classes ::: Place,
children :::
branches ::: Laboratory, The Laboratory

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object:Laboratory
class:Place

see also :::

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Heart_of_Matter
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Mothers_Agenda
Toward_the_Future

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
1.rb_-_The_Laboratory-Ancien_Rgime

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
01.03_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_his_School
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
0_1966-01-26
0_1966-03-02
0_1967-05-17
0_1967-12-30
0_1971-12-11
03.15_-_Towards_the_Future
05.04_-_The_Immortal_Person
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.22_-_Mysticism_and_Occultism
10.01_-_Cycles_of_Creation
1.007_-_Initial_Steps_in_Yoga_Practice
1.010_-_Self-Control_-_The_Alpha_and_Omega_of_Yoga
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.01_-_The_Human_Aspiration
1.01_-_The_Offering
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Authors_second_meeting,_March_1921
1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND
1.02_-_THE_WITHIN_OF_THINGS
10.30_-_India,_the_World_and_the_Ashram
10.37_-_The_Golden_Bridge
1.03_-_Concerning_the_Archetypes,_with_Special_Reference_to_the_Anima_Concept
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Time_Series,_Information,_and_Communication
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.04_-_The_Future_of_Man
1.05_-_2010_and_1956_-_Doomsday?
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature
1.089_-_The_Levels_of_Concentration
1.1.04_-_Philosophy
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.13_-_And_Then?
1.1.5_-_Thought_and_Knowledge
1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being
1.17_-_The_Transformation
12.03_-_The_Sorrows_of_God
1f.lovecraft_-_Ashes
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Cool_Air
1f.lovecraft_-_From_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_Herbert_West-Reanimator
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Colour_out_of_Space
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Disinterment
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Electric_Executioner
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Man_of_Stone
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_Winged_Death
1.rb_-_The_Laboratory-Ancien_Rgime
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_THE_ADVENT_OF_LIFE
2.06_-_Two_Tales_of_Seeking_and_Losing
2.08_-_The_Sword
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
2.21_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.4.2_-_Interactions_with_Others_and_the_Practice_of_Yoga
3.00.2_-_Introduction
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret
3.05_-_SAL
3.08_-_Purification
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
3.11_-_Spells
3.12_-_Of_the_Bloody_Sacrifice
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
3.2.01_-_The_Newness_of_the_Integral_Yoga
32.02_-_Reason_and_Yoga
3.20_-_Of_the_Eucharist
3.2.2_-_Sleep
33.03_-_Muraripukur_-_I
3.4.02_-_The_Inconscient
3-5_Full_Circle
6.04_-_THE_MEANING_OF_THE_ALCHEMICAL_PROCEDURE
6.05_-_THE_PSYCHOLOGICAL_INTERPRETATION_OF_THE_PROCEDURE
6.08_-_THE_CONTENT_AND_MEANING_OF_THE_FIRST_TWO_STAGES
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
Blazing_P2_-_Map_the_Stages_of_Conventional_Consciousness
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
Deutsches_Requiem
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
MoM_References
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
The_Act_of_Creation_text
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers

PRIMARY CLASS

Place
SIMILAR TITLES
Laboratory
The Laboratory
the Laboratory

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Laboratory INstrument Computer "computer" (LINC) A computer which was originally designed in 1962 by {Wesley Clark}, {Charles Molnar}, Severo Ornstein and others at the {Lincoln Laboratory Group}, to facilitate scientific research. With its {digital logic} and {stored programs}, the LINC is accepted by the {IEEE Computer Society} to be the World's first {interactive} {personal computer}. The machine was developed to fulfil a need for better laboratory tools by doctors and medical researchers. It would supplant the 1958 {Average Response Computer}, and was designed for individual use. Led by William N. Papian and mainly funded by the {National Institute of Health}, Wesley Clark designed the logic while Charles Molnar did the engineering. The first LINC was finished in March 1962. In January 1963, the project moved to {MIT}, and then to {Washington University} (in St. Louis) in 1964. The LINC had a simple {operating system}, four "knobs" (which was used like a {mouse}), a {Soroban keyboard} (for alpha-numeric data entry), two {LINCtape} drives and a small {CRT} display. It originally had one {kilobit} of {core memory}, but this was expanded to 2 Kb later. The computer was made out of {Digital Equipment Corporation} (DEC) hardware modules. Over 24 LINC systems had been built before late 1964 when DEC began to sell the LINC commercially. After the introduction of the {PDP-8}, {Dick Clayton} at DEC produced a rather frightening hybrid of the LINC and PDP-8 called a LINC-8. This really was not a very satisfactory machine, but it used the new PDP-8 style DEC cards and was cheaper and easier to produce. It still didn't sell that well. In the late 1960s, Clayton brought the design to its pinnacle with the PDP-12, an amazing tour de force of the LINC concept; along with about as seamless a merger as could be done with the PDP-8. This attempted to incorporate {TTL logic} into the machine. The end of the LINC line had been reached. Due to the success of the LINC-8, {Spear, Inc.} produced a LINC clone (since the design was in the {public domain}). The interesting thing about the Spear {micro-LINC 300} was that it used {MECL} II logic. MECL logic was known for its blazing speed (at the time!), but the Spear computer ran at very modest rates. In 1995 the last of the classic LINCs was turned off for the final time after 28 years of service. This LINC had been in use in the Eaton-Peabody Laboratory of Auditory Physiology (EPL) of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. On 15 August 1995, it was transferred to the MIT {Computer Museum} where it was put on display. {LINC/8, PDP-12 (http://faqs.org/faqs/dec-faq/pdp8/section-7.html)}. {Lights out for last LINC (http://rleweb.mit.edu/publications/currents/6-1linc.HTM)}. ["Computers and Automation", Nov. 1964, page 43]. (1999-05-20)

Laboratory INstrument Computer ::: (computer) (LINC) A computer which was originally designed in 1962 by Wesley Clark, Charles Molnar, Severo Ornstein and others at the Lincoln stored programs, the LINC is accepted by the IEEE Computer Society to be the World's first interactive personal computer.The machine was developed to fulfil a need for better laboratory tools by doctors and medical researchers. It would supplant the 1958 Average Response Computer, and was designed for individual use.Led by William N. Papian and mainly funded by the National Institute of Health, Wesley Clark designed the logic while Charles Molnar did the engineering. The first LINC was finished in March 1962.In January 1963, the project moved to MIT, and then to Washington University (in St. Louis) in 1964.The LINC had a simple operating system, four knobs (which was used like a mouse), a Soroban keyboard (for alpha-numeric data entry), two LINCtape drives was expanded to 2 Kb later. The computer was made out of Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) hardware modules.Over 24 LINC systems had been built before late 1964 when DEC began to sell the LINC commercially.After the introduction of the PDP-8, Dick Clayton at DEC produced a rather frightening hybrid of the LINC and PDP-8 called a LINC-8. This really was not a very satisfactory machine, but it used the new PDP-8 style DEC cards and was cheaper and easier to produce. It still didn't sell that well.In the late 1960s, Clayton brought the design to its pinnacle with the PDP-12, an amazing tour de force of the LINC concept; along with about as seamless a merger as could be done with the PDP-8. This attempted to incorporate TTL logic into the machine. The end of the LINC line had been reached.Due to the success of the LINC-8, Spear, Inc. produced a LINC clone (since the design was in the public domain). The interesting thing about the Spear micro-LINC 300 was that it used MECL II logic. MECL logic was known for its blazing speed (at the time!), but the Spear computer ran at very modest rates.In 1995 the last of the classic LINCs was turned off for the final time after 28 years of service. This LINC had been in use in the Eaton-Peabody Laboratory of Auditory Physiology (EPL) of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.On 15 August 1995, it was transferred to the MIT Computer Museum where it was put on display. . .[Computers and Automation, Nov. 1964, page 43]. (1999-05-20)

Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench "tool" (LabVIEW) A package from National Instruments Corp originally developed to provide a {graphical user interface} to instruments connected by the {IEEE 488} (GPIB) bus. It has powerful graphical editing facilities for defining and interconnecting "virtual instruments". (1996-04-24)

Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench ::: (tool) (LabVIEW) A package from National Instruments Corp originally developed to provide a graphical user interface to instruments connected by the IEEE 488 (GPIB) bus. It has powerful graphical editing facilities for defining and interconnecting virtual instruments. (1996-04-24)

Laboratory. Will collide two beams of atomic nuclei at 99.95 percent the speed of light.


  


laboratory experiments: conducted in a laboratory or a rigorously controlled environment, whereby the independent variable is manipulated, whilst all other extraneous variables are strictly controlled.

laboratory ::: n. --> The workroom of a chemist; also, a place devoted to experiments in any branch of natural science; as, a chemical, physical, or biological laboratory. Hence, by extension, a place where something is prepared, or some operation is performed; as, the liver is the laboratory of the bile.


TERMS ANYWHERE

(2) The term experimental psychology is also used in a more restricted sense to designate a special branch of psychology consisting of laboratory studies conducted on normal, human adults as distinguished from such branches as child, abnormal, differential, animal or comparative, social, educational and applied psychology. This restricted sense is employed in the titles of text-books and manuals of "experimental psychology." Included in this field are such topics as sensory phenomena, perception, judgment, memory, learning, reaction-time, motor phenomena, emotional responses, motivation, thinking and reasoning. This identification of experimental psychology with a specific type of content is largely a result of historical accident, the first experimental psychologists were preoccupied with these particular topics.

ADVENT "games" /ad'vent/ The prototypical computer {adventure} game, first implemented by Will Crowther for a {CDC} computer (probably the {CDC 6600}?) as an attempt at computer-refereed fantasy gaming. ADVENT was ported to the {PDP-10}, and expanded to the 350-point {Classic} puzzle-oriented version, by Don Woods of the {Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory} (SAIL). The game is now better known as Adventure, but the {TOPS-10} {operating system} permitted only six-letter filenames. All the versions since are based on the SAIL port. David Long of the {University of Chicago} Graduate School of Business Computing Facility (which had two of the four {DEC20s} on campus in the late 1970s and early 1980s) was responsible for expanding the cave in a number of ways, and pushing the point count up to 500, then 501 points. Most of his work was in the data files, but he made some changes to the {parser} as well. This game defined the terse, dryly humorous style now expected in text adventure games, and popularised several tag lines that have become fixtures of hacker-speak: "A huge green fierce snake bars the way!" "I see no X here" (for some noun X). "You are in a maze of twisty little passages, all alike." "You are in a little maze of twisty passages, all different." The "magic words" {xyzzy} and {plugh} also derive from this game. Crowther, by the way, participated in the exploration of the Mammoth & Flint Ridge cave system; it actually *has* a "Colossal Cave" and a "Bedquilt" as in the game, and the "Y2" that also turns up is cavers' jargon for a map reference to a secondary entrance. See also {vadding}. [Was the original written in Fortran?] [{Jargon File}] (1996-04-01)

Alan Turing ::: (person) Alan M. Turing, 1912-06-22/3? - 1954-06-07. A British mathematician, inventor of the Turing Machine. Turing also proposed the Turing test. Turing's work was fundamental in the theoretical foundations of computer science.Turing was a student and fellow of King's College Cambridge and was a graduate student at Princeton University from 1936 to 1938. While at Princeton Turing published On Computable Numbers, a paper in which he conceived an abstract machine, now called a Turing Machine.Turing returned to England in 1938 and during World War II, he worked in the British Foreign Office. He masterminded operations at Bletchley Park, UK which perform many repetitive symbolic manipulations quickly. Before the building of the Colossus computer this work was done by a roomful of women.In 1945 he joined the National Physical Laboratory in London and worked on the design and construction of a large computer, named Automatic Computing Engine Manchester where the Manchester Automatic Digital Machine, the worlds largest memory computer, was being built.He also worked on theories of artificial intelligence, and on the application of mathematical theory to biological forms. In 1952 he published the first part of his theoretical study of morphogenesis, the development of pattern and form in living organisms.Turing was gay, and died rather young under mysterious circumstances. He was arrested for violation of British homosexuality statutes in 1952. He died of inquest concluded that it was self-administered but it is now thought by some to have been an accident.There is an excellent biography of Turing by Andrew Hodges, subtitled The Enigma of Intelligence and a play based on it called Breaking the Code. There was also a popular summary of his work in Douglas Hofstadter's book G�del, Escher, Bach. .(2001-10-09)

Alan Turing "person" Alan M. Turing, 1912-06-22/3? - 1954-06-07. A British mathematician, inventor of the {Turing Machine}. Turing also proposed the {Turing test}. Turing's work was fundamental in the theoretical foundations of computer science. Turing was a student and fellow of {King's College Cambridge} and was a graduate student at {Princeton University} from 1936 to 1938. While at Princeton Turing published "On Computable Numbers", a paper in which he conceived an {abstract machine}, now called a {Turing Machine}. Turing returned to England in 1938 and during World War II, he worked in the British Foreign Office. He masterminded operations at {Bletchley Park}, UK which were highly successful in cracking the Nazis "Enigma" codes during World War II. Some of his early advances in computer design were inspired by the need to perform many repetitive symbolic manipulations quickly. Before the building of the {Colossus} computer this work was done by a roomful of women. In 1945 he joined the {National Physical Laboratory} in London and worked on the design and construction of a large computer, named {Automatic Computing Engine} (ACE). In 1949 Turing became deputy director of the Computing Laboratory at Manchester where the {Manchester Automatic Digital Machine}, the worlds largest memory computer, was being built. He also worked on theories of {artificial intelligence}, and on the application of mathematical theory to biological forms. In 1952 he published the first part of his theoretical study of morphogenesis, the development of pattern and form in living organisms. Turing was gay, and died rather young under mysterious circumstances. He was arrested for violation of British homosexuality statutes in 1952. He died of potassium cyanide poisoning while conducting electrolysis experiments. An inquest concluded that it was self-administered but it is now thought by some to have been an accident. There is an excellent biography of Turing by Andrew Hodges, subtitled "The Enigma of Intelligence" and a play based on it called "Breaking the Code". There was also a popular summary of his work in Douglas Hofstadter's book "Gödel, Escher, Bach". {(http://AlanTuring.net/)}. (2001-10-09)

Also self-learning know-how system. ::: A technology that employs the latest findings in neuroscience. The term was first introduced by the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in Zurich, Switzerland, in the context of the ROBOY project.[69] Brain Technology can be employed in robots,[70] know-how management systems[71] and any other application with self-learning capabilities. In particular, Brain Technology applications allow the visualization of the underlying learning architecture often coined as "know-how maps".

animal ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The animal is a living laboratory in which Nature has, it is said, worked out man. Man himself may well be a thinking and living laboratory in whom and with whose conscious co-operation she wills to work out the superman, the god. Or shall we not say, rather, to manifest God?” *The Life Divine

animal ::: “The animal is a living laboratory in which Nature has, it is said, worked out man. Man himself may well be a thinking and living laboratory in whom and with whose conscious co-operation she wills to work out the superman, the god. Or shall we not say, rather, to manifest God?” The Life Divine

ANL ::: Argonne National Laboratory

ANL {Argonne National Laboratory}

Automated Engineering Design "language" (AED) (Or "ALGOL Extended for Design") A systems language for the {IBM 7090} and {IBM 360} developed at {MIT} System Laboratory ca. 1965 by a team led by Douglas T. Ross (now at {Softech}). AED is an extension of {ALGOL 60} with {records} ("plexes"), pointers, and {dynamic allocation}. {DYNAMO II} was written in AED, as was the first {BCPL} {compiler}. Versions: AED-0, AED-1, AED-JR. ["The Automated Engineering Design (AED) Approach to Generalized Computer-Aided Design", D.T. Ross, Proc ACM 22nd Natl Conf, 1967]. [Sammet 1969 and 1978]. (1995-03-26)

Automated Engineering Design ::: (language) (AED) (Or ALGOL Extended for Design) A systems language for the IBM 7090 and IBM 360 developed at MIT System Laboratory ca. 1965 by a team records (plexes), pointers, and dynamic allocation. DYNAMO II was written in AED, as was the first BCPL compiler.Versions: AED-0, AED-1, AED-JR.[The Automated Engineering Design (AED) Approach to Generalized Computer-Aided Design, D.T. Ross, Proc ACM 22nd Natl Conf, 1967].[Sammet 1969 and 1978]. (1995-03-26)

Avichi (Sanskrit) Avīci [from a not + vīci waves, pleasure] Waveless, having no waves or movement; without happiness; without repose. “A generalized term for places of evil realizations, but not of ‘punishment’ in the Christian sense; where the will for evil, and the unsatisfied evil longings for pure selfishness, find their chance for expansion — and final extinction of the entity itself. Avichi has many degrees or grades. Nature has all things in her; if she has heavens where good and true men find rest and peace and bliss, so has she other spheres and states where gravitate those who must find an outlet for the evil passions burning within. They, at the end of their avichi, go to pieces and are ground over and over, and vanish away finally like a shadow before the sunlight in the air — ground over in Nature’s laboratory” (OG 16-17).

Avichi(Sanskrit) ::: A word, the general meaning of which is "waveless," having no waves or movement,suggesting the stagnation of life and being in immobility; it also means "without happiness" or "withoutrepose." A generalized term for places of evil realizations, but not of punishment in the Christian sense;where the will for evil, and the unsatisfied evil longings for pure selfishness, find their chance forexpansion -- and final extinction of the entity itself. Avichi has many degrees or grades. Nature has allthings in her; if she has heavens where good and true men find rest and peace and bliss, so has she otherspheres and states where gravitate those who must find an outlet for the evil passions burning within.They, at the end of their avichi, go to pieces and are ground over and over, and vanish away finally like ashadow before the sunlight in the air -- ground over in nature's laboratory. (See also Eighth Sphere)

BABEL "language" 1. A subset of {ALGOL 60} with many {ALGOL W} extensions. ["BABEL, A New Programming Language", R.S. Scowen, {National Physics Laboratory}, UK, Report CCU7, 1969]. ["Babel, an application of extensible compilers", R. S. Scowen, National Physical Laboratory, Proceedings of the international symposium on Extensible languages, Grenoble, France 1971-09-06, https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=807971]. 2. A language mentioned in "The Psychology of Computer Programming", G.M. Weinberg, Van Nostrand 1971, p.241. 3. A language based on {higher-order functions} and {first-order logic}. ["Graph-Based Implementation of a Functional Logic Language", H. Kuchen et al, Proc ESOP 90, LNCS 432, Springer 1990, pp. 271-290]. ["Logic Programming with Functions and Predicates: The Language BABEL", Moreno-Navarro et al, J Logic Prog 12(3), Feb 1992]. (1994-11-28)

Bell Communications Research, Inc ::: (Bellcore) The research laboratory for the seven regional Bell Telephone companies in the USA that were created by the divestiture of AT&T in 1984.It can be compared to Bell Laboratories, for which many Bellcore employees used to work. Currently jointly owned by the seven baby bells (as they are called), there are rumours that it is to be sold by its current owners to become an independent research laboratoryIts headquarters are in Livingstone, New Jersey. It has offices in Morristown, Lincroft, and Piscataway, all in New Jersey, USA.Telephone: +1 (201) 74 3000, +1 (800) 521 CORE. (1994-12-06)

Bell Communications Research, Inc (Bellcore) The research laboratory for the seven regional {Bell Telephone} companies in the USA that were created by the divestiture of {AT&T} in 1984. It can be compared to {Bell Laboratories}, for which many Bellcore employees used to work. Currently jointly owned by the seven baby bells (as they are called), there are rumours that it is to be sold by its current owners to become an independent research laboratory Its headquarters are in Livingstone, New Jersey. It has offices in Morristown, Lincroft, and Piscataway, all in New Jersey, USA. Telephone: +1 (201) 74 3000, +1 (800) 521 CORE. (1994-12-06)

Berkeley EDIF200 ::: translator-building toolkitWendell C. Baker and Prof A. Richard Newton of the Electronics Research Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley.Version 7.6. Restriction: no-profit without permission. . (1990-07-01)

Berkeley EDIF200 translator-building toolkit Wendell C. Baker and Prof A. Richard Newton of the Electronics Research Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the {University of California, Berkeley}. Version 7.6. Restriction: no-profit without permission. {(ftp://ic.berkeley.edu/pub/edif)}. (1990-07-01)

Laboratory INstrument Computer "computer" (LINC) A computer which was originally designed in 1962 by {Wesley Clark}, {Charles Molnar}, Severo Ornstein and others at the {Lincoln Laboratory Group}, to facilitate scientific research. With its {digital logic} and {stored programs}, the LINC is accepted by the {IEEE Computer Society} to be the World's first {interactive} {personal computer}. The machine was developed to fulfil a need for better laboratory tools by doctors and medical researchers. It would supplant the 1958 {Average Response Computer}, and was designed for individual use. Led by William N. Papian and mainly funded by the {National Institute of Health}, Wesley Clark designed the logic while Charles Molnar did the engineering. The first LINC was finished in March 1962. In January 1963, the project moved to {MIT}, and then to {Washington University} (in St. Louis) in 1964. The LINC had a simple {operating system}, four "knobs" (which was used like a {mouse}), a {Soroban keyboard} (for alpha-numeric data entry), two {LINCtape} drives and a small {CRT} display. It originally had one {kilobit} of {core memory}, but this was expanded to 2 Kb later. The computer was made out of {Digital Equipment Corporation} (DEC) hardware modules. Over 24 LINC systems had been built before late 1964 when DEC began to sell the LINC commercially. After the introduction of the {PDP-8}, {Dick Clayton} at DEC produced a rather frightening hybrid of the LINC and PDP-8 called a LINC-8. This really was not a very satisfactory machine, but it used the new PDP-8 style DEC cards and was cheaper and easier to produce. It still didn't sell that well. In the late 1960s, Clayton brought the design to its pinnacle with the PDP-12, an amazing tour de force of the LINC concept; along with about as seamless a merger as could be done with the PDP-8. This attempted to incorporate {TTL logic} into the machine. The end of the LINC line had been reached. Due to the success of the LINC-8, {Spear, Inc.} produced a LINC clone (since the design was in the {public domain}). The interesting thing about the Spear {micro-LINC 300} was that it used {MECL} II logic. MECL logic was known for its blazing speed (at the time!), but the Spear computer ran at very modest rates. In 1995 the last of the classic LINCs was turned off for the final time after 28 years of service. This LINC had been in use in the Eaton-Peabody Laboratory of Auditory Physiology (EPL) of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. On 15 August 1995, it was transferred to the MIT {Computer Museum} where it was put on display. {LINC/8, PDP-12 (http://faqs.org/faqs/dec-faq/pdp8/section-7.html)}. {Lights out for last LINC (http://rleweb.mit.edu/publications/currents/6-1linc.HTM)}. ["Computers and Automation", Nov. 1964, page 43]. (1999-05-20)

Laboratory INstrument Computer ::: (computer) (LINC) A computer which was originally designed in 1962 by Wesley Clark, Charles Molnar, Severo Ornstein and others at the Lincoln stored programs, the LINC is accepted by the IEEE Computer Society to be the World's first interactive personal computer.The machine was developed to fulfil a need for better laboratory tools by doctors and medical researchers. It would supplant the 1958 Average Response Computer, and was designed for individual use.Led by William N. Papian and mainly funded by the National Institute of Health, Wesley Clark designed the logic while Charles Molnar did the engineering. The first LINC was finished in March 1962.In January 1963, the project moved to MIT, and then to Washington University (in St. Louis) in 1964.The LINC had a simple operating system, four knobs (which was used like a mouse), a Soroban keyboard (for alpha-numeric data entry), two LINCtape drives was expanded to 2 Kb later. The computer was made out of Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) hardware modules.Over 24 LINC systems had been built before late 1964 when DEC began to sell the LINC commercially.After the introduction of the PDP-8, Dick Clayton at DEC produced a rather frightening hybrid of the LINC and PDP-8 called a LINC-8. This really was not a very satisfactory machine, but it used the new PDP-8 style DEC cards and was cheaper and easier to produce. It still didn't sell that well.In the late 1960s, Clayton brought the design to its pinnacle with the PDP-12, an amazing tour de force of the LINC concept; along with about as seamless a merger as could be done with the PDP-8. This attempted to incorporate TTL logic into the machine. The end of the LINC line had been reached.Due to the success of the LINC-8, Spear, Inc. produced a LINC clone (since the design was in the public domain). The interesting thing about the Spear micro-LINC 300 was that it used MECL II logic. MECL logic was known for its blazing speed (at the time!), but the Spear computer ran at very modest rates.In 1995 the last of the classic LINCs was turned off for the final time after 28 years of service. This LINC had been in use in the Eaton-Peabody Laboratory of Auditory Physiology (EPL) of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.On 15 August 1995, it was transferred to the MIT Computer Museum where it was put on display. . .[Computers and Automation, Nov. 1964, page 43]. (1999-05-20)

Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench "tool" (LabVIEW) A package from National Instruments Corp originally developed to provide a {graphical user interface} to instruments connected by the {IEEE 488} (GPIB) bus. It has powerful graphical editing facilities for defining and interconnecting "virtual instruments". (1996-04-24)

Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench ::: (tool) (LabVIEW) A package from National Instruments Corp originally developed to provide a graphical user interface to instruments connected by the IEEE 488 (GPIB) bus. It has powerful graphical editing facilities for defining and interconnecting virtual instruments. (1996-04-24)

Laboratory. Will collide two beams of atomic nuclei at 99.95 percent the speed of light.


  


black magic, the “laboratory of Satan.”

Blood Transfusion The introducing of blood from the vascular system of one animal or person into the blood vessels of another. Selecting a person for a donor whose blood matches that of the recipient takes no account of the subtle personal and karmic qualities, both active and latent, which are carried over from the donor’s lifestream. The protean influence of personalized blood, thus directly transmitted, is conveyed to the other person with greater potency than would result even from drinking it. No laboratory findings of supposedly healthy blood can ever reveal the latent seeds of karmic disease, or of mental or psychological disorder, which will manifest in due time unless destroyed, even when transplanted into a different vital culture-medium. Moreover, transfusion may result in an increased or abnormal activity of such germinating seeds which thus have been involved with the physical conditions and the life issues of another person. W. Q. Judge, speaking of the esoteric teaching on the influence of the body’s tissues on the soul, says:

Bureau International des Poids et Mesures ::: (body, standard) (BIPM) The standards body that ensures world-wide uniformity of measurements and their traceability to the International System of metrology laboratories of the member states of the convention, and through its own laboratory work.The BIPM carries out measurement-related research. It takes part in, and organises, international comparisons of national measurement standards, and it carries out calibrations for member states. .(2005-03-15)

Bureau International des Poids et Mesures "body, standard" (BIPM) The standards body that ensures world-wide uniformity of measurements and their traceability to the {International System of Units} (SI). The BIPM is based in France and operates with the authority of the Convention of the Metre, a diplomatic treaty between fifty-one nations. It operates through a series of committees, whose members are the national metrology laboratories of the member states of the convention, and through its own laboratory work. The BIPM carries out measurement-related research. It takes part in, and organises, international comparisons of national measurement standards, and it carries out calibrations for member states. {BIPM Home (http://www.bipm.org/)}. (2014-07-08)

CERN "body" The European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Swizerland. Sir {Tim Berners-Lee} invented the {World-Wide Web} while working at CERN. Other notable computing developments at CERN include {ADAMO}, {Application Software Installation Server}, {CERNLIB}, {cfortran.h}, {CHEOPS}, {CICERO}, {Cortex}, {EMDIR}, {HBOOK}, {LIGHT}, {NFT}, {PATCHY}, {PL-11}, {Schoonschip}, {SHIFT}, and {ZEBRA}. {CERN Home (http://cern.ch/)}. (2004-10-24)

CERN ::: (body) The European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Swizerland.Tim Berners-Lee invented the World-Wide Web while working at CERN.Other notable computing developments at CERN include ADAMO, Application Software Installation Server, CERNLIB, cfortran.h, CHEOPS, CICERO, Cortex, EMDIR, HBOOK, LIGHT, NFT, PATCHY, PL-11, Schoonschip, SHIFT, and ZEBRA. .(2004-10-24)

Consortium for Lexical Research "body" (CLR) A repository for {natural language processing} software, {lexical} data, tools and resources; set up in July 1991 in the Computing Research Laboratory of {New Mexico State University}, Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA. CLR maintained a public {FTP} {archive site} and a separate members-only library. As of 1994-02-01, CLR had about 60 members, mostly academic institutions, including most US natural language processing centres. Materials could be contributed in exchange for membership. In 2006, the CRL closed down due to lack of funding. The CLR FTP server and e-mail address seems to have disappeared with it. [{The Consortium for Lexical Research, Y. Wilks, Principal Investigator, Computing Research Laboratory, New Mexico State University (http://clair.eecs.umich.edu/aan/paper.php?paper_id=H92-1114)}]. (2014-07-06)

Consortium for Lexical Research ::: (CLR) The Consortium for Lexical Research is a repository for natural language processing software, lexical data, tools and resources. It was set up in July 1991 in the Computing Research Laboratory of New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico.CLR maintains a public ftp site, and a separate members-only library. Currently (Feb 1994) CLR has about 60 members, mostly academic institutions, including most US natural language processing centres. Materials can be contributed to the archives in exchange for membership. (128.123.1.12). E-mail: .

Content Data Model "standard, documentation, language" (CDM) An {SGML}-based specification for interactive maintenance manuals, developed by the Air Force Human Resourceas Laboratory (AFHRL) with assistance from RJO Enterprises, Incorporated. CDM models data hierachically and data are identified by their content structure with SGML mark-up used to identify information classes such as "system information", "functions", "tasks" and "steps". {(http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a205916.pdf)}. ["Final Report - Content Data Model of Organizational Maintenance Information for Automated Interchange of Technical Source Data.", Chicago, Illinois, Datalogics, Inc., 1998-07-07]. (2014-10-20)

Coordinated Universal Time "time, standard" (UTC, World Time) The standard time common to every place in the world. UTC is derived from {International Atomic Time} (TAI) by the addition of a whole number of "leap seconds" to synchronise it with {Universal Time} 1 (UT1), thus allowing for the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit, the rotational axis tilt (23.5 degrees), but still showing the Earth's irregular rotation, on which UT1 is based. Coordinated Universal Time is expressed using a 24-hour clock and uses the {Gregorian calendar}. It is used in aeroplane and ship navigation, where it also sometimes known by the military name, "Zulu time". "Zulu" in the phonetic alphabet stands for "Z" which stands for longitude zero. UTC was defined by the International Radio Consultative Committee ({CCIR}), a predecessor of the {ITU-T}. CCIR Recommendation 460-4, or ITU-T Recommendation X.680 (7/94), contains the full definition. The language-independent international abbreviation, UTC, is neither English nor French. It means both "Coordinated Universal Time" and "Temps Universel Coordonné". {BIPM (http://www.bipm.org/enus/5_Scientific/c_time/time_1.html)}. {The Royal Observatory Greenwich (http://rog.nmm.ac.uk/leaflets/time/time.html)}. {History of UTC and GMT (http://ecco.bsee.swin.edu.au/chronos/GMT-explained.html)}. {U.S. National Institute of Standards & Technology (http://its.bldrdoc.gov/fs-1037/dir-009/_1277.htm)}. {UK National Physical Laboratory (http://npl.co.uk/npl/ctm/time_scales.html)}. {US Naval Observatory (http://tycho.usno.navy.mil/systime.html)}. {International Telecommunications Union (http://itu.int/radioclub/rr/arts02.htm)}. {Earth's irregular rotation (/pub/misc/earth_rotation)}. (2001-08-30)

DESY ::: Deutsches Electronen Synchrotron Laboratory, Hamburg, Germany.

DESY Deutsches Electronen Synchrotron Laboratory, Hamburg, Germany.

Eighth Sphere or Planet of Death ::: A term used in the more esoteric or inner part of the teachings about which little can be said, for over thispart of the doctrine there has always been drawn a thick veil of secrecy and silence.Frequently the term is confused with avichi, but this is incorrect, because the two, while closelyconnected, are nevertheless quite distinct. While avichi is a state where very evil human beings "die andare reborn without interruption," yet not without hope of final redemption -- something which canactually take place even on our physical plane in the cases of very evil or soulless men -- the EighthSphere represents a degree of psychomental degeneration still more advanced. As just hinted, even inavichi there is a possibility of reinsoulment by the ray of the spiritual monad; whereas in the EighthSphere or Planet of Death such possibility finally vanishes, and the entity which has sunk to the Planet ofDeath is what is technically called in the esoteric philosophy a "lost soul." In the Eighth Sphere the lostsouls are ground over and over in nature's laboratory, and are finally dissipated into their componentpsycho-astral elements or life-atoms. The Eighth Sphere or Planet of Death is an actual globe. It is also ofcourse a state or condition of being; whereas the avichi is almost exclusively a state or condition in whichan entity may find itself, although obviously this entity must have position or place and therefore localityin space -- on our earth or elsewhere.

Eighth Sphere or Planet of Death Both a globe and a condition of being, where utterly, irredeemably corrupt human souls are attracted, to be dissipated as earth entities. These “lost souls” have through lifetimes lost their link with their inner god, and so can no longer serve as a channel for those spiritual forces. Too gross to remain in kama-loka or avichi, they sink to this slowly dying planet of our solar system, invisible because too dense, which acts as a vent or receptacle for human waste. “The Eighth Sphere is a very necessary organic part of the destiny of our earth and its chain. . . . in the solar system there are certain bodies which act as vents, cleansing channels, receptacles for human waste and slag. . . . [the lost soul] therefore sinks into the Planet of Death or the globe of Mara to which its own heavy material magnetism drags it, where it is dissipated as an entity from above, which means from our globe, and is slowly ground over in nature’s laboratory. . . . However, precisely because the lost soul is yet an aggregate of astral-vital-psychical life-atoms connected around a monad as yet scarcely evolved, this monad, when freed from its earth veil of life atoms, thereupon begins in the Planet of Death a career of its own in this highly material globe.” (FSO 347-8)

elaboratory ::: a. --> Tending to elaborate. ::: n. --> A laboratory.

Electronic Discrete Sequential Automatic Computer "computer, history" (EDSAC, often "Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Computer") Based upon the {EDVAC} (Electronic Discrete Variable Automatic Computer) designed in 1945, the EDSAC was completed in 1949 at the University of Cambridge Mathematical Laboratory in England. The EDSAC performed its first calculation on 1949-05-06. EDSAC was considered to be the first computer to store programs. It ceased to exist in about 1951. [What happened to it?] (2010-01-07)

Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer "computer" (ENIAC) The first electronic {digital computer} and an ancestor of most computers in use today. ENIAC was developed by Dr. {John Mauchly} and {J. Presper Eckert} during World War II at the Moore School of the {University of Pennsylvania}. In 1940 Dr. {John Vincent Atanasoff} attended a lecture by Mauchly and subsequently agreed to show him his binary calculator, the {Atanasoff-Berry Computer} (ABC), which was partially built between 1937-1942. Mauchly used ideas from the ABC in the design of ENIAC, which was started in June 1943 and released publicly in 1946. ENIAC was not the first digital computer, {Konrad Zuse}'s {Z3} was released in 1941. Though, like the ABC, the Z3 was {electromechanical} rather than electronic, it was freely programmable via paper tape whereas ENIAC was only programmable by manual rewiring or switches. Z3 used binary representation like modern computers whereas ENIAC used decimal like mechanical calculators. ENIAC was underwritten and its development overseen by Lieutenant Herman Goldstine of the U.S. Army Ballistic Research Laboratory (BRL). While the prime motivation for constructing the machine was to automate the wartime production of firing and bombing tables, the very first program run on ENIAC was a highly classified computation for Los Alamos. Later applications included weather prediction, cosmic ray studies, wind tunnel design, petroleum exploration, and optics. ENIAC had 20 {registers} made entirely from {vacuum tubes}. It had no other no memory as we currently understand it. The machine performed an addition in 200 {microseconds}, a multiplication in about three {milliseconds}, and a division in about 30 milliseconds. {John von Neumann}, a world-renowned mathematician serving on the BRL Scientific Advisory Committee, soon joined the developers of ENIAC and made some critical contributions. While Mauchly, Eckert and the Penn team continued on the technological problems, he, Goldstine, and others took up the logical problems. In 1947, while working on the design for the successor machine, EDVAC, von Neumann realized that ENIAC's lack of a central control unit could be overcome to obtain a rudimentary stored program computer (see the Clippinger reference below). Modifications were undertaken that eventually led to an {instruction set} of 92 "orders". {Von Neumann} also proposed the {fetch-execute cycle}. [R. F. Clippinger, "A Logical Coding System Applied to the ENIAC", Ballistic Research Laboratory Report No. 673, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, September 1948. {(http://ftp.arl.mil/~mike/comphist/48eniac-coding)}]. [H. H. Goldstine, "The Computer from Pascal to von Neumann", Princeton University Press, 1972]. [K. Kempf, "Electronic Computers within the Ordnance Corps", Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 1961. {(http://ftp.arl.mil/~mike/comphist/61ordnance)}]. [M. H. Weik, "The ENIAC Story", J. American Ordnance Assoc., 1961. {(http://ftp.arl.mil/~mike/comphist/eniac-story.html)}]. [How "general purpose" was ENIAC, compared to Zuse's {Z3}?] (2003-10-01)

Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer ::: (computer) (ENIAC) The first electronic digital computer and an ancestor of most computers in use today. ENIAC was developed by Dr. John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert during World War II at the Moore School of the University of Pennsylvania.In 1940 Dr. John Vincent Atanasoff attended a lecture by Mauchly and subsequently agreed to show him his binary calculator, the Atanasoff-Berry from the ABC in the design of ENIAC, which was started in June 1943 and released publicly in 1946.ENIAC was not the first digital computer, Konrad Zuse's Z3 was released in 1941. Though, like the ABC, the Z3 was electromechanical rather than electronic, it manual rewiring or switches. Z3 used binary representation like modern computers whereas ENIAC used decimal like mechanical calculators.ENIAC was underwritten and its development overseen by Lieutenant Herman Goldstine of the U.S. Army Ballistic Research Laboratory (BRL). While the prime prediction, cosmic ray studies, wind tunnel design, petroleum exploration, and optics.ENIAC had 20 registers made entirely from vacuum tubes. It had no other no memory as we currently understand it. The machine performed an addition in 200 microseconds, a multiplication in about three milliseconds, and a division in about 30 milliseconds.John von Neumann, a world-renowned mathematician serving on the BRL Scientific Advisory Committee, soon joined the developers of ENIAC and made some critical contributions. While Mauchly, Eckert and the Penn team continued on the technological problems, he, Goldstine, and others took up the logical problems.In 1947, while working on the design for the successor machine, EDVAC, von Neumann realized that ENIAC's lack of a central control unit could be overcome below). Modifications were undertaken that eventually led to an instruction set of 92 orders. Von Neumann also proposed the fetch-execute cycle.[R. F. Clippinger, A Logical Coding System Applied to the ENIAC, Ballistic Research Laboratory Report No. 673, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, September 1948. ].[H. H. Goldstine, The Computer from Pascal to von Neumann, Princeton University Press, 1972].[K. Kempf, Electronic Computers within the Ordnance Corps, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 1961. ].[M. H. Weik, The ENIAC Story, J. American Ordnance Assoc., 1961. ].[How general purpose was ENIAC, compared to Zuse's Z3?](2003-10-01)

Ephesus was one of the foci of the universal secret doctrine, a laboratory whence sprang light derived from the quintessence of Buddhist, Zoroastrian, and Chaldean philosophy (IU 2:155). It was such in the early days of Christianity, and from it spread that Gnosis to which the Church was later so bitter an antagonist. It was “famous for its great metaphysical College where Occultism (Gnosis) and Platonic philosophy were taught in the days of the Apostle Paul. . . . It was at Ephesus where was the great College of the Essenes and all the lore the Tanaim had brought from the Chaldees” (TG 114).

equipment ::: n. --> The act of equipping, or the state of being equipped, as for a voyage or expedition.
Whatever is used in equipping; necessaries for an expedition or voyage; the collective designation for the articles comprising an outfit; equipage; as, a railroad equipment (locomotives, cars, etc. ; for carrying on business); horse equipments; infantry equipments; naval equipments; laboratory equipments.


experimental psychology: is a field of psychology that typically involves laboratory research in basic areas of the discipline.

field experiments: an experiment in a natural setting, rather than the comparatively artificial setting of the laboratory. Consequently, extraneous variables are difficult to control.

FNAL ::: Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Illinois, USA).

FNAL Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Illinois, USA).

Foonly 1. The {PDP-10} successor that was to have been built by the Super Foonly project at the {Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory} along with a new operating system. The intention was to leapfrog from the old DEC {time-sharing} system SAIL was then running to a new generation, bypassing TENEX which at that time was the {ARPANET} {standard}. {ARPA} funding for both the Super Foonly and the new operating system was cut in 1974. Most of the design team went to DEC and contributed greatly to the design of the PDP-10 model KL10. 2. The name of the company formed by Dave Poole, one of the principal Super Foonly designers, and one of hackerdom's more colourful personalities. Many people remember the parrot which sat on Poole's shoulder and was a regular companion. 3. Any of the machines built by Poole's company. The first was the F-1 (a.k.a. Super Foonly), which was the computational engine used to create the graphics in the movie "TRON". The F-1 was the fastest PDP-10 ever built, but only one was ever made. The effort drained Foonly of its financial resources, and the company turned toward building smaller, slower, and much less expensive machines. Unfortunately, these ran not the popular {TOPS-20} but a TENEX variant called Foonex; this seriously limited their market. Also, the machines shipped were actually wire-wrapped engineering prototypes requiring individual attention from more than usually competent site personnel, and thus had significant reliability problems. Poole's legendary temper and unwillingness to suffer fools gladly did not help matters. By the time of the Jupiter project cancellation in 1983, Foonly's proposal to build another F-1 was eclipsed by the {Mars}, and the company never quite recovered. See the {Mars} entry for the continuation and moral of this story. [{Jargon File}]

Foonly ::: 1. The PDP-10 successor that was to have been built by the Super Foonly project at the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory along with a new operating system was cut in 1974. Most of the design team went to DEC and contributed greatly to the design of the PDP-10 model KL10.2. The name of the company formed by Dave Poole, one of the principal Super Foonly designers, and one of hackerdom's more colourful personalities. Many people remember the parrot which sat on Poole's shoulder and was a regular companion.3. Any of the machines built by Poole's company. The first was the F-1 (a.k.a. Super Foonly), which was the computational engine used to create the graphics in never quite recovered. See the Mars entry for the continuation and moral of this story.[Jargon File]

From these considerations it is readily seen why the Masters or mahatmas in Blavatsky’s time stated that the scientific theory of the conservation of energy was wrong in concept and therefore untrue in fact, although workable enough as a mere hypothesis for laboratory studies and the then closely restricted scientific theorizing of the day.

genetic algorithm (GA) An {evolutionary algorithm} which generates each individual from some encoded form known as a "chromosome" or "genome". Chromosomes are combined or mutated to breed new individuals. "Crossover", the kind of recombination of chromosomes found in sexual reproduction in nature, is often also used in GAs. Here, an offspring's chromosome is created by joining segments choosen alternately from each of two parents' chromosomes which are of fixed length. GAs are useful for multidimensional optimisation problems in which the chromosome can encode the values for the different variables being optimised. {Illinois Genetic Algorithms Laboratory (http://GAL4.GE.UIUC.EDU/illigal.home.html)} (IlliGAL). (1995-02-03)

Genome Sequencing - a laboratory process that determines the complete DNA sequence of an organism's genome at a single time.

h 1. A simple {markup} language intended for quick conversion of existing text to {hypertext}. 2. A method of marking common words to call attention to the fact that they are being used in a nonstandard, ironic, or humorous way. Originated in the fannish catchphrase "Bheer is the One True Ghod!" from decades ago. H-infix marking of "Ghod" and other words spread into the 1960s counterculture via underground comix, and into early hackerdom either from the counterculture or from SF fandom (the three overlapped heavily at the time). More recently, the h infix has become an expected feature of benchmark names (Dhrystone, Rhealstone, etc.); this follows on from the original Whetstone (the name of a laboratory) but may have been influenced by the fannish/counterculture h infix. [{Jargon File}] (1994-11-04)

h ::: 1. A simple markup language intended for quick conversion of existing text to hypertext.2. A method of marking common words to call attention to the fact that they are being used in a nonstandard, ironic, or humorous way. Originated in the fannish this follows on from the original Whetstone (the name of a laboratory) but may have been influenced by the fannish/counterculture h infix.[Jargon File] (1994-11-04)

High Performance Parallel Interface "hardware, standard" (HIPPI, previously HPPI) A {connection-oriented}, point-to-point networking {standard} using {circuit-switching} technology at a speed of 800 Mbits/s or 1.6 Gbits/s (simplex or full-duplex). HIPPI is often used for short distances (up to 10km depending on cable type) to connect a {supercomputer} to {routers}, {frame buffers}, {mass-storage} peripherals and other computers. HIPPI was developed at {Los Alamos National Laboratory} and is now {ANSI} standard X3T9/88-127. Standards for interconnecting with {ATM}, {SONet}, and {fibre channel} are in development. {HIPPI Networking Forum (http://esscom.com/hnf)}. (1997-06-29)

High Performance Parallel Interface ::: (hardware, standard) (HIPPI, previously HPPI) A connection-oriented, point-to-point networking standard using circuit-switching technology at a speed short distances (up to 10km depending on cable type) to connect a supercomputer to routers, frame buffers, mass-storage peripherals and other computers.HIPPI was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and is now ANSI standard X3T9/88-127. Standards for interconnecting with ATM, SONet, and fibre channel are in development. . (1997-06-29)

HITL {Human Interface Technology Laboratory}

Human Interface Technology Laboratory (HITL) The Human Interface Technology Laboratory at the {University of Washington} was founded in 1990. It is a centre for research and development of advanced interface technology. Located on the university campus, HITL forms a bridge between academia and industry. It maintains its industrial focus via the Virtual Worlds Consortium and maintains contacts with academia by training students and teaching courses. The lab has access to faculty and students throughout the State of Washington. Address: Human Interface Technology Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. (1995-02-13)

Human Interface Technology Laboratory ::: (HITL) The Human Interface Technology Laboratory at the University of Washington was founded in 1990. It is a centre for research and development of advanced teaching courses. The lab has access to faculty and students throughout the State of Washington.Address: Human Interface Technology Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. (1995-02-13)

IBM 701 "computer" ("Defense Calculator") The first of the {IBM 700 series} of computers. The IBM 701 was annouced internally on 1952-04-29 as "the most advanced, most flexible high-speed computer in the world". Known as the Defense Calculator while in development at {IBM Poughkeepsie Laboratory}, it went public on 1953-04-07 as the "IBM 701 Electronic Data Processing Machines" (plural because it consisted of eleven connected units). The 701 was the first IBM large-scale electronic computer manufactured in quantity and their first commercial {scientific computer}. It was the first IBM machine in which programs were stored in an internal, addressable, electronic memory. It was developed and produced in less than two years from "first pencil on paper" to installation. It was key to IBM's transition from {punched card} machines to electronic computers. It consisted of four {magnetic tape drives}, a {magnetic drum} memory unit, a {cathode-ray tube storage unit}, an L-shaped {arithmetic and control unit} with an operator's panel, a {punched card {reader}, a printer, a card punch and three power units. It performed more than 16,000 additions or subtractions per second, read 12,500 digits a second from tape, print 180 letters or numbers a second and output 400 digits a second from punched-cards. The IBM 701 ran the following languages and systems: {BACAIC}, {BAP}, {DOUGLAS}, {DUAL-607}, {FLOP}, {GEPURS}, {JCS-13}, {KOMPILER}, {LT-2}, {PACT I}, {QUEASY}, {QUICK}, {SEESAW}, {SHACO}, {SO 2}, {Speedcoding}, {SPEEDEX}. {IBM History (http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/701/701_intro.html)}. (2005-06-20)

If the term "experimental" is broadly understood as implying a general mode of inquiry based on observation and the tentative application of hypotheses to particular cases, it includes many studies in aesthetics which avoid quantitative measurement and laboratory procedure. The full application of scientific method is still commonly regarded as impossible or unfruitful in dealing with the more subtle and complex phenomena of art. But the progress of aesthetics toward scientific status is being slowly made, through increasing use of an objective and logical approach instead of a dogmatic or personal one, and through bringing the results of other sciences to bear on aesthetic problems. Recent years have seen a vast increase in the amount and variety of artistic data available for the aesthetician, as a result of anthropological and archeological research and excavation, diversified museum collections, improved reproductions, translations, and phonograph records. -- T.M.

Integrated Systems Laboratory ::: (company) A joint project of Control Data Corporation and NCR Corporation, established in 1973 and dissolved in 1976.Integrated Systems Laboratory developed Software Writer's Language.Address: Escondidio, California, USA.(2003-12-31)

Integrated Systems Laboratory "company" A joint project of {Control Data Corporation} and {NCR Corporation}, established in 1973 and dissolved in 1976. Integrated Systems Laboratory developed {Software Writer's Language}. Address: Escondidio, California, USA. (2003-12-31)

Intel 8086 "processor" A sixteen bit {microprocessor} chip used in early {IBM PCs}. The {Intel 8088} was a version with an eight-bit external data bus. The Intel 8086 was based on the design of the {Intel 8080} and {Intel 8085} (it was {source compatible} with the 8080) with a similar {register set}, but was expanded to 16 bits. The Bus Interface Unit fed the instruction stream to the Execution Unit through a 6 byte {prefetch} queue, so fetch and execution were concurrent - a primitive form of {pipelining} (8086 instructions varied from 1 to 4 bytes). It featured four 16-bit general {registers}, which could also be accessed as eight 8-bit registers, and four 16-bit {index registers} (including the {stack pointer}). The data registers were often used implicitly by instructions, complicating {register allocation} for temporary values. It featured 64K 8-bit I/O (or 32K 16 bit) ports and fixed {vectored interrupts}. There were also four {segment registers} that could be set from index registers. The segment registers allowed the CPU to access 1 meg of memory in an odd way. Rather than just supplying missing bytes, as most segmented processors, the 8086 actually shifted the segment registers left 4 bits and added it to the address. As a result, segments overlapped, and it was possible to have two pointers with the same value point to two different memory locations, or two pointers with different values pointing to the same location. Most people consider this a {brain damaged} design. Although this was largely acceptable for {assembly language}, where control of the segments was complete (it could even be useful then), in higher level languages it caused constant confusion (e.g. near/far pointers). Even worse, this made expanding the address space to more than 1 meg difficult. A later version, the {Intel 80386}, expanded the design to 32 bits, and "fixed" the segmentation, but required extra modes (suppressing the new features) for compatibility, and retains the awkward architecture. In fact, with the right assembler, code written for the 8008 can still be run on the most recent {Intel 486}. The {Intel 80386} added new {op codes} in a kludgy fashion similar to the {Zilog Z80} and {Zilog Z280}. The {Intel 486} added full {pipelines}, and {clock doubling} (like the {Zilog Z280}). So why did {IBM} chose the 8086 series when most of the alternatives were so much better? Apparently IBM's own engineers wanted to use the {Motorola 68000}, and it was used later in the forgotten {IBM Instruments} 9000 Laboratory Computer, but IBM already had rights to manufacture the 8086, in exchange for giving Intel the rights to its {bubble memory} designs. Apparently IBM was using 8086s in the IBM {Displaywriter} {word processor}. Other factors were the 8-bit {Intel 8088} version, which could use existing {Intel 8085}-type components, and allowed the computer to be based on a modified 8085 design. 68000 components were not widely available, though it could use {Motorola 6800} components to an extent. {Intel} {bubble memory} was on the market for a while, but faded away as better and cheaper memory technologies arrived. (1994-12-23)

joe code /joh' kohd"/ 1. Code that is overly {tense} and unmaintainable. "{Perl} may be a handy program, but if you look at the source, it's complete joe code." 2. Badly written, possibly buggy code. Correspondents wishing to remain anonymous have fingered a particular Joe at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and observed that usage has drifted slightly; the original sobriquet "Joe code" was intended in sense 1. [{Jargon File}]

joe code ::: /joh' kohd/ 1. Code that is overly tense and unmaintainable. Perl may be a handy program, but if you look at the source, it's complete joe code.2. Badly written, possibly buggy code.Correspondents wishing to remain anonymous have fingered a particular Joe at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and observed that usage has drifted slightly; the original sobriquet Joe code was intended in sense 1.[Jargon File]

JPLDIS ::: Jet Propulsion Laboratory Display Information System. Query system for UNIVAC 1108 [or PDP's?] written in Fortran, based on Tymshare's Retrieve. Indirectly led to Vulcan which led to dBASE II. Jack Hatfield, George Masters, W. Van Snyder, Jeb Long et al, JPL.

JPLDIS {Jet Propulsion Laboratory} Display Information System. Query system for {UNIVAC 1108} [or PDP's?] written in {Fortran}, based on {Tymshare}'s "Retrieve". Indirectly led to {Vulcan} which led to {dBASE II}. Jack Hatfield, George Masters, W. Van Snyder, Jeb Long et al, JPL.

Knowledge Systems Laboratory ::: (KSL) An artificial intelligence research laboratory within the Department of Computer Science at Stanford University. Current work focuses on knowledge computational environments for modelling physical devices, architectures for adaptive intelligent systems, and expert systems for science and engineering. (1994-12-06)

Knowledge Systems Laboratory (KSL) An {artificial intelligence} research laboratory within the Department of Computer Science at {Stanford University}. Current work focuses on {knowledge representation} for sharable engineering knowledge bases and systems, computational environments for modelling physical devices, architectures for adaptive intelligent systems, and {expert systems} for science and engineering. (1994-12-06)

KSL {Knowledge Systems Laboratory}

laboratories ::: pl. --> of Laboratory

laboratory experiments: conducted in a laboratory or a rigorously controlled environment, whereby the independent variable is manipulated, whilst all other extraneous variables are strictly controlled.

laboratory ::: n. --> The workroom of a chemist; also, a place devoted to experiments in any branch of natural science; as, a chemical, physical, or biological laboratory. Hence, by extension, a place where something is prepared, or some operation is performed; as, the liver is the laboratory of the bile.

LabVIEW {Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench}

LANL ::: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA.

LANL Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA.

LaTeX "language, text, tool" (Lamport TeX) Leslie Lamport "lamport@pa.dec.com"'s document preparation system built on top of {TeX}. LaTeX was developed at {SRI International}'s Computer Science Laboratory and was built to resemble {Scribe}. LaTeX adds commands to simplify typesetting and lets the user concentrate on the structure of the text rather than on formatting commands. {BibTeX} is a LaTeX package for bibliographic citations. Lamport's LaTeX book has an exemplary index listing every symbol, concept and example in the book. The index in the, now obsolete, first edition includes (on page 221) the mysterious entry "Gilkerson, Ellen, 221". The second edition (1994) has an entry for "{infinite loop}" instead. ["LaTeX, A Document Preparation System", Leslie Lamport, A-W 1986, ISBN 0-201-15790-X (first edition, now obsolete)]. (1997-11-17)

LaTeX ::: (language, text, tool) (Lamport TeX) Leslie Lamport 's document preparation system built on top of TeX. LaTeX was developed at SRI International's Computer Science Laboratory and was built to resemble Scribe.LaTeX adds commands to simplify typesetting and lets the user concentrate on the structure of the text rather than on formatting commands.BibTeX is a LaTeX package for bibliographic citations.Lamport's LaTeX book has an exemplary index listing every symbol, concept and example in the book. The index in the, now obsolete, first edition includes (on page 221) the mysterious entry Gilkerson, Ellen, 221. The second edition (1994) has an entry for infinite loop instead.[LaTeX, A Document Preparation System, Leslie Lamport, A-W 1986, ISBN 0-201-15790-X (first edition, now obsolete)]. (1997-11-17)

Lawrence Livermore Labs ::: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Lawrence Livermore Labs {Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory}

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory "body" (LLNL) A research organaisatin operated by the {University of California} under a contract with the US Department of Energy. LLNL was founded on 2 September 1952 at the site of an old World War II naval air station. The Lab employs researchers from many scientific and engineering disciplines. Some of its departments are the National Ignition Facility, the Human Genome Center, the ASCI Tera-Scale Computing partnership, the Computer Security Technology Center, and the Site 300 Experimental Test Facility. Other research areas are Astronomy and Astrophysics, Atmospheric Science, Automation and Robotics, Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Energy Research, Engineering, Environmental Science, Fusion, Geology and Geophysics, Health, Lasers and Optics, Materials Science, National Security, Physics, Sensors and Instrumentation, Space Science. LLNL also works with industry in research and licensing projects. At the end of fiscal year 1995, the lab had signed agreements for 193 cost-shared research projects involving 201 companies and worth nearly $600m. {(http://llnl.gov/)}. Address: Fremont, California, USA. (1996-10-30)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ::: (body) (LLNL) A research organaisatin operated by the University of California under a contract with the US Department of Energy. LLNL was founded on 2 September 1952 at the site of an old World War II naval air station.The Lab employs researchers from many scientific and engineering disciplines. Some of its departments are the National Ignition Facility, the Human Genome Optics, Materials Science, National Security, Physics, Sensors and Instrumentation, Space Science.LLNL also works with industry in research and licensing projects. At the end of fiscal year 1995, the lab had signed agreements for 193 cost-shared research projects involving 201 companies and worth nearly $600m. .Address: Fremont, California, USA. (1996-10-30)

LBL ::: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA.

LBL Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA.

Linc ::: 1. (language) A Burroughs/Unisys 4GL designed in New Zealand.2. Laboratory Instrument Computer. (1999-03-29)

Linc 1. "language" A {Burroughs}/{Unisys} {4GL} designed in New Zealand. 2. {Laboratory Instrument Computer}. (1999-03-29)

LINCtape ::: (storage) A formatted, block-oriented, high-reliability, random access tape system used on the Laboratory Instrument Computer. The tape was 3/4 wide.The funny DECtape is actually a variant of the original LINCtape. According to Wesley Clark, DEC tried to improve the LINCtape system, which mechanically, to protect it. What happened was that all the forced alignment stuff caused shredding at the edge.An independent company, Computer Operations[?], built LINCtape drives for use in nuclear submarines. This was based on the tape system's high reliability. Correspondent Brian Converse has a picture of himself holding a LINCtape punched full of 1/4 holes. It still worked! (1999-03-29)

LINCtape "storage" A formatted, block-oriented, high-reliability, {random access} tape system used on the {Laboratory Instrument Computer}. The tape was 3/4" wide. The funny {DECtape} is actually a variant of the original LINCtape. According to {Wesley Clark}, DEC tried to "improve" the LINCtape system, which mechanically, was wonderfully simple and elegant. The DEC version had pressure fingers and tape guides to force alignment as well as huge {DC} servo motors and complex control circuitry. These literally shredded the tape to bits if not carefully adjusted, and required frequent cleaning to remove all the shedded tape oxide. That was amazing, because the tape had a micro-thin plastic layer OVER the oxide to protect it. What happened was that all the forced alignment stuff caused shredding at the edge. An independent company, Computer Operations[?], built LINCtape drives for use in nuclear submarines. This was based on the tape system's high reliability. Correspondent Brian Converse has a picture of himself holding a LINCtape punched full of 1/4" holes. It still worked! (1999-03-29)

Lisp Object-Oriented Programming System ::: (LOOPS) An object-oriented extension of Lisp from the Intelligent Systems Laboratory at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. It is used in the development of knowledge-based systems.See also CommonLoops.[The LOOPS Manual, D.G. Bobrow & M. Stefik, Xerox Corp 1983].

Lisp Object-Oriented Programming System (LOOPS) An {object-oriented} extension of {Lisp} from the {Intelligent Systems Laboratory} at {Xerox} {Palo Alto Research Center}. It is used in the development of {knowledge-based systems}. See also {CommonLoops}. ["The LOOPS Manual", D.G. Bobrow & M. Stefik, Xerox Corp 1983].

LLNL {Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory}

LRLTRAN ::: Lawrence Radiation Laboratory TRANslator.A Fortran extension with vector arithmetic and dynamic storage, used for scientific work and systems programming, including the LTSS operating system.[The LRLTRAN Compiler, S.F. Mendicino, CACM 11(11):747-775 (Nov 1969)].

LRLTRAN Lawrence Radiation Laboratory TRANslator. A {Fortran} extension with vector arithmetic and {dynamic storage}, used for scientific work and systems programming, including the {LTSS} {operating system}. ["The LRLTRAN Compiler", S.F. Mendicino, CACM 11(11):747-775 (Nov 1969)].

Magnum Opus (Latin) The great work; in medieval and modern times an alchemical term for the making of the philosopher’s stone and the elixir of life; an achievement which, as with alchemy generally, may be regarded as being accomplished either in the laboratory of human nature among the elements of man’s constitution, or in a brick and mortar laboratory with chemicals.

Margaret Hamilton "person" (born 1936-08-17) A {computer scientist}, {systems engineer} and business owner, credited with coining the term {software engineering}. Margaret Hamilton published over 130 papers, proceedings and reports about the 60 projects and six major programs in which she has been involved. In 1965 she became Director of Software Programming at MIT's {Charles Stark Draper Laboratory} and Director of the Software Engineering Division of the {MIT Instrumentation Laboratory}, which developed on-board {flight software} for the Apollo space program. At {NASA}, Hamilton pioneered the Apollo on-board guidance software that navigated to and landed on the Moon and formed the basis for software used in later missions. At the time, programming was a hands-on, engineering descipline; computer science and software engineering barely existed. Hamilton produced innovations in {system design} and software development, enterprise and {process modelling}, development paradigms, {formal systems modelling languages}, system-oriented objects for systems modelling and development, {automated life-cycle environments}, {software reliability}, {software reuse}, {domain analysis}, correctness by built-in language properties, open architecture techniques for robust systems, full {life-cycle automation}, {quality assurance}, {seamless integration}, {error detection and recovery}, {man-machine interface} systems, {operating systems}, {end-to-end testing} and {life-cycle management}. She developed concepts of {asynchronous software}, {priority scheduling} and {Human-in-the-loop} decision capability, which became the foundation for modern, ultra-reliable software design. The Apollo 11 moon landing would have aborted when spurious data threatened to overload the computer, but thanks to the innovative asynchronous, priority based scheduling, it eliminated the unnecessary processing and completed the landing successfully. In 1986, she founded {Hamilton Technologies, Inc.}, developed around the {Universal Systems Language} and her systems and software design {paradigm} of {Development Before the Fact} (DBTF). (2015-03-08)

Mathematical Analyzer, Numerical Integrator and Computer "computer, history" (MANIAC, Or "Mathematical Analyzer, Numerator, Integrator, and Computer") An early computer, built for the {Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory}. MANIAC began operation in March 1952. Typical of early computers, it ran its own propriatery language. It was succeeded by {MANIAC II} in 1957. A {MANIAC III} was built at the University of Chicago in 1964. Contrary to legend, MANIAC did not run {MAD} ({Michigan Algorithm Decoder}), which was not invented until 1959. (2013-05-05)

MELDC A {reflective} {object-oriented} {concurrent} programming language developed in 1990 by the MELD Project of the Programming Systems Laboratory at {Columbia University}. MELDC is a redesign of {MELD} based on {C}. The core of the architecture is a {micro-kernel} (the MELDC kernel), which encapsulates a minimum set of entities that cannot be modelled as objects. All components outside of the kernel are implemented as objects in MELDC itself and are modularised in the MELDC libraries. MELDC is reflective in three dimensions: structural, computational and architectural. The structural reflection indicates that classes and meta-classes are objects, which are written in MELDC. The computational reflection means that object behaviours can be computed and extended at run time. The architectural reflection indicates that new features/properties (e.g. persistency and remoteness) can be constructed in MELDC. Version 2.0 runs on {Sun-4}/{SunOS} 4.1 and {DECstation} and {MIPS}/{Ultrix} 4.2. E-mail: Gail Kaiser "meldc@cs.columbia.edu". MELDC is available under licence from "MeldC@cs.columbia.edu" and may not be used for commercial purposes. (1992-12-15)

MELDC ::: A reflective object-oriented concurrent programming language developed in 1990 by the MELD Project of the Programming Systems Laboratory at Columbia University. MELDC is a redesign of MELD based on C.The core of the architecture is a micro-kernel (the MELDC kernel), which encapsulates a minimum set of entities that cannot be modelled as objects. All features/properties (e.g. persistency and remoteness) can be constructed in MELDC.Version 2.0 runs on Sun-4/SunOS 4.1 and DECstation and MIPS/Ultrix 4.2.E-mail: Gail Kaiser .MELDC is available under licence from (1992-12-15)

MIT AI Lab ::: (body) (Massachusetts Institute of Technology artificial intelligence laboratory) Workplace of many famous AI researchers at MIT including GLS and RMS. .Address: 545 Technology Sq., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.(2003-02-28)

MIT AI Lab "body" ({Massachusetts Institute of Technology} {artificial intelligence} laboratory) Workplace of many famous AI researchers at MIT including {GLS} and {RMS}. {(http://ai.mit.edu/)}. Address: 545 Technology Sq., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. (2003-02-28)

MITRE Corporation ::: (body) A US federally funded R&D center, spun off in 1958 from the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (also an FFRDC). MITRE is a non-profit corporation chartered to do R&D in the public interest.MITRE were responsible for system engineering and implementation oversight of SAGE.MITRE does not stand for MIT Research and Engineering, though it could have. . (1999-12-16)

MITRE Corporation "body" A US federally funded R&D center, spun off in 1958 from the {MIT Lincoln Laboratory} (also an FFRDC). MITRE is a non-profit corporation chartered to do R&D in the public interest. MITRE were responsible for system engineering and implementation oversight of {SAGE}. MITRE does not stand for MIT Research and Engineering, though it could have. {(http://mitre.org/)}. (1999-12-16)

MIT Research Laboratory for Electronics "body" See also {Jay Forrester}, {core memory}, the {Whirlwind} computer, {MIT Lincoln Laboratory}. [Summary?] (1999-12-16)

MIT Research Laboratory for Electronics ::: (body)See also Jay Forrester, core memory, the Whirlwind computer, MIT Lincoln Laboratory.[Summary?] (1999-12-16)

MLAB ::: Modeling LABoratory. An interactive mathematical modelling system.[MLAB, An On-Line Modeling Laboratory, NIH (Mar 1975)]. (1994-10-13)

MLAB Modeling LABoratory. An interactive mathematical modelling system. ["MLAB, An On-Line Modeling Laboratory", NIH (Mar 1975)]. (1994-10-13)

NELIAC ::: Navy Electronics Laboratory International ALGOL Compiler.An Algol variant designed for numeric and logical computations and based on IAL. 1958-1959.Version: BC NELIAC.[Neliac - A Dialect of Algol, H.D. Huskey et al, CACM 3(8):463-468 (Aug 1960)]. (1994-11-29)

NELIAC Navy Electronics Laboratory International ALGOL Compiler. An {Algol} variant designed for numeric and logical computations and based on {IAL}. 1958-1959. Version: BC NELIAC. ["Neliac - A Dialect of Algol", H.D. Huskey et al, CACM 3(8):463-468 (Aug 1960)]. (1994-11-29)

NLANR ::: National Laboratory for Applied Network Research

NLANR {National Laboratory for Applied Network Research}

NPL ::: 1. New Programming Language. IBM's original (temporary) name for PL/I, changed due to conflict with England's National Physical Laboratory. MPL and MPPL were considered before settling on PL/I. Sammet 1969, p.542.2. A functional language with pattern matching designed by Rod Burstall and John Darlington in 1977. The language allowed certain sets and logic constructs to appear on the right hand side of definitions, E.g. setofeven(X) = :x: x in X & even(x) :> lost set comprehensions which were called list comprehensions in later functional languages.[John Darlington, Program Transformation and Synthesis: Present Capabilities, Research Report No. 77/43, Dept. of Computing and Control, Imperial College of Science and Technology, London September 1977.]3. NonProcedural Language. A relational database language developed by T.D. Truitt et al in 1980 for Apple II and MS-DOS.[An Introduction to Nonprocedural Languages Using NPL, T.D. Truitt et al, McGraw-Hill 1983].

NPL 1. New Programming Language. IBM's original (temporary) name for PL/I, changed due to conflict with England's "National Physical Laboratory." MPL and MPPL were considered before settling on PL/I. Sammet 1969, p.542. 2. A {functional language} with {pattern matching} designed by Rod Burstall and John Darlington in 1977. The language allowed certain sets and logic constructs to appear on the right hand side of definitions, E.g. setofeven(X) "= ":x: x in X & even(x) :" The NPL {interpreter} evaluates the list of {generators} from left to right so conditions can mention any bound variables that occur to their left. These were known as {set comprehensions}. NPL eventually evolved into {Hope} but lost set comprehensions which were called {list comprehensions} in later functional languages. [John Darlington, "Program Transformation and Synthesis: Present Capabilities", Research Report No. 77/43, Dept. of Computing and Control, Imperial College of Science and Technology, London September 1977.] 3. NonProcedural Language. A {relational database} language developed by T.D. Truitt et al in 1980 for {Apple II} and {MS-DOS}. ["An Introduction to Nonprocedural Languages Using NPL", T.D. Truitt et al, McGraw-Hill 1983].

operatory ::: n. --> A laboratory.

Our visible sun, though the center of its system, is not the father of the planets but their “co-uterine brother,” one of the “eight sons of Aditi.” It is not the creator of the fohatic forces, but their radiating focus. Nor is it an incandescent and cooling body; it is nature’s great laboratory of intelligently vital and electromagnetic forces for our system. “The Sun is the heart of the Solar World (System) and its brain is hidden behind the (visible) Sun. From thence, sensation is radiated into every nerve-centre of the great body, and the waves of the life-essence flow into each artery and vein. . . . The planets are its limbs and pulses” (SD 1:541). Physiologically, the sun pulsates life through the solar system, in connection with the 11 and 22 year sunspot phenomena — the solar spots being due to the contraction of the solar heart.

Overlapping among all the above-mentioned fields is inevitable, as well as great differences in approach among individual writers. Some of these stress the nature and varieties of form in art, with attention to historic types and styles such as romanticism, the Baroque, etc., and in studying their evolution adopt the historian's viewpoint to some extent. Some stress the psychology of creation, appreciation, imagination, aesthetic experience, emotion, evaluation, and preference. Their work may be classed as "aesthetics", "aesthetic psychology", or "psychology of art". Within this psychological group, some can be further distinguished as laboratory or statistical psychologists, attempting more or less exact calculation and measurement. This approach (sometimes called "experimental aesthetics") follows the lead of Fechner, whose studies of aesthetic preference in 1876 helped to inaugurate modern experimental psychology as well as the empirical approach to aesthetics. It has dealt less with works of art than with preference for various arbitrary, simplified linear shapes, color-combinations and tone-combinations.

Parallel Virtual Machine "parallel, networking, tool" (PVM) 1. A {software} system designed to allow a network of {heterogeneous} machines to be used as a single {distributed} {parallel processor}. PVM was developed by the {University of Tennessee}, The {Oak Ridge National Laboratory} and the {Emory University}. {(http://epm.ornl.gov/pvm/)}. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.parallel.pvm}. 2. The {intermediate language} used by the {Gambit} compiler for {Scheme}. [And Multilisp?] (1995-01-30)

Parallel Virtual Machine ::: (parallel, networking, tool) (PVM) 1. A software system designed to allow a network of heterogeneous machines to be used as a single distributed parallel processor.PVM was developed by the University of Tennessee, The Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Emory University. .Usenet newsgroup: comp.parallel.pvm.2. The intermediate language used by the Gambit compiler for Scheme.[And Multilisp?] (1995-01-30)

PARMACS The "Argonne macros" from {Argonne National Laboratory}. A package of {macros} written in {m4} for portable {parallel programming}, using {monitors} on {shared memory} machines, and {message passing} on {distributed memory} machines. [E. Lusk et al, "Portable Programs for Parallel Processors", HRW 1987. p4]. {(ftp://research.att.com/netlib/parmacs)}.

PARMACS ::: The Argonne macros from Argonne National Laboratory. A package of macros written in m4 for portable parallel programming, using monitors on shared memory machines, and message passing on distributed memory machines.[E. Lusk et al, Portable Programs for Parallel Processors, HRW 1987. p4]. .

pharmacopoeia ::: n. --> A book or treatise describing the drugs, preparations, etc., used in medicine; especially, one that is issued by official authority and considered as an authoritative standard.
A chemical laboratory.


Ponder A {non-strict} {polymorphic}, {functional language} by Jon Fairbairn "jf@cl.cam.ac.uk". Ponder's type system is unusual. It is more powerful than the {Hindley-Milner type} system used by {ML} and {Miranda} and extended by {Haskell}. Ponder adds extra recursive 'mu' types to those of Girard's {System F}, allowing more general {recursion}. Surprisingly, the type system and {type inference} {algorithm} are still not completely understood. ["Ponder and its Type System", J. Fairbairn, TR 31, Cambridge U Computer Lab, Nov 1982]. [J. Fairbairn, "Design and Implementation of a Simple Typed Language based on the Lambda-Calculus", Technical Report No. 75, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, May 1985]. [J. Fairbairn, "A New Type-Checker for a Functional Language", Technical Report No. 53, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 1984]. [J. Fairbairn, "Some Types with Inclusion Properties in \forall, \rightarrow, \mu", Technical Report No. 171, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Jun 1989]. [Valeria C. V. de Paiva, "Subtyping in Ponder (Preliminary Report)", Technical Report No. 203, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Aug 1990].

Ponder ::: A non-strict polymorphic, functional language by Jon Fairbairn .Ponder's type system is unusual. It is more powerful than the Hindley-Milner type system used by ML and Miranda and extended by Haskell. Ponder adds extra recursion. Surprisingly, the type system and type inference algorithm are still not completely understood.[Ponder and its Type System, J. Fairbairn, TR 31, Cambridge U Computer Lab, Nov 1982].[J. Fairbairn, Design and Implementation of a Simple Typed Language based on the Lambda-Calculus, Technical Report No. 75, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, May 1985].[J. Fairbairn, A New Type-Checker for a Functional Language, Technical Report No. 53, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 1984].[J. Fairbairn, Some Types with Inclusion Properties in \forall, \rightarrow, \mu, Technical Report No. 171, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Jun 1989].[Valeria C. V. de Paiva, Subtyping in Ponder (Preliminary Report), Technical Report No. 203, Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Aug 1990].

Program Composition Notation (PCN) A specification language for parallelism between {C} and {Fortran} {modules}. PCN provides a simple language for specifying {concurrent} {algorithms}, interfaces to {Fortran} and {C}, a portable toolkit that allows applications to be developed on a {workstation} or small parallel computer and run unchanged on {supercomputers} and integrated debugging and performance analysis tools. PCN was developed at {Argonne National Laboratory} and the {California Institute of Technology}. It has been used to develop a wide variety of applications, in areas such as climate modelling, fluid dynamics, computational biology, chemistry, and circuit simulation. Version 2.0 runs on networks of workstations: {Sun-4}, {NeXT}, {RS/6000}, {SGI}; {multicomputers}: {iPSC}/860, {Touchstone DELTA}; and {shared memory} multiprocessors: {Symmetry}/{Dynix}. {(ftp://info.mcs.anl.gov/pub/pcn)}. E-mail: Ian Foster "pcn@mcs.anl.gov", Steve Tuecke "tuecke@mcs.anl.gov". ["Productive Parallel Programming: The PCN Approach", I. Foster et al, Sci Prog 1(1):51-66 (1992)]. (1993-02-12)

Project MAC "project" A project suggested by J C R Licklider; its founding director was {MIT} Prof. Robert M Fano. MAC stood for Multiple Access Computers on the 5th floor of Tech Square, and Man and Computer on the 9th floor. The major efforts were Corbato's {Multics} development and {Marvin Minsky}'s {Artificial Intelligence} Laboratory. In 1963 Project MAC hosted a summer study, which brought many well-known computer scientists to Cambridge to use {CTSS} and to discuss the future of computing. Funding for Project MAC was provided by the Information Processing Techniques Office of the {Advanced Research Projects Agency} (ARPA) of the US Department of Defense. See also {Early PL/I}, {MacLisp}, {MACSYMA}, {MDL}, {Multipop-68}, {OCAL}. (1997-01-29)

RAL ::: 1. Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK).2. An expert system.

RAL 1. Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). 2. An {expert system}.

Real Programmers Don't Use Pascal ::: (humour) Back in the good old days - the Golden Era of computers, it was easy to separate the men from the boys (sometimes called Real Men and out that Real Men don't relate to anything, and aren't afraid of being impersonal.)But, as usual, times change. We are faced today with a world in which little old ladies can get computers in their microwave ovens, 12-year-old kids can blow danger of becoming extinct, of being replaced by high-school students with TRASH-80s.There is a clear need to point out the differences between the typical high-school junior Pac-Man player and a Real Programmer. If this difference is why it would be a mistake to replace the Real Programmers on their staff with 12-year-old Pac-Man players (at a considerable salary savings).LANGUAGESThe easiest way to tell a Real Programmer from the crowd is by the programming language he (or she) uses. Real Programmers use Fortran. Quiche Eaters use need all these abstract concepts to get their jobs done - they are perfectly happy with a keypunch, a Fortran IV compiler, and a beer.Real Programmers do List Processing in Fortran.Real Programmers do String Manipulation in Fortran.Real Programmers do Accounting (if they do it at all) in Fortran.Real Programmers do Artificial Intelligence programs in Fortran.If you can't do it in Fortran, do it in assembly language. If you can't do it in assembly language, it isn't worth doing.STRUCTURED PROGRAMMINGThe academics in computer science have gotten into the structured programming rut over the past several years. They claim that programs are more easily in the world won't help you solve a problem like that - it takes actual talent. Some quick observations on Real Programmers and Structured Programming:Real Programmers aren't afraid to use GOTOs.Real Programmers can write five-page-long DO loops without getting confused.Real Programmers like Arithmetic IF statements - they make the code more interesting.Real Programmers write self-modifying code, especially if they can save 20 nanoseconds in the middle of a tight loop.Real Programmers don't need comments - the code is obvious.Since Fortran doesn't have a structured IF, REPEAT ... UNTIL, or CASE statement, Real Programmers don't have to worry about not using them. Besides, they can be simulated when necessary using assigned GOTOs.Data Structures have also gotten a lot of press lately. Abstract Data Types, Structures, Pointers, Lists, and Strings have become popular in certain circles. Languages, as we all know, have implicit typing based on the first letter of the (six character) variable name.OPERATING SYSTEMSWhat kind of operating system is used by a Real Programmer? CP/M? God forbid - CP/M, after all, is basically a toy operating system. Even little old ladies and grade school students can understand and use CP/M.Unix is a lot more complicated of course - the typical Unix hacker never can remember what the PRINT command is called this week - but when it gets right systems: they send jokes around the world on UUCP-net and write adventure games and research papers.No, your Real Programmer uses OS 370. A good programmer can find and understand the description of the IJK305I error he just got in his JCL manual. A great outstanding programmer can find bugs buried in a 6 megabyte core dump without using a hex calculator. (I have actually seen this done.)OS is a truly remarkable operating system. It's possible to destroy days of work with a single misplaced space, so alertness in the programming staff is people claim there is a Time Sharing system that runs on OS 370, but after careful study I have come to the conclusion that they were mistaken.PROGRAMMING TOOLSWhat kind of tools does a Real Programmer use? In theory, a Real Programmer could run his programs by keying them into the front panel of the computer. Back the first operating system for the CDC7600 in on the front panel from memory when it was first powered on. Seymore, needless to say, is a Real Programmer.One of my favorite Real Programmers was a systems programmer for Texas Instruments. One day he got a long distance call from a user whose system had includes a keypunch and lineprinter in his toolkit, he can get along with just a front panel and a telephone in emergencies.In some companies, text editing no longer consists of ten engineers standing in line to use an 029 keypunch. In fact, the building I work in doesn't contain a system is called SmallTalk, and would certainly not talk to the computer with a mouse.Some of the concepts in these Xerox editors have been incorporated into editors running on more reasonably named operating systems - Emacs and VI being two. The the Real Programmer wants a you asked for it, you got it text editor - complicated, cryptic, powerful, unforgiving, dangerous. TECO, to be precise.It has been observed that a TECO command sequence more closely resembles transmission line noise than readable text [4]. One of the more entertaining will probably destroy your program, or even worse - introduce subtle and mysterious bugs in a once working subroutine.For this reason, Real Programmers are reluctant to actually edit a program that is close to working. They find it much easier to just patch the binary object Programmer to do the job - no Quiche Eating structured programmer would even know where to start. This is called job security.Some programming tools NOT used by Real Programmers:Fortran preprocessors like MORTRAN and RATFOR. The Cuisinarts of programming - great for making Quiche. See comments above on structured programming.Source language debuggers. Real Programmers can read core dumps.Compilers with array bounds checking. They stifle creativity, destroy most of the interesting uses for EQUIVALENCE, and make it impossible to modify the operating system code with negative subscripts. Worst of all, bounds checking is inefficient.Source code maintenance systems. A Real Programmer keeps his code locked up in a card file, because it implies that its owner cannot leave his important programs unguarded [5].THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT WORKWhere does the typical Real Programmer work? What kind of programs are worthy of the efforts of so talented an individual? You can be sure that no Real or sorting mailing lists for People magazine. A Real Programmer wants tasks of earth-shaking importance (literally!).Real Programmers work for Los Alamos National Laboratory, writing atomic bomb simulations to run on Cray I supercomputers.Real Programmers work for the National Security Agency, decoding Russian transmissions.It was largely due to the efforts of thousands of Real Programmers working for NASA that our boys got to the moon and back before the Russkies.Real Programmers are at work for Boeing designing the operating systems for cruise missiles.Some of the most awesome Real Programmers of all work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Many of them know the entire operating system of the bytes of unused memory in a Voyager spacecraft that searched for, located, and photographed a new moon of Jupiter.The current plan for the Galileo spacecraft is to use a gravity assist trajectory past Mars on the way to Jupiter. This trajectory passes within 80 +/-3 kilometers of the surface of Mars. Nobody is going to trust a Pascal program (or a Pascal programmer) for navigation to these tolerances.As you can tell, many of the world's Real Programmers work for the U.S. Government - mainly the Defense Department. This is as it should be. Recently, programmers and Quiche Eaters alike.) Besides, the determined Real Programmer can write Fortran programs in any language.The Real Programmer might compromise his principles and work on something slightly more trivial than the destruction of life as we know it, providing Fortran, so there are a fair number of people doing graphics in order to avoid having to write COBOL programs.THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT PLAYGenerally, the Real Programmer plays the same way he works - with computers. He is constantly amazed that his employer actually pays him to do what he would be breath of fresh air and a beer or two. Some tips on recognizing Real Programmers away from the computer room:At a party, the Real Programmers are the ones in the corner talking about operating system security and how to get around it.At a football game, the Real Programmer is the one comparing the plays against his simulations printed on 11 by 14 fanfold paper.At the beach, the Real Programmer is the one drawing flowcharts in the sand.At a funeral, the Real Programmer is the one saying Poor George, he almost had the sort routine working before the coronary.In a grocery store, the Real Programmer is the one who insists on running the cans past the laser checkout scanner himself, because he never could trust keypunch operators to get it right the first time.THE REAL PROGRAMMER'S NATURAL HABITATWhat sort of environment does the Real Programmer function best in? This is an important question for the managers of Real Programmers. Considering the amount of money it costs to keep one on the staff, it's best to put him (or her) in an environment where he can get his work done.The typical Real Programmer lives in front of a computer terminal. Surrounding this terminal are:Listings of all programs the Real Programmer has ever worked on, piled in roughly chronological order on every flat surface in the office.Some half-dozen or so partly filled cups of cold coffee. Occasionally, there will be cigarette butts floating in the coffee. In some cases, the cups will contain Orange Crush.Unless he is very good, there will be copies of the OS JCL manual and the Principles of Operation open to some particularly interesting pages.Taped to the wall is a line-printer Snoopy calendar for the year 1969.Strewn about the floor are several wrappers for peanut butter filled cheese bars - the type that are made pre-stale at the bakery so they can't get any worse while waiting in the vending machine.Hiding in the top left-hand drawer of the desk is a stash of double-stuff Oreos for special occasions.Underneath the Oreos is a flowcharting template, left there by the previous occupant of the office. (Real Programmers write programs, not documentation. Leave that to the maintenance people.)The Real Programmer is capable of working 30, 40, even 50 hours at a stretch, under intense pressure. In fact, he prefers it that way. Bad response time project done on time, but creates a convenient excuse for not doing the documentation. In general:No Real Programmer works 9 to 5 (unless it's the ones at night).Real Programmers don't wear neckties.Real Programmers don't wear high-heeled shoes.Real Programmers arrive at work in time for lunch [9].A Real Programmer might or might not know his wife's name. He does, however, know the entire ASCII (or EBCDIC) code table.Real Programmers don't know how to cook. Grocery stores aren't open at three in the morning. Real Programmers survive on Twinkies and coffee.THE FUTUREWhat of the future? It is a matter of some concern to Real Programmers that the latest generation of computer programmers are not being brought up with the same ever learning Fortran! Are we destined to become an industry of Unix hackers and Pascal programmers?From my experience, I can only report that the future is bright for Real Programmers everywhere. Neither OS 370 nor Fortran show any signs of dying out, one of them has a way of converting itself back into a Fortran 66 compiler at the drop of an option card - to compile DO loops like God meant them to be.Even Unix might not be as bad on Real Programmers as it once was. The latest release of Unix has the potential of an operating system worthy of any Real in - like having the best parts of Fortran and assembly language in one place. (Not to mention some of the more creative uses for

Real Programmers Don't Use Pascal "humour" Back in the good old days - the "Golden Era" of computers, it was easy to separate the men from the boys (sometimes called "Real Men" and "Quiche Eaters" in the literature). During this period, the Real Men were the ones that understood computer programming, and the Quiche Eaters were the ones that didn't. A real computer programmer said things like "DO 10 I=1,10" and "ABEND" (they actually talked in capital letters, you understand), and the rest of the world said things like "computers are too complicated for me" and "I can't relate to computers - they're so impersonal". (A previous work [1] points out that Real Men don't "relate" to anything, and aren't afraid of being impersonal.) But, as usual, times change. We are faced today with a world in which little old ladies can get computers in their microwave ovens, 12-year-old kids can blow Real Men out of the water playing Asteroids and Pac-Man, and anyone can buy and even understand their very own Personal Computer. The Real Programmer is in danger of becoming extinct, of being replaced by high-school students with {TRASH-80s}. There is a clear need to point out the differences between the typical high-school junior Pac-Man player and a Real Programmer. If this difference is made clear, it will give these kids something to aspire to -- a role model, a Father Figure. It will also help explain to the employers of Real Programmers why it would be a mistake to replace the Real Programmers on their staff with 12-year-old Pac-Man players (at a considerable salary savings). LANGUAGES The easiest way to tell a Real Programmer from the crowd is by the programming language he (or she) uses. Real Programmers use {Fortran}. Quiche Eaters use {Pascal}. Nicklaus Wirth, the designer of Pascal, gave a talk once at which he was asked how to pronounce his name. He replied, "You can either call me by name, pronouncing it 'Veert', or call me by value, 'Worth'." One can tell immediately from this comment that Nicklaus Wirth is a Quiche Eater. The only parameter passing mechanism endorsed by Real Programmers is call-by-value-return, as implemented in the {IBM 370} {Fortran-G} and H compilers. Real programmers don't need all these abstract concepts to get their jobs done - they are perfectly happy with a {keypunch}, a {Fortran IV} {compiler}, and a beer. Real Programmers do List Processing in Fortran. Real Programmers do String Manipulation in Fortran. Real Programmers do Accounting (if they do it at all) in Fortran. Real Programmers do {Artificial Intelligence} programs in Fortran. If you can't do it in Fortran, do it in {assembly language}. If you can't do it in assembly language, it isn't worth doing. STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING The academics in computer science have gotten into the "structured programming" rut over the past several years. They claim that programs are more easily understood if the programmer uses some special language constructs and techniques. They don't all agree on exactly which constructs, of course, and the examples they use to show their particular point of view invariably fit on a single page of some obscure journal or another - clearly not enough of an example to convince anyone. When I got out of school, I thought I was the best programmer in the world. I could write an unbeatable tic-tac-toe program, use five different computer languages, and create 1000-line programs that WORKED. (Really!) Then I got out into the Real World. My first task in the Real World was to read and understand a 200,000-line Fortran program, then speed it up by a factor of two. Any Real Programmer will tell you that all the Structured Coding in the world won't help you solve a problem like that - it takes actual talent. Some quick observations on Real Programmers and Structured Programming: Real Programmers aren't afraid to use {GOTOs}. Real Programmers can write five-page-long DO loops without getting confused. Real Programmers like Arithmetic IF statements - they make the code more interesting. Real Programmers write self-modifying code, especially if they can save 20 {nanoseconds} in the middle of a tight loop. Real Programmers don't need comments - the code is obvious. Since Fortran doesn't have a structured IF, REPEAT ... UNTIL, or CASE statement, Real Programmers don't have to worry about not using them. Besides, they can be simulated when necessary using {assigned GOTOs}. Data Structures have also gotten a lot of press lately. Abstract Data Types, Structures, Pointers, Lists, and Strings have become popular in certain circles. Wirth (the above-mentioned Quiche Eater) actually wrote an entire book [2] contending that you could write a program based on data structures, instead of the other way around. As all Real Programmers know, the only useful data structure is the Array. Strings, lists, structures, sets - these are all special cases of arrays and can be treated that way just as easily without messing up your programing language with all sorts of complications. The worst thing about fancy data types is that you have to declare them, and Real Programming Languages, as we all know, have implicit typing based on the first letter of the (six character) variable name. OPERATING SYSTEMS What kind of operating system is used by a Real Programmer? CP/M? God forbid - CP/M, after all, is basically a toy operating system. Even little old ladies and grade school students can understand and use CP/M. Unix is a lot more complicated of course - the typical Unix hacker never can remember what the PRINT command is called this week - but when it gets right down to it, Unix is a glorified video game. People don't do Serious Work on Unix systems: they send jokes around the world on {UUCP}-net and write adventure games and research papers. No, your Real Programmer uses OS 370. A good programmer can find and understand the description of the IJK305I error he just got in his JCL manual. A great programmer can write JCL without referring to the manual at all. A truly outstanding programmer can find bugs buried in a 6 megabyte {core dump} without using a hex calculator. (I have actually seen this done.) OS is a truly remarkable operating system. It's possible to destroy days of work with a single misplaced space, so alertness in the programming staff is encouraged. The best way to approach the system is through a keypunch. Some people claim there is a Time Sharing system that runs on OS 370, but after careful study I have come to the conclusion that they were mistaken. PROGRAMMING TOOLS What kind of tools does a Real Programmer use? In theory, a Real Programmer could run his programs by keying them into the front panel of the computer. Back in the days when computers had front panels, this was actually done occasionally. Your typical Real Programmer knew the entire bootstrap loader by memory in hex, and toggled it in whenever it got destroyed by his program. (Back then, memory was memory - it didn't go away when the power went off. Today, memory either forgets things when you don't want it to, or remembers things long after they're better forgotten.) Legend has it that {Seymore Cray}, inventor of the Cray I supercomputer and most of Control Data's computers, actually toggled the first operating system for the CDC7600 in on the front panel from memory when it was first powered on. Seymore, needless to say, is a Real Programmer. One of my favorite Real Programmers was a systems programmer for Texas Instruments. One day he got a long distance call from a user whose system had crashed in the middle of saving some important work. Jim was able to repair the damage over the phone, getting the user to toggle in disk I/O instructions at the front panel, repairing system tables in hex, reading register contents back over the phone. The moral of this story: while a Real Programmer usually includes a keypunch and lineprinter in his toolkit, he can get along with just a front panel and a telephone in emergencies. In some companies, text editing no longer consists of ten engineers standing in line to use an 029 keypunch. In fact, the building I work in doesn't contain a single keypunch. The Real Programmer in this situation has to do his work with a "text editor" program. Most systems supply several text editors to select from, and the Real Programmer must be careful to pick one that reflects his personal style. Many people believe that the best text editors in the world were written at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center for use on their Alto and Dorado computers [3]. Unfortunately, no Real Programmer would ever use a computer whose operating system is called SmallTalk, and would certainly not talk to the computer with a mouse. Some of the concepts in these Xerox editors have been incorporated into editors running on more reasonably named operating systems - {Emacs} and {VI} being two. The problem with these editors is that Real Programmers consider "what you see is what you get" to be just as bad a concept in Text Editors as it is in women. No the Real Programmer wants a "you asked for it, you got it" text editor - complicated, cryptic, powerful, unforgiving, dangerous. TECO, to be precise. It has been observed that a TECO command sequence more closely resembles transmission line noise than readable text [4]. One of the more entertaining games to play with TECO is to type your name in as a command line and try to guess what it does. Just about any possible typing error while talking with TECO will probably destroy your program, or even worse - introduce subtle and mysterious bugs in a once working subroutine. For this reason, Real Programmers are reluctant to actually edit a program that is close to working. They find it much easier to just patch the binary {object code} directly, using a wonderful program called SUPERZAP (or its equivalent on non-IBM machines). This works so well that many working programs on IBM systems bear no relation to the original Fortran code. In many cases, the original source code is no longer available. When it comes time to fix a program like this, no manager would even think of sending anything less than a Real Programmer to do the job - no Quiche Eating structured programmer would even know where to start. This is called "job security". Some programming tools NOT used by Real Programmers: Fortran preprocessors like {MORTRAN} and {RATFOR}. The Cuisinarts of programming - great for making Quiche. See comments above on structured programming. Source language debuggers. Real Programmers can read core dumps. Compilers with array bounds checking. They stifle creativity, destroy most of the interesting uses for EQUIVALENCE, and make it impossible to modify the operating system code with negative subscripts. Worst of all, bounds checking is inefficient. Source code maintenance systems. A Real Programmer keeps his code locked up in a card file, because it implies that its owner cannot leave his important programs unguarded [5]. THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT WORK Where does the typical Real Programmer work? What kind of programs are worthy of the efforts of so talented an individual? You can be sure that no Real Programmer would be caught dead writing accounts-receivable programs in {COBOL}, or sorting {mailing lists} for People magazine. A Real Programmer wants tasks of earth-shaking importance (literally!). Real Programmers work for Los Alamos National Laboratory, writing atomic bomb simulations to run on Cray I supercomputers. Real Programmers work for the National Security Agency, decoding Russian transmissions. It was largely due to the efforts of thousands of Real Programmers working for NASA that our boys got to the moon and back before the Russkies. Real Programmers are at work for Boeing designing the operating systems for cruise missiles. Some of the most awesome Real Programmers of all work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Many of them know the entire operating system of the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft by heart. With a combination of large ground-based Fortran programs and small spacecraft-based assembly language programs, they are able to do incredible feats of navigation and improvisation - hitting ten-kilometer wide windows at Saturn after six years in space, repairing or bypassing damaged sensor platforms, radios, and batteries. Allegedly, one Real Programmer managed to tuck a pattern-matching program into a few hundred bytes of unused memory in a Voyager spacecraft that searched for, located, and photographed a new moon of Jupiter. The current plan for the Galileo spacecraft is to use a gravity assist trajectory past Mars on the way to Jupiter. This trajectory passes within 80 +/-3 kilometers of the surface of Mars. Nobody is going to trust a Pascal program (or a Pascal programmer) for navigation to these tolerances. As you can tell, many of the world's Real Programmers work for the U.S. Government - mainly the Defense Department. This is as it should be. Recently, however, a black cloud has formed on the Real Programmer horizon. It seems that some highly placed Quiche Eaters at the Defense Department decided that all Defense programs should be written in some grand unified language called "ADA" ((C), DoD). For a while, it seemed that ADA was destined to become a language that went against all the precepts of Real Programming - a language with structure, a language with data types, {strong typing}, and semicolons. In short, a language designed to cripple the creativity of the typical Real Programmer. Fortunately, the language adopted by DoD has enough interesting features to make it approachable -- it's incredibly complex, includes methods for messing with the operating system and rearranging memory, and Edsgar Dijkstra doesn't like it [6]. (Dijkstra, as I'm sure you know, was the author of "GoTos Considered Harmful" - a landmark work in programming methodology, applauded by Pascal programmers and Quiche Eaters alike.) Besides, the determined Real Programmer can write Fortran programs in any language. The Real Programmer might compromise his principles and work on something slightly more trivial than the destruction of life as we know it, providing there's enough money in it. There are several Real Programmers building video games at Atari, for example. (But not playing them - a Real Programmer knows how to beat the machine every time: no challenge in that.) Everyone working at LucasFilm is a Real Programmer. (It would be crazy to turn down the money of fifty million Star Trek fans.) The proportion of Real Programmers in Computer Graphics is somewhat lower than the norm, mostly because nobody has found a use for computer graphics yet. On the other hand, all computer graphics is done in Fortran, so there are a fair number of people doing graphics in order to avoid having to write COBOL programs. THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT PLAY Generally, the Real Programmer plays the same way he works - with computers. He is constantly amazed that his employer actually pays him to do what he would be doing for fun anyway (although he is careful not to express this opinion out loud). Occasionally, the Real Programmer does step out of the office for a breath of fresh air and a beer or two. Some tips on recognizing Real Programmers away from the computer room: At a party, the Real Programmers are the ones in the corner talking about operating system security and how to get around it. At a football game, the Real Programmer is the one comparing the plays against his simulations printed on 11 by 14 fanfold paper. At the beach, the Real Programmer is the one drawing flowcharts in the sand. At a funeral, the Real Programmer is the one saying "Poor George, he almost had the sort routine working before the coronary." In a grocery store, the Real Programmer is the one who insists on running the cans past the laser checkout scanner himself, because he never could trust keypunch operators to get it right the first time. THE REAL PROGRAMMER'S NATURAL HABITAT What sort of environment does the Real Programmer function best in? This is an important question for the managers of Real Programmers. Considering the amount of money it costs to keep one on the staff, it's best to put him (or her) in an environment where he can get his work done. The typical Real Programmer lives in front of a computer terminal. Surrounding this terminal are: Listings of all programs the Real Programmer has ever worked on, piled in roughly chronological order on every flat surface in the office. Some half-dozen or so partly filled cups of cold coffee. Occasionally, there will be cigarette butts floating in the coffee. In some cases, the cups will contain Orange Crush. Unless he is very good, there will be copies of the OS JCL manual and the Principles of Operation open to some particularly interesting pages. Taped to the wall is a line-printer Snoopy calendar for the year 1969. Strewn about the floor are several wrappers for peanut butter filled cheese bars - the type that are made pre-stale at the bakery so they can't get any worse while waiting in the vending machine. Hiding in the top left-hand drawer of the desk is a stash of double-stuff Oreos for special occasions. Underneath the Oreos is a flowcharting template, left there by the previous occupant of the office. (Real Programmers write programs, not documentation. Leave that to the maintenance people.) The Real Programmer is capable of working 30, 40, even 50 hours at a stretch, under intense pressure. In fact, he prefers it that way. Bad response time doesn't bother the Real Programmer - it gives him a chance to catch a little sleep between compiles. If there is not enough schedule pressure on the Real Programmer, he tends to make things more challenging by working on some small but interesting part of the problem for the first nine weeks, then finishing the rest in the last week, in two or three 50-hour marathons. This not only impresses the hell out of his manager, who was despairing of ever getting the project done on time, but creates a convenient excuse for not doing the documentation. In general: No Real Programmer works 9 to 5 (unless it's the ones at night). Real Programmers don't wear neckties. Real Programmers don't wear high-heeled shoes. Real Programmers arrive at work in time for lunch [9]. A Real Programmer might or might not know his wife's name. He does, however, know the entire {ASCII} (or EBCDIC) code table. Real Programmers don't know how to cook. Grocery stores aren't open at three in the morning. Real Programmers survive on Twinkies and coffee. THE FUTURE What of the future? It is a matter of some concern to Real Programmers that the latest generation of computer programmers are not being brought up with the same outlook on life as their elders. Many of them have never seen a computer with a front panel. Hardly anyone graduating from school these days can do hex arithmetic without a calculator. College graduates these days are soft - protected from the realities of programming by source level debuggers, text editors that count parentheses, and "user friendly" operating systems. Worst of all, some of these alleged "computer scientists" manage to get degrees without ever learning Fortran! Are we destined to become an industry of Unix hackers and Pascal programmers? From my experience, I can only report that the future is bright for Real Programmers everywhere. Neither OS 370 nor Fortran show any signs of dying out, despite all the efforts of Pascal programmers the world over. Even more subtle tricks, like adding structured coding constructs to Fortran have failed. Oh sure, some computer vendors have come out with Fortran 77 compilers, but every one of them has a way of converting itself back into a Fortran 66 compiler at the drop of an option card - to compile DO loops like God meant them to be. Even Unix might not be as bad on Real Programmers as it once was. The latest release of Unix has the potential of an operating system worthy of any Real Programmer - two different and subtly incompatible user interfaces, an arcane and complicated teletype driver, virtual memory. If you ignore the fact that it's "structured", even 'C' programming can be appreciated by the Real Programmer: after all, there's no type checking, variable names are seven (ten? eight?) characters long, and the added bonus of the Pointer data type is thrown in - like having the best parts of Fortran and assembly language in one place. (Not to mention some of the more creative uses for

RLaB ::: A MATLAB-like matrix-oriented programming language/toolbox. RLaB focusses on creating a good experimental environment (or laboratory) in which to do matrix and string scalars, and matrices. RLaB also contains a list variable type, which is a heterogeneous associative array.Version 0.95 includes an interpreter, libraries and documentation. E-mail: Ian Searle . . Requires GNUPLOT, lib[IF]77.a (from f2c). Ported to many platforms including Unix, OS/2, Amiga. (1993-10-27).

RLaB A {MATLAB}-like matrix-oriented programming language/toolbox. RLaB focusses on creating a good experimental environment (or laboratory) in which to do matrix mathematics. Currently RLaB has numeric scalars and matrices (real and complex), and string scalars, and matrices. RLaB also contains a list variable type, which is a heterogeneous associative array. Version 0.95 includes an interpreter, libraries and documentation. E-mail: Ian Searle "ians@eskimo.com". {(ftp://evans.ee.adfa.oz.au)}. Requires {GNUPLOT}, lib[IF]77.a (from f2c). Ported to many {platforms} including {Unix}, {OS/2}, {Amiga}. (1993-10-27)

SAIL ::: 1. (body, education) Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.2. (language) Stanford Artificial Intelligence Language.3. (language) An early system on the Larc computer.[Listed in CACM 2(5):16, May 1959].[Jargon File](2001-06-22)

SAIL 1. "body, education" {Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory}. 2. "language" {Stanford Artificial Intelligence Language}. 3. "language" An early system on the {Larc} computer. [Listed in CACM 2(5):16, May 1959]. [{Jargon File}] (2001-06-22)

sanctum: A specially prepared safe, ritual, or laboratory space; sometimes capitalized, especially when referring to a space that has been magickally prepared.

Scheme-to-C "language" A {Scheme} {compiler} written in {C} that emits C and is embeddable in C. Scheme-to-C was written by Joel Bartlett of {Digital Western Research Laboratory}. Version 15mar93 translates a superset of Revised**4 Scheme to C that is then compiled by the {native} {C} compiler for the {target machine}. This design results in a portable system that allows either stand-alone Scheme programs or programs written in both compiled and interpreted Scheme and other languages. It supports "{expansion passing style}" {macros}, {foreign function} calls, {records}, and interfaces to {Xlib} ({Ezd} and {Scix}). Scheme-to-C runs on {VAX}, {ULTRIX}, {DECstation}, {Alpha AXP} {OSF}/1, {Windows 3.1}, {Apple Macintosh} 7.1, {HP 9000/300}, {HP 9000/700}, {Sony News}, {SGI} {Iris} and {Harris} {Nighthawk}, and other {Unix}-like {88000} systems. The earlier 01nov91 version runs on {Amiga}, {SunOS}, {NeXT}, and {Apollo} systems. {(ftp://gatekeeper.dec.com/pub/DEC/Scheme-to-C/)}. (2000-05-24)

Science and Engineering Research Council ::: (body) (SERC) Formerly the largest of the five research councils funded by the British Government through the Office of Science and Technology. SERC Daresbury Laboratory, near Warrington; the Royal Greenwich Observatory at Cambridge and the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh.In April 1994 SERC was split into the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. SERC's remote Biotechnology and Biological Sciences RC. The two major SERC laboratories - Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and Daresbury Laboratory are now independent. . (1994-12-15)

Science and Engineering Research Council "body" (SERC) Formerly the largest of the five research councils funded by the British Government through the Office of Science and Technology. SERC funded higher education research in science and engineering, including computing and was responsible for the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, near Oxford; the Daresbury Laboratory, near Warrington; the Royal Greenwich Observatory at Cambridge and the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh. In April 1994 SERC was split into the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. SERC's remote sensing efforts have been transferred to the Natural Environment RC and its biotechnology efforts merged with the Agriculture and Food RC to make the new Biotechnology and Biological Sciences RC. The two major SERC laboratories - {Rutherford Appleton Laboratory} and Daresbury Laboratory are now independent. {(http://unixfe.rl.ac.uk/serc/serc.html)}. (1994-12-15)

Semi-Automatic Ground Environment ::: (project) (SAGE) The computer system of the old US Norad air defence system. SAGE was ground-breaking in many ways, such as being one of the first very large software projects and the first real-time system.MIT Lincoln Laboratory developed SAGE and MITRE Corporation was responsible for system engineering and implementation oversight. , , .[Confirm? Dates? Connection with MIT Research Laboratory for Electronics?] (1999-12-16)

Semi-Automatic Ground Environment "project" (SAGE) The computer system of the old US Norad air defence system. SAGE was ground-breaking in many ways, such as being one of the first very large software projects and the first {real-time} system. {MIT Lincoln Laboratory} developed SAGE and {MITRE Corporation} was responsible for system engineering and implementation oversight. {(http://togger.com/)}, {(http://jps.net/ethelen/sage.html)}, {(http://eskimo.com/%7Ewow-ray/sage28.html)}. [Confirm? Dates? Connection with MIT Research Laboratory for Electronics?] (1999-12-16)

SISAL "language" (Streams and Iteration in a Single Assignment Language) A general-purpose {single assignment} {functional programming language} with {strict} semantics, automatic parallelisation and efficient {arrays}. Outputs a dataflow graph in {IF1} (Intermediary Form 1). Derived from {VAL}, adds {recursion} and finite {streams}. {Pascal}-like syntax. Designed to be a common high-level language for numerical programs on a variety of {multiprocessors}. Implementations exist for {Cray X-MP}, {Cray Y-MP}, {Cray-2}, {Sequent}, {Encore Alliant}, {dataflow} architectures, {transputers} and {systolic arrays}. Defined in 1983 by James McGraw et al, {Manchester University}, {Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory}, {Colorado State University} and {DEC}. Revised in 1985. First compiled implementation in 1986. Performance superior to {C} and competitive with {Fortran}, combined with efficient and automatic parallelisation. Not to be confused with {SASL}. E-mail: John Feo "feo@llnl.gov", Rod Oldehoeft "rro@cs.colostate.edu". David C. Cann has written an {Optimising SISAL Compiler (ftp://sisal.llnl.gov/pub/sisal)} (OSC) which attempts to make efficient use of {parallel processors} such as {Crays}. ["A Report on the SISAL Language Project", J.T. Feo et al, J Parallel and Distrib Computing 10(4):349-366 (Dec 1990)]. (2000-07-07)

SISAL ::: Streams and Iteration in a Single Assignment Language.A general-purpose single assignment functional programming language with strict semantics, automatic parallelisation and efficient arrays. Outputs a dataflow streams. Pascal-like syntax. Designed to be a common high-level language for numerical programs on a variety of multiprocessors.Implementations exist for Cray X-MP, Cray Y-MP, Cray-2, Sequent, Encore Alliant, dataflow architectures, transputers and systolic arrays.Defined in 1983 by James McGraw et al, Manchester University, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Colorado State University and DEC. Revised in 1985. First compiled implementation in 1986. Performance superior to C and competitive with Fortran, combined with efficient and automatic parallelisation.Not to be confused with SASL.E-mail: John Feo , Rod Oldehoeft .David C. Cann has written an (OSC) which attempts to make efficient use of parallel processors such as Crays.Latest version: 12.0, SISAL 1.2.[A Report on the SISAL Language Project, J.T. Feo et al, J Parallel and Distrib Computing 10(4):349-366 (Dec 1990)].(2000-07-07)

Software Writer's Language "language" (SWL) /swil/ An industrial strength dialect of {Pascal} that allowed multiple {source code} files, originally developed at {Control Data Corporation} (CDC) prior to 1973. Development continued at the {Integrated Systems Laboratory}. SWL was adopted by NCR as its corporate {operating system} and {compiler} implementation language (1978-1982+). The NCR SWL dialect was renamed NCRL (NCR Language) in 1981 and continued development [until ?]. (2003-12-31)

Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory "body, education" (SAIL) /sayl/, not /S-A-I-L/ An important site in the early development of {LISP}; with the {MIT AI Lab}, {BBN}, {CMU}, {XEROX PARC}, and the {Unix} community, one of the major wellsprings of technical innovation and hacker-culture traditions (see the {WAITS} entry for details). The SAIL machines were shut down in late May 1990, scant weeks after the MIT AI Lab's ITS cluster was officially decommissioned. [{Jargon File}] (2001-06-22)

Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory ::: (body, education) (SAIL) /sayl/, not /S-A-I-L/ An important site in the early development of LISP; with the MIT AI Lab, BBN, CMU, XEROX PARC, and the were shut down in late May 1990, scant weeks after the MIT AI Lab's ITS cluster was officially decommissioned.[Jargon File](2001-06-22)

Stephen Kleene ::: (person) Professor Stephen Cole Kleene (1909-01-05 - 1994-01-26) /steev'n (kohl) klay'nee/ An American mathematician whose work at the University of theory and for inventing regular expressions. The Kleene star and Ascending Kleene Chain are named after him.Kleene was born in Hartford, Conneticut, USA. He received his bachelor of arts degree from Amherst College in 1930. From 1930 to 1935, he was a graduate doctorate in mathematics in 1934. In 1935, he joined UW-Madison mathematics department as an instructor. He became an assistant professor in 1937.From 1939 to 1940, he was a visiting scholar at Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study where he laid the foundation for recursive function theory, an area that would be his lifelong research interest. In 1941 he returned to Amherst as an associate professor of mathematics.During World War II Kleene was a lieutenant commander in the United States Navy. He was an instructor of navigation at the U.S. Naval Reserve's Midshipmen's School in New York, and then a project director at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C.In 1946, he returned to Wisconsin, eventually becoming a full professor. He was chair of mathematics, and computer sciences in 1962 and 1963 and dean of the College of Letters and Science from 1969 to 1974. In 1964 he was named the Cyrus C. MacDuffee professor of mathematics.An avid mountain climber, Kleene had a strong interest in nature and the environment and was active in many conservation causes. He led several Logic from 1956 to 1958. In 1961, he served as president of the International Union of the History and the Philosophy of Science.Kleene pronounced his last name /klay'nee/. /klee'nee/ and /kleen/ are extremely common mispronunciations. His first name is /steev'n/, not /stef'n/. His son, pronunciation is incorrect in all known languages. I believe that this novel pronunciation was invented by my father. . (1999-03-03)

Stephen Kleene "person" Professor Stephen Cole Kleene (1909-01-05 - 1994-01-26) /steev'n (kohl) klay'nee/ An American mathematician whose work at the {University of Wisconsin-Madison} helped lay the foundations for modern computer science. Kleene was best known for founding the branch of {mathematical logic} known as {recursion theory} and for inventing {regular expressions}. The {Kleene star} and {Ascending Kleene Chain} are named after him. Kleene was born in Hartford, Conneticut, USA. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Amherst College in 1930. From 1930 to 1935, he was a graduate student and research assistant at {Princeton University} where he received his doctorate in mathematics in 1934. In 1935, he joined UW-Madison mathematics department as an instructor. He became an assistant professor in 1937. From 1939 to 1940, he was a visiting scholar at Princeton's {Institute for Advanced Study} where he laid the foundation for recursive function theory, an area that would be his lifelong research interest. In 1941 he returned to Amherst as an associate professor of mathematics. During World War II Kleene was a lieutenant commander in the United States Navy. He was an instructor of navigation at the U.S. Naval Reserve's Midshipmen's School in New York, and then a project director at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. In 1946, he returned to Wisconsin, eventually becoming a full professor. He was chair of mathematics, and computer sciences in 1962 and 1963 and dean of the College of Letters and Science from 1969 to 1974. In 1964 he was named the Cyrus C. MacDuffee professor of mathematics. An avid mountain climber, Kleene had a strong interest in nature and the environment and was active in many conservation causes. He led several professional organisations, serving as president of the {Association of Symbolic Logic} from 1956 to 1958. In 1961, he served as president of the International Union of the History and the Philosophy of Science. Kleene pronounced his last name /klay'nee/. /klee'nee/ and /kleen/ are extremely common mispronunciations. His first name is /steev'n/, not /stef'n/. His son, Ken Kleene "kenneth.kleene@umb.edu", wrote: "As far as I am aware this pronunciation is incorrect in all known languages. I believe that this novel pronunciation was invented by my father." {(gopher://gopher.adp.wisc.edu/00/.data/.news-rel/.9401/.940126a)}. (1999-03-03)

stillatory ::: a. --> An alembic; a vessel for distillation.
A laboratory; a place or room in which distillation is performed.


Symbolic Mathematical Laboratory "tool, mathematics" An on-line system under {CTSS} for {symbolic mathematics}. It used a {display screen} and a {light pen}. [Sammet 1969, p.514]. (1995-04-16)

Symbolic Mathematical Laboratory ::: (tool, mathematics) An on-line system under CTSS for symbolic mathematics. It used a display screen and a light pen.[Sammet 1969, p.514]. (1995-04-16)

symbolic mathematics ::: (mathematics, application) (Or symbolic math) The use of computers to manipulate mathematical equations and expressions in symbolic form, as opposed of one expression into another, simplification of an expression, change of subject etc.One of the best known symbolic mathematics software packages is Mathematica. Others include ALAM, ALGY, AMP, Ashmedai, AXIOM*, CAMAL, CAYLEY, CCalc, CLAM, Pari, REDUCE, SAC-1, SAC2, SAINT, Schoonschip, Scratchpad I, SHEEP, STENSOR, SYMBAL, SymbMath, Symbolic Mathematical Laboratory, TRIGMAN, UBASIC.Usenet newsgropup: sci.math.symbolic. (1995-04-12)

symbolic mathematics "mathematics, application" (Or "symbolic math") The use of computers to manipulate mathematical equations and expressions in symbolic form, as opposed to manipulating the numerical quantities represented by those symbols. Such a system might be used for symbolic integration or differentiation, substitution of one expression into another, simplification of an expression, change of subject etc. One of the best known symbolic mathematics software packages is {Mathematica}. Others include {ALAM}, {ALGY}, {AMP}, {Ashmedai}, {AXIOM*}, {CAMAL}, {CAYLEY}, {CCalc}, {CLAM}, {CoCoA}(?), {ESP}, {FLAP}, {FORM}, {FORMAL}, {Formula ALGOL}, {GAP}, {JACAL}, {LiE}, {Macaulay}, {MACSYMA}, {Magic Paper}, {MAO}, {Maple}, {Mathcad}, {MATHLAB}, {MuMath}, {Nother}, {ORTHOCARTAN}, {Pari}, {REDUCE}, {SAC-1}, {SAC2}, {SAINT}, {Schoonschip}, {Scratchpad I}, {SHEEP}, {STENSOR}, {SYMBAL}, {SymbMath}, {Symbolic Mathematical Laboratory}, {TRIGMAN}, {UBASIC}. {Usenet} newsgropup: {news:sci.math.symbolic}. (1995-04-12)

The elements of our present atmosphere are compounded from simpler elements which existed on earth at earlier stages of its evolution, and which exist now on some other globes. The atmosphere of our earth has become not only a chemical, but an alchemical crucible, in which “there is a perpetual exchange taking place in space of molecules, or atoms rather, correlating, and thus changing their combining equivalents on every planet” (SD 1:142). Neither sun nor stars are said to have our terrestrial elements, except in the sun’s outer robes, for it is only in its outer robes that the integration of atomic substances become sufficiently physical to permit the appearance of our terrestrial elements; also our globe is said to have its own special laboratory on the far outskirts of the atmosphere, and when the atoms and molecules cross this, they change and differentiate from their primordial nature. The spectroscope may show certain similarities between the elements on sun and stars and those on earth but we have no logical right to infer identity in other respects; and actually the physical and chemical properties of atoms differ on different globes, as do also most of the effects of temperature (SD 1:142).

The first laboratory of experimental psychology was founded at Leipzig in 1879 by Wundt, who has been called "the first professional psychologist." With such research as that of Stumpf on sound; G. E. Müller on psycho-physics, color and learning; Ebbinghaus on memory; and Kulpe and the Würzburg school on the "higher thought processes," experimental psychology made rapid strides within the next two decades. In America, the chief standard bearer of Wundtian psychology was Titchener. Among the others who were instrumental in the introduction and development of experimental psychology in America, may be mentioned James, Hall, Münsterberg, Cattell, and Watson.

Theosophy holds that a nebula is the first stage of manifestation on the highest subplanes of the physical cosmic plane of the physical vehicle of a planet or star. Virtually all of the true irresolvable nebulae, however, are composed of matter which is hardly physical at all — physical matter in its 4th, 5th, 6th, or 7th state or condition counting upwards, and hence not the physical matter known and experimented upon in the laboratory.

The Sanskrit word for medicine in general is aushadha (consisting of herbs), and the ancient Hindu materia medica was the source from which subsequent systems of practice in many other countries drew their remedies, when a broad conception of the sacred art of healing marked their highest periods of national attainment. Originally the medical practitioners were as familiar with the mystical and occult properties of plants and minerals as magicians themselves were. Both understood the analogy and interrelations between the principles of the composite human being and all the various elements throughout the realm of nature. That some plants are attracted by the sun and others by the moon, etc., was explained by a profound knowledge of astronomy and of the occult influences of solar, lunar, and planetary time periods and sidereal forces. This gave the key for the best time, place, and conditions for gathering the herbs, and for the special pharmacy required for bringing out the vital remedial action which, by working with nature, left no unfavorable aftereffects. There is no record of medical laboratory work producing artificial synthetic products which, even when duplicating nature’s substances chemically, are not different vitally. Nor was organotherapy resorted to when and where the healing art held a worthy place in high civilizations.

The word is used relatively to signify the absence of something, as the absence of physical matter in an evacuated bulb. But another form of matter is still present, for we can transmit light as well as many other forms of radiation. Thus proceeding by successive steps we come to the logical limit in the conception of the cosmic void — which nevertheless from the spiritual viewpoint is a pleroma or utter fullness. The physical vacuum of the laboratory has become confused with the scientific and mystical void of the archaic philosophy.

ThingLab ::: A simulation system written in Smalltalk-80. It solves constraints using value inference.Version: ThingLab II.[The Programming Language Aspects of ThingLab, A Constraint-Oriented Simulation Laboratory, A. Borning, ACM TOPLAS 3(4):353-387 (Oct 1981)].

ThingLab A {simulation} system written in {Smalltalk-80}. It solves {constraints} using {value inference}. Version: ThingLab II. ["The Programming Language Aspects of ThingLab, A Constraint-Oriented Simulation Laboratory", A. Borning, ACM TOPLAS 3(4):353-387 (Oct 1981)].

Thomas "language" A language compatible with the language {Dylan}(TM). Thomas is NOT {Dylan}(TM). The first public release of a translator to {Scheme} by Matt Birkholz, Jim Miller, and Ron Weiss, written at {Digital Equipment Corporation}'s {Cambridge Research Laboratory} runs (slowly) on {MIT}'s {CScheme}, DEC's {Scheme-"C}, Marc Feeley's {Gambi}, {Macintosh}, {PC}, {Vax}, {MIPS}, {Alpha}, {680x0}. {(ftp://gatekeeper.pa.dec.com/pub/DEC/Thomas)}. Mailing list: "info-thomas@crl.dec.com". ["Dylan(TM) an object-oriented dynamic language", {Apple Computer}, Eastern Research and Technology, April 1992]. (1992-09-11)

Thomas ::: (language) A language compatible with the language Dylan(TM). Thomas is NOT Dylan(TM).The first public release of a translator to Scheme by Matt Birkholz, Jim Miller, and Ron Weiss, written at Digital Equipment Corporation's Cambridge Research Laboratory runs (slowly) on MIT's CScheme, DEC's Scheme->C, Marc Feeley's Gambi, Macintosh, PC, Vax, MIPS, Alpha, 680x0. .Mailing list: .[Dylan(TM) an object-oriented dynamic language, Apple Computer, Eastern Research and Technology, April 1992]. (1992-09-11)

Thorndike puzzle-box: piece of laboratory apparatus used by Skinner, to demonstrate trial-and-error learning.

Tim Berners-Lee "person" (Sir -) The man who invented the {web} while working at the {Center for European Particle Research} (CERN). He is Director of the {World Wide Web Consortium}. Tim Berners-Lee graduated from the Queen's College at Oxford University, England, 1976. Whilst there he built his first computer with a soldering iron, {TTL} gates, an {M6800} processor and an old television. He then went on to work for {Plessey Telecommunications}, and D.G. Nash Ltd (where he wrote software for intelligent printers and a {multi-tasking} {operating system}), before joining CERN, where he designed a program called 'Enquire', which was never published, but formed the conceptual basis for today's {web}. In 1984, he took up a fellowship at CERN, and in 1989, he wrote the first {web server}, "{httpd}", and the first client, "WorldWideWeb" a {hypertext} browser/editor which ran under {NEXTSTEP}. The program "WorldWideWeb" was first made available within CERN in December, and on the {Internet} as a whole in the summer of 1991. In 1994, Tim joined the {Laboratory for Computer Science} (LCS) at the {Massachusetts Institute of Technology} (MIT). In 1999, he became the first holder of the {3Com} Founders chair. He is also the author of "Weaving the Web", on the past present and future of the Web. In 2001, Tim was made a fellow of The Royal Society. Tim is married to Nancy Carlson. They have two children, born 1991 and 1994. {(http://w3.org/People/Berners-Lee/Longer.html)}. (2001-06-17)

Tim Berners-Lee ::: (person) The man who invented the World-Wide Web while working at the Center for European Particle Research (CERN). Now Director of the World-Wide Web Consortium.Tim Berners-Lee graduated from the Queen's College at Oxford University, England, 1976. Whilst there he built his first computer with a soldering iron, TTL gates, an M6800 processor and an old television.He then went on to work for Plessey Telecommunications, and D.G. Nash Ltd (where he wrote software for intelligent printers and a multi-tasking operating which was never published, but formed the conceptual basis for today's World-Wide Web.In 1984, he took up a fellowship at CERN, and in 1989, he wrote the first World-Wide Web server, httpd, and the first client, WorldWideWeb a hypertext made available within CERN in December, and on the Internet as a whole in the summer of 1991.In 1994, Tim joined the Laboratory for Computer Science (LCS) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). In 1999, he became the first holder of the 3Com Founders chair. He is also the author of Weaving the Web, on the past present and future of the Web.In 2001, Tim was made a fellow of The Royal Society.Tim is married to Nancy Carlson. They have two children, born 1991 and 1994. .(2001-06-17)

U. Cassina, L'oeuvre philosophique de G. Peano, Revue de Metaphysique et de Morale, vol. 40 (1933), pp. 481-491. Peirce, Charles Sanders: American Philosopher. Born in Cambridge, Mass, on September 10th, 1839. Harvard M.A. in 1862 and Sc. B. in 1863. Except for a brief cireer as lectuier in philosophy at Harvard, 1864-65 and 1869-70 and in logic at Johns Hopkins, 1879-84, he did no formal teaching. Longest tenure was with the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey for thirty years beginning in 1861. Died at Milford, Pa. in 1914 He had completed only one work, The Grand Logic, published posthumously (Coll. Papers). Edited Studies in Logic (1883). No volumes published during his lifetime but author of many lectures, essays and reviews in periodicals, particularly in the Popular Science Monthly, 1877-78, and in The Monist, 1891-93, some of which have been reprinted in Chance, Love and Logic (1923), edited by Morris R. Cohen, and. together with the best of his other work both published and unpublished, in Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce (1931-35), edited by Charles Hartshorne ¦ind Paul Weiss. He was most influenced by Kant, who had he thought, raised all the relevant philosophical problems but from whom he differed on almost every solution. He was excited by Darwin, whose doctrine of evolution coincided with his own thought, and disciplined by laboratory experience in the physical sciences which inspired his search for rigor and demonstration throughout his work. Felt himself deeply opposed to Descartes, whom he accused of being responsible for the modern form of the nominalistic error. Favorably inclined toward Duns Scotus, from whom he derived his realism. Philosophy is a sub-class of the science of discovery, in turn a branch of theoretical science. The function of philosophy is to expliin and hence show unity in the variety of the universe. All philosophy takes its start in logic, or the relations of signs to their objects, and phenomenology, or the brute experience of the objective actual world. The conclusions from these two studies meet in the three basic metaphysical categories: quality, reaction, and representation. Quality is firstness or spontaneity; reaction is secondness or actuality; and representation is thirdness or possibility. Realism (q.v.) is explicit in the distinction of the modes of being actuality as the field of reactions, possibility as the field of quality (or values) and representation (or relations). He was much concerned to establish the realism of scientific method: that the postulates, implications and conclusions of science are the results of inquiry yet presupposed by it. He was responsible for pragmatism as a method of philosophy that the sum of the practical consequences which result by necessity from the truth of an intellectual conception constitutes the entire meaning of that conception. Author of the ethical principle that the limited duration of all finite things logically demands the identification of one's interests with those of an unlimited community of persons and things. In his cosmology the flux of actuality left to itself develops those systematic characteristics which are usually associated with the realm of possibility. There is a logical continuity to chance events which through indefinite repetition beget order, as illustrated in the tendency of all things to acquire habits. The desire of all things to come together in this certain order renders love a kind of evolutionary force. Exerted a strong influence both on the American pragmatist, William James (1842-1910), the instrumentalist, John Dewey (1859-), as well as on the idealist, Jociah Royce (1855-1916), and many others. -- J.K.F.

Vint Cerf "person" (Vinton G. Cerf) The co-inventor with {Bob Kahn} of the {Internet} and its base {protocol}, {TCP/IP}. Like {Jon Postel}, he was crucial in the development of many higher-level protocols, and has written several dozen {RFCs} since the late 1960s. Vinton Cerf is senior vice president of Internet Architecture and Technology for {MCI WorldCom}. His team of architects and engineers design advanced Internet frameworks for delivering a combination of data, information, voice and video services for business and consumer use. In December 1997, President Clinton presented the U.S. National Medal of Technology to Cerf and his partner, Robert E. Kahn, for founding and developing the Internet. Prior to rejoining MCI in 1994, Cerf was vice president of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI). As vice president of MCI Digital Information Services from 1982-1986, he led the engineering of {MCI Mail}, the first commercial e-mail service to be connected to the Internet. During his tenure from 1976-1982 with the U.S. Department of {Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency} (DARPA), Cerf played a key role leading the development of Internet and Internet-related data packet and security technologies. Cerf served as founding president of the {Internet Society} from 1992-1995 and is currently chairman of the Board. Cerf is a member of the U.S. Presidential Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) and the Advisory Committee for Telecommunications (ACT) in Ireland. Cerf is a recipient of numerous awards and commendations in connection with his work on the Internet. In December 1994, People magazine identified Cerf as one of that year's "25 Most Intriguing People." In addition to his work on behalf of MCI and the Internet, Cerf serves as technical advisor to production for "Gene Roddenberry's Earth: Final Conflict," the number one television show in first-run syndication. He also made a special guest appearance in May 1998. Cerf also holds an appointment as distinguished visiting scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where he is working on the design of an interplanetary Internet. Cerf holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from Stanford University and Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from UCLA. He also holds honorary Doctorate degrees from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich; Lulea University of Technology, Sweden; University of the Balearic Islands, Palma; Capitol College and Gettysburg College. {(http://mci.com/cerfsup/)}. (1999-02-25)

Vint Cerf ::: (person) (Vinton G. Cerf) The co-inventor with Bob Kahn of the Internet and its base protocol, TCP/IP. Like Jon Postel, he was crucial in the development of many higher-level protocols, and has written several dozen RFCs since the late 1960s.Vinton Cerf is senior vice president of Internet Architecture and Technology for MCI WorldCom. His team of architects and engineers design advanced Internet frameworks for delivering a combination of data, information, voice and video services for business and consumer use.In December 1997, President Clinton presented the U.S. National Medal of Technology to Cerf and his partner, Robert E. Kahn, for founding and developing the Internet.Prior to rejoining MCI in 1994, Cerf was vice president of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI). As vice president of MCI Digital Information Services from 1982-1986, he led the engineering of MCI Mail, the first commercial e-mail service to be connected to the Internet.During his tenure from 1976-1982 with the U.S. Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Cerf played a key role leading the development of Internet and Internet-related data packet and security technologies.Cerf served as founding president of the Internet Society from 1992-1995 and is currently chairman of the Board. Cerf is a member of the U.S. Presidential Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) and the Advisory Committee for Telecommunications (ACT) in Ireland.Cerf is a recipient of numerous awards and commendations in connection with his work on the Internet. In December 1994, People magazine identified Cerf as one of that year's 25 Most Intriguing People.In addition to his work on behalf of MCI and the Internet, Cerf serves as technical advisor to production for Gene Roddenberry's Earth: Final Conflict, visiting scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where he is working on the design of an interplanetary Internet.Cerf holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from Stanford University and Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from UCLA. He also Zurich; Lulea University of Technology, Sweden; University of the Balearic Islands, Palma; Capitol College and Gettysburg College. . (1999-02-25)

visualisation "graphics" Making a visible presentation of numerical data, particularly a graphical one. This might include anything from a simple X-Y graph of one dependent variable against one independent variable to a {virtual reality} which allows you to fly around the data. {Gnuplot} is the {Free Software Foundation}'s utility for producing various kinds of graphs. {Usenet} newsgroup: {news:comp.graphics}. The {Computer Graphics Resource Listing} contains pointers to several visualisation tools. {comp.graphics FAQ (ftp://src.doc.ic.ac.uk/usenet/news-info/comp.graphics/)}. {Electronic Visualization Laboratory, University of Illinois at Chicago (http://ncsa.uiuc.edu/EVL/docs/Welcome.html)}. (2002-02-21)

Well Monitoring ::: Measurement, by on-site instruments or laboratory methods, of the quality of water in a well.



Wesley Clark ::: (person) One of the designers of the Laboratory Instrument Computer at MIT who subsequently had a quiet hand in many seminal computing events, such as the development of the Internet, the first really good description of the metastability problem in computer logic. . (1999-03-29)

Wesley Clark "person" One of the designers of the {Laboratory Instrument Computer} at {MIT} who subsequently had a quiet hand in many seminal computing events, such as the development of the {Internet}, the first really good description of the {metastability} problem in computer logic. {(http://pretext.com/mar98/features/story1.htm)}. (1999-03-29)

Whetstone "benchmark" The first major {synthetic benchmark} program, intended to be representative for numerical ({floating-point} intensive) programming. It is based on statistics gathered by Brian Wichmann at the {National Physical Laboratory} in England, using an {Algol 60} {compiler} which translated Algol into instructions for the imaginary Whetstone machine. The compilation system was named after the small town of Whetstone outside the City of Leicester, England, where it was designed. The later {dhrystone} benchmark was a pun on Whetstone. Source code: {C (ftp://netlib.att.com/netlib/benchmark/whetstonec.Z)}, {single precision Fortran (ftp://netlib.att.com:/netlib/benchmark/whetstones.Z)}, {double precision Fortran (ftp://netlib.att.com:/netlib/benchmark/whetstoned.Z)}. ["A Synthetic Benchmark", H.J. Curnow and B.A. Wichmann, The Computer Journal, 19,1 (1976), pp. 43-49]. (1994-11-14)

Whirlwind "computer" An early computer from the {MIT Research Laboratory for Electronics}. Whirlwind used {electrostatic memory} and ran {Laning and Zierler} (1953); and {ALGEBRAIC}, {COMPREHENSIVE} and {SUMMER SESSION} (all 1959). [Details, reference?] (2002-06-03)

Whirlwind ::: (computer) An early computer from the MIT Research Laboratory for Electronics.Whirlwind used electrostatic memory and ran Laning and Zierler (1953); and ALGEBRAIC, COMPREHENSIVE and SUMMER SESSION (all 1959).[Details, reference?](2002-06-03)

Wild_LIFE Logic, Inheritance, Functions and Equations parts: interpreter, manual, tests, libraries, examples Paradise Project, DEC Paris Research Laboratory. {(ftp://gatekeeper.dec.com/pub/plan/Life.tar.Z)} - Wild_LIFE interpreter from Paradise project at DEC's Paris Research Lab LIFE is an experimental programming language with a powerful facility for structured type inheritance. It reconciles styles from functional programming, logic programming, and object-oriented programming. LIFE implements a constraint logic programming language with equality (unification) and entailment (matching) constraints over order-sorted feature terms. The Wild_LIFE interpreter has a comfortable user interface with incremental query extension ability. It contains an extensive set of built-in operations as well as an X Windows interface. A semantic superset of LOGIN and LeFun. Syntax is similar to prolog. bugs: "life-bugs@prl.dec.com" ports: MIPS-Ultrix Mailing list: life-request@prl.dec.com E-mail: Peter Van Roy "vanroy@prl.dec.com" (1992-12-14)

Wild_LIFE ::: Logic, Inheritance, Functions and Equationsparts: interpreter, manual, tests, libraries, examplesParadise Project, DEC Paris Research Laboratory. - Wild_LIFE interpreter from Paradise project at DEC's Paris Research LabLIFE is an experimental programming language with a powerful facility for structured type inheritance. It reconciles styles from functional programming, comfortable user interface with incremental query extension ability. It contains an extensive set of built-in operations as well as an X Windows interface.A semantic superset of LOGIN and LeFun. Syntax is similar to prolog.bugs: ports: MIPS-UltrixMailing list: E-mail: Peter Van Roy (1992-12-14)

Wundt, Wilhelm Max: (1832-1920) German physiologist, psychologist and philosopher, who after studying medicine at Heidelberg and Berlin and lecturing at Heidelberg, became Professor of Philosophy at Leipzig in 1875 where he founded the first psychological laboratory in 1879. Wundt's psychological method, as exemplified in his Principles of Physiological Psychology, 1873-4, combines exact physical and philological measurement of stimulus and response along with an introspective analysis of the "internal experience" which supervenes between stimulus and response; he affirmed an exact parallelism or one-to-one correspondence between the physiological and the psychological series. Wundt's psychology on its introspective side, classified sensations with respect to modality, intensity, duration, extension, etc.; and feelings as: (a) pleasant or unpleisant, (b) tense or relaxed, (c) excited or depressed. He advanced but later abandoned on introspective grounds the feeling of innervation (discharge of nervous energy in initiating muscular movement). Among psychologists influenced by Wundt are Cattell, Stanley Hall and Titchener. -- L.W.

X Consortium A vendor consortium supporting development, evolution and maintenance of the {X Window System}. The X Consortium is an independent, not-for-profit company. It was formed in 1993 as the successor to the {MIT} X Consortium, a research group of the MIT {Laboratory for Computer Science}. {(ftp://ftp.x.org)}. {(http://x.org/)}. [Members?]

X Consortium ::: A vendor consortium supporting development, evolution and maintenance of the X Window System. The X Consortium is an independent, not-for-profit company. It was formed in 1993 as the successor to the MIT X Consortium, a research group of the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science. .[Members?]



QUOTES [7 / 7 - 639 / 639]


KEYS (10k)

   2 Sri Aurobindo
   1 Stephen LaBerge
   1 Nikola Tesla
   1 Matt Mercer
   1 ken-wilber
   1 Eliphas Levi

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   17 Anonymous
   9 Siddhartha Mukherjee
   7 Kurt Vonnegut
   6 Richard Rhodes
   6 Marie Curie
   6 Hope Jahren
   6 Gary Taubes
   5 Thomas S Kuhn
   5 Rick Riordan
   5 Michio Kaku
   5 Carl Sagan
   4 Vladimir Nabokov
   4 Viktor E Frankl
   4 Mary Roach
   4 Daniel G Amen
   3 Thomas Pynchon
   3 Stephen Hawking
   3 Sri Aurobindo
   3 Rebecca Solnit
   3 Rebecca Skloot

1:The mystics ask you to take nothing on mere belief. Rather, they give you a set of experiments to test in your own awareness and experience. The laboratory is your own mind, the experiment is meditation. ~ ken-wilber,
2:The grand workshop of spiritual experiment, the laboratory of the soul has been India, where thousands of great spirits have been born in every generation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II, Spirituality and Nationalism,
3:The word, the form, the charm, the glory and grace
   Are missioned sparks from a stupendous Fire;
   A sample from the laboratory of God
   Of which he holds the patent upon earth,
   Comes to him wrapped in golden coverings
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
4:The mind is sharper and keener in seclusion and uninterrupted solitude. No big laboratory is needed in which to think. Originality thrives in seclusion free of outside influences beating upon us to cripple the creative mind. Be alone, that is the secret of invention; be alone, that is when ideas are born. That is why many of the earthly miracles have had their genesis in humble surroundings. ~ Nikola Tesla,
5:MATT: Okay. You spiral upward and upward and upward, climbing an extremely long period of time.

Your legs begin to ache a little bit. Then another floor opens up. It appears the tower is now divided into two chambers. From the bottom floor up, it's now two sides to a tower and you're on the right side. The hallway curves around the outer edge of the tower. On the opposite side, you can see the staircase continues upward. The interior of this chamber appears to be an incredible arcane laboratory, occupying the center space of the tower inside. You see six overlapping circles of dulled runes and glyphs that encompass the entire 30-foot walkway between here and the stairs. Shelves and tables of countless glass tubes and metallic vices lay out across tables, organized in a near-OCD pattern. Tomes and books line the inner chamber walls. What do you guys do? ~ Matt Mercer, Critical Role,
6:The key one and threefold, even as universal science. The division of the work is sevenfold, and through these sections are distributed the seven degrees of initiation into is transcendental philosophy.

The text is a mystical commentary on the oracles of Solomon, ^ and the work ends with a series of synoptic schedules which are the synthesis of Magic and the occult Kabalah so far as concerns that which can be made public in writing. The rest, being the esoteric and inexpressible part of the science, is formulated in magnificent pantacles carefully designed and engraved. These are nine in number, as follows

(1) The dogma of Hermes;
(2) Magical realisation;
(3) The path of wisdom and the initial procedure in the work
(4) The Gate of the Sanctuary enlightened by seven mystic rays;
(5) A Rose of Light, in the centre of which a human figure is extending its arms in the form of a cross;
(6) The magical laboratory of Khunrath, demonstrating the necessary union of prayer and work
(7) The absolute synthesis of science;
(8) Universal equilibrium ;
(9) A summary of Khunrath's personal embodying an energetic protest against all his detractors. ~ Eliphas Levi, The History Of Magic,
7:Wake-Initiated Lucid Dreams (WILDS)
In the last chapter we talked about strategies for inducing lucid dreams by carrying an idea from the waking world into the dream, such as an intention to comprehend the dream state, a habit of critical state testing, or the recognition of a dreamsign. These strategies are intended to stimulate a dreamer to become lucid within a dream.
This chapter presents a completely different set of approaches to the world of lucid dreaming based on the idea of falling asleep consciously. This involves retaining consciousness while wakefulness is lost and allows direct entry into the lucid dream state without any loss of reflective consciousness. The basic idea has many variations.
While falling asleep, you can focus on hypnagogic (sleep onset) imagery, deliberate visualizations, your breath or heartbeat, the sensations in your body, your sense of self, and so on. If you keep the mind sufficiently active while the tendency to enter REM sleep is strong, you feel your body fall asleep, but you, that is to say, your consciousness, remains awake. The next thing you know, you will find yourself in the dream world, fully lucid.
These two different strategies for inducing lucidity result in two distinct types of lucid dreams. Experiences in which people consciously enter dreaming sleep are referred to as wake-initiated lucid dreams (WILDs), in contrast to dream-initiated lucid dreams (DILDs), in which people become lucid after having fallen asleep unconsciously. 1 The two kinds of lucid dreams differ in a number of ways. WILDs always happen in association with brief awakenings (sometimes only one or two seconds long) from and immediate return to REM sleep. The sleeper has a subjective impression of having been awake. This is not true of DILDs. Although both kinds of lucid dream are more likely to occur later in the night, the proportion of WILDs also increases with time of night. In other words, WILDs are most likely to occur the late morning hours or in afternoon naps. This is strikingly evident in my own record of lucid dreams. Of thirty-three lucid dreams from the first REM period of the night, only one (3 percent) was a WILD, compared with thirteen out of thirty-two (41 percent) lucid dreams from afternoon naps. 2 Generally speaking, WILDs are less frequent than DILDs; in a laboratory study of seventy-six lucid dreams, 72 percent were DILDs compared with 28 percent WILDs. 3 The proportion of WILDs observed in the laboratory seems, by my experience, to be considerably higher than the proportion of WILDs reported at home.
To take a specific example, WILDs account for only 5 percent of my home record of lucid dreams, but for 40 percent of my first fifteen lucid dreams in the laboratory. 4 Ibelieve there are two reasons for this highly significant difference: whenever I spentthe night in the sleep laboratory, I was highly conscious of every time I awakened andI made extraordinary efforts not to move more than necessary in order to minimizeinterference with the physiological recordings.
Thus, my awakenings from REM in the lab were more likely to lead toconscious returns to REM than awakenings at home when I was sleeping with neitherheightened consciousness of my environment and self nor any particular intent not tomove. This suggests that WILD induction techniques might be highly effective underthe proper conditions.
Paul Tholey notes that, while techniques for direct entry to the dream staterequire considerable practice in the beginning, they offer correspondingly greatrewards. 5 When mastered, these techniques (like MILD) can confer the capacity toinduce lucid dreams virtually at will. ~ Stephen LaBerge, Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming, 4 - Falling Asleep Consciously,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:What is possible in the Cavendish Laboratory may not be too difficult in the sun. ~ sir-arthur-eddington, @wisdomtrove
2:A neat and orderly laboratory is unlikely. It is, after all, so much a place of false starts and multiple attempts. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
3:The inner chambers of the soul are like the photographer's darkroom. Like a laboratory. One cannot stay there all the time or it becomes the solitary cell of the neurotic. ~ anais-nin, @wisdomtrove
4:We have not, in fact, proved that science excludes miracles: we have only proved that the question of miracles, like innumerable other questions, excludes laboratory treatment. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
5:The difference between physics and metaphysics is not that the practitioners of one are smarter than the practitioners of the other. The difference is that the metaphysicist has no laboratory. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
6:The mystics ask you to take nothing on mere belief. Rather, they give you a set of experiments to test in your own awareness and experience. The laboratory is your own mind, the experiment is meditation. ~ ken-wilber, @wisdomtrove
7:Is it necessary to practice all these asanas, further and further? Is it necessary to develop scientific researches further and further? To a yogi, the body is a laboratory, a field of experiments and perpetual researches. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
8:Though modern Marriage is a tremendous laboratory, its members are often without preparation for the partnership function. How much agony and remorse and failure could have been avoided if there had been at least some rudimentary learning before they entered the partnership. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
9:Wherefore the brain must be looked upon as the universal and general sensory and at the same time as the universal and general motory organ of the body and finally as the universal and general laboratory of the animal spirits and the blood or of the essential juices of life. ~ emanuel-swedenborg, @wisdomtrove
10:There is therefore no reason to put a limit to evolutionary possibility by taking our present organization or status of existence as final. The animal is a laboratory in which Nature has worked out man; man may very well be a laboratory in which she wills to work out superman, to disclose the soul as a divine being, to evolve a divine nature. ~ sri-aurobindo, @wisdomtrove
11:Capitalism has created the highest standard of living ever known on earth. The evidence is incontrovertible. The contrast between West and East Berlin is the latest demonstration, like a laboratory experiment for all to see. Yet those who are loudest in proclaiming their desire to eliminate poverty are loudest in denouncing capitalism. Man's well-being is not their goal. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
12:There is, in fact, no reason to believe that any given natural phenomenon, however marvelous it may seem today, will remain forever inexplicable. Soon or late the laws governing the production of life itself will be discovered in the laboratory, and man may set up business as a creator on his own account. The thing, indeed, is not only conceivable; it is even highly probable. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
13:It's becoming clear that in a sense the cosmos provides the only laboratory where sufficiently extreme conditions are ever achieved to test new ideas on particle physics. The energies in the Big Bang were far higher than we can ever achieve on Earth. So by looking at evidence for the Big Bang, and by studying things like neutron stars, we are in effect learning something about fundamental physics. ~ martin-rees, @wisdomtrove
14:To our senses, the elements are four and have ever been, and will ever be for they are the elements of life, of poetry, and of perception, the four Great Ones, the Four Roots, the First Four of Fire and the Wet, Earth and the wide Air of the World. To find the other many elements, you must go to the laboratory and hunt them down. But the four we have always with us, they are our world. Or rather, they have us with them. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
15:Regarding perfection, that's a very difficult question. I can say that I have superseded most in my sadhana [practice]. I am in it, and my mind and my intelligence gets better in my sadhana, and it reaches a certain place. When I stretch, I stretch in such a way that my awareness moves, and a gate of awareness finally opens... My body is a laboratory, you can say. I don't stretch my body as if it is an object. I do yoga from the self towards the body, not the other way around. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
16:A human being is not one thing among others; things determine each other, but man is ultimately self-determining. What he becomes - within the limits of endowment and environment- he has made out of himself. In the concentration camps, for example, in this living laboratory and on this testing ground, we watched and witnessed some of our comrades behave like swine while others behaved like saints. Man has both potentialities within himself; which one is actualized depends on decisions but not on conditions. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
17:I would say that introverts make some of the best international philosophers. The less common attribute of the introverted lifestyle - a close societal connection, as such a connection disappears or changes in relevance as the currents of the winds change - leaves too much room for one's own cultural bias. Instead, introverts tend to turn inward, the laboratory of being and all its forms. This is the most accurate study of the individual human being, which is in turn, rather than those affected by cultural limitations, the most universal reflection of human understanding and human behavior. ~ criss-jami, @wisdomtrove
18:When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong. Perhaps the adjective &
19:Finally, we can congratulate ourselves on the unprecedented accomplishments of modern Sapiens only if we completely ignore the fate of all other animals. Much of the vaunted material wealth that shields us from disease and famine was accumulated at the expense of laboratory monkeys, dairy cows and conveyor-belt chickens. Over the last two centuries tens of billions of them have been subjected to a regime of industrial exploitation whose cruelty has no precedent in the annals of planet Earth. If we accept a mere tenth of what animal-rights activists are claiming, then modern industrial agriculture might well be the greatest crime in history. When evaluating global happiness, it is wrong to count the happiness only of the upper classes, of Europeans or of men. Perhaps it is also wrong to consider only the happiness of humans. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:My mind is my laboratory. ~ Albert Einstein,
2:Laboratory, then waved Hagen ~ Clive Cussler,
3:Art, to me, was a research laboratory, ~ Supervert,
4:That dark laboratory we call the soil. ~ Aldo Leopold,
5:I am a guinea pig in the laboratory of God. ~ Timothy Power,
6:the laboratory evidence that linked her to Todd ~ A J Banner,
7:The library is the mathematician's laboratory. ~ Paul Halmos,
8:Vietnam was as much a laboratory experiment as a war. ~ John Pilger,
9:I think of Texas as the laboratory for bad government. ~ Molly Ivins,
10:In history as in nature, decay is the laboratory of life. ~ Karl Marx,
11:A good little bookstore…is a laboratory for our coming together. ~ Ross Gay,
12:Magic is a science.
Miracle is the work.
Mind is a laboratory. ~ Toba Beta,
13:Conversation is the laboratory and workshop of the student. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
14:He was a thing of books and alembics to me, library and laboratory. ~ Naomi Novik,
15:She begins to write to Pierre, a sort of laboratory notebook of grief. ~ Lydia Davis,
16:. . . [S]uppose we considered the war itself as a laboratory? ~ Thomas Pynchon,
17:The gastric laboratory uses its protein ferment under an acid reaction. ~ Ivan Pavlov,
18:Life is a playground and a laboratory; avoid neglecting one for the other. ~ T F Hodge,
19:Nevertheless, a few brave researchers have bellied up to the laboratory. ~ Eric Weiner,
20:I was in an industrial laboratory because academia found me unsuitable ~ Benoit Mandelbrot,
21:If the child is a budding psychologist, we parents are the laboratory rats. ~ Alison Gopnik,
22:suppose he were to donate a laboratory to Brandeis or even to Harvard? The ~ Harry Kemelman,
23:Quantum phenomena do not occur in a Hilbert space. They occur in a laboratory. ~ Asher Peres,
24:The Alchemy's secret key is hidden in the laboratory of the man and woman. ~ Samael Aun Weor,
25:My laboratory is like a church because it is where I figure out what I believe. ~ Hope Jahren,
26:I used to work in a hospital, in a laboratory doing phlebotomy. I was a vampire. ~ John Edward,
27:We are chemists in the laboratory of the Infinite. What, then shall we create? ~ Ernest Holmes,
28:I suppose, in the absence of universal certainties, we are our own best laboratory. ~ Matt Haig,
29:At the school of wisdom, mistake is not just a lesson but, a laboratory ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
30:The modern research laboratory can be a large and complicated social organism. ~ J Michael Bishop,
31:What is possible in the Cavendish Laboratory may not be too difficult in the sun. ~ Arthur Eddington,
32:History is the only laboratory we have in which to test the consequences of thought. ~ Etienne Gilson,
33:Innovation and renewal are required to keep a laboratory on the frontiers of science. ~ Burton Richter,
34:I want to get out in the water. I want to see fish, real fish, not fish in a laboratory. ~ Sylvia Earle,
35:Motto for a research laboratory: what we work on today, others will first think of tomorrow. ~ Alan Perlis,
36:A couple of months in the laboratory can frequently save a couple of hours in the library. ~ Frank Westheimer,
37:Don’t think of me as a librarian. Think of me as a mad scientist; this is my secret laboratory. ~ Kami Garcia,
38:I like to be in the laboratory with the doors closed. I like experimenting and trying things. ~ Nigel Godrich,
39:laboratory with three other people, and the next, I’m alone in that same room, on my hands and ~ Jodi Picoult,
40:The effort whites put into observing racial etiquette has been demonstrated in the laboratory. ~ Jared Taylor,
41:Wilderness, then, assumes unexpected importance as a laboratory for the study of land - health. ~ Aldo Leopold,
42:We're all of us guinea pigs in the laboratory of God. Humanity is just a work in progress. ~ Tennessee Williams,
43:Set foot in our house again,” said Sofia, “and you'll become a permanent feature in my laboratory. ~ Scott Lynch,
44:Sorry, I didn't see the big X with the words Top Secret Government Laboratory on the map, did you? ~ Julie Kagawa,
45:If I had done everything I'm credited with, I'd be speaking to you from a laboratory jar at Harvard. ~ Frank Sinatra,
46:Laboratory research suggests that how we look and act in the virtual affect our behavior in the real. ~ Sherry Turkle,
47:If they are afraid of revision in the laboratory, truth will never be released except by accident. ~ Barbara W Tuchman,
48:Laboratory scientists use formaldehyde as a disinfectant or preservative. They don't fucking drink it. ~ Rory Freedman,
49:Cities are an immense laboratory of trial and error, failure and success, in city building and city design. ~ Jane Jacobs,
50:The soul cannot be seen in a biological laboratory, any more than pain can be seen on an operating table. ~ Fulton J Sheen,
51:A first-rate laboratory is one in which mediocre scientists can produce outstanding work. ~ Patrick Blackett Baron Blackett,
52:Once you close down your laboratory, you can't just rev it up again if you're able to finally get a grant. ~ Laurie Glimcher,
53:Seventy-plus years in the Marxist-Leninist laboratory gave rise to a new man: Homo sovieticus. Some see ~ Svetlana Alexievich,
54:Why spend a day in the library when you can learn the same thing by working in the laboratory for a month? ~ Frank Westheimer,
55:For him, the Holocaust was a laboratory gone mad, accelerating and intensifying human processes a hundredfold... ~ David Grossman,
56:I consider nature a vast chemical laboratory in which all kinds of composition and decompositions are formed. ~ Antoine Lavoisier,
57:They don't understand the multi-life sequences. Anything they can't see in a laboratory, they think is nonsense. ~ Frederick Lenz,
58:A neat and orderly laboratory is unlikely. It is, after all, so much a place of false starts and multiple attempts. ~ Isaac Asimov,
59:Verily, chemistry is not a splitting of hairs when you have got half a dozen raw Irishmen in the laboratory. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
60:As an undergraduate at Harvard in the 1960s, I was fascinated by my visits to psychologist B.F. Skinner's laboratory. ~ Andrew Weil,
61:Hypotheses like professors, when they are seen not to work any longer in the laboratory, should disappear. ~ Henry Edward Armstrong,
62:No one but a theorist believes his theory; everyone puts faith in a laboratory result but the experimenter himself. ~ Albert Einstein,
63:More than eighty years later, Curie’s laboratory notes remain so radioactive that they are kept in a lead-lined box. ~ Adam Higginbotham,
64:Rediscovery in the library may be a more difficult and uncertain process than the first discovery in the laboratory. ~ John William Strutt,
65:the W and Z particles were observed at the CERN laboratory in Geneva in 1983 and another Nobel Prize was awarded in 1984 ~ Stephen Hawking,
66:The men preferred to think they worked not in a laboratory but in what Kelly once called “an institute of creative technology. ~ Jon Gertner,
67:and spend lonely nights in the library or laboratory pursuing a glowing truth that only six or seven people will ever care about. ~ Anonymous,
68:protective of his gleaming domain, beavering away in it alone like an obsessed scientist in a humid and luridly lit laboratory. ~ Michel Faber,
69:I run a modest-sized laboratory thats looking specifically at what we call the pathogenic mechanisms of HIV disease, or AIDS. ~ Anthony S Fauci,
70:All creative scientists know that the true laboratory is the mind, where behind illusions they uncover the laws of truth. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
71:[Chemistry] laboratory work was my first challenge. ... I still carry the scars of my first discovery-that test-tubes are fragile. ~ Edward Teller,
72:I'm not an advocate for everything that rolls out of the laboratory. I'm an advocate for things sanctioned by millennia of usage. ~ Terence McKenna,
73:Latin America in the late twentieth century was a tragic laboratory for testing all the wrong ways to think about a national culture. ~ Clive James,
74:Giving cancer to laboratory animals has not and will not help us to understand the disease or to treat those persons suffering from it. ~ Albert Sabin,
75:I see my studio like a laboratory, where I work like an investigator - it's almost forensic. I love the discovery process in painting. ~ Ross Bleckner,
76:Oh, Hello. I'm Eugene Mirman, and I'm here to introduce my special. It's called An Evening of Comedy in a Fake Underground Laboratory. ~ Eugene Mirman,
77:Trying to replace the common law with a rationally designed law is, he jests, like trying to design a better rhinoceros in a laboratory. ~ Matt Ridley,
78:When Miss Carter came back to the table she reported that laboratory tests had shown that the “sleepy” kitten had indeed been drugged. ~ Carolyn Keene,
79:If he had been a dog in a city, a policeman would have shot him and sent his head to a laboratory, to see if he had rabies. So it goes. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
80:Like thousands of other boys, I had a little chemical laboratory in our cellar and think that some of our friends thought me a bit crazy. ~ Linus Pauling,
81:If he had been a dog in a city, a policeman would have shot him and sent his head to a laboratory, to see if he had rabies. So it goes. As ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
82:Our education apparatus can't be one that produces robots. That can happen in laboratory. There has to be overall personality development. ~ Narendra Modi,
83:We need to transmute the lead of personality into the gold of the Spirit. This work is only possible in the laboratory of the Alchemist. ~ Samael Aun Weor,
84:For a novelist, a given historic situation is an anthropologic laboratory in which he explores his basic question: What is human existence? ~ Milan Kundera,
85:We all flinched as Ray flipped the breaker back on, but my laboratory again failed to erupt in flames. It must be a mad scientist record. ~ Richard Roberts,
86:A plant bred in a laboratory is no more or less "real" than a baby born through in vitro fertilization. The traits matter, not the process. ~ Michael Specter,
87:The body is a marvelous machine...a chemical laboratory, a power-house. Every movement, voluntary or involuntary, full of secrets and marvels ~ Theodor Herzl,
88:Breathe, Newberry. If you faint in the Blacksmith’s laboratory, only the stars above know what might be grafted to your body when you wake up. ~ Meljean Brook,
89:I came out of independent film, that's my roots. I used my independent film as a laboratory, and used what I could discover in that laboratory. ~ Nicolas Cage,
90:I wouldn’t care whether it was a laboratory or a carnival. But it’s merely safe. Tell me, Mr. Pollock, what is the matter with Gopher Prairie? ~ Sinclair Lewis,
91:Nationalism is blamed for this century's wars, but nationalism need not mean militarism. And the nation-state has been the laboratory of liberty. ~ George Will,
92:The mind is the laboratory where products, both fake and genuine are manufactured. People grow wild weeds, others grow flourishing flowers! ~ Israelmore Ayivor,
93:All the stuff we've ever seen in the laboratory, all the kinds of particles and matter and energy, that only makes up 5 percent of our universe. ~ Sean M Carroll,
94:But Dad! It really did happen! I was transported to a Laboratory in an old stone castle and there was a wizard in blue robes with a floppy hat and... ~ L R W Lee,
95:Conversation is our account of ourselves...Conversation is the vent of character as well as thoughts...It is the laboratory of the student. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
96:I realized why I need to start a new company. Not for the money. Not because I'm 'bored'. But because a company is a laboratory to try your ideas. ~ Derek Sivers,
97:Volunteer activities can foster enormous leadership skills. The nonprofit professional volunteer world is a laboratory for self - realization. ~ Madeleine M Kunin,
98:As an experimental psychologist, I have been trained not to believe anything unless it can be demonstrated in the laboratory on rats or sophomores. ~ Steven Pinker,
99:Cambridge was the place for someone from the Colonies or the Dominions to go on to, and it was to the Cavendish Laboratory that one went to do physics. ~ Aaron Klug,
100:Be it whim or emergency, the modern laboratory is equally at the service of romance, equally ready to gratify mankind with a torpedo or a toy. ~ Richard Le Gallienne,
101:Put off your imagination, as you put off your overcoat, when you enter the laboratory. Put it on again, as you put on your overcoat, when you leave. ~ Claude Bernard,
102:A scientist in his laboratory is not a mere technician: he is also a child confronting natural phenomena that impress him as though they were fairy tales. ~ Marie Curie,
103:Adam's hot Pheebs! Admit it girl. That body is like some kind of happy experiment. It's like he was manufactured in a nympho scientist's secret laboratory ~ Daniel Waters,
104:Much as I admired the elegance of physical theories, which at that time geology wholly lacked, I preferred a life in the woods to one in the laboratory. ~ John Tuzo Wilson,
105:[...] any fool can make a discovery. Every baby has to discover more in the first years of its life than Roger Bacon ever discovered in his laboratory. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
106:Growing the mycelium of the Chaga mushroom under laboratory conditions provides an ecologically friendly alternative supply of this unique medicinal mushroom. ~ Paul Stamets,
107:There are no objective tests in psychiatry-no X-ray, laboratory, or exam finding that says definitively that someone does or does not have a mental disorder. ~ Allen Frances,
108:And what would I do ? Part of me was immobile, stunned with despair, like those rats that lose hope in laboratory experiments and lie down in the maze to starve. ~ Donna Tartt,
109:The studio is a laboratory, not a factory. An exhibition is the result of your experiments, but the process is never-ending. So an exhibition is not a conclusion. ~ Chris Ofili,
110:First, there was 2 Stupid Dogs. Then, Dexters Laboratory. And now, Powerpuff Girls. There were a lot of little things in between, but those were the main ones. ~ Craig McCracken,
111:Now a cholera epidemic was sweeping through Southeast Asia and south Asia in the early 1970s, so I started medical school and I joined a laboratory to work on this. ~ Peter Agre,
112:our present relationships are both the laboratory in which we labor to perfect ourselves and the source of that enjoyment that will constitute our true heaven. ~ Terryl L Givens,
113:Tachyons travel faster than light and have imaginary mass; it’s not clear if they fall up or down under gravity. They, too, have not been found in the laboratory.) ~ Michio Kaku,
114:My brother said this to him, tapping his own forehead with his fingertips: “If you think this laboratory is bad, you should see what it’s like in here.” And so on. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
115:I think what we're talking about is a sense of fashion as laboratory work. I mean, we are not scientific, of course, but we are looking for ideas all the time. ~ Nicolas Ghesquiere,
116:It'll keep you alive for another 10 years if you get yourself a laugh once a day: either provoke it, or look around in the wildest laboratory in the world, the public. ~ Jerry Lewis,
117:The trains are central to Bombay just as the subway is central to New York; they are the great social laboratory of that city. And today, they became a charnel-house. ~ Suketu Mehta,
118:My brother said this to him, tapping his own forehead with his fingertips: “If you think this laboratory is bad, you should see what it’s like in here.” And so on. *** ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
119:The inner chambers of the soul are like the photographer's darkroom. Like a laboratory. One cannot stay there all the time or it becomes the solitary cell of the neurotic. ~ Anais Nin,
120:A real alchemical laboratory should be full of the kind of glassware that looked as if it were produced during the Guild of Glassblowers All-Comers Hiccuping Contest. ~ Terry Pratchett,
121:My laboratory,” I said, experimentally, drawing out each syllable. “Why is it that saying it like that always makes me want to follow it with ‘mwoo-hah-hah-hah-hahhhhhh’? ~ Jim Butcher,
122:What happens if a big asteroid hits Earth ? Judging from realistic simulations involving a sledge hammer and a common laboratory frog, we can assume it will be pretty bad. ~ Dave Barry,
123:A laboratory of natural history is a sanctuary where nothing profane should be tolerated. I feel less agony at improprieties in churches than in a scientific laboratory. ~ Louis Agassiz,
124:why fur-farmers and so-called laboratory scientists are repaid with violence - it is because they deal in violence themselves and it's the only language they understand.
~ Morrissey,
125:I’ve learned to put great store in my own observations of everyday life, because while laboratory experiments are one way to study human nature, they aren’t the only way. ~ Gretchen Rubin,
126:Some Pd-Cu-Ga alloys have hardness values comparable with or exceeding that of tooth enamel, and castings from these alloys may be difficult to finish in the dental laboratory ~ Anonymous,
127:Only in education, never in the life of farmer, sailor, merchant, physician, or laboratory experimenter, does knowledge mean primarily a store of information aloof from doing. ~ John Dewey,
128:We have not, in fact, proved that science excludes miracles: we have only proved that the question of miracles, like innumerable other questions, excludes laboratory treatment. ~ C S Lewis,
129:Scientists who have dedicated their lives to building machines that think, feel that it's only a matter of time before some form of consciousness is captured in the laboratory. ~ Michio Kaku,
130:The God of the Bible is also the God of the genome. He can be worshipped in the cathedral or in the laboratory. His creation is majestic, awesome, intricate, and beautiful. ~ Francis Collins,
131:The God of the Bible is also the God of the genome. He can be worshipped in the cathedral or in the laboratory. His creation is majestic, awesome, intricate, and beautiful. ~ Francis S Collins,
132:Natick Labs and precursor the Quartermaster Subsistence Research Laboratory have extended shelf lives to near immortality. They currently make a sandwich that keeps for three years. ~ Mary Roach,
133:There are no bona fide treatments available for embryonic stem cells. There is nothing in the laboratory, and there is certainly nothing in the clinics available to patients. ~ Michael C Burgess,
134:If I had a vision of the perfect psychedelic drug and knew its structure, I'd make it. That's why I have a laboratory out there - to make things that haven't been made before. ~ Alexander Shulgin,
135:The Laboratory for Radioactivity consisted of only two rooms at the time; at a later date, when tests of radioactive substances became more extensive, it expanded into four rooms. ~ Walther Bothe,
136:Unless our laboratory results are to give us artificialities, mere scientific curiosities, they must be subjected to interpretation by gradual re-approximation to conditions of life. ~ John Dewey,
137:the laboratory, the gold standard appears to be aerobic exercise, 30 minutes at a clip, two or three times a week. Add a strengthening regimen and you get even more cognitive benefit. ~ John Medina,
138:was peering through the microscope at the tooth of an adder I had captured behind the coach house that very morning after church, when there came a light knock at the laboratory door. ~ Alan Bradley,
139:I was selected to be an astronaut on a military program called the Manned Orbiting Laboratory back in '67 and that program got cancelled in '69 and NASA ended up taking half of us... ~ Robert Crippen,
140:Canada has made a strong commitment as a partner in the International Space Station and, like the other partners, wishes to see the assembly of this unique orbiting laboratory continue. ~ Marc Garneau,
141:In the Radiation Laboratory we count it a privilege to do everything we can to assist our medical colleagues in the application of these new tools to the problems of human suffering. ~ Ernest Lawrence,
142:Henrietta’s were different: they reproduced an entire generation every twenty-four hours, and they never stopped. They became the first immortal human cells ever grown in a laboratory. ~ Rebecca Skloot,
143:We locked ourselves in, and then took Moreau’s mangled body into the yard and laid it upon a pile of brushwood. Then we went into the laboratory and put an end to all we found living there. ~ H G Wells,
144:I began the study of medicine, impelled by a desire for knowledge of facts and of man. The resolution to do disciplined work tied me to both laboratory and clinic for a long time to come. ~ Karl Jaspers,
145:I set up a laboratory in the Department of Physiology in the Medical School in South Africa and begin to try to find a bacteriophage system which we might use to solve the genetic code. ~ Sydney Brenner,
146:You can not become a scientist if you require that every question has an answer because its the very questions that have no answer that attract you to a laboratory every single day. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
147:...daily receiving the old physician in his study; or visiting the laboratory, and, for recreation's sake, watching the processes by which weeds were converted into drugs of potency. ~ Nathaniel Hawthorne,
148:I spent eighteen months as a graduate student in physics at Columbia University, waiting unhappily for an opportunity to work in a laboratory and wondering if I should continue in physics. ~ Sidney Altman,
149:The laboratory evidence that carbohydrate-rich diets can cause the body to reain water and so raise blood pressure, just as salt consumption is supposed to do, dates back well over a century ~ Gary Taubes,
150:Healthy nutrition is just as much an art as science. It is important to test and investigate methods and foods in your own laboratory (your body) and observe how various things affect you. Be ~ Mantak Chia,
151:I still remember "the mighty Cros" visiting the ranch in his van. That van was a rolling laboratory that made Jack Casady's briefcase look like chicken feed. Forget I said that! Was my mic on? ~ Neil Young,
152:The difference between physics and metaphysics is not that the practitioners of one are smarter than the practitioners of the other. The difference is that the metaphysicist has no laboratory. ~ Carl Sagan,
153:The kitchen is the great laboratory of the household, and much of the 'weal and woe' as far as regards bodily health, depends on the nature of the preparations concocted within its walls. ~ Isabella Beeton,
154:Because you scratched my itch and then you kissed me—both of which freaked me out because neither of which are in the course syllabus for laboratory experiments this semester. And, furthermore— ~ Penny Reid,
155:I felt a bit silly giving this advice to a girl who regularly fought monsters with golden swords, but I had promised Bill Nye the Science Guy I would always promote safe laboratory practices. ~ Rick Riordan,
156:Painters, especially American painters since the Second World War, have been much more troubled, beset by formal perplexity, than American writers. Theyve been a laboratory for everybody. ~ Donald Barthelme,
157:Taking this view, it is possible to see financial markets as a laboratory for testing hypotheses, albeit not strictly scientific ones. The truth is, successful investing is a kind of alchemy. ~ George Soros,
158:In truth, the laboratory is the forecourt of the temple of philosophy, and whoso has not offered sacrifices and undergone purification there has little chance of admission into the sanctuary. ~ Thomas Huxley,
159:What makes a college of social work a unique laboratory for rumbling is the expectation that we must have uncomfortable conversations if we’re going to work to empower people and change systems. ~ Bren Brown,
160:I have no dress except the one I wear every day. If you are going to be kind enough to give me one, please let it be practical and dark so that I can put it on afterwards to go to the laboratory. ~ Marie Curie,
161:We are able to find everything in our memory, which is like a dispensary or chemical laboratory in which chance steers our hand sometimes to a soothing drug and sometimes to a dangerous poison. ~ Marcel Proust,
162:Modern science is fast-moving, and no laboratory can exist for long with a program based on old facilities. Innovation and renewal are required to keep a laboratory on the frontiers of science. ~ Burton Richter,
163:My goal was to develop into an independent research scientist studying clinical problems at the laboratory bench, but I felt that postgraduate residency training in internal medicine was necessary. ~ Peter Agre,
164:Although each of us obviously inhabits a separate physical body, the laboratory data from a hundred years of parapsychology research strongly indicate that there is no separation in consciousness. ~ Russell Targ,
165:really a hedge fund but a versatile technology laboratory full of innovators and talented engineers who could apply computer science to a variety of different problems.5 Investing was only the first ~ Brad Stone,
166:Clearly, binary outcomes are not very prevalent in life; they mostly exist in laboratory experiments and in research papers. In life, payoffs are usually open-ended, or, at least, variable. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
167:D'you know how embarrassing it is to mention good and evil in a scientific laboratory? Have you any idea? One of the reasons I became a scientist was not to have to think about that kind of thing. ~ Philip Pullman,
168:The office is the laboratory and meeting your users is like going into the field. You can't just stay in the lab. And it's not just asking users what they want, it's about seeing what they're doing. ~ Brian Chesky,
169:And let us dispose of a common misconception. The complete transmutation of even one animal species into a different species has never been directly observed either in the laboratory or in the field. ~ Dean H Kenyon,
170:For the moment, he's off plotting his Igoresque revenge. I don't know about you, but I have this image of him rubbing his hands together and laughing like Dexter from Dexter's Laboratory. (Kyrian) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
171:[From a typical McDonald's meal] this is how the laboratory measured our meal: soda (100%), milk shake (78%), salad dressing (65%), chicken nuggets (56%), cheeseburger (52%), and French fries (23%). ~ Michael Pollan,
172:From the beginning of the Radiation Laboratory, I have had the rare good fortune of being in the center of a group of men of high ability, enthusiastic and completely devoted to scientific pursuits. ~ Ernest Lawrence,
173:I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician, he is also a child place before natural phenomenon, which impress him like a fairy tale. ~ Marie Curie,
174:The mystics ask you to take nothing on mere belief. Rather, they give you a set of experiments to test in your own awareness and experience. The laboratory is your own mind, the experiment is meditation. ~ Ken Wilber,
175:Voyages to the outer solar system are controlled from a single place on the planet Earth, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Pasadena, California. ~ Carl Sagan,
176:Edison was not a loner. For the invention of the lightbulb, he had thirty assistants, including well-trained scientists, often working around the clock in a corporate-funded state-of-the-art laboratory! ~ Carol S Dweck,
177:Today, laboratory-cultivated DHA is available that is made, as noted above, from algae grown indoors, free of the pollutants found in algae collected in the wild—that is, without mercury or other toxins. ~ Joel Fuhrman,
178:The Language Laboratory at Cambridge is a very good way of finding out about grammar and the vocabulary and that's why I learned to read German and later on I added Spanish, the standard European languages. ~ Clive James,
179:But perhaps the rest of us could have separate classes in science appreciation, the wonder of science, scientific ways of thinking, and the history of scientific ideas, rather than laboratory experience. ~ Richard Dawkins,
180:I liked looking on at other people in crucial situations. If there was a road accident or a street fight or a baby pickled in a laboratory jar for me to look at, I'd stop and look so hard I never forgot it. ~ Sylvia Plath,
181:[Duesberg] is absolutely correct in saying that no one has proven that AIDS is caused by the AIDS virus. And he is absolutely correct that the virus cultured in the laboratory may not be the cause of AIDS. ~ Walter Gilbert,
182:The grand workshop of spiritual experiment, the laboratory of the soul has been India, where thousands of great spirits have been born in every generation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II, Spirituality and Nationalism,
183:Whether epidemiology alone can, in strict logic, ever prove causality, even in this modern sense, may be questioned, but the same must also be said of laboratory experiments on animals. —Richard Doll ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
184:I joined the Army and was sent to the MIT radiation laboratory after a few months of introduction to electromagnetic wave theory in a special course, given for Army personnel at the University of Chicago. ~ Jack Steinberger,
185:We live in the midst of the greatest scientific civilization in the history of the world. But the greatest wisdom walking our streets is not in any laboratory scientist, but the wisdom of Jesus Christ. ~ Norman Vincent Peale,
186:Nature is a rag-merchant, who works up every shred and ort and end into new creations; like a good chemist, whom I found, the other day, in his laboratory, converting his old shirts into pure white sugar. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
187:In this manifestation of gene editing, it is impossible to distinguish between an organism that was edited by scientists in the laboratory and a naturally occurring variant with the same change in the same letter. ~ Nessa Carey,
188:Just as scientists test a theory by taking it into the lab and mixing chemicals in a test tube to see if the results confirm the theory, so we test a worldview by taking it into the laboratory of ordinary life. ~ Nancy R Pearcey,
189:Materialistically bound, traditional science assumes that anything that cannot be measured, tested in a laboratory, or probed by the five senses or their technological extensions simply doesn't exist. it's "not real. ~ Anonymous,
190:An individual ant, even though it has a brain about a millionth of a size of a human being's, can learn a maze; the kind we use is a simple rat maze in a laboratory. They can learn it about one-half as fast as a rat. ~ E O Wilson,
191:I have always believed that astrophysics should be the extrapolation of laboratory physics, that we must begin from the present universe and work our way backward to progressively more remote and uncertain epochs. ~ Hannes Alfven,
192:I wanted to cry.

I also wanted to go to my laboratory and prepare an enormous batch of nitrogen triiodide with which to blow up, in a spectacular mushroom cloud of purple vapor, the world and everyone in it. ~ Alan Bradley,
193:I can go write an absolutely saccharine pop record with a really catchy lyric for another artist that could become a hit without meaning anything to me, but that's more the science laboratory, that's the other thing. ~ Ryan Tedder,
194:Most of the exercise I get is from standing and walking around laboratory tables all day. I derive more benefit and entertainment from this than some of my friends and competitors get from playing games like golf. ~ Thomas A Edison,
195:Even granting that we [humans] face greater harm than laboratory animals presently endure if ... research on these animals is stopped, the animal rights view will not be satisfied with anything less than total abolition. ~ Tom Regan,
196:I did several interesting jobs, working in restaurants, I worked at a lab rat farm, feeding and watering all these rats. Then I got a full-time job as a technical writer for a large scientific research laboratory. ~ Kevin J Anderson,
197:THE HAZMAT SUIT was stifling and Luca Ginelli could barely catch his breath as he studied the monitors. Thanks to the research laboratory's state-of-the-art microsphere nanoscope, the young lab technician could easily ~ Nick Stephenson,
198:Europe’s long and checkered history of far-right extremism and other varieties of militancy, from violent Marxism to the Irish Republican Army, makes the continent a rich laboratory for counterextremism and deradicalization. ~ Anonymous,
199:I can no longer believe in any voodoo spell or laboratory virus. This is something deeper, darker. This comes from the cosmos, from the stars, or the unknown blackness behind them. The shadows in God's boarded-up basement. ~ Isaac Marion,
200:In my opinion -- we're the raw materials for a scientific experiment, for an international laboratory. There are ten million Bellarussians, and two million of us live on poisoned land. It's a huge devil's laboratory. ~ Svetlana Alexievich,
201:Is it necessary to practice all these asanas, further and further? Is it necessary to develop scientific researches further and further? To a yogi, the body is a laboratory, a field of experiments and perpetual researches. ~ B K S Iyengar,
202:We used to joke about canned men, putting people in a can and seeing how far you can send them and bring them back. That's not the purpose of this program... Space is a laboratory, and we go into it to work and learn the new. ~ John Glenn,
203:A chemistry is performed so that a chemical reaction occurs and generates a signal from the chemical interaction with the sample, which is translated into a result, which is then reviewed by certified laboratory personnel. ~ John Carreyrou,
204:It is not only my laboratory and my place of work but also my home, so that on the 30th October I was able to share my happiness immediately with my students and collaborators and, at the same time, with my wife and family. ~ George Porter,
205:She couldn’t stop watching his eyes. They were bright black, surrounded by an incredible network of lines, like a laboratory maze for studying intelligence in tears. They seemed to know what she wanted, even if she didn’t. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
206:I believe the projects were a social experiment; we were laboratory rats stacked on top of each other, and people just knew, inherently, that there was something wrong. There's not a lot of regard for the property by the residents. ~ Mos Def,
207:Münsterberg came to believe that there is no better psychological laboratory than a nickelodeon, in much the same way that Marston later came to believe that there is no better form of psychological propaganda than a comic book. ~ Jill Lepore,
208:There's one thing which I hate about color films... people who use up a lot of their despairing producer's money by working in the laboratory to bring out the dominant hues, or to make color films where there isn't any color. ~ Claude Chabrol,
209:Posterity will one day laugh at the sublime foolishness of the modern materialistic philosophy. The more I study nature, the more I stand amazed at the work of the Creator. I pray while I am engaged at my work in the laboratory. ~ Louis Pasteur,
210:Science is often misrepresented as "the body of knowledge acquired by performing replicated controlled experiments in the laboratory." Actually, science is something broader: the acquisition of reliable knowledge about the world. ~ Jared Diamond,
211:Science is often misrepresented as ‘the body of knowledge acquired by performing replicated controlled experiments in the laboratory.’ Actually, science is something broader: the acquisition of reliable knowledge about the world. ~ Jared Diamond,
212:I tried to make him a young court-wizard in my mind—he almost looked the part in his fine clothes, pursuing some lovely noblewoman—and there my imagination stumbled. He was a thing of books and alembics to me, library and laboratory. ~ Naomi Novik,
213:Given the choice of apathy or someone liberating mink, burning down a research torture-laboratory, or killing a vivisectionist or other DIRECT murderer of animals, I will choose the aforesaid actions over apathy any day of the week.- ~ Gary Yourofsky,
214:But there was no way that Randolph, or the men at the laboratory, or anyone else could have predicted that the hiring of a group of black female mathematicians at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory would end at the Moon. ~ Margot Lee Shetterly,
215:I guess I'm just an old mad scientist at bottom. Give me an underground laboratory, half a dozen atom-smashers, and a beautiful girl in a diaphanous veil waiting to be turned into a chimpanzee, and I care not who writes the nation's laws. ~ S J Perelman,
216:It makes sense to invest in new work. It's almost like having a research department in a scientific laboratory. You have to try things out. You'll make some bad mistakes. Some things will fail but at least you'll energise the organisation. ~ Gavin Bryars,
217:Ageing is very rare. We only see it in humans and laboratory animals and in zoo animals and in our pets. Basically, organisms that are protected from the external world. Once you create that protection, you live long enough to see ageing. ~ S Jay Olshansky,
218:If one cannot state a matter clearly enough so that even an intelligent twelve-year-old can understand it, one should remain within the cloistered walls of the university and laboratory until one gets a better grasp of one's subject matter. ~ Margaret Mead,
219:FBI laboratory scientists said Sunday they have determined that the anthrax mailed to Senate offices last fall was fresh. They say it's only two years old. If the stuff is two years old and it's still fresh, it's not anthrax, it's Velveeta. ~ Argus Hamilton,
220:Juanita found herself at Old Jeemy's radio station in a room she could have sworn was a laboratory where creatures with antennas in their heads, knobs for eyes, jagged arms, and dangly legs conducted experiments on the bodies of dead vocalists. ~ Dan Jenkins,
221:Science is not a collection of facts. Nor is science something that happens in the laboratory. Science happens in the head. It's a flight of imagination beyond the constraints of ordinary perception. Columbus chapter -The Virgin and the Mousetrap ~ Chet Raymo,
222:The educative value of manual activities and of laboratory exercises, as well as of play, depends upon the extent in which they aid in bringing about a sensing of the meaning of what is going on. In effect, if not in name, they are dramatizations. ~ John Dewey,
223:A space planner provides spaces for playing basketball, performing laboratory experiments, manufacturing widgets, or staging theatrical productions; an architect imbues the experience of these places with poignancy, richness, fun, beauty, and irony. ~ Anonymous,
224:To his dismay, it sounded as out of place in this somber laboratory as the book looked out of place, and he found himself rushing to keep ahead of his growing mortification, which only made it sound wilder and more foolish the faster he went. “You ~ Laini Taylor,
225:I think that the marriage of academic medical centers and academicians with the private sector is a very, is a marriage made in heaven because it's the best way to get basic discoveries from the laboratory into new therapeutics for our patients. ~ Laurie Glimcher,
226:The reason we are all stuck in life’s mud is that we ceaselessly run from our problems and after our desires. Meditation provides us with a laboratory situation in which we can examine this syndrome and devise strategies for dealing with it. ~ Henepola Gunaratana,
227:But the problem remains two fold: the need for recognition that low thyroid function very often can provoke menstrual problems, and the need for recognition, too, that hypothyroidism may be present despite laboratory tests suggesting it is not. ~ Broda Otto Barnes,
228:Extensive laboratory determinations have shown that most people cannot absorb more than half of the calcium and phosphorus from the foods eaten. The amounts utilized depend directly on the presence of other substances, particularly fatsoluble vitamins. ~ Anonymous,
229:Ino the course of developing agents of chemical warfare, some of the chemicals created in the laboratory were found to be lethal to insects, The discovery did not come by chance: insects were widely used to test chemicals as agents of death for man. ~ Rachel Carson,
230:Mind wandering is anathema to engagement. Be it mind wandering from lack of stimulation, mind wandering from multitasking (basically, most of modern existence), or mind wandering because of a forced laboratory paradigm, it cannot coexist with engagement ~ Anonymous,
231:The stage is like a laboratory where you can run theatrical experiments, imposing interesting conditions on the cast or story and seeing how they pan out. Each new play is like creating a tiny virtual universe enclosed by the confines of the stage. ~ Marcus du Sautoy,
232:Meg, what I'm about to do - never, ever try this on your own." I felt a bit silly giving this advice to a girl who regularly fought monsters with golden swords, but I had promised Bill Nye the Science Guy I would always promote safe laboratory practices. ~ Rick Riordan,
233:Meg, what I'm about to do - never, ever try this on your own." I felt a bit silly giving this advice to a girl who regulartly fought monsters with golden swords, but I had promised Bill Nye the Science Guy I would always promote safe laboratory practices. ~ Rick Riordan,
234:Only a madman would try to market headache medicine today under the name John's Headache Pills. This would be insufficiently techno-marvelous. No, the name must sound like it carne out of a laboratory yesterday ... Zantistat 100, or something like that. ~ Douglas Wilson,
235:Love enmeshes you in your partner's unique set of karmic complications, so make sure you're very interested in his or her problems. Love is a laboratory where you can uncover secrets about yourself that have previously been hidden, so be ravenously curious. ~ Rob Brezsny,
236:The leaders of my department understood that to create a fertile laboratory, they had to assemble different kinds of thinkers and then encourage their autonomy. They had to offer feedback when needed but also had to be willing to stand back and give us room. ~ Ed Catmull,
237:What if history was a gambler, instead of a force in a laboratory experiment, and the boys his ace in the hole? What if history was not a reasonable citizen, but a madman full of paranoid guile and these boys his agents, his big surprise! His own revenge? ~ Ralph Ellison,
238:With a new national commitment, our scientists and engineers will overcome obstacles to taking these [hydrogen fuel cell] cars from laboratory to showroom, so that the first car driven by a child born today could be powered by hydrogen, and pollution-free. ~ George W Bush,
239:Labs, too, can become machines. In science, it is more often a pejorative description than a complimentary one: an efficient, thrumming, technically accomplished laboratory is like a robot orchestra that produces perfectly pitched tunes but no music. ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
240:When your laboratory explodes, lacing your body with a supercharged elixir, what do you do? You don't just lie there. You crawl out of the rubble, hideously scarred, and swear vengeance on the world. You keep going. You keep trying to take over the world. ~ Austin Grossman,
241:When your laboratory explodes, lacing your body with a supercharged elixir, what do you do? You don’t just lie there. You crawl out of the rubble, hideously scarred, and swear vengeance on the world. You keep going. You keep trying to take over the world. ~ Austin Grossman,
242:Every good laboratory consists of first rate men working in great harmony to insure the progress of science; but down at the end of the hall is an unsociable, wrong-headed fellow working on unprofitable lines, and in his hands lies the hope of discovery. ~ Ernest Rutherford,
243:Throw away your 10-function chronometer, heart-rate monitor with the computer printout, training log, high-tech underwear, pace charts, and laboratory-rat-tested-air-injected-gel-lined-mo-tion-control-top-of-the-line footwear. Run with your own imagination. ~ Lorraine Moller,
244:Stop for a second to behold the miracle of engineering that these hand-held, networked computers represent—the typical CPU in a modern smartphone is ten times more powerful than the Cray-1 supercomputer installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1976. ~ Anthony M Townsend,
245:University biologists working with infectious viruses have airtight facilities to ensure that the objects of their study do not escape from the laboratory and damage the population at large. Unfortunately, no such safeguards are imposed on economics departments. ~ James Rickards,
246:It is through this cultural life rather than through experimental encounter in a laboratory that we really come to know the elements individually, and it is a cause for sadness that most chemistry teaching does so little to acknowledge this rich existence. ~ Hugh Aldersey Williams,
247:We live in the space station, the way you live in a building. We work in it, the way scientists work in a laboratory, and we also work on it, the way mechanics work on a boat, if the boat were adrift in international waters and the Coast Guard had no way to reach it. ~ Scott Kelly,
248:Since stepping down as laboratory director in 1999, I have devoted an increasing fraction of my time to international issues. I am involved with energy, environment, and sustainability issues, particularly as they involve new energy sources free of greenhouse gases. ~ Burton Richter,
249:The story is told of a famous German chemist that his marriage did not take place, because he forgot the hour of his wedding and went to the laboratory instead of to the church. He was wise enough to be satisfied with a single attempt and died at a great age unmarried ~ Sigmund Freud,
250:We have to be plumbers, electricians, construction engineers, or workers, on the space station, but at the same time running a laboratory, being scientists, being the best laboratory assistants we can be. It's all in a bundle; it's very exciting, it's a lot of fun. ~ Thomas Marshburn,
251:If our scientists invent concepts like forces, it is only because they cannot visualize the invisible vibrations that fill the empty space around us. Some scientists sneer at the mention of higher dimensions because they cannot be conveniently measured in the laboratory. ~ Michio Kaku,
252:And this is a table ma'am. What in essence it consists of is a horizontal rectilinear plane surface maintained by four vertical columnar supports, which we call legs. The tables in this laboratory, ma'am, are as advanced in design as one will find anywhere in the world. ~ Michael Frayn,
253:I enjoy some physical stuff. But if I had a choice between playing a scene where it's raining, it's terribly cold, I'm wet and I'm being drowned and playing a scene with dinosaur eggs in a laboratory, I'd probably take the latter. It's warmer and generally more comfortable! ~ Sam Neill,
254:Posterity will one day laugh at the foolishness of modern materialistic philosophers. The more I study nature, the more I stand amazed at the work of the Creator. I pray while I am engaged at my work in the laboratory. ~ Louis Pasteur, as quoted in The Literary Digest (18 October 1902),
255:Dartmouth College employs computer learning techniques in a very broad array of courses. For example, a student can gain a deep insight into the statistics of Mendelian genetics in an hour with the computer rather than spend a year crossing fruit flies
in the laboratory. ~ Carl Sagan,
256:In all cultures, the family imprints its members with selfhood. Human experience of identity has two elements; a sense of belonging and a sense of being separate. The laboratory in which these ingredients are mixed and dispensed is the family, the matrix of identity. ~ Salvador Minuchin,
257:Intuition is possible because the unknowable is there. Science denies the existence of the divine because it says, “There is only one division: the known and the unknown. If there is any God, we will discover him through laboratory methods. If he exists, science will discover him. ~ Osho,
258:Finally, as the digestive canal is a complex system, a series of separate chemical laboratories, I cut the connections between them in order to investigate the course of phenomena in each particular laboratory; thus I resolved the digestive canal into several separate parts. ~ Ivan Pavlov,
259:Though modern Marriage is a tremendous laboratory, its members are often without preparation for the partnership function. How much agony and remorse and failure could have been avoided if there had been at least some rudimentary learning before they entered the partnership. ~ Carl Rogers,
260:Time... is an essential requirement for effective research. An investigator may be given a palace to live in, a perfect laboratory to work in, he may be surrounded by all the conveniences money can provide; but if his time is taken from him he will remain sterile. ~ Walter Bradford Cannon,
261:In practice it is possible to determine directly the skin colour and hence the ethnic affiliations of the ancient Egyptians by microscopic analysis in the laboratory; I doubt if the sagacity of the researchers who have studied the question has overlooked the possibility. ~ Cheikh Anta Diop,
262:My laboratory,' I said, experimentally, drawing out each syllable. 'Why is it that saying it like that always makes me want to follow it with 'mwoo-hah-hah-hahhhhh'? ' 'You were overexposed to Hammer Films as a child?' - Harry Dresden & Bob the Skull, Changes, Jim Butcher ~ Jim Butcher,
263:I figure I'll just keep on going the way I am until something starts making sense."
"What if nothing ever does?"
"I guess if that happens, I'll start hoping all the God freaks are right, and there's some superior intelligence up there treating us all like laboratory rats. ~ Mira Grant,
264:When I left the Beatles, I made an album called McCartney that I played everything on. And it was kind of a cool experience. I felt like a professor in a laboratory, just crafting stuff and adding this, and putting this on and moving the microphone, and it was very homemade. ~ Paul McCartney,
265:Laboratory tests are the next set of important numbers to know. Here are the key lab test numbers you need to know: 1. Complete blood count 2. General metabolic panel with fasting blood sugar and lipid panel 3. HgA1C 4. Vitamin D 5. Thyroid panel 6. C-reactive protein ~ Daniel Amen,
266:Laboratory tests are the next set of important numbers to know. Here are the key lab test numbers you need to know:   1. Complete blood count   2. General metabolic panel with fasting blood sugar and lipid panel   3. HgA1C   4. Vitamin D   5. Thyroid panel   6. C-reactive protein ~ Daniel G Amen,
267:Wherefore the brain must be looked upon as the universal and general sensory and at the same time as the universal and general motory organ of the body and finally as the universal and general laboratory of the animal spirits and the blood or of the essential juices of life. ~ Emanuel Swedenborg,
268:My laboratory,' I said, experimentally, drawing out each syllable. 'Why is it that saying it like that always makes me want to follow it with 'mwoo-hah-hah-hahhhhh'? '
'You were overexposed to Hammer Films as a child?'
- Harry Dresden & Bob the Skull, Changes, Jim Butcher ~ Jim Butcher,
269:But now all the natural secrets have been exposed, and it is likely that the turtles have been sold to laboratory scientists who want to remove their shells so that they can wire electrodes to the turtles' skin in order to monitor their increasing terror at the loss of their shells. ~ Mary Gaitskill,
270:Plato and his objectivistic successors ... preserved the awareness of differences that pragmatism has been invented to deny the difference between thinking in the laboratory and in philosophy, and consequently the difference between the destination of mankind and its present course. ~ Max Horkheimer,
271:Although I was amused at the mad scientist’s idea of injecting a powerful bleach to render himself invisible, what truly shocked me was the way he treated his laboratory equipment. “It’s just a fill-um, dear,” Mrs. Mullet said, as I gripped her arm during the smashing of the glassware. ~ Alan Bradley,
272:When I was five I came to understand that I was not a boy. I still wasn’t sure what I was, but it became clear that whatever I was, it was less than a boy. I saw that my brothers, who were five, ten, and fifteen years older than I, could do all of our laboratory play in the outside world. ~ Hope Jahren,
273:Disgusted by Edison’s shameless cruelty and dishonesty, Tesla began performing regular exhibitions of his technology in his laboratory in which he lighted lamps by allowing alternating current electricity to flow through his body. Public opinion swung to and fro, unsure of whom to believe. ~ Sean Patrick,
274:I use colors that have already been experienced through the light of day and through the state of mind of the total man. In other words, my colors are not colors that are laboratory tools which are isolated from all accidentals or impurities so that they have a specified identity or purity. ~ Mark Rothko,
275:We worked very hard on that untitled record to do something different and that we were proud of and to try a bunch of different ideas. It was like this gigantic musical laboratory that we were going to every day. I love that record, I think that's one of the high watermarks of us as a band. ~ Mark Hoppus,
276:The word, the form, the charm, the glory and grace
   Are missioned sparks from a stupendous Fire;
   A sample from the laboratory of God
   Of which he holds the patent upon earth,
   Comes to him wrapped in golden coverings
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
277:Scientists had been trying to keep human cells alive in culture for decades, but they all eventually died. Henrietta’s were different: they reproduced an entire generation every twenty-four hours, and they never stopped. They became the first immortal human cells ever grown in a laboratory. ~ Rebecca Skloot,
278:So someday in the near future hopefully rather than having a foot or a leg amputated we'll just give you an injection of the cells and restore the blood flow. We've also created entire tubes of red blood cells from scratch in the laboratory. So there are a lot of exciting things in the pipeline. ~ Robert Lanza,
279:Although I usually think I know what I'm going to be writing about, what I'm going to say, most of the time it doesn't happen that way at all. At some point I get misled down a garden path, I get surprised by an idea that I hadn't anticipated getting, which is a little bit like being in a laboratory. ~ Lewis Thomas,
280:In the laboratory there are no fustian ranks, no brummagem aristocracies; the domain of Science is a republic, and all its citizens are brothers and equals, its princes of Monaco and its stonemasons of Cromarty meeting, barren of man-made gauds and meretricious decorations, upon the one majestic level! ~ Mark Twain,
281:I'm afraid that - not necessarily deliberately, but consistently - I've made a kind of laboratory out of my life, where I mix the stuff in the test tubes to create explosions - possibly resulting in interesting by-products. I mean, not deliberately - I'd be crazy to deliberately do that - or maybe not. ~ Jay McInerney,
282:It would no sooner have occurred to her that a place with so baroque a name as the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory would solicit an application from Negro women than that the white women at the college across the street would beckon her through the front doors of their manicured enclave. ~ Margot Lee Shetterly,
283:In the concentration camps, for example, in this living laboratory and on this testing ground, we watched and witnessed some of our comrades behave like swine while others behaved like saints. Man has both potentialities within himself; which one is actualized depends on decisions but not on conditions. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
284:It's like a laboratory, a micro-society of real life, so it didn't look odd to talk about bureaucracy. In the school, in the class, there are already a lot of children from different ethnic backgrounds so the reality is there. I don't have to shove it in people's face. It's just there and it's normal. ~ Philippe Falardeau,
285:I went to the trash pile at Tuskegee Institute and started my laboratory with bottles, old fruit jars and any other thing I found I could use. ... [The early efforts were] worked out almost wholly on top of my flat topped writing desk and with teacups, glasses, bottles and reagents I made myself. ~ George Washington Carver,
286:Your life is a kind of laboratory where you're constantly experimenting with your own higher knowing, always increasing your capacity to design the life you choose. Human beings must create; it's hardwired. The question is, are you consciously creating or only sleepwalking through your human life? ~ David Emerald Womeldorff,
287:In the concentration camps, for example, in this living laboratory and on this testing ground, we watched and witnessed some of our comrades behave like swine while others behaved like saints. Man has both potentialities within himself; which one is actualized depends on decisions but not on conditions. Our ~ Viktor E Frankl,
288:I held up the second syringe, the one filled with water. ‘Meg, what I’m about to do – never, ever try this on your own.’ I felt a bit silly giving this advice to a girl who regularly fought monsters with golden swords, but I had promised Bill Nye the Science Guy I would always promote safe laboratory practices. ~ Rick Riordan,
289:There are two kinds of visual memory: one when you skillfully recreate an image in the laboratory of your mind, [...]; and the other when you instantly evoke, with shut eyes, on the dark innerside of your eyelids, the objective, absolutely optical replica of a beloved face, a little ghost in natural colors. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
290:Science does not deal in all possible laboratory manipulations. Instead, it selects those relevant to the juxtaposition of a paradigm with the immediate experience that that paradigm has partially determined. As a result, scientists with different paradigms engage in different concrete laboratory manipulations. ~ Thomas S Kuhn,
291:Sometimes my courage fails me and I think I ought to stop working, live in the country and devote myself to gardening. But I am held by a thousand bonds, and I don't know when I shall be able to arrange things otherwise. Nor do I know whether, even by writing scientific books, I could live without the laboratory. ~ Marie Curie,
292:He wandered among the tanks for a long time, and often came back with her to the laboratory and the aquaria, submitting his physicist's arrogance to those small strange lives, to the existence of beings to whom present is eternal, beings that do not explain themselves and need not ever justify their ways to man. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
293:Napster co-founder and former Facebook President Sean Parker says he used the election cycle as “a laboratory for learning” on how the ballot initiative process works. Next year, he plans to expand with the opening of San Francisco startup Brigade, dedicated to political engagement. He is planning to go bigger in 2016. ~ Anonymous,
294:Black holes provide theoreticians with an important theoretical laboratory to test ideas. Conditions within a black hole are so extreme, that by analyzing aspects of black holes we see space and time in an exotic environment, one that has shed important, and sometimes perplexing, new light on their fundamental nature. ~ Brian Greene,
295:In a word, I consider hospitals only as the entrance to scientific medicine; they are the first field of observation which a physician enters; but the true sanctuary of medical science is a laboratory; only there can he seek explanations of life in the normal and pathological states by means of experimental analysis. ~ Claude Bernard,
296:It is as dangerous for people unaccustomed to handling words and unacquainted with their technique to tinker about with these heavily-charged nuclei of emotional power as it would be for me to burst into a laboratory and play about with a powerful electromagnet or other machine highly charged with electrical force. ~ Dorothy L Sayers,
297:He wandered among the tanks for a long time, and often came back with her to the laboratory and the aquaria, submitting his physicist’s arrogance to those small strange lives, to the existence of beings to whom the present is eternal, beings that do not explain themselves and need not ever justify their ways to man. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
298:It was a place as blank as a sheet of paper. It was the place I had always been looking for... Flat expanses would call to me... These are the places where the desert is most itself: stark, open, free, an invitation to wander, a laboratory of perception, scale, light, a place where loneliness has a luxurious flavor... ~ Rebecca Solnit,
299:I have seen many phases of life; I have moved in imperial circles, I have been a Minister of State; but if I had to live my life again, I would always remain in my laboratory, for the greatest joy of my life has been to accomplish original scientific work, and, next to that, to lecture to a set of intelligent students. ~ Jean Baptiste Dumas,
300:Sometimes she would be engaged in a laboratory exercise or a seminar when the instructor would say, "Gentlemen, let's proceed," and sensing Ellie's frown would add, "Sorry, Miss Arroway, but I think of you as one of the boys." The highest compliment they were capable of paying was that in their minds she was not overtly female. ~ Carl Sagan,
301:Humor, a good sense of it, is to Americans what manhood is to Spaniards, and we will go to great lengths to prove it. Experiments with laboratory rats have shown that, if one psychologist in the room laughs at something a rat does, all of the other psychologists will laugh equally. Nobody wants to be left holding the joke. ~ Garrison Keillor,
302:Enter this laboratory of the soul where incidents are refracted into a diary, dissected to prove that every one of us carries a deforming mirror where he sees himself too small or too large, too fat or too thin… Once the deforming mirror is smashed, there is a possibility of wholeness; there is a possibility of joy. —Diary 1, pg. 105 ~ Ana s Nin,
303:However, at that stage in the walk one of those curious changes took place in circumstances of mutual intercourse that might almost be compared, scientifically speaking, with the addition in the laboratory of one chemical to another, by which the whole nature of the experiment is altered: perhaps even an explosion brought about. ~ Anthony Powell,
304:He wasn't a complete human being at all. He was a tiny bit of one, unnaturally developed; something in a bottle, an organ kept alive in a laboratory. I thought he was a sort of primitive savage, but he was something absolutely modern and up-to-date that only this ghastly age could produce. A tiny bit of a man pretending to be whole. ~ Evelyn Waugh,
305:This was another area of research that had emerged in the 1960s, with laboratory work by some of the leading cancer researchers—including Howard Temin, who would later win the Nobel Prize—demonstrating that cancer cells require insulin to propagate; at least they do so outside the human body, growing as cell cultures in the laboratory. ~ Gary Taubes,
306:Every year tens of thousands of animals suffer and die in laboratory tests of cosmetics and household products...despite the fact that the test results do not help prevent or treat accidental or purposeful misuse of the products. Please join me in using your voice for those whose cries are forever sealed behind the laboratory doors. ~ Woody Harrelson,
307:According to my views, aiming at quantitative investigations, that is at establishing relations between measurements of phenomena, should take first place in the experimental practice of physics. By measurement to knowledge [door meten tot weten] I should like to write as a motto above the entrance to every physics laboratory. ~ Heike Kamerlingh Onnes,
308:Scientists want full proof under laboratory conditions. And the answer is very simple: When Im put under pressure, I cant perform. Even the phenomenon Im most known for. When Im on stage, Im not under pressure and it happens. In other important places, it happens. But in a laboratory where I really want it to happen, its very hard for me. ~ Uri Geller,
309:He wasn't a complete human being at all. He was a tiny bit of one, unnaturally developed; something in a bottle, an organ kept alive in a laboratory. I thought he was a sort of primitive savage, but he was something absolutely modern and up-to-date that only this ghastly age could produce. A tiny bit of a man pretending he was the whole. ~ Evelyn Waugh,
310:In the laboratory, we call this the six-degrees-of-separation-from-cancer rule: you can ask any biological question, no matter how seemingly distant—what makes the heart fail, or why worms age, or even how birds learn songs—and you will end up, in fewer than six genetic steps, connecting with a proto-oncogene or tumor suppressor. ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
311:Great news for employers: A blizzard is coming! When bad weather hits, workers get more productive. That’s the finding of new research that marries real world and laboratory data to show that the mere prospect of frolicking in the sun — even when workers stay at their desks — interrupts focus, slows task time and leads to greater error rates. ~ Anonymous,
312:I would like to emphasize strongly my belief that the era of computing chemists, when hundreds if not thousands of chemists will go to the computing machine instead of the laboratory for increasingly many facets of chemical information, is already at hand. There is only one obstacle, namely that someone must pay for the computing time. ~ Robert S Mulliken,
313:herself. She is the laboratory for the child to become an adult, and it takes its toll on her. The good mother gets her needs for love, affection, and respect met by God and the safe people in her life. Only in this way can she altruistically and sacrificially do the best thing for the child, who desperately needs safe passage toward adulthood. ~ Henry Cloud,
314:There are, of course, many reasons to think that brains operate mostly in parallel. Individual neurons are too slow to allow brains to operate in strict serial von Neumann fashion, and ample data suggest that in any given laboratory task (and by extension, any real-world situation) many different parts of the brain are engaged simultaneously. ~ Gary F Marcus,
315:There is therefore no reason to put a limit to evolutionary possibility by taking our present organization or status of existence as final. The animal is a laboratory in which Nature has worked out man; man may very well be a laboratory in which she wills to work out superman, to disclose the soul as a divine being, to evolve a divine nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
316:Indeed, the scientific effort to improve performance in medicine—an effort that at present gets only a miniscule portion of scientific budgets—can arguably save more lives in the next decade than bench science, more lives than research on the genome, stem cell therapy, cancer vaccines, and all the other laboratory work we hear about in the news. ~ Atul Gawande,
317:I noticed affixed to a laboratory door the following words: "Les théories passent. Le Grenouille reste. [The theories pass. The frog remains.] &mdashJean Rostand, Carnets d'un biologiste." There is a risk that in the less severe discipline of criticism the result may turn out to be different; the theories will remain but the frog may disappear. ~ Frank Kermode,
318:In the Clarendon Laboratory at Oxford University sits a battery-powered bell that has been ringing since the year 1840. The bell “rings” so quietly it’s almost inaudible, using only a tiny amount of charge with every motion of the clapper. Nobody knows exactly what kind of batteries it uses because nobody wants to take it apart to figure it out. ~ Randall Munroe,
319:....though modern Marriage is a tremendous laboratory, its members are often utterly without preparation for the partnership function. How much agony and remorse and failure could have been avoided if there had been at least some rudimentary learning before they entered the partnership....And that statement is equally valid for all relationships. ~ Leo F Buscaglia,
320:Pragmatism , in trying to turn experimental physics into a prototype of all science and to model all spheres of intellectual life after the techniques of the laboratory, is the counterpart of modern industrialism, for which the factory is the prototype of human existence, and which models all branches of culture after production on the conveyor belt. ~ Max Horkheimer,
321:The ducks in St James's Park are so used to being fed bread by secret agents meeting clandestinely that they have developed their own Pavlovian reaction. Put a St James's Park duck in a laboratory cage and show it a picture of two men -- one usually wearing a coat with a fur collar, the other something sombre with a scarf -- and it'll look up expectantly. ~ Neil Gaiman,
322:What decided him (almost invariably) was a college project in which he had occasion to do some independent research—to find out things for himself. Once he discovered the pleasures of this kind of work, he never turned back. He is completely satisfied with his chosen vocation. . . . He works hard and devotedly in his laboratory, often seven days a week. ~ Richard Rhodes,
323:Speaking one day to Monsieur de Buffon, on the present ardor of chemical inquiry, he affected to consider chemistry but as cookery, and to place the toils of the laboratory on the footing with those of the kitchen. I think it, on the contrary, among the most useful of sciences, and big with future discoveries for the utility and safety of the human race. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
324:I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician: he is also a child placed before natural phenomena which impress him like a fairy tale. We should not allow it to be believed that all scientific progress can be reduced to mechanisms, machines, gearings, even though such machinery has its own beauty. ~ Marie Curie,
325:The light of Christ illuminates the laboratory, his speech is the fount of communication, he makes possible the study of humans in all their interactions, he is the source of all life, he provides the wherewithal for every achievement of human civilization, he is the telos of all that is beautiful. He is, among his many other titles, the Christ of the academic road. ~ Mark Noll,
326:Nowadays, not to say that that doesn't happen, but music is made a lot almost in a laboratory where you get one guy working in one studio, they send the file to another guy in some other part of the world, they send it back and then they send it this way and that way. Musicianship is kind of - there's nothing wrong with that. In fact, some great music is made that way. ~ Dave Koz,
327:As he approached the place where a meeting of doctors was being held, he saw some elegant limousines and remarked, "The surgeons have arrived." Then he saw some cheaper cars and said, "The physicians are here, too." ... And when he saw a row of overshoes inside, under the hat rack, he is reported to have remarked, "Ah, I see there are laboratory men here." ~ Walter Bradford Cannon,
328:The battle with Men Who Explain Things has trampled down many women—of my generation, of the up-and-coming generation we need so badly, here and in Pakistan and Bolivia and Java, not to speak of the countless women who came before me and were not allowed into the laboratory, or the library, or the conversation, or the revolution, or even the category called human. ~ Rebecca Solnit,
329:Capitalism has created the highest standard of living ever known on earth. The evidence is incontrovertible. The contrast between West and East Berlin is the latest demonstration, like a laboratory experiment for all to see. Yet those who are loudest in proclaiming their desire to eliminate poverty are loudest in denouncing capitalism. Man's well-being is not their goal. ~ Ayn Rand,
330:As Stewart Brand (co-founder of Emeryville's Global Business Network) likes to say, "Information lasts forever. Digital information lasts forever or for five years, whichever comes first." There are examples everywhere. The tapes from the original Viking landers that went to Mars are at (NASA's) Jet Propulsion Laboratory, but there is no machine that can read the tapes. ~ Paul Saffo,
331:The battle with Men Who Explain Things has trampled down many women — of my generation, of the up-and-coming generation we need so badly, here and in Pakistan and Bolivia and Java, not to speak of the countless women who came before me and were not allowed into the laboratory, or the library, or the conversation, or the revolution, or even the category called human. ~ Rebecca Solnit,
332:This here’s a re-search laboratory. Re-search means look again, don’t it? Means they’re looking for something they found once and it got away somehow, and now they got to re-search for it? How come they got to build a building like this, with mayonnaise elevators and all, and fill it with all these crazy people? What is it they’re trying to find again? Who lost what? ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
333:The order and harmony of the Western world, its most famous achievement, and a laboratory in which structures of a complexity as yet unknown are being fashioned, demand the elimination of a prodigious mass of noxious by-products which now contaminate the globe. The first thing we see as we travel round the world is our own filth, thrown into the face of mankind. ~ Claude Levi Strauss,
334:As supernatural types went, that seemed weird, and I suspected there was more to it. According to the notes, some of the kids had problems. So they locked them up in a group home. The kids figured out why they were there and escaped. And apparently came back and destroyed the laboratory, killing Dr. Davidoff and several others.
“Why can’t we do that?” Corey said. ~ Kelley Armstrong,
335:Szilard encouraged me to apply for a postdoc position at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in Livermore, though he knew I might work on nuclear weapons eventually. My job interview with Teller was both stimulating and unnerving; at the end of it, I suspected Teller understood my thesis better than I did. It was also terrifying; I had no warning who would interview me. ~ Gregory Benford,
336:God is going to reveal to us things He never revealed before if we put our hands in His. No books ever go into my laboratory. The thing I am to do and the way of doing it are revealed to me. I never have to grope for methods. The method is revealed to me the moment I am inspired to create something new. Without God to draw aside the curtain I would be helpless. ~ George Washington Carver,
337:I feel that, in a sense, the writer knows nothing any longer. He has no moral stance. He offers the reader the contents of his own head, a set of options and imaginative alternatives. His role is that of a scientist, whether on safari or in his laboratory, faced with an unknown terrain or subject. All he can do is to devise various hypotheses and test them against the facts. ~ J G Ballard,
338:I'm not the "not-working" type. I derive pleasure from my work. Work gives me relaxation too. Every moment I am thinking of something new: making a new plan, new ways to work. In the same way that a scientist draws pleasure from long hours in the laboratory, I draw pleasure in governance, in doing new things and bringing people together. That pleasure is sufficient for me. ~ Narendra Modi,
339:Liebig taught the world two great lessons. The first was that in order to teach chemistry it was necessary that students should be taken into a laboratory. The second lesson was that he who is to apply scientific thought and method to industrial problems must have a thorough knowledge of the sciences. The world learned the first lesson more readily than it learned the second. ~ Ira Remsen,
340:The suggestion that the cores of the gas giants might consist of diamond was first made by Marvin Ross of the University of California’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in a classic paper “The ice layer in Uranus and Neptune—diamonds in the sky?” (Nature, Vol. 292, No. 5822, pp. 435–36, July 30, 1981.) Surprisingly, Ross did not extend his calculations to Jupiter. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
341:You must realise now, more clearly than ever, that God is calling you to serve Him in and from the ordinary, secular and civil activities of human life. He waits for us everyday, in the laboratory, in the operating theatre, in the army barracks, in the university chair, in the factory, in the workshop, in the fileds, in the home and in all the immense panorama of work. ~ Josemaria Escriva,
342:There is, in fact, no reason to believe that any given natural phenomenon, however marvelous it may seem today, will remain forever inexplicable. Soon or late the laws governing the production of life itself will be discovered in the laboratory, and man may set up business as a creator on his own account. The thing, indeed, is not only conceivable; it is even highly probable. ~ H L Mencken,
343:As the behavioral psychologist B. F. Skinner proved in the laboratory, the human mind seeks relationships between events and often finds them even when they are not present. Slot-machines are based on Skinnerian principles of intermittent reinforcement. The dumb human, like the dumb rat, only needs an occasional payoff to keep pulling the handle. The mind will do the rest. ~ Michael Shermer,
344:In fact, selling—rather than creating—inventions may have been Thomas Edison’s greatest talent. Many of the famous inventions from his laboratory were imagined and developed by his staff, not Edison. His assistant, Francis Jehl, lamented that Edison was a more skilled pitchman than inventor, that his “genius” was most reminiscent of master huckster and showman P. T. Barnum. ~ Robert I Sutton,
345:I always tried to live up to Leo Szilard's commandment, "don't lie if you don't have to." I had to. I filled up pages with words and plans I knew I would not follow. When I go home from my laboratory in the late afternoon, I often do not know what I am going to do the next day. I expect to think that up during the night. How could I tell them what I would do a year hence? ~ Albert Szent Gyorgyi,
346:According to the notes, some of the kids had problems. So they locked them up in a group home. The kids figured out why they were there and escaped. And apparently came back and destroyed the laboratory, killing Dr. Davidoff and several others.
“Why can’t we do that?” Corey said.
“Because we don’t know where to find anyone,” I said. “Even if we did, we aren’t ready for that. ~ Kelley Armstrong,
347:Like a researcher in his laboratory, I am the first spectator of the suggestions drawn from the materials. I unleash their expressive possibilities, even if I do not have a very clear idea of what I am going to do. As I go along with my work I formulate my thought, and from this struggle between what I want and the reality of the material - from this tension - is born an equilibrium. ~ Antoni Tapies,
348:But I realized now that without quite thinking it through, I'd half-imagined myself a place here in the tower. My little room upstairs, a cheerful rummaging through the laboratory and the library, tormenting Sarkan like an untidy ghost who left his books out of place and threw his great doors open, and who made him come to the spring festival and stay long enough to dance once or twice. ~ Naomi Novik,
349:I have been trying to point out that in our lives chance may have an astonishing influence and, if I may offer advice to the young laboratory worker, it would be this-never neglect an extraordinary appearance or happening. It may be-usually is, in fact-a false alarm that leads to nothing, but may on the other hand be the clue provided by fate to lead you to some important advance. ~ Alexander Fleming,
350:After a glass of fino, warm bread was served. It was dark green and smelled overwhelmingly of the sea. “Plankton bread,” said the server, but he didn’t have to. I had heard about Ángel’s signature bread, with its homemade brew of phytoplankton, which Ángel had a laboratory grow for him. “You mix the yeast with the plankton,” he said, “and it gives you a 70 percent better rise in the dough. ~ Dan Barber,
351:In the Clarendon Laboratory at Oxford University sits a battery-powered bell that has been ringing since the year 1840. The bell “rings” so quietly it’s almost inaudible, using only a tiny amount of charge with every motion of the clapper. Nobody knows exactly what kind of batteries it uses because nobody wants to take it apart to figure it out. Sadly, there’s no light hooked up to it. ~ Randall Munroe,
352:He noticed that she threw away the crumbled bus ticket on the street as soon as she got down. He picked it up and put it in his pocket along with his own a memorabilia of their first date together, just like a strand of her hair he would find later on his shirt and the broken pen cap that she would go on to search in the laboratory and so many other such small things which he would collect. ~ Faraaz Kazi,
353:The mind is sharper and keener in seclusion and uninterrupted solitude. No big laboratory is needed in which to think. Originality thrives in seclusion free of outside influences beating upon us to cripple the creative mind. Be alone, that is the secret of invention; be alone, that is when ideas are born. That is why many of the earthly miracles have had their genesis in humble surroundings. ~ Nikola Tesla,
354:But when we face the great questions about gravitation Does it require time? Is it polar to the 'outside of the universe' or to anything? Has it any reference to electricity? or does it stand on the very foundation of matter-mass or inertia? then we feel the need of tests, whether they be comets or nebulae or laboratory experiments or bold questions as to the truth of received opinions. ~ James Clerk Maxwell,
355:I started with the belief that every person who came to the laboratory was free to accept or to reject the dictates of authority. This view sustains a conception of human dignity insofar as it sees in each man a capacity for choosing his own behavior. And as it turned out, many subjects did, indeed, choose to reject the experimenter's commands, providing a powerful affirmation of human ideals. ~ Stanley Milgram,
356:It's becoming clear that in a sense the cosmos provides the only laboratory where sufficiently extreme conditions are ever achieved to test new ideas on particle physics. The energies in the Big Bang were far higher than we can ever achieve on Earth. So by looking at evidence for the Big Bang, and by studying things like neutron stars, we are in effect learning something about fundamental physics. ~ Martin Rees,
357:As I worked on projects which fulfilled a real human need forces were working through me which amazed me. I would often go to sleep with an apparently insoluble problem. When I woke the answer was there. Why, then, should we who believe in Christ be so surprised at what God can do with a willing man in a laboratory? Some things must be baffling to the critic who has never been born again. ~ George Washington Carver,
358:In my teaching and consulting practice, I encourage people to learn to experiment with confidence and to see themselves as scientists in the laboratory of their lives, continually trying new ways to pursue what matters most to them and to the people who depend on them. Smart, small wins are crucial to this approach, as is devoting time and attention to reflecting on what works and what doesn't. ~ Stewart D Friedman,
359:If we were to smooth out all the material in the Universe into a uniform sea of atoms we would see just how little of anything there is. There would be little more than about 1 atom in every cubic metre of space. No laboratory on Earth could produce an artificial vacuum that was anywhere near as empty as that. The best vacuum achievable today contains approximately 1000 billion atoms in a cubic metre. ~ John D Barrow,
360:IF SEANAN MCGUIRE WERE A superhero, her power would be— Oh, who am I kidding? You and I both know Seanan would be a supervillain. She’d wear a sparkling tiara and a glittering orange and black costume (complete with machete and a builtin battery pack for the chainsaw attachment). She’d laugh from her secret virology laboratory as she manipulated a hundred strains of beautiful, microscopic, viral doom. ~ Seanan McGuire,
361:It emerged from two other disciplines, physiology and philosophy. German Wilhelm Wundt (1832–1920) is seen as the father of psychology because he insisted it should be a separate discipline, more empirical than philosophy and more focused on the mind than physiology. In the 1870s he created the first experimental psychology laboratory, and wrote his huge work Principles of Physiological Psychology. ~ Tom Butler Bowdon,
362:The well-intentioned mothers who don't want their children polluted by fairy tales would not only deny them their childhood, with its high creativity, but they would have them conform to the secular world, with its dirty devices. The world of fairy tale, fantasy, myth, is inimical to the secular world, and in total opposition to it, for it is interested not in limited laboratory proofs but in truth. ~ Madeleine L Engle,
363:I intend to create a new work of art, all my own. A still life, of sorts. You three will be vital parts of the process. Rejoice in your good fortune.” In the sterile environment of the laboratory, with the cold assistance of his personal robot guards, Erasmus proceeded to vivisect the trio of victims, oblivious to their screams. “I want to get to the heart of the matter,” he quipped, “the lifeblood of it. ~ Brian Herbert,
364:In several studies using mice, it has been demonstrated that AAV2 kills 100 per cent of breast cancer cells in the laboratory by activating proteins called caspases, which are essential for the cell’s natural death. Cancer cells infected with AAV2 also produced more Ki-67, a protein that activates the immune system, and c-Myc, a protein that helps to increase cell growth as well as induce apoptosis. ~ Christopher C Doyle,
365:There has been opposition to experimenting on animals for a long time. This opposition has made little headway because experimenters, backed by commercial firms that profit by supplying laboratory animals and equipment, have been able to convince legislators and the public that opposition comes from uninformed fanatics who consider the interests of animals more important than the interests of human beings. ~ Peter Singer,
366:The original Watson and Crick model of DNA, with its hammered metal plates and rickety rods twisting precariously around a steel laboratory stand, is housed behind a glass case. The model looks like a latticework corkscrew invented by a madman, or an impossibly fragile spiral staircase that might connect the human past to its future. Crick’s handwritten scribbles—A, C, T, and G—still adorn the plates. ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
367:History teaches us that many breakthroughs were happy accidents. Whether that's penicillin coming from Fleming neglecting to clean his laboratory before going on vacation or the team at Odeon trying a little side project that allowed people to communicate in real time as long as their message was 140 characters or less (which ultimately of course became Twitter), the unintended is often the transformational. ~ Scott D Anthony,
368:Johnson’s research suggests that elevated levels of uric acid (at least in laboratory animals) leads to mild kidney damage and accelerates the process of kidney disease that’s already established. The uric acid appears to cause the blood vessels in the kidneys to constrict and increases the blood pressure in the small capillaries (known as glomeruli) through which the kidneys filter waste products from the blood. ~ Gary Taubes,
369:As he played it off to Nat, Archy knew—felt, like the baby-shaped ache in his left arm—that neither his ability nor his willingness to care for Rolando English for an hour, a day, a week, had anything whatsoever to do with his willingness or ability to be a father to the forthcoming child now putting the finishing touches on its respiratory and endocrine systems in the dark laboratory of his wife’s womb. Wiping ~ Michael Chabon,
370:From all we have learnt about the structure of living matter, we must be prepared to find it working in a manner that cannot be reduced to the ordinary laws of physics. And that not on the ground that there is any 'new force' or what not, directing the behaviour of the single atoms within a living organism, but because the construction is different from anything we have yet tested in the physical laboratory. ~ Erwin Schrodinger,
371:Living is no laughing matter:
you must take it seriously,
so much so and to such a degree
that, for example, your hands tied behind your back,
your back to the wall,
or else in a laboratory
in your white coat and safety glasses,
you can die for people--
even for people whose faces you've never seen,
even though you know living
is the most real, the most beautiful thing. ~ N z m Hikmet Ran,
372:laboratory. Ours is not a ‘lab faith,’ but a ‘journey faith,’ a historical faith. God has revealed himself as history, not as a compendium of abstract truths. I am afraid of laboratories, because in the laboratory you take the problems and then you bring them home to tame them, to paint them artificially, out of their context. You cannot bring home the frontier, but you have to live on the border and be audacious. ~ Pope Francis,
373:Out of every hundred new ideas ninety-nine or more will probably be inferior to the traditional responses which they propose to replace. No one man, however brilliant or well-informed, can come in one lifetime to such fullness of understanding as to safely judge and dismiss the customs or institutions of his society, for those are the wisdom of generations after centuries of experiment in the laboratory of history. ~ Will Durant,
374:Out of every hundred new ideas ninety-nine or more will probably be inferior to the traditional responses which they propose to replace. No one man, however brilliant or well-informed, can come in one lifetime to such fullness of understanding as to safely judge and dismiss the customs or institutions of his society, for those are the wisdom of generations after centuries of experiment in the laboratory of history. ~ Thomas Sowell,
375:The purpose of any military is to kill people and break things. It's not to advance anybody's social agenda. It's not a laboratory for the left's social ideas or playgrounds. It is to kill people and break things, and the second rule is that the aggressor in any conflict sets the rules. And if they violate an existing rule book, then so be it. The aggressor sets the rules, and right now, Putin is setting the rules. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
376:I was very happy with Vampire's Kiss, which in my opinion was almost like an independent laboratory to start realizing some of my more expressionistic dreams with film performance. Then using what I had learned in Vampire's Kiss and putting it into a very big action movie in the form of Face/Off with John Woo. If you look at those two movies back to back, you can see where I stole from my performance in Vampire's Kiss. ~ Nicolas Cage,
377:To our senses, the elements are four and have ever been, and will ever be for they are the elements of life, of poetry, and of perception, the four Great Ones, the Four Roots, the First Four of Fire and the Wet, Earth and the wide Air of the World. To find the other many elements, you must go to the laboratory and hunt them down. But the four we have always with us, they are our world. Or rather, they have us with them. ~ D H Lawrence,
378:The power of science. Sometimes she thought how one day even love might become like a science. Everyone saying exactly the same right words. Everyone reacting the same exact ways. Love feeling and tasting and looking exactly the way some scientists in some laboratory determined that it should. Perhaps a development like that would solve many romantic disputes, maybe even bring down divorce rates to a cool zero percent. ~ Chinelo Okparanta,
379:Bath," I said, relishing the short A of my new accent. "Baaaath. Privacy. Aluminum. Laboratory. Tomato. Schhhhhedule."

The giggles come over me, and I stop right there, hand against my chest, trying to catch my breath. I know I'm laughing mostly because I refuse to give in and start crying. The grief for my father has nowhere to go and is twisting every other mood I have into knots. And... tomahhhhto. That's hilarious. ~ Claudia Gray,
380:Wilson-Donovan wanted to move ahead as quickly as possible to clinical trials on patients, which was why it was so important to test Vicotec’s safety now before the FDA hearings in September, which would hopefully put it on the “Fast Track.” Peter was absolutely sure that the testing being concluded by Paul-Louis Suchard, the head of the laboratory in Paris, would only confirm the good news he had just been given in Geneva. ~ Danielle Steel,
381:Besides human tissue, West employed much of the reptile embryo tissue which he had cultivated with such singular results. It was better than human material for maintaining life in organless fragments, and that was now my friend's chief activity. In a dark corner of the laboratory, over a queer incubating burner, he kept a large covered vat full of this reptilian cell-matter; which multiplied and grew puffily and hideously. On ~ H P Lovecraft,
382:Outside the wind had picked up a little. Isaac sheltered his prize and walked quickly up the little alley that adjoined The Dying Child with Paddler Way and his workshop-home. He pushed open the green doors with his bum and backed into the building. Isaac’s laboratory had been a factory and a warehouse years ago, and its huge, dusty floorspace swamped the little benches and retorts and blackboards that perched in its corners. ~ China Mi ville,
383:The landed classes neglected technical education, taking refuge in classical studies; as late as 1930, for example, long after Ernest Rutherford at Cambridge had discovered the atomic nucleus and begun transmuting elements, the physics laboratory at Oxford had not been wired for electricity. Intellectual neglect technical education to this day.

[Describing C.P. Snow's observations on the neglect of technical education.] ~ Richard Rhodes,
384:Turning hard material (e.g., bones) into fossils is easy in a lab setting, but in 1993, scientists were even able to make fossils from soft animal tissues! New York Times’ Science Watch reports: Scientists have for the first time produced fossils of soft animal tissues in a laboratory. In the process they discovered that most of the phosphate required for the fossilization of small animal carcasses comes from within the animal itself. ~ Ken Ham,
385:When one studies strongly radioactive substances special precautions must be taken if one wishes to be able to take delicate measurements. The various objects used in a chemical laboratory and those used in a chemical laboratory, and those which serve for experiments in physics, become radioactive in a short time and act upon photographic plates through black paper. Dust, the air of the room, and one's clothes all become radioactive. ~ Marie Curie,
386:Another guy came in, and he said he was quitting his job at the Research Laboratory; said anything a scientist worked on was sure to wind up as a weapon, one way or another. Said he didn’t want to help politicians with their fugging wars anymore. Name was Breed. I asked him if he was any relation to the boss of the fugging Research Laboratory. He said he fugging well was. Said he was the boss of the Research Laboratory’s fugging son. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
387:It is not difficult to make microbes resistant to penicillin in the laboratory by exposing them to concentrations not sufficient to kill them, and the same thing has occasionally happened in the body. The time may come when penicillin can be bought by anyone in the shops. Then there is the danger that the ignorant man may easily underdose himself and by exposing his microbes to non-lethal quantities of the drug make them resistant. ~ Alexander Fleming,
388:Any really good scientist is as much an artist as a scientist. All the interesting stuff is found on the edge between knowing and not knowing. I know that sounds like a meditation teacher speaking, but when you're in the laboratory, or you're theorizing about physics, you need to know what you know, but if you can't get out from under that, you won't be able to make that insightful, first-time connection that nobody else has seen before. ~ Jon Kabat Zinn,
389:For disease prevention, berries of all colors have “emerged as champions,” according to the head of the Bioactive Botanical Research Laboratory.39 The purported anticancer properties of berry compounds have been attributed to their apparent ability to counteract, reduce, and repair damage resulting from oxidative stress and inflammation.40 But it wasn’t known until recently that berries may also boost your levels of natural killer cells. ~ Michael Greger,
390:Dijk and his prolific team examined gene expression in a group of healthy young men and women after having restricted them to six hours of sleep a night for one week, all monitored under strict laboratory conditions. After one week of subtly reduced sleep, the activity of a hefty 711 genes was distorted, relative to the genetic activity profile of these very same individuals when they were obtaining eight and a half hours of sleep for a week. ~ Matthew Walker,
391:To read history, to debate history, is to test our assumptions in the laboratory of real events; to learn, in the process, some appropriate humility about our capacity to forestall crises; and to grasp that extraordinary moments generally demand that ordinary assumptions be hurled out the window. Model-based social sciences, with their search for certainties that appear constant in large sets of data, teach neither humility nor flexibility. ~ Sebastian Mallaby,
392:parts of the world, governments are no longer in charge. Once a new technology is out in the world anyone can use it. At that point it becomes a weapon in human conflicts and an embodiment of human dreams. We are not masters of the tools we have invented. They affect our lives in ways we cannot control – and often cannot understand. The world today is a vast, unsupervised laboratory, in which a multitude of experiments are simultaneously under way. ~ John N Gray,
393:Only a work democracy can create the foundation of genuine freedom. Long experience in sociological disputes leads me to expect that a great many people will take offense at the disclosure of this miscalculation. It makes the highest demands on people's will to veracity; it puts a heavy burden on everyday living; it places all social responsibility on those who work, be it in the factory, in the office, on the farm, in the laboratory, or wherever. ~ Wilhelm Reich,
394:The AMA virtually stopped the Rife treatment in 1939, first by threatening the physicians using Rife's instrument, then by forcing Rife into court....During the period 1935 to early 1939, the leading laboratory for electronic or energy medicine in the USA, in New Jersy, was independently verifying Rife's discoveries...(this) laboratory was "mysteriously" burned to the ground.....Rife's treatment was ruthlessly suppressed by the AMA's Morris Fishbein. ~ Barry Lynes,
395:Henrietta died in 1951 from a vicious case of cervical cancer, he told us. But before she died, a surgeon took samples of her tumor and put them in a petri dish. Scientists had been trying to keep human cells alive in culture for decades, but they all eventually died. Henrietta’s were different: they reproduced an entire generation every twenty-four hours, and they never stopped. They became the first immortal human cells ever grown in a laboratory. ~ Rebecca Skloot,
396:Perhaps, if you were in a laboratory of alchemy, this would be the right time to study the best way to understand the Emerald Tablet. But you are in the desert. So immerse yourself in it. The desert will give you an understanding of the world; in fact, anything on the face of the earth will do that. You don't even have to understand the desert: all you have to do is contemplate a simple grain of sand, and you will see in it all the marvels of creation. ~ Paulo Coelho,
397:My investigation of movement has led me to choices which vary from traditional norms. My dancers and I see the rehearsal as a laboratory for testing scientific principles on the body. We invent action ideas which we think are archetypal, noticeable, understandable. The outcome is a mixture of slam dancing, exquisite and amazing human flight and a wild action sport which captures kids, older people and the general public’s hearts and minds and bodies. ~ Elizabeth Streb,
398:You mean, how have we kept together all these years? With so much to separate us?” “Yes. How did you?” “Well, it wasn’t always serene. But many questions do resolve themselves without words. You stand side by side for so long and have other things to fight than each other.” Yes, she loved the man, her husband. But still did not know him. At least not with the knowledge of the laboratory. It was an inner kind of knowing maybe, an underdeveloped sense. ~ Michael D O Brien,
399:In 1928, Scottish scientist Alexander Fleming found that a mysterious antibacterial fungus had grown on a petri dish he’d forgotten to cover in his laboratory: he discovered penicillin by accident. Scientists have sought to harness the power of chance ever since. Modern drug discovery aims to amplify Fleming’s serendipitous circumstances a millionfold: pharmaceutical companies search through combinations of molecular compounds at random, hoping to find a hit. ~ Peter Thiel,
400:On the terrace of the Pepiniere, the 150 pupils of the Institut Chemique talk chemistry as they leave the auditoria and the laboratory. The echoes of the magnificent public garden of the city of Nancy make the words reverberate; coupling, condensation, grignardization. Moreover, their clothes stay impregnated with strong and characteristic odours; we follow the initiates of Hermes by their scent. In such an environment, how is it possible not to be productive? ~ Victor Grignard,
401:What saves the day for physics ... is the fact that the experimentalist does not accept the Cartesian philosophy, which is to say that he treats his apparatus not as a mathematical structure, but as a perceivable object. Even as there are said to be 'no atheists in the trenches', so indeed there are no bifurcationists in the laboratory. All knowledge of the external world begins in the perceptible realm: deny the perceptible object, and nothing external remains. ~ Wolfgang Smith,
402:When you become responsive to the solicitations of silence, you may be called to explore the invitation. This exploration is a kind of laboratory. You may sit and observe the coming and going of perceptions. You remain present to them but do not follow them. Following a thought is what maintains it. If you remain present without becoming an accomplice, agitation slows down through lack of fuel. In the absence of agitation you are taken by the resonance of stillness. ~ Jean Klein,
403:If you put a stake in the ground at Kepler’s, an eclectic bookstore run by pacifist Roy Kepler that was located on El Camino Real in Menlo Park beginning in the 1950s, and drew a five-mile circle around it, you would have captured Engelbart’s Augment research group at SRI, McCarthy’s Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center, as well as the hobbyists who made up the People’s Computer Company and the Homebrew Computer Club. It ~ John Markoff,
404:All this has come about because of the sudden rise and prodigious growth of an industry for the production of man-made or synthetic chemicals with insecticidal properties. This industry is a child of the Second World War. In the course of developing agents of chemical warfare, some of the chemicals created in the laboratory were found to be lethal to insects. The discovery did not come by chance: insects were widely used to test chemicals as agents of death for man. ~ Rachel Carson,
405:Dramocles got up from the operating table thinking he had just had a massage, and now wanted to take a brisk walk. A posthypnotic command took him a hundred yards from Fish’s laboratory. Then he heard the explosion. Hurrying back, he saw that Dr. Fish had been blown up. Dramocles couldn’t imagine why anyone would want to blow up an inoffensive android like Fish. He never considered the possibility that he had done it himself, since exploded androids tell no tales. ~ Robert Sheckley,
406:The drive to change the genome of a human embryo has turned into an intercontinental arms race.

As of this writing, four other groups in China are reportedly working on introducing permanent mutations in human embryos. By the time this book is published, I would not be surprised if the first successful targeted genome modification of a human embryo had been achieved in a laboratory. The first "post-genomic" human might be on his or her way to being born. ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
407:We have been forced to admit for the first time in history not only the possibility of the fact of the growth and decay of the elements of matter. With radium and with uranium we do not see anything but the decay. And yet, somewhere, somehow, it is almost certain that these elements must be continuously forming. They are probably being put together now in the laboratory of the stars. ... Can we ever learn to control the process. Why not? Only research can tell. ~ Robert Andrews Millikan,
408:Proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors are the molecular pivots of the cell. They are the gatekeepers of cell division, and the division of cells is so central to our physiology that genes and pathways that coordinate this process intersect with nearly every other aspect of our biology. In the laboratory, we call this the six-degrees-of-separation-from-cancer rule: you can ask any biological question, no matter how seemingly distant—what makes the heart fail, or why ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
409:Of the many 'firsts' with which I have been involved at the Texas Heart Institute —including the first successful human heart transplant in the United States and the first total artificial heart transplant in the world—the achievement that may have the greatest impact on health care did not occur in the operating room or in the research laboratory. It happened on a piece of paper... when we created the first-ever packaged pricing plan for cardiovascular surgical procedures. ~ Denton Cooley,
410:Speaking one day to Monsieur de Buffon, on the present ardor of chemical inquiry, he affected to consider chemistry but as cookery, and to place the toils of the laboratory on the footing with those of the kitchen. I think it, on the contrary, among the most useful of sciences, and big with future discoveries for the utility and safety of the human race. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
411:Regarding perfection, that's a very difficult question. I can say that I have superseded most in my sadhana [practice]. I am in it, and my mind and my intelligence gets better in my sadhana, and it reaches a certain place. When I stretch, I stretch in such a way that my awareness moves, and a gate of awareness finally opens... My body is a laboratory, you can say. I don't stretch my body as if it is an object. I do yoga from the self towards the body, not the other way around. ~ B K S Iyengar,
412:Sometimes I think that the only effective and productive method of destroying speciesism would be for each uncaring human to be forced to live the life of a cow on a feedlot, or a monkey in a laboratory, or an elephant in the circus, or a bull in a rodeo, or a mink on a fur farm. Then people would be awakened from their soporific states and finally understand the horrors that are inflicted on the animal kingdom by the vilest species to ever roam this planet: the human animal! ~ Gary Yourofsky,
413:Granted the endless variations of moral customs, still the essential standards persist. As in a scientific laboratory, all else may change but the standards are unalterable- disinterested love of truth, fidelity to facts, accuracy in measurement, exactness of verification-so, in life as a whole, the towering ethical criteria remain unshaken. Falsehood is never better than truth, theft better than than honesty, treachery better than loyalty, cowardice better than courage. ~ Harry Emerson Fosdick,
414:The physical sciences, good and innocent in themselves, had already... begun to be warped, had been subtly manoeuvred in a certain direction. Despair of objective truth had been increasingly insinuated into the scientists; indifference to it, and a concentration upon mere power, had been the result… The very experiences of the dissecting room and the pathological laboratory were breeding a conviction that the stifling of all deep-set repugnances was the first essential for progress. ~ C S Lewis,
415:He even found time on the day of the occupation to worry about the large gold Nobel Prize medals that Max von Laue and James Franck had given him for safekeeping.1290 Exporting gold from Germany was a serious criminal offense and their names were engraved on the medals.1291, 1292 George de Hevesy devised an effective solution—literally: he dissolved the medals separately in acid. As solutions of black liquid in unmarked jars they sat out the war innocently on a laboratory shelf. ~ Richard Rhodes,
416:But the eventual results were too intriguing to ignore. When people were placed in front of a mirror, or told that their actions were being filmed, they consistently changed their behavior. These self-conscious people worked harder at laboratory tasks. They gave more valid answers to questionnaires (meaning that their answers jibed more closely with their actual behavior). They were more consistent in their actions, and their actions were also more consistent with their values. ~ Roy F Baumeister,
417:It seems to me that there is a good deal of ballyhoo about scientific method. I venture to think that the people who talk most about it are the people who do least about it. Scientific method is what working scientists do, not what other people or even they themselves may say about it. No working scientist, when he plans an experiment in the laboratory, asks himself whether he is being properly scientific, nor is he interested in whatever method he may be using as method. ~ Percy Williams Bridgman,
418:Built in the hope of distracting workers from the peril of drink, it contained a gymnasium, a laboratory, a billiards room, a library, a reading room, and a lecture and concert hall. Never before had manual workers been given a more lavish opportunity to better themselves, an opportunity that many scores enthusiastically seized. One James Waddington, an untutored woolsorter, became a world authority on linguistics and a leading light of the Phonetic Society of Great Britain and Ireland. ~ Bill Bryson,
419:the process of learning a theory depends upon the study of applications, including practice problem-solving both with a pencil and paper and with instruments in the laboratory. If, for example, the student of Newtonian dynamics ever discovers the meaning of terms like ‘force,’ ‘mass,’ ‘space,’ and ‘time,’ he does so less from the incomplete though sometimes helpful definitions in his text than by observing and participating in the application of these concepts to problem-solution. That ~ Thomas S Kuhn,
420:More generally, the financial benefits of self-employment are mediocre: given the same qualifications, people achieve higher average return by selling their skills to employers than by setting out on their own. The evidence suggests that optimism is widespread, stubborn, and costly. Psychologists have confirmed that most people genuinely believe they are superior to most others on most desirable traits - they are willing to bet small amounts of money on these beliefs in the laboratory. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
421:It’s a notion that was proposed three decades ago by Jane Goodall and her colleague Hans Kummer. The pair made a plea for measuring a wild animal’s intelligence by looking at its ability to find solutions to problems in its natural setting. What’s needed is an ecological rather than a laboratory measure of intelligence, they suggested. This can be found in an animal’s ability to innovate in its own environment, “to find a solution to a novel problem, or a novel solution to an old one. ~ Jennifer Ackerman,
422:Paranormal activity cannot be replicated in a laboratory environment and therefore cannot be studied as closely as a natural science, like chemistry or biology. So the inability to replicate the phenomena makes verification and categorization of paranormal events very difficult and erodes the credibility of the science. After all, if we could summon spirits of the departed consistently and reliably in order to study them, there would be a whole new market in trans-dimensional communications. ~ Zak Bagans,
423:Based on Tor, which is what they all use. Which was written by the United States Naval Research Laboratory, ironically. To provide a safe haven for political dissidents and whistleblowers, all around the world. Which is the law of unintended consequences, right there, biting the world in the ass. Tor stands for The Onion Router. Because that’s what we’re dealing with here. Layers upon layers upon layers, like the layers of an onion, in the Deep Web itself, and inside all of its separate sites. ~ Lee Child,
424:It is my conviction that if any professional biologist will take adequate time to examine carefully the assumptions upon which the macro-evolution doctrine rests, and the observational and laboratory evidence that bears on the problem of origins, he/she will conclude that there are substantial reasons for doubting the truth of this doctrine. Moreover, I believe that a scientifically sound creationist view of origins is not only possible, but it is to be preferred over the evolutionary one. ~ Dean H Kenyon,
425:Sebastian Thrun, previously the director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and now the head of Google’s autonomous car lab, feels the benefits will be significant. “There are nearly 50 million auto accidents worldwide each year, with over 1.2 million needless deaths. AI applications such as automatic breaking or lane guidance will keep drivers from injuring themselves when falling asleep at the wheel. This is where artificial intelligence can help save lives every day. ~ Peter H Diamandis,
426:Robert Oppenheimer thus acquired for Los Alamos what Leo Szilard had not been able to organize in Chicago: scientific freedom of speech. The price the new community paid, a social but more profoundly a political price, was a guarded barbed-wire fence around the town and a second guarded barbed-wire fence around the laboratory itself, emphasizing that the scientists and their families were walled off where knowledge of their work was concerned not only from the world but even from each other. ~ Richard Rhodes,
427:There are two kinds of visual memory: one when you skillfully recreate an image in the laboratory of your mind, with your eyes open (and then I see Annabel in such general terms as: "honey-colored skin," "thin arms," "brown bobbed hair," "long lashes," "big bright mouth"); and the other when you instantly evoke, with shut eyes, on the dark innerside of your eyelids, the objective, absolutely optical replica of a beloved face, a little ghost in natural colors (and this is how I see Lolita). ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
428:There are two kinds of visual memory: one when you skillfully recreate an image in the laboratory of your mind, with your eyes open (and then I see Annabel in such general terms as: “honey-colored skin,” “thin arms,” “brown bobbed hair,” “long lashes,” “big bright mouth”); and the other when you instantly evoke, with shut eyes, on the dark innerside of your eyelids, the objective, absolutely optical replica of a beloved face, a little ghost in natural colors (and this is how I see Lolita). ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
429:What's a „culture“? Look it up. „A group of micro-organisms grown in a nutrient substance under controlled conditions“. A squirm of germs on a glass slide is all, a laboratory experiment calling itself a society. Most of us wrigglers make do with life on the slide; we even agree to feel proud of that „culture“. Like slaves voting for slavery or brains for lobotomy, we kneel down before the god of all moronic micro-organisms and pray to be homogenized or killed or engineered; we promise to obey. ~ Salman Rushdie,
430:She’d never encountered any stories as intricate or compelling as the stories he gave her, nor anything that made her sigh when she read it. She liked best the stories about people becoming other things. Stories where women became swans or echoes. In the evenings, when Finn disappeared into the mysterious recesses of the laboratory, Cat went out to the garden or down to the river and wondered what it would be like to be a stream of water, a cypress tree, a star burning a million miles away. ~ Cassandra Rose Clarke,
431:I started out studying literature, but soon discovered that science was where I actually belonged. The contrast made it all the clearer: in science classes we did things instead of just sitting around talking about things. We worked with our hands and there were concrete and almost daily payoffs. Our laboratory experiments were predesigned to work perfectly and elegantly every time, and the more of them that you did, the bigger the machines and the more exotic were the chemicals that they let you use. ~ Hope Jahren,
432:The problem ... is that we have run out of dinosaurs to form oil with. Scientists working for the Department of Energy have tried to form oil using other animals; they've piled thousands of tons of sand and Middle Eastern countries on top of cows, raccoons, haddock, laboratory rats, etc., but so far all they have managed to do is run up an enormous bulldozer-rental bill and anger a lot of Middle Eastern persons. None of the animals turned into oil, although most of the laboratory rats developed cancer. ~ Dave Barry,
433:I can conceive few human states more enviable than that of the man to whom, panting in the foul laboratory, or watching for his life under the tropic forest, Isis shall for a moment lift her sacred veil, and show him, once and for ever, the thing he dreamed not of; some law, or even mere hint of a law, explaining one fact; but explaining with it a thousand more, connecting them all with each other and with the mighty whole, till order and meaning shoots through some old Chaos of scattered observations. ~ Charles Kingsley,
434:It was one of those things they keep in a jar in the tent of a sideshow on the outskirts of a little, drowsy town. One of those pale things drifting in alcohol plasma, forever dreaming and circling, with its peeled, dead eyes staring out at you and never seeing you. It went with the noiselessness of late night, and only the crickets chirping, the frogs sobbing off in the moist swampland. One of those things in a big jar that makes your stomach jump as it does when you see a preserved arm in a laboratory vat. ~ Ray Bradbury,
435:A human being is not one thing among others; things determine each other, but man is ultimately self-determining. What he becomes - within the limits of endowment and environment- he has made out of himself. In the concentration camps, for example, in this living laboratory and on this testing ground, we watched and witnessed some of our comrades behave like swine while others behaved like saints. Man has both potentialities within himself; which one is actualized depends on decisions but not on conditions. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
436:Experiments recently conducted by Merle Lawrence (Princeton) and Adelbert Ames (Dartmouth) in the latter’s psychology laboratory at Hanover, N.H., prove that what you see when you look at something depends not so much on what is there as on the assumption you make when you look. Since what we believe to be the “real” physical world is actually only an “assumptive” world, it is not surprising that these experiments prove that what appears to be solid reality is actually the result of “expectations” or “assumptions. ~ Neville Goddard,
437:Students using astrophysical textbooks remain essentially ignorant of even the existence of plasma concepts, despite the fact that some of them have been known for half a century. The conclusion is that astrophysics is too important to be left in the hands of astrophysicists who have gotten their main knowledge from these textbooks. Earthbound and space telescope data must be treated by scientists who are familiar with laboratory and magnetospheric physics and circuit theory, and of course with modern plasma theory. ~ Hannes Alfven,
438:Many of the things that have happened in the laboratory have happened in ways it would have been impossible to foresee, but not impossible to plan for in a sense. I do not think Dr. Whitney deliberately plans his serendipity but he is built that way; he has the art-an instinctive way of preparing himself by his curiosity and by his interest in people and in all kinds of things and in nature, so that the things he learns react on one another and thereby accomplish things that would be impossible to foresee and plan. ~ Irving Langmuir,
439:The universe has certain rules. Among them are:
He who owns a sharp tool will eventually cut himself.
And:
Laboratory accidents never result in super-hero-type powers.
And most applicable in this case:
He who laughs first gets caught.
The first rule could be, at a stretch, applied to Tony Stark and the Iron Man suit, considering recent events.
One notable exception to the second rule was currently swinging around New York City on a spider web, which did not bear thinking about. ~ Eoin Colfer,
440:It is very different to make a practical system and to introduce it. A few experiments in the laboratory would prove the practicability of system long before it could be brought into general use. You can take a pipe and put a little coal in it, close it up, heat it and light the gas that comes out of the stem, but that is not introducing gas lighting. I'll bet that if it were discovered to-morrow in New York that gas could be made out of coal it would be at least five years before the system would be in general use. ~ Thomas A Edison,
441:When chemists have brought their knowledge out of their special laboratories into the laboratory of the world, where chemical combinations are and have been through all time going on in such vast proportions,-when physicists study the laws of moisture, of clouds and storms, in past periods as well as in the present,-when, in short, geologists and zoologists are chemists and physicists, and vice versa,-then we shall learn more of the changes the world has undergone than is possible now that they are separately studied. ~ Louis Agassiz,
442:In the weeks that followed, I frequently visited Kahn’s clinic and research laboratory, to see how lasers worked, talk with staff, try the equipment myself, and then train to use it. Kahn’s clinic, called Meditech, had a staff of forty-five people, mostly clinicians, and also a laboratory that designed the lasers. The ultimate goal of my visits was to see how lasers might influence the brain, but first I wanted to understand how lasers worked and see what serious laser treatments could do for common bodily afflictions. ~ Norman Doidge,
443:The apartment is a laboratory in which we conduct experiments, perform research on each other. We discover Henry hates it when I absentmindedly click my spoon against my teeth while reading the paper at breakfast. We agree that it is okay for me to listen to Joni Mitchell and it is okay for Henry to listen to the Shaggs as long as the other person isn't around. We figure out that Henry should do all the cooking and I should be in charge of laundry and neither of us is willing to vacuum so we hire a cleaning service. ~ Audrey Niffenegger,
444:You have a roommate."
"Yeah." He sounds confused.
"The, um, picture on your door surprised me."
"NO. No. I prefer my women with...fewer carnivorous beasts and less weaponry." He pauses and smiles. "Naked is okay. What she needs are a golden retriever and a telescope. Maybe then it would do it for me."
I laugh.
"A squirrel and a laboratory beaker?"
"A bunny rabbit and a flip chart," I say.
"Only if the flip chart has mathematical equations on it."
I fake swoon onto his bed. "Too much, too much! ~ Stephanie Perkins,
445:A group of refugee scientists was gathered outside the Clarendon Laboratory at Oxford the next morning discussing the Munich agreement when Frederick Lindemann drove up.937 Churchill had described the Czechoslovakian partition as amounting to “the complete surrender of the Western Democracies to the Nazi threat of force.”938 Lindemann, Churchill’s intimate adviser, was equally disgusted. One of the refugees asked him if he thought Chamberlain had something up his sleeve. “No,” the Prof snapped, “something down his pants. ~ Richard Rhodes,
446:Rodents, on the other hand, are slaves to sweetness. They have been known to die of malnutrition rather than step away from a sugar-water drip. In an obesity study from the 1970s, rats fed an all-you-can-eat “supermarket” diet that included marshmallows, milk chocolate, and chocolate-chip cookies gained 269 percent more weight than rats fed standard laboratory fare. There are strains of mice that will, over the course of a day, consume their own bodyweight in diet soda, and you do not want the job of changing their bedding. Does ~ Mary Roach,
447:I shared with the ninety-year-old Subramaniam his vision of a second Green Revolution. He told me about his dream of setting up a national agro foundation that would develop hybrid seeds. His foundation would adopt small and marginal farmers and provide them with laboratory facilities for soil testing and access to information on the weather and markets, so that they could earn more through enhanced yields and better prices for what they produced. He aimed at bringing a million farmers under the scheme. Visionaries don’t age! ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
448:Two decades is a sweet spot for prognosticators of radical change: near enough to be attention-grabbing and relevant, yet far enough to make it possible to suppose that a string of breakthroughs, currently only vaguely imaginable, might by then have occurred. Contrast this with shorter timescales: most technologies that will have a big impact on the world in five or ten years from now are already in limited use, while technologies that will reshape the world in less than fifteen years probably exist as laboratory prototypes. Twenty ~ Nick Bostrom,
449:Science has shown us that atoms aren’t just sitting in a void, they’re in fact sitting in a sea of energy. Once physicists realized that this energy is there, the next question was whether it could be tapped, or used to develop new, clean green energy generators that run of off it. The answer is yes. Back in the 1980’s a researcher at Hughes laboratory by the name of Robert Forward demonstrated a phenomenon dubbed the “casimir effect” which proved that yes, this energy could indeed be tapped and possibly used to generate energy itself. ~ Anonymous,
450:Rodents, on the other hand, are slaves to sweetness. They have been known to die of malnutrition rather than step away from a sugar-water drip. In an obesity study from the 1970s, rats fed an all-you-can-eat “supermarket” diet that included marshmallows, milk chocolate, and chocolate-chip cookies gained 269 percent more weight than rats fed standard laboratory fare. There are strains of mice that will, over the course of a day, consume their own bodyweight in diet soda, and you do not want the job of changing their bedding. Does that mean ~ Mary Roach,
451:After scientists broke open the coat of a lotus seed (Nelumbo nucifera) and coddled the embryo into growth, they kept the empty husk. When they radiocarbon-dated this discarded outer shell, they discovered that their seedling had been waiting for them within a peat bog in China for no less than two thousand years. This tiny seed had stubbornly kept up the hope of its own future while entire human civilizations rose and fell. And then one day this little plant's yearning finally burst forth within a laboratory. I wonder where it is right now. ~ Hope Jahren,
452:In 1945 J.A. Ratcliffe ... suggested that I [join his group at Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge] to start an investigation of the radio emission from the Sun, which had recently been discovered accidentally with radar equipment. ... [B]oth Ratcliffe and Sir Lawrence Bragg, then Cavendish Professor, gave enormous support and encouragement to me. Bragg's own work on X-ray crystallography involved techniques very similar to those we were developing for "aperture synthesis", and he always showed a delighted interest in the way our work progressed. ~ Martin Ryle,
453:I see on a immense scale, and as clearly as in a demonstration in a laboratory, that good comes out of evil; that the impartiality of the Nature Providence is best; that we are made strong by what we overcome; that man is man because he is as free to do evil as to do good; that life is as free to develop hostile forms as to develop friendly; that power waits upon him who earns it; that disease, wars, the unloosened, devastating elemental forces have each and all played their part in developing and hardening man and giving him the heroic fiber. ~ John Burroughs,
454:The popular social network Twitter is handing over to data scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s famed Media Lab every message ever tweeted. It’s part of a five-year $10 million program to develop new ways to understand and use social networks. The school is setting up a Laboratory for Social Machines,where researchers will work on methods for understanding public opinion through the messages we post online. The lab will be able to analyze all new Twitter messages in real time, as well as the company’s archive of all previous tweets. ~ Anonymous,
455:The city as a center where, any day in any year, there may be a fresh encounter with a new talent, a keen mind or a gifted specialist-this is essential to the life of a country. To play this role in our lives a city must have a soul-a university, a great art or music school, a cathedral or a great mosque or temple, a great laboratory or scientific center, as well as the libraries and museums and galleries that bring past and present together. A city must be a place where groups of women and men are seeking and developing the highest things they know. ~ Margaret Mead,
456:Cancer, then, is quite literally trying to emulate a regenerating organ—or perhaps, more disturbingly, the regenerating organism. Its quest for immortality mirrors our own quest, a quest buried in our embryos and in the renewal of our organs. Someday, if a cancer succeeds, it will produce a far more perfect being than its host—imbued with both immortality and the drive to proliferate. One might argue that the leukemia cells growing in my laboratory derived from the woman who died three decades earlier have already achieved this form of “perfection. ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
457:When the first mechanical clocks were invented, marking off time in crisp, regular intervals, it must have surprised people to discover that time flowed outside their own mental and physiological processes. Body time flows at its own variable rate, oblivious to the most precise hydrogen master clocks in the laboratory. In fact, the human body contains its own exquisite time-pieces, all with their separate rhythms. There are the alpha waves in the brain; another clock is the heart. And all the while tick the mysterious, ruthless clocks that regulate aging. ~ Alan Lightman,
458:He even found time on the day of the occupation to worry about the large gold Nobel Prize medals that Max von Laue and James Franck had given him for safekeeping.1290 Exporting gold from Germany was a serious criminal offense and their names were engraved on the medals.1291, 1292 George de Hevesy devised an effective solution—literally: he dissolved the medals separately in acid. As solutions of black liquid in unmarked jars they sat out the war innocently on a laboratory shelf. Afterward the Nobel Foundation recast them and returned them to their owners. ~ Richard Rhodes,
459:I was working with these very long-chain ... extended-chain polymers, where you had a lot of benzene rings in them. ... Transforming a polymer solution from a liquid to a fiber requires a process called spinning. ... We spun it and it spun beautifully. It [Kevlar] was very strong and very stiff-unlike anything we had made before. I knew that I had made a discovery. I didn't shout "Eureka!" but I was very excited, as was the whole laboratory excited, and management was excited, because we were looking for something new. Something different. And this was it. ~ Stephanie Kwolek,
460:I often think that we are like the carp swimming contentedly in that pond. We live out our lives in our own "pond," confident that our universe consists of only the familiar and the visible. We smugly refuse to admit that parallel universes or dimensions can exist next to ours, just beyond our grasp. If our scientists invent concepts like forces, it is only because they cannot visualize the invisible vibrations that fill the empty space around us. Some scientists sneer at the mention of higher dimensions because they cannot be conveniently measured in the laboratory. ~ Michio Kaku,
461:[T]he early diary proves retrospectively to be not only a laboratory for self-exploration but a technical testing-ground for the future writer of fiction. Indeed, for someone with literary ambitions, the two impulses are hard to separate: fictional invention itself is another vehicle of self-knowledge, a way of recasting one's experience under the camouflage of fabulation; and, correspondingly, even so scrupulous an effort to observe what one had undergone as we find in Fogel's diary is also on some level a playing with the possibility of turning it into literature. ~ Robert Alter,
462:At St. John’s College, Annapolis, where Robert Hutchins’ educational views have been most successfully practiced, they make, it is true, a great hubbub about science. The school’s catalog boasts that more mathematics and laboratory work are required than at any other college, and there is even a pretentious listing of all pieces of apparatus used by the student, down to such items as compass, calipers, and ruler. But so heavy is the emphasis on highlights in the past history of science, that little time is left for acquiring a solid grasp of current scientific opinion. ~ Martin Gardner,
463:Chapter three delineates the decades-long laboratory work we did with experimental animals, work that passed the requirements to be called “good science.” The finding: casein, and very likely all animal proteins, may be the most relevant cancer-causing substances that we consume. Adjusting the amount of dietary casein has the power to turn on and turn off cancer growth, and to override the cancer-producing effects of aflatoxin, a very potent Class IA carcinogen, but even though these findings were substantially confirmed, they still applied to experimental animals. It ~ T Colin Campbell,
464:No Geologist worth anything is permanently bound to a desk or laboratory, but the charming notion that true science can only be based on unbiased observation of nature in the raw is mythology. Creative work, in geology and anywhere else, is interaction and synthesis: half-baked ideas from a bar room, rocks in the field, chains of thought from lonely walks, numbers squeezed from rocks in a laboratory, numbers from a calculator riveted to a desk, fancy equipment usually malfunctioning on expensive ships, cheap equipment in the human cranium, arguments before a road cut. ~ Stephen Jay Gould,
465:The lovely paradox of willing compliance with what an ancient prophet called “the great plan of happiness,” is that conformity to law breeds both freedom and individualism. We may think a leaping child, in the euphoria of his imagination, enjoys unfettered freedom when he tells us he is going to land on the moon. But the rocket scientist hard at work in the laboratory, enmeshed in formulae and equations she has labored to master, and slaving away in perfect conformity with the laws of physics, is the one with true freedom: for she will land on the moon; the boy will not. ~ Terryl L Givens,
466:John P. Ioannidis published a controversial paper titled “Why Most Published Research Findings Are False.”39 The paper studied positive findings documented in peer-reviewed journals: descriptions of successful predictions of medical hypotheses carried out in laboratory experiments. It concluded that most of these findings were likely to fail when applied in the real world. Bayer Laboratories recently confirmed Ioannidis’s hypothesis. They could not replicate about two-thirds of the positive findings claimed in medical journals when they attempted the experiments themselves.40 ~ Nate Silver,
467:Skippy’s dead, Blowjob! He’s dead, and you can’t bring him back! Not you, not every bent scientist in every laboratory in the world!’ Breathing heavily, Dennis pauses, then turns his dreadful gaze on the others. ‘You bummers need to get it through your heads that this is real. None of the stupid bullshit we do to distract ourselves is going to help any more. Spiderman isn’t going to help. Eminem isn’t going to help. Some fucking gay lame tinfoil time machine isn’t going to help. All that stuff is over, don’t you see? He’s dead! He’s dead, and he’s going to stay dead for ever! ~ Paul Murray,
468:England and all civilised nations stand in deadly peril of not having enough to eat. As mouths multiply, food resources dwindle. Land is a limited quantity, and the land that will grow wheat is absolutely dependent on difficult and capricious natural phenomena... I hope to point a way out of the colossal dilemma. It is the chemist who must come to the rescue of the threatened communities. It is through the laboratory that starvation may ultimately be turned into plenty... The fixation of atmospheric nitrogen is one of the great discoveries, awaiting the genius of chemists. ~ William Crookes,
469:Qian Xuesen, the father of the Chinese Space Program, studied in the United States, and he was a protégé of Theodore Von Carmen's at Cal Tech and helped start the jet propulsion laboratory there, and then he got caught up in the anti-communism wave and was accused of being a spy and was actually deported back to China where he built from nothing, their entire missile and space program. So, in a way, in a very real way, the United States in trying to protect so-called protect our secrets and throwing this guy out of the country, we helped seed and start the Chinese missile program. ~ Leroy Chiao,
470:I love you. As the same value, as the same expression, with the same pride and the same meaning as I love my work, my mills, my Metal, my hours at a desk, at a furnace, in a laboratory, in an ore mine, as I love my ability to work, as I love the act of sight and knowledge, as I love the action of my mind when it solves a chemical equation or grasps a sunrise, as I love the things I've made and the things I've felt, as *my* product, as *my* choice, as a shape of my world, as my best mirror, as the wife I've never had, as that which makes all the rest of it possible: as my power to live. ~ Ayn Rand,
471:When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong. Perhaps the adjective 'elderly' requires definition. In physics, mathematics, and astronautics it means over thirty; in the other disciplines, senile decay is sometimes postponed to the forties. There are, of course, glorious exceptions; but as every researcher just out of college knows, scientists of over fifty are good for nothing but board meetings, and should at all costs be kept out of the laboratory! ~ Arthur C Clarke,
472:Thinking is an action. For all aspiring intellectuals, thoughts are the laboratory where one goes to pose questions and find answers, and the place where visions of theory and praxis come together. The heartbeat of critical thinking is the longing to know—to understand how life works. Children are organically predisposed to be critical thinkers. Across the boundaries of race, class, gender, and circumstance, children come into the world of wonder and language consumed with a desire for knowledge. Sometimes they are so eager for knowledge that they become relentless interrogators—demanding ~ bell hooks,
473:It is as important to decide when to abandon an innovative effort as it is to know which one to start. In fact, it may be more important. Successful laboratory directors know when to abandon a line of research which does not yield the expected results. The less successful ones keep hoping against hope, are dazzled by the “scientific challenge” of a project, or are fooled by the scientists’ repeated promise of a “breakthrough next year.” And the unsuccessful ones cannot abandon a project and cannot admit that what seemed like a good idea has turned into a waste of men, time, and money. ~ Peter F Drucker,
474:The odors of the laboratory animals, dogs, monkeys, mice, spin me back into memories, and it is difficult to know whether I am experiencing a new sensation or recalling the past. It is impossible to tell what proportion is memory and what exists here and now- so that a strange compound is formed of memory and reality; past and present; response to stimuli stored in my brain centers, and response to stimuli in this room. It's as if all the things I've learned have fused into a crystal universe spinning before me so that I can see all the facets of it reflected in gorgeous bursts of light. ~ Daniel Keyes,
475:I would say that introverts make some of the best international philosophers. The less common attribute of the introverted lifestyle - a close societal connection, as such a connection disappears or changes in relevance as the currents of the winds change - leaves too much room for one's own cultural bias. Instead, introverts tend to turn inward, the laboratory of being and all its forms. This is the most accurate study of the individual human being, which is in turn, rather than those affected by cultural limitations, the most universal reflection of human understanding and human behavior. ~ Criss Jami,
476:Albert Einstein hardly ever set foot in the laboratory; he didn’t test phenomena or use elaborate equipment. He was a theorist who perfected the “thought experiment,” in which you engage nature through your imagination, by inventing a situation or model and then working out the consequences of some physical principle. In Germany before World War II, laboratory-based physics far outranked theoretical physics in the minds of most Aryan scientists. Jewish physicists were all relegated to the lowly theorists’ sandbox and left to fend for themselves. And what a sandbox that would become. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
477:We were trying to do as much science as we could because that was the main purpose of the international space station. But without the shuttle to bring up heavy laboratory equipment and bring back samples, we were limited by what we could do, but I was proud that we actually accomplished more science that was planned for the flight. And I got a chance to do two Russian spacewalks on that flight, I had become an expert in U.S. spacewalks and using U.S. suits and techniques, and this was a chance to put on a Russian Orlan suit and do two construction space flights outside of the space station. ~ Leroy Chiao,
478:The social sciences are obsessed by epistemological questioning in a way that no science, no real science is. You never have a chemistry class that starts with the methodology of chemistry; you start by doing chemistry. And the problem is that since the social sciences don’t know what it is to be scientific, because they know nothing about the real sciences, they imagine that they have to be listing endless numbers of criteria and precautions before doing anything. And they usually miss precisely what is interesting in natural sciences which is [LAUGHS] a laboratory situation and the experimental protocol! ~ Bruno Latour,
479:Are we in some sick laboratory? Can you take this man, this black hole of charisma, this oozing miasma of featurelessness and turn him into a leader? Can you follow the simplest playbook of power and morph this Quasimodean combination of bureaucrat's paunch, jowled cheeks, and balding scalp into a demagogue of the month to be washed down with your Coke? Identify existential enemy, mobilise killing forces, pump hysterical nationalism onto airwaves, pose for photos with lions, use basic fonts, invoke mythological pasts, have choirs of children sing your name, and voilà: sit back and look upon your works. ~ Omar Robert Hamilton,
480:Blatant idiocies had been tried by early men and women--foolishness that would never have been considered by species aware of the laws of nature. Desperate superstitions had bred during the savage centuries. Styles of government, intrigues, philosophies were tested with abandon. It was almost as if Orphan Earth had been a planetary laboratory, upon which a series of senseless and bizarre experiments were tried. Illogical and shameful as they seemed in retrospect, those experiences enriched modern Man. Few races had made so many mistakes in so short a time, or tried so many tentative solutions to hopeless problems. ~ David Brin,
481:I grant you that my children need their meals balanced. If you like, I shall take the pledge here and now to see to it that they get greens along with their starches. My own feeling, however, is that they need something else even more. They need to have their tastes unbalanced: to have them skewed, driven off dead center, and fastened firmly on the astonishing oddness of the world. If they get a course from me at all, it should not be a string of lectures on how best to adapt reality to their uses, but a series of laboratory sessions where their senses can be exposed to the delectability of being as such. ~ Robert Farrar Capon,
482:The odds that Holmes could pull off this latest Houdini act while under criminal investigation were very long, but watching her confidently walk the audience through her sleek slide show helped crystallize for me how she’d gotten this far: she was an amazing saleswoman. She never once stumbled or lost her train of thought. She wielded both engineering and laboratory lingo effortlessly and she showed seemingly heartfelt emotion when she spoke of sparing babies in the NICU from blood transfusions. Like her idol Steve Jobs, she emitted a reality distortion field that forced people to momentarily suspend disbelief. ~ John Carreyrou,
483:The earliest modern attempt to test prayer’s efficacy was Sir Francis Galton’s innovative but flawed survey in 1872.16 The field languished until the 1960s, when several researchers began clinical and laboratory studies designed to answer two fundamental questions: (1) Do the prayerful, compassionate, healing intentions of humans affect biological functions in remote individuals who may be unaware of these efforts? (2) Can these effects be demonstrated in nonhuman processes, such as microbial growth, specific biochemical reactions, or the function of inanimate objects? The answer to both questions appears to be yes. ~ Ervin Laszlo,
484:The theory behind primate experimentation was that these animals were closer biologically to man. In the 1950's, several laboratories even attempted experiments on gorillas, going to great trouble and expense to work with these seemingly most human of animals. However, by 1960 it had been demonstrated that of the apes, the chimpanzee was biochemically more like man than the gorilla. (On the basis of similarity to man, the choice of laboratory animals is often surprising. For example, the hamster is preferred for immunological and cancer studies, since his responses are so similar to man's, while for studies of the heart ~ Anonymous,
485:The Ryland website showed a few nominal photos of students in goggles doing something with a torch in a laboratory, or squinting over a whiteboard jammed with calculations, but the rest of the photos were social, cornball: an afternoon of ice skating on a frozen pond, a classic “three in a tree” shot of students chatting beneath a spreading oak. In fact, the campus only had one such tree, which had been over-photographed into exhaustion. In daylight, students straggled to class along the paths of the inelegant campus, occasionally even wearing pajamas, like the members of a good-natured bear family in a children’s book ~ Meg Wolitzer,
486:Tolerance is an attitude of reasoned patience toward evil … a forbearance that restrains us from showing anger or inflicting punishment. Tolerance applies only to persons … never to truth. Tolerance applies to the erring, intolerance to the error … Architects are as intolerant about sand as foundations for skyscrapers as doctors are intolerant about germs in the laboratory. Tolerance does not apply to truth or principles. About these things we must be intolerant, and for this kind of intolerance, so much needed to rouse us from sentimental gush, I make a plea. Intolerance of this kind is the foundation of all stability. ~ Fulton J Sheen,
487:If AIBO is in some sense a toy, it is a toy that changes minds. It does this in several ways. It heightens our sense of being close to developing a postbiological life and not just in theory or in the laboratory. And it suggests how this passage will take place. It will begin with our seeing the new life as “as if ” life and then deciding that “as if ” may be life enough. Even now, as we contemplate “creatures” with artificial feelings and intelligence, we come to reflect differently on our own. The question here is not whether machines can be made to think like people but whether people have always thought like machines. ~ Sherry Turkle,
488:I came from Paris in the Spring of 1884, and was brought in intimate contact with him [Thomas Edison]. We experimented day and night, holidays not excepted. His existence was made up of alternate periods of work and sleep in the laboratory. He had no hobby, cared for no sport or amusement of any kind and lived in utter disregard of the most elementary rules of hygiene. There can be no doubt that, if he had not married later a woman of exceptional intelligence, who made it the one object of her life to preserve him, he would have died many years ago from consequences of sheer neglect. So great and uncontrollable was his passion for work. ~ Nikola Tesla,
489:Always this same morbid interest in other people and their doings, their privacies, their dirty linen, always this air of alertness for personal happenings, personalities, personalities, personalities. Always this subtle criticism and appraisal of other people, this analysis of other people’s motives. If anatomy presupposes a corpse, then psychology presupposes a world of corpses. Personalities, which means personal criticism and analysis, presuppose a whole world laboratory of human psyches waiting to be vivisected. If you cut a thing up, of course it will smell. Hence, nothing raises such an infernal stink, at last, as human psychology. ~ D H Lawrence,
490:About twenty-five years ago the body channel received a tremendous boost from the discovery of mirror neurons in a laboratory in Parma, Italy. These neurons are activated when we perform an action, such as reaching for a cup, but also when we see someone else reach for a cup. These neurons don’t distinguish between our own behavior and that of someone else, so they allow one individual to get under another’s skin. Their actions become our own. This discovery has been hailed as being of equal importance to psychology as the discovery of DNA was for biology, because of its profound implications for imitation and other forms of bodily fusion. ~ Frans de Waal,
491:Six hundred years after it became protected, there are still only seven producers allowed to make all of the real Roquefort cheese. Today, the mold can be manufactured in a laboratory, but under French law, only mold produced from the naturally occurring spore in these caves can be used, and there are many other requirements too. The milk can only come from three specific breeds of sheep, all of which have to be ranged in this area, where what they eat is natural and regulated. In addition, the time from milking to cheese making is tightly controlled. Every other step of the process, from maturation to cutting to packaging, must also occur here. ~ Larry Olmsted,
492:A computer program written by researchers at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois has come up with a major mathematical proof that would have been called creative if a human had thought of it. In doing so, the computer has, for the first time, got a toehold into pure mathematics, a field described by its practitioners as more of an art form than a science. ...Dr. McCune's proof concerns a conjecture that is the very epitome of pure mathematics. ...His computer program proved that a set of three equations is equivalent to a Boolean algebra... ~ Gina Kolata, "With Major Math Proof, Brute Computers Show Flash of Reasoning Power," The New York Times (Dec 10, 1996),
493:The era of garage biology is upon us. Want to participate? Take a moment to buy yourself a molecular biology lab on eBay. A mere $1,000 will get you a set of precision pipettors for handling liquids and an electrophoresis rig for analyzing DNA. Side trips to sites like BestUse and LabX (two of my favorites) may be required to round out your purchases with graduated cylinders or a PCR thermocycler for amplifying DNA. If you can’t afford a particular gizmo, just wait six months—the supply of used laboratory gear only gets better with time. Links to sought-after reagents and protocols can be found at DNAHack. And, of course, Google is no end of help. ~ Peter H Diamandis,
494:It's like the control insects at the Laboratory. Di d I ever tell you about them? Well, we keep a lot of insect colonies in big glass jars out there. Some of them have been breeding for twenty-five years. That's a thousand generations. All they know about life is what goes on inside their Jar. They haven't been exposed to pesticides or pollution, so they haven't developed immunities or evolved in any way. They stay the same, generation after generation. If we released them into the outside world, they'd die. I think something like that happens after seven generations in Savannah. Savannah gets to be the only place you can live. We're like bugs in a jar. ~ John Berendt,
495:However, the spooky boys of the super secret Technical Laboratory failed to impress me. I possessed a vast library on the various facades of technical intelligence. I was amused to see the rudimentary wireless sets (some manufactured by the IB technicians at mount joy), clandestine cameras, miniature radio transmitters and a few bugging tools flaunted by the so-called experts as the main tools of technical intelligence. These gadgets were shown to us like the magicians pulling out an occasional rabbit from their hats. I don’t think anyone emerged out of the classrooms much wiser about the application of electronic gadgets for generating intelligence ~ Maloy Krishna Dhar,
496:We live in a world of illusions. We think we’re aware of everything going on around us. We look out and see an uninterrupted, complete picture of the visual world, composed of thousands of little detailed images. We may know that each of us has a blind spot, but we go on day to day blissfully unaware of where it actually is because our occipital cortex does such a good job of filling in the missing information and hence hiding it from us. Laboratory demonstrations of inattentional blindness (like the gorilla video of the last chapter) underscore how little of the world we actually perceive, in spite of the overwhelming feeling that we’re getting it all. ~ Daniel J Levitin,
497:It was that genuflecting obedience, the steadfast devotion to execute whatever task the Emperor assigned, that had given rise to so many rumors about Vader: that he was a counterpart to the Confederacy’s General Grievous the Emperor had been holding in reserve; that he was an augmented human or near-human who had been trained or had trained himself in the ancient dark arts of the Sith; that he was nothing more than a monster fashioned in some clandestine laboratory. Many believed that the Emperor’s willingness to grant so much authority to such a being heralded the shape of things to come, for it was beyond dispute that Vader was the Empire’s first terror weapon. ~ James Luceno,
498:Talking on a cell phone makes us four times as likely to have an accident—the same as a driver who has a blood alcohol content of .08 percent, which qualifies as intoxicated in most states. The risk is equal for drivers holding their phones to their ears and for those speaking through a hands-free device. In both cases, researchers suggest, the drivers generate mental images of the unseen person at the other end of the line, which conflicts with their capacity for spatial processing. “It’s not that your hands aren’t on the wheel,” says David Strayer, the director of the Applied Cognition Laboratory at the University of Utah, “it’s that your mind is not on the road. ~ Tony Schwartz,
499:There is a small ncRNA called BC1 which is expressed in specific neurons in mice. When researchers at the University of Munster in Germany deleted this ncRNA, the mice seemed fine. But then the scientists moved the mutant animals from the very controlled laboratory setting into a more natural environment. Under these conditions, it became clear that the mutants were not the same as normal mice. They were reluctant to explore their surroundings and were anxious37. If they had simply been left in their cages, we would never have appreciated that loss of the BC1 ncRNA actually had a quite pronounced effect on behaviour. A clear case of what we see being dependent on how we look. ~ Nessa Carey,
500:NASA's Software Engineering Laboratory studied ten projects that pursued reuse aggressively (McGarry, Waligora, and McDermott 1989). In both the object-oriented and the functionally oriented approaches, the initial projects weren't able to take much of their code from previous projects because previous projects hadn't established a sufficient code base. Subsequently, the projects that used functional design were able to take about 35 percent of their code from previous projects. Projects that used an object-oriented approach were able to take more than 70 percent of their code from previous projects. If you can avoid writing 70 percent of your code by planning ahead, do it! ~ Steve McConnell,
501:Annabel was, like the writer, of mixed parentage: half-English, half-Dutch, in her case. I remember her features far less distinctly today than I did a few years ago, before I knew Lolita. There are two kinds of visual memory: one when you skillfully recreate an image in the laboratory of your mind, with your eyes open (and then I see Annabel in such general terms as: "honey-colored skin," "thin arms," "brown bobbed hair," "long lashes," "big bright mouth"); and the other when you instantly evoke, with shut eyes, on the dark innerside of your eyelids, the objective, absolutely optical replica of a beloved face, a little ghost in natural colors (and this is how I see Lolita). ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
502:Living is no laughing matter:
You must take it seriously.
So much so and to such a degree
that, for example, your hands tied
behind your back,
your back to the wall
or else in a laboratory
in your white coat and safety glasses,
you can die for people –
even for people whose faces you’ve
never seen,
even though you know living
is the most real, most beautiful
thing.
I mean, you must take living so
seriously
that even at seventy, for example, you’ll
plant olive trees –
and not for your children, either,
but because, although you fear death you
don’t believe it,
because living, I mean, weighs heavier.

- "On Living ~ N z m Hikmet Ran,
503:In this way we consumed the newt whom we had come to know as Hans; Hans was an educated and intelligent animal with a special talent for scientific work; it had worked in Dr. Hinkel’s department as a laboratory assistant and could even be trusted with delicate chemical analyses. We would spend entire evenings talking with Hans who enjoyed boundless curiosity. It became unfortunately necessary to dispose of Hans after he became blind after my experiments with trepanation. Hans’s meat was dark and with a slight flavour of mushrooms, but left no unpleasant effects. There is no doubt that in the event of need arising from war it would be possible to use newt meat as a cheap substitute for beef.] ~ Karel apek,
504:During World War II, the University of Minnesota’s Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene conducted what scientists and relief workers still regard today as a benchmark study of starvation. Partly funded by religious groups, including the Society of Friends, the study was intended to help the Allies cope with released concentration-camp internees, prisoners of war, and refugees. The participants were all conscientious objectors who volunteered to lose 25 percent of their body weight over six months. The experiment was supervised by Dr. Ancel Keys (for whom the K-ration was named). The volunteers lived a spare but comfortable existence at a stadium on the campus of the University of Minnesota. ~ Nathaniel Philbrick,
505:There are exceptions, when here and there some very high energy particle does something, and in the laboratory we have been able to do some peculiar things. But if we leave out these special cases, all ordinary phenomena can be explained by the actions and the motions of particles. For example, life itself is supposedly understandable in principle from the movements of atoms, and those atoms are made out of neutrons, protons and electrons. I must immediately say that when we state that we understand it in principle, we only mean that we think that, if we could figure everything out, we would find that there is nothing new in physics which needs to be discovered in order to understand the phenomena of life. ~ Anonymous,
506:I worry about exposing him to bands like Journey, the appreciation of which will surely bring him nothing but the opprobrium of his peers. Though he has often been resistant - children so seldom know what is good for them - I have taught him to appreciate all the groundbreaking musicmakers of our time - Big Country, Haircut 100, Loverboy - and he is lucky for it. His brain is my laboratory, my depository. Into it I can stuff the books I choose, the television shows, the movies, my opinion about elected officials, historical events, neighbors, passersby. He is my twenty-four-hour classroom, my captive audience, forced to ingest everything I deem worthwhile. He is a lucky, lucky boy! And no one can stop me. ~ Dave Eggers,
507:Cohen testified that there was no 'direct relationship' linking heart disease to dietary fats, and that he had been able to induce the same blood-vessel complications seen in heart disease merely by feeding sugar to his laboratory rats. Peter Cleave testified to his belief that the problem extended to all refined carbohydrates. 'I don't hold the cholesterol view for a moment,' Cleave said, noting that mankind had been eating saturated fats for hundreds of thousands of years. 'For a modern disease to be related to an old-fashioned food is one of the most ludicrous things I have ever heard in my life... but, when it comes to the dreadful sweet things that are served up... that is a very different proposition. ~ Gary Taubes,
508:Today I am more convinced than ever. Conceptual integrity is central to product quality. Having a system architect is the most important single step toward conceptual integrity. These principles are by no means limited to software systems, but to the design of any complex construct, whether a computer, an airplane, a Strategic Defense Initiative, a Global Positioning System. After teaching a software engineering laboratory more than 20 times, I came to insist that student teams as small as four people choose a manager and a separate architect. Defining distinct roles in such small teams may be a little extreme, but I have observed it to work well and to contribute to design success even for small teams. ~ Frederick P Brooks Jr,
509:When the interests of Erdos's colleagues drifted away from pure mathematics, he made no secret of his disapproval. "When I wasn't sure whether to stay a mathematician or go to the Technical University and become an engineer, Vazsonyi recalled, "Erdos warned me:
'I'll hide, and when you enter the Technical University, Iwill shoot you. ' That settled the matter. "
When probability theorist Mark Kac had a paper published in the Journal if Applied Physics based on his work during the war at MIT's Radiation Laboratory, Erdos sent him a one sentence postcard: "I am prayi:ng for your soul." Erdos was "reminding me," Kac said, "that I might be straying from the path of true virtue, which, as a matter of fact, I was. ~ Paul Hoffman,
510:But on night duty, alone, he had to face the self he had been afraid to uncover, and he was homesick for the laboratory, for the thrill of uncharted discoveries, the quest below the surface and beyond the moment, the search for fundamental laws which the scientist (however blasphemously and colloquially he may describe it) exalts above temporary healing as the religious exalts the nature and terrible glory of God above pleasant daily virtues. With this sadness there was envy that he should be left out of things, that others should go ahead of him, ever surer in technique, more widely aware of the phenomena of biological chemistry, more deeply daring to explain laws at which the pioneers had but fumbled and hinted. ~ Sinclair Lewis,
511:as the University of Toronto cancer researcher Vuk Stambolic would later describe it, these breast-cancer cells seemed to be “addicted to” insulin, and when weaned off it in the laboratory they responded by dying. This kind of phenomenon was seen also in cancers of adrenal and liver cells. As one 1976 report put it, insulin “intensely stimulated cell proliferation in certain tumors”; another, by researchers at the National Cancer Institute, described one particular line of breast-cancer cells as “exquisitely sensitive to insulin.” By then, researchers had established that malignant breast tumors had receptors to insulin, which were absent in healthy breast tissue, and that the more they had, the more insulin-sensitive they were. ~ Gary Taubes,
512:Probiotics—These help maintain healthy intestinal flora and healthy estrogen levels. Make sure you get human-strain probiotics that have live cultures. Consider taking 10–60 billion units per day. Plant Phytoestrogens—These plant-based compounds have healthy estrogen-like activity and have been found helpful for a variety of conditions, including menopausal symptoms, PMS, and endometriosis. Phytoestrogens can be found in soy, kudzu, red clover, and pomegranate. Resveratrol is a bioflavonoid antioxidant that occurs naturally in grapes and red wine and has been reported to inhibit breast cancer cell growth in laboratory studies. Black cohosh—This herb has been used for centuries by Native Americans for hormonal balance in women. ~ Daniel G Amen,
513:The four had come to an exciting decision" during the six months of the blockade threatened by the authorities, they would make the ruins a laboratory, a demonstration of how well and happily men could live with virtually no machines. They saw now the common man's wisdom in wrecking practically everything. That was the way to do it, and the hell with moderation!

"All right, so we'll heat our water and cook our food and light and warm our homes with wood fires," said Lasher.

"And walk wherever we're going," said Finnerty.

"And read books instead of watching television," said von Neumann. "The Renaissance comes to upstate New York! We'll rediscover the two greatest wonders of the world, the human mind and hand. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
514:...with his dripping basket and flip-flapped up the hill. Then a car turned into Cannery Row and Doc drove up to the front of the laboratory. His eyes were red rimmed with fatigue. He moved slowly with tiredness. When the car had stopped, he sat still for a moment to let the road jumps get out of his nerves. Then he climbed out of the car. At his step on the stairs, the rattlesnakes ran out their tongues and listened with their waving forked tongues. The rats scampered madly about the cages. Doc climbed the stairs. He looked in wonder at the sagging door and at the broken window. The weariness seemed to go out of him. He stepped quickly inside. Then he went quickly from room to room, stepping around the broken glass. He bent down. ~ John Steinbeck,
515:The electron that scientists see in the laboratory-the electron that physicists, chemists, and engineers have known and loved for decades-is an impostor. It is not the true electron. The true electron is hidden in a shroud of particles, made up of the zero-point fluctuations, those particles that constantly pop in and out of existence. As an electron sits in the vacuum, it occasionally absorbs or spits out one of these particles, such as a photon. The swarm of particles makes it difficult to get a measurement of the electron's mass and charge, because the particles interfere with the measurement, madking the electron's true properties. The "true" electron is a bit heavier and carries a greater charge than the electron that physicists observe. ~ Charles Seife,
516:The leap from maps to fluid flow seemed so great that even those most responsible sometimes felt it was like a dream. How nature could tie such complexity to such simplicity was far from obvious. "You have to regard it as a kind of miracle, not like the usual connection between theory and experiment," Jerry Gollub said. Within a few years, the miracle was being repeated again and again in a vast bestiary of laboratory systems: bigger fluid cells with water and mercury, electronic oscillators, lasers, even chemical reactions. Theorists adapted Feigenbaum's techiniques and found other mathematical routes to chaos, cousins of period-doubling: such patterns as intermittency and quasiperiodicity. These, too, proved universal in theory and experiment. ~ James Gleick,
517:She pinched her nose against the stench as I squirted oil of vitriol around the door. Vaporous tendrils curled from the seams. "What is that stuff?"
"Back in medieval times," I said, "we used oil of vitriol for its healing properties. No doubt that's why Commodus had some in his infirmary. Today we call it sulphuric acid."
Meg flinched. "Isn't that dangerous?"
"Very."
"And you healed with it?"
"It was the Middle Ages. We were crazy back then."
I held up the second syringe, this one filled with water. "Meg, what I'm about to do - never, ever try this on your own." I felt a bit silly giving this advice to a girl who regularly fought monsters with golden swords, but I had promised Bill Nye the Science Guy I would always promote safe laboratory practices. ~ Rick Riordan,
518:I spent the afternoon in a bookstore. There were no books in it. None had been printed for nearly half a century. And how I have looked forward to them, after the micro films that made up the library of the Prometheus! No such luck. No longer was it possible to browse among shelves, to weigh volumes in hand, to feel their heft, the promise of ponderous reading. The bookstore resembled, instead, an electronic laboratory. The books were crystals with recorded contents. They can be read the aid of an opton, which was similar to a book but had only one page between the covers. At a touch, successive pages of the text appeared on it. But optons were little used, the sales-robot told me. The public preferred lectons - like lectons read out loud, they could be set to any voice, tempo, and modulation. ~ Stanis aw Lem,
519:She reflected on the way things like juices were these days tasting exactly the way they were supposed to. No variation in gradations of sweet and tart, not like in the olden days, the olden days being those years when she was in primary and secondary school in Nigeria. Here and now, no matter the season, the time of year, the place you bought it, many things always tasted the same. The power of science. Sometimes she thought how one day even love might become like a science. Everyone saying exactly the same right words. Everyone reacting the same exact ways. Love feeling and tasting and looking exactly the way some scientists in some laboratory determined that it should. Perhaps a development like that would solve many romantic disputes, maybe even bring down divorce rates to a cool zero percent. ~ Chinelo Okparanta,
520:Daniel Levitin is one of the world’s leading experts on how music influences the brain. He would be appearing with the conductor Edwin Outwater and the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony Orchestra, which would play Beethoven. Levitin would explain how the music was affecting the audience’s collective brain. Levitin was no disinterested academic. He had had a serious career as a musician, performing with Sting, Mel Tormé, and Blue Öyster Cult, consulting with Stevie Wonder and Steely Dan, and having been recording engineer for Santana and the Grateful Dead. Then he—like Kahn—made a big switch and become a research psychologist, investigating how music interacts with the brain. He was now head of McGill University’s Laboratory for Musical Perception, Cognition and Expertise and author of This Is Your Brain on Music. ~ Norman Doidge,
521:Henry called my house a laboratory of the soul. Enter this laboratory of the soul where every feeling will be X-rayed by Dr. Allendy to expose the blocks, the twists, the deformations, the scars which interfere with the flow of life. Enter this laboratory of the soul where incidents are refracted into a diary, dissected to prove that everyone of us carries a deforming mirror where he sees himself too small or too large, too fat or too thin, even Henry who believes himself so free, blithe, and unscarred. Enter here where one discovers that destiny can be directed, that one does not need to remain in bondage to the first wax imprint made on childhood sensibilities. One need not be branded by the first pattern. Once the deforming mirror is smashed, there is a possibility of wholeness; there is a possibility of joy. ~ Ana s Nin,
522:Laypeople as well as most scientists believe that science regards the world as built out of tiny bits of matter. “Yet this view is wrong,” argues Henry Stapp, a physicist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory high in the hills above Berkeley, California. At least one version of quantum theory, propounded by the Hungarian mathematician John von Neumann in the 1930s, “claims that the world is built not out of bits of matter but out of bits of knowledge—subjective, conscious knowings,” Stapp says. These ideas, however, have fallen far short of toppling the materialist worldview, which has emerged so triumphant that to suggest humbly that there might be more to mental life than action potentials zipping along axons is to risk being branded a scientific naif. Even worse, it is to be branded nonscientific. ~ Jeffrey M Schwartz,
523:what affects the ear and the eye has something to do with what the mind perceives; grimaces and smiles betray the mind's moods and bodily castigations lead, it is hoped, to moral improvement. But the actual transactions between the episodes of the private history ancTthose of the public history remain mysterious, since by definition they can belong to neither series. They could not be reported among the happenings described in a person's autobiography of his inner life, but nor could they be reported among those described in some one else's biography of that person's overt career. They can be inspected neither by introspection nor by laboratory experiment. They are theoretical shuttlecocks which are forever being bandied from the physiologist back to the psychologist and from the psychologist back to the physiologist. ~ Anonymous,
524:Dear Merlin, How empty is empty space? ARTHUR LEVY HOUSTON, TEXAS When a rabbit disappears into “thin air” at a magic show nobody tells you the thin air already contains over 10,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten quintillion) atoms per cubic centimeter. The very best laboratory vacuum chambers have as few as 10,000 atoms per cubic centimeter. Interplanetary space gets down to about 10 atoms per cubic centimeter while interstellar space is as low as 0.5 atoms per cubic centimeter. The award for nothingness, however, must be given to intergalactic space. There it is difficult to find more than 0.0000001 atoms per cubic centimeter. It has been postulated that outside the universe, where there is no space, there is no nothing. We might call this hypothetical region (where we are certain to find multitudes of rabbits) nothing-nothing ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
525:Scholarships allowed her to study at Woods Hole Biological Laboratory, where she fell in love with the sea, and at Johns Hopkins University, where she was isolated, one of a handful of women in marine biology. She had no mentors and no money to continue in graduate school after completing an M.A. in zoology in 1932. Along the way she worked as a laboratory assistant in the school of public health, where she was lucky enough to receive some training in experimental genetics. As employment opportunities in science dwindled, she began writing articles about the natural history of Chesapeake Bay for the Baltimore Sun. Although these were years of financial and emotional struggle, Carson realized that she did not have to choose between science and writing, that she had the talent to do both. From childhood on, Carson was interested in ~ Rachel Carson,
526:My laboratory is like a church because it is where I figure out what I believe. The machines drone a gathering hymn as I enter. I know whom I’ll probably see, and I know how they’ll probably act. I know there’ll be silence; I know there’ll be music, a time to greet my friends, and a time to leave others to their contemplation. There are rituals that I follow, some I understand and some I don’t. Elevated to my best self, I strive to do each task correctly. My lab is a place to go on sacred days, as is a church. On holidays, when the rest of the world is closed, my lab is open. My lab is a refuge and an asylum. It is my retreat from the professional battlefield; it is the place where I coolly examine my wounds and repair my armor. And, just like church, because I grew up in it, it is not something from which I can ever really walk away. My ~ Hope Jahren,
527:When we discuss the successful dietary programs of the various groups from the standpoint of their ability to control tooth decay and prevent deformity we find that for the people in the high and isolated Alpine valleys their nutrition is dependent largely on entire rye bread and dairy products with meat about once a week and various vegetables, fresh in the summer season and stored for the winter season. An analysis in my laboratory of the dairy products obtained from the Loetschental Valley in Switzerland through a series of years has shown the vitamin content to be much higher than the average throughout the world for similar foods during the same seasons. The milk in these high valleys is produced from green pasturage and stored green hay of exceptionally high chlorophyll content. The milk and the rye bread provided minerals abundantly ~ Anonymous,
528:Thirty years later, his regime had accomplished its historical task. Economic development had transformed Spanish society, radical mass politics had been extinguished, and democracy was no longer hazardous for capital. So completely had the dictatorship done its work that a toothless Bourbon socialism was incapable even of restoring the republic it had overthrown. In this Spanish laboratory could be found a parabola of the future, which the Latin American dictators of the 1970s – Pinochet is the exemplary case – would repeat, architects of a political order in which electors, grateful for civic liberties finally restored, could be trusted henceforward not to tamper with the social order. Today the Spanish template has become the general formula of freedom: no longer making the world safe for democracy, but democracy safe for this world. ~ Perry Anderson,
529:At Brookhaven National Laboratory, on Long Island, and at several other centers around the world, there are special rooms where people rarely tread. Nothing much seems to be happening in these rooms, there's no visible motion, and the only sound is the gently whir of fans that keep the temperature steady and the humidity low. In these rooms, roughly 10^30 protons and neutrons are at work. They have been organized into hundreds of computers, harnessed to work in parallel. The team races at teraflop rates, which means 10^12- a million million-FLoating point OPerations per second. We let them labor for months-10^7 seconds. At the end , they've done what a single proton does every 10^-24 second, which is figure out how to orchestrate quark and gluon fields in the best possible way so that they keep the Grid satisfied and make a stable equilibrium. ~ Frank Wilczek,
530:The daughter of Lithuanian immigrants, born with a precocious scientific intellect and a thirst for chemical knowledge, Elion had completed a master's degree in chemistry from New York University in 1941 while teaching high school science during the day and preforming her research for her thesis at night and on the weekends. Although highly qualified, talented, and driven, she had been unable to find a job in an academic laboratory. Frustrated by repeated rejections, she had found a position as a supermarket product supervisor. When Hitchings found Trudy Elion, who would soon become on of the most innovative synthetic chemists of her generation (and a future Nobel laureate), she was working for a food lab in New York, testing the acidity of pickles and the color of egg yolk going into mayonnaise. Rescued from a life of pickles and mayonnaise… ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
531:Meteorology . . . is quite as “scientific” as geology and far more so than archaeology—it actually makes more use of scientific instruments, computers, and higher mathematics. . . . Yet we laugh at the weatherman every other day; we are not overawed by his impressive paraphernalia, because we can check up on him any time we feel like it: he makes his learned pronouncements—and then it rains or it doesn’t rain.

No scientific conclusion is to be trusted without testing—to the extent to which exact sciences are exact they are also experimental sciences; it is in the laboratory that the oracle must be consulted. But the archaeologist is denied access to the oracle. For him there is no neat and definitive demonstration; he is doomed to plod along, everlastingly protesting and fumbling through a laborious, often rancorous running debate that never ends. ~ Hugh Nibley,
532:Genesis [god Said, 'Let There Be Crime,' And The
Command]
God said, 'Let there be Crime,' and the command
Brought Satan, leading Stoneman by the hand.
'Why, that's Stupidity, not Crime,' said God
'Bring what I ordered.' Satan with a nod
Replied, 'This is _one_ element-when I
The _other_-Opportunity-supply
In just equivalent, the two'll affine
And in a chemical embrace combine
And Crime result-for Crime can only be
Stupiditate of Opportunity.'
So leaving Stoneman (not as yet endowed
With soul) in special session on a cloud,
Nick to his sooty laboratory went,
Returning soon with t'other element.
'Here's Opportunity,' he said, and put
Pen, ink, and paper down at Stoneman's foot.
He seized them-Heaven was filled with fires and thunders,
And Crime was added to Creation's wonders!
~ Ambrose Bierce,
533:She said no one had more than one perspective, not even in his so-called hard sciences. We’re always, in everything we do in this world, she said, limited by subjectivity. But our perspective can have an enormous wingspan, if we give it the freedom to unfurl. Look at Malinowski, she said. Look at Boas. They defined their cultures as they saw them, as they understood the natives’ point of view. The key is, she said, to disengage yourself from all your ideas about what is “natural.” ‘Even if I manage that, the next person who comes here will tell a different story about the Kiona.’ ‘No doubt.’ ‘Then what is the point?’ I said. ‘This is no different from the laboratory. What’s the point of anyone’s search for answers? The truth you find will always be replaced by someone else’s. Someday even Darwin will look like a quaint Ptolemy who saw what he could see but no more. ~ Lily King,
534:MATT: Okay. You spiral upward and upward and upward, climbing an extremely long period of time.

Your legs begin to ache a little bit. Then another floor opens up. It appears the tower is now divided into two chambers. From the bottom floor up, it's now two sides to a tower and you're on the right side. The hallway curves around the outer edge of the tower. On the opposite side, you can see the staircase continues upward. The interior of this chamber appears to be an incredible arcane laboratory, occupying the center space of the tower inside. You see six overlapping circles of dulled runes and glyphs that encompass the entire 30-foot walkway between here and the stairs. Shelves and tables of countless glass tubes and metallic vices lay out across tables, organized in a near-OCD pattern. Tomes and books line the inner chamber walls. What do you guys do? ~ Matt Mercer, Critical Role,
535:Each of the most basic physical laws that we know of corresponds to some invariance, which in turn is equivalent to a collection of changes which form a symmetry group. The symmetry group describes all the variations that can be formed from an initial seed pattern whilst still leaving some underlying theme unchanged. Thus, for example, the conservation of energy is equivalent to the invariance of the laws of motion with respect to translations backwards or forwards in time (that is, the result of an experiment should not depend on the time at which it was carried out, all other factors being identical); the conservation of linear momentum is equivalent to the invariance of the laws of motion with respect to the position of your laboratory in space, and the conservation of angular momentum to an invariance with respect to the directional orientation of your laboratory in space. ~ John D Barrow,
536:Winfree came from a family in which no one had gone to college. He got started, he would say, by not having proper education. His father, rising from the bottom of the life insurance business to the level of vice president, moved family almost yearly up and down the East Coast, and Winfree attended than a dozen schools before finishing high school. He developed a feeling that the interesting things in the world had to do with biology and mathematics and a companion feeling that no standard combination of the two subjects did justice to what was interesting. So he decided not to take a standard approach. He took a five-year course in engineering physics at Cornell University, learning applied mathematics and a full range of hands-on laboratory styles. Prepared to be hired into military-industrial complex, he got a doctorate in biology, striving to combine experiment with theory in new ways. ~ James Gleick,
537:Our main difference from chimps and gorillas is that over the last 3 million years or so, we have been shaped less and less by nature, and more and more by culture. We have become experimental creatures of our own making. This experiment has never been tried before. And we, its unwitting authors, have never controlled it. The experiment is now moving very quickly and on a colossal scale. Since the early 1900s, the world’s population has multiplied by four and its economy — a rough measure of the human load on nature — by more than forty. We have reached a stage where we must bring the experiment under rational control, and guard against present and potential dangers. It’s entirely up to us. If we fail — if we blow up or degrade the biosphere so it can no longer sustain us — nature will merely shrug and conclude that letting apes run the laboratory was fun for a while but in the end a bad idea. ~ Ronald Wright,
538:Many claim that caloric restriction (permanent or episodic) activates healthy reactions and switches that, among other benefits, lengthen life expectancy in laboratory animals. We humans live too long for researchers to test if such restriction increases our life expectancy (if the hypothesis is true, then the subjects of the test would outlive the researchers). But it looks like such restriction makes humans healthier (and may also improve their sense of humor). But since abundance would bring the opposite effect, this episodic caloric restriction can be also interpreted as follows: too much regular food is bad for you, and depriving humans of the stressor of hunger may make them live less than their full potential; so all hormesis seems to be doing is reestablishing the natural dosage for food and hunger in humans. In other words, hormesis is the norm, and its absence is what hurts us. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
539:Some researchers have reported that high levels of stress are associated with improved memory in the laboratory (Goodman et al. 1991b; Warren & Swartwood, 1992), some have reported that high levels of stress are associated with poorer memory (Bugental et al., 1992; Merritt, Ornstein, & Spicker, 1994). For example, Howe, Courage, & Peterson (1994) found no relationship between the amount of stress (reported by the parents) and the amount of information recalled by their children either 3-5 days or 6 months after an emergency room procedure. By contrast, Goodman et al. (1991b) found that children who showed higher levels of arousal during a medical procedure reported the incident more accurately than children who simply had a washable tattoo applied. ~ Teti D.M. (2005). Handbook of research methods in developmental science: New developments in the study of infant memory. San Francisco: Blackwell Publishing., p.500,
540:In its extreme Stalinist form the Russian megamachine betrayed, even before Hitler, the most sinister defects of the ancient megamachine: its reliance upon physical coercion and terrorism, its systematic enslavement of the entire working population, including members of the dictatorial party, its suppression of free personal intercourse, free travel, free access to the existing store of knowledge, free association, and finally its imposition of human sacrifice to appease the wrath and sustain the life of its terrible, blood-drinking God, Stalin himself. The result of this system was to transform the entire country into a prison, part concentration camp, part extermination laboratory, from which the only hope of escape was by death. The 'liberty, fraternity, and equality' of the French Revolution had turned, by a further revolution around the same axle, into alienation, inequality, and enslavement. ~ Lewis Mumford,
541:One general theory for the origin of AIDS goes that, during the late nineteen-sixties, a new and lucrative business grew up in Africa, the export of primates to industrialized countries for use in medical research. Uganda was one of the biggest sources of these animals. As the monkey trade was established throughout central Africa, the native workers in the system, the monkey trappers and handlers, were exposed to large numbers of wild monkeys, some of which were carrying unusual viruses. These animals, in turn, were being jammed together in cages, exposed to one another, passing viruses back and forth. Furthermore, different species of monkeys were mixed together. It was a perfect setup for an outbreak of a virus that could jump species. It was also a natural laboratory for rapid virus evolution, and possibly it led to the creation of HIV. Did HIV crash into the human race as a result of the monkey trade? ~ Richard Preston,
542:(...) a child is led into a laboratory and asked to face one of the walls. The experimenter then explains that he is going to set up an elaborate toy a few feet behind them. After setting up the toy, the experimenter explains that he has to leave the laboratory, and asks the child not to turn around and peek at the toy. The child is secretly filmed by hidden cameras for a few minutes, and then the experimenter returns and asks them whether they peeked. Almost all 3-year-olds do, and then half of them lie about it to the experimenter. By the time the children have reached the age of 5, all of them peek and all of them lie. The results provide compelling evidence that lying starts to emerge the moment we learn to speak. Perhaps surprisingly, when adults are shown films of their children denying that they peeked at the toy, they are unable to detect whether their darling offspring are lying or telling the truth. ~ Richard Wiseman,
543:Diindolylmethane (DIM)—This is a phytochemical found in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower. It shifts estrogen metabolism to favor the friendly or harmless estrogen metabolites. DIM can significantly increase the urinary excretion of the “bad” estrogens in as little as four weeks. The typical dose of DIM is 75–300 mg per day. Omega-3 Fatty Acids (fish oils)—These contain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), which has been reported in laboratory studies to help control estrogen metabolism and decrease the risk of breast cancer. Eating grass-fed organic beef also supplies these fats. I typically recommend 2,000 mg a day. Calcium d-glucarate—This natural compound is found in fruits and vegetables like apples, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and cabbage. Calcium d-glucarate inhibits the enzyme that contributes to breast, prostate, and colon cancers. It also reduces reabsorbed estrogen from the digestive tract. ~ Daniel G Amen,
544:In fact, many of the most famous anti-Christian polemicists of the last 200 years—who sought to use science to justify their unbelief—never themselves set foot in a laboratory or conducted a single field observation. That includes the Marquis de Sade (a writer), Percy Bysshe Shelley (a poet), Friedrich Nietzsche (a philologist by training), Algernon Swinburne (a poet), Bertrand Russell (a philosopher), Karl Marx (a philosopher), Robert Ingersoll (a lecturer), George Bernard Shaw (a playwright), Vladimir Lenin (a communist revolutionary), Joseph Stalin (a communist dictator), H. L. Mencken (a newspaper columnist), Jean-Paul Sartre (a philosopher), Benito Mussolini (a fascist dictator), Luis Buñuel (Spanish filmmaker), Clarence Darrow (a lawyer), Ayn Rand (a novelist), Christopher Hitchens (a journalist), Larry Flynt (a pornographer), George Soros and Warren Buffett (investors), and Penn and Teller (magicians). ~ Robert J Hutchinson,
545:to test. Would weightlessness put them off their game? It did. The turtles moved “slowly and insecurely” and did not attack a piece of bait placed directly in front of them. Then again, the water in which they swam was repeatedly floating up out of the jar and forming an “ovoid cupola.” Who could eat? Von Beckh quickly moved on from turtles to Argentinean pilots. Under the section heading “Experiments with Human Subjects”—a heading that, were I a doctor previously employed by Nazi Germany, I might have rephrased—von Beckh reports on the efforts of the pilots to mark X’s inside small boxes during regular and weightless flight. During weightlessness, many of the letters strayed from the boxes, indicating that pilots might experience difficulties maneuvering their planes and doing crossword puzzles during air battles. The following year, von Beckh was recruited by the Aeromedical Research Laboratory at Holloman Air Force ~ Mary Roach,
546:Twisting space-time into knots requires energy on a scale that will not be available within the next several centuries or even millenia-if ever. Even if all the nations of the world were to band together to build a machine that could probe hyperspace, they would ultimately fail. And, as Guth points out, the temperatures necessary to create a baby universe in the laboratory is 1,000 trillion trillion degrees, far in excess of anything available to us. In fact, that temperature is much greater than anything found in the interior of a star. So, although it is possible that Einstein's laws and the laws of quantum theory might allow for time travel, this is not within the capabilities of earthlings like us, who can barely escape the feeble gravitational field of our own planet. While we can marvel at the implications of wormhole research, realizing its potential is strictly reserved for advanced extraterrestrial civilizations. ~ Michio Kaku,
547:Will we turn our backs on science because it is perceived as a threat to God, abandoning all the promise of advancing our understanding of nature and applying that to the alleviation of suffering and the betterment of humankind? Alternatively, will we turn our backs on faith, concluding that science has rendered the spiritual life no longer necessary, and that traditional religious symbols can now be replaced by engravings of the double helix on our alters?

Both of these choices are profoundly dangerous. Both deny truth. Both will diminish the nobility of humankind. Both will be devastating to our future. And both are unnecessary. The God of the Bible is also the God of the genome. He can be worshipped in the cathedral or in the laboratory. His creation is majestic, awesome, intricate and beautiful - and it cannot be at war with itself. Only we imperfect humans can start such battles. And only we can end them. ~ Francis S Collins,
548:Coe’s expansive boundaries encompassed more than two million acres of the southern Everglades, Florida Bay, Ten Thousand Islands, Big Cypress, and the upper Keys, stretching as far north as fifteen miles above the Tamiami Trail highway and as far east as the barrier reefs in the Atlantic. The primary goa was the preserve the ecosystems’ vast diversity of habitats in their primitive condition- pinelands and marshlands, estuaries and sloughs, dwarf cypress and elk horn coral. A secondary goal was half a million annual visitors, buts the botanist David Fairchild explained at a congresisonal hearing, the Everglades was not Yosemite, and its entertainment value would be only part of its appeal. It would also educate children, provide a unique laboratory for scientists, protect rare flora and fauna from extinction, and “Startle Americans out of the runs which an exclusive association with he human animal produces in the mind of man. ~ Michael Grunwald,
549:Single photons are not usually evident, but in the laboratory we can produce a beam of light so faint that it consists of a stream of single photons, which we can detect as individuals just as we can detect individual electrons or buckyballs. And we can repeat Young’s experiment employing a beam sufficiently sparse that the photons reach the barrier one at a time, with a few seconds between each arrival. If we do that, and then add up all the individual impacts recorded by the screen on the far side of the barrier, we find that together they build up the same interference pattern that would be built up if we performed the Davisson-Germer experiment but fired the electrons (or buckyballs) at the screen one at a time. To physicists, that was a startling revelation: If individual particles interfere with themselves, then the wave nature of light is the property not just of a beam or of a large collection of photons but of the individual particles. ~ Stephen Hawking,
550:Coincident with developments in the temporal-cortical explicit memory network, long-term recall abilities are newly emergent late in the first year of human life. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) in 9-month-olds as an index of the integrity of the neural substrate underlying a task thought to reflect explicit memory, namely, deferred imitation. ERP measures of recognition memory 1 week after unique laboratory experiences predicted whether and how much infants recalled of the experiences 1 month later. The findings further imply that memory storage and consolidation processes are a major source of variability in long-term recall memory late in the first year of life. ~ Bauer, P.J.; Wiebe, S.A.; Carver, L.J.; Waters, J.M.; Nelson, C.A. (November 2003). "Developments in long-term explicit memory late in the first year of life: behavioral and electrophysiological indices". Psychol Sci. 14 (6): 629–35. doi:10.1046/j.0956-7976.2003.psci_1476.x. PMID 14629697.,
551:In human studies, black cohosh has been found to decrease hot flashes associated with menopause. Unlike conventional estrogen effects on individuals predisposed to breast cancer, black cohosh has been shown in laboratory studies to inhibit cancer cells. Most studies used doses of 20–80 mg twice daily, providing 4–8 mg triterpene glycosides for up to six months. Melatonin—This hormone is produced in the pineal gland that, among other functions, helps sleep. Melatonin levels decline with age and may lead to the sleep disturbances common during menopause. Melatonin has been shown in laboratory studies to inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells. Melatonin acts as an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant in the brain and other tissues like the intestine. Studies show that low melatonin levels increase breast cancer risk in women. So if you are having trouble sleeping consider 3–6 mg of melatonin before bed. It may boost your immune system and help you sleep. ~ Daniel G Amen,
552:She came upon a bankside of lavender crocuses. The sun was on them for the moment, and they were opened flat, great five-pointed, seven-pointed lilac stars, with burning centres, burning with a strange lavender flame, as she had seen some metal burn lilac-flamed in the laboratory of the hospital at Islington. All down and oak-dry bankside they burned their great exposed stars. And she felt like going down on her knees and bending her forehead to the earth in an oriental submission, they were so royal, so lovely, so supreme. She came again to them in the morning, when the sky was grey, and they were closed, sharp clubs, wonderfully fragile on their stems of sap, among leaves and old grass and wild periwinkle. They had wonderful dark stripes running up their cheeks, the crocuses, like the clear proud stripes on a badger’s face, or on some proud cat. She took a handful of the sappy, shut, striped flames. In her room they opened into a grand bowl of lilac fire. ~ D H Lawrence,
553:Natural selection may be unconscious but, as Darwin and his successors made clear, it is the opposite of a random force. It can drive changes in an organism in a very linear, per sis tent fashion—as had been observed in the laboratory, in nature, and in simulations such as the one that modeled eye evolution. Denton was wrong about evolution’s being one big lottery. The correct analogy would be a game of darts in which the players cannot see the target. Some darts will find their mark while the majority will miss—a random process. But the rules of the game eliminate all but the best-thrown darts. Because nature tosses an im mense number of darts—the mutation rate in any single gene in an organism will run in the millions—natural selection has plenty of well-targeted darts to choose from, and the march toward new and complex forms is not so difficult to understand, after all. But presenting an accurate meta phor would not have supported an attack on evolution. ~ Edward Humes,
554:Newton was a decidedly odd figure – brilliant beyond measure, but solitary, joyless, prickly to the point of paranoia, famously distracted (upon swinging his feet out of bed in the morning he would reportedly sometimes sit for hours, immobilized by the sudden rush of thoughts to his head), and capable of the most riveting strangeness. He built his own laboratory, the first at Cambridge, but then engaged in the most bizarre experiments. Once he inserted a bodkin – a long needle of the sort used for sewing leather – into his eye socket and rubbed it around ‘betwixt my eye and the bone4 as near to [the] backside of my eye as I could’ just to see what would happen. What happened, miraculously, was nothing – at least, nothing lasting. On another occasion, he stared at the Sun for as long as he could bear, to determine what effect it would have upon his vision. Again he escaped lasting damage, though he had to spend some days in a darkened room before his eyes forgave him. ~ Bill Bryson,
555:Whenever we describe the genome we talk about it in very two-dimensional terms, almost like a railway track. Peter Fraser’s laboratory at the Babraham Institute outside Cambridge has published some extraordinary work showing it’s probably nothing like this at all. He works on the genes that code for the proteins required to make haemoglobin, the pigment in red blood cells that carries oxygen all around the body. There are a number of different proteins needed to create the final pigment, and they lie on different chromosomes. Doctor Fraser has shown that in cells that produce large amounts of haemoglobin, these chromosome regions become floppy and loop out like tentacles sticking out of the body of an octopus. These floppy regions mingle together in a small area of the cell nucleus, waving about until they can find each other. By doing this, there is an increased chance that all the proteins needed to create the functional haemoglobin pigment will be expressed together at the same time2 ~ Nessa Carey,
556:Bartal placed one rat in an enclosure, where it encountered a small transparent container, a bit like a jelly jar. Squeezed inside it was another rat, locked up, wriggling in distress. Not only did the free rat learn how to open a little door to liberate the other, but she was remarkably eager to do so. Never trained on it, she did so spontaneously. Then Bartal challenged her motivation by giving her a choice between two containers, one with chocolate chips—a favorite food that they could easily smell—and another with a trapped companion. The free rat often rescued her companion first, suggesting that reducing her distress counted more than delicious food.47 The empathy of laboratory rats has been tested by presenting them with a companion trapped in a glass container. Responding to the distress of the trapped rat, the free rat makes a purposeful effort to liberate her. This behavior disappears if the free rat is put on a relaxing drug, which dulls her sensitivity to the other’s emotional state. ~ Frans de Waal,
557:There is voluminous evidence that exclusive reliance on heuristic processing tendencies of Type I sometimes results in suboptimal responding (Baron, 2008; Evans, 2007a; Gilovich, Griffin, & Kahneman, 2002; Johnson-Laird, 2006; Kahneman & Tversky, 1973, 1996, 2000; Koehler & Harvey, 2004; Nickerson, 2004, 2008; Nisbett & Ross, 1980; Tversky & Kahneman, 1974, 1983, 1986) and that such thinking errors are not limited to the laboratory (Ariely, 2008; Åstebro, Jeffrey, & Adomdza, 2007; Baron, 1998; Baron, Bazerman, & Shonk, 2006; Belsky & Gilovich, 1999; Berner & Graber, 2008; Camerer, 2000; Chapman & Elstein, 2000; Croskerry, 2009a, 2009b; Dawes, 2001; Hilton, 2003; Kahneman & Tversky, 2000; Lichtenstein & Slovic, 2006; Lilienfeld, Ammirati, & Landfield, 2009; Myers, 2002; Prentice, 2003; Reyna et al., 2009; Stewart, 2009; Sunstein, 2002, 2005; Taleb, 2001, 2007; Tavris & Aronson, 2007; Tetlock, 2005; Thaler & Sunstein, 2008; Ubel, 2000). ~ Keith E Stanovich,
558:Working with Bohr in Copenhagen was the Hungarian chemist George de Hevesy, who in 1923 had discovered the element hafnium, naming it after the Latin for the city, ‘Hafnia’. Hevesy first suggested that they bury the medals, but Bohr felt it was too likely they would be discovered. Instead, as Nazi troops flooded into the city, he set about dissolving them in aqua regia–with some difficulty, he complained later, as there was a considerable amount of gold and it was reluctant to react even with this strong acid. The Nazis took over the Institute for Theoretical Physics and carefully searched Bohr’s laboratory, but omitted to enquire as to the contents of the bottles of brown liquid on a shelf, which remained there undisturbed for the duration of the war. After the war, Bohr wrote a letter to the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences accompanying the return of the medal gold explaining what had happened to it. The gold was recovered, and the Nobel Foundation duly minted new medals for the two physicists. ~ Hugh Aldersey Williams,
559:website Kickstarter.com (“A New Way to Fund and Follow Creativity”), where inventors, entrepreneurs, and dreamers of every stripe could post their wild schemes and pet projects and ask for money to fund them. BioCurious announced an initial goal of $30,000. The partners were soon oversubscribed, almost overwhelmed, with 239 backers pledging $35,319. In the fall of 2010 Gentry and her partners were looking to lease 3,000 square feet of industrial space in Mountain View, but in the end settled for a 2,400 square feet in Sunnyvale, calling it “Your Bay Area hackerspace for biotech.” In December 2010, meanwhile, another DIY biohacker lab, Genspace, opened in Brooklyn, New York. The founders referred to it as “the world’s first permanent, biosafety level 1 community laboratory” (genspace.org). Many others soon followed, in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Asia. With free synthetic biology kits, DIYbio, Livly lab, BioCurious, Genspace, and others, the synthetic biology genie was well and truly out of the bottle. ~ George M Church,
560:It is a mistake to confound Alchemy with Chemistry. Modern Chemistry is a science which deals merely with the external forms in which the element of matter is manifesting itself. It never produces anything new. We may mix and compound and decompose two or more chemical bodies an unlimited number of times, and cause them to appear under various different forms, but at the end we will have no augmentation of substance, nor anything more than the combinations of the substances that have been employed at the beginning. Alchemy does not mix or compound anything, it causes that which already exists in a latent state to become active and grow. Alchemy is, therefore, more comparable to botany or agriculture than to Chemistry; and, in fact, the growth of a plant, a tree, or an animal is an alchemical process going on in the alchemical laboratory of nature, and performed by the great Alchemist, the power of God acting in nature. ~ Franz Hartmann, in In the Pronaos of the Temple of Wisdom, containing the History of the True and the False Rosicrucians (1890), p. 129,
561:But it was not just Freemasonry in itself — not just the rites, rituals, traditions, opportunities and benefits of Freemasonry. It was also an ambience, a mentality, a hierarchy of attitudes and values for which Freemasonry provided a particularly effacious conduit. The Freemasonry of the age was a repository for an imaginatively stirring and potent idealism, which it was able, in a fashion uniquely its own, to disseminate. Most colonists did not actually read Locke, Hume, Voltaire, Diderot or Rousseau, any more than most British soldiers did. Through the lodges, however, the currents of thought associated with such philosophies became universally accessible. It was largely through the lodges that 'ordinary' colonists learned of that lofty premise called 'the rights of man'. It was through the lodges that they learned the concept of the perfectibility of society. And the New World seemed to offer a species of blank slate, a species of laboratory in which social experiment was possible and the principles enshrined by Freemasonry could be applied in practice. ~ Michael Baigent,
562:Closely examined, whether historically or in the contemporary laboratory, that enterprise seems an attempt to force nature into the preformed and relatively inflexible box that the paradigm supplies. No part of the aim of normal science is to call forth new sorts of phenomena; indeed those that will not fit the box are often not seen at all. Nor do scientists normally aim to invent new theories, and they are often intolerant of those invented by others.1 Instead, normal-scientific research is directed to the articulation of those phenomena and theories that the paradigm already supplies. Perhaps these are defects. The areas investigated by normal science are, of course, minuscule; the enterprise now under discussion has drastically restricted vision. But those restrictions, born from confidence in a paradigm, turn out to be essential to the development of science. By focusing attention upon a small range of relatively esoteric problems, the paradigm forces scientists to investigate some part of nature in a detail and depth that would otherwise be unimaginable. ~ Thomas S Kuhn,
563:system. At 12:04:03, every screen in the building strobed for eighteen seconds in a frequency that produced seizures in a susceptible segment of Sense/Net employees. Then something only vaguely like a human face filled the screens, its features stretched across asymmetrical expanses of bone like some obscene Mercator projection. Blue lips parted wetly as the twisted, elongated jaw moved. Something, perhaps a hand, a thing like a reddish clump of gnarled roots, fumbled toward the camera, blurred, and vanished. Subliminally rapid images of contamination: graphics of the building’s water supply system, gloved hands manipulating laboratory glassware, something tumbling down into darkness, a pale splash. . . . The audio track, its pitch adjusted to run at just less than twice the standard playback speed, was part of a month-old newscast detailing potential military uses of a substance known as HsG, a biochemical governing the human skeletal growth factor. Overdoses of HsG threw certain bone cells into overdrive, accelerating growth by factors as high as one thousand percent. ~ William Gibson,
564:Because remembered experience is a distortion of actual experience, and because it's difficult to elicit real emotional experience in laboratory studies, some contemporary researchers emphasize the importance of obtaining immediate or on-line evaluations during real emotional episodes (measures of instant utility), especially in natural settings. Though such studies circumvent the errors of remembered utility and the artificiality of laboratory research, they are extremely hard to implement, as well as being time-consuming, and in the end are still subject to the biases and measurement problems inherent in any method that relies on one's introspective evaluation of his or her own mental states. The fallibility and subjectivity of introspection are, after all, what triggered the behaviorist revolution in psychology in the early twentieth century. And recall that the cognitive revolution only succeeded in bringing the mind back to psychology because it figured out how to study the mind without relying on introspection-by focusing on mental processes rather than mental content. ~ Joseph E LeDoux,
565:Progress. — Let us not be deceived! Time marches forward; we'd like to believe that everything that is in it also marches forward— that the development is one that moves forward. The most level-headed are led astray by this illusion. But the nineteenth century does not represent progress over the sixteenth; and the German spirit of 1888 represents a regress from the German spirit of 1788. "Mankind" does not advance, it does not even exist. The overall aspect is that of a tremendous experimental laboratory in which a few successes are scored, scattered throughout all ages, while there are untold failures, and all order, logic, union, and obligingness are lacking. How can we fail to recognize that the ascent of Christianity is a movement of decadence? -That the German Reformation is a recrudescence of Christian barbarism? -That the Revolution destroyed the instinct for a grand organization of society? Man represents no progress over the animal: the civilized tenderfoot is an abortion compared to the Arab and Corsican; the Chinese is a more successful type, namely more durable, than the European. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
566:The way in which a man accepts his fate and all the suffering it entails, the way in which he takes up his cross, gives him ample opportunity—even under the most diffcult circumstances—to add a deeper meaning to his life. It may remain brave, dignified and unselfish. Or in the bitter fight for self-preservation he may forget his human dignity and become no more than an animal. Here lies the chance for a man either to make use of or to forgo the opportunities of attaining the moral values that a diffcult situation may afford him. And this decides whether he is worthy of his sufferings or not.

A human being is not one thing among others; things determine each other, but man is ultimately self-determining. What he becomes—within the limits of endowment and environment—he has made out of himself. In the concentration camps, for example, in this living laboratory and on this testing ground, we watched and witnessed some of our comrades behave like swine while others behaved like saints. Man has both potentialities within himself; which one is actualized depends on decisions but not on conditions. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
567:For John Dillinger
In hope he is still alive
Thanksgiving Day, November 28, 1986
In hope he is still alive

Thanks for the wild turkey and the Passenger Pigeons, destined to be shit out through wholesome American guts; thanks for a Continent to despoil and poison; thanks for Indians to provide a modicum of challenge and danger; thanks for vast herds of bison to kill and skin, leaving the carcass to rot; thanks for bounties on wolves and coyotes; thanks for the American Dream to vulgarize and falsify until the bare lies shine through; thanks for the KKK; for nigger-killing lawmen feeling their notches; for decent church-going women with their mean, pinched, bitter, evil faces; thanks for Kill a Queer for Christ stickers; thanks for laboratory AIDS; thanks for Prohibition and the War Against Drugs; thanks for a country where nobody is allowed to mind his own business; thanks for a nation of finks—yes, thanks for all the memories all right, lets see your arms; you always were a headache and you always were a bore; thanks for the last and greatest betrayal of the last and greatest of human dreams. ~ William S Burroughs,
568:In a stunning 1971 paper, Twenty Things to Do with a Computer, Seymour Papert and Logo co-creator Cynthia Solomon proposed educative computer-based projects for kids. They included composing music, controlling puppets, programming, movie making, mathematical modeling, and a host of other projects that schools should aspire to more than 40 years later. Papert and Solomon also made the case for 1:1 computing and stressed the three game changers discussed later in this book. The school computer should have a large number of output ports to allow the computer to switch lights on and off, start tape recorders, actuate slide projectors and start and stop all manner of little machines. There should also be input ports to allow signals to be sent to the computer. In our image of a school computation laboratory, an important role is played by numerous “controller ports” which allow any student to plug any device into the computer… The laboratory will have a supply of motors, solenoids, relays, sense devices of various kids, etc. Using them, the students will be able to invent and build an endless variety of cybernetic systems. ~ Anonymous,
569:Many of the great world religions teach that God demands a particular faith and form of worship. It should not be surprising that SOME of the people who take these teachings seriously should sincerely regard these divine commands as incomparably more important than any merely secular virtues like tolerance or compassion or reason.
Across Asia and Africa the forces of religious enthusiasm are gathering strength, and reasom and tolerance are not safe even in the secular states of the West. The historian Huge Trevor-Roper has said that it was the spread of the spirit of science in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries that finally ended the burning pf the witches in Europe. We may need to rely again on the influence of science to preserve a sane wolrd.It's not the certainty of the scientific knowledge that fits it for this role, but its UNCERTAINTY. Seeing scientists change their minds again and again about the matters that can be studied directly in laboratory experiments, how can one take seriously the claims of religious traditions or sacred writings to certain knowledge about matters beyond human experience ~ Steven Weinberg,
570:Here’s another example that some overworked mothers might find inspiring. We saw in Chapter 2 that being the one who produces
the sperm doesn’t dictate, by universal principle, that parenting is out of the portfolio. However, in the case of the rat (as with most
mammals), the balance of trade-offs make it more adaptive for males to leave parenting to the mothers. This might tempt us to take it for
granted that males, by virtue of their sex, therefore lack the capacity to care for pups. We might well assume that, through sexual selection, they lost or never acquired the biological capacity to parent: that it isn’t “in” their genes, hormones, or neural circuits. That it isn’t in their male nature. But bear in mind that one reliable feature of a male rat’s developmental system is a female rat that does the child care. So what happens when a scientist, under controlled laboratory conditions, simulates a first-wave feminist rodent movement by placing males in cages with pups but no females? Before too long you will see the male “mothering” the infant, in much the same way that females do. Feminism: 1. Sexual selection: nil. ~ Cordelia Fine,
571:Ceil moaned. Mattie rocked. Propelled by the sound, Mattie rocked her out of that bed, out of that room, into a blue vastness just underneath the sun and above time. She rocked her over Aegean seas so clean they shine like crystal, so clear the fresh blood of sacrificed babies torn from their mothers arms and given to Neptune could be seen like pink froth on the water. She rocked her on and on, past Dachau, where soul-gutted Jewish mothers swept their children's entrails off laboratory floors. They flew past the spilled brains of Senegalese infants whose mothers had dashed them on the wooden sides of slave ships. And she rocked on.
She rocked her into her childhood and let her see murdered dreams. And she rocked her back, back into the womb, to the nadir of her hurt, and they found it-a slight silver splinter, embedded just below the surface of her skin. And Mattie rocked and pulled-and the splinter gave way, but its roots were deep, gigantic, ragged, and they tore up flesh with bits of fat and muscle tissue clinging to them. They left a huge hole, which was already starting to pus over, but Mattie was satisfied. It would heal. ~ Gloria Naylor,
572:Curl moaned. Mattie rocked. Propelled by the sound, Mattie rocked her out of that bed, out of that room, into a blue vastness just underneath the sun and above time. She rocked her over Aegean seas so clean they shine like crystal, so clear the fresh blood of sacrificed babies torn from their mothers arms and given to Neptune could be seen like pink froth on the water. She rocked her on and on, past Dachau, where soul-gutted Jewish mothers swept their children's entrails off laboratory floors. They flew past the spilled brains of Senegalese infants whose mothers had dashed them on the wooden sides of slave ships. And she rocked on.
She rocked her into her childhood and let her see murdered dreams. And she rocked her back, back into the womb, to the nadir of her hurt, and they found it-a slight silver splinter, embedded just below the surface of her skin. And Mattie rocked and pulled-and the splinter gave way, but its roots were deep, gigantic, ragged, and they tore up flesh with bits of fat and muscle tissue clinging to them. They left a huge hole, which was already starting to pus over, but Mattie was satisfied. It would heal. ~ Gloria Naylor,
573:the Mexican sierra has “XVII-15-IX” spines in the dorsal fin. These can easily be counted. But if the sierra strikes hard on the line so that our hands are burned, if the fish sounds and nearly escapes and finally comes in over the rail, his colors pulsing and his tail beating the air, a whole new relational externality has come into being—an entity which is more than the sum of the fish plus the fisherman. The only way to count the spines of the sierra unaffected by this second relational reality is to sit in a laboratory, open an evil-smelling jar, remove a stiff colorless fish from a formalin solution, count the spines, and write the truth “D.XVII-15-IX.” There you have recorded a reality which cannot be assailed—probably the least important reality concerning either the fish or yourself.
It is good to know what you are doing. The man with his pickled fish has set down one truth and has recorded in his experience many lies. The fish is not that color, that texture, that dead, nor does he smell that way…. [W]e were determined not to let a passion for unassailable little truths draw in the horizon and crowd the sky down on us. ~ John Steinbeck,
574:—but not to you. That makes me the only person here who can talk to everybody. How . . . nice. Do tell me about the drains, dear Pym. Don’t tell me they backed up again.” Ekaterin slipped the envelope into the inside pocket of her bolero, leaned her elbow on her chair arm and her chin on her hand, and sat listening with her dark eyebrows crinkling. Pym nodded. “I’m afraid so, Miss Martya. Late last night, Dr. Borgos”—Pym’s lips compressed at the name—“being in a great hurry to return to the search for his missing queen, took two days’ harvest of bug butter—about forty or fifty kilos, we estimated later—which was starting to overflow the hutches on account of Miss Kareen not being there to take care of things properly, and flushed it all down the laboratory drain. Where it encountered some chemical conditions which caused it to . . . set. Like soft plaster. Entirely blocking the main drain, which, in a household with over fifty people in it—all the Viceroy and Vicereine’s staff having arrived yesterday, and my fellow armsmen and their families—caused a pretty immediate and pressing crisis.” Martya had the bad taste to giggle. Pym merely looked prim. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
575:David Park is a physicist and philosopher at Williams College in Massachusetts with a lifelong interest in a time which he too thinks doesn't pass. For Park, the passage of time is not so much an illusion as a myth, "because it involves no deception of the senses.... One cannot perform any experiment to tell unambiguously whether time passes or not." This is certainly a telling argument. After all, what reality can be attached to a phenomenon that can never be demonstrated experimentally? In fact, it is not even clear how to think about demonstrating the flow of time experimentally. As the apparatus, laboratory, experimenter, technicians, humanity generally and the universe as a whole are apparently caught up in the same inescapable flow, how can any bit of the universe be "stopped in time" in order to register the flow going on in the rest of it? It is analogous to claiming that the whole universe is moving through space at the same speed—or, to make the analogy closer, that space is moving through space. How can such a claim ever be tested? ~ Paul Davies,
576:December 31 YOUR DEDICATION The way of Love, upon which you may step at any moment—at this moment if you like—requires no formal permit, has no entrance fee, and no conditions whatever. You need no expensive laboratory in which to train, because your own daily life, and your ordinary daily surroundings, are your laboratory. You need no reference library, no professional training; no external acts of any kind. All you need is to begin steadfastly to reject from your mentality everything that is contrary to the law of love. You must build up by faithful daily exercise the true Love Consciousness. Love will heal you. Love will comfort you. Love will guide you. Love will illumine you. Love will redeem you from sin, sickness, and death, and lead you into your promised land. Say to yourself: “My mind is made up; I have counted the cost; and I am resolved to attain the Goal by the path of Love. Others may pursue knowledge, or organize great enterprises for the benefit of humanity, or scale the austere heights of asceticism; but I have chosen the path of Love. My own heart is to be my workshop, my laboratory, my great enterprise, and love is to be my contribution to humanity. ~ Emmet Fox,
577:As the ego-dead, so we might imagine, we would continue to know pain in its various forms—that is the essence of existence—but we would not be cozened by our egos to take it personally, an attitude that converts an individual’s pain into conscious suffering. Naturally, we would still have to feed, but we would not be omnivorous gourmands who eat for amusement, gorging down everything in nature and turning to the laboratory for more. As for reproduction, who can say? Animals are driven to copulate, and even as the ego-dead we would not be severed from biology, although we would not be unintelligently ruled by it, as we are now. As a corollary of not being unintelligently ruled by biology, neither would we sulk over our extinction, as we do now. Why raise another generation destined to climb aboard the evolution treadmill? But then, why not raise another generation of the ego-dead? For those who do not perceive either their pleasures or their pains as belonging to them, neither life nor death would be objectionable or not objectionable, desirable or not desirable, all right or not all right. We would be the ego-dead, the self-less, and, dare we are, the enlightened. ~ Thomas Ligotti,
578:Nothing about Vader seemed natural—not his towering height, his deep voice, his antiquated diction—yet despite those qualities and the mask and respirator, Tarkin believed him to be more man than machine. Although he had clearly twisted the powers of the Force to his own dark purposes, Vader’s innate strength was undeniable. His contained rage was genuine, as well, and not simply the result of some murderous cyberprogram. But the quality that made him most human was the fierce dedication he demonstrated to the Emperor. It was that genuflecting obedience, the steadfast devotion to execute whatever task the Emperor assigned, that had given rise to so many rumors about Vader: that he was a counterpart to the Confederacy’s General Grievous the Emperor had been holding in reserve; that he was an augmented human or near-human who had been trained or had trained himself in the ancient dark arts of the Sith; that he was nothing more than a monster fashioned in some clandestine laboratory. Many believed that the Emperor’s willingness to grant so much authority to such a being heralded the shape of things to come, for it was beyond dispute that Vader was the Empire’s first terror weapon. ~ John Jackson Miller,
579:The key one and threefold, even as universal science. The division of the work is sevenfold, and through these sections are distributed the seven degrees of initiation into is transcendental philosophy.

The text is a mystical commentary on the oracles of Solomon, ^ and the work ends with a series of synoptic schedules which are the synthesis of Magic and the occult Kabalah so far as concerns that which can be made public in writing. The rest, being the esoteric and inexpressible part of the science, is formulated in magnificent pantacles carefully designed and engraved. These are nine in number, as follows

(1) The dogma of Hermes;
(2) Magical realisation;
(3) The path of wisdom and the initial procedure in the work
(4) The Gate of the Sanctuary enlightened by seven mystic rays;
(5) A Rose of Light, in the centre of which a human figure is extending its arms in the form of a cross;
(6) The magical laboratory of Khunrath, demonstrating the necessary union of prayer and work
(7) The absolute synthesis of science;
(8) Universal equilibrium ;
(9) A summary of Khunrath's personal embodying an energetic protest against all his detractors. ~ Eliphas Levi, The History Of Magic,
580:What, more realistically, is this “mutation,” the “new man”? He is the rootless man, discontinuous with a past that Nihilism has destroyed, the raw material of every demagogue’s dream; the “free-thinker” and skeptic, closed only to the truth but “open” to each new intellectual fashion because he himself has no intellectual foundation; the “seeker” after some “new revelation,” ready to believe anything new because true faith has been annihilated in him; the planner and experimenter, worshipping “fact” because he has abandoned truth, seeing the world as a vast laboratory in which he is free to determine what is “possible”; the autonomous man, pretending to the humility of only asking his “rights,” yet full of the pride that expects everything to be given him in a world where nothing is authoritatively forbidden; the man of the moment, without conscience or values and thus at the mercy of the strongest “stimulus”; the “rebel,” hating all restraint and authority because he himself is his own and only god; the “mass man,” this new barbarian, thoroughly “reduced” and “simplified” and capable of only the most elementary ideas, yet scornful of anyone who presumes to point out the higher things or the real complexity of life. ~ Seraphim Rose,
581:The operations and measurements that a scientist undertakes in the laboratory are not "the given" of experience but rather "the collected with difficulty." They are not what the scientist sees-at least not before his research is well advanced and his attention focused. Rather, they are concrete indices to the content of more elementary perceptions, and as such they are selected for the close scrutiny of normal research only because they promise opportunity for the fruitful elaboration of an accepted paradigm. Far more clearly than the immediate experience from which they in part derive, operations and measurements are paradigm-determined. Science does not deal in all possible laboratory manipulations. Instead, it selects those relevant to the juxtaposition of a paradigm with the immediate experience that that that paradigm has partially determined. As a result, scientists with different paradigms engage in different concrete laboratory manipulations. The measurements to be performed on a pendulum are not the ones relevant to a case of constrained fall. Nor are the operations relevant for the elucidation of oxygen's properties uniformly the same as those required when investigating the characteristics of dephlogisticated air. ~ Thomas S Kuhn,
582:It’s about the experiment that went wrong. Project Genesis. Details of what happened.”
“And what happened?” Corey said.
I had to finish reading the first page before I could answer. Then I explained. As we’d guessed, Project Genesis was another experiment with genetically modified supernaturals. Only these ones seemed to be normal types. Well, “normal” in the sense that we’d heard about them before. Witches, sorcerers, half-demons, werewolves, and something called necromancers.
“I’ve seen them in video games,” Corey said. “They control the dead.”
“Zombies?” I said.
“Right.”
As supernatural types went, that seemed weird, and I suspected there was more to it. According to the notes, some of the kids had problems. So they locked them up in a group home. The kids figured out why they were there and escaped. And apparently came back and destroyed the laboratory, killing Dr. Davidoff and several others.
“Why can’t we do that?” Corey said.
“Because we don’t know where to find anyone,” I said. “Even if we did, we aren’t ready for that. They had help. A father and an aunt who’d been in on the experiments.”
“So what happened?” Corey asked. “And what does this have to do with us?”
I read the second page. Then I told him. ~ Kelley Armstrong,
583:In the side refrigerators, where Vito so carefully arranges the morning's new attractions, you'll find even more examples of a traditional caseificio gone rogue: a wheel of aged goat cheese coated in a rough armor of wild herbs; a thick, blue-veined goat cheese soaked red with purple with Primitivo wine; goat yogurt in half a dozen international flavors.
You won't be surprised to find that the early efforts of the Dicecca boys were met with opposition- both from the family and the regular clientele. Each brother has a story about the resistance he has encountered along the way- the parental eye rolling at the cacao-coated goat cheese, the sisterly skepticism about mango-stuffed burrata, the customers' confusion at the latest experiment to emerge from the lactic laboratory in back. Every story ends the same way: with one or all of the family members doubting the viability of another esoteric cheese, followed by the long, slow acceptance by enough customers to justify its real estate space in the display case.
"When I started making cheese with the Nikka barrel, they made fun of me, said I was destroying the taste of the cheese. Now they're copying me. That's the pattern we always see: at first they make fun, then they start to copy. ~ Matt Goulding,
584:No, Miller, I don’t myself think much of science as a phase of human development. It has given us a lot of ingenious toys; they take our attention away from the real problems, of course, and since the problems are insoluble, I suppose we ought to be grateful for distraction. But the fact is, the human mind, the individual mind, has always been made more interesting by dwelling on the old riddles, even if it makes nothing of them. Science hasn’t given us any new amazements, except of the superficial kind we get from witnessing dexterity and sleight-of-hand. It hasn’t given us any richer pleasures, as the Renaissance did, nor any new sins—not one! Indeed, it takes our old ones away. It’s the laboratory, not the Lamb of God, that taketh away the sins of the world. You’ll agree there is not much thrill about a physiological sin. We were better off when even the prosaic matter of taking nourishment could have the magnificence of a sin. I don’t think you help people by making their conduct of no importance—you impoverish them. As long as every man and woman who crowded into the cathedrals on Easter Sunday was a principal in a gorgeous drama with God, glittering angels on one side and the shadows of evil coming and going on the other, life was a rich thing. The ~ Willa Cather,
585:One of those was Gary Bradski, an expert in machine vision at Intel Labs in Santa Clara. The company was the world’s largest chipmaker and had developed a manufacturing strategy called “copy exact,” a way of developing next-generation manufacturing techniques to make ever-smaller chips. Intel would develop a new technology at a prototype facility and then export that process to wherever it planned to produce the denser chips in volume. It was a system that required discipline, and Bradski was a bit of a “Wild Duck”—a term that IBM originally used to describe employees who refused to fly in formation—compared to typical engineers in Intel’s regimented semiconductor manufacturing culture. A refugee from the high-flying finance world of “quants” on the East Coast, Bradski arrived at Intel in 1996 and was forced to spend a year doing boring grunt work, like developing an image-processing software library for factory automation applications. After paying his dues, he was moved to the chipmaker’s research laboratory and started researching interesting projects. Bradski had grown up in Palo Alto before leaving to study physics and artificial intelligence at Berkeley and Boston University. He returned because he had been bitten by the Silicon Valley entrepreneurial bug. ~ John Markoff,
586:It is well known that animals respond poorly to living conditions that do not stimulate them mentally or physically. Rats, mice, monkeys, and other mammals confined for long periods in laboratory cages where they have little or no opportunity to engage in such natural behaviors as foraging, hiding, nest-building, or choosing social partners develop neurotic behaviors. Termed “stereotypies,” these behaviors involve repetitive, functionless actions sometimes performed for hours on end. Rodents, for example, will dig for hours at the corners of their cages, gnaw at the bars, or perform repeated somersaults. These “behavioral stereotypies” are estimated to afflict about half of the 100 million mice currently used in laboratory tests and experiments in the United States.16 Monkeys chronically confined to the boredom, stress, and social isolation of laboratory cages perform a wide range of abnormal, disturbing behaviors such as eating or smearing their own excrement, pulling or plucking their hair, slapping themselves, and self-biting that can cause serious, even fatal injury. Severely psychotic human patients display similar behaviors. If you’ve seen the repetitive pacing of caged big cats (and many other smaller animals) at the zoo, you’ve witnessed behavioral stereotypies. ~ Jonathan Balcombe,
587:Our ability to leave our physical bodies and travel to other places has been demonstrated in controlled laboratory experiments by researchers with good academic credentials. These include Charles Tart at the University of California in Davis, and Russell Targ and Harold Puthoff at the Stanford Reesearch Institute. Russell Targ's research of "remote viewing" involves two people. The "viewer" stays in a carefully controlled laboratory environment while a "beacon" person is located somewhere outside that vicinity. A computer then selects a location that is unknown to the viewer.
The beacon person is secretly notified where he or she is to go, based on the computer's random selection of a site. After the beacon person gets to the site, the viewer is asked to describe what the beacon person is seeing. The distance between the beacon person and the viewer appears to have no significant effect on the viewer's ability to accurately describe the site; the distance between them can be a few blocks or many thousand miles. In several successful attempts, a Soviet psychic not only accurately described the location of Targ's associate Keith Harary who acted as a beacon, he also described what Harary would see at the next computer-selected site--even before he got there or knew what he would see! ~ Stanislav Grof,
588:I want you to write a narrative, a narrative from the future of your city, and you can date it, set it out one year from now, five years from now, a decade from now, a generation from now, and write it as a case study looking back, looking back at the change that you wanted in your city, looking back at the cause that you were championing, and describing the ways that that change and that cause came, in fact, to succeed. Describe the values of your fellow citizens that you activated, and the sense of moral purpose that you were able to stir. Recount all the different ways that you engaged the systems of government, of the marketplace, of social institutions, of faith organizations, of the media. Catalog all the skills you had to deploy, how to negotiate, how to advocate, how to frame issues, how to navigate diversity in conflict, all those skills that enabled you to bring folks on board and to overcome resistance. What you'll be doing when you write that narrative is you'll be discovering how to read power, and in the process, how to write power. So share what you write, do you what you write, and then share what you do.
[...] Together, we can create a great network of city that will be the most powerful collective laboratory for self-government this planet has ever seen. We have the power to do that. ~ Eric Liu,
589:The concept of internal selection, of a hierarchy of controls which eliminate the consequences of harmful gene-mutations and co-ordinates the effects of useful mutations, is the missing link in orthodoxy theory between the 'atoms' of heredity and the living stream of evolution. Without that link, neither of them makes sense. There can be no doubt that random mutations do occur: they can be observed in the laboratory. There can be no doubt that Darwinian selection is a powerful force. But in between these two events, between the chemical changes in a gene and the appearance of the finished product as a newcomer on the evolutionary stage, there is a whole hierarchy of internal processes at work which impose strict limitations on the range of possible mutations and thus considerably reduce the importance of the chance factor. We might say that the monkey works at a typewriter which the manufacturers have programmed to print only syllables which exist in our language, but not nonsense syllables. If a nonsense syllable occurs, the machine will automatically erase it. To pursue the metaphor, we would have to populate the higher levels of the hierarchy with proof-readers and then editors, whose task is no longer elimination, but correction, self-repair and co-ordination-as in the example of the mutated eye. ~ Arthur Koestler,
590:The America of my time line is a laboratory example of what can happen to democracies, what has eventually happened to all perfect democracies throughout all histories. A perfect democracy, a ‘warm body’ democracy in which every adult may vote and all votes count equally, has no internal feedback for self-correction. It depends solely on the wisdom and self-restraint of citizens… which is opposed by the folly and lack of self-restraint of other citizens. What is supposed to happen in a democracy is that each sovereign citizen will always vote in the public interest for the safety and welfare of all. But what does happen is that he votes his own self-interest as he sees it… which for the majority translates as ‘Bread and Circuses.’

‘Bread and Circuses’ is the cancer of democracy, the fatal disease for which there is no cure. Democracy often works beautifully at first. But once a state extends the franchise to every warm body, be he producer or parasite, that day marks the beginning of the end of the state. For when the plebs discover that they can vote themselves bread and circuses without limit and that the productive members of the body politic cannot stop them, they will do so, until the state bleeds to death, or in its weakened condition the state succumbs to an invader—the barbarians enter Rome. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
591:Sade’s success in our day is explained by the dream that he had in common with contemporary thought: the demand for total freedom, and dehumanization coldly planned by the intelligence. The reduction of man to an object of experiment, the rule that specifies the relation between the will to power and man as an object, the sealed laboratory that is the scene of this monstrous experiment, are lessons which the theoreticians of power will discover again when they come to organizing the age of slavery.
Two centuries ahead of time and on a reduced scale, Sade extolled totalitarian societies in the name of unbridled freedom—which, in reality, rebellion does not demand. The history and the tragedy of our times really begin with him. He only believed that a society founded on freedom of crime must coincide with freedom of morals, as though servitude had its limits. Our times have limited themselves to blending, in a curious manner, his dream of a universal republic and his technique of degradation. Finally, what he hated most, legal murder, has availed itself of the discoveries that he wanted to put to the service of instinctive murder. Crime, which he wanted to be the exotic and delicious fruit of unbridled vice, is no more today than the dismal habit of a police-controlled morality. Such are the surprises of literature. ~ Albert Camus,
592:All the various time travel devices used by Verne and Bert were stored in the repository, Poe explained, including the ones that had never quite worked as they were meant to. There was one that resembled a blue police box from London—“Stolen by a doctor with delusions of grandeur,” said Poe—one that was simply a large, transparent sphere—“Created by a scientist with green skin and too much ego,” said Verne—and one that was rather ordinary by comparison.
“This one looks like an automobile,” John said admiringly, “with wings.”
“The doors open that way for a reason,” Verne explained, “we just never figured out what it was. The inventor of this particular model tried integrating his designs into a car, an airplane, and even a steam engine train. He was running a crackpot laboratory in the Arizona desert, and he never realized that it was not his inventions themselves, but his proximity to some sort of temporal fluctuation in the local topography, that allowed them to work.”
“What happened to him?” asked Jack.
“He’d get the machines up to one hundred and six miles per hour,” said Bert, “and then he’d run out of fuel and promptly get arrested by whatever constabulary had been chasing him. The sad part was that Jules figured out if he’d just gone two miles an hour faster, he’d likely have been successful in his attempt. ~ James A Owen,
593:In the 1920s, there was a dinner at which the physicist Robert W. Wood was asked to respond to a toast ... 'To physics and metaphysics.' Now by metaphysics was meant something like philosophy—truths that you could get to just by thinking about them. Wood took a second, glanced about him, and answered along these lines: The physicist has an idea, he said. The more he thinks it through, the more sense it makes to him. He goes to the scientific literature, and the more he reads, the more promising the idea seems. Thus prepared, he devises an experiment to test the idea. The experiment is painstaking. Many possibilities are eliminated or taken into account; the accuracy of the measurement is refined. At the end of all this work, the experiment is completed and ... the idea is shown to be worthless. The physicist then discards the idea, frees his mind (as I was saying a moment ago) from the clutter of error, and moves on to something else. The difference between physics and metaphysics, Wood concluded, is that the metaphysicist has no laboratory. ~ Carl Sagan,
594:With a few of his colleagues, he built two sets of homes for laboratory rats. In the first home, they lived as they had in the original experiments, in solitary confinement, isolated except for their fix. But then he built a second home: a paradise for rats. Within its plywood walls,11 it contained everything a rat could want—there were wheels and colored balls and the best food, and other rats to hang out with and have sex with. He called it Rat Park.12 In these experiments, both sets of rats had access to a pair of drinking bottles. The first bottle contained only water. The other bottle contained morphine—an opiate that rats process in a similar way to humans and that behaves just like heroin when it enters their brains. At the end of each day, Bruce or a member of his team would weigh the bottles to see how much the rats had chosen to take opiates, and how much they had chosen to stay sober. What they discovered was startling. It turned out that the rats in isolated cages used up to 25 milligrams of morphine a day, as in the earlier experiments. But the rats in the happy cages used hardly any morphine at all—less than 5 milligrams. “These guys [in Rat Park] have a complete total twenty-four-hour supply” of morphine, Bruce said, “and they don’t use it.” They don’t kill themselves. They choose to spend their lives doing other things. So ~ Johann Hari,
595:My laboratory is a place where I write. I have become proficient at producing a rare species of prose capable of distilling ten years of work by five people into six published pages, written in a language that very few people can read and that no one ever speaks. This writing relates the details of my work with the precision of a laser scalpel, but its streamlined beauty is a type of artifice, a size-zero mannequin designed to showcase the glory of a dress that would be much less perfect on any real person. My papers do not display the footnotes that they have earned, the table of data that required painstaking months to redo when a graduate student quit, sneering on her way out that she didn’t want a life like mine. The paragraph that took five hours to write while riding on a plane, stunned with grief, flying to a funeral that I couldn’t believe was happening. The early draft that my toddler covered in crayon and applesauce while it was still warm from the printer. Although my publications contain meticulous details of the plants that did grow, the runs that went smoothly, and the data that materialized, they perpetrate a disrespectful amnesia against the entire gardens that rotted in fungus and dismay, the electrical signals that refused to stabilize, and the printer ink cartridges that we secured late at night through nefarious means. I ~ Hope Jahren,
596:In the City Market is the Meet Café. Followers of obsolete, unthinkable trades doodling in Etruscan, addicts of drugs not yet synthesized, pushers of souped-up harmine, junk reduced to pure habit offering precarious vegetable serenity, liquids to induce Latah, Tithonian longevity serums, black marketeers of World War III, excusers of telepathic sensitivity, osteopaths of the spirit, investigators of infractions denounced by bland paranoid chess players, servers of fragmentary warrants taken down in hebephrenic shorthand charging unspeakable mutilations of the spirit, bureaucrats of spectral departments, officials of unconstituted police states, a Lesbian dwarf who has perfected operation Bang-utot, the lung erection that strangles a sleeping enemy, sellers of orgone tanks and relaxing machines, brokers of exquisite dreams and memories tested on the sensitized cells of junk sickness and bartered for raw materials of the will, doctors skilled in the treatment of diseases dormant in the black dust of ruined cities, gathering virulence in the white blood of eyeless worms feeling slowly to the surface and the human host, maladies of the ocean floor and the stratosphere, maladies of the laboratory and atomic war... A place where the unknown past and the emergent future meet in a vibrating soundless hum... Larval entities waiting for a Live One... ~ William S Burroughs,
597:Misha’s and my mission to spend a year on ISS is unprecedented. A normal mission to the space station lasts five to six months, so scientists have a good deal of data about what happens to the human body in space for that length of time. But very little is known about what happens after month six. The symptoms might get precipitously worse in the ninth month, for instance, or they might level off. We don’t know, and there is only one way to find out. Misha and I will collect various types of data for studies on ourselves, which will take a significant amount of our time. Because Mark and I are identical twins, I’m also taking part in an extensive study comparing the two of us throughout the year, down to the genetic level. The International Space Station is a world-class orbiting laboratory, and in addition to the human studies of which I am one of the main subjects, I will also spend a lot of my time this year working on other experiments, like fluid physics, botany, combustion, and Earth observation. When I talk about the International Space Station to audiences, I always share with them the importance of the science being done there. But to me, it’s just as important that the station is serving as a foothold for our species in space. From there, we can learn more about how to push out farther into the cosmos. The costs are high, as are the risks. ~ Scott Kelly,
598:But then a peculiar thing happened. I became extraordinarily affected by the summer afternoons in the laboratory. The August sunlight came streaming in the great dusty fanlights and lay in yellow bars across the room. The old building ticked and creaked in the heat. Outside we could hear the cries of summer students playing touch football. In the course of an afternoon the yellow sunlight moved across old group pictures of the biology faculty. I became bewitched by the presence of the building; for minutes at a stretch I sat on the floor and watched the motes rise and fall in the sunlight. I called Harry’s attention to the presence but he shrugged and went on with his work. He was absolutely unaffected by the singularities of time and place. His abode was anywhere. It was all the same to him whether he catheterized a pig at four o’clock in the afternoon in New Orleans or at midnight in Transylvania. He was actually like one of those scientists in the movies who don’t care about anything but the problem in their heads - now here is a fellow who does have a “flair for research” and will be heard from. Yet I do not envy him. I would not change places with him if he discovered the cause and cure of cancer. For he is no more aware of the mystery which surrounds him than a fish is aware of the water it swims in. He could do research for a thousand years and never have an inkling of it. ~ Walker Percy,
599:demonstrating that the first of these, the integral fast reactor, was safe even under the circumstances that destroyed Three Mile Island 2 and would prove disastrous at Chernobyl and Fukushima. The liquid fluoride thorium reactor (LFTR), an even more advanced concept developed at Tennessee’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is fueled by thorium. More plentiful and far harder to process into bomb-making material than uranium, thorium also burns more efficiently in a reactor and could produce less hazardous radioactive waste with half-lives of hundreds, not tens of thousands, of years. Running at atmospheric pressure, and without ever reaching a criticality, the LFTR doesn’t require a massive containment building to guard against loss-of-coolant accidents or explosions and can be constructed on such a compact scale that every steel mill or small town could have its own microreactor tucked away underground. In 2015 Microsoft founder Bill Gates had begun funding research projects similar to these fourth-generation reactors in a quest to create a carbon-neutral power source for the future. By then, the Chinese government had already set seven hundred scientists on a crash program to build the world’s first industrial thorium reactor as part of a war on pollution. “The problem of coal has become clear,” the engineering director of the project said. “Nuclear power provides the only solution. ~ Adam Higginbotham,
600:Brace yourselves, girls: Soda is liquid Satan. It is the devil. It is garbage. There is nothing in soda that should be put into your body. For starters, soda’s high levels of phosphorous can increase calcium loss from the body, as can its sodium and caffeine. [Cousens, Conscious Eating, 475] You know what this means—bone loss, which may lead to osteoporosis. And the last time we checked, sugar, found in soda by the boatload, does not make you skinny! Now don’t go patting yourself on the back if you drink diet soda. That stuff is even worse. Aspartame (an ingredient commonly found in diet sodas and other sugar-free foods) has been blamed for a slew of scary maladies, like arthritis, birth defects, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer’s, lupus, multiple sclerosis, and diabetes.2 When methyl alcohol, a component of aspartame, enters your body, it turns into formaldehyde. Formaldehyde is toxic and carcinogenic (cancer-causing). 3 Laboratory scientists use formaldehyde as a disinfectant or preservative. They don’t fucking drink it. Perhaps you have a lumpy ass because you are preserving your fat cells with diet soda. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has received more complaints about aspartame than any other ingredient to date.4 Want more bad news? When aspartame is paired with carbs, it causes your brain to slow down its production of serotonin.5 A healthy level of serotonin is needed to be happy and well balanced. So drinking soda can make you fat, sick, and unhappy. ~ Rory Freedman,
601:It has been the strange fate of Tibet, once one of the most isolated places on earth, to function as a laboratory for the most ambitious and ruthless human experiments of the modern era: the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, and now a state-imposed capitalism. After having suffered totalitarian communism, Tibetans now confront a dissolute capitalism, one that seeks arrogantly, and often violently, to turn all of the world's diverse humanity into middle-class consumers. But it seems wrong to think of Tibetans, as many outsiders do, as helpless victims of large, impersonal forces.
It is no accident that the Tibetans seem to have survived the large-scale Communist attempt at social engineering rather better than most people in China itself. This is at least partly due to their Buddhist belief in the primacy of empathy and compassion. And faced with an aggressively secular materialism, they may still prove, almost alone in the world, how religion, usually dismissed, and not just by Mao, as "poison," can be a source of cultural identity and moral values; how it can become a means of political protest without blinding the devout with hatred and prejudice; how it can help not only heal the shocks and pain of history- the pain that has led people elsewhere in the world into nihilistic rage- but also create a rational and ethical national culture, what may make a freer Tibet, whenever it comes about, better prepared for its state of freedom than most societies. ~ Pankaj Mishra,
602:Out of a single man, they get a thousand: homo economicus, homo politicus, homo physico-chimicus, homo endocrinus, homo skeletonicus, homo emotions, homo percipiens, homo libidinosus, homo peregrinans, homo ridens, homo ratiocinans, homo artifex, homo aestbeticus, homo religiosus, homo sapiens, homo historicus, homo ethnographicus, and many, many more. But at the very end of the production line in this laboratory of mine sits a Scienter who is quite unique. Three thousand brains in one. His function is to collect all the data and clarifications written up by the specialist Scienters. When he has collated everything, he is convinced that he has clasped the red rabbit or the essential man entire to his understanding. There you are, you can see him from here,' he ended, with a sign to one of his assistants who brought me a pair of binoculars.

I put them to my eyes and, indeed, at the far end of the gallery, I saw the Omniscienter. There he was, an enormous cranial dome with a tiny, shapeless, crumpled face, which seemed to me to be hanging by the ears from the two ebony knobs on the back of a raised throne. Swinging to and fro beneath this head was a little cloth puppet which dangled its empty trouser legs over the crimson plush seat. His tiny right arm was kept aloft by means of a wire, and the index finger rested on his temple in the gesture of one who knows. Above the throne ran a banner bearing this inscription:

I KNOW EVERYTHING, BUT I DON'T UNDERSTAND ANY OF IT ~ Ren Daumal,
603:The second development, in 1960, was the development of a new technology that allowed researchers for the first time ever to measure accurately the level of hormones circulating in the bloodstream. It was the invention of Rosalyn Yalow, a medical physicist, and Solomon Berson, a physician, and was called the radioimmunoassay. When Yalow won the Nobel Prize for the work in 1977 (Berson by then was not alive to share it), the Nobel Foundation would describe it aptly as bringing about “a revolution in biological and medical research.” Those interested in obesity could now finally answer the questions about which the pre–World War II European clinicians could only speculate: which hormones were regulating the storage of fat in fat cells and its use for fuel by the rest of the body? Answers began coming with the very first publications out of Yalow and Berson’s laboratory and were swiftly confirmed by others. As it turns out, virtually all hormones work to mobilize fat from fat cells so that it can then be used for fuel. Hormones are signaling our bodies to act—flee or fight, reproduce, grow—and they also signal the fat cells to make available the fuel necessary for these actions. The one dominant exception to this fuel-mobilization signaling is insulin, the same hormone that researchers still assumed in the early 1960s to be deficient in all cases of diabetes. Insulin, Yalow and Berson reported, can be thought of as orchestrating how the body uses or “partitions” the fuel it takes in. ~ Gary Taubes,
604:A phenomenon familiar to both students of science and historians of science provides a clue. The former regularly report that they have read through a chapter of their text, understood it perfectly, but nonetheless had difficulty solving a number of the problems at the chapter's end. Ordinarily, also, those difficulties dissolve int he same way. The student discovers, with or without the assistance of his instructor, a way to see his problem as like a problem he has already encountered. Having seen the resemblance, grasped the analogy between two or more distinct problems, he can interrelate symbols and attach them to nature in the ways that have proved effective before. The law-sketch, say f = ma, has functioned as a tool, informing the student what similarities to look for, signaling the gestalt in which the situation is to be seen. The resultant ability to see a variety of situations as like each other, as subjects for f = ma or some other symbolic generalization, is, I think, the main thing a student acquires by doing exemplary problems, whether with a pencil and paper in a well-designed laboratory. After he has completed a certain number, which may vary widely from one individual to the next, he views the situations that confront him as a scientist in the same gestalt as other members of his specialists' group. For him they are no longer the same situations he had encountered when his training began. He has meanwhile assimilated a time-tested and group-licensed way of seeing. ~ Thomas S Kuhn,
605:Curiously, Schrodinger's equation describes the change in the probability that we will obtain a particular result if we conduct an experiment. It is telling us something about what we can know about the world. Thus, when we say that a particle is behaving like a wave, we should not think of this wave as if it were a water wave or a sound wave. It is more appropriate to regard it as a wave of information or probability, like a crime wave or a wave of hysteria. For, if a wave of hysteria passes through a population, it means that we are more likely to find hysterical behaviour there. Likewise, if an electron wave passes through your laboratory it means that you are more likely to detect an electron there. There is complete determinism in quantum theory, but not at the level of appearances or the things that are measured. Schrodinger's amazing equation gives a completely deterministic description of the change of the quantity (called the wave function') which captures the wavelike aspect of a given situation. But the wave function is not observable. It allows you only to calculate the result of a measurement in terms of the probabilities of different outcomes. It might tell you that fifty percent of the time you will find the atom to have one state, and fifty percent of the time, another. And, remarkably, in the microscopic realm, this is exactly what the results of successive measurements tell you: not the same result every time but a pattern of outcomes in which some are more likely than others. ~ John D Barrow,
606:Briefly, there are two types of cells that we inherit from our parents —body cells and germ cells. These cells are composed of chromosomes containing genes—a separate gene for each mental and physical characteristic. The body cells, dividing, multiplying, changing, growing, determine the sort of individual we are to be; the germ cells, remaining practically unchanged from our conception, determine what characteristics our progeny will inherit, through us, from our progenitors and from us. "I determined that heredity could be controlled through the transference of these genes from one individual to another. I learned that the genes never die; they are absolutely indestructible—the basis of all life on earth, the promise of immortality throughout all eternity. "I was certain of all this, but I could carry on no experiments. Scientists scoffed at me, the public laughed at me, the authorities threatened to lock me up in a madhouse. The church wished to crucify me. "I hid, and carried on my research in secret. I obtained genes from living subjects—young men and women whom I enticed to my laboratory on various pretexts. I drugged them and extracted germ cells from them. I had not discovered at that time, or, I should say, I had not perfected the technique of recovering body cells. "In 1858 I managed, through bribery, to gain access to a number of tombs in Westminster Abbey; and from the corpses of former kings and queens of England and many a noble lord and lady I extracted the deathless genes. ~ Edgar Rice Burroughs,
607:The now-famous yearly Candlebrow Conferences, like the institution itself, were subsidized out of the vast fortune of Mr. Gideon Candlebrow of Grossdale, Illinois, who had made his bundle back during the great Lard Scandal of the '80s, in which, before Congress put an end to the practice, countless adulterated tons of that comestible were exported to Great Britain, compromising further an already debased national cuisine, giving rise throughout the island, for example, to a Christmas-pudding controversy over which to this day families remain divided, often violently so. In the consequent scramble to develop more legal sources of profit, one of Mr. Candlebrow's laboratory hands happened to invent "Smegmo," an artificial substitute for everything in the edible-fat category, including margarine, which many felt wasn't that real to begin with. An eminent Rabbi of world hog capital Cincinnati, Ohio, was moved to declare the product kosher, adding that "the Hebrew people have been waiting four thousand years for this. Smegmo is the Messiah of kitchen fats." [...]

Miles, locating the patriotically colored Smegmo crock among the salt, pepper, ketchup, mustard, steak sauce, sugar and molasses, opened and sniffed quizzically at the contents. "Say, what is this stuff?"

"Goes with everything!" advised a student at a nearby table. "Stir it in your soup, spread it on your bread, mash it into your turnips! My doormates comb their hair with it! There's a million uses for Smegmo! ~ Thomas Pynchon,
608:There is the space of encounters which allow one to trace out an absolute limit to the analogy between the social world and the physical world. This is basically because two particles never encounter one another except where their rupture phenomena can be deduced from laboratory observations. The encounter is that durable instant where intensities manifest between the forms-of-life present in each individual. It is, even above the social and communications, the territory that actualizes the potentials of bodies and actualizes itself in the differences of intensity that they give off and comprise. Encounters are above language, outside of words, in the virgin lands of the unspoken, in suspended animation, a potential of the world which is also its negation, its “power to not be.” What is other people? “Another possible world,” responds Deleuze. The Other incarnates the possibility that the world has of not being, of being otherwise. This is why in the so-called “primitive” societies war takes on the primordial importance of annihilating any other possible world. It is pointless, however, to think about conflict without also thinking about enjoyment, to think about war without thinking about love. In each tumultuous birth of love, the fundamental desire to transform oneself by transforming the world is reborn. The hate and suspicion that lovers excite around them is an automatic defensive response to the war they wage, merely by loving each other, against a world where all passion must misunderstand itself and die off. ~ Tiqqun,
609:Those who do not carry within them the soul of everything the world can show them, will do well to watch it: they will not recognize it, each thing being beautiful only according to the thought of him who gazes at it & reflects it in himself. Faith is essential in poetry as in religion, & faith has no need of seeing with corporeal eyes to contemplate that which it recognizes much better in itself.
Such ideas were many times, under multiple forms, always new, expressed by Villiers de L'Isle-Adam in his works. Without going as far as Berkley's pure negations, which nevertheless are but the extreme logic of subjective idealism, he admitted in his conception of life, on the same plan, the Interior & the Exterior, Spirit & Matter, with a very visible tendency to give the first term domination over the second. For him the idea of progress was never anything but a subject for jest, together with the nonsense of the humanitarian positivists who teach, reversed mythology, that terrestrial paradise, a superstition if we assign it the past, becomes the sole legitimate hope if we place it in the future.
On the contrary, he makes a protagonist (Edison doubtless) say in a short fragment of an old manuscript of l'Eve future: "We are in the ripe age of Humanity, that is all! Soon will come the senility & decrepitude of this strange polyp, & the evolution accomplished, his mortal return to the mysterious laboratory where all the Ghosts eternally work their experiments, by grace of some unquestionable necessity. ~ R my de Gourmont,
610:Yet the hunger to treat patients still drove Farber. And sitting in his basement laboratory in the summer of 1947, Farber had a single inspired idea: he chose, among all cancers, to focus his attention on one of its oddest and most hopeless variants—childhood leukemia. To understand cancer as a whole, he reasoned, you needed to start at the bottom of its complexity, in its basement. And despite its many idiosyncrasies, leukemia possessed a singularly attractive feature: it could be measured. Science begins with counting. To understand a phenomenon, a scientist must first describe it; to describe it objectively, he must first measure it. If cancer medicine was to be transformed into a rigorous science, then cancer would need to be counted somehow—measured in some reliable, reproducible way. In this, leukemia was different from nearly every other type of cancer. In a world before CT scans and MRIs, quantifying the change in size of an internal solid tumor in the lung or the breast was virtually impossible without surgery: you could not measure what you could not see. But leukemia, floating freely in the blood, could be measured as easily as blood cells—by drawing a sample of blood or bone marrow and looking at it under a microscope. If leukemia could be counted, Farber reasoned, then any intervention—a chemical sent circulating through the blood, say—could be evaluated for its potency in living patients. He could watch cells grow or die in the blood and use that to measure the success or failure of a drug. He could perform an “experiment” on cancer. ~ Siddhartha Mukherjee,
611:The racial conflict and self-segregation described [...] are not what we would expect if widespread assumptions about the advantages of diversity are true. The prevailing view in the media and some parts of academia is that race is not even a legitimate biological category, and that it is only because of prejudiced conditioning that we even notice it.
This view ignores the large body of scientific work that suggests racial and ethnic consciousness is deeply rooted in human psychology. Our species seems to have an instinct for determining who is in our group and who is not. Studies of individuals point to unconscious processes in the brain that reflect a suspicion of people unlike ourselves, leading some researchers to conclude that ethnocentrism is part of human nature.
At the same time, studies at the group level show that ethnic conflict is universal. In all countries, diversity of religion, ethnicity, or race causes conflict. For the better part of the post-war period, sociologists and political scientists downplayed ethnic conflict, on the assumption that it was a pre modern relic that would be replaced by competition based on class or professional affiliation. This has not happened. As one researcher has concluded, “ethnicity based on common descent tends to be more important than class based on common interest. Blood runs thicker than money.”
It is from two directions, therefore, that scientists have begun to question the view that ethnic or racial mixing can be easily achieved. Laboratory investigations of individuals have found what may be tribal or ethnocentric instincts, while analysis of societies suggests that diversity invariably brings conflict. ~ Jared Taylor,
612:I don't myself think much of science as a phase of human development. It has given us a lot of ingenious toys; they take our attention away from the real problems, of course, and since the problems are insoluble, I suppose we ought to be grateful for distraction. But the fact is, the human mind, the individual mind, has always been made more interesting by dwelling on the old riddles, even if it makes nothing of them. Science hasn't given us any new amazements, except of the superficial kind we get from witnessing dexterity and sleight-of-hand. It hasn't given us any richer pleasures, as the Renaissance did, nor any new sins-not one! Indeed, it takes our old ones away. It's the laboratory, not the Lamb of God, that taketh away the sins of the world. You'll agree there is not much thrill about a physiological sin. We were better off when even the prosaic matter of taking nourishment could have the magnificence of a sin. I don't think you help people by making their conduct of no importance-you impoverish them. As long as every man and woman who crowded into the cathedrals on Easter Sunday was a principal in a gorgeous drama with God, glittering angels on one side and the shadows of evil coming and going on the other, life was a rich thing. The king and the beggar had the same chance at miracles and great temptations and revelations. And that's what makes men happy, believing in the mystery and importance of their own little individual lives. It makes us happy to surround our creature needs and bodily instincts with as much pomp and circumstance as possible. Art and religion (they are the same thing, in the end, of course) have given man the only happiness he has ever had. ~ Willa Cather,
613:Men have before hired bravos to transact their crimes, while their own person and reputation sat under shelter. I was the first that ever did so for his pleasures. I was the first that could plod in the public eye with a load of genial respectability, and in a moment, like a schoolboy, strip off these lendings and spring headlong into the sea of liberty. But for me, in my impenetrable mantle, the safety was complete. Think of it-I did not even exist! Let me but escape into my laboratory door, give me but a second or two to mix and swallow the draught that I had always standing ready; and whatever he had done, Edward Hyde would pass away like the stain of breath upon a mirror; and there in his stead, quietly at home, trimming the midnight lamp in his study, a man who could afford to laugh at suspicion, would be Henry Jekyll.
The pleasures which I made haste to seek in my disguise were, as I have said, undignified; I would scarce use a harder term. But in the hands of Edward Hyde, they soon began to turn toward the monstrous. When I would come back from these excursions, I was often plunged into a kind of wonder at my vicarious depravity. This familiar that I called out of my own soul, and sent forth alone to do his good pleasure, was a being inherently malign and villainous; his every act and thought centered on self; drinking pleasure with bestial avidity from any degree of torture to another; relentless like a man of stone. Henry Jekyll stood at times aghast before the acts of Edward Hyde; but the situation was apart from ordinary laws, and insidiously relaxed the grasp of conscience. It was Hyde, after all, and Hyde alone, that was guilty. Jekyll was no worse; he woke again to his good qualities seemingly unimpaired; he would even make haste, where it was possible, to undo the evil done by Hyde. And thus his conscience slumbered. ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
614:If, as I believe, the conceptual structures we construct today are too complicated to be accurately specified in advance, and too complex to be built faultlessly, then we must take a radically different approach. Let us turn to nature and study complexity in living things, instead of just the dead works of man. Here we find constructs whose complexities thrill us with awe. The brain alone is intricate beyond mapping, powerful beyond imitation, rich in diversity, self-protecting, and self-renewing. The secret is that it is grown, not built. So it must be with our software systems. Some years ago Harlan Mills proposed that any software system should be grown by incremental development.[11] That is, the system should first be made to run, even though it does nothing useful except call the proper set of dummy subprograms. Then, bit by bit it is fleshed out, with the subprograms in turn being developed into actions or calls to empty stubs in the level below. I have seen the most dramatic results since I began urging this technique on the project builders in my software engineering laboratory class. Nothing in the past decade has so radically changed my own practice, or its effectiveness. The approach necessitates top-down design, for it is a top-down growing of the software. It allows easy backtracking. It lends itself to early prototypes. Each added function and new provision for more complex data or circumstances grows organically out of what is already there. The morale effects are startling. Enthusiasm jumps when there is a running system, even a simple one. Efforts redouble when the first picture from a new graphics software system appears on the screen, even if it is only a rectangle. One always has, at every stage in the process, a working system. I find that teams can grow much more complex entities in four months than they can build. ~ Frederick P Brooks Jr,
615:Let me put the contrast in a single concrete example. The physician who finds time to give personal attention to his patients and listens to them. carefully probing inner conditions that may be more significant than any laboratory reports, has become a rarity. Where the power complex is dominant, a visit to a physician is paced, not to fit the patient's needs, but mainly to perform the succession of physical tests upon which the diagnosis will be based. Yet if there were a sufficient number of competent physicians on hand whose inner resources were as available as their laboratory aids, a more subtle diagnosis might be possible, and the patient's subjective response might in many cases effectively supplement the treatment. Thoreau expressed this to perfection when he observed in his 'Journal' that "the really efficient laborer will be found not to crowd his day with work, but will saunter to his task surrounded by a wide halo of ease and leisure."

Without this slowing of the tempo of all activities the positive advantages of plenitude could not be sufficiently enjoyed; for the congestion of time is as threatening to the good life as the congestion of space or people, and produces stresses and tensions that equally undermine human relations. The inner stability that such a slowdown brings about is essential to the highest uses of the mind, through opening up that second life which one lives in reflection and contemplation and self-scrutiny. The means to escape from the "noisy crowing up of things and whatsoever wars on the divine" was one of the vital offerings of the classic religions: hence their emphasis was not on technological productivity but on personal poise. The old slogan of New York subway guards in handling a crush of passengers applies with even greater force to the tempo of megatechnic society: "What's your hurry...Watch your step! ~ Lewis Mumford,
616:There could be something wrong with me because I see Negroes neither better nor worse than any other race. Race pride is a luxury I cannot afford. There are too many implications bend the term. Now, suppose a Negro does something really magnificent, and I glory, not in the benefit to mankind, but the fact that the doer was a Negro. Must I not also go hang my head in shame when a member of my race does something execrable? If I glory, then the obligation is laid upon me to blush also. I do glory when a Negro does something fine, I gloat because he or she has done a fine thing, but not because he was a Negro. That is incidental and accidental. It is the human achievement which I honor. I execrate a foul act of a Negro but again not on the grounds that the doer was a Negro, but because it was foul. A member of my race just happened to be the fouler of humanity. In other words, I know that I cannot accept responsibility for thirteen million people. Every tub must sit on its own bottom regardless. So 'Race Pride' in me had to go. And anyway, why should I be proud to be Negro? Why should anyone be proud to be white? Or yellow? Or red? After all, the word 'race' is a loose classification of physical characteristics. I tells nothing about the insides of people. Pointing a achievements tells nothing either. Races have never done anything. What seems race achievement is the work of individuals. The white race did not go into a laboratory and invent incandescent light. That was Edison. The Jews did not work out Relativity. That was Einstein. The Negros did not find out the inner secrets of peanuts and sweet potatoes, nor the secret of the development of the egg. That wad Carver and Just. If you are under the impression that every white man is Edison, just look around a bit. If you have the idea that every Negro is a Carver, you had better take off plenty of time to do your searching. ~ Zora Neale Hurston,
617:SCIENTISTS HAD KNOWN since the late nineteenth century that tobacco smoke contains carbon monoxide. Victorian scientists had even been able to calculate the amount of gas in the smoke: up to 4 percent in cigarette smoke, and in Gettler’s own choice of tobacco, the cigar, between 6 and 8 percent. Gettler’s latest work theorized that chain smokers might suffer from low-level carbon monoxide poisoning. He speculated in a 1933 report that “headaches experienced by heavy smokers are due in part to the inhalation of carbon monoxide.” But his real interest lay less in their symptoms than in how much of the poison had accumulated in their blood, and how that might affect his calculations on cause of death. He approached that problem in his usual, single-minded way. To get a better sense of carbon monoxide contamination from smoking tobacco, Gettler selected three groups of people to compare: persons confined to a state institution in the relatively clean air of the country; street cleaners who worked in a daily, dusty cloud of car exhaust; and heavy smokers. As expected, carboxyhemoglobin blood levels for country dwellers averaged less than 1 percent saturation. The levels for Manhattan street cleaners were triple that amount, a solid 3 percent. But smokers came in the highest, higher than he’d expected, well above the nineteenth-century calculations. Americans were inhaling a lot more tobacco smoke than they had once done, and their saturation levels ranged from 8 to 19 percent. (The latter was from a Bronx cab driver who admitted to smoking six cigarettes on his way to Gettler’s laboratory, lighting one with the stub of another as he went.) It was safe to assume, Gettler wrote with his usual careful precision, that “tobacco smoking appreciably increases the carbon monoxide in the blood and cannot be ignored in the interpretation of laboratory results.”     THE OTHER NOTABLE poison in tobacco smoke was nicotine. ~ Deborah Blum,
618:the AuThoRS Neal Lathia is a research associate in the Computer laboratory at the university of Cambridge. His research falls at the intersection of data mining, mobile systems, and personalization/recommender systems. lathia has a phD in computer science from the university College london. Contact him at neal.lathia@ cl.cam.ac.uk. Veljko Pejovic is a postdoctoral research fellow at the school of Computer science at the university of birmingham, uK. His research focuses on adaptive wireless technologies and their impact on society. pejovic received a phD in computer science from the university of California, santa barbara. Contact him at v.pejovic@cs.bham.ac.uk. Kiran K. Rachuri is a phD student in the Computer laboratory at the university of Cambridge. His research interests include smartphone sensing systems, energy efficient sensing, and sensor networks. rachuri received an ms in computer science from the Indian Institute of technology madras. Contact him at kiran.rachuri@cl.cam.ac.uk. Cecilia Mascolo is a reader in mobile systems in the Computer laboratory at the university of Cambridge. Her interests are in the area of mobility modeling, sensing, and social network analysis. mascolo has a phD in computer science from the university of bologna. Contact her at cecilia.mascolo@cl.cam.ac.uk. Mirco Musolesi is a senior lecturer in the school of Computer science at the university of birmingham, uK. His research interests include mobile sensing, large-scale data mining, and network science. musolesi has a phD in computer science from the university College london. Contact him at m.musolesi@ cs.bham.ac.uk. Peter J. Rentfrow is a senior lecturer in the psychology Department at the university of Cambridge. His research focuses on behavioral manifestations of personality and psychological processes. rentfrow earned a phD in psychology from the university of texas at Austin. Contact him at pjr39@cam.ac.uk.selected Cs articles and columns are also available for free at http ~ Anonymous,
619:As respects its isolation and its indifference to the basic requirements of all organic activity, the pecuniary power complex discloses a startling resemblance to a newly discovered center in the brain-that which is called the pleasure center. So far as is known, this pleasure center performs no useful function in the organism, unless it should prove that in some still obscure way it plays a part in more functional pleasure reactions. But in laboratory monkeys this localized center can be penetrated by electrodes which permit a micro-current to stimulate the nervous tissue in such a fashion that the flow of current-and hence the intensity of pleasure-can be regulated by the animal himself.

Apparently the stimulation of this pleasure center is so rewarding that the animal will continue to press the current regulator for an indefinite length of time, regardless of every other impulse or physiological need, even that for food, and even to the point of starvation. The intensity of this abstract stimulus produces something like a total neurotic insensibility to life needs. The power complex seems to operate on the same principle. The magical electronic stimulus is money.

What increases the resemblance between this pecuniary motivation and that of the cerebral pleasure center is that both centers, unlike virtually all organic reactions, recognize no quantitative limits. What has always been true of money, among those susceptible to its influence, applies equally to the other components of the power complex: the abstraction replaces the concrete reality, and therefore those who seek to increase it never know when they have had enough. Each of these drives, for power, for goods, for fame, for pleasure, may-it goes without saying-have as useful a part to play in the normal economy of a community as in the human body itself. It is by their detachment, their isolation, their quantitative over-concentration, and their mutual re-enforcement that they become perverse and life-corroding. ~ Lewis Mumford,
620:Quantum physics tells us that no matter how thorough our observation of the present, the (unobserved) past, like the future, is indefinite and exists only as a spectrum of possibilities. The universe, according to quantum physics, has no single past, or history. The fact that the past takes no definite form means that observations you make on a system in the present affect its past. That is underlined rather dramatically by a type of experiment thought up by physicist John Wheeler, called a delayed-choice experiment. Schematically, a delayed-choice experiment is like the double-slit experiment we just described, in which you have the option of observing the path that the particle takes, except in the delayed-choice experiment you postpone your decision about whether or not to observe the path until just before the particle hits the detection screen. Delayed-choice experiments result in data identical to those we get when we choose to observe (or not observe) the which-path information by watching the slits themselves. But in this case the path each particle takes—that is, its past—is determined long after it passed through the slits and presumably had to “decide” whether to travel through just one slit, which does not produce interference, or both slits, which does. Wheeler even considered a cosmic version of the experiment, in which the particles involved are photons emitted by powerful quasars billions of light-years away. Such light could be split into two paths and refocused toward earth by the gravitational lensing of an intervening galaxy. Though the experiment is beyond the reach of current technology, if we could collect enough photons from this light, they ought to form an interference pattern. Yet if we place a device to measure which-path information shortly before detection, that pattern should disappear. The choice whether to take one or both paths in this case would have been made billions of years ago, before the earth or perhaps even our sun was formed, and yet with our observation in the laboratory we will be affecting that choice. In ~ Stephen Hawking,
621:Because all such things are aspects of the holomovement, he feels it has no meaning to speak of consciousness and matter as interacting. In a sense, the observer is the observed. The observer is also the measuring device, the experimental results, the laboratory, and the breeze that blows outside the laboratory. In fact, Bohm believes that consciousness is a more subtle form of matter, and the basis for any relationship between the two lies not in our own level of reality, but deep in the implicate order. Consciousness is present in various degrees of enfoldment and unfoldment in all matter, which is perhaps why plasmas possess some of the traits of living things. As Bohm puts it, "The ability of form to be active is the most characteristic feature of mind, and we have something that is mindlike already with the electron. "11 Similarly, he believes that dividing the universe up into living and nonliving things also has no meaning. Animate and inanimate matter are inseparably interwoven, and life, too, is enfolded throughout the totality of the universe. Even a rock is in some way alive, says Bohm, for life and intelligence are present not only in all of matter, but in "energy, " "space, " "time, " "the fabric of the entire universe, " and everything else we abstract out of the holomovement and mistakenly view as separate things. The idea that consciousness and life (and indeed all things) are ensembles enfolded throughout the universe has an equally dazzling flip side. Just as every portion of a hologram contains the image of the whole, every portion of the universe enfolds the whole. This means that if we knew how to access it we could find the Andromeda galaxy in the thumbnail of our left hand. We could also find Cleopatra meeting Caesar for the first time, for in principle the whole past and implications for the whole future are also enfolded in each small region of space and time. Every cell in our body enfolds the entire cosmos. So does every leaf, every raindrop, and every dust mote, which gives new meaning to William Blake's famous poem:
To see a World in a Grain of Sand And a Heaven in a Wild Flower, Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand And Eternity in an hour. ~ Michael Talbot,
622:I.
Now that I, tying thy glass mask tightly,
May gaze thro' these faint smokes curling whitely,
As thou pliest thy trade in this devil's-smithy-
Which is the poison to poison her, prithee?

II.
He is with her, and they know that I know
Where they are, what they do: they believe my tears flow
While they laugh, laugh at me, at me fled to the drear
Empty church, to pray God in, for them!-I am here.

III
Grind away, moisten and mash up thy paste,
Pound at thy powder,-I am not in haste!
Better sit thus, and observe thy strange things,
Than go where men wait me and dance at the King's.

IV
That in the mortar-you call it a gum?
Ah, the brave tree whence such gold oozings come!
And yonder soft phial, the exquisite blue,
Sure to taste sweetly,-is that poison too?

V
Had I but all of them, thee and thy treasures,
What a wild crowd of invisible pleasures!
To carry pure death in an earring, a casket,
A signet, a fan-mount, a filigree basket!

VI
Soon, at the King's, a mere lozenge to give,
And Pauline should have just thirty minutes to live!
But to light a pastile, and Elise, with her head
And her breast and her arms and her hands, should drop dead!

VII
Quick-is it finished? The colour's too grim!
Why not soft like the phial's, enticing and dim?
Let it brighten her drink, let her turn it and stir,
And try it and taste, ere she fix and prefer!

VIII
What a drop! She's not little, no minion like me!
That's why she ensnared him: this never will free
The soul from those masculine eyes,-Say, ``no!''
To that pulse's magnificent come-and-go.

IX
For only last night, as they whispered, I brought
My own eyes to bear on her so, that I thought
Could I keep them one half minute fixed, she would fall
Shrivelled; she fell not; yet this does it all!

X
Not that I bid you spare her the pain;
Let death be felt and the proof remain:
Brand, burn up, bite into its grace-
He is sure to remember her dying face!

XI
Is it done? Take my mask off! Nay, be not morose;
It kills her, and this prevents seeing it close;
The delicate droplet, my whole fortune's fee!
If it hurts her, beside, can it ever hurt me?

XII
Now, take all my jewels, gorge gold to your fill,
You may kiss me, old man, on my mouth if you will!
But brush this dust off me, lest horror it brings
Ere I know it-next moment I dance at the King's!


~ Robert Browning, The Laboratory-Ancien Rgime
,
623:Among the most virulent of all such cultural parasite-equivalents is the religion-based denial of organic evolution. About one-half of Americans (46 percent in 2013, up from 44 percent in 1980), most of whom are evangelical Christians, together with a comparable fraction of Muslims worldwide, believe that no such process has ever occurred. As Creationists, they insist that God created humankind and the rest of life in one to several magical mega-strokes. Their minds are closed to the overwhelming mass of factual demonstrations of evolution, which is increasingly interlocked across every level of biological organization from molecules to ecosystem and the geography of biodiversity. They ignore, or more precisely they call it virtue to remain ignorant of, ongoing evolution observed in the field and even traced to the genes involved. Also looked past are new species created in the laboratory. To Creationists, evolution is at best just an unproven theory. To a few, it is an idea invented by Satan and transmitted through Darwin and later scientists in order to mislead humanity. When I was a small boy attending an evangelical church in Florida, I was taught that the secular agents of Satan are extremely bright and determined, but liars all, man and woman, and so no matter what I heard I must stick my fingers in my ears and hold fast to the true faith. We are all free in a democracy to believe whatever we wish, so why call any opinion such as Creationism a virulent cultural parasite-equivalent? Because it represents a triumph of blind religious faith over carefully tested fact. It is not a conception of reality forged by evidence and logical judgment. Instead, it is part of the price of admission to a religious tribe. Faith is the evidence given of a person’s submission to a particular god, and even then not to the deity directly but to other humans who claim to represent the god. The cost to society as a whole of the bowed head has been enormous. Evolution is a fundamental process of the Universe, not just in living organisms but everywhere, at every level. Its analysis is vital to biology, including medicine, microbiology, and agronomy. Furthermore psychology, anthropology, and even the history of religion itself make no sense without evolution as the key component followed through the passage of time. The explicit denial of evolution presented as a part of a “creation science” is an outright falsehood, the adult equivalent of plugging one’s ears, and a deficit to any society that chooses to acquiesce in this manner to a fundamentalist faith. ~ Edward O Wilson,
624:them out if they make dumb choices. Let them struggle; let them learn; let them take responsibility. They need to figure out the importance of working hard, saving money, being smart. For God’s sake, don’t be a damned fool and then go begging the government to save you.” This is not a stupid argument. I come at the issues differently, of course, as someone who supports a strong social safety net. But this more conservative view represents a considered and consistent position, worthy of respect. Lower-income conservatives are making the same kind of argument that rich liberals are making. They are willing to make monetary sacrifices to answer the call of their fundamental values. For liberals, those values are more about the common good and enlightened self-interest. For conservatives, those values are more about the importance of independence and personal responsibility. But both sides rightfully see their voting behavior as needing to reflect more than just a vulgar calculation about their immediate pocketbook needs. If one side deserves respect, then so does the other.*1 Of course, respecting our opponent’s argument doesn’t mean we have to just accept it and give in. It doesn’t mean we shouldn’t argue passionately about the best approach to taxes or spending—especially in a society as complex as ours, with the stakes as high as they are. In fact, we should disagree and debate. Debate is the lifeblood of democracy, after all. Disagreement is a good thing—even heated disagreement. Only in a dictatorship does everybody have to agree. In a democracy, nobody has to agree. That’s called freedom. It’s the whole point of America. But at the base of too many of our public discussions sits the same destructive assumption: I’m right. And you’re wrong. We proceed on both sides as if our side is grounded in “the Truth” and the other side is always insane and delusional. And some version of this flawed concept has become the default setting throughout American political discourse. It is one thing to say, “I disagree with you because we have different values and priorities.” It’s quite another to say, “I disagree with you because you are an uneducated idiot—a pawn—and a dupe.” The prevalence of the latter set of arguments is why the Democratic Party stinks of elitism. Here’s another liberal favorite: “How can we argue with conservatives? They don’t believe in facts anymore—only ‘alternative facts.’ At least, liberals believe in science. Right-wingers don’t!” I understand the source of liberal exasperation here. Even though any high school student can reproduce the greenhouse-gas effect in a laboratory beaker, ~ Van Jones,
625:You. Man at the machine and man in the workshop. If tomorrow they tell you you are to make no more water-pipes and saucepans but are to make steel helmets and machine-guns, then there's only one thing to do:

Say NO!

You. Woman at the counter and woman in the office. If tomorrow they tell you you are to fill shells and assemble telescopic sights for snipers' rifles, then there's only one thing to do:

Say NO!

You. Research worker in the laboratory. If tomorrow they tell you you are to invent a new death for the old life, then there's only one thing to do:

Say NO!

You. Priest in the pulpit. If tomorrow they tell you you are to bless murder and declare war holy, then there's only one thing to do:

Say NO!

You. Pilot in your aeroplane. If tomorrow they tell you you are to
carry bombs over the cities, then there's only one thing to do: Say NO!

You. Man of the village and man of the town. If tomorrow they come and give you your call-up papers, then there's only one thing to do:

Say NO!

You. Mother in Normandy and mother in the Ukraine, mother in Vancouver and in London, you on the Hwangho and on the Mississippi, you in Naples and Hamburg and Cairo and Oslo - mothers in all parts of the earth, mothers of the world, if tomorrow they tell you you are to bear new soldiers for new battles, then there's only one thing to do:

Say NO!

For if you do not say NO - if YOU do not say no - mothers, then: then!

In the bustling hazy harbour towns the big ships will fall silent as corpses against the dead deserted quay walls, their once shimmering bodies overgrown with seaweed and barnacles, smelling of graveyards and rotten fish.

The trams will lie like senseless glass-eyed cages beside the twisted steel skeleton of wires and track.

The sunny juicy vine will rot on decaying hillsides, rice will dry in the withered earth, potatoes will freeze in the unploughed land and cows will stick their death-still legs into the air like overturned chairs.

In the fields beside rusted ploughs the corn will be flattened like a beaten army.

Then the last human creature, with mangled entrails and infected lungs, will wander around, unanswered and lonely, under the poisonous glowing sun, among the immense mass graves and devastated cities.

The last human creature, withered, mad, cursing, accusing - and the terrible accusation: WHY?

will die unheard on the plains, drift through the ruins, seep into the rubble of churches, fall into pools of blood, unheard, unanswered,

the last animal scream of the last human animal -

All this will happen tomorrow, tomorrow, perhaps, perhaps even tonight, perhaps tonight, if - if -

You do not say NO. ~ Wolfgang Borchert,
626:If we consider the possibility that all women–from the infant suckling her mother’s breast, to the grown woman experiencing orgasmic sensations while suckling her own child, perhaps recalling her mother’s milk-smell in her own; to two women, like Virginia Woolf’s Chloe and Olivia, who share a laboratory; to the woman dying at ninety, touched and handled by women–exist on a lesbian continuum, we can see ourselves as moving in and out of this continuum, whether we identify ourselves as lesbian or not. It allows us to connect aspects of woman-identification as diverse as the impudent, intimate girl-friendships of eight- or nine-year-olds and the banding together of those women of the twelfth and fifteenth centuries known as Beguines who “shared houses, rented to one another, bequeathed houses to their room-mates … in cheap subdivided houses in the artisans’ area of town,” who “practiced Christian virtue on their own, dressing and living simply and not associating with men,” who earned their livings as spinners, bakers, nurses, or ran schools for young girls, and who managed–until the Church forced them to disperse–to live independent both of marriage and of conventual restrictions. It allows us to connect these women with the more celebrated “Lesbians” of the women’s school around Sappho of the seventh century B.C.; with the secret sororities and economic networks reported among African women; and with the Chinese marriage resistance sisterhoods–communities of women who refused marriage, or who if married often refused to consummate their marriages and soon left their husbands–the only women in China who were not footbound and who, Agnes Smedley tells us, welcomed the births of daughters and organized successful women’s strikes in the silk mills. It allows us to connect and compare disparate individual instances of marriage resistance: for example, the type of autonomy claimed by Emily Dickinson, a nineteenth-century white woman genius, with the strategies available to Zora Neale Hurston, a twentieth-century black woman genius. Dickinson never married, had tenuous intellectual friendships with men, lived self-convented in her genteel father’s house, and wrote a lifetime of passionate letters to her sister-in-law Sue Gilbert and a smaller group of such letters to her friend Kate Scott Anthon. Hurston married twice but soon left each husband, scrambled her way from Florida to Harlem to Columbia University to Haiti and finally back to Florida, moved in and out of white patronage and poverty, professional success and failure; her survival relationships were all with women, beginning with her mother. Both of these women in their vastly different circumstances were marriage resisters, committed to their own work and selfhood, and were later characterized as “apolitical ”. Both were drawn to men of intellectual quality; for both of them women provided the ongoing fascination and sustenance of life. ~ Adrienne Rich,
627:WHY ADDICTION IS NOT A DISEASE In its present-day form, the disease model of addiction asserts that addiction is a chronic, relapsing brain disease. This disease is evidenced by changes in the brain, especially alterations in the striatum, brought about by the repeated uptake of dopamine in response to drugs and other substances. But it’s also shown by changes in the prefrontal cortex, where regions responsible for cognitive control become partially disconnected from the striatum and sometimes lose a portion of their synapses as the addiction progresses. These are big changes. They can’t be brushed aside. And the disease model is the only coherent model of addiction that actually pays attention to the brain changes reported by hundreds of labs in thousands of scientific articles. It certainly explains the neurobiology of addiction better than the “choice” model and other contenders. It may also have some real clinical utility. It makes sense of the helplessness addicts feel and encourages them to expiate their guilt and shame, by validating their belief that they are unable to get better by themselves. And it seems to account for the incredible persistence of addiction, its proneness to relapse. It even demonstrates why “choice” cannot be the whole answer, because choice is governed by motivation, which is governed by dopamine, and the dopamine system is presumably diseased. Then why should we reject the disease model? The main reason is this: Every experience that is repeated enough times because of its motivational appeal will change the wiring of the striatum (and related regions) while adjusting the flow and uptake of dopamine. Yet we wouldn’t want to call the excitement we feel when visiting Paris, meeting a lover, or cheering for our favourite team a disease. Each rewarding experience builds its own network of synapses in and around the striatum (and OFC), and those networks continue to draw dopamine from its reservoir in the midbrain. That’s true of Paris, romance, football, and heroin. As we anticipate and live through these experiences, each network of synapses is strengthened and refined, so the uptake of dopamine gets more selective as rewards are identified and habits established. Prefrontal control is not usually studied when it comes to travel arrangements and football, but we know from the laboratory and from real life that attractive goals frequently override self-restraint. We know that ego fatigue and now appeal, both natural processes, reduce coordination between prefrontal control systems and the motivational core of the brain (as I’ve called it). So even though addictive habits can be more deeply entrenched than many other habits, there is no clear dividing line between addiction and the repeated pursuit of other attractive goals, either in experience or in brain function. London just doesn’t do it for you anymore. It’s got to be Paris. Good food, sex, music . . . they no longer turn your crank. But cocaine sure does. ~ Marc Lewis,
628:thumb. Marie-Laure’s father is principal locksmith for the National Museum of Natural History. Between the laboratories, warehouses, four separate public museums, the menagerie, the greenhouses, the acres of medicinal and decorative gardens in the Jardin des Plantes, and a dozen gates and pavilions, her father estimates there are twelve thousand locks in the entire museum complex. No one else knows enough to disagree. All morning he stands at the front of the key pound and distributes keys to employees: zookeepers coming first, office staff arriving in a rush around eight, technicians and librarians and scientific assistants trooping in next, scientists trickling in last. Everything is numbered and color-coded. Every employee from custodians to the director must carry his or her keys at all times. No one is allowed to leave his respective building with keys, and no one is allowed to leave keys on a desk. The museum possesses priceless jade from the thirteenth century, after all, and cavansite from India and rhodochrosite from Colorado; behind a lock her father has designed sits a Florentine dispensary bowl carved from lapis lazuli that specialists travel a thousand miles every year to examine. Her father quizzes her. Vault key or padlock key, Marie? Cupboard key or dead bolt key? He tests her on the locations of displays, on the contents of cabinets. He is continually placing some unexpected thing into her hands: a lightbulb, a fossilized fish, a flamingo feather. For an hour each morning—even Sundays—he makes her sit over a Braille workbook. A is one dot in the upper corner. B is two dots in a vertical line. Jean. Goes. To. The. Baker. Jean. Goes. To. The. Cheese. Maker. In the afternoons he takes her on his rounds. He oils latches, repairs cabinets, polishes escutcheons. He leads her down hallway after hallway into gallery after gallery. Narrow corridors open into immense libraries; glass doors give way to hothouses overflowing with the smells of humus, wet newspaper, and lobelia. There are carpenters’ shops, taxidermists’ studios, acres of shelves and specimen drawers, whole museums within the museum. Some afternoons he leaves Marie-Laure in the laboratory of Dr. Geffard, an aging mollusk expert whose beard smells permanently of damp wool. Dr. Geffard will stop whatever he is doing and open a bottle of Malbec and tell Marie-Laure in his whispery voice about reefs he visited as a young man: the Seychelles, Belize, Zanzibar. He calls her Laurette; he eats a roasted duck every day at 3 P.M.; his mind accommodates a seemingly inexhaustible catalog of Latin binomial names. On the back wall of Dr. Geffard’s lab are cabinets that contain more drawers than she can count, and he lets her open them one after another and hold seashells in her hands—whelks, olives, imperial volutes from Thailand, spider conchs from Polynesia—the museum possesses more than ten thousand specimens, over half the known species in the world, and Marie-Laure gets to handle most of them. “Now that shell, Laurette, belonged to a violet sea snail, a blind snail that lives its whole life on the surface of the sea. As soon as it is released into the ocean, it agitates the water to make bubbles, and ~ Anthony Doerr,
629:it is not uncommon for experts in DNA analysis to testify at a criminal trial that a DNA sample taken from a crime scene matches that taken from a suspect. How certain are such matches? When DNA evidence was first introduced, a number of experts testified that false positives are impossible in DNA testing. Today DNA experts regularly testify that the odds of a random person’s matching the crime sample are less than 1 in 1 million or 1 in 1 billion. With those odds one could hardly blame a juror for thinking, throw away the key. But there is another statistic that is often not presented to the jury, one having to do with the fact that labs make errors, for instance, in collecting or handling a sample, by accidentally mixing or swapping samples, or by misinterpreting or incorrectly reporting results. Each of these errors is rare but not nearly as rare as a random match. The Philadelphia City Crime Laboratory, for instance, admitted that it had swapped the reference sample of the defendant and the victim in a rape case, and a testing firm called Cellmark Diagnostics admitted a similar error.20 Unfortunately, the power of statistics relating to DNA presented in court is such that in Oklahoma a court sentenced a man named Timothy Durham to more than 3,100 years in prison even though eleven witnesses had placed him in another state at the time of the crime. It turned out that in the initial analysis the lab had failed to completely separate the DNA of the rapist and that of the victim in the fluid they tested, and the combination of the victim’s and the rapist’s DNA produced a positive result when compared with Durham’s. A later retest turned up the error, and Durham was released after spending nearly four years in prison.21 Estimates of the error rate due to human causes vary, but many experts put it at around 1 percent. However, since the error rate of many labs has never been measured, courts often do not allow testimony on this overall statistic. Even if courts did allow testimony regarding false positives, how would jurors assess it? Most jurors assume that given the two types of error—the 1 in 1 billion accidental match and the 1 in 100 lab-error match—the overall error rate must be somewhere in between, say 1 in 500 million, which is still for most jurors beyond a reasonable doubt. But employing the laws of probability, we find a much different answer. The way to think of it is this: Since both errors are very unlikely, we can ignore the possibility that there is both an accidental match and a lab error. Therefore, we seek the probability that one error or the other occurred. That is given by our sum rule: it is the probability of a lab error (1 in 100) + the probability of an accidental match (1 in 1 billion). Since the latter is 10 million times smaller than the former, to a very good approximation the chance of both errors is the same as the chance of the more probable error—that is, the chances are 1 in 100. Given both possible causes, therefore, we should ignore the fancy expert testimony about the odds of accidental matches and focus instead on the much higher laboratory error rate—the very data courts often do not allow attorneys to present! And so the oft-repeated claims of DNA infallibility are exaggerated. ~ Leonard Mlodinow,
630:LINUS PAULING WAS WRONG about megavitamins because he had made two fundamental errors. First, he had assumed that you cannot have too much of a good thing. Vitamins are critical to life. If people don’t get enough vitamins, they suffer various deficiency states, like scurvy (not enough vitamin C) or rickets (not enough vitamin D). The reason that vitamins are so important is that they help convert food into energy. But there’s a catch. To convert food into energy, the body uses a process called oxidation. One outcome of oxidation is the generation of something called free radicals, which can be quite destructive. In search of electrons, free radicals damage cell membranes, DNA, and arteries, including the arteries that supply blood to the heart. As a consequence, free radicals cause cancer, aging, and heart disease. Indeed, free radicals are probably the single greatest reason that we aren’t immortal. To counter the effects of free radicals, the body makes antioxidants. Vitamins—like vitamins A, C, E, and beta-carotene—as well as minerals like selenium and substances like omega-3 fatty acids all have antioxidant activity. For this reason, people who eat diets rich in fruits and vegetables, which are rich in antioxidants, tend to have less cancer, less heart disease, and live longer. Pauling’s logic to this point is clear; if antioxidants in food prevent cancer and heart disease, then eating large quantities of manufactured antioxidants should do the same thing. But Linus Pauling had ignored one important fact: Oxidation is also required to kill new cancer cells and clear clogged arteries. By asking people to ingest large quantities of vitamins and supplements, Pauling had shifted the oxidation-antioxidation balance too far in favor of antioxidation, therefore inadvertently increasing the risk of cancer and heart disease. As it turns out, Mae West aside, you actually can have too much of a good thing. (“Too much of a good thing can be wonderful,” said West, who was talking about sex, not vitamins.) Second, Pauling had assumed that vitamins and supplements ingested in food were the same as those purified or synthesized in a laboratory. This, too, was incorrect. Vitamins are phytochemicals, which means that they are contained in plants (phyto- means “plant” in Greek). The 13 vitamins (A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B7, B9, B12, C, D, E, and K) contained in food are surrounded by thousands of other phytochemicals that have long and complicated names like flavonoids, flavonols, flavanones, isoflavones, anthocyanins, anthocyanidins, proanthocyanidins, tannins, isothiocyanates, carotenoids, allyl sulfides, polyphenols, and phenolic acids. The difference between vitamins and these other phytochemicals is that deficiency states like scurvy have been defined for vitamins but not for the others. But make no mistake: These other phytochemicals are important, too. And Pauling’s recommendation to ingest massive quantities of vitamins apart from their natural surroundings was an unnatural act. For example, as described in Catherine Price’s book, Vitamania, half of an apple has the antioxidant activity of 1,500 milligrams of vitamin C, even though it contains only 5.7 milligrams of the vitamin. That’s because the phytochemicals that surround vitamin C in apples enhance its effect ~ Paul A Offit,
631:Cannery Row in Monterey in California is a poem, a stink, a grating noise, a quality of light, a tone, a habit, a nostalgia, a dream. Cannery Row is the gathered and scattered, tin and iron and rust and splintered wood, chipped pavement and weedy lots and junk heaps, sardine canneries of corrugated iron, honky-tonks, restaurants and whore-houses, and little crowded groceries, and laboratories and flop-houses. Its inhabitants are, as the man once said, "whores, pimps, gamblers, and sons of bitches," by which he meant Everybody. Had the man looked through another peep-hole he might have said: "Saints and angels and martyrs and holy men," and he would have meant the same thing.

In the morning when the sardine fleet has made a catch, the purse-seiners waddle heavily into the bay blowing their whistles. The deep-laden boats pull in against the coast where the canneries dip their tails into the bay. The figure is advisedly chosen, for if the canneries dipped their mouths into the bay the canned sardines which emerge from the other end would be metaphorically, at least, even more horrifying. Then cannery whistles scream and all over the town men and women scramble into their clothes and come running down to the Row to go to work. Then shining cars bring the upper classes down: superintendents, accountants, owners who disappear into offices. Then from the town pour Wops and Chinamen and Polaks, men and women in trousers and rubber coats and oilcloth aprons. They come running to clean and cut and pack and cook and can the fish. The whole street rumbles and groans and screams and rattles while the silver rivers of fish pour in out of the boats and the boats rise higher and higher in the water until they are empty. The canneries rumble and rattle and squeak until the last fish is cleaned and cut and cooked and canned and then the whistles scream again and the dripping, smelly, tired Wops and Chinamen and Polaks, men and women, straggle out and droop their ways up the hill into the town and Cannery Row becomes itself again-quiet and magical. Its normal life returns. The bums who retired in disgust under the black cypress-tree come out to sit on the rusty pipes in the vacant lot. The girls from Dora's emerge for a bit of sun if there is any. Doc strolls from the Western Biological Laboratory and crosses the street to Lee Chong's grocery for two quarts of beer. Henri the painter noses like an Airedale through the junk in the grass-grown lot for some pan or piece of wood or metal he needs for the boat he is building. Then the darkness edges in and the street light comes on in front of Dora's-- the lamp which makes perpetual moonlight in Cannery Row. Callers arrive at Western Biological to see Doc, and he crosses the street to Lee Chong's for five quarts of beer.

How can the poem and the stink and the grating noise-- the quality of light, the tone, the habit and the dream-- be set down alive? When you collect marine animals there are certain flat worms so delicate that they are almost impossible to capture whole, for they break and tatter under the touch. You must let them ooze and crawl of their own will on to a knife blade and then lift them gently into your bottle of sea water. And perhaps that might be the way to write this book-- to open the page and to let the stories crawl in by themselves. ~ John Steinbeck,
632:Suddenly he felt his foot catch on something and he stumbled over one of the trailing cables that lay across the laboratory floor. The cable went tight and pulled one of the instruments monitoring the beam over, sending it falling sideways and knocking the edge of the frame that held the refractive shielding plate in position. For what seemed like a very long time the stand wobbled back and forth before it tipped slowly backwards with a crash.

‘Take cover!’ Professor Pike screamed, diving behind one of the nearby workbenches as the other Alpha students scattered, trying to shield themselves behind the most solid objects they could find. The beam punched straight through the laboratory wall in a cloud of vapour and alarm klaxons started wailing all over the school. Professor Pike scrambled across the floor towards the bundle of thick power cables that led to the super-laser, pulling them from the back of the machine and extinguishing the bright green beam.

‘Oops,’ Franz said as the emergency lighting kicked in and the rest of the Alphas slowly emerged from their hiding places. At the back of the room there was a perfectly circular, twenty-centimetre hole in the wall surrounded by scorch marks. ‘I am thinking that this is not being good.’

Otto walked cautiously up to the smouldering hole, glancing nervously over his shoulder at the beam emitter that was making a gentle clicking sound as it cooled down.

‘Woah,’ he said as he peered into the hole. Clearly visible were a series of further holes beyond that got smaller and smaller with perspective. Dimly visible at the far end was what could only be a small circle of bright daylight.

‘Erm, I don’t know how to tell you this, Franz,’ Otto said, turning towards his friend with a broad grin on his face, ‘but it looks like you just made a hole in the school.’

‘Oh dear,’ Professor Pike said, coming up beside Otto and also peering into the hole. ‘I do hope that we haven’t damaged anything important.’

‘Or anyone important,’ Shelby added as she and the rest of the Alphas gathered round.

‘It is not being my fault,’ Franz moaned. ‘I am tripping over the cable.’

A couple of minutes later, the door at the far end of the lab hissed open and Chief Dekker came running into the room, flanked by two guards in their familiar orange jumpsuits. Otto and the others winced as they saw her. It was well known already that she had no particular love for H.I.V.E.’s Alpha stream and she seemed to have a special dislike for their year in particular.

‘What happened?’ she demanded as she strode across the room towards the Professor. Her thin, tight lips and sharp cheekbones gave the impression that she was someone who’d heard of this thing called smiling but had decided that it was not for her.

‘There was a slight . . . erm . . . malfunction,’ the Professor replied with a fleeting glance in Franz’s direction. ‘Has anyone been injured?’

‘It doesn’t look like it,’ Dekker replied tersely, ‘but I think it’s safe to say that Colonel Francisco won’t be using that particular toilet cubicle again.’ Franz visibly paled at the thought of the Colonel finding out that he had been in any way responsible for whatever indignity he had just suffered. He had a sudden horribly clear vision of many laps of the school gym somewhere in his not too distant future. ~ Mark Walden,
633:What are the dead, anyway, but waves and energy? Light shining from a dead star?

That, by the way, is a phrase of Julian's. I remember it from a lecture of his on the Iliad, when Patroklos appears to Achilles in a dream. There is a very moving passage where Achilles overjoyed at the sight of the apparition – tries to throw his arms around the ghost of his old friend, and it vanishes. The dead appear to us in dreams, said Julian, because that's the only way they can make us see them; what we see is only a projection, beamed from a great distance, light shining at us from a dead star…

Which reminds me, by the way, of a dream I had a couple of weeks ago.

I found myself in a strange deserted city – an old city, like London – underpopulated by war or disease. It was night; the streets were dark, bombed-out, abandoned. For a long time, I wandered aimlessly – past ruined parks, blasted statuary, vacant lots overgrown with weeds and collapsed apartment houses with rusted girders poking out of their sides like ribs. But here and there, interspersed among the desolate shells of the heavy old public buildings, I began to see new buildings, too, which were connected by futuristic walkways lit from beneath. Long, cool perspectives of modern architecture, rising phosphorescent and eerie from the rubble.

I went inside one of these new buildings. It was like a laboratory, maybe, or a museum. My footsteps echoed on the tile floors.There was a cluster of men, all smoking pipes, gathered around an exhibit in a glass case that gleamed in the dim light and lit their faces ghoulishly from below.

I drew nearer. In the case was a machine revolving slowly on a turntable, a machine with metal parts that slid in and out and collapsed in upon themselves to form new images. An Inca temple… click click click… the Pyramids… the Parthenon.

History passing beneath my very eyes, changing every moment.

'I thought I'd find you here,' said a voice at my elbow.

It was Henry. His gaze was steady and impassive in the dim light. Above his ear, beneath the wire stem of his spectacles, I could just make out the powder burn and the dark hole in his right temple.

I was glad to see him, though not exactly surprised. 'You know,' I said to him, 'everybody is saying that you're dead.'

He stared down at the machine. The Colosseum… click click click… the Pantheon. 'I'm not dead,' he said. 'I'm only having a bit of trouble with my passport.'

'What?'

He cleared his throat. 'My movements are restricted,' he said.

'I no longer have the ability to travel as freely as I would like.'

Hagia Sophia. St. Mark's, in Venice. 'What is this place?' I asked him.

'That information is classified, I'm afraid.'

1 looked around curiously. It seemed that I was the only visitor.

'Is it open to the public?' I said.

'Not generally, no.'

I looked at him. There was so much I wanted to ask him, so much I wanted to say; but somehow I knew there wasn't time and even if there was, that it was all, somehow, beside the point.

'Are you happy here?' I said at last.

He considered this for a moment. 'Not particularly,' he said.

'But you're not very happy where you are, either.'

St. Basil's, in Moscow. Chartres. Salisbury and Amiens. He glanced at his watch.

'I hope you'll excuse me,' he said, 'but I'm late for an appointment.'

He turned from me and walked away. I watched his back receding down the long, gleaming hall. ~ Donna Tartt,
634:John Isidore said, “I found a spider.”

The three androids glanced up, momentarily moving their attention from the TV screen to him.

“Let’s see it,” Pris said. She held out her hand.

Roy Baty said, “Don’t talk while Buster is on.”

“I’ve never seen a spider,” Pris said. She cupped the medicine bottle in her palms, surveying the creature within. “All those legs. Why’s it need so many legs, J. R.?”

“That’s the way spiders are,” Isidore said, his heart pounding; he had difficulty breathing. “Eight legs.”

Rising to her feet, Pris said, “You know what I think, J. R.? I think it doesn’t need all those legs.”

“Eight?” Irmgard Baty said. “Why couldn’t it get by on four? Cut four off and see.” Impulsively opening her purse, she produced a pair of clean, sharp cuticle scissors, which she passed to Pris.

A weird terror struck at J. R. Isidore.

Carrying the medicine bottle into the kitchen, Pris seated herself at J. R. Isidore’s breakfast table. She removed the lid from the bottle and dumped the spider out. “It probably won’t be able to run as fast,” she said, “but there’s nothing for it to catch around here anyhow. It’ll die anyway.” She reached for the scissors.

“Please,” Isidore said.

Pris glanced up inquiringly. “Is it worth something?”

“Don’t mutilate it,” he said wheezingly. Imploringly.

With the scissors, Pris snipped off one of the spider’s legs.

In the living room Buster Friendly on the TV screen said, “Take a look at this enlargement of a section of background. This is the sky you usually see. Wait, I’ll have Earl Parameter, head of my research staff, explain their virtually world-shaking discovery to you.”

Pris clipped off another leg, restraining the spider with the edge of her hand. She was smiling.

“Blowups of the video pictures,” a new voice from the TV said, “when subjected to rigorous laboratory scrutiny, reveal that the gray backdrop of sky and daytime moon against which Mercer moves is not only not Terran—it is artificial.”

“You’re missing it!” Irmgard called anxiously to Pris; she rushed to the kitchen door, saw what Pris had begun doing. “Oh, do that afterward,” she said coaxingly. “This is so important, what they’re saying; it proves that everything we believed—”

“Be quiet,” Roy Baty said.

“—is true,” Irmgard finished.

The TV set continued, “The ‘moon’ is painted; in the enlargements, one of which you see now on your screen, brush strokes show. And there is even some evidence that the scraggly weeds and dismal, sterile soil—perhaps even the stones hurled at Mercer by unseen alleged parties—are equally faked. It is quite possible in fact that the ‘stones’ are made of soft plastic, causing no authentic wounds.”

“In other words,” Buster Friendly broke in, “Wilbur Mercer is not suffering at all.”

The research chief said, “We at last managed, Mr. Friendly, to track down a former Hollywood special-effects man, a Mr. Wade Cortot, who flatly states, from his years of experience, that the figure of ‘Mercer’ could well be merely some bit player marching across a sound stage. Cortot has gone so far as to declare that he recognizes the stage as one used by a now out-of-business minor moviemaker with whom Cortot had various dealings several decades ago.”

“So according to Cortot,” Buster Friendly said, “there can be virtually no doubt.”

Pris had now cut three legs from the spider, which crept about miserably on the kitchen table, seeking a way out, a path to freedom. It found none. ~ Philip K Dick,
635:Wake-Initiated Lucid Dreams (WILDS)
In the last chapter we talked about strategies for inducing lucid dreams by carrying an idea from the waking world into the dream, such as an intention to comprehend the dream state, a habit of critical state testing, or the recognition of a dreamsign. These strategies are intended to stimulate a dreamer to become lucid within a dream.
This chapter presents a completely different set of approaches to the world of lucid dreaming based on the idea of falling asleep consciously. This involves retaining consciousness while wakefulness is lost and allows direct entry into the lucid dream state without any loss of reflective consciousness. The basic idea has many variations.
While falling asleep, you can focus on hypnagogic (sleep onset) imagery, deliberate visualizations, your breath or heartbeat, the sensations in your body, your sense of self, and so on. If you keep the mind sufficiently active while the tendency to enter REM sleep is strong, you feel your body fall asleep, but you, that is to say, your consciousness, remains awake. The next thing you know, you will find yourself in the dream world, fully lucid.
These two different strategies for inducing lucidity result in two distinct types of lucid dreams. Experiences in which people consciously enter dreaming sleep are referred to as wake-initiated lucid dreams (WILDs), in contrast to dream-initiated lucid dreams (DILDs), in which people become lucid after having fallen asleep unconsciously. 1 The two kinds of lucid dreams differ in a number of ways. WILDs always happen in association with brief awakenings (sometimes only one or two seconds long) from and immediate return to REM sleep. The sleeper has a subjective impression of having been awake. This is not true of DILDs. Although both kinds of lucid dream are more likely to occur later in the night, the proportion of WILDs also increases with time of night. In other words, WILDs are most likely to occur the late morning hours or in afternoon naps. This is strikingly evident in my own record of lucid dreams. Of thirty-three lucid dreams from the first REM period of the night, only one (3 percent) was a WILD, compared with thirteen out of thirty-two (41 percent) lucid dreams from afternoon naps. 2 Generally speaking, WILDs are less frequent than DILDs; in a laboratory study of seventy-six lucid dreams, 72 percent were DILDs compared with 28 percent WILDs. 3 The proportion of WILDs observed in the laboratory seems, by my experience, to be considerably higher than the proportion of WILDs reported at home.
To take a specific example, WILDs account for only 5 percent of my home record of lucid dreams, but for 40 percent of my first fifteen lucid dreams in the laboratory. 4 Ibelieve there are two reasons for this highly significant difference: whenever I spentthe night in the sleep laboratory, I was highly conscious of every time I awakened andI made extraordinary efforts not to move more than necessary in order to minimizeinterference with the physiological recordings.
Thus, my awakenings from REM in the lab were more likely to lead toconscious returns to REM than awakenings at home when I was sleeping with neitherheightened consciousness of my environment and self nor any particular intent not tomove. This suggests that WILD induction techniques might be highly effective underthe proper conditions.
Paul Tholey notes that, while techniques for direct entry to the dream staterequire considerable practice in the beginning, they offer correspondingly greatrewards. 5 When mastered, these techniques (like MILD) can confer the capacity toinduce lucid dreams virtually at will. ~ Stephen LaBerge, Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming, 4 - Falling Asleep Consciously,
636:Whites impose these rules on themselves because they know blacks, in particular, are so quick to take offense. Radio host Dennis Prager was surprised to learn that a firm that runs focus groups on radio talk shows excludes blacks from such groups. It had discovered that almost no whites are willing to disagree with a black. As soon as a black person voiced an opinion, whites agreed, whatever they really thought. When Mr. Prager asked his listening audience about this, whites called in from around the country to say they were afraid to disagree with a black person for fear of being thought racist.
Attempts at sensitivity can go wrong. In 2009, there were complaints from minority staff in the Delaware Department of Transportation about insensitive language, so the department head, Carolann Wicks, distributed a newsletter describing behavior and language she considered unacceptable. Minorities were so offended that the newsletter spelled out the words whites were not supposed to use that the department had to recall and destroy the newsletter.
The effort whites put into observing racial etiquette has been demonstrated in the laboratory. In experiments at Tufts University and Harvard Business School, a white subject was paired with a partner, and each was given 30 photographs of faces that varied by race, sex, and background color. They were then supposed to identify one of the 30 faces by asking as few yes-or-no questions as possible. Asking about race was clearly a good way to narrow down the possibilities —whites did not hesitate to use that strategy when their partner was white—but only 10 percent could bring themselves to mention race if their partner was black. They were afraid to admit that they even noticed race.
When the same experiment was done with children, even white 10- and 11-year olds avoided mentioning race, though younger children were less inhibited. Because they were afraid to identify people by race if the partner was black, older children performed worse on the test than younger children. “This result is fascinating because it shows that children as young as 10 feel the need to try to avoid appearing prejudiced, even if doing so leads them to perform poorly on a basic cognitive test,” said Kristin Pauker, a PhD candidate at Tufts who co-authored the study.
During Barack Obama’s campaign for President, Duke University sociologist Eduardo Bonilla-Silva asked the white students in his class to raise their hands if they had a black friend on campus. All did so. At the time, blacks were about 10 percent of the student body, so for every white to have a black friend, every black must have had an average of eight or nine white friends. However, when Prof. Bonilla-Silva asked the blacks in the class if they had white friends none raised his hand. One hesitates to say the whites were lying, but there would be deep disapproval of any who admitted to having no black friends, whereas there was no pressure on blacks to claim they had white friends.
Nor is there the same pressure on blacks when they talk insultingly about whites. Claire Mack is a former mayor and city council member of San Mateo, California. In a 2006 newspaper interview, she complained that too many guests on television talk shows were “wrinkled-ass white men.” No one asked her to apologize.
Daisy Lynum, a black commissioner of the city of Orlando, Florida, angered the city’s police when she complained that a “white boy” officer had pulled her son over for a traffic stop. She refused to apologize, saying, “That is how I talk and I don’t plan to change.”
During his 2002 reelection campaign, Sharpe James, mayor of Newark, New Jersey, referred to his light-skinned black opponent as “the faggot white boy.” This caused no ripples, and a majority-black electorate returned him to office. ~ Jared Taylor,
637:Many of you out there
will have encountered a world of calamity and ruin
with one last gasp at the end of it
and clearly labelled the instructions:
“this Day the Suprise Transport”
“port Saild from this”
and so on.
Not on our planet
yet still
that destination lingers –
terminus,
“animae viles, a sort of
excrementitious mass, that could be projected,
and accordingly was projected – ”
as detritus, cast “from the depth of a shipwreck”
floundering in the blast of an abandoned broadcast –
“Sudden effluvial aftermath here. Have encountered
daze without number...” – doomed
emission, vast dump “which departs from itself”
as a wheezed, unavoidable, looming
exhalation – insidious galactic bloom
whose drift is a swift mutation aboard that
soundtrack lumbering in the background,
strange clank or muffled boom
heralding a dank impending cloudbank possibly
or black-and-white photograph taken on the moon,
featuring I, quaint blip,
feinted relic ’mid dim reverberations
e.g. ghost in portalled tomb
whose blundered destination
plunges on – old death throes
rattle in the deep,
where the dice cup heaves up sleep I’m leaving.
Denizens, sensitive as always, I remain
captain of the spaceship
“Isle of Destolation”
creepily dotted about my photo – where it roams,
approximations of despair breathing malice
pass by in the wake of an interest
I no longer maintain, who fondly recall
how to comb myself and shave my hair
and park my coat and hat in the hall.
Sincerely I resemble all those
who have written to me with letters of condolence,
whether edifice or orifice, bit or whole.
“Though alien drones and foreign hums
within me thrive... ”
strange feeling of sudden distinction was creeping upon me
convinced of its authenticity,
spurting up like a hideous gas
and the whole mass imploding
into its own brief fumes.
Oddly,
I began my radio career
as a swarm of bees.
Some still speak of it
and I go on and on about it,
as befits my condition.
For example, this transmission explains
why someone of approximately my own
age and intelligence suddenly
led me across the large laboratory,
Firkon, Zuhl and the others all following.
Frankly I could have disintegrated
in a pilot’s suit of the same style
“whereby hangs
an immense bridge”
chomping away at the background
as we reached the platform.
Firkon suggested looking down into the elevator shaft
“Notice anything? ”
and when I did, saw three
more floors or deck
levels below.
“At each level
a bridge or balcony...”
projected into the shaft contra-indicating the gap
dome of saucer
between
“analogy of the abyss”
and his tautology
hovered outrageously above it.
“We use rudder-post technology to detach the post and
reinser it on a short staff carried by a frame –
Welcome, 260 thousand cubic centimetres.”
At once, I clambered aboard and found
that taste of his butthole strangely hypnotic
whine of the motor gained in pitch like a twanging ’cello string.
Spike took up the “How long must I wait? I mean – ”
...
A tremor ran through the hull of the Moonraker...
A pencil fell from the instrument ta...
“I – I’m not sure...
Always together in this darned silence,
midground hard to determine between
both and neither,
column and house.”
(I could see right away what these things had in common:
they were all crap. I decided to demonstrate this
by tying strings between various objects.)
“My first
close-up
shot of the moon
filled me with cold foreboding”
– i.e.
stillness, a lack
of “Thank you”
amid the harsh glare of remnants,
bright greys and sooty
blacks,
the jagged,
razor-sharp outlines of the crags –
and no living thing but me,
crater.
“I? But I am an expert! I have so much to discover!
My ‘shallow cell’ theory – ”
a twelve-foot cylinder mounted on two
pairs of caterpillar tracks
glanced to the left, in the direction of the pit.
From this I could disappear into a narrow, walled valley several miles away.
Suddenly,
there I was, ethereal vapour
trails cut deep between the intermittent static
dispatched amid stygian fumes
his only glue
then split.
~ Chris Edwards,
638:The Bombardment
Slowly, without force, the rain drops into the city. It stops a moment
on the carved head of Saint John, then slides on again, slipping and trickling
over his stone cloak. It splashes from the lead conduit of a gargoyle,
and falls from it in turmoil on the stones in the Cathedral square.
Where are the people, and why does the fretted steeple sweep about in the sky?
Boom! The sound swings against the rain. Boom, again! After it, only water
rushing in the gutters, and the turmoil from the spout of the gargoyle.
Silence. Ripples and mutters. Boom!
The room is damp, but warm. Little flashes swarm about from the firelight.
The lustres of the chandelier are bright, and clusters of rubies
leap in the bohemian glasses on the `etagere'. Her hands are restless,
but the white masses of her hair are quite still. Boom! Will it never cease
to torture, this iteration! Boom! The vibration shatters a glass
on the `etagere'. It lies there, formless and glowing,
with all its crimson gleams shot out of pattern, spilled, flowing red,
blood-red. A thin bell-note pricks through the silence. A door creaks.
The old lady speaks: 'Victor, clear away that broken glass.' 'Alas!
Madame, the bohemian glass!' 'Yes, Victor, one hundred years ago
my father brought it -' Boom! The room shakes, the servitor quakes.
Another goblet shivers and breaks. Boom!
It rustles at the window-pane, the smooth, streaming rain, and he is shut
within its clash and murmur. Inside is his candle, his table, his ink,
his pen, and his dreams. He is thinking, and the walls are pierced with
beams of sunshine, slipping through young green. A fountain tosses itself
up at the blue sky, and through the spattered water in the basin he can see
copper carp, lazily floating among cold leaves. A wind-harp in a cedar-tree
grieves and whispers, and words blow into his brain, bubbled, iridescent,
shooting up like flowers of fire, higher and higher. Boom!
The flame-flowers snap on their slender stems. The fountain rears up
in long broken spears of dishevelled water and flattens into the earth. Boom!
And there is only the room, the table, the candle, and the sliding rain.
Again, Boom! - Boom! - Boom! He stuffs his fingers into his ears.
He sees corpses, and cries out in fright. Boom! It is night,
and they are shelling the city! Boom! Boom!
246
A child wakes and is afraid, and weeps in the darkness. What has made
the bed shake? 'Mother, where are you? I am awake.' 'Hush, my Darling,
I am here.' 'But, Mother, something so queer happened, the room shook.'
Boom! 'Oh! What is it? What is the matter?' Boom! 'Where is Father?
I am so afraid.' Boom! The child sobs and shrieks. The house
trembles and creaks. Boom!
Retorts, globes, tubes, and phials lie shattered. All his trials
oozing across the floor. The life that was his choosing, lonely, urgent,
goaded by a hope, all gone. A weary man in a ruined laboratory,
that is his story. Boom! Gloom and ignorance, and the jig of drunken brutes.
Diseases like snakes crawling over the earth, leaving trails of slime.
Wails from people burying their dead. Through the window, he can see
the rocking steeple. A ball of fire falls on the lead of the roof,
and the sky tears apart on a spike of flame. Up the spire,
behind the lacings of stone, zigzagging in and out of the carved tracings,
squirms the fire. It spouts like yellow wheat from the gargoyles, coils round
the head of Saint John, and aureoles him in light. It leaps into the night
and hisses against the rain. The Cathedral is a burning stain on the white,
wet night.
Boom! The Cathedral is a torch, and the houses next to it begin to scorch.
Boom! The bohemian glass on the `etagere' is no longer there.
Boom! A stalk of flame sways against the red damask curtains.
The old lady cannot walk. She watches the creeping stalk and counts.
Boom! - Boom! - Boom!
The poet rushes into the street, and the rain wraps him in a sheet of silver.
But it is threaded with gold and powdered with scarlet beads. The city burns.
Quivering, spearing, thrusting, lapping, streaming, run the flames.
Over roofs, and walls, and shops, and stalls. Smearing its gold on the sky,
the fire dances, lances itself through the doors, and lisps and chuckles
along the floors.
The child wakes again and screams at the yellow petalled flower
flickering at the window. The little red lips of flame creep along
the ceiling beams.
247
The old man sits among his broken experiments and looks at
the burning Cathedral. Now the streets are swarming with people.
They seek shelter and crowd into the cellars. They shout and call,
and over all, slowly and without force, the rain drops into the city.
Boom! And the steeple crashes down among the people. Boom! Boom, again!
The water rushes along the gutters. The fire roars and mutters. Boom!
~ Amy Lowell,
639:Hesperus: A Legend Of The Stars
PRELUDE.
The Stars are heaven's ministers;
Right royally they teach
God's glory and omnipotence,
In wondrous lowly speech.
All eloquent with music as
The tremblings of a lyre,
To him that hath an ear to hear
They speak in words of fire.
Not to learned sagas only
Their whisperings come down;
The monarch is not glorified
Because he wears a crown.
The humblest soldier in the camp
Can win the smile of Mars,
And 'tis the lowliest spirits hold
Communion with the stars.
Thoughts too refined for utterance,
Ethereal as the air,
Crowd through the brain's dim labyrinths,
And leave their impress there;
As far along the gleaming void
Man's tender glances roll,
Wonder usurps the throne of speech,
But vivifies the soul.
Oh, heaven-cradled mysteries,
What sacred paths ye've trodBright, jewelled scintillations from
The chariot-wheels of God!
When in the spirit He rode forth,
With vast creative aim,
These were His footprints left behind,
To magnify His name!
38
--We gazed on the Evening Star,
Mary and I,
As it shone
On its throne
Afar,
In the blue sky;
Shone like a ransomed soul
In the depths of that quiet heaven;
Like a pearly tear,
Trembling with fear
On the pallid cheek of Even.
And I thought of the myriad souls
Gazing with human eyes
On the light of that star,
Shining afar,
In the quiet evening skies;
Some with winged hope,
Clearing the cope
Of heaven as swift as light,
Others, with souls
Blind as the moles,
Sinking in rayless night.
Dreams such as dreamers dream
Flitted before our eyes;
Beautiful visions!Angelo's, Titian's,
Had never more gorgeous dyes:
We soared with the angels
Through vistas of glory,
We heard the evangels
Relate the glad story
Of the beautiful star,
Shining afar
In the quiet evening skies.
And we gazed and dreamed,
Till our spirits seemed
39
Absorbed in the stellar world;
Sorrow was swallowed up,
Drained was the bitter cup
Of earth to the very lees;
And we sailed over seas
Of white vapour that whirled
Through the skies afar,
Angels our charioteers,
Threading the endless spheres,
And to the chorus of angels
Rehearsed the evangels
The Birth of the Evening Star.
--I.
Far back in the infant ages,
Before the eras stamped their autographs
Upon the stony records of the earth;
Before the burning incense of the sun
Rolled up the interlucent space,
Brightening the blank abyss;
Ere the Recording Angel's tears
Were shed for man's transgressions:
A Seraph, with a face of light,
And hair like heaven's golden atmosphere,
Blue eyes serene in their beatitude,
Godlike in their tranquillity,
Features as perfect as God's dearest work,
And stature worthy of her race,
Lived high exalted in the sacred sphere
That floated in a sea of harmony
Translucent as pure crystal, or the light
That flowed, unceasing, from this higher world
Unto the spheres beneath it. Far below
The extremest regions underneath the Earth
The first spheres rose, of vari-coloured light,
In calm rotation through aerial deep,
Like seas of jasper, blue, and coralline,
Crystal and violet; layers of worlds-
40
The robes of ages that had passed away,
Left as memorials of their sojournings.
For nothing passes wholly. All is changed.
The Years but slumber in their sepulchres,
And speak prophetic meanings in their sleep.
FIRST ANGEL.
Oh, how our souls are gladdened,
When we think of that brave old age,
When God's light came down
From heaven, to crown
Each act of the virgin page!
Oh, how our souls are saddened,
At the deeds which were done since then,
By the angel race
In the holy place,
And on earth by the sons of men!
Lo, as the years are fleeting,
With their burden of toil and pain,
We know that the page
Of that primal age
Will be opened up once again.
II.
Progressing still, the bright-faced Seraph rose
From Goodness to Perfection, till she stood
The fairest and the best of all that waked
The tuneful echoes of that lofty world,
Where Lucifer, then the stateliest of the throng
Of Angels, walked majestical, arrayed
In robes of brightness worthy of his place.
And all the intermediate spheres were homes
Of the existences
Of spiritual life.
41
Love, the divine arcanum, was the bond
That linked them to each other-heart to heart,
And angel world to world, and soul to soul.
Thus the first ages passed,
Cycles of perfect bliss,
God the acknowledged sovereign of all.
Sphere spake with sphere, and love conversed with love,
From the far centre to sublimest height,
And down the deep, unfathomable space,
To the remotest homes of angel-life,
A viewless chain of being circling all,
And linking every spirit to its God.
ANGEL CHORUS.
Spirits that never falter,
Before God's altar
Rehearse their paeans of unceasing praise;
Their theme the boundless love
By which God rules above,
Mysteriously engrafted
On grace divine, and wafted
Into every soul of man that disobeys.
Not till the wondrous being
Of the All-Seeing
Is manifested to finite man,
Can ye understand the love
By which God rules above,
Evermore extending,
In circles never-ending,
To every atom in the universal plan.
SECOND ANGEL.
Oh, the love beyond computing
Of the high and holy place!
The unseen bond
Circling beyond
42
The limits of time and space.
Through earth and her world of beauty
The heavenly links extend,
Man feels its presence,
Imbibes its essence,
But cannot yet comprehend.
THIRD ANGEL.
But the days are fast approaching,
When the Father of Love will send
His interpreter
From the highest sphere,
That man fully may comprehend.
III.
Oh, truest Love, because the truest life!
Oh, blest existence, to exist with Love!
Oh, Love, without which all things else must die
The death that knows no waking unto life!
Oh, Jealousy that saps the heart of Love,
And robs it of its tenderness divine;
And Pride, that tramples with its iron hoof
Upon the flower of love, whose fragrant soul
Exhales itself in sweetness as it dies!
A lofty spirit surfeited with Bliss!
A Prince of Angels cancelling all love,
All due allegiance to his rightful Lord;
Doing dishonour to his high estate;
Turning the truth and wisdom which were his
For ages of supreme felicity,
To thirst for power, and hatred of his God,
Who raised him to such vast preeminence!
SECOND ANGEL CHORUS.
43
Woe, woe to the ransomed spirit,
Once freed from the stain of sin,
Whose pride increases
Till all love ceases
To nourish it from within!
Its doom is the darkened regions
Where the rebel angel legions
Live their long night of sorrow;
Where no expectant morrow,
No mercy-tempered ray
From the altar of to-day,
Comes down through the gloom to borrow
One dropp from their cup of sorrow,
Or lighten their cheerless way.
FIRST ANGEL.
But blest be the gentle spirit
Whose love is ever increased
From its own pure soul,
The illumined goal
Where Love holds perpetual feast!
IV.
Ingrate Angel, he,
To purchase Hell, and at so vast a price!
'Tis the old story of celestial strifeRebellion in the palace-halls of GodFalse angels joining the insurgent ranks,
Who suffered dire defeats, and fell at last
From bliss supreme to darkness and despair.
But they, the faithful dwellers in the spheres,
Who kept their souls inviolate, to whom
Heaven's love and truth were truly great rewards:
For these the stars were sown throughout all space,
As fit memorials of their faithfulness.
The wretched lost were banished to the depths
Beneath the lowest spheres. Earth barred the space
44
Between them and the Faithful. Then the hills
Rose bald and rugged o'er the wild abyss;
The waters found their places; and the sun,
The bright-haired warder of the golden morn,
Parting the curtains of reposing night,
Rung his first challenge to the dismal shades,
That shrunk back, awed, into Cimmerean gloom;
And the young moon glode through the startled void
With quiet beauty and majestic mien.
SECOND ANGEL.
Slowly rose the daedal Earth,
Through the purple-hued abysm
Glowing like a gorgeous prism,
Heaven exulting o'er its birth,
Still the mighty wonder came,
Through the jasper-coloured sphere,
Ether-winged, and crystal-clear,
Trembling to the loud acclaim,
In a haze of golden rain,
Up the heavens rolled the sun,
Danae-like the earth was won,
Else his love and light were vain.
So the heart and soul of man
Own the light and love of heaven,
Nothing yet in vain was given,
Nature's is a perfect plan.
V.
The glowing Seraph with the brow of light
Was first among the Faithful. When the war
Between heaven's rival armies fiercely waged,
She bore the Will Divine from rank to rank,
The chosen courier of Deity.
45
Her presence cheered the combatants for Truth,
And Victory stood up where'er she moved.
And now, in gleaming robe of woven pearl,
Emblazoned with devices of the stars,
And legends of their glory yet to come,
The type of Beauty Intellectual,
The representative of Love and Truth,
She moves first in the innumerable throng
Of angels congregating to behold
The crowning wonder of creative power.
THIRD ANGEL CHORUS,
Oh, joy, that no mortal can fathom,
To rejoice in the smile of God!
To be first in the light
Of His Holy sight,
And freed from His chastening rod.
Faithful, indeed, that soul, to be
The messenger of Deity!
FIRST ANGEL.
This, this is the chosen spirit,
Whose love is ever increased
From its own pare soul,
The illumined goal
Where Love holds perpetual feast.
VI.
With noiseless speed the angel charioteers
In dazzling splendour all triumphant rode;
Through seas of ether painfully serene,
That flashed a golden, phosphorescent spray,
As luminous as the sun's intensest beams,
46
Athwart the wide, interminable space.
Legion on legion of the sons of God;
Vast phalanxes of graceful cherubim;
Innumerable multitudes and ranks
Of all the hosts and hierarchs of heaven,
Moved by one universal impulse, urged
Their steeds of swiftness up the arch of light,
From sphere to sphere increasing as they came,
Till world on world was emptied of its race.
Upward, with unimaginable speed,
The myriads, congregating zenith-ward,
Reached the far confines of the utmost sphere,
The home of Truth, the dwelling-place of Love,
Striking celestial symphonies divine
From the resounding sea of melody,
That heaved in swells of soft, mellifluous sound,
To the blest crowds at whose triumphal tread
Its soul of sweetness waked in thrills sublime,
The sun stood poised upon the western verge;
The moon paused, waiting for the march of earth,
That stayed to watch the advent of the stars;
And ocean hushed its very deepest deeps
In grateful expectation.
SECOND ANGEL.
Still through the viewless regions
Of the habitable air,
Through the ether ocean,
In unceasing motion,
Pass the multitudinous legions
Of angels everywhere.
Bearing each new-born spirit
Through the interlucent void
To its starry dwelling,
Angel anthems telling
Every earthly deed of merit
To each flashing asteroid.
47
THIRD ANGEL.
Through the realms sidereal,
Clothed with the immaterial,
Far as the fields elysian
In starry bloom extend,
The stretch of angel vision
Can see and comprehend.
VII.
Innumerable as the ocean sands
The angel concourse in due order stood,
In meek anticipation waiting for
The new-created orbs,
Still hidden in the deep
And unseen laboratory, where
Not even angel eyes could penetrate:
A star for each of that angelic host,
Memorials of their faithfulness and love.
The Evening Star, God's bright eternal gift
To the pure Seraph with the brow of light,
And named for her, mild Hesperus,
Came twinkling down the unencumbered blue,
On viewless wings of sweet melodious sound,
Beauty and grace presiding at its birth.
Celestial plaudits sweeping through the skies
Waked resonant paeans, till the concave thrilled
Through its illimitable bounds.
With a sudden burst
Of light, that lit the universal space
As with a flame of crystal,
Rousing the Soul of Joy
That slumbered in the patient sea,
From every point of heaven the hurrying cars
Conveyed the constellations to their thronesThe throbbing planets, and the burning suns,
Erratic comets, and the various grades
48
And magnitudes of palpitating stars.
From the far arctic and antarctic zones,
Through all the vast, surrounding infinite,
A wilderness of intermingling orbs,
The gleaming wonders, pulsing earthward, came;
Each to its destined place,
Each in itself a world,
With all its coining myriad life,
Drawing us nearer the Omnipotent,
With hearts of wonder, and with souls of praise:
Astrea, Pallas, strange Aldebaran,
The Pleiads, Arcturus, the ruddy Mars,
Pale Saturn, Ceres and OrionAll as they circle still
Through the enraptured void.
For each young angel born to us from earth,
A new-made star is launched among its peers.
FULL ANGEL CHORUS.
Dreamer in the realms aerial,
Searcher for the true and good,
Hoper for the high, ethereal
Limit of Beatitude,
Lift thy heart to heaven, for there
Is embalmed thy spirit prayer:
Not in words is shrined thy prayer,
But thy Thought awaits thee there.
God loves the silent worshipper.
The grandest hymn
That nature chants-the litany
Of the rejoicing stars-is silent praise.
Their nightly anthems stir
The souls of lofty seraphim
In the remotest heaven. The melody
Descends in throbbings of celestial light
Into the heart of man, whose upward gaze,
And meditative aspect, tell
Of the heart's incense passing up the night.
Above the crystalline height
The theme of thoughtful praise ascends.
49
Not from the wildest swell
Of the vexed ocean soars the fullest psalm;
But in the evening calm,
And in the solemn midnight, silence blends
With silence, and to the ear
Attuned to harmony divine
Begets a strain
Whose trance-like stillness wakes delicious pain.
The silent tear
Holds keener anguish in its orb of brine,
Deeper and truer grief
Than the loud wail that brings relief,
As thunder clears the atmosphere.
But the deep, tearless Sorrow,-how profound!
Unspoken to the ear
Of sense, 'tis yet as eloquent a sound
As that which wakes the lyre
Of the rejoicing Day, when
Morn on the mountains lights his urn of fire.
The flowers of the glen
Rejoice in silence; huge pines stand apart
Upon the lofty hills, and sigh
Their woes to every breeze that passeth by;
The willow tells its mournful tale
So tenderly, that e'en the passing gale
Bears not a murmur on its wings
Of what the spirit sings
That breathes its trembling thoughts through all the
drooping strings.
He loves God most who worships most
In the obedient heart.
The thunder's noisome boast,
What is it to the violet lightning thought?
So with the burning passion of the starsCreation's diamond sands,
Strewn along the pearly strands,
And far-extending corridors
Of heaven's blooming shores;
No scintil of their jewelled flame
But wafts the exquisite essence
Of prayer to the Eternal Presence,
50
Of praise to the Eternal Name.
The silent prayer unbars
The gates of Paradise, while the too-intimate,
Self-righteous' boast, strikes rudely at the gate
Of heaven, unknowing why it does not open to
Their summons, as they see pale Silence passing through.
VIII.
In grateful admiration, till the Dawn
Withdrew the gleaming curtains of the night,
We watched the whirling systems, until each
Could recognize their own peculiar star;
When, with the swift celerity
Of Fancy-footed Thought,
The light-caparisoned, aerial steeds,
Shod with rare fleetness,
Revisited the farthest of the spheres
Ere the earth's sun had kissed the mountain tops,
Or shook the sea-pearls from his locks of gold.
--Still on the Evening Star
Gazed we with steadfast eyes,
As it shone
On its throne
Afar,
In the blue skies.
No longer the charioteers
Dashed through the gleaming spheres;
No more the evangels
Rehearsed the glad story;
But, in passing, the angels
Left footprints of glory:
For up the starry void
Bright-flashing asteroid,
Pale moon and starry choir,
Aided by Fancy's fire,
51
Rung from the glittering lyre
Changes of song and hymn,
Worthy of Seraphim.
Night's shepherdess sat, queenlike, on her throne,
Watching her starry flocks from zone to zone,
While we, like mortals turned to breathing stone,
Intently pondered on the Known Unknown.
~ Charles Sangster,

IN CHAPTERS [96/96]



   31 Integral Yoga
   16 Fiction
   10 Occultism
   9 Psychology
   6 Christianity
   4 Yoga
   4 Philosophy
   3 Science
   2 Cybernetics
   1 Poetry
   1 Integral Theory
   1 Alchemy


   16 H P Lovecraft
   12 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   10 Sri Aurobindo
   10 Satprem
   7 Carl Jung
   6 The Mother
   5 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   4 Aleister Crowley
   3 Swami Krishnananda
   3 Aldous Huxley
   2 Norbert Wiener
   2 Jordan Peterson
   2 George Van Vrekhem
   2 A B Purani


   16 Lovecraft - Poems
   5 Liber ABA
   4 Mysterium Coniunctionis
   4 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04
   3 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   3 The Perennial Philosophy
   3 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   3 Letters On Yoga IV
   2 The Secret Doctrine
   2 The Practice of Psycho therapy
   2 The Future of Man
   2 Preparing for the Miraculous
   2 On the Way to Supermanhood
   2 Maps of Meaning
   2 Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   2 Essays Divine And Human
   2 Cybernetics
   2 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07
   2 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03
   2 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02
   2 Agenda Vol 08
   2 Agenda Vol 07


01.03 - Sri Aurobindo and his School, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   And, properly speaking, it is not at all a school, least of all a mere school of thought, that is growing round Sri Aurobindo. It is rather the nucleus of a new life that is to come. Quite naturally it has almost insignificant proportions at present to the outward eye, for the work is still of the nature of experiment and trial in very restricted limits, something in the nature of what is done in a Laboratory when a new power has been discovered, but has still to be perfectly formulated in its process. And it is quite a mistake to suppose that there is a vigorous propaganda carried on in its behalf or that there is a large demand for recruits. Only the few, who possess the call within and are impelled by the spirit of the future, have a chance of serving this high attempt and great realisation and standing among its first instruments and pioneer workers.
   ***

01.04 - The Poetry in the Making, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   In other words, the tension in the human consciousness has been raised to the nth power, the heat of a brooding consciousness is about to lead it to an outburst of new creationsah tapastaptva. Human self-consciousness, the turning of oneself upon oneself, the probing and projecting of oneself into oneselfself-consciousness raised so often to the degree of self-torture, marks the acute travail of the spirit. The thousand "isms" and "logies" that pullulate in all fields of life, from the political to the artistic or even the religious and the spiritual indicate how the human Laboratory is working at white heat. They are breaches in the circuit of the consciousness, volcanic eruptions from below or cosmic-ray irruptions from above, tearing open the normal limit and boundaryBaudelaire's couvercle or the "golden lid" of the Upanishads-disclosing and bringing into the light of common day realities beyond and unseen till now.
   Ifso long the poet was more or less a passive, a half-conscious or unconscious intermediary between the higher and the lower lights and delights, his role in the future will be better fulfilled when he becomes fully aware of it and consciously moulds and directs his creative energies. The poet is and has to be the harbinger and minstrel of unheard-of melodies: he is the fashioner of the creative word that brings down and embodies the deepest aspirations and experiences of the human consciousness. The poet is a missionary: he is missioned by Divine Beauty to radiate upon earth something of her charm and wizardry. The fullness of his role he can only play up when he is fully conscious for it is under that condition that all obstructing and obscuring elements lying across the path of inspiration can be completely and wholly eradicated: the instrument purified and tempered and transmuted can hold and express golden truths and beauties and puissances that otherwise escape the too human mould.

0 1966-01-26, #Agenda Vol 07, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   It was about those big shrimps that are called jumbo prawns here: they are as big as crayfish. Someone (a disciple here), who died rather a long time ago, came and brought me prawns; that is to say, I met him in the rooms downstairs There are rooms that are reproduced somewhere, in a sort of subconscient, in fact the subconscient that has to be transformed, organized and so on, and there exists a sort of reproduction of the rooms downstairs [below Mothers room], but not exactly the same (yet with the same layout), and a certain category of activities takes place there. Thats where we were together once, I told you: you were trying to clarify peoples ideas (!) Its the same place. Its not physical here, its in the subconscient. So then, there was that tall fellow who watched over the Samadhi for a long time, Haradhan; he was there. And when he saw me arrive, he told me, I have brought something for you. And in a sort of dark-blue cloth, he had wrapped two big prawns, which he gave me! There were already cooked, ready to be eaten. The cloth wasnt very much to my liking! So I thought, How can I make them a little cleaner before eating them? (Laughing) You know, its a farcea farce to make you understand your stupidity. I began by removing the (what is it called?), its not skin Oh, here too the word hasnt come, but on a tangent came cuirass! (Laughing) Cuirass and cartilage! Anyway I removed that, and as soon as I had removed it, I said to myself, You fool! Now its even more exposed than before! I looked for a way, and I ran to a corner (in the place of Pavitras Laboratory), found a water tap and put my prawn under the tap. Immediately someone told me (not someone, the inner voice told me [laughing]), Your water is even dirtier than the cloth! So the consciousness came along with the light, and I was shown with such a clear vision the relativity of the measures we take, which are all preconceived ideas, based on no true knowledge. And finally he told me, Come on, eat, thats the best you can do! So I ate my prawn, and it was very good!
   You know, we could write a farce. And scenes of such buffoonery!

0 1966-03-02, #Agenda Vol 07, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Wait, I am not seeing clearly anymore (Mother takes her head in her hands and stays motionless for a moment) You know, in a very precise, material and detailed way I am developing the power to heal. I dont do it deliberately, thats just how it is. And then (laughing), I am given opportunities to test, to experiment on my own bodytheres always something the matter. Suddenly something goes wrong and I apply my hand, or simply do a concentration, some movement or other, and everything disappears but materially: the power to heal. You know, I apply my hand and then the Force goes through. Its very interesting. Only (laughing), I am the Laboratory! Thats not so funny.
   ***

0 1967-05-17, #Agenda Vol 08, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   An Italian professor did some research in Mexico. He says: Human cells can generate enough electrical energy to electrocute another human being standing eighteen feet away. Dr. Ruggiero feels that his experiments in human cells may result in the cure of paralysis and he says that an electrical energy screen generated by human cells could be used to stop bullets. Electrical energy could make a human dynamo capable not only of inflicting death, but of literally walking on air. By connecting cables to the human frame, human cells could produce energy and light sufficient to fill the power needs of an average home or small manufacturing unit. In experiments in his Mexico City Laboratory, Dr. Ruggiero has produced a current from a goat enough to light up a series of 40 watt bulbs and to activate an electric door bell
   But its been known for a long time that cats, the skin of cats, is full of electricity. It was used in the past to cure rheumatism.

0 1967-12-30, #Agenda Vol 08, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Some things are really interesting. For instance, Id like there to be To begin with, every country will have its pavilion, and in the pavilion, there will be the cuisine of that country, which means that the Japanese will be able to eat Japanese food if they want to(!), etc., but in the township itself, there will be food for vegetarians, food for nonvegetarians, and also a sort of experiment to find tomorrows food. You see, all this work of assimilation which makes you so heavy (it takes up so much time and energy from the being) should be done BEFORE, you should be able to immediately assimilate what you are given, as with things they make now; for instance, they have those vitamins that can be directly assimilated, and also (what do they call it? (Mother tries to remember) I take them every day. Words and I arent on very good terms!) proteins. Nutritive principles that are found in one thing or another and arent bulkyyou need to take a tremendous quantity of food to assimilate very little. So now that they are fairly clever with chemicals, that could be simplified. People dont like it, simply because they take an intense pleasure in eating(!), but when you no longer take pleasure in eating, you need to be nourished and not to waste your time with that. The amount of time lost is enormous: time for eating, time for digesting, and the rest. So I would like to have an experimental kitchen there, a sort of culinary Laboratory, to try out. And according to their tastes and tendencies, people would go here or there.
   And you dont pay for your food, but you must give your work, or the ingredients: for example, those who had fields would give the produce of their fields; those who had factories would give their products; or else your own work in exchange for food.

0 1971-12-11, #Agenda Vol 12, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   For the problem is fundamental. It is not a question of bringing a new philosophy to the world or new ideas or illuminations, as they are called. The question is not of making the Prison of our lives more habitable, or of endowing man with ever more fantastic powers. Armed with his microscopes and telescopes, the human gnome remains a gnome, pain-ridden and helpless. We send rockets to the moon, but we know nothing of our own hearts. It is a question, says Sri Aurobindo, of creating a new physical nature which is to be the habitation of the Supramental being in a new evolution.3 For, in actuality, he says, the imperfection of Man is not the last word of Nature, but his perfection too is not the last peak of the Spirit.4 Beyond the mental man we are, there exists the possibility of another being who will be the spearhead of evolution as man was once the spearhead of evolution among the great apes. If, says Sri Aurobindo, the animal is a living Laboratory in which Nature has, it is said, worked out man, man himself may well be a thinking and living Laboratory in whom and with whose conscious co-operation she wills to work out the superman, the god.5 Sri Aurobindo has come to tell us how to create this other being, this supramental being, and not only to tell us but actually to create this other being and open the path of the future, to hasten upon earth the rhythm of evolution, the new vibration that will replace the mental vibrationexactly as a thought one day disturbed the slow routine of the beastsand will give us the power to shatter the walls of our human prison.
   Indeed, the prison is already starting to collapse. The end of a stage of evolution, announced by Sri Aurobindo, is usually marked by a powerful recrudescence of all that has to go out of the evolution.6 Everywhere about us we see this paroxysmal shattering of all the old forms: our borders, our churches, our laws, our morals are collapsing on all sides. They are not collapsing because we are bad, immoral, irreligious, or because we are not sufficiently rational, scientific or human, but because we have come to the end of the human! To the end of the old mechanism for we are on our way to SOMETHING ELSE. The world is not going through a moral crisis but through an evolutionary crisis. We are not going towards a better worldnor, for that matter, towards a worse onewe are in the midst of a MUTATION to a radically different world, as different as the human world was from the ape world of the Tertiary Era. We are entering a new era, a supramental Quinary. We leave our countries, wander aimlessly, we go looking for drugs, for adventure, we go on strike here, enact reforms there, foment revolutions and counterrevolutions. But all this is only an appearance; in fact, unwittingly, we are looking for the new being. We are in the midst of human evolution.

03.15 - Towards the Future, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   We know today, thanks to modern science, of the mystery of particles. The ultimate constituents of the material world consist of particles (or wave-particles), that is to say, packets of material energy strung together or merely juxtaposed, but held together somehow. Now the Buddhists added that these are particles of energy no doubt, but the energy is not mere material, i.e., electrical energy; they are desire-energy. Human being or consciousness is an aggregate of cells of desire-energy. The task man has before him the alchemy or Laboratory work man is to do is to empty the cells of desire and so annihilate "them; desire gone, cells crumble awayexistence becomes Nihilan inexpressible stillness or tranquillity.
   There is however another solution. The cells can be emptied -of desire, but a new element can be put in the place of desire or desire itself can be transmuted.

05.04 - The Immortal Person, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Ego means a hardened core that is not easily broken by the impact of forces. It delimits, ,cuts out, endeavours to maintain its formation by a strong violent self-assertion. Ego is a helper, but also it is a bar. It assists the first formation but delays and obstructs the true and final formation. For the ego is a formation, an individual formation, but on the level of universal Nature: it is of a piece with the normal cosmic movement, only bounded by a peripheral line. In the general expanse it puts up enclosures and preserves and fencings; the constituting elements remaining the same in substance and quality. Even the delimitation is illusory in reality, it is something like the membrane in the body separating the different functional organs, rigid yet allowing interaction and interpenetration. That is why, when death removes the outward fencing, the individuality also cannot long maintain itself and merges into the general. We may look upon egoism as a kind of artificial or experimental individuality, a Laboratory formation, as it were, tried and developed under given conditions. In fact, however, egoism is a shadow or an echo upon this side of our nature of the true individuality which lies and comes from elsewhere.
   And that is the soul of the man. We have spoken of the body, the life and the mind of the individual, but beside and beyond these elements which are only instruments there is this secret master and overlord. It is the particle of divinity in each, the developing consciousness the spark of Fire, the ray of Light the immortal in the mortal no bigger than one's thumb." The soul is an individual, an individual formation of the divine reality: it is a godhead formulating an aspect or function of God. We may thus say that the whole purpose of earthly evolution is the evolution of this soul-formation, that is to say, its growing individualisation in light and power, in the expression of the godhead. This growth is first in itself and of itself, its inherent being and consciousness; then, the growth is that of its instrumentation, in other words, the development and organisation of the mind, the life and the body.

07.06 - Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A sample from the Laboratory of God
  Of which he holds the patent upon earth,

07.22 - Mysticism and Occultism, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Occultism is the knowledge of invisible forces and the power to handle them. It is a science, altogether a science. I always compare occultism with chemistry or physics; for occult knowledge is very much like scientific knowledge, only science deals with material objects and forces, while occultism deals with invisible entities and energies, their potentials of combination and association. And as by your chemical or physical knowledge you control material phenomena, in the same way by the occult knowledge you control subtle phenomena, make them active and effective. The procedure also is quite scientific. It is to be learnt exactly as you do a science. It is not a matter of feeling or emotion: it is nothing vague or uncertain. You must work as in a Laboratory. You have to learn the laws of action and reaction and apply them. Only there are not many people to teach you. Also it is not without danger. There are in this field combinations as explosive as any chemical combination.
   It is a thing, however, that can be learnt. But one must have the aptitude. If you have the power latent in you, you can develop it by practice; but if you have not, you can try for 50 years, it will come to nothing. Everybody cannot have the occult power; it is as if you said that everybody in the world could be a musician or a painter or a poet. There are people who can and there are those who cannot. Usually, if you are interested in the subject, unless it is a mere idle curiosity, it is a sign that you have the gift. You then try. But, as I say, it is to be done with great precaution.

10.01 - Cycles of Creation, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The present cycle, the great cycle that is to say, has, as I have said, for its ultimate motive and purpose the advent and reign of the Supermind. But this proceeds through stages, each stage forming a minor or lesser cycle. The stages of these cycles are the different degrees of what is called evolution. The evolution starts upon the basis of an apparently simple substance and goes on unfolding gradually an inherent complexity. As we know, the different cycles of evolution in the past were at the outset a purely material universe of inorganic elements, then came the cycle of organic combinations, then the manifestation of life and next the mind and at present the mind at its peak capacity, which means the advent of the strange creature that has a miraculous destiny to accomplish. And that is to bring forth out of him the achievement and fulfilment of the next cycle. For the mind is there to bring forth, to usher in the Supermind and man is there as the Laboratory and the vanguard as well of the Supermind.
   At the present time the human consciousness in general has been so prepared and its dwelling and playfield the earth consciousness made ready to such a degree that it has been possible for the still secreted higher perfection to enter into the arena. The evolution, the growth has been a gradual expression and revelation of the light, the consciousness in a higher and higher degree of purity and potency through an encasement hard and resistant at first but gradually yielding to the impact of the higher status and even transforming itself so as to become its instrument and embodiment. We speak of the present situation, we are concerned with man and what he is to grow into or bring out of himself. Here also there seem to be stages or cycles of creation leading to the final achievement. The whole burden of the present endeavour is how to transcend, transform or modify the animalhood which is the basis of humanity even now and in and through which man is growing and seeking to manifest and incarnate his superior potencies. Man's supramental destiny means that he totally outgrows the animal, outgrows even his manhood in so far as it is merely human; for he has to incorporate the principle of the supramental which wholly transcends the mental.

1.007 - Initial Steps in Yoga Practice, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  Whenever there is repeated persistence in one given direction with reference to any chosen point of attention, we will see that some sort of success results. If a Laboratory scientist is to analyse the structure of an atom, he will analyse a particular atom repeatedly by bombarding it with various kinds of light rays, but he will not go on changing the atoms today this atom, tomorrow that atom, today a hydrogen atom, tomorrow some other thing. That will not lead to success. A particular object will be taken up for consideration, observation and analysis, and a repeated attempt will be made to go deep into its structure until its mystery is revealed. So for this, great leisure is necessary, persistence is necessary, energy and willpower are necessary, and there is no need to mention that we must be free from all other outward distractions. When one takes to the practice of yoga, there should be no distraction of any pronounced nature. Minor distractions may be there, but serious distractions which will divert our attention markedly from the point of attention should not be there.
  A fixed place, a fixed time, and a fixed method of concentration are called for. In one of the aphorisms of the sutras of Patanjali, which is very relevant to this point, it is said that the practise should be for a long period: sa tu drghakla nairantarya satkra sevita dhabhmi (I.14). If we want to establish ourselves in yoga, some conditions are to be fulfilled. One condition he mentions is that the practice should be for a protracted period I said at least five years, and not less than five years. It should be repeatedly done every day, without missing even a single day. Even if we have a temperature, fever or a headache, we should not miss it, because these are obstacles. The more we try to exert our will in the practice of concentration, the more will the body also try to revolt. It will create all kinds of complications we will have indigestion, we will have a stomachache, we will have a headache, we will have fever all sorts of things will come. As a matter of fact, it is specifically mentioned in the Yoga Sutras that we will fall sick. It will be an obstacle, and we should not think, "Today I am sick; I will not meditate." That is what it wants, and then it has succeeded. So, first of all, a little guarded way of living may be called for to see, as far as possible, that we do not become so ill that we cannot even sit for a few minutes of meditation. By a regulation of diet and living in a climate that is not too extreme, etc., one can be somewhat free from the anxiety of falling ill to the extent that it would prevent us from doing anything at all in the spiritual field.

1.010 - Self-Control - The Alpha and Omega of Yoga, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  The effect here, which is our own personality and individuality, is projected by certain conditions as causative factors which do not operate outside our individuality, but are the very constituents of our individuality; therefore, what is called for is a very unusual type of transformation on the part of the effect, for the sake of the knowledge of its cause. All logical and scientific methods fail here because of a completely new type of technique that is expected to be employed. The observing scientist here is not sitting in a Laboratory with some instrument to observe the effect, or to know the nature of the cause of a particular effect. The observer is involved in the very act of observation, and herein is the difficulty. The observer is involved in the act of observation, so that the condition of the observer determines the condition of the observation and the nature of the observed effect.
  The effect, which is this individuality of ours, is nothing but a spatial and temporal projection of a particular condition called the cause. The more we become externalised, the more we become spatial and temporal. The more we go towards the cause internally, the less is the pressure exerted on us by space, time and relevant conditions. But the more we proceed further and further in an external direction towards space, time and objects, the more we become automatons, more and more enslaved, more and more helpless, more and more puppets, as it were. We become more and more free and autonomous the more we withdraw ourselves from spatial and temporal conditions and tend to be what we are in our own selves. The causes of our existence as individuals are not capable of being known by the mind, because these causes drive even the mind in a particular way for its function in space and in time.

1.01 - A NOTE ON PROGRESS, #The Future of Man, #Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, #Christianity
  to our requirements in the Laboratory; but who has shaped or wit-
  nessed the shaping of a geological stratum? The rock which we

1.01 - Newtonian and Bergsonian Time, #Cybernetics, or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, #Norbert Wiener, #Cybernetics
  in the Laboratory. Compared with the distances between them,
  the planets, and even the sun, are very nearly points. Compared

1.01 - THAT ARE THOU, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  The lack of a suitable vocabulary and an adequate frame of reference, and the absence of any strong and sustained desire to invent these necessary instruments of though there are two sufficient reasons why so many of the almost endless potentialities of the human mind remained for so long unactualized. Another and, on its own level, equally cogent reason is this: much of the worlds most original and fruitful thinking is done by people of poor physique and of a thoroughly unpractical turn of mind. Because this is so, and because the value of pure thought, whether analytical or integral, has everywhere been more or less clearly recognized, provision was and still is made by every civilized society for giving thinkers a measure of protection from the ordinary strains and stresses of social life. The hermitage, the monastery, the college, the academy and the research Laboratory; the begging bowl, the endowment, patronage and the grant of taxpayers moneysuch are the principal devices that have been used by actives to conserve that rare bird, the religious, philosophical, artistic or scientific contemplative. In many primitive societies conditions are hard and there is no surplus wealth. The born contemplative has to face the struggle for existence and social predominance without protection. The result, in most cases, is that he either dies young or is too desperately busy merely keeping alive to be able to devote his attention to anything else. When this happens the prevailing philosophy will be that of the hardy, extraverted man of action.
  All this sheds some lightdim, it is true, and merely inferentialon the problem of the perennialness of the Perennial Philosophy. In India the scriptures were regarded, not as revelations made at some given moment of history, but as eternal gospels, existent from everlasting to everlasting, inasmuch as coeval with man, or for that matter with any other kind of corporeal or incorporeal being possessed of reason. A similar point of view is expressed by Aristotle, who regards the fundamental truths of religion as everlasting and indestructible. There have been ascents and falls, periods (literally roads around or cycles) of progress and regress; but the great fact of God as the First Mover of a universe which partakes of His divinity has always been recognized. In the light of what we know about prehistoric man (and what we know amounts to nothing more than a few chipped stones, some paintings, drawings and sculptures) and of what we may legitimately infer from other, better documented fields of knowledge, what are we to think of these traditional doctrines? My own view is that they may be true. We know that born contemplatives in the realm both of analytic and of integral thought have turned up in fair numbers and at frequent intervals during recorded history. There is therefore every reason to suppose that they turned up before history was recorded. That many of these people died young or were unable to exercise their talents is certain. But a few of them must have survived. In this context it is highly significant that, among many contemporary primitives, two thought-patterns are foundan exoteric pattern for the unphilosophic many and an esoteric pattern (often monotheistic, with a belief in a God not merely of power, but of goodness and wisdom) for the initiated few. There is no reason to suppose that circumstances were any harder for prehistoric men than they are for many contemporary savages. But if an esoteric monotheism of the kind that seems to come natural to the born thinker is possible in modern savage societies, the majority of whose members accept the sort of polytheistic philosophy that seems to come natural to men of action, a similar esoteric doctrine might have been current in prehistoric societies. True, the modern esoteric doctrines may have been derived from higher cultures. But the significant fact remains that, if so derived, they yet had a meaning for certain members of the primitive society and were considered valuable enough to be carefully preserved. We have seen that many thoughts are unthinkable apart from an appropriate vocabulary and frame of reference. But the fundamental ideas of the Perennial Philosophy can be formulated in a very simple vocabulary, and the experiences to which the ideas refer can and indeed must be had immediately and apart from any vocabulary whatsoever. Strange openings and theophanies are granted to quite small children, who are often profoundly and permanently affected by these experiences. We have no reason to suppose that what happens now to persons with small vocabularies did not happen in remote antiquity. In the modern world (as Vaughan and Traherne and Wordsworth, among others, have told us) the child tends to grow out of his direct awareness of the one Ground of things; for the habit of analytical thought is fatal to the intuitions of integral thinking, whether on the psychic or the spiritual level. Psychic preoccupations may be and often are a major obstacle in the way of genuine spirituality. In primitive societies now (and, presumably, in the remote past) there is much preoccupation with, and a widespread talent for, psychic thinking. But a few people may have worked their way through psychic into genuinely spiritual experiencejust as, even in modern industrialized societies, a few people work their way out of the prevailing preoccupation with matter and through the prevailing habits of analytical thought into the direct experience of the spiritual Ground of things.

1.01 - The Human Aspiration, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  4:We speak of the evolution of Life in Matter, the evolution of Mind in Matter; but evolution is a word which merely states the phenomenon without explaining it. For there seems to be no reason why Life should evolve out of material elements or Mind out of living form, unless we accept the Vedantic solution that Life is already involved in Matter and Mind in Life because in essence Matter is a form of veiled Life, Life a form of veiled Consciousness. And then there seems to be little objection to a farther step in the series and the admission that mental consciousness may itself be only a form and a veil of higher states which are beyond Mind. In that case, the unconquerable impulse of man towards God, Light, Bliss, Freedom, Immortality presents itself in its right place in the chain as simply the imperative impulse by which Nature is seeking to evolve beyond Mind, and appears to be as natural, true and just as the impulse towards Life which she has planted in certain forms of Matter or the impulse towards Mind which she has planted in certain forms of Life. As there, so here, the impulse exists more or less obscurely in her different vessels with an ever-ascending series in the power of its will-to-be; as there, so here, it is gradually evolving and bound fully to evolve the necessary organs and faculties. As the impulse towards Mind ranges from the more sensitive reactions of Life in the metal and the plant up to its full organisation in man, so in man himself there is the same ascending series, the preparation, if nothing more, of a higher and divine life. The animal is a living Laboratory in which Nature has, it is said, worked out man. Man himself may well be a thinking and living Laboratory in whom and with whose conscious co-operation she wills to work out the superman, the god. Or shall we not say, rather, to manifest God? For if evolution is the progressive manifestation by Nature of that which slept or worked in her, involved, it is also the overt realisation of that which she secretly is. We cannot, then, bid her pause at a given stage of her evolution, nor have we the right to condemn with the religionist as perverse and presumptuous or with the rationalist as a disease or hallucination any intention she may evince or effort she may make to go beyond. If it be true that Spirit is involved in Matter and apparent Nature is secret God, then the manifestation of the divine in himself and the realisation of God within and without are the highest and most legitimate aim possible to man upon earth.
  5:Thus the eternal paradox and eternal truth of a divine life in an animal body, an immortal aspiration or reality inhabiting a mortal tenement, a single and universal consciousness representing itself in limited minds and divided egos, a transcendent, indefinable, timeless and spaceless Being who alone renders time and space and cosmos possible, and in all these the higher truth realisable by the lower term, justify themselves to the deliberate reason as well as to the persistent instinct or intuition of mankind. Attempts are sometimes made to have done finally with questionings which have so often been declared insoluble by logical thought and to persuade men to limit their mental activities to the practical and immediate problems of their material existence in the universe; but such evasions are never permanent in their effect. Mankind returns from them with a more vehement impulse of inquiry or a more violent hunger for an immediate solution. By that hunger mysticism profits and new religions arise to replace the old that have been destroyed or stripped of significance by a scepticism which itself could not satisfy because, although its business was inquiry, it was unwilling sufficiently to inquire. The attempt to deny or stifle a truth because it is yet obscure in its outward workings and too often represented by obscurantist superstition or a crude faith, is itself a kind of obscurantism. The will to escape from a cosmic necessity because it is arduous, difficult to justify by immediate tangible results, slow in regulating its operations, must turn out eventually to have been no acceptance of the truth of Nature but a revolt against the secret, mightier will of the great Mother It is better and more rational to accept what she will not allow us as a race to reject and lift it from the sphere of blind instinct, obscure intuition and random aspiration into the light of reason and an instructed and consciously self-guiding will. And if there is any higher light of illumined intuition or self-revealing truth which is now in man either obstructed and inoperative or works with intermittent glancings as if from behind a veil or with occasional displays as of the northern lights in our material skies, then there also we need not fear to aspire. For it is likely that such is the next higher state of consciousness of which Mind is only a form and veil, and through the splendours of that light may lie the path of our progressive self-enlargement into whatever highest state is humanity's ultimate resting-place.

1.01 - The Offering, #Hymn of the Universe, #Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, #Christianity
  who in office, Laboratory and factory, through their
  vision of truth or despite their error, truly believe

1.02 - MAPS OF MEANING - THREE LEVELS OF ANALYSIS, #Maps of Meaning, #Jordan Peterson, #Psychology
  rate.117 Similar responses are expressed when Laboratory rats are exposed to a cat for the first time, but
  following amygdala lesions such responses are no longer present,118 suggesting that the responses are
  --
  behavior, or interpretive schema. The (relatively) novel target Laboratory tone, for example, is investigated
  for its underlying structure by the cortical systems involved in audition. These systems actively analyze the
  --
  When a cat is presented to established mixed-sex groups of Laboratory rats living in a visible burrow
  system, the behaviors of the subjects change dramatically, in many cases for 24 hours or more.124 The

1.02 - Meeting the Master - Authors second meeting, March 1921, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Zen
   I had lived there for nearly a generation but had never felt the Pondicherry Ashram as something fixed and unchanging. I realised this most strongly on the day I was returning to it. Pondicherry has always been to me the symbol of a great experiment, of a divine ideal. It is marching every hour towards the ultimate goal of mans upward ascent to the Divine. Not a city but a spiritual Laboratory, a collective being with a daily changing horizon yet pursuing a fixed distant objective, a place fixed to the outer view but constantly moving Pondicherry to me is always like the Arab's tent.
   ***

1.02 - THE NATURE OF THE GROUND, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  Mind affects its body in four wayssubconsciously, through that unbelievably subtle physiological intelligence, which Driesch hypostatized under the name of the entelechy; consciously, by deliberate acts of will; subconsciously again, by the reaction upon the physical organism of emotional states having nothing to do with the organs or processes reacted upon; and, either consciously or subconsciously, in certain supernormal manifestations. Outside the body matter can be influenced by the mind in two waysfirst, by means of the body and, second, by a supernormal process, recently stuthed under Laboratory conditions and described as the PK effect. Similarly, the mind can establish relations with other minds either indirectly, by willing its body to undertake symbolic activities, such as speech or writing; or supernormally, by the direct approach of mind-reading, telepathy, extra-sensory perception.
  Let us now consider these relationships a little more closely. In some fields the physiological intelligence works on its own initiative, as when it directs the never-ceasing processes of breathing, say, or assimilation. In others it acts at the behest of the conscious mind, as when we will to accomplish some action, but do not and cannot will the muscular, glandular, nervous and vascular means to the desired end. The apparently simple act of mimicry well illustrates the extraordinary nature of the feats performed by the physiological intelligence. When a parrot (making use, let us remember, of the beak, tongue and throat of a bird) imitates the sounds produced by the lips, teeth, palate and vocal cords of a man articulating words, what precisely happens? Responding in some as yet entirely uncomprehended way to the conscious minds desire to imitate some remembered or immediately perceived event, the physiological intelligence sets in motion large numbers of muscles, co-ordinating their efforts with such exquisite skill that the result is a more or less perfect copy of the original. Working on its own level, the conscious mind not merely of a parrot, but of the most highly gifted of human beings, would find itself completely baffled by a problem of comparable complexity.
  --
  Finally we come to such occurrences as faith healing and levitationoccurrences supernormally strange, but nevertheless attested by masses of evidence which it is hard to discount completely. Precisely how faith cures diseases (whether at Lourdes or in the hypnotists consulting room), or how St. Joseph of Cupertino was able to ignore the laws of gravitation, we do not know. (But let us remember that we are no less ignorant of the way in which minds and bodies are related in the most ordinary of everyday activities.) In the same way we are unable to form any idea of the modus operandi of what Professor Rhine has called the PK effect. Nevertheless the fact that the fall of dice can be influenced by the mental states of certain individuals seems now to have been established beyond the possibility of doubt. And if the PK effect can be demonstrated in the Laboratory and measured by statistical methods, then, obviously, the intrinsic credibility of the scattered anecdotal evidence for the direct influence of mind upon matter, not merely within the body, but outside in the external world, is thereby notably increased. The same is true of extra-sensory perception. Apparent examples of it are constantly turning up in ordinary life. But science is almost impotent to cope with the particular case, the isolated instance. Promoting their methodological ineptitude to the rank of a criterion of truth, dogmatic scientists have often branded everything beyond the pale of their limited competence as unreal and even impossible. But when tests for ESP can be repeated under standardized conditions, the subject comes under the jurisdiction of the law of probabilities and achieves (in the teeth of what passionate opposition!) a measure of scientific respectability.
  Such, very baldly and briefly, are the most important things we know about mind in regard to its capacity to influence matter. From this modest knowledge about ourselves, what are we entitled to conclude in regard to the divine object of our nearly total ignorance?

10.30 - India, the World and the Ashram, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   We know also that the earth is the symbol of the cosmic evolution. What creation means has been epitomised in earth's history: the earth has been chosen as the field and means of working out a cosmic plan. As the earth is the representative of the world, so India is the representative of the earth. For the evolution of the earth, India has been chosen as the channel and the Laboratory; all problems confronting humanity are found as if gathered here. All that is solved here will be solved almost automatically in the world and the how of it will be shown. All difficulties are concentrated here because here there is a living consciousness which alone can solve them.
   In the same way it may be said that our Ashram here is the symbol of all the difficulties that humanity faces, difficulties psychological and material, national and social. All varieties of contradictions and contraries, obstacles and impediments, ignorances and prejudices are here that confuse the issue and seek to delay the journey as much as possible, towards progress and new creation. This is because it is a place where there is behind the surface movements of negation, an aspiration and a supporting consciousness supreme in power and effectivity. The individuals here have to meet all kinds of difficulties so that a way out of them may be discovered both in the individual nature and in collective achievement. .

10.37 - The Golden Bridge, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The recoil from the brute facts of life, the concrete living realities has affected even the world of artistic creation. We are very much familiar with what has been called abstract art, that is to say, art denuded of all content. The supreme art today is this sketch of bare skeletoneven a skeleton, not in its organised form but merely dismembered bits strewn about. Even poetry, the art that is perhaps most bound to the sense pattern, as no other, so indissolubly married to sense-life, seems to be giving way to the new impact and inspiration. A poetry devoid of all thought-content, pure of all sentiment and understandable imagery is being worked out in the Laboratory, as it were, a new poetry made of a bizarre combination of tones and syllables with a changed form too in regard to arrangement of lines and phrases. It is the pure form that is aimed at the very essence, it is said, what is quintessential!
   In other words, mind, that is to say, the rational mind on which stands man's superiority has now been so developed, developed along a single line, has specialised itself so much that it has almost defeated its own purpose. Today it has entered a cul-de-sac, a blind alley where it has bogged itself and does not know where and how to move.

1.03 - Concerning the Archetypes, with Special Reference to the Anima Concept, #The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  gerated expectations of this experimental Laboratory science
  were reflected in Fechner's "psychophysics," and its results today

1.03 - Preparing for the Miraculous, #Preparing for the Miraculous, #George Van Vrekhem, #Integral Yoga
  of the Divine. The animal is a living Laboratory in which
  Nature has, it is said, worked out Man. Man himself may
  well be a thinking and living Laboratory in whom and with
  whose conscious co-operation she wills to work out the su-

1.03 - Time Series, Information, and Communication, #Cybernetics, or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, #Norbert Wiener, #Cybernetics
  tistical Laboratory. The ingenuity needed in their use has been
  built into them in advance, just as it has into the automatic
  --
  whether in the computing Laboratory or in the telephone circuit,
  have to deal with the recording, preservation, transmission, and

1.04 - SOME REFLECTIONS ON PROGRESS, #The Future of Man, #Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, #Christianity
  we have been able to reconstruct in the Laboratory, any movement of
  Life, if such exists, must of necessity show itself.

1.04 - The Future of Man, #Let Me Explain, #Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, #Christianity
  workshop by the Laboratory, of production by research, of
  the desire for well-being by the desire for more-being - what

1.05 - 2010 and 1956 - Doomsday?, #Preparing for the Miraculous, #George Van Vrekhem, #Integral Yoga
  being. The animal is a living Laboratory in which Nature
  has, it is said, worked out man. Man himself may well be
  a thinking and living Laboratory in whom and with whose
  conscious cooperation she wills to work out the superman,112

1.05 - THE HOSTILE BROTHERS - ARCHETYPES OF RESPONSE TO THE UNKNOWN, #Maps of Meaning, #Jordan Peterson, #Psychology
  question of Laboratory operations is proven by the insistence on the virtues and qualities of the
  alchemist: the latter must be healthy, humble, patient, chaste; he must be of free spirit and in harmony
  --
  Newton experimented in his Laboratory with the operations described in the immense alchemical
  literature, probing the latter as it has never been probed before or since (p. 88). With the aid of
  --
  Brooks, A. (1991). Intelligence without Reason. MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory: Artificial
  Intelligence Memo 1293.
  Brooks, A., and Stein, L.A. (1993). Building Brains for Bodies. MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory:
  Artificial Intelligence Memo 1439.
  --
  Sensory abilities of Cetaceans: Laboratory and field evidence (pp.19-30). New York: Plenum Press.
  Goethe, J.W. (1979a). Faust, part one (P. Wayne, Trans.). London: Penguin Books.

1.07 - The Farther Reaches of Human Nature, #Sex Ecology Spirituality, #Ken Wilber, #Philosophy
  First and foremost, if this higher unfolding is to be called "religious" or "spiritual," it is a very far cry from what is ordinarily meant by those terms. We have spent several chapters painstakingly reviewing the earlier developments of the archaic, magic, and mythic structures (which are usually associated with the world's great religions), precisely because those structures are what transpersonal and contemplative development is not. And here we can definitely agree with Campbell: if 99.9 percent of people want to call magic and mythic "real religion," then so be it for them (that is a legitimate use);10 but that is not what the world's greatest yogis, saints, and sages mean by mystical or "really religious" development, and in any event is not what I have in mind. Campbell, however, is quite right that a very, very few individuals, during the magic and mythic and rational eras, were indeed able to go beyond magic, beyond mythic, and beyond rational-into the transrational and transpersonal domains. And even if their teachings (such as those of Buddha, Christ, Patanjali, Padmasambhava, Rumi, and Chih-i) were snapped up by the masses and translated downward into magic and mythic and egoic terms-"the salvation of the individual soul"-that is not what their teachings clearly and even blatantly stated, nor did they intentionally lend any support to such endeavors. Their teachings were about the release from individuality, and not about its everlasting perpetuation, a grotesque notion that was equated flat-out with hell or samsara. Their teachings, and their contemplative endeavors, were (and are) transrational through and through. That is, although all of the contemplative traditions aim at going within and beyond reason, they all start with reason, start with the notion that truth is to be established by evidence, that truth is the result of experimental methods, that truth is to be tested in the Laboratory of personal experience, that these truths are open to all those who wish to try the experiment and thus disclose for themselves the truth or falsity of the spiritual claims-and that dogmas or given beliefs are precisely what hinder the emergence of deeper truths and wider visions.
  Thus, each of these spiritual or transpersonal endeavors (which we will carefully examine) claims that there exist higher domains of awareness, embrace, love, identity, reality, self, and truth. But these claims are not dogmatic; they are not believed in merely because an authority proclaimed them, or because sociocentric tradition hands them down, or because salvation depends upon being a "true believer." Rather, the claims about these higher domains are a conclusion based on hundreds of years of experimental introspection and communal verification. False claims are rejected on the basis of consensual evidence, and further evidence is used to adjust and fine-tune the experimental conclusions.

1.089 - The Levels of Concentration, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  Now we go deeper still. Is there such a thing as wooden pulp? It is nothing but a heap of chemical substances. The wooden pulp is nothing but a chemical value, assessable and measurable in a Laboratory. Perhaps we will be able to manufacture, chemically, certain substances which are equivalent to wooden pulp. We can chemically manufacture paper without wood. The essence of the wooden pulp is nothing but a chemical substance so much of carbon, so much of this, so much of that. They have been mixed in a particular proportion, in permutation and combination, and what we call the wooden pulp is nothing but a chemical substance. So we have gone from currency note to paper, from paper to wooden pulp, and from wooden pulp we have gone to the chemical substance. What is the chemical substance made of?
  We go deeper still. The physicist will see the chemical substance in a different way altogether. His angle of vision is different. The physicists observation will reveal certain atomic forces which have been arranged in a particular manner to form that chemical substance called the wooden pulp. The velocity and the arrangement of the electrons around a nucleus determine the structure of the chemical substance. It may be hydrogen, it may be carbon, it may be nitrogen whatever it is. These chemical substances are really not independent, indivisible physical matter. They are only certain arrangements of electrical particles to which everything is reducible, says the physicist.

1.1.04 - Philosophy, #Essays Divine And Human, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  I have wandered in regions illuminated by no material sun," and he answers, "You are only fit for the gaol or the lunatic asylum." No one has seen the earth whirling round the sun, indeed we see daily the opposite, yet he holds the first opinion obstinately, but if you say "Although God is not seen of men, yet He exists," he turns from you angrily and stalks into his Laboratory.
  The practical man avoids error by refusing to think at all.

1.12 - God Departs, #Twelve Years With Sri Aurobindo, #Nirodbaran, #Integral Yoga
  Since midday the symptoms were on the increase, particularly the breathing difficulty; urine output definitely diminished. That was an alarming signal. We decided to make a thorough blood analysis. Sri Aurobindo consented after a great deal of reluctance. Our poor human vision! It was a Sunday; the General Hospital was closed. Dr. Nripendra and I hunted out the Laboratory assistant; he took some blood from Sri Aurobindo's imperceptible vein. The punctures were painful to the sensitive body which was getting transformed. The result of the examination staggered us. All the signs of imminent kidney failure and nothing to be done! As a last resort we had to give some drugs. He was now always indrawn, and only woke up whenever he was called for a drink. That confirmed the Mother's observation that he was fully conscious within and disproved the idea that he was in uraemic coma. Throughout the entire course of the illness he was never unconscious.
  By 5 p.m. there was a respite and he called for the commode. In view of the distress, we requested him not to move out of the bed, but he firmly insisted. He knew evidently what he was doing while we always looked through our medical glasses. There was a thorough purposive clearance of the bowels though he had taken very little food for many days. He then walked to the big cushion chair; again a self of calm repose. Alas, but for a brief instant. The respiratory distress returned with redoubled force. He went to his bed and plunged deep within himself. It was during this period that he often came out of the trance, and each time leaned forward, hugged and kissed Champaklal who was sitting by the side of his bed. Champaklal also hugged him in return. A wonderful sight it was, though so strangely unlike Sri Aurobindo who had rarely called us even by our names in these twelve years. We knew that Champaklal particularly longed for some tender outward expression. But Sri Aurobindo's impersonal nature kept at bay all personal touches except during our birthday or Darshan pranams when he would pat and caress our heads. Now Champaklal had his heart's yearning gratified to the full extent. But on what grounds? Was it the repayment of God's debt to his "servant" for his lifelong dedicated service without the expectation of any other meed than perhaps some occasional look or touch or word? For my part too, I can count a few glowing touches that shine like stars on a dark night. First of all, soon after the completion of Savitri, as I would enter his room in the morning, he would cast a moment's quiet glance at me leaving me in wonderment but happy. Then, when I did pranam on my birthday, 17th November, and the last Darshan day, he was unusually tender and caressed and pressed my head for a long time. But the climax of the wonder came when I was massaging his right leg. He was quietly lying down in bed; I was within the reach of his right hand. As I bent down, I suddenly felt a quick touch of his palm on my head. At once I looked up; all was as before. His gaze was elsewhere as if he knew nothing about it. I was utterly mystified. That these were indications of his imminent withdrawal became clear only after he had left the body. I am sure my other colleagues also received either vivid or veiled tokens.

1.12 - The Sociology of Superman, #On the Way to Supermanhood, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  There are ten or twenty, perhaps fifty, here or there, in one latitude or another, who yearn to till a truer plot of land, a small patch of man to grow a truer being within themselves, perhaps create together a Laboratory of the superman, lay the first stone of the City of Truth on earth. They do not know, they do not know anything, except that they need something else and that there exists a Law of Harmony, a marvelous something of the Future seeking to be incarnated. They want to find the conditions of that incarnation, to lend themselves to the trial, to offer their substance for that living experiment. They know nothing except that everything must be different: in hearts, in gestures, in matter and the handling of matter. They are not seeking to create a new civilization, but another man; not a supercity among the millions of buildings of the world, but a listening post for the forces of the future, a supreme yantra of Truth, a conduit, a channel to try to capture and inscribe in matter a first note of the great Harmony, a first tangible sign of the new world. They do not pose as the champions of anything; they do not defend any liberty or attack any ism. They simply try together. They are the champions of their own pure little note, which is unlike the next person's and yet is everyone's note. They are no longer from a country, a family, a religion or a party; they belong to their own party, which is no one else's and yet is the party of the world, because what becomes true at one point becomes true for the whole world and brings the whole world together. They are from a family to be invented, from a country yet to be born. They do not try to correct others or anybody, to pour self-glorifying charities over the world, to cure the poor and the lepers; they try to cure the great poverty of smallness in themselves, the gray elf of the inner misery, to reclaim one single parcel of truth from themselves, one single ray of harmony. For if that Disease is cured in our own heart or a few hearts, the world will be that much lighter, and, through our clarity, the Law of Truth will better penetrate matter and radiate all around spontaneously. What liberation, what relief can a man who suffers in his own heart bring to the world? They do not work for themselves, though they are the primary ground of the experience, but as an offering, pure and simple, to that which they do not really know, but which shimmers at the edge of the world like the dawn of a new age. They are the prospectors of the new cycle. They have given themselves to the future, body and soul, the way one jumps into the fire, without a look back. They are the servants of the infinite in the finite, of the totality in the infinitesimal, of eternity in each second and each gesture. They create their heaven with each step and carve the new world out of the banality of the day. And they are not afraid of failure, for they have left behind the failures and success of the prison they live in the sole infallibility of a right little note.
  But these builders of the new world will have to be careful not to erect a new prison, be it an ideal and enlightened one. In fact, they will understand, and quickly that this City of Truth will not and cannot see the light of day until they themselves live totally in the Truth, and that that building site is first and foremost the site of their own transmutation. One does not deceive Truth.
  --
  The apprentice superman does not believe in suffering. He believes in enrichment through joy; he believes in Harmony. He does not believe in education; he believes in the power of truth in the heart of all things and all beings he only helps that truth to grow with as little interference as possible. He trusts in the powers of that truth. He knows that man always moves toward his goal, inexorably, despite everything he is told or taught he only tries to suppress that despite. He simply waters that little sapling of truth and then again, with some caution, for some saplings prefer a sandy and rocky soil. But, at least, in that City or rather, Laboratory of the future the child will be born in less stifling conditions. He will not be brainwashed, met at every street corner by screaming posters, corrupted by television or poisoned by vulgar movies, not burdened by all the vibrations of anxiety, fear or desire that his mother may have conscientiously accumulated in her womb through entertaining reading, debilitating films or a torn home life for everything is recorded, the slightest vibration, the least shock; everything enters the embryo freely, remains and accumulates there. The Greeks knew this well, and the Egyptians and the Indians, who used to surround the mother with special conditions of beauty and harmony so that the breath of the gods could pervade each day and each breath of the child, so that everything could be an inspiration of truth. And when the mother and father decided to have a child, they did it as a prayer, a sacrifice for incarnating the gods of the future. It takes only a spark of aspiration, a flame of entreaty, a luminous breath in the mother's heart for the same light to answer and come down, the identical flame, the kindred intensity of life if we are gray and dull, we will summon only the grayness and nothingness of millions of lifeless men.
  The child of that City will be born with a flame, consciously, voluntarily, without having to undo millennia of animality or abysses of prejudice. He will not be told incessantly that he has to earn a living, for nobody will earn a living in the City of the Future, nobody will have money. Living will be devoted to serving the Truth, each according to his capacity or talent, and the only earnings will be joy. He will not be deluged with musts and must-nots; he will only be shown the immediate sadness of not listening to the right little note. He will not be tormented with the idea of finding a job, being a success, outranking others, passing or failing grades, for nobody succeeds or fails in the City of the Future, nobody has a job, nobody takes precedence over anybody; one does the one job of pursuing a clear little note that lights up everything, does everything for one, takes care of everything for one, unites everything in its tranquil harmony, and whose only success is to be in accord with itself and with the whole. He will not learn to depend on a teacher, a book or a machine, but to rely on that little flame inside, that sprightly little flowing that guides his steps, prompts a discovery, leads by chance to an experience and brings out knowledge effortlessly. And he will learn to cultivate the powers of his body the way others today cultivate the powers of push buttons. His faculties will not be confined in ready-made forms of vision and comprehension; in him will be fostered a vision that has nothing to do with the eyes, a comprehension that is not from books, dreams of other worlds that prepare tomorrow's, direct communications and instant intuitions and subtle senses. And if machines are still used in the City of the Future, he will be told that they are temporary crutches until we find in our own heart the source of the pure Power which will one day transmute matter as we now transmute a blank sheet of paper into a green prairie with the stroke of a pencil. He will be taught the Look, the true and potent look, the look that creates, that changes everything he will be taught to use his own powers and to believe in his power of truth, and that the purer and clearer he is, in harmony with the Law, the more matter responds to Truth. And, instead of entering a prison, the child will grow up in an atmosphere of natural oneness, free of you, me, yours or mine, where he will not have been taught constantly to put up screens and mental barriers, but to be consciously what he unconsciously has been since the beginning of time: to extend himself into all that is and lives, to feel in all that feels, to comprehend through an identical more profound breathing, through a silence that carries everything, to recognize the same little flame everywhere, to love the same clear little flowing everywhere, and to be the self everywhere, behind a thousand different faces and in a thousand musics that are a single music.

1.12 - The Superconscient, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  Perhaps It seeks to experience the same Glory and Joy in conditions seemingly contrary to Its own, in a life besieged by death, ignorance, and obscurity, in the multitudinous diversity of the world, instead of in a blank unity. Then this life and this Matter would at least have a meaning; no longer a purgatory or an empty transition to the beyond, but a Laboratory where step by step through matter, plants, animals, and then an increasingly conscious human being the Spirit evolves the superman, the god: The soul has not finished what it has to do by merely developing into humanity; it has still to develop that humanity into its higher possibilities. Obviously, the soul that lodges in a Caribbee or an untaught primitive or an Apache of Paris or an American gangster, has not yet exhausted the necessity of human birth, has not developed all its possibilities or the whole meaning of humanity, has not worked out all the sense of Sachchidananda in the universal Man; neither has the soul lodged in a vitalistic European occupied with dynamic production and vital pleasure or in an Asiatic peasant engrossed in the ignorant round of the domestic and economic life. We may reasonably doubt whether even a Plato or a Shankara marks the crown and therefore the end of the outflowering of the spirit in man. We are apt to suppose that these may be the limit, because these and others like them seem to us the highest point which the mind of man can reach, but that may be the illusion of our present possibility. . . . The soul had a prehuman past, it has a superhuman future.
  Sri Aurobindo is not a theoretician of evolution; he is a practitioner of evolution. We have jumped ahead in this discussion merely to shed some light upon his groping process in the Alipore jail. He could see that that cosmic and blissful vastitude was not the place where any work could be done, that one had to come back down into the body, humbly, and search there. Yet, we may ask, if "the transformation" is to take place through a power of consciousness and not by some external machinery, what consciousness higher than the cosmic consciousness can there be? Is that not the top of the ladder and therefore the limit of power? The question is relevant if we wish to understand the practical process of the discovery, and eventually experience it ourselves. We might answer with two observations.

1.12 - TIME AND ETERNITY, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  From Hobbes onwards, the enemies of the Perennial Philosophy have denied the existence of an eternal now. According to these thinkers, time and change are fundamental; there is no other reality. Moreover, future events are completely indeterminate, and even God can have no knowledge of them. Consequently God cannot be described as Alpha and Omegamerely as Alpha and Lambda, or whatever other intermediate letter of the temporal alphabet is now in process of being spelled out. But the anecdotal evidence collected by the Society for Psychical Research and the statistical evidence accumulated during many thousands of Laboratory tests for extra-sensory perception point inescapably to the conclusion that even human minds are capable of foreknowledge. And if a finite consciousness can know what card is going to be turned up three seconds from now, or what shipwreck is going to take place next week, then there is nothing impossible or even intrinsically improbable in the idea of an infinite consciousness that can know now events indefinitely remote in what, for us, is future time. The specious present in which human beings live may be, and perhaps always is, something more than a brief section of transition from known past to unknown future, regarded, because of the vividness of memory, as the instant we call now; it may and perhaps always does contain a portion of the immediate and even of the relatively distant future. For the Godhead, the specious present may be precisely that interminabilis vitae tota simul et perpetua possessio, of which Boethius speaks.
  The existence of the eternal now is sometimes denied on the ground that a temporal order cannot co-exist with another order which is non-temporal; and that it is impossible for a changing substance to be united with a changeless substance. This objection, it is obvious, would be valid if the non-temporal order were of a mechanical nature, or if the changeless substance were possessed of spatial and material qualities. But according to the Perennial Philosophy, the eternal now is a consciousness; the divine Ground is spirit; the being of Brahman is chit, or knowledge. That a temporal world should be known and, in being known, sustained and perpetually created by an eternal consciousness is an idea which contains nothing self-contradictory.

1.13 - And Then?, #On the Way to Supermanhood, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  But the work is not finished. Evolution has not reached its summit; it has not even entered its solar Truth. If the Work were to stop here, we would have reached the summit of man and produced a super-man, but not the being of the next age. Our widened consciousness, our direct perceptions, our refined senses, our exact gestures and movements, our perfect actions, our right thoughts and right wills, our unalterable joy would still rest upon an animal body an aging, precarious and decaying body, which would threaten our luminous poise with abrupt collapse at every moment, checking the operation of our truth-consciousness with a tiny grain of sand and what kind of truth is that if it is so fragile? Truth is or is not, and it is immortal, infinite, invulnerable. It is light and luminous, incorruptible, and it cannot be prevented from being all that it is, any more than the mango tree can prevent itself from being a full tree with all its flowers and every one of its golden fruits. It will not stop at that limited accomplishment and will not rest until the whole earth and all beings are in its likeness, since the whole earth and all beings are in fact its own seeds. The superman, too, is a transitional being. He is the forerunner of another being on earth, as different from man as we are from the ape, and maybe even more, for man is still made of the same substance as the ape while the new being will be made of another substance immortal, luminous and light as Truth itself. He is the elaborator of the supramental being announced by Sri Aurobindo, and his substance is the humble Laboratory of a perilous adventure.
  Our body's cells must hold the Immortal's flame.

1.1.5 - Thought and Knowledge, #Letters On Yoga IV, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Assuredly, rejection means control of ones thoughts, and why should not one be master of ones own mind and thoughts and not only master of ones vital passions and bodily movements? If it is the right thing to control the body and not allow it to make a stupid, wrong or injurious movement, if it is the right thing to reject from the vital an ignorant passion or low desire, it must be equally the right thing to reject from the mind a thought that ought not to be there or that for good reasons one does not want to be there. As for possibility, I suppose when a thought that is manifestly stupid or false presents itself to the mind one can and usually does reject and throw it out and bid it not recur again. If one can do that with a given thought, it follows that one can do it with any thoughts that need for any reason to be excluded. If a scientist goes into his Laboratory to work out a problem, he shuts out from his mind for the time being all thoughts of his wife, his family or his financial affairs, and if they come he repels them and says, This is not your time. If he has resolved to carry out a line of investigation to the end or a method of invention and, if doubts assail him, he will certainly throw them aside and say, I mean to see this through to the end and till I have reached the end, I have no intention of listening to you. At every step a man of any mental calibre has to exercise some power over his mind, otherwise he would be as much in a state of restless mental confusion or of mechanical incoherence as one who had no control over his impulses and desires.
  ***

1.16 - Man, A Transitional Being, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  Light, Bliss, Freedom, Immortality presents itself in its right place in the chain as simply the imperative impulse by which Nature is seeking to evolve beyond Mind, and appears to be as natural, true and just as the impulse towards Life which she has planted in forms of Matter or the impulse towards Mind which she has planted in certain forms of life. . . . The animal is a living Laboratory in which Nature has, it is said, worked out man. Man himself may well be a thinking and living Laboratory in whom and with whose conscious cooperation she wills to work out the superman, the god. Or shall we not say, rather, to manifest God?334 If evolution succeeds in making this difficult transition, the great Equilibrium will be attained; we will enter "the vast home" (Rig Veda V.68.5); Force will have recovered all its Consciousness instead of wandering aimlessly, and Consciousness will have recovered all its Force instead of understanding and loving powerlessly.
  The rishis, too, knew that the journey was not over. They said that Agni "conceals his two extremities," that Agni is "without head and without feet." (Rig Veda IV.1.7,11) We are a tiny flame lost between the superconscious Agni of heaven and the subconscious Agni of the earth, and we suffer, tossing and turning upon our bed of misery, some 331

1.17 - The Transformation, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  Transformation is not one individual's prerogative; on the contrary, it requires many individuals, as diverse as possible. The Ashram was only a symbolic point of the work, as a Laboratory is the symbolic testing-ground for a vaccine that will benefit millions of people. Sri Aurobindo himself often called his Ashram the Laboratory. This might be better appreciated if we understand that each individual represents a certain aggregate of vibrations and is in contact with a certain zone of the subconscient. These worlds, apparently full of diversity, are in fact each made up of a few typical vibrations; the multiplicity of forms (of deformations, rather), of beings, places, or events within a given zone merely mask an identical vibration. The moment we become somewhat conscious and begin to descend into the subconscient (without becoming overwhelmed) in order to work, we are surprised,
  or sometimes even amused, to find that some persons we know, who are outwardly very different from one another when we meet them on the mental or vital planes, are almost the same and interchangeable in the subconscient! Thus, people separated by different religions,
  --
  It's even more than a difficulty; I think I told you before that each one represents an impossibility to be resolved; when all these imposibilities are resolved, the Work will be over. As previously mentioned, each person has a shadow that keeps pursuing him and that seems to contradict the very aim of his existence. This is the particular vibration he must transform, his field of work, his impossible knot. At once the challenge of his life and its potential triumph, it is his share in the progress of the collective evolution upon the earth. But something curious happens in this particular Laboratory: in ordinary life, or in an individual yoga, the shadow is more or less dormant,
  more or less bothersome, and usually dissolves by itself or, rather,

12.03 - The Sorrows of God, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   At the very outset the light descends as a shower of scattered glowing points into the heart of things, secreted and unobserved; that gives only just a basis for the progressive upward movement. It initiates a mere possibility. For a more effective power, for the dynamic upward drive other descents are necessary, descents of individual formations, individualities and personalities embodying the light and force of conscious ness. This becomes tangible when the light enters into the human creation. All men, all human formations are individualised specks of light cast into a material shape. And this shape bears all the stigma of inconscient nature. But it is the work and mission of the secret immanent light to corrode into the dense dark material and illumine and new create it. The whole suffering humanity presents the picture of a Laboratory where a new laser beam is operating for the realisation of a renovated humanity.
   Great souls, Avatars, are a necessity, an inevitability in the process of evolution and ascension, for they are individualisations, impersonations so to say, in whom the consciousness energy is massively stored and concretised for a greater and radical effective power of realisation. Inevitably this means as I have said the assumption of all the ills of nature; for the very purpose of incarnation is to purify the external nature, so that it becomes one with the inner being. So, all terrestrial human beings share in the impurity of the ignorant ordinary nature and share also, as secretly conscious entities although outwardly almost absolutely unconscious, in the general work of progress and purification. But there are beings who come forward as conscious formations with the mission of uplifting, transmuting, divinising humanity.

1f.lovecraft - Ashes, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   sound-proof Laboratory of his, on the top floor of his home. Then he
   got so busy with his confounded experiments he couldnt find time to be
  --
   bit in his Laboratory, and I soon discovered she took a genuine
   interest in puttering around, making experiments of her own. Indeed,
   she spent nearly all her spare time with us in the Laboratory.
   It was only natural that such companionship should result in a close
  --
   About two months ago Van Allister had the Laboratory partitioned off,
   and made a separate workroom for himself. He told us that he was about
  --
   realize that the Laboratory was no place for such ardent
   demonstrations. At any moment Van Allister might come out of his
  --
   and not once did I lay eyes upon her until my tasks in the Laboratory
   were completed.
  --
   wanted me in the Laboratory.
   I was in no mood for experiments, but while I was under his roof he
  --
   to me to close the door of the Laboratory and join him in the little
   room.
  --
   admitted us to Van Allisters home. Bruce let us into the Laboratory
   with his key. The door of the workshop was still ajar.
  --
   Together we bore the limp figure of the girl into the Laboratory. Bruce
   hastily mixed a concoction which he forced between her lips. A second
  --
   was needless to gag me. As you know, the Laboratory is absolutely
   sound-proof.

1f.lovecraft - At the Mountains of Madness, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   Wish I had a real Laboratory here. Dyer better kick himself for
   having tried to stop my westward trip. First the worlds greatest
  --
   despite the heat of a gasoline stove in the newly raised Laboratory
   tent, the deceptively flexible tissues of the chosen specimena
  --
   emerged from the Laboratory tent, and studied the intact specimens with
   renewed interest. The ceaseless antarctic sun had begun to limber up
  --
   had tried to analyse. On and around that Laboratory table were strown
   other things, and it did not take long for us to guess that those
  --
   smudges on the Laboratory table, and on the jumble of roughly handled
   illustrated books scattered near it, we were much too bewildered to

1f.lovecraft - Cool Air, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   had mentionedwas merely the Laboratory of the doctor; and that his
   main living quarters lay in the spacious adjoining room whose
  --
   mixed a suitable draught of drugs fetched from the smaller Laboratory
   room. Evidently he found the society of a well-born man a rare novelty
  --
   finally even 28; the bathroom and Laboratory, of course, being less
   chilled, in order that water might not freeze, and that chemical
  --
   Laboratory supply houses.
   An increasing and unexplained atmosphere of panic seemed to rise around

1f.lovecraft - From Beyond, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   Laboratory and his house in a burst of fanatical rage. I had known that
   he now remained mostly shut in the attic Laboratory with that accursed
   electrical machine, eating little and excluding even the servants, but
  --
   to talk to himself. We entered the Laboratory in the attic, and I
   observed that detestable electrical machine, glowing with a sickly,
  --
   curtain of a theatre. I saw the attic Laboratory, the electrical
   machine, and the unsightly form of Tillinghast opposite me; but of all
  --
   machine which now lay hopelessly shattered on the Laboratory floor. I
   did not tell very much of what I had seen, for I feared the coroner

1f.lovecraft - Herbert West-Reanimator, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   fitted up on the ground floor an operating room and a Laboratory, each
   with dark curtains to conceal our midnight doings. The place was far
  --
   It was agreed to call the whole thing a chemical Laboratory if
   discovery should occur. Gradually we equipped our sinister haunt of
  --
   apparatus was too costly for our unauthorised Laboratory. Bodies were
   always a nuisanceeven the small guinea-pig bodies from the slight
  --
   acetylene lamp into the adjacent Laboratory, we left our silent guest
   on the slab in the dark, and bent every energy to the mixing of a new
  --
   repeating his daring misuse of the college Laboratory.
   The peak of the epidemic was reached in August. West and I were almost
  --
   do. But what actually absorbed our minds was the secret Laboratory we
   had fitted up in the cellarthe Laboratory with the long table under
   the electric lights, where in the small hours of the morning we often
  --
   circumstances. But at the time of the scream in the cellar Laboratory
   of the isolated Bolton cottage, our fears were subordinate to our
  --
   secret cellar Laboratory a corpse whose decay could not by any
   possibility have begun. What would happen on reanimation, and whether
  --
   cellar Laboratory and gazed at a white, silent figure beneath the
   dazzling arc-light. The embalming compound had worked uncannily well,
  --
   nightmarish session in the cellar Laboratory when I learned that a
   certain specimen had been a living body when he secured it. That was
  --
   delirium. West had a private Laboratory in an east room of the
   barn-like temporary edifice, assigned him on his plea that he was
  --
   corner of the Laboratory, over a queer incubating burner, he kept a
   large covered vat full of this reptilian cell-matter; which multiplied
  --
   in a shadowy corner of the Laboratory. The shell had been merciful, in
   a waybut West could never feel as certain as he wished, that we two
  --
   of little use to a scientist seeking very fresh bodies. The Laboratory
   was in a sub-cellar secretly constructed by imported workmen, and
  --
   the walls of the secret Laboratory. I speak of Wests decadence, but
   must add that it was a purely mental and intangible thing. Outwardly he
  --
   thing down to the Laboratorylistening. I do not remember many
   particularsyou can imagine my state of mindbut it is a vicious lie to
  --
   Laboratory in single file; led by a stalking thing with a beautiful
   head made of wax. A sort of mad-eyed monstrosity behind the leader

1f.lovecraft - Out of the Aeons, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   view and transferred to the museum Laboratory awaiting a really
   scientific examination before some suitable medical authority.
  --
   the Laboratory equipment, he began at once; exclaiming aloud at the
   odd, fibrous nature of the grey, mummified substance.

1f.lovecraft - The Alchemist, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   much like an alchemists Laboratory. In one corner was an immense pile
   of a shining yellow metal that sparkled gorgeously in the light of the

1f.lovecraft - The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   of negro blood. In the lean-to of this house was the Laboratory where
   most of the chemical experiments were conducted. Curious porters and
  --
   farmhouse and Laboratory whither he had never invited anyone before;
   and the two drove out at once in Mr. Merritts coach.
  --
   the Laboratory being in a lean-to toward the north, where the roof came
   nearly to the ground. This building stood clear of any other; yet
  --
   a Laboratory in the unused attic of the house, and for the latter
   haunting all the sources of vital statistics in Providence. Local
  --
   not in his new Laboratory with a score of obsolete alchemical books,
   could be found either poring over old burial records down town or glued
  --
   a Laboratory which he had established in one of his rooms. That he said
   nothing of antiquarian rambles in the glamorous old city with its
  --
   sounds heard at all hours from Wards attic Laboratory, in which he
   kept himself most of the time. There were chantings and repetitions,
  --
   The odours occasionally wafted from the Laboratory were likewise
   exceedingly strange. Sometimes they were very noxious, but more often
  --
   usual to his Laboratory. He exhibited a curious interest in the
   weather, and made odd inquiries about the date of the spring thawing of
  --
   the dark shades of his Laboratory windows and appearing to be working
   on some metal substance. He would open the door to no one, and
  --
   Laboratory upon any pretext. This, indeed, proved the beginning of a
   new policy of secrecy; for never afterward was any other person
  --
   been listening in despair outside her sons locked Laboratory, shivered
   as she recognised its hellish import; for Charles had told her of its
  --
   corridor outside the Laboratory; and realising that she had fainted,
   hastened to fetch a glass of water from a set bowl in a neighbouring
  --
   seemingly silent Laboratory was not as silent as it had appeared to be,
   but held the murmurs of a tense, muffled conversation in tones too low
  --
   Charless Laboratory. On the third floor, however, he paused at the
   sounds which he heard proceeding from the now disused library of his
  --
   library and the attic Laboratory. His actions were quiet and rational,
   but he had a furtive, hunted look which his mother did not like, and
  --
   Laboratory elsewhere. At the loss of the portrait he grieved singularly
   little considering his first enthusiasm over it, but seemed to find
  --
   Laboratory which brought a stern reproof from Mr. Ward and a somewhat
   distracted promise of amendment from Charles. It occurred one morning,
  --
   early evening there had been some noise and thumping in the Laboratory
   upstairs, and Mr. Ward was on the point of investigating when it
  --
   Laboratory above; sounds as if of sobbing and pacing, and of a sighing
   which told only of despairs profoundest depths. Mrs. Ward had grown
  --
   in the attic Laboratory and bedroom, and emphasised the occurrence of
   muffled sighs and sobbings at the most impossible times. Early in July
  --
   contents of his attic Laboratory, including the books both weird and
   modern which he had borrowed from his study. He had this van loaded in
  --
   so-called Laboratory was the flimsiest sort of a blind. Clearly there
   were a library and a Laboratory elsewhere; but just where, it was
   impossible to say. Essentially defeated in his quest for something he
  --
   noxious Laboratory odours when he did finally make his agitated
   appearance, proved a far from recalcitrant subject; and admitted freely
  --
   possessed no library or Laboratory beyond the visible ones, and waxed
   abstruse in explaining the absence from the house of such odours as now
  --
   different tones in the locked attic Laboratory. What were they like,
   with their depth and hollowness? Was there not here some awful
  --
   and more systematic raid. He had still to find the hidden Laboratory,
   so leaving his valise in the lighted room he emerged again into the
  --
   to keep for reserve use in whatever hidden Laboratory he might uncover
   beyond the terrible open space with its unclean altar and nameless
  --
   Laboratory of Charles Wardand no doubt of old Joseph Curwen before
   him.
  --
   final raid. Three archways opened off the Laboratory, and these the
   doctor proceeded to sample in turn. From his cursory survey he saw that
  --
   he judged to be fragments of old Joseph Curwens Laboratory appliances.
   These had suffered damage at the hands of the raiders, but were still
  --
   jars on the shelves of the Laboratory proper. Custodes, Materia;
   that was the Latin for Guards and Materials, respectivelyand then
  --
   pits of stench and howling, no Laboratory or shelves or chiselled
   formulae, no. . . . Dr. Willett turned pale, and clutched at the
  --
   Laboratory and brought down a few odds and ends not included in the
   moving of the July before. They were in a covered basket, and Mr. Ward
  --
   upstairs Laboratory. He had left the window open, and into that once
   accursed room was pouring a wealth of pure, wholesome air to mix with a
  --
   how he kept you hidden in his Laboratory while you studied modern
   things and roved abroad as a vampire by night, and how you later shewed

1f.lovecraft - The Colour out of Space, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   Laboratory; doing nothing at all and shewing no occluded gases when
   heated on charcoal, being wholly negative in the borax bead, and soon
  --
   specimenwhich proved, however, as baffling in the Laboratory as its
   predecessor had been. Aside from being almost plastic, having heat,
  --
   total; so that nothing was left to do but go back to the Laboratory and
   test again the disappearing fragment left carefully cased in lead. That
  --
   Laboratory where the two phials of dust were finally taken. Under the
   spectroscope both samples gave off an unknown spectrum, in which many

1f.lovecraft - The Disinterment, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   Laboratory, for he was constantly carrying on various hidden projects
   in glandular and muscular transplantation on guinea-pigs and rabbits.
  --
   the Laboratory. At my success a slow smile spread across his leering
   features, and he turned to disappear from the darkened doorway. His
  --
   the nefarious doings going on in that Laboratory across the
   thresholdthe animal cries were shocking, and rasped hideously on my
  --
   proceeded very quietly toward the Laboratory door.
   My first steps came jerkily and with much difficulty, and in the

1f.lovecraft - The Dunwich Horror, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   obtained from the college Laboratory. The more he reflected on the
   hellish diary, the more he was inclined to doubt the efficacy of any

1f.lovecraft - The Electric Executioner, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   unaccountably in the companys Laboratory at odd hours. That he was
   implicated with a Mexican boss and several peons in some thefts of ore

1f.lovecraft - The Horror at Red Hook, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   of the rooms, and the primitive chemical Laboratory in the attic, all
   helped to convince the detective that he was on the track of something

1f.lovecraft - The Man of Stone, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   the snow. I wouldnt want my Laboratory and storeroom to be found just
   yet! When I got home I told Rose that Wheeler had found a telegram at

1f.lovecraft - The Trap, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   procured a large magnifying-glass from the school Laboratory and
   studied minutely every square millimeter of that whorl-center which

1f.lovecraft - Winged Death, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   April 20Back at Mgonga and busy in the Laboratory. Have sent to Dr.
   Joost in Pretoria for some tsetse-flies for hybridisation experiments.
  --
   When I returned to the Laboratory after the death I heard the most
   singular buzzing and thrashing in cage 12, which contained the fly that

1.rb - The Laboratory-Ancien Rgime, #Browning - Poems, #Robert Browning, #Poetry
  object:1.rb - The Laboratory-Ancien Rgime
  author class:Robert Browning

2.01 - On Books, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Zen
   [1] Swami Jnanananda was originally the son of a Zamindar in Andhra. After Sannyas he went to North India and became a scientist. He went to Prague and Liverpool and was in the National Physical Laboratory, Delhi.
   ***

2.01 - THE ADVENT OF LIFE, #The Phenomenon of Man, #Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, #Christianity
  struct the process in the Laboratory, we shall probably never find
  any material vestige of this emergence of the microscopic from
  --
  the phenomenon in the Laboratory.
  9<5
  --
  on one point. From the fact diat, in the Laboratory, life never
  appears in a medium from which all germs have previously been

2.06 - Two Tales of Seeking and Losing, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  The mosaic of cards that we are watching, fixed here, is therefore the Work of the Quest that one would like to conclude without work or search. Doctor Faust has wearied of having the instantaneous metamorphoses of metals depend on the slow transformations that take place within himself, he doubts the wisdom accumulated in the solitary life of a Hermit, he is disappointed in the powers of his art as he is in this dawdling over the tarot combinations. At that moment a thunderbolt illuminates his little cell at the top of The Tower. A personage appears before him with a broad-brimmed hat, such as the students wear at Wittenberg, a wandering clerk perhaps, or a charlatan Juggler, a mountebank at a fair, who has laid out on a stand a Laboratory of ill-assorted jars.
  "Do you believe you can counterfeit my art?" So the true alchemist must have addressed the impostor. "What messes are you stirring in your pots?"

2.08 - The Sword, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  Only in the absolute calm of the Laboratory, where the observer is perfectly indifferent to what may happen, only concerned to observe exactly what that happening is, to measure and to weigh it by means of instruments incapable of emotion, can one even begin to hope for a truthful record of events. Even the common physical bases of emotion, the senses of pleasure and pain, lead the observer infallibly to err. This though they be not sufficiently excited to disturb his mind.
  Place one hand into a basin of hot water, the other into a basin of cold water, then both together into a basin of tepid water; the one hand will say hot, the other cold.

2.1.03 - Man and Superman, #Essays Divine And Human, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  This ignorant, imperfect and divided being, with his labouring uncertain thought and half-successful will, this toiling and fluctuating experiment, this field of the attempt at emergence of a thousand things that are striving to be, is no consummation of the struggle of cosmic Force; he is only a Laboratory in which
  Nature seeks for its own concealed secret, makes tentative efforts at what she has been missioned to achieve.

2.21 - IN THE COMPANY OF DEVOTEES AT SYAMPUKUR, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  M: "Why, you say that during your experiments in the Laboratory you go into ecstasy when you think of God's creation. Further, you feel the same emotion when you think of man. If that is so, why shouldn't we bow our heads before God? God dwells in the heart of man.
  "According to Hinduism God dwells in all beings. You have not studied this subject much.

2.4.2 - Interactions with Others and the Practice of Yoga, #Letters On Yoga IV, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And if some find that retirement is the best way of giving oneself to the Higher, to the Divine by avoiding as much as possible occasions for the bubbling up of the lower, why not? The aim they have come for is that and why blame or look with distrust and suspicion on the means they find best or daub it with disparaging adjectives to discredit itgrim, inhuman and the rest? It is your vital that shrinks from it and your vital mind that supplies these epithets which express only your shrinking and not what the retirement really is. For it is the vital or the social part of it that shrinks from solitude; the thinking mind does not but rather courts it. The poet seeks solitude with himself or with Nature to listen to his inspiration; the thinker plunges into solitude to meditate on things and commune with a deeper knowledge; the scientist shuts himself up in his Laboratory to pore by experiment into the secrets of Nature; these retirements are not grim and inhuman. Neither is the retirement of the sadhak into the exclusive concentration of which he feels the need; it is a means to an end, to the end on which his whole heart is set. As for the Yogin or bhakta who has already begun to have the fundamental experience, he is not in a grim and inhuman solitude. The Divine and all the world are there in the being of the one, the supreme Beloved or his Ananda is there in the heart of the other.
  I say this as against your depreciation of retirement founded on ignorance of what it really is; but I do not, as I have often said, recommend a total seclusion, for I hold that to be a dangerous expedient which may lead to morbidity and much error. Nor do I impose retirement on anyone as a method or approve of it unless the person himself seeks it, feels its necessity, has the joy of it and the personal proof that it helps to the spiritual experience. It is not to be imposed on anyone as a principle, for that is the mental way of doing things, the way of the ordinary mindit is as a need that it has to be accepted, when it is felt as a need, not as a general law or rule.

3.00.2 - Introduction, #The Practice of Psycho therapy, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  into a Laboratory, where he bustles about with crucibles and alembics,
  and an oratory, where he prays to God for the much needed illumination

3.02 - The Great Secret, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
    All of you know the story of the atom bomb. You know that it has been succeeded by an infinitely more destructive weapon, the hydrogen bomb. You also know as well as I do that humanity is staggering under the impact of these discoveries, which have placed in its hands an unequalled power of destruction. But if I now revealed my new discovery, if I unveiled my secret, I would place a diabolical power in the hands of just anybody. And without any control or restriction... Uranium and thorium were easily monopolised by the governments, first on account of their relative scarcity, but mostly because of the difficulty of activating them in atomic piles. But you can well imagine what would happen if any criminal or crank or fanatic could in any make-shift Laboratory put together a weapon capable of blowing up Paris, London or New York! Would that not be the finishing blow for humanity? I too have reeled under the weight of my discovery. I hesitated a long time and have not yet been able to come to any decision which satisfies both my reason and my heart.
    Thus the very first postulate with which I set out as a young scientist in quest of Nature's secrets, has fallen to pieces. Even though an increase in knowledge may bring an added power, it does not follow at all that humanity will be automatically bettered. Scientific progress does not necessarily imply moral progress. Scientific and intellectual knowledge is powerless to change human nature, and yet that has become the pressing need. If human greed and passion remain what they are today, almost the same as they were in the Stone Age, then humanity is doomed. We have reached a point where, unless there is a rapid and radical moral change, mankind will destroy itself with the power it has in its own hands.

3.05 - SAL, #Mysterium Coniunctionis, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  This complete identification of the lapis with the son of man must obviously end with its ascension. But that contradicts the original and widespread conception of the lapis as the tincture or medicine, which has meaning and value only if it applies itself to the base substances of the lower world. The upper world is in need of no medicine, since it is incorruptible anyway. A redeemer who proceeds from matter and returns to matter gradually became unthinkable. Those who identified the lapis absolutely with Christ stopped working in the Laboratory, and those who preferred Laboratory work slowly gave up their mystic language.
  [296] Ascent and descent, above and below, up and down, represent an emotional realization of opposites, and this realization gradually leads, or should lead, to their equilibrium. This motif occurs very frequently in dreams, in the form of going up- and downhill, climbing stairs, going up or down in a lift, balloon, aeroplane, etc.561 It corresponds to the struggle between the winged and the wingless dragon, i.e., the uroboros. Dorn describes it also as the circular distillation562 and as the spagyric vessel which has to be constructed after the likeness of the natural vessel, i.e., in the form of a sphere. As Dorn interprets it, this vacillating between the opposites and being tossed back and forth means being contained in the opposites. They become a vessel in which what was previously now one thing and now another floats vibrating, so that the painful suspension between opposites gradually changes into the bilateral activity of the point in the centre.563 This is the liberation from opposites, the nirdvandva of Hindu philosophy, though it is not really a philosophical but rather a psychological development. The Aurelia occulta puts this thought in the words of the dragon: Many from one and one from many, issue of a famous line, I rise from the lowest to the highest. The nethermost power of the whole earth is united with the highest. I therefore am the One and the Many within me.564 In these words the dragon makes it clear that he is the chthonic forerunner of the self.

3.08 - Purification, #The Practice of Psycho therapy, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  principles. This is what the Laboratory worker called the extractio animae,
  and what in the psychological field we would call the working through of
  --
  when he was shaken out of the deadly dull rut of his Laboratory and
  philosophical work by the revelation that feeling is all. In this we can

3.09 - Of Silence and Secrecy, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  mentions his work as a Laboratory assistant under Professor Hughes in 1892 briefly
  in Confessions, cap. 9 of Symonds & Grant edition.]
  --
  has the Universe for its Library and its Laboratory; all
  Nature is its Subject; and its Game, free from close seasons

3.11 - Spells, #Advanced Dungeons and Dragons 2E, #unset, #Zen
  hit point, and a fully equipped Laboratory.
  Solipsism ::: (Alteration)

3.12 - Of the Bloody Sacrifice, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  form of energy.1 Laboratory experiments in food-values seem to be
  almost worthless, for reasons which we cannot here enter into; the
  --
  done in the Laboratory. Already we restore the apparently drowned. Why not
  those dead from such causes as syncope? If we understood the ultimate physics

3.18 - Of Clairvoyance and the Body of Light, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  greater than Robert Burns; the perfection of Laboratory apparatus prepares indeed
  the path of a Pasteur, but cannot make masters out of mediocrities.

3.2.01 - The Newness of the Integral Yoga, #Letters On Yoga II, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Well, I dont suppose the new race can be created by or according to logic or that any race has been. But why should the idea of the creation of a new race be illogical? It is not only my ideas that baffle reason, but Adhar Dass also! he must really be a superman,self-made of course, outside the Laboratory. As for the past seers, they dont trouble me. If going beyond the experiences of the past seers and sages is so shocking, each new seer and sage in turn has done that shocking thingBuddha, Shankara, Chaitanya etc. all did that wicked act. If not, what was the necessity of their starting new philosophies, religions, schools of Yoga? If they were merely verifying and meekly repeating the lives and experiences of past seers and sages without bringing the world some new thing, why all that stir and pother? Of course, you may say they were simply explaining the old truth but in the right way but this would mean that nobody had explained or understood it rightly beforewhich is again giving the lie etc. Or you may say that all the new sages (they were not among Xs cherished past ones in their day), e.g. Shankara, Ramanuja, Madhwa, were each merely repeating the same blessed thing as all the past seers and sages had repeated with an unwearied monotony before them. Well, well, but why repeat it in such a way that each gives the lie to the others? Truly, this shocked reverence for the past is a wonderful and fearful thing! After all, the Divine is infinite and the unrolling of the Truth may be an infinite process or at least, if not quite so much, yet with some room for new discovery and new statement, even perhaps new achievement, not a thing in a nutshell cracked and its contents exhausted once for all by the first seer or sage, while the others must religiously crack the same nutshell all over again, each tremblingly careful not to give the lie to the past seers and sages.
  ***

32.02 - Reason and Yoga, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   If one wants to see London one has to go to London. You cannot say that there is no London because it is not visible from your room. Have you seen a positron? Have you seen a neutron? How many have seen them? To see them, one has to go to the Laboratory and follow a special procedure.
   The process that brings the direct vision of God, the Self, Immortality and the touch of the Divine Life is called the practice of Yoga.

3.20 - Of the Eucharist, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  whose sanctity demanded some such symbolic veil as the cryptographic use of the language of the Laboratory.
  The MASTER THERION is sanguine that his present reduction of all

3.2.2 - Sleep, #Letters On Yoga IV, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  As for the actual mastery of a situation by occult powers, it can only come by use and experimentas one develops strength by exercises or develops a process in the Laboratory by finding out through the actual use of a power how it can and ought to be applied to the field in which it operates. It is of no use waiting for the strength before one tries; the strength will come with repeated trials. Neither must you fear failure or be discouraged by failure for these things do not always succeed at once. These are things one has to learn by personal experiences, how to get into touch with the cosmic forces, how to relate or equate our individual action with theirs, how to become an instrument of the Master Consciousness which we call the Divine.
  There is something a little too personal in your attitude I mean the insistence on personal strength or weakness as the determining factor. After all, for the greatest as for the smallest of us our strength is not our own but given to us for the game that has to be played, the work that we have to do. The strength may be formed in us, but its present formation is not final,neither formation of power nor formation of weakness. At any moment the formation may changeat any moment one sees, especially under the pressure of Yoga, weakness changing into power, the incapable becoming capable, suddenly or slowly the instrumental consciousness rising to a new stature or developing its latent powers. Above us, within us, around us is the AllStrength and it is that that we have to rely on for our work, our development, our transforming change. If we proceed with the faith in the work, in our instrumentality for the work, in the Power that missions us, then in the very act of trial, of facing and surmounting difficulties and failures, the strength will come and we shall find our capacity to contain as much as we need of the All-Strength of which we grow more and more perfect vessels.

33.03 - Muraripukur - I, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Almost about the same period, I had thought of another childish plan, again in connection with the making of a bomb: the thing had so much got into my head. I was a student of the Calcutta Presidency College where the great Jagadish Chandra was professor at the time. Here was the idea and it was approved by my leaders - could I not join his Laboratory, as some kind of an assistant? Then one could carry on research and experiments on bombs. But how to get hold of him? I thought of Sister Nivedita. She was a great friend of Jagadish Bose and it was easy to approach Nivedita, for she was one among our circle of acquaintances. But the occasion did not arise for this line of advance, for things had been moving fast at the Gardens.
   Let me say a few words about our life there. But may I preface it with an amusing incident? I have said that my attendance at College had been getting more and more irregular. This attracted the notice of some of my class-fellows. One day, I found one of their representatives arriving "on deputation" to meet me at the .Mess. He began questioning me as an intimate friend and well-wisher with a show of great kindness and affection. "Tell me," he said, "what has been the matter with you? What makes you keep away from College? Has there been a mishap somewhere? You have been such a good student and 'so regular in your attendance, what could have come over you all on a sudden?" I could guess what he must have been suspecting: surely it had something to do with my morals - chercher la femme! Was that the case here? Complaints and entreaties having failed, he finally sought to console and encourage me with these words, "Don't you worry; If Calcutta does not suit you, let us leave the place and go somewhere else. The two of us could stay together, and if we worked hard for, say, three or four months, we would get ready for the examination without fail. Our absence from College would make no difference." To this I replied in a grave tone, "'Very well, I shall think it over." Lest there should be similar attacks in the future, I practically gave up the Mess.

3.4.02 - The Inconscient, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  All this is easy to see in the realm of Matter; but mankind is not yet entirely ready to recognise the same truth and follow up the same principle in the realm of Mind. It is true that psychology has made an advance and has begun to improve its method. Formerly, it was a crude, scholastic and superficial systematisation of mans ignorance of himself. The surface psychological functionings, will, mind, senses, reason, conscience, etc., were arranged in a dry and sterile classification; their real nature and relation to each other were not fathomed nor any use made of them which went beyond the limited action Nature had found sufficient for a very superficial mental and psychic life and for very superficial and ordinary workings. Because we do not know ourselves, therefore we are unable to ameliorate radically our subjective life or develop with mastery, with rapidity, with a sure science the hidden possibilities of our mental capacity and our moral nature. The new psychology seeks indeed to penetrate behind superficial appearances, but it is encumbered by initial errors which prevent a profounder knowledge,the materialistic error which bases the study of mind upon the study of the body; the sceptical error which prevents any bold and clear-eyed investigation of the hidden profundities of our subjective existence; the error of conservative distrust and recoil which regards any subjective state or experience that departs from the ordinary operations of our mental and psychical nature as a morbidity or a hallucination,just as the Middle Ages regarded all new science as magic and a diabolical departure from the sane and right limits of human capacity; finally, the error of objectivity which leads the psychologist to study others from outside instead of seeing his true field of knowledge and Laboratory of experiment in himself. Psychology is necessarily a subjective science and one must proceed in it from the knowledge of oneself to the knowledge of others.
  But whatever the crudities of the new science, it has at least taken the first capital step without which there can be no true psychological knowledge; it has made the discovery which is the beginning of self-knowledge and which all must make who deeply study the facts of consciousness,that our waking and surface existence is only a small part of our being and does not yield to us the root and secret of our character, our mentality or our actions. The sources lie deeper. To discover them, to know the nature and the processes of the inconscient or subconscient self and, so far as is possible, to possess and utilise them as physical science possesses and utilises the secret of the forces of Nature ought to be the aim of a scientific psychology.

3-5 Full Circle, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Several of the teachers are applying the basic ideas of the seminar in their own teaching and are reporting quite significant results in terms of student motivation and technical performance. The flexibility of the approach is suggested by the fact that teachers in many different fields and grade levels are using some adaptation of it. For instance, William Eblen and his associates in Wilton, Connecticut, use their own variation of this approach in their high school and college ecology project, Total Education for a Total Environment (TETE). Professor Rossalie Pinkham, Director of Laboratory Schools, Southern Connecticut State College, and Chairman, Consortium on Systems Education, New Haven, uses it as a springboard into, and as a frame of reference for, linguistic and social science subject areas. Chemistry teachers in high school use the periodic table as a springboard into interdisciplinary units. Biology teachers can use the general model as a functional framework for integrating the study of evolution in all the traditional sub-fields of biology and for relating evolution theory to psycho-social studies. Historians and anthropologists use it as a functional basis for explaining the process of change.
  Being an economist who had already developed a broad economizing model for interpreting the universe of organized energy before meeting Mr. Haskell two years ago, I have blended his model into the economizing framework. A brief sketch of that master model will set the stage for describing the nature and importance of the task of developing a meta-language of the sciences, and for describing the particular approach we are developing at the SCSC Center for I-D Creativity.
  --
  CASSIDY, Harold Gomes, born in Havana, Cuba, October 17, 1906; A.B. Oberlin College, 1930, A.M. 1932; Ph.D. (Chemistry) Yale, 1939. Member of Yale faculty, 1938-72, professor of chemistry, 1958-72. National Sigma Xi lecturer, 1960, 1965; Ayd lecturer, 1962; Korzybski Memorial lecturer, 1962; national lecturer, Scientific Research Society of America, 1965; senior fellow in science, Center for Advanced Studies, Wesleyan University, 1965-66; Danforth visiting lecturer, Association of American Colleges Arts Program, 1968, 1971 ; Sigma Xi centennial lecturer, Ohio State University, 1970. Recipient of third John Prymak service award, Connecticut Science Teachers Association, 1968; national award for excellence in chemistry teaching, Manufacturing Chemists Association, 1972. Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science, New York Academy of Sciences; secretary, Council for Unified Research and Education; member of New University Council. Author : (with J. English) Principles of Organic Chemistry, 1949; Absorption and Chromatography, 1951; (with J. English) Laboratory Book, 1951; Fundamentals of Chromatography, 1957; The Sciences and the Arts, 1962 ; (with K. A. Kun) Oxidation-Reduction Polymers, 1965; Knowledge, Experience and Action, 1969; Science Restated--Physics and Chemistry for the Non-Scientist, 1970; numerous articles. Associate editor, American Journal of Science, 1948-67. Address : Hanover College, Hanover, Indiana.
  CLARK, Jere Walton, born in Rex, Georgia, January 31, 1922; B.B.A. University of Georgia, 1947, M.A. 1949; Du Pont fellow, University of Virginia, 1949-51, Ph.D. (economics) 1953. Assistant professor, West Virginia University, 1952-55; associate professor, University of Chattanooga, 1955-62; professor of economics, Southern Connecticut State College, 1962- , chairman of Department of economics, 1966-70, director of Center for Interdisciplinary Creativity, 1967- . Recipient of award for best college course in economics, Calvin K. Kazanjian Economics Foundation, 1963. Chairman, task force on general systems education, Society for General Systems Research; executive director, Consortium on Systems Education, New Haven. Address : Center for Interdisciplinary Creativity, Southern Connecticut State College, New Haven, Connecticut 06515.

6.04 - THE MEANING OF THE ALCHEMICAL PROCEDURE, #Mysterium Coniunctionis, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  [692] I have detailed this process in order to give the reader a direct impression of the alchemical procedure. One can hardly suppose that all this is mere poppycock, for Dorn was a man who obviously took things seriously. So far as one can judge he meant what he said, and he himself worked in the Laboratory. Of course we do not know what success he had chemically, but we are sufficiently informed about the results of his meditative exertions.
  [693] The caelum, for Dorn, was the celestial substance hidden in man, the secret truth, the sum of virtue, the treasure which is not eaten into by moths nor dug out by thieves. In the worlds eyes it is the cheapest thing, but to the wise more worthy of love than precious stones and gold, a good that passeth not away, and is taken hence after death.104 The reader will gather from this that the adept was describing nothing less than the kingdom of heaven on earth. I think that Dorn was not exaggerating, but that he wanted to communicate to his public something very important to him. He believed in the necessity of the alchemical operation as well as in its success; he was convinced that the quintessence was needed for the preparation of the body,105 and that the body was so much improved by this universal medicine that the coniunctio with spirit and soul could be consummated. If the production of the caelum from wine is a hair-raising chemical fantasy, our understanding ceases altogether when the adept mixes this heaven with his gamonymous and other magical herbs. But if the one consists mainly of fantasies so does the other. This makes it interesting. Fantasies always mean something when they are spontaneous. The question then arises: what is the psychological meaning of the procedure?

6.05 - THE PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION OF THE PROCEDURE, #Mysterium Coniunctionis, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  [705] The production of the caelum is a symbolic rite performed in the Laboratory. Its purpose was to create, in the form of a substance, that truth, the celestial balsam or life principle, which is identical with the God-image. Psychologically, it was a representation of the individuation process by means of chemical substances and procedures, or what we today call active imagination. This is a method which is used spontaneously by nature herself or can be taught to the patient by the analyst. As a rule it occurs when the analysis has constellated the opposites so powerfully that a union or synthesis of the personality becomes an imperative necessity. Such a situation is bound to arise when the analysis of the psychic contents, of the patients attitude and particularly of his dreams, has brought the compensatory or complementary images from the unconscious so insistently before his mind that the conflict between the conscious and the unconscious personality becomes open and critical. When this confrontation is confined to partial aspects of the unconscious the conflict is limited and the solution simple: the patient, with insight and some resignation or a feeling of resentment, places himself on the side of reason and convention. Though the unconscious motifs are repressed again, as before, the unconscious is satisfied to a certain extent, because the patient must now make a conscious effort to live according to its principles and, in addition, is constantly reminded of the existence of the repressed by annoying resentments. But if his recognition of the shadow is as complete as he can make it, then conflict and disorientation ensue, an equally strong Yes and No which he can no longer keep apart by a rational decision. He cannot transform his clinical neurosis into the less conspicuous neurosis of cynicism; in other words, he can no longer hide the conflict behind a mask. It requires a real solution and necessitates a third thing in which the opposites can unite. Here the logic of the intellect usually fails, for in a logical antithesis there is no third. The solvent can only be of an irrational nature. In nature the resolution of opposites is always an energic process: she acts symbolically in the truest sense of the word,126 doing something that expresses both sides, just as a waterfall visibly mediates between above and below. The waterfall itself is then the incommensurable third. In an open and unresolved conflict dreams and fantasies occur which, like the waterfall, illustrate the tension and nature of the opposites, and thus prepare the synthesis.
  [706] This process can, as I have said, take place spontaneously or be artificially induced. In the latter case you choose a dream, or some other fantasy-image, and concentrate on it by simply catching hold of it and looking at it. You can also use a bad mood as a starting-point, and then try to find out what sort of fantasy-image it will produce, or what image expresses this mood. You then fix this image in the mind by concentrating your attention. Usually it will alter, as the mere fact of contemplating it animates it. The alterations must be carefully noted down all the time, for they reflect the psychic processes in the unconscious background, which appear in the form of images consisting of conscious memory material. In this way conscious and unconscious are united, just as a waterfall connects above and below. A chain of fantasy ideas develops and gradually takes on a dramatic character: the passive process becomes an action. At first it consists of projected figures, and these images are observed like scenes in the theatre. In other words, you dream with open eyes. As a rule there is a marked tendency simply to enjoy this interior entertainment and to leave it at that. Then, of course, there is no real progress but only endless variations on the same theme, which is not the point of the exercise at all. What is enacted on the stage still remains a background process; it does not move the observer in any way, and the less it moves him the smaller will be the cathartic effect of this private theatre. The piece that is being played does not want merely to be watched impartially, it wants to compel his participation. If the observer understands that his own drama is being performed on this inner stage, he cannot remain indifferent to the plot and its dnouement. He will notice, as the actors appear one by one and the plot thickens, that they all have some purposeful relationship to his conscious situation, that he is being addressed by the unconscious, and that it causes these fantasy-images to appear before him. He therefore feels compelled, or is encouraged by his analyst, to take part in the play and, instead of just sitting in a theatre, really have it out with his alter ego. For nothing in us ever remains quite uncontradicted, and consciousness can take up no position which will not call up, somewhere in the dark corners of the psyche, a negation or a compensatory effect, approval or resentment. This process of coming to terms with the Other in us is well worth while, because in this way we get to know aspects of our nature which we would not allow anybody else to show us and which we ourselves would never have admitted.127 It is very important to fix this whole procedure in writing at the time of its occurrence, for you then have ocular evidence that will effectively counteract the ever-ready tendency to self-deception. A running commentary is absolutely necessary in dealing with the shadow, because otherwise its actuality cannot be fixed. Only in this painful way is it possible to gain a positive insight into the complex nature of ones own personality.

6.08 - THE CONTENT AND MEANING OF THE FIRST TWO STAGES, #Mysterium Coniunctionis, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  [752] Thus the modern man cannot even bring about the unio mentalis which would enable him to accomplish the second degree of conjunction. The analysts guidance in helping him to understand the statements of his unconscious in dreams, etc. may provide the necessary insight, but when it comes to the question of real experience the analyst can no longer help him: he himself must put his hand to the work. He is then in the position of an alchemists apprentice who is inducted into the teachings by the Master and learns all the tricks of the Laboratory. But sometime he must set about the opus himself, for, as the alchemists emphasize, nobody else can do it for him. Like this apprentice, the modern man begins with an unseemly prima materia which presents itself in unexpected forma contemptible fantasy which, like the stone that the builders rejected, is flung into the street and is so cheap that people do not even look at it. He will observe it from day to day and note its alterations until his eyes are opened or, as the alchemists say, until the fishs eyes, or the sparks, shine in the dark solution. For the eyes of the fish are always open and therefore must always see, which is why the alchemists used them as a symbol of perpetual attention. (Pis. 8 and 9.)
  [753] The light that gradually dawns on him consists in his understanding that his fantasy is a real psychic process which is happening to him personally. Although, to a certain extent, he looks on from outside, impartially, he is also an acting and suffering figure in the drama of the psyche. This recognition is absolutely necessary and marks an important advance. So long as he simply looks at the pictures he is like the foolish Parsifal, who forgot to ask the vital question because he was not aware of his own participation in the action. Then, if the flow of images ceases, next to nothing has happened even though the process is repeated a thousand times. But if you recognize your own involvement you yourself must enter into the process with your personal reactions, just as if you were one of the fantasy figures, or rather, as if the drama being enacted before your eyes were real. It is a psychic fact that this fantasy is happening, and it is as real as youas a psychic entityare real. If this crucial operation is not carried out, all the changes are left to the flow of images, and you yourself remain unchanged. As Dorn says, you will never make the One unless you become one yourself. It is, however, possible that if you have a dramatic fantasy you will enter the interior world of images as a fictitious personality and thereby prevent any real participation; it may even endanger consciousness because you then become the victim of your own fantasy and succumb to the powers of the unconscious, whose dangers the analyst knows all too well. But if you place yourself in the drama as you really are, not only does it gain in actuality but you also create, by your criticism of the fantasy, an effective counterbalance to its tendency to get out of hand. For what is now happening is the decisive rapprochement with the unconscious. This is where insight, the unio mentalis, begins to become real. What you are now creating is the beginning of individuation, whose immediate goal is the experience and production of the symbol of totality.
  --
  [757] As a rule this state is represented pictorially by a mandala. Often such drawings contain clear allusions to the sky and the stars and therefore refer to something like the inner heaven, the firmament or Olympus of Paracelsus, the Microcosm. This, too, is that circular product, the caelum,224 which Dorn wanted to produce by assiduous rotary movements. Because it is not very likely that he ever manufactured this quintessence as a chemical body, and he himself nowhere asserts that he did, one must ask whether he really meant this chemical operation or rather, perhaps, the opus alchymicum in general, that is, the transmutation of Mercurius duplex under the synonym of the red and white wine,225 thus alluding at the same time to the opus ad rubeum et ad album. This seems to me more probable. At any rate some kind of Laboratory work was meant. In this way Dorn shaped out his intuition of a mysterious centre preexistent in man, which at the same time represented a cosmos, i.e., a totality, while he himself remained conscious that he was portraying the self in matter. He completed the image of wholeness by the admixture of honey, magic herbs, and human blood, or their meaningful equivalents, just as a modern man does when he associates numerous symbolic attributes with his drawing of a mandala. Also, following the old Sabaean and Alexandrian models, Dorn drew the influence of the planets (stellae inferiores)or Tartarus and the mythological aspect of the underworldinto his quintessence, just as the patient does today.226
  [758] In this wise Dorn solved the problem of realizing the unio mentalis, of effecting its union with the body, thereby completing the second stage of the coniunctio. We would say that with this production of a physical equivalent the idea of the self had taken shape. But the alchemist associated his work with something more potent and more original than our pale abstraction. He felt it as a magically effective action which, like the substance itself, imparted magical qualities. The projection of magical qualities indicates the existence of corresponding effects on consciousness, that is to say the adept felt a numinous effect emanating from the lapis, or whatever he called the arcane substance. We, with our rationalistic minds, would scarcely attri bute any such thing to the pictures which the modern man makes of his intuitive vision of unconscious contents. But it depends on whether we are dealing with the conscious or with the unconscious. The unconscious does in fact seem to be influenced by these images. One comes to this conclusion when one examines more closely the psychic reactions of the patients to their own drawings: they do have in the end a quietening influence and create something like an inner foundation. While the adept had always looked for the effects of his stone outside, for instance as the panacea or golden tincture or life-prolonging elixir, and only during the sixteenth century pointed with unmistakable clarity to an inner effect, psychological experience emphasizes above all the subjective reaction to the formation of images, andwith a free and open mindstill reserves judgment in regard to possible objective effects.227

7 - Yoga of Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  vague or uncertain. You must work as in a Laboratory.
  You have to learn the laws of action and reaction and

Blazing P2 - Map the Stages of Conventional Consciousness, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  capacity has a profound effect on his behavior in Laboratory experiments. Subjects at the
  Infancy to Enlightenment, Part II: Conventional Consciousness

BOOK I. -- PART I. COSMIC EVOLUTION, #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  ments of the Laboratory, and which even the mind cannot grasp, although it can equally little avoid the
  conclusion that these underlying essences of things must exist. Fire and Water, or Father* and Mother,

BOOK I. -- PART III. SCIENCE AND THE SECRET DOCTRINE CONTRASTED, #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  justified by Science, for Mr. Crookes said: -"We have shown, from arguments drawn from the chemical Laboratory, that in matter
  which has responded to every test of an element, there are minute shades of difference
  --
  more than one naturalist and physicist who has visited Mr. Keely's Laboratory and witnessed
  personally its tremendous effects -- what is it? Is it a "mode of motion," also, "in Vacuo," since there is
  --
  * Just so; "those forms of energy . . . which become evident . . ." in the Laboratory of the chemist and
  physicist; but there are other forms of energy wedded to other forms of matter, -- which are
  --
  Secondly, that our globe has its own special Laboratory on the far-away outskirts of its atmosphere,
  crossing which, every atom and molecule change and differentiate from their primordial nature.

Deutsches Requiem, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  destroyed my Laboratory. The Third Reich was dying, harassed by vast
  continents; it struggled alone against innumerable enemies. Then a singular

ENNEAD 06.05 - The One and Identical Being is Everywhere Present In Its Entirety.345, #Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 04, #Plotinus, #Christianity
  1295 It must not be supposed that in thus tracing the springs of our modern thought we necessarily approve of all the thought of Plotinos, Numenius or Plato. On the contrary, they were far more likely to have committed logical errors than we are, because they were hypnotized by the glamor of the terms they used, which to us are mere Laboratory tools. The best way to prove this will be to appraise at its logical value for us Plotinos's discussion of Matter, elsewhere studied in its value for us.
  1296

For a Breath I Tarry, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
     For years he labored at his designed, without once producing a prototype of any of the machines involved. Then he ordered construction of a Laboratory.
     Before it was completed by his surplus builders another half-century had passed. Mordel came to him.
  --
     The Laboratory was finished. Within it, Frost's workers began constructing the necessary equipment. The work did not proceed rapidly, as some of the materials were difficult to obtain.
     "Frost?"
  --
     He placed the corpses in refrigeration units and shipped them to his Laboratory.
     That very day he received his first communication from Solcom since the Bright Defile incident.
  --
     They entered the Laboratory. Frost prepared the host and activated his machines.
     Then Solcom spoke to him:

MoM References, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Brooks, A. (1991). Intelligence without Reason. MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory: Artificial
  Intelligence Memo 1293.
  Brooks, A., and Stein, L.A. (1993). Building Brains for Bodies. MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory:
  Artificial Intelligence Memo 1439.
  --
  Sensory abilities of Cetaceans: Laboratory and field evidence (pp.19-30). New York: Plenum Press.
  Goethe, J.W. (1979a). Faust, part one (P. Wayne, Trans.). London: Penguin Books.

Talks With Sri Aurobindo 1, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  PURANI: Yes, he seems to have started a Laboratory to utilise the sun's rays for
  material and spiritual purposes, but the Laboratory was not completed.
  SRI AUROBINDO: Material purposes possible, but how spiritual?

The Act of Creation text, #The Act of Creation, #Arthur Koestler, #Psychology
  confirmed by Laboratory experiments. Electrical stimulation of the
  zygomatic major, the main lifting muscle of the upper lip, with currents
  --
  chemical Laboratory and (b) with the (metaphorical) dissolution of
  one's high principles in one's cups. The first few words of the sentence
  --
  summer unattended in the Laboratory. In the early autumn, however,
  he resumed his experiments. He injected a number of chickens with the
  --
  to produce vaccines at will in the Laboratory. Instead of depending upon
  the chance of naturally occurring immunizing agents, as cow-pox was
  --
  or in the Laboratory where the situation still resembles in some respects
  other situations encountered in the past, yet contains new features or
  --
  work in the Laboratory. The dream made him see the situation
  in its proper perspective;, now all he had to do was to tell Y the
  --
  Let me return from the Laboratory of the Sorcerer at Menlo Park
  to that blacksmith's workshop in Samos which, according to tradition,
  --
  later achievements. The decisive incident was again a Laboratory
  mishap.
  --
  caught a cold. A drip from his nose fell into a dish in his Laboratory at
  St. Mary's Hospital; the nasal slime killed off the bacilli in the culture;
  --
  Eleven years later, in the first Laboratory of his own, he was working
  on about fifty inventions simultaneously among them the typewriter
  --
  scope'. 13 The microscope was in a Laboratory of the cole Normale
  which Pasteur had given him; MechnikofF was observing the life of the
  --
  immediately, went to the Laboratory, and performed a simple
  experiment on a frog heart according to the nocturnal design. . . .
  --
  I glanced over all the papers published from my Laboratory. I
  came across two studies made about two years before the arrival of
  --
  rush to the Laboratory.
  After the event one wonders, of course, why one idea had to wait for
  --
  matter of borrowing, so to speak, an existing technique or Laboratory
  THE EVOLUTION OF IDEAS 233
  --
  Electronics Laboratory repeated once more the 'crucial experiment'.
  Again his instruments were far more accurate than Miller's, and again
  --
  worm or Laboratory worker. He is aloof and detached, not because he
  has outgrown passion but because he is devoid of temperament, desic-
  --
  in the psychological Laboratory who are made to witness an unex-
  pected sequence of events and, when asked to relate what happened,
  --
  will not be prepared to form a kidney. In the experimental Laboratory,
  a transplanted eye-vesicle can be used to induce a lens on the sala-
  --
  the Laboratory it is called regeneration; and the same goes for budding,
  which is the natural way of reproduction of some marine coelen-
  --
  in isolation, will perform on the stone floor of the Laboratory their
  characteristic 'tap-dance* which, under normal circumstances, would
  --
  of the Laboratory is a stimulus quite different from the soft mud hence
  the 'chain-reaction ought never to start, or to break off after the .first
  --
  in a Pavlov-type Laboratory, while expecting the fall of food from the
  container, will stamp, yawn, and pant activities which do not belong
  --
  Tinbergen's simplified Laboratory models of the pregnant stickleback.
  Top. 493. Thorpe continues: 'However, the answer may be that the nature
  --
  Thus neuro-physiological considerations, Laboratory work with
  animals, and the observations of ethologists of the Lorenz-Tinbergen
  --
  In Laboratory experiments the animal's exploratory possibilities are
  restricted, and artificial motivations replace the drive as it operates in
  freedom. At the same time, animals in the Laboratory are induced to
  pay attention to, and discriminate between, stimuli which under
  --
  excitation-patterns which outside the Laboratory would be treated as
  biologically irrelevant and would accordingly leave no trace. Outside
  the Laboratory, edible things do not emit signals by metronome-clicks,
  or by displaying the figure of an ellipse on a cardboard. The dog's
  --
  yet in Pavlov's Laboratory dogs require long series of repeated ex-
  periences for learning to relate certain perceptual signals to the immi-
  --
  to the individual dog outside the Laboratory. In its natural environ-
  ment the dog would pay no attention to them, but pursue some
  --
  "platform, in a soundproof Laboratory, alone, cut off from all natural
  THE ACT OF CREATION
  --
  dog's Laboratory attitude', which is sharply distinguished from its
  behaviour outside the lab. Deprived of all other stimuli and activities,
  --
  appearance of meat-powder by remote control. The dog's Laboratory
  attitude is dominated by this periodically repeated event; and as his
  --
  lines. The whole attitude of the dog, as it has become adapted to the Laboratory
  situation, is based on the expectation that all stimuli are events relevant to food; and
  --
  to fact, because in the Laboratory universe this sequence is natural law.
  Of course some connecting links are missing in the dog's inner model
  --
  ideal conditions in the Laboratory'.
  The Dawn of Symbol Consciousness
  --
  in the Laboratory situation, when it seems to dawn on the cat that 'all
  these contraptions are means of escape', as it dawns on the child that
  --
  bring simpler responses into the Laboratory for study. Once the psychologist dis-
  covers the principles of learning for simpler phenomena under the more ideal
  conditions of the Laboratory [sic], it is likely that he can apply these principles
  to the more complex activities as they occur in everyday life. The more complex
  --
  in perceptual analysers. In the Laboratory situation, however, the
  animal must in the first place readjust to an artificial universe, in which
  --
  due to maturation and guided learning. In the experimental Laboratory,
  as in reformatory schools and other brainwashing establishments,
  --
  Similarly, if in the experimental Laboratory the subject is given the
  stimulus word: S = 'big' and is asked for the 'response', the question
  --
  discourse outside the Laboratory.
  The lesson which emerges from these elaborate and painstaking
  --
  he delivered his lectures and superintended the Laboratory as usual.
  The modernity of Maxwell's science, and the antiquity of his sociology
  --
  his case beyond all possible doubt in his experimental Laboratory, and
  had hardened it by countless painstaking repetitions. As a result,
  --
  Ybrkes, R. M., Chimpanzees: A Laboratory Colony. New Haven: Yale Univ.
  Press, 1943.

The Dwellings of the Philosophers, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  4 - THE LEGENDARY Laboratory
  5 - CHEMISTRY AND PHILOSOPHY
  --
  THE LEGENDARY Laboratory
  With its following of mystery and the unknown, behind its veil of illuminism and marvel,
  --
  His Laboratory cave, cell, or ancient crypt is dimly lit by gloomy daylight diffused
  through the myriad dusty spider webs. Yet, it is there, amidst the silence, that the prodigy is
  --
  Such is the legendary painting of the alchemist and his Laboratory. Fantastic vision, lacking
  truth, sprung from popular imagination and reproduced in the old almanacs, treasures of the
  --
  of the secret of their elaborations. To open ajar the door of the Laboratory where nature mixes
  the elements, is good; to discover the occult force under whose influence her work is
  --
  possibility of artificially recreating, through Laboratory means, a part of this evolution
  naturally produced in billions or trillions of years by cosmic forces and to transform lighter
  --
  realized the transmutation himself, unless he saw it accomplished before his eyes in the Laboratory of an Adept.
  The operation lasted two hours. This is what comes out of a curious document, on paper, handwritten by him in
  --
  class by means of Laboratory practice. Metallurgists, goldsmiths, painters, ceramic artists,
  glassmakers, dyers, distillers, enamellers, potters, etc., had, as much as apothecaries, to be
  --
  Jean-Baptiste Helmont, relating hi experience in 1618 in his Laboratory at Vilvorde near
  Brussels, writes, I have seen and touched te philosophers stone more than once; its color is
  --
  interior of a sumptuous Laboratory; in the middle of this Laboratory there is a table covered with musical
  instruments and many musical scores. The Greek word [*194-1] ( musikos) has for root [*194-2] ( mythos ), fable,
  --
  doors of the hermetic Laboratory (12) . If they err, and get bored, if they multiply their attempts
  without discovering the successful goal, it probably results from the fact that they have not
  --
  journey and whoever wants to gain from it, cannot leave the Laboratory if only for a moment.
  He must constantly watch the vase, the matter, and the fire. He must day and night stay at the
  --
  of a special technique, of some Laboratory artifice, it would amount to very little and would
  not exceed the value of a simple formula. Now, the science goes much beyond the synthetic
  --
  Helmont in his Laboratory at Vilvorde near Brussels in 1618, the stone transmuted into gold
  18,740 times its weight in flowing mercury. Richtausen, with the help of a product given by
  --
  and unknown, the other easy, comfortable, and often performed in a Laboratory.
  Having described the first of these dissolutions elsewhere and having given, in an allegorical,
  --
  as well as in alchemy. It is in the first rank of Laboratory operations, and it can be said that
  most chemical works depend on it. In alchemy, the entire works only consists in a succession
  --
  the key to Natures Laboratory; it alone liberates the spirit, imprisoned at the core of the
  material body. A shadow, a dispenser of light, a sanctuary of truth, an untouched asylum of

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun laboratory

The noun laboratory has 2 senses (first 1 from tagged texts)
                  
1. (19) lab, laboratory, research lab, research laboratory, science lab, science laboratory ::: (a workplace for the conduct of scientific research)
2. testing ground, laboratory ::: (a region resembling a laboratory inasmuch as it offers opportunities for observation and practice and experimentation; "the new nation is a testing ground for socioeconomic theories"; "Pakistan is a laboratory for studying the use of American troops to combat terrorism")


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun laboratory

2 senses of laboratory                        

Sense 1
lab, laboratory, research lab, research laboratory, science lab, science laboratory
   => workplace, work
     => geographic point, geographical point
       => point
         => location
           => object, physical object
             => physical entity
               => entity

Sense 2
testing ground, laboratory
   => region
     => location
       => object, physical object
         => physical entity
           => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun laboratory

1 of 2 senses of laboratory                      

Sense 1
lab, laboratory, research lab, research laboratory, science lab, science laboratory
   => biology lab, biology laboratory, bio lab
   => chemistry lab, chemistry laboratory, chem lab
   => defense laboratory
   => physics lab, physics laboratory


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun laboratory

2 senses of laboratory                        

Sense 1
lab, laboratory, research lab, research laboratory, science lab, science laboratory
   => workplace, work

Sense 2
testing ground, laboratory
   => region




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun laboratory

2 senses of laboratory                        

Sense 1
lab, laboratory, research lab, research laboratory, science lab, science laboratory
  -> workplace, work
   => bakery, bakeshop, bakehouse
   => beehive
   => brokerage house, brokerage
   => central, telephone exchange, exchange
   => colliery, pit
   => creamery
   => drill site
   => exchange
   => farm
   => fishery, piscary
   => fish farm
   => forge, smithy
   => gasworks
   => glassworks
   => ironworks
   => job
   => lab, laboratory, research lab, research laboratory, science lab, science laboratory
   => laundry
   => location
   => lumberyard
   => oyster bed, oyster bank, oyster park
   => proving ground
   => ropewalk, rope yard
   => roundhouse
   => shipyard
   => shop floor
   => studio
   => studio
   => tannery
   => test bed
   => waterworks
   => workshop, shop

Sense 2
testing ground, laboratory
  -> region
   => area, country
   => backwater
   => breadbasket
   => theater of war, theatre of war
   => field, field of operations, theater, theater of operations, theatre, theatre of operations
   => zone of interior
   => district, territory, territorial dominion, dominion
   => domain, demesne, land
   HAS INSTANCE=> Old World
   HAS INSTANCE=> Far East
   => northland
   => southland
   => field
   => geographical area, geographic area, geographical region, geographic region
   => biogeographical region
   => heartland
   => irredenta, irridenta
   => antipodes
   => unknown, unknown region, terra incognita
   => testing ground, laboratory
   HAS INSTANCE=> West, Occident
   HAS INSTANCE=> French West Indies




--- Grep of noun laboratory
air force research laboratory
biology laboratory
chemistry laboratory
defense laboratory
department of defense laboratory system
laboratory
laboratory bench
laboratory coat
naval research laboratory
physics laboratory
research laboratory
science laboratory
space laboratory
u.s. army criminal investigation laboratory
united states army criminal investigation laboratory
us army criminal investigation laboratory



IN WEBGEN [10000/860]

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Wikipedia - Harold A. Fidler -- Associate Director of the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory
Wikipedia - Harvard Apparatus -- American laboratory equipment manufacturer
Wikipedia - High-shear mixer -- Laboratory equipment
Wikipedia - IBM Laboratory Vienna
Wikipedia - IBM San Jose Research Laboratory
Wikipedia - IBM Zurich Research Laboratory
Wikipedia - Idaho National Laboratory
Wikipedia - Industrial Bio-Test Laboratories -- Former industrial product safety testing laboratory
Wikipedia - Islamic University Laboratory School & College -- School and college in Kushtia District
Wikipedia - Jackson Laboratory
Wikipedia - Janice Musfeldt -- Researcher at Los Alamos National Laboratory
Wikipedia - Jens Dilling -- Laboratory director in Canada
Wikipedia - Jet Propulsion Laboratory -- Research and development center and NASA field center in California, United States
Wikipedia - John F. Anderson (scientist) -- third director of the United States Hygienic Laboratory
Wikipedia - Kipp's apparatus -- Laboratory device for preparing gases.
Wikipedia - Knowledge Systems Laboratory
Wikipedia - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso -- Physics laboratory in Assergi, Italy
Wikipedia - Laboratory animal allergy
Wikipedia - Laboratory animal sources
Wikipedia - Laboratory animal suppliers in the United Kingdom
Wikipedia - Laboratory animal
Wikipedia - Laboratory automation
Wikipedia - Laboratory diagnosis of viral infections -- Laboratory methods for determining whether a virus infection has occurred in an organism
Wikipedia - Laboratory equipment
Wikipedia - Laboratory experiments of speciation
Wikipedia - Laboratory for Analysis and Architecture of Systems
Wikipedia - Laboratory for Automation Psychology
Wikipedia - Laboratory for Computer Science
Wikipedia - Laboratory for Electromagnetic and Electronic Systems -- Massachusetts Institute of Technology research institute
Wikipedia - Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science
Wikipedia - Laboratory glassware
Wikipedia - Laboratory medicine
Wikipedia - Laboratory mouse
Wikipedia - Laboratory of biomechanics -- French research laboratory
Wikipedia - Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition (LCHC)
Wikipedia - Laboratory of Molecular Biology
Wikipedia - Laboratory quality control -- Set of measures to detect, reduce, and correct deficiencies in a laboratory's internal analytical process prior to the release of patient results, in order to improve the quality of the results reported by the laboratory
Wikipedia - Laboratory rat -- Inbred strains of Rattus norvegicus used for scientific research
Wikipedia - Laboratory school -- School designed to facilitate experimentation and development in education
Wikipedia - Laboratory techniques
Wikipedia - Laboratory -- Facility that provides controlled conditions in which scientific or technological research, experiments, and measurement may be performed.
Wikipedia - LabVantage -- Laboratory information management system (LIMS) provider
Wikipedia - Land lab -- Outdoor laboratory for biological study
Wikipedia - Langmuir-Blodgett trough -- Laboratory equipment
Wikipedia - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory -- United States national laboratory located near Berkeley, California
Wikipedia - Lawrence Livermore Laboratory
Wikipedia - Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory -- Federal research institute in Livermore, California, United States
Wikipedia - Lawrence Radiation Laboratory
Wikipedia - Lerner Marine Laboratory -- Research station in Bimini, Bahamas
Wikipedia - Leukapheresis -- laboratory procedure in which white blood cells are separated from a sample of blood
Wikipedia - Lincoln Laboratory's Experimental Test Site
Wikipedia - Lincoln Laboratory
Wikipedia - List of Dexter's Laboratory episodes -- list of episodes of the American animated television series Dexter's Laboratory
Wikipedia - List of electronic laboratory notebook software packages -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of University of Chicago Laboratory Schools people -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - L. L. Thurstone Psychometric Laboratory
Wikipedia - Los Alamos Laboratory
Wikipedia - Los Alamos National Laboratory -- Research laboratory near Santa Fe, New Mexico
Wikipedia - Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory
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Wikipedia - Macie Roberts -- Former supervisor at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Wikipedia - Magnetic stirrer -- Laboratory device
Wikipedia - Marine Biological Laboratory
Wikipedia - Marquette University Humanoid Engineering & Intelligent Robotics Lab -- robotics research laboratory
Wikipedia - Mars Science Laboratory -- Robotic mission that deployed the Curiosity rover to Mars in 2012
Wikipedia - Max Dale Cooper -- American immunologist and Professor of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine at Emory University
Wikipedia - Medical laboratory scientist -- Healthcare professional who works in the laboratory
Wikipedia - Metallurgical Laboratory -- Former laboratory at the University of Chicago, part of the Manhattan Project
Wikipedia - Michael L. Gernhardt -- NASA astronaut and manager of Environmental Physiology Laboratory
Wikipedia - Minus Eighty Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS -- Experiment storage freezer for the ISS
Wikipedia - Mission 31 -- An undersea expedition organized by Fabien Cousteau in the undersea laboratory Aquarius in the Florida Keys, scuba diving to collect scientific data and IMAX footage
Wikipedia - MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Wikipedia - MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory -- CS and AI Laboratory at MIT
Wikipedia - MIT Instrumentation Laboratory
Wikipedia - MIT Laboratory for Computer Science
Wikipedia - MIT Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems
Wikipedia - MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Wikipedia - MIT Radiation Laboratory
Wikipedia - Montreal Laboratory -- Physics laboratory (World War II)
Wikipedia - More Hall Annex -- Former nuclear laboratory in historic building, Seattle, Washington, U.S.
Wikipedia - Mote Marine Laboratory -- Non-profit organisation in the USA
Wikipedia - MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology -- Research institute in Cambridge, England
Wikipedia - MS2 tagging -- Laboratory technique
Wikipedia - National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center -- U.S. government biodefense research laboratory
Wikipedia - National Institute of Laboratory Medicine & Referral Centre -- Laboratory medicine institute in Dhaka, Bangladesh
Wikipedia - National Institute of Standards and Technology -- Measurement standards laboratory in the United States
Wikipedia - National Laboratory of Psychical Research
Wikipedia - National Nuclear Laboratory -- UK government owned and operated nuclear services technology provider
Wikipedia - National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory -- American research center
Wikipedia - National Physical Laboratory, UK
Wikipedia - National Physical Laboratory (United Kingdom)
Wikipedia - National Virus Reference Laboratory -- Irish national laboratory
Wikipedia - Naval Electronics Laboratory
Wikipedia - Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton -- U.S. Navy biomedical research laboratory
Wikipedia - Naval Ordnance Laboratory -- Disestablished United States naval laboratory at White Oak, Maryland
Wikipedia - Naval Research Laboratory Flyrt -- Unmanned aerial vehicle
Wikipedia - Naval Research Laboratory
Wikipedia - Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory -- Research unit for submarine and diving medicine
Wikipedia - Navy Electronics Laboratory -- United States Navy organization
Wikipedia - Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory -- NASA astronaut training facility in Houston, Texas
Wikipedia - Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy -- Laboratory technique
Wikipedia - Nude mouse -- A laboratory mouse from a strain with a genetic mutation that causes a deteriorated or absent thymus, resulting in an inhibited immune system due to a greatly reduced number of T cells
Wikipedia - Oak Ridge National Laboratory -- United States DOE national laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, United States
Wikipedia - Oil analysis -- Laboratory analysis of an oil based lubricant's properties and contaminants
Wikipedia - Olivetti Research Laboratory
Wikipedia - Omni Commons -- Hackerspace and community laboratory in San Francisco
Wikipedia - OpenAI -- Artificial intelligence research laboratory
Wikipedia - OPS 0855 -- American boilerplate Manned Orbital Laboratory spacecraft
Wikipedia - Oxford University Computing Laboratory
Wikipedia - Pain and suffering in laboratory animals
Wikipedia - Parabiosis -- laboratory technique to study physiology
Wikipedia - Paul Syverson -- Computer scientist and mathematician at the US Naval Research Laboratory, inventor of onion routing
Wikipedia - Philips Natuurkundig Laboratorium -- Research laboratory of Philips (NatLab)
Wikipedia - Pipeclay triangle -- Fireproof support; laboratory equipment
Wikipedia - Pipette -- Liquid-transferring laboratory tool
Wikipedia - Plasma Physics Laboratory (Saskatchewan) -- Physics laboratory at the University of Saskatchewan
Wikipedia - Poison laboratory of the Soviet secret services
Wikipedia - Polymerase chain reaction -- Laboratory technique to multiply a DNA sample for study
Wikipedia - Positive pressure personnel suit -- Totally encapsulating, industrial protection garments worn within special biocontainment or maximum containment laboratory facilities
Wikipedia - Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory -- national laboratory for plasma physics and nuclear fusion science at Princeton, New Jersey
Wikipedia - Proctor compaction test -- Laboratory test for determining the optimal water content at which a soil is the most compacted
Wikipedia - Project Y -- Secret laboratory established by the Manhattan Project
Wikipedia - Public health laboratory
Wikipedia - Quest Diagnostics -- American clinical laboratory company
Wikipedia - Radial immunodiffusion -- Laboratory technique
Wikipedia - Radiation Laboratory (MIT)
Wikipedia - Radiation Laboratory
Wikipedia - Rapid amplification of cDNA ends -- Laboratory technique
Wikipedia - Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory
Wikipedia - Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art
Wikipedia - Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT
Wikipedia - Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction -- Laboratory technique to multiply an RNA sample for study
Wikipedia - RNase H-dependent PCR -- Laboratory technique
Wikipedia - Rome Laboratory
Wikipedia - Rude Removal -- An unaired episode of ''Dexter's Laboratory''
Wikipedia - Santa Susana Field Laboratory -- Industrial research and development facilities in southern California
Wikipedia - Scott Crooker -- Researcher at Los Alamos National Laboratory
Wikipedia - Separatory funnel -- Laboratory glassware
Wikipedia - Seto Marine Biological Laboratory
Wikipedia - Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory
Wikipedia - Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory -- Integration and training facility which supported the Space Shuttle program
Wikipedia - Simula Research Laboratory
Wikipedia - SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
Wikipedia - SNOLAB -- Canadian neutrino laboratory
Wikipedia - SOLAR (ISS) -- ESA science observatory on the Columbus Laboratory
Wikipedia - Solar System Ambassadors -- Public outreach program of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Wikipedia - Solid State Physics Laboratory -- Laboratory in Delhi
Wikipedia - Southern Regional Research Center -- Agricultural research laboratory in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Wikipedia - Soxhlet extractor -- Laboratory apparatus
Wikipedia - Spacelab -- Temporary, reusable laboratory aboard the Space Shuttle
Wikipedia - Space Sciences Laboratory
Wikipedia - Space Systems Laboratory (Maryland)
Wikipedia - Space Systems Laboratory -- Neutral buoyacy facility at the University of Maryland
Wikipedia - Stanford AI Laboratory
Wikipedia - Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Wikipedia - Tektite habitat -- Undersea laboratory and experimental habitat
Wikipedia - The Jackson Laboratory
Wikipedia - The Laboratory
Wikipedia - Thin section -- Laboratory preparation of a rock, mineral, soil, pottery, bones, or metal for use with a petrographic microscope
Wikipedia - Tiangong-2 -- Chinese space laboratory
Wikipedia - Titration -- Laboratory method for determining the concentration of an analyte
Wikipedia - Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor -- former experimental tokamak at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
Wikipedia - Tranquilandia -- Columbian cocaine processing laboratory
Wikipedia - United States Army Research Laboratory
Wikipedia - United States Naval Computing Machine Laboratory
Wikipedia - United States Naval Research Laboratory
Wikipedia - University Laboratory High School (Urbana, Illinois) -- High school in Urbana, Illinois
Wikipedia - University of California Radiation Laboratory
Wikipedia - University of California, Riverside 1985 laboratory raid
Wikipedia - University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory
Wikipedia - University of Cambridge Mathematical Laboratory
Wikipedia - University of Chicago Laboratory Schools
Wikipedia - U.S. Army Research Laboratory
Wikipedia - US Army Research Laboratory
Wikipedia - US Naval Research Laboratory
Wikipedia - U.S. Salinity Laboratory -- National Laboratory for research on salt-affected soil
Wikipedia - Vandi Verma -- Roboticist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and driver of the Mars rovers
Wikipedia - Victoria Makerspace -- Community laboratory in Victoria, British Columbia
Wikipedia - Virtual Laboratory
Wikipedia - Vivien Zapf -- Researcher at Los Alamos National Laboratory
Wikipedia - Volta Laboratory and Bureau
Wikipedia - Wave tank -- A laboratory setup for observing the behavior of surface waves
Wikipedia - Widnes Laboratory -- British research institute
Wikipedia - Willis R. Whitney -- American chemist and founder of the research laboratory of the General Electric Company (1926-2012)
Wikipedia - Willow Run Laboratory
Wikipedia - World Ocean Atlas -- A data product of the Ocean Climate Laboratory of the National Oceanographic Data Center (U.S.)
Wikipedia - Yokohama Animation Laboratory -- Japanese animation studio
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https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Laboratory
Dexter's Laboratory (1996 - 2003) - Dexter's Laboratory (Dexter's Lab for short) was an American animated television series created by Genndy Tartakovsky. It was produced by Hanna-Barbera Cartoons for Cartoon Network from 1996 to 1997, and by Cartoon Network Studios from 2001 to 2002. The original pilot episode appeared as the second...
The What-A-Cartoon Show (1995 - 2002) - A showcase of animated shorts on Cartoon Network which launched five of the network's premiere series (Dexter's Laboratory, The Powerpuff Girls, Courage the Cowardly Dog, Johnny Bravo, and Cow and Chicken). Originally back in 1995 it was called World Premire Toons and was only 10 minutes long, Than...
Cartoon Network's Cartoon Theatre (1998 - 2004) - A program on Cartoon Network which aired movies produced by Warner Brothers as well as original movies such as Dexter's Laboratory Ego Trip and The Powerpuff Girls movie. Other studios include Universal Cartoon Studios and Paramount Pictures.
Dai Sentai Goggle V (1982 - 1983) - The Dark Science Empire Deathdark launches its scheme for world conquest from their Wolfborg Castle in Germany. Doctor Hongou, founder of the Future Science Laboratory, is saved from one of their attacks by world class explorer Ken'ichi Akama. Using his Comboyputer, Hongou recruits five people, incl...
Kagaku Sentai Dynaman (1983 - 1984) - The Jashinka empire (Combination of the Japanese words for 'evil,' (Jashin) and 'evolution' (Shinka). ) rises from the depths of the Earth to conquer the world. To stop them, Dr. Yumeno assembles five inventors to his laboratory, Yumeno Invention Laboratory and gives them the power to become Dynamen...
Astro Boy (2003) (2003 - 2004) - Astro is a robotic boy that posesses super human powers and an artificial intelligence system that is unparalleled to any robot. His creator, Dr. Tenma, created him to replace his late son, Tovio. Dr. Tenma soon destroys his laboratory, after the creation of Astro, and shuts down Astro. Soon after,...
Ready Jet Go! (2016 - Current) - a preschool CGI animated television series produced by Wind Dancer Films. The series premiered on PBS Kids on February 15, 2016. It was created by animator Craig Bartlett,[1] and is produced in cooperation with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The show is aimed at kids ages 3 to 8. On August 17, 20...
Danny Phantom (2004 - 2007) - Danny Fenton was once your typical shy kid--you know, kind of a wallflower. But all that changed one afternoon when Danny accidentally blew up his parents' laboratory and became ghost-hunting superhero Danny Phantom. Now 1/2 ghost, Danny's picked up some pretty cool paranormal powers-- but only his...
Commando Cody - Radar Men from the Moon (1952 - 1952) - Commando Cody is a freelance civilian scientist who has owns a laboratory, in this facility he has a full staff of assistants, a rocket ship with ability to travel to the moon and the his own personal rocket pack. Cody is called to action when various military and major facilities are attacked and t...
Dexter's Laboratory Ego Trip(1999) - Dexter, having chasing Mandark in his cape (as well as Dee Dee) out of his lab, while Mandark was try to steal the all-powerful Neurotomic Protocore, was attacked by a group of robots seeking to eliminate The One who Saved the Future, yet he defeated them all. Dexter was fascinated with being the On...
Bride of the Monster (1955) - A old mansion is being used by Dr. Eric Vornoff as laboratory in hopes that Vornoff can create a new race of atomic supermen with the power of nuclear power. Along with his assistant Lobo they plan on taking over the world but his plans are delayed when Newspaper reporter Janet Lawton and the local...
The Brave Little Toaster to the Rescue(1999) - The Brave Little Toaster and friends must rescue the animals at a veterinary hospital from being sent to a testing laboratory.
The Boys & Girls Guide To Getting Down(2006) - Tongue-in-cheek look at 20-something singles clubbing and partying in L.A.; it's organized into 15 chapters from overview and preparation to partying and the morning after. Voice-over narration, charts and graphs, and visits to a research laboratory punctuate the story of a single night when groups...
Resident Evil(2002) - A special military unit fights a powerful, out-of-control supercomputer and hundreds of scientists who have mutated into flesh-eating creatures after a laboratory accident.
https://myanimelist.net/manga/4348/Love_Laboratory
Dexter's Laboratory ::: TV-G | 23min | Animation, Adventure, Comedy | TV Series (19962003) -- The misadventures of a boy genius and his annoying sister. Creators: Genndy Tartakovsky, Chris Savino, John McIntyre | 5 more credits
Dollhouse ::: TV-14 | 44min | Drama, Mystery, Sci-Fi | TV Series (20092010) -- A futuristic laboratory has erased the identities of lost young people, and now imprints them with the temporary identities they need to fulfill assignments for clients. Creator:
Dollhouse ::: TV-14 | 44min | Drama, Mystery, Sci-Fi | TV Series (2009-2010) Episode Guide 27 episodes Dollhouse Poster -- A futuristic laboratory has erased the identities of lost young people, and now imprints them with the temporary identities they need to fulfill assignments for clients. Creator:
I Origins (2014) ::: 7.4/10 -- R | 1h 46min | Drama, Mystery, Romance | 19 September 2014 (South -- I Origins Poster -- A molecular biologist and his laboratory partner uncover evidence that may fundamentally change society as we know it. Director: Mike Cahill Writer:
Jake 2.0 ::: 1h | Drama, Sci-Fi | TV Series (20032004) Jake Foley is a computer technician for the N.S.A., who secretly longs for a chance to work in the field. Circumstance puts him in a top secret laboratory, in the middle of a shoot-out ... S Creator: Silvio Horta Stars:
ReGenesis ::: 13+ | 49min | Drama, Mystery, Sci-Fi | TV Series (20042008) Geneticist David Sandstrom is the chief scientist at the prestigious virology/micro-biology NORBAC laboratory, a joint enterprise between the USA, Canada and Mexico for countering bio-terrorism. Creator: Christina Jennings Stars:
Resident Evil (2002) ::: 6.7/10 -- R | 1h 40min | Action, Horror, Sci-Fi | 15 March 2002 (USA) -- A special military unit fights a powerful, out-of-control supercomputer and hundreds of scientists who have mutated into flesh-eating creatures after a laboratory accident. Director: Paul W.S. Anderson Writer:
Rosewood ::: TV-14 | 42min | Crime, Drama, Mystery | TV Series (20152017) -- Miami pathologist Dr. Beaumont Rosewood, Jr. finds secrets in people's bodies using his state-of-the-art laboratory equipment. Creator: Todd Harthan
Tarantula (1955) ::: 6.5/10 -- Approved | 1h 20min | Horror, Sci-Fi | 20 February 1956 (Sweden) -- A spider escapes from an isolated Arizona desert laboratory experimenting in giantism and grows to tremendous size as it wreaks havoc on the local inhabitants. Director: Jack Arnold Writers:
The Andromeda Strain (1971) ::: 7.2/10 -- G | 2h 11min | Mystery, Sci-Fi, Thriller | 12 March 1971 (USA) -- A team of top scientists work feverishly in a secret, state-of-the-art laboratory to discover what has killed the citizens of a small town and learn how this deadly contagion can be stopped. Director: Robert Wise Writers:
The Big Bang Theory ::: TV-PG | 22min | Comedy, Romance | TV Series (20072019) -- A woman who moves into an apartment across the hall from two brilliant but socially awkward physicists shows them how little they know about life outside of the laboratory. Creators:
The Glass Bottom Boat (1966) ::: 6.5/10 -- Approved | 1h 50min | Comedy, Romance | 9 June 1966 (USA) -- After a series of misunderstandings, the head of an aerospace research laboratory begins to suspect his new girlfriend is a Russian spy. Director: Frank Tashlin Writer: Everett Freeman
The Plague Dogs (1982) ::: 7.8/10 -- PG-13 | 1h 43min | Animation, Adventure, Drama | 9 January 1985 (USA) -- Two dogs escape from a laboratory and are hunted as possible carriers of the bubonic plague. Director: Martin Rosen Writers: Richard Adams (novel), Martin Rosen Stars:
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https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Transgenic_Laboratory
https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Wardenclyffe_laboratory
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Astro Boy: Tetsuwan Atom -- -- Tezuka Productions -- 50 eps -- Manga -- Action Sci-Fi Adventure Super Power Kids Mecha Shounen -- Astro Boy: Tetsuwan Atom Astro Boy: Tetsuwan Atom -- Astro is a robotic boy that posses super human powers and an artificial intelligence system that is unparalleled to any robot. His creator, Dr. Tenma, created him to replace his late son, Tovio. Dr. Tenma soon destroys his laboratory, after the creation of Astro, and shuts down Astro. Soon after, Dr. O'Shay, the head of the Ministry of Science revives Astro, and tries to give him a normal life as a 6th grade student that helps the police agency keep renegade robots and bigot humans from causing harm. Astro faces extreme racism for being a robot, and he must discover the truth about his creator Dr. Tenma. -- -- (Source: ANN) -- TV - Apr 6, 2003 -- 17,883 7.00
Concrete Revolutio: Choujin Gensou -- -- Bones -- 13 eps -- Original -- Action Demons Drama Fantasy Mystery Sci-Fi Super Power Supernatural -- Concrete Revolutio: Choujin Gensou Concrete Revolutio: Choujin Gensou -- On a sunny July day in the 41st year of the Shinka Era, Jirou Hitoyoshi is tasked with covertly listening in on a secret meeting between a top government scientist and an industrial spy. However, his cover is blown, and the spy reveals himself to be an alien in disguise. Amidst the ensuing chaos, Jirou enlists the aid of cafe waitress and magical girl Kikko Hoshino, one of many "superhumans" who blend into society and secretly protect humanity from extraterrestrial threats. As a member of the government agency known as the Super Population Research Laboratory, Jirou has the dual task of protecting superhumans that defend humanity and disposing of any deemed too dangerous to live. Having proven herself a worthy ally, Kikko is invited to join the agency as its newest recruit. -- -- Fast forward five years: disapproval and distaste for superhumans are now commonplace in Tokyo. From government corruption and conflicting ideas of justice, to the morality of superhuman rights, the relationship between humans and the supernatural minority balances precariously in a world pervaded by whispers of unrest and unease. Under mysterious circumstances, Jirou has betrayed the agency, and is now a fugitive on the run. As he skulks through the rainy back alleys of Shinjuku, he is pursued by the very same superhumans that he himself once recruited. -- -- 76,484 6.70
Concrete Revolutio: Choujin Gensou -- -- Bones -- 13 eps -- Original -- Action Demons Drama Fantasy Mystery Sci-Fi Super Power Supernatural -- Concrete Revolutio: Choujin Gensou Concrete Revolutio: Choujin Gensou -- On a sunny July day in the 41st year of the Shinka Era, Jirou Hitoyoshi is tasked with covertly listening in on a secret meeting between a top government scientist and an industrial spy. However, his cover is blown, and the spy reveals himself to be an alien in disguise. Amidst the ensuing chaos, Jirou enlists the aid of cafe waitress and magical girl Kikko Hoshino, one of many "superhumans" who blend into society and secretly protect humanity from extraterrestrial threats. As a member of the government agency known as the Super Population Research Laboratory, Jirou has the dual task of protecting superhumans that defend humanity and disposing of any deemed too dangerous to live. Having proven herself a worthy ally, Kikko is invited to join the agency as its newest recruit. -- -- Fast forward five years: disapproval and distaste for superhumans are now commonplace in Tokyo. From government corruption and conflicting ideas of justice, to the morality of superhuman rights, the relationship between humans and the supernatural minority balances precariously in a world pervaded by whispers of unrest and unease. Under mysterious circumstances, Jirou has betrayed the agency, and is now a fugitive on the run. As he skulks through the rainy back alleys of Shinjuku, he is pursued by the very same superhumans that he himself once recruited. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- 76,484 6.70
Dragon Ball Z Movie 02: Kono Yo de Ichiban Tsuyoi Yatsu -- -- Toei Animation -- 1 ep -- Manga -- Action Sci-Fi Adventure Comedy Fantasy Shounen -- Dragon Ball Z Movie 02: Kono Yo de Ichiban Tsuyoi Yatsu Dragon Ball Z Movie 02: Kono Yo de Ichiban Tsuyoi Yatsu -- In his laboratory, biotechnology expert Dr. Kochin gathers the dragon balls intending to free his master Dr. Uirou, a mad scientist hellbent on ruling the world, forever frozen in the never-melting ice of the Tsurumai-Tsuburi Mountains. Attempting to locate the dragon balls, Gohan Son and Oolong arrive at the scene and are ambushed by several creatures known as "Bio-Men." Training nearby, Piccolo attempts to save them but is then attacked by three mysterious warriors. When the ice beneath them breaks, it cuts their altercation short, burying Gohan and Oolong within. -- -- After regaining consciousness, they return home to Kame House only to encounter Bio-Men, demanding Muten-Roushi to follow them. Refusing, he easily defeats the creatures, piquing Dr. Kochin's interest. Under the impression of Muten-Roushi being the strongest man in the world, Dr. Kochin takes Bulma hostage, forcing Roushi's agreement to accompany him in mysterious plans involving his master. Who are Dr. Kochin and Dr. Uirou? What even is their purpose? -- -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- Movie - Mar 10, 1990 -- 91,335 6.64
Dragon Ball Z Movie 02: Kono Yo de Ichiban Tsuyoi Yatsu -- -- Toei Animation -- 1 ep -- Manga -- Action Sci-Fi Adventure Comedy Fantasy Shounen -- Dragon Ball Z Movie 02: Kono Yo de Ichiban Tsuyoi Yatsu Dragon Ball Z Movie 02: Kono Yo de Ichiban Tsuyoi Yatsu -- In his laboratory, biotechnology expert Dr. Kochin gathers the dragon balls intending to free his master Dr. Uirou, a mad scientist hellbent on ruling the world, forever frozen in the never-melting ice of the Tsurumai-Tsuburi Mountains. Attempting to locate the dragon balls, Gohan Son and Oolong arrive at the scene and are ambushed by several creatures known as "Bio-Men." Training nearby, Piccolo attempts to save them but is then attacked by three mysterious warriors. When the ice beneath them breaks, it cuts their altercation short, burying Gohan and Oolong within. -- -- After regaining consciousness, they return home to Kame House only to encounter Bio-Men, demanding Muten-Roushi to follow them. Refusing, he easily defeats the creatures, piquing Dr. Kochin's interest. Under the impression of Muten-Roushi being the strongest man in the world, Dr. Kochin takes Bulma hostage, forcing Roushi's agreement to accompany him in mysterious plans involving his master. Who are Dr. Kochin and Dr. Uirou? What even is their purpose? -- -- Movie - Mar 10, 1990 -- 91,335 6.64
Dragon Ball Z Movie 07: Kyokugen Battle!! Sandai Super Saiyajin -- -- Toei Animation -- 1 ep -- Manga -- Action Adventure Comedy Fantasy Sci-Fi Shounen -- Dragon Ball Z Movie 07: Kyokugen Battle!! Sandai Super Saiyajin Dragon Ball Z Movie 07: Kyokugen Battle!! Sandai Super Saiyajin -- Dr. Gero's Androids #13, #14, and #15 are awakened by the laboratory computers and immediately head to the mall where Goku is shopping. After Goku, Trunks, and Vegeta defeat #14 and #15, #13 absorbs their inner computers and becomes a super being greater than the original three separately were. Now it is up to Goku to stop him. -- -- (Source: ANN) -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- Movie - Jul 11, 1992 -- 96,252 6.87
Dragon Ball Z Movie 07: Kyokugen Battle!! Sandai Super Saiyajin -- -- Toei Animation -- 1 ep -- Manga -- Action Adventure Comedy Fantasy Sci-Fi Shounen -- Dragon Ball Z Movie 07: Kyokugen Battle!! Sandai Super Saiyajin Dragon Ball Z Movie 07: Kyokugen Battle!! Sandai Super Saiyajin -- Dr. Gero's Androids #13, #14, and #15 are awakened by the laboratory computers and immediately head to the mall where Goku is shopping. After Goku, Trunks, and Vegeta defeat #14 and #15, #13 absorbs their inner computers and becomes a super being greater than the original three separately were. Now it is up to Goku to stop him. -- -- (Source: ANN) -- Movie - Jul 11, 1992 -- 96,252 6.87
Gokukoku no Brynhildr -- -- Arms -- 13 eps -- Manga -- Drama Mystery Sci-Fi Seinen -- Gokukoku no Brynhildr Gokukoku no Brynhildr -- Venturing into the wilderness, the skeptical Ryouta Murakami and the ambitious Kuroneko were on a quest to prove the existence of extraterrestrial life when a tragic accident occurred, reaping Kuroneko of her life and leaving Ryouta in a critically injured state. -- -- Ten years have passed since the disaster, and Ryouta is now living a normal life in high school. He vows to prove that aliens are real in honor of his late friend. A transfer student named Neko Kuroha unexpectedly arrives one day, bearing a striking resemblance to the late Kuroneko—even sharing a similar name. Most mysteriously, she seems to possess supernatural powers. -- -- As Ryouta takes more interest in Neko, he is drawn into a deadly world where dangerous scientists hunt magic-wielding witches that have escaped from their secret research laboratory. Neko is one of these escapees, but there are many others who are in similar situations, and it's up to Ryouta to protect them from their would-be captors. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Sentai Filmworks -- 286,839 6.91
Hi no Tori -- -- Tezuka Productions -- 13 eps -- Manga -- Sci-Fi Adventure Historical Supernatural Drama -- Hi no Tori Hi no Tori -- From prehistoric times to the distant future, Hi no Tori portrays how the legendary immortal bird Phoenix acts as a witness and chronicler for the history of mankind's endless struggle in search of power, justice, and freedom. -- -- The Dawn -- Since time immemorial, people have sought out the legendary Phoenix for its blood, which is known to grant eternal life. Hearing about rumored Phoenix sightings in the Land of Fire, Himiko—the cruel queen of Yamatai obsessed with immortality—sends her army to conquer the nation and retrieve the creature. Young Nagi, his elder sister Hinaku, and her foreign husband Guzuri are the only survivors of the slaughter. But while Nagi is taken prisoner by the enemy, elsewhere, Hinaku has a shocking revelation. -- -- The Resurrection -- In a distant future where Earth has become uninhabitable, Leona undergoes surgery on a space station to recover from a deadly accident. However, while also suffering from amnesia, his brain is now half cybernetic and causes him to see people as formless scraps and robots as humans. Falling in love with Chihiro, a discarded robot, they escape together from the space station to prevent Chihiro from being destroyed. Yet as his lost memories gradually return, Leona will have to confront the painful truth about his past. -- -- The Transformation -- Yearning for independence, Sakon no Suke—the only daughter of a tyrant ruler—kills priestess Yao Bikuni, the sole person capable of curing her father's illness. Consequently, she and her faithful servant, Kahei, are unexpectedly confined to the temple grounds of Bikuni's sanctuary. While searching for a way out, Sakon no Suke assumes the priestess's position and uses a miraculous feather to heal all those reaching out for help. -- -- The Sun -- After his faction loses the war, Prince Harima's head is replaced with a wolf's. An old medicine woman who recognizes his bloodline assists him and the wounded General Azumi-no-muraji Saruta in escaping to Wah Land. But their arrival at a small Wah village is met with unexpected trouble as Houben, a powerful Buddhist monk, wants Harima dead. With the aid of the Ku clan wolf gods that protect the village's surroundings, he survives the murder attempt. After tensions settle, Saruta uses his established reputation in Wah to persuade the villagers to welcome Harima into their community. Over a period of time, Harima becomes the village's respected leader under the name Inugami no Sukune. But while the young prince adapts to his new role, he must remain vigilant as new dangers soon arise and threaten his recently acquired tranquility. -- -- The Future -- Life on Earth has gradually ceased to exist, with the survivors taking refuge in underground cities. To avoid human extinction, Doctor Saruta unsuccessfully tries to recreate life in his laboratory. However, the unexpected visit of Masato Yamanobe, his alien girlfriend Tamami, and his colleague Rock Holmes reveals a disturbing crisis: the computers that regulate the subterranean cities have initiated a nuclear war that will eliminate all of mankind. -- -- TV - Mar 21, 2004 -- 7,595 7.10
Kimera -- -- animate Film -- 1 ep -- Manga -- Action Horror Sci-Fi Shounen Ai Supernatural Vampire -- Kimera Kimera -- Osamu and Jay are two cereal salesmen traveling for work when they encounter a barricade. Curious as to what is going on, they step out of their car and enter into a government secret. Two mysterious demon-like men have been terrorizing the military, who came to respond to a car crash involving a vehicle carrying government research material. Inside the car wreckage, Osamu finds a beautiful hermaphrodite with gold and crimson eyes trapped in a frozen chamber. Osamu shares a kiss with them through the glass before he is forced to flee the scene. -- -- Osamu and Jay interrogate Jay's father, a top researcher at a government laboratory, who reveals that what Osamu and Jay saw was top-secret, and they would likely be sitting in prison if it weren't for his influence. While Jay is ready to forget everything that happened, Osamu cannot let it go that easily. After stealing a security badge, Osamu finds where the person he kissed is being kept, and learns that their name is Kimera. Osamu wants to run away with the beautiful Kimera, though he does not know why Kimera is being held captive or what a relationship with them means for the future of humanity. -- -- -- Licensor: -- ADV Films -- OVA - Jul 31, 1996 -- 6,184 5.12
Kimera -- -- animate Film -- 1 ep -- Manga -- Action Horror Sci-Fi Shounen Ai Supernatural Vampire -- Kimera Kimera -- Osamu and Jay are two cereal salesmen traveling for work when they encounter a barricade. Curious as to what is going on, they step out of their car and enter into a government secret. Two mysterious demon-like men have been terrorizing the military, who came to respond to a car crash involving a vehicle carrying government research material. Inside the car wreckage, Osamu finds a beautiful hermaphrodite with gold and crimson eyes trapped in a frozen chamber. Osamu shares a kiss with them through the glass before he is forced to flee the scene. -- -- Osamu and Jay interrogate Jay's father, a top researcher at a government laboratory, who reveals that what Osamu and Jay saw was top-secret, and they would likely be sitting in prison if it weren't for his influence. While Jay is ready to forget everything that happened, Osamu cannot let it go that easily. After stealing a security badge, Osamu finds where the person he kissed is being kept, and learns that their name is Kimera. Osamu wants to run away with the beautiful Kimera, though he does not know why Kimera is being held captive or what a relationship with them means for the future of humanity. -- -- OVA - Jul 31, 1996 -- 6,184 5.12
Memories -- -- Madhouse, Studio 4°C -- 3 eps -- Manga -- Drama Horror Psychological Sci-Fi -- Memories Memories -- Memories is a compilation of three standalone short films encompassing different genres. -- -- Magnetic Rose -- In the far reaches of space, after tracing a distress signal to a large abandoned space station, a pair of engineers—Heintz Beckner and Miguel Costrela—find a derelict mansion and decide to explore on foot. Their investigation reveals a dark secret surrounding the fate of Eva Friedel, a renowned opera singer with a tragic history. Hallucinations soon begin to plague them, and they must fight to retain their sanity in order to escape the station alive. -- -- Stink Bomb -- Hapless lab technician Nobuo Tanaka consumes some pills at his laboratory to cure a cold. Unknown to him, however, the pills are actually experimental drugs that enhance his flatulence to a lethal degree. As the toxic gas escaping him kills everyone in his vicinity, he is ordered by his superiors to retreat to the company headquarters in Tokyo. The journey to the city is made all the more arduous as Nobuo struggles with his deadly odor while the police, military, and foreign adversaries are hot on his trail. -- -- Cannon Fodder -- In a fortress city filled to the brim with cannons, a young boy wishes to surpass his father by becoming a revered artillery officer. Despite no proof of an enemy nation, he cannot resist the urge to partake in the daily bombardment routines organized by the city. Whether at school or just before bedtime, he only dreams of someday firing a cannon for the sake of his homeland. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Discotek Media, Sony Pictures Entertainment -- Movie - Dec 23, 1995 -- 83,342 7.73
Memories -- -- Madhouse, Studio 4°C -- 3 eps -- Manga -- Drama Horror Psychological Sci-Fi -- Memories Memories -- Memories is a compilation of three standalone short films encompassing different genres. -- -- Magnetic Rose -- In the far reaches of space, after tracing a distress signal to a large abandoned space station, a pair of engineers—Heintz Beckner and Miguel Costrela—find a derelict mansion and decide to explore on foot. Their investigation reveals a dark secret surrounding the fate of Eva Friedel, a renowned opera singer with a tragic history. Hallucinations soon begin to plague them, and they must fight to retain their sanity in order to escape the station alive. -- -- Stink Bomb -- Hapless lab technician Nobuo Tanaka consumes some pills at his laboratory to cure a cold. Unknown to him, however, the pills are actually experimental drugs that enhance his flatulence to a lethal degree. As the toxic gas escaping him kills everyone in his vicinity, he is ordered by his superiors to retreat to the company headquarters in Tokyo. The journey to the city is made all the more arduous as Nobuo struggles with his deadly odor while the police, military, and foreign adversaries are hot on his trail. -- -- Cannon Fodder -- In a fortress city filled to the brim with cannons, a young boy wishes to surpass his father by becoming a revered artillery officer. Despite no proof of an enemy nation, he cannot resist the urge to partake in the daily bombardment routines organized by the city. Whether at school or just before bedtime, he only dreams of someday firing a cannon for the sake of his homeland. -- -- Movie - Dec 23, 1995 -- 83,342 7.73
Metropolis -- -- Madhouse -- 1 ep -- Manga -- Adventure Drama Police Romance Sci-Fi Shounen -- Metropolis Metropolis -- In the great city of Metropolis, severe community structures and prejudice dominate a world where humans and robots live together. Unrest and violence increase with each new day. -- -- Searching for the scientist Dr. Laughton, suspected to violate human rights by trading organs, the Japanese detective Shunsaku Ban and his nephew Kenichi arrive at Metropolis. In the scientist's laboratory, Kenichi discovers a girl without any memory of her past life. He decides to help her, so they run away together. His uncle follows him and penetrates the dark secrets of the city to find Duke Red, the man ruling from the shadows. Meanwhile, Kenichi desperately tries to protect the mysterious girl from the people hunting her. However, Duke Red and his adoptive son have their own deep reasons for chasing the girl. These reasons are connected to her true identity and the struggle for the domination of Metropolis... -- -- Movie - May 26, 2001 -- 80,567 7.54
Moyashimon Returns -- -- Shirogumi, Telecom Animation Film -- 11 eps -- Manga -- Comedy Supernatural School Seinen -- Moyashimon Returns Moyashimon Returns -- In the second season the story continues exactly where it left off previously. Professor Itsuki's Fermentation Cellar and laboratory is ready for operation and with Sawaki Tadayasu's unique gift to see and communicate with microbes to help, Itsuki's motley group of students begin to process different fermented products like soy sauce and sake. -- -- (Source: ANN) -- 22,523 7.22
Night Head Genesis -- -- Bee Media -- 24 eps -- Manga -- Sci-Fi Mystery Psychological Supernatural Drama -- Night Head Genesis Night Head Genesis -- It is said that 70% of the human brain capacity is unused. If humans possess incredible power, it is strongly believed to be lying dormant within this region. This unused 70% brain capacity is known as "Night Head". -- -- The famous work 'NIGHT HEAD' is going to break the silence. They were abandoned by their parents because of the psychic power they possessed. They are the Kirihara brothers, who lived in a laboratory within a barrier-protected forest. They have escaped from the laboratory, and a new wave of 'Revolution' is about to arise. -- -- A new "Night Head" is about to be awakened. -- -- Licensor: -- Media Blasters -- TV - Jun 17, 2006 -- 26,476 6.77
Night Head Genesis -- -- Bee Media -- 24 eps -- Manga -- Sci-Fi Mystery Psychological Supernatural Drama -- Night Head Genesis Night Head Genesis -- It is said that 70% of the human brain capacity is unused. If humans possess incredible power, it is strongly believed to be lying dormant within this region. This unused 70% brain capacity is known as "Night Head". -- -- The famous work 'NIGHT HEAD' is going to break the silence. They were abandoned by their parents because of the psychic power they possessed. They are the Kirihara brothers, who lived in a laboratory within a barrier-protected forest. They have escaped from the laboratory, and a new wave of 'Revolution' is about to arise. -- -- A new "Night Head" is about to be awakened. -- TV - Jun 17, 2006 -- 26,476 6.77
Zettai Karen Children -- -- SynergySP -- 51 eps -- Manga -- Action Comedy Supernatural Shounen -- Zettai Karen Children Zettai Karen Children -- They're cute, adorable and three of the most powerful Espers the world has ever seen: Kaoru, the brash psychokinetic who can move objects with her mind; Shiho, the sarcastic and dark natured psychometric able to pick thoughts from people's minds and read the pasts of inanimate objects like a book; and Aoi, the most collected and rational of the three, who has the ability to teleport herself and the others at will. So what to do with these potential psychic monsters in the making? Enter B.A.B.E.L., the Base of Backing ESP Laboratory, where hopefully "The Children" and others like them can become part of the answer to an increasing wave of psychic evolution. It's a win-win solution... Unless you're Koichi Minamoto, the overworked young man stuck with the unenviable task of field commanding a team of three pre-teen girls! -- -- (Source: Sentai Filmworks) -- -- Licensor: -- Sentai Filmworks -- TV - Apr 6, 2008 -- 40,173 7.34
Zettai Karen Children -- -- SynergySP -- 51 eps -- Manga -- Action Comedy Supernatural Shounen -- Zettai Karen Children Zettai Karen Children -- They're cute, adorable and three of the most powerful Espers the world has ever seen: Kaoru, the brash psychokinetic who can move objects with her mind; Shiho, the sarcastic and dark natured psychometric able to pick thoughts from people's minds and read the pasts of inanimate objects like a book; and Aoi, the most collected and rational of the three, who has the ability to teleport herself and the others at will. So what to do with these potential psychic monsters in the making? Enter B.A.B.E.L., the Base of Backing ESP Laboratory, where hopefully "The Children" and others like them can become part of the answer to an increasing wave of psychic evolution. It's a win-win solution... Unless you're Koichi Minamoto, the overworked young man stuck with the unenviable task of field commanding a team of three pre-teen girls! -- -- (Source: Sentai Filmworks) -- TV - Apr 6, 2008 -- 40,173 7.34
Zoids -- -- Xebec -- 67 eps -- - -- Action Adventure Comedy Mecha Sci-Fi -- Zoids Zoids -- Zoids are beast-like fighting machines used in both everyday use such as transportation, and special use such as war. Some types of Zoids, know as Organoids, are miniature Zoids that are living organisms. These Organoids have the capability to fuse with a non-living Zoid and make it much more powerful. -- -- Van (Ban) Freiheit discovers a Zoid Organoid in an abandoned laboratory while running from two strangers piloting Zoids. Also in the laboratory, in an animated suspension tube is a strange girl. He breaks the tube open and takes her and the Organoid with him. Spotting a ruined Shield Liger Zoid outside nearby, the Organoid fuses with it and repairs the damages. Making his escape, Van names the Organoid Zeke, and decides to keep him as a friend. The girl, who says her name is Fiona, wants to find something called Zoids Eve, and so Van, Zeke, and Fiona begin their adventure. -- -- (Source: AniDB) -- -- Licensor: -- Geneon Entertainment USA, VIZ Media -- 42,390 7.38
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Robert_A.W._Carleton_Strength_of_Materials_Laboratory
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Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists
Accelerated Learning Laboratory
Actors' Laboratory Theatre
Advanced Propulsion Physics Laboratory
Advanced Systems Laboratory
Advancing Chemistry by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory
Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory
Air Force Research Laboratory
A Laboratory Manual for Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
Alden Research Laboratory
Allegany Ballistics Laboratory
American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
American Laboratory Theatre
American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
Ames Laboratory
Analytics, Computing, and Complex Systems Laboratory
Andr E. Lalonde Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory
Annals of Clinical & Laboratory Science
Antarctic Technology Offshore Lagoon Laboratory
Apiary Laboratory
Applied Physics Laboratory
Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
Arctic Submarine Laboratory
Argonne National Laboratory
Arizona Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory
Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory
Armstrong Laboratory
Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
sp Hard Rock Laboratory
Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International
Association for Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Association for Laboratory Automation
Association for Laboratory Phonology
Astrobiology Field Laboratory
Astroparticle and Cosmology Laboratory
Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory
Ballistic Research Laboratory
Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative
Beaker (laboratory equipment)
Bell Laboratory
Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory
Biosafety Level 4 Zoonotic Laboratory Network
Blackett Laboratory
Book:Mars Science Laboratory
Book:SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
Bristol Robotics Laboratory
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Buyers Laboratory Inc
CADRE Laboratory for New Media
Calculator-Based Laboratory
Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Canfranc Underground Laboratory
Carlsberg Laboratory
Cavendish Laboratory
Central Forensic Science Laboratory, Hyderabad
Central Science Laboratory
Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems
China Jinping Underground Laboratory
CINTRA (research laboratory)
Clarendon Laboratory
Clark R. Bavin National Fish and Wildlife Forensic Laboratory
Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory
Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute
Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Clinical Laboratory
Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments
Coastal Waters Laboratory
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Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
Communications of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory
Complex and Adaptive Systems Laboratory
Computer Laboratory
Computing Machine Laboratory
Condenser (laboratory)
Coordinated Science Laboratory
Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-based Sciences and Education
Council for the Central Laboratory of the Research Councils
Critical-Creative Thinking and Behavioral Research Laboratory
Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences
Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Cryptographic Module Testing Laboratory
Daresbury Laboratory
Defence Bioengineering and Electromedical Laboratory
Defence Electronics Research Laboratory
Defence Laboratory
Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory
Defence Research Laboratory
Defence Science and Technology Laboratory
Dental laboratory
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Dexter's Laboratory
Dexter's Laboratory: Deesaster Strikes!
Dexter's Laboratory: Ego Trip
Dexter's Laboratory: Mandark's Lab?
Dexter's Laboratory: The Hip-Hop Experiment
Dexter's Laboratory: The Musical Time Machine
Draft:Laboratory for Innovation Venturing and Entrepreneurship
Draper Laboratory
Duke University Marine Laboratory
Earth System Research Laboratory
East Baton Rouge Laboratory Academy
Edison laboratory
Electro-Magnetic Laboratory Rail Gun
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Engines and energy conversion laboratory
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory
Equatorial Geophysical Research Laboratory
European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy
European Magnetic Field Laboratory
European Molecular Biology Laboratory
European Severe Storms Laboratory
Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and Development
FBI Laboratory
Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations
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Field & Laboratory
Film laboratory
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Flight Laboratory, IIT Kanpur
Flight Research Laboratory
Fluid Science Laboratory
Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research
Friedrich Miescher Laboratory of the Max Planck Society
FX Palo Alto Laboratory
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General Applied Science Laboratory
General Electric Research Laboratory
Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory
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George Herbert Jones Laboratory
Georgia Nuclear Aircraft Laboratory
Gilbert U-238 Atomic Energy Laboratory
Glasgow Precision Oncology Laboratory
Global Online Laboratory Consortium
Godwin Laboratory, University of Cambridge
Good clinical laboratory practice
Good laboratory practice
Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
Green Roof Innovation Testing Laboratory
GTRI Advanced Concepts Laboratory
GTRI Applied Systems Laboratory
GTRI Electronic Systems Laboratory
GTRI Electro-Optical Systems Laboratory
GTRI Health and Environmental Systems Laboratory
GTRI Information and Communications Laboratory
GTRI Sensors and Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory
Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory
Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory
Hale Solar Laboratory
HAL Laboratory
Harvard Fatigue Laboratory
Harvard Laboratory for Computer Graphics and Spatial Analysis
Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory
High Energy Materials Research Laboratory
High Performance Computing Virtual Laboratory
Hot Laboratory and Waste Management Center
Idaho National Laboratory
IISc Guidance, Control and Decision Systems Laboratory
Infectious Disease Pharmacokinetics Laboratory
Institute for Laboratory Animal Research
Instrumentation Laboratory
International Down and Feather Testing Laboratory
International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
International Society for Laboratory Hematology
Iron ring (laboratory)
Jackson Laboratory
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Jet Propulsion Laboratory Development Ephemeris
Jet Propulsion Laboratory Display Information System
Joint Committee for Traceability in Laboratory Medicine
KastlerBrossel Laboratory
Kawishiwi Field Laboratory
Kerckhoff Marine Laboratory
Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory
Knowledge Systems Laboratory
Kyiv Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence
LabEx ReFi - European Laboratory on Financial Regulation
Laboratory
Laboratory animal sources
Laboratory animal suppliers in the United Kingdom
Laboratory automation
Laboratory B in Sungul
Laboratory Cabin Module
Laboratory centrifuge
Laboratory developed test
Laboratory diagnosis of viral infections
Laboratory drying rack
Laboratory experiments of speciation
Laboratory flask
Laboratory for Advanced Materials
Laboratory for Analysis and Architecture of Systems
Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
Laboratory for Automation Psychology
Laboratory for Computational Cultural Dynamics
Laboratory for Experimental Medicine and Surgery in Primates
Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science
Laboratory for Interactive Learning Technologies
Laboratory for Laser Energetics
Laboratory for the Analysis of Organisational Communication Systems
Laboratory for the Conservation of Endangered Species
Laboratory frame of reference
Laboratory funnel
Laboratory glassware
Laboratory informatics
Laboratory information management system
Laboratory Investigation (journal)
Laboratory Life
Laboratory mouse
Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition
Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particles Physics
Laboratory of Microstructure Studies and Mechanics of Materials
Laboratory of Nano and Quantum Engineering
Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research
Laboratory oven
Laboratory phonology
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Laboratory rat
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