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--- WIKI
Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 July 4, 1826) was an American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, architect, philosopher, and Founding Father who served as the third president of the United States from 1801 to 1809. He previously served as the second vice president of the United States from 1797 to 1801. The principal author of the Declaration of Independence, Jefferson was a proponent of democracy, republicanism, and individual rights, motivating American colonists to break from the Kingdom of Great Britain and form a new nation; he produced formative documents and decisions at both the state and national level. During the American Revolution, he represented Virginia in the Continental Congress that adopted the Declaration, drafted the law for religious freedom as a Virginia legislator, and served as the second Governor of Virginia from 1779 to 1781, during the American Revolutionary War. He became the United States Minister to France in May 1785, and subsequently, the nation's first secretary of state under President George Washington from 1790 to 1793. Jefferson and James Madison organized the Democratic-Republican Party to oppose the Federalist Party during the formation of the First Party System. With Madison, he anonymously wrote the provocative Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions in 1798 and 1799, which sought to streng then states' rights by nullifying the federal Alien and Sedition Acts. As president, Jefferson pursued the nation's shipping and trade interests against Barbary pirates and aggressive British trade policies. He also organized the Louisiana Purchase, almost doubling the country's territory. As a result of peace negotiations with France, his administration reduced military forces. He was reelected in 1804. Jefferson's second term was beset with difficulties at home, including the trial of former vice president Aaron Burr. American foreign trade was diminished when Jefferson implemented the Embargo Act of 1807, in response to British threats to U.S. shipping. In 1803, Jefferson began a controversial process of Indian tribe removal to the newly organized Louisiana Territory, and he signed the Act Prohibiting Importation of Slaves in 1807. After retiring from public office, Jefferson founded the University of Virginia. Jefferson, while primarily a planter, lawyer and politician, mastered many disciplines, which ranged from surveying and mathematics to horticulture and mechanics. He was an architect in the classical tradition. Jefferson's keen interest in religion and philosophy led to his presidency of the American Philosophical Society; he shunned organized religion but was influenced by both Christianity and deism. A philologist, Jefferson knew several languages. He was a prolific letter writer and corresponded with many prominent people. His only full-length book is Notes on the State of Virginia (1785), considered perhaps the most important American book published before 1800. Although Jefferson is regarded as a leading spokesman for democracy and republicanism in the era of the Enlightenment, some modern scholarship has been critical of Jefferson, finding a contradiction between his ownership and trading of many slaves that worked his plantations, and his famous declaration that "all men are created equal". Although the matter remains a subject of debate, most historians believe that Jefferson had a sexual relationship with his slave Sally Hemings, a mixed-race woman who was a half-sister to his late wife and that he fathered at least one of her children. Presidential scholars and historians generally praise Jefferson's public achievements, including his advocacy of religious freedom and tolerance in Virginia. Jefferson continues to rank highly among U.S. presidents.
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Thomas Jefferson

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coincidence ::: n. --> The condition of occupying the same place in space; as, the coincidence of circles, surfaces, etc.
The condition or fact of happening at the same time; as, the coincidence of the deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.
Exact correspondence in nature, character, result, circumstances, etc.; concurrence; agreement.


jeffersonian ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or characteristic of, Thomas Jefferson or his policy or political doctrines.



QUOTES [7 / 7 - 1500 / 2452]


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   6 Thomas Jefferson
   1 Thomas Jefferson?

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

1414 Thomas Jefferson
   4 Ron Chernow
   3 Jon Meacham
   3 John F Kennedy
   3 John C Maxwell
   2 Sharron Angle
   2 Ronald Reagan
   2 Neil deGrasse Tyson
   2 Kurt Vonnegut
   2 John Adams
   2 Jack McDevitt
   2 Glenn Beck

1:Honesty is the first chapter of the book wisdom. ~ Thomas Jefferson
2:Whenever you do a thing, act as if all the world were watching.
   ~ Thomas Jefferson,
3:Where the press is free, and everyone is able to read, all is safe. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
4:I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
5:When the speech condemns a free press, you are hearing the words of a tyrant.
   ~ Thomas Jefferson?,
6:Whenever you are to do a thing, though it can never be known but to yourself, ask yourself how you would act were all the world looking at you, and act accordingly. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
7:If people let the government decide what foods they eat and what medicines they take, their bodies will soon be in as sorry a state as are the souls of those who live under tyranny. ~ Thomas Jefferson, paraphrase of Jefferson's statement in Notes on the State of Virginia,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:probably the greatest concentration of talent and genius in this house except for perhaps those times when Thomas Jefferson ate alone. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
2:I knew Thomas Jefferson. He was a friend of mine. And believe me, you are no Thomas Jefferson. (at 1992 Republican party convention, referring to Bill Clinton) ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
3:I think this is the most extraordinary collection of talent, of human knowledge, that has ever been gathered at the White House - with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
4:Thomas Jefferson once said. He said , "We should never judge a President by his age, only by his works." And ever since he told me that, I've stopped worrying. There are those who say I've stopped working. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
5:Don't say you don't have enough time. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Pasteur, Michelangelo, Mother Teresa, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein. ~ h-jackson-brown-jr, @wisdomtrove
6:Don't say you don't have enough time. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Pasteur, Michaelangelo, Mother Teresa, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein. ~ h-jackson-brown-jr, @wisdomtrove
7:Thomas Jefferson made a comment about the Presidency and age. He said that one should not worry about one's exact chronological age in reference to his ability to perform one's task. And ever since he told me that, I stopped worrying. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
8:My long-time view about Christianity is that it represents an amalgam of two seemingly immiscible parts-the religion of Jesus and the religion of Paul. Thomas Jefferson attempted to excise the Pauline parts of the New Testament. There wasn't much left when he was done, but it was an inspiring document. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
9:Voltaire said about God that ‘there is no God, but don’t tell that to my servant, lest he murder me at night’. Hammurabi would have said the same about his principle of hierarchy, and Thomas Jefferson about human rights. Homo sapiens has no natural rights, just as spiders, hyenas and chimpanzees have no natural rights. But don’t tell that to our servants, lest they murder us at night. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
10:The Greeks understood that mind and body must develop in harmonious proportions to produce a creative intelligence. And so did the most brilliant intelligence of our earliest days - Thomas Jefferson - when he said, not less than two hours a day should be devoted to exercise. If the man who wrote the Declaration of Independence, was Secretary of State, and twice President, could give it two hours, our children can give it ten or fifteen minutes. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
11:I've long believed that one of the mainsprings of our own liberty has been the widespread ownership of property among our people and the expectation that anyone's child, even from the humblest of families, could grow up to own a business or a corporation. Thomas Jefferson dreamed of a land of small farmers, of shopowners, and merchants. Abraham Lincoln signed into law the Homestead Act that ensured that the great western prairies of America would be the realm of independent, propertyowning citizens-a mightier guarantee of freedom is difficult to imagine. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
12:How do you cause people to believe in an imagined order such as Christianity, democracy or capitalism? First, you never admit that the order is imagined. You always insist that the order sustaining society is an objective reality created by the great gods or by the laws of nature. People are unequal, not because Hammurabi said so, but because Enlil and Marduk decreed it. People are equal, not because Thomas Jefferson said so, but because God created them that way. Free markets are the best economic system, not because Adam Smith said so, but because these are the immutable laws of nature. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Thomas Jefferson ~ Albert Einstein,
2:Is it the Fourth? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
3:Thomas Jefferson survives. ~ John Adams,
4:Peace is our passion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
5:Force cannot give right. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
6:Our people shall be free ~ Thomas Jefferson,
7:Thomas Jefferson still survives ~ John Adams,
8:All men are created equal. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
9:I can't live without books ~ Thomas Jefferson,
10:I can't live without magic ~ Thomas Jefferson,
11:Merchants have no country. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
12:I cannot live without books ~ Thomas Jefferson,
13:The smell rewards the care. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
14:I can not live without books ~ Thomas Jefferson,
15:I cannot live without books. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
16:Delay is preferable to error. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
17:I can not live without books. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
18:The merchant has no country . ~ Thomas Jefferson,
19:Everything yields to diligence ~ Thomas Jefferson,
20:I cannot live without books... ~ Thomas Jefferson,
21:Light and liberty go together. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
22:Our bills shall not be killed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
23:Everything yields to diligence. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
24:Resisting tyranny is obeying God ~ Thomas Jefferson,
25:The sun - my almighty physician. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
26:Dependence leads to subservience. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
27:Enemies in War, in Peace Friends. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
28:I cannot live without books . . . ~ Thomas Jefferson,
29:I cannot live without my books" - ~ Thomas Jefferson,
30:Ignorance is preferable to error. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
31:Taste cannot be controlled by law. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
32:Tranquility is the old man's milk. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
33:A little rebellion is a good thing. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
34:Freedom, the first-born of science. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
35:Half a loaf is better than no bread ~ Thomas Jefferson,
36:Health is worth more than learning. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
37:I have sworn upon the altar of god. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
38:One generation cannot bind another. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
39:One man with courage is a majority. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
40:The dead should not rule the living ~ Thomas Jefferson,
41:A little revolution is a good thing. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
42:All authority belongs to the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
43:All power is inherent in the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
44:A strong body makes the mind strong. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
45:Bigotry is the disease of ignorance. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
46:Ministers and merchants love nobody. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
47:Never use one word when two will do. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
48:Power is not alluring to pure minds. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
49:The dead should not rule the living. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
50:Without virtue, happiness cannot be. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
51:As government grows, freedom recedes. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
52:Never use two words when one will do. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
53:Without books, I would certainly die. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
54:Follow truth wherever it may lead you. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
55:Health is the requisite after morality ~ Thomas Jefferson,
56:Health is value greater than studying. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
57:I’m not Thomas Jefferson. He was a pussy. ~ Charlie Sheen,
58:Of all exercises, walking is the best. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
59:The same facts impress us differently. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
60:A mind always employed is always happy. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
61:Evil triumphs when good men do nothing. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
62:What we learn to do, we learn by doing. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
63:A little rebellion is good now and then. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
64:Be polite to all, but intimate with few. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
65:Don't spend your money till you have it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
66:Every generation needs a new revolution. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
67:Good wine is a necessity of life for me. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
68:I am a sect by myself, as far as I know. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
69:no people can be both ignorant and free. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
70:The Bible is the cornerstone of liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
71:The cost of freedom is eternal vigilance ~ Thomas Jefferson,
72:I like to see the people awake and alert. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
73:Let the eye of vigilance never be closed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
74:No nation is drunken where wine is cheap. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
75:Rebellion to tyranny is obedience to God. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
76:What is it men cannot be made to believe! ~ Thomas Jefferson,
77:From candlelight to early bedtime, I read. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
78:In matters of principal stand like a rock. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
79:Never spend your money before you have it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
80:One insult pocketed soon produces another. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
81:Question boldly even the existence of God. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
82:Take things always by their smooth handle. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
83:The power of making war often prevents it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
84:The soil is the gift of God to the living. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
85:Traveling makes men wiser, but less happy. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
86:A good neighbor is a very desireable thing. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
87:An injured friend is the bitterest of foes. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
88:Free men do not ask permission to bear arms ~ Thomas Jefferson,
89:History is philosophy teaching by examples. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
90:In matters of principle, stand like a rock. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
91:The price of barbecue is eternal vigilance. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
92:We never repent of having eaten too little. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
93:Amplification is the vice of modern oratory. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
94:Eternal Vigilance is the price of democracy. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
95:He who knows best knows how little he knows. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
96:Never trust quotes you find on the internet. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
97:Nothing is troublesome that we do willingly. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
98:Our liberty depends on freedom of the press. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
99:ours are the only farmers who can read Homer ~ Thomas Jefferson,
100:The art of life is the art of avoiding pain. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
101:The darker the berry, the sweeter the juice. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
102:The only security of all is in a free press. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
103:When the heart is right, the feet are swift. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
104:Difference of opinion is helpful in religion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
105:I cannot live without books. Thomas Jefferson ~ Thomas Jefferson,
106:Ignorance is a poor tool in a battle of wits. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
107:No freeman shall be debarred the use of arms. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
108:No nation was ever drunk when wine was cheap. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
109:No people who are ignorant can be truly free. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
110:Our ancestors ... were laborers, not lawyers. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
111:The Bible makes the best people in the world. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
112:Truth between candid minds can never do harm. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
113:Botany I rank with the most valuable sciences. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
114:It is better to have no ideas than false ones. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
115:The hole and the patch should be commensurate. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
116:This is the fourth?

[Last words] ~ Thomas Jefferson,
117:Victory and defeat are each of the same price. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
118:What i value more than all things, good humor. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
119:Wine brightens the life and thinking of anyone ~ Thomas Jefferson,
120:Freedom [is] the first-born daughter of science ~ Thomas Jefferson,
121:Those are governed best who are governed least. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
122:A little rebellion now and then is a good thing. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
123:Always take hold of things by the smooth handle. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
124:A Nation's best defense is an educated citizenry ~ Thomas Jefferson,
125:Educate and inform the whole mass of the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
126:Every man has two countries: his own and France. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
127:Honesty is the first chapter of the book wisdom. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
128:If you serve humanity, you serve humanity's God. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
129:. . . in the full tide of successful experiment. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
130:Music...This is the favorite passion of my soul. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
131:Nobody can acquire honor by doing what is wrong. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
132:One had rather have no opinion than a false one. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
133:That government that governs least governs best. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
134:The bulk of mankind are schoolboys through life. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
135:The sun has not caught me in bed in fifty years. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
136:The ultimate arbiter is the people of the Union. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
137:Thomas Jefferson basically secularized Jesus. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
138:But though an old man, I am but a young gardener. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
139:Equal rights for all, special privileges for none ~ Thomas Jefferson,
140:I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
141:My heart trembles when I reflect that God is just ~ Thomas Jefferson,
142:NEVER PUT OFF FOR TOMORROW, WHAT YOU CAN DO TODAY ~ Thomas Jefferson,
143:Never spend your money before you have earned it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
144:The earth belongs to the living, not to the dead. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
145:When tyranny becomes law, rebellion becomes duty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
146:Never trouble another for what you can do yourself ~ Thomas Jefferson,
147:No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms ~ Thomas Jefferson,
148:Pride costs us more than hunger, thirst, and cold. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
149:That government which governs best, governs least. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
150:The bloom of Monticello is chilled by my solitude. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
151:We did not raise armies for glory or for conquest. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
152:Books may be classed from the Faculties of the mind ~ Thomas Jefferson,
153:Coffee - the favorite drink of the civilized world. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
154:Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
155:If the body be feeble, the mind will not be strong. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
156:Most men die at age 25, but aren't buried until 70. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
157:No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
158:Question with boldness even the existence of a god. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
159:The earth belongs always to the living generations. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
160:The most successful war seldom pays for its losses. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
161:Truth is great and will prevail if left to herself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
162:Whatever enables us to go to war, secures our peace ~ Thomas Jefferson,
163:Anarchy [is] necessarily consequent to inefficiency. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
164:An enemy generally says and believes what he wishes. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
165:A room without books is like a life without meaning. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
166:If ignorance is bliss, why aren't more people happy? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
167:We might have been a free and great people together. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
168:When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
169:A candle loses nothing when it lights another candle. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
170:Courts love the people always, as wolves do the sheep ~ Thomas Jefferson,
171:Knowledge indeed is a desirable, a lovely possession. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
172:Public offices were not made for private convenience. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
173:...We are all Federalists,and we are all Republicans. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
174:We must be contented to amuse, when we cannot inform. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
175:We wish the happiness and prosperity of every nation. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
176:A free government is of all others the most energetic. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
177:Courts love the people always, as wolves do the sheep. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
178:Doubts and jealousies often beget the facts they fear. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
179:Government governed least is government governed best. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
180:Men of quality are not threatened by women of equality ~ Thomas Jefferson,
181:No society is so precious as that of one’s own family. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
182:The boisterous sea of liberty is never without a wave. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
183:The federal government is our servant, not our master. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
184:You see I am an enthusiast on the subject of the arts. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
185:Let those flatter who fear; it is not an American art . ~ Thomas Jefferson,
186:Paul was the first corrupter of the doctrines of Jesus. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
187:The government you elect is the government you deserve. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
188:Truth will do well enough if left to shift for herself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
189:Walking is the best possible exercise. — THOMAS JEFFERSON ~ Michael J Gelb,
190:We must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
191:Your own reason is the only oracle given to you by God. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
192:Debt and revolution are inseparable as cause and effect. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
193:I prefer the tumult of liberty to the quiet of servitude ~ Thomas Jefferson,
194:Nothing can now be believed that is seen in a newspaper. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
195:The best defense of democracy is an informed electorate. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
196:The law of self-preservation is higher than written law. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
197:The only way to win money out of a casino is to own one. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
198:Do not write me studied letters but ramble as you please. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
199:I am opposed to any form of tyranny over the mind of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
200:I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
201:No nation is permitted to live in ignorance with impunity ~ Thomas Jefferson,
202:Resort is had to ridicule only when reason is against us. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
203:Take not from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
204:The last hope of human liberty in this world rests on us. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
205:Those who would trade safety for freedom deserve neither. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
206:Tobacco is a culture productive of infinite wretchedness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
207:We figure great careers aren't made. They're experienced. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
208:A single good government is a blessing to the whole earth. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
209:Happiness is not being pained in body or troubled in mind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
210:Leave no authority existing not responsible to the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
211:Lethargy is the forerunner of death to the public liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
212:None but an armed nation can dispense with a standing army ~ Thomas Jefferson,
213:Our business is to have great credit and to use it little. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
214:the field of knolege is the common property of all mankind ~ Thomas Jefferson,
215:Those who labor in the earth are the chosen people of God. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
216:To learn, you have to listen. To improve, you have to try. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
217:Wonderful is the effect of impudent and persevering lying. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
218:All that is necessary for a student is access to a library. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
219:Although we are free by the law, we are not so in practice. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
220:An elective despotism was not the government we fought for. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
221:A true patriot will defend his country from its government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
222:God grant that men of principle shall be our principal men. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
223:I abhor war and view it as the greatest scourge of mankind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
224:I have seen enough of one war never to wish to see another. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
225:I steer my bark with hope in the head, leaving fear astern. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
226:Responsibility is a tremendous engine in a free government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
227:The advertisement is the most truthful part of a newspaper. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
228:The bridge between failure and success is hope. THOMAS JEFFERSON ~ Dave Ramsey,
229:[The Federal Convention] is really an assembly of demigods. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
230:The glow of one warm thought is to me worth more than money ~ Thomas Jefferson,
231:The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
232:the measure of society is how it treats the weakest members ~ Thomas Jefferson,
233:The press is impotent when it abandons itself to falsehood. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
234:Whether I retire to bed early or late, I rise with the sun. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
235:History, in general, only informs us what bad government is. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
236:I find that the harder I work, the more luck I seem to have. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
237:If you have to eat crow, eat it while it's young and tender. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
238:It is wonderful how much may be done if we are always doing. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
239:Not less than two hours a day should be devoted to exercise. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
240:The Earth is given as a common for men to labor and live in. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
241:The glow of one warm thought is to me worth more than money. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
242:The past stays put, I just keep moving farther away from it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
243:The small landholders are the most precious part of a state. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
244:A lawyer without books would be like a workman without tools. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
245:An informed citizenry is at the heart of a dynamic democracy. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
246:A pirate spreading misery and ruin over the face of the ocean ~ Thomas Jefferson,
247:Dependence begets subservience and paves the way for tyranny. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
248:Fear can only prevail when victims are ignorant of the facts. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
249:Great innovations should not be forced on slender majorities. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
250:I do not find in orthodox Christianity one redeeming feature. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
251:I find that the harder I work , the more luck I seem to have. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
252:It is more honorable to repair a wrong than to persist in it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
253:No man has done everything he can who has done only his best. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
254:Religions are all alike- founded upon fables and mythologies. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
255:Religions are all the same...Based upon legends and fantasies ~ Thomas Jefferson,
256:when you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on ~ Thomas Jefferson,
257:A well informed citizenry is the best defense against tyranny. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
258:Certain teachings in the Bible are as diamonds in a dung-heap. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
259:Everyone must act according to the dictates of his own reason. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
260:I cannot live without books.
--Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) ~ Thomas Jefferson,
261:I find as I grow older, I love those most, whom I loved first. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
262:If we cannot secure all our rights, let us secure what we can. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
263:I haven't failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that don't work. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
264:Speeches that are measured by the hour will die with the hour. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
265:The cement of this union is the heart-blood of every American. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
266:The moral sense is the first excellence of well-organized man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
267:[The People] are the ultimate, guardians of their own liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
268:There is not a sprig of grass that shoots uninteresting to me. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
269:Wine from long habit has become an indispensable for my health ~ Thomas Jefferson,
270:A coward is much more exposed to quarrels than a man of spirit. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
271:[A] lawyer without books would be like a workman without tools. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
272:All the States but our own are sensible that knowlege is power. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
273:By oft repeating an untruth, men come to believe it themselves. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
274:Christianity neither is, nor ever was a part of the common law. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
275:Force is the vital principle and immediate parent of despotism. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
276:History, in general, only informs us of what bad government is. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
277:I am ever unwilling that [peace] should be disturbed as long as ~ Thomas Jefferson,
278:I cannot live qithout books"~ Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson ~ Thomas Jefferson,
279:I have not observed mens honesty to increase with their riches. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
280:Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is Just ~ Thomas Jefferson,
281:It is to secure our rights that we resort to government at all. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
282:One travels more usefully when alone, because he reflects more. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
283:Our duty to ourselves, to posterity, and to mankind, call on us ~ Thomas Jefferson,
284:The failure of one thing is repaired by the success of another. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
285:The liberty of speaking and writing guards our other liberties. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
286:The only true corrective of Constitutional abuses is education. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
287:Whenever you do a thing, act as if all the world were watching. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
288:Don't talk about what you have done or what you are going to do. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
289:For here we are not afraid to follow truth wherever it may lead. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
290:Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
291:Laws provide against injury from others; but not from ourselves. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
292:Let your gun therefore be your constant companion of your walks. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
293:Motherhood is the keystone of the arch of matrimonial happiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
294:One war, such as that of our Revolution, is enough for one life. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
295:Say nothing of my religion. It is known to God and myself alone. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
296:The man who would choose security over freedom deserves neither. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
297:The possession of facts is knowledge; the use of them is wisdom. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
298:The whole art of government consists in the art of being honest. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
299:Where the press is free and every man able to read, all is safe. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
300:But every difference of opinion is not a difference of principle. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
301:By nature's law, man is at peace with man till some aggression is ~ Thomas Jefferson,
302:Difference of opinion leads to inquiry, and inquiry to the truth. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
303:I find as I grow older that I love those most whom I loved first. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
304:I have a right to nothing which another has a right to take away. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
305:It is an essential attribute of the jurisdiction of every country ~ Thomas Jefferson,
306:It is reasonable that everyone who asks justice should do justice ~ Thomas Jefferson,
307:No man will labor for himself who can make another labor for him. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
308:Nothing betrays imbecility so much as the being insensible of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
309:The Giver of life gave it for happiness and not for wretchedness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
310:The ocean ... like the air, is the common birth-right of mankind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
311:The only thing a man can take beyond this lifetime is his ethics. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
312:War...is as much a punishment to the punisher as to the sufferer. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
313:A Man's management of his own purse speaks volumes about character ~ Thomas Jefferson,
314:I find friendship to be like wine. Raw when new. Ripened with age. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
315:I have great confidence in the common sense of mankind in general. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
316:...in war, they will kill some of us; we shall destroy all of them ~ Thomas Jefferson,
317:Never put off your massage until tomorrow if you can get it today. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
318:One of my favorite ideas is, never to keep an unnecessary soldier. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
319:When angry, count ten before you speak; if very angry, an hundred. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
320:Whenever you do a thing, act as if all the world were watching.
   ~ Thomas Jefferson,
321:Where a new invention promises to be useful, it ought to be tried. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
322:Whiskey claims to itself alone the exclusive office of sot-making. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
323:A properly functioning democracy depends on an informed electorate. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
324:Commerce with all nations, alliance with none, should be our motto. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
325:God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
326:Good humor is one of the preservatives of our peace and tranquility ~ Thomas Jefferson,
327:I'd prefer to have dangerous freedom,
than have peaceful slavery ~ Thomas Jefferson,
328:It will take a thousand years for the frontier to reach the Pacific ~ Thomas Jefferson,
329:Love your neighbor as yourself and your country more than yourself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
330:No country and no people can be free and ignorant at the same time. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
331:The sheep are happier of themselves, than under the care of wolves. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
332:The way to silence religious disputes is to take no notice of them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
333:We need a revolution every 20 years just to keep government honest. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
334:When the subject is strong, simplicity is the only way to treat it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
335:Above all things, and at all times, practice yourself in good humor. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
336:A great deal of love given to a few is better than a little to many. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
337:Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever state or persuasion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
338:Good humor is one of the preservatives of our peace and tranquility. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
339:Hemp is one of the greatest, most important substances of our nation ~ Thomas Jefferson,
340:I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
341:It is in our lives and not our words that our religion must be read. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
342:It takes time to persuade men to do even what is for their own good. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
343:Knowledge is power...knowled ge is safety...knowle dge is happiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
344:Love your neighbor as yourself, and your country more than yourself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
345:Money, not morality, is the principle commerce of civilized nations. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
346:Peace, that glorious moment in time when everyone stops and reloads. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
347:Reason and free inquiry are the only effectual agents against error. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
348:The execution of the laws is more important than the making of them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
349:The variety of opinions leads to questions. Questions lead to truth. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
350:Travelling is good for your health and necessary for your amusement. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
351:Until we stop harming all other living beings, we are still savages. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
352:Where the press is free, and everyone is able to read, all is safe. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
353:A democratic society depends upon an informed and educated citizenry. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
354:An equal application of law to every condition of man is fundamental. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
355:An informed citizenry is the only true repository of the public will. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
356:Hemp is of first necessity to the wealth & protection of the country. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
357:How much pain they have cost us, the evils which have never happened. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
358:I find that he is happiest of whom the world says least, good or bad. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
359:It will be said that great societies cannot exist without government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
360:Money, not morality, constitutes the principle of commercial nations. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
361:No government can continue good, but under the control of the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
362:Without society, and a society to our taste, men are never contented. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
363:It is part of the American character to consider nothing as desperate. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
364:Material abundance without character is the surest way to destruction. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
365:Nothing can be believed but what one sees, or has from an eye witness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
366:One precedent in favor of power is stronger than a hundred against it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
367:Paper is poverty, it is only the ghost of money, and not money itself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
368:The juries are our judges of all fact, and of law when they choose it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
369:The mass of the citizens is the safest depositary of their own rights. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
370:The tender breasts of ladies were not formed for political convulsion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
371:This is a subject with which wisdom and patriotism should be occupied. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
372:To draw around the whole nation the strength of the General Government ~ Thomas Jefferson,
373:To every obstacle oppose patience, perseverance and soothing language. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
374:An honest heart being the first blessing, a knowing head is the second. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
375:An individual, thinking himself injured, makes more noise than a State. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
376:A single zealot may commence prosecutor, and better men be his victims. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
377:[Christianity is] the most ... perverted system that ever shone on man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
378:Civil officials have no business meddling in private religious affairs. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
379:Democracy is 51% of the people taking away the rights of the other 49%. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
380:He who lights his [candle] at mine receives light without darkening me. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
381:I have no ambition to govern men; it is a painful and thankless office. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
382:In every country and every age, the priest had been hostile to Liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
383:In the environment, every victory is temporary, every defeat permanent. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
384:It is my principle that the will of the majority should always prevail. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
385:Nothing is unchangeable but the inherent and unalienable rights of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
386:ONLY a government that is AFRAID of its citizens tries to control them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
387:The more a subject is understood, the more briefly it may be explained. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
388:A morsel of genuine history is a thing so rare as to be always valuable. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
389:A superintending power to maintain the Universe in its course and order. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
390:Cultivators of the earth are the most virtuous and independent citizens. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
391:How much pain they have cost us, the evils which have never happened. -- ~ Thomas Jefferson,
392:I believe that every human mind feels pleasure in doing good to another. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
393:I think all the world would gain by setting commerce at perfect liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
394:The doctrines of Jesus are simple, and tend to all the happiness of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
395:The spirit of this country is totally adverse to a large military force. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
396:History of the United States in the Administrations of Thomas Jefferson, ~ Stephen E Ambrose,
397:It is in the love of one's family only that heartfelt happiness is known. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
398:Newspapers . . . serve as chimnies to carry off noxious vapors and smoke. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
399:[Oppose] with manly firmness [any] invasions on the rights of the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
400:Postpone to the great object of Liberty every smaller motive and passion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
401:That government is the strongest of which every man feels himself a part. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
402:The legislative powers of government reach actions only and not opinions. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
403:There is nothing more unequal than the equal treatment of unequal people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
404:Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of Liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
405:Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
406:Unmerited abuse wounds, while unmerited praise has not the power to heal. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
407:We sometimes from dreams pick up some hint worth improving by reflection. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
408:As for what is not true, you will always find abundance in the newspapers. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
409:Conquest is not in our principles. It is inconsistent with our government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
410:Errors of opinion may be tolerated where reason is left free to combat it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
411:Every man has a commission to admonish, exhort, convince another of error. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
412:If I could not go to Heaven but with a party, I would not go there at all. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
413:In every country and in every age, the priest has been hostile to liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
414:Is uniformity of opinion desirable? No more than that of face and stature. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
415:Of all machines, the human heart is the most complicated and inexplicable. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
416:Only aim to do your duty, and mankind will give you credit where you fail. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
417:The course of history shows that as a government grows, liberty decreases. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
418:The office of reformer of the superstitions of a nation is ever dangerous. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
419:The right of self-government does not comprehend the government of others. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
420:besides the comfort of knowlege, every science is auxiliary to every other. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
421:It is in our lives, and not from our words, that our religion must be read. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
422:Opinion, and the just maintenance of it, shall never be a crime in my view. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
423:The Christian religion is the best religion that has ever been given to man ~ Thomas Jefferson,
424:The Governor would serve a five-year term and be ineligible for reelection. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
425:Thomas Jefferson creates the Marines for the Islamic pirates that were happening. ~ Glenn Beck,
426:Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very far. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
427:God grant that men of principle shall be our principal men.”   — Thomas Jefferson ~ G S Jennsen,
428:He does most in God's great world who does his best in his own little world. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
429:I have nothing but contempt for anyone who can spell a word in only one way. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
430:It does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods or no God. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
431:Never buy what you do not want, because it is cheap; it will be dear to you. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
432:Nothing then is unchangeable but the inherent and inalienable rights of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
433:One loves to possess arms, though they hope never to have occasion for them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
434:Politics is such a torment that I advise everyone I love not to mix with it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
435:The people of every country are the only safe guardians of their own rights. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
436:The protection of our citizens, the spirit and honor of our country, require ~ Thomas Jefferson,
437:The rational and peaceable instrument of reform, the suffrage of the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
438:Truth is certainly a branch of morality and a very important one to society. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
439:All... natural rights may be abridged or modified in [their] exercise by law. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
440:For an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
441:I like a little rebellion now and then. It is like a storm in the atmosphere. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
442:Men are disposed to live honestly, if the means of doing so are open to them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
443:Men as well as rivers grow crooked by following the path of least resistance. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
444:My affections were first for my own country, then, generally, for all mankind ~ Thomas Jefferson,
445:Political interest [can] never be separated in the long run from moral right. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
446:We will be soldiers, so our sons may be farmers, so their sons may be artists ~ Thomas Jefferson,
447:Whose foot is to be the measure to which ours are all to be cut or stretched? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
448:Choice by the people themselves is not generally distinguished for its wisdom. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
449:Do not bite at the bait of pleasure till you know there is no hook beneath it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
450:Inspirational Quotes on: Honesty, Simplicity, Secret, Universe, Modesty, Peace ~ Thomas Jefferson,
451:Preachers dread the advance of science as witches do the approach of daylight. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
452:Principle will, in... most... cases open the way for us to correct conclusion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
453:Taxes should be proportioned to what may be annually spared by the individual. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
454:The genius of architecture seems to have shed its maledictions over this land. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
455:The natural cause of the human mind is certainly from credulity to skepticism. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
456:We are the friends of liberty everywhere, but the guarrantors of only our own. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
457:When angry count to ten before you speak. If very angry, count to one hundred. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
458:As was said by Thomas Jefferson, “the price of freedom is eternal vigilance. ~ William R Forstchen,
459:Bind them down by the chains of the Constitution where they can do no mischief. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
460:Dispositions of the mind, like limbs of the body, acquire strength by exercise. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
461:Do not bite at the bait of pleasure, till you know there is no hook beneath it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
462:I do not agree that an age of pleasure is no compensation for a moment of pain. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
463:I'd rather have newspapers and no government than government and no newspapers. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
464:I extremely believe in luck, and I discovered more hard work, your luck as much ~ Thomas Jefferson,
465:I firmly believe in luck. And I noticed: the more I work, the luckier I become. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
466:Ignorance and bigotry, like other insanities, are incapable of self-government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
467:Our attachment to no nation on earth should supplant our attachment to liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
468:The cornerstone of democracy rests on the foundation of an educated electorate. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
469:When a man assumes a public trust he should consider himself a public property. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
470:All the world would be Christian if they were taught the pure Gospel of Christ!. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
471:Easter was when they nailed Him to the cross. And He never said a mumbling word. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
472:I can never fear that things will go far wrong where common sense has fair play. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
473:Private enterprise manages so much better all the concerns to which it is equal. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
474:The best commentary on the principles of government which has ever been written. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
475:There is no habit you will value so much as that of walking far without fatigue. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
476:Too old to plant trees for my own gratification, I shall do it for my posterity. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
477:We are not to expect to be translated from despotism to liberty in a featherbed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
478:We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honour. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
479:We prefer war in all cases to tribute under any form and to any people whatever. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
480:When you abandon freedom to achieve security, you lose both and deserve neither. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
481:I'm a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
482:It must be observed that our revenues are raised almost wholly on imported goods. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
483:My only fear is that I may live too long. This would be a subject of dread to me. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
484:Nothing is so disgusting to our sex as want of cleanliness and delicacy in yours. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
485:The fortune of our lives depends on employing well the short period of our youth. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
486:The lamp of war is kindled here, not to be extinguished but by torrents of blood. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
487:The olive tree is surely the richest gift of Heaven. I can scarcely expect bread. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
488:The only foundation for useful education in a republic is to be laid in religion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
489:We generally learn languages for the benefit of reading the books written in them ~ Thomas Jefferson,
490:When the speech condemns a free press, you are hearing the words of a tyrant.
   ~ Thomas Jefferson?,
491:With the same honest views, the most honest men often form different conclusions. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
492:all. I like a little rebellion now and then. It is like a storm in the Atmosphere. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
493:A man's moral sense must be unusually strong if slavery does not make him a thief. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
494:I... [am] convinced [man] has no natural right in opposition to his social duties. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
495:I'm a greater believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it ~ Thomas Jefferson,
496:I never saw an instance of one or two disputants convincing the other by argument. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
497:May it be to the world... to assume the blessings and security of self-government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
498:Ridicule is the only weapon which can be used against unintelligible propositions. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
499:We often repent of what we have said, but never, never, of that which we have not. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
500:When tempted to do any thing in secret, ask yourself if you would do it in public. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
501:I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
502:It is error alone which needs the support of government. Truth can stand by itself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
503:Our particular principles of religion are a subject of accountability to God alone. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
504:Some other natural rights... [have] not yet entered into any declaration of rights. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
505:That liberty [is pure] which is to go to all, and not to the few or the rich alone. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
506:The first object of human association [is] the full improvement of their condition. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
507:The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one will do. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
508:Thomas Jefferson said, “It’s wonderful how much can be done if we are always working. ~ John C Maxwell,
509:Thomas Jefferson taught that a democracy was impractical unless the people were educated. ~ Carl Sagan,
510:Though [the people] may acquiesce, they cannot approve what they do not understand. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
511:What all agree upon is probably right; what no two agree in most probably is wrong. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
512:If I had to choose between government and a free press, I would choose a free press. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
513:It is for the benefit of mankind to mitigate the horrors of war as much as possible. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
514:Nobody is better than you and remember, you are better than nobody. Thomas Jefferson ~ Thomas Jefferson,
515:Politics, like religion, hold up the torches of martyrdom to the reformers of error. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
516:The art of printing secures us against the retrogradation of reason and information. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
517:There is no act, however virtuous, for which ingenuity may not find some bad motive. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
518:Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government ~ Thomas Jefferson,
519:An honest man can feel no pleasure in the exercise of power over his fellow citizens. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
520:A walk about Paris will provide lessons in history, beauty, and in the point of Life. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
521:Everything is useful which contributes to fix the principles and practices of virtue. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
522:I consider him [Alexander von Humboldt] the most important scientist whom I have met. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
523:If we are made in some degree for others, yet in a greater are we made for ourselves. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
524:I own that I am not a friend to a very energetic government. It is always oppressive. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
525:The happiest hours of my life have been spent in the flow of affection among friends. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
526:The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
527:[The people] are in truth the only legitimate proprietors of the soil and government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
528:There is a natural aristocracy among men. The grounds of this are virtue and talents. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
529:There is not a truth existing which I fear, or would wish unknown to the whole world. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
530:Whenever a man has cast a longing eye on offices, a rottenness begins in his conduct. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
531:Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
532:Do you want to know who you are? Don't ask. Act! Action will delineate and define you. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
533:I hope we shall . . . crush in [its] birth the aristocracy of our monied corporations. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
534:I never yet saw an instance of one of two disputants convincing the other by argument. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
535:In spite of what Thomas Jefferson wrote, all men may be created equal, but not to all women. ~ Bill Cosby,
536:No man will ever carry out of the Presidency the reputation which carried him into it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
537:One never really knows how much one has been touched by a place until one has left it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
538:Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
539:The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield, and government to gain ground. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
540:Agriculture is at the same time the most tranquil, healthy, and independent occupation. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
541:All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
542:A walk about Paris will provide lessons in history, beauty, and in the point of life... ~ Thomas Jefferson,
543:I consider ethics, as well as religion, as supplements to law in the government of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
544:In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
545:It is neither wealth nor splendor, but tranquility and occupation which give happiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
546:On matters of style, swim with the current, on matters of principle, stand like a rock. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
547:Peace, commerce and honest friendship with all nations; entangling alliances with none. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
548:The greatest honor of a man is in doing good to his fellow men, not in destroying them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
549:The most uninformed mind with a healthy body is happier than the wisest valetudinarian. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
550:The opinions of men are not the object of civil government, nor under its jurisdiction. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
551:The ordinary affairs of a nation offer little difficulty to a person of any experience. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
552:There is not a truth existing which I fear... or would wish unknown to the whole world. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
553:Those who expect to be both ignorant and free, expect what never was and never will be. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
554:A habilidade mais valiosa é aquela de jamais usar duas palavras quando uma apenas basta. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
555:A professorship of theology should have
no place in our institution. —THOMAS JEFFERSON ~ Richard Dawkins,
556:Determine never to be idle. It is wonderful how much may be done if we are always doing. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
557:"Do you want to know who you are? Don't ask. Act! Action will delineate and define you." ~ Thomas Jefferson,
558:Establish the eternal truth that acquiescence under insult is not the way to escape war. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
559:Everything is useful which contributes to fix in the principles and practices of virtue. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
560:Gaming corrupts our disposition and teaches us a habit of hostility against all mankind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
561:History, by apprising [the people] of the past, will enable them to judge of the future. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
562:It is the old practice of despots to use a part of the people to keep the rest in order. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
563:I view great cities as pestilential to the morals, the health, and the liberties of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
564:No government ought to be without censors; and where the press is free no one ever will. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
565:No race of kings has ever presented above one man of common sense in twenty generations. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
566:Peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations...entangling alliances with none ~ Thomas Jefferson,
567:That one hundred and fifty lawyers should do business together ought not to be expected. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
568:The idea is quite unfounded that on entering into society we give up any natural rights. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
569:The legitimate powers of government extend to such acts only as are injurious to others. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
570:The only greater [evil] than separation... [is] living under a government of discretion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
571:We must meet our duty and convince the world that we are just friends and brave enemies. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
572:Where thought is free in its range, we need never fear to hazard what is good in itself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
573:Earnestly recommended to all officers and soldiers, diligently to attend divine services. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
574:He who permits himself to tell a lie once, finds it much easier to do it the second time. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
575:I am never tempted to pray but when a warm feeling for my friends comes athwart my heart. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
576:I would rather have newspapers without a government than a government without newspapers. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
577:Malice will always find bad motives for good actions. - Shall we therefore never do good? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
578:Our rulers can have authority over such natural rights only as we have submitted to them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
579:Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everyone is standing around reloading ~ Thomas Jefferson,
580:Religious leaders will always avail themselves of public ignorance for their own purpose. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
581:There is preparing, I hope, under the auspices of heaven, a way for a total emancipation. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
582:The sentiments of men are known not only by what they receive, but what they reject also. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
583:Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very far.” —Thomas Jefferson ~ Mark Sisson,
584:We ought not to schismatize on either men or measures. Principles alone can justify that. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
585:Were we directed from Washington when to sow and when to reap, we should soon want bread. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
586:While prudence will endeavor to avoid this issue of war, bravery will prepare to meet it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
587:Democracy as a system has evolved into something that Thomas Jefferson didn't anticipate. ~ Hunter S Thompson,
588:Do not be too severe upon the errors of the people, but reclaim them by enlightening them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
589:I pledge undying hostility to any government restrictions on the free minds of the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
590:Law is often the tyrant's will, and always so when it violates the right of an individual. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
591:Men fight for freedom; then they begin to accumulate laws to take it away from themselves. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
592:The evils of war are great in their endurance, and have a long reckoning for ages to come. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
593:The opinions and beliefs of men follow involuntarily the evidence proposed to their minds. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
594:A machine for making revolutions is doing precisely the wrong thing at just the right time. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
595:Beer, if drank with moderation, softens the temper, cheers the spirit, and promotes health. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
596:Blest is that nation whose silent course of happiness furnishes nothing for history to say. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
597:Every gentleman plays billiards, but someone who plays billiards too well, is no gentleman. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
598:It is neither wealth nor splendor; but tranquility and occupation which give you happiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
599:music, drawing, books, invention & exercise will be so many resources to you against ennui. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
600:Nothing but free argument, raillery and even ridicule will preserve the purity of religion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
601:The constitution of the United States is the result of the collected wisdom of our country. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
602:There is no King, who, with sufficient force, is not always ready to make himself absolute. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
603:Trial by jury is part of the bright constellation which leads to peace, liberty and safety. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
604:Tyranny is defined as that which is legal for the government but illegal for the citizenry. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
605:Who better to so softly bind the wound of one, than she who has suffered the wound herself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
606:A government held together by the bands of reason only, requires much compromise of opinion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
607:All men are created equal and have the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
608:Creeds have been the bane of the Christian church ... made of Christendom a slaughter-house. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
609:I do not pretend that language is science. It isan instrument for the attainment of science. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
610:If Thomas Jefferson had heard us, he probably would have said, 'We shouldn't have free speech.' ~ Robin Quivers,
611:If you want something you’ve never had, you’ve got to do something you’ve never done before. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
612:I know of no safe depository of the ultimate power of the society but the people themselves. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
613:I prefer to be remembered for what I have done for others, not what others have done for me. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
614:Let common sense and common honesty have fair play, and they will soon set things to rights. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
615:No person shall be capable of being a delegate for more than three years in any term of six. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
616:Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate than that these people are to be free. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
617:The chief purpose of government is to protect life. Abandon that and you have abandoned all. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
618:Aristocrats fear the people, and wish to transfer all power to the higher classes of society. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
619:I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
620:If ever there was a holy war, it was that which saved our liberties and gave us independence. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
621:I think with the Romans, that the general of today should be a soldier tomorrow if necessary. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
622:Nature intended me for the tranquil pursuits of science by rendering them my supreme delight. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
623:The constitutional freedom of religion is the most inalienable and sacred of all human rights ~ Thomas Jefferson,
624:The issue for patents for new discovers has given a spring to invention beyond my conception. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
625:The man who stops advertising to save money is like the man who stops the clock to save time. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
626:The moral sense is as much a part of our constitution as that of feeling, seeing, or hearing. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
627:The patient, treated on the fashionable theory, sometimes gets well in spite of the medicine. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
628:There is no justification for taking away individuals' freedom in the guise of public safety. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
629:The time to guard against corruption and tyranny is before they shall have gotten hold of us. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
630:Those who bear equally the burthens of Government should equally participate of its benefits. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
631:When earth is rich it bids defiance to droughts, yields in abundance and of the best quality. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
632:A little rebellion now and then... is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
633:a woman who brings a child every two years [is] more profitable than the best man of the farm. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
634:I trust there is not a young man now living in the United States who will not die a Unitarian. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
635:Man [is] a rational animal, endowed by nature with rights and with an innate sense of justice. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
636:never trust a man who won't accept that there is more than one way to spell a word Paraphrased ~ Thomas Jefferson,
637:New York, like London, seems to be a cloacina [toilet] of all the depravities of human nature. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
638:No duty the Executive had to perform was so trying as to put the right man in the right place. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
639:The Christian god is a being of terrific character - cruel, vindictive, capricious and unjust. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
640:The second office in the government is honorable and easy; the first is but a splendid misery. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
641:We have no right to prejudice another in his civil enjoyments because he is of another church. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
642:Who then can so softly bind up the wound of another as he who has felt the same wound himself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
643:Banking establishments are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.” Thomas Jefferson ~ Chris Dietzel,
644:But this momentous question, like a fire bell in the night, awakened and filled me with terror. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
645:Do not neglect your music. It will be a companion which will sweeten many hours of life to you. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
646:I don't want them to kill no hog . . . . I want a man to go to that chair, on his own two feet. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
647:Industry, commerce and security are the surest roads to the happiness and prosperity of people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
648:It is every Americans' right and obligation to read and interpret the Constitution for himself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
649:letters are not the first, but the last step in the progression from barbarism to civilisation. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
650:Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
651:The advocate of religious freedom is to expect neither peace nor forgiveness from [the clergy]. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
652:The children of Israel in the wilderness, led by a cloud by day, and a pillar of fire by night. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
653:The difficulty is no longer to find candidates for the offices, but offices for the candidates. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
654:The tree of Liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
655:The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
656:Thomas Jefferson, happiness was based on the choices we make, not the conditions we were born with. ~ Jack Kilborn,
657:Those who wish to be ignorant and free, believe in something that never was and never shall be. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
658:When wrongs are pressed because it is believed they will be borne, resistance becomes morality. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
659:A little rebellion now and then is a good thing. —Thomas Jefferson, “Letter to James Madison” (1787) ~ Raine Miller,
660:A mind always employed is always happy. This is the true secret, the grand recipe, for felicity. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
661:A professorship of Theology should have no place in our institution [the University of Virginia] ~ Thomas Jefferson,
662:If you want something you've never had
You must be willing to do something you've never done. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
663:I’m a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson ~ M J DeMarco,
664:In our early struggles for liberty, religious freedom could not fail to become a primary object. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
665:I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that his justice cannot sleep forever. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
666:Knowing that religion does not furnish grosser bigots than law, I expect little from old judges. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
667:The excellence of every government is its adaptation to the state of those to be governed by it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
668:The greatest good we can do our country is to heal its party divisions and make them one people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
669:The plough is to the farmer what the wand is to the sorcerer. Its effect is really like sorcery. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
670:The sovereign invigorator of the body is exercise, and of all the exercises walking is the best. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
671:To take a single step beyond the text would be to take possession of a boundless field of power. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
672:Experience has proved to us that a dollar of silver disappears for every dollar of paper emitted. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
673:Pokud chcete něco, co jste nikdy neměli, musíte být ochotni udělat něco, co jste nikdy neudělali. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
674:we declared that an attack on any one colony should be considered as an attack on the whole. This ~ Thomas Jefferson,
675:A society that will trade a little liberty for a little order will lose both, and deserve neither. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
676:Honesty and interest are as intimately connected in the public as in the private code of morality. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
677:I believe in good luck, and the harder I work and the more I believe in myself, the luckier I get. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
678:I deny the power of the general government to making paper money, or anything else a legal tender. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
679:It is while we are young that the habit of industry is formed. If not then, it never is afterward. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
680:Let our countrymen know that the people alone can protect us against these evils of misgovernment. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
681:No society can make a perpetual constitution... The earth belongs always to the living generation. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
682:Questions of natural right are triable by their conformity with the moral sense and reason of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
683:The appointment of a woman to office is an innovation for which the public is not prepared, nor I. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
684:The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
685:We confide in our strength, without boasting of it, we respect that of others, without fearing it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
686:We see the wisdom of Solon's remark, that no more good must be attempted than the nation can bear. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
687:Government can do something for the people only in proportion as it can do something to the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
688:Sensibility of mind is indeed the parent of every virtue, but it is the parent of much misery, too. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
689:The good opinion of mankind, like the lever of Archimedes, with the given fulcrum, moves the world. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
690:The interests of a nation, when well understood, will be found to coincide with their moral duties. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
691:granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, ~ Thomas Jefferson,
692:He who knows nothing is closer to the truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
693:I believe the states can best govern our home concerns, and the general government our foreign ones. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
694:If you have any duty which must be done, and it seems disagreeable, do it promptly and have it over. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
695:It is the duty of every American citizen to take part in a vigorous debate on the issues of the day. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
696:Let us in education dream of an aristocracy of achievement arising out of a democracy of opportunity ~ Thomas Jefferson,
697:My principle is to do whatever is right, and leave consequences to him who has the disposal of them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
698:The day is not distant when we must bear and adopt [the abolition of slavery], or worse will follow. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
699:The greatest calamity which could befall us would be submission to a government of unlimited powers. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
700:The inquisition of public opinion overwhelms in practice the freedom asserted by the laws in theory. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
701:The order of nature [is] that individual happiness shall be inseparable from the practice of virtue. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
702:We do not mean to count or weigh our contributions by any standard other than that of our abilities. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
703:All are dead, and ourselves left alone amidst a new generation whom we know not, and who know us not. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
704:Ambition is a tricky little animal to tame. It is very skillful at concealing itself from its master. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
705:Common sense is the foundation of all authorities, of the laws themselves, and of their construction. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
706:[F]alsehood of the tongue leads to that of the heart, and in time depraves all its good dispositions. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
707:never trust a man who won't accept that there is more than one way to spell a word

Paraphrased ~ Thomas Jefferson,
708:The appointment of a woman to office is an innovation for which the public is not prepared, nor am I. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
709:We must use a good deal of economy in our wood, never cutting down new, where we can make the old do. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
710:When two parties make a compact, there results to each a power of compelling the other to execute it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
711:All, all dead: and ourselves left alone amidst a new generation whom we know not, and who know not us. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
712:Circumstances sometimes require, that rights the most unquestionable should be advanced with delicacy. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
713:I could say much about politics, our only entertainment here, but you would not care a fig about that. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
714:I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just, and that his justice will not sleep forever. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
715:No man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place, or ministry whatsoever. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
716:Peace with all nations, and the right which that gives us with respect to all nations, are our object. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
717:The merchants will manage [commerce] the better, the more they are left free to manage for themselves. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
718:The power of making war often prevents it, and in our case would give efficacy to our desire of peace. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
719:Experience has taught me that manufacturers are now as necessary to our independence as to our comfort. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
720:History, I believe, furnishes no example of a priest-ridden people maintaining a free civil government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
721:If Americans desire to be both ignorant and free, they want what never has been and what never will be. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
722:I see no comfort in outliving one's friends, and remaining a mere monument of the times which are past. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
723:Man, once surrendering his reason, has no remaining guard against absurdities the most monstrous. . . . ~ Thomas Jefferson,
724:Not less than two hours a day should be devoted to exercise, and the weather should be little regarded. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
725:The happiest moments of my life have been the few which I have passed at home in the bosom of my family ~ Thomas Jefferson,
726:Were people to mingle only with those of like mind, every man would be an insulate being." Thomas Jefferson ~ John Ferling,
727:When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
728:Erecting the 'wall of separation between church and state'... is absolutely essential in a free society. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
729:Experience has already shown that the impeachment the Constitution has provided is not even a scarecrow. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
730:I do not take a single newspaper, nor read one a month, and I feel myself infinitely the happier for it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
731:I have overlived the generation with which mutual labors & perils begat mutual confidence and influence. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
732:Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just: that his justice cannot sleep forever. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
733:It is always better to have no ideas than false ones; to believe nothing, than to believe what is wrong. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
734:Kejujuran merupakan suatu kebijakan dalam bisnis, yang tidak perlu diubah atau disesuaikan dengan waktu. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
735:Peace and friendship with all mankind is our wisest policy, and I wish we may be permitted to pursue it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
736:The Declaration of Independence . . . [is the] declaratory charter of our rights, and the rights of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
737:The happiest moments of my life have been the few which I have passed at home in the bosom of my family. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
738:To penetrate and dissipate these clouds of darkness, the general mind must be strengthened by education. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
739:I have sworn upon the altar of God Eternal, hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
740:I have sworn upon the altar of god, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
741:The most sacred of the duties of a government [is] to do equal and impartial justice to all its citizens. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
742:The present generation has the same right of self-government which the past one has exercised for itself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
743:The unsuccessful strugglers against tyranny have been the chief martyrs of treason laws in all countries. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
744:To the corruptions of Christianity I am indeed opposed; but not to the genuine precepts of Jesus himself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
745:We in America do not have government by the majority. We have government by the majority who participate. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
746:I can scarcely contemplate a more incalculable evil than the breaking of the Union into two or more parts. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
747:If I am to meet with a disappointment, the sooner I know it, the more of life I shall have to wear it off. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
748:I think our governments will remain virtuous for many centuries; as long as they are chiefly agricultural. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
749:Kalau marah, berhitunglah sampai sepuluh sebelum berbicara, atau bahkan seratus kalau sedang marah sekali. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
750:the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
751:Though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will, to be rightful, must be reasonable. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
752:When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
753:History has informed us that bodies of men as well as individuals are susceptible of the spirit of tyranny. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
754:I am not among those who fear the people. They, and not the rich, are our dependence for continued freedom. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
755:I join you therefore in branding as cowardly the idea that the human mind is incapable of further advances. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
756:The benefit of even limited monopolies is too doubtful, to be opposed to that of their general suppression. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
757:The selfish spirit of commerce, which knows no country, and feels no passion or principle but that of gain. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
758:Bank-paper must be suppressed, and the circulating medium must be restored to the nation to whom it belongs. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
759:Bodily decay is gloomy in prospect, but of all human contemplations the most abhorrent is body without mind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
760:I cannot live without books: but fewer will suffice where amusement, and not use, is the only future object. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
761:I do not know whether you are fond of chemical reading. There are some things in this science worth reading. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
762:I endeavor to keep their attention fixed on the main objects of all science, the freedom & happiness of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
763:I see the necessity of sacrificing our opinions sometimes to the opinions of others for the sake of harmony. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
764:I shall need, too, the favor of that Being in whose hands we are, who led our forefathers, as Israel of old. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
765:It would not be for the public good to have [a majority in Congress of one party] greater [than] two to one. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
766:Self-interest, or rather self-love, or egoism, has been more plausibly substituted as the basis of morality. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
767:Slavery is an abomination and must be loudly proclaimed as such, but I own that I nor any other man has any ~ Thomas Jefferson,
768:That liberty [is pure] which is to go to all, and not to the few or the rich alone. (to Horatio Gates, 1798) ~ Thomas Jefferson,
769:An hereditary aristocracy... will change the form of our governments from the best to the worst in the world. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
770:[A] spirit of justice and friendly accomodation...is our duty and our interest to cultivate with all nations. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
771:Congress has not unlimited powers to provide for the general welfare, but only those specifically enumerated. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
772:History has informed us that bodies of men, as well as individuals, are susceptible of the spirit of tyranny. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
773:I value peace, and I should unwillingly see any event take place which would render war a necessary resource. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
774:Never fear the want of business. A man who qualifies himself well for his calling, never fails of employment. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
775:Difficulties indeed sometimes arise; but common sense and honest intentions will generally steer through them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
776:He [Weishaupt] says, no one ever laid a surer foundation for liberty than our grand master, Jesus of Nazareth. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
777:If Thomas Jefferson thought taxation without representation was bad, he should see how it is with representation. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
778:I have ever deemed it more honorable and more profitable, too, to set a good example than to follow a bad one. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
779:I never before knew the full value of trees. Under them I breakfast, dine, write, read and receive my company. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
780:I set out on this ground, which I suppose to be self-evident, that the dart belongs in usufruct to the living. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
781:I was bold in the pursuit of knowledge, never fearing to follow truth and reason to whatever results they led. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
782:Natural rights [are] the objects for the protection of which society is formed and municipal laws established. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
783:Of all the cankers of human happiness, none corrodes it with so silent, yet so baneful, a tooth, as indolence. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
784:Of all the cankers of human happiness none corrodes with so silent, yet so baneful an influence, as indolence. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
785:Our civil rights have no dependence upon our religious opinions more than our opinions in physics or geometry. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
786:preach, my dear Sir, a crusade against ignorance; establish & improve the law for educating the common people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
787:To unequal privileges among members of the same society the spirit of our nation is, with one accord, adverse. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
788:Wisdom I know is social. She seeks her fellows. But Beauty is jealous, and illy bears the presence of a rival. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
789:[A]lthough a republican government is slow to move, yet when once in motion, its momentum becomes irresistible. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
790:An acre of the best ground for hemp, is to be selected and sewn in hemp and be kept for a permanent hemp patch. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
791:A nation, as a society, forms a moral person, and every member of it is personally responsible for his society. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
792:Christianity neither is, nor ever was a part of the common law. ~ Thomas Jefferson, letter to Dr. Thomas Cooper (10 February 1814),
793:I believe that Thomas Jefferson said: 'If it neither breaks my leg nor picks my pocket, what difference is it to me?' ~ Glenn Beck,
794:I find the pain of a little censure, even when it is unfounded, is more acute than the pleasure of much praise. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
795:I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past. —Thomas Jefferson, Letter to John Adams, 1816 ~ Jack McDevitt,
796:I set out on this ground, which I suppose to be self-evident, that the earth belongs in usufruct to the living. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
797:No government should be without critics. If its intentions are good then it has nothing to fear from criticism. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
798:Our properties within our own territories [should not] be taxed or regulated by any power on earth but our own. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
799:The Bible is the cornerstone of liberty ... students perusal of the sacred volume will make us better citizens. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
800:The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. —THOMAS JEFFERSON ~ Michelle Moran,
801:The world is indebted for all triumphs which have been gained by reason and humanity over error and oppression. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
802:Agreeable society is the first essential in constituting the happiness and of course the value of our existence. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
803:Confidence is everywhere the parent of despotism. Free government is founded in jealousy, and not in confidence. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
804:For a people who are free, and who mean to remain so, a well-organized and armed militia is their best security. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
805:If ever this vast country is brought under a single government, it will be one of the most extensive corruption. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
806:If we are to guard against ignorance and remain free, it is the responsibility of every American to be informed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
807:If your letters are as long as the bible, they will appear short to me. Only let them be brim full of affection. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
808:I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
809:It is my disposition to maintain peace until its condition shall be made less tolerable than that of war itself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
810:No generation has a right to contract debts greater than can be paid off during the course of its own existence. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
811:The more ignorant we become the less value we set on science, and the less inclination we shall have to seek it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
812:When right, I shall often be thought wrong by those whose positions will not command a view of the whole ground. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
813:Without health there is no happiness. An attention to health, then, should take the place of every other object. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
814:He who knows nothing is closer to the truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehood and errors. —Thomas Jefferson ~ Brandi Reeds,
815:I do verily believe that a single, consolidated government would become the most corrupt government on the earth. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
816:Laws that forbid the carrying of arms disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
817:Never did a prisoner, released from his chains, feel such relief as I shall on shaking off the shackles of power. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
818:The care of human life and happiness, and not their destruction, is the first and only object of good government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
819:The God who gave us life gave us liberty at the same time; the hand of force may destroy but cannot disjoin them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
820:The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time. ~ Thomas Jefferson, Summary View of the Rights of British America (1774),
821:The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
822:the qualifications for self-government in society are not innate. they are the result of habit and long training. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
823:The tree of Liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots . . . —Thomas Jefferson, 1787 ~ Robert A Heinlein,
824:To compel a man to furnish funds for the propagation of ideas he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
825:Any Government strong enough to give you what you want, is a Government strong enough to take everything you have! ~ Thomas Jefferson,
826:Congress has scarcely any thing to employ them, and complain that the place [Washington, D.C.] is remarkably dull. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
827:he repudiated the writings of the Apostle Paul," whom he considered the (first corrupter of the doctrines of Jesus ~ Thomas Jefferson,
828:It is as useless to argue with those who have renounced the use of reason as to administer medication to the dead. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
829:No knowledge can be more satisfactory to a man than that of his own frame, its parts, their functions and actions. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
830:No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
831:Our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions any more than our opinions in physics or geometry... ~ Thomas Jefferson,
832:The spirit of resistance to government is so valuable on certain occasions that I wish it to be always kept alive. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
833:The worst day in a man's life is when he sits down and begins thinking about how he can get something for nothing. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
834:Travelling. ... when men of sober age travel, they gather knowlege which they may apply usefully for their country ~ Thomas Jefferson,
835:War is an instrument entirely inefficient toward redressing wrong; and multiplies, instead of indemnifying losses. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
836:We are now vibrating between too much and too little government, and the pendulum will rest finally in the middle. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
837:Whensoever the General Government assumes undelegated powers, its acts are unauthoritative, void, and of no force. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
838:Honesty is the first chapter in the Book of wisdom. Let it be our endeavor to merit the character of a just nation. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
839:I am for freedom of religion, and against all maneuvers to bring about a legal ascendency of one sect over another. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
840:I find friendship to be like wine, raw when new, ripened with age, the true old man's milk and restorative cordial. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
841:In a government bottomed on the will of all, the... liberty of every individual citizen becomes interesting to all. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
842:Let the farmer forevermore be honored in his calling; for they who labor in the earth are the chosen people of God. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
843:The greatest service which can be rendered any country is to add a useful plant to its culture. --The Fruit Hunters ~ Thomas Jefferson,
844:Civil government being the sole object of forming societies, its administration must be conducted by common consent. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
845:creation: “If I could not go to heaven but with a party,” proclaimed Thomas Jefferson, “I would not go there at all.”1 ~ Joseph J Ellis,
846:Each generation has a right to choose for itself the form of government it believes most promotive of its happiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
847:Enlighten the people, and tyranny and oppressions of body and mind will vanish like evil spirits at the dawn of day. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
848:It may be regarded as certain that not a foot of land will ever be taken from the Indians without their own consent. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
849:The genuine and simple religion of Jesus will one day be restored: such as it was preached and practiced by Himself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
850:The issuing power [of money] should be taken from the banks and restored to the people, to whom it properly belongs. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
851:The wise know too well their weakness to assume infallibility; and he who knows most knows best how little he knows. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
852:Thomas Jefferson was a real poet. He was slick with that 'pursuit' of happiness because the 'pursuit' puts it back on you. ~ Will Smith,
853:A free people [claim] their rights as derived from the laws of nature, and not as the gift of their chief magistrate. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
854:Every day is lost in which we do not learn something useful. Man has no nobler or more valuable possession than time. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
855:From the nature of things, every society must at all times possess within itself the sovereign powers of legislation. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
856:If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
857:If our house be on fire, without inquiring whether it was fired from within or without, we must try to extinguish it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
858:I hope that we have not labored in vain, and that our experiment will still prove that men can be governed by reason. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
859:It is a misnomer to call a government republican in which a branch of the supreme power is independent of the nation. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
860:It is not by the consolidation or concentration of powers but by their distribution that good government is effected. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
861:It is surely time for men to think for themselves, and to throw off the authority of names so artificially magnified. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
862:Liberty is the great parent of science and of virtue; and a nation will be great in both in proportion as it is free. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
863:My confidence is that there will for a long time be virtue and good sense enough in our countrymen to correct abuses. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
864:We should talk over the lessons of the day, or lose them in Music, Chess, or the merriments of our family companions. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
865:Defend our liberties and fashion into one united people the multitudes brought hither out of many kindred and tongues. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
866:Difference of opinion is advantageous in religion. The several sects perform the office of a Censor - over each other. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
867:Every citizen should be a soldier. This was the case with the Greeks and Romans, and must be that of every free state. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
868:Excessive taxation . . . will carry reason & reflection to every man's door, and particularly in the hour of election. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
869:For themselves they fought, for themselves they conquered, and for themselves alone they have they have right to hold. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
870:I advance it therefore [...] that the blacks [...] are inferior to the whites in the endowments both of body and mind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
871:Idleness begets ennui, ennui the hypochondriac, and that a diseased body. No laborious person was ever yet hysterical. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
872:Independence can be trusted nowhere but with the people in mass. They are inherently independent of all but moral law. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
873:It is more dangerous that even a guilty person should be punished without the forms of law than that he should escape. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
874:I will not believe our labors are lost. I shall not die without a hope that light and liberty are on a steady advance. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
875:May I never get too busy in my own affairs that I fail to respond to the needs of others with kindness and compassion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
876:Music furnishes a delightful recreation for the hours of respite from the cares of the day, and lasts us through life. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
877:The republican is the only form of government which is not eternally at open or secret war with the rights of mankind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
878:The right to use a thing comprehends a right to the means necessary to its use, and without which it would be useless. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
879:Was the government to prescribe to us our medicine and diet, our bodies would be in such keeping as our souls are now. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
880:We are completely saddled and bridled, and... the bank is so firmly mounted on us that we must go where it will guide. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
881:Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
882:Every honest man will suppose honest acts to flow from honest principles, and the rogues may rail without intermission. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
883:Games played with the ball, and others of that nature, are too violent for the body and stamp no character on the mind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
884:Give up money, give up fame, give up science, give the earth itself and all it contains, rather than do an immoral act. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
885:I have no fear that the result of our experiment will be that men may be trusted to govern themselves without a master. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
886:It does me no injury for my neighbour to say there are 20 gods or no God. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
887:Nothing gives one person so much advantage over another as to remain always cool and unruffled under all circumstances. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
888:Our peculiar security is in the possession of a written Constitution. Let us not make it a blank paper by construction. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
889:The happiest moments my heart knows are those in which it is pouring forth its affections to a few esteemed characters. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
890:With nations as with individuals our interests soundly calculated will ever be found inseparable from our moral duties. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
891:History teaches the young the virtues of freedom. By apprising them of the past it will enable them to judge the future. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
892:It is error alone that needs the support of government.2 Truth can stand by itself. —THOMAS JEFFERSON, on freedom of religion ~ Jon Meacham,
893:It should be our endeavor to cultivate the peace and friendship of every nation, even of that which has injured us most. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
894:Paper money is liable to be abused, has been, is, and forever will be abused, in every country in which it is permitted. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
895:The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
896:The fore horse of this frightful team is public debt. Taxation follow that, and in its turn wretchedness and oppression. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
897:The laws that forbid the carrying of arms... disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
898:The Tree of Liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrant. It is its natural manure. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
899:Agriculture is our wisest pursuit, because it will in the end contribute most to real wealth, good morals, and happiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
900:As Thomas Jefferson proclaimed, “In matters of fashion, swim with the current. In matters of conscience, stand like a rock. ~ John C Maxwell,
901:I long to be in the midst of the children, and have more pleasure in their little follies than in the wisdom of the wise. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
902:It is a happy circumstance in human affairs that evils which are not cured in one way will cure themselves in some other. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
903:I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
904:Man is not made for the State but the State for man and it derives its just powers only from the consent of the governed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
905:Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today.” “I get the feeling that’s not what Thomas Jefferson meant,” muttered Mitch. ~ V E Schwab,
906:The care of human life and happiness, and their destruction is the first and only legitimate object of a good government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
907:The spirit of 1776 is not dead. It had only been slumbering. The body of the American people is substantially republican. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
908:We seem not to perceive that, by the law of nature, one generation is to another as one independent nation is to another. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
909:With all the imperfections of our present government, it is without comparison the best existing, or that ever did exist. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
910:A rising nation, spread over a wide and fruitful Land, traversing all the seas with the rich production of their Industry. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
911:It does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods or no god. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
912:I think we have more machinery of government than is necessary, too many parasites living on the labor of the industrious. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
913:I tolerate with the utmost latitude the right of others to differ from me in opinion without imputing to them criminality. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
914:I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty, than those attending too small a degree of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
915:No man has greater confidence than I have in the spirit of the people, to a rational extent. Whatever they can, they will. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
916:Public employment contributes neither to advantage nor happiness. It is but honorable exile from one's family and affairs. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
917:Should things go wrong at any time, the people will set them to rights by the peaceable exercise of their elective rights. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
918:Take more pleasure in giving what is best to another than in having it for yourself, and then all the world will love you. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
919:The clergy believe that any power confided in me will be exerted in opposition to their schemes, and they believe rightly. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
920:The functionaries of every government have propensities to command at will the liberty and property of their constituents. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
921:The greatest service which can be rendered any country is to add a useful plant to its culture.

--The Fruit Hunters ~ Thomas Jefferson,
922:The mobs of great cities add just so much to the support of pure government as sores do to the strength of the human body. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
923:The press is the best instrument for enlightening the mind of man, and improving him as a rational, moral and social being ~ Thomas Jefferson,
924:There is a fulness of time when men should go, and not occupy too long the ground to which others have a right to advance. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
925:A nation which expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, expects that which never was and never will be. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
926:A Prince, whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
927:Everyone has a natural right to choose that vocation in life which he thinks most likely gives him comfortable subsistence. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
928:For Heaven's sake discard the monstrous wig which makes the English judges look like rats peeping through bunches of oakum. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
929:For if one link in nature's chain might be lost, another might be lost, until the whole of things will vanish by piecemeal. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
930:I feel much alarmed at the prospect of seeing General Jackson President. He is the most unfit man I know for such a place. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
931:I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
932:It is safer to have a whole people respectably enlightened than a few in a high state of science and the many in ignorance. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
933:That one generation of men in civil society have no right to make acts to bind another, is a truth that cannot be confused. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
934:Every nation has a right to govern itself internally under what forms it pleases, and to change these forms at its own will. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
935:I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
936:People generally have more feeling for canals and roads than education. However, I hope we can advance them with equal pace. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
937:All we can do is to make the best of our friends, love and cherish what is good in them, and keep out of the way what is bad. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
938:Error indeed has often prevailed by the assistance of power or force. Truth is the proper and sufficient antagonist to error. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
939:How little do my countrymen know what precious blessings they are in possession of, and which no other people on earth enjoy! ~ Thomas Jefferson,
940:I have given up newspapers in exchange for Tacitus and Thucydides, for Newton and Euclid; and I find myself much the happier. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
941:It is an encouraging observation that no good measure was ever proposed which, if duly pursued, failed to prevail in the end. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
942:Laws abridging the natural right of the citizen should be restrained by rigorous constructions within their narrowest limits. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
943:The Central Bank is an institution of the most deadly hostility existing against the principles and form of our Constitution. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
944:The declaration that religious faith shall be unpunished does not give immunity to criminal acts dictated by religious error. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
945:The introduction of so powerful an agent as steam [to a carriage on wheels] will make a great change in the situation of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
946:The policy of the American government is to leave their citizens free, neither restraining nor aiding them in their pursuits. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
947:Enlighten the people generally, and tyranny and oppressions of body and mind will vanish like evil spirits at the dawn of day. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
948:How sublime to look down on the workhouse of nature, to see her clouds, hail, snow, rain, thunder, all fabricated at our feet! ~ Thomas Jefferson,
949:If the measures which have been pursued are approved by the majority, it is the duty of the minority to acquiesce and conform. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
950:The Habeas Corpus secures every man here, alien or citizen, against everything which is not law, whatever shape it may assume. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
951:To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
952:When the people are afraid of the government, that's tyranny. But when the government is afraid of the people, that's liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
953:You are now old enough to know how very important to your future life will be the manner in which you employ your present time ~ Thomas Jefferson,
954:Be a listener only, keep within yourself, and endeavor to establish with yourself the habit of silence, especially in politics. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
955:Dependence begets subservience and venality, suffocates the germ of virtue, and prepares fit tools for the designs of ambition. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
956:«El árbol de la libertad debe ser vigorizado de vez en cuando con la sangre de patriotas y tiranos: es su fertilizante natural» ~ Thomas Jefferson,
957:Gouverneur Morris had often told me that General Washington believed no more of that system (Christianity) than did he himself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
958:He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither swarms of officers to harass our people and eat out their substance. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
959:Ignorance is preferable to error, and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing than he who believes what is wrong. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
960:I have always said that a studious perusal of the sacred volume will make better citizens, better fathers, and better husbands. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
961:I, place economy among the first & most important republican virtues, & public debt as the greatest of the dangers to be feared ~ Thomas Jefferson,
962:It is false to suggest that Thomas Jefferson or any other Founding Father believed in a legal barrier to God in the public square. ~ Newt Gingrich,
963:Nothing gives one person so much advantage over another as to remain cool and unruffled under all circumstances. —Thomas Jefferson ~ Jeffrey J Fox,
964:The cutting of heads is become so much a la mode, that one is apt to feel of a morning whether their own is on their shoulders. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
965:The dominion which the banking institutions have obtained over the minds of our citizens...must be broken, or it will break us. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
966:The happiest moments of my life have been the few which I have passed at home in the bosom of my family. —Thomas Jefferson ~ Clayton M Christensen,
967:The principle of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
968:Health, learning and virtue will ensure your happiness; they will give you a quiet conscience, private esteem and public honour. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
969:He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our People, and eat out their substance. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
970:If the obstacles of bigotry and priestcraft can be surmounted, we may hope that common sense will suffice to do everything else. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
971:It is wonderful to me that old men should not be sensible that their minds keep pace with their bodies in the progress of decay. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
972:No stile of writing is so delightful as that which is all pith, which never omits a necessary word, nor uses an unnecessary one. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
973:The Constitution is a mere thing of wax in the hands of the judiciary, which they may twist and shape into any form they please. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
974:The policy of the American government is to leave its citizens free, neither restraining them nor aiding them in their pursuits. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
975:We discover in the gospels a groundwork of vulgar ignorance, of things impossible, of superstition, fanaticism and fabrication . ~ Thomas Jefferson,
976:We must train and classify the whole of our male citizens, and make military instruction a regular part of collegiate education. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
977:A government which can be felt; a government of energy. God send that our country may never have a government, which it can feel. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
978:As our enemies have found we can reason like men, so now let us show them we can fight like men also.1 —THOMAS JEFFERSON, July 5, 1775 ~ Jon Meacham,
979:Enlighten the people generally, and tyranny and opressions of the body and mind will vanish like evil spirits at the dawn of day. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
980:I apprehend... that the total abandonment of the principle of rotation in the offices of President and Senator will end in abuse. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
981:I have learned to be less confident in the conclusions of human reason, and give more credit to the honesty of contrary opinions. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
982:I hope the terms of Excellency, Honor, Worship, Esquire, forever disappear from among us... I wish that of Mr. would follow them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
983:I wish to see this beverage become common instead of the whiskey which kills sone-third of our citizens and ruins their families. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
984:The law for religious freedom... [has]put down the aristocracy of the clergy and restored to the citizen the freedom of the mind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
985:They [Republicans] say, 'You're too conservative.' Was Thomas Jefferson too conservative? I'm tired of some people calling me wacky. ~ Sharron Angle,
986:Above all I hope that the education of the common people will be attended to so they won't forget the basic principles of freedom. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
987:A democracy is nothing more than mob rule, where fifty-one percent of the people may take away the rights of the other forty-nine. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
988:Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers of the people alone. The people themselves are its only safe depositories. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
989:If there is one principle more deeply rooted in the mind of every American, it is that we should have nothing to do with conquest. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
990:I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
991:Nothing can now be believed which is seen in a newspaper. Truth itself becomes suspicious by being put into that polluted vehicle. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
992:So now it turns out that Thomas Jefferson was having sex with Sally Hemings while serving in the 101st Airborne during the Vietnam War. ~ Ann Coulter,
993:the boys of the rising generation are to be the men of the next, and the sole guardians of the principles we deliver over to them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
994:The reason that Christianity is the best friend of government is because Christianity is the only religion that changes the heart. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
995:Brute animals are the most healthy, and they are exposed to all weather, and of men, those are healthiest who are the most exposed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
996:Communities should be planned with an eye to the effect on the human spirit of being continually surrounded by a maximum of beauty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
997:Health, learning and virtue will ensure your happiness; they will give
you a quiet conscience, private esteem and public honour. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
998:Ignorance of the law is no excuse in any country. If it were, the laws would lose their effect, because it can always be pretended. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
999:I sincerely believe the banking institutions having the issuing power of money, are more dangerous to liberty than standing armies. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1000:Man ... feels that he is a participator in the government of affairs not merely at an election, one day in the year, but every day. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1001:My theory has always been, that if we are to dream, the flatteries of hope are as cheap, and pleasanter, than the gloom of despair. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1002:None but an armed nation can dispense with a standing army. To keep ours armed and disciplined is therefore at all times important. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1003:The equal rights of man and the happiness of every individual are now acknowledged to be the only legitimate objects of government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1004:The persons and property of our citizens are entitled to the protection of our government in all places where they may lawfully go. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1005:The religion-builders have so distorted and deformed the doctrines of Jesus, so muffled them in mysticism, fancies, and falsehoods. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1006:Thomas Jefferson said, “Determine never to be idle. No person will have occasion to complain of the want of time, who never loses any. ~ Neil Pasricha,
1007:While the art of printing is left to us science can never be retrograde; what is once acquired of real knowledge can never be lost. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1008:A determination never to do what is wrong, prudence, and good-humor, will go far toward securing to you the estimation of the world. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1009:Error is to be pitied and pardoned: it is the weakness of human nature. But vice is a foul blemish, not pardonable in any character. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1010:Government is being founded on opinion, the opinion of the public, even when it is wrong, ought to be respected to a certain degree. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1011:I am a Christian in the only sense in which He wished anyone to be: sincerely attached to His doctrines in preference to all others. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1012:If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be. —THOMAS JEFFERSON ~ Rick Shenkman,
1013:I have never been able to conceive how any rational being could propose happiness to himself from the exercise of power over others. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1014:In questions of power, let no more be heard of confidence in man, but bind him down from mischief by the chains of the constitution. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1015:One single object . . . [will merit] the endless gratitude of the society: that of restraining the judges from usurping legislation. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1016:probably the greatest concentration of talent and genius in this house except for perhaps those times when Thomas Jefferson ate alone. ~ John F Kennedy,
1017:Taxation is, in fact, the most difficult function of government and that against which their citizens are most apt to be refractory. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1018:The general (federal) government will tend to monarchy, which will fortify itself from day to day, instead of working its own cures. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1019:The true foundation of republican government is the equal right of every citizen in his person and property and in their management. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1020:Be assured that it gives much more pain to the mind to be in debt, than to do without any article whatever which we may seem to want. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1021:If I had to choose between government without newspapers, and newspapers without government, I wouldn't hesitate to choose the latter ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1022:I never will, by any word or act, bow to the shrine of intolerance or admit a right of inquiry into the religious opinions of others. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1023:It was one of the rules which above all others made Doctr. Franklin the most amiable of men in society, "never to contradict anybody. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1024:My God! How little do my countrymen know what precious blessings they are in possession of, and which no other people on earth enjoy! ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1025:No nation is drunken where wine is cheap, and none sober where the dearness of wine substitutes ardent spirits as the common beverage ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1026:No one has a right to obstruct another exercising his faculties innocently for the relief of sensibilities made a part of his nature. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1027:Our minds were circumscribed within narrow limits by an habitual belief that it was our duty to be subordinate to the mother country. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1028:The art of governing consists simply of being honest, exercising common sense, following principle, and doing what is right and just. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1029:The equal rights of man, and the happiness of every individual, are now acknowledged to be the only legitimate objects of government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1030:The force of public opinion cannot be resisted when permitted freely to be expressed. The agitation it produces must be submitted to. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1031:The idea of formulated 'rights ... comes not from John Locke and Thomas Jefferson ... but from the canon law of the Catholic Church. ~ Thomas E Woods Jr,
1032:What justice would there be to take this life? Justice, gentlemen? Why, I would just as soon put a hog in the electric chair as this. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1033:While the farmer holds the title to the land, actually, it belongs to all the people because civilization itself rests upon the soil. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1034:Every man is under the natural duty of contributing to the necessities of the society; and this is all the laws should enforce on him. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1035:Exercise and application produce order in our affairs, health of body, cheerfulness of mind, and these make us precious to our friends ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1036:I am convinced that those societies which live without government enjoy in their gen'l mass an infinitely greater degree of happiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1037:If a due participation of office is a matter of right, how are vacancies to be obtained? Those by death are few; by resignation, none. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1038:I have lived temperately....I double the doctor's recommendation of a glass and a half wine each day and even treble it with a friend. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1039:Not for ourselves alone, but for all humanity... Let us hasten to find the path that leads to liberty, safety, and peace for everyone. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1040:The happiest moments of my life have been the few which I have passed at home in the bosom of my family. —Thomas Jefferson, Letters, 1790 ~ Jack McDevitt,
1041:The last hope of human liberty in this world rests on us. we ought, for so dear a stake, to sacrifice every attachment & every enmity. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1042:The liberty of the whole earth was depending on the issue of the contest, and was ever such a prize won with so little innocent blood? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1043:They are nations of eternal war. All their energies are expended in the destruction of the labor, property, and lives of their people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1044:When Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence, slaves constituted 40 percent of the population of his home state, Virginia. ~ Ron Chernow,
1045:Certainly one of the highest duties of the citizen is a scrupulous obedience to the laws of the nation. But it is not the highest duty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1046:He who is permitted by law to have no property of his own, can with difficulty conceive that property is founded in anything but force. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1047:I hold the precepts of Jesus as delivered by Himself, to be the most pure, benevolent and sublime which have ever been preached to man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1048:Revenue on the consumption of foreign articles is paid cheerfully by those who can afford to add foreign luxuries to domestic comforts. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1049:The contest is not between Us and Them, but between Good and Evil, and if those who would fight Evil adopt the ways of Evil, Evil wins. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1050:The contest is not between us and them, but between good and evil, and if those who would fight evil adopt the ways of evil, evil wins. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1051:Was the government to prescribe us our medicine and diet, our bodies would be in such keeping as our souls are now." - Thomas Jefferson ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1052:Were I to commence my administration again, the first question I would ask respecting a candidate would be, Does he use ardent spirits? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1053:While old men feel sensibly enough their own advance in years, they do not sufficiently recollect it in those whom they have seenyoung. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1054:An occasional insurrection will not weigh against the inconveniences of a government of force, such as are monarchies and aristocracies. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1055:I am tired of a life of contention, and of being the personal object for the hatred of every man, who hates the present state of things. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1056:I find it more than a little disingenuous to act as if keeping slaves was something that set Thomas Jefferson apart from all mankind. ~ Annette Gordon Reed,
1057:Learn to be flexible. Thomas Jefferson once said, “In matters of principle, stand like a rock. In matters of taste, swim with the current. ~ John C Maxwell,
1058:All should be laid open to you without reserve, for there is not a truth existing which I fear, or would wish unknown to the whole world. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1059:A prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a people who mean to be free. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1060:Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call on her tribunal for every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1061:The purpose of establishing different houses of legislation is to introduce the influence of different interests or different principles. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1062:There is a debt of service due from every man to his country, proportioned to the bounties which nature and fortune have measured to him. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1063:we commit honest maniacs to Bedlam, so judges should be withdrawn from their bench, whose erroneous biases are leading us to dissolution. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1064:Were parties here divided merely by a greediness for office,...to take a part with either would be unworthy of a reasonable or moral man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1065:Although our prospect is peace, our policy and purpose are to provide for defense by all those means to which our resources are competent. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1066:It does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods or no God. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg.” -Thomas Jefferson ~ Angela Roquet,
1067:It should be remembered, as an axiom of eternal truth in politics, that whatever power in any government is independent, is absolute also. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1068:No man has a natural right to commit aggression on the equal rights of another; and this is all from which the laws ought to restrain him. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1069:Nothing was or is farther from my intentions, than to enlist myself as the champion of a fixed opinion, where I have only expressed doubt. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1070:The art of life is the art of avoiding pain; and he is the best pilot, who steers clearest of the rocks and shoals with which it is beset. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1071:The will of the people is the only legitimate foundation of any government, and to protect its free expression should be our first object. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1072:We know Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin as politicians, but they felt that science was something everyone should have a knowledge of. ~ Rush D Holt Jr,
1073:Your own reason is the only oracle given you by heaven, and you are answerable for, not the rightness, but the uprightness of the decision ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1074:Still less let it be proposed that our properties within our own territories shall be taxed or regulated by any power on earth but our own. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1075:The abolition of domestic slavery is the great object of desire in those colonies, where it was unhappily introduced in their infant state. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1076:The further the departure from direct and constant control by the citizens, the less has the government of the ingredient of republicanism. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1077:The information of the people at large can alone make them the safe as they are the sole depositary of our political and religious freedom. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1078:The whole art of government consists in the art of being honest. Only aim to do your duty, and mankind will give you credit where you fail. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1079:This I hope will be the age of experiments in government, and that their basis will be founded in principles of honesty, not of mere force. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1080:We could in the United States make as great a variety of wines as are made in Europe, not exactly of the same kinds, but doubtless as good. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1081:By making this wine known to the public, I have rendered my country as great a service as if I had enabled it to pay back the national debt. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1082:I have ever judged of the religion of others by their lives. For it is in our lives, and not from our works, that our religion must be read. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1083:I think it is a great error to consider a heavy tax on wines as a tax on luxury. On the contrary, it is a tax on the health of our citizens. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1084:Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1085:My passion strengthens daily to quit political turmoil, and retire into the bosom of my family, the only scene of sincere and purehappiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1086:There is not one redeeming feature in our superstition of Christianity. It has made one half the world fools, and the other half hypocrites. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1087:Had the doctrines of Jesus been preached always as pure as they came from his lips, the whole civilized world would now have been Christians. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1088:It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1089:It is proof of sincerity, which I value above all things; as, between those who practice it, falsehood and malice work their efforts in vain. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1090:My general plan would be to make the States one as to everything connected with foreign nations and several as to everything purely domestic. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1091:Our citizens may be deceived for awhile, and have been deceived; but as long as the presses can be protected, we may trust to them for light. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1092:The several states composing the United States of America are not united on the principle of unlimited submission to their general government ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1093:the study of the law is useful in a variety of points of view. it qualifies a man to be useful to himself, to his neighbors, & to the public. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1094:A Bill of Rights is what the people are entitled to against every government, and what no just government should refuse, or rest on inference. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1095:I advance with obedience to the work, ready to retire from it whenever you become sensible how much better choice it is in your power to make. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1096:I consider trial by jury as the only anchor ever yet imagined by man, by which a government can be held to the principles of its constitution. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1097:In Europe the object is to make the most of their land, labour being abundant: here it is to make the most of our labour, land being abundant. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1098:Perseverance in object, though not by the most direct way, is often more laudable than perpetual changes, as often as the object shifts light. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1099:The uniform tenor of a man's life furnishes better evidence of what he has said or done on any particular occasion than the word of any enemy. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1100:Trial by jury is part of that bright constellation which has gone before us and guided our steps through an age of revolution and reformation. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1101:We have the wolf by the ears, and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go. Justice is in one scale, and self-preservation in the other. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1102:We have the wolf by the ears; and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go. Justice is in one scale, and self-preservation in the other. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1103:Always take hold of things by the smooth handle grateful that they are not worse rather than the rough handle, bitter that they are not better. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1104:En cuestiones de estilo, nade con la corriente”, dicen que aconsejaba Thomas Jefferson, pero “en cuestiones de principios, sea sólido como una roca”, ~ Adam Grant,
1105:If we can but prevent the government from wasting the labours of the people, under the pretence of taking care of them, they must become happy. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1106:I steer my bark with hope in the head, leaving fear astern. My hopes indeed sometimes fail, but not oftener than the forebodings of the gloomy. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1107:Mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1108:My great wish is to go on in a strict but silent performance of my duty; to avoid attracting notice, and to keep my name out of the newspapers. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1109:The authors of the gospels were unlettered and ignorant men and the teachings of Jesus have come to us mutilated, misstated and unintelligible. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1110:The issue today is the same as it has been throughout all history, whether man shall be allowed to govern himself or be ruled by a small elite. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1111:They are exactly the persons who are to succeed to the government of our country and to rule its future enmities, its friendships and fortunes. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1112:All persons shall have full and free liberty of religious opinion; nor shall any be compelled to frequent or maintain any religious institution. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1113:Any woodsman can tell you that in a broken and sundered nest, one can hardly find more than a precious few whole eggs. So it is with the family. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1114:Government as well as religion has furnished its schisms, its persecutions and its devices for fattening idleness on the earnings of the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1115:How soon the labor of men would make a paradise of the earth were it not for misgovernment and a diversion of his energies to selfish interests. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1116:I have ever deemed it fundamental for the United States never to take active part in the quarrels of Europe.... They are nations of eternal war. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1117:I have now the gloomy prospect of retiring from office loaded with serious debts, which will materially affect the tranquility of my retirement. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1118:In a republican nation whose citizens are to be led by reason and persuasion and not by force, the art of reasoning becomes of first importance. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1119:In a republican nation, whose citizens are to be led by reason and persuasion and not by force, the art of reasoning becomes of first importance ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1120:Nothing can now be believed which is seen in a newspaper. Truth itself becomes suspicious by being put into that polluted vehicle. (Thomas Jefferson) ~ Ron Chernow,
1121:Orang yang membiarkan dirinya berbohong sekali, akan menyadari bahwa lebih mudah berbohong untuk kedua dan ketiga kali sampai menjadi kebiasaan. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1122:The result of your fifty or sixty years of religious reading in the four words: 'Be just and good,' is that in which all our enquiries must end. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1123:We act not for ourselves but for the whole human race. The event of our experiment is to show whether man can be trusted with self - government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1124:I am mortified to be told that, in the United States of America, the sale of a book can become a subject of inquiry, and of criminal inquiry too. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1125:I am savage enough to prefer the woods, the wilds, and the independence of Monticello, to all the brilliant pleasures of this gaycapital [Paris]. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1126:I leave the world and its affairs to the young and energetic, and resign myself to their care, of whom I have endeavored to take care when young. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1127:I steer my bark with Hope in the head, leaving Fear astern. My hopes, indeed, sometimes fail; but not oftener than the forebodings of the gloomy. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1128:I think one travels more usefully when they travel alone, because they reflect more."

(Letter to John Banister, Jr., June 19, 1787) ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1129:Laws ... proportionate and mild should never be dispensed with. Let mercy be the character of the law-giver, but let the judge be a mere machine. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1130:Nothing can stop the man with the right mental attitude
from achieving his goal.
Nothing on earth can help the man with the wrong attitude. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1131:Bigotry is the disease of ignorance, of morbid minds; enthusiasm of the free and buoyant. Education and free discussion are the antidotes of both. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1132:Compulsion in religion is distinguished peculiarly from compulsion in every other thing. ...I cannot be saved by a worship I disbelieve and abhor. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1133:I am savage enough to prefer the woods, the wilds, and the independence of Monticello, to all the brilliant pleasures of this gay capital [Paris]. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1134:I have the consolation of having added nothing to my private fortune during my public service, and of retiring with hands clean as they are empty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1135:I like the power given the Legislature to levy taxes, and for that reason solely approve of the greater house being chosen by the people directly. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1136:I never before knew the full value of trees....What would I not give that the trees planted nearest round the house at Monticello were full grown. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1137:Nothing can stop the man with the right mental attitude from achieving his goal; nothing on earth can help the man with the wrong mental attitude. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1138:Our ancestors ... possessed a right, which nature has given to all men, of departing from the country in which chance, not choice has placed them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1139:Thomas Jefferson wrote that “If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be. ~ Edward L Glaeser,
1140:Governments constantly choose between telling lies and fighting wars, with the end result always being the same. One will always lead to the other. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1141:If any state in the Union will declare that it prefers separation... to a continuance in union... I have no hesitation in saying, 'let us separate. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1142:I have done for my country and for all mankind, all that I could do, and I now resign my soul, without fear, to my God - my daughter to my country. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1143:It is true that in the meantime we are suffering deeply in spirit, and incurring the horrors of a war and long oppressions of enormous public debt. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1144:Every people may establish what form of government they please, and change it as they please, the will of the nation being the only thing essential. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1145:Our minds and hearts are free to believe everything or nothing at all - and it is our duty to protect and perpetuate this sacred culture of freedom. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1146:While learning the language in France a young man's morals, health and fortune are more irresistibly endangered than in any country of the universe. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1147:The constitutions of most of our States assert that all power is inherent in the people; that... it is their right and duty to be at all times armed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1148:The sickly, weakly, timid man fears the people, and is a Tory by nature. The healthy, strong and bold cherishes them, and is formed a Whig by nature. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1149:We love and we value peace; we know its blessings from experience. We abhor the follies of war, and are not untried in its distresses and calamities. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1150:We must endeavor to forget our former love for them [the British] and to hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, enemies in war, in peace friends. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1151:Certainly, no power to prescribe any religious exercise, or to assume authority in religious discipline, has been delegated to the General Government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1152:Experience demands that man is the only animal which devours his own kind, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1153:The cement of this union is in the heart blood of every American. I do not believe there is on earth a government established on so immovable a basis. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1154:The happiness of the domestic fireside is the first boon of Heaven; and it is well it is so, since it is that which is the lot of the mass of mankind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1155:The wisdom of our ages and the blood of our heroes has been devoted to the attainment of trial by jury. It should be the creed of our political faith. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1156:Would it not be better to simplify the system of taxation rather than to spread it over such a variety of subjects and pass through so many new hands. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1157:But under the beaming, constant and almost vertical sun of Virginia, shade is our Elysium. In the absence of this no beauty of the eye can be enjoyed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1158:Educate and inform the whole mass of the people. Enable them to see that it is their interest to preserve peace and order, and they will preserve them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1159:Man is an imitative animal. This quality is the germ of all education in him. From his cradle to his grave he is learning to do what he sees others do. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1160:Question with boldness even the existence of a god; because, if there be one, he must more approve the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1161:There is not a single crowned head in Europe whose talents or merit would entitle him to be elected a vestryman by the people of any parish in America. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1162:Drawing ... is an innocent & engaging amusement, often useful, and a qualification not to be neglected in one who is to become a mother & an instructor. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1163:I am not an advocate for frequent changes in laws and constitutions, but laws and institutions must go hand in hand with the progress of the human mind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1164:Our judges are as honest as other men and not more so. They have, with others, the same passions for party, for power, and the privilege of their corps. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1165:Taste cannot be controlled by law. We must resist at all costs any attempt to regulate our individual freedoms and to legislate our personal moralities. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1166:You will perceive by my preaching that I am growing old: it is the privilege of years, and I am sure you will pardon it from the purity of it's motives. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1167:If the book be false in its facts, disprove them; if false in its reasoning, refute it. But, for God's sake, let us freely hear both sides, if we choose. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1168:It can never be too often repeated, that the time for fixing every essential right on a legal basis is while our rulers are honest, and ourselves united. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1169:It was Thomas Jefferson who said that we should not allow the courts to have a monopoly on the interpretation of what is constitutional and what is not. ~ Walter E Williams,
1170:Never yet could I find that a black had uttered a thought above the level of plain narration; never saw even an elemental trait of painting or sculpture. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1171:Peace and abstinence from European interferences are our objects, and so will continue while the present order of things in America remain uninterrupted. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1172:If science produces no better fruits than tyranny... I would rather wish our country to be ignorant, honest and estimable as our neighbouring savages are. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1173:Never was so much false arithmetic employed on any subject, as that which has been employed to persuade nations that it is in their interest to go to war. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1174:Not less than two hours a day should be devoted to exercise, and the weather shall be little regarded. If the body is feeble, the mind will not be strong. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1175:Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1176:So much of the presidency is a matter of standing in the path of a Newsham Engine for Quenching Fires, opening one's mouth, and attempting to get a drink. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1177:The human character, we believe, requires in general constant and immediate control to prevent its being biased from right by the seductions of self-love. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1178:There are other places at which ... the laws have said there shall be towns; but Nature has said there shall not, and they remain unworthy of enumeration. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1179:How I longed to see these things; how I longed to see the Liberty Bell and walk on the streets where Thomas Jefferson, Tom Paine and Benjamin Franklin had walked. ~ Burl Ives,
1180:If the Wise be the happy man... he must be virtuous too; for, without virtue, happiness cannot be. This then is the true scope of all academical emulation. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1181:It is a principle that the right to a thing gives a right to the means without which it could not be used, that is to say, that the means follow their end. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1182:It is strangely absurd to suppose that a million of human beings, collected together, are not under the same moral laws which bind each of them separately. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1183:Neither Pagan nor Mahamedan nor Jew ought to be excluded from the civil rights of the Commonwealth because of his religion. -quoting John Locke's argument. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1184:Our wish is that...[there be] maintained that state of property, equal or unequal, which results to every man from his own industry or that of his fathers. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1185:Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blind-folded fear. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1186:Religion, morality, and knowledge are necessary for good government... Therefore schools and the means of educating the people should always be encouraged. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1187:Thomas Jefferson declared, stating that he was speaking on behalf of the other founding fathers, ...(that) we should build a wall between the church and state. ~ Jimmy Carter,
1188:Agriculture, manufactures, commerce, and navigation, the four pillars of our prosperity, are the most thriving when left most free to individual enterprise. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1189:But friendship is precious, not only in the shade, but in the sunshine of life, and thanks to a benevolent arrangement the greater part of life is sunshine. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1190:I have recently been examining all the known superstitions of the world and do not find in our particular superstition [Christianity] one redeeming feature. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1191:I knew Thomas Jefferson. He was a friend of mine. And believe me, you are no Thomas Jefferson. (at 1992 Republican party convention, referring to Bill Clinton) ~ Ronald Reagan,
1192:I know nothing more important to inculcate into the minds of young people than the wisdom, the honor, and the blessed comfort of living within their income. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1193:No provision in our Constitution ought to be dearer to man than that which protects the rights of conscience against the enterprises of the civil authority. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1194:The great cause which divides our countries is not to be decided by individual animosities. The harmony of private societies cannot weaken national efforts. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1195:The same prudence which in private life would forbid our paying our own money for unexplained projects, forbids it in the dispensation of the public moneys. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1196:When habit has strengthened our sense of duties, they leave us no time for other things; but when young we neglect them and this gives us time for anything. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1197:I predict future happiness for Americans, if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1198:Self-love . . . is the sole antagonist of virtue, leading us constantly by our propensities to self-gratification in violation of our moral duties to others. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1199:The God who gave us life gave us liberty. Can the liberties of a nation be secure when we have removed a conviction that these liberties are the gift of God? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1200:He who receives an idea from me, receives instruction himself without lessening mine; as he who lights his taper at mine, receives light without darkening me. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1201:It is rare that the public sentiment decides immorally or unwisely, and the individual who differs from it ought to distrust and examine well his own opinion. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1202:The eyes of our citizens are not sufficiently open to the true cause of our distress. They ascribe them to everything but their true cause, the banking system ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1203:The mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately, by the grace of God. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1204:The two principles on which our conduct towards the Indians should be founded are justice and fear. After the injuries we have done them, they cannot love us. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1205:[An] act of the Congress of the United States... which assumes powers... not delegated by the Constitution, is not law, but is altogether void and of no force. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1206:I have lived temperately, eating little animal food, and that not as an aliment, so much as a condiment for the vegetables, which constitute my principal diet. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1207:No instance exists of a person's writing two language perfectly. That will always appear to be his native language which was most familiar to him in his youth. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1208:Question with boldness even the existence of a
God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of
the homage of reason than that of blindfolded fear. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1209:Reading, reflection and time have convinced me that the interests of society require the observation of those moral precepts only in which all religions agree. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1210:The people cannot be all, and always well informed. The part which is wrong will be discontented in proportion to the importance of the facts they misconceive. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1211:This is the real reason Thomas Jefferson owned a Koran. No proto-multiculturalist, he simply wanted to understand the threat jihadism posed to his young nation. ~ Sebastian Gorka,
1212:. Thomas Jefferson had paid Meriwether Lewis to hide the map, to keep a record of its location but not reveal to the world what the second president had possession ~ Nick Thacker,
1213:What country can preserve its liberties if its rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1214:When an instrument admits two constructions, the one safe, the other dangerous, the one precise, the other indefinite, I prefer that which is safe and precise. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1215:Every Christian sect gives a great handle to Atheism by their general dogma that, without a revelation, there would not be sufficient proof of the being of god. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1216:Every constitution..., and every law, naturally expires at the end of 19 years [a generation]. If it be enforced longer, it is anact of force, and not of right. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1217:Experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms of government those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1218:Nothing but a necessity invincible by any other means can justify ... a prostitution of laws, which constitute the pillars of our whole system of jurisprudence. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1219:We exist, and are quoted, as standing proofs that a government, so modeled as to rest continually on the will of the whole society, is a practicable government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1220:We have already given in example one effectual check to the dog of war by transferring the power of letting him loose from the Executive to the Legislative body ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1221:A rigid economy of the public contributions and absolute interdiction of all useless expenses will go far towards keeping the government honest and unoppressive. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1222:I had rather ask an enlargement of power from the nation, where it is found necessary, than to assume it by a construction which would make our powers boundless. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1223:No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, no culture comparable to that of the garden...But though an old man, I am but a young gardener. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1224:I believe from what I have lately seen that we should be substantially safe were our Citizens Armed, but we have not as many Arms as we have Enemies in the State. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1225:If the happiness of the mass of mankind can be secured at the expense of a little tempest now and then, or even of a little blood, it will be a precious purchase. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1226:In truth, politeness is artificial good humor, it covers the natural want of it, and ends by rendering habitual a substitute nearly equivalent to the real virtue. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1227:I would observe to you that what is called style in writing or speaking is formed very early in life while the imagination is warm, and impressions are permanent. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1228:Men of high learning and abilities are few in every country; and by taking in those who are not so, the able part of the body have their hands tied by the unable. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1229:The end of democracy and the defeat of the American Revolution will occur when government falls into the hands of lending institutions and moneyed incorporations. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1230:The majority, oppressing an individual, is guilty of a crime, abuses its strength, and by acting on the law of the strongest breaks up the foundations of society. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1231:The only orthodox object of the institution of government is to secure the greatest degree of happiness possible to the general mass of those associated under it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1232:A community of small farmers... land property owners, will be the only assurance that the freedom our republic offers will be guaranteed to each and every citizen. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1233:Eliot tried to popularize Thomas Jefferson and Socrates, too, but people couldn’t remember from one visit to the next who they were. "Which one is which?" they’d say. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
1234:I consider the government of the U.S. as interdicted by the Constitution from intermeddling with religious institutions, their doctrines, discipline, or exercises. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1235:I have learnt to expect that it will rarely fall to the lot of imperfect man to retire from this station with the reputation and the favor which bring him into it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1236:Let it be signified to me through any channelthat the possession of the Floridas would be desirable to the United States, andin sixty days it will be accomplished. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1237:Old heads as well as young may sometimes be charged with ignorance and presumption. The natural course of the human mind is certainly from credulity to skepticism. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1238:Should [reformers] attempt more than the established habits of the people are ripe for, they may lose all and retard indefinitely the ultimate object of their aim. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1239:The moral sense, or conscience, is as much part of a man as his leg or arm. It is given to all in a stronger or weaker degree.. It may be strengthened by exercise. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1240:The myth that John Locke was the philosopher behind the American Republic, is easily refuted by examining how Locke's philosophy steered Thomas Jefferson, for example. ~ Robert Trout,
1241:What has been the effect of [religious] coercion? To make one half the world fools, and the other half hypocrites. To support roguery and error all over the earth. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1242:Leave all the afternoon for exercise and recreation, which are as necessary as reading. I will rather say more necessary because health is worth more than learning. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1243:Planting is one of my great amusements, and even of those things which can only be for posterity, for a Septuagenary has no right to count on any thing but annuals. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1244:The States should be urged to concede to the General Government, with a saving of chartered rights, the exclusive power of establishing banks of discount for paper. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1245:Thomas Jefferson said, The tree of liberty must be fertilized from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Yeah and I heard that and thought, I'm out! ~ Christopher Titus,
1246:Whenever you are to do a thing, though it can never be known but to yourself, ask yourself how you would act were all the world looking at you, and act accordingly. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1247:A judiciary independent of a king or executive alone, is a good thing; but independence of the will of the nation is a solecism, at least in a republican government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1248:But every state, says an inquisitor, has established some religion. No two, say I, have established the same. Is this a proof of the infallibility of establishments? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1249:How did Jefferson feel about the people of his day who were the equivalent of our modern day penecostals? You know, those revelation reveling tongue speaking idiots. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1250:I was bold in the pursuit of knowledge, never fearing to follow truth and reason to whatever results they led, and bearding every authority which stood in their way. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1251:Nothing but good can result from an exchange of information and opinions between those whose circumstances and morals admit no doubt of the integrity of their views. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1252:Printers shall be liable to legal prosecution for printing and publishing false facts injurious to the party prosecuting: but they shall be under no other restraint. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1253:THE AMERICAN EXPERIMENT rests on three political ideas—“these truths,” Thomas Jefferson called them—political equality, natural rights, and the sovereignty of the people. ~ Jill Lepore,
1254:The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest his (sic)patient in the care of the human frame, in diet and in the cause and prevention of disease ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1255:The hocus-pocus phantasm of a God, like another Cerberus, with one body and three heads, had its birth and growth in the blood of thousands and thousands of martyrs. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1256:Whenever you are to do a thing, though it can never be known but to yourself, ask yourself how you would act were all the world looking at you, and act accordingly. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1257:Heliotrope. To be sowed in the spring. A delicious flower, but I suspect it must be planted in boxes and kept in the house in the winter. The smell rewards the care. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1258:I feel... an ardent desire to see knowledge so disseminated through the mass of mankind that it may, at length, reach even the extremes of society: beggars and kings. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1259:No experiment can be more interesting than that we are now trying, and which we trust will end in establishing the fact, that man may be governed by reason and truth. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1260:If all be true that I do think, there are five reasons we should drink. Good friends, good times, or being dry, or lest we should be by and by, or any other reason why ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1261:If a sect arises whose tenets would subvert morals, good sense has fair play and reasons and laughs it out of doors without suffering the State to be troubled with it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1262:I set out on this ground, which I suppose to be self evident, "that the earth belongs in usufruct to the living": that the dead have neither powers nor rights over it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1263:Legislators invent too many devices for subdividing property, only taking care to let their subdivisions go hand in hand with the natural affections of the human mind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1264:Take painsto write a neat round, plain hand, and you will find it a great convenience through life to write a small and compact hand as well as a fair and legible one. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1265:The love of justice and the love of country plead equally the cause of these people, and it is a moral reproach to us that they should have pleaded it so long in vain. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1266:All authority belongs to the people... In questions of power let no more be heard of confidence in man, but bind him down from mischief with chains of the Constitution. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1267:Cherish therefore the spirit of our people, and keep alive their attention.1 Do not be too severe upon their errors, but reclaim them by enlightening them. —THOMAS JEFFERSON ~ Jon Meacham,
1268:He, who steadily observes those moral precepts in which all religions concur, will never be questioned at the gates of heaven as to the dogmas in which they all differ. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1269:Honesty, disinterestedness and good nature are indispensable to procure the esteem and confidence of those with whom we live, and on whose esteem our happiness depends. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1270:The reward of esteem, respect and gratitude [is] due to those who devote their time and efforts to render the youths of every successive age fit governors for the next. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1271:To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our election between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1272:Big banks are more dangerous than standing armies, and the practice of borrowing and spending money to be paid back by the next generation is stealing from their future. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1273:Can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of people that these liberties are the gift of God? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1274:From breakfast, or noon at the latest, to dinner, I am mostly on horseback, Attending to My Farm or other concerns, which I find healthful to my body, mind, and affairs. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1275:I am a real Christian, that is to say, a cisciple of the doctrines of Jesus. I have little doubt that our whole country will soon be rallied to the unity of our Creator. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1276:I deem no government safe which is under the vassalage of any self-constituted authorities, or any other authority than that of the nation, or its regular functionaries. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1277:Is it less dishonest to do what is wrong because it is not expressly prohibited by written law? Let us hope our moral principles are not yet in that stage of degeneracy. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1278:no one more sincerely wishes the spread of information among mankind than I do, and none has greater confidence in it's effect towards supporting free & good government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1279:The constitution has erected no such single tribunal, knowing that to whatever hands confided, with the corruption's of time and party, its members would become despots. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1280:Determine never to be idle. No person will have occasion to complain of the want of time who never loses any. It is wonderful how much may be done if we are always doing. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1281:...is the spirit of the people an infallible, a permanent reliance? ...the spirit of the times may alter, will alter. Our rulers will become corrupt, our people careless. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1282:Our ancient laws expressly declare that those who are but delegates themselves shall not delegate to others powers which require judgment and integrity in their exercise. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1283:So confident am I in the intentions, as well as wisdom, of the government, that I shall always be satisfied that what is not done, either cannot, or ought not to be done. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1284:The purpose of government is to enable the people of a nation to live in safety and happiness. Government exists for the interests of the governed, not for the governors. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1285:The superiority of chocolate (hot chocolate), both for health and nourishment, will soon give it the same preference over tea and coffee in America which it has in Spain. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1286:this interesting subject, which, if the condition of man is to be progressively ameliorated, as we fondly hope and believe, is to be the chief instrument in effecting it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1287:Thomas Jefferson High
School [..] His high school was named after a slave owner who was also one of
the world’s greatest theoreticians on the subject of human liberty. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
1288:To be really useful, we must keep pace with the state of society, and not dishearten it by attempts at what its population, means, or occupations will fail in attempting. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1289:Ultimately, it’s easy to imagine Thomas Jefferson as an early American George Costanza, a seething nebbish quick to take umbrage but never quite able to respond convincingly. ~ Jon Mooallem,
1290:Where the law of the majority ceases to be acknowledged, there government ends; the law of the strongest takes its place, and life and property are his who can take them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1291:Freedom has been privatized - it is how you dress, what your sexual orientation is, choosing your own life. That's fine. But that is not what Thomas Jefferson was talking about. ~ Eric Foner,
1292:I am an Epicurean. I consider the genuine (not the imputed) doctrines of Epicurus as containing everything rational in moral philosophy which Greece and Rome have left us. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1293:Determine never to be idle. No person will have occasion to complain of the want of time, who never loses any. It is wonderful how much may be done, if we are always doing. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1294:Every male citizen of the commonwealth, liable to taxes or to militia duty in any county, shall have a right to vote for representatives for that county to the legislature. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1295:I do not like [in the new Federal Constitution] the omission of a Bill of Rights providing clearly and without the aid of sophisms for... protection against standing armies ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1296:I look to the diffusion of light and education as the resource most to be relied on for ameliorating the condition, promoting the virtue and advancing the happiness of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1297:It is an insult to our citizens to question whether they are rational beings or not, and blasphemy against religion to suppose it cannot stand the test of truth and reason. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1298:My religious reading has long been confined to the moral branch of religion, which is the same in all religions; while in that branch which consists of dogmas, all differ[. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1299:The object of walking is to relax the mind. You should therefore not permit yourself even to think while you walk. But divert your attention by the objects surrounding you. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1300:Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1301:A little rebellion now and then is a good thing. Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God. In order to flourish, the tree of Liberty needs the blood of patriots and tyrants. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1302:I agree with you that it is the duty of every good citizen to use all the opportunities, which occur to him, for preserving documents relating to the history of our country. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1303:I am satisfied, and sufficiently occupied with the things which are, without tormenting or troubling myself about those which may indeed be, but of which I have no evidence. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1304:In every country and in every age, the priest has been hostile to liberty. He is always in alliance with the despot, abetting his abuses in return for protection to his own. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1305:It has been thought that the people are not competent electors of judges learned in the law. But I do not know this to be true, and, if doubtful, we should follow principle. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1306:State a moral case to a plowman and a professor. The former will decide it as well, and often better than the latter, because he has not been led astray by artificial rules. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1307:War has been avoided from a due sense of the miseries, and the demoralization it produces, and of the superior blessings of a state of peace and friendship with all mankind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1308:Neither believe nor reject any thing because any other person, or description of persons have rejected or believed it. Your own reason is the only oracle given you by heaven. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1309:all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1310:And even should the cloud of barbarism and despotism again obscure the science and libraries of Europe, this country remains to preserve and restore light and liberty to them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1311:I am not myself apt to be alarmed at innovations recommended by reason. That dread belongs to those whose interests or prejudices shrink from the advance of truth and science. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1312:If you are obliged to neglect any thing, let it be your chemistry. It is the least useful and the least amusing to a country gentleman of all the ordinary branches of science. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1313:Importation of such Persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1314:It is a melancholy truth, that a suppression of the press could not more completely deprive the nation of its benefits than is done by its abandoned prostitution to falsehood. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1315:No religious reading, instruction or exercise, shall be prescribed or practiced [in the elementary schools] inconsistent with the tenets of any religious sect or denomination. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1316:... the common law existed while the Anglo-Saxons were yet pagans, at a time when they had never yet heard the name of Christ pronounced or knew that such a character existed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1317:The multiplication of public offices, increase of expense beyond income, growth and entailment of a public debt are indications soliciting the employment of the pruning knife. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1318:The purse of the people is the real seat of sensibility. Let it be drawn upon largely, and they will then listen to truths which could not excite them through any other organ. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1319:There was no contradiction in the bold claim made by Thomas Jefferson in the Declaration of Independence that “all men are created equal” if Africans were not really people. ~ Michelle Alexander,
1320:This ball of liberty, I believe most piously, is now so well in motion that it will roll round the globe. at least the enlightened part of it, for light & liberty go together. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1321:Those who labour in the earth are the chosen people of God, if ever he had a chosen, people, whose breasts he has made his peculiar deposit for substantial and genuine virtue. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1322:An association of men who will not quarrel with one another is a thing which has never yet existed, from the greatest confederacy of nations down to a town meeting or a vestry. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1323:As new discoveries are made, new truths discovered and manners and opinions change with the change of circumstances, institutions must advance also to keep pace with the times. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1324:I can never join Calvin in addressing his god. He was indeed an Atheist, which I can never be; or rather his religion was Daemonism. If ever man worshipped a false god, he did. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1325:If thinking men would have the courage to think for themselves, and to speak what they think, it would be found they do not differ in religious opinions as much as is supposed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1326:No one, I hope, can doubt my wish to see... all mankind exercising self-government, and capable of exercising it. But the question is not what we wish, but what is practicable. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1327:[States and the Federal government are] coordinate departments of one simple and integral whole... The one is the domestic, the other the foreign branch of the same government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1328:When describing the University of Virginia: Here, We are not afraid to follow truth wherever it may lead, nor to tolerate any error so long as reason is left free to combat it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1329:Does the government fear us? Or do we fear the government? When the people fear the government, tyranny has found victory. The federal government is our servant, not our master! ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1330:for the present we may groupe the sciences into Professorships as follows, subject however to be changed according to the qualifications of the persons we may be able to engage. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1331:Here was buried Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of American Independence, of the statute of Virginia for religious freedom, and father of the University of Virginia. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1332:I am convinced our own happiness requires that we should continue to mix with the world, and to keep pace with it as it goes. " - Wise words from Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826). ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1333:I have so much confidence in the good sense of man, and his qualifications for self-government, that I am never afraid of the issue where reason is left free to exert her force. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1334:I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.
-Thomas Jefferson ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1335:I thank heaven that the 4th. of July is over. It is always a day of great fatigue to me, and of some embarrassments from improper intrusions and some from unintended exclusions. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1336:Morals were too essential to the happiness of man, to be risked on the uncertain combinations of the head. Nature laid their foundation, therefore, in sentiment, not in science. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1337:Scenes are now to take place as will open the eyes of credulity and of insanity itself, to the dangers of a paper medium abandoned to the discretion of avarice and of swindlers. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1338:The rights of the people to the exercise and fruits of their own industry can never be protected against the selfishness of rulers not subject to their control at short periods. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1339:Thomas Jefferson helped the Marquis de Lafayette draft a declaration,” Simon blurts. “Mr. Spier, memorizing the Hamilton soundtrack is not going to save you on the AP Euro exam. ~ Becky Albertalli,
1340:Those who have once got an ascendancy, and possessed themselves of all the resources of the nation, their revenues and offices, have immense means for retaining their advantage. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1341:It does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods or no god. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg. ~ Thomas Jefferson, Query 17 in Notes on the State of Virginia (1781-1785),
1342:Nature [has] implanted in our breasts a love of others, a sense of duty to them, a moral instinct, in short, which prompts us irresistibly to feel and to succor their distresses. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1343:No man will ever bring out of the Presidency the reputation which carries him into it. To myself, personally, it brings nothing but increasing drudgery and daily loss of friends. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1344:Thomas Jefferson’s resignation as secretary of state on December 31, 1793. The Virginian had failed to eject Hamilton from the cabinet and had lost the contest for Washington’s favor. ~ Ron Chernow,
1345:Those who don’t read the newspapers are better off than those who do insofar as those who know nothing are better off than those whose heads are filled with half-truths and lies. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1346:To consider judges as the ultimate arbiters of all constitutional questions is a very dangerous doctrine indeed, and one which would place us under the despotism of an oligarchy. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1347:A private central bank issuing the public currency is a greater menace to the liberties of the people than a standing army. We must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1348:As you are entered with the class of Nat. philosophy, give to it the hours of lecture, but devote all your other time to Mathematics, avoiding company as the bane of all progress. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1349:It behooves every man who values liberty of conscience for himself, to resist invasions of it in the case of others: or their case may, by change of circumstances, become his own. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1350:[It is a] happy truth that man is capable of self-government, and only rendered otherwise by the moral degradation designedly superinduced on him by the wicked acts of his tyrant. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1351:Nimic nu îl poate opri pe omul cu o atitudine mentală corectă să îşi îndeplinească scopul Nimic din lumea aceasta nu îl poate ajuta pe omul care are o atitudine greşită. THOMAS JEFFERSON ~ Anonymous,
1352:The objects of this primary education . . . would be . . . to form the statesmen, legislators and judges, on whom public prosperity and individual happiness are so much to depend. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1353:The President is bound to stop at the limits prescribed by our Constitution and law to the authorities in his hands, [and this] would apply in an occasion of peace as well as war. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1354:To take a single step beyond the boundaries specially drawn around the powers of Congress is to take possession of a boundless field of power, no longer susceptible to definition. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1355:And for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1356:If I could not go to heaven with but a party, I would not go there at all. Therefore, I am not of the party of federalists. But I am much further from that of the anti-federalists. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1357:Man is fed with fables through life, and leaves it in the belief he knows something of what has been passing, when in truth he knows nothing but what has passed under his own eyes. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1358:The most effective means of preventing tyranny is to illuminate, as far as practicable, the minds of the people at large, and more especially to give them knowledge of those facts. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1359:They (religions) dread the advance of science as witches do the approach of daylight and scowl on the fatal harbinger announcing the subversions of the duperies on which they live. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1360:It is not too soon to provide by every possible means that as few as possible shall be without a little portion of land. The small landholders are the most precious part of a state. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1361:Liberty is to the collective body, what health is to every individual body. Without health no pleasure can be tasted by man; without liberty, no happiness can be enjoyed by society. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1362:Many of the opposition [to the new Federal Constitution] wish to take from Congress the power of internal taxation. Calculation has convinced me that this would be very mischievous. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1363:People have always said - those words, 'too conservative,' is fairly relative. I'm sure that they probably said that about Thomas Jefferson and George Washington and Benjamin Franklin. ~ Sharron Angle,
1364:The clergy, by getting themselves established by law and in-grafted into the machine of government, have been a very formidable engine against the civil and religious rights of man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1365:If the children are untaught, their ignorance and vices will in future life cost us much dearer in their consequences than it would have done in their correction by a good education. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1366:If virtuous, the government need not fear the fair operation of attack and defense. Nature has given to man no other means of sifting the truth, either in religion, law, or politics. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1367:I hope the necessity will at length be seen of establishing institutions, here as in Europe, where every branch of science, useful at this day, may be taught in it's highest degrees. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1368:The metaphysical insanities of Athanasius, of Loyola, and of Calvin, are, to my understanding, mere lapses into polytheism, differing from paganism only by being more unintelligible. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1369:I enclose to you a copy of the declaration of independence as agreed to by the House, and also, as originally framed. You will judge whether it is the better or worse for the Critics. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1370:Never throw off the best affections of nature in the moment when they become most precious to their object; nor fear to extend you hand to save another, lest you should sink yourself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1371:Shake hands with Pain, give greeting unto Grief, Those angels in disguise, and thy glad soul From height to height, from star to shining star, Shall climb and claim blest immortality. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1372:The best hemp and the best tobacco grow on the same kind of soil. The former article is of the first necessity to the wealth and protection of the country. The latter, never useful. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1373:The true fountains of evidence [are] the head and heart of every rational and honest man. It is there nature has written her moral laws, and where every man may read them for himself. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1374:A little patience, and we shall see the reign of witches pass over, their spells dissolve, and the people, recovering their true sight, restore their government to its true principles. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1375:But every difference of opinion is not a difference of principle. We have been called by different names brethren of the same principle. We are all Republicans, we are all Federalists. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1376:Honor, justice, and humanity, forbid us tamely to surrender that freedom which we received from our gallant ancestors, and which our innocent posterity have a right to receive from us. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1377:Rogueries, absurdities and untruths were perpetrated upon the teachings of Jesus by a large band of dupes and importers led by Paul, the first great corrupter of the teaching of Jesus. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1378:Very many and very meritorious were the worthy patriots who assisted in bringing back our government to its republican tack. To preserve it in that, will require unremitting vigilance. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1379:What is true of every member of the society, individually, is true of them all collectively; since the rights of the whole can be no more than the sum of the rights of the individuals. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1380:[All religious sects] dread the advance of science as witches do the approach of daylight; and scowl on the fatal harbinger announcing the subversion of the duperies in which they live. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1381:Experience declares that man is the only animal which devours his own kind; for I can apply no milder term to the governments of Europe, and to the general prey of the rich on the poor. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1382:In every government on earth is some trace of human weakness, some germ of corruption and degeneracy, which cunning will discover, and wickedness insensibly open, cultivate and improve. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1383:It behooves our citizens to be on their guard, to be firm in their principles, and full of confidence in themselves. We are able to preserve our self-government if we will but think so. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1384:No other depositories of power [but the people themselves] have ever yet been found, which did not end in converting to their own profit the earnings of those committed to their charge. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1385:We are sensible of the duty and expediency of submitting our opinions to the will of the majority, and can wait with patience till they get right if they happen to be at any time wrong. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1386:[We should be] determined... to sever ourselves from the union we so much value rather than give up the rights of self-government... in which alone we see liberty, safety and happiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1387:I love to see honest and honorable men at the helm, men who will not bend their politics to their purses, nor pursue measures by which they may profit, and then profit by their measures. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1388:It is a problem, not clear in my mind, that [a society without government, as among our Indians] is not the best. But I believe it to be inconsistent with any great degree of population. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1389:Our country is now taking so steady a course as to show by what road it will pass to destruction, to wit: by consolidation of power first, and then corruption, its necessary consequence. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1390:Friendship is but another name for an alliance with the follies and the misfortunes of others. Our own share of miseries is sufficient: why enter then as volunteers into those of another? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1391:I was reading a lot of Thomas Jefferson at the time, and Jefferson said that every 20 years, if one party has stayed in power, it's your obligation as an American to vote the other party in. ~ Dennis Hopper,
1392:Men possessing minds of the first order and who have had opportunities of being known and of acquiring the general confidence do not abound in any country beyond the wants of the country. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1393:The expedition of Messrs. Lewis & Clarke for exploring the river Missouri, & the best communication from that to the Pacific ocean, has had all the success which could have been expected. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1394:The physician is happy in the attachment of the families in which he practices. All think he has saved one of them, and he finds himself everywhere a welcome guest, a home in every house. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1395:Against us are all timid men who prefer the calm of despotism to the boisterous sea of liberty We are likely to preserve the liberty we have obtained only by unremitting labors and perils. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1396:If anything pass in a religious meeting seditiously and contrary to the public peace, let it be punished in the same manner and no otherwise than as if it had happened in a fair or market. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1397:I rejoice when I hear of young men of virtue and talents, worthy to receive and likely to preserve the splendid inheritance of self- government, which we have acquired and shaped for them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1398:Amplification is the vice of modern oratory. It is an insult to an assembly of reasonable men, disgusting and revolting instead ofpersuading. Speeches measured by the hour, die by the hour. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1399:It is not the policy of the government in America to give aid to works of any kind. They let things take their natural course without help or impediment, which is generally the best policy. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1400:life is of no value but as it brings gratifications. among the most valuable of these is rational society. it informs the mind, sweetens the temper, chears our spirits, and promotes health. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1401:[T]he dignity of parliament it seems can brook no opposition to it's power. Strange that a set of men who have made sale of theirvirtue to the minister should yet talk of retaining dignity! ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1402:If we suffer ourselves to be frightened from our post by mere lying, surely the enemy will use that weapon; for what one so cheap to those of whose system of politics morality makes no part? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1403:Lay down true principles and adhere to them inflexibly. Do not be frightened into their surrender by the alarms of the timid, or the croakings of wealth against the ascendency of the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1404:Nothing is so engaging as the little domestic cares into which you appear to be entering, and as to reading it is useful for onlyfilling up the chinks of more useful and healthy occupations. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1405:That paper money has some advantages is admitted. But that its abuses also are inevitable and, by breaking up the measure of value, makes a lottery of all private property, cannot be denied. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1406:The people are not always well-informed, but is better that they have misconceptions that make them restless than that they be lethargic-for lethargy in the people means death for republics. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1407:Hindsight is an exact science. Hold fast to your dreams, for it dreams die, life is a broken-winged bird that cannot fly. How much pain they have cost us, the evils which have never happened. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1408:If we could believe that Jesus...countenanced the follies, falsehoods and charlatanisms which his biographers father on him, ...the conclusion would be irresistible...that he was an imposter. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1409:It is while we are young that the habit of industry is formed. If not then, it never is afterwards. The fortune of our lives therefore depends on employing well the short period of our youth. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1410:man who felt no need to placate Thomas Jefferson or James Madison had to grovel before the raffish James Reynolds, whom he later described bitterly as “an obscure, unimportant, and profligate man. ~ Ron Chernow,
1411:My most earnest wish is to see the republican element of popular control pushed to the maximum of its practicable exercise. I shall then believe that our government may be pure and perpetual. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1412:I may grow rich by an art I am compelled to follow; I may recover health by medicines I am compelled to take against my own judgment; but I cannot be saved by a worship I disbelieve and abhor. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1413:On a hot day in Virginia, I know nothing more comforting than a fine spiced pickle, brought up trout-like from the sparkling depths of the aromatic jar below the stairs of Aunt Sally's cellar. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1414:The elective franchise, if guarded as the ark of our safety, will peaceably dissipate all combinations to subvert a Constitution, dictated by the wisdom, and resting on the will of the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1415:Thomas Jefferson believed that to preserve the very foundations of our Nation, we would need dramatic change from time to time. Well, my fellow Americans, this is our time. Let us embrace it. ~ William J Clinton,
1416:With those who wish to think amiss of me, I have learnt to be perfectly indifferent: but where I know a mind to be ingenuous, andto need only truth to set it to rights, I cannot be as passive. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1417:I hope we shall crush in its birth the aristocracy of our monied corporations which dare already to challenge our government to a trial by strength, and bid defiance to the laws of our country. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1418:I shall see with sincere satisfaction the progress of those sentiments which tend to restore to man all his natural rights, convinced he has no natural right in opposition to his social duties. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1419:I think this is the most extraordinary collection of talent, of human knowledge, that has ever been gathered at the White House - with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone. ~ John F Kennedy,
1420:We are here lounging our time away, doing nothing, and having nothing to do. It gives me great regret to be passing my time so uselessly when it could have been so importantly employed at home. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1421:When sins are dear to us we are too prone to slide into them again. The act of repentance itself is often sweetened with the thought that it clears our account for a repetition of the same sin. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1422:Above all things I hope the education of the common people will be attended to; convinced that on their good sense we may rely with most security for the preservation of a due degree of liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1423:Every man's reason is his own rightful umpire. This principle, with that of acquiescence in the will of the majority, will preserve us free and prosperous as long as they are sacredly observed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1424:Let those flatter, who fear: it is not an American art. To give praise where it is not due, might be well from the venal, but would ill beseem those who are asserting the rights of human nature. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1425:… the man who never looks into a newspaper is better informed than he who reads them, inasmuch as he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1426:This is perhaps the most important statement on religion ever made. It clarified the intent of the founders of the constitution irrespective of the attempts of modern day religious revisionists. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1427:We lay it down as a fundamental, that laws, to be just, must give a reciprocation of right; that, without this, they are mere arbitrary rules of conduct, founded in force, and not in conscience. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1428:I am sure that in estimating every man's value either in private or public life, a pure integrity is the quality we take first into calculation, and that learning and talents are only the second. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1429:If our country, when pressed with wrongs at the point of the bayonet, had been governed by its heads instead of its hearts, where should we have been now? Hanging on a gallows as high as Haman's. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1430:I served with General Washington in die Legislature of Virginia...and...with Doctor Franklin in Congress. I never heard neither of them speak ten minutes at a time, nor to any but the main point. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1431:[O]ur rules can have authority over such natural rights only as we have submitted to them. The rights of conscience we never submitted, we could not submit. We are answerable for them to our God. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1432:[T]he people seem to have deposited the monarchical and taken up the republican government with as much ease as would have attended their throwing off an old and putting on a new suit of clothes. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1433:Truth and reason are eternal. They have prevailed. And they will eternally prevail; however, in times and places they may be overborne for a while by violence, military, civil, or ecclesiastical. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1434:I am not afraid of the priests. They have tried upon me all their various batteries, of pious whining, hypocritical canting, lying and slandering, without being able to give me one moment of pain. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1435:I concur with you strictly in your opinion of the comparative merits of atheism and demonism, and really see nothing but the latter in the being worshipped by many who think themselves Christians. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1436:Rejecting all organs of informationbut my senses, I rid myself of the Pyrrhonisms with which an indulgence in speculations hyperphysical and antiphysical so uselessly occupy and disquiet the mind. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1437:The opinions of men should not be the object of any government. Our civil rights are no more dependent on our religious beliefs than they are dependent upon our thoughts about geometry or physics! ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1438:Whenever the people are well informed, they can be trusted with their own government; that whenever things get so far wrong as to attract their notice, they may be relied on to set them to rights. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1439:A cold-blooded, calculation, unprincipled, usurper, without a virtue, no statesman, knowing nothing of commerce, political economy, or civil government, and supplying ignorance by bold presumption. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1440:A lottery is a salutary instrument and a tax... laid on the willing only, that is to say, on those who can risk the price of a ticket without sensible injury, for the possibility of a higher prize. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1441:I am certainly not an advocate for frequent and untried changes in laws and constitutions...but I know also that laws and constitutions must go hand in hand with the progress of the human mind..... ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1442:If the freedom of religion, guaranteed to us by law in theory, can ever rise in practice under the overbearing inquisition of public opinion, [then and only then will truth]prevail over fanaticism. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1443:I sincerely pray that all the members of the human family may, in the time prescribed by the Father of us all, find themselves securely established in the enjoyment of life, liberty, and happiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1444:It is not only vain, but wicked, in a legislator to frame laws in opposition to the laws of nature, and to arm them with the terrors of death. This is truly creating crimes in order to punish them. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1445:It is too late in the day for men of sincerity to pretend they believe in the Platonic mysticisms that three are one, and one is three; and yet that the one is not three, and the three are not one. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1446:So inscrutable is the arrangement of causes and consequences in this world, that a two-penny duty on tea, unjustly imposed in a sequestered part of it, changes the condition of all its inhabitants. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1447:The man who never looks into a newspaper is better informed than he who reads them, in-as-much as he who knows nothing is nearer to the truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehood and errors. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1448:Free government is founded in jealousy, and not in confidence; it is jealousy, and not confidence, which prescribes limited constitutions, to bind down those whom we are obliged to trust with power. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1449:I hope that we shall crush in its birth the aristocracy of our monied corporations which dare already to challenge our government to a trial of strength, and bid defiance to the laws of our country. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1450:I really look with commiseration over the great body of my fellow citizens who, reading newspapers, live and die in the belief that they have known something of what has been passing in their times. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1451:No government can be maintained without the principle of fear as well as duty. Good men will obey the last, but bad ones the former only. If our government ever fails, it will be from this weakness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1452:Truth can stand by itself...If there be but one right [religion], and [Christianity] that one, we should wish to see the nine hundred and ninety-nine wandering sects gathered into the fold of truth. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1453:Whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends [life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness] it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new government. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1454:Christian creeds and doctrines, the clergy's own fatal inventions, through all the ages has made of Christendom a slaughterhouse, and divided it into sects of inextinguishable hatred for one another. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1455:Democrats consider the people as the safest depository of power in the last resort; they cherish them, therefore, and wish to leave in them all the powers to the exercise of which they are competent. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1456:I believe in both a creative and personal God, a divinely ordered universe, that man has an innate moral sense, and that Jesus was a great moral teacher, perhaps the greatest the world has witnessed. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1457:Look at Thomas Jefferson. The guy had illegitimate kids in the 1700s, and they caught him last year. If you cheat on your wife and cover it up for 200 years, you're pretty much thinking you're home free. ~ Greg Giraldo,
1458:Private fortunes, in the present state of our circulation, are at the mercy of those self-created money lenders, and are prostrated by the floods of nominal money with which their avarice deluges us. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1459:The provisions we have made [for our government] are such as please ourselves; they answer the substantial purposes of government and of justice, and other purposes than these should not be answered. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1460:To consider the judges as the ultimate arbiters of all constitutional questions is a very dangerous doctrine indeed, and one which would place us under the despotism of an oligarchy. — Thomas Jefferson ~ Boston T Party,
1461:Every human being must be viewed according to what it is good for. For not one of us, no, not one, is perfect. And were we to love none who had imperfection, this world would be a desert for our love. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1462:I deem it the duty of every man to devote a certain portion of his income for charitable purposes; and that it is his further duty to see it so applied and to do the most good for which it is capable. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1463:I may err in my measures, but never shall deflect from the intention to fortify the public liberty by every possible means, and to put it out of the power of the few to riot on the labors of the many. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1464:I never did, or countenanced, in public life, a single act inconsistent with the strictest good faith; having never believed there was one code of morality for a public, and another for a private man. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1465:In the New Testament, Thomas Jefferson cut out everything that was mystical, magical, miracle - physically with scissors - and then pasted in all that remained, such as Jesus's Sermon on the Mount. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
1466:I think by far the most important bill in our whole code is that for the diffusion of knowlege among the people. no other sure foundation can be devised for the preservation of freedom, and happiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1467:Our greatest happiness does not depend on the condition of life in which chance has placed us, but is always the result of a good conscience, good health, occupation, and freedom in all just pursuits. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1468:Whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends [life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness] it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new government... ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1469:Even in Europe a change has sensibly taken place in the mind of man. Science has liberated the ideas of those who read and reflect, and the American example has kindled feelings of right in the people. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1470:It is highly interesting to our country, and it is the duty of its functionaries, to provide that every citizen in it should receive an education proportioned to the condition and pursuits of his life. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1471:My views and feelings (are) in favor of the abolition of war-and I hope it is practicable, by improving the mind and morals of society, to lessen the disposition to war; but of its abolition I despair. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1472:Nothing is more incumbent on the old than to know when they should get out of the way and relinquish to younger successors the honors they can no longer earn, and the duties they can no longer perform. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1473:Of distinction by birth or badge, [Americans] had no more idea than they had of the mode of existence in the moon or planets. They had heard only that there were such, and knew that they must be wrong. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1474:Our part is to pursue with steadiness what is right, turning neither to right nor left for the intrigues or popular delusions of the day, assured that the public approbation will in the end be with us. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1475:To make us one nation as to foreign concerns, and keep us distinct in Domestic ones gives the outline of the proper division of powers between the general [national] and particular [state] governments. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1476:We are not immortal ourselves, my friend; how can we expect our enjoyments to be so? We have no rose without its thorn; no pleasure without alloy. It is the law of our existence; and we must acquiesce. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1477:what are the objects of an useful American education? classical knowlege, modern languages & chiefly French, Spanish, & Italian; Mathematics; Natural philosophy; Natural History; Civil History; Ethics. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1478:A declaration of the independence of America, and the sovereignty of the United STates was drawn by the ingenious and philosophic pen of Thomas Jefferson, Esquire, a delegate from the state of Virginia ~ Mercy Otis Warren,
1479:A lively and lasting sense of filial duty is more effectually impressed on the mind of a son or daughter by reading King Lear, than by all the dry volumes of ethics, and divinity that ever were written. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1480:But of all the views of this law [universal education] none is more important, none more legitimate, than that of rendering the people the safe, as they are the ultimate, guardians of their own liberty. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1481:I think this is the most extraordinary collection of talent, of human knowledge, that has ever been gathered together at the White House-- with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone. ~ John F Kennedy,
1482:The day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the Supreme Being as his father, in the womb of a virgin, will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva in the brain of Jupiter. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1483:Thomas Jefferson once said. He said , "We should never judge a President by his age, only by his works." And ever since he told me that, I've stopped worrying. There are those who say I've stopped working. ~ Ronald Reagan,
1484:When you are doubting whether a thing is worth the trouble of going to see, recollect that you will never again be so near it. You may repent not having seen it, but you can never repent having seen it. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1485:You have never by a word or a deed given me one moment's uneasiness; on the contrary I have felt perpetual gratitude to heaven forhaving given me, in you, a source of so much pure and unmixed happiness. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1486:I do love this people [the French] with all my heart, and think that with a better religion and a better form of government and their present governors their condition and country would be most enviable. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1487:If Thomas Jefferson was the idealist, and George Washington the leader, and James Madison the architect, Samuel Adams the community organizer, then Franklin would have been the Yoda of the founding generation. ~ Matt Kibbe,
1488:I have come to a resolution myself as I hope every good citizen will, never again to purchase any article of foreign manufacture which can be had of American make, be the difference of price what it may. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1489:I shall rejoin myself to my native country, with new attachments, and with exaggerated esteem for its advantages; for though there is less wealth there, there is more freedom, more ease, and less misery. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1490:Our legislators are not sufficiently apprized of the rightful limits of their power; that their true office is to declare and enforce only our natural rights and duties, and to take none of them from us. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1491:When Thomas Jefferson sat on the steps of the White House and, with a pair of scissors, began to cut out all portions of the Bible that he felt were mythic nonsense, he was expressing a rational point of view. ~ Ken Wilber,
1492:Congress errs in too much talking, how can it be otherwise, in a body to which the people send one hundred and fifty lawyers, whose trade it is to question everything, yield nothing, and talk by the hour? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1493:If the question [before justices of the peace] relate to any point of public liberty, or if it be one of those in which the judges may be suspected of bias, the jury undertake to decide both law and fact. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1494:Of all the errors which can possibly be committed to the education of youth, that of sending them to Europe is the most fatal. I see [clearly] that no American should come to Europe under 30 years of age. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1495:The fantastical idea of virtue and the public good being a sufficient security to the state against the commission of crimes, which you say you have heard insisted on by some, I assure you was never mine. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1496:The foundation on which (our government is) built is the natural equality of man, the denial of every pre-eminence but that annexed to legal office, and particularly the denial of a pre-eminence by birth. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1497:The tax which will be paid for the purpose of education is not more than the thousandth part of what will be paid to kings, priests and nobles who will rise up among us if we leave the people in ignorance ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1498:When a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1499:And, in general, that branch which is to act ultimately and without appeal on any law is the rightful expositor of the validity of the law, uncontrolled by the opinions of the other coordinate authorities. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1500:An industrious farmer occupies a more dignified place in the scale of beings...than a lazy lounger...too proud to work, and drawing out a miserable existence by eating on that surplus of other men's labor. ~ Thomas Jefferson,

IN CHAPTERS [2/2]









2.02 - Habit 2 Begin with the End in Mind, #The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, #Stephen Covey, #unset
  "Our peculiar security," said Thomas Jefferson, "is in the possession of a written Constitution."
  A personal mission statement based on correct principles becomes the same kind of standard for an individual. It becomes a personal constitution, the basis for making major, life-directing decisions, the basis for making daily decisions in the midst of the circumstances and emotions that affect our lives. It empowers individuals with the same timeless strength in the midst of change.

3-5 Full Circle, #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  To clarify the issue, 1et us make the improbable assumption that the Soviet authorities made this second claim and that, with their full cooperation, it was demonstrated by outside investigators to be accurate. The first conclusion would then be that the Soviet Union is moving toward realization of Thomas Jefferson's model of government: government by what he called the natural aristocracy. "I agree", he wrote to John Adams, "that there is a natural aristocracy among men. The grounds of this are virtue and talents . . . The natural aristocracy I consider as the most precious gift of nature for the instruction, the trusts, and the government of society."28 (If Communists were now to claim that by classless society they mean government by the natural aristocracy we would, by taking to pen and ink, have started to settle the question.)
  The second conclusion would be the one predicted by Unified Science: The fairest and most objective tests will show virtue to be quite evenly distributed among all social Strata. But they will show a great skewing of talent-distribution, where talent is predominantly identified with abstraction ceilings. (This skewing occurs both empirically and ex hypothesi: in Unified Science the distribution of social Strata is based upon the distribution of abstraction ceilings, as shown in Figures IV-2 and IV-4.)
  --
  28. Padover, Saul K., ed., Thomas Jefferson on Democracy, New American Library, New York, 1946, p. 82.
  29. These tests will of course also show the existence and the size of what Thomas Jefferson called the artficial aristocracy. "There is also an artificial aristocracy," he wrote in the same letter, "founded on wealth and birth, without either virtue or talents."28 We probably can, however, go a great deal deeper: with computer help we probably can show various degrees of talents, and degrees of diverse temperaments. Also significant combinations of these degrees and kinds of innate talent and virtue or viciousness, as the case may be. These we can then match with appropriate schools and other kinds of training.
  30. The giant corporations and monopolistic trade unions are fully as disintegrative, intensifying the system's malfunction (see Mintz, Morton, and J. S. Cohen, with a preface by Ralph Nader, "America, Inc.--Who Owns and Operates the United States," Dial Press, New York, 197I.)
  --
  Stratum, social, human The human individual's social Stratum is originally determined by his parents and other relatives. His potential Stratum is mainly determined by his ontogenetic ceiling (q.v. ) . Hence he may move socially up or down during his lifetime. Thomas Jefferson distinguished the highest social Stratum as "artificial", the highest potential as "natural" aristocracy. These terms, however, are noisy. C.f. Noise, ontogeny, ceiling of; Stratum, potential.
  Stratum, social, human The human individual's social Stratum is originally determined by his parents and other relatives. His potential Stratum is mainly determined by his ontogenetic ceiling (q.v. ) . Hence he may move socially up or down during his lifetime. Thomas Jefferson distinguished the highest social Stratum as "artificial", the highest potential as "natural" aristocracy. These terms, however, are noisy. C.f. Noise, ontogeny, ceiling of; Stratum, potential.
  Sub-strata (plural of Stratum, written with a capital S) The ontogenetic layers or levels in a system whose ceiling number (q.v.) determines the number of the Stratum in question. (See Strata). E.g., in plants, animals or persons the ontogenetic stage at the time in question. The number of its ontogenetic stages at maturity is its Stratum number (q.v.). See Number, characteristic.

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun thomas_jefferson

The noun thomas jefferson has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
              
1. Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson, President Jefferson ::: (3rd President of the United States; chief drafter of the Declaration of Independence; made the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 and sent out the Lewis and Clark Expedition to explore it (1743-1826))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun thomas_jefferson

1 sense of thomas jefferson                      

Sense 1
Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson, President Jefferson
   INSTANCE OF=> President of the United States, United States President, President, Chief Executive
     => head of state, chief of state
       => representative
         => negotiator, negotiant, treater
           => communicator
             => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
               => organism, being
                 => living thing, animate thing
                   => whole, unit
                     => object, physical object
                       => physical entity
                         => entity
               => causal agent, cause, causal agency
                 => physical entity
                   => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun thomas_jefferson
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun thomas_jefferson

1 sense of thomas jefferson                      

Sense 1
Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson, President Jefferson
   INSTANCE OF=> President of the United States, United States President, President, Chief Executive




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun thomas_jefferson

1 sense of thomas jefferson                      

Sense 1
Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson, President Jefferson
  -> President of the United States, United States President, President, Chief Executive
   HAS INSTANCE=> Adams, John Adams, President Adams, President John Adams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Adams, John Quincy Adams, President Adams, President John Quincy Adams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arthur, Chester A. Arthur, Chester Alan Arthur, President Arthur
   HAS INSTANCE=> Buchanan, James Buchanan, President Buchanan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bush, George Bush, George H.W. Bush, George Herbert Walker Bush, President Bush
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carter, Jimmy Carter, James Earl Carter, James Earl Carter Jr., President Carter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cleveland, Grover Cleveland, Stephen Grover Cleveland, President Cleveland
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clinton, Bill Clinton, William Jefferson Clinton, President Clinton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Coolidge, Calvin Coolidge, President Coolidge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eisenhower, Dwight Eisenhower, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Dwight David Eisenhower, Ike, President Eisenhower
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fillmore, Millard Fillmore, President Fillmore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ford, Gerald Ford, Gerald R. Ford, Gerald Rudolph Ford, President Ford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Garfield, James Garfield, James A. Garfield, James Abraham Garfield, President Garfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grant, Ulysses Grant, Ulysses S. Grant, Ulysses Simpson Grant, Hiram Ulysses Grant, President Grant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harding, Warren Harding, Warren Gamaliel Harding, President Harding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harrison, William Henry Harrison, President Harrison, President William Henry Harrison
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harrison, Benjamin Harrison, President Harrison, President Benjamin Harrison
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hayes, Rutherford B. Hayes, Rutherford Birchard Hayes, President Hayes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoover, Herbert Hoover, Herbert Clark Hoover, President Hoover
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jackson, Andrew Jackson, Old Hickory
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson, President Jefferson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Johnson, Andrew Johnson, President Johnson, President Andrew Johnson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Johnson, Lyndon Johnson, Lyndon Baines Johnson, LBJ, President Johnson, President Lyndon Johnson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kennedy, Jack Kennedy, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, JFK, President Kennedy, President John F. Kennedy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln, President Lincoln, President Abraham Lincoln
   HAS INSTANCE=> Madison, James Madison, President Madison
   HAS INSTANCE=> McKinley, William McKinley, President McKinley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Monroe, James Monroe, President Monroe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nixon, Richard Nixon, Richard M. Nixon, Richard Milhous Nixon, President Nixon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pierce, Franklin Pierce, President Pierce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Polk, James Polk, James K. Polk, James Knox Polk, President Polk
   HAS INSTANCE=> Reagan, Ronald Reagan, Ronald Wilson Reagan, President Reagan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, President Roosevelt, President Theodore Roosevelt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, F. D. Roosevelt, President Roosevelt, President Franklin Roosevelt, FDR
   HAS INSTANCE=> Taft, William Howard Taft, President Taft
   HAS INSTANCE=> Taylor, Zachary Taylor, President Taylor
   HAS INSTANCE=> Truman, Harry Truman, Harry S Truman, President Truman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tyler, John Tyler, President Tyler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Van Buren, Martin Van Buren, President Van Buren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Washington, George Washington, President Washington
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Woodrow Wilson, Thomas Woodrow Wilson, President Wilson




--- Grep of noun thomas_jefferson
thomas jefferson



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