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object:Wumen Huikai
object:Wu Men Hui-k'ai
class:author
subject class:Zen
subject class:Poetry

link:https://terebess.hu/zen/mumonkan-eng.html
https://www.poetry-chaikhana.com/Poets/W/WuMenHuikai/index.html



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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Infinite_Library
The_Gateless_Gate

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1.wh_-_Moon_and_clouds_are_the_same
1.wh_-_One_instant_is_eternity
1.wh_-_Ten_thousand_flowers_in_spring,_the_moon_in_autumn
1.wh_-_The_Great_Way_has_no_gate

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
1.wh_-_Moon_and_clouds_are_the_same
1.wh_-_One_instant_is_eternity
1.wh_-_Ten_thousand_flowers_in_spring,_the_moon_in_autumn
1.wh_-_The_Great_Way_has_no_gate

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
Wumen Huikai

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Wumen Huikai. (J. Mumon Ekai; K. Mumun Hyegae 無門慧開) (1183-1260). In Chinese, "Gateless, Opening of Wisdom"; CHAN master in the LINJI ZONG; author of the eponymous WUMEN GUAN ("Gateless Checkpoint"), one of the two most important collections of Chan GONG'AN (J. koan; K. kongan). A native of Hangzhou prefecture in present-day Zhejiang province, Huikai was ordained by the monk "One Finger" Tianlong (d.u.), who also hailed from Hangzhou (see also YIZHI CHAN). Wumen later went to the monastery of Wanshousi in Jiangsu province to study with Yuelin Shiguan (1143-1217), from whom Huikai received the WU GONG'AN of ZHAOZHOU CONGSHEN; Huikai is said to have struggled with this gong'an for six years. In 1218, Huikai traveled to Baoyinsi on Mt. Anji, where he succeeded Yuelin as abbot. He subsequently served as abbot at such monasteries as TIANNINGSI, Pujisi, Kaiyuansi, and Baoningsi. In 1246, Huikai was appointed as abbot of Huguo Renwangsi in Hangzhou prefecture, and it is here that the Japanese ZEN monk SHINICHI KAKUSHIN studied under him. Emperor Lizong (r. 1224-1264) invited Huikai to provide a sermon at the Pavilion of Mysterious Virtue in the imperial palace and also to pray for rain. In honor of his achievements, the emperor bestowed upon him a golden robe and the title Chan master Foyan (Dharma Eye).

Wumen Huikai


TERMS ANYWHERE

Wumen Huikai. (J. Mumon Ekai; K. Mumun Hyegae 無門慧開) (1183-1260). In Chinese, "Gateless, Opening of Wisdom"; CHAN master in the LINJI ZONG; author of the eponymous WUMEN GUAN ("Gateless Checkpoint"), one of the two most important collections of Chan GONG'AN (J. koan; K. kongan). A native of Hangzhou prefecture in present-day Zhejiang province, Huikai was ordained by the monk "One Finger" Tianlong (d.u.), who also hailed from Hangzhou (see also YIZHI CHAN). Wumen later went to the monastery of Wanshousi in Jiangsu province to study with Yuelin Shiguan (1143-1217), from whom Huikai received the WU GONG'AN of ZHAOZHOU CONGSHEN; Huikai is said to have struggled with this gong'an for six years. In 1218, Huikai traveled to Baoyinsi on Mt. Anji, where he succeeded Yuelin as abbot. He subsequently served as abbot at such monasteries as TIANNINGSI, Pujisi, Kaiyuansi, and Baoningsi. In 1246, Huikai was appointed as abbot of Huguo Renwangsi in Hangzhou prefecture, and it is here that the Japanese ZEN monk SHINICHI KAKUSHIN studied under him. Emperor Lizong (r. 1224-1264) invited Huikai to provide a sermon at the Pavilion of Mysterious Virtue in the imperial palace and also to pray for rain. In honor of his achievements, the emperor bestowed upon him a golden robe and the title Chan master Foyan (Dharma Eye).

Wumen Huikai

Ekai 慧開. See WUMEN HUIKAI

Fukeshu. (普化宗). In Japanese, "Puhua Sect"; a secondary sect of the Japanese ZEN school, founded by SHINCHI KAKUSHIN (1207-1298). While Kakushin was in China studying under WUMEN HUIKAI (1183-1260), he is said to have met a layman, the otherwise-unknown Zhang Can (J. Cho San; d.u.), who claimed to be a sixteenth-generation successor of the little-known Tang-dynasty monk Puhua (J. Fuke; d.u.), supposedly an eccentric friend of LINJI YIXUAN and a successor of MAZU DAOYI. Four lay disciples of Zhang's accompanied Kakushin when he returned to Japan, helping Kakushin to establish the sect. There is no evidence of the existence of a Puhua school in China apart from Kakushin's account, however, and the school seems to be a purely Japanese creation. During the Tokugawa era (1603-1867), in particular, the school attracted itinerant lay Zen practitioners, known as "clerics of emptiness" (kamuso), who played the bamboo flute (shakuhachi) as a form of meditation and wore a distinctive bamboo hat that covered their entire face as they traveled on pilgrimage around the country. Because masterless samurai (ronin) and bandits began adopting Fuke garb as a convenient disguise during the commission of their crimes, the Meiji government proscribed the school in 1871 and it vanished from the scene.

Huikai. (C) (慧開). See WUMEN HUIKAI.

Hyegae 慧開. See WUMEN HUIKAI

Mumon Ekai 無門慧開. See WUMEN HUIKAI

Mumun Hyegae 無門慧開. See WUMEN HUIKAI

Shinchi Kakushin. (心地覺心) (1207-1298). Japanese ZEN teacher in the RINZAISHu, who is retrospectively regarded as the founder of the small FUKESHu branch of the Zen tradition; also known by his posthumous title HOTTo KOKUSHI. He became a monk at the age of fourteen in the SHINGONSHu esoteric tradition, and received full ordination at twenty-nine at ToDAIJI in Nara, the ancient capital of Japan. Shinchi studied esoteric teachings at KoYASAN, the headquarters of the Shingon school, and engaged in Zen training under the Rinzai master Taiko Gyoyu (1163-1241) and the SoToSHu master DoGEN KIGEN (1200-1253). Shinchi left for China in 1249 to study under the Chinese Linji master WUZHUN SHIFAN (1177-1249). Unfortunately, the master died before Shinchi arrived, so Shichi instead traveled to Hangzhou to study under WUMEN HUIKAI (1183-1260), in the YANGQI PAI of the LINJI ZONG. Wumen is said to have given Shinchi dharma transmission (CHUANFA) after just six months of training. Shinchi returned to Japan in 1254 with the master's robe and portrait, as well as a copy of the master's WUMEN GUAN, which was the first introduction of that famous GONG'AN (J. koan) collection to the Japanese isles. In present-day Wakayama prefecture, Shinchi built a monastery called Saihoji, which was later renamed Kokokuji. Shinchi resided there for the rest of his life, but often traveled to Kyoto to lecture on Buddhism before the retired monarchs Gofukakusa (r. 1246-1259), Kameyama (r. 1259-74) and Gouda (r. 1274-87). Kameyama granted him the honorary title "Hotto Zenji" (Zen Master Dharma Lamp). After his death, the Emperor Godaigo (r. 1318-1339) later bestowed on him the posthumous title of Hotto Enmyo Kokushi (State Preceptor Lamp of Dharma that is Perfectly Bright). Shinchi came to be regarded as the founder of the Fukeshu, a smaller secondary school of Japanese Zen, whose itinerant practitioners played the bamboo flute (shakuhachi) as a form of meditation and wore a distinctive bamboo hat that covered the entire face. The school was proscribed in 1871 and vanished from the scene.

Wumen guan. (J. Mumonkan; K. Mumun kwan 無門關). In Chinese, lit., "Gateless Checkpoint," or "Wumen's Checkpoint"; compiled by the CHAN master WUMEN HUIKAI, after whom the collection is named, also known as the Chanzong Wumen guan ("Gateless Checkpoint of the Chan Tradition"). Along with the BIYAN LU ("Blue Cliff Record"), the Wumen guan is considered one of the two most important GONG'AN (J. koan; K. kongan) collections of the Chan tradition. In the summer of 1228, at the request of the resident monks at the monastery of Longxiangsi, Wumen lectured on a series of forty-eight cases (gong'an) that he culled from various "transmission of the lamplight" (CHUANDENG LU) histories and the recorded sayings (YULU) of previous Chan masters. His lectures were recorded and compiled that same year and published with a preface by Wumen in the following year (1229). Another case (case 49), composed by the layman Zheng Qingzhi, was added to the Wumen guan in 1246. The Wumen guan begins with a popular case attributed to ZHAOZHOU CONGSHEN, in which Zhaozhou replies "WU" (no) to the question, "Does a dog have buddha nature, or not?" (see WU GONG'AN). Wumen himself is known to have struggled with this case, which was given to him by his teacher Yuelin Shiguan (1143-1217). The Japanese monk SHINICHI KAKUSHIN, who briefly studied under Wumen in China, brought the Wumen guan to Japan. Although the collection was once declared to be heretical by the SoToSHu in the mid-seventeenth century, many Japanese commentaries on the Wumen guan were composed at the time, testifying to its growing influence during the Edo period.

Yangqi pai. (J. Yogiha; K. Yanggi p'a 楊岐派). One of the two major branches of the LINJI ZONG of the CHAN school, which is listed among the five houses and seven schools (WU JIA QI ZONG) of the mature Chinese Chan tradition. The school is named after its founder, YANGQI FANGHUI (995-1049), who taught at Mt. Yangqi in what is now Yuanzhou province. Yangqi was a disciple of Shishuang Chuyuan (986-1039), a sixth-generation successor in the Linji school, who also taught HUANGLONG HUINAN (1002-1069), the founder of the HUANGLONG PAI sublineage of the Linji school. The Yangqi lineage flourished under its third-generation successors, Fojian Huiqin (1059-1117), Foyan Qingyuan (1067-1120), and YUANWU KEQIN (1063-1135), who promoted it among the literati, and it became one of the dominant schools of Song-dynasty Buddhism thanks to the decisive role played by Yuanwu's disciple DAHUI ZONGGAO (1089-1163). It was especially within this lineage that the meditative technique of the Chan of investigating the meditative topic or questioning meditation (KANHUA CHAN) flourished. The Yangqi masters took a different approach to GONG'AN (public case) training, criticizing "lettered Chan" (WENZI CHAN), a style of Chan developed by Yunmen and Huanglong masters, which gained popularity among the literati officials in the Northern Song period with its polished language and elegant verse explanations of the meaning of the gong'an. Dahui in particular presented the gong'an as a meditative tool for realizing one's innate enlightenment, not to demonstrate one's talent in clever repartee or one's literary prowess; at the same time, he critiqued the approaches of rival Chan schools, criticizing such Huanglong masters as JUEFAN HUIHONG (1071-1128) for clinging to intellectual and literary endeavors and such CAODONG ZONG masters as HONGZHI ZHENGJUE (1091-1157) for clinging to tranquillity and simply waiting for one's innate enlightenment to manifest itself. The school also produced many gong'an collections, including the BIYANLU ("Blue Cliff Record"), complied by Yuanwu Keqin, and the WUMEN GUAN ("Gateless Checkpoint"), compiled by the seventh-generation successor WUMEN HUIKAI (1183-1260). The Yangqi lineage was formally introduced to Korea by T'AEGO POU (1301-1382), who studied with the eleventh-generation Yangqi teacher Shiwu Qinggong (1272-1352); some modern Korean monks and scholars argue that the contemporary Korean Son tradition should be traced back to T'aego and his Yangqi lineage, rather than to POJO CHINUL (1158-1210). The Yangqi school reached Japan in the thirteenth century through pilgrim monks, including Shunjo (1166-1227), who studied with the Yangqi teacher Meng'an Yuancong (1126-1209), and NANPO JoMYo (1235-1309), better known by his imperially bestowed title Entsu Daio Kokushi ("state preceptor," see GUOSHI), who studied with the ninth-generation teacher XUTANG ZHIYU (1185-1269). All Linji lineages in contemporary Japan are affiliated with the Yangqi pai.

zhurengong. (J. shujinko; K. chuin'gong 主人公). In Chinese, literally "master" or "owner"; a term used within the CHAN tradition to refer to "buddha-nature" (C. FOXING) or "true mind" (C. zhenxin), sometimes seen also as the variant "old master" (zhurenweng). The ZIMEN JINGXUN ("Admonitions for the Dark-[Robed]"), an influential Buddhist primer compiled in 1313 by the CHAN monk Yongzhong (d.u.), specifically refers to the variant zhurenweng as a designation for "true mind." The WUMEN GUAN ("Gateless Checkpoint"), the eponymous GONG'AN collection of WUMEN HUIKAI (1183-1260), includes a gong'an on zhurengong attributed to Ruiyan Shican (850-910), a second-generation successor of DESHAN XUANJIAN (782-865): Ruiyan would call to himself every day, "Master (zhurengong)!" And he would respond, "Yes." Then he would say, "Be clear!" "Yes." "Any time and any day, don't be fooled by anything." "I won't be." Yaun Kagu's (fl. c. 1376) CHAGYoNG MUN ("Self-admonitions"), one of the three texts included in the Korean monastic primer CH'OBALSIM CHAGYoNG MUN, opens with an admonition to postulants and novices: "Master (chuin'gong)! Listen to my words! How can you continue to transmigrate through the realms of suffering when so many people have realized the way through the gateway of emptiness?" The Korean Son community uses the concept of chuin'gong as a generic "meditative topic" (hwadu; C. HUATOU) in kanhwa Son (C. KANHUA CHAN), or "questioning meditation."



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   5 Wumen Huikai

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:"When idle concerns don't fill your thoughts, that's your best season." ~ Wumen Huikai,
2:English version by Stephen Mitchell
One instant is eternity;
eternity is the now.
When you see through this one instant,
you see through the one who sees.
~ Wumen Huikai, One instant is eternity
,
3:English version by Stephen Mitchell
Moon and clouds are the same;
mountain and valley are different.
All are blessed; all are blessed.
Is this one? Is this two?

~ Wumen Huikai, Moon and clouds are the same
,
4:English version by Eiichi Shimomisei
The Great Way has no gate,
A thousand roads enter it.
When one passes through this gateless gate,
He freely walks between heaven and earth.
~ Wumen Huikai, The Great Way has no gate
,
5: English version by Stephen Mitchell
Ten thousand flowers in spring, the moon in autumn,
a cool breeze in summer, snow in winter.
If your mind isn't clouded by unnecessary things,
this is the best season of your life.

~ Wumen Huikai, Ten thousand flowers in spring, the moon in autumn
,

IN CHAPTERS [0/0]









WORDNET














IN WEBGEN [10000/19]

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