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object:Michel de Montaigne
class:author
subject class:Writer
langauge class:French
language class:English


--- WIKI
Michel Eyquem de Montaigne, Lord of Montaigne (, ; 28 February 1533 13 September 1592) was one of the most significant philosophers of the French Renaissance, known for popularizing the essay as a literary genre. His work is noted for its merging of casual anecdotes and autobiography with intellectual insight. His massive volume Essais contains some of the most influential essays ever written. Montaigne had a direct influence on Western writers, including Francis Bacon, Ren Descartes, Blaise Pascal, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Virginia Woolf, Albert Hirschman, William Hazlitt, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Friedrich Nietzsche, Stefan Zweig, Eric Hoffer, Isaac Asimov, and possibly, on the later works of William Shakespeare. During his lifetime, Montaigne was admired more as a statesman than as an author. The tendency in his essays to digress into anecdotes and personal ruminations was seen as detrimental to proper style rather than as an innovation, and his declaration that, "I am myself the matter of my book", was viewed by his contemporaries as self-indulgent. In time, however, Montaigne came to be recognized as embodying, perhaps better than any other author of his time, the spirit of freely entertaining doubt that began to emerge at that time. He is most famously known for his skeptical remark, "Que say-je?" ("What do I know?", in Middle French; now rendered as Que sais-je? in modern French).

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Infinite_Library
The_Complete_Essays

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Michel de Montaigne

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QUOTES [17 / 17 - 500 / 1465]


KEYS (10k)

   15 Michel de Montaigne
   1 Tom Butler-Bowdon
   1 Mortimer J Adler

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  486 Michel de Montaigne
   10 Michel de Montaigne

1:I am myself the matter of my book.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
2:The most certain sign of wisdom is cheerfulness.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
3:Not being able to govern events, I govern myself.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
4:Sometimes it is a good choice not to choose at all. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
5:I quote others only in order the better to express myself. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
6:He who fears he shall suffer, already suffers what he fears. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
7:Rejoice in the things that are present; all else is beyond thee.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
8:Ignorance is the softest pillow on which a man can rest his head.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
9:I know well what I am fleeing from but not what I am in search of.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
10:I do myself a greater injury in lying than I do him of whom I tell a lie.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
11:The soul which has no fixed purpose in life is lost; to be everywhere, is to be nowhere.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
12:If you press me to say why I loved him, I can say no more than because he was he, and I was I. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
13:It is an absolute and virtually divine perfection to know how to enjoy our being rightfully.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
14:I write to keep from going mad from the contradictions I find among mankind - and to work some of those contradictions out for myself.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
15:The value of life lies not in the length of days, but in the use we make of them... Whether you find satisfaction in life depends not on your tale of years, but on your will.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
16:reading :::
   50 Philosophy Classics: List of Books Covered:
   1. Hannah Arendt - The Human Condition (1958)
   2. Aristotle - Nicomachean Ethics (4th century BC)
   3. AJ Ayer - Language, Truth and Logic (1936)
   4. Julian Baggini - The Ego Trick (2011)
   5. Jean Baudrillard - Simulacra and Simulation (1981)
   6. Simone de Beauvoir - The Second Sex (1952)
   7. Jeremy Bentham - Principles of Morals and Legislation (1789)
   8. Henri Bergson - Creative Evolution (1911)
   9. David Bohm - Wholeness and the Implicate Order (1980)
   10. Noam Chomsky - Understanding Power (2002)
   11. Cicero - On Duties (44 BC)
   12. Confucius - Analects (5th century BC)
   13. Rene Descartes - Meditations (1641)
   14. Ralph Waldo Emerson - Fate (1860)
   15. Epicurus - Letters (3rd century BC)
   16. Michel Foucault - The Order of Things (1966)
   17. Harry Frankfurt - On Bullshit (2005)
   18. Sam Harris - Free Will (2012)
   19. GWF Hegel - Phenomenology of Spirit (1803)
   20. Martin Heidegger - Being and Time (1927)
   21. Heraclitus - Fragments (6th century)
   22. David Hume - An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748)
   23. William James - Pragmatism (1904)
   24. Daniel Kahneman - Thinking: Fast and Slow (2011)
   25. Immanuel Kant - Critique of Pure Reason (1781)
   26. Soren Kierkegaard - Fear and Trembling (1843)
   27. Saul Kripke - Naming and Necessity (1972)
   28. Thomas Kuhn - The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962)
   29. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Theodicy (1710)
   30. John Locke - An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690)
   31. Marshall McLuhan - The Medium is the Massage (1967)
   32. Niccolo Machiavelli - The Prince (1532)
   33. John Stuart Mill - On Liberty (1859)
   34. Michel de Montaigne - Essays (1580)
   35. Iris Murdoch - The Sovereignty of Good (1970)
   36. Friedrich Nietzsche - Beyond Good and Evil (1886)
   37. Blaise Pascal - Pensees (1670)
   38. Plato - The Republic (4th century BC)
   39. Karl Popper - The Logic of Scientific Discovery (1934)
   40. John Rawls - A Theory of Justice (1971)
   41. Jean-Jacques Rousseau - The Social Contract (1762)
   42. Bertrand Russell - The Conquest of Happiness (1920)
   43. Michael Sandel - Justice (2009)
   44. Jean Paul Sartre - Being and Nothingness (1943)
   45. Arthur Schopenhauer - The World as Will and Representation (1818)
   46. Peter Singer - The Life You Can Save (2009)
   47. Baruch Spinoza - Ethics (1677)
   48. Nassim Nicholas - Taleb The Black Swan (2007)
   49. Ludwig Wittgenstein - Philosophical Investigations (1953)
   50. Slavoj Zizek - Living In The End Times (2010)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Philosophy Classics,
17:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Que sçay-je? ~ Michel de Montaigne
2:Ease crushes us. ~ Michel de Montaigne
3:Death pays all debts. ~ Michel de Montaigne
4:We are all blockheads. ~ Michel de Montaigne
5:Habit is second nature. ~ Michel de Montaigne
6:it is myself I paint. My ~ Michel de Montaigne
7:Habit is a second nature. ~ Michel de Montaigne
8:I do not teach. I relate. ~ Michel de Montaigne
9:Every movement reveals us. ~ Michel de Montaigne
10:God defend me from myself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
11:Wie overal is, is nergens. ~ Michel de Montaigne
12:My trade and art is to live. ~ Michel de Montaigne
13:To philosophize is to doubt. ~ Michel de Montaigne
14:Books are a languid pleasure. ~ Michel de Montaigne
15:Eduquer, c'est allumer un feu ~ Michel de Montaigne
16:It needs courage to be afraid. ~ Michel de Montaigne
17:Que sçay-je? (What do I know?) ~ Michel de Montaigne
18:The thing I fear most is fear. ~ Michel de Montaigne
19:One may be humble out of pride. ~ Michel de Montaigne
20:Que sçais-je?" (What do I know?) ~ Michel de Montaigne
21:Let every foot have its own shoe. ~ Michel de Montaigne
22:My art and profession is to live. ~ Michel de Montaigne
23:And not to serve for a table-talk. ~ Michel de Montaigne
24:He loves little who loves by rule. ~ Michel de Montaigne
25:I am myself the matter of my book. ~ Michel de Montaigne
26:No man is a hero to his own valet. ~ Michel de Montaigne
27:We should tend our freedom wisely. ~ Michel de Montaigne
28:Cowardice is the mother of cruelty. ~ Michel de Montaigne
29:L'honneste est stable et permanent. ~ Michel de Montaigne
30:Oh, what a valiant faculty is hope. ~ Michel de Montaigne
31:To philosophize is to learn to die. ~ Michel de Montaigne
32:To smell, though well, is to stink. ~ Michel de Montaigne
33:We cannot fail in following nature. ~ Michel de Montaigne
34:It is fear that I am most afraid of. ~ Michel de Montaigne
35:Às vezes é boa escolha nada escolher. ~ Michel de Montaigne
36:I am myself the matter of my book.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
37:My appetite comes to me while eating. ~ Michel de Montaigne
38:The world is but a perpetual see-saw. ~ Michel de Montaigne
39:What a man hates, he takes seriously. ~ Michel de Montaigne
40:A man may be humble through vainglory. ~ Michel de Montaigne
41:Few men are admired by their servants. ~ Michel de Montaigne
42:L’homme d’entendement n’a rien a perdre ~ Michel de Montaigne
43:Men are nothing until they are excited. ~ Michel de Montaigne
44:Necessity is a violent school-mistress. ~ Michel de Montaigne
45:Only the fools are certain and assured. ~ Michel de Montaigne
46:To philosophise is to learn how to die. ~ Michel de Montaigne
47:We have nothing to fear but fear itself ~ Michel de Montaigne
48:You have your face bare; I am all face. ~ Michel de Montaigne
49:Ambition is not a vice of little people. ~ Michel de Montaigne
50:I do not understand; I pause; I examine. ~ Michel de Montaigne
51:Saying is one thing and doing is another ~ Michel de Montaigne
52:The most universal quality is diversity. ~ Michel de Montaigne
53:For a desperate disease a desperate cure. ~ Michel de Montaigne
54:God sends the cold according to the coat. ~ Michel de Montaigne
55:In my opinion, every rich man is a miser. ~ Michel de Montaigne
56:No noble thing can be done without risks. ~ Michel de Montaigne
57:Pleasure itself is painful at the bottom. ~ Michel de Montaigne
58:We seek and offer ourselves to be gulled. ~ Michel de Montaigne
59:A man must become wise at his own expense. ~ Michel de Montaigne
60:Most pleasures embrace us but to strangle. ~ Michel de Montaigne
61:A strong imagination begetteth opportunity. ~ Michel de Montaigne
62:It's not victory if it doesn't end the war. ~ Michel de Montaigne
63:[Just as any foreigner is not fully human.] ~ Michel de Montaigne
64:No man profiteth but by the loss of others. ~ Michel de Montaigne
65:No wind favors he who has no destined port. ~ Michel de Montaigne
66:Time steals away without any inconvenience. ~ Michel de Montaigne
67:To know how to live is my trade and my art. ~ Michel de Montaigne
68:We have power over nothing except our will. ~ Michel de Montaigne
69:Women when they marry buy a cat in the bag. ~ Michel de Montaigne
70:It is not death, it is dying that alarms me. ~ Michel de Montaigne
71:The good opinion of the vulgar is injurious. ~ Michel de Montaigne
72:We need but little learning to live happily. ~ Michel de Montaigne
73:When we have got it, we want something else. ~ Michel de Montaigne
74:All general judgments are loose and imperfect ~ Michel de Montaigne
75:Fame and tranquility can never be bedfellows. ~ Michel de Montaigne
76:Few men have been admired of their familiars. ~ Michel de Montaigne
77:I had rather fashion my mind than furnish it. ~ Michel de Montaigne
78:I have seen people rude by being over-polite. ~ Michel de Montaigne
79:I want death to find me planting my cabbages. ~ Michel de Montaigne
80:Kings and philosophers shit—and so do ladies. ~ Michel de Montaigne
81:Parce que c'était lui, parce que c'était moi. ~ Michel de Montaigne
82:The only thing certain is nothing is certain. ~ Michel de Montaigne
83:The smallest annoyances, disturb us the most. ~ Michel de Montaigne
84:We are all of us richer than we think we are. ~ Michel de Montaigne
85:We must learn to suffer what we cannot evade. ~ Michel de Montaigne
86:Книжная учёность - украшение, а не фундамент. ~ Michel de Montaigne
87:Никой добродетел не взема за помощник лъжата. ~ Michel de Montaigne
88:A foreign war is a lot milder than a civil war. ~ Michel de Montaigne
89:Death, they say, acquits us of all obligations. ~ Michel de Montaigne
90:I walk firmer and more secure uphill than down. ~ Michel de Montaigne
91:The plague of man is boasting of his knowledge. ~ Michel de Montaigne
92:An untempted woman cannot boast of her chastity. ~ Michel de Montaigne
93:Custom is a second nature, and no less powerful. ~ Michel de Montaigne
94:Happiness is a singular incentive to mediocrity. ~ Michel de Montaigne
95:I would rather be an expert on me than on Cicero ~ Michel de Montaigne
96:Not being able to govern events, I govern myself ~ Michel de Montaigne
97:The beauty of stature is the only beauty of men. ~ Michel de Montaigne
98:The clatter of arms drowns out the voice of law. ~ Michel de Montaigne
99:The most certain sign of wisdom is cheerfulness. ~ Michel de Montaigne
100:To obey is the proper office of a rational soul. ~ Michel de Montaigne
101:A wise man loses nothing, if he but save himself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
102:I quote others in order to better express myself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
103:Is there anything so grave and serious as an ass? ~ Michel de Montaigne
104:Je veux que la mort me trouve plantant mes choux. ~ Michel de Montaigne
105:Not being able to govern events, I govern myself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
106:The soul that has no established aim loses itself ~ Michel de Montaigne
107:To know much is often the cause of doubting more. ~ Michel de Montaigne
108:To understand via the heart is not to understand. ~ Michel de Montaigne
109:Desire and hope will push us on toward the future. ~ Michel de Montaigne
110:Habituation puts to sleep the eye of our judgment. ~ Michel de Montaigne
111:Il n'est rien qui tente mes larmes que les larmes. ~ Michel de Montaigne
112:Kings and philosophers defecate, and so do ladies. ~ Michel de Montaigne
113:Obsession is the wellspring of genius and madness. ~ Michel de Montaigne
114:The continuous work of our life is to build death. ~ Michel de Montaigne
115:There is no more expensive thing than a free gift. ~ Michel de Montaigne
116:There is no passion so contagious as that of fear. ~ Michel de Montaigne
117:A man must either imitate the vicious or hate them. ~ Michel de Montaigne
118:A well-bred man is always sociable and complaisant. ~ Michel de Montaigne
119:A wise man never loses anything, if he has himself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
120:graces were never yet given to any one man."A verse ~ Michel de Montaigne
121:Happiness involves working toward meaningful goals. ~ Michel de Montaigne
122:It is easier to sacrifice great than little things. ~ Michel de Montaigne
123:Sometimes it is a good choice not to choose at all. ~ Michel de Montaigne
124:The most certain sign of wisdom is cheerfulness.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
125:The thing in the world I am most afraid of is fear. ~ Michel de Montaigne
126:Whatever can be done another day can be done today. ~ Michel de Montaigne
127:Every abridgement of a good book is a fool abridged. ~ Michel de Montaigne
128:[Fortune is glass: it glitters, then it shatters.]58 ~ Michel de Montaigne
129:He who lives not to others, lives little to himself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
130:Not being able to govern events, I govern myself.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
131:Nothing is so firmly believed as what we least know. ~ Michel de Montaigne
132:Sometimes it is a good choice not to choose at all. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
133:There is no wish more natural than the wish to know. ~ Michel de Montaigne
134:Women are more susceptible to pain than to pleasure. ~ Michel de Montaigne
135:Writing does not cause misery. It is born of misery. ~ Michel de Montaigne
136:Writing does not cause misery, it is born of misery. ~ Michel de Montaigne
137:آدمی از هیجانات سوزان، ناگزیر به تب های سوزان می جهد ~ Michel de Montaigne
138:All the world knows me in my book, and my book in me. ~ Michel de Montaigne
139:As soon as women become ours we are no longer theirs. ~ Michel de Montaigne
140:A woman is no sooner ours than we are no longer hers. ~ Michel de Montaigne
141:Every man carries the entire form of human condition. ~ Michel de Montaigne
142:He whose mouth is out of taste says the wine is flat. ~ Michel de Montaigne
143:The honor of the conquest is rated by the difficulty. ~ Michel de Montaigne
144:Vexations may be petty, but they are vexations still. ~ Michel de Montaigne
145:Everyone calls barbarity what he is not accustomed to. ~ Michel de Montaigne
146:I never met a man who thought his thinking was faulty. ~ Michel de Montaigne
147:There are some defeats more triumphant than victories. ~ Michel de Montaigne
148:To forbid us anything is to make us have a mind to 't. ~ Michel de Montaigne
149:Why do people respect the package rather than the man? ~ Michel de Montaigne
150:Don't be afraid to say what you are not afraid to think ~ Michel de Montaigne
151:Every man bears the whole stamp of the human condition. ~ Michel de Montaigne
152:Every man has within himself the entire human condition ~ Michel de Montaigne
153:He who would teach men to die would teach them to live. ~ Michel de Montaigne
154:Il n'est pas de chagrin qu'un livre ne puisse consoler. ~ Michel de Montaigne
155:It is a rare life that remains orderly even in private. ~ Michel de Montaigne
156:It is not necessity but abundance which produces greed. ~ Michel de Montaigne
157:I would have every man write what he knows and no more. ~ Michel de Montaigne
158:Lend yourself to others, but give yourself to yourself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
159:Men are most apt to believe what they least understand. ~ Michel de Montaigne
160:My reason is not framed to bend or stoop: my knees are. ~ Michel de Montaigne
161:No pleasure has any savor for me without communication. ~ Michel de Montaigne
162:Opinion is a powerful party, bold, and without measure. ~ Michel de Montaigne
163:Qui craint de souffrir souffre déjà de ce qu’il craint. ~ Michel de Montaigne
164:To forbid us anything is to make us have a mind for it. ~ Michel de Montaigne
165:Whoever will be cured of ignorance, let him confess it. ~ Michel de Montaigne
166:I would rather be an authority on myself than on Cicero. ~ Michel de Montaigne
167:Learning must not only lodge with us: we must marry her. ~ Michel de Montaigne
168:The way of the world is to make laws, but follow custom. ~ Michel de Montaigne
169:A man with nothing to lend should refrain from borrowing. ~ Michel de Montaigne
170:A strong memory is commonly coupled with infirm judgment. ~ Michel de Montaigne
171:For being the more learned, they are none the less fools. ~ Michel de Montaigne
172:He that I am reading seems always to have the most force. ~ Michel de Montaigne
173:I give my opinion not as being good, but as being my own. ~ Michel de Montaigne
174:Il faut se prêter à autrui et ne se donner qu'à soi-même. ~ Michel de Montaigne
175:I neither complain of the past, nor do I fear the future. ~ Michel de Montaigne
176:Jeg har ikke noen annen lidenskap til å holde meg i ånde. ~ Michel de Montaigne
177:Life should be an aim unto itself, a purpose unto itself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
178:Speech belongs half to the speaker, half to the listener. ~ Michel de Montaigne
179:Tis so much to be a king, that he only is so by being so. ~ Michel de Montaigne
180:Todos los días van hacia la muerte, el último la alcanza. ~ Michel de Montaigne
181:You should study more to understand that you know little. ~ Michel de Montaigne
182:Each man calls barbarism whatever is not his own practice. ~ Michel de Montaigne
183:Friendship is the highest degree of perfection in society. ~ Michel de Montaigne
184:I quote others only in order the better to express myself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
185:La plus grande chose du monde, c'est de savoir être à soi. ~ Michel de Montaigne
186:Let us not be ashamed to speak what we shame not to think. ~ Michel de Montaigne
187:Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know. ~ Michel de Montaigne
188:Nul vent ne faict pour celuy qui n'a point de port destiné ~ Michel de Montaigne
189:One should be ever booted and spurred and ready to depart. ~ Michel de Montaigne
190:Speaking is half his that speaks, and half his that hears. ~ Michel de Montaigne
191:Those things that are dearest to us have cost us the most. ~ Michel de Montaigne
192:True freedom is to have power over oneself for everything. ~ Michel de Montaigne
193:Why did I love her? Because it was her; because it was me. ~ Michel de Montaigne
194:A man has need of tough ears to hear himself fairly judged. ~ Michel de Montaigne
195:A wise man sees as much as he ought, not as much as he can. ~ Michel de Montaigne
196:Excellent memories are often coupled with feeble judgments. ~ Michel de Montaigne
197:He who fears he shall suffer already suffers what he fears. ~ Michel de Montaigne
198:He who fears he will suffer, already suffers from his fear. ~ Michel de Montaigne
199:I have never seen a greater monster or miracle than myself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
200:I quote others only in order the better to express myself. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
201:Marriage, a market which has nothing free but the entrance. ~ Michel de Montaigne
202:No doctor takes pleasure in the health even of his friends. ~ Michel de Montaigne
203:Nothing is so firmly believed as that which is least known. ~ Michel de Montaigne
204:Things seem greater by imagination than they are in effect. ~ Michel de Montaigne
205:To die of age is a rare, singular, and extraordinary death, ~ Michel de Montaigne
206:Everything must not always be said, for that would be folly. ~ Michel de Montaigne
207:He that is a friend to himself, know; he is a friend to all. ~ Michel de Montaigne
208:He who fears he shall suffer, already suffers what he fears. ~ Michel de Montaigne
209:I speak to the paper, as I speak to the first person I meet. ~ Michel de Montaigne
210:Lawyers and physicians are an ill provision for any country. ~ Michel de Montaigne
211:Nothing doth sooner breed a distaste or satiety than plenty. ~ Michel de Montaigne
212:One should always have one's boots on and be ready to leave. ~ Michel de Montaigne
213:Our great and glorious masterpiece is to live appropriately. ~ Michel de Montaigne
214:The conduct of our lives is the true mirror of our doctrine. ~ Michel de Montaigne
215:The customs and practices of life in society sweep us along. ~ Michel de Montaigne
216:The day of your birth leads you to death as well as to life. ~ Michel de Montaigne
217:We do not correct the man we hang; we correct others by him. ~ Michel de Montaigne
218:We should spread joy, but, as far as we can, repress sorrow. ~ Michel de Montaigne
219:Who feareth to suffer suffereth already, because he feareth. ~ Michel de Montaigne
220:Wise men have more to learn of fools than fools of wise men. ~ Michel de Montaigne
221:A hair shirt does not always render those chaste who wear it. ~ Michel de Montaigne
222:A lady could not boast of her chastity who was never tempted. ~ Michel de Montaigne
223:He who fears he shall suffer, already suffers what he fears. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
224:The man who thinks he knows does not yet know what knowing is ~ Michel de Montaigne
225:The souls of emperors and cobblers are cast in the same mould ~ Michel de Montaigne
226:Words repeated again have as another sound, so another sense. ~ Michel de Montaigne
227:All permanent decisions are made in a temporary state of mind. ~ Michel de Montaigne
228:an outstanding memory is often associated with weak judgement. ~ Michel de Montaigne
229:A speech belongs half to the speaker and half to the listener. ~ Michel de Montaigne
230:Every day I hear stupid people say things that are not stupid. ~ Michel de Montaigne
231:If I am a man of some reading, I am a man of no retentiveness. ~ Michel de Montaigne
232:I have never known a greater miracle, or monster, than myself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
233:I have never seen a greater monster or
miracle than myself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
234:It is good to rub and polish our brain against that of others. ~ Michel de Montaigne
235:Kendimizden kaçmamız, kendimizde olup biteni bilmememizdendir. ~ Michel de Montaigne
236:Les montagnes bougent, c'est juste qu'elles bougent lentement. ~ Michel de Montaigne
237:L'utilité du vivre n'est pas en l'espace: elle est en l'usage. ~ Michel de Montaigne
238:Open talk opens the way to further talk, as wine does or love. ~ Michel de Montaigne
239:Poverty of goods is easily cured; poverty of soul, impossible. ~ Michel de Montaigne
240:There is a plague on Man: his opinion that he knows something. ~ Michel de Montaigne
241:There is a plague on Man, the opinion that he knows something. ~ Michel de Montaigne
242:The wise man lives as long as he ought, not so long as he can. ~ Michel de Montaigne
243:To make a crooked stick straight, we bend it the contrary way. ~ Michel de Montaigne
244:All is a-swarm with commentaries; of authors there is a dearth. ~ Michel de Montaigne
245:All is a-swarm with commentaries: of authors there is a dearth. ~ Michel de Montaigne
246:All of the days go toward death and the last one arrives there. ~ Michel de Montaigne
247:Fie on the eloquence that leaves us craving itself, not things! ~ Michel de Montaigne
248:It is not my deeds that I write down, it is myself, my essence. ~ Michel de Montaigne
249:Kun je ook maar iemand goed vinden als je niemand slecht vindt? ~ Michel de Montaigne
250:Like the watermen who advance forward while they look backward. ~ Michel de Montaigne
251:No wind serves him who addresses his voyage to no certain port. ~ Michel de Montaigne
252:Off I go, rummaging about in books for sayings which please me. ~ Michel de Montaigne
253:Since we cannot match it let us take our revenge by abusing it. ~ Michel de Montaigne
254:The most profound joy has more of gravity than of gaiety in it. ~ Michel de Montaigne
255:There is nothing useless in nature; not even uselessness itself ~ Michel de Montaigne
256:Wise people are foolish if they cannot adapt to foolish people. ~ Michel de Montaigne
257:Age imprints more wrinkles in the mind than it does on the face. ~ Michel de Montaigne
258:As far as physicians go, chance is more valuable than knowledge. ~ Michel de Montaigne
259:Gentleness and repose are paramount to everything else in woman. ~ Michel de Montaigne
260:Honesty is a question of right and wrong, not a matter of policy ~ Michel de Montaigne
261:Ignorance is the softest pillow on which a man can rest his head ~ Michel de Montaigne
262:I had rather complain of ill-fortune than be ashamed of victory. ~ Michel de Montaigne
263:I must use these great men's virtues as a cloak for my weakness. ~ Michel de Montaigne
264:Of all our infirmities, the most savage is to despise our being. ~ Michel de Montaigne
265:Rejoice in the things that are present; all else is beyond thee. ~ Michel de Montaigne
266:Silence and modesty are very valuable qualities in conversation. ~ Michel de Montaigne
267:The ceaseless labor of your life is to build the house of death. ~ Michel de Montaigne
268:A good marriage would be between a blind wife and a deaf husband. ~ Michel de Montaigne
269:a good marriage would be between a blind wife and a deaf husband. ~ Michel de Montaigne
270:All the opinions in the world point out that pleasure is our aim. ~ Michel de Montaigne
271:Anyone who teaches men how to die would teach them how to live.36 ~ Michel de Montaigne
272:Cada cual llama barbarie a lo que no forma parte de su costumbre. ~ Michel de Montaigne
273:Heureuse la mort qui oste le loisir aux apprests de tel equipage. ~ Michel de Montaigne
274:He who fears he will suffer, already suffers because of his fear. ~ Michel de Montaigne
275:Ignorance is the softest pillow on which a man can rest his head. ~ Michel de Montaigne
276:Intelligence is required to be able to know that a man knows not. ~ Michel de Montaigne
277:It would be better to have no laws at all, than to have too many. ~ Michel de Montaigne
278:Man in sooth is a marvellous, vain, fickle, and unstable subject. ~ Michel de Montaigne
279:No passion disturbs the soundness of our judgement as anger does. ~ Michel de Montaigne
280:The ceaseless labour of your life is to build the house of death. ~ Michel de Montaigne
281:There are no truths, only moments of claryty passing for answers. ~ Michel de Montaigne
282:We are more solicitous that men speak of us, than how they speak. ~ Michel de Montaigne
283:A man who fears suffering is already suffering from what he fears. ~ Michel de Montaigne
284:Each man contains the entire pattern of the human condition. There ~ Michel de Montaigne
285:How many valiant men we have seen to survive their own reputation! ~ Michel de Montaigne
286:I know well what I am fleeing from but not what I am in search of. ~ Michel de Montaigne
287:Nichts wird so fest geglaubt wie das, was wir am wenigsten wissen. ~ Michel de Montaigne
288:The great and glorious masterpiece of man is to live to the point. ~ Michel de Montaigne
289:The great and glorious masterpiece of man is to live with purpose. ~ Michel de Montaigne
290:Things are not bad in themselves, but our cowardice makes them so. ~ Michel de Montaigne
291:To philosophize is nothing else than to prepare oneself for death. ~ Michel de Montaigne
292:Who so hath his mind on taking, hath it no more on what he taketh. ~ Michel de Montaigne
293:Friendship is a creature formed for a companionship not for a herd. ~ Michel de Montaigne
294:Hath God obliged himself not to exceed the bounds of our knowledge? ~ Michel de Montaigne
295:I find that the best virtue I have has in it some tincture of vice. ~ Michel de Montaigne
296:oddness or novelty (qualities which usually give value to anything) ~ Michel de Montaigne
297:Only he can judge of matters great and high whose soul is likewise. ~ Michel de Montaigne
298:Rejoice in the things that are present; all else is beyond thee.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
299:The greatest thing in the world is to know how to live to yourself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
300:The memory represents to us not what we choose but what it pleases. ~ Michel de Montaigne
301:We need to interpret interpretations more than to interpret things. ~ Michel de Montaigne
302:A man must live in the world and make the best of it, such as it is. ~ Michel de Montaigne
303:A man should not so much respect what he eats, as with whom he eats. ~ Michel de Montaigne
304:Among the liberal arts, let us begin with the art that liberates us. ~ Michel de Montaigne
305:Ignorance is the softest pillow on which a man can rest his head.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
306:In our time the most warlike nations are the most rude and ignorant. ~ Michel de Montaigne
307:It is a human tendency "to measure truth and error by our capacity." ~ Michel de Montaigne
308:It is much more easy to accuse the one sex than to excuse the other. ~ Michel de Montaigne
309:I would rather be old for a shorter time than be old before my time. ~ Michel de Montaigne
310:Miracles arise from our ignorance of nature, not from nature itself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
311:Most of our desires are born and nurtured at other people's expense. ~ Michel de Montaigne
312:The curiosity of knowing things has been given to man for a scourge. ~ Michel de Montaigne
313:The greatest thing in the world is to know how to belong to oneself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
314:All the fame you should look for in life is to have lived it quietly. ~ Michel de Montaigne
315:Almost all the opinions we have are taken on authority and on credit. ~ Michel de Montaigne
316:How many condemnations I have witnessed more criminal than the crime! ~ Michel de Montaigne
317:I know well what I am fleeing from but not what I am in search of.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
318:Mon métier et mon art c’est vivre. [My craft and my skill is living.] ~ Michel de Montaigne
319:The danger was not that I would do wrong, but that I would do nothing ~ Michel de Montaigne
320:The finest souls are those that have the most variety and suppleness. ~ Michel de Montaigne
321:The profit we possess after study is to have become better and wiser. ~ Michel de Montaigne
322:There is no greater enemy to those who would please than expectation. ~ Michel de Montaigne
323:Valor is stability, not of legs and arms, but of courage and the soul ~ Michel de Montaigne
324:Virtue shuns ease as a companion. It demands a rough and thorny path. ~ Michel de Montaigne
325:[What best becomes a man is whatever is most peculiarly his own.] [B] ~ Michel de Montaigne
326:El amor no es más que el deseo furioso de algo que huye de nosotros... ~ Michel de Montaigne
327:I do not speak the minds of others except to speak my own mind better. ~ Michel de Montaigne
328:Let [children] be able to do all things, and love to do only the good. ~ Michel de Montaigne
329:Let us give Nature a chance; she knows her business better than we do. ~ Michel de Montaigne
330:No one should be subjected to force over things which belonged to him. ~ Michel de Montaigne
331:The perpetual work of your life is but to lay the foundation of death. ~ Michel de Montaigne
332:There is perhaps no more obvious vanity than to write of it so vainly. ~ Michel de Montaigne
333:The world is all a carcass and vanity, The shadow of a shadow, a play ~ Michel de Montaigne
334:Valor is stability, not of legs and arms, but of courage and the soul. ~ Michel de Montaigne
335:What hits you affects you and wakes you up more then what pleases you. ~ Michel de Montaigne
336:A man must learn to endure patiently what he cannot avoid conveniently. ~ Michel de Montaigne
337:A person of honor chooses to loss his honor rather than his consicience ~ Michel de Montaigne
338:But you do not die because you are sick, you die because you are alive. ~ Michel de Montaigne
339:Malice sucks up the greatest part of its own venom, and poisons itself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
340:Not because Socrates said so,... I look upon all men as my compatriots. ~ Michel de Montaigne
341:The public weal requires that men should betray, and lie, and massacre. ~ Michel de Montaigne
342:Wisdom has its excesses, and has no less need of moderation than folly. ~ Michel de Montaigne
343:A little folly is desirable in him that will not be guilty of stupidity. ~ Michel de Montaigne
344:A little of everything and nothing thoroughly, after the French fashion. ~ Michel de Montaigne
345:Fortune, seeing that she could not make fools wise, has made them lucky. ~ Michel de Montaigne
346:I do not care so much what I am to others as I care what I am to myself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
347:I have never seen a greater monster or miracle in the world than myself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
348:In love, 'tis no other than frantic desire for that which flies from us. ~ Michel de Montaigne
349:It is easier to write an indifferent poem than to understand a good one. ~ Michel de Montaigne
350:Judgement can do without knowledge: but not knowledge without judgement. ~ Michel de Montaigne
351:Nothing fixes a thing so intensely in the mind as the wish to forget it. ~ Michel de Montaigne
352:On the highest throne in the world, we still sit only on our own bottom. ~ Michel de Montaigne
353:Our wisdom and deliberation for the most part follow the lead of chance. ~ Michel de Montaigne
354:We are born to inquire into truth; it belongs to a greater to possess it ~ Michel de Montaigne
355:Who does not in some sort live to others, does not live much to himself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
356:All other knowledge is hurtful to him who has not honesty and good-nature ~ Michel de Montaigne
357:As Michel de Montaigne observed, “No wind favors him who has no destined port. ~ John C Maxwell
358:Every place swarms with commentaries; of authors there is great scarcity. ~ Michel de Montaigne
359:He who does not live in some degree for others, hardly lives for himself. ~ Michel de Montaigne
360:I do myself a greater injury in lying than I do him of whom I tell a lie. ~ Michel de Montaigne
361:In plain Truth, it is no Want, but rather Abundance that creates Avarice. ~ Michel de Montaigne
362:Man is forming thousands of ridiculous relations between himself and God. ~ Michel de Montaigne
363:Nothing fixes a thing so intensely in the memory as the wish to forget it ~ Michel de Montaigne
364:Nothing prints more lively in our minds than something we wish to forget. ~ Michel de Montaigne
365:One must be a little foolish if one does not want to be even more stupid. ~ Michel de Montaigne
366:Rash and incessant scolding runs into custom and renders itself despised. ~ Michel de Montaigne
367:The greater part of the world's troubles are due to questions of grammar. ~ Michel de Montaigne
368:There is no conversation more boring than the one where everybody agrees. ~ Michel de Montaigne
369:The Stoics forbid this emotion to their sages as being base and cowardly. ~ Michel de Montaigne
370:Confidence in the goodness of another is good proof of one's own goodness. ~ Michel de Montaigne
371:He who is not sure of his memory, should not undertake the trade of lying. ~ Michel de Montaigne
372:Kendimizle aramızdaki fark, bir başkasıyla aramızdaki fark kadar büyüktür. ~ Michel de Montaigne
373::Nothing fixes a thing so intensely in the memory as the wish to forget it ~ Michel de Montaigne
374:Nothing fixes a thing so intensely in the memory as the wish to forget it. ~ Michel de Montaigne
375:The strangest, most generous, and proudest of all virtues is true courage. ~ Michel de Montaigne
376:To honor him whom we have made is far from honoring him that hath made us. ~ Michel de Montaigne
377:We must not attach knowledge to the mind, we have to incorporate it there. ~ Michel de Montaigne
378:We should rather examine, who is better learned, than who is more learned. ~ Michel de Montaigne
379:When I quote others I do so in order to express my own ideas more clearly. ~ Michel de Montaigne
380:And obstinacy is the sister of constancy, at least in vigour and stability. ~ Michel de Montaigne
381:Confidence in others' honesty is no light testimony of one's own integrity. ~ Michel de Montaigne
382:I...think it much more supportable to be always alone, than never to be so. ~ Michel de Montaigne
383:It is in the enjoyment and not in mere possession that makes for happiness. ~ Michel de Montaigne
384:My life has been full of terrible misfortunes most of which never happened. ~ Michel de Montaigne
385:No one is exempt from talking nonsense; the misfortune is to do it solemnly ~ Michel de Montaigne
386:Nothing else but an insatiate thirst of enjoying a greedily desired object. ~ Michel de Montaigne
387:Scratching is one of nature's sweetest gratifications, and nearest at hand. ~ Michel de Montaigne
388:The most unhappy and frail creatures are men and yet they are the proudest. ~ Michel de Montaigne
389:There is hardly less torment in running a family than in running a country. ~ Michel de Montaigne
390:There were many terrible things in my life and most of them never happened. ~ Michel de Montaigne
391:Certainly, if he still has himself, a man of understanding has lost nothing. ~ Michel de Montaigne
392:Experience has further taught me this, that we ruin ourselves by impatience. ~ Michel de Montaigne
393:Give me the provisions and whole apparatus of a kitchen, and I would starve. ~ Michel de Montaigne
394:He who falls obstinate in his courage, if he falls he fights from his knees. ~ Michel de Montaigne
395:I do myself a greater injury in lying than I do him of whom I tell a lie.
   ~ Michel de Montaigne,
396:It is a sign of contraction of the mind when it is content, or of weariness. ~ Michel de Montaigne
397:Lying is a terrible vice, it testifies that one despises God, but fears men. ~ Michel de Montaigne
398:My life has been full of terrible misfortunes, most of which never happened. ~ Michel de Montaigne
399:Repentance is but a denying of our will, and an opposition of our fantasies. ~ Michel de Montaigne
400:The worth of the mind consisteth not in going high, but in marching orderly. ~ Michel de Montaigne
401:Tis the taste of effeminacy that disrelishes ordinary and accustomed things. ~ Michel de Montaigne
402:What fear has once made me will, I am bound still to will when without fear. ~ Michel de Montaigne
403:Without doubt, it is a delightful harmony when doing and saying go together. ~ Michel de Montaigne
404:A man is not hurt so much by what happens, as by his opinion of what happens. ~ Michel de Montaigne
405:Death is not one of our social managements; it is a scene with one character. ~ Michel de Montaigne
406:Example is a bright looking-glass, universal and for all shapes to look into. ~ Michel de Montaigne
407:He that had never seen a river, imagined the first he met with to be the sea. ~ Michel de Montaigne
408:Stubborn and ardent clinging to one's opinion is the best proof of stupidity. ~ Michel de Montaigne
409:Take care that old age does not wrinkle your spirit even more than your face. ~ Michel de Montaigne
410:The greatest and glorious masterpiece of a man is how to live with a purpose. ~ Michel de Montaigne
411:We are Christians by the same title as we are natives of Perigord or Germany. ~ Michel de Montaigne
412:We find our energies are actually cramped when we are overanxious to succeed. ~ Michel de Montaigne
413:As for extraordinary things, all the provision in the world would not suffice. ~ Michel de Montaigne
414:D'autant que nous avons cher, estre, et estre consiste en mouvement et action. ~ Michel de Montaigne
415:He who fears he shall suffer already suffers what he fears.” —MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE1 ~ Joseph E LeDoux
416:I care not so much what I am in the opinion of others, as what I am in my own. ~ Michel de Montaigne
417:If it lay in my power to make myself feared, I had rather make myself beloved. ~ Michel de Montaigne
418:I seek in the reading of books, only to please myself, by an honest diversion. ~ Michel de Montaigne
419:Nature is a gentle guide, but not more sweet and gentle than prudent and just. ~ Michel de Montaigne
420:Nor is it enough to toughen up his soul; you must also toughen up his muscles. ~ Michel de Montaigne
421:Other people do not see you at all, but guess at you by uncertain conjectures. ~ Michel de Montaigne
422:There is no passion so much transports the sincerity of judgment as doth anger ~ Michel de Montaigne
423:The reverse side of truth has a hundred thousand shapes and no defined limits. ~ Michel de Montaigne
424:The study of books is a drowsy and feeble exercise which does not warm you up. ~ Michel de Montaigne
425:'Tis the sharpness of our mind that gives the edge to our pains and pleasures. ~ Michel de Montaigne
426:Experience teaches that a strong memory is generally joined to a weak judgment. ~ Michel de Montaigne
427:Gjor vi ikke oss selv til dyr når vi kaller den handling som skaper oss dyrisk? ~ Michel de Montaigne
428:I determine nothing; I do not comprehend things; I suspend judgment; I examine. ~ Michel de Montaigne
429:I will follow the right side even to the fire, but excluding the fire if I can. ~ Michel de Montaigne
430:My life has been filled with terrible misfortune; most of which never happened. ~ Michel de Montaigne
431:Nature has, herself, I fear, imprinted in man a kind of instinct to inhumanity. ~ Michel de Montaigne
432:Praise is always pleasing, let it come from whom, or upon what account it will. ~ Michel de Montaigne
433:Pride dwells in the thought; the tongue can have but a very little share in it. ~ Michel de Montaigne
434:The diversity of physical arguments and opinions embraces all sorts of methods. ~ Michel de Montaigne
435:There are truths on this side of the Pyrenees which are falsehoods on the other ~ Michel de Montaigne
436:The virtue of the soul does not consist in flying high, but in walking orderly. ~ Michel de Montaigne
437:This notion [skepticism] is more clearly understood by asking "What do I know?" ~ Michel de Montaigne
438:Unless a man feels he has a good enough memory, he should never venture to lie. ~ Michel de Montaigne
439:When we see a man with bad shoes, we say it is no wonder, if he is a shoemaker. ~ Michel de Montaigne
440:Every other knowledge is harmful to him who does not have knowledge of goodness. ~ Michel de Montaigne
441:It is an absolute perfection... to get the very most out of one's individuality. ~ Michel de Montaigne
442:It is taking one's conjectures rather seriously to roast someone alive for them. ~ Michel de Montaigne
443:I will follow the good side right to the fire, but not into it if I can help it. ~ Michel de Montaigne
444:Nobody is exempt from saying stupid things, the harm is to do it presumptuously. ~ Michel de Montaigne
445:The archer who overshoots his mark does no better than he who falls short of it. ~ Michel de Montaigne
446:The beautiful souls are they that are universal, open, and ready for all things. ~ Michel de Montaigne
447:The conduct of our lives is the true reflection of our thoughts. —MICHEL DE MONTAIGNE ~ Gretchen Rubin
448:There is little less trouble in governing a private family than a whole kingdom. ~ Michel de Montaigne
449:Those that will combat use and custom by the strict rules of grammar do but jest ~ Michel de Montaigne
450:Virtue can have naught to do with ease. . . . It craves a steep and thorny path. ~ Michel de Montaigne
451:All passions that suffer themselves to be relished and digested are but moderate. ~ Michel de Montaigne
452:And to bring in a new word by the head and shoulders, they leave out the old one. ~ Michel de Montaigne
453:Any person of honor chooses rather to lose his honor than to lose his conscience. ~ Michel de Montaigne
454:For I never see the whole of anything; nor do those who promise to show it to us. ~ Michel de Montaigne
455:If I can, I will prevent my death from saying anything not first said by my life. ~ Michel de Montaigne
456:In general I ask for books that make use of learning, not those that build it up. ~ Michel de Montaigne
457:Lucius Arruntius killed himself, he said, to escape both the future and the past. ~ Michel de Montaigne
458:Man is certainly crazy. He could not make a mite, and he makes gods by the dozen. ~ Michel de Montaigne
459:The beautiful souls are they that are unniversal, open, and ready for all things. ~ Michel de Montaigne
460:We are more unhappy to see people ahead of us than happy to see people behind us. ~ Michel de Montaigne
461:Whom conscience, ne'er asleep, Wounds with incessant strokes, not loud, but deep. ~ Michel de Montaigne
462:For truth itself has not the privilege to be spoken at all times and in all sorts. ~ Michel de Montaigne
463:It is the mind that maketh good or ill, That maketh wretch or happy, rich or poor. ~ Michel de Montaigne
464:Report followeth not all goodness, except difficulty and rarity be joined thereto. ~ Michel de Montaigne
465:There is no passion so much transports the
sincerity of judgement as doth anger ~ Michel de Montaigne
466:The sage says that all that is under heaven incurs the same law and the same fate. ~ Michel de Montaigne
467:We are nearer neighbours to ourselves than whiteness to snow, or weight to stones. ~ Michel de Montaigne
468:We trouble our life by thoughts about death, and our death by thoughts about life. ~ Michel de Montaigne
469:Disappointment and feebleness imprint upon us a cowardly and valetudinarian virtue. ~ Michel de Montaigne
470:Glory and repose are things that cannot possibly inhabit in one and the same place. ~ Michel de Montaigne
471:He who establishes his argument by noise and command shows that his reason is weak. ~ Michel de Montaigne
472:How many things were articles of faith to us yesterday that are fables to us today? ~ Michel de Montaigne
473:If I were of the trade, I should naturalize art as much as they "artialize" nature. ~ Michel de Montaigne
474:Le monde n’est qu’une balançoire perpétuelle. Toutes choses y balancent sans cesse. ~ Michel de Montaigne
475:Men ... are not agreed about any one thing, not even that heaven is over our heads. ~ Michel de Montaigne
476:No one is exempt from speaking nonsense. The great misfortune is to do it solemnly. ~ Michel de Montaigne
477:No-one is exempt from speaking nonsense – the only misfortune is to do it solemnly. ~ Michel de Montaigne
478:The lack of wealth is easily repaired but the poverty of the soul is irreplaceable. ~ Michel de Montaigne
479:There is a sort of gratification in doing good which makes us rejoice in ourselves. ~ Michel de Montaigne
480:~The value of life lies not in the length of days, but in the use we make of them ~ ~ Michel de Montaigne
481:Anyone who does not feel sufficiently strong in memory should not meddle with lying. ~ Michel de Montaigne
482:Children's plays are not sports, and should be deemed as their most serious actions. ~ Michel de Montaigne
483:He who establishes his argument by noise and command, shows that his reason is weak. ~ Michel de Montaigne
484:No man is exempt from saying silly things; the mischief is to say them deliberately. ~ Michel de Montaigne
485:Philosophical discussions habitually make men happy and joyful not frowning and sad. ~ Michel de Montaigne
486:Taking it all in all, I find it is more trouble to watch after money than to get it. ~ Michel de Montaigne
487:The laws of conscience, though we ascribe them to nature, actually come from custom. ~ Michel de Montaigne
488:The worst condition of humans is when they lose knowledge and control of themselves. ~ Michel de Montaigne
489:Wonder is the foundation of all philosophy, inquiry the progress, ignorance the end. ~ Michel de Montaigne
490:Decency, not to dare to do that in public which it is decent enough to do in private. ~ Michel de Montaigne
491:Et si je suis un homme ayant quelque lecture, je suis un homme qui n’en retient rien. ~ Michel de Montaigne
492:Even opinion is of force enough to make itself to be espoused at the expense of life. ~ Michel de Montaigne
493:How many things we held yesterday as articles of faith which today we tell as fables. ~ Michel de Montaigne
494:Indeed, there is no such thing as an altogether ugly woman — or altogether beautiful. ~ Michel de Montaigne
495:It is fear that I stand most in fear of, in sharpness it exceeds every other feeling. ~ Michel de Montaigne
496:I would rather let affairs break their neck than twist my faith for the sake of them. ~ Michel de Montaigne
497:Let us permit nature to have her way. She understands her business better than we do. ~ Michel de Montaigne
498:Men are tormented by the opinions they have of things, and not the things themselves. ~ Michel de Montaigne
499:Nature a, (ce crains-je) elle mesme attaché à l'homme quelque instinct à l'inhumanité ~ Michel de Montaigne
500:Reason has so many forms that we do not know which to choose-Experiment has no fewer. ~ Michel de Montaigne

IN CHAPTERS









WORDNET


































IN WEBGEN [10000/19]

Wikipedia - Clameur de haro -- Ancient legal injunction of restraint still enforceable in Jersey and Guernsey
Wikipedia - Dough offering -- The biblical injunction to separate a tithe from bread
Wikipedia - Hyper-injunctions in English law -- Form of superinjunction
Wikipedia - Injunction -- a legal order to stop doing something
Wikipedia - Non-molestation order -- An injunction that protects victims of abuse or harassment
Wikipedia - Occupation order -- An injunction that regulates who may reside in a home
https://legal.fandom.com/wiki/Mareva_injunction
2011 British privacy injunctions controversy
Anonymised injunctions in English law
Anti-Injunction Act
Cross-border injunction
Gang injunction
Injunction
Interlocutory injunction
List of known legal cases involving super-injunctions
List of privacy injunction cases in English law
National injunctions
Oakland gang injunctions
Tax Anti-Injunction Act


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