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object:Carl Rogers
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subject class:Psychology
subject:Psychology



--- WIKI
Carl Ransom Rogers (January 8, 1902 February 4, 1987) was an American psychologist and among the founders of the humanistic approach (or client-centered approach) to psychology. Rogers is widely considered to be one of the founding fathers of psycho therapy research and was honored for his pioneering research with the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contri butions by the American Psychological Association (APA) in 1956. The person-centered approach, his own unique approach to understanding personality and human relationships, found wide application in various domains such as psycho therapy and counseling (client-centered therapy), education (student-centered learning), organizations, and other group settings. For his professional work he was bestowed the Award for Distinguished Professional Contri butions to Psychology by the APA in 1972. In a study by Steven J. Haggbloom and colleagues using six criteria such as citations and recognition, Rogers was found to be the sixth most eminent psychologist of the 20th century and second, among clinicians, only to Sigmund Freud.
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author
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Carl Rogers

DEFINITIONS


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client-centred therapy: an humanistic approach to therapy developed by Carl Rogers, in which the person seeking treatment (termed a client), not the therapist, is seen as directing the process of therapy; later called person-centred therapy.

self-actualisation : in Maslows hierarchy of needs, refers to an individuals desire to grow and reach his or her potential. The process of becoming a person in psychological emancipation (Carl Rogers).



QUOTES [4 / 4 - 120 / 120]


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   2 Carl Rogers
   1 Tom Butler-Bowdon
   1 S. I. Hayakawa

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  107 Carl Rogers
   3 Tom Butler Bowdon
   2 Kristin Neff

1:The mainspring of creativity appears to be the same tendency which we discover so deeply as the curative force in psychotherapy, man's tendency to actualize himself, to become his potentialities. By this I mean the organic and human life, the urge to expand, extend, develop, mature - the tendency to express and activate all the capacities of the organism, or the self. ~ Carl Rogers,
2:Hearing has consequences. When I truly hear a person and the meanings that are important to him at that moment, hearing not simply his words, but him, and when I let him know that I have heard his own private personal meanings, many things happen. There is first of all a grateful look. He feels released. He wants to tell me more about his world. He surges forth in a new sense of freedom. He becomes more open to the process of change. I have often noticed that the more deeply I hear the meanings of the person, the more there is that happens. Almost always, when a person realize he has been deeply heard, his eyes moisten. I think in some real sense he is weeping for joy. It is as though he were saying, "Thank God, somebody heard me. Someone knows what it's like to be me. ~ Carl Rogers,
3:My deepest debt in this book is to the General Semantics ('non-Aristotelian system') of Alfred Korzybski. I have also drawn heavily upon the works of other contributors to semantic thought: especially C. K. Ogden and I. A. Richards, Thorstein Veblen, Edward Sapir, Leonard Bloomfield, Karl R. Popper, Thurman Arnold, Jerome Frank, Jean Piaget, Charles Morris, Wendell Johnson, Irving J. Lee, Ernst Cassirer, Anatol Rapoport, Stuart Chase. I am also deeply indebted to the writings of numerous psychologists and psychiatrists with one or another of the dynamic points of view inspired by Sigmund Freud: Karl Menninger, Trigant Burrow, Carl Rogers, Kurt Lewin, N. R. F. Maier, Jurgen Ruesch, Gregory Bateson, Rudolf Dreikurs, Milton Rokeach. I have also found extremely helpful the writings of cultural anthropologists, especially those of Benjamin Lee Whorf, Ruth Benedict, Clyde Kluckhohn, Leslie A. White, Margaret Mead, Weston La Barre. ~ S. I. Hayakawa,
4:reading :::
   50 Psychology Classics: List of Books Covered:
   Alfred Adler - Understanding Human Nature (1927)
   Gordon Allport - The Nature of Prejudice (1954)
   Albert Bandura - Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control (1997)
   Gavin Becker - The Gift of Fear (1997)
   Eric Berne - Games People Play (1964)
   Isabel Briggs Myers - Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type (1980)
   Louann Brizendine - The Female Brain (2006)
   David D Burns - Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy (1980)
   Susan Cain - Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (2012)
   Robert Cialdini - Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (1984)
   Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Creativity (1997)
   Carol Dweck - Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006)
   Albert Ellis & Robert Harper - (1961) A Guide To Rational Living(1961)
   Milton Erickson - My Voice Will Go With You (1982) by Sidney Rosen
   Eric Erikson - Young Man Luther (1958)
   Hans Eysenck - Dimensions of Personality (1947)
   Viktor Frankl - The Will to Meaning (1969)
   Anna Freud - The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (1936)
   Sigmund Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams (1901)
   Howard Gardner - Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983)
   Daniel Gilbert - Stumbling on Happiness (2006)
   Malcolm Gladwell - Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005)
   Daniel Goleman - Emotional Intelligence at Work (1998)
   John M Gottman - The Seven Principles For Making Marriage Work (1999)
   Temple Grandin - The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed (2013)
   Harry Harlow - The Nature of Love (1958)
   Thomas A Harris - I'm OK - You're OK (1967)
   Eric Hoffer - The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951)
   Karen Horney - Our Inner Conflicts (1945)
   William James - Principles of Psychology (1890)
   Carl Jung - The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (1953)
   Daniel Kahneman - Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)
   Alfred Kinsey - Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953)
   RD Laing - The Divided Self (1959)
   Abraham Maslow - The Farther Reaches of Human Nature (1970)
   Stanley Milgram - Obedience To Authority (1974)
   Walter Mischel - The Marshmallow Test (2014)
   Leonard Mlodinow - Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (2012)
   IP Pavlov - Conditioned Reflexes (1927)
   Fritz Perls - Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality (1951)
   Jean Piaget - The Language and Thought of the Child (1966)
   Steven Pinker - The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (2002)
   VS Ramachandran - Phantoms in the Brain (1998)
   Carl Rogers - On Becoming a Person (1961)
   Oliver Sacks - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1970)
   Barry Schwartz - The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less (2004)
   Martin Seligman - Authentic Happiness (2002)
   BF Skinner - Beyond Freedom & Dignity (1953)
   Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen - Difficult Conversations (2000)
   William Styron - Darkness Visible (1990)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Psychology Classics,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Life is about being and becoming ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
2:It's an awful risky thing to live. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
3:It is a direction not a destination. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
4:I prize the privilege of being alone. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
5:What is most personal is most universal. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
6:What you are to be, you are now becoming. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
7:Experience is, for me, the highest authority. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
8:Don't be a damned ammunition wagon. Be a rifle! ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
9:There are as many "real worlds" as there are people! ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
10:What I am is good enough if I would only be it openly. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
11:To be original, or different, is felt to be "dangerous." ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
12:The only person who cannot be helped is that person who blames others. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
13:The basic idea behind teaching is to teach people what they need to know. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
14:Neurotic behavior is quite predictable. Healthy behavior is unpredictable. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
15:Loneliness is a barrier that prevents one from uniting with the inner self. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
16:Life, at its best, is a flowing, changing process in which nothing is fixed. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
17:Openness to all attitudes no matter how extreme or unrealistic they may seem. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
18:As no one else can know how we perceive, we are the best experts on ourselves. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
19:Don't be the ammunition wagon, be the rifle knowledge exists primarily for use. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
20:Man's inability to communicate is a result of his failure to listen effectively. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
21:The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
22:With the price of life these days, you've got to get everything for free you can. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
23:Don't be the ammunition wagon, be the rifle... knowledge exists primarily for use. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
24:The only person who is educated is the one who has learned how to learn and change. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
25:Am I living in a way which is deeply satisfying to me, and which truly expresses me? ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
26:The only person who is educated is the one who has learned how to learn - and change ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
27:When I look at the world I'm pessimistic, but when I look at people I am optimistic. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
28:The good life is a process, not a state of being. It is a direction not a destination. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
29:It is astonishing how elements that seem insoluble become soluble when someone listens. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
30:It would not take very long to recoup our money, ... It would be a very short payback. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
31:People only seriously consider change when they feel accepted for exactly who they are. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
32:No other person's ideas, and none of my own ideas, are as authoritative as my experience. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
33:A person cannot teach another person directly; a person can only facilitate another's learning ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
34:Powerful is our need to be known, really known by ourselves and others, even if only for a moment. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
35:The very essence of the creative is its novelty, and hence we have no standard by which to judge it. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
36:The organism has one basic tendency and striving - to actualize, maintain, and enhance the experiencing organism ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
37:Allowance of the freedom of choices in direction, either for the group or individuals particularly in the near future. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
38:We will also be trying to circulate copies overseas, particularly in Denmark, where people are really keen on walking. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
39:The purpose of adult education is to help them to learn, not to teach them all you know and thus stop them from learning. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
40:The facts are always friendly, every bit of evidence one can acquire, in any area, leads one that much closer to what is true. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
41:It is the client who knows what hurts, what directions to go, what problems are crucial, what experiences have been deeply buried. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
42:I was forced to stretch my thinking, to realize that sincere and honest people could believe in very divergent religious doctrines. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
43:There is in every organism, at whatever level, an underlying flow of movement toward constructive fulfillment of its inherent possibilities. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
44:Learning of all kinds goes on best, lasts best, and tends to lead itself on more when it grows out of a real focus of interest in the learner. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
45:We cannot change, we cannot move away from what we are, until we thoroughly accept what we are. Then change seems to come about almost unnoticed. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
46:Unless man can make new and original adaptations to his environment as rapidly as his science can change the environment, our culture will perish. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
47:In a person who is open to experience each stimulus is freely relayed through the nervous system, without being distorted by any process of defensiveness. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
48:The degree to which I can create relationships, which facilitate the growth of others as separate persons, is a measure of the growth I have achieved in myself. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
49:The paradigm of Western culture is that the essence of persons is dangerous; thus, they must be taught, guided, and controlled by those with superior authority. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
50:Growth occurs when individuals confront problems, struggle to master them, and through that struggle develop new aspects of their skills, capacities, views about life. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
51:I am increasingly an architect of self. I am free to will and choose. I can, through accepting my individuality... become more of my uniqueness, more of my potentiality. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
52:Each person is an island unto himself, in a very real sense; and he can only build bridges to other islands if he is first of all willing to be himself and permitted to be himself. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
53:We in the West seem to have made a fetish out of complete individual self-sufficiency, of not needing help, of being completely private except in a very few selected relationships. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
54:Adults who think that children must be manipulated for their own good have developed the attitude of a controlling parent who lacks faith in himself, the child, or humanity or himself. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
55:We think we listen, but very rarely do we listen with real understanding, true empathy. Yet listening, of this very special kind, is one of the most potent forces for change that I know. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
56:It is astonishing how elements that seem insoluble become soluble when someone listens, how confusions that seem irremediable turn into relatively clear flowing streams when one is heard. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
57:Both the young and the old are almost completely useless in our modern society, and are made keenly aware of that uselessness. They have no place. They are private, isolated - and hopeless. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
58:It is astonishing how elements which seem insoluble become soluble when someone listens. How confusions which seem irremediable turn into relatively clear flowing streams when one is heard. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
59:I believe that the testing of the student's achievements in order to see if he meets some criterion held by the teacher, is directly contrary to the implications of therapy for significant learning. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
60:Although the client-centered approach had its origin purely within the limits of the psychological clinic, it is proving to have implications, often of a startling nature, for very diverse fields of effort. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
61:Most of us consist of two separated parts, trying desperately to bring themselves together into an integrated soma, where the distinctions between mind and body, feelings and intellect, would be obliterated. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
62:True empathy is always free of any evaluative or diagnostic quality. This comes across to the recipient with some surprise. "If I am not being judged, perhaps I am not so evil or abnormal as I have thought". ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
63:The state of empathy, or being empathic, is to perceive the internal frame of reference of another with accuracy and with the emotional components and meanings which pertain thereto as if one were the person. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
64:If I were to search for the central core of difficulty in people as I have come to know them, it is that in the great majority of cases they despise themselves, regarding themselves as worthless and unlovable. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
65:Empathy is a special way of coming to know another and ourself, a kind of attuning and understanding. When empathy is extended, it satisfies our needs and wish for intimacy, it rescues us from our feelings of aloneness. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
66:When a person realizes he has been deeply heard, his eyes moisten. I think in some real sense he is weeping for joy. It is as though he were saying, "Thank God, somebody heard me. Someone knows what it's like to be me". ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
67:The education situation which most effectively promotes significant learning is one in which (1) threat to the self of the learner is reduced to a minimum and (2) differential perception of the field of experience is facilitated ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
68:People are just as wonderful as sunsets if you let them be. When I look at a sunset, I don't find myself saying, "Soften the orange a bit on the right hand corner." I don't try to control a sunset. I watch with awe as it unfolds. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
69:We can choose to use our growing knowledge to enslave people in ways never dreamed of before, depersonalizing them, controlling them by means so carefully selected that they will perhaps never be aware of their loss of personhood. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
70:I realize that if I were stable, prudent and static; I'd live in death. Therefore I accept confusion, uncertainty, fear and emotional ups and downs; because that's the price I'm willing to pay for a fluid, perplexed and exciting life. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
71:If I can listen to what he can tell me, if I can understand how it seems to him; if I can see its personal meaning for him, if I can sense the emotional flavor which it has for him, then I will be releasing potent forces of change in him. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
72:I have come to think that one of the most satisfying experiences I know — and also one of the most growth-promoting experiences for the other person — is just fully to appreciate this individual in the same way that I appreciate a sunset. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
73:In my early professional years I was asking the question: How can I treat, or cure, or change this person? Now I would phrase the question in this way: How can I provide a relationship which this person may use for his own personal growth? ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
74:In my early professionals years I was asking the question: How can I treat, or cure, or change this person? Now I would phrase the question in this way: How can I provide a relationship which this person may use for his own personal growth? ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
75:The elements in a relationship which seem impossible to share, the secretly disturbing, dissatisfying elements, are the most rewarding to share. This is a hard, risky, frightening thing to learn, and it needs to be re-learned over and over. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
76:Freedom, individualism, authenticity and being yourself so long as you don't hurt another's physical person or property: The creative process is the emergence in action of a novel relational product, growing out of the uniqueness of the individual. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
77:So I have learned to ask myself, can I hear the sounds and sense the shape of this other person's inner world? Can I resonate to what he is saying so deeply that I sense the meanings he is afraid of, yet would like to communicate, as well as those he knows? ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
78:This process of the good life is not, I am convinced, a life for the faint-hearted. It involves the stretching and growing of becoming more and more of one's potentialities. It involves the courage to be. It means launching oneself fully into the stream of life. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
79:Over the years, however, the research evidence keeps piling up, and it points strongly to the conclusion that a high degree of empathy in a relationship is possibly the most potent and certainly one of the most potent factors in bringing about change and learning. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
80:If the time comes when our culture tires of the endless homicidal feuds, despairs of the use of force and war as a means of bringing peace, becomes discontent with the half-lives that its members are living - only then will our culture seriously look for alternatives. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
81:If we value independence, if we are disturbed by the growing conformity of knowledge, of values, of attitudes, which our present system induces, then we may wish to set up conditions of learning which make for uniqueness, for self-direction, and for self-initiated learning. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
82:Though modern Marriage is a tremendous laboratory, its members are often without preparation for the partnership function. How much agony and remorse and failure could have been avoided if there had been at least some rudimentary learning before they entered the partnership. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
83:I believe I know why it is satisfying to me to hear someone. When I can really hear someone, it puts me in touch with him; it enriches my life. It is through hearing people that I have learned all that I know about individuals, about personality, about interpersonal relationships. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
84:I have learned that in any significant or continuing relationship, feelings which are persistent had best be expressed. If they are expressed as feelings owned by me, the result may be temporarily upsetting but ultimately far more rewarding than any attempt to deny or conceal them. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
85:The only reality I can possibly know is the world as I perceive it at this moment. The only reality you can possibly know is the world as you see it at this moment. And the only certainty is that those perceived realities are different. There are as many “real worlds” as there are people! ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
86:The sense of community does not arise out of collective movement, nor from conforming to some group direction. Quite the contrary. Each individual tends to use the opportunity to become all that he or she can become. Separateness and diversity - the uniqueness of being "me" - are experienced ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
87:A second characteristic of the process which for me is the good life, is that it involves an increasingly tendency to live fully in each moment. I believe it would be evident that for the person who was fully open to his new experience, completely without defensiveness, each moment would be new. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
88:It is that the individual has within him or herself vast resources for self-understanding, for altering the self-concept basic attitudes, and his or her self-directed behavior - and that these resources can be tapped if only a definable climate of facilitative psychological attitudes can be provided ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
89:I hear the words, the thoughts, the feeling tones, the personal meaning, even the meaning that is below the conscious intent of the speaker. Sometimes too, in a message which superficially is not very important, I hear a deep human cry that lies buried and unknown far below the surface of the person. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
90:The relationship which I have found helpful is characterized by a sort of transparency on my part, in which my real feelings are evident; by an acceptance of this other person as a separate person with value in his own right; and by a deep empathic understanding which enables me to see his private world through his eyes. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
91:Experience is, for me, the highest authority. The touchstone of validity is my own experience. No other person's ideas, and none of my own ideas, are as authoritative as my experience. It is to experience that I must return again and again, to discover a closer approximation to truth as it is in the process of becoming me. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
92:The action of the child inventing a new game with his playmates; Einstein formulating a theory of relativity; the housewife devising a new sauce for the meat, a young author writing his first novel; all of these are in terms of definition, Creative, and there is no attempt to set them in some order of more or less Creative. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
93:You know that I don't believe that anyone has ever taught anything to anyone. I question that efficacy of teaching. The only thing that I know is that anyone who wants to learn will learn. And maybe a teacher is a facilitator, a person who puts things down and shows people how exciting and wonderful it is and asks them to eat. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
94:The kind of caring that the client-centered therapist desires to achieve is a gullible caring, in which clients are accepted as they say they are, not with a lurking suspicion in the therapist's mind that they may, in fact, be otherwise. This attitude is not stupidity on the therapist's part; it is the kind of attitude that is most likely to lead to trust. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
95:The kind of caring that the client-centered therapist desires to achieve is a gullible caring, in which clients are accepted as they say they are, not with a lurking suspicion in the therapist's mind that they may, in fact, be otherwise. This attitude is not stupidity on the therapist's part; it is the kind of attitude that is most likely to lead to trust... ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
96:The mainspring of creativity appears to be the same tendency which we discover so deeply as the curative force in psychotherapy, man's tendency to actualize himself, to become his potentialities. By this I mean the organic and human life, the urge to expand, extend, develop, mature - the tendency to express and activate all the capacities of the organism, or the self. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
97:When the other person is hurting, confused, troubled, anxious, alienated, terrified; or when he or she is doubtful of self-worth, uncertain as to identity, then understanding is called for. The gentle and sensitive companionship of an empathic stance… provides illumination and healing. In such situations deep understanding is, I believe, the most precious gift one can give to another. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
98:The way of being with another person which is termed empathic... means temporarily living in their life, moving abut in it delicately without making judgment... to be with another in this way means that for the time being you lay aside the views and values you hold for yourself in order to enter the other's world without prejudice... a complex, demanding, strong yet subtle and gentle way of being. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
99:One of the most satisfying experiences I know is fully to appreciate an individual in the same way I appreciate a sunset. When I look at a sunset... I don't find myself saying, &
100:One of the most revolutionary concepts to grow out of our clinical experience is the growing recognition that innermost core of man's nature - the deepest layers of his personality, the base of his &
101:To perceive the internal frame of reference of another with accuracy and with the emotional components and meanings which pertain thereto as if one were the person, but without ever losing the "as if" condition. Thus, it means to sense the hurt or the pleasure of another as he senses it and to perceive the causes thereof as he perceives them, but without ever losing the recognition that it is as if I were hurt or pleased and so forth. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
102:Then we got another letter saying, &
103:When I can relax, and be close to the transcendental core of me, then I may behave in strange and impulsive ways in the relationship, ways I cannot justify rationally, which have nothing to do with my thought processes. But these strange behaviors turn out to be right in some odd way. At these moments it seems that my inner spirit has reached out and touched the inner spirit of the other. Our relationship transcends itself and has become something larger. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
104:When someone really hears you without passing judgment on you, without trying to take responsibility for you, without trying to mold you, it feels damn good. . . . When I have been listened to and when I have been heard, I am able to re-perceive my world in a new way and to go on. It is astonishing how elements which seem insoluble become soluble when someone listens. How confusions which seem irremediable turn into relatively clear flowing streams when one is heard. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
105:So, as you can readily see from what I have said thus far, a creative, active, sensitive, accurate, empathic, nonjudgmental listening is for me terribly important in a relationship. It is important for me to provide it; it has been extremely important, especially at certain times in my life, to receive it. I feel that I have grown within myself when I have provided it; I am very sure that I have grown and been released and enhanced when I have received this kind of listening. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
106:The genuinely significant creation, whether an idea, or a work of art, or a scientific discovery, is most likely to be seen at first as erroneous, bad, or foolish. Later it may be seen as obvious, something self-evident to all. Only still later does it receive its final evaluation as a creative contribution. It seems clear no contemporary mortal can satisfactorily evaluate a creative product at the time it is formed, and this statement is increasingly true the greater the novelty of the creation. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
107:Facilitative attitudes (and skills) can help a therapist gain entry into the group Freedom from a desire to control the outcome, and respect for the capacity of the group, and skills in releasing individual expression Openness to all attitudes no matter how extreme or unrealistic they may seem Acceptance of the problems experienced by the group where they are clearly defined as issues Allowance of the freedom of choices in direction, either for the group or individuals particularly in the near future ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
108:There is another peculiar satisfaction in really hearing someone: It is like listening to the music of the spheres, because beyond the immediate message of the person, no matter what that might be, there is the universal. Hidden in all of the personal communications which I really hear there seem to be orderly psychological laws, aspects of the same order we find in the universe as a whole. So there is both the satisfaction of hearing this person and also the satisfaction of feeling one's self in touch with what is universally true. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
109:I think my deepest criticism of the educational system . . . is that it's all based upon a distrust of the student. Don't trust him to follow his own leads; guide him; tell him what to do; tell him what he should think; tell him what he should learn. Consequently at the very age when he should be developing adult characteristics of choice and decision making, when he should be trusted on some of those things, trusted to make mistakes and to learn from those mistakes, he is, instead, regimented and shoved into a curriculum, whether it fits him or not. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
110:I hear the words, the thoughts, the feeling tones, the personal meaning, even the meaning that is below the conscious intent of the speaker. Sometimes too, in a message which superficially is not very important, I hear a deep human cry that lies buried and unknown far below the surface of the person. So I have learned to ask myself, can I hear the sounds and sense the shape of this other person's inner world? Can I resonate to what he is saying so deeply that I sense the meanings he is afraid of, yet would like to communicate, as well as those he knows? ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Life is about Being & Becoming. ~ Carl Rogers,
2:It's an awful risky thing to live ~ Carl Rogers,
3:Experience is the highest authority. ~ Carl Rogers,
4:It is a direction not a destination. ~ Carl Rogers,
5:I prize the privilege of being alone. ~ Carl Rogers,
6:what is most personal is most universal ~ Carl Rogers,
7:What you are to be, you are now becoming. ~ Carl Rogers,
8:Experience is, for me, the highest authority. ~ Carl Rogers,
9:there is direction but there is no destination ~ Carl Rogers,
10:Don't be a damned ammunition wagon. Be a rifle! ~ Carl Rogers,
11:There are as many "real worlds" as there are people! ~ Carl Rogers,
12:What I am is good enough if I would only be it openly. ~ Carl Rogers,
13:To be original, or different, is felt to be "dangerous." ~ Carl Rogers,
14:The only person who cannot be helped is that person who blames others. ~ Carl Rogers,
15:The basic idea behind teaching is to teach people what they need to know. ~ Carl Rogers,
16:Neurotic behavior is quite predictable. Healthy behavior is unpredictable. ~ Carl Rogers,
17:Loneliness is a barrier that prevents one from uniting with the inner self. ~ Carl Rogers,
18:Life, at its best, is a flowing, changing process in which nothing is fixed. ~ Carl Rogers,
19:Openness to all attitudes no matter how extreme or unrealistic they may seem. ~ Carl Rogers,
20:As no one else can know how we perceive, we are the best experts on ourselves. ~ Carl Rogers,
21:Man's inability to communicate is a result of his failure to listen effectively. ~ Carl Rogers,
22:The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change. ~ Carl Rogers,
23:With the price of life these days, you've got to get everything for free you can. ~ Carl Rogers,
24:Don't be the ammunition wagon, be the rifle... knowledge exists primarily for use. ~ Carl Rogers,
25:The only person who is educated is the one who has learned how to learn and change. ~ Carl Rogers,
26:Am I living in a way which is deeply satisfying to me, and which truly expresses me? ~ Carl Rogers,
27:When I look at the world I'm pessimistic, but when I look at people I am optimistic. ~ Carl Rogers,
28:The good life is a process, not a state of being. It is a direction not a destination. ~ Carl Rogers,
29:It is astonishing how elements that seem insoluble become soluble when someone listens. ~ Carl Rogers,
30:People only seriously consider change when they feel accepted for exactly who they are. ~ Carl Rogers,
31:No other person's ideas, and none of my own ideas, are as authoritative as my experience. ~ Carl Rogers,
32:The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change. Carl Rogers ~ Tara Brach,
33:A person cannot teach another person directly; a person can only facilitate another's learning ~ Carl Rogers,
34:Powerful is our need to be known, really known by ourselves and others, even if only for a moment. ~ Carl Rogers,
35:The very essence of the creative is its novelty, and hence we have no standard by which to judge it. ~ Carl Rogers,
36:The organism has one basic tendency and striving - to actualize, maintain, and enhance the experiencing organism ~ Carl Rogers,
37:Allowance of the freedom of choices in direction, either for the group or individuals particularly in the near future. ~ Carl Rogers,
38:The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change. —CARL ROGERS, On Becoming a Person T ~ Kristin Neff,
39:The purpose of adult education is to help them to learn, not to teach them all you know and thus stop them from learning. ~ Carl Rogers,
40:The facts are always friendly, every bit of evidence one can acquire, in any area, leads one that much closer to what is true. ~ Carl Rogers,
41:It is the client who knows what hurts, what directions to go, what problems are crucial, what experiences have been deeply buried. ~ Carl Rogers,
42:I was forced to stretch my thinking, to realize that sincere and honest people could believe in very divergent religious doctrines. ~ Carl Rogers,
43:La curiosa paradoja es que cuando me acepto tal como soy, entonces puedo cambiar. CARL ROGERS, El proceso de convertirse en persona ~ Kristin Neff,
44:There is in every organism, at whatever level, an underlying flow of movement toward constructive fulfillment of its inherent possibilities. ~ Carl Rogers,
45:Learning of all kinds goes on best, lasts best, and tends to lead itself on more when it grows out of a real focus of interest in the learner. ~ Carl Rogers,
46:We cannot change, we cannot move away from what we are, until we thoroughly accept what we are. Then change seems to come about almost unnoticed. ~ Carl Rogers,
47:Unless man can make new and original adaptations to his environment as rapidly as his science can change the environment, our culture will perish. ~ Carl Rogers,
48:As Carl Rogers, one of the founders of humanistic psychology, once noted: “The curious paradox is that when I accept myself as I am, then I change. ~ William Ury,
49:In a person who is open to experience each stimulus is freely relayed through the nervous system, without being distorted by any process of defensiveness. ~ Carl Rogers,
50:The degree to which I can create relationships, which facilitate the growth of others as separate persons, is a measure of the growth I have achieved in myself. ~ Carl Rogers,
51:The paradigm of Western culture is that the essence of persons is dangerous; thus, they must be taught, guided, and controlled by those with superior authority. ~ Carl Rogers,
52:Growth occurs when individuals confront problems, struggle to master them, and through that struggle develop new aspects of their skills, capacities, views about life. ~ Carl Rogers,
53:To recognize that "I am the one who chooses" and "I am the one who determines the value of an experience for me" is both an invigorating and a frightening realization. ~ Carl Rogers,
54:I am increasingly an architect of self. I am free to will and choose. I can, through accepting my individuality... become more of my uniqueness, more of my potentiality. ~ Carl Rogers,
55:This idea originated with psychologist Carl Rogers (see p 238), who taught that nonjudgmental listening and acceptance of another person’s feelings create rapport. Applied ~ Tom Butler Bowdon,
56:Each person is an island unto himself, in a very real sense; and he can only build bridges to other islands if he is first of all willing to be himself and permitted to be himself. ~ Carl Rogers,
57:We in the West seem to have made a fetish out of complete individual self-sufficiency, of not needing help, of being completely private except in a very few selected relationships. ~ Carl Rogers,
58:Adults who think that children must be manipulated for their own good have developed the attitude of a controlling parent who lacks faith in himself, the child, or humanity or himself. ~ Carl Rogers,
59:"I have been astonished to find how accurately the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard pictured the dilemma of the individual more than a century ago, with deep psychological insight." ~ Carl Rogers,
60:We think we listen, but very rarely do we listen with real understanding, true empathy. Yet listening, of this very special kind, is one of the most potent forces for change that I know. ~ Carl Rogers,
61:It is astonishing how elements that seem insoluble become soluble when someone listens, how confusions that seem irremediable turn into relatively clear flowing streams when one is heard. ~ Carl Rogers,
62:Both the young and the old are almost completely useless in our modern society, and are made keenly aware of that uselessness. They have no place. They are private, isolated - and hopeless. ~ Carl Rogers,
63:I believe that the testing of the student's achievements in order to see if he meets some criterion held by the teacher, is directly contrary to the implications of therapy for significant learning. ~ Carl Rogers,
64:Although the client-centered approach had its origin purely within the limits of the psychological clinic, it is proving to have implications, often of a startling nature, for very diverse fields of effort. ~ Carl Rogers,
65:Most of us consist of two separated parts, trying desperately to bring themselves together into an integrated soma, where the distinctions between mind and body, feelings and intellect, would be obliterated. ~ Carl Rogers,
66:True empathy is always free of any evaluative or diagnostic quality. This comes across to the recipient with some surprise. "If I am not being judged, perhaps I am not so evil or abnormal as I have thought". ~ Carl Rogers,
67:The state of empathy, or being empathic, is to perceive the internal frame of reference of another with accuracy and with the emotional components and meanings which pertain thereto as if one were the person. ~ Carl Rogers,
68:If I were to search for the central core of difficulty in people as I have come to know them, it is that in the great majority of cases they despise themselves, regarding themselves as worthless and unlovable. ~ Carl Rogers,
69:Empathy is a special way of coming to know another and ourself, a kind of attuning and understanding. When empathy is extended, it satisfies our needs and wish for intimacy, it rescues us from our feelings of aloneness. ~ Carl Rogers,
70:When a person realizes he has been deeply heard, his eyes moisten. I think in some real sense he is weeping for joy. It is as though he were saying, "Thank God, somebody heard me. Someone knows what it's like to be me". ~ Carl Rogers,
71:The education situation which most effectively promotes significant learning is one in which (1) threat to the self of the learner is reduced to a minimum and (2) differential perception of the field of experience is facilitated ~ Carl Rogers,
72:People are just as wonderful as sunsets if you let them be. When I look at a sunset, I don't find myself saying, "Soften the orange a bit on the right hand corner." I don't try to control a sunset. I watch with awe as it unfolds. ~ Carl Rogers,
73:We can choose to use our growing knowledge to enslave people in ways never dreamed of before, depersonalizing them, controlling them by means so carefully selected that they will perhaps never be aware of their loss of personhood. ~ Carl Rogers,
74:I realize that if I were stable, prudent and static; I'd live in death. Therefore I accept confusion, uncertainty, fear and emotional ups and downs; because that's the price I'm willing to pay for a fluid, perplexed and exciting life. ~ Carl Rogers,
75:If I can listen to what he can tell me, if I can understand how it seems to him; if I can see its personal meaning for him, if I can sense the emotional flavor which it has for him, then I will be releasing potent forces of change in him. ~ Carl Rogers,
76:I have come to think that one of the most satisfying experiences I know — and also one of the most growth-promoting experiences for the other person — is just fully to appreciate this individual in the same way that I appreciate a sunset. ~ Carl Rogers,
77:In my early professional years I was asking the question: How can I treat, or cure, or change this person? Now I would phrase the question in this way: How can I provide a relationship which this person may use for his own personal growth? ~ Carl Rogers,
78:The elements in a relationship which seem impossible to share, the secretly disturbing, dissatisfying elements, are the most rewarding to share. This is a hard, risky, frightening thing to learn, and it needs to be re-learned over and over. ~ Carl Rogers,
79:I have come to feel that the more fully the individual is understood and accepted, the more he tends to drop the false fronts with which he has been meeting life, and the more he tends to move in a direction which is forward. ~ Carl Rogers, On Becoming a Person,
80:"Freedom, individualism, authenticity and being yourself so long as you don't hurt another's physical person or property: The creative process is the emergence in action of a novel relational product, growing out of the uniqueness of the individual." ~ Carl Rogers,
81:To some extent this area was foreshadowed by pioneering humanistic psychologist Abraham Maslow, who wrote about the self-actualized or fulfilled person, and Carl Rogers, who once noted that he was pessimistic about the world, but optimistic about people. ~ Tom Butler Bowdon,
82:This process of the good life is not, I am convinced, a life for the faint-hearted. It involves the stretching and growing of becoming more and more of one's potentialities. It involves the courage to be. It means launching oneself fully into the stream of life. ~ Carl Rogers,
83:Over the years, however, the research evidence keeps piling up, and it points strongly to the conclusion that a high degree of empathy in a relationship is possibly the most potent and certainly one of the most potent factors in bringing about change and learning. ~ Carl Rogers,
84:Experience is, for me, the highest authority. The touchstone of validity is my own experience. No other person’s ideas, and none of my own ideas, are as authoritative as my experience. It is to experience that I must return to discover a closer approximation to truth. ~ Carl Rogers,
85:If the time comes when our culture tires of the endless homicidal feuds, despairs of the use of force and war as a means of bringing peace, becomes discontent with the half-lives that its members are living - only then will our culture seriously look for alternatives. ~ Carl Rogers,
86:If we value independence, if we are disturbed by the growing conformity of knowledge, of values, of attitudes, which our present system induces, then we may wish to set up conditions of learning which make for uniqueness, for self-direction, and for self-initiated learning. ~ Carl Rogers,
87:Though modern Marriage is a tremendous laboratory, its members are often without preparation for the partnership function. How much agony and remorse and failure could have been avoided if there had been at least some rudimentary learning before they entered the partnership. ~ Carl Rogers,
88:I believe I know why it is satisfying to me to hear someone. When I can really hear someone, it puts me in touch with him; it enriches my life. It is through hearing people that I have learned all that I know about individuals, about personality, about interpersonal relationships. ~ Carl Rogers,
89:I have learned that in any significant or continuing relationship, feelings which are persistent had best be expressed. If they are expressed as feelings owned by me, the result may be temporarily upsetting but ultimately far more rewarding than any attempt to deny or conceal them. ~ Carl Rogers,
90:The only reality I can possibly know is the world as I perceive it at this moment. The only reality you can possibly know is the world as you see it at this moment. And the only certainty is that those perceived realities are different. There are as many “real worlds” as there are people! ~ Carl Rogers,
91:The sense of community does not arise out of collective movement, nor from conforming to some group direction. Quite the contrary. Each individual tends to use the opportunity to become all that he or she can become. Separateness and diversity - the uniqueness of being "me" - are experienced ~ Carl Rogers,
92:A second characteristic of the process which for me is the good life, is that it involves an increasingly tendency to live fully in each moment. I believe it would be evident that for the person who was fully open to his new experience, completely without defensiveness, each moment would be new. ~ Carl Rogers,
93:It is that the individual has within him or herself vast resources for self-understanding, for altering the self-concept basic attitudes, and his or her self-directed behavior - and that these resources can be tapped if only a definable climate of facilitative psychological attitudes can be provided ~ Carl Rogers,
94:I hear the words, the thoughts, the feeling tones, the personal meaning, even the meaning that is below the conscious intent of the speaker. Sometimes too, in a message which superficially is not very important, I hear a deep human cry that lies buried and unknown far below the surface of the person. ~ Carl Rogers,
95:The contribution of humanistic psychology to better relationships is recognized by the inclusion of Carl Rogers, whose influential book reminds us that relationships cannot flower if they don’t have a climate of listening and nonjudgmental acceptance, and that empathy is the mark of a genuine person. ~ Tom Butler Bowdon,
96:Experience is, for me, the highest authority. The touchstone of validity is my own experience. No other person's ideas, and none of my own ideas, are as authoritative as my experience. It is to experience that I must return again and again, to discover a closer approximation to truth as it is in the process of becoming me. ~ Carl Rogers,
97:The action of the child inventing a new game with his playmates; Einstein formulating a theory of relativity; the housewife devising a new sauce for the meat, a young author writing his first novel; all of these are in terms of definition, Creative, and there is no attempt to set them in some order of more or less Creative. ~ Carl Rogers,
98:You know that I don't believe that anyone has ever taught anything to anyone. I question that efficacy of teaching. The only thing that I know is that anyone who wants to learn will learn. And maybe a teacher is a facilitator, a person who puts things down and shows people how exciting and wonderful it is and asks them to eat. ~ Carl Rogers,
99:The kind of caring that the client-centered therapist desires to achieve is a gullible caring, in which clients are accepted as they say they are, not with a lurking suspicion in the therapist's mind that they may, in fact, be otherwise. This attitude is not stupidity on the therapist's part; it is the kind of attitude that is most likely to lead to trust. ~ Carl Rogers,
100:The mainspring of creativity appears to be the same tendency which we discover so deeply as the curative force in psychotherapy, man's tendency to actualize himself, to become his potentialities. By this I mean the organic and human life, the urge to expand, extend, develop, mature - the tendency to express and activate all the capacities of the organism, or the self. ~ Carl Rogers,
101:The mainspring of creativity appears to be the same tendency which we discover so deeply as the curative force in psychotherapy, man's tendency to actualize himself, to become his potentialities. By this I mean the organic and human life, the urge to expand, extend, develop, mature - the tendency to express and activate all the capacities of the organism, or the self. ~ Carl Rogers,
102:When the other person is hurting, confused, troubled, anxious, alienated, terrified; or when he or she is doubtful of self-worth, uncertain as to identity, then understanding is called for. The gentle and sensitive companionship of an empathic stance… provides illumination and healing. In such situations deep understanding is, I believe, the most precious gift one can give to another. ~ Carl Rogers,
103:The way of being with another person which is termed empathic...means temporarily living in their life, moving abut in it delicately without making judgment... to be with another in this way means that for the time being you lay aside the views and values you hold for yourself in order to enter the other's world without prejudice...a complex, demanding, strong yet subtle and gentle way of being. ~ Carl Rogers,
104:One of the most revolutionary concepts to grow out of our clinical experience is the growing recognition that innermost core of man's nature - the deepest layers of his personality, the base of his 'animal nature' - is basically socialized, forward-moving, rational and realistic... He is realistically able to control himself, and he is incorrigibly socialized in his desires. There is no beast in man, there is only man in man. ~ Carl Rogers,
105:To perceive the internal frame of reference of another with accuracy and with the emotional components and meanings which pertain thereto as if one were the person, but without ever losing the "as if" condition. Thus, it means to sense the hurt or the pleasure of another as he senses it and to perceive the causes thereof as he perceives them, but without ever losing the recognition that it is as if I were hurt or pleased and so forth. ~ Carl Rogers,
106:When I can relax, and be close to the transcendental core of me, then I may behave in strange and impulsive ways in the relationship, ways I cannot justify rationally, which have nothing to do with my thought processes. But these strange behaviors turn out to be right in some odd way. At these moments it seems that my inner spirit has reached out and touched the inner spirit of the other. Our relationship transcends itself and has become something larger. ~ Carl Rogers,
107:When someone really hears you without passing judgment on you, without trying to take responsibility for you, without trying to mold you, it feels damn good. . . . When I have been listened to and when I have been heard, I am able to re-perceive my world in a new way and to go on. It is astonishing how elements which seem insoluble become soluble when someone listens. How confusions which seem irremediable turn into relatively clear flowing streams when one is heard. ~ Carl Rogers,
108:So, as you can readily see from what I have said thus far, a creative, active, sensitive, accurate, empathic, nonjudgmental listening is for me terribly important in a relationship. It is important for me to provide it; it has been extremely important, especially at certain times in my life, to receive it. I feel that I have grown within myself when I have provided it; I am very sure that I have grown and been released and enhanced when I have received this kind of listening. ~ Carl Rogers,
109:Before every session, I take a moment to remember my humanity. There is no experience that this man has that I cannot share with him, no fear that I cannot understand, no suffering that I cannot care about, because I too am human. No matter how deep his wound, he does not need to be ashamed in front of me. I too am vulnerable. And because of this, I am enough. Whatever his story, he no longer needs to be alone with it. This is what will allow his healing to begin. (Carl Rogers) ~ Rachel Naomi Remen,
110:Perfectionism and optimalism are not distinct ways of being, an either-or choice, but rather they coexist in each person. And while we can move from perfectionism toward optimalism, we never fully leave perfectionism behind and never fully reach optimalism ahead. The optimalism ideal is not a distant shore to be reached but a distant star that guides us and can never be reached. As Carl Rogers pointed out, ‘The good life is a process, not a state of being. It is a direction, not a destination ~ Tal Ben Shahar,
111:The genuinely significant creation, whether an idea, or a work of art, or a scientific discovery, is most likely to be seen at first as erroneous, bad, or foolish. Later it may be seen as obvious, something self-evident to all. Only still later does it receive its final evaluation as a creative contribution. It seems clear no contemporary mortal can satisfactorily evaluate a creative product at the time it is formed, and this statement is increasingly true the greater the novelty of the creation. ~ Carl Rogers,
112:Facilitative attitudes (and skills) can help a therapist gain entry into the group Freedom from a desire to control the outcome, and respect for the capacity of the group, and skills in releasing individual expression Openness to all attitudes no matter how extreme or unrealistic they may seem Acceptance of the problems experienced by the group where they are clearly defined as issues Allowance of the freedom of choices in direction, either for the group or individuals particularly in the near future ~ Carl Rogers,
113:There is another peculiar satisfaction in really hearing someone: It is like listening to the music of the spheres, because beyond the immediate message of the person, no matter what that might be, there is the universal. Hidden in all of the personal communications which I really hear there seem to be orderly psychological laws, aspects of the same order we find in the universe as a whole. So there is both the satisfaction of hearing this person and also the satisfaction of feeling one's self in touch with what is universally true. ~ Carl Rogers,
114:Maybe I should at least wait, to help you, until it’s clear that you want to be helped. Carl Rogers, the famous humanistic psychologist, believed it was impossible to start a therapeutic relationship if the person seeking help did not want to improve.67 Rogers believed it was impossible to convince someone to change for the better. The desire to improve was, instead, the precondition for progress. I’ve had court-mandated psychotherapy clients. They did not want my help. They were forced to seek it. It did not work. It was a travesty. ~ Jordan Peterson,
115:Maybe I should at least wait, to help you, until it’s clear that you want to be helped. Carl Rogers, the famous humanistic psychologist, believed it was impossible to start a therapeutic relationship if the person seeking help did not want to improve.67 Rogers believed it was impossible to convince someone to change for the better. The desire to improve was, instead, the precondition for progress. I’ve had court-mandated psychotherapy clients. They did not want my help. They were forced to seek it. It did not work. It was a travesty. ~ Jordan B Peterson,
116:I think my deepest criticism of the educational system . . . is that it's all based upon a distrust of the student. Don't trust him to follow his own leads; guide him; tell him what to do; tell him what he should think; tell him what he should learn. Consequently at the very age when he should be developing adult characteristics of choice and decision making, when he should be trusted on some of those things, trusted to make mistakes and to learn from those mistakes, he is, instead, regimented and shoved into a curriculum, whether it fits him or not. ~ Carl Rogers,
117:An empathic way of being can be learned from empathic persons. Perhaps the most important statement of all is that the ability to be accurately empathic is something which can be developed by training. Therapists, parents and teachers can be helped to become empathic. This is especially likely to occur if their teachers and supervisors are themselves individuals of sensitive understanding. It is most encouraging to know that this subtle, elusive quality, of utmost importance in therapy, is not something one is "born with", but can be learned, and learned most rapidly in an empathic climate. ~ Carl Rogers,
118:Hearing has consequences. When I truly hear a person and the meanings that are important to him at that moment, hearing not simply his words, but him, and when I let him know that I have heard his own private personal meanings, many things happen. There is first of all a grateful look. He feels released. He wants to tell me more about his world. He surges forth in a new sense of freedom. He becomes more open to the process of change. I have often noticed that the more deeply I hear the meanings of the person, the more there is that happens. Almost always, when a person realize he has been deeply heard, his eyes moisten. I think in some real sense he is weeping for joy. It is as though he were saying, "Thank God, somebody heard me. Someone knows what it's like to be me. ~ Carl Rogers,
119:My deepest debt in this book is to the General Semantics ('non-Aristotelian system') of Alfred Korzybski. I have also drawn heavily upon the works of other contributors to semantic thought: especially C. K. Ogden and I. A. Richards, Thorstein Veblen, Edward Sapir, Leonard Bloomfield, Karl R. Popper, Thurman Arnold, Jerome Frank, Jean Piaget, Charles Morris, Wendell Johnson, Irving J. Lee, Ernst Cassirer, Anatol Rapoport, Stuart Chase. I am also deeply indebted to the writings of numerous psychologists and psychiatrists with one or another of the dynamic points of view inspired by Sigmund Freud: Karl Menninger, Trigant Burrow, Carl Rogers, Kurt Lewin, N. R. F. Maier, Jurgen Ruesch, Gregory Bateson, Rudolf Dreikurs, Milton Rokeach. I have also found extremely helpful the writings of cultural anthropologists, especially those of Benjamin Lee Whorf, Ruth Benedict, Clyde Kluckhohn, Leslie A. White, Margaret Mead, Weston La Barre. ~ S. I. Hayakawa,
120:reading :::
   50 Psychology Classics: List of Books Covered:
   Alfred Adler - Understanding Human Nature (1927)
   Gordon Allport - The Nature of Prejudice (1954)
   Albert Bandura - Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control (1997)
   Gavin Becker - The Gift of Fear (1997)
   Eric Berne - Games People Play (1964)
   Isabel Briggs Myers - Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type (1980)
   Louann Brizendine - The Female Brain (2006)
   David D Burns - Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy (1980)
   Susan Cain - Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (2012)
   Robert Cialdini - Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (1984)
   Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Creativity (1997)
   Carol Dweck - Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006)
   Albert Ellis & Robert Harper - (1961) A Guide To Rational Living(1961)
   Milton Erickson - My Voice Will Go With You (1982) by Sidney Rosen
   Eric Erikson - Young Man Luther (1958)
   Hans Eysenck - Dimensions of Personality (1947)
   Viktor Frankl - The Will to Meaning (1969)
   Anna Freud - The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (1936)
   Sigmund Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams (1901)
   Howard Gardner - Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983)
   Daniel Gilbert - Stumbling on Happiness (2006)
   Malcolm Gladwell - Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005)
   Daniel Goleman - Emotional Intelligence at Work (1998)
   John M Gottman - The Seven Principles For Making Marriage Work (1999)
   Temple Grandin - The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed (2013)
   Harry Harlow - The Nature of Love (1958)
   Thomas A Harris - I'm OK - You're OK (1967)
   Eric Hoffer - The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951)
   Karen Horney - Our Inner Conflicts (1945)
   William James - Principles of Psychology (1890)
   Carl Jung - The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (1953)
   Daniel Kahneman - Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)
   Alfred Kinsey - Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953)
   RD Laing - The Divided Self (1959)
   Abraham Maslow - The Farther Reaches of Human Nature (1970)
   Stanley Milgram - Obedience To Authority (1974)
   Walter Mischel - The Marshmallow Test (2014)
   Leonard Mlodinow - Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (2012)
   IP Pavlov - Conditioned Reflexes (1927)
   Fritz Perls - Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality (1951)
   Jean Piaget - The Language and Thought of the Child (1966)
   Steven Pinker - The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (2002)
   VS Ramachandran - Phantoms in the Brain (1998)
   Carl Rogers - On Becoming a Person (1961)
   Oliver Sacks - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1970)
   Barry Schwartz - The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less (2004)
   Martin Seligman - Authentic Happiness (2002)
   BF Skinner - Beyond Freedom & Dignity (1953)
   Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen - Difficult Conversations (2000)
   William Styron - Darkness Visible (1990)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Psychology Classics,

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--- Overview of noun carl_rogers

The noun carl rogers has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
                
1. Rogers, Carl Rogers ::: (United States psychologist who developed client-centered therapy (1902-1987))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun carl_rogers

1 sense of carl rogers                        

Sense 1
Rogers, Carl Rogers
   INSTANCE OF=> psychologist
     => scientist
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun carl_rogers
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun carl_rogers

1 sense of carl rogers                        

Sense 1
Rogers, Carl Rogers
   INSTANCE OF=> psychologist




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun carl_rogers

1 sense of carl rogers                        

Sense 1
Rogers, Carl Rogers
  -> psychologist
   => behaviorist, behaviourist
   => hypnotist, hypnotizer, hypnotiser, mesmerist, mesmerizer
   => parapsychologist
   => psycholinguist
   => psychophysicist
   HAS INSTANCE=> Binet, Alfred Binet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burt, Cyril Burt, Cyril Lodowic Burt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cattell, James McKeen Cattell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cattell, Ray Cattell, R. B. Cattell, Raymond B. Cattell, Raymond Bernard Cattell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clark, Kenneth Clark, Kenneth Bancroft Clark
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eysenck, Hans Eysenck, H. J. Eysenck, Hans Jurgen Eysenck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gesell, Arnold Gesell, Arnold Lucius Gesell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hall, G. Stanley Hall, Granville Stanley Hall
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, William James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jung, Carl Jung, Carl Gustav Jung
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leary, Tim Leary, Timothy Leary, Timothy Francis Leary
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ogden, C. K. Ogden, Charles Kay Ogden
   HAS INSTANCE=> Piaget, Jean Piaget
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rogers, Carl Rogers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simon, Herb Simon, Herbert A. Simon, Herbert Alexander Simon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Skinner, Fred Skinner, B. F. Skinner, Burrhus Frederic Skinner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thorndike, Edward Lee Thorndike
   HAS INSTANCE=> Watson, John Broadus Watson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Yerkes, Robert M. Yerkes, Robert Mearns Yerkes




--- Grep of noun carl_rogers
carl rogers



IN WEBGEN [10000/2]

InuYasha: Kanketsu-hen -- -- Sunrise -- 26 eps -- Manga -- Action Adventure Comedy Historical Demons Supernatural Magic Romance Fantasy Shounen -- InuYasha: Kanketsu-hen InuYasha: Kanketsu-hen -- Thwarted again by Naraku, Inuyasha, Kagome Higurashi, and their friends must continue their hunt for the few remaining Shikon Jewel shards, lest they fully form into a corrupted jewel at the hands of Naraku. But Naraku has plans of his own to acquire them, and will destroy anyone and anything standing in his way—even his own underlings. -- -- The persistent, unyielding danger posed by Naraku forces Sango and Miroku to decide what is most important to them—each other or their duty in battle. Meanwhile, Inuyasha must decide whether his heart lies with Kikyou or Kagome, before fate decides for him. Amid the race to find the shards, Inuyasha and his brother Sesshoumaru must also resolve their feud and cooperate for their final confrontation with Naraku, as it is a battle they must win in order to put a stop to his evil and cruelty once and for all. -- -- 221,159 8.21
InuYasha: Kanketsu-hen -- -- Sunrise -- 26 eps -- Manga -- Action Adventure Comedy Historical Demons Supernatural Magic Romance Fantasy Shounen -- InuYasha: Kanketsu-hen InuYasha: Kanketsu-hen -- Thwarted again by Naraku, Inuyasha, Kagome Higurashi, and their friends must continue their hunt for the few remaining Shikon Jewel shards, lest they fully form into a corrupted jewel at the hands of Naraku. But Naraku has plans of his own to acquire them, and will destroy anyone and anything standing in his way—even his own underlings. -- -- The persistent, unyielding danger posed by Naraku forces Sango and Miroku to decide what is most important to them—each other or their duty in battle. Meanwhile, Inuyasha must decide whether his heart lies with Kikyou or Kagome, before fate decides for him. Amid the race to find the shards, Inuyasha and his brother Sesshoumaru must also resolve their feud and cooperate for their final confrontation with Naraku, as it is a battle they must win in order to put a stop to his evil and cruelty once and for all. -- -- -- Licensor: -- VIZ Media -- 221,159 8.21



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