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object:Martin Heidegger
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subject class:Philosophy
subject:Philosophy
wiki:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Heidegger
Influences:Friedrich Nietzsche, Sren Kierkegaard, Friedrich Hlderlin, Georg Hegel, Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Schelling, Martin Luther, Aristotle, Heraclitus, Plato, Augustine of Hippo, Thomas Aquinas, Parmenides
Influenced:Agamben, Arendt, Beaufret, Blanchot, Borgmann, Bultmann, Derrida, Dreyfus, Dugin, El-, Bizri, Foucault, Gadamer, Jaspers, Jonas, Kuki, Levinas, Lwith, Marcel, Marcuse, Marion, Merleau-, Ponty, Nancy, Norberg-, Schulz, Patoka, Rahner, Rorty, Sartre, Schrmann, Sloterdijk, Stiegler, Strauss

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Kyoto school. An influential school of modern and contemporary Japanese philosophy that is closely associated with philosophers from Kyoto University; it combines East Asian and especially MAHĀYĀNA Buddhist thought, such as ZEN and JoDO SHINSHu, with modern Western and especially German philosophy and Christian thought. NISHIDA KITARo (1870-1945), Tanabe Hajime (1885-1962), and NISHITANI KEIJI (1900-1991) are usually considered to be the school's three leading figures. The name "Kyoto school" was coined in 1932 by Tosaka Jun (1900-1945), a student of Nishida and Tanabe, who used it pejoratively to denounce Nishida and Tanabe's "Japanese bourgeois philosophy." Starting in the late 1970s, Western scholars began to research the philosophical insights of the Kyoto school, and especially the cross-cultural influences with Western philosophy. During the 1990s, the political dimensions of the school have also begun to receive scholarly attention. ¶ Although the school's philosophical perspectives have developed through mutual criticism between its leading figures, the foundational philosophical stance of the Kyoto school is considered to be based on a shared notion of "absolute nothingness." "Absolute nothingness" was coined by Nishida Kitaro and derives from a putatively Zen and PURE LAND emphasis on the doctrine of emptiness (suNYATĀ), which Kyoto school philosophers advocated was indicative of a distinctive Eastern approach to philosophical inquiry. This Eastern emphasis on nothingness stood in contrast to the fundamental focus in Western philosophy on the ontological notion of "being." Nishida Kitaro posits absolute nothingness topologically as the "site" or "locale" (basho) of nonduality, which overcomes the polarities of subject and object, or noetic and noematic. Another major concept in Nishida's philosophy is "self-awareness" (jikaku), a state of mind that transcends the subject-object bifurcation, which was initially adopted from William James' (1842-1910) notion of "pure experience" (J. junsui keiken); this intuition reveals a limitless, absolute reality that has been described in the West as God or in the East as emptiness. Tanabe Hajime subsequently criticized Nishida's "site of absolute nothingness" for two reasons: first, it was a suprarational religious intuition that transgresses against philosophical reasoning; and second, despite its claims to the contrary, it ultimately fell into a metaphysics of being. Despite his criticism of what he considered to be Nishida's pseudoreligious speculations, however, Tanabe's Shin Buddhist inclinations later led him to focus not on Nishida's Zen Buddhist-oriented "intuition," but instead on the religious aspect of "faith" as the operative force behind other-power (TARIKI). Inspired by both Nishida and such Western thinkers as Meister Eckhart (c. 1260-1327), Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), and Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) (with whom he studied), Nishitani Keiji developed the existential and phenomenological aspects of Nishida's philosophy of absolute nothingness. Concerned with how to reach the place of absolute nothingness, given the dilemma of, on the one hand, the incessant reification and objectification by a subjective ego and, on the other hand, the nullification of reality, he argued for the necessity of overcoming "nihilism." The Kyoto school thinkers also played a central role in the development of a Japanese political ideology around the time of the Pacific War, which elevated the Japanese race mentally and spiritually above other races and justified Japanese colonial expansion. Their writings helped lay the foundation for what came to be called Nihonjinron, a nationalist discourse that advocated the uniqueness and superiority of the Japanese race; at the same time, however, Nishida also resisted tendencies toward fascism and totalitarianism in Japanese politics. Since the 1990s, Kyoto school writings have come under critical scrutiny in light of their ties to Japanese exceptionalism and pre-war Japanese nationalism. These political dimensions of Kyoto school thought are now considered as important for scholarly examination as are its contributions to cross-cultural, comparative philosophy.

Nishitani Keiji. (西谷啓治) (1900-1990). Japanese philosopher and member of what came to be known as the KYOTO SCHOOL, a contemporary school of Japanese philosophy that sought to synthesize ZEN Buddhist thought with modern Western, and especially Germanic, philosophy. Nishitani was schooled in Ishikawa prefecture and Tokyo and graduated from Kyoto University in 1924 with a degree in philosophy. A student of NISHIDA KITARo (1870-1945), the founder of the Kyoto School, Nishitani became a professor in the Department of Religion at Kyoto University in 1935 and from 1937 to 1939 studied with Martin Heidegger in Freiburg, Germany. He later chaired the Department of Modern Philosophy at Kyoto Prefectural University from 1955 to 1963. In such works as his 1949 Nihirizumu (translated in 1990 as The Self-Overcoming of Nihilism) and Shukyo to wa nani ka ("What Is Religion?," 1961, translated in 1982 as Religion and Nothingness), Nishitani sought to synthesize German existentialism, Christian mysticism, and what he considered to be Zen experience. Where German philosophy, which is governed by logic and cognitive thinking, addressed ontological questions regarding the self, he argued that such means as Christian mysticism and Zen meditation could complement German philosophy in constructing a path to a complete realization of the self. Nishitani took issue with Nietzsche's nihilism by borrowing from the Buddhist concept of emptiness (suNYATĀ) to argue that recognition of the self as empty brings one to an understanding of things as they are (viz., the Buddhist concept of suchness, or TATHATĀ), and hence a true understanding and affirmation of oneself. Nishitani's philosophical justification of Japan's wartime activities, notably his contributions to the well-known journal Chuokoron ("Central Review") in the early 1940s, has become a controversial aspect of his work.

ontologism ::: The ideological system that maintains that God and divine ideas are the first object of humans' intelligence and that the intuition of God is the first act of their intellectual knowledge. Note that Martin Heidegger used the term Onto-theology to refer to answering questions of being with direct reference to belief in God.

postmodernism ::: A philosophical movement characterized by the postmodern criticism and analysis of Western philosophy. Beginning as a critique of Continental philosophy, it was heavily influenced by phenomenology, structuralism, and existentialism, and by the philosophers Friedrich Nietzsche and Martin Heidegger. It was also influenced to some degree by Ludwig Wittgenstein's later criticisms of analytic philosophy. Within postmodern philosophy, there are numerous interrelated fields, including deconstruction and several fields beginning with the prefix "post-", such as post-structuralism, post-Marxism, and post-feminism. In particular postmodern philosophy has spawned a huge literature of critical theory.



QUOTES [7 / 7 - 138 / 138]


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   6 Martin Heidegger
   1 reading :::
   50 Philosophy Classics: List of Books Covered:
   1. Hannah Arendt - The Human Condition (1958)
   2. Aristotle - Nicomachean Ethics (4th century BC)
   3. AJ Ayer - Language

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  128 Martin Heidegger

1:Why are there beings at all, instead of Nothing? ~ Martin Heidegger,
2:Every man is born as many men and dies as a single one. ~ Martin Heidegger,
3:Being means appearing. Appearing is not something subsequent that sometimes happens to being. Being presences as appearing. ~ Martin Heidegger, Introduction to Metaphysics (p. 107),
4:Constituting does not mean producing in the sense of making and fabricating; it means letting the entity be seen in its objectivity. ~ Martin Heidegger, History of the Concept of Time, 76,
5:This environmental milieu…does not consist just of things, objects, which are then conceived as meaning this and this; rather, the meaningful is primary and immediately given to me without any mental detours across thing-oriented apprehension. ~ Martin Heidegger, TDP p. 61,
6:Only a god can save us. The only possibility available to us is that by thinking and poeticizing we prepare a readiness for the appearance of a god, or for the absence of a god in [our] decline, insofar as in view of the absent god we are in a state of decline
   ~ Martin Heidegger,
7:reading :::
   50 Philosophy Classics: List of Books Covered:
   1. Hannah Arendt - The Human Condition (1958)
   2. Aristotle - Nicomachean Ethics (4th century BC)
   3. AJ Ayer - Language, Truth and Logic (1936)
   4. Julian Baggini - The Ego Trick (2011)
   5. Jean Baudrillard - Simulacra and Simulation (1981)
   6. Simone de Beauvoir - The Second Sex (1952)
   7. Jeremy Bentham - Principles of Morals and Legislation (1789)
   8. Henri Bergson - Creative Evolution (1911)
   9. David Bohm - Wholeness and the Implicate Order (1980)
   10. Noam Chomsky - Understanding Power (2002)
   11. Cicero - On Duties (44 BC)
   12. Confucius - Analects (5th century BC)
   13. Rene Descartes - Meditations (1641)
   14. Ralph Waldo Emerson - Fate (1860)
   15. Epicurus - Letters (3rd century BC)
   16. Michel Foucault - The Order of Things (1966)
   17. Harry Frankfurt - On Bullshit (2005)
   18. Sam Harris - Free Will (2012)
   19. GWF Hegel - Phenomenology of Spirit (1803)
   20. Martin Heidegger - Being and Time (1927)
   21. Heraclitus - Fragments

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*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:To dwell is to garden. ~ Martin Heidegger,
2:Only a god can save us. ~ Martin Heidegger,
3:Being is an issue for one. ~ Martin Heidegger,
4:True time is four-dimensional. ~ Martin Heidegger,
5:Being is only Being for Dasein. ~ Martin Heidegger,
6:Transcendence constitutes selfhood. ~ Martin Heidegger,
7:Questioning is the piety of thought. ~ Martin Heidegger,
8:But what is great can only begin great. ~ Martin Heidegger,
9:How one encounters reality is a choice. ~ Martin Heidegger,
10:The possible ranks higher than the actual. ~ Martin Heidegger,
11:Everyone is the other and no one is himself. ~ Martin Heidegger,
12:Language is the house of the truth of Being. ~ Martin Heidegger,
13:We ourselves are the entities to be analyzed. ~ Martin Heidegger,
14:Why are there beings at all, instead of Nothing? ~ Martin Heidegger,
15:We do not "have" a body; rather, we "are" bodily. ~ Martin Heidegger,
16:Why are there beings at all, instead of Nothing? ~ Martin Heidegger,
17:Tell me how you read and I'll tell you who you are. ~ Martin Heidegger,
18:Longing is the agony of the nearness of the distant. ~ Martin Heidegger,
19:he who thinks great thoughts often makes great errors ~ Martin Heidegger,
20:Making itself intelligible is suicide for philosophy. ~ Martin Heidegger,
21:Is the earth in our head? Or do we stand on the earth? ~ Martin Heidegger,
22:Every man is born as many men and dies as a single one. ~ Martin Heidegger,
23:Every man is born as many men and dies as a single one. ~ Martin Heidegger,
24:Every man is born as many men and dies as a single one. ~ Martin Heidegger,
25:Only if we are capable of dwelling, only then can we build ~ Martin Heidegger,
26:We make a space inside ourselves, so that being can speak. ~ Martin Heidegger,
27:In order to remain silent Da-sein must have something to say. ~ Martin Heidegger,
28:We would like only, for once, to get to where we are already. ~ Martin Heidegger,
29:Nothing is everything that doesn't happen at this very moment. ~ Martin Heidegger,
30:truth is that which makes a people certain, clear, and strong. ~ Martin Heidegger,
31:The poets are in the vanguard of a changed conception of Being. ~ Martin Heidegger,
32:Whatever can be noted historically can be found within history. ~ Martin Heidegger,
33:The essence of technology is by no means anything technological. ~ Martin Heidegger,
34:The song still remains which names the land over which it sings. ~ Martin Heidegger,
35:We should live totally in the face of the night and of the Evil. ~ Martin Heidegger,
36:In everything well known something worthy of thought still lurks. ~ Martin Heidegger,
37:The human being is not the lord of beings, but the shepherd of Being. ~ Martin Heidegger,
38:Understanding of being is itself a determination of being of Da-sein. ~ Martin Heidegger,
39:A man's first bond is that which ties him into the national community. ~ Martin Heidegger,
40:The human body is essentially something other than an animal organism. ~ Martin Heidegger,
41:We still by no means think decisively enough about the essence of action. ~ Martin Heidegger,
42:The German language speaks Being, while all the others merely speak of Being. ~ Martin Heidegger,
43:We do not say: Being is, time is, but rather: there is Being and there is time. ~ Martin Heidegger,
44:There is no such thing as an empty word, only one that is worn out yet remains full. ~ Martin Heidegger,
45:I take great pleasure, every day, in seeing my work deeply rooted in our native soil. ~ Martin Heidegger,
46:A boundary is not that at which something stops, but that from which something begins. ~ Martin Heidegger,
47:Temporality temporalizes as a future which makes present in the process of having been. ~ Martin Heidegger,
48:Being-alone is a deficient mode of being-with; its possibility is a proof for the latter. ~ Martin Heidegger,
49:Only where leader and led together bind each other in one destiny ... does true order grow. ~ Martin Heidegger,
50:The word "art" does not designate the concept of a mere eventuality; it is a concept of rank. ~ Martin Heidegger,
51:This characteristic of Dasein's being this "that it is" is veiled in its "whence" and "whither. ~ Martin Heidegger,
52:The relationship between man and space is none other than dwelling, strictly thought and spoken. ~ Martin Heidegger,
53:A person is neither a thing nor a process but an opening through which the Absolute can manifest. ~ Martin Heidegger,
54:The most thought-provoking thing in our thought-provoking time is that we are still not thinking. ~ Martin Heidegger,
55:So long as we represent technology as an instrument, we remain held fast in the will to master it. ~ Martin Heidegger,
56:We should never allow our fears or the expectations of others to set the frontiers of our destiny. ~ Martin Heidegger,
57:But every historical statement and legitimization itself moves within a certain relation to history. ~ Martin Heidegger,
58:The will to mastery becomes all the more urgent the more technology threatens to slip from human control ~ Martin Heidegger,
59:To think is to confine yourself to a single thought that one day stands still like a star in the world's sky. ~ Martin Heidegger,
60:Man acts as though he were the shaper and master of language, while in fact language remains the master of man. ~ Martin Heidegger,
61:Man acts as though he were the shaper and master of language, while in fact language remains the master of man. ~ Martin Heidegger,
62:Making itself intelligible is suicide for philosophy. ~ Martin Heidegger, Contributions to Philosophy, P. Emad, trans. (1989), p. 307.,
63:A giving which gives only its gift, but in the giving holds itself back and withdraws, such a giving we call sending. ~ Martin Heidegger,
64:The relation of feeling toward art and its bringing-forth can be one of production or one of reception and enjoyment. ~ Martin Heidegger,
65:Thinking begins only when we have come to know that reason, glorified for centuries, is the stiff-necked adversary of thought. ~ Martin Heidegger,
66:I know that everything essential and great originated from the fact that the human being had a homeland and was rooted in tradition. ~ Martin Heidegger,
67:Time-space as commonly understood, in the sense of the distance measured between two time-points, is the result of time calculation. ~ Martin Heidegger,
68:Language is the house of Being. In its home man dwells. Those who think and those who create with words are the guardians of this home. ~ Martin Heidegger,
69:Dwelling is not primarily inhabiting but taking care of and creating that space within which something comes into its own and flourishes. ~ Martin Heidegger,
70:What was Aristotle’s life?’ Well, the answer lay in a single sentence: ‘He was born, he thought, he died.’ And all the rest is pure anecdote. ~ Martin Heidegger,
71:Thinking only begins at the point where we have come to know that Reason, glorified for centuries, is the most obstinate adversary of thinking. ~ Martin Heidegger,
72:Spiritual superiority [consists in] deep dedication ... in the form of the most rigorous training, as commitment, resistance, solitude, and love. ~ Martin Heidegger,
73:Time is not a thing, thus nothing which is, and yet it remains constant in its passing away without being something temporal like the beings in time. ~ Martin Heidegger,
74:As the ego cogito, subjectivity is the consciousness that represents something, relates this representation back to itself, and so gathers with itself. ~ Martin Heidegger,
75:Thus "phenomenology" means αποφαινεσθαι τα φαινομενα -- to let that which shows itself be seen from itself in the very way in which it shows itself from itself. ~ Martin Heidegger,
76:To be a poet in a destitute time means: to attend, singing, to the trace of the fugitive gods. This is why the poet in the time of the world's night utters the holy. ~ Martin Heidegger,
77:The question concerning technology is the question concerning the constellation in which revealing and concealing, in which the coming to presence of truth, comes to pass ~ Martin Heidegger,
78:In Nietzsche's view nihilism is not a Weltanschauung that occurs at some time and place or another; it is rather the basic character of what happens in Occidental history. ~ Martin Heidegger,
79:When modern physics exerts itself to establish the world's formula, what occurs thereby is this: the being of entities has resolved itself into the method of the totally calculable. ~ Martin Heidegger,
80:The Fuhrer alone is the present and future German reality and its law. Learn to know ever more deeply: from now on every single thing demands decision, and every action responsibility. ~ Martin Heidegger,
81:If I take death into my life, acknowledge it, and face it squarely, I will free myself from the anxiety of death and the pettiness of life - and only then will I be free to become myself. ~ Martin Heidegger,
82:Philosophy will not be able to effect an immediate transformation of the present condition of the world. This is not only true of philosophy, but of all merely human thought and endeavor. ~ Martin Heidegger,
83:If I take death into my life, acknowledge it, and face it squarely, I will free myself from the anxiety of death and the pettiness of life - and only then will I be free to become myself. ~ Martin Heidegger,
84:To think Being itself explicitly requires disregarding Being to the extent that it is only grounded and interpreted in terms of beings and for beings as their ground, as in all metaphysics. ~ Martin Heidegger,
85:No thinker has ever entered into another thinker’s solitude. Yet it is only from its solitude that all thinking, in a hidden mode, speaks to the thinking that comes after or that went before. ~ Martin Heidegger,
86:Being and time determine each other reciprocally, but in such a manner that neither can the former - Being - be addressed as something temporal nor can the latter - time - be addressed as a being. ~ Martin Heidegger,
87:If in Nietzsche's thinking the prior tradition of Western thought is gathered and completed in a decisive respect, then the confrontation with Nietzsche becomes one with all Western thought hitherto. ~ Martin Heidegger,
88:Pessimism negates the existing world. Yet its negating is ambiguous. It can simply will decay and nothingness, but it can also renounce what exists and thus open a path for a new formation of the world. ~ Martin Heidegger,
89:The average, vague understanding of being can be permeated by traditional theories and opinions about being in such a way that these theories, as the sources of the prevailing understanding, remain hidden. ~ Martin Heidegger,
90:Form displays the relation [to beings] itself as the state of original comportment toward beings, the festive state in which the being itself in its essence is celebrated and thus for the first time placed in the open. ~ Martin Heidegger,
91:Profound boredom, drifting here and there in the abysses of our existence like a muffling fog, removes all things and men and oneself along with it into a remarkable indifference. This boredom reveals being as a whole. ~ Martin Heidegger,
92:We name time when we say: every thing has its time. This means: everything which actually is, every being comes and goes at the right time and remains for a time during the time allotted to it. Every thing has its time. ~ Martin Heidegger,
93:Everyone is the other, and no one is himself. The they, which supplies the answer to the who of everyday Da-sein, is the nobody to whom every Da-sein has always already surrendered itself, in its being-among-one-another. ~ Martin Heidegger,
94:The world, in resting upon the earth, strives to surmount it. As self-opening it cannot endure anything closed. The earth, however, as sheltering and concealing, tends always to draw the world into itself and keep it there ~ Martin Heidegger,
95:Technology is therefore no mere means. Technology is a way of revealing. If we give heed to this, then another whole realm for the essence of technology will open itself up to us. It is the realm of revealing, i.e., of truth ~ Martin Heidegger,
96:Nietzsche ... does not shy from conscious exaggeration and one-sided formulations of his thought, believing that in this way he can most clearly set in relief what in his vision and in his inquiry is different from the run-of-the-mill. ~ Martin Heidegger,
97:What seems natural to us is probably just something familiar in a long tradition that has forgotten the unfamiliar source from which it arose. And yet this unfamiliar source once struck man as strange and caused him to think and to wonder. ~ Martin Heidegger,
98:The critique of the highest values hitherto does not simply refute them or declare them invalid. It is rather a matter of displaying their origins as impositions which must affirm precisely what ought to be negated by the values established. ~ Martin Heidegger,
99:The small are always dependent on the great; they are "small" precisely because they think they are independent. The great thinker is one who can hear what is greatest in the work of other "greats" and who can transform it in an original manner. ~ Martin Heidegger,
100:From our human experience and history, at least as far as I am informed, I know that everything essential and great has only emerged when human beings had a home and were rooted in a tradition. Today's literature is, for instance, largely destructive. ~ Martin Heidegger,
101:And so man, as existing transcendence abounding in and surpassing toward possibilities, is a creature of distance. Only through the primordial distances he establishes toward all being in his transcendence does a true nearness to things flourish in him. ~ Martin Heidegger,
102:Only a god can save us. The only possibility available to us is that by thinking and poeticizing we prepare a readiness for the appearance of a god, or for the absence of a god in [our] decline, insofar as in view of the absent god we are in a state of decline
   ~ Martin Heidegger,
103:The senses do not enable us to cognize any entity in its Being; they merely serve to announce the ways in which 'external' Things within-the-world are useful or harmful for human creatures encumbered with bodies....they tell us nothing about entities in their Being. ~ Martin Heidegger,
104:Agriculture is now a motorized food industry, the same thing in its essence as the production of corpses in the gas chambers and the extermination camps, the same thing as blockades and the reduction of countries to famine, the same thing as the manufacture of hydrogen bombs. ~ Martin Heidegger,
105:In no way can it be uttered, as can other things, which one can learn. Rather, from out of a full, co-existential dwelling with the thing itself - as when a spark, leaping from the fire, flares into light - so it happens, suddenly, in the soul, there to grow, alone with itself. ~ Martin Heidegger,
106:Nevertheless, the ultimate business of philosophy is to preserve the force of the most elemental words in which Dasein expresses itself, and to keep the common understanding from levelling them off to that unintelligibility which functions in turn as a source of pseudo-problems. ~ Martin Heidegger,
107:Eighty years ago, Martin Heidegger extolled Nazi Germany as providing the best hope for rescuing the glorious civilization of the Greeks from the barbarians of the East and West. Today, German bankers are crushing Greece under an economic regime designed to maintain their wealth and power. ~ Noam Chomsky,
108:Dasein is a being that does not simply occur among other beings. Rather it is ontically distinguished by the fact that in its being this being is concerned about its very being. Thus it is constitutive of the being of Dasein to have, in its very being, a relation of being to this being. ~ Martin Heidegger,
109:The domination of the public way in which things have been interpreted has already decided upon even the possibilities of being attuned, that is, about the basic way in which Da-sein lets itself be affected by the world. The they prescribes that attunement, it determines what and how one "sees. ~ Martin Heidegger,
110:What is peddled about nowadays as philosophy, especially that of N.S. [National Socialism], but has nothing to do with the inner truth and greatness of that movement [namely the encounter between global technology and modern humanity] is nothing but fishing in that troubled sea of values and totalities. ~ Martin Heidegger,
111:English humorist Alan Coren was surely wrong when he said that the only books guaranteed to sell well were those about cats, golf and the Third Reich. His book Golfing for Cats, adorned with a Swastika, could also have done with some Peak-Oil pie-charts and a centerfold pull-out of a topless Martin Heidegger. ~ Leigh Phillips,
112:Everywhere we remain unfree and chained to technology, whether we passionately affirm or deny it. But we are delivered over to it in the worst possible way when we regard it as something neutral; for this conception of it, to which today we particularly like to do homage, makes us utterly blind to the essence of technology. ~ Martin Heidegger,
113:Anyone can achieve their fullest potential, who we are might be predetermined, but the path we follow is always of our own choosing. We should never allow our fears or the expectations of others to set the frontiers of our destiny. Your destiny can't be changed but, it can be challenged. Every man is born as many men and dies as a single one. ~ Martin Heidegger,
114:Teaching is more difficult than learning because what teaching calls for is this: to let learn. The real teacher, in fact, lets nothing else be learned than learning. His conduct, therefore, often produces the impression that we properly learn nothing from him, if by "learning" we now suddenly understand merely the procurement of useful information. ~ Martin Heidegger,
115:In the work of art the truth of an entity has set itself to work. ‘To set’ means here: to bring to a stand. Some particular entity, a pair of peasant shoes, comes in the work to stand in the light of its being. The being of the being comes into the steadiness of its shining. The nature of art would then be this: the truth of being setting itself to work. ~ Martin Heidegger,
116:The threat to man does not come in the first instance from the potentially lethal machines and apparatus of technology. The actual threat has already affected man in his essence. The rule of Enframing threatens man with the possibility that it could be denied to him to enter into a more original revealing and hence to experience the call of a more primal truth ~ Martin Heidegger,
117:In many places, above all in the Anglo-Saxon countries, logistics is today considered the only possible form of strict philosophy, because its result and procedures yield an assured profit for the construction of the technological universe. In America and elsewhere, logistics as the only proper philosophy of the future is thus beginning today to seize power over the intellectual world. ~ Martin Heidegger,
118:In Germany, Martin Heidegger turned against his former mentor Edmund Husserl, but later Heidegger's friends and colleagues turned their backs on him. In France, Gabriel Marcel attacked Jean-Paul Sartre, Sartre fell out with Camus, Camus fell out with Merleau-Ponty, Merleau-Ponty fell out with Sartre, and the Hungarian intellectual Arthur Koestler fell out with everyone and punched Camus in the street. ~ Sarah Bakewell,
119:Celebration... is self restraint, is attentiveness, is questioning, is meditating, is awaiting, is the step over into the more wakeful glimpse of the wonder - the wonder that a world is worlding around us at all, that there are beings rather than nothing, that things are and we ourselves are in their midst, that we ourselves are and yet barely know who we are, and barely know that we do not know all this. ~ Martin Heidegger,
120:The mathematical is that evident aspect of things within which we are always already moving and according to which we experience them as things at all, and as such things. The mathematical is this fundamental position we take toward things by which we take up things as already given to us, and as they must and should be given. Therefore, the mathematical is the fundamental presupposition of the knowledge of things. ~ Martin Heidegger,
121:You can be horrified by the state of the prisons, the misery in certain neighborhoods of its cities, or their level of poverty. Anti-Americanism, by which I mean a hatred for America as such-its transformation into a metaphysical category, which incarnates all the evil in the world-is one of fascism's favorite themes. Look at writer and political theorist Charles Maurras in France. The philosopher Martin Heidegger in Germany. The radical Islamists of today! ~ Bernard Henri Levy,
122:Since time itself is not movement, it must somehow have to do with movement.Time is initially encountered in those entities which are changeable, change is in time. How is time exhibited in this way of encountering it, namely, as that within which things change? Does it here give itself as itself in what it is? Can an axplacation of time starts here guarantee that time will thereby provide as it were the fundamental phenomena that determine it in its own being? ~ Martin Heidegger,
123:In many places, above all in the Anglo-Saxon countries, logistics is today considered the only possible form of strict philosophy, because its result and procedures yield an assured profit for the construction of the technological universe. In America and elsewhere, logistics as the only proper philosophy of the future is thus beginning today to seize power over the intellectual world. ~ Martin Heidegger, What is Called Thinking, J. Glenn Gray, trans. (New York: Harper, 1968), p. 21.,
124:Oswald Spengler's Decline of the West, Ernst Bloch's Spirit of Utopia, Hermann Hesse's Glimpse Into Chaos, Edmund Husserl's The Crisis in European Science, Karl Kraus's The Last Days of Mankind, Arthur Koestler's The Ghost in the Machine, Robert Musil's The Man Without Qualities, José Ortega y Gasset's The Revolt of the Masses, Martin Heidegger's Being and Time, René Guenon's The Reign of Quantity, Thomas Mann's The Magic Mountain, Colin Wilson's The Outsider—the list could go on. ~ Gary Lachman,
125:Freedom is only to be found where there is burden to be shouldered. In creative achievements this burden always represents an imperative and a need that weighs heavily upon man’s mood, so that he comes to be in a mood of melancholy. All creative action resides in a mood of melancholy, whether we are clearly aware of the fact or not, whether we speak at length about it or not. All creative action resides in a mood of melancholy, but this is not to say that everyone in a melancholy mood is creative. ~ Martin Heidegger,
126:I see the situation of man in the world of planetary technicity not as an inexitricable and inescapable destiny, but I see the task of thought precisely in this, that within its own limits it helps man as such achieve a satisfactory relationship to the essence of technicity. National Socialism did indeed go in this direction. Those people, however, were far too poorly equipped for thought to arrive at a really explicit relationship to what is happening today and has been underway for the past 300 years. ~ Martin Heidegger,
127:The world worlds, and is more fully in being than the tangible and perceptible realm in which we believe ourselves to be at home...By the opening up of a world, all things gain their lingering and hastening, their remoteness and nearness, their scope and limits. In a world's worlding is gathered that spaciousness out of which the protective grace of the gods is granted and withheld. Even this doom of the god remaining absent is a way in which the world worlds...All coming to presence...keeps itself concealed to the last. ~ Martin Heidegger,
128:Body', 'soul', and 'spirit' may designate phenomenal domains which can be detached as themes for definite investigations; within certain limits their ontological indefiniteness may not be important. When, however, we come to the question of man's Being, this is not something we can simply compute by adding together those kinds of Being which body, soul, and spirit respectively possess--kinds of being whose nature has not as yet been determined. And even if we should attempt such an ontological procedure, some idea of the Being of the whole must be presupposed. ~ Martin Heidegger,
129:Why are there beings at all instead of nothing? That is the question. Presumably it is not arbitrary question, "Why are there beings at all instead of nothing"- this is obviously the first of all questions. Of course it is not the first question in the chronological sense [...] And yet, we are each touched once, maybe even every now and then, by the concealed power of this question, without properly grasping what is happening to us. In great despair, for example, when all weight tends to dwindle away from things and the sense of things grows dark, the question looms. ~ Martin Heidegger,
130:Questions are not happenstance thoughts nor are questions common problems of today which one picks up from hearsay and booklearning and decks out with a gesture of profundity questions grow out of confrontation with the subject matter and the subject matter is there only where eyes are, it is in this manner that questions will be posed and all the more considering that questions that have today fallen out of fashion in the great industry of problems. One stands up for nothing more than the normal running of the industry. Philosophy interprets its corruption as the resurrection of metaphysics. ~ Martin Heidegger,
131:When the farthest corner of the globe has been conquered
technologically and can be exploited economically; when any incident you like, in any place you like, at any time you like, becomes
accessible as fast as you like; when you can simultaneously "experience" an assassination attempt against a king in France and a symphony concert in Tokyo; when time is nothing but speed, instantaneity, and simultaneity, and time as history has vanished from all
Being of all peoples; when a boxer counts as the great man of a
people; when the tallies of millions at mass meetings are a triumph;
then, yes then, there still looms like a specter over all this uproar the
question: what for? — where to? — and what then? ~ Martin Heidegger,
132:Why is love beyond all measure of other human possibilities so rich and such a sweet burden for the one who has been struck by it? Because we change ourselves into that which we love, and yet remain ourselves. Then we would like to thank the beloved, but find nothing that would do it adequately. We can only be thankful to ourselves. Love transforms gratitude into faithfulness to ourselves and into an unconditional faith in the Other. Thus love steadily expands its most intimate secret. Closeness here is existence in the greatest distance from the other- the distance that allows nothing to dissolve - but rather presents the “thou” in the transparent, but “incomprehensible” revelation of the “just there”. That the presence of the other breaks into our own life - this is what no feeling can fully encompass. Human fate gives itself to human fate, and it is the task of pure love to keep this self-surrender as vital as on the first day. ~ Martin Heidegger,
133:Cities have often been compared to language: you can read a city, it’s said, as you read a book. But the metaphor can be inverted. The journeys we make during the reading of a book trace out, in some way, the private spaces we inhabit. There are texts that will always be our dead-end streets; fragments that will be bridges; words that will be like the scaffolding that protects fragile constructions. T.S. Eliot: a plant growing in the debris of a ruined building; Salvador Novo: a tree-lined street transformed into an expressway; Tomas Segovia: a boulevard, a breath of air; Roberto Bolano: a rooftop terrace; Isabel Allende: a (magically real) shopping mall; Gilles Deleuze: a summit; and Jacques Derrida: a pothole. Robert Walser: a chink in the wall, for looking through to the other side; Charles Baudelaire: a waiting room; Hannah Arendt: a tower, an Archimedean point; Martin Heidegger: a cul-de-sac; Walter Benjamin: a one-way street walked down against the flow. ~ Valeria Luiselli,
134:It is perhaps permissible here to draw attention to a distinction made by Martin Heidegger, who speaks of the duality of calculating and reflective thought. Both modes of thought are legitimate and necessary, but for this very reason neither can be absorbed in the other. There must therefore be both: calculating thought, which is concerned with "makability," and reflective thought, which is concerned with meaning. And one cannot deny that the Freiburg philosopher has a good deal of justification for expressing the fear that in an age in which calculating thought is celebrating the most amazing triumphs man is nevertheless threatened, perhaps more than ever before by thoughtlessness, by the flight from thought. By thinking only of the practicable, of what can be made, he is in danger of forgetting to reflect on himself and on the meaning of his existence. Of course, this temptation is present in every age. Thus in the thirteenth century the great Franciscan theologian Bonaventure felt obliged to reproach his colleagues of the philosophical faculty at Paris with having learned how to measure the world but having forgotten how to measure themselves. ~ Benedict XVI,
135:Fasismi ei ollut Hitlerin keskintöä. Monien aikalaistensa tavoin hänkin tutustui totalitaariseen valtamalliin kotonaan. Fasismin kansallissosialistisessa muodossa on epäilemättä selviä jälkiä Hitlerin lapsuudesta. Hänen lapsuutensa ei kuitenkaan ollut poikkeuksellinen. Siksi Gerhart Hauptmann ja Martin Heidegger ja monet muutkin kuuluisat intellektuellit eivät kyenneet näkemään Hitlerin hulluuden läpi. Siihen he olisivat kyenneet vain jos olisivat nähneet itse saamansa kasvatuksen läpi. Adolf Hitler pääsi tekemään Euroopasta ja maailmasta lapsuutensa taistelutantereen, koska miljoonat silloisen Saksan asukkaat olivat lapsuudessaan kokeneet vastaavaa. He pitivät seuraavia periaatteita itsestäänselvyytenä, vaikkeivät tietoisesti: #1 Arvoista ylin ei ole elämä vaan järjestys ja kuuliaisuus. #2 Järjestyksen voi luoda ja säilyttää vain väkivallalla. #3 Luovuus (jota lapsi edustaa) on aikuiselle vaara ja täytyy hävittää. #4 Korkein laki on ehdoton tottelevaisuus isälle. #5 Tottelemattomuus ja arvostelu eivät tule kysymykseen, koska niiden rangaistuksena on kuritus tai kuoleman uhka. #6 Elävästä, vitaalista lapsesta on mahdollisimman varhain koulittava kuuliainen robotti, orja. #7 Ei-toivotut tuneet ja todelliset tarpeet on siitä syystä määrätietoisesti tukahdutettava. #8 Äiti ei koskaan suojele lasta isän rangaistustoimilta vaan pitää hänelle kidutuksen jälkeen saarnan vanhempien kunnioittamisesta ja rakastamisesta. ~ Alice Miller,
136:Philosophy, then, is not a doctrine, not some simplistic scheme for orienting oneself in the world, certainly not an instrument or achievement of human Dasein. Rather, it is this Dasein itself insofar as it comes to be, in freedom, from out of its own ground. Whoever, by stint of research, arrives at this self-understanding of philosophy is granted the basic experience of all philosophizing, namely that the more fully and originally research comes into its own, the more surely is it "nothing but" the transformation of the same few simple questions. But those who wish to transform must bear within themselves the power of a fidelity that knows how to preserve. And one cannot feel this power growing within unless one is up in wonder. And no one can be caught up in wonder without travelling to the outermost limits of the possible. But no one will ever become the friend of the possible without remaining open to dialogue with the powers that operate in the whole of human existence. But that is the comportment of the philosopher: to listen attentively to what is already sung forth, which can still be perceived in each essential happening of world. And in such comportment the philosopher enters the core of what is truly at stake in the task he has been given to do. Plato knew of that and spoke of it in his Seventh Letter:

'In no way can it be uttered, as can other things, which one can learn. Rather, from out of a full, co-existential dwelling with the thing itself - as when a spark, leaping from the fire, flares into light - so it happens, suddenly, in the soul, there to grow, alone with itself. ~ Martin Heidegger,
137:Another way of posing the problem is to ask oneself: what is the “present”? We say that only the things of the present exist: the past no longer exists and the future doesn’t exist yet. But in physics there is nothing that corresponds to the notion of the “now.” Compare “now” with “here.” “Here” designates the place where a speaker is: for two different people “here” points to two different places. Consequently “here” is a word the meaning of which depends on where it is spoken. The technical term for this kind of utterance is “indexical.” “Now” also points to the instant in which the word is uttered and is also classed as “indexical.” But no one would dream of saying that things “here” exist, whereas things that are not “here” do not exist. So then why do we say that things that are “now” exist and that everything else doesn’t? Is the present something that is objective in the world, that “flows,” and that makes things “exist” one after the other, or is it only subjective, like “here”? This may seem like an abstruse mental problem. But modern physics has made it into a burning issue, since special relativity has shown that the notion of the “present” is also subjective. Physicists and philosophers have come to the conclusion that the idea of a present that is common to the whole universe is an illusion and that the universal “flow” of time is a generalization that doesn’t work. When his great Italian friend Michele Besso died, Einstein wrote a moving letter to Michele’s sister: “Michele has left this strange world a little before me. This means nothing. People like us, who believe in physics, know that the distinction made between past, present and future is nothing more than a persistent, stubborn illusion.” Illusion or not, what explains the fact that for us time “runs,” “flows,” “passes”? The passage of time is obvious to us all: our thoughts and our speech exist in time; the very structure of our language requires time—a thing “is” or “was” or “will be.” It is possible to imagine a world without colors, without matter, even without space, but it’s difficult to imagine one without time. The German philosopher Martin Heidegger emphasized our “dwelling in time.” Is it possible that the flow of time that Heidegger treats as primal is absent from descriptions of the world? Some ~ Carlo Rovelli,
138:reading :::
   50 Philosophy Classics: List of Books Covered:
   1. Hannah Arendt - The Human Condition (1958)
   2. Aristotle - Nicomachean Ethics (4th century BC)
   3. AJ Ayer - Language, Truth and Logic (1936)
   4. Julian Baggini - The Ego Trick (2011)
   5. Jean Baudrillard - Simulacra and Simulation (1981)
   6. Simone de Beauvoir - The Second Sex (1952)
   7. Jeremy Bentham - Principles of Morals and Legislation (1789)
   8. Henri Bergson - Creative Evolution (1911)
   9. David Bohm - Wholeness and the Implicate Order (1980)
   10. Noam Chomsky - Understanding Power (2002)
   11. Cicero - On Duties (44 BC)
   12. Confucius - Analects (5th century BC)
   13. Rene Descartes - Meditations (1641)
   14. Ralph Waldo Emerson - Fate (1860)
   15. Epicurus - Letters (3rd century BC)
   16. Michel Foucault - The Order of Things (1966)
   17. Harry Frankfurt - On Bullshit (2005)
   18. Sam Harris - Free Will (2012)
   19. GWF Hegel - Phenomenology of Spirit (1803)
   20. Martin Heidegger - Being and Time (1927)
   21. Heraclitus - Fragments (6th century)
   22. David Hume - An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748)
   23. William James - Pragmatism (1904)
   24. Daniel Kahneman - Thinking: Fast and Slow (2011)
   25. Immanuel Kant - Critique of Pure Reason (1781)
   26. Soren Kierkegaard - Fear and Trembling (1843)
   27. Saul Kripke - Naming and Necessity (1972)
   28. Thomas Kuhn - The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962)
   29. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Theodicy (1710)
   30. John Locke - An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690)
   31. Marshall McLuhan - The Medium is the Massage (1967)
   32. Niccolo Machiavelli - The Prince (1532)
   33. John Stuart Mill - On Liberty (1859)
   34. Michel de Montaigne - Essays (1580)
   35. Iris Murdoch - The Sovereignty of Good (1970)
   36. Friedrich Nietzsche - Beyond Good and Evil (1886)
   37. Blaise Pascal - Pensees (1670)
   38. Plato - The Republic (4th century BC)
   39. Karl Popper - The Logic of Scientific Discovery (1934)
   40. John Rawls - A Theory of Justice (1971)
   41. Jean-Jacques Rousseau - The Social Contract (1762)
   42. Bertrand Russell - The Conquest of Happiness (1920)
   43. Michael Sandel - Justice (2009)
   44. Jean Paul Sartre - Being and Nothingness (1943)
   45. Arthur Schopenhauer - The World as Will and Representation (1818)
   46. Peter Singer - The Life You Can Save (2009)
   47. Baruch Spinoza - Ethics (1677)
   48. Nassim Nicholas - Taleb The Black Swan (2007)
   49. Ludwig Wittgenstein - Philosophical Investigations (1953)
   50. Slavoj Zizek - Living In The End Times (2010)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Philosophy Classics,

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WORDNET



--- Overview of noun martin_heidegger

The noun martin heidegger has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
              
1. Heidegger, Martin Heidegger ::: (German philosopher whose views on human existence in a world of objects and on Angst influenced the existential philosophers (1889-1976))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun martin_heidegger

1 sense of martin heidegger                      

Sense 1
Heidegger, Martin Heidegger
   INSTANCE OF=> existentialist, existentialist philosopher, existential philosopher
     => philosopher
       => scholar, scholarly person, bookman, student
         => intellectual, intellect
           => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
             => organism, being
               => living thing, animate thing
                 => whole, unit
                   => object, physical object
                     => physical entity
                       => entity
             => causal agent, cause, causal agency
               => physical entity
                 => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun martin_heidegger
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun martin_heidegger

1 sense of martin heidegger                      

Sense 1
Heidegger, Martin Heidegger
   INSTANCE OF=> existentialist, existentialist philosopher, existential philosopher




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun martin_heidegger

1 sense of martin heidegger                      

Sense 1
Heidegger, Martin Heidegger
  -> existentialist, existentialist philosopher, existential philosopher
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beauvoir, Simone de Beauvoir
   HAS INSTANCE=> Camus, Albert Camus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heidegger, Martin Heidegger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sartre, Jean-Paul Sartre




--- Grep of noun martin_heidegger
martin heidegger



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