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object:John Keats
subject class:Poetry
class:author

Wikipedia
Born 31 October 1795 - Moorgate, London, England
Died 23 February 1821 (aged 25) - Rome, Papal States

John Keats (/kits/; 31 October 1795 23 February 1821) was an English Romantic poet. He was one of the main figures of the second generation of Romantic poets, along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, despite his works having been in publication for only four years before his death from tuberculosis at the age of 25.[1]

Although his poems were not generally well received by critics during his lifetime, his reputation grew after his death,[2] and by the end of the 19th century, he had become one of the most beloved of all English poets. He had a significant influence on a diverse range of poets and writers. Jorge Luis Borges stated that his first encounter with Keats' work was a great experience that he felt all of his life.[3]

The poetry of Keats is characterised by a style "heavily loaded with sensualities", most notably in the series of odes. This is typical of the Romantic poets, as they aimed to accentuate extreme emotion through an emphasis on natural imagery. Today his poems and letters are some of the most popular and most analysed in English literature. Some of his most acclaimed works are "Ode to a Nightingale", "Sleep and Poetry" and the famous sonnet "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer".


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OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Hyperion
Keats_-_Poems

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
1.pbs_-_Adonais_-_An_elegy_on_the_Death_of_John_Keats

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1.jk_-_Acrostic__-_Georgiana_Augusta_Keats
1.jk_-_A_Draught_Of_Sunshine
1.jk_-_A_Galloway_Song
1.jk_-_An_Extempore
1.jk_-_Answer_To_A_Sonnet_By_J.H.Reynolds
1.jk_-_A_Party_Of_Lovers
1.jk_-_Apollo_And_The_Graces
1.jk_-_A_Prophecy_-_To_George_Keats_In_America
1.jk_-_Asleep!_O_Sleep_A_Little_While,_White_Pearl!
1.jk_-_A_Song_About_Myself
1.jk_-_A_Thing_Of_Beauty_(Endymion)
1.jk_-_Ben_Nevis_-_A_Dialogue
1.jk_-_Bright_Star
1.jk_-_Calidore_-_A_Fragment
1.jk_-_Character_Of_Charles_Brown
1.jk_-_Daisys_Song
1.jk_-_Dawlish_Fair
1.jk_-_Dedication_To_Leigh_Hunt,_Esq.
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_I
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_My_Brother_George
1.jk_-_Extracts_From_An_Opera
1.jk_-_Faery_Songs
1.jk_-_Fancy
1.jk_-_Fill_For_Me_A_Brimming_Bowl
1.jk_-_Fragment_-_Modern_Love
1.jk_-_Fragment_Of_An_Ode_To_Maia._Written_On_May_Day_1818
1.jk_-_Fragment_Of_The_Castle_Builder
1.jk_-_Fragment._Welcome_Joy,_And_Welcome_Sorrow
1.jk_-_Fragment._Wheres_The_Poet?
1.jk_-_Give_Me_Women,_Wine,_And_Snuff
1.jk_-_Hither,_Hither,_Love
1.jk_-_Hymn_To_Apollo
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_II
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_III
1.jk_-_Imitation_Of_Spenser
1.jk_-_Isabella;_Or,_The_Pot_Of_Basil_-_A_Story_From_Boccaccio
1.jk_-_I_Stood_Tip-Toe_Upon_A_Little_Hill
1.jk_-_King_Stephen
1.jk_-_La_Belle_Dame_Sans_Merci
1.jk_-_La_Belle_Dame_Sans_Merci_(Original_version_)
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_II
1.jk_-_Lines
1.jk_-_Lines_On_Seeing_A_Lock_Of_Miltons_Hair
1.jk_-_Lines_On_The_Mermaid_Tavern
1.jk_-_Lines_Rhymed_In_A_Letter_From_Oxford
1.jk_-_Lines_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Highlands_After_A_Visit_To_Burnss_Country
1.jk_-_Meg_Merrilies
1.jk_-_Ode_On_A_Grecian_Urn
1.jk_-_Ode_On_Indolence
1.jk_-_Ode_On_Melancholy
1.jk_-_Ode_To_A_Nightingale
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Apollo
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Autumn
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Psyche
1.jk_-_Ode._Written_On_The_Blank_Page_Before_Beaumont_And_Fletchers_Tragi-Comedy_The_Fair_Maid_Of_The_In
1.jk_-_On_A_Dream
1.jk_-_On_Death
1.jk_-_On_Hearing_The_Bag-Pipe_And_Seeing_The_Stranger_Played_At_Inverary
1.jk_-_On_Receiving_A_Curious_Shell
1.jk_-_On_Receiving_A_Laurel_Crown_From_Leigh_Hunt
1.jk_-_On_Seeing_The_Elgin_Marbles_For_The_First_Time
1.jk_-_On_Visiting_The_Tomb_Of_Burns
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_I
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_II
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_III
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_IV
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_V
1.jk_-_Robin_Hood
1.jk_-_Sharing_Eves_Apple
1.jk_-_Sleep_And_Poetry
1.jk_-_Song._Hush,_Hush!_Tread_Softly!
1.jk_-_Song._I_Had_A_Dove
1.jk_-_Song_Of_Four_Faries
1.jk_-_Song_Of_The_Indian_Maid,_From_Endymion
1.jk_-_Song._Written_On_A_Blank_Page_In_Beaumont_And_Fletchers_Works
1.jk_-_Sonnet._A_Dream,_After_Reading_Dantes_Episode_Of_Paulo_And_Francesca
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_After_Dark_Vapors_Have_Oppressd_Our_Plains
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_As_From_The_Darkening_Gloom_A_Silver_Dove
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_Before_He_Went
1.jk_-_Sonnet._If_By_Dull_Rhymes_Our_English_Must_Be_Chaind
1.jk_-_Sonnet_III._Written_On_The_Day_That_Mr._Leigh_Hunt_Left_Prison
1.jk_-_Sonnet_II._To_.........
1.jk_-_Sonnet_I._To_My_Brother_George
1.jk_-_Sonnet_IV._How_Many_Bards_Gild_The_Lapses_Of_Time!
1.jk_-_Sonnet_IX._Keen,_Fitful_Gusts_Are
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_Oh!_How_I_Love,_On_A_Fair_Summers_Eve
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_A_Picture_Of_Leander
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_Leigh_Hunts_Poem_The_Story_of_Rimini
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_Peace
1.jk_-_Sonnet_On_Sitting_Down_To_Read_King_Lear_Once_Again
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_The_Sea
1.jk_-_Sonnet._The_Day_Is_Gone
1.jk_-_Sonnet._The_Human_Seasons
1.jk_-_Sonnet._To_A_Lady_Seen_For_A_Few_Moments_At_Vauxhall
1.jk_-_Sonnet._To_A_Young_Lady_Who_Sent_Me_A_Laurel_Crown
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Byron
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Chatterton
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_George_Keats_-_Written_In_Sickness
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Homer
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Mrs._Reynoldss_Cat
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Sleep
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Spenser
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_The_Nile
1.jk_-_Sonnet_VIII._To_My_Brothers
1.jk_-_Sonnet_VII._To_Solitude
1.jk_-_Sonnet_VI._To_G._A._W.
1.jk_-_Sonnet_V._To_A_Friend_Who_Sent_Me_Some_Roses
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_When_I_Have_Fears_That_I_May_Cease_To_Be
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Why_Did_I_Laugh_Tonight?
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Before_Re-Read_King_Lear
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_In_Answer_To_A_Sonnet_By_J._H._Reynolds
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_In_Disgust_Of_Vulgar_Superstition
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Page_In_Shakespeares_Poems,_Facing_A_Lovers_Complaint
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Space_At_The_End_Of_Chaucers_Tale_Of_The_Floure_And_The_Lefe
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Upon_The_Top_Of_Ben_Nevis
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XIII._Addressed_To_Haydon
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XII._On_Leaving_Some_Friends_At_An_Early_Hour
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XI._On_First_Looking_Into_Chapmans_Homer
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XIV._Addressed_To_The_Same_(Haydon)
1.jk_-_Sonnet_X._To_One_Who_Has_Been_Long_In_City_Pent
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XVII._Happy_Is_England
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XVI._To_Kosciusko
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XV._On_The_Grasshopper_And_Cricket
1.jk_-_Specimen_Of_An_Induction_To_A_Poem
1.jk_-_Spenserian_Stanzas_On_Charles_Armitage_Brown
1.jk_-_Spenserian_Stanza._Written_At_The_Close_Of_Canto_II,_Book_V,_Of_The_Faerie_Queene
1.jk_-_Staffa
1.jk_-_Stanzas._In_A_Drear-Nighted_December
1.jk_-_Stanzas_To_Miss_Wylie
1.jk_-_Teignmouth_-_Some_Doggerel,_Sent_In_A_Letter_To_B._R._Haydon
1.jk_-_The_Cap_And_Bells;_Or,_The_Jealousies_-_A_Faery_Tale_.._Unfinished
1.jk_-_The_Devon_Maid_-_Stanzas_Sent_In_A_Letter_To_B._R._Haydon
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_Saint_Mark._A_Fragment
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_St._Agnes
1.jk_-_The_Gadfly
1.jk_-_This_Living_Hand
1.jk_-_To_......
1.jk_-_To_.......
1.jk_-_To_Ailsa_Rock
1.jk_-_To_Charles_Cowden_Clarke
1.jk_-_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_To_George_Felton_Mathew
1.jk_-_To_Hope
1.jk_-_To_Some_Ladies
1.jk_-_To_The_Ladies_Who_Saw_Me_Crowned
1.jk_-_Translated_From_A_Sonnet_Of_Ronsard
1.jk_-_Two_Or_Three
1.jk_-_Two_Sonnets_On_Fame
1.jk_-_Two_Sonnets._To_Haydon,_With_A_Sonnet_Written_On_Seeing_The_Elgin_Marbles
1.jk_-_What_The_Thrush_Said._Lines_From_A_Letter_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Woman!_When_I_Behold_Thee_Flippant,_Vain
1.jk_-_Written_In_The_Cottage_Where_Burns_Was_Born
1.jk_-_You_Say_You_Love

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
1.jk_-_Acrostic__-_Georgiana_Augusta_Keats
1.jk_-_A_Draught_Of_Sunshine
1.jk_-_A_Galloway_Song
1.jk_-_An_Extempore
1.jk_-_Answer_To_A_Sonnet_By_J.H.Reynolds
1.jk_-_A_Party_Of_Lovers
1.jk_-_Apollo_And_The_Graces
1.jk_-_A_Prophecy_-_To_George_Keats_In_America
1.jk_-_Asleep!_O_Sleep_A_Little_While,_White_Pearl!
1.jk_-_A_Song_About_Myself
1.jk_-_A_Thing_Of_Beauty_(Endymion)
1.jk_-_Ben_Nevis_-_A_Dialogue
1.jk_-_Bright_Star
1.jk_-_Calidore_-_A_Fragment
1.jk_-_Character_Of_Charles_Brown
1.jk_-_Daisys_Song
1.jk_-_Dawlish_Fair
1.jk_-_Dedication_To_Leigh_Hunt,_Esq.
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_I
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_My_Brother_George
1.jk_-_Extracts_From_An_Opera
1.jk_-_Faery_Songs
1.jk_-_Fancy
1.jk_-_Fill_For_Me_A_Brimming_Bowl
1.jk_-_Fragment_-_Modern_Love
1.jk_-_Fragment_Of_An_Ode_To_Maia._Written_On_May_Day_1818
1.jk_-_Fragment_Of_The_Castle_Builder
1.jk_-_Fragment._Welcome_Joy,_And_Welcome_Sorrow
1.jk_-_Fragment._Wheres_The_Poet?
1.jk_-_Give_Me_Women,_Wine,_And_Snuff
1.jk_-_Hither,_Hither,_Love
1.jk_-_Hymn_To_Apollo
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_II
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_III
1.jk_-_Imitation_Of_Spenser
1.jk_-_Isabella;_Or,_The_Pot_Of_Basil_-_A_Story_From_Boccaccio
1.jk_-_I_Stood_Tip-Toe_Upon_A_Little_Hill
1.jk_-_King_Stephen
1.jk_-_La_Belle_Dame_Sans_Merci
1.jk_-_La_Belle_Dame_Sans_Merci_(Original_version_)
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_II
1.jk_-_Lines
1.jk_-_Lines_On_Seeing_A_Lock_Of_Miltons_Hair
1.jk_-_Lines_On_The_Mermaid_Tavern
1.jk_-_Lines_Rhymed_In_A_Letter_From_Oxford
1.jk_-_Lines_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Highlands_After_A_Visit_To_Burnss_Country
1.jk_-_Meg_Merrilies
1.jk_-_Ode_On_A_Grecian_Urn
1.jk_-_Ode_On_Indolence
1.jk_-_Ode_On_Melancholy
1.jk_-_Ode_To_A_Nightingale
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Apollo
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Autumn
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Psyche
1.jk_-_Ode._Written_On_The_Blank_Page_Before_Beaumont_And_Fletchers_Tragi-Comedy_The_Fair_Maid_Of_The_In
1.jk_-_On_A_Dream
1.jk_-_On_Death
1.jk_-_On_Hearing_The_Bag-Pipe_And_Seeing_The_Stranger_Played_At_Inverary
1.jk_-_On_Receiving_A_Curious_Shell
1.jk_-_On_Receiving_A_Laurel_Crown_From_Leigh_Hunt
1.jk_-_On_Seeing_The_Elgin_Marbles_For_The_First_Time
1.jk_-_On_Visiting_The_Tomb_Of_Burns
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_I
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_II
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_III
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_IV
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_V
1.jk_-_Robin_Hood
1.jk_-_Sharing_Eves_Apple
1.jk_-_Sleep_And_Poetry
1.jk_-_Song._Hush,_Hush!_Tread_Softly!
1.jk_-_Song._I_Had_A_Dove
1.jk_-_Song_Of_Four_Faries
1.jk_-_Song_Of_The_Indian_Maid,_From_Endymion
1.jk_-_Song._Written_On_A_Blank_Page_In_Beaumont_And_Fletchers_Works
1.jk_-_Sonnet._A_Dream,_After_Reading_Dantes_Episode_Of_Paulo_And_Francesca
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_After_Dark_Vapors_Have_Oppressd_Our_Plains
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_As_From_The_Darkening_Gloom_A_Silver_Dove
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_Before_He_Went
1.jk_-_Sonnet._If_By_Dull_Rhymes_Our_English_Must_Be_Chaind
1.jk_-_Sonnet_III._Written_On_The_Day_That_Mr._Leigh_Hunt_Left_Prison
1.jk_-_Sonnet_II._To_.........
1.jk_-_Sonnet_I._To_My_Brother_George
1.jk_-_Sonnet_IV._How_Many_Bards_Gild_The_Lapses_Of_Time!
1.jk_-_Sonnet_IX._Keen,_Fitful_Gusts_Are
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_Oh!_How_I_Love,_On_A_Fair_Summers_Eve
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_A_Picture_Of_Leander
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_Leigh_Hunts_Poem_The_Story_of_Rimini
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_Peace
1.jk_-_Sonnet_On_Sitting_Down_To_Read_King_Lear_Once_Again
1.jk_-_Sonnet._On_The_Sea
1.jk_-_Sonnet._The_Day_Is_Gone
1.jk_-_Sonnet._The_Human_Seasons
1.jk_-_Sonnet._To_A_Lady_Seen_For_A_Few_Moments_At_Vauxhall
1.jk_-_Sonnet._To_A_Young_Lady_Who_Sent_Me_A_Laurel_Crown
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Byron
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Chatterton
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_George_Keats_-_Written_In_Sickness
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Homer
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Mrs._Reynoldss_Cat
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Sleep
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_Spenser
1.jk_-_Sonnet_To_The_Nile
1.jk_-_Sonnet_VIII._To_My_Brothers
1.jk_-_Sonnet_VII._To_Solitude
1.jk_-_Sonnet_VI._To_G._A._W.
1.jk_-_Sonnet_V._To_A_Friend_Who_Sent_Me_Some_Roses
1.jk_-_Sonnet_-_When_I_Have_Fears_That_I_May_Cease_To_Be
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Why_Did_I_Laugh_Tonight?
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Before_Re-Read_King_Lear
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_In_Answer_To_A_Sonnet_By_J._H._Reynolds
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_In_Disgust_Of_Vulgar_Superstition
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Page_In_Shakespeares_Poems,_Facing_A_Lovers_Complaint
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_On_A_Blank_Space_At_The_End_Of_Chaucers_Tale_Of_The_Floure_And_The_Lefe
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Written_Upon_The_Top_Of_Ben_Nevis
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XIII._Addressed_To_Haydon
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XII._On_Leaving_Some_Friends_At_An_Early_Hour
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XI._On_First_Looking_Into_Chapmans_Homer
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XIV._Addressed_To_The_Same_(Haydon)
1.jk_-_Sonnet_X._To_One_Who_Has_Been_Long_In_City_Pent
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XVII._Happy_Is_England
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XVI._To_Kosciusko
1.jk_-_Sonnet_XV._On_The_Grasshopper_And_Cricket
1.jk_-_Specimen_Of_An_Induction_To_A_Poem
1.jk_-_Spenserian_Stanzas_On_Charles_Armitage_Brown
1.jk_-_Spenserian_Stanza._Written_At_The_Close_Of_Canto_II,_Book_V,_Of_The_Faerie_Queene
1.jk_-_Staffa
1.jk_-_Stanzas._In_A_Drear-Nighted_December
1.jk_-_Stanzas_To_Miss_Wylie
1.jk_-_Teignmouth_-_Some_Doggerel,_Sent_In_A_Letter_To_B._R._Haydon
1.jk_-_The_Cap_And_Bells;_Or,_The_Jealousies_-_A_Faery_Tale_.._Unfinished
1.jk_-_The_Devon_Maid_-_Stanzas_Sent_In_A_Letter_To_B._R._Haydon
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_Saint_Mark._A_Fragment
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_St._Agnes
1.jk_-_The_Gadfly
1.jk_-_This_Living_Hand
1.jk_-_To_......
1.jk_-_To_.......
1.jk_-_To_Ailsa_Rock
1.jk_-_To_Charles_Cowden_Clarke
1.jk_-_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_To_George_Felton_Mathew
1.jk_-_To_Hope
1.jk_-_To_Some_Ladies
1.jk_-_To_The_Ladies_Who_Saw_Me_Crowned
1.jk_-_Translated_From_A_Sonnet_Of_Ronsard
1.jk_-_Two_Or_Three
1.jk_-_Two_Sonnets_On_Fame
1.jk_-_Two_Sonnets._To_Haydon,_With_A_Sonnet_Written_On_Seeing_The_Elgin_Marbles
1.jk_-_What_The_Thrush_Said._Lines_From_A_Letter_To_John_Hamilton_Reynolds
1.jk_-_Woman!_When_I_Behold_Thee_Flippant,_Vain
1.jk_-_Written_In_The_Cottage_Where_Burns_Was_Born
1.jk_-_You_Say_You_Love
1.pbs_-_Adonais_-_An_elegy_on_the_Death_of_John_Keats
1.pbs_-_Help_/_Contact_us
1.rb_-_Popularity
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
John Keats

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QUOTES [1 / 1 - 500 / 817]


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   1 John Keats

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  488 John Keats
   4 Poetical Works of John Keats
   2 John Keats

1:My imagination is a monastery, and I am its monk ~ John Keats

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Who, of men, can tell ~ John Keats
2:Time, that aged nurse, ~ John Keats
3:The air is all softness. ~ John Keats
4:I’ll feel my heaven anew, ~ John Keats
5:Load every rift with ore. ~ John Keats
6:You are always new to me. ~ John Keats
7:Death is Life's high meed. ~ John Keats
8:I’ll tell you how to burn, ~ John Keats
9:I came to feel how far above ~ John Keats
10:Asleep in lap of legends old. ~ John Keats
11:Beauty is truth, truth beauty ~ John Keats
12:Give me women, wine and snuff ~ John Keats
13:Health is my expected heaven. ~ John Keats
14:I always made an awkward bow. ~ John Keats
15:Souls of poets dead and gone, ~ John Keats
16:To stay youthful, stay useful. ~ John Keats
17:I burn'd
And ached for wings ~ John Keats
18:No one can usurp the heights... ~ John Keats
19:All writing is a form of prayer. ~ John Keats
20:Shed no tear - O, shed no tear! ~ John Keats
21:'Tis the witching hour of night, ~ John Keats
22:Wine is only sweet to happy men. ~ John Keats
23:I have so much of you in my heart ~ John Keats
24:I have so much of you in my heart. ~ John Keats
25:I want a brighter word than bright ~ John Keats
26:That queen of secrecy, the violet. ~ John Keats
27:A thing of beauty is a joy forever. ~ John Keats
28:To silence gossip, don't repeat it. ~ John Keats
29:A hope beyond the shadow of a dream. ~ John Keats
30:I find I cannot exist without Poetry ~ John Keats
31:Stop and consider! life is but a day ~ John Keats
32:Ghosts of melodious prophesyings rave ~ John Keats
33:Knowledge enormous makes a God of me. ~ John Keats
34:Knowledge enormous makes a god of me. ~ John Keats
35:Touch has a memory. O say, love say, ~ John Keats
36:Upon the honey’d middle of the night, ~ John Keats
37:Love in a hut, with water and a crust, ~ John Keats
38:O aching time! O moments big as years! ~ John Keats
39:Philosophy will clip an angel's wings. ~ John Keats
40:The poetry of the earth is never dead. ~ John Keats
41:There is a budding morrow in midnight. ~ John Keats
42:A quote about drinking is a joy forever ~ John Keats
43:Hear ye not the hum Of mighty workings? ~ John Keats
44:I can feel the daisies growing over me. ~ John Keats
45:Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness ~ John Keats
46:Love is my religion--I could die for it. ~ John Keats
47:There is a budding tomorrow in midnight. ~ John Keats
48:Alas! when passion is both meek and wild! ~ John Keats
49:Fast fading violets cover'd up in leaves; ~ John Keats
50:La Belle Dame Sans Merci ORIGINAL VERSION ~ John Keats
51:Love is my religion - I could die for it. ~ John Keats
52:Beauty is truth, truth beauty,-that is all ~ John Keats
53:Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget. ~ John Keats
54:Parting they seemed to tread upon the air, ~ John Keats
55:Scenery is fine -but human nature is finer ~ John Keats
56:That which is creative must create itself. ~ John Keats
57:What is more gentle than a wind is summer? ~ John Keats
58:Here lies one whose name was writ in water. ~ John Keats
59:Here lies one whose name was writ on water. ~ John Keats
60:My chest of books divide amongst my friends ~ John Keats
61:Thou foster-child of Silence and slow Time. ~ John Keats
62:And there shall be for thee all soft delight ~ John Keats
63:Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget... ~ John Keats
64:I will clamber through the clouds and exist. ~ John Keats
65:Much have I travell'd in the realms of gold. ~ John Keats
66:My chest of books divide amongst my friends. ~ John Keats
67:My creed is love and you are its only tenet. ~ John Keats
68:Of love, that fairest joys give most unrest. ~ John Keats
69:Scenery is fine - but human nature is finer. ~ John Keats
70:The silver, snarling trumpets 'gan to chide. ~ John Keats
71:The thought, the deadly thought of solitude. ~ John Keats
72:My chest of books divide amongst my friends-- ~ John Keats
73:She press'd his hand in slumber; so once more ~ John Keats
74:Sweet are the pleasures that to verse belong, ~ John Keats
75:The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone! ~ John Keats
76:The excellence of every Art is its intensity. ~ John Keats
77:The poppies hung Dew-dabbled on their stalks. ~ John Keats
78:Time, that aged nurse, rocked me to patience. ~ John Keats
79:All clean and comfortable I sit down to write. ~ John Keats
80:A moment's thought is passion's passing knell. ~ John Keats
81:And how they kist each other's tremulous eyes. ~ John Keats
82:Literary men are . . . a perpetual priesthood. ~ John Keats
83:Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes. ~ John Keats
84:Thou art a dreaming thing, A fever of thyself. ~ John Keats
85:Failure is, in a sense, the highway to success. ~ John Keats
86:I can bear to die - I cannot bear to leave her. ~ John Keats
87:So, when dark thoughts my boding spirit shroud, ~ John Keats
88:The days of peace and slumberous calm are fled. ~ John Keats
89:My imagination is a monastery and I am its monk. ~ John Keats
90:My imagination is a monastery, and I am its monk ~ John Keats
91:My love is selfish. I cannot breathe without you. ~ John Keats
92:Nothing ever becomes real 'til it is experienced. ~ John Keats
93:Nothing ever becomes real till it is experienced. ~ John Keats
94:Thou art a dreaming thing,
A fever of thyself. ~ John Keats
95:A man's life of any worth is a continual allegory. ~ John Keats
96:But were there ever any Writhed not at passed joy? ~ John Keats
97:Fino a che una cosa non ci ammala, non la capiamo. ~ John Keats
98:Joy, whose hand is ever at his lips, bidding adieu ~ John Keats
99:Works of genius are the first things in the world. ~ John Keats
100:I have loved the principle of beauty in all things. ~ John Keats
101:It keeps eternal whisperings around desolate shores ~ John Keats
102:I would sooner fail than not be among the greatest. ~ John Keats
103:O for a life of Sensations rather than of Thoughts! ~ John Keats
104:The genius of Shakespeare was an innate university. ~ John Keats
105:My friends should drink a dozen of Claret on my Tomb. ~ John Keats
106:Sunt un laș, nu pot îndura suferința de a fi fericit. ~ John Keats
107:Where soil is, men grow, Whether to weeds or flowers. ~ John Keats
108:Dancing music, music sad, Both together, sane and mad. ~ John Keats
109:Sonnet to Sleep O soft embalmer of the still midnight, ~ John Keats
110:The air I breathe in a room empty of you is unhealthy. ~ John Keats
111:If something is not beautiful, it is probably not true. ~ John Keats
112:Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard are sweeter. ~ John Keats
113:Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard, are sweeter ~ John Keats
114:Many a time I have been half in love with easeful Death. ~ John Keats
115:Soft closer of our eyes! Low murmur of tender lullabies! ~ John Keats
116:Dancing music, music sad,
Both together, sane and mad… ~ John Keats
117:If poetry does not come as naturally as leaves to a tree, ~ John Keats
118:I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death. ~ John Keats
119:Pleasure is oft a visitant; but pain Clings cruelly to us. ~ John Keats
120:I am profoundly enchanted by the flowing complexity in you. ~ John Keats
121:My dear girl, I love you ever and ever and without reserve. ~ John Keats
122:A fact is not a truth until you love it. —John Keats ~ Daniel James Brown
123:John Keats / John Keats / John / Please put your scarf on. ~ J D Salinger
124:Now a soft kiss - Aye, by that kiss, I vow an endless bliss. ~ John Keats
125:The creature has a purpose, and his eyes are bright with it. ~ John Keats
126:Aí de quando a paixão é simultaneamente modesta e arrebatada! ~ John Keats
127:Do not all charms fly / At the mere touch of cold philosophy? ~ John Keats
128:Open afresh your rounds of starry folds, Ye ardent Marigolds. ~ John Keats
129:I must choose between despair and Energy──I choose the latter. ~ John Keats
130:Pleasure is oft a visitant; but pain
Clings cruelly to us. ~ John Keats
131:Everything that reminds me of her goes through me like a spear. ~ John Keats
132:La vita è un'avventura da vivere, non un problema da risolvere. ~ John Keats
133:On a lone winter evening, when the frost Has wrought a silence. ~ John Keats
134:The grandeur of the dooms We have imagined for the mighty dead. ~ John Keats
135:There is not a fiercer hell than the failure in a great object. ~ John Keats
136:There is nothing stable in the world; uproar's your only music. ~ John Keats
137:They swayed about upon a rocking horse, And thought it Pegasus. ~ John Keats
138:Music's golden tongue Flatter'd to tears this aged man and poor. ~ John Keats
139:Nada es estable en el mundo. El tumulto es vuestra única música. ~ John Keats
140:So let me be thy choir, and make a moan Upon the midnight hours. ~ John Keats
141:Sudden a thought came like a full-blown rose, Flushing his brow. ~ John Keats
142:And shade the violets, That they may bind the moss in leafy nets. ~ John Keats
143:I wish to believe in immortality-I wish to live with you forever. ~ John Keats
144:Oh what can ail thee, knight-at-arms, Alone and palely loitering? ~ John Keats
145:Thou, silent form, dost tease us out of thought As doth eternity. ~ John Keats
146:What shocks the virtuous philosopher delights the chameleon poet. ~ John Keats
147:What shocks the virtuous philosopher, delights the chameleon poet. ~ John Keats
148:You are always new. The last of your kisses was ever the sweetest. ~ John Keats
149:You are always new, the last of your kisses was ever the sweetest. ~ John Keats
150:A poet without love were a physical and metaphysical impossibility. ~ John Keats
151:Don't be discouraged by a failure. It can be a positive experience. ~ John Keats
152:Health and spirits can only belong unalloyed to the selfish man—the ~ John Keats
153:I think we may class the lawyer in the natural history of monsters. ~ John Keats
154:Let us open our leaves like a flower, and be passive and receptive. ~ John Keats
155:Life is divine Chaos. It's messy, and it's supposed to be that way. ~ John Keats
156:There is an awful warmth about my heart like a load of immortality. ~ John Keats
157:Fine writing, next to doing nothing, is the best thing in the world. ~ John Keats
158:Oh what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
Alone and palely loitering? ~ John Keats
159:Two souls with but a single thought,
Two hearts that beat as one! ~ John Keats
160:I am sailing with thee through the dizzy sky! How beautiful thou art! ~ John Keats
161:You dazzled me. There is nothing in the world so bright and delicate. ~ John Keats
162:Fine writing, next to doing nothing, is the best thing in the world. – ~ John Keats
163:Thou, silent form, dost tease us out of thought
As doth eternity... ~ John Keats
164:Where but to think is to be full of sorrow
And leaden-eyed despairs ~ John Keats
165:Fanatics have their dreams, wherewith they weave a paradise for a sect. ~ John Keats
166:I shall soon be laid in the quiet grave - thank God for the quiet grave ~ John Keats
167:No such thing as the world becoming an easy place to save your soul in. ~ John Keats
168:O latest born and loveliest vision far of all Olympus' faded hierarchy. ~ John Keats
169:O, sorrow! Why dost borrow Heart's lightness from the merriment of May? ~ John Keats
170:Conversation is not a search after knowledge, but an endeavor at effect. ~ John Keats
171:I am sailing with thee through the dizzy sky!
How beautiful thou art! ~ John Keats
172:The poetry of earth is never dead. The poetry of earth is ceasing never. ~ John Keats
173:Through buried paths, where sleepy twilight dreams The summer time away. ~ John Keats
174:Open wide the mind's cage-door,
She'll dart forth, and cloudward soar. ~ John Keats
175:I have nothing to speak of but my self-and what can I say but what I feel. ~ John Keats
176:Some say the world is a vale of tears, I say it is a place of soul-making. ~ John Keats
177:was it a vision or a waking dream? Fled is that music--do I wake or sleep? ~ John Keats
178:Already with thee! tender is the night. . . But here there is no light. . . ~ John Keats
179:Many have original minds who do not think it - they are led away by custom! ~ John Keats
180:The two divinest things the world has got— A lovely woman and a rural spot. ~ John Keats
181:Through buried paths, where sleepy twilight dreams
The summer time away. ~ John Keats
182:Through the dancing poppies stole A breeze, most softly lulling to my soul. ~ John Keats
183:What is there in thee, Moon! That thou should'st move My heart so potently? ~ John Keats
184:Fanatikler rüyalarında kendi mezheplerinden olanlara cennet kapılarını açar. ~ John Keats
185:If I am destined to be happy with you here -- how short is the longest Life. ~ John Keats
186:It ought to come like the leaves to the trees, or it better not come at all. ~ John Keats
187:The imagination may be compared to Adam's dream-he awoke and found it truth. ~ John Keats
188:The imagination may be compared to adams dream. He awoke and found it truth. ~ John Keats
189:You cannot conceive how I ache to be with you: how I would die for one hour. ~ John Keats
190:Ay, in the very temple of Delight
Veil’d Melancholy has her sovran shrine, ~ John Keats
191:I would jump down Etna for any public good - but I hate a mawkish popularity. ~ John Keats
192:Already with thee! tender is the night. . .
But here there is no light. . . ~ John Keats
193:For axioms in philosophy are not axioms until they are proved upon our pulses. ~ John Keats
194:I Cannot Exist Without You. I Am Forgetful Of Everything But Seeing You Again. ~ John Keats
195:I go amongst the buildings of a city and I see a Man hurrying along - to what? ~ John Keats
196:Life is but a day; A fragile dewdrop on its perilous way From a tree's summit. ~ John Keats
197:O for the gentleness of old Romance, the simple planning of a minstrel's song! ~ John Keats
198:Touch has a memory. O say, love, say,
What can I do to kill it and be free? ~ John Keats
199:Turn the key deftly in the oiled wards, And seal the hushed Casket of my Soul. ~ John Keats
200:Was it a vision, or a waking dream?
Fled is that music:—Do I wake or sleep? ~ John Keats
201:You cannot conceive how I ache to be with you: how I would die for one hour... ~ John Keats
202:How beautiful, if sorrow had not made Sorrow more Beautiful than Beauty’s self. ~ John Keats
203:How beautiful, if sorrow had not made Sorrow more beautiful than Beauty's self. ~ John Keats
204:Pale wox I, and in vapours hid my face.
Art thou, too, near such doom? vague ~ John Keats
205:When it is moving on luxurious wings, The soul is lost in pleasant smotherings. ~ John Keats
206:Every mental pursuit takes its reality and worth from the ardour of the pursuer. ~ John Keats
207:He ne'er is crowned with immortality Who fears to follow where airy voices lead. ~ John Keats
208:His religion at best is an anxious wish,-like that of Rabelais, a great Perhaps. ~ John Keats
209:I feel confident I should have been a rebel Angel had the opportunity been mine. ~ John Keats
210:I would sooner fail," said Keats at twenty-two, "than not be among the greatest. ~ John Keats
211:Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun. ~ John Keats
212:Then felt I like some watcher of the skies when a new planet swims into his ken. ~ John Keats
213:Where are you now? How are the nymphs? I suppose they have led you a fine dance. ~ John Keats
214:I never can feel certain of any truth, but from a clear perception of its beauty. ~ John Keats
215:Turn the key deftly in the oiled wards,
And seal the hushed Casket of my Soul. ~ John Keats
216:How does the poet speak to men with power, but by being still more a man than they ~ John Keats
217:I will imagine you Venus tonight and pray, pray, pray to your star like a Heathen. ~ John Keats
218:When it is moving on luxurious wings,
The soul is lost in pleasant smotherings. ~ John Keats
219:When through the old oak forest I am gone,
Let me not wander in a barren dream. ~ John Keats
220:A man should have the fine point of his soul taken off to become fit for this world. ~ John Keats
221:Like a mermaid in sea-weed, she dreams awake, trembling in her soft and chilly nest. ~ John Keats
222:A little noiseless noise among the leaves, Born of the very sigh that silence heaves. ~ John Keats
223:If I am destined to be happy with you here – how short is the longest Life. John Keats ~ Ali Smith
224:Life is but a day;
A fragile dew-drop on its perilous way
From a tree’s summit. ~ John Keats
225:Much have I traveled in the realms of gold, and many goodly states and kingdoms seen. ~ John Keats
226:Yes, in spite of all, Some shape of beauty moves away the pall From our dark spirits. ~ John Keats
227:Four seasons fill the measure of the year; there are four seasons in the minds of men. ~ John Keats
228:Hence, pageant history! hence, gilded cheat!
Swart planet in the universe of deeds! ~ John Keats
229:I was never afraid of failure; for I would sooner fail than not be among the greatest. ~ John Keats
230:When I have fears that I may ceace to be, Before my pen has gleaned my teaming brain". ~ John Keats
231:And when thou art weary I'll find thee a bed, Of mosses and flowers to pillow thy head. ~ John Keats
232:If poetry comes not as naturally as the leaves to a tree it had better not come at all. ~ John Keats
233:I wish I was either in your arms full of faith, or that a Thunder bolt would strike me. ~ John Keats
234:O aching time! O moments big as years!
All as ye pass swell out the monstrous truth, ~ John Keats
235:Real are the dreams of gods, and soothly pass their pleasures in a long immortal dream. ~ John Keats
236:She hurried at his words, beset with fears, For there were sleeping dragons all around. ~ John Keats
237:The feel of not to feel it, When there is none to heal it Nor numbed sense to steel it. ~ John Keats
238:Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all
Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know ~ John Keats
239:But the rose leaves herself upon the brier, For winds to kiss and grateful bees to feed. ~ John Keats
240:Health is the greatest of blessings - with health and hope we should be content to live. ~ John Keats
241:I am in that temper that if I were under water I would scarcely kick to come to the top. ~ John Keats
242:I have two luxuries to brood over in my walks, your loveliness and the hour of my death. ~ John Keats
243:My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains/ My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk. ~ John Keats
244:Real are the dreams of Gods, and smoothly pass Their pleasures in a long immortal dream. ~ John Keats
245:The redbreast whistles from a garden-croft; and gathering swallows twitter in the skies. ~ John Keats
246:...yes, in spite of all, Some shape of beauty moves away the pall From out dark spirits. ~ John Keats
247:But let me see thee stoop from heaven on wings That fill the sky with silver glitterings! ~ John Keats
248:But what, without the social thought of thee,
Would be the wonders of the sky and sea? ~ John Keats
249:Darkling I listen; and, for many a time
I have been half in love with easeful Death... ~ John Keats
250:For so delicious were the words she sung,it seem'd he had loved them a whole summer long. ~ John Keats
251:If poetry comes not as naturally as the leaves to a tree it had better not come at all. – ~ John Keats
252:I have clung
To nothing, lov’d a nothing, nothing seen
Or felt but a great dream! ~ John Keats
253:Its better to lose your ego to the One you Love than to lose the One you Love to your Ego ~ John Keats
254:The roaring of the wind is my wife and the stars through the window pane are my children. ~ John Keats
255:Whatever the imagination seizes as Beauty must be truth -whether it existed before or not ~ John Keats
256:And when thou art weary I'll find thee a bed,
Of mosses and flowers to pillow thy head. ~ John Keats
257:Can death be sleep, when life is but a dream,
And scenes of bliss pass as a phantom by? ~ John Keats
258:Dry your eyes O dry your eyes, For I was taught in Paradise To ease my breast of melodies. ~ John Keats
259:Oh ye! Who have your eye-balls vexed and tired,
Feast them upon the wideness of the sea ~ John Keats
260:Tall oaks branch charmed by the earnest stars Dream and so dream all night without a stir. ~ John Keats
261:Their woes gone by, and both to heaven upflown, To bow for gratitude before Jove's throne. ~ John Keats
262:Upon the forehead of humanity.
All its more ponderous and bulky worth
Is friendship, ~ John Keats
263:You have absorb'd me. I have a sensation at the present moment as though I was dissolving. ~ John Keats
264:I never was in love - yet the voice and the shape of a woman has haunted me these two days. ~ John Keats
265:The excellency of every art is its intensity, capable of making all disagreeable evaporate. ~ John Keats
266:Where the nightingale doth sing Not a senseless, tranced thing, But divine melodious truth. ~ John Keats
267:But let me see thee stoop from heaven on wings
That fill the sky with silver glitterings! ~ John Keats
268:I love you the more in that I believe you had liked me for my own sake and for nothing else. ~ John Keats
269:Neither poetry, nor ambition, nor love have any alertness of countenance as they pass by me. ~ John Keats
270:The silvery tears of April? Youth of May?
Or June that breathes out life for butterflies? ~ John Keats
271:What is this world's delight,
Lightening that mocks the night,
Brief as even as bright ~ John Keats
272:O that our dreamings all, of sleep or wake,
Would all their colours from the sunset take. ~ John Keats
273:Beauty is truth, truth beauty,” — that is all
Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know. 50 ~ John Keats
274:Blinded alike from sunshine and from rain,
As though a rose should shut, and be a bud again ~ John Keats
275:Even bees, the little almsmen of spring bowers, know there is richest juice in poison-flowers. ~ John Keats
276:Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard
Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on. ~ John Keats
277:O Solitude! If I must with thee dwell, Let it not be among the jumbled heap of murky buildings ~ John Keats
278:Where are the songs of Spring? Aye, where are they? Think not of them; thou has thy music too. ~ John Keats
279:Every fresh experience points out some form of error which we shall afterwards carefully avoid. ~ John Keats
280:This is a mere matter of the moment. I think I shall be among the English poets after my death. ~ John Keats
281:And for her eyes: what could such eyes do there But weep, and weep, that they were born so fair? ~ John Keats
282:To bear all naked truths, And to envisage circumstance, all calm, That is the top of sovereignty ~ John Keats
283:Even now I am perhaps not speaking from myself: but from some character in whose soul I now live. ~ John Keats
284:He who saddens at thought of idleness cannot be idle, / And he's awake who thinks himself asleep. ~ John Keats
285:His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead, Unsceptred; and his realmless eyes were closed. ~ John Keats
286:I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections, and the truth of imagination. ~ John Keats
287:We have woven a web, you and I, attached to this world but a separate world of our own invention. ~ John Keats
288:A thing of beauty is a joy forever: its loveliness increases; it will never pass into nothingness. ~ John Keats
289:Land and sea, weakness and decline are great separators, but death is the great divorcer for ever. ~ John Keats
290:Easy was the task:
A thousand handicraftsmen wore the mask
Of Poesy. Ill-fated, impious race! ~ John Keats
291:Call the world if you please "the vale of soul-making." Then you will find out the use of the world. ~ John Keats
292:Can death be sleep, when life is but a dream, And scenes of bliss pass as a phantom by? ---"On death ~ John Keats
293:His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead,
Unsceptred; and his realmless eyes were closed; ~ John Keats
294:I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the Heart's affections and the truth of the Imagination. ~ John Keats
295:We read fine things but never feel them to the full until we have gone the same steps as the author. ~ John Keats
296:I don't need the stars in the night I found my treasure All I need is you by my side so shine forever ~ John Keats
297:I have an habitual feeling of my real life having past, and that I am leading a posthumous existence. ~ John Keats
298:In a drear-nighted December, Too happy, happy tree, Thy branches ne'er remember Their green felicity. ~ John Keats
299:De nada tengo certeza sino de la santidad de los afectos del corazón y de la verdad de la imaginación. ~ John Keats
300:I could be martyred for my religion. Love is my religion and I could die for that. I could die for you. ~ John Keats
301:My mind has been the most discontented and restless one that ever was put into a body too small for it. ~ John Keats
302:I have a habitual feeling of my real life having past, and that I am now leading a posthumous existence. ~ John Keats
303:It appears to me that almost any man may like the spider spin from his own inwards his own airy citadel. ~ John Keats
304:You might curb your magnanimity, and be more of an artist, and load every rift of your subject with ore. ~ John Keats
305:--then on the shore Of the wide world I stand alone, and think Till love and fame to nothingness do sink. ~ John Keats
306:To be happy with you seems such an impossibility! it requires a luckier Star than mine! it will never be. ~ John Keats
307:You are to me an object so intensely desirable that the air I breathe in a room empty of you is unhealthy ~ John Keats
308:A thing of beauty is a joy forever:
Its loveliness increases;
It will never
Pass into nothingness. ~ John Keats
309:But I, being poor, have only my dreams. I lay them at your feet. Tread lightly, for you tread on my dreams. ~ John Keats
310:Can death be sleep, when life is but a dream,
And scenes of bliss pass as a phantom by?
---"On death ~ John Keats
311:Do you not see how necessary a world of pains and troubles is to school an intelligence and make it a soul? ~ John Keats
312:forgotten? Yes, a schism
Nurtured by foppery and barbarism,
Made great Apollo blush for this his land. ~ John Keats
313:I am convinced more and more day by day that fine writing is next to fine doing, the top thing in the world. ~ John Keats
314:I have good reason to be content, for thank God I can read and perhaps understand Shakespeare to his depths. ~ John Keats
315:Nothing ever becomes real till experienced – even a proverb is no proverb until your life has illustrated it ~ John Keats
316:I have met with women whom I really think would like to be married to a Poem and to be given away by a Novel. ~ John Keats
317:I see a lily on thy brow, With anguish moist and fever dew; And on thy cheek a fading rose Fast withereth too. ~ John Keats
318:When the pig is over-roasted,
Huzza for folly O!
And the cheese is over-toasted,
Huzza for folly O! ~ John Keats
319:I believe in nothing but the holiness of the heart’s affections and the truth of the imagination. —JOHN KEATS ~ Jandy Nelson
320:Nothing is finer for the purposes of great productions than a very gradual ripening of the intellectual powers. ~ John Keats
321:--then on the shore
Of the wide world I stand alone, and think
Till love and fame to nothingness do sink. ~ John Keats
322:O magic sleep! O comfortable bird, That broodest o'er the troubled sea of the mind Till it is hush'd and smooth! ~ John Keats
323:one of the most mysterious of semi-speculations is, one would suppose, that of one Mind's imagining into another ~ John Keats
324:Give me books, French wine, fruit, fine weather and a little music played out of doors by somebody I do not know. ~ John Keats
325:…how light
Must dreams themselves be; seeing they’re more slight
Than the mere nothing that engenders them! ~ John Keats
326:I have good reason to be content,
for thank God I can read and
perhaps understand Shakespeare to his depths. ~ John Keats
327:Severn - I - lift me up - I am dying - I shall die easy; don't be frightened - be firm, and thank God it has come. ~ John Keats
328:With a great poet the sense of Beauty overcomes every other consideration, or rather obliterates all consideration. ~ John Keats
329:I do think better of womankind than to suppose they care whether Mister John Keats five feet high likes them or not. ~ John Keats
330:I was too much in solitude, and consequently was obliged to be in continual burning of thought, as an only resource. ~ John Keats
331:Poetry should... should strike the reader as a wording of his own highest thoughts, and appear almost a remembrance". ~ John Keats
332:There is an old saying "well begun is half done"-'tis a bad one. I would use instead-Not begun at all 'til half done. ~ John Keats
333:Reading makes immigrants of us all. It takes us away from home, but, most important, it finds homes for us everywhere. ~ John Keats
334:The Public - a thing I cannot help looking upon as an enemy, and which I cannot address without feelings of hostility. ~ John Keats
335:I see a lily on thy brow,
With anguish moist and fever dew;
And on thy cheek a fading rose
Fast withereth too. ~ John Keats
336:O for ten years, that I may overwhelm / Myself in poesy; so I may do the deed / That my own soul has to itself decreed. ~ John Keats
337:Away! away! for I will fly to thee,
Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards,
But on the viewless wings of Poesy, ~ John Keats
338:No one can usurp the heights...
But those to whom the miseries of the world
Are misery, and will not let them rest. ~ John Keats
339:The feel of not to feel it,
When there is none to heal it
Nor numbed sense to steel it,
Was never said in rhyme. ~ John Keats
340:Bards of Passion and of Mirth, Ye have left your souls on earth! Have ye souls in heaven too, Double-lived in regions new? ~ John Keats
341:Where long ago a giant battle was;
And, from the turf, a lullaby doth pass
In every place where infant Orpheus slept. ~ John Keats
342:Is there another Life? Shall I awake and find all this a dream? There must be we cannot be created for this sort of suffering. ~ John Keats
343:Failure is in a sense the highway to success, as each discovery of what is false leads us to seek earnestly after what is true. ~ John Keats
344:I feel more and more every day, as my imagination strengthens, that I do not live in this world alone but in a thousand worlds. ~ John Keats
345: ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes


346:The same that oft-times hath
charm'd magic casements,
opening on the foam
of perilous seas, in fairy lands forlorn. ~ John Keats
347:Blessed is the healthy nature; it is the coherent, sweetly co-operative, not incoherent, self-distracting, self-destructive one! ~ John Keats
348:So rainbow-sided, touch'd with miseries, She seem'd, at once, some penanced lady elf, Some demon's mistress, or the demon's self. ~ John Keats
349:A long poem is a test of invention which I take to be the Polar star of poetry, as fancy is the sails, and imagination the rudder. ~ John Keats
350:by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895.

351:I equally dislike the favor of the public with the love of a woman - they are both a cloying treacle to the wings of independence. ~ John Keats
352:I equally dislike the favor of the public with the love of a woman -- they are both a cloying treacle to the wings of independence ~ John Keats
353:I should like the window to open onto the Lake of Geneva--and there I'd sit and read all day like the picture of somebody reading. ~ John Keats
354:tis very sweet to look into the fair
and open face of heaven, - to breathe a prayer
full in the smile of the blue firmament. ~ John Keats
355: by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895.

356:I cannot see what flowers are at my feet, Nor what soft incense hangs upon the boughs, But, in embalmed darkness, guess each sweet. ~ John Keats
357: ~ The Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes


358:The world is too brutal for me-I am glad there is such a thing as the grave-I am sure I shall never have any rest till I get there. ~ John Keats
359:The world is too brutal for me—I am glad there is such a thing as the grave—I am sure I shall never have any rest till I get there. ~ John Keats
360:Alas! thou this wilt never do:
Thou art an enchantress too,
And wilt surely never spill
Blood of those whose eyes can kill. ~ John Keats
361:Why employ intelligent and highly paid ambassadors and then go and do their work for them? You don't buy a canary and sing yourself. ~ John Keats
362:You are always new. The last of your kisses was even the sweetest; the last smile the brightest; the last movement the gracefullest. ~ John Keats
363:I saw pale kings and princes too, Pale warriors, death-pale were they all; They cried- "La Belle Dame sans Merci Hath thee in thrall! ~ John Keats
364:It is a flaw In happiness to see beyond our bourn, - It forces us in summer skies to mourn, It spoils the singing of the nightingale. ~ John Keats
365:Or thou might'st better listen to the wind, Whose language is to thee a barren noise, Though it blows legend-laden through the trees. ~ John Keats
366:yet I must not forget
Sleep, quiet with his poppy coronet:
For what there may be worthy in these rhymes
I partly owe to him: ~ John Keats
367:A voice came sweeter, sweeter than all tune,
And still it cried, ‘Apollo! young Apollo!
The morning-bright Apollo! young Apollo! ~ John Keats
368:Praise or blame has but a momentary effect on the man whose love of beauty in the abstract makes him a severe critic on his own works. ~ John Keats
369:So rainbow-sided, touch'd with miseries,
She seem'd, at once, some penanced lady elf,
Some demon's mistress, or the demon's self. ~ John Keats
370:Who would wish to be among the commonplace crowd of the little famous - who are each individually lost in a throng made up of themselves? ~ John Keats
371:A poet is the most unpoetical of anything in existence because he has no identity-he is continually infirming and filling some other body. ~ John Keats
372:I do think the bars
That kept my spirit in are burst - that I
Am sailing with thee through the dizzy sky!
How beautiful thou art! ~ John Keats
373:I would have borne it as I would bear death if fate was in that humour: but I should as soon think of choosing to die as to part from you. ~ John Keats
374:Philosophy will clip an angel's wings, Conquer all mysteries by rule and line, Empty the haunted air, and gnomed mine - Unweave a rainbow. ~ John Keats
375:A poet is the most unpoetical of anything in existence; because he has no identity he is continually informing and filling some other body. ~ John Keats
376:If I am destined to be happy with you here—how short is the longest Life—I wish to believe in immortality—I wish to live with you for ever. ~ John Keats
377:The only means of strengthening one's intellect is to make up one's mind about nothing, to let the mind be a thoroughfare for all thoughts. ~ John Keats
378:A man's life of any worth is a continual allegory, and very few eyes can see the mystery of his life, a life like the scriptures, figurative. ~ John Keats
379:Besides, a long poem is a test of invention, which I take to be the Polar star of Poetry, as Fancy is the sails - and Imagination the rudder. ~ John Keats
380:How could I sleight you? How threaten to leave you? not in the spirit of a Threat to you -- no -- but in the spirit of Wretchedness in myself. ~ John Keats
381:I compare human life to a large mansion of many apartments, two of which I can only describe, the doors of the rest being as yet shut upon me. ~ John Keats
382:On the green of the hill
We will drink our fill
Of golden sunshine,
Till our brains intertwine
With the glory and grace of Apollo! ~ John Keats
383:Though a quarrel in the streets is a thing to be hated, the energies displayed in it are fine; the commonest man shows a grace in his quarrel. ~ John Keats
384:To the very last, he [Napoleon] had a kind of idea; that, namely, of la carrière ouverte aux talents, - the tools to him that can handle them. ~ John Keats
385:Tis "the witching time of night", / Orbed is the moon and bright, / And the stars they glisten, glisten, / Seeming with bright eyes to listen — ~ John Keats
386:The only means of strengthening one's intellect is to make up one's mind
about nothing -- to let the mind be a thoroughfare for all thoughts. ~ John Keats
387:I love your hills and I love your dales, And I love your flocks a-bleating; but oh, on the heather to lie together, With both our hearts a-beating! ~ John Keats
388:Philosophy will clip an Angel’s wings,
Conquer all mysteries by rule and line,
Empty the haunted air, and gnomed mine —
Unweave a rainbow, ~ John Keats
389:Poetry should be great and unobtrusive, a thing which enters into one's soul, and does not startle it or amaze it with itself, but with its subject. ~ John Keats
390:I have two luxuries to brood over in my walks, your loveliness and the hour of my death. O that I could have possession of them both in the same minute. ~ John Keats
391:All my clear-eyed fish, Golden, or rainbow-sided, or purplish, Vermilion-tail'd, or finn'd with silvery gauze... My charming rod, my potent river spells. ~ John Keats
392:Feeling well that breathed words Would all be lost, unheard, and vain as swords Against the enchased crocodile, or leaps Of grasshoppers against the sun. ~ John Keats
393:To Sorrow I bade good-morrow, And thought to leave her far away behind; But cheerly, cheerly, She loves me dearly: She is so constant to me, and so kind. ~ John Keats
394:           "Under the flag
Of each his faction, they to battle bring
Their embryo atoms." ~ John Keats, Fragment. Welcome Joy, And Welcome Sorrow

395:You speak of Lord Byron and me; there is this great difference between us. He describes what he sees I describe what I imagine. Mine is the hardest task. ~ John Keats
396:I will give you a definition of a proud man: he is a man who has neither vanity nor wisdom one filled with hatreds cannot be vain, neither can he be wise. ~ John Keats
397:My restless spirit never could endure
To brood so long upon one luxury,
Unless it did, though fearfully espy
A hope beyond the shadow of a dream. ~ John Keats
398:The excellence of every art is its intensity, capable of making all disagreeables evaporate, from their being in close relationship with beauty and truth. ~ John Keats
399:Then Lamia breath’d death breath; the sophist’s eye,
Like a sharp spear, went through her utterly, 300
Keen, cruel, perceant, stinging: she, as well ~ John Keats
400:An extensive knowledge is needful to thinking people-it takes away the heat and fever; and helps, by widening speculation, to ease the burden of the mystery. ~ John Keats
401:Then sang forth the Nine,
Apollo’s garland:–yet didst thou divine
Such home-bred glory, that they cry’d in vain,
“Come hither, Sister of the Island! ~ John Keats
402:O fret not after knowledge - I have none, and yet my song comes native with the warmth. O fret not after knowledge - I have none, and yet the Evening listens. ~ John Keats
403:I should write for the mere yearning and fondness I have for the beautiful, even if my night's labors should be burnt every morning and no eye shine upon them. ~ John Keats
404:It can be said of him, when he departed he took a Man's life with him. No sounder piece of British manhood was put together in that eighteenth century of Time. ~ John Keats
405:To feel forever its soft fall and swell, Awake for ever in a sweet unrest, Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath, And so live ever-or else swoon in death. ~ John Keats
406:No stir of air was there, Not so much life as on a summer's day Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass, But where the dead leaf fell, there did it rest. ~ John Keats
407:Ay, on the shores of darkness there is a light, and precipices show untrodden green; there is a budding morrow in midnight; there is triple sight in blindness keen. ~ John Keats
408:No, no, I'm sure, My restless spirit never could endure To brood so long upon one luxury, Unless it did, though fearfully, espy A hope beyond the shadow of a dream. ~ John Keats
409:To one who has been long in city pent, ’Tis very sweet to look into the fair And open face of heaven, — to breathe a prayer Full in the smile of the blue firmament. ~ John Keats
410:There's a blush for won't, and a blush for shan't, and a blush for having done it: There's a blush for thought and a blush for naught, and a blush for just begun it. ~ John Keats
411:There was an awful rainbow once in heaven: We know her woof, her texture; she is given In the dull catalogue of common things. Philosophy will clip an angel's wings. ~ John Keats
412:I find that I can have no enjoyment in the World but continual drinking of Knowledge - I find there is no worthy pursuit but the idea of doing some good for the world ~ John Keats
413:Poetry should surprise by a fine excess and not by singularity, it should strike the reader as a wording of his own highest thoughts, and appear almost a remembrance. ~ John Keats
414:... the open sky sits upon our senses like a sapphire crown - the Air is our robe of state - the Earth is our throne, and the Sea a mighty minstrel playing before it. ~ John Keats
415:I almost wish we were butterflies and liv'd but three summer days - three such days with you I could fill with more delight than fifty common years could ever contain. ~ John Keats
416:Thou wast not born for death, immortal bird! No hungry generations tread thee down; The voice I hear this passing night was heard In ancient days by emperor and clown. ~ John Keats
417:As marble was there lavish, to the vast
Of one fair palace, that far far surpass’d,
Even for common bulk, those olden three,
Memphis, and Babylon, and Nineveh. ~ John Keats
418:The poetry of earth is never dead When all the birds are faint with the hot sun, And hide I cooling trees, a voice will run From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead. ~ John Keats
419:To Sorrow
I bade good morrow,
And thought to leave her far away behind;
But cheerly, cheerly,
She loves me dearly;
She is so constant to me, and so kind. ~ John Keats
420:I wish you could invent some means to make me at all happy without you. Every hour I am more and more concentrated in you; everything else tastes like chaff in my mouth. ~ John Keats
421:I find that I can have no enjoyment in the world but the continual drinking of knowledge. I find there is no worthy pursuit but the idea of doing some good for the world. ~ John Keats
422:When I behold, upon the night's starr'd face, Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance, And think that I may never live to trace Their shadows, with the magic hand of chance. ~ John Keats
423:She dwells with Beauty--Beauty that must die: And Joy, whose hand is ever at his lips, bidding Adieu; and aching Pleasure nigh, Turning to poison while the bee mouths sips: ~ John Keats
424:The uttered part of a man's life, let us always repeat, bears to the unuttered, unconscious part a small unknown proportion. He himself never knows it, much less do others. ~ John Keats
425:Bright star, would I were steadfast as thou art-- Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night And watching, with eternal lids apart, Like nature's patient, sleepless Eremite. ~ John Keats
426:I had a dove and the sweet dove died; And I have thought it died of grieving: O, what could it grieve for? Its feet were tied, With a silken thread of my own hands' weaving. ~ John Keats
427:In the long vista of the years to roll,\\ Let me not see my country's honor fade;\\ Oh! let me see our land retain its soul!\\ Her pride in Freedom, and not Freedom's shade. ~ John Keats
428:To one who has been long in city pent,
’Tis very sweet to look into the fair
And open face of heaven,—to breathe a prayer
Full in the smile of the blue firmament. ~ John Keats
429:Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear'd, Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone. ~ John Keats
430:Here are sweet peas, on tiptoe for a flight; With wings of gentle flush o'er delicate white, And taper fingers catching at all things, To bind them all about with tiny rings. ~ John Keats
431:No sooner had I stepp'd into these pleasures Than I began to think of rhymes and measures: The air that floated by me seem'd to say 'Write! thou wilt never have a better day. ~ John Keats
432:There’s a blush for won’t, and a blush for shan’t,
And a blush for having done it:
There’s a blush for thought and a blush for naught,
And a blush for just begun it. ~ John Keats
433:I think poetry should surprise by a fine excess, and not by singularity; it should strike the reader as a wording of his own highest thoughts, and appear almost a remembrance. ~ John Keats
434:Darkling I listen; and, for many a time
I have been half in love with easeful Death,
Call'd him soft names in many a musèd rhyme,
To take into the air my quiet breath. ~ John Keats
435:I shall soon be laid in the quiet grave--thank God for the quiet grave--O! I can feel the cold earth upon me--the daisies growing over me--O for this quiet--it will be my first. ~ John Keats
436:Young playmates of the rose and daffodil, Be careful ere ye enter in, to fill Your baskets high With fennel green, and balm, and golden pines Savory latter-mint, and columbines. ~ John Keats
437:... for, by all the stars That tend thy bidding, I do think the bars That kept my spirit in are burst - that I Am sailing with thee through the dizzy sky! How beautiful thou art! ~ John Keats
438:Are there not thousands in the world who love their fellows even to the death, who feel the giant agony of the world, and more, like slaves to poor humanity, labor for mortal good? ~ John Keats
439:Do you not see how necessary a World of Pains and troubles is to school an Intelligence and make it a soul? A place where the heart must feel and suffer in a thousand diverse ways! ~ John Keats
440:Bright star, would I were steadfast as thou art--
Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night
And watching, with eternal lids apart,
Like nature's patient, sleepless Eremite. ~ John Keats
441:If you want to study writing, read Dickens. That's how to study writing, or Faulkner, or D.H. Lawrence, or John Keats. They can teach you everything you need to know about writing. ~ Shelby Foote
442:Can death be sleep, when life is but a dream,
And scenes of bliss pass as a phantom by?
The transient pleasures as a vision seem,
And yet we think the greatest pain's to die. ~ John Keats
443:Let me write not for fame and laurel, but from the mere yearning and fondness I have for the beautiful even if my night's labors be burnt each morning and no eye ever shine upon them. ~ John Keats
444:No sooner had I stepp'd into these pleasures
Than I began to think of rhymes and measures:
The air that floated by me seem'd to say
'Write! thou wilt never have a better day. ~ John Keats
445:The opinion I have of the generality of women--who appear to me as children to whom I would rather give a sugar plum than my time, forms a barrier against matrimony which I rejoice in. ~ John Keats
446:I had a dove and the sweet dove died;
And I have thought it died of grieving:
O, what could it grieve for? Its feet were tied,
With a silken thread of my own hand's weaving. ~ John Keats
447:Faded the flower and all its budded charms,Faded the sight of beauty from my eyes,Faded the shape of beauty from my arms,Faded the voice, warmth, whiteness, paradise!Vanishd unseasonably ~ John Keats
448:I have had a thousand kisses, for which with my whole soul I thank love—but if you should deny me the thousand and first—‘t would put me to the proof how great a misery I could live through. ~ John Keats
449:My spirit is too weak--mortality Weighs heavily on me like unwilling sleep, And each imagin'd pinnacle and steep Of godlike hardship tells me I must die Like a sick Eagle looking at the sky. ~ John Keats
450:No estoy seguro de nada excepto de la santidad del afecto del Corazón y la verdad de la Imaginación. Aquello que la imaginación capta como Belleza ha de ser verdad, haya existido antes o no. ~ John Keats
451:The genius of poetry must work out its own salvation in a man; it cannot be matured by law and precept, but by sensation and watchfulness in itself. That which is creative must create itself. ~ John Keats
452:As the Swiss inscription says: Sprechen ist silbern, Schweigen ist golden,- "Speech is silvern, Silence is golden;" or, as I might rather express it, Speech is of Time, Silence is of Eternity. ~ John Keats
453:I left poor Scylla in a niche and fled.
My fever’d parchings up, my scathing dread
Met palsy half way: soon these limbs became 640
Gaunt, wither’d, sapless, feeble, cramp’d, and lame. ~ John Keats
454:Dance and Provencal song and sunburnt mirth! On for a beaker full of the warm South, Full of the true, the blushful Hippocrene! With beaded bubbles winking at the brim, And purple-stained mouth. ~ John Keats
455:Give me women, wine, and snuff
Until I cry out 'hold, enough!'
You may do so sans objection
Till the day of resurrection;
For bless my beard thy aye shall be
My beloved Trinity. ~ John Keats
456:I have had a thousand kisses, for which with my whole soul I thank love -- but if you should deny me the thousand and first -- 'twould put me to the proof how great a misery I could live through. ~ John Keats
457:Into the wide stream came of purple hue–
’Twas Bacchus and his crew!
The earnest trumpet spake, and silver thrills
From kissing cymbals made a merry din– 200
’Twas Bacchus and his kin! ~ John Keats
458:Wherein lies happiness? In that which becks Our ready minds to fellowship divine, A fellowship with essence; till we shine, Full alchemiz’d, and free of space. Behold The clear religion of heaven! ~ John Keats
459:We have oftener than once endeavoured to attach some meaning to that aphorism, vulgarly imputed to Shaftesbury, which however we can find nowhere in his works, that "ridicule is the test of truth." ~ John Keats
460:What occasions the greater part of the world's quarrels? Simply this: Two minds meet and do not understand each other in time enough to prevent any shock of surprise at the conduct of either party. ~ John Keats
461:Closer of lovely eyes to lovely dreams, Lover of loneliness, and wandering, Of upcast eye, and tender pondering! Thee must I praise above all other glories That smile us on to tell delightful stories. ~ John Keats
462:~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
~ Burton's 'Anatomy of Melancholy.' Part 3. Sect. 2. Memb. 1. Subs. 1.

463:The roaring of the wind is my wife and the stars through the window pane are my children. The mighty abstract idea I have of beauty in all things stifles the more divided and minute domestic happiness. ~ John Keats
464:for anon, 640
I felt upmounted in that region
Where falling stars dart their artillery forth,
And eagles struggle with the buffeting north
That balances the heavy meteor-stone;–
Felt too, ~ John Keats
465:How sad it is when a luxurious imagination is obliged in self defense to deaden its delicacy in vulgarity, and riot in things attainable that it may not have leisure to go mad after things that are not. ~ John Keats
466:My spirit is too weak--mortality
Weighs heavily on me like unwilling sleep,
And each imagin'd pinnacle and steep
Of godlike hardship tells me I must die
Like a sick Eagle looking at the sky. ~ John Keats
467:When the melancholy fit shall fall Sudden from heaven like a weeping cloud, That fosters the droop-headed flowers all, And hides the green hill in an April shroud; Then glut thy sorrow on a morning rose. ~ John Keats
468:... Who alive can say 'Thou art no Poet - mayst not tell thy dreams'? Since every man whose soul is not a clod Hath visions, and would speak, if he had loved, And been well nurtured in his mother tongue. ~ John Keats
469:Through the sad heart of Ruth, when sick for home She stood in tears amid the alien corn; The same that ofttimes hath Charm'd magic casements, opening on the foam Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn. ~ John Keats
470:...how sad is it when a luxurious imagination is obliged in self defense to deaden its delicacy in vulgarity, and riot in things attainable that it may not have leisure to go mad after things which are not. ~ John Keats
471:A thing of beauty is a joy for ever: Its loveliness increases; it will never Pass into nothingness; but still will keep A bower quiet for us, and a sleep Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing. ~ John Keats
472:Deep in the shady sadness of a vale Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn, Far from the fiery noon and eve's one star, Sat gray-haired Saturn, quiet as a stone, Still as the silence round about his lair. ~ John Keats
473:Wherein lies happiness? In that which becks
Our ready minds to fellowship divine,
A fellowship with essence; till we shine,
Full alchemiz’d, and free of space. Behold
The clear religion of heaven! ~ John Keats
474:I have been
Presumptuous against love, against the sky,
Against all elements, against the tie
Of mortals each to each, against the blooms
Of flowers, rush of rivers, and the tombs
Of heroes gone. ~ John Keats
475:In a drear-nighted December, Too happy, happy brook, Thy bubblings ne'er remember Apollo's summer look; But with a sweet forgetting, They stay their crystal fretting, Never, never petting About the frozen time. ~ John Keats
476:I never felt my Mind repose upon anything with complete and undistracted enjoyment - upon no person but you. When you are in the room my thoughts never fly out of window: you always concentrate my whole senses. ~ John Keats
477:We must repeat the often repeated saying, that it is unworthy a religious man to view an irreligious one either with alarm or aversion, or with any other feeling than regret and hope and brotherly commiseration. ~ John Keats
478:Away, ye horrid moods!
Moods of one’s mind! You know I hate them well.
You know I’d sooner be a clapping bell
To some Kamtschatcan missionary church,
Than with these horrid moods be left i’ the lurch. ~ John Keats
479:Closer of lovely eyes to lovely dreams,
Lover of loneliness, and wandering,
Of upcast eye, and tender pondering!
Thee must I praise above all other glories
That smile us on to tell delightful stories. ~ John Keats
480:Philosophy will clip an Angel's wings,
Conquer all mysteries by rule and line,
Empty the haunted air, and gnomèd mine—
Unweave a rainbow, as it erewhile made
The tender-person'd Lamia melt into a shade ~ John Keats
481:Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
While yet our England was a wolfish den; ~ John Keats
482:Let us away, my love, with happy speed; There are no ears to hear, or eyes to see, - Drown'd all in Rhenish and the sleepy mead. Awake! arise! my love and fearless be, For o'er the southern moors I have a home for thee. ~ John Keats
483:sidelong fix’d her eye on Saturn’s face:
There saw she direst strife; the supreme God
At war with all the frailty of grief,
Of rage, of fear, anxiety, revenge,
Remorse, spleen, hope, but most of all despair. ~ John Keats
484:I cannot exist without you - I am forgetful of every thing but seeing you again - my Life seems to stop there - I see no further. You have absorb'd me. I have a sensation at the present moment as though I was dissolving. ~ John Keats
485:If I should die, I have left no immortal work behind me — nothing to make my friends proud of my memory — but I have loved the principle of beauty in all things, and if I had had time I would have made myself remembered. ~ John Keats
486:Pillow'd upon my fair love's ripening breast,
To feel for ever its soft swell and fall,
Awake for ever in a sweet unrest,
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath,
And so live ever-or else swoon to death. ~ John Keats
487:When old age shall this generation waste, Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st, "Beauty is truth, truth beauty," - that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know. ~ John Keats
488:There is an old saying "well begun is half done" - 'tis a bad one. I would use instead, "Not begun at all till half done;" so according to that I have not begun my Poem and consequently (a priori) can say nothing about it. ~ John Keats
489:When by my solitary hearth I sit,
When no fair dreams before my “mind’s eye” flit,
And the bare heath of life presents no bloom;
Sweet Hope, ethereal balm upon me shed,
And wave thy silver pinions o’er my head. ~ John Keats
490:A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:
Its loveliness increases; it will never
Pass into nothingness; but still will keep
A bower quiet for us, and a sleep
Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing. ~ John Keats
491:In the fam’d memoirs of a thousand years,
Written by Crafticant, and published
By Parpaglion and Co., (those sly compeers
Who rak’d up ev’ry fact against the dead,)
In Scarab Street, Panthea, at the Jubal’s Head. ~ John Keats
492:When shall we pass a day alone? I have had a thousand kisses, for which with my whole soul I thank love - but if you should deny me the thousand and first - 'twould put me to the proof how great a misery I could live through. ~ John Keats
493:There is an electric fire in human nature tending to purify - so that among these human creatures there is continually some birth of heroism. The pity is that we must wonder at it, as we should at finding a pearl in the rubbish. ~ John Keats
494:There is an electric fire in human nature tending to purify - so that among these human creatures there is continually some birth of new heroism. The pity is that we must wonder at it, as we should at finding a pearl in rubbish. ~ John Keats
495:...I leaped headlong into the Sea, and thereby have become more acquainted with the Soundings, the quicksands, and the rocks, than if I had stayed upon the green shore, and piped a silly pipe, and took tea and comfortable advice. ~ John Keats
496:As I lay in my bed slepe full unmete
Was unto me, but why that I ne might
Rest I ne wist, for there n'as erthly wight
[As I suppose] had more of hertis ese
Than I, for I n'ad sicknesse nor disese. ~ John Keats, Sleep And Poetry

497:Let us away, my love, with happy speed;
There are no ears to hear, or eyes to see,
- Drown'd all in Rhenish and the sleepy mead.
Awake! arise! my love and fearless be,
For o'er the southern moors I have a home for thee. ~ John Keats
498:Adieu! adieu! thy plaintive anthem fades Past the near meadows, over the still stream, Up the hill-side; and now 'tis buried deep In the next valley-glades: Was it a vision, or a waking dream? Fled is that music:--do I wake or sleep? ~ John Keats
499:When old age shall this generation waste,
Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe
Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st,
"Beauty is truth, truth beauty," - that is all
Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know. ~ John Keats
500:I wish you could infuse a little confidence of human nature into my heart. I cannot muster any -- the world is too brutal for me -- I am glad there is such a thing as the grave -- I am sure I shall never have any rest till I get there. ~ John Keats

IN CHAPTERS



  119 Poetry
   2 Fiction


  116 John Keats
   2 Percy Bysshe Shelley


  116 Keats - Poems
   2 Shelley - Poems


1.jk - Acrostic - Georgiana Augusta Keats, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - A Draught Of Sunshine, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - An Extempore, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  And of[f] he went run, trot, or anyhow--
  Found at the end of "Nonsense Verses" in Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895.
   by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

1.jk - A Party Of Lovers, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895.
   by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

1.jk - A Prophecy - To George Keats In America, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - A Song About Myself, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Dawlish Fair, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Dedication To Leigh Hunt, Esq., #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  Dedication of his Poems, 1817. 'Keats's first volume, published early in 1817, is a foolscap octavo worked in half sheets. It was issued in drab boards, with a back label Keats's Poems, and consists of a blank leaf, fly-title Poems in heavy black letter, with imprint on verso, ''Printed by C. Richards, No. 18, Warwick Street, Golden Square, London,' title-page given opposite...' etc.
  'Readers of Charles Cowden Clarke's Recollections of Keats,... will remember the statement, still appropriate here, that, ''on the evening when the last proof sheet [of the 1817 volume] was brought from the printer, it was accompanied by the information that if a 'dedication to the book was intended it must be sent forthwith.' Whereupon he withdrew to a side table, and in the buzz of a mixed conversation (for there were several friends in the room) he composed and brought to Charles Ollier, the publisher, the Dedication Sonnet to Leigh Hunt.'' The first of the three Sonnets to Keats in Hunt's Foliage forms a fitting reply to this.' ~ The Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Endymion - Book I, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  (line 347): The reference here is to the passage from the second Book of the Argonautica of Apollonius Rhodius, beginning at verse 674 ... which Shelley had in mind when (Prose Works, Vol. 3, p. 56) he alluded to the Apollo "so finely described by Apollonius Rhodius when the dazzling radiance of his beautiful limbs suddenly shone over the dark Euxine."
  __ note found before the Preface of Endymion, in the Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. ...,
  'In Woodhouse's copy of Endymion there is a note against the passage "so I will begin" &c., line 39, Book I, to the effect that the poem was begun in the spring of 1817 and finished in the winter of 1817-18; and in the title-page he has inserted April before 1818. The statement corresponds with Keats's own record of May 1817, that he was busying himself at Margate with the commencement of Endymion.'

1.jk - Endymion - Book II, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Endymion - Book III, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Epistle To John Hamilton Reynolds, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Extracts From An Opera, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  'First given among the Literary Remains in Volume II of the Life, Letters &c. (1848), and assigned to the year 1818.'
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Faery Songs, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  'These two songs appeared in the Life, Letters &c (1848) among the Literary Remains; and a fac-simile of the manuscript of No. 1 was inserted in the second volume by way of frontispiece.'
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Fragment - Modern Love, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  '"Modern Love" follows "Where's the Poet?" in the group of undated fragments at the end of Volume I of the Life, Letters &c. (1848).'
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Fragment Of An Ode To Maia. Written On May Day 1818, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Fragment Of The Castle Builder, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  'This is the third of the undated fragments at the end of Volume I of the Life, Letters &c. (1848).'
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Fragment. Welcome Joy, And Welcome Sorrow, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  'This is the fourth of the undated fragments at the end of Volume I of the Life, Letters &c. (1848).'
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Fragment. Wheres The Poet?, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  Or his ear like mother-tongue.
  'This is one of a group of undated fragments given at the end of Volume I of the Life, Letters &c. (1848).' ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Hymn To Apollo, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  This also was first given in the Literary Remains in the second volume of the Life, Letters &c. 1848, where it stood next to the Ode To Apollo, though undated. As Lord Houghton retains it between the Ode To Apollo and the stanzas To Hope (dated February 1815) in the chronological Aldine edition, the date February 1815 may be presumed to be that of the Hymn as well as that of the Ode.
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Hyperion. Book I, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895.
  

1.jk - Hyperion. Book III, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Imitation Of Spenser, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  Outviewing all the buds in Flora's diadem.
  'The copy of these stanzas in Tom Keats's copy-book has a reading in line 12 which ought perhas to supersede the printed text of 1817, namely, 'golden scals light.' It seems highly likely that Keats really meant to carry his archaism to the extent of making scales a dissyllable, especially as the metre is thus corrected. Lord Houghton states on the authority of the notes of Charles Armitage Brown, given to his lordship in 1832, that this is the earliest known composition of Keats, and was written while he was living at Edmonton.' ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Isabella; Or, The Pot Of Basil - A Story From Boccaccio, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - I Stood Tip-Toe Upon A Little Hill, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~The Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - La Belle Dame Sans Merci, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Lamia. Part I, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Lamia. Part II, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Lines, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

1.jk - Lines On Seeing A Lock Of Miltons Hair, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  
  ~ Poetical Works of John Keats, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Crowell publ. 1895. by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
  

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun john_keats

The noun john keats has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
                  
1. Keats, John Keats ::: (Englishman and romantic poet (1795-1821))




--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun john_keats

1 sense of john keats                        

Sense 1
Keats, John Keats
   INSTANCE OF=> poet
     => writer, author
       => communicator
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity




--- Hyponyms of noun john_keats
                                    




--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun john_keats

1 sense of john keats                        

Sense 1
Keats, John Keats
   INSTANCE OF=> poet










--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun john_keats

1 sense of john keats                        

Sense 1
Keats, John Keats
  -> poet
   => bard
   => elegist
   => odist
   => poetess
   => poet laureate
   => poet laureate
   => sonneteer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alcaeus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Apollinaire, Guillaume Apollinaire, Wilhelm Apollinaris de Kostrowitzki
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arnold, Matthew Arnold
   HAS INSTANCE=> Arp, Jean Arp, Hans Arp
   HAS INSTANCE=> Auden, W. H. Auden, Wystan Hugh Auden
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baudelaire, Charles Baudelaire, Charles Pierre Baudelaire
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benet, Stephen Vincent Benet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Blake, William Blake
   HAS INSTANCE=> Blok, Alexander Alexandrovich Blok, Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Blok
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boccaccio, Giovanni Boccaccio
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bradstreet, Anne Bradstreet, Anne Dudley Bradstreet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brecht, Bertolt Brecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brooke, Rupert Brooke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Browning, Elizabeth Barrett Browning
   HAS INSTANCE=> Browning, Robert Browning
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burns, Robert Burns
   HAS INSTANCE=> Butler, Samuel Butler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Byron, Lord George Gordon Byron, Sixth Baron Byron of Rochdale
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calderon, Calderon de la Barca, Pedro Calderon de la Barca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carducci, Giosue Carducci
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carew, Thomas Carew
   HAS INSTANCE=> Catullus, Gaius Valerius Catullus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chaucer, Geoffrey Chaucer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ciardi, John Ciardi, John Anthony Ciardi
   HAS INSTANCE=> Coleridge, Samuel Taylor Coleridge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Corneille, Pierre Corneille
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cowper, William Cowper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crane, Hart Crane, Harold Hart Crane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cynewulf, Cynwulf
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dante, Dante Alighieri
   HAS INSTANCE=> de la Mare, Walter de la Mare, Walter John de la Mare
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dickinson, Emily Dickinson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Donne, John Donne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dryden, John Dryden
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, T. S. Eliot, Thomas Stearns Eliot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fitzgerald, Edward Fitzgerald
   HAS INSTANCE=> Frost, Robert Frost, Robert Lee Frost
   HAS INSTANCE=> Garcia Lorca, Frederico Garcia Lorca, Lorca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gilbert, William Gilbert, William S. Gilbert, William Schwenk Gilbert, Sir William Gilbert
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ginsberg, Allen Ginsberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gongora, Luis de Gongora y Argote
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gray, Thomas Gray
   HAS INSTANCE=> Herrick, Robert Herrick
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hesiod
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoffmannsthal, Hugo von Hoffmannsthal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hogg, James Hogg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Homer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hopkins, Gerard Manley Hopkins
   HAS INSTANCE=> Horace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Housman, A. E. Housman, Alfred Edward Housman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hughes, Ted Hughes, Edward James Hughes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hugo, Victor Hugo, Victor-Marie Hugo
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ibsen, Henrik Ibsen, Henrik Johan Ibsen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jarrell, Randall Jarrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jeffers, Robinson Jeffers, John Robinson Jeffers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jimenez, Juan Ramon Jimenez
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jonson, Ben Jonson, Benjamin Jonson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Karlfeldt, Erik Axel Karlfeldt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Keats, John Keats
   HAS INSTANCE=> Key, Francis Scott Key
   HAS INSTANCE=> Klopstock, Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lindsay, Vachel Lindsay, Nicholas Vachel Lindsay
   HAS INSTANCE=> Li Po
   HAS INSTANCE=> Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lovelace, Richard Lovelace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowell, Amy Lowell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowell, Robert Lowell, Robert Traill Spence Lowell Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lucretius, Titus Lucretius Carus
   HAS INSTANCE=> MacLeish, Archibald MacLeish
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mallarme, Stephane Mallarme
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mandelstam, Osip Mandelstam, Osip Emilevich Mandelstam, Mandelshtam
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marini, Giambattista Marini, Marino, Giambattista Marino
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marlowe, Christopher Marlowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marti, Jose Julian Marti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Martial
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marvell, Andrew Marvell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Masefield, John Masefield, John Edward Masefield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Masters, Edgar Lee Masters
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mayakovski, Vladimir Vladimirovich Mayakovski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Meredith, George Meredith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Milton, John Milton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moore, Marianne Moore, Marianne Craig Moore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moore, Thomas Moore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Morris, William Morris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Musset, Alfred de Musset, Louis Charles Alfred de Musset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Neruda, Pablo Neruda, Reyes, Neftali Ricardo Reyes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Noyes, Alfred Noyes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Omar Khayyam
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ovid, Publius Ovidius Naso
   HAS INSTANCE=> Palgrave, Francis Turner Palgrave
   HAS INSTANCE=> Petrarch, Petrarca, Francesco Petrarca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pindar
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plath, Sylvia Plath
   HAS INSTANCE=> Poe, Edgar Allan Poe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pope, Alexander Pope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pound, Ezra Pound, Ezra Loomis Pound
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pushkin, Alexander Pushkin, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Racine, Jean Racine, Jean Baptiste Racine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Riley, James Whitcomb Riley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rilke, Rainer Maria Rilke
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rimbaud, Arthur Rimbaud, Jean Nicholas Arthur Rimbaud
   HAS INSTANCE=> Robinson, Edwin Arlington Robinson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rostand, Edmond Rostand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seeger, Alan Seeger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sexton, Anne Sexton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, Shakspere, William Shakspere, Bard of Avon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shevchenko, Taras Grigoryevich Shevchenko
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sidney, Sir Philip Sidney
   HAS INSTANCE=> Silverstein, Shel Silverstein, Shelby Silverstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sitwell, Dame Edith Sitwell, Dame Edith Louisa Sitwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Southey, Robert Southey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spender, Stephen Spender, Sir Stephen Harold Spender
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spenser, Edmund Spenser
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stevens, Wallace Stevens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Suckling, Sir John Suckling
   HAS INSTANCE=> Swinburne, Algernon Charles Swinburne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Symons, Arthur Symons
   HAS INSTANCE=> Synge, J. M. Synge, John Millington Synge, Edmund John Millington Synge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tasso, Torquato Tasso
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tate, Allen Tate, John Orley Allen Tate
   HAS INSTANCE=> Teasdale, Sara Teasdale
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tennyson, Alfred Tennyson, First Baron Tennyson, Alfred Lord Tennyson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thespis
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thomas, Dylan Thomas, Dylan Marlais Thomas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trumbull, John Trumbull
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tzara, Tristan Tzara, Samuel Rosenstock
   HAS INSTANCE=> Uhland, Johann Ludwig Uhland
   HAS INSTANCE=> Verlaine, Paul Verlaine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Villon, Francois Villon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Virgil, Vergil, Publius Vergilius Maro
   HAS INSTANCE=> Voznesenski, Andrei Voznesenski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Warren, Robert Penn Warren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Watts, Isaac Watts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wheatley, Phillis Wheatley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Whitman, Walt Whitman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Whittier, John Greenleaf Whittier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Williams, William Carlos Williams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wordsworth, William Wordsworth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wyatt, Sir Thomas Wyatt, Wyat, Sir Thomas Wyat
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wylie, Elinor Morton Hoyt Wylie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Yeats, William Butler Yeats, W. B. Yeats
   HAS INSTANCE=> Yevtushenko, Yevgeni Yevtushenko, Yevgeni Aleksandrovich Yevtushenko
   HAS INSTANCE=> Young, Edward Young










--- Grep of noun john_keats
john keats





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Wikipedia - He Yong (rock musician) -- Chinese singer/musician
Wikipedia - Huey Lewis -- Singer-songwriter, rock musician
Wikipedia - Ibrahim Emin -- Azerbaijani rock musician
Wikipedia - I Dont Know How But They Found Me -- American pop/rock musical duo
Wikipedia - Indie Recordings -- Norwegian rock music record label
Wikipedia - Indie rock -- Genre of alternative rock music
Wikipedia - Jagged Little Pill (musical) -- 2018 rock musical
Wikipedia - James Iha -- American rock musician (guitarist, producer, writer, singer)
Wikipedia - Jason White (musician) -- American punk rock musician
Wikipedia - Java Rockin'land -- Indonesian rock music festival
Wikipedia - JD McPherson -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Jeff Lynne -- British rock musician; songwriter, singer, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist
Wikipedia - Jeffrey Davies (guitarist) -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Jesse Valenzuela -- American rock musician and singer
Wikipedia - Jill Birt -- Australian rock musician and architect
Wikipedia - Joan Jett -- American rock musician and actress
Wikipedia - John Bonham -- English rock musician
Wikipedia - John Mellencamp -- American rock musician and painter
Wikipedia - Jo Jo Zep & The Falcons -- Australian blues and rock music band
Wikipedia - Jon Butcher -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - July (band) -- British rock music group
Wikipedia - Kat Bjelland -- American rock musician, born 1963
Wikipedia - Kathryn Calder -- Canadian indie rock musician
Wikipedia - Keith Buckley -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Keith Moon -- English rock musician, drummer of The Who
Wikipedia - Ken Fleming (musician) -- Canadian punk rock musician
Wikipedia - Kenji Ueda -- Japanese rock musician and producer
Wikipedia - Kim Deal -- American alternative rock musician
Wikipedia - Kirk Pengilly -- Australian rock musician, saxophonist and guitarist
Wikipedia - Krist Novoselic -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Larry Mullen Jr. -- Irish rock musician, U2 drummer
Wikipedia - Latin rock -- Term to describe a music subgenre consisting in melting traditional sounds and elements of Latin American and Caribbean folk with rock music
Wikipedia - Lemmy -- British rock musician; singer-songwriter
Wikipedia - List of rock musicals -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - List of years in rock music -- Wikipedia list article
Wikipedia - Little Shop of Horrors (musical) -- 1982 horror comedy rock musical, by composer Alan Menken and writer Howard Ashman
Wikipedia - Marc Bolan -- British rock musician
Wikipedia - Mark Sandman -- Indie-rock musician, lead singer for band Morphine
Wikipedia - Math rock -- Style of rock music
Wikipedia - Maureen Herman -- American rock musician, born 1966
Wikipedia - Max Frost -- American indie rock musician
Wikipedia - Melody Maker -- Historical British weekly pop/rock music newspaper (1926-2000)
Wikipedia - Michael Feuerstack -- Canadian indie rock musician
Wikipedia - Mick Taylor -- British rock musician, former member of The Rolling Stones
Wikipedia - Mike Dirnt -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - MTVX -- Defunct digital cable hard rock music channel
Wikipedia - MusicMight -- Former rock music website
Wikipedia - Nancy Wilson (rock musician) -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - National Socialist black metal -- Genre of rock music promoting Nazism and Satanism
Wikipedia - Nepalese rock -- Rock music of Nepal
Wikipedia - Neue Deutsche HM-CM-$rte -- Subgenre of rock music
Wikipedia - Neurot Recordings -- | American rock music record label
Wikipedia - Nils Lofgren -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Niverville Pop Festival -- Canadian rock music festival
Wikipedia - Noise rock -- Experimental rock music mixed with noise
Wikipedia - Paulo Ricardo Nery -- American rock musician and act
Wikipedia - Peter Frampton -- English rock musician, singer, songwriter, and producer
Wikipedia - Peter Green (musician) -- English blues rock musician (1946-2020)
Wikipedia - Portal:Rock music
Wikipedia - Post-rock -- Subgenre of rock music, often instrumental
Wikipedia - Progressive rock -- Rock music subgenre
Wikipedia - Proto-punk -- Subgenre of rock music
Wikipedia - Psychedelic rock -- Style of rock music
Wikipedia - Punk rock -- Genre of rock music
Wikipedia - Randall Dunn -- United States record engineer and rock musician
Wikipedia - Rent (musical) -- American rock musical, based on La Boheme
Wikipedia - Richard Barone -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Richard Kruspe -- German rock musician
Wikipedia - Rickey Medlocke -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Rising Sun Rock Festival -- Rock music festival in Japan
Wikipedia - Robert DeLeo -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Robyn Hitchcock -- English psychedelic/folk-rock musician, born 1953
Wikipedia - Rock Musical Bleach -- Series of rock musicals
Wikipedia - Rock music in Albania
Wikipedia - Rock music in Puerto Rico -- History of the evolution of rock music in Puerto Rico
Wikipedia - Rock music -- Genre of popular music that originated as "rock and roll" in 1950s US
Wikipedia - Rock My Religion -- Artistic documentary about rock music and religion
Wikipedia - Rock opera -- Work of rock music that presents a storyline told over multiple parts, songs or sections
Wikipedia - Ronnie Bird -- French rock music singer
Wikipedia - Ronnie Wood -- British rock musician, member of The Rolling Stones
Wikipedia - Roots rock -- Genre of rock music
Wikipedia - Rucks Parker -- Salvadorean pop rock music duo
Wikipedia - Rudy Salas (musician) -- American chicano rock musician
Wikipedia - Scott Blasey -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Scott Shiflett -- American rock musician; bassist
Wikipedia - Scott Weinrich -- American rock musician and songwriter
Wikipedia - Season of the Witch: How the Occult Saved Rock and Roll -- Book about the impact of occult on rock music
Wikipedia - Simon Binks -- Australian rock musician
Wikipedia - Simon Bonney -- Australian country rock musician
Wikipedia - Solon Bixler -- American indie rock musician
Wikipedia - Someplace Good -- 2004 rock music song
Wikipedia - Southern rock -- Subgenre of rock music and a genre of Americana
Wikipedia - Spring Awakening (musical) -- Rock musical
Wikipedia - Stacy Jones -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Steve Albini -- American record engineer and rock musician
Wikipedia - Stoner rock -- |Rock music genre
Wikipedia - Sunfest (Gimli, Manitoba) -- Former Canadian rock music festival
Wikipedia - Ted Nugent -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - The Anomoanon -- American rock music group
Wikipedia - The Edge -- Irish rock musician, U2 guitarist
Wikipedia - The Movies (band) -- British pub rock music group
Wikipedia - The New Moon (music venue) -- Former rock music venue in Paris
Wikipedia - The Setters -- Collaborative rock music project
Wikipedia - The Southern Gothic -- American country and rock music group
Wikipedia - The Who's Tommy -- Rock musical
Wikipedia - This Is the Kit -- British folk rock musician
Wikipedia - Tinsley Ellis -- American blues and rock musician
Wikipedia - Tom Blankenship -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Tom DeLonge -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - TrM-CM-) Cool -- Drummer, punk rock musician
Wikipedia - Troy Horne -- American pop/rock musician
Wikipedia - Troy Van Leeuwen -- American rock musician and producer
Wikipedia - Two Gentlemen of Verona (musical) -- 1971 Rock musical
Wikipedia - Van Conner -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Vicki Peterson -- American rock musician and songwriter
Wikipedia - Viktor Tsoi -- Soviet rock musician and actor
Wikipedia - Ville Valo -- Finnish rock musician
Wikipedia - Walter Egan -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Walter Schreifels -- American rock musician
Wikipedia - Whenever You're on My Mind -- 1983 song by American rock musician Marshall Crenshaw
Wikipedia - Wikipedia:WikiProject Rock music/Queens of the Stone Age taskforce -- Sub-project of WikiProject Rock music
Wikipedia - Wikipedia:WikiProject Rock music -- Wikimedia subject-area collaboration
Wikipedia - Wolfgang Niedecken -- German singer, rock musician, and visual artist, known for BAP
Wikipedia - XHMORE-FM -- Spanish-language rock music radio station in Tijuana
Wikipedia - You're My Favorite Waste of Time -- 1982 song by American rock musician Marshall Crenshaw
Wikipedia - Yuri Kasparyan -- Soviet rock musician
Nick Rocks (1982 - 1989) - Nick Rocks is a television show that aired on American cable channel Nickelodeon from 1982 to 1989, which featured pop and rock music videos for 30 minutes. The show's host was identified only as "Joe From Chicago." Nick Rocks occasionally featured guest stars hosting the show, including They Might...
The Little Rascals (Cartoon series) (1982 - 1984) - The series aired originally aired on ABC and was set in the California town of Greenpoint, supposedly in the early-1980s, with references to rock music, computers, television, and push-button traffic controls.
Monster Dog(1985) - This "monster dog" horror story stars Alice Cooper as Vincent, a rock musician. Vincent's troubles first start when he goes to his childhood home to shoot a music video with his girlfriend Sandra (Victoria Vera), who is the director. Soon after arriving several gruesome murders occur, apparently cau...
Woodstock(1970) - A film verison of the famous rock music festival. features jimi hendriz janis joplin the who 3 days of music peace and love
Voyage of the Rock Aliens(1985) - Goofy musical comedy featuring a group of aliens (Rhema) who come to earth in search of rock music. They find it in the strange town of Speelburgh, along with a beautiful wannabe singer (Pia Zadora), her greaser boyfriend (Craig Sheffer) and his pack of cronies (Jimmy and the Mustangs), two escaped...
Rock Music with the Muppets(1985) - In this movie from Playhouse Video, the muppets' well known gold toothed Dr. Teeth of the Electric Mayhem hosts this contemplation of the best rock and roll moments of The Muppet Show (1976-1981). Joining him is Beaker who triggers a couple o
Graffiti Bridge(1990) - Graffiti Bridge is a 1990 American rock musical drama film written by, directed by, and starring Prince in his final film role. It is the sequel to his 1984 film, Purple Rain. Like its predecessor, it was accompanied by a soundtrack album of the sam
Superchick(1973) - Tara B. True is a flight attendant who makes a weekly swing through New York, Miami, and Los Angeles. In each city, she has a man: Edward, older and wealthy; Johnny, a beach bum with gambling debts; and, Davey, a rock musician on the cusp of success. Tara is a free spirit, faithful to each man in he...
It Might Get Loud(2008) - A documentary on the electric guitar from the point of view of three significant rock musicians: The Edge, Jimmy Page and Jack White.
Footloose (1984) ::: 6.6/10 -- PG | 1h 47min | Drama, Music, Romance | 17 February 1984 (USA) -- A city teenager moves to a small town where rock music and dancing have been banned, and his rebellious spirit shakes up the populace. Director: Herbert Ross Writer: Dean Pitchford
The Ed Sullivan Show ::: Toast of the Town (original tit ::: TV-G | 1h | Comedy, Music | TV Series (19481971) -- The classic prime time variety show most famous for its vaudeville acts and rock music performances. Stars:
https://list.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_British_pop_and_rock_musicians_of_the_1940s
https://marsred.fandom.com/wiki/Mars_Red_(Rock_Musical)
https://rock.fandom.com/wiki/Rock_music
https://rock.fandom.com/wiki/Rock_Music_Wiki:About
https://rock.fandom.com/wiki/Rock_Music_Wiki:Community_Portal
https://rock.fandom.com/wiki/The_Rock_Music_Wiki
Listeners -- -- MAPPA -- 12 eps -- Original -- Action Mecha Music Sci-Fi -- Listeners Listeners -- Set in a world where the concept of music ceases to exist. The story begins when a boy encounters Myuu, a mysterious girl who possesses an audio input jack in her body. The two intermingle with the history of rock music and embark on an unforgettable journey. -- -- (Source: MAL News) -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- 51,305 5.37
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Indie_rock_musical_groups_from_California
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Indie_rock_musical_groups_from_New_York_(state)
2009 in rock music
2010 in rock music
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2015 in rock music
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Amen (rock musician)
British rock music
Brother Love (rock musician)
Canadian rock music charts
Chris Wood (rock musician)
Do You Like Rock Music?
Electronics in rock music
George Young (rock musician)
Greg Brown (rock musician)
He Yong (rock musician)
James Ray (rock musician)
Jerry Adler (rock musician)
Jihae (rock musician)
List of 1970s punk rock musicians
List of blues rock musicians
List of hard rock musicians (AM)
List of hard rock musicians (NZ)
List of indie rock musicians
List of Japanese rock music groups
List of Latin American rock musicians
List of rock musicals
List of rock music performers
List of years in rock music
Massive Grooves from the Electric Church of Psychofunkadelic Grungelism Rock Music
Michael Brown (rock musician)
Mike Clark (indie rock musician)
Nancy Wilson (rock musician)
Phil Cunningham (rock musician)
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Rock music
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Rock Musical Bleach
Rock music and the fall of communism
Rock music in Albania
Rock music in Angola
Rock music in Australia
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Rock music in Belgium
Rock music in Bosnia and Herzegovina
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Rock music in Puerto Rico
Rock music in Romania
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Rock music of Canada
Rockville 2069: A Rock Musical
Social effects of rock music
Warren Williams (rock musician)
Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Rock music


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