift of the gods. ~ Diogenes,
114:How can there be such anger in the minds of the gods? ~ Virgil,
115:May the gods always send me stupid enemies. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
116:Not even the gods fight against necessity. ~ Simonides of Ceos,
117:The gods are fugitive guests of literature. ~ Roberto Calasso,
118:Which of us can say what the gods hold wicked? ~ Carol Goodman,
119:Whoever truly worships the gods loves their priests. ~ Statius,
120:All the gods are dead except the god of war. ~ Eldridge Cleaver,
121:If the gods do a shameful thing, they are not gods. ~ Euripides,
122:If you can't please the gods, trick them. ~ Lesley Nneka Arimah,
123:The gods look in pleasure on penitent sinners. ~ Theodor Adorno,
124:There are many roads to happiness, if the gods assent. ~ Pindar,
125:A grief-stricken man is driven to defy the gods. ~ Clive Cussler,
126:Even the gods couldn't devise a fates so twisted. ~ Rick Riordan,
127:I was born for killing—the gods made me to ruin. ~ Mark Lawrence,
128:The glorious gifts of the gods are not to be cast aside. ~ Homer,
129:The gods are immortal men, and men are mortal gods. ~ Heraclitus,
130:Then the lights went out, and Shadow saw the gods. ~ Neil Gaiman,
131:Thou oughtest to know, since thou livest near the gods. ~ Horace,
132:Whoever obeys the gods, to him they particularly listen. ~ Homer,
133:The gods alone know, what kind of wife a man will have. ~ Juvenal,
134:The gods are immortal men, and men are mortal gods. ~ Heraclitus,
135:The gods give to mortals not everything at the same time. ~ Homer,
136:The gods love to laugh at a happy man, however. ~ Joe Abercrombie,
137:All that is from the gods is full of Providence. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
138:more 27 and 53,'i said. 'Food of the gods,' he said ~ David Almond,
139:Reverence the gods, and help men. Short is life. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
140:The gods are just, and of our pleasant vices ~ William Shakespeare,
141:There is no part of me that is not of the Gods. ~ Aleister Crowley,
142:Whom the gods wish to destroy, they first drive mad. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
143:Even in the darkest times the gods are always there. ~ Tomi Adeyemi,
144:A Letter is a Joy of Earth - It is denied the Gods ~ Emily Dickinson,
145:For you can always tell the gods by their appetite. ~ Anatole France,
146:Mankind is poised midway between the gods and the beasts. ~ Plotinus,
147:On the Disc the gods dealt severely with atheists. ~ Terry Pratchett,
148:The gods looked down from their mountain and shrugged. ~ Paul Auster,
149:Those who want the fewest things are nearest to the gods. ~ Socrates,
150:When we tell our stories, the gods hear our sorrows. ~ Cathy Ostlere,
151:Fury from the heavens; fury at the gods - inseparable. ~ Janet Morris,
152:It was too much... the gods would not permit such joy. ~ Eva Ibbotson,
153:I wonder do the gods know what it feels like to be a man. ~ C S Lewis,
154:Mathematics is the language in which the gods talk to people. ~ Plato,
155:The gods give no gifts without hooks embedded. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
156:The gods have given you wealth and the means of enjoying it. ~ Horace,
157:The gods - if they existed - detested happiness. ~ Michael J Sullivan,
158:the gods seldom
give
but so quickly
take. ~ Charles Bukowski,
159:The Gods themselves cannot recall their gifts. ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
160:The gods visit the sins of the fathers upon the children. ~ Euripides,
161:When dealing with the gods, one deals with danger. ~ Yasmine Galenorn,
162:Against stupidity, the gods themselves contend in vain. ~ Isaac Asimov,
163:He is nearest to the gods who knows how to be silent. ~ Cato the Elder,
164:If a man obeys the gods they’re quick to hear his prayers. ~ Anonymous,
165:I feel like the gods have certainly patted me on the head. ~ Dane Cook,
166:It's the priests who have demands, not the gods. ~ Stanislaw Jerzy Lec,
167:Know we how many tomorrows the gods intend for our todays. ~ Euripides,
168:Love is powerful. It can bring the gods to their knees. ~ Rick Riordan,
169:of every night you must be open to the Gods, and if ~ Bernard Cornwell,
170:Pray to the devils; the gods have given us over. ~ William Shakespeare,
171:The Gods cannot help those who do not seize opportunities. ~ Confucius,
172:tiny mortals tampering with chariots of the gods. ~ Karen Marie Moning,
173:We ignore the gods and fill our minds with trash. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
174:When the gods wish to punish us they answer our prayers. ~ Oscar Wilde,
175:From my example learn to be just, and not to despise the gods. ~ Virgil,
176:He couldn't offend the gods with a pointed stick. ~ Megan Whalen Turner,
177:In dreams, the gods watch over us. Awake, we're on our own. ~ Ana s Nin,
178:Madness ends sometimes. The Gods decree it, not man. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
179:Mankind is poised midway between the gods and the beasts.
   ~ Plotinus,
180:Mediocrity is not allowed to poets, either by the gods or men. ~ Horace,
181:Respect the gods and the devils but keep them at a distance ~ Confucius,
182:The Ancestors fashioned the gods as a workman fashions iron. ~ Rig Veda,
183:The designer always has to leave room for the gods. ~ Robert Bringhurst,
184:The gods loves to punish whatever is greater than the rest. ~ Herodotus,
185:When the gods come among men, they are not known. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
186:Against boredom the gods themselves fight in vain. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
187:Every comic can report a few 'gift from the gods' moments. ~ Dick Cavett,
188:Heartily know, when half-gods go, the gods arrive. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
189:I like the night and the sky better than the gods of men. ~ Albert Camus,
190:Remember, this is war. The gods are at war for your soul. ~ Kyle Idleman,
191:Respect the gods and buddhas, but never rely on them. ~ Miyamoto Musashi,
192:The gods cannot misunderstand, man cannot explain. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
193:The Gods give with one hand and take with the other. ~ George R R Martin,
194:The more we deny ourselves, the more the gods supply our wants. ~ Horace,
195:They departed, the gods, on the day of the strange tide. ~ John Banville,
196:If I am unable to make the gods above relent, I shall move hell. ~ Virgil,
197:If you are wise, be wise; keep what goods the gods provide you. ~ Plautus,
198:It is difficult to be king when the gods are changing. ~ James A Michener,
199:It is not the rituals of worship that please the gods. ~ Orson Scott Card,
200:The gods give that man some profit to whom they are propitious. ~ Plautus,
201:The mills of the gods grind slowly....but they grind to dust. ~ Greg Iles,
202:Those whom the Gods wish to destroy, they first make bored. ~ Ian Fleming,
203:Ultimately the gods of pleasure can’t satisfy our desires. ~ Kyle Idleman,
204:Whom the gods wish to destroy they first call promising. ~ Cyril Connolly,
205:Man's responsibility increases as that of the gods decreases. ~ Andre Gide,
206:May the gods show their mercy... The Alexion would not. ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
207:the fool had been branded for the slaughter by the gods. ~ Herman Melville,
208:The friendship of a great man is a favor of the gods. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte,
209:The gods never let us love and be wise at the same time. ~ Publilius Syrus,
210:The gods wanted war?
They were about to get it. ~ Jennifer L Armentrout,
211:The populace drags down the gods to their own level. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
212:We Ask the Gods for Answers and They Give Us Questions ~ Christopher Moore,
213:Who knows whether the gods will add tomorrow to the present hour? ~ Horace,
214:Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
215:Deos fortioribus adesse. The gods support those who are stronger. ~ Tacitus,
216:Exceeds man's might: that dwells with the gods above. ~ William Shakespeare,
217:If the gods sent you to fight here, then the gods are fools. ~ Janet Morris,
218:Man's first and greatest victory must be won against the gods. ~ Andre Gide,
219:Most men do nothing to deserve what the gods throw their way, ~ Scott Lynch,
220:No matter how much I crave peace, the gods have other plans. ~ Tomi Adeyemi,
221:Respect the gods and Buddhas, but do not depend on them. ~ Miyamoto Musashi,
222:There is as much confusion in the world of the gods as in ours. ~ Euripides,
223:The saying goes that the gods leave a town once it is captured. ~ Aeschylus,
224:To the gods belong power, and to us the work of our hands. ~ Elizabeth Moon,
225:Whom the Gods love die young no matter how long they live. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
226:Creation is man's immortality and brings him nearest to the gods. ~ Socrates,
227:Do the gods sleep well at night? I think maybe they do. ~ Laurell K Hamilton,
228:Govern your tongue before all other things, following the gods. ~ Pythagoras,
229:How could Quing-jao know what the gods meant by anything? ~ Orson Scott Card,
230:…it will be possible, in the time of the wolf, to kill the gods. ~ A S Byatt,
231:Piety and holiness of life will propitiate the gods. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
232:The gods plant reason in mankind, of all good gifts the highest. ~ Sophocles,
233:when the gods created mankind, death they dispensed to mankind, ~ David Rose,
234:When the gods were more manlike, Men were more godlike. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
235:Wise men have interpreted dreams, and the gods have laughed. ~ H P Lovecraft,
236:You are making Socrates's mistake of assuming the gods are good. ~ Jo Walton,
237:Zeus, the Lord of the Gods, wore a dark blue pinstriped suit. ~ Rick Riordan,
238:Disciple : The gods do not care whether man is killed or not. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
239:Respect Buddha and the gods without counting on their help ~ Miyamoto Musashi,
240:Respect the gods, but have as little to do with them as possible. ~ Confucius,
241:Taste this, and be henceforth among the Gods thyself a Goddess. ~ John Milton,
242:The gods are fond of the cryptic and dislike the evident. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
243:The gods changed their war cry to: “RUN!” “HELP!” And: “MOMMY! ~ Rick Riordan,
244:The gods do not visit you to remind you what you know already. ~ Mary Stewart,
245:The Gods give of their best, not their worst, to men! ~ Marion Zimmer Bradley,
246:The gods use their chosen hard, but reveal little to them. ~ Jacqueline Carey,
247:Create your own myths; that is how the gods got started. ~ Stanislaw Jerzy Lec,
248:Mankind is poised midway between the gods and the beasts. PLOTINUS ~ Anonymous,
249:that the gods made a bridge from earth, to heaven, called Bifröst? ~ Anonymous,
250:The dead were legion and the gods had their own secret agenda. ~ Kate Atkinson,
251:The Gods are but names for the forces of Nature themselves. ~ Aleister Crowley,
252:The gods are here, if they are anywhere at all in the world. ~ Jeff VanderMeer,
253:The gods sell anything and to everybody at a fair price. ~ Orison Swett Marden,
254:The one sin the gods never forgive us is that of being born women. ~ C S Lewis,
255:Truly, when the gods set their faces against you, you are fucked. ~ Robert Low,
256:When all shoot at one mark, the gods join in the combat. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
257:When a man takes the road to destruction, the gods help him along. ~ Aeschylus,
258:All the gods, all the heavens, all the hells, are within you. ~ Joseph Campbell,
259:All the gods, all the heavens, all the worlds, are within us. ~ Joseph Campbell,
260:But as Nietzsche said, ‘The gods furl their flags at boredom. ~ Haruki Murakami,
261:Cease to think that the decrees of the gods can be changed by prayers. ~ Virgil,
262:For by the will of the gods Fate hath held sway since ancient days. ~ Aeschylus,
263:The love of books is among the choicest gifts of the gods. ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
264:To be famous when you are young is the fortune of the gods. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
265:To witness two lovers is a spectacle for the gods. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
266:All the gods and goddesses are only varied aspects of the One. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
267:But the boy already had a god of his own. And the gods were selfish. ~ R F Kuang,
268:Let us be silent — so we may hear the whisper of the gods. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
269:Not they who reject the gods are profane, but those who accept them. ~ Lucretius,
270:The gods bestowed on Max [Beerbohm] the gift of perpetual old age. ~ Oscar Wilde,
271:The only thing you can count on is that the gods make other plans. ~ Janie Chang,
272:We would have to think the gods had no minds, to pray for murderers. ~ Euripides,
273:When the gods give you another look at the world, best enjoy it. ~ Leigh Bardugo,
274:Who knows if the gods above will add tomorrow's span to this day's sum? ~ Horace,
275:You judge the gods by who bows down at their altars?" Ai Ling asked. ~ Cindy Pon,
276:All the gods and goddesses are only varied aspects of the One. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
277:A woman is a dish for the gods, if the devil dress her not. ~ William Shakespeare,
278:If you don't know how to serve men, why worry about serving the gods? ~ Confucius,
279:The gods approve The depth, and not the tumult, of the soul. ~ William Wordsworth,
280:There. Let the gods of friendship and common sense strike him dead. ~ Kelly Moran,
281:Who, except the gods, can live time through forever without any pain? ~ Aeschylus,
282:Charm is the seal of the gods upon woman. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
283:For business, our internet love affair was a gift from the gods. ~ Gary Vaynerchuk,
284:He lived far from the gods, but in his mind he was at home with them. ~ Pythagoras,
285:I don't want to be any closer to the gods than death will bring me. ~ Janet Morris,
286:Love is powerful, Piper. It can bring even the gods to their knees. ~ Rick Riordan,
287:Money degrades all the gods of man and converts them into commodities. ~ Karl Marx,
288:My job, one of them, in science, was to find the gods inside of us. ~ Howard Bloom,
289:Sometimes, the gods are kind. And hubris is the worst of sins. ~ Christian Cameron,
290:The gods attend to great matters, they neglect small ones. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
291:The gods envy me because they cannot die. ~ Giannina Braschi in "Empire of Dreams",
292:The gods you do not pay are the ones that can curse you best. ~ Barbara Kingsolver,
293:Though the favourites of the Gods die young, they also live ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
294:Trauma is hell on earth. Trauma resolved is a gift from the gods. ~ Peter A Levine,
295:While the gods remained more human, the men were more divine. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
296:With our mortal minds we should seek from the gods that which becomes us. ~ Pindar,
297:Ah! Do not judge the gods, young man, they have painful secrets. ~ Jean Paul Sartre,
298:A true writer is someone the gods have called to the task. ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
299:How I envy you creative people - creativity is a gift from the gods ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
300:It is the gods' custom to bring low all things of surpassing greatness. ~ Herodotus,
301:The flesh is the clay of the gods. Only the chosen can be sculptors. ~ Michael West,
302:The gods are fair, and they use our little vices to punish us ~ William Shakespeare,
303:The gods conceal from men the happiness of death, that they may endure life ~ Lucan,
304:The gods were great, but what good was greatness if you didn't love? ~ Lev Grossman,
305:The gods were great, but what good was greatness if you didn’t love? ~ Lev Grossman,
306:Truth is the beginning of every good to the gods, and of every good to man. ~ Plato,
307:Were not the gods forms created like me and you, mortal, transient? ~ Hermann Hesse,
308:Are the Gods real or is Ike Karton just crazy? And the answer is: Yes. ~ Mark Leyner,
309:Come, then! Face Ravelle! The gods have sent your doom, motherfuckers! ~ Scott Lynch,
310:From this entertainment industry, may the gods of language protect us. ~ David Antin,
311:It sounds to me like the gods of sneaking out have smiled upon Lucy. ~ Suzanne Young,
312:Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun. ~ Alan Watts,
313:Never honor the gods in one breath and take the gods for fools the next. ~ Sophocles,
314:Of all the gods nailed to the cross, Discord was the most beautiful. ~ Norah Labiner,
315:So why not care for that side of you, where you and the gods are equals? ~ Epictetus,
316:Who apart from the gods is without pain for his whole lifetime's length? ~ Aeschylus,
317:A daughter of the gods, divinely tall, And most divinely fair. ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
318:A good commander can beat the odds. A great commander can beat the gods. ~ Jack Kirby,
319:Death is an evil; the gods have so judged; had it been good, they would die. ~ Sappho,
320:Is he not sacred, even to the gods, the wandering man who comes in weariness? ~ Homer,
321:Nature made us - nature did it all - not the gods of the religions. ~ Thomas A Edison,
322:Poets are never allowed to be mediocre by the gods, by men or by publishers. ~ Horace,
323:The Gods did not count time spent fishing in the hours of a man's life. ~ Neil Gaiman,
324:The gods make use of our forgotten deeds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
325:Tis the old secret of the gods that they come in low disguises. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
326:You're in the lap of the gods. If people go, they go, and if they don't. ~ Sam Mendes,
327:Death is an evil; the gods have so judged; had it been good, they would die. ~ Sappho,
328:...for when the gods have made up their minds they do not change them lightly. ~ Homer,
329:If we neglect our privileges, the gods take them from us. ~ Constance Fenimore Woolson,
330:It is vain to ask of the gods what man is capable of supplying for himself. ~ Epicurus,
331:...let the gods distinguish between the wiched and the merely incompetent. ~ Glen Cook,
332:Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun. ~ Alan W Watts,
333:On the Disc, the Gods aren't so much worshipped, as they are blamed. ~ Terry Pratchett,
334:The Gods are unkind and deny us knowledge of what the future holds ~ Peter L Bernstein,
335:The most natural path in the world is to adopt the gods of our parents. ~ Kyle Idleman,
336:They wanted them to look like the Gods.
God doesn't look like this. ~ James Rollins,
337:Worry less about what the gods might do and more about what you can, ~ Joe Abercrombie,
338:Anyone who desires to see the gods face-to-face is a great fool, ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
339:Calum patted her shoulder and prayed to the Gods of Balanced Equations ~ Anne McCaffrey,
340:Clovis,’ Nico growled, ‘for the gods’ sake, stop dreaming so powerfully! ~ Rick Riordan,
341:it rained as if the gods were disconsolate, as if spring were a sorrow, ~ Claire Messud,
342:Love is the joy of the good, the wonder of the wise, the amazement of the Gods. ~ Plato,
343:Man invented the gods. Then the gods went off on their own, but not far. ~ Mason Cooley,
344:Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun.
   ~ Alan Watts,
345:The gods are hard to handle — when they come blazing forth in their true power. ~ Homer,
346:The Gods do not protect fools. Fools are protected by more capable fools. ~ Larry Niven,
347:The gods do not protect fools. Fools are protected by more capable fools. ~ Larry Niven,
348:They were the gods of this strange little heaven, and I was their guest. ~ Ransom Riggs,
349:This only is denied the Gods: the power to remake the past. —ARISTOTLE ~ Jeffery Deaver,
350:A certain portion of mankind do not believe at all in the existence of the gods. ~ Plato,
351:Actually it’s two cups. And yes. Coffee is the elixir of the gods. ~ Denise Grover Swank,
352:Are the gods not just?' 'Oh no, child. What would become us us if they were? ~ C S Lewis,
353:Each and every being has an innate ability to heal as a gift from the gods. ~ Mikao Usui,
354:None of the gods has formed the world, nor has any man, it has always been. ~ Empedocles,
355:One cannot come closer to the gods than by bringing health to his Fellow Man. ~ Socrates,
356:The best way to be thankful is to use the goods the gods provide you. ~ Anthony Trollope,
357:The gods do not care. It is not them, after all, that will pay the cost. ~ Akwaeke Emezi,
358:The ways of the gods are long, but in the end they are not without strength. ~ Euripides,
359:When a man cannot fight he would curse. The gods like to feel needed. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
360:Death must be an evil and the gods agree; for why else would they live for ever? ~ Sappho,
361:If, as Niko asks, you show them mercy, then the gods will be well pleased. ~ Janet Morris,
362:Prometheus stole fire from the gods so that humans could become like gods. ~ Alan Russell,
363:When a man cannot fight he should curse. The gods like to feel needed. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
364:Without the gods, how would I sing?' I asked. With your own voice,' he said. ~ Erica Jong,
365:Yes, she was still breathing—and by the gods, he would keep her that way! ~ T L Shreffler,
366:Friendship is the gift of the gods, and the most precious boon to man. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
367:Know thyself and thou shall know all the mysteries of the gods and the universe. ~ Various,
368:Mankind, in all his lusts, punishes himself. The gods have to do very little. ~ Criss Jami,
369:Nothing more excellent or valuable than wine was every granted by the gods to man. ~ Plato,
370:The gods don’t care about men, no more than kings care about peasants. ~ George R R Martin,
371:The path of the gods is a sunlit path in which difficulties lose all reality. ~ The Mother,
372:We must believe in the gods no longer if injustice is to prevail over justice. ~ Euripides,
373:Against stupidity, the gods themselves contend in vain. I’m not even a god. ~ Jack Campbell,
374:Like flies to wanton boys are we to the gods; they kill us for sport. ~ William Shakespeare,
375:Sometimes I feel like I'm writing pornography in the notebook of the gods. ~ Grant Morrison,
376:The gods are blind. And men see only what they wish" - Tyrion Lannister ~ George R R Martin,
377:The gods have been created by Him, but of Him who knows the manner of His being? ~ Rig Veda,
378:You make choices that are good and sound, but the gods have other plans for you. ~ Lisa See,
379:Disbelieve nothing wonderful concerning the gods, nor concerning divine dogmas. ~ Pythagoras,
380:If the gods care not for me and for my children, There is a reason for it. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
381:The gods do not deduct from man's allotted span the hours spent in fishing. ~ Herbert Hoover,
382:When we stop believing in the gods we can start believing in their stories. ~ Salman Rushdie,
383:Without the gods, how would I sing?' I asked.
With your own voice,' he said. ~ Erica Jong,
384:He too,I think,should pray to the deathless ones himself.
All men need the gods... ~ Homer,
385:Men in no way approach so nearly to the gods as in doing good to men. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
386:One of the lessons of history is that the gods can be silent in many languages. ~ Will Durant,
387:The gods do not protect fools. Fools are protected by more capable fools. She'd ~ Larry Niven,
388:The gods give, like twin flowers,
power and ruin, memory and oblivion. ~ Gabriela Mistral,
389:The gods help those who help themselves, and my word, didn't I help myself. ~ Terry Pratchett,
390:Time has nothing to do with the gifts that the gods give you; it's what you do. ~ Anita Baker,
391:Upon such sacrifices, my Cordelia,
The gods themselves throw incense ~ William Shakespeare,
392:Use him wisely. Few have been given such a weapon by the gods or Fates before. ~ Janet Morris,
393:Chose me because I was good at it. At suffering. That is whom the gods choose. ~ Douglas Clegg,
394:If lightning is the anger of the gods, then the gods are concerned mostly about trees. ~ Laozi,
395:In a thousand ages of the gods I could not tell thee of the glories of Himachal. ~ Ruskin Bond,
396:It is the privilege of the gods to want nothing, and of godlike men to want little. ~ Diogenes,
397:It was said that the gods favored fools because they were entertaining to watch. ~ N K Jemisin,
398:The world the gods made is too big for us, so we make ourselves a smaller one. ~ Sarah Micklem,
399:Those whom the gods chose as their property must not consort with mortals. ~ Franz Grillparzer,
400:Are the gods not just?"

"Oh no, child. What would become of us if they were? ~ C S Lewis,
401:As to the gods, I have no means of knowing either that they exist or do not exist. ~ Protagoras,
402:But I like not these great successes of yours; for I know how jealous are the gods. ~ Herodotus,
403:Give someone the power of the gods and he will become as indifferent as the gods. ~ Rick Yancey,
404:If the gods had intended for people to vote, they would have given us candidates. ~ Howard Zinn,
405:Men mock the gods until they need them, Kaz.”
― Leigh Bardugo, Six of Crows ~ Leigh Bardugo,
406:Mind is a light which the Gods mock us with, To lead those false who trust it. ~ Matthew Arnold,
407:Of course we all would like to foretell the future and make contact with the gods. ~ Carl Sagan,
408:Pain is the hammer of the Gods to break a dead resistance in the mortal's heart ~ Sri Aurobindo,
409:Surely you do not believe in the gods. What's your argument? Where's your proof? ~ Aristophanes,
410:Then the gods become no gods; death becomes no death; life becomes no life. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
411:...the path of the gods is a sunlit path in which difficulties lose all reality. ~ ~ The Mother,
412:The souls of heroes are forged by the gods and tempered with the pain of life. ~ Brian Rathbone,
413:This atheism concerning the gods of men pertains hereafter to any possible faith ~ Paul Ricoeur,
414:Why would the gods care what happens to a child who doesn’t care about himself? ~ Mark Lawrence,
415:As flies to wanton boys, are we to the gods; they kill us for their sport. ~ William Shakespeare,
416:Don’t spit into heaven... Don’t tell the gods your plans; they’ll only laugh. ~ Joseph Monninger,
417:Do the gods light this fire in our hearts or does each man's mad desire become his god? ~ Virgil,
418:If lightning is the anger of the gods, then the gods are concerned mostly about trees. ~ Lao Tzu,
419:If we don't have the omnipotence of gods, we at least can destroy like the gods. ~ Ernest Becker,
420:Pully, hauly, tug with a will; the gods wiggle waggle, but the sky stands still. ~ Aldous Huxley,
421:The battlefield of the gods is your heart. Your heart is shaped by your thoughts. ~ Kyle Idleman,
422:The gods gave you a brain, boy,' he'd say. 'If you want to honor them, use it. ~ Mercedes Lackey,
423:He tells stories of the gods, but his yarn is spun from the ungodly, human heart. ~ Arundhati Roy,
424:Immortality is only for the gods," he whispered. "I wonder how they can stand it. ~ Barry Hughart,
425:Immortality is only for the gods,” he whispered. “I wonder how they can stand it. ~ Barry Hughart,
426:I saw my real gods . . the gods of most men. Food, drink, and security in conformity. ~ Anne Rice,
427:It is the privilege of the gods to want nothing, and of godlike men to want little.
   ~ Diogenes,
428:It is unfortunate for the gods that, unlike us, they cannot commit suicide. ~ Ry nosuke Akutagawa,
429:It is unfortunate for the gods that, unlike us, they cannot commit suicide. ~ Ryunosuke Akutagawa,
430:Know thyself and thou shalt know the universe and the gods. ~ Inscription of the Temple of Delphi,
431:Let the gods into your life and you rapidly lose faith in the natural laws. ~ Megan Whalen Turner,
432:The tragic hero usurps the function of the gods and attempts to remake the world. ~ Helen Gardner,
433:Traitors hoist by their own petard?--or victims of the gods?--we shall never know! ~ Tom Stoppard,
434:Why work? The gods are there to lavish upon the faithful the good gifts of nature. ~ Paul Gauguin,
435:(‘With stupidity, even the gods struggle in vain.’) Friedrich Schiller (1759–1805) ~ William Blum,
436:As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods.
They kill us for their sport. ~ William Shakespeare,
437:He whom the gods love dies young, whilst he is full of health, perception, and judgment. ~ Plautus,
438:Human sacrifice empowered the gods with the spiritual life source of their victims. ~ Brian Godawa,
439:If extravagance were a fault, it would not have a place in the festivals of the gods. ~ Aristippus,
440:If I and my two children cannot move the gods, the gods must have their reasons. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
441:If the gods weren’t long dead, I might accuse them of lining up to take a shit on me. ~ Luke Scull,
442:It is the privilege of the gods to want nothing, and of godlike men to want little. ~ Ryan Holiday,
443:Our ideals, like the gods of old, are constantly demanding human sacrifices. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
444:The gods, if they exist, are just the people who happen to live on the other side. ~ Brendan Myers,
445:The gods of Djelibeybi In the river kingdom of Djelibeybi, the national religion ~ Terry Pratchett,
446:The gods to each ascribe a differing lot: Some enter at the portal. Some do not! ~ Ford Madox Ford,
447:We drink to the gods,” Amiit said, raising his bowl. “May they never drink to us. ~ Daniel Abraham,
448:When the gods amused themselves at a man’s expense, they had a tendency to overdue. ~ Josie Litton,
449:When you love someone it catches the attention of the Gods, who punish you. ~ Cinda Williams Chima,
450:Who can gauge all the ways in which the Gods who've created you craft your life? ~ Bill Willingham,
451:have already in the fourth act killed all the Gods- for the sake of morality! ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
452:Never ask the Gods for life set free from grief, but ask for courage that endureth long. ~ Menander,
453:People in big empty places are likely to behave very much as the gods did on Olympus. ~ Edna Ferber,
454:Talking to Yogi Berra about baseball is like talking to Homer about the Gods. ~ A Bartlett Giamatti,
455:The gods only go with you if you put yourself in their path. And that takes courage. ~ Mary Stewart,
456:The gods throw the dice and they don't ask whether we want to be in the game or not. ~ Paulo Coelho,
457:They become gods, and the gods become tyrants, and the tyrants become slave masters. ~ Kyle Idleman,
458:But I'd rather not add to my regrets. The gods know I got a queue of the bastards. ~ Joe Abercrombie,
459:Coming in Fall 2015 Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard, Book One The Sword of Summer ~ Rick Riordan,
460:Death is an ill; 'tis thus the Gods decide: / For had death been a boon, the Gods had died. ~ Sappho,
461:guile was no match for the world and that hubris would always be punished by the gods. ~ Dan Simmons,
462:Having come from the light and from the gods, here I am in exile, separated from them. ~ Umberto Eco,
463:If we are the toys of the gods are not perhaps the gods themselves mere children? ~ Michael Moorcock,
464:In nothing do humans approach so nearly to the gods as doing good to others. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
465:In the financial sector, those whom the gods want to destroy they first teach math. ~ Niall Ferguson,
466:Know yourself and fit yourself to new fashions. For there is a new ruler among the gods. ~ Aeschylus,
467:No god would do this to him, he said. Not even the all the gods in the underworld. ~ Nicole R Taylor,
468:Prayer indeed is good, but while calling on the gods a man should himself lend a hand. ~ Hippocrates,
469:The gods are just, and of our pleasant vices
Make instruments to plague us. ~ William Shakespeare,
470:The human mind evolved to believe in the gods. It did not evolve to believe in biology. ~ E O Wilson,
471:We inspire friendship in men when we have contracted friendship with the gods. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
472:And may the gods keep us from a world where only the people who deserve love get it. ~ Daniel Abraham,
473:Believe me, the gods spare the afflicted, and do not always oppress those who are unfortunate. ~ Ovid,
474:If there is one thing that I have come to hate more than the gods, it is time. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
475:In nothing do men more nearly approach the gods than in giving health to men. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
476:Once freedom lights its beacon in man's heart, the gods are powerless against him. ~ Jean Paul Sartre,
477:O, why should nature build so foul a den, Unless the gods delight in tragedies? ~ William Shakespeare,
478:The gods had a habit of going round to atheists' houses and smashing their windows. ~ Terry Pratchett,
479:The gods only go with you if you put yourself in their path. And that takes courage. I ~ Mary Stewart,
480:The skirts of the gods Drag in our mud. We feel the touch And take it to be a kiss. ~ Christopher Fry,
481:UGLINESS, n. A gift of the gods to certain women, entailing virtue without humility. ~ Ambrose Bierce,
482:Always, he whispered. The gods do not always answer, but they are always listening. ~ Jacqueline Carey,
483:Even Zeus, the grandest of the gods, is no match for the goddesses of vengeance. ~ Ry nosuke Akutagawa,
484:... Life can be savored only if you look to the future and leave vengeance to the gods ~ David Gemmell,
485:Piety, then, is that which is dear to the gods, and impiety is that which is not dear to them. ~ Plato,
486:The girl had hoped for fog, but the gods ignored her prayers as gods so often did. ~ George R R Martin,
487:Ugliness, n.: A gift of the gods to certain women, entailing virtue without humility. ~ Ambrose Bierce,
488:You are given the gifts of the gods; you create your reality according to your beliefs. ~ Jane Roberts,
489:and has found that the world, and the gods, and heaven are ... within his own Self. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
490:Before you can steal fire from the Gods you gotta be able to get coffee for the director. ~ David Mamet,
491:Every thing has been achieved except for the gods to rule; for no one is free save Jupiter. ~ Aeschylus,
492:For the gods know I
speak this in hunger for bread, not in thirst for revenge ~ William Shakespeare,
493:He was Loki, a being who only half belonged to the Gods; his father was the Wind Giant. ~ Padraic Colum,
494:It is unwise for them to be so very happy, for the gods will feel the need to humble us. ~ R L LaFevers,
495:Love is the hoop of the gods
Hearts to combine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
496:Never invoke the gods unless you really want them to appear. It annoys them very much. ~ G K Chesterton,
497:Our souls are but leaves in a storm, and only the gods know where we will come to rest. ~ David Gemmell,
498:Quos vilt perdere dementat' Whome the gods wish to destroy, they first drive mad (Latin). ~ Leo Tolstoy,
499:The gods do make playthings of us. But it is we mortals who provide them with tools. ~ Melina Marchetta,
500:The gods had gone away, and the ritual of the religion continued senselessly, uselessly. ~ Ray Bradbury,
501:You are not alone. You are part of the Olympian family. The gods have not abandoned you. ~ Rick Riordan,
502:It is the privilege of the gods to want nothing, and of godlike men to want little. ~ Diogenes of Sinope,
503:I wondered why the gods no longer came to earth. It would make belief so much easier. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
504:May your dreams be gifts from the gods and may you open them with excitement and pleasure. ~ Harley King,
505:On any occasion when one can discover the cause of events, one should not resort to the gods. ~ Polybius,
506:Quos vilt perdere dementat' Whome the gods wish to destroy, they first drive made (Latin). ~ Leo Tolstoy,
507:The gods were not, in fact, smiling upon me. I at least hoped they weren't laughing at me. ~ Jeff Strand,
508:Thor—the Batman or James Bond of the gods—has once again conquered the forces of evil. ~ Jostein Gaarder,
509:Without the interns to do their nefarious bidding, the gods turn to other tricks. ~ Carmen Maria Machado,
510:Worry less about what the gods might do and more about what you can, that’s my advice. ~ Joe Abercrombie,
511:And the gods did not kill for hubris-for hubris, they let you live long enough to learn. ~ Alexander Chee,
512:For the gods, though slow to see, see well, whenever a man casting aside worship turns folly. ~ Sophocles,
513:I believe that the gods themselves are frightened of the world which they have fashioned. ~ Peter Ackroyd,
514:Play out the game, act well your part, and if the gods have blundered, we will not. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
515:The Gods are the incarnation of what we can never be. The weariness of all hypotheses … ~ Fernando Pessoa,
516:The gods sell anything and to everybody at a fair price. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson, Quotation and Originality,
517:There is nothing which power cannot believe of itself, when it is praised as equal to the gods. ~ Juvenal,
518:You can do anything you think you can. This knowledge is literally the gift of the gods. ~ Robert Collier,
519:Do not look upon this world with fear and loathing. Bravely face whatever the gods offer ~ Morihei Ueshiba,
520:Farden, I swear to the gods, I will carry you through this door myself if you don’t hurry up! ~ Ben Galley,
521:He whom the gods love dies young, while he is in health, has his senses and his judgments sound. ~ Plautus,
522:If the gods cannot recognize your names,” she warned, “they will never hear your prayers. ~ Michelle Moran,
523:If you want the whole thing, the gods will give it to you. But you must be ready for it. ~ Joseph Campbell,
524:It is folly for a man to pray to the gods for that which he has the power to obtain by himself. ~ Epicurus,
525:It is the men of this land who are bloodthirsty and they lay their own guilt on the gods. ~ Edith Hamilton,
526:I wish sometimes that the gods would either choose better, or make their wishes clearer ~ Jacqueline Carey,
527:Nothing's promised us by the gods. Isn't that all the more reason to love while we can? ~ Livia Blackburne,
528:Prometheus, thief of light, giver of light, bound by the gods, must have been a book. ~ Mark Z Danielewski,
529:We often want one thing and pray for another, not telling the truth even to the gods. ~ Seneca the Younger,
530:Will you walk the road to your destiny, or must the Gods drag you to it unwilling? ~ Marion Zimmer Bradley,
531:And when love speaks, the voice of all the gods makes Heaven drowsy with the harmony. ~ William Shakespeare,
532:Any object, intensely regarded, may be a gate of access to the incorruptible eon of the gods. ~ James Joyce,
533:Blood, though it sleep a time, yet never dies. The gods on murtherers fix revengeful eyes. ~ George Chapman,
534:Do not look upon this world with fear and loathing. Bravely face whatever the gods offer. ~ Morihei Ueshiba,
535:Is the pious loved by the gods because it is pious, or is it pious because it is loved by the gods? ~ Plato,
536:Man hunts and fights. Woman contrives and dreams; she is the mother of fancy, of the gods. ~ Jules Michelet,
537:May the gods defend me from heroes with duct tape. And heroes always seem to have duct tape. ~ Rick Riordan,
538:Mire is the man who hears not the gods when they cry to his bosom. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
539:One sort of believes in recycling. But one believes in it as a kind of palliative to the gods. ~ Fay Weldon,
540:Religion would have us believe that immortality is reserved for the gods. We remain skeptical. ~ Fiona Paul,
541:So you can go down there and see the gods, sell Girl Scout cookies door-to-door or whatever? ~ Rick Riordan,
542:The gods rule us still. They have come down from the stars. And they are no longer kind. ~ Victoria Aveyard,
543:Undisturbed by fears and unspoiled by pleasures, we shall be afraid neither of death nor the gods. ~ Seneca,
544:When the anger of the gods is incurred, wealth or power only bring more devastating punishment. ~ Euripides,
545:Whom the gods notice they destroy. Be small… and you will escape the jealousy of the great. ~ Philip K Dick,
546:You've injured me, Farshooter, most deadly of the gods;
And I'd punish you, if I had the power. ~ Homer,
547:Any object, intensely regarded, may be a gate of access to the incorruptible eons of the gods. ~ James Joyce,
548:Art is the final cunning of the human soul which would rather do anything than face the gods. ~ Iris Murdoch,
549:every study of the gods, of everyone’s gods, is a revelation of vengeance toward the innocent. ~ John Irving,
550:Given the diverse raiment life sports, one never knows what the guises of the gods may be. ~ Stephanie Mills,
551:Instead of preparing to die, prepare to live in the midst of all the exaltations of the Gods ~ Brigham Young,
552:Life is loneliness, broken only by the gods taunting us with friendship and the odd bonk ~ Christopher Moore,
553:Men resemble the gods in nothing so much as in doing good to their fellow creatures. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
554:Once liberty has exploded in the soul of a man, the gods can do nothing against that man. ~ Jean Paul Sartre,
555:The gods cannot, if they would, give themselves unasked. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I, Bhawani Mandir,
556:They say he was fearless. And we’ve all got a bit of our fathers in us. The gods know I do. ~ Nicholas Eames,
557:Which reminded me...I still owed the gods a debt. "You're a genius," I (Percy) told Annabeth. ~ Rick Riordan,
558:Whom the gods wish to destroy they first call promising. —Cyril Connolly, Enemies of Promise ~ Michael Lewis,
559:I could mend my soul no more than my face. Unless the gods helped. And why did the gods not help? ~ C S Lewis,
560:Is something good because the gods approve of it? Or do the gods approve of it because it is good? ~ Socrates,
561:Never invoke the gods unless you really want them to appear. It annoys them very much. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
562:Socrates thought and so do I that the wisest theory about the gods is no theory at all. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
563:The gods offer no rewards for intellect. There was never one yet that showed any interest in it. ~ Mark Twain,
564:Whom the gods notice they destroy. Be small... and you will escape the jealousy of the great. ~ Philip K Dick,
565:A good man cannot be harmed either in life or in death, and his affairs are not neglected by the gods. ~ Plato,
566:No man who is not willing to help himself has any right to apply to his friends, or to the gods. ~ Demosthenes,
567:The gods are capricious, and I was about to amuse them. And Alfred was right. I was a fool. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
568:The gods do make playthings of us ... but it is we mortals who provide them with the tools. ~ Melina Marchetta,
569:The gods," he said. "Imprisoned in a thought. And perhaps they were never more than a dream. ~ Terry Pratchett,
570:Do not try to find out - we're forbidden to know - what end the gods have in store for me, or for you. ~ Horace,
571:Of all the things which a man has, next to the gods his soul is the most divine and most truly his own. ~ Plato,
572:The gods listen, Rain. Put a thought out there often enough, and they'll think it's what you want. ~ C L Wilson,
573:The gods offer no rewards for intellect. There was never one yet that showed any interest in it... ~ Mark Twain,
574:The gods were there to do the duties of a megaphone, because who else would people listen to? ~ Terry Pratchett,
575:Which reminded me...I still owed the gods a debt.
"You're a genius," I (Percy) told Annabeth. ~ Rick Riordan,
576:And to kill time while awaiting death, I smoke slender cigarettes thumbing my nose to the gods. ~ Jules Laforgue,
577:...every study of the gods, of everyone's gods, is a revelation of vengeance towards the innocent. ~ John Irving,
578:[...]every study of the gods, of everyone's gods, is a revelation of vengeance toward the innocent ~ John Irving,
579:It does not do to neglect the gods of a place, whoever they may be. In the end, they are all one. ~ Mary Stewart,
580:It is curiosity, quite right-a divine curiosity. A characteristic of the gods is curiosity. ~ David Attenborough,
581:Men imitate the gods whom they adore, and to such miserable beings their crimes become their religion. ~ Cyprian,
582:Shrines! Shrines! Surely you don't believe in the gods. What's your argument? Where's your proof? ~ Aristophanes,
583:The battle with the gods thus hinges on our own mortality! Creativity is a yearning for immortality. ~ Rollo May,
584:To me a book is a message from the gods to mankind; or, if not, should never be published at all. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
585:Whether the gods are inside or outside makes very little difference to whether there are gods. ~ Jordan Peterson,
586:How wealthy the gods would be if we remembered the promises we made when we were in danger. ~ Jean de La Fontaine,
587:If oxen and horses and lions could draw and paint, they would delineate the gods in their own image. ~ Xenophanes,
588:The Gods know what it is to be eternal, and they love to toy with mortals who use absolutes. ~ Josephine Angelini,
589:The myths about Hades and the gods, though they are pure invention, help to make men virtuous. ~ Diodorus Siculus,
590:It is said that men may not be the dreams of the god, but rather that the gods are the dreams of men. ~ Carl Sagan,
591:The gods’ most savage curses come to us as answers to our own prayers. Prayer is a dangerous business. ~ Anonymous,
592:Tyson, thank the gods. Annabeth is hurt!” “You thank the gods she is hurt?” he asked, puzzled. “No! ~ Rick Riordan,
593:Tyson! Thank the gods, Annabeth is hurt!" "You thank the gods that she is hurt?" he asked, puzzled. ~ Rick Riordan,
594:Why do the Gods make kings and queens if not to protect the ones who can't protect themselves? ~ George R R Martin,
595:You have to decide to servant the gods of materialism all around us or the true and the living God. ~ Billy Graham,
596:Ah, ye brethren, that God whom I created was human work and human madness, like all the Gods! ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
597:If mortals wait until the gods remake the world to their liking to be happy, they are already in hell. ~ Bette Lord,
598:Is it the gods who set this fire in our hearts, or do we each make our fierce desire into a god? ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
599:Then why do the gods even let me live? It would be safer to kill me.” “You’re right.” “Thanks a lot. ~ Rick Riordan,
600:They seem to think the females belong to the males here rather than the way the gods truly intended it. ~ G A Aiken,
601:whether in peace or in war, man generally speaking is the best thing that ever happened to the gods. ~ Jos Saramago,
602:Every smoker is an embodiment of Prometheus, stealing fire from the gods and bringing it on back home. ~ Tom Robbins,
603:For I am yearning to visit the limits of the all-nurturing Earth, and Oceans, from whom the gods are sprung. ~ Homer,
604:In the end, we are what our pasts have made us and we live the lives the gods have chosen for us. ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
605:Madness has a purpose! It’s a gift from the Gods, and like all their gifts it comes with a price, ~ Bernard Cornwell,
606:One soul is enough, I know, to pay the debt for thousands, if one will go to the gods in all good faith. ~ Sophocles,
607:Sometimes the gods smile,” he grunted. “Yes, sir.” And sometimes they kick you over and stomp you flat. ~ Tanya Huff,
608:The confounding of all right and wrong, in wild fury, has averted from us the gracious favor of the gods. ~ Catullus,
609:The gods hate those who plan badly, and help those with good friends, good swords, and good sense. ~ Joe Abercrombie,
610:The veneration in which some people hold the gods says more about those people than about the gods ~ James Lovegrove,
611:To me a book is a message from the gods to mankind; or, if not, should never be published at all. ~ Aleister Crowley,
612:We pulled slow and steady through the darkness and we hammered the ears of the gods with prayers. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
613:you put too much faith in the power of the gods, if you think they can give and take away the shape of things ~ Ovid,
614:All the gods in a mortal body dwelt, bore a single name. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, A Strong Son of Lightning,
615:Great ideas travel slowly, and for a time noiselessly, as the gods whose feet were shod with wool. ~ James A Garfield,
616:How gracious are the gods in bestowing high positions; and how reluctant are they to insure them when given. ~ Lucian,
617:Hubris means deadly pride, Percy. Thinking you can do things better than anyone else... Even the gods. ~ Rick Riordan,
618:If the gods do decide to wipe us out, is it such a bad thing? Maybe we've earned a little annihilation. ~ N K Jemisin,
619:I swear, the reason for full moons is so the gods can more clearly see the mischief they create. ~ Michael J Sullivan,
620:Know thyself, and thou shalt know all the mysteries of the gods and the universe.
   ~ the Temple of Apollo at Delphi,
621:The gods are nothing more than the creations of humans needing something to blame for their problems. ~ Andy Peloquin,
622:The Gods are not to be feared; death cannot be felt; the good can be won; what we dread can be conquered. ~ Luc Ferry,
623:The gods use instruments,
Not ask their consent. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Short Stories - I, Act Five,
624:Tyson! Thank the gods, Annabeth is hurt!"
"You thank the gods that she is hurt?" he asked, puzzled. ~ Rick Riordan,
625:Justice is in the hands of the gods, an old poet wrote, mortal hands hold only mercy and the sword. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
626:Prayer indeed is good, but while calling on the gods a man should himself lend a hand. ~ Hippocrates, Regimen, IV, 87,
627:So it is that the gods do not give all men gifts of grace - neither good looks nor intelligence nor eloquence. ~ Homer,
628:That such baseness could occur alongside events of staggering significance was like a joke from the gods. ~ Hugh Howey,
629:The gods grow jealous of too much contentment anywhere, and they show their displeasure all of a sudden. ~ R K Narayan,
630:Ultimately a hero is a man who would argue with the gods, and so awakens devils to contest his vision. ~ Norman Mailer,
631:Eat and carouse with Bacchus, or munch dry bread with Jesus, but don't sit down without one of the gods. ~ D H Lawrence,
632:From space this Earth is incandescent with abominations - the gods write their signature in our entrails ~ Steve Aylett,
633:Luck is not a magical ability or a gift from the gods. Instead, it is a way of thinking and behaving. ~ Richard Wiseman,
634:Nothing that is really good and admirable is granted by the gods to men without some effort and application. ~ Xenophon,
635:Only the gods tell him what to do, and you should beware of men who take their orders from the gods. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
636:Thank the Gods Below for paranoia. I classified it as a survival skill rather than a neurotic condition. ~ Kevin Hearne,
637:The Gods have proclaimed Christ to have been most pious, but the Christians are a confused and vicious sect. ~ Porphyry,
638:The world will fall, the gods will die, and I will never achieve a perfect score on this stupid machine. ~ Rick Riordan,
639:To me a book is a message from the gods to mankind; or, if not, should never be published at all.
   ~ Aleister Crowley,
640:We are all, as ever, the playthings of the Gods, and none of us can say what our tomorrows may bring; ~ Dennis Wheatley,
641:Anytus and Meletus can kill me, but they cannot harm me,’50 he says, and: ‘If it pleases the gods, so be it. ~ Epictetus,
642:He spotted, for example, the importance of religion, or ‘fear of the gods’, in controlling Roman behaviour, ~ Mary Beard,
643:Ignorance and fear create the gods, enthusiasm and deceit adorn them, and human weakness worships them. ~ Graham McNeill,
644:It's not the gods But our own hearts We need to fear. The evil starts Against all odds Not there but here. ~ Vikram Seth,
645:So she concentrates on technique. The professional masters how, and leaves what and why to the gods. ~ Steven Pressfield,
646:The gods are cruel not because they make us work. They are cruel because they allow us to hope. ~ Robert Jackson Bennett,
647:The Lord God has often lost out when competing with the gods of entertainment for our time and attention. ~ Kyle Idleman,
648:The poets are nothing but interpreters of the gods, each one possessed by the divinity to whom he is in bondage. ~ Plato,
649:These athletes can be considered the gods in certain ways and the fans can be considered parishioners. ~ Michael Strahan,
650:They are not wise, then, who stand forth to buffet against Love; for Love rules the gods as he will, and me. ~ Sophocles,
651:Thus do the gods justify the life of man: they themselves live it--the only satisfactory theodicy! ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
652:We don't know enough, we'll never know.
Oh happy Homer, taking the stars and the Gods for granted. ~ Robinson Jeffers,
653:...a good man cannot be harmed either in life or in death, and that his affairs are not neglected by the gods. ~ Socrates,
654:Men knew better than they realized, when they placed the abode of the gods beyond the reach of gravity. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
655:The gods destroy the heroes with a sudden blow, but they grind us mediocrities for weary, weary years. ~ Robertson Davies,
656:The gods where like the weather; sometimes good, sometimes bad, and either way, always beyond her. ~ Michelle Sagara West,
657:Tyson, thank the gods. Annabeth is hurt!'
'You thank the gods she is hurt?' He asked, puzzled.
'No! ~ Rick Riordan,
658:When science drove the gods out of nature, they took refuge in poetry and the porticos of civic buildings. ~ Mason Cooley,
659:You do not swing in a shield wall, you stab. May the gods ever send me enemies who swing their blades. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
660:Collaboration, it turns out, is not a gift from the gods but a skill that requires effort and practice. ~ Douglas B Reeves,
661:Ever since the gods created the world, mortals have been forgetting from where their blessings come. ~ Megan Whalen Turner,
662:How I miss the Hetawa baths! The gods put hot water and fragrant oil in this world for a reason, I tell you. ~ N K Jemisin,
663:If I am interested, amazed, stimulated to work, that is sufficient reason to thank the gods, and go ahead! ~ Edward Weston,
664:Let us go whither the omens of the Gods and the iniquity of our enemies call us. The die is now cast." XXXIII. ~ Suetonius,
665:must not trouble the gods with our affairs; they take no heed of our angers and disputes."Plutarch.] ~ Michel de Montaigne,
666:Of course, it couldn't last. Those whom the gods would destroy utterly, they first give a taste of heaven. ~ Cory Doctorow,
667:Quing-Jao: I am a slave to the gods, and I rejoice in it. Jane: A slave who rejoices is a slave indeed. ~ Orson Scott Card,
668:The gods had been dead for fifteen years, after all, but their hate had lingered, and ruled in their stead. ~ Laini Taylor,
669:Then he had felt in his heart: “A path lies before you which you are called to follow. The gods await you. ~ Hermann Hesse,
670:Three things are required of man—to worship the gods, to do no evil, and to maintain manly behavior. ~ Donna Fletcher Crow,
671:We are like he who the gods have condemned to push the boulder up the hill only to watch it roll back down. ~ Albert Camus,
672:All words have power, of course, but names are the most potent of all, which is why the gods had so many. ~ Joanne M Harris,
673:For, as the myths tell us, it is by defying the gods that human beings have best expressed their humanity. ~ Salman Rushdie,
674:If you did not know at age five that the gods are made up beings and the myths made up stories, you are a fool. ~ Suetonius,
675:That fear first created the gods is perhaps as true as anything so brief could be on so great a subject. ~ George Santayana,
676:Think not to match yourself against the gods, for men that walk the earth cannot hold their own with the immortals. ~ Homer,
677:What does one do when one needs to pray to the gods for patience but a god is causing the need for patience? ~ Kevin Hearne,
678:What is to be taught I learn; what is to be discovered I seek; what is to be prayed for I sought from the gods. ~ Sophocles,
679:Whether in peace or in war, man, generally speaking, is the best thing that could have happened to the gods. ~ Jos Saramago,
680:with the breakdown of the medieval system, the gods of chaos, lunacy, and bad taste gained ascendancy. ~ John Kennedy Toole,
681:Having come from the light and from the gods, here I am in exile, separated from them. —Fragment of Turfa’n M7 ~ Umberto Eco,
682:He had done as his dreams had told him, but dreams know more than they reveal, even to the wisest of the gods. ~ Neil Gaiman,
683:Human thought is thought that opens up into the future, and the future is inescapably the domain of the gods. ~ Daniel Quinn,
684:I had at least loved Psyche truly. There, if nowhere else, I had the right of it and the gods were in the wrong. ~ C S Lewis,
685:Praise be to the Weaver and all the gods!' said Shalhassan of Cathal. 'Finally she's done something adult! ~ Guy Gavriel Kay,
686:The gods created certain kinds of beings to replenish our bodies... they are the trees and the plants and the seeds. ~ Plato,
687:The gods offer no reward for intellect. There was never one yet that showed any interest in it.” -Mark Twain ~ Angela Roquet,
688:There was a moment of silence and then Sutherland breathed, “But, darling! Gossip is the food of the gods. ~ Andrew Holleran,
689:Though men determine, the gods doo dispose: and oft times many things fall out betweene the cup and the lip. ~ Robert Greene,
690:Faith in one’s own destiny was among the most valuable of the gifts which the gods could bestow upon a man, ~ Arthur C Clarke,
691:Hope is that tiny light that the gods have given us so that we can find our way through our darkest hours. ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
692:I am an ant in the battlefield of the gods. There's no room for pride or ego, and barely enough room for survival. ~ Susan Ee,
693:It is said by some that the gods show us their bitter humor by molding us into what we hate most in others. ~ Raymond E Feist,
694:Of the gods we believe, and of men we know, that by a necessary law of their nature they rule wherever they can. ~ Thucydides,
695:Of what use are the gods
If they crown not our just desires on earth? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
696:Pearls were accidents, and the finding of one was luck, a little pat on the back by God or the gods or both. ~ John Steinbeck,
697:Quing-Jao: I am a slave to the gods, and I rejoice in it.
Jane: A slave who rejoices is a slave indeed. ~ Orson Scott Card,
698:Ruling the world is child’s play. To truly rule your soul is like ruling creation. It is above even the gods. ~ Deepak Chopra,
699:The gods and myths of Babylon and Nineveh are in many cases modifications or developments of Sumerian theology; ~ Will Durant,
700:The sweat of hard work is not to be displayed. It is much more graceful to appear favored by the gods. ~ Maxine Hong Kingston,
701:What is Death, so it be but glorious? 'Tis a sunset; And mortals may be happy to resemble The Gods but in decay. ~ Lord Byron,
702:When we are stirred to lament the loss of the gods, it is more than likely the gods who are doing the stirring. ~ J M Coetzee,
703:For what we are about to receive . . . ,” murmured someone over the command net. “May the gods make us thankful. ~ David Drake,
704:If I am mad, it is mercy! May the gods pity the man who in his callousness can remain sane to the hideous end! ~ H P Lovecraft,
705:I wandered the earth a mercenary, daring the gods to kill me but surviving because part of me was already dead. ~ Barry Eisler,
706:Religion may in most of its forms be defined as the belief that the gods are on the side of the government. ~ Bertrand Russell,
707:The gods we ourselves have created ruled us for centuries! What a great comedy! And what a great tragedy! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
708:The world is ashes and the gods are a horror. Tell me, Learned, what other place is there for me to go? ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
709:Ungit tells me things. I hear of terrible doings in this land, mortals aping the gods and stealing the worship due ~ C S Lewis,
710:Creativity is neither the product of neurosis nor simple talent, but an intense courageous encounter with the Gods. ~ Rollo May,
711:Deos placatos pictas efficiet et sanctitas. - Piety and holiness of life will propitiate the gods. ~ Cicero, De Officiis. II. 3,
712:Fate is never too generous even to its favorites. Rarely do the gods grant a mortal more than one immortal deed. ~ Stefan Zweig,
713:Man is the creator of the gods whom he worships in his temples. Therefore humanity has made its gods in its own image. ~ Hermes,
714:No matter what the world said, my magic was beautiful. Even without powers, the gods had blessed me with a gift. ~ Tomi Adeyemi,
715:Richard Wagner commenting on the music of Ludvig Van Beethoven: He was a Titan, wrestling with the Gods. ~ Ludwig van Beethoven,
716:She told herself she should concentrate on those things in her control, not what was in the lap of the gods. ~ Elisabeth Storrs,
717:That is how the worlds will end, in ash and flood, in darkness and in ice. That is the final destiny of the gods. ~ Neil Gaiman,
718:The gods' most savage curses come upon us as answers to our own prayers. Prayer is a dangerous business. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
719:An old art spreading rumours about / Paradise, it begs outside the gates / Of the gods: the active gods come out. ~ Peter Porter,
720:Flirting with random women in a tavern? That sounds like Helios. Well, it sounds like most of the gods, actually. ~ Rick Riordan,
721:From light lips and casual thoughts
The gods speak best as if by chance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
722:If I am the pawn of the gods, it is because they know me so well, not because they make my mind up for me. ~ Megan Whalen Turner,
723:If I'd been listening closely, I'd have caught the sound of the gods having a great big old tee-hee at my expense. ~ Sue Grafton,
724:The ineffable joy of forgiving and being forgiven forms an ecstasy that might well arouse the envy of the gods. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
725:“The only freedom the gods grant usIs this: to submitOf our own free will to their sovereignty.” ~ Ricardo Reis/ Fernando Pessoa,
726:But Ubba? Only the gods tell him what to do, and you should beware of men who take their orders from the gods. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
727:Even then, she knew that there is no such thing as sure. There is no absolute anything. The gods love to fuck with ~ Lauren Groff,
728:If some animals are good at hunting and others are suitable for hunting, then the Gods must clearly smile on hunting. ~ Aristotle,
729:If you call upon the Gods and they answer, who is there to oppose or to challenge the integrity of your Path? ~ Andrew D Chumbley,
730:My father, an occasionally wise man, once said that we were blessed only when the gods remained ignorant of us. ~ Raymond E Feist,
731:On the day the gods chose for his destruction, Peter Hale ate his breakfast on the terrace of his condominium. ~ Phillip Margolin,
732:The gods at will can shape a gladder strain, and from the lamentations at the graveside, a song of triumph may arise. ~ Aeschylus,
733:The world will fall, the gods will die, and I will never achieve a perfect score on this stupid machine. -Dionysus ~ Rick Riordan,
734:We are the gods of the atoms that make up ourselves but we are also the atoms of the gods that make up the universe. ~ Manly Hall,
735:Who knows this ruler within, he knows the worlds and the gods and creatures and the Self, he knows all. ~ Mundaka Upanishad I.210,
736:all the gods are the same unknowable mystery, just as each face of a jewel strikes light in a different direction ~ Kate Constable,
737:Fear is the mother of all gods ... Nature does all things spontaneously, by herself, without the meddling of the gods. ~ Lucretius,
738:Like most Chinese, I am basically a fatalist - too sophisticated for religion and too superstitious to deny the gods. ~ Bette Lord,
739:Our magic,’ said Tozi’s mother, ‘comes not from the gods, or from men, but from the source of all created things. ~ Graham Hancock,
740:Usually he didn’t bother the gods, and he hoped the gods wouldn’t bother him. Life was quite complicated enough. ~ Terry Pratchett,
741:You're saying the gods don't have free will." "The power to make mistakes," Penny said. "Only we have that. Mortals ~ Lev Grossman,
742:Despise all those things which when liberated from the body you will not want; invoke the Gods to become your helpers. ~ Pythagoras,
743:Give people the power of the gods, and they'll eventually run down like wind-up toys for lack of reasons to go on. ~ Karl Schroeder,
744:He's like a God. You worship the gods, but you don't go out with them. You only like guys like that from a distance. ~ Cynthia Hand,
745:If only we were wiser or better people, perhaps the gods would explain to us the mad, unbearable things they do. ~ Orson Scott Card,
746:My advice," he added in a whisper, "would be to make your peace with the gods, for I fear you will face them shortly. ~ Darren Shan,
747:That is the gods' work, spinning threads of death through the lives of mortal men, an all to make a song for those to come. ~ Homer,
748:The uproar of mankind is intolerable and sleep is no longer possible ….” So the gods agreed to exterminate mankind. ~ Ronald Wright,
749:Usury lives in the pores of production, as it were, just as the gods of Epicurus lived in the space between the worlds. ~ Karl Marx,
750:Whoever undertakes to set himself up as a judge of Truth and Knowledge is shpwrecked by the laughter of the gods. ~ Albert Einstein,
751:You walked the path the gods ordained for you, Xena, Athena mind-whispered. You are not here to change it. No, ~ Martin H Greenberg,
752:Among all the creatures of creation, the gods favor us: We are the only ones who can empathize with their problems. ~ David Eagleman,
753:Beginning to doubt the gods, there is only Atman...and where is Atman found but in the self? But where is this self? ~ Hermann Hesse,
754:Even when the gods stood on the side of righteousness, they were concerned with the act more than with the intent. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
755:Liquor does this? Even after you’re sober?” “A cruel joke, isn’t it? The gods put a price tag on everything, it seems. ~ Scott Lynch,
756:May the gods damn you all! (Talon)
The gods don’t damn us, we damn ourselves by our words and deeds. (Acheron) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
757:That man to me seems equal to the gods,
the man who sits opposite you
and close by listens
to your sweet voice ~ Sappho,
758:The world will fall, the gods will die, and I will never achieve a perfect score on this stupid machine.
-Dionysus ~ Rick Riordan,
759:We are all atheists about most of the gods that humanity has ever believed in. Some of us just go one god further. ~ Richard Dawkins,
760:Whatever a man imagines he can attain, if he doesn't become too arrogant and encroach on the rights of the gods. ~ Charles Lindbergh,
761:Whoever undertakes to set himself up as a judge of Truth and Knowledge is shipwrecked by the laughter of the gods. ~ Albert Einstein,
762:Even then, she knew that there is no such thing as sure. There is no absolute anything. The gods love to fuck with us. ~ Lauren Groff,
763:For the gods, instead of what is most pleasing, will give what is most proper. Man is dearer to them than he is to himself. ~ Juvenal,
764:Gegen die Dummheit kämpfen selbst die Götter vergebens ("Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain") ~ Friedrich Schiller,
765:Grateful for his mistakes, man should be the gods, because by overcoming the faults the stronger force is developed. ~ Rudolf Steiner,
766:If you knew what the Gods have in store for you, you would run naked and dance on the beach.
   ~ Vikings, The Seer to Rollo, Vikings,
767:Surely all the world has rolled upside down. Perhaps the gods have gotten drunk on comet-wine again, like in the tales. ~ N K Jemisin,
768:The gods, my dear simple fellow, are a mere expression coined by vulgar superstition. We frown upon such coinage here. ~ Aristophanes,
769:The gods of the Greeks were like helpless children compared to humankind today and the powers we now wield. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
770:This world is a people of friends, and these friends are first the gods and next men whom Nature has made for each other. ~ Epictetus,
771:We took out our heavy revolvers (all of a sudden there were revolvers in the dream) and joyfully killed the Gods. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
772:A man's moral conscience is the curse he had to accept from the gods in order to gain from them the right to dream. ~ William Faulkner,
773:And this is the life of the Gods, and of Godlike men, a life without love of the world, a flight of the Alone to the Alone. ~ Plotinus,
774:But he’s like a god. You worship the gods but you don’t go out with them. You only like guys like that from a distance. ~ Cynthia Hand,
775:Don't fear the gods,
Don't worry about death;
What is good is easy to get, and
What is terrible is easy to endure. ~ Epicurus,
776:He who thus knows, “I am the Eternal”, the gods themselves cannot make him other, for he is their own self. ~ Brihadaranyaka Upanishad,
777:If a man loves the labour of his trade, apart from any question of success or fame, the gods have called him. ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
778:It is a law, of the gods which is never broken, to sell somewhat dearly the great benefits which they confer on us. ~ Pierre Corneille,
779:Life is a jest of the Gods and there is no justice. You must learn to laugh… or else you'll weep yourself to death. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
780:She had dared to dream beyond what someone else had ordained her destiny to be, beyond what even the gods had destined. ~ Mia Sheridan,
781:That students of philosophy ought first to learn logics, then ethics, next physics, last of all the nature of the gods.”1 ~ David Hume,
782:The gods being always close to men perceive those who afflict others with unjust devices and do not fear the wrath of heaven. ~ Hesiod,
783:The Gods play games with us, but if we open ourselves then we can become a part of the game instead of its victims. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
784:We are all atheists about most of the gods that societies have ever believed in. Some of us just go one god further. ~ Richard Dawkins,
785:When the gods know that a god hath fallen, With this kindly feeling They do encourage him-- Be thou a god again and again. ~ T S Eliot,
786:Because not wanting the prize the gods have arranged for you - that just might offend the hell right out of them. ~ Megan Whalen Turner,
787:Life has meaning only in the struggle. Triumph or defeat is in the hands of the Gods. So let us celebrate the struggle! ~ Stevie Wonder,
788:Live with the gods. And he does so who constantly shows them that his soul is satisfied with what is assigned to him. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
789:Some people are just born evil. You know, in the good old days, they threw those babies off cliffs to appease the Gods. ~ Emily Goodwin,
790:Where the body went, the mind followed. Give someone the power of the gods and he will become as indifferent as the gods. ~ Rick Yancey,
791:(Brian) Fawcett himself had scribbled in a letter to a friend, 'Those whom the gods intend to destroy they first make mad! ~ David Grann,
792:Speak the truth, do not yield to anger; give, if thou art asked for little; by these three steps thou wilt go near the gods. ~ Confucius,
793:The Gods have two ways of dealing harshly with us—the first is to deny us our dreams, and the second is to grant them. ~ William Bridges,
794:The language of men was involved with only one hemisphere in order to leave the other free for the language of the gods. ~ Julian Jaynes,
795:Truly, we are the gods' own children, forged in the fire of our tortured pasts, but also blessed with unimaginable gifts. ~ R L LaFevers,
796:Where have all the good men gone, and where are all the gods? Where's the street-wise Hercules, to fight the rising odds? ~ Bonnie Tyler,
797:whether or not people get the gods that they deserve, they tend to get the gods (and demons) that their animals deserve— ~ Wendy Doniger,
798:Who can tell what metals the gods use in forging the subtle bond which we call sympathy, which we might as well call love. ~ Kate Chopin,
799:I know the gods exist, whether i believe them worth worshipping is an entirely different matter.
Brakandaran té Carn ~ Jennifer Fallon,
800:It's not the gods
But our own hearts
We need to fear.
The evil starts
Against all odds
Not there but here. ~ Vikram Seth,
801:Mitt der Dummheit k a« mpfen G o« tter selbst vergebens. Even the gods themselves struggle in vain against stupidity. ~ Elsa Schiaparelli,
802:reminding him of what he once intended to be before he ate the apple of wisdom and became as the gods and devils. ~ Grace Livingston Hill,
803:To live the life the gods have given you, you must clutch wisely, then run. Run like the houds of hell on a sinner's scent! ~ Scott Lynch,
804:We should use all the tools the gods gave us,” Juliette said. “Except for the one you wield, this power to make others fear. ~ Hugh Howey,
805:A fierce unrest seethes at the core, of all existing things:, it was the eager wish to soar, that gave the gods their wings. ~ Don Marquis,
806:Better and safer is an assured peace than a victory hoped for. The one is in your own power, the other is in the hands of the gods. ~ Livy,
807:Durkheim be damned, those of us who actually honor the Gods believe that there is more to religion than social mummery. ~ Galina Krasskova,
808:Of all the Gods, Love is the best friend of humankind, the helper and healer of all ills that stand in the way of human happiness. ~ Plato,
809:Though the favourites of the gods die young, they also live eternally in the company of gods." - Friedrich Nietzsche ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
810:He came to understand the difference between the gods' blessed and a smart man. His uncle was one. His father the other. ~ Melina Marchetta,
811:I’m not above using unsavory beings to kick the Gods’ asses, but the Phantoms are too unpredictable for my taste,” I said. ~ Laura Kreitzer,
812:Inspiration is indispensable to my work, but it is hard to come by. It is there or it is not; it is a gift of the gods. ~ Elaine de Kooning,
813:It is not for the gods to decide whether or not Man exists - it is for Man to decide whether or not the gods exist. ~ J Michael Straczynski,
814:The gods are for whatever we wish. That is the point of gods. The gods will carry me onwards, and that is all that matters. ~ Kieron Gillen,
815:The gods do make playthings of us,” the priest-king acknowledged. “But it is we mortals who provide them with the tools. ~ Melina Marchetta,
816:To have her meals, and her daily walk, and her fill of novels, and to be left alone, was all that she asked of the gods. ~ Anthony Trollope,
817:You’re saying the gods don’t have free will.”

“The power to make mistakes,” Penny said. “Only we have that. Mortals. ~ Lev Grossman,
818:A certain peace is better and safer than a victory in prospect; the former is at your own disposal, the latter depends upon the gods. ~ Livy,
819:And the fact remained, whatever games the gods played, it was hard-working dirt-poor bastards like him who suffered for it. ~ Steven Erikson,
820:Frailty and cruelty are our gifts to the world. Who is to say that suffering is not the greatest of all gifts from the gods? ~ Douglas Clegg,
821:How did you end up with an assassin and newly crowned king as your confidantes?"
"The gods have a wicked sense of humor. ~ Mary E Pearson,
822:I could only hope he’d be called up soon to return to his regiment, and if the gods be just, kicked in the head by a horse. ~ Mary E Pearson,
823:Loudly she asked the gods to defend her in her innocence; silently she prayed for her accusers to suffer sudden, painful deaths. ~ Anonymous,
824:Not all of life's roads are set fast, for a man may do this or a man may do that and not even the gods know the mind of a man. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
825:The gods of the hearth exist for us still; and let all new faith be tolerant of that fetishism, lest it bruise its own roots. ~ George Eliot,
826:The Soul is the sum of all the gods. "All the gods are this one Soul, and all dwell in the Soul." (Manu Smṛti 12.119. [13]) ~ Alain Dani lou,
827:To deny ones' true nature and the gifts given you by the gods is to tempt disaster. You cannot hide behind the mask forever. ~ Midori Snyder,
828:Well, the gods love a man who laughs at hardship.” “Hardship is boring as all hell. Gotta find laughs if you can’t stay drunk, ~ Scott Lynch,
829:A Spartan, seeing a man taking up a collection for the gods, said that he did not think much of gods who were poorer than himself. ~ Plutarch,
830:It depends on what you mean by the word religion. Certainly I don't go to temples and pray to the gods or anything like that. ~ Indira Gandhi,
831:Nobody knows better than I that the gods exist. Whether I believe them worthy of adoration is an entirely different matter. ~ Jennifer Fallon,
832:That child whose mother has never smiled upon him is worthy neither of the table of the gods nor the couch of the goddesses. ~ Anatole France,
833:The Egyptians treated her like a pharaoh even though she was from a Greek family and a woman. She worshipped the gods of Egypt. ~ Terry Deary,
834:Truly the gods have not from the beginning revealed all things to mortals, but by long seeking, mortals discover what is better. ~ Xenophanes,
835:We're going to bring back God and the Bible and drive the gods of secular humanism right out of the public schools of America. ~ Pat Buchanan,
836:A day will come when the European god of the nineteenth century will be classed with the gods of Olympus and the Nile. ~ William Winwood Reade,
837:A religion is a kind of group dream. ~ Weston La Barre, “Hallucinogens and the Shamanic Origins of Religion,” Flesh of the Gods (1972), p. 264,
838:Blessed is he who has acquired a wealth of divine wisdom, but miserable he in whom there rests a dim opinion concerning the gods. ~ Empedocles,
839:Homer invented these fictions and attributed human powers to the gods; I wish he had attributed divine powers to us ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
840:I do not have an act. I just do Eartha Kitt... I want to be whoever Eartha Kitt is until the gods take me wherever they take me. ~ Eartha Kitt,
841:If men think that a ruler is religious and has a reverence for the Gods, they are less afraid of suffering injustice at his hands. ~ Aristotle,
842:Isn't man but a blossom taken by wind, and only the mountains and the sea and the stars and this land of the gods everlasting? ~ James Clavell,
843:One act of pure love in saving life is greater than spending the whole of one's time in religious offerings to the gods . . . ~ Gautama Buddha,
844:Only one accomplishment is beyond both the power and the mercy of the Gods. They cannot make the past as though it had never been. ~ Aeschylus,
845:Talking to the gods had been a much more comfortable proposition when there had seemed no danger of Their talking back. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
846:The gods are nothing more than the creations of humans who require something to blame for their problems," the Hunter scoffed. ~ Andy Peloquin,
847:The gods have said, and the Greeks also, that when a man wishes to evade his duties he can summon any illness to assist him, ~ Taylor Caldwell,
848:The word I use is hubris. Our word for arrogance that scrapes the stars, for violence and towering rage as ugly as the gods. ~ Madeline Miller,
849:And the Earth had no name. The gods know themselves and have no need of names. It is man who names all things, even gods. ~ Megan Whalen Turner,
850:And this Kino knew also - that the gods do not love men's plans, and the gods do not love success unless it comes by accident. ~ John Steinbeck,
851:As a breath on glass, - As witch-fires that burn, The gods and monsters pass, Are dust, and return. (“The Face of the Skies”) ~ George Sterling,
852:If you have a good spine, the gods will chase you. Nobody has psychological or emotional problems, everyone has a bad spine. ~ Bikram Choudhury,
853:Naglfar—a ship constructed from the fingernails of the dead, sails the end of the world to wage war against the gods. ~ Tom Sweterlitsch,
854:Religion may in most of its forms be defined as the belief that the gods are on the side of the Government. —Bertrand Russell ~ Graham E Fuller,
855:This is what it had come to. Glitter. How he thought glitter had been a good idea, the Gods only knew."

- Charles' thoughts ~ K F Breene,
856:Wind and words. We are only human, and the gods have fashioned us for love. That is our great glory, and our great tragedy. ~ George R R Martin,
857:As long as the working-people fold hands and pray the gods in Washington to give them work, so long they will not get it. ~ Voltairine de Cleyre,
858:Even the gods were impressed. They descended from Olympus and loaded Hercules down with so much swag, it got embarrassing. Hermes ~ Rick Riordan,
859:I am the goddess of the Mist,” Hecate explained. “I am responsible for keeping the veil that separates the world of the gods from ~ Rick Riordan,
860:I’m aware of the cruelty of the gods, but they do believe in balance.” “Without that balance, the world would be a cold, dark place. ~ Lia Davis,
861:Once upon a time, there was a man as great as the gods…
But even the great can tremble with fear.
Even the great can fall ~ Mary E Pearson,
862:Sometimes, when the gods aren't looking and destiny loses its way, even good people get a taste of good luck in their lives. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
863:Still, from what he had observed in Annawadi, the fact that a boy knew about the gods didn’t mean the gods would look after the boy. ~ Anonymous,
864:The ancients rightly called this internal longing for wholeness “fate” or “destiny,” the “inner voice” or the “call of the gods.” ~ Rcihard Rohr,
865:The reason meant for nearness to the gods
And uplift to heavenly scale by the touch of mind ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Descent into Night,
866:These facts make the creator of music a being like the gods, and make music itself the supreme mystery of human knowledge. ~ Claude Levi Strauss,
867:You must never deprive the people of their belief in
the power of the gods, and you must never deprive yourself of it either. ~ Karen Essex,
868:An old sculptor said of his carvings, whose backs were to be out of all possible inspection, “But the gods will see." Every ~ Orison Swett Marden,
869:Before the gods that made the gods had seen their sunrise pass, the white horse of the white horse vale was cut out of the grass ~ G K Chesterton,
870:But like a shining answer from the gods
   Approached through sun-bright spaces Savitri.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Call to the Quest, [T5],
871:Every great legend begins with that one person who raises an angry fist to the sky and flips off the gods in defiance. Acheron ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
872:Forewilled by the gods, Alexander,
All things happen on earth and yet we must strive who are mortals, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
873:He often referred to Rush’s three members—Neil Peart, Alex Lifeson, and Geddy Lee—as “the Holy Trinity” or “the Gods of the North. ~ Ernest Cline,
874:Never to be cast away are the gifts of the gods, magnificent, which they give of their own will, no man could have them for wanting them. ~ Homer,
875:Whoever undertakes to set himself up as a judge in the field of truth and knowledge is shipwrecked by the laughter of the gods. ~ Anthony Robbins,
876:You don't go after poetry, you take what comes. Maybe the gods do it through me but I certainly do a hell of a lot of the work. ~ Phyllis Gotlieb,
877:Among my kindred, it is said that the gods of the deep places created stone to house us, iron to serve us, and gold to feed us. ~ Jonathan Moeller,
878:As surely as Water will wet us, as surely as Fire will burn, The Gods of the Copybook Headings with terror and slaughter return! ~ Rudyard Kipling,
879:Every man is capable of doing good to another, but to contribute to the happiness of an entire society is to become akin to the gods ~ Montesquieu,
880:In the elder days of art Builders wrought with greatest care Each minute and unseen part, For the Gods are everywhere ~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,
881:Is that not the Promethean fable, that the fire stolen from the gods will light men their way even while it burns their hands? ~ Zia Haider Rahman,
882:Outside the port, the slashed rock of the unnamed asteroid tumbled and spun in dynamics known only to the gods of chaos mathematics. ~ Dan Simmons,
883:Suddenly, the gods have stopped saying yes and have started making really obnoxious farting noises. In my face. With their armpits. ~ Jody Gehrman,
884:The gods, after all, are only human, and once their rage has been placated they are perfectly capable of acts of mercy and grace. ~ Thomas M Disch,
885:The gods are deaf to hot and peevish vows. They are polluted off'rings, more abhorred! Than spotted livers in the sacrifice. ~ William Shakespeare,
886:True nature of the gods is that of magical images shaped out of the astral plane by mankind's thought and influenced by the mind
   ~ Dion Fortune,
887:—What is it about wine, Harry?
—What d'ya mean?
—What is it that cures us?
—Made to glorify the gods. And dull the idiots. ~ Colum McCann,
888:While the Gods are powerful, we learn little about them. It is only in their day of decadence that a strong light beats into heaven. ~ E M Forster,
889:You heard the decree of the gods, boy. You’ve become entirely too close to this mortal. You are hereby banned from further contact! ~ Rick Riordan,
890:As far as the gods go, right now is a trickster moment we’re living in, more than goddess time, Zeus time, or any other kind of time. ~ Martin Shaw,
891:Blood and chaos is the wine and meat of the gods—most of them, anyway. Especially the ones most eager to meddle in mortal affairs. ~ Steven Erikson,
892:He was the sort of person who stood on mountaintops during thunderstorms in wet copper armor shouting "All the Gods are bastards! ~ Terry Pratchett,
893:No, I will finish what I started, here, at Glimpa’s Arch. The act belongs to me, the consequence, pleasing or not, belongs to the gods. ~ J Z Colby,
894:Remember, the Muse favors working stiffs. She hates prima donnas. To the gods the supreme sin is not rape or murder, but pride. ~ Steven Pressfield,
895:The gods are alone, and when they stroll, by chance, on earth, they are pathological cases or buffoons, or histrions...who are despised! ~ Rachilde,
896:The king of the gods took away this man’s family, everyone that he loved—and still this particular man did not surrender. ~ Matthew Woodring Stover,
897:The meanest hut with love in it is a palace fit for the gods, and a palace without love is a den only fit for wild beasts. ~ Robert Green Ingersoll,
898:He was the sort of person who stood on mountaintops during thunderstorms in wet copper armour shouting 'All the Gods are bastards. ~ Terry Pratchett,
899:Knowing that the gods exist makes one less likely to mistake oneself for a god. In this way myths help tell the ego what it is not. ~ Edward Edinger,
900:The gods have died, and we distrust our dreams. We emerge from the void, stare back at it for a short while, and then rejoin the void. ~ J G Ballard,
901:Enjoy your life, fill your belly with wine and food, and accept death. The Gods kept immortality for themselves, death is the lot of man. ~ Anne Rice,
902:Harder! Harder! Strike at it, for the gods’ sake! It’s a Parthian, not your grandmother! I swear if you don’t put some effort into— What? ~ M C Scott,
903:He was the sort of person who stood on mountaintops during thunderstorms in wet copper armour shouting 'All the Gods are bastards.' ~ Terry Pratchett,
904:If the gods listened to the prayers of men, all men would quickly have perished: for they are forever praying for evil against one another ~ Epicurus,
905:I knew and cared nothing about the will of the gods. I only knew that I would land where I myself had been cast, wherever that would be. ~ Ann Leckie,
906:Keeping the Gods first doesn’t mean that you withdraw from life, rather it informs every aspect of the way you engage with living. ~ Galina Krasskova,
907:Present day kings aren’t very inspiring, the gods are on a vacation, and about the only heroes left are the scientists and the poor. ~ John Steinbeck,
908:There's no shame in loving life above death. Otherwise I would be dead. What use would that be to the gods, who will not die themselves? ~ Erica Jong,
909:The true nature of the gods is that of magical images shaped out of the astral plane by mankind's thought, and influenced by the mind. ~ Dion Fortune,
910:Yet the ivory gods, And the ebony gods, And the gods of diamond-jade, Are only silly puppet gods That people themselves Have made.- ~ Langston Hughes,
911:You can pretend it's a play,' I told him. 'Such small things do not anger the gods. Plays only anger the mortal men who watch them ~ Danielle Bennett,
912:As surely as Water will wet us, as surely as Fire will burn,
The Gods of the Copybook Headings with terror and slaughter return! ~ Rudyard Kipling,
913:A world like that, which exists only because the gods enjoy a joke, must be a place where magic can survive. And sex too, of course. ~ Terry Pratchett,
914:Ever the words of the gods resound; But the porches of man's ear seldom in this low life's round are unsealed, that he may hear. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
915:Life must be lived as play, playing certain games, making sacrifices, singing and dancing, and then a man will be able to propitiate the gods. ~ Plato,
916:The favours of the Gods are too awful to be coveted. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest, To His Sister,
917:Tragic heroes always moan when the gods take an interest in them, but it's the people the gods ignore who get the really tough deals ~ Terry Pratchett,
918:After all, suffering, though of course unwanted, has its uses. Without it we would be like the gods, never longing for release from saṃsāra. ~ ntideva,
919:By all the gods, I desire you, but you must know that you have my love. It's given, sieva. Wholly entrusted to you. Have a care with it. ~ Kresley Cole,
920:Drink," says the White Logic. "The Greeks believed that the gods gave them wine so that they might forget the miserableness of existence. ~ Jack London,
921:I don’t need to be reminded that we’re up to our heads in dark water. I just want you boys to remember that we’re the gods-damned sharks. ~ Scott Lynch,
922:Pain is the hammer of the Gods to break
   A dead resistance in the mortals heart,
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
923:The others agreed that the gifts of the ancients and the gods were sometimes confusing, and Desidora did eventually decide to stay in. ~ Patrick Weekes,
924:Tragic heroes always moan when the gods take an interest in them, but it's the people the gods ignore who get the really tough deals. ~ Terry Pratchett,
925:all the best, greatest, purest and worthiest things in life are beyond all market-value and that the gifts of the gods are not for sale. ~ Marie Corelli,
926:Before the gods that made the gods Had seen their sunrise pass, The White Horse of the White Horse Vale Was cut out of the grass. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
927:Being is good, but getting rich is better.... If the gods had only the riches of men's adoration, they would be as poor as poor Caligula. ~ Albert Camus,
928:Every decision you make can change the world. The best life is the one the gods don’t notice. You want to live free, boy, live quietly. ~ Steven Erikson,
929:I'm surprised your mother never turned you in."
"She tried once. Nyk put the fear of the gods into her."

-Galene & Fain ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
930:The dire delight that could shatter mortal flesh,
The rapture that the gods sustain he bore. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Paradise of the Life-Gods,
931:There are secret articles in our treaties with the gods, of more importance than all the rest, which the historian can never know. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
932:Whoever undertakes to set himself up as a judge of Truth and Knowledge is shipwrecked by the laughter of the gods. —Albert Einstein ~ William Paul Young,
933:You have debased my child....You have made him a laughingstock of intelligence...a stench in the nostrils of the gods of the ionosphere. ~ Lee De Forest,
934:Be not too hasty either with praise or blame; speak always as though you were giving evidence before the judgement-seat of the Gods. ~ Seneca the Younger,
935:It is sound planning that invariably earns us the outcome we want; without it, even the gods are unlikely to look with favour on our designs. ~ Herodotus,
936:Love is a honey and poison in the breast
Drunk by it as the nectar of the gods. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Gospel of Death and Vanity of the Ideal,
937:Safety is an illusion, as is faith without temptation. We’re imperfect, unlike the gods, but in that imperfection we may yet make them jealous. ~ Ken Liu,
938:The gods damn you, look what you've done! If I want to grow this back, I'll have to endure the most terrifying sex imaginable! Gaahhhhhhh! ~ Kevin Hearne,
939:When an oath is taken ... the mind is more attentive; for it guards against two things, the reproach of friends and offence against the gods. ~ Sophocles,
940:As Nietzsche said, "God is dead". The gods die but the Titans gain power.

Technology is just the clothes, the armour, of the Titans. ~ Ernst J nger,
941:"Every decision you make can change the world. The best life is the one the gods don't notice. You want to live free, boy, live quietly." ~ Steven Erikson,
942:Honour your parents; worship the gods; hurt not animals. ~ Triptolemus, according to Porphyry (On Abstinence IV.22) From his traditional laws or precepts.,
943:If the gods listened to the prayers of men, all humankind would quickly perish since they constantly pray for many evils to befall one another. ~ Epicurus,
944:It is not simply to show power...that a man...throws coppers into the sea...In doing this he is also sacrificing to the gods and spirits... ~ Marcel Mauss,
945:It was fate, I thought. Just fate. We think we control our own lives, but the gods play with us like children playing with straw dolls. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
946:Our mind is the scene upon which the gods perform their plays, and we don’t know the beginning and we don’t know the end. ~ Carl Jung, Zarathustra Seminar,
947:The gods! long since they hold us in contempt,
Scornful of gifts thus offered by the lost!
Why should we fawn and flinch away from doom? ~ Aeschylus,
948:The Gods prodigiously sometimes reverse
The common rule of Nature and compel
Matter with soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act II,
949:The movement of time is guaranteed by the birth of generation after generation, a never-ending succession that fills the gods with fear. ~ Mikhail Bakhtin,
950:But cast away the thirst after books, that thou mayest not die murmuring, but cheerfully, truly, and from thy heart thankful to the gods. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
951:I swear to the gods that if you answer one more of my questions with a question, I am going to go all Tyson and bite your damned ear off... ~ Nicole Peeler,
952:I talk about the gods, I am an atheist. But I am an artist too, and therefore a liar. Distrust everything I say. I am telling the truth. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
953:I talk about the gods; I am an atheist. But I am an artist too, and therefore a liar. Distrust everything I say. I am telling the truth. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
954:The love of the gods belongs to anyone who has given to true virtue and nourished it, and if any human being could become immortal, it would be he. ~ Plato,
955:They are enlightened who join in this play knowing it as play, for people suffer only because they take as serious what the gods made for fun. ~ Alan Watts,
956:Those who are guided by reason are generally successful in their plans; those who are rash and precipitate seldom enjoy the favour of the gods. ~ Herodotus,
957:if you can rid your life of realities by night and keep your days as one long dream always, then you will indeed be blessed of the Gods. Gath, ~ Dave Duncan,
958:In the beginning the gods did not at all reveal all things clearly to mortals, but by searching men in the course of time find them out better. ~ Xenophanes,
959:In the elder days of Art,
Builders wrought with greatest care
Each minute and unseen part;
For the Gods are everywhere ~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,
960:Isolation is a gift. Everything else is just a test of your endurance. You will be alone with the Gods. Your nights will flame with fire. ~ Charles Bukowski,
961:O that the gods would bring to a miserable end such fictitious, crazy, deformed labours, with which the minds of the studious are blinded! ~ William Gilbert,
962:Prometheus had stolen fire from the gods and suffered the consequences. I had returned the gift of the gods, and the price had been my dreams. ~ Jim C Hines,
963:Socrates isguilty of corrupting the minds of the young, and of believing indeities of his own invention instead of the gods recognized by the state. ~ Plato,
964:So in a sense it’s we with faith who create gods, not the gods who create us. And, if that’s the case, then it’s we who created the universe. ~ Kevin Hearne,
965:Truth is for the gods; from our human point of view, it is an ideal, towards which we can approximate, but which we cannot hope to reach. ~ Bertrand Russell,
966:He felt, in a way so familiar as to be almost dreary, the chosen victim of the gods, the self-admitted traitor, the one destined for judgment. ~ Iris Murdoch,
967:I have known no man of genius who had not to pay, in some affliction or defect, either physical or spiritual, for what the gods had given him. ~ Max Beerbohm,
968:The gods used to walk among us.
True
, said death.
Why did you leave?
Ah, sweet child, it was your people who left us.
~ Marie Rutkoski,
969:Menopause: it had to be the gods’ ironic warning to (or just plain nasty trick on) humanity for having artificially extended the life span, ~ Haruki Murakami,
970:The two commandments go beneath social performance and social appearance to the deep, elemental, defining issue of “God versus the gods. ~ Walter Brueggemann,
971:Always ascends the zigzag of the gods
And upward points the spirit’s climbing Fire. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
972:Count not life nor death, defeat nor triumph, Pyrrhus.
Only thy soul regard and the gods in thy joy or thy labour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
973:It is the mind that makes us rich and happy, in what condition soever we are, and money signifies no more to it than it does to the gods. ~ Seneca the Younger,
974:I've definitely had my fair share at shaking my fists at the gods of Hollywood, but I'm learning that I cannot think that way or I will go crazy. ~ Sarah Drew,
975:The gods of one age become the devils of the age to follow. The priests look forward to the age to come and see only the end of the world. ~ Lon Milo DuQuette,
976:The philosophers of antiquity taught contempt for work, that degradation of the free man, the poets sang of idleness, that gift from the Gods. ~ Paul Lafargue,
977:The realms of the gods and demons - heaven, purgatory, hell - are of the substance of dreams. Myth, in this view, is the dream of the world. ~ Joseph Campbell,
978:Vídarr is the name of one, the silent god. He has a thick shoe. He is nearly as strong as Thor; in him the gods have great trust in all struggles. ~ Anonymous,
979:What the gods most ask of us is that we attend them-bear conscious witness to their energies, of which their forms are but their material husk. ~ James Hollis,
980:Where is the chief abode or holy place of the gods?" Hárr answered: 'That is at the Ash of Yggdrasill; there the gods must give judgment everyday. ~ Anonymous,
981:Whether on earth or in the abodes of the gods, all beings are upon three evil paths; they are in thepower of existence, desire and ignorance. ~ Latita Vistara,
982:But the great leveler, Death: not even the gods
can defend a man, not even one they love, that day
when fate takes hold and lays him out at last. ~ Homer,
983:Her pragmatism of the transcendent Truth
Fills silence with the voices of the gods, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
984:I can't tell you if this is the right path; the future is too mountainous to see to far ahead. ... Only 'the gods' know what awaits us at its end. ~ Max Brooks,
985:“Religion would have us believe that
immortality is reserved for the gods.
We remain skeptical.”


-THE BOOK OF THE ETERNAL ROSE ~ Fiona Paul,
986:Most of the gods throw dice but Fate plays chess, and you don't find out until too late that he's been using two queens all along. Fate wins. ~ Terry Pratchett,
987:Only the saints would joke so about the gods, because it was either joke or scream, and they alone knew it was all the same to the gods. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
988:The artist must raise the cup of his vision aloft to the gods in the high hope that they will pour into it the sweet mellow wine of inspiration. ~ Paul Brunton,
989:Froi heard Zabat's voice echo over and over again throughout the gorge. Wonderful. The gods had found a way of multiplying the idiot's voice. ~ Melina Marchetta,
990:I am yours. I've always been yours. I'll be yours here on earth, in Elysium. I'll fight the gods if I have to. I'll stand before them and declare ~ Mia Sheridan,
991:If death be the last thing I do, why, I pray the gods and heroes of my people that I try to do it as well as I have done more pleasant things. ~ Alice Borchardt,
992:I'm very happy with what the gods have given me. I take life as she presents herself to me, and whatever you see in my face is what I have earned. ~ Eartha Kitt,
993:In this dog-eat-dog world, he thought, when you get old and even common sense hurts, a crumb of kindness or pity is a dish fit for the gods. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
994:Remember how long you have been putting off these things, and how often you have received an opportunity from the gods, and yet do not use it. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
995:Speak the truth do not become angered and give when asked, even be it a little. By these three conditions one goes to the presence of the gods. ~ Gautama Buddha,
996:The artist was notoriously cantankerous and he assumed, at first, that we were trying to mock the gods, and him, with a prank or a hoax. ~ Gregory David Roberts,
997:Those who make them [idols] will be like them, and so will all who trust in them” (see Ps. 115:1–8). We become like the gods that we worship! ~ Warren W Wiersbe,
998:A sole thing the Gods
Demand from all men living, sacrifice:
Nor without this shall any crown be grasped. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Love and Death,
999: Chapter XVI.--He Disapproves of the Mode of Educating Youth, and He Points Out Why Wickedness is Attributed to the Gods by the Poets. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
1000:Come, sir, come,
I'll wrestle with you in my strength of love.
Look, here I have you, thus I let you go,
And give you to the gods. ~ William Shakespeare,
1001:If all the world be worth thy winning. / Think, oh think it worth enjoying: / Lovely Thaïs sits beside thee, / Take the good the gods provide thee. ~ John Dryden,
1002:Madam, you’re complicating our night, so before we come in and complicate yours, kindly cork your bullshit bottle and close the gods-damned window! ~ Scott Lynch,
1003:The gods granted us misery, in jealousy over the thought that we two, always together, should enjoy our youth, and then come to the threshold of old age. ~ Homer,
1004:I could be stronger than all the gods in the pantheon, Maia, but without you it means nothing. Nothing.” - from Rosanna Leo's For the Love of a God. ~ Rosanna Leo,
1005:If by religion we mean a belief in humanity rather than the gods, an effort to make man better and a little happier, then yes, I'm very religious. ~ Indira Gandhi,
1006:Life and treasure and fame to cast on the wings of a moment,
Fiercer joy than this the gods have not given to mortals. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
1007:Nearly everyone in ancient Egypt exhorted the gods to let the Pharaoh live 'forever. These collective prayers failed. Their failure constitutes data. ~ Carl Sagan,
1008:Show me someone untroubled with disturbing thoughts about illness, danger, death, exile or loss of reputation. By all the gods, I want to see a Stoic! ~ Epictetus,
1009:The gods, likening themselves to all kinds of strangers, go in various disguises from city to city, observing the wrongdoing and the righteousness of men. ~ Homer,
1010:Among whom the gods bless, high on the list are the music people, who tune into celestial vibe-brations and give mortals a taste of immortal sensations. ~ Ruby Dee,
1011:An animal more like the gods than these, more intellectually capable and able to control the other beasts, had not as yet appeared: now man was born, either ~ Ovid,
1012:If I am a pawn of the gods, it is because they know me so well, not because they make up my mind for me."

Eddis, "The Queen of Attolia ~ Megan Whalen Turner,
1013:It is the gods who have been accused. They have answered her. If they in turn accuse her, a greater judge and a more excellent court must try the case. ~ C S Lewis,
1014:Let us revenge this with
our pikes, ere we become rakes: for the gods know I
speak this in hunger for bread, not in thirst for revenge. ~ William Shakespeare,
1015:That is what we do each time we see someone who falls in love with evil strategies, until we hurl him into misery, so he may learn to fear the Gods. ~ Aristophanes,
1016:There are always those to whom all self-revelation is contemptible, unless it ends with a noble thanks to the gods for the Unconquerable Soul. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
1017:This was a man who moved like the gods were watching: every gesture he made was upright and correct. There was no one else it could be but Hector ~ Madeline Miller,
1018:To every religion the gods of other religions are only notions concerning God, but its own conception of God is to it God himself, the true God. ~ Ludwig Feuerbach,
1019:We're more Christian than the Pope. And, I mean, that's not our religion. We pray to the Gods of our conquerors... all black and brown people. ~ Immortal Technique,
1020:(“Don’t lurk, Brenner. You’re an acolyte. Acolytes look worried all the time. Like they’re afraid they’ll do something the gods will disapprove of.”) ~ T Kingfisher,
1021:Do you see what little is required of a man to live a well-tempered and god-fearing life? Obey these precepts, and the gods will ask nothing more. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1022:Ezri, if you need to hit me, then by the gods hit me. If that's what you need, I won't fight you for a second. Not ever. Just...tell me what you want. ~ Scott Lynch,
1023:For life is a trumpery thing at best, isn't it? A few moments, a few words, between dark and dark. But in true love you keep company with the Gods. ~ Winston Graham,
1024:How amazing it is to be alive Anyone who lives and breathes and puts both feet on the ground, What possible reason could he have for envying the gods ~ Paul Claudel,
1025:Many things the gods achieve beyond our judgement,'" said the sorrowful girl. "'What we thought is not confirmed and what we thought not God contives. ~ John Irving,
1026:Only a philosopher's mind grows wings, since its memory always keeps it as close as possible to those realities by being close to which the gods are divine. ~ Plato,
1027:The gods have chosen to entertain me with chronic eyestrain headaches. Very poisonous episodes. So I don't do a lot of reading anymore except on tape. ~ Tom Robbins,
1028:The gods want to bring a better day, and you are their messengers. Trust not in all you see. Trust only in your hearts. And in us, who love you both. ~ Janet Morris,
1029:There must, whether the gods see it or not, be something great in the mortal soul. For suffering, it seems, is infinite, and our capacity without limit. ~ C S Lewis,
1030:A good cook is the peculiar gift of the gods. He must be a perfect creature from the brain to the palate, from the palate to the finger's end. ~ Walter Savage Landor,
1031:Fear of the gods arose from man’s ignorance of God and his ignorance of the laws that govern the world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Godward Emotions,
1032:Gone is the trust to be placed in oaths; I cannot understand if the gods you swore by then no longer rule, or men live by new standards of what is right. ~ Euripides,
1033:I don't give a damn, laddie. Until the actual moment, when they cut me down, I shall still be looking to win. And the gods of war are fickle at best. ~ David Gemmell,
1034:I fear that there will be no neat ending to this, in the manner of the old Greek plays. Where the Gods descend, and all is explained, and tidied away. ~ Paul McAuley,
1035:If you are going to try, go all the way or don't even start. If you follow it you will be alive with the gods. It is the only good fight there is. ~ Charles Bukowski,
1036:I will set up my name in the place where the names of famous men are written, and where no man’s name is written yet I will raise a monument to the gods. ~ Anonymous,
1037:Kill them. Kill them all. Remind the world what it means to be Arya. Remind the world what it is to walk with the gods.
– Syoddhan Kauravya ~ Krishna Udayasankar,
1038:Kill them. Kill them all. Remind the world what it means to be Arya. Remind the world what it is to walk with the gods.
– Syoddhan Kauravyaw ~ Krishna Udayasankar,
1039:Music is still the antidote for the nameless...Music is planetary fire, an irreducible which is all sufficient; it is the slate-writing of the gods... ~ Henry Miller,
1040:Save your energy,” he said. “The future changes as we stand here, else we are the game pieces of the gods, not their heirs, as we have been promised. ~ Margaret Weis,
1041:Science is only truly consistent with an atheistic worldview with regards to the claimed miracles of the gods of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. ~ Lawrence M Krauss,
1042:The gods know what's important, what's wrong about you. They know everything. If you go out searching for the Holy Grail, they won't let you find it. ~ Tom Spanbauer,
1043:The gods that we've made are exactly the gods you'd expect to be made by a species that's about half a chromosome away from being chimpanzee. ~ Christopher Hitchens,
1044:Do we, holding that the gods exist, deceive ourselves with insubstantial dreams and lies, while random careless chance and change alone control the world? ~ Euripides,
1045:Evolution teaches us the original purpose of language was to ritualize men's threats and curses, his spells to compel the gods; communication came later. ~ Gene Wolfe,
1046:Man is a venerating animal. He venerates as easily as he purges himself. When they take away from him the gods of his fathers, he looks for others abroad. ~ Max Jacob,
1047:Sixty years ago, these men and women broke the heavens, and made the gods weep. They had spent the time since learning how hard it was to run a world. ~ Max Gladstone,
1048:Some say those are just stories, but I don’t believe that. The gods rule us still. They have come down from the stars. And they are no longer kind. ~ Victoria Aveyard,
1049:The gods have sent medicines for the venom of serpents, but there is no medicine for a bad woman. She is more noxious than the viper, or than fire itself. ~ Euripides,
1050:There are those who believe destiny rests at the feet of the gods, but the truth is that it confronts the conscious of man with a burning challenge. ~ Eduardo Galeano,
1051:The world must live. We are only one species among billions. The gods don't love us any more than they love spiders or bears or whales or water lilies. ~ Daniel Quinn,
1052:They are dying, the old oracles sent to Laius, now our masters strike them off the rolls. Nowhere Apollo's golden glory now -- the gods, the gods go down. ~ Sophocles,
1053:Ah, reader! I would the gods had made thee rhythmical, that thou mightest comprehend the thousandth part of my labours in the evasion of cacophony. ~ Thomas de Quincey,
1054:I don't know why the gods made Fate our master then gave us a fighting spirit, perhaps only for their own amusement, perhaps to give us a thirst for life. ~ Scott Oden,
1055:Knowing what I know now…it would be harder. But I would hope…I would pray, Royse, that the gods would still lend me such foolishness in my need. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1056:Most religions live from a narrative that shapes their relationship with the divine other, God or the gods, and with the human other, the stranger. ~ Timothy Radcliffe,
1057:My girlfriend: sophomore honors student, demigod, and—oh, yeah—head architect for redesigning the palace of the gods on Mount Olympus in her spare time. ~ Rick Riordan,
1058:The earliest Greek philosopher's criticized Homer's mythology because the gods resembled mortals too much and were just as egotistic and treacherous. ~ Jostein Gaarder,
1059:The strands (the gods) weave out of our mortal lives are like a pattern visible only from the heavens; we here on earth can only guess at their designs ~ Steven Saylor,
1060:We swallowed a few bites-not to much scince the food of the gods can burn you to ashes is you overindulge. I guess thats why you don't see many fat gods ~ Rick Riordan,
1061:Achilles tilted back his head, clenched his fists, and roared his triumph to the gods, to the ghost of Patroclus, to the city of Troy, to the whole world. ~ Jodi Taylor,
1062:He whose senses have become calm like horses perfectly tamed by a driver, who has rid himself of pride and concupiscence, the gods themselves envy his lot. ~ Dhammapada,
1063:I gazed at him, silhouetted in the moonlight from the window - feeling soft inside, when I never felt soft, and worshipful, when I thought the gods had died. ~ Amy Lane,
1064:In his tent, Achilles grieved with his whole being and the gods saw he was a man already dead, a victim of the part that loved, the part that was mortal. ~ Louise Gl ck,
1065:In the flesh,” Maharet said. “In the flesh all wisdom begins. Beware the thing that has no flesh. Beware the gods, beware the idea, beware the devil. ~ Anne Rice,
1066:O, that the gods
Would set me free from this unhallow'd place,
Though they did change me to the meanest bird
That flies i' the purer air! ~ William Shakespeare,
1067:This basic theme . . . how long can human beings be successful without falling victims to their own pride or . . .to the jealousy of the gods? P. 106 ~ Carl Gustav Jung,
1068:I mean, we think we believe that the gods are wise and just and powerful, but what we really believe is that they are like our father after a long day. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1069:Pray all the time, read all the scriptures in the world, and worship all the gods there are ...but unless you realize the Truth, there is no freedom. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
1070:Speak the truth, do not abandon yourself to wrath, give of the little you have to those who seek your aid. By these three steps you shall approach the Gods. ~ Dhammapada,
1071:The heart of marriage is memories; and if the two of you happen to have the same ones and can savor your reruns, then your marriage is a gift from the gods. ~ Bill Cosby,
1072:This observe, thy task in thy destiny noble or fallen;
Time and result are the gods’; with these things be not thou troubled. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
1073:We forgot, we made errors, argued ambiguities, and twisted meanings to suit our own ends. And in so doing, mayhap we reshaped the gods themselves. Now ~ Jacqueline Carey,
1074:Face time with the kids wasn’t a priority for Norse deities—maybe because they had hundreds or thousands of children. Or maybe because the gods were jerks. ~ Rick Riordan,
1075:Her smile grew bitter as desert brine. "The gods may forgive Ista all day long. But if Ista does not forgive Ista, the gods may go hang themselves. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1076:The gods are just. No doubt. But their code of law is dictated, in the last resort, by the people who organize society; Providence takes its cue from men. ~ Aldous Huxley,
1077:The gods, who are not ignorant of the future, usually speak through the mouths of children and madmen. I also understand that they favor alcoholics. ~ Adolfo Bioy Casares,
1078:"While trauma can be hell on earth, trauma resolved is a gift of the gods—a heroic journey that belongs to each of us." ~ Peter A. Levine, Ann Frederick, Waking the Tiger,
1079:And so it came that White Fang learned that the right to punish was something the gods reserved for themselves and denied to the lesser creatures under them. ~ Jack London,
1080:My girlfriend: sophomore honors student, demigod, and — oh, yeah — head architect for redesigning the palace of the gods on Mount Olympus in her spare time. ~ Rick Riordan,
1081:None of us know when our time is up. The gods gave us one gift—to know when our loves would come. The part of life. It would be greedy to ask for more. ~ Dhonielle Clayton,
1082:That was the message. For me, alone among mortals, the gods send their messenger to tell me to stop whining. That’ll teach me to go hide in a temple. ~ Megan Whalen Turner,
1083:The gods are strange. It is not our vices only they make instruments to scourge us. They bring us to ruin through what in us is good, gentle, humane, loving. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1084:We live by oaths and we can die by them. To give an oath is to harness a life to a promise, and to break an oath is to tempt the punishment of the gods. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
1085:Expedit esse deos et, ut expedit, esse putemus. - The existence of the gods is expedient and, as it is expedient, let us assume it. ~ Ovid, The Art of Love (c. AD 2) I, 645,
1086:Food sacred to the manes or to the gods must be given to a man distinguished by sacred knowledge, for hands, smeared with blood, cannot be cleansed with blood. ~ Guru Nanak,
1087:Have you any idea of what you’ve unleashed? (Hades) Cruelty, pestilence, wrath, violence, ultimate suffering…what other gifts did the gods bestow on him? ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1088:He saw a lone immense high-curved world-pile
Erect like a mountain-chariot of the Gods
Motionless under an inscrutable sky. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The World-Stair,
1089:I fought side by side with the gods and some other demigod…Harry Cleese, I think.” “Heracles?” Piper suggested politely. “Whatever,” Bacchus said. “Anyway, I ~ Rick Riordan,
1090:Percy," Grover said, "the gods really don't appreciate people sitting in their thrones. I mean like turn-you-into-a-pile-of-ashes don't appreciate it. ~ Rick Riordan,
1091:The point which I should first wish to understand is whether the pious or holy is beloved by the gods because it is holy, or holy because it is beloved of the gods. ~ Plato,
1092:we’re often worse than pagans. True pagans had a reverence for nature and the gods. Today we worship ourselves and our tools. That sin defaces the world. ~ Charles J Chaput,
1093:advancing Nephilim. She could now see their skin and faces. Their entire bodies were covered in occultic tattoos, displaying their new allegiance to the gods. ~ Brian Godawa,
1094:But as the Interdiction has shown us, the gods function perfectly well whether we believe in them or not, so why devote all that energy to a pointless purpose? ~ N K Jemisin,
1095:But know this, if you let me go, you’ll regret it forever, because sometimes the gods run out of patience with fools and take back the gifts they’ve offered. ~ Alexis Morgan,
1096:He claims that the gods, and we, are both right here all the time, a shadow’s thickness apart. We’ve no distance to cross at all to get to each other. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1097:If you go to space, you'll look down and see no national boundaries. You'll never see the gods people are killing each other over, but they're incredibly real. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1098:It goes without saying that all of the people, living, dead, and otherwise, in this story are fictional or used in a fictional context. Only the gods are real. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1099:Not as the ways of other mortals are theirs who are guided,
They whose eyes are the gods and they walk by a light that is secret. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
1100:The gods spend the wealth the universe gathers, they scan the wonders and fling them to nothingness. That's why they're the gods! I told you they were devils. ~ Fritz Leiber,
1101:The story never ends, but our part in the tale does, for a while, and I’m in the mood for some happy-ever-aftering! We earned it, as the Gods themselves know! ~ S M Stirling,
1102:You’re beautiful, Finnie, but by the gods you have never been more beautiful than you are right now, spread before me, wrapped in my wool and filled with me ~ Kristen Ashley,
1103:It is not good to want a thing too much. It sometimes drives the luck away. You must want it just enough, and you must be very tactful with Gods or the gods. ~ John Steinbeck,
1104:It is one thing to have the gift of seeing the spirits and hearing the Gods who move about us as we come and go; but it is a gift of darkness as well as light. ~ Mary Stewart,
1105:The gods sell anything and to everybody at a fair price." Success is on sale in the world market place. All who are willing to pay the price can buy it. ~ Orison Swett Marden,
1106:There are plenty of people out there judging us every day of our lives and for every move we make. The gods of guilt are many.You don't need to add to them ~ Michael Connelly,
1107:There is no happiness where there is no wisdom; No wisdom but in submission to the gods. Big words are always punished, And proud men in old age learn to be wise. ~ Sophocles,
1108:There’s war between the gods, Uhtred, war between the Christian god and our gods, and when there is war in Asgard the gods make us fight for them on earth. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
1109:Thoughts arise in the hostage's tormented brain. In the hospital, patients feel they are returning to childhood; in prison, they age. The gods blind themselves. ~ Elie Wiesel,
1110:Have you any idea of what you’ve unleashed? (Hades)
Cruelty, pestilence, wrath, violence, ultimate suffering…what other gifts did the gods bestow on him? ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1111:I’m special,” I declared sarcastically. I actually was special, but not in a kick-the-gods-asses kind of way. More in the dropped-on-my-head-at-birth kind of way. ~ Jaymin Eve,
1112:Look now how mortals are blaming the gods, for they say that evils come from us, but in fact they themselves have woes beyond their share because of their own follies. ~ Homer,
1113:Only of one thing
Man can be sure, the will in his heart and his strength in his purpose:
This too is Fate and this too the gods ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
1114:Perhaps, instead of controlling every step, the gods have started a hundred or a thousand Cazarils and Umegats down this road. And only those arrive who choose to. ~ Anonymous,
1115:Perhaps the gods are kind to us, by making life more disagreeable as we grow older. In the end death seems less intolerable than the manifold burdens we carry ~ Sigmund Freud,
1116:Quilters are so confident of a perfect product that they have a tradition of introducing a flaw into a quilt on purpose, in order not to offend the gods. ~ Carol Fisher Saller,
1117:Sometimes, the stars line up, the gods smile, and love gets a fighting chance. Just a chance. That's all it can really hope for. No guarantees, no certainties ~ Tess Gerritsen,
1118:Hero,” said Machaon to his sister who was still muttering to her gods. “Please stop. Surely the gods would have heard you by now … let’s try not to annoy them. ~ Sulari Gentill,
1119:It reminded me to never take the story of any god or spirit or magical being to be all true. If the gods created everything, was truth not just another creation? ~ Marlon James,
1120:Let us try to see things from their better side: You complain about seeing thorny rose bushes; Me, I rejoice and give thanks to the gods That thorns have roses. ~ Alphonse Karr,
1121:Badness can be got easily and in shoals; the road to her is smooth, and she lives very near us. But between us and Goodness the gods have placed the sweat of our brows; ~ Hesiod,
1122:[…] either the gods are there whether you believe or not, or exist only as a function of the belief, so either way you might as well ignore the whole business. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1123:His mouth moved up to my ear. “Let me stroke you, swear to the gods, sweets, you loosen up just a hint, I’ll make you come so hard you’ll think you’ve exploded. ~ Kristen Ashley,
1124:Perhaps the gods punish us by bringing us face to face with our own foolish mistakes, condemning us to watch our children fall into the same traps that crippled us. ~ Robin Hobb,
1125:We should not make comparisons between the gods. When a man has really seen a divinity, he knows that all divinities are manifestations of one and the same Brahman. ~ Ramakishna,
1126:changed. A few details might, but the big picture always remained the same. Than realized that none of the gods was really all that different from Sisyphus who, each ~ Eva Pohler,
1127:...either the gods are there whether you believe or not, or exist only as a function of the belief, so either way you might as well ignore the whole business... ~ Terry Pratchett,
1128:In religions which have lost their creative spark, the gods eventually become no more than poetic motifs or ornaments for decorating human solitude and walls. ~ Nikos Kazantzakis,
1129:It did remind me of something out of Greek mythology - the richest king who gets everything he wants, but ultimately his family has a curse on it from the Gods. ~ Martin Scorsese,
1130:Maybe, she thought with some perversity, it wasn’t the gods who controlled the universe, but cats. Cats who toyed with humans as a puppeteer would a marionette. ~ Kristen Britain,
1131:Men are so quick to blame the gods: they say that we devise their misery. But they themselves- in their depravity- design grief greater than the griefs that fate assigns. ~ Homer,
1132:Only one way to win when you're being chased by someone bigger and tougher than you. Turn straight around, punch their teeth out, and hope the gods are fond of you. ~ Scott Lynch,
1133:The Gods occupy the loftiest regions, men the lowest, the demons the middle region...They have immortality of body, but passions of the mind in common with men. ~ Saint Augustine,
1134:The lesson seemed to be twofold: do not anger the gods, but if you must, at least make sure your city isn't next to a lake, as that's just asking for trouble. ~ Jonathan L Howard,
1135:There's a lot of humiliation in
living, but that's okay, for if
the gods are always laughing,
then surely at times they must
be laughing with us. ~ J Andrew Schrecker,
1136:When I investigate and when I discover that the forces of the heavens and the planets are within ourselves, then truly I seem to be living among the gods. ~ Leon Battista Alberti,
1137:Hit me again, and I'll report you to the authorities. Follow me to my bed one more time, and I swear to the gods, I'll search for the most painful way to murder you. ~ Kien Nguyen,
1138:In other words, our destiny is to become the gods that we once feared and worshipped. Science will give us the means by which we can shape the universe in our image. ~ Michio Kaku,
1139:The gods of the realms are many and varied -- or they are the many and varied names and identities tagged onto the same being. I know not -- and care not -- which. ~ R A Salvatore,
1140:The role of the poet in "destitute times" is to keep the memory of the gods alive, to inspire people to reimagine them, and find the courage to believe in them anew. ~ David Tacey,
1141:Deut. 6:4 “Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is one.”   Psa. 82:1 God has taken his place in the divine council; in the midst of the gods he holds judgment. ~ Brian Godawa,
1142:Forgetfulness of grief I yet may gain;In some wise may come ending to my pain;It may be yet the Gods will have me glad!Yet, Love, I would that thee and pain I had! ~ William Morris,
1143:He fought the men and he slayed the monsters and he bested the gods, and at last the hero, having conquered all, earned the thing that he wanted most. To go home. ~ Victoria Schwab,
1144:I have tried to write Paradise Do not move Let the wind speak that is paradise. Let the Gods forgive what I have made Let those I love try to forgive what I have made. ~ Ezra Pound,
1145:The Gods we worship write their names on our faces.” The face is carved from within by invisible tools; our thoughts, our moods, our emotions are the chisels. ~ Orison Swett Marden,
1146:The world in many ways would be a much calmer and gentler place if women ruled. There would have been fewer children sacrificed to the gods of greed and power. ~ William Paul Young,
1147:For surely the gods would know better than she what to make of this hot, beautiful grief, the gods who had, after all, created her with such a fierce, lonesome soul. ~ Thea Harrison,
1148:The drive to create music that is pure is my highest priority. Sometimes I'll get extremely technical, and other times I'll just kind of go with the gods of music. ~ John Frusciante,
1149:The moon is dark, and the gods dance in the night; there is terror in the sky, for upon the moon hath sunk an eclipse foretold in no books of men or of earth's gods. ~ H P Lovecraft,
1150:And like everyone whom the gods spoil without reason, I feel a kind of anxiety buried at the heart of my happiness. It's all too beautiful, too flawless, too complete. ~ S ndor M rai,
1151:But death is a thing that comes to all alike. Not even the gods can fend it away from a man they love, when once the destructive doom of leveling death has fastened upon him. ~ Homer,
1152:For all the Gods are one god (...) and all the Goddesses are one Goddess, and their is only one Initiator. And to every man his own truth, and the God within. ~ Marion Zimmer Bradley,
1153:For here now is the age of iron. Never by daytime will there be an end to hard work and pain, nor in the night to weariness, when the gods will send anxieties to trouble us. ~ Hesiod,
1154:Frank Zappa was one of the gods of the Czech underground, I thought of him as a friend. Whenever I feel like escaping from the world of the Presidency, I think of him. ~ Vaclav Havel,
1155:How seven days had passed since she had disappeared from existence.
That it would take the eyes of the gods to find her.
Or the heart of the Lumateran exile. ~ Melina Marchetta,
1156:It is not only that there is no hiding place for the gods from the searching telescope and microscope; there is no such society any more as the gods once supported. ~ Joseph Campbell,
1157:None has been able to hold all the gods in his bosom unstaggered,
All have grown drunken with force and have gone down to Hell and to Ate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
1158:She had prayed for someone else, anyone else but Den. She'd been hoping for a nice, quiet man like Papa. Instead, the gods had sent her the man who'd scorched the world. ~ C L Wilson,
1159:There is always a reason to live. The Gods will set you on the proper path. There is a deeper purpose to the path you have been set upon, one that has yet to reveal itself.
   ~ Sura,
1160:There is in general good reason to suppose that in several respects the gods could all benefit from instruction by us human beings. We humans are - more humane. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1161:Why do you think the old stories tell of men who set out on great journeys to impress the gods? Because trying to impress people just isn't worth the time and effort. ~ Henry Rollins,
1162:For the one (what is dear to the gods) is of the sort to be loved
because it is loved; the other (the holy), because it is of the sort to be loved,
therefore is loved. ~ Plato,
1163:I have learned that it is one thing to kill in battle, to send a brave man's soul to the corpse hall of the gods, but quite another to take a helpless man's life... ~ Bernard Cornwell,
1164:In his tent, Achilles
grieved with his whole being
and the gods saw
he was a man already dead, a victim
of the part that loved,
the part that was mortal. ~ Louise Gl ck,
1165:Is there anyone who has conquered the gods and lived continuously in that victory? Sooner or later retribution has always come. Do not be contemptuous of men or monkeys. ~ R K Narayan,
1166:It has been my experience that if you defer to the gods with the full reverence and respect that they deserve and expect, they are often inclined to return the compliment. ~ Anonymous,
1167:I will not stand by and let any man believe his death is an act of one of the gods. They don't deserve the credit. This is just nature, a side effect of mortality - H ~ Katie Hamstead,
1168:Some hate us, think us outlaws to hang at the gallows. Some fear us, think us demons to burn at the stake. Some worship us, think us children of the gods. But all know us. ~ Anonymous,
1169:The Greeks, it will be recalled, regarded Eros, the god of love, as the eldest of the gods; but also as the youngest, born fresh and dewy-eyed in every living heart. ~ Joseph Campbell,
1170:There is no happiness where there is no wisdom;
No wisdom but in submission to the gods.
Big words are always punished,
And proud men in old age learn to be wise. ~ Sophocles,
1171:The woman laughed, shoulders bouncing. "I think the gods eat suffering. That's why they've put it everywhere you look: so anywhere they go, they'll always be fed. ~ Edward W Robertson,
1172:Those who try to lead the people can only do so by following the mob. It is through the voice of one crying in the wilderness that the ways of the gods must be prepared. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1173:turned out Queen Metaneira was there with her family and her household guards, offering sacrifices to the gods in celebration of the birth of her newest son, Demophoon. ~ Rick Riordan,
1174:We're pieces on a gameboard, Dr. March, and some of us are more powerful than others. You. Me. Her. We're the ones the gods want. We're the ones they're fighting over. ~ Richelle Mead,
1175:You ask me, I welcome new gods. Bring them on. The god of the guns. The god of bombs. All the gods of ignorance and intolerance, of self-righteousness, idiocy and blame. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1176:You will, if you're wise and know the art of travel, let yourself go on the stream of the unknown and accept whatever comes in the spirit in which the gods may offer it. ~ Freya Stark,
1177:Furthermore, it goes without saying that all of the people, living, dead and otherwise in this story are fictional or used in a fictional context. Only the gods are real. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1178:God's Desire
Lo, how all shakes when the gods tread too near!
All moves, is in peril, anguished, torn, upheaved. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
1179:I was left with a sensation of having encountered a monster, in the ancient sense of the original Latin word, “monstrum”: “an omen or warning of the will of the gods.”4 ~ Peter Vronsky,
1180:Just when the gods had ceased to be, and the Christ had not yet come, there was a unique moment in history, between Cicero and Marcus Aurelius, when man stood alone. ~ Gustave Flaubert,
1181:Kill her. Hide the body. If only he could…Damn, stupid conscience. Why had the gods given them that gift? It definitely should have come with a return policy.’ (Syn) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1182:Love is the joy of the good, the wonder of the wise, the amazement of the gods; desired by those who have no part in him, and precious to those who have the better part in him. ~ Plato,
1183:Most of us are safe. If you're not a delirious dream the gods are having, if your beauty doesn't trouble the constellations, nobody's going to cast a spell on you. ~ Michael Cunningham,
1184:Therefore, if the gods are immortal and eternal, what need is there of the other sex, when they themselves do not require succession, since they are always about to exist? ~ Lactantius,
1185:These sages breathed for God’s delight in things.
Assisting the slow entries of the gods,
Sowing in young minds immortal thoughts they lived, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Quest,
1186:This is where the gods play games with the lives of men, on a board which is at one and the same time a simple playing area and the whole world. And Fate always wins. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1187:To the gods I am indebted for having good grandfathers, good parents, a good sister, good teachers, good associates, good kinsmen and friends, nearly everything good. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1188:You must go home eventually."
"I would throw myself off a precipice first, except that I would land in the arms of the gods, Whom I do not wish to see again. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1189:By taking these three steps you will get closer to the Gods: First, Say the Truth. Second: Don't let you get Angry. Third: Give, even though you have so little to give. ~ Gautama Buddha,
1190:Furthermore, it goes without saying that all of the people, living, dead, and otherwise in this story are fictional or used in a fictional context. Only the gods are real. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1191:Holly. In the name of all the gods, stop shooting energy into all-energy beings. Just how stupid are you? The bots quivered and meshed, growing larger and more aggressive. ~ Eoin Colfer,
1192:I once heard the survivors of a colony of ants that had been partially obliterated by a cow's foot seriously debating the intention of the gods towards their civilization. ~ Don Marquis,
1193:Roland grabbed Jake and hauled him to his feet. “You came!” Jake shouted. “You really came!” “I came, yes. By the grace of the gods and the courage of my friends, I came. ~ Stephen King,
1194:The gods are dead, but the "gods" are alive and well-- or, I would say, the literal is dead, but the metaphorical is alive and well. ~ Michael Vannoy Adams, The Mythological Unconscious,
1195:The gods hate those who plan badly, and help those with good friends, good swords, and good sense. Worry less about what the gods might do and more about what you can, ~ Joe Abercrombie,
1196:The idea that we are the gods now, and we are doing things that our ancestors think are god-like is not a rhetorical question. You know what I mean? We really are as gods. ~ Jason Silva,
1197:The Roman religion was in fact of the nature of a bargain: men paid certain sacrifices and rites, and the gods granted their favour, irrespective of right or wrong. In ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1198:At times such as these, you get a good, humble feeling, like the gods made this place, this moment, first and concocted you as an afterthought just to be there to enjoy it. ~ Wells Tower,
1199:For such a man, one who neglects no effort to set himself from now in the ranks of the best, is a priest, a minister of the gods, a friend of Him who dwells within him. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1200:Furthermore, it goes without saying that all of the people, living, dead, and otherwise, in this story are fictional or used in a fictional context. Only the gods are real. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1201:In addition to the arts and poetry, we might say that depth psychology devotes itself to tracking the gods in a godless time. This is a thankless task, but a necessary one. ~ David Tacey,
1202:To give oneself ernestly to securing righteousness and justice among the people, and while respecting the gods and demons, to keep aloof from them, that may be called wisdom. ~ Confucius,
1203:when it comes to the caprices and manipulations of the gods or God, whichever philosophy you may embrace, we are all of us merely pawns in their games, rather than players. ~ Peter David,
1204:Esagila meant “House of the Raised Head.” Marduk meant to raise himself above the heads of all the gods. He wanted to rule in the heavens as Nimrod wanted to rule on earth. ~ Brian Godawa,
1205:Greece is the home of the gods; they may have died but their presence still makes itself felt. The gods were of human proportion: they were created out of the human spirit. ~ Henry Miller,
1206:In fact I think the Gods love people like Tristan who sway effortlessly before the winds of fate and spring back with a smile, looking on life always with blithe optimism. ~ James Herriot,
1207:In her time, she has known the evil that men do. But nothing matches with the evil of the Gods, who, having created humanity, now spend their days teasing and testing it. ~ Thrity Umrigar,
1208:Men are so quick to blame the gods: they say
that we devise their misery. But they
themselves- in their depravity- design
grief greater than the griefs that fate assigns. ~ Homer,
1209:Nor at all can tell Whether I mean this day to end myself, Or lend an ear to Plato where he says, That men like soldiers may not quit the post Allotted by the Gods. ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
1210:Remember how long thou hast already put off these things, and how often a certain day and hour as it were, having been set unto thee by the gods, thou hast neglected it. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1211:The gods of the realms are many and varied-or they are the many and varied names and identities tagged onto the same being. I know not-and care not- which. Drizzt Do’Urden ~ R A Salvatore,
1212:Time's works
The giant’s and the Titan’s furious march
Climbs to usurp the kingdom of the gods
Or skirts the demon magnitudes of Hell; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
1213:Best of children, sisters arm-in-arm, we must bear what the gods give us to bear-- don't fire up your hearts with so much grief. No reason to blame the pass you've come to now. ~ Sophocles,
1214:Free from the happiness desired by slaves, delivered from the gods and their adoration, fearless and terrible, grand and solitary is the will of the man of truth. ~ Nietzsche, Zarathoustra,
1215:I will deny I ever said this, of course, but the gods need heroes. They always have. Otherwise we would not keep you annoying little brats around." I feel so wanted. Thanks. ~ Rick Riordan,
1216:Set honour in one eye and death i' the other, And I will look on both indifferently, For let the gods so speed me as I love The name of honour more than I fear death. ~ William Shakespeare,
1217:Too hard the gods are with man’s fragile race;
In their large heavens they dwell exempt from Fate
And they forget the wounded feet of man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
1218:We make the dragons as we make the gods, because we need them, because, somewhere deep in our hearts, we recognize that a world without them is a world not worth living in. ~ R A Salvatore,
1219:As Xenophanes wrote:     The gods did not reveal, from the beginning, All things to us, but in the course of time, Through seeking we may learn and know things better.   This ~ Matthew Syed,
1220:I don't believe in God. I believe gods and devils are within us. It's our own battle. Our life's battle is to appeal to the gods within us, and to fight the devils within us. ~ Eddie Izzard,
1221:If I promise to be the soul of charitability and kindness, will you release me of my torment?” I asked the gods, any of them, I didn’t care which one was listening. “What’s ~ Kristen Ashley,
1222:Loki was a shape changer and a trickster. He could turn into animals like fish, horses, and falcons. At times, Loki helped the gods, but his tricks also made them angry. ~ Mary Pope Osborne,
1223:Mind’s voices mimicked inspiration’s stress,
Its ictus of infallibility,
Its speed and lightning heaven-leap of the Gods. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Entry into the Inner Countries,
1224:One of the reasons people find me a believable actor is that I don't seem like one of the gods from Olympus. I seem like someone who was lucky enough to be let into Olympus. ~ John C Reilly,
1225:Secure against the designs of men, secure against the malignity of the Gods, they have accomplished a thing of infinite difficulty; that to them nothing remains even to be wished. ~ Tacitus,
1226:That is the power you must one day command. Let them think every breath of theirs is a gift, not from the gods, but from you. Do this, and you will become a god among them. ~ David Dalglish,
1227:The change which the writing wrought in me (and of which I did not write) was only a beginning; only to prepare me for the gods' surgery. They used my own pen to probe my wound. ~ C S Lewis,
1228:Walking into the night, he was in control of his world. He would shape it with the gods and demons into an understanding of forces, each with its own price, marked in blood. ~ Brian Catling,
1229:Who are you, Hockenberry, to thwart Fate and defy the Will of the Gods?

I am me, Thomas Hockenberry. I am fed up with these power-addled thugs who call themselves gods. ~ Dan Simmons,
1230:And of all the gods who might help them, the only ones not affected by the Greek–Roman schism seemed to be Aphrodite, Nemesis, and Dionysus. Love, revenge, wine. Very helpful. ~ Rick Riordan,
1231:And so, to the end of history, murder shall breed murder, always in the name of right and honor and peace, until the gods are tired of blood and create a race that can understand. ~ Ben Bova,
1232:Because it is my destiny, Zabdas! Because I've always known the gods made me for something more -- more than just a wife, just a mother, just a woman. They made me for power! ~ Libbie Hawker,
1233:Have not all theists painted their Deity as the god of love and goodness? Yet after thousands of years of such preachments the gods remain deaf to the agony of the human race. ~ Emma Goldman,
1234:Men are so quick to blame the gods: they say that [the gods] devise their misery. But [men] themselves- in their depravity- design
grief greater than the griefs that fate assigns. ~ Homer,
1235:Pain is the hammer of the Gods to break
A dead resistance in the mortal’s heart,
His slow inertia as of living stone. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
1236:The Creative Artist and the poet and saint must fight the actual gods of our society—the god of conformism as well as the gods of apathy, material success and exploitative power. ~ Rollo May,
1237:Those who become aware of the death of the gods, and bring this tragic news to humanity, inhabit a psychic space which is full of danger. ~ David Tacey [referring to Nietzsche and Holderlin],
1238:A screened Necessity drives even the gods.
Over human lives it strides to unseen ends;
Our tragic failures are its stepping-stones. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act IV,
1239:Surface-dwellers had an expression about the wrath of the gods. Since goblins didn't really care for gods, they had an alternate expression-they called it the wrath of the chef. ~ Jim C Hines,
1240:What love had been given her she wished to give to others. Most times they didn’t much want it but hounds, horses, cats, and dogs did and they were a gift from the gods, too. ~ Rita Mae Brown,
1241:Are you suggesting that the gods have trouble acting together, young lady?" Dionysus asked. Yes, Lord Dionysus." Mr. D nodded. "Just checking. You're right, of course. Carry on. ~ Rick Riordan,
1242:But remember, when you pray to the gods, that men stood like the heroes of old at Marathon, and were better. And that they are still no better than the women who bear them. ~ Christian Cameron,
1243:I am Isis, Queen of this country. I was instructed by Mercury. No one can destroy the laws which I have established. I am the eldest daughter of Saturn, most ancient of the Gods. ~ Albert Pike,
1244:I thought how we might have to yell to be heard by Higher Power, but that's not saying it's not there. And that is faith for you. It's belief even when the gods don't deliver. ~ Louise Erdrich,
1245:The gods, the immortals, were the inventors of death and corruption; yet with one or two notable exceptions they have lacked the courage to try their invention out on themselves. ~ J M Coetzee,
1246:these sacrifices sustained the cosmic cycle: Maize became blood, and blood was then transformed back into maize. Sacrificial victims were referred to as “tortillas for the gods. ~ Tom Standage,
1247:Here is a lesson to you—do not envy the gods; pity us, for we are fixed in our divine function, while you are free to do as you please. We must be wise whereas you may be fools. ~ Vera Nazarian,
1248:I will produce a lowly Primitive; "Man" shall be his name. I will create a Primitive Worker; He will be charged with the service of the gods, that they might have their ease. ~ Zecharia Sitchin,
1249:Theocracies are hell.  A sign of a diseased culture.  For who speaks for the gods but the temples?  And the temples have their own agendas that have little to do with the gods.  ~ Terry Mancour,
1250:Your place in life you can always change, whether you have the gift or not. But you cannot change what the gods have made you. The sooner you accept that, the happier you'll be. ~ Tamora Pierce,
1251:I choose not to believe in any gods as an act of charity," Marcus said. "Charity toward whom?" "Toward the gods. Seems rude to think they couldn't make a world better than this. ~ Daniel Abraham,
1252:I choose not to believe in any gods as an act of charity,” Marcus said. “Charity toward whom?” “Toward the gods. Seems rude to think they couldn’t make a world better than this, ~ Daniel Abraham,
1253:I decide to go out and spend all my money on underwear, then throw them about the room to
decide my fate like a satiny, lace-gusseted I Ching. Let the gods of Beau Bra decide. ~ Belle de Jour,
1254:I poured out a libation on the mountain top … I heaped up wood and cane and cedar and myrtle … When the gods smelled the sweet savour they gathered like flies over the sacrifice ~ Graham Hancock,
1255:I saw you from my deck, you know,” he whispers in my ear. “Before coming aboard. You’ve never looked more beautiful, Evie. And I’ve never begged the gods to steer my ship faster. ~ Sarah Henning,
1256:MEDEA: The gods know who was the author of this sorrow.
JASON: Yes, the gods know indeed, they know your loathsome heart.
MEDEA: Hate me. But I tire of your barking bitterness. ~ Euripides,
1257:Our world is a dream of the gods. Maybe they have other dreams. But all we have is this story unfolding, and in the script of this world, nothing's going to bring Altan back to life. ~ R F Kuang,
1258:Someone stake that bastard, please, and for the sake of the gods, dust Benny off the table by the fountain. The powder’s disgusting and it’s getting into the blood. (Apollite) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1259:The gods are the guardians and increasers of the Truth, the powers of the Immortal, the sons of the infinite Mother. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Renaissance in India, Indian Spirituality and Life - II,
1260:Every evildoer began by despising the Gods; and one not previously corrupt, taking to this contempt, even though in other respects not wholly bad, becomes an evildoer by the very fact. ~ Plotinus,
1261:Inspiration is a message-in-a-bo ttle from the distant shore, a window into the other world, a tap of the muse's finger, the grace of the gods. It comes when you least expect it. ~ Phil Cousineau,
1262:I will deny I ever said this, of course, but the gods need heroes. They always have. Otherwise we would not keep you annoying little brats around."

I feel so wanted. Thanks. ~ Rick Riordan,
1263:The Gods being good and making all things, there is no positive evil, it only comes by absence of good; just as darkness itself does not exist, but only comes about by absence of light. ~ Sallust,
1264:The way to peace is to be content with yourself, honor the light of reason within, live in harmony with others, and be grateful to the gods for the universe and your role in it. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1265:Your true nature doesn't come out. So the gods let you do what you want because free will would be compromised if they showed up at the White House saying, 'Take us to your leader. ~ Tarsem Singh,
1266:‎For Tempus...was a dozen storm gods' avatar; no army he sanctified could know defeat; no war he fought could not be won. Combat was life to him; he fought like the gods themselves. ~ Janet Morris,
1267:He is the only God man has ever heard of who loves sinners. False gods—the gods of human manufacturing—despise sinners, but the Father of Jesus loves all, no matter what they do. ~ Brennan Manning,
1268:In cloud-ships the gods are wont to travel, and wise cotters have legends that keep them from certain high peaks at night when it is cloudy, for the gods are not lenient as of old. ~ H P Lovecraft,
1269:One night, in his cups, he drank a jar of wildfire, after telling his friends it would transform him into a dragon, but the gods were kind and it transformed him into a corpse. ~ George R R Martin,
1270:Perfection shall remain the boring privilege of the gods, while our bungling, messy world every night shall be lived as if it were the last and every day as if it were the first. ~ Eduardo Galeano,
1271:The gods confound the man who first found out How to distinguish hours! Confound him, too, Who in this place set up a sun-dial, To cut and hack my days so wretchedly Into small portions. ~ Plautus,
1272:The gods, (if gods to goodness are inclined If acts of mercy touch their heavenly mind), And, more than all the gods, your generous heart, Conscious of worth, requite its own desert! ~ John Dryden,
1273:The typical conservative Roman was far too practical for that. If you didn’t know by age five that the gods were made-up creatures and the myths invented stories, then you were a fool. ~ Anne Rice,
1274:When the Greeks said, Whom the gods love die young, they probably meant, as Lord Sankey suggested, that those favored by the gods stay young till the day they die; young and playful. ~ Eric Hoffer,
1275:Yet the success of plans and the advantage to be derived from them do not at all times agree, seeing the gods claim to themselves the right to decide as to the final result. ~ Ammianus Marcellinus,
1276:Chapter 3.   That the Romans Did Not Show Their Usual Sagacity When They Trusted that They Would Be Benefited by the Gods Who Had Been Unable to Defend Troy.    And these ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
1277:Let him grow taller,she asked the gods.Let him know sixteen, and twenty, and fifty. Let him grow as tall as his father, and hold his own son in his arms. Please, please, please. ~ George R R Martin,
1278:As the Takers see it, the gods gave man the same choice they gave Achilles: a brief life of glory, or a long, uneventful life in obscurity. And the Takers chose a brief life of glory. ~ Daniel Quinn,
1279:I knew: the gods turned once, in their madness,
Men into things, not killing humane senses.
You’ve been turned in to my reminiscences
To make eternal the unearthly sadness. ~ Anna Akhmatova,
1280:No matter what ugliness and destruction you may witness around you, I want you always to believe that the tiniest glimpse of beauty here and there is a reflection of the gods' abode. ~ Vaddey Ratner,
1281:One should not inquire too closely where ancient legends about the gods are concerned; many things which reason rejects acquire some color of probability once you bring a god into the story ~ Arrian,
1282:The words men used to describe the gods were the words they used for fetters or bonds, things which held the world together, within bounds, preventing the breakout of chaos and disorder. ~ A S Byatt,
1283:I bless the gods for not letting my education in rhetoric, poetry, and other literary studies come easily to me, and thereby sparing me from an absorbing interest in these subjects. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1284:It's disgraceful how these humans blame the gods. They say their tribulations come from us, when they themselves, through their own foolishness, bring hardships which are not decreed by Fate. ~ Homer,
1285:Let this then be one of our rules and principles concerning the gods, to which our poets and reciters will be expected to conform --that God is not the author of all things, but of good only. ~ Plato,
1286:Listen, if you walk into a whorehouse and find yourself getting sucked off, it’s because you put some money on the counter, not because the gods transported a pair of lips to your cock. ~ Scott Lynch,
1287:Madness and greatness are two sides of the same coin. Every time a new Targaryen is born, the gods toss the coin in the air and the world holds its breath to see how it will land. ~ George R R Martin,
1288:The farther afield you go, the more you are going home ... as if the gods put us down with a certain arbitrary glee in the wrong place and what we seek is who we had really ought to be. ~ Diane Arbus,
1289:What is the difference between the Christian God, and the gods of the other religions?" He simply, yet profoundly answered, "The main difference is this: The God of Christianity exists. ~ R C Sproul,
1290:What was it they said about the gods? They wouldn’t exist if there weren’t people to believe in them? And that applied to everything. Reality was what went on inside people’s heads. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1291:As the saying goes, behind every great man is an even greater woman. I guess playing Hera [in Wonder Woman] means that I'm, well, not only Queen of the Gods, I'm better than he is! ~ Marg Helgenberger,
1292:But if the gods only cursed us, then we would hate them. And if they only blessed us, then—well, then we’d care nothing for their laws because we’d respect nothing but our own pleasure. ~ Kate Elliott,
1293:fools! whose pride
Absurd the gods permit a little space
To please their souls with laughter, then replace
In the loud limbo of futilities. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Lines on Ireland,
1294:If a man goes up into Parnassus after sunset, why should he not see strange things? The gods still walk there, and a man who would not go carefully in the country of the gods is a fool. ~ Mary Stewart,
1295:Mathilde let him eat two doughnuts, and his eyes filled with tears because they were the most amazing doughnuts in the history of glazed doughnuts, food of the gods. He was full of joy. ~ Lauren Groff,
1296:No one rules the world forever, the gods grow jealous. If someone is constantly successful or too powerful - be it Alexander or Napolean or Hitler - the gods will eventually destroy him. ~ Ruskin Bond,
1297:On earth, Sky Mother created humans, her children of blood and bone. In the heavens she gave birth to the gods and goddesses. Each would come to embody a different fragment of her soul. ~ Tomi Adeyemi,
1298:The prayers of most religions generally praise and thank the gods involved, either out of general piety or in the hope that he or she will take the hint and start acting responsibly. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1299:What the gods said was heard by each combatant in his own language, and according to his own understanding. It boiled down to: I. This is Not a Game. II. Here and Now, You are Alive. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1300:Your hunter has a destiny to bear the mark of the gods. Only one true warrior receives such an honer - one who will lay down his own life for another's"
...
"You are the protector. ~ M R Merrick,
1301:And so, to the end of history, murder shall breed murder, always in the name of right and honor and peace, until the gods are tired of blood and create a race that can understand. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1302:, But the streets need cleaning, brother," Gromph said.
"That is why the gods gave us magic, brother," Jarlaxle replied in the same smug tone. "To perform the mundane tasks of life. ~ R A Salvatore,
1303:I can’t be sure, but I think perthro is his…what do Christians call it? A ‘Hail Mary pass.’ He was throwing that rune like you’d throw dice from a cup, turning our fate over to the gods. ~ Rick Riordan,
1304:Infinite hopes—and fears—may both be yours. Be sure that, whatever else you get, you will not get justice.” “Are the gods not just?” “Oh no, child. What would become of us if they were? But ~ C S Lewis,
1305:- The myths are dead. The gods are dead. The ghosts and ghouls and phantoms are dead. There is only the State, and the People.
- No, Monsieur Robespierre. There is much more than that. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1306:We call on the gods, and the gods well know
what storms torment us, sailors whirled to nothing.
But if we are to live and reach the haven,
one small seed could grow a mighty tree - ~ Aeschylus,
1307:We were human, mortal and fallible. We forgot, we made errors, argued ambiguities, and twisted meanings to suit our own ends. And in so doing, mayhap we reshaped the gods themselves. ~ Jacqueline Carey,
1308:where are the gods the gods hate us the gods have run away the gods have hidden in holes the gods are dead of the plague they rot and stink too there never were any gods there’s only death ~ Ted Hughes,
1309:Build slow and sure; 'tis for life, young man. In the elder days of art, Builders wrought with greatest care Each minute and unseen part, For the gods see everywhere. — Longfellow. ~ Orison Swett Marden,
1310:False gods - the gods of human understanding - despise sinners, but the Father of Jesus loves all, no matter what they do. But of course this is almost too incredible for us to accept. ~ Brennan Manning,
1311:For great is the LORD, and greatly to be praised;         he is to be feared above all gods.     5 For all the gods of the peoples are worthless idols,         but the LORD made the heavens. ~ Anonymous,
1312:Hugo learned that Prometheus had created humankind out of mud, and then stolen fire from the gods as a gift for the people he had made, so they could survive. So Prometheus was a thief. ~ Brian Selznick,
1313:i once heard the survivors
of a colony of ants
that had been partially
obliterated by a cow s foot
seriously debating
the intention of the gods
towards their civilization ~ Don Marquis,
1314:Schiller. A German dramatist of three centuries ago. In a play about Joan of Arc, he said, ‘Against stupidity, the gods themselves contend in vain.’ I’m no god and I’ll contend no longer. ~ Isaac Asimov,
1315:The dark does not weep for itself because there is no light. Rather, it accepts that it is the dark. It is said that even the gods must die." He winks. "But not without one hell of a fight. ~ Libba Bray,
1316:There were a million stars. Were they the gods? They seemed so far away, cold, indifferent and irrelevant – silent witnesses to the drama unfolding on a tiny rock called earth. There ~ Anand Neelakantan,
1317:We mustn't keep meeting like this. Communications between the people of the moon and earth is forbidden...it is the way of the gods...we mustn't fall in love...but its already too late. ~ Naoko Takeuchi,
1318:Whoever undertakes to set himself up as a judge of Truth and Knowledge is shipwrecked by the laughter of the gods."

[Preface to Brissot's Address to His Constituents (1794)] ~ Edmund Burke,
1319:Healing the sick was once considered a sacred gift bestowed on mortals by the gods. Let the investors find their recompense in the good they have done and not in monetary returns alone. ~ E A Bucchianeri,
1320:Heimthra' was the word used for longing: for home, for the past, for things to be as they once had been. Even the gods were said to know that yearning, from when the worlds were broken. ~ Guy Gavriel Kay,
1321:He is encompassed himself, in the steering clasp of hand on shoulder and scrubber-fluffed noggin bobbing in prayer to the gods of cock, filled with grace from the sacred font of the phallus. ~ Hal Duncan,
1322:He is Jason and Hercules and Perseus---a figure so strong and beautiful and heroic that the blood of the gods must flow through him, because how else could a being so fine exist in this world? ~ J Kenner,
1323:He likes to humble our foes by making them seem ridiculous. As he said to me the other day, ‘Kill a man, and you cede him honor in the eyes of the gods. Laugh at him and you shame him'. ~ Raymond E Feist,
1324:Only men to whom the family is sacred will ever have a standard or a status by which to criticize the State. They alone can appeal to something more holy than the gods of the city. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
1325:Thanks to the gods I didn't spend much time while growing up with my grandfather's mistress and preserved the flower of my youth, waiting for the proper time to demonstrate my virility. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1326:The gods hate those who plan badly, and help those with good friends, good swords, and good sense. Worry less about what the gods might do and more about what you can, that’s my advice. ~ Joe Abercrombie,
1327:The gods wrest our careful policies
To their own ends until we stand appalled
Remembering what we meant to do and seeing
What has been done. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act IV,
1328:The latest page I've been working is about the organization of the pantheon of the gods. Who's indebted to whom, how they are related, who screwed whose uncle or grandmother, all of that. ~ Ben Nicholson,
1329:There’s an old saying: ‘be careful what you wish for; you might get it.’” “Oh, gods.” A quaver shook Ilya’s voice. “The bargains we make with the gods never fall out as we think they will. ~ Kate Elliott,
1330:And my commander always says, when we go about our business in the city, that when you look at the state of mankind you are forced to accept the reality of the gods.'
(Captain Carrot) ~ Terry Pratchett,
1331:As touching the gods, I do not know whether they exist or not, nor how they are featured; for there is much to prevent our knowing: the obscurity of the subject and the brevity of human life. ~ Protagoras,
1332:In all things I would have the island of a man inviolate. Let us sit apart as the gods, talking from peak to peak all round Olympus. No degree of affection need invade this religion. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1333:It is said that the gods play games with the lives of men. But what games, and why, and the identities of the actual pawns, and what the game is, and what the rules are – who knows? Best ~ Terry Pratchett,
1334:Perhaps such things pass for virtue among the gods. But how is there glory in taking life? We die so easily. Would you make him another Pyrrhus? Let the stories of him be something more. ~ Madeline Miller,
1335:Accept the universe
As the gods gave it to you.
If the gods wanted to give you something else
They’d have done it.

If there are other matters and other worlds
There are. ~ Alberto Caeiro,
1336:Do not go to others for the answers. Look in your own heart, search your own faith. You will either find the answer or come to see that the answer is with the gods themselves, not with man. ~ Margaret Weis,
1337:I heard a cry and awoke and found that I had dreamed, and looking out of my house into the street I found that a flash of lightning had killed a child. Then I knew that the gods still lived. ~ Lord Dunsany,
1338:The house was an altar with ten thousand attendants, big, small, servicing, attending, in choirs. But the gods had gone away, and the ritual of the religion continued senselessly, uselessly. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1339:The world, an entity out of everything, was created by none of the gods or men, but was, is and will be eternally living fire, regularly becoming ignited and reg- ularly becoming extinguished. ~ Heraclitus,
1340:Valmiki the Poet held all the moving world inside a water drop in his hand.
The gods and saints from heaven looked down on Lanka,
And Valmiki looked down at the gods in the morning of Time. ~ Valmiki,
1341:Yet you could feel a vibration in the air, a sense of hastening. It had started with the moon, inaccessible poem that it was. Now men had walked upon it, rubber treads on a pearl of the gods. ~ Patti Smith,
1342:Are you suggesting that the gods have trouble acting together, young lady?" Dionysus asked.

Yes, Lord Dionysus."

Mr. D nodded. "Just checking. You're right, of course. Carry on. ~ Rick Riordan,
1343:despair is ultimately destructive to oneself and a burden to others; and that if one persists in it, the gods will sooner or later lose patience and give one something to really despair about. ~ Tom Robbins,
1344:Reeve kissed like he was made for kissing her, as if he'd been custom-designed by the gods of kissing to touch her lips, and taste her mouth, and drown her in kisses as she'd always wanted. ~ Lauren Blakely,
1345:The abode of God, too, is wherever is earth and sea and air, and sky and virtue. Why further do we seek the Gods of heaven? Whatever thou dost behold and whatever thou dost touch, that is Jupiter. ~ Lucan,
1346:What a lamentable thing it is that men should blame the gods and regard us as the source of their troubles, when it is their own transgressions which bring them suffering that was not their destiny. ~ Homer,
1347:With venom in its heart, the Viper will ignite the world to discover the king amongst men. The world will weep. The Gods will scream in their temple. The flood will open. The end will come. ~ Daniel Arenson,
1348:Be deaf to those who love you most of all; they pray for bad things with good intentions. And, if you would be happy, entreat the gods that none of their fond desires for you may be brought to pass. ~ Seneca,
1349:Enoch did not care about the rebellion. He did not care about the gods. He did not care about anything anymore. His Edna was gone. Now, only his son Methuselah kept him anchored to this earth. ~ Brian Godawa,
1350:I know that it is likely that as worship of the gods declines, faith between men and all human society will disappear, as well as that most excellent of all virtues, which is justice. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
1351:Naturally, since [the Sumerians] didn't know what caused the flood anymore than we do, they blamed the gods. (That's the advantage of religion. You're never short an explanation for anything.) ~ Isaac Asimov,
1352:The gods do not grant miracles for our purposes, but for theirs. If you are become their tool, it is for a greater reason, an urgent reason. But you are the tool. You are not the work. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1353:We mustn't keep meeting like this. Communications between the people of the moon and earth is forbidden...it is the way of the gods...we mustn't fall in love...but its already too late...... ~ Naoko Takeuchi,
1354:...if one thing frightens people, it is that so much happens, on earth and out in space, the reasons for which seem somehow to escape them, and they fill in the gap by putting it down to the gods. ~ Lucretius,
1355:So the gods pulled alternately on the rope of this violent and evenly balanced battle, to make it taut over the two sides. The rope was indestructible and no one could break it; but it broke many men. ~ Homer,
1356:The people there were gods and midgets and knew themselves mortal and so the midgets walked tall so as not to embarrass the gods and the gods crouched so as to make the small ones feel at home. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1357:Confidence, of course is an admirable asset to a golfer, but it should be an unspoken confidence. It is perilous to put it into speech. The gods of golf lie in wait to chasten the presumptious. ~ P G Wodehouse,
1358:Every moment of my peace was a lie, for it came only at the gods’ pleasure. No matter what I did, how long I lived, at a whim they would be able to reach down and do with me what they wished. ~ Madeline Miller,
1359:He writhed at the thought and vowed by the gods of magic, by all three gods of magic, that he would never return to Solace until he could do so with pride in himself and with power in his hand. ~ Margaret Weis,
1360:I believe in the gods; or rather I believe that I believe in the gods. But I don't believe that they are great brooding presences watching over us; I believe they are completely absent minded. ~ Jean Giraudoux,
1361:If you lack the iron and the fizz to take control of your own life, if you insist on leaving your fate to the gods, then the gods will repay your weakness by having a grin or two at your expense. ~ Tom Robbins,
1362:I have tried to write Paradise

Do not move
Let the wind speak
that is paradise.

Let the Gods forgive what I
have made
Let those I love try to forgive
what I have made. ~ Ezra Pound,
1363:Temple-ground
Man, shun the impulses dire that spring armed from thy nature’s abysms!
Dread the dusk rose of the gods, flee the honey that tempts from its petals! ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
1364:that all pretensions to being self-made hide the reciprocal truth, that we have unpayable debts to the world around us, to our community, to our forebears, to the ancients, to nature, to the gods. ~ Lewis Hyde,
1365:The LORD will be awesome against them;          s for he will famish all the gods of the earth,     and  t to him shall bow down,         each in its place,         all  u the lands of the nations. ~ Anonymous,
1366:There is no trade anymore, you're not nothing, you didn't kill Caidi, you're going to be the most beautiful-dangerous Incendiary the gods have ever seen, and I fucking love you. Deal with it. ~ Carole Cummings,
1367:Be of good hope in the face of death. Believe in this one truth for certain, that no evil can befall a good man either in life or death, and that his fate is not a matter of indifference to the gods. ~ Socrates,
1368:Beware, Diomedês! Forbear, Diomedês! Do not try to put yourself on a level with the gods; that is too high for a man's ambition. The immortal gods are one race, men that walk upon the earth are another. ~ Homer,
1369:He had the sense that the gods was just another name for time, but he felt that it would be as stupid to say such a thing as it would be to suggest that against the gods we can never prevail. ~ Richard Flanagan,
1370:It is an old custom of these people to pick up a stone and toss it on the pile. Perhaps it is a symbolical lightening of the load they carry, perhaps a small offering to the gods of the trails. ~ Louis L Amour,
1371:It was the actions of Jupiter and Saturn that quite inadvertently created life on Earth — not the gods of the Roman pantheon, but the giant planets, which once orbited much closer to the sun. Driven ~ Anonymous,
1372:Just as he reached the point of utter exhaustion, he happened to read Raymond Radiguet’s dying words, ‘God’s soldiers are coming to get me,’ and sensed once again the laughter of the gods. ~ Ry nosuke Akutagawa,
1373:Life just is and the gods have their plans for us. We're powerless against them. In the end, we are what our pasts have made us and we live the lives the gods have chosen for us."

-Syn ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1374:A tendency of human groups to “diabolize” the gods of their neighbors seems to be a constant theme throughout history and a cause for continuing difficulties to historians of religious ideas. ~ Stephen E Flowers,
1375:One thing that I get from a lot of people with American Gods is people saying that they would love some kind of glossary with a list of all the Gods and who they are, so that they can look them up. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1376:Ah how shameless – the way these mortals blame the gods. From us alone they say come all their miseries yes but they themselves with their own reckless ways compound their pains beyond their proper share. ~ Homer,
1377:Art in the twenty-first century may come to constitute a form of mediation between human and post-human consciousness, just as in past cultures it has been used to mediate between mankind and the gods. ~ Max More,
1378:Do not interrogate silence because silence is mute; do not expect anything from the gods, nor should you try to bribe them with gifts, because it is in ourselves that we must look for liberation. ~ Gautama Buddha,
1379:Jen was in turmoil; she was grappling with self-esteem issues and a failed attempt at anorexia. I was in the right place at the right time, and the gods were finally ready to cut me some slack. ~ Jonathan Tropper,
1380:"Nobody can achieve happiness through preconceived ideas, one should rather call it a gift of the gods. It comes and goes, and what has made you happy once does not necessarily do so at another time." ~ Carl Jung,
1381:Priests are meant to pass on the word of the gods, minister to the poor, and provide the services offered by their temples. No one said anything about being holy. Not even the gods are truly holy. ~ Andy Peloquin,
1382:She’s alive,” Leo said. “Thank the gods and pass the hot sauce.” Frank frowned. “What does that mean?” Leo wiped the chip crumbs off his face. “It means pass the hot sauce, Zhang. I’m still hungry. ~ Rick Riordan,
1383:So what options were left?
Kill her. Hide the body.
If only he could...Damn, stupid conscience. Why had the gods given them that gift? It definitely should have come with a return policy. ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1384:The Gods and Goddesses of myth, legend and fairy tale represent archetypes, real potencies and potentialities deep within the psyche, which, when allowed to flower permit us to be more fully human. ~ Margot Adler,
1385:About the gods I have no means of knowing either that they exist or that they do not exist or what they are to look at. Many things prevent my knowing. Among others, the fact that they are never seen. ~ Protagoras,
1386:Every decision you make can change the world. The best life is the one the gods don't notice. You want to live free, boy, live quietly.
I want to be a soldier. A hero.
You'll grow out of it. ~ Steven Erikson,
1387:[Hermes addresses Prometheus :] To you, the clever and crafty, bitter beyond all bitterness, who has sinned against the gods in bestowing honors upon creatures of a day--to you, thief of fire, I speak. ~ Aeschylus,
1388:Once apparently the chief concern and masterpiece of the gods, the human race now begins to bear the aspect of an accidental by-product of their vast, inscrutable and probably nonsensical operations. ~ H L Mencken,
1389:One of the greatest of a great man's qualities is success; 't is the result of all the others; 't is a latent power in him which compels the favor of the gods, and subjugates fortune. ~ William Makepeace Thackeray,
1390:Water was a state of mind. If you think it your friend when you swim in the river or wash away the dirt, why call it your enemy when it comes from the heavens? From the cup of the gods themselves. ~ Kate Furnivall,
1391:You must believe: a poem is a holy thing - a good poem, that is. The poem, even a short time after being written, seems no miracle; unwritten, it seems something beyond the capacity of the gods. ~ Theodore Roethke,
1392:Demons have existed on the Discworld for at least as long as the gods, who in many ways they closely resemble. The difference is basically the same as that between terrorists and freedom fighters. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1393:Life is made of our attitudes. And there are certain things that the gods oblige us to live through. Their reason for this does not matter, and there is no action we can take to make them pass us by. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1394:Life must be lived as play, playing certain games, making sacrifices, singing and dancing, and then a man will be able to propitiate the gods, and defend himself against his enemies, and win in the contest. ~ Plato,
1395:The mathematical phenomenon always develops out of simple arithmetic, so useful in everyday life, out of numbers, those weapons of the gods: the gods are there, behind the wall, at play with numbers. ~ Le Corbusier,
1396:To see myth psychologically is not to psychologize, that is, to say that something is only psychological. Rather it is to acknowledge that a psychological view is all we have left. ~ James Hollis, Tracking the Gods,
1397:When the souls rise up in glory, yours shall not be shunned nor sundered, but shall be the prize of the gods’ gardens. Even your darkness shall be treasured then, and all your pain made holy. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1398:Wise are the gods in their silence,
Wise when they speak; but their speech is other than ours and their wisdom
Hard for a mortal mind to hold and not madden or wander. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
1399:All lives are tales. Some spread, and grow in the telling. Others are just told between us and the gods, muttered back and forth behind our days, but those tales grow too and shake us just as fierce. ~ Mark Lawrence,
1400:Around me celestial flowers are falling in a crystal shower. Or are they the tears of the gods who crowd the skies, looking down in sorrow and admiration at my final act of self-respect? ~ Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni,
1401:Göt·ter·däm·mer·ung (in Germanic mythology) the downfall of the gods. German, literally 'twilight of the gods', popularized by Wagner's use of the word as the title of the last opera of the Ring cycle. ~ Erin McKean,
1402:Homer and Hesiod attributed to the gods all things which are disreputable and worthy of blame when done by men; and they told of them many lawless deeds, stealing, adultery, and deception of each other. ~ Xenophanes,
1403:Rooster was a bad slave. He had no use for anyone, not even the gods. Not that he was angry at the gods, like some I'd met. He just dismissed them entirely. There were no gods, and that was that. ~ Steven Pressfield,
1404:The drunk answers every assault with smirking equanimity,’ observed Haut, pouring his cup full again. ‘All reasoned words thud like pebbles in the sand. Made immune, I imbibe the nectar of the gods. ~ Steven Erikson,
1405:The gods we prayed to when we were young used up their time so long ago. They cannot answer anymore.

They never liked us, did they?

Gods don't "like". They love, they hate, they ignore... ~ Neil Gaiman,
1406:the plain fact of the matter was that the Disc was manifestly traversing space on the back of a giant turtle and the gods had a habit of going around to atheists’ houses and smashing their windows. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1407:Wisdom is the supreme part of happiness; and reverence towards the Gods must be inviolate. Great words of prideful men are ever punished with great blows, and, in old age, teach the chastened to be wise. ~ Sophocles,
1408:12 For I will pass through the land of Egypt that night, and I will strike all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, both man and beast; and on all the gods of Egypt I will execute judgments: I am the LORD. ~ Anonymous,
1409:How many hands were shook and names were signed
and pipes were passed congenially in a circle,
before the first of the used-car dealerships rose up
on the ground where the gods had walked? ~ Albert Goldbarth,
1410:I have to finish what I started. I’d have had that beast on my spear by now, except for Prince Meleager. He saw me wound it and thought I was in danger. The gods protect me from men who mean well! ~ Esther M Friesner,
1411:Later that day, shortly before the sun sank in the wintry sky, despite the best efforts of the medics, Arra Sails closed her eyes, made peace with the gods of the vampires, breathed her last...and died. ~ Darren Shan,
1412:Most communities attempting to survive under irresistible pressure from a dominant culture develop a myth that allows them to believe they are somehow a special people. Chosen. Favored by the gods. ~ Orson Scott Card,
1413:Together we made our way down to the street level. Neither of us said a word. The music was awful--Neil Diamond or something. I should've made that part of my gift form the gods: better elevator tunes. ~ Rick Riordan,
1414:When the souls rise up in glory, yours shall not be shunned nor sunderered, but shall be the prize of the gods' gardens. Even your darkness shall be treasured then, and all your pain made holy. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1415:Anyway, either the gods are there whether you believe or not, or exist only as a function of the belief, so either way you might as well ignore the whole business and, as it were, eat off your knees. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1416:Every decision you make can change the world. The best life is the one the gods don't notice. You want to live free, boy, live quietly."
"I want to be a soldier. A hero."
"You'll grow out of it. ~ Steven Erikson,
1417:Everywhere in the world the industrial regime tends to make the unorganized or unorganizable individual, the pauper, into the victim of a kind of human sacrifice offered to the gods of civilization. ~ Jacques Maritain,
1418:He was like some tragic figure in Greek mythology whose offenses against the gods had caused them to design for him this exquisite torture: you must desperately need to see what you cannot bear to see. ~ Michael Lewis,
1419:It is the greatest and the tallest of trees that the gods bring low with bolts and thunder. For the gods love to thwart whatever is greater than the rest. They do not suffer pride in anyone but themselves. ~ Herodotus,
1420:Men imagine gods to be born, and to have clothes and voices and shapes like theirs....Yea, the gods of the Ethiopians are black and flat-nosed, and the gods of the Thracians are red-haired and blue-eyed. ~ Michio Kaku,
1421:On the day the Gjallerhorn is blown, it will wake the gods, no matter where they are, no matter how deeply they sleep.

Heimdall will blow Gjallerhorn only once, at the end of all things, Ragnarok. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1422:to grow old is to have taken away, one by one, all gifts of life, the food and wine, the music and the company. ... the gods unloose, one by one, the mortal fingers that cling to the edge of the table. ~ Storm Jameson,
1423:What a lamentable thing it is that men should blame the gods and regard us as the source of their troubles, when it is their own wickedness that brings them sufferings worse than any which destiny allots them. ~ Homer,
1424:Even the gods felt close, drawn to witness all that was to come. Witness, or to seize the moment and act directly. A nudge here, a tug there, if only to appease their egos… if only to see what happens. ~ Steven Erikson,
1425:I fear not for the angry frown of Heaven,
I flinch not from the red assault of Hell;
I crush the opposition of the gods,
Tread down a million goblin obstacles. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Triple Soul-Forces,
1426:Men ask for health in their prayers to the gods: they do not realize that the power to achieve it lies in themselves. Lacking self-control, they perform contrary actions and betray health to their desires. ~ Democritus,
1427:Oh where is the noble face of modesty, or the strength of virtue, now that blasphemy is in power and men have put justice behind them, and there is no law but lawlessness, and none join in fear of the gods? ~ Euripides,
1428:Our eyes were on the Other-world, the stars, the gods.
We didn’t keep watch on the world around us.
And when we eventually lowered our heads and studied the waters closer to home, it was too late. ~ Darren Shan,
1429:That the gods die from time to time is due to man’s sudden discovery that they do not mean anything, that they are made by human hands, useless idols of wood and stone. ~ Carl Jung, Collected Works of CG Jung, Volume 9,
1430:Ever wonder why the gods created man, Grom? I personally think that we're the original reality show. They were so effing bored that they created us just so that they could feel better about themselves ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1431:ho'oponopono (Hawaiian):
Solving a problem by talking it out. After an invocation of the gods, the aggrieved parties sit down and discuss the issue until it is set right (pono means righteousness). ~ Howard Rheingold,
1432:In fact, my mother always says that emotions are what the gods gave us to distract us from the pain of life. They are what make life bearable and what keeps us going no matter how hard it gets. (Alix) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1433:Such, then, was my position: to care for almost nothing but the gods and heroes, the garden of the Hesperides, Launcelot and the Grail, and to believe in nothing but atoms and evolution and military service. ~ C S Lewis,
1434:The animal is satisfied with a modicum of necessity; the gods are content with their splendours. But man cannot rest permanently until he reaches some highest good. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, Man in the Universe,
1435:The opinions held by most people about the gods are not true conceptions of them but fallacious notions, according to which awful penalties are meted out to the evil and the greatest of blessings to the good. ~ Epicurus,
1436:Walled from ours are other hearts:
For if life’s barriers twixt our souls were broken,
Men would be free and one, earth paradise
And the gods live neglected. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act I,
1437:You know what I mean. Is it true the folk hereabouts”—he pointed to the land ahead—“are cripples? Missing half their hindquarters?”
“The fauns? Cripples?” I laughed. “By the gods who made them, no! ~ Harry Turtledove,
1438:As to the gods, I have no means of knowing either that they exist or do not exist. For many are the obstacles that impede knowledge, both the obscurity of the question and the shortness of human life. ~ Diogenes La rtius,
1439:Wast thou not made in the shape of a woman? Sweetness and beauty
Move like a song of the gods in thy limbs and to love is thy duty
Graved in thy heart as on tablets of fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ahana,
1440:I'm not saying you were wrong, Royesse. This time. I'm saying you were running blindfolded. And if it wasn't headlong into a tree, it was only by the mercy of the gods, and not by any care of yours. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1441:May the gods have mercy on whoever pisses them off, because Zarek and Jericho will have none for them. (Madoc) You’d better be glad I’m flattered by that. Otherwise I’d gut you. (Zarek) Ditto. (Jericho) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1442:That sort of news travels faster than horses, faster than boats. The messengers of the gods carry rumors through the sky the way bees carry pollen and drop them from their wings onto the earth below. ~ Megan Whalen Turner,
1443:This wasn't prayer anyway, it was just argument with the gods. Prayer, he suspected as he hoisted himself up and turned for the door, was putting one foot in front of the other. Moving all the same. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1444:world rotted as we slid from light into darkness, getting ever nearer to the black chaos in which this middle world would end and the gods would fight and all love and light and laughter would dissolve. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
1445:Would Grandmother scold him? Would she say, “Frank! Thank the gods, you've come. I'm surrounded by monsters.” More likely she'd scold him, or mistake them for intruders and chase them off with a frying pan. ~ Rick Riordan,
1446:You can do anything you think you can. This knowledge is literally the gift of the gods, for through it you can solve every human problem. It should make of you an incurable optimist. It is the open door. ~ Robert Collier,
1447:A hopeless exile from his native home, From death alone exempt—but cease to mourn; Let all combine to achieve his wish'd return; Neptune atoned, his wrath shall now refrain, Or thwart the synod of the gods in vain. ~ Homer,
1448:Am I doing anything? I do it with reference to the good of mankind. Does anything happen to me? I receive it and refer it to the gods, and the source of all things, from which all that happens is derived. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1449:Speak the truth, do not yield to anger; give, if thou art asked for little; by these three steps thou wilt go near the gods.

راست بگو، تسليم خشم نشو، اگر از تو كم خواستند ببخش؛ با اين سه به خدايان مي رسي ~ Confucius,
1450:That's what the gods are! An answer that will do! Please give us a simple answer, so that we don't have to think, because if we think, we might find answers that don't fit the way we want the world to be. ~ Terry Pratchett,
1451:What’s your point, Legal?” “The point is that there are plenty of people out there judging us every day of our lives and for every move we make. The gods of guilt are many. You don’t need to add to them. ~ Michael Connelly,
1452:God would seem to indicate to us and not allow us to doubt that these beautiful poems are not human, or the work of man, but divine and the work of God; and that the poets are only the interpreters of the Gods... ~ Socrates,
1453:If we stay as we have been, then we will die, just as a pool dries up in the summer if there is no rain. We must change if we want to live. But we must also remain who we are and who the gods gifted us to be. ~ Kate Elliott,
1454:Think of Shakespeare and Melville and you think of thunder, lightning, wind. They all knew the joy of creating in large or small forms, on unlimited or restricted canvases. These are the children of the gods. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1455:Thousands of years ago, after the big Titan—God war, the gods had sliced him to bits with his own scythe and scattered his remains in Tartarus, which is like the gods’ bottomless recycling bin for their enemies. ~ Anonymous,
1456:Plato found fault that the poets of his time filled the world with wrong opinions of the gods, making light tales of that unspotted essence, and therefore would not have the youth depraved with such opinions. ~ Philip Sidney,
1457:The people cursed the gods, and as the end loomed near, the religion of old was destroyed as the people realized their gods were false, nothing more than wishful imagination. False gods could not save them. ~ Michael R Hicks,
1458:This wasn't prayer anyway, it was just argument with the gods.
Prayer, he suspected as he hoisted himself up and turned for the door, was putting one foot in front of the other. Moving all the same. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1459:Would Grandmother scold him? Would she say, “Frank! Thank the gods, you've come. I'm surrounded by monsters.”
More likely she'd scold him, or mistake them for intruders and chase them off with a frying pan. ~ Rick Riordan,
1460:Apollo had changed Hyacinth into a flower to protect him. I would give Alex back control so she could protect herself instead of making the decision for her. That's how we were different from the gods. ~ Jennifer L Armentrout,
1461:In Destroyer of the gods I focus on several major features of early Christianity that made it distinctive, even odd or bizarre .We don't today realize just how different early Christianity was in that context. ~ Larry Hurtado,
1462:Now you must excuse your Raja for he must suffer to give audience to the prince of Punt, a pompous old fool, who believes that his frequent flatulencies are the echoes of the Gods applauding his non sequiturs. ~ Piers Anthony,
1463:That person fearing for his life went to the beer section, which again is admirable, beer is the nectar of the gods. Then grabs Keystone Light? Are you kidding me? I’d rather eat the can than drink those contents. ~ Mark Tufo,
1464:The gods always spoke ambivalently, and sometimes they even changed their minds in the middle of your asking them a question. Divination was a matter of ascertaining the future through inherently unreliable methods. ~ Ken Liu,
1465:the gods did not desire flawless souls, but great ones. I think that very darkness is where the greatness grows from, as flowers from the soil. I am not sure, in fact, if greatness can bloom without it. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
1466:The gods envy us. They envy us because we’re mortal, because any moment may be our last. Everything is more beautiful because we’re doomed. You will never be lovelier than you are now. We will never be here again. ~ Brad Pitt,
1467:Ultimately a hero is a man who would argue with the gods, and so awakens devils to contest his vision. The more a man can achieve, the more he may be certain that the devil will inhabit a part of his creation. ~ Norman Mailer,
1468:If it be aught toward the general good, Set honor in one eye and death i' th' other, And I will look on both indifferently; For let the gods so speed me as I love The name of honor more than I fear death. ~ William Shakespeare,
1469:If there is one thing in this world that I was raised and trained to know, it is that there is only so much you may ask of the gods. Victory in battle is their lightest gift; a quiet heart is your own concern. ~ Peter S Beagle,
1470:Isn’t it only through laughter that we become one with the gods and thus can endure life and can overcome all the horror and waste and suffering here on earth? …Isn’t it only through laughter we can stay human? ~ James Clavell,
1471:Perhaps he should have fallen to his knees and given thanks to the gods for their unlikely victory but the red harvest sword-hacked and arrow-stuck about the ruin did not look like a thing to give thanks for. ~ Joe Abercrombie,
1472:So you, the kings, you too must reflect upon this punishment, because the immortals are here in the midst of manking, observing those who do not hold the gods in awe...but grind each other down with crooked judgements ~ Hesiod,
1473:That is why Bias jested with those who were going through the perils of a great storm with him and calling on the gods for help: "Shut up," he said, "so that they do not realize that you are here with me. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
1474:where are the gods
the gods hate us
the gods have run away
the gods have hidden in holes
the gods are dead of the plague
they rot and stink too

there never were any gods
there’s only death ~ Ted Hughes,
1475:Belief in a certain series of myths was neither obligatory as a part of the true religion, nor was it supposed that, by believing, a man acquired religious merit and conciliated the favour of the gods. ~ William Robertson Smith,
1476:Emerson has said, "When half-gods go, the gods arrive." That is a very doubtful maxim. Better say, "When God arrives (and only then) the half-gods can remain." Left to themselves they either vanish or become demons. ~ C S Lewis,
1477:(Fenris was a giant wolf of Norse mythology who, it was prophesied, would return one day to fuck everything up, and such were the ground rules of that mythos that there was nothing the gods could do about it). ~ Neal Stephenson,
1478:I saw well why the gods do not speak to us openly, nor let us answer. Till that word can be dug out of us, why should they hear the babble that we think we mean? How can they meet us face to face till we have faces? ~ C S Lewis,
1479:Malick to Jacin: "There is no trade anymore, you're not nothing, you didn't kill Caidi, you're going to be the most beautiful-dangerous Incendiary the gods have ever seen, and I fucking love you. Deal with it. ~ Carole Cummings,
1480:May the gods have mercy on whoever pisses them off, because Zarek and Jericho will have none for them. (Madoc)
You’d better be glad I’m flattered by that. Otherwise I’d gut you. (Zarek)
Ditto. (Jericho) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1481:Haven’t you ever noticed that people who win say it’s because the gods know they are in the right, but if they lose, it wasn’t the gods who declared them wrong? Their opponent cheated, or their equipment was bad. ~ Tamora Pierce,
1482:Honor and revere the gods, treat human beings as they deserve, be tolerant with others and strict with yourself. Remember, nothing belongs to you but your flesh and blood—and nothing else is under your control. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1483:lesser beings do many horrible things in the name of the gods. That does not mean we gods approve. The way our sons and daughters act in our names . . . well, it usually says more about them than it does about us. ~ Rick Riordan,
1484:Let him submit to me! Only the god of death is so relentless, Death submits to no one—so mortals hate him most of all the gods. Let him bow down to me! I am the greater king, I am the elder-born, I claim—the greater man. ~ Homer,
1485:None is greater than he. The gods themselves will have to descend upon earth and it is in a human form that they will get their salvation. Man alone reaches the perfection of which the gods themselves are ignorant. ~ Vivekananda,
1486:Thousands of years ago, after the big Titan-God war, the gods had sliced him into bits with his own scythe and scattered his remains in Tartarus, which is like the gods’ bottomless recycling bin for their enemies. ~ Rick Riordan,
1487:We were surrounded by thirty-foot-tall giants who were about to kill us. Then the sky opened up, and the gods descended."
"Grandad," the kids said, "you are full of schist."
"I'm not kidding!" he protested. ~ Rick Riordan,
1488:For every nation that lives peaceably, there will be many others to grow hard and push their arrogance to extremes; the gods attend to these things slowly. But they attend to those who put off God and turn to madness. ~ Sophocles,
1489:it will help you a great deal to keep the gods in mind as well. What they want is not flattery, but for rational things to be like them. For figs to do what figs were meant to do—and dogs, and bees … and people. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
1490:Life must be lived as play, playing certain games, making sacrifices, singing and dancing, and then a man will be able to propitiate the gods, and defend himself against his enemies, and win in the contest”. Thus ~ Johan Huizinga,
1491:No. I cannot believe that. I must believe that the gods do not send us trials that we cannot endure. It would have been easier to believe that if he hadn’t seen so many people broken by the trials they had endured. ~ T Kingfisher,
1492:Oh you who are born of the gods, easy is the descent into Hell. The door of darkness stands open day and night. But to retrace your steps, and come back out into the brightness above, that is the work, that is the labor. ~ Virgil,
1493:The gods whispered to you once, Finnikin. And you listened. But they are proud and refuse to speak to those who do not believe that there is something out there mightier than the minds and intellect of mortals. ~ Melina Marchetta,
1494:There were others, such as Jack London,who offered their readers such a respite from the miserable horror of existence that their books were like gifts from the gods. (Character of Tristan Sadler in "the Absolutist") ~ John Boyne,
1495:Though the ancient poet in Plutarch tells us we must not trouble the gods with our affairs because they take no heed of our angers and disputes, we can never enough decry the disorderly sallies of our minds. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
1496:What husband is he who abandons his wife? What wife is she taken without love? The gods demand of us action and the use of our free will! That is piety, not to buckle beneath necessity’s yoke like dumb beasts! ~ Steven Pressfield,
1497:1.2) On Gender of Gods & Goddesses:"Well, perhaps it is under their inspiration that Nature made (the gender differentiation). It is certainly not because it appeared on earth that it is like that with the gods.." ~ The Mother,
1498:Historically, the gods of an existing religion become the demons of the conquering religion. That doesn’t make one evil and the other good, it just means that one tribe is better at waging war than the other. ~ Christopher Penczak,
1499:It is unfair that one person should suffer in order for others to be blessed. If the gods were powerful enough to shape our destinies, why couldn't they just send us a good fortune untainted by sorrow? ~ Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni,
1500:Man is weak, greedy, craven, lustful, prey to every species of vice and depravity. He will lie, steal, cheat, murder, melt down the very statues of the gods and coin their gold as money for whores. This is man. ~ Steven Pressfield,

IN CHAPTERS [300/829]



  293 Integral Yoga
  137 Poetry
   81 Occultism
   38 Philosophy
   34 Yoga
   34 Psychology
   25 Fiction
   25 Christianity
   24 Hinduism
   17 Mythology
   9 Philsophy
   9 Mysticism
   1 Thelema
   1 Islam
   1 Education
   1 Buddhism
   1 Baha i Faith
   1 Alchemy


  230 Sri Aurobindo
  127 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   78 The Mother
   58 Satprem
   31 Carl Jung
   30 James George Frazer
   28 Aleister Crowley
   22 Sri Ramakrishna
   21 H P Lovecraft
   20 Vyasa
   17 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   17 Friedrich Schiller
   13 Ovid
   12 Plato
   12 A B Purani
   10 Anonymous
   9 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   8 Swami Vivekananda
   8 Lucretius
   8 Jorge Luis Borges
   7 William Wordsworth
   7 Percy Bysshe Shelley
   7 George Van Vrekhem
   6 William Butler Yeats
   6 Robert Browning
   6 Nirodbaran
   6 John Keats
   5 Plotinus
   5 Jordan Peterson
   4 Walt Whitman
   4 Joseph Campbell
   4 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   3 Swami Krishnananda
   3 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   3 Rabindranath Tagore
   3 Friedrich Nietzsche
   3 Aristotle
   3 Aldous Huxley
   2 Patanjali
   2 Mahendranath Gupta
   2 Henry David Thoreau


   39 Savitri
   30 The Golden Bough
   27 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05
   23 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   21 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   21 Lovecraft - Poems
   20 Vishnu Purana
   18 Essays On The Gita
   18 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07
   17 Schiller - Poems
   17 Magick Without Tears
   17 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02
   17 Collected Poems
   17 City of God
   16 Record of Yoga
   15 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 08
   14 The Secret Of The Veda
   14 Mysterium Coniunctionis
   14 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04
   13 The Life Divine
   13 Metamorphoses
   13 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03
   13 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01
   12 Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   12 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   11 Liber ABA
   11 Agenda Vol 03
   10 Kena and Other Upanishads
   10 Essays Divine And Human
   9 Emerson - Poems
   9 5.1.01 - Ilion
   8 Of The Nature Of Things
   8 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   8 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 06
   8 Anonymous - Poems
   8 Agenda Vol 02
   8 Agenda Vol 01
   7 Wordsworth - Poems
   7 The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious
   7 Shelley - Poems
   7 Preparing for the Miraculous
   7 Isha Upanishad
   6 Yeats - Poems
   6 Vedic and Philological Studies
   6 Twelve Years With Sri Aurobindo
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   6 On Thoughts And Aphorisms
   6 Letters On Yoga I
   6 Keats - Poems
   6 Browning - Poems
   6 Aion
   6 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah
   5 The Human Cycle
   5 Talks
   5 On the Way to Supermanhood
   5 Maps of Meaning
   5 Labyrinths
   4 Whitman - Poems
   4 The Practice of Psycho therapy
   4 The Hero with a Thousand Faces
   4 Some Answers From The Mother
   4 Raja-Yoga
   4 Questions And Answers 1957-1958
   4 Agenda Vol 08
   4 Agenda Vol 05
   3 Words Of Long Ago
   3 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   3 The Perennial Philosophy
   3 The Bible
   3 Tagore - Poems
   3 Questions And Answers 1956
   3 Questions And Answers 1950-1951
   3 Questions And Answers 1929-1931
   3 Poetics
   3 Letters On Yoga IV
   3 Agenda Vol 07
   3 Agenda Vol 06
   2 Walden
   2 Thus Spoke Zarathustra
   2 Symposium
   2 Questions And Answers 1954
   2 Questions And Answers 1953
   2 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 04
   2 Patanjali Yoga Sutras
   2 Letters On Poetry And Art
   2 Goethe - Poems
   2 Faust
   2 Crowley - Poems
   2 Bhakti-Yoga
   2 Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin
   2 Agenda Vol 13
   2 Agenda Vol 04


00.01 - The Mother on Savitri, #Sweet Mother - Harmonies of Light, #unset, #Zen
  My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the Gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga.
  All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind.

00.03 - Upanishadic Symbolism, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   There was an aspirant, a student who was seeking after knowledge. One day there appeared to him a white dog. Soon, other dogs followed and addressed their predecessor: "O Lord, sing to our Food, for we desire to eat." The white dog answered, "Come to me at dawn here in this very place." The aspirant waited. The dogs, like singer-priests, circled round in a ring. Then they sat and cried aloud; they cried out," Om We eat and Om we drink, may the Gods bring here our food."
   Now, before any explanation is attempted it is important to bear in mind that the Upanishads speak of things experiencednot merely thought, reasoned or argued and that these experiences belong to a world and consciousness other than that of the mind and the senses. One should naturally expect here a different language and mode of expression than that which is appropriate to mental and physical things. For example, the world of dreams was once supposed to be a sheer chaos, a mass of meaningless confusion; but now it is held to be quite otherwise. Psychological scientists have discovered a methodeven a very well-defined and strict methodin the madness of that domain. It is an ordered, organised, significant world; but its terminology has to be understood, its code deciphered. It is not a jargon, but a foreign language that must be learnt and mastered.
  --
   The Word has four breasts. the Gods feed on two, SWAHAKAR and VASHATKAR, men upon the third, HANTAKAR,and the Ancestor upon the fourth, SWADHA 2
   Ritualistically these four terms are the formulae for oblation to four Deities, Powers or Presences, whom the sacrificer wishes to please and propitiate in order to have their help and blessing and in order thereby to discharge his dharma or duty of life. Svh is the offering especially dedicated to Agni, the foremost of the Gods, for he is the divine messenger who carries men's offering to the Gods and brings their blessing to men. Vaatkr is the offering to the Gods generally. Hantakr is the offering to mankind, to our kin, an especial form of it being the worship of the guests,sarvadevamayo' tithi. Svadh is the offering to the departed Fathers (Pitris).
   The duty of life consists, it is said, in the repaying of three debts which every man contracts as soon as he takes birth upon earth the debt to the Gods, to Men and to the Ancestors. This threefold debt or duty has, in other terms, reference to the three fields or domains wherein an embodied being lives and moves and to which he must adjust and react rightly -if he is to secure for his life an integral fulfilment. These are the family, society and the world and beyond-world. the Gods are the Powers that rule the world and beyond, they are the forms and forces of the One Spirit underlying the universe, the varied expressions of divine Truth and Reality: To worship the Gods, to do one's duty by them, means to come into contact and to be unitedin being, consciousness and activitywith the universal and spiritual existence, which is the supreme end and purpose of human life. The seconda more circumscribed fieldis the society to which one belongs, the particular group of humanity in which he functions as a limb. The service to society or good citizenship entails the worship of humanity, of Man as a god. Lastly, man belongs to the family, which is the unit of society; and the backbone of the family is the continuous line of ancestors, who are its presiding deity and represent the norm of a living dharma, the ethic of an ideal life.
   From the psychological standpoint, the four oblations are movements or reactions of consciousness in its urge towards the utterance and expression of Divine Truth. Like some other elements in the cosmic play, these also form a quartetcaturvyha and work together for a common purpose in view of a perfect and all-round result.
  --
   the Gods feed upon Svdh and Vaa, as these represent the ascending movement of human consciousness: it is man's self-giving and aspiration and the upward urge of his heart and soul that reach to the Gods, and it is that which the immortals take into themselves and are, as it were, nourished by, since it is something that appertains to their own nature.
   And in response they descend and approach and enter into the aspiring human soulthis descent and revelation and near and concrete presence of Divinity, this Hanta is man's food, for by it his consciousness is nourished.
   This interchange, or mutual giving, the High Covenant between the Gods and Men, to which the Gita too refers
   With this sacrifice nourish the Gods, that the Gods may nourish you; thus mutually nourishing ye shall obtain the highest felicity3 is the very secret of the cosmic play, the basis of the spiritual evolution in the universal existence.
   the Gods are the formations or particularisations of the Truth-consciousness, the multiple individualisations of the One spirit. The Pitris are the Divine Fathers, that is to say, souls that once laboured and realised here below, and now have passed beyond. They dwell in another world, not too far removed from the earth, and from there, with the force of their Realisation, lend a more concrete help and guidance to the destiny that is being worked out upon earth. They are forces and formations of consciousness in an intermediate region between Here and There (antarika), and serve to bring men and gods nearer to each other, inasmuch as they belong to both the categories, being a divinised humanity or a humanised divinity. Each fixation of the Truth-consciousness in an earthly mould is a thing of joy to the Pitris; it is the Svadh or food by which they live and grow, for it is the consolidation and also the resultant of their own realisation. The achievements of the sons are more easily and securely reared and grounded upon those of the forefa thers, whose formative powers we have to invoke, so that we may pass on to the realisation, the firm embodiment of higher and greater destinies.
   III. The Path of the Fathers and the Path of the Gods
   One is an ideal in and of the world, the other is an ideal transcending the world. The Path of the Fathers (Pityna) enjoins the right accomplishing of the dharma of Lifeit is the path of works, of Karma; it is the line of progressive evolution that, man follows through the experience of life after life on earth. The Path of the Gods (Devayna) runs above life's evolutionary course; it lifts man out of the terrestrial cycle and places him in a superior consciousness it is the path of knowledge, of Vidya.4 The Path of the Fathers is the soul's southern or inferior orbit (dakiyana, aparrdha); the Path of the Gods is the northern or superior orbit (uttaryaa, parrdha)The former is also called the Lunar Path and the latter the Solar Path.5 For the moon represents the mind,6 and is therefore, an emblem that befits man so long as he is a mental being and pursues a dharma that is limited by the mind; the sun, on the other hand, is the knowledge and consciousness that is beyond the mindit is the eye of the Gods.7
   Man has two aspects or natures; he dwells in two worlds. The first is the manifest world the world of the body, the life and the mind. The body has flowered into the mind through the life. The body gives the basis or the material, the life gives power and energy and the mind the directing knowledge. This triune world forms the humanity of man. But there is another aspect hidden behind this apparent nature, there is another world where man dwells in his submerged, larger and higher consciousness. To that his soul the Purusha in his heart only has access. It is the world where man's nature is transmuted into another triune realitySat, Chit and Ananda.
   The one, however, is not completely divorced from the other. The apparent, the inferior nature is only a preparation for the real, the superior nature. The Path of the Fathers concerns itself with man as a mental being and seeks so to ordain and accomplish its duties and ideals as to lead him on to the Path of the Gods; the mind, the life, and the body consciousness should be so disciplined, educated, purified, they should develop along such a line and gradually rise to such a stage as to make them fit to receive the light which belongs to the higher level, so allowing the human soul imbedded in them to extricate itself and pass on to the Immortal Life.
   And they who are thus lifted up into the Higher Orbit are freed from the bondage to the cycle of rebirth. They enjoy the supreme Liberation that is of the Spirit; and even when they descend into the Inferior Path, it is to work out as free agents, as vehicles of the Divine, a special purpose, to bring down something of the substance and nature of the Solar reality into the lower world, enlighten and elevate the lower, as far as it is allowed, into the higher.
  --
   The central secret of the transfigured consciousness lies, as we have already indicated, in the mystic rite or law of Sacrifice. It is the one basic, fundamental, universal Law that upholds and explains the cosmic movement, conformity to which brings to the thrice-bound human being release and freedom. Sacrifice consists essentially of two elements or processes: (i) The offering or self giving of the lower reality to the higher, and, as a consequence, an answering movement of (ii) the descent of the higher into the lower. The lower offered to the higher means the lower sublimated and integrated into the higher; and the descent of the higher into the lower means the incarnation of the former and the fulfilment of the latter. The Gita elaborates the same idea when it says that by Sacrifice men increase the Gods and the Gods increase men and by so increasing each other they attain the supreme Good. Nothing is, nothing is done, for its own sake, for an egocentric satisfaction; all, even movements relating to food and to sex should be dedicated to the Cosmic BeingVisva Purusha and that alone received which comes from Him.
   VII. The Cosmic and the Transcendental
  --
   It would be interesting to know what the five ranges or levels or movements of consciousness exactly are that make up the Universal Brahman described in this passage. It is the mystic knowledge, the Upanishad says, of the secret delight in thingsmadhuvidy. The five ranges are the five fundamental principles of delightimmortalities, the Veda would say that form the inner core of the pyramid of creation. They form a rising tier and are ruled respectively by the GodsAgni, Indra, Varuna, Soma and Brahmawith their emanations and instrumental personalities the Vasus, the Rudras, the Adityas, the Maruts and the Sadhyas. We suggest that these refer to the five well-known levels of being, the modes or nodi of consciousness or something very much like them. The Upanishad speaks elsewhere of the five sheaths. The six Chakras of Tantric system lie in the same line. The first and the basic mode is the physical and the ascent from the physical: Agni and the Vasus are always intimately connected with the earth and -the earth-principles (it can be compared with the Muladhara of the Tantras). Next, second in the line of ascent is the Vital, the centre of power and dynamism of which the Rudras are the deities and Indra the presiding God (cf. Swadhishthana of the Tantras the navel centre). Indra, in the Vedas, has two aspects, one of knowledge and vision and the other of dynamic force and drive. In the first aspect he is more often considered as the Lord of the Mind, of the Luminous Mind. In the present passage, Indra is taken in his second aspect and instead of the Maruts with whom he is usually invoked has the Rudras as his agents and associates.
   The third in the line of ascension is the region of Varuna and the Adityas, that is to say, of the large Mind and its lightsperhaps it can be connected with Tantric Ajnachakra. The fourth is the domain of Soma and the Marutsthis seems to be the inner heart, the fount of delight and keen and sweeping aspirations the Anahata of the Tantras. The fifth is the region of the crown of the head, the domain of Brahma and the Sadhyas: it is the Overmind status from where comes the descending inflatus, the creative Maya of Brahma. And when you go beyond, you pass into the ultimate status of the Sun, the reality absolute, the Transcendent which is indescribable, unseizable, indeterminate, indeterminable, incommensurable; and once there, one never returns, neverna ca punarvartate na ca punarvartate.
  --
   "How many Gods are there?" Yajnavalkya was once asked.13 The Rishi answered, they say there are three thousand and three of them, or three hundred and three, or again, thirty-three; it may be said too there are six or three or two or one and a half or one finally. Indeed as the Upanishad says elsewhere, it is the One Unique who wished to be many: and all the Gods are the various glories (mahim) or emanations of the One Divine. The ancient of ancient Rishis had declared long long ago, in the earliest Veda, that there is one indivisible Reality, the seers name it in various ways.
   In Yajnavalkya's enumeration, however, it is to be noted, first of all, that he stresses on the number three. The principle of triplicity is of very wide application: it permeates all fields of consciousness and is evidently based upon a fundamental fact of reality. It seems to embody a truth of synthesis and comprehension, points to the order and harmony that reigns in the cosmos, the spheric music. The metaphysical, that is to say, the original principles that constitute existence are the well-known triplets: (i) the superior: Sat, Chit, Ananda; and (ii) the inferior: Body, Life and Mindthis being a reflection or translation or concretisation of the former. We can see also here how the dual principle comes in, the twin godhead or the two gods to which Yajnavalkya refers. The same principle is found in the conception of Ardhanarishwara, Male and Female, Purusha-Prakriti. The Upanishad says 14 yet again that the One original Purusha was not pleased at being alone, so for a companion he created out of himself the original Female. The dual principle signifies creation, the manifesting activity of the Reality. But what is this one and a half to which Yajnavalkya refers? It simply means that the other created out of the one is not a wholly separate, independent entity: it is not an integer by itself, as in the Manichean system, but that it is a portion, a fraction of the One. And in the end, in the ultimate analysis, or rather synthesis, there is but one single undivided and indivisible unity. The thousands and hundreds, very often mentioned also in the Rig Veda, are not simply multiplications of the One, a graphic description of its many-sidedness; it indicates also the absolute fullness, the complete completeness (prasya pram) of the Reality. It includes and comprehends all and is a rounded totality, a full circle. The hundred-gated and the thousand-pillared cities of which the ancient Rishis chanted are formations and embodiments of consciousness human and divine, are realities whole and entire englobing all the layers and grades of consciousness.

00.04 - The Beautiful in the Upanishads, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Only, to some perhaps the beauty may not appear as evident and apparent. The Spirit of beauty that resides in the Upanishadic consciousness is more retiring and reticent. It dwells in its own privacy, in its own home, as it were, and therefore chooses to be bare and austere, simple and sheer. Beauty means usually the beauty of form, even if it be not always the decorative, ornamental and sumptuous form. The early Vedas aimed at the perfect form (surpaktnum), the faultless expression, the integral and complete embodiment; the Gods they envisaged and invoked were gleaming powers carved out of harmony and beauty and figured close to our modes of apprehension (spyan). But the Upanishads came to lay stress upon what is beyond the form, what the eye cannot see nor the vision reflect:
   na sandi tihati rpamasya

00.05 - A Vedic Conception of the Poet, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   'Kavi' is an invariable epithet of the Gods. The Vedas mean by this attribute to bring out a most fundamental character, an inalienable dharma of the heavenly host. All the Gods are poets; and a human being can become a poet only in so far as he attains to the nature and status of a god. Who is then a kavi? The Poet is he who by his poetic power raises forms of beauty in heavenkavi kavitv divi rpam sajat.1Thus the essence of poetic power is to fashion divine Beauty, to reveal heavenly forms. What is this Heaven whose forms the Poet discovers and embodies? HeavenDyaushas a very definite connotation in the Veda. It means the luminous or divine Mind 2the mind purified of its obscurity and limitations, due to subjection to the external senses, thus opening to the higher Light, receiving and recording faithfully the deeper and vaster movements and vibrations of the Truth, giving them a form, a perfect body of the right thought and the right word. Indra is the lord of this world and he can be approached only with an enkindled intelligence, ddhay man,3a faultless understanding, sumedh. He is the supreme Artisan of the poetic power,Tash, the maker of perfect forms, surpa ktnum.4 All the Gods turn towards Indra and become gods and poets, attain their Great Names of Supreme Beauty.5 Indra is also the master of the senses, indriyas, who are his hosts. It is through this mind and the senses that the poetic creation has to be manifested. The mind spreads out wide the Poet's weaving;6 the poet is the priest who calls down and works out the right thinking in the sacrificial labour of creation.7 But that creation is made in and through the inner mind and the inner senses that are alive to the subtle formation of a vaster knowledge.8 The poet envisages the golden forms fashioned out of the very profundity of the consciousness.9 For the substance, the material on which the Poet works, is Truth. The seat of the Truth the poets guard, they uphold the supreme secret Names.10 The poet has the expressive utterance, the creative word; the poet is a poet by his poetic creation-the shape faultlessly wrought out that unveils and holds the Truth.11The form of beauty is the body of the Truth.
   The poet is a trinity in himself. A triune consciousness forms his personality. First of all, he is the Knower-the Seer of the Truth, kavaya satyadrara. He has the direct vision, the luminous intelligence, the immediate perception.12 A subtle and profound and penetrating consciousness is his,nigam, pracetas; his is the eye of the Sun,srya caku.13 He secures an increased being through his effulgent understanding.14 In the second place, the Poet is not only Seer but Doer; he is knower as well as creator. He has a dynamic knowledge and his vision itself is power, ncak;15 he is the Seer-Will,kavikratu.16 He has the blazing radiance of the Sun and is supremely potent in his self-Iuminousness.17 The Sun is the light and the energy of the Truth. Even like the Sun the Poet gives birth to the Truth, srya satyasava, satyya satyaprasavya. But the Poet as Power is not only the revealer or creator,savit, he is also the builder or fashioner,ta, and he is the organiser,vedh is personality. First of all, he is the Knower-the Seer of the Truth, kavaya satyadrara, of the Truth.18 As Savita he manifests the Truth, as Tashta he gives a perfected body and form to the Truth, and as Vedha he maintains the Truth in its dynamic working. The effective marshalling and organisation of the Truth is what is called Ritam, the Right; it is also called Dharma,19 the Law or the Rhythm, the ordered movement and invincible execution of the Truth. The Poet pursues the Path of the Right;20 it is he who lays out the Path for the march of the Truth, the progress of the Sacrifice.21 He is like a fast steed well-yoked, pressing forward;22 he is the charger that moves straight and unswerving and carries us beyond 23into the world of felicity.
  --
   The Poet creates forms of beauty in Heaven; but these forms are not made out of the void. It is the Earth that is raised to Heaven and transmuted into divine truth forms. The union of Earth and Heaven is the source of the Joy, the Ananda, that the Poet unseals and distributes. Heaven and Earth join and meet in the world of Delight; between them they press out Soma, the drink of the Gods.
   The Mind and the Body are held together by means of the Life, the mid-world. The Divine Mind by raising the body-consciousness into itself gathers up too, by that act, the delight of life and releases the fountain of immortal Bliss. That is the work and achievement of the Gods as poets.
   Where then is the birth of the Poets? Ask it of the Masters. The Poets have seized and mastered the Mind, they have the perfect working and they fashion the Heaven.
  --
   All the Gods are poetstheir forms are perfect, surpa, suda, their Names full of beauty,cru devasya nma.31 This means also that the Gods embody the different powers that constitute the poetic consciousness. Agni is the Seer-Will, the creative vision of the Poet the luminous energy born of an experience by identity with the Truth. Indra is the Idea-Form, the architectonic conception of the work or achievement. Mitra and Varuna are the large harmony, the vast cadence and sweep of movement. The Aswins, the Divine Riders, represent the intense zest of well-yoked Life-Energy. Soma is Rasa, Ananda, the Supreme Bliss and Delight.
   The Vedic Poet is doubtless the poet of Life, the architect of Divinity in man, of Heaven upon earth. But what is true of Life is fundamentally true of Art tooat least true of the Art as it was conceived by the ancient seers and as it found expression at their hands.32

0.00a - Introduction, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  A good many attri butions in other symbolic areas, I feel are subject to the same criticism. The Egyptian Gods have been used with a good deal of carelessness, and without sufficient explanation of motives in assigning them as I did. In a recent edition of Crowley's masterpiece Liber 777 (which au fond is less a reflection of Crowley's mind as a recent critic claimed than a tabulation of some of the material given piecemeal in the Golden Dawn knowledge lectures), he gives for the first time brief explanations of the motives for his attri butions. I too should have been far more explicit in the explanations I used in the case of some of the Gods whose names were used many times, most inadequately, where several paths were concerned. While it is true that the religious coloring of the Egyptian Gods differed from time to time during Egypt's turbulent history, nonetheless a word or two about just that one single point could have served a useful purpose.
  Some of the passages in the book force me today to emphasize that so far as the Qabalah is concerned, it could and should be employed without binding to it the partisan qualities of any one particular religious faith. This goes as much for Judaism as it does for Christianity. Neither has much intrinsic usefulness where this scientific scheme is concerned. If some students feel hurt by this statement, that cannot be helped. The day of most contemporary faiths is over; they have been more of a curse than a boon to mankind. Nothing that I say here, however, should reflect on the peoples concerned, those who accept these religions. They are merely unfortunate. The religion itself is worn out and indeed is dying.

0.00 - INTRODUCTION, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
   Gadadhar grew up into a healthy and restless boy, full of fun and sweet mischief. He was intelligent and precocious and endowed with a prodigious memory. On his father's lap he learnt by heart the names of his ancestors and the hymns to the Gods and goddesses, and at the village school he was taught to read and write. But his greatest delight was to listen to recitations of stories from Hindu mythology and the epics. These he would afterwards recount from memory, to the great joy of the villagers. Painting he enjoyed; the art of moulding images of the Gods and goddesses he learnt from the potters. But arithmetic was his great aversion.
   At the age of six or seven Gadadhar had his first experience of spiritual ecstasy. One day in June or July, when he was walking along a narrow path between paddy-fields, eating the puffed rice that he carried in a basket, he looked up at the sky and saw a beautiful, dark thunder-cloud. As it spread, rapidly enveloping the whole sky, a flight of snow-white cranes passed in front of it. The beauty of the contrast overwhelmed the boy. He fell to the ground, unconscious, and the puffed rice went in all directions. Some villagers found him and carried him home in their arms. Gadadhar said later that in that state he had experienced an indescribable joy.
  --
   Born in an orthodox brahmin family, Sri Ramakrishna knew the formalities of worship, its rites and rituals. The innumerable gods and goddesses of the Hindu religion are the human aspects of the indescribable and incomprehensible Spirit, as conceived by the finite human mind. They understand and appreciate human love and emotion, help men to realize their secular and spiritual ideals, and ultimately enable men to attain liberation from the miseries of phenomenal life. The Source of light, intelligence, wisdom, and strength is the One alone from whom comes the fulfilment of desire. Yet, as long as a man is bound by his human limitations, he cannot but worship God through human forms. He must use human symbols. Therefore Hinduism asks the devotees to look on God as the ideal father, the ideal mother, the ideal husband, the ideal son, or the ideal friend. But the name ultimately leads to the Nameless, the form to the Formless, the word to the Silence, the emotion to the serene realization of Peace in Existence-Knowledge-Bliss Absolute. the Gods gradually merge in the one God. But until that realization is achieved, the devotee cannot dissociate human factors from his worship. Therefore the Deity is bathed and clothed and decked with ornaments. He is fed and put to sleep. He is propitiated with hymns, songs, and prayers. And there are appropriate rites connected with all these functions. For instance, to secure for himself external purity, the priest bathes himself in holy water and puts on a holy cloth. He purifies the mind and the sense-organs by appropriate meditations. He fortifies the place of worship against evil forces by drawing around it circles of fire and water. He awakens the different spiritual centres of the body and invokes the Supreme Spirit in his heart. Then he transfers the Supreme Spirit to the image before him and worships the image, regarding it no longer as clay or stone, but as the embodiment of Spirit, throbbing with Life and Consciousness. After the worship the Supreme Spirit is recalled from the image to Its true sanctuary, the heart of the priest. The real devotee knows the absurdity of worshipping the Transcendental Reality with material articles — clothing That which pervades the whole universe and the beyond, putting on a pedestal That which cannot be limited by space, feeding That which is disembodied and incorporeal, singing before That whose glory the music of the spheres tries vainly to proclaim. But through these rites the devotee aspires to go ultimately beyond rites and rituals, forms and names, words and praise, and to realize God as the All-pervading Consciousness.
   Hindu priests are thoroughly acquainted with the rites of worship, but few of them are aware of their underlying significance. They move their hands and limbs mechanically, in obedience to the letter of the scriptures, and repeat the holy mantras like parrots. But from the very beginning the inner meaning of these rites was revealed to Sri Ramakrishna. As he sat facing the image, a strange transformation came over his mind. While going through the prescribed ceremonies, he would actually find himself encircled by a wall of fire protecting him and the place of worship from unspiritual vibrations, or he would feel the rising of the mystic Kundalini through the different centres of the body. The glow on his face, his deep absorption, and the intense atmosphere of the temple impressed everyone who saw him worship the Deity.
  --
   Totapuri arrived at the Dakshineswar temple garden toward the end of 1864. Perhaps born in the Punjab, he was the head of a monastery in that province of India and claimed leadership of seven hundred sannyasis. Trained from early youth in the disciplines of the Advaita Vedanta, he looked upon the world as an illusion. the Gods and goddesses of the dualistic worship were to him mere fantasies of the deluded mind. Prayers, ceremonies, rites, and rituals had nothing to do with true religion, and about these he was utterly indifferent. Exercising self-exertion and unshakable will-power, he had liberated himself from attachment to the sense-objects of the relative universe. For forty years he had practised austere discipline on the bank of the sacred Narmada and had finally realized his identity with the Absolute. Thenceforward he roamed in the world as an unfettered soul, a lion free from the cage. Clad in a loin-cloth, he spent his days under the canopy of the sky alike in storm and sunshine, feeding his body on the slender pittance of alms. He had been visiting the estuary of the Ganges. On his return journey along the bank of the sacred river, led by the inscrutable Divine Will, he stopped at Dakshineswar.
   Totapuri, discovering at once that Sri Ramakrishna was prepared to be a student of Vedanta, asked to initiate him into its mysteries. With the permission of the Divine Mother, Sri Ramakrishna agreed to the proposal. But Totapuri explained that only a sannyasi could receive the teaching of Vedanta. Sri Ramakrishna agreed to renounce the world, but with the stipulation that the ceremony of his initiation into the monastic order be performed in secret, to spare the feelings of his old mother, who had been living with him at Dakshineswar.
  --
   Totapuri asked the disciple to withdraw his mind from all objects of the relative world, including the Gods and goddesses, and to concentrate on the Absolute. But the task was not easy even for Sri Ramakrishna. He found it impossible to take his mind beyond Kali, the Divine Mother of the Universe. "After the initiation", Sri Ramakrishna once said, describing the event, "Nangta began to teach me the various conclusions of the Advaita Vedanta and asked me to withdraw the mind completely from all objects and dive deep into the Atman. But in spite of all my attempts I could not altogether cross the realm of name and form and bring my mind to the unconditioned state. I had no difficulty in taking the mind from all the objects of the world. But the radiant and too familiar figure of the Blissful Mother, the Embodiment of the essence of Pure Consciousness, appeared before me as a living reality. Her bewitching smile prevented me from passing into the Great Beyond. Again and again I tried, but She stood in my way every time. In despair I said to Nangta: 'It is hopeless. I cannot raise my mind to the unconditioned state and come face to face with Atman.' He grew excited and sharply said: 'What? You can't do it? But you have to.' He cast his eyes around. Finding a piece of glass he took it up and stuck it between my eyebrows. 'Concentrate the mind on this point!' he thundered. Then with stern determination I again sat to meditate. As soon as the gracious form of the Divine Mother appeared before me, I used my discrimination as a sword and with it clove Her in two. The last barrier fell. My spirit at once soared beyond the relative plane and I lost myself in samadhi."
   Sri Ramakrishna remained completely absorbed in samadhi for three days. "Is it really true?" Totapuri cried out in astonishment. "Is it possible that he has attained in a single day what it took me forty years of strenuous practice to achieve? Great God! It is nothing short of a miracle!" With the help of Totapuri, Sri Ramakrishna's mind finally came down to the relative plane.
  --
   The Knowledge of Brahman in nirvikalpa samadhi had convinced Sri Ramakrishna that the Gods of the different religions are but so many readings of the Absolute, and that the Ultimate Reality could never be expressed by human tongue. He understood that all religions lead their devotees by differing paths to one and the same goal. Now he became eager to explore some of the alien religions; for with him understanding meant actual experience.
   --- ISLAM
  --
   Pratap Chandra Mazumdar, the right-hand man of Keshab and an accomplished Brahmo preacher in Europe and America, bitterly criticized Sri Ramakrishna's use of uncultured language and also his austere attitude toward his wife. But he could not escape the spell of the Master's personality. In the course of an article about Sri Ramakrishna, Pratap wrote in the "Theistic Quarterly Review": "What is there in common between him and me? I, a Europeanized, civilized, self-centred, semi-sceptical, so-called educated reasoner, and he, a poor, illiterate, unpolished, half-idolatrous, friendless Hindu devotee? Why should I sit long hours to attend to him, I, who have listened to Disraeli and Fawcett, Stanley and Max Muller, and a whole host of European scholars and divines? . . . And it is not I only, but dozens like me, who do the same. . . . He worships Siva, he worships Kali, he worships Rama, he worships Krishna, and is a confirmed advocate of Vedantic doctrines. . . . He is an idolater, yet is a faithful and most devoted meditator on the perfections of the One Formless, Absolute, Infinite Deity. . . . His religion is ecstasy, his worship means transcendental insight, his whole nature burns day and night with a permanent fire and fever of a strange faith and feeling. . . . So long as he is spared to us, gladly shall we sit at his feet to learn from him the sublime precepts of purity, unworldliness, spirituality, and inebriation in the love of God. . . . He, by his childlike bhakti, by his strong conceptions of an ever-ready Motherhood, helped to unfold it [God as our Mother] in our minds wonderfully. . . . By associating with him we learnt to realize better the divine attributes as scattered over the three hundred and thirty millions of deities of mythological India, the Gods of the Puranas."
   The Brahmo leaders received much inspiration from their contact with Sri Ramakrishna. It broadened their religious views and kindled in their hearts the yearning for God-realization; it made them understand and appreciate the rituals and symbols of Hindu religion, convinced them of the manifestation of God in diverse forms, and deepened their thoughts about the harmony of religions. The Master, too, was impressed by the sincerity of many of the Brahmo devotees. He told them about his own realizations and explained to them the essence of his teachings, such as the necessity of renunciation, sincerity in the pursuit of one's own course of discipline, faith in God, the performance of one's duties without thought of results, and discrimination between the Real and the unreal.
  --
   The more the body was devastated by illness, the more it became the habitation of the Divine Spirit. Through its transparency the Gods and goddesses began to shine with ever increasing luminosity. On the day of the Kali Puja the devotees clearly saw in him the manifestation of the Divine Mother.
   It was noticed at this time that some of the devotees were making an unbridled display of their emotions. A number of them, particularly among the householders, began to cultivate, though at first unconsciously, the art of shedding tears, shaking the body, contorting the face, and going into trances, attempting thereby to imitate the Master. They began openly to declare Sri Ramakrishna a Divine Incarnation and to regard themselves as his chosen people, who could neglect religious disciplines with impunity. Narendra's penetrating eye soon sized up the situation. He found out that some of these external manifestations were being carefully practised at home, while some were the outcome of malnutrition, mental weakness, or nervous debility. He mercilessly exposed the devotees who were pretending to have visions, and asked all to develop a healthy religious spirit. Narendra sang inspiring songs for the younger devotees, read with them the Imitation of Christ and the Gita, and held before them the positive ideals of spirituality.

0.00 - The Book of Lies Text, #The Book of Lies, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
     the Gods.
    This Reason and Law is the Bond of the Great Lie.
  --
    been the most acceptable offerings to all the Gods, but
    especially the Christian God.
  --
    circumstances of the Equinox of the Gods.
     The word "Phoenix" may be taken as including the
  --
    crapulence. The priests of the Gods were carefully
    chosen, and carefully trained to fulfill the sacrament of
  --
    sonally, at the Equinox of the Gods. (It is the flame
    desending upon the altar, and licking up the burnt

0.02 - The Three Steps of Nature, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Matter, which, however the too ethereally spiritual may despise it, is our foundation and the first condition of all our energies and realisations, and the Life-Energy which is our means of existence in a material body and the basis there even of our mental and spiritual activities. She has successfully achieved a certain stability of her constant material movement which is at once sufficiently steady and durable and sufficiently pliable and mutable to provide a fit dwelling-place and instrument for the progressively manifesting god in humanity. This is what is meant by the fable in the Aitareya Upanishad which tells us that the Gods rejected the animal forms successively offered to them by the Divine Self and only when man was produced, cried out, "This indeed is perfectly made," and consented to enter in. She has effected also a working compromise between the inertia of matter and the active Life that lives in and feeds on it, by which not only is vital existence sustained, but the fullest developments of mentality are rendered possible. This equilibrium constitutes the basic status of Nature in man and is termed in the language of Yoga his gross body composed
  The Three Steps of Nature

0.05 - The Synthesis of the Systems, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Everything in us is seized by the hands of a mighty Artificer and transformed into a clear image of that which it now seeks confusedly to present. In that ever-progressive experience we begin to perceive how this lower manifestation is constituted and that everything in it, however seemingly deformed or petty or vile, is the more or less distorted or imperfect figure of some element or action in the harmony of the divine Nature. We begin to understand what the Vedic Rishis meant when they spoke of the human forefa thers fashioning the Gods as a smith forges the crude material in his smithy.
  Thirdly, the divine Power in us uses all life as the means of this integral Yoga. Every experience and outer contact with our world-environment, however trifling or however disastrous, is used for the work, and every inner experience, even to the most repellent suffering or the most humiliating fall, becomes a step on the path to perfection. And we recognise in ourselves with opened eyes the method of God in the world, His purpose of light in the obscure, of might in the weak and fallen, of delight in what is grievous and miserable. We see the divine method to be the same in the lower and in the higher working; only in the one it is pursued tardily and obscurely through the subconscious in

0.08 - Letters to a Young Captain, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  The overmind is the region of the Gods, the beings of divine
  origin who have been charged with supervising, directing and
  --
  progressive ascension. It is usually to the Gods of the overmind
  that the prayers of the various religions are addressed. These religions most often choose, for various reasons, one of these gods

0.09 - Letters to a Young Teacher, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  drink from the cup of the Gods who are immortal.
  To receive the divine grace, not only must one have a great

01.01 - The New Humanity, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The New Humanity will be something in the mould that we give to the Gods. It will supply the link that we see missing between gods and men; it will be the race of embodied gods. Man will attain that thing which has been his first desire and earliest dream, for which he coveted the Gods Immortality, amritatwam. The mortalities that cut and divide, limit and bind man make him the sorrowful being he is. These are due to his ignorance and weakness and egoism. These are due to his soul itself. It is the soul that requires change, a new birth, as Christ demanded. Ours is a little soul that has severed itself from the larger and mightier self that it is. And therefore does it die every moment and even while living is afraid to live and so lives poorly and miserably. But the age is now upon us when the god-like soul anointed with its immortal royalties is ready to emerge and claim our salutation.
   The breath and the surge of the new creation cannot be mistaken. The question that confronts us today is no longer whether the New Man, the Super-humanity, will come or if at all, when; but the question we have to answer is who among us are ready to be its receptacle, its instrument and embodiment.

01.01 - The Symbol Dawn, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  It was the hour before the Gods awake.
  1.2
  --
  In her there was the anguish of the Gods
  Imprisoned in our transient human mould,

01.02 - Sri Aurobindo - Ahana and Other Poems, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   To humanise the Divine, that is what we all wish to do; for the Divine is too lofty for us and we cannot look full into his face. We cry and supplicate to Rudra, "O dire Lord, show us that other form of thine that is benign and humane". All earthly imageries we lavish upon the Divine so that he may appear to us not as something far and distant and foreign, but, quite near, among us, as one of us. We take recourse to human symbolism often, because we wish to palliate or hide the rigours of a supreme experience, not because we have no adequate terms for it. The same human or earthly terms could be used differently if we had a different consciousness. Thus the Vedic Rishis sought not to humanise the Divine, their purpose was rather to divinise the human. And their allegorical language, although rich in terrestrial figures, does not carry the impress and atmosphere of mere humanity and earthliness. For in reality the symbol is not merely the symbol. It is mere symbol in regard to the truth so long as we take our stand on the lower plane when we have to look at the truth through the symbol; but if we view it from the higher plane, from truth itself, it is no longer mere symbol but the very truth bodied forth. Whatever there is of symbolism on earth and its beauties, in sense and its enjoyments, is then transfigured into the expression of the truth, of the divinity itself. We then no longer speak in human language but in the language of the Gods.
   We have been speaking of philosophy and the philosophic manner. But what are the exact implications of the words, let us ask again. They mean nothing more and nothing lessthan the force of thought and the mass of thought content. After all, that seems to be almost the whole difference between the past and the present human consciousness in so far at least as it has found expression in poetry. That element, we wish to point out, is precisely what the old-world poets lacked or did not care to possess or express or stress. A poet meant above all, if not all in all, emotion, passion, sensuousness, sensibility, nervous enthusiasm and imagination and fancy: remember the classic definition given by Shakespeare of the poet
  --
   And if there is something in the creative spirit of Sri Aurobindo which tends more towards the strenuous than the genial, the arduous than the mellifluous, and which has more of the austerity of Vyasa than the easy felicity of Valmiki, however it might have affected the ultimate value of his creation, according to certain standards,14 it has illustrated once more that poetry is not merely beauty but power, it is not merely sweet imagination but creative visionit is even the Rik, the mantra that impels the Gods to manifest upon earth, that fashions divinity in man.
   James H. Cousins in his New Ways in English Literature describes Sri Aurobindo as "the philosopher as poet."

01.02 - The Issue, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Moves in some prophet cavern of the Gods,
  A heart of silence in the hands of joy
  --
  The strength, the silence of the Gods were hers.
  3.41
  --
  Her walk kept still the measures of the Gods.
  4.4
  --
  Years like gold raiment of the Gods that pass;
  Her youth sat throned in calm felicity.

01.03 - Mystic Poetry, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   This is spiritual matter and spiritual manner that can never be improved upon. This is spiritual poetry in its quintessence. I am referring naturally here to the original and not to the translation which can never do full justice, even at its very best, to the poetic value in question. For apart from the individual genius of the poet, the greatness of the language, the instrument used by the poet, is also involved. It may well be what is comparatively easy and natural in the language of the Gods (devabhasha) would mean a tour de force, if not altogether an impossibility, in a human language. The Sanskrit language was moulded and fashioned in the hands of the Rishis, that is to say, those who lived and moved and had their being in the spiritual consciousness. The Hebrew or even the Zend does not seem to have reached that peak, that absoluteness of the spiritual tone which seems inherent in the Indian tongue, although those too breathed and grew in a spiritual atmosphere. The later languages, however, Greek or Latin or their modern descendants, have gone still farther from the source, they are much nearer to the earth and are suffused with the smell and effluvia of this vale of tears.
   Among the ancients, strictly speaking, the later classical Lucretius was a remarkable phenomenon. By nature he was a poet, but his mental interest lay in metaphysical speculation, in philosophy, and unpoetical business. He turned away from arms and heroes, wrath and love and, like Seneca and Aurelius, gave himself up to moralising and philosophising, delving 'into the mystery, the why and the how and the whither of it all. He chose a dangerous subject for his poetic inspiration and yet it cannot be said that his attempt was a failure. Lucretius was not a religious or spiritual poet; he was rather Marxian,atheistic, materialistic. The dialectical materialism of today could find in him a lot of nourishment and support. But whatever the content, the manner has made a whole difference. There was an idealism, a clarity of vision and an intensity of perception, which however scientific apparently, gave his creation a note, an accent, an atmosphere high, tense, aloof, ascetic, at times bordering on the supra-sensual. It was a high light, a force of consciousness that at its highest pitch had the ring and vibration of something almost spiritual. For the basic principle of Lucretius' inspiration is a large thought-force, a tense perception, a taut nervous reactionit is not, of course, the identity in being with the inner realities which is the hallmark of a spiritual consciousness, yet it is something on the way towards that.

01.03 - Sri Aurobindo and his School, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Sri Aurobindo's sadhana starts from the perception of a Power that is beyond the ordinary nature yet is its inevitable master, a fulcrum, as we have said, outside the earth. For what is required first is the discovery and manifestation of a new soul-consciousness in man which will bring about by the very pressure and working out of its self-rule an absolute reversal of man's nature. It is the Asuras who are now holding sway over humanity, for man has allowed himself so long to be built in the image of the Asura; to dislodge the Asuras, the Gods in their sovereign might have to be forged in the human being and brought into play. It is a stupendous task, some would say impossible; but it is very far removed from quietism or passivism. Sri Aurobindo is in retirement, but it is a retirement only from the outward field of present physical activities and their apparent actualities, not from the true forces and action of life. It is the retreat necessary to one who has to go back into himself to conquer a new plane of creative power,an entrance right into the world of basic forces, of fundamental realities, into the flaming heart of things where all actualities are born and take their first shape. It is the discovery of a power-house of tremendous energism and of the means of putting it at the service of earthly life.
   And, properly speaking, it is not at all a school, least of all a mere school of thought, that is growing round Sri Aurobindo. It is rather the nucleus of a new life that is to come. Quite naturally it has almost insignificant proportions at present to the outward eye, for the work is still of the nature of experiment and trial in very restricted limits, something in the nature of what is done in a laboratory when a new power has been discovered, but has still to be perfectly formulated in its process. And it is quite a mistake to suppose that there is a vigorous propaganda carried on in its behalf or that there is a large demand for recruits. Only the few, who possess the call within and are impelled by the spirit of the future, have a chance of serving this high attempt and great realisation and standing among its first instruments and pioneer workers.

01.03 - The Yoga of the King - The Yoga of the Souls Release, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The weeping of Love, the quarrel of the Gods,
  Ceased in a truth which lives in its own light.
  --
  Air rippled round the argosies of the Gods,
  Strange riches sailed to him from the Unseen;
  --
  Covered by the forged signatures of the Gods,
  Detect the magic bride in her disguise
  --
  A recorder of the inquiry of the Gods,
  Spokesman of the silent seeings of the Supreme,

01.04 - The Intuition of the Age, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The worship of man as something essentially and exclusively human necessitates as a corollary, the other doctrine, viz the deification of Reason; and vice versa. Humanism and Scientism go together and the whole spirit and mentality of the age that is passing may be summed up in those two words. So Nietzsche says, "All our modern world is captured in the net of the Alexandrine culture and has, for its ideal, the theoretical man, armed with the most powerful instruments of knowledge, toiling in the service of science and whose prototype and original ancestor is Socrates." Indeed, it may be generally asserted that the nation whose prophet and sage claimed to have brought down Philosophia from heaven to dwell upon earth among men was precisely the nation, endowed with a clear and logical intellect, that was the very embodiment of rationality and reasonableness. As a matter of fact, it would not be far, wrong to say that it is the Hellenic culture which has been moulding humanity for ages; at least, it is this which has been the predominating factor, the vital and dynamic element in man's nature. Greece when it died was reborn in Rome; Rome, in its return, found new life in France; and France means Europe. What Europe has been and still is for the world and humanity one knows only too much. And yet, the Hellenic genius has not been the sole motive power and constituent element; there has been another leaven which worked constantly within, if intermittently without. If Europe represented mind and man and this side of existence, Asia always reflected that which transcends the mind the spirit, the Gods and the Beyonds.
   However, we are concerned more with the immediate past, the mentality that laid its supreme stress upon the human rationality. What that epoch did not understand was that Reason could be overstepped, that there was something higher, something greater than Reason; Reason being the sovereign faculty, it was thought there could be nothing beyond, unless it were draison. The human attribute par excellence is Reason. Exactly so. But the fact is that man is not bound by his humanity and that reason can be transformed and sublimated into other more powerful faculties.

01.05 - The Yoga of the King - The Yoga of the Spirits Freedom and Greatness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  All that the Gods have learned is there self-known.
  There in a hidden chamber closed and mute
  --
  Its law of the opposition of the Gods,
  Its list of inseparable contraries.
  --
  She has canalised the outbreaks of the Gods
  And cut through vistas of intuitive sight
  --
  Aspired in a crescendo of the Gods
  From Matter's abysses to the Spirit's peaks.

01.09 - The Parting of the Way, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Indeed it is a divine creature that should be envisaged on the next level of evolution. The mental and the moral, the psychical and the physical transfigurations which must follow the change in the basic substratum do imply such a mutation, the birth of a new species, as it were, fashioned in the nature of the Gods. The vision of angels and Siddhas, which man is having ceaselessly since his birth, may be but a prophecy of the future actuality.
   This then, it seems to us, is the immediate problem that Nature has set before herself. She is now at the parting of the ways. She has done with man as an essentially human being, she has brought out the fundamental possibilities of humanity and perfected it, so far as perfection may be attained within the cadre by which she chose to limit herself; she is now looking forward to another kind of experiment the evolving of another life, another being out of her entrails, that will be greater than the humanity we know today, that will be superior even to the supreme that has yet been actualised.

0.10 - Letters to a Young Captain, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  and kindlier rapture."4 So the Gods are cowards! Where
  then is their greatness and their splendour? Why do we
  --
  "The Titans are stronger than the Gods because they have agreed with God to front
  and bear the burden of His wrath and enmity; the Gods were able to accept only the
  pleasant burden of His love and kindlier rapture."
  --
  not, I see no need for us to worship the Gods, great or small. Our
  adoration ought to go only to the Supreme Lord, who is one in

01.12 - Three Degrees of Social Organisation, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Still, the conception of duty cannot finally and definitively solve the problem. It cannot arrive at a perfect harmonisation of the conflicting claims of individual units; for, duty, as I have already said, is a child of mental idealism, and although the mind can exercise some kind of control over life-forces, it cannot altogether eliminate the seeds of conflict that lie imbedded in the very nature of life. It is for this reason that there is an element of constraint in duty; it is, as the poet says, the "stern daughter of the Voice of God". One has to compel oneself, one has to use force on oneself to carry out one's dutythere is a feeling somehow of its being a bitter pill. The cult of duty means rajas controlled and coerced by Sattwa, not the transcendence of rajas. This leads us to the high and supreme conception of Dharma, which is a transcendence of the gunas. Dharma is not an ideal, a standard or a rule that one has to obey: it is the law of self-nature that one inevitably follows, it is easy, spontaneous, delightful. The path of duty is heroic, the path of Dharma is of the Gods, godly (cf. Virabhava and Divyabhava of the Tantras).
   The principle of Dharma then inculcates that each individual must, in order to act, find out his truth of being, his true soul and inmost consciousness: one must entirely and integrally merge oneself into that, be identified with it in such a manner that all acts and feelings and thoughts, in fact all movements, inner and outerspontaneously and irrepressibly well out of that fount and origin. The individual souls, being made of one truth-nature in its multiple modalities, when they live, move and have their being in its essential law and dynamism, there cannot but be absolute harmony and perfect synthesis between all the units, even as the sun and moon and stars, as the Veda says, each following its specific orbit according to its specific nature, never collide or haltna me thate na tas thatuh but weave out a faultless pattern of symphony.

0.11 - Letters to a Sadhak, #Some Answers From The Mother, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  They are the Gods.
  Naturally, this is a way of speaking which corresponds to a
  --
  of the Gods?
  The vibrations of evil are in truth less powerful than the vibrations of good.

0 1958-07-06, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   In effect, according to tradition, the first divine forces that emanated for the creation were the Asuras, who turned into demons. the Gods were created later to repair the disorder engendered by the demons.
   So'ham, the traditional mantra of the Vedantic path, which declares that the world is an illusion.

0 1958-07-19, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   We are the distorting intermediary between the purity of the animal and the divine purity of the Gods.
   ***

0 1958-08-09, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   Evidently the Gods of the Puranas are a good deal worse than human beings, as we saw in that film the other day1 (and that story was absolutely true). the Gods of the Overmind are infinitely more egocentric the only thing that counts for them is their power, the extent of their power. Man has in addition a psychic being, so consequently he has true love and compassionwherein lies his superiority over the Gods. It was very, very clearly expressed in this film, and its very true.
   the Gods are faultless, for they live according to their own nature, spontaneously and without constraint; it is their godly way. But if one looks at it from a higher point of view, if one has a higher vision, a vision of the whole, they have fewer qualities than man. In this film, it was proved that through their capacity for love and self-giving, men can have as much power as the Gods, and even morewhen they are not egoists, when they can overcome their egoism.
   Certainly man is nearer the Supreme than the Gods. Provided he fulfills the necessary conditions, he can be nearerhe isnt so automatically, but he can be, he has the power, the potentiality to be.
   Anusuya: wife of the rishi Atri and endowed with a great inner force. In her husband's absence, three gods came (Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva) disguised as brahmins and asked her for something to eat. Then they refused to eat unless she served them naked. Since they were brahmins, she could not send them away without feeding them, so by her inner power, she changed them into babies and served them naked. This film was shown at the Ashram Playground on August 5, 1958.

0 1958-11-04 - Myths are True and Gods exist - mental formation and occult faculties - exteriorization - work in dreams, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   (Concerning; the Agenda of August 9, 1958, on the Gods of the Puranas)
   the Gods of the Puranas are merciless gods who respect only power and have nothing of the true love, charity or profound goodness that the Divine has put into the human consciousness and which compensate psychically for all the outer defects. They themselves have nothing of this, they have no psychic.1 The Puranic gods have no psychic, so they act according to their power. They are restrained only when their power is not all-powerful, thats all.
   But what does Anusuya represent?2
   She is a portrait of the ideal woman according to the Hindu conception, the woman who worships her husb and as a god, which means that she sees the Supreme in her husband. And so this woman was much more powerful than all the Gods of the Puranas precisely because she had this psychic capacity for total self-giving; and her faith in the Supremes presence in her husb and gave her a much greater power than that of all the Gods.
   The story narrated in the film went like this: Narada, as usual, was having fun. (Narada is a demigod with a divine position that is, he can communicate with man and with the Gods as he pleases, and he serves as an intermediary, but then he likes to have fun!) So he was quarrelling with one of the goddesses, I no longer recall which one, and he told her (Ah, yes! The quarrel was with Saraswati.) Saraswati was telling him that knowledge is much greater than love (much greater in that it is much more powerful than love), and he replied to her, You dont know what youre talking about! (Mother laughs) Love is much more powerful than knowledge. So she challenged him, saying, Well then, prove it to me.I shall prove it to you, he replied. And the whole story starts there. He began creating a whole imbroglio on earth just to prove his point.
   It was only a film story, but anyway, the goddesses, the three wives of the Trimurti that is, the consort of Brahma, the consort of Vishnu and the consort of Shivajoined forces (!) and tried all kinds of things to foil Narada. I no longer recall the details of the story Oh yes, the story begins like this: one of the three I believe it was Shivas consort, Parvati (she was the worst one, by the way!)was doing her puja. Shiva was in meditation, and she began doing her puja in front of him; she was using an oil lamp for the puja, and the lamp fell down and burned her foot. She cried out because she had burned her foot. So Shiva at once came out of his meditation and said to her, What is it, Devi? (laughter) She answered, I burned my foot! Then Narada said, Arent you ashamed of what you have done?to make Shiva come out of his meditation simply because you have a little burn on your foot, which cannot even hurt you since you are immortal! She became furious and snapped at him, Show me that it can be otherwise! Narada replied, I am going to show you what it is to really love ones husbandyou dont know anything about it!
   Then comes the story of Anusuya and her husb and (who is truly a husb and a very good man, but well, not a god, after all!), who was sleeping with his head resting upon Anusuyas knees. They had finished their puja (both of them were worshippers of Shiva), and after their puja he was resting, sleeping, with his head on Anusuyas knees. Meanwhile, the Gods had descended upon earth, particularly this Parvati, and they saw Anusuya like that. Then Parvati exclaimed, This is a good occasion! Not very far away a cooking fire was burning. With her power, she sent the fire rolling down onto Anusuyas feetwhich startled her because it hurt. It began to burn; not one cry, not one movement, nothing because she didnt want to awaken her husband. But she began invoking Shiva (Shiva was there). And because she invoked Shiva (it is lovely in the story), because she invoked Shiva, Shivas foot began burning! (Mother laughs) Then Narada showed Shiva to Parvati: Look what you are doing; you are burning your husbands foot! So Parvati made the opposite gesture and the fire was put out.
   Thats how it went.
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   Oh, the story was very lovely all along. There was one thing after another, one thing after another, and always the power of Anusuya was greater than the power of the Gods. I liked that story very much.
   It ended in a (Oh, the story was very long; it lasted three hours!) But really, it was lovely throughout. Lovely in the way it showed that the sincerity of love is much more powerful than anything else.
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   (Shortly afterwards, the disciple again brings up the topic of August 9, where Mother had said that the Gods are a good deal worse than human beings)
   It should be said that we are speaking of the Puranic gods, because the Christians, for example, do not understand what this can mean. They have an entirely different conception of the Gods.
   It could apply to the old Greek mythology, though.
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   There is something similar between the Puranic gods and the Gods of Greek or Egyptian mythology. the Gods of Egyptian mythology are terrible beings They cut off peoples heads, tear their enemies to pieces!
   The Greeks were not always tender either!
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   They are beings who belong to the progressive creation of the universe and who have themselv