classes ::: Poetry, author,
children :::
branches ::: Vidyapati
see also :::

Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:Vidyapati
subject class:Poetry
class:author

dob:1352-1448
pob:Bisfi (present day Madhubani Bihar, India)

Wikipedia
Vidyapati (c.1352 1448), also known by the sobriquet Maithil Kavi Kokil (the poet cuckoo of Maithili), was a Maithili and Sanskrit poet, composer, writer, courtier and royal priest.[2] He was a devotee of Shiva, but also wrote love songs and devotional Vaishnava songs.[3] He knew Sanskrit, Prakrit, Apabhramsha, and Maithili.[3]

Vidyapati's influence was not just restricted to Maithili and Sanskrit literature but also extended to other Eastern Indian literary traditions.[2] The language at the time of Vidyapati, the prakrit-derived late Abahattha, had just begun to transition into early versions of the Eastern languages such as Maithili and Bhojpuri. Thus, Vidyapati's influence on making these languages has been described as "analogous to that of Dante in Italy and Chaucer in England".[4] He has been called the "Father of Bengali literature".[4]


questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or
join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1.vpt_-_All_my_inhibition_left_me_in_a_flash
1.vpt_-_As_the_mirror_to_my_hand
1.vpt_-_He_promised_hed_return_tomorrow
1.vpt_-_My_friend,_I_cannot_answer_when_you_ask_me_to_explain
1.vpt_-_The_moon_has_shone_upon_me

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
1.17_-_The_Transformation
18.01_-_Padavali
1.vpt_-_All_my_inhibition_left_me_in_a_flash
1.vpt_-_As_the_mirror_to_my_hand
1.vpt_-_He_promised_hed_return_tomorrow
1.vpt_-_My_friend,_I_cannot_answer_when_you_ask_me_to_explain
1.vpt_-_The_moon_has_shone_upon_me
2.05_-_On_Poetry
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.04_-_Intuition_and_Inspiration_in_Art
30.05_-_Rhythm_in_Poetry
30.12_-_The_Obscene_and_the_Ugly_-_Form_and_Essence
31.01_-_The_Heart_of_Bengal

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
Vidyapati

DEFINITIONS



QUOTES [0 / 0 - 5 / 5]


KEYS (10k)


NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   5 Vidyapati

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:He promised he'd return tomorrow. And I wrote everywhere on my floor: "Tomorrow." The morning broke, when they all asked: Now tell us, when will your "Tomorrow" come? Tomorrow, Tomorrow, where are you? I cried and cried, but my Tomorrow never returned! Vidyapati says: O listen, dear! Your Tomorrow became a today with other women.

~ Vidyapati, He promised hed return tomorrow

2:All my inhibition left me in a flash, When he robbed me of my clothes, But his body became my new dress. Like a bee hovering on a lotus leaf He was there in my night, on me! True, the god of love never hesitates! He is free and determined like a bird Winging toward the clouds it loves. Yet I remember the mad tricks he played, My heart restlessly burning with desire Was yet filled with fear!

~ Vidyapati, All my inhibition left me in a flash

3:As the mirror to my hand, the flowers to my hair, kohl to my eyes, tambul to my mouth, musk to my breast, necklace to my throat, ecstasy to my flesh, heart to my home -- as wing to bird, water to fish, life to the living -- so you to me. But tell me, Madhava, beloved, who are you? Who are you really? Vidyapati says, they are one another. [2203.jpg] -- from In Praise of Krishna: Songs from the Bengali, Translated by Edward C. Dimock, Jr. / Translated by Denise Levertov

~ Vidyapati, As the mirror to my hand

4:The moon has shone upon me, the face of my beloved. O night of joy! Joy permeates all things. My life: joy, my youth: fulfillment. Today my house is again home, today my body is my body. The god of destiny smiled on me. No more doubt. Let the nightingales sing, then, let there be myriad rising moons, let Kama's five arrows become five thousand and the south wind softly, softly blow: for now my body has meaning in the presence of my beloved Vidyapati says, Your luck is great; may this return of love be blessed. [2203.jpg] -- from In Praise of Krishna: Songs from the Bengali, Translated by Edward C. Dimock, Jr. / Translated by Denise Levertov

~ Vidyapati, The moon has shone upon me

5:My friend, I cannot answer when you ask me to explain what has befallen me. Love is transformed, renewed, each moment. He has dwelt in my eyes all the days of my life, yet I am not sated with seeing. My ears have heard his sweet voice in eternity, and yet it is always new to them. How many honeyed nights have I passed with him in love's bliss, yet my body wonders at his. Through all the ages he has been clasped to my breast, yet my desire never abates. I have seen subtle people sunk in passion but none came so close to the heart of the fire. Who shall be found to cool your heart, says Vidyapati. [2203.jpg] -- from In Praise of Krishna: Songs from the Bengali, Translated by Edward C. Dimock, Jr. / Translated by Denise Levertov

~ Vidyapati, My friend, I cannot answer when you ask me to explain


IN CHAPTERS



   8 Integral Yoga
   4 Poetry


   6 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   4 Vidyapati


   5 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07


1.17 - The Transformation, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  Vikramorvasie, 1903-1904 (Baroda) 1st ed. 1911
  Songs of Vidyapati, 1893-1905 (Baroda) 1st ed. 1956
  Rodogune, 1893-1905 (Baroda) 1st ed. 1958

18.01 - Padavali, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
  
   Vidyapati in dread of the last summons, cries:
   There is no way out for me but Thee alone.
  --
  
   Vidyapati
  
  --
   but none has spotted it anywhere!
   Vidyapati says, of the soul's satisfaction
   not even one in a million possessed it.
  
   Vidyapati
  
  --
   the lightnings never rest in their leng thening chains.
   Vidyapati says how shall you without the divine comrade
   pass your days and nights!
  
   Vidyapati
  

1.vpt - As the mirror to my hand, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
   English version by Edward C. Dimock, Jr. and Denise Levertov Original Language Maithili As the mirror to my hand, the flowers to my hair, kohl to my eyes, tambul to my mouth, musk to my breast, necklace to my throat, ecstasy to my flesh, heart to my home -- as wing to bird, water to fish, life to the living -- so you to me. But tell me, Madhava, beloved, who are you? Who are you really? Vidyapati says, they are one another. [2203.jpg] -- from In Praise of Krishna: Songs from the Bengali, Translated by Edward C. Dimock, Jr. / Translated by Denise Levertov <   

1.vpt - He promised hed return tomorrow, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
   English version by Azfar Hussain Original Language Maithili He promised he'd return tomorrow. And I wrote everywhere on my floor: "Tomorrow." The morning broke, when they all asked: Now tell us, when will your "Tomorrow" come? Tomorrow, Tomorrow, where are you? I cried and cried, but my Tomorrow never returned! Vidyapati says: O listen, dear! Your Tomorrow became a today with other women. <   

1.vpt - My friend, I cannot answer when you ask me to explain, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
   English version by Edward C. Dimock, Jr. and Denise Levertov Original Language Maithili My friend, I cannot answer when you ask me to explain what has befallen me. Love is transformed, renewed, each moment. He has dwelt in my eyes all the days of my life, yet I am not sated with seeing. My ears have heard his sweet voice in eternity, and yet it is always new to them. How many honeyed nights have I passed with him in love's bliss, yet my body wonders at his. Through all the ages he has been clasped to my breast, yet my desire never abates. I have seen subtle people sunk in passion but none came so close to the heart of the fire. Who shall be found to cool your heart, says Vidyapati. [2203.jpg] -- from In Praise of Krishna: Songs from the Bengali, Translated by Edward C. Dimock, Jr. / Translated by Denise Levertov <   

1.vpt - The moon has shone upon me, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
   English version by Edward C. Dimock, Jr. and Denise Levertov Original Language Maithili The moon has shone upon me, the face of my beloved. O night of joy! Joy permeates all things. My life: joy, my youth: fulfillment. Today my house is again home, today my body is my body. The god of destiny smiled on me. No more doubt. Let the nightingales sing, then, let there be myriad rising moons, let Kama's five arrows become five thousand and the south wind softly, softly blow: for now my body has meaning in the presence of my beloved Vidyapati says, Your luck is great; may this return of love be blessed. [2203.jpg] -- from In Praise of Krishna: Songs from the Bengali, Translated by Edward C. Dimock, Jr. / Translated by Denise Levertov <   

2.05 - On Poetry, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Zen
  
   Disciple: Can you give an instance of psychic poetry? Is there a psychic element in Vidyapati?
  

30.01 - World-Literature, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
  
   In our Bengali literature Vidyapati and Chandidas are the pioneer poets who made an attempt at creating genuine poetry surpassing all plebeian poetry. They had infused the popular literature with a new spirit, and thus formed a basis for real poetic utterance. The joy we derive from the songs of Vidyapati and Chandidas can be called the real poetic pleasure. For example,
  
  --
  
   It is said that Valmiki is the pioneer poet in Sanskrit literature. In our Bengali literature it is Vidyapati, nay, to be more precise and accurate, it is Chandidas who is the father of poetry. He raised the natural vital experiences to the level of the psychic. He has transformed even colloquial expressions into a deeper rhythm and flow. But even theirs was only the initial stage that required a long time to develop fullness and maturity. In truth, this is the third stage we have already referred to. Throughout the era of the Vaishnava poets, coming down to the time of Bharat Chandra the same line of sadhana, of spiritual practice, continued. The Bengali poets who flourished after Chandidas have hardly made any new contri bution, they have not unveiled another layer of the soul of the poetic genius of Bengali literature. What they have done amounts to an external refinement and orderliness. The literature of this age has tried to transcend the ordinary thoughts, i.e.,the manner of ordinary thinking, and has considerably succeeded too; still the presence of imperfection, the signs of a lower flight loom large there. We do not find there - in the words of Matthew Arnold - 'a humanity variously and fully developed' or a multifarious free scope of the universal life such as we have already mentioned.
  

30.04 - Intuition and Inspiration in Art, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
  
   Now, in the creation nothing can remain itself and unaltered for good. Difference and polarity are the inviolable laws of nature. Therefore it is not that we do not find glimpses of pure intuition here and there among the Bengalees. Chandidas, the pioneer poet of Bengal, represents an unalloyed, pure inspiration and Vidyapati reflects glimpses of intuition. When a feeling of emotion tingled through the blood of Chandidas he turned deep within and sang to himself with his eyes closed, in trance as it were:
  
  --
  
   On the other hand, the self-poised Vidyapati with his eyes wide open sang:
  

30.05 - Rhythm in Poetry, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
  
   It is this quality of sweetness that has made the fame of Bengali language and literature, from Vidyapati and Chandidas right down to Rabindranath. But the possibilities of this language and literature, not only for sweetness or grace but also for strength and nobility have been brought out by Madhusudan. He has not the power and depth of thought, but there is in his style and manner something reminiscent of that "stepping of the goddess" in Virgil. One hears as if the rumbling of the clouds in the opening lines of Meghnadbadh:
  

30.12 - The Obscene and the Ugly - Form and Essence, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
  
   Kalidasa has excelled in depicting the beauties of form. Shakespeare sought not beauty but the wide surge of vital truths. Petrarch abounds in the beauty of form. He created more and yet more beauty of form. But Dante is to be appreciated rather through the poetic truths that stood out as unmoving rocks, the tremendous energy petrified as it were in the form. Our Indian poet Vidyapati was mad after the beauty of form. He expressed the pangs of his heart thus:
  

31.01 - The Heart of Bengal, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
  
   The nervous system of the Bengalis is not very strong, but it is very sharp. Their vital energy is not solid, but it is pliant. Prompt are they in their actions, but not persevering. They have a subtle sensitivity and a quick sensibility. In addition, they are sentimental and emotional; and consequently, they are thoughtful and imaginative. They are unsteady; therefore they are ever open to the new. They do not want to see the world as it is with calm and plain eyes; they would like to see the world coloured with the collyrium of their heart. They are swayed to and fro by the impulse of their heart, like a pendulum. No others can make the impulses of the heart intense and one-pointed to such a high degree. Chandidas was a typical Bengali poet. Judging from this point of view, Vidyapati does not seem to be a Bengali poet at all. In him we find a play of intellect and reasoning, an attitude of casting side glances, and an alertness. But Chandidas was self-oblivious and beside himself with poetic imagination.
  
  --
  
   Vidyapati, also breathing the atmosphere of Bengal, as it were, queried, "Do you ask me about my own experience?" It is the experience of the heart that has mobilized, glorified and widened all other faculties of the Bengalis. .
  

WORDNET


































IN WEBGEN [10000/1]

Wikipedia - Human sacrifice -- Killing one or more humans, usually as an offering to a deity, as part of a ritual


change font "color":
change "background-color":
change "font-family":
change "padding":
change "table font size":
last updated: 2021-08-18 18:36:54
376879 site hits