classes ::: Integral Yoga, elements in the yoga, element of the yoga, power, favorite,
children :::
branches ::: Faith, Faithfulness

bookmarks: Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:Faith

--- DEFINITIONS
Faith is the union of God and the soul. ~ Saint John of the Cross,

Faith is not intellectual belief but a function of the soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Baha i Faith,

Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason has once accepted in spite of your changing moods. ~ C S Lewis,

Faith is spontaneous knowledge in the psychic. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II 3.03 - Faith and the Divine Grace,

Faith is only a will aiming at greater truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.14 - The Power of the Instruments,

Real faith is something spiritual, a knowledge of the soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I Morality and Yoga,

Faith is the surest guide in the darkest days. 16 August 1954 ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II 3.03 - Faith and the Divine Grace,

Faith is a general word = Sraddha -the soul's belief in the Divine's existence, wisdom, power, love and grace-confidence and trust are aspects of faith and results of it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga II

Faith in its essence is a light in the soul which turns towards the truth even when the mind doubts or the vital revolts or the physical consciousness denies it. When this extends itself to the instruments, it becomes a fixed belief in the mind, a sort of inner knowledge which resists all apparent denial by circumstances or appearances, a complete confidence, trust, adhesion in the vital and in the physical consciousness, an invariable clinging to the truth in which one has faith even when all is dark around and no cause of hope seems to be there. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II,

- As described above and all about this page, Faith is spoken of at times as if it were a power of incalculable importance. As it has been said to move mountains, or to make the impossible possible. The truth of faith is said to be everpresent to the Soul, for to the Soul God is there, and there is no doubt in thisto it. As it is said also that certain types of knowledge can be considered true by self-evidence, this then seems like it could only be tested by finding the Soul where by conscious experience Faith would pass into Knowledge. Until then it is justifyingly obscured by the rest of the nature.


--- IMPORTANCE / MERITS

Man suffers through lack of faith in God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,

Faith has need of the whole truth. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,

Once a person has faith, he has achieved everything. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,

Anything done against faith or conscience is sinful. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,

They who have faith will go through. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II

All difficulties are there to test the endurance of the faith. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II

It is our lack of faith that creates our limitations. With my blessings, ~ The Mother, Mantras Of The Mother,

For anyone, man or woman, who has faith in me, I have never departed. I sleep on their threshold. ~ Guru Rinpoche,

Have a sincere faith in the Divine and you will clearly know what you have to do. Blessings. ~ The Mother,

For those with faith, no evidence is necessary; for those without it, no evidence will suffice. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,

It is good to have this unshakable faith - it makes your path easier and shorter. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,

But for one who has faith in the Divine Grace, the return to the Light becomes easy. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953,

In all circumstances take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming darts of the evil one. ~ Saint Paul

The Supreme's power is infinite -it is our faith that is small. With my Blessings. ~ The Mother, Mantras Of The Mother, 23 August,

If you have faith and confidence, it is not the human form of the guru that you worship, but the Supreme Lord who manifests through him. ~ The Mother,

Mental knowledge cannot replace faith; so long as there is only mental knowledge, faith is still needed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Baha i Faith,

It can come early or it can come late, but come it will if one is faithful in ones call. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 1.4.01 - The Divine Grace and Guidance,



--- METHOD / WHAT
Have faith in the Lord's mercy and all can and will change. ~ The Mother,

Be always faithful to your faith and you will feel no sorrow. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,

The supreme faith is that which sees God in all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.12 - The Way and the Bhakta,

Have faith in the Divine, and go deep inside yourself. My help is always with you. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,

Be confident, you will become what you have to be and achieve what you have to do. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II 3.03 - Faith and the Divine Grace,

The Grace will never fail us - such is the faith we must keep constantly in our heart. With my blessings ~ The Mother, Mantras Of The Mother 10 May,

By faithfulness we are collected and wound up into unity within ourselves, whereas we had been scattered abroad in multiplicity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,

--- METHOD / HOW
How can I have more and more faith and calm, Mother? Aspiration and will. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,

The strength is always with you to be always faithful to the Divine Will. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II Faithfulness,

Ask: 'Who am I?' until well-established in the conviction that a Higher Power guides us. That is firmness of faith. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,


--- OBSTACLES
The enemy of faith is doubt. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Faith and Shakti,

--- UNSORTED IMPORTANT
The eye of Faith is not one with the eye of Knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,

--- IN CHAPTERS
Aldous Huxley, The Perennial Philosophy, 1.18 - FAITH
Aleister Crowley, Magick Without Tears, 1.67 - Faith
Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga II, 1.2.08 - Faith
Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, 4.18 - Faith and shakti
The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, 3.03 - Faith and the Divine Grace
The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931, 2.14 - Faith


--- QUOTES UNSORTED
--- THE MOTHER, WORDS OF THE MOTHER II
Confidence is a feeling of sureness that the Divine will hear when sincerely called and help and that all the Divine does is for the best.

Trust is the mind's and heart's complete reliance on the Divine and its guidance and protection.

Faith ::: a dynamic entire belief and acceptance.

Belief ::: intellectual acceptance only.

Conviction ::: intellectual belief held on what seem to be good reasons.

Reliance ::: dependence on another for something, based on trust.

Trust ::: the feeling of sure expectation of another's help and reliance on his word, character etc.

Confidence ::: the sense of security that goes with trust.


Faith in its essence is a light in the soul which turns towards the truth even when the mind doubts or the vital revolts or the physical consciousness denies it. When this extends itself to the instruments, it becomes a fixed belief in the mind, a sort of inner knowledge which resists all apparent denial by circumstances or appearances, a complete confidence, trust, adhesion in the vital and in the physical consciousness, an invariable clinging to the truth in which one has faith even when all is dark around and no cause of hope seems to be there.

Faith in the spiritual sense is not a mental belief which can waver and change. It can wear that form in the mind, but that belief is not the faith itself, it is only its external form. Just as the body, the external form, can change but the spirit remains the same, so it is here. Faith is a certitude in the soul which does not depend on reasoning, on this or that mental idea, on circumstances, on this or that passing condition of the mind or the vital or the body. It may be hidden, eclipsed, may even seem to be quenched, but it reappears again after the storm or the eclipse; it is seen burning still in the soul when one has thought that it was extinguished for ever. The mind may be a shifting sea of doubts and yet that faith may be there within and, if so, it will keep even the doubt-racked mind in the way so that it goes on in spite of itself towards its destined goal. Faith is a spiritual certitude of the spiritual, the divine, the soul's ideal, something that clings to that even when it is not fulfilled in life, even when the immediate facts or the persistent circumstances seem to deny it. This is a common experience in the life of the human being; if it were not so, man would be the plaything of a changing mind or a sport of circumstance.


--- FOOTER
subject class:Integral Yoga
object:faith
class:elements in the yoga
class:element of the yoga
class:power
see also ::: truth, The Divine Grace, surrender, gratitude, faithfulness,
class:favorite







see also ::: faithfulness, gratitude, surrender, The_Divine_Grace, truth

questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or
join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers



now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [1] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
Sraddha
Sraddha
SEE ALSO

faithfulness
gratitude
surrender
The_Divine_Grace
truth

AUTH

BOOKS
Blazing_the_Trail_from_Infancy_to_Enlightenment
City_of_God
Enchiridion_text
Essays_On_The_Gita
Full_Circle
God_Exists
Guru_Bhakti_Yoga
Heart_of_Matter
Hymn_of_the_Universe
Infinite_Library
Know_Yourself
Let_Me_Explain
Letters_On_Yoga
Letters_On_Yoga_I
Letters_On_Yoga_II
Letters_On_Yoga_IV
Life_without_Death
Magick_Without_Tears
Mantras_Of_The_Mother
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
On_Belief
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Process_and_Reality
Questions_And_Answers_1929-1931
Questions_And_Answers_1953
Questions_And_Answers_1954
Questions_And_Answers_1955
Questions_And_Answers_1957-1958
Savitri
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(toc)
Self_Knowledge
Spiral_Dynamics
Stages_Of_Faith
The_Act_of_Creation
The_Bible
The_Book_of_Certitude
The_Book_of_Secrets__Keys_to_Love_and_Meditation
The_Divine_Comedy
The_Divine_Companion
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Essential_Songs_of_Milarepa
The_Future_of_Man
The_Heros_Journey
The_Hidden_Words
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Integral_Yoga
The_Lotus_Sutra
The_Middle_Way__Faith_Grounded_in_Reason
The_Most_Holy_Book
The_Perennial_Philosophy
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Seven_Valleys_and_the_Four_Valleys
The_Synthesis_Of_Yoga
The_Tarot_of_Paul_Christian
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Yoga_Sutras
Three_Books_on_Occult_Philosophy
Toward_the_Future
Twilight_of_the_Idols
Words_Of_The_Mother_II
Words_Of_The_Mother_III

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
08.10_-_Are_Not_Dogs_More_Faithful_Than_Men?
08.26_-_Faith_and_Progress
1.09_-_FAITH_IN_PEACE
1.11_-_FAITH_IN_MAN
1.18_-_FAITH
1.2.08_-_Faith
1.67_-_Faith
1929-05-05_-_Intellect,_true_and_wrong_movement_-_Attacks_from_adverse_forces_-_Faith,_integral_and_absolute_-_Death,_not_a_necessity_-_Descent_of_Divine_Consciousness_-_Inner_progress_-_Memory_of_former_lives
1954-05-05_-_Faith,_trust,_confidence_-_Insincerity_and_unconsciousness
1954-06-23_-_Meat-eating_-_Story_of_Mothers_vegetable_garden_-_Faithfulness_-_Conscious_sleep
1954-11-10_-_Inner_experience,_the_basis_of_action_-_Keeping_open_to_the_Force_-_Faith_through_aspiration_-_The_Mothers_symbol_-_The_mind_and_vital_seize_experience_-_Degrees_of_sincerity_-Becoming_conscious_of_the_Divine_Force
1954-12-22_-_Possession_by_hostile_forces_-_Purity_and_morality_-_Faith_in_the_final_success_-Drawing_back_from_the_path
1955-04-06_-_Freuds_psychoanalysis,_the_subliminal_being_-_The_psychic_and_the_subliminal_-_True_psychology_-_Changing_the_lower_nature_-_Faith_in_different_parts_of_the_being_-_Psychic_contact_established_in_all_in_the_Ashram
1957-06-19_-_Causes_of_illness_Fear_and_illness_-_Minds_working,_faith_and_illness
1958-07-09_-_Faith_and_personal_effort
1.fs_-_German_Faith
1.fs_-_My_Faith
1.hs_-_Heres_A_Message_for_the_Faithful
1.jwvg_-_Faithful_Eckhart
1.jwvg_-_The_Faithless_Boy
1.mah_-_Kill_me-_my_faithful_friends
1.sdi_-_To_the_wall_of_the_faithful_what_sorrow,_when_pillared_securely_on_thee?
1.sjc_-_Song_of_the_Soul_That_Delights_in_Knowing_God_by_Faith
1.ww_-_As_faith_thus_sanctified_the_warrior's_crest
2.03_-_The_Christian_Phenomenon_and_Faith_in_the_Incarnation
2.14_-_Faith
3.03_-_Faith_and_the_Divine_Grace
4.18_-_Faith_and_shakti

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri
00.03_-_Upanishadic_Symbolism
00.05_-_A_Vedic_Conception_of_the_Poet
0.00a_-_Introduction
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.00_-_THE_GOSPEL_PREFACE
0.00_-_To_the_Reader
0.02_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.03_-_Letters_to_My_little_smile
0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life
0.05_-_Letters_to_a_Child
0.05_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Systems
0.06_-_INTRODUCTION
0.06_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Sadhak
0.07_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
01.03_-_Yoga_and_the_Ordinary_Life
01.04_-_Motives_for_Seeking_the_Divine
01.04_-_The_Intuition_of_the_Age
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge
01.06_-_Vivekananda
01.07_-_Blaise_Pascal_(1623-1662)
01.08_-_Walter_Hilton:_The_Scale_of_Perfection
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.10_-_Nicholas_Berdyaev:_God_Made_Human
01.10_-_Principle_and_Personality
01.11_-_Aldous_Huxley:_The_Perennial_Philosophy
01.12_-_Three_Degrees_of_Social_Organisation
01.13_-_T._S._Eliot:_Four_Quartets
0.12_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0.14_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0_1955-06-09
0_1956-10-28
0_1957-04-09
0_1958-05-10
0_1958-10-10
0_1958-11-04_-_Myths_are_True_and_Gods_exist_-_mental_formation_and_occult_faculties_-_exteriorization_-_work_in_dreams
0_1958-11-22
0_1960-08-10_-_questions_from_center_of_Education_-_reading_Sri_Aurobindo
0_1960-11-26
0_1961-01-17
0_1961-02-18
0_1961-02-25
0_1961-03-04
0_1961-03-14
0_1961-04-07
0_1961-04-12
0_1961-04-29
0_1961-06-24
0_1961-07-07
0_1962-01-09
0_1962-03-06
0_1962-04-13
0_1962-07-21
0_1962-10-12
0_1963-03-06
0_1963-03-09
0_1963-03-23
0_1963-04-06
0_1963-05-18
0_1963-06-19
0_1963-07-06
0_1963-07-17
0_1963-07-27
0_1963-08-03
0_1963-08-10
0_1963-09-04
0_1963-09-07
0_1963-10-19
0_1963-11-04
0_1963-11-20
0_1963-11-23
0_1963-12-07_-_supramental_ship
0_1964-01-04
0_1964-01-22
0_1964-01-28
0_1964-01-29
0_1964-03-07
0_1964-03-25
0_1964-04-08
0_1964-07-28
0_1964-08-08
0_1964-08-11
0_1964-10-07
0_1964-10-10
0_1964-10-30
0_1964-11-21
0_1964-12-02
0_1965-01-12
0_1965-03-06
0_1965-05-08
0_1965-07-10
0_1965-07-17
0_1965-07-28
0_1965-08-07
0_1965-11-13
0_1965-11-27
0_1965-12-07
0_1965-12-10
0_1965-12-18
0_1965-12-31
0_1966-03-26
0_1966-04-20
0_1966-04-24
0_1966-05-22
0_1966-07-09
0_1966-09-17
0_1966-10-08
0_1966-12-17
0_1967-01-21
0_1967-02-08
0_1967-02-25
0_1967-04-24
0_1967-05-03
0_1967-05-20
0_1967-06-14
0_1967-06-21
0_1967-08-15
0_1967-08-26
0_1967-09-16
0_1967-09-20
0_1967-10-19
0_1967-12-06
0_1967-12-20
0_1968-02-03
0_1968-05-04
0_1968-05-22
0_1968-07-06
0_1968-08-07
0_1968-08-28
0_1968-09-21
0_1968-09-25
0_1968-10-23
0_1968-11-09
0_1968-12-21
0_1969-01-22
0_1969-03-12
0_1969-03-26
0_1969-04-19
0_1969-04-26
0_1969-05-17
0_1969-07-26
0_1969-08-16
0_1969-08-20
0_1969-09-27
0_1969-11-08
0_1969-11-15
0_1970-01-31
0_1970-02-25
0_1970-02-28
0_1970-03-14
0_1970-03-18
0_1970-03-28
0_1970-04-29
0_1970-05-13
0_1970-05-16
0_1970-06-17
0_1970-07-18
0_1970-08-05
0_1970-09-09
0_1970-10-07
0_1970-12-03
0_1971-01-30
0_1971-02-27
0_1971-04-07
0_1971-04-29
0_1971-05-05
0_1971-05-08
0_1971-05-15
0_1971-06-16
0_1971-08-21
0_1971-09-22
0_1971-10-06
0_1971-10-27
0_1971-11-10
0_1971-11-13
0_1971-12-04
0_1971-12-22
0_1972-01-02
0_1972-01-15
0_1972-01-29
0_1972-03-11
0_1972-04-02a
0_1972-04-05
0_1972-04-06
0_1972-04-12
0_1972-06-23
0_1972-07-12
0_1972-07-19
0_1972-08-19
0_1973-04-07
02.01_-_Our_Ideal
02.03_-_The_Glory_and_the_Fall_of_Life
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_Boris_Pasternak
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.07_-_George_Seftris
02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night
02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
02.12_-_The_Heavens_of_the_Ideal
02.14_-_Panacea_of_Isms
03.01_-_The_New_Year_Initiation
03.03_-_A_Stainless_Steel_Frame
03.04_-_The_Body_Human
03.04_-_Towardsa_New_Ideology
03.06_-_The_Pact_and_its_Sanction
03.07_-_The_Sunlit_Path
03.08_-_The_Democracy_of_Tomorrow
03.08_-_The_Standpoint_of_Indian_Art
03.09_-_Buddhism_and_Hinduism
03.09_-_Sectarianism_or_Loyalty
03.10_-_Hamlet:_A_Crisis_of_the_Evolving_Soul
03.10_-_Sincerity
03.15_-_Towards_the_Future
04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame
04.04_-_The_Quest
04.05_-_The_Immortal_Nation
04.09_-_Values_Higher_and_Lower
04.16_-_To_the_Heights-XVI
04.21_-_To_the_HeightsXXI
04.42_-_To_the_Heights-XLII
05.05_-_Of_Some_Supreme_Mysteries
05.06_-_Physics_or_philosophy
05.07_-_The_Observer_and_the_Observed
05.11_-_The_Soul_of_a_Nation
05.12_-_The_Revealer_and_the_Revelation
05.13_-_Darshana_and_Philosophy
05.14_-_The_Sanctity_of_the_Individual
05.22_-_Success_and_its_Conditions
06.01_-_The_End_of_a_Civilisation
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
06.07_-_Total_Transformation_Demands_Total_Rejection
06.10_-_Fatigue_and_Work
06.27_-_To_Learn_and_to_Understand
06.35_-_Second_Sight
07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries
07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.10_-_Diseases_and_Accidents
07.17_-_Why_Do_We_Forget_Things?
07.25_-_Prayer_and_Aspiration
07.42_-_The_Nature_and_Destiny_of_Art
08.09_-_Spirits_in_Trees
08.10_-_Are_Not_Dogs_More_Faithful_Than_Men?
08.11_-_The_Work_Here
08.17_-_Psychological_Perfection
08.24_-_On_Food
08.25_-_Meat-Eating
08.26_-_Faith_and_Progress
08.27_-_Value_of_Religious_Exercises
09.01_-_Prayer_and_Aspiration
09.04_-_The_Divine_Grace
09.14_-_Education_of_Girls
09.17_-_Health_in_the_Ashram
1.002_-_The_Heifer
1.003_-_Family_of_Imran
10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death
1.004_-_Women
1.005_-_The_Table
1.006_-_Livestock
1.007_-_The_Elevations
1.008_-_The_Spoils
1.009_-_Repentance
1.00h_-_Foreword
1.00_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00_-_Introduction_to_Alchemy_of_Happiness
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PREFACE
1.00_-_Preface
1.00_-_PREFACE_-_DESCENSUS_AD_INFERNOS
1.00_-_Preliminary_Remarks
1.010_-_Jonah
1.012_-_Joseph
1.012_-_Sublimation_-_A_Way_to_Reshuffle_Thought
1.014_-_Abraham
1.016_-_The_Bee
1.018_-_The_Cave
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_BOOK_THE_FIRST
1.01_-_Description_of_the_Castle
1.01_-_Economy
1.01_-_Historical_Survey
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_MASTER_AND_DISCIPLE
1.01_-_MAXIMS_AND_MISSILES
1.01_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Authors_first_meeting,_December_1918
1.01_-_NIGHT
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_On_renunciation_of_the_world
1.01_-_Principles_of_Practical_Psycho_therapy
1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA
1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine
1.01_-_The_Cycle_of_Society
1.01_-_The_First_Steps
1.01_-_The_Four_Aids
1.01_-_The_Human_Aspiration
1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin
1.01_-_The_Lord_of_hosts
1.01_-_The_Offering
1.01_-_The_Science_of_Living
1.01_-_Two_Powers_Alone
1.01_-_Who_is_Tara
1.021_-_The_Prophets
1.022_-_The_Pilgrimage
1.023_-_The_Believers
1.025_-_Sadhana_-_Intensifying_a_Lighted_Flame
1.026_-_The_Poets
1.028_-_Bringing_About_Whole-Souled_Dedication
1.029_-_The_Spider
1.02_-_BEFORE_THE_CITY-GATE
1.02_-_BOOK_THE_SECOND
1.02_-_Fire_over_the_Earth
1.02_-_In_the_Beginning
1.02_-_Karmayoga
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Meditating_on_Tara
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_Prana
1.02_-_Self-Consecration
1.02_-_SOCIAL_HEREDITY_AND_PROGRESS
1.02_-_The_Child_as_growing_being_and_the_childs_experience_of_encountering_the_teacher.
1.02_-_The_Descent._Dante's_Protest_and_Virgil's_Appeal._The_Intercession_of_the_Three_Ladies_Benedight.
1.02_-_The_Eternal_Law
1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND
1.02_-_THE_PROBLEM_OF_SOCRATES
1.02_-_The_Recovery
1.02_-_The_Shadow
1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation
1.02_-_The_Two_Negations_1_-_The_Materialist_Denial
1.02_-_The_Ultimate_Path_is_Without_Difficulty
1.02_-_The_Virtues
1.030_-_The_Romans
1.032_-_Prostration
1.033_-_The_Confederates
1.034_-_Sheba
10.36_-_Cling_to_Truth
1.036_-_Ya-Seen
1.037_-_The_Aligners
1.038_-_Saad
1.039_-_Throngs
1.03_-_A_Parable
1.03_-_BOOK_THE_THIRD
1.03_-_Concerning_the_Archetypes,_with_Special_Reference_to_the_Anima_Concept
1.03_-_Eternal_Presence
1.03_-_Fire_in_the_Earth
1.03_-_Invocation_of_Tara
1.03_-_Japa_Yoga
1.03_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Meeting_with_others
1.03_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_World.
1.03_-_ON_THE_AFTERWORLDLY
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers
1.03_-_Reading
1.03_-_.REASON._IN_PHILOSOPHY
1.03_-_Some_Aspects_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.03_-_Supernatural_Aid
1.03_-_Sympathetic_Magic
1.03_-_The_Armour_of_Grace
1.03_-_The_Desert
1.03_-_The_Gate_of_Hell._The_Inefficient_or_Indifferent._Pope_Celestine_V._The_Shores_of_Acheron._Charon._The
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_The_Human_Disciple
1.03_-_The_Syzygy_-_Anima_and_Animus
1.03_-_The_Two_Negations_2_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Ascetic
1.03_-_The_Void
1.03_-_VISIT_TO_VIDYASAGAR
1.040_-_Forgiver
1.042_-_Consultation
1.045_-_Kneeling
1.046_-_The_Dunes
1.047_-_Muhammad
1.048_-_Victory
1.049_-_The_Chambers
1.04_-_ADVICE_TO_HOUSEHOLDERS
1.04_-_BOOK_THE_FOURTH
1.04_-_Communion
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_Magic_and_Religion
1.04_-_Nothing_Exists_Per_Se_Except_Atoms_And_The_Void
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_ON_THE_DESPISERS_OF_THE_BODY
1.04_-_Reality_Omnipresent
1.04_-_Relationship_with_the_Divine
1.04_-_Religion_and_Occultism
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.04_-_The_Aims_of_Psycho_therapy
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Conditions_of_Esoteric_Training
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_First_Circle,_Limbo__Virtuous_Pagans_and_the_Unbaptized._The_Four_Poets,_Homer,_Horace,_Ovid,_and_Lucan._The_Noble_Castle_of_Philosophy.
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Paths
1.04_-_The_Praise
1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Compact)
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.052_-_The_Mount
1.053_-_A_Very_Important_Sadhana
1.058_-_The_Argument
1.059_-_The_Mobilization
1.05_-_Bhakti_Yoga
1.05_-_BOOK_THE_FIFTH
1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women
1.05_-_CHARITY
1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self
1.05_-_Mental_Education
1.05_-_Morality_and_War
1.05_-_On_painstaking_and_true_repentance_which_constitute_the_life_of_the_holy_convicts;_and_about_the_prison.
1.05_-_On_the_Love_of_God.
1.05_-_Pratyahara_and_Dharana
1.05_-_Prayer
1.05_-_Problems_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.05_-_Qualifications_of_the_Aspirant_and_the_Teacher
1.05_-_Some_Results_of_Initiation
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_THE_MASTER_AND_KESHAB
1.05_-_THE_NEW_SPIRIT
1.05_-_The_Second_Circle__The_Wanton._Minos._The_Infernal_Hurricane._Francesca_da_Rimini.
1.05_-_The_True_Doer_of_Works
1.05_-_The_Ways_of_Working_of_the_Lord
1.05_-_War_And_Politics
1.05_-_Work_and_Teaching
1.05_-_Yoga_and_Hypnotism
1.060_-_The_Woman_Tested
1.065_-_Divorce
1.067_-_Sovereignty
1.06_-_A_Summary_of_my_Phenomenological_View_of_the_World
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_Dhyana
1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi
1.06_-_Magicians_as_Kings
1.06_-_Of_imperfections_with_respect_to_spiritual_gluttony.
1.06_-_On_Thought
1.06_-_Origin_of_the_four_castes
1.06_-_THE_FOUR_GREAT_ERRORS
1.06_-_The_Literal_Qabalah
1.06_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES
1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes
1.06_-_The_Three_Mothers_or_the_First_Elements
1.06_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_1
1.06_-_Wealth_and_Government
1.071_-_Noah
1.074_-_The_Enrobed
1.076_-_Man
1.078_-_The_Event
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_BOOK_THE_SEVENTH
1.07_-_Bridge_across_the_Afterlife
1.07_-_Incarnate_Human_Gods
1.07_-_Medicine_and_Psycho_therapy
1.07_-_Note_on_the_word_Go
1.07_-_Past,_Present_and_Future
1.07_-_Production_of_the_mind-born_sons_of_Brahma
1.07_-_Raja-Yoga_in_Brief
1.07_-_Savitri
1.07_-_Standards_of_Conduct_and_Spiritual_Freedom
1.07_-_The_Ego_and_the_Dualities
1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature
1.07_-_The_Infinity_Of_The_Universe
1.07_-_The_Literal_Qabalah_(continued)
1.07_-_The_Magic_Wand
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.07_-_The_Prophecies_of_Nostradamus
1.07_-_The_Psychic_Center
1.07_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_2
1.080_-_He_Frowned
1.08_-_Adhyatma_Yoga
1.08a_-_The_Ladder
1.08_-_Attendants
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_Departmental_Kings_of_Nature
1.08_-_EVENING_A_SMALL,_NEATLY_KEPT_CHAMBER
1.08_-_Independence_from_the_Physical
1.08_-_Information,_Language,_and_Society
1.08_-_RELIGION_AND_TEMPERAMENT
1.08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Descent_into_Death
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish
1.08_-_The_Methods_of_Vedantic_Knowledge
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Will
1.08_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_3
1.08_-_THINGS_THE_GERMANS_LACK
1.098_-_Clear_Evidence
1.09_-_ADVICE_TO_THE_BRAHMOS
1.09_-_BOOK_THE_NINTH
1.09_-_Civilisation_and_Culture
1.09_-_Concentration_-_Its_Spiritual_Uses
1.09_-_FAITH_IN_PEACE
1.09_-_Kundalini_Yoga
1.09_-_Legend_of_Lakshmi
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE
1.09_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Big_Bang
1.09_-_The_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.09_-_The_Pure_Existent
1.1.01_-_Certitudes
1.1.01_-_Seeking_the_Divine
1.1.02_-_The_Aim_of_the_Integral_Yoga
11.02_-_The_Golden_Life-line
1.10_-_BOOK_THE_TENTH
1.10_-_GRACE_AND_FREE_WILL
1.10_-_Mantra_Yoga
1.10_-_The_descendants_of_the_daughters_of_Daksa_married_to_the_Rsis
1.10_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES_(II)
1.10_-_THE_NEIGHBORS_HOUSE
1.10_-_The_Revolutionary_Yogi
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
11.10_-_The_Test_of_Truth
1.11_-_A_STREET
1.11_-_BOOK_THE_ELEVENTH
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_FAITH_IN_MAN
1.11_-_GOOD_AND_EVIL
1.11_-_Higher_Laws
1.11_-_Oneness
1.11_-_ON_THE_NEW_IDOL
1.11_-_The_Broken_Rocks._Pope_Anastasius._General_Description_of_the_Inferno_and_its_Divisions.
1.11_-_The_Change_of_Power
1.11_-_The_Kalki_Avatar
1.11_-_The_Master_of_the_Work
1.1.1_-_The_Mind_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
1.11_-_The_Reason_as_Governor_of_Life
1.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.11_-_Woolly_Pomposities_of_the_Pious_Teacher
1.12_-_BOOK_THE_TWELFTH
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.12_-_ON_THE_FLIES_OF_THE_MARKETPLACE
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Minotaur._The_Seventh_Circle__The_Violent._The_River_Phlegethon._The_Violent_against_their_Neighbours._The_Centaurs._Tyrants.
1.12_-_The_Office_and_Limitations_of_the_Reason
1.12_-_The_Sacred_Marriage
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.13_-_BOOK_THE_THIRTEENTH
1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self
1.1.3_-_Mental_Difficulties_and_the_Need_of_Quietude
1.13_-_Reason_and_Religion
1.13_-_SALVATION,_DELIVERANCE,_ENLIGHTENMENT
1.13_-_THE_HUMAN_REBOUND_OF_EVOLUTION_AND_ITS_CONSEQUENCES
1.13_-_THE_MASTER_AND_M.
1.13_-_The_Spirit
1.13_-_The_Wood_of_Thorns._The_Harpies._The_Violent_against_themselves._Suicides._Pier_della_Vigna._Lano_and_Jacopo_da_Sant'_Andrea.
1.14_-_INSTRUCTION_TO_VAISHNAVS_AND_BRHMOS
1.14_-_ON_THE_FRIEND
1.14_-_Postscript
1.1.4_-_The_Physical_Mind_and_Sadhana
1.14_-_The_Sand_Waste_and_the_Rain_of_Fire._The_Violent_against_God._Capaneus._The_Statue_of_Time,_and_the_Four_Infernal_Rivers.
1.14_-_The_Structure_and_Dynamics_of_the_Self
1.14_-_The_Suprarational_Beauty
1.14_-_TURMOIL_OR_GENESIS?
1.15_-_Index
1.15_-_LAST_VISIT_TO_KESHAB
1.15_-_Prayers
1.15_-_Sex_Morality
1.15_-_THE_DIRECTIONS_AND_CONDITIONS_OF_THE_FUTURE
1.15_-_The_Suprarational_Good
1.15_-_The_world_overrun_with_trees;_they_are_destroyed_by_the_Pracetasas
1.1.5_-_Thought_and_Knowledge
1.16_-_MARTHAS_GARDEN
1.16_-_PRAYER
1.16_-_Religion
1.16_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.17_-_Astral_Journey__Example,_How_to_do_it,_How_to_Verify_your_Experience
1.17_-_DOES_MANKIND_MOVE_BIOLOGICALLY_UPON_ITSELF?
1.17_-_M._AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.17_-_On_poverty_(that_hastens_heavenwards).
1.17_-_On_Teaching
1.17_-_Religion_as_the_Law_of_Life
1.17_-_SUFFERING
1.17_-_The_Divine_Birth_and_Divine_Works
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_FAITH
1.18_-_M._AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.18_-_THE_HEART_OF_THE_PROBLEM
1.19_-_GOD_IS_NOT_MOCKED
1.19_-_Tabooed_Acts
1.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_HIS_INJURED_ARM
1.2.01_-_The_Call_and_the_Capacity
1.2.02_-_Qualities_Needed_for_Sadhana
1.2.04_-_Sincerity
1.2.05_-_Aspiration
1.2.07_-_Surrender
1.2.08_-_Faith
1.20_-_Equality_and_Knowledge
1.20_-_HOW_MAY_WE_CONCEIVE_AND_HOPE_THAT_HUMAN_UNANIMIZATION_WILL_BE_REALIZED_ON_EARTH?
1.20_-_RULES_FOR_HOUSEHOLDERS_AND_MONKS
1.20_-_Tabooed_Persons
1.20_-_TANTUM_RELIGIO_POTUIT_SUADERE_MALORUM
1.20_-_The_Fourth_Bolgia__Soothsayers._Amphiaraus,_Tiresias,_Aruns,_Manto,_Eryphylus,_Michael_Scott,_Guido_Bonatti,_and_Asdente._Virgil_reproaches_Dante's_Pity.
1.20_-_Visnu_appears_to_Prahlada
1.2.1.03_-_Psychic_and_Esoteric_Poetry
1.2.10_-_Opening
12.10_-_The_Sunlit_Path
1.2.11_-_Patience_and_Perseverance
1.21_-_A_DAY_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.21_-_IDOLATRY
1.2.1_-_Mental_Development_and_Sadhana
1.21_-_On_unmanly_and_puerile_cowardice.
1.21_-_Tabooed_Things
1.21_-_The_Spiritual_Aim_and_Life
1.22_-_ADVICE_TO_AN_ACTOR
1.22_-_EMOTIONALISM
1.22_-_ON_THE_GIFT-GIVING_VIRTUE
1.22_-_On_the_many_forms_of_vainglory.
1.22_-_THE_END_OF_THE_SPECIES
1.22_-_The_Necessity_of_the_Spiritual_Transformation
1.23_-_Improvising_a_Temple
1.23_-_THE_MIRACULOUS
1.240_-_1.300_Talks
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_Describes_how_vocal_prayer_may_be_practised_with_perfection_and_how_closely_allied_it_is_to_mental_prayer
1.24_-_RITUAL,_SYMBOL,_SACRAMENT
1.2.4_-_Speech_and_Yoga
1.24_-_The_Advent_and_Progress_of_the_Spiritual_Age
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_ADVICE_TO_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.25_-_On_Religion
1.25_-_On_the_destroyer_of_the_passions,_most_sublime_humility,_which_is_rooted_in_spiritual_feeling.
1.25_-_SPIRITUAL_EXERCISES
1.26_-_FESTIVAL_AT_ADHARS_HOUSE
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.27_-_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.27_-_CONTEMPLATION,_ACTION_AND_SOCIAL_UTILITY
1.27_-_On_holy_solitude_of_body_and_soul.
1.27_-_Succession_to_the_Soul
1.28_-_On_holy_and_blessed_prayer,_mother_of_virtues,_and_on_the_attitude_of_mind_and_body_in_prayer.
1.28_-_The_Killing_of_the_Tree-Spirit
1.29_-_Concerning_heaven_on_earth,_or_godlike_dispassion_and_perfection,_and_the_resurrection_of_the_soul_before_the_general_resurrection.
1.29_-_What_is_Certainty?
1.2_-_Katha_Upanishads
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
1.3.01_-_Peace__The_Basis_of_the_Sadhana
1.3.02_-_Equality__The_Chief_Support
1.30_-_Concerning_the_linking_together_of_the_supreme_trinity_among_the_virtues.
1.30_-_Describes_the_importance_of_understanding_what_we_ask_for_in_prayer._Treats_of_these_words_in_the_Paternoster:_Sanctificetur_nomen_tuum,_adveniat_regnum_tuum._Applies_them_to_the_Prayer_of_Quiet,_and_begins_the_explanation_of_them.
1.31_-_Adonis_in_Cyprus
1.33_-_The_Gardens_of_Adonis
1.3.4.04_-_The_Divine_Superman
1.34_-_Continues_the_same_subject._This_is_very_suitable_for_reading_after_the_reception_of_the_Most_Holy_Sacrament.
1.34_-_The_Myth_and_Ritual_of_Attis
1.37_-_Death_-_Fear_-_Magical_Memory
1.37_-_Oriential_Religions_in_the_West
1.38_-_The_Myth_of_Osiris
1.38_-_Treats_of_the_great_need_which_we_have_to_beseech_the_Eternal_Father_to_grant_us_what_we_ask_in_these_words:_Et_ne_nos_inducas_in_tentationem,_sed_libera_nos_a_malo._Explains_certain_temptations._This_chapter_is_noteworthy.
1.38_-_Woman_-_Her_Magical_Formula
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.3_-_Mundaka_Upanishads
1.400_-_1.450_Talks
1.4.01_-_The_Divine_Grace_and_Guidance
1.4.02_-_The_Divine_Force
1.4.03_-_The_Guru
14.06_-_Liberty,_Self-Control_and_Friendship
14.08_-_A_Parable_of_Sea-Gulls
1.40_-_Coincidence
1.40_-_Describes_how,_by_striving_always_to_walk_in_the_love_and_fear_of_God,_we_shall_travel_safely_amid_all_these_temptations.
1.40_-_The_Nature_of_Osiris
1.41_-_Isis
1.42_-_Treats_of_these_last_words_of_the_Paternoster__Sed_libera_nos_a_malo._Amen._But_deliver_us_from_evil._Amen.
1.439
1.44_-_Demeter_and_Persephone
1.450_-_1.500_Talks
1.48_-_Morals_of_AL_-_Hard_to_Accept,_and_Why_nevertheless_we_Must_Concur
15.02_-_1973-02-17
1.51_-_Homeopathic_Magic_of_a_Flesh_Diet
1.51_-_How_to_Recognise_Masters,_Angels,_etc.,_and_how_they_Work
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.550_-_1.600_Talks
1.58_-_Human_Scapegoats_in_Classical_Antiquity
1.64_-_The_Burning_of_Human_Beings_in_the_Fires
1.65_-_Balder_and_the_Mistletoe
1.66_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Tales
1.66_-_Vampires
1.67_-_Faith
1.67_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Custom
1.69_-_Farewell_to_Nemi
1.69_-_Original_Sin
17.06_-_Hymn_of_the_Supreme_Goddess
1.76_-_The_Gods_-_How_and_Why_they_Overlap
1.77_-_Work_Worthwhile_-_Why?
1.78_-_Sore_Spots
1.79_-_Progress
18.05_-_Ashram_Poets
19.01_-_The_Twins
19.10_-_Punishment
1912_11_03p
1913_02_10p
1913_11_22p
1914_01_10p
1914_01_11p
1914_02_01p
1914_02_05p
1914_03_03p
1914_03_15p
1914_04_17p
1914_04_20p
1914_06_23p
1914_09_05p
1914_12_04p
1915_03_07p
1915_05_24p
19.15_-_On_Happiness
1916_11_28p
1916_12_08p
1916_12_30p
1917_11_25p
19.18_-_On_Impurity
19.21_-_Miscellany
19.23_-_Of_the_Elephant
19.24_-_The_Canto_of_Desire
19.25_-_The_Bhikkhu
19.26_-_The_Brahmin
1929-04-21_-_Visions,_seeing_and_interpretation_-_Dreams_and_dreaml_and_-_Dreamless_sleep_-_Visions_and_formulation_-_Surrender,_passive_and_of_the_will_-_Meditation_and_progress_-_Entering_the_spiritual_life,_a_plunge_into_the_Divine
1929-05-05_-_Intellect,_true_and_wrong_movement_-_Attacks_from_adverse_forces_-_Faith,_integral_and_absolute_-_Death,_not_a_necessity_-_Descent_of_Divine_Consciousness_-_Inner_progress_-_Memory_of_former_lives
1929-05-12_-_Beings_of_vital_world_(vampires)_-_Money_power_and_vital_beings_-_Capacity_for_manifestation_of_will_-_Entry_into_vital_world_-_Body,_a_protection_-_Individuality_and_the_vital_world
1929-06-09_-_Nature_of_religion_-_Religion_and_the_spiritual_life_-_Descent_of_Divine_Truth_and_Force_-_To_be_sure_of_your_religion,_country,_family-choose_your_own_-_Religion_and_numbers
1929-06-16_-_Illness_and_Yoga_-_Subtle_body_(nervous_envelope)_-_Fear_and_illness
1929-06-23_-_Knowledge_of_the_Yogi_-_Knowledge_and_the_Supermind_-_Methods_of_changing_the_condition_of_the_body_-_Meditation,_aspiration,_sincerity
1929-06-30_-_Repulsion_felt_towards_certain_animals,_etc_-_Source_of_evil,_Formateurs_-_Material_world
1931_11_24p
1937_10_23p
1950-12-25_-_Christmas_-_festival_of_Light_-_Energy_and_mental_growth_-_Meditation_and_concentration_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams_-_Playing_a_game_well,_and_energy
1950-12-28_-_Correct_judgment.
1951-03-03_-_Hostile_forces_-_difficulties_-_Individuality_and_form_-_creation
1951-03-08_-_Silencing_the_mind_-_changing_the_nature_-_Reincarnation-_choice_-_Psychic,_higher_beings_gods_incarnating_-_Incarnation_of_vital_beings_-_the_Lord_of_Falsehood_-_Hitler_-_Possession_and_madness
1951-03-14_-_Plasticity_-_Conditions_for_knowing_the_Divine_Will_-_Illness_-_microbes_-_Fear_-_body-reflexes_-_The_best_possible_happens_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_True_knowledge_-_a_work_to_do_-_the_Ashram
1951-03-26_-_Losing_all_to_gain_all_-_psychic_being_-_Transforming_the_vital_-_physical_habits_-_the_subconscient_-_Overcoming_difficulties_-_weakness,_an_insincerity_-_to_change_the_world_-_Psychic_source,_flash_of_experience_-_preparation_for_yoga
1951-03-31_-_Physical_ailment_and_mental_disorder_-_Curing_an_illness_spiritually_-_Receptivity_of_the_body_-_The_subtle-physical-_illness_accidents_-_Curing_sunstroke_and_other_disorders
1951-04-12_-_Japan,_its_art,_landscapes,_life,_etc_-_Fairy-lore_of_Japan_-_Culture-_its_spiral_movement_-_Indian_and_European-_the_spiritual_life_-_Art_and_Truth
1951-04-14_-_Surrender_and_sacrifice_-_Idea_of_sacrifice_-_Bahaism_-_martyrdom_-_Sleep-_forgetfulness,_exteriorisation,_etc_-_Dreams_and_visions-_explanations_-_Exteriorisation-_incidents_about_cats
1951-05-11_-_Mahakali_and_Kali_-_Avatar_and_Vibhuti_-_Sachchidananda_behind_all_states_of_being_-_The_power_of_will_-_receiving_the_Divine_Will
1953-04-29
1953-06-24
1953-07-01
1953-07-08
1953-07-15
1953-07-22
1953-08-19
1953-08-26
1953-09-02
1953-10-07
1953-10-28
1953-11-18
1953-11-25
1953-12-16
1953-12-23
1954-04-14_-_Love_-_Can_a_person_love_another_truly?_-_Parental_love
1954-05-05_-_Faith,_trust,_confidence_-_Insincerity_and_unconsciousness
1954-05-19_-_Affection_and_love_-_Psychic_vision_Divine_-_Love_and_receptivity_-_Get_out_of_the_ego
1954-06-23_-_Meat-eating_-_Story_of_Mothers_vegetable_garden_-_Faithfulness_-_Conscious_sleep
1954-06-30_-_Occultism_-_Religion_and_vital_beings_-_Mothers_knowledge_of_what_happens_in_the_Ashram_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Drawing_on_Mother
1954-07-07_-_The_inner_warrior_-_Grace_and_the_Falsehood_-_Opening_from_below_-_Surrender_and_inertia_-_Exclusive_receptivity_-_Grace_and_receptivity
1954-07-14_-_The_Divine_and_the_Shakti_-_Personal_effort_-_Speaking_and_thinking_-_Doubt_-_Self-giving,_consecration_and_surrender_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Ornaments_and_protection
1954-07-21_-_Mistakes_-_Success_-_Asuras_-_Mental_arrogance_-_Difficulty_turned_into_opportunity_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Conversion_of_men_governed_by_adverse_forces
1954-10-06_-_What_happens_is_for_the_best_-_Blaming_oneself_-Experiences_-_The_vital_desire-soul_-Creating_a_spiritual_atmosphere_-Thought_and_Truth
1954-11-03_-_Body_opening_to_the_Divine_-_Concentration_in_the_heart_-_The_army_of_the_Divine_-_The_knot_of_the_ego_-Streng_thening_ones_will
1954-11-10_-_Inner_experience,_the_basis_of_action_-_Keeping_open_to_the_Force_-_Faith_through_aspiration_-_The_Mothers_symbol_-_The_mind_and_vital_seize_experience_-_Degrees_of_sincerity_-Becoming_conscious_of_the_Divine_Force
1954-11-24_-_Aspiration_mixed_with_desire_-_Willing_and_desiring_-_Children_and_desires_-_Supermind_and_the_higher_ranges_of_mind_-_Stages_in_the_supramental_manifestation
1954-12-08_-_Cosmic_consciousness_-_Clutching_-_The_central_will_of_the_being_-_Knowledge_by_identity
1954-12-22_-_Possession_by_hostile_forces_-_Purity_and_morality_-_Faith_in_the_final_success_-Drawing_back_from_the_path
1955-02-23_-_On_the_sense_of_taste,_educating_the_senses_-_Fasting_produces_a_state_of_receptivity,_drawing_energy_-_The_body_and_food
1955-03-09_-_Psychic_directly_contacted_through_the_physical_-_Transforming_egoistic_movements_-_Work_of_the_psychic_being_-_Contacting_the_psychic_and_the_Divine_-_Experiences_of_different_kinds_-_Attacks_of_adverse_forces
1955-04-06_-_Freuds_psychoanalysis,_the_subliminal_being_-_The_psychic_and_the_subliminal_-_True_psychology_-_Changing_the_lower_nature_-_Faith_in_different_parts_of_the_being_-_Psychic_contact_established_in_all_in_the_Ashram
1955-07-13_-_Cosmic_spirit_and_cosmic_consciousness_-_The_wall_of_ignorance,_unity_and_separation_-_Aspiration_to_understand,_to_know,_to_be_-_The_Divine_is_in_the_essence_of_ones_being_-_Realising_desires_through_the_imaginaton
1955-11-23_-_One_reality,_multiple_manifestations_-_Integral_Yoga,_approach_by_all_paths_-_The_supreme_man_and_the_divine_man_-_Miracles_and_the_logic_of_events
1956-01-18_-_Two_sides_of_individual_work_-_Cheerfulness_-_chosen_vessel_of_the_Divine_-_Aspiration,_consciousness,_of_plants,_of_children_-_Being_chosen_by_the_Divine_-_True_hierarchy_-_Perfect_relation_with_the_Divine_-_India_free_in_1915
1956-01-25_-_The_divine_way_of_life_-_Divine,_Overmind,_Supermind_-_Material_body__for_discovery_of_the_Divine_-_Five_psychological_perfections
1956-03-07_-_Sacrifice,_Animals,_hostile_forces,_receive_in_proportion_to_consciousness_-_To_be_luminously_open_-_Integral_transformation_-_Pain_of_rejection,_delight_of_progress_-_Spirit_behind_intention_-_Spirit,_matter,_over-simplified
1956-03-14_-_Dynamic_meditation_-_Do_all_as_an_offering_to_the_Divine_-_Significance_of_23.4.56._-_If_twelve_men_of_goodwill_call_the_Divine
1956-06-06_-_Sign_or_indication_from_books_of_revelation_-_Spiritualised_mind_-_Stages_of_sadhana_-_Reversal_of_consciousness_-_Organisation_around_central_Presence_-_Boredom,_most_common_human_malady
1956-07-25_-_A_complete_act_of_divine_love_-_How_to_listen_-_Sports_programme_same_for_boys_and_girls_-_How_to_profit_by_stay_at_Ashram_-_To_Women_about_Their_Body
1956-08-01_-_Value_of_worship_-_Spiritual_realisation_and_the_integral_yoga_-_Symbols,_translation_of_experience_into_form_-_Sincerity,_fundamental_virtue_-_Intensity_of_aspiration,_with_anguish_or_joy_-_The_divine_Grace
1956-08-08_-_How_to_light_the_psychic_fire,_will_for_progress_-_Helping_from_a_distance,_mental_formations_-_Prayer_and_the_divine_-_Grace_Grace_at_work_everywhere
1956-08-15_-_Protection,_purification,_fear_-_Atmosphere_at_the_Ashram_on_Darshan_days_-_Darshan_messages_-_Significance_of_15-08_-_State_of_surrender_-_Divine_Grace_always_all-powerful_-_Assumption_of_Virgin_Mary_-_SA_message_of_1947-08-15
1956-12-19_-_Preconceived_mental_ideas_-_Process_of_creation_-_Destructive_power_of_bad_thoughts_-_To_be_perfectly_sincere
1957-01-16_-_Seeking_something_without_knowing_it_-_Why_are_we_here?
1957-02-13_-_Suffering,_pain_and_pleasure_-_Illness_and_its_cure
1957-04-03_-_Different_religions_and_spirituality
1957-06-19_-_Causes_of_illness_Fear_and_illness_-_Minds_working,_faith_and_illness
1957-07-24_-_The_involved_supermind_-_The_new_world_and_the_old_-_Will_for_progress_indispensable
1957-07-31_-_Awakening_aspiration_in_the_body
1957-08-07_-_The_resistances,_politics_and_money_-_Aspiration_to_realise_the_supramental_life
1957-12-04_-_The_method_of_The_Life_Divine_-_Problem_of_emergence_of_a_new_species
1958-01-15_-_The_only_unshakable_point_of_support
1958-03-19_-_General_tension_in_humanity_-_Peace_and_progress_-_Perversion_and_vision_of_transformation
1958-06-04_-_New_birth
1958-06-18_-_Philosophy,_religion,_occultism,_spirituality
1958-07-09_-_Faith_and_personal_effort
1958-08-06_-_Collective_prayer_-_the_ideal_collectivity
1958_10_10
1958_10_24
1960_05_04
1960_07_19
1960_11_14?_-_51
1961_05_22?
1962_10_12
1963_03_06
1963_08_10
1963_11_04
1964_03_25
1966_07_06
1969_08_03
1969_09_14
1969_11_08?
1969_12_29?
1969_12_31
1970_01_03
1970_02_17
1970_02_23
1970_03_11
1970_03_13
1970_03_14
1970_03_15
1970_03_17
1970_03_18
1970_04_10
1970_06_02
1.ac_-_The_Buddhist
1.ac_-_The_Four_Winds
1.ac_-_The_Titanic
1.ami_-_Selfhood_can_demolish_the_magic_of_this_world_(from_Baal-i-Jibreel)
1.ami_-_The_secret_divine_my_ecstasy_has_taught_(from_Baal-i-Jibreel)
1.asak_-_On_Unitys_Way
1.at_-_If_thou_wouldst_hear_the_Nameless_(from_The_Ancient_Sage)
1.bts_-_Love_is_Lord_of_All
1.cs_-_Consumed_in_Grace
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Celephais
1f.lovecraft_-_Herbert_West-Reanimator
1f.lovecraft_-_Poetry_and_the_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Descendant
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Disinterment
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Burying-Ground
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Museum
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Lurking_Fear
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Man_of_Stone
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Rats_in_the_Walls
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tomb
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Transition_of_Juan_Romero
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Unnamable
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Very_Old_Folk
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1.fs_-_Feast_Of_Victory
1.fs_-_German_Faith
1.fs_-_Hero_And_Leander
1.fs_-_Hymn_To_Joy
1.fs_-_Light_And_Warmth
1.fs_-_Longing
1.fs_-_My_Faith
1.fs_-_Ode_To_Joy
1.fs_-_Ode_To_Joy_-_With_Translation
1.fs_-_Parables_And_Riddles
1.fs_-_Pompeii_And_Herculaneum
1.fs_-_Resignation
1.fs_-_The_Celebrated_Woman_-_An_Epistle_By_A_Married_Man
1.fs_-_The_Complaint_Of_Ceres
1.fs_-_The_Fight_With_The_Dragon
1.fs_-_The_Gods_Of_Greece
1.fs_-_The_Hostage
1.fs_-_The_Ideals
1.fs_-_The_Infanticide
1.fs_-_Thekla_-_A_Spirit_Voice
1.fs_-_The_Lay_Of_The_Bell
1.fs_-_The_Maid_Of_Orleans
1.fs_-_The_Philosophical_Egotist
1.fs_-_The_Pilgrim
1.fs_-_The_Power_Of_Song
1.fs_-_The_Ring_Of_Polycrates_-_A_Ballad
1.fs_-_The_Veiled_Statue_At_Sais
1.fs_-_The_Walk
1.fua_-_A_slaves_freedom
1.fua_-_Look_--_I_do_nothing-_He_performs_all_deeds
1.fua_-_The_Lover
1.fua_-_The_Valley_of_the_Quest
1.hcyc_-_14_-_The_best_student_goes_directly_to_the_ultimate_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.he_-_Hakuins_Song_of_Zazen
1.hs_-_Heres_A_Message_for_the_Faithful
1.hs_-_Its_your_own_self
1.hs_-_Mystic_Chat
1.hs_-_Spring_and_all_its_flowers
1.hs_-_The_Garden
1.hs_-_The_Pearl_on_the_Ocean_Floor
1.hs_-_With_Madness_Like_To_Mine
1.ia_-_A_Garden_Among_The_Flames
1.ia_-_Fire
1.iai_-_A_feeling_of_discouragement_when_you_slip_up
1.ia_-_Modification_Of_The_R_Poem
1.ia_-_My_Heart_Has_Become_Able
1.ia_-_My_heart_wears_all_forms
1.ia_-_Wonder
1.jk_-_Ben_Nevis_-_A_Dialogue
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jk_-_King_Stephen
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_I
1.jk_-_Sonnet_IX._Keen,_Fitful_Gusts_Are
1.jk_-_The_Cap_And_Bells;_Or,_The_Jealousies_-_A_Faery_Tale_.._Unfinished
1.jlb_-_Browning_Decides_To_Be_A_Poet
1.jr_-_In_The_Waters_Of_Purity
1.jwvg_-_Faithful_Eckhart
1.jwvg_-_Lover_In_All_Shapes
1.jwvg_-_Symbols
1.jwvg_-_The_Faithless_Boy
1.jwvg_-_The_Sea-Voyage
1.jwvg_-_To_The_Chosen_One
1.jwvg_-_Wont_And_Done
1.kbr_-_Hope_For_Him
1.kbr_-_O_Friend
1.kbr_-_Poem_15
1.kbr_-_Where_do_you_search_me
1.kg_-_Little_Tiger
1.lb_-_Changgan_Memories
1.lb_-_The_River-Captains_Wife__A_Letter
1.lovecraft_-_Fungi_From_Yuggoth
1.lovecraft_-_On_Receiving_A_Picture_Of_Swans
1.lovecraft_-_Poemata_Minora-_Volume_II
1.lovecraft_-_Psychopompos-_A_Tale_in_Rhyme
1.mah_-_Kill_me-_my_faithful_friends
1.mah_-_Seeking_Truth,_I_studied_religion
1.mdl_-_Inside_the_hidden_nexus_(from_Jacobs_Journey)
1.mm_-_Of_the_voices_of_the_Godhead
1.pbs_-_Alastor_-_or,_the_Spirit_of_Solitude
1.pbs_-_Charles_The_First
1.pbs_-_Chorus_from_Hellas
1.pbs_-_Feelings_Of_A_Republican_On_The_Fall_Of_Bonaparte
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Supposed_To_Be_Parts_Of_Otho
1.pbs_-_Ginevra
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_HERE_I_sit_with_my_paper
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Marenghi
1.pbs_-_Mont_Blanc_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Vale_of_Chamouni
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_On_An_Icicle_That_Clung_To_The_Grass_Of_A_Grave
1.pbs_-_Peter_Bell_The_Third
1.pbs_-_Prince_Athanase
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_I.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_IX.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_V.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VII.
1.pbs_-_Rosalind_and_Helen_-_a_Modern_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Scenes_From_The_Faust_Of_Goethe
1.pbs_-_Song._Come_Harriet!_Sweet_Is_The_Hour
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_From_The_Italian_Of_Cavalcanti
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Daemon_Of_The_World
1.pbs_-_The_Pine_Forest_Of_The_Cascine_Near_Pisa
1.pbs_-_The_Retrospect_-_CWM_Elan,_1812
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_To_Coleridge
1.pbs_-_To_Constantia
1.pbs_-_To_Jane_-_The_Recollection
1.pbs_-_To--_Oh!_there_are_spirits_of_the_air
1.pbs_-_To_William_Shelley
1.pbs_-_Verses_On_A_Cat
1.poe_-_Al_Aaraaf-_Part_1
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_In_Youth_I_have_Known_One
1.poe_-_The_Bridal_Ballad
1.poe_-_The_Conversation_Of_Eiros_And_Charmion
1.poe_-_To_Marie_Louise_(Shew)
1.rb_-_Any_Wife_To_Any_Husband
1.rb_-_Bishop_Blougram's_Apology
1.rb_-_Holy-Cross_Day
1.rb_-_Master_Hugues_Of_Saxe-Gotha
1.rb_-_Old_Pictures_In_Florence
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_III_-_Paracelsus
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_II_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_I_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_IV_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_V_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pauline,_A_Fragment_of_a_Question
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_I_-_Morning
1.rb_-_Rhyme_for_a_Child_Viewing_a_Naked_Venus_in_a_Painting_of_'The_Judgement_of_Paris'
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fifth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fourth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Second
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Sixth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Third
1.rb_-_The_Glove
1.rb_-_The_Italian_In_England
1.rmr_-_Dedication
1.rmr_-_Fear_of_the_Inexplicable
1.rt_-_Fireflies
1.rt_-_Lovers_Gifts_LII_-_Tired_Of_Waiting
1.rt_-_My_Song
1.rt_-_On_The_Nature_Of_Love
1.rt_-_Religious_Obsession_--_translation_from_Dharmamoha
1.rt_-_Ungrateful_Sorrow
1.rwe_-_Boston
1.rwe_-_Boston_Hymn
1.rwe_-_Celestial_Love
1.rwe_-_Character
1.rwe_-_Dirge
1.rwe_-_May-Day
1.rwe_-_Quatrains
1.rwe_-_Solution
1.rwe_-_Terminus
1.rwe_-_The_Problem
1.rwe_-_Woodnotes
1.sdi_-_To_the_wall_of_the_faithful_what_sorrow,_when_pillared_securely_on_thee?
1.sfa_-_The_Praises_of_God
1.sfa_-_The_Prayer_Before_the_Crucifix
1.sjc_-_Not_for_All_the_Beauty
1.sjc_-_Song_of_the_Soul_That_Delights_in_Knowing_God_by_Faith
1.snt_-_You,_oh_Christ,_are_the_Kingdom_of_Heaven
1.tr_-_You_Do_Not_Need_Many_Things
1.wb_-_Auguries_of_Innocence
1.wby_-_A_Dramatic_Poem
1.wby_-_Easter_1916
1.wby_-_King_And_No_King
1.wby_-_The_Fool_By_The_Roadside
1.wby_-_The_Gift_Of_Harun_Al-Rashid
1.wby_-_The_Grey_Rock
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_The_Harp_Of_Aengus
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_The_Shadowy_Waters
1.wby_-_The_Tower
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_I
1.wby_-_Tom_The_Lunatic
1.wby_-_Vacillation
1.wby_-_Wisdom
1.whitman_-_All_Is_Truth
1.whitman_-_Apostroph
1.whitman_-_Are_You_The_New_Person,_Drawn_Toward_Me?
1.whitman_-_As_A_Strong_Bird_On_Pinious_Free
1.whitman_-_As_I_Sat_Alone_By_Blue_Ontarios_Shores
1.whitman_-_Behavior
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Words
1.whitman_-_Crossing_Brooklyn_Ferry
1.whitman_-_Europe,_The_72d_And_73d_Years_Of_These_States
1.whitman_-_From_Pent-up_Aching_Rivers
1.whitman_-_In_Cabind_Ships_At_Sea
1.whitman_-_Mediums
1.whitman_-_O_Me!_O_Life!
1.whitman_-_Passage_To_India
1.whitman_-_Pensive_On_Her_Dead_Gazing,_I_Heard_The_Mother_Of_All
1.whitman_-_Prayer_Of_Columbus
1.whitman_-_Respondez!
1.whitman_-_Salut_Au_Monde
1.whitman_-_Song_At_Sunset
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLIV
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXXIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Broad-Axe
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Exposition
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Universal
1.whitman_-_Starting_From_Paumanok
1.whitman_-_The_Great_City
1.whitman_-_The_Indications
1.whitman_-_The_Mystic_Trumpeter
1.whitman_-_The_Wound_Dresser
1.whitman_-_This_Compost
1.whitman_-_This_Day,_O_Soul
1.whitman_-_Thought
1.whitman_-_To_A_Foild_European_Revolutionaire
1.whitman_-_To_One_Shortly_To_Die
1.whitman_-_To_Oratists
1.whitman_-_To_Think_Of_Time
1.whitman_-_Vigil_Strange_I_Kept_on_the_Field_one_Night
1.whitman_-_Virginia--The_West
1.whitman_-_Wandering_At_Morn
1.whitman_-_Washingtons_Monument,_February,_1885
1.whitman_-_When_I_Peruse_The_Conquerd_Fame
1.ww_-_0-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons_-_Dedication
1.ww_-_1-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_2-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_3-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_44_-_It_is_time_to_explain_myself_--_let_us_stand_up
1.ww_-_4-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_5-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_7-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_A_Fact,_And_An_Imagination,_Or,_Canute_And_Alfred,_On_The_Seashore
1.ww_-_After-Thought
1.ww_-_A_Jewish_Family_In_A_Small_Valley_Opposite_St._Goar,_Upon_The_Rhine
1.ww_-_A_Morning_Exercise
1.ww_-_Artegal_And_Elidure
1.ww_-_As_faith_thus_sanctified_the_warrior's_crest
1.ww_-_A_Whirl-Blast_From_Behind_The_Hill
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Book_Eleventh-_France_[concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_Fifth-Books
1.ww_-_Book_First_[Introduction-Childhood_and_School_Time]
1.ww_-_Book_Fourteenth_[conclusion]
1.ww_-_Book_Fourth_[Summer_Vacation]
1.ww_-_Book_Ninth_[Residence_in_France]
1.ww_-_Book_Second_[School-Time_Continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Seventh_[Residence_in_London]
1.ww_-_Book_Sixth_[Cambridge_and_the_Alps]
1.ww_-_Book_Tenth_{Residence_in_France_continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Third_[Residence_at_Cambridge]
1.ww_-_Book_Thirteenth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_Concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_Twelfth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_]
1.ww_-_Brave_Schill!_By_Death_Delivered
1.ww_-_British_Freedom
1.ww_-_By_Moscow_Self-Devoted_To_A_Blaze
1.ww_-_Character_Of_The_Happy_Warrior
1.ww_-_Composed_Near_Calais,_On_The_Road_Leading_To_Ardres,_August_7,_1802
1.ww_-_Epitaphs_Translated_From_Chiabrera
1.ww_-_From_The_Cuckoo_And_The_Nightingale
1.ww_-_Guilt_And_Sorrow,_Or,_Incidents_Upon_Salisbury_Plain
1.ww_-_In_Due_Observance_Of_An_Ancient_Rite
1.ww_-_Laodamia
1.ww_-_Lines_Composed_a_Few_Miles_above_Tintern_Abbey
1.ww_-_Lines_Written_In_Early_Spring
1.ww_-_Maternal_Grief
1.ww_-_Michael-_A_Pastoral_Poem
1.ww_-_October,_1803
1.ww_-_Ode_on_Intimations_of_Immortality
1.ww_-_O_Me!_O_life!
1.ww_-_O_Nightingale!_Thou_Surely_Art
1.ww_-_Power_Of_Music
1.ww_-_Resolution_And_Independence
1.ww_-_Ruth
1.ww_-_Song_at_the_Feast_of_Brougham_Castle
1.ww_-_Sonnet-_It_is_not_to_be_thought_of
1.ww_-_Stanzas
1.ww_-_Surprised_By_Joy
1.ww_-_The_Eagle_and_the_Dove
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_II-_Book_First-_The_Wanderer
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IV-_Book_Third-_Despondency
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IX-_Book_Eighth-_The_Parsonage
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_V-_Book_Fouth-_Despondency_Corrected
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_VII-_Book_Sixth-_The_Churchyard_Among_the_Mountains
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_X-_Book_Ninth-_Discourse_of_the_Wanderer,_and_an_Evening_Visit_to_the_Lake
1.ww_-_The_Forsaken
1.ww_-_The_Highland_Broach
1.ww_-_The_Morning_Of_The_Day_Appointed_For_A_General_Thanksgiving._January_18,_1816
1.ww_-_The_Oak_Of_Guernica_Supposed_Address_To_The_Same
1.ww_-_The_Pet-Lamb
1.ww_-_The_Primrose_of_the_Rock
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
1.ww_-_The_Thorn
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Fourth
1.ww_-_The_Wishing_Gate_Destroyed
1.ww_-_To_B._R._Haydon
1.ww_-_To_Lady_Eleanor_Butler_and_the_Honourable_Miss_Ponsonby,
1.ww_-_Weak_Is_The_Will_Of_Man,_His_Judgement_Blind
1.ww_-_Yarrow_Revisited
1.ww_-_Yarrow_Visited
1.yt_-_The_Supreme_Being_is_the_Dakini_Queen_of_the_Lake_of_Awareness!
1.yt_-_This_self-sufficient_black_lady_has_shaken_things_up
20.03_-_Act_I:The_Descent
20.04_-_Act_II:_The_Play_on_Earth
2.00_-_BIBLIOGRAPHY
2.01_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE
2.01_-_Mandala_One
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_On_the_Concept_of_the_Archetype
2.01_-_The_Mother
2.01_-_The_Object_of_Knowledge
2.01_-_The_Yoga_and_Its_Objects
2.01_-_War.
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind
2.02_-_On_Letters
2.02_-_THE_DURGA_PUJA_FESTIVAL
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.02_-_The_Synthesis_of_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.02_-_UPON_THE_BLESSED_ISLES
2.03_-_Atomic_Forms_And_Their_Combinations
2.03_-_DEMETER
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_On_Medicine
2.03_-_The_Christian_Phenomenon_and_Faith_in_the_Incarnation
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.03_-_THE_MASTER_IN_VARIOUS_MOODS
2.03_-_The_Naturalness_of_Bhakti-Yoga_and_its_Central_Secret
2.03_-_The_Pyx
2.03_-_The_Supreme_Divine
2.04_-_Absence_Of_Secondary_Qualities
2.04_-_Concentration
2.04_-_ON_PRIESTS
2.04_-_Positive_Aspects_of_the_Mother-Complex
2.04_-_The_Divine_and_the_Undivine
2.04_-_The_Secret_of_Secrets
2.05_-_Aspects_of_Sadhana
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_The_Cosmic_Illusion;_Mind,_Dream_and_Hallucination
2.05_-_The_Religion_of_Tomorrow
2.05_-_The_Tale_of_the_Vampires_Kingdom
2.05_-_VISIT_TO_THE_SINTHI_BRAMO_SAMAJ
2.06_-_On_Beauty
2.06_-_Revelation_and_the_Christian_Phenomenon
2.06_-_The_Wand
2.06_-_WITH_VARIOUS_DEVOTEES
2.06_-_Works_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.07_-_BANKIM_CHANDRA
2.07_-_On_Congress_and_Politics
2.07_-_The_Mother__Relations_with_Others
2.08_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE_(II)
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.08_-_Memory,_Self-Consciousness_and_the_Ignorance
2.08_-_On_Non-Violence
2.08_-_ON_THE_FAMOUS_WISE_MEN
2.08_-_Three_Tales_of_Madness_and_Destruction
2.09_-_Human_representations_of_the_Divine_Ideal_of_Love
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.09_-_SEVEN_REASONS_WHY_A_SCIENTIST_BELIEVES_IN_GOD
2.0_-_Reincarnation_and_Karma
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.01_-_The_Central_Process_of_the_Sadhana
2.1.01_-_The_Parts_of_the_Being
2.1.02_-_Combining_Work,_Meditation_and_Bhakti
2.1.02_-_Love_and_Death
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
2.10_-_THE_DANCING_SONG
2.10_-_THE_MASTER_AND_NARENDRA
2.11_-_The_Guru
2.1.1_-_The_Nature_of_the_Vital
2.11_-_THE_TOMB_SONG
2.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_IN_CALCUTTA
2.12_-_On_Miracles
2.12_-_THE_MASTERS_REMINISCENCES
2.1.2_-_The_Vital_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
2.12_-_The_Way_and_the_Bhakta
2.1.3.1_-_Students
2.1.3.4_-_Conduct
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.1.3_-_Wrong_Movements_of_the_Vital
2.14_-_AT_RAMS_HOUSE
2.14_-_Faith
2.14_-_ON_THE_LAND_OF_EDUCATION
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.15_-_The_Lamen
2.16_-_Power_of_Imagination
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.16_-_VISIT_TO_NANDA_BOSES_HOUSE
2.17_-_December_1938
2.17_-_ON_POETS
2.17_-_THE_MASTER_ON_HIMSELF_AND_HIS_EXPERIENCES
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.19_-_Feb-May_1939
2.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_DR._SARKAR
2.19_-_THE_SOOTHSAYER
2.2.01_-_Work_and_Yoga
2.2.03_-_The_Divine_Force_in_Work
2.2.05_-_Creative_Activity
2.20_-_Chance
2.20_-_Nov-Dec_1939
2.20_-_The_Lower_Triple_Purusha
2.20_-_THE_MASTERS_TRAINING_OF_HIS_DISCIPLES
2.20_-_The_Philosophy_of_Rebirth
2.21_-_1940
2.2.1_-_Cheerfulness_and_Happiness
2.21_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.21_-_ON_HUMAN_PRUDENCE
2.2.1_-_The_Prusna_Upanishads
2.22_-_1941-1943
2.22_-_THE_MASTER_AT_COSSIPORE
2.22_-_The_Supreme_Secret
2.2.3_-_Depression_and_Despondency
2.23_-_Man_and_the_Evolution
2.23_-_The_Core_of_the_Gita.s_Meaning
2.23_-_THE_MASTER_AND_BUDDHA
2.2.4_-_Taittiriya_Upanishad
2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man
2.24_-_THE_MASTERS_LOVE_FOR_HIS_DEVOTEES
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.25_-_List_of_Topics_in_Each_Talk
2.26_-_The_Ascent_towards_Supermind
2.2.7.01_-_Some_General_Remarks
2.28_-_The_Divine_Life
2.3.01_-_Aspiration_and_Surrender_to_the_Mother
2.3.02_-_Mantra_and_Japa
2.3.02_-_Opening,_Sincerity_and_the_Mother's_Grace
2.3.03_-_Integral_Yoga
2.3.03_-_The_Mother's_Presence
2.3.04_-_The_Mother's_Force
2.3.05_-_Sadhana_through_Work_for_the_Mother
2.3.07_-_The_Mother_in_Visions,_Dreams_and_Experiences
2.3.07_-_The_Vital_Being_and_Vital_Consciousness
2.3.08_-_The_Mother's_Help_in_Difficulties
23.10_-_Observations_II
2.3.10_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Inconscient
23.11_-_Observations_III
2.3.1_-_Ego_and_Its_Forms
2.3.2_-_Chhandogya_Upanishad
2.3.2_-_Desire
2.3.4_-_Fear
2.4.01_-_Divine_Love,_Psychic_Love_and_Human_Love
2.4.02_-_Bhakti,_Devotion,_Worship
24.05_-_Vision_of_Dante
2.4.1_-_Human_Relations_and_the_Spiritual_Life
2.4.2_-_Interactions_with_Others_and_the_Practice_of_Yoga
2_-_Other_Hymns_to_Agni
30.02_-_Greek_Drama
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.08_-_Poetry_and_Mantra
30.09_-_Lines_of_Tantra_(Charyapada)
3.00_-_Introduction
30.18_-_Boris_Pasternak
3.01_-_Hymn_to_Matter
3.01_-_Proem
3.01_-_Sincerity
3.01_-_That_Which_is_Speaking
3.02_-_Aridity_in_Prayer
3.02_-_Aspiration
3.02_-_King_and_Queen
3.02_-_Mysticism
3.02_-_SOL
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret
3.02_-_The_Motives_of_Devotion
3.02_-_The_Psychology_of_Rebirth
3.03_-_Faith_and_the_Divine_Grace
3.03_-_SULPHUR
3.03_-_The_Ascent_to_Truth
3.03_-_The_Consummation_of_Mysticism
3.03_-_The_Godward_Emotions
3.03_-_The_Mind_
3.03_-_THE_MODERN_EARTH
3.03_-_The_Naked_Truth
3.04_-_LUNA
3.04_-_On_Thought_-_III
3.05_-_Cerberus_And_Furies,_And_That_Lack_Of_Light
3.05_-_SAL
3.06_-_UPON_THE_MOUNT_OF_OLIVES
3.07_-_The_Adept
3.07_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Soul
3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail
3.08_-_ON_APOSTATES
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
3.09_-_The_Return_of_the_Soul
3.0_-_THE_ETERNAL_RECURRENCE
31.01_-_The_Heart_of_Bengal
3.1.01_-_The_Problem_of_Suffering_and_Evil
3.1.02_-_Asceticism_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
31.05_-_Vivekananda
31.06_-_Jagadish_Chandra_Bose
3.10_-_ON_THE_THREE_EVILS
3.10_-_Punishment
3.11_-_ON_THE_SPIRIT_OF_GRAVITY
3.11_-_Spells
3.1.1_-_The_Transformation_of_the_Physical
3.1.2_-_Levels_of_the_Physical_Being
3.1.3_-_Difficulties_of_the_Physical_Being
3.13_-_THE_CONVALESCENT
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.15_-_Of_the_Invocation
3.15_-_THE_OTHER_DANCING_SONG
3.16.2_-_Of_the_Charge_of_the_Spirit
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
31_Hymns_to_the_Star_Goddess
3.2.01_-_On_Ideals
32.01_-_Where_is_God?
3.2.02_-_The_Veda_and_the_Upanishads
3.2.03_-_Conservation_and_Progress
32.03_-_In_This_Crisis
3.2.04_-_The_Conservative_Mind_and_Eastern_Progress
32.04_-_The_Human_Body
3.2.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Bhagavad_Gita
32.07_-_The_God_of_the_Scientist
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
3.2.09_-_The_Teachings_of_Some_Modern_Indian_Yogis
3.21_-_Of_Black_Magic
3.2.2_-_Sleep
3.2.3_-_Dreams
3.2.4_-_Sex
33.03_-_Muraripukur_-_I
33.05_-_Muraripukur_-_II
33.06_-_Alipore_Court
33.07_-_Alipore_Jail
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.16_-_Soviet_Gymnasts
3.3.1_-_Illness_and_Health
3.3.2_-_Doctors_and_Medicines
3.3.3_-_Specific_Illnesses,_Ailments_and_Other_Physical_Problems
34.09_-_Hymn_to_the_Pillar
3.4.1.01_-_Poetry_and_Sadhana
3.4.1_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.4.2_-_The_Inconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.5.01_-_Aphorisms
3.5.02_-_Thoughts_and_Glimpses
3-5_Full_Circle
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
36.08_-_A_Commentary_on_the_First_Six_Suktas_of_Rigveda
37.01_-_Yama_-_Nachiketa_(Katha_Upanishad)
37.05_-_Narada_-_Sanatkumara_(Chhandogya_Upanishad)
37.06_-_Indra_-_Virochana_and_Prajapati
3.7.1.01_-_Rebirth
3.7.1.03_-_Rebirth,_Evolution,_Heredity
3.7.1.04_-_Rebirth_and_Soul_Evolution
3.7.2.02_-_The_Terrestial_Law
3.7.2.04_-_The_Higher_Lines_of_Karma
38.02_-_Hymns_and_Prayers
3.8.1.01_-_The_Needed_Synthesis
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
4.01_-_THE_COLLECTIVE_ISSUE
4.01_-_The_Presence_of_God_in_the_World
4.02_-_Autobiographical_Evidence
4.02_-_BEYOND_THE_COLLECTIVE_-_THE_HYPER-PERSONAL
4.02_-_Difficulties
4.02_-_Humanity_in_Progress
4.02_-_The_Psychology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_Prayer_of_Quiet
4.03_-_Prayer_to_the_Ever-greater_Christ
4.03_-_The_Meaning_of_Human_Endeavor
4.03_-_The_Psychology_of_Self-Perfection
4.03_-_The_Senses_And_Mental_Pictures
4.03_-_The_Special_Phenomenology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION_OF_THE_KING
4.03_-_THE_ULTIMATE_EARTH
4.04_-_In_the_Total_Christ
4.04_-_THE_REGENERATION_OF_THE_KING
4.04_-_Weaknesses
4.06_-_RETIRED
4.07_-_THE_RELATION_OF_THE_KING-SYMBOL_TO_CONSCIOUSNESS
4.08_-_THE_RELIGIOUS_PROBLEM_OF_THE_KINGS_RENEWAL
4.09_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Nature
4.09_-_THE_SHADOW
4.0_-_NOTES_TO_ZARATHUSTRA
4.0_-_The_Path_of_Knowledge
4.10_-_AT_NOON
4.10_-_The_Elements_of_Perfection
4.1.1.02_-_Four_Bases_of_Realisation
4.1.1_-_The_Difficulties_of_Yoga
4.1.2.03_-_Preparation_for_the_Supramental_Change
4.1.2_-_The_Difficulties_of_Human_Nature
4.1.3_-_Imperfections_and_Periods_of_Arrest
4.13_-_The_Action_of_Equality
4.1.4_-_Resistances,_Sufferings_and_Falls
4.14_-_The_Power_of_the_Instruments
4.15_-_Soul-Force_and_the_Fourfold_Personality
4.18_-_Faith_and_shakti
4.18_-_THE_ASS_FESTIVAL
4.19_-_The_Nature_of_the_supermind
4.2.1_-_The_Right_Attitude_towards_Difficulties
4.2.2.01_-_The_Meaning_of_Psychic_Opening
4.2.2_-_Steps_towards_Overcoming_Difficulties
4.2.3.04_-_Means_of_Bringing_Forward_the_Psychic
4.2.3_-_Vigilance,_Resolution,_Will_and_the_Divine_Help
4.2.4.01_-_The_Psychic_Touch_or_Influence
4.2.4.09_-_Psychic_Tears_or_Weeping
4.2.4.10_-_Psychic_Yearning
4.2.4_-_Time_and_CHange_of_the_Nature
4.2.5.01_-_Psychisation_and_Spiritualisation
4.2.5_-_Dealing_with_Depression_and_Despondency
4.2_-_Karma
4.3.1_-_The_Hostile_Forces_and_the_Difficulties_of_Yoga
4.3.2_-_Attacks_by_the_Hostile_Forces
4.3.3_-_Dealing_with_Hostile_Attacks
4.3.4_-_Accidents,_Possession,_Madness
4.3_-_Bhakti
4.41_-_Chapter_One
4.4.3.02_-_Calling_in_the_Higher_Consciousness
4.4.4.05_-_The_Descent_of_Force_or_Power
4.4.5.01_-_Descent_and_Experiences_of_the_Inner_Being
4.4.5.02_-_Descent_and_Psychic_Experiences
5.01_-_EPILOGUE
5.01_-_On_the_Mysteries_of_the_Ascent_towards_God
5.04_-_Three_Dreams
5.05_-_Origins_Of_Vegetable_And_Animal_Life
5.07_-_Beginnings_Of_Civilization
5.1.01.1_-_The_Book_of_the_Herald
5.1.01.2_-_The_Book_of_the_Statesman
5.1.01.3_-_The_Book_of_the_Assembly
5.1.01.4_-_The_Book_of_Partings
5.1.01.7_-_The_Book_of_the_Woman
5.1.03_-_The_Hostile_Forces_and_Hostile_Beings
5.4.01_-_Notes_on_Root-Sounds
5.4.01_-_Occult_Knowledge
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.01_-_THE_ALCHEMICAL_VIEW_OF_THE_UNION_OF_OPPOSITES
6.03_-_Extraordinary_And_Paradoxical_Telluric_Phenomena
6.04_-_The_Plague_Athens
6.08_-_Intellectual_Visions
6.08_-_THE_CONTENT_AND_MEANING_OF_THE_FIRST_TWO_STAGES
6.09_-_Imaginary_Visions
6.09_-_THE_THIRD_STAGE_-_THE_UNUS_MUNDUS
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
7.03_-_Cheerfulness
7.03_-_The_Heart
7.04_-_Self-Reliance
7.04_-_The_Vital
7.05_-_Patience_and_Perseverance
7.09_-_Right_Judgement
7.10_-_Order
7.14_-_Modesty
7.16_-_Sympathy
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
9.99_-_Glossary
Aeneid
Appendix_4_-_Priest_Spells
Averroes_Search
Bhagavad_Gita
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Blazing_P2_-_Map_the_Stages_of_Conventional_Consciousness
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_III._-_The_external_calamities_of_Rome
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
BOOK_IX._-_Of_those_who_allege_a_distinction_among_demons,_some_being_good_and_others_evil
Book_of_Genesis
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Book_of_Proverbs
Book_of_Psalms
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XII._-_Of_the_creation_of_angels_and_men,_and_of_the_origin_of_evil
BOOK_XIV._-_Of_the_punishment_and_results_of_mans_first_sin,_and_of_the_propagation_of_man_without_lust
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XXI._-_Of_the_eternal_punishment_of_the_wicked_in_hell,_and_of_the_various_objections_urged_against_it
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_II
COSA_-_BOOK_III
COSA_-_BOOK_IV
COSA_-_BOOK_IX
COSA_-_BOOK_V
COSA_-_BOOK_VI
COSA_-_BOOK_VII
COSA_-_BOOK_VIII
COSA_-_BOOK_X
COSA_-_BOOK_XII
COSA_-_BOOK_XIII
Cratylus
Deutsches_Requiem
DS3
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.02_-_Of_Providence.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.07_-_Of_the_Immortality_of_the_Soul:_Polemic_Against_Materialism.
ENNEAD_05.01_-_The_Three_Principal_Hypostases,_or_Forms_of_Existence.
ENNEAD_05.02_-_Of_Generation_and_of_the_Order_of_Things_that_Follow_the_First.
ENNEAD_05.03_-_The_Self-Consciousnesses,_and_What_is_Above_Them.
ENNEAD_05.08_-_Concerning_Intelligible_Beauty.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
ENNEAD_06.06_-_Of_Numbers.
ENNEAD_06.09_-_Of_the_Good_and_the_One.
Epistle_to_the_Romans
First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Thessalonians
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
Medea_-_A_Vergillian_Cento
MoM_References
Phaedo
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1912_07_03
r1912_07_21
r1912_07_22
r1912_12_01
r1912_12_05
r1912_12_08
r1912_12_13
r1912_12_21
r1912_12_28
r1913_01_02
r1913_01_06
r1913_01_15
r1913_01_17
r1913_02_02
r1913_02_03
r1913_02_06
r1913_07_05
r1913_07_06
r1913_07_07
r1913_07_08
r1913_09_05b
r1913_09_13
r1913_09_18
r1913_09_19
r1913_09_25
r1913_09_30
r1913_11_11
r1913_11_12
r1913_11_13
r1913_11_14
r1913_11_18
r1913_11_21
r1913_11_22
r1913_11_23
r1913_11_24
r1913_11_25
r1913_11_28
r1913_12_01b
r1913_12_02a
r1913_12_02b
r1913_12_07
r1913_12_10
r1913_12_11
r1913_12_12b
r1913_12_14
r1913_12_16
r1913_12_18
r1913_12_22
r1913_12_23
r1913_12_27
r1914_01_06
r1914_03_13
r1914_03_18
r1914_03_25
r1914_03_27
r1914_03_28
r1914_04_04
r1914_04_07
r1914_04_08
r1914_04_09
r1914_04_13
r1914_04_17
r1914_04_27
r1914_04_28
r1914_05_01
r1914_05_02
r1914_05_05
r1914_05_08
r1914_05_09
r1914_05_28
r1914_05_30
r1914_06_11
r1914_06_12
r1914_06_14
r1914_06_15
r1914_06_16
r1914_06_17
r1914_06_18
r1914_06_24
r1914_06_25
r1914_06_26
r1914_06_29
r1914_06_30
r1914_07_01
r1914_07_03
r1914_07_04
r1914_07_05
r1914_07_07
r1914_07_08
r1914_07_10
r1914_07_11
r1914_07_13
r1914_07_15
r1914_07_17
r1914_07_18
r1914_07_20
r1914_07_26
r1914_07_27
r1914_07_28
r1914_07_30
r1914_08_01
r1914_08_07
r1914_08_08
r1914_08_15
r1914_08_16
r1914_08_17
r1914_08_20
r1914_08_22
r1914_08_23
r1914_08_26
r1914_08_31
r1914_09_06
r1914_09_18
r1914_09_27
r1914_10_06
r1914_10_07
r1914_10_08
r1914_10_09
r1914_10_13
r1914_10_14
r1914_10_20
r1914_10_28
r1914_10_29
r1914_11_02
r1914_11_03
r1914_11_04
r1914_11_10
r1914_11_13
r1914_11_14
r1914_11_17
r1914_11_18
r1914_11_25
r1914_11_27
r1914_12_03
r1914_12_04
r1914_12_05
r1914_12_07
r1914_12_08
r1914_12_10
r1914_12_13
r1914_12_15
r1914_12_16
r1914_12_18
r1914_12_19
r1914_12_21
r1915_01_01a
r1915_01_02
r1915_01_02a
r1915_01_05a
r1915_01_05b
r1915_01_12
r1915_01_13
r1915_01_14
r1915_01_15
r1915_01_23
r1915_01_24
r1915_01_29
r1915_02_01
r1915_05_02
r1915_05_05
r1915_05_20
r1915_05_24
r1915_06_06
r1915_06_23
r1915_06_30
r1915_07_11
r1915_07_12
r1915_07_31
r1915_08_03
r1915_08_04
r1915_08_05
r1917_01_30
r1917_02_11
r1917_03_07
r1918_03_27
r1918_05_23
r1919_07_01
r1919_07_22
r1920_06_07
r1927_01_15
r1927_01_27
r1927_04_07
r1927_04_09a
r1927_04_10
r1927_04_12
r1927_04_13
r1927_04_14
r1927_04_16
r1927_04_18
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Story_of_the_Warrior_and_the_Captive
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_001-025
Talks_026-050
Talks_051-075
Talks_076-099
Talks_125-150
Talks_500-550
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Isaiah
The_Book_of_Wisdom
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Divine_Names_Text_(Dionysis)
The_Dream_of_a_Ridiculous_Man
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Epistle_of_James
The_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Ephesians
The_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Philippians
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Corinthians
The_First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_Timothy
The_First_Epistle_of_Peter
The_First_Letter_of_John
The_Golden_Verses_of_Pythagoras
The_Gospel_According_to_John
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Gospel_According_to_Mark
The_Gospel_According_to_Matthew
The_Hidden_Words_text
The_Immortal
The_Last_Question
The_Letter_to_the_Hebrews
The_Library_of_Babel
The_Library_Of_Babel_2
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Lottery_in_Babylon
The_Mirror_of_Enigmas
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Revelation_of_Jesus_Christ_or_the_Apocalypse
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Second_Epistle_of_Paul_to_Timothy
The_Second_Epistle_of_Peter
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
The_Theologians
The_Third_Letter_of_John
The_Witness
The_Zahir
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

element_of_the_yoga
elements_in_the_yoga
favorite
power
SIMILAR TITLES
Affirming Faith In Mind
Baha i Faith
Faith
Faithfulness
faith in God
HAVE FAITH IN YOUR MIND
Inscription on Faith in Mind - One is All
Stages Of Faith
The Middle Way Faith Grounded in Reason
Verses on the Faith Mind

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Faith: According to St. Augustine, faith means, to believe that which one does not see. (Fides ergo est, quod non vides credere.) That is the reason why faith is praiseworthy.

Faith ::: A general term for religious belief used both of an attitude (to have faith) and of a collection of doctrines (the faith). See also "emuna".

Faith ::: Faith is a necessary means for arriving at realisation because we are ignorant and do not yet know that which we are seeking to realise; faith is indeed knowledge giving the ignorance an intimation of itself previous to its own manifestation, it is the gleam sent before by the yet unrisen Sun.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 191


Faith — fouf kinds ::: Mental fmth combats doubt and helps to open to the true knowledge ; \Ual faith prevents the attacks of the hostile forces or defeats them and helps to open to the true spiritual will and action ; physical faith keeps one firm through all physical obscurity, inertia or suffering and helps to open to the foundation of the true consciousness ; psychic faith

Faithfulness to the Light and the Call — to refuse to listen to any suggestions, impulses, lures and to oppose to them all the call of the Truth, the imperative beckoning of the Light. In all doubt and depression, to say, “ I belong to the Divine, I cannot fail ” ; to all suggestions of impurity and unfitness, to reply, “ I am a child of Immortality chosen by the Divine ; I have but to be true to myself and to Him — the victory is sure ; even if I fell, I would rise again " ; to all impulses to depart and serve some smaller ideal, to reply, "This is the greatest, this is the Truth that alone can satisfy the soul within me ;

Faith healing: A cure effected by the belief that disease and pain can be counteracted and cast out by faith in the Divine Power.

Faith Healing, Drugless Healing Apart from the regular medical and surgical practice, widespread forms of drugless healing are employed today. Public opinion generally is either frankly skeptical about the whole matter, or believes that such afford safe and easy means of relief and escape from suffering and disease. As a whole, these forms of faith or magnetic healing depend on the “inborn or inherent, ability of the ‘healer’ or practitioner to convey healthy life-force from himself to the diseased person. This is the key to success, or the lack of success, in all cases, and in all kinds of healing of whatever so-called ‘school’ ” (SOPh 622). If the practitioner succeeds in conveying the vitality of the pranic fluids from his own healthy body to the diseased body or organ of another person, that healthy life-force “expels” or changes the inharmonious vibrations in the afflicted part and, by restoring harmony there, brings about health. Such cures can be permanent; usually they are temporary, lasting from a few days to a few years.

Faith is a certitude In the soul which does not depend on reasoning, on this or that menial idea, on circumstances. Faith is a spiritual certitude of the spiritual, the divine, the soul’s ideal, something that clings to that even when it is not fulfilled in life, even when the immediate facts or the persistent circum- stances seem to deny it.

Faith is a necessary means for arriving at realisation, because we arc ignorant and do not yet know that which we arc seeking to realise ; faith is indeed knowledge giving the ignorance an intimation of itself previous to its own manifestation, it is the gleam sent before by the yet unrisen Sun.

Faith: (Kant. Ger. Glaube) The acceptance of ideals which are theoretically indemonstrable, yet necessarily entailed by the indubitable reality of freedom. For Kant, the Summum Bonum, God, and immortality are the chief articles of faith or "practical" belief. See Kantianism. Cf. G. Santayana, Skepticism and Animal Faith, where faith is the non-rational belief in objects encountered in action. -- O.F.K.

Faith —one of the 3 theological virtues (with

Faith ::: See Pistis.

FAITH—Active belief; belief which amounts to a basis for action upon the accepted premises.

FAITH. ::: A dynamic entire belief and acceptance.

faith ::: a dynamic intuitive conviction in the inner being of the truth of supersensible things which cannot be proved by any physical evidence but which are a subject of experience; the soul's witness to something not yet manifested, achieved or realised, but which yet the Knower within us feels to be true or supremely worth following or achieving; the soul's belief in the Divine's existence, wisdom, power, love, and grace.

faith :::Faith is a necessary means for arriving at realisation, because we are ignorant and do not yet know that which we are seeking to realise; faith is indeed knowledge giving the ignorance an intimation of itself previous to its own manifestation, it is the gleam sent before by the yet unrisen Sun. When the Sun shall rise, there will be no longer any need of the gleam.” Letters on Yoga

faithed ::: a. --> Having faith or a faith; honest; sincere.

faithful ::: a. --> Full of faith, or having faith; disposed to believe, especially in the declarations and promises of God.
Firm in adherence to promises, oaths, contracts, treaties, or other engagements.
True and constant in affection or allegiance to a person to whom one is bound by a vow, be ties of love, gratitude, or honor, as to a husband, a prince, a friend; firm in the observance of duty; loyal; of true fidelity; as, a faithful husband or servant.


FAITHFULNESS. ::: To admit and to manifest no other move- ments but only the movements prompted and guided by the

faithful

faithful; tutelary prince of Israel; angel of

faithless ::: a. --> Not believing; not giving credit.
Not believing on God or religion; specifically, not believing in the Christian religion.
Not observant of promises or covenants.
Not true to allegiance, duty, or vows; perfidious; trecherous; disloyal; not of true fidelity; inconstant, as a husband or a wife.
Serving to disappoint or deceive; delusive;


faithless

faith ::: n. --> Belief; the assent of the mind to the truth of what is declared by another, resting solely and implicitly on his authority and veracity; reliance on testimony.
The assent of the mind to the statement or proposition of another, on the ground of the manifest truth of what he utters; firm and earnest belief, on probable evidence of any kind, especially in regard to important moral truth.
The belief in the historic truthfulness of the Scripture


faiths—Christian (mainly Catholics), Jewish (mainly orthodox), Mohammedan.

faith. See sRADDHĀ; XINXIN.

faith.

faith


TERMS ANYWHERE

1. Consistently reliable. 2. Steady in allegiance; loyal; constant. 3. Having faith; remaining true, constant, or loyal. 4. Accurate in detail.

a bhagavati ::: faith in God; "faith in the presence and power of the Divine in us and the world". sraddha sraddh a bhagavati svasakty svasaktyam aṁ ca (sraddha bhagavati swashaktyam

adhere ::: v. i. --> To stick fast or cleave, as a glutinous substance does; to become joined or united; as, wax to the finger; the lungs sometimes adhere to the pleura.
To hold, be attached, or devoted; to remain fixed, either by personal union or conformity of faith, principle, or opinion; as, men adhere to a party, a cause, a leader, a church.
To be consistent or coherent; to be in accordance; to agree.


adiaphoristic ::: a. --> Pertaining to matters indifferent in faith and practice.

adultery ::: n. --> The unfaithfulness of a married person to the marriage bed; sexual intercourse by a married man with another than his wife, or voluntary sexual intercourse by a married woman with another than her husband.
Adulteration; corruption.
Lewdness or unchastity of thought as well as act, as forbidden by the seventh commandment.
Faithlessness in religion.


a ::: faith in the success of the work; sraddha in the achievement of karmasiddhi.

affiance ::: n. --> Plighted faith; marriage contract or promise.
Trust; reliance; faith; confidence. ::: v. t. --> To betroth; to pledge one&


affy ::: v. t. --> To confide (one&

A glad and strong and helpful ^submission is demanded to the working of the Divine Force, the obedience of the Illumined disciple of thb Truth, of the inner warrior who fights against obscurity hnd falsehood, of the faithful servant of the Divine.

All depends upon the order of thin gs which the colours indi- cate in a particular case. There is an order of significances in which they indicate various psycbolo^cal dynamisms, c.g. faith, love, protection, etc. There is another order of significances In which they indicate the aura or the activity of divine beings,

Al-Mu’min ::: The One who enables the awareness that He, by respect of His Names, is beyond what is perceived. This awareness reflects upon us as ‘faith’ (iman). All believers, including Rasuls and angels, have their faith rested upon this awareness, which frees the mind from the enslavement of illusion. While illusion can deter the mind, which uses comparison to operate, it becomes powerless and ineffective   in the sight of faith.

amaya tapas ::: will-power full of faith in its own fulfilment.

am (bhagavati swashaktyam) ::: (faith) in God and in the power within oneself.

a ::: mental faith; belief.

Among his most important works the following must be mentioned: Paz en la Guerra, 1897; De la Ensenanza Superior en Espana, 1899; En Torno al Casticismo, 1902; Amor y Pedagogia, 1902; Vida de Don Quijote y Sancho, 1905; Mi Religion y Otros Ensayos, 1910; Soliloquios y Conversaciones, 1912; Contra Esto y Aquello, 1912; Ensayos, 7 vols., 1916-1920; Del Sentimiento Tragico de la Vida en los Hombres y en los Pueblos, 1914; Niebla, 1914; La Agonia del Cristianismo, 1930; etc. Unamuno conceives of everv individual man as an end in himself and not a means. Civilization has an individual responsibility towards each man. Man lives in society, but society as such is an abstraction. The concrete fact is the individual man "of flesh and blood". This doctrine of man constitutes the first principle of his entire philosophy. He develops it throughout his writings by way of a soliloquy in which he attacks the concepts of "man", "Society", "Humanity", etc. as mere abstractions of the philosophers, and argues for the "Concrete", "experiential" facts of the individual living man. On his doctrine of man as an individual fact ontologically valid, Unamuno roots the second principle of his philosophy, namely, his theory of Immortality. Faith in immortality grows out, not from the realm of reason, but from the realm of facts which lie beyond the boundaries of reason. In fact, reason as such, that is, as a logical function is absolutely disowned bv Unamuno, as useless and unjustified. The third principle of his philosophy is his theory of the Logos which has to do with man's intuition of the world and his immediate response in language and action. -- J.A.F.

an.asraddha (kalyanasraddha; kalyana sraddha) ::: faith that all is for the best, "the sense of a divine power making for good behind all experiences", an element of cittasakti.

and the power that perseveres and conquers. It is really a habit that one has to get of opening to these helpful forces and either passively receiving them or actively drawing upon them — for one can do either. It is easier if you have the conception of them above and around you and the faith and the will to receive them ; for that brings the experience and concrete sense of them and the capacity to receive at need or at will. It is a question of habituating your consciousness to get into touch and keep in touch with these helpful forces ; and for that you must accustom yourself to reject the impressions forced on you by the others, depression, self-distrust, repining and all similar disturbances.

Anglo-Catholic Philosophy: Anglo-Catholicism is the name frequently used to describe the Church of England and her sister communions, including the Episcopal Church in America. As a religious system, it may be described as the maintenance of the traditional credal, ethical and sacramental position of Catholic Christianity, with insistence on the incorporation into that general position of the new truth of philosophy, science and other fields of study and experience. Historically, the Anglo-Catholic divines (as in Hooker and the Caroline writers) took over the general Platonic-Aristotelian philosophy of the schools; their stress, however, was more on the Platonic than the Aristotelian side: "Platonism", Dr. Inge has said, "is the loving mother-nurse of Anglicanism." Statements of this position, modified by a significant agnosticism concerning areas into which reason (it is said) cannot penetrate, may be found collected in Anglicanism (edited by More and Cross). A certain empiricism has always marked Anglo-Catholic theological and philosophical speculation; this is brought out in recent writing by Taylor (Faith of a Moralist), the writers in Lux Mundi (edited by Gore) and its modern successor Essays Catholic and Critical.

antenicene ::: a. --> Of or in the Christian church or era, anterior to the first council of Nice, held a. d. 325; as, antenicene faith.

antinomian ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the Antinomians; opposed to the doctrine that the moral law is obligatory. ::: n. --> One who maintains that, under the gospel dispensation, the moral law is of no use or obligation, but that faith alone is necessary to salvation. The sect of Antinomians originated with John

A persistent faith which no circumstance or event can break.

Apologetics: (Gr. apologetikos, fit for a defence) The discipline which deals with a defence of a position or body of doctrines. Traditional Christian theology gave over to Christian Apologetics (or, simply Apologetics) the task of defending the faith. As such the discipline was also called "Evidences of the Christian Religion." Each particular faith, however, developed its own particular type of apologetics. -- V.F.

apologist ::: n. --> One who makes an apology; one who speaks or writes in defense of a faith, a cause, or an institution; especially, one who argues in defense of Christianity.

apostasy ::: n. --> An abandonment of what one has voluntarily professed; a total desertion of departure from one&

apostate ::: n. --> One who has forsaken the faith, principles, or party, to which he before adhered; esp., one who has forsaken his religion for another; a pervert; a renegade.
One who, after having received sacred orders, renounces his clerical profession. ::: a.


apostatize ::: v. i. --> To renounce totally a religious belief once professed; to forsake one&

apostle ::: n. --> Literally: One sent forth; a messenger. Specifically: One of the twelve disciples of Christ, specially chosen as his companions and witnesses, and sent forth to preach the gospel.
The missionary who first plants the Christian faith in any part of the world; also, one who initiates any great moral reform, or first advocates any important belief; one who has extraordinary success as a missionary or reformer; as, Dionysius of Corinth is called the apostle of France, John Eliot the apostle to the Indians, Theobald


apostolical ::: a. --> Pertaining to an apostle, or to the apostles, their times, or their peculiar spirit; as, an apostolical mission; the apostolic age.
According to the doctrines of the apostles; delivered or taught by the apostles; as, apostolic faith or practice.
Of or pertaining to the pope or the papacy; papal.


ARRESTS IN SADHANA. ::: A difficulty comes or an arrest in some movement which you have begun or have been carrying on for some time. Such arrests are inevitably frequent enough; one might almost say that every step forward is followed by an arrest. It is to be dealt with by becoming always more quiet, more firm in the will to go through, by opening oneself more and more so that any obstructing non-receptivity in the nature may diminish or disappear, by an affirmation of faith even in the midst of obscurity, faith in the presence of a Power that is working behind the cloud and the veil, in the guidance of the Guru, by an observation of oneself to find any cause of the arrest, not in a spirit of depression or discouragement but with the will to find out and remove it. This is the only right attitude and, if one is persistent in taking it, the periods of arrest are not abolished, - for that cannot be at this stage, - but greatly shortened and lightened in their incidence. Sometimes these arrests are periods, long or short, of assimilation or unseen preparation, their appearance of sterile immobility is deceptive ::: in that case, with the right attitude, one can after a time, by opening, by observation, by accumulated experience, begin to feel, to get some inkling of what is being prepared or done. Sometimes it is a period of true obstruction in which the Power at work has to deal with the obstacles in the way, obstacles in oneself, obstacles of the opposing cosmic forces or any other or of all together, and this kind of arrest may be long or short according to the magnitude or obstinacy or complexity of the impediments that are met. But here, too, the right attitude can alleviate or shorten and, if persistently taken, help to a more radical removal of the difficulties and greatly diminish the necessity of complete arrests hereafter.
On the contrary, an attitude of depression or unfaith in the help or the guidance or in the certitude of the victory of the guiding Power, a shutting up of yourself in the sense of the difficulties, helps the obstructions to recur with force instead of progressively diminishing in their incidence.


Art, to dialectical materialism, is an activity of human beings which embodies a reflection of the reality surrounding them, a reflection which may be conscious, unconscious, reconstructive or deliberately fantastic, and which possesses positive aesthetic value in terms of rhythm, figure, color, image and the like. Art is good to the extent that it is a faithful and aesthetic reflection of the reality dealt with. Accordingly, proletarian or socialist realism (q.v.) is not photographic, static, but dialectical, conscious that any given period or subject is moving into its future, that class society is becoming classless society. This realism is optimistic, involving a "revolutionary romanticism". Marx, Engels, Lenin, Soviet philosophy, also, separate entries for detailed definitions of specific terms.

asa ::: blind faith.

a (self-çraddha) ::: faith in the power within oneself; same as svasaktyaṁ sraddha. se to rajii

asraddha ::: lack of faith; doubt, scepticism, distrust, "unfaith"; the asraddha negation of sraddha.

a ::: supra-intellectual (vijñanamaya) faith.

a ::: the faith of the emotional being. tertiary d dasya

ATTITUDE. ::: A glad and strong and helpful submission is demanded to the working of the Divine Force, the obedience of the illumined disciple of the Truth, of the inner Warrior who fights against obscurity and falsehood, of the faithful servant of the Divine.

Aufklärung: In general, this German word and its English equivalent Enlightenment denote the self-emancipation of man from mere authority, prejudice, convention and tradition, with an insistence on freer thinking about problems uncritically referred to these other agencies. According to Kant's famous definition "Enlightenment is the liberation of man from his self-caused state of minority, which is the incapacity of using one's understanding without the direction of another. This state of minority is caused when its source lies not in the lack of understanding, but in the lack of determination and courage to use it without the assistance of another" (Was ist Aufklärung? 1784). In its historical perspective, the Aufklärung refers to the cultural atmosphere and contrlbutions of the 18th century, especially in Germany, France and England [which affected also American thought with B. Franklin, T. Paine and the leaders of the Revolution]. It crystallized tendencies emphasized by the Renaissance, and quickened by modern scepticism and empiricism, and by the great scientific discoveries of the 17th century. This movement, which was represented by men of varying tendencies, gave an impetus to general learning, a more popular philosophy, empirical science, scriptural criticism, social and political thought. More especially, the word Aufklärung is applied to the German contributions to 18th century culture. In philosophy, its principal representatives are G. E. Lessing (1729-81) who believed in free speech and in a methodical criticism of religion, without being a free-thinker; H. S. Reimarus (1694-1768) who expounded a naturalistic philosophy and denied the supernatural origin of Christianity; Moses Mendelssohn (1729-86) who endeavoured to mitigate prejudices and developed a popular common-sense philosophy; Chr. Wolff (1679-1754), J. A. Eberhard (1739-1809) who followed the Leibnizian rationalism and criticized unsuccessfully Kant and Fichte; and J. G. Herder (1744-1803) who was best as an interpreter of others, but whose intuitional suggestions have borne fruit in the organic correlation of the sciences, and in questions of language in relation to human nature and to national character. The works of Kant and Goethe mark the culmination of the German Enlightenment. Cf. J. G. Hibben, Philosophy of the Enlightenment, 1910. --T.G. Augustinianism: The thought of St. Augustine of Hippo, and of his followers. Born in 354 at Tagaste in N. Africa, A. studied rhetoric in Carthage, taught that subject there and in Rome and Milan. Attracted successively to Manicheanism, Scepticism, and Neo-Platontsm, A. eventually found intellectual and moral peace with his conversion to Christianity in his thirty-fourth year. Returning to Africa, he established numerous monasteries, became a priest in 391, Bishop of Hippo in 395. Augustine wrote much: On Free Choice, Confessions, Literal Commentary on Genesis, On the Trinity, and City of God, are his most noted works. He died in 430.   St. Augustine's characteristic method, an inward empiricism which has little in common with later variants, starts from things without, proceeds within to the self, and moves upwards to God. These three poles of the Augustinian dialectic are polarized by his doctrine of moderate illuminism. An ontological illumination is required to explain the metaphysical structure of things. The truth of judgment demands a noetic illumination. A moral illumination is necessary in the order of willing; and so, too, an lllumination of art in the aesthetic order. Other illuminations which transcend the natural order do not come within the scope of philosophy; they provide the wisdoms of theology and mysticism. Every being is illuminated ontologically by number, form, unity and its derivatives, and order. A thing is what it is, in so far as it is more or less flooded by the light of these ontological constituents.   Sensation is necessary in order to know material substances. There is certainly an action of the external object on the body and a corresponding passion of the body, but, as the soul is superior to the body and can suffer nothing from its inferior, sensation must be an action, not a passion, of the soul. Sensation takes place only when the observing soul, dynamically on guard throughout the body, is vitally attentive to the changes suffered by the body. However, an adequate basis for the knowledge of intellectual truth is not found in sensation alone. In order to know, for example, that a body is multiple, the idea of unity must be present already, otherwise its multiplicity could not be recognized. If numbers are not drawn in by the bodily senses which perceive only the contingent and passing, is the mind the source of the unchanging and necessary truth of numbers? The mind of man is also contingent and mutable, and cannot give what it does not possess. As ideas are not innate, nor remembered from a previous existence of the soul, they can be accounted for only by an immutable source higher than the soul. In so far as man is endowed with an intellect, he is a being naturally illuminated by God, Who may be compared to an intelligible sun. The human intellect does not create the laws of thought; it finds them and submits to them. The immediate intuition of these normative rules does not carry any content, thus any trace of ontologism is avoided.   Things have forms because they have numbers, and they have being in so far as they possess form. The sufficient explanation of all formable, and hence changeable, things is an immutable and eternal form which is unrestricted in time and space. The forms or ideas of all things actually existing in the world are in the things themselves (as rationes seminales) and in the Divine Mind (as rationes aeternae). Nothing could exist without unity, for to be is no other than to be one. There is a unity proper to each level of being, a unity of the material individual and species, of the soul, and of that union of souls in the love of the same good, which union constitutes the city. Order, also, is ontologically imbibed by all beings. To tend to being is to tend to order; order secures being, disorder leads to non-being. Order is the distribution which allots things equal and unequal each to its own place and integrates an ensemble of parts in accordance with an end. Hence, peace is defined as the tranquillity of order. Just as things have their being from their forms, the order of parts, and their numerical relations, so too their beauty is not something superadded, but the shining out of all their intelligible co-ingredients.   S. Aurelii Augustini, Opera Omnia, Migne, PL 32-47; (a critical edition of some works will be found in the Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum, Vienna). Gilson, E., Introd. a l'etude de s. Augustin, (Paris, 1931) contains very good bibliography up to 1927, pp. 309-331. Pope, H., St. Augustine of Hippo, (London, 1937). Chapman, E., St. Augustine's Philos. of Beauty, (N. Y., 1939). Figgis, J. N., The Political Aspects of St. Augustine's "City of God", (London, 1921). --E.C. Authenticity: In a general sense, genuineness, truth according to its title. It involves sometimes a direct and personal characteristic (Whitehead speaks of "authentic feelings").   This word also refers to problems of fundamental criticism involving title, tradition, authorship and evidence. These problems are vital in theology, and basic in scholarship with regard to the interpretation of texts and doctrines. --T.G. Authoritarianism: That theory of knowledge which maintains that the truth of any proposition is determined by the fact of its having been asserted by a certain esteemed individual or group of individuals. Cf. H. Newman, Grammar of Assent; C. S. Peirce, "Fixation of Belief," in Chance, Love and Logic, ed. M. R. Cohen. --A.C.B. Autistic thinking: Absorption in fanciful or wishful thinking without proper control by objective or factual material; day dreaming; undisciplined imagination. --A.C.B. Automaton Theory: Theory that a living organism may be considered a mere machine. See Automatism. Automatism: (Gr. automatos, self-moving) (a) In metaphysics: Theory that animal and human organisms are automata, that is to say, are machines governed by the laws of physics and mechanics. Automatism, as propounded by Descartes, considered the lower animals to be pure automata (Letter to Henry More, 1649) and man a machine controlled by a rational soul (Treatise on Man). Pure automatism for man as well as animals is advocated by La Mettrie (Man, a Machine, 1748). During the Nineteenth century, automatism, combined with epiphenomenalism, was advanced by Hodgson, Huxley and Clifford. (Cf. W. James, The Principles of Psychology, Vol. I, ch. V.) Behaviorism, of the extreme sort, is the most recent version of automatism (See Behaviorism).   (b) In psychology: Psychological automatism is the performance of apparently purposeful actions, like automatic writing without the superintendence of the conscious mind. L. C. Rosenfield, From Beast Machine to Man Machine, N. Y., 1941. --L.W. Automatism, Conscious: The automatism of Hodgson, Huxley, and Clifford which considers man a machine to which mind or consciousness is superadded; the mind of man is, however, causally ineffectual. See Automatism; Epiphenomenalism. --L.W. Autonomy: (Gr. autonomia, independence) Freedom consisting in self-determination and independence of all external constraint. See Freedom. Kant defines autonomy of the will as subjection of the will to its own law, the categorical imperative, in contrast to heteronomy, its subjection to a law or end outside the rational will. (Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals, § 2.) --L.W. Autonomy of ethics: A doctrine, usually propounded by intuitionists, that ethics is not a part of, and cannot be derived from, either metaphysics or any of the natural or social sciences. See Intuitionism, Metaphysical ethics, Naturalistic ethics. --W.K.F. Autonomy of the will: (in Kant's ethics) The freedom of the rational will to legislate to itself, which constitutes the basis for the autonomy of the moral law. --P.A.S. Autonymy: In the terminology introduced by Carnap, a word (phrase, symbol, expression) is autonymous if it is used as a name for itself --for the geometric shape, sound, etc. which it exemplifies, or for the word as a historical and grammatical unit. Autonymy is thus the same as the Scholastic suppositio matertalis (q. v.), although the viewpoint is different. --A.C. Autotelic: (from Gr. autos, self, and telos, end) Said of any absorbing activity engaged in for its own sake (cf. German Selbstzweck), such as higher mathematics, chess, etc. In aesthetics, applied to creative art and play which lack any conscious reference to the accomplishment of something useful. In the view of some, it may constitute something beneficent in itself of which the person following his art impulse (q.v.) or playing is unaware, thus approaching a heterotelic (q.v.) conception. --K.F.L. Avenarius, Richard: (1843-1896) German philosopher who expressed his thought in an elaborate and novel terminology in the hope of constructing a symbolic language for philosophy, like that of mathematics --the consequence of his Spinoza studies. As the most influential apostle of pure experience, the posltivistic motive reaches in him an extreme position. Insisting on the biologic and economic function of thought, he thought the true method of science is to cure speculative excesses by a return to pure experience devoid of all assumptions. Philosophy is the scientific effort to exclude from knowledge all ideas not included in the given. Its task is to expel all extraneous elements in the given. His uncritical use of the category of the given and the nominalistic view that logical relations are created rather than discovered by thought, leads him to banish not only animism but also all of the categories, substance, causality, etc., as inventions of the mind. Explaining the evolution and devolution of the problematization and deproblematization of numerous ideas, and aiming to give the natural history of problems, Avenarius sought to show physiologically, psychologically and historically under what conditions they emerge, are challenged and are solved. He hypothesized a System C, a bodily and central nervous system upon which consciousness depends. R-values are the stimuli received from the world of objects. E-values are the statements of experience. The brain changes that continually oscillate about an ideal point of balance are termed Vitalerhaltungsmaximum. The E-values are differentiated into elements, to which the sense-perceptions or the content of experience belong, and characters, to which belongs everything which psychology describes as feelings and attitudes. Avenarius describes in symbolic form a series of states from balance to balance, termed vital series, all describing a series of changes in System C. Inequalities in the vital balance give rise to vital differences. According to his theory there are two vital series. It assumes a series of brain changes because parallel series of conscious states can be observed. The independent vital series are physical, and the dependent vital series are psychological. The two together are practically covariants. In the case of a process as a dependent vital series three stages can be noted: first, the appearance of the problem, expressed as strain, restlessness, desire, fear, doubt, pain, repentance, delusion; the second, the continued effort and struggle to solve the problem; and finally, the appearance of the solution, characterized by abating anxiety, a feeling of triumph and enjoyment.   Corresponding to these three stages of the dependent series are three stages of the independent series: the appearance of the vital difference and a departure from balance in the System C, the continuance with an approximate vital difference, and lastly, the reduction of the vital difference to zero, the return to stability. By making room for dependent and independent experiences, he showed that physics regards experience as independent of the experiencing indlvidual, and psychology views experience as dependent upon the individual. He greatly influenced Mach and James (q.v.). See Avenarius, Empirio-criticism, Experience, pure. Main works: Kritik der reinen Erfahrung; Der menschliche Weltbegriff. --H.H. Averroes: (Mohammed ibn Roshd) Known to the Scholastics as The Commentator, and mentioned as the author of il gran commento by Dante (Inf. IV. 68) he was born 1126 at Cordova (Spain), studied theology, law, medicine, mathematics, and philosophy, became after having been judge in Sevilla and Cordova, physician to the khalifah Jaqub Jusuf, and charged with writing a commentary on the works of Aristotle. Al-mansur, Jusuf's successor, deprived him of his place because of accusations of unorthodoxy. He died 1198 in Morocco. Averroes is not so much an original philosopher as the author of a minute commentary on the whole works of Aristotle. His procedure was imitated later by Aquinas. In his interpretation of Aristotelian metaphysics Averroes teaches the coeternity of a universe created ex nihilo. This doctrine formed together with the notion of a numerical unity of the active intellect became one of the controversial points in the discussions between the followers of Albert-Thomas and the Latin Averroists. Averroes assumed that man possesses only a disposition for receiving the intellect coming from without; he identifies this disposition with the possible intellect which thus is not truly intellectual by nature. The notion of one intellect common to all men does away with the doctrine of personal immortality. Another doctrine which probably was emphasized more by the Latin Averroists (and by the adversaries among Averroes' contemporaries) is the famous statement about "two-fold truth", viz. that a proposition may be theologically true and philosophically false and vice versa. Averroes taught that religion expresses the (higher) philosophical truth by means of religious imagery; the "two-truth notion" came apparently into the Latin text through a misinterpretation on the part of the translators. The works of Averroes were one of the main sources of medieval Aristotelianlsm, before and even after the original texts had been translated. The interpretation the Latin Averroists found in their texts of the "Commentator" spread in spite of opposition and condemnation. See Averroism, Latin. Averroes, Opera, Venetiis, 1553. M. Horten, Die Metaphysik des Averroes, 1912. P. Mandonnet, Siger de Brabant et l'Averroisme Latin, 2d ed., Louvain, 1911. --R.A. Averroism, Latin: The commentaries on Aristotle written by Averroes (Ibn Roshd) in the 12th century became known to the Western scholars in translations by Michael Scottus, Hermannus Alemannus, and others at the beginning of the 13th century. Many works of Aristotle were also known first by such translations from Arabian texts, though there existed translations from the Greek originals at the same time (Grabmann). The Averroistic interpretation of Aristotle was held to be the true one by many; but already Albert the Great pointed out several notions which he felt to be incompatible with the principles of Christian philosophy, although he relied for the rest on the "Commentator" and apparently hardly used any other text. Aquinas, basing his studies mostly on a translation from the Greek texts, procured for him by William of Moerbecke, criticized the Averroistic interpretation in many points. But the teachings of the Commentator became the foundation for a whole school of philosophers, represented first by the Faculty of Arts at Paris. The most prominent of these scholars was Siger of Brabant. The philosophy of these men was condemned on March 7th, 1277 by Stephen Tempier, Bishop of Paris, after a first condemnation of Aristotelianism in 1210 had gradually come to be neglected. The 219 theses condemned in 1277, however, contain also some of Aquinas which later were generally recognized an orthodox. The Averroistic propositions which aroused the criticism of the ecclesiastic authorities and which had been opposed with great energy by Albert and Thomas refer mostly to the following points: The co-eternity of the created word; the numerical identity of the intellect in all men, the so-called two-fold-truth theory stating that a proposition may be philosophically true although theologically false. Regarding the first point Thomas argued that there is no philosophical proof, either for the co-eternity or against it; creation is an article of faith. The unity of intellect was rejected as incompatible with the true notion of person and with personal immortality. It is doubtful whether Averroes himself held the two-truths theory; it was, however, taught by the Latin Averroists who, notwithstanding the opposition of the Church and the Thomistic philosophers, gained a great influence and soon dominated many universities, especially in Italy. Thomas and his followers were convinced that they interpreted Aristotle correctly and that the Averroists were wrong; one has, however, to admit that certain passages in Aristotle allow for the Averroistic interpretation, especially in regard to the theory of intellect.   Lit.: P. Mandonnet, Siger de Brabant et l'Averroisme Latin au XIIIe Siecle, 2d. ed. Louvain, 1911; M. Grabmann, Forschungen über die lateinischen Aristotelesübersetzungen des XIII. Jahrhunderts, Münster 1916 (Beitr. z. Gesch. Phil. d. MA. Vol. 17, H. 5-6). --R.A. Avesta: See Zendavesta. Avicehron: (or Avencebrol, Salomon ibn Gabirol) The first Jewish philosopher in Spain, born in Malaga 1020, died about 1070, poet, philosopher, and moralist. His main work, Fons vitae, became influential and was much quoted by the Scholastics. It has been preserved only in the Latin translation by Gundissalinus. His doctrine of a spiritual substance individualizing also the pure spirits or separate forms was opposed by Aquinas already in his first treatise De ente, but found favor with the medieval Augustinians also later in the 13th century. He also teaches the necessity of a mediator between God and the created world; such a mediator he finds in the Divine Will proceeding from God and creating, conserving, and moving the world. His cosmogony shows a definitely Neo-Platonic shade and assumes a series of emanations. Cl. Baeumker, Avencebrolis Fons vitae. Beitr. z. Gesch. d. Philos. d. MA. 1892-1895, Vol. I. Joh. Wittman, Die Stellung des hl. Thomas von Aquino zu Avencebrol, ibid. 1900. Vol. III. --R.A. Avicenna: (Abu Ali al Hosain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina) Born 980 in the country of Bocchara, began to write in young years, left more than 100 works, taught in Ispahan, was physician to several Persian princes, and died at Hamadan in 1037. His fame as physician survived his influence as philosopher in the Occident. His medical works were printed still in the 17th century. His philosophy is contained in 18 vols. of a comprehensive encyclopedia, following the tradition of Al Kindi and Al Farabi. Logic, Physics, Mathematics and Metaphysics form the parts of this work. His philosophy is Aristotelian with noticeable Neo-Platonic influences. His doctrine of the universal existing ante res in God, in rebus as the universal nature of the particulars, and post res in the human mind by way of abstraction became a fundamental thesis of medieval Aristotelianism. He sharply distinguished between the logical and the ontological universal, denying to the latter the true nature of form in the composite. The principle of individuation is matter, eternally existent. Latin translations attributed to Avicenna the notion that existence is an accident to essence (see e.g. Guilelmus Parisiensis, De Universo). The process adopted by Avicenna was one of paraphrasis of the Aristotelian texts with many original thoughts interspersed. His works were translated into Latin by Dominicus Gundissalinus (Gondisalvi) with the assistance of Avendeath ibn Daud. This translation started, when it became more generally known, the "revival of Aristotle" at the end of the 12th and the beginning of the 13th century. Albert the Great and Aquinas professed, notwithstanding their critical attitude, a great admiration for Avicenna whom the Arabs used to call the "third Aristotle". But in the Orient, Avicenna's influence declined soon, overcome by the opposition of the orthodox theologians. Avicenna, Opera, Venetiis, 1495; l508; 1546. M. Horten, Das Buch der Genesung der Seele, eine philosophische Enzyklopaedie Avicenna's; XIII. Teil: Die Metaphysik. Halle a. S. 1907-1909. R. de Vaux, Notes et textes sur l'Avicennisme Latin, Bibl. Thomiste XX, Paris, 1934. --R.A. Avidya: (Skr.) Nescience; ignorance; the state of mind unaware of true reality; an equivalent of maya (q.v.); also a condition of pure awareness prior to the universal process of evolution through gradual differentiation into the elements and factors of knowledge. --K.F.L. Avyakta: (Skr.) "Unmanifest", descriptive of or standing for brahman (q.v.) in one of its or "his" aspects, symbolizing the superabundance of the creative principle, or designating the condition of the universe not yet become phenomenal (aja, unborn). --K.F.L. Awareness: Consciousness considered in its aspect of act; an act of attentive awareness such as the sensing of a color patch or the feeling of pain is distinguished from the content attended to, the sensed color patch, the felt pain. The psychologlcal theory of intentional act was advanced by F. Brentano (Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkte) and received its epistemological development by Meinong, Husserl, Moore, Laird and Broad. See Intentionalism. --L.W. Axiological: (Ger. axiologisch) In Husserl: Of or pertaining to value or theory of value (the latter term understood as including disvalue and value-indifference). --D.C. Axiological ethics: Any ethics which makes the theory of obligation entirely dependent on the theory of value, by making the determination of the rightness of an action wholly dependent on a consideration of the value or goodness of something, e.g. the action itself, its motive, or its consequences, actual or probable. Opposed to deontological ethics. See also teleological ethics. --W.K.F. Axiologic Realism: In metaphysics, theory that value as well as logic, qualities as well as relations, have their being and exist external to the mind and independently of it. Applicable to the philosophy of many though not all realists in the history of philosophy, from Plato to G. E. Moore, A. N. Whitehead, and N, Hartmann. --J.K.F. Axiology: (Gr. axios, of like value, worthy, and logos, account, reason, theory). Modern term for theory of value (the desired, preferred, good), investigation of its nature, criteria, and metaphysical status. Had its rise in Plato's theory of Forms or Ideas (Idea of the Good); was developed in Aristotle's Organon, Ethics, Poetics, and Metaphysics (Book Lambda). Stoics and Epicureans investigated the summum bonum. Christian philosophy (St. Thomas) built on Aristotle's identification of highest value with final cause in God as "a living being, eternal, most good."   In modern thought, apart from scholasticism and the system of Spinoza (Ethica, 1677), in which values are metaphysically grounded, the various values were investigated in separate sciences, until Kant's Critiques, in which the relations of knowledge to moral, aesthetic, and religious values were examined. In Hegel's idealism, morality, art, religion, and philosophy were made the capstone of his dialectic. R. H. Lotze "sought in that which should be the ground of that which is" (Metaphysik, 1879). Nineteenth century evolutionary theory, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and economics subjected value experience to empirical analysis, and stress was again laid on the diversity and relativity of value phenomena rather than on their unity and metaphysical nature. F. Nietzsche's Also Sprach Zarathustra (1883-1885) and Zur Genealogie der Moral (1887) aroused new interest in the nature of value. F. Brentano, Vom Ursprung sittlicher Erkenntnis (1889), identified value with love.   In the twentieth century the term axiology was apparently first applied by Paul Lapie (Logique de la volonte, 1902) and E. von Hartmann (Grundriss der Axiologie, 1908). Stimulated by Ehrenfels (System der Werttheorie, 1897), Meinong (Psychologisch-ethische Untersuchungen zur Werttheorie, 1894-1899), and Simmel (Philosophie des Geldes, 1900). W. M. Urban wrote the first systematic treatment of axiology in English (Valuation, 1909), phenomenological in method under J. M. Baldwin's influence. Meanwhile H. Münsterberg wrote a neo-Fichtean system of values (The Eternal Values, 1909).   Among important recent contributions are: B. Bosanquet, The Principle of Individuality and Value (1912), a free reinterpretation of Hegelianism; W. R. Sorley, Moral Values and the Idea of God (1918, 1921), defending a metaphysical theism; S. Alexander, Space, Time, and Deity (1920), realistic and naturalistic; N. Hartmann, Ethik (1926), detailed analysis of types and laws of value; R. B. Perry's magnum opus, General Theory of Value (1926), "its meaning and basic principles construed in terms of interest"; and J. Laird, The Idea of Value (1929), noteworthy for historical exposition. A naturalistic theory has been developed by J. Dewey (Theory of Valuation, 1939), for which "not only is science itself a value . . . but it is the supreme means of the valid determination of all valuations." A. J. Ayer, Language, Truth and Logic (1936) expounds the view of logical positivism that value is "nonsense." J. Hessen, Wertphilosophie (1937), provides an account of recent German axiology from a neo-scholastic standpoint.   The problems of axiology fall into four main groups, namely, those concerning (1) the nature of value, (2) the types of value, (3) the criterion of value, and (4) the metaphysical status of value.   (1) The nature of value experience. Is valuation fulfillment of desire (voluntarism: Spinoza, Ehrenfels), pleasure (hedonism: Epicurus, Bentham, Meinong), interest (Perry), preference (Martineau), pure rational will (formalism: Stoics, Kant, Royce), apprehension of tertiary qualities (Santayana), synoptic experience of the unity of personality (personalism: T. H. Green, Bowne), any experience that contributes to enhanced life (evolutionism: Nietzsche), or "the relation of things as means to the end or consequence actually reached" (pragmatism, instrumentalism: Dewey).   (2) The types of value. Most axiologists distinguish between intrinsic (consummatory) values (ends), prized for their own sake, and instrumental (contributory) values (means), which are causes (whether as economic goods or as natural events) of intrinsic values. Most intrinsic values are also instrumental to further value experience; some instrumental values are neutral or even disvaluable intrinsically. Commonly recognized as intrinsic values are the (morally) good, the true, the beautiful, and the holy. Values of play, of work, of association, and of bodily well-being are also acknowledged. Some (with Montague) question whether the true is properly to be regarded as a value, since some truth is disvaluable, some neutral; but love of truth, regardless of consequences, seems to establish the value of truth. There is disagreement about whether the holy (religious value) is a unique type (Schleiermacher, Otto), or an attitude toward other values (Kant, Höffding), or a combination of the two (Hocking). There is also disagreement about whether the variety of values is irreducible (pluralism) or whether all values are rationally related in a hierarchy or system (Plato, Hegel, Sorley), in which values interpenetrate or coalesce into a total experience.   (3) The criterion of value. The standard for testing values is influenced by both psychological and logical theory. Hedonists find the standard in the quantity of pleasure derived by the individual (Aristippus) or society (Bentham). Intuitionists appeal to an ultimate insight into preference (Martineau, Brentano). Some idealists recognize an objective system of rational norms or ideals as criterion (Plato, Windelband), while others lay more stress on rational wholeness and coherence (Hegel, Bosanquet, Paton) or inclusiveness (T. H. Green). Naturalists find biological survival or adjustment (Dewey) to be the standard. Despite differences, there is much in common in the results of the application of these criteria.   (4) The metaphysical status of value. What is the relation of values to the facts investigated by natural science (Koehler), of Sein to Sollen (Lotze, Rickert), of human experience of value to reality independent of man (Hegel, Pringle-Pattlson, Spaulding)? There are three main answers:   subjectivism (value is entirely dependent on and relative to human experience of it: so most hedonists, naturalists, positivists);   logical objectivism (values are logical essences or subsistences, independent of their being known, yet with no existential status or action in reality);   metaphysical objectivism (values   --or norms or ideals   --are integral, objective, and active constituents of the metaphysically real: so theists, absolutists, and certain realists and naturalists like S. Alexander and Wieman). --E.S.B. Axiom: See Mathematics. Axiomatic method: That method of constructing a deductive system consisting of deducing by specified rules all statements of the system save a given few from those given few, which are regarded as axioms or postulates of the system. See Mathematics. --C.A.B. Ayam atma brahma: (Skr.) "This self is brahman", famous quotation from Brhadaranyaka Upanishad 2.5.19, one of many alluding to the central theme of the Upanishads, i.e., the identity of the human and divine or cosmic. --K.F.L.

AUTO-SUGGESTIONS. ::: Auto-suggestions- it is really faith in a mental form - act both on the subliminal and the subconscient. In the subliminal they set in action the powers of the inner being, its occult power to make thought, will or simple conscious force effective on the body - in the subconscient they silence or block the suggestions of death and illness (expressed or unexpressed) that prevent the return of health. They help also to combat the same things (adverse suggestions) in the mind, vital, body consciousness. Where all this is completely done or with some completeness, the effects can be very remarkable.

A. V. Vasihev, Space, Time, Motion, translated by H. M. Lucas and C. P. Sanger, with an introduction by Bertrand Russell, London. 1924, and New York, 1924. Religion, Philosophy of: The methodic or systematic investigation of the elements of religious consciousness, the theories it has evolved and their development and historic relationships in the cultural complex. It takes account of religious practices only as illustrations of the vitality of beliefs and the inseparableness of the psychological from thought reality in faith. It is distinct from theology in that it recognizes the priority of reason over faith and the acceptance of creed, subjecting the latter to a logical analysis. As such, the history of the Philosophy of Religion is coextensive with the free enquiry into religious reality, particularly the conceptions of God, soul, immortality, sin, salvaition, the sacred (Rudolf Otto), etc., and may be said to have its roots in any society above the pre-logical, mythological, or custom-controlled level, first observed in Egypt, China, India, and Greece. Its scientific treatment is a subsidiary philosophic discipline dates from about Kant's Religion innerhalb der Grenzen der reinen Vernunft and Hegel's Philosophie der Religion, while in the history of thought based on Indian and Greek speculation, sporadic sallies were made by all great philosophers, especially those professing an idealism, and by most theologians.

backslide ::: v. i. --> To slide back; to fall away; esp. to abandon gradually the faith and practice of a religion that has been professed.

bailment ::: n. --> The action of bailing a person accused.
A delivery of goods or money by one person to another in trust, for some special purpose, upon a contract, expressed or implied, that the trust shall be faithfully executed.


bedswerver ::: n. --> One who swerves from and is unfaithful to the marriage vow.

belief ::: 1. Confidence in the truth or existence of something not immediately susceptible to rigorous proof. 2. Trust or confidence, faith. 3. Something believed; an opinion or conviction. beliefs.

Question: "Sweet Mother, l don"t understand very clearly the difference between faith, belief and confidence.”

Mother: "But Sri Aurobindo has given the full explanation here. If you don"t understand, then. . . He has written ‘Faith is a feeling in the whole being." The whole being, yes. Faith, that"s the whole being at once. He says that belief is something that occurs in the head, that is purely mental; and confidence is quite different. Confidence, one can have confidence in life, trust in the Divine, trust in others, trust in one"s own destiny, that is, one has the feeling that everything is going to help him, to do what he wants to do. Faith is a certitude without any proof. Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 6.


beliefful ::: a. --> Having belief or faith.

belief ::: n. --> Assent to a proposition or affirmation, or the acceptance of a fact, opinion, or assertion as real or true, without immediate personal knowledge; reliance upon word or testimony; partial or full assurance without positive knowledge or absolute certainty; persuasion; conviction; confidence; as, belief of a witness; the belief of our senses.
A persuasion of the truths of religion; faith.
The thing believed; the object of belief.


believed in ::: was persuaded of the truth or existence of; had faith in the reliability, honesty, benevolence, etc. of.

"Be thyself, immortal, and put not thy faith in death; for death is not of thyself, but of thy body. For the Spirit is immortality.” Essays Divine and Human

“Be thyself, immortal, and put not thy faith in death; for death is not of thyself, but of thy body. For the Spirit is immortality.” Essays Divine and Human

betray ::: v. t. --> To deliver into the hands of an enemy by treachery or fraud, in violation of trust; to give up treacherously or faithlessly; as, an officer betrayed the city.
To prove faithless or treacherous to, as to a trust or one who trusts; to be false to; to deceive; as, to betray a person or a cause.
To violate the confidence of, by disclosing a secret, or that which one is bound in honor not to make known.


Faith ::: Faith is a necessary means for arriving at realisation because we are ignorant and do not yet know that which we are seeking to realise; faith is indeed knowledge giving the ignorance an intimation of itself previous to its own manifestation, it is the gleam sent before by the yet unrisen Sun.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 191


Faith — fouf kinds ::: Mental fmth combats doubt and helps to open to the true knowledge ; \Ual faith prevents the attacks of the hostile forces or defeats them and helps to open to the true spiritual will and action ; physical faith keeps one firm through all physical obscurity, inertia or suffering and helps to open to the foundation of the true consciousness ; psychic faith

Faithfulness to the Light and the Call — to refuse to listen to any suggestions, impulses, lures and to oppose to them all the call of the Truth, the imperative beckoning of the Light. In all doubt and depression, to say, “ I belong to the Divine, I cannot fail ” ; to all suggestions of impurity and unfitness, to reply, “ I am a child of Immortality chosen by the Divine ; I have but to be true to myself and to Him — the victory is sure ; even if I fell, I would rise again " ; to all impulses to depart and serve some smaller ideal, to reply, "This is the greatest, this is the Truth that alone can satisfy the soul within me ;

**"Faith in the heart is the obscure & often distorted reflection of a hidden knowledge.” Essays Divine and Human

Faith in the heart is the obscure & often distorted reflection of a hidden knowledge.” Essays Divine and Human

Faith is a certitude In the soul which does not depend on reasoning, on this or that menial idea, on circumstances. Faith is a spiritual certitude of the spiritual, the divine, the soul’s ideal, something that clings to that even when it is not fulfilled in life, even when the immediate facts or the persistent circum- stances seem to deny it.

::: **"Faith is a certitude in the soul which does not depend on reasoning, on this or that mental idea, on circumstances, on this or that passing condition of the mind or the vital or the body. It may be hidden, eclipsed, may even seem to be quenched, but it reappears again after the storm or the eclipse; it is seen burning still in the soul when one has thought that it was extinguished for ever. The mind may be a shifting sea of doubts and yet that faith may be there within and, if so, it will keep even the doubt-racked mind in the way so that it goes on in spite of itself towards its destined goal. Faith is a spiritual certitude of the spiritual, the divine, the soul"s ideal, something that clings to that even when it is not fulfilled in life, even when the immediate facts or the persistent circumstances seem to deny it.” Letters on Yoga

Faith is a certitude in the soul which does not depend on reasoning, on this or that mental idea, on circumstances, on this or that passing condition of the mind or the vital or the body. It may be hidden, eclipsed, may even seem to be quenched, but it reappears again after the storm or the eclipse; it is seen burning still in the soul when one has thought that it was extinguished for ever. The mind may be a shifting sea of doubts and yet that faith may be there within and, if so, it will keep even the doubt-racked mind in the way so that it goes on in spite of itself towards its destined goal. Faith is a spiritual certitude of the spiritual, the divine, the soul’s ideal, something that clings to that even when it is not fulfilled in life, even when the immediate facts or the persistent circumstances seem to deny it.” Letters on Yoga

Faith is a necessary means for arriving at realisation, because we arc ignorant and do not yet know that which we arc seeking to realise ; faith is indeed knowledge giving the ignorance an intimation of itself previous to its own manifestation, it is the gleam sent before by the yet unrisen Sun.

:::   "Faith is the soul"s witness to something not yet manifested, achieved or realised, but which yet the Knower within us, even in the absence of all indications, feels to be true or supremely worth following or achieving.” *Letters on Yoga

Faith is the soul’s witness to something not yet manifested, achieved or realised, but which yet the Knower within us, even in the absence of all indications, feels to be true or supremely worth following or achieving.” Letters on Yoga

Faith: (Kant. Ger. Glaube) The acceptance of ideals which are theoretically indemonstrable, yet necessarily entailed by the indubitable reality of freedom. For Kant, the Summum Bonum, God, and immortality are the chief articles of faith or "practical" belief. See Kantianism. Cf. G. Santayana, Skepticism and Animal Faith, where faith is the non-rational belief in objects encountered in action. -- O.F.K.

bhas.ya (bhashya) ::: commentary; scriptural interpretation; the capacbhasya ity of exegesis "in faithful subordination to the strict purport & connotation of the text".

biblist ::: n. --> One who makes the Bible the sole rule of faith.
A biblical scholar; a biblicist.


bigot ::: n. --> A hypocrite; esp., a superstitious hypocrite.
A person who regards his own faith and views in matters of religion as unquestionably right, and any belief or opinion opposed to or differing from them as unreasonable or wicked. In an extended sense, a person who is intolerant of opinions which conflict with his own, as in politics or morals; one obstinately and blindly devoted to his own church, party, belief, or opinion.


bona fide ::: --> In or with good faith; without fraud or deceit; real or really; actual or actually; genuine or genuinely; as, you must proceed bona fide; a bona fide purchaser or transaction.

But it is always the right inner poise, quietude inward and outward, faith, the opening of the body consciousness to the

"But our more difficult problem is to liberate the true Person and attain to a divine manhood which shall be the pure vessel of a divine force and the perfect instrument of a divine action. Step after step has to be firmly taken; difficulty after difficulty has to be entirely experienced and entirely mastered. Only the Divine Wisdom and Power can do this for us and it will do all if we yield to it in an entire faith and follow and assent to its workings with a constant courage and patience.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“But our more difficult problem is to liberate the true Person and attain to a divine manhood which shall be the pure vessel of a divine force and the perfect instrument of a divine action. Step after step has to be firmly taken; difficulty after difficulty has to be entirely experienced and entirely mastered. Only the Divine Wisdom and Power can do this for us and it will do all if we yield to it in an entire faith and follow and assent to its workings with a constant courage and patience.” The Synthesis of Yoga

Cardinal virtues: The cardinal virtues for a given culture are those which it regards as primary, the others being regarded either as derived from them or as relatively unimportant. Thus the Greeks had four, wisdom, courage, temperance, and justice, to which the Christians added three, faith, hope, and love or charity. -- W.K.S.

Cartesianism: The philosophy of the French thinker, Rene Descartes (Cartesius) 1596-1650. After completing his formal education at the Jesuit College at La Fleche, he spent the years 1612-1621 in travel and military service. The reminder of his life was devoted to study and writing. He died in Sweden, where he had gone in 1649 to tutor Queen Christina. His principal works are: Discours de la methode, (preface to his Geometric, Meteores, Dieptrique) Meditationes de prima philosophia, Principia philosophiae, Passions de l'ame, Regulae ad directionem ingenii, Le monde. Descartes is justly regarded as one of the founders of modern epistemology. Dissatisfied with the lack of agreement among philosophers, he decided that philosophy needed a new method, that of mathematics. He began by resolving to doubt everything which could not pass the test of his criterion of truth, viz. the clearness and distinctness of ideas. Anything which could pass this test was to be readmitted as self-evident. From self-evident truths, he deduced other truths which logically follow from them. Three kinds of ideas were distinguished: innate, by which he seems to mean little more than the mental power to think things or thoughts; adventitious, which come to him from without; factitious, produced within his own mind. He found most difficulty with the second type of ideas. The first reality discovered through his method is the thinking self. Though he might doubt nearly all else, Descartes could not reasonably doubt that he, who was thinking, existed as a res cogitans. This is the intuition enunciated in the famous aphorism: I think, therefore I am, Cogito ergo sum. This is not offered by Descartes as a compressed syllogism, but as an immediate intuition of his own thinking mind. Another reality, whose existence was obvious to Descartes, was God, the Supreme Being. Though he offered several proofs of the Divine Existence, he was convinced that he knew this also by an innate idea, and so, clearly and distinctly. But he did not find any clear ideas of an extra-mental, bodily world. He suspected its existence, but logical demonstration was needed to establish this truth. His adventitious ideas carry the vague suggestion that they are caused by bodies in an external world. By arguing that God would be a deceiver, in allowing him to think that bodies exist if they do not, he eventually convinced himself of the reality of bodies, his own and others. There are, then, three kinds of substance according to Descartes: Created spirits, i.e. the finite soul-substance of each man: these are immaterial agencies capable of performing spiritual operations, loosely united with bodies, but not extended since thought is their very essence. Uncreated Spirit, i.e. God, confined neither to space nor time, All-Good and All-Powerful, though his Existence can be known clearly, his Nature cannot be known adequately by men on earth, He is the God of Christianity, Creator, Providence and Final Cause of the universe. Bodies, i.e. created, physical substances existing independently of human thought and having as their chief attribute, extension. Cartesian physics regards bodies as the result of the introduction of "vortices", i.e. whorls of motion, into extension. Divisibility, figurability and mobility, are the notes of extension, which appears to be little more thin what Descartes' Scholastic teachers called geometrical space. God is the First Cause of all motion in the physical universe, which is conceived as a mechanical system operated by its Maker. Even the bodies of animals are automata. Sensation is the critical problem in Cartesian psychology; it is viewed by Descartes as a function of the soul, but he was never able to find a satisfactory explanation of the apparent fact that the soul is moved by the body when sensation occurs. The theory of animal spirits provided Descartes with a sort of bridge between mind and matter, since these spirits are supposed to be very subtle matter, halfway, as it were, between thought and extension in their nature. However, this theory of sensation is the weakest link in the Cartesian explanation of cognition. Intellectual error is accounted for by Descartes in his theory of assent, which makes judgment an act of free will. Where the will over-reaches the intellect, judgment may be false. That the will is absolutely free in man, capable even of choosing what is presented by the intellect as the less desirable of two alternatives, is probably a vestige of Scotism retained from his college course in Scholasticism. Common-sense and moderation are the keynotes of Descartes' famous rules for the regulation of his own conduct during his nine years of methodic doubt, and this ethical attitude continued throughout his life. He believed that man is responsible ultimately to God for the courses of action that he may choose. He admitted that conflicts may occur between human passions and human reason. A virtuous life is made possible by the knowledge of what is right and the consequent control of the lower tendencies of human nature. Six primary passions are described by Descartes wonder, love, hatred, desire, joy and sorrow. These are passive states of consciousness, partly caused by the body, acting through the animal spirits, and partly caused by the soul. Under rational control, they enable the soul to will what is good for the body. Descartes' terminology suggests that there are psychological faculties, but he insists that these powers are not really distinct from the soul itself, which is man's sole psychic agency. Descartes was a practical Catholic all his life and he tried to develop proofs of the existence of God, an explanation of the Eucharist, of the nature of religious faith, and of the operation of Divine Providence, using his philosophy as the basis for a new theology. This attempted theology has not found favor with Catholic theologians in general.

catechise ::: v. t. --> To instruct by asking questions, receiving answers, and offering explanations and corrections, -- esp. in regard to points of religious faith.
To question or interrogate; to examine or try by questions; -- sometimes with a view to reproof, by eliciting from a person answers which condemn his own conduct.


catholic ::: a. --> Universal or general; as, the catholic faith.
Not narrow-minded, partial, or bigoted; liberal; as, catholic tastes.
Of or pertaining to, or affecting the Roman Catholics; as, the Catholic emancipation act. ::: n.


catholicism ::: n. --> The state or quality of being catholic or universal; catholicity.
Liberality of sentiment; breadth of view.
The faith of the whole orthodox Christian church, or adherence thereto.
The doctrines or faith of the Roman Catholic church, or adherence thereto.


Central faith ::: A faith in the soul or the central being behind, a faith which is there even when the mind doubts and (he vital despairs and the physical wants to collapse, and after the attack is over, reappears and pushes on the path again.

certitude ::: freedom from doubt, esp. in matters of faith or opinion; certainty. certitudes.

cha) ::: faith in the Divine and in the power within oneself. sraddhamaya sraddh

chaja ::: n. --> The crested screamer of Brazil (Palamedea, / Chauna, chavaria), so called in imitation of its notes; -- called also chauna, and faithful kamichi. It is often domesticated and is useful in guarding other poultry. See Kamichi.

christendom ::: n. --> The profession of faith in Christ by baptism; hence, the Christian religion, or the adoption of it.
The name received at baptism; or, more generally, any name or appelation.
That portion of the world in which Christianity prevails, or which is governed under Christian institutions, in distinction from heathen or Mohammedan lands.
The whole body of Christians.


christless ::: a. --> Without faith in Christ; unchristian.

Chung: Being true to the principle of the self; being true to the originally good nature of the self; being one's true self; the Confucian "central thread or principle" (i kuan) with respect to the self, as reciprocity (shu) is that principle with respect to others. See i kuan. Exerting one's pure heart to the utmost, to the extent of "not a single thought not having been exhausted", honesty, sincerity; devotion of soul, conscientiousness. (Confucianism.) "Honesty (chung) is complete realization of one's nature" whereas truthfulness (hsin) is "complete realization of the nature of things." "Honesty (chung) is the subjective side of truthfulness (hsin) whereas truthfulness is the objective side of honesty." (Ch'eng Ming-tao, 1032-1086.)   "Honesty is exerting one's heart to the utmost whereas truthfulness is the observance of the Reason of things." (Chu Hsi, 1230-1300.) Impartiality, especially in love and profit, Loyalty, especially to one's superiors, faithfulness.

circumcision ::: n. --> The act of cutting off the prepuce or foreskin of males, or the internal labia of females.
The Jews, as a circumcised people.
Rejection of the sins of the flesh; spiritual purification, and acceptance of the Christian faith.


cittasaktih. (snigdhata, tejahslagha, kalyanasraddha, premasamarthyam, iti chittashaktih) ::: richness of feeling, assertion of psychic force, faith in the universal good, capacity for unbounded love: these constitute the power of the emotional being.

cleave ::: 1. To adhere closely to; stick; cling. 2. To be faithful (usually fol. by to.)

Clement of Alexandria: (150-217) An early Christian thinker and theologian who attempted to raise the attitude of faith to the level of knowledge; he was influenced by Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, and Philo Judaeus. -- R.B.W.

communion ::: n. --> The act of sharing; community; participation.
Intercourse between two or more persons; esp., intimate association and intercourse implying sympathy and confidence; interchange of thoughts, purposes, etc.; agreement; fellowship; as, the communion of saints.
A body of Christians having one common faith and discipline; as, the Presbyterian communion.
The sacrament of the eucharist; the celebration of the


CONCENTRATION ::: Fixing the consciousness in one place or on one object and in a single condition.

A gathering together of the consciousness and either centralising at one point or turning on a single object, e.g. the Divine; there can also be a gathered condition throughout the whole being, not at a point.

Concentration is necessary, first to turn the whole will and mind from the discursive divagation natural to them, following a dispersed movement of the thoughts, running after many-branching desires, led away in the track of the senses and the outward mental response to phenomena; we have to fix the will and the thought on the eternal and real behind all, and this demands an immense effort, a one-pointed concentration. Secondly, it is necessary in order to break down the veil which is erected by our ordinary mentality between ourselves and the truth; for outer knowledge can be picked up by the way, by ordinary attention and reception, but the inner, hidden and higher truth can only be seized by an absolute concentration of the mind on its object, an absolute concentration of the will to attain it and, once attained, to hold it habitually and securely unite oneself with it.

Centre of Concentration: The two main places where one can centre the consciousness for yoga are in the head and in the heart - the mind-centre and the soul-centre.

Brain concentration is always a tapasyā and necessarily brings a strain. It is only if one is lifted out of the brain mind altogether that the strain of mental concentration disappears.

At the top of the head or above it is the right place for yogic concentration in reading or thinking.

In whatever centre the concentration takes place, the yoga force generated extends to the others and produces concentration or workings there.

Modes of Concentration: There is no harm in concentrating sometimes in the heart and sometimes above the head. But concentration in either place does not mean keeping the attention fixed on a particular spot; you have to take your station of consciousness in either place and concentrate there not on the place, but on the Divine. This can be done with eyes shut or with eyes open, according as it best suits.

If one concentrates on a thought or a word, one has to dwell on the essential idea contained in the word with the aspiration to feel the thing which it expresses.

There is no method in this yoga except to concentrate, preferably in the heart, and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force to transform the consciousness; one can concentrate also in the head or between the eye-brows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is a beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be.

Powers (three) of Concentration ::: By concentration on anything whatsoever we are able to know that thing, to make it deliver up its concealed secrets; we must use this power to know not things, but the one Thing-in-itself. By concentration again the whole will can be gathered up for the acquisition of that which is still ungrasped, still beyond us; this power, if it is sufficiently trained, sufficiently single-minded, sufficiently sincere, sure of itself, faithful to itself alone, absolute in faith, we can use for the acquisition of any object whatsoever; but we ought to use it not for the acquisition of the many objects which the world offers to us, but to grasp spiritually that one object worthy of pursuit which is also the one subject worthy of knowledge. By concentration of our whole being on one status of itself we can become whatever we choose ; we can become, for instance, even if we were before a mass of weaknesses and fears, a mass instead of strength and courage, or we can become all a great purity, holiness and peace or a single universal soul of Love ; but we ought, it is said, to use this power to become not even these things, high as they may be in comparison with what we now are, but rather to become that which is above all things and free from all action and attributes, the pure and absolute Being. All else, all other concentration can only be valuable for preparation, for previous steps, for a gradual training of the dissolute and self-dissipating thought, will and being towards their grand and unique object.

Stages in Concentration (Rajayogic) ::: that in which the object is seized, that in which it is held, that in which the mind is lost in the status which the object represents or to which the concentration leads.

Concentration and Meditation ::: Concentration means fixing the consciousness in one place or one object and in a single condition Meditation can be diffusive,e.g. thinking about the Divine, receiving impressions and discriminating, watching what goes on in the nature and acting upon it etc. Meditation is when the inner mind is looking at things to get the right knowledge.

vide Dhyāna.


confessionalism ::: n. --> An exaggerated estimate of the importance of giving full assent to any particular formula of the Christian faith.

confessionist ::: n. --> One professing a certain faith.

confession ::: n. --> Acknowledgment; avowal, especially in a matter pertaining to one&

confessor ::: n. --> One who confesses; one who acknowledges a fault, or the truth of a charge, at the risk of suffering; specifically, one who confesses himself a follower of Christ and endures persecution for his faith.
A priest who hears the confessions of others and is authorized to grant them absolution.


confessorship ::: n. --> The act or state of suffering persecution for religious faith.

confess ::: v. t. --> To make acknowledgment or avowal in a matter pertaining to one&

confidence ::: 1. Full trust or faith in a person or thing. 2. A feeling of assurance, especially of self-assurance.

confidence ::: n. --> The act of confiding, trusting, or putting faith in; trust; reliance; belief; -- formerly followed by of, now commonly by in.
That in which faith is put or reliance had.
The state of mind characterized by one&


confide ::: v. i. --> To put faith (in); to repose confidence; to trust; -- usually followed by in; as, the prince confides in his ministers. ::: v. t. --> To intrust; to give in charge; to commit to one&

congregational ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to a congregation; conducted, or participated in, by a congregation; as, congregational singing.
Belonging to the system of Congregationalism, or to Congregationalist; holding to the faith and polity of Congregationalism; as, a Congregational church.


congregationalism ::: n. --> That system of church organization which vests all ecclesiastical power in the assembled brotherhood of each local church.
The faith and polity of the Congregational churches, taken collectively.


conscientiously ::: adv. --> In a conscientious manner; as a matter of conscience; hence; faithfully; accurately; completely.

constant ::: v. t. --> Firm; solid; fixed; immovable; -- opposed to fluid.
Not liable, or given, to change; permanent; regular; continuous; continually recurring; steadfast; faithful; not fickle.
Remaining unchanged or invariable, as a quantity, force, law, etc.
Consistent; logical. ::: n.


creance ::: n. --> Faith; belief; creed.
A fine, small line, fastened to a hawk&


credendum ::: n. --> A thing to be believed; an article of faith; -- distinguished from agendum, a practical duty.

credit ::: n. --> Reliance on the truth of something said or done; belief; faith; trust; confidence.
Reputation derived from the confidence of others; esteem; honor; good name; estimation.
A ground of, or title to, belief or confidence; authority derived from character or reputation.
That which tends to procure, or add to, reputation or esteem; an honor.


Credo quia absurdum est: Literally, I believe because it is absurd. Although these particular words are often wrongly attributed to Tertullian (born middle of the 2nd century) they nevertheless convey the thought of this Latin church father who maintained the rule of faith on the basis of one's trust in the commands and authority of Christ rather than upon the compulsion of reason or truth. To believe in the absurd, in other words, is to reveal a greater faith than to believe in the reasonable. -- V.F.

Credo ut intelligam: Literally, I believe in order that I may understand. A principle which affirms that after an act of faith a philosophy begins, held by such thinkers as Augustine, Anselm, Duns Scotus and many others. -- V.F.

creed ::: 1. A formal statement of religious belief; a confession of faith. 2. Any system or codification of belief or of opinion. creeds.

creed ::: v. t. --> A definite summary of what is believed; esp., a summary of the articles of Christian faith; a confession of faith for public use; esp., one which is brief and comprehensive.
Any summary of principles or opinions professed or adhered to.
To believe; to credit.


Criterion: Broadly speaking, any ground, basis, or means of judging anything as to its quality. Since validity, truth, goodness, justice, virtue, and beauty are some of the most fundamental qualities for philosophic enquiry, criteria for these are embodied in almost all philosophies and are either assumed or derived. In logic, consistency is a generally recognized criterion; in epistemology, evidence of the senses, comparison, or reason may be regarded as criteria; in metaphysical speculation have been suggested. as criteria for truth, among others, correspondence, representation, practicability, and coherence; in religion, evidences of faith, revelation or miracle; in ethics, pleasure, desirability, utility, self-determination of the will, duty, conscience, happiness, are among common criteria, while in aesthetics there have been cited interest, satisfaction, enjoyment, utility, harmony. -- K.F.L.

cuckold ::: n. --> A man whose wife is unfaithful; the husband of an adulteress.
A West Indian plectognath fish (Ostracion triqueter).
The cowfish. ::: v. t. --> To make a cuckold of, as a husband, by seducing his


cucquean ::: n. --> A woman whose husband is unfaithful to her.

Datum: That which is given or presented. In logic: facts from which inferences may be drawn. In epistemology: an actual presented to the mind; the given of knowledge. In psychology: that which is given in sensation; the content of sensation. --J.K.F. Daud, Abraham Ibn: (of Toledo, 1110-1180) Jewish historian and philosopher with distinctly Aristotelian bent. His Emunah Ramah ( Al-Akida Al-Rafia), i.e., Exalted Faith, deals with the principles of both philosophy and religion and with ethics. He also enunciated six dogmas of Judaism to which every Jew must subscribe. -- M.W.

defy ::: v. t. --> To renounce or dissolve all bonds of affiance, faith, or obligation with; to reject, refuse, or renounce.
To provoke to combat or strife; to call out to combat; to challenge; to dare; to brave; to set at defiance; to treat with contempt; as, to defy an enemy; to defy the power of a magistrate; to defy the arguments of an opponent; to defy public opinion. ::: n.


denier ::: n. --> One who denies; as, a denier of a fact, or of the faith, or of Christ.
A small copper coin of insignificant value.


derelict ::: a. --> Given up or forsaken by the natural owner or guardian; left and abandoned; as, derelict lands.
Lost; adrift; hence, wanting; careless; neglectful; unfaithful. ::: n. --> A thing voluntary abandoned or willfully cast away by its


Dewey, John: (1859-) Leading American philosopher. The spirit of democracy and an abiding faith in the efficacy of human intelligence run through the many pages he has presented in the diverse fields of metaphysics, epistemology, logic, psychology, aesthetics, religion, ethics, politics and education, in all of which he has spoken with authority. Progressive education owes its impetus to his guidance and its tenets largely to his formulation. He is the chief exponent of that branch of pragmatism known as instrumentalism. Among his main works are Psychology, 1886; Outline of Ethics, 1891; Studies in Logical Theory, 1903; Ethics (Dewey and Tufts), 1908; How We Think, 1910; Influence of Darwin on German Philosophy, 1910; Democracy and Education, 1916; Essays in Experimental Logic, 1916; Reconstruction in Philosophy, 1920; Human Nature and Conduct, 1922; Experience and Nature, 1925; The Quest for Certainty, 1929; Art as Experience, 1933; Logic: The Theory of Inquiry, 1939.   Cf. J. Ratner, The Philosophy of John Dewey, 1940, M. H. Thomas, A Bibliography of John Dewey, 1882-1939, The Philosophy of John Dewey, ed. P. A. Schilpp (Evanston, 1940). Dharma: (Skr.) Right, virtue, duty, usage, law, social as well as cosmic. -- K.F.L.

Difficulties and perplexities can never be got rid of by the mind brooding over them and trying in that way to get out of them*; this habit of the mind only makes them recur without a solu- tion and keeps up by brooding the persistent tangfe. I( is from something above and outside the perplexities that the solution , must come. It is a subtle law of the action of consciousness that if you stress difficulties — you have to observe them, of course, but not stress them, they will quite sufficiently do that for themselves — the difficulties tend to slick or even increase ; on the contrary, if you put your whole stress on faith and aspira-

disespouse ::: v. t. --> To release from espousal or plighted faith.

dishonest ::: a. --> Dishonorable; shameful; indecent; unchaste; lewd.
Dishonored; disgraced; disfigured.
Wanting in honesty; void of integrity; faithless; disposed to cheat or defraud; not trustworthy; as, a dishonest man.
Characterized by fraud; indicating a want of probity; knavish; fraudulent; unjust. ::: v. t.


dishonesty ::: n. --> Dishonor; dishonorableness; shame.
Want of honesty, probity, or integrity in principle; want of fairness and straightforwardness; a disposition to defraud, deceive, or betray; faithlessness.
Violation of trust or of justice; fraud; any deviation from probity; a dishonest act.
Lewdness; unchastity.


disloyal ::: a. --> Not loyal; not true to a sovereign or lawful superior, or to the government under which one lives; false where allegiance is due; faithless; as, a subject disloyal to the king; a husband disloyal to his wife.

distrust ::: v. t. --> To feel absence of trust in; not to confide in or rely upon; to deem of questionable sufficiency or reality; to doubt; to be suspicious of; to mistrust. ::: n. --> Doubt of sufficiency, reality, or sincerity; want of confidence, faith, or reliance; as, distrust of one&

Divine exists and the Divine is the one thing to be followed after — nothing else in life is worth having in comparison with that. So long as a man has that faith, he is marked for the spiritual life.

doctrine ::: n. --> Teaching; instruction.
That which is taught; what is held, put forth as true, and supported by a teacher, a school, or a sect; a principle or position, or the body of principles, in any branch of knowledge; any tenet or dogma; a principle of faith; as, the doctrine of atoms; the doctrine of chances.


Does the intervention of the Grace come through a call?When one calls? I think so. Anyway, not exclusively and solely. But certainly, yes, if one has faith in the Grace and an aspiration and if one does what a little child would when it runs to its mother and says: "Mamma, give me this", if one calls with that simplicity, if one turns to the Grace and says "Give me this", I believe it listens. Unless one asks for something that is not good for one, then it does not listen. If one asks from it something that does harm or is not favourable, it does not listen.
   Ref: CWM Vol.05, Page: 366


Dogma: The Greek term signified a public ordinance of decree, also an opinion. A present meaning: an established, or generally admitted, philosophic opinion explicitly formulated, in a depreciative sense; one accepted on authority without the support of demonstration or experience. Kant calls a directly synthetical proposition grounded on concepts a dogma which he distinguishes from a mathema, which is a similar proposition effected by a construction of concepts. In the history of Christianity dogmas have come to mean definition of revealed truths proposed by the supreme authority of the Church as articles of faith which must be accepted by all its members. -- J.J.R.

Dogmatism: (Gr. dogma, opinion) A term used by many and various philosophers to characterize their opponents' view more or less derogatorily since the word cannot rid itself of certain linguistic and other associations. The Skeptics among Greek philosophers, doubting all, called dogmatism every assertion of a positive nature. More discriminately, dogmatism may be applied to presumptuous statements or such that lack a sufficiently rational ground, while in the popular mind the word still has the affiliation with the rigor of church dogma which, having a certain finality about it, appeals to faith rather than reason. Since Kant, dogmatism has a specific connotation in that it refers to metaphysical statements made without previous analysis of their justification on the basis of the nature and aptitudes of reason, exactly what Kant thought to remedy through his criticism. By this animadversion are scored especially all 17th and 18th century metaphysical systems as well as later ones which cling to a priori principles not rationally founded. Now also applied to principles of a generalized character maintained without regard to empirical conditions. -- K.F.L.

Do not be always thinking of your defects and nxong move- ments. Concentrate more upon what you are to be, on the ideal, mth (be faith that, since it is the goal before you it must and will come.

duplicity ::: n. --> Doubleness; a twofold state.
Doubleness of heart or speech; insincerity; a sustained form of deception which consists in entertaining or pretending to entertain one of feelings, and acting as if influenced by another; bad faith.
The use of two or more distinct allegations or answers, where one is sufficient.
In indictments, the union of two incompatible offenses.


emeritus ::: a. --> Honorably discharged from the performance of public duty on account of age, infirmity, or long and faithful services; -- said of an officer of a college or pastor of a church. ::: n. --> A veteran who has honorably completed his service.

entire ::: a. --> Complete in all parts; undivided; undiminished; whole; full and perfect; not deficient; as, the entire control of a business; entire confidence, ignorance.
Without mixture or alloy of anything; unqualified; morally whole; pure; faithful.
Consisting of a single piece, as a corolla.
Having an evenly continuous edge, as a leaf which has no kind of teeth.


exercise, left as an Used to complete a proof in technical books when one doesn't mind a {handwave}, or to avoid one entirely. The complete phrase is: "The proof [or "the rest"] is left as an exercise for the reader." This comment *has* occasionally been attached to unsolved research problems by authors possessed of either an evil sense of humour or a vast faith in the capabilities of their audiences. [{Jargon File}] (1995-02-20)

eyeservant ::: n. --> A servant who attends faithfully to his duty only when watched.

Fa chia: The Legalists School, the Philosophers of Law, also called hsing ming chia, who "had absolute faithfulness in reward and punishment as support for the system of correct conduct," and made no distinction between kindred and strangers and no discrimination between the honorable and the humble, but treated them as equals before the law. They emphasized the power natural to the position of a ruler (shih, especially Kuan Tzu, sixth century B.C. and Shen Tao, 350-275 B.C.?) statecraft (shu, especially Shen Pu-hai, 400-337 B.C.?), and law (fa, especially Shang Chun, 390-338 B.C.?), with Han Fei Tzu (280-233 B.C.) synthesizing all the three tendencies. -- W.T.C.

FAITH. ::: A dynamic entire belief and acceptance.

faith ::: a dynamic intuitive conviction in the inner being of the truth of supersensible things which cannot be proved by any physical evidence but which are a subject of experience; the soul's witness to something not yet manifested, achieved or realised, but which yet the Knower within us feels to be true or supremely worth following or achieving; the soul's belief in the Divine's existence, wisdom, power, love, and grace.

faith :::Faith is a necessary means for arriving at realisation, because we are ignorant and do not yet know that which we are seeking to realise; faith is indeed knowledge giving the ignorance an intimation of itself previous to its own manifestation, it is the gleam sent before by the yet unrisen Sun. When the Sun shall rise, there will be no longer any need of the gleam.” Letters on Yoga

faithed ::: a. --> Having faith or a faith; honest; sincere.

faithful ::: a. --> Full of faith, or having faith; disposed to believe, especially in the declarations and promises of God.
Firm in adherence to promises, oaths, contracts, treaties, or other engagements.
True and constant in affection or allegiance to a person to whom one is bound by a vow, be ties of love, gratitude, or honor, as to a husband, a prince, a friend; firm in the observance of duty; loyal; of true fidelity; as, a faithful husband or servant.


FAITHFULNESS. ::: To admit and to manifest no other move- ments but only the movements prompted and guided by the

faithful

faithless ::: a. --> Not believing; not giving credit.
Not believing on God or religion; specifically, not believing in the Christian religion.
Not observant of promises or covenants.
Not true to allegiance, duty, or vows; perfidious; trecherous; disloyal; not of true fidelity; inconstant, as a husband or a wife.
Serving to disappoint or deceive; delusive;


faithless

faith ::: n. --> Belief; the assent of the mind to the truth of what is declared by another, resting solely and implicitly on his authority and veracity; reliance on testimony.
The assent of the mind to the statement or proposition of another, on the ground of the manifest truth of what he utters; firm and earnest belief, on probable evidence of any kind, especially in regard to important moral truth.
The belief in the historic truthfulness of the Scripture


faith

falsehood ::: n. --> Want of truth or accuracy; an untrue assertion or representation; error; misrepresentation; falsity.
A deliberate intentional assertion of what is known to be untrue; a departure from moral integrity; a lie.
Treachery; deceit; perfidy; unfaithfulness.
A counterfeit; a false appearance; an imposture.


falseness ::: n. --> The state of being false; contrariety to the fact; inaccuracy; want of integrity or uprightness; double dealing; unfaithfulness; treachery; perfidy; as, the falseness of a report, a drawing, or a singer&

false ::: superl. --> Uttering falsehood; unveracious; given to deceit; dishnest; as, a false witness.
Not faithful or loyal, as to obligations, allegiance, vows, etc.; untrue; treacherous; perfidious; as, a false friend, lover, or subject; false to promises.
Not according with truth or reality; not true; fitted or likely to deceive or disappoint; as, a false statement.
Not genuine or real; assumed or designed to deceive;


falsify ::: a. --> To make false; to represent falsely.
To counterfeit; to forge; as, to falsify coin.
To prove to be false, or untrustworthy; to confute; to disprove; to nullify; to make to appear false.
To violate; to break by falsehood; as, to falsify one&


fastness ::: a. --> The state of being fast and firm; firmness; fixedness; security; faithfulness.
A fast place; a stronghold; a fortress or fort; a secure retreat; a castle; as, the enemy retired to their fastnesses in the mountains.
Conciseness of style.
The state of being fast or swift.


fay ::: n. --> A fairy; an elf.
Faith; as, by my fay. ::: v. t. --> To fit; to join; to unite closely, as two pieces of wood, so as to make the surface fit together.


feal ::: a. --> Faithful; loyal.

fealty ::: n. --> Fidelity to one&

fecks ::: n. --> A corruption of the word faith.

fey ::: a. --> Fated; doomed. ::: n. --> Faith. ::: v. t.

Fideism: A doctrine of Abbe Bautain which attempted to justify the teachings of Christianity by the theory that all knowledge rested upon premises accepted by faith. The premises of religion are to be found in the tradition of the Synagogue and Church. This tradition needs no rational criticism because it is self-critical. The doctrine was condemned in 1840 by Gregory XVI. -- G.B.

fidelity ::: n. --> Faithfulness; adherence to right; careful and exact observance of duty, or discharge of obligations.
Adherence to a person or party to which one is bound; loyalty.
Adherence to the marriage contract.
Adherence to truth; veracity; honesty.


Fides: Faith, according to St. Augustine, means, to believe that which one does not see: Fides ergo est, quod non vides credere. That is the reason why faith is praiseworthy. Haec est enim laus fidei, si quod creditur non videtur. -- J.J.R.

fides ::: n. --> Faith personified as a goddess; the goddess of faith.

fidiciary ::: a. --> Involving confidence or trust; confident; undoubting; faithful; firm; as, in a fiduciary capacity.
Holding, held, or founded, in trust.


fiducial ::: a. --> Having faith or trust; confident; undoubting; firm.
Having the nature of a trust; fiduciary; as, fiducial power.


fiduciary ::: n. --> One who holds a thing in trust for another; a trustee.
One who depends for salvation on faith, without works; an Antinomian.


". . . for doubt is the mind"s persistent assailant.” Letters on Yoga ::: "The enemy of faith is doubt, and yet doubt too is a utility and necessity, because man in his ignorance and in his progressive labour towards knowledge needs to be visited by doubt, otherwise he would remain obstinate in an ignorant belief and limited knowledge and unable to escape from his errors.” The Synthesis of Yoga*

::: **"For me faith is not intellectual belief but a function of the soul; . . . .” Letters on Yoga

“For me faith is not intellectual belief but a function of the soul; …” Letters on Yoga

formula ::: n. --> A prescribed or set form; an established rule; a fixed or conventional method in which anything is to be done, arranged, or said.
A written confession of faith; a formal statement of foctrines.
A rule or principle expressed in algebraic language; as, the binominal formula.
A prescription or recipe for the preparation of a medicinal compound.


  "For the main business of the heart, its true function is love. It is our destined instrument of complete union and oneness; for to see oneness in the world by the understanding is not enough unless we also feel it with the heart and in the psychic being, and this means a delight in the One and in all existences in the world in him, a love of God and all beings. The heart"s faith and will in good are founded on a perception of the one Divine immanent in all things and leading the world.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

“For the main business of the heart, its true function is love. It is our destined instrument of complete union and oneness; for to see oneness in the world by the understanding is not enough unless we also feel it with the heart and in the psychic being, and this means a delight in the One and in all existences in the world in him, a love of God and all beings. The heart’s faith and will in good are founded on a perception of the one Divine immanent in all things and leading the world.” The Synthesis of Yoga

foy ::: n. --> Faith; allegiance; fealty.
A feast given by one about to leave a place.


Fundainental faith ::: Faith inherent in the soul, that the

glassite ::: n. --> A member of a Scottish sect, founded in the 18th century by John Glass, a minister of the Established Church of Scotland, who taught that justifying faith is "no more than a simple assent to the divine testimone passively recived by the understanding." The English and American adherents of this faith are called Sandemanians, after Robert Sandeman, the son-in-law and disciple of Glass.

god ::: a being conceived as the perfect, omnipotent, omniscient originator and ruler of the universe, the principal object of faith and worship in monotheistic religions. gods, gods", God"s, Gods, God-bliss, God-born, god-chant, God-child, god-children, God-ecstasy, God-face, God-frame, God-Force, God-given, god-haunts, God-instinct"s, God-joy, God-Light, god-kind, God-knowledge, God-language, God-light, god-mind, god-phase, God-spark, god-speech, God-state, god-touch, God-vision"s, god-wings, child-god, dream-god"s, half-god, Sun-god"s.

goddess ::: “The faith in the divine Shakti must be always at the back of our strength and when she becomes manifest, it must be or grow implicit and complete. There is nothing that is impossible to her who is the conscious Power and universal Goddess all-creative from eternity and armed with the Spirit’s omnipotence.” The Life Divine

God: In metaphysical thinking a name for the highest, ultimate being, assumed by theology on the basis of authority, revelation, or the evidence of faith as absolutely necessary, but demonstrated as such by a number of philosophical systems, notably idealistic, monistic and dualistic ones. Proofs of the existence of God fall apart into those that are based on facts of experience (desire or need for perfection, dependence, love, salvation, etc.), facts of religious history (consensus gentium, etc.)), postulates of morality (belief in ultimate justice, instinct for an absolute good, conscience, the categorical imperative, sense of duty, need of an objective foundation of morality, etc.)), postulates of reason (cosmological, physico-theological, teleological, and ontological arguments), and the inconceivableness of the opposite. As to the nature of God, the great variety of opinions are best characterized by their several conceptions of the attributes of God which are either of a non-personal (pantheistic, etc.) or personal (theistic, etc.) kind, representing concepts known from experience raised to a superlative degree ("omniscient", "eternal", etc.). The reality, God, may be conceived as absolute or as relative to human values, as being an all-inclusive one, a duality, or a plurality. Concepts of God calling for unquestioning faith, belief in miracles, and worship or representing biographical and descriptive sketches of God and his creation, are rather theological than metaphysical, philosophers, on the whole, utilizing the idea of God or its linguistic equivalents in other languages, despite popular and church implications, in order not to lose the feeling-contact with the rather abstract world-ground. See Religion, Philosophy of. -- K.F.L.

GONO faith 118

Grace (.Divine Grace) ::: Have faith and unshaken confidence. The Divine Grace will do the rest.

HELPFUL FORCES. ::: If there are always forces around which are concerned to depress and discourage, there are always forces above and around us which we can draw upon, — draw into our- selves to restore, to fill up again with strength and faith and joy

Hence in its widest sense Scholasticism embraces all the intellectual activities, artistic, philosophical and theological, carried on in the medieval schools. Any attempt to define its narrower meaning in the field of philosophy raises serious difficulties, for in this case, though the term's comprehension is lessened, it still has to cover many centuries of many-faced thought. However, it is still possible to list several characteristics sufficient to differentiate Scholastic from non-Scholastic philosophy. While ancient philosophy was the philosophy of a people and modern thought that of individuals, Scholasticism was the philosophy of a Christian society which transcended the characteristics of individuals, nations and peoples. It was the corporate product of social thought, and as such its reasoning respected authority in the forms of tradition and revealed religion. Tradition consisted primarily in the systems of Plato and Aristotle as sifted, adapted and absorbed through many centuries. It was natural that religion, which played a paramount role in the culture of the middle ages, should bring influence to bear on the medieval, rational view of life. Revelation was held to be at once a norm and an aid to reason. Since the philosophers of the period were primarily scientific theologians, their rational interests were dominated by religious preoccupations. Hence, while in general they preserved the formal distinctions between reason and faith, and maintained the relatively autonomous character of philosophy, the choice of problems and the resources of science were controlled by theology. The most constant characteristic of Scholasticism was its method. This was formed naturally by a series of historical circumstances,   The need of a medium of communication, of a consistent body of technical language tooled to convey the recently revealed meanings of religion, God, man and the material universe led the early Christian thinkers to adopt the means most viable, most widely extant, and nearest at hand, viz. Greek scientific terminology. This, at first purely utilitarian, employment of Greek thought soon developed under Justin, Clement of Alexandria, Origin, and St. Augustine into the "Egyptian-spoils" theory; Greek thought and secular learning were held to be propaedeutic to Christianity on the principle: "Whatever things were rightly said among all men are the property of us Christians." (Justin, Second Apology, ch. XIII). Thus was established the first characteristic of the Scholastic method: philosophy is directly and immediately subordinate to theology.   Because of this subordinate position of philosophy and because of the sacred, exclusive and total nature of revealed wisdom, the interest of early Christian thinkers was focused much more on the form of Greek thought than on its content and, it might be added, much less of this content was absorbed by early Christian thought than is generally supposed. As practical consequences of this specialized interest there followed two important factors in the formation of Scholastic philosophy:     Greek logic en bloc was taken over by Christians;     from the beginning of the Christian era to the end of the XII century, no provision was made in Catholic centers of learning for the formal teaching of philosophy. There was a faculty to teach logic as part of the trivium and a faculty of theology.   For these two reasons, what philosophy there was during this long period of twelve centuries, was dominated first, as has been seen, by theology and, second, by logic. In this latter point is found rooted the second characteristic of the Scholastic method: its preoccupation with logic, deduction, system, and its literary form of syllogistic argumentation.   The third characteristic of the Scholastic method follows directly from the previous elements already indicated. It adds, however, a property of its own gained from the fact that philosophy during the medieval period became an important instrument of pedogogy. It existed in and for the schools. This new element coupled with the domination of logic, the tradition-mindedness and social-consciousness of the medieval Christians, produced opposition of authorities for or against a given problem and, finally, disputation, where a given doctrine is syllogistically defended against the adversaries' objections. This third element of the Scholastic method is its most original characteristic and accounts more than any other single factor for the forms of the works left us from this period. These are to be found as commentaries on single or collected texts; summae, where the method is dialectical or disputational in character.   The main sources of Greek thought are relatively few in number: all that was known of Plato was the Timaeus in the translation and commentary of Chalcidius. Augustine, the pseudo-Areopagite, and the Liber de Causis were the principal fonts of Neoplatonic literature. Parts of Aristotle's logical works (Categoriae and de Interpre.) and the Isagoge of Porphyry were known through the translations of Boethius. Not until 1128 did the Scholastics come to know the rest of Aristotle's logical works. The golden age of Scholasticism was heralded in the late XIIth century by the translations of the rest of his works (Physics, Ethics, Metaphysics, De Anima, etc.) from the Arabic by Gerard of Cremona, John of Spain, Gundisalvi, Michael Scot, and Hermann the German, from the Greek by Robert Grosseteste, William of Moerbeke, and Henry of Brabant. At the same time the Judae-Arabian speculation of Alkindi, Alfarabi, Avencebrol, Avicenna, Averroes, and Maimonides together with the Neoplatonic works of Proclus were made available in translation. At this same period the Scholastic attention to logic was turned to metaphysics, even psychological and ethical problems and the long-discussed question of the universals were approached from this new angle. Philosophy at last achieved a certain degree of autonomy and slowly forced the recently founded universities to accord it a separate faculty.

Herder, Johann Gottfried: (1744-1803) A founder of modern religious humanism, he explained human history as a consequence of the nature of man and of man's physical environment. Held implicitly to the view that society is basically an organic whole. Accounted for the differences in culture and institutions of different peoples as being due to geographical conditions. Although history is a process of the education of the human species, it has no definite goal of perfection and development. The vehicle of living culture is a distinct Volk or Nation with its distinct language and traditions. As a child of the Enlightenment, Herder had a blind faith in nature, in man and in the ultimate development of reason and justice.

heretic ::: n. --> One who holds to a heresy; one who believes some doctrine contrary to the established faith or prevailing religion.
One who having made a profession of Christian belief, deliberately and pertinaciously refuses to believe one or more of the articles of faith "determined by the authority of the universal church."


heterodoxy ::: n. --> An opinion or doctrine, or a system of doctrines, contrary to some established standard of faith, as the Scriptures, the creed or standards of a church, etc.; heresy.

Hocking, William Ernest: (1873) Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Harvard. Has endeavored to blend idealism vvith pragmatism while making some concessions to realism, even is in current theory he strives for a reconciliation between laissez faire liberalism and collectivism through a midground found in the worth of the individual in a "commotive union in the coagent state," a notion comparable to the "conjunct self" of George Herbert Palmer only with a more individualistic emphasis and a current flavor. Among his works are: The Meaning of God in Human Experience, Man and the State, Types of Philosophy, Lasting Elements of Individualism and Living Religions and a World Faith. -- L.E.D.

hollow ::: a. --> Having an empty space or cavity, natural or artificial, within a solid substance; not solid; excavated in the interior; as, a hollow tree; a hollow sphere.
Depressed; concave; gaunt; sunken.
Reverberated from a cavity, or resembling such a sound; deep; muffled; as, a hollow roar.
Not sincere or faithful; false; deceitful; not sound; as, a hollow heart; a hollow friend.


Hsiao: Filial piety; love of parents; serving and supporting one's parents in the best way. It is "the standard of Heaven, the principle of Earth, and the basis for the conduct of Man," "the basis of morality and the root of culture." "It begins with serving one's parents, extends to the duties towards one's sovereign, and ends in the establishment of one's personal character." "It is the beginning of morality, as respect for elders (ti) is the order of morality;" it is "the actuality of benevolence (jen)" as respect for elders is "the actuality of righteousness (i)." As such "it involves loving kindness to relatives, respect to associates, benevolence to friends, and good faith to acquaintances." "True manhood, (jen) means to make filial piety the basis of manhood; righteousness (i) means to give it proper application; being true to the nature of the self (chung) means to make it the central moral ideal; moral order (li) is to put it to actual practice, and truthfulness (hsin) means to make it strong." -- W.T.C.

Hsin: Good faith, one of the Five Cardinal Confucian Virtues (wu ch'ang); honesty; sincerity; truthfulness; truth. (Confucianism.) "Actualization of honesty (chung)." (Ch'eng Ming-tao, 1032-1086.) See Chung. Belief; trust. Power, or the efficacy of the essence of Tao. (Lao Tzu.)

:::   "Humility before the Divine is also a sine qua non of the spiritual life, and spiritual pride, arrogance, or vanity and self-assurance press always downward. But confidence in the Divine and a faith in one"s spiritual destiny (i.e. since my heart and soul seek for the Divine, I cannot fail one day to reach Him) are much needed in view of the difficulties of the Path.” Letters on Yoga

“Humility before the Divine is also a sine qua non of the spiritual life, and spiritual pride, arrogance, or vanity and self-assurance press always downward. But confidence in the Divine and a faith in one’s spiritual destiny (i.e. since my heart and soul seek for the Divine, I cannot fail one day to reach Him) are much needed in view of the difficulties of the Path.” Letters on Yoga

“If we need any personal and inner witness to this indivisible All-Consciousness behind the ignorance,—all Nature is its external proof,—we can get it with any completeness only in our deeper inner being or larger and higher spiritual state when we draw back behind the veil of our own surface ignorance and come into contact with the divine Idea and Will behind it. Then we see clearly enough that what we have done by ourselves in our ignorance was yet overseen and guided in its result by the invisible Omniscience; we discover a greater working behind our ignorant working and begin to glimpse its purpose in us: then only can we see and know what now we worship in faith, recognise wholly the pure and universal Presence, meet the Lord of all being and all Nature.” The Life Divine

II. Early Scholastics (12 cent.) St. Anselm of Canterbury (+1109) did more than anyone else in this early period to codify the spirit of Scholasticism. His motto: credo, ut tntelligam taken from St. Augustine, expressed the organic relation that existed between the supernatural and the natural during the Middle Ages and the interpretative and the directive force which faith had upon reason. In this period a new interest was taken in the problem of the universals. For the first time a clear demarcation was noted between the realistic and the nominalistic solutions to this problem. William of Champeaux (+1121) proposed the former and Roscelin (+c. 1124) the latter. A third solution, concepiualistic in character, was proposed by Abelard (+1142) who finally crystalized the Scholastic method. He was the most subtle dialectician of his age. Two schools of great importance of this period were operating at Chartres and the Parisian Abbey of St. Victor. The first, founded by Fulbert of Chartres in the late tenth century, was characterized by its leanings toward Platonism and distinguished by its humanistic tendencies coupled with a love of the natural sciences. Many of its Greek, Arabian and Jewish sources for studies in natural sciences came from the translations of Constantine the African (+c. 1087) and Adelard of Bath. Worthy to be noted as members of or sympathizers with this school are Bernard and Thierry of Chartres (+c. 1127; c. 1150); William of Conches (+1145) and Bernard Silvestris (+1167). The two most important members of the School were Gilbert de la Poiree (+1154) and John of Salisbury (+1180). The latter was a humanistic scholar of great stylistic skill and calm, balanced judgment. It is from his works, particularly the Metalogicus, that most of our knowledge of this period still derives. Juxtaposed to the dialectic, syllogistic and rationalistic tendencies of this age was a mystical movement, headed by St. Bernard of Clairvaux (+1153). This movement did not oppose itself to dialectics in the uncompromising manner of Peter Damiani, but sought rather to experience and interiorize truth through contemplation and practice. Bernard found a close follower and friend in William of St. Thierry (+1148 or 1153). An attempt to synthesize the mystic and dialectical movements is found in two outstanding members of the Victorine School: Hugh of St. Victor (+1141) who founded its spirit in his omnia disce, videbis postea nihil esse supervuum and Richard of St. Victor (+1173), his disciple, who introduced the a posteriori proof for God's existence into the Scholastic current of thought. Finally, this century gave Scholasticism its principal form of literature which was to remain dominant for some four centuries. While the method came from Abelard and the formulas and content, in great part, from the Didascalion of Hugh of St. Victor, it was Robert of Melun (+1167) and especially Peter the Lombard (+1164) who fashioned the great Summae sententiarum.

I know by wWch the taking up of sadbaoa by the Dmne becomes a sensible fact before the preparation of the nature is done. In other methods the Divine action may be felt from time to time, but it remains mostly behind the veil till all is ready. In some the ditioe action Is not recognised ; all must be done by (apioya. In most there is a mixing of the two ::: the iapas>3 finally calling the direct help and intervention. The idea and experience of the Divine doing all belong to the Yoga based on surrender. But whatever way is followed, the one thing to be done is to be faithful and go on to the end.

iman :::   faith; belief; that which you accept to be the truth

infallible ::: a. --> Not fallible; not capable of erring; entirely exempt from liability to mistake; unerring; inerrable.
Not liable to fail, deceive, or disappoint; indubitable; sure; certain; as, infallible evidence; infallible success; an infallible remedy.
Incapable of error in defining doctrines touching faith or morals. See Papal infallibility, under Infallibility.


infidel ::: a. --> Not holding the faith; -- applied esp. to one who does not believe in the inspiration of the Scriptures, and the supernatural origin of Christianity. ::: n. --> One who does not believe in the prevailing religious faith; especially, one who does not believe in the divine origin and

infidelity ::: n. --> Want of faith or belief in some religious system; especially, a want of faith in, or disbelief of, the inspiration of the Scriptures, of the divine origin of Christianity.
Unfaithfulness to the marriage vow or contract; violation of the marriage covenant by adultery.
Breach of trust; unfaithfulness to a charge, or to moral obligation; treachery; deceit; as, the infidelity of a servant.


In scholasticism: means either faith or opinion. Opinion is a statement lacking evidence. Faith is a supernatural act, due to God's grace, referring to things reason finds beyond its capacity of proof, though not contradicting its principles. Statements capable of experimental proof are not objects of faith. -- R.A.

INSTRUMENT. ::: To be able to receive the Divine Power and let it act through you in the things of the outward life, there are three necessary conditions ::: (I) Quietude, equality — not to be disturbed by anything that happens, to keep the mind still and firm, seeing the play of forces, but itself tranquil. (2) Absolute faith — faith that what is for the best will happen, but also that if one can make oneself a true instrument, the fruit will be that which one's will guided by the Divine Light sees as the thing to be done. (3) Receptivity — the power to receive the Divine Force and to feel its presence and the presence of the Mother in it and allow it to work, guiding one’s sight and will and action.

If this power and presence can be felt and this plasticity made the habit of the consciousness in action, — but plasticity to the Divine Force alone without bringing in any foreign clement, — the eventual result is sure.

Conditions to become an instrument of the Divine ::: A receptive silence of the mind, an effacemenl of the mental ego and the reduction of the mental being to the position of a witness, a close find themselves in the Divine. It cannot be done in a spirit of levity or laxity ; the work is too high and difficult, the adverse powers in the lower Nature too ready to take advantage of the least sanction or the smallest opening, the aspiration and tapasya needed too constant and intense.


INTEGRAL YOGA ::: This yoga accepts the value of cosmic existence and holds it to be a reality; its object is to enter into a higher Truth-Consciousness or Divine Supramental Consciousness in which action and creation are the expression not of ignorance and imperfection, but of the Truth, the Light, the Divine Ānanda. But for that, the surrender of the mortal mind, life and body to the Higher Consciousnessis indispensable, since it is too difficult for the mortal human being to pass by its own effort beyond mind to a Supramental Consciousness in which the dynamism is no longer mental but of quite another power. Only those who can accept the call to such a change should enter into this yoga.

Aim of the Integral Yoga ::: It is not merely to rise out of the ordinary ignorant world-consciousness into the divine consciousness, but to bring the supramental power of that divine consciousness down into the ignorance of mind, life and body, to transform them, to manifest the Divine here and create a divine life in Matter.

Conditions of the Integral Yoga ::: This yoga can only be done to the end by those who are in total earnest about it and ready to abolish their little human ego and its demands in order to find themselves in the Divine. It cannot be done in a spirit of levity or laxity; the work is too high and difficult, the adverse powers in the lower Nature too ready to take advantage of the least sanction or the smallest opening, the aspiration and tapasyā needed too constant and intense.

Method in the Integral Yoga ::: To concentrate, preferably in the heart and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force transform the consciousness. One can concentrate also in the head or between the eye-brows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is the beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be. For the rest one must not depend on one’s own efforts only, but succeed in establishing a contact with the Divine and a receptivity to the Mother’s Power and Presence.

Integral method ::: The method we have to pursue is to put our whole conscious being into relation and contact with the Divine and to call Him in to transform Our entire being into His, so that in a sense God Himself, the real Person in us, becomes the sādhaka of the sādhana* as well as the Master of the Yoga by whom the lower personality is used as the centre of a divine transfiguration and the instrument of its own perfection. In effect, the pressure of the Tapas, the force of consciousness in us dwelling in the Idea of the divine Nature upon that which we are in our entirety, produces its own realisation. The divine and all-knowing and all-effecting descends upon the limited and obscure, progressively illumines and energises the whole lower nature and substitutes its own action for all the terms of the inferior human light and mortal activity.

In psychological fact this method translates itself into the progressive surrender of the ego with its whole field and all its apparatus to the Beyond-ego with its vast and incalculable but always inevitable workings. Certainly, this is no short cut or easy sādhana. It requires a colossal faith, an absolute courage and above all an unflinching patience. For it implies three stages of which only the last can be wholly blissful or rapid, - the attempt of the ego to enter into contact with the Divine, the wide, full and therefore laborious preparation of the whole lower Nature by the divine working to receive and become the higher Nature, and the eventual transformation. In fact, however, the divine strength, often unobserved and behind the veil, substitutes itself for the weakness and supports us through all our failings of faith, courage and patience. It” makes the blind to see and the lame to stride over the hills.” The intellect becomes aware of a Law that beneficently insists and a Succour that upholds; the heart speaks of a Master of all things and Friend of man or a universal Mother who upholds through all stumblings. Therefore this path is at once the most difficult imaginable and yet in comparison with the magnitude of its effort and object, the most easy and sure of all.

There are three outstanding features of this action of the higher when it works integrally on the lower nature. In the first place, it does not act according to a fixed system and succession as in the specialised methods of Yoga, but with a sort of free, scattered and yet gradually intensive and purposeful working determined by the temperament of the individual in whom it operates, the helpful materials which his nature offers and the obstacles which it presents to purification and perfection. In a sense, therefore, each man in this path has his own method of Yoga. Yet are there certain broad lines of working common to all which enable us to construct not indeed a routine system, but yet some kind of Shastra or scientific method of the synthetic Yoga.

Secondly, the process, being integral, accepts our nature such as it stands organised by our past evolution and without rejecting anything essential compels all to undergo a divine change. Everything in us is seized by the hands of a mighty Artificer and transformed into a clear image of that which it now seeks confusedly to present. In that ever-progressive experience we begin to perceive how this lower manifestation is constituted and that everything in it, however seemingly deformed or petty or vile, is the more or less distorted or imperfect figure of some elements or action in the harmony of the divine Nature. We begin to understand what the Vedic Rishis meant when they spoke of the human forefathers fashioning the gods as a smith forges the crude material in his smithy.

Thirdly, the divine Power in us uses all life as the means of this integral Yoga. Every experience and outer contact with our world-environment, however trifling or however disastrous, is used for the work, and every inner experience, even to the most repellent suffering or the most humiliating fall, becomes a step on the path to perfection. And we recognise in ourselves with opened eyes the method of God in the world, His purpose of light in the obscure, of might in the weak and fallen, of delight in what is grievous and miserable. We see the divine method to be the same in the lower and in the higher working; only in the one it is pursued tardily and obscurely through the subconscious in Nature, in the other it becomes swift and selfconscious and the instrument confesses the hand of the Master. All life is a Yoga of Nature seeking to manifest God within itself. Yoga marks the stage at which this effort becomes capable of self-awareness and therefore of right completion in the individual. It is a gathering up and concentration of the movements dispersed and loosely combined in the lower evolution.

Key-methods ::: The way to devotion and surrender. It is the psychic movement that brings the constant and pure devotion and the removal of the ego that makes it possible to surrender.

The way to knowledge. Meditation in the head by which there comes the opening above, the quietude or silence of the mind and the descent of peace etc. of the higher consciousness generally till it envelops the being and fills the body and begins to take up all the movements.
Yoga by works ::: Separation of the Purusha from the Prakriti, the inner silent being from the outer active one, so that one has two consciousnesses or a double consciousness, one behind watching and observing and finally controlling and changing the other which is active in front. The other way of beginning the yoga of works is by doing them for the Divine, for the Mother, and not for oneself, consecrating and dedicating them till one concretely feels the Divine Force taking up the activities and doing them for one.

Object of the Integral Yoga is to enter into and be possessed by the Divine Presence and Consciousness, to love the Divine for the Divine’s sake alone, to be tuned in our nature into the nature of the Divine, and in our will and works and life to be the instrument of the Divine.

Principle of the Integral Yoga ::: The whole principle of Integral Yoga is to give oneself entirely to the Divine alone and to nobody else, and to bring down into ourselves by union with the Divine Mother all the transcendent light, power, wideness, peace, purity, truth-consciousness and Ānanda of the Supramental Divine.

Central purpose of the Integral Yoga ::: Transformation of our superficial, narrow and fragmentary human way of thinking, seeing, feeling and being into a deep and wide spiritual consciousness and an integrated inner and outer existence and of our ordinary human living into the divine way of life.

Fundamental realisations of the Integral Yoga ::: The psychic change so that a complete devotion can be the main motive of the heart and the ruler of thought, life and action in constant union with the Mother and in her Presence. The descent of the Peace, Power, Light etc. of the Higher Consciousness through the head and heart into the whole being, occupying the very cells of the body. The perception of the One and Divine infinitely everywhere, the Mother everywhere and living in that infinite consciousness.

Results ::: First, an integral realisation of Divine Being; not only a realisation of the One in its indistinguishable unity, but also in its multitude of aspects which are also necessary to the complete knowledge of it by the relative consciousness; not only realisation of unity in the Self, but of unity in the infinite diversity of activities, worlds and creatures.

Therefore, also, an integral liberation. Not only the freedom born of unbroken contact of the individual being in all its parts with the Divine, sāyujya mukti, by which it becomes free even in its separation, even in the duality; not only the sālokya mukti by which the whole conscious existence dwells in the same status of being as the Divine, in the state of Sachchidananda ; but also the acquisition of the divine nature by the transformation of this lower being into the human image of the divine, sādharmya mukti, and the complete and final release of all, the liberation of the consciousness from the transitory mould of the ego and its unification with the One Being, universal both in the world and the individual and transcendentally one both in the world and beyond all universe.

By this integral realisation and liberation, the perfect harmony of the results of Knowledge, Love and Works. For there is attained the complete release from ego and identification in being with the One in all and beyond all. But since the attaining consciousness is not limited by its attainment, we win also the unity in Beatitude and the harmonised diversity in Love, so that all relations of the play remain possible to us even while we retain on the heights of our being the eternal oneness with the Beloved. And by a similar wideness, being capable of a freedom in spirit that embraces life and does not depend upon withdrawal from life, we are able to become without egoism, bondage or reaction the channel in our mind and body for a divine action poured out freely upon the world.

The divine existence is of the nature not only of freedom, but of purity, beatitude and perfection. In integral purity which shall enable on the one hand the perfect reflection of the divine Being in ourselves and on the other the perfect outpouring of its Truth and Law in us in the terms of life and through the right functioning of the complex instrument we are in our outer parts, is the condition of an integral liberty. Its result is an integral beatitude, in which there becomes possible at once the Ānanda of all that is in the world seen as symbols of the Divine and the Ānanda of that which is not-world. And it prepares the integral perfection of our humanity as a type of the Divine in the conditions of the human manifestation, a perfection founded on a certain free universality of being, of love and joy, of play of knowledge and of play of will in power and will in unegoistic action. This integrality also can be attained by the integral Yoga.

Sādhanā of the Integral Yoga does not proceed through any set mental teaching or prescribed forms of meditation, mantras or others, but by aspiration, by a self-concentration inwards or upwards, by a self-opening to an Influence, to the Divine Power above us and its workings, to the Divine Presence in the heart and by the rejection of all that is foreign to these things. It is only by faith, aspiration and surrender that this self-opening can come.

The yoga does not proceed by upadeśa but by inner influence.

Integral Yoga and Gita ::: The Gita’s Yoga consists in the offering of one’s work as a sacrifice to the Divine, the conquest of desire, egoless and desireless action, bhakti for the Divine, an entering into the cosmic consciousness, the sense of unity with all creatures, oneness with the Divine. This yoga adds the bringing down of the supramental Light and Force (its ultimate aim) and the transformation of the nature.

Our yoga is not identical with the yoga of the Gita although it contains all that is essential in the Gita’s yoga. In our yoga we begin with the idea, the will, the aspiration of the complete surrender; but at the same time we have to reject the lower nature, deliver our consciousness from it, deliver the self involved in the lower nature by the self rising to freedom in the higher nature. If we do not do this double movement, we are in danger of making a tamasic and therefore unreal surrender, making no effort, no tapas and therefore no progress ; or else we make a rajasic surrender not to the Divine but to some self-made false idea or image of the Divine which masks our rajasic ego or something still worse.

Integral Yoga, Gita and Tantra ::: The Gita follows the Vedantic tradition which leans entirely on the Ishvara aspect of the Divine and speaks little of the Divine Mother because its object is to draw back from world-nature and arrive at the supreme realisation beyond it.

The Tantric tradition leans on the Shakti or Ishvari aspect and makes all depend on the Divine Mother because its object is to possess and dominate the world-nature and arrive at the supreme realisation through it.

This yoga insists on both the aspects; the surrender to the Divine Mother is essential, for without it there is no fulfilment of the object of the yoga.

Integral Yoga and Hatha-Raja Yogas ::: For an integral yoga the special methods of Rajayoga and Hathayoga may be useful at times in certain stages of the progress, but are not indispensable. Their principal aims must be included in the integrality of the yoga; but they can be brought about by other means. For the methods of the integral yoga must be mainly spiritual, and dependence on physical methods or fixed psychic or psychophysical processes on a large scale would be the substitution of a lower for a higher action. Integral Yoga and Kundalini Yoga: There is a feeling of waves surging up, mounting to the head, which brings an outer unconsciousness and an inner waking. It is the ascending of the lower consciousness in the ādhāra to meet the greater consciousness above. It is a movement analogous to that on which so much stress is laid in the Tantric process, the awakening of the Kundalini, the Energy coiled up and latent in the body and its mounting through the spinal cord and the centres (cakras) and the Brahmarandhra to meet the Divine above. In our yoga it is not a specialised process, but a spontaneous upnish of the whole lower consciousness sometimes in currents or waves, sometimes in a less concrete motion, and on the other side a descent of the Divine Consciousness and its Force into the body.

Integral Yoga and other Yogas ::: The old yogas reach Sachchidananda through the spiritualised mind and depart into the eternally static oneness of Sachchidananda or rather pure Sat (Existence), absolute and eternal or else a pure Non-exist- ence, absolute and eternal. Ours having realised Sachchidananda in the spiritualised mind plane proceeds to realise it in the Supramcntal plane.

The suprcfhe supra-cosmic Sachchidananda is above all. Supermind may be described as its power of self-awareness and W’orld- awareness, the world being known as within itself and not out- side. So to live consciously in the supreme Sachchidananda one must pass through the Supermind.

Distinction ::: The realisation of Self and of the Cosmic being (without which the realisation of the Self is incomplete) are essential steps in our yoga ; it is the end of other yogas, but it is, as it were, the beginning of outs, that is to say, the point where its own characteristic realisation can commence.

It is new as compared with the old yogas (1) Because it aims not at a departure out of world and life into Heaven and Nir- vana, but at a change of life and existence, not as something subordinate or incidental, but as a distinct and central object.

If there is a descent in other yogas, yet it is only an incident on the way or resulting from the ascent — the ascent is the real thing. Here the ascent is the first step, but it is a means for the descent. It is the descent of the new coosdousness attain- ed by the ascent that is the stamp and seal of the sadhana. Even the Tantra and Vaishnavism end in the release from life ; here the object is the divine fulfilment of life.

(2) Because the object sought after is not an individual achievement of divine realisation for the sake of the individual, but something to be gained for the earth-consciousness here, a cosmic, not solely a supra-cosmic acbievement. The thing to be gained also is the bringing of a Power of consciousness (the Supramental) not yet organised or active directly in earth-nature, even in the spiritual life, but yet to be organised and made directly active.

(3) Because a method has been preconized for achieving this purpose which is as total and integral as the aim set before it, viz., the total and integral change of the consciousness and nature, taking up old methods, but only as a part action and present aid to others that are distinctive.

Integral Yoga and Patanjali Yoga ::: Cilia is the stuff of mixed mental-vital-physical consciousness out of which arise the movements of thought, emotion, sensation, impulse etc.

It is these that in the Patanjali system have to be stilled altogether so that the consciousness may be immobile and go into Samadhi.

Our yoga has a different function. The movements of the ordinary consciousness have to be quieted and into the quietude there has to be brought down a higher consciousness and its powers which will transform the nature.


I. Period of Preparation (9-12 cent.). Though he does not belong in time to this period, the most dominant figure in Christian thought was St. Augustine (+430), who constructed the general framework within which all subsequent Scholastic speculation operated. Another influential figure was Boethius (+525) whose opuscula sacra established the Scholastic method and who furnished many of the classical definitions and axioms. The first great figure of this period was John Scottus Erigena (+c. 877) who introduced to Latin thought the works of Denis the Pseudo-Areopagite, broadened the Scholastic method by his glossary on Boethius' opuscule sacra and made an unfruitful attempt to interest his contemporaries in natural philosophy by his semi-pantheistic De Divisione Naturae. Other figures of note: Gerbert (+1003) important in the realm of mathematics and natural philosophy; Fulbert of Chartres (+1028) influential in the movement to apply dialectics to theology; Berengar of Tours (+1088) Fulbert's disciple, who, together with Anselm the Peripatetic, was a leader in the movement to rationalize theology. Peter Damiani (+1072), preached strongly against this rationalistic spirit. More moderate and more efficacious in his reaction to the dialectical spirit of his age was Lawfranc (+1089), who strove to define the true boundaries of faith and reason.

islamism ::: n. --> The faith, doctrines, or religious system of the Mohammedans; Mohammedanism; Islam.

islam ::: n. --> The religion of the Mohammedans; Mohammedanism; Islamism. Their formula of faith is: There is no God but Allah, and Mohammed is his prophet.
The whole body of Mohammedans, or the countries which they occupy.


It is not the medicine that cures so much ns the patient’s faith in the doctor and the medicine. Both arc a clumsy substitute for the natural faith in one’s own self-power which they have them- selves destroyed.

::: **"It is therefore necessary from the beginning to understand and accept the arduous difficulty of the path and to feel the need of a faith which to the intellect may seem blind, but yet is wiser than our reasoning intelligence. For this faith is a support from above; it is the brilliant shadow thrown by a secret light that exceeds the intellect and its data; it is the heart of a hidden knowledge that is not at the mercy of immediate appearances.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“It is therefore necessary from the beginning to understand and accept the arduous difficulty of the path and to feel the need of a faith which to the intellect may seem blind, but yet is wiser than our reasoning intelligence. For this faith is a support from above; it is the brilliant shadow thrown by a secret light that exceeds the intellect and its data; it is the heart of a hidden knowledge that is not at the mercy of immediate appearances.” The Synthesis of Yoga

Jacobi, Friedrich Heinrich: (1743-1819) German philosopher of "feeling" who opposed the Kantian tradition. He held that the system of absolute subjective idealism, to which he reduced Kant, could not grasp ultimate reality. He was equally opposed to a dogmatic rationalism such as the Spinozistic. He based his view upon feeling, belief or faith by which he purported to find truth as immediately revealed in consciousness. Main works: Ueber die Lehre des Spinoza in Briefen an Moses Mendelsohn, 1785; David Hume über den Glauben, 1787; Sendschreiben an Fichte, 1799. -- L.E.D.

Jainism: An Indian religion claiming great antiquity, the last of the great teachers (tirthankara) being Mahavira (6th cent. B.C.), embracing many philosophical elements of a pluralistic type of realism. It rejects Vedic (q.v.) authority and an absolute being, gods as well as men partaking of mortality, and holds the mythologically conceived world to be eternal and subject only to the fixed sequence of six ages, good and bad, but not periodic creation and destruction. There is an infinitude of indestructible individual souls or spiritual entities, each possessing by nature many properties inclusive of omniscience, unlimited energy and bliss which come to the fore upon attaining full independence. The non-spiritual substances are space and time, rest and motion, and matter composed of atoms and capable of being apprehended by the senses and combining to form the world of infinite variety. Matter also penetrates spiritual substance like a physician's pill, changing to karma and producing physical attachments. The good life consists in the acquisition of the three gems (triratna) of right faith (samyag-darsana), right knowledge (samyag-jnana), right conduct (samyag-caritra). Salvation, i.e., becoming a kevalin (cf. kevala), is an arduous task achieved in 14 stages of perfection, the last being bodiless existence in bliss and complete oblivion to the world and its ways. -- K.F.L.

jealous ::: a. --> Zealous; solicitous; vigilant; anxiously watchful.
Apprehensive; anxious; suspiciously watchful.
Exacting exclusive devotion; intolerant of rivalry.
Disposed to suspect rivalry in matters of interest and affection; apprehensive regarding the motives of possible rivals, or the fidelity of friends; distrustful; having morbid fear of rivalry in love or preference given to another; painfully suspicious of the faithfulness of husband, wife, or lover.


jealousy ::: mental uneasiness from suspicion or fear of rivalry, unfaithfulness, etc., as in love or aims.

jealousy ::: n. --> The quality of being jealous; earnest concern or solicitude; painful apprehension of rivalship in cases nearly affecting one&

Jefferson, Thomas: (1743-1826) Third president of the United States. He was the author of the Declaration of Independence, which remains as one of the monuments to his firm faith in democratic principles. His opposition to Hamiltonian centralization of power placed him at one extreme of the arc described by the pendulum of political theory that has swayed through the history of this country. He had firm faith in free speech and education and his life long efforts stand uppermost among those who struggled for tolerance and religious freedom. In addition to politics, he was keenly interested in the science and mathematics of his day. Cf. Writings of T. J., 10 vols. (N. Y. 1892-9), ed. P. L. Ford. -- L.E.D.

Korn's philosophy represents an attack against naive and dogmatic positivism, but admits and even assimilates an element of Positivism which Korn calls Native Argentinian Positivism. Alejandro Korn may be called The Philosopher of Freedom. In fact, freedom is the keynote of his thought. He speaks of Human liberty as the indissoluble union of economic and ethical liberties. The free soul's knowledge of the world of science operates mainly on the basis of intuition. In fact, intuition is the basis of all knowledge. "Necessity of the objective world order", "Freedom of the spirit in the subjective realm", "Identity", 'Purpose", "Unity of Consciousness", and other similar concepts, are "expressions of immediate evidence and not conclusions of logical dialectics". The experience of freedom, according to Korn, leads to the problem of evaluation, which he defines as "the human response to a fact", whether the fact be an object or an event. Valuation is an experience which grows out of the struggle for liberty. Values, therefore, are relative to the fields of experience in which valuation takes place. The denial of an absolute value or values, does not signify the exclusion of personal faith. On the contrary, personal, faith is the common ground and point of departure of knowledge and action. See Latin-American Philosophy. -- J.A.F.

laving ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Lave ::: v. i. --> Being alive; having life; as, a living creature.
Active; lively; vigorous; -- said esp. of states of the mind, and sometimes of abstract things; as, a living faith; a living principle.


leal ::: a. --> Faithful; loyal; true.

Let your faith be pure, candid and perfect. An egoistic faith in the mental and vital being tainted by ambition, pride, vanity, mental arrogance, vital self-will, personal demand, desire for the petty satisfactions of the lower nature is a low and smoke-obs- cured flame that cannot bum upwards to heaven.

liege ::: a. --> Sovereign; independent; having authority or right to allegiance; as, a liege lord.
Serving an independent sovereign or master; bound by a feudal tenure; obliged to be faithful and loyal to a superior, as a vassal to his lord; faithful; loyal; as, a liege man; a liege subject.
Full; perfect; complete; pure. ::: n.


ligeance ::: n. --> The connection between sovereign and subject by which they were mutually bound, the former to protection and the securing of justice, the latter to faithful service; allegiance.

literalism ::: n. --> That which accords with the letter; a mode of interpreting literally; adherence to the letter.
The tendency or disposition to represent objects faithfully, without abstraction, conventionalities, or idealization.


loyal ::: a. --> Faithful to law; upholding the lawful authority; faithful and true to the lawful government; faithful to the prince or sovereign to whom one is subject; unswerving in allegiance.
True to any person or persons to whom one owes fidelity, especially as a wife to her husband, lovers to each other, and friend to friend; constant; faithful to a cause or a principle.


loyally ::: adv. --> In a loyal manner; faithfully.

lutely necessary. Otherwise* although the body may go on for a very long time, yet in the end there can be a danger of a collapse. The body can be sustained for a long time when there is the full influence and there is a single-minded faith and call in the mind and the vital ; but if the mind or the vital is dis- turbed by other influences or opens itself to forces which are not the Mother’s, then there will be a mixed condition and there will be sometimes strength, sometimes fatigue, exhaustion or illness or a mixture of the two at the same time. Finally, If not only the mind and the vital, but the body also is open and can absorb the Force, it can do extraordinary things in the way of work without breaking down. Still even then rest is necessary.

Lutheranism: An ecclesiastical school of thought claiming Martin Luther (1483-1546) as its source and inspiration. See Reformation. The Protestant doctrine of salvation by faith, the free grace of God, wholly without earned merit and institutional sanctions, is emphasized. The essence of the church-community is held to revolve about the pure, revealed Word of God and the sacraments of baptism and communion. Varieties of Lutheranism range from a liberal acknowledgment of the Augsburg Confession of 1530 to a more strict adherence to the several Lutheran documents collectively known as the Book of Concord. -- V.F.

machiavelian ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to Machiavel, or to his supposed principles; politically cunning; characterized by duplicity or bad faith; crafty. ::: n. --> One who adopts the principles of Machiavel; a cunning and unprincipled politician.

mahdi ::: n. --> Among Mohammedans, the last imam or leader of the faithful. The Sunni, the largest sect of the Mohammedans, believe that he is yet to appear.

MAHESHWARI ::: goddess of the supreme knowledge, and brings to us her vision for all kinds and widenesses of truth, her rectitude of the spiritual will, the calm and passion of her supramental largeness, her felicity of illumination; ~ TSOY, 4.18 - Faith and shakti

Main works: Sense and Beauty, 1896; Interpret. of Poetry and Religion, 1900; Life of Reason, 5 vols , 1905-6 (Reason in Common Sense, Reason in Society, Reason in Religion, Reason in Art, Reason in Science); Winds of Doctrine, 1913; Egotism in German Philosophy, 1915; Character and Opinion in the U. S., 1920; Skepticism and Animal Faith, 1923; Realms of Being, 4 vols., 1927-40 (Realm of Essence, Realm of Matter, Realm of Truth, Realm of Spirit). -- B.A.G.F. Sarva-darsana-sangraha: (Skr.) A work by Madhvavacarya, professing to be a collection (sangraha) of all (sarva) philosophic views (darsana) or schools. It includes systems which acknowledge and others which reject Vedic (s.v.) authority, such as the Carvaka, Buddhist and Jaina schools (which see). -- K.F.L.

Manicheism, a religio-philosophical doctrine which spread from Persia to the West and was influential during the 3rd and 7th century, was instituted by Mani (Grk. Manes, Latinized: Manichaeus), a Magian who, upon conversion to Christianity, sought to synthesize the latter with the dualism of Zoroastrianism (q.v.), not without becoming a martyr to his faith. To combat the powers of darkness, the mother of light created the first man. As Buddha (q.v.) and Zoroaster he worked illumination among men ; as Jesus, the Son of Man, he had to suffer, become transfigured and symbolize salvation by his apparent death at the cross; as spirit of the sun he attracts all connatural light particles to himself. But final salvation from the throes of evil demons is accomplished by ascetic living, reminding of the Hindu code of ethics (see Indian Ethics), and belief in Mani as the prophesied paraclete (John 14.16-17). Revived once more in the Occident during the crusades by the Cathari. -- K.F.L.

martyrdom ::: n. --> The condition of a martyr; the death of a martyr; the suffering of death on account of adherence to the Christian faith, or to any cause.
Affliction; torment; torture.


mati. ::: thought; view; opinion; faith; religion; doctrine; tradition; conviction

mennonite ::: n. --> One of a small denomination of Christians, so called from Menno Simons of Friesland, their founder. They believe that the New Testament is the only rule of faith, that there is no original sin, that infants should not be baptized, and that Christians ought not to take oath, hold office, or render military service.

mentor ::: n. --> A wise and faithful counselor or monitor.

metecorn ::: n. --> A quantity of corn formerly given by the lord to his customary tenants, as an encouragement to, or reward for, labor and faithful service.

mirror ::: n. 1. A surface capable of reflecting sufficient undiffused light to form an image of an object placed in front of it. 2. Something that faithfully reflects or gives a true picture of something else. Also fig. mirrors. v. 3. To reflect in or as if in a mirror. mirrors, mirrored, mirroring, mirror-air, fragment-mirrorings.

miscreancy ::: n. --> The quality of being miscreant; adherence to a false religion; false faith.

miscreant ::: n. --> One who holds a false religious faith; a misbeliever.
One not restrained by Christian principles; an unscrupulous villain; a while wretch. ::: a. --> Holding a false religious faith.
Destitute of conscience; unscrupulous.


misfaith ::: n. --> Want of faith; distrust.

misserve ::: v. t. & i. --> To serve unfaithfully.

Mohammedanism: The commonly applied term in the Occident to the religion founded by Mohammed. It sought to restore the indigenous monotheism of Arabia, Abraham's uncorrupted religion. Its essential dogma is the belief in the absolute unity of Allah. Its chief commandments are: profession of faith, ritual prayer, the payment of the alms tax, fasting and the pilgrimage. It has no real clerical caste, no church organization, no liturgy, and rejects monasticism. Its ascetic attitude is expressed in warnings against woman, in prohibition of nudity and of construction of splendid buildings except the house of worship; condemns economic speculation; praises manual labor and poverty; prohibits music, wine and pork, and the portrayal of living beings. -- H.H.

neophyte ::: n. --> A new convert or proselyte; -- a name given by the early Christians, and still given by the Roman Catholics, to such as have recently embraced the Christian faith, and been admitted to baptism, esp. to converts from heathenism or Judaism.
A novice; a tyro; a beginner in anything.


nisthah ::: fixed and steady concentration; concentrated will of devotion; faith.

novice ::: n. --> One who is new in any business, profession, or calling; one unacquainted or unskilled; one yet in the rudiments; a beginner; a tyro.
One newly received into the church, or one newly converted to the Christian faith.
One who enters a religious house, whether of monks or nuns, as a probationist.


nullifidian ::: a. --> Of no faith; also, not trusting to faith for salvation; -- opposed to solifidian. ::: n. --> An unbeliever.

“One must have faith in the Master of our life and works, even if for a long time He conceals Himself, and then in His own right time He will reveal His Presence.” Letters on Yoga

orthodox ::: a. --> Sound in opinion or doctrine, especially in religious doctrine; hence, holding the Christian faith; believing the doctrines taught in the Scriptures; -- opposed to heretical and heterodox; as, an orthodox Christian.
According or congruous with the doctrines of Scripture, the creed of a church, the decree of a council, or the like; as, an orthodox opinion, book, etc.
Approved; conventional.


orthodoxly ::: adv. --> In an orthodox manner; with soundness of faith.

orthodoxy ::: n. --> Soundness of faith; a belief in the doctrines taught in the Scriptures, or in some established standard of faith; -- opposed to heterodoxy or to heresy.
Consonance to genuine Scriptural doctrines; -- said of moral doctrines and beliefs; as, the orthodoxy of a creed.
By extension, said of any correct doctrine or belief.


or troubled or depressed or despondent, to go on with a steady faith in the Divine’s Will. But equality docs not include inert acceptance. If, for instance, then? is a temporary failure of some endeavour in the sadhana, one has to keep equality, not to be troubled or despondent, but one has not to accept the failure as an indication of the Divine Will and give up the endeavour. You ought rather to find out the reason and mean- ing of the failure and go forward in faith towards victory.

Paganism: (Lat. pagus, village) The term probably reverts to the designation of villagers who had not yet been reached by the missionary propaganda emanating from populous centers. Fourth-century Christians employed the term to refer to those faiths and practices outside the circumference of the Christian faith. -- V.F.

painstaker ::: n. --> One who takes pains; one careful and faithful in all work.

painstaking ::: a. --> Careful in doing; diligent; faithful; attentive. ::: n. --> The act of taking pains; carefulness and fidelity in performance.

Parallel with these developments was the growth of Buddhism in China, a story too long to relate here. Many Buddhist doctrines, latent in India, were developed in China. The nihilism of Madhyamika (Sun-lan, c. 450-c. 1000) to the effect that reality is Void in the sense of being "devoid" of any specific character, was brought to fullness, while the idealism of Vijnaptimatravada (Yogacara, Fahsiang, 563-c. 1000), which claimed that reality in its imaginary, dependent and absolute aspects is "representation-only," was pushed to the extreme. But these philosophies failed because their extreme positions were not consonant with the Chinese Ideal of the golden mean. In the meantime, China developed her own Buddhist philosophy consistent with her general philosophical outlook. We need only mention the Hua-yen school (Avatamisaka, 508) which offered a totalistic philosophy of "all in one" and "one in all," the T'ien-t'ai school (c. 550) which believes in the identity of the Void, Transitoriness, and the Mean, and in the "immanence of 3,000 worlds in one moment of thought," and the Chin-t'u school (Pure Land, c. 500) which bases its doctrine of salvation by faith and salvation for all on the philosophy of the universality of Buddha-nature. These schools have persisted because they accepted both noumenon and phenomenon, both ens and non-ens, and this "both-and" spirit is predominantly characteristic of Chinese philosophy.

parfay ::: interj. --> By my faith; verily.

parole ::: n. --> A word; an oral utterance.
Word of promise; word of honor; plighted faith; especially (Mil.), promise, upon one&


Pascal, Blaise: (1623-1662) French philosopher mathematician and scientist. He conducted scientific researches including experiments on atmospheric pressure and invented an ingenious calculating machine. He turned from preoccupation with the scientific to the study of man and his spiritual problems and found faith as a sounder guide than reason. At this stage of his thought, theology becomes central. These thoughts are developed in his Provincial Letters and in his posthumously published masterpieces of style, the Pensees. -- L.E.D.

patience ::: “ In all Yoga the first requisites are faith and patience. The ardours of the heart and the violences of the eager will that seek to take the kingdom of heaven by storm can have miserable reactions if they disdain to support their vehemence on these humbler and quieter auxiliaries. And in the long and difficult integral Yoga there must be an integral faith and an unshakable patience.” The Synthesis of Yoga

Pelagianism: The teaching of Pelagius of Britain who was active during the first quarter of the fifth century in Rome, North Africa, and Palestine. He denied original sin and the necessity of baptism in order to be freed from it. Death was not a punishment for sin, and men can be saved without the aid of divine grace. By justification men are purged of their sins through faith alone. Pelagius was notably influenced by Stoic doctrines. He and his followers refused to submit to the decisions of the Church, which repeatedly condemned their tenets, largely owing to the efforts of Augustine. -- J.J.R.

perfidious ::: a. --> Guilty of perfidy; violating good faith or vows; false to trust or confidence reposed; teacherous; faithless; as, a perfidious friend.
Involving, or characterized by, perfidy.


perfidy ::: n. --> The act of violating faith or allegiance; violation of a promise or vow, or of trust reposed; faithlessness; treachery.

Pessimism: (Lat. pessimus, the worst) The attitude gained by reflection on life, man, and the world (psychiatrically explained as due to neurotic or other physiological conditions, economically to over-population, mechanization, rampant utilitarianism; religiously to lack of faith; etc.) which makes a person gloomy, despondent, magnifying evil and sorrow, or holding the world in contempt. Rationalizations of this attitude have been attempted before Schopenhauer (as in Hesiod, Job, among the Hindus, in Byron, Giacomo Leopardi, Heine, Musset, and others), but never with such vigor, consistency, and acumen, so that since his Welt als Wille und Vorstellung we speak of a 19th century philosophic literature of pessimism which considers this world the worst possible, holds man to be born to sorrow, and thinks it best if neither existed. Buddhism (q.v.) blames the universal existence of pain, sorrow, and death; Schopenhauer the blind, impetuous will as the very stuff life and the world are made of; E. v. Hartmann the alogical or irrational side of the ill-powerful subconscious; Oswald Spengler the Occidental tendency toward civilization and hence the impossibility of extricating ourselves from decay as the natural terminus of all organic existence. All pessimists, however, suggest compensations or remedies; thus, Buddhism looks hopefully to nirvana (q.v.), Schopenhauer to the Idea, v. Hartmann to the rational, Spengler to a rebirth through culture. See Optimism. -- K.F.L.

Philosophy of Religion: An inquiry into the general subject of religion from the philosophical point of view, i.e., an inquiry employing the accepted tools of critical analysis and evaluation without a predisposition to defend or reject the claims of any particular religion. Among the specific questions considered are the nature, function and value of religion; the validity of the claims of religious knowledge; the relation of religion and ethics; the character of ideal religion; the nature of evil; the problem of theodicy; revealed versus natural religion; the problem of the human spirit (soul) and its destiny; the relation of the human to the divine as to the freedom and responsibility of the individual and the character (if any) of a divine purpose; evaluation of the claims of prophecy, mystic intuitions, special revelations, inspired utterances; the value of prayers of petition; the human hope of immortality; evaluation of institutional forms of expressions, rituals, creeds, ceremonies, rites, missionary propaganda; the meaning of human existence, the character of value, its status in the world of reality, the existence and character of deity; the nature of belief and faith, etc.

Pistology: A noun derived from the Greek, pistis, faith, hence in general the science of faith or religious belief. A branch of theology specially concerned with faith and its restricted scope, as distinguished from reason. -- J.J.R.

Platonic Realism: See Realism. Platonism: The philosophy of Plato marks one of the high points in the development of Greek philosophical genius Platomsm is characterised by a partial contempt for sense knowledge and empirical studies, by a high regard for mathematics and its method, by a longing for another and better world, by a frankly spiritualistic view of life, by its use of a method of discussion involving an accumulation of ever more profound insights rather than the formal logic of Aristotle, and, above all, by an unswerving faith in the capacity of the human mind to attain absolute truth and to use this truth in the rational direction of human life and affairs.

Platonism, medieval: Plato's works were not accessible to the medievil writers previous to the 13th century. They possessed only part of the Timaeus in the translation and commentary by Chalcidius. Nor were they acquainted with the writings of the Neo-Platonists. They had the logical texts by Porphyrius; little besides. St. Augustine, the greatest authority in these ages, was well acquainted with the teachings of the "Academy" of his time and became a source for Neo-Platonic influences. Furthermore, there were the writings of Pseudo-Dionysius of which first Alcuin had made a rather insufficient, later Scotus Eriugena a readible translation. Scotus himself was thoroughly Neo-Platonic in his philosophy, however "Christianized" his Platonism may have been. The medieval "Platoniststs" held, among some propositions of minor importance, that universals were existent substances (Realism, q.v.), that body and soul were two independent substances, united more or less accidentally; they assumed accordingly a "plurality of forms" in one substance. Some believed that Plato had been given a peculiar insight even in the mysteries of Christian faith. Thus they went so far as to identify the anima mundi, which they believed to be a Platonic notion, with the Holy Ghost (e.g. Abelard). Even after the revival of Aristotelian philosophy, against which the "Platonists" reacted violently, Platonism, or as they afterwards preferred to call it, Augustinianism persisted in many schools, especially in those depending on the Franciscans. -- R.A.

Positive Theology: A term referring to doctrines alleged to be grounded upon a "positive" revelation and not upon the alleged "negative" conclusions of liberal and rationalistic speculations. The term was used to characterize Scriptural theologies from the freer deistic and rationalistic expositions of doctrines, also, it was used to oppose the conclusions of the so-called "higher critics" of the New and Old Testaments. The term has still another meaning: a theology is said to be positive if it is "constructive", by which is meant that it is apologetic of the spirit, if not the letter, of Protestant faith. In the latter sense positive theology is said to be distinguished from a philosophical theology. -- V.F.

Power a secret spiritual will and soul-faith in us. the dominant hidden force of our nature, is the individual instrument, more nearly in communication with the Supreme, a surer guide and enlightener, could we once get at it and hold it, because pro- founder and more intimately neat to the Identical and Absolute than the surface activities of our thought powers To know that will in ourselves and in the universe and follow it to its divine

prayer ::: “Prayer is only a particular form given to that will, aspiration and faith. Its forms are very often crude and not only childlike, which is in itself no defect, but childish; but still it has a real power and significance. Its power and sense is to put the will, aspiration and faith of man into touch with the divine Will as that of a conscious Being with whom we can enter into conscious and living relations.” The Synthesis of Yoga

prayer ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Prayer is only a particular form given to that will, aspiration and faith. Its forms are very often crude and not only childlike, which is in itself no defect, but childish; but still it has a real power and significance. Its power and sense is to put the will, aspiration and faith of man into touch with the divine Will as that of a conscious Being with whom we can enter into conscious and living relations.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

PRAYER. ::: The life of man is a life of wants and needs and therefore of desires, not only in his physical and vital, but in his mental and spiritual being. When he becomes conscious of a greater Power governing the world, he approaches it through prayer for the fulfilment of his needs, for help in his rough journey, for protection and aid in his struggle. Whatever crudi- ties there may be in the ordinary religious approach to God by prayer, and there are many, especially that attitude which ima- gines the Divine as if capable of being propitiated, bribed, flat- tered into acquiescence or indulgence by praise, entreaty and gifts and has often little te^td to the spirit in which he is approached, still this way of turning to the Divine is an essen- tial movement of our religious being and reposes on a universal truth.

The efficacy of prayer is often doubted and prayer itself supposed to be a thing irrational and necessarily superfluous and ineffective. It is true that the universal will executes always its aim and cannot be deflected by egoistic propitiation and entreaty, it is true of the Transcendent who expresses himself in the universal order that, being omniscient, his larger knowledge must foresee the thing to be done and it does not need direction or stimulation by human thought and that the individual's desires are not and cannot be in any world-order the true determining factor. But neither is that order or the execution of the universal will altogether effected by mechanical Law, but by powers and forces of which for human life at least, human will, aspiration and faith are not among the least important. Prayer is only a particular form given to that will, aspiration and faith. Its forms are very often crude and not only childlike, which is in itself no defect, but childish; but still it has a real power and significance. Its power and sense is to put the will, aspiration and faith of man into touch with the divine Will as that of a conscious Being with whom we can enter into conscious and living relations. For our will and aspiration can act either by our own strength and endeavour, which can no doubt be made a thing great and effective whether for lower or higher purposes, -and there are plenty of disciplines which put it forward as the one force to be used, -- or it can act in dependence upon and with subordination to the divine or the universal Will. And this latter way, again, may either look upon that Will as responsive indeed to our aspiration, but almost mechanically, by a sort of law of energy, or at any rate quite impersonally, or else it may look upon it as responding consciously to the divine aspiration and faith of the human soul and consciously bringing to it the help, the guidance, the protection and fruition demanded, yogaksemam vahamyaham. ~ TSOY, SYN

Prayer helps to prepare this relation for us at first on the lower plane even while it is (here consistent with much that is mere egoism and self-delusion; but afterwards we can draw towards the spiritual truth which is behind it. It is not then the givinc of the thing asked for that matters, but the relation itself, the contact of man’s life with God, the conscious interchange.

In spiritual matters and in the seeking of spiritual gains, this conscious relation is a great power; it is a much greater power than our own entirely self-reliant struggle and effort and it brings a fuller spiritual growth and experience. Necessarily, in the end prayer either ceases in the greater thing for which it prepared us, -- in fact the form we call prayer is not itself essential so long as the faith, the will, the aspiration are there, -- or remains only for the joy of the relation. Also its objects, the artha or interest it seeks to realise, become higher and higher until we reach the highest motiveless devotion, which is that of divine love pure and simple without any other demand or longing.

Prayer for others ::: The fact of praying and the attitude it brings, especially unselfish prayer for others, itself opens you to the higher Power, even if there is no corresponding result in the person prayed for. 'Nothing can be positively said about that, for the result must necessarily depend on the persons, whe- ther they arc open or receptive or something in them can res- pond to any Force the prayer brings down.

Prayer must well up from the heart on a crest of emotion or aspiration.

Prayer {Ideal)'. Not prayer insisting on immediate fulfilment, but prayer that is itself a communion of the mind and heart with the Divine*and can have the joy and satisfaction of itself, trusting for fulfilment by the Divine in his own time.


Prayer ::: The life of man is a life of wants and needs and th
   refore of desires, not only in his physical and vital, but in his mental and spiritual being. When he becomes conscious of a greater Power governing the world, he approaches it through prayer for the fulfilment of his needs, for help in his rough journey, for protection and aid in his struggle. Whatever crudities there may be in the ordinary religious approach to God by prayer, and there are many, especially that attitude which imagines the Divine as if capable of being propitiated, bribed, flattered into acquiescence or indulgence by praise, entreaty and gifts and has often little regard to the spirit in which he is approached, still this way of turning to the Divine is an essential movement of our religious being and reposes on a universal truth. The efficacy of prayer is often doubted and prayer itself supposed to be a thing irrational and necessarily superfluous and ineffective. It is true that the universal will executes always its aim and cannot be deflected by egoistic propitiation and entreaty, it is true of the Transcendent who expresses himself in the universal order that being omniscient his larger knowledge must foresee the thing to be done and it does not need direction or stimulation by human thought and that the individual’s desires are not and cannot be in any world-order the true determining factor. But neither is that order or the execution of the universal will altogether effected by mechanical Law, but by powers and forces of which for human life at least human will, aspiration and faith are not among the least important. Prayer is only a particular form given to that will, aspiration and faith. Its forms are very often crude and not only childlike, which is in itself no defect, but childish; but still it has a real power and significance. Its power and sense is to put the will, aspiration and faith of man into touch with the divine Will as that of a conscious Being with whom we can enter into conscious and living relations. For our will and aspiration can act either by our own strength and endeavour, which can no doubt be made a thing great and effective whether for lower or higher purposes,—and there are plenty of disciplines which put it forward as the one force to be used,—or it can act in dependence upon and with subordination to the divine or the universal Will. And this latter way again may either look upon thatWill as responsive indeed to our aspiration, but almost mechanically, by a sort of law of energy, or at any rate quite impersonally, or else it may look upon it as responding consciously to the divine aspiration and faith of the human soul and consciously bringing to it the help, the guidance, the protection and fruition demanded. Prayer helps to prepare this relation for us at first on the lower plane even while it is there consistent with much that is mere egoism and self-delusion; but afterwards we can draw towards the spiritual truth which is behind it. It is not then the giving of the thing asked for that matters, but the relation itself, the contact of man’s life with God, the conscious interchange. In spiritual matters and in the seeking of spiritual gains, this conscious relation is a great power; it is a much greater power than our own entirely self-reliant struggle and effort and it brings a fuller spiritual growth and experience. Necessarily in the end prayer either ceases in the greater thing for which it prepared us, —in fact the form we call prayer is not itself essential so long as the faith, the will, the aspiration are there,—or remains only for the joy of the relation. Also its objects, the artha or interest it seeks to realise, become higher and higher until we reach the highest motiveless devotion, which is that of divine love pure and simple without any other demand or longing.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 566-67-68


premasamarthyam ::: rich. slagha, kalyanasraddha, ness of feeling, assertion of psychic force, faith in the universal good, capacity for unbounded love (the elements of cittasakti). snigdhata, tejah.s.lagha, kalyan.asraddha, premasamarthyam, iti snigdhata,

presbyterianism ::: n. --> That form of church government which invests presbyters with all spiritual power, and admits no prelates over them; also, the faith and polity of the Presbyterian churches, taken collectively.

presence ::: 1. The state or fact of being present; current existence or occurrence. 2. A divine, spiritual, or supernatural spirit or influence felt or conceived as present. 3. The immediate proximity of someone or something.

Sri Aurobindo: "It is intended by the word Presence to indicate the sense and perception of the Divine as a Being, felt as present in one"s existence and consciousness or in relation with it, without the necessity of any further qualification or description. Thus, of the ‘ineffable Presence" it can only be said that it is there and nothing more can or need be said about it, although at the same time one knows that all is there, personality and impersonality, Power and Light and Ananda and everything else, and that all these flow from that indescribable Presence. The word may be used sometimes in a less absolute sense, but that is always the fundamental significance, — the essential perception of the essential Presence supporting everything else.” *Letters on Yoga

"Beyond mind on spiritual and supramental levels dwells the Presence, the Truth, the Power, the Bliss that can alone deliver us from these illusions, display the Light of which our ideals are tarnished disguises and impose the harmony that shall at once transfigure and reconcile all the parts of our nature.” Essays Divine and Human

"But if we learn to live within, we infallibly awaken to this presence within us which is our more real self, a presence profound, calm, joyous and puissant of which the world is not the master — a presence which, if it is not the Lord Himself, is the radiation of the Lord within.” *The Life Divine

"The true soul secret in us, — subliminal, we have said, but the word is misleading, for this presence is not situated below the threshold of waking mind, but rather burns in the temple of the inmost heart behind the thick screen of an ignorant mind, life and body, not subliminal but behind the veil, — this veiled psychic entity is the flame of the Godhead always alight within us, inextinguishable even by that dense unconsciousness of any spiritual self within which obscures our outward nature. It is a flame born out of the Divine and, luminous inhabitant of the Ignorance, grows in it till it is able to turn it towards the Knowledge. It is the concealed Witness and Control, the hidden Guide, the Daemon of Socrates, the inner light or inner voice of the mystic. It is that which endures and is imperishable in us from birth to birth, untouched by death, decay or corruption, an indestructible spark of the Divine.” *The Life Divine

"If we need any personal and inner witness to this indivisible All-Consciousness behind the ignorance, — all Nature is its external proof, — we can get it with any completeness only in our deeper inner being or larger and higher spiritual state when we draw back behind the veil of our own surface ignorance and come into contact with the divine Idea and Will behind it. Then we see clearly enough that what we have done by ourselves in our ignorance was yet overseen and guided in its result by the invisible Omniscience; we discover a greater working behind our ignorant working and begin to glimpse its purpose in us: then only can we see and know what now we worship in faith, recognise wholly the pure and universal Presence, meet the Lord of all being and all Nature.” *The Life Divine

"The presence of the Spirit is there in every living being, on every level, in all things, and because it is there, the experience of Sachchidananda, of the pure spiritual existence and consciousness, of the delight of a divine presence, closeness, contact can be acquired through the mind or the heart or the life-sense or even through the physical consciousness; if the inner doors are flung sufficiently open, the light from the sanctuary can suffuse the nearest and the farthest chambers of the outer being.” *The Life Divine

"There is a secret divine Will, eternal and infinite, omniscient and omnipotent, that expresses itself in the universality and in each particular of all these apparently temporal and finite inconscient or half-conscient things. This is the Power or Presence meant by the Gita when it speaks of the Lord within the heart of all existences who turns all creatures as if mounted on a machine by the illusion of Nature.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

"For what Yoga searches after is not truth of thought alone or truth of mind alone, but the dynamic truth of a living and revealing spiritual experience. There must awake in us a constant indwelling and enveloping nearness, a vivid perception, a close feeling and communion, a concrete sense and contact of a true and infinite Presence always and everywhere. That Presence must remain with us as the living, pervading Reality in which we and all things exist and move and act, and we must feel it always and everywhere, concrete, visible, inhabiting all things; it must be patent to us as their true Self, tangible as their imperishable Essence, met by us closely as their inmost Spirit. To see, to feel, to sense, to contact in every way and not merely to conceive this Self and Spirit here in all existences and to feel with the same vividness all existences in this Self and Spirit, is the fundamental experience which must englobe all other knowledge.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

"One must have faith in the Master of our life and works, even if for a long time He conceals Himself, and then in His own right time He will reveal His Presence.” *Letters on Yoga

"They [the psychic being and the Divine Presence in the heart] are quite different things. The psychic being is one"s own individual soul-being. It is not the Divine, though it has come from the Divine and develops towards the Divine.” *Letters on Yoga

"For it is quietness and inwardness that enable one to feel the Presence.” *Letters on Yoga

"Beyond mind on spiritual and supramental levels dwells the Presence, the Truth, the Power, the Bliss that can alone deliver us from these illusions, display the Light of which our ideals are tarnished disguises and impose the harmony that shall at once transfigure and reconcile all the parts of our nature.” *Essays Divine and Human

The Mother: "For, in human beings, here is a presence, the most marvellous Presence on earth, and except in a few very rare cases which I need not mention here, this presence lies asleep in the heart — not in the physical heart but the psychic centre — of all beings. And when this Splendour is manifested with enough purity, it will awaken in all beings the echo of his Presence.” Words of the Mother, MCW, Vol. 15.


probabilist ::: n. --> One who maintains that certainty is impossible, and that probability alone is to govern our faith and actions.
One who maintains that a man may do that which has a probability of being right, or which is inculcated by teachers of authority, although other opinions may seem to him still more probable.


Proclus: (411-485) A prominent Neo-Platonist and theological commentator, who taught that man becomes united with God through the practice of love, truth and faith. Main works: Commentaries on Timeus, on Republic, on Parmenides; Instit. Theol.; In Platonis Theol., Comment on First Book of Euclid. -- R.B.W.

profession ::: v. --> The act of professing or claiming; open declaration; public avowal or acknowledgment; as, professions of friendship; a profession of faith.
That which one professed; a declaration; an avowal; a claim; as, his professions are insincere.
That of which one professed knowledge; the occupation, if not mechanical, agricultural, or the like, to which one devotes one&


professor ::: n. --> One who professed, or makes open declaration of, his sentiments or opinions; especially, one who makes a public avowal of his belief in the Scriptures and his faith in Christ, and thus unites himself to the visible church.
One who professed, or publicly teaches, any science or branch of learning; especially, an officer in a university, college, or other seminary, whose business it is to read lectures, or instruct students, in a particular branch of learning; as a professor of


proposition ::: n. --> The act of setting or placing before; the act of offering.
That which is proposed; that which is offered, as for consideration, acceptance, or adoption; a proposal; as, the enemy made propositions of peace; his proposition was not accepted.
A statement of religious doctrine; an article of faith; creed; as, the propositions of Wyclif and Huss.
A complete sentence, or part of a sentence consisting


PSYCHICISATION. ::: Change of the lower nature bringing right vision into the mind, right impulse and feeling into the vital, ri^t movement and habit into the physical — all turned towards the Divine, all based on love, adoration, bhakti — finally the vision and sense of the Mother everywhere in all as w’ell as in the heart, her Force working in the being, faith, con- secration, surrender.

punic ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the ancient Carthaginians.
Characteristic of the ancient Carthaginians; faithless; treacherous; as, Punic faith.


puritan ::: n. --> One who, in the time of Queen Elizabeth and the first two Stuarts, opposed traditional and formal usages, and advocated simpler forms of faith and worship than those established by law; -- originally, a term of reproach. The Puritans formed the bulk of the early population of New England.
One who is scrupulous and strict in his religious life; -- often used reproachfully or in contempt; one who has overstrict notions.


". . . real faith is something spiritual, a knowledge of the soul.” Letters on Yoga*

“… real faith is something spiritual, a knowledge of the soul.” Letters on Yoga

Realism: Theory of the reality of abstract or general terms, or umversals, which are held to have an equal and sometimes a superior reality to actual physical particulars. Umversals exist before things, ante res. Opposed to nominalism (q.v.) according to which universals have a being only after things, post res. Realism means (a) in ontology that no derogation of the reality of universals is valid, the realm of essences, or possible umversals, being as real as, if not more real than, the realm of existence, or actuality; (b) in epistemology: that sense experience reports a true and uninterrupted, if limited, account of objects; that it is possible to have faithful and direct knowledge of the actual world. While realism was implicit in Egyptian religion, where truth was through deification distinguished from particular truths, and further suggested in certain aspects of Ionian philosophy, it was first explicitly set forth by Plato in his doctrine of the ideas and developed by Aristotle in his doctrine of the forms. According to Plato, the ideas have a status of possibility which makes them independent both of the mind by which they may be known and of the actual world of particulars in which they may take place. Aristotle amended this, so that his forms have a being only in things, in rebus. Realism in its Platonic version was the leading philosophy of the Christian Middle Ages until Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) officially adopted the Aristotelian version. It has been given a new impetus in recent times by Charles S. Peirce (1839-1914) in America and by G. E. Moore (1873-) in England. Moore's realism has been responsible for many of his contemporaries in both English-speaking countries. Roughly speaking, the American realists, Montague, Perry, and others, in The New Realism (1912) have directed their attention to the epistemological side, while the English have constructed ontological systems. The most comprehensive realistic systems of the modern period are Process and Reality by A. N. Whitehead (1861-) and Space, Time and Deity by S. Alexander: (1859-1939). The German, Nicolai Hartmann, should also be mentioned, and there are others. -- J.K.F.

realty ::: n. --> Royalty.
Loyalty; faithfulness.
Reality.
Immobility, or the fixed, permanent nature of real property; as, chattels which savor of the realty; -- so written in legal language for reality.
Real estate; a piece of real property.


recreant ::: a. --> Crying for mercy, as a combatant in the trial by battle; yielding; cowardly; mean-spirited; craven.
Apostate; false; unfaithful. ::: n. --> One who yields in combat, and begs for mercy; a mean-spirited, cowardly wretch.


Recurrence of doubts ::: In the nature of these recurrences there is usually a constant return of the same adverse experiences, the same adverse resistance, thoughts destructive of all belief and faith and confidence in the future of the sadhana, frustrating doubts of what one has known as the truth, urgings to abandon- ment of the yoga or to other disastrous counsels of decheance.

Reformation: The Protestant Reformation may be dated from 1517, the year Martin Luther (1483-1546), Augustinian monk and University professor in Wittenberg, publicly attacked the sale of indulgences by the itinerant Tetzel, Dominican ambassador of the Roman Church. The break came first in the personality of the monk who could not find in his own religious and moral endeavors to win divine favor the peace demanded by a sensitive conscience; and when it came he found to his surprise that he had already parted company with a whole tradition. The ideology which found a response in his inner experience was set forth by Augustine, a troubled soul who had surrendered himself completely to divine grace and mercy. The philosophers who legitimized man's endeavor to get on in the world, the church which demanded unquestioned loyalty to its codes and commands, he eschewed as thoroughly inconsonant with his own inner life. Man is wholly dependent upon the merits of Christ, the miracle of faith alone justifies before God. Man's conscience, his reason, and the Scriptures together became his only norm and authority. He could have added a fourth: patriotism, since Luther became the spokesman of a rising tide of German nationalism already suspect of the powers of distant Rome. The humanist Erasmus (see Renaissance) supported Luther by his silence, then broke with him upon the reformer's extreme utterances concerning man's predestination. This break with the humanists shows clearly the direction which the Protestant Reformation was taking: it was an enfranchised religion only to a degree. For while Erasmus pleaded for tolerance and enlightenment the new religious movement called for decision and faith binding men's consciences to a new loyalty. At first the Scriptures were taken as conscience permitted, then conscience became bound by the Scuptures. Luther lacked a systematic theology for the simple reason that he himself was full of inconsistencies. A reformer is often not a systematic thinker. Lutheran princes promoted the reconstruction of institutions and forms suggested by the reformer and his learned ally, Melanchthon, and by one stroke whole provinces became Protestant. The original reformers were reformed by new reformers. Two of such early reformers were Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531) in Switzerland and John Calvin (1509-1564) who set up a rigid system and rule of God in Geneva. Calvinism crossed the channel under the leadership of John Knox in Scotland. The English (Anglican) Reformation rested on political rather than strictly religious considerations. The Reformation brought about a Counter-Reformation within the Roman Church in which abuses were set right and lines against the Protestants more tightly drawn (Council of Trent, 1545-1563). -- V.F.

relapse ::: v. i. --> To slip or slide back, in a literal sense; to turn back.
To slide or turn back into a former state or practice; to fall back from some condition attained; -- generally in a bad sense, as from a state of convalescence or amended condition; as, to relapse into a stupor, into vice, or into barbarism; -- sometimes in a good sense; as, to relapse into slumber after being disturbed.
To fall from Christian faith into paganism, heresy, or


relied ::: placed one"s faith or confidence in. relying.

"Religion in fact is not knowledge, but a faith and aspiration; it is justified indeed both by an imprecise intuitive knowledge of large spiritual truths and by the subjective experience of souls that have risen beyond the ordinary life, but in itself it only gives us the hope and faith by which we may be induced to aspire to the intimate possession of the hidden tracts and larger realities of the Spirit. That we turn always the few distinct truths and the symbols or the particular discipline of a religion into hard and fast dogmas, is a sign that as yet we are only infants in the spiritual knowledge and are yet far from the science of the Infinite.” The Synthesis of Yoga*

“Religion in fact is not knowledge, but a faith and aspiration; it is justified indeed both by an imprecise intuitive knowledge of large spiritual truths and by the subjective experience of souls that have risen beyond the ordinary life, but in itself it only gives us the hope and faith by which we may be induced to aspire to the intimate possession of the hidden tracts and larger realities of the Spirit. That we turn always the few distinct truths and the symbols or the particular discipline of a religion into hard and fast dogmas, is a sign that as yet we are only infants in the spiritual knowledge and are yet far from the science of the Infinite.” The Synthesis of Yoga

religion ::: n. --> The outward act or form by which men indicate their recognition of the existence of a god or of gods having power over their destiny, to whom obedience, service, and honor are due; the feeling or expression of human love, fear, or awe of some superhuman and overruling power, whether by profession of belief, by observance of rites and ceremonies, or by the conduct of life; a system of faith and worship; a manifestation of piety; as, ethical religions; monotheistic religions; natural religion; revealed religion; the religion of the

religion ::: Sri Aurobindo: "There is no word so plastic and uncertain in its meaning as the word religion. The word is European and, therefore, it is as well to know first what the Europeans mean by it. In this matter we find them, — when they can be got to think clearly on the matter at all, which is itself unusual, — divided in opinion. Sometimes they use it as equivalent to a set of beliefs, sometimes as equivalent to morality coupled with a belief in God, sometimes as equivalent to a set of pietistic actions and emotions. Faith, works and pious observances, these are the three recognised elements of European religion . . . . ::: Religion in India is a still more plastic term and may mean anything from the heights of Yoga to strangling your fellowman and relieving him of the worldly goods he may happen to be carrying with him. It would therefore take too long to enumerate everything that can be included in Indian religion. Briefly, however, it is Dharma or living religiously, the whole life being governed by religion.” *From an unpublished essay

religion ::: “There is no word so plastic and uncertain in its meaning as the word religion. The word is European and, therefore, it is as well to know first what the Europeans mean by it. In this matter we find them,—when they can be got to think clearly on the matter at all, which is itself unusual,—divided in opinion. Sometimes they use it as equivalent to a set of beliefs, sometimes as equivalent to morality coupled with a belief in God, sometimes as equivalent to a set of pietistic actions and emotions. Faith, works and pious observances, these are the three recognised elements of European religion . . . .

religious ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to religion; concerned with religion; teaching, or setting forth, religion; set apart to religion; as, a religious society; a religious sect; a religious place; religious subjects, books, teachers, houses, wars.
Possessing, or conforming to, religion; pious; godly; as, a religious man, life, behavior, etc.
Scrupulously faithful or exact; strict.
Belonging to a religious order; bound by vows.


Removal of faith ::: It is a spiritual principle not to take away any faith or support of faith, unless the persons who have it arc able to replace it by something larger and more complete.

renegade ::: n. --> One faithless to principle or party.
An apostate from Christianity or from any form of religious faith.
One who deserts from a military or naval post; a deserter.
A common vagabond; a worthless or wicked fellow.


reproduction (‘s) ::: something reproduced, esp. in the faithfulness of its resemblance to the form and elements of the original.

revolt ::: n. --> To turn away; to abandon or reject something; specifically, to turn away, or shrink, with abhorrence.
Hence, to be faithless; to desert one party or leader for another; especially, to renounce allegiance or subjection; to rise against a government; to rebel.
To be disgusted, shocked, or grossly offended; hence, to feel nausea; -- with at; as, the stomach revolts at such food; his nature revolts at cruelty.


rijal :::   person who is faithful to his or her vows under all circumstances

Rule of Faith: In general, an authoritative statement of belief. In historic Christianity such statements appeared out of existing formulae (e.g., the early baptismal confessions) or were formulated to meet existing heresies. In Catholic Christianity the Rule of Faith (Regula Fidei) includes the whole of apostolic teaching and its further elaborations. -- V.F.

Saadia, ben Joseph: (Arabic Sa'id Al-Fayyumi) (892-942) Born and educated in Egypt, he left his native country in 915 and settled in Babylonia where he was appointed in 928 Gaon of the Academy of Sura. He translated the Bible into Arabic and wrote numerous works, both in Hebrew and Arabic, in the fields of philology, exegesis, Talmudics, polemics, Jewish history, and philosophy. His chief philosophical work is the Kitab Al-Amanat wa'l-Itikadat, better known by its Hebrew title, Emunot we-Deott, i.e., Doctrines and Religious Beliefs. Its purpose is to prove the compatibility of the principles of Judaism with reason and to interpret them in such a way that their rationality be evident The first nine sections establish philosophically the ten fundamental articles of faith, and the tenth deals with ethics. Philosophically, Saadia was influenced by the teachings of the Mutazilia. See Jewish Philosophy. -- Q.V.

sadhana chatushtaya. ::: the four-fold aids to spiritual practice &

sakti (sasraddha shakti) ::: force applied with faith in the result.

saktyam bhagavati ca (iti sraddha) ::: (faith) in the Lord and his sakti.

sandemanianism ::: n. --> The faith or system of the Sandemanians.

Santayana, George: For Santayana (1863-), one of the most eminent of contemporary naturalists, consciousness, instead of distorting the nature of Reality immediately reveals it. So revealed, Reality proclaims itself an infinity of essences (Platonic Ideas) subsisting in and by themselves, some of which are entertained by minds, and some of which are also enacted in and by a non-mental substratum, substance or matter, which adds concrete existence to their subsistence. The presence of this substratum, though incapable of rational proof, is assumed in action as a matter of animal faith. Furthermore, without it a selective principle, the concrete enactment of some essences but not of others is inexplicable.

sattvanurupa sarvasya sraddha ::: the faith of each man takes the shape given to it by his stuff of being. [Gita 17.3]

schism ::: n. --> Division or separation; specifically (Eccl.), permanent division or separation in the Christian church; breach of unity among people of the same religious faith; the offense of seeking to produce division in a church without justifiable cause.

secre ::: a. --> Secret; secretive; faithful to a secret. ::: n. --> A secret.

secret ::: a. --> Hidden; concealed; as, secret treasure; secret plans; a secret vow.
Withdraw from general intercourse or notice; in retirement or secrecy; secluded.
Faithful to a secret; not inclined to divulge or betray confidence; secretive.
Separate; distinct.
Something studiously concealed; a thing kept from general


secularist ::: n. --> One who theoretically rejects every form of religious faith, and every kind of religious worship, and accepts only the facts and influences which are derived from the present life; also, one who believes that education and other matters of civil policy should be managed without the introduction of a religious element.

self-trust ::: n. --> Faith in one&

seljukian ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to Seljuk, a Tartar chief who embraced Mohammedanism, and began the subjection of Western Asia to that faith and rule; of or pertaining to the dynasty founded by him, or the empire maintained by his descendants from the 10th to the 13th century.

shatkasampatti &

shirk ::: v. t. --> To procure by petty fraud and trickery; to obtain by mean solicitation.
To avoid; to escape; to neglect; -- implying unfaithfulness or fraud; as, to shirk duty. ::: v. i. --> To live by shifts and fraud; to shark.


sisterhood ::: n. --> The state or relation of being a sister; the office or duty of a sister.
A society of sisters; a society of women united in one faith or order; sisters, collectively.


sister ::: n. --> A female who has the same parents with another person, or who has one of them only. In the latter case, she is more definitely called a half sister. The correlative of brother.
A woman who is closely allied to, or assocciated with, another person, as in the sdame faith, society, order, or community.
One of the same kind, or of the same condition; -- generally used adjectively; as, sister fruits.


solifidian ::: n. --> One who maintains that faith alone, without works, is sufficient for justification; -- opposed to nullifidian. ::: a. --> Holding the tenets of Solifidians; of or pertaining to the solifidians.

soothfast ::: a. --> Firmly fixed in, or founded upon, the thruth; true; genuine; real; also, truthful; faithful. ::: adv. --> Soothly; really; in fact.

sooth ::: superl. --> True; faithful; trustworthy.
Pleasing; delightful; sweet. ::: a. --> Truth; reality.
Augury; prognostication.
Blandishment; cajolery.


sophist ::: n. --> One of a class of men who taught eloquence, philosophy, and politics in ancient Greece; especially, one of those who, by their fallacious but plausible reasoning, puzzled inquirers after truth, weakened the faith of the people, and drew upon themselves general hatred and contempt.
Hence, an impostor in argument; a captious or fallacious reasoner.


Soul (Scholastic): With few exceptions (e.g., Tertullian) already the Fathers were agreed that the soul is a simple spiritual substance. Some held that it derived from the souls of the parents (Traducianism), others that it is created individually by God (Creationism), the latter view being generally accepted and made an article of faith. Regarding the union with the body, the early Middle-Ages, following St. Augustine, professed a modified Platonic Dualism: the body is a substance in itself to which the soul is added and with which it enters a more or less accidental union. With the revival of Aristoteleanism, the hylemorphic theory became general: the soul is the substantial form of the body, the only origin of all vital and mental performances, there is no other form besides. This strictly Aristotelian-Thomistic view has been modified by later Scholastics who assume the existence of a forma corporeitatis distinct from the soul. (See Form) -- The soul is simple but not devoid of accidents; the "faculties" (q.v.) are its proper accidents; every experience adds an accidental form to the soul. Though a substance in itself, the soul is naturally ordained towards a body; separated, it is an "incomplete" substance. It is created in respect to the body it will inform, so that the inheritance of bodily features and of mental characteristics insofar as they depend on organic functions is safeguarded. -- As a simple and spiritual substance, the soul is immortal. It is not the total human nature, since person is the composite of niatter informed by the soul. -- Animals and plants too have souls, the former a sensitive, the latter a vegetative soul, which function as the principles of life. These souls are perishable, they too are substantial forms. The human soul contains all the powers of the two other souls and is the origin of the vegetative and sensitive performances in man. -- R.A.

soundness ::: n. --> The quality or state of being sound; as, the soundness of timber, of fruit, of the teeth, etc.; the soundness of reasoning or argument; soundness of faith.

Spiritualism (4) means the faith that spirits of the dead communicate with the living through persons who are "mediums" and through other forms of manifestation. The word Spiritism is more properly used for this faith. -- R.M.J.

Spirituality ::: Spirituality is not a high intellectuality, not idealism, not an ethical turn of mind or moral purity and austerity, not religiosity or an ardent and exalted emotional fervour, not even a compound of all these excellent things; a mental belief, creed or faith, an emotional aspiration, a regulation of conduct according to a religious or ethical formula are not spiritual achievement and experience. These things are of considerable value to mind and life; they are of value to the spiritual evolution itself as preparatory movements disciplining, purifying or giving a suitable form to the nature; but they still belong to the mental evolution,— the beginning of a spiritual realisation, experience, change is not yet there. Spirituality is in its essence an awakening to the inner reality of our being, to a spirit, self, soul which is other than our mind, life and body, an inner aspiration to know, to feel, to be that, to enter into contact with the greater Reality beyond and pervading the universe which inhabits also our own being, to be in communion with It and union with It, and a turning, a conversion, a transformation of our whole being as a result of the aspiration, the contact, the union, a growth or waking into a new becoming or new being, a new self, a new nature.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 889-90


spiritual ::: The word “spiritual” has at least four major usages: 1. “Spiritual” refers to the highest levels in any developmental line (e.g., transrational cognition, transpersonal self-identity, etc.). 2. “Spiritual” is a separate developmental line itself (e.g., Fowler’s stages of faith). 3. “Spiritual” refers to a state or peak experience (e.g., nature mysticism). 4. “Spiritual” means a particular attitude or orientation, like openness, wisdom, or compassion, which can be present at virtually any state or stage.

sponsor ::: n. --> One who binds himself to answer for another, and is responsible for his default; a surety.
One who at the baptism of an infant professore the christian faith in its name, and guarantees its religious education; a godfather or godmother.


sraddha. ::: earnestness; faith; faith in the scriptures and the Guru; confidence or assurance that arises from personal experience

sraddha ::: enthusiastic faith.

sraddha ::: faith in the Divine; same as sraddha bhagavati. bhagavati svasakty svasaktyam

sraddha (shaktyam bhagawati cha, iti sraddha) ::: sraddha means faith in God and in his sakti (the formula of the last member of the sakti catus.t.aya).

sraddha (Shraddha) ::: faith; will-to-believe; constituting belief.

sraddha (sraddha; çraddha) ::: faith; faith in the Divine (bhagavan), in sraddha his executive Power (sakti) and in the power within oneself (svasakti), the last member of the sakti catus.t.aya. sraddha sraddh

(sraddha swashaktyam) ::: faith in one"s own power (svasakti) as the power of the universal sakti manifested in oneself.

sraddha (swashaktyam sraddha) ::: faith in one"s own power as an expression of the universal sakti; same as sraddha svasaktyam. svayamprak svayamprakasa

sraddhavan bhajate ::: the one who has faith has love (for Me) . [Gita 6.47]

sraddhavan labhate jnanam ::: the one who has faith attains to knowledge. [Gita 4.39]

Sri Aurobindo: "Faith is a necessary means for arriving at realisation, because we are ignorant and do not yet know that which we are seeking to realise; faith is indeed knowledge giving the ignorance an intimation of itself previous to its own manifestation, it is the gleam sent before by the yet unrisen Sun. When the Sun shall rise, there will be no longer any need of the gleam.” *Letters on Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: " In all Yoga the first requisites are faith and patience. The ardours of the heart and the violences of the eager will that seek to take the kingdom of heaven by storm can have miserable reactions if they disdain to support their vehemence on these humbler and quieter auxiliaries. And in the long and difficult integral Yoga there must be an integral faith and an unshakable patience.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

Sri Aurobindo: "The faith in the divine Shakti must be always at the back of our strength and when she becomes manifest, it must be or grow implicit and complete. There is nothing that is impossible to her who is the conscious Power and universal Goddess all-creative from eternity and armed with the Spirit"s omnipotence.” The Life Divine

Ssu chiao: The four things which Confucius taught his pupils, namely, letters, personal conduct, being one's true self (chung), and good faith in social relationship (hsin). -- W.T.C.

Ssu te: The Four Virtues Being attentive to the fundamentals, penetrative, beneficial, and unflinching --the virtues of the trigram ch'ien (Heaven, male, yang) and therefore ethical ideals of the superior man. Filial piety, respect for elders, loyalty to superiors (chung), and good faith in social relationship (hsin). Lady-like conduct, speech, skill, and appearance. Also called ssu hsing.

St. Thomas was a teacher and a writer for some twenty years (1254-1273). Among his works are: Scriptum in IV Libros Sententiarum (1254-1256), Summa Contra Gentiles (c. 1260), Summa Theologica (1265-1272); commentaries on Boethius. (De Trinitate, c. 1257-1258), on Dionysius the Pseudo-Areopagite (De Divinis Nominibus, c. 1261), on the anonymous and important Liber de Causis (1268), and especially on Aristotle's works (1261-1272), Physics, Metaphysics, Nicomachean Ethics, Politics, On the Soul, Posterior Analytics, On Interpretation, On the Heavens, On Generation and Corruption; Quaestiones Disputatae, which includes questions on such large subjects as De Veritate (1256-1259); De Potentia (1259-1263); De Malo (1263-1268); De Spiritualibus Creaturis, De Anima (1269-1270); small treatises or Opuscula, among which especially noteworthy are the De Ente et Essentia (1256); De Aeternitate Mundi (1270), De Unitate Intellecus (1270), De Substantiis Separatis (1272). While it is extremely difficult to grasp in its entirety the personality behind this complex theological and philosophical activity, some points are quite clear and beyond dispute. During the first five years of his activity as a thinker and a teacher, St. Thomas seems to have formulated his most fundamental ideas in their definite form, to have clarified his historical conceptions of Greek and Arabian philosophers, and to have made more precise and even corrected his doctrinal positions, (cf., e.g., the change on the question of creation between In II Sent., d.l, q.l, a.3, and the later De Potentia, q. III, a.4). This is natural enough, though we cannot pretend to explain why he should have come to think as he did. The more he grew, and that very rapidly, towards maturity, the more his thought became inextricably involved in the defense of Aristotle (beginning with c. 1260), his texts and his ideas, against the Averroists, who were then beginning to become prominent in the faculty of arts at the University of Paris; against the traditional Augustinianism of a man like St. Bonaventure; as well as against that more subtle Augustinianism which could breathe some of the spirit of Augustine, speak the language of Aristotle, but expound, with increasing faithfulness and therefore more imminent disaster, Christian ideas through the Neoplatonic techniques of Avicenna. This last group includes such different thinkers as St. Albert the Great, Henry of Ghent, the many disciples of St. Bonaventure, including, some think, Duns Scotus himself, and Meister Eckhart of Hochheim.

SUNLIT PATH ::: There Is a sunlit path as well as a gloomy one and It Is the better of the two — a path In which one goes forward In absolute reliaoce on the Mother, fearing ootWng, sorrowing over nothing. Aspiration is needed but there can be a sunlit aspiration full of light and faith and confidence and joy.

sunlit path (the) ::: when the psychic being comes out in its inherent power; is usually or habitually in front; a natural spirit of faith and surrender; a bright settled faith and happy bhakti. [S24:1610, 1616, 1621]

svasaktyaṁ bhagavati ca (swashaktyam bhagavati cha) ::: (faith) in svasaktyam one"s own power (svasakti) and in God (bhagavan). svasakty svasaktyam aṁ sraddha

svasaktyam (swashaktyam) ::: (faith) in one"s own power (svasakti). svasaktyam

Symbolism: An artistic trend flourishing at the end of the XIXth century in reaction to faith in the beauty of nature, and endeavoring to represent spiritual values by means of abstract signs. -- L.V.

Syndicalism: This social and political theory, usually considered as the creation of Georges Sorel, is philosophically rooted in a radical anti-intellectualism. Will, faith and action are the basic and creative realities of human nature, whereas all ideological factors are but creatures of these realities -- they are 'myths.' Working upon this metaphysical assumption and upon the Marxist concept of the class struggle, Syndicalsm argues that the ills and vices of bourgeois society can be eliminated only if that class which possesses the most creative power (such a class is known as the 'elite') destroys the present form of society by direct action and violence guided by the 'myth of the general strike.' The working class is, of course, taken to be this elite, and hence the trade unions, or 'syndicates', become the center of the revolution. The economic aim of the revolution is to substitute collectivism for capitalism, its political aim, to substitute 'proletarian management' through the instrumentality of the various syndicates (which represent functional interests) for political control through the instrumentality of the State. Some features of Syndicalism have been consciously incorporated into the ideology of Italian Fascism. -- M.B.M.

Tapasya. Not only so, but in fact a double process of Tapasya and increasing surrender persists for a long time even when the surrender has fairly well begun. But a time comes when one feels the Presence and the force constantly and more and more feels ’that that is doing everylhmg — so that the worst difficul- ties cannot disturb this sense and personal effort is no longer necessary, hardly even possible. That is the sign of the full surrender of the nature into the bands of the Divine. There are some who take this position in faith even before there is this experience and if the Bhakti and the faith are strong it carries them through till the experience is there. But all cannot take this position from the beginning — and for some it would be dangerous since they might pul themselves into the hand of a wrong Force thinking it to be the Divine. For most it is neces- sary to grow through Tapasya into surrender.

tapatya ::: (in 1913-16) a form of tapas, sometimes associated with Mahakali bhava and with a "higher rudra intensity of knowledge, action, ananda", described in its true form as sasraddha sakti, a "selffulfilling force which is sure beforehand of its result", though there is also a "disinterested and instrumental Tapatya not depending on faith in the results"; an instance of the use of such a force; (in 1917-19) a form of intellectual / mental tapas intermediate between tapastya and tapata, defined as "the straining to know and fulfil" which, when desire is eliminated, remains "as an illegitimate prolongation and stress of what is received in the ideality . . . bringing false stress and falsification . of values".

Taylor, Alfred Edward: Born in 1869, professor of philosophy at St. Andrews and Edinburgh, after teaching for many years at Oxford. Taylor's metaphysics were predominantly Hegelian and idealist (as in Elements of Metaphysics) during his early years, in later years (as in numerous essays in Mind, and his Gifford Lectures Faith of a Moralist) he has become something of a neo-scholastic, although he follows no school exclusively. In his Gifford Lectures he argues from moral experience to God; in other essays, he declares that grounds for belief are found in cosmology, in conscience and in religious experience. As an Anglo-Catholic, he has given (in volume two of his Giffords) a learned apologia for this position, on philosophical grounds. -- W.N.P.

Tehmi: “This is a reference to the story of Hercules who married Deianeira, the daughter of King Oeneus. One day he and his wife had to cross a stream swollen by rains. As his wife could not swim Hercules asked the centaur boatman to ferry her across. Midway across the centaur began to molest Deianeira. Hercules then shot him with a poison arrow that had been dipped in the Hydra’s blood. As the centaur was dying he told the naïve Deianeira to dip a shirt in his blood and whenever she felt Hercules was betraying her to send him the shirt and he would remain faithful to her. Long afterward Hercules went on a journey and Deianeira suspected him of being unfaithful and sent him the blood-glued shirt. Hercules put on the shirt which burned his flesh to the bone, killing him.”**

Tertullian: (165-220) A prominent Christian Apologist, later the leader of the sect of the Montanists. He took an excessively dogmatic position toward faith, regarded it as standing above reason, and expressed the attitude in his famous statement "Credo quia absurdum est". Cf. Migne PL (vols. 1, 2). -- R.B.W.

:::   "The efficacy of prayer is often doubted and prayer itself supposed to be a thing irrational and necessarily superfluous and ineffective. It is true that the universal will executes always its aim and cannot be deflected by egoistic propitiation and entreaty, it is true of the Transcendent who expresses himself in the universal order that being omniscient his larger knowledge must foresee the thing to be done and it does not need direction or stimulation by human thought and that the individual"s desires are not and cannot be in any world-order the true determining factor. But neither is that order or the execution of the universal will altogether effected by mechanical Law, but by powers and forces of which for human life at least human will, aspiration and faith are not among the least important.

“The efficacy of prayer is often doubted and prayer itself supposed to be a thing irrational and necessarily superfluous and ineffective. It is true that the universal will executes always its aim and cannot be deflected by egoistic propitiation and entreaty, it is true of the Transcendent who expresses himself in the universal order that being omniscient his larger knowledge must foresee the thing to be done and it does not need direction or stimulation by human thought and that the individual’s desires are not and cannot be in any world-order the true determining factor. But neither is that order or the execution of the universal will altogether effected by mechanical Law, but by powers and forces of which for human life at least human will, aspiration and faith are not among the least important. The Synthesis of Yoga

“The enemy of faith is doubt, and yet doubt too is a utility and necessity, because man in his ignorance and in his progressive labour towards knowledge needs to be visited by doubt, otherwise he would remain obstinate in an ignorant belief and limited knowledge and unable to escape from his errors.” The Synthesis of Yoga

— the Grace of the Divine Mother and on your side an inner state made up of faith, sincerity and surrender. Let your faith be pure, cancfid and perfect. An egoistic faith in the mental and vital being tainted by arabidoo, pride, vanity, mental arrogance, vital self-will, personal demand, desire for petty satisfaction of the lower nature is a low and smokc-obscurcd flame that cannot bum upwards to heaven. Regard your life as given you only for the divine work and to help in the dirine manifestation.

— their faith makes them imperturbable.

Theism: (Gr. theos, god) Is in general that type of religion or religious philosophy (see Religion, Philosophy of) which incorporates a conception of God as a unitary being; thus may be considered equivalent to monotheism. The speculation as to the relation of God to world gave rise to three great forms: God identified with world in pantheism (rare with emphasis on God); God, once having created the world, relatively disinterested in it, in deism (mainly an 18th cent, phenomenon); God working in and through the world, in theism proper. Accordingly, God either coincides with the world, is external to it (deus ex machina), or is immanent. The more personal, human-like God, the more theological the theism, the more appealing to a personal adjustment in prayer, worship, etc., which presuppose either that God, being like man, may be swayed in his decision, has no definite plan, or subsists in the very stuff man is made of (humanistic theism). Immanence of God entails agency in the world, presence, revelation, involvement in the historic process, it has been justified by Hindu and Semitic thinkers, Christian apologetics, ancient and modern metaphysical idealists, and by natural science philosophers. Transcendency of God removes him from human affairs, renders fellowship and communication in Church ways ineffectual, yet preserves God's majesty and absoluteness such as is postulated by philosophies which introduce the concept of God for want of a terser term for the ultimate, principal reality. Like Descartes and Spinoza, they allow the personal in God to fade and approach the age-old Indian pantheism evident in much of Vedic and post-Vedic philosophy in which the personal pronoun may be the only distinguishing mark between metaphysical logic and theology, similarly as in Hegel. The endowment postulated of God lends character to a theistic system of philosophy. Much of Hindu and Greek philosophy stresses the knowledge and ration aspect of the deity, thus producing an epistemological theism; Aristotle, in conceiving him as the prime mover, started a teleological one; mysticism is psychologically oriented in its theism, God being a feeling reality approachable in appropriate emotional states. The theism of religious faith is unquestioning and pragmatic in its attitude toward God; theology has often felt the need of offering proofs for the existence of God (see God) thus tending toward an ontological theism; metaphysics incorporates occasionally the concept of God as a thought necessity, advocating a logical theism. Kant's critique showed the respective fields of pure philosophic enquiry and theistic speculations with their past in historic creeds. Theism is left a possibility in agnosticism (q.v.). -- K.F.L.

The leader of the journey, the captain of the march, the first and most ancient priest of our sacrifice is the Will. This Will is not the wish of the heart or the demand or
   reference of the mind to which we often give the name. It is that inmost, dominant and often veiled conscious force of our being and of all being, Tapas, Shakti, Sraddha, that sovereignly determines our orientation and of which the intellect and the heart are more or less blind and automatic servants and instruments. The Self that is quiescent, at rest, vacant of things and happenings is a support and background to existence, a silent channel or a hypostasis of something Supreme: it is not itself the one entirely real existence, not itself the Supreme. The Eternal, the Supreme is the Lord and the all-originating Spirit. Superior to all activities and not bound by any of them, it is the source, sanction, material, efficient power, master of all activities. All activities proceed from this supreme Self and are determined by it; all are its operations, processes of its own conscious force and not of something alien to Self, some power other than the Spirit. In these activities is expressed the conscious Will or Shakti of the Spirit moved to manifest its being in infinite ways, a Will or Power not ignorant but at one with its own self-knowledge and its knowledge of all that it is put out to express. And of this Power a secret spiritual will and soul-faith in us, the dominant hidden force of our nature, is the individual instrument, more nearly in communication with the Supreme, a surer guide and enlightener, could we once get at it and hold it, because profounder and more intimately near to the Identical and Absolute than the surface activities of our thought powers. To know that will in ourselves and in the universe and follow it to its divine finalities, whatever these may be, must surely be the highest way and truest culmination for knowledge as for works, for the seeker in life and for the seeker in Yoga.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 289-90


The more complete y-our faith, sincerity and surrender, the more will grace and protection be with you. And when the grace and protection of the Divine Mother arc with you, what is there lliat can touch you or whom need you fear? A little of it even will carry you through all diiliculties, obstacles and dangers ; surrounded by its full presence you can go securely on your way because it is hers, careless of all menace, unaffected by any hostility however powerful, whether from this world or from worlds invisible. Its touch can turn difficulties into oppor- tunities, failure into success and weakness into unfaltering strength. For the grace of the Divine Mother is the sanction of the Supreme and now or tomorrow its ciTect is sure, a thing decreed. Inevitable and irresistible.

The more complete your faith, sincerity and surrender, the mote will grace and protection be with you. And when the grace and protection of the Divine Mother are with you, what is there that can touch you or whom need you fear? A little of it even will carry you through all difficulties, obstacles and dangers ; surrounded by its full presence you can go securely on your way because it is hers, careless of all menace, unaffected by any hostility however powerful, whether from this world or from worlds invisible. Its touch can turn difficulties into oppor- tunities, failure into success and weakness into unfaltering strength.

Theology: (Gr. theos, god, logos, study) Simply stated, theology is a study of the question of God and the relation of God to the world of reality. Theology, in the widest sense of the term, is a branch of philosophy, i.e., a special field of philosophical inquiry having to do with God. However, the term is widely employed to mean the theoretical expression of a particuhr religion. In the latter sense, theology becomes "Christian", "Jewish", "Presbyterian", "Reformed", etc. When thus employed, theology becomes in a narrow sense "historic", "systematic", "polemic", "ecclesiastical", "apologetic", etc., -- phases of theoretical discussions within a particular religious faith. Theology need not have any necessary reference to religion, it may be a purely theoretical discussion about God and God's relation to the world on a disinterested plane of free inquiry. -- V.F.

theology ::: n. --> The science of God or of religion; the science which treats of the existence, character, and attributes of God, his laws and government, the doctrines we are to believe, and the duties we are to practice; divinity; (as more commonly understood) "the knowledge derivable from the Scriptures, the systematic exhibition of revealed truth, the science of Christian faith and life."

"There is a sunlit path as well as a gloomy one and it is the better of the two — a path in which one goes forward in absolute reliance on the Mother, fearing nothing, sorrowing over nothing. Aspiration is needed but there can be a sunlit aspiration full of light and faith and confidence and joy. If difficulty comes, even that can be faced with a smile.” Letters on Yoga

“There is a sunlit path as well as a gloomy one and it is the better of the two—a path in which one goes forward in absolute reliance on the Mother, fearing nothing, sorrowing over nothing. Aspiration is needed but there can be a sunlit aspiration full of light and faith and confidence and joy. If difficulty comes, even that can be faced with a smile.” Letters on Yoga

these openings in one’s nature and ieam to close them perma- nently to such attacks or to throw out the intruders at once or as soon as possible. The recurrence is no proof of a funda- mental incapacity ; if one takes the right inner attitude, it can and will be overcome. One must have faith in the Master of our life and works, even if for a long time He conceals Himself, and then in His own right lime He will reveal His Presence.

The subconscient is not the whole foundation of the nature; it is only the lower basis of the Ignorance and affects mostly the lower vital and physical exterior consciousness and these again affect the higher parts of the nature. While it is well to see what it is and how it acts, one must not be too preoccupied with this dark side or this apparent aspect of the instrumental being. One should rather regard it as something not oneself, a mask of false nature imposed on the true being by the Ignorance. The true being is the inner with all its vast possibilities of reaching and expressing the Divine and especially the inmost, the soul, the psychic Purusha which is always in its essence pure, divine, turned to all that is good and true and beautiful. The exterior being has to be taken hold of by the inner being and turned into an instrument no longer of the upsurging of the ignorant subconscient Nature, but of the Divine. It is by remembering always that and opening the nature upwards that the Divine Consciousness can be reached and descend from above into the whole inner and outer existence, mental, vital, physical, the subconscient, the subliminal, all that we overtly or secretly are. This should be the main preoccupation. To dwell solely on the subconscient and the aspect of imperfection creates depression and should be avoided. One has to keep a right balance and stress on the positive side most, recognising the other but only to reject and change it. This and a constant faith and reliance on the Mother are what is needed for the transformation to come. P.S. It is certainly the abrupt and decisive breaking that is the easiest and best way for these things—vital habits.
   Ref: SABCL Vol. 22-23-24, Page: 355


The subject of the philosophy of religion is regarded in conservative circles not as a discipline given to free philosophical inquiry but as a particular religion's philosophy. In this form it is a more or less disguised apologetics or defense of an already accepted religious faith. While the data for this subject include the so-called classical religions, philosophy of religion, in the genuinely philosophical sense, takes for its material religious expressions of all types, whether classical or not, together with all the psychological material available on the nature of the human spirit and man's whole cultural development. -- V.F.

"The sunlit path can only be followed if the psychic is constantly or usually in front or if one has a natural spirit of faith and surrender or a face turned habitually towards the sun or psychic predisposition (e.g. a faith in one"s spiritual destiny) or, if one has acquired the psychic turn. That does not mean that the sunlit man has no difficulties; he may have many, but he regards them cheerfully as all in the day's work''. If he gets a bad beating, he is capable of saying,Well, that was a queer go but the Divine is evidently in a queer mood and if that is his way of doing things, it must be the right one; I am surely a still queerer fellow myself and that, I suppose, was the only means of putting me right."" Letters on Yoga

“The sunlit path can only be followed if the psychic is constantly or usually in front or if one has a natural spirit of faith and surrender or a face turned habitually towards the sun or psychic predisposition (e.g. a faith in one’s spiritual destiny) or, if one has acquired the psychic turn. That does not mean that the sunlit man has no difficulties; he may have many, but he regards them cheerfully as all in the day’s work’’. If he gets a bad beating, he is capable of saying,Well, that was a queer go but the Divine is evidently in a queer mood and if that is his way of doing things, it must be the right one; I am surely a still queerer fellow myself and that, I suppose, was the only means of putting me right.’’ Letters on Yoga

.. this being we are is or can be whatever it has the faith and will to be – for faith is only will aiming at a higher truth – and cease to set limits to our possibility… - Sri Aurobindo ::: .Falsehood ::: Falsehood, on the other hand, is not this Avidya, but an extreme result of it. It is created by an Asuric power which intervenes in this creation and is not only separated from the Truth and th
   refore limited in knowledge and open to error, but in revolt against the Truth or in the habit of seizing the Truth only to pervert it. This Power, the dark Asuric Shakti or Rakshasic Maya, puts forward its own perverted consciousness as true knowledge and its wilful distortions or reversals of the Truth as the verity of things. It is the powers and personalities of this perverted and perverting consciousness that we call hostile beings, hostile forces. Whenever these perversions created by them out of the stuff of the Ignorance are put forward as the truth of things, that is the Falsehood, in the Yogic sense, mithya, moha.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 35, Page: 103


This is the true attitude and only those who can take and keep it, preserve a faith unshaken by disappointments and difficulties and shall pass through the ordeal to the supreme vic- tory and the great transmutation.

This opposition has been permitted from of old not merely as a test or ordeal, but as a compulsion on us to seek a greater strength, a more perfect self-knowledge, an intenser purity and force of aspiration, a faith that nothing can crush, a more power- ful descent of the Divine Grace.

This rebuilding of the notion of creature permits St. Thomas also to analyze the problems that Averroism was making more and more prominent. Philosophical truth was discovered by the Greeks and the Arabians neither completely nor adequately nor without error. What the Christian thinker must do in their presence is not to divide his allegiance between them and Christianity, but to discover the meaning of reason and the conditions of true thinking. That discovery will enable him to learn from the Greeks without also learning their errors; and it would thus show him the possibility of the harmony between reason and revelation. He must learn to be a philosopher, to discover the philosopher within the Christian man, in order to meet philosophers. In exploring the meaning of a creature, St. Thomas was building a philosophy which permitted his contemporaries (at least, if they listened to him) to free themselves from the old eternalistic and rigid world of the Greeks and to free their thinking, therefore, from the antinomies which this world could raise up for them. In the harmony of faith and reason which St. Thomas defended against Averroism, we must see the culminating point of his activity. For such a harmony meant ultimately not only a judicious and synthetic diagnosis of Greek philosophy, as well as a synthetic incorporation of Greek ideas in Christian thought, it meant also the final vindication of the humanism and the naturalism of Thomistic philosophy. The expression and the defense of this Christian humanism constitute one of St. Thomas' most enduring contributions to European thought. -- A.C.P.

This representation does not reproduce faithfully all particulars of the traditional account. The fact is that the traditional doctrine, having grown up from various sources and under an inadequate formal analysis, is not altogether what seems to be the best representation, and simply note the four following points of divergence: We have defined the connectives ⊃x and ∧x in terms of universal and existential quantification, whereas the traditional account might be thought to be more closely reproduced if they were taken as primitive notations. (It would, however, not be difficult to reformulate the functional calculus of first order so that these connectives would be primitive and the usual quantifiers defined in terms of them.) The traditional account associates the negation in E and O with the copula (q. v.), whereas the negation symbol is here prefixed to the sub-formula P(x). (Notice that this sub-formula represents ambiguously a proposition and that, in fact, the notation of the functional calculus of first order provides for applying negation only to propositions.) The traditional account includes under A and E respectively, also (propositions denoted by) P(A) and ∼P(A), where A is an individual constant. These singular propositions are ignored in our account of opposition and immediate inference, but will appear in § 5 as giving variant forms of certain syllogisms. Some aspects of the traditional account require that A and E be represented as we have here, others that they be represented by     [(Ex)S(x)][S(x) ⊃x P(x)]   and   [(Ex)S(x)][S(x) ⊃x ∼P(x)]     respectively. The question concerning the choice between these two interpretations is known as the problem of existential import of propositions. We prefer to introduce (Ex)S(x) as a separate premiss at those places where it is required. Given a fixed subject S and a fixed predicate P, we have, according to the square of opposition, that A and O are contradictory, E and I are contradictory, A and E are contrary, I and O are subcontrary, A and I are subaltern, E and O are subaltern. The two propositions in a contradictory pair cannot be both true and cannot be both false (one is the exact negation of the other). The two propositions in a subaltern pair are so related that the first one, together with the premiss (Ex)S(x), implies the second (subalternation). Under the premiss (Ex)S(x), the contrary pair, A, E, cannot be both true, and the subcontrary pair, I, O, cannot be both false.

::: **"This sraddhâ — the English word faith is inadequate to express it — is in reality an influence from the supreme Spirit and its light a message from our supramental being which is calling the lower nature to rise out of its petty present to a great self-becoming and self-exceeding.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“This sraddhâ—the English word faith is inadequate to express it—is in reality an influence from the supreme Spirit and its light a message from our supramental being which is calling the lower nature to rise out of its petty present to a great self-becoming and self-exceeding.” The Synthesis of Yoga

This "widespread instinctive conviction" in the order of nature, without its theological implications, became the basis and primary article of faith of modern natural science, whose aim is to express this rationality of nature as far as possible by the laws of natural science. Cf. Whitehead, Science and the Modern World, p. 5ff). Opposed to chaos, disorder, absence of law, irrationality. -- L-M.H.

"Thought is not essential to existence nor its cause, but it is an instrument for becoming; I become what I see in myself. All that thought suggests to me, I can do; all that thought reveals in me, I can become. This should be man"s unshakable faith in himself, because God dwells in him.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

“Thought is not essential to existence nor its cause, but it is an instrument for becoming; I become what I see in myself. All that thought suggests to me, I can do; all that thought reveals in me, I can become. This should be man’s unshakable faith in himself, because God dwells in him.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga

Three senses of "Ockhamism" may be distinguished: Logical, indicating usage of the terminology and technique of logical analysis developed by Ockham in his Summa totius logicae; in particular, use of the concept of supposition (suppositio) in the significative analysis of terms. Epistemological, indicating the thesis that universality is attributable only to terms and propositions, and not to things as existing apart from discourse. Theological, indicating the thesis that no tneological doctrines, such as those of God's existence or of the immortality of the soul, are evident or demonstrable philosophically, so that religious doctrine rests solely on faith, without metaphysical or scientific support. It is in this sense that Luther is often called an Ockhamist.   Bibliography:   B. Geyer,   Ueberwegs Grundriss d. Gesch. d. Phil., Bd. II (11th ed., Berlin 1928), pp. 571-612 and 781-786; N. Abbagnano,   Guglielmo di Ockham (Lanciano, Italy, 1931); E. A. Moody,   The Logic of William of Ockham (N. Y. & London, 1935); F. Ehrle,   Peter von Candia (Muenster, 1925); G. Ritter,   Studien zur Spaetscholastik, I-II (Heidelberg, 1921-1922).     --E.A.M. Om, aum: (Skr.) Mystic, holy syllable as a symbol for the indefinable Absolute. See Aksara, Vac, Sabda. --K.F.L. Omniscience: In philosophy and theology it means the complete and perfect knowledge of God, of Himself and of all other beings, past, present, and future, or merely possible, as well as all their activities, real or possible, including the future free actions of human beings. --J.J.R. One: Philosophically, not a number but equivalent to unit, unity, individuality, in contradistinction from multiplicity and the mani-foldness of sensory experience. In metaphysics, the Supreme Idea (Plato), the absolute first principle (Neo-platonism), the universe (Parmenides), Being as such and divine in nature (Plotinus), God (Nicolaus Cusanus), the soul (Lotze). Religious philosophy and mysticism, beginning with Indian philosophy (s.v.), has favored the designation of the One for the metaphysical world-ground, the ultimate icility, the world-soul, the principle of the world conceived as reason, nous, or more personally. The One may be conceived as an independent whole or as a sum, as analytic or synthetic, as principle or ontologically. Except by mysticism, it is rarely declared a fact of sensory experience, while its transcendent or transcendental, abstract nature is stressed, e.g., in epistemology where the "I" or self is considered the unitary background of personal experience, the identity of self-consciousness, or the unity of consciousness in the synthesis of the manifoldness of ideas (Kant). --K.F.L. One-one: A relation R is one-many if for every y in the converse domain there is a unique x such that xRy. A relation R is many-one if for every x in the domain there is a unique y such that xRy. (See the article relation.) A relation is one-one, or one-to-one, if it is at the same time one-many and many-one. A one-one relation is said to be, or to determine, a one-to-one correspondence between its domain and its converse domain. --A.C. On-handedness: (Ger. Vorhandenheit) Things exist in the mode of thereness, lying- passively in a neutral space. A "deficient" form of a more basic relationship, termed at-handedness (Zuhandenheit). (Heidegger.) --H.H. Ontological argument: Name by which later authors, especially Kant, designate the alleged proof for God's existence devised by Anselm of Canterbury. Under the name of God, so the argument runs, everyone understands that greater than which nothing can be thought. Since anything being the greatest and lacking existence is less then the greatest having also existence, the former is not really the greater. The greatest, therefore, has to exist. Anselm has been reproached, already by his contemporary Gaunilo, for unduly passing from the field of logical to the field of ontological or existential reasoning. This criticism has been repeated by many authors, among them Aquinas. The argument has, however, been used, if in a somewhat modified form, by Duns Scotus, Descartes, and Leibniz. --R.A. Ontological Object: (Gr. onta, existing things + logos, science) The real or existing object of an act of knowledge as distinguished from the epistemological object. See Epistemological Object. --L.W. Ontologism: (Gr. on, being) In contrast to psychologism, is called any speculative system which starts philosophizing by positing absolute being, or deriving the existence of entities independently of experience merely on the basis of their being thought, or assuming that we have immediate and certain knowledge of the ground of being or God. Generally speaking any rationalistic, a priori metaphysical doctrine, specifically the philosophies of Rosmini-Serbati and Vincenzo Gioberti. As a philosophic method censored by skeptics and criticists alike, as a scholastic doctrine formerly strongly supported, revived in Italy and Belgium in the 19th century, but no longer countenanced. --K.F.L. Ontology: (Gr. on, being + logos, logic) The theory of being qua being. For Aristotle, the First Philosophy, the science of the essence of things. Introduced as a term into philosophy by Wolff. The science of fundamental principles, the doctrine of the categories. Ultimate philosophy; rational cosmology. Syn. with metaphysics. See Cosmology, First Principles, Metaphysics, Theology. --J.K.F. Operation: "(Lit. operari, to work) Any act, mental or physical, constituting a phase of the reflective process, and performed with a view to acquiring1 knowledge or information about a certain subject-nntter. --A.C.B.   In logic, see Operationism.   In philosophy of science, see Pragmatism, Scientific Empiricism. Operationism: The doctrine that the meaning of a concept is given by a set of operations.   1. The operational meaning of a term (word or symbol) is given by a semantical rule relating the term to some concrete process, object or event, or to a class of such processes, objectj or events.   2. Sentences formed by combining operationally defined terms into propositions are operationally meaningful when the assertions are testable by means of performable operations. Thus, under operational rules, terms have semantical significance, propositions have empirical significance.   Operationism makes explicit the distinction between formal (q.v.) and empirical sentences. Formal propositions are signs arranged according to syntactical rules but lacking operational reference. Such propositions, common in mathematics, logic and syntax, derive their sanction from convention, whereas an empirical proposition is acceptable (1) when its structure obeys syntactical rules and (2) when there exists a concrete procedure (a set of operations) for determining its truth or falsity (cf. Verification). Propositions purporting to be empirical are sometimes amenable to no operational test because they contain terms obeying no definite semantical rules. These sentences are sometimes called pseudo-propositions and are said to be operationally meaningless. They may, however, be 'meaningful" in other ways, e.g. emotionally or aesthetically (cf. Meaning).   Unlike a formal statement, the "truth" of an empirical sentence is never absolute and its operational confirmation serves only to increase the degree of its validity. Similarly, the semantical rule comprising the operational definition of a term has never absolute precision. Ordinarily a term denotes a class of operations and the precision of its definition depends upon how definite are the rules governing inclusion in the class.   The difference between Operationism and Logical Positivism (q.v.) is one of emphasis. Operationism's stress of empirical matters derives from the fact that it was first employed to purge physics of such concepts as absolute space and absolute time, when the theory of relativity had forced upon physicists the view that space and time are most profitably defined in terms of the operations by which they are measured. Although different methods of measuring length at first give rise to different concepts of length, wherever the equivalence of certain of these measures can be established by other operations, the concepts may legitimately be combined.   In psychology the operational criterion of meaningfulness is commonly associated with a behavioristic point of view. See Behaviorism. Since only those propositions which are testable by public and repeatable operations are admissible in science, the definition of such concepti as mind and sensation must rest upon observable aspects of the organism or its behavior. Operational psychology deals with experience only as it is indicated by the operation of differential behavior, including verbal report. Discriminations, or the concrete differential reactions of organisms to internal or external environmental states, are by some authors regarded as the most basic of all operations.   For a discussion of the role of operational definition in phvsics. see P. W. Bridgman, The Logic of Modern Physics, (New York, 1928) and The Nature of Physical Theory (Princeton, 1936). "The extension of operationism to psychology is discussed by C. C. Pratt in The Logic of Modem Psychology (New York. 1939.)   For a discussion and annotated bibliography relating to Operationism and Logical Positivism, see S. S. Stevens, Psychology and the Science of Science, Psychol. Bull., 36, 1939, 221-263. --S.S.S. Ophelimity: Noun derived from the Greek, ophelimos useful, employed by Vilfredo Pareto (1848-1923) in economics as the equivalent of utility, or the capacity to provide satisfaction. --J.J.R. Opinion: (Lat. opinio, from opinor, to think) An hypothesis or proposition entertained on rational grounds but concerning which doubt can reasonably exist. A belief. See Hypothesis, Certainty, Knowledge. --J.K.F- Opposition: (Lat. oppositus, pp. of oppono, to oppose) Positive actual contradiction. One of Aristotle's Post-predicaments. In logic any contrariety or contradiction, illustrated by the "Square of Opposition". Syn. with: conflict. See Logic, formal, § 4. --J.K.F. Optimism: (Lat. optimus, the best) The view inspired by wishful thinking, success, faith, or philosophic reflection, that the world as it exists is not so bad or even the best possible, life is good, and man's destiny is bright. Philosophically most persuasively propounded by Leibniz in his Theodicee, according to which God in his wisdom would have created a better world had he known or willed such a one to exist. Not even he could remove moral wrong and evil unless he destroyed the power of self-determination and hence the basis of morality. All systems of ethics that recognize a supreme good (Plato and many idealists), subscribe to the doctrines of progressivism (Turgot, Herder, Comte, and others), regard evil as a fragmentary view (Josiah Royce et al.) or illusory, or believe in indemnification (Henry David Thoreau) or melioration (Emerson), are inclined optimistically. Practically all theologies advocating a plan of creation and salvation, are optimistic though they make the good or the better dependent on moral effort, right thinking, or belief, promising it in a future existence. Metaphysical speculation is optimistic if it provides for perfection, evolution to something higher, more valuable, or makes room for harmonies or a teleology. See Pessimism. --K.F.L. Order: A class is said to be partially ordered by a dyadic relation R if it coincides with the field of R, and R is transitive and reflexive, and xRy and yRx never both hold when x and y are different. If in addition R is connected, the class is said to be ordered (or simply ordered) by R, and R is called an ordering relation.   Whitehcid and Russell apply the term serial relation to relations which are transitive, irreflexive, and connected (and, in consequence, also asymmetric). However, the use of serial relations in this sense, instead ordering relations as just defined, is awkward in connection with the notion of order for unit classes.   Examples: The relation not greater than among leal numbers is an ordering relation. The relation less than among real numbers is a serial relation. The real numbers are simply ordered by the former relation. In the algebra of classes (logic formal, § 7), the classes are partially ordered by the relation of class inclusion.   For explanation of the terminology used in making the above definitions, see the articles connexity, reflexivity, relation, symmetry, transitivity. --A.C. Order type: See relation-number. Ordinal number: A class b is well-ordered by a dyadic relation R if it is ordered by R (see order) and, for every class a such that a ⊂ b, there is a member x of a, such that xRy holds for every member y of a; and R is then called a well-ordering relation. The ordinal number of a class b well-ordered by a relation R, or of a well-ordering relation R, is defined to be the relation-number (q. v.) of R.   The ordinal numbers of finite classes (well-ordered by appropriate relations) are called finite ordinal numbers. These are 0, 1, 2, ... (to be distinguished, of course, from the finite cardinal numbers 0, 1, 2, . . .).   The first non-finite (transfinite or infinite) ordinal number is the ordinal number of the class of finite ordinal numbers, well-ordered in their natural order, 0, 1, 2, . . .; it is usually denoted by the small Greek letter omega. --A.C.   G. Cantor, Contributions to the Founding of the Theory of Transfinite Numbers, translated and with an introduction by P. E. B. Jourdain, Chicago and London, 1915. (new ed. 1941); Whitehead and Russell, Princtpia Mathematica. vol. 3. Orexis: (Gr. orexis) Striving; desire; the conative aspect of mind, as distinguished from the cognitive and emotional (Aristotle). --G.R.M.. Organicism: A theory of biology that life consists in the organization or dynamic system of the organism. Opposed to mechanism and vitalism. --J.K.F. Organism: An individual animal or plant, biologically interpreted. A. N. Whitehead uses the term to include also physical bodies and to signify anything material spreading through space and enduring in time. --R.B.W. Organismic Psychology: (Lat. organum, from Gr. organon, an instrument) A system of theoretical psychology which construes the structure of the mind in organic rather than atomistic terms. See Gestalt Psychology; Psychological Atomism. --L.W. Organization: (Lat. organum, from Gr. organon, work) A structured whole. The systematic unity of parts in a purposive whole. A dynamic system. Order in something actual. --J.K.F. Organon: (Gr. organon) The title traditionally given to the body of Aristotle's logical treatises. The designation appears to have originated among the Peripatetics after Aristotle's time, and expresses their view that logic is not a part of philosophy (as the Stoics maintained) but rather the instrument (organon) of philosophical inquiry. See Aristotelianism. --G.R.M.   In Kant. A system of principles by which pure knowledge may be acquired and established.   Cf. Fr. Bacon's Novum Organum. --O.F.K. Oriental Philosophy: A general designation used loosely to cover philosophic tradition exclusive of that grown on Greek soil and including the beginnings of philosophical speculation in Egypt, Arabia, Iran, India, and China, the elaborate systems of India, Greater India, China, and Japan, and sometimes also the religion-bound thought of all these countries with that of the complex cultures of Asia Minor, extending far into antiquity. Oriental philosophy, though by no means presenting a homogeneous picture, nevertheless shares one characteristic, i.e., the practical outlook on life (ethics linked with metaphysics) and the absence of clear-cut distinctions between pure speculation and religious motivation, and on lower levels between folklore, folk-etymology, practical wisdom, pre-scientiiic speculation, even magic, and flashes of philosophic insight. Bonds with Western, particularly Greek philosophy have no doubt existed even in ancient times. Mutual influences have often been conjectured on the basis of striking similarities, but their scientific establishment is often difficult or even impossible. Comparative philosophy (see especially the work of Masson-Oursel) provides a useful method. Yet a thorough treatment of Oriental Philosophy is possible only when the many languages in which it is deposited have been more thoroughly studied, the psychological and historical elements involved in the various cultures better investigated, and translations of the relevant documents prepared not merely from a philological point of view or out of missionary zeal, but by competent philosophers who also have some linguistic training. Much has been accomplished in this direction in Indian and Chinese Philosophy (q.v.). A great deal remains to be done however before a definitive history of Oriental Philosophy may be written. See also Arabian, and Persian Philosophy. --K.F.L. Origen: (185-254) The principal founder of Christian theology who tried to enrich the ecclesiastic thought of his day by reconciling it with the treasures of Greek philosophy. Cf. Migne PL. --R.B.W. Ormazd: (New Persian) Same as Ahura Mazdah (q.v.), the good principle in Zoroastrianism, and opposed to Ahriman (q.v.). --K.F.L. Orphic Literature: The mystic writings, extant only in fragments, of a Greek religious-philosophical movement of the 6th century B.C., allegedly started by the mythical Orpheus. In their mysteries, in which mythology and rational thinking mingled, the Orphics concerned themselves with cosmogony, theogony, man's original creation and his destiny after death which they sought to influence to the better by pure living and austerity. They taught a symbolism in which, e.g., the relationship of the One to the many was clearly enunciated, and believed in the soul as involved in reincarnation. Pythagoras, Empedocles, and Plato were influenced by them. --K.F.L. Ortega y Gasset, Jose: Born in Madrid, May 9, 1883. At present in Buenos Aires, Argentine. Son of Ortega y Munillo, the famous Spanish journalist. Studied at the College of Jesuits in Miraflores and at the Central University of Madrid. In the latter he presented his Doctor's dissertation, El Milenario, in 1904, thereby obtaining his Ph.D. degree. After studies in Leipzig, Berlin, Marburg, under the special influence of Hermann Cohen, the great exponent of Kant, who taught him the love for the scientific method and awoke in him the interest in educational philosophy, Ortega came to Spain where, after the death of Nicolas Salmeron, he occupied the professorship of metaphysics at the Central University of Madrid. The following may be considered the most important works of Ortega y Gasset:     Meditaciones del Quijote, 1914;   El Espectador, I-VIII, 1916-1935;   El Tema de Nuestro Tiempo, 1921;   España Invertebrada, 1922;   Kant, 1924;   La Deshumanizacion del Arte, 1925;   Espiritu de la Letra, 1927;   La Rebelion de las Masas, 1929;   Goethe desde Adentio, 1934;   Estudios sobre el Amor, 1939;   Ensimismamiento y Alteracion, 1939;   El Libro de las Misiones, 1940;   Ideas y Creencias, 1940;     and others.   Although brought up in the Marburg school of thought, Ortega is not exactly a neo-Kantian. At the basis of his Weltanschauung one finds a denial of the fundamental presuppositions which characterized European Rationalism. It is life and not thought which is primary. Things have a sense and a value which must be affirmed independently. Things, however, are to be conceived as the totality of situations which constitute the circumstances of a man's life. Hence, Ortega's first philosophical principle: "I am myself plus my circumstances". Life as a problem, however, is but one of the poles of his formula. Reason is the other. The two together function, not by dialectical opposition, but by necessary coexistence. Life, according to Ortega, does not consist in being, but rather, in coming to be, and as such it is of the nature of direction, program building, purpose to be achieved, value to be realized. In this sense the future as a time dimension acquires new dignity, and even the present and the past become articulate and meaning-full only in relation to the future. Even History demands a new point of departure and becomes militant with new visions. --J.A.F. Orthodoxy: Beliefs which are declared by a group to be true and normative. Heresy is a departure from and relative to a given orthodoxy. --V.S. Orthos Logos: See Right Reason. Ostensible Object: (Lat. ostendere, to show) The object envisaged by cognitive act irrespective of its actual existence. See Epistemological Object. --L.W. Ostensive: (Lat. ostendere, to show) Property of a concept or predicate by virtue of which it refers to and is clarified by reference to its instances. --A.C.B. Ostwald, Wilhelm: (1853-1932) German chemist. Winner of the Nobel prize for chemistry in 1909. In Die Uberwindung des wissenschaftlichen Materialistmus and in Naturphilosophie, his two best known works in the field of philosophy, he advocates a dynamic theory in opposition to materialism and mechanism. All properties of matter, and the psychic as well, are special forms of energy. --L.E.D. Oupnekhat: Anquetil Duperron's Latin translation of the Persian translation of 50 Upanishads (q.v.), a work praised by Schopenhauer as giving him complete consolation. --K.F.L. Outness: A term employed by Berkeley to express the experience of externality, that is the ideas of space and things placed at a distance. Hume used it in the sense of distance Hamilton understood it as the state of being outside of consciousness in a really existing world of material things. --J.J.R. Overindividual: Term used by H. Münsterberg to translate the German überindividuell. The term is applied to any cognitive or value object which transcends the individual subject. --L.W. P

To arrive at this condition the important thing is a persistent aspiration, call and self-offering and a will to reject all in oneself or around that stands in the way. Difficulties there will always be at the beginning and for as long a time as is necessary for the change ; but they are bound to disappear if they are met by a settled faith, will and patience.

To be always observing faults and wrong mo>’ements brings depression and discourages faith. Turn your eyes more to the incoming light and less to any immediate darkness.

token ::: n. --> Something intended or supposed to represent or indicate another thing or an event; a sign; a symbol; as, the rainbow is a token of God&

traditionlism ::: n. --> A system of faith founded on tradition; esp., the doctrine that all religious faith is to be based solely upon what is delivered from competent authority, exclusive of rational processes.

traitorous ::: a. --> Guilty of treason; treacherous; perfidious; faithless; as, a traitorous officer or subject.
Consisting in treason; partaking of treason; implying breach of allegiance; as, a traitorous scheme.


treacherous ::: a. --> Like a traitor; involving treachery; violating allegiance or faith pledged; traitorous to the state or sovereign; perfidious in private life; betraying a trust; faithless.

treachery ::: n. --> Violation of allegiance or of faith and confidence; treasonable or perfidious conduct; perfidy; treason.

trial ::: n. --> The act of trying or testing in any manner.
Any effort or exertion of strength for the purpose of ascertaining what can be done or effected.
The act of testing by experience; proof; test.
Examination by a test; experiment, as in chemistry, metallurgy, etc.
The state of being tried or tempted; exposure to suffering that tests strength, patience, faith, or the like; affliction or


tried ::: --> imp. & p. p. of Try. ::: adj. --> Proved; tested; faithful; trustworthy; as, a tried friend. ::: imp. & p. p.

troth ::: n. --> Belief; faith; fidelity.
Truth; verity; veracity; as, by my troth.
Betrothal.


true ::: 1. Faithful, as to a friend, vow, or cause; loyal. 2. Real, genuine, authentic. 3. Consistent with fact or reality; not false or erroneous. 4. Being or reflecting the essential or genuine character of something. 5. Proper. 6. Sincere; not deceitful. 7. Reliable; accurate: truer, truest, half-true.

true-hearted ::: a. --> Of a faithful heart; honest; sincere; not faithless or deceitful; as, a truhearted friend.

true ::: n. --> Conformable to fact; in accordance with the actual state of things; correct; not false, erroneous, inaccurate, or the like; as, a true relation or narration; a true history; a declaration is true when it states the facts.
Right to precision; conformable to a rule or pattern; exact; accurate; as, a true copy; a true likeness of the original.
Steady in adhering to friends, to promises, to a prince, or the like; unwavering; faithful; loyal; not false, fickle, or


trueness ::: n. --> The quality of being true; reality; genuineness; faithfulness; sincerity; exactness; truth.

truly ::: adv. --> In a true manner; according to truth; in agreement with fact; as, to state things truly; the facts are truly represented.
Exactly; justly; precisely; accurately; as, to estimate truly the weight of evidence.
Sincerely; honestly; really; faithfully; as, to be truly attached to a lover; the citizens are truly loyal to their prince or their country.
Conformably to law; legally; legitimately.


trustful ::: a. --> Full of trust; trusting.
Worthy of trust; faithful; trusty; trustworthy.


trustless ::: a. --> That may not be trusted; not worthy of trust; unfaithful.

trust ::: n. 1. Firm reliance on the integrity, ability, or character of a person or thing. 2. The condition and resulting obligation of having confidence placed in one. 3. A person or thing in which confidence or faith is placed. v. 4. To have or place reliance; depend on someone or something; have faith in. trusted, trusting.

truthless ::: a. --> Devoid of truth; dishonest; dishonest; spurious; faithless.

truth ::: n. --> The quality or being true; as: -- (a) Conformity to fact or reality; exact accordance with that which is, or has been; or shall be.
Conformity to rule; exactness; close correspondence with an example, mood, object of imitation, or the like.
Fidelity; constancy; steadfastness; faithfulness.
The practice of speaking what is true; freedom from falsehood; veracity.
That which is true or certain concerning any matter or


Truth, of the inner Warrior who fights against obscurity and falsehood, of the faithful servant of the Divine.

Unamuno y Jugo, Miguel de: Spanish Professor and writer. Born at Bilbao, Spain, September 29, 1864. Died 1936. First and secondary education in Bilbao. Philosophical studies and higher learning at the Central University of Madrid since 1880. Private instructor in Bilbao, 1884-1891. Professor of Greek language and literature at the University of Salamanca since 1891. President of the University of Salamanca and at the same time Professor of the History of the Spanish Language, in 1901. Madariaga considers him "The most important literary figure of Spain". If he does not embody, at least it may be asserted that Unamuno very well symbolizes the character of Spain. His conflict between faith and reason, life and thought, culture and civilization, depicts for us a clear picture of the Spanish cultural crisis.

unchristian ::: a. --> Not Christian; not converted to the Christian faith; infidel.
Contrary to Christianity; not like or becoming a Christian; as, unchristian conduct. ::: v. t. --> To make unchristian.


unchristianize ::: v. t. --> To turn from the Christian faith; to cause to abandon the belief and profession of Christianity.

unconverted ::: a. --> Not converted or exchanged.
Not changed in opinion, or from one faith to another.
Not persuaded of the truth of the Christian religion; heathenish.
Unregenerate; sinful; impenitent.


unfaithful ::: a. --> Not faithful; not observant of promises, vows, allegiance, or duty; violating trust or confidence; treacherous; perfidious; as, an unfaithful subject; an unfaithful agent or servant.
Not possessing faith; infidel.


unfaith ::: n. --> Absence or want of faith; faithlessness; distrust; unbelief.

universalist ::: n. --> One who believes in Universalism; one of a denomination of Christians holding this faith.
One who affects to understand all the particulars in statements or propositions. ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to Unversalists of their doctrines.


untrue ::: a. --> Not true; false; contrary to the fact; as, the story is untrue.
Not faithful; inconstant; false; disloyal. ::: adv. --> Untruly.


untruth ::: n. --> The quality of being untrue; contrariety to truth; want of veracity; also, treachery; faithlessness; disloyalty.
That which is untrue; a false assertion; a falsehood; a lie; also, an act of treachery or disloyalty.


unworthy of faith or trust; unreliable.

"Veda, then, is the creation of an age anterior to our intellectual philosophies. In that original epoch thought proceeded by other methods than those of our logical reasoning and speech accepted modes of expression which in our modern habits would be inadmissible. The wisest then depended on inner experience and the suggestions of the intuitive mind for all knowledge that ranged beyond mankind"s ordinary perceptions and daily activities. Their aim was illumination, not logical conviction, their ideal the inspired seer, not the accurate reasoner. Indian tradition has faithfully preserved this account of the origin of the Vedas. The Rishi was not the individual composer of the hymn, but the seer (drashtâ ) of an eternal truth and an impersonal knowledge. The language of Veda itself is shruti, a rhythm not composed by the intellect but heard, a divine Word that came vibrating out of the Infinite to the inner audience of the man who had previously made himself fit for the impersonal knowledge.” The Secret of the Veda

“Veda, then, is the creation of an age anterior to our intellectual philosophies. In that original epoch thought proceeded by other methods than those of our logical reasoning and speech accepted modes of expression which in our modern habits would be inadmissible. The wisest then depended on inner experience and the suggestions of the intuitive mind for all knowledge that ranged beyond mankind’s ordinary perceptions and daily activities. Their aim was illumination, not logical conviction, their ideal the inspired seer, not the accurate reasoner. Indian tradition has faithfully preserved this account of the origin of the Vedas. The Rishi was not the individual composer of the hymn, but the seer (drashtâ ) of an eternal truth and an impersonal knowledge. The language of Veda itself is shruti, a rhythm not composed by the intellect but heard, a divine Word that came vibrating out of the Infinite to the inner audience of the man who had previously made himself fit for the impersonal knowledge.” The Secret of the Veda

\Vhile this transformation is being done it is more than ever necessary to keep yourself free from all taint of the perversions of the ego. Let no demand or insistence creep in to stain the purity of the self-giving and the sacrifice. There must be no attachment to the work or the result, no laying doNvn of condi- tions, no claim to possess the Power that should possess you, no pride of the instrument, no vani^’ or arrogance. Nothing in the mind or in the vital or physical parts should be suffered to distort to its own use or seize for its own personal and separate satisfaction the greatness of the forces that are acting through you. Let your faith, your sincerity, your purity of aspiration be absolute and pervasive of all the planes and layers of the being ; then every disturbing element and distorting influence will pro- gressively fall away from your nature.

Voluntarism: (Lat. voluntas, will) In ontology, the theory that the will is the ultimate constituent of reality. Doctrine that the human will, or some force analogous to it, is the primary stuff of the universe; that blind, purposive impulse is the real in nature. (a) In psychology, theory that the will is the most elemental psychic factor, that striving, impulse, desire, and even action, with their concomitant emotions, are alone dependable. (b) In ethics, the doctrine that the human will is central to all moral questions, and superior to all other moral criteria, such as the conscience, or reasoning power. The subjective theory that the choice made by the will determines the good. Stands for indeterminism and freedom. (c) In theology, the will as the source of all religion, that blessedness is a state of activity. Augustine (353-430) held that God is absolute will, a will independent of the Logos, and that the good will of man is free. For Avicebron (1020-1070), will is indefinable and stands above mature and soul, matter and form, as the pnmary category. Despite the metaphysical opposition of Duns Scotus (1265-1308) the realist, and William of Occam (1280-1347) the nominalist, both considered the will superior to the intellect. Hume (1711-1776) maintained that the will is the determining factor in human conduct, and Kant (1724-1804) believed the will to be the source of all moral judgment, and the good to be based on the human will. Schopenhauer (1788-1860) posited the objectified will as the world-substance, force, or value. James (1842-1910) followed up Wundt's notion of the will as the purpose of the good with the notion that it is the essence of faith, also manifest in the will to believe. See Will, Conation. Opposed to Rationalism, Materialism, Intellectualism. -- J.K.F.

waverer ::: n. --> One who wavers; one who is unsettled in doctrine, faith, opinion, or the like.

When there is full faith and consecration, there comes also a receptivity to the Force which makes one do the right thing and take the right means and then circumstances adapt themselves and the result is visible.

Will to Believe: A phrase made famous by William James (1842-1910) in an essay by that title (1896). In general, the phrase characterizes much of James's philosophic ideas: a defence of the right and even the necessity to believe where evidence is not complete, the adventurous spirit by which men must live, the heroic character of all creative thinking, the open-mind to possibilities, the repudiation of the stubborn spirit and the will-not-to-know, the primacy of the will in successful living, the reasonableness of the whole man acting upon presented data, the active pragmatic disposition in general. This will to believe does not imply indiscriminative faith; it implies a genuine option, one which presents an issue that is lively, momentous and forced. Acts of indecision may be negative decisions. -- V.F.

With reference to the approach to the central reality of religion, God, and man's relation to it, types of the Philosophy of Religion may be distinguished, leaving out of account negative (atheism), skeptical and cynical (Xenophanes, Socrates, Voltaire), and agnostic views, although insertions by them are not to be separated from the history of religious consciousness. Fundamentalism, mainly a theological and often a Church phenomenon of a revivalist nature, philosophizes on the basis of unquestioning faith, seeking to buttress it by logical argument, usually taking the form of proofs of the existence of God (see God). Here belong all historic religions, Christianity in its two principal forms, Catholicism with its Scholastic philosophy and Protestantism with its greatly diversified philosophies, the numerous religions of Hinduism, such as Brahmanism, Shivaism and Vishnuism, the religion of Judaism, and Mohammedanism. Mysticism, tolerated by Church and philosophy, is less concerned with proof than with description and personal experience, revealing much of the psychological factors involved in belief and speculation. Indian philosophy is saturated with mysticism since its inception, Sufism is the outstanding form of Arab mysticism, while the greatest mystics in the West are Plotinus, Meister Eckhart, Tauler, Ruysbroek, Thomas a Kempis, and Jacob Bohme. Metaphysics incorporates religious concepts as thought necessities. Few philosophers have been able to avoid the concept of God in their ontology, or any reference to the relation of God to man in their ethics. So, e.g., Plato, Spinoza, Leibniz, Schelling, and especially Hegel who made the investigation of the process of the Absolute the essence of the Philosophy of Religion.

workless ::: a. --> Without work; not laboring; as, many people were still workless.
Not carried out in practice; not exemplified in fact; as, workless faith.


Wu ch'ang: The Five Constant Virtues of ancient Confucianism: righteousness on the part of the mother, brotherliness on the part of the elder brother, respect on the part of the young brother, and filial piety on the part of the son. Also called wu chiao and wu tien. The Five Constant Virtues of Confucianism from the Han dynasty (206 B.C. -220 A.D.) on benevolence (jen), righteousness (i), proprietv (li), wisdom (chih), and good faith (hsin). Also called wu hsing and wu te. The Five Human Relationships of Confucianism (wu lun).

Wu lun: The five human relationships, "those between the father and the son, the ruler and subordinates, husbind and wife, the elder and the younger, and friends." Also called the Five Constants (wu ch'ang). "Between father and son, there should be affection, between sovereign and ministers, there should be righteousness, between husband and wife, attention to their separate functions; between old and young, a proper order; and between friends, good faith (hsin)." (Mencius) -- W.T.C.

yam yam tanum sraddhaya arcati ::: whatever form he worships with faith. [cf. Gita 7.21]

yo yacchraddhah sa eva sah ::: whatever is a man's faith (sraddha) , that he is. [Gita 17.3]

zoroastrianism ::: n. --> The religious system of Zoroaster, the legislator and prophet of the ancient Persians, which was the national faith of Persia; mazdeism. The system presupposes a good spirit (Ormuzd) and an opposing evil spirit (Ahriman). Cf. Fire worship, under Fire, and Parsee.



QUOTES [487 / 487 - 1500 / 22028]


KEYS (10k)

   80 Sri Aurobindo
   60 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   45 The Mother
   34 Sri Ramakrishna
   14 Anonymous
   11 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   8 Swami Vivekananda
   7 Saint Leo the Great
   5 SWAMI SUBODHANANDA
   5 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   4 SWAMI BRAHMANANDA
   4 Robert Heinlein
   4 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   3 SWAMI PARAMANANDA
   3 Swami Akhandananda
   3 Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina
   3 Saint John of the Cross
   3 Saint Ambrose
   3 Patrul Rinpoche
   2 Thomas A Kempis
   2 Taigen Dan Leighton
   2 Swami Saradananda
   2 SWAMI RAMA
   2 Sri Sarada Devi
   2 Saint Hildegard of Bingen
   2 Saint Francis de Sales
   2 Rabindranath Tagore
   2 Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel
   2 Pope Gregory the Great
   2 Our Lady to Fr. Stefano Gobbi
   2 Our Lady to Father Stefano Gobbi
   2 Our Lady
   2 James W Fowler
   2 Ignatius of Antioch
   2 Guru Rinpoche
   2 Attar of Nishapur
   2 Athanasius
   2 Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
   2 Nichiren
   2 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   2 Jalaluddin Rumi
   2 Ibn Arabi
   2 Epictetus
   1 William Wordsworth
   1 William James
   1 Vivekananda
   1 Vincent van Gogh
   1 Venerable Mary of Jesus of Ágreda (1602-1665)
   1 Venerable Barthalomew Holzhauser
   1 The Mother?
   1 The incense they offer to GOD
   1 Tertullian of Carthage
   1 Terry Brooks
   1 SWAMI VIRAJANANDA
   1 Swami Vijnanananda
   1 Swami Sivananda Saraswati
   1 SWAMI RAMA TIRTHA
   1 Swami Paramananda
   1 Swami Brahmananda
   1 Swami Avdheshanand
   1 Swami Adbhutananda
   1 Steve Jobs
   1 S T Coleridge
   1 Sri Aurobindo
   1 Soren Kierkegaard
   1 Sophronius of Jerusalem
   1 SONG from GOSPEL OF SRI RAMAKRISHNA
   1 Shaykh Nazim Al Haqqani
   1 Shaykh Abdul Qadir Jilani
   1 Shantideva
   1 Sengcan
   1 Seneca
   1 Saint Vincent of Lerins
   1 Saint Peter Chrysologus
   1 Saint Paul
   1 Saint Louis de Montfort
   1 Saint Julie Billiart
   1 Saint John Vianney
   1 Saint John Eudes
   1 Saint John Climacus
   1 Saint Irenaeus of Lyons
   1 Saint Ignatius of Antioch
   1 Saint Gregory of Nyssa
   1 Saint Francis of Assisi
   1 Saint Cyril of Jerusalem
   1 Saint Cyprian of Carthage
   1 Saint Clement of Rome
   1 Saint Clare of Assisi
   1 Saint Bonaventure
   1 Saint Basil the Great
   1 Saint Basil of Caesarea
   1 Saint Angela Merici
   1 Saint Alphonsus Liguori
   1 Rowan Williams https://newstatesman.com/politics/religion/2020/08/covid-and-confronting-our-own-mortality
   1 Revelations III
   1 Revelation 1:5
   1 Ramakrishna
   1 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   1 Rainer Maria Rilke
   1 Raimon Panikkar
   1 Quodvultdeus
   1 Pope St. Leo the Great
   1 Polycarp to the Philippians
   1 Pierre Rousselot
   1 Peter J Carroll
   1 patiendo)
   1 PARAMAHAMSA YOGANANDA
   1 Our Lady of Revelation
   1 Our Lady of Good Success
   1 Norman Vincent Peale
   1 Norbert Wiener
   1 Nietzsche
   1 MOTHER MIRA
   1 Mother Mariana of Jesus Torres y Berriochoa (+1635)
   1 Maximus the Confessor
   1 Martin Luther King Jr.
   1 Martin Luther King
   1 Margaret Shepherd
   1 Manly P Hall
   1 Manapurush Swami Shivananda
   1 Mahayana; the Book of the Faith
   1 Luke XVI.10
   1 Letter of Barnabas
   1 Latita Vistara
   1 Kurt Vonnegut
   1 Khalil Gibran
   1 J.R.R. Tolkien
   1 Joseph Ratzinger
   1 Jordan Peterson
   1 John Paul II
   1 John Milton
   1 John Henry Newman
   1 JI Timothy IV. 7. 8
   1 Jerusalem Catecheses
   1 Jean Gebser
   1 James 1. 2
   1 Jalaluddin Rumi
   1 Jacques Rivière
   1 Jack Gardner
   1 is to shatter the faith of men here
   1 Israel Regardie
   1 Irenaeus
   1 Immanuel Kant
   1 Ibrahim of Cordova
   1 Herbert McCabe
   1 Henri de Lubac
   1 Henri De Lubac
   1 Helen Keller
   1 Gregory the Great
   1 Geshe Kelsang Gyatso
   1 George Eliot
   1 Fides et Ratio
   1 Ernest Holmes
   1 Eric Maisel
   1 Erelesiastieus
   1 Dr Robert A Hatch
   1 Didache
   1 Dhammapada
   1 C S Lewis
   1 Confucius
   1 Claudio Naranjo
   1 Cheryl Strayed
   1 Carl Sagan
   1 Carl Jung
   1 Caesarius of Arles
   1 Buddha
   1 Blaise Pascal
   1 Baruch Spinoza
   1 Baha-ullah
   1 Archibald Thomas Robertson
   1 Amaghanda Susta
   1 al-Kabīr al-Tabrānī
   1 Saint Teresa of Avila
   1 Jetsun Milarepa
   1 Aleister Crowley
   1 Abu Hamid al-Ghazali
   1 Abu Hassan al-Kharaqani
   1 Abd Al-Qadir al-Jilani
   1 2nd century sermon
   1 1 Timothy 6:20).
   1 1 John 5:3-5
   1 1904-1995)
   1 ?

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   41 Anonymous
   32 Paloma Faith
   30 Marianne Faithfull
   21 Faith Hunter
   20 Mahatma Gandhi
   16 The Mother
   15 Faith Hill
   14 Faith Martin
   13 Martin Luther
   12 Paulo Coelho
   12 Mother Teresa
   11 William Shakespeare
   11 Toba Beta
   10 Swami Vivekananda
   10 Mason Cooley
   9 Saint Augustine
   8 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   8 Max Lucado
   8 John Calvin
   7 Charles Haddon Spurgeon

1:Faith is a passionate intuition.
   ~ William Wordsworth,
2:This is the victory over the world - our faith. ~ 1 John 5:3-5,
3:Faith is the union of God and the soul. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
4:Faith Alone is what really matters. ~ Nichiren,
5:Man has become disconnected from his faith in perceptions. ~ Claudio Naranjo,
6:If one has faith one has nothing to fear. ~ SONG from GOSPEL OF SRI RAMAKRISHNA,
7:Sometimes life hits you in the head with a brick. Don't lose faith." ~ Steve Jobs,
8:Have faith and go on. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
9:Sometimes your only available transportation is a leap of faith ~ Margaret Shepherd,
10:to have faith is precisely to lose one's mind so as to win God. ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
11:Doubt is a pain too lonely to know that faith is his twin brother.
   ~ Khalil Gibran,
12:Man suffers through lack of faith in God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
13:Faith that is allergic to questioning is just fundamentalist blind dogma. ~ Taigen Dan Leighton,
14:Faith first, knowledge afterwards. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
15:Faith is a dark night for man, but in this very way it gives him light. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
16:Faith is the bird that feels the light when the dawn is still dark.
   ~ Rabindranath Tagore, [T5],
17:One description of faith involves letting go of our resistance to receiving. ~ Taigen Dan Leighton,
18:Have faith in the Lord's mercy and all can and will change.
   ~ The Mother,
19:Faith is different from proof; the latter is human, the former is a Gift from God.
   ~ Blaise Pascal,
20:Faith is taking the first step even when you can't see the whole staircase. ~ Martin Luther King Jr.,
21:Once a person has faith, he has achieved everything. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
22:With faith in the Divine Grace, all difficulties are solved.
   ~ The Mother,
23:But it must truly be development of the faith, not alteration of the faith. ~ Saint Vincent of Lerins,
24:Faith is taking the first step even when you don't see the whole staircase.
   ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.,
25:Faith is hidden household capital. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
26:He who has faith has all, and he who lacks it lacks all. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
27:Miracle is the pet child of faith. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
28:They who have faith will go through. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, [T0],
29:Faith has need of the whole truth. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
30:Gentleness and simple faith are the roads to the kingdom. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
31:He who has faith has all -- he who lacks faith lacks all. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
32:Imān (Faith) is not accepted without deeds, and deeds (are not accepted without) ~ al-Kabīr al-Tabrānī,
33:So faith comes from hearing, and hearing through the word of Christ. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Romans, 10:17,
34:You feel depressed because your faith is lukewarm. You must cultivate self-confidence. ~ Swami Saradananda,
35:And whatever you ask in prayer, you will receive, if you have faith. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Matthew, 21:22,
36:Faith is perfected through charity ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (DV 14.7ad5).,
37:He who has faith has all, and he who lacks faith lacks all. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
38:Faith is not the clinging to a shrine but an endless pilgrimage of the heart. ~ Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel,
39:There is but one cause of human failure. And that is man's lack of faith in his true Self.
   ~ William James,
40:The difficult is not the impossible. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Faith,
41:Anything done against faith or conscience is sinful. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
42:To be brave is to have faith in the Mother. ~ Swami Vivekananda, (C.W. VI. 149),
43:Any innovation in matters of faith is extremely pernicious and utterly damnable! ~ Saint John Eudes, (1601-1680),
44:For anyone, man or woman, who has faith in me, I have never departed. I sleep on their threshold. ~ Guru Rinpoche,
45:Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence." ~ Helen Keller,
46:The enemy of faith is doubt. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
47:Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason has once accepted in spite of your changing moods. ~ C S Lewis,
48:The disbelief of Thomas has done more for our faith than the faith of the other disciples. ~ Pope Gregory the Great,
49:You will have to subjugate your passions and hold fast to the faith that God exists everywhere. ~ Swami Vijnanananda,
50:Anyone who has once called on the Master, with sincere faith and devotion has nothing more to fear. ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
51:All my words are but chaff next to the faith of a simple man. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
52:Is there one faith for moderns and ancients ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (i.e. the Jews)?,
53:Renounce without hesitation faith and unbelief. ~ Attar of Nishapur, the Eternal Wisdom
54:Faith can achieve miracles, while vanity or egotism is the death of man. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
55:Put no faith in salvation through the political order. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
56:Constantly observe sincerity and fidelity and good faith. ~ Confucius, the Eternal Wisdom
57:Faith implies merely assent to what is proposed ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.8.5ad3).,
58:Faith demands piety rather than truth. Consequently, nobody is faithful except by reason of their obedience.~ Baruch Spinoza,
59:Be always faithful to your faith and you will feel no sorrow.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
60:My children, the three acts of faith, hope, and charity contain all the happiness of man upon the earth. ~ Saint John Vianney,
61:The activity of God, then, is not an alternative to my free activity. It is its source. ~ Herbert McCabe, Faith within Reason,
62:You must have boundless faith in the divine goodness, for the victory is absolutely certain. ~ Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina,
63:All difficulties are there to test the endurance of the faith.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
64:I am with you and I will take you to the goal. Have an unshakable faith and all will go well. Blessings.
   ~ The Mother?, [T2],
65:The eye of Faith is not one with the eye of Knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin, In Either Case,
66:Religious Faith strikes me as intellectual laziness.
   ~ Robert Heinlein, Jubal Hershaw, in Stranger in a Strange Land, (1961).,
67:For what is faith unless it is to believe what you do not see? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
68:Faith, Princess, the Prism Cat repeated. It is a highly underrated weapon against the dark things in this world.
   ~ Terry Brooks,
69:Day after day our aspiration will grow and our faith will intensify. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
70:Indeed, neither fasts nor vigils nor prayers nor alms nor faith nor virginity can help a man without charity. ~ Caesarius of Arles,
71:Faith is like pure eyes that enable us to see a pure and perfect world beyond the suffering world of samsara. ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
72:Entire resignation and absolute faith in God are at the root of all miraculous deeds. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
73:Faith is not intellectual belief but a function of the soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Faith,
74:If you have true faith and longing, you will get everything by the Grace of the Lord. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
75:Faith is like a bright ray of sunlight. It enables us to see God in all things as well as all things in God." ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
76:It is our lack of faith that creates our limitations. With my blessings,
   ~ The Mother, Mantras Of The Mother,
77:man carries the seed of the divine life in himself ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
78:Faith fights for God, while Knowledge is waiting for fulfilment. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin, In Either Case,
79:Faith guides even us and we follow its sure light on the way which conducts us to God and His homeland. ~ Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina,
80:The supreme faith is that which sees God in all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita, The Way and the Bhakta,
81:To the soul and Shakti in man nothing is impossible. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
82:Have a sincere faith in the Divine and you will clearly know what you have to do. Blessings.
   ~ The Mother, [T5],
83:Without a great ideal there can be no great movement. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I, The Leverage of Faith,
84:A faith she craves that can survive defeat, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Secret Knowledge,
85:Friendship with God, which is charity, is impossible without faith ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 1-2.65.5).,
86:It is faith in the name of the Lord that works wonders, for faith is life and doubt is death. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
87:Faith divines in the large what Knowledge sees distinctly and clearly. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin, In Either Case,
88:Faith is only a will aiming at greater truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Power of the Instruments,
89:Its faith is perfectibility, its watchword is progress. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Threefold Life,
90:Faith is a brief foretaste of the knowledge we will have in the future ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (DV 14.2ad9).,
91:How can I have more and more faith and calm, Mother?

   Aspiration and will.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
92:Real faith is something spiritual, a knowledge of the soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I, Morality and Yoga,
93:Have faith in the Divine, and go deep inside yourself. My help is always with you. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
94:In all circumstances take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming darts of the evil one. ~ Saint Paul, (Eph. 6:16),
95:Without indomitable Faith or inspired Wisdom no great cause can conquer. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin, In Either Case,
96:Faith is spontaneous knowledge in the psychic.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, Faith and the Divine Grace, Faith,
97:It is good to have this unshakable faith - it makes your path easier and shorter.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
98:Faith has to do with things that are not seen and hope with things that are not at hand. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
99:For a subject people there is no royal road to emancipation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I, The Leverage of Faith,
100:Give me, divine mother, love that knows no incontinence and faith adamantine that cannot be shaken. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
101:or it is not at all. Faith is as real as life; as actual as force ; as effectual as volition. It is the physics of the moral being. ~ S T Coleridge,
102:The mind forms or accepts the theories that support the turn of the being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Faith,
103:So long as you have faith in your guru, nothing will be able to obstruct your way. ~ Swami Vivekananda, (C.W. V. 106),
104:Faith is midway between scientific knowledge and opinion ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on Romans 1, lect. 6).,
105:The tamasic devotee has fiery faith. He employs force with God, like a robber seizing things by force. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
106:If you have a faith in something that cannot be proved, you must believe in everyone's else's faiths." ~ Jack Gardner, "Words are not things,", (2005).,
107:The primary and formal object of faith is the good which is the First Truth ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.7.1ad3).,
108:There may be happiness or misery. Be equally indifferent to both and abide in the faith of God. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
109:As you rest firmly on your own faith and opinion, so allow others also equal liberty to stand by theirs. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
110:Bare your forehead, waiting for the first blessing of light, and sing with the bird of the morning in glad faith. ~ Rabindranath Tagore, Fruit Gathering,
111:Faith is the first condition of success in every great undertaking. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I, The Leverage of Faith,
112:For those with faith, no evidence is necessary; for those without it, no evidence will suffice. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
113:If you want to see God, repeat his name with firm faith and try to discriminate the real from the unreal. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
114:One should have faith like that of an innocent child and the longing of a child who wants to see its mother. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
115:The Christian faith regards fire not as fire, but as representing the sublimity of God ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ScG 2.4).,
116:The mystery of the Trinity has opened up for us an entirely new perspective: the ground all being is communio.... ~ Henri de Lubac, The Christian Faith (13),
117:Seek to make your work a prayer, your believing an act, your living an art. It is then the object of your faith will be made visible to you." ~ Ernest Holmes,
118:But for one who has faith in the Divine Grace, the return to the Light becomes easy.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953, [T7],
119:It is in the transparency of faith and knowledge, and not with their aid, that the sphere of Being becomes perceptible in its entire diaphaneity. ~ Jean Gebser,
120:The prayer of faith is the only kind that is real prayer, and it is trust in God with full acknowledgment of God's power and love. ~ Archibald Thomas Robertson,
121:Faith is to believe what you do not see; the reward of this faith is to see what you believe." ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
122:Outward circumstances are only a cover for the real workings of the spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
123:A disciple, having firm faith in the infinite power of his Guru, walked over a river by simply uttering his name. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
124:Faith is to believe what we cannot see, and the reward of this faith is to see what we believe. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
125:Have faith, and realize that everything is He, and He is everything. There is nothing without Him. He has created everything out of Himself. ~ Swami Akhandananda,
126:Man demands miracles that he may have faith; he wishes to be dazzled in order that he may see
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga,
127:Mental faith is not sufficient; it must be completed and enforced by a vital and even a physical faith, a faith of the body. ~ The Mother,
128:A heretic who disbelieves one article of faith has neither living faith nor lifeless faith ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.5.3).,
129:so too is the grace of MIRACLES necessary that people may be confirmed in their faith ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.178.1ad5).,
130:Any advice?

   Be steady and confident.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, Elements of Yoga, Faith and the Divine Grace, Confidence,
131:f you are keen on realising God, repeat His name' with firm faith, and try to discriminate the Real from the unreal. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
132:If you are keen on realising God, repeat His name with firm faith, and try to discriminate the Real from the unreal. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
133:Knowledge relating to God keeps pace with faith. Where there is little faith, it is idle to look for much knowledge. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
134:With Christians, a poetical view of things is a duty. We are bid to color all things with hues of faith, to see a divine meaning in every event. ~ John Henry Newman,
135:Faith is the surest guide in the darkest days. 16 August 1954
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, Faith and the Divine Grace, FAITH [79],
136:One should have faith like that of an innocent child and such longing as a child has when it wants to see its mother. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
137:If you desire only the Divine, there is an absolute certitude that you will reach the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Faith,
138:Once the seed of faith takes root, it cannot be blown away, even by the strongest wind. Now that's a blessing.
   ~ Jalaluddin Rumi, [T5],
139:The worship of reason is arrogance and betrays a lack of intelligence. The rejection of reason is cowardice and betrays a lack of faith. ~ Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel,
140:He who can resign himself to the will of the Almighty with simple faith and guileless love realises the Lord very quickly. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
141:Hold firmly that our faith is identical with the ancients. Deny this, and you dissolve the unity of the Church." ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
142:The Supreme's power is infinite -it is our faith that is small. With my Blessings.
   ~ The Mother, Mantras Of The Mother, 23 August, [T5],
143:Ask: "Who am I?" until well-established in the conviction that a Higher Power guides us. That is firmness of faith. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
144:With perfect and unyielding faith, With steadfastness, respect, and courtesy, With modesty and conscientiousness, Work calmly for the happiness of others." ~ Shantideva, ,
145:Before the Lord comes, he sends yearning, love, reverence and faith into the heart of the devotee whom he is about to honor. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
146:Ask: 'Who am I?' until well-established in the conviction that a Higher Power guides us. That is firmness of faith.
   ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
147:Faith is more noble than science on the part of the object because its object is the First Truth ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 1-2.67.3ad1).,
148:In those who lack faith
Nothing positive will grow
Just as from a burnt seed
No green shoot will ever sprout.
~ Patrul Rinpoche, The Words of My Perfect Teacher,
149:Be confident, you will become what you have to be and achieve what you have to do.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, Faith and the Divine Grace,
150:Believe in your self! Have faith in your abilities! Without a humble, but reasonable confidence in your own powers, you cannot be successful or happy." ~ Norman Vincent Peale,
151:If you have faith and confidence, it is not the human form of the guru that you worship, but the Supreme Lord who manifests through him. ~ The Mother,
152:And this is what he means when the Apostle says, 'the just man lives by faith' ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on Galatians 3, lect. 4).,
153:As soon as a man falls into sin, charity, faith, and mercy do not free him from sin, without penance ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (St 3.84.5ad2).,
154:or the Christian faith is resisted after it has been accepted ... and such is the unbelief of heretics ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.10.5),
155:Spiritual practices are absolutely necessary for self-knowledge, but if there be perfect faith, then little practice is enough. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
156:The Grace will never fail us - such is the faith we must keep constantly in our heart. With my blessings
   ~ The Mother, Mantras Of The Mother, 10 May,
157:The Church, though dispersed throughout the whole world, even to the ends of the earth, has received from the apostles and their disciples this faith. ~ Saint Irenaeus of Lyons,
158:Faith may vary with different men, in different epochs, but love is invariable in all. The true faith is ~ Ibrahim of Cordova, the Eternal Wisdom
159:Have faith and complete trust in the ways of God. relentless prayers offered with a pure and devoted heart have the power to make the impossible possible.
   ~ Swami Avdheshanand,
160:It is indispensable to keep the faith and the will to conquer. 2 May 1949
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, Faith and the Divine Grace, FAITH [80],
161:Mental knowledge cannot replace faith; so long as there is only mental knowledge, faith is still needed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Faith,
162:Faith is a kind of knowledge, inasmuch as the intellect is determined by faith to some knowable object ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 1.12.13ad3).,
163:By faith we too embraced Christ, the salvation of God the Father, as he came to us from Bethlehem. Gentiles before, we have now become the people of God. ~ Sophronius of Jerusalem,
164:In the present growing conflict what should be our attitude?

   Faith and total confidence in the Divine's Grace.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
165:It is absolutely necessary to confess according to Catholic faith that the whole Christ is in this sacrament ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 3.76.1).,
166:Our Lord's works produce faith in the things that he says: "He confirmed the word through accompanying signs" ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Mk 16:20).,
167:The faith of total trust allows blessings to enter you.
When the mind is free of doubt, whatever you wish can be achieved.
~ Patrul Rinpoche, The Words of My Perfect Teacher,
168:The loving child of God, by faith and devotion, experiences no trouble passing through life in spite of all its trouble and anxiety. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
169:The true devotee, firm in his faith, though he may be surrounded by all the impurities of the world, never loses his faith and love. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
170:For all who think of him with faith
The Buddha is there in front of them
And will give empowerments and blessings.
~ Patrul Rinpoche, The Words of My Perfect Teacher, [T5],
171:I am never far from those with faith, or even from those without it, though they do not see me. My children will always, always, be protected by my compassion. ~ Guru Rinpoche, [T5],
172:it is ordered toward confirming the faith, and it proceeds from God's omnipotence on which faith relies ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.178.1ad5).,
173:Why talk of sin and hell-fire all the days of your life? Chant the name of God. Have faith in God and you will be purged of all sins. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
174:Faith and courage are the true attitude to keep in life and work always and in the spiritual experience also. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Faith,
175:The Guru shows the disciple the path to life eternal, and protects him from all troubles. Putting great faith in the words of the Guru let the disciple live them. ~ SWAMI BRAHMANANDA,
176:The vision of faith penetrates into the remote future and turns the impossible into the possible. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I, The Leverage of Faith,
177:But the fruit of the spirit is love, joy, peace, long suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance. ~ Latita Vistara, the Eternal Wisdom
178:The intellect and life and emotion always grasp too much at things, fasten on premature certitudes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
179:We know some things about God through faith which, because of their sublimity, demonstrative reason cannot attain ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ScG 3.40).,
180:Your trust in God is sufficient to save you from rebirths. Cast all burden on Him. Have faith and that will save you. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks, 30,
181:Count it all joy when ye fall into diverse temptations, knowing this that the trying of your faith work-eth patience. ~ James 1. 2, 3, the Eternal Wisdom
182:The Divine holds our hand through all and if he seems to let us fall, it is only to raise us higher. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
183:We do not come to God with bodily steps, but with those of the mind, the first of which is faith ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on Jn 6, lect. 4).,
184:Have faith in the Lord; He is ever present...But no one can find God without continuous love for Him in the heart. To feel that love for God, one must practice it. ~ PARAMAHAMSA YOGANANDA,
185:Live in faith and hope, though it be in darkness, for in this darkness God protects the soul. Cast your care upon God for you are his and he will not forget you. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
186:The letter, even of the Gospel would kill, unless there exists the inward presence of the healing grace of faith ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 1-2.106.2).,
187:We have faith for a defense, if we are not smitten with distrust, in immediately making the sign of the cross and commanding and smearing the heel with the beast. ~ Tertullian of Carthage,
188:The perfect faith is an assent of the whole being to the truth seen by it or offered to its acceptance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
189:A heretic does not have the character of faith even if it is only one article of faith which he refuses to believe ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (DV 14.10ad10).,
190:All the time of our life and faith will benefit us nothing if we do not resist, as is fitting for children of God, in this present lawless age and in the coming trials. ~ Letter of Barnabas,
191:And without faith it is impossible to please him, for whoever would draw near to God must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who seek him. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Hebrews, 11:6,
192:In the long and difficult integral Yoga there must be an integral faith and an unshakable patience. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Master of the Work,
193:You are the Divinity, the Lord of lords you are; feel that. Realize in this moment. Faith full of conviction and devoid of the least doubt is true faith and works wonders. ~ SWAMI RAMA TIRTHA,
194:For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Ephesians, 2:8-9,
195:Three things are necessary to everyone: truth of faith which brings understanding, love of Christ which brings compassion, and endurance of hope which brings perseverance." ~ Saint Bonaventure,
196:When the sun of the gnosis has risen, doubt itself will pass away because its cause and utility have ended. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
197:When we contemplate the sufferings of Jesus He grants us, according to the measure of our faith, the grace to practice the virtues He revealed during those sacred hours." ~ Saint Angela Merici,
198:Three are the words that sum up the first state of the Yoga of devotion, faith, worship, obedience. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine and Human, Partial Systems of Yoga,
199:Those who have only an unformed faith do not believe in his name because they do not work unto salvation ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on Jn 1, lect. 6).,
200:What paralyzes life is lack of faith and lack of audacity. The difficulty lies not in solving problems but identifying them. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
201:A present incapacity, however heavy may seem its pressure, is only a trial of faith and a temporary difficulty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
202:Stand firm like a rock in your own faith. Be always watchful, cheerful and faithful to your Ideal. Be brave and true and unselfish. Never fear and never look back, but move on. ~ SWAMI PARAMANANDA,
203:Understanding is the reward of faith. Therefore, seek not to understand that you may believe, but believe that you may understand. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
204:In spiritual matters mental logic easily blunders; intuition, faith, a plastic spiritual reason are here the only guides. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, The Guru,
205:Make your entire life an expression of your faith and love for your teacher. This is real dwelling with the Guru. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, I Am That, Ch 32,
206:One must have faith in the Master of our life and works, even if for a long time He conceals Himself, and then in His own right time He will reveal His Presence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga IV,
207:The knowledge of faith does not bring rest to desire but rather sets it aflame, since every man desires to see what he believes ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ScG 3.40),
208:The knowledge of faith does not bring rest to desire but rather sets it aflame, since every man desires to see what he believes ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ScG 3.40).,
209:Before the Second Coming of Christ, Mary must, more than ever, shine in mercy, might and grace in order to bring unbelievers into the Catholic Faith." ~ Venerable Mary of Jesus of Ágreda (1602-1665),
210:The three elements of creativity are thus: loving, knowing, and doing - or heart, mind, and hands - or, as Zen Buddhist teaching has it; great faith, great question, and great courage." ~ Eric Maisel,
211:FAITH and HOPE can exist indeed in a way without charity, but they do not have the perfect character of virtue without CHARITY ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 1-2.65.4).,
212:In the preaching of the holy Gospel all should receive a strengthening of their faith. No one should be ashamed of the cross of Christ, through which the world has been redeemed. ~ Saint Leo the Great,
213:You made the profession of faith that brings salvation, you were plunged into the water, and three times you rose again. This symbolised the three days Christ spent in the tomb. ~ Jerusalem Catecheses,
214:The whole future of the Earth, as of religion, seems to me to depend on the awakening of our faith in the future. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Future of Man,
215:The whole world has been made by the energy of man, by the power of enthusiasm, by the power of faith. Arise and awake, the world is calling upon you. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
216:He alone enters the Kingdom of Heaven who is not a thief of his own thoughts. In other words, guilelessness and simple faith are the roads to that Kingdom. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
217:A heretic with regard to one article has no faith in the other articles, but only a kind of opinion in accordance with his own will ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.5.3).,
218:The circumstances that provoke our first entry into the path are not the real index of the thing that is at work in us. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
219:Faith is essentially and chiefly about God Who is the very truth, and secondarily about creatures in which God's truth is reflected ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.89.6).,
220:If I have the gift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and all knowledge; and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, 1 Corinthians, 13:2
221:Concentrate more upon what you are to be, on the ideal, with the faith that, since it is the goal before you, it must and will come.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV, [T1],
222:Having one soul and one heart, the Church holds this faith, preaches and teaches it consistently as though by a single voice. For though there are different languages, there is but one tradition. ~ Irenaeus,
223:Just as sacred doctrine is founded on the light of faith, so things in philosophy are founded on the light of natural reason ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (On the Trinity, 2.3).,
224:Let us unite our will in a great aspiration; let us pray for an intervention of the Grace. A miracle can always happen. Faith has a sovereign power. ~ The Mother, On Education, [T5],
225:The future is for those who have the soul of a hero. The stronger and more sincere our faith, the more powerful and effective will be the help received.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
226:You must have faith and patience. You have persistently up and doing. What will you gain by dejection and moaning just because you cannot achieve anything with a little effort? ~ Manapurush Swami Shivananda,
227:Faith in the Guru's words. One attains God by following the Guru's instructions step by step. It is like reaching an object by following the trail of a thread. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
228:Faith is indispensable to man, for without it he could not proceed forward in his journey through the Unknown. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, The Evolution of the Spiritual Man,
229:A heretic who disbelieves a single article of the Faith does not have either the habit of formed faith or the habit of unformed faith ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.5.3sc).,
230:The will moves the intellect and the other powers of the soul to the end: and in this respect an act of faith is "to believe in God" ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.2.2ad4).,
231:Faith is the unshaken stance of the soul and is unmoved by any adversity. The believing man is not one who thinks God can do all things, but one who trusts that he will obtain everything. ~ Saint John Climacus,
232:When we trust in the Divine's Grace we get an unfailing courage. 15 May 1954
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, Faith and the Divine Grace, TRUST IN THE DIVINE GRACE AND HELP [92],
233:All is possible if there is a true faith, a complete consecration, a sincere and pure aspiration and a persistent endeavour.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Himself And The Ashram, 539,
234:One can­not achieve everything merely by receiving the mantra; one must perform sadhana—severe sadhana. One should perform sadhana exactly as the Guru has instructed and with full faith. ~ Swami Adbhutananda,
235:As the ancient Fathers were saved through faith in Christ's future coming, so are we saved through faith in Christ's past birth and Passion ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 3.61.4).,
236:Behind every exoteric religion there is an esoteric Yoga, an intuitive knowledge to which its faith is the first step. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Lower Triple Purusha,
237:Faith and baptism are two kindred and inseparable ways of salvation: faith is perfected by baptism; baptism is established by faith, and both are completed by the use of the same names. ~ Saint Basil of Caesarea,
238:To put into practice the teachings of our holy faith, it is not enough to convince ourselves that they are true; we must love them. Love united to faith makes us practise our religion." ~ Saint Alphonsus Liguori,
239:Have strength. Have courage, no matter what may come before you. Overcome all weakness by the strength of purity. Move onward boldly, having real faith in the Lord. He will always protect you. ~ SWAMI PARAMANANDA,
240:Errors about creatures sometimes lead one astray from the truth of faith, in so far as the errors are inconsistent with a true knowledge of God ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ScG 2.3).,
241:If the disciple has sincere faith in the Guru, it is easy for him to attain Divine knowledge and devotion. The one thing needful is faith in the Guru. When this is gained, everything is gained. ~ SWAMI BRAHMANANDA,
242:Every faith is to a certain extent rational, it has its own analysis and synthesis by which it seeks to establish itself intellectually. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin, Opinion and Comments,
243:I have fought the good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith. Henceforth there is laid up for me-a crown of righteousness. ~ JI Timothy IV. 7. 8, the Eternal Wisdom
244:It is when all seems lost that all can be saved. When you have lost confidence in your personal power, then you should have faith in the Divine Grace.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
245:Even a blind and ignorant faith is a better possession than the sceptical doubt which turns its back on our spiritual possibilities. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
246:Humans can see God if they give up selfishness, think of Him, and call upon Him. Through His name the inauspicious turns auspicious, and peace comes out of peacelessness. One need only have faith. ~ SWAMI SUBODHANANDA,
247:Thus strive by the faith of love to burn the veils of the demoniac nature over the soul that thou mayst purify thy mind and make it ready to understand. ~ Baha-ullah, the Eternal Wisdom
248:O Timothy, guard what has been entrusted to you. Avoid the godless chatter and contradictions of what is falsely called knowledge, for by professing it some have missed the mark as regards the faith" ~ 1 Timothy 6:20).,
249:A psalm is a blessing on the lips of the people, a hymn in praise of God, the assembly's homage, a general acclamation, a word that speaks for all, the voice of the Church, a confession of faith in song. ~ Saint Ambrose,
250:Tell the night that it cannot claim our day. No religion claims love's holy faith. Love's an ocean, vast and without shores. When lovers drown, they don't cry out or pray. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
251:Whatever you do, you have to do with faith. Whatever is to be achieved will be achieved that way alone. Go on doing worship and japa as you have been doing. Don't make your mind restless needlessly. ~ SWAMI SUBODHANANDA,
252:In moments of trial faith in the Divine protection and the call for that protection; at all times the faith that what the Divine wills is the best. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Faith,
253:Come together frequently to seek what is useful to your souls, because the whole time of your faith will not help you, if you are not made perfect at the last time. In the last days false prophets will multiply, ~ Didache,
254:The fact that some happen to doubt about articles of faith is not due to the uncertain nature of the truths, but to the weakness of human intelligence ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 1.5ad1).,
255:Until we know the Truth (not mentally but by experience, by change of consciousness) we need the soul's faith to sustain us and hold on to the Truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Faith,
256:The heart's faith and will in good are founded on a perception of the one Divine immanent in all things and leading the world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Power of the Instruments,
257:There is tremendous power in practice. Practice becomes firm and abiding if continued long and uninterruptedly with faith and devotion. Whatever you practice becomes in course of time your second nature. ~ SWAMI VIRAJANANDA,
258:Faith is necessary throughout and at every step because it is a needed assent of the soul and without this assent there can be no progress. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
259:Have faith in Guru, in his teachings, and in the surety that you can get free. Think day and night that this universe is zero, only God is. Have intense desire to get free. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
260:True belief, which is known as faith, comes after direct experience. Faith born from direct experience becomes a part of the aspirant's being, and such faith protects the aspirant like a mother protects her child. ~ SWAMI RAMA,
261:Once longing awakens, one becomes absorbed in contemplating and meditating on God. Through constant contemplation and meditation, one begins having glimpses of the Truth, and these experiences strengthen his faith. ~ SWAMI RAMA,
262:Faith in one's own Guru is necessary. If a man loves his Guru with his whole heart, obeys what the latter says, his mind being devoted to him, will naturally shun other attractions and thus get concentrated. ~ SWAMI SUBODHANANDA,
263:Up to a better covenant; disciplined From shadowy types to truth; from flesh to spirit; From imposition of strict laws to free Acceptance of large grace; from servile fear To filial; works of law to works of faith. ~ John Milton,
264:Knowledge and tapasya, whatever their force, have a less sustaining power—faith is the strongest staff for the journey. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother with Letters on The Mother, The Mother's Protection,
265:The faith of the heart and the life mind, like that of the intelligence, must be capable of a constant correction, enlarging and transformation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
266:Allah gave it to us to use it against shaitan, so use it at the start of every act. this weapon can defeat countless devils, so have faith, and use it. ~ Shaykh Nazim Al Haqqani, @Sufi_Path
267:Our faith is not only the power of believing in certain truths of the supernatural order: it is also, and at the same time, a new power of interpreting the visible world and natural being; a renaissance of reason. ~ Pierre Rousselot,
268:Out of suffering comes the serious mind; out of salvation, the grateful heart; out of endurance, fortitude; out of deliverance faith. Patient endurance attends to all things. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
269:All the nations will be united in the Catholic faith. Men will seek the kingdom of God in all solicitude. The Lord will give good pastors to the Church. Men will live in peace, each in his own field." ~ Venerable Barthalomew Holzhauser,
270:An absolute faith and trust in the Grace is, in the last analysis, the Supreme Wisdom. 15 August 1956
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, Faith and the Divine Grace, FAITH IN THE DIVINE AND HELP [106], [T9],
271:Very few are those who can stand firm on the rock of their faith and trust in the Divine.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, Elements of Yoga, Faith and the Divine Grace, Trust in the Divine Grace and Help,
272:The Grace and the help are always there for all who aspire for them and their power is limitless when received with faith and confidence.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, Faith in the Divine Grace and Help,
273:If we had a truly living faith, an absolute certitude of the almighty power of the Divine, His manifestation could be so evident that the whole earth would be transformed by it. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
274:There is nothing to prevent a man, who cannot grasp a proof, accepting as a matter of faith, what in itself is capable of being scientifically known and demonstrated ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 1.2.2ad1).,
275:The synthesis of the faith was not made to accord with human opinions, but rather what was of the greatest importance was gathered from all the Scriptures, to present the one teaching of the faith in its entirety. ~ Saint Cyril of Jerusalem,
276:Believe in a love that is being stored up for you like an inheritance, and have faith that in this love there is a strength and a blessing so large that you can travel as far as you wish without having to step outside it. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
277:He declares that the deserted wife shall have more children than she who has a husband, because faith has now made our people who seemed to have been deserted by God more numerous than those who were thought to possess him. ~ 2nd century sermon,
278:Many Bishops, Priests, Religious and Faithful no longer believe and have already lost the true faith in Jesus and in the Gospel. For this reason, the Church must be purified, with persecution and with blood." ~ Our Lady to Father Stefano Gobbi ,
279:There is nothing that is impossible to her who is the conscious Power and universal Goddess all-creative from eternity and armed with the Spirit's omnipotence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
280:When they tell of one who is born a king, Herod is disturbed. To save his kingdom he resolves to kill him, though if he would have faith in the child, he himself would reign in peace in this life and for ever in the life to come. ~ Quodvultdeus,
281:Detachment begets love. Hope in God begets detachment. Endurance and long-suffering beget hope. Total self-mastery begets these. Fear of God begets self-mastery. And faith in the Lord begets fear ~ Maximus the Confessor, Centuries on Charity 1.2,
282:The UNDERSTANDING of principles results from man's very nature, which is equally shared by all: whereas FAITH results from the gift of grace, which is not equally in all ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.5.4ad3).,
283:What the thought, the inner regard, the faith, śraddhā, settles itself upon with a complete and definite insistence, into that our inner being tends to change. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita, The Supreme Divine,
284:The lack of faith is spreading. Sins are committed and justified. The ministers of the sanctuary languish in lukewarmness and indifference and are dissipating the treasures which the Lord has put into their hands." ~ Our Lady to Fr. Stefano Gobbi,
285:Matrimony is specially ordained for the good of human offspring, but adultery is specially opposed to matrimony, by breaking the marriage faith which is due between spouses ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.154.8ad2).,
286:Nicodemus did not yet have true faith in the resurrection because he brought myrrh and aloes, thinking that the body of Christ would soon corrupt without them ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on John 19, lect. 6).,
287:The true believer practices what he believes. But of those who pay only lip service to faith, Paul has this to say: They profess to know God, but they deny him in their works. Therefore James says: Faith without works is dead. ~ Pope Gregory the Great,
288:I've never understood how God could expect His creatures to pick the one true religion by faith - it strikes me as a sloppy way to run a universe.
   ~ Robert Heinlein, Jubal Harshaw in Stranger in a Strange Land, (1961).Quotes About Religion & Theology,
289:Like the child who does not reason and has no care, trust thyself to the Divine that His will may be done.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, Elements of Yoga, Faith and the Divine Grace, Trust in the Divine Grace and Help,
290:Now, Macarius, true lover of Christ, we must take a step further in the faith of our holy religion, and consider the Word's becoming Man and His divine Appearing in our midst. That mystery the Jews traduce, the Greeks deride, but we adore. ~ Athanasius,
291:Without faith, our calendar is simply a way by which the revolutions of the earth around itself and around the sun are measured… In faith, time is measured…by the acts of God, whose heart is, in all his activity, turned toward man. ~ Joseph Ratzinger,
292:266. There are three forms in which the command may come, the will and faith in thy nature, thy ideal on which heart and brain are agreed and the voice of Himself or His angels.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human, Karma,
293:Faith is said to surpass reason, not because there is no act of reason in faith, but because reasoning about faith cannot lead to the sight of those things which are matters of faith ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (DV 14.2ad9).,
294:If faith and incredulity offered themselves together to him, he would receive them with an equal willingness, let them but open to him the door through which he must pass to his goal. ~ Attar of Nishapur, the Eternal Wisdom
295:The Magi are the "first-fruits of the Gentiles" that believed in Christ because their faith was a presage of the faith and devotion of the nations who were to come to Christ from afar ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 3.36.8).,
296:Faith adheres to all the articles of faith by reason of one medium: the First Truth proposed to us in Scriptures, according to the teaching of the Church who well understands them ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.5.3.ad2).,
297:If we wanted to lift our mind up towards God, we must have to bring it back from all external things and concentrate it at one point. But how to concentrate the scattered mind? This can be effected by faith in God or in one's own Guru. ~ SWAMI SUBODHANANDA,
298:One thing, all things: move among and intermingle, without distinction. To live in this realization is to be without anxiety about non-perfection. To live in this faith is the road to non-duality, because the non-dual is one with the trusting mind." ~ Sengcan,
299:To understand divine movements one must enter into the divine consciousness, till then faith and surrender are the only right attitude. How can the mind judge what is beyond all its measures?
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II,
300:One must be bold enough to face everything in order to serve the Ideal. Truth can never be realized by weak-minded people. Our task in life must be done boldly. Fear none. Divinity and purity are your birthright. Have faith and struggle on. ~ SWAMI PARAMANANDA,
301:You must have faith in the enlightened souls and carry on your religious practices accordingly. Trying to understand the pros and cons of their teachings with our impure minds - occupied as they are with thoughts of the world leads nowhere. ~ Swami Saradananda,
302:To suffer as a Christian is not only to suffer in confession of the faith, which is done by words, but also to suffer for doing any good work, or for avoiding any sin, for Christ's sake ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.124.5ad1).,
303:We must neither doubt nor hesitate with respect to the words of the Lord; rather, we must be fully persuaded that every word of God is true and possible, even if our nature should rebel against the idea; for in this lies the test of faith. ~ Saint Basil the Great,
304:I don't tell you or advise you to despise God's works, or to think there is anything against your faith in what the good God has made good. But use every kind of creature, and everything this world is equipped with, reasonably and moderately. ~ Saint Leo the Great,
305:Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love, Where there is injury, pardon; Where there is doubt, faith; Where there is despair, hope; Where there is darkness, light; And where there is sadness, joy.
   ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
306:Not only our memory but somehow our eyes as well contemplate the conversation between the angel Gabriel and the wondering Mary; likewise the conception by the Holy Spirit is wonderful both in its promise and in the faith that received it." ~ Pope St. Leo the Great,
307:How to concentrate the scattered mind? the mind which has been distributed to wife and children, to the attainment of name and fame and to the pursuit of all sorts of sensual pleasures? This can be effected by faith in God or in one's own Guru. ~ SWAMI SUBODHANANDA,
308:I chant the name of Hari. How can I be a sinner? He who constantly repeats: 'I am a sinner! I am a wretch!' verily becomes a sinner. What lack of faith! A man chants the name of God so much, and still he talks of sin! ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
309:God is brought into the presence of our affections through faith, since the believer assents to God voluntarily, according to what is said in Ephesians ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (3:17): "that Christ may dwell by faith in our hearts.",
310:Faith, more faith! Faith in your possibilities, faith in the Power that is at work behind the veil, faith in the work that is to be done and the offered guidance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV, Steps towards Overcoming Difficulties,
311:Meet together in common — every single one of you — in grace, in one faith and on Jesus Christ (who was of David's line in his human nature, son of man and son of God) that you may obey the bishop and presbytery with undistracted mind. ~ Saint Ignatius of Antioch,
312:Nor does she believe it loss of honour that she is soon to be the Mother of God. For why should she be in despair over the novelty of such conception, to whom the power of the most High has promised to effect it. Her implicit faith is confirmed. ~ Saint Leo the Great,
313:So Daniel, when he was required to worship the idol Bel, which the people and the king then worshipped, in asserting the honor of his God, broke forth with full faith and freedom, saying, "I worship nothing but the Lord my God" ~ Dn 14:5). ~ Saint Cyprian of Carthage,
314:There are three things by which faith stands firm, devotion remains constant, and virtue endures. They are prayer, fasting and mercy. Prayer knocks at the door, fasting obtains, mercy receives. Prayer, mercy and fasting: these three are one. ~ Saint Peter Chrysologus,
315:The way to rest is through toil, the way to life is through death. Christ has taken on himself the whole weakness of our lowly human nature. If then we are steadfast in our faith in him and in our love for him, we win the victory that he has won. ~ Saint Leo the Great,
316:The true believer [mu'min] is not concerned about his sustenance, because of the strength of his faith [iman] and his trusting reliance [ittikal] on his Lord (Almighty and Glorious is He). ~ Shaykh Abdul Qadir Jilani, @Sufi_Path
317:With the littlest ones, I am attaining each day my victory over Satan and his powerful army of evil, over the satanic and masonic forces organized against God, because I am leading my children along the road of heroic faith, of sure hope and of perfect love." ~ Our Lady ,
318:You proclaimed your faith in the Father - recall what you did - and the Son and the Spirit. Mark the sequence of events. In proclaiming this faith you died to the world, you rose again to God, and, as though buried to sin, you were reborn to eternal life. ~ Saint Ambrose,
319:Do not accept any of my words on faith, believing them just because I said them. Be like an analyst buying gold, who cuts, burns, and critically examines his product for authenticity. Only accept what passes the test by proving useful and beneficial in your life. ~ Buddha,
320:I become what I see in myself. All that thought suggests to me, I can do; all that thought reveals in me, I can become. This should be man's unshakable faith in himself, because God dwells in him.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays In Philosophy And Yoga,
321:Have faith that we have to regain our lost Self and 'Stop not till the goal is reached.' Remember these words of Swamiji, 'Do not forget the ideal - do not cut it down.' Let this body perish, still do not lower the ideal. Pray for strength. Pray always. ~ Swami Akhandananda,
322:He who fails to join in your worship shows his arrogance by the very fact of becoming a schismatic. If then, those who act carnally suffer death, how much more shall those who by wicked teaching corrupt God's faith for which Jesus Christ was crucified. ~ Ignatius of Antioch,
323:Some persons, however, find a difficulty in this faith; when they hear that the Father is God, and the Son God, and the Holy Spirit God, and yet that this Trinity is not three Gods, but one God. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, De Trinitate,
324:Your eyes are blindfolded; because there is the cloud of Maya before you. Your mind is dirty. Wash it, cleanse it - this is Sadhana. Faith and conviction of mind will grow according to your surroundings. That is why the company of holy men is necessary. ~ Swami Akhandananda,
325:The small number of souls, who hidden, will preserve the treasures of the Faith and practise virtue will suffer a cruel, unspeakable and prolonged martyrdom. Many will succumb to death from the violence of their sufferings and those who sacrifice." ~ Our Lady of Good Success,
326:Call on the Master devotedly; you will attain everything. I say, you are blessed; for you have been born in such an age. This is the time when you can see His divine sport. One can easily understand this divine play if he looks upon it with faith and devotion ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
327:Faith is the mother of us all, going forward with hope following and with love of God and Christ and neighbor leading the way. If a man is among these then he has fulfilled the commandment of righteousness, for he who has love is far from all sin. ~ Polycarp to the Philippians,
328:Faith & reason I like to wings on which the human spirit rises to the contemplation of truth; & God has placed in the human heart a desire to know the truth... so that, by knowing & loving God, men & women may also come to the fullness of truth about themselves. ~ John Paul II,
329:By their gifts, they acknowledge what they believe in their hearts, that they may show forth the mystery of their faith and understanding. ~ The incense they offer to GOD, the myrrh to MAN, the gold to the KING, consciously paying honour to the Divine and human Nature in union.,
330:Man is given faith in himself, his ideas and his powers that he may work and create and rise to greater things and in the end bring his strength as a worthy offering to the altar of the Spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
331:The very word paradox is paradoxical. Let the paradox be... Remember, after all, that the Gospel is full of paradoxes, that man is himself a living paradox, and that according to the Fathers of the Church, the Incarnation is the supreme Paradox." ~ Henri De Lubac, Par. of Faith,
332:A scholar wakes up early in the morning and seeks how to increase his knowledge. A pious wakes up and seeks how to increase his faith. But Abul-Hassan looks for how to make a human being happy." ~ Abu Hassan al-Kharaqani, (961 - 1033), one of the master Sufis of Iran, Wikipedia.,
333:More interesting than to demonstrate the Christian Faith, would be to set out a temptation... to describe it with plenty of detail, to show forth its wonderful cohesion with force enough to make the unbeliever giddy, and leave nothing for him but to plunge in. ~ Jacques Rivière,
334:Faith & reason are like two wings on which the human spirit rises to contemplation of truth; and God has placed in the human heart a desire to know the truth... so that, by knowing & loving God, men & women may also come to the fullness of truth about themselves. ~ Fides et Ratio,
335:The Church is not a special little group, isolated, apart, remaining untouched amidst the changes of the world. The Church is the world as believing in Christ, or, what comes to the same thing, it is Christ dwelling in and saving the world by our faith. ~ Yves Congar ~ 1904-1995),
336:The ocean is full of precious pearls,but you may not get them at the first dive. My boys, once again I enjoin you, have firm faith in the words of your Guru, & try to get absorbed in deep meditation. Be sure, sooner or later you will have a vision of the Lord. ~ SWAMI BRAHMANANDA,
337:Therefore, keep yourselves clean from these and watch over the tradition of the Fathers, and, above all, the orthodox faith in our Lord Jesus Christ, as you have learned it from the Scriptures and as you have often been put in mind of by me." ~ Athanasius, Life of Antony, 89(ACW),
338:The small number of souls, who hidden, will preserve the treasures of the Faith and practise virtue will suffer a cruel, unspeakable and prolonged martyrdom. Many will succumb to death from the violence of their sufferings..." ~ Mother Mariana of Jesus Torres y Berriochoa (+1635),
339:The name of the Lord purifies both the body & the mind. "I have taken the name of God; what have I to fear? What is there in the world to bind me? I have become immortal by taking the Lord's name with such a burning faith one should practice spiritual exercises ~ SWAMI BRAHMANANDA,
340:The reason for the transfiguration was to remove the scandal of the cross from the hearts of his disciples, and to prevent the humiliation of his voluntary suffering from disturbing the faith of those who had witnessed the surpassing glory that lay concealed. ~ Saint Leo the Great,
341:But it is not only the martyrs who share in his passion by their glorious courage; the same is true, by faith, of all who are reborn through baptism. That is why we are to celebrate the Lord's paschal sacrifice with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth. ~ Saint Leo the Great,
342:In Christ Abrahams posterity is blessed because in him the whole world receives the adoption of sons, and in him the patriarch becomes the father of all nations through the birth, not from human stock but by faith, of the descendants that were promised to him. ~ Saint Leo the Great,
343:The Prophet said: Don't sit with every learned man. Sit with the learned man who calls towards five matters towards faith from doubt, sincerity from show, modesty from pride, love from enmity, and ascetism from worldliness. ~ Abu Hamid al-Ghazali,
344:Because of Michael's help God's faithful children will march under his protection. They will decimate their foes and achieve victory through God's power…As a result of this a large number of heathens will join Christians in true faith ..." ~ Saint Hildegard of Bingen, (1098- 1179),
345:To see God is to have eternal life - and yet the pillars of our faith, John and Paul and Moses, say that God cannot be seen. Can you understand the dizziness of a soul that contemplates their words? If God is life, whoever does not see God does not see life. ~ Saint Gregory of Nyssa,
346:Courage their armour, faith their sword, they must walk,
The hand ready to smite, the eye to scout,
Casting a javelin regard in front,
Heroes and soldiers of the army of Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Descent into Night,
347:In the region of politics faith is the result of imagination working in the light of history; it takes its stand on reason and experience and aspires into the future from the firm ground of the past. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I, The Leverage of Faith,
348:The knowledge of the saints is more excellent than the knowledge of the wayfarer, and yet faith is more properly said of the wayfarer's knowledge, because the word "faith" denotes an imperfection of knowledge ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 2-2.174.2ad3).,
349:And He *said to them, "Because of the littleness of your faith; for truly I say to you, if you have faith the size of a mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, 'Move from here to there,' and it will move; and nothing will be impossible to you. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, Matthew, 17:20
350:It [the effectiveness of namajapa] depends on the person and how he does it. The Name of the Divine is in itself a power, if it is taken with the right faith and in the right attitude. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II, Namajapa or Repetition of the Name,
351:A summons to faith, courage and energy in the face of death isn't a call to heroics for the ego. It is an invitation to attend, to be absorbed in value, depth and beauty not our own. ~ Rowan Williams https://newstatesman.com/politics/religion/2020/08/covid-and-confronting-our-own-mortality,
352:Oh my heart, don't become discouraged so easily. Have faith. In the hidden world, there are many mysteries, many wonders. Even if the whole planet threatens your life, don't let go of the Beloved's robe for even a breath. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi, @Sufi_Path
353:Doing good to others is virtue; injuring other is sin. Strength & courage are virtue; weakness & cowardice are sin. Independence is virtue; dependence is sin. Loving others is virtue; hating others is sin. Faith in God is virtue; doubt is sin. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
354:A man thinks of God, no doubt, but he has no faith in Him. Again and again he forgets God and becomes attached to the world. It is like giving the elephant a bath; afterwards he covers his body with mud and dirt again. 'The mind is a mad elephant.' ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
355:The human intellect is too much afraid of error precisely because it is too much attached to a premature sense of certitude and a too hasty eagerness for positive finality in what it seems to seize of knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Faith and Shakti,
356:It is useful that many persons should write many books, differing in style but not in faith, concerning even the same questions, that the matter itself may reach the greatest number — some in one way, some in another. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, De Trinitate,
357:The existence of God and other like truths about God, which can be known by natural reason, are not articles of faith, but are preambles to the articles; for faith presupposes natural knowledge, even as grace presupposes nature ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 1.2.2ad1).,
358:Faith is a support from above; it is the brilliant shadow thrown by a secret light that exceeds the intellect and its data; it is the heart of a hidden knowledge that is not at the mercy of immediate appearances. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Master of the Work,
359:If a man repeats the name of God, his body, mind, and everything become pure. Why should one talk only about sin and hell, and such things? Say but once, 'O Lord, I have undoubtedly done wicked things, but I won't repeat them.' And have faith in His name. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
360:Jul 16 There is infinite strength in you. Never lose faith in yourself, my boy; God is in you. And His grace too. He is gracious to all. … Have faith, therefore; have firm faith in Him. Work hard with unshakable determination, and He will give you all knowledge. Strive unceasingly.~ Swami Brahmananda,
361:White Magic leans more toward the acquisition of wisdom and a general feeling of faith in the universe. The Black form in concerned more with the acquisition of power and is reflective of a basic faith in oneself.
   ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null, The Initiate Syllabuses 3o IOT, Liber Lux, Liber Nox [25],
362:As for the attacks, it is a long-standing affair and it may not be easy to make them stop at once-but one day they will have to cease. And meanwhile they can be made shorter and less acute, by keeping faith in my promise and calling for my help that is always available.
   ~ The Mother,
363:The plurality of persons in God is an article of faith, and natural reason is unable to discuss and adequately understand it though we hope to understand it in heaven when we shall see God in his essence, and faith will be replaced by vision ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (DP 9.5).,
364:As the certitude of scientia rests on first principles naturally known, so the principles of faith are known from a light divinely infused: "You are saved by grace, through faith; and this is not due to yourselves, for it is the gift of God" ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Eph 2:8).,
365:Each one of you has a glorious future if you dare believe me. Have a tremendous faith in yourselves, like the faith I had when I was a child, & which I am working out now. Have that faith, each one of you, in yourself, that eternal power is lodged in every soul ~ Swami Vivekananda,
366:We are commanded to live righteously, and the reward is set before us of our meriting to live happily in eternity. But who is able to live righteously and do good works unless he has been justified by faith? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, Various Questions to Simplician 1:2:21,
367:Each one of you has a glorious future if you dare believe me. Have a tremendous faith in yourselves, like the faith I had when I was a child, & which I am working out now. Have that faith, each one of you,in yourself — that eternal power is lodged in every soul ~ Swami Vivekananda,
368:...
12-Now we see but a dim reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.
13-And now these three remain: faith, hope, and love; but the greatest of these is love. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, 1 Corinthians, 13:13, King James Version,
369:Nothing is so dangerous as the habit we have of referring to a common opinion. So long as one trusts other people without taking the trouble to judge for oneself, one lives by the faith of others, error is passed on from hand to hand and example destroys us. ~ Seneca, the Eternal Wisdom
370:Sincerity, Aspiration, Faith, Devotion and Self-Giving, Surrender to the Divine Will, Love, Openness and Receptivity, Purity and Humility, Gratitude and Faithfulness, Will and Perseverance, Enthusiasm, Hope and Straightforwardness, Happiness and Joy, Heroism and Bravery, Prudence and Balance, Truth and Speech ~ ?, toc,
371:I have said that science is impossible without faith. ... Inductive logic, the logic of Bacon, is rather something on which we can act than something which we can prove, and to act on it is a supreme assertion of faith ... Science is a way of life which can only fluorish when men are free to have faith. ~ Norbert Wiener,
372:The Divine accepts whatever symbol, form or conception of himself is present to the mind of the worshipper, yāṁ yāṁ tanuṁ śraddhayā arcati, as it is said elsewhere, and meets him according to the faith that is in him. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita, Works, Devotion and Knowledge,
373:You have to remain in that beingness or consciousness with firm faith while having no identification with the body or personality or with name and form. Always identify yourself with consciousness. It will take a while for this conviction to take root, but persist. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
374:Christ takes shape in a believer through the faith that is in his inmost soul. Such a believer, gentle and humble of heart, is called to the freedom of grace. He does not boast of the merit he gains from good works, for they are worth nothing. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, Exposition on Galatians,
375:Fear is hidden consent. When you are afraid of something, it means that you admit its possibility and thus strengthen its hand. It can be said that it is a subconscient consent. Fear can be overcome in many ways. The ways of courage, faith, knowledge are some of them. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, 243,
376:Contradicted by the human law,
A faith in things that are not and must be
Lives comrade of this world's delight and pain,
The child of the secret soul's forbidden desire
Born of its amour with eternity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
377:Only were safe who kept God in their hearts:
   Courage their armour, faith their sword, they must walk,
   The hand ready to smite, the eye to scout,
   Casting a javelin regard in front,
   Heroes and soldiers of the army of Light.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Descent into Night, [T5],
378:For just as the first general precepts of the law of nature are self-evident to one in possession of natural reason, and have no need of promulgation, so also that of believing in God is primary and self-evident to one who has faith: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
379:It is a great gift to suffer for Christ, as it says in James ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (1:2): "Count it all joy, my brethren, when you meet various trials, for you know that the testing of your faith produces patience" ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on Mt. 10, lect.2 ).,
380:Whoever builds his faith exclusively on demonstrative proofs and deductive arguments, builds a faith on which it is impossible to rely. For he is affected by the negativities of constant objections. Certainty(al-yaqin) does not derive from the evidences of the mind but pours out from the depths of the heart. ~ Ibn Arabi,
381:Always we must repeat to the doubting intellect the promise of the Master, 'I will deliver thee from all sin and evil; do not grieve.' At the end, the flickerings of faith will cease; for we shall see his face and feel always the Divine Presence.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Master of the Work, 245, [T3],
382:Then if the tempest be loud and the thunderbolt leaping incessant
Shatters the roof, if the lintels flame at last and each cornice
Shrieks with the pain of the blast, if the very pillars totter,
Keep yet your faith in Zeus, hold fast to the word of ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
383:God is our wise and perfect friend, because he knows when to smite and when to fondle; when to slay us no less then when to save and to succour... There must be faith in the love and wisdom of God,... working out all for our good even when it is apparently veiled in evil. ~ Sri Aurobindo, 1984 Ashram Diary, July 3 and Augst 22,
384:As for cancer, the first thing is that you should drive off all fear. \* If you want to get cured there are two conditions. First you must be without fear, absolutely fearless, you understand, and secondly you must have a complete faith in the Divine protection. These two things are essential.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III,
385:What would you say are your three truths? JP: I would say, stive to manifest the faith necessary to make things better rather than worse. Pray that you have enough terror to be frightened out of your own deceit. And stive to be grateful regardless. That would be, thats good enough. ~ Jordan Peterson, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylTHKT4HSBc&list=WL&index=8
386:I was a terrible believer in things,but I was also a terrible nonbeliever in things. I was as searching as I was skeptical. I didn't know where to put my faith,or if there was such a place,or even what the word faith meant, in all of it's complexity. Everything seemed to be possibly potent and possibly fake. ~ Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail,
387:Bhagavan: God is of course necessary, for most people. They can go on with one, till they find out that they and God are not different.
The Swami continued, "In actual practice, sadhakas, even sincere ones, sometimes become dejected and lose faith in God. How to restore their faith? What should we do for them?" ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Day by Day,
388:In fact, however, the divine Strength, often unobserved and behind the veil, substitutes itself for our weakness and supports us through all our failings of faith, courage and patience. It makes the blind to see and the lame to stride over the hills.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Conditions of the Synthesis, The Synthesis of the Systems, 46,
389:... In all is the one Self, the one Divine is all; all are in the Divine, all are the Divine and there is nothing else in the universe, - this thought or this faith is the whole background until it becomes the whole substance of the consciousness of the worker. ...
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Sacrifice and the Lord of the Sacrifice [112] [T1],
390:Never forget that you are not alone. The Divine is with you helping and guiding you. He is the companion who never fails, the friend whose love comforts and strengthens. The more you feel lonely, the more you are ready to perceive His luminous Presence. Have faith and He will do everything for you.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, The Divine Is with You, [T5],
391:A mind now clouded by the illusions of the innate darkness of life is like a tarnished mirror, but when polished, it is sure to become like a clear mirror, reflecting the essential nature of phenomena and the true aspect of reality. Arouse deep faith, and diligently polish your mirror day and night. How should you polish it? Only by chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo ~ Nichiren,
392:If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God, who gives generously to all without reproach, and it will be given him. But let him ask in faith, with no doubting, for the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea that is driven and tossed by the wind. For that person must not suppose that he will receive anything from the Lord; he is a double-minded man, unstable in all his ways. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, James, 1:5-8,
393:Certainty [of faith] will remain incomplete as long as there is an atom of love of this world in the heart. When faith has become certitude, certitude has become knowingness, and knowingness has become Knowledge, you will become an expert in distinguishing between the good and the bad in the service of Allah (mighty and glorified is He). ~ Abd Al-Qadir al-Jilani, Purification of the Mind (Jila' Al-Khatir), Second Edition,
394:We cannot counteract the harm done by mental faith in the need for drugs by any external measures. Only by escaping from the mental prison and emerging consciously into the light of the spirit, by a conscious union with the Divine, can we enable Him to give back to us the balance and health we have lost.The supramental transformation is the only true remedy.
   ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms,
395:But from time to time Thy sublime light shines in a being and radiates through him over the world, and then a little wisdom, a little knowledge, a little disinterested faith, heroism and compassion penetrates men's hearts, transforms their minds and sets free a few elements from that sorrowful and implacable wheel of existence to which their blind ignorance subjects them.
   ~ The Mother, Prayers And Meditations,
396:The truth is that my work ~ I was going to say my mission ~ is to shatter the faith of men here, there, and everywhere, faith in affirmation, faith in negation, and faith in abstention in faith, and this for the sake of faith in faith itself; it is to war against all those who submit, whether it be to Catholicism, or to rationalism, or to agnosticism; it is to make all men live the life of inquietude and passionate desire. ~ Miguel de Unamuno,
397:So, the only thing to do is to accept quietly the conditions in which you find yourself, knowing that for him who has faith in the Divine it is always the best for him that happens. The Divine does not want human beings to suffer, but, in their ignorance, human beings react in such a way that they bring suffering upon themselves. In peace, quietness and surrender is the only solution.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
398:In the woods, we return to reason and faith. There I feel nothing can befall me in life - no disgrace, no calamity, (leaving me my eyes) which Nature cannot repair. Standing on the bare ground - my head bathed by the blithe air, and uplifted into infinite space - all mean egotism vanishes. I become a transparent eye-ball; I am nothing; I see all; the currents of the Universal Being circulate through me; I am part or particle of God. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
399:...to do the integral yoga one must first resolve to surrender entirely to the Divine, there is no other way, this is the way. But after that one must have the five psychological virtues, five psychological perfections and we say that the perfections are 1.Sincerity or Transparency 2.Faith or Trust (Trust in the Divine) 3.Devotion or Gratitude 4.Courage or Inspiration 5.Endurance or Perseverance
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956,
400:In India the healers by faith comm and their sick to repeat with absolute conviction the words, "There is no malady in me, Sickness is not." The sick man repeats and, so mentally denied, his malady disappears. Thus if you believe yourself to be mortally weak, you find yourself actually in that condition. Know and believe that you can have an immense power, and the power will come to you in the end. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
401:A DEVOTEE:"Sir, is there no help, then, for such a worldly person?"
MASTER:"Certainly there is. From time to time he should live in the company of holy men, and from time to time go into solitude and meditate on God. Furthermore, he should practice discrimination and pray to God, 'Give me faith and devotion.' Once a person has faith he has achieved everything. There is nothing greater than faith. ~ Sri Ramakrishna, The Gospels of Ramakrishna,
402:A religion is sometime a source of happiness, and I would not deprive anyone of happiness. But it is a comfort appropriate for the weak, not for the strong. The great trouble with religion - any religion - is that a religionist, having accepted certain propositions by faith, cannot thereafter judge those propositions by evidence. One may bask at the warm fire of faith or choose to live in the bleak certainty of reason- but one cannot have both.
   ~ Robert Heinlein, from Friday.,
403:5'If you need wisdom, ask our generous God, and he will give it to you. He will not rebuke you for asking. 6'But when you ask him, be sure that your faith is in God alone. Do not waver, for a person with divided loyalty is as unsettled as a wave of the sea that is blown and tossed by the wind. 7'Such people should not expect to receive anything from the Lord. 8'Their loyalty is divided between God and the world, and they are unstable in everything they do. ~ Anonymous, The Bible, James, 1,
404:It is important to preserve the body's strength and health, for it is our best instrument. Take care that it is strong and healthy, you possess no better instrument. Imagine that it is as strong as steel and that thanks to it you travel over this ocean of life. The weak will never attain to liberation, put off all weakness, tell your body that it is robust, your intelligence that it is strong, have in yourself a boundless faith and hope ~ Vivekananda, the Eternal Wisdom
405:The faith in which I was brought up assured me that I was better than other people; I was saved, they were damned ...Our hymns were loaded with arrogance -- self-congratulation on how cozy we were with the Almighty and what a high opinion he had of us, what hell everybody else would catch come Judgment Day.
   ~ Robert Heinlein, from Laurence J. Peter, Peter's Quotations: Ideas for Our Time, also James A. Haught, ed., 2000 Years Of Disbelief, Famous People with the Courage to Doubt.Quotes About Priests,
406:I admit that my visions can never mean to other men as much as they do to me. I do not regret this. All I ask is that my results should convince seekers after truth that there is beyond doubt something worth while seeking, attainable by methods more or less like mine. I do not want to father a flock, to be the fetish of fools and fanatics, or the founder of a faith whose followers are content to echo my opinions. I want each man to cut his own way through the jungle. ~ Aleister Crowley,
407:The sadhana of this Yoga does not proceed through any set mental teaching or prescribed forms of meditation, mantras or others, but by aspiration, by a self-concentration inwards or upwards, by self-opening to an Influence, to the Divine Power above us and its workings, to the Divine Presence in the heart, and by the rejection of all that is foreign to these things. It is only by faith, aspiration and surrender that this self-opening can come.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II, [T3],
408:All that the Light from above asks of us that it may begin its work is a call from the soul and a sufficient point of support in the mind. This support can be reached through an insistent idea of the Divine in the thought, a corresponding will in the dynamic parts, an aspiration, a faith, a need in the heart. Any one of these may lead or predominate, if all cannot move in unison or in an equal rhythm.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Yoga of Divine Works, Self-Consecration, 81,
409:The Real made me contemplate the light of the veils as the star of strong backing rose, and He said to me, "Do you know how many veils I have veiled you with?"
"No", I replied.
He said, "With seventy veils. Even if you raise them you will not see Me, and if you do not raise them you will not see Me."
"If you raise them you will see Me and if you do not raise them you will see Me."
"Take care of burning yourself!"
"You are My sight, so have faith. You are My Face, so veil yourself" ~ Ibn Arabi,
410:I didn't learn until I was in college about all the other cultures, and I should have learned that in the first grade. A first grader should understand that his or her culture isn't a rational invention; that there are thousands of other cultures and they all work pretty well; that all cultures function on faith rather than truth; that there are lots of alternatives to our own society. Cultural relativism is defensible and attractive. It's also a source of hope. It means we don't have to continue this way if we don't like it. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
411:These questionings and depressions are very foolish movements of the mind. If you were not open to the Grace, you would not have had these descents or experiences and there would have been no such progress as you have made. You have not to put such questions but to take it as a settled fact, and with full faith in the Mother and her working in you go on with your sadhana. Whatever difficulties there may be, will be solved in time by the natural progress of the sadhana. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV, Dealing with Depression and Despondency,
412:There are not many, those who have no secret garden of the mind. For this garden alone can give refreshment when life is barren of peace or sustenance or satisfactory answer. Such sanctuaries may be reached by a certain philosophy or faith, by the guidance of a beloved author or an understanding friend, by way of the temples of music and art, or by groping after truth through the vast kingdoms of knowledge. They encompass almost always truth and beauty, and are radiant with the light that never was on sea or land. - Clare Cameron, Green Fields of England ~ Israel Regardie, A Garden Of Pomegranates,
413:I believe faith is a human universal. We are endowed at birth with nascent capacities for faith. How these capacities are activated and grow depends to a large extent on how we are welcomed into the world and what kinds of environments we grow in. Faith is interactive and social; it requires community, language, ritual and nurture. Faith is also shaped by initiatives from beyond us and other people, initiatives of spirit or grace. How these latter initiatives are recognized and imaged, or unperceived and ignored, powerfully affects the shape of faith in our lives.
   ~ James W Fowler, Stages Of Faith,
414:Faith in its essence is a light in the soul which turns towards the truth even when the mind doubts or the vital revolts or the physical consciousness denies it. When this extends itself to the instruments, it becomes a fixed belief in the mind, a sort of inner knowledge which resists all apparent denial by circumstances or appearances, a complete confidence, trust, adhesion in the vital and in the physical consciousness, an invariable clinging to the truth in which one has faith even when all is dark around and no cause of hope seems to be there. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II,
415:When the disciple considering an idea sees rise in him bad or unhealthy thoughts, thoughts of covetousness, hatred or error, he should either turn his mind away from that idea or concentrate it upon a healthy thought, or else examine the fatal nature of the idea, or analyse it and decompose it into its different elements, or, making appeal to all his strength and applying the greatest energy, suppress it from his mind; thus are removed and disappear these bad and unhealthy ideas and the mind becomes firm, calm, unified, full of vigour. ~ Mahayana; the Book of the Faith, the Eternal Wisdom
416:way of the Integral Yogin :::
   Nor is the seeker of the integral fulfilment permitted to solve too arbitrarily even the conflict of his own inner members. He has to harmonise deliberate knowledge with unquestioning faith; he must conciliate the gentle soul of love with the formidable need of power; the passivity of the soul that lives content in transcendent calm has to be fused with the activity of the divine helper and the divine warrior. ... An all-inclusive concentration is the difficult achievement towards which he must labour.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Self-Consecration, 78,
417:Faith is a coat against ... nakedness. For most of us, most of the time, faith functions so as to screen off the abyss of mystery that surrounds us. But we all at certain times call upon faith to provide nerve to stand in the presence of the abyss--naked, stripped of life supports, trusting only in the being, the mercy and the power of the Other in the darkness. Faith helps us form a dependable 'life space,' an ultimate environment. At a deeper level, faith undergirds us when our life space is punctured and collapses, when the felt reality of our ultimate environment proves to be less than ultimate.
   ~ James W Fowler, Stages Of Faith,
418:When a man attains the Knowledge of Brahman he shows certain characteristics. The Bhagavata describes four of them: the state of a child, of an inert thing, of a madman, and of a ghoul. Sometimes the knower of Brahman acts like a five-year-old child. Sometimes he acts like a madman. Sometimes he remains like an inert thing. In this state he cannot work; he renounces all action. You may say that jnanis like Janaka were active. The truth is that people in olden times gave responsibility to their subordinate officers and thus freed themselves from worry. Further, at that time men possessed intense faith. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
419:There are only three fundamental obstacles that can stand in the way: (1) Absence of faith or insufficient faith. (2) Egoism - the mind clinging to its own ideas, the vital preferring its own desires to a true surrender, the physical adhering to its own habits. (3) Some inertia or fundamental resistance in the consciousness, not willing to change because it is too much of an effort or because it does not want to believe in its own capacity or the power of the Divine - or for some other more subconscient reason. You have to see for yourself which of these it is.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - III, Difficulties of the Path,
420:Although there is a difference of procedure between a Shaman of the Tungas and a Catholic prelate of Europe or between a coarse and sensual Vogul and a Puritan Independent of Connecticut, there is no difference in the principle of their creeds; for they all belong to the same category of people whose religion consists not in becoming better, but in believing in and carrying out certain arbitrary regulations. Only those who believe that the worship of God consists in aspiring to a better life differ from the first because they recognize quite another and certainly a loftier principle uniting all men of good faith in an invisible temple which alone can be the universal temple. ~ Immanuel Kant,
421:But while it is difficult for man to believe in something unseen within himself, it is easy for him to believe in something which he can image as extraneous to himself. The spiritual progress of most human beings demands an extraneous support, an object of faith outside us. It needs an external image of God; or it needs a human representative, - Incarnation, Prophet or Guru; or it demands both and receives them. For according to the need of the human soul the Divine manifests himself as deity, as human divine or in simple humanity - using that thick disguise, which so successfully conceals the Godhead, for a means of transmission of his guidance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga,
422:The ego cannot see where it is being led; it revolts against the leading, loses confidence, loses courage. These failings would not matter; for the divine Guide within is not offended by our revolt, not discouraged by our want of faith or repelled by our weakness; he has the entire love of the mother and the entire patience of the teacher. But by withdrawing our assent from the guidance we lose the consciousness, though not all the actuality-not, in any case, the eventuality -of its benefit. And we withdraw our assent because we fail to distinguish our higher Self from the lower through which he is preparing his self-revelation.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Four Aids, 64,
423:Although there is a difference of procedure between a Shaman of the Tungas and a Catholic prelate of Europe or between a coarse and sensual Vogul and a Puritan Independent of Connecticut, there is no difference in the principle of their creeds; for they all belong to the same category of people whose religion consists not in becoming better, but in believing in and carrying out certain arbitrary regulations. Only those who believe that the worship of God consists in aspiring to a better life differ from the first because they recognize quite another and certainly a loftier principle uniting all men of good faith in an invisible temple which alone can be the universal temple. ~ Kant, the Eternal Wisdom
424:There is no method in this Yoga except to concentrate, preferably in the heart, and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force transform the consciousness; one can concentrate also in the head or between the eyebrows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is a beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be. For the rest one must not depend on one's own efforts only, but succeed in establishing a contact with the Divine and a receptivity to the Mother's Power and Presence.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II,
425:The truth is that Tolstoy, with his immense genius, with his colossal faith, with his vast fearlessness and vast knowledge of life, is deficient in one faculty and one faculty alone. He is not a mystic; and therefore he has a tendency to go mad. Men talk of the extravagances and frenzies that have been produced by mysticism; they are a mere drop in the bucket. In the main, and from the beginning of time, mysticism has kept men sane. The thing that has driven them mad was logic. ...The only thing that has kept the race of men from the mad extremes of the convent and the pirate-galley, the night-club and the lethal chamber, has been mysticism - the belief that logic is misleading, and that things are not what they seem. ~ G K Chesterton, Tolstoy,
426:Faith :::
One must say, "Since I want only the Divine, my success is sure, I have only to walk forward in all confidence and His own Hand will be there secretly leading me to Him by His own way and at His own time." That is what you must keep as your constant mantra. Anything else one may doubt but that he who desires only the Divine shall reach the Divine is a certitude and more certain than two and two make four. That is the faith every sadhak must have at the bottom of his heart, supporting him through every stumble and blow and ordeal. It is only false ideas still casting their shadows on your mind that prevent you from having it. Push them aside and the back of the difficulty will be broken. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II,
427:The surest way towards this integral fulfilment is to find the Master of the secret who dwells within us, open ourselves constantly to the divine Power which is also the divine Wisdom and Love and trust to it to effect the conversion. But it is difficult for the egoistic consciousness to do this at all at the beginning. And, if done at all, it is still difficult to do it perfectly and in every strand of our nature. It is difficult at first because our egoistic habits of thought, of sensation, of feeling block up the avenues by which we can arrive at the perception that is needed. It is difficult afterwards because the faith, the surrender, the courage requisite in this path are not easy to the ego-clouded soul.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, [63] [T7],
428:The Divine is with you according to your aspiration. Naturally that does not mean that He bends to the caprices of your outer nature,-I speak here of the truth of your being. And yet, sometimes he does fashion himself according to your outer aspirations, and if, like the devotees, you live alternately in separation and union, ecstasy and despair, the Divine also will separate from you and unite with you, according as you believe. The attitude is thus very important, even the outer attitude. People do not know how important is faith, how faith is miracle, creator of miracles. If you expect at every moment to be lifted up and pulled towards the Divine, He will come to lift you and He will be there, quite close, closer, ever closer.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I, Faith,
429:Certainly we have had our Napoleons and our Hitlers, but we have also had Jesus and Buddha. We have had tyrants, but also great humanitarians. We have had corrupt politicians, but also noble rulers. Even in the most selfish of times, the world has brought forth idealists, philanthropists, great artists, musicians, and poets. If we have inherited ages of feuding and intolerance, we have also inherited the magnificence of Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. For each tyrant who has profaned the pages of history, there have been thousands, even millions, of gentle people who have lived unhonored and unknown, keeping principles and living convictions under the most difficult situations. To see this good, and to know it, is to find a new courage and a new faith. ~ Manly P Hall, PRS Journal Summer 1961, p.7,
430:You must not fear, hold back, count or be a miser with your thoughts and feelings. It is also true that creation comes from an overflow, so you have to learn to intake, to imbibe, to nourish yourself and not be afraid of fullness. The fullness is like a tidal wave which then carries you, sweeps you into experience and into writing. Permit yourself to flow and overflow, allow for the rise in temperature, all the expansions and intensifications. Something is always born of excess: great art was born of great terrors, great loneliness, great inhibitions, instabilities, and it always balances them. If it seems to you that I move in a world of certitudes, you, par contre, must benefit from the great privilege of youth, which is that you move in a world of mysteries. But both must be ruled by faith. ~ Anais Nin,
431:Why does one feel afraid?

   I suppose it is because one is egoistic.
   There are three reasons. First, an excessive concern about one's security. Next, what one does not know always gives an uneasy feeling which is translated in the consciousness by fear. And above all, one doesn't have the habit of a spontaneous trust in the Divine. If you look into things sufficiently deeply, this is the true reason. There are people who do not even know that That exists, but one could tell them in other words, 'You have no faith in your destiny' or 'You know nothing about Grace' - anything whatever, you may put it as you like, but the root of the matter is a lack of trust. If one always had the feeling that it is the best that happens in all circumstances, one would not be afraid
   ~ The Mother,
432:If the doctor has a duty to relieve the suffering of his patients, he must have some idea where that suffering comes from, and this involves the retention of judgment, including moral judgment.And if, as far as he can tell in good faith, the misery of his patients derives from the way they live, he has a duty to tell them so—which often involves a more or less explicit condemnation of their way of life as completely incompatible with a satisfying existence. By avoiding the issue, the doctor is not being kind to his patients; he is being cowardly. Moreover, by refusing to place the onus on the patients to improve their lot, he is likely to mislead them into supposing that he has some purely technical or pharmacological answer to their problems, thus helping to perpetuate them. ~ Theodore Dalrymple, Life at the Bottom,
433:The more complete your faith, sincerity and surrender, the more will grace and protection be with you. And when the grace and protection of the Divine Mother are with you, what is there that can touch you or whom need you fear? A little of it even will carry you through all difficulties, obstacles and dangers, surrounded by its full presence you can go securely on your way because it is hers, careless of all menace, unaffected by any hostility however powerful, whether from this world or from worlds invisible. Its touch can turn difficulties into opportunities, failure into success and weakness into unfaltering strength. For the grace of the Divine Mother is the sanction of the Supreme and now or tomorrow its effect is sure, a thing decreed, inevitable and irresistible.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother,
434:Dare to be wise! Energy and spirit is needed to overcome the obstacles which indolence of nature as well as cowardice of heart oppose to our instruction. It is not without significance that the old myth makes the goddess of Wisdom emerge fully armed from the head of Jupiter; for her very first function is warlike. Even in her birth she has to maintain a hard struggle with the senses, which do not want to be dragged from their sweet repose. The greater part of humanity is too much harassed and fatigued by the struggle with want, to rally itself for a new and sterner struggle with error. Content if they themselves escape the hard labor of thought, men gladly resign to others the guardianship of their ideas, and if it happens that higher needs are stirred in them, they embrace with a eager faith the formulas which State and priesthood hold in readiness for such an occasion. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
435:10 You, however, know all about my teaching, my way of life, my purpose, faith, patience, love, endurance,
11 persecutions, sufferings—what kinds of things happened to me in Antioch, Iconium and Lystra, the persecutions I endured. Yet the Lord rescued me from all of them.
12 In fact, everyone who wants to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted,
13 while evildoers and impostors will go from bad to worse, deceiving and being deceived.
14 But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have become convinced of, because you know those from whom you learned it,
15 and how from infancy you have known the Holy Scriptures, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.
16 All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness,
17 so that the servant of God[a] may be thoroughly equipped for every good work. ~ 2 Timothy 3
436:Please initiate me into a tangible form of Yoga. I make this assurance that I shall follow your instructions to the very letter and refer to you my doubts and difficulties on the way.

There is no method in this Yoga except to concentrate, preferably in the heart, and call the presence and power of the Mother to take up the being and by the workings of her force transform the consciousness; one can concentrate also in the head or between the eyebrows, but for many this is a too difficult opening. When the mind falls quiet and the concentration becomes strong and the aspiration intense, then there is a beginning of experience. The more the faith, the more rapid the result is likely to be. For the rest one must not depend on one's own efforts only, but succeed in establishing a contact with the Divine and a receptivity to the Mother's Power and Presence. 30 November 1934 ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother,
437:People have to start educating themselves more in the faith. It is not enough just to go to mass anymore. You can't do that... We don't live at a time in which one can spiritually survive and be intellectually not very good. Maybe a few older ladies who have the extraordinary graces can get away with it. But modernism is such a toxic heresy that [you need] a lot of educational background--which you should work on anyway, because everybody has an obligation to continue educating themselves according to their state in life... They need to be reading more. They can listen to interviews and podcasts, that's fine. But at some point you've got to encounter the books. You've got to start reading them and educating yourself and getting a deeper understanding of the faith so that when you hear the nonsense from the secular media, [and even] from members of the magisterium now, you can keep your focus. ~ Reverend Chad Ripperger, transcribed from interview with Taylor Marshall,
438:The hostile forces have a certain self-chosen function: it is to test the condition of the individual, of the work, of the earth itself and their readiness for the spiritual descent and fulfilment. At every step of the journey, they are there attacking furiously, criticising, suggesting, imposing despondency or inciting to revolt, raising unbelief, amassing difficulties. No doubt, they put a very exaggerated interpretation on the rights given them by their function, making mountains even out of what seems to us a mole-hill. A little trifling false step or mistake and they appear on the road and clap a whole Himalaya as a barrier across it. But this opposition has been permitted from of old not merely as a test or ordeal, but as a compulsion on us to seek a greater strength, a more perfect self-knowledge, an intenser purity and force of aspiration, a faith that nothing can crush, a more powerful descent of the Divine Grace.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV,
439:Though I speak with the tongues of men and of an- gels and have not charity, I am as a sounding brass or a tinkling cymbal. And though I have the gift of prophecy and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and though I have all faith so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing. And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing. Charity suffereth long and is kind; charity envieth not ; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up doth not behave itself unseemly seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinlceth no evil, rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth, beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things. Charity never faileth...And now abideth faith, hope, charity, these three: but the greatest of these is charity. Follow after charity. ~ I. Corinthians. 1. 8. 13-XIV. 8, the Eternal Wisdom
440:To be able to receive the Divine Power and let act through you in the things of the outward life, there are three necessary conditions:
(i) Quietude, equality - not to be disturbed by anything that happens, to keep the mind still and firm, seeing the play of forces, but itself tranquil.
(ii) Absolute faith - faith that what is for the best will happen, but also that if one can make oneself a true instrument, the fruit will be that which one's will guided by the Divine Light sees as the thing to be done - kartavyam karma.
(iii) Receptivity - the power to receive the Divine Force and to feel its presence and the presence of the Mother in it and allow it to work, guiding one's sight and will and action. If this power and presence can be felt and this plasticity made the habit of the consciousness in action, - but plasticity to the Divine force alone without bringing in any foreign element, - the eventual result is sure. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II,
441:All that the Light from above asks of us that it may begin its work is a call from the soul and a sufficient point of support in the mind. This support can be reached through an insistent idea of the Divine in the thought, a corresponding will in the dynamic parts, an aspiration, a faith, a need in the heart. Any one of these may lead or predominate, if all cannot move in unison or in an equal rhythm. The idea may be and must in the beginning be inadequate; the aspiration may be narrow and imperfect, the faith poorly illumined or even, as not surely founded on the rock of knowledge, fluctuating, uncertain, easily diminished; often even it may be extinguished and need to be lit again with difficulty like a torch in a windy pass. But if once there is a resolute self-consecration from deep within, if there is an awakening to the souls call, these inadequate things can be a sufficient instrument for the divine purpose.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Yoga of Divine Works, Self-Consecration, 81,
442:There is nothing unintelligible in what I say about strength and Grace. Strength has a value for spiritual realisation, but to say that it can be done by strength only and by no other means is a violent exaggeration. Grace is not an invention, it is a face of spiritual experience. Many who would be considered as mere nothings by the wise and strong have attained by Grace; illiterate, without mental power or training, without "strength" of character or will, they have yet aspired and suddenly or rapidly grown into spiritual realisation, because they had faith or because they were sincere. ...

   Strength, if it is spiritual, is a power for spiritual realisation; a greater power is sincerity; the greatest power of all is Grace. I have said times without number that if a man is sincere, he will go through in spite of long delay and overwhelming difficulties. I have repeatedly spoken of the Divine Grace. I have referred any number of times to the line of the Gita:

   "I will deliver thee from all sin and evil, do not grieve." ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II,
443:It is here upon earth, in the body itself, that you must acquire a complete knowledge and learn to use a full and complete power. Only when you have done that will you be free to move about with entire security in all the worlds. Only when you are incapable of having the slightest fear, when you remain unmoved, for example, in the midst of the worst nightmare, can you say, "Now I am ready to go into the vital world." But this means the acquisition of a power and a knowledge that can come only when you are a perfect master of the impulses and desires of the vital nature. You must be absolutely free from everything that can bring in the beings of the darkness or allow them to rule over you; if you are not free, beware!

No attachments, no desires, no impulses, no preferences; perfect equanimity, unchanging peace and absolute faith in the Divine protection: with that you are safe, without it you are in peril. And as long as you are not safe, it is better to do like little chickens that take shelter under the mother's wings. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
444:It is necessary to observe and know the wrong movements in you; for they are the source of your trouble and have to be persistently rejected if you are to be free.
But do not be always thinking of your defects and wrong movements. Concentrate more upon what you are to be, on the ideal, with the faith that, since it is the goal before you, it must and will come.
To be always observing faults and wrong movements brings depression and discourages the faith. Turn your eyes more to the coming Light and less to any immediate darkness. Faith, cheerfulness, confidence in the ultimate victory are the things that help, - they make the progress easier and swifter. Make more of the good experiences that come to you; one experience of the kind is more important than the lapses and failures. When it ceases, do not repine or allow yourself to be discouraged, but be quiet within and aspire for its renewal in a stronger form leading to still deeper and fuller experience. Aspire always, but with more quietude, opening yourself to the Divine simply and wholly. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV,
445:Prayer helps to prepare this relation for us at first on the lower plane even while it is there consistent with much that is mere egoism and self-delusion; but afterwards we can draw towards the spiritual truth which is behind it. It is not then the giving of the thing asked for that matters, but the relation itself, the contact of mans life with God, the conscious interchange. In spiritual matters and in the seeking of spiritual gains, this conscious relation is a great power; it is a much greater power than our own entirely self-reliant struggle and effort and it brings a fuller spiritual growth and experience. Necessarily, in the end prayer either ceases in the greater thing for which it prepared us, -- in fact the form we call prayer is not itself essential so long as the faith, the will, the aspiration are there, -- or remains only for the joy of the relation. Also its objects, the artha or interest it seeks to realise, become higher and higher until we reach the highest motiveless devotion, which is that of divine love pure and simple without any other demand or longing.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Yoga of Divine Love,
446:By religion, then, I understand a propitiation or conciliation of powers superior to man which are believed to direct and control the course of nature and of human life. Thus defined, religion consists of two elements, a theoretical and a practical, namely, a belief in powers higher than man and an attempt to propitiate or please them. Of the two, belief clearly comes first, since we must believe in the existence of a divine being before we can attempt to please him. But unless the belief leads to a corresponding practice, it is not a religion but merely a theology; in the language of St. James, "faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone." In other words, no man is religious who does not govern his conduct in some measure by the fear or love of God. On the other hand, mere practice, divested of all religious belief, is also not religion. Two men may behave in exactly the same way, and yet one of them may be religious and the other not. If the one acts from the love or fear of God, he is religious; if the other acts from the love or fear of man, he is moral or immoral according as his behaviour comports or conflicts with the general good. ~ James George Frazer, The Golden Bough,
447:Anyway, in instances of this kind, I think it is people's faith, above all, which saves them. When they have performed their little ceremony properly, they feel confident, "Oh! now it will be over, for she is satisfied." And because they feel confident, it helps them to react and the illness disappears. I have seen this very often in the street. There might be a small hostile entity there, but these are very insignificant things.
   In other cases, in some temples, there are vital beings who are more or less powerful and have made their home there. But what Sri Aurobindo means here is that there is nothing, not even the most anti-divine force, which in its origin is not the Supreme Divine. So, necessarily, everything goes back to Him, consciously or unconsciously. In the consciousness of the one who makes the offering it does not go to the Divine: it goes to the greater or smaller demon to whom he turns. But through everything, through the wood of the idol or even the ill-will of the vital adversary, ultimately, all returns to the Divine, since all comes from Him. Only, the one who has made the offering or the sacrifice receives but in proportion to his own consciousness... ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956,
448:I have got three letters from you, but as I was busy with many things I couldn't answer them-today I am answering all the three together. It was known that it wouldn't be possible for you to come for darshan this time, it can't be easy to come twice within this short time. Don't be sorry, remain calm and remember the Mother, gather faith and strength within. You are a child of the Divine Mother, be tranquil, calm and full of force. There is no special procedure. To take the name of the Mother, to remember her within, to pray to her, all this may be described as calling the Mother. As it comes from within you, you have to call her accordingly. You can do also this - shutting your eyes you can imagine that the Mother is in front of you or you can sketch a picture of her in your mind and offer her your pranam, that obeissance will reach her. When you've time, you can meditate on her with the thinking attitude that she is with you, she's sitting in front of you. Doing these things people at last get to see her. Accept my blessings, I send the Mother's blessings also at the same time. From time to time Jyotirmoyee will take blessing flowers during pranam and send them to you. ~ The Mother, Nirodbaran Memorable contacts with the Mother,
449:the three results of effective practice: devotion, the central liberating knowledge and purification of ego; :::
   ...it leads straight and inevitably towards the highest devotion possible;.. There is bound up a growing sense of the Divine in all things, a deepening communion with the Divine in all our through, will and action and at every moment of our lives, a more and more moved conscecration to the Divine of the totality of our being....
   ...next, the practice of this Yoga demands a constant inward remembrance of the one central liberating knowledge, ... In all is the one Self, the one Divine is all; all are in the Divine, all are the Divine and there is nothing else in the universe, - this thought or this faith is the whole background until it becomes the whole substance of the consciousness of the worker. ...
   Lastly, the practice of this Yoga of sacrifice compels us to renounce all the inner supports of egoism, casting them out of our mind and will and actions, and to eliminate its seed, its presence, its influence out of our nature. All must be done for the Divine; all must be directed towards the Divine.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Sacrifice, The Triune Path and the Lord of the Sacrifice [T1],
450:I accept, will not give up, and will practice each of the Three Jewels,
   And will not let go of my guru or my yidam deity.
   As the samaya of the Buddha, first among the Three Jewels,
   I will apply myself to the true, essential reality.
   As the samaya of sacred Dharma, second among the Three Jewels,
   I will distill the very essence of all the vehicles' teachings.
   As the samaya of the Sangha, the third and final Jewel,
   I will look upon reality; I will behold pure awareness.
   And as the samaya of the guru and the yidam deity,
   I will take my very own mind, my pure mind, as a witness.
  
   Generally speaking, the Three Jewels should be regarded as the ultimate place to take refuge. As was taught in the section on taking refuge, your mind should be focused one-pointedly, with all your hopes and trust placed in their care. The gurus are a lamp that dispels the darkness of ignorance.
   As the guides who lead you along the path to liberation, they are your sole source of refuge and protection, from now until you attain enlightenment.
   For these reasons, you should act with unwavering faith, pure view and devotion, and engage in the approach and accomplishment of the divine yidam deity. ~ Dzogchen Rinpoche III, Great Perfection Outer and Inner Preliminaries,
451:Considered from this point of view, the fact that some of the theories which we know to be false give such amazingly accurate results is an adverse factor. Had we somewhat less knowledge, the group of phenomena which these "false" theories explain would appear to us to be large enough to "prove" these theories. However, these theories are considered to be "false" by us just for the reason that they are, in ultimate analysis, incompatible with more encompassing pictures and, if sufficiently many such false theories are discovered, they are bound to prove also to be in conflict with each other. Similarly, it is possible that the theories, which we consider to be "proved" by a number of numerical agreements which appears to be large enough for us, are false because they are in conflict with a possible more encompassing theory which is beyond our means of discovery. If this were true, we would have to expect conflicts between our theories as soon as their number grows beyond a certain point and as soon as they cover a sufficiently large number of groups of phenomena. In contrast to the article of faith of the theoretical physicist mentioned before, this is the nightmare of the theorist. ~ Eugene Paul Wigner, The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences,
452:Q: What is the right attitude to stick on to this path till the Supramental Truth is realised?

"A: There is the psychic condition and sincerity and devotion to the Mother."

What is "the psychic condition"?

The psychic condition? That means being in relation with one's psychic, I suppose, being governed by one's psychic being.

Sweet Mother, I don't understand very clearly the difference between faith, belief and confidence.

But Sri Aurobindo has given the full explanation here. If you don't understand, then...

He has written "Faith is a feeling in the whole being."

The whole being, yes. Faith, that's the whole being at once. He says that belief is something that occurs in the head, that is purely mental; and confidence is quite different. Confidence - one can have confidence in life, trust in the Divine, trust in others, trust in one's own destiny, that is, one has the feeling that everything is going to help him, to do what he wants to do.

Faith is a certitude without any proof.

Mother, on what does faith depend?

Probably on Divine Grace. Some people have it spontaneously. There are others who need to make a great effort to have it.
~ The Mother, Question and Answers, Volume-6, page no.120,
453:keep faith :::
We must have faith that always what is for the best happens. We may for the moment not consider it as the best because we are ignorant and also blind, because we do not see the consequences of things and what will happen later. But we must keep the faith that if it is like that, if we rely on the Divine, if we give Him the full charge of ourselves, if we let Him decide everything for us, well, we must know that it is always what is best for us that happens. This is an absolute fact. To the extent to which you surrender, the best happens to you. This may not be in conformity with what you would like, your preferences or desire, because these things are blind: it is the best from thespiritual point of view, the best for your progress, your development, your spiritual growth, your true life. It is always that. And you must keep this faith, because faith is the expression of a trust in the Divine and the full self-giving you make to the Divine. And when you make it, it is something absolutely marvellous. That's a fact, these are not just words, you understand, it is a fact. When you look back, all kinds of things which you did not understand when they happened to you, you realise as just the thing which was necessary in order to compel you to make the needed progress. Always, without exception. It is our blindness which prevents us from seeing it. ~ The Mother,
454:the first necessity; :::
   The first necessity is to dissolve that central faith and vision in the mind which concentrate it on its development and satisfaction and interests in the old externalised order of things. It is imperative to exchange this surface orientation for the deeper faith and vision which see only the Divine and seek only after the Divine. The next need is to compel all our lower being to pay homage to this new faith and greater vision. All our nature must make an integral surrender; it must offer itself in every part and every movement to that which seems to the unregenerated sensemind so much less real than the material world and its objects. Our whole being - soul, mind, sense, heart, will, life, body - must consecrate all its energies so entirely and in such a way that it shall become a fit vehicle for the Divine. This is no easy task; for everything in the world follows the fixed habit which is to it a law and resists a radical change. And no change can be more radical than the revolution attempted in the integral Yoga. Everything in us has constantly to be called back to the central faith and will and vision. Every thought and impulse has to be reminded in the language of the Upanishad that That is the divine Brahman and not this which men here adore. Every vital fibre has to be persuaded to accept an entire renunciation of all that hitherto represented to it its own existence.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Self-Consecration, 72,
455:9. Atonement with the Father/Abyss:Atonement consists in no more than the abandonment of that self-generated double monster-the dragon thought to be God (superego) and the dragon thought to be Sin (repressed id). But this requires an abandonment of the attachment to ego itself, and that is what is difficult. One must have a faith that the father is merciful, and then a reliance on that mercy. Therewith, the center of belief is transferred outside of the bedeviling god's tight scaly ring, and the dreadful ogres dissolve. It is in this ordeal that the hero may derive hope and assurance from the helpful female figure, by whose magic (pollen charms or power of intercession) he is protected through all the frightening experiences of the father's ego-shattering initiation. For if it is impossible to trust the terrifying father-face, then one's faith must be centered elsewhere (Spider Woman, Blessed Mother); and with that reliance for support, one endures the crisis-only to find, in the end, that the father and mother reflect each other, and are in essence the same. The problem of the hero going to meet the father is to open his soul beyond terror to such a degree that he will be ripe to understand how the sickening and insane tragedies of this vast and ruthless cosmos are completely validated in the majesty of Being. The hero transcends life with its peculiar blind spot and for a moment rises to a glimpse of the source. He beholds the face of the father, understands-and the two are atoned. ~ Joseph Campbell,
456:Life clung to its seat with cords of gasping breath;
   Lapped was his body by a tenebrous tongue.
   Existence smothered travailed to survive;
   Hope strangled perished in his empty soul,
   Belief and memory abolished died
   And all that helps the spirit in its course.
   There crawled through every tense and aching nerve
   Leaving behind its poignant quaking trail
   A nameless and unutterable fear.
   As a sea nears a victim bound and still,
   The approach alarmed his mind for ever dumb
   Of an implacable eternity
   Of pain inhuman and intolerable.
   This he must bear, his hope of heaven estranged;
   He must ever exist without extinction's peace
   In a slow suffering Time and tortured Space,
   An anguished nothingness his endless state.
   A lifeless vacancy was now his breast,
   And in the place where once was luminous thought,
   Only remained like a pale motionless ghost
   An incapacity for faith and hope
   And the dread conviction of a vanquished soul
   Immortal still but with its godhead lost,
   Self lost and God and touch of happier worlds.
   But he endured, stilled the vain terror, bore
   The smothering coils of agony and affright;
   Then peace returned and the soul's sovereign gaze.
   To the blank horror a calm Light replied:
   Immutable, undying and unborn,
   Mighty and mute the Godhead in him woke
   And faced the pain and danger of the world.
   He mastered the tides of Nature with a look:
   He met with his bare spirit naked Hell.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Descent into Night,
457:challenge for the Integral Yogin :::
   Nor is the seeker of the integral fulfilment permitted to solve too arbitrarily even the conflict of his own inner members. He has to harmonise deliberate knowledge with unquestioning faith; he must conciliate the gentle soul of love with the formidable need of power; the passivity of the soul that lives content in transcendent calm has to be fused with the activity of the divine helper and the divine warrior. To him as to all seekers of the spirit there are offered for solution the oppositions of the reason, the clinging hold of the senses, the perturbations of the heart, the ambush of the desires, the clog of the physical body; but he has to deal in another fashion with their mutual and internal conflicts and their hindrance to his aim, for he must arrive at an infinitely more difficult perfection in the handling of all this rebel matter. Accepting them as instruments for the divine realisation and manifestation, he has to convert their jangling discords, to enlighten their thick darknesses, to transfigure them separately and all together, harmonising them in themselves and with each other, -- integrally, omitting no grain or strand or vibration, leaving no iota of imperfection anywhere. All exclusive concentration, or even a succession of concentrations of that kind, can be in his complex work only a temporary convenience; it has to be abandoned as soon as its utility is over. An all-inclusive concentration is the difficult achievement towards which he must labour.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, 78, [T9],
458:How can faith be increased?

Through aspiration, I suppose. Some have it spontaneously... You see, it is difficult to pray if one doesn't have faith, but if one can make prayer a means of increasing one's faith, or aspiring, having an aspiration, having an aspiration to have faith... Most of these qualities require an effort. If one does not have a thing and wants to have it, well, it needs great, great, great sustained efforts, a constant aspiration, an unflagging will, a sincerity at each moment; then one is sure, it will come one day - it can come in a second. There are people who have it, and then they have contrary movements which come and attack. These people, if their will is sincere, can shield their faith, repel the attacks. There are others who cultivate doubt because it is a kind of dilettantism - that, there's nothing more dangerous than that. It is as though one were letting the worm into the fruit: it eventually eats it up completely. This means that when a movement of this sort comes - it usually comes first into the mind - the first thing to do is to be very determined and refuse it. Surely one must not enjoy looking on just to see what is going to happen; that kind of curiosity is terribly dangerous.

It is perhaps more difficult for intellectuals to have faith than for those who are simple, sincere, who are straightforward, without intellectual complications. But I think that if an intellectual person has faith, then that becomes very powerful, a very powerful thing which can truly work miracles. ~ The Mother, Question and Answers, Volume-6, page no.121),
459:the powers of concentration :::
   By concentration on anything whatsoever we are able to know that thing, to make it deliver up its concealed secrets; we must use this power to know not things, but the one Thing-in-itself. By concentration again the whole will can be gathered up for the acquisition of that which is still ungrasped, still beyond us; this power, if it is sufficiently trained, sufficiently single-minded, sufficiently sincere, sure of itself, faithful to itself alone, absolute in faith, we can use for the acquisition of any object whatsoever; but we ought to use it not for the acquisition of the many objects which the world offers to us, but to grasp spiritually that one object worthy of pursuit which is also the one subject worthy of knowledge. By concentration of our whole being on one status of itself, we can become whatever we choose; we can become, for instance, even if we were before a mass of weaknesses and fear, a mass instead of strength and courage, or we can become all a great purity, holiness and peace or a single universal soul of Love; but we ought, it is said, to use this power to become not even these things, high as they may be in comparison with what we now are, but rather to become that which is above all things and free from all action and attributes, the pure and absolute Being. All else, all other concentration can only be valuable for preparation, for previous steps, for a gradual training of the dissolute and self-dissipating thought, will and being towards their grand and unique object.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Concentration, [318],
460:You say that you feel you have returned to your old life and that you have fallen from that state of spiritual consciousness in which you remained for some time. And you ask whether it comes from the fact that Sri Aurobindo and myself have withdrawn our protection and our help because you had been unable to fulfil your promise.

It is a mistake to think that anything at all has been withdrawn by us. Our help and our protection are with you as always, but it would be more correct to say that both your inability to feel our help and your inability to keep your promise are the simultaneous effects of the same cause.

Remember what I wrote to you when you went to Calcutta to fetch your family: do not let any influence come in between you and the Divine. You did not pay sufficient attention to this warning: you have allowed an influence to interfere strongly between you and your spiritual life; your devotion and your faith have been seriously shaken by this. As a consequence, you became afraid and you did not find the same joy in your offering to the Divine Cause; and also, quite naturally, you fell back into your ordinary consciousness and your old life.

You are quite right, nevertheless, not to let yourself be discouraged. Whatever the fall, it is always possible not only to get up again but also to rise higher and to reach the goal. Only a strong aspiration and a constant will are needed.

You have to take a firm resolution to let nothing interfere with your ascent towards the Divine Realisation. And then the success is certain.

Be assured of our unfailing help and protection. 3 February 1931 ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother - I,
461:But in the integral conception the Conscious Soul is the Lord, the Nature-Soul is his executive Energy. Purusha is of the nature of Sat, the being of conscious self-existence pure and infinite; Shakti or Prakriti is of the nature of Chit, - it is power of the Purusha's self-conscious existence, pure and infinite. The relation of the two exists between the poles of rest and action. When the Energy is absorbed in the bliss of conscious self-existence, there is rest; when thePurusha pours itself out in the action of its Energy, there is action, creation and the enjoyment or Ananda of becoming. But if Ananda is the creator and begetter of all becoming, its method is Tapas or force of the Purusha's consciousness dwelling upon its own infinite potentiality in existence and producing from it truths of conception or real Ideas, vijnana, which, proceedingfrom an omniscient and omnipotent Self-existence, have the surety of their own fulfilment and contain in themselves the nature and law of their own becoming in the terms of mind, life and matter. The eventual omnipotence of Tapas and the infallible fulfilment of the Idea are the very foundation of all Yoga. In man we render these terms by Will and Faith, - a will that is eventually self-effective because it is of the substance of Knowledge and a faith that is the reflex in the lower consciousness of a Truth or real Idea yet unrealised in the manifestation. It is this self-certainty of the Idea which is meant by the Gita when it says, yo yac-chraddhah sa eva sah, 'whatever is a man's faith or the sure Idea in him, that he becomes.'
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Conditions of the Synthesis, The Synthesis of the Systems, 43,
462:The Lord has veiled himself and his absolute wisdom and eternal consciousness in ignorant Nature-Force and suffers her to drive the individual being, with its complicity, as the ego; this lower action of Nature continues to prevail, often even in spite of man's half-lit imperfect efforts at a nobler motive and a purer self-knowledge. Our human effort at perfection fails, or progresses very incompletely, owing to the force of Nature's past actions in us, her past formations, her long-rooted associations; it turns towards a true and high-climbing success only when a greater Knowledge and Power than our own breaks through the lid of our ignorance and guides or takes up our personal will. For our human will is a misled and wandering ray that has parted from the supreme Puissance. The period of slow emergence out of this lower working into a higher light and purer force is the valley of the shadow of death for the striver after perfection; it is a dreadful passage full of trials, sufferings, sorrows, obscurations, stumblings, errors, pitfalls. To abridge and alleviate this ordeal or to penetrate it with the divine delight faith is necessary, an increasing surrender of the mind to the knowledge that imposes itself from within and, above all, a true aspiration and a right and unfaltering and sincere practice. "Practise unfalteringly," says the Gita, "with a heart free from despondency," the Yoga; for even though in the earlier stage of the path we drink deep of the bitter poison of internal discord and suffering, the last taste of this cup is the sweetness of the nectar of immortality and the honey-wine of an eternal Ananda. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Supreme Will, 219,
463:There is the one door in us that sometimes swings open upon the splendour of a truth beyond and, before it shuts again, allows a ray to touch us, - a luminous intimation which, if we have the strength and firmness, we may hold to in our faith and make a starting-point for another play of consciousness than that of the sense-mind, for the play of Intuition. For if we examine carefully, we shall find that Intuition is our first teacher. Intuition always stands veiled behind our mental operations. Intuition brings to man those brilliant messages from the Unknown which are the beginning of his higher knowledge. Reason only comes in afterwards to see what profit it can have of the shining harvest. Intuition gives us that idea of something behind and beyond all that we know and seem to be which pursues man always in contradiction of his lower reason and all his normal experience and impels him to formulate that formless perception in the more positive ideas of God, Immortality, Heaven and the rest by which we strive to express it to the mind. For Intuition is as strong as Nature herself from whose very soul it has sprung and cares nothing for the contradictions of reason or the denials of experience. It knows what is because it is, because itself it is of that and has come from that, and will not yield it to the judgment of what merely becomes and appears. What the Intuition tells us of, is not so much Existence as the Existent, for it proceeds from that one point of light in us which gives it its advantage, that sometimes opened door in our own self-awareness. Ancient Vedanta seized this message of the Intuition and formulated it in the three great declarations of the Upanishads, I am He, Thou art That, O Swetaketu, All this is the Brahman; this Self is the Brahman.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, The Methods of Vedantic Knowledge,
464:I know some individuals who make this their daily practice: starting at the beginning and reading a canto or half a canto every day till they reach the end and then starting at the beginning again, and in that way they have gone through the whole of Savitri many times. When this is done in groups there's really no doubt that by this going through the whole soundbody of the epic from beginning to end aloud, there must be built up a very strong force field of vibrations. It is definitely of benefit to the people who participate in it. But again I would say that the effect or benefit of this sacrifice will be richer to the extent that the reading is done with understanding and above all with soul surrender. It shouldn't become a mere ritual.
Sri Aurobindo's mantric lines, repeated one after the other, will always have their power; but the power will be much greater if the mind can participate, and the will and the heart.
I have also heard of some groups who select one line that seems to have a particular mantric power and then within the group they chant that line many, many times. They concentrate on that one special line, and try to take its vibrations deep into themselves. Again I am sure that this is very beneficial to those who practice it.
In that way the words enter very deeply into the consciousness. There they resonate and do their work, and perhaps not just the surface meaning but the deeper meaning and the deeper vibrations may reveal their full depth to those who undertake this exercise if it is done with self-dedication, with a true aspiration to internalise the heart of the meaning, not just as a mere repetition.
At another end of the spectrum of possible approaches to Savitri, we can say there would be the aesthetic approach, the approach of enjoying it for its poetic beauty. I met a gentleman a couple of months ago, who told me, "We have faith in Sri Aurobindo, but it is so difficult to understand his books. We tried with The Life Divine, we tried with The Synthesis of Yoga but we found them so difficult. ~ collab summer & fall 2011,
465:the characteristics of Life, Mind and Spirit :::
   The characteristic energy of bodily Life is not so much in progress as in persistence, not so much in individual self-enlargement as in self-repetition. There is, indeed, in physical Nature a progression from type to type, from the vegetable to the animal, from the animal to man; for even in inanimate Matter Mind is at work. But once a type is marked off physically, the chief immediate preoccupation of the terrestrial Mother seems to be to keep it in being by a constant reproduction. For Life always seeks immortality; but since individual form is impermanent and only the idea of a form is permanent in the consciousness that creates the universe, -for there it does not perish,- such constant reproduction is the only possible material immortality. Self-preservation, self-repetition, self-multiplication are necessarily, then, the predominant instincts of all material existence.
   The characteristic energy of pure Mind is change and the more it acquires elevation and organisation, the more this law of Mind assumes the aspect of a continual enlargement, improvement and better arrangement of its gains and so of a continual passage from a smaller and simpler to a larger and more complex perfection. For Mind, unlike bodily life, is infinite in its field, elastic in its expansion, easily variable in its formations. Change, then, self-enlargement and self-improvement are its proper instincts. Its faith is perfectibility, its watchword is progress.
   The characteristic law of Spirit is self-existent perfection and immutable infinity. It possesses always and in its own right the immortality which is the aim of Life and the perfection which is the goal of Mind. The attainment of the eternal and the realisation of that which is the same in all things and beyond all things, equally blissful in universe and outside it, untouched by the imperfections and limitations of the forms and activities in which it dwells, are the glory of the spiritual life.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Introduction - The Conditions Of the Synthesis, The Threefold Life,
466:And therefore, all of those for whom authentic transformation has deeply unseated their souls must, I believe, wrestle with the profound moral obligation to shout form the heart-perhaps quietly and gently, with tears of reluctance; perhaps with fierce fire and angry wisdom; perhaps with slow and careful analysis; perhaps by unshakable public example-but authentically always and absolutely carries a a demand and duty: you must speak out, to the best of your ability, and shake the spiritual tree, and shine your headlights into the eyes of the complacent. You must let that radical realization rumble through your veins and rattle those around you.
   Alas, if you fail to do so, you are betraying your own authenticity. You are hiding your true estate. You don't want to upset others because you don't want to upset your self. You are acting in bad faith, the taste of a bad infinity.
   Because, you see, the alarming fact is that any realization of depth carries a terrible burden: those who are allowed to see are simultaneously saddled with the obligation to communicate that vision in no uncertain terms: that is the bargain. You were allowed to see the truth under the agreement that you would communicate it to others (that is the ultimate meaning of the bodhisattva vow). And therefore, if you have seen, you simply must speak out. Speak out with compassion, or speak out with angry wisdom, or speak out with skillful means, but speak out you must.
   And this is truly a terrible burden, a horrible burden, because in any case there is no room for timidity. The fact that you might be wrong is simply no excuse: You might be right in your communication, and you might be wrong, but that doesn't matter. What does matter, as Kierkegaard so rudely reminded us, is that only by investing and speaking your vision with passion, can the truth, one way or another, finally penetrate the reluctance of the world. If you are right, or if you are wrong, it is only your passion that will force either to be discovered. It is your duty to promote that discovery-either way-and therefore it is your duty to speak your truth with whatever passion and courage you can find in your heart. You must shout, in whatever way you can. ~ Ken Wilber, One Taste,
467:formal-operational ::: The orange altitude emerged a few hundred years ago with the European Rennisance. Its modern, rational view grew in prominance through the Age of Enlightenment and came to its fullest expression during the Industrial Revolution.

Fueling this age of reason and science was the emergence of formal operational cognition, or the ability to operate on thoughts themselves. No longer limited to reflection on concrete objects, cognition moves from representations to abstractions and can now operate on a range of non-tangiable propositions that may not reflect the concrete world. This is the basis of scientific reasoning through hypothesis. Orange also brings multiplistic thinking, or the realization that there are several possible ways of approaching a situation, even though one is still considered most right. Self-sense at orange features two shifts, first to expert and then to achiever, these moves feature an increase in self-awareness and appreciation for multiple possibilities in a given situation. Recognition that one doesnt always live up to idealized social expectations is fueled by an awareness that begins to penetrate the inner world of subjectivity. This is the beginning of introspection. An objectifiable self-sense and the capacity to take a third person perspective. Needs shift from belonging to self-esteem. And values land on pragmatic utiliarian approaches to life that rely on ... and thinking to earn progress, prosperity and self-reliance. Morality at orange sees right defined by universal ethical principles. The emergence of formal operational thinking at orange enables a world-centric care for universal human rights and the right of each individual for autonomy and the pursuit of happiness. A desire for individual dignity and self-respect are also driving forces behind orange morality. A significant number of the founding fathers of the United States harbored orange values. ...

Faith at orange is called Individual Reflective and so far as identity and world-view are differentiated from others, and faith takes on an essence of critical thought. Demythologizing symbols into conceptual meanings. At orange we see the emergence of rational deism and secularism. ~ Essential Integral, 4.1-51, Formal Operational,
468:At the basis of this collaboration there is necessarily the will to change, no longer to be what one is, for things to be no longer what they are. There are several ways of reaching it, and all the methods are good when they succeed! One may be deeply disgusted with what exists and wish ardently to come out of all this and attain something else; one may - and this is a more positive way - one may feel within oneself the touch, the approach of something positively beautiful and true, and willingly drop all the rest so that nothing may burden the journey to this new beauty and truth.

   What is indispensable in every case is the ardent will for progress, the willing and joyful renunciation of all that hampers the advance: to throw far away from oneself all that prevents one from going forward, and to set out into the unknown with the ardent faith that this is the truth of tomorrow, inevitable, which must necessarily come, which nothing, nobody, no bad will, even that of Nature, can prevent from becoming a reality - perhaps of a not too distant future - a reality which is being worked out now and which those who know how to change, how not to be weighed down by old habits, will surely have the good fortune not only to see but to realise. People sleep, they forget, they take life easy - they forget, forget all the time.... But if we could remember... that we are at an exceptional hour, a unique time, that we have this immense good fortune, this invaluable privilege of being present at the birth of a new world, we could easily get rid of everything that impedes and hinders our progress.

   So, the most important thing, it seems, is to remember this fact; even when one doesn't have the tangible experience, to have the certainty of it and faith in it; to remember always, to recall it constantly, to go to sleep with this idea, to wake up with this perception; to do all that one does with this great truth as the background, as a constant support, this great truth that we are witnessing the birth of a new world.

   We can participate in it, we can become this new world. And truly, when one has such a marvellous opportunity, one should be ready to give up everything for its sake. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958, [T1],
469:Are there no false visions?
There are what in appearance are false visions. There are, for instance, hundreds or thousands of people who say that they have seen the Christ. Of that number those who have actually seen Him are perhaps less than a dozen, and even with them there is much to say about what they have seen. What the others saw may be an emanation; or it may be a thought or even an image remembered by the mind. There are, too, those who are strong believers in the Christ and have had a vision of some Force or Being or some remembered image that is very luminous and makes upon them a strong impression. They have seen something which they feel belongs to another world, to a supernatural order, and it has created in them an emotion of fear, awe or joy; and as they believe in the Christ, they can think of nothing else and say it is He. But the same vision or experience if it comes to one who believes in the Hindu, the Mohammedan or some other religion, will take a different name and form. The thing seen or experienced may be fundamentally the same, but it is formulated differently according to the different make-up of the apprehending mind. It is only those that can go beyond beliefs and faiths and myths and traditions who are able to say what it really is; but these are few, very few. You must be free from every mental construction, you must divest yourself of all that is merely local or temporal, before you can know what you have seen.

   Spiritual experience means the contact with the Divine in oneself (or without, which comes to the same thing in that domain). And it is an experience identical everywhere in all countries, among all peoples and even in all ages. If you meet the Divine, you meet it always and everywhere in the same way. Difference comes in because between the experience and its formulation there is almost an abyss. Directly you have spiritual experience, which takes place always in the inner consciousness, it is translated into your external consciousness and defined there in one way or another according to your education, your faith, your mental predisposition. There is only one truth, one reality; but the forms through which it may be expressed are many. 21 April 1929 ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
470:There I waited day and night for the voice of God within me, to know what He had to say to me, to learn what I had to do. In this seclusion the earliest realisation, the first lesson came to me. I remembered then that a month or more before my arrest, a call had come to me to put aside all activity, to go in seclusion and to look into myself, so that I might enter into closer communion with Him. I was weak and could not accept the call. My work was very dear to me and in the pride of my heart I thought that unless I was there, it would suffer or even fail and cease; therefore I would not leave it. It seemed to me that He spoke to me again and said, The bonds you had not the strength to break, I have broken for you, because it is not my will nor was it ever my intention that that should continue. I have had another thing for you to do and it is for that I have brought you here, to teach you what you could not learn for yourself and to train you for my work. Then He placed the Gita in my hands. His strength entered into me and I was able to do the sadhana of the Gita. I was not only to understand intellectually but to realise what Sri Krishna demanded of Arjuna and what He demands of those who aspire to do His work, to be free from repulsion and desire, to do work for Him without the demand for fruit, to renounce self-will and become a passive and faithful instrument in His hands, to have an equal heart for high and low, friend and opponent, success andfailure, yet not to do His work negligently. I realised what the Hindu religion meant. We speak often of the Hindureligion, of the Sanatan Dharma, but few of us really know what that religion is. Other religions are preponderatingly religions of faith and profession, but the Sanatan Dharma is life itself; it is a thing that has not so much to be believed as lived. This is the Dharma that for the salvation of humanity was cherished in the seclusion of this peninsula from of old. It is to give this religion that India is rising. She does not rise as other countries do, for self or when she is strong, to trample on the weak. She is rising to shed the eternal light entrusted to her over the world. India has always existed for humanity and not for herself and it is for humanity and not for herself that she must be great.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin,
471:I have seen the truth; I have seen and I know that people can be beautiful and happy without losing the power of living on earth. I will not and cannot believe that evil is the normal condition of mankind. And it is just this faith of mine that they laugh at. But how can I help believing it? I have seen the truth ~ it is not as though I had invented it with my mind, I have seen it, seen it, and the living image of it has filled my soul for ever. I have seen it in such full perfection that I cannot believe that it is impossible for people to have it. And so how can I go wrong? I shall make some slips no doubt, and shall perhaps talk in second-hand language, but not for long: the living image of what I saw will always be with me and will always correct and guide me. Oh, I am full of courage and freshness, and I will go on and on if it were for a thousand years! Do you know, at first I meant to conceal the fact that I corrupted them, but that was a mistake ~ that was my first mistake! But truth whispered to me that I was lying, and preserved me and corrected me. But how establish paradise ~ I don't know, because I do not know how to put it into words. After my dream I lost command of words. All the chief words, anyway, the most necessary ones. But never mind, I shall go and I shall keep talking, I won't leave off, for anyway I have seen it with my own eyes, though I cannot describe what I saw. But the scoffers do not understand that. It was a dream, they say, delirium, hallucination. Oh! As though that meant so much! And they are so proud! A dream! What is a dream? And is not our life a dream? I will say more. Suppose that this paradise will never come to pass (that I understand), yet I shall go on preaching it. And yet how simple it is: in one day, in one hour everything could be arranged at once! The chief thing is to love others like yourself, that's the chief thing, and that's everything; nothing else is wanted ~ you will find out at once how to arrange it all. And yet it's an old truth which has been told and retold a billion times ~ but it has not formed part of our lives! The consciousness of life is higher than life, the knowledge of the laws of happiness is higher than happiness ~ that is what one must contend against. And I shall. If only everyone wants it, it can be arranged at once. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky in The Dream of a Ridiculous Man,
472:higher mind or late vision logic ::: Even more rare, found stably in less than 1% of the population and even more emergent is the turquoise altitude.

Cognition at Turquoise is called late vision-logic or cross-paradigmatic and features the ability to connect meta-systems or paradigms, with other meta-systems. This is the realm of coordinating principles. Which are unified systems of systems of abstraction to other principles. ... Aurobindo indian sage and philosopher offers a more first-person account of turquoise which he called higher-mind, a unitarian sense of being with a powerful multiple dynamism capable of formation of a multitude of aspects of knowledge, ways of action, forms and significances of becoming of all of which a spontaneous inherient knowledge.

Self-sense at turquoise is called Construct-aware and is the first stage of Cook-Greuter's extension of Loveigers work on ego-development. The Construct-aware stage sees individuals for the first time as exploring more and more complex thought-structures with awareness of the automatic nature of human map making and absurdities which unbridaled complexity and logical argumentation can lead. Individuals at this stage begin to see their ego as a central point of reference and therefore a limit to growth. They also struggle to balance unique self-expressions and their concurrent sense of importance, the imperical and intuitive knowledge that there is no fundamental subject-object separation and the budding awareness of self-identity as temporary which leads to a decreased ego-desire to create a stable self-identity. Turquoise individuals are keenly aware of the interplay between awareness, thought, action and effects. They seek personal and spiritual transformation and hold a complex matrix of self-identifications, the adequecy of which they increasingly call into question. Much of this already points to Turquoise values which embrace holistic and intuitive thinking and alignment to universal order in a conscious fashion.

Faith at Turquoise is called Universalising and can generate faith compositions in which conceptions of Ultimate Reality start to include all beings. Individuals at Turquoise faith dedicate themselves to transformation of present reality in the direction of transcendent actuality. Both of these are preludes to the coming of Third Tier. ~ Essential Integral, L4.1-54, Higher Mind,
473:meta-systemic operations ::: As the 1950's and 60s begin to roll around the last stage of first tier emerged as a cultural force. With the Green Altitude we see the emergence of Pluralistic, Multicultural, Post-Modern world-views.

Cognition is starting to move beyond formal-operations into the realm of co-ordinating systems of abstractions, in what is called Meta-systemic Cognition. While formal-operations acted upon the classes and relations between members of classes. Meta-systemic operations start at the level of relating systems to systems. The focus of these investigations is placed upon comparing, contrasting, transforming and synthesizing entire systems, rather than components of one system. This emergent faculty allows self-sense to focus around a heightened sense of individuality and an increased ability for emotional resonance. The recognition of individual differences, the ability to tolerate paradox and contradiction, and greater conceptual complexity all provide for an understanding of conflict as being both internally and externally caused. Context plays a major role in the creation of truth and individual perspective. With each being context dependent and open to subjective interpretation, meaning each perspective and truth are rendered relative and are not able to be judged as better or more true than any other. This fuels a value set that centers on softness over cold rationality. Sensitivity and preference over objectivity.

Along with a focus on community harmony and equality which drives the valuing of sensitivity to others, reconcilation, consensus, dialogue, relationship, human development, bonding, and a seeking of a peace with the inner-self. Moral decisions are based on rights, values, or principles that are agreeable to all individuals composing a society based on fair and beneficial practices. All of this leads to the Equality movements and multiculturalism. And to the extreme form of relativitism which we saw earlier as context dependant nature of all truth including objective facts.

Faith at the green altitude is called Conjunctive, and allows the self to integrate what was unrecognized by the previous stages self-certainty and cognitive and affective adaptation to reality. New features at this level of faith include the unification of symbolic power with conceptual meaning, an awareness of ones social unconscious, a reworking of ones past, and an opening to ones deeper self. ~ Essential Integral, 4.1-52, Meta-systemic Operations,
474:the ways of the Bhakta and man of Knowledge :::
   In the ordinary paths of Yoga the method used for dealing with these conflicting materials is direct and simple. One or another of the principal psychological forces in us is selected as our single means for attaining to the Divine; the rest is quieted into inertia or left to starve in its smallness. The Bhakta, seizing on the emotional forces of the being, the intense activities of the heart, abides concentrated in the love of God, gathered up as into a single one-pointed tongue of fire; he is indifferent to the activities of thought, throws behind him the importunities of the reason, cares nothing for the mind's thirst for knowledge. All the knowledge he needs is his faith and the inspirations that well up from a heart in communion with the Divine. He has no use for any will to works that is not turned to the direct worship of the Beloved or the service of the temple. The man of Knowledge, self-confined by a deliberate choice to the force and activities of discriminative thought, finds release in the mind's inward-drawn endeavour. He concentrates on the idea of the self, succeeds by a subtle inner discernment in distinguishing its silent presence amid the veiling activities of Nature, and through the perceptive idea arrives at the concrete spiritual experience. He is indifferent to the play of the emotions, deaf to the hunger-call of passion, closed to the activities of Life, -- the more blessed he, the sooner they fall away from him and leave him free, still and mute, the eternal non-doer. The body is his stumbling-block, the vital functions are his enemies; if their demands can be reduced to a minimum, that is his great good fortune. The endless difficulties that arise from the environing world are dismissed by erecting firmly against them a defence of outer physical and inner spiritual solitude; safe behind a wall of inner silence, he remains impassive and untouched by the world and by others. To be alone with oneself or alone with the Divine, to walk apart with God and his devotees, to entrench oneself in the single self-ward endeavour of the mind or Godward passion of the heart is the trend of these Yogas. The problem is solved by the excision of all but the one central difficulty which pursues the only chosen motive-force; into the midst of the dividing calls of our nature the principle of an exclusive concentration comes sovereignly to our rescue.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Self-Consecration. 76-77,
475:As far as heaven, as near as thought and hope,
Glimmered the kingdom of a griefless life.
Above him in a new celestial vault
Other than the heavens beheld by mortal eyes,
As on a fretted ceiling of the gods,
An archipelago of laughter and fire,
Swam stars apart in a rippled sea of sky.
Towered spirals, magic rings of vivid hue
And gleaming spheres of strange felicity
Floated through distance like a symbol world.
On the trouble and the toil they could not share,
On the unhappiness they could not aid,
Impervious to life's suffering, struggle, grief,
Untarnished by its anger, gloom and hate,
Unmoved, untouched, looked down great visioned planes
Blissful for ever in their timeless right.
Absorbed in their own beauty and content,
Of their immortal gladness they live sure.
Apart in their self-glory plunged, remote
Burning they swam in a vague lucent haze,
An everlasting refuge of dream-light,
A nebula of the splendours of the gods
Made from the musings of eternity.
Almost unbelievable by human faith,
Hardly they seemed the stuff of things that are.
As through a magic television's glass
Outlined to some magnifying inner eye
They shone like images thrown from a far scene
Too high and glad for mortal lids to seize.
But near and real to the longing heart
And to the body's passionate thought and sense
Are the hidden kingdoms of beatitude.
In some close unattained realm which yet we feel,
Immune from the harsh clutch of Death and Time,
Escaping the search of sorrow and desire,
In bright enchanted safe peripheries
For ever wallowing in bliss they lie.
In dream and trance and muse before our eyes,
Across a subtle vision's inner field,
Wide rapturous landscapes fleeting from the sight,
The figures of the perfect kingdom pass
And behind them leave a shining memory's trail.
Imagined scenes or great eternal worlds,
Dream-caught or sensed, they touch our hearts with their depths;
Unreal-seeming, yet more real than life,
Happier than happiness, truer than things true,
If dreams these were or captured images,
Dream's truth made false earth's vain realities.
In a swift eternal moment fixed there live
Or ever recalled come back to longing eyes
Calm heavens of imperishable Light,
Illumined continents of violet peace,
Oceans and rivers of the mirth of God
And griefless countries under purple suns.
~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Glory and the Fall of Life,
476:A difficulty comes or an arrest in some movement which you have begun or have been carrying on for some time. How is it to be dealt with?—for such arrests are inevitably frequent enough, not only for you, but for everyone who is a seeker; one might almost say that every step forward is followed by an arrest—at least, that is a very common, if not a universal experience. It is to be dealt with by becoming always more quiet, more firm in the will to go through, by opening oneself more and more so that any obstructing non-receptivity in the nature may diminish or disappear, by an affirmation of faith even in the midst of the obscurity, faith in the presence of a Power that is working behind the cloud and the veil, in the guidance of the Guru, by an observation of oneself to find any cause of the arrest, not in a spirit of depression or discouragement but with the will to find out and remove it. This is the only right attitude and, if one is persistent in taking it, the periods of arrest are not abolished,—for that cannot be at this stage,—but greatly shortened and lightened in their incidence. Sometimes these arrests are periods, long or short, of assimilation or unseen preparation, their appearance of sterile immobility is deceptive: in that case, with the right attitude, one can after a time, by opening, by observation, by accumulated experience, begin to feel, to get some inkling of what is being prepared or done. Sometimes it is a period of true obstruction in which the Power at work has to deal with the obstacles in the way, obstacles in oneself, obstacles of the opposing cosmic forces or any other or of all together, and this kind of arrest may be long or short according to the magnitude or obstinacy or complexity of the impediments that are met. But here too the right attitude can alleviate or shorten and, if persistently taken, help to a more radical removal of the difficulties and greatly diminish the necessity of complete arrests hereafter.

On the contrary, an attitude of depression or unfaith in the help or the guidance or in the certitude of the victory of the guiding Power, a shutting up of yourself in the sense of the difficulties impedes the recovery, prolongs the difficulties, helps the obstructions to recur with force instead of progressively diminishing in their incidence. It is an attitude whose persistence or recurrence you must resolutely throw aside if you want to get over the obstruction which you feel so much—which the depressed attitude only makes, while it lasts, more acute. ~ Sri Aurobindo, LOY4, Imperfections and Periods of Arrest,
477:Thus the eternal paradox and eternal truth of a divine life in an animal body, an immortal aspiration or reality inhabiting a mortal tenement, a single and universal consciousness representing itself in limited minds and divided egos, a transcendent, indefinable, timeless and spaceless Being who alone renders time and space and cosmos possible, and in all these the higher truth realisable by the lower term, justify themselves to the deliberate reason as well as to the persistent instinct or intuition of mankind. Attempts are sometimes made to have done finally with questionings which have so often been declared insoluble by logical thought and to persuade men to limit their mental activities to the practical and immediate problems of their material existence in the universe; but such evasions are never permanent in their effect. Mankind returns from them with a more vehement impulse of inquiry or a more violent hunger for an immediate solution. By that hunger mysticism profits and new religions arise to replace the old that have been destroyed or stripped of significance by a scepticism which itself could not satisfy because, although its business was inquiry, it was unwilling sufficiently to inquire. The attempt to deny or stifle a truth because it is yet obscure in its outward workings and too often represented by obscurantist superstition or a crude faith, is itself a kind of obscurantism. The will to escape from a cosmic necessity because it is arduous, difficult to justify by immediate tangible results, slow in regulating its operations, must turn out eventually to have been no acceptance of the truth of Nature but a revolt against the secret, mightier will of the great Mother. It is better and more rational to accept what she will not allow us as a race to reject and lift it from the sphere of blind instinct, obscure intuition and random aspiration into the light of reason and an instructed and consciously self-guiding will. And if there is any higher light of illumined intuition or self-revealing truth which is now in man either obstructed and inoperative or works with intermittent glancings as if from behind a veil or with occasional displays as of the northern lights in our material skies, then there also we need not fear to aspire. For it is likely that such is the next higher state of consciousness of which Mind is only a form and veil, and through the splendours of that light may lie the path of our progressive self-enlargement into whatever highest state is humanity's ultimate resting-place. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, The Human Aspiration,
478:
   "Without conscious occult powers, is it possible to help or protect from a distance somebody in difficulty or danger? If so, what is the practical procedure?"

Then a sub-question:

   "What can thought do?"

We are not going to speak of occult processes at all; although, to tell the truth, everything that happens in the invisible world is occult, by definition. But still, practically, there are two processes which do not exclude but complete each other, but which may be used separately according to one's preference.

   It is obvious that thought forms a part of one of the methods, quite an important part. I have already told you several times that if one thinks clearly and powerfully, one makes a mental formation, and that every mental formation is an entity independent of its fashioner, having its own life and tending to realise itself in the mental world - I don't mean that you see your formation with your physical eyes, but it exists in the mental world, it has its own particular independent existence. If you have made a formation with a definite aim, its whole life will tend to the realisation of this aim. Therefore, if you want to help someone at a distance, you have only to formulate very clearly, very precisely and strongly the kind of help you want to give and the result you wish to obtain. That will have its effect. I cannot say that it will be all-powerful, for the mental world is full of innumerable formations of this kind and naturally they clash and contradict one another; hence the strongest and the most persistent will have the best of it.

   Now, what is it that gives strength and persistence to mental formations? - It is emotion and will. If you know how to add to your mental formation an emotion, affection, tenderness, love, and an intensity of will, a dynamism, it will have a much greater chance of success. That is the first method. It is within the scope of all those who know how to think, and even more of those who know how to love. But as I said, the power is limited and there is great competition in that world.

   Therefore, even if one has no knowledge at all but has trust in the divine Grace, if one has the faith that there is something in the world like the divine Grace, and that this something can answer a prayer, an aspiration, an invocation, then, after making one's mental formation, if one offers it to the Grace and puts one's trust in it, asks it to intervene and has the faith that it will intervene, then indeed one has a chance of success.

   Try, and you will surely see the result.

   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956, 253,
479:Worthy The Name Of Sir Knight
Sir Knight of the world's oldest order,
Sir Knight of the Army of God,
You have crossed the strange mystical border,
The ground floor of truth you have trod;
You have entered the sanctum sanctorum,
Which leads to the temple above,
Where you come as a stone, and a Christ-chosen one,
In the kingdom of Friendship and Love.
II
As you stand in this new realm of beauty,
Where each man you meet is your friend,
Think not that your promise of duty
In hall, or asylum, shall end;
Outside, in the great world of pleasure,
Beyond, in the clamor of trade,
In the battle of life and its coarse daily strife
Remember the vows you have made.
III
Your service, majestic and solemn,
Your symbols, suggestive and sweet,
Your uniformed phalanx in column
On gala days marching the street;
Your sword and your plume and your helmet,
Your 'secrets' hid from the world's sight;
These things are the small, lesser parts of the all
Which are needed to form the true Knight.
IV
The martyrs who perished rejoicing
In Templary's glorious laws,
Who died 'midst the fagots while voicing
The glory and worth of their cause-
935
They honored the title of 'Templar'
No more than the Knight of to-day
Who mars not the name with one blemish of shame,
But carries it clean through life's fray.
To live for a cause, to endeavor
To make your deeds grace it, to try
And uphold its precepts forever,
Is harder by far than to die.
For the battle of life is unending,
The enemy, Self, never tires,
And the true Knight must slay that sly foe every day
Ere he reaches the heights he desires.
VI
Sir Knight, have you pondered the meaning
Of all you have heard and been told?
Have you strengthened your heart for its weaning
From vices and faults loved of old?
Will you honor, in hours of temptation,
Your promises noble and grand?
Will your spirit be strong to do battle with wrong,
'And having done all, to stand?'
VII
Will you ever be true to a brother
In actions as well as in creed?
Will you stand by his side as no other
Could stand in the hour of his need?
Will you boldly defend him from peril,
And lift him from poverty's curseWill the promise of aid which you willingly made,
Reach down from your lips to your purse?
VIII
The world's battle field is before you!
Let Wisdom walk close by your side,
936
Let Faith spread her snowy wings o'er you,
Let Truth be your comrade and guide;
Let Fortitude, Justice and Mercy
Direct all your conduct aright,
And let each word and act tell to men the proud fact,
You are worthy the name of 'Sir Knight'.
~ Ella Wheeler Wilcox,
480:Sri Aurobindo tells us that surrender is the first and absolute condition for doing the yoga. Therefore it is not merely one of the required qualities, it is the very first indispensable attitude for commencing the yoga.

If you are not decided to make a total surrender, you cannot begin. But to make your surrender total, all the other qualities are necessary: sincerity, faith, devotion and aspiration.

And I add another one : endurance. Because if you are not able to face difficulties without getting discouraged, without giving up under the pretext that it is too difficult, if you are not able to receive blows and continue all the same, to "pocket" them, as it is said,—you receive blows because of your defects : you put them into your pocket and continue to march on without faltering; if you cannot do that with endurance, you will not go very far; at the first turning, when you lose sight of the little habitual life, you despair and give up the game.

The most material form of endurance is perseverance. Unless you are resolved to begin the same thing over again a thousand times if needed, you will arrive nowhere.

People come to me in despair : "But I thought it had been done, and I have to begin again !" And if they are told, "But it is nothing, you have to begin probably a hundred times, two hundred times, a thousand times", they lose all courage.

You take one step forward and you believe you are solid, but there will be always something that will bring about the same difficulty a little farther ahead.

You believe you have solved the problem, but will have to solve it again, it will present itself with just a little difference in its appearance, but it will be the same problem.

Thus there are people who have a fine experience and they exclaim, "Now, it is done !" Then things settle down, begin to fade, go behind a veil, and all on a sudden, something quite unexpected, a thing absolutely commonplace, that appears to be of no interest at all, comes before them and closes up the road. Then you lament: "Of what use is this progress that I have made, if I am to begin again !

Why is it so? I made an effort, I succeeded, I arrived at something and now it is as if I had done nothing. It is hopeless". This is because there is still the "I" and this "I" has no endurance.

If you have endurance, you say : "All right, I will begin again and again as long as necessary, a thousand times, ten thousand times, a million times, if necessary, but I will go to the end and nothing can stop me on the way".

That is very necessary.

Now, to sum up, we will put at the head of our list surrender. That is to say, we accept the fact that one must, in order to do the integral yoga, take the resolution of surrendering oneself wholly to the Divine. There is no other way, it is the way. ~ The Mother,
481:But still the greater and wider the moving idea-force behind the consecration, the better for the seeker; his attainment is likely to be fuller and more ample. If we are to attempt an integral Yoga, it will be as well to start with an idea of the Divine that is itself integral. There should be an aspiration in the heart wide enough for a realisation without any narrow limits. Not only should we avoid a sectarian religious outlook, but also all onesided philosophical conceptions which try to shut up the Ineffable in a restricting mental formula. The dynamic conception or impelling sense with which our Yoga can best set out would be naturally the idea, the sense of a conscious all-embracing but all-exceeding Infinite. Our uplook must be to a free, all-powerful, perfect and blissful One and Oneness in which all beings move and live and through which all can meet and become one. This Eternal will be at once personal and impersonal in his self-revelation and touch upon the soul. He is personal because he is the conscious Divine, the infinite Person who casts some broken reflection of himself in the myriad divine and undivine personalities of the universe. He is impersonal because he appears to us as an infinite Existence, Consciousness and Ananda and because he is the fount, base and constituent of all existences and all energies, -the very material of our being and mind and life and body, our spirit and our matter. The thought, concentrating on him, must not merely understand in an intellectual form that he exists, or conceive of him as an abstraction, a logical necessity; it must become a seeing thought able to meet him here as the Inhabitant in all, realise him in ourselves, watch and take hold on the movement of his forces. He is the one Existence: he is the original and universal Delight that constitutes all things and exceeds them: he is the one infinite Consciousness that composes all consciousnesses and informs all their movements; he is the one illimitable Being who sustains all action and experience; his will guides the evolution of things towards their yet unrealised but inevitable aim and plenitude. To him the heart can consecrate itself, approach him as the supreme Beloved, beat and move in him as in a universal sweetness of Love and a living sea of Delight. For his is the secret Joy that supports the soul in all its experiences and maintains even the errant ego in its ordeals and struggles till all sorrow and suffering shall cease. His is the Love and the Bliss of the infinite divine Lover who is drawing all things by their own path towards his happy oneness. On him the Will can unalterably fix as the invisible Power that guides and fulfils it and as the source of its strength. In the impersonality this actuating Power is a self-illumined Force that contains all results and calmly works until it accomplishes, in the personality an all wise and omnipotent Master of the Yoga whom nothing can prevent from leading it to its goal. This is the faith with which the seeker has to begin his seeking and endeavour; for in all his effort here, but most of all in his effort towards the Unseen, mental man must perforce proceed by faith. When the realisation comes, the faith divinely fulfilled and completed will be transformed into an eternal flame of knowledge.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Self-Consecration [83],
482:Allow the Lord to Do Everything :::
Now, when I start looking like this (Mother closes her eyes), two things are there at the same time: this smile, this joy, this laughter are there, and such peace! Such full, luminous, total peace, in which there are no more conflicts, no more contradictions. There are no more conflicts. It is one single luminous harmony - and yet everything we call error, suffering, misery, everything is there. It eliminates nothing. It is another way of seeing.
(long silence)

   There can be no doubt that if you sincerely want to get out of it, it is not so difficult after all: you have nothing to do, you only have to allow the Lord to do everything. And He does everything. He does everything. It is so wonderful, so wonderful!

   He takes anything, even what we call a very ordinary intelligence and he simply teaches you to put this intelligence aside, to rest: "There, be quiet, don't stir, don't bother me, I don't need you." Then a door opens - you don't even feel that you have to open it; it is wide open, you are tkane over to the other side. All that is done by Someone else, not you. And then the other way becomes impossible.

   All this... oh, this tremendous labour of hte mind striving to understand, toiling and giving itself headaches!... It is absolutely useless, absolutely useless, no use at all, it merely increases the confusion.

   You are faced with a so-called problem: what should you say, what should you do, how should you act? There is nothing to do, nothing, you only have to say to the Lord, "There, You see, it is like that" - that's all. And then you stay very quiet. And then quite spontaneously, without thinking about it, without reflection, without calculation, nothing, nothing, without the slightest effect - you do what has to be done. That is to say, the Lord does it, it is no longer you. He does it. He arranges the circumstances, He arranges the people, He puts the words into your mouth or your pen - He does everything, everything, everything, everything; you have nothing more to do but allow yourself to live blissfully.

   I am more and more convinced that people do not really want it.

But clearing the ground is difficult, the work of clearing the ground before hand.
But you don't even need to do it! He does it for you.

But they are constantly breaking in: the old consciousness, the old thoughts....
Yes, they try to come in again, by habit. You only have to say, "Lord, You see, You see, You see, it is like that" - that's all. "Lord, You see, You see this, You see that, You see this fool" - and it is all over immediately. And it changes automatically, my child, without the slightest effort. Simply to be sincere, that is to say, to truly want everything to be right. You are perfectly conscious that you can do nothing about it, that you have no capacity.... But there is always something that wants to do it by itself; that's the trouble, otherwise...

   No, you may be full of an excellent goodwill and then you want to do it. That's what complicated everything. Or else you don't have faith, you believe that the Lord will not be able to do it and that you must do it yourself, because He does not know! (Mother laughs.) This, this kind of stupidity is very common. "How can He see things? We live in a world of Falsehood, how can He see Falsehood and see..." But He sees the thing as it is! Exactly!

   I am not speaking of people of no intelligence, I am speaking of people who are intelligent and try - there is a kind of conviction, like that, somewhere, even in people who know that we live in a world of Ignorance and Falsehood and that there is a Lord who is All-Truth. They say, "Precisely because He is All-Truth, He does not understand. (Mother laughs.) He does not understand our falsehood, I must deal with it myself." That is very strong, very common.

   Ah! we make complications for nothing. ~ The Mother,
483:I have never been able to share your constantly recurring doubts about your capacity or the despair that arises in you so violently when there are these attacks, nor is their persistent recurrence a valid ground for believing that they can never be overcome. Such a persistent recurrence has been a feature in the sadhana of many who have finally emerged and reached the goal; even the sadhana of very great Yogis has not been exempt from such violent and constant recurrences; they have sometimes been special objects of such persistent assaults, as I have indeed indicated in Savitri in more places than one - and that was indeed founded on my own experience. In the nature of these recurrences there is usually a constant return of the same adverse experiences, the same adverse resistance, thoughts destructive of all belief and faith and confidence in the future of the sadhana, frustrating doubts of what one has known as the truth, voices of despondency and despair, urgings to abandonment of the Yoga or to suicide or else other disastrous counsels of déchéance. The course taken by the attacks is not indeed the same for all, but still they have strong family resemblance. One can eventually overcome if one begins to realise the nature and source of these assaults and acquires the faculty of observing them, bearing, without being involved or absorbed into their gulf, finally becoming the witness of their phenomena and understanding them and refusing the mind's sanction even when the vital is still tossed in the whirl or the most outward physical mind still reflects the adverse suggestions. In the end these attacks lose their power and fall away from the nature; the recurrence becomes feeble or has no power to last: even, if the detachment is strong enough, they can be cut out very soon or at once. The strongest attitude to take is to regard these things as what they really are, incursions of dark forces from outside taking advantage of certain openings in the physical mind or the vital part, but not a real part of oneself or spontaneous creation in one's own nature. To create a confusion and darkness in the physical mind and throw into it or awake in it mistaken ideas, dark thoughts, false impressions is a favourite method of these assailants, and if they can get the support of this mind from over-confidence in its own correctness or the natural rightness of its impressions and inferences, then they can have a field day until the true mind reasserts itself and blows the clouds away. Another device of theirs is to awake some hurt or rankling sense of grievance in the lower vital parts and keep them hurt or rankling as long as possible. In that case one has to discover these openings in one's nature and learn to close them permanently to such attacks or else to throw out intruders at once or as soon as possible. The recurrence is no proof of a fundamental incapacity; if one takes the right inner attitude, it can and will be overcome. The idea of suicide ought never to be accepted; there is no real ground for it and in any case it cannot be a remedy or a real escape: at most it can only be postponement of difficulties and the necessity for their solution under no better circumstances in another life. One must have faith in the Master of our life and works, even if for a long time he conceals himself, and then in his own right time he will reveal his Presence.
   I have tried to dispel all the misconceptions, explain things as they are and meet all the points at issue. It is not that you really cannot make progress or have not made any progress; on the contrary, you yourself have admitted that you have made a good advance in many directions and there is no reason why, if you persevere, the rest should not come. You have always believed in the Guruvada: I would ask you then to put your faith in the Guru and the guidance and rely on the Ishwara for the fulfilment, to have faith in my abiding love and affection, in the affection and divine goodwill and loving kindness of the Mother, stand firm against all attacks and go forward perseveringly towards the spiritual goal and the all-fulfilling and all-satisfying touch of the All-Blissful, the Ishwara.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV,
484:[an Integral conception of the Divine :::
   But on that which as yet we know not how shall we concentrate? And yet we cannot know the Divine unless we have achieved this concentration of our being upon him. A concentration which culminates in a living realisation and the constant sense of the presence of the One in ourselves and in all of which we are aware, is what we mean in Yoga by knowledge and the effort after knowledge. It is not enough to devote ourselves by the reading of Scriptures or by the stress of philosophical reasoning to an intellectual understanding of the Divine; for at the end of our long mental labour we might know all that has been said of the Eternal, possess all that can be thought about the Infinite and yet we might not know him at all. This intellectual preparation can indeed be the first stage in a powerful Yoga, but it is not indispensable : it is not a step which all need or can be called upon to take. Yoga would be impossible, except for a very few, if the intellectual figure of knowledge arrived at by the speculative or meditative Reason were its indispensable condition or a binding preliminary. All that the Light from above asks of us that it may begin its work is a call from the soul and a sufficient point of support in the mind. This support can be reached through an insistent idea of the Divine in the thought, a corresponding will in the dynamic parts, an aspiration, a faith, a need in the heart. Any one of these may lead or predominate, if all cannot move in unison or in an equal rhythm. The idea may be and must in the beginning be inadequate; the aspiration may be narrow and imperfect, the faith poorly illumined or even, as not surely founded on the rock of knowledge, fluctuating, uncertain, easily diminished; often even it may be extinguished and need to be lit again with difficulty like a torch in a windy pass. But if once there is a resolute self-consecration from deep within, if there is an awakening to the soul's call, these inadequate things can be a sufficient instrument for the divine purpose. Therefore the wise have always been unwilling to limit man's avenues towards God; they would not shut against his entry even the narrowest portal, the lowest and darkest postern, the humblest wicket-gate. Any name, any form, any symbol, any offering has been held to be sufficient if there is the consecration along with it; for the Divine knows himself in the heart of the seeker and accepts the sacrifice.
   But still the greater and wider the moving idea-force behind the consecration, the better for the seeker; his attainment is likely to be fuller and more ample. If we are to attempt an integral Yoga, it will be as well to start with an idea of the Divine that is itself integral. There should be an aspiration in the heart wide enough for a realisation without any narrow limits. Not only should we avoid a sectarian religious outlook, but also all onesided philosophical conceptions which try to shut up the Ineffable in a restricting mental formula. The dynamic conception or impelling sense with which our Yoga can best set out would be naturally the idea, the sense of a conscious all-embracing but all-exceeding Infinite. Our uplook must be to a free, all-powerful, perfect and blissful One and Oneness in which all beings move and live and through which all can meet and become one. This Eternal will be at once personal and impersonal in his self-revelation and touch upon the soul. He is personal because he is the conscious Divine, the infinite Person who casts some broken reflection of himself in the myriad divine and undivine personalities of the universe. He is impersonal because he appears to us as an infinite Existence, Consciousness and Ananda and because he is the fount, base and constituent of all existences and all energies, -the very material of our being and mind and life and body, our spirit and our matter. The thought, concentrating on him, must not merely understand in an intellectual form that he exists, or conceive of him as an abstraction, a logical necessity; it must become a seeing thought able to meet him here as the Inhabitant in all, realise him in ourselves, watch and take hold on the movement of his forces. He is the one Existence: he is the original and universal Delight that constitutes all things and exceeds them: he is the one infinite Consciousness that composes all consciousnesses and informs all their movements; he is the one illimitable Being who sustains all action and experience; his will guides the evolution of things towards their yet unrealised but inevitable aim and plenitude. To him the heart can consecrate itself, approach him as the supreme Beloved, beat and move in him as in a universal sweetness of Love and a living sea of Delight. For his is the secret Joy that supports the soul in all its experiences and maintains even the errant ego in its ordeals and struggles till all sorrow and suffering shall cease. His is the Love and the Bliss of the infinite divine Lover who is drawing all things by their own path towards his happy oneness. On him the Will can unalterably fix as the invisible Power that guides and fulfils it and as the source of its strength. In the impersonality this actuating Power is a self-illumined Force that contains all results and calmly works until it accomplishes, in the personality an all wise and omnipotent Master of the Yoga whom nothing can prevent from leading it to its goal. This is the faith with which the seeker has to begin his seeking and endeavour; for in all his effort here, but most of all in his effort towards the Unseen, mental man must perforce proceed by faith. When the realisation comes, the faith divinely fulfilled and completed will be transformed into an eternal flame of knowledge.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Self-Consecration, 82-83 [T1],
485:This, in short, is the demand made on us, that we should turn our whole life into a conscious sacrifice. Every moment and every movement of our being is to be resolved into a continuous and a devoted self-giving to the Eternal. All our actions, not less the smallest and most ordinary and trifling than the greatest and most uncommon and noble, must be performed as consecrated acts. Our individualised nature must live in the single consciousness of an inner and outer movement dedicated to Something that is beyond us and greater than our ego. No matter what the gift or to whom it is presented by us, there must be a consciousness in the act that we are presenting it to the one divine Being in all beings. Our commonest or most grossly material actions must assume this sublimated character; when we eat, we should be conscious that we are giving our food to that Presence in us; it must be a sacred offering in a temple and the sense of a mere physical need or self-gratification must pass away from us. In any great labour, in any high discipline, in any difficult or noble enterprise, whether undertaken for ourselves, for others or for the race, it will no longer be possible to stop short at the idea of the race, of ourselves or of others. The thing we are doing must be consciously offered as a sacrifice of works, not to these, but either through them or directly to the One Godhead; the Divine Inhabitant who was hidden by these figures must be no longer hidden but ever present to our soul, our mind, our sense. The workings and results of our acts must be put in the hands of that One in the feeling that that Presence is the Infinite and Most High by whom alone our labour and our aspiration are possible. For in his being all takes place; for him all labour and aspiration are taken from us by Nature and offered on his altar. Even in those things in which Nature is herself very plainly the worker and we only the witnesses of her working and its containers and supporters, there should be the same constant memory and insistent consciousness of a work and of its divine Master. Our very inspiration and respiration, our very heart-beats can and must be made conscious in us as the living rhythm of the universal sacrifice.
   It is clear that a conception of this kind and its effective practice must carry in them three results that are of a central importance for our spiritual ideal. It is evident, to begin with, that, even if such a discipline is begun without devotion, it leads straight and inevitably towards the highest devotion possible; for it must deepen naturally into the completest adoration imaginable, the most profound God-love. There is bound up with it a growing sense of the Divine in all things, a deepening communion with the Divine in all our thought, will and action and at every moment of our lives, a more and more moved consecration to the Divine of the totality of our being. Now these implications of the Yoga of works are also of the very essence of an integral and absolute Bhakti. The seeker who puts them into living practice makes in himself continually a constant, active and effective representation of the very spirit of self-devotion, and it is inevitable that out of it there should emerge the most engrossing worship of the Highest to whom is given this service. An absorbing love for the Divine Presence to whom he feels an always more intimate closeness, grows upon the consecrated worker. And with it is born or in it is contained a universal love too for all these beings, living forms and creatures that are habitations of the Divine - not the brief restless grasping emotions of division, but the settled selfless love that is the deeper vibration of oneness. In all the seeker begins to meet the one Object of his adoration and service. The way of works turns by this road of sacrifice to meet the path of Devotion; it can be itself a devotion as complete, as absorbing, as integral as any the desire of the heart can ask for or the passion of the mind can imagine.
   Next, the practice of this Yoga demands a constant inward remembrance of the one central liberating knowledge, and a constant active externalising of it in works comes in too to intensify the remembrance. In all is the one Self, the one Divine is all; all are in the Divine, all are the Divine and there is nothing else in the universe, - this thought or this faith is the whole background until it becomes the whole substance of the consciousness of the worker. A memory, a self-dynamising meditation of this kind, must and does in its end turn into a profound and uninterrupted vision and a vivid and all-embracing consciousness of that which we so powerfully remember or on which we so constantly meditate. For it compels a constant reference at each moment to the Origin of all being and will and action and there is at once an embracing and exceeding of all particular forms and appearances in That which is their cause and upholder. This way cannot go to its end without a seeing vivid and vital, as concrete in its way as physical sight, of the works of the universal Spirit everywhere. On its summits it rises into a constant living and thinking and willing and acting in the presence of the Supramental, the Transcendent. Whatever we see and hear, whatever we touch and sense, all of which we are conscious, has to be known and felt by us as That which we worship and serve; all has to be turned into an image of the Divinity, perceived as a dwelling-place of his Godhead, enveloped with the eternal Omnipresence. In its close, if not long before it, this way of works turns by communion with the Divine Presence, Will and Force into a way of Knowledge more complete and integral than any the mere creature intelligence can construct or the search of the intellect can discover.
   Lastly, the practice of this Yoga of sacrifice compels us to renounce all the inner supports of egoism, casting them out of our mind and will and actions, and to eliminate its seed, its presence, its influence out of our nature. All must be done for the Divine; all must be directed towards the Divine. Nothing must be attempted for ourselves as a separate existence; nothing done for others, whether neighbours, friends, family, country or mankind or other creatures merely because they are connected with our personal life and thought and sentiment or because the ego takes a preferential interest in their welfare. In this way of doing and seeing all works and all life become only a daily dynamic worship and service of the Divine in the unbounded temple of his own vast cosmic existence. Life becomes more and more the sacrifice of the eternal in the individual constantly self-offered to the eternal Transcendence. It is offered in the wide sacrificial ground of the field of the eternal cosmic Spirit; and the Force too that offers it is the eternal Force, the omnipresent Mother. Therefore is this way a way of union and communion by acts and by the spirit and knowledge in the act as complete and integral as any our Godward will can hope for or our soul's strength execute.
   It has all the power of a way of works integral and absolute, but because of its law of sacrifice and self-giving to the Divine Self and Master, it is accompanied on its one side by the whole power of the path of Love and on the other by the whole power of the path of Knowledge. At its end all these three divine Powers work together, fused, united, completed, perfected by each other.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Yoga of Divine Works, The Sacrifice, the Triune Path and the Lord of the Sacrifice [111-114],
486:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step.

But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort.

Savitri alone is sufficient to make you climb to the highest peaks. If truly one knows how to meditate on Savitri, one will receive all the help one needs. For him who wishes to follow this path, it is a concrete help as though the Lord himself were taking you by the hand and leading you to the destined goal. And then, every question, however personal it may be, has its answer here, every difficulty finds its solution herein; indeed there is everything that is necessary for doing the Yoga.

*He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection.

You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, *I am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: *I have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages.

In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything.

It may then be said that Savitri is a revelation, it is a meditation, it is a quest of the Infinite, the Eternal. If it is read with this aspiration for Immortality, the reading itself will serve as a guide to Immortality. To read Savitri is indeed to practice Yoga, spiritual concentration; one can find there all that is needed to realise the Divine. Each step of Yoga is noted here, including the secret of all other Yogas. Surely, if one sincerely follows what is revealed here in each line one will reach finally the transformation of the Supramental Yoga. It is truly the infallible guide who never abandons you; its support is always there for him who wants to follow the path. Each verse of Savitri is like a revealed Mantra which surpasses all that man possessed by way of knowledge, and I repeat this, the words are expressed and arranged in such a way that the sonority of the rhythm leads you to the origin of sound, which is OM.

My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga.

All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind.

These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconscience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness.

And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed.

And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen.

My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal.

Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic message Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967

~ The Mother, Sweet Mother, The Mother to Mona Sarkar, [T0],
487:He is Allah, other than whom there is no deity, Knower of the unseen and the witnessed. He is the Entirely Merciful, the Especially Merciful. He is Allah, other than whom there is no deity, the Sovereign, the Pure, the Perfection, the Bestower of Faith, the Overseer, the Exalted in Might, the Compeller, the Superior. Exalted is Allah above whatever they associate with Him. He is Allah, the Creator, the Inventor, the Fashioner; to Him belong the best names. Whatever is in the heavens and earth is exalting Him. And He is the Exalted in Might, the Wise. ~ Koran, Chapter 59, Verses 22-24,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Faith is a gift of God. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
2:Meet your fears with faith. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
3:Faith is the force of life. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
4:Have faith. We will do ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
5:The fruit of faith is love. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
6:I've lost my faith in science. ~ bette-davis, @wisdomtrove
7:Fear clogs; Faith liberates. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
8:Put faith in one who's had experience. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
9:Reason is the enemy of faith. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
10:Faith is God's work within us. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
11:Faith is the yes of the heart. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
12:Fear is faith in reverse gear. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
13:Have faith in your destiny ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
14:Your faith and hope are in god. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
15:Faith is God's work within us. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
16:Faith is under the left nipple. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
17:Faith is reason at rest in God. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
18:For we walk by faith, not by sight. ~ jesus-christ, @wisdomtrove
19:Holiness sincerity, and faith. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
20:Duty cannot exist without faith ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
21:Faith is a state of openness or trust. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
22:Faith is the soul riding at anchor. ~ josh-billings, @wisdomtrove
23:Faith lives in honest doubt. ~ alfred-lord-tennyson, @wisdomtrove
24:Skepticism is the beginning of Faith. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
25:Faith in faith is faith astray. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
26:We travel out of darkness into faith." ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
27:Worry and faith just don't mix. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
28:Faith is your reaction to God's ability. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
29:You had no faith to lose and you know it. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
30:Be courageous! Have faith! Go forward. ~ thomas-edison, @wisdomtrove
31:Great faith must have great trials. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
32:Non-violence is the article of faith. ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
33:Optimism is a faith that leads to success. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
34:Faith slips - and laughs, and rallies ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
35:If one has faith, one has everything. ~ sri-ramakrishna, @wisdomtrove
36:Only real risk passes the reality of faith. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
37:There can be no faith without risk. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
38:Understanding is the reward of faith. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
39:Doubt is but another element of faith. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
40:Faith is spiritualized imagination. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
41:Faith means believing the unbelievable. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
42:Faith is stronger than so-called reality. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
43:Faith minus vulnerability is fundamentalism ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
44:Life's a fight. It's a good fight of faith. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
45:Faith consists in believing what reason cannot. ~ voltaire, @wisdomtrove
46:Faith is the highest passion in a man. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
47:Perseverance is another word for faith! ~ earl-nightingale, @wisdomtrove
48:Reason saw not, till Faith sprung the Light. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
49:Faith keeps the person who keeps the faith. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
50:Faith, like a guillotine. As heavy, as light. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
51:It is faith that makes a lion of a man. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
52:Keep the faith... that the best is yet to come. ~ les-brown, @wisdomtrove
53:Man suffers through lack of faith in God. ~ sri-ramakrishna, @wisdomtrove
54:Christian life consists of faith and charity ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
55:Without risk, faith is an impossibility. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
56:You have as much laughter as you have faith. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
57:Faith activates God - Fear activates the Enemy. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
58:FAITH is the only known antidote for FAILURE! ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
59:Have faith in yourself; faith in the infinite ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
60:It's our faith that activates the power of God. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
61:Faith does not quench desire, but inflames it. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
62:Faith in oneself is the best and safest course. ~ michelangelo, @wisdomtrove
63:Shall love be blamed for want of faith? ~ alfred-lord-tennyson, @wisdomtrove
64:The Clergy is the greatest hindrance to faith. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
65:Don't put my faith in nobody, not even a scientist. ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
66:Faith does not quench desire, but inflames it. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
67:Faith is believing what we cannot prove. ~ alfred-lord-tennyson, @wisdomtrove
68:Faith is the bird that sings while it is yet dark. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
69:Man discovers truth by reason only, not by faith. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
70:My anger rises up within faith and not outside it. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
71:The light of faith makes us see what we believe. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
72:Faith is the master, and reason the maid-servant. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
73:I don't have to have faith, I have experience.  ~ joseph-campbell, @wisdomtrove
74:Our faith triumphant o'er our fears. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
75:The light of faith makes us see what we believe. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
76:The opposite of faith is not heresy but indifference ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
77:Faith is the courage to face reality with hope. ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
78:Faith is the gaze of a soul upon a saving God. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
79:Have faith in your faith-and doubt your doubts. ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
80:I do not have enough faith to believe there is no god. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
81:My faith in man is, at bottom, a faith in God. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
82:Anything done against faith or conscience is sinful. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
83:Faith ever says, "If Thou wilt," not "If Thou canst. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
84:Leap of faith – yes, but only after reflection ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
85:Our faith is released as we say, pray and do the Word. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
86:Rewards await you if you stay steadfast in your faith. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
87:Trust the Universe. Trust and believe and have faith. ~ rhonda-byrne, @wisdomtrove
88:All work that is worth anything is done in faith. ~ albert-schweitzer, @wisdomtrove
89:Anything done against faith or conscience is sinful. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
90:Faith in God is to be demonstrated, not defined. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
91:Faith is a living, daring, confidence in God's grace. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
92:In a real sense faith is total surrender to God . ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
93:Once a person has faith, he has achieved everything. ~ sri-ramakrishna, @wisdomtrove
94:The faith of religion is belief on insufficient evidence. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
95:A man of faith does not bargain or stipulate with God. ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
96:Faith in Christ is the only thing to save you from despair. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
97:Our faith comes in moments; our vice is habitual. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
98:Desire backed by faith knows no such word as impossible. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
99:Doubt your doubts before you doubt your faith. ~ marc-and-angel-chernoff, @wisdomtrove
100:Just in ratio as knowledge increases, faith diminishes. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
101:Just in the ratio knowledge increases, faith decreases. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
102:Love without faith is as bad as faith without love. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
103:Put no faith in salvation through the political order. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
104:Through faith, the weak times can become peak times. ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
105:We have more faith in what we imitate than in what we create ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
106:Even the merest gesture is holy if it is filled with faith. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
107:Faith is reacting positively to a negative situation. ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
108:Losing faith in one's self means losing faith in God. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
109:The activity of love and faith is what makes heaven. ~ emanuel-swedenborg, @wisdomtrove
110:A faith that is afraid of other people is no faith at all. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
111:Only our individual faith in freedom can keep us free. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
112:What is faith worth if it is not translated into action?  ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
113:You cannot be a man of faith unless you know how to doubt. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
114:A faith that is afraid of other people is not faith at all. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
115:A foolish faith in authority is the worst enemy of truth. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
116:Care more for a grain of faith than a ton of excitement. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
117:Faith is, above all, openness; an act of trust in the unknown. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
118:Positive minds full of faith and hope produce positive lives. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
119:Faith, if it is ever right about anything, is right by accident ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
120:Faith is making claims to victory before it is achieved. ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
121:Faith is seeing the invisible, but not the nonexistent. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
122:All my words are but chaff next to the faith of a simple man. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
123:All who call on God in true faith... will certainly be heard. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
124:Faith is about trusting God when you have unanswered questions. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
125:If you desire faith, then you have faith enough. ~ elizabeth-barrett-browning, @wisdomtrove
126:I have no mystic faith in the people. I have in the individual. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
127:.. lurks at the door of faith and threatens to devour it. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
128:To fear and not be afraid- that is the paradox of faith. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
129:All my words are but chaff next to the faith of a simple man. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
130:My faith is brightest in the midst of impenetrable darkness.  ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
131:There can be no progress if people have no faith in tomorrow. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
132:The Vedanta teaches men to have faith in themselves first. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
133:Be brave as your fathers before you. Have faith and go forward. ~ thomas-edison, @wisdomtrove
134:Faith embraces many truths which seem to contradict each other. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
135:Faith is a gift from God and he gives it to whomever he chooses ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
136:Faith is not something to grasp, it is a state to grow into.   ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
137:Faith is what is left after all your beliefs have been blown to hell. ~ ram-das, @wisdomtrove
138:He who has no faith in himself can never have faith in God. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
139:This is true faith, a living confidence in the goodness of God. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
140:You know the disease, you know the remedy, only have faith. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
141:Faith grows when it is planted in the fertile soil of God's Word. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
142:Faith is loyalty to some inspired teacher, some spiritual hero. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
143:Faith, consciousness, and awareness all exist beyond the thinking mind. ~ ram-das, @wisdomtrove
144:Faith is a knowledge within the heart, beyond the reach of proof. ~ kahlil-gibran, @wisdomtrove
145:Faith will tell us Christ is present, When our human senses fail. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
146:Have faith in the Yankees my son. Think of the great DiMaggio. ~ ernest-hemingway, @wisdomtrove
147:If you live in bad faith, lies will appear to you like the truth. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
148:It is certain that an atom of goodness on the path of faith is never lost. ~ rumi, @wisdomtrove
149:A faith is a necessity to a man. Woe to him who believes in nothing. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
150:Does trust have to be earned. Or is it simply a matter of faith? ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
151:Doubt is a pain too lonely to know that faith is his twin brother. ~ kahlil-gibran, @wisdomtrove
152:Faith is loved and honored by God more than any other single thing. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
153:Faith, to my mind, is a stiffening process, a sort of mental starch. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
154:Faith will tell us Christ is present, When our human senses fail. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
155:For your life to be great,your faith must be bigger than your fear. ~ robin-sharma, @wisdomtrove
156:If faith were rational , it wouldn't be -by definition- faith. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
157:No falsehood is so fatal as that which is made an article of faith. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
158:Our liberty springs from and depends upon an abiding faith in God. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
159:The truth of the Christian faith surpasses the capacity of reason. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
160:Work hard, be steady, and have faith in the Lord. Set to work. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
161:Faith is holding onto uncertainties with passionate conviction. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
162:Faith must trample under foot all reason, sense, and understanding. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
163:In the harsh face of life faith can read a bracing gospel. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
164:The truth of the Christian faith surpasses the capacity of reason. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
165:to have faith is precisely to lose one's mind so as to win God. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
166:We must have courage, faith, and lunch together sometime soon. ~ ashleigh-brilliant, @wisdomtrove
167:“A paradise of inward tranquility seems to be faith's usual result.” ~ william-james, @wisdomtrove
168:Even in the darkest moments, light exists if you have faith to see it. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
169:Faith is a decision we make about where we are going to put our trust. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
170:Faith is not a conclusion you reach... it's a journey you live. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
171:Faith is trusting in the good. Fear is putting your trust in the bad. ~ rhonda-byrne, @wisdomtrove
172:Interview with Faith L. Justice, www.salon.com. January 23, 2001. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
173:Prayer is more than a wish; it is the voice of faith directed to God. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
174:We can have faith in the future only if we have faith in ourselves. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
175:Faith is an organ of knowledge, and love an organ of experience. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
176:Faith is a withholding of conclusion so that you allow what is to arise. ~ adyashanti, @wisdomtrove
177:Pin thy faith to no man's sleeve. Hast thou not two eyes of thy own? ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
178:Pin your faith to no ones sleeves, haven't you two eyes of your own. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
179:We are saved by faith alone, but the faith that saves is never alone. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
180:We don't have to talk about faith and family at dinner-we just show it. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
181:A genuine faith resolves the mystery of life by the mystery of God. ~ reinhold-niebuhr, @wisdomtrove
182:Faith is all about trusting God even when you don't understand His plan. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
183:Faith is led confidently to expect what reason would never suggest. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
184:Faith means that you have peace even when you dont have all the answers. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
185:Faith must be enforced by reason.  When faith becomes blind it dies.  ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
186:Never lose faith in yourself; you can do anything in the universe. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
187:Faith can give us courage to face the uncertainties of the future. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
188:Faith is a recognition of those things which are above the senses. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
189:Faith is the fountain, the foundation and the fosterer of obedience. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
190:Humor is a prelude to faith and laughter is the beginning of prayer. ~ reinhold-niebuhr, @wisdomtrove
191:The man of faith who has never experienced doubt is not a man of faith. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
192:True faith is never found alone; it is accompanied by expectation. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
193:Faith consists in believing when it is beyond the power of reason to believe. ~ voltaire, @wisdomtrove
194:For mysterious things of faith, rely on the proponent, Heaven's authority. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
195:Give us this day our daily Faith, but deliver us, dear God, from Belief. ~ aldous-huxley, @wisdomtrove
196:I have great faith in fools,‚ self-confidence my friends will call it. ~ edgar-allan-poe, @wisdomtrove
197:Let God be true but every man a liar" is the language of true faith ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
198:Replace those thoughts of worry with thoughts of hope, faith, and victory. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
199:The disease with which the human mind now labors is want of faith. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
200:The object of (Christian) faith is not the teaching but the Teacher. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
201:Faith in a higher power helps us to control our mind and thoughts. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
202:Faith is the bird that feels the light when the dawn is still dark. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
203:Unbelief will destroy the best of us; faith will save the worst of us. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
204:We are ever free if we would only believe it, only have faith enough. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
205:Faith is not belief, it is the grasp on the Ultimate, an illumination. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
206:Faith is powerful spiritual dynamic, and it is something God responds to and ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
207:It is a mysterious thing, the loss of faith as mysterious as faith itself. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
208:The essence of our Faith consists simply in this freedom of the Ishta. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
209:The only saving faith is that which casts itself on God for life or death. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
210:When things are difficult, smile by faith. Don't wait until you feel better. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
211:I have an ultimate faith in America and an audacious faith in mankind. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
212:Love, we say, is life; but love without hope and faith is agonizing death. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
213:Non-violence requires a double faith, faith in God and also faith in man.  ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
214:Not brute force but only persuasion and faith are the kings of this world. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
215:Faith doesn't always instantly deliver you, but it always carries you through. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
216:Faith is permitting ourselves to be seized by the things that we do not see. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
217:Gratitude, like faith, is a muscle. The more you use it, the stronger it grows. ~ alan-cohen, @wisdomtrove
218:The tears of affliction are often needed to keep the eye of faith bright. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
219:To say that you are being carried is a declaration of enormous faith and hope. ~ fred-rogers, @wisdomtrove
220:Faith is knowing and thinking truths. Charity is willing and doing them. ~ emanuel-swedenborg, @wisdomtrove
221:Faith is the effort to believe what your common sense tells you is not true. ~ elbert-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
222:Faith is the strength by which a shattered world shall emerge into the light. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
223:In the realist, faith is not born from miracles, but miracles from faith. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
224:It's not miracles that generate faith, but faith that generates miracles. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
225:Orthodoxy is the ability to say two and two make five when faith requires it. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
226:Our walk by faith, if it is true biblical faith, will get us in trouble. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
227:The greatest act of faith is when a man understands he is not God. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-jr, @wisdomtrove
228:We must have faith in the people of this country and faith in our principles. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
229:When you release your faith in uncommon ways, youll see God do uncommon things. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
230:You know one of the most encouraging things about faith? It pleases God. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
231:Faith makes it possible to achieve that which man's mind can conceive and believe. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
232:Feed your fears and your faith will starve. Feed your faith, and your fears will. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
233:God works where there's an attitude of faith. I believe faith is all about hope. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
234:Have faith in yourself, all power is in you, be conscious and bring it out ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
235:Have faith in yourselves, great convictions are the mother of great deeds. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
236:Kind hearts are more than coronets, And simple faith than Norman blood. ~ alfred-lord-tennyson, @wisdomtrove
237:Our faith becomes stronger as we express it; a growing faith is a sharing faith ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
238:To know that God thinks about me is the beginning of my journey of faith. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
239:Faith creates nothing; it simply reckons upon that which is already there. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
240:Fear tries to get us to give up but faith takes us all the way through to victory ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
241:The highest order that was ever instituted on earth is the order of faith. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
242:To make the future demands courage. It demands work. But it also demands faith. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
243:Whatever happens, do not lose hold of the two main ropes of life - hope and faith. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
244:A faith that cannot survive collision with the truth is not worth many regrets. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
245:Faith and Fear make poor bedfellows. Where one is found, the other cannot exist. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
246:Faith is taking the first step even when you don't see the whole staircase. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
247:Faith itself cannot accomplish anything, yet without faith, no one can fly. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
248:I am truly grateful that faith enables me to move past the question of &
249:Real faith invariably produces holiness of heart and righteousness of life. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
250:The true office of any faith is to give life a meaning which death cannot destroy. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
251:To take up half on trust, and half to try, Name it not faith but bungling bigotry. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
252:We are all architects of faith, ever living in these walls of time. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
253:We often forget that the author of our faith must be the finisher of it also. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
254:And the attitude of faith is the very opposite of clinging to belief, of holding on. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
255:As the yellow gold is tried in fire, so the faith of friendship must be seen in adversity. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
256:Be a sinner and sin strongly, but more strongly have faith and rejoice in Christ. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
257:Prayer is the hand of faith on the door knob of your heart, inviting Jesus to enter. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
258:Survival activates miracles when a person relies on the graces of hope and faith. ~ caroline-myss, @wisdomtrove
259:Take out the kernel of spiritual truth with any faith, and what is left is dogma. ~ peace-pilgrim, @wisdomtrove
260:To trust God in the light is nothing, but trust him in the dark-that is faith. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
261:A lively faith will bear aloft the mind, and leave the luggage of good works behind. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
262:Faith is different from proof; the latter is human, the former is a Gift from God. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
263:If you truly believe in Jesus, it is for life. Saving faith is a life-long act. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
264:Faith does not offer a strong link between our beliefs and actual states of the world. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
265:Faith is the &
266:“Faith means belief in something concerning which doubt is theoretically possible.” ~ william-james, @wisdomtrove
267:If religion comprises rules you follow, faith is demonstrated by the actions you take. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
268:Let us fear the worst, but work with faith; the best will always take care of itself. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
269:That state of mind in which a man is impressed with invisible things is faith. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
270:There lives more faith in honest doubt, believe me, than in half the creeds. ~ alfred-lord-tennyson, @wisdomtrove
271:Wherever faith has eyes to see, there is a smiling presence of the Son of God. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
272:By faith we began, by hope we continue, and by revelation we shall obtain the whole. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
273:Faith-is the pierless bridge supporting what We see unto the scene that we do not. ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
274:Faith,Waiting in the heart of a seed, Promises a miracle of life which cannot prove at once. ~ kabir, @wisdomtrove
275:He who does not embrace the teaching of the Church does not have the habit of faith. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
276:I wish I was either in your arms full of faith, or that a Thunder bolt would strike me. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
277:My faith is a wounded faith, but it's not without faith. My life is not without faith. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
278:The history of the world is the history of a few men who had faith in themselves ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
279:With the rise of Christianity, faith replaced thought as the bringer of immortality. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
280:Choosing an attitude of faith will release peace out of your spirit and into your soul. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
281:He who does not embrace the teaching of the Church does not have the habit of faith. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
282:The greatest religion is to be true to your own nature. Have faith in yourselves. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
283:Any faith that must be supported by the evidence of the senses is not real faith. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
284:Faith is in the soul. Belief is thought. Faith is so rich. Faith gives me my spiritual self. ~ ram-das, @wisdomtrove
285:Faith may be defined briefly as an illogical belief in the occurrence of the improbable. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
286:Reason is in fact the path to faith, and faith takes over when reason can say no more. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
287:So long as you have faith in your Guru, nothing will be able to obstruct your way. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
288:Great hearts can only be made by great troubles. Great faith must have great trials. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
289:It would be superfluous to receive by faith, things that can be known by natural reason ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
290:Living by faith includes the call to something greater than cowardly self-preservation. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
291:Sometimes you have to smile by faith. If you'll smile by faith, soon the joy will follow. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
292:Trust and faith bring joy to life and help relationships grow to their maximum potential. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
293:Columbus found a world, and had no chart save one that Faith deciphered in the skies. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
294:Do not disturb the faith of any. . . Our duty is not to disturb the faith of others. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
295:Doubt is poison. It leads to a loss of faith in yourself, and in all that's good and true. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
296:Faith has to do with things that are not seen and hope with things that are not at hand. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
297:Faith is not a once-done act, but a continuous gaze of the heart at the Triune God. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
298:Faith is not merely a journey for the feet, but it is also a journey for the heart. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
299:Faith is the eternal elixir. It gives life, power, and action to the impulse of thought. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
300:Faith pulls the black mask from the face of trouble, and discovers the angel beneath. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
301:For without risk there is no faith, and the greater the risk, the greater the faith. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
302:I practice a faith that's been long abandoned Ain't no altars on this long and lonesome road ~ bob-dylan, @wisdomtrove
303:It would be superfluous to receive by faith, things that can be known by natural reason ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
304:No grief has a right to immortality. That ground belongs to joy, to hope, to faith. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
305:Persistence is nothing more than Concentrated Effort mixed with Determination and Faith. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
306:Revealed religion first informed thy sight, and reason saw not till faith sprung to light. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
307:Survival activates miracles when a person relies on the graces of hope and faith. ~ norman-vincent-peale, @wisdomtrove
308:A sign of a culture that has lost its faith - Moral collapse follows upon spiritual collapse. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
309:Every great move forward in your life begins with a leap of faith, a step into the unknown. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
310:Every religion seems like a fantasy to outsiders, but as holy truth to those of the faith. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
311:Faith has to do with things that are not seen and hope with things that are not at hand. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
312:Faith is a sounder guide than reason. Reason can only go so far, but faith has no limits. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
313:If God allows proof that he exists he robs people of faith and without faith what is God? ~ douglas-adams, @wisdomtrove
314:The majority of my patients consisted not of believers but of those who had lost their faith. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
315:When you put faith, hope and love together, you can raise positive kids in a negative world. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
316:A man full of faith is simply one who has lost the capacity for clear and realistic thought. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
317:I believe here's what the Bible teaches and from the Christian faith this is what I believe. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
318:If I were dying, my last words would be: Have faith and pursue the unknown end. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-jr, @wisdomtrove
319:The alleged short-cut to knowledge, which is faith, is only a short-circuit destroying the mind ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
320:True faith will no more fail to produce [good works] than the sun can cease to give light. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
321:Truly, if faith is there, the believer cannot hold back... he breaks out into good works. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
322:Every week I preach justification by faith to my people, because every week they forget it. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
323:Faith does not, in the realist, spring from the miracle but the miracle from the faith. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
324:Have faith in yourselves, be proud of your ancestors, instead of being ashamed of them. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
325:How many things we held yesterday as articles of faith which today we tell as fables. ~ michel-de-montaigne, @wisdomtrove
326:If your faith isn't rooted in the Bible, it will wither like a plant pulled out of the soil. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
327:Reason is the greatest enemy that faith has: it never comes to the aid of spiritual things. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
328:The imagination is the secret and marrow of civilization. It is the very eye of faith. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
329:We must make good people wish that the Christian faith were true, and then show that it is. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
330:What can be found equal to modesty, uncorrupt faith, the sister of justice, and undisguised truth? ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
331:Where there is lack, God’s abundance is on the way. Hold on. Have faith. It’s coming. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
332:All the scholastic scaffolding falls, as a ruined edifice, before a single word: faith. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
333:Faith is a bird that can see the light when it is dawn and starts singing in the dark. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
334:Faith is a state of mind that can be conditioned through self-discipline. Faith will accomplish. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
335:Faith is not a delicate flower which would wither away under the slightest stormy weather.  ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
336:Fear makes you feel surrounded by an enemy. Faith makes you realize you are surrounded by God. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
337:May you find in yourself enough patience to endure and enough simplicity to have faith. ~ rainer-maria-rilke, @wisdomtrove
338:Observe good faith and justice toward all nations. Cultivate peace and harmony with all. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
339:When faith burns itself out, 'tis God who dies and thenceforth proves unavailing. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
340:Faith is a free surrenderand a joyous wager on the unseen, unknown, untested goodness of God. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
341:Have faith in yourselves, and stand up on that faith and be strong; that is what we need. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
342:If I should neglect prayer but a single day, I should lose a great deal of the fire of faith. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
343:The only answer to fear is faith in God, knowing He loves you unconditionally and individually. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
344:The scholar does not consider gold and jade to be precious treasures, but loyalty and good faith. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
345:To teach in order to lead others to faith is the task of every preacher and of each believer. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
346:Faith is a principle which hath its root deeper feeling. We believe, whether we see or not. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
347:Faith is not in itself a meritorious act; the merit is in the One to Whom it is directed. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
348:Fear and faith have something in common. They both ask us to believe in something we cannot see. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
349:It is not through judgment that the good in people can be reached, but through love and faith. ~ peace-pilgrim, @wisdomtrove
350:Let us renew our faith that as free men and women we still have the power to better our lives. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
351:To teach in order to lead others to faith is the task of every preacher and of each believer. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
352:A little faith will bring your soul to heaven; a great faith will bring heaven to your soul. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
353:Faith is to believe what you do not see; the reward of this faith is to see what you believe. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
354:Faith never makes herself her own plea, she rests all her argument upon the blood of Christ. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
355:For those with faith, no evidence is necessary; for those without it, no evidence will suffice. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
356:It's faith in something and enthusiasm for something that makes a life worth living. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-sr, @wisdomtrove
357:There is no love without hope, no hope without love, and neither hope nor love without faith. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
358:Walk by faith! Stop the plague of worry. Relax! Learn to say, "Lord, this is Your battle." ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
359:We lack faith in *what* exists within us because we lack faith in *Who* exists within us. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
360:But the attitude of faith is to let go, and become open to truth, whatever it might turn out to be. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
361:Can you imagine a life with no fear? What if faith, not fear, was your default reaction to threats? ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
362:Faith goes up the stairs that love has built and looks out the windows which hope has opened. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
363:Faith in the supernatural is a desperate wager made by man at the lowest ebb of his fortunes. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
364:Faith is a fine invention When gentlemen can see, But microscopes are prudent In an emergency. ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
365:Faith never goes contrary to reason - faith simply ignores reason and rises above it. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
366:Faith, there hath been many great men that have flattered the people who ne'er loved them. ~ william-shakespeare, @wisdomtrove
367:For those with faith, no evidence is necessary; for those without it, no evidence will suffice. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
368:Have faith in man, whether he appears to you to be a very learned one or a most ignorant one ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
369:It is not that we don't have faith it is just that Satan is trying to destroy our faith with lies. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
370:“Our faith is faith in someone else's faith, and in the greatest matters this is most the case.” ~ william-james, @wisdomtrove
371:Remember, success is a journey not a destination. Have faith in your ability. You will do just fine. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
372:The truth is mightier than eloquence, the Spirit greater than genius, faith more than education. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
373:Faith gives us strength and reassurance and leaves us bathed in the wisdom that we are never alone. ~ debbie-ford, @wisdomtrove
374:Faith is a mockery if it does not teach us that we can build a more complete and beautiful world. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
375:Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
376:The external forces conceal from the eyes the deep meaning of existence; True faith resides in the heart. ~ kabir, @wisdomtrove
377:There are times when God leaves huge question marks as tools in our lives to stretch our our faith. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
378:To study history means submitting to chaos and nevertheless retaining faith in order and meaning. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
379:Amidst sorrows, the only thing that enlivens us is optimistic faith. Never lose that faith. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
380:A mission is a place where you ask nonbelievers to come and find faith and hope and feel love. ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
381:Be willing to launch in faith, with no guarantees of success. This is the mark of personal greatness ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
382:Faith is occupied with the Object upon which it rests and pays no attention to itself at all. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
383:Faith is the conviction that God knows more than we do about this life and He will get us through it. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
384:Postulates are based on assumption and adhered to by faith. Nothing in the Universe can shake them. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
385:Who is of so little faith that in a moment of great disaster or heartbreak has not called to his God? ~ og-mandino, @wisdomtrove
386:and thus of being conjoined to God by faith and love, and to be conjoined to God is to live to ~ emanuel-swedenborg, @wisdomtrove
387:A simple, childlike faith in a Divine Friend solves all the problems that come to us by land or sea ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
388:Really, a young Atheist cannot guard his faith too carefully. Dangers lie in wait for him on every side. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
389:To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
390:Faith is more important to me than life itself because without it there would be no fullness of life. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
391:Faith is not the belief that God will do what you want. It is the belief that God will do what is right. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
392:If we cling to belief in God, we cannot likewise have faith, since faith is not clinging but letting go. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
393:Small souls who seek power over others first destroy the faith those others might have in themselves. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
394:The foundation stones for a balanced success are honesty, character, integrity, faith, love and loyalty. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
395:Too much reasoning has spoiled the contemporary mind. People have lost their hearts and faith. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
396:To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
397:Upon the glazen shelves kept watch Matthew and Waldo, guardians of the faith The army of unalterable law. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
398:A mind dominated by positive emotions, becomes a favorable abode for the state of mind known as faith. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
399:Any faith that admires truth, that strives to know God, must be brave enough to accommodate the universe. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
400:Doubt is an old disease. Faith is an old medicine. Compassion is an old doctor. Concern is an old nurse. ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
401:Faith obliterates time, annihilates distance, and brings future things at once into its possession. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
402:I trust that God wouldn't give me more than I can handle. I just wish he didn't have such faith in me. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
403:Lecturer, n. One with his hand in your pocket, his tongue in your ear and his faith in your patience. ~ ambrose-bierce, @wisdomtrove
404:Next to the Holy Scriptures, the greatest aide to the life of faith may be Christian biographies. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
405:To lose ones faith-surpass The loss of an Estate- Because Estates can be Replenished- faith cannot-. ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
406:Faith is the final triumph over incongruity, the final assertion of the meaningfulness of existence. ~ reinhold-niebuhr, @wisdomtrove
407:If you lose money you lose much, If you lose friends you lose more, If you lose faith you lose all. ~ eleanor-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
408:Take the first step in faith. You don't have to see the whole staircase, just take the first step. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
409:You will not find another faith, but rather one and the same single religion presupposed everywhere. ~ nicholas-of-cusa, @wisdomtrove
410:Faith is having a positive attitude about what you can do and not worrying at all about what you can't do. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
411:Let`s choose each day and every day to keep an attitude of faith and joy and belief and compassion. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
412:Progress can be slow and gradual. Continue putting in effort with patience, enthusiasm and faith. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
413:Faith and doubt go hand in hand, they are complementaries. One who never doubts will never truly believe. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
414:God's blessings are dispensed according to the riches of his grace, not according to the depth of our faith. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
415:If there was no faith there would be no living in this world. We could not even eat hash with any safety. ~ josh-billings, @wisdomtrove
416:In faith there is enough light for those who want to believe and enough shadows to blind those who don't. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
417:The facts may tell you one thing. But, God is not limited by the facts. Choose faith in spite of the facts. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
418:Unbelief is actually perverted faith, for it puts its faith not in the living God, but in dying men. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
419:We must learn that to expect God to do everything while we do nothing is not faith but superstition. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
420:We rely on faith only in the context of claims for which there is no sufficient sensory or logical evidence. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
421:Fear of death makes us devoid both of valour and religion. For want of valour is want of religious faith. ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
422:In order to have faith in his own path, a warrior does not need to prove that someone else's path is wrong. ~ paulo-coelho, @wisdomtrove
423:Life becomes meaningful and all activities are purposeful only on the basis of faith in the enduring reality. ~ meher-baba, @wisdomtrove
424:When God creates faith in a man, that is as great a work as if He created heaven and earth all over again. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
425:Faith, hope, love, and insight are the highest achievements of human effort. They are found-given-by experience. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
426:No matter how long it's been, no matter how impossible it looks, if you'll stay in faith, your time is coming. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
427:There being an imminent danger for the faith, prelates must be questioned, even publicly, by their subjects. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
428:After faith comes repentance, or, rather, repentance is faith's twin brother and is born at the same time. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
429:Difficult and painful as it is, we must walk on in the days ahead with an audacious faith in the future. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
430:Frantic orthodoxy is never rooted in faith but in doubt. It is when we are unsure that we are doubly sure. ~ reinhold-niebuhr, @wisdomtrove
431:In the beginning there was faith - which is childish; trust - which is vain; and illusion - which is dangerous. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
432:Regarding the debate about faith and works: It's like asking which blade in a pair of scissors is most important. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
433:Religious faith is the one species of human ignorance that will not admit of even the possibility of correction. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
434:The important things to me are your faith, your family and your friends. If you have that, you have everything. ~ john-wooden, @wisdomtrove
435:There being an imminent danger for the faith, prelates must be questioned, even publicly, by their subjects. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
436:The Simple Path Silence is Prayer Prayer is Faith Faith is Love Love is Service The Fruit of Service is Peace ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
437:As long as we have faith in our own cause and an unconquerable will to win, victory will not be denied us. ~ winston-churchill, @wisdomtrove
438:Don't use your faith to try to get rid of problems. Use your faith to remain calm in the midst of your problems. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
439:Every tomorrow has two handles. We can take hold of it with the handle of anxiety or the handle of faith. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
440:Our belief in God is not blind faith. Belief is having a firm conviction something is true, not hoping it's true. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
441:Success Recipe: 2 cups faith, 2 cups love, 1 cup hard work, 1 cup persistence, 1 tbsp vision and a dash of swagger. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
442:Surrender is faith that the power of Love can accomplish anything even when you cannot foresee the outcome.    ~ deepak-chopra, @wisdomtrove
443:The fools of the world have been those who have established religions, ceremonies, laws, faith, rule of life. ~ giordano-bruno, @wisdomtrove
444:This is not the time to shrink back in fear. Move forward in faith. Get up every morning knowing you are gifted. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
445:At this very moment, God’s working behind the scenes in your life, arranging things in your favor. Stay in faith! ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
446:Hope and faith are two intimate brothers; they always go together. Hope nourishes faith and faith treasures hope. ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
447:It is not faith in Christ that saves you (though faith is the instrument) - it is Christ's blood and merits. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
448:Real faith never disappoints because it is in God, grounded on His character, promises, covenant and oath. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
449:That's my thing - keep filled with faith. Keep doing what you can do and I believe God will do what you can't do. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
450:The beautiful thing about this adventure called faith is that we can count on Him never to lead us astray. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
451:This is faith, receiving the truth of Christ; first knowing it to be true, and then acting upon that belief. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
452:Unwearied ceaseless effort is the price that must be paid for turning faith into a rich infallible experience. ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
453:We're not always going to understand why something happens.True faith is trusting even when it doesn't make sense ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
454:Abraham is trying to obey God, but not to kill. I feel that moment is one of the defining moments of Jewish faith. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
455:A man with a grain of faith in God never loses hope, because he ever believes in the ultimate triumph of Truth. ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
456:Faith: Belief without evidence in what is told by one who speaks without knowledge, of things without parallel. ~ ambrose-bierce, @wisdomtrove
457:The great test of faith is to wait on God. . . not expecting to push a button and get whatever we want now. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
458:I dont think that we're meant to understand it all the time. I think that sometimes we just have to have faith. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
459:Proofs are the last thing looked for by a truly religious mind which feels the imaginary fitness of its faith. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
460:We should never forget that after every night, there is a dawn. We should never lose our optimistic faith. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
461:Without faith to act as a governor, the human mind is a runaway worry generator, a dynamo of negative expectations. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
462:Absolutely no religious rites of any kind, relating to any religious faith, should be associated with my funeral. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
463:FAITH is the only agency through which the cosmic force of Infinite Intelligence can be harnessed and used by man. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
464:Fear can paralyze us and keep us from believing God and stepping out in faith. The devil loves a fearful Christian! ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
465:It's time for us to rise up, get out of the rut and routine, and begin to take our Christian faith seriously. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
466:Let your tears fall because of sin, but, at the same time, let the eye of faith steadily behold the Son of man. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
467:One of the most obtuse superstitions is the superstition of the scientists who say that man can exist without faith. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
468:Christianity teaches salvation by grace through faith, every other religion teaches salvation through works and merit. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
469:Faith is a re-directing of our sight, a getting out of the focus of our own vision and getting God into focus. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
470:Faith is not in your head. Faith is in your heart. Sometimes you have to turn your mind off and listen to your heart. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
471:I have not lost faith in God. I have moments of anger and protest. Sometimes I've been closer to him for that reason. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
472:Send your life to a whole new level! Zip up the negative words and start speaking faith and victory into your future. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
473:so it is with human reason, which strives not against faith, when enlightened, but rather furthers and advances it. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
474:You should approach Joyce's Ulysses as the illiterate Baptist preacher approaches the Old Testament: with faith. ~ william-faulkner, @wisdomtrove
475:All collective judgments are wrong. Only racists make them. No human race is superior; no religious faith is inferior. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
476:For he who loves God without faith reflects on himself, while the person who loves God in faith reflects on God. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
477:If we try to obey without faith, we get nowhere. If we try to have faith without obedience, it ends in nothing. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
478:It is impossible to separate works from faith- yea, just as impossible as to separate burning and shining from fire. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
479:A library implies an act of faith which generations, still in darkness hid, sign in their night in witness of the dawn. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
480:A man of faith will remain steadfast to truth even though the whole world might appear to be enveloped in falsehood. ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
481:A small body of determined spirits fired by an unquenchable faith in their mission can alter the course of history.  ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
482:Faith implies four things: self-renunciation, reliance with utter confidence on Christ, obedience, and a changed life. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
483:Have faith that others will pay their own price one day for what they’ve done. You don’t have to be the justice system. ~ rick-hanson, @wisdomtrove
484:If your faith does not make you pray, have nothing to do with it; get rid of it, and God help thee to begin again. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
485:The whole being of any Christian is faith and love. Faith brings the person to God, love brings the person to people. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
486:We operate by faith, which means that we have confidence in what God says, whether we fully understand it or not ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
487:Faith cannot be inherited or gained by being baptized into a Church. Faith is a matter between the individual and God. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
488:Faith is the ability to see things that don't yet exist. Faith, though, can turn difficulty into reality, positive reality. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
489:Human beings have neither kindness, nor faith, nor charity beyond what serves to increase the pleasure of the moment. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
490:It is time that scientists and other public intellectuals observed that the contest between faith and reason is zero-sum. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
491:Faithfulness, faith, all of the words that so few people live, you must live. Only then are you worthy of immortality. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
492:Faith is belief in what you cannot see or prove or touch. Faith is walking face-first and full-speed into the dark. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
493:God must not engage in theology. The writer must not destroy by human reasonings the faith that art requires of us. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
494:Hold firmly that our faith is identical with that of the ancients. Deny this, and you dissolve the unity of the Church. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
495:It's up to me to promote my faith and somebody else to promote theirs. Let the government just protect our right to do so. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
496:The most satisfying and ecstatic faith is almost purely agnostic. It trusts absolutely without professing to know at all. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
497:We must have the faith that things will work out somehow, that God will make a way for us when there seems no way. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
498:We tend to have tremendous faith in the power of our disasters and far too little faith in the power of miracles. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
499:Hold firmly that our faith is identical with that of the ancients. Deny this, and you dissolve the unity of the Church. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
500:If the blind put their hands in God's, they find their way more surely than those who see but have not faith or purpose. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:shut off the bike, ~ Faith Hunter,
2:top floor, helping ~ Faith Hunter,
3:Doubt is faith's shadow. ~ Jo Nesb,
4:Dang ninja vamp. Eli ~ Faith Hunter,
5:Faith is Individual ~ Martin Luther,
6:Faith is reasonable. ~ Benedict XVI,
7:God-Given Faith ~ Smith Wigglesworth,
8:I enjoy being a girl. ~ Paloma Faith,
9:My faith guides my life. ~ Kay Hagan,
10:Faith must be worked at. ~ James Cook,
11:Even fear afraid of faith. ~ Toba Beta,
12:Have a little faith. ~ Cassandra Clare,
13:Love is an act of faith. ~ Erich Fromm,
14:Faith is a gift of God. ~ Blaise Pascal,
15:Holy Necrophilia, Batman ~ Faith Hunter,
16:I'm a serial monogamist. ~ Paloma Faith,
17:Life is an act of faith. ~ Paulo Coelho,
18:much older than you knew ~ Faith Martin,
19:We put our faith in love. ~ Lauren Kate,
20:Faith is important to me. ~ Vera Farmiga,
21:Faith is the fool's excuse. ~ James Frey,
22:Faith itself is a miracle, ~ John Irving,
23:Faith reveals the potential. ~ Toba Beta,
24:Have faith in yourself. ~ Nathan Parsons,
25:I have my shield of faith. ~ Joel Osteen,
26:I will always remember ~ Faith Ringgold,
27:Meet your fears with faith. ~ Max Lucado,
28:obedience comes from faith. ~ Beth Moore,
29:Pactum serva" - "Keep the faith ~ Horace,
30:pear and Camembert tarts, ~ Faith Martin,
31:RESTORATION OF FAITH - Takes ~ Anonymous,
32:Deep faith eliminates fear. ~ Lech Walesa,
33:Faith is the force of life. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
34:My faith keeps me strong. ~ Cissy Houston,
35:One king, one law, one faith. ~ Louis XIV,
36:on the outside, and all of ~ Faith Martin,
37:sort of gal — she wouldn’t ~ Faith Martin,
38:You cannot schedule death. ~ Paloma Faith,
39:A little faith can do wonders. ~ Dan Brown,
40:God will honor our faith. ~ Dwight L Moody,
41:Have faith in yourself. ~ Richard Branson,
42:Have faith. We will do ~ Swami Vivekananda,
43:I'm a very independent woman. ~ Faith Hill,
44:Live by faith, not by sight. ~ Mastin Kipp,
45:Soul rotted before my eyes. ~ Faith Hunter,
46:You say you've lost your faith ~ Bob Dylan,
47:Faith. Trust. and Pixie Dust. ~ Walt Disney,
48:Peyote Made Everything Weird ~ Faith Hunter,
49:The antidote to fear is faith. ~ Wayne Dyer,
50:The fruit of faith is love. ~ Mother Teresa,
51:To me faith means not worrying ~ John Dewey,
52:We just need some faith. ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
53:Awe precedes faith. ~ Abraham Joshua Heschel,
54:Big faith doesn't need big words. ~ Bob Goff,
55:Eternal Quest, Eternal Faith ~ S V Divvaakar,
56:Faith is a big thing we explore. ~ Uzo Aduba,
57:Fear is the absence of faith. ~ Paul Tillich,
58:Have faith in God. Stay focused. ~ DJ Khaled,
59:Her faith in you survives her, ~ Lauren Kate,
60:I have faith in nights. ~ Rainer Maria Rilke,
61:I've lost my faith in science. ~ Bette Davis,
62:Our priorities is our faith. ~ George W Bush,
63:strenght-faith-hope-love ~ Bruce Springsteen,
64:To me faith means not worrying. ~ John Dewey,
65:Don't lose faith in your stars. ~ Ian Fleming,
66:Don't say I'm lucky. Ever. ~ Faith Erin Hicks,
67:Faith is in the gaze of a soul. ~ Ann Voskamp,
68:Faith is taking God seriously. ~ Derek Prince,
69:Fear clogs; Faith liberates. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
70:Fear is always at war with faith. ~ Toba Beta,
71:Put faith in one who's had experience. ~ Ovid,
72:Reason is the enemy of faith. ~ Martin Luther,
73:The antidote to fear is faith. ~ Wayne W Dyer,
74:The silence killed your faith. ~ Barack Obama,
75:Am I acting on faith or feelings? ~ Lara Casey,
76:Faith Alone is what really matters. ~ Nichiren,
77:Faith is lived, not thought. ~ Terryl L Givens,
78:Faith is the enemy of discovery. ~ Simon Mawer,
79:Faith is the yes of the heart. ~ Martin Luther,
80:Faith without works is dead, ~ Scott Nicholson,
81:Fear is faith in reverse gear. ~ Napoleon Hill,
82:For me, my faith informs my life. ~ Mike Pence,
83:Have faith in your destiny ~ Swami Vivekananda,
84:I have faith in the jury system. ~ Nancy Grace,
85:I want faith; but I am faithless ~ Errol Flynn,
86:Making art is an act of faith. ~ Julia Cameron,
87:performance is an act of faith. ~ Marya Mannes,
88:She took a leap of faith and ~ David Brinkley,
89:We live by faith and not by sight. ~ Anonymous,
90:your faith and hope are in god. ~ Billy Graham,
91:Faith Alone is what really matters. ~ Nichiren,
92:Faith first, knowledge afterwards. ~ The Mother,
93:Faith is learned through life. ~ Lysa TerKeurst,
94:Faith is the conqueror of dreams. ~ Suzy Kassem,
95:Faith is under the left nipple. ~ Martin Luther,
96:Faith is what we do between miracles. ~ Unknown,
97:Faith, not feelings, pleases God. ~ Rick Warren,
98:I have a lot of faith in people. ~ John Lithgow,
99:I have faith in my imperfections! ~ Dana Delany,
100:I just have an inability to lie. ~ Paloma Faith,
101:It's a blindness thing, faith. ~ Niall Williams,
102:marked more by the way the grass ~ Faith Hunter,
103:My Christian faith is my backbone ~ Bear Grylls,
104:Pride renders faith impossible. ~ Andrew Murray,
105:You are whatever your faith is. ~ Deepak Chopra,
106:A library implies an act of faith. ~ Victor Hugo,
107:Always have Faith. Always have Hope. ~ DJ Khaled,
108:Belief clings, but faith lets go. ~ Alan W Watts,
109:Faith alone is the sun of life. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
110:Faith does not mean credulity... ~ Ronald Fisher,
111:Faith enables us to move past fear. ~ bell hooks,
112:Faith is necessary to victory. ~ William Hazlitt,
113:Faith is obedience, nothing else. ~ Emil Brunner,
114:Faith is the soul's adventure. ~ William Bridges,
115:Faith makes things possible, not easy. ~ Unknown,
116:Fear is faith that it won't work. ~ Mary Kay Ash,
117:grace in a silver-grey suit, dark ~ Faith Martin,
118:Have faith in all that you make. ~ Dahvie Vanity,
119:I had to put my faith in time. ~ Haruki Murakami,
120:I'm such a happy, easygoing person. ~ Faith Hill,
121:I wasn't a great background singer. ~ Faith Hill,
122:Love is the greatest act of faith. ~ Amber Kizer,
123:Never break faith with the truth. ~ George Tenet,
124:The righteous shall live by faith.”  ~ Anonymous,
125:The Thessalonians’ Faith and Example ~ Anonymous,
126:to enable true repentance and faith. ~ Anonymous,
127:We live by faith. We love by faith. ~ Beth Moore,
128:We walk by faith and not by sight. ~ Joel Osteen,
129:Authentic faith cannot help but act. ~ Beth Moore,
130:Curvy is something to be proud of. ~ Paloma Faith,
131:Faith means walking on the waters. ~ Julien Green,
132:Faith, not facts, moves mountains. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
133:faith without doubt is addiction ~ Salman Rushdie,
134:For we walk by faith, not by sight. ~ S Jae Jones,
135:Have faith in your own thoughts. ~ Brooke Shields,
136:I'm a home girl. I like to stay home ~ Faith Hill,
137:I shall not repent of my faith. ~ Seth Adam Smith,
138:It takes a busload of faith to get by. ~ Lou Reed,
139:Lately I've been running on faith. ~ Eric Clapton,
140:They who have faith will go through. ~ The Mother,
141:Trust is the action of faith. ~ Gerard de Marigny,
142:Faith and optimism are contagious. ~ Thom S Rainer,
143:Faith assuages, guides, restores. ~ Arthur Rimbaud,
144:Faith changes hope into reality. ~ Kenneth E Hagin,
145:Faith did return in extremis ~ Megan Whalen Turner,
146:Faith is a fuel to the engine of soul. ~ Toba Beta,
147:Faith is a function of the heart. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
148:Faith is reason at rest in God. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
149:Faith is the ability to endure. ~ Michael R French,
150:faith is the evidence of non-evidence. ~ Anonymous,
151:Faith should be backed by reason. ~ Dalai Lama XIV,
152:FAITH triumphs in trial. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
153:Fear can be overcome by faith. ~ Grantly Dick Read,
154:Fight for faith, and hope will be born. ~ Nely Cab,
155:God is bigger than the Christian faith. ~ Rob Bell,
156:Have faith in your imaginel act. ~ Neville Goddard,
157:Holiness sincerity, and faith. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
158:If faith fails, prayer perishes. ~ Saint Augustine,
159:I try to act out of faith. ~ Marian Wright Edelman,
160:I’ve always been a woman of faith. ~ Lauren London,
161:I walk by faith, not by sight. ~ Denzel Washington,
162:prayer is faith become audible. ~ Timothy J Keller,
163:Prayer is helplessness plus faith. ~ Bill Thrasher,
164:Truth resides where there is faith. ~ Paulo Coelho,
165:union with God -- namely, faith. ~ Juan de la Cruz,
166:We are twice armed if we fight with faith. ~ Plato,
167:We walk by faith, not by sight. ~ Paul the Apostle,
168:With the gift of faith, we move on. ~ Irvine Welsh,
169:7 (for we walk by faith, not by sight:) ~ Anonymous,
170:Duty cannot exist without faith ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
171:Faith builds, cynicism destroys. ~ Lyndon B Johnson,
172:Faith has no power unless chosen freely ~ Ryk Brown,
173:Faith is a higher faculty than reason. ~ H C Bailey,
174:Faith is always about the Future. ~ Michael Pfleger,
175:Faith is a state of openness or trust. ~ Alan Watts,
176:Faith is intellectual laziness. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
177:Faith is not faith until it is tested! ~ Kay Arthur,
178:Faith is personal if it's to be real. ~ Bear Grylls,
179:Faith is the evidence of the unseen. ~ Maya Angelou,
180:Faith is the refusal to panic. ~ Martyn Lloyd Jones,
181:Faith lives in honest doubt. ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
182:Faith only grows through suffering. ~ Mark Driscoll,
183:Faith that denies fact is fanaticism, ~ Barb Hendee,
184:Faith with proof is no faith at all. ~ Patrick Ness,
185:Hope is never ill when faith is well. ~ John Bunyan,
186:Hope is the mother of faith. ~ Walter Savage Landor,
187:I have great faith in a seed. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
188:I think the future deserves our faith. ~ John Green,
189:Living with faith and courage is ~ Kathryn Kuhlman,
190:Mushy reviews are a breach of faith ~ Wilfrid Sheed,
191:No prayer fully expresses our faith. ~ Oscar Romero,
192:No, you shall be, my faith! Tartuffified. ~ Moli re,
193:Scepticism is the beginning of Faith. ~ Oscar Wilde,
194:The faith I was born into formed me. ~ Huston Smith,
195:The final mode is misplaced faith. ~ Timothy Snyder,
196:Time flies, dreams die, people lose faith, ~ Xzibit,
197:Twist Your Lil’ Bobblehead Right Off ~ Faith Hunter,
198:Without mystery, there was no faith. ~ Stacy Schiff,
199:You of little faith, why did you doubt? ~ Anonymous,
200:Your faith frames your world daily. ~ Charles Capps,
201:As far as possible, join faith to reason. ~ Boethius,
202:A word of the faith that never balks, ~ Walt Whitman,
203:Faith and optimism come from love. ~ Maya Soetoro Ng,
204:Faith can turn the night to light. ~ Seth Adam Smith,
205:Faith idles when character shrivels. ~ Miroslav Volf,
206:Faith is active confidence in God. ~ James MacDonald,
207:Faith is in the eye of the beholder. ~ Tilda Swinton,
208:Faith is only a word, embroidered. ~ Margaret Atwood,
209:Faith is taking God at His Word. ~ Leonard Ravenhill,
210:Faith is the function of the heart. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
211:Faith thrives in holy discomfort. The ~ Louie Giglio,
212:Faith without challenge is nothing. ~ Iyanla Vanzant,
213:Have faith in the light you carry. ~ Seth Adam Smith,
214:He though does not always have faith. ~ Paulo Coelho,
215:If faith is your motivation, share that. ~ Tim Kaine,
216:Mutual perfect faith would be heaven! ~ Richard Rohr,
217:My faith protects me. My Kevlar helps. ~ Jim Butcher,
218:Prayer is the chief exercise of faith. ~ John Calvin,
219:Silly thing, kissing. Licking better. ~ Faith Hunter,
220:Sing, for faith and hope are high- ~ Rudyard Kipling,
221:'Tis my faith that every flower ~ William Wordsworth,
222:Trust is earned. Faith is given.” His ~ Emily Hemmer,
223:When has faith ever been about feelings? ~ Camy Tang,
224:You just have to have a simple faith. ~ Jimmy Carter,
225:But a dauntless faith believes ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
226:Faith is a passionate intuition. ~ William Wordsworth,
227:Faith is God's work within us. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
228:Faith is hard to achieve, easy to lose. ~ Zadie Smith,
229:Faith never makes a confession. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
230:Feed your faith, starve your doubts. ~ John C Maxwell,
231:Have a little faith, kick a little dirt. ~ Diane Ladd,
232:I have no faith in political arithmetic. ~ Adam Smith,
233:I like sparkles; I think I'm a magpie. ~ Paloma Faith,
234:Martha had never trusted skinny cooks. ~ Faith Martin,
235:Obedience is the fruit of faith. ~ Christina Rossetti,
236:Our life must answer for our faith. ~ Thomas F Wilson,
237:seemed silly to Faith. And offensive ~ Danielle Steel,
238:Thou shalt not take anything on faith ~ Penn Jillette,
239:True faith is ever connected with hope. ~ John Calvin,
240:You cannot insult the faith of others. ~ Pope Francis,
241:You had no faith to lose and you know it. ~ Bob Dylan,
242:You haven’t the brains God gave a cow, ~ Faith Hunter,
243:An untested faith is an unreliable faith. ~ Kay Warren,
244:Difficult days demand decisions of faith. ~ Max Lucado,
245:Doubt is resistance, faith is surrender. ~ Jen Sincero,
246:Every moment in life is an act of faith ~ Paulo Coelho,
247:Faith becomes the foundation I'm built on. ~ T D Jakes,
248:Faith begins where reason leaves off. ~ Charlie Lovett,
249:Faith is not reason's labour, but repose. ~ Neil Young,
250:Faith is not the opposite of reason. ~ Richard Dawkins,
251:Faith is obedience, not compliance. ~ George MacDonald,
252:Faith is the flame that eliminates fear. ~ Suzy Kassem,
253:Faith is the head chemist of the mind. ~ Napoleon Hill,
254:focus and have faith in my own story. ~ Michelle Obama,
255:Great faith must have great trials. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
256:Have a little faith. Don't give up. ~ Fantasia Barrino,
257:Hope, love and faith are in the waiting. ~ Dean Koontz,
258:Hope, love, and faith are in the waiting ~ Dean Koontz,
259:I have a great faith in God and Jesus. ~ Ernie Harwell,
260:I think that at the core of faith is trust. ~ Rob Bell,
261:I think the Moslem faith teaches hate. ~ Jerry Falwell,
262:I try to be a person of faith. ~ Marian Wright Edelman,
263:Keep the faith, and keep going strong! ~ Doreen Virtue,
264:Non-violence is the article of faith. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
265:Obedience is the fruit of faith; ~ Christina Rossetti,
266:Once you lost your faith, it was gone. ~ Tarryn Fisher,
267:Optimism is a faith that leads to success. ~ Bruce Lee,
268:There can be no faith without doubt ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
269:The source of faith is the Word of God. ~ Phil Pringle,
270:Understanding is the wages of faith. ~ Saint Augustine,
271:All action is vicarious faith. ~ Abraham Joshua Heschel,
272:All is well, tho' faith and form ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
273:Blind faith isn't always a good thing. ~ Heather Graham,
274:Everything starts with belief. With faith. ~ V E Schwab,
275:Faith is believing what you know ain't so. ~ Mark Twain,
276:Faith isn't blind, it's visionary ~ Marianne Williamson,
277:Faith is the evidence of divine adoption. ~ John Calvin,
278:Faith is the summit of the Torah. ~ Solomon Ibn Gabirol,
279:Faith slips - and laughs, and rallies ~ Emily Dickinson,
280:Fear can be overcome only by Faith. ~ Grantly Dick Read,
281:He is cured by faith who is sick of fate. ~ James Joyce,
282:I don't know why 'happy' can't be a story. ~ Faith Hill,
283:If one has faith, one has everything. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
284:Let your faith be bigger than your fear. ~ Francis Chan,
285:Love is an act of faith, not an exchange ~ Paulo Coelho,
286:Only real risk passes the reality of faith. ~ C S Lewis,
287:That's the thing about faith. It works. ~ Lauren Oliver,
288:There can be no faith without risk. ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
289:There is no argument to be had with faith. ~ Meg Elison,
290:Understanding is the reward of faith. ~ Saint Augustine,
291:Art is the closest thing I have to faith. ~ Abigail Boyd,
292:Be courageous! Have faith! Go forward. ~ Thomas A Edison,
293:Doubt is but another element of faith. ~ Saint Augustine,
294:E'er since, by faith, I saw the stream ~ William Cowper,
295:Faith begins where Reason sinks exhausted. ~ Albert Pike,
296:Faith involves an acceptance of absurdity. ~ Zadie Smith,
297:Faith is a passionate intuition.
   ~ William Wordsworth,
298:Faith is a record of great risks taken. ~ Winkie Pratney,
299:Faith is a total attitude of the self. ~ John Macquarrie,
300:Faith is a vulnerable thing, not a battle. ~ David Bazan,
301:Faith is spiritualized imagination. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
302:Faith is stronger than so-called reason. ~ Hermann Hesse,
303:I don't have faith, I have experience. ~ Joseph Campbell,
304:I don't need faith. I have experience. ~ Joseph Campbell,
305:I'm very competitive but in a very nice way ~ Faith Hill,
306:Is a faith without action a sincere faith? ~ Jean Racine,
307:It takes a God-fearing man to be led by faith. ~ E N Joy,
308:Journalism is an act of faith in the future. ~ Ann Curry,
309:Love askes faith, and faith firmenesse. ~ George Herbert,
310:Love is an act of faith, not an exchange. ~ Paulo Coelho,
311:One percent doubt is zero percent faith. ~ Oprah Winfrey,
312:Sometimes you just have to have faith. ~ Mark T Sullivan,
313:The antidote to fear of man is faith in God. ~ Anonymous,
314:The poem is a confession of faith. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
315:To my fellow Crosses, keep the faith. ~ Malorie Blackman,
316:To sleep is an act of faith. ~ Barbara Grizzuti Harrison,
317:Training is principally an act of faith. ~ Franz Stampfl,
318:Ultimately, blind faith is the only kind. ~ Mason Cooley,
319:Understanding is the reward of faith. ~ Saint Augustine,
320:We are coerced into faith by our suffering. ~ James Cook,
321:we put too much faith in G.D.P. as a metric. ~ Anonymous,
322:Alarm stole over me on little kitten feet. ~ Faith Hunter,
323:As a vamp killer for hire, I travel light. ~ Faith Hunter,
324:But the righteous one will live by his faith. ~ Anonymous,
325:Demons have faith, but they tremble. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
326:Doubt is part of searching. Same as faith. ~ Gayle Forman,
327:Faith doesn't make sense. It makes miracles. ~ Tony Evans,
328:Faith is believing things you know aint true ~ Mark Twain,
329:Faith is stronger than so-called reality. ~ Hermann Hesse,
330:Faith minus vulnerability is fundamentalism ~ Brene Brown,
331:Faith prefers the absurd to the plausible. ~ Mason Cooley,
332:Feed your faith and starve your doubts. ~ Kenneth E Hagin,
333:For faith with no effort is no faith at all. ~ Max Lucado,
334:George Michael Was Right - You Gotta Have Faith ~ Jim Bob,
335:Hard to have faith and fear at the same time. ~ Toba Beta,
336:Have a little faith in my magic fingers ~ Cassandra Clare,
337:Knowledge is only one half. Faith is the other. ~ Novalis,
338:My faith in God is such that I am not afraid. ~ Malcolm X,
339:Really sucked the red off of all my candy. ~ Faith Hunter,
340:Shall love be blamed for want of faith? ~ Alfred Tennyson,
341:The enormous faith of many made for one. ~ Alexander Pope,
342:The faith that acts not, is it truly faith? ~ Jean Racine,
343:Those of little faith are of little hatred. ~ Eric Hoffer,
344:True faith does not depend on circumstances. ~ The Mother,
345:With faith, all things are possible. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
346:A little bit of stage fright, then I'm ready. ~ Faith Hill,
347:Dont just talk about your faith; practice it ~ C D Rencher,
348:Faith consists in believing what reason cannot. ~ Voltaire,
349:... FAITH: ... Full Assurance In The Heart. ~ Nick Vujicic,
350:Faith gives us living joy and dying rest. ~ Dwight L Moody,
351:Faith is nothing but obedience and piety. ~ Baruch Spinoza,
352:Faith is the flame that eliminates all fear. ~ Suzy Kassem,
353:Faith is the gaze of a soul upon a saving God. ~ A W Tozer,
354:Faith is the highest passion in a man. ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
355:Faith is the highest passion in a man. ~ S ren Kierkegaard,
356:Faith sir! She looks like the Old Course. ~ Old Tom Morris,
357:Fear exists because we do not have faith. ~ Shri Radhe Maa,
358:"Follow the stream, have faith in its course." ~ Sheng-yen,
359:Have faith in yourself and in the future. ~ Edward Kennedy,
360:I'm very affected by what I watch and read. ~ Paloma Faith,
361:In love and faith
I just have to believe ~ Kevin Brooks,
362:It is love, not faith, that moves mountains. ~ George Sand,
363:I want my shows to be eerie and mysterious. ~ Paloma Faith,
364:Language lacks the power to describe Faith. ~ Mohsin Hamid,
365:People do not put their faith in phantoms. ~ Marissa Meyer,
366:Put your faith in what you most believe in. ~ Phil Collins,
367:Reason saw not, till Faith sprung the Light. ~ John Dryden,
368:Sleep Red, I've got you." - Vaughn to Faith ~ Nalini Singh,
369:There is no faith, without a critical mind ~ Tariq Ramadan,
370:To have faith is to believe unconditionally. ~ Miguel Ruiz,
371:... true faith never comes without anguish. ~ R L LaFevers,
372:When we have faith in angels, they do deliver. ~ Kyle Gray,
373:Where there is faith, fear cannot exist. ~ Radhanath Swami,
374:Bad faith makes the most of every ambiguity. ~ Mason Cooley,
375:By faith we know God without seeing Him. By ~ Thomas Merton,
376:Cleave to no faith when faith brings blood. ~ Arthur Miller,
377:Don’t hold to any faith. Even legends die. ~ Steven Erikson,
378:Every life is a profession of faith. ~ Henri Frederic Amiel,
379:Faith in God includes faith in His timing. ~ Neal A Maxwell,
380:Faith is acting like God is telling the truth. ~ Tony Evans,
381:Faith is simply whatever is real to us. ~ Elizabeth Kostova,
382:Faith is the surest guide in the darkest days. ~ The Mother,
383:Faith keeps the person who keeps the faith. ~ Mother Teresa,
384:Faith, like a guillotine. As heavy, as light. ~ Franz Kafka,
385:Fathers can find great inspiration in faith. ~ Bruce Feiler,
386:Have faith and go on. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
387:Have faith in God but keep your powder dry. ~ Louis L Amour,
388:Have faith in God; God has faith in you. ~ Edwin Louis Cole,
389:I don't write my own songs. I don't have time. ~ Faith Hill,
390:I feel curious about every situation I'm in. ~ Paloma Faith,
391:If you have no faith, you've lost your battle. ~ Bill Cosby,
392:I have no faith at all. I only hold convictions. ~ Ayn Rand,
393:I haven't chosen to make an issue of faith. ~ Peter Garrett,
394:I'm not walking by sight- I'm, walking by faith ~ T D Jakes,
395:It is faith that makes a lion of a man. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
396:I will walk by faith, even when I cannot see. ~ Jeremy Camp,
397:Keep the faith, keep the faith, keep working. ~ Deb Fischer,
398:Man suffers through lack of faith in God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
399:My faith reminds me that we all are sinners. ~ Barack Obama,
400:Specific praying is the key to building faith ~ Leslie Ludy,
401:The principle part of faith is patience. ~ George MacDonald,
402:To the man of faith, there is always a future. ~ T B Joshua,
403:Trials are the soil in which faith flourishes. ~ T B Joshua,
404:Without faith it is impossible to please God. ~ Rick Warren,
405:you base your faith on experience, your faith is ~ Ram Dass,
406:Your voice is worthwhile. Have faith in it. ~ John Lasseter,
407:Application of your faith will change your life ~ Glenn Beck,
408:Catholicism is an obsessive-compulsive faith. ~ Ann Patchett,
409:Christian life consists of faith and charity ~ Martin Luther,
410:Faith begins where religious pretension ends ~ Austin Farrer,
411:Faith, I have been a truant in the law ~ William Shakespeare,
412:Faith is a beam radiating from the face of God. ~ John Eudes,
413:faith is acting as if God is telling the truth. ~ Tony Evans,
414:Faith is a twenty-four hour a day commitment. ~ Mary Kay Ash,
415:Faith is synonymous with working hypothesis. ~ William James,
416:Faith is the path of least resistance. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
417:Faith is your guide in the absence of knowledge. ~ Toba Beta,
418:Have faith in God; God has faith in you. ~ Edwin Louis Cole,
419:I don't have enough faith to be an Atheist. ~ Norman Geisler,
420:I have this strength that comes from knowledge. ~ Faith Hill,
421:I'm not a downtrodden woman. I just won't be. ~ Paloma Faith,
422:Let not your heart be troubled. Have faith ~ Mark T Sullivan,
423:Man suffers through lack of faith in God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
424:Sometimes faith in something is all you have. ~ Terry Brooks,
425:Such mockery of religious faith is inexcusable. ~ Sam Harris,
426:That every moment in life is an act of faith. ~ Paulo Coelho,
427:The dream has sucked the sleeper of his faith ~ Dylan Thomas,
428:The unifying theme is resilience and faith. ~ Cheryl Strayed,
429:We are to be strong in faith, and soft in love. ~ John Stott,
430:Who hath no faith to man, to God hath none. ~ George Chapman,
431:With faith, you can change your destiny, ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
432:Without risk, faith is an impossibility. ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
433:You have as much laughter as you have faith. ~ Martin Luther,
434:You may not have faith in my friend fate, ~ Matthew Lillard,
435:Your faith has saved you; go in peace. ~ Luke the Evangelist,
436:A man is saved only by faith ... only by faith. ~ Paul Washer,
437:A weak faith can lay hold on a strong Christ. ~ Thomas Watson,
438:because life is not stable except by faith. Let ~ John Calvin,
439:Faith activates God - Fear activates the Enemy. ~ Joel Osteen,
440:Faith doesn't mean that you don't have doubts. ~ Barack Obama,
441:Faith in God includes Faith in God's timing. ~ Neal A Maxwell,
442:Faith is like a rock; feelings are like waves. ~ Peter Kreeft,
443:FAITH is the only known antidote for FAILURE! ~ Napoleon Hill,
444:Faith lights us through the dark to Deity. ~ William Davenant,
445:Faith of the bore: everything is worth saying. ~ Mason Cooley,
446:Faith receives. Love gives. ~ Vladimir Aleksandrovich Antonov,
447:Faith reminds us that change is always possible. ~ Jim Wallis,
448:Faith rests not on ignorance, but on knowledge. ~ John Calvin,
449:Faith strikes me as intellectual laziness ~ Robert A Heinlein,
450:Faith transforms poison into crystalline water ~ Paulo Coelho,
451:faith unchallenged ordinarily remains unchanged. ~ Beth Moore,
452:Faith which does not doubt is dead faith. ~ Miguel de Unamuno,
453:Have faith in yourself; faith in the infinite ~ Napoleon Hill,
454:I love you, Faith. Lord knows I've tried not to. ~ Maya Banks,
455:It's about time we start criticizing faith. ~ Richard Dawkins,
456:It's our faith that activates the power of God. ~ Joel Osteen,
457:Jesus lets us be real with our life and our faith. ~ Bob Goff,
458:Lose not courage, lose not faith, go forward. ~ Marcus Garvey,
459:Real faith is sharing responsibility with God. ~ Bill Winston,
460:Sometimes its better to take a leap of faith ~ Anamika Mishra,
461:The Gita is not for those who have no faith. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
462:The substance of faith is a hope in the unseen. ~ Ron Suskind,
463:We need to make our faith our very own love story. ~ Bob Goff,
464:When there is faith, there is no fear. Is ~ Devdutt Pattanaik,
465:Yet simple souls, their faith it knows no stint: ~ John Clare,
466:You have to have a little faith in people. ~ Mariel Hemingway,
467:A man of faith is also full of courage ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
468:Blind faith in bad leaders is not patriotism. ~ Rocky Anderson,
469:Both faith and cynicism make judgment too easy. ~ Mason Cooley,
470:Can a faith that does nothing be called sincere? ~ Jean Racine,
471:Faith does not answer to wishes but to working ~ David Oyedepo,
472:Faith doesn't begin until reason stops. ~ Jean Claude Carriere,
473:Faith in oneself is the best and safest course. ~ Michelangelo,
474:Faith is an outward look, not an inward look. ~ Dwight L Moody,
475:Faith means believing the unbelievable. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
476:Faith must always pass the test of discouragement. ~ T D Jakes,
477:Faith: not wanting to know what is true. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
478:Faith strikes me as intellectual laziness. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
479:Friendship is but a name, faith is an empty name. Alas, ~ Ovid,
480:Hope walks through the fire. Faith leaps over it. ~ Jim Carrey,
481:If the vision is there, the means will follow. ~ Faith Popcorn,
482:I have no faith in my ability to judge things. ~ Ozzy Osbourne,
483:I have not faith enough to believe in matter. ~ G K Chesterton,
484:I think everybody should focus on inner beauty. ~ Paloma Faith,
485:I think reading a translation is an act of faith. ~ Donna Leon,
486:It's easy to lose your soul in high school. ~ Faith Erin Hicks,
487:My family and my faith are everything to me. ~ Karen Kingsbury,
488:Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement ~ Helen Keller,
489:Rest easy and go with the faith you lived with ~ Walter Mosley,
490:Shall love be blamed for want of faith? ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
491:That was where Graham lost his faith in .38’s. ~ Thomas Harris,
492:The Clergy is the greatest hindrance to faith. ~ Martin Luther,
493:The curse turned to grace when the hurt turned to faith. ~ DMX,
494:To me, Faith is not just a noun but also a verb ~ Jimmy Carter,
495:True faith nor biddeth nor abideth form, ~ Philip James Bailey,
496:We must hold enormous faith in ourselves. ~ Giorgio de Chirico,
497:What is faith? Is it merely assent to facts? ~ Charles C Ryrie,
498:What we give to fear, we take away from...faith. ~ Mitch Albom,
499:Why are you  r so afraid? Have you still no faith? ~ Anonymous,
500:will get you nowhere if it’s faith you’re after. ~ Shulem Deen,
501:worrying was showing your lack of faith in God. ~ Alison Stone,
502:Your faith is what you believe, not what you know. ~ Dan Eaton,
503:a great comfort faith can be to those left behind. ~ Donna Leon,
504:All she had left was faith. Belief. God Himself. ~ Laura Frantz,
505:A man of courage is also full of faith, ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
506:A man of courage is also full of faith. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
507:a priest without faith is unworthy to lead. ~ Paul Antony Jones,
508:as if ye have faith and it shall be given to you. ~ Jess Walter,
509:Blind faith is just another word for slavery ~ Genevieve Cogman,
510:By itself, faith can’t deliver God, but it does ~ Deepak Chopra,
511:Don't put my faith in nobody, not even a scientist. ~ Bob Dylan,
512:Faith can take many different forms and expressions. ~ Rob Bell,
513:Faith grows when it is lived and shaped by Love. ~ Pope Francis,
514:Faith has need of the whole truth. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
515:Faith is believing what we cannot prove. ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
516:Faith is hidden household capital. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
517:Faith is the bird that sings while it is yet dark. ~ Max Lucado,
518:faith is the gaze of a soul upon a saving God. When ~ A W Tozer,
519:Fear finds an excuse while faith finds a way. ~ Seth Adam Smith,
520:Girls who can run in high heels should be feared. ~ Faith McKay,
521:God! Thou art love! I build my faith on that. ~ Robert Browning,
522:Have faith, Raphael, I know you remember how. ~ Cassandra Clare,
523:Have faith, Raphael. I know you remember how. ~ Cassandra Clare,
524:I am not a conqueror. I am nothing like you. ~ Faith Erin Hicks,
525:I could be patient. I could. If they’d hurry up. ~ Faith Hunter,
526:I show you doubt, to prove that faith exists. ~ Robert Browning,
527:I think comedy is one of the hardest things to do. ~ Faith Ford,
528:Man discovers truth by reason only, not by faith. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
529:Miracle is the pet child of faith. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
530:Morale is faith in the man at the top. ~ Albert Sidney Johnston,
531:My faith doesn't go over real well in Hollywood. ~ Jim Caviezel,
532:Not quite so fast, sir, if you please,’ she said ~ Faith Martin,
533:One man's faith is another man's delusion. . . . ~ Jon Krakauer,
534:Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement ~ Helen Keller,
535:Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. ~ Helen Keller,
536:The nature of faith is that it must be tried. ~ Oswald Chambers,
537:The opposite of faith is not doubt, but certainty. ~ Bren Brown,
538:To be brave is to have faith in the Mother. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
539:True faith manifests itself through our actions. ~ Francis Chan,
540:We are older by faith than by experience. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
541:When we feed our faith, we starve our doubts. ~ Christine Caine,
542:Writing is an act of faith, not a trick of grammar. ~ E B White,
543:Your faith will help you overcome your obstacles. ~ Joel Osteen,
544:A man who has faith is somebody who can be saved. ~ Otto Penzler,
545:A satyagrahi should have a living faith in God. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
546:courage is walking through your fear with faith. ~ Maria Shriver,
547:Even the most political poem is an act of faith. ~ Martin Espada,
548:Even the most political poem is an act of faith. ~ Mart n Espada,
549:Faith dissolves fear and makes us courageous. ~ Stormie Omartian,
550:Faith doesn't work if you don't even believe it. ~ Bryant McGill,
551:Faith embraces itself and the doubt about itself. ~ Paul Tillich,
552:Faith has need of the whole truth. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin,
553:Faith is a refusal to panic, come what may. ~ Martyn Lloyd Jones,
554:Faith is hidden household capital. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
555:Faith is knowing something that no-one else does. ~ Phil Pringle,
556:Faith is the deepest and truest form of magic. ~ Seth Adam Smith,
557:Faith is the state of being ultimately concerned. ~ Paul Tillich,
558:Faith is to the human what sand is to the ostrich. ~ Lenny Bruce,
559:Have Faith. Where'er thy bark is driven, - ~ Friedrich Schiller,
560:Hope meets you halfway on a bridge called faith. ~ Bryant McGill,
561:I am disabused of all faith, and see too clearly. ~ Sylvia Plath,
562:I don't have to have faith, I have experience. ~ Joseph Campbell,
563:I'm filled with doubt, especially about my faith. ~ Paulo Coelho,
564:It's not up to God for us to use the gift of faith. ~ James Cook,
565:John McCain has not spoken about my Muslim faith. ~ Barack Obama,
566:Miracle is the pet child of faith. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
567:My anger rises up within faith and not outside it. ~ Elie Wiesel,
568:My faith dictates a whole lot of what I'll do. ~ Candace Cameron,
569:Never lose Faith. Always have hope. Love for always. ~ J B McGee,
570:Our best help is faith - The Divine is all merciful. ~ Anonymous,
571:Safety is an illusion, as is faith without temptation. ~ Ken Liu,
572:The foundation of justice is good faith. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero,
573:The opposite of faith is not doubt, but certainty. ~ Anne Lamott,
574:There must be no coercion in matters of faith! ~ Karen Armstrong,
575:the very point of faith was that it must be tested. ~ Jojo Moyes,
576:To have faith is to believe unconditionally. ~ Miguel Angel Ruiz,
577:We live in a society where everything's packaged. ~ Paloma Faith,
578:We must have infinite faith in each other. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
579:What are you doing right now that requires faith? ~ Francis Chan,
580:You know, my faith is one that admits some doubt. ~ Barack Obama,
581:Your faith shapes the kind of person that you are. ~ Mark Martin,
582:A faith which does not doubt is a dead faith. ~ Miguel de Unamuno,
583:Faith comes from listening to the right stories. ~ Michael Gungor,
584:Faith does not grow in a house of certainty. ~ William Paul Young,
585:Faith is found when one isn't looking for it. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
586:Faith is like a lily, lifted high and white. ~ Christina Rossetti,
587:Faith is the master, and reason the maid-servant. ~ Martin Luther,
588:Faith is the union of God and the soul. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
589:Faith is the work of God's grace in us. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
590:Faith is trust in what the spirit learned eons ago. ~ B H Roberts,
591:Faith like a child … that’s how I want to live. ~ Karen Kingsbury,
592:Faith makes blessed. Consequently it lies. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
593:Faith puts God between us and our circumstances. ~ Daniel Webster,
594:Fear is strong, but faith is stronger yet. ~ Norman Vincent Peale,
595:had the misfortune of meeting up a parish employee ~ Faith Hunter,
596:Have faith and pursue the unknown end. ~ Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr,
597:Heaven plants a special seed, and we must have faith. ~ Amy Grant,
598:He hadn't a cent in his pocket, but he had faith ! ~ Paulo Coelho,
599:I have faith. It doesn't matter what I decide. ~ Christopher Pike,
600:I have my beliefs. i have faith. but don't you? ~ Nicholas Sparks,
601:In a democracy, dissent is an act of faith. ~ J William Fulbright,
602:In the woods we return to reason and faith. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
603:It is at night that faith in light is admirable. ~ Edmond Rostand,
604:It is not reason which makes faith hard, but life. ~ Jean Ingelow,
605:I will walk by faith … even when I cannot see … ~ Karen Kingsbury,
606:Just go on..and faith will soon return. ~ Jean le Rond d Alembert,
607:My Christian faith is at the very heart of who I am. ~ Mike Pence,
608:My faith is important. I have nothing without it. ~ Kathy Ireland,
609:not proclaimed their faith in Allah, and in Mohammed ~ Sam Harris,
610:Our faith triumphant o'er our fears. ~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,
611:People of faith feel responsible for God's world. ~ Mike Huckabee,
612:She loved this city. She just didn’t like it much. ~ Faith Martin,
613:Sometimes acts of faith are called for in life. ~ Menna van Praag,
614:Still, I had faith we would figure something out. ~ Bella Forrest,
615:The greater the faith, the greater the result. ~ Frank Fools Crow,
616:The opposite of faith is not doubt, it’s certainty. ~ Anne Lamott,
617:'Tis well averred, A scientific faith's absurd. ~ Robert Browning,
618:To follow by faith alone is to follow blindly ~ Benjamin Franklin,
619:Trust resides squarely between faith and doubt. ~ Warren G Bennis,
620:We live by faith, not by sight. 2 CORINTHIANS 5 : 7 ~ Sarah Young,
621:What is important is faith expressing itself in love. ~ Anonymous,
622:What's up is faith, what's down is heresy. ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
623:When I look around me, I can't help having faith. ~ Donna Brazile,
624:You can treat faith as part of people's it's lives. ~ John Ridley,
625:All novelty in faith is a sure mark of heresy. ~ Vincent of Lerins,
626:Always have faith in God, Yourself and the Cowboys. ~ Eddie Sutton,
627:As an actor, you usually live your life with faith. ~ Molly Parker,
628:Ask me, it’s a sin to pervert faith with religion. ~ Ellen Hopkins,
629:A slew of cognitive traits predisposes us to faith. ~ Pascal Boyer,
630:Believe, my child. Faith is the food of survival. ~ Tobsha Learner,
631:Doubt is the mechanism by which faith evolves. ~ Rachel Held Evans,
632:Every faith has its story; every faith has its roots. ~ Max Lucado,
633:Excuses are your lack of faith in your own power. ~ Robert Anthony,
634:Faith dare the soul to go further than it can see. ~ William Clark,
635:Faith is a channel through which the anointing flows. ~ T B Joshua,
636:Faith is believing in something you know isn't true. ~ Tom Robbins,
637:Faith is giving the divine a chance to act. ~ Sri Sri Ravi Shankar,
638:Faith is the union of God and the soul. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
639:Faith leads the way, fear upbuilds, and love perfects. ~ Anonymous,
640:Faith requires following the power of a whisper. ~ Shannon L Alder,
641:Faith was a choice. So, it followed, was wonder. ~ Glen David Gold,
642:For many of us, our values come from our faith. ~ Katharine Hayhoe,
643:Gravity is love and every turn is a leap of faith. ~ Warren Miller,
644:He who has no faith in others shall find no faith in them. ~ Laozi,
645:Hope meets you halfway on a bridge called faith. ~ Bryant H McGill,
646:I'd never go on a reality show - it's too invasive. ~ Paloma Faith,
647:I'd rather be on my own than be with a violent man. ~ Paloma Faith,
648:I feel quite fearless protecting the people I love. ~ Paloma Faith,
649:I get to know my regular fans, and they inspire me. ~ Paloma Faith,
650:I had faith, and if I had faith I couldn't worry. ~ Gena Showalter,
651:In faith, I do not love thee with mine eyes, ~ William Shakespeare,
652:In the prism of faith, every crisis looks shallow. ~ Nilesh Rathod,
653:In the woods, we return to reason and faith. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
654:Intolerance betrays want of faith in one's cause. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
655:I try to live a faith-filled life. I'm a believer. ~ George W Bush,
656:It's celebrated in British culture to be eccentric. ~ Paloma Faith,
657:It's not a faith in technology. It's faith in people. ~ Steve Jobs,
658:I've got so many clothes; I can dress in any style. ~ Paloma Faith,
659:I wasn't really comfortable reading until I was 12. ~ Paloma Faith,
660:Leap of faith. Shit, no parachute. —Katherine Yunker ~ Larry Smith,
661:Leap of faith – yes, but only after reflection ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
662:Leap of faith – yes, but only after reflection ~ S ren Kierkegaard,
663:Never believe in any faith younger than you are. ~ Dahlia Lithwick,
664:Perhaps true faith is a form of insanity. ~ Kristine Kathryn Rusch,
665:Put your faith in God and confidence in yourself. ~ Alberta Hunter,
666:The faith that I love the best, says God, is hope. ~ Charles Peguy,
667:The key that opens the door to the faith is prayer. ~ Pope Francis,
668:The object of the Christian’s faith is unseen reality. ~ A W Tozer,
669:The opposite of faith is not heresy but indifference ~ Elie Wiesel,
670:There was little room for adventure without faith. ~ Tessa Gratton,
671:The word faith is a noun and has no verbal form in ~ Jerry Bridges,
672:To become capable, one must have faith in oneself. ~ Indira Gandhi,
673:To Follow by faith alone is to follow blindly. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
674:True faith always produces real conformity to Christ. ~ R C Sproul,
675:Without the voice of reason, every faith is its own curse. ~ Sting,
676:You must use that hope an' faith to help you get well. ~ Zane Grey,
677:Art must be nourished by faith, the faith of an equal. ~ May Sarton,
678:Bad faith likes discourse on friendship and loyalty. ~ Mason Cooley,
679:Do you have faith? Yes. Then you are healed. ~ Michael Farris Smith,
680:Faith and unfaith can ne'er be equal powers; ~ Alfred Lord Tennyson,
681:Faith does not contradict reason. Faith exceeds reason. ~ Mark Hart,
682:Faith does not grow in the house of certainty. ~ William Paul Young,
683:Faith grows with exercise. You see God work miracles. ~ Bill Bright,
684:Faith is being loyal to you unseen reality within ~ Neville Goddard,
685:Faith is the ticket to the feast, not the feast. ~ Edwin Louis Cole,
686:Faith: not wanting to know what the truth is. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
687:Faith puts the power of the universe at your disposal. ~ James Cook,
688:Faith's only function is to receive what grace offers. ~ John Stott,
689:Fear that makes faith may break faith. ~ Algernon Charles Swinburne,
690:For both faith and want of faith have destroyed men alike. ~ Hesiod,
691:For trust not him that hath once broken faith ~ William Shakespeare,
692:Have wisdom in your actions and faith in your merits. ~ Yogi Bhajan,
693:His faith sustains him—and faith is so easy to break. ~ N K Jemisin,
694:I do not have enough faith to believe there is no god. ~ David Hume,
695:I don't let things go unless I'm ready for them to go. ~ Faith Hill,
696:I see heaven's glories shine and faith shines equal. ~ Emily Bronte,
697:I think society, in general, is hard on women, period. ~ Faith Hill,
698:It is not a matter of faith, it is a matter of practice ~ Nhat Hanh,
699:Keep your faith in God, but keep your powder dry. ~ Oliver Cromwell,
700:Life’s too short for doubt, and yet too long for faith. ~ Jeff Long,
701:My faith in non-co-operation is as bright as ever. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
702:My faith will proclaim it is so - we are never alone. ~ John Denver,
703:My last fear, the fear of God, died with my faith. ~ G Gordon Liddy,
704:My mother keeps me abreast of all the hometown things. ~ Faith Ford,
705:Push on and faith will catch up with you. ~ Jean le Rond d Alembert,
706:Renounce without hesitation faith and unbelief. ~ Faridud-din-attar,
707:The beast faith lives on its own dung. ~ Algernon Charles Swinburne,
708:The state of faith allows no mention of impossibility. ~ Tertullian,
709:To be afraid is to have more faith in evil than in God. ~ Emmet Fox,
710:Whatever you are, you have the right to get married. ~ Paloma Faith,
711:What is faith if it is not translated into action? ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
712:And it is impossible to please God without faith. Anyone ~ Anonymous,
713:Cleverness is cheap. It is faith that He praises. ~ George MacDonald,
714:Faith begins precisely where thinking leaves off ~ S ren Kierkegaard,
715:Faith branches off the highroad before reason begins ~ William James,
716:Faith builds the bridge from this old world to the new. ~ Neil Young,
717:Faith can move mountains; true: mountains of stupidity. ~ Andre Gide,
718:Faith ever says, "If Thou wilt," not "If Thou canst. ~ Martin Luther,
719:Faith, if it be a living faith, will be a working faith. ~ John Owen,
720:Faith was the most powerful force in the universe. ~ Robert Ferrigno,
721:fear is nothing more than the absence of faith! ~ Linda Hudson Smith,
722:Follow your faith - it is not likely to mislead you. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
723:Get up and go on your way. Your faith has made you well. ~ Anonymous,
724:If we lose faith and trust, then we've lost everything ~ James Ponti,
725:I’ll put my faith in individuals, not the collective. ~ Louise Penny,
726:Imagination and faith are the secrets of creation. ~ Neville Goddard,
727:Instilling values of faith at an early age is important. ~ T D Jakes,
728:It is bad for a nation when it is without faith. ~ Winston Churchill,
729:It needs fanatical faith to rationalize our cowardice. ~ Eric Hoffer,
730:It's a leap of faith doing any serialised storytelling. ~ J J Abrams,
731:It's called faith because it's not knowledge. ~ Christopher Hitchens,
732:Logic will get you nowhere if it’s faith you’re after. ~ Shulem Deen,
733:Love is faith and one faith leads to another. ~ Henri Frederic Amiel,
734:mind for a time on some one of the lessons of faith, ~ Andrew Murray,
735:No faith is our own that we have not arduously won. ~ Havelock Ellis,
736:Nothing like a little chest pain to restore your faith. ~ Ray Romano,
737:Only when Christ is preached will faith be imparted. ~ Joseph Prince,
738:Patience and Diligence, like faith, remove mountains. ~ William Penn,
739:Rewards await you if you stay steadfast in your faith. ~ Joel Osteen,
740:Sharing my faith is not a monologue, it is a dialogue. ~ Greg Laurie,
741:Show a little faith, there's magic in the night. ~ Bruce Springsteen,
742:That is all faith is, you know. Pity for our souls. ~ Steven Erikson,
743:The 9/11 terrorist attack was a faith-based initiative. ~ Dan Barker,
744:The abuse of faith has to be resisted precisely. ~ Pope Benedict XVI,
745:The power of faith to ease our suffering is God's love. ~ James Cook,
746:There are no tricks in plain and simple faith. ~ William Shakespeare,
747:this dream. Nightmare, really. I’m drenched in sweat ~ Faith Andrews,
748:This is about your faith being greater than your fear. ~ Jen Sincero,
749:To write for children at all is an act of faith. ~ Madeleine L Engle,
750:Trust the Universe. Trust and believe and have faith. ~ Rhonda Byrne,
751:(3) Is it not to God alone that all sincere faith is due? ~ Anonymous,
752:Absolute faith corrupts as absolutely as absolute power ~ Eric Hoffer,
753:All work that is worth anything is done in faith. ~ Albert Schweitzer,
754:Better to have faith than to surrender to despair. ~ Elisabeth Storrs,
755:Constantly observe sincerity and fidelity and good faith. ~ Confucius,
756:Cow preservation is an article of faith in Hinduism. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
757:Everyone wants something miraculous to have faith in. ~ Chris Dietzel,
758:Every step on your life-journey can be a step of faith. ~ Sarah Young,
759:Faith and philosophy are air, but events are brass. ~ Herman Melville,
760:Faith does not quench desire, but inflames it. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
761:Faith is a great thing. The trick is keeping it. Dad ~ Allen M Steele,
762:Faith is a living, daring, confidence in God's grace. ~ Martin Luther,
763:Faith is only as good as the one in whom it's invested. ~ Lee Strobel,
764:Faith is the black person's federal reserve system. ~ Hattie McDaniel,
765:faith is vital when it comes to doing the impossible. ~ Bill O Reilly,
766:I'd rather die than let somebody get the better of me. ~ Paloma Faith,
767:I have faith in the market when we get the rules right. ~ Kenneth Lay,
768:Imagine centuries of faith undone by a telescope! ~ Rachel Held Evans,
769:It’s faith that makes these things sacred, isn’t it? ~ Oliver P tzsch,
770:My reason nourishes my faith and my faith my reason. ~ Norman Cousins,
771:Pascal, Faith is God made sensible to the heart, then ~ Michael Lewis,
772:Sometimes ignoring people’s anger made them calm down. ~ Faith Hunter,
773:The fire of affliction reveals the quality of our faith ~ John Calvin,
774:The one who has real Faith doesn't need to believe. ~ Samael Aun Weor,
775:The problem is not with the faith, but with the faithful ~ Kofi Annan,
776:universalistic demands of morality. Faith requires ~ Hubert L Dreyfus,
777:We must focus on Jesus, the source and goal of our faith. ~ Anonymous,
778:we surrender ourselves, and accept in faith the whole ~ Andrew Murray,
779:Without faith, without belief in something, what are we? ~ Clive Owen,
780:31 May 2020 -Happiest who stand on faith as on a rock. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
781:Absolute faith corrupts as absolutely as absolute power. ~ Eric Hoffer,
782:Acting on even a twig of faith allows God to grow it. ~ Henry B Eyring,
783:A perfect faith would lift us absolutely above fear ~ George MacDonald,
784:As fire is to the chemist, so is faith to a covenant people. ~ Various,
785:Base souls have no faith in great individuals. ~ Jean Jacques Rousseau,
786:Buddhism strongly discourages blind faith and fanaticism. ~ Dalai Lama,
787:By all means rid yourself of an impoverished faith. ~ George MacDonald,
788:Christians call it faith ... I call it the herd. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
789:Closed minds do not inspire faith, courage, and belief ~ Napoleon Hill,
790:Despotism may govern without faith, but liberty cannot. ~ Eric Metaxas,
791:Faith can reclaim deserts as well as move mountains. ~ Wallace Stegner,
792:Faith does not always demand that God explains Himself. ~ Jen Hatmaker,
793:Faith, hope, and love are some good things He gave us; ~ Alan Jackson,
794:faith, hope,  and love. But the greatest of these is love. ~ Anonymous,
795:Faith is, by its very definition, belief without proof. ~ Stephen King,
796:Faith is love taking the form of aspiration. ~ William Ellery Channing,
797:Faith is the beginning, love is the end, union of two is God ~ Unknown,
798:God's got something for me. I have faith it'll be OK. ~ Chubby Checker,
799:Haz'tu ro'mah, it means have faith and faith will have you ~ Anonymous,
800:My faith in man is, at bottom, a faith in God. ~ Martin Luther King Jr,
801:Never confuse the faith with the supposedly faithful. ~ R K Milholland,
802:Never surrender, it's all about the faith that you got. ~ Tupac Shakur,
803:Once a person has faith, he has achieved everything. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
804:Once torched by truth, a little thing like faith is easy. ~ Leif Enger,
805:One cannot coerce faith into being, or out of being, ~ Russell D Moore,
806:Pippa was too unpredictable and wild to play away with. ~ Faith Martin,
807:Practically, Science is true; and Faith is foolish. ~ Aleister Crowley,
808:Souls reconstructed with faith transform agony into peace. ~ Aberjhani,
809:Stephen,  q a man full of faith and  r of the Holy Spirit, ~ Anonymous,
810:The Bible is the most important part of your faith. ~ Elizabeth George,
811:The course of everything goes to teach us faith. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
812:The faith of religion is belief on insufficient evidence. ~ Sam Harris,
813:The faith that stands on authority is not faith. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
814:The foolishness of faith is the winning ticket in life ~ David Oyedepo,
815:When there is not enough faith, there is lack of good faith. ~ Lao Tzu,
816:Where there is faith there is an awareness of holiness. ~ Paul Tillich,
817:While we wait, God builds our faith in His promises. ~ James MacDonald,
818:Why are ye so fearful? how is it that ye have no faith? 41 ~ Anonymous,
819:Wisdom is the best guide and faith is the best companion. ~ Dalai Lama,
820:You're all I need and maybe some faith would do me good. ~ Fiona Apple,
821:A faith is that which is able to survive a mood. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
822:All the world is made of faith, and trust, and pixie dust. ~ J M Barrie,
823:A man of faith does not bargain or stipulate with God. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
824:and stepped inside, and instantly felt the damp and cold ~ Faith Martin,
825:Don't trust the person who has broken faith once. ~ William Shakespeare,
826:Doubter wants proof which contributes nothing to her faith. ~ Toba Beta,
827:Dreams dress us carefully in the colors of power and faith. ~ Aberjhani,
828:Faith: a firm belief for which there is no evidence. ~ Bertrand Russell,
829:Faith alone saves, but the faith that saves is not alone. ~ John Calvin,
830:Faith healing, what it means, and how blind faith works ~ Joseph Murphy,
831:Faith in Christ is the only thing to save you from despair. ~ C S Lewis,
832:Faith in people is an a priori requirement for dialogue. ~ Paulo Freire,
833:Faith in spiritual power must not depend on circumstances. ~ The Mother,
834:Faith is as precious to die by as to live by. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
835:Faith...is letting go and trusting oneself to the unknown. ~ Alan Watts,
836:Faith is like porridge. Better with milk and honey. ~ George R R Martin,
837:Faith, that's as well said as if I had said it myself. ~ Jonathan Swift,
838:Feed your faith and your doubts will starve to death. ~ Debbie Macomber,
839:Forgiveness is like faith. You have to keep reviving it. ~ Mason Cooley,
840:Friendship requires a leap, not of faith but of regard. ~ Mark Kingwell,
841:Gemma crossed a pair of legs, clad in expensive hosiery, ~ Faith Martin,
842:Having faith often means doing what others see as crazy. ~ Francis Chan,
843:He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat. ~ William Shakespeare,
844:If I see something that inspires me, I'll dress like it. ~ Paloma Faith,
845:I must confess that I lost faith in the sanity of the world ~ H G Wells,
846:It's hard to fake faith, in yourself or anything else. ~ Victor LaValle,
847:It's not about my looks or faith. It's that I'm a woman. ~ Nora Sakavic,
848:It's not great faith you need; it is faith in a great God. ~ N T Wright,
849:Less is even less, and more is still not quite enough. ~ Faith Ringgold,
850:My faith is big enough to accept all of God's wonders. ~ Kirsten Miller,
851:Once a person has faith, he has achieved everything. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
852:Only in a world where faith is difficult can faith exist. ~ Lee Strobel,
853:Our faith comes in moments; our vice is habitual. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
854:Society lives by faith, and develops by science. ~ Henri Fr d ric Amiel,
855:Society lives by faith, and develops by science. ~ Henri Frederic Amiel,
856:Stop shouting, “What if?” and just take a leap of faith. ~ Haemin Sunim,
857:The light of faith makes us see what we believe. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
858:The man was so smooth he wouldn’t slide on an oil slick. ~ Faith Hunter,
859:The only way our faith can strengthen is if we use it. ~ Lysa TerKeurst,
860:There is no true gospel fruit without faith and repentance. ~ John Owen,
861:The village road was as narrow as her old granny’s mind. ~ Faith Martin,
862:We are hungry for things that have touched human hands. ~ Faith Popcorn,
863:Be patient and keep faith. It will all fall into place. ~ Shri Radhe Maa,
864:Christianity has always embraced both reason and faith. ~ Dinesh D Souza,
865:Desire backed by faith knows no such word as impossible. ~ Napoleon Hill,
866:Every worldview has to bring together reason and faith. ~ Ravi Zacharias,
867:Faith always shows itself in the whole personality. ~ Martyn Lloyd Jones,
868:Faith first, knowledge afterwards. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
869:Faith in God - life can never take you by surprise again. ~ James Dobson,
870:Faith is not a distant view, but a warm embrace of Christ. ~ John Calvin,
871:Faith is stepping out on nothing and landing on something. ~ Cornel West,
872:Faith is the soul going out of itself for all its wants. ~ Thomas Boston,
873:Faith journeys are never simply intellectual exercises. ~ Timothy Keller,
874:For we live by faith not by sight."

2 Corinthians 5:7 ~ Anonymous,
875:For we live by faith, not by sight.

2 Corinthians 5:7 ~ Anonymous,
876:He who has no faith in himself can never have faith in God. ~ Guru Nanak,
877:Human misery is too great for men to die without faith. ~ Heinrich Heine,
878:I am conscious. I have faith that you are also conscious. ~ Jaron Lanier,
879:I had to deny knowledge in order to make room for faith. ~ Immanuel Kant,
880:It is my firm faith that man is by nature going higher. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
881:Just in ratio as knowledge increases, faith diminishes. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
882:Just in the ratio knowledge increases, faith decreases. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
883:Let us move forward with strong and active faith. ~ Franklin D Roosevelt,
884:"Like it or not, your existence is grounded in faith." ~ Jordan Peterson,
885:Love and respect all people. Hate and destroy all faith. ~ Penn Jillette,
886:Love without faith is as bad as faith without love. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
887:Martyrs create faith, faith does not create martyrs. ~ Miguel de Unamuno,
888:Nobody knows anybody. We’re all working on blind faith. ~ Kameron Hurley,
889:Once torched by truth... a little thing like faith is easy. ~ Leif Enger,
890:One should never tie his faith to how old the earth is. ~ Norman Geisler,
891:Politics must be founded on the solid faith of God almighty ~ Alan Keyes,
892:Put no faith in salvation through the political order. ~ Saint Augustine,
893:Religious faith is not a storm cellar to which men and women ~ Sam Ervin,
894:The journey to understanding begins with a leap of faith. ~ Dannika Dark,
895:The renunciation of the Gita is the acid test of faith. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
896:There's no point of having faith if you have evidence. ~ Richard Dawkins,
897:The world needs less faith and more love and nobility. ~ Walter Kaufmann,
898:This is the victory that has conquered the world: our faith. ~ Anonymous,
899:We can't die. We're famous. They wouldn't let that happen. ~ Faith McKay,
900:We have more faith in what we imitate than in what we create ~ Bruce Lee,
901:We worship the aesthetic, but we do not have faith in it. ~ Mason Cooley,
902:When doubt comes knocking on your door, answer with faith. ~ Joyce Meyer,
903:You’re having a crisis of faith. Just be there with it. ~ Barbara O Neal,
904:You think you're embarrassing me, but you're not.' He was. ~ Faith McKay,
905:Any faith served man only as a crutch supporting him. ~ Dmitry Glukhovsky,
906:As a nation, I believe we've acquired faith in ourselves. ~ Indira Gandhi,
907:Don’t be so touchy. I have my faith, and my faith has me.” Odd ~ J R Ward,
908:Even the merest gesture is holy if it is filled with faith. ~ Franz Kafka,
909:Faith and joy are the ascensive forces of song. ~ Edmund Clarence Stedman,
910:Faith in friendship is the noblest part. ~ Roger Boyle 1st Earl of Orrery,
911:Faith is a padlock of the mind, and few keys can open it. ~ Jerry A Coyne,
912:Faith is not belief. Belief is passive. Faith is active. ~ Edith Hamilton,
913:Faith is not believing that God can, but that God will. ~ Abraham Lincoln,
914:Faith means the will to avoid knowing what is true. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
915:Faith means you want God and want to want nothing else. ~ Brennan Manning,
916:Faith works miracles. At least it allows time for them. ~ George Meredith,
917:For we live by faith, not by sight."

2 Corinthians 5:7 ~ Anonymous,
918:He have a modified shrug that tilted one shoulder forward, ~ Faith Hunter,
919:He who keeps his faith only, cannot be discrowned. ~ James Russell Lowell,
920:I am free to go wherever I want for the rest of my life. ~ Faith Ringgold,
921:I am so thankful that God’s love is not fickle like my faith. ~ Anonymous,
922:I have more faith in my bra than I have in my accountant. ~ Laurie Notaro,
923:In a real sense faith is total surrender to God . ~ Martin Luther King Jr,
924:I never really had the classic struggle. I had faith. ~ Denzel Washington,
925:Leave the bad memories behind and have faith in a greater tomorrow ~ Zane,
926:Let us build our lives of faith on the rock who is Christ. ~ Pope Francis,
927:Losing faith in one's self means losing faith in God. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
928:Magic is the divinity of man achieved in union with faith. ~ Eliphas Levi,
929:Man without faith can know neither true good nor justice. ~ Blaise Pascal,
930:Miss Starling’s first priority is always food, apparently. ~ Faith Martin,
931:Nothing will get you into trouble so deep or as sad as faith. ~ Rick Bass,
932:Put no faith in salvation through the political order. ~ Saint Augustine,
933:Religion means peace! Faith means understanding! ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
934:The activity of love and faith is what makes heaven. ~ Emanuel Swedenborg,
935:The future bears a resemblance to the past, only more so. ~ Faith Popcorn,
936:The way to see by Faith is to shut the Eye of Reason. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
937:The way to see by faith is to shut the eye of reason. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
938:Vision creates faith and faith creates willpower. ~ Arnold Schwarzenegger,
939:ye, bstand fast in the faith, 1quit you like men, cbe strong. ~ Anonymous,
940:Zombies weren't the true plague of the world, laziness was. ~ Faith McKay,
941:advise, if you cannot be positive, then at least be quiet. ~ Faith Andrews,
942:A faith that is afraid of other people is no faith at all. ~ Thomas Merton,
943:And I have faith that you will shine in your final test. ~ Neal Shusterman,
944:A pope going through a faith crisis would be funny to see. ~ Kyle Dunnigan,
945:Be always faithful to your faith and you will feel no sorrow. ~ The Mother,
946:Be of good cheer. The future is as bright as your faith. ~ Thomas S Monson,
947:Christ is our temple, in whom by faith all believers meet. ~ Matthew Henry,
948:Despotism can do without faith but freedom cannot. ~ Alexis de Tocqueville,
949:Even then, Faith. Even then. If you call for me, I'll come. ~ Nalini Singh,
950:Faith, culture, structure and guidance are good things. ~ Bethenny Frankel,
951:Faith holds on to truth and reason from what it knows to be fact. ~ Martyn,
952:Faith is the narcotic that fueled the insanity of religion. ~ C J Anderson,
953:Figures I’d put more faith in the devil than any god. ~ Karen Marie Moning,
954:He was trying to mix fact and faith, science and sorcery, ~ Robert Masello,
955:He who has faith has all, and he who lacks it lacks all. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
956:Hope is faith holding out its hand in the dark. —George Iles ~ Marie Force,
957:I believe that religious faith schools are highly dubious. ~ Bjorn Ulvaeus,
958:If you [5] are not firm in faith, you will not be firm at all. ~ Anonymous,
959:Ignorance is not bad faith. But persistence in ignorance is. ~ Joanna Russ,
960:I just have faith. It's just there. It's not any big deal. ~ Ernie Harwell,
961:I like someone with a really good and dark sense of humour. ~ Paloma Faith,
962:I'm slowly losing faith in humanity, one idiot at a time... ~ Jos N Harris,
963:I think everyone should have a problem with zombies on fire. ~ Faith McKay,
964:It takes more faith to be an atheist than to believe in God. ~ Ruth Graham,
965:"Like it or not, your existence is grounded in faith." ~ Jordan B Peterson,
966:No one wants to hear about your faith. They must see it. ~ Karen Kingsbury,
967:Ok to appoint atheists or agnostics-no litmus test of faith. ~ Mitt Romney,
968:Ordained Baptist minister; I make no apology for my faith. ~ Mike Huckabee,
969:Please forgive me for thinking faith means certainty. ~ Mark Z Danielewski,
970:Send me out into another life. But get me back for supper. ~ Faith Popcorn,
971:The foundation of family - that's where it all begins for me. ~ Faith Hill,
972:Those who have courage and faith shall never perish in misery ~ Anne Frank,
973:We don‘t have faith that #freedom works. We have evidence. ~ Thomas Sowell,
974:We may explain faith till nobody understands it. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
975:When fear knocks at the door, send faith to answer! ~ Suzanne Woods Fisher,
976:With strength to meet sorrow, and faith to endure ~ Frances Sargent Osgood,
977:You cannot be a man of faith unless you know how to doubt. ~ Thomas Merton,
978:You feel a sense of elation seeing yourself on a billboard. ~ Paloma Faith,
979:Your fate is mostly shaped by your faith in yourself! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
980:A foolish faith in authority is the worst enemy of truth. ~ Albert Einstein,
981:All difficulties are there to test the endurance of the faith. ~ The Mother,
982:All the world is made of faith, and trust, and pixie dust. ~ James M Barrie,
983:And though I walk home alone, my faith in love is still devout. ~ Morrissey,
984:Anything done against faith or conscience is sinful. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
985:Be on guard. Stand firm in the faith. Be courageous. Be strong. ~ Anonymous,
986:Care more for a grain of faith than a ton of excitement. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
987:Clear skin, a manicure, a couple dead zombies, and then fame! ~ Faith McKay,
988:Faith cannot be shaken, it is the result of being shaken. ~ Jacob Needleman,
989:Faith does not ask for possible things; it demands impossible. ~ T B Joshua,
990:Faith in God is the sole answer to the mystery of evil. ~ Richard Wurmbrand,
991:Faith is, above all, openness; an act of trust in the unknown. ~ Alan Watts,
992:Faith is agreeing with God and saying what He says about you. ~ John Osteen,
993:Faith is like love: it does not let itself be forced. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer,
994:Faith means wanting God and wanting to want nothing else. ~ Brennan Manning,
995:For whatever does not proceed from faith is sin” (Rom. 14:23). ~ R C Sproul,
996:From the beginning, this has been a faith-based ministry. ~ David Wilkerson,
997:Have faith in the Lord's mercy and all can and will change.
   ~ The Mother,
998:He whose faith never doubted, may justly doubt of his faith. ~ Robert Boyle,
999:If you want to lose your faith, make friends with a priest. ~ G I Gurdjieff,
1000:I have a great deal of confidence in myself and in my faith. ~ Jimmy Carter,
1001:Live with your sins, confess them or not, but never lose faith ~ Mario Puzo,
1002:My faith has pretty much been on the rocks for a while now. ~ Susan Sleeman,
1003:Paul substituted faith in Christ for the Christlike life. ~ Walter Kaufmann,
1004:Reason always stands in need of being purified by faith ~ Pope Benedict XVI,
1005:Sorrow looks back, Worry looks around, Faith looks up ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1006:The best way to see Faith is to shut the eye of Reason. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
1007:The cliches of a culture sometimes tell the deepest truths. ~ Faith Popcorn,
1008:The majesty of creation forms my faith in the Creator. ~ Anthony D Williams,
1009:There's no more faith in thee than in a stewed prune. ~ William Shakespeare,
1010:Unless your faith is firm,        I cannot make you stand firm. ~ Anonymous,
1011:What if is fear. Even if is faith. Choose the latter my boy. ~ Karina Halle,
1012:You have faith in your own worth and the world won’t matter. ~ Mia Sheridan,
1013:You shall not discover the truth being being blinded to faith. ~ Malinda Lo,
1014:All who call on God in true faith...will certainly be heard. ~ Martin Luther,
1015:A miracle, my friend, is an event which creates faith. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1016:Anything done against faith or conscience is sinful. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
1017:But even in my darkest days I had faith it would turn around. ~ Steve Harvey,
1018:Doubt isn't the opposite of faith; it is an element of faith. ~ Paul Tillich,
1019:Enthusiasm is a kind of faith that has been set afire ~ George Matthew Adams,
1020:Faith as tiny as a grain of sand allows us to move mountains. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1021:faith begins where the will, or the Word, of God is known. ~ Kenneth E Hagin,
1022:Faith has to take in all the other possibilities it can. ~ Flannery O Connor,
1023:faith, hope, and love (with the greatest of these being love). ~ Amor Towles,
1024:Faith in our associates is part of our faith in God. ~ Charles Horton Cooley,
1025:Faith is an organ of knowledge, and love an organ of experience. ~ A W Tozer,
1026:Faith is necessary to men; woe to him who believes in nothing! ~ Victor Hugo,
1027:Faith is realizing that you always get what you need. ~ Sri Sri Ravi Shankar,
1028:Faith is the inborn capacity to see God behind everything. ~ Oswald Chambers,
1029:Faith is trust or commitment to what you think is true. ~ William Lane Craig,
1030:Faith that is going to be trusted is going to be tested. ~ Leonard Ravenhill,
1031:Faith without thankfulness lacks strength and fortitude. ~ John Henry Jowett,
1032:Forget aging. If you're six feet above ground, it's a good day. ~ Faith Hill,
1033:Great faith overcomes laws of nature that govern physical world. ~ Toba Beta,
1034:I come from a good family. I come from a faith-based family. ~ Ryan Merriman,
1035:I ground my faith upon God's word, and not upon the church. ~ Lady Jane Grey,
1036:I guess I had fun doing it but it has hard memories for me. ~ Faith Ringgold,
1037:I had a strong faith that I would, eventually, have a baby. ~ Trinny Woodall,
1038:I have faith in human beings. I struggle with that faith. ~ Julianna Baggott,
1039:In religion, faith is a virtue. In science, faith is a vice. ~ Jerry A Coyne,
1040:I try not to brand myself 'weird' any more because it sticks. ~ Paloma Faith,
1041:It's easier to have faith in yourself if you have faith in God. ~ James Cook,
1042:Keep faith, trust to love, fight with honor, but fight to win. ~ Gail Simone,
1043:knowledge, absolutely sure of its infallibility, is faith ~ Yevgeny Zamyatin,
1044:Living on Faith.
Striving on Desire.
Flying on Hope. ~ Imania Margria,
1045:My fear is greater than my faith, but I walk the missionary way. ~ Tori Amos,
1046:Never admit you’re wrong when silence lies that you’re right. ~ Faith Hunter,
1047:Not hope, but Faith. I don't believe in hope. Hope is a beggar. ~ Jim Carrey,
1048:Only our individual faith in freedom can keep us free. ~ Dwight D Eisenhower,
1049:Promise has faith as premise.
Only men of faith can promise. ~ Toba Beta,
1050:Sometimes people deserve to have their faith rewarded. ~ Christopher J Nolan,
1051:Sorrow looks back, worry looks around, and faith looks up. ~ Debbie Macomber,
1052:The essence of faith is fewness of words and abundance of deeds ~ Bah u ll h,
1053:This faith in time’s infinite patience triggers procrastination. ~ Anonymous,
1054:To doubt is to have faith in the worst possible outcome. ~ Blaine Lee Pardoe,
1055:True faith goes into operation when there are no answers. ~ Elisabeth Elliot,
1056:True faith is belief in the reality of absolute values. ~ William Ralph Inge,
1057:Turn anger into compassion, and fear into faith. ~ Kimberly Williams Paisley,
1058:We don’t smoke for enjoyment. We smoke to proclaim our faith. ~ Tom Perrotta,
1059:We will experience the life we have the faith to experience. ~ Julia Cameron,
1060:When in doubt, throw doubt out and have a little faith.... ~ E A Bucchianeri,
1061:With faith in the Divine Grace, all difficulties are solved.
   ~ The Mother,
1062:You can’t confuse childlike faith with childish thinking. ~ John F MacArthur,
1063:Your father and Nikita. Man likes to live dangerously.” Faith ~ Nalini Singh,
1064:Anne Lamott: “The opposite of faith is not doubt, but certainty. ~ Bren Brown,
1065:But for my faith in God, I should have been a raving maniac. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1066:Capuchin monkeys have no faith in America; they hold to no dream ~ Don Watson,
1067:Doubt is invariably the result of want or weakness of faith. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1068:Faith, if it is ever right about anything, is right by accident. ~ Sam Harris,
1069:‎Faith, if it is ever right about anything, is right by accident ~ Sam Harris,
1070:Faith is a continuum, and we each fall on that line where we may. ~ Dan Brown,
1071:Faith is as precious to die by as it is to live by. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
1072:Faith is not believing that God can. It is knowing that God will. ~ Ben Stein,
1073:Faith is not something to grasp, it is a state to grow into. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1074:Faith is not the result of fuzy thinking. It is the cause of it. ~ Dan Barker,
1075:Faith is the receiver of grace; unbelief is the rejector. ~ Alisa Hope Wagner,
1076:Faith looks out instead of in and the whole life falls into line. ~ A W Tozer,
1077:Faith never requires us to crucify our minds or deny our senses. ~ R C Sproul,
1078:For the mind of faith, a promised act of God is as good as done. ~ John Piper,
1079:Having faith is believing in something you just know ain't true. ~ Mark Twain,
1080:I always come here when I can't sleep [. . .] every night. ~ Faith Erin Hicks,
1081:I always have faith that good things will happen regardless. ~ Mike Conley Jr,
1082:I didn't know how faith felt when it grew incrementally. ~ Jen Pollock Michel,
1083:I do have faith in humanity but I don’t have faith in humans. ~ M F Moonzajer,
1084:If you desire faith, then you have faith enough. ~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning,
1085:I have no mystic faith in the people. I have in the individual. ~ E M Forster,
1086:I just really want to make albums - and however I can, I will. ~ Paloma Faith,
1087:I’ll awake you from this living sleep”- Matador, Faith No More ~ Karina Halle,
1088:I love playing moms. It's a lot easier than being a mom, I hear. ~ Faith Ford,
1089:Impossible starts the second you let fear get bigger than faith. ~ Sean Platt,
1090:I think faith in each other is much harder than faith in God... ~ Stephen Fry,
1091:It's amazing living alone. I'm very lucky. It's like a refuge. ~ Paloma Faith,
1092:I've been brought up with the Christian faith with my family. ~ Ioan Gruffudd,
1093:Ive done a lot of movies, but my favorite was Blind Faith. ~ Courtney B Vance,
1094:Knowledge, absolutely sure of its infallibility, is faith. ~ Yevgeny Zamyatin,
1095:Lives of faith are the great mirror of the dependability of God. ~ John Piper,
1096:My faith is brightest in the midst of impenetrable darkness. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1097:My faith is what they bury when they force me to expose it. ~ Uzma Aslam Khan,
1098:My favourite authors are Milan Kundera and Jeanette Winterson. ~ Paloma Faith,
1099:My true religion, my simple faith is in love and compassion. ~ Dalai Lama XIV,
1100:Real true faith is man's weakness leaning on God's strength. ~ Dwight L Moody,
1101:Regardless of your faith, you can never escape uncertainty. ~ Shannon L Alder,
1102:Religion exists to instill false security and blind faith, ~ Kelley Armstrong,
1103:The greatest hindrance to growth in faith is comfortable living. ~ John Carey,
1104:To keep a faith pure, man had better retire to a monastery. ~ Walter Lippmann,
1105:Upper-room futility. A little bit of faith but very little fire. ~ Max Lucado,
1106:We are a nation of faith, and we are stewards of God's world. ~ Mike Huckabee,
1107:Woman's faith and woman's trust, Write the characters in dust. ~ Walter Scott,
1108:You are never too young to be fierce and brave in your faith! ~ Natalie Grant,
1109:you just had to be still and have faith, that was the main thing. ~ Jim Dodge,
1110:According to your faith be it unto you” (Matthew 9:29). ~ Norman Vincent Peale,
1111:A faith based on material proofs is not faith—it is a bargaining. ~ The Mother,
1112:A foolish faith in authority is the worst enemy of truth.”46 ~ Walter Isaacson,
1113:A living faith cannot be manufactured by the rule of majority ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1114:And really, what is trust other than faith in a clever disguise? ~ Rick R Reed,
1115:Belief attracts something; faith makes things happen! ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
1116:cleave not to faith when faith brings blood." - Rev. John Hale ~ Arthur Miller,
1117:Doubt is not the opposite of faith; it is one element of faith. ~ Paul Tillich,
1118:E)    Plan the leap, but don't rely on faith. Plan EVERYTHING ~ James Altucher,
1119:Faith-based religion must suffer the same slide into obsolescence ~ Sam Harris,
1120:Faith begins as an experiment, and ends as an experience. ~ William Ralph Inge,
1121:Faith, hope, and love remain. But the greatest of these is love. ~ Jon Foreman,
1122:Faith is underrated. Paradoxically, religion is vastly overrated. ~ Seth Godin,
1123:I find,” Vader ventured mildly, “this lack of faith disturbing. ~ George Lucas,
1124:If, then, faith widens the connections, it elevates the man. ~ Matthew Simpson,
1125:I have to believe much in God because I have lost my faith in man. ~ Jos Rizal,
1126:Indifferentism about doctrine makes no heroes of the faith. ~ J Gresham Machen,
1127:I think the greatest taboos in America are faith and failure. ~ Michael Malone,
1128:I've had a great life following my faith and my instincts. ~ Evander Holyfield,
1129:Making money is pretty pointless and it needs constant attention. ~ Adam Faith,
1130:Man has become disconnected from his faith in perceptions. ~ Claudio Naranjo,
1131:My faith always has been and always will be important to me. ~ Aretha Franklin,
1132:My faith has always been important to me. It defines who I am. ~ Katie Ledecky,
1133:My faith is that the only soul a man must save is his own. ~ William O Douglas,
1134:One needs no strange spiritual faith to worship the earth. ~ John Cowper Powys,
1135:The definitions of the Church are the rules of true faith. ~ Alphonsus Liguori,
1136:There can be no progress if people have no faith in tomorrow. ~ John F Kennedy,
1137:...there's nothing more important than making a faith reasonable ~ Jan Guillou,
1138:The Vedanta teaches men to have faith in themselves first. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
1139:We are all drifting reefwards now, and faith is our only anchor. ~ Bram Stoker,
1140:We are faith. We speak all languages of beauty and hardship. ~ G Willow Wilson,
1141:You are My sight, so have faith. You are My Face, so veil yourself ~ Ibn Arabi,
1142:You can trust a crystal ball about as far as you can throw it. ~ Faith Popcorn,
1143:"All difficulties are there to test the endurance of the faith." ~ ~ The Mother,
1144:All humans have fear, and those of us who are fortunate have faith. ~ Van Jones,
1145:All the things that I find beautiful have a darkness about them. ~ Paloma Faith,
1146:A miracle can be the result of effort multiplied by faith. ~ Evgenij Vodolazkin,
1147:Back to work. If I’m [writing] I’m not thinking about the crazy. ~ Faith Hunter,
1148:Corruption is nature's way of restoring our faith in democracy. ~ Peter Ustinov,
1149:Despotism may govern without faith, but liberty cannot. ~ Alexis de Tocqueville,
1150:Don't doubt your faith; doubt your doubts for they are unreliable. ~ T B Joshua,
1151:Faith embraces many truths which seem to contradict each other. ~ Blaise Pascal,
1152:Faith is a gift from God and he gives it to whomever he chooses ~ Mother Teresa,
1153:Faith is a leap into the light, not a step into the darkness. ~ Reinhard Bonnke,
1154:Faith is believing in something you cannot prove for certain. ~ Seth Adam Smith,
1155:Faith is put to the test when the situation is most difficult. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1156:Faith looks beyond the walls of the obstacle and on to the answer. ~ Benny Hinn,
1157:Faith makes all things possible... love makes all things easy. ~ Dwight L Moody,
1158:Faith was praiseworthy, but should be seasoned with intelligence. ~ Dave Duncan,
1159:Have faith have faith. When you have nothing else have faith. ~ Francine Rivers,
1160:He who has no faith in himself can never have faith in God. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
1161:Hope is hearing the music of the future. Faith is to dance to it. ~ Rub