classes ::: author, Computer Science,
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object:Alan Perlis
class:author
class:Computer Science


--- WIKI
Alan Jay Perlis (April 1, 1922 February 7, 1990) was an American computer scientist and professor at Purdue University, Carnegie Mellon University and Yale University. He is best known for his pioneering work in programming languages and was the first recipient of the Turing Award.

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

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Infinite_Library

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

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author
Computer_Science
SIMILAR TITLES
Alan Perlis

DEFINITIONS

Lisp ::: (language) LISt Processing language.(Or mythically Lots of Irritating Superfluous Parentheses). Artificial Intelligence's mother tongue, a symbolic, functional, recursive language based on the ideas of lambda-calculus, variable-length lists and trees as fundamental data types and the interpretation of code as data and vice-versa.Data objects in Lisp are lists and atoms. Lists may contain lists and atoms. Atoms are either numbers or symbols. Programs in Lisp are themselves lists of functions with side-effects but there is a core of Lisp which is purely functional.All Lisp functions and programs are expressions that return values; this, together with the high memory use of Lisp, gave rise to Alan Perlis's famous quip (itself a take on an Oscar Wilde quote) that Lisp programmers know the value of everything and the cost of nothing.The original version was LISP 1, invented by John McCarthy at MIT in the late 1950s. Lisp is actually variants are quite different in detail. The dominant HLL among hackers until the early 1980s, Lisp now shares the throne with C. See languages of choice.One significant application for Lisp has been as a proof by example that most newer languages, such as COBOL and Ada, are full of unnecessary crocks. When the Right Thing has already been done once, there is no justification for bogosity in newer languages.See also Association of Lisp Users, Common Lisp, Franz Lisp, MacLisp, Portable Standard Lisp, Interlisp, Scheme, ELisp, Kamin's interpreters.[Jargon File] (1995-04-16)

Lisp "language" LISt Processing language. (Or mythically "Lots of Irritating Superfluous Parentheses"). {Artificial Intelligence}'s mother tongue, a symbolic, {functional}, {recursive} language based on the ideas of {lambda-calculus}, variable-length lists and trees as fundamental data types and the interpretation of code as data and vice-versa. Data objects in Lisp are lists and {atoms}. Lists may contain lists and atoms. Atoms are either numbers or symbols. Programs in Lisp are themselves lists of symbols which can be treated as data. Most implementations of Lisp allow functions with {side-effects} but there is a core of Lisp which is {purely functional}. All Lisp functions and programs are expressions that return values; this, together with the high memory use of Lisp, gave rise to {Alan Perlis}'s famous quip (itself a take on an Oscar Wilde quote) that "Lisp programmers know the value of everything and the cost of nothing". The original version was {LISP 1}, invented by {John McCarthy} "jmc@sail.stanford.edu" at {MIT} in the late 1950s. Lisp is actually older than any other {high level language} still in use except {Fortran}. Accordingly, it has undergone considerable change over the years. Modern variants are quite different in detail. The dominant {HLL} among hackers until the early 1980s, Lisp now shares the throne with {C}. See {languages of choice}. One significant application for Lisp has been as a proof by example that most newer languages, such as {COBOL} and {Ada}, are full of unnecessary {crocks}. When the {Right Thing} has already been done once, there is no justification for {bogosity} in newer languages. See also {Association of Lisp Users}, {Common Lisp}, {Franz Lisp}, {MacLisp}, {Portable Standard Lisp}, {Interlisp}, {Scheme}, {ELisp}, {Kamin's interpreters}. [{Jargon File}] (1995-04-16)

rococo ::: (jargon, abuse) Baroque in the extreme. Used to imply that a program has become so encrusted with the software equivalent of gold leaf and curlicues that mid-1700s in Europe. Alan Perlis said: Every program eventually becomes rococo, and then rubble.Compare critical mass.[Jargon File] (1996-04-06)

rococo "jargon, abuse" {Baroque} in the extreme. Used to imply that a program has become so encrusted with the software equivalent of gold leaf and curlicues that they have completely swamped the underlying design. Called after the later and more extreme forms of Baroque architecture and decoration prevalent during the mid-1700s in Europe. Alan Perlis said: "Every program eventually becomes rococo, and then rubble." Compare {critical mass}. [{Jargon File}] (1996-04-06)

syntactic sugar ::: Term coined by Peter Landin for additions to the syntax of a language which do not affect its expressiveness but make it sweeter for humans to use. Syntactic more like some familiar notation. It does not affect the expressiveness of the formalism (compare chrome).Syntactic sugar can be easily translated (desugared) to produce a program in some simpler core syntax. E.g. C's a[i] notation is syntactic sugar for *(a and the use of infix notation x+y is syntactic sugar for function application (+) x y.Alan Perlis once quipped, Syntactic sugar causes cancer of the semicolon.The variants syntactic saccharin and syntactic syrup are also recorded. These denote something even more gratuitous, in that they serve no purpose at all. Compare candygrammar, syntactic salt.

syntactic sugar Term coined by Peter Landin for additions to the syntax of a language which do not affect its expressiveness but make it "sweeter" for humans to use. Syntactic sugar gives the programmer an alternative way of coding that is more succinct or more like some familiar notation. It does not affect the expressiveness of the formalism (compare {chrome}). Syntactic sugar can be easily translated ("desugared") to produce a program in some simpler "core" syntax. E.g. C's "a[i]" notation is syntactic sugar for "*(a + i)". In a (curried) functional language, all operators are really functions and the use of {infix notation} "x+y" is syntactic sugar for function application "(+) x y". Alan Perlis once quipped, "Syntactic sugar causes cancer of the semicolon." The variants "syntactic saccharin" and "syntactic syrup" are also recorded. These denote something even more gratuitous, in that they serve no purpose at all. Compare {candygrammar}, {syntactic salt}.



QUOTES [7 / 7 - 97 / 97]


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   7 Alan Perlis

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   95 Alan Perlis

1:To understand a program, you must become both the machine and the program. ~ Alan Perlis,
2:We toast the Lisp programmer who pens his thoughts within nests of parentheses. ~ Alan Perlis,
3:A language that doesn't affect the way you think about programming is not worth knowing. ~ Alan Perlis,
4:LISP programmers know the value of everything and the cost of nothing. ~ Alan Perlis, ,(take on an Oscar Wilde quote),
5:A year spent in artificial intelligence is enough to make one believe in God
   ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams in Programming, 1982,
6:You think you know when you learn, are more sure when you can write, even more when you can teach, but certain when you can program.
   ~ Alan Perlis, Paradigms of Artifical Intelligence,
7:What does matter is how well they perform and how smoothly they fit with other programs in the creation of still greater programs. The programmer must seek both perfection of part and adequacy of collection. ~ Alan Perlis, SICP, Foreward,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Any noun can be verbed. ~ Alan Perlis,
2:Optimization hinders evolution. ~ Alan Perlis,
3:In English every word can be verbed. ~ Alan Perlis,
4:There is no such thing as a free variable. ~ Alan Perlis,
5:One man's constant is another man's variable. ~ Alan Perlis,
6:Syntactic sugar causes cancer of the semicolon. ~ Alan Perlis,
7:Computer Science is embarrassed by the computer. ~ Alan Perlis,
8:C programmers never die. They are just cast into void. ~ Alan Perlis,
9:Simplicity does not precede complexity, but follows it. ~ Alan Perlis,
10:In computing, the mean time to failure keeps getting shorter. ~ Alan Perlis,
11:If your computer speaks English, it was probably made in Japan. ~ Alan Perlis,
12:In the long run, every program becomes rococo, and then rubble. ~ Alan Perlis,
13:One can't proceed from the informal to the formal by formal means. ~ Alan Perlis,
14:In software systems it is often the early bird that makes the worm. ~ Alan Perlis,
15:If you have a procedure with 10 parameters, you probably missed some. ~ Alan Perlis,
16:In programming, as in everything else, to be in error is to be reborn. ~ Alan Perlis,
17:Don't have good ideas if you aren't willing to be responsible for them. ~ Alan Perlis,
18:In man-machine symbiosis, it is man who must adjust: The machines can't. ~ Alan Perlis,
19:Once you understand how to write a program get someone else to write it. ~ Alan Perlis,
20:A LISP programmer knows the value of everything, but the cost of nothing. ~ Alan Perlis,
21:There are two ways to write error-free programs; only the third one works. ~ Alan Perlis,
22:To understand a program, you must become both the machine and the program. ~ Alan Perlis,
23:Some programming languages manage to absorb change, but withstand progress. ~ Alan Perlis,
24:To understand a program, you must become both the machine and the program. ~ Alan Perlis,
25:It is easier to change the specification to fit the program than vice versa. ~ Alan Perlis,
26:We are on the verge: Today our program proved Fermat's next-to-last theorem. ~ Alan Perlis,
27:A year spent in artificial intelligence is enough to make one believe in God. ~ Alan Perlis,
28:If a listener nods his head when you're explaining your program, wake him up. ~ Alan Perlis,
29:1: One man's constant is another man's variable. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
30:We toast the Lisp programmer who pens his thoughts within nests of parentheses. ~ Alan Perlis,
31:We toast the Lisp programmer who pens his thoughts within nests of parentheses. ~ Alan Perlis,
32:3: Syntactic sugar causes cancer of the semi-colons. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
33:A good programming language is a conceptual universe for thinking about programming. ~ Alan Perlis,
34:Fools ignore complexity. Pragmatists suffer it. Some can avoid it. Geniuses remove it. ~ Alan Perlis,
35:A language that doesn't affect the way you think about programming is not worth knowing. ~ Alan Perlis,
36:In English every word can be verbed. Would that it were so in our programming languages. ~ Alan Perlis,
37:A language that doesn't affect the way you think about programming is not worth knowing. ~ Alan Perlis,
38:31: Simplicity does not precede complexity, but follows it. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
39:A programming language is low level when its programs require attention to the irrelevant. ~ Alan Perlis,
40:Motto for a research laboratory: what we work on today, others will first think of tomorrow. ~ Alan Perlis,
41:FORTRAN is not a flower but a weed - it is hardy, occasionally blooms, and grows in every computer. ~ Alan Perlis,
42:In computing, turning the obvious into the useful is a living definition of the word "frustration". ~ Alan Perlis,
43:When a professor insists computer science is X but not Y, have compassion for his graduate students. ~ Alan Perlis,
44:Adapting old programs to fit new machines usually means adapting new machines to behave like old ones. ~ Alan Perlis,
45:Learning French is trivial: the word for horse is cheval, and everything else follows in the same way. ~ Alan Perlis,
46:11: If you have a procedure with 10 parameters, you probably missed some. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
47:LISP programmers know the value of everything and the cost of nothing. ~ Alan Perlis, ,(take on an Oscar Wilde quote),
48:You can measure a programmer's perspective by noting his attitude on the continuing vitality of FORTRAN. ~ Alan Perlis,
49:55: LISP programmers know the value of everything and the cost of nothing. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
50:95: Don't have good ideas if you aren't willing to be responsible for them. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
51:Every program has (at least) two purposes: the one for which it was written and another for which it wasn't. ~ Alan Perlis,
52:41: Some programming languages manage to absorb change, but withstand progress. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
53:A year spent in artificial intelligence is enough to make one believe in God
   ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams in Programming, 1982,
54:57: It is easier to change the specification to fit the program than vice versa. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
55:79: A year spent in artificial intelligence is enough to make one believe in God. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
56:When someone says, "I want a programming language in which I need only say what I want done," give him a lollipop. ~ Alan Perlis,
57:A year spent in artificial intelligence is enough to make one believe in God. ~ Alan Perlis (1982) Epigrams on Programming. nr.79,
58:75: The computing field is always in need of new cliches: Banality sooths our nerves. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
59:Because of its vitality, the computing field is always in desperate need of new cliches: Banality soothes our nerves. ~ Alan Perlis,
60:Programmers are not to be measured by their ingenuity and their logic but by the completeness of their case analysis. ~ Alan Perlis,
61:80: Prolonged contact with the computer turns mathematicians into clerks and vice versa. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
62:58: Fools ignore complexity. Pragmatists suffer it. Some can avoid it. Geniuses remove it. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
63:It is better to have 100 functions operate on one data structure than to have 10 functions operate on 10 data structures. ~ Alan Perlis,
64:59: In English every word can be verbed. Would that it were so in our programming languages. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
65:19: A language that doesn't affect the way you think about programming, is not worth knowing. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
66:8: A programming language is low level when its programs require attention to the irrelevant. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
67:Often it is the means that justify the ends: goals advance technique and technique survives even when goal structures crumble. ~ Alan Perlis,
68:I think it is inevitable that people program poorly. Training will not substantially help matters. We have to learn to live with it. ~ Alan Perlis,
69:You think you KNOW when you learn, are more sure when you can write, even more when you can teach, but certain when you can program. ~ Alan Perlis,
70:The best book on programming for the layman is Alice in Wonderland, but that's because it's the best book on anything for the layman. ~ Alan Perlis,
71:Dealing with failure is easy: Work hard to improve. Success is also easy to handle: You've solved the wrong problem. Work hard to improve. ~ Alan Perlis,
72:42: You can measure a programmer's perspective by noting his attitude on the continuing vitality of FORTRAN. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
73:Both knowledge and wisdom extend man's reach. Knowledge led to computers, wisdom to chopsticks. ~ Alan Perlis, The Synthesis of Algorithmic Systems, 1966,
74:A picture is worth 10K words - but only those to describe the picture. Hardly any sets of 10K words can be adequately described with pictures. ~ Alan Perlis,
75:16: Every program has (at least) two purposes: the one for which it was written and another for which it wasn't. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
76:We toast the Lisp programmer who pens his thoughts within nests of parentheses. ~ Alan Perlis, Quoted in The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs.,
77:Optimization hinders evolution. Everything should be built top-down, except the first time. Simplicity does not precede complexity, but follows it. ~ Alan Perlis,
78:Is it possible that software is not like anything else, that it is meant to be discarded: that the whole point is to always see it as a soap bubble? ~ Alan Perlis,
79:64: Often it is means that justify ends: Goals advance technique and technique survives even when goal structures crumble. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
80:A Lisp programmer knows the value of everything, but the cost of nothing. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Notices 17 (9), September 1982, pp. 7–13.,
81:This language [LISP] induces humorous arguments among programmers, often being damned and praised for the same feature. ~ Alan Perlis, The Synthesis of Algorithmic Systems, 1966,
82:116: You think you know when you learn, are more sure when you can write, even more when you can teach, but certain when you can program. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
83:One can only display complex information in the mind. Like seeing, movement or flow or alteration of view is more important than the static picture, no matter how lovely. ~ Alan Perlis,
84:You think you know when you learn, are more sure when you can write, even more when you can teach, but certain when you can program.
   ~ Alan Perlis, Paradigms of Artifical Intelligence,
85:101 Dealing with failure is easy: Work hard to improve. Success is also easy to handle: You've solved the wrong problem. Work hard to improve. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
86:39: A picture is worth 10K words - but only those to describe the picture. Hardly any sets of 10K words can be adequately described with pictures. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
87:Programmers should never be satisfied with languages which permit them to program everything, but to program nothing of interest easily. ~ Alan Perlis, The Synthesis of Algorithmic Systems, 1966,
88:Computer science is a restless infant and its progress depends as much on shifts in point of view as on the orderly development of our current concepts. ~ Alan Perlis, The Synthesis of Algorithmic Systems, 1966,
89:Every reader should ask himself periodically “Toward what end, toward what end?”—but do not ask it too often lest you pass up the fun of programming for the constipation of bittersweet philosophy. ~ Alan Perlis,
90:It goes against the grain of modern education to teach children to program. What fun is there in making plans, acquiring discipline in organizing thoughts, devoting attention to detail and learning to be self-critical? ~ Alan Perlis,
91:Computer science is neither mathematics nor electrical engineering. ~ Alan Perlis (1968) title of article "Computer Science is neither Mathematics nor Electrical Engineering" in: A. Finerman (Hg.), University Education in Computing Science, New York, London, pp. 69-77,
92:117: It goes against the grain of modern education to teach children to program. What fun is there to making plans, acquiring discipline in organizing thoughts, devoting attention to detail and, learning to be self-critical? ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
93:There is an appreciated substance to the phrase "ALGOL-like" which is often used in arguments about programming, languages and computation. ALGOL appears to be a durable model, and even flourishes under surgery — be it explorative, plastic, or amputative. ~ Alan Perlis, The Synthesis of Algorithmic Systems, 1966,
94:Pascal is for building pyramids -- imposing, breathtaking, static structures built by armies pushing heavy blocks into place. Lisp is for building organisms -- imposing, breathtaking, dynamic structures built by squads fitting fluctuating myriads of simpler organisms into place. ~ Alan Perlis, as quoted in Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs by Harold Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman with Julie Sussman.,
95:The vision we have of conversational programming takes in much more than rapid turn around time and convenient debugging aids: our most interesting programs are never wrong and never final. [...] What is new is the requirement to make variable in our languages what we had previously taken as fixed. I do not refer to new data classes now, but to variables whose values are programs or parts of programs, syntax or parts of syntax, and regimes of control. ~ Alan Perlis, The Synthesis of Algorithmic Systems, 1966,
96:I think that it's extraordinarily important that we in computer science keep fun in computing. When it started out, it was an awful lot of fun. Of course, the paying customers got shafted every now and then, and after a while we began to take their complaints seriously. We began to feel as if we really were responsible for the successful, error-free perfect use of these machines. I don't think we are. I think we're responsible for stretching them, setting them off in new directions, and keeping fun in the house. I hope the field of computer science never loses its sense of fun. ~ Alan Perlis,
97:I think that it's extraordinarily important that we in computer science keep fun in computing. When it started out, it was an awful lot of fun. Of course, the paying customers got shafted every now and then, and after a while we began to take their complaints seriously. We began to feel as if we really were responsible for the successful, error-free perfect use of these machines. I don't think we are. I think we're responsible for stretching them, setting them off in new directions, and keeping fun in the house. I hope the field of computer science never loses its sense of fun. Above all, I hope we don't become missionaries. Don't feel as if you're Bible salesmen. The world has too many of those already. What you know about computing other people will learn. Don't feel as if the key to successful computing is only in your hands. What's in your hands, I think and hope, is intelligence: the ability to see the machine as more than when you were first led up to it, that you can make it more. ~ Alan Perlis,     Quoted in The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs by Hal Abelson, Gerald Jay Sussman and Julie Sussman (McGraw-Hill, 2nd edition, 1996).,

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https://vegan.fandom.com/wiki/Gardening
https://worldhealer.fandom.com/wiki/Guerilla_Gardening
Kashimashi: Girl Meets Girl -- -- Studio Hibari -- 12 eps -- Manga -- Comedy Drama Romance School Shoujo Ai Slice of Life -- Kashimashi: Girl Meets Girl Kashimashi: Girl Meets Girl -- Hazumu was a shy boy who enjoyed gardening, collecting herbs, and long walks in the mountains. One day he finally worked up the courage to confess his love to Yasuna, but she rejected him. -- -- Depressed, he wandered up Mt. Kashimayama, the place where they first met, to reconsider his feelings. After getting lost, he wished upon a shooting star and received a bizarre twist of fate. -- -- Now he is a she, and she stumbles headfirst back into social life and relationships only to find that the entire landscape has changed! -- -- (Source: Media Blasters) -- -- Licensor: -- Discotek Media, Media Blasters -- TV - Jan 12, 2006 -- 43,936 6.66
Nanatsu-iro� -- Drops -- -- Diomedéa -- 12 eps -- Visual novel -- Magic Romance School -- Nanatsu-iro� -- Drops Nanatsu-iro� -- Drops -- Tsuwabuki is a normal student, though not very social. One day he meets a new transfer student, named Sumomo Akihime, and another girl, both the only members of the gardening club. Tsuwabuki is forced by a teacher to join this club. But then he bumps into a strange guy with dog ears, switching his drink with they guy's by mistake. Drinking it, he is turned in a stuffed animal. The teacher tells him that the only way to turn back to normal is to find the chosen girl and let her catch the seven stardrops. This girl is Sumomo, that accepts to help him, though she's not allowed to know the animal's true identity. -- -- (Source: ANN) -- TV - Jul 3, 2007 -- 20,408 7.02
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Forest_gardening
Allotment (gardening)
Amateur Gardening (magazine)
American Community Gardening Association
Atomic gardening
Australian Organic Farming and Gardening Society
Biodynamic Farming & Gardening Association
Butterfly gardening
Canadian Gardening
Climate-friendly gardening
Clipping (gardening)
Community gardening
Fine Gardening
Forest gardening
Gardening
Gardening at Night
Gardening (cryptanalysis)
Gardening for Kids with Madi
Gardening for the Million
Gardening in restricted spaces
Gardening in Scotland
Gardening in Spain
Gardening Leave (charity)
Gardening Mama
Gardening Mama 2: Forest Friends
Guerrilla gardening
History of gardening
Impact gardening
Index of gardening articles
List of horticulture and gardening books/publications
No-dig gardening
Outline of organic gardening and farming
Pattern gardening
Portal:Gardening
Portal:Gardening/WikiProjects
Raised-bed gardening
Slow gardening
Square foot gardening
Sustainable gardening
The Profitable Arte of Gardening
Urban gardening
Vegan organic gardening
World Naked Gardening Day


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last updated: 2022-02-09 03:44:54
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