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George Eliot

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Main works: Psychol.-ethische Untersuch. z. Werttheorie, 1894; Ueber Annahmen, 1907; Ueber d. Stellung d. Gegenstandstheorie im Syst. d. Wissensch., 1907; Ueber Möglichkeit u. Wahrscheinlichkeit, 1915. Cf. Gesammelte Abh. 3 vols., 1914. Meliorism: (Lat. melior, better) View that the world is neither completely evil nor completely good, but that the relative amounts of good and evil are changeable, that good is capable of increase. Human effort to improve the world can be effective in making the world better and probably the trend of biological and social evolution tends in that direction. Opposed to Optimism and Pessimism. The term was coined by George Eliot. -- A.J.B.



QUOTES [11 / 11 - 1500 / 2357]


KEYS (10k)

   9 George Eliot
   1 George Eliot
   1 A N Wilson

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

1492 George Eliot

1:You are never too old to be what you might have been. ~ George Eliot,
2:The reward of one duty is the power to fulfill another. ~ George Eliot,
3:subtle impressions for which words are quite too coarse a medium. ~ George Eliot,
4:What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult to each other? ~ George Eliot,
5:Animals are such agreeable friends - they ask no questions; they pass no criticisms." ~ George Eliot,
6:Delicious autumn! My very soul is wedded to it, and if I were a bird I would fly about the earth seeking the successive autumns. ~ George Eliot,
7:Human feeling is like the mighty rivers that bless the earth: it does not wait for beauty ~ it flows with resistless force and brings beauty with it. ~ George Eliot,
8:It is well known to all experienced minds that our firmest convictions are often dependent on subtle impressions for which words are quite too coarse a medium. ~ George Eliot,
9:The growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs. ~ George Eliot,
10:O may I join the choir invisible of those immortal dead who live again in minds made better by their presence; live in pulses stirred to generosity, in deeds of daring rectitude, in scorn for miserable aims that end with self, in thoughts sublime that pierce the night like stars, and with their mild persistence urge men's search to vaster issues. ~ George Eliot,
11:John Ruskin did not go to school. Nor did Queen Victoria, nor John Stuart Mill, George Eliot or Harriet Martineau. It would be absurd to suggest that Disraeli, Dickens, Newman or Darwin, to name four very different figures, who attended various schools for short spells in their boyhood, owed very much to their schooling. Had they been born in a later generation, school would have loomed much larger in their psychological stories, if only because they would have spent so much longer there, and found themselves preparing for public examinations. It is hard not to feel that a strong 'syllabus', or a school ethos, might have cramped the style of all four and that in their different ways - Disraeli, comparatively rich, anarchically foppish, indiscriminately bookish; Darwin, considered a dunce, but clearly - as he excitedly learned to shoot, to fish and to bird-watch - beginning his revolutionary relationship with the natural world; Newman, imagining himself an angel; Dickens, escaping the ignominy of his circumstances through theatrical and comedic internalized role-play - they were lucky to have been born before the Age of Control. For the well-meaning educational reforms of the 1860s were the ultimate extension of those Benthamite exercises in control which had begun in the 1820s and 1830s. Having exercised their sway over the poor, the criminals, the agricultural and industrial classes, the civil service and - this was next - the military, the controllers had turned to the last free spirits left, the last potential anarchists: the children. ~ A N Wilson,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:There's life for you. Spend the best years of your life studying penmanship and rhetoric and syntax and Beowulf and George Eliot, and then somebody steals your pencil. ~ dorothy-parker, @wisdomtrove
2:Without those forerunners, Jane Austen and the Brontes and George Eliot could no more have written than Shakespeare could have written without Marlowe, or Marlowe without Chaucer, or Chaucer without those forgotten poets who paved the ways and tamed the natural savagery of the tongue. For masterpieces are not single and solitary births; they are the outcome of many years of thinking in common, of thinking by the body of the people, so that the experience of the mass is behind the single voice. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Some can be happy. ~ George Eliot,
2:i am always bored". ~ George Eliot,
3:The worst of misery ~ George Eliot,
4:Modesty, not temper. ~ George Eliot,
5:Love once, love always ~ George Eliot,
6:Trouble's made us kin. ~ George Eliot,
7:History repeats itself. ~ George Eliot,
8:Joy is the best of wine. ~ George Eliot,
9:Brothers are so unpleasant. ~ George Eliot,
10:Consequences are unpitying. ~ George Eliot,
11:Hopes have precarious life. ~ George Eliot,
12:Kisses honeyed by oblivion. ~ George Eliot,
13:Women know no perfect love: ~ George Eliot,
14:Man cannot choose his duties. ~ George Eliot,
15:Who knows that about anybody? ~ George Eliot,
16:least said, soonest mended. We ~ George Eliot,
17:Those who trust us educate us. ~ George Eliot,
18:A good horse makes short miles. ~ George Eliot,
19:A good solid bit of work lasts. ~ George Eliot,
20:Breed is stronger than pasture. ~ George Eliot,
21:Consequences are unpitying. Our ~ George Eliot,
22:Don't judge a book by its cover ~ George Eliot,
23:It's puzzling work, talking is. ~ George Eliot,
24:Sometimes it upset her gravity. ~ George Eliot,
25:Don't judge a book by its cover. ~ George Eliot,
26:They the royal-hearted women are ~ George Eliot,
27:Blows are sarcasms turned stupid. ~ George Eliot,
28:Our finest hope is finest memory. ~ George Eliot,
29:We cannot reform our forefathers. ~ George Eliot,
30:Go forward with joyful confidence. ~ George Eliot,
31:I don't mind [being ugly], do you? ~ George Eliot,
32:Love supreme defies all sophistry. ~ George Eliot,
33:Souls live on in perpetual echoes. ~ George Eliot,
34:When you see fair hair Be pitiful. ~ George Eliot,
35:Animals are such agreeable friends. ~ George Eliot,
36:A woman mixed of such fine elements ~ George Eliot,
37:I think I shall trusten till I die. ~ George Eliot,
38:Steady work turns genius to a loom. ~ George Eliot,
39:Even success needs its consolations. ~ George Eliot,
40:I flutter all ways, and fly in none. ~ George Eliot,
41:After all, the true seeing is within. ~ George Eliot,
42:Teach love, for that is what you are. ~ George Eliot,
43:Tis what i love determines how i love ~ George Eliot,
44:as I hardly know where I am, with what ~ George Eliot,
45:As leopard feels at home with leopard. ~ George Eliot,
46:Conscience is harder than our enemies, ~ George Eliot,
47:Correct English is the slang of prigs. ~ George Eliot,
48:Falsehood is easy, truth so difficult. ~ George Eliot,
49:Hear Everything and judge for yourself ~ George Eliot,
50:One gets a bad habit of being unhappy. ~ George Eliot,
51:The bow always strung ... will not do. ~ George Eliot,
52:What if my words Were meant for deeds. ~ George Eliot,
53:what isn’t honest does come t’ harm. I ~ George Eliot,
54:What's broke can never be whole again. ~ George Eliot,
55:But faithfulness can feed on suffering, ~ George Eliot,
56:But is it what we love, or how we love, ~ George Eliot,
57:Effective magic is transcendent nature. ~ George Eliot,
58:For my part I am very sorry for him. It ~ George Eliot,
59:i am always bored." (gwendolen harleth) ~ George Eliot,
60:In high vengeance there is noble scorn. ~ George Eliot,
61:No man can be wise on an empty stomach. ~ George Eliot,
62:Where Jack isn't safe, Tom's in danger. ~ George Eliot,
63:Dark the Night, with breath all flowers, ~ George Eliot,
64:Human experience is usually paradoxical. ~ George Eliot,
65:imagination is a licensed trespasser: it ~ George Eliot,
66:It must be sad to outlive aught we love. ~ George Eliot,
67:One can say everything best over a meal. ~ George Eliot,
68:Nothing is so good as it seems beforehand ~ George Eliot,
69:Our thoughts are often worse than we are. ~ George Eliot,
70:The story can be told without many words. ~ George Eliot,
71:History, we know, is apt to repeat itself. ~ George Eliot,
72:I protest against any absolute conclusion. ~ George Eliot,
73:I shall do everything it becomes me to do. ~ George Eliot,
74:It is a woman's duty not to lower herself. ~ George Eliot,
75:Nothing is so good as it seems beforehand. ~ George Eliot,
76:Particular lies may speak a general truth. ~ George Eliot,
77:The best fire doesna flare up the soonest. ~ George Eliot,
78:Adventure is not outside man; it is within. ~ George Eliot,
79:Each position has its corresponding duties. ~ George Eliot,
80:Education is an asset no man can take away. ~ George Eliot,
81:I wish always to be quoted as George Eliot. ~ George Eliot,
82:Keep true, never be ashamed of doing right. ~ George Eliot,
83:The beauty of a lovely woman is like music. ~ George Eliot,
84:The dew-bead Gem of earth and sky begotten. ~ George Eliot,
85:Time, like money, is measured by our needs. ~ George Eliot,
86:A husband would not let you have your plans. ~ George Eliot,
87:All our ignorance brings us closer to death. ~ George Eliot,
88:Awful Night! Ancestral mystery of mysteries. ~ George Eliot,
89:Better a false belief than no belief at all. ~ George Eliot,
90:In every parting there is an image of death. ~ George Eliot,
91:I think cheerfulness is a fortune in itself. ~ George Eliot,
92:She was no longer wrestling with the grief, ~ George Eliot,
93:Take your sensibility and use it as a vision ~ George Eliot,
94:But certain winds will make men's temper bad. ~ George Eliot,
95:Falsehood is so easy, truth so difficult. The ~ George Eliot,
96:Our growing thought Makes growing revelation. ~ George Eliot,
97:There are many victories worse than a defeat. ~ George Eliot,
98:Things are achieved when they are well begun. ~ George Eliot,
99:What loneliness is more lonely than distrust? ~ George Eliot,
100:Best friend, my well-spring in the wilderness! ~ George Eliot,
101:It is never too late to be who you want to be. ~ George Eliot,
102:One must be poor to know the luxury of giving! ~ George Eliot,
103:One must be poor to know the luxury of giving. ~ George Eliot,
104:Our deeds are fetters that we forge ourselves. ~ George Eliot,
105:Them as ha' never had a cushion don't miss it. ~ George Eliot,
106:what is opportunity to a man who can't use it. ~ George Eliot,
107:Affection is the broadest basis of a good life. ~ George Eliot,
108:Delicious autumn! My very soul is wedded to it. ~ George Eliot,
109:Family likeness has often a deep sadness in it. ~ George Eliot,
110:Truth has rough flavours if we bite it through. ~ George Eliot,
111:What is opportunity to the man who cant use it? ~ George Eliot,
112:What makes life dreary is the want of a motive. ~ George Eliot,
113:"Abroad," that large home of ruined reputations. ~ George Eliot,
114:Every limit is a beginning as well as an ending. ~ George Eliot,
115:Genius ... is necessarily intolerant of fetters. ~ George Eliot,
116:How can a man explain at the expense of a woman? ~ George Eliot,
117:I carry my unwritten poems in cipher on my face! ~ George Eliot,
118:No retrospect will take us to the true beginning ~ George Eliot,
119:Our consciences are not all of the same pattern. ~ George Eliot,
120:Vague memories hang about the mind like cobwebs. ~ George Eliot,
121:It's ill guessing what the bats are flying after. ~ George Eliot,
122:Nothing at times is more expressive than silence. ~ George Eliot,
123:other, just as if it had been only yesterday when ~ George Eliot,
124:Our words have wings, but fly not where we would. ~ George Eliot,
125:Poetry and art and knowledge are sacred and pure. ~ George Eliot,
126:Where you have friends you should not go to inns. ~ George Eliot,
127:Appearances have very little to do with happiness. ~ George Eliot,
128:Blameless people are always the most exasperating. ~ George Eliot,
129:Excessive literary production is a social offense. ~ George Eliot,
130:I am not quite sure whether clever men ever dance. ~ George Eliot,
131:I love not to be choked with other men's thoughts. ~ George Eliot,
132:It is but once that we can know our worst sorrows. ~ George Eliot,
133:Men and women are but children of a larger growth. ~ George Eliot,
134:Resolve will melt no rocks. But it can scale them. ~ George Eliot,
135:All passion becomes strength when it has an outlet. ~ George Eliot,
136:Boots and shoes are the greatest trouble of my life ~ George Eliot,
137:Decide on what you think is right, and stick to it. ~ George Eliot,
138:Ignorance gives one a large range of probabilities. ~ George Eliot,
139:It's never too late to be who you were meant to be. ~ George Eliot,
140:The light can be a curtain as well as the darkness. ~ George Eliot,
141:three cuttle-fish sable, and a commentator rampant. ~ George Eliot,
142:A suppressed resolve will betray itself in the eyes. ~ George Eliot,
143:(beer was a thing only to be drunk on holidays), and ~ George Eliot,
144:Boots and shoes are the greatest trouble of my life. ~ George Eliot,
145:But what is opportunity to the man who can't use it? ~ George Eliot,
146:It is never too late to be what you might have been. ~ George Eliot,
147:It is one thing to see your road, another to cut it. ~ George Eliot,
148:It's a father's duty to give his sons a fine chance. ~ George Eliot,
149:She hates everything that is not what she longs for. ~ George Eliot,
150:The intensest form of hatred is that rooted in fear. ~ George Eliot,
151:There is a great deal of unmapped country within us. ~ George Eliot,
152:What sunshine is to flowers, smiles are to humanity. ~ George Eliot,
153:What you do wrong once, you can alter the next time. ~ George Eliot,
154:Worldly faces never look so worldly as at a funeral. ~ George Eliot,
155:A patronizing disposition always has its meaner side. ~ George Eliot,
156:He who rules must fully humor as much as he commands. ~ George Eliot,
157:It's well known there's always two sides, if no more. ~ George Eliot,
158:The desire to conquer is itself a sort of subjection. ~ George Eliot,
159:Wit is a form of force that leaves the limbs at rest. ~ George Eliot,
160:A maggot must be born i' the rotten cheese to like it. ~ George Eliot,
161:A proud heart and a lofty mountain are never fruitful. ~ George Eliot,
162:A woman's lot is made for her by the love she accepts. ~ George Eliot,
163:Don't you meddle with me, and I won't meddle with you. ~ George Eliot,
164:Each lived in a world of which the other knew nothing. ~ George Eliot,
165:I like not only to be loved, but to be told i am loved ~ George Eliot,
166:Life began with waking up and loving my mother's face. ~ George Eliot,
167:The best happiness will be to escape the worst misery. ~ George Eliot,
168:There's many a good bit o' work done with a sad heart. ~ George Eliot,
169:As they who make Good luck a god count all unlucky men. ~ George Eliot,
170:Good God! It is horrible! He is no better than a mummy! ~ George Eliot,
171:hatred is like fire—it makes even light rubbish deadly. ~ George Eliot,
172:I like not only to be loved, but to be told I am loved. ~ George Eliot,
173:I shall be glad of a cup of coffee as soon as possible. ~ George Eliot,
174:It is always fatal to have music or poetry interrupted. ~ George Eliot,
175:The reward of one duty is the power to fulfill another. ~ George Eliot,
176:There was no delivering himself from his cage, however; ~ George Eliot,
177:We want people to feel with us more than to act for us. ~ George Eliot,
178:Any coward can fight a battle when he's sure of winning. ~ George Eliot,
179:Fear was stronger than the calculation of probabilities. ~ George Eliot,
180:Fine art, poetry, that kind of thing, elevates a nation. ~ George Eliot,
181:Hatred is like fire, it makes even light rubbish deadly. ~ George Eliot,
182:I desire no future that will break the ties of the past. ~ George Eliot,
183:I have a knack of hoping, which is as good as an estate. ~ George Eliot,
184:Might, could, would - they are contemptible auxiliaries. ~ George Eliot,
185:One has to spend many years in learning how to be happy. ~ George Eliot,
186:The human heart finds nowhere shelter but in human kind. ~ George Eliot,
187:The stars are golden fruit upon a tree all out of reach. ~ George Eliot,
188:We cannot help the way in which people speak of us . . . ~ George Eliot,
189:Everything seems more bearable since I have talked to you ~ George Eliot,
190:No great deed is done by falterers who ask for certainty. ~ George Eliot,
191:Our deeds determine us, as long as we determine our deeds ~ George Eliot,
192:So to live is heaven; to make undying music in the world. ~ George Eliot,
193:There are men whose presence infuses trust and reverence. ~ George Eliot,
194:Timid people always reek their peevishness on the gentle. ~ George Eliot,
195:A perverted moral judgment belongs to the dogmatic system. ~ George Eliot,
196:He has got no good red blood in his body," said Sir James. ~ George Eliot,
197:Hurt, he'll never be hurt--he's made to hurt other people. ~ George Eliot,
198:It is a very good quality in a man to have a trout-stream. ~ George Eliot,
199:I will to make life less bitter for a few within my reach. ~ George Eliot,
200:Net the large fish and you are sure to have the small fry. ~ George Eliot,
201:Our deeds determine us, as much as we determine our deeds. ~ George Eliot,
202:Our deeds determine us, as much as we determine our deeds; ~ George Eliot,
203:Receptiveness is a rare and massive power, like fortitude. ~ George Eliot,
204:Speech is but broken light upon the depth Of the unspoken. ~ George Eliot,
205:Speech is but broken light upon the depth of the unspoken. ~ George Eliot,
206:To the old, sorrow is sorrow; to the young, it is despair. ~ George Eliot,
207:We are led on, like little children, by a way we know not. ~ George Eliot,
208:What a different result one gets by changing the metaphor! ~ George Eliot,
209:Whatever be thy fate today, Remember, this will pass away! ~ George Eliot,
210:All meanings, we know, depend on the key of interpretation. ~ George Eliot,
211:All things except reason and order are possible with a mob. ~ George Eliot,
212:bad literature of the sort called amusing is spiritual gin. ~ George Eliot,
213:consequences are determined not by excuses but by actions!) ~ George Eliot,
214:I like not only to be loved, but also to be told I am loved ~ George Eliot,
215:Men can do nothing without the make-believe of a beginning. ~ George Eliot,
216:Our dead are never dead to us until we have forgotten them. ~ George Eliot,
217:...that imagined 'otherwise' which is our practical heaven. ~ George Eliot,
218:The strongest principle of growth lies in the human choice. ~ George Eliot,
219:We are all apt to believe what the world believes about us. ~ George Eliot,
220:We don't ask what a woman does; we ask whom she belongs to. ~ George Eliot,
221:We hand folks over to God's mercy, and show none ourselves. ~ George Eliot,
222:Wise books For half the truths they hold are honored tombs. ~ George Eliot,
223:Among all forms of mistake, prophecy is the most gratuitous. ~ George Eliot,
224:I like not only to be loved, but also to be told I am loved. ~ George Eliot,
225:It's easy finding reasons why other folks should be patient. ~ George Eliot,
226:Of all forms of human error, prophesy is the most avoidable. ~ George Eliot,
227:Our dead are never dead to us, until we have forgotten them. ~ George Eliot,
228:Our good depends on the quality and breadth of our emotions. ~ George Eliot,
229:The beginning of compunction is the beginning of a new life. ~ George Eliot,
230:trouble makes us treat all who feel with us very much alike. ~ George Eliot,
231:A man deep-wounded may feel too much pain To feel much anger. ~ George Eliot,
232:An ass may bray a good while before he shakes the stars down. ~ George Eliot,
233:In the vain laughter of folly wisdom hears half its applause. ~ George Eliot,
234:Kebencian itu seperti api yang akan membakar habis segalanya. ~ George Eliot,
235:Men, like planets, have both a visible and invisible history. ~ George Eliot,
236:Much of our waking experience is but a dream in the daylight. ~ George Eliot,
237:The wit of a family is usually best received among strangers. ~ George Eliot,
238:This is a puzzling world, and Old Harry's got a finger in it. ~ George Eliot,
239:to my thinking, it is more pitiable to bore than to be bored. ~ George Eliot,
240:While the heart beats, bruise it--it is your only opportunity ~ George Eliot,
241:I have serious things to do now. I have a living to give away. ~ George Eliot,
242:I not only want to be loved, I want to be told that I'm loved. ~ George Eliot,
243:I suppose it's the name: there's a deal in the name of a tune. ~ George Eliot,
244:Marriage must be a relation either of sympathy or of conquest. ~ George Eliot,
245:scientific insight and furnished lodgings: the incompatibility ~ George Eliot,
246:There is often something poisonous in the air of public rooms, ~ George Eliot,
247:To judge wisely, we must know how things appear to the unwise. ~ George Eliot,
248:Wear a smile and have friends; wear a scowl and have wrinkles. ~ George Eliot,
249:Anxiety is good for nothing if we can’t turn it into a defense. ~ George Eliot,
250:But we are frightened at much that is not strictly conceivable. ~ George Eliot,
251:Everything is all one - that is the beginning and end with you. ~ George Eliot,
252:It's but little good you'll do a-watering the last year's crops ~ George Eliot,
253:Jews are not fit for Heaven, but on earth they are most useful. ~ George Eliot,
254:Life seems to go on without effort when I am filled with music. ~ George Eliot,
255:Oh, he dreams footnotes, and they run away with all his brains. ~ George Eliot,
256:The happiest women, like the happiest nations, have no history. ~ George Eliot,
257:Giants have an immemorial right to stupidity and insolent abuse. ~ George Eliot,
258:I like trying to get pregnant. I'm not so sure about childbirth. ~ George Eliot,
259:It's all one web, sir. The prosperity of the country is one web. ~ George Eliot,
260:Knowledge slowly builds up what Ignorance in an hour pulls down. ~ George Eliot,
261:Only in the agony of parting do we look into the depths of love. ~ George Eliot,
262:Perhaps we don't always discriminate between sense and nonsense. ~ George Eliot,
263:There is no killing the suspicion that deceit has once begotten. ~ George Eliot,
264:Things out o’ natur niver thrive: God A’mighty doesn’t like ’em. ~ George Eliot,
265:To manage men one ought to have a sharp mind in a velvet sheath. ~ George Eliot,
266:Vague memories hang about the mind like cobwebs. ~ George Eliot, Romola (1863).,
267:A woman must not force her heart—she’ll do a man no good by that. ~ George Eliot,
268:A woman's hopes are woven of sunbeams; a shadow annihilates them. ~ George Eliot,
269:Beauty is part of the finished language by which goodness speaks. ~ George Eliot,
270:But the silence in her husband's ear was never more to be broken. ~ George Eliot,
271:For power finds its place in lack of power;               Advance ~ George Eliot,
272:Genius is the capacity for receiving and improving by discipline. ~ George Eliot,
273:I am not imposed upon by fine words; I can see what actions mean. ~ George Eliot,
274:I think I dislike what I don't like more than I like what I like. ~ George Eliot,
275:It is impossible, to me at least, to be poetical in cold weather. ~ George Eliot,
276:It is surely better to pardon too much, than to condemn too much. ~ George Eliot,
277:Loquacity with tongue or pen is its own reward -- or, punishment. ~ George Eliot,
278:Subtle impressions for which words are quite too coarse a medium. ~ George Eliot,
279:The finest language is mostly made up of simple unimposing words. ~ George Eliot,
280:There’s Jeremy Taylor’s ‘Holy Living and Dying’ among ‘em. I read ~ George Eliot,
281:The thirst that from the soul doth rise, Doth ask a drink divine. ~ George Eliot,
282:The very truth hath a colour from the disposition of the utterer. ~ George Eliot,
283:things may be lovable that are not altogether handsome, I hope? I ~ George Eliot,
284:Who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rests in unvisited tombs. ~ George Eliot,
285:Your trouble's easy borne when everybody gives it a lift for you. ~ George Eliot,
286:A perfectly sane intellect is hardly at home in this insane world. ~ George Eliot,
287:If Art does not enlarge men's sympathies, it does nothing morally. ~ George Eliot,
288:If Art does not enlarge men’s sympathies, it does nothing morally. ~ George Eliot,
289:If art does not enlarge men's sympathies, it does nothing morally. ~ George Eliot,
290:In all failures, the beginning is certainly the half of the whole. ~ George Eliot,
291:sympathy is but a living again through our own past in a new form, ~ George Eliot,
292:The circumstances would always be stronger than his assertion. And ~ George Eliot,
293:There are glances of hatred that stab, and raise no cry of murder. ~ George Eliot,
294:What are we here for if not to make life easier
for each other? ~ George Eliot,
295:What do we live for, if not to make life less difficult to others? ~ George Eliot,
296:Who with repentance is not satisfied, is not of heaven, nor earth. ~ George Eliot,
297:A difference of taste in jokes is a great strain on the affections. ~ George Eliot,
298:Blessed is the influence of one true, loving human soul on another. ~ George Eliot,
299:have never seen that her religion made any difference in her dress. ~ George Eliot,
300:If you are to rule men, you must rule them through their own ideas. ~ George Eliot,
301:It is better - it shall be better with me because I have known you. ~ George Eliot,
302:It is strange how deeply colours seem to penetrate one, like scent. ~ George Eliot,
303:Oh, child, men's men: gentle or simple, they're much of a muchness. ~ George Eliot,
304:The last refuge of intolerance is in not tolerating the intolerant. ~ George Eliot,
305:The young ones have always a claim on the old to help them forward. ~ George Eliot,
306:Was never true love loved in vain, For truest love is highest gain. ~ George Eliot,
307:Husbands are an inferior class of men, who require keeping in order. ~ George Eliot,
308:husbands are an inferior class of men, who require keeping in order. ~ George Eliot,
309:People are almost always better than their neighbors think they are. ~ George Eliot,
310:Pity that consequences are determined not by excuses but by actions! ~ George Eliot,
311:Souls have complexions too: what will suit one will not suit another ~ George Eliot,
312:There's folks as make bad butter and trusten to the salt t' hide it. ~ George Eliot,
313:The sweetest of all success is that which one wins by hard exertion. ~ George Eliot,
314:It is not ignoble to feel that the fuller life which a sad experience ~ George Eliot,
315:Souls have complexions too: what will suit one will not suit another. ~ George Eliot,
316:We can never give up longing and wishing while we are throughly alive ~ George Eliot,
317:Wine and the sun will make vinegar without any shouting to help them. ~ George Eliot,
318:Your dunce who can't do his sums always has a taste for the infinite. ~ George Eliot,
319:. . . . a horsewhipping is not likely to be paid for with sugar-plums. ~ George Eliot,
320:A prig is a fellow who is always making you a present of his opinions. ~ George Eliot,
321:But if she can marry blood, beauty, and bravery—the sooner the better. ~ George Eliot,
322:Elinor used to tell her sisters that she married me for my ugliness -  ~ George Eliot,
323:His confession was silent, and her promise of faithfulness was silent. ~ George Eliot,
324:It is a wonderful subduer-this need of love, this hunger of the heart. ~ George Eliot,
325:She handled it (her trade) with all the grace that belongs to mastery. ~ George Eliot,
326:Stone Court were scenting the air quite impartially, as if Mr. Raffles ~ George Eliot,
327:We’re not all put together alike, and we may misjudge one another. God ~ George Eliot,
328:Y ¿existe acaso una soledad más solitaria que la desconfianza? (p.474) ~ George Eliot,
329:I cannot bear to think that any one should die and leave no love behind ~ George Eliot,
330:No compliment can be eloquent, except as an expression of indifference. ~ George Eliot,
331:Signs are small measurable things, but interpretations are illimitable, ~ George Eliot,
332:That is the bitterest of all,--to wear the yoke of our own wrong-doing. ~ George Eliot,
333:To the receptive soul the river of life pauseth not, nor is diminished. ~ George Eliot,
334:What do we live for, if not to make life less difficult for each other? ~ George Eliot,
335:Where women love each other, men learn to smother their mutual dislike. ~ George Eliot,
336:You're like a tipsy man as thinks everybody's had too much but himself. ~ George Eliot,
337:Friendships begin with liking or gratitude- roots that can be pulled up. ~ George Eliot,
338:Inclination snatches arguments To make indulgence seem judicious choice. ~ George Eliot,
339:...it is art's duty to make us aware of realities which are not our own. ~ George Eliot,
340:No man is matriculated to the art of life till he has been well tempted. ~ George Eliot,
341:... one always believes one's own town to be more stupid than any other. ~ George Eliot,
342:sleep comes to the perplexed—if the perplexed are only weary enough. But ~ George Eliot,
343:Sweet Truth is a queen proud and mighty-- Her throne is in heaven above. ~ George Eliot,
344:the religion of personal fear remains nearly at the level of the savage. ~ George Eliot,
345:The responsibility of tolerance lies in those who have the wider vision. ~ George Eliot,
346:When land is gone and money's spent,
Then learning is most excellent. ~ George Eliot,
347:character is not cut in marble—it is not something solid and unalterable. ~ George Eliot,
348:Destiny stands by sarcastic with our dramatis personæ folded in her hand. ~ George Eliot,
349:I like not only to be loved, but to be told that I am loved; the realm of ~ George Eliot,
350:In travelling I shape myself betimes to idleness And take fools' pleasure ~ George Eliot,
351:Iteration, like friction, is likely to generate heat instead of progress. ~ George Eliot,
352:Life was never anything but a perpetual see-saw between gravity and jest. ~ George Eliot,
353:Music sweeps by me as a messenger - Carrying a message that is not for me ~ George Eliot,
354:People who can't be witty exert themselves to be devout and affectionate. ~ George Eliot,
355:Plainness has its peculiar temptations and vices quite as much as beauty. ~ George Eliot,
356:We must find our duties in what comes to us, not in what might have been. ~ George Eliot,
357:Acting is nothing more or less than playing. The idea is to humanize life. ~ George Eliot,
358:A fool or idiot is one who expects things to happen that never can happen. ~ George Eliot,
359:a woman’s no business wi’ being so clever; it’ll turn to trouble, I doubt. ~ George Eliot,
360:Destiny stands by sarcastic with our dramatis personae folded in her hand. ~ George Eliot,
361:I am not resigned: I am not sure life is long enough to learn that lesson. ~ George Eliot,
362:I should see how it was possible to lead a grand life here—now—in England. ~ George Eliot,
363:It is never too late to become the person you always thought you could be. ~ George Eliot,
364:I've always felt that your belongings have never been on a level with you. ~ George Eliot,
365:I’ve always felt that your belongings have never been on a level with you. ~ George Eliot,
366:Saints and martyrs had never interested Maggie so much as sages and poets. ~ George Eliot,
367:the colossi whose huge legs our living pettiness is observed to walk under ~ George Eliot,
368:The pride of the body is a barrier against the gifts that purify the soul. ~ George Eliot,
369:The responsibility of tolerance lies with those who have the wider vision. ~ George Eliot,
370:These gems have life in them: their colors speak, say what words fail of. ~ George Eliot,
371:We are rather apt to consider an act wrong because it is unpleasant to us. ~ George Eliot,
372:we are rather apt to consider an act wrong because it is unpleasant to us, ~ George Eliot,
373:What is the use of being exquisite if you are not seen by the best judges? ~ George Eliot,
374:When a man turns a blessing from his door, it falls to them as take it in. ~ George Eliot,
375:how hard it is to walk always in fear of hurting another who is tied to us. ~ George Eliot,
376:I always think the flowers can see us, and know what we are thinking about. ~ George Eliot,
377:in a paradise with sweet laughs for bird-notes, and blue eyes for a heaven. ~ George Eliot,
378:I want that sort of thing — not ideas, you know, but a way of putting them. ~ George Eliot,
379:Mysterious haunts of echoes old and far, The voice divine of human loyalty. ~ George Eliot,
380:Opposition may become sweet to a man when he has christened it persecution. ~ George Eliot,
381:The troublesome ones in a family are usually either the wits or the idiots. ~ George Eliot,
382:Conscience is harder than our enemies, knows more, accuses with more nicety. ~ George Eliot,
383:Self-consciousness of the manner is the expensive substitute for simplicity. ~ George Eliot,
384:Uncomfortable thoughts must be got rid of by good intentions for the future, ~ George Eliot,
385:Uncomfortable thoughts must be got rid of by good intentions for the future. ~ George Eliot,
386:You must learn to deal with the odd and even in life, as well as in figures. ~ George Eliot,
387:Young ladies don’t understand political economy, you know,” said Mr. Brooke, ~ George Eliot,
388:And, of course men know best about everything, except what women know better. ~ George Eliot,
389:Anger and jealousy can no more bear to lose sight of their objects than love. ~ George Eliot,
390:. "A woman's no business wi' being so clever; it'll turn to trouble, I doubt. ~ George Eliot,
391:Grant folly's prayers that hinder folly's wish, And serve the ends of wisdom. ~ George Eliot,
392:I have the conviction that excessive literary production is a social offence. ~ George Eliot,
393:[It is easier] to quell emotion than to incur the consequences of venting it. ~ George Eliot,
394:Many an irritating fault, many an unlovely oddity, has come of a hard sorrow. ~ George Eliot,
395:Miss Brooke’s large eyes seemed, like her religion, too unusual and striking. ~ George Eliot,
396:On the verge of a decision we all tremble: hope pauses with fluttering wings. ~ George Eliot,
397:So shall I join the choir invisible Whose music is the gladness of the world. ~ George Eliot,
398:There is a mercy which is weakness, and even treason against the common good. ~ George Eliot,
399:The words of genius have a wider meaning than the thought that prompted them. ~ George Eliot,
400:We could never have loved the earth so well if we had had no childhood in it. ~ George Eliot,
401:What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult for each other? ~ George Eliot,
402:A man's a man. But when you see a king, you see the work of many thousand men. ~ George Eliot,
403:And, of course, men know best about everything, except what women know better. ~ George Eliot,
404:Anger and jealousy can no more bear to lose sight of their objects than love . ~ George Eliot,
405:But, bless us, things may be lovable that are not altogether handsome, I hope? ~ George Eliot,
406:For the most glutinously indefinite minds enclose some hard grains of habit... ~ George Eliot,
407:Genius at first is little more than a great capacity for receiving discipline. ~ George Eliot,
408:He distrusted her affection; and what loneliness is more lonely than distrust. ~ George Eliot,
409:He distrusted her affection; and what loneliness is more lonely than distrust? ~ George Eliot,
410:How unspeakably the lengthening of memories in common endears our old friends! ~ George Eliot,
411:If one is not to get into a rage sometimes, what is the good of being friends? ~ George Eliot,
412:I'm not denyin' the women are foolish. God Almighty made 'em to match the men. ~ George Eliot,
413:In all private quarrels the duller nature is triumphant by reason of dullness. ~ George Eliot,
414:Mighty is the force of motherhood! It transforms all things by its vital heat. ~ George Eliot,
415:Our deeds travel with us from afar, And what we have been makes us what we are ~ George Eliot,
416:there are always people who can't forgive an able man for differing from them. ~ George Eliot,
417:There comes a moment when the soul must have no guide but the voice within it. ~ George Eliot,
418:There is no private life which has not been determined by a wider public life. ~ George Eliot,
419:Upon my word, I think the truth is the hardest missile one can be pelted with. ~ George Eliot,
420:we could never have loved the earth so well if we had had no childhood in it . ~ George Eliot,
421:A woman may get to love by degrees—the best fire does not flare up the soonest. ~ George Eliot,
422:But what we call our despair is often only the painful eagerness of unfed hope. ~ George Eliot,
423:It had already occurred to him that books were stuff, and that life was stupid. ~ George Eliot,
424:it had already occurred to him that books were stuff, and that life was stupid. ~ George Eliot,
425:It is a narrow mind which cannot look at a subject from various points of view. ~ George Eliot,
426:It is in the nature of foolish reasonings to seem good to the foolish reasoner. ~ George Eliot,
427:One can begin so many things with a new person!— even begin to be a better man. ~ George Eliot,
428:What can promote innocent mirth, and I may say virtue, more than a good riddle? ~ George Eliot,
429:A man falling into dark waters seeks a momentary footing even on sliding stones. ~ George Eliot,
430:A man falling into dark waters seeks a momentary footing even on sliding stones; ~ George Eliot,
431:In poor Rosamond's mind there was not room enough for luxuries to look small in. ~ George Eliot,
432:In poor Rosamond’s mind there was not room enough for luxuries to look small in. ~ George Eliot,
433:It's no use filling your pocket with money if you have got a hole in the corner. ~ George Eliot,
434:One can begin so many things with a new person! - even begin to be a better man. ~ George Eliot,
435:One soweth and another reapeth is a verity that applies to evil as well as good. ~ George Eliot,
436:Scepticismcan never be thoroughly applied, else life would come to a standstill. ~ George Eliot,
437:We are not apt to fear for the fearless, when we are companions in their danger. ~ George Eliot,
438:What are a handful of reasonable men against a crowd with stones in their hands? ~ George Eliot,
439:But it is one thing to like defiance, and another thing to like its consequences. ~ George Eliot,
440:Death was not to be a leap: it was to be a long descent under thickening shadows. ~ George Eliot,
441:Don't seem to he on the lookout for crows, else you'll set other people watching. ~ George Eliot,
442:Even when she was speaking, her soul was in prayer reposing on an unseen support. ~ George Eliot,
443:Every woman is supposed to have the same set of motives, or else to be a monster. ~ George Eliot,
444:It is difficult for woman to try to be anything good when she is not believed in. ~ George Eliot,
445:... it is one thing to like defiance, and another thing to like its consequences. ~ George Eliot,
446:Nature repairs her ravages,--repairs them with her sunshine and with human labor. ~ George Eliot,
447:The devil tempts us not--'tis we tempt him, Reckoning his skill with opportunity. ~ George Eliot,
448:The only failure one should fear, is not hugging to the purpose they see as best. ~ George Eliot,
449:There's folks 'ud hold a sieve under the pump and expect to carry away the water. ~ George Eliot,
450:There's folks 'ud stand on their heads and then say the fault was i' their boots. ~ George Eliot,
451:Animals are such agreeable friends―they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms. ~ George Eliot,
452:Her own misery filled her heart—there was no room in it for other people's sorrow. ~ George Eliot,
453:Hetty did not understand how anybody could be very fond of middle-aged people. And ~ George Eliot,
454:I can look forward to no better happiness than that which would be one with yours. ~ George Eliot,
455:Knightly love is blent with reverence As heavenly air is blent with heavenly blue. ~ George Eliot,
456:The brethren sometimes err in measuring the Divine love by the sinner's knowledge. ~ George Eliot,
457:The memory has as many moods as the temper, and shifts its scenery like a diorama. ~ George Eliot,
458:The right word is always a power, and communicates its definiteness to our action. ~ George Eliot,
459:Those only can thoroughly feel the meaning of death who know what is perfect love. ~ George Eliot,
460:true love for a good woman is a great thing, Susan. It shapes many a rough fellow. ~ George Eliot,
461:Un’intelligenza perfettamente sana è sempre un po’ spaesata in questo pazzo mondo. ~ George Eliot,
462:We mustn't be in a hurry to fix and choose our own lot; we must wait to be guided. ~ George Eliot,
463:What courage and patience are wanted for every life that aims to produce anything! ~ George Eliot,
464:When a workman knows the use of his tools, he can make a door as well as a window. ~ George Eliot,
465:Would not love see returning penitence afar off, and fall on its neck and kiss it? ~ George Eliot,
466:and it is a narrow mind which cannot look at a subject from various points of view. ~ George Eliot,
467:Children demand that their heroes should be fleckless, and easily believe them so . ~ George Eliot,
468:He sat watching what went forward with the quiet outward glance of healthy old age. ~ George Eliot,
469:It is always chilling, in friendly intercourse, to say you have no opinion to give. ~ George Eliot,
470:It will never rain roses: when we want to have more roses we must plant more trees. ~ George Eliot,
471:Little children are still the symbol of the eternal marriage between love and duty. ~ George Eliot,
472:Men’s lives are as thoroughly blended with each other as the air they breathe: evil ~ George Eliot,
473:O radiant Dark! O darkly fostered ray!
Thou hast a joy too deep for shallow Day. ~ George Eliot,
474:Our impartiality is kept for abstract merit and demerit, which none of us ever saw. ~ George Eliot,
475:Probabilities—the surest screen a wise man can place between himself and the truth. ~ George Eliot,
476:Proceeding by loops and zig-zags, we now and then arrive just where we ought to be. ~ George Eliot,
477:She had forgotten his faults as we forget
the sorrows of our departed childhood. ~ George Eliot,
478:Susceptible persons are more affected by a change of tone that by unexpected words. ~ George Eliot,
479:There is no sense of ease like the ease we felt in those scenes where we were born. ~ George Eliot,
480:Animals are such agreeable friends - they ask no questions; they pass no criticisms. ~ George Eliot,
481:Bulstrode, after a moment’s hesitation, took his hat from the floor and slowly rose, ~ George Eliot,
482:but very little achievement is required in order to pity another man's shortcomings. ~ George Eliot,
483:I am afraid of nothing but that
we should miss the passing of our lives together. ~ George Eliot,
484:I am not magnanimous enough to like people who speak to me without seeming to see me ~ George Eliot,
485:I never had any preference for her, any more than I have a preference for breathing. ~ George Eliot,
486:I take a dose of mathematics every day to prevent my brain from becoming quite soft. ~ George Eliot,
487:I think I should have no other mortal wants, if I could always have plenty of music. ~ George Eliot,
488:It will never rain roses: when we want to have more roses, we must plant more roses. ~ George Eliot,
489:Many an inherited sorrow that has marred a life has been breathed into no human ear. ~ George Eliot,
490:No todos podemos hacer conquistas cuando nuestra fealdad ha pasado su mejor momento. ~ George Eliot,
491:Our deeds still travel with us from afar, And what we have been makes us what we are ~ George Eliot,
492:Our deeds still travel with us from afar/And what we have been makes us what we are. ~ George Eliot,
493:The place where you are is the one where my mind must live, wherever I might travel. ~ George Eliot,
494:We could never have loved the earth so well if we had had no childhood in it . . . . ~ George Eliot,
495:We get a deal o' useless things about us, only because we've got the money to spend. ~ George Eliot,
496:We must find our duties in what comes to us, not in what we imagine might have been. ~ George Eliot,
497:I am not magnanimous enough to like people who speak to me without seeming to see me. ~ George Eliot,
498:I couldn't live in peace if I put the shadow of a willful sin between myself and God. ~ George Eliot,
499:It is not true that love makes all things easy; it makes us choose what is difficult. ~ George Eliot,
500:I would not creep along the coast but steer Out in mid-sea, by guidance of the stars. ~ George Eliot,
501:Legal redress is imperfect satisfaction for having one’s head broken with a brickbat. ~ George Eliot,
502:Our deeds still travel with us from afar, and what we have been makes us what we are. ~ George Eliot,
503:Speech is often barren; but silence also does not necessarily brood over a full nest. ~ George Eliot,
504:The devil tempts us not; 'tis we who tempt him, beckoning his skill with opportunity. ~ George Eliot,
505:... the fallibility of human brains is in nothing more obvious than in proof reading. ~ George Eliot,
506:There's good chances and bad chances, and nobody's luck is pulled only by one string. ~ George Eliot,
507:When what is good comes of age, and is likely to live, there is reason for rejoicing. ~ George Eliot,
508:You know I have duties──we both have duties──before which feeling must be sacrificed. ~ George Eliot,
509:If you could make a pudding wi' thinking o' the batter, it 'ud be easy getting dinner. ~ George Eliot,
510:It is as useless to fight against the interpretations of ignorance as to whip the fog. ~ George Eliot,
511:Men outlive their love, but they don’t outlive the consequences of their recklessness. ~ George Eliot,
512:the existence of insignificant people has very important consequences in the world. It ~ George Eliot,
513:To know intense joy without a strong bodily frame, one must have an enthusiastic soul. ~ George Eliot,
514:Try to take hold of your sensibility, and use it as if it were a faculty, like vision. ~ George Eliot,
515:Veracity is a plant of paradise, and the seeds have never flourished beyond the walls. ~ George Eliot,
516:We are all of us imaginative in some form or other, for images are the brood of desire ~ George Eliot,
517:A mother's yearning feels the presence of the cherished child even in the degraded man. ~ George Eliot,
518:Does not the Hunger Tower stand as the type of the utmost trial to what is human in us? ~ George Eliot,
519:Do we not all agree to call rapid thought and noble impulse by the name of inspiration? ~ George Eliot,
520:Her little butterfly soul fluttered incessantly between memory and dubious expectation. ~ George Eliot,
521:I cannot imagine myself without some opinion, but I wish to have good reasons for them. ~ George Eliot,
522:I magnified, as usual, the impression any word or deed of mine could produce on others. ~ George Eliot,
523:I'm not one of those that can see the cat in the dairy and wonder what she's there for. ~ George Eliot,
524:Miss Brooke had that kind of beauty which seems to be thrown into relief by poor dress. ~ George Eliot,
525:Mrs. Davilow have willingly let fall a hint of the aerial castle-building which she had ~ George Eliot,
526:Somebody put a drop under a magnifying-glass and it was all semicolons and parentheses. ~ George Eliot,
527:The important work of moving the world forward does not wait to be done by perfect men. ~ George Eliot,
528:...There's nothing kills a man so soon as having nobody to find fault with but himself. ~ George Eliot,
529:We are all of us imaginative in some form or other, for images are the brood of desire. ~ George Eliot,
530:'Character," says Novalis, in one of his questionable aphorisms - character is destiny'. ~ George Eliot,
531:Childhood has no forebodings; but then, it is soothed by no memories of outlived sorrow. ~ George Eliot,
532:Conscientious people are apt to see their duty in that which is the most painful course. ~ George Eliot,
533:it is a curious fact that the more sophisticated we become the simpler grows our speech. ~ George Eliot,
534:I would not creep along the coast but steer
Out in mid-sea, by guidance of the stars. ~ George Eliot,
535:Memory, when duly impregnated with ascertained facts, is sometimes surprisingly fertile. ~ George Eliot,
536:The world is full of hopeful analogies and handsome, dubious eggs, called possibilities. ~ George Eliot,
537:For pain must enter into its glorified life of memory before it can turn into compassion. ~ George Eliot,
538:it is seldom a medical man has true religious views—there is too much pride of intellect. ~ George Eliot,
539:Melodies die out, like the pipe of Pan, with the ears that love them and listen for them. ~ George Eliot,
540:Old men's eyes are like old men's memories; they are strongest for things a long way off. ~ George Eliot,
541:People talk about evidence as if it could really be weighed in scales by a blind Justice. ~ George Eliot,
542:Power of generalizing gives men so much the superiority in mistake over the dumb animals. ~ George Eliot,
543:There's no disappointment in memory, and one's exaggerations are always on the good side. ~ George Eliot,
544:... the true seeing is within; and painting stares at you with an insistent imperfection. ~ George Eliot,
545:the very breath of science is a contest with mistake, and must keep the conscience alive. ~ George Eliot,
546:To an old memory like mine the present days are but as a little water poured on the deep. ~ George Eliot,
547:To men who only aim at escaping felony, nothing short of the prisoner's dock is disgrace. ~ George Eliot,
548:We mortals, men and women, devour many a disappointment between breakfast and dinnertime. ~ George Eliot,
549:How oft review; each finding, like a friend, Something to blame, and something to commend. ~ George Eliot,
550:If you could make a pudding wi’ thinking o’ the batter, it ’ud be easy getting dinner. How ~ George Eliot,
551:I thought it was all over with me, and there was nothing to try for–only things to endure. ~ George Eliot,
552:More helpful than all wisdom is one draught of simple human pity that will not forsake us. ~ George Eliot,
553:Religion, like all things, begins with self, And naught is known, until one knows himself. ~ George Eliot,
554:the devil will be having his finger in what we call our duties as well as our sins. Mayhap ~ George Eliot,
555:The fact is, both callers and work thicken - the former sadly interfering with the latter. ~ George Eliot,
556:There are answers which, in turning away wrath, only send it to the other end of the room. ~ George Eliot,
557:The yoke a man creates for himself by wrong-doing will breed hate in the kindliest nature. ~ George Eliot,
558:To have suffered much is like knowing many languages. Thou hast learned to understand all. ~ George Eliot,
559:Whether happiness may come or not, one should try and prepare one's self to do without it. ~ George Eliot,
560:Who can prove Wit to be witty when with deeper ground Dulness intuitive declares wit dull? ~ George Eliot,
561:Excellence encourages one about life generally; it shows the spiritual wealth of the world. ~ George Eliot,
562:Great feelings will often take the aspect of error, and great faith the aspect of illusion. ~ George Eliot,
563:How can one ever do anything nobly Christian, living among people with such petty thoughts? ~ George Eliot,
564:If you want to slip into a round hole, you must make a ball of yourself—that’s where it is. ~ George Eliot,
565:Keep true. Never be ashamed of doing right. Decide what you think is right and stick to it. ~ George Eliot,
566:My role models were childless: Virginia Woolf, Jane Austen, George Eliot, the Brontes. ~ Joyce Carol Oates,
567:Selbstsüchtige Menschen halten immer ihr eigenes Unbehagen für das Wichtigste auf der Welt. ~ George Eliot,
568:The best travel is that which one can take by one's own fireside. In memory or imagination. ~ George Eliot,
569:The higher life begins for us ... when we renounce our own will to bow before a Divine law. ~ George Eliot,
570:The scornful nostril and the high head gather not the odors that lie on the track of truth. ~ George Eliot,
571:But a good wife—a good unworldly woman—may really help a man, and keep him more independent. ~ George Eliot,
572:But it is one thing to like defiance, and another thing to like its consequences. Meanwhile, ~ George Eliot,
573:It is necessary to me, not simply to be but to utter, and I require utterance of my friends. ~ George Eliot,
574:It is not true that love makes all things easy, it makes us chose things that are difficult. ~ George Eliot,
575:only in another sort of pinfold than that from which she had been released. Lydgate's advice ~ George Eliot,
576:The first sense of mutual love excludes other feelings; it will have the soul all to itself. ~ George Eliot,
577:You are a good young man," she said. "But I do not like husbands. I will never have another. ~ George Eliot,
578:You have such strong words at command, that they make the smallest argument seem formidable. ~ George Eliot,
579:Better spend an extra hundred or two on your son's education, than leave it him in your will. ~ George Eliot,
580:Education was almost entirely a matter of luck — usually of ill-luck — in those distant days. ~ George Eliot,
581:I don't see how a man is to be good for much unless he has some one woman to love him dearly. ~ George Eliot,
582:scepticism, as we know, can never be thoroughly applied, else life would come to a standstill ~ George Eliot,
583:She seems to have what I never saw in any woman before—a fountain of friendship towards men—a ~ George Eliot,
584:Some people are born to make life pretty, and others to grumble that it is not pretty enough. ~ George Eliot,
585:There is no escaping the fact that want of sympathy condemns us to a corresponding stupidity. ~ George Eliot,
586:There is only one failure in life possible, and that is not to be true to the best one knows. ~ George Eliot,
587:Tom’s mind was set to the expectation of the worst that could happen—not death, but disgrace. ~ George Eliot,
588:We have all our secret sins; and if we knew ourselves we should not judge each other harshly. ~ George Eliot,
589:... when one's outward lot is perfect, the sense of inward imperfection is the more pressing. ~ George Eliot,
590:when we desire eagerly to find something, we are apt to search for it in hopeless places. No, ~ George Eliot,
591:all men needed the bridle of religion, which, properly speaking, was the dread of a Hereafter. ~ George Eliot,
592:a terrible scorching light showed him the hidden letters that changed the meaning of the past. ~ George Eliot,
593:Eros has degenerated; he began by introducing order and harmony, and now he brings back chaos. ~ George Eliot,
594:It is better to keep your mouth closed and appear a fool than to open it and remove all doubt. ~ George Eliot,
595:... it is seldom a medical man has true religious views--there is too much pride of intellect. ~ George Eliot,
596:Miserliness is a capital quality to run in families; it's the safe side for madness to dip on. ~ George Eliot,
597:People can easily take the sacred word duty as a name for what they desire any one else to do. ~ George Eliot,
598:Pride only helps us to be generous; it never makes us so, any more than vanity makes us witty. ~ George Eliot,
599:That golden sky, which was the doubly blessed symbol of advancing day and of approaching rest. ~ George Eliot,
600:That sort of reputation which precedes performance [is] often the larger part of a man's fame. ~ George Eliot,
601:That's what a man wants in a wife, mostly; he wants to make sure one fool tells him he's wise. ~ George Eliot,
602:The blessed work of helping the world forward happily does not wait to be done by perfect men. ~ George Eliot,
603:There are new eras in one's life that are equivalent to youth-are something better than youth. ~ George Eliot,
604:There are various orders of beauty, causing men to make fools of themselves in various styles. ~ George Eliot,
605:There is nothing that will kill a man so soon as having nobody to find fault with but himself. ~ George Eliot,
606:Blessed is the man, who having nothing to say, abstains from giving wordy evidence of the fact. ~ George Eliot,
607:I love words; they are the quoits, the bows, the staves that furnish the gymnasium of the mind. ~ George Eliot,
608:I’m determined to read no more books where the blond-haired women carry away all the happiness. ~ George Eliot,
609:Life is measured by the rapidity of change, the succession of influences that modify the being. ~ George Eliot,
610:No soul is desolate as long as there is a human being for whom it can feel trust and reverence. ~ George Eliot,
611:Selfish— a judgment readily passed by those who have never tested their own power of sacrifice. ~ George Eliot,
612:The first condition of human goodness is something to love; the second, something to reverence. ~ George Eliot,
613:There is no feeling, except the extremes of fear and grief, that does not find relief in music. ~ George Eliot,
614:When gratitude has become a matter of reasoning there are many ways of escaping from its bonds. ~ George Eliot,
615:Evil's evil, and sorrow's sorrow, and you can't alter it's nature by wrapping it up other words. ~ George Eliot,
616:Harold, like the rest of us, had many impressions which saved him the trouble of distinct ideas. ~ George Eliot,
617:If a man has a capacity for great thoughts, he is likely to overtake them before he is decrepit. ~ George Eliot,
618:I had not read George Eliot, so read a few. I felt ashamed I hadn't read "Middlemarch" before. ~ Stephen Dobyns,
619:Impatient people, according to Bacon, are like the bees, and kill themselves in stinging others. ~ George Eliot,
620:It’s an uncommonly dangerous thing to be left without any padding against the shafts of disease. ~ George Eliot,
621:It's no trifle at her time at her time of life to part with a doctor who knows her constitution. ~ George Eliot,
622:O father," said Eppie, "what a pretty home ours is! I think nobody could be happier than we are. ~ George Eliot,
623:we begin by knowing little and believing much, and we sometimes end by inverting the quantities. ~ George Eliot,
624:Who can tell what just criticisms Murr the Cat may be passing on us beings of wider speculation? ~ George Eliot,
625:Yes," said Mr. Casaubon, with that peculiar pitch of voice which makes the word half a negative. ~ George Eliot,
626:A blush is no language; only a dubious flag - signal which may mean either of two contradictories ~ George Eliot,
627:Few things hold the perception more thoroughly captive than anxiety about what we have got to say ~ George Eliot,
628:it seems as if them as aren’t wanted here are th’ only folks as aren’t wanted i’ th’ other world. ~ George Eliot,
629:neighbourly kindness is among those things that are the more precious the older they get. Indeed, ~ George Eliot,
630:The nature o' things doesn't change, though it seems as if one's own life was nothing but change. ~ George Eliot,
631:The right to rebellion is the right to seek a higher rule, and not to wander in mere lawlessness. ~ George Eliot,
632:These irregularities of judgment, I imagine, are found even in riper minds than Mary Garth's: our ~ George Eliot,
633:Vanity is as ill at ease under indifference as tenderness is under a love which it cannot return. ~ George Eliot,
634:We are all of us born in moral stupidity, taking the world as an udder to feed our supreme selves ~ George Eliot,
635:You must love your work and not always be looking over the edge of it wanting your play to begin. ~ George Eliot,
636:A woman dictates before marriage in order that she may have an appetite for submission afterwards. ~ George Eliot,
637:Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us wordy evidence of the fact. ~ George Eliot,
638:But scepticism, as we know, can never be thoroughly applied, else life would come to a standstill: ~ George Eliot,
639:do what we will, it’s only making use o’ the sperrit and the powers that ha’ been given to us. And ~ George Eliot,
640:Happily she never attempted to joke, and this perhaps was the most decisive mark of her cleverness ~ George Eliot,
641:I cherish my childish loves--the memory of that warm little nest where my affections were fledged. ~ George Eliot,
642:If we had lost our own chief good, other people’s good would remain, and that is worth trying for. ~ George Eliot,
643:In Rome it seems as if there were so many things which are more wanted in the world than pictures. ~ George Eliot,
644:People who live at a distance are naturally less faulty than those immediately under our own eyes. ~ George Eliot,
645:People who live at a distance are naturally less faulty than those immediately under our own eyes; ~ George Eliot,
646:She says, he is a great soul.—A great bladder for dried peas to rattle in!” said Mrs. Cadwallader. ~ George Eliot,
647:The best augury of a man's success in his profession is that he thinks it the finest in the world. ~ George Eliot,
648:We are all of us born in moral stupidity, taking the world as an udder to feed our supreme selves: ~ George Eliot,
649:What is your religion? I mean-not what you know about religion but the belief that helps you most? ~ George Eliot,
650:What novelty is worth that sweet monotony where everything is known and loved because it is known? ~ George Eliot,
651:Cruelty, like every other vice, requires no motive outside of itself; it only requires opportunity. ~ George Eliot,
652:I believe that people are almost always better than their neighbors think they are,” said Dorothea. ~ George Eliot,
653:Ignorance is not so damnable as humbug, but when it prescribes pills it may happen to do more harm. ~ George Eliot,
654:Ignorance is not so damnable as humbug; but when it prescribes pills it may happen to do more harm. ~ George Eliot,
655:In so complex a thing as human nature, we must consider it is hard to find rules without exception. ~ George Eliot,
656:In spite of his practical ability, some of his experience had petrified into maxims and quotations. ~ George Eliot,
657:It is better sometimes not to follow great reformers of abuses beyond the threshold of their homes. ~ George Eliot,
658:it is better sometimes not to follow great reformers of abuses beyond the threshold of their homes. ~ George Eliot,
659:I've never any pity for conceited people, because I think they carry their comfort about with them. ~ George Eliot,
660:Joy and sorrow are both my perpetual companions, but the joy is called Past and the sorrow Present. ~ George Eliot,
661:Ma ciò che chiamiamo disperazione è in realtà la dolorosa impazienza della speranza non alimentata. ~ George Eliot,
662:These charitable people never know vinegar from wine till they have swallowed it and got the colic. ~ George Eliot,
663:What novelty is worth that sweet monotony where everything is known, and loved because it is known? ~ George Eliot,
664:When one sees a perfect woman, one never thinks of her attributes–one is conscious of her presence. ~ George Eliot,
665:A common fallacy: to imagine a measure will be easy because we have private motives for desiring it. ~ George Eliot,
666:Has any one ever pinched into its pilulous smallness the cobweb of pre-matrimonial acquaintanceship? ~ George Eliot,
667:In so complex a thing as human nature, we must consider, it is hard to find rules without exception. ~ George Eliot,
668:Love at its highest flood rushes beyond its object, and loses itself in the sense of divine mystery. ~ George Eliot,
669:One way of getting an idea of our fellow-countrymen's miseries is to go and look at their pleasures. ~ George Eliot,
670:Our deeds still travel with us from afar, And what we have been makes us what we are.”   Bulstrode’s ~ George Eliot,
671:When one sees a perfect woman, one never thinks of her attributes--one is conscious of her presence. ~ George Eliot,
672:I should never like scolding any one else so well; and that is a point to be thought of in a husband. ~ George Eliot,
673:I think any hardship is better than pretending to do what one is paid for, and never really doing it. ~ George Eliot,
674:I've always mistrusted that sort o' learning as leaves folks foolish and unreasonable about business. ~ George Eliot,
675:Subtract from the New Testament the miraculous and highly impossible, and what will be the remainder? ~ George Eliot,
676:there are many blanks left in the weeks of courtship which a loving faith fills with happy assurance. ~ George Eliot,
677:We all remember epochs in our experience when some dear expectation dies, or some new motive is born. ~ George Eliot,
678:All the learnin' my father ever paid for was a bit o' birch at one end and the alphabet at th ' other. ~ George Eliot,
679:and how was a man to be explained unless you at least knew somebody who knew his father and mother? To ~ George Eliot,
680:If troubles were put up to market, I'd sooner buy old than new. It's something to have seen the worst. ~ George Eliot,
681:If we could hear the squirrel's heartbeat, the sound of the grass growing, we should die of that roar. ~ George Eliot,
682:in certain crises direct expression of sympathy is the least possible to those who most feel sympathy. ~ George Eliot,
683:in our eagerness to explain impressions, we often lose our hold of the sympathy that comprehends them. ~ George Eliot,
684:In the ages since Adam's marriage, it has been good for some men to be alone, and for some women also. ~ George Eliot,
685:One of the tortures of jealousy is, that it can never turn away its eyes from the thing that pains it. ~ George Eliot,
686:One's self-satisfaction is an untaxed kind of property which it is very unpleasant to find deprecated. ~ George Eliot,
687:One’s self-satisfaction is an untaxed kind of property which it is very unpleasant to find deprecated. ~ George Eliot,
688:Shall we, because we walk on our hind feet, assume to ourselves only the privilege of imperishability? ~ George Eliot,
689:there are many blanks left in the weeks of courtship, which a loving faith fills with happy assurance. ~ George Eliot,
690:The secret of our emotions never lies in the bare object, but in its subtle relations to our own past. ~ George Eliot,
691:Tom's contemptuous conception of a girl included the attribute of being unfit to walk in dirty places. ~ George Eliot,
692:Dinah, do you think God will take away that crying and the place in the wood, now I've told everything? ~ George Eliot,
693:No man can begin to mould himself on a faith or an idea without rising to a higher order of experience. ~ George Eliot,
694:Perfect love has a breath of poetry which can exalt the relations of the least-instructed human beings. ~ George Eliot,
695:The worst service, I fancy, that anyone can do for truth, is to set silly people writing on its behalf. ~ George Eliot,
696:when a man’s said what he means, he’d better stop, for th’ ale ’ull be none the better for stannin’. An ~ George Eliot,
697:in so complex a thing as human nature, we must consider, it is hard to find rules without exceptions. Of ~ George Eliot,
698:It always remains true that if we had been greater, circumstance would have been less strong against us. ~ George Eliot,
699:Justice is like the kingdom of God--it is not without us as a fact, it is within us as a great yearning. ~ George Eliot,
700:O the anguish of the thought that we can never atone to our dead for the stinted affection we gave them. ~ George Eliot,
701:people who have pleasant homes get indoor enjoyments that they would never think of but for the rain. If ~ George Eliot,
702:Sympathetic people often don't communicate well, they back reflected images which hide their own depths. ~ George Eliot,
703:We judge other according to results; how else?--not knowing the process by which results are arrived at. ~ George Eliot,
704:A kind Providence furnishes the limpest personality with a little gum or starch in the form of tradition. ~ George Eliot,
705:Aye, aye, that's the way wi' thee: thee allays makes a peck o' thy own words out o' a pint o' the Bible's ~ George Eliot,
706:But, for the point of wisdom, I would choose / To know the mind that stirs between the wings / Of bees... ~ George Eliot,
707:Everything comes to light, Nancy, sooner or later. When God Almighty wills it, our secrets are found out. ~ George Eliot,
708:Hobbies are apt to run away with us, you know; it doesn't do to be run away with. We must keep the reins. ~ George Eliot,
709:If you like to swallow him, for his sister's sake, you may; but I've no sauce that will make him go down. ~ George Eliot,
710:I think I am quite wicked with roses. I like to gather them, and smell them till they have no scent left. ~ George Eliot,
711:there’s folks as thinks a woman’s fool enough to stan’ by an’ look on while the men sign her soul away, I ~ George Eliot,
712:A man should make sacrifices to keep clear of doing a wrong; sacrifices won’t undo it when it’s done. When ~ George Eliot,
713:An ingenious web of probabilities is the surest screen a wise man can place between himself and the truth. ~ George Eliot,
714:It always seemed to me a sort of clever stupidity only to have one sort of talent - like a carrier pigeon. ~ George Eliot,
715:People who write finely must not expect to be left in repose; they will be molested with thanks, at least. ~ George Eliot,
716:The tale of the Divine Pity was never yet believed from lips that were not felt to be moved by human pity. ~ George Eliot,
717:Alas! the scientific conscience had got into the debasing company of money obligation and selfish respects. ~ George Eliot,
718:But I wasn't worth doing wrong for---- nothing is in this world. Nothing is so good as it seems beforehand. ~ George Eliot,
719:College mostly makes people like bladders-just good for nothing but t'hold the stuff as is poured into 'em. ~ George Eliot,
720:Every man who is not a monster, a mathematician, or a mad philosopher, is the slave of some woman or other. ~ George Eliot,
721:If the past is not to bind us, where can duty lie? We should have no law but the inclination of the moment. ~ George Eliot,
722:Speech may be barren; but it is ridiculous to suppose that silence is always brooding on a nestful of eggs. ~ George Eliot,
723:There are natures in which, if they love us, we are conscious of having a sort of baptism and consecration. ~ George Eliot,
724:When death, the great Reconciler, has come, it is never our tenderness that we repent of, but our severity. ~ George Eliot,
725:When death, the great reconciler, has come, it is never our tenderness that we repent of, but our severity. ~ George Eliot,
726:Bodily haste and exertion usually leave our thoughts very much at the mercy of our feelings and imagination. ~ George Eliot,
727:... happy husbands and wives can hear each other say the same thing over and over again without being tired. ~ George Eliot,
728:If a man goes a little too far along a new road, it is usually himself that he harms more than any one else. ~ George Eliot,
729:It was not that she was out of temper, but that the world was not equal to the demands of her fine organism. ~ George Eliot,
730:It will always remain true that if we had been greater, circumstance would have been less strong against us. ~ George Eliot,
731:My life is too short, and God’s work is too great for me to think of making a home for myself in this world. ~ George Eliot,
732:People glorify all sorts of bravery except the bravery they might show on behalf of their nearest neighbors. ~ George Eliot,
733:Pride helps us; and pride is not a bad thing when it only urges us to hide our own hurts—not to hurt others. ~ George Eliot,
734:The lines and lights of the human countenance are like other symbols,–not always easy to read without a key. ~ George Eliot,
735:They say fortune is a woman and capricious. But sometimes she is a good woman, and gives to those who merit. ~ George Eliot,
736:Can any man or woman choose duties? No more than they can choose their birthplace or their father and mother. ~ George Eliot,
737:Even much stronger mortals than Fred Vincy hold half their rectitude in the mind of the being they love best. ~ George Eliot,
738:Every year strips us of at least one vain expectation, and teaches us to reckon some solid good in its stead. ~ George Eliot,
739:Inconsistencies," answered Imlac, "cannot both be right, but imputed to man they may both be true."—Rasselas. ~ George Eliot,
740:I shall never love anybody. I can't love people. I hate them.' 'The time will come, dear, the time will come. ~ George Eliot,
741:Language gives a fuller image, which is all the better for beings vague. After all, the true seeing is within ~ George Eliot,
742:Notions and scruples were like spilt needles, making one afraid of treading, or sitting down, or even eating. ~ George Eliot,
743:She was always trying to be what her husband wished, and never able to repose on his delight in what she was. ~ George Eliot,
744:Starting a long way off the true point by loops and zigags, we now and then arrive just where we ought to be. ~ George Eliot,
745:That's the way with 'em all: it's as if they thought the world 'ud be new-made because they're to be married. ~ George Eliot,
746:Thought Has joys apart, even in blackest woe, And seizing some fine thread of verity Knows momentary godhead. ~ George Eliot,
747:his father was in the law:—most exemplary and honest nevertheless, which is a reason for our never being rich. ~ George Eliot,
748:I easily sink into mere absorption of what other minds have done, and should like a whole life for that alone. ~ George Eliot,
749:O me, O me, what frugal cheer My love doth feed upon! A touch, a ray, that is not here, A shadow that is gone: ~ George Eliot,
750:Sane people did what their neighbors did, so that if any lunatics were at large, one might know and avoid them ~ George Eliot,
751:The beginning of an acquaintance whether with persons or things is to get a definite outline of our ignorance. ~ George Eliot,
752:There is a sort of human paste that when it comes near the fire of enthusiasm is only baked into harder shape. ~ George Eliot,
753:As I've gotten older I've become a devotee of 19th-century authors, such as Charles Dickens and George Eliot. ~ David Duchovny,
754:Folks as have no mind to be o' use have allays the luck to be out o' the road when there's anything to be done. ~ George Eliot,
755:folks as have no mind to be o’ use have allays the luck to be out o’ the road when there’s anything to be done. ~ George Eliot,
756:If a woman's young and pretty, I think you can see her good looks all the better for her being plainly dressed. ~ George Eliot,
757:I think there are stores laid up in our human nature that our understandings can make no complete inventory of. ~ George Eliot,
758:No story is the same to us after a lapse of time; or rather we who read it are no longer the same interpreters. ~ George Eliot,
759:Oh may I join the choir invisible Of those immortal dead who live again In minds made better by their presence. ~ George Eliot,
760:Poor Maggie sat down again, with the music all chased out of her soul, and the seven small demons all in again. ~ George Eliot,
761:Sane people did what their neighbors did, so that if any lunatics were at large, one might know and avoid them. ~ George Eliot,
762:Say "I love you" to those you love. The eternal silence is long enough to be silent in, and that awaits us all. ~ George Eliot,
763:There are robberies that leave man or woman forever beggared of peace and joy, yet kept secret by the sufferer. ~ George Eliot,
764:The thing we look forward to often comes to pass, but never precisely in the way we have imagined to ourselves. ~ George Eliot,
765:What we call the 'just possible' is sometimes true and the thing we find it easier to believe is grossly false. ~ George Eliot,
766:as Voltaire said, incantations will destroy a flock of sheep if administered with a certain quantity of arsenic. ~ George Eliot,
767:Bodily haste and exertion usually leave our thoughts very much at the mercy of our feelings and imagination; and ~ George Eliot,
768:But with regard to critical occasions, it often happens that all moments seem comfortably remote until the last. ~ George Eliot,
769:College mostly makes people like bladders—
just good for nothing but t’ hold the stuff as is poured into ‘em. ~ George Eliot,
770:Even in 1831 Lowick was at peace, not more agitated by Reform than by the solemn tenor of the Sunday sermon. The ~ George Eliot,
771:if you would maintain the slightest belief in human heroism, you must never make a pilgrimage to see the hero. I ~ George Eliot,
772:... indefinite visions of ambition are weak against the ease of doing what is habitual or beguilingly agreeable. ~ George Eliot,
773:It is a common enough case, that of a man being suddenly captivated by a woman nearly the opposite of his ideal. ~ George Eliot,
774:Sane people did what their neighbours did, so that if any lunatics were at large, one might know and avoid them. ~ George Eliot,
775:That farewell kiss which resembles greeting, that last glance of love which becomes the sharpest pang of sorrow. ~ George Eliot,
776:the red drapery which was being hung for Christmas spreading itself everywhere like a disease of the retina. Not ~ George Eliot,
777:They had entered the thorny wilderness, and the golden gates of their childhood had for ever closed behind them. ~ George Eliot,
778:What right have such men to represent Christianity—as if it were an institution for getting up idiots genteelly? ~ George Eliot,
779:And when a woman's will is as strong as the man's who wants to govern her, half her strength must be concealment. ~ George Eliot,
780:Failure after long perseverance is much grander than never to have a striving good enough to be called a failure. ~ George Eliot,
781:Hold up your head! You were not made for failure, you were made for victory. Go forward with a joyful confidence. ~ George Eliot,
782:Ignorance ... is a painless evil; so, I should think, is dirt, considering the merry faces that go along with it. ~ George Eliot,
783:Perbuatan-perbuatan kita menentukan siapa diri kita sebesar sebagaimana kita menentukan perbuatan-perbuatan kita. ~ George Eliot,
784:She was no longer struggling against the perception of facts, but adjusting herself to their clearest perception. ~ George Eliot,
785:When a conversation has taken a wrong turn for us, we only get farther and farther into the swamp of awkwardness. ~ George Eliot,
786:When we get to wishing a great deal for ourselves, whatever we get soon turns into mere limitation and exclusion. ~ George Eliot,
787:When you get me a good man made out of arguments, I will get you a good dinner with reading you the cookery book. ~ George Eliot,
788:When you get me a good man made out of arguments, I will get you a good dinner with reading you the cookery-book. ~ George Eliot,
789:...with the fine instinct of a lover, he felt that it would be best for her to hear his voice before she saw him. ~ George Eliot,
790:A toddling little girl is a center of common feeling which makes the most dissimilar people understand each other. ~ George Eliot,
791:A toddling little girl is a centre of common feeling which makes the most dissimilar people understand each other. ~ George Eliot,
792:Falsehood is so easy, truth so difficult. Even with no motive to be false, it is very hard to say the exact truth. ~ George Eliot,
793:No evil dooms us hopelessly except the evil we love, and desire to continue in, and make no effort to escape from. ~ George Eliot,
794:No story is the same to us after a lapse of time; or rather we who read it
are no longer the same interpreters. ~ George Eliot,
795:The greatest benefit we owe to the artist, whether painter, poet, or novelist, is the extension of our sympathies. ~ George Eliot,
796:when the people have made up their mind as they are making it up now, they don’t want a man—they only want a vote. ~ George Eliot,
797:Enveloped in a common mist, we seem to walk in clearness ourselves, and behold only the mist that enshrouds others. ~ George Eliot,
798:For there is no creature whose inward being is so strong that it is not greatly determined by what lies outside it. ~ George Eliot,
799:For we all of us, grave or light, get our thoughts entangled in metaphors, and act fatally on the strength of them. ~ George Eliot,
800:He was of an impressible nature, and lived a great deal in other people's opinions and feelings concerning himself. ~ George Eliot,
801:In bitter manuscript remarks on other men's notions about solar deities, he had become indifferent to the sunlight. ~ George Eliot,
802:In this stupid world most people never consider that a thing is good to be done unless it is done by their own set. ~ George Eliot,
803:Jealousy is never satisfied with anything short of an omniscience that would detect the subtlest fold of the heart. ~ George Eliot,
804:Mankind is not disposed to look narrowly into the conduct of great victors when their victory is on the right side. ~ George Eliot,
805:There is no sorrow I have thought more about than that-to love what is great, and try to reach it, and yet to fail. ~ George Eliot,
806:There is no sorrow I have thought more about than that—to love what is great, and try to reach it, and yet to fail. ~ George Eliot,
807:The rich ate and drank freely, accepting gout and apoplexy as things that ran mysteriously in respectable families. ~ George Eliot,
808:'Tis God gives skill, but not without men's hand: He could not make Antonio Stradivarius's violins without Antonio. ~ George Eliot,
809:trouble always seems heavier when it is only one's thought and not one's bodily activity that is employed about it. ~ George Eliot,
810:was something very new and strange in his life that these few words of trust from a woman should be so much to him. ~ George Eliot,
811:I am open to conviction on all points except dinner and debts. I hold that the one must be eaten and the other paid. ~ George Eliot,
812:In this stupid world, most people never consider that a thing is good to be done unless it is done by their own set. ~ George Eliot,
813:I shall never love anybody. I can't love people. I hate them.'

'The time will come, dear, the time will come. ~ George Eliot,
814:I thirsted for the unknown: the thirst is gone. O God, let me stay with the known, and be weary of it: I am content. ~ George Eliot,
815:It is seldom that the miserable can help regarding their misery as a wrong inflicted by those who are less miserable ~ George Eliot,
816:We prepare ourselves for sudden deeds by the reiterated choice of good or evil which gradually determines character. ~ George Eliot,
817:But Anxiety went on, though in noisy Christmas company; refusing to be utterly quieted even by much drinking. CHAPTER ~ George Eliot,
818:even the spring flowers and the grass had a dull shiver in them under the afternoon clouds that hid the sun fitfully; ~ George Eliot,
819:It is seldom that the miserable can help regarding their misery as a wrong inflicted by those who are less miserable. ~ George Eliot,
820:I’ve written to him, to desire that from henceforth he will send me no book or pamphlet on anything that ends in ism. ~ George Eliot,
821:She felt that she enjoyed it [horseback riding] in a pagan, sensuous way, and always looked forward to renouncing it. ~ George Eliot,
822:the present moment is all we can call our own for works of mercy, of righteous dealing, and of family tenderness. All ~ George Eliot,
823:There is no sorrow I have thought about more than that - to love what is great, and try to reach it, and yet to fail. ~ George Eliot,
824:What can still that hunger of the heart which sickens the eye for beauty, and makes sweet-scented ease an oppression? ~ George Eliot,
825:You must mind and not lower the Church in people's eyes by seeming to be frightened about it for such a little thing. ~ George Eliot,
826:Habit is the beneficent harness of routine which enables silly men to live respectfully and unhappy men to live calmly ~ George Eliot,
827:I care only to know, if possible, the lasting meaning that lies in all religious doctrine from the beginning till now. ~ George Eliot,
828:In our instinctive rebellion against pain, we are children again, and demand an active will to wreak our vengeance on. ~ George Eliot,
829:Life would be no better than candlelight tinsel and daylight rubbish if our spirits were not touched by what has been. ~ George Eliot,
830:They were too hopelessly alienated in their inner life ever to have that contest which is an effort towards agreement. ~ George Eliot,
831:But no story is the same to us after a lapse of time—
or rather, we who read it are no longer the same interpreters. ~ George Eliot,
832:Dorothea, he said to himself, was for ever enthroned in his soul: no other woman could sit higher than her footstool... ~ George Eliot,
833:Of course people need not be always talking well. Only one tells the quality of their minds when they try to talk well. ~ George Eliot,
834:We are contented with our day when we have been able to bear our grief in silence, and act as if we were not suffering. ~ George Eliot,
835:What is opportunity to the man who can't use it? An unfecundated egg, which the waves of time wash away into nonentity. ~ George Eliot,
836:You are a poem--and that is to be the best part of a poet--what makes up the
poet’s consciousness in his best moods. ~ George Eliot,
837:A peasant can no more help believing in a traditional superstition than a horse can help trembling when be sees a camel. ~ George Eliot,
838:Favourable Chance, I fancy, is the god of all men who follow their own devices instead of obeying a law they believe in. ~ George Eliot,
839:History, we know, is apt to repeat itself, and to foist very old incidents upon us with only a slight change of costume. ~ George Eliot,
840:It is so very rarely that facts hit that nice medium required by our own enlightened opinions and refined taste! Perhaps ~ George Eliot,
841:manners must be very marked indeed before they cease to be interpreted by preconceptions either confident or distrustful ~ George Eliot,
842:No matter whether failure came A thousand different times, For one brief moment of success, Life rang its golden chimes. ~ George Eliot,
843:our firmest convictions are often dependent on subtle impressions for which words are quite too coarse a medium. However ~ George Eliot,
844:Quarrel? Nonsense; we have not quarreled. If one is not to get into a rage sometimes, what is the good of being friends? ~ George Eliot,
845:So our lives glide on: the river ends we don't know where, and the sea begins, and then there is no more jumping ashore. ~ George Eliot,
846:there is nothing more thoroughly rotten than making people believe that society can be cured by a political hocus-pocus. ~ George Eliot,
847:We are overhasty to speak as if God did not manifest himself by our silent feeling, and make his love felt through ours. ~ George Eliot,
848:Death is the king of this world: 'Tis his park where he breeds life to feed him. Cries of pain are music for his banquet. ~ George Eliot,
849:God, immortality, duty - how inconceivable the first, how unbelievable the second, how peremptory and absolute the third. ~ George Eliot,
850:History, we know, is apt to repeat herself, and to foist very old incidents upon us with only a slight change of costume. ~ George Eliot,
851:let us love that other beauty too, which lies in no secret of proportion, but in the secret of deep human sympathy. Paint ~ George Eliot,
852:Quarrel? Nonsense; we have not quarrelled. If one is not to get into a rage sometimes, what is the good of being friends? ~ George Eliot,
853:Things are achieved when they are well begun. The perfect archer calls the deer his own While yet the shaft is whistling. ~ George Eliot,
854:To have in general but little feeling, seems to be the only security against feeling too much on any particular occasion. ~ George Eliot,
855:We have all got to exert ourselves a little to keep sane, and call things by the same names as other people call them by. ~ George Eliot,
856:Women should be protected from anyone's exercise of unrighteous power... but then, so should every other living creature. ~ George Eliot,
857:Friendship is the inexpressible comfort of feeling safe with a person, having neither to weigh thoughts nor measure words. ~ George Eliot,
858:It is just that I don’t know how I could live without the hope of her. It would be like learning to live with wooden legs. ~ George Eliot,
859:Plain women he regarded as he did the other severe facts of life, to be faced with philosophy and investigated by science. ~ George Eliot,
860:The human soul is hospitable, and will entertain conflicting sentiments and contradictory opinions with much impartiality. ~ George Eliot,
861:The majority of us scarcely see more distinctly the faultiness of our own conduct than the faultiness of our own judgement ~ George Eliot,
862:Your mind is a sort of world to me: you can tell me all I want to know. I think I should never be tired of being with you. ~ George Eliot,
863:And a man who speaks effectively through music is compelled to something more difficult than parliamentary eloquence.” With ~ George Eliot,
864:Certainly these men who had so few spontaneous ideas might be very useful members of society under good feminine direction, ~ George Eliot,
865:It is not true that a man's intellectual power is, like the strength of a timber beam, to be measured by its weakest point. ~ George Eliot,
866:she walked round and round the brown library considering by what sort of manoeuvre she could arrest her wandering thoughts. ~ George Eliot,
867:The moment of finding a fellow-creature is often as full of mingled doubt and exultation, as the moment of finding an idea. ~ George Eliot,
868:A man's mind must be continually expanding and shrinking between the whole human horizon and the horizon of an object-glass. ~ George Eliot,
869:Every man's work, pursued steadily, tends to become an end in itself, and so to bridge over the loveless chasms of his life. ~ George Eliot,
870:Favourable Chance, I fancy, is the god of all men who follow their own devices instead of obeying a law they believe in. Let ~ George Eliot,
871:Imagination is a licensed trespasser: it has no fear of dogs, but may climb over walls and peep in at windows with impunity. ~ George Eliot,
872:Impossible," said Mary, relapsing into her usual tone; "husbands are an inferior class of men, who require keeping in order. ~ George Eliot,
873:I never felt that I had enough music, - I wanted more instruments playing together; I wanted voices to be fuller and deeper. ~ George Eliot,
874:People who seem to enjoy their ill-temper have a way of keeping it in fine condition by inflicting privations on themselves. ~ George Eliot,
875:There's things to put up wi' in ivery place, an' you may change an' change an' not better yourself when all's said an' done. ~ George Eliot,
876:But womanly, I hope," said Mrs. Garth, half suspecting that Mrs. Casaubon might not hold the true principle of subordination. ~ George Eliot,
877:Mortals are easily tempted to pinch the life out of their neighbor's buzzing glory, and think that such killing is no murder. ~ George Eliot,
878:Mortals are easily tempted to pinch the life out of their neighbor’s buzzing glory, and think that such killing is no murder. ~ George Eliot,
879:... one's own faults are always a heavy chain to drag through life and one can't help groaning under the weight now and then. ~ George Eliot,
880:The gods of the hearth exist for us still; and let all new faith be tolerant of that fetishism, lest it bruise its own roots. ~ George Eliot,
881:Those old stories of visions and dreams guiding men have their truth; we are saved by making the future present to ourselves. ~ George Eliot,
882:we are over-hasty to speak—as if God did not manifest himself by our silent feeling, and make his love felt through ours. She ~ George Eliot,
883:Who can quit young lives after being long in company with them, and not desire to know what befell them in their after-years? ~ George Eliot,
884:Yes, young people are usually blind to everything but their own wishes, and seldom imagine how much those wishes cost others, ~ George Eliot,
885:a certain consciousness of our entire past and our imagined future blends itself with all our moments of keen sensibility. And ~ George Eliot,
886:And your mind is a sort of world to me; you can tell me all I want to know. I think I should never be tired of being with you. ~ George Eliot,
887:He had disliked Will while he helped him, but he had begun to dislike him still more now that Will had declined his help. That ~ George Eliot,
888:I daresay some would never get their eyes opened if it were not for a violent shock from the consequences of their own actions ~ George Eliot,
889:Mortals are easily tempted to pinch the life out of their neighbour's buzzing glory, and think that such killing is no murder. ~ George Eliot,
890:Opinions: men's thoughts about great subjects. Taste: their thoughts about small ones: dress, behavior, amusements, ornaments. ~ George Eliot,
891:... the human soul is hospitable, and will entertain conflicting sentiments and contradictory opinions with much impartiality. ~ George Eliot,
892:What people do who go into politics I can't think; it drives me almost mad to see mismanagement over only a few hundred acres. ~ George Eliot,
893:But we all know the wag’s definition of a philanthropist: a man whose charity increases directly as the square of the distance. ~ George Eliot,
894:Dogma gives a charter to mistake, but the very breath of science is a contest with mistake, and must keep the conscience alive. ~ George Eliot,
895:Human experience is usually paradoxical, if that means incongruous with the phrases of current talk or even current philosophy. ~ George Eliot,
896:It is always good to know, if only in passing, charming human beings. It refreshes one like flowers and woods and clear brooks. ~ George Eliot,
897:Of a truth, Knowledge is power, but it is a power reined by scruple, having a conscience of what must be and what may be. . . . ~ George Eliot,
898:Starting a long way off the true point, and proceeding by loops and zigzags , we now and then arrive just where we ought to be. ~ George Eliot,
899:... we all know the wag's definition of a philanthropist: a man whose charity increases directly as the square of the distance. ~ George Eliot,
900:We long for an affection altogether ignorant of our faults. Heaven has accorded this to us in the uncritical canine attachment. ~ George Eliot,
901:when you are among the fields and hedgerows, it is impossible to maintain a consistent superiority to simple natural pleasures. ~ George Eliot,
902:You won't be giving me away, father,' she had said before they went to church; 'you'll only be taking Aaron to be a son to you. ~ George Eliot,
903:But human experience is usually paradoxical, that means incongruous with the phrases of current talk or even current philosophy. ~ George Eliot,
904:Delicious autumn! My very soul is wedded to it, and if I were a bird I would fly about the earth seeking the successive autumns. ~ George Eliot,
905:It is a sad weakness in us, after all, that the thought of a man's death hallows him anew to us; as if life were not sacred too. ~ George Eliot,
906:It is pleasant to have a kind word now and then when one is not near enough to have a kind glance or a hearty shake by the hand. ~ George Eliot,
907:I trust you as holy men trust God; you could do nought that was not pure and loving, though the deed might pierce me unto death. ~ George Eliot,
908:It's them as take advantage that get advantage I' this world, I think: folks have to wait long enough afore it's brought to 'em. ~ George Eliot,
909:Man may content himself with the applause of the world and the homage paid to his intellect, but woman's heart has holier idols. ~ George Eliot,
910:Nevertheless the joy of being with Dinah would triumph - it was like the influence of climate, which no resistance can overcome. ~ George Eliot,
911:Persecution and revenge, like courtship and toadyism, will not prosper without a considerable expenditure of time and ingenuity, ~ George Eliot,
912:The kindness fell on him as sunshine falls on the wretched - he had no heart to taste it, and felt that it was very far off him. ~ George Eliot,
913:Things look dim to old folks: they'd need have some young eyes about 'em, to let 'em know the world's the same as it used to be. ~ George Eliot,
914:When our indignation is borne in submissive silence, we are apt to feel twinges of doubt afterwards as to our own generosity, if ~ George Eliot,
915:Any coward can fight a battle when he's sure of winning; but give me the man who has the pluck to fight when he's sure of losing. ~ George Eliot,
916:Fate has carried me 'Mid the thick arrows: I will keep my stand Not shrink and let the shaft pass by my breast To pierce another. ~ George Eliot,
917:It is for art to present images of a lovelier order than the actual, gently winning the affections, and so determining the taste. ~ George Eliot,
918:It is good to be helpful and kindly, but don't give yourself to be melted into candle grease for the benefit of the tallow trade. ~ George Eliot,
919:It’s rather a strong check to one’s self-complacency to find how much of one’s right doing depends on not being in want of money. ~ George Eliot,
920:The difficult task of knowing another soul is not for young gentleman whose consciousness is chiefly made up of their own wishes. ~ George Eliot,
921:The difficult task of knowing another soul is not for young gentlemen whose consciousness is chiefly made up of their own wishes. ~ George Eliot,
922:The mother's love is at first an absorbing delight, blunting all other sensibilities; it is an expansion of the animal existence. ~ George Eliot,
923:There is a chill air surrounding those who are down in the world, and people are glad to get away from them, as from a cold room. ~ George Eliot,
924:There's truth in wine, and there may be some in gin and muddy beer; but whether it's truth worth my knowing, is another question. ~ George Eliot,
925:the wisest of us must be beguiled in this way sometimes, and must think both better and worse of people than they deserve. Nature ~ George Eliot,
926:Will not a tiny speck very close to our vision blot out the glory of the world, and leave only a margin by which we see the blot? ~ George Eliot,
927:1st Gent. Our deeds are fetters that we forge ourselves. 2d Gent. Ay, truly: but I think it is the world That brings the iron. [1] ~ George Eliot,
928:Don't you think men overrate the necessity for humoring everybody's nonsense, till they get despised by the very fools they humor? ~ George Eliot,
929:Gwendolen would not have liked to be an object of disgust to this husband whom she hated: she liked all disgust to be on her side. ~ George Eliot,
930:Happen he knowsna as he wants t’ see her; he knowsna as I put salt in’s broth, but he’d miss it pretty quick if it warna there. He ~ George Eliot,
931:Her full nature, like that river of which Cyrus broke the strength, spent itself in channels which had no great name on the earth. ~ George Eliot,
932:It is always good to know, if only in passing, charming human beings.
It refreshes one like flowers and woods and clear brooks ~ George Eliot,
933:I went into science a great deal myself at one time; but I saw it would not do. It leads to everything; you can let nothing alone. ~ George Eliot,
934:Obligation may be stretched till it is no better than a brand of slavery stamped on us when we were too young to know its meaning. ~ George Eliot,
935:Perhaps the most delightful friendships are those in which there is much agreement, much disputation, and yet more personal liking ~ George Eliot,
936:She was no longer wresting with the grief, but could sit down with it as a lasting companion and make it a sharer in her thoughts. ~ George Eliot,
937:The law and medicine should be very serious professions to undertake, should they not? People's lives and fortunes depend on them. ~ George Eliot,
938:There is so much to read and the days are so short! I get more hungry for knowledge every day, and less able to satisfy my hunger. ~ George Eliot,
939:Under every guilty secret there is hidden a brood of guilty wishes, whose unwholesome infecting life is cherished by the darkness. ~ George Eliot,
940:You're mighty fond o' Craig, but for my part, I think he's welly like a cock as thinks the sun's rose o' purpose to hear him crow. ~ George Eliot,
941:But at present this caution against a too hasty judgment interests me more in relation to Mr. Casaubon than to his young cousin. If ~ George Eliot,
942:Hostesses who entertain much must make up their parties as ministers make up their cabinets, on grounds other than personal liking. ~ George Eliot,
943:I don't make myself disagreeable; it is you who find me so. Disagreeable is a word that describes your feelings and not my actions. ~ George Eliot,
944:I don't want the world to give me anything for my books except money enough to save me from the temptation to write only for money. ~ George Eliot,
945:In the man whose childhood has known caresses and kindness, there is always a fiber of memory that can be touched to gentle issues. ~ George Eliot,
946:Perhaps the most delightful friendships are those in which there is much agreement, much disputation, and yet more personal liking. ~ George Eliot,
947:She was no longer wrestling with the grief, but could sit down with it as a lasting companion and make it a sharer in her thoughts. ~ George Eliot,
948:What destroys us most effectively is not a malign fate but our own capacity for self-deception and for degrading our own best self. ~ George Eliot,
949:You must be sure of two things: you must love your work, and not be always looking over the edge of it, wanting your play to begin. ~ George Eliot,
950:Better a wrong will than a wavering; better a steadfast enemy than an uncertain friend; better a false belief than no belief at all. ~ George Eliot,
951:Despair no more leans on others than perfect contentment, and in despair pride ceases to be counteracted by the sense of dependence. ~ George Eliot,
952:I don't feel sure about doing good in any way now; everything seems like going on a mission to a people whose language I don't know. ~ George Eliot,
953:I know the sort,' said Mr. Hawley, 'some emissary. He'll begin with flourish about the Rights of Man and end with murdering a wench. ~ George Eliot,
954:In my opinion," said Lydgate, "legal training only makes a man more incompetent in questions that require knowledge of another kind. ~ George Eliot,
955:... in no part of the world is genteel visiting founded on esteem, in the absence of suitable furniture and complete dinner-service. ~ George Eliot,
956:There’s no pleasure i’ living, if you’re to be corked up for ever, and only dribble your mind out by the sly, like a leaky barrel. I ~ George Eliot,
957:They said of old the Soul had human shape, But smaller, subtler than the fleshly self, So wandered forth for airing when it pleased. ~ George Eliot,
958:Dorothea was not only his wife: she was a personification of that shallow world which surrounds the appreciated or desponding author. ~ George Eliot,
959:Esther always avoided asking questions of Lydley, who found an answer as she found a key, by pouring out a pocketful of miscellanies. ~ George Eliot,
960:Life is like our game at whist ... I don't enjoy the game much, but I like to play my cards well, and see what will be the end of it. ~ George Eliot,
961:Perhaps the wind Wails so in winter for the summers dead, And all sad sounds are nature's funeral cries For what has been and is not. ~ George Eliot,
962:Solomon's Proverbs, I think, have omitted to say, that as the sore palate findeth grit, so an uneasy consciousness heareth innuendos. ~ George Eliot,
963:The progress of the world can certainly never come at all save by the modified action of the individual beings who compose the world. ~ George Eliot,
964:There is heroism even in the circles of hell for fellow-sinners who cling to each other in the fiery whirlwind and never recriminate. ~ George Eliot,
965:The sons of Judah have to choose that God may again choose them. The divine principle of our race is action, choice, resolved memory. ~ George Eliot,
966:The worst of all hobbies are those that people think they can get money at. They shoot their money down like corn out of a sack then. ~ George Eliot,
967:Tis a petty kind of fame At best, that comes of making violins; And saves no masses, either. Thou wilt go To purgatory none the less. ~ George Eliot,
968:Trouble comes to us all in this life: we set our hearts on things which it isn't God's will for us to have, and then we go sorrowing. ~ George Eliot,
969:Under the vague dullness of the gray hours, dissatisfaction seeks a definite object and finds it in the privation of an untried good. ~ George Eliot,
970:But I hasten to finish my story. Brevity is justified at once to those who readily understand, and to those who will never understand. ~ George Eliot,
971:Death is the only physician, the shadow of his valley the only journeying that will cure us of age and the gathering fatigue of years. ~ George Eliot,
972:He had the superficial kindness of a good-humored, self-satisfied nature, that fears no rivalry, and has encountered no contrarieties. ~ George Eliot,
973:Mr. Craig was not above talking politics occasionally, though he piqued himself rather on a wise insight than on specific information. ~ George Eliot,
974:Solomon’s Proverbs, I think, have omitted to say, that as the sore palate findeth grit, so an uneasy consciousness heareth innuendoes. ~ George Eliot,
975:A pretty building I'm making, without either bricks or timber. I'm up i' the garret a'ready, and haven't so much as dug the foundation. ~ George Eliot,
976:"Heaven help us," said the old religion; the new one, from its very lack of that faith, will teach us all the more to help one another. ~ George Eliot,
977:I'd sooner have one real grief on my mind than twenty false. It's better to know one's robbed than to think one's going to be murdered. ~ George Eliot,
978:Ignorant kindness may have the effect of cruelty; but to be angry with it as if it were direct cruelty would be an ignorant unkindness. ~ George Eliot,
979:The really delightful marriage must be that where your husband was a sort of father, and could teach you even Hebrew, if you wished it. ~ George Eliot,
980:We have no right to come forward and urge wider changes for good, until we have tried to alter the evils which lie under our own hands. ~ George Eliot,
981:Every man's work, pursued steadily, tends in this way to become an end in itself, and so to bridge over the loveless chasms of his life. ~ George Eliot,
982:Fred at six years old thought her the nicest girl in the world, making her his wife with a brass ring which he had cut from an umbrella. ~ George Eliot,
983:I shall never forget you. I have never forgotten anyone whom I once knew. My life has never been crowded, and seems not likely to be so. ~ George Eliot,
984:It is the way with half the truth amidst which we live, that it only haunts us and makes dull pulsations that are never born into sound. ~ George Eliot,
985:Oh, Mr Deronda is not so very high,” said Kate. “He need not hinder us from thinking ill of the whole peerage and baronetage if we like. ~ George Eliot,
986:On the other hand, she was disproportionately indulgent towards the failings of men, and was often heard to say that these were natural. ~ George Eliot,
987:The floods of nonsense printed in the form of critical opinions seem to me a chief curse of the times, a chief obstacle to true culture. ~ George Eliot,
988:There is a great deal of unmapped country within us which would have to be taken into account in an explanation of our gusts and storms. ~ George Eliot,
989:The vainest woman is never thoroughly conscious of her beauty till she is loved by the man who sets her own passion vibrating in return. ~ George Eliot,
990:Women were expected to have weak opinions; but the great safeguard of society and of domestic life was, that opinions were not acted on. ~ George Eliot,
991:autobiography at least saves a man or woman that the world is curious about from the publication of a string of mistakes called 'Memoirs. ~ George Eliot,
992:It is probable that no speculative or theological hatred would be ultimately strong enough to resist the persuasive power of convenience: ~ George Eliot,
993:No anguish I have had to bear on your account has been too heavy a price to pay for the new life into which I have entered in loving you. ~ George Eliot,
994:No chemical process shows a more wonderful activity than the transforming influence of the thoughts we imagine to be going on in another. ~ George Eliot,
995:We learn words by rote, but not their meaning; that must be paid for with our life-blood, and printed in the subtle fibres of our nerves. ~ George Eliot,
996:You may try — but you can never imagine what it is to have a man's force of genius in you, and yet to suffer the slavery of being a girl. ~ George Eliot,
997:A child, more than all other gifts That earth can offer to declining man, Brings hope with it, and forward-looking thoughts." —WORDSWORTH. ~ George Eliot,
998:For what is love itself, for the one we love best? An enfolding of immeasurable cares which yet are better than any joys outside our love. ~ George Eliot,
999:Our guides, we pretend, must be sinless: as if those were not often the best teachers who only yesterday got corrected for their mistakes. ~ George Eliot,
1000:The really delightful
marriage must be that where your husband was a sort of father, and could teach you even Hebrew, if you wished it ~ George Eliot,
1001:As to people saying a few idle words about us, we must not mind that, any more than the old church steeple minds the rooks cawing about it. ~ George Eliot,
1002:A vigorous young mind not overbalanced by passion, finds a good in making acquaintance with life, and watches its own powers with interest. ~ George Eliot,
1003:but an amiable handsome baronet, who said ‘Exactly’ to her remarks even when she expressed uncertainty,—how could he affect her as a lover? ~ George Eliot,
1004:Doubtless a great anguish may do the work of years, and we may come out from that baptism of fire with a soul full of new awe and new pity. ~ George Eliot,
1005:Each thought is a nail that is driven In structures that cannot decay; And the mansion at last will be given To us as we build it each day. ~ George Eliot,
1006:If you put him a-horseback on politics, I warn you of the consequences. It was all very well to ride on sticks at home and call them ideas. ~ George Eliot,
1007:I think what we call the dullness of things is a disease in ourselves. Else how could anyone find an intense interest in life? And many do. ~ George Eliot,
1008:It is easy to say how we love new friends, and what we think of them, but words can never trace out all the fibers that knit us to the old. ~ George Eliot,
1009:Our selfishness is so robust and many-clutching that, well encouraged, it easily devours all sustenance away from our poor little scruples. ~ George Eliot,
1010:soul of man, when it gets fairly rotten, will bear you all sorts of poisonous toad-stools, and no eye can see whence came the seed thereof. ~ George Eliot,
1011:Fate has carried me
'Mid the thick arrows: I will keep my stand--
Not shrink and let the shaft pass by my breast
To pierce another. ~ George Eliot,
1012:For what is love itself, for the one we love best? - an enfolding of immeasurable cares which yet are better than any joys outside our love. ~ George Eliot,
1013:I beg your pardon: correct English is the slang of prigs who write history and essays. And the strongest slang of all is the slang of poets. ~ George Eliot,
1014:... it is because sympathy is but a living again through our own past in a new form, that confession often prompts a response of confession. ~ George Eliot,
1015:There was no reason why I should go anywhere. The world about me seemed like a vision that was hurrying by while I stood still with my pain. ~ George Eliot,
1016:The sublime delight of truthful speech to one who has the great gift of uttering it, will make itself felt even through the pangs of sorrow. ~ George Eliot,
1017:When one is five-and-twenty, one has not chalk-stones at one's finger-ends that the touch of a handsome girl should be entirely indifferent. ~ George Eliot,
1018:You should read history and look at ostracism, persecution, martyrdom, and that kind of thing. They always happen to the best men, you know. ~ George Eliot,
1019:Gossip is a sort of smoke that comes from the dirty tobacco-pipes of those who diffuse it: it proves nothing but the bad taste of the smoker. ~ George Eliot,
1020:Our sweet illusions are half of them conscious illusions, like effects of colour that we know to be made up of tinsel, broken glass and rags. ~ George Eliot,
1021:Self-confidence is apt to address itself to an imaginary dullness in others; as people who are well off speak in a cajoling tone to the poor. ~ George Eliot,
1022:A bachelor's children are always young: they're immortal children - always lisping, waddling, helpless, and with a chance of turning out good. ~ George Eliot,
1023:...but an amiable handsome baronet, who said ‘Exactly’ to her remarks even when she expressed uncertainty,—how could he affect her as a lover? ~ George Eliot,
1024:It so often happens that others are measuring us by our past self while we are looking back on that self with a mixture of disgust and sorrow. ~ George Eliot,
1025:There is much pain that is quite noiseless; and vibrations that make human agonies are often a mere whisper in the roar of hurrying existence. ~ George Eliot,
1026:We look at the one little woman's face we love, as we look at the face of our mother earth, and see all sorts of answers to our own yearnings. ~ George Eliot,
1027:What greater thing is there for human souls than to feel that they are joined for life - to be with each other in silent unspeakable memories. ~ George Eliot,
1028:He loved also to think, "I did it!" And I believe the only people who are free from that weakness are those who have no work to call their own. ~ George Eliot,
1029:I know the way o' wives; they set one on to abuse their husbands, and then they turn round on one and praise 'em as if they wanted to sell 'em. ~ George Eliot,
1030:Instead of getting a soft fence against the cold, shadowy, unapplausive audience of his life, had he only given it a more substantial presence? ~ George Eliot,
1031:still—it could not be fairly called wooing a woman to tell her that he would never woo her. It must be admitted to be a ghostly kind of wooing. ~ George Eliot,
1032:The soul of man, when it gets fairly rotten, will bear you all sorts of poisonous toad-stools, and no eye can see whence came the seed thereof. ~ George Eliot,
1033:to have a discussion coolly waived when you feel that justice is all on your own side is even more exasperating in marriage than in philosophy. ~ George Eliot,
1034:You youngsters nowadays think you're to begin with living well and working easy; you've no notion of running afoot before you get on horseback. ~ George Eliot,
1035:I could not without vile hypocrisy and a miserable truckling to the smile of the world ... profess to join in worship which I wholly disapprove. ~ George Eliot,
1036:One couldn't carry on life comfortably without a little blindness to the fact that everything has been said better than we can put it ourselves. ~ George Eliot,
1037:The wrong that rouses our angry passions finds only a medium in us; it passes through us like a vibration, and we inflict what we have suffered. ~ George Eliot,
1038:As to his religious notions—why, as Voltaire said, incantations will destroy a flock of sheep if administered with a certain quantity of arsenic. ~ George Eliot,
1039:Before such calm external beauty the presence of a vague fear is more distinctly felt - like a raven flapping its slow wing across the sunny air. ~ George Eliot,
1040:I am influenced at the present time by far higher considerations and by a nobler idea of duty than I ever was when I held the Evangelical belief. ~ George Eliot,
1041:I can't bear fishing. I think people look like fools sitting watching a line hour after hour-or else throwing and throwing, and catching nothing. ~ George Eliot,
1042:Still, I repeat, there was a general impression that Lydgate was something rather more uncommon than any general practitioner in Middlemarch. And ~ George Eliot,
1043:There are moments when our passions speak and decide for us ... like a fire kindled within our being to which everything else in us is mere fuel. ~ George Eliot,
1044:Trouble is so hard to bear, is it not?—How can we live and think that any one has trouble—piercing trouble—and we could help them, and never try? ~ George Eliot,
1045:What business has an old bachelor like that to marry?' said Sir James. 'He has one foot in the grave.' 'He means to draw it out again, I suppose. ~ George Eliot,
1046:George Eliot has the heart of Sappho; but the face, with the long proboscis, the protruding teeth of the Apocalyptic horse, betrayed animality. ~ George Meredith,
1047:I can't bear fishing. I think people look like fools sitting watching a line hour after hour--or else throwing and throwing, and catching nothing. ~ George Eliot,
1048:If you are not proud of your cellar, there is no thrill of satisfaction in seeing your guest hold up his wineglass to the light and look judicial. ~ George Eliot,
1049:Religion can only change when the emotions which fill it are changed; and the religion of personal fear remains nearly at the level of the savage. ~ George Eliot,
1050:She was one of those women who are never handsome till they are old, and she had had the wisdom to embrace the beauty of age as early as possible. ~ George Eliot,
1051:The intense happiness of our union is derived in a high degree from the perfect freedom with which we each follow and declare our own impressions. ~ George Eliot,
1052:There are few prophets in the world; few sublimely beautiful women; few heroes. I can’t afford to give all my love and reverence to such rarities: ~ George Eliot,
1053:Well, I aren't like a bird-clapper, forced to make a rattle when the wind blows on me. I can keep my own counsel when there's no good i' speaking. ~ George Eliot,
1054:Well, well, my boy, if good luck knocks at your door, don't you put your head out at window and tell it to be gone about its business, that's all. ~ George Eliot,
1055:A child, more than all other gifts
That earth can offer to declining man,
Brings hope with it, and forward-looking thoughts."
—WORDSWORTH. ~ George Eliot,
1056:A man never lies with more delicious languor under the influence of a passion than when he has persuaded himself that he shall subdue it to-morrow. ~ George Eliot,
1057:And certainly, the mistakes that we male and female mortals make when we have our own way might fairly raise some wonder that we are so fond of it. ~ George Eliot,
1058:... Genius consisting neither in self-conceit nor in humilty, but in a power to making or do, not anything in general, but something in particular. ~ George Eliot,
1059:human feeling is like the mighty rivers that bless the earth: it does not wait for beauty—it flows with resistless force and brings beauty with it. ~ George Eliot,
1060:Human longings are perversely obstinate; and to the man whose mouth is watering for a peach, it is of no use to offer the largest vegetable marrow. ~ George Eliot,
1061:I am perhaps talking rather superfluously; but a man likes to assume superiority over himself, by holding up his bad example and sermonising on it. ~ George Eliot,
1062:I found it better for my soul to be humble before the mysteries o' God's dealings, and not be making a clatter about what I could never understand. ~ George Eliot,
1063:John considered a young master as the natural enemy of an old servant, and young people in general as a poor contrivance for carrying on the world. ~ George Eliot,
1064:The egoism which enters into our theories does not affect their sincerity; rather, the more our egoism is satisfied, the more robust is our belief. ~ George Eliot,
1065:At one time you take pleasure in a sort of perverse self-denial, and at another you have not resolution to resist a thing that you know to be wrong. ~ George Eliot,
1066:Half the sorrows of women would be averted if they could repress the speech they know to be useless-nay, the speech they have resolved not to utter. ~ George Eliot,
1067:Our consciences are not all of the same pattern, an inner deliverance of fixed laws: they are the voice of sensibilities as various as our memories. ~ George Eliot,
1068:The years between fifty and seventy are the hardest. You are always being asked to do things, and yet you are not decrepit enough to turn them down. ~ George Eliot,
1069:We are all of us denying or fulfilling prayers – and men in their careless deeds walk amidst invisible outstretched arms and pleadings made in vain. ~ George Eliot,
1070:he held it one of the prettiest attitudes of the feminine mind to adore a man’s pre-eminence without too precise a knowledge of what it consisted in. ~ George Eliot,
1071:Human feeling is like the mighty rivers that bless the earth: it does not wait for beauty — it flows with resistless force and brings beauty with it. ~ George Eliot,
1072:It cuts one sadly to see the grief of old people; they've no way o' working it off; and the new spring brings no new shoots out on the withered tree. ~ George Eliot,
1073:There is a sort of jealousy which needs very little fire: it is hardly a passion, but a blight bred in the cloudy, damp despondency of uneasy egoism. ~ George Eliot,
1074:There is a sort of jealousy which needs very little fire; it is hardly a passion, but a blight bred in the cloudy, damp despondency of uneasy egoism. ~ George Eliot,
1075:And certainly, the mistakes that we male and female mortals make when we have our own way might fairly raise some wonder that we are so fond of it. On ~ George Eliot,
1076:It is painful to be told that anything is very fine and not be able to feel that it is fine--something like being blind, while people talk of the sky. ~ George Eliot,
1077:Often the soul is ripened into fuller goodness while age has spread an ugly film, so that mere glances can never divine the preciousness of the fruit. ~ George Eliot,
1078:Rosamond being one of those women who live much in the idea that each man they meet would have preferred them if the preference had not been hopeless. ~ George Eliot,
1079:Some folks' tongues are like the clocks as run on strikin', not to tell you the time o' the day, but because there's summat wrong i' their own inside. ~ George Eliot,
1080:The clergy are, practically, the most irresponsible of all talkers.

["Evangelical Teaching: Dr. Cumming," The Westminster Review, 1885.] ~ George Eliot,
1081:The ‘History of the Devil,’ by Daniel Defoe,–not quite the right book for a little girl,” said Mr. Riley. “How came it among your books, Mr. Tulliver? ~ George Eliot,
1082:There are some cases in which the sense of injury breeds not the will to inflict injuries and climb over them as a ladder, but a hatred of all injury. ~ George Eliot,
1083:There is hardly any mental misery worse than that of having our own serious phrases, our own rooted beliefs, caricatured by a charlatan or a hireling. ~ George Eliot,
1084:We are poor plants buoyed up by the air-vessels of our own conceit: alas for us, if we get a few pinches that empty us of that windy self-subsistence. ~ George Eliot,
1085:We reap what we sow, but nature has love over and above that justice, and gives us shadow and blossom and fruit, that spring from no planting of ours. ~ George Eliot,
1086:For getting a fine flourishing growth of stupidity there is nothing like pouring out on a mind a good amount of subjects in which it feels no interest. ~ George Eliot,
1087:For the egoism which enters into our theories does not affect their sincerity; rather, the more our egoism is satisfied, the more robust is our belief. ~ George Eliot,
1088:Her anger said, as anger is apt to say, that God was with her— that all heaven, though it were crowded with spirits watching them, must be on her side. ~ George Eliot,
1089:he was gradually discovering the delight there is in frank kindness and companionship between a man and a woman who have no passion to hide or confess. ~ George Eliot,
1090:How will you find good? It is not a thing of choice; it is a river that flows from the foot of the Invisible Throne and flows by the path of obedience. ~ George Eliot,
1091:Is it not rather what we expect in men, that they should have numerous strands of experience lying side by side and never compare them with each other? ~ George Eliot,
1092:It is offensive to tell a lady when she is expressing her amazement at your skill, that she is altogether mistaken and rather foolish in her amazement. ~ George Eliot,
1093:... learning to love any one is like an increase of property, -- it increases care, and brings many new fears lest precious things should come to harm. ~ George Eliot,
1094:No sooner does a woman show that she has genius or effective talent, than she receives the tribute of being moderately praised and severely criticised. ~ George Eliot,
1095:Strong souls Live like fire-hearted suns to spend their strength In farthest striving action; breathe more free In mighty anguish than in trivial ease. ~ George Eliot,
1096:The little light he possessed spread its beams so narrowly, that frustrated belief was a curtain broad enough to create for him the blackness of night. ~ George Eliot,
1097:You go against rottenness, and there is nothing more thoroughly rotten than making people believe that society can be cured by a political hocus-pocus. ~ George Eliot,
1098:Anger seek it prey,-- Something to tear with sharp-edged tooth and claw, Like not to go off hungry, leaving Love To feast on milk and honeycomb at will. ~ George Eliot,
1099:character is not cut in marble—it is not something solid and unalterable. It is something living and changing, and may become diseased as our bodies do. ~ George Eliot,
1100:I don’t see how a man is to be good for much unless he has some one woman to love him dearly.’ ‘I think the goodness should come before he expects that. ~ George Eliot,
1101:I'm proof against that word failure. I've seen behind it. The only failure a man ought to fear is failure of cleaving to the purpose he sees to be best. ~ George Eliot,
1102:Then I shall tell you. It is because you are to me the chief woman in the world - the throned lady whose colours I carry between my heart and my armour. ~ George Eliot,
1103:What business has an old bachelor like that to marry?' said Sir James. 'He has one foot in the grave.'

'He means to draw it out again, I suppose. ~ George Eliot,
1104:A bit o' bread's what I like from one year's end to the other; but men's stomachs are made so comical, they want a change--they do, I know, God help 'em. ~ George Eliot,
1105:Childhood is only the beautiful and happy time in contemplation and retrospect: to the child it is full of deep sorrows, the meaning of which is unknown. ~ George Eliot,
1106:I fear that in this thing many rich people deceive themselves. They go on accumulating the means but never using them; making bricks, but never building. ~ George Eliot,
1107:I have nothing to tell except travellers' stories, which are always tiresome, like the description of a play which was very exciting to those who saw it. ~ George Eliot,
1108:My books don't seem to belong to me after I have once written them; and I find myself delivering opinions about them as if I had nothing to do with them. ~ George Eliot,
1109:Slander may be defeated by equanimity; but courageous thoughts will not pay your baker’s hill, and fortitude is nowhere considered legal tender for beef. ~ George Eliot,
1110:The golden moments in the stream of life rush past us and we see nothing but sand; the angels come to visit us, and we only know them when they are gone. ~ George Eliot,
1111:There are episodes in most men's lives in which their highest qualities can only cast a deterring shadow over the objects that fill their inward version. ~ George Eliot,
1112:The tread Of coming footsteps cheats the midnight watcher Who holds her heart and waits to hear them pause, And hears them never pause, but pass and die. ~ George Eliot,
1113:Apparently the mingled thread in the web of their life was so curiously twisted together that there could be no joy without a sorrow coming close upon it. ~ George Eliot,
1114:Character is not cut in marble - it is not something solid and unalterable. It is something living and changing, and may become diseased as our bodies do. ~ George Eliot,
1115:eulogy—especially from a young lass who, as he informed his mother that evening, had “such uncommon eyes, they looked somehow as they made him feel nohow. ~ George Eliot,
1116:It is very difficult to be learned; it seems as if people were worn out on the way to great thoughts, and can never enjoy them because they are too tired. ~ George Eliot,
1117:The golden moments in the stream of life rush past us, and we see nothing but sand; the angels come to visit us, and we only know them when they are gone. ~ George Eliot,
1118:There are conditions under which the most majestic person is obliged to sneeze, and our emotions are liable to be acted on in the same incongruous manner. ~ George Eliot,
1119:But Duty has a trick of behaving unexpectedly—something like a heavy friend whom we have amiably asked to visit us and who breaks his leg within our gates. ~ George Eliot,
1120:Duty has a trick of behaving unexpectedly -- something like a heavy friend whom we have amiably asked to visit us, and who breaks his leg within our gates. ~ George Eliot,
1121:Her imagination was not easily acted on, but she could not help thinking that her case was a hard one, since it appeared that other people thought it hard. ~ George Eliot,
1122:I thought we should never part with that while we lived; everything is going away from us; the end of our lives will have nothing in it like the beginning! ~ George Eliot,
1123:I've been turning it over in after-dinner speeches, but it looks awkward-it's not what people are used to-it wants a good deal of Latin to make it go down. ~ George Eliot,
1124:more needful that my heart should swell with loving admiration at some trait of gentle goodness in the faulty people who sit at the same hearth with me, or ~ George Eliot,
1125:Pues no podemos haber aquello que queremos, queramos aquello que podremos. Since we cannot get what we like, let us like what we can get. —Spanish Proverb. ~ George Eliot,
1126:There is no feeling, perhaps, except the extremes of fear and grief, that does not find relief in music,--that does not make a man sing or play the better. ~ George Eliot,
1127:There was my brother, as is dead an’ gone, had a housekeeper once, an’ she took half the feathers out o’ the best bed, an’ packed ’em up an’ sent ’em away. ~ George Eliot,
1128:To most mortals there is a stupidity which is unendurable and a stupidity which is altogether acceptable - else, indeed, what would become of social bonds? ~ George Eliot,
1129:To most mortals there is a stupidity which is unendurable and a stupidity which is altogether acceptable — else, indeed, what would become of social bonds? ~ George Eliot,
1130:You are not a woman. You may try-but you can never imagine what it is to have a man's force of genius in you and yet to suffer the slavery of being a girl. ~ George Eliot,
1131:Art is the nearest thing to life; it is a mode of amplifying experience and extending our contact with our fellow men beyond the bounds of our personal lot. ~ George Eliot,
1132:Art is the nearest thing to life; it is a mode of amplifying experience and extending our contact with our fellow-men beyond the bounds of our personal lot. ~ George Eliot,
1133:Fatally powerful as religious systems have been, human nature is stronger and wider, and though dogmas may hamper they cannot absolutely repress its growth. ~ George Eliot,
1134:I like breakfast-time better than any other moment in the day. No dust has settled on one's mind then, and it presents a clear mirror to the rays of things. ~ George Eliot,
1135:Mr. Bates was sober, with that manly, British, churchman-like sobriety which can carry a few glasses of grog without any perceptible clarification of ideas. ~ George Eliot,
1136:Mrs. Poyser was scrupulous in declaring that she had “nothing to say again’ him, on’y it was a pity he couldna be hatched o’er again, an’ hatched different. ~ George Eliot,
1137:To fear the examination of any proposition apears to me an intellectual and a moral palsy that will ever hinder the firm grasping of any substance whatever. ~ George Eliot,
1138:for it was nearly five o’clock; and if people are to quarrel often, it follows as a corollary that their quarrels cannot be protracted beyond certain limits. ~ George Eliot,
1139:Here undoubtedly lies the chief poetic energy: - in the force of imagination that pierces or exalts the solid fact, instead of floating among cloud-pictures. ~ George Eliot,
1140:In our spring-time every day has its hidden growths in the mind, as it has in the earth when the little folded blades are getting ready to pierce the ground. ~ George Eliot,
1141:Our mental business is carried on much in the same way as the business of the State: a great deal of hard work is done by agents who are not acknowledged. In ~ George Eliot,
1142:There are but two sorts of government: one where men show their teeth at each other, and one where men show their tongues and lick the feet of the strongest. ~ George Eliot,
1143:We must not sit still and look for miracles; up and doing, and the Lord will be with thee. Prayer and pains, through faith in Christ Jesus, will do anything. ~ George Eliot,
1144:What to one man is the virtue which he has sunk below the possibility of aspiring to, is to another the backsliding by which he forfeits his spiritual crown. ~ George Eliot,
1145:But it is very difficult to be learned; it seems as if people were worn out on the way to great thoughts, and can never enjoy them because they are too tired. ~ George Eliot,
1146:If a man means to be hard, let him keep in his saddle and speak from that height, above the level of pleading eyes, and with the command of a distant horizon. ~ George Eliot,
1147:Mrs. Hackit declines cream; she has so long abstained from it with an eye to the weekly butter-money, that abstinence, wedded to habit, has begotten aversion. ~ George Eliot,
1148:She disliked this cautious weighing of consequences, instead of an ardent faith in efforts of justice and mercy, which would conquer by their emotional force. ~ George Eliot,
1149:[She] looked as if her nerves were quivering with the expectation that something would be thrown at her. But she never had anything worse than words to dread. ~ George Eliot,
1150:the involuntary loss of any familiar object almost always brings a chill as from an evil omen; it seems to be the first finger-shadow of advancing death. From ~ George Eliot,
1151:The poverty of our imagination is no measure of say the world's resources. Our posterity will no doubt get fuel in ways that we are unable to devise for them. ~ George Eliot,
1152:there is no escape from sordidness but by being free from money-craving, with all its base hopes and temptations, its watching for death, its hinted requests. ~ George Eliot,
1153:For my part I have some fellow-feeling with Dr. Sprague: one's self-satisfaction is an untaxed kind of property which it is very unpleasant to find deprecated. ~ George Eliot,
1154:It is well known to all experienced minds that our firmest convictions are often dependent on subtle impressions for which words are quite too coarse a medium. ~ George Eliot,
1155:My childhood was full of deep sorrows - colic, whooping-cough, dread of ghosts, hell, Satan, and a Deity in the sky who was angry when I ate too much plumcake. ~ George Eliot,
1156:That things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs ~ George Eliot,
1157:When a man had married into a family where there was a whole litter of women, he might have plenty to put up with if he chose. But Mr. Tulliver did not choose. ~ George Eliot,
1158:Adam went to bed comforted, having woven for himself an ingenious web of probabilities—the surest screen a wise man can place between himself and the truth. His ~ George Eliot,
1159:But let the wise be warned against too great readiness at explanation: it multiplies the sources of mistake, lengthening the sum for reckoners sure to go wrong. ~ George Eliot,
1160:But let the wise be warned against too great readiness to explanation: it multiplies the sources of mistake, lengthening the sum for reckoners sure to go wrong. ~ George Eliot,
1161:But that intimacy of mutual embarrassment, in which each feels that the other is feeling something, having once existed, its effect is not to be done away with. ~ George Eliot,
1162:He longed now to have the sort of apprenticeship to life which would not shape him too definitely, and rob him of the choice that might come from a free growth. ~ George Eliot,
1163:Here and there a cygnet is reared uneasily among the ducklings in the brown pond, and never finds the living stream in fellowship with its own oary-footed kind. ~ George Eliot,
1164:...he was one of those men who can be prompt without being rash, because their motives run in fixed tracks, and they have no need to reconcile conflicting aims. ~ George Eliot,
1165:It is very hard to say the exact truth, even about your own immediate feelings – much harder than to say something fine about them which is not the exact truth. ~ George Eliot,
1166:read to each other from novels by George Eliot and Dickens and Hardy and Tolstoy during my elementary school years. My brother Bill (now a professor of English) ~ Robert Coles,
1167:Thank God; human feeling is like the mighty rivers that bless the earth: it does not wait for beauty — it flows with resistless force and brings beauty with it. ~ George Eliot,
1168:That things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs. ~ George Eliot,
1169:The evenings were delicious in that quiet spot, when the new hay-ricks lately set up were sending forth odours to mingle with the breath of the rich old garden. ~ George Eliot,
1170:To many among us neither heaven nor earth has any revelation till some personality touches theirs with a particular influence, subduing them into receptiveness. ~ George Eliot,
1171:... we are most of us brought up in the notion that the highest motive for not doing a wrong is something irrespective of the beings who would suffer the wrong. ~ George Eliot,
1172:A deistical prater, fit to sit in the chimney-corner of a pot-house, and make blasphemous comments on the one greasy newspaper fingered by beer-swilling tinkers. ~ George Eliot,
1173:It is the favourite stratagem of our passions to sham a retreat, and to turn sharp round upon us at the moment we have made up our minds that the day is our own. ~ George Eliot,
1174:It was a constant source of irritation to him that the public men on his side were, on the whole, not conspicuously better than the public men on the other side. ~ George Eliot,
1175:Love has a way of cheating itself consciously, like a child who plays at solitary hide-and-seek; it is pleased with assurances that it all the while disbelieves. ~ George Eliot,
1176:Play not with paradoxes. That caustic which you handle in order to scorch others may happen to sear your own fingers and make them dead to the quality of things. ~ George Eliot,
1177:This was a puzzling world, as he often said, and if you drive your wagon in a hurry, you may light on an awkward corner. Mr. Riley, meanwhile, was not impatient. ~ George Eliot,
1178:What have you been doing lately?’ ‘I? Oh, minding the house–pouring out syrup–pretending to be amiable and contented–learning to have a bad opinion of everybody. ~ George Eliot,
1179:A map was a fine thing to study when you were disposed to think of something else, being made up of names that would turn into a chime if you went back upon them. ~ George Eliot,
1180:He once called her his basil plant, and when she asked for an explanation said that basil was a plant which had flourished wonderfully on a murdered man’s brains. ~ George Eliot,
1181:If I got places, sir, it was because I made myself fit for 'em. If you want to slip into a round hole, you must first make a ball of yourself; that's where it is. ~ George Eliot,
1182:Life is so complicated a game that the devices of skill are liable to be defeated at every turn by air-blown chances, incalculable as the descent of thistle-down. ~ George Eliot,
1183:One morning, some weeks after her arrival at Lowick, Dorothea - but why always Dorothea? Was her point of view the only possible one with regard to this marriage? ~ George Eliot,
1184:The early months of marriage often are times of critical tumult,--whether that of a shrimp pool or of deeper water,--which afterwards subside into cheerful peace. ~ George Eliot,
1185:there are two ways of speaking an audience will always like: one is, to tell them what they don't understand; and the other is, to tell them what they're used to. ~ George Eliot,
1186:There's a thing I've got i' my head," said Mr. Tulliver at last, in rather a lower tone than usual, as he turned his head and looked steadfastly at his companion. ~ George Eliot,
1187:The years seem to rush by now, and I think of death as a fast approaching end of a journey-double and treble reason for loving as well as working while it is day. ~ George Eliot,
1188:an afternoon in which destiny disguises her cold awful face behind a hazy radiant veil, encloses us in warm downy wings, and poisons us with violet-scented breath. ~ George Eliot,
1189:and she rarely forgot that while her grammar and accent were above the town standard, she wore a plain cap, cooked the family dinner, and darned all the stockings. ~ George Eliot,
1190:He once called her his basil plant; and when she asked for an explanation, said that basil was a plant which had flourished wonderfully on a murdered man's brains. ~ George Eliot,
1191:Mrs. Tulliver, as we have seen, was not without influence over her husband. No woman is; she can always incline him to do either what she wishes, or the reverse... ~ George Eliot,
1192:Surely it is not true blessedness to be free of sorrow while there is sorrow and sin in the world. Sorrow is a part of love and love does not seek to throw it off. ~ George Eliot,
1193:A book which hath been culled from the flowers of all books. ~ George Eliot, The Spanish Gypsy (1868), Book II; in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 653-54.,
1194:A woman's heart must be of such a size and no larger, else it must be pressed small, like Chinese feet; her happiness is to be made as cakes are, by a fixed recipe. ~ George Eliot,
1195:(connected, I may say, with such activity of the affections as even the preoccupations of a work too special to be abdicated could not uninterruptedly dissimulate); ~ George Eliot,
1196:For character too is a process and an unfolding. . . among our valued friends is there not someone or other who is a little too self confident and disdainful. . . . ~ George Eliot,
1197:He leaped over the years in this way, and, in the haste of strong purpose and strong desire, did not see how they would be made up of slow days, hours, and minutes. ~ George Eliot,
1198:He once called her his basil plant;* and when she asked for an explanation, said that basil was a plant which had flourished wonderfully on a murdered man’s brains. ~ George Eliot,
1199:If we need a true conception of the popular character to guide our sympathies rightly, we need it equally to check our theories, and direct us in their application. ~ George Eliot,
1200:I used to think I could never bear life if it kept on being the same every day, and I must always be doing things of no consequence and never know anything greater. ~ George Eliot,
1201:No one knew where wandering men had their homes or their origin; and how was a man to be explained unless you at least knew somebody who knew his father and mother? ~ George Eliot,
1202:To act with doubleness towards a man whose own conduct was double, was so near an approach to virtue that it deserved to be called by no meaner name than diplomacy. ~ George Eliot,
1203:When one is grateful for something too good for common thanks, writing is less unsatisfactory than speech-one does not, at least, hear how inadequate the words are. ~ George Eliot,
1204:Before marriage she had completely mastered my imagination, for she was a secret to me; and I created the unknown thought before which I trembled as if it were hers. ~ George Eliot,
1205:Dear heart, dear heart! But you must have a cup o’ tea first, child,” said Mrs. Poyser, falling at once from the key of B with five sharps to the frank and genial C. ~ George Eliot,
1206:I hold it a blasphemy to say that a man ought not to fight against authority: there is no great religion and no great freedom that has not done it, in the beginning. ~ George Eliot,
1207:It is curious what patches of hardness and tenderness lie side by side in men’s dispositions. I suppose he has some test by which he finds out whom Heaven cares for. ~ George Eliot,
1208:The days were longer then (for time, like money, is measured by our needs), when summer afternoons were spacious, and the clock ticked slowly in the winter evenings. ~ George Eliot,
1209:... the majority of us scarcely see more distinctly the faultiness of our own conduct than the faultiness of our own arguments, orthe dulness [sic] of our own jokes. ~ George Eliot,
1210:When God makes His presence felt through us, we are like the burning bush: Moses never took any heed what sort of bush it was—he only saw the brightness of the Lord. ~ George Eliot,
1211:When one wanted one's interests looking after whatever the cost, it was not so well for a lawyer to be over honest, else he might not be up to other people's tricks. ~ George Eliot,
1212:She was not in the least teaching Mr Casaubon to ask if he were good enough for her, but merely asking herself anxiously how she could be good enough for Mr Casaubon. ~ George Eliot,
1213:... the business of life shuts us up within the environs of London and within sight of human advancement, which I should be so very glad to believe in without seeing. ~ George Eliot,
1214:The golden moments īn the stream of life rush past us and we see nothing but sand; The angels come to visit us, and we only know them when they are gone. —George Eliot ~ Karen White,
1215:there’s the ’pinion a man has of himsen, and there’s the ’pinion other folks have on him. There’d be two ’pinions about a cracked bell, if the bell could hear itself. ~ George Eliot,
1216:There was nothing financial, still less sordid, in her previsions: she cared about what were considered refinements, and not about the money that was to pay for them. ~ George Eliot,
1217:When you've been used to doing things, and they've been taken away from you, it's as if your hands had been cut off, and you felt the fingers as are of no use to you. ~ George Eliot,
1218:Do we not wile away moments of inanity or fatigued waiting by repeating some trivial movement or sound, until the repetition has bred a want, which is incipient habit? ~ George Eliot,
1219:For a long while she had been oppressed by the indefiniteness which hung in her mind, like a thick summer haze, over all her desire to make her life greatly effective. ~ George Eliot,
1220:Their ardor alternated between a vague ideal and the common yearning of womanhood; so that the one was disapproved as extravagance, and the other condemned as a lapse. ~ George Eliot,
1221:There is no general doctrine which is not capable of eating out our morality if unchecked by the deep-seated habit of direct fellow-feeling with individual fellow-men. ~ George Eliot,
1222:What greater thing is there for two human souls than to feel that they are joined to strengthen each other, to be at one with each other in silent unspeakable memories ~ George Eliot,
1223:Who can know how much of his most inward life is made up of the thoughts he believes other men to have about him, until that fabric of opinion is threatened with ruin? ~ George Eliot,
1224:I have the conviction that excessive literary production is a social offense. ... Everyone who contributes to the 'too much' of literature is doing grave social injury. ~ George Eliot,
1225:I would rather not be engaged. When people are engaged, they begin to think of being married soon, and I should like everything to go on for a long while just as it is. ~ George Eliot,
1226:Perspective, as its inventor remarked, is a beautiful thing. What horrors of damp huts, where human beings languish, may not become picturesque through aerial distance! ~ George Eliot,
1227:Satan was a blunderer ... who made a stupendous failure. If he had succeeded, we should all have been worshipping him, and his portrait would have been more flattering. ~ George Eliot,
1228:She was not in the least teaching Mr. Casaubon to ask if he were good enough for her, but merely asking herself anxiously how she could be good enough for Mr. Casaubon. ~ George Eliot,
1229:when God makes his presence felt through us, we are like the burning bush:* Moses never took any heed what sort of bush it was—he only saw the brightness of the Lord. I ~ George Eliot,
1230:A fine lady is a squirrel-headed thing, with small airs and small notions; about as applicable to the business of life as a pair of tweezers to the clearing of a forest. ~ George Eliot,
1231:It is a fact capable of amiable interpretation that ladies are not the worst disposed towards a new acquaintance of their own sex, because she has points of inferiority. ~ George Eliot,
1232:It seems to me we can never give up longing and wishing while we are still alive. There are certain things we feel to be beautiful and good, and we must hunger for them. ~ George Eliot,
1233:Our life is determined for us--and it makes the mind very free when we give up wishing, and only think of bearing what is laid upon us, and doing what is given us to do. ~ George Eliot,
1234:There is a power in the direct glance of a sincere and loving human soul, which will do more to dissipate prejudice and kindle charity than the most elaborate arguments. ~ George Eliot,
1235:There's life for you. Spend the best years of your life studying penmanship and rhetoric and syntax and Beowulf and George Eliot, and then somebody steals your pencil. ~ Dorothy Parker,
1236:To think of the part one little woman can play in the life of a man, so that to renounce her may be a very good imitation of heroism, and to win her may be a discipline. ~ George Eliot,
1237:When a tender affection has been storing itself in us through many of our years, the idea that we could accept any exchange for it seems to be a cheapening of our lives. ~ George Eliot,
1238:Will not a tiny speck very close to our vision blot out the glory of the world, and leave only a margin by which we see the blot? I know no speck so troublesome as self. ~ George Eliot,
1239:I have often felt since I have been in Rome that most of our lives would look much uglier and more bungling than the pictures, if they could be put on the wall.” Dorothea ~ George Eliot,
1240:I should like to know what is the proper function of women, if it is not to make reasons for husbands to stay at home, and still stronger reasons for bachelors to go out. ~ George Eliot,
1241:It had seemed to him as if they were like two creatures slowly turning to marble in each other’s presence, while their hearts were conscious and their eyes were yearning. ~ George Eliot,
1242:Rome - the city of visible history, where the past of a whole hemisphere seems moving in funeral procession with strange ancestral images and trophies gathered from afar. ~ George Eliot,
1243:Stupefaction is not resignation; and it is stupefaction to remain in ignorance,–to shut up all the avenues by which the life of your fellow-men might become known to you. ~ George Eliot,
1244:thee mustna take me unkind. I wasna driving at thee in what I said just now. Some ‘s got one way o’ looking at things and some ‘s got another.” “Nay, nay, Addy, thee mean ~ George Eliot,
1245:Why should I not marry the man who loves me, if I love him?” said Catherine. To her the effort was something like the leap of a woman from the deck into the lifeboat. “It ~ George Eliot,
1246:Worldly faces never look so worldly as at a funeral. They have the same effect of grating incongruity as the sound of a coarse voice breaking the solemn silence of night. ~ George Eliot,
1247:All things journey: sun and moon, Morning, noon, and afternoon, Night and all her stars; 'Twixt the east and western bars Round they journey, Come and go! We go with them! ~ George Eliot,
1248:How lovely the little river is, with its dark changing wavelets! It seems to me like a living companion while I wander along the bank, and listen to its low, placid voice. ~ George Eliot,
1249:I am feeling easy now, and you will well understand that after undergoing pain this ease is opening paradise. Invalids must be excused for being eloquent about themselves. ~ George Eliot,
1250:In the schoolroom her quick mind had taken readily that strong starch of unexplained rules and disconnected facts which saves ignorance from any painful sense of limpness. ~ George Eliot,
1251:sacred is the task of the artist when he undertakes to paint the life of the People. Falsification here is far more pernicious than in the more artificial aspects of life. ~ George Eliot,
1252:We are apt to think it the finest era of the world when America was beginning to be discovered, when a bold sailor, even if he were wrecked, might alight on a new kingdom. ~ George Eliot,
1253:What greater thing is there for two human souls than to feel that they are joined - to strengthen each other - to be at one with each other in silent unspeakable memories. ~ George Eliot,
1254:and in the long valley of her life, which looked so flat and empty of way-marks, guidance would come as she walked along the road, and saw her fellow-passengers by the way. ~ George Eliot,
1255:Leisure is gone,--gone where the spinning-wheels are gone, and the pack-horses, and the slow wagons, and the peddlers, who brought bargains to the door on sunny afternoons. ~ George Eliot,
1256:Our sense of duty must often wait for some work which shall take the place of dilettanteism and make us feel that the quality of our action is not a matter of indifference. ~ George Eliot,
1257:There is a sort of subjection which is the peculiar heritage of largeness and of love; and strength is often only another name for willing bondage to irremediable weakness. ~ George Eliot,
1258:The strength of the donkey mind lies in adopting a course inversely as the arguments urged, which, well considered, requires as great a mental force as the direct sequence. ~ George Eliot,
1259:When we are dead : it is the living only who cannot be forgiven the living only from whom men's indulgence and reverence are held off, like the rain by the hard east wind . ~ George Eliot,
1260:Miss Lucy's called the bell o' St. Ogg's, they say: that's a cur'ous word,' observed Mr. Pullet, on whom the mysteries of etymology sometimes fell with an oppressive weight. ~ George Eliot,
1261:We are on a perilous margin when we begin to look passively at our future selves, and see our own figures led with dull consent into insipid misdoing and shabby achievement. ~ George Eliot,
1262:But oppositions have the illimitable range of objections at command, which need never stop short at the boundary of knowledge, but can draw forever on the vasts of ignorance. ~ George Eliot,
1263:Gossip is a sort of smoke that comes from the dirty tobacco-pipes of those who diffuse it; it proves nothing but the bad taste of the smoker,” But the truth is, gossip hurts. ~ George Eliot,
1264:The purifying influence of public confession springs from the fact, that by it the hope in lies is forever swept away, and the soul recovers the noble attitude of simplicity. ~ George Eliot,
1265:What believer sees a disturbing omission or infelicity? The text, whether of prophet or of poet, expands for whatever we can put into it, and even his bad grammar is sublime. ~ George Eliot,
1266:He has got no good red blood in his body," said Sir James. "No. Somebody put a drop under a magnifying-glass and it was all semicolons and parentheses," said Mrs. Cadwallader. ~ George Eliot,
1267:He has got no good red blood in his body,” said Sir James. “No. Somebody put a drop under a magnifying-glass and it was all semicolons and parentheses,” said Mrs. Cadwallader. ~ George Eliot,
1268:If boys and men are to be welded together in the glow of transient feeling, they must be made of metal that will mix, else they inevitably fall asunder when the heat dies out. ~ George Eliot,
1269:I should be glad to see a good change in anybody, Mr. Godfrey.' she answered, with the slightest discernible difference of tone, 'but it 'ud be better if no change was wanted. ~ George Eliot,
1270:It is always your heaviest bore who is astonished at the tameness of modern celebrities: naturally; for a little of his company has reduced them to a state of flaccid fatigue. ~ George Eliot,
1271:I was dead to worldly ambitions, to social vanities, to all the incentives within the compass of her narrow imagination, and I lived under influences utterly invisible to her. ~ George Eliot,
1272:Passion is of the nature of seed, and finds nourishment within, tending to a predominance which determines all currents towards itself, and makes the whole life its tributary. ~ George Eliot,
1273:Perhaps his might be one of the natures where a wise estimate of consequences is fused in the fires of that passionate belief which determines the consequences it believes in. ~ George Eliot,
1274:Science is properly more scrupulous than dogma. Dogma gives a charter to mistake, but the very breath of science is a contest with mistake, and must keep the conscience alive. ~ George Eliot,
1275:The mind that is too ready at contempt and reprobation is, I may say, as a clenched fist that can give blows, but is shut up from receiving and holding ought that is precious. ~ George Eliot,
1276:Will was not without his intentions to be always generous, but our tongues are little triggers which have usually been pulled before general intentions can be brought to bear. ~ George Eliot,
1277:He thought it probable that Miss Brooke liked him, and manners must be very marked indeed before they cease to be interpreted by preconceptions either confident or distrustful. ~ George Eliot,
1278:If there is an angel who records the sorrows of men as well as their sins, he knows how many and deep are the sorrows that spring from false ideas for which no man is culpable. ~ George Eliot,
1279:It seems to me we can never give up longing and wishing while we are thoroughly alive. There are certain things we feel to be beautiful and good, and we must hunger after them. ~ George Eliot,
1280:Men and women make sad mistakes about their own symptoms, taking their vague uneasy longings, sometimes for genius, sometimes for religion, and oftener still for a mighty love. ~ George Eliot,
1281:Men and women make sad mistakes about their own symptoms, taking their vague, uneasy longings sometimes for genius, sometimes for religion, and oftener still for a mighty love. ~ George Eliot,
1282:Our vanities differ as our noses do: all conceit is not the same conceit, but varies in correspondence with the minutiae of mental make in which one of us differs from another. ~ George Eliot,
1283:Plainness has its peculiar temptations and vices quite as much as beauty; it is apt either to feign amiability, or not feigning it, to show all the repulsiveness of discontent. ~ George Eliot,
1284:That is the way with you political writers, Ladislaw–crying up a measure as if it were a universal cure, and crying up men who are a part of the very disease that wants curing. ~ George Eliot,
1285:There's times when the crockery seems alive, an' flies out o' your hand like a bird. It's like the glass, sometimes, 'ull crack as it stands. What is to be broke will be broke. ~ George Eliot,
1286:When a man has seen the woman whom he would have chosen if he had intended to marry speedily, his remaining a bachelor will usually depend on her resolution rather than on his. ~ George Eliot,
1287:Una especie de gruñido monosilábico fue la respuesta, a mayor o menor distancia de la pregunta, según los casos, de acuerdo con la lentitud de los respectivos procesos mentales. ~ George Eliot,
1288:What furniture can give such finish to a room as a tender woman's face? And is there any harmony of tints that has such stirring of delight as the sweet modulation of her voice? ~ George Eliot,
1289:A supreme love, a motive that gives a sublime rhythm to a woman's life, and exalts habit into partnership with the soul's highest needs, is not to be had where and how she wills. ~ George Eliot,
1290:having early had strong reason to believe that things were not likely to be arranged for her peculiar satisfaction, she wasted no time in astonishment and annoyance at that fact. ~ George Eliot,
1291:Our sense of duty must often wait for some work which shall take the place of dilettanteism [sic] and make us feel that the quality of our action is not a matter of indifference. ~ George Eliot,
1292:The tendency toward good in human nature has a force which no creed can utterly counteract, and which insures the ultimate triumph of that tendency over all dogmatic perversions. ~ George Eliot,
1293:Confound you handsome young fellows! You think of having it all your own way in the world. You don't understand women. They don't admire you half so much as you admire yourselves. ~ George Eliot,
1294:Confound you handsome young fellows! you think of having it all your own way in the world. You don’t understand women. They don’t admire you half so much as you admire yourselves. ~ George Eliot,
1295:El fracaso después de una larga perseverancia tiene mucha más grandeza que no haber realizado nunca un esfuerzo lo bastante intenso para que luego quepa hablar de fracaso (p.247). ~ George Eliot,
1296:He has got no good red blood in his body," said Sir James.
"No. Somebody put a drop under a magnifying glass, and it was all semicolons and parentheses," said Mrs. Cadwallader. ~ George Eliot,
1297:He has got no good red blood in his body," said Sir James.
"No. Somebody put a drop under a magnifying-glass, and it was all semicolons and parenthesis," said Mrs. Cadwallader. ~ George Eliot,
1298:It is a common sentence that knowledge is power; but who hath duly considered or set forth the power of ignorance? Knowledge slowly builds up what ignorance in an hour pulls down. ~ George Eliot,
1299:There was no gleam, no shadow, for the heavens, too, were one still, pale cloud; no sound or motion in anything but the dark river that flowed and moaned like an unresting sorrow. ~ George Eliot,
1300:there was no gleam, no shadow, for the heavens, too, were one still, pale cloud; no sound or motion in anything but the dark river that flowed and moaned like an unresting sorrow. ~ George Eliot,
1301:We have had an unspeakably delightful journey, one of those journeys which seem to divide one's life in two, by the new ideas they suggest and the new views of interest they open. ~ George Eliot,
1302:Fielding lived when the days were longer (for time, like money, is measured by our needs), when summer afternoons were spacious, and the clock ticked slowly in the winter evenings. ~ George Eliot,
1303:Fred dislikes the idea going into the ministry partly because he doesn't like "feeling obligated to look serious", and he centers his doubts on "what people expect of a clergyman". ~ George Eliot,
1304:He has got no good red blood in his body,” said Sir James. “No. Somebody put a drop under a magnifying-glass and it was all semicolons and parentheses,” said Mrs. Cadwallader. “Why ~ George Eliot,
1305:you can so seldom get hold of a man as can turn his brains to more nor one thing; it’s just as if they wore blinkers like th’ horses, and could see nothing o’ one side of ’em. Now, ~ George Eliot,
1306:he was a likable man: sweet-tempered, ready-witted, frank, without grins of suppressed bitterness or other conversational flavors which make half of us an affliction to our friends. ~ George Eliot,
1307:I think thee'dst perhaps like to read it, but I didna say anything about it because thee'st seemed so full of other things. It's quite easy t' read—she writes wonderful for a woman. ~ George Eliot,
1308:Unhappily the habit of being offensive 'without meaning it' leads usually to a way of making amends which the injured person cannot but regard as a being amiable without meaning it. ~ George Eliot,
1309:A proud woman who has learned to submit carries all her pride to the reinforcement of her submission, and looks down with severe superiority on all feminine assumption as unbecoming. ~ George Eliot,
1310:Errors look so very ugly in persons of small means -one feels they are taking quite a liberty in going astray; whereas people of fortune may naturally indulge in a few delinquencies. ~ George Eliot,
1311:Having once embarked on your marital voyage, it is impossible not to be aware that you make no way and the sea is not within sight; that in fact, you are exploring an enclosed basin. ~ George Eliot,
1312:He has got no good red blood in his body," said Sir James.

"No. Somebody put a drop under a magnifying-glass and it was all semicolons and parentheses," said Mrs. Cadwallader. ~ George Eliot,
1313:I had some ambition. I meant everything to be different with me. I thought I had more strength and mastery. But the most terrible obstacles are such as nobody can see except oneself. ~ George Eliot,
1314:It seems to me now, if I was to find Father at home to-night, I should behave different; but there’s no knowing — perhaps nothing ‘ud be a lesson to us if it didn’t come too late. It ~ George Eliot,
1315:there is no hour that has not its births of gladness and despair, no morning brightness that does not bring new sickness to desolation as well as new forces to genius and love. There ~ George Eliot,
1316:A dull mind, once arriving at an inference that flatters a desire, is rarely able to retain the impression that the notion from which the inference started was purely problematic. And ~ George Eliot,
1317:I’m very fond of you, Maggie; I shall never forget you,” said Philip, “and when I’m very unhappy, I shall always think of you, and wish I had a sister with dark eyes, just like yours. ~ George Eliot,
1318:It is a vain thought to flee from the work that God appoints us, for the sake of finding a greater blessing, instead of seeking it where alone it is to be found - in loving obedience. ~ George Eliot,
1319:Society never made the preposterous demand that a man should think as much about his own qualifications for making a charming girl happy as he thinks of hers for making himself happy. ~ George Eliot,
1320:The dull mind, once arriving at an inference that flatters the desire, is rarely able to retain the impression that the notion from which the inference started was purely problematic. ~ George Eliot,
1321:the philanthropic banker his brother-in-law, who predominated so much in the town that some called him a Methodist, others a hypocrite, according to the resources of their vocabulary; ~ George Eliot,
1322:When he turned his head quickly his hair seemed to shake out light, and some persons thought they saw decided genius in this coruscation. Mr. Casaubon, on the contrary, stood rayless. ~ George Eliot,
1323:When we are treated well, we naturally begin to think that we are not altogether unmeritous, and that it is only just we should treat ourselves well, and not mar our own good fortune. ~ George Eliot,
1324:Instead of trying to still his fears he encouraged them, with that superstitious impression which clings to us all that if we expect evil very strongly it is the less likely to come... ~ George Eliot,
1325:It was one of those dangerous moments when speech is at once sincere and deceptive, when feeling, rising high above its average depth, leaves flood-marks which are never reached again. ~ George Eliot,
1326:With a single drop of ink for a mirror, the Egyptian sorcerer undertakes to reveal to any chance comer far-reaching visions of the past. This is what I undertake to do for you, reader. ~ George Eliot,
1327:A character at unity with itself –that performs what it intends, subdues every counteracting impulse, and has no visions beyond the distinctly possible –is strong by its very negations. ~ George Eliot,
1328:How can you bear to be so contemptible, when others are working and striving, and there are so many things to be done–how can you bear to be fit for nothing in the world that is useful? ~ George Eliot,
1329:It is time the clergy are told that thinking men, after a close examination of that doctrine, pronounce it to be subversive of true moral development and, therefore, positively noxious. ~ George Eliot,
1330:It was one of those dangerous moments when speech is at once sincere and deceptive - when feeling, rising high above its average depth, leaves flood-marks which are never reached again. ~ George Eliot,
1331:Of new acquaintances one can never be sure because one likes them one day that it will be so the next. Of old friends one is sure that it will be the same yesterday, today, and forever. ~ George Eliot,
1332:Surely there was something taught her by this experience of great need; and she must be learning a secret of human tenderness and long-suffering, that the less erring could hardly know? ~ George Eliot,
1333:The darkest night that ever fell upon the earth never hid the light, never put out the stars. It only made the stars more keenly, kindly glancing, as if in protest against the darkness. ~ George Eliot,
1334:He did not shrug his shoulders; and for want of that muscular outlet he thought the more irritably of beautiful lips kissing holy skulls and other emptinesses ecclesiastically enshrined. ~ George Eliot,
1335:...her own questions about her mother could not have been parried, as she grew up, without the complete shrouding of the past which would have made a painful barrier between their minds. ~ George Eliot,
1336:Our consiousness rarely registers the beginning of a growth within us anymore than without us: there have been many circulations of the sap before we detect the smallest sign of the bud. ~ George Eliot,
1337:When we are treated well, we naturally begin to think that we are not altogether unmeritorious, and that it is only just we should treat ourselves well, and not mar our own good fortune. ~ George Eliot,
1338:But many of these misdeeds were like the subtle muscular movements which are not taken account of in the consciousness, though they bring about the end that we fix our mind on and desire. ~ George Eliot,
1339:Having once embarked on your marital voyage, it is impossible not to be aware that you make no way and that the sea is not within sight—that, in fact, you are exploring an enclosed basin. ~ George Eliot,
1340:It is a wonderful subduer, this need of love-this hunger of the heart-as peremptory as that other hunger by which Nature forces us to submit to the yoke, and change the face of the world. ~ George Eliot,
1341:My own experience and development deepen every day my conviction that our moral progress may be measured by the degree in which we sympathize with individual suffering and individual joy. ~ George Eliot,
1342:Our consciousness rarely registers the beginning of a growth within us any more than without us; there have been many circulation of the sap before we detect the smallest sign of the bud. ~ George Eliot,
1343:The commonest man, who has his ounce of sense and feeling, is conscious of the difference between a lovely, delicate woman and a coarse one. Even a dog feels a difference in her presence. ~ George Eliot,
1344:The idea of duty--that recognition of something to be lived for beyond the mere satisfaction of self--is to the moral life what the addition of a great central ganglion is to animal life. ~ George Eliot,
1345:There is hardly any contact more depressing to a young ardent creature than that of a mind in which years full of knowledge seem to have issued in a blank absence of interest or sympathy. ~ George Eliot,
1346:The weavers and tanners of Middlemarch, unlike Mr. Mawmsey, had never thought of Mr. Brooke as a neighbour and were not more attached to him than if he had been sent in a box from London. ~ George Eliot,
1347:The world outside the books was not a happy one, Maggie felt; it seemed to be a world where people behaved the best to those they did not pretend to love, and that did not belong to them. ~ George Eliot,
1348:Yes, the house must be inhabited, and we will see by whom; for imagination is a licensed trespasser: it has no fear of dogs, but may climb over walls and peep in at windows with impunity. ~ George Eliot,
1349:But most of us are apt to settle within ourselves that the man who blocks our way is odious, and not to mind causing him a little of the disgust which his personality excites in ourselves. ~ George Eliot,
1350:For the tragedy of our lives is not created entirely from within. "Character," says Novalis, in one of his questionable aphorisms,–"character is destiny." But not the whole of our destiny. ~ George Eliot,
1351:If you deliver an opinion at all, it is mere stupidity not to do it with an air of conviction and well-founded knowledge. You make it your own in uttering it, and naturally get fond of it. ~ George Eliot,
1352:Our consciousness rarely registers the beginning of a growth within us any more than without us: there have been many circulations of the sap before we detect the smallest sign of the bud. ~ George Eliot,
1353:A medical man likes to make psychological observations, and sometimes in the pursuit of such studies is too easily tempted into momentous prophecy which life and death easily set at nought. ~ George Eliot,
1354:But how little we know what would make paradise for our neighbors! We judge from our own desires, and our neighbors themselves are not always open enough even to throw out a hint of theirs. ~ George Eliot,
1355:But how little we know what would make paradise for our neighbors. We judge from our own desires, and our neighbors themselves are not always open enough even to throw out a hint of theirs. ~ George Eliot,
1356:For continual suffering had annihilated religious faith within me: to the utterly miserable –the unloving and the unloved –there is no religion possible, no worship but a worship of devils. ~ George Eliot,
1357:It is a wonderful subduer, this need of love,–this hunger of the heart,–as peremptory as that other hunger by which Nature forces us to submit to the yoke, and change the face of the world. ~ George Eliot,
1358:It is a wonderful subduer, this need of love--this hunger of the heart--as peremptory as that other hunger by which Nature forces us to submit to the yoke, and change the face of the world. ~ George Eliot,
1359:Mrs. Bulstrode's naïve way of conciliating piety and worldliness, the nothingness of this life and desirability of cut glass, the consciousness at once of filthy rags and the best damask... ~ George Eliot,
1360:Primary (the LDS Church's Sunday school for children) is where you go to do with somebody else's mother the things you would do with your own mother if she weren't so busy teaching Primary. ~ George Eliot,
1361:There were women in Raveloe, at that present time, who had worn one of the Wise Woman's little bags round their necks, and, in consequence, had never had an idiot child, as Ann Coulter had. ~ George Eliot,
1362:Young women of such birth, living in a quiet country-house, and attending a village church hardly larger than a parlor, naturally regarded frippery as the ambition of a huckster’s daughter. ~ George Eliot,
1363:Could there be a slenderer, more insignificant thread in human history than this consciousness of a girl, busy with her small inferences of the way in which she could make her life pleasant? ~ George Eliot,
1364:Hans: [Y]ou can't conceive what a great fellow I'm going to be. The seed of immortality has sprouted within me.
Deronda: Only a fungoid growth, I daresay - a crowing disease in the lungs. ~ George Eliot,
1365:I only thought of myself, and I made you grieve. It hurts me now to think of your grief. You must not grieve anymore for me. It is better it shall be better with me because I have known you. ~ George Eliot,
1366:Speculative truth begins to appear but a shadow of individual minds, agreement between intellects seems unattainable, and we turn to the truth of feeling as the only universal bond of union. ~ George Eliot,
1367:Walking along the street with a firm, rapid step, at this point in his reverie he was startled by some one who had crossed without his notice, and who said to him in a rough, familiar voice: ~ George Eliot,
1368:But how little we know what would make paradise for our neighbours! We judge from our own desires, and our neighbours themselves are not always open enough even to throw out a hint of theirs. ~ George Eliot,
1369:Ingenious philosophers tell you, perhaps, that the great work of the steam-engine is to create leisure for mankind. Do not believe them; it only creates a vacuum for eager thought to rush in. ~ George Eliot,
1370:In the first moments when we come away from the presence of death, every other relation to the living is merged, to our feeling, in the great relation of a common nature and a common destiny. ~ George Eliot,
1371:It is an uneasy lot at best, to be what we call highly taught and yet not to enjoy: to be present at this great spectacle of life and never to be liberated from a small hungry shivering self. ~ George Eliot,
1372:Let my body dwell in poverty, and my hands be as the hands of the toiler; but let my soul be as a temple of remembrance where the treasures of knowledge enter and the inner sanctuary is hope. ~ George Eliot,
1373:Sir James paused. He did not usually find it easy to give his reasons: it seemed to him strange that people should not know them without being told, since he only felt what was reasonable. At ~ George Eliot,
1374:These bitter sorrows of childhood! when sorrow is all new and strange, when hope has not yet got wings to fly beyond the days and weeks, and the space from summer to summer seems measureless. ~ George Eliot,
1375:Trust to me, my boy, trust to me. I've got no wife to worm it out of me and then run out and cackle it in everybody's hearing. If you trust a man, let him be a bachelor—let him be a bachelor. ~ George Eliot,
1376:We may handle even extreme opinions with impunity while our furniture, our dinner giving, and preference for armorial bearings in our own case link us indissolubly with the established order. ~ George Eliot,
1377:But he had something else to curse--his own viscious folly, which now seemed as mad and unaccountable to him as almost all our follies and vices do when their promptings have long passed away. ~ George Eliot,
1378:But what we strive to gratify, though we may call it a distant hope, is an immediate desire: the future estate for which men drudge up city alleys exists already in their imagination and love. ~ George Eliot,
1379:But what we strive to gratify, though we may call it a distant hope, is an immediate desire; the future estate for which men drudge up city alleys exists already in their imagination and love. ~ George Eliot,
1380:Everybody liked better to conjecture how the thing was, than simply to know it; for conjecture soon became more confident than knowledge, and had a more liberal allowance for the incompatible. ~ George Eliot,
1381:Let even an affectionate Goliath get himself tied to a small tender thing, dreading to hurt it by pulling, and dreading still more to snap the cord, and which of the two, pray, will be master? ~ George Eliot,
1382:Mrs. Deane was a thin-lipped woman, who made small well-considered speeches on peculiar occasions, repeating them afterwards to her husband, and asking him if she had not spoken very properly. ~ George Eliot,
1383:O may I join the choir invisible
Of those immortal dead who live again
In minds made better by their presence; live
In pulses stirred to generosity,
In deeds of daring rectitude... ~ George Eliot,
1384:Strange, that some of us, with quick alternate vision, see beyond our infatuations, and even while we rave on the heights, behold the wide plain where our persistent self pauses and awaits us. ~ George Eliot,
1385:We are all humiliated by the sudden discovery of a fact which has existed very comfortably and perhaps been staring at us in private while we have been making up our world entirely without it. ~ George Eliot,
1386:We insignificant people with our daily words and acts are preparing the lives of many Dorotheas, some of which may present a far sadder sacrifice than that of the Dorothea whose story we know. ~ George Eliot,
1387:We may handle even extreme opinions with impunity while our furniture, our dinner-giving, and preference for armorial bearings in our own case, link us indissolubly with the established order. ~ George Eliot,
1388:We must not inquire too curiously into motives. they are apt to become feeble in the utterance: the aroma is mixed with the grosser air. We must keep the germinating grain away from the light. ~ George Eliot,
1389:Ah, Iddio non paga il Sabatol (‘God does not pay on a Saturday’)—the wages of men’s sins often linger in their payment, and I myself saw much established wickedness of long-standing prosperity. ~ George Eliot,
1390:Love is frightened at the intervals of insensibility and callousness that encroach by little and little on the domain of grief, and it makes efforts to recall the keenness of the first anguish. ~ George Eliot,
1391:the mother’s yearning, that completest type of the life in another life which is the essence of real human love, feels the presence of the cherished child even in the debased, degraded man; and ~ George Eliot,
1392:Those bitter sorrows of childhood!-- when sorrow is all new and strange, when hope has not yet got wings to fly beyond the days and weeks, and the space from summer to summer seems measureless. ~ George Eliot,
1393:When the soul is just liberated from the wretched giant's bed of dogmas on which it has been racked and stretched ever since it began to think, there is a feeling of exultation and strong hope. ~ George Eliot,
1394:Boots and shoes are the greatest trouble of my life. Everything else one can turn and turn about, and make old look like new; but there's no coaxing boots and shoes to look better than they are. ~ George Eliot,
1395:but he had the blood of the peasant in him as well as of the artisan, and a peasant can no more help believing in a traditional superstition than a horse can help trembling when he sees a camel. ~ George Eliot,
1396:Certain strains of music affect me so strangely - I can never hear them without their changing my whole attitude of mind for a time, and if the effect would last, I might be capable of heroisms. ~ George Eliot,
1397:Maggie in her crude form, with her hair down her back, and altogether in a state of dubious promise, was a most undesirable niece; but now she was capable of being at once ornamental and useful. ~ George Eliot,
1398:News is often dispersed as thoughtlessly and effectively as that pollen which the bees carry off (having no idea how powdery they are) when they are buzzing in search of their particular nectar. ~ George Eliot,
1399:Strange, that some of us, with quick alternative vision, see beyond our infatuations, and even while we rave on the heights, behold the wide plain where our persistent self pauses and awaits us. ~ George Eliot,
1400:The golden moments in the stream of life rush past us, and we see nothing but sand; the angels come to visit us, and we only know them when they are gone. —GEORGE ELIOT, Scenes of Clerical Life ~ Gail Caldwell,
1401:They are always wanting reasons, yet they are too ignorant to understand the merits of any question, and usually fall back on their moral sense to settle things after their own taste." Evidently ~ George Eliot,
1402:Until every good man is brave, we must expect to find many good women timid--too timid even to believe in the correctness of their own best promptings, when these would place them in a minority. ~ George Eliot,
1403:Whatever may be the success of my stories, I shall be resolute in preserving my incognito, having observed that a nom de plume secures all the advantages without the disagreeables of reputation. ~ George Eliot,
1404:A human being in this aged nation of ours is a very wonderful hole, the slow creation of long interchanging influences; and charm is a result of two such wholes, the one loving and the one loved. ~ George Eliot,
1405:Any coward can fight a battle when he's sure of winning; but give me the man who has pluck to fight when he's sure of losing. That's my way, sir; and there are many victories worse than a defeat. ~ George Eliot,
1406:Strange, that some of us, with quick alternate vision, see beyond our infatuations, and even while we rave on the heights, behold the wide plain where our persistent self pauses and awaits us. To ~ George Eliot,
1407:To crown all, there was to be a donkey-race—that sublimest of all races, conducted on the grand socialistic idea of everybody encouraging everybody else's donkey, and the sorriest donkey winning. ~ George Eliot,
1408:A human being in this aged nation of ours is a very wonderful whole, the slow creation of long interchanging influences; and charm is a result of two such wholes, the one loving and the one loved. ~ George Eliot,
1409:But we insignificant people with our daily words and acts are preparing the lives of many Dorotheas, some of which may present a far sadder sacrifice than that of the Dorothea whose story we know. ~ George Eliot,
1410:I've had my say out, and I shall be the' easier for't all my life. There's no pleasure i' living, if you're to be corked up forever, and only dribble your mind out by the sly, like a leaky barrel. ~ George Eliot,
1411:Mrs. Stelling was not a loving, tender-hearted woman; she was a woman whose skirt sat well, who adjusted her waist and patted her curls with a preoccupied air when she inquired after your welfare. ~ George Eliot,
1412:The calendar hath not an evil day
For souls made one by love, and even death
Were sweetness, if it came like rolling waves
While they two clasped each other, and foresaw
No life apart. ~ George Eliot,
1413:The select natures who pant after the ideal, and find nothing in pantaloons or petticoats great enough to command their reverence and love, are curiously in unison with the narrowest and pettiest. ~ George Eliot,
1414:what secular avocation on earth was there for a young man (whose friends could not get him an ‘appointment’) which was at once gentlemanly, lucrative, and to be followed without special knowledge? ~ George Eliot,
1415:Whence, I fear, the tragedy of human life is likely to continue for a long time to come, in spite of mental philosophers who are ready with the best receipts for avoiding all mistakes of the kind. ~ George Eliot,
1416:He had no ideal world of dead heroes; he knew little of the life of men in the past; he must find the beings to whom he could cling with loving admiration among those who came within speech of him. ~ George Eliot,
1417:I don't mind how many letters I receive from one who interests me as much as you do. The receptive part of correspondence I can carry on with much alacrity. It is writing answers that I groan over. ~ George Eliot,
1418:If we use common words on a great occasion, they are the more striking, because they are felt at once to have a particular meaning, like old banners, or everyday clothes, hung up in a sacred place. ~ George Eliot,
1419:In the love of a brave and faithful man there is always a strain of maternal tenderness; he gives out again those beams of protecting fondness which were shed on him as he lay on his mother's knee. ~ George Eliot,
1420:We must not inquire too curiously into motives,' he interposed, in his measured way. 'Miss Brooke knows that they are apt to become feeble in the utterance: the aroma is mixed with the grosser air. ~ George Eliot,
1421:When I married Humphrey I made up my mind to like sermons, and I set out by liking the end very much. That soon spread to the middle and the beginning, because I couldn't have the end without them. ~ George Eliot,
1422:... there is a lightness about the feminine mind--a touch and go--music, the fine arts, that kind of thing--they should study those up to a certain point, women should; but in a light way, you know. ~ George Eliot,
1423:All who remember their childhood remember the strange vague sense, when some new experience came, that everything else was going to be changed, and that there would be no lapse into the old monotony. ~ George Eliot,
1424:She felt that she was beginning to know the pang of disappointed love, and that no other man could be the occasion of such delightful aerial building as she had been enjoying for the last six months. ~ George Eliot,
1425:Dodo!" exclaimed Celia, looking after her in surprise. "I never heard you make such a comparison before." "Why should I make it before the occasion came? It is a good comparison: the match is perfect. ~ George Eliot,
1426:The best part of a woman's love is worship; but it is hard to her to be sent away with her precious spikenard rejected, and her long tresses, too, that were let fall, ready to soothe the wearied feet. ~ George Eliot,
1427:We are children of a large family, and must learn, as such children do, not to expect that our hurts will be made much of—to be content with little nurture and caressing, and help each other the more. ~ George Eliot,
1428:A human being in this aged nation of ours is a very wonderful whole, the slow creation of long interchanging influences: and charm is a result of two such wholes, the one loving and the one loved. When ~ George Eliot,
1429:It is possible to have a strong self-love without any self-satisfaction, rather with a self-discontent which is the more intense because one's own little core of egoistic sensibility is a supreme care. ~ George Eliot,
1430:Nature has her language, and she is not unveracious; but we don't know all the intricacies of her syntax just yet, and in a hasty reading we may happen to extract the very opposite of her real meaning. ~ George Eliot,
1431:That was an evil terror---- an ugly inmate to have found a nestling-place in Godfrey's kindly disposition; but no disposition is a security from evil wishes to a man whose happiness hangs on duplicity. ~ George Eliot,
1432:The beauty of a lovely woman is like music ... the rounded neck, the dimpled arm, move us by something more than their prettiness--by their close kinship with all we have known of tenderness and peace. ~ George Eliot,
1433:The great safeguard of society and of domestic life was, that opinions were not acted on. Sane people did what their neighbors did, so that if any lunatics were at large, one might know and avoid them. ~ George Eliot,
1434:The sense of an entailed disadvantage - the deformed foot doubtfully hidden by the shoe, makes a restlessly active spiritual yeast, and easily turns a self-centered, unloving nature into an Ishmaelite. ~ George Eliot,
1435:a man can’t very well steal a bank-note unless the bank-note lies within convenient reach; but he won’t make us think him an honest man because he begins to howl at the bank-note for falling in his way. ~ George Eliot,
1436:And to me it is one of the most odious things in a girl’s life, that there must always be some supposition of falling in love coming between her and any man who is kind her, and to whom she is grateful. ~ George Eliot,
1437:Dear Friends all, A thousand Christmas pleasures and blessings to you -- good resolutions and bright hopes for the New Year! Amen. People who can't be witty exert themselves to be pious or affectionate. ~ George Eliot,
1438:I have no courage to write much unless I am written to. I soon begin to think that there are plenty of other correspondents more interesting - so if you all want to hear from me you know the conditions. ~ George Eliot,
1439:I still think that the greater part of the world is mistaken about many things. Surely one may be sane and yet think so, since the greater part of the world has often had to come round from its opinion. ~ George Eliot,
1440:Meanwhile the indefiniteness remains, and the limits of variation are really much wider than any one would imagine from the sameness of women's coiffure and the favorite love-stories in prose and verse. ~ George Eliot,
1441:So I am content to tell my simple story, without trying to make things seem better than they were; dreading nothing, indeed, but falsity, which, in spite of one's best efforts, there is reason to dread. ~ George Eliot,
1442:It is so with emotional natures whose thoughts are no more than the fleeting shadows cast by feeling: to them words are facts, and even when known to be false, have a mastery over their smiles and tears. ~ George Eliot,
1443:It seems to me as a woman's face doesna want flowers; it's almost like a flower itself.... It's like when a man's singing a good tune, you don't want t' hear bells tinkling and interfering wi' the sound. ~ George Eliot,
1444:Oh, sir, the loftiest hopes on earth Draw lots with meaner hopes: heroic breasts, Breathing bad air, run risk of pestilence; Or, lacking lime-juice when they cross the Line, May languish with the scurvy. ~ George Eliot,
1445:The beginning of hardship is like the first taste of bitter food—it seems for a moment unbearable; yet, if there is nothing else to satisfy our hunger, we take another bite and find it possible to go on. ~ George Eliot,
1446:What is better than to love and live with the loved? -- But that must sometimes bring us to live with the dead; and this too turns at last into a very tranquil and sweet tie, safe from change and injury. ~ George Eliot,
1447:Yes, Isaac Taylor, who has just published 'The World of Mind,' is the Isaac Taylor, author of the 'Natural History of Enthusiasm.' I dare say by this time there is a want of fatty particles in his brain. ~ George Eliot,
1448:Among all the many kinds of first love, that which begins in childish companionship is the strongest and most enduring: when passion comes to unite its force to long affection, love is at its spring-tide. ~ George Eliot,
1449:But on safe opportunities, she had an indirect mode of making her negative wisdom tell upon Dorothea, and calling her down from her rhapsodic mood by reminding her that people were staring, not listening. ~ George Eliot,
1450:Hath she her faults? I would you had them too. They are the fruity must of soundest wine; Or say, they are regenerating fire Such as hath turned the dense black element Into a crystal pathway for the sun. ~ George Eliot,
1451:it was soon clear to the Raveloe lasses that he would never urge one of them to accept him against her will—quite as if he had heard them declare that they would never marry a dead man come to life again. ~ George Eliot,
1452:My spirit is too weak; mortality Weighs heavily on me like unwilling sleep, And each imagined pinnacle and steep Of godlike hardship tells me I must die Like a sick eagle looking at the sky.” —Keats After ~ George Eliot,
1453:The beginning of hardship is like the first taste of bitter food--it seems for a moment unbearable; yet, if there is nothing else to satisfy our hunger, we take another bite and find it possible to go on. ~ George Eliot,
1454:Cold, is it, my darling? Bless your sweet face!" said Mrs. Poyser, who was remarkable for the facility with which she could relapse from her official objurgatory to one of fondness or of friendly converse. ~ George Eliot,
1455:If we had a keen vision and feeling of all ordinary human life, it would be like hearing the grass grow and the squirrel’s heartbeat, and we should die of that roar which lies on the other side of silence. ~ George Eliot,
1456:There is no despair so absolute as that which comes from the first moments of our first great sorrow when we have not yet known what it is to have suffered and healed, to have despaired and recovered hope. ~ George Eliot,
1457:We know what a masquerade all development is, and what effective shapes may be disguised in helpless embryos.—In fact, the world is full of hopeful analogies and handsome dubious eggs called possibilities. ~ George Eliot,
1458:He bore the same sort of resemblance to his mother that our loving memory of a friend’s face often bears to the face itself: the lines were all more generous, the smile brighter, the expression heartier. If ~ George Eliot,
1459:Her heart went out to him with a stronger movement than ever, at the thought that people would blame him. Maggie hated blame; she had been blamed her whole life, and nothing had come of it but evil tempers. ~ George Eliot,
1460:If we had a keen vision and feeling of all ordinary human life, it would be like hearing the grass grow and the squirrel's heart beat, and we should die of that roar which lies on the other side of silence. ~ George Eliot,
1461:If we had a keen vision and feeling of all ordinary human life, it would be like hearing the grass grow and the squirrel’s heart beat, and we should die of that roar which lies on the other side of silence. ~ George Eliot,
1462:surely the only true knowledge of our fellow-man is that which enables us to feel with him—which gives us a fine ear for the heart-pulses that are beating under the mere clothes of circumstance and opinion. ~ George Eliot,
1463:The Vicar’s talk was not always inspiriting: he had escaped being a Pharisee, but he had not escaped that low estimate of possibilities which we rather hastily arrive at as an inference from our own failure. ~ George Eliot,
1464:Ah, I often think it's wi' th' old folks as it is wi' the babies; they're satisfied wi' looking, no matter what they're looking at. It's God A'mighty's way o' quietening 'em, I reckon, afore they go to sleep. ~ George Eliot,
1465:even when you have no motive to be false, it is a very hard thing to say the exact truth, even about your own immediate feelings—much harder than to say something fine about them which is not the exact truth. ~ George Eliot,
1466:in courtship everything is regarded as provisional and preliminary, and the smallest sample of virtue or accomplishment is taken to guarantee delightful stores which the broad leisure of marriage will reveal. ~ George Eliot,
1467:The betrothed bride must see her future home, and dictate any changes that she would like to have made there. A woman dictates before marriage in order that she may have an appetite for submission afterwards. ~ George Eliot,
1468:There is no human being who having both passions and thoughts does not think in consequences of his passions--does not find images rising in his mind which soothe the passion with hope or sting it with dread. ~ George Eliot,
1469:Doubtless some ancient Greek has observed that behind the big mask and the speaking-trumpet, there must always be our poor little eyes peeping as usual and our timorous lips more or less under anxious control. ~ George Eliot,
1470:We are children of a large family, and must learn, as such children do, not to expect that our little hurts will be made much of - to be content with little nurture and caressing, and help each other the more. ~ George Eliot,
1471:A picture of human life such as a great artist can give, surprises even the trivial and the selfish into that attention to what is apart from themselves, which may be called the raw material of moral sentiment. ~ George Eliot,
1472:His faith wavered, but not his speech: it is the lot of every man who has to speak for the satisfaction of the crowd, that he must often speak in virtue of yesterday's faith, hoping it will come back to-morrow. ~ George Eliot,
1473:until we know what has been or will be the peculiar combination of outward with inward facts, which constitutes a man’s critical actions, it will be better not to think ourselves wise about his character. There ~ George Eliot,
1474:Deeds are the pulse of Time, his beating life, And righteous or unrighteous, being done, Must throb in after-throbs till Time itself Be laid in stillness, and the universe Quiver and breathe upon no mirror more. ~ George Eliot,
1475:Fine old Christmas, with the snowy hair and ruddy face, had done his duty that year in the noblest fashion, and had set off his rich gifts of warmth and color with all the heightening contrast of frost and snow. ~ George Eliot,
1476:Our deeds are like children that are born to us; they live and act apart from our own will. Nay, children may be strangled, but deeds never: they have an indestructible life both in and out of our consciousness. ~ George Eliot,
1477:Si les choses n'ont pas, pour vous et moi, tourné aussi mal qu'elles l'auraient pu, c'est en grande partie grâce à ces êtres qui ont vécu loyalement une existence discrète et reposent dans des tombes délaissées. ~ George Eliot,
1478:A man must have a very rare genius to make changes of that sort. I am afraid mine would not carry me even to the pitch of doing well what has been done already, at least not so well as to make it worth while. And ~ George Eliot,
1479:Fine old Christmas, with the snowy hair and ruddy face, had done his duty that year in the noblest fashion, and had set off his rich gifts of warmth and colour with all the heightening contrast of frost and snow. ~ George Eliot,
1480:For in general mortals have a great power of being astonished at the presence of an effect toward which they have done everything, and at the absence of an effect toward which they had done nothing but desire it. ~ George Eliot,
1481:He seemed to weave, like the spider, from pure impulse, without reflection. Every man's work, pursued steadily, tends in this way to become an end in itself, and so to bridge over the loveless chasms of his life. ~ George Eliot,
1482:Marner was in the right in what he said about a man’s turning away a blessing from his door: it falls to somebody else. I wanted to pass for childless once, Nancy – I shall pass for childless now against my wish. ~ George Eliot,
1483:There is one order of beauty which seems made to turn heads. It is a beauty like that of kittens, or very small downy ducks making gentle rippling noises with their soft bills, or babies just beginning to toddle. ~ George Eliot,
1484:But as to listening to what one lawyer says without asking another—I wonder at a man o’ your cleverness, Mr. Dill. It’s well known there’s always two sides, if no more; else who’d go to law, I should like to know? ~ George Eliot,
1485:The early days of an acquaintance almost always have this importance for us, and fill up a larger space in our memory than longer subsequent periods, which have been less filled with discovery and new impressions. ~ George Eliot,
1486:The most solid comfort one can fall back upon is the thought that the business of one's life is to help in some small way to reduce the sum of ignorance, degradation and misery on the face of this beautiful earth. ~ George Eliot,
1487:but, dear me! has it not by this time ceased to be remarkable--is it not rather that we expect in men, that they should have numerous strands of experience lying side by side and never compare them with each other? ~ George Eliot,
1488:...but prejudices, like odorous bodies, have a double existence both solid and subtle — solid as the pyramids, subtle as the twentieth echo of an echo, or as the memory of hyacinths which once scented the darkness. ~ George Eliot,
1489:He, like others, happened to be looking at her, and their eyes met—to her intense vexation, for it seemed to her that by looking at him she had betrayed the reference of her thoughts, and she felt herself blushing. ~ George Eliot,
1490:I have never done you injustice. Please remember me,” said Dorothea, repressing a rising sob.

“Why should you say that?” said Will, with irritation. “As if I were not in danger of forgetting everything else. ~ George Eliot,
1491:There is no despair so absolute as that which comes with the first moments of our first great sorrow, when we have not yet known what it is to have suffered and be healed, to have despaired and have recovered hope. ~ George Eliot,
1492:After all, people may really have in them some vocation which is not quite plain to themselves, may they not? They may seem idle and weak because they are growing. We should be very patient with each other, I think. ~ George Eliot,
1493:Having made this rather lofty comparison I am less uneasy in calling attention to the existence of low people by whose interference, however little we may like it, the course of the world is very much determined. It ~ George Eliot,
1494:In spite of his mildness and timidity in reproving, every one about him knew that on the exceptional occasions when he chose, he was absolute. He never, indeed, chose to be absolute except on some one else’s behalf. ~ George Eliot,
1495:I never had a PREFERENCE for her, any more than I have a preference for breathing. No other woman exists by the side of her. I would rather touch her hand if it were dead, than I would touch any other woman’s living. ~ George Eliot,
1496:I think I should have no other mortal wants, if I could always have plenty of music. It seems to infuse strength into my limbs and ideas into my brain. Life seems to go on without effort, when I am filled with music. ~ George Eliot,
1497:Our passions do not live apart in locked chambers but dress in their small wardrobe of notions, bring their provisions to a common table and mess together, feeding out of the common store according to their appetite. ~ George Eliot,
1498:we get accustomed to mental as well as bodily pain, without, for all that, losing our sensibility to it: it becomes a habit of our lives, and we cease to imagine a condition of perfect ease as possible for us. Desire ~ George Eliot,
1499:... as usual I am suffering much from doubt as to the worth of what I am doing and fear lest I may not be able to complete it so as to make it a contribution to literature and not a mere addition to the heap of books. ~ George Eliot,
1500:Expenditure–like ugliness and errors–becomes a totally new thing when we attach our own personality to it, and measure it by that wide difference which is manifest (in our own sensations) between ourselves and others. ~ George Eliot,

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WORDNET



--- Overview of noun george_eliot

The noun george eliot has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
                
1. Eliot, George Eliot, Mary Ann Evans ::: (British writer of novels characterized by realistic analysis of provincial Victorian society (1819-1880))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun george_eliot

1 sense of george eliot                        

Sense 1
Eliot, George Eliot, Mary Ann Evans
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author
     => communicator
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun george_eliot
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun george_eliot

1 sense of george eliot                        

Sense 1
Eliot, George Eliot, Mary Ann Evans
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun george_eliot

1 sense of george eliot                        

Sense 1
Eliot, George Eliot, Mary Ann Evans
  -> writer, author
   => abstractor, abstracter
   => alliterator
   => authoress
   => biographer
   => coauthor, joint author
   => commentator, reviewer
   => compiler
   => contributor
   => cyberpunk
   => drafter
   => dramatist, playwright
   => essayist, litterateur
   => folk writer
   => framer
   => gagman, gagster, gagwriter
   => ghostwriter, ghost
   => Gothic romancer
   => hack, hack writer, literary hack
   => journalist
   => librettist
   => lyricist, lyrist
   => novelist
   => pamphleteer
   => paragrapher
   => poet
   => polemicist, polemist, polemic
   => rhymer, rhymester, versifier, poetizer, poetiser
   => scenarist
   => scriptwriter
   => space writer
   => speechwriter
   => tragedian
   => wordmonger
   => word-painter
   => wordsmith
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   HAS INSTANCE=> Algren, Nelson Algren
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   HAS INSTANCE=> Anderson, Sherwood Anderson
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   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Charlotte Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Emily Bronte, Emily Jane Bronte, Currer Bell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Anne Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Browne, Charles Farrar Browne, Artemus Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Buck, Pearl Buck, Pearl Sydenstricker Buck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bunyan, John Bunyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burgess, Anthony Burgess
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burnett, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, Edgar Rice Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, William Burroughs, William S. Burroughs, William Seward Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Butler, Samuel Butler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cabell, James Branch Cabell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Caldwell, Erskine Caldwell, Erskine Preston Caldwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calvino, Italo Calvino
   HAS INSTANCE=> Camus, Albert Camus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Canetti, Elias Canetti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Capek, Karel Capek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cather, Willa Cather, Willa Sibert Cather
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chandler, Raymond Chandler, Raymond Thornton Chandler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chateaubriand, Francois Rene Chateaubriand, Vicomte de Chateaubriand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cheever, John Cheever
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chesterton, G. K. Chesterton, Gilbert Keith Chesterton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chopin, Kate Chopin, Kate O'Flaherty Chopin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Christie, Agatha Christie, Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Churchill, Winston Churchill, Winston S. Churchill, Sir Winston Leonard Spenser Churchill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clemens, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Mark Twain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cocteau, Jean Cocteau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Claudine Colette
   HAS INSTANCE=> Collins, Wilkie Collins, William Wilkie Collins
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conan Doyle, A. Conan Doyle, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conrad, Joseph Conrad, Teodor Josef Konrad Korzeniowski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cooper, James Fenimore Cooper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crane, Stephen Crane
   HAS INSTANCE=> cummings, e. e. cummings, Edward Estlin Cummings
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   HAS INSTANCE=> Defoe, Daniel Defoe
   HAS INSTANCE=> De Quincey, Thomas De Quincey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dickens, Charles Dickens, Charles John Huffam Dickens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Didion, Joan Didion
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dinesen, Isak Dinesen, Blixen, Karen Blixen, Baroness Karen Blixen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Doctorow, E. L. Doctorow, Edgard Lawrence Doctorow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dos Passos, John Dos Passos, John Roderigo Dos Passos
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoevsky, Feodor Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Feodor Dostoevski, Fyodor Dostoevski, Feodor Dostoevsky, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dreiser, Theodore Dreiser, Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dumas, Alexandre Dumas
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, George du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, Daphne du Maurier, Dame Daphne du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Durrell, Lawrence Durrell, Lawrence George Durrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ehrenberg, Ilya Ehrenberg, Ilya Grigorievich Ehrenberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, George Eliot, Mary Ann Evans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ellison, Ralph Ellison, Ralph Waldo Ellison
   HAS INSTANCE=> Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Farrell, James Thomas Farrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ferber, Edna Ferber
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fielding, Henry Fielding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fitzgerald, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald
   HAS INSTANCE=> Flaubert, Gustave Flaubert
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fleming, Ian Fleming, Ian Lancaster Fleming
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ford, Ford Madox Ford, Ford Hermann Hueffer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Forester, C. S. Forester, Cecil Scott Forester
   HAS INSTANCE=> France, Anatole France, Jacques Anatole Francois Thibault
   HAS INSTANCE=> Franklin, Benjamin Franklin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fuentes, Carlos Fuentes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaboriau, Emile Gaboriau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Galsworthy, John Galsworthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gardner, Erle Stanley Gardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaskell, Elizabeth Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn Stevenson Gaskell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Geisel, Theodor Seuss Geisel, Dr. Seuss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gibran, Kahlil Gibran
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gide, Andre Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gjellerup, Karl Gjellerup
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gogol, Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol
   HAS INSTANCE=> Golding, William Golding, Sir William Gerald Golding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goldsmith, Oliver Goldsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gombrowicz, Witold Gombrowicz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Edmond de Goncourt, Edmond Louis Antoine Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Jules de Goncourt, Jules Alfred Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gordimer, Nadine Gordimer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gorky, Maksim Gorky, Gorki, Maxim Gorki, Aleksey Maksimovich Peshkov, Aleksey Maximovich Peshkov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grahame, Kenneth Grahame
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grass, Gunter Grass, Gunter Wilhelm Grass
   HAS INSTANCE=> Graves, Robert Graves, Robert Ranke Graves
   HAS INSTANCE=> Greene, Graham Greene, Henry Graham Greene
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grey, Zane Grey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Jakob Grimm, Jakob Ludwig Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Wilhelm Grimm, Wilhelm Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haggard, Rider Haggard, Sir Henry Rider Haggard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haldane, Elizabeth Haldane, Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hale, Edward Everett Hale
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haley, Alex Haley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hall, Radclyffe Hall, Marguerite Radclyffe Hall
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hammett, Dashiell Hammett, Samuel Dashiell Hammett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hamsun, Knut Hamsun, Knut Pedersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hardy, Thomas Hardy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Frank Harris, James Thomas Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Joel Harris, Joel Chandler Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harte, Bret Harte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hasek, Jaroslav Hasek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hawthorne, Nathaniel Hawthorne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hecht, Ben Hecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heinlein, Robert A. Heinlein, Robert Anson Heinlein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heller, Joseph Heller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hesse, Hermann Hesse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyse, Paul Heyse, Paul Johann Ludwig von Heyse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyward, DuBois Heyward, Edwin DuBois Hayward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Higginson, Thomas Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Storrow Higginson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoffmann, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Holmes, Oliver Wendell Holmes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Howells, William Dean Howells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoyle, Edmond Hoyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hubbard, L. Ron Hubbard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hughes, Langston Hughes, James Langston Hughes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hunt, Leigh Hunt, James Henry Leigh Hunt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, John Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, Washington Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Isherwood, Christopher Isherwood, Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jackson, Helen Hunt Jackson, Helen Maria Fiske Hunt Jackson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, Jane Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, W. W. Jacobs, William Wymark Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, Henry James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jensen, Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Dr. Johnson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jong, Erica Jong
   HAS INSTANCE=> Joyce, James Joyce, James Augustine Aloysius Joyce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kafka, Franz Kafka
   HAS INSTANCE=> Keller, Helen Keller, Helen Adams Keller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kerouac, Jack Kerouac, Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kesey, Ken Kesey, Ken Elton Kesey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kipling, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Rudyard Kipling
   HAS INSTANCE=> Koestler, Arthur Koestler
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Fontaine, Jean de La Fontaine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lardner, Ring Lardner, Ringgold Wilmer Lardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Rochefoucauld, Francois de La Rochefoucauld
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, D. H. Lawrence, David Herbert Lawrence
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, T. E. Lawrence, Thomas Edward Lawrence, Lawrence of Arabia
   HAS INSTANCE=> le Carre, John le Carre, David John Moore Cornwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leonard, Elmore Leonard, Elmore John Leonard, Dutch Leonard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lermontov, Mikhail Yurievich Lermontov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Doris Lessing, Doris May Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, C. S. Lewis, Clive Staples Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, Sinclair Lewis, Harry Sinclair Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> London, Jack London, John Griffith Chaney
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowry, Malcolm Lowry, Clarence Malcolm Lowry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lyly, John Lyly
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lytton, First Baron Lytton, Bulwer-Lytton, Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mailer, Norman Mailer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malamud, Bernard Malamud
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malory, Thomas Malory, Sir Thomas Malory
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malraux, Andre Malraux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mann, Thomas Mann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mansfield, Katherine Mansfield, Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp
   HAS INSTANCE=> Manzoni, Alessandro Manzoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marquand, John Marquand, John Philip Marquand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marsh, Ngaio Marsh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mason, A. E. W. Mason, Alfred Edward Woodley Mason
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maugham, Somerset Maugham, W. Somerset Maugham, William Somerset Maugham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maupassant, Guy de Maupassant, Henri Rene Albert Guy de Maupassant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mauriac, Francois Mauriac, Francois Charles Mauriac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maurois, Andre Maurois, Emile Herzog
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCarthy, Mary McCarthy, Mary Therese McCarthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCullers, Carson McCullers, Carson Smith McCullers
   HAS INSTANCE=> McLuhan, Marshall McLuhan, Herbert Marshall McLuhan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Melville, Herman Melville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Merton, Thomas Merton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Michener, James Michener, James Albert Michener
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Henry Miller, Henry Valentine Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Milne, A. A. Milne, Alan Alexander Milne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitchell, Margaret Mitchell, Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Nancy Mitford, Nancy Freeman Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Jessica Mitford, Jessica Lucy Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montaigne, Michel Montaigne, Michel Eyquem Montaigne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montgomery, L. M. Montgomery, Lucy Maud Montgomery
   HAS INSTANCE=> More, Thomas More, Sir Thomas More
   HAS INSTANCE=> Morrison, Toni Morrison, Chloe Anthony Wofford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Munro, H. H. Munro, Hector Hugh Munro, Saki
   HAS INSTANCE=> Murdoch, Iris Murdoch, Dame Jean Iris Murdoch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Musset, Alfred de Musset, Louis Charles Alfred de Musset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nabokov, Vladimir Nabokov, Vladimir vladimirovich Nabokov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nash, Ogden Nash
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nicolson, Harold Nicolson, Sir Harold George Nicolson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Norris, Frank Norris, Benjamin Franklin Norris Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Oates, Joyce Carol Oates
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Brien, Edna O'Brien
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Connor, Flannery O'Connor, Mary Flannery O'Connor
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Flaherty, Liam O'Flaherty
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Hara, John Henry O'Hara
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ondaatje, Michael Ondaatje, Philip Michael Ondaatje
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orczy, Baroness Emmusca Orczy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orwell, George Orwell, Eric Blair, Eric Arthur Blair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Page, Thomas Nelson Page
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parker, Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Rothschild Parker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pasternak, Boris Pasternak, Boris Leonidovich Pasternak
   HAS INSTANCE=> Paton, Alan Paton, Alan Stewart Paton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Percy, Walker Percy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Petronius, Gaius Petronius, Petronius Arbiter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plath, Sylvia Plath
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Elder, Gaius Plinius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Younger, Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Poe, Edgar Allan Poe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, William Sydney Porter, O. Henry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, Katherine Anne Porter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Post, Emily Post, Emily Price Post
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pound, Ezra Pound, Ezra Loomis Pound
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, John Cowper Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Theodore Francis Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Llewelyn Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pyle, Howard Pyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pynchon, Thomas Pynchon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rand, Ayn Rand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Richler, Mordecai Richler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roberts, Kenneth Roberts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roth, Philip Roth, Philip Milton Roth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Rousseau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Runyon, Damon Runyon, Alfred Damon Runyon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rushdie, Salman Rushdie, Ahmed Salman Rushdie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, George William Russell, A.E.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sade, de Sade, Comte Donatien Alphonse Francois de Sade, Marquis de Sade
   HAS INSTANCE=> Salinger, J. D. Salinger, Jerome David Salinger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sand, George Sand, Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin, Baroness Dudevant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sandburg, Carl Sandburg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Saroyan, William Saroyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sayers, Dorothy Sayers, Dorothy L. Sayers, Dorothy Leigh Sayers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schiller, Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scott, Walter Scott, Sir Walter Scott
   HAS INSTANCE=> Service, Robert William Service
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shelley, Mary Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mary Godwin Wollstonecraft Shelley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shute, Nevil Shute, Nevil Shute Norway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simenon, Georges Simenon, Georges Joseph Christian Simenon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sinclair, Upton Sinclair, Upton Beall Sinclair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Singer, Isaac Bashevis Singer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smollett, Tobias Smollett, Tobias George Smollett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Snow, C. P. Snow, Charles Percy Snow, Baron Snow of Leicester
   HAS INSTANCE=> Solzhenitsyn, Alexander Isayevich Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sontag, Susan Sontag
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spark, Muriel Spark, Dame Muriel Spark, Muriel Sarah Spark
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spillane, Mickey Spillane, Frank Morrison Spillane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stael, Madame de Stael, Baronne Anne Louise Germaine Necker de Steal-Holstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steele, Sir Richrd Steele
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stein, Gertrude Stein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steinbeck, John Steinbeck, John Ernst Steinbeck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stendhal, Marie Henri Beyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stephen, Sir Leslie Stephen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sterne, Laurence Sterne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stevenson, Robert Louis Stevenson, Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stockton, Frank Stockton, Francis Richard Stockton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoker, Bram Stoker, Abraham Stoker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Styron, William Styron
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sue, Eugene Sue
   HAS INSTANCE=> Symonds, John Addington Symonds
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Sir Rabindranath Tagore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tarbell, Ida Tarbell, Ida M. Tarbell, Ida Minerva Tarbell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thackeray, William Makepeace Thackeray
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thoreau, Henry David Thoreau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tocqueville, Alexis de Tocqueville, Alexis Charles Henri Maurice de Tocqueville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Toklas, Alice B. Toklas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolkien, J.R.R. Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolstoy, Leo Tolstoy, Count Lev Nikolayevitch Tolstoy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trollope, Anthony Trollope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Turgenev, Ivan Turgenev, Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Undset, Sigrid Undset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Untermeyer, Louis Untermeyer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Updike, John Updike, John Hoyer Updike
   HAS INSTANCE=> Van Doren, Carl Van Doren, Carl Clinton Van Doren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vargas Llosa, Mario Vargas Llosa, Jorge Mario Pedro Vargas Llosa
   HAS INSTANCE=> Verne, Jules Verne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vidal, Gore Vidal, Eugene Luther Vidal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Voltaire, Arouet, Francois-Marie Arouet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vonnegut, Kurt Vonnegut
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wain, John Wain, John Barrington Wain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walker, Alice Walker, Alice Malsenior Walker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wallace, Edgar Wallace, Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walpole, Horace Walpole, Horatio Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walton, Izaak Walton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ward, Mrs. Humphrey Ward, Mary Augusta Arnold Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Warren, Robert Penn Warren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Waugh, Evelyn Waugh, Evelyn Arthur Saint John Waugh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webb, Beatrice Webb, Martha Beatrice Potter Webb
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wells, H. G. Wells, Herbert George Wells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Welty, Eudora Welty
   HAS INSTANCE=> Werfel, Franz Werfel
   HAS INSTANCE=> West, Rebecca West, Dame Rebecca West, Cicily Isabel Fairfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wharton, Edith Wharton, Edith Newbold Jones Wharton
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, E. B. White, Elwyn Brooks White
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, Patrick White, Patrick Victor Martindale White
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wiesel, Elie Wiesel, Eliezer Wiesel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Sir Angus Wilson, Angus Frank Johnstone Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Harriet Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wister, Owen Wister
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wodehouse, P. G. Wodehouse, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Clayton Wolfe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Tom Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wood, Mrs. Henry Wood, Ellen Price Wood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Woolf, Virginia Woolf, Adeline Virginia Stephen Woolf
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wouk, Herman Wouk
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Richard Wright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Willard Huntington Wright, S. S. Van Dine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zangwill, Israel Zangwill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zweig, Stefan Zweig




--- Grep of noun george_eliot
george eliot



IN WEBGEN [10000/1300]

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https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10060172-return-of-prayers
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https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38604947-thoughts-and-prayers-corporation
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38647255-prayers-from-the-heart
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38664775-sea-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38746243-the-christmas-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39127542-31-prayers-for-my-daughter
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/391866.Celtic_Prayers_from_Iona
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39207964-dangerous-prayers\
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39402031-31-prayers-for-my-son
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39406164-prayers-of-honoring-grief
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39510331-prayers-of-honoring-grief
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39777205-prayers-and-lies
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39836383-the-gutter-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40138931-the-opposite-of-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40139533-the-gutter-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40360806-horse-prayers
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/403800.Experiencing_God_Through_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40540200-classic-children-s-prayers
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40595528-six-prayers-that-change-the-world
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40738349-the-5-minute-prayer-plan-for-women
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40872397-nineteen-sermons-concerning-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/416722.An_American_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/41825787-prancie-s-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42092544-the-5-habits-of-prayerful-people
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42115657-my-darkest-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4215418-the-prayer-room
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/422.A_Book_of_Common_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/423331.The_Path_of_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42524893-third-day-prayers
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42955398-prayer-essentials-for-living-in-his-presence-volume-2
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43792224-family-prayer-time
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4473.A_Prayer_for_Owen_Meany
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/44766212-prayers-in-stone
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4618898-prayers-for-sale
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4911526-city-of-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/491843.The_Path_of_Celtic_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/496072.The_Book_of_Uncommon_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/503436.A_Memory_a_Monologue_a_Rant_and_a_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/504787.On_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5102175-the-making-of-the-first-american-book-of-common-prayer-1776-1789
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/518982.Prayers_for_Bobby
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/520256.Prayers_for_Forgiveness
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/526990.Franciscan_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/527661.The_Friday_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/53827.Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/544582.An_Exhortation_to_Martyrdom_Prayer_and_Selected_Works
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5448787-the-prayers-of-african-religion
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/546226.A_Method_for_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/546784.The_Power_of_Simple_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5660340-prayers-meditations
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5718505-helping-yourself-with-selected-prayers
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5737116-the-storm-s-call-for-prayers
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5804844-creative-family-prayer-times
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/592866.Fiqh_Us_Sunnah_Purification_and_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6095945-a-prayer-for-owen-meany
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/616650.Prayers_for_Children
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/649032.Pagan_Prayer_Beads
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6492498-livin-on-a-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6511281-i-say-a-little-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6581792-secrets-of-a-prayer-warrior
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6589708-wrestling-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6593800-secrets-of-the-lost-mode-of-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/659434.The_Yada_Yada_Prayer_Group_Gets_Decked_Out
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6611994-prayers-paws-providence
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6656696-on-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6768233-frank-laubach-s-prayer-diary
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/68987.The_Power_of_a_Praying_Parent_Book_of_Prayers
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/705891.The_Art_of_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/705892.The_Art_of_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/709465.Leading_in_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7175899-winning-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/728424.Gratefulness_The_Heart_Of_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/741808.A_Prayer_for_Katerina_Horovitzova
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/746837.Contemplative_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/753275.Prayer_of_the_Warrior
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7583.Centering_Prayer_and_Inner_Awakening
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/762254.Cancer_and_The_Lord_s_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7648567-prayers-that-break-curses
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/765862.Prayerfully_Expecting
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/766326.A_Life_of_Total_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7784342-prayers-that-bring-healing
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/781911.A_Prayer_for_the_Night
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7836076-psalms-the-school-of-prayer-study-set
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7850890-val-s-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7894594-the-island-of-bali-is-littered-with-prayers
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/789961.Prayer_That_Works
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7926859-prayers-to-strengthen-your-inner-man
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/792901.Experiencing_Prayer_with_Jesus
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/799792.On_a_Wing_and_a_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8046818-common-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8124323-leading-in-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/81421.Remembrance_and_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/815442.Grandad_s_Prayers_of_the_Earth
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8296232-a-prayer-for-spiritual-elevation-and-protection
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8303298-a-small-furry-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/832349.Predators_Prayers
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8384703-on-the-lord-s-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8420970-a-comprehensive-prayer-formula
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8428685-does-prayer-change-things
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8589515-prayers-that-release-heaven-on-earth
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/861560.Catholic_Prayer_Book_for_Mothers
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/871623.Daily_PrayerWalk
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8771705-prayers-that-rout-demons-and-break-curses
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/88564.Prayers_of_the_Cosmos
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/88592.When_Your_Prayers_Seem_Unanswered
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/886217.Prayers_for_a_Small_Child_A_Knee_High_Book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8883034-picture-prayers
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/89122.Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8978978-prayers-and-lies
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9129541-the-greatest-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/917942.The_Power_of_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/918917.Clowning_in_Rome_Reflections_on_Solitude__Celibacy__Prayer__and_Contemplation
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/929970.The_Power_of_Prayer_in_a_Believer_s_Life
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/930776.Crafted_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/930778.How_to_Get_Your_Prayers_Answered
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9370511-a-short-and-easy-method-of-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/943404.Uncommon_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9561131-prayers-and-lies
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/97844.God_s_Prayer_Program
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/97849.The_Psalms_for_Prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/981092.Common_Prayers
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9927194-handle-with-prayer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9941086-the-friday-prayer---part-3
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9956290-mccormick-s-prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/15_Prayers_of_St._Bridget
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Ancient_Egyptian_religion#Hymns_and_prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Anglicanism#Book_of_Common_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Anglicanism#Practices:_prayer_and_worship
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/A_Prayer_for_Mohammedans_Everywhere
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#A_Child.27s_Prayer.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#Against_Evil_Thoughts.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#Against_the_Persecutors_of_the_Church.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers/A_Universal_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_a_Congregation_or_Family.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_a_Husband_or_Wife.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_all_Orders_of_Ecclesiastics.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_all_Things_Necessary_to_Salvation
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_a_Sick_Person_near_Death.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_Bishops.2C_and_the_People_committed_to_them.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_Choosing_a_State_of_Life.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_Civil_Authorities.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_Enemies.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_Fair_Weather.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_Forgiveness_of_Sins.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_Heretics_and_Schismatics.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_Jews.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_our_Friends.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_Pagans.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_Preservation_of_Concord_in_a_Congregation.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_Rain.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_the_Bishop_of_the_Diocese.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_the_Dead.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_the_gift_of_Charity.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_the_gift_of_Continence.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_the_gift_of_Humility.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_the_gift_of_Patience.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_the_gift_of_Tears.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_the_Pope.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_the_Sick.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_the_Tempted_and_Afflicted.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_the_Whole_Church.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#For_those_at_Sea.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#In_any_Necessity.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#In_any_Tribulation.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#In_Time_of_Famine_or_Pestilence.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#In_Times_of_Threatened_Calamity.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#Prayer_before_Study_or_Instructions.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#Prayers_of_Parents.2C_for_themselves_and_for_their_Children.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers#Short_Recommendation_to_God.
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Bible_(King_James)/Prayer_of_Azarias_and_Hymn_of_the_Three_Children
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Bible_(King_James)/Prayer_of_Manasseh
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Bidding_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Book_of_Common_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Buddhist_prayer_beads
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Buddhist_prayer_beads#Ba-di
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Buddhist_prayer_beads#External_links
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Buddhist_prayer_beads#Juzu
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Buddhist_prayer_beads#Mala
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Buddhist_prayer_beads#Numbers_and_Symbolism
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Buddhist_prayer_beads#References
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Buddhist_prayer_beads#See_also
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Buddhist_prayer_beads#Shu_zhu
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Buddhist_prayer_beads#Usage
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category:Book_of_Common_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category:Christian_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category:Hindu_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category:Jewish_prayer_and_ritual_texts
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category:Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category:Prayer_beads
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category:Prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category:Roman_Catholic_prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category_talk:Christian_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Category_talk:Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Catholic_beliefs_on_the_power_of_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Catholic_Church#Devotional_life_and_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Catholic_Church#Prayer_and_worship
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Centering_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Christian_worship#Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Commemoration_(prayer)
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Common_table_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Criticism_of_Roman_Catholicism#Criticism_of_Roman_Catholic_prayer_and_worship
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Criticism_of_the_Catholic_Church#Criticism_of_Catholic_prayer_and_worship
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Discursive_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Does_Prayer_Affect_How_God_Acts
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Early_Christianity#Prayer_for_the_dead
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Ecumenical_Miracle_Rosary#Prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Ecumenical_Miracle_Rosary#The_Jesus_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Exultet#Prayer_for_the_Emperor
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/File:Book_of_common_prayer_1596.jpg
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/File:EveningPrayers01a.jpg
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/File:Japa_mala_(prayer_beads)_of_Tulasi_wood_with_108_beads_-_20040101-01.jpg
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/File:Swayambhunath_Prayer_Wheels.jpg
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/File:Taiz%C3%A9_prayer.JPG
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/File:The_Christian_Martyrs_Last_Prayer.jpg
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Forms_of_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Funeral_Sermon_and_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Guardian_angel#Christian_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Hindu_prayer_beads
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Jesus#Importance_of_faith_and_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Jesus_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Joseph_Smith's_First_Prayer_(song)
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Judaism#Prayer_leaders
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Judaism#Prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Leonine_Prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Jewish_prayers_and_blessings
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/List_of_Jewish_prayers_and_blessings#Everyday_prayers_and_blessings
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Lord's_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Mantra#Universal_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Mental_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Monlam_Prayer_Festival
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/National_Day_of_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Obligatory_Bah%C3%A1'%C3%AD_prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer_beads
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer_book
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer_(Christian_point_of_View)
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer_in_Christianity
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer_in_the_Bah
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer_in_the_Bah%C3%A1'%C3%AD_Faith
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer_in_the_New_Testament
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer_(Neutral_point_of_View)
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer_of_Manasseh
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer_rope
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer_Rule
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayers_confessing_sin
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer_shawl
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayers_to_Mary
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Prayer/The_act_of_Worship
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Roman_Catholic_Church/prayer_and_worship
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Rosary_based_prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Saint_George:_Devotions,_traditions_and_prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Special:WhatLinksHere/Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:A_Prayer_for_Mohammedans_Everywhere
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:Baltimore_Book_of_Prayers/Occasional_Prayers/A_Universal_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:Bidding_prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:Buddhist_prayer_beads
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:Jesus_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:Prayer_in_the_Bah
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Talk:Vesting_Prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Template:Catholic_Prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Text:Lord's_Prayer_(1928_Book_of_Common_Prayer)
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/The_Lord's_Prayer
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/The_Prayer_of_Azariah_and_Song_of_the_Three_Holy_Children
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_prayers
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#Bishop
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#Deacon
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#Divine_Liturgy
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#External_links
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#In_the_Eastern_Rites
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#In_the_Mozarabic_Rite.2C_before_Mass
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#In_the_Roman_Rite.2C_before_Mass
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#In_the_Western_Rites
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#Notes
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#Of_a_celebrant_who_is_a_Bishop.2C_before_Low_Mass
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#Of_a_Celebrant_who_is_a_Bishop.2C_before_Pontifical_Mass
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#Of_a_Celebrant_who_is_a_Priest
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#Of_a_celebrant_who_is_a_priest_2
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#Other_clergy
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#Other_services
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Vesting_Prayers#Priest
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/Week_of_Prayer_for_Christian_Unity
https://religion.wikia.org/wiki/World_Mission_Prayer_League
auromere - on-collective-prayer-and-meditation
auromere - places-of-worship-relics-prayer-rooms
Centering Prayer: Its History and Importance
Centering Prayer: Origins, Practice, and Contributions to an Integral Spirituality
Simply Love: An Integral Prayer
A Taste of Centering Prayer
selforum - aswapati has offered his prayer in
https://thoughtsandvisions-searle88.blogspot.com/2012/11/jesus-prayer.html
https://thoughtsandvisions-searle88.blogspot.com/2015/06/categoryprayer.html
https://thoughtsandvisions-searle88.blogspot.com/2015/06/jesus-prayer.html
dedroidify.blogspot - funny-prayers-for-myers-briggs-types
dedroidify.blogspot - jeff-buckley-new-years-eve-prayer
dedroidify.blogspot - the-ravers-prayer
https://circumsolatious.blogspot.com/2011/05/prayer-for-new-way.html
wiki.auroville - News_&_Notes_660:A_Prayer_to_Sri_Aurobindo
wiki.auroville - Prayer
wiki.auroville - Prayers_and_Meditations
Dharmapedia - Mantras_and_Prayers
Psychology Wiki - Prayer
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy - petitionary-prayer
Occultopedia - death_prayer
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Anime/CosPrayers
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Fanfic/HogwartsSchoolOfPrayerAndMiracles
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Fanfic/TheLastPrayer
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Fanfic/ThePrayerWarriors
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/PrayersForBobby
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/TheCrowWickedPrayer
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/TheFinalPrayer
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Literature/APrayerForOwenMeany
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/CartoonBugSprayer
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/EmergencyMultifaithPrayer
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/GodNeedsPrayerBadly
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/GodsNeedPrayerBadly
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/PrayerIsALastResort
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/PrayerOfMalice
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/PrayerPose
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/SayYourPrayers
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/SillyPrayer
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/SongOfPrayer
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Music/LikeAPrayer
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Music/Wrathprayer
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/AnsweredPrayers
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/PrayerOfTheFaithless
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/TouhouReiidenHighlyResponsiveToPrayers
https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Book_of_Common_Prayer
https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/File:Evening_prayers_on_the_banks_of_Ganges,_Muni_ki_Reti,_Rishikesh.jpg
https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/File:Gandhi_prayer_meeting_1946.jpg
https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/File:Rossakiewicz_Prayer.jpg
https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Grace_(prayer)
https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Prayer
https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Prayers
https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Prayers_for_Bobby
Prayer of the Rollerboys(1991) - Some time in the future, USA has declined and become a country of violence and racial prejudice. Griffin earns his living delivering pizzas while he tries to take care of his little brother. An old friend of his, Gary Lee, is the leader of a gang with big ambitions, the Rollerboys. Gary joins them t...
The Crow: Wicked Prayer(2005) - Eddie Furlong dons the makeup in The Crow: Wicked Prayer, the fourth installment in The Crow film series. This tale follows Jimmy Cuervo, a down-on-his-luck ex-con living in a polluted mining town on an Indian reservation that would run him out of town if not for the remainder of his probation. With...
https://myanimelist.net/anime/2455/Prayers --
https://myanimelist.net/anime/44086/Prayer_X -- Music, Dementia
A Prayer Before Dawn (2017) ::: 6.9/10 -- R | 1h 56min | Action, Biography, Crime | 10 August 2018 (USA) -- The true story of an English boxer incarcerated in one of Thailand's most notorious prisons as he fights in Muay Thai tournaments to earn his freedom. Director: Jean-Stphane Sauvaire Writers:
Lilies of the Field (1963) ::: 7.6/10 -- Unrated | 1h 34min | Drama | 5 July 1963 (West Germany) -- A travelling handyman becomes the answer to the prayers of nuns who wish to build a chapel in the desert. Director: Ralph Nelson Writers: James Poe (screenplay), William E. Barrett (novel)
Prayers for Bobby (2009) ::: 8.1/10 -- TV-14 | 1h 30min | Biography, Drama, Romance | TV Movie 24 January 2009 -- True story of Mary Griffith, gay rights crusader, whose teenage son committed suicide due to her religious intolerance. Based on the book of the same title by Leroy Aarons. Director: Russell Mulcahy Writers: Katie Ford (teleplay), Leroy Aarons (book) Stars:
https://prayer.fandom.com
https://prayer.fandom.com/
https://ancardia.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer
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https://ancardia.fandom.com/wiki/Staff_of_prayers
https://animanga.fandom.com/wiki/The_Cosmopolitan_Prayers
https://banana-fish.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_X
https://bignate.fandom.com/wiki/A_Thanksgiving_Prayer
https://codesah.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_(Plegaria)
https://diablo.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer
https://dnd4.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_for_victory
https://dnd4.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_Made_Real
https://dnd4.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_of_vengeance
https://dnd4.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_of_Victory
https://dreamfiction.fandom.com/wiki/Touhou_Reiiden:_Highly_Responsive_to_Prayers_(Drillimation)
https://dreamfiction.fandom.com/wiki/Touhou_Reiiden:_The_Highly_Responsive_to_Prayers_(Drillimation)
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/Combat_Prayer
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/Hasty_Prayer
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/North_Wind%27s_Prayer
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/North_Wind's_Prayer
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_of_the_Resolute
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/Prayers_of_Baranat
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_To_Y'ffre
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/South_Wind%27s_Prayer
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/South_Wind's_Prayer
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/The_Consolations_of_Prayer
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/The_Prayers_of_Baranat
https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/Tu'whacca's_Prayer
https://electrogirl.fandom.com/wiki/The_Outlaws_of_the_West_and_Prayers_Wakan_Tanka_1
https://electrogirl.fandom.com/wiki/The_Outlaws_of_the_West_and_Prayers_Wakan_Tanka_2
https://eq2.fandom.com/wiki/Blessed_Coldain_Prayer_Shawl
https://eq2.fandom.com/wiki/Devout_Prayers
https://eq2.fandom.com/wiki/Enhance:_Prayer_of_Healing
https://eq2.fandom.com/wiki/Sacrificial_Prayers
https://ffxiclopedia.fandom.com/wiki/Flames_of_Prayer
https://fireemblem.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_Manual
https://fireemblem.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_Ring
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Necklace_of_prayer_beads
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_of_healing
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Prayers_from_the_Faithful
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_(spell)
https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Sunburst_(prayer)
https://girls-x-battle.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_Tree
https://glee.fandom.com/wiki/I_Say_a_Little_Prayer
https://glee.fandom.com/wiki/Like_a_Prayer
https://glee.fandom.com/wiki/Start_Me_Up/Livin'_on_a_Prayer
https://goblin-slayer.fandom.com/wiki/Non-Prayer_Characters
https://grimm.fandom.com/wiki/Dyin'_on_a_Prayer
https://hai-to-gensou-no-grimgal.fandom.com/wiki/Episode_1:_Whisper,_Chant,_Prayer,_Awaken
https://hai-to-gensou-no-grimgal.fandom.com/wiki/Level._1_Whisper,_Chant,_Prayer,_Awaken
https://heavenmusic.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_list
https://ironmaiden.fandom.com/wiki/No_Prayer_for_the_Dying
https://kaminomi.fandom.com/wiki/The_World_God_Only_Knows_2_Prayer_and_Curse_and_Miracle
https://knightrun.fandom.com/wiki/War_of_Prayer
https://megamitensei.fandom.com/wiki/Shin_Megami_Tensei_IV_-Prayers-
https://memory-alpha.fandom.com/wiki/Chemical_sprayer
https://memory-alpha.fandom.com/wiki/Gorlan_prayer_stick
https://memory-alpha.fandom.com/wiki/Ocampan_prayer_taper
https://memory-alpha.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer
https://memory-beta.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer
https://musicvideo.fandom.com/wiki/Like_a_Prayer
https://ninjago.fandom.com/wiki/On_a_Wish_and_a_Prayer
https://ninjago.fandom.com/wiki/On_a_Wish_and_a_Prayer/Transcript
https://peace.fandom.com/wiki/PeacePrayers
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/3_o'_Clock_Prayer
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Acknowledgements
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/An_Army_Delivered_by_Prayer
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Apostle's_Creed
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Blog:Recent_posts
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Glory_Be_to_the_Father
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/God_and_The_Spider_Web
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Hail_Holy_Queen
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Hail_Mary
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Local_Sitemap
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Lord's_Prayer
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Lower_Airfare!
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Main_Page
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Millionaire_by_Faith
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Payroll_Miracle
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_Links
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_Stories
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Sign_of_the_Cross
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/The_Big_Wheel
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/The_Water_Bottle
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/The_White_Calvary
https://prayer.fandom.com/wiki/Twenty-Six_Guards
https://prey.fandom.com/wiki/Acid_Sprayer
https://remnantsofskystone.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_Feathers
https://shokugekinosoma.fandom.com/wiki/Chapter_300:_Prayer_Book
https://starwars.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_flag
https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/A_Wing_and_a_Prayer_(comic_story)
https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_leaf
https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Thoughts_and_Prayers_(audio_story)
https://touhou.fandom.com/wiki/Highly_Responsive_to_Prayers
https://valkyrie-anatomia.fandom.com/wiki/Unanswered_Prayers
https://whitewolf.fandom.com/wiki/The_Prayer
https://wowwiki-archive.fandom.com/wiki/Desperate_Prayer
https://wowwiki-archive.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_of_Healing
https://wowwiki-archive.fandom.com/wiki/Prayer_of_Mending
Anomalies -- -- - -- 1 ep -- Original -- Psychological -- Anomalies Anomalies -- We try to enrich ourselves through prayer, faith and devotion to someone or something "other." Similarly, we believe in the existence of "anomalies," such as unknowable and uncontrollable monsters. But can such beliefs advance us? -- -- (Source: Official website) -- Special - ??? ??, 2013 -- 699 4.59
Chocotto Sister -- -- Nomad -- 24 eps -- Manga -- Comedy Drama Romance Ecchi -- Chocotto Sister Chocotto Sister -- Haruma Kawagoe is an only child. A long time ago, at Christmas time, his mother miscarried the child that was to have been his baby sister. That night, young Haruma knelt down and offered up an earnest prayer: "Please make my mother well again, and please give me a little sister." Years have passed, and Haruma has nearly forgotten his prayer. But Santa hasn't.... one Christmas, when Haruma is least expecting it, he gets an unusual present - his sister. -- -- (Source: ANN) -- TV - Jul 12, 2006 -- 18,907 6.79
Chou Henshin Cosprayers -- -- Imagin, Studio Live -- 8 eps -- Original -- Action Ecchi Adventure Fantasy Magic Comedy Super Power Sci-Fi -- Chou Henshin Cosprayers Chou Henshin Cosprayers -- Koto unknowingly seals away the Sun Goddess Amaterasu, and now she is in a different world and can't return. Meeting priestesses who combat the evil in this strange place she learns that Black Towers throughout the land keep Amaterasu sealed away and are guarded by evil monsters. Koto must now find a way to help defeat these monsters and return the world to the way it was. -- -- (Source: ANN) -- TV - Jan 12, 2004 -- 7,481 4.94
Dororo -- -- MAPPA, Tezuka Productions -- 24 eps -- Manga -- Action Adventure Demons Historical Samurai Shounen Supernatural -- Dororo Dororo -- The greedy samurai lord Daigo Kagemitsu's land is dying, and he would do anything for power, even renounce Buddha and make a pact with demons. His prayers are answered by 12 demons who grant him the power he desires by aiding his prefecture's growth, but at a price. When Kagemitsu's first son is born, the boy has no limbs, no nose, no eyes, no ears, nor even skin—yet still, he lives. -- -- This child is disposed of in a river and forgotten. But as luck would have it, he is saved by a medicine man who provides him with prosthetics and weapons, allowing for him to survive and fend for himself. The boy lives and grows, and although he cannot see, hear, or feel anything, he must defeat the demons that took him as sacrifice. With the death of each one, he regains a part of himself that is rightfully his. For many years he wanders alone, until one day an orphan boy, Dororo, befriends him. The unlikely pair of castaways now fight for their survival and humanity in an unforgiving, demon-infested world. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Sentai Filmworks -- 745,731 8.20
Gundam Evolve -- -- Sunrise -- 15 eps -- Original -- Action Military Space Mecha -- Gundam Evolve Gundam Evolve -- A series of short films packaged with certain model kits and aired at conventions, the Gundam Evolve series chronicles a number of side-stories, alternative scenes, and even bonus omake from all around the Gundam canon. Featuring a mix of animation media—from traditional cels to 3-D CG rendering to even cel-shaded 2-D animation—these often 3-5 minute shorts cover such events as Domon Kasshu's training (and a bit of a romantic tift with Rain Mikamura) from G Gundam, Amuro Ray battling Quess Paraya from Char's Counterattack, Kamille Bidan training in the Gundam Mk.II from Zeta Gundam, and Canard Pars dueling Prayer Reverie from the Gundam SEED X Astray manga. -- -- (Source: ANN) -- -- Licensor: -- Nozomi Entertainment -- OVA - ??? ??, 2001 -- 9,319 6.61
Honzuki no Gekokujou: Shisho ni Naru Tame ni wa Shudan wo Erandeiraremasen -- -- Ajia-Do -- 14 eps -- Light novel -- Slice of Life Fantasy -- Honzuki no Gekokujou: Shisho ni Naru Tame ni wa Shudan wo Erandeiraremasen Honzuki no Gekokujou: Shisho ni Naru Tame ni wa Shudan wo Erandeiraremasen -- Urano Motosu loves books and has an endless desire to read literature, no matter the subject. She almost fulfills her dream job of becoming a librarian before her life is ended in an accident. As she draws her last breath, she wishes to be able to read more books in her next life. -- -- As if fate was listening to her prayer, she wakes up reincarnated as Myne—a frail five-year-old girl living in a medieval era. What immediately comes to her mind is her passion. She tries to find something to read, only to become frustrated by the lack of books at her disposal. -- -- Without the printing press, books have to be written and copied by hand, making them very expensive; as such, only a few nobles can afford them—but this won't stop Myne. She will prove that her will to read is unbreakable, and if there are no books around, she will make them herself! -- -- 162,089 8.02
Honzuki no Gekokujou: Shisho ni Naru Tame ni wa Shudan wo Erandeiraremasen -- -- Ajia-Do -- 14 eps -- Light novel -- Slice of Life Fantasy -- Honzuki no Gekokujou: Shisho ni Naru Tame ni wa Shudan wo Erandeiraremasen Honzuki no Gekokujou: Shisho ni Naru Tame ni wa Shudan wo Erandeiraremasen -- Urano Motosu loves books and has an endless desire to read literature, no matter the subject. She almost fulfills her dream job of becoming a librarian before her life is ended in an accident. As she draws her last breath, she wishes to be able to read more books in her next life. -- -- As if fate was listening to her prayer, she wakes up reincarnated as Myne—a frail five-year-old girl living in a medieval era. What immediately comes to her mind is her passion. She tries to find something to read, only to become frustrated by the lack of books at her disposal. -- -- Without the printing press, books have to be written and copied by hand, making them very expensive; as such, only a few nobles can afford them—but this won't stop Myne. She will prove that her will to read is unbreakable, and if there are no books around, she will make them herself! -- -- -- Licensor: -- Crunchyroll -- 162,089 8.02
Prayer X -- -- PERIMETRON -- 1 ep -- Original -- Music Dementia -- Prayer X Prayer X -- Music video directed and animated by Ryoji Yamada for the song Prayer X by King Gnu -- -- In the music video Prayer X, King Gnu takes an abstract and animated approach to mental health topics such as paranoia, anxiety, depression, and suicide. The setting is in a grey monotonous world where the main character is trapped inside a repetitive schedule which slowly drives him insane. -- -- (Source: JROCK NEWS) -- Music - Aug 6, 2018 -- 483 6.84
Sol -- -- - -- 1 ep -- - -- Dementia Music -- Sol Sol -- This video clip is a story of realization. -- A story of a child who has been inheriting a negative legacy of humankind that continuously accumulates in diverse ways. The child keeps carrying the legacy, that is too heavy and too much to bear for her body, feverishly without knowing the real meaning of the act. -- -- Soon, the child starts to act out a vision of knowledge, prayers, courage and curiosity. She realizes that positive power is the best balance towards purification and she should stop carrying on the negativity through a negative attitude. -- -- (Source: Vimeo) -- Music - Jan 12, 2012 -- 269 4.90
Tales of Zestiria the Cross -- -- ufotable -- 12 eps -- Game -- Action Adventure Magic Fantasy -- Tales of Zestiria the Cross Tales of Zestiria the Cross -- The Celestial Records speak of the existence of the "Seraphim," a race of divine beings who give blessings to humanity and are offered prayers by them in return. Those who are anointed with the ability to interact with these spirits are known as "Shepherds." Hailed as heroes for their prompt appearances in times of crisis, while also being feared for their power, the Shepherds are imprinted in common folklore along with the Seraphim. -- -- Sorey is a young human who has spent his entire life living in harmony alongside the Seraphim in the village of Elysia. Fascinated by the myths of the Celestial Records, he explores some nearby ruins with Mikleo—his childhood Seraphim companion—hoping to enlighten himself about the Seraphims' history with mankind. -- -- Unfortunately, they become trapped in the depths of the historical site during their investigation. While searching for an exit, they come across a mysterious girl who desperately seeks the help of a Shepherd to save the world, which is on the brink of being consumed by darkness. Despite Mikleo's warning about making contact with other humans, Sorey decides to help the stranger, which unknowingly leads him closer to the dream of peaceful coexistence between man and Seraphim. -- -- 273,686 7.29
Tales of Zestiria the Cross -- -- ufotable -- 12 eps -- Game -- Action Adventure Magic Fantasy -- Tales of Zestiria the Cross Tales of Zestiria the Cross -- The Celestial Records speak of the existence of the "Seraphim," a race of divine beings who give blessings to humanity and are offered prayers by them in return. Those who are anointed with the ability to interact with these spirits are known as "Shepherds." Hailed as heroes for their prompt appearances in times of crisis, while also being feared for their power, the Shepherds are imprinted in common folklore along with the Seraphim. -- -- Sorey is a young human who has spent his entire life living in harmony alongside the Seraphim in the village of Elysia. Fascinated by the myths of the Celestial Records, he explores some nearby ruins with Mikleo—his childhood Seraphim companion—hoping to enlighten himself about the Seraphims' history with mankind. -- -- Unfortunately, they become trapped in the depths of the historical site during their investigation. While searching for an exit, they come across a mysterious girl who desperately seeks the help of a Shepherd to save the world, which is on the brink of being consumed by darkness. Despite Mikleo's warning about making contact with other humans, Sorey decides to help the stranger, which unknowingly leads him closer to the dream of peaceful coexistence between man and Seraphim. -- -- -- Licensor: -- Funimation -- 273,686 7.29
The Place Where We Were -- -- - -- 1 ep -- Original -- Dementia -- The Place Where We Were The Place Where We Were -- A couple are seen at home. The woman says a heartfelt prayer while the man looks up from his newspaper, holding a cup of tea. They both look out of the window. In the sky above their house a giant angel is flying past. A forest has grown on the angel's back. In the forest three creatures sit around a table and playing cards. The cards are laid out and feature different images: three cards depicting babies jump down a hole in the middle of the table and begin a journey through the body of the angel. They stop in a cave where a creature plays the harp for them and turns the cards into tears. The tears fly through the air out of the angel's eyes and one of them reaches the woman's womb. In the next scene she is seen sitting at home, with her cat, contentedly stroking her own pregnant belly. The next scene is an exterior: a field with a lone tree growing on it. The man is dancing and walking towards the tree: behind the tree he finds his partner, the woman, holding a baby. They all smile at each other. -- -- -- (Source: Tommaso Corvi-Mora) -- Movie - ??? ??, 2008 -- 428 N/A -- -- Kiseki -- -- - -- 1 ep -- - -- Music Dementia -- Kiseki Kiseki -- Experimental animation by Kuri Youji. -- Movie - ??? ??, 1963 -- 427 4.83
Windaria -- -- Idol, Kaname Productions -- 1 ep -- Original -- Action Drama Fantasy Romance Sci-Fi -- Windaria Windaria -- Two pairs of young lovers become embroiled in a war between two rival kingdoms, the primitive but resplendent Isa and the militaristic but undisciplined Paro. Izu and his young wife, Marin, are simple farmers who live in the unassuming village of Saki, which lies directly between Isa and Paro. While Saki does not have the beauty of Isa nor the war machines of Paro, they do possess a magnificent tree known as "Windaria," to which the villagers give their prayers in return for "good memories." -- -- When the war erupts, Izu decides to join Paro's army, enthralled by the fantastic motorbike "given" to him as a bribe. Before he departs, they each take a vow: He will definitely return to her, and until he does, she will wait for him. The other two lovers are Jill, the prince of Paro, and Ahanas, Princess of Isa. They initially want nothing to do with the rapidly escalating conflict, but after Jill's father, Paro's king, dies by his son's hand in an altercation over the war, Jill has little choice but to realize his father's final wish: the taking of Isa. -- -- The only problem is that he had promised his beloved, Ahanas, that he would not become involved. Windaria is a war parable set in a fantasy land of unicorns and ghost ships. -- -- (Source: AnimeNfo) -- -- Licensor: -- ADV Films -- Movie - Jul 19, 1986 -- 7,639 6.53
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Prayer
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https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Angels_in_prayer
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https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Kneeling_in_prayer
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:National_Day_of_Prayer
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A Beautiful Prayer
Absentee funeral prayer (Islam)
Affirmative prayer
Afternoon prayer
American Prayer (song)
An American Prayer
Anglican prayer beads
Answered Prayers
A Prayer for My Daughter
A Prayer for Owen Meany
A Prayer Under Pressure of Violent Anguish
Asr prayer
A Thousand Years of Good Prayers (short story collection)
Authorised Daily Prayer Book
A Wing and a Prayer (film)
Baladi-rite prayer
Bhopal: A Prayer for Rain
Bidding-prayer
Book of Common Prayer
Book of Common Prayer (1549)
Book of Common Prayer (1928)
Call to prayer
Catholic prayers to Jesus
Centering prayer
Chaplet (prayer)
Christian child's prayer
Christian prayer
Comin' In on a Wing and a Prayer
Congregational prayer
Congressional prayer
Congressional Prayer Room
Continual prayer
Cosmopolitan Church of Prayer
Daily Prayer for Peace
Day of Prayer
Day of Prayer for the Peace of Jerusalem
Deaf to Our Prayers
Drunkard's Prayer
Efficacy of prayer
Eid prayers
Ejaculatory prayer
Entrance prayers
Evening Prayer
Everyday I Said a Prayer for Kathy and Made a One Inch Square
Fajr prayer
Ftima prayers
Feast of the Prayer of Christ
Federal Day of Thanksgiving, Repentance and Prayer
Fixed prayer times
Four Men and a Prayer
Friday prayer
Funeral Sermon and Prayer
Gang Signs & Prayer
Garden of Prayer
Gestalt prayer
Good Friday prayer for the Jews
Grace (prayer)
Harley Prayer Book
Hear My Prayer
History of the Lord's Prayer in English
Holy Willie's Prayer
Homeric prayer
House of Prayer Episcopal Church and Rectory
Idiot Prayer
International Day of Prayer for the Persecuted Church
International House of Prayer
I Say a Little Prayer
Isha prayer
Jesus Prayer
Jewish prayer
Just a Baby's Prayer at Twilight (For Her Daddy Over There)
Justice House of Prayer
Leonine Prayers
Life of prayer and penance
Like a Prayer
Like a Prayer (album)
Like a Prayer (song)
List of Jewish prayers and blessings
List of prayers
List of Tehran's Friday Prayer Imams
Little Prayers and Finite Experience
Live Prayer
Livin' on a Prayer
Livin' on a Prayer (Family Guy)
Lokaksema (Hindu prayer)
Lord's Prayer
Lorica (prayer)
Macedonian Prayer (video)
Maghrib prayer
Maiden's Prayer
Malediction and Prayer
Mario Prayer
Mary's Prayer
Master of the Dresden Prayerbook
Master of the Prayer Books of around 1500
Midshipman Prayer
Monlam Prayer Festival
Morning Prayer
Nafl prayer
National Day of Prayer
National Prayer Breakfast
Night Prayer
Nitro Mega Prayer
No Prayer for the Dying
Obligatory Bah prayers
On a Wing and a Prayer
Palmless Prayer / Mass Murder Refrain
Pasadena International House of Prayer
Patriot Prayer
Pillows & Prayers
Poems, Prayers & Promises
Pope's Worldwide Prayer Network
Portal:India/SC Summary/SP Tibetan Prayer Flag
Portals of Prayer
Prayer
Prayer (album)
Prayer at JordanHare
Prayer beads
Prayer Bead with the Adoration of the Magi and the Crucifixion
Prayer before a crucifix
Prayer Before Birth
Prayer blog
Prayer book
Prayer Book Cross
Prayerbook of Albert of Brandenburg
Prayer Book Rebellion
Prayer Book Society
Prayer Book Society of Canada
Prayer Book Society of the USA
Prayer bump
Prayer circle
Prayer circle (Mormonism)
Prayer: Conversing With God
Prayer (disambiguation)
Prayer During the Day
Prayer flag
Prayer for a Child
Prayer for a Lost Mitten
Prayer for Aradia
Prayer for Cleansing
Prayer for Judgement Continued
Prayer for Peace
Prayer for relief
Prayer for the Assassin
Prayer for the dead
Prayer for the Weekend
Prayer for the Wild Things
Prayer for You
Prayer in Hinduism
Prayer in Mormonism
Prayer in the Bah Faith
Prayer in the Catholic Church
Prayer in the Hebrew Bible
Prayer in the New Testament
Prayer kettle
Prayer, meditation and contemplation in Christianity
Prayer nut
Prayer of a Common Man
Prayer of Columbus
Prayer of Consecration to the Sacred Heart
Prayer of Humble Access
Prayer of Manasseh
Prayer of Quiet
Prayer of Saint Ephrem
Prayer of Saint Francis
Prayer of Solomon
Prayer of the Apostle Paul
Prayer of the Blessed Virgin
Prayer of the Refugee
Prayer of the Rollerboys
Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom
Prayer plant
Prayer rope
Prayer rug
Prayers Be Answered
Prayers (duo)
Prayers for Bobby
Prayers for Bobby (book)
Prayers for the Assassin
Prayers for the Damned
Prayer shawl
Prayers of Kierkegaard
Prayers of Steel
Prayers of the Last Prophet
Prayers on Fire
Prayer stick
Prayers to Broken Stones
Prayers / Triangles
Prayer to Saint Joseph
Prayer to Saint Michael
Prayer Tower
Prayer warrior
Prayer wheel
Rajan Zed prayer protest
Rosary-based prayers
Rothschild Prayerbook
Royal Prayer Book
Saint George in devotions, traditions and prayers
Saint Jerome at Prayer (Georges de La Tour)
Saint Louis de Montfort's Prayer to Jesus
Save a Prayer
Say a Little Prayer
Say a Prayer
Say Your Prayers
Scout prayers
Scream the Prayer Tour
Serenity Prayer
Sign prayer
Sinner's prayer
Somebody Said a Prayer
Sprayer
St. James House of Prayer Episcopal Church
St. Jerome at Prayer (Bosch)
Studies on intercessory prayer
Sunnah prayer
Swami Vivekananda's prayer to Kali at Dakshineswar
Teen Age Prayer
The Carnal Prayer Mat
The Cosmopolitan Prayers
The Crow: Wicked Prayer
The Fifteen Whispered Prayers
The Golden Arrow prayer
The Hunter's Prayer
The Indian's Prayer
The Lord's Prayer (Albert Hay Malotte song)
The Lord's Prayer (Sister Janet Mead song)
The Millennium Prayer
The Nightingale's Prayer
The Prayer (Bloc Party song)
The Prayer (Celine Dion and Andrea Bocelli song)
The Prayer Chain
The Prayer (film)
The Prayer of Azariah and Song of the Three Holy Children
The Prayer of Jabez
The Prayer of Russians
The War Prayer
The World Peace Prayer Society
Thoughts and prayers
Thoughts and Prayers (film)
Tickets for a Prayer Wheel (poetry collection)
Tobias and Sarah in Prayer with the Angel Raphael and the Demon
Travelin' Prayer
Traveller's Prayer (album)
Unanswered Prayers
Union of Prayer
United House of Prayer for All People
Universal Prayer
Universal Sufi Prayers
Venkatachalapathi Samuldrala prayer controversy
Vesting prayers
Week of Prayer for Christian Unity
Wessobrunn Prayer
Wing and a Prayer (disambiguation)
Wing and a Prayer Fife and Drum Corps
Wing and a Prayer, The Story of Carrier X
World Day of Prayer
World War II Memorial Prayer Act of 2013
Zuhr prayer



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