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object:Bertrand Russell
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subject class:Philosophy
subject:Philosophy


./Bertrand_Russell_-_ABC_of_Atoms_(Dutton,_1923).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_ABC_of_Relativity_(Routledge,_2009).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_A_Free_Man's_Worship_(1903).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Analysis_of_Matter_(Routledge,_1992).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Analysis_of_Mind_(Routledge,_2005).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_An_essay_on_the_foundations_of_geometry.txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Authority_and_the_Individual_(Routledge,_2005).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Autobiography_(Routledge,_2009).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Byron_and_the_Modern_World_(1940).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Common_Sense_and_Nuclear_Warfare_(Routledge,_2009).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Contemplation_and_Action,_1902-14_(Allen_&_Unwin,_1985).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Critical_Exposition_of_the_Philosophy_of_Leibniz_(Routledge,_2005).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Cult_of_'Common_Usage'_(1953).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Dr_Schiller's_Analysis_of_the_Analysis_of_Mind_(1922).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Education_and_the_Social_Order_(Routledge,_2009).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Essay_on_the_Foundations_of_Geometry_(Dover,_1956).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Essays_in_Analysis_(Braziller,_1973).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Ethics_of_War_(1915).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Existential_Import_of_Propositions_(1905).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Fact_and_Fiction_(Routledge,_2009).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Freedom_and_Organization_(Allen_&_Unwin,_1934).txt
./Bertrand_Russell-Free_Thought_and_Official_Propaganda.txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Free_Thought_and_Official_Propaganda_(Watts,_1922).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_German_Social_Democracy_(Allen_&_Unwin,_1965).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_History_of_Western_Philosophy_(Routledge,_2014).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Human_Knowledge_(Simon_&_Schuster,_1948).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Human_Society_in_Ethics_and_Politics_(Routledge,_2005).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Impact_of_Science_on_Society_(AMS,_1968).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Index_of_the_Project_Gutenberg_Works_of_Bertrand_Russell.txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_In_Praise_of_Idleness_(Routledge,_2005).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Inquiry_into_Meaning_and_Truth_(Allen_&_Unwin,_1961).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Introduction_To_Mathematical_Philosophy_(Dover,_1993).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Is_Position_in_Time_and_Space_Absolute_or_Relative_(1901).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Justice_in_War_Time_(Open_Court,_1916).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Knowledge_by_Acquaintance_and_Description_(1910).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Logic_and_Ontology_(1957).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Marriage_and_the_Population_Question_(1916).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Mathematical_Infinity_(1958).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Mathematical_Logic_as_Based_on_the_Theory_of_Types_(1908).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Mr_Strawson_on_Referring_(1957).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_My_Philosophical_Development_(Simon_&_Schuster,_1959).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Mysticism_and_Logic_and_Other_Essays.txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Mysticism_and_Logic_(Doubleday,_1957).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_New_Hopes_for_a_Changing_World_(Simon_&_Schuster,_1951).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Nightmares_of_Eminent_Persons_(Bodley_Head,_1954).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Note_on_C_D_Broad's_Article_in_the_July_'Mind'_(1919).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Obituary__Ludwig_Wittgenstein_(1951).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_On_Denoting_(1905).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_On_Essentials_for_a_Stable_World_(1992).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_On_Propositions_(1919).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Our_Knowledge_of_the_External_World_as_a_Field_for_Scientific_Method_in_Philosophy.txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Our_Knowledge_of_the_External_World_(Routledge,_2009).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Philosophy_of_Bergson_(Macmillan,_1914).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Philosophy_of_Logical_Atomism_(Routledge,_2010).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Physics_and_Perception_(1922).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Political_Ideals.txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Portraits_from_Memory_&_Other_Essays_(Simon_&_Schuster,_1956).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Power_(Routledge,_2004).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Practice_and_Theory_of_Bolshevism_(Allen_&_Unwin,_1920).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Principia_Mathematica_to__56_(Cambridge,_1997).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Principles_of_Mathematics_(Routledge,_2010).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Principles_of_Mathematics.txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Problems_of_Philosophy_(Oxford,_2001).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Professor_Dewey's_'Essays_in_Experimental_Logic'_(1919).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Prospects_of_Industrial_Civilization_(Routledge,_2010).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Religion_and_Science_(Butterworth,_1935).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Role_of_the_Intellectual_in_the_Modern_World_(1939).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Sceptical_Essays_(Routledge,_2004).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Scientific_Outlook_(Routledge,_2009).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Substance_(1927).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_The_Analysis_of_Mind.txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Theory_of_Implication_(1906).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Theory_of_Knowledge_(Routledge,_1992).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_The_Practice_and_Theory_of_Bolshevism.txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_The_Problem_of_China.txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_The_Problems_of_Philosophy.txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_War_and_Non-Resistance_(1915).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_War_Crimes_in_Vietnam_(Monthly_Review,_1967).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_What_I_Believe_(Routledge,_2004).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_What_is_Mind_(1958).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Whitehead_and_Principia_Mathematica_(1948).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Why_I_Am_Not_a_Christian_(Routledge,_2005).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Why_Men_Fight_(Routledge,_2010).txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Why_Men_Fight.txt
./Bertrand_Russell_-_Will_to_Doubt_(Philosophical_Library,_1958).txt



--- WIKI
Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, (18 May 1872 2 February 1970) was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, writer, essayist, social critic, political activist, and Nobel laureate. Throughout his life, Russell considered himself a liberal, a socialist and a pacifist, although he also sometimes suggested that his sceptical nature had led him to feel that he had "never been any of these things, in any profound sense." Russell was born in Monmouthshire into one of the most prominent aristocratic families in the United Kingdom. In the early 20th century, Russell led the British "revolt against idealism". He is considered one of the founders of analytic philosophy along with his predecessor Gottlob Frege, colleague G. E. Moore and protg Ludwig Wittgenstein. He is widely held to be one of the 20th century's premier logicians. With A. N. Whitehead he wrote Principia Mathematica, an attempt to create a logical basis for mathematics, the quintessential work of classical logic. His philosophical essay "On Denoting" has been considered a "paradigm of philosophy". His work has had a considerable influence on mathematics, logic, set theory, linguistics, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, computer science (see type theory and type system) and philosophy, especially the philosophy of language, epistemology and metaphysics. Russell was a prominent anti-war activist and he championed anti-imperialism. Occasionally, he advocated preventive nuclear war, before the opportunity provided by the atomic monopoly had passed and he decided he would "welcome with enthusiasm" world government. He went to prison for his pacifism during World War I. Later, Russell concluded that war against Adolf Hitler's Nazi Germany was a necessary "lesser of two evils" and criticised Stalinist totalitarianism, attacked the involvement of the United States in the Vietnam War and was an outspoken proponent of nuclear disarmament. In 1950, Russell was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature "in recognition of his varied and significant writings in which he champions humanitarian ideals and freedom of thought".
Influences:Robert Ingersoll, Thales, E. Haldeman-Julius, Percy Williams Bridgman, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, David Hume, G.E. Moore, John Stuart Mill, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Thomas Paine, Albert Einstein, Gottlob Frege, Charles Sanders Peirce, Giuseppe Peano, J. Robert Oppenheimer

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
A_History_of_Western_Philosophy
Analysis_of_Mind
Contemplation_and_Action
Free_thought_and_Official_Propaganda
Human_Knowledge
Infinite_Library
Logic_and_Ontology
Mysticism_and_Logic
Our_Knowledge_of_the_External_World
Process_and_Reality
Religion_and_Science
Role_of_the_Intellectual_in_the_Modern_World
The_Principles_of_Mathematics
The_Problem_of_China
The_Problems_of_Philosophy
Toward_the_Future

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
1.05_-_Computing_Machines_and_the_Nervous_System

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
Bertrand Russell

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Bertrand Russell "person" (1872-1970) A British mathematician, the discoverer of {Russell's paradox}. (1995-03-27)

Bertrand Russell ::: (person) (1872-1970) A British mathematician, the discoverer of Russell's paradox. (1995-03-27)


TERMS ANYWHERE

(a) English New Realists: Less radical in that mind was given a status of its own character although a part of its objective environment. Among distinguished representatives were: G. E. Moore, Bertrand Russell, S. Alexander, T. P. Nunn, A. Wolf, G. F. Stout,

Also called the descriptivist theory of names. ::: A view of the nature of the meaning and reference of proper names, generally attributed to Gottlob Frege and Bertrand Russell. The theory consists essentially of the idea that the meanings of names are identical to the descriptions associated with them by speakers, while their referents are determined to be the objects that satisfy these descriptions.

A. V. Vasihev, Space, Time, Motion, translated by H. M. Lucas and C. P. Sanger, with an introduction by Bertrand Russell, London. 1924, and New York, 1924. Religion, Philosophy of: The methodic or systematic investigation of the elements of religious consciousness, the theories it has evolved and their development and historic relationships in the cultural complex. It takes account of religious practices only as illustrations of the vitality of beliefs and the inseparableness of the psychological from thought reality in faith. It is distinct from theology in that it recognizes the priority of reason over faith and the acceptance of creed, subjecting the latter to a logical analysis. As such, the history of the Philosophy of Religion is coextensive with the free enquiry into religious reality, particularly the conceptions of God, soul, immortality, sin, salvaition, the sacred (Rudolf Otto), etc., and may be said to have its roots in any society above the pre-logical, mythological, or custom-controlled level, first observed in Egypt, China, India, and Greece. Its scientific treatment is a subsidiary philosophic discipline dates from about Kant's Religion innerhalb der Grenzen der reinen Vernunft and Hegel's Philosophie der Religion, while in the history of thought based on Indian and Greek speculation, sporadic sallies were made by all great philosophers, especially those professing an idealism, and by most theologians.

Bertrand Russell "person" (1872-1970) A British mathematician, the discoverer of {Russell's paradox}. (1995-03-27)

Bertrand Russell ::: (person) (1872-1970) A British mathematician, the discoverer of Russell's paradox. (1995-03-27)

Bertrand ::: (Named after the British mathematician Bertrand Russell (1872-1970)). Wm. Leler. Rule-based specification language based on augmented term rewriting. Used to implement constraint languages. The user must explicitly specify the tree-search and the constraint propagation. .[Constraint Programming Languages - Their Specification and Generation, W. Leler, A-W 1988, ISBN 0-201-06243-7].

Bertrand (Named after the British mathematician Bertrand Russell (1872-1970)). Wm. Leler. Rule-based specification language based on augmented term rewriting. Used to implement constraint languages. The user must explicitly specify the tree-search and the constraint propagation. {(ftp://nexus.yorku.ca/pub/scheme/scm/bevan.shar)}. ["Constraint Programming Languages - Their Specification and Generation", W. Leler, A-W 1988, ISBN 0-201-06243-7].

games "games" "The time you enjoy wasting is not time wasted." -- {Bertrand Russell}. Here are some games-related pages on the {Web}: {Imperial Nomic (http://mit.edu:8001/people/achmed/fascist/)}, {Thoth's games and recreations page (http://cis.ufl.edu/~thoth/library/recreation.html)}, {Games Domain (http://wcl-rs.bham.ac.uk/GamesDomain)}, {Zarf's List of Games on the Web (http://leftfoot.com/games.html)}, {Dave's list of pointers to games resources (http://wcl-rs.bham.ac.uk/~djh/index.html)}, {Collaborative Fiction (http://asylum.cid.com/fiction/fiction.html)}. See also {3DO}, {ADL}, {ADVENT}, {ADVSYS}, {alpha/beta pruning}, {Amiga}, {CHIP-8}, {Core Wars}, {DROOL}, {empire}, {I see no X here.}, {Infocom}, {Inglish}, {initgame}, {life}, {minimax}, {moria}, {mudhead}, {multi-user Dimension}, {nethack}, {ogg}, {plugh}, {rogue}, {SPACEWAR}, {virtual reality}, {wizard mode}, {wumpus}, {xyzzy}, {ZIL}, {zorkmid}. See also {game theory}. (1996-03-03)

games ::: (games) The time you enjoy wasting is not time wasted. -- Bertrand Russell.Here are some games-related pages on the Web: , , , .See also 3DO, ADL, ADVENT, ADVSYS, alpha/beta pruning, Amiga, CHIP-8, Core Wars, DROOL, empire, I see no X here., Infocom, Inglish, initgame, life, minimax, moria, mudhead, multi-user Dimension, nethack, ogg, plugh, rogue, SPACEWAR, virtual reality, wizard mode, wumpus, xyzzy, ZIL, zorkmid.See also game theory. (1996-03-03)

logical atomism ::: Bertrand Russell developed logical atomism in an attempt to identify the atoms of thought – pieces of thought that cannot be divided into smaller pieces of thought.

logicism ::: A school of thought in the philosophy of mathematics, putting forth the theory that mathematics is an extension of logic and therefore all mathematics is reducible to logic.[16] Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead championed this theory fathered by Gottlob Frege. Frege gave up on the project after Russell recognized a paradox exposing an inconsistency in naive set theory. Russell and Whitehead continued on with the project in their Principia Mathematica.[17]

Russell ::: (After Bertrand Russell) A compact, polymorphically typed functional language by A. Demers & J. Donahue with bignums and continuations. Types are themselves first-class values and may be passed as arguments. .[An Informal Description of Russell, H. Boehm et al, Cornell CS TR 80-430, 1980].[Understanding Russell: A First Attempt, J.G. Hook in LNCS 173, Springer]. (1995-03-27)

Russell, Bertrand {Bertrand Russell}

Russell "language" (After {Bertrand Russell}) A compact, {polymorphical}ly typed {functional language} by A. Demers & J. Donahue with {bignums} and {continuations}. {Types} are themselves {first-class} values and may be passed as {arguments}. {(ftp://parcftp.xerox.com/pub/russell/russell.tar.Z)}. ["An Informal Description of Russell", H. Boehm et al, Cornell CS TR 80-430, 1980]. ["Understanding Russell: A First Attempt", J.G. Hook in LNCS 173, Springer]. (1995-03-27)

Russell's Paradox ::: (mathematics) A logical contradiction in set theory discovered by Bertrand Russell. If R is the set of all sets which don't contain themselves, does R contain itself? If it does then it doesn't and vice versa.The paradox stems from the acceptance of the following axiom: If P(x) is a property then {x : P} i.e. something clearly false. Thus any theory built on this axiom must be inconsistent.In lambda-calculus Russell's Paradox can be formulated by representing each set by its characteristic function - the property which is true for members and false for non-members. The set R becomes a function r which is the negation of its argument applied to itself: r = \ x . not (x x) If we now apply r to itself, r r = (\ x . not (x x)) (\ x . not (x x))= not ((\ x . not (x x))(\ x . not (x x))) So if (r r) is true then it is false and vice versa.An alternative formulation is: if the barber of Seville is a man who shaves all men in Seville who don't shave themselves, and only those men, who shaves the whereas seemingly obvious axioms of set theory suggest the existence of the paradoxical set R.Zermelo Fr�nkel set theory is one solution to this paradox. Another, type theory, restricts sets to contain only elements of a single type, (e.g. integers or sets of integers) and no type is allowed to refer to itself so no set can contain itself.A message from Russell induced Frege to put a note in his life's work, just before it went to press, to the effect that he now knew it was inconsistent but he hoped it would be useful anyway.(2000-11-01)

Russell's Paradox "mathematics" A {paradox} (logical contradiction) in {set theory} discovered by {Bertrand Russell}. If R is the set of all sets which don't contain themselves, does R contain itself? If it does then it doesn't and vice versa. The paradox stems from the acceptance of the following {axiom}: If P(x) is a property then {x : P} is a set. This is the {Axiom of Comprehension} (actually an {axiom schema}). By applying it in the case where P is the property "x is not an element of x", we generate the paradox, i.e. something clearly false. Thus any theory built on this axiom must be inconsistent. In {lambda-calculus} Russell's Paradox can be formulated by representing each set by its {characteristic function} - the property which is true for members and false for non-members. The set R becomes a function r which is the negation of its argument applied to itself: r = \ x . not (x x) If we now apply r to itself, r r = (\ x . not (x x)) (\ x . not (x x))   = not ((\ x . not (x x))(\ x . not (x x)))   = not (r r) So if (r r) is true then it is false and vice versa. An alternative formulation is: "if the barber of Seville is a man who shaves all men in Seville who don't shave themselves, and only those men, who shaves the barber?" This can be taken simply as a proof that no such barber can exist whereas seemingly obvious axioms of {set theory} suggest the existence of the paradoxical set R. {Zermelo Fränkel set theory} is one "solution" to this paradox. Another, {type theory}, restricts sets to contain only elements of a single type, (e.g. {integers} or sets of integers) and no type is allowed to refer to itself so no set can contain itself. A message from Russell induced {Frege} to put a note in his life's work, just before it went to press, to the effect that he now knew it was inconsistent but he hoped it would be useful anyway. (2000-11-01)

Whitehead, Alfred North: British philosopher. Born in 1861. Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, 1911-14. Lecturer in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics at University College, London, 1914-24. Professor of Applied Mathematics at the Imperial College of Science and Technology, London. From 1924 until retirement in 1938, Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University. Among his most important philosophical works are the Principia Mathematica, 3 vols. (1910-13) (with Bertrand Russell; An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Natural Knowledge (1919); The Concept of Nature (1920); Science and the Modern World (1926); Religion tn the Making (1926); Symbolism (1928); Process and Reality (1929); and Adventures of Ideas (1933). The principle of relativity in physics is the key to the understanding of metaphysics. Whitehead opposes the current philosophy of static substance having qualities which he holds to be based on the simply located material bodies of Newtonian physics and the "pure sensations" of Hume. This 17th century philosophy depends upon a "bifurcation of nature" into two unequal systems of reality on the Cartesian model of mind and matter. The high abstractions of science must not be mistaken for concrete realities. Instead, Whitehead argues that there is only one reality, what appears, whatever is given in perception, is real. There is nothing existing beyond what is present in the experience of subjects, understanding by subject any actual entity. There are neither static concepts nor substances in the world; only a network of events. All such events are actual extensions or spatio-temporal unities. The philosophy of organism, as Whitehead terms his work, is based upon the patterned process of events. All things or events are sensitive to the existence of all others; the relations between them consisting in a kind of feeling. Every actual entity is then a "prehensive occasion", that is, it consists of all those active relations with other things into which it enters. An actual entity is further determined by "negative prehension", the exclusion of all that which it is not. Thus every feeling is a positive prehension, every abstraction a negative one. Every actual entity is lost as an individual when it perishes, but is preserved through its relations with other entities in the framework of the world. Also, whatever has happened must remain an absolute fact. In this sense, past events have achieved "objective immortality". Except for this, the actual entities are involved in flux, into which there is the ingression of eternal objects from the realm of possibilities. The eternal objects are universals whose selection is necessary to the actual entities. Thus the actual world is a certain selection of eternal objects. God is the principles of concretion which determines the selection. "Creativity" is the primal cause whereby possibilities are selected in the advance of actuality toward novelty. This movement is termed the consequent nature of God. The pure possibility of the eternal objects themsehes is termed his primordial nature. -- J.K.F.



QUOTES [41 / 41 - 1500 / 2287]


KEYS (10k)

   38 Bertrand Russell
   1  Bertrand Russell
   1 Alfred Korzybski
   1 ?

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

1449 Bertrand Russell
   5 Richard Dawkins
   4 Timothy Ferriss
   2 Tom Hodgkinson
   2 Jim Holt

1:The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
2:A sense of duty is useful in work, but offensive in relations.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
3:Too little liberty brings stagnation, and too much brings chaos.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
4:Neither love without knowledge nor knowledge without love can produce a good life.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
5:Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric. ~ Bertrand Russell,
6:The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
7:The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
8:The search for something permanent is one of the deepest of the instincts leading men to philosophy.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
9:There are two motives for reading a book; one, that you enjoy it; the other, that you can boast about it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
10:One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
11:Hegel's philosophy is so odd that one would not have expected him to be able to get some men to accept it, but he did." ~ Bertrand Russell,
12:Drunkenness is temporary suicide: the happiness that it brings is merely negative, a momentary cessation of unhappiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
13:Neither a man nor a crowd nor a nation can be trusted to act humanely or to think sanely under the influence of a great fear.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
14:It is in the moments when the mind is most active and the fewest things are forgotten that the most intense joys are experienced.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
15:The objection to propaganda is not only its appeal to unreason, but still more the unfair advantage which it gives to the rich and powerful.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
16:And if there were a God, I think it very unlikely that He would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
17:We know very little, and yet it is astonishing that we know so much, and still more astonishing that so little knowledge can give us so much power.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
18:I do not like mystical language, and yet I hardly know how to express what I mean without employing phrases that sound poetic rather than scientific.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
19:A stupid man's report of what a clever man says can never be accurate, because he unconsciously translates what he hears into something he can understand.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
20:Having made the decision, do not revise it unless some new fact comes to your knowledge. Nothing is so exhausting as indecision, and nothing is so futile.
   ~ Bertrand Russell, [T5],
21:Perfect rationality consists, not in believing what is true, but in attaching to every proposition a degree of belief corresponding to its degree of credibility.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
22:Physics is mathematical not because we know so much about the physical world, but because we know so little; it is only its mathematical properties that we can discover. ~ Bertrand Russell,
23:Truth is a shining goddess, always veiled, always distant, never wholly approachable, but worthy of all the devotion of which the human spirit is capable. ~ Bertrand Russell, Fact and Fiction,
24:To teach how to live without certainty, and yet without being paralyzed by hesitation, is perhaps the chief thing that philosophy, in our age, can still do for those who study it.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
25:In the philosophy of Bertrand Russell, genius entails that an individual possesses unique qualities and talents that make the genius especially valuable to the society in which he or she operates.
   ~ ?,
26:The Victorian Age, for all its humbug, was a period of rapid progress, because men were dominated by hope rather than fear. If we are again to have progress, we must again be dominated by hope. ~ Bertrand Russell,
27:The secret of happiness is this : let your interest be as wide as possible, and let your reactions to the things and persons that interest you be as far as possible friendly rather than hostile. ~ Bertrand Russell,
28:Philosophy is to be studied, not for the sake of any definite answers to its questions since no definite answers can, as a rule, be known to be true, but rather for the sake of the questions themselves. ~ Bertrand Russell,
29:It is essential to happiness that our way of living should spring from our own deep impulses and not from the accidental tastes and desires of those who happen to be our neighbors, or even our relations. ~ Bertrand Russell,
30:The mind of the most rational among us may be compared to a stormy ocean of passionate convictions based on desire, upon which float perilously a few tiny boats carrying a cargo of scientifically tested beliefs. ~ Bertrand Russell,
31:It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to live after your own; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude. ~ Bertrand Russell,
32:Our great democracies still tend to think that a stupid man is more likely to be honest than a clever man, and our politicians take advantage of this prejudice by pretending to be even more stupid than nature made them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
33:My desire and wish is that the things I start with should be so obvious that you wonder why I spend my time stating them. This is what I aim at because the point of philosophy is to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
34:Sin makes a man unhappy and makes him feel inferior. Being unhappy, he is likely to make claims upon other people which are excessive and which prevent him from enjoying happiness in personal relations. Feeling inferior, he will have a grudge against those who seem superior. He will find admiration difficult and envy easy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
35:Man differs from other animals in one very important respect, and that is that he has some desires which are, so to speak, infinite, which can never be fully gratified, and which would keep him restless even in paradise. The boa constrictor, when he has had an adequate meal, goes to sleep, and does not wake until he needs another meal. Human beings, for the most part, are not like this. ~ Bertrand Russell,
36:To The Works Of:
   Aristotle, Cassius J. Keyser, Eric T. Bell, G. W. Leibnitz, Eugen Bleuler, J. Locke, Niels Bohr, Jacques Loeb, George Boole, H. A. Lorentz, Max Born, Ernst Mach, Louis De Brogue, J. C. Maxwell, Georg Cantor, Adolf Meyer, Ernst Cassirer, Hermann Minkowsja, Charles M. Child, Isaac Newton, C. Darwin, Ivan Pavlov, Rene Descartes, Giuseppe Peano, P. A. M. Dirac, Max Planck, A. S. Eddington, Plato, Albert Einstein, H. Poincare, Euclid, M. Faraday, Sigmund Freud, Josiah Royce, Karl F. Gauss, G. Y. Rainich, G. B. Riemann, Bertrand Russell, Thomas Graham, Ernest Rutherford, Arthur Haas, E. Schrodinger, Wm. R. Hamilton, C. S. Sherrington, Henry Head, Socrates, Werner Heisenberg, Arnold Sommerfeld, C. Judson Herrick, Oswald Veblen, E. V. Huntington, Wm. Alanson White, Smith Ely Jeluffe, Alfred N. Whitehead, Ludwig Wittgenstein
   Which Have Creatly Influenced My Enquiry
   This System Is Dedicated ~ Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity,
37:The best way to overcome it [the fear of death]-so at least it seems to me-is to make your interests gradually wider and more impersonal, until bit by bit the walls of the ego recede, and your life becomes increasingly merged in the universal life. An individual human existence should be like a river: small at first, narrowly contained within its banks, and rushing passionately past rocks and over waterfalls. Gradually the river grows wider, the banks recede, the waters flow more quietly, and in the end, without any visible break, they become merged in the sea, and painlessly lose their individual being. The man who, in old age, can see his life in this way, will not suffer from the fear of death, since the things he cares for will continue. And if, with the decay of vitality, weariness increases, the thought of rest will not be unwelcome. I should wish to die while still at work, knowing that others will carry on what I can no longer do and content in the thought that what was possible has been done. ~ Bertrand Russell,
38:I have been accused of a habit of changing my opinions. I am not myself in any degree ashamed of having changed my opinions. What physicist who was already active in 1900 would dream of boasting that his opinions had not changed during the last half century? In science men change their opinions when new knowledge becomes available; but philosophy in the minds of many is assimilated rather to theology than to science. The kind of philosophy that I value and have endeavoured to pursue is scientific, in the sense that there is some definite knowledge to be obtained and that new discoveries can make the admission of former error inevitable to any candid mind. For what I have said, whether early or late, I do not claim the kind of truth which theologians claim for their creeds. I claim only, at best, that the opinion expressed was a sensible one to hold at the time when it was expressed. I should be much surprised if subsequent research did not show that it needed to be modified. I hope, therefore, that whoever uses this dictionary will not suppose the remarks which it quotes to be intended as pontifical pronouncements, but only as the best I could do at the time towards the promotion of clear and accurate thinking. Clarity, above all, has been my aim.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
39:But even when the desire to know exists in the requisite strength, the mental vision by which abstract truth is recognised is hard to distinguish from vivid imaginability and consonance with mental habits. It is necessary to practise methodological doubt, like Descartes, in order to loosen the hold of mental habits; and it is necessary to cultivate logical imagination, in order to have a number of hypotheses at command, and not to be the slave of the one which common sense has rendered easy to imagine. These two processes, of doubting the familiar and imagining the unfamiliar, are correlative, and form the chief part of the mental training required for a philosopher.

The naïve beliefs which we find in ourselves when we first begin the process of philosophic reflection may turn out, in the end, to be almost all capable of a true interpretation; but they ought all, before being admitted into philosophy, to undergo the ordeal of sceptical criticism. Until they have gone through this ordeal, they are mere blind habits, ways of behaving rather than intellectual convictions. And although it may be that a majority will pass the test, we may be pretty sure that some will not, and that a serious readjustment of our outlook ought to result. In order to break the dominion of habit, we must do our best to doubt the senses, reason, morals, everything in short. In some directions, doubt will be found possible; in others, it will be checked by that direct vision of abstract truth upon which the possibility of philosophical knowledge depends. ~ Bertrand Russell, Our Knowledge of the External World,
40:Philosophy, like all other studies, aims primarily at knowledge. The knowledge it aims at is the kind of knowledge which gives unity and system to the body of the sciences, and the kind which results from a critical examination of the grounds of our convictions, prejudices, and beliefs. But it cannot be maintained that philosophy has had any very great measure of success in its attempts to provide definite answers to its questions. If you ask a mathematician, a mineralogist, a historian, or any other man of learning, what definite body of truths has been ascertained by his science, his answer will last as long as you are willing to listen. But if you put the same question to a philosopher, he will, if he is candid, have to confess that his study has not achieved positive results such as have been achieved by other sciences. It is true that this is partly accounted for by the fact that, as soon as definite knowledge concerning any subject becomes possible, this subject ceases to be called philosophy, and becomes a separate science. The whole study of the heavens, which now belongs to astronomy, was once included in philosophy; Newton's great work was called 'the mathematical principles of natural philosophy'. Similarly, the study of the human mind, which was a part of philosophy, has now been separated from philosophy and has become the science of psychology. Thus, to a great extent, the uncertainty of philosophy is more apparent than real: those questions which are already capable of definite answers are placed in the sciences, while those only to which, at present, no definite answer can be given, remain to form the residue which is called philosophy.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
41:Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. These passions, like great winds, have blown me hither and thither, in a wayward course, over a great ocean of anguish, reaching to the very verge of despair.
   I have sought love, first, because it brings ecstasy - ecstasy so great that I would often have sacrificed all the rest of life for a few hours of this joy. I have sought it, next, because it relieves loneliness--that terrible loneliness in which one shivering consciousness looks over the rim of the world into the cold unfathomable lifeless abyss. I have sought it finally, because in the union of love I have seen, in a mystic miniature, the prefiguring vision of the heaven that saints and poets have imagined. This is what I sought, and though it might seem too good for human life, this is what--at last--I have found.
   With equal passion I have sought knowledge. I have wished to understand the hearts of men. I have wished to know why the stars shine. And I have tried to apprehend the Pythagorean power by which number holds sway above the flux. A little of this, but not much, I have achieved.
   Love and knowledge, so far as they were possible, led upward toward the heavens. But always pity brought me back to earth. Echoes of cries of pain reverberate in my heart. Children in famine, victims tortured by oppressors, helpless old people a burden to their sons, and the whole world of loneliness, poverty, and pain make a mockery of what human life should be. I long to alleviate this evil, but I cannot, and I too suffer.
   This has been my life. I have found it worth living, and would gladly live it again if the chance were offered me. ~ Bertrand Russell,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:All movements go too far. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
2:All forms of fear produce fatigue. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
3:Do not feel absolutely certain of anything. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
4:Extreme hopes are born from extreme misery. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
5:Freedom is the greatest of political goods. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
6:To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
7:The universe is just there, and that is all. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
8:One must care about a world one will not see. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
9:The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
10:Anything you're good at contributes to happiness. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
11:What science cannot discover, mankind cannot know. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
12:No one gossips about other people's secret virtues. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
13:Either Man will abolish war, or war will abolish Man. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
14:I am firm; you are obstinate; he is a pig-headed fool. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
15:Folly is perennial and yet the human race has survived. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
16:War does not determine who is right - only who is left. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
17:I would never die for my beliefs because I might be wrong. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
18:To realize the unimportance of time is the gate to wisdom. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
19:Even when the experts all agree, they may well be mistaken. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
20:Power may be defined as the production of intended effects. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
21:There is much pleasure to be gained from useless knowledge. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
22:Science is what you know, philosophy is what you don't know. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
23:Many people would sooner die than think; in fact, they do so. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
24:Never try to discourage thinking for you are sure to succeed. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
25:None but a coward dares to boast that he has never known fear. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
26:Righteousness cannot be born until self-righteousness is dead. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
27:The good life is one inspired by love and guided by knowledge. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
28:The state is primarily an organization for killing foreigners. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
29:How much good it would do if one could exterminate the human race. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
30:Indignation is a submission of our thoughts, but not of our desires. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
31:One must look into hell before one has any right to speak of heaven. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
32:Men are born ignorant, not stupid. They are made stupid by education. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
33:Reason is a harmonising, controlling force rather than a creative one. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
34:Patriotism is the willingness to kill and be killed for trivial reasons. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
35:Civilized people cannot fully satisfy their sexual instinct without love. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
36:Mystery is delightful, but unscientific, since it depends upon ignorance. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
37:Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
38:A world without delight and without affection is a world destitute of value. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
39:Democracy is the process by which people choose the man who'll get the blame. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
40:Moral rules ought not to be such as to make instinctive happiness impossible. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
41:Science may set limits to knowledge but should not set limits to imagination. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
42:If you're certain, you're certainly wrong, because nothing deserves certainty. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
43:Liberty is the right to do what I like; license, the right to do what you like. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
44:The degree of one’s emotions varies inversely with one’s knowledge of the facts. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
45:The idea that the poor should have leisure has always been shocking to the rich. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
46:To be without some of the things you want is an indispensable part of happiness. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
47:I don't like the spirit of socialism – I think freedom is the basis of everything. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
48:To fear love is to fear life, and those who fear life are already three parts dead. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
49:Of all forms of caution, caution in love is perhaps the most fatal to true happiness. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
50:Only in thought is man a God; in action and desire we are the slaves of circumstance. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
51:A hallucination is a fact, not an error; what is erroneous is a judgment based upon it. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
52:Patriots always talk of dying for their country and never of killing for their country. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
53:To understand a name, you must be acquainted with the particular of which it is a name. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
54:I find that the whiter my hair becomes, the more ready people are to believe what I say. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
55:So far as I can remember, there is not one word in the Gospels in praise of intelligence. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
56:Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
57:The secret of happiness is to face the fact that the world is horrible, horrible, horrible. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
58:Freedom in general may be defined as the absence of obstacles to the realization of desires. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
59:I dislike Communism because it is undemocratic, and capitalism because it favors exploitation. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
60:Is there any knowledge in the world which is so certain that no reasonable man could doubt it? ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
61:A History of Western Philosophy. Book by Bertrand Russell, Book Three, Part I, Chapter 17. Hume, 1945. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
62:My whole religion is this: do every duty, and expect no reward for it, either here or hereafter. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
63:I regard [religion] as a disease born of fear and as a source of untold misery to the human race. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
64:The demand for certainty is one which is natural to man but is nevertheless an intellectual vice. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
65:The most savage controversies are about matters as to which there is no good evidence either way. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
66:What is wanted is not the will to believe, but the will to find out, which is the exact opposite. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
67:Without civic morality communities perish; without personal morality their survival has no value. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
68:In human relations one should penetrate to the core of loneliness in each person and speak to that. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
69:Italy, and the spring and first love all together should suffice to make the gloomiest person happy. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
70:I believe marriage to be the best and most important relation that can exist between two human beings. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
71:If I were a medical man, I should prescribe a holiday to any patient who considered his work important. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
72:Awareness of universals is called conceiving, and a universal of which we are aware is called a concept. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
73:All the time that he can spare from the adornment of his person, he devotes to the neglect of his duties. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
74:Do not use power to suppress opinions you think pernicious, for if you do the opinions will suppress you. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
75:Man needs, for his happiness, not only the enjoyment of this or that, but hope and enterprise and change. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
76:The ideal of an “all-round” education is out of date; it has been destroyed by the progress of knowledge. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
77:The place of the father in the modern suburban family is a very small one, particularly if he plays golf. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
78:When people begin to philosophize they seem to think it necessary to make themselves artificially stupid. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
79:The fact that a belief has a good moral effect upon a man is no evidence whatsoever in favor of its truth. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
80:Ethics is in origin the art of recommending to others the sacrifices required for cooperation with oneself. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
81:Every man would like to be God, if it were possible; some few find it difficult to admit the impossibility. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
82:It is only in marriage with the world that our ideals can bear fruit, divorced from it, they remain barren. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
83:The infliction of cruelty with a good conscience is a delight to moralists. That is why they invented Hell. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
84:A great many worries can be diminished by realizing the unimportance of the matter which is causing anxiety. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
85:One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
86:It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
87:As soon as we abandon our own reason, and are content to rely upon authority, there is no end to our troubles. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
88:No nation was ever so virtuous as each believes itself, and none was ever so wicked as each believes the other. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
89:Why is propaganda so much more successful when it stirs up hatred than when it tries to stir up friendly feeling? ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
90:Every great study is not only an end in itself, but also a means of creating and sustaining a lofty habit of mind. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
91:It seems to be the fate of idealists to obtain what they have struggled for in a form which destroys their ideals. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
92:Mathematics possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty - a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
93:The universe may have a purpose, but nothing we know suggests that, if so, this purpose has any similarity to ours. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
94:This is patently absurd; but whoever wishes to become a philosopher must learn not to be frightened by absurdities. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
95:Be scrupulously truthful, even if the truth is inconvenient, for it is more inconvenient when you try to conceal it. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
96:Both in thought and in feeling, even though time be real, to realise the unimportance of time is the gate of wisdom. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
97:Boys and girls should be taught respect for each other's liberty... and that jealousy and possessiveness kill love. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
98:A happy life must be to a great extent a quiet life, for it is only in an atmosphere of quiet that true joy can live. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
99:Boredom is ... a vital problem for the moralist, since at least half the sins of mankind are caused by the fear of it. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
100:In all affairs it's a healthy thing now and then to hang a question mark on the things you have long taken for granted. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
101:The best life is the one in which the creative impulses play the largest part and the possessive impulses the smallest. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
102:The fundamental defect of fathers, in our competitive society, is that they want their children to be a credit to them. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
103:It has been said that man is a rational animal. All my life I have been searching for evidence which could support this. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
104:Fear is the main source of superstition, and one of the main sources of cruelty. To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
105:Do not feel envious of the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise, for only a fool will think that it is happiness. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
106:Neither a man nor a crowd nor a nation can be trusted to act humanely or to think sanely under the influence of a great fear. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
107:Collective fear stimulates herd instinct and tends to produce ferocity toward those who are not regarded as members of the herd. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
108:Contempt for happiness is usually contempt for other people's happiness and is an elegant disguise for hatred of the human race. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
109:Love of power is greatly increased by the experience of power, and this applies to petty power as well as to that of potentates. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
110:The fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
111:Man is a credulous animal and must believe something; in the absence of good ground for belief, he will be satisfied with bad ones. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
112:Mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
113:We are faced with the paradoxical fact that education has become one of the chief obstacles to intelligence and freedom of thought. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
114:Mathematics takes us into the region of absolute necessity, to which not only the actual word, but every possible word, must conform. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
115:Science, ever since the time of the Arabs, has had two functions: (1) to enable us to know things, and (2) to enable us to do things. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
116:We have two kinds of morality side by side: one which we preach but do not practice and another which we practice but seldom preach.   ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
117:If all our happiness is bound up entirely in our personal circumstances it is difficult not to demand of life more than it has to give. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
118:The reformative effect of punishment is a belief that dies hard, chiefly I think, because it is so satisfying to our sadistic impulses. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
119:Religion is something left over from the infancy of our intelligence, it will fade away as we adopt reason and science as our guidelines. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
120:There is something feeble and a little contemptible about a man who cannot face the perils of life without the help of comfortable myths. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
121:A sense of duty is useful in work but offensive in personal relations. People wish to be liked, not to be endured with patient resignation. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
122:The qualities most needed are charity and tolerance, not some form of fanatical faith such as is offered to us by the various rampant isms. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
123:Those who have never known the deep intimacy and the intense companionship of mutual love have missed the best thing that life has to give. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
124:Conventional people are roused to fury by departure from convention, largely because they regard such departure as a criticism of themselves. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
125:Of all evils of war, the greatest is the purely spiritual evil: the hatred, the injustice, the repudiation of truth, the artificial conflict. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
126:The supreme maxim in scientific philosophising is this: wherever possible, logical constructions are to be substituted for inferred entities. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
127:And if there were a God, I think it very unlikely that He would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
128:The coward wretch whose hand and heart Can bear to torture aught below, Is ever first to quail and start From the slightest pain or equal foe. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
129:I resolved from the beginning of my quest that I would not be misled by sentiment and desire into beliefs for which there was no good evidence. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
130:When I come to my own beliefs, I find myself quite unable to discern any purpose in the universe, and still more unable to wish to discern one. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
131:I remain convinced that obstinate addiction to ordinary language in our private thoughts is one of the main obstacles to progress in philosophy. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
132:Fanaticism is the danger of the world, and always has been, and has done untold harm. I might almost say that I was fanatical against fanaticism. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
133:Thought looks into the pit of hell and is not afraid ... Thought is great and swift and free, the light of the world, and the chief glory of man. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
134:Some kind of philosophy is a necessity to all but the most thoughtless, and in the absence of knowledge it is almost sure to be a silly philosophy. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
135:Freedom comes only to those who no longer ask of life that it shall yield them any of those personal goods that are subject to the mutations of time. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
136:If I were granted omnipotence, and millions of years to experiment in, I should not think Man much to boast of as the final result of all my efforts. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
137:Philosophers, for the most part, are constitutionally timid, and dislike the unexpected. Few of them would be genuinely happy as pirates or burglars. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
138:Religions, which condemn the pleasures of sense, drive men to seek the pleasures of power. Throughout history power has been the vice of the ascetic. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
139:The good life, as I conceive it, is a happy life. I do not mean that if you are good you will be happy; I mean that if you are happy you will be good. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
140:Continuity of purpose is one of the most essential ingredients of happiness in the long run, and for most people this comes chiefly through their work. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
141:Political ideals must be based upon ideals for the individual life. The aim of politics should be to make the lives of individuals as good as possible. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
142:The observer, when he seems to himself to be observing a stone, is really, if physics is to be believed, observing the effects of the stone upon himself. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
143:A stupid man's report of what a clever man says can never be accurate, because he unconsciously translates what he hears into something he can understand. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
144:Truth is a shining goddess, always veiled, always distant, never wholly approachable, but worthy of all the devotion of which the human spirit is capable. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
145:Even if the open windows of science at first make us shiver ... in the end, the fresh air brings vigor, and the great spaces have a splendor of their own. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
146:Change is one thing, progress is another. "Change" is scientific, "progress" is ethical; change is indubitable, whereas progress is a matter of controversy. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
147:I think we ought always to entertain our opinions with some measure of doubt. I shouldn't wish people dogmatically to believe any philosophy, not even mine. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
148:Arithmetic must be discovered in just the same sense in which Columbus discovered the West Indies, and we no more create numbers than he created the Indians. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
149:I say quite deliberately that the Christian religion, as organized in its Churches, has been and still is the principal enemy of moral progress in the world. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
150:The happiness that is genuinely satisfying is accompanied by the fullest exercise of our faculties and the fullest realization of the world in which we live. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
151:In the revolt against idealism, the ambiguities of the word experience have been perceived, with the result that realists have more and more avoided the word. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
152:Our instinctive emotions are those that we have inherited from a much more dangerous world, and contain, therefore, a larger portion of fear than they should. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
153:Next to enjoying ourselves, the next greatest pleasure consists in preventing others from enjoying themselves, or, more generally, in the acquisition of power. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
154:The point of philosophy is to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
155:Religions that teach brotherly love have been used as an excuse for persecution, and our profoundest scientific insight is made into a means of mass destruction. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
156:In all affairs – love, religion, politics, or business – it's a healthy idea, now and then, to hang a question mark on the things you have long taken for granted. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
157:Mathematics takes us still further from what is human, into the region of absolute necessity, to which not only the world, but every possible world, must conform. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
158:There is darkness without and when I die there will be darkness within. There is no splendor, nor vastness anywhere; only triviality for a moment and then nothing. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
159:I believe that the abolition of private ownership of land and capital is a necessary step toward any world in which the nations are to live at peace with one another. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
160:I do wish I believed in the life eternal, for it makes me quite miserable to think man is merely a kind of machine endowed, unhappily for himself, with consciousness. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
161:A process which led from the amoeba to man appeared to the philosophers to be obviously a progress though whether the amoeba would agree with this opinion is not known. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
162:Machines are worshipped because they are beautiful and valued because they confer power; they are hated because they are hideous and loathed because they impose slavery. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
163:Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
164:To teach how to live without certainty and yet without being paralysed by hesitation is perhaps the chief thing that philosophy, in our age, can do for those who study it. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
165:Without effort and change, human life cannot remain good. It is not a finished Utopia that we ought to desire, but a world where imagination and hope are alive and active. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
166:It is possible that mankind is on the threshold of a golden age; but, if so, it will be necessary first to slay the dragon that guards the door, and this dragon is religion. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
167:A life devoted to science is therefore a happy life, and its happiness is derived from the very best sources that are open to dwellers on this troubled and passionate planet. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
168:People seem good while they are oppressed, but they only wish to become oppressors in their turn: life is nothing but a competition to be the criminal rather than the victim. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
169:When the intensity of emotional conviction subsides, a man who is in the habit of reasoning will search for logical grounds in favour of the belief which he finds in himself. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
170:Those who forget good and evil and seek only to know the facts are more likely to achieve good than those who view the world through the distorting medium of their own desires. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
171:Almost everything that distinguishes the modern world from earlier centuries is attributable to science, which achieved its most spectacular triumphs in the seventeenth century. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
172:Among human beings, the subjection of women is much more complete at a certain level of civilization than it is among savages. And the subjection is always reinforced by morality. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
173:The theoretical understanding of the world, which is the aim of philosophy, is not a matter of great practical importance to animals, or to savages, or even to most civilised men. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
174:The true spirit of delight, the exaltation, the sense of being more than Man, which is the touchstone of the highest excellence, is to be found in mathematics as surely as poetry. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
175:All exact science is dominated by the idea of approximation. When a man tells you that he knows the exact truth about anything, you are safe in inferring that he is an inexact man. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
176:We are speaking on this occasion, not as members of this or that nation, continent, or creed, but as human beings, members of the species Man, whose continued existence is in doubt. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
177:If there were in the world today any large number of people who desired their own happiness more than they desired the unhappiness of others, we could have a paradise in a few years. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
178:The pleasure of work is open to anyone who can develop some specialised skill, provided that he can get satisfaction from the exercise of his skill without demanding universal applause. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
179:For my part I distrust all generalizations about women, favorable and unfavorable, masculine and feminine, ancient and modern; all alike, I should say, result from paucity of experience. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
180:The life of man is a long march through the night, surrounded by invisible foes, tortured by weariness and pain, towards a goal that few can hope to reach, and where none may tarry long. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
181:Thought is subversive and revolutionary, destructive and terrible, Thought is merciless to privilege, established institutions, and comfortable habit. Thought is great and swift and free. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
182:I like mathematics because it is not human and has nothing particular to do with this planet or with the whole accidental universe - because, like Spinoza's God, it won't love us in return. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
183:The painter has to unlearn the habit of thinking that things seem to have the color which common sense says they &
184:Our words tend to conceal what is private and particular in our impressions, and to make us believe that different people live in a common world to a greater extent than is in fact the case. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
185:There are those who blame the Press, but in this I think they are mistaken. The Press is such as the public demands, and the public demands bad newspapers because it has been badly educated. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
186:With the introduction of agriculture mankind entered upon a long period of meanness, misery, and madness, from which they are only now being freed by the beneficent operation of the machine. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
187:The secret of happiness is this - let your interests be wide as possible and let your reactions to the things and persons that interest you be as far as possible friendly rather than hostile. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
188:One should respect public opinion in so far as is necessary to avoid starvation and to keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
189:Politics is concerned with herds rather than with individuals, and the passions which are important in politics are, therefore, those in which the various members of a given herd can feel alike. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
190:Love is something far more than desire for sexual intercourse; it is the principal means of escape from the loneliness which afflicts most men and women throughout the greater part of their lives. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
191:Many people when they fall in love look for a little haven of refuge from the world, where they can be sure of being admired when they are not admirable and praised when they are not praiseworthy. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
192:It is entirely clear that there is only one way in which great wars can be permanently prevented, and that is the establishment of an international government with a monopoly of serious armed force. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
193:I believe in using words, not fists. I believe in my outrage knowing people are living in boxes on the street. I believe in honesty. I believe in a good time. I believe in good food. I believe in sex. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
194:Advocates of capitalism are very apt to appeal to the sacred principles of liberty, which are embodied in one maxim: The fortunate must not be restrained in the exercise of tyranny over the unfortunate. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
195:The first dogma which I came to disbelieve was that of free will. It seemed to me that all notions of matter were determined by the laws of dynamics and could not therefore be influenced by human wills. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
196:By religion I mean a set of beliefs held as dogmas, dominating the conduct of life, going beyond or contrary to evidence, and inculcated by methods which are emotional or authoritarian, not intellectual. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
197:If a philosophy is to bring happiness it should be inspired by kindly feelings. Marx pretended that he wanted the happiness of the proletariat; what he really wanted was the unhappiness of the bourgeois. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
198:Dogmatism and skepticism are both, in a sense, absolute philosophies; one is certain of knowing, the other of not knowing. What philosophy should dissipate is certainty, whether of knowledge or ignorance. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
199:Love can flourish only as long as it is free and spontaneous; it tends to be killed by the thought of duty. To say that it is your duty to love so-and-so is the surest way to cause you to hate him of her. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
200:New truth is often uncomfortable, especially to the holders of power; nevertheless, amid the long record of cruelty and bigotry, it is the most important achievement of our intelligent but wayward species. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
201:If a "religion" is defined to be a system of ideas that contains unprovable statements, then Gödel taught us that mathematics is not only a religion, it is the only religion that can prove itself to be one. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
202:If any philosopher had been asked for a definition of infinity, he might have produced some unintelligible rigmarole, but he would certainly not have been able to give a definition that had any meaning at all. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
203:When you meet with opposition, even if it should be from your husband or your children, endeavour to overcome it by argument and not by authority, for a victory dependent upon authority is unreal and illusory. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
204:The habit of looking to the future and thinking that the whole meaning of the present lies in what it will bring forth is a pernicious one. There can be no value in the whole unless there is value in the parts. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
205:There is no need to worry about mere size. We do not necessarily respect a fat man more than a thin man. Sir Isaac Newton was very much smaller than a hippopotamus, but we do not on that account value him less. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
206:A truer image of the world, I think, is obtained by picturing things as entering into the stream of time from an eternal world outside, than from a view which regards time as the devouring tyrant of all that is. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
207:Real life is, to most men, a long second-best, a perpetual compromise between the ideal and the possible but the world of pure reason knows no compromise, no practical limitations, no barrier to the creative activity. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
208:Every philosophical problem, when it is subjected to the necessary analysis and justification, is found either to be not really philosophical at all, or else to be, in the sense in which we are using the word, logical. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
209:Our ruined lifeless planet will continue for countless ages to circle aimlessly round the sun unredeemed by the joys and loves, the occasional wisdom and the power to create beauty which have given value to human life. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
210:There is one very serious defect to my mind in Christ's moral character, and that is that He believed in hell. I do not myself feel that any person who is really profoundly humane can believe in everlasting punishment. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
211:I found one day in school a boy of medium size ill-treating a smaller boy. I expostulated, but he replied: ‘The bigs hit me, so I hit the babies; that’s fair.’ In these words he epitomized the history of the human race. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
212:Our great democracies still tend to think that a stupid man is more likely to be honest than a clever man, and our politicians take advantage of this prejudice by pretending to be even more stupid than nature made them. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
213:The megalomaniac differs from the narcissist by the fact that he wishes to be powerful rather than charming and seeks to be feared rather than loved. To this type belong many lunatics and most of the great men of history. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
214:The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widely spread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
215:The man who is unhappy will, as a rule, adopt an unhappy creed, while the man who is happy will adopt a happy creed; each may attribute his happiness or unhappiness to his beliefs, while the real causation is the other way round. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
216:Young men and young women meet each other with much less difficulty than was formerly the case, and every housemaid expects at least once a week as much excitement as would have lasted a Jane Austen heroine throughout a whole novel. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
217:Nine-tenths of the appeal of pornography is due to the indecent feelings concerning sex which moralists inculcate in the young; the other tenth is physiological and will occur in one way or another whatever the state of the law may be. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
218:Science can teach us, and I think our hearts can teach us, no longer to look around for imaginary supporters, no longer to invent allies in the sky, but rather to look to our own efforts here below to make the world a fit place to live. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
219:It is a waste of energy to be angry with a man who behaves badly, just as it is to be angry with a car that won't go. The difference is that you can compel your car to go to a garage, but you cannot compel Hitler to go to a psychiatrist. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
220:Here, then, is the problem which we present to you, stark and dreadful and inescapable: Shall we put an end to the human race; or shall mankind renounce war? People will not face this alternative because it is so difficult to abolish war. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
221:The opinions that are held with passion are always those for which no good ground exists; indeed the passion is the measure of the holders lack of rational conviction. Opinions in politics and religion are almost always held passionately. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
222:Envy consists in seeing things never in themselves, but only in their relations. If you desire glory, you may envy Napoleon, but Napoleon envied Caesar, Caesar envied Alexander, and Alexander, I daresay, envied Hercules, who never existed. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
223:Organic life, we are told, has developed gradually from the protozoon to the philosopher, and this development, we are assured, is indubitably an advance. Unfortunately, it is the philosopher, not the protozoon, who gives us this assurance. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
224:A world full of happiness is not beyond human power to create; the obstacles imposed by inanimate nature are not insuperable. The real obstacles lie in the heart of man, and the cure for these is a firm hope, informed and fortified by thought. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
225:To be happy in this world, especially when youth is past, it is necessary to feel oneself not merely an isolated individual whose day will soon be over, but part of a stream of life flowing on from the first germ to the remote and unknown future. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
226:For love of domination we must substitute equality; for love of victory we must substitute justice; for brutality we must substitute intelligence; for competition we must substitute cooperation. We must learn to think of the human race as one family. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
227:I don't care for the applause one gets by saying what others are thinking; I want actually to change people's thoughts. Power over people's minds is the main personal desire of my life; and this sort of power is not acquired by saying popular things. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
228:Philosophy is that part of science which at present people chose to have opinions about, but which they have no knowledge about. Therefore, every advance in knowledge robs philosophy of some problems which formerly it had …and will belong to science. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
229:Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds. The mediocre mind is incapable of understanding the man who refuses to bow blindly to conventional prejudices and chooses instead to express his opinions courageously and honestly. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
230:Philosophy, if it cannot answer so many questions as we could wish, has at least the power of asking questions which increase the interest of the world, and show the strangeness and wonder lying just below the surface even in the commonest things of daily life. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
231:All definite knowledge - so I should contend - belongs to science; all dogma as to what surpasses definite knowledge belongs to theology. But between theology and science there is a No Man's Land, exposed to attack by both sides; this No Man's Land is philosophy. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
232:Love is better than hate, because it brings harmony instead of conflict into the desires of the persons concerned. Two people between whom there is love succeed or fail together, but when two people hate each other the success of either is the failure of the other. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
233:A logical theory may be tested by its capacity for dealing with puzzles, and it is a wholesome plan, in thinking about logic, to stock the mind with as many puzzles as possible, since these serve much the same purpose as is served by experiments in physical science. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
234:The State is a collection of officials, different for difference purposes, drawing comfortable incomes so long as the status quo is preserved. The only alteration they are likely to desire in the status quo is an increase of bureaucracy and the power of bureaucrats. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
235:In action, in desire, we must submit perpetually to the tyranny of outside forces; but in thought, in aspiration, we are free, free from our fellowmen, free from the petty planet on which our bodies impotently crawl, free even, while we live, from the tyranny of death. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
236:The most essential characteristic of scientific technique is that it proceeds from experiment, not from tradition. The experimental habit of mind is a difficult one for most people to maintain; indeed, the science of one generation has already become the tradition of the next. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
237:In the welter of conflicting fanaticisms, one of the few unifying forces is scientific truthfulness, by which I mean the habit of basing our beliefs upon observations and inferences as impersonal, and as much divested of local and temperamental bias, as is possible for human beings. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
238:I do not think that the real reason why people accept religion has anything to do with argumentation. They accept religion on emotional grounds. One is often told that it is a very wrong thing to attack religion, because religion makes men virtuous. So I am told; I have not noticed it. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
239:Power, like vanity, is insatiable. Nothing short of omnipotence could satisfy it completely. And as it is especially the vice of energetic men, the causal efficacy of love of power is out of all proportion to its frequency. It is, indeed, by far the strongest motive in the lives of important men. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
240:After ages during which the earth produced harmless trilobites and butterflies, evolution progressed to the point at which it generated Neros, Genghis Khans, and Hitlers. This, however, is a passing nightmare; in time the earth will become again incapable of supporting life, and peace will return. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
241:I must confess that I am deeply troubled. I fear that human beings are intent upon acting out a vast death wish and that it lies with us now to make every effort to promote resistance to the insanity and brutality of policies which encompass the extermination of hundreds of millions of human beings. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
242:While it is true that science cannot decide questions of value, that is because they cannot be intellectually decided at all and lie outside the realm of truth and falsehood. Whatever knowledge is attainable, must be attained by scientific methods; and what science cannot discover, mankind cannot know. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
243:I cannot believe – and I say this with all the emphasis of which I am capable – that there can ever be any good excuse for refusing to face the evidence in favour of something unwelcome. It is not by delusion, however exalted, that mankind can prosper, but only by unswerving courage in the pursuit of truth. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
244:When you want to teach children to think, you begin by treating them seriously when they are little, giving them responsibilities, talking to them candidly, providing privacy and solitude for them, and making them readers and thinkers of significant thoughts from the beginning. That’s if you want to teach them to think. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
245:Descartes, the father of modern philosophy … would never—so he assures us—have been led to construct his philosophy if he had had only one teacher, for then he would have believed what he had been told; but, finding that his professors disagreed with each other, he was forced to conclude that no existing doctrine was certain. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
246:Philosophy is to be studied, not for the sake of any definite answers to its questions... but rather for the sake of the questions themselves... because, through the greatness of the universe which philosophy contemplates, the mind is also rendered great, and becomes capable of that union with the universe which constitutes its highest good. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
247:Aristotle could have avoided the mistake of thinking that women have fewer teeth than men, by the simple device of asking Mrs. Aristotle to keep her mouth open while he counted. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
248:The process of philosophizing, to my mind, consists mainly in passing from those obvious, vague, ambiguous things, that we feel quite sure of, to something precise, clear, definite, which by reflection and analysis we find is involved in the vague thing that we start from, and is, so to speak, the real truth of which that vague thing is a sort of shadow. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
249:I do not pretend to be able to prove that there is no God. I equally cannot prove that Satan is a fiction. The Christian god may exist; so may the gods of Olympus, or of ancient Egypt, or of Babylon. But no one of these hypotheses is more probable than any other: they lie outside the region of even probable knowledge, and therefore there is no reason to consider any of them. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
250:None of this means, however, that a business or stock is an intelligent purchase simply because it is unpopular; a contrarian approach is just as foolish as a follow-the-crowd strategy. What's required is thinking rather than polling. Unfortunately, Bertrand Russell's observation about life in general applies with unusual force in the financial world: "Most men would rather die than think. Many do." ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
251:Descartes, the father of modern philosophy … would never—so he assures us—have been led to construct his philosophy if he had had only one teacher, for then he would have believed what he had been told; but, finding that his professors disagreed with each other, he was forced to conclude that no existing doctrine was certain.  Bertrand Russell ~ rene-descartes, @wisdomtrove
252:While the dogmatist is harmful, the sceptic is useless …; one is certain of knowing, the other of not knowing. What philosophy should dissipate is certainty, whether of knowledge or of ignorance. Knowledge is not so precise a concept as is commonly thought. Instead of saying ‘I know this’, we ought to say ‘I more or less know something more or less like this’. … Knowledge in practical affairs has not the certainty or the precision of arithmetic. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
253:Men fear thought as they fear nothing else on earth - more than ruin, more even than death. Thought is subversive and revolutionary, destructive and terrible, thought is merciless to privilege, established institutions, and comfortable habits; thought is anarchic and lawless, indifferent to authority, careless of the well-tried wisdom of the ages. Thought looks into the pit of hell and is not afraid ... Thought is great and swift and free, the light of the world, and the chief glory of man. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
254:The scientific attitude of mind involves a sweeping away of all other desires in the interests of the desire to know&
255:It cannot be denied that tact is a virtue. The sort of person who always manages to blurt out the tactless thing, apparently by accident, is a person full of dislike of his or her fellow creatures. But although tact is a virtue, it is very closely allied to certain vices; the line between tact and hypocrisy is a very narrow one. I think the distinction comes in the motive: when it is kindliness that makes us wish to please, our tact is the right sort; when it is fear of offending, or desire to obtain some advantage by flattery, our tact is apt to be of a less amiable kind. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
256:If you think that your belief is based upon reason, you will support it by argument, rather than by persecution, and will abandon it if the argument goes against you. But if your belief is based on faith, you will realize that argument is useless, and will therefore resort to force either in the form of persecution or by stunting and distorting the minds of the young in what is called "education". This last is particularly dastardly, since it takes advantage of the defencelessness of immature minds. Unfortunately, it is practiced in greater or less degree in the schools of every civilised country. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
257:A well-known scientist (some say it was Bertrand Russell) once gave a public lecture on astronomy. He described how the earth orbits around the sun and how the sun, in turn, orbits around the center of a vast collection of stars called our galaxy. At teh end of the lecture, a little old lady at the back of the room got up and said: "What you have told us is rubbish. The world is really a flat plate supported on the back of a giant tortoise." The scientist gave a superior smile before replying, "What is the tortoise standing on?" "You're very clever, young man, very clever, " said the old lady. "But it turtles all the way down! ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
258:Consider the long history of the activities inspired by moral fervour: human sacrifices, persecutions of heretics, witch-hunts, pogroms leading up to wholesale extermination by poison gases ... Are these abominations, and the ethical doctrines by which they are prompted, really evidence of an intelligent Creator? And can we really wish that the men who practised them should live for ever? The world in which we live can be understood as a result of muddle and accident; but if it is the outcome of a deliberate purpose, the purpose must have been that of a fiend. For my part, I find accident a less painful and more plausible hypothesis. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Sin is geographical. ~ Bertrand Russell,
2:Memory demands an image. ~ Bertrand Russell,
3:Worry is a form of fear. ~ Bertrand Russell,
4:All movements go too far. ~ Bertrand Russell,
5:Philosophy bakes no bread ~ Bertrand Russell,
6:Choose your parents wisely. ~ Bertrand Russell,
7:Only six need be attempted. ~ Bertrand Russell,
8:What is matter? Never mind. ~ Bertrand Russell,
9:To fear love is to fear life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
10:to justify any such inference. ~ Bertrand Russell,
11:Common sense, however it tries, ~ Bertrand Russell,
12:Envy is the basis of democracy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
13:Do not feel certain of anything. ~ Bertrand Russell,
14:Beware the man of the single book ~ Bertrand Russell,
15:Drunkenness is temporary suicide. ~ Bertrand Russell,
16:Hitler is an outcome of Rousseau. ~ Bertrand Russell,
17:I do so hate to leave this world. ~ Bertrand Russell,
18:It's coexistence or no existence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
19:A few societies have perished from ~ Bertrand Russell,
20:All forms of fear produce fatigue. ~ Bertrand Russell,
21:It seems that sin is geographical. ~ Bertrand Russell,
22:Love is wise,
Hatred is foolish ~ Bertrand Russell,
23:Clarity, above all, has been my aim. ~ Bertrand Russell,
24:We know too much and feel too little. ~ Bertrand Russell,
25:Man can be scientifically manipulated. ~ Bertrand Russell,
26:The camera is as subjective as we are. ~ Bertrand Russell,
27:Vanity is a motive of immense potency. ~ Bertrand Russell,
28:Orthodoxy is the death of intelligence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
29:War grows out of ordinary human nature. ~ Bertrand Russell,
30:Americans need rest, but do not know it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
31:Ants and savages put strangers to death. ~ Bertrand Russell,
32:Some people would rather die than think. ~ Bertrand Russell,
33:All human activity is prompted by desire. ~ Bertrand Russell,
34:A smell of petroleum prevails throughout. ~ Bertrand Russell,
35:Change is one thing, progress is another. ~ Bertrand Russell,
36:Of course not. After all, I may be wrong. ~ Bertrand Russell,
37:All religions are both harmful and untrue. ~ Bertrand Russell,
38:We need a science to save us from science. ~ Bertrand Russell,
39:Every great idea starts out as a blasphemy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
40:Extreme hopes are born from extreme misery. ~ Bertrand Russell,
41:Love is a slippery eel that bites like hell ~ Bertrand Russell,
42:To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
43:Almost all education has a political motive. ~ Bertrand Russell,
44:Remember your humanity, and forget the rest. ~ Bertrand Russell,
45:We must be sceptical even of our scepticism. ~ Bertrand Russell,
46:We must be skeptical even of our skepticism. ~ Bertrand Russell,
47:One must care about a world one will not see. ~ Bertrand Russell,
48:The above proposition is occasionally useful. ~ Bertrand Russell,
49:Whatever we know without inference is mental. ~ Bertrand Russell,
50:I shall never lose the sense of being a ghost. ~ Bertrand Russell,
51:Love and knowledge led upwards to the heavens. ~ Bertrand Russell,
52:The saviors of the world, society's last hope. ~ Bertrand Russell,
53:The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time. ~ Bertrand Russell,
54:When all experts agree, you need to watch out. ~ Bertrand Russell,
55:no one ever gossips about the virtues of others ~ Bertrand Russell,
56:Obviousness is always the enemy of correctness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
57:To think I have spent my life on absolute muck. ~ Bertrand Russell,
58:We ought to look the world frankly in the face. ~ Bertrand Russell,
59:A proverb is one man's wit and all men's wisdom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
60:Love is a little haven of refuge from the world. ~ Bertrand Russell,
61:Anything you're good at contributes to happiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
62:dont let the old break you; let the love make you ~ Bertrand Russell,
63:Our beliefs are, however, often contrary to fact. ~ Bertrand Russell,
64:The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
65:Grasshopper always wrong in argument with chicken. ~ Bertrand Russell,
66:The more you complain the longer God lets you live ~ Bertrand Russell,
67:War...seems a mere madness, a collective insanity. ~ Bertrand Russell,
68:What science cannot discover, mankind cannot know. ~ Bertrand Russell,
69:El tiempo que disfrutas perder no es tiempo perdido ~ Bertrand Russell,
70:Indemnity for the past and security for the future. ~ Bertrand Russell,
71:No one gossips about other people's secret virtues. ~ Bertrand Russell,
72:No one gossips about other people’s secret virtues. ~ Bertrand Russell,
73:No satisfaction based upon self-deception is solid. ~ Bertrand Russell,
74:Science, by itself cannot, supply us with an ethic. ~ Bertrand Russell,
75:An individual human existence should be like a river ~ Bertrand Russell,
76:Faith: a firm belief for which there is no evidence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
77:Logic must no more admit a unicorn than zoology can. ~ Bertrand Russell,
78:What men really want is not knowledge but certainty. ~ Bertrand Russell,
79:Either man will abolish war, or war will abolish man. ~ Bertrand Russell,
80:European travellers find the Japanese a smiling race. ~ Bertrand Russell,
81:Organized people are just too lazy to look for things ~ Bertrand Russell,
82:The power of thought, the vast regions it can master. ~ Bertrand Russell,
83:Affection cannot be created; it can only be liberated. ~ Bertrand Russell,
84:I am firm; YOU are obstinate; HE is a pig-headed fool. ~ Bertrand Russell,
85:In a wise community a wise man would not seem foolish! ~ Bertrand Russell,
86:No opinion has ever been too errant to become a creed. ~ Bertrand Russell,
87:Folly is perennial and yet the human race has survived. ~ Bertrand Russell,
88:Fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves. ~ Bertrand Russell,
89:It is only theory that makes men completely incautious. ~ Bertrand Russell,
90:The only thing that will redeem mankind is cooperation. ~ Bertrand Russell,
91:War does not determine who is right - only who is left. ~ Bertrand Russell,
92:a vast collection of electric charges in violent motion. ~ Bertrand Russell,
93:Great God in Boots! – the ontological argument is sound! ~ Bertrand Russell,
94:The essence of life is doing things for their own sakes. ~ Bertrand Russell,
95:The main thing needed to make men happy is intelligence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
96:Even if all the experts agree, they may well be mistaken. ~ Bertrand Russell,
97:No great achievement is possible without persistent work. ~ Bertrand Russell,
98:The free intellect is the chief engine of human progress. ~ Bertrand Russell,
99:The good life is inspired by love and guided by knowledge ~ Bertrand Russell,
100:a certain amount of boredom is...essential to a happy life ~ Bertrand Russell,
101:Artists are on the average less happy than men of science. ~ Bertrand Russell,
102:A victory dependent upon authority is unreal and illusory. ~ Bertrand Russell,
103:Every increase in knowledge requires an increase in wisdom ~ Bertrand Russell,
104:I would never die for my beliefs because I might be wrong. ~ Bertrand Russell,
105:The axiomatic method has many advantages over honest work. ~ Bertrand Russell,
106:To realize the unimportance of time is the gate to wisdom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
107:A mind perpetually open, will be a mind perpetually vacant. ~ Bertrand Russell,
108:Even when the experts all agree, they may well be mistaken. ~ Bertrand Russell,
109:I can't tell whether I am living in a dream or a nightmare. ~ Bertrand Russell,
110:If you had the power to destroy the world, would you do so? ~ Bertrand Russell,
111:Religion is based, I think, primarily and mainly upon fear. ~ Bertrand Russell,
112:Science is what you know, philosophy is what you don't know ~ Bertrand Russell,
113:There is much pleasure to be gained from useless knowledge. ~ Bertrand Russell,
114:War doesn't determine who's right, it determines who's left ~ Bertrand Russell,
115:All exact science is dominated by the idea of approximation. ~ Bertrand Russell,
116:Facts have to be discovered by observation, not by reasoning ~ Bertrand Russell,
117:In a just world, there would be no possibility of 'charity'. ~ Bertrand Russell,
118:Most people would rather die than think and many of them do! ~ Bertrand Russell,
119:People who are vigorous and brutal often find war enjoyable. ~ Bertrand Russell,
120:Science is what you know, philosophy is what you don't know. ~ Bertrand Russell,
121:The habit of thinking in terms of comparison is a fatal one. ~ Bertrand Russell,
122:Auch wenn alle einer Meinung sind, können alle unrecht haben. ~ Bertrand Russell,
123:From childish fear springs the desire to externalise the ego. ~ Bertrand Russell,
124:Happiness is not best achieved by those who seek it directly. ~ Bertrand Russell,
125:Most people would sooner die than think; in fact, they do so. ~ Bertrand Russell,
126:Never try to discourage thinking, for you are sure to succeed. ~ Bertrand Russell,
127:None but a coward dares to boast that he has never known fear. ~ Bertrand Russell,
128:Opinions which justify cruelty are inspired by cruel impulses. ~ Bertrand Russell,
129:Righteousness cannot be born until self-righteousness is dead. ~ Bertrand Russell,
130:Science is what we know, and philosophy is what we don't know. ~ Bertrand Russell,
131:The good life is one inspired by love and guided by knowledge. ~ Bertrand Russell,
132:You must believe that you can help bring about a better world. ~ Bertrand Russell,
133:Any pleasure that does no harm to other people is to be valued. ~ Bertrand Russell,
134:A smile happens in a flash, but its memory can last a lifetime. ~ Bertrand Russell,
135:Il mondo non ha bisogno di dogmi, ha bisogno di libera ricerca. ~ Bertrand Russell,
136:Intelligibility or precision: to combine the two is impossible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
137:Philosophy seems to me on the whole a rather hopeless business. ~ Bertrand Russell,
138:All joy in true thought is part of the intellectual love of God, ~ Bertrand Russell,
139:Dora and I are now married, but just as happy as we were before. ~ Bertrand Russell,
140:I feel life is so small unless it has windows into other worlds. ~ Bertrand Russell,
141:In the ordinary business of life punctuality is . . . necessary. ~ Bertrand Russell,
142:It's not what you have lost, but what you have left that counts. ~ Bertrand Russell,
143:It will be found, as men grow more tolerant in their instincts, ~ Bertrand Russell,
144:No rules, however wise, are a substitute for affection and tact. ~ Bertrand Russell,
145:Prudence versus passion is a conflict that runs through history. ~ Bertrand Russell,
146:The experience of overcoming fear is extraordinarily delightful. ~ Bertrand Russell,
147:The reason is, and by rights ought to be, slave to the emotions. ~ Bertrand Russell,
148:Too little liberty brings stagnation, and too much brings chaos. ~ Bertrand Russell,
149:What hunger is in relation to food, zest is in relation to life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
150:A sense of duty is useful in work, but offensive in relations.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
151:Dogmatism is the greatest of mental obstacles to human happiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
152:Literature is inexhaustible, with every book a homage to infinity ~ Bertrand Russell,
153:Nothing is so exhausting as indecision, and nothing is so futile. ~ Bertrand Russell,
154:The legacy of Greece to Western philosophy is Western philosophy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
155:The purpose of education is to teach a defense against eloquence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
156:We may often do as we please - but we cannot please as we please. ~ Bertrand Russell,
157:Will machines destroy emotions or will emotions destroy machines? ~ Bertrand Russell,
158:How much good it would do if one could exterminate the human race. ~ Bertrand Russell,
159:We love our habits more than our income, often more than our life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
160:More cranks take up unfashionable errors than unfashionable truths. ~ Bertrand Russell,
161:Philosophy is an unusually ingenious attempt to think fallaciously. ~ Bertrand Russell,
162:The key to happiness is accepting one unpleasant reality every day. ~ Bertrand Russell,
163:Too little liberty brings stagnation, and too much brings chaos.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
164:I am not myself in any degree ashamed of having changed my opinions. ~ Bertrand Russell,
165:Indignation is a submission of our thoughts, but not of our desires. ~ Bertrand Russell,
166:Love of England is very nearly the strongest emotion that I possess. ~ Bertrand Russell,
167:Psychology often becomes the disease of which it should be the cure. ~ Bertrand Russell,
168:Stupidity and unconscious bias often work more damage than venality. ~ Bertrand Russell,
169:Writing can be either readable or precise, but not at the same time. ~ Bertrand Russell,
170:A widespread belief is more often likely to be foolish than sensible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
171:I am as drunk as a lord, but then, I am one, so what does it matter ? ~ Bertrand Russell,
172:I am paid by the word, so I always write the shortest words possible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
173:Men are born ignorant, not stupid. They are made stupid by education. ~ Bertrand Russell,
174:Men are born ignorant, not stupid; they are made stupid by education. ~ Bertrand Russell,
175:Nessuna regola, per quanto saggia può sostituire l'affetto e il tatto ~ Bertrand Russell,
176:Ser optimista o pesimista es cuestion de temperamento, no de razones. ~ Bertrand Russell,
177:Teachers are more than any other group the guardians of civilization. ~ Bertrand Russell,
178:The human race may well become extinct before the end of the century. ~ Bertrand Russell,
179:War can only be abolished by the establishment of a world government. ~ Bertrand Russell,
180:Why repeat the old errors, if there are so many new errors to commit? ~ Bertrand Russell,
181:El zorro no puede explicar claramente cuánto le disgusta que lo cacen. ~ Bertrand Russell,
182:It has always been correct to praise Plato, but not to understand him. ~ Bertrand Russell,
183:Life and hope for the world are to be found only in the deeds of love. ~ Bertrand Russell,
184:[One] must look into hell before one has any right to speak of heaven. ~ Bertrand Russell,
185:Reason is a harmonising, controlling force rather than a creative one. ~ Bertrand Russell,
186:The commonest objection to birth control is that it is against nature. ~ Bertrand Russell,
187:There can be no value in the whole unless there is value in the parts. ~ Bertrand Russell,
188:Mathematics rightly viewed possesses not only truth but supreme beauty. ~ Bertrand Russell,
189:Patriotism is the willingness to kill and be killed for trivial reasons ~ Bertrand Russell,
190:self-consciousness is the source of all our knowledge of mental things. ~ Bertrand Russell,
191:The happy life is to an extraordinary extent the same as the good life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
192:The resistance to a new idea increases by the square of its importance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
193:The secret to happiness is to face the fact that the world is horrible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
194:Unless you assume a God, the question of life's purpose is meaningless. ~ Bertrand Russell,
195:War does not determine who is right - only who is left.  Bertrand Russell ~ Doug Dandridge,
196:A fanatical belief in democracy makes democratic institutions impossible ~ Bertrand Russell,
197:Bad philosophers may have a certain influence; good philosophers, never. ~ Bertrand Russell,
198:Look at me. Look at me is one of the fundamental desires of human heart. ~ Bertrand Russell,
199:Mathematics is only the art of saying the same thing in different words. ~ Bertrand Russell,
200:Patriotism is the willingness to kill and be killed for trivial reasons. ~ Bertrand Russell,
201:The right age for marriage is thirty-seven in men, eighteen in women. We ~ Bertrand Russell,
202:War does not determine who is right – only who is left.” Bertrand Russell ~ Iain Rob Wright,
203:What the world needs is not dogma but an attitude of scientific inquiry. ~ Bertrand Russell,
204:A fanatical belief in democracy makes democratic institutions impossible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
205:Animal rights, taken to their logical conclusion, mean votes for oysters. ~ Bertrand Russell,
206:Bertrand Russell was pithier: A combination of Einstein and Mary Baker Eddy. ~ Frank Wilczek,
207:Civilized people cannot fully satisfy their sexual instinct without love. ~ Bertrand Russell,
208:Half the useful work in the world consists of combating the harmful work. ~ Bertrand Russell,
209:It's easy to fall in love. The hard part is finding someone to catch you. ~ Bertrand Russell,
210:Mystery is delightful, but unscientific, since it depends upon ignorance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
211:The goods of the mind are at least as important as the goods of the body. ~ Bertrand Russell,
212:I believe that when I die I shall rot, and nothing of my ego will survive. ~ Bertrand Russell,
213:I do not believe that I am now dreaming, but I cannot prove that I am not. ~ Bertrand Russell,
214:Insight, untested and unsupported, is an uncertain guarantee of the truth. ~ Bertrand Russell,
215:It is a natural propensity to attribute misfortune to someone's malignity. ~ Bertrand Russell,
216:Las Iglesias prefieren la guerra, la peste y el hambre a la contracepción. ~ Bertrand Russell,
217:Power is sweet; it is a drug, the desire for which increases with a habit. ~ Bertrand Russell,
218:To endure uncertainity is difficult, but so are most of the other virtues. ~ Bertrand Russell,
219:Belief systems provide a programme which relieves the necessity of thought. ~ Bertrand Russell,
220:Bertrand Russell: ‘Many people would sooner die than think. In fact they do. ~ Richard Dawkins,
221:Freedom of opinion can only exist when the government thinks itself secure. ~ Bertrand Russell,
222:Gradually, by selective breeding, the congenital differences between rulers ~ Bertrand Russell,
223:Great Empedocles, that ardent soul, Leapt into Etna, and was roasted whole. ~ Bertrand Russell,
224:La mayor felicidad se deriva del completo dominio de las propias facultades ~ Bertrand Russell,
225:Orthodoxy is the grave of intelligence, no matter what orthodoxy it may be. ~ Bertrand Russell,
226:There can't be a practical reason for believing something that is not true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
227:Your writing is never as good as you hoped; but never as bad as you feared. ~ Bertrand Russell,
228:As men begin to grow civilized, they cease to be satisfied with mere taboos. ~ Bertrand Russell,
229:A world without delight and without affection is a world destitute of value. ~ Bertrand Russell,
230:Liberty demands self-government, but not the right to interfere with others. ~ Bertrand Russell,
231:Life is nothing but a competition to be the criminal rather than the victim. ~ Bertrand Russell,
232:Men who are unhappy, like men who sleep badly, are always proud of the fact. ~ Bertrand Russell,
233:Much that passes as idealism is disguised hatred or disguised love of power. ~ Bertrand Russell,
234:Nature and books and (later) mathematics saved me from complete despondency. ~ Bertrand Russell,
235:Next to worry probably one of the most potent causes of unhappiness is envy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
236:Obscenity is whatever happens to shock some elderly and ignorant magistrate. ~ Bertrand Russell,
237:Only impatience prompts the belief in the possibility of sudden improvement. ~ Bertrand Russell,
238:The whiter my hair becomes, the more ready people are to believe what I say. ~ Bertrand Russell,
239:Unrestricted nationalism is, in the long run, incompatible with world peace. ~ Bertrand Russell,
240:We believe, first and foremost, what makes us feel that we are fine fellows. ~ Bertrand Russell,
241:Well, there are many religions, but I suppose they all worship the same God. ~ Bertrand Russell,
242:Democracy is the process by which people choose the man who'll get the blame. ~ Bertrand Russell,
243:Few people can be happy unless they hate some other person, nation, or creed. ~ Bertrand Russell,
244:I am as firmly convinced that religions do harm as I am that they are untrue. ~ Bertrand Russell,
245:Ironclads and Maxim guns must be the ultimate arbiters of metaphysical truth. ~ Bertrand Russell,
246:It is not rational arguments but emotions that cause belief in a future life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
247:John Locke invented common sense, and only Englishmen have had it ever since! ~ Bertrand Russell,
248:The road to happiness and prosperity lies in an organized diminution of work. ~ Bertrand Russell,
249:I am sometimes shocked by the blasphemies of those who think themselves pious. ~ Bertrand Russell,
250:Is the set of all sets which are not members of themselves a member of itself? ~ Bertrand Russell,
251:Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination. ~ Bertrand Russell,
252:The hardest thing to learn in life is which bridge to cross and which to burn. ~ Bertrand Russell,
253:The question is how to arrive at your opinions and not what your opinions are. ~ Bertrand Russell,
254:To be able to fill leisure intelligently is the last product of civilization . ~ Bertrand Russell,
255:All the conditions of happiness are realized in the life of the man of science. ~ Bertrand Russell,
256:America... where law and custom alike are based upon the dreams of spinsters... ~ Bertrand Russell,
257:Even in civilized mankind faint traces of monogamous instinct can be perceived. ~ Bertrand Russell,
258:It is the things for which there is no evidence that are believed with passion. ~ Bertrand Russell,
259:Knowledge, as opposed to fantasies of wish fulfilment, is difficult to come by. ~ Bertrand Russell,
260:Liberty is the right to do what I like; licence, the right to do what you like. ~ Bertrand Russell,
261:Life is just one cup of coffee after another, and don't look for anything else. ~ Bertrand Russell,
262:There may be no good reasons for very many opinions that are held with passion. ~ Bertrand Russell,
263:To fear love is to fear life, and those who fear life are already 3-parts dead. ~ Bertrand Russell,
264:War does not determine who is right—only who is left.” —Bertrand Russell ~ Nicholas Sansbury Smith,
265:Why do people read? The answer, as regards the great majority, is: 'They don't. ~ Bertrand Russell,
266:How much longer is the world willing to endure this spectacle of wanton cruelty? ~ Bertrand Russell,
267:People are zealous for a cause when they are not quite positive that it is true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
268:Politics is largely governed by sententious platitudes which are devoid of truth ~ Bertrand Russell,
269:Punctuality is a quality the need of which is bound up with social co-operation. ~ Bertrand Russell,
270:Ser-se único é uma coisa, mas pertencer a um rebanho de pecadores não tem piada. ~ Bertrand Russell,
271:The idea that the poor should have leisure has always been shocking to the rich. ~ Bertrand Russell,
272:To be without some of the things you want is an indispensable part of happiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
273:Every advance in civilization has been denounced as unnatural while it was recent ~ Bertrand Russell,
274:Every sane and sensible and quiet thing we do is absolutely ignored by the press. ~ Bertrand Russell,
275:I did not, however, commit suicide, because I wished to know more of mathematics. ~ Bertrand Russell,
276:It is the great reward of losing youth that one finds onseself able to be of use; ~ Bertrand Russell,
277:The luxury to disparage freedom is the privilege of those who already possess it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
278:The thing that I should wish to obtain from money would be leisure with security. ~ Bertrand Russell,
279:...what is the use of making everybody rich if the rich themselves are miserable? ~ Bertrand Russell,
280:You are a wicked motorcar, and I shall not give you any more petrol until you go. ~ Bertrand Russell,
281:Dread of disaster makes everybody act in the very way that increases the disaster. ~ Bertrand Russell,
282:Elogio de la ociosidad y otros ensayos (Diario Público, 2010), de Bertrand Russell. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
283:Every advance in civilization has been denounced as unnatural while it was recent. ~ Bertrand Russell,
284:Government can easily exist without laws, but law cannot exist without government. ~ Bertrand Russell,
285:I don't like the spirit of socialism - I think freedom is the basis of everything. ~ Bertrand Russell,
286:most holders of authority were bigoted, illogical and not to be taken seriously. I ~ Bertrand Russell,
287:Nadie debería creerse perfecto, ni preocuparse demasiado por el hecho de no serlo. ~ Bertrand Russell,
288:Neither love without knowledge nor knowledge without love can produce a good life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
289:Really high-minded people are indifferent to happiness, especially other people's. ~ Bertrand Russell,
290:So did Bertrand Russell: ‘Many people would sooner die than think. In fact they do. ~ Richard Dawkins,
291:temptation to be interesting rather than technically effective is a dangerous one. ~ Bertrand Russell,
292:The rules of logic are to mathematics what those of structure are to architecture. ~ Bertrand Russell,
293:The true spirit of delight...is to be found in mathematics as surely as in poetry. ~ Bertrand Russell,
294:To discover a system for the avoidance of war is a vital need of our civilisation. ~ Bertrand Russell,
295:As Bertrand Russell once wrote, two plus two is four even in the interior of the sun. ~ Martin Gardner,
296:Most people learn nothing from experience, except confirmation of their prejudices. ~ Bertrand Russell,
297:Neither love without knowledge, nor knowledge without love can produce a good life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
298:The very best proof that something can be done is that someone has already done it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
299:The world is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper. ~ Bertrand Russell,
300:Thought is merciless to privilege, established institutions, and comfortable habit. ~ Bertrand Russell,
301:To fear love is to fear life, and those who fear life are already three parts dead. ~ Bertrand Russell,
302:You may kill an artist or a thinker, but you cannot acquire his art or his thought. ~ Bertrand Russell,
303:A man without a bias cannot write interesting history - if indeed such a man exists. ~ Bertrand Russell,
304:In a man whose reasoning powers are good, fallacious arguments are evidence of bias. ~ Bertrand Russell,
305:My first advice (on how not to grow old) would be to choose you ancestors carefully. ~ Bertrand Russell,
306:proper task of philosophy is to remind ourselves of what we already know to be true: ~ Bertrand Russell,
307:Thought is great and swift and free, the light of the world, the chief glory of man. ~ Bertrand Russell,
308:A man is rational in proportion as his intelligence informs and controls his desires. ~ Bertrand Russell,
309:Escape from boredom is one of the really powerful desires of almost all human beings. ~ Bertrand Russell,
310:if you sympathise with everybody it comes to much the same as sympathising with none, ~ Bertrand Russell,
311:I have in later years taken to Euclid, Whitehead, Bertrand Russell, in an elemental way. ~ Carl Sandburg,
312:Many a marriage hardly differs from prostitution, except being harder to escape from. ~ Bertrand Russell,
313:Neither love without knowledge nor knowledge without love can produce a good life.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
314:Not to be absolutely certain is, I think, one of the essential things in rationality. ~ Bertrand Russell,
315:Of all forms of caution, caution in love is perhaps the most fatal to true happiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
316:Only in thought is man a God; in action and desire we are the slaves of circumstance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
317:Whenever one finds oneself inclined to bitterness, it is a sign of emotional failure. ~ Bertrand Russell,
318:HELL: A place where the police are German, the motorists French and the cooks English. ~ Bertrand Russell,
319:Most people learn nothing from experience except confirmation of their own prejudices. ~ Bertrand Russell,
320:Sometimes the hardest thing in life is to know which bridge to cross and which to burn ~ Bertrand Russell,
321:Televison allows thousands of people to laugh at the same joke and still remain alone. ~ Bertrand Russell,
322:there is no profit in feeling unless one learns to dominate it and impersonalise it. - ~ Bertrand Russell,
323:The taboo against nakedness is an obstacle to a decent attitude on the subject of sex. ~ Bertrand Russell,
324:Thinking you know when in fact you don't is a fatal mistake, to which we are all prone ~ Bertrand Russell,
325:To understand a name you must be acquainted with the particular of which it is a name. ~ Bertrand Russell,
326:What Galileo and Newton were to the seventeenth century, Darwin was to the nineteenth. ~ Bertrand Russell,
327:Whoever wishes to become a philosopher must learn not to be frightened by absurdities. ~ Bertrand Russell,
328:A hallucination is a fact, not an error; what is erroneous is a judgment based upon it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
329:Human life, its growth, its hopes, fears, loves, et cetera, are the result of accidents ~ Bertrand Russell,
330:If you wish to be happy yourself, you must resign yourself to seeing others also happy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
331:One of the most powerful of all our passions is the desire to be admired and respected. ~ Bertrand Russell,
332:Patriots always talk of dying for their country and never of killing for their country. ~ Bertrand Russell,
333:Patriots always talk of dying for their country but never of killing for their country. ~ Bertrand Russell,
334:Even in the most purely logical realms, it is insight that first arrives at what is new. ~ Bertrand Russell,
335:I do not think there can be any defense for the view that knowledge is ever undesirable. ~ Bertrand Russell,
336:I feel as if one would only discover on one's death bed what one ought to have lived for ~ Bertrand Russell,
337:La scienza potrebbe anche aver ispirato il detto famoso al quale Platone allude:<> ~ Bertrand Russell,
338:None of our beliefs are quite true; all have at least a penumbra of vagueness and error. ~ Bertrand Russell,
339:Only mathematics and mathematical logic can say as little as the physicist means to say. ~ Bertrand Russell,
340:So far as I can remember there is not one word in the Gospels in praise of intelligence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
341:There is an artist imprisoned in each one of us. Let him loose to spread joy everywhere. ~ Bertrand Russell,
342:To be able to concentrate for a considerable time is essential to difficult achievement. ~ Bertrand Russell,
343:What we cannot think we cannot think, therefore we also cannot say what we cannot think. ~ Bertrand Russell,
344:Be isolated, be ignored, be attacked, be in doubt, be frightened, but do not be silenced. ~ Bertrand Russell,
345:Human nature being what it is, people will insist upon getting some pleasure out of life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
346:So far as I can remember, there is not one word in the Gospels in praise of intelligence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
347:The wise use of leisure, it must be conceded, is a product of civilization and education. ~ Bertrand Russell,
348:Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric. ~ Bertrand Russell,
349:Everything is vague to a degree you do not realize till you have tried to make it precise. ~ Bertrand Russell,
350:fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wise people so full of doubts. ~ Bertrand Russell,
351:Happiness is promoted by associations of persons with similar tastes and similar opinions. ~ Bertrand Russell,
352:It is in our hearts that evil lies, and it is from our hearts that it must be plucked out. ~ Bertrand Russell,
353:Shakespeare . . . If he does not give you delight, you had better ignore him [if you can]. ~ Bertrand Russell,
354:The problem with the wise is they are so filled with doubts while the dull are so certain. ~ Bertrand Russell,
355:There's a Bible on that shelf there. But I keep it next to Voltaire - poison and antidote. ~ Bertrand Russell,
356:The secret of happiness is to face the fact that the world is horrible, horrible horrible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
357:Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric. ~ Bertrand Russell,
358:Há dois motivos para ler um livro. Um: porque você gosta; o outro: pra você se gabar disto. ~ Bertrand Russell,
359:I often long to . . . give up my life to love of my neighbour. This is really a temptation. ~ Bertrand Russell,
360:Men fear thought as they fear nothing else on earth - more than ruin, more even than death. ~ Bertrand Russell,
361:Science is no substitute for virtue; the heart is as necessary for a good life as the head. ~ Bertrand Russell,
362:The idea that things must have a beginning is really due to the poverty of our imagination. ~ Bertrand Russell,
363:The secret of happiness is to face the fact that the world is horrible, horrible, horrible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
364:To create a healthy philosophy you should renounce metaphysics but be a good mathematician. ~ Bertrand Russell,
365:Very few people are able to discount the effect of circumstances upon their own characters. ~ Bertrand Russell,
366:What vanity needs for its satisfaction is glory, and it's easy to have glory without power. ~ Bertrand Russell,
367:Africans had to be taught that nudity is wicked; this was done very cheaply by missionaries. ~ Bertrand Russell,
368:Bertrand Russell where he declared, “I would rather be mad with the truth than sane with lies. ~ Todd McCaffrey,
369:Freedom in general may be defined as the absence of obstacles to the realization of desires. ~ Bertrand Russell,
370:Men fear thought as they fear nothing else on earth -- more than ruin, more even than death. ~ Bertrand Russell,
371:My sad conviction is that people can only agree about what they're not really interested in. ~ Bertrand Russell,
372:One is always a little afraid of love, but above all, one is afraid of pain or causing pain. ~ Bertrand Russell,
373:Power, like vanity, is insatiable. Nothing short of omnipotence could satisfy it completely. ~ Bertrand Russell,
374:The morality of work is the morality of slaves, and the modern world has no need of slavery. ~ Bertrand Russell,
375:The pure mathematician, like the musician, is a free creator of his world of ordered beauty. ~ Bertrand Russell,
376:To acquire immunity to eloquence is of the utmost importance to the citizens of a democracy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
377:Unless you assume a God, the question of life’s purpose is meaningless. BERTRAND RUSSELL, ATHEIST ~ Rick Warren,
378:Extreme hopes are born of extreme misery, and in such a world hopes could only be irrational. ~ Bertrand Russell,
379:Happiness, as is evident, depends partly upon external circumstances and partly upon oneself. ~ Bertrand Russell,
380:Herd pressure is to be judged by two things: first, its intensity, and second, its direction. ~ Bertrand Russell,
381:Ideas and principles that do harm are as a rule, though not always, cloaks for evil passions. ~ Bertrand Russell,
382:One's work is never so bad as it appears on bad days, nor so good as it appears on good days. ~ Bertrand Russell,
383:What has human happiness to do with morals? The object of morals is not to make people happy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
384:I dislike Communism because it is undemocratic, and capitalism because it favors exploitation. ~ Bertrand Russell,
385:Is there any knowledge in the world which is so certain that no reasonable man could doubt it? ~ Bertrand Russell,
386:Neither acquiescence in skepticism nor acquiescence in dogma is what education should produce. ~ Bertrand Russell,
387:The average man's opinions are much less foolish than they would be if he thought for himself. ~ Bertrand Russell,
388:What is new in our time is the increased power of the authorities to enforce their prejudices. ~ Bertrand Russell,
389:When we look at a rock what we are seeing is not the rock, but the effect of the rock upon us. ~ Bertrand Russell,
390:A man cannot possibly be at peace with others until he has learned to be at peace with himself. ~ Bertrand Russell,
391:I FIND IT SO DIFFICULT NOT TO HATE, WHEN I DO NOT HATE I FEEL WE FEW ARE SO LONELY IN THE WORLD ~ Bertrand Russell,
392:If the West can claim superiority in anything, it is . . . in science and scientific technique. ~ Bertrand Russell,
393:Love should be a tree whose roots are deep in the earth, but whose branches extend into heaven. ~ Bertrand Russell,
394:well-known scientist (some say it was Bertrand Russell) once gave a public lecture on astronomy. ~ Stephen Hawking,
395:He forgets that to be without some of the things you want is an indispensable part of happiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
396:If we compare Europe with other continents, it is marked out as [another] persecuting continent. ~ Bertrand Russell,
397:My whole religion is this: do every duty, and expect no reward for it, either here or hereafter. ~ Bertrand Russell,
398:the world would be much happier, if men were as fully able to keep silence as they are to speak. ~ Bertrand Russell,
399:Among the Tibetans, one wife has many husbands, because men are too poor to support a whole wife. ~ Bertrand Russell,
400:A política é em grande parte dominada por estribilhos moralistas desprovidos de qualquer verdade. ~ Bertrand Russell,
401:a priori knowledge such as mathematics or logic is general, whereas all experience is particular. ~ Bertrand Russell,
402:I hate being all tidy like a book in a library where nobody reads – prison is horribly like that. ~ Bertrand Russell,
403:It is undesirable to believe a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true ~ Bertrand Russell,
404:Order, unity, and continuity are human inventions, just as truly as catalogues and encyclopedias. ~ Bertrand Russell,
405:Since Adam and Eve ate the apple, man has never refrained from any folly of which he was capable. ~ Bertrand Russell,
406:The essence of education is that it is a change effected in the organism to satisfy the operator. ~ Bertrand Russell,
407:The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution. ~ Bertrand Russell,
408:The most savage controversies are about matters as to which there is no good evidence either way. ~ Bertrand Russell,
409:The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. ~ Bertrand Russell,
410:... the whole world of loneliness, poverty, and pain make a mockery of what human life should be. ~ Bertrand Russell,
411:Undoubtedly the desire for food has been and still is one of the main causes of political events. ~ Bertrand Russell,
412:What is wanted is not the will to believe, but the will to find out, which is the exact opposite. ~ Bertrand Russell,
413:What is wanted is not the will to believe, but the wish to find out, which is its exact opposite. ~ Bertrand Russell,
414:What will be the good of the conquest of leisure and health, if no one remembers how to use them? ~ Bertrand Russell,
415:Without civic morality communities perish; without personal morality their survival has no value. ~ Bertrand Russell,
416:A generation educated in fearless freedom will have wider and bolder hopes than are possible to us ~ Bertrand Russell,
417:A priori Logical propositions are such as can be known a priori without study of the actual world. ~ Bertrand Russell,
418:Have no respect for the authority of others, for there are always contrary authorities to be found ~ Bertrand Russell,
419:How about Pithecanthropus Erectus? Was it really he who ate the apple? Or was it Homo Pekiniensis? ~ Bertrand Russell,
420:Laughter is the most inexpensive and most effective wonder drug. Laughter is a universal medicine. ~ Bertrand Russell,
421:Si nous n'avions pas peur de la mort , je ne crois pas que serait jamais née l'idée d'immortalité. ~ Bertrand Russell,
422:The demand for certainty is one which is natural to man, but is nevertheless an intellectual vice. ~ Bertrand Russell,
423:The finding of arguments for a conclusion given in advance is not philosophy, but special pleading ~ Bertrand Russell,
424:The . . . increase in the power of officials is a constant source of irritation to everybody else. ~ Bertrand Russell,
425:[There has been] every kind of cruelty practiced upon all sorts of people in the name of religion. ~ Bertrand Russell,
426:The Ten Commandments should be headed like an examination paper: No more than six to be attempted. ~ Bertrand Russell,
427:The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure, and the intelligent are full of doubt. ~ Bertrand Russell,
428:A million million years gives us some time to prepare for the end . . . let us make the best of it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
429:In a democracy it is necessary that people should learn to endure having their sentiments outraged. ~ Bertrand Russell,
430:In human relations one should penetrate to the core of loneliness in each person and speak to that. ~ Bertrand Russell,
431:Machines have altered our way of life, but not our instincts. Consequently, there is maladjustment. ~ Bertrand Russell,
432:No matter how eloquently a dog may bark, he cannot tell you that his parents were poor, but honest. ~ Bertrand Russell,
433:Philosophy, as I shall understand the word, is something intermediate between theology and science. ~ Bertrand Russell,
434:Religions which have any very strong hold over men's actions have generally some instinctive basis. ~ Bertrand Russell,
435:The faculty of being acquainted with things other than itself is the main characteristic of a mind. ~ Bertrand Russell,
436:All great books contain boring portions, and all great lives have contained uninteresting stretches. ~ Bertrand Russell,
437:Belief in a Divine mission is one of the many forms of certainty that have afflicted the human race. ~ Bertrand Russell,
438:In considering irregular appearances, there are certain very natural mistakes which must be avoided. ~ Bertrand Russell,
439:Italy, and the spring and first love all together should suffice to make the gloomiest person happy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
440:The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd. ~ Bertrand Russell,
441:The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
442:The search for something permanent is one of the deepest of the instincts leading men to philosophy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
443:The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
444:To understand the actual world as it is, not as we should wish it to be, is the beginning of wisdom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
445:A European who goes to New York and Chicago sees the future... when he goes to Asia he sees the past. ~ Bertrand Russell,
446:Bertrand Russell claimed that “at least half the sins of mankind” were caused by the fear of boredom. ~ Warren W Wiersbe,
447:Das Schlimme an dieser Welt ist, dass die Dummen todsicher und die Intelligenten voller Zweifel sind. ~ Bertrand Russell,
448:Fear is the parent of cruelty, and therefore it is no wonder if cruelty and religion go hand in hand. ~ Bertrand Russell,
449:The whole conception of 'sin' is one which I find very puzzling, doubtless owing to my sinful nature. ~ Bertrand Russell,
450:There are 2 motives for reading a book; 1. That you enjoy it, 2. that can boast about it on goodreads. ~ Bertrand Russell,
451:A marriage is likely to be called happy if neither party ever expected to get much happiness out of it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
452:As soon as we abandon our reason and are content to rely on authority, there is no end to our troubles. ~ Bertrand Russell,
453:Brief and powerless is Man's life; on him and all his race the slow, sure doom falls pitiless and dark. ~ Bertrand Russell,
454:Brief and powerless is man's life; on him and all his race the slow, sure doom falls pitiless and dark. ~ Bertrand Russell,
455:If a law were passed giving six months to every writer of a first book, only the good ones would do it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
456:If I were a medical man, I should prescribe a holiday to any patient who considered his work important. ~ Bertrand Russell,
457:It is obviously possible that what we call waking life may only be an unusual and persistent nightmare. ~ Bertrand Russell,
458:It must be admitted, however, that life in More's Utopia, as in most others, would be intolerably dull. ~ Bertrand Russell,
459:The most savage controversies are those about matters as to which there is no good evidence either way. ~ Bertrand Russell,
460:The search for something permanent is one of the deepest of the instincts leading men to philosophy.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
461:All serious innovation is only rendered possible by some accident enabling unpopular persons to survive. ~ Bertrand Russell,
462:Awareness of universals is called conceiving, and a universal of which we are aware is called a concept. ~ Bertrand Russell,
463:Beggars do not envy millionaires, though of course they will envy other beggars who are more successful. ~ Bertrand Russell,
464:Bertrand Russell would not have wished to be called a saint of any description; but he was a great and good man. ~ A J Ayer,
465:But in the ’nineties young men desired something more sweeping and passionate, more bold and less bland. ~ Bertrand Russell,
466:I think the essence of wisdom is emancipation, as far as possible, from the tyranny of the here and now. ~ Bertrand Russell,
467:The first step in wisdom, as well as in morality, is to open the windows of the ego as wide as possible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
468:According to Bertrand Russell, the virtuous stoic was one whose will was in agreement with the natural order. ~ Piper Kerman,
469:All that alcohol does for them is to liberate the sense of sin, which reason suppresses in saner moments. ~ Bertrand Russell,
470:All the time that he can spare from the adornment of his person, he devotes to the neglect of his duties. ~ Bertrand Russell,
471:Do not use power to suppress opinions you think pernicious, for if you do the opinions will suppress you. ~ Bertrand Russell,
472:Education ought to foster the wish for truth, not the conviction that some particular creed is the truth. ~ Bertrand Russell,
473:Human nature is so constructed that it gives affection most readily to those who seem least to demand it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
474:I am allowed to use plain English because everybody knows that I could use mathematical logic if I chose. ~ Bertrand Russell,
475:Man needs, for his happiness, not only the enjoyment of this or that, but hope and enterprise and change. ~ Bertrand Russell,
476:One of the chief triumphs of modern mathematics consists in having discovered what mathematics really is. ~ Bertrand Russell,
477:Real life is, to most men, a long second best, a perpetual compromise between the ideal and the possible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
478:Right conduct can never, except by some rare accident, be promoted by ignorance or hindered by knowledge. ~ Bertrand Russell,
479:The ideal of an “all-round” education is out of date; it has been destroyed by the progress of knowledge. ~ Bertrand Russell,
480:The mind is a strange machine which can combine the materials offered to it in the most astonishing ways. ~ Bertrand Russell,
481:The place of the father in the modern suburban family is a very small one, particularly if he plays golf. ~ Bertrand Russell,
482:There are two motives for reading a book: one, that you enjoy it; the other, that you can boast about it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
483:There are two motives for reading a book; one, that you enjoy it; the other, that you can boast about it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
484:The sentiments of an adult are compounded of a kernel of instinct surrounded by a vast husk of education. ~ Bertrand Russell,
485:When people begin to philosophize they seem to think it necessary to make themselves artificially stupid. ~ Bertrand Russell,
486:Any philosophy worth taking seriously would have to be built upon a firm foundation of unyielding despair. ~ Bertrand Russell,
487:Broadly speaking, we are in the middle of a race between human skill as a means and human folly as an end. ~ Bertrand Russell,
488:Neither the Church nor modern public opinion condemns petting, provided it stops short at a certain point. ~ Bertrand Russell,
489:Our great democracies still tend to think that a stupid man is more likely to be honest than a clever man. ~ Bertrand Russell,
490:The fact that a belief has a good moral effect upon a man is no evidence whatsoever in favor of its truth. ~ Bertrand Russell,
491:All serious innovation is only rendered possible by some accident
enabling unpopular persons to survive. ~ Bertrand Russell,
492:Ethics is in origin the art of recommending to others the sacrifices required for cooperation with oneself. ~ Bertrand Russell,
493:I do not myself feel that any person who is really profoundly humane can believe in everlasting punishment. ~ Bertrand Russell,
494:In all the creative work that I have done, what has come first is a problem, a puzzle involving discomfort. ~ Bertrand Russell,
495:It is only in marriage with the world that our ideals can bear fruit; divorced from it, they remain barren. ~ Bertrand Russell,
496:Language serves not only to express thought but to make possible thoughts which could not exist without it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
497:Religion may in most of its forms be defined as the belief that the gods are on the side of the government. ~ Bertrand Russell,
498:The sea, the stars, the night wind in waste places, mean more to me than even the human beings I love best. ~ Bertrand Russell,
499:While economics is about how people make choice, sociology is about how they don't have any choice to make. ~ Bertrand Russell,
500:A great many worries can be diminished by realizing the unimportance of the matter which is causing anxiety. ~ Bertrand Russell,
501:Boredom is... a vital problem for the moralist, since half the sins of mankind are caused by the fear of it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
502:Creieu-me, que és una recomanació feta de tot cor. Llegiu Bertrand Russell. No és un filòsof, és un desinfectant. ~ Joan Fuster,
503:Man needs, for his happiness, not merely the enjoyment of this or that, but hope, and enterprise and change. ~ Bertrand Russell,
504:marriage is likely to be what is called happy if niether party ever expected to get much happiness out of it ~ Bertrand Russell,
505:One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important. ~ Bertrand Russell,
506:One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one’s work is terribly important. ~ Bertrand Russell,
507:The infliction of cruelty with a good conscience is a delight to moralists - that is why they invented hell. ~ Bertrand Russell,
508:The next time anyone asks you "What is Bertrand Russell's philosophy?" the correct answer is "What year, please?" ~ Sidney Hook,
509:The secrets to happiness include enterprise, exploration of one's interests and the overcoming of obstacles. ~ Bertrand Russell,
510:For a good notation has a subtlety and suggestiveness which at times make it seem almost like a live teacher. ~ Bertrand Russell,
511:is clear that human knowledge must always be content to accept some terms as intelligible without definition, ~ Bertrand Russell,
512:It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly. ~ Bertrand Russell,
513:Love as a relation between men and women was ruined by the desire to make sure of the legitimacy of children. ~ Bertrand Russell,
514:[T]he infliction of cruelty with a good conscience is a delight to moralists. That is why they invented Hell. ~ Bertrand Russell,
515:The man who only loves beautiful things is dreaming, whereas the man who knows absolute beauty is wide awake. ~ Bertrand Russell,
516:The young, no doubt, make mistakes; but the old, when they try to think for them, make even greater mistakes. ~ Bertrand Russell,
517:When a man tells you he knows the exact truth about anything, you are safe in inferring he is an inexact man. ~ Bertrand Russell,
518:As soon as we abandon our own reason, and are content to rely upon authority, there is no end to our troubles. ~ Bertrand Russell,
519:Change is scientific; progress is ethical; change is indubitable, whereas progress is a matter of controversy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
520:Conquer the world by intelligence, and not merely by being slavishly subdued by the terror that comes from it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
521:I am myself a dissenter from all known religions, and I hope that every kind of religious belief will die out. ~ Bertrand Russell,
522:In spreading his ideas, Plato was willing to employ emotional appeals, state propaganda, and the use of force. ~ Bertrand Russell,
523:In this lies Man's true freedom: in determination to worship only the God created by our own love of the good. ~ Bertrand Russell,
524:It is because modern education is so seldom inspired by a great hope that it so seldom achieves great results. ~ Bertrand Russell,
525:The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. —Bertrand Russell ~ Eric Siegel,
526:When two things have frequently existed in close temporal contiguity, either comes in time to cause the other. ~ Bertrand Russell,
527:All's well that ends well; which is the epitaph I should put on my tombstone if I were the last man left alive. ~ Bertrand Russell,
528:A mind perpetually open, will be a mind perpetually vacant!
العقل المنفتح على الدوام هو عقل فارغ على الدوام! ~ Bertrand Russell,
529:Change is scientific, ‘progress’ is ethical. Change is indubitable whereas progress is a matter of controversy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
530:Curious learning not only makes unpleasant things less unpleasant but also makes pleasant things more pleasant. ~ Bertrand Russell,
531:Every proposition which we can understand must be composed wholly of constituents with which we are acquainted. ~ Bertrand Russell,
532:God and Satan alike are essentially human figures, the one a projection of ourselves, the other of our enemies. ~ Bertrand Russell,
533:No nation was ever so virtuous as each believes itself, and none was ever so wicked as each believes the other. ~ Bertrand Russell,
534:One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
535:This is one of those views which are so absolutely absurd that only very learned men could possibly adopt them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
536:But history is perhaps an even better antidote to anarchic individualism as well as to a lifeless traditionalism ~ Bertrand Russell,
537:Ethical metaphysics is fundamentally an attempt, however disguised, to give legislative force to our own wishes. ~ Bertrand Russell,
538:I can only say that, while my own opinions as to ethics do not satisfy me, other people's satisfy me still less. ~ Bertrand Russell,
539:It is clear that thought is not free if the profession of certain opinions makes it impossible to earn a living. ~ Bertrand Russell,
540:there is no such thing as matter at all, and that the world consists of nothing but minds and their ideas. Hylas ~ Bertrand Russell,
541:Uncomplicated joy and sorrow is not matter for philosophy, but rather for the simpler kinds of poetry and music. ~ Bertrand Russell,
542:We love those who hate our enemies, and if we had no enemies there would be very few people whom we should love. ~ Bertrand Russell,
543:Bertrand Russell’s words that “everything is vague to a degree you do not realize till you have tried to make it precise ~ Anonymous,
544:Boys and young men acquire readily the moral sentiments of their social milieu, whatever these sentiments may be. ~ Bertrand Russell,
545:Cruelty is, in theory, a perfectly adequate ground for divorce, but it may be interpreted so as to become absurd. ~ Bertrand Russell,
546:It is the preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly. ~ Bertrand Russell,
547:Nunca ha estado del todo claro si el secreto de la felicidad consiste en no ser completamente imbécil o en serlo. ~ Bertrand Russell,
548:Reverence for human personality is the beginning of wisdom, in every social question, but above all in education. ~ Bertrand Russell,
549:True happiness for human beings is possible only to those who develop their godlike potentialities to the utmost. ~ Bertrand Russell,
550:Why is propaganda so much more successful when it stirs up hatred than when it tries to stir up friendly feeling? ~ Bertrand Russell,
551:All knowledge, we feel, must be built up upon our instinctive beliefs; and if these are rejected, nothing is left. ~ Bertrand Russell,
552:All knowledge, we find, must be built up upon our instinctive beliefs, and if these are rejected, nothing is left. ~ Bertrand Russell,
553:It seems to be the fate of idealists to obtain what they have struggled for in a form which destroys their ideals. ~ Bertrand Russell,
554:Measures of sterilization should, in my opinion, be very definitely confined to persons who are mentally defective ~ Bertrand Russell,
555:Philosophy seems to me on the whole a rather hopeless business. ~ Bertrand Russell, in a letter to Gilbert Murray, December 28, 1902.,
556:The modern man thinks that everything ought to be done for the sake of something else, and never for its own sake. ~ Bertrand Russell,
557:The most essential characteristic of scientific technique is that it proceeds from experiment, not from tradition. ~ Bertrand Russell,
558:There are certain things that our age needs. It needs, above all, courageous hope and the impulse to creativeness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
559:There are infinite possibilities of error, and more cranks take up fashionable untruths than unfashionable truths. ~ Bertrand Russell,
560:There was, I think, never any reason to believe in any innate superiority of the male, except his superior muscle. ~ Bertrand Russell,
561:To discuss endlessly what silly people mean when they say silly things may be amusing but can hardly be important. ~ Bertrand Russell,
562:To like many people spontaneously and without effort is perhaps the greatest of all sources of personal happiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
563:Boys and girls should be taught respect for each other's liberty... and that jealousy and possessiveness kill love. ~ Bertrand Russell,
564:Our individual life is brief, and perhaps the whole life of mankind will be brief if measured in astronomical scale ~ Bertrand Russell,
565:The universe may have a purpose, but nothing we know suggests that, if so, this purpose has any similarity to ours. ~ Bertrand Russell,
566:We are condemned to kill time, thus we die bit by bit. - Octavio Paz The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time. ~ Bertrand Russell,
567:Zeno was concerned with three problems... These are the problem of the infinitesimal, the infinite, and continuity. ~ Bertrand Russell,
568:Be scrupulously truthful, even if the truth is inconvenient, for it is more inconvenient when you try to conceal it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
569:Both in thought and in feeling, even though time be real, to realise the unimportance of time is the gate of wisdom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
570:Both in thought and in feeling, even though time be real, to realize the unimportance of time is the gate of wisdom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
571:Modern American politicians have the same cowardice about denying an equally bloodthirsty even sillier god, Jehovah. ~ Bertrand Russell,
572:The Eugenic Society . . . is perpetually bewailing the fact that wage-earners breed faster than middle-class people. ~ Bertrand Russell,
573:The scientific attitude of mind involves a sweeping away of all other desires in the interest of the desire to know. ~ Bertrand Russell,
574:To save the world requires faith and courage: faith in reason, and courage to proclaim what reason shows to be true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
575:When the journey from means to end is not too long, the means themselves are enjoyed if the end is ardently desired. ~ Bertrand Russell,
576:A happy life must be to a great extent a quiet life, for it is only in an atmosphere of quiet that true joy can live. ~ Bertrand Russell,
577:Berkeley retains the merit of having shown that the existence of matter is capable of being denied without absurdity. ~ Bertrand Russell,
578:Every living thing is a sort of imperialist, seeking to transform as much as possible of its environment into itself. ~ Bertrand Russell,
579:He had a great intellectual influence upon my generation, though in retrospect I do not think it was a very good one. ~ Bertrand Russell,
580:I consider the official Catholic attitude on divorce, birth control, and censorship exceedingly dangerous to mankind. ~ Bertrand Russell,
581:It is a waste of energy to be angry with a man who behaves badly, just as it is to be angry with a car that won't go. ~ Bertrand Russell,
582:It is held that no woman can have a good moral influence unless she is or pretends to be indifferent to the male sex. ~ Bertrand Russell,
583:Moral progress has consisted in the main of protest against cruel customs, and of attempts to enlarge human sympathy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
584:Nine-tenths of the activities of a modern Government are harmful; therefore the worse they are performed, the better. ~ Bertrand Russell,
585:There is no nonsense so errant that it cannot be made the creed of the vast majority by adequate governmental action. ~ Bertrand Russell,
586:A happy life must be to a great extent a quiet life, for it is only in an atmosphere of quiet that true joy dare live. ~ Bertrand Russell,
587:Diversity is essential to happiness and in Utopia there is hardly any. This is a defect in all planned social systems. ~ Bertrand Russell,
588:Into every tidy scheme for arranging the pattern of human life, it is necessary to inject a certain dose of anarchism. ~ Bertrand Russell,
589:it is difficult to throw oneself into other people's petty concerns when one's own are very absorbing and interesting. ~ Bertrand Russell,
590:It is evident as a matter of logic that, since they (world religions) disagree, not more than one of them can be true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
591:Most human beings, though in varying degrees, desire to control, not only their own lives but also the lives of others ~ Bertrand Russell,
592:The fundamental cause of trouble in the world is that the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt. ~ Bertrand Russell,
593:To a modern mind, it is difficult to feel enthusiastic about a virtuous life if nothing is going to be achieved by it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
594:Upon hearing via Littlewood an exposition on the theory of relativity: To think I have spent my life on absolute muck. ~ Bertrand Russell,
595:When a man tells you that he knows the exact truth about anything you are safe in inferring that he is an inexact man. ~ Bertrand Russell,
596:Drunkeness is temporary suicide: the happiness that it brings is merely negative, a momentary cessation of unhappiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
597:Entre todas las formas de cautela, la
cautela en el amor es, posiblemente, la más letal para la auténtica felicidad. ~ Bertrand Russell,
598:Historically, it is quite doubtful whether Christ ever existed at all, and if He did we do not know anything about Him. ~ Bertrand Russell,
599:I am compelled to fear that science will be used to promote the power of dominant groups rather than to make men happy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
600:If the Church is not now as bad as the Soviet Government, that is due to the influence of those who attacked the Church ~ Bertrand Russell,
601:I have throughout been curious about how much we can be said to know and with what degree of certainty or doubtfulness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
602:In all affairs it's a healthy thing now and then to hang a question mark on the things you have long taken for granted. ~ Bertrand Russell,
603:It is not my prayer and humility that you cause things to go as you wish, but by acquiring a knowledge of natural laws. ~ Bertrand Russell,
604:It is only intellect that keeps me sane; perhaps this makes me overvalue intellect against feeling. Bertrand Russell. ~ Maloy Krishna Dhar,
605:One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one’s work is terribly important. BERTRAND RUSSELL ~ John Lloyd,
606:The Axiom of Choice is necessary to select a set from an infinite number of socks, but not an infinite number of shoes. ~ Bertrand Russell,
607:The best life is the one in which the creative impulses play the largest part and the possessive impulses the smallest. ~ Bertrand Russell,
608:The fundamental defect of fathers, in our competitive society, is that they want their children to be a credit to them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
609:Drunkenness is temporary suicide: the happiness that it brings is merely negative, a momentary cessation of unhappiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
610:Fundamental happiness depends more than anything else upon what may be called a friendly interest in persons and things. ~ Bertrand Russell,
611:Hegel's philosophy is so odd that one would not have expected him to be able to get some men to accept it, but he did." ~ Bertrand Russell,
612:In our age, mankind collectively has given itself over to a degree of hubris surpassing everything known in former ages. ~ Bertrand Russell,
613:It has been said that man is a rational animal. All my life I have been searching for evidence which could support this. ~ Bertrand Russell,
614:Love, children, and work, are the great sources of fertilizing contact between the individual and the rest of the world. ~ Bertrand Russell,
615:Mankind has become so much one family that we cannot insure our own prosperity except by insuring that of everyone else. ~ Bertrand Russell,
616:The best practical advice I can give to the present generation is to practice the virtue which the Christians call love. ~ Bertrand Russell,
617:The degree of one's emotions varies inversely with one's knowledge of the facts - the less you know the hotter you get. ~ Bertrand Russell,
618:The pursuit of knowledge is, I think, mainly actuated by love of power. And so are all advances in scientific technique. ~ Bertrand Russell,
619:The quarrel between Hume and Rousseau is symbolic: Rousseau was mad but influential; Hume was sane but had no followers. ~ Bertrand Russell,
620:There are two motives for reading a book; one, that you enjoy it; the other, that you can boast about it [on Goodreads]. ~ Bertrand Russell,
621:Drunkenness is temporary suicide: the happiness that it brings is merely negative, a momentary cessation of unhappiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
622:Görülmesi en kolay şey ne çok büyük, ne çok küçük, ne çok uzak ne çok yakın, ne çok karmaşık, ne ne de çok basit olandır. ~ Bertrand Russell,
623:Heretical views arise when the truth is uncertain, and it is only when the truth is uncertain that censorship is invoked. ~ Bertrand Russell,
624:In any closet, you can find it, if it is too small, or out of style, or there is just one of it where there should be two ~ Bertrand Russell,
625:It is not by delusion, however exalted, that mankind can prosper, but only by unswerving courage in the pursuit of truth. ~ Bertrand Russell,
626:One of the symptoms of approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one’s work is terribly important. —BERTRAND RUSSELL W ~ Ryan Holiday,
627:...only those who slavishly worship success can think that effectiveness is admirable without regard to what is effected. ~ Bertrand Russell,
628:Physics, owing to the simplicity of its subject matter, has reached a higher state of development than any other science. ~ Bertrand Russell,
629:The atomic bomb embodies the results of a combination genius and patience as remarkable as any in the history of mankind. ~ Bertrand Russell,
630:The teaching of Christ, as it appears in the Gospels, has had extraordinarily little to do with the ethics of Christians. ~ Bertrand Russell,
631:This has been my life. I have found it worth living, and would gladly live it again if the second chance were offered me. ~ Bertrand Russell,
632:This seems plainly absurd; but whoever wishes to become a philosopher must learn not to be frightened by absurdities. One ~ Bertrand Russell,
633:Those who advocate common usage in philosophy sometimes speak in a manner that suggests the mystique of the 'common man.' ~ Bertrand Russell,
634:Do not feel envious of the happiness of those who live in a fool's paradise, for only a fool will think that is happiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
635:Mankind is divided into two classes: those who, being artificial, praise nature, and those who, being natural, praise art. ~ Bertrand Russell,
636:Belief in God and a future life makes it possible to go through life with less of stoic courage than is needed by skeptics. ~ Bertrand Russell,
637:More important than the curriculum is the question of the methods of teaching and the spirit in which the teaching is given ~ Bertrand Russell,
638:No Carthaginian denied Moloch, because to do so would have required more courage that was required to face death in battle. ~ Bertrand Russell,
639:Public opinion is always more tyrannical towards those who obviously fear it than towards those who feel indifferent to it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
640:Science is what we know, and philosophy is what we don't know. ~ Bertrand Russell, Unpopular Essays (1950), Chapter II: Philosophy for Laymen.,
641:There is no difference between someone who eats too little and sees Heaven and someone who drinks too much and sees snakes. ~ Bertrand Russell,
642:While economics is about how people make choice, sociology is about how they don’t have any choice to make. Bertrand Russell ~ Pierre Bourdieu,
643:Boredom is therefore a vital problem for the moralist, since at least half the sins of mankind are caused by the fear of it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
644:Fear is the main source of superstition, and one of the main sources of cruelty. To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
645:Frege has the merit of ... finding a third assertion by recognising the world of logic which is neither mental nor physical. ~ Bertrand Russell,
646:Philosophy, from the earliest times, has made greater claims, and achieved fewer results, than any other branch of learning. ~ Bertrand Russell,
647:Religion may in most of its forms be defined as the belief that the gods are on the side of the Government. —Bertrand Russell ~ Graham E Fuller,
648:The essence of the conception of righteousness, therefore, is to afford an outlet for sadism by cloaking cruelty as justice. ~ Bertrand Russell,
649:The fundamental cause of trouble in the world today is that the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt. ~ Bertrand Russell,
650:The fundamental concept in social science is Power, in the same sense in which Energy is the fundamental concept in physics. ~ Bertrand Russell,
651:The method of "postulating" what we want has many advantages; they are the same as the advantages of theft over honest toil. ~ Bertrand Russell,
652:Where envy is unavoidable it must be used as a stimulus to one’s own efforts, not to the thwarting of the efforts of rivals. ~ Bertrand Russell,
653:Admiration of the proletariat, like that of dams, power stations, and aeroplanes, is part of the ideology of the machine age. ~ Bertrand Russell,
654:As for earthquakes, though they were still formidable, they were so interesting that men of science could hardly regret them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
655:Casual experience of life is of very little use to a specialist, such as I aspire to be; good manners are absolutely useless. ~ Bertrand Russell,
656:Do not feel envious of the happiness of those who live in a fool’s paradise, for only a fool will think that it is happiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
657:Epicurus, Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, Plato, Michel de Montaigne, Arthur Schopenhauer, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Bertrand Russell. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
658:It was the duty of wives to submit to husbands, not of husbands to submit to wives. . . men have stronger muscles than women. ~ Bertrand Russell,
659:Neither a man nor a crowd nor a nation can be trusted to act humanely or to think sanely under the influence of a great fear. ~ Bertrand Russell,
660:Perhaps the best hope for the future of mankind is that ways will be found of increasing the scope and intensity of sympathy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
661:The method of 'postulating' what we want has many advantages ; they are the same as the advantages of theft over honest toil. ~ Bertrand Russell,
662:We know too much and feel too little. At least, we feel too little of those creative emotions from which a good life springs. ~ Bertrand Russell,
663:If one lived for ever the joys of life would inevitably in the end lose their savour. As it is, they remain perennially fresh. ~ Bertrand Russell,
664:It is curious that Mill makes very little mention of the police as a danger to liberty. In our day they are its worst enemy... ~ Bertrand Russell,
665:Man is not a solitary animal, and so long as social Life survives, self-realization cannot be the supreme principle of ethics. ~ Bertrand Russell,
666:One of the most painful circumstances of recent advances in science is that each one makes us know less than we thought we did ~ Bertrand Russell,
667:Galileo and Kepler had "dangerous thoughts" (as they are called in Japan), and so have the most intelligent men of our own day. ~ Bertrand Russell,
668:Mathematics is, I believe, the chief source of the belief in eternal and exact truth, as well as a sensible intelligible world. ~ Bertrand Russell,
669:Suppose atomic bombs had reduced the population of the world to one brother and sister; should they let the human race die out? ~ Bertrand Russell,
670:This, however, is a passing nightmare; in time the earth will become again incapable of supporting life, and peace will return. ~ Bertrand Russell,
671:When I was a child . . . Only virtue was prized, virtue at the expense of intellect, health, happiness, and every mundane good. ~ Bertrand Russell,
672:For over two thousand years it has been the custom among earnest moralists to decry happiness as something degraded and unworthy ~ Bertrand Russell,
673:Machines deprive us of two things which are certainly important ingredients of human happiness, namely, spontaneity and variety. ~ Bertrand Russell,
674:Neither a man nor a crowd nor a nation can be trusted to act humanely or to think sanely under the influence of a great fear.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
675:There seems scarcely any limit to what could be done in the way of producing a good world, if only men would use science wisely. ~ Bertrand Russell,
676:The white tails of rabbits, according to some theologians, have a purpose, namely to make it easier for sportsmen to shoot them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
677:The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so sure of themselves and wiser people so full of doubts. ~ Bertrand Russell,
678:To put it simply, we first explain what we are talking about, and then explain why what we are saying is true (pace Bertrand Russell). ~ IU I Manin,
679:Wealth can often purchase not only the semblance of love but its reality. This is unjust and undesirable but nonetheless a fact. ~ Bertrand Russell,
680:When admitting that nothing is certain, one must also, I think, admit that some things are much more nearly certain than others. ~ Bertrand Russell,
681:When one admits that nothing is certain one must, I think, also admit that some things are much more nearly certain than others. ~ Bertrand Russell,
682:A man of Seville is shaved by the Barber of Seville if and only if the man does not shave himself. Does the barber shave himself? ~ Bertrand Russell,
683:As the philosopher Bertrand Russell once said, “In the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt. ~ David McRaney,
684:Collective fear stimulates herd instinct, and tends to produce ferocity toward those who are not regarded as members of the herd. ~ Bertrand Russell,
685:Contempt for happiness is usually contempt for other people's happiness, and is an elegant disguise for hatred of the human race. ~ Bertrand Russell,
686:Contempt for happiness is usually contempt for other people’s happiness, and is an elegant disguise for hatred of the human race. ~ Bertrand Russell,
687:Every man, wherever he goes, is encompassed by a cloud of comforting convictions, which move with him like flies on a summer day. ~ Bertrand Russell,
688:[F]or all refutation must begin with some piece of knowledge which the disputants share; from blank doubt, no argument can begin. ~ Bertrand Russell,
689:If everything has a cause, then God must have a cause. If there can be anything without a cause, it may just be the world as God. ~ Bertrand Russell,
690:If the State does not acquire supremacy over [vast private] enterprises, it becomes their puppet, and they become the real State. ~ Bertrand Russell,
691:It is in the moments when the mind is most active and the fewest things are forgotten that the most intense joys are experienced. ~ Bertrand Russell,
692:It is likely that America will be more important during the next century or two, but after that it may well be the turn of China. ~ Bertrand Russell,
693:Liberation from the tyranny of the body contributes to greatness, but just as much to greatness in sin as to greatness in virtue. ~ Bertrand Russell,
694:The fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt. ~ Bertrand Russell,
695:The pursuit of social success, in the form of prestige or power or both, is the most important obstacle in a competitive society. ~ Bertrand Russell,
696:The satisfaction to be derived from success in a great constructive enterprise is one of the most massive that life has to offer. ~ Bertrand Russell,
697:All our knowledge, both knowledge of things and knowledge of truths, rests upon acquaintance (connaitre, kennen) as its foundation ~ Bertrand Russell,
698:Christ . . . said that a man who had looked after a woman lustfully had sinned as much as the man who had seduced her. How absurd! ~ Bertrand Russell,
699:Education is not to be viewed as something like filling a vessel with water but, rather, assisting a flower to grow in its own way ~ Bertrand Russell,
700:Having knowledge of an unethical act and allowing it to continue can spread a contagion that can affect multiple beings in society ~ Bertrand Russell,
701:Knowledge exists, and good will exists; but both remain impotent until they possess the proper organs for making themselves heard. ~ Bertrand Russell,
702:Perhaps the greatest importance of the family, in these days of contraceptives, is that it preserves the habit of having children. ~ Bertrand Russell,
703:Religion and Science are two aspects of social life, of which the former has been important as far back as we know anything of man ~ Bertrand Russell,
704:We need a morality based upon love of life, upon pleasure in growth and positive achievement, not upon repression and prohibition. ~ Bertrand Russell,
705:If everything has a cause, then God must have a cause. If there can be anything without a cause, it may just be the world as God... ~ Bertrand Russell,
706:Mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
707:To choose one sock from each of infinitely many pairs of socks requires the Axiom of Choice, but for shoes the Axiom is not needed. ~ Bertrand Russell,
708:We are faced with the paradoxical fact that education has become one of the chief obstacles to intelligence and freedom of thought. ~ Bertrand Russell,
709:We have two kinds of morality side by side: one which we preach but do not practice and another which we practice but seldom preach ~ Bertrand Russell,
710:A dog cannot relate his autobiography; however, eloquently he may bark, he cannot tell you that his parents were honest though poor. ~ Bertrand Russell,
711:Every housemaid expects at least once a week as much excitement as would have lasted a Jane Austen heroine throughout a whole novel. ~ Bertrand Russell,
712:It is in the moments when the mind is most active and the fewest things are forgotten that the most intense joys are experienced.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
713:No sientas envidia de la felicidad de los que viven en el paraíso de los necios, pues sólo un necio pensará que eso es la felicidad. ~ Bertrand Russell,
714:Persecution is used in theology, not in arithmetic, because in arithmetic there is knowledge, but in theology there is only opinion. ~ Bertrand Russell,
715:There was a law in Connecticut - I believe it is still formally unrepealed - making it illegal for a man to kiss his wife on Sunday. ~ Bertrand Russell,
716:The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts. ~ Bertrand Russell,
717:The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts. ~ Bertrand Russell,
718:Americans need rest, but do not know it. I believe this to be a large part of the explanation of the crime wave in the United States. ~ Bertrand Russell,
719:Calculating machines do sums better than even the cleverest people… As arithmetic has grown easier, it has come to be less respected. ~ Bertrand Russell,
720:I never found that love, either when it prospered or when it did not, interfered in the slightest with my intellectual concentration. ~ Bertrand Russell,
721:Man is a credulous animal, and must believe something; in the absence of good grounds for belief, he will be satisfied with bad ones. ~ Bertrand Russell,
722:Mathematics takes us into the region of absolute necessity, to which not only the actual word, but every possible word, must conform. ~ Bertrand Russell,
723:Mysticism is, in essence, little more than a certain intensity and depth of feeling in regard to what is believed about the universe. ~ Bertrand Russell,
724:This idea of weapons of mass extermination is utterly horrible and is something which no one with one spark of humanity can tolerate. ~ Bertrand Russell,
725:This illustrates an important truth, namely, that the worse your logic, the more interesting the consequences to which it gives rise. ~ Bertrand Russell,
726:To be able to fill leisure intelligently is the last product of civilization, and at present very few people have reached this level. ~ Bertrand Russell,
727:Christianity offers reasons for not fearing death or the universe, and in so doing it fails to teach adequately the virtue of courage. ~ Bertrand Russell,
728:En aşağı tasarılarımız ve yoksulluğumuz kadar,çirkinlikte, bizim özel girişim kârına köle olmak için ödediğimiz fiyatın bir bölümüdür. ~ Bertrand Russell,
729:In mass cruelty, the expulsions of Germans ordered by the Russians fall not very far short of the atrocities perpetrated by the Nazis. ~ Bertrand Russell,
730:it is here that Spinoza is in the right—a life dominated by a single passion is a narrow life, incompatible with every kind of wisdom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
731:I've always thought respectable people scoundrels, and I look anxiously at my face every morning for signs of my becoming a scoundrel. ~ Bertrand Russell,
732:Men would be chosen for jobs on account of fitness to do the work, not because they flattered the irrational dogmas of those in power. ~ Bertrand Russell,
733:The British philosopher Bertrand Russell said that philosophy went downhill after Democritus and did not recover until the Renaissance. ~ Leon M Lederman,
734:The discipline in your life should be one determined by your own desires and your own needs, not put upon you by society or authority. ~ Bertrand Russell,
735:When people begin to philosophize they seem to think it necessary to make themselves artificially stupid. ~ Bertrand Russell, Theory of Knowledge (1913).,
736:If all our happiness is bound up entirely in our personal circumstances it is difficult not to demand of life more than it has to give. ~ Bertrand Russell,
737:If one man offers you democracy and another offers you a bag of grain, at what stage of starvation do you prefer the grain to the vote? ~ Bertrand Russell,
738:If we were all given by magic the power to read each other's thoughts, I suppose the first effect would be to dissolve all friendships. ~ Bertrand Russell,
739:My own view on religion is that of Lucretius. I regard it as a disease born of fear and as a source of untold misery to the human race. ~ Bertrand Russell,
740:The reformative effect of punishment is a belief that dies hard, chiefly I think, because it is so satisfying to our sadistic impulses. ~ Bertrand Russell,
741:El autor anónimo de estos versos no buscaba una solución para el ateísmo, ni la clave del universo; estaba simplemente pasándoselo bien. ~ Bertrand Russell,
742:My advice to anyone who wishes to write is to know all the very best literature by heart, and ignore the rest as completely as possible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
743:One of the main causes of trouble in the world is dogmatic and fanatical belief in some doctrine for which there is no adequate evidence ~ Bertrand Russell,
744:The desire for legitimate offspring is, in fact, according to the Catholic Church, the only motive which can justify sexual intercourse. ~ Bertrand Russell,
745:Thus mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
746:Grammar and ordinary language are bad guides to metaphysics. A great book might be written showing the influence of syntax on philosophy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
747:One eminently orthodox Catholic divine laid it down that a confessor may fondle a nun's breasts, provided he does it without evil intent. ~ Bertrand Russell,
748:Prudence versus passion is a conflict that runs through history. It is not a conflict in which we ought to side wholly with either party. ~ Bertrand Russell,
749:Religion is something left over from the infancy of our intelligence, it will fade away as we adopt reason and science as our guidelines. ~ Bertrand Russell,
750:There is something feeble and a little contemptible about a man who cannot face the perils of life without the help of comfortable myths. ~ Bertrand Russell,
751:Truth is for the gods; from our human point of view, it is an ideal, towards which we can approximate, but which we cannot hope to reach. ~ Bertrand Russell,
752:Unless a man has been taught what to do with success after getting it, the achievement of it must inevitably leave him a prey to boredom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
753:Who ever heard a theologian preface his creed, or a politician conclude his speech with an estimate of the probable error of his opinion? ~ Bertrand Russell,
754:In general, I find that things that have happened to me out of doors have made a deeper impression than things that have happened indoors. ~ Bertrand Russell,
755:Many orthodox people speak as though it were the business of sceptics to disprove received dogmas rather than of dogmatists to prove them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
756:The lunatic who thinks he is a crowned head may be, in a sense, happy, but his happiness is not of a kind that any sane person would envy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
757:The qualities most needed are charity and tolerance, not some form of fanatical faith such as is offered to us by the various rampant isms ~ Bertrand Russell,
758:The twin conceptions of sin and vindictive punishment seem to be at the root of much that is most vigorous, both in religion and politics. ~ Bertrand Russell,
759:When I was 4 years old ... I dreamt that I'd been eaten by a wolf, and to my great surprise I was in the wolf's stomach and not in heaven. ~ Bertrand Russell,
760:A sense of duty is useful in work but offensive in personal relations. People wish to be liked, not to be endured with patient resignation. ~ Bertrand Russell,
761:In our complex world, there cannot be fruitful initiative without government, but unfortunately there can be government without initiative. ~ Bertrand Russell,
762:We have almost reached the point where praise of rationality is held to mark a man as an old fogey regrettably surviving from a bygone age. ~ Bertrand Russell,
763:Human nature is still, to a very great extent, regarded irrationally because it is pleasant to regard people as objects of praise and blame. ~ Bertrand Russell,
764:It is only through imagination that men become aware of what the world might be; without it, ‘progress’ would become mechanical and trivial. ~ Bertrand Russell,
765:Modesty... consists in pretending not to think better of ourselves and our belongings than of the man we are speaking to and his belongings. ~ Bertrand Russell,
766:Of all evils of war the greatest is the purely spiritual evil: the hatred, the injustice, the repudiation of truth, the artificial conflict. ~ Bertrand Russell,
767:The more we realize our minuteness and our impotence in the face of cosmic forces, the more amazing becomes what human beings have achieved. ~ Bertrand Russell,
768:The objection to propaganda is not only its appeal to unreason, but still more the unfair advantage which it gives to the rich and powerful. ~ Bertrand Russell,
769:All that passes for knowledge can be arranged in a hierarchy of degrees of certainty, with arithmetic and the facts of perception at the top. ~ Bertrand Russell,
770:And if there were a God, I think it very unlikely that He would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence ~ Bertrand Russell,
771:Aristotle is the last Greek philosopher who faces the world cheerfully; after him, all have, in one form or another, a philosophy of retreat. ~ Bertrand Russell,
772:Bertrand Russell started off as a mathematician and then degenerated into a philosopher and finally into a humanist; he went downhill rapidly! ~ Gregory Chaitin,
773:Conventional people are roused to fury by departure from convention, largely because they regard such departure as a criticism of themselves. ~ Bertrand Russell,
774:I cannot escape from the conclusion that the great ages of progress have depended upon a small number of individuals of transcendent ability. ~ Bertrand Russell,
775:Love cannot exists as a duty; to tell a child that it ought to love its parents and its brother and sisters is utterly useless, if not worse. ~ Bertrand Russell,
776:One is often told that it is a very wrong thing to attack religion, because religion makes men virtuous. So I am told; I have not noticed it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
777:only a foolish asceticism, usually vicarious, makes us continue to insist on work in excessive quantities now that the need no longer exists. ~ Bertrand Russell,
778:The supreme maxim in scientific philosophising is this: wherever possible, logical constructions are to be substituted for inferred entities. ~ Bertrand Russell,
779:After five years spent in retirement, he died of a chill caught while experimenting on refrigeration by stuffing a chicken full of snow. Bacon ~ Bertrand Russell,
780:for if once you have become filled with hate you will not easily derive from construction the pleasure which another man would derive from it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
781:Nothing can penetrate the loneliness of the human heart except the highest intensity of the sort of love the religious teachers have preached. ~ Bertrand Russell,
782:Science has made unrestricted national sovereignty incompatible with human survival. The only possibilities are now world government or death. ~ Bertrand Russell,
783:That the world is in a bad shape is undeniable, but there is not the faintest reason in history to suppose that Christianity offers a way out. ~ Bertrand Russell,
784:The atomists , unlike Socrates , Plato , and Aristotle , sought to explain the world without introducing the notion of purpose or final cause. ~ Bertrand Russell,
785:The coward wretch whose hand and heart Can bear to torture aught below, Is ever first to quail and start From the slightest pain or equal foe. ~ Bertrand Russell,
786:The pursuit of social success, in the form of prestige or power or both, is the most important obstacle to happiness in a competitive society. ~ Bertrand Russell,
787:Todo homem, aonde quer que vá, está envolto por uma nuvem de convicções confortadoras, que se deslocam com ele como moscas em um dia de verão. ~ Bertrand Russell,
788:3 is prime, 5 is prime, 7 is prime, 9 is a paradox; as is a paradox why the number 1 is not prime if it has no other divisors besides himself. ~ Bertrand Russell,
789:A philosopher who uses his professional competence for anything other except a disinterested search for truth is guilty of a kind of treachery. ~ Bertrand Russell,
790:I resolved from the beginning of my quest that I would not be misled by sentiment and desire into beliefs for which there was no good evidence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
791:The objection to propaganda is not only its appeal to unreason, but still more the unfair advantage which it gives to the rich and powerful.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
792:There Self must die; there the eagerness, the greed of untamed desire must be slain, for only so can the soul be freed from the empire of Fate. ~ Bertrand Russell,
793:And if there were a God, I think it very unlikely that He would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
794:I do not think that the real reason why people accept religion has anything to do with argumentation. They accept religion on emotional grounds. ~ Bertrand Russell,
795:I remain convinced that obstinate addiction to ordinary language in our private thoughts is one of the main obstacles to progress in philosophy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
796:I went to Salt Lake City and the Mormons tried to convert me, but when I found they forbade tea and tobacco I thought it was no religion for me. ~ Bertrand Russell,
797:Not all superstitions are dark and cruel. I once received a communication from the god Osiris. He was living at that time in a suburb of Boston. ~ Bertrand Russell,
798:The first effect of emancipation from the Church was not to make men think rationally, but to open their minds to every sort of antique nonsense ~ Bertrand Russell,
799:To expect a personality to survive the disintegration of the brain is like expecting a cricket club to survive when all of its members are dead. ~ Bertrand Russell,
800:Um homem sábio desfrutará os bens que há em abundância, e de lixo intelectual encontrará abundante dieta, no nosso tempo como em qualquer outro. ~ Bertrand Russell,
801:Fanaticism is the danger of the world, and always has been, and has done untold harm. I might almost say that I was fanatical against fanaticism. ~ Bertrand Russell,
802:Most political leaders acquire their position by causing large numbers of people to believe that these leaders are actuated by altruistic desires ~ Bertrand Russell,
803:Of all the studies by which men acquire citizenship of the intellectual commonwealth, no single one is so indispensable as the study of the past. ~ Bertrand Russell,
804:There is equality where all are slaves, as well as where all are free. This shows that equality, by itself, is not enough to make a good society. ~ Bertrand Russell,
805:The Stoic assures us that what is happening now will happen over and over again. [If so, Providende would] ultimately grow weary through despair. ~ Bertrand Russell,
806:The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts. BERTRAND RUSSELL ~ Guy Kawasaki,
807:Those who defend traditional morality will sometimes admit that it is not perfect, but contend that any criticism will make all morality crumble. ~ Bertrand Russell,
808:Those who have never known the deep intimacy and the intense companionship of happy mutual love have missed the best thing that life has to give. ~ Bertrand Russell,
809:To preserve hope in our world makes calls upon our intelligence and our energy. In those who despair it is frequently the energy that is lacking. ~ Bertrand Russell,
810:We have in fact, two kinds of morality, side by side: one which we preach, but do not practice, and another which we practice, but seldom preach. ~ Bertrand Russell,
811:When we perceive any object of a familiar kind, much of what appears subjectively to be immediately given is really derived from past experience. ~ Bertrand Russell,
812:A life without adventure is likely to be unsatisfying, but a life in which adventure is allowed to take whatever form it will is sure to be short. ~ Bertrand Russell,
813:Clergymen almost necessarily fail in two ways as teachers of morals. They condemn acts which do no harm and they condone acts which do great harm. ~ Bertrand Russell,
814:For the learning of every virtue there is an appropriate discipline, and for the learning of suspended judgment the best discipline is philosophy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
815:I did not know I loved you until I heard myself telling so, for one instance I thought, "Good God, what have I said?" and then I knew it was true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
816:If a Black Death could be spread throughout the world once in every generation survivors could procreate freely without making the world too full. ~ Bertrand Russell,
817:„Marea problemă cu lumea este că proștii și fanaticii sunt întotdeauna foarte siguri pe ei, în timp ce oamenii mai înțelepți, sunt plini de dubii. ~ Bertrand Russell,
818:Morally, a philosopher who uses his professional competence for anything except a disinterested search for truth is guilty of a kind of treachery. ~ Bertrand Russell,
819:One of the troubles about vanity is that it grows with what it feeds on. The more you are talked about, the more you will wish to be talked about. ~ Bertrand Russell,
820:seems that men are at their best between sixty and seventy, the reason being that in such occupations a wide experience of other men is essential. ~ Bertrand Russell,
821:The fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt.”—Bertrand Russell ~ Timothy Ferriss,
822:The good life is one inspired by love and guided by knowledge. Neither love without knowledge, nor knowledge without love can produce a good life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
823:The newspapers at one time said that I was dead but after carefully examining the evidence I came to the conclusion that this statement was false. ~ Bertrand Russell,
824:The object of education ought not to be to make all men think alike, but to make each think in the way which is the fullest expression of his own. ~ Bertrand Russell,
825:Envy ... is one form of a vice, partly moral, partly intellectual, which consists in seeing things never in themselves but only in their relations. ~ Bertrand Russell,
826:In Labor movements generally, success through violence can hardly be expected except in circumstances where success without violence is attainable. ~ Bertrand Russell,
827:I think I shall have to avoid growing intimate with people I don't respect, or trying to help them: it seems to be a job for which I am not fitted. ~ Bertrand Russell,
828:It is permissible with certain precautions to speak in print of coitus, but it is not permissible to employ the monosyllabic synonym for this word. ~ Bertrand Russell,
829:We know very little, and yet it is astonishing that we know so much, and still more astonishing that so little knowledge can give us so much power. ~ Bertrand Russell,
830:When we have told how things behave when they are electrified, and under what circumstances they are electrified, we have told all there is to know ~ Bertrand Russell,
831:Continuity of purpose is one of the most essential ingredients of happiness in the long run, and for most men that comes chiefly through their work. ~ Bertrand Russell,
832:Fear is the main source of superstition, and one of the main sources of cruelty. To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom.

Bertrand Russell ~ Bertrand Russell,
833:Humanistic ethics is based on the principle that only humans themselves can determine the criterion for virtue and not an authority transcending us. ~ Bertrand Russell,
834:Law in origin was merely a codification of the power of dominant groups, and did not aim at anything that to a modern man would appear to be justice ~ Bertrand Russell,
835:Most of the greatest evils that man has inflicted upon man have come through people feeling quite certain about something which, in fact, was false. ~ Bertrand Russell,
836:Science, by itself, cannot supply us with an ethic. It can show us how to achieve a given end, and it may show us that some ends cannot be achieved. ~ Bertrand Russell,
837:The dictum that human nature cannot be changed is one of those tiresome platitudes that conceal from the ignorant the depths of their own ignorance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
838:The human heart as modern civilization has made it is more prone to hatred than to friendship. And it is prone to hatred because it is dissatisfied. ~ Bertrand Russell,
839:Thomas Aquinas states parenthetically, as something entirely obvious, that men are more rational than women. For my part, I see no evidence of this. ~ Bertrand Russell,
840:We are uttering a mere tautology if we mean by ‘in the mind’ the same as by ‘before the mind’, i.e. if we mean merely being apprehended by the mind. ~ Bertrand Russell,
841:What you say about changing one's self denial is only too true and terrible - it went to my heart - one does form a habit, and then it is no bother. ~ Bertrand Russell,
842:A man's acts are partly determined by spontaneous impulse, partly by the conscious and unconscious effects of the various groups to which he belongs. ~ Bertrand Russell,
843:Emphatic and reiterated assertion, especially during childhood, produces in most people a belief so firm as to have a hold even over the unconscious. ~ Bertrand Russell,
844:Freedom comes only to those who no longer ask of life that it shall yield them any of those personal goods that are subject to the mutations of time. ~ Bertrand Russell,
845:I believe four ingredients are necessary for happiness: health, warm personal relations, sufficient means to keep you from want, and successful work. ~ Bertrand Russell,
846:I do not like mystical language, and yet I hardly know how to express what I mean without employing phrases that sound poetic rather than scientific. ~ Bertrand Russell,
847:If an opinion contrary to your own makes you angry, that is a sign that you are subconsciously aware of having no good reason for thinking as you do. ~ Bertrand Russell,
848:If I were granted omnipotence, and millions of years to experiment in, I should not think Man much to boast of as the final result of all my efforts. ~ Bertrand Russell,
849:It is in the nature of imperialism that citizens of the imperial power are always among the last to know-or care-about circumstances in the colonies. ~ Bertrand Russell,
850:I wish to understand [Plato], but to treat him with as little reverence as if he were a contemporary English or American advocate of totalitarianism. ~ Bertrand Russell,
851:Much of the most important evils that mankind have to consider are those which they inflict upon each other through stupidity or malevolence or both. ~ Bertrand Russell,
852:Religions, which condemn the pleasures of sense, drive men to seek the pleasures of power. Throughout history power has been the vice of the ascetic. ~ Bertrand Russell,
853:The circumstances of men's lives do much to determine their philosophy, but, conversely, their philosophy does much to determine their circumstances. ~ Bertrand Russell,
854:There is little of the true philosophic spirit in Aquinas. He does not, like the Platonic Socrates, set out to follow wherever the argument may lead. ~ Bertrand Russell,
855:You may reasonably expect a man to walk a tightrope safely for ten minutes; it would be unreasonable to do so without accident for two hundred years. ~ Bertrand Russell,
856:Reason may be a small force, but it is constant, and works always in one direction, while the forces of unreason destroy one another in futile strife. ~ Bertrand Russell,
857:Uncertainty in the pressure of vivid hopes and fears is painful, but must be endured if we wish to live without the support of comforting fairy tales. ~ Bertrand Russell,
858:Unhappy business men, I am convinced, would increase their happiness more by walking six miles every day than by any conceivable change of philosophy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
859:We know very little, and yet it is astonishing that we know so much, and still more astonishing that so little knowledge can give us so much power.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
860:When the state intervenes to insure the indoctrination of some doctrine, it does so because there is no conclusive evidence in favor of that doctrine. ~ Bertrand Russell,
861:Whether science-and indeed civilization in general-can long survive depends upon psychology, that is to say, it depends upon what human beings desire. ~ Bertrand Russell,
862:A bad teacher will will aim at imposing his opinion, and turning out a set of pupils all of whom will give the same definite answer on a doubtful point ~ Bertrand Russell,
863:His most important books are his two Logics, and these must be understood if the reasons for his views on other subjects are to be rightly apprehended. ~ Bertrand Russell,
864:[I] browsed far outside science in my reading and attended public lectures - Bertrand Russell, H. G. Wells, Huxley, and Shaw being my favorite speakers. ~ Raymond Cattell,
865:If wars are eliminated and production is organized scientifically, it is probable that four hours' work a day will suffice to keep everybody in comfort ~ Bertrand Russell,
866:In adolescence, I hated life and was continually on the verge of suicide, from which, however, I was restrained by the desire to know more mathematics. ~ Bertrand Russell,
867:It is impossible to read in America, except on a train, because of the telephone. Everyone has a telephone, and it rings all day and most of the night. ~ Bertrand Russell,
868:Obscenity’ is not a term capable of exact legal definition; in the practice of the Courts, it means ‘anything that shocks the magistrate’. BERTRAND RUSSELL ~ A C Grayling,
869:The only cure [for envy] in the case of ordinary men and women is happiness, and the difficulty is that envy is itself a terrible obstacle to happiness ~ Bertrand Russell,
870:And a society composed of men and women who do not bow too much to the conventions is a far more interesting society than one in which all behave alike. ~ Bertrand Russell,
871:I do not like mystical language, and yet I hardly know how to express what I mean without employing phrases that sound poetic rather than scientific.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
872:The solution of the difficulties which formerly surrounded the mathematical infinite is probably the greatest achievement of which our age has to boast. ~ Bertrand Russell,
873:Tobacco . . . is not prohibited in the Scriptures, though, as Samuel Butler points out, St. Paul would no doubt have denounced it if he had known of it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
874:Uncertainty, in the presence of vivid hopes and fears, is painful, but must be endured if we wish to live without the support of comforting fairy tales. ~ Bertrand Russell,
875:As a lover of truth, the national propaganda of all the belligerent nations sickened me. As a lover of civilization, the return to barbarism appalled me. ~ Bertrand Russell,
876:I am in no degree ashamed of having changed my opinions. What physicist who was actice in 1900 would dream of boasting that his opinions had not changed? ~ Bertrand Russell,
877:I am in no degree ashamed of having changed my opinions. What physicist who was active in 1900 would dream of boasting that his opinions had not changed? ~ Bertrand Russell,
878:I suppose the advocates of unreason think that there is a better chance of profitably deceiving the populace if they keep it in a state of effervescence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
879:Life seems to me essentially passion, conflict, rage. It is only intellect that keeps me sane; perhaps this makes me overvalue intellect against feeling. ~ Bertrand Russell,
880:Naive realism leads to physics, and physics, if true, shows naive realism to be false. Therefore naive realism, if true, is false; therefore it is false. ~ Bertrand Russell,
881:One of the chief obstacles to intelligence is credulity, and credulity could be enormously diminished by instruction in the prevalent forms of mendacity. ~ Bertrand Russell,
882:Some things are believed because people feel as if they must be true, and in such cases an immense weight of evi­dence is necessary to dispel the belief. ~ Bertrand Russell,
883:The observer, when he seems to himself to be observing a stone, is really, if physics is to be believed, observing the effects of the stone upon himself. ~ Bertrand Russell,
884:The problem of finding a collection of “wise” men and leaving the government to them is thus an insoluble one. That is the ultimate reason for democracy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
885:Two people between whom there is love succeed or fail together, but when two people hate each other the success of either is the failure of the other. If ~ Bertrand Russell,
886:Uno de los aspectos más dolorosos de nuestros tiempos es que los estúpidos están muy seguros de sí mismos mientras los inteligentes están llenos de dudas ~ Bertrand Russell,
887:Women cannot enjoy a tolerable position in society where it is considered of the utmost importance that they should not infringe a very rigid moral code. ~ Bertrand Russell,
888:Aristotle and Plato considered Greeks so innately superior to barbarians that slavery is justified so long as the master is Greek and the slave barbarian. ~ Bertrand Russell,
889:A stupid man's report of what a clever man says can never be accurate, because he unconsciously translates what he hears into something he can understand. ~ Bertrand Russell,
890:Calculus required continuity, and continuity was supposed to require the infinitely little; but nobody could discover what the infinitely little might be. ~ Bertrand Russell,
891:Envy, in fact, is one form of a vice, partly moral, partly intellectual, which consists in seeing things never in themselves, but only in their relations. ~ Bertrand Russell,
892:Having made the decision, do not revise it unless some new fact comes to your knowledge. Nothing is so exhausting as indecision, and nothing is so futile. ~ Bertrand Russell,
893:Right discipline consists, not in external compulsion, but in the habits of mind which lead spontaneously to desirable rather than undesirable activities. ~ Bertrand Russell,
894:Sir Arthur Eddington deduces religion from the fact that atoms do not obey the laws of mathematics. Sir James Jeans deduces it from the fact that they do. ~ Bertrand Russell,
895:This [Hegel's philosophy] illustrates an important truth, namely, that the worse your logic, the more interesting the consequences to which it gives rise. ~ Bertrand Russell,
896:Truth is a shining goddess, always veiled, always distant, never wholly approachable, but worthy of all the devotion of which the human spirit is capable. ~ Bertrand Russell,
897:What's the difference between a bright, inquisitive five-year-old, and a dull, stupid nineteen-year-old? Fourteen years of the British educational system. ~ Bertrand Russell,
898:Bertrand Russell penned a gushing tribute to the glories of mathematics. “Rightly viewed,” Russell wrote, mathematics “possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty ~ Jim Holt,
899:J'estime que dans toutes les définitions de la vie bienheureuse , il faut faire entrer un instinct d'animal , sans quoi la vie devient fade et sans intérêt ~ Bertrand Russell,
900:Santayana....reasoned that the young men who were being killed in the war would die anyhow sooner or later, and would be good for nothing while they lived. ~ Bertrand Russell,
901:Thee will find out in time that I have a great love of professing vile sentiments, I don't know why, unless it springs from long efforts to avoid priggery. ~ Bertrand Russell,
902:We are faced with the paradoxical fact that education has become one of the chief obstacles to intelligence and freedom of thought. ~ Bertrand Russell Sceptical Essays (1928),
903:As soon as it is held that any belief, no matter what, is important for some other reason than that it is true, a whole host of evils is ready to spring up. ~ Bertrand Russell,
904:I think we ought always to entertain our opinions with some measure of doubt. I shouldn't wish people dogmatically to believe any philosophy, not even mine. ~ Bertrand Russell,
905:The need of politeness is at its maximum in speaking with foreigners, and is so irksome as to be paralysing to those who are only accustomed to compatriots. ~ Bertrand Russell,
906:Work is of two kinds: first, altering the position of matter at or near the earth's surface relative to other matter; second, telling other people to do so. ~ Bertrand Russell,
907:Arithmetic must be discovered in just the same sense in which Columbus discovered the West Indies, and we no more create numbers than he created the Indians. ~ Bertrand Russell,
908:A stupid man's report of what a clever man says can never be accurate, because he unconsciously translates what he hears into something he can understand.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
909:(...) compreender uma época ou uma nação devemos compreender sua filosofia e, para que compreendamos sua filosofia, temos de ser, até certo ponto, filósofos. ~ Bertrand Russell,
910:In his school, Bertrand Russell thought it was better if they had the sex, so they could give their undivided attention to mathematics, which was the main thing. ~ Paul Goodman,
911:I say quite deliberately that the Christian religion, as organized in its Churches, has been and still is the principal enemy of moral progress in the world. ~ Bertrand Russell,
912:I say quite deliberately that the Christian religion, as organized in its churches, has been and still is the principal enemy of moral progress in the world. ~ Bertrand Russell,
913:One of the chief obstacles to intelligence is credulity, and credulity could be enormously diminished by instructions as to the prevalent forms of mendacity. ~ Bertrand Russell,
914:The centre of me is always and eternally in terrible pain ... A searching for something beyond what the world contains, something transfiguring and infinite. ~ Bertrand Russell,
915:The happiness that is genuinely satisfying is accompanied by the fullest exercise of our faculties and the fullest realization of the world in which we live. ~ Bertrand Russell,
916:The importance of Man, which is the one indispensable dogma of the theologians, receives no support from a scientific view of the future of the solar system. ~ Bertrand Russell,
917:There is no reason to suppose that the world had a beginning at all. The idea that things must have a beginning is really due to the poverty of our thoughts. ~ Bertrand Russell,
918:And if happiness were common, it would preserve itself, because appeals to hatred and fear, which now constitute almost the whole of politics would fall flat. ~ Bertrand Russell,
919:But how is this to be accomplished? "Cut away everything." The experience of "ecstasy" (standing outside one's own body) happened frequently to Plotinus: Many ~ Bertrand Russell,
920:Cruel men believe in a cruel god and use their belief to excuse their cruelty. Only kindly men believe in a kindly god, and they would be kindly in any case. ~ Bertrand Russell,
921:I feel a real and solid pleasure when anybody points out a fallacy in any of my views, because I care much less about my opinions than about their being true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
922:In the revolt against idealism, the ambiguities of the word experience have been perceived, with the result that realists have more and more avoided the word. ~ Bertrand Russell,
923:...love must feel the ego of the beloved person as important as one's own ego, and must realize the other's feelings and wishes as though they were one's own. ~ Bertrand Russell,
924:Our instinctive emotions are those that we have inherited from a much more dangerous world, and contain, therefore, a larger portion of fear than they should. ~ Bertrand Russell,
925:The affection of parents makes infants feel safe in this dangerous world, and gives them boldness in experimentation and in exploration of their environments. ~ Bertrand Russell,
926:The difficulty is old, but none the less real. An omnipotent being who created a world containing evil not due to sin must Himself be at least partially evil. ~ Bertrand Russell,
927:To a mind of sufficient intellectual power, the whole of mathematics would appear trivial, as trivial as the statement that a four-footed animal is an animal. ~ Bertrand Russell,
928:A great deal of our modern trouble has come from mixing up romantic love, which is a poetic and anarchic impulse, with marriage, which is a social institution. ~ Bertrand Russell,
929:Aristotle's metaphysics, roughly speaking, may be described as Plato diluted by common sense. He is difficult because Plato and common sense do not mix easily. ~ Bertrand Russell,
930:I do not think any reasonable person can doubt that in India, China and Japan, if the knowledge of birth control existed, the birthrate would fall very rapidly ~ Bertrand Russell,
931:Man can be stimulated by hope or driven by fear, but the hope and the fear must be vivid and immediate if they are to be effective without producing weariness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
932:Next to enjoying ourselves, the next greatest pleasure consists in preventing others from enjoying themselves, or, more generally, in the acquisition of power. ~ Bertrand Russell,
933:No man can be a good teacher unless he has feelings of warm affection toward his pupils and a genuine desire to impart to them what he believes to be of value. ~ Bertrand Russell,
934:The belief that personality is mysterious and irreducible has no scientific warrant, and is accepted chiefly because it is flattering to our human self esteem. ~ Bertrand Russell,
935:The habit of considering a man’s religious, moral and political opinions before appointing him to a post or giving him a job is the modern form of persecution. ~ Bertrand Russell,
936:The military superiority of Europe to Asia is not an eternal law of nature, as we are tempted to think, and our superiority in civilization is a mere delusion. ~ Bertrand Russell,
937:The point of philosophy is to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
938:There are two motives for reading a book: one, that you enjoy it; the other, that you can boast about it. ~ Bertrand Russell, The Conquest of Happiness (1930), Ch. 3: Competition.,
939:All the important human advances that we know of since historical times began have been due to individuals of whom the majority faced virulent public opposition. ~ Bertrand Russell,
940:Good nature is, of all moral qualities, the one that the world needs most, and good nature is the result of ease and security, not of a life of arduous struggle. ~ Bertrand Russell,
941:...nor do I think that my scientific outlook has contributed very greatly to my happiness, which I attribute to defecating twice a day with unfailing regularity. ~ Bertrand Russell,
942:Perfect rationality consists, not in believing what is true, but in attaching to every proposition a degree of belief corresponding to its degree of credibility. ~ Bertrand Russell,
943:Religions that teach brotherly love have been used as an excuse for persecution, and our profoundest scientific insight is made into a means of mass destruction. ~ Bertrand Russell,
944:The conception of duty has been a means used by the holders of power to induce
others to live for the interests of their masters rather than for their
own. ~ Bertrand Russell,
945:The human race may well become extinct before the end of the century. Speaking as a mathematician, I should say the odds are about three to one against survival. ~ Bertrand Russell,
946:The use of self control is like the use of brakes on train. It is useful when you find yourself in wrong direction but merely harmful when the direction is right ~ Bertrand Russell,
947:Worry is a form of fear, and all forms of fear produce fatigue. A man who has learned not to feel fear will find the fatigue of daily life enormously diminished. ~ Bertrand Russell,
948:No other organization rouses anything like the loyalty aroused by the national State. And the chief activity of the State is preparation for large-scale homicide. ~ Bertrand Russell,
949:The desire to understand the world and the desire to reform it are the two great engines of progress, without which human society would stand still or retrogress. ~ Bertrand Russell,
950:When the qualities that now confer leadership have become universal, there will no longer be leaders and followers, and democracy will have been realized at last. ~ Bertrand Russell,
951:Having made the decision, do not revise it unless some new fact comes to your knowledge. Nothing is so exhausting as indecision, and nothing is so futile.
   ~ Bertrand Russell, [T5],
952:it [is] possible to suppose that, if Russia is allowed to have peace, an amazing industrial development may take place, making Russia a rival of the United States. ~ Bertrand Russell,
953:Moral indignation is one of the most harmful forces in the modern world, the more so as it can always be diverted to sinister uses by those who control propaganda. ~ Bertrand Russell,
954:One comes across white men occasionally who suffer under the delusion that China is not a civilized country. Such men have forgotten what constitutes civilization. ~ Bertrand Russell,
955:One of the most interesting and harmful delusions to which men and nations can be subjected is that of imagining themselves special instruments of the Divine Will. ~ Bertrand Russell,
956:The first essential character [of civilization], I should say, is forethought. This, indeed, is what mainly distinguishes men from brutes and adults from children. ~ Bertrand Russell,
957:The man who pursues happiness wisely will aim at the possession of a number of subsidiary interests in addition to those central ones upon which his life is built. ~ Bertrand Russell,
958:There is darkness without and when I die there will be darkness within. There is no splendor, nor vastness anywhere; only triviality for a moment and then nothing. ~ Bertrand Russell,
959:Those who in principle oppose birth control are either incapable of arithmetic or else in favour of war, pestilence and famine as permanent features of human life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
960:Analytic It is clear that the definition of "logic" or "mathematics" must be sought by trying to give a new definition of the old notion of "analytic" propositions. ~ Bertrand Russell,
961:From India to Spain, the brilliant civilization of Islam flourished. What was lost to christendom at this time was not lost to civilization, but quite the contrary. ~ Bertrand Russell,
962:Intelligence, it might be said, has caused our troubles; but it is not unintelligence that will cure them. Only more and wiser intelligence can make a happier world ~ Bertrand Russell,
963:Marriage is for women the commonest mode of livelihood, and the total amount of undesired sex endured by women is probably greater in marriage than in prostitution. ~ Bertrand Russell,
964:My own view on religion is . . . It helped in early days to fix the calendar, and . . . to chronicle eclipses . . . These two services I am prepared to acknowledge. ~ Bertrand Russell,
965:Perfect rationality consists, not in believing what is true, but in attaching to every proposition a degree of belief corresponding to its degree of credibility.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
966:That Plato's Republic should have been admired, on its political side, by decent people is perhaps the most astonishing example of literary snobbery in all history. ~ Bertrand Russell,
967:The Mormons had a divine revelation in favour of polygamy, but under pressure from the United States Government they discovered that the revelation was not binding. ~ Bertrand Russell,
968:Cynicism such as one finds very frequently among the most highly educated young men and women of the West, results from the combination of comfort and powerlessness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
969:I do not pretend to start with precise questions. I do not think you can start with anything precise. You have to achieve such precision as you can, as you go along. ~ Bertrand Russell,
970:It appeared to me obvious that the happiness of mankind should be the aim of all action, and I discovered to my surprise that there were those who thought otherwise. ~ Bertrand Russell,
971:I used often to go to America during Prohibition, and there was far more drunkenness there then than before; the prohibition of pornography has much the same effect. ~ Bertrand Russell,
972:Science tells us what we can know, but what we can know is little, and if we forget how much we cannot know we become insensitive to many things of great importance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
973:That Plato's Republic should have been admired, on its political side, by decent people, is perhaps the most astonishing example of literary snobbery in all history. ~ Bertrand Russell,
974:The people who are regarded as moral luminaries are those who forego ordinary pleasures themselves and find compensation in interfering with the pleasures of others. ~ Bertrand Russell,
975:The world needs wisdom as it has never needed it before; and if knowledge continues to increase, the world will need wisdom in the future even more than it does now. ~ Bertrand Russell,
976:We know that the exercise of virtue should be its own reward, and it seems to follow that the enduring of it on the part of the patient should be its own punishment. ~ Bertrand Russell,
977:We shall say that we have acquaintance with anything of which we are directly aware, without the intermediary of any process of inference of any knowledge of truths. ~ Bertrand Russell,
978:A man who has never enjoyed beautiful things in the company of a woman whom he loved has not experienced to the full the magic power of which such things are capable. ~ Bertrand Russell,
979:I believe that the abolition of private ownership of land and capital is a necessary step toward any world in which the nations are to live at peace with one another. ~ Bertrand Russell,
980:I do wish I believed in the life eternal, for it makes me quite miserable to think man is merely a kind of machine endowed, unhappily for himself, with consciousness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
981:It would now be technically possible to unify the world, abolish war and poverty altogether, if men desired their own happiness more than the misery of their enemies. ~ Bertrand Russell,
982:Ridicule, nominally amusing but really an expression of hostility, was the favourite weapon—the worst possible, short of actual cruelty, in dealing with young people. ~ Bertrand Russell,
983:Science tells us what we can know, but what we can know is little, and if we forget how much we cannot know, we become insensitive to many things of great importance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
984:The barbarian invasion put an end, for six centuries, to the civilization of western Europe. It lingered in Ireland until the Danes destroyed it in the ninth century; ~ Bertrand Russell,
985:To write tragedy, a man must feel tragedy. To feel tragedy, a man must be aware of the world in which he lives. Not only with his mind, but with his blood and sinews. ~ Bertrand Russell,
986:Everybody can do something toward creating in his own environment kindly feelings rather than anger, reasonableness rather than hysteria, happiness rather than misery. ~ Bertrand Russell,
987:It is not known why the Lord made the human body as he did, since one might suppose that omnipotence could have made it such as would not have shocked the nice people. ~ Bertrand Russell,
988:Mathematics takes us still further from what is human into the region of absolute necessity, to which not only the actual world, but ever possible world, must conform. ~ Bertrand Russell,
989:The tragedy of one successful politician after another is the gradual substitution of narcissism for an interest in the community and the measures for which he stands. ~ Bertrand Russell,
990:What I do maintain is that success can only be one ingredient in happiness, and is too dearly purchased if all the other ingredients have been sacrificed to obtain it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
991:A process which led from the amoeba to man appeared to the philosophers to be obviously a progress though whether the amoeba would agree with this opinion is not known. ~ Bertrand Russell,
992:Good nature is, of all moral qualities, the one that the world needs most, and good nature is the result of ease and security, not of a life of arduous struggle. Modern ~ Bertrand Russell,
993:[Industrialism's soon diminishing] capacity to supply human needs could be prevented if men exercised any restraint or foresight in their present frenzied exploitation. ~ Bertrand Russell,
994:La disciplina externa es el único camino a la felicidad para aquellos desdichados cuya absorción en sí mismos es tan profunda que no se puede curar de ningún otro modo. ~ Bertrand Russell,
995:Since this craving (for material possessions) is in the nature of competition, it only brings happiness when we outdistance a rival, to whom it brings correlative pain. ~ Bertrand Russell,
996:The opinions that are held with passion are always those for which no good ground exists; indeed the passion is the measure of the holder’s lack of rational conviction. ~ Bertrand Russell,
997:We are all prone to the malady of the introvert who with the manifold spectacle of the world spread out before him, turns away and gazes only upon the emptiness within. ~ Bertrand Russell,
998:Find more pleasure in intelligent dissent than in passive agreement, for, if you value intelligence as you should, the former implies a deeper agreement than the latter. ~ Bertrand Russell,
999:Machines are worshipped because they are beautiful and valued because they confer power; they are hated because they are hideous and loathed because they impose slavery. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1000:Many orthodox people speak as though it were the business of sceptics to disprove received dogmas rather than of dogmatists to prove them. This is, of course, a mistake. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1001:Physics is mathematical not because we know so much about the physical world, but because we know so little: it is only its mathematical properties that we can discover. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1002:Physics is mathematical not because we know so much about the physical world, but because we know so little; it is only its mathematical properties that we can discover. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1003:Self-respect will keep a man from being abject when he is in the power of enemies, and will enable him to feel that he may be in the right when the world is against him. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1004:Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1005:Although it is a gloomy view to suppose that life will die out, sometimes when I contemplate the things that people do with their lives I think it is almost a consolation ~ Bertrand Russell,
1006:Any of us confronted by a forgotten letter written some years ago will be astonished to find how much more foolish our opinions were than we had remembered them as being. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1007:It is possible that mankind is on the threshold of a golden age; but, if so,it will be necessary first to slay the dragon that gaurds the door,and this dragon is religion ~ Bertrand Russell,
1008:Many a man will have the courage to die gallantly, but will not have the courage to say, or even to think, that the cause for which he is asked to die is an unworthy one. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1009:Marx's father became a Christian when Marx was a little boy, and some, at least, of the dogmas he must have then accepted seem to have born fruit in his son's psychology. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1010:Physics is mathematical not because we know so much about the physical world, but because we know so little; it is only its mathematical properties that we can discover. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1011:Science tells us what we can know, but what we can know is little, and if we forget how much we cannot know we become insensitive to many things of very great importance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1012:The wise man thinks about his troubles only when there is some purpose in doing so; at other times he thinks about other things, or, if it is night, about nothing at all. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1013:Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1014:Aristotle maintained that women have fewer teeth than men; although he was twice married, it never occurred to him to verify this statement by examining his wives' mouths. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1015:If I were granted omnipotence, and millions of years to experiment in, I should not think Man much to boast of as the final result of all my efforts. ~ Bertrand Russell, Religion and Science,
1016:[Kant] was like many people: in intellectual matters he was skeptical, but in moral matters he believed imjplicitly in the maximx that he had imbibed at his mother's knee. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1017:Machines are worshipped because they are beautiful, and valued because they confer power; they are hated because they are hideous, and loathed because they impose slavery. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1018:No man who believes that all is for the best in this suffering world can keep his ethical values unimpaired, since he is always having to find excuses for pain and misery. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1019:The Pleroma is the totality. The superset. Magisteria are the subsets.” Eat your heart out, Bertrand Russell. “We all have one. Even you. Your own little slice of the divine. ~ Ian Tregillis,
1020:The typical Westerner wishes to be the cause of as many changes as possible in his environment; the typical Chinaman wishes to enjoy as much and as delicately as possible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1021:To teach how to live without certainty and yet without being paralysed by hesitation is perhaps the chief thing that philosophy, in our age, can do for those who study it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1022:Without effort and change, human life cannot remain good. It is not a finished Utopia that we ought to desire, but a world where imagination and hope are alive and active. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1023:All who are not lunatics are agreed about certain things : That it is better to be alive than dead, better to be adequately fed than starved, better to be free than a slave ~ Bertrand Russell,
1024:But I simply can't stand a view limited to this earth, I feel life is so small unless it has windows into other worlds...I like mathematics largely because it is not human. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1025:By self-interest, Man has become gregarious, but in instinct he has remained to a great extent solitary; hence the need of religion and morality to reinforce self-interest. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1026:I am delighted to know that Principia Mathematica can now be done by machinery. . . I am quite willing to believe that anything in deductive logic can be done by machinery. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1027:In detective stories . . . I alternately identify myself with the murderer and the huntsman-detective, but . . . there are those to which this vicarious outlet is too mild. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1028:One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1029:Plato has dramatic strength ... but is quite unaware of the strength of the argument against his position ... and allows himself to be grossly unfair in arguing against it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1030:The wise man will be as happy as circumstances permit, and if he finds the contemplation of the universe painful beyond a point, he will contemplate something else instead. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1031:Altogether it will be found that a quiet life is characteristic of great men, and that their pleasures have not been of the sort that would look exciting to the outward eye. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1032:Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy by Bertrand Russell Complexity and Chaos by Dr. Roger White The Lily: Evolution, Play, and the Power of a Free Society by Daniel Cloud ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1033:It is possible that mankind is on the threshold of a golden age; but, if so, it will be necessary first to slay the dragon that guards the door, and this dragon is religion. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1034:Modern life cannot be constructed on . . . physically strenuous principles. A great deal of work is sedentary, and most manual work exercises only a few specialized muscles. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1035:Truth is a shining goddess, always veiled, always distant, never wholly approachable, but worthy of all the devotion of which the human spirit is capable. ~ Bertrand Russell, Fact and Fiction,
1036:A life devoted to science is therefore a happy life, and its happiness is derived from the very best sources that are open to dwellers on this troubled and passionate planet. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1037:At first it seems obvious, but the more you think about it the stranger the deductions from this axiom seem to become; in the end you cease to understand what is meant by it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1038:Certain things are indispensable to the happiness of most men, but these are simple things: food and shelter, health, love, successful work and the respect of one's own herd. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1039:Civilized life has altogether grown too tame, and, if it is to be stable, it must provide a harmless outlets for the impulses which our remote ancestors satisfied in hunting. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1040:One who believes, as I do, that the free intellect is the chief engine of human progress, cannot but be fundamentally opposed to Bolshevism, as much as to the Church of Rome. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1041:People seem good while they are oppressed, but they only wish to become oppressors in their turn: life is nothing but a competition to be the criminal rather than the victim. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1042:The immense majority of intellectually eminent men disbelieve in the Christian religion, but they conceal the fact in public, because they are afraid of losing their incomes. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1043:When the intensity of emotional conviction subsides, a man who is in the habit of reasoning will search for logical grounds in favour of the belief which he finds in himself. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1044:Our instinctive apparatus consists of two parts- the one tending to further our own life and that of our descendants, the other tending to thwart the lives of supposed rivals. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1045:To avoid the various foolish opinions to which mankind are prone, no superhuman genius is required. A few simple rules will keep you, not from all error, but from silly error. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1046:We cannot admire a social system which allows no scope for individual achievement, and we cannot approve one in which excessive individualism makes the social system unstable. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1047:What I do maintain is that success can only be one ingredient in happiness,
and is too dearly purchased if all the other ingredients have been sacrificed to obtain
it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1048:Almost everything that distinguishes the modern world from earlier centuries is attibutable to science, which achieved its most spectacular triumphs in the seventeenth century. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1049:For my part, I prefer the ontological argument, the cosmological argument and the rest of the old stock-in-trade, to the sentimental illogicality that has sprung from Rousseau. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1050:It might seem that the empirical philosopher is the slave of his material, but that the pure mathematician, like the musician, is a free creator of his world of ordered beauty. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1051:Official morality has always been oppressive and negative: it has said "thou shalt not," and has not troubled to investigate the effect of activities not forbidden by the code. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1052:The man who can centre his thoughts and hopes upon something transcending self can find a certain peace in the ordinary troubles of life which is impossible to the pure egoist. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1053:There are still many people in America who regard depressions as acts of God. I think Keynes proved that the responsibility for these occurrences does not rest with Providence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1054:There is no greater reason for children to honour parents than for parents to honour children except, that while the children are young, the parents are stronger than children. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1055:Those who forget good and evil and seek only to know the facts are more likely to achieve good than those who view the world through the distorting medium of their own desires. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1056:Almost everything that distinguishes the modern world from earlier centuries is attributable to science, which achieved its most spectacular triumphs in the seventeenth century. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1057:Aristotle could have avoided the mistake of thinking that women have fewer teeth than men, by the simple device of asking Mrs. Aristotle to keep her mouth open while he counted. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1058:Democracy has at least one merit, namely that a Member of Parliament cannot be stupider than his constituents, for the more stupid he is, the more stupid they were to elect him. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1059:I have frequently experienced myself the mood in which I felt that all is vanity; I have emerged from it not by any philosophy, but owing to some imperative necessity of action. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1060:The slave is doomed to worship time and fate and death, because they are greater than anything he finds in himself, and because all his thoughts are of things which they devour. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1061:When two great powers disagree about anything - it doesn't matter what - they must find a way to settle it somehow by arbitration or by negotiation, not by war or threat of war. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1062:Hume is thus led to the view that, when we say ‘A causes B’, we mean only that A and B are constantly conjoined in fact, not that there is some necessary connection between them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1063:It seems to me a fundamental dishonesty, and a fundamental treachery to intellectual integrity to hold a belief because you think it's useful and not because you think it's true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1064:The demand for certainty is one which is natural to man, but is nevertheless an intellectual vice. [...] To endure uncertainty is difficult, but so are most of the other virtues. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1065:There are a great many ways in which, the church, by its insistence upon what it chooses to call morality, inflicts upon all sorts of people undeserved and unnecessary suffering. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1066:The tendency of our perceptions is to emphasise increasingly the objective elements in an impression, unless we have some special reason, as artists have, for doing the opposite. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1067:A life too full of excitement is an exhausting life, in which continually stronger stimuli are needed to give the thrill that has come to be thought an essential part of pleasure. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1068:Among human beings, the subjection of women is much more complete at a certain level of civilization than it is among savages. And the subjection is always reinforced by morality. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1069:The conception of duty, speaking historically, has been a means used by the holders of power to induce others to live for the interests of their masters rather than for their own. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1070:There is an element of the busybody in our conception of virtue: unless a man makes himself a nuisance to a great many people, we do not think he can be an exceptionally good man. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1071:The theoretical understanding of the world, which is the aim of philosophy, is not a matter of great practical importance to animals, or to savages, or even to most civilised men. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1072:The true spirit of delight, the exaltation, the sense of being more than Man, which is the touchstone of the highest excellence, is to be found in mathematics as surely as poetry. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1073:To teach how to live without certainty, and yet without being paralyzed by hesitation, is perhaps the chief thing that philosophy, in our age, can still do for those who study it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1074:When conscious activity is wholly concentrated on some one definite purpose, the ultimate result, for most people, is lack of balance accompanied by some form of nervous disorder. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1075:Against my will, in the course of my travels, the belief that everything worth knowing was known at Cambridge gradually wore off. In this respect my travels were very useful to me. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1076:If children learn of sex as a relation between their parents to which they owe their own existence, they learn of it in its best form and in connection with its biological purpose. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1077:If our logic is to find the common world intelligible, it must not be hostile, but must be inspired by a genuine acceptance such as is not usually to be found among metaphysicians. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1078:If there were in the world today any large number of people who desired their own happiness more than they desired the unhappiness of others, we could have paradise in a few years. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1079:No; we have been as usual asking the wrong question. It does not matter a hoot what the mockingbird on the chimney is singing. The real and proper question is: Why is it beautiful? ~ Bertrand Russell,
1080:An Honest politician will not be tolerated by a democracy unless he is very stupid ... because only a very stupid man can honestly share the prejudices of more than half the nation. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1081:It is a curious fact that the more democratic a country becomes, the less respect it has for its rulers. Aristocracies and foreign conquerors may be hated but they are not despised. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1082:Si existiese en el mundo de hoy un número tan grande de gente que deseara su propia felicidad más de lo que desean la infelicidad del resto, tendríamos el paraíso en unos pocos años ~ Bertrand Russell,
1083:Consequently people fight for and against quite irrelevant measures, while the few who have a rational opinion are not listened to because they do not minister to any one's passions. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1084:If men would learn to pursue their own happiness rather than the misery of others, we can achieve a better life for everyone. Adopting this would help turn our Earth into a paradise. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1085:If there were in the world today any large number of people who desired their own happiness more than they desired the unhappiness of others, we could have a paradise in a few years. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1086:I have not found in Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations anything that seemed to me interesting and I do not understand why a whole school finds important wisdom in its pages. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1087:In the part of this universe that we know there is great injustice, and often the good suffer, and often the wicked prosper, and one hardly knows which of those is the more annoying. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1088:The evolution of our spirit is blazed on the dark background of eternity by our individual wakes. Every person can, if he/she wishes, leave a more or less brilliant wake behind them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1089:The more intense has been the religion of any period and the more profound has been the dogmatic belief, the greater has been the cruelty and the worse has been the state of affairs. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1090:The more things a man is interested in, the more opportunities of happiness he has and the less he is at the mercy of fate, since if he loses one thing he can fall back upon another. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1091:The true spirit of delight, the exaltation, the sense of being more than Man, which is the touchstone of the highest excellence, is to be found in mathematics as surely as in poetry. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1092:To teach how to live without certainty, and yet without being paralyzed by hesitation, is perhaps the chief thing that philosophy, in our age, can still do for those who study it.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
1093:Travelling, whether in the mental or the physical world, is a joy, and it is good to know that, in the mental world at least, there are vast countries still very imperfectly explored ~ Bertrand Russell,
1094:When I found myself regarded as respectable, I began to wonder what sins I had committed. I must be very wicked, I thought. I began to engage in the most uncomfortable introspection. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1095:I've made an odd discovery. Every time I talk to a savant I feel quite sure that happiness is no longer a possibility. Yet when I talk with my gardener, I'm convinced of the opposite. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1096:The painter has to unlearn the habit of thinking that things seem to have the color which common sense says they 'really' have, and to learn the habit of seeing things as they appear. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1097:Each act of cruelty is eternally a part of the universe; nothing that happens later can make that act good rather than bad, or can confer perfection on the whole of which it is a part. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1098:I do not pretend that birth control is the only way in which population can be kept from increasing. There are others, which, one must suppose, opponents of birth control would prefer. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1099:If you question any candid person who is no longer young, he is very likely to tell you that, having tasted life in this world, he has no wish to begin again as a "new boy" in another. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1100:In the philosophy of Bertrand Russell, genius entails that an individual possesses unique qualities and talents that make the genius especially valuable to the society in which he or she operates.
   ~ ?,
1101:I’ve made an odd discovery. Every time I talk to a savant, I feel quite sure that happiness is no longer a possibility. Yet when I talk with my gardener, I’m convinced of the opposite. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1102:Joy of life... depends upon a certain spontaneity in regard to sex. Where sex is repressed, only work remains, and a gospel of work for work's sake never produced any work worth doing. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1103:Man is essentially a dreamer, wakened sometimes for a moment by some peculiarly obtrusive element in the outer world, but lapsing again quickly into the happy somnolence of imagination. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1104:Modern definitions of truth, such as those as pragmatism and instrumentalism, which are practical rather than contemplative, are inspired by industrialisation as opposed to aristocracy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1105:My doctor said to me afterwards, 'When you were ill you behaved like a true philosopher. Every time you came to yourself you made a joke.' I never had a compliment that pleased me more. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1106:The pleasure of work is open to anyone who can develop some specialised skill, provided that he can get satisfaction from the exercise of his skill without demanding universal applause. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1107:The pleasure of work is open to anyone who can develop some specialized skill, provided that he can get satisfaction from the exercise of his skill without demanding universal applause. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1108:To the primitive mind, everything is either friendly or hostile; but experience has shown that friendliness and hostility are not the conceptions by which the world is to be understood. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1109:For my part I distrust all generalizations about women, favorable and unfavorable, masculine and feminine, ancient and modern; all alike, I should say, result from paucity of experience. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1110:Most people believe in God because they have been taught from early infancy to do it, and that is the main reason. Then I think that the next most powerful reason is the wish for safety. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1111:The life of man is a long march through the night, surrounded by invisible foes, tortured by weariness and pain, towards a goal that few can hope to reach, and where none may tarry long. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1112:all our reasonings concerning causes and effects are derived from nothing but custom; and that belief is more properly an act of the sensitive, than of the cogitative part of our natures. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1113:Bertrand Russell writes that the painful thing “about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision. ~ Rollo May,
1114:Formality Thus the absence of all mention of particular things or properties in logic or pure mathematics is a necessary result of the fact that this study is, as we say, "purely formal". ~ Bertrand Russell,
1115:One of the symptoms of the approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one’s work is terribly important & that to take a holiday would bring all kinds of disaster. Bertrand Russell ~ Tom Hodgkinson,
1116:One should respect public opinion insofar as is necessary to avoid starvation and keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1117:The problem of political theory is how to combine that degree of individual initiative which is necessary for progress, with the degree of social cohesion which is necessary for survival. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1118:Thought is subversive and revolutionary, destructive and terrible, Thought is merciless to privilege, established institutions, and comfortable habit. Thought is great and swift and free. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1119:The great majority of men and women, in ordinary times, pass through life without ever contemplating or criticising, as a whole, either their own conditions or those of the world at large. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1120:The youth who is capable of becoming a philosopher will be distinguished among his fellows as just and gentle, fond of learning, possessed of a good memory and a naturally harmonious mind. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1121:Freedom in education has many aspects. There is first of all freedom to learn or not to learn. Then there is freedom as to what to learn. And in later education there is freedom of opinion. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1122:Hatred of enemies is easier and more intense than love of friends. But from men who are more anxious to injure opponents than to benefit the world at large no great good is to be expected. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1123:If we spent half an hour every day in silent immobility, I am convinced that we should conduct all our affairs, personal, national, and international, far more sanely than we do at present. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1124:[If] we wish to diminish the love of money which, we are told, is the root of all evil, the first step must be the creation of a system in which everyone has enough and no one has too much. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1125:I like mathematics because it is not human and has nothing particular to do with this planet or with the whole accidental universe - because, like Spinoza's God, it won't love us in return. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1126:I like mathematics because it is not human and has nothing particular to do with this planet or with the whole accidental universe – because, like Spinoza's God, it won't love us in return. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1127:It must not be supposed that the subjective elements are any less 'real' than the objective elements; they are only less important... because they do not point to anything beyond ourselves. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1128:When you hear people in church, debasing themselves and saying that they are miserable sinners, and all the rest of it, it seems contemptible and not worthy of self-respecting human beings. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1129:In time of war there is a unification of interests, especially if the war is fierce; but in time of peace the clash may be very great between the interests of one class and those of another. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1130:In various ways, methods of approaching the mathematician's ideal were sought, and the resulting suggestions were the source of much that was mistaken in metaphysics and theory of knowledge. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1131:I think it would be just to say the most essential characteristic of mind is memory, using this word in its broadest sense to include every influence of past experience on present reactions. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1132:The main things which seem to me important on their own account, and not merely as means to other things, are knowledge, art, instinctive happiness, and relations of friendship or affection. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1133:Through the greatness of the universe, which philosophy contemplates, the mind also is rendered great, and becomes capable of that union with the universe which constitutes its highest good. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1134:To abandon the struggle for private happiness, to expel all eagerness of temporary desire, to burn with passion for eternal things - this is emancipation, and this is the free man's worship. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1135:When considering marriage one should ask oneself this question; 'will I be able to talk with this person into old age?' Everything else is transitory, the most time is spent in conversation. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1136:When considering marriage one should ask oneself this question; ‘will I be able to talk with this person into old age?’ Everything else is transitory; the most time is spent in conversation. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1137:Whenever you find yourself getting angry about a difference of opinion, be on your guard; you will probably find, on examination, that your belief is going beyond what the evidence warrants. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1138:With the introduction of agriculture mankind entered upon a long period of meanness, misery, and madness, from which they are only now being freed by the beneficent operation of the machine. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1139:You could live without the opera singer, but not without the services of the baker. On this ground you might say that the baker performs a greater service; but no lover of music would agree. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1140:Good and bad, and even the higher good that mysticism finds everywhere, are the reflections of our own emotions on other things, not part of the substance of things as they are in themselves. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1141:Hegel's philosophy is very difficult—he is, I should say, the hardest to understand of all the great philosophers. Before entering on any detail, a general characterization may prove helpful. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1142:Never let yourself be diverted, either by what you wish to believe, or what you think could have beneficent social effects if it were believed; but look only and solely at what are the facts. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1143:No man is liberated from fear who dare not see his place in the world as it is; no man can achieve the greatness of which he is capable until he has allowed himself to see his own littleness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1144:On the one hand, philosophy is to keep us thinking about things that we may come to know, and on the other hand to keep us modestly aware of how much that seems like knowledge isn't knowledge ~ Bertrand Russell,
1145:The positive sum of pleasures in a modern man's life is undoubtedly greater than was to be found in more primitive communities, but the consciousness of what might be has increased even more. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1146:There is as much difference between a collection of mentally free citizens and a community molded by modern methods of propaganda as there is between a heap of raw materials and a battleship. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1147:The secret of happiness is this: let your interest be as wide as possible and let your reactions to the things and persons who interest you be as far as possible friendly rather than hostile. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1148:Voltaire got it right long ago: ‘Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.’ So did Bertrand Russell: ‘Many people would sooner die than think. In fact they do. ~ Richard Dawkins,
1149:Abstract work, if one wishes to do it well, must be allowed to destroy one's humanity; one raises a monument which is at the same time a tomb, in which, voluntarily, one slowly inters oneself. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1150:Do you think that, if you were granted omnipotence and omniscience and millions of years in which to perfect your world, you could produce nothing better than the Ku Klux Klan or the Fascists? ~ Bertrand Russell,
1151:...impregnation will be regarded in an entirely different manner, more in the light of a surgical operation, so that it will be thought not ladylike to have it performed in the natural manner. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1152:Kita tidak bisa menjamin kesejahteraan kita, kecuali dengan menjamin kesejahteraan orang-orang lain juga.
Jika anda bahagia, anda harus rela mengusahakan orang-orang lain agar bahagia pula. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1153:Mathematics takes us still further from what is human, into the region of absolute necessity, to which not only the world, but every possible world, must conform. ~ Bertrand Russell, Study of Mathematics (1902).,
1154:Nessuno può liberarsi della Paura se non osa vedere il suo posto nel mondo così com'è; nessuno può toccare la grandezza di cui pur è capace se prima non ha la forza di vedere la sua piccolezza ~ Bertrand Russell,
1155:The "social contract," in the only sense in which it is not completely mythical, is a contract among conquerors, which loses its raison d'être if they are deprived of the benefits of conquest. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1156:The Victorian Age, for all its humbug, was a period of rapid progress, because men were dominated by hope rather than fear. If we are again to have progress, we must again be dominated by hope. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1157:We all have a tendency to think that the world must conform to our prejudices. The opposite view involves some effort of thought, and most people would die sooner than think in fact they do so. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1158:Advocates of capitalism like to appeal to the sacred principles of liberty, which are embodied in one maxim: The fortunate must not be restrained in the exercise of tyranny over the unfortunate. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1159:Among ourselves (Westerners), the people who are regarded as moral luminaries are those who forgo ordinary pleasures themselves and find compensation in interfering with the pleasures of others. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1160:Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty-a beauty cold and austere ... yet sublimely pure and capable of stern perfection such as only the greatest art can show. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1161:Politics is concerned with herds rather than with individuals, and the passions which are important in politics are, therefore, those in which the various members of a given herd can feel alike. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1162:RELIGION: A set of beliefs held as dogmas, dominating the conduct of life, going beyond or contrary to evidence, and inculcated by methods which are emotional or authoritarian, not intellectual. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1163:The law of causality, I believe, like much that passes muster among philosophers, is a relic of a bygone age, surviving, like the monarchy, only because it is erroneously supposed to do no harm. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1164:The secret of happiness is this: let your interests be as wide as possible, and let your reactions to the things and persons that interest you be as far as possible friendly rather than hostile. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1165:The Victorian Age, for all its humbug, was a period of rapid progress, because men were dominated by hope rather than fear. If we are again to have progress, we must again be dominated by hope. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1166:Unfortunately, however, power is sweet, and the man who in the beginning seeks power merely in order to have scope for his benevolence is likely, before long, to love the power for its own sake. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1167:When Benjamin Franklin invented the lightning-rod, the clergy, both in England and America, with enthusiastic support of George III, condemned it as an impious attempt to defeat the will of God. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1168:A good world needs knowledge, kindliness, and courage; it does not need a regretful hankering after the past or a fettering of the free intelligence by the words uttered long ago by ignorant men. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1169:America remained a land of promise for lovers of freedom. Even Byron, at a moment when he was disgusted with Napoleon for not committing suicide, wrote an eloquent stanza in praise of Washington. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1170:If there were a God, I think it very unlikely that he would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt his existence. ~ Bertrand Russell, quoted in Bertrand Russell's Best (1958), "On Religion",
1171:I have come to realize that an early symptom of approaching mental illness is the belief that one's work is terribly important. If you consider your work very important you should take a day off. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1172:...I went to Chicago, where I stayed with an eminent gynaecologist and his family...He was obviously a man of very strong sexual passions, and his face was ravaged by the efforts of self-control. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1173:Love is something far more than desire for sexual intercourse it is the principal means of escape from the loneliness which afflicts most men and women throughout the greater part of their lives. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1174:Remote from human passions, remote even from the pitiful facts of nature, the generations have gradually created an ordered cosmos [mathematics], where pure thought can dwell in its natural home. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1175:The secret of happiness is this : let your interest be as wide as possible, and let your reactions to the things and persons that interest you be as far as possible friendly rather than hostile. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1176:What is best in mathematics deserves not merely to be learnt as a task, but to assimilated as a part of daily thought, and brought again and again before the mind with ever-renewed encouragement. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1177:Love is something far more than desire for sexual intercourse; it is the principal means of escape from the loneliness which afflicts most men and women throughout the greater part of their lives. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1178:No people anywhere in the world would accept being expelled en masse from their own country; how can anyone require the people of Palestine to accept a punishment which nobody else would tolerate? ~ Bertrand Russell,
1179:Science seems to be at war with itself.... Naive realism leads to physics, and physics, if true, shows naive realism to be false. Therefore naive realism, if true, is false; therefore it is false. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1180:The fundamental defect of Christian ethics consists in the fact that it labels certain classes of acts 'sins' and others 'virtue' on grounds that have nothing to do with their social consequences. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1181:The man who has fed the chicken every day throughout its life at last wrings its neck instead, showing that more refined views as to the uniformity of nature would have been useful to the chicken. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1182:I know a parson who frightened his congregation terribly by telling them the second coming was very imminent indeed, but they were much consoled when they found he was planting trees in his garden. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1183:La Ciencia en ningún momento está totalmente en lo cierto, pero rara vez está completamente equivocada y tiene en general mayores posibilidades de estar en lo cierto que las teorías no científicas. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1184:Many people when they fall in love look for a little haven of refuge from the world, where they can be sure of being admired when they are not admirable, and praised when they are not praiseworthy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1185:Morala curentă este un amestec bizar de utilitarism și superstiție, unde însă, cum e și firesc, precumpănește componenta superstițioasă, de vreme ce superstiția se află la obârșia regulilor morale. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1186:Plato possessed the art to dress up illiberal suggestions in such a way that they deceived future ages, which admired the Republic without ever becoming aware of what was involved in its proposals. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1187:Politicians do not find any attractions in a view which does not lend itself to party declamation, and ordinary mortals prefer views which attribute misfortune to the machinations of their enemies. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1188:If everything must have a cause, then God must have a cause. If there can be anything without a cause, it may just as well be the world as God, so that there cannot be any validity in that argument. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1189:It is entirely clear that there is only one way in which great wars can be permanently prevented, and that is the establishment of an international government with a monopoly of serious armed force. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1190:It is not what the man of science believes that distinguishes him, but how and why he believes it. His beliefs are tentative, not dogmatic; they are based on evidence, not on authority or intuition. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1191:Rahasia kebahagiaan adalah, biarkan minat anda berkembang seluas mungkin.
Dan biarkan reaksi anda pada orang-orang dan benda-benda yang menarik perhatian anda bersifat bersahabat, bukan memusuhi. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1192:The war showed conclusively that, by the scientific organization of production, it is possible to keep modern populations in fair comfort on a small part of the working capacity of the modern world. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1193:We do not like to be robbed of an enemy; we want someone to hate when we suffer. It is so depressing to think that we suffer because we are fools; yet, taking mankind in the mass, that is the truth. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1194:What really moves people to believe in God is not any intellectual argument at all. Most people believe in God because they have been taught from early infancy to do it, and that is the main reason. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1195:Bertrand Russell recounts in his autobiography that as an unhappy adolescent he frequently contemplated suicide. But he did not go through with it, he tells us, “because I wished to know more of mathematics. ~ Jim Holt,
1196:I do not believe that I am now dreaming, but I cannot prove that I am not. I am, however, quite certain that I am having certain experiences, whether they be those of a dream or those of waking life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1197:Ignore fact and reason, live entirely in the world of your own fantastic and myth-producing passions; do this whole-heartedly and with conviction, and you will become one of the prophets of your age. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1198:Is a man what he seems to the astronomer, a tiny lump of impure carbon and water crawling impotently on a small and unimportant planet? Or is he what he appears to Hamlet? Is he perhaps both as once? ~ Bertrand Russell,
1199:Men are born ignorant, not stupid; they are made stupid by education. ~ Bertrand Russell, A History of Western Philosophy (1945), Book Three, Part II, Chapter XXI: Currents of Thought in the Nineteenth Century, p. 722.,
1200:There is no excuse for deceiving children. And when, as must happen in conventional families, they find that their parents have lied, they lose confidence in them and feel justified in lying to them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1201:I believe in using words, not fists. I believe in my outrage knowing people are living in boxes on the street. I believe in honesty. I believe in a good time. I believe in good food. I believe in sex. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1202:I read Zuleika Dobson with pleasure. It represents the Oxford that the two World Wars have destroyed with a charm that is not likely to be reproduced anywhere in the world for the next thousand years. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1203:I think modern educational theorists are inclined to attach too much importance to the negative virtue of not interfering with children, and too little to the positive merit of enjoying their company. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1204:[Regarding] the convention that clergymen are more virtuous than other men. Any average selection of mankind, set apart and told that it excels the rest in virtue, must tend to sink below the average. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1205:Some `advanced thinkers' are of the opinion that anyone who differs from the conventional opinion must be in the right. This is a delusion; if it were not, truth would be easier to come by than it is. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1206:Answering questions is a major part of sex education. Two rules cover the ground. First, always give a truthful answer to a question; secondly, regard sex knowledge as exactly like any other knowledge. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1207:I think periods of browsing during which no occupation is imposed from without are important in youth because they give time for the formation of these apparently fugitive but really vital impressions. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1208:Advocates of capitalism are very apt to appeal to the sacred principles of liberty, which are embodied in one maxim: The fortunate must not be restrained in the exercise of tyranny over the unfortunate. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1209:It would have been very much better for the world if Britain had remained neutral and the Germans had won a quick victory. We should not have had either the Nazis or the Communists if that had happened. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1210:Many of the actions by which men have become rich are far more harmful to the community than the obscure crimes of poor men, yet they go unpunished because they do not interfere with the existing order. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1211:One should as a rule respect public opinion in so far as is necessary to avoid starvation and to keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1212:Patriotism which has the quality of intoxication is a danger not only to its native land but to the world, and "My country never wrong" is an even more dangerous maxim than "My country, right or wrong." ~ Bertrand Russell,
1213:Philosophy is to be studied, not for the sake of any definite answers to its questions since no definite answers can, as a rule, be known to be true, but rather for the sake of the questions themselves. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1214:The first dogma which I came to disbelieve was that of free will. It seemed to me that all notions of matter were determined by the laws of dynamics and could not therefore be influenced by human wills. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1215:The fundamental principle in the analysis of propositions containing descriptions is this: Every proposition which we can understand must be composed wholly of constituents with which we are acquainted. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1216:At all times, except when a monarch could enforce his will, war has been facilitated by the fact that vigorous males, confident of victory, enjoyed it, while their females admired them for their prowess. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1217:If a philosophy is to bring happiness it should be inspired by kindly feelings. Marx pretended that he wanted the happiness of the proletariat; what he really wanted was the unhappiness of the bourgeois. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1218:I lost the power of attending to impressions per se, and always abstracted from them and sought the scientific and intellectual and abstract that lay behind them, so that it wouldn't have occurred to me, ~ Bertrand Russell,
1219:It is essential to happiness that our way of living should spring from our own deep impulses and not from the accidental tastes and desires of those who happen to be our neighbors, or even our relations. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1220:Philosophy is to be studied, not for the sake of any definite answers to its questions since no definite answers can, as a rule, be known to be true, but rather for the sake of the questions themselves. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1221:The frequency with which a man experiences lust depends upon his own physical condition, whereas the occasion which rouse such feelings in him depend upon the social conventions to which he is accustomed ~ Bertrand Russell,
1222:The point of philosophy is to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it. ~ Bertrand Russell, The Philosophy of Logical Atomism (1918).,
1223:Dogmatism and skepticism are both, in a sense, absolute philosophies; one is certain of knowing, the other of not knowing. What philosophy should dissipate is certainty, whether of knowledge or ignorance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1224:I dislike Nietzsche because he likes the contemplation of pain, because he erects conceit into a duty, because the men whom he most admires are conquerors, whose glory is cleverness in causing men to die. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1225:I never held Negroes to be inherently inferior. The statement in Marriage and Morals refers to environmental conditioning. I have had it withdrawn from subsequent editions because it is clearly ambiguous. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1226:It is amazing how much both happiness and efficiency can be increased by the cultivation of an orderly mind, which thinks about a matter adequately at the right time rather than inadequately at all times. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1227:It is essential to happiness that our way of living should spring from our own deep impulses and not from the accidental tastes and desires of those who happen to be our neighbors, or even our relations. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1228:Love can flourish only as long as it is free and spontaneous; it tends to be killed by the thought of duty. To say that it is your duty to love so-and-so is the surest way to cause you to hate him of her. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1229:Philosophers, for the most part, are constitutionally timid, and dislike the unexpected. Few of them would be genuinely happy as pirates or burglars. ~ Bertrand Russell, Unpopular Essays (1950), Chapter IV, Part iii, p. 74.,
1230:The bulk of the population of every country is persuaded that all marriage customs other than its own are immoral, and that those who combat this view only do so in order to justify their own loose lives. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1231:Thus every principle of simplicity urges us to adopt the natural view, that there really are objects other than ourselves and our sense-data which have an existence not dependent upon our perceiving them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1232:In 1946, Bertrand Russell, a friend of Einstein, said it was necessary to use the fear of nuclear weapons to force all nations to give up their sovereignty and submit to the dictatorship of the United Nations.11 ~ David Icke,
1233:Suppose you are walking in a thunderstorm, and you say to yourself, “I am not at all likely to be struck by lightning.” The next moment you are struck. but you experience no surprise, because you are dead. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1234:The secret of happiness is very simply this: let your interests be as wide as possible, and let your reactions to the things and persons that interest you be as far as possible friendly rather than hostile ~ Bertrand Russell,
1235:The way of man has no wisdom, but that of God has…. Man is called a baby by God, even as a child by a man…. The wisest man is an ape compared to God, just as the most beautiful ape is ugly compared to man. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1236:A habit of basing convictions upon evidence, and of giving to them only that degree or certainty which the evidence warrants, would, if it became general, cure most of the ills from which the world suffers. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1237:I reflected that the value of a work of art has no relation whatever to the pleasure it gives; indeed, the more I have dwelt upon the subject, the more I have come to prize austerity rather than luxuriance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1238:Man is a rational animal. So at least we have been told. Throughout a long life I have searched diligently for evidence in favor of this statement. So far, I have not had the good fortune to come across it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1239:Philosophy is no longer the pillar of fire going before a few intrepid seekers after truth: it is rather an ambulance following in the wake of the struggle for existence and picking up the weak and wounded. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1240:The meta-physical creed, I shall maintain, is a mistaken outcome of the emotion, although this emotion, as colouring and informing all other thoughts and feelings, is the inspirer of whatever is best in Man. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1241:The problem of the social reformer, therefore, is not merely to seek means of security, for if these means when found provide no deep satisfaction the security will be thrown away for the glory of adventure. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1242:The time has come, or is about to come, when only large-scale civil disobedience, which should be nonviolent, can save the populations from the universal death which their governments are preparing for them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1243:Where there is evidence , no one speaks of " faith " . We do not speak of faith that two and two are four or that the earth is round . We only speak of faith when we wish to substitute emotion for evidence . ~ Bertrand Russell,
1244:A good man will never suspect his friends of shady actions: this is part of his goodness. A good man will never be suspected by the public of using his goodness to screen villains: this is part of his utility ~ Bertrand Russell,
1245:I used, when I was younger, to take my holidays walking. I would cover 25 miles a day, and when the evening came I had no need of anything to keep me from boredom, since the delight of sitting amply sufficed. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1246:Logic was, formerly, the art of drawing inferences; it has now become the art of abstaining from inferences, since it has appeared that the inferences we feel naturally inclined to make are hardly ever valid. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1247:Prophets, mystics, poets, scientific discoverers are men whose lives are dominated by a vision; they are essentially solitary men . . . whose thoughts and emotions are not subject to the dominion of the herd. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1248:Skilled work, of no matter what kind, is only done well by those who take a certain pleasure in it, quite apart from its utility, either to themselves in earning a living, or to the world through its outcome. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1249:When you meet with opposition, even if it should be from your husband or your children, endeavor to overcome it by argument and not by authority, for a victory dependent upon authority is unreal and illusory. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1250:Force plays a much larger part in the government of the world than it did before 1914, and what is especially alarming, force tends increasingly to fall into the hands of those who are enemies of civilization. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1251:If any philosopher had been asked for a definition of infinity, he might have produced some unintelligible rigmarole, but he would certainly not have been able to give a definition that had any meaning at all. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1252:If two hitherto rival football teams, under the influence of brotherly love, decided to co-operate in placing the football first beyond one goal and then beyond the other, no one's happiness would be increased ~ Bertrand Russell,
1253:The habit of looking to the future and thinking that the whole meaning of the present lies in what it will bring forth is a pernicious one. There can be no value in the whole unless there is value in the parts ~ Bertrand Russell,
1254:There have been poverty, pestilence, and famine, which were due to man's inadequate mastery of nature. There have been wars, oppressions and tortures which have been due to men's hostility to their fellow men. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1255:When you find
yourself inclined to brood on anything, no matter what, the best plan always is to
think about it even more than you naturally would, until at last its morbid fascination
is worn off. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1256:Although this may seem a paradox, all exact science is based on the idea of approximation. If a man tells you he knows a thing exactly, then you can be safe in inferring that you are speaking to an inexact man. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1257:Fervent religious believers sacrifice pleasures of the body, but instead enjoy pleasures of the mind, including the joy of knowing that those men who didn't follow their religion would be tortured for eternity. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1258:In emancipation from the fears that beset the slave of circumstance he will experience a profound joy, and through all the vicissitudes of his outward life he will remain in the depths of his being a happy man. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1259:No satisfaction based upon self-deception is solid, and however unpleasant the truth may be, it is better to face it once and for all, to get used to it, and to proceed to build your life in accordance with it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1260:Our nominal morality has been formulated by priests and mentally enslaved women. It is time that men who have to take a normal part in the normal life of the world learned to rebel against this sickly nonsense. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1261:The citizens of Athens, like those of other cities in other ages and continents, showed a certain hostility to those who attempted to introduce a higher level of culture than that to which they were accustomed. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1262:The habit of looking to the future and thinking that the whole meaning of the present lies in what it will bring forth is a pernicious one. There can be no value in the whole unless there is value in the parts. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1263:There is no need to worry about mere size. We do not necessarily respect a fat man more than a thin man. Sir Isaac Newton was very much smaller than a hippopotamus, but we do not on that account value him less. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1264:What was exciting in the Victorian Age, would leave a man of franker epoch quite unmoved. The more prudes restrict the permissible degree of sexual appeal, the less is required to make such an appeal effective. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1265:William James used to preach the 'will to believe.' For my part, I should wish to preach the 'will to doubt' ... what is wanted is not the will to believe, but the wish to find out, which is the exact opposite. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1266:A truer image of the world, I think, is obtained by picturing things as entering into the stream of time from an eternal world outside, than from a view which regards time as the devouring tyrant of all that is. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1267:Even if the open windows of science at first make us shiver after the cozy indoor warmth of traditional humanizing myths, in the end the fresh air brings vigor, and the great spaces have a splendor of their own. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1268:Even if we could be certain that one of the world's religions were perfectly true, given the sheer number of conflicting faiths on offer, every believer should expect damnation purely as a matter of probability. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1269:The mind of the most rational among us may be compared to a stormy ocean of passionate convictions based on desire, upon which float perilously a few tiny boats carrying a cargo of scientifically tested beliefs. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1270:The practical distinction among passions comes as regards their success: some passions lead to success in what is desired; others, to failure. If you pursue the former, you will be happy; if the latter, unhappy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1271:All the labor of all the ages, all the devotion, all the inspiration, all the noonday brightness of human genius are destined to extinction. So now, my friends, if that is true, and it is true, what is the point? ~ Bertrand Russell,
1272:Science is at no moment quite right, but it is seldom quite wrong, and has, as a rule, a better chance of being right than the theories of the unscientific. It is, therefore, rational to accept it hypothetically. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1273:The mind of the most rational among us may be compared to a stormy ocean of passionate convictions based on desire, upon which float perilously a few tiny boats carrying a cargo of scientifically tested beliefs. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1274:The 'practical' man, as this word is often used, is one who recognizes only the material needs, who realizes that men must have food for the body, but is oblivious of the necessity of providing food for the mind. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1275:Philosophy, though unable to tell us with certainty what is the true answer to the doubts which it raises, is able to suggest many possibilities which enlarge our thoughts and free them from the tyranny of custom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1276:Love can only flourish as long as it is free and spontaneous; it tends to be killed by the thought that it is a duty. To say that it is your duty to love so-and-so is the surest way to cause you to hate him or her. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1277:If all our happiness is bound up entirely in our personal circumstances it is difficult not to demand of life more than it has to give. And to demand too much is the surest way of getting even less than is possible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1278:Inferences of Science and Common Sense differ from those of deductive logic and mathematics in a very important respect, namely, when the premises are true and the reasoning correct, the conclusion is only probable. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1279:You find this curious fact, that the more intense has been the religion of any period and the more profound has been the dogmatic belief, the greater has been the cruelty and the worse has been the state of affairs. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1280:You may kill an artist or a thinker, but you cannot acquire his art or his thought. You may put a man do death because he loves his fellow-men, but you will not by so doing acquire the love which made his happiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1281:You must believe that you can help bring about a better world. A good society is produced only by good individuals, just as truly as a majority in a presidential election is produced by the votes of single electors. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1282:There was a footpath leading across fields to New Southgate, and I used to go there alone to watch the sunset and contemplate suicide. I did not, however, commit suicide, because I wished to know more of mathematics. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1283:...untroubled by the thought of death because he fears himself not really separate from those who will come after him. It is in such profound instinctive union with the stream of life the greatest joy is to be found. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1284:Every philosophical problem, when it is subjected to the necessary analysis and justification, is found either to be not really philosophical at all, or else to be, in the sense in which we are using the word, logical. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1285:I cannot, therefore, prove that my view of the good life is right; I can only state my view, and hope that as many as possible will agree. My view is this: The good life is one inspired by love and guided by knowledge. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1286:It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to live after your own; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1287:It seems that sin is geographical. From this conclusion, it is only a small step to the further conclusion that the notion of 'sin' is illusory, and that the cruelty habitually practised in punishing it is unnecessary. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1288:My first book of stories was 'Satan in the Suburbs'. The title story was in part suggested to me by a stranger whom I met in Mortlake and who, when he saw me, crossed the road and made the sign of the Cross as he went. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1289:Science does not aim at establishing immutable truths and eternal dogmas; its aim is to approach the truth by successive approximations, without claiming that at any stage final and complete accuracy has been achieved. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1290:The psychology of adultery has been falsified by conventional morals, which assume, in monogamous countries, that attraction to one person cannot coexist with affection for another. Everybody knows that this is untrue. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1291:The three main extra-rational activities in modern life are religion, war, and love. all these are extra-rational, but love is not anti-rational, that is to say, a reasonable man may reasonably rejoice in its existence ~ Bertrand Russell,
1292:I found one day in school a boy of medium size ill-treating a smaller boy. I expostulated, but he replied: "The bigs hit me, so I hit the babies; that's fair." In these words he epitomized the history of the human race. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1293:It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to live after your own; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1294:Our great democracies still tend to think that a stupid man is more likely to be honest than a clever man, and our politicians take advantage of this prejudice by pretending to be even more stupid than nature made them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1295:So long as there is death there will be sorrow, and so long as there is sorrow it can be no part of the duty of human beings to increase its amount, in spite of the fact that a few rare spirits know how to transmute it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1296:The heterosexual emotions of young children can find a natural, wholesome and innocent outlet with other children; in this form they are a part of play, and like all play, they afford a preparation for adult activities. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1297:...the nonexistence of God makes more difference to some of us than to others. To me, it means that there is no absolute morality, that moralities are sets of social conventions devised by humans to satisfy their needs. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1298:Almost all philosophers, in their ethical systems, first lay down a false doctrine, and then argue that wickedness consists in acting in a manner that proves it false, which would be impossible if the doctrine were true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1299:It is quite impossible to guess in advance what will interest a man, but most men are capable of a keen interest in something or other, and when once such an interest has been aroused their life becomes free from tedium. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1300:I want to say, in all seriousness, that a great deal of harm is being done in the modern world by belief in the virtuousness of work, and that the road to happiness and prosperity lies in an organised diminution of work. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1301:Our great democracies still tend to think that a stupid man is more likely to be honest than a clever man, and our politicians take advantage of this prejudice by pretending to be even more stupid than nature made them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1302:Whatever can be thought of is an idea in the mind of the person thinking of it; therefore nothing can be thought of except ideas in minds; therefore anything else is inconceivable, and what is inconceivable cannot exist. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1303:I want to say, in all seriousness, that a great deal of harm is being done in the modern world by belief in the virtuousness of WORK, and that the road to happiness and prosperity lies in the organised diminution of work. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1304:The essence of good manners consists in making it clear that one has no wish to hurt. When it is clearly necessary to hurt, it must be done in such a way as to make it evident that the necessity is felt to be regrettable. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1305:The moral thing I should wish to say to them is very simple; I should say: "Love is wise - Hatred is foolish." In this world, which is getting more and more closely interconnected, we have to learn to tolerate each other. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1306:The megalomaniac differs from the narcissist by the fact that he wishes to be powerful rather than charming, and seeks to be feared rather than loved. To this type belong many lunatics and most of the great men of history. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1307:The megalomaniac differs from the narcissist by the fact that he wishes to be powerful rather than charming, and seeks to be feared rather than loved. to this type belong many lunatics and most of the great men of history. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1308:London is a weary place, where it is quite impossible to think or feel anything worthy of a human being - I feel horribly lost here. Only the river and the gulls are my friends; they are not making money or acquiring power. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1309:Our great democracies still tend to think that a stupid man is more likely to be honest than a clever man, and our politicians take advantage of this prejudice by pretending to be even more stupid than nature has made them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1310:Speaking psycho-analytically, it may be laid down that any "great ideal" which people mention with awe is really an excuse for inflicting pain on their enemies. Good wine needs no bush, and good morals need no bated breath. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1311:a generation that cannot endure boredom will be a generation of little men, of men unduly divorced from the slow process of nature, of men in whom every vital impulse slowly withers as though they were cut flowers in a vase. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1312:Can a society in which thought and technique are scientific persist for a long period, as, for example, ancient Egypt persisted, or does it necessarily contain within itself forces which must bring either decay or explosion? ~ Bertrand Russell,
1313:Dread of disaster makes everybody act in the very way that increases the disaster. Psychologically the situation is analogous to that of people trampled to death when there is a panic in a theatre caused by a cry of `Fire!'. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1314:What the world needs is not dogma but an attitude of scientific inquiry combined with a belief that the torture of millions is not desirable, whether inflicted by Stalin or by a Deity imagined in the likeness of the believer ~ Bertrand Russell,
1315:All disenchantment is to me a malady, which, it is true, certain circumstances may render inevitable, but which none the less, when it occurs, is to be cured as soon as possible, not to be regarded as a higher form of wisdom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1316:If it is the devil that tempts the young to enjoy themselves, is it not the same personage that persuades the old to condemn their enjoyment? And is not condemnation perhaps merely a form of excitement appropriate to old age? ~ Bertrand Russell,
1317:It is one of the defects of modern higher education that it has become too much a training in the acquisition of certain kinds of skill, and too little an enlargement of the mind and heart by an impartial survey of the world. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1318:We all have a tendency to think that the world must conform to our prejudices. The opposite view involves some effort of thought, and most people would die sooner than think – in fact they do so.” The ABC of Relativity [1925] ~ Bertrand Russell,
1319:In spite of the fundamental importance of economic facts in determining politics and beliefs of an age or nation, I do not think that non-economic factors can be neglected without risks of error which may be fatal in practice. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1320:It is clear that the most elementary condition, if thought is to be free, is the absence of legal penalties for the expression of opinions. No great country has yet reached to this level, although most of them think they have. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1321:Throughout the long period of religious doubt, I had been rendered very unhappy by the gradual loss of belief, but when the process was completed, I found to my surprise that I was quite glad to be done with the whole subject. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1322:As soon as we abandon our own reason, and are content to rely upon authority, there is no end to our trouble. . . . No Catholic, for instance, takes seriously the text which says that a Bishop should be the husband of one wife. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1323:I wish to propose a doctrine which may, I fear, appear wildly paradoxical and subversive. The doctrine in question is this: that it is undesirable to believe a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1324:My own belief is that in most ages and in most places obscure psychological forces led men to adopt systems involving quite unnecessary cruelty, and that this is still the case among the most civilized races at the present day. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1325:Suffering to the criminal can never be justified by the notion of vindictive punishment. If education combined with kindness is equally effective, it is to be preferred; still more is it to be preferred if it is more effective. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1326:The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widely spread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1327:There is a special department of Hell for students of probability. In this department there are many typewriters and many monkeys. Every time that a monkey walks on a typewriter, it types by chance one of Shakespeare's sonnets. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1328:...the work of inspection was left to magistrates and clergymen. To the relief of employers, experience showed that magistrates and clergymen had no objection to law-breaking when its purpose was merely the torture of children. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1329:You can get away from envy by enjoying the pleasures that come your way, by doing the work that you have to do, and by avoiding comparisons with those whom you imagine, perhaps quite falsely, to be more fortunate than yourself. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1330:And where a solution appears possible, the new logic provides a method which enables us to obtain results that do not merely embody personal idiosyncrasies, but must command the assent of all who are competent to form an opinion. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1331:I should wish to see a world in which education aimed at mental freedom rather than at imprisoning the minds of the young in a rigid armor of dogma calculated to protect them through life against the shafts of impartial evidence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1332:it is a most astonishing thing that people can believe that this world, with all the things that are in it, with all its defects, should be the best that omnipotence and omniscience have been able to produce in millions of years. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1333:The decay of the family in quite recent times is undoubtedly to be attributed in the main to the industrial revolution, but it had already begun before that event, and its beginnings were inspired by individualistic theory. Young ~ Bertrand Russell,
1334:The man who is unhappy will, as a rule, adopt an unhappy creed, while the man who is happy will adopt a happy creed; each may attribute his happiness or unhappiness to his beliefs, while the real causation is the other way round. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1335:The root of the matter is a very simple and old fashioned thing... love or compassion. If you feel this, you have a motive for existence, a guide for action, a reason for courage, an imperative necessity for intellectual honesty. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1336:... any hypothesis, however absurd, may be useful in science, if it enables a discoverer to conceive things in a new way; but when it has served this purpose by luck, it is likely to become an obstacle to further advance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1337:It may be laid down broadly that irrationalism, i.e. disbelief in objective fact, arises almost always from the desire to assert something for which there is no evidence, or to deny something for which there is very good evidence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1338:The essence of good manners consists in making it clear that one has no wish to hurt. When it is clearly necessary to hurt, it must be done in such a way as to make it evident that the necessity is felt to be regrettable. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1339:The only thing that will redeem mankind is cooperation ... it is common to wish well to oneself, but in our technically unified world, wishing well to oneself is sure to be futile unless it is combined with wishing well to others. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1340:It may be laid down broadly that irrationalism, i.e., disbelief in objective fact, arises almost always from the desire to assert something for which there is no evidence, or to deny something for which there is very good evidence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1341:The examination system, and the fact that instruction is treated mainly as a training for a livelihood, leads the young to regard knowledge from a purely utilitarian point of view as the road to money, not as the gateway to wisdom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1342:The really useful education is that which follows the direction of the child's own instinctive interests, supplying knowledge for which it is seeking, not dry, detailed information wholly out of relation to its spontaneous desires. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1343:Those whose lives are fruitful to themselves, to their friends, or to the world are inspired by hope and sustained by joy: they see in imagination the things that might be and the way in which they are to be brought into existence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1344:Written words differ from spoken words in being material structures. A spoken word is a process in the physical world, having an essential time-order; a written word is a series of pieces of matter, having an essential space-order. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1345:A scientist can hardly meet with anything more undesirable than to have the foundations give way just as the work is finished. I was put in this position by a letter from Mr. Bertrand Russell when the work was nearly through the press. ~ Gottlob Frege,
1346:Some of the deepest truths are simple, when seen in the clearest light, and it takes a lucid intellect to grasp them so thoroughly that their simplicity can be brought into that light and offered to all, not just the privileged few. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1347:We think too much of production, and too little of consumption. One result is that we attach too little importance to enjoyment and simple happiness, and that we do not judge production by the pleasure that it gives to the consumer. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1348:It can be shown that a mathematical web of some kind can be woven about any universe containing several objects. The fact that our universe lends itself to mathematical treatment is not a fact of any great philosophical significance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1349:St. Paul introduced an entirely novel view of marriage, that it existed primarily to prevent the sin of fornication. It is just as if one were to maintain that the sole reason for baking bread is to prevent people from stealing cake. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1350:The fact that all Mathematics is Symbolic Logic is one of the greatest discoveries of our age; and when this fact has been established, the remainder of the principles of mathematics consists of the analysis of Symbolic Logic itself. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1351:The skill of the politician consists in guessing what people can be brought to think advantageous to themselves; the skill of the expert consists in calculating what really is advantageous, provided people can be brought to think so. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1352:With civilized men..., it is, I think, chiefly love of excitement which makes the populace applaud when war breaks out; the emotion is exactly the same as at a football match, although the results are sometimes somewhat more serious. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1353:Education, which was at first made universal in order that all might be able to read and write, has been found capable of serving quite other purposes. By instilling nonsense it unifies populations and generates collective enthusiasm. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1354:I suggest to young professors that their first work should be written in a jargon only to be understood by the erudite few. With that behind them, they can ever after say what they have to say in a language 'understand of the people.' ~ Bertrand Russell,
1355:I was told that The Chinese said they would bury me by the Western Lake and build a shrine to my memory. I have some slight regret that this did not happen, as I might have become a god, which would have been very chic for an atheist. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1356:Ordinary language is totally unsuited for expressing what physics really asserts, since the words of everyday life are not sufficiently abstract. Only mathematics and mathematical logic can say as little as the physicist means to say. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1357:All traditional logic habitually assumes that precise symbols are being employed. It is therefore not applicable to this terrestial life but only to an imagined celestial existence... logic takes us nearer to heaven than other studies. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1358:Pero qué pocos vivos piensan que también ellos serán algún día moribundos, que también ellos buscarán simpatía, aunque acabarán por encontrarse solos, en una soledad tan terrible y absoluta que la propia muerte parecerá una liberación. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1359:Como dice Russell, «las personas que son desdichadas, como las que duermen mal, siempre se enorgullecen de ello». Este es el primer obstáculo a vencer si uno pretende intentar ser feliz, dejar de intentar a toda costa ser «interesante». ~ Bertrand Russell,
1360:It is the part of courage, when misfortune comes, to bear without repining the ruin of our hopes, to turn away our thoughts from vain regrets. This degree of submission to Power is not only just and right: it is the very gate of wisdom. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1361:Leibniz used to discourse to Queen Sophia Charlotte of Prussia concerning the infinitely little, and how she would reply that on that subject she needed no instruction—the behaviour of courtiers had made her thoroughly familiar with it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1362:Nine-tenths of the appeal of pornography is due to the indecent feelings concerning sex which moralists inculcate in the young; the other tenth is physiological, and will occur in one way or another whatever the state of the law may be. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1363:Patience and boredom are closely related. Boredom, a certain kind of boredom, is really impatience. You don't like the way things are, they aren't interesting enough for you, so you deccide- and boredom is a decision-that you are bored. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1364:Science can teach us, and I think our hearts can teach us, no longer to look around for imaginary supporters, no longer to invent allies in the sky, but rather to look to our own efforts here below to make the world a fit place to live. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1365:the great world, so far as we know it from philosophy of nature, is neither good nor bad, and is not concerned to make us happy or unhappy. All such philosophies spring from self-importance, and are best corrected by a little astronomy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1366:The most valuable things in life are not measured in monetary terms. The really important things are not houses and lands, stocks and bonds, automobiles and real state, but friendships, trust, confidence, empathy, mercy, love and faith. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1367:There is in Aristotle an almost complete absence of what may be called benevolence or philanthropy. The sufferings of mankind . . . there is no evidence that they cause him unhappiness except when the sufferers happen to be his friends. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1368:... mathematical knowledge ... is, in fact, merely verbal knowledge. "3" means "2+1", and "4" means "3+1". Hence it follows (though the proof is long) that "4" means the same as "2+2". Thus mathematical knowledge ceases to be mysterious. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1369:Protestants, from the first, have been distinguished from their opponents by what they do not believe; to throw over one more dogma is, therefore, merely to carry the movement one stage further. Moral fervor is the essence of the matter. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1370:The whole of theology, in regard to hell no less than to heaven, takes it for granted that Man is what is of most importance in the Universe of created beings. Since all theologians are men, this postulate has met with little opposition. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1371:To modern educated people, it seems obvious that matters of fact are to be ascertained by observation, not by consulting ancient authorities. But this is an entirely modern conception, which hardly existed before the seventeenth century. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1372:Another merit of home is that it preserves the diversity between individuals. If we were all alike, it might be convenient for the bureaucrat and the statistician, but it would be very dull, and would lead to a very unprogressive society. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1373:Collective wisdom, alas, is no adequate substitute for the intelligence of individuals. Individuals who opposed received opinions have been the source of all progress, both moral and intellectual. They have been unpopular, as was natural. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1374:Morality in sexual relations, when it is free from superstition, consists essentially in respect for the other person, and unwillingness to use that person solely as a means of personal gratification, without regard to his or her desires. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1375:The opinions that are held with passion are always those for which no good ground exists; indeed the passion is the measure of the holders lack of rational conviction. Opinions in politics and religion are almost always held passionately. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1376:The teacher, like the artist, the philosopher, and the man of letters, can only perform his work adequately if he feels himself to be an individual directed by an inner creative impulse, not dominated and fettered by an outside authority. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1377:Undoubtedly the most important source of religion is fear; this can be seen in the present day, since anything that causes alarm is apt to turn people's thoughts to God. Battle, pestilence, and shipwreck all tend to make people religious. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1378:because, no matter how he’d come to hate her, he was also, even now, trying to impress her and win her praise, bringing her his Bertrand Russell papers as mother-flattering evidence of his outsize intellect, constructing his rhyme schemes. ~ Jonathan Franzen,
1379:Envy consists in seeing things never in themselves, but only in their relations. If you desire glory, you may envy Napoleon, but Napoleon envied Caesar, Caesar envied Alexander, and Alexander, I daresay, envied Hercules, who never existed. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1380:I do not believe that science per se is an adequate source of happiness, nor do I think that my own scientific outlook has contributed very greatly to my own happiness, which I attribute to defecating twice a day with unfailing regularity. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1381:It appeared to me that the dignity of which human existence is capable is not attainable by devotion to the mechanism of life , and that unless contemplation of eternal things is preserved, mankind will become no better than well-fed pigs. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1382:Meantime, the world in which we exist has other aims. But it will pass away, burnt up in the fire of its own hot passions; and from its ashes will spring a new and younger world, full of fresh hope, woth the light of morning in its eyes. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1383:Men have physical needs, and they have emotions. While physical needs are unsatisfied, they take first place; but when they are satisfied, emotions unconnected with them become important in deciding whether a man is to be happy or unhappy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1384:Organic life, we are told, has developed gradually from the protozoon to the philosopher, and this development, we are assured, is indubitably an advance. Unfortunately it is the philosopher, not the protozoon, who gives us this assurance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1385:The conception of the necessary unit of all that is resolves itself into the poverty of the imagination, and a freer logic emancipates us from the straitwaistcoated benevolent institution, which idealism palms off as the totality of being. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1386:To discover a system for the avoidance of war is a vital need of our civilization; but no such system has a chance while men are so unhappy that mutual extermination seems to them less dreadful than continued endurance of the light of day. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1387:It is we who create value and our desires which confer value. In this realm we are kings, and we debase our kingship if we bow down to Nature. It is for us to determine the good life, not for Nature - not even for Nature personified as God. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1388:Look into the irrationality closely, with a determination not to respect it, and not to let it dominate you. Whenever it thrusts foolish thoughts or feelings into your consciousness, pull them up by the roots, examine them, and reject them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1389:Organic life, we are told, has developed gradually from the protozoon to the philosopher; and this development, we are assured, is indubitably an advance. Unfortunately, it is the philosopher, not the protozoon, who gives us this assurance. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1390:Whoever wishes to see the world truly, to rise in thought above the tyranny of practical desires, must learn to overcome the difference of attitude towards past and future, and to survey the whole stream of time in one comprehensive vision. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1391:Following Locke's doctrine that the mind is a tabula rasa, Helvetius considered the differences between individuals entirely due to differences of education: in every individual, his talents and his virtues are the effect of his instruction. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1392:Il fatto che un'opinione sia ampiamente condivisa, non è affatto una prova che non sia completamente assurda. Anzi, considerata la stupidità della maggioranza degli uomini, è più probabile che un'opinione diffusa sia cretina anziché sensata. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1393:In democratic countries, the most important private organizations are economic. Unlike secret societies, they are able to exercise their terrorism without illegality, since they do not threaten to kill their enemies, but only to starve them. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1394:To be out of harmony with one's surroundings is of course a misfortune, but it is not always a misfortune to be avoided at all costs. Where the environment is stupid or prejudiced or cruel, it is a sign of merit to be out of harmony with it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1395:For all serious intellectual progress depends upon a certain kind of independence of outside opinion, which cannot exist where the will of the majority is treated with that kind of religious respect which the orthodox give to the will of God. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1396:I do not myself think there is any superior rationality in being unhappy. The wise man will be as happy as circumstances permit, and if he finds contemplation of the universe painful beyond a point, he will contemplate something else instead. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1397:When men assimilate themselves to machines and value only the consequences of their work, not the work itself, style disappears, to be replaced by something which to the mechanised man appears more natural, though in fact is only more brutal. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1398:A world full of happiness is not beyond human power to create; the obstacles imposed by inanimate nature are not insuperable. The real obstacles lie in the heart of man, and the cure for these is a firm hope, informed and fortified by thought. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1399:Boredom is essentially a thwarted desire for events, not necessarily pleasant ones, but just occurrences such as will enable the victim of ennui to know one day from another. The opposite of boredom, in a word, is not pleasure, but excitement. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1400:I think that there is far too much work done in the world, that immense harm is caused by the belief that work is virtuous, and that what needs to be preached in modern industrial countries is quite different from what always has been preached. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1401:It is false to suggest that men must turn away from his desires in the interest of a higher duty. Men only responds to duty if he desires to do so. To understand men, you must understand their desires and the relative strength of those desires. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1402:They must often change, who would be constant in happiness or wisdom. Those who continually search for happiness will never find it. Happiness is made, not found. To be without some of the things you want is an indispensable part of happiness. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1403:Bertrand Russell used a hypothetical teapot in orbit about Mars for the same didactic purpose. You have to be agnostic about the teapot, but that doesn't mean you treat the likelihood of its existence as being on all fours with its non-existence. ~ Richard Dawkins,
1404:El impulso hacia las empresas personales debe dirigirse hacia cosas tales como la creación artística, los descubrimientos científicos o la creación de instituciones útiles; en una palabra, en actividades que son creativas más bien que posesivas. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1405:The world is full of injustice, and those who profit by injustice are in a position to administer rewards and punishments. The rewards go to those who invent ingenious justifications for inequality, the punishments to those who try to remedy it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1406:Philosophers, for the most part, are constitutionally timid, and dislike the unexpected. Few of them would be genuinely happy as pirates or burglars. Accordingly they invent systems which make the future calculable, at least in its main outlines. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1407:Always remember that true happiness is not in getting what you want, but wanting what you already have. He who dies with the most toys is still dead. What is wanted is not the will to believe, but the will to find out, which is the exact opposite. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1408:It is because modern education is so seldom inspired by a great hope that it so seldom achieves great results. The wish to preserve the past rather that the hope of creatingfuture dominates the minds of those who control the teaching of the young. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1409:The essence of the Liberal outlook lies not in what opinions are held, but in how they are held: instead of being held dogmatically, they are held tentatively, and with a consciousness that new evidence may at any moment lead to their abandonment. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1410:The essence of the liberal outlook lies not in what opinions are held, but in how they are held; instead of being held dogmatically, they are held tentatively, and with a consciousness that new evidence may at any moment lead to their abandonment. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1411:The world in which we live can be understood as a result of muddle and accident; but if it is the outcome of deliberate purpose, the purpose must have been that of a fiend. For my part, I find accident a less painful and more plausible hypothesis. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1412:To the young I should offer two maxims: Don't accept superficial solutions of difficult problems. It is better to do a little good than much harm. I should not offer anything more specific; every young person should decide on his or her own credo. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1413:A child develops best when, like a young plant, he is left undisturbed in the same soil. Too much travel, too much variety of impressions, are not good for the young, and cause them as they grow up to become incapable of enduring fruitful monotony. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1414:There lies before us, if we choose, continual progress in happiness, knowledge and wisdom. Shall we instead choose death, because we cannot forget our quarrels? I appeal as a human being to human beings; remember your humanity, and forget the rest. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1415:To be happy in this world, especially when youth is past, it is necessary to feel oneself not merely an isolated individual whose day will soon be over, but part of the stream of life flowing on from the first germ to the remote and unknown future. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1416:To discover a system for the avoidance of war is a vital need for our civ ilisation; but
no such system has a chance while men are so unhappy that mutual extermination
seems to them less dreadful than continued endurance of the light of day ~ Bertrand Russell,
1417:Dogma demands authority, rather than intelligent thought, as the source of opinion; it requires persecution of heretics and hostility to unbelievers; it asks of its disciples that they should inhibit natural kindliness in favor of systematic hatred. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1418:We are told that Sin consists in acting contrary to God's commands, but we are also told that God is omnipotent. If He is, nothing contrary to His will can occur; therefore when the sinner disobeys His commands, He must have intended this to happen. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1419:You may, if you are an old-fashioned schoolmaster, wish to consider yourself full of universal benevolence and at the same time derive great pleasure from caning boys. In order to reconcile these two desires you have to persuade yourself that caning ~ Bertrand Russell,
1420:A democrat need not believe that the majority will always reach a wise decision. He should however believe in the necessity of accepting the decision of the majority, be it wise or unwise, until such a time that the majority reaches another decision. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1421:But in fact, while some aspects of history can be made more or less scientific, and while it is important to do this wherever it is possible, the material is too complex to be reduced to scientific laws at present, and probably for centuries to come. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1422:Even if (as I myself believe) almost all Hegel's doctrines are false, he still retains an importance which is not merely historical, as the best representative of a certain kind of philosophy which, in others, is less coherent and less comprehensive. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1423:For love of domination we must substitute equality; for love of victory we must substitute justice; for brutality we must substitute intelligence; for competition we must substitute cooperation. We must learn to think of the human race as one family. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1424:He will see himself and life and the world as truly as our human limitations will permit; realizing the brevity and minuteness of human life, he will realize also that in individual minds is concentrated whatever of value the known universe contains. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1425:I don't care for the applause one gets by saying what others are thinking; I want actually to change people's thoughts. Power over people's minds is the main personal desire of my life; and this sort of power is not acquired by saying popular things. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1426:There are three ways of securing a society that shall be stable as regards population. The first is that of birth control, the second that of infanticide or really destructive wars, and the third that of general misery except for a powerful minority. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1427:Philosophy is that part of science which at present people chose to have opinions about, but which they have no knowledge about. Therefore every advance in knowledge robs philosophy of some problems which formerly it had ...and will belong to science. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1428:With subjectivism in philosophy, anarchism in politics goes hand in hand.
http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Bertrand... ~ Bertrand Russell,
1429:So in everything: power lies with those who control finance, not with those who know the matter upon which the money is to be spent. Thus, the holders of power are, in general, ignorant and malevolent, and the less they exercise their power the better. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1430:The harm that theology has done is not to create cruel impulses, but to give them the sanction of what professes to be lofty ethic, and to confer an apparently sacred character upon practices which have come down from more ignorant and barbarous times. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1431:To be happy in this world, especially when youth is past, it is necessary to feel oneself not merely an isolated individual whose day will soon be
over, but part of the stream of life flowing on from the first germ to the remote and unknown future. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1432:We are accustomed to take progress for granted: to assume without hesitation that the changes which have happened during the last hundred years were unquestionably for the better, and that further changes for the better are sure to follow indefinitely. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1433:But truth is not the only merit that a metaphysic can possess. It may have beauty, and this is certainly to be found in Plotinus; there are passages that remind one of the later cantos of Dante's Para- diso, and of almost nothing else in literature. Now ~ Bertrand Russell,
1434:For the inexperienced, however, it is very difficult to distinguish passionate love from mere sex hunger; especially is this the case with well-brought-up girls, who have been taught that they could not possibly like to kiss a man unless they loved him. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1435:I was made to learn Latin and Greek, but I resented it, being of opinion that it was silly to learn a language that was no longer spoken. I believe that all the little good I got from years of classical studies I could have got in adult life in a month. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1436:Education should have two objects: first, to give definite knowledge—reading and writing, languages and mathematics, and so on; secondly, to create those mental habits which will enable people to acquire knowledge and form sound judgments for themselves. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1437:In his youth, Wordsworth sympathized with the French Revolution, went to France, wrote good poetry and had a natural daughter. At this period, he was a bad man. Then he became good, abandoned his daughter, adopted correct principles and wrote bad poetry. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1438:There isn't [in new atheism]. Nothing that wasn't in Bertrand Russell or probably Robert Ingersoll. But I suppose it is more of a political effect, in that all these books happened to come out at the same time. I like to think that we have some influence. ~ Richard Dawkins,
1439:With the wise man, what he has does not cease to be enjoyable because some one else has something else. Envy, in fact, is one form of vice, partly moral, partly intellectual, which consists in seeing things never in themselves but only in their relations ~ Bertrand Russell,
1440:Being passionately interested in religion, and unable to speak about it, I wrote down my thoughts in Greek letters, in a book which I headed “Greek exercises”, in which, to make concealment more complete, I adopted an original system of phonetic spelling. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1441:The way to stop feeling guilty is to read stuff - I'm not saying my book, but works by Bertrand Russell or Oscar Wilde, people who weren't losers but who didn't believe in the work ethic, and argued this thing about guilt or wrote philosophy about idleness. ~ Tom Hodgkinson,
1442:Without being aware that I was following in my father’s footsteps, I read, before I went to Cambridge, Mill’s Logic and Political Economy, and made elaborate notes in which I practised the art of expressing the gist of each paragraph in a single sentence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1443:Both men and women who have children as a rule regulate their lives largely with reference to them, and children cause perfectly ordinary men and women to act unselfishly in certain ways, of which perhaps life insurance is the most definite and measurable. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1444:How pleasant a world would be in which no man was allowed to operate on the Stock Exchange unless he could pass and examination in economics and Greek poetry, and in which politicians were obliged to have a competent knowledge of history and modern novels. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1445:In adolescence, I hated life and was continually on the verge of suicide, from which, however, I was restrained by the desire to know more mathematics. Now, on the contrary, I enjoy life; I might almost say that with every year that passes I enjoy it more. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1446:The opinions which are still persecuted strike the majority as so monstrous and immoral that the general principle of toleration cannot be held to apply to them. But this is exactly the same view as that which made possible the tortures of the Inquisition. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1447:There is no reason, therefore, so far as I am able to perceive, to deny the ultimate and absolute philosophical validity of a theory of geometry which regards space as composed of points, and not as a mere assemblage of relations between non-spatial terms. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1448:We shall be compelled to renounce the hope of finding philosophical proofs of religious beliefs. ...Hence, once more, the value of philosophy must not depend upon any supposed body of definitely ascertainable knowledge to be acquired by those who study it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1449:There will still be things that machines cannot do. They will not produce great art or great literature or great philosophy; they will not be able to discover the secret springs of happiness in the human heart; they will know nothing of love and friendship. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1450:When you are studying any matter or considering any philosophy, ask yourself only: what are the facts, and what is the truth that the facts bear out. Never let yourself be diverted by what you wish to believe, but look only and surely at what are the facts. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1451:De façon générale, on estime que gagner de l'argent, c'est bien, mais que le dépenser, c'est mal. Quelle absurdité, si l'on songe qu'il y a toujours deux parties dans une transaction: autant soutenir que les clés, c'est bien, mais les trous de serrures, non. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1452:I found one day in school a boy of medium size ill-treating a smaller boy. I expostulated, but he replied: 'The bigs hit me, so I hit the babies; that's fair.' In these words he epitomized the history of the human race. ~ Bertrand Russell, Education and the Social Order (1932),
1453:Punctuality is a quality the need of which is bound up with social co-operation. It has nothing to do with the relation of the soul to God, or with mystic insight, or with any of the matters with which the more elevated and spiritual moralists are concerned. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1454:It is amusing to hear the modern Christian telling you how mild and rationalistic Christianity really is and ignoring the fact that all its mildness and rationalism is due to the teaching of men who in their own day were persecuted by all orthodox Christians. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1455:The happy man is the man who lives objectively, who has free affections and wide interests, who secures his happiness through these interests and affections and through the fact that they, in turn, make him an object of interest and affections to many others. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1456:Ve yine bence, kaleme alındığı şekliyle, tek bir virgülünü dahi değiştirme gereği olmaksızın, İnsan Hakları Evrensel Bildirisi, ilkelerin doğruluğu ve hedeflerin berraklığı bakımından, yeryüzündeki bütün siyasi parti programlarının layıkıyla yerine geçebilir. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1457:what is work? Work is of two kinds: first, altering the position of matter at or near the earth's surface relatively to other such matter; second, telling other people to do so. The first one is unpleasant and ill paid; the second is pleasant and highly paid. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1458:For my part, the thing I would wish to obtain from money would be leisure with security. But what the typical modern man desires to get with it is more money, with a view to ostentation, splendour, and the outshining of those who have hitherto been his equals. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1459:Respectability, regularity, and routine - the whole cast-iron discipline of a modern industrial society - have atrophied the artistic impulse, and imprisoned love so that it can no longer be generous and free and creative, but must be either stuffy or furtive. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1460:The world that we must seek is a world in which the creative spirit is alive, in which life is an adventure full of joy and hope, based rather upon the impulse to construct than upon the desire to retain what we possess or to seize what is possessed by others. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1461:Philosophy, if it cannot answer so many questions as we could wish, has at least the power of asking questions which increase the interest of the world, and show the strangeness and wonder lying just below the surface even in the commonest things of daily life. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1462:Dr. Arnold . . . the admired reformer of public schools, came across some cranks who thought it a mistake to flog boys. Anyone reading his outburst of furious indignation against this opinion will be forced to the conclusion that he enjoyed inflicting floggings. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1463:It is for this reason that rationality is of supreme importance to the well-being of the human species...even more, in those less fortunate times in which it is despised and rejected as the vain dream of men who lack the virility to kill where they cannot agree. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1464:I went to Russia a Communist; but contact with those who have no doubts has intensified a thousandfold my own doubts, not as to Communism in itself, but as to the wisdom of holding a creed so firmly that for its sake men are willing to inflict widespread misery. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1465:Political and social institutions are to be judged by the good or harm that they do to individuals. Do they encourage creativeness rather than possessiveness? Do they embody or promote a spirit of reverence between human beings? Do they preserve self-respect? In ~ Bertrand Russell,
1466:All definite knowledge - so I should contend - belongs to science; all dogma as to what surpasses definite knowledge belongs to theology. But between theology and science there is a No Man's Land, exposed to attack by both sides; this No Man's Land is philosophy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1467:...Bir filozof olarak Aristoteles, kendisinden önceki bütün filozoflardan birçok bakımdan farklıdır. Bir profesör gibi yazan ilk kişidir: yazdıkları sistematiktir, tartışmaları başlıklara ayrılır, ilhamlı bir peygamber değil, profesyonel bir öğretmendir. (s. 299) ~ Bertrand Russell,
1468:Perhaps the nuclear physicists have come so near to the ultimate secrets that He thinks it time to bring their activities to a stop. And what simpler method could He devise than to let them carry their ingenuity to the point where they exterminate the human race? ~ Bertrand Russell,
1469:In America everybody is of the opinion that he has no social superiors, since all men are equal, but he does not admit that he has no social inferiors, for, from the time of Jefferson onward, the doctrine that all men are equal applies only upwards, not downwards. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1470:In a world where there were no specifically mental facts, is it not plain that there would be a complete impartiality, an evenly diffused light, not the central illumination fading away into outer darkness, which is characteristic of objects in relation to a mind? ~ Bertrand Russell,
1471:It seems clear to me that marriage ought to be constituted by children, and relations not involving children ought to be ignored by the law and treated as indifferent by public opinion. It is only through children that relations cease to be a purely private matter. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1472:The Church no longer contends that knowledge is in itself sinful, though it did so in its palmy days; but the acquisition of knowledge, even though not sinful, is dangerous, since it may lead to pride of intellect, and hence to a questioning of the Christian dogma. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1473:A logical theory may be tested by its capacity for dealing with puzzles, and it is a wholesome plan, in thinking about logic, to stock the mind with as many puzzles as possible, since these serve much the same purpose as is served by experiments in physical science. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1474:...It is necessary for the average citizen, if he wishes to make a living, to avoid incurring the hostility of certain big men. And these big men have an outlook - religious, moral, and political - with which they expect their employees to agree, at least outwardly. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1475:One should as a rule respect public opinion in so far as is necessary to avoid starvation and to keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny, and is likely to interfere with happiness in all kinds of ways. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1476:Ordinary language is totally unsuited for expressing what physics really asserts, since the words of everyday life are not sufficiently abstract. Only mathematics and mathematical logic can say as little as the physicist means to say. ~ Bertrand Russell, The Scientific Outlook (1931).,
1477:Os conceitos da vida e do mundo que chamamos "filosóficos" são produto de dois fatores: um, constituído de fatores religiosos e éticos herdados; o outro, pela espécie de investigação que podemos denominar "científica", empregando a palavra em seu sentido mais amplo. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1478:The argument against the persecution of opinion does not depend upon what the excuse for persecution may be. The argument is that we none of us know all truth, that the discovery of new truth is promoted by free discussion and rendered very difficult by suppression. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1479:The State is a collection of officials, different for difference purposes, drawing comfortable incomes so long as the status quo is preserved. The only alteration they are likely to desire in the status quo is an increase of bureaucracy and the power of bureaucrats. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1480:A man is not allowed to practise medicine unless he knows something of the human body, but a financier is allowed to operate freely without any knowledge at all of the multifarious effects of his activities, with the sole exception of the effect upon his bank account. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1481:One must expect a war between U.S.A. and U.S.S.R. which will begin with the total destruction of London. I think the war will last 30 years, and leave a world without civilised people, from which everything will have to build afresh - a process taking (say) 500 years. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1482:In action, in desire, we must submit perpetually to the tyranny of outside forces; but in thought, in aspiration, we are free, free from our fellowmen, free from the petty planet on which our bodies impotently crawl, free even, while we live, from the tyranny of death. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1483:I wish to propose for the reader's favourable consideration a doctrine which may, I fear, appear wildly paradoxical and subversive. The doctrine in question is this: that it is undesirable to believe a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1484:Philosophy, if it cannot answer so many questions as we could wish, has at least the power of asking questions which increase the interest of the world, and show the strangeness and wonder lying just below the surface even in the commonest things of daily life. CHAPTER ~ Bertrand Russell,
1485:If you think that by killing men you can prevent some one from censuring your evil lives, you are mistaken; that is not a way of escape which is either possible or honourable; the easiest and the noblest way is not to be disabling others, but to be improving yourselves. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1486:I once saw a photograph of a large herd of wild elephants in Central Africa Seeing an airplane for the first time, and all in a state of wild collective terror... As, however, there were no journalists among them, the terror died down when the airplane was out of sight. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1487:It is not growing fanaticism, but growing democracy, that causes my troubles. Did you ever read the life of Averroes? He was protected by kings, but hated by the mob, which was fanatical. In the end, the mob won. Free thought has always been a perquisite of aristocracy. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1488:Modern technique has made it possible for leisure, within limits, to be not the prerogative of small privileged classes, but a right evenly distributed throughout the community. The morality of work is the morality of slaves, and the modern world has no need of slavery. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1489:Must think for thyself instead of merely taking scraps from different people - that is what makes thy opinions so disjointed, because thee takes different opinions from different people, thinking the two subjects independent - but no two subjects are really independent, ~ Bertrand Russell,
1490:The trouble arises from the generally received philosophy of life, according to which life is a contest, a competition, in which respect is to be a ccorded to the victor. This view leads to an undue cultivation of the will at the expense of the senses and the intellect. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1491:Those of us who love poetry read the great masterpieces of modern literature before we have any experience of the passions they deal with. To come across a new masterpiece with a more mature mind is a wonderful experience, and one which I have found almost overwhelming. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1492:Let us not delude ourselves with the hope that the best is within the reach of all, or that emotion uniformed by thought can ever attain the highest level. All such optimisms seem to me dangerous to civilisation, and the outcome of a heart not yet sufficiently mortified. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1493:One should as a rule r espect public opinion in so far as is necessary to avoid starvation and to keep out of
prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny, and is likely to interfere with happiness in all kinds of ways. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1494:Only the guardians, in Plato’s language, are to think; the rest are to obey, or to follow leaders like a herd of sheep. This doctrine, often unconsciously, has survived the introduction of political democracy, and has radically vitiated all national systems of education. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1495:The immense majority of even the noblest persons' actions have self-regarding motives, nor is this to be regretted, since if it were otherwise, the human race could not survive. A man who spent his time seeing that others were fed and forgot to feed himself would perish. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1496:at first sight it might be thought that knowledge might be defined as belief which is in agreement with the facts. The trouble is that no one knows what a belief is, no one knows what a fact is, and no one knows what sort of agreement between them would make a belief true. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1497:I would not say that ethical behavior is not possible for the atheist or agnostic. It is. A couple of pretty good examples are Bertrand Russell and Jean-Paul Sartre. However, I will have to say that if we take the human lot as a whole, these two men must be seen as exceptions. ~ Huston Smith,
1498:First of all: what is work? Work is of two kinds: first, altering the position of matter at or near the earth’s surface relatively to other such matter; second, telling other people to do so. The first kind is unpleasant and ill paid; the second is pleasant and highly paid. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1499:It is, of course, clear that a country with a large foreign population must endeavour, through its schools, to assimilate the children of immigrants. It is, however, unfortunate that a large part of this process should be effected by means of a somewhat blatant nationalism. ~ Bertrand Russell,
1500:Something of the hermit's temper is an essential element in many forms of excellence, since it enables men to resist the lure of popularity, to pursue important work in spite of general indifference or hostility, and arrive at opinions which are opposed to prevalent errors. ~ Bertrand Russell,

IN CHAPTERS [0/0]









WORDNET



--- Overview of noun bertrand_russell

The noun bertrand russell has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
              
1. Russell, Bertrand Russell, Bertrand Arthur William Russell, Earl Russell ::: (English philosopher and mathematician who collaborated with Whitehead (1872-1970))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun bertrand_russell

1 sense of bertrand russell                      

Sense 1
Russell, Bertrand Russell, Bertrand Arthur William Russell, Earl Russell
   INSTANCE OF=> logician, logistician
     => expert
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity
   INSTANCE OF=> philosopher
     => scholar, scholarly person, bookman, student
       => intellectual, intellect
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun bertrand_russell
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun bertrand_russell

1 sense of bertrand russell                      

Sense 1
Russell, Bertrand Russell, Bertrand Arthur William Russell, Earl Russell
   INSTANCE OF=> logician, logistician
   INSTANCE OF=> philosopher




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun bertrand_russell

1 sense of bertrand russell                      

Sense 1
Russell, Bertrand Russell, Bertrand Arthur William Russell, Earl Russell
  -> logician, logistician
   => dialectician
   => syllogist, syllogizer, syllogiser
   => symbolic logician
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jevons, William Stanley Jevons
   HAS INSTANCE=> Peirce, Charles Peirce, Charles Sanders Peirce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Quine, W. V. Quine, Willard Van Orman Quine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, Bertrand Russell, Bertrand Arthur William Russell, Earl Russell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Venn, John Venn
  -> philosopher
   => nativist
   => Cynic
   => eclectic, eclecticist
   => empiricist
   => epistemologist
   => esthetician, aesthetician
   => ethicist, ethician
   => existentialist, existentialist philosopher, existential philosopher
   => gymnosophist
   => libertarian
   => mechanist
   => moralist
   => naturalist
   => necessitarian
   => nominalist
   => pluralist
   => pre-Socratic
   => realist
   => Scholastic
   => Sophist
   => Stoic
   => transcendentalist
   => yogi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Abelard, Peter Abelard, Pierre Abelard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaxagoras
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaximander
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anaximenes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arendt, Hannah Arendt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aristotle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Averroes, ibn-Roshd, Abul-Walid Mohammed ibn-Ahmad Ibn-Mohammed ibn-Roshd
   HAS INSTANCE=> Avicenna, ibn-Sina, Abu Ali al-Husain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bacon, Francis Bacon, Sir Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam, 1st Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bentham, Jeremy Bentham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bergson, Henri Bergson, Henri Louis Bergson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Berkeley, Bishop Berkeley, George Berkeley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bruno, Giordano Bruno
   HAS INSTANCE=> Buber, Martin Buber
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cassirer, Ernst Cassirer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cleanthes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Comte, Auguste Comte, Isidore Auguste Marie Francois Comte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Condorcet, Marquis de Condorcet, Marie Jean Antoine Nicolas Caritat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Confucius, Kongfuze, K'ung Futzu, Kong the Master
   HAS INSTANCE=> Democritus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Derrida, Jacques Derrida
   HAS INSTANCE=> Descartes, Rene Descartes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dewey, John Dewey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Diderot, Denis Diderot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Diogenes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Empedocles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Epictetus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Epicurus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haeckel, Ernst Heinrich Haeckel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hartley, David Hartley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heraclitus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herbart, Johann Friedrich Herbart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herder, Johann Gottfried von Herder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hobbes, Thomas Hobbes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hume, David Hume
   HAS INSTANCE=> Husserl, Edmund Husserl
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hypatia
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, William James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kant, Immanuel Kant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kierkegaard, Soren Kierkegaard, Soren Aabye Kierkegaard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lao-tzu, Lao-tse, Lao-zi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leibniz, Leibnitz, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Locke, John Locke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lucretius, Titus Lucretius Carus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lully, Raymond Lully, Ramon Lully
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mach, Ernst Mach
   HAS INSTANCE=> Machiavelli, Niccolo Machiavelli
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maimonides, Moses Maimonides, Rabbi Moses Ben Maimon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malebranche, Nicolas de Malebranche
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marcuse, Herbert Marcuse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marx, Karl Marx
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mead, George Herbert Mead
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mill, John Mill, John Stuart Mill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mill, James Mill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montesquieu, Baron de la Brede et de Montesquieu, Charles Louis de Secondat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moore, G. E. Moore, George Edward Moore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
   HAS INSTANCE=> Occam, William of Occam, Ockham, William of Ockham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Origen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ortega y Gasset, Jose Ortega y Gasset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parmenides
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pascal, Blaise Pascal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Peirce, Charles Peirce, Charles Sanders Peirce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Perry, Ralph Barton Perry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plato
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plotinus
   => Popper, Karl Popper, Sir Karl Raimund Popper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pythagoras
   HAS INSTANCE=> Quine, W. V. Quine, Willard Van Orman Quine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Radhakrishnan, Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, Sir Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Reid, Thomas Reid
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Rousseau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, Bertrand Russell, Bertrand Arthur William Russell, Earl Russell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schopenhauer, Arthur Schopenhauer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schweitzer, Albert Schweitzer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Socrates
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spencer, Herbert Spencer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spengler, Oswald Spengler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spinoza, de Spinoza, Baruch de Spinoza, Benedict de Spinoza
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steiner, Rudolf Steiner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stewart, Dugald Stewart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Sir Rabindranath Tagore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Teilhard de Chardin, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thales, Thales of Miletus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Theophrastus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Weil, Simone Weil
   HAS INSTANCE=> Whitehead, Alfred North Whitehead
   HAS INSTANCE=> Williams, Sir Bernard Williams, Bernard Arthur Owen Williams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wittgenstein, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Ludwig Josef Johan Wittgenstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Xenophanes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zeno, Zeno of Citium
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zeno, Zeno of Elea




--- Grep of noun bertrand_russell
bertrand russell



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