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object:Viktor Frankl
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subject class:Psychology
subject:Psychology


--- WIKI
Viktor Emil Frankl (26 March 1905 2 September 1997) was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist as well as a Holocaust survivor, surviving Theresienstadt, Auschwitz, Kaufering and Trkheim. Frankl was the founder of logotherapy (literally "healing through meaning") a meaning-centered school of psycho therapy, considered the Third Viennese School of Psycho therapy following the theories developed by Sigmund Freud and Alfred Adler. Logotherapy is part of existential and humanistic psychology theories. He is the author of over 39 books; he is most noted for his best-selling book Man's Search for Meaning based on his experiences in various Nazi concentration camps.
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IN CHAPTERS TITLE

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1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
2.01_-_Habit_1__Be_Proactive
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind

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author
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Viktor Frankl

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QUOTES [8 / 8 - 69 / 69]


KEYS (10k)

   5 Viktor Frankl
   2 Tom Butler-Bowdon
   1 Jordan Peterson

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   7 Viktor Frankl
   5 Stephen R Covey
   5 Ryan Holiday
   4 Bob Proctor
   4 Anonymous
   3 Timothy Ferriss
   3 Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
   3 Jordan Peterson
   3 Brian Tracy
   2 Viktor E Frankl
   2 Steven Konkoly
   2 Jordan B Peterson
   2 Dennis Prager
   2 Damien Echols
   2 Dalai Lama XIV

1:What is to give light must endure the burning.
   ~ Viktor Frankl,
2:When we can no longer change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves. ~ Viktor Frankl,
3:Between stimulus and response, there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.
   ~ Viktor Frankl,
4:Humor was another of the soul's weapons in the fight for self-preservation. It is well known that humor, more than anything else in the human make-up, can afford an aloofness and an ability to rise above any situation, even if only for a few seconds. ~ Viktor Frankl,
5:A man who becomes conscious of the responsibility he bears toward a human being who affectionately waits for him, or to an unfinished work, will never be able to throw away his life. He knows the 'why' for his existence, and will be able to bear almost any 'how'.
   ~ Viktor Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning,
6:Jordan Peterson's Book List
1. Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
2. 1984 - George Orwell
3. Road To Wigan Pier - George Orwell
4. Crime And Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky
5. Demons - Fyodor Dostoevsky
6. Beyond Good And Evil - Friedrich Nietzsche
7. Ordinary Men - Christopher Browning
8. The Painted Bird - Jerzy Kosinski
9. The Rape of Nanking - Iris Chang
10. Gulag Archipelago (Vol. 1, Vol. 2, & Vol. 3) - Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
11. Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl
12. Modern Man in Search of A Soul - Carl Jung
13. Maps Of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief - Jordan B. Peterson
14. A History of Religious Ideas (Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3) - Mircea Eliade
15. Affective Neuroscience - Jaak Panksepp ~ Jordan Peterson,
7:reading :::
   Self-Help Reading List:
   James Allen As a Man Thinketh (1904)
   Marcus Aurelius Meditations (2nd Century)
   The Bhagavad-Gita
   The Bible
   Robert Bly Iron John (1990)
   Boethius The Consolation of Philosophy (6thC)
   Alain de Botton How Proust Can Change Your Life (1997)
   William Bridges Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes (1980)
   David Brooks The Road to Character (2015)
   Brené Brown Daring Greatly (2012)
   David D Burns The New Mood Therapy (1980)
   Joseph Campbell (with Bill Moyers) The Power of Myth (1988)
   Richard Carlson Don't Sweat The Small Stuff (1997)
   Dale Carnegie How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936)
   Deepak Chopra The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success (1994)
   Clayton Christensen How Will You Measure Your Life? (2012)
   Paulo Coelho The Alchemist (1988)
   Stephen Covey The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (1989)
   Mihaly Cziksentmihalyi Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience (1991)
   The Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler The Art of Happiness (1999)
   The Dhammapada (Buddha's teachings)
   Charles Duhigg The Power of Habit (2011)
   Wayne Dyer Real Magic (1992)
   Ralph Waldo Emerson Self-Reliance (1841)
   Clarissa Pinkola Estes Women Who Run With The Wolves (1996)
   Viktor Frankl Man's Search For Meaning (1959)
   Benjamin Franklin Autobiography (1790)
   Shakti Gawain Creative Visualization (1982)
   Daniel Goleman Emotional Intelligence (1995)
   John Gray Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus (1992)
   Louise Hay You Can Heal Your Life (1984)
   James Hillman The Soul's Code: In Search of Character and Calling (1996)
   Susan Jeffers Feel The Fear And Do It Anyway (1987)
   Richard Koch The 80/20 Principle (1998)
   Marie Kondo The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up (2014)
   Ellen Langer Mindfulness: Choice and Control in Everyday Life (1989)
   Lao-Tzu Tao-te Ching (The Way of Power)
   Maxwell Maltz Psycho-Cybernetics (1960)
   Abraham Maslow Motivation and Personality (1954)
   Thomas Moore Care of the Soul (1992)
   Joseph Murphy The Power of Your Subconscious Mind (1963)
   Norman Vincent Peale The Power of Positive Thinking (1952)
   M Scott Peck The Road Less Traveled (1990)
   Anthony Robbins Awaken The Giant Within (1991)
   Florence Scovell-Shinn The Game of Life and How To Play It (1923)
   Martin Seligman Learned Optimism (1991)
   Samuel Smiles Self-Help (1859)
   Pierre Teilhard de Chardin The Phenomenon of Man (1955)
   Henry David Thoreau Walden (1854)
   Marianne Williamson A Return To Love (1993)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Self-Help,
8:reading :::
   50 Psychology Classics: List of Books Covered:
   Alfred Adler - Understanding Human Nature (1927)
   Gordon Allport - The Nature of Prejudice (1954)
   Albert Bandura - Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control (1997)
   Gavin Becker - The Gift of Fear (1997)
   Eric Berne - Games People Play (1964)
   Isabel Briggs Myers - Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type (1980)
   Louann Brizendine - The Female Brain (2006)
   David D Burns - Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy (1980)
   Susan Cain - Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (2012)
   Robert Cialdini - Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (1984)
   Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Creativity (1997)
   Carol Dweck - Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006)
   Albert Ellis & Robert Harper - (1961) A Guide To Rational Living(1961)
   Milton Erickson - My Voice Will Go With You (1982) by Sidney Rosen
   Eric Erikson - Young Man Luther (1958)
   Hans Eysenck - Dimensions of Personality (1947)
   Viktor Frankl - The Will to Meaning (1969)
   Anna Freud - The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (1936)
   Sigmund Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams (1901)
   Howard Gardner - Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983)
   Daniel Gilbert - Stumbling on Happiness (2006)
   Malcolm Gladwell - Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005)
   Daniel Goleman - Emotional Intelligence at Work (1998)
   John M Gottman - The Seven Principles For Making Marriage Work (1999)
   Temple Grandin - The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed (2013)
   Harry Harlow - The Nature of Love (1958)
   Thomas A Harris - I'm OK - You're OK (1967)
   Eric Hoffer - The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951)
   Karen Horney - Our Inner Conflicts (1945)
   William James - Principles of Psychology (1890)
   Carl Jung - The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (1953)
   Daniel Kahneman - Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)
   Alfred Kinsey - Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953)
   RD Laing - The Divided Self (1959)
   Abraham Maslow - The Farther Reaches of Human Nature (1970)
   Stanley Milgram - Obedience To Authority (1974)
   Walter Mischel - The Marshmallow Test (2014)
   Leonard Mlodinow - Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (2012)
   IP Pavlov - Conditioned Reflexes (1927)
   Fritz Perls - Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality (1951)
   Jean Piaget - The Language and Thought of the Child (1966)
   Steven Pinker - The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (2002)
   VS Ramachandran - Phantoms in the Brain (1998)
   Carl Rogers - On Becoming a Person (1961)
   Oliver Sacks - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1970)
   Barry Schwartz - The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less (2004)
   Martin Seligman - Authentic Happiness (2002)
   BF Skinner - Beyond Freedom & Dignity (1953)
   Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen - Difficult Conversations (2000)
   William Styron - Darkness Visible (1990)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Psychology Classics,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:A human being is a deciding being. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
2:Despair is suffering without meaning. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
3:Success is total self-acceptance ... ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
4:Happiness must ensue. It cannot be pursued ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
5:What is to give light must endure burning. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
6:Happiness cannot be pursued; it must ensue. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
7:The last freedom is choosing your attitude. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
8:Fear may come true that which one is afraid of. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
9:The salvation of man is through love and in love. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
10:Decisions, not conditions, determine what a man is. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
11:We needed to stop asking about the meaning of life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
12:God is the partner of your most intimate soliloquies ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
13:It is the pursuit of happiness that thwarts happiness. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
14:There are only two races, the decent and the indecent. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
15:You don't create your mission in life - you detect it. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
16:Between stimulus and response is the freedom to choose. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
17:I do the unpleasant tasks before I do the pleasant ones. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
18:To suffer unecessarily is masochistic rather than heroic. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
19:Ultimate freedom is a man's right to choose his attitude. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
20:Man's inner strength may raise him above his outward fate. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
21:Every human being has the freedom to change at any instant. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
22:It is always important to have something yet to do in life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
23:No one can take away my freedom to choose how I will react. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
24:Our greatest freedom is the freedom to choose our attitude. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
25:The last of the human freedoms is to choose one's attitudes. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
26:Love goes very far beyond the physical person of the beloved. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
27:Man's search for meaning is the chief motivation of his life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
28:Set me like a seal upon thy heart, love is as strong as death. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
29:What you have experienced, no power on earth can take from you. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
30:When a man cannot find meaning, he numbs himself with pleasure. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
31:Either belief in God is unconditional or it is no belief at all. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
32:One can choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
33:The meaning of my life is to help others find meaning in theirs. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
34:An abnormal reaction to an abnormal situation is normal behavior. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
35:Having been is also a kind of being, and perhaps the surest kind. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
36:Love is the ultimate and the highest goal to which man can aspire. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
37:Our main motivation for living is our will to find meaning in life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
38:The angels are lost in perpetual contemplation of an infinite glory. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
39:The existential vacuum manifests itself mainly in a state of boredom. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
40:It said to me, &
41:Pain is only bearable if we know it will end, not if we deny it exists. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
42:The more one forgets one’s own self, the more human the person becomes. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
43:The quest for meaning is the key to mental health and human flourishing ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
44:Life can be pulled by goals just as surely as it can be pushed by drives. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
45:Man can only find meaning for his existence in something outside himself. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
46:Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
47:It is a peculiarity of man that he can only live by looking to the future. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
48:Humor was another of the soul's weapons in the fight for self-preservation. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
49:Those who have a &
50:And I quoted from Nietzsche: That which does not kill me, makes me stronger. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
51:If there is meaning in life at all, then there must be meaning in suffering. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
52:The meaning of our existence is not invented by ourselves, but rather detected. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
53:The point is not what we expect from life, but rather what life expects from us. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
54:Even when it is not fully attained, we become better by striving for a higher goal. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
55:Man's last freedom is his freedom to choose how he will react in any given situation ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
56:Challenging the meaning of life is the truest expression of the state of being human. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
57:I do not forget any good deed done to me & I do not carry a grudge for a bad one. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
58:It isn't the past which holds us back, it's the future; and how we undermine it, today. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
59:Life is never made unbearable by circumstances, but only by lack of meaning and purpose. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
60:When a person can’t find a deep sense of meaning, they distract themselves with pleasure. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
61:When we are no longer able to change a situation - we are challenged to change ourselves. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
62:Love is the only way to grasp another human being in the innermost core of his personality ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
63:It is not freedom from conditions, but it is freedom to take a stand toward the conditions. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
64:Live as if you were living a second time, and as though you had acted wrongly the first time. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
65:No one can become fully aware of the very essence of another human being unless he loves him. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
66:Since Auschwitz we know what man is capable of. And since Hiroshima we know what is at stake. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
67:The one thing you can't take away from me is the way I choose to respond to what you do to me. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
68:The last of human freedoms - the ability to chose one's attitude in a given set of circumstances. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
69:When we are not any lengthier capable to alter a predicament, we're challenged to alter ourselves ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
70:Human kindness can be found in all groups, even those which as a whole it would be easy to condemn. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
71:Somewhere I heard a victorious "Yes" in answer to my question of the existence of ultimate purpose. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
72:At any moment, man must decide, for better or for worse, what will be the monument of his existence. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
73:Man’s main concern is not to gain pleasure or to avoid pain but rather to see a meaning in his life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
74:It is this spiritual freedom - which cannot be taken away - that makes life meaningful and purposeful. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
75:I recommend that the Statue of Liberty be supplemented by a Statue of Responsibility on the west coast. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
76:Everywhere man is confronted with fate , with a chance of achieving something through his own suffering. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
77:For the world is in a bad state, but everything will become still worse unless each of us does his best. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
78:Woe to him who saw no more sense in his life, no aim, no purpose, and therefore no point in carrying on. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
79:Life asks of every individual a contribution, and it is up to that individual to discover what it should be ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
80:Now, it is my contention that the deneuroticization of humanity requires a rehumanization of psychotherapy. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
81:Life requires of man spiritual elasticity, so that he may temper his efforts to the chances that are offered. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
82:Man ultimately decides for himself! And in the end, education must be education towards the ability to decide ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
83:A man who could not see the end of his"provisional existence" was not able to aim at an ultimate goal in life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
84:In his creative work the artist is dependent on sources and resources deriving from the spiritual unconscious. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
85:Each of us carries a unique spark of the divine, and each of us is also an inseparable part of the web of life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
86:Nothing is likely to help a person overcome or endure troubles than the consciousness of having a task in life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
87:When a man finds that it is his destiny to suffer... his unique opportunity lies in the way he bears his burden. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
88:We had to learn... that it did not really matter what we expected from life but rather what life expected from us. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
89:In some ways suffering ceases to be suffering at the moment it finds a meaning, such as the meaning of a sacrifice. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
90:Success, like happiness, is the unexpected side effect of one's personal dedication to a cause greater than oneself. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
91:Man is capable of changing the world for the better if possible, and of changing himself for the better if necessary. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
92:Self-actualization cannot be attained if it is made an end in itself, but only as a side effect of self-transcendence. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
93:Sleep [is like] a dove which has landed near one's hand and stays there as long as one does not pay any attention to it. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
94:Ultimately, man should not ask what the meaning of his life is, but rather he must recognize that it is he who is asked. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
95:In times of crisis, people reach for meaning. Meaning is strength. Our survival may depend on our seeking and finding it. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
96:There are two races of men in this world but only these two: the race of the decent man and the race of the indecent man. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
97:It is true that we can see the therapist as a technician only if we have first viewed the patient as some sort of machine. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
98:A sound philosophy of life, I think, may be the most valuable asset for a psychiatrist to have when he is treating a patient. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
99:No man should judge unless he asks himself in absolute honesty whether in a similar situation he might not have done the same. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
100:A man's concern, even his despair, over the worthwhileness of life is an existential distress but by no means a mental disease. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
101:If we take a man as he is, we make him worse, but if we take man as he should be we make him capable of becoming what he can be. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
102:A life of short duration... could be so rich in joy and love that it could contain more meaning than a life lasting eighty years. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
103:Man is not fully conditioned and determined but rather determines himself whether he gives in to conditions or stands up to them. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
104:Our greatest human freedom is that, despite whatever our physical situation is in life, WE ARE ALWAYS FREE TO CHOOSE OUR THOUGHTS! ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
105:We can discover this meaning in life in three different ways: 1. by doing a deed; 2. by experiencing a value; and 3. by suffering. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
106:But there was no need to be ashamed of tears, for tears bore witness that a man had the greatest of courage, the courage to suffer. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
107:It is here that we encounter the central theme of existentialism: to live is to suffer, to survive is to find meaning in the suffering. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
108:As such, I also bear witness to the unexpected extent to which man is capable of defying and braving even the worst conditions conceivable, ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
109:Suffering presents us with a challenge: to find our goals and purpose in our lives that make even the worst situation worth living through. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
110:Happiness cannot be attained by wanting to be happy - it must come as the unintended consequence of working for a goal greater than oneself. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
111:Once an individual's search for meaning is successful, it not only renders him happy but also gives him the capability to cope with suffering ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
112:Each man is questioned by life; and he can only answer to life by answering for his own life; to life he can only respond by being responsible. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
113:Forces beyond your control can take away everything you possess except one thing, your freedom to choose how you will respond to the situation. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
114:I never would have made it if I could not have laughed. It lifted me momentarily out of this horrible situation, just enough to make it livable. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
115:The attempt to develop a sense of humor and to see things in a humorous light is some kind of a trick learned while mastering the art of living. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
116:Such a value system might be responsible for the fact that the burden of unavoidable unhappiness is increased by unhappiness about being unhappy. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
117:Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
118:I understood how a man who has nothing left in this world still may know bliss, be it only for a brief moment, in the contemplation of his beloved. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
119:No one can take from us the ability to choose our attitudes toward the circumstances in which we find ourselves. This is the last of human freedoms. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
120:The more one forgives himself - by giving himself to a cause to serve or another person to love - the more human he is and the more he actualizes himself. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
121:The struggle for existence is a struggle &
122:As the struggle for survival has subsided, the question has emerged: survival for what? Ever more people have the means to live, but no meaning to live for. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
123:I became acquainted with those martyrs whose behavior in camp, whose suffering and death, bore witness to the fact that the last inner freedom cannot be lost. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
124:Being tolerant does not mean that I share another ones belief. But it does mean that I acknowledge another ones right to believe, and obey, his own conscience. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
125:Life ultimately means taking the responsibility to find the right answer to its problems and to fulfill the tasks which it constantly sets for each individual. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
126:Being tolerant does not mean that I share another one's belief. But it does mean that I acknowledge another one's right to believe, and obey, his own conscience. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
127:Then I grasped the meaning of the greatest secret that human poetry and human thought and belief have to impart: The salvation of man is through love and in love. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
128:Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of human freedoms - to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
129:Everything can be taken from a man but one thing; the last of the human freedoms - to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
130:The crowning experience of all, for the homecoming man, is the wonderful feeling that, after all he has suffered, there is nothing he need fear anymore—except his God. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
131:These tasks, and therefore the meaning of life, differ from man to man, and from moment to moment. Thus it is impossible to define the meaning in life in a general way. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
132:The last of human freedoms - the ability to chose one's attitude especially an attitude of gratitude in a given set of circumstances especially in difficult circumstances. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
133:Everything can be taken from a man or a woman but one thing: the last of human freedoms to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
134:The one thing you cant take away from me is the way I choose to respond to what you do to me. The last of ones freedoms is to choose ones attitude in any given circumstance. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
135:It is well known that humor, more than anything else in the human make-up, can afford an aloofness and an ability to rise above any situation, even if only for a few seconds. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
136:There is nothing in the world, I venture to say, that would so effectively help one to survive even the worst conditions as the knowledge that there is a meaning in one's life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
137:Everything can be taken away from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedom - to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
138:We dislike talking about our experiences. No explanations are needed for those who have been inside, and the others will understand neither how we felt then nor how we feel now. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
139:... to think of ourselves as those who were being questioned by life-daily and hourly. Our answer must consist, not in talk and meditation, but in right action and in right conduct. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
140:As for the concept of collective guilt, I personally think that it is totally unjustified to hold one person responsible for the behavior of another person or a collective of persons. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
141:Man does not simply exist but always decides what his existence will be, what he will become the next moment. By the same token, every human being has the freedom to change at any instant. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
142:Fundamentally, therefore, any man can, even under such circumstances, decide what shall become of him—mentally and spiritually. He may retain his human dignity even in a concentration camp. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
143:For what then matters is to bear witness to the uniquely human potential at its best, which is to transform a personal tragedy into a triumph, to turn one’s predicament into a human achievement. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
144:The transitoriness of our existence in now way makes it meaningless. But it does constitute our responsibleness; for everything hinges upon our realizing the essentially transitory possibilities. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
145:This is the core of the human spirit ... If we can find something to live for - if we can find some meaning to put at the center of our lives - even the worst kind of suffering becomes bearable. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
146:Logotherapy . . . considers man as a being whose main concern consists in fulfilling a meaning and in actualizing values, rather than in the mere gratification and satisfaction of drives and instincts. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
147:If there is meaning in life at all, then there must be a meaning in suffering. Suffering is an ineradicable part of life, even as fate and death. Without suffering and death human life cannot be complete. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
148:Just as a small fire is extinguished by the storm whereas a large fire is enhanced by it - likewise a weak faith is weakened by predicament and catastrophes whereas a strong faith is strengthened by them. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
149:The incurable sufferer is given very little opportunity to be proud of his suffering and to consider it ennobling rather than degrading" so that "he is not only unhappy, but also ashamed of being unhappy. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
150:Everyone has his own specific vocation or mission in life . . . Therein he cannotbe replaced, nor can his life be repeated. Thus, everyone's task is as unique as ishis specific opportunity to implement it. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
151:Sunday neurosis, that kind of depression which afflicts people who become aware of the lack of content in their lives when the rush of the busy week is over and the void within themselves becomes manifest. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
152:What is demanded of man is not, as some existential philosophers teach, to endure the meaninglessness of life, but rather to bear his incapacity to grasp its unconditional meaningfulness in rational terms. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
153:I try to do everything as soon as possible, and not at the last moment. This ensures that, when I am overburdened with work, I will not face the added pressure of knowing that something is still to be done. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
154:It is a peculiarity of man that he can only live by looking to the future... And this is his salvation in the most difficult moments of his existence, although he sometimes has to force his mind to the task. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
155:At such a moment, it is not the physical pain which hurts the most (and this applies to adults as much as to punished children); it is the mental agony caused by the injustice, the unreasonableness of it all. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
156:We cannot, after all, judge a biography by its length, by the number of pages in it; we must judge by the richness of the contents... Sometimes the &
157:Life is not primarily a quest for pleasure, as Freud believed, or a quest for power, as Alfred Adler taught, but a quest for meaning. The greatest task for any person is to find meaning in his or her own life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
158:View life as a series of movie frames, the ending and meaning may not be apparent until the very end of the movie, and yet, each of the hundreds of individual frames has meaning within the context of the whole movie. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
159:Thus, human existence-at least as long as it has not been neurotically distorted-is always directed to something, or someone, other than itself, be it a meaning to fulfill or another human being to encounter lovingly. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
160:Here lies the chance for a man either to make use of or to forgo the opportunities of attaining the moral values that a difficult situation may afford him. And this decides whether he is worthy of his sufferings or not. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
161:For the meaning of life differs from man to man, from day to day and from hour to hour. What matters, therefore, is not the meaning of life in general but rather the specific meaning of a person's life at a given moment. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
162:Sports allow men to build up situations of emergency. What he then demands of himself is unnecessary achievement - and unnecessary sacrifice. He artificially creates the tension that he has been spared by affluent society. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
163:There is also purpose in life which is almost barren of both creation and enjoyment and which admits of but one possibility of high moral behavior: namely, in man's attitude to his existence, an existence restricted by external forces. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
164:But my mind clung to my wife's image, imagining it with an uncanny acuteness. I heard her answering me, saw her smile, her frank and encouraging look. Real or not, her look then was more luminous than the sun which was beginning to rise. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
165:How can we dare to predict the behavior of man? We may predict the movements of a machine, of an automaton; more than this, we many even try to predict the mechanisms or "dynamisms" of the human psyche as well. But man is more than psyche. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
166:You can take away my wife, you can take away my children, you can strip me of my clothes and my freedom, but there is one thing no person can ever take away from me - and that is my freedom to choose how I will react to what happens to me! ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
167:Freedom is in danger of degenerating into mere arbitrariness unless it is lived in terms of responsibleness. That is why I recommend that the Statue of Liberty on the East Coast be supplemented by a Statue of Responsibility on the West Coast. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
168:I am absolutely convinced that the gas chambers of Auschwitz, Treblinka, and Maidanek were ultimately prepared not in some ministry or other in Berlin, but rather at the desks and in the lecture halls of nihilistic scientists and philosophers. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
169:For success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue, and it only does so as the unintended side-effect of one's personal dedication to a cause greater than oneself or as the by-product of one's surrender to a person other than oneself. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
170:Ultimately, we are not subject to the conditions that confront us; rather, these conditions are subject to our decision ... we must decide whether we will face up or give in, whether or not we will let ourselves be determined by the conditions. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
171:What man actually needs is not a tensionless state but rather the striving and struggling for some goal worthy of him. What he needs is not the discharge of tension at any cost, but the call of a potential meaning waiting to be fulfilled by him. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
172:Love goes very far beyond the physical person of the beloved. It finds its deepest meaning in its spiritual being, his inner self. Whether or not he is actually present, whether or not he is still alive at all, ceases somehow to be of importance. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
173:View your life from your funeral, looking back at your life experiences, what have you accomplished? What would you have wanted to accomplish but didn't? What were the happy moments? What were the sad? What would you do again, and what you wouldn't ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
174:What was really needed was a fundamental change in our attitude toward life. We had to learn ourselves and, furthermore, we had to teach the despairing men, that it did not really matter what we expected from life, but rather what life expected from us. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
175:Instead of possibilities, I have realities in my past, not only the reality of work done and of love loved, but of sufferings bravely suffered. These sufferings are even the things of which I am most proud, though these are things which cannot inspire envy. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
176:A man who becomes conscious of the responsibility he bears toward a human being who affectionately waits for him, or to an unfinished work, will never be able to throw away his life. He knows the "why" for his existence, and will be able to bear almost any "how." ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
177:One should not search for an abstract meaning of life ... Life can be made meaningful in a threefold way: first, through what we give to life ... second, by what we take from the world ... third, through the stand we take toward a fate we no longer can change ... ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
178:Everyone has his own specific vocation or mission in life; everyone must carry out a concrete assignment that demands fulfillment. Therein he cannot be replaced, nor can his life be repeated, thus, everyone's task is unique as his specific opportunity to implement it. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
179:I want you to listen to what your conscience commands you to do and go on to carry it out to the best of your knowledge. Then you will live to see that in the long run- in the long run, I say! - success will follow you precisely because you had forgotten to think of it. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
180:Most important, however, is the third avenue to meaning in life: even the helpless victim of a hopeless situation, facing a fate he cannot change, may rise above himself, may grow beyond himself, and by so doing change himself. He may turn a personal tragedy into a triumph. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
181:Our generation is realistic, for we have come to know man as he really is. After all, man is that being who invented the gas chambers of Auschwitz; however, he is also that being who entered those gas chambers upright, with the Lord's Prayer or the Shema Yisrael on his lips. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
182:Our attitude towards what has happened to us in life is the important thing to recognize. Once hopeless, my life is now hope-full, but it did not happen overnight. The last of human freedoms, to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, is to choose one's own way. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
183:Pain from problems and disappointments, etc., is inevitable in life, but suffering is a choice determined by whether you choose to compare your experience and pain to something better and therefore feel unlucky and bitter or to something worse and therefore feel lucky and grateful! ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
184:I would say that our patients never really despair because of any suffering in itself! Instead, their despair stems in each instance from a doubt as to whether suffering is meaningful. Man is ready and willing to shoulder any suffering as soon and as long as he can see a meaning in it. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
185:Austrian public-opinion pollsters recently reported that those held in highest esteem by most of the people interviewed are neither the great artists nor the great scientists, neither the great statesmen nor the great sport figures, but those who master a hard lot with their heads held high. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
186:Man's search for meaning is the primary motivation in his life and not a "secondary rationalization" of instinctual drives. This meaning is unique and specific in that it must and can be fulfilled by him alone; only then does it achieve a significance which will satisfy his own will to meaning. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
187:Ironically enough, in the same way that fear brings to pass what one is afraid of, likewise a forced intention makes impossible what one forcibly wishes... Pleasure is, and must remain, a side-effect or by-product, and is destroyed and spoiled to the degree to which it is made a goal in itself. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
188:Only to the extent that someone is living out this self transcendence of human existence, is he truly human or does he become his true self. He becomes so, not by concerning himself with his self's actualization, but by forgetting himself and giving himself, overlooking himself and focusing outward. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
189:[Speaking of his experience in a concentration camp:] As we said before, any attempt to restore a man's inner strength in the camp had first to succeed in showing him some future goal... Woe to him who saw no more sense in his life, no aim, no purpose, and therefore no point in carrying on. He was soon lost. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
190:There are some authors who contend that meanings and values are "nothing but defense mechanisms, reaction formations and sublimations." But as for myself, I would not be willing to live merely for the sake of my "defense mechanisms," nor would I be ready to die merely for the sake of my "reaction formations. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
191:If architects want to strengthen a decrepit arch, they increase the load that is laid upon it, for thereby the parts are joined more firmly together. So, if therapists wish to foster their patients' mental health, they should not be afraid to increase that load through a reorientation toward the meaning of one's life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
192:In psychiatry there is a certain condition known as delusion of reprieve. The condemned man, immediately before his execution, gets the illusion that he might be reprieved at the very last minute. No one could yet grasp the fact that everything would be taken away. all we possessed, literally, was our naked existence. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
193:Usually, to be sure, man considers only the stubble field of transitoriness and overlooks the full granaries of the past, wherein he had salvaged once and for all his deeds, his joys and also his sufferings. Nothing can be undone, and nothing can be done away with. I should say having been is the surest kind of being. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
194:Even though conditions such as lack of sleep, insufficient food and various mental stresses may suggest that the inmates were bound to react in certain ways, in the final analysis it becomes clear that the sort of person the prisoner became was the result of an inner decision, and not the result of camp influences alone. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
195:Most men in a concentration camp believed that the real opportunities of life had passed. Yet, in reality, there was an opportunity and a challenge. One could make a victory of those experiences, turning life into an inner triumph, or one could ignore the challenge and simply vegetate, as did a majority of the prisoners. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
196:When a man finds that it is his destiny to suffer, he will have to accept his suffering as his task. . . . He will have to acknowledge the fact that even in suffering he is unique and alone in the universe. No one can relieve him of his suffering or suffer in his place. His unique opportunity lies in the way in which he bears his burden. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
197:Those who know how close the connection is between the state of mind of a man-his courage and hope, or lack of them-and the state of immunity of his body will understand that the sudden loss of hope and courage can have a deadly effect. The ultimate cause of my friend's death was that the expected liberation did not come and he was severely disappointed. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
198:For the first time in my life I saw the truth as it is set into song by so many poets, proclaimed as the final wisdom by so many thinkers. The truth - that Love is the ultimate and highest goal to which man can aspire. Then I grasped the meaning of the greatest secret that human poetry and human thought and belief have to impart: The salvation of man is through love and in love. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
199:The way in which a man accepts his fate and all the suffering it entails, the way in which he takes up his cross, gives him ample opportunity — even under the most difficult circumstances — to add a deeper meaning to his life. It may remain brave, dignified and unselfish. Or in the bitter fight for self preservation he may forget his human dignity and become no more than an animal ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
200:We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread. They may have been few in number, but they offer sufficient proof that everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms - to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
201:Because of social pressure, individualism is rejected by most people in favor of conformity. Thus the individual relies mainly upon the actions of others and neglects the meaning of his own personal life. Hence he sees his own life as meaningless and falls into the “existential vacuum” feeling inner void. Progressive automation causes increasing alcoholism, juvenile delinquency, and suicide. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
202:. . . nothing could touch the strength of my love, and the thoughts of my beloved. Had I known then that my wife was dead, I think that I still would have given myself, undisturbed by that knowledge, to the contemplation of that image, and that my mental conversation with her would have been just as vivid and just as satisfying. "Set me like a seal upon thy heart, love is as strong as death." ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
203:To draw an analogy: a man's suffering is similar to the behavior of a gas. If a certain quantity of gas is pumped into an empty chamber, it will fill the chamber completely and evenly, no matter how big the chamber. Thus suffering completely fills the human soul and conscious mind, no matter whether the suffering is great or little. Therefore the "size" of human suffering is absolutely relative. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
204:As a professor in two fields, neurology and psychiatry, I am fully aware of the extent to which man is subject to biological, psychological and sociological conditions. But in addition to being a professor in two fields I am a survivor of four camps - concentration camps, that is - and as such I also bear witness to the unexpected extent to which man is capable of defying and braving even the worst conditions conceivable. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
205:I had wanted simply to convey to the reader by way of concrete example that life holds a potential meaning under any conditions, even the most miserable ones. And I thought that if the point were demonstrated in a situation as extreme as that in a concentration camp, my book might gain a hearing. I therefore felt responsible for writing down what I had gone through, for I thought it might be helpful to people who are prone to despair. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
206:To be sure, man's search for meaning may arouse inner tension rather than inner equilibrium. However, precisely such tension is an indispensable prerequisite of mental health. There is nothing in the world, I venture to say, that would so effectively help one to survive even the worst conditions as the knowledge that there is a meaning in one's life. There is much wisdom in the words of Nietzsche: "He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
207:I understood how a man who has nothing left in this world may still know bliss, be it only for a brief moment, in the contemplation of his beloved. In a position of utter desolation, when a man cannot express himself in positive action, when his only achievement may consist in enduring his sufferings in the right way - an honorable way - in such a position man can, through loving contemplation of the image he carries of his beloved, achieve fulfillment. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
208:No one can become fully aware of the very essence of another human being until he loves him. By his love he is enabled to see the essential traits and features in the beloved person; and even more, he sees that which is potential in him, which is not yet actualized. Furthermore, by his love, the loving person enables the beloved person to actualize these potentialities. By making him aware of what he can be and what he should become, he makes these potentialities come true. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
209:Consider a movie: it consists of thousands upon thousands of individual pictures, and each of them makes sense and carries a meaning, yet the meaning of the whole film cannot be seen before its last sequence is shown. However, we cannot understand the whole film without having first understood each of its components, each of the individual pictures. Isn't it the same with life? Doesn't the final meaning of life, too, reveal itself, it at all, only at its end, on the verge of death? ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
210:It did not really matter what we expected from life, but rather what life expected from us. We needed to stop asking about the meaning of life, and instead to think of ourselves as those who were being questioned by life—daily and hourly. Our answer must consist, not in talk and meditation, but in right action and in right conduct. Life ultimately means taking the responsibility to find the right answer to its problems and to fulfill the tasks which it constantly sets for each individual. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
211:We must never forget that we may also find meaning in life even when confronted with a hopeless situation, when facing a fate that cannot be changed. For what then matters is to bear witness to the uniquely human potential at its best, which is to transform a personal tragedy into a triumph, to turn one's predicament into a human achievement. When we are no longer able to change a situation-just think of an incurable disease such as inoperable cancer-we are challenged to change ourselves. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
212:To the European, it is a characteristic of the American culture that, again and again, one is commanded and ordered to &
213:A human being is not one thing among others; things determine each other, but man is ultimately self-determining. What he becomes - within the limits of endowment and environment- he has made out of himself. In the concentration camps, for example, in this living laboratory and on this testing ground, we watched and witnessed some of our comrades behave like swine while others behaved like saints. Man has both potentialities within himself; which one is actualized depends on decisions but not on conditions. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
214:In a last violent protest against the hopelessness of imminent death, I sensed my spirit piercing through the enveloping gloom. I felt it transcend that hopeless, meaningless world, and from somewhere I heard a victorious "Yes" in answer to my question of the existence of an ultimate purpose. At that moment a light was lit in a distant farmhouse, which stood on the horizon as if painted there, in the midst of the miserable gray of a dawning morning in Bavaria. "Et lux in tenebris lucet"-and the light shineth in the darkness. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
215:... being human always points, and is directed, to something, or someone, other than oneself—be it meaning to fulfill or another human being to encounter. The more one forgets himself—by giving himself to a cause to serve or another person to love—the more human he is and the more he actualizes himself... . What is called self-actualization is not an attainable aim at all, for the simple reason that the more one would strive for it, the more he would miss it. In other words, self-actualization is possible only as a side-effect of self-transcendence. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
216:What will it matter to him if he notices that he is growing old? Has he any reason to envy the young people whom he sees, or wax nostalgic over his own lost youth? What reasons has he to envy a young person? For the possibilities that a young person has, the future which is in store for him? "No, thank you," he will think. "Instead of possibilities, I have realities in my past, not only the reality of work done and love loved, but of sufferings bravely suffered. These sufferings are even the things of which I am most proud, though these things are things that cannot inspire envy." ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
217:I shall never forget how I was roused one night by the groans of a fellow prisoner, who threw himself about in his sleep, obviously having a horrible nightmare. Since I had always been especially sorry for people who suffered from fearful dreams or deliria, I wanted to wake the poor man. Suddenly I drew back the hand which was ready to shake him, frightened at the thing I was about to do. At that moment I became intensely conscious of the fact that no dream, no matter how horrible, could be as bad as the reality of the camp which surrounded us, and to which I was about to recall him. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove

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1:What is to give light must endure the burning.
   ~ Viktor Frankl,
2:What is to give light must endure burning. VIKTOR FRANKL ~ Anonymous,
3:Man is pushed by drives, but he is pulled by values — Viktor Frankl ~ Ryan Holiday,
4:One of the most inspirational people I have ever known is Viktor Frankl, ~ Stephen R Covey,
5:What is to give light must endure burning.” It’s by a writer named Viktor Frankl. ~ Damien Echols,
6:When we can no longer change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves. ~ Viktor Frankl,
7:Our perspective toward life is our final and ultimate freedom. - Viktor Frankl quoted by Desmond Tutu ~ Dalai Lama XIV,
8:Between stimulus and response, there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.
   ~ Viktor Frankl,
9:U čoveku se kriju obe mogućnosti: svinja i svetac. Šta će neko ostvariti zavisi od njegovih odluka, a ne od uslova."
Viktor Frankl: "Zašto se niste ubili ~ Viktor E Frankl,
10:The existential vacuum manifests itself mainly in a state of boredom. —VIKTOR FRANKL, Auschwitz survivor and founder of Logotherapy, Man’s Search for Meaning ~ Timothy Ferriss,
11:What you alone can contribute, no one else can contribute. Viktor Frankl said we don’t invent our mission; we detect it. It’s within us waiting to be realized. ~ Stephen R Covey,
12:you. Viktor Frankl, the founder of Logotherapy, wrote that the greatest need of human beings is for a sense of meaning and purpose in life, for a goal to work toward. ~ Brian Tracy,
13:should read, the book that teaches us that we cannot control the circumstances around us, all we can control is our attitude—Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl. ~ Simon Sinek,
14:Man’s Search for Meaning: “No instinct tells him what he has to do, and no tradition tells him what he ought to do; sometimes he does not even know what he wishes to do.” ~ Viktor Frankl,
15:They [Nazi captors]had more liberty, more options to choose from in their environment; but he [Viktor Frankl] had more freedom, more internal power to exercise his options. ~ Stephen Covey,
16:Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way. —VIKTOR FRANKL ~ Bob Proctor,
17:They [Nazi captors]had more liberty, more options to choose from in their environment; but he [Viktor Frankl] had more freedom, more internal power to exercise his options. ~ Stephen R Covey,
18:Viktor Frankl the Concentration camp survivalist said no matter how much mental or physical abuse had been given nobody could cause him to think something he didn't want to think ~ Bob Proctor,
19:Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way. —Viktor Frankl, ~ Tom Peters,
20:Don’t aim at success-the more you aim at it and make it a target, the more you are going to miss it. For success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue. – Viktor Frankl ~ Viktor E Frankl,
21:Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms–to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.” ~Viktor Frankl ~ Steven Konkoly,
22:Philosophy is simply asking us to pay careful attention and to strive to be more than a pawn. As Viktor Frankl puts it in The Will to Meaning, “Man is pushed by drives but pulled by values. ~ Ryan Holiday,
23:Viktor Frankl said the Concentration camp survivalist said no matter how much mental or physical abuse had been given nobody could cause him to think about anything he didn't want to think about ~ Bob Proctor,
24:Viktor Frankl, un psihiatru evreu trimis de nazisti intr-un lagar de concentrare, in al Doilea Razboi Mondial, spunea: “Omul este dispus sa rabde orice suferinta atata timp cat vede un sens in ea. ~ Dalai Lama XIV,
25:Man does not simply exist but always decides what his existence will be, what he will become the next moment. By the same token, every human being has the freedom to change at any instant. —VIKTOR FRANKL ~ Anonymous,
26:Man does not simply exist but always decides what his existence will be, what he will become the next moment. By the same token, every human being has the freedom to change at any instant. —VIKTOR FRANKL ~ Ryan Holiday,
27:Suffering ceases to be suffering in some way at the moment it finds a meaning.” — Viktor Frankl (psychiatrist who survived a Nazi concentration camp and wrote about his experiences in Man’s Search for Meaning) ~ Doreen Virtue,
28:If Adler’s theory of human action relates to power, concentration camp survivor Viktor Frankl’s brand of existential psychology, “logotherapy,” posits that the human species is uniquely made to seek meaning. ~ Tom Butler Bowdon,
29:Viktor Frankl perhaps captured it best: “Success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue, and it only does so as the unintended side-effect of one’s personal dedication to a cause greater than oneself. ~ Frederic Laloux,
30:Viktor Frankl the Concentration camp survivalist said no matter how much mental or physical abuse had been given nobody could cause him to think about anything he didn't want to think about”


― Bob Proctor ~ Bob Proctor,
31:Half a century ago, the Austrian psychiatrist Viktor Frankl wrote that happiness cannot be attained by wanting to be happy - it must come as the unintended consequence of working for a goal greater than oneself. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
32:yesterday in the airport I spent ten minutes expounding on the virtues of Bethenny Frankel from the New York season of the Real Housewives until I realized the person next to me had been talking about a book by Viktor Frankl. ~ Jen Lancaster,
33:A St. Louis oncology nurse quoted Holocaust survivor and psychiatrist Viktor Frankl to States News Service in 2012: “ ‘What is to give light must endure burning.’ I think people who care for others understand. Caregiving is painful. ~ Alexandra Robbins,
34:Humor was another of the soul's weapons in the fight for self-preservation. It is well known that humor, more than anything else in the human make-up, can afford an aloofness and an ability to rise above any situation, even if only for a few seconds. ~ Viktor Frankl,
35:Viktor Frankl, the psychiatrist and Nazi concentration camp survivor who wrote the classic Man’s Search for Meaning, drew a similar social-psychological conclusion: deceitful, inauthentic individual existence is the precursor to social totalitarianism. ~ Jordan Peterson,
36:Most-gifted or recommended books? Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl The Fourth Turning by William Strauss (Also, Generations by William Strauss, which was gifted to Tony by Bill Clinton) Mindset by Carol Dweck (for parenting) As a Man Thinketh by ~ Timothy Ferriss,
37:Viktor Frankl, the psychiatrist and Nazi concentration camp survivor who wrote the classic Man’s Search for Meaning, drew a similar social-psychological conclusion: deceitful, inauthentic individual existence is the precursor to social totalitarianism. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
38:The Will to Meaning Man’s search for meaning is the primary motivation in his life... This meaning is unique and specific in that it must and can be fulfilled by him alone; only then does it achieve a significance which will satisfy his own will to meaning. ~ Viktor Frankl,
39:Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl The Fourth Turning by William Strauss (Also, Generations by William Strauss, which was gifted to Tony by Bill Clinton) Mindset by Carol Dweck (for parenting) As a Man Thinketh by James Allen (see Shay Carl, page 441) ~ Timothy Ferriss,
40:Messages “For success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue, and it only does so as the unintended side-effect of one’s dedication to a cause greater than oneself or as the by-product of one’s surrender to a person other than oneself.” – Viktor Frankl ~ Brian Tracy,
41:According to Viktor Frankl, a person finds identity only to the extent that “he commits himself to something beyond himself, to a cause greater than himself.”4 The meaning of our lives emerges in the surrender of ourselves to an adventure of becoming who we are not yet. ~ Brennan Manning,
42:No matter how you really feel at the moment or what is happening in your life, resolve to remain cheerful and upbeat. As Viktor Frankl wrote in his bestselling book Man’s Search for Meaning, “The last of the human freedoms [is] to choose one’s attitude in any given set of cricumstances. ~ Brian Tracy,
43:Viktor Frankl tells us in Man’s Search for Meaning that “between stimulus and response, there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” And in that growth and freedom lies the heartbeat of a life well lived. Question ~ Jonathan Fields,
44:A man who becomes conscious of the responsibility he bears toward a human being who affectionately waits for him, or to an unfinished work, will never be able to throw away his life. He knows the 'why' for his existence, and will be able to bear almost any 'how'.
   ~ Viktor Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning,
45:I agree with Viktor Frankl that a sense of life meaning ensues but cannot be deliberately pursued: life meaning is always a derivative phenomenon that materializes when we have transcended ourselves, when we have forgotten ourselves and become absorbed in someone (or something) outside ourselves. ~ Irvin D Yalom,
46:The great psychologist Viktor Frankl, survivor of three concentration camps, found presumptuousness in the age-old question: “What is the meaning of life?” As though it is someone else’s responsibility to tell you. Instead, he said, the world is asking you that question. And it’s your job to answer with your actions. In ~ Ryan Holiday,
47:I was drawn to authors and others who were explicitly outside of the Christian tradition . . . Such as Joseph Campbell (The Power of Myth), Robert Bly (Iron John), Don Miguel Ruiz (The Four Agreements), and Sam Keen (Fire in the Belly). I also re-read Viktor Frankl’s classic Man’s Search for Meaning (which my daughter Lizz and my wife Sue also read while Lizz was away). ~ Peter Enns,
48:Viktor Frankl, the Austrian psychologist, summarized it beautifully in the preface to his book Man’s Search for Meaning: “Don’t aim at success—the more you aim at it and make it a target, the more you are going to miss it. For success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue…as the unintended side-effect of one’s personal dedication to a course greater than oneself. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
49:Viktor Frankl's timeless formula for survival. One of the classic psychiatric texts of our time, Man's Search for Meaning is a meditation on the irreducible gift of one's own counsel in the face of great suffering, as well as a reminder of the responsibility each of us owes in valuing the community of our humanity. There are few wiser, kinder, or more comforting challenges than Frankl's. ~ Patricia J Williams,
50:Viktor Frankl, a Holocaust survivor and the author of Man's Search for Meaning, wrote that human beings create meaning in three ways: thought their work, though their relationships, and by how they choose to meet unavoidable suffering. Every life brings hardship and trial, and every life also offers deep possibilities for meaningful work and love... I've learned that courage and compassion are two sides of the same coin. ~ Eric Greitens,
51:The great psychologist Viktor Frankl, survivor of three concentration camps, found presumptuousness in the age-old question: “What is the meaning of life?” As though it is someone else’s responsibility to tell you. Instead, he said, the world is asking you that question. And it’s your job to answer with your actions. In every situation, life is asking us a question, and our actions are the answer. Our job is simply to answer well. ~ Ryan Holiday,
52:Back to my midlife crisis. There is a line I had written down from Viktor Frankl’s memoir about surviving the Holocaust, Man’s Search for Meaning, that stopped me cold when I read it: “it did not really matter what we expected from life, but rather what life expected from us.” I had never thought about what life expected from me. I had only thought about what I expected from life. That was a book putter-downer. It was a look up at the sky and wonder Where the fuck have I been all my life? moment. ~ Chelsea Handler,
53:It is by being fully involved with every detail of our lives, whether good or bad, that we find happiness, not by trying to look for it directly. Viktor Frankl, the Austrian psychologist, summarized it beautifully in the preface to his book Man’s Search for Meaning:“Don’t aim at success—the more you aim at it and make it a target, the more you are going to miss it. For success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue…as the unintended side-effect of one’s personal dedication to a course greater than oneself. ~ Anonymous,
54:Anlam arayışı ve zorluklarla mücadele etmek. Özdeğerlendirme yaparken baktığım pencerelerden biri Dr. Viktor Frankl’in penceresidir. İnsanın Anlam Arayışı isimli kitabında der ki “İnsan stresten kaçmaz, insanın asıl kaçtığı şey anlamsızlıktır. Anlam bulduğumuz işlerde, çalıştığımızı bile fark etmeden çalışır, bu yolda verdiğimiz (hatta başka şartlarda stres diyebileceğimiz) mücadeleyle de övünürüz.” Bu tespit, karşılığında hiçbir şey beklemeden yaptığımız gönüllü faaliyetlerimizdeki sorgusuz emeğimizin motivasyonunu da açıklayabilir. ~ Anonymous,
55:Set aside a half hour to picture yourself at age ninety and to put yourself in the mind of ninety-year-old you. What does your life look like when you view it from that vantage point? What have you accomplished? What have you contributed? What are your regrets? This isn’t an easy exercise—neither intellectually nor emotionally. But it can be enormously valuable. And it can help you satisfy one of Viktor Frankl’s most powerful imperatives: “Live as if you were living for the second time and had acted as wrongly the first time as you are about to act now. ~ Daniel H Pink,
56:One day, naked and alone in a small room, he began to become aware of what he later called “the last of the human freedoms”—the freedom his Nazi captors could not take away. They could control his entire environment, they could do what they wanted to his body, but Viktor Frankl himself was a self-aware being who could look as an observer at his very involvement. His basic identity was intact. He could decide within himself how all of this was going to affect him. Between what happened to him, or the stimulus, and his response to it, was his freedom or power to choose that response. ~ Stephen R Covey,
57:I’ve spoken to people in Rwanda who survived the genocide. And I’ve spoken to people who’ve survived acts of God, like in Sri Lanka after the tsunami. And I’ve found that suffering usually draws people closer to God and gives them more faith. I think that the main driver in the human spirit is hope. Man can endure anything if he has hope.” I was reminded of Man’s Search for Meaning, the book Viktor Frankl wrote about surviving Nazi concentration camps, and how he said that the most important survival skill to have was faith. As he put it, “Woe to him who saw no more sense in his life, no aim, no purpose, and therefore no point in carrying on. ~ Neil Strauss,
58:Yet we cannot reach happiness by consciously searching for it. “Ask yourself whether you are happy,” said J. S. Mill, “and you cease to be so.” It is by being fully involved with every detail of our lives, whether good or bad, that we find happiness, not by trying to look for it directly. Viktor Frankl, the Austrian psychologist, summarized it beautifully in the preface to his book Man’s Search for Meaning: “Don’t aim at success—the more you aim at it and make it a target, the more you are going to miss it. For success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue…as the unintended side-effect of one’s personal dedication to a course greater than oneself.” So ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
59:In theory, multiculturalism is something we should all celebrate; unfortunately, in practice, multiculturalism means multi-morality.... The only antidote to such nihilistic thinking is ethical monotheism, the belief in one universal code of ethics. Differing cultures glorify humanity, but differing moralities destroy it. We must teach what Professor Viktor Frankl concluded after surviving Auschwitz: There are only two races of human beings, the decent and the indecent. That is how the world is divided: not between rich and poor, men and women, North and South, black and white, the powerful and the powerless, or any other nonmoral division that too many contemporary liberals have been advocating. ~ Dennis Prager,
60:Someone sent me a letter that had one of the best quotes I've ever read. It said "What is to give light must endure burning." It's by a writer named Viktor Frankl. I've been turning that quote over and over in my head. The truth of it is absolutely awe-inspiring. In the end, I believe it's why we all suffer. It's the meaning we all look for behind the tragedies in our lives. The pain deepens us, burns away our impurities and petty selfishness. It makes us capable of empathy and sympathy. It makes us capable of love. The pain is the fire that allows us to rise from the ashes of what we were, and more fully realize what we can become. When you can step back and see the beauty of the process, it's amazing beyond words. ~ Damien Echols,
61:One of the credos of my life is taken from Viktor Frankl, a Jewish survivor of Nazi concentration camps, who was a psychiatrist and author. In his highly influential book, Man’s Search for Meaning, he related that after the war someone asked him if he ‘hated the German race.’ He responded that he did not because in his view, ‘There are only two races, the decent and the indecent.’ That is how I divide the world. Not between Muslim and non-Muslim, black and white, or American and non-American, but between the decent and indecent. The issues I raise about Islam are not about the decency of Muslims, but about whether Islam in its traditional Islamist configuration is more or less likely than the American value system to produce good societies. ~ Dennis Prager,
62:Jordan Peterson's Book List
1. Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
2. 1984 - George Orwell
3. Road To Wigan Pier - George Orwell
4. Crime And Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky
5. Demons - Fyodor Dostoevsky
6. Beyond Good And Evil - Friedrich Nietzsche
7. Ordinary Men - Christopher Browning
8. The Painted Bird - Jerzy Kosinski
9. The Rape of Nanking - Iris Chang
10. Gulag Archipelago (Vol. 1, Vol. 2, & Vol. 3) - Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
11. Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl
12. Modern Man in Search of A Soul - Carl Jung
13. Maps Of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief - Jordan B. Peterson
14. A History of Religious Ideas (Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3) - Mircea Eliade
15. Affective Neuroscience - Jaak Panksepp ~ Jordan Peterson,
63:Viktor Frankl, the psychiatrist and Nazi concentration camp survivor who wrote the classic Man’s Search for Meaning, drew a similar social-psychological conclusion: deceitful, inauthentic individual existence is the precursor to social totalitarianism. Sigmund Freud, for his part, analogously believed that “repression” contributed in a non-trivial manner to the development of mental illness (and the difference between repression of truth and a lie is a matter of degree, not kind). Alfred Adler knew it was lies that bred sickness. C.G. Jung knew that moral problems plagued his patients, and that such problems were caused by untruth. All these thinkers, all centrally concerned with pathology both individual and cultural, came to the same conclusion: lies warp the structure of Being. Untruth corrupts the soul and the state alike, and one form of corruption feeds the other. ~ Jordan Peterson,
64:Viktor Frankl, the psychiatrist and Nazi concentration camp survivor who wrote the classic Man’s Search for Meaning, drew a similar social-psychological conclusion: deceitful, inauthentic individual existence is the precursor to social totalitarianism. Sigmund Freud, for his part, analogously believed that “repression” contributed in a non-trivial manner to the development of mental illness (and the difference between repression of truth and a lie is a matter of degree, not kind). Alfred Adler knew it was lies that bred sickness. C.G. Jung knew that moral problems plagued his patients, and that such problems were caused by untruth. All these thinkers, all centrally concerned with pathology both individual and cultural, came to the same conclusion: lies warp the structure of Being. Untruth corrupts the soul and the state alike, and one form of corruption feeds the other. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
65:In his famous book Man’s Search for Meaning, Viktor Frankl writes, “Man’s search for meaning is the primary motivation in his life.” He quotes Nietzsche’s words, “He who has a why to live for can bear with almost any how.” But then Frankl made a crucial, helpful point: It’s fruitless to try to think in the abstract about what life in general means. The meaning of one’s life is only discernible within the specific circumstances of one’s own specific life. In the concentration camp, he writes, “We had to learn ourselves and, furthermore, we had to teach the despairing men, that it did not really matter what we expected from life, but rather what life expected from us. We needed to stop asking the meaning of life, and instead to think of ourselves as those who were being questioned by life—daily and hourly. Our answer must consist, not in talk and meditation, but in right action and right conduct. ~ David Brooks,
66:Practice using these two unique human capacities: first, see yourself going to the office this afternoon, or home tonight, and finding it in a terrible situation. The house is a total disaster. No one has done his or her job; all the commitments made have been unfulfilled. And you’re tired and beat up. Now, imagine yourself responding to that reality in a mature, wise, self-controlled manner. See the effect that has on someone else. You didn’t confess their sins. You started to pitch in. You were cheerful, helpful, pleasant. And your behavior will prick the conscience of others and allow the consequences agreed upon to happen. You just used two unique human capacities: imagination and conscience. You didn’t rely on memory; if you had relied on memory or history, you might have lost your cool, made judgments of other people, and exacerbated conditions. Memory is built into your past responses to the same or similar stimuli. Memory ties you to your past. Imagination points you to your future. Your potential is unlimited, but to potentiate is to actualize your capabilities no matter what the conditions. In the book Man’s Search for Meaning, Viktor Frankl, the Austrian psychiatrist imprisoned in the death camps of Nazi Germany in World War II, tells how he exercised the power to choose his response to his terrible conditions. One day he was subjected to experiments on his body. And he discovered, “I have the power to choose.” And he looked for meaning. He believed that if you have a meaning (purpose or cause), if you have a why, you can live with any what. The development of his professional life came out of that one insight. He was raised in the Freudian tradition of psychic determinism. He learned it was a lie. It wasn’t based on science. It came from the study of sick people—neurotics and psychotics—not from the study of healthy, creative, effective people. He didn’t go to his memory, he went to his imagination and conscience. You, too, can progress along the continuum from futility and old habits to faith, hope, and inner security through the exercise of conscience and imagination. ~ Stephen R Covey,
67:Which brings me back to Ecclesiastes, his search for happiness, and mine. I spoke in chapter 4 about my first meeting, as a student, with Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneersohn, the Lubavitcher Rebbe. As I was waiting to go in, one of his disciples told me the following story. A man had recently written to the Rebbe on something of these lines: ‘I need the Rebbe’s help. I am deeply depressed. I pray and find no comfort. I perform the commands but feel nothing. I find it hard to carry on.’ The Rebbe, so I was told, sent a compelling reply without writing a single word. He simply ringed the first word in every sentence of the letter: the word ‘I’. It was, he was hinting, the man’s self-preoccupation that was at the root of his depression. It was as if the Rebbe were saying, as Viktor Frankl used to say in the name of Kierkegaard, ‘The door to happiness opens outward.’23 It was this insight that helped me solve the riddle of Ecclesiastes. The word ‘I’ does not appear very often in the Hebrew Bible, but it dominates Ecclesiastes’ opening chapters. I enlarged my works: I built houses for myself, I planted vineyards for myself; I made gardens and parks for myself and I planted in them all kinds of fruit trees; I made ponds of water for myself from which to irrigate a forest of growing trees. I bought male and female slaves and I had homeborn slaves. Also I possessed flocks and herds larger than all who preceded me in Jerusalem. Also, I collected for myself silver and gold and the treasure of kings and provinces. (Ecclesiastes 2:4–8) Nowhere else in the Bible is the first-person singular used so relentlessly and repetitively. In the original Hebrew the effect is doubled because of the chiming of the verbal suffix and the pronoun: Baniti li, asiti li, kaniti li, ‘I built for myself, I made for myself, I bought for myself.’ The source of Ecclesiastes’ unhappiness is obvious and was spelled out many centuries later by the great sage Hillel: ‘If I am not for myself, who will be? But if I am only for myself, what am I?’24 Happiness in the Bible is not something we find in self-gratification. Hence the significance of the word simchah. I translated it earlier as ‘joy’, but really it has no precise translation into English, since all our emotion words refer to states of mind we can experience alone. Simchah is something we cannot experience alone. Simchah is joy shared. ~ Jonathan Sacks,
68:reading :::
   Self-Help Reading List:
   James Allen As a Man Thinketh (1904)
   Marcus Aurelius Meditations (2nd Century)
   The Bhagavad-Gita
   The Bible
   Robert Bly Iron John (1990)
   Boethius The Consolation of Philosophy (6thC)
   Alain de Botton How Proust Can Change Your Life (1997)
   William Bridges Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes (1980)
   David Brooks The Road to Character (2015)
   Brené Brown Daring Greatly (2012)
   David D Burns The New Mood Therapy (1980)
   Joseph Campbell (with Bill Moyers) The Power of Myth (1988)
   Richard Carlson Don't Sweat The Small Stuff (1997)
   Dale Carnegie How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936)
   Deepak Chopra The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success (1994)
   Clayton Christensen How Will You Measure Your Life? (2012)
   Paulo Coelho The Alchemist (1988)
   Stephen Covey The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (1989)
   Mihaly Cziksentmihalyi Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience (1991)
   The Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler The Art of Happiness (1999)
   The Dhammapada (Buddha's teachings)
   Charles Duhigg The Power of Habit (2011)
   Wayne Dyer Real Magic (1992)
   Ralph Waldo Emerson Self-Reliance (1841)
   Clarissa Pinkola Estes Women Who Run With The Wolves (1996)
   Viktor Frankl Man's Search For Meaning (1959)
   Benjamin Franklin Autobiography (1790)
   Shakti Gawain Creative Visualization (1982)
   Daniel Goleman Emotional Intelligence (1995)
   John Gray Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus (1992)
   Louise Hay You Can Heal Your Life (1984)
   James Hillman The Soul's Code: In Search of Character and Calling (1996)
   Susan Jeffers Feel The Fear And Do It Anyway (1987)
   Richard Koch The 80/20 Principle (1998)
   Marie Kondo The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up (2014)
   Ellen Langer Mindfulness: Choice and Control in Everyday Life (1989)
   Lao-Tzu Tao-te Ching (The Way of Power)
   Maxwell Maltz Psycho-Cybernetics (1960)
   Abraham Maslow Motivation and Personality (1954)
   Thomas Moore Care of the Soul (1992)
   Joseph Murphy The Power of Your Subconscious Mind (1963)
   Norman Vincent Peale The Power of Positive Thinking (1952)
   M Scott Peck The Road Less Traveled (1990)
   Anthony Robbins Awaken The Giant Within (1991)
   Florence Scovell-Shinn The Game of Life and How To Play It (1923)
   Martin Seligman Learned Optimism (1991)
   Samuel Smiles Self-Help (1859)
   Pierre Teilhard de Chardin The Phenomenon of Man (1955)
   Henry David Thoreau Walden (1854)
   Marianne Williamson A Return To Love (1993)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Self-Help,
69:reading :::
   50 Psychology Classics: List of Books Covered:
   Alfred Adler - Understanding Human Nature (1927)
   Gordon Allport - The Nature of Prejudice (1954)
   Albert Bandura - Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control (1997)
   Gavin Becker - The Gift of Fear (1997)
   Eric Berne - Games People Play (1964)
   Isabel Briggs Myers - Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type (1980)
   Louann Brizendine - The Female Brain (2006)
   David D Burns - Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy (1980)
   Susan Cain - Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (2012)
   Robert Cialdini - Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (1984)
   Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Creativity (1997)
   Carol Dweck - Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006)
   Albert Ellis & Robert Harper - (1961) A Guide To Rational Living(1961)
   Milton Erickson - My Voice Will Go With You (1982) by Sidney Rosen
   Eric Erikson - Young Man Luther (1958)
   Hans Eysenck - Dimensions of Personality (1947)
   Viktor Frankl - The Will to Meaning (1969)
   Anna Freud - The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (1936)
   Sigmund Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams (1901)
   Howard Gardner - Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983)
   Daniel Gilbert - Stumbling on Happiness (2006)
   Malcolm Gladwell - Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005)
   Daniel Goleman - Emotional Intelligence at Work (1998)
   John M Gottman - The Seven Principles For Making Marriage Work (1999)
   Temple Grandin - The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed (2013)
   Harry Harlow - The Nature of Love (1958)
   Thomas A Harris - I'm OK - You're OK (1967)
   Eric Hoffer - The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951)
   Karen Horney - Our Inner Conflicts (1945)
   William James - Principles of Psychology (1890)
   Carl Jung - The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (1953)
   Daniel Kahneman - Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)
   Alfred Kinsey - Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953)
   RD Laing - The Divided Self (1959)
   Abraham Maslow - The Farther Reaches of Human Nature (1970)
   Stanley Milgram - Obedience To Authority (1974)
   Walter Mischel - The Marshmallow Test (2014)
   Leonard Mlodinow - Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (2012)
   IP Pavlov - Conditioned Reflexes (1927)
   Fritz Perls - Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality (1951)
   Jean Piaget - The Language and Thought of the Child (1966)
   Steven Pinker - The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (2002)
   VS Ramachandran - Phantoms in the Brain (1998)
   Carl Rogers - On Becoming a Person (1961)
   Oliver Sacks - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1970)
   Barry Schwartz - The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less (2004)
   Martin Seligman - Authentic Happiness (2002)
   BF Skinner - Beyond Freedom & Dignity (1953)
   Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen - Difficult Conversations (2000)
   William Styron - Darkness Visible (1990)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Psychology Classics,

IN CHAPTERS [3/3]



   1 Psychology




   2 The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People


1.02 - MAPS OF MEANING - THREE LEVELS OF ANALYSIS, #Maps of Meaning, #Jordan Peterson, #Psychology
  our experience. The existential psycho therapist Viktor Frankl relates a story regarding his experiences as a
  Nazi death camp inmate, which makes this point most strikingly:

2.01 - Habit 1 Be Proactive, #The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, #Stephen Covey, #unset
  In answer to those questions, let me share with you the catalytic story of Viktor Frankl.
  Frankl was a determinist raised in the tradition of Freudian psychology, which postulates that whatever happens to you as a child shapes your character and personality and basically governs your whole life. The limits and parameters of your life are set, and, basically, you can't do much about it.
  --
  One day, naked and alone in a small room, he began to become aware of what he later called "the last of the human freedoms" -- the freedom his Nazi captors could not take away. They could control his entire environment, they could do what they wanted to his body, but Viktor Frankl himself was a self-aware being who could look as an observer at his very involvement. His basic identity was intact.
  He could decide within himself how all of this was going to affect him. Between what happened to him, or the stimulus, and his response to it, was his freedom or power to choose that response.

2.02 - Habit 2 Begin with the End in Mind, #The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, #Stephen Covey, #unset
  But it doesn't have to be that way. In the Nazi death camps where Viktor Frankl learned the principle of proactivity, he also learned the importance of purpose, of meaning in life. The essence of
  "logotherapy," the philosophy he later developed and taught, is that many so-called mental and emotional illnesses are really symptoms of an underlying sense of meaninglessness or emptiness.

WORDNET














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last updated: 2022-04-29 21:58:55
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