classes ::: Judaism, Poetry, author,
children :::
branches ::: Yannai
see also :::

Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:Yannai
subject class:Judaism
subject class:Poetry
class:author

Israel/Palestine (6th Century) Timeline
Jewish


PC
The poetry of Yannai was virtually unknown until he was rediscovered in the early 20th century by scholars.

Yannai lived in Palestine in the 6th century. An Ashkenazi tradition says that Yannai was the teacher of Eleazar ben Kallir, the best known of the classical paytanim (Jewish liturgical poets). There has even been a legend suggesting that Yannai grew jealous of his talented student and killed him by placing a scorpion in ben Kallir's shoe, though the written tale calls the story into question by adding, "May God forgive all those who say this of Yannai -- if it did not really happen."

Yannai is now thought of as the first of the great classical paytanim, and the first to use rhyme and acrostics in his works, which later became the standard in this form of Jewish sacred poetry.


questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or
join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1.yni_-_Hymn_from_the_Heavens
1.yni_-_The_Celestial_Fire

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
1.yni_-_Hymn_from_the_Heavens
1.yni_-_The_Celestial_Fire

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
Yannai

DEFINITIONS

Yannai, Alexander ::: The Hasmonean King of Judea (103-76 BCE). Yannai expanded his kingdom over the whole coast region from Mount Carmel to the Egyptian border. Yannai then became unpopular, and during years of unrest attacks from the Nabateans caused him to lose much of his gains. Yannai eventually became popular again and regained part of the territories back, including the Golan and the eastern bank of the Jordan.



QUOTES [0 / 0 - 9 / 9]


KEYS (10k)


NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   2 Yannai
   2 Peter Cameron

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:It seems priggish or pollyannaish to deny that my intention in writing the work was to titillate the nastier propensities of my readers. My own healthy inheritance of original sin comes out in the book and I enjoyed raping and ripping by proxy. It is the novelist’s innate cowardice that makes him depute to imaginary personalities the sins that he is too cautious to commit for himself. ~ Anthony Burgess
2:We spend most of our lives with unfulfilled desires, and the occasional satisfactions that are all most of us can achieve are insufficient to outweigh these prolonged negative states. If we think that this is a tolerable state of affairs it is because we are, in Benatar’s view, victims of the illusion of pollyannaism. This illusion may have evolved because it helped our ancestors survive, but it is an illusion nonetheless. If we could see our lives objectively, we would see that they are not something we should inflict on anyone. ~ Peter Singer
3:Having bad experiences sometimes helps; it makes it clearer what it is you
should be doing. I know that sounds very Pollyannaish but it’s true. People who have had only good experiences aren’t very interesting. They may be content, and happy after a fashion, but they aren’t very deep. It may seem a misfortune now, and it makes things difficult, but well—it’s easy to feel all the happy, simple stuff. Not that happiness is necessarily simple. But I don’t think you’re going to have a life like that, and I think you’ll be the better for it. The difficult thing is to not be overwhelmed by the bad patches. You mustn’t let them defeat you. You must see them as a gift—a cruel gift, but a gift nonetheless. ~ Peter Cameron
4:Now an angel of the Lord appeared to Moses in a blazing fire -- a fire that devours fire; a fire that burns in things dry and moist; a fire that glows amid snow and ice; a fire that is like a crouching lion; a fire that reveals itself in many forms; a fire that is, and never expires; a fire that shines and roars; a fire that blazes and sparkles; a fire that flies in a storm wind; a fire that burns without wood; a fire that renews itself every day; a fire that is not fanned by fire; a fire that billows like palm branches; a fire whose sparks are flashes of lightning; a fire black as a raven; a fire, curled, like the colours of the rainbow! [1835.jpg] -- from The Penguin Book of Hebrew Verse, Edited by T. Carmi

~ Yannai, The Celestial Fire

5:Fulfilled desires, like pleasures (even of the intrinsic kind), are states of achievement rather than default states. For instance, one has to work at satiating oneself, while hunger comes naturally. After one has eaten or taken liquid, bowel and bladder discomfort ensues quite naturally and we have to seek relief. One has to seek out pleasurable sensations, in the absence of which blandness comes naturally. The upshot of this is that we must continually work at keeping suffering (including tedium) at bay, and we can do so only imperfectly. Dissatisfaction does and must pervade life. There are moments, perhaps even periods, of satisfaction, but they occur against a background of dissatisfied striving. Pollyannaism may cause most people to blur out this background, but it remains there. ~ David Benatar
6:And if college is all wrong for you, if you really don't like it in the way you fear, well - it won't be a waste to have gone. Having bad experiences sometimes helps; its makes it clearer what it is you should be doing. I know that sounds very Pollyannaish but it's true. People who have had only good experiences aren't very interesting. They may be content, and happy after a fashion, but they aren't very deep. It may seem a misfortune now, and it makes things difficult, but well - it's easy to feel all the happy, simple stuff. Not that happiness is necessarily simple. But I don't think you're going to have a life like that, and I think you'll be the better for it. The difficult thing is to not be overwhelmed by the bad patches. You mustn't let them defeat you. You must see them as a gift - a cruel gift, but a gift nonetheless. ~ Peter Cameron
7:I loathed being sixty-four, and I will hate being sixty-five. I don’t let on about such things in person; in person, I am cheerful and Pollyannaish. But the honest truth is that it’s sad to be over sixty. The long shadows are everywhere—friends dying and battling illness. A miasma of melancholy hangs there, forcing you to deal with the fact that your life, however happy and successful, has been full of disappointments and mistakes, little ones and big ones. There are dreams that are never quite going to come true, ambitions that will never quite be realized. There are, in short, regrets. Edith Piaf was famous for singing a song called “Non, je ne regrette rien.” It’s a good song. I know what she meant. I can get into it; I can make a case that I regret nothing. After all, most of my mistakes turned out to be things I survived, or turned into funny stories, or, on occasion, even made money from. But ~ Nora Ephron
8:From Heaven to the Heaven of Heavens; from the Heaven of Heavens to the Dark Clouds; from the Dark Clouds to the Abode; from the Abode to the Dwelling-place; from the Dwelling-place to the Skies; from the Skies to the Plains; from the Plains to the height of the Throne; and from the height of the Throne to the Chariot -- who can be compared to You, who is your equal? who has seen You, who has reached You? who can hold his head high, who can lift up his eyes? who can question, who can defy? who can fathom, who can calculate? who can be proud, who can be haughty? who is like You? For You ride on a cherub and fly on the wind; Your road is in the whirlwind, Your way is in the storm; Your path is through waters. Fires are Your emissaries -- thousands of thousands and myriads of myriads, who are changed into men, changed into women, changed into winds, changed into demons; who assume all shapes and fulfill every mission, with fear, dread, awe, trembling, terror, trepidation, they open... [1835.jpg] -- from The Penguin Book of Hebrew Verse, Edited by T. Carmi

~ Yannai, Hymn from the Heavens

9:I don’t ever remember being afraid of “oldness”.

There are things I miss about being younger - chiefly the ability to pull all-nighters and keep working and working well; and being smiled at by girls I didn’t know who thought I was cute; and I wish I had the eyesight I had even five years ago… but that stuff feels pretty trivial.

I’m happier than I’ve been at any time in my life these days. I have a wonderful wife whom I adore, watched three amazing kids grow into two delightful adults and my favourite teenager, an astonishing number of grand life experiences, I’ve made art I’m proud of, I have real, true, glorious friends, and I’ve been able to do real good for things I care about, like freedom of speech, like libraries.

Sometimes I’ll do something like An Evening With Neil and Amanda, or the 8 in 8 project, and completely surprise myself.

I miss friends who have died, but then, I’m glad that time gave them to me, to befriend, even for a while, and that I was alive to know them. I knew Douglas Adams, and I knew Roger Zelazny, and I knew John M Ford, and I knew Diana Wynne Jones… do you know how lucky that makes me?

Ah, I’m rabbiting on, and I sound a bit more Pollyannaish than I’m intending to sound: I know the downside of age and the downside of time, and I am sure that the view from age 51 is not the view from age 71.

I wish the time hadn’t gone so fast, though. And sometimes I wish I’d enjoyed it more on the way, and worried about it less. ~ Neil Gaiman

IN CHAPTERS









WORDNET


































IN WEBGEN [10000/0]



change font "color":
change "background-color":
change "font-family":
change "padding":
change "table font size":
last updated: 2021-08-18 18:36:07
372283 site hits