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object:Miguel de Cervantes
subject class:Poetry
Novelist, Playwright
1547-1616
class:author

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

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SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Don_Quixote

IN CHAPTERS TITLE

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
Miguel de Cervantes

DEFINITIONS


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TERMS ANYWHERE



QUOTES [2 / 2 - 481 / 481]


KEYS (10k)

   1 Mortimer J Adler
   1 Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  440 Miguel de Cervantes
   30 Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   2 Mortimer J Adler

1:I know who I am and who I may be, if I choose. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
2:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Get out of harms way. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
2:Every dog has his day. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
3:Thank you for nothing. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
4:Comparisons are odious. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
5:Give the devil his due. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
6:Miracle me no miracles. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
7:Fair and softly goes far. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
8:I have other fish to fry. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
9:Many littles make a much. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
10:As ill-luck would have it. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
11:Delay always heeds danger. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
12:Honesty's the best policy. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
13:I'll turn over a new leaf. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
14:Delay always breeds danger. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
15:Think before thou speakest. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
16:Thou hast seen nothing yet. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
17:Tomorrow will be a new day. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
18:Until death it is all life. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
19:He who reforms, God assists. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
20:Little said is soon amended. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
21:The proof is in the pudding. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
22:Facts are the enemy of truth. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
23:It is good to live and learn. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
24:All is not gold that glisters. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
25:A stout heart breaks bad luck. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
26:Behind the cross is the devil. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
27:He had a face like a blessing. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
28:In hell there is no retention. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
29:Virtue is the truest nobility. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
30:Whoever is ignorant is vulgar. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
31:He who gives early gives twice. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
32:In the night all cats are gray. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
33:Patience and shuffle the cards. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
34:Seek for good, but expect evil. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
35:Soul of fibre and heart of oak. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
36:Too much sanity may be madness! ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
37:We must not stand upon trifles. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
38:A closed mouth catches no flies. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
39:All sorrows are less with bread. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
40:Dine on little, and sup on less. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
41:Faint heart ne'er won fair lady. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
42:He preaches well that lives well ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
43:He preaches well who lives well. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
44:Let the worst come to the worst. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
45:There's no love lost between us. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
46:My thoughts ran a wool-gathering. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
47:Sing away sorrow, cast away care. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
48:There is no love lost between us. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
49:The wicked are always ungrateful. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
50:He that gives quickly gives twice. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
51:I shall be as secret as the grave. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
52:Man appoints, and God disappoints. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
53:The pen is the tongue of the mind. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
54:Be slow of tongue and quick of eye. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
55:Health and cheerfulness make beauty ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
56:It takes all sorts (to make a world ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
57:Jests that give pains are no jests. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
58:Let every man look before he leaps. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
59:Let us forget and forgive injuries. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
60:Necessity urges desperate measures. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
61:Other men's pains are easily borne. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
62:The absent feel and fear every ill. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
63:Where one door shuts another opens. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
64:With life many things are remedied. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
65:Everything disturbs an absent lover. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
66:He who's never loved cannot be good. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
67:Let every man mind his own business. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
68:The journey is better than the inn". ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
69:When you are at Rome, do as you see. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
70:Blessings on him, who invented sleep. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
71:He who sings frightens away his ills. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
72:Let us make hay while the sun shines. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
73:There is no proverb that is not true. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
74:They who lose today may win tomorrow. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
75:Treason pleases, but not the traitor. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
76:When we are asleep, we are all equal. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
77:Wit and humor belong to genius alone. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
78:Don't put all your eggs in one basket. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
79:Every man is the son of his own works. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
80:Hunger is the best sauce in the world. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
81:Man have to have friends even in hell. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
82:My honor is dearer to me than my life. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
83:The eyes those silent tongues of love. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
84:Those two fatal words, Mine and Thine. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
85:What a man has, so much he is sure of. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
86:What is bought is cheaper than a gift. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
87:A Man Without Honor is Worse than Dead. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
88:A person dishonored is worst than dead. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
89:Evil comes not amiss if it comes alone. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
90:God exalts the man who humbles himself. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
91:Ill-luck, you know, seldom comes alone. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
92:It requires a long time to know anyone. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
93:That which costs little is less valued. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
94:The proof of the pudding is the eating. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
95:A good name is better than bags of gold. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
96:Believe there are no limits but the sky. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
97:God helps everyone with what is his own. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
98:God who gives the wound gives the salve. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
99:I can tell where my own shoe pinches me. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
100:Spare your breath to cool your porridge. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
101:Thou art a cat, and a rat, and a coward. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
102:A blot in thy escutcheon to all futurity. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
103:Arms are my ornaments, warfare my repose. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
104:Leap out of the frying pan into the fire. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
105:One swallow alone does not make a summer. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
106:They must needs go whom the Devil drives. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
107:Where there's music there can be no evil. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
108:A man prepared has half fought the battle. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
109:A shy face is better than a forward heart. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
110:Can we ever have too much of a good thing? ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
111:Every production must resemble its author. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
112:Heaven's help is better than early rising. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
113:It will be seen in the frying of the eggs. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
114:There is nothing costs less than civility. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
115:There's no sauce in the world like hunger. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
116:There's no taking trout with dry breeches. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
117:Whom God loves, his house is sweet to him. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
118:Wit and humor do not reside in slow minds. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
119:God bears with the wicked, but not forever. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
120:God who sends the wound sends the medicine. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
121:Great people create great acts of kindness. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
122:Let us not throw the rope after the bucket. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
123:Sleep is the best cure for waking troubles. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
124:Take away the cause, and the effect ceases. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
125:The man who fights for his ideals is alive. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
126:Urgent necessity prompts many to do things. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
127:All sorrows are bearable, if there is bread. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
128:An honest man's word is as good as his bond. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
129:The little birds have God for their caterer. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
130:Time ripens all things; no man is born wise. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
131:Troubles take wing for the man who can sing. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
132:You cannot eat your cake and have your cake. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
133:Good Christians should never avenge injuries. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
134:Good wits jump; a word to the wise is enough. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
135:The ass bears the load, but not the overload. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
136:When God sends the dawn, he sends it for all. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
137:When thou art at Rome, do as they do at Rome. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
138:Wine taken in moderation never does any harm. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
139:Great persons are able to do great kindnesses. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
140:I am almost frightened out of my seven senses. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
141:I know who I am and who I may be, if I choose. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
142:Old, that's an affront no woman can well bear. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
143:Experience is the universal mother of sciences. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
144:I do not believe that the Good Lord plays dice. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
145:The guts carry the feet, not the feet the guts. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
146:The wise hand does not all the tongue dictates. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
147:Under a bad cloak there is often a good drinker ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
148:Riches are able to solder up abundance of flaws. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
149:She who desires to see, desires also to be seen. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
150:Take away the motive, and you take away the sin. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
151:The darts of love are blunted by maiden modesty. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
152:When in doubt, lean to the side of
153:Alas! all music jars when the soul's out of tune. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
154:A tooth is much more to be prized than a diamond. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
155:For hope is always born at the same time as love. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
156:The road to the inn is much better than the stay. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
157:The treason pleases, but the traitors are odious. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
158:Every man is as God made him, ay, and often worse. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
159:Every one in his own house and God in all of them. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
160:Fear has many eyes and can see things underground. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
161:I find my familiarity with thee has bred contempt. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
162:I must speak the truth, and nothing but the truth. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
163:Make yourself honey and the flies will devour you. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
164:Wine in excess keeps neither secrets nor promises. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
165:Good painter imitates nature, bad ones spews it up. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
166:Love not what you are but only what you may become. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
167:Our hours in love have wings; in absence, crutches. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
168:The man who is prepared has his battle half fought. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
169:Truth will rise above falsehood as oil above water. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
170:No fathers or mothers think their own children ugly. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
171:We are all as God made us and frequently much worse. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
172:A wise man does not trust all his eggs to one basket. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
173:Great expectations are better than a poor possession. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
174:Many go out for wool, and come home shorn themselves. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
175:A knowledge of thyself will preserve thee from vanity. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
176:Mere flimflam stories, and nothing but shams and lies. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
177:To be good to the vile is to throw water into the sea. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
178:A proverb is a short sentence based on long experience. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
179:Not with whom you are born, but with whom you are bred. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
180:Valor lies just halfway between rashness and cowardice. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
181:Well, now there's a remedy for everything except death. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
182:You must not think, sir, to catch old birds with chaff. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
183:Every man was not born with a silver spoon in his mouth. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
184:He is mad past recovery, but yet he has lucid intervals. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
185:Laziness never arrived at the attainment of a good wish. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
186:One shouldn't talk of halters in the hanged man's house. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
187:Proverbs are short sentences drawn from long experience. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
188:The knowledge of yourself will preserve you from vanity. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
189:Those who'll play with cats must expect to be scratched. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
190:Cunning cheats itself wholly, and other people partially. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
191:Fortune leaves always some door open to come at a remedy. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
192:My memory is so bad that many times I forget my own name. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
193:The worst reconciliation is better than the best divorce. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
194:When the head aches, all the members partake of the pain. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
195:A silly remark can be made in Latin as well as in Spanish. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
196:Forewarned, forearmed; to be prepared is half the victory. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
197:Good actions ennoble us, and we are the sons of our deeds. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
198:Lovers are commonly industrious to make themselves uneasy. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
199:One should not talk of hatters in the house of the hanged. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
200:What man can pretend to know the riddle of a woman's mind? ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
201:Captivity is the greatest of all evils that can befall one. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
202:It is courage that vanquishes in war, and not good weapons. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
203:Never look for birds of this year in the nests of the last. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
204:Never meddle with play-actors, for they're a favoured race. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
205:Since we have a good loaf, let us not look for cheesecakes. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
206:Every tooth in a man's head is more valuable than a diamond. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
207:The good governor should have a broken leg and keep at home. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
208:All women are good - good for nothing, or good for something. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
209:No man is more than another unless he does more than another. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
210:The stomach carries the heart, and not the heart the stomach. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
211:True valor lies in the middle between cowardice and rashness. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
212:When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
213:Get the better of yourself - this is the best kind of victory. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
214:Never stand begging for that which you have the power to earn. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
215:The eating. By a small sample we may judge of the whole piece. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
216:The foolish sayings of the rich pass for wise saws in society. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
217:The pitcher goes so often to the fountain that if gets broken. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
218:Abundance, even of good things, prevents them from being valued ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
219:In order to attain the impossible, one must attempt the absurd. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
220:Nothing costs less nor is cheaper than compliments of civility. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
221:Our greatest foes, and whom we must chiefly combat, are within. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
222:That which we are capable of feeling, we are capable of saying. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
223:For if he like a madman lived; At least he like a wise one died. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
224:He that will not when he may, When he would, he should have nay. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
225:Love is a power too strong to be overcome by anything but flight. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
226:There is no greater folly in the world than for a man to despair. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
227:There is nothing so subject to the inconstancy of fortune as war. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
228:Tis ill talking of halters in the house of a man that was hanged. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
229:When good luck knocks at the door, let him in and keep him there. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
230:Fly not, cowards and vile beings, for a single knight attacks you. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
231:Folly is wont to have more followers and comrades than discretion. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
232:I know what's what, and have always taken care of the main chance. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
233:It is one thing to praise discipline, and another to submit to it. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
234:Tis a dainty thing to command, though 'twere but a flock of sheep. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
235:Beware, gentle knight - the greatest monster of them all is reason. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
236:Everyone is as God has made him, and oftentimes a great deal worse. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
237:Tell me what company thou keepest and I'll tell thee what thou art. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
238:I drink when I have occasion, and sometimes when I have no occasion. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
239:There were but two families in the world, Have-much and Have-little. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
240:The very remembrance of my former misfortune proves a new one to me. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
241:They can expect nothing but their labor for their pains. - Cervantes ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
242:True courage lies in the middle, between cowardice and recklessness. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
243:Woman's advice has little value, but he who won't take it is a fool. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
244:The wounds received in battle bestow honor, they do not take it away. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
245:Tis the only comfort of the miserable to have partners in their woes. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
246:Virtue is persecuted by the wicked more than it is loved by the good. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
247:Don't put too fine a point to your wit for fear it should get blunted. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
248:He who has the judge for his father goes into court with an easy mind. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
249:There is no book so bad... that it does not have something good in it. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
250:There is remedy for all things except death - Don Quixote De La Mancha ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
251:A bad year and a bad month to all the backbiting bitches in the world!. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
252:Sancho Panza by name is my own self, if I was not changed in my cradle. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
253:A little in one's own pocket is better than much in another man's purse. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
254:Controlling my temper is important, ... Sometimes it's hard, but I try. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
255:My heart is wax molded as she pleases, but enduring as marble to retain. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
256:A private sin is not so prejudicial in this world, as a public indecency. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
257:Digo, paciencia y barajar. What I say is, patience, and shuffle the cards. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
258:There is no jewel in the world so valuable as a chaste and virtuous woman. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
259:You are a king by your own fireside, as much as any monarch in his throne. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
260:Blessed be he who invented sleep, a cloak that covers all a man's thoughts. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
261:Pray, look better, sir... those things yonder are no giants, but windmills. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
262:Well-gotten wealth may lose itself, but the ill-gotten loses its master also. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
263:How will he who does not know how to govern himself know how to govern others? ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
264:Inasmuch as ill-deeds spring up as a spontaneous crop, they are easy to learn. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
265:It is better that a judge should lean on the side of compassion than severity. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
266:Where envy reigns virtue can't exist, and generosity doesn't go with meanness. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
267:By the streets of &
268:Delay always breeds danger; and to protract a great design is often to ruin it. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
269:Do not eat garlic or onions; for their smell will reveal that you are a peasant. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
270:Drink moderately, for drunkeness neither keeps a secret, nor observes a promise. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
271:Maybe the greatest madness is to see life as it is rather than what it could be. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
272:The brave man carves out his fortune, and every man is the sum of his own works. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
273:Riches are of little avail in many of the calamities to which mankind are liable. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
274:Let everyone turn himself around, and look at home, and he will find enough to do. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
275:All persons are not discreet enough to know how to take things by the right handle. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
276:Be brief, for no talk can please when too long. Being prepared is half the victory. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
277:The ass will carry his load, but not a double load; ride not a free horse to death. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
278:El pan comido y la compan? |a deshecha. With the bread eaten, the company breaks up. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
279:It is past all controversy that what costs dearest is, and ought to be, most valued. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
280:Love is invisible and comes and goes where it wants, without anyone asking about it. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
281:When the severity of the law is to be softened, let pity, not bribes, be the motive. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
282:Make it thy business to know thyself, which is the most difficult lesson in the world ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
283:Does the devil possess you? You're leaping over the hedge before you come at the stile. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
284:He who's down one day can be up the next, unless he really wants to stay in bed, that is. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
285:Liberty ... is one of the most valuable blessings that Heaven has bestowed upon mankind. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
286:We ought to love our Maker for His own sake, without either hope of good or fear of pain. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
287:In short, virtue cannot live where envy reigns, nor liberality subsist with niggardliness. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
288:She fights and vanquishes in me, and I live and breathe in her, and I have life and being. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
289:It is a true saying that a man must eat a peck of salt with his friend before he knows him. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
290:Let me leap out of the frying-pan into the fire; or, out of God's blessing into the warm sun. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
291:That's the nature of women, not to love when we love them, and to love when we love them not. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
292:For me alone Don Quixote was born and I for him. His was the power of action, mine of writing. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
293:There were no embraces, because where there is great love there is often little display of it. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
294:The bow cannot always stand bent, nor can human frailty subsist without some lawful recreation. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
295:Whether the pitcher hits the stone or the stone hits the pitcher, it goes ill with the pitcher. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
296:There is no remembrance which time does not obliterate, nor pain which death does not terminate. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
297:I have always heard, Sancho, that doing good to base fellows is like throwing water into the sea. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
298:Nay, what is worse, perhaps turn poet, which, they say, is an infectious and incurable distemper. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
299:The woman who is resolved to be respected can make herself be so even amidst an army of soldiers. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
300:Fortune may have yet a better success in reserve for you and they who lose today may win tomorrow. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
301:&
302:From reading too much, and sleeping too little, his brain dried up on him and he lost his judgment. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
303:Too much sanity may be madness and the maddest of all, to see life as it is and not as it should be. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
304:There is a remedy for everything but death; who, in spite of our teeth, will take us in his clutches. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
305:Well, there's a remedy for all things but death, which will be sure to lay us flat one time or other. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
306:There are only two families in the world, my old grandmother used to say, the Haves and the Have-nots. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
307:Anyone who does not know how to make the most of his luck has no right to complain if it passes by him. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
308:Be temperate in your drinking, remembering that too much wine cannot keep either a secret or a promise. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
309:Love and war are the same thing, and stratagems and policy are as allowable in the one as in the other. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
310:Many count their chickens before they are hatched; and where they expect bacon, meet with broken bones. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
311:The pen is the tongue of the soul; as are the thoughts engendered there, so will be the things written. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
312:Truth may be stretched, but cannot be broken, and always gets above falsehood, as does oil above water. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
313:One of the effects of fear is to disturb the senses and cause things to appear other than what they are. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
314:When a man says, "Get out of my house! what would you have with my wife?" there is no answer to be made. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
315:The pen is the language of the soul; as the concepts that in it are generated, such will be its writings. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
316:Truly I was born to be an example of misfortune, and a target at which the arrows of adversary are aimed. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
317:Among the attributes of God, although they are equal, mercy shines with even more brilliance than justice. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
318:He who loses wealth loses much; he who loses a friend loses more; but he that loses his courage loses all. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
319:When we leave this world, and are laid in the earth, the prince walks as narrow a path as the day-laborer. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
320:The most difficult character in comedy is that of the fool, and he must be no simpleton that plays that part. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
321:Though Gods attributes are equal, yet his mercy is more attractive and pleasing in our eyes than his justice. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
322:To withdraw is not to run away, and to stay is no wise action, when there's more reason to fear than to hope. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
323:It seldom happens that any felicity comes so pure as not to be tempered and allayed by some mixture of sorrow. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
324:Truth indeed rather alleviates than hurts, and will always bear up against falsehood, as oil does above water. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
325:It is the part of a wise man to keep himself today for tomorrow, and not to venture all his eggs in one basket. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
326:Whether it's the pot that hits the rock or the rock that hits the pot , it's the pot that will break every time ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
327:Liberty, as well as honor, man ought to preserve at the hazard of his life, for without it life is insupportable ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
328:there are many hours and minutes between now and tomorrowand in any one of them-even in a minute,the house falls ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
329:A knight errant who turns mad for a reason deserves neither merit nor thanks. The thing is to do it without cause ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
330:There is a time for some things, and a time for all things; a time for great things, and a time for small things. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
331:But do not give it to a lawyer's clerk to write, for they use a legal hand that Satan himself will not understand. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
332:The cleverest character in comedy is the clown, for he who would make people take him for a fool, must not be one. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
333:The gratification of wealth is not found in mere possession or in lavish expenditure, but in its wise application. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
334:Urgent necessity prompts many to do things, at the very thoughts of which they perhaps would start at other times. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
335:By such innovations are languages enriched, when the words are adopted by the multitude, and naturalized by custom. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
336:For let us women be never so ill-favored, I imagine that we are always delighted to hear ourselves called handsome. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
337:Once a woman parts with her virtue, she loses the esteem even of the man whose vows and tears won her to abandon it. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
338:Do you see over yonder, friend Sancho, thirty or forty hulking giants? I intend to do battle with them and slay them. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
339:Sorrow was made for man, not for beasts; yet if men encourage melancholy too much, they become no better than beasts. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
340:&
341:One of the most considerable advantages the great have over their inferiors is to have servants as good as themselves. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
342:That one man scorned and covered with scars Still strove with his last ounce of courage To reach the unreachable star. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
343:Modesty, tis a virtue not often found among poets, for almost every one of them thinks himself the greatest in the world. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
344:Now blessings light on him that first invented this same sleep. It covers a man all over, thoughts and all, like a cloak. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
345:Take my advice and live for a long, long time. Because the maddest thing a man can do is this life is to let himself die. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
346:All the vices, Sancho, bring some kind of pleasure with them; but envy brings nothing but irritation, bitterness, and rage. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
347:Be not under the dominion of thine own will; it is the vice of the ignorant, who vainly presume on their own understanding. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
348:Jealousy sees things always with magnifying glasses which make little things large, of dwarfs giants, of suspicions truths. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
349:The phoenix hope, can wing her way through the desert skies, and still defying fortune's spite; revive from ashes and rise. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
350:All kinds of beauty do not inspire love; there is a kind which only pleases the sight, but does not captivate the affections. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
351:But my thoughts ran a wool-gathering; and I did like the countryman, who looked for his ass while he was mounted on his back. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
352:She wanted, with her fickleness, to make my destruction constant; I want, by trying to destroy myself, to satisfy her desire. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
353:The reason for the unreason with which you treat my reason , so weakens my reason that with reason I complain of your beauty. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
354:You are a devil at everything, and there is no kind of thing in the &
355:The most perceptive character in a play is the fool, because the man who wishes to seem simple cannot possibly be a simpleton. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
356:Diligence is the mother of good fortune, and idleness, its opposite, never brought a man to the goal of any of his best wishes. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
357:I never thrust my nose into other men's porridge. It is no bread and butter of mine; every man for himself, and God for us all. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
358:Nor has his death the world deceiv'd than his wondrous life surprise d; if he like a madman liv'd least he like a wise one dy'd. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
359:For neither good nor evil can last for ever; and so it follows that as evil has lasted a long time, good must now be close at hand. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
360:At this the duchess, laughing all the while, said: "Sancho Panza is right in all he has said, and will be right in all he shall say. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
361:No fathers or mothers think their own children ugly; and this self-deceit is yet stronger with respect to the offspring of the mind. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
362:There are men that will make you books, and turn them loose into the world, with as much dispatch as they would do a dish of fritters. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
363:Death eats up all things, both the young lamb and old sheep; and I have heard our parson say, death values a prince no more than a clown. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
364:Be a terror to the butchers, that they may be fair in their weight; and keep hucksters and fraudulent dealers in awe, for the same reason. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
365:There are but few proverbial sayings that are not true, for they are all drawn from experience itself, which is the mother of all sciences. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
366:Her father guarded her, and she guarded herself; for there are no padlocks, bolts, or bars, that secure a maiden better than her own reserve. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
367:I do not insist," answered Don Quixote, "that this is a full adventure, but it is the beginning of one, for this is the way adventures begin. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
368:History is the depository of great actions, the witness of what is past, the example and instructor of the present, and monitor to the future. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
369:It is impossible for good or evil to last forever; and hence it follows that the evil having lasted so long, the good must be now nigh at hand. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
370:Happy the man to whom heaven has given a morsel of bread without laying him under the obligation of thanking any other for it than heaven itself. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
371:I believe there's no proverb but what is true; they are all so many sentences and maxims drawn from experience, the universal mother of sciences. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
372:For the army is a school in which the miser becomes generous, and the generous prodigal; miserly soldiers are like monsters, but very rarely seen. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
373:I know well enough that there have been dogs so loving that they have thrown themselves into the same grave with the dead bodies of their masters. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
374:I had rather munch a crust of brown bread and an onion in a corner, without any more ado, or ceremony, than feed upon turkey at another man's table. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
375:One day, in the San Francisco walk, he came upon some badly painted figures and observed that good painters imitate nature but bad ones vomit it forth. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
376:The reputation of a woman may also be compared to a mirror of crystal, shining and bright, but liable to be sullied by every breath that comes near it. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
377:There is also this benefit in brag, that the speaker is unconsciously expressing his own ideal. Humor him by all means, draw it all out, and hold him to it. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
378:Journey over all the universe in a map, without the expense and fatigue of traveling, without suffering the inconveniences of heat, cold, hunger, and thirst. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
379:Historians ought to be precise, faithful, and unprejudiced; and neither interest nor fear, hatred nor affection, should make them swerve from the way of truth. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
380:And thus being totally preoccupied, he rode so slowly that the sun was soon glowing with such intense heat that it would have melted his brains, if he'd had any. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
381:For men may prove and use their friends, as the poet expresses it, usque ad aras, meaning that a friend should not be required to act contrary to the law of God. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
382:The poet may say or sing, not as things were, but as they ought to have been; but the historian must pen them, not as they ought to have been, but as they really were. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
383:Three things too much, and three too little are pernicious to man; to speak much, and know little; to spend much, and have little; to presume much, and be worth little. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
384:Laws that only threaten, and are not kept, become like the log that was given to the frogs to be their king, which they feared at first, but soon scorned and trampled on. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
385:For a man to attain to an eminent degree in learning costs him time, watching, hunger, nakedness, dizziness in the head, weakness in the stomach, and other inconveniences. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
386:I do not say a proverb is amiss when aptly and reasonably applied, but to be forever discharging them, right or wrong, hit or miss, renders conversation insipid and vulgar. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
387:All I know is that so long I am asleep I am rid of all fears and hopes and toils and glory, and long live the man who invented sleep, the cloak that covers all human thirst. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
388:History is in a manner a sacred thing, so far as it contains truth; for where truth is, the supreme Father of it may also be said to be, at least, inasmuch as concerns truth. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
389:Is it possible your pragmatical worship should not know that the comparisons made between wit and wit, courage and courage, beauty and beauty, birth and birth, are always odious and ill taken?. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
390:I do not deny that what happened to us is a thing worth laughing at. But it is not worth telling, for not everyone is sufficiently intelligent to be able to see things from the right point of view. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
391:There is a strange charm in the thoughts of a good legacy, or the hopes of an estate, which wondrously removes or at least alleviates the sorrow that men would otherwise feel for the death of friends. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
392:Honesty is the best policy, I will stick to that. The good shall have my hand and heart, but the bad neither foot nor fellowship. And in my mind, the main point of governing, is to make a good beginning. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
393:Make it thy business to know thyself, which is the most difficult lesson in the world. Yet from this lesson thou will learn to avoid the frog's foolish ambition of swelling to rival the bigness of the ox. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
394:The beauty of some women has days and seasons, depending upon accidents which diminish or increase it; nay, the very passions of the mind naturally improve or impair it, and very often utterly destroy it. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
395:Men of great talents, whether poets or historians, seldom escape the attacks of those who, without ever favoring the world with any production of their own, take delight in criticising the works of others. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
396:When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? Perhaps to be too practical may be madness. To surrender dreams, this may be madness ... Maddest of all is to see life as it is and not as it should be. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
397:I want you to see me naked and performing one or two dozen mad acts, which will take me less than half an hour, because if you have seen them with your own eyes, you can safely swear to any others you might wish to add. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
398:Tis an old saying, the Devil lurks behind the cross. All is not gold that glitters. From the tail of the plough, Bamba was made King of Spain; and from his silks and riches was Rodrigo cast to be devoured by the snakes. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
399:Translation from one language to another is like viewing a piece of tapestry on the wrong side where though the figures are distinguishable yet there are so many ends and threads that the beauty and exactness of the work is obscured. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
400:I would do what I pleased, and doing what I pleased, I should have my will, and having my will, I should be contented; and when one is contented, there is no more to be desired; and when there is no more to be desired, there is an end of it. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
401:The virtuous woman must be treated like a relic - adored, but not handled; she should be guarded and prized, like a fine flower-garden, the beauty and fragrance of which the owner allows others to enjoy only at a distance, and through iron walls. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
402:They must take me for a fool, or even worse, a lunatic. And no wonder ,for I am so intensely conscious of my misfortune and my misery is so overwhelming that I am powerless to resist it and am being turned into stone, devoid of all knowledge or feeling. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
403:In every case, the remedy is to take action. Get clear about exactly what it is that you need to learn and exactly what you need to do to learn it. BEING CLEAR KILLS FEAR. Make it thy business to know thyself, which is the most difficult lesson in the world. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
404:Since Don Quixote de la Mancha is a crazy fool and a madman, and since Sancho Panza, his squire, knows it, yet, for all that, serves and follows him, and hangs on these empty promises of his, there can be no doubt that he is more of a madman and a fool than his master. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
405:I follow a more easy, and, in my opinion, a wiser course, namely&
406:A father may have a child who is ugly and lacking in all the graces, and the love he feels for him puts a blindfold over his eyes so that he does not see his defects but considers them signs of charm and intelligence and recounts them to his friends as if they were clever and witty. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
407:If you are ambitious of climbing up to the difficult, and in a manner inaccessible, summit of the Temple of Fame, your surest way is to leave on one hand the narrow path of Poetry, and follow the narrower track of Knight-Errantry, which in a trice may raise you to an imperial throne. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
408:&
409:Thou camest out of thy mother's belly without government, thou hast liv'd hitherto without government, and thou mayst be carried to thy long home without government, when it shall please the Lord. How many people in this world live without government, yet do well enough, and are well look'd upon? ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
410:There are two kinds of people in this world, my grandmother used to say: the Have's and the Have-not's, and she stuck to the Have's. And today, Señor Don Quixote, people are more interested in having than in knowing. An ass covered with gold makes a better impression than a horse with a packsaddle. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
411:Here lies a gentleman bold Who was so very brave He went to lengths untold, And on the brink of the grave Death had on him no hold. By the world he set small store&
412:It is one thing to write as poet and another to write as a historian: the poet can recount or sing about things not as they were, but as they should have been, and the historian must write about them not as they should have been, but as they were, without adding or subtracting anything from the truth. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
413:Love is influenced by no consideration, recognizes no restraints of reason, and is of the same nature as death, that assails alike the lofty palaces of kings and the humble cabins of shepherds; and when it takes entire possession of a heart, the first thing it does is to banish fear and shame from it. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
414:If thou takest virtue for the rule of life, and valuest thyself upon acting in all things comfortably thereto, thou wilt have no cause to envy lords and princes; for blood is inherited, but virtue is common property, and may be acquired by all; it has, moreover, an intrinsic worth, which blood has not. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
415:Liberty is one of the most precious gifts which heaven has bestowed on man; with it we cannot compare the treasures which the earth contains or the sea conceals; for liberty, as for honor, we can and ought to risk our lives; and, on for the other hand, captivity is the greatest evil that can befall man. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
416:Blessed be those happy ages that were strangers to the dreadful fury of these devilish instruments of artillery, whose inventor I am satisfied is now in Hell, receiving the reward of his cursed invention, which is the cause that very often a cowardly base hand takes away the life of the bravest gentleman. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
417:Translating from one language to another, unless it is from Greek and Latin, the queens of all languages, is like looking at Flemish tapestries from the wrong side, for although the figures are visible, they are covered by threads that obscure them, and cannot be seen with the smoothness and color of the right side. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
418:Do but take care to express yourself in a plain, easy Manner, in well-chosen, significant and decent Terms, and to give a harmonious and pleasing Turn to your Periods: study to explain your Thoughts, and set them in the truest Light, labouring as much as possible, not to leave them dark nor intricate, but clear and intelligible. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
419:Poesy is a beauteous damsel, chaste, honourable, discreet, witty, retired, and who keeps herself within the limits of propriety. She is a friend of solitude; fountains entertain her, meadows console her, woods free her from ennui, flowers delight her; in short, she gives pleasure and instruction to all with whom she communicates. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
420:I would have nobody to control me; I would be absolute: and who but I? Now, he that is absolute can do what he likes; he that can do what he likes can take his pleasure; he that can take his pleasure can be content; and he that can be content has no more to desire. So the matter &
421:It's up to brave hearts, sir, to be patient when things are going badly, as well as being happy when they're going well ... For I've heard that what they call fortune is a flighty woman who drinks too much, and, what's more, she's blind, so she can't see what she's doing, and she doesn't know who she's knocking over or who she's raising up. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
422:For historians ought to be precise, truthful, and quite unprejudiced, and neither interest nor fear, hatred nor affection, should cause them to swerve from the path of truth, whose mother is history, the rival of time, the depository of great actions, the witness of what is past, the example and instruction of the present, the monitor of the future. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
423:&
424:There are two kinds of beauty, one being of the soul and the other of the body, That of the soul is revealed through intelligence, modesty, right conduct, Generosity and good breeding, all of which qualities may exist in an ugly man; And when one's gaze is fixed upon beauty of this sort and not upon that of the body, Love is usually born suddenly and violently. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
425:By God and upon my conscience, said the devil, I never observed it, for my mind is occupied with so many different things that I was forgetting the main thing I came about. This demon must be an honest fellow and a good Christian, said Sancho; for if he wasn't he wouldn't swear by God and his conscience; I feel sure now there must be good souls even in hell itself. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
426:Now, blessings light on him that first invented sleep!Ê It covers a man all over, thoughts and all, like a cloak; it is meat for the hungry, drink for the thirsty, heat for the cold, and cold for the hot.Ê It is the current coin that purchases all the pleasures of the world cheap, and the balance that sets the king and the shepherd, the fool and the wise man, even. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
427:It is not the responsibility of knights errant to discover whether the afflicted, the enchained and the oppressed whom they encounter on the road are reduced to these circumstances and suffer this distress for their vices, or for their virtues: the knight's sole responsibility is to succour them as people in need, having eyes only for their sufferings, not for their misdeeds. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
428:One who has not only the four S's, which are required in every good lover, but even the whole alphabet; as for example... Agreeable, Bountiful, Constant, Dutiful, Easy, Faithful, Gallant, Honorable, Ingenious, Kind, Loyal, Mild, Noble, Officious, Prudent, Quiet, Rich, Secret, True, Valiant, Wise; the X indeed, is too harsh a letter to agree with him, but he is Young and Zealous. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
429:And for the citation of so many authors, 'tis the easiest thing in nature. Find out one of these books with an alphabetical index, and without any farther ceremony, remove it verbatim into your own... there are fools enough to be thus drawn into an opinion of the work; at least, such a flourishing train of attendants will give your book a fashionable air, and recommend it for sale. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
430:Oh Senor" said the niece. "Your grace should send them to be burned (books), just like all the rest, because it's very likely that my dear uncle, having been cured of the chivalric disease, will read these and want to become a shepherd and wander through the woods and meadows singing and playing and, what would be even worse, become a poet, and that, they say, is an incurable and contagious disease. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
431:I had rather munch a crust of brown bread and an onion in a corner, without any more ado or ceremony, than feed upon turkey at another man?s table, where one is fain to sit mincing and chewing his meat an hour together, drink little, be always wiping his fingers and his chops, and never dare to cough nor sneeze, though he has never so much a mind to it, nor do a many things which a body may do freely by one?s self. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
432:Don Quixote followed nature, and being satisfied with his first sleep, did not solicit more. As for Sancho, he never wanted a second, for the first lasted him from night to morning, indicating a sound body and a mind free from care; but his master, being unable to sleep himself awakened him, saying, "I am amazed, Sancho, at the torpor of thy soul; it seems as if thou wert made of marble or brass, insensible of emotion or sentiment! ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
433:Reading Don Quixote can be compared to an indefinite visit from your most impossible senior relative, with all his pranks, dirty habits, unstoppable reminiscences, and terrible cronies. When the experience is over, and the old boy checks out at last (on page 846 - the prose wedged tight, with no breaks for dialogue), you will shed tears all right; not tears of relief or regret but tears of pride. You made it, despite all that &
434:The fear thou art in, Sancho," said Don Quixote, "prevents thee from seeing or hearing correctly, for one of the effects of fear is to derange the senses and make things appear different from what they are; if thou art in such fear, withdraw to one side and leave me to myself, for alone I suffice to bring victory to that side to which I shall give my aid;" and so saying he gave Rocinante the spur, and putting the lance in rest, shot down the slope like a thunderbolt. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
435:To think that the affairs of this life always remain in the same state is a vain presumption; indeed they all seem to be perpetually changing and moving in a circular course. Spring is followed by summer, summer by autumn, and autumn by winter, which is again followed by spring, and so time continues its everlasting round. But the life of man is ever racing to its end, swifter than time itself, without hope of renewal, unless in the next that is limitless and infinite. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
436:All of that is true, responded Don Quixote, ‘but we cannot all be friars, and God brings His children to heaven by many paths: chivalry is a religion, and there are sainted knights in Glory. Yes, responded Sancho, ‘but Ive heard that there are more friars in heaven than knights errant. That is true, responded Don Quixote, ‘because the number of religious is greater than the number of knights. There are many who are errant, said Sancho. Many, responded Don Quixote, ‘but few who deserve to be called knights. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Get out of harms way. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
2:Every dog has his day. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
3:Thank you for nothing. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
4:Comparisons are odious. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
5:Give the devil his due. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
6:Miracle me no miracles. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
7:Fair and softly goes far. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
8:I have other fish to fry. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
9:Many littles make a much. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
10:As ill-luck would have it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
11:Delay always heeds danger. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
12:Honesty's the best policy. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
13:I'll turn over a new leaf. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
14:Delay always breeds danger. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
15:Think before thou speakest. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
16:Thou hast seen nothing yet. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
17:Tomorrow will be a new day. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
18:Until death it is all life. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
19:He who reforms, God assists. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
20:Little said is soon amended. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
21:The proof is in the pudding. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
22:Facts are the enemy of truth. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
23:It is good to live and learn. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
24:All is not gold that glisters. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
25:A stout heart breaks bad luck. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
26:Behind the cross is the devil. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
27:Bien predica quien bien vive. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
28:He had a face like a blessing. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
29:In hell there is no retention. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
30:Virtue is the truest nobility. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
31:Whoever is ignorant is vulgar. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
32:He who gives early gives twice. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
33:In the night all cats are gray. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
34:Patience and shuffle the cards. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
35:Seek for good, but expect evil. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
36:Soul of fibre and heart of oak. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
37:Too much sanity may be madness! ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
38:We must not stand upon trifles. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
39:A closed mouth catches no flies. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
40:All sorrows are less with bread. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
41:Dine on little, and sup on less. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
42:Faint heart ne'er won fair lady. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
43:He preaches well that lives well ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
44:Let the worst come to the worst. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
45:There's no love lost between us. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
46:My thoughts ran a wool-gathering. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
47:Sing away sorrow, cast away care. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
48:There is no love lost between us. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
49:The wicked are always ungrateful. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
50:He that gives quickly gives twice. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
51:I shall be as secret as the grave. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
52:Man appoints, and God disappoints. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
53:The pen is the tongue of the mind. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
54:Be slow of tongue and quick of eye. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
55:Health and cheerfulness make beauty ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
56:It takes all sorts (to make a world ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
57:Jests that give pains are no jests. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
58:Let every man look before he leaps. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
59:Let us forget and forgive injuries. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
60:Necessity urges desperate measures. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
61:Other men's pains are easily borne. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
62:The absent feel and fear every ill. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
63:Until death it is all life ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
64:Where one door shuts another opens. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
65:With life many things are remedied. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
66:Everything disturbs an absent lover. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
67:He who's never loved cannot be good. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
68:Let every man mind his own business. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
69:The journey is better than the inn". ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
70:Thou hast seen nothing yet. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
71:When one door is shut, another opens ~ Miguel De Cervantes,
72:When you are at Rome, do as you see. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
73:Blessings on him, who invented sleep. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
74:He who sings frightens away his ills. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
75:Let us make hay while the sun shines. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
76:There is no proverb that is not true. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
77:They who lose today may win tomorrow. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
78:Treason pleases, but not the traitor. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
79:When we are asleep, we are all equal. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
80:Wit and humor belong to genius alone. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
81:Don't put all your eggs in one basket. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
82:Every man is the son of his own works. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
83:Facts are the enemy of truth. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
84:Hunger is the best sauce in the world. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
85:Man have to have friends even in hell. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
86:My honor is dearer to me than my life. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
87:The eyes those silent tongues of love. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
88:Those two fatal words, Mine and Thine. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
89:What a man has, so much he is sure of. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
90:What is bought is cheaper than a gift. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
91:A Man Without Honor is Worse than Dead. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
92:A person dishonored is worst than dead. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
93:Evil comes not amiss if it comes alone. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
94:God exalts the man who humbles himself. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
95:Ill-luck, you know, seldom comes alone. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
96:It requires a long time to know anyone. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
97:That which costs little is less valued. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
98:The proof of the pudding is the eating. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
99:A good name is better than bags of gold. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
100:Believe there are no limits but the sky. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
101:God helps everyone with what is his own. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
102:God who gives the wound gives the salve. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
103:I can tell where my own shoe pinches me. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
104:Spare your breath to cool your porridge. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
105:Thou art a cat, and a rat, and a coward. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
106:A blot in thy escutcheon to all futurity. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
107:Arms are my ornaments, warfare my repose. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
108:Leap out of the frying pan into the fire. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
109:One swallow alone does not make a summer. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
110:They must needs go whom the Devil drives. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
111:Where there's music there can be no evil. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
112:All sorrows are less with bread. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
113:A man prepared has half fought the battle. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
114:A shy face is better than a forward heart. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
115:Can we ever have too much of a good thing? ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
116:Every production must resemble its author. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
117:Heaven's help is better than early rising. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
118:It will be seen in the frying of the eggs. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
119:There is nothing costs less than civility. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
120:There's no sauce in the world like hunger. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
121:There's no taking trout with dry breeches. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
122:Whom God loves, his house is sweet to him. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
123:Wit and humor do not reside in slow minds. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
124:God bears with the wicked, but not forever. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
125:God who sends the wound sends the medicine. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
126:Great people create great acts of kindness. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
127:He who sings scares away his woes. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
128:Let us not throw the rope after the bucket. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
129:Sleep is the best cure for waking troubles. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
130:Take away the cause, and the effect ceases. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
131:The man who fights for his ideals is alive. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
132:The pen is the tongue of the mind. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
133:Urgent necessity prompts many to do things. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
134:All sorrows are bearable, if there is bread. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
135:An honest man's word is as good as his bond. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
136:That one man scorned and covered with scars ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
137:The little birds have God for their caterer. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
138:Time ripens all things; no man is born wise. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
139:Troubles take wing for the man who can sing. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
140:You cannot eat your cake and have your cake. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
141:Good Christians should never avenge injuries. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
142:Good wits jump; a word to the wise is enough. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
143:The ass bears the load, but not the overload. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
144:When God sends the dawn, he sends it for all. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
145:When thou art at Rome, do as they do at Rome. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
146:Wine taken in moderation never does any harm. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
147:Great persons are able to do great kindnesses. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
148:I am almost frightened out of my seven senses. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
149:I know who I am and who I may be, if I choose. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
150:Old, that's an affront no woman can well bear. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
151:Experience is the universal mother of sciences. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
152:Hunger is the best sauce in the world. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
153:I do not believe that the Good Lord plays dice. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
154:The guts carry the feet, not the feet the guts. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
155:The wise hand does not all the tongue dictates. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
156:Under a bad cloak there is often a good drinker ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
157:When in doubt, lean to the side of #‎ mercy . ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
158:Riches are able to solder up abundance of flaws. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
159:She who desires to see, desires also to be seen. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
160:Take away the motive, and you take away the sin. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
161:The darts of love are blunted by maiden modesty. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
162:The proof of the pudding is the eating. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
163:Alas! all music jars when the soul's out of tune. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
164:A tooth is much more to be prized than a diamond. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
165:For hope is always born at the same time as love. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
166:The road to the inn is much better than the stay. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
167:The treason pleases, but the traitors are odious. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
168:Every man is as God made him, ay, and often worse. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
169:Every one in his own house and God in all of them. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
170:Fear has many eyes and can see things underground. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
171:I find my familiarity with thee has bred contempt. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
172:I must speak the truth, and nothing but the truth. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
173:Make yourself honey and the flies will devour you. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
174:Wine in excess keeps neither secrets nor promises. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
175:Good painter imitates nature, bad ones spews it up. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
176:Love not what you are but only what you may become. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
177:Our hours in love have wings; in absence, crutches. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
178:The man who is prepared has his battle half fought. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
179:Truth will rise above falsehood as oil above water. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
180:No fathers or mothers think their own children ugly. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
181:We are all as God made us and frequently much worse. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
182:A wise man does not trust all his eggs to one basket. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
183:Great expectations are better than a poor possession. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
184:Many go out for wool, and come home shorn themselves. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
185:Time ripens all things; no man is born wise. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
186:A knowledge of thyself will preserve thee from vanity. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
187:Mere flimflam stories, and nothing but shams and lies. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
188:To be good to the vile is to throw water into the sea. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
189:A proverb is a short sentence based on long experience. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
190:I know who I am and who I may be, if I choose. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
191:Not with whom you are born, but with whom you are bred. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
192:Valor lies just halfway between rashness and cowardice. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
193:Well, now there's a remedy for everything except death. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
194:You must not think, sir, to catch old birds with chaff. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
195:Every man was not born with a silver spoon in his mouth. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
196:He is mad past recovery, but yet he has lucid intervals. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
197:Laziness never arrived at the attainment of a good wish. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
198:One shouldn't talk of halters in the hanged man's house. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
199:Proverbs are short sentences drawn from long experience. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
200:The knowledge of yourself will preserve you from vanity. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
201:Those who'll play with cats must expect to be scratched. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
202:Cunning cheats itself wholly, and other people partially. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
203:Fortune leaves always some door open to come at a remedy. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
204:My memory is so bad that many times I forget my own name. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
205:The worst reconciliation is better than the best divorce. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
206:When the head aches, all the members partake of the pain. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
207:A silly remark can be made in Latin as well as in Spanish. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
208:Forewarned, forearmed; to be prepared is half the victory. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
209:Good actions ennoble us, and we are the sons of our deeds. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
210:Lovers are commonly industrious to make themselves uneasy. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
211:One should not talk of hatters in the house of the hanged. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
212:What man can pretend to know the riddle of a woman's mind? ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
213:Captivity is the greatest of all evils that can befall one. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
214:It is courage that vanquishes in war, and not good weapons. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
215:Never look for birds of this year in the nests of the last. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
216:Never meddle with play-actors, for they're a favoured race. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
217:Since we have a good loaf, let us not look for cheesecakes. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
218:Every tooth in a man's head is more valuable than a diamond. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
219:The good governor should have a broken leg and keep at home. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
220:All women are good - good for nothing, or good for something. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
221:Đhanet insanın hoşuna gider ama hainler iğrençtir.' Miguel de Cervantes ~ Anonymous,
222:No man is more than another unless he does more than another. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
223:«Puede haber amor sin celos, pero no sin temores» MIGUEL DE CERVANTES ~ Rachel Cusk,
224:The stomach carries the heart, and not the heart the stomach. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
225:True valor lies in the middle between cowardice and rashness. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
226:When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
227:El que lee mucho y anda mucho, ve mucho y sabe mucho. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
228:Get the better of yourself - this is the best kind of victory. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
229:Never stand begging for that which you have the power to earn. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
230:The eating. By a small sample we may judge of the whole piece. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
231:The foolish sayings of the rich pass for wise saws in society. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
232:The pitcher goes so often to the fountain that if gets broken. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
233:Abundance, even of good things, prevents them from being valued ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
234:In order to attain the impossible, one must attempt the absurd. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
235:Nothing costs less nor is cheaper than compliments of civility. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
236:Our greatest foes, and whom we must chiefly combat, are within. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
237:That which we are capable of feeling, we are capable of saying. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
238:For if he like a madman lived; At least he like a wise one died. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
239:He that will not when he may, When he would, he should have nay. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
240:Love is a power too strong to be overcome by anything but flight. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
241:There is no greater folly in the world than for a man to despair. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
242:There is nothing so subject to the inconstancy of fortune as war. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
243:Tis ill talking of halters in the house of a man that was hanged. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
244:When good luck knocks at the door, let him in and keep him there. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
245:Fly not, cowards and vile beings, for a single knight attacks you. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
246:Folly is wont to have more followers and comrades than discretion. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
247:Honesty’s the best policy. —Miguel de Cervantes Liars prosper. —Anonymous ~ Stephen King,
248:I know what's what, and have always taken care of the main chance. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
249:It is one thing to praise discipline, and another to submit to it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
250:Tis a dainty thing to command, though 'twere but a flock of sheep. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
251:Beware, gentle knight - the greatest monster of them all is reason. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
252:By the streets of 'by and by,' one arrives at the house of 'never'. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
253:Everyone is as God has made him, and oftentimes a great deal worse. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
254:Tell me what company thou keepest and I'll tell thee what thou art. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
255:What man can pretend to know the riddle of a woman's mind? ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
256:I drink when I have occasion, and sometimes when I have no occasion. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
257:There were but two families in the world, Have-much and Have-little. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
258:The very remembrance of my former misfortune proves a new one to me. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
259:They can expect nothing but their labor for their pains. - Cervantes ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
260:True courage lies in the middle, between cowardice and recklessness. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
261:Woman's advice has little value, but he who won't take it is a fool. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
262:There is no book so bad...that it does not have something good in it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
263:The wounds received in battle bestow honor, they do not take it away. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
264:Tis the only comfort of the miserable to have partners in their woes. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
265:Virtue is persecuted by the wicked more than it is loved by the good. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
266:Don't put too fine a point to your wit for fear it should get blunted. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
267:He who has the judge for his father goes into court with an easy mind. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
268:There is remedy for all things except death - Don Quixote De La Mancha ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
269:A bad year and a bad month to all the backbiting bitches in the world!. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
270:Controlling my temper is important, ... Sometimes it's hard, but I try. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
271:Never stand begging for that which you have the power to earn. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
272:Sancho Panza by name is my own self, if I was not changed in my cradle. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
273:A little in one's own pocket is better than much in another man's purse. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
274:My heart is wax molded as she pleases, but enduring as marble to retain. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
275:A private sin is not so prejudicial in this world, as a public indecency. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
276:Digo, paciencia y barajar. What I say is, patience, and shuffle the cards. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
277:There is no jewel in the world so valuable as a chaste and virtuous woman. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
278:You are a king by your own fireside, as much as any monarch in his throne. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
279:Blessed be he who invented sleep, a cloak that covers all a man's thoughts. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
280:Pray, look better, sir... those things yonder are no giants, but windmills. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
281:Well-gotten wealth may lose itself, but the ill-gotten loses its master also. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
282:How will he who does not know how to govern himself know how to govern others? ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
283:Inasmuch as ill-deeds spring up as a spontaneous crop, they are easy to learn. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
284:It is better that a judge should lean on the side of compassion than severity. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
285:There is no book so bad...that it does not have something good in it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
286:Virtue is persecuted by the wicked more than it is loved by the good. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
287:Where envy reigns virtue can't exist, and generosity doesn't go with meanness. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
288:Delay always breeds danger; and to protract a great design is often to ruin it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
289:Do not eat garlic or onions; for their smell will reveal that you are a peasant. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
290:Drink moderately, for drunkeness neither keeps a secret, nor observes a promise. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
291:Maybe the greatest madness is to see life as it is rather than what it could be. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
292:The brave man carves out his fortune, and every man is the sum of his own works. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
293:Riches are of little avail in many of the calamities to which mankind are liable. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
294:Let everyone turn himself around, and look at home, and he will find enough to do. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
295:All persons are not discreet enough to know how to take things by the right handle. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
296:Be brief, for no talk can please when too long. Being prepared is half the victory. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
297:The ass will carry his load, but not a double load; ride not a free horse to death. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
298:It is past all controversy that what costs dearest is, and ought to be, most valued. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
299:Love is invisible and comes and goes where it wants, without anyone asking about it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
300:When the severity of the law is to be softened, let pity, not bribes, be the motive. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
301:El pan comido y la compan? |a deshecha. With the bread eaten, the company breaks up. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
302:Make it thy business to know thyself, which is the most difficult lesson in the world ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
303:Does the devil possess you? You're leaping over the hedge before you come at the stile. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
304:Liberty ... is one of the most valuable blessings that Heaven has bestowed upon mankind. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
305:He who's down one day can be up the next, unless he really wants to stay in bed, that is. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
306:We ought to love our Maker for His own sake, without either hope of good or fear of pain. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
307:In short, virtue cannot live where envy reigns, nor liberality subsist with niggardliness. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
308:She fights and vanquishes in me, and I live and breathe in her, and I have life and being. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
309:It is a true saying that a man must eat a peck of salt with his friend before he knows him. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
310:"He preaches well that lives well," quoth Sancho, "that's all the divinity I can understand." ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
311:Let me leap out of the frying-pan into the fire; or, out of God's blessing into the warm sun. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
312:That's the nature of women, not to love when we love them, and to love when we love them not. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
313:For me alone Don Quixote was born and I for him. His was the power of action, mine of writing. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
314:There were no embraces, because where there is great love there is often little display of it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
315:The bow cannot always stand bent, nor can human frailty subsist without some lawful recreation. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
316:Whether the pitcher hits the stone or the stone hits the pitcher, it goes ill with the pitcher. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
317:There is no remembrance which time does not obliterate, nor pain which death does not terminate. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
318:I have always heard, Sancho, that doing good to base fellows is like throwing water into the sea. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
319:Nay, what is worse, perhaps turn poet, which, they say, is an infectious and incurable distemper. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
320:The woman who is resolved to be respected can make herself be so even amidst an army of soldiers. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
321:Fortune may have yet a better success in reserve for you and they who lose today may win tomorrow. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
322:From reading too much, and sleeping too little, his brain dried up on him and he lost his judgment. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
323:Es natural condición de las mujeres desdeñar a quien las quiere y amar a quien las aborrece ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
324:Too much sanity may be madness and the maddest of all, to see life as it is and not as it should be. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
325:There is a remedy for everything but death; who, in spite of our teeth, will take us in his clutches. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
326:Well, there's a remedy for all things but death, which will be sure to lay us flat one time or other. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
327:There are only two families in the world, my old grandmother used to say, the Haves and the Have-nots. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
328:Anyone who does not know how to make the most of his luck has no right to complain if it passes by him. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
329:Be temperate in your drinking, remembering that too much wine cannot keep either a secret or a promise. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
330:Love and war are the same thing, and stratagems and policy are as allowable in the one as in the other. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
331:Many count their chickens before they are hatched; and where they expect bacon, meet with broken bones. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
332:The pen is the tongue of the soul; as are the thoughts engendered there, so will be the things written. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
333:There were no embraces, because where there is great love there is often little display of it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
334:Truth may be stretched, but cannot be broken, and always gets above falsehood, as does oil above water. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
335:... he who's down one day can be up the next, unless he really wants to stay in bed, that is... ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
336:One of the effects of fear is to disturb the senses and cause things to appear other than what they are. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
337:When a man says, "Get out of my house! what would you have with my wife?" there is no answer to be made. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
338:The pen is the language of the soul; as the concepts that in it are generated, such will be its writings. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
339:Truly I was born to be an example of misfortune, and a target at which the arrows of adversary are aimed. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
340:Among the attributes of God, although they are equal, mercy shines with even more brilliance than justice. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
341:He who loses wealth loses much; he who loses a friend loses more; but he that loses his courage loses all. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
342:When we leave this world, and are laid in the earth, the prince walks as narrow a path as the day-laborer. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
343:Todo es comenzar á ser venturoso. (To be lucky at the beginning is everything.) —MIGUEL DE CERVANTES, Don Quixote ~ Daniel H Pink,
344:The most difficult character in comedy is that of the fool, and he must be no simpleton that plays that part. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
345:Though Gods attributes are equal, yet his mercy is more attractive and pleasing in our eyes than his justice. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
346:To withdraw is not to run away, and to stay is no wise action, when there's more reason to fear than to hope. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
347:It seldom happens that any felicity comes so pure as not to be tempered and allayed by some mixture of sorrow. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
348:Truth indeed rather alleviates than hurts, and will always bear up against falsehood, as oil does above water. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
349:It is the part of a wise man to keep himself today for tomorrow, and not to venture all his eggs in one basket. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
350:Whether it's the pot that hits the rock or the rock that hits the pot , it's the pot that will break every time ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
351:"From what I have seen here," remarked Sancho, "justice is so good a thing that even robbers find it necessary." ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
352:Liberty, as well as honor, man ought to preserve at the hazard of his life, for without it life is insupportable ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
353:there are many hours and minutes between now and tomorrowand in any one of them-even in a minute,the house falls ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
354:A knight errant who turns mad for a reason deserves neither merit nor thanks. The thing is to do it without cause ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
355:There is a time for some things, and a time for all things; a time for great things, and a time for small things. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
356:But do not give it to a lawyer's clerk to write, for they use a legal hand that Satan himself will not understand. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
357:The cleverest character in comedy is the clown, for he who would make people take him for a fool, must not be one. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
358:The gratification of wealth is not found in mere possession or in lavish expenditure, but in its wise application. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
359:Truly I was born to be an example of misfortune, and a target at which the arrows of adversary are aimed. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
360:Urgent necessity prompts many to do things, at the very thoughts of which they perhaps would start at other times. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
361:By such innovations are languages enriched, when the words are adopted by the multitude, and naturalized by custom. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
362:For let us women be never so ill-favored, I imagine that we are always delighted to hear ourselves called handsome. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
363:Once a woman parts with her virtue, she loses the esteem even of the man whose vows and tears won her to abandon it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
364:Do you see over yonder, friend Sancho, thirty or forty hulking giants? I intend to do battle with them and slay them. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
365:Sorrow was made for man, not for beasts; yet if men encourage melancholy too much, they become no better than beasts. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
366:One of the most considerable advantages the great have over their inferiors is to have servants as good as themselves. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
367:You are a devil at everything, and there is no kind of thing in the 'versal world but what you can turn your hand into. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
368:Finally, from so little sleeping and so much reading, his brain dried up and he went completely out of his mind. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
369:Modesty, tis a virtue not often found among poets, for almost every one of them thinks himself the greatest in the world. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
370:No con quien naces, sino con quien paces. - Not with whom you are born, but with whom you are bred. ~ Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote, II. 10.,
371:Now blessings light on him that first invented this same sleep. It covers a man all over, thoughts and all, like a cloak. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
372:Take my advice and live for a long, long time. Because the maddest thing a man can do is this life is to let himself die. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
373:The truth may be stretched thin, but it never breaks, and it always surfaces above lies, as oil floats on water. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
374:All the vices, Sancho, bring some kind of pleasure with them; but envy brings nothing but irritation, bitterness, and rage. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
375:Be not under the dominion of thine own will; it is the vice of the ignorant, who vainly presume on their own understanding. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
376:Jealousy sees things always with magnifying glasses which make little things large, of dwarfs giants, of suspicions truths. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
377:The phoenix hope, can wing her way through the desert skies, and still defying fortune's spite; revive from ashes and rise. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
378:All kinds of beauty do not inspire love; there is a kind which only pleases the sight, but does not captivate the affections. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
379:But my thoughts ran a wool-gathering; and I did like the countryman, who looked for his ass while he was mounted on his back. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
380:She wanted, with her fickleness, to make my destruction constant; I want, by trying to destroy myself, to satisfy her desire. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
381:The reason for the unreason with which you treat my reason , so weakens my reason that with reason I complain of your beauty. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
382:Finally, from so little sleeping and so much reading, his brain dried up and he went completely out of his mind. ~ Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote.,
383:The most perceptive character in a play is the fool, because the man who wishes to seem simple cannot possibly be a simpleton. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
384:Diligence is the mother of good fortune, and idleness, its opposite, never brought a man to the goal of any of his best wishes. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
385:I never thrust my nose into other men's porridge. It is no bread and butter of mine; every man for himself, and God for us all. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
386:Nor has his death the world deceiv'd than his wondrous life surprise d; if he like a madman liv'd least he like a wise one dy'd. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
387:Take my advice and live for a long, long time. Because the maddest thing a man can do in this life is to let himself die. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
388:For neither good nor evil can last for ever; and so it follows that as evil has lasted a long time, good must now be close at hand. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
389:At this the duchess, laughing all the while, said: "Sancho Panza is right in all he has said, and will be right in all he shall say. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
390:No fathers or mothers think their own children ugly; and this self-deceit is yet stronger with respect to the offspring of the mind. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
391:"There is no book so bad," said the bachelor, "but something good may be found in it." ~ Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote (1605-15), Part II, Chapter III.,
392:There are men that will make you books, and turn them loose into the world, with as much dispatch as they would do a dish of fritters. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
393:The reason for the unreason with which you treat my reason , so weakens my reason that with reason I complain of your beauty. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
394:Death eats up all things, both the young lamb and old sheep; and I have heard our parson say, death values a prince no more than a clown. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
395:Be a terror to the butchers, that they may be fair in their weight; and keep hucksters and fraudulent dealers in awe, for the same reason. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
396:The phoenix hope, can wing her way through the desert skies, and still defying fortune's spite; revive from ashes and rise. Miguel de Cervantes ~ Cecilia London,
397:There are but few proverbial sayings that are not true, for they are all drawn from experience itself, which is the mother of all sciences. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
398:For neither good nor evil can last for ever; and so it follows that as evil has lasted a long time, good must now be close at hand. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
399:Her father guarded her, and she guarded herself; for there are no padlocks, bolts, or bars, that secure a maiden better than her own reserve. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
400:I do not insist," answered Don Quixote, "that this is a full adventure, but it is the beginning of one, for this is the way adventures begin. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
401:History is the depository of great actions, the witness of what is past, the example and instructor of the present, and monitor to the future. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
402:It is impossible for good or evil to last forever; and hence it follows that the evil having lasted so long, the good must be now nigh at hand. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
403:Happy the man to whom heaven has given a morsel of bread without laying him under the obligation of thanking any other for it than heaven itself. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
404:I believe there's no proverb but what is true; they are all so many sentences and maxims drawn from experience, the universal mother of sciences. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
405:For the army is a school in which the miser becomes generous, and the generous prodigal; miserly soldiers are like monsters, but very rarely seen. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
406:I know well enough that there have been dogs so loving that they have thrown themselves into the same grave with the dead bodies of their masters. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
407:I had rather munch a crust of brown bread and an onion in a corner, without any more ado, or ceremony, than feed upon turkey at another man's table. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
408:One day, in the San Francisco walk, he came upon some badly painted figures and observed that good painters imitate nature but bad ones vomit it forth. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
409:The reputation of a woman may also be compared to a mirror of crystal, shining and bright, but liable to be sullied by every breath that comes near it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
410:There is also this benefit in brag, that the speaker is unconsciously expressing his own ideal. Humor him by all means, draw it all out, and hold him to it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
411:Journey over all the universe in a map, without the expense and fatigue of traveling, without suffering the inconveniences of heat, cold, hunger, and thirst. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
412:Historians ought to be precise, faithful, and unprejudiced; and neither interest nor fear, hatred nor affection, should make them swerve from the way of truth. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
413:And thus being totally preoccupied, he rode so slowly that the sun was soon glowing with such intense heat that it would have melted his brains, if he'd had any. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
414:For men may prove and use their friends, as the poet expresses it, usque ad aras, meaning that a friend should not be required to act contrary to the law of God. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
415:The poet may say or sing, not as things were, but as they ought to have been; but the historian must pen them, not as they ought to have been, but as they really were. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
416:Three things too much, and three too little are pernicious to man; to speak much, and know little; to spend much, and have little; to presume much, and be worth little. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
417:Laws that only threaten, and are not kept, become like the log that was given to the frogs to be their king, which they feared at first, but soon scorned and trampled on. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
418:For a man to attain to an eminent degree in learning costs him time, watching, hunger, nakedness, dizziness in the head, weakness in the stomach, and other inconveniences. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
419:I do not say a proverb is amiss when aptly and reasonably applied, but to be forever discharging them, right or wrong, hit or miss, renders conversation insipid and vulgar. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
420:All I know is that so long I am asleep I am rid of all fears and hopes and toils and glory, and long live the man who invented sleep, the cloak that covers all human thirst. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
421:History is in a manner a sacred thing, so far as it contains truth; for where truth is, the supreme Father of it may also be said to be, at least, inasmuch as concerns truth. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
422:Is it possible your pragmatical worship should not know that the comparisons made between wit and wit, courage and courage, beauty and beauty, birth and birth, are always odious and ill taken?. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
423:I do not deny that what happened to us is a thing worth laughing at. But it is not worth telling, for not everyone is sufficiently intelligent to be able to see things from the right point of view. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
424:There is a strange charm in the thoughts of a good legacy, or the hopes of an estate, which wondrously removes or at least alleviates the sorrow that men would otherwise feel for the death of friends. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
425:Honesty is the best policy, I will stick to that. The good shall have my hand and heart, but the bad neither foot nor fellowship. And in my mind, the main point of governing, is to make a good beginning. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
426:Make it thy business to know thyself, which is the most difficult lesson in the world. Yet from this lesson thou will learn to avoid the frog's foolish ambition of swelling to rival the bigness of the ox. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
427:The beauty of some women has days and seasons, depending upon accidents which diminish or increase it; nay, the very passions of the mind naturally improve or impair it, and very often utterly destroy it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
428:Men of great talents, whether poets or historians, seldom escape the attacks of those who, without ever favoring the world with any production of their own, take delight in criticising the works of others. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
429:I do not deny that what happened to us is a thing worth laughing at. But it is not worth telling, for not everyone is sufficiently intelligent to be able to see things from the right point of view. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
430:When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? Perhaps to be too practical may be madness. To surrender dreams, this may be madness ...Maddest of all is to see life as it is and not as it should be. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
431:I want you to see me naked and performing one or two dozen mad acts, which will take me less than half an hour, because if you have seen them with your own eyes, you can safely swear to any others you might wish to add. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
432:Tis an old saying, the Devil lurks behind the cross. All is not gold that glitters. From the tail of the plough, Bamba was made King of Spain; and from his silks and riches was Rodrigo cast to be devoured by the snakes. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
433:Translation from one language to another is like viewing a piece of tapestry on the wrong side where though the figures are distinguishable yet there are so many ends and threads that the beauty and exactness of the work is obscured. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
434:I would do what I pleased, and doing what I pleased, I should have my will, and having my will, I should be contented; and when one is contented, there is no more to be desired; and when there is no more to be desired, there is an end of it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
435:The virtuous woman must be treated like a relic - adored, but not handled; she should be guarded and prized, like a fine flower-garden, the beauty and fragrance of which the owner allows others to enjoy only at a distance, and through iron walls. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
436:They must take me for a fool, or even worse, a lunatic. And no wonder ,for I am so intensely conscious of my misfortune and my misery is so overwhelming that I am powerless to resist it and am being turned into stone, devoid of all knowledge or feeling. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
437:When life itself seems lunatic, who knows where madness lies? Perhaps to be too practical is madness. To surrender dreams — this may be madness. Too much sanity may be madness — and maddest of all: to see life as it is, and not as it should be! ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
438:In every case, the remedy is to take action. Get clear about exactly what it is that you need to learn and exactly what you need to do to learn it. BEING CLEAR KILLS FEAR. Make it thy business to know thyself, which is the most difficult lesson in the world. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
439:I follow a more easy, and, in my opinion, a wiser course, namely--to inveigh against the levity of the female sex, their fickleness, their double-dealing, their rotten promises, their broken faith, and, finally, their want of judgment in bestowing their affections. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
440:Since Don Quixote de la Mancha is a crazy fool and a madman, and since Sancho Panza, his squire, knows it, yet, for all that, serves and follows him, and hangs on these empty promises of his, there can be no doubt that he is more of a madman and a fool than his master. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
441:A father may have a child who is ugly and lacking in all the graces, and the love he feels for him puts a blindfold over his eyes so that he does not see his defects but considers them signs of charm and intelligence and recounts them to his friends as if they were clever and witty. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
442:If you are ambitious of climbing up to the difficult, and in a manner inaccessible, summit of the Temple of Fame, your surest way is to leave on one hand the narrow path of Poetry, and follow the narrower track of Knight-Errantry, which in a trice may raise you to an imperial throne. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
443:'Tis the maddest trick a man can ever play in his whole life, to let his breath sneak out of his body without any more ado, and without so much as a rap o'er the pate, or a kick of the guts; to go out like the snuff of a farthing candle, and die merely of the mulligrubs, or the sullens. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
444:Here lies a gentleman bold Who was so very brave He went to lengths untold, And on the brink of the grave Death had on him no hold. By the world he set small store-- He frightened it to the core-- Yet somehow, by Fate's plan, Though he'd lived a crazy man, When he died he was sane once more. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
445:Thou camest out of thy mother's belly without government, thou hast liv'd hitherto without government, and thou mayst be carried to thy long home without government, when it shall please the Lord. How many people in this world live without government, yet do well enough, and are well look'd upon? ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
446:There are two kinds of people in this world, my grandmother used to say: the Have's and the Have-not's, and she stuck to the Have's. And today, Señor Don Quixote, people are more interested in having than in knowing. An ass covered with gold makes a better impression than a horse with a packsaddle. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
447:It is one thing to write as poet and another to write as a historian: the poet can recount or sing about things not as they were, but as they should have been, and the historian must write about them not as they should have been, but as they were, without adding or subtracting anything from the truth. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
448:Love is influenced by no consideration, recognizes no restraints of reason, and is of the same nature as death, that assails alike the lofty palaces of kings and the humble cabins of shepherds; and when it takes entire possession of a heart, the first thing it does is to banish fear and shame from it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
449:If thou takest virtue for the rule of life, and valuest thyself upon acting in all things comfortably thereto, thou wilt have no cause to envy lords and princes; for blood is inherited, but virtue is common property, and may be acquired by all; it has, moreover, an intrinsic worth, which blood has not. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
450:Liberty is one of the most precious gifts which heaven has bestowed on man; with it we cannot compare the treasures which the earth contains or the sea conceals; for liberty, as for honor, we can and ought to risk our lives; and, on for the other hand, captivity is the greatest evil that can befall man. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
451:Blessed be those happy ages that were strangers to the dreadful fury of these devilish instruments of artillery, whose inventor I am satisfied is now in Hell, receiving the reward of his cursed invention, which is the cause that very often a cowardly base hand takes away the life of the bravest gentleman. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
452:Translating from one language to another, unless it is from Greek and Latin, the queens of all languages, is like looking at Flemish tapestries from the wrong side, for although the figures are visible, they are covered by threads that obscure them, and cannot be seen with the smoothness and color of the right side. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
453:I would have nobody to control me; I would be absolute: and who but I? Now, he that is absolute can do what he likes; he that can do what he likes can take his pleasure; he that can take his pleasure can be content; and he that can be content has no more to desire. So the matter 's over; and come what will come, I am satisfied. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
454:Do but take care to express yourself in a plain, easy Manner, in well-chosen, significant and decent Terms, and to give a harmonious and pleasing Turn to your Periods: study to explain your Thoughts, and set them in the truest Light, labouring as much as possible, not to leave them dark nor intricate, but clear and intelligible. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
455:Poesy is a beauteous damsel, chaste, honourable, discreet, witty, retired, and who keeps herself within the limits of propriety. She is a friend of solitude; fountains entertain her, meadows console her, woods free her from ennui, flowers delight her; in short, she gives pleasure and instruction to all with whom she communicates. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
456:It's up to brave hearts, sir, to be patient when things are going badly, as well as being happy when they're going well ... For I've heard that what they call fortune is a flighty woman who drinks too much, and, what's more, she's blind, so she can't see what she's doing, and she doesn't know who she's knocking over or who she's raising up. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
457:For historians ought to be precise, truthful, and quite unprejudiced, and neither interest nor fear, hatred nor affection, should cause them to swerve from the path of truth, whose mother is history, the rival of time, the depository of great actions, the witness of what is past, the example and instruction of the present, the monitor of the future. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
458:'Tis said of love that it sometimes goes, sometimes flies; runs with one, walks gravely with another; turns a third into ice, and sets a fourth in a flame: it wounds one, another it kills: like lightning it begins and ends in the same moment: it makes that fort yield at night which it besieged but in the morning; for there is no force able to resist it. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
459:There are two kinds of beauty, one being of the soul and the other of the body, That of the soul is revealed through intelligence, modesty, right conduct, Generosity and good breeding, all of which qualities may exist in an ugly man; And when one's gaze is fixed upon beauty of this sort and not upon that of the body, Love is usually born suddenly and violently. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
460:Love (they say) sometimes flies, sometimes walks, runs with one, creeps with another, warms a third, burns a fourth, wounding some, and slaying others. In one moment it begins, performs and concludes its career; lays siege in the morning to a fortress which is surrendered before night, there being no fortress that can withstand its power.” —Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra ~ Susan Meissner,
461:By God and upon my conscience, said the devil, I never observed it, for my mind is occupied with so many different things that I was forgetting the main thing I came about. This demon must be an honest fellow and a good Christian, said Sancho; for if he wasn't he wouldn't swear by God and his conscience; I feel sure now there must be good souls even in hell itself. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
462:Now, blessings light on him that first invented sleep!Ê It covers a man all over, thoughts and all, like a cloak; it is meat for the hungry, drink for the thirsty, heat for the cold, and cold for the hot.Ê It is the current coin that purchases all the pleasures of the world cheap, and the balance that sets the king and the shepherd, the fool and the wise man, even. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
463:It is not the responsibility of knights errant to discover whether the afflicted, the enchained and the oppressed whom they encounter on the road are reduced to these circumstances and suffer this distress for their vices, or for their virtues: the knight's sole responsibility is to succour them as people in need, having eyes only for their sufferings, not for their misdeeds. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
464:One who has not only the four S's, which are required in every good lover, but even the whole alphabet; as for example... Agreeable, Bountiful, Constant, Dutiful, Easy, Faithful, Gallant, Honorable, Ingenious, Kind, Loyal, Mild, Noble, Officious, Prudent, Quiet, Rich, Secret, True, Valiant, Wise; the X indeed, is too harsh a letter to agree with him, but he is Young and Zealous. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
465:And for the citation of so many authors, 'tis the easiest thing in nature. Find out one of these books with an alphabetical index, and without any farther ceremony, remove it verbatim into your own... there are fools enough to be thus drawn into an opinion of the work; at least, such a flourishing train of attendants will give your book a fashionable air, and recommend it for sale. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
466:Oh Senor" said the niece. "Your grace should send them to be burned (books), just like all the rest, because it's very likely that my dear uncle, having been cured of the chivalric disease, will read these and want to become a shepherd and wander through the woods and meadows singing and playing and, what would be even worse, become a poet, and that, they say, is an incurable and contagious disease. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
467:I had rather munch a crust of brown bread and an onion in a corner, without any more ado or ceremony, than feed upon turkey at another man?s table, where one is fain to sit mincing and chewing his meat an hour together, drink little, be always wiping his fingers and his chops, and never dare to cough nor sneeze, though he has never so much a mind to it, nor do a many things which a body may do freely by one?s self. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
468:Don Quixote followed nature, and being satisfied with his first sleep, did not solicit more. As for Sancho, he never wanted a second, for the first lasted him from night to morning, indicating a sound body and a mind free from care; but his master, being unable to sleep himself awakened him, saying, "I am amazed, Sancho, at the torpor of thy soul; it seems as if thou wert made of marble or brass, insensible of emotion or sentiment! ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
469:Reading Don Quixote can be compared to an indefinite visit from your most impossible senior relative, with all his pranks, dirty habits, unstoppable reminiscences, and terrible cronies. When the experience is over, and the old boy checks out at last (on page 846 - the prose wedged tight, with no breaks for dialogue), you will shed tears all right; not tears of relief or regret but tears of pride. You made it, despite all that 'Don Quixote' could do. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
470:The fear thou art in, Sancho," said Don Quixote, "prevents thee from seeing or hearing correctly, for one of the effects of fear is to derange the senses and make things appear different from what they are; if thou art in such fear, withdraw to one side and leave me to myself, for alone I suffice to bring victory to that side to which I shall give my aid;" and so saying he gave Rocinante the spur, and putting the lance in rest, shot down the slope like a thunderbolt. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
471:To think that the affairs of this life always remain in the same state is a vain presumption; indeed they all seem to be perpetually changing and moving in a circular course. Spring is followed by summer, summer by autumn, and autumn by winter, which is again followed by spring, and so time continues its everlasting round. But the life of man is ever racing to its end, swifter than time itself, without hope of renewal, unless in the next that is limitless and infinite. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
472:All of that is true,’ responded Don Quixote, ‘but we cannot all be friars, and God brings His children to heaven by many paths: chivalry is a religion, and there are sainted knights in Glory.’ Yes,’ responded Sancho, ‘but I’ve heard that there are more friars in heaven than knights errant.’ That is true,’ responded Don Quixote, ‘because the number of religious is greater than the number of knights.’ There are many who are errant,’ said Sancho. Many,’ responded Don Quixote, ‘but few who deserve to be called knights. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
473:Roque...lined his men up and had them produce all the clothing, jewels, money, and other objects that they had stolen since the last time they had divided the spoils. Having made a hasty appraisal and reduced to terms of money those items that could not be divided, he split the whole into shares with such equity and exactitude that in not a single instance did he go beyond or fall short of a strict distributive justice. They were all well satisfied with the payment received, indeed they were quite well pleased; and Roque then turned to Don Quixote. ~ Miguel de Cervantes,
474:I’ll lay a bet,” said Sancho, “that before long there won’t be a tavern, roadside inn, hostelry, or barber’s shop where the story of our doings won’t be painted up; but I’d like it painted by the hand of a better painter than painted these.” “Thou art right, Sancho,” said Don Quixote, “for this painter is like Orbaneja, a painter there was at Ubeda, who when they asked him what he was painting, used to say, ‘Whatever it may turn out’; and if he chanced to paint a cock he would write under it, ‘This is a cock,’ for fear they might think it was a fox.” —Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote ~ Michael Gruber,
475:Remember that there are two kinds of beauty: one of the soul and the other of the body. That of the soul displays its radiance in intelligence, in chastity, in good conduct, in generosity, and in good breeding, and all these qualities may exist in an ugly man. And when we focus our attention upon that beauty, not upon the physical, love generally arises with great violence and intensity. I am well aware that I am not handsome, but I also know that I am not deformed, and it is enough for a man of worth not to be a monster for him to be dearly loved, provided he has those spiritual endowments I have spoken of. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
476:All I know is that while I’m asleep, I’m never afraid, and I have no hopes, no struggles, no glories — and bless the man who invented sleep, a cloak over all human thought, food that drives away hunger, water that banishes thirst, fire that heats up cold, chill that moderates passion, and, finally, universal currency with which all things can be bought, weight and balance that brings the shepherd and the king, the fool and the wise, to the same level. There’s only one bad thing about sleep, as far as I’ve ever heard, and that is that it resembles death, since there’s very little difference between a sleeping man and a corpse. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
477:Destiny guides our fortunes more favorably than we could have expected. Look there, Sancho Panza, my friend, and see those thirty or so wild giants, with whom I intend to do battle and kill each and all of them, so with their stolen booty we can begin to enrich ourselves. This is nobel, righteous warfare, for it is wonderfully useful to God to have such an evil race wiped from the face of the earth."
"What giants?" Asked Sancho Panza.
"The ones you can see over there," answered his master, "with the huge arms, some of which are very nearly two leagues long."
"Now look, your grace," said Sancho, "what you see over there aren't giants, but windmills, and what seems to be arms are just their sails, that go around in the wind and turn the millstone."
"Obviously," replied Don Quijote, "you don't know much about adventures. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
478:Milan Kundera'nın söylediği gibi: Cervantes Don Kişot'u mitlerden, maskelerden, basmakalıplardan, önyargılardan ve önyorumlardan örülü perdeyi yırtmak için gönderdi, içinde bulunduğumuz ve anlamaya çabaladığımız dünyayı sıkı sıkı örten perdelerden... Ancak perde kalkmadıkça ya da yırtılmadıkça boşuna uğraşıyoruz. Don Kişot bir fatih değildi, 0 fethedilmişti. Ancak, yenilgisi ile, bize gösterdiği, “hayat denen kaçınılmaz yenilginin karşısında yapabileceğimiz tek şey durup onu anlamaya çalışmaktır” oldu. Bu Miguel de Cervantes'in büyük, çığır açan keşfiydi; bir kere bulundu mu bir daha unutulamazdı. Beşeri bilimlerle uğraşan bizler önümüzde serili duran bu keşfin izlerini takip ediyoruz. Cervantes sayesinde buralardayız.

Perdeyi yırtmak, hayatı anlamak... Bunun anlamı ne? Biz, insanlar, iyinin ve kötünün, güzelin ve çirkinin, gerçeğin ve yalanın birbirlerinden kesin bir şekilde ayrıldığı ve asla bir diğerine karışmadığı, böylece şeylerin nasıl olduğundan, nereye gidebileceğimizden ve nasıl ilerleyebileceğimizden emin olduğumuz sıradan, temiz ve saydam bir dünyayı tercih ediyoruz; çaba gerektiren bir anlayış olmadan hükümlere ulaşmayı ve kararlar almayı hayal ediyoruz. İşte bizim bu hayalimizden ideolojiler doğdu. Görüşümüzü kapatan o kalın perdeler. . . Bizim bu etkisizleştirici eğilimimize Etienne de la Boétie "gönüllü kölelik” adını verdi. Cervantes bizim bu tür bir
kölelikten çıkmamızı istiyordu; dünyanın tümüyle çıplak, rahatsız, ancak özgürleştirici gerçekliğini sunarak;
anlam çokluğu gerçekliğini ve onarılamaz mutlak gerçekler açığını. Bu tür bir dünyada, kesin olan tek şeyin hiçbir şeyin kesin olmaması olduğu bir dünyada, tekrar tekrar ve sonuç almaksızın kendimizi ve birbirimizi anlamaya, iletişim kurmaya ve birbirimiz için yaşamaya çalışacağız. ~ Zygmunt Bauman,
479:I was born free, and that I might live in freedom I chose the solitude of the fields; in the trees of the mountains I find society, the clear waters of the brooks are my mirrors, and to the trees and waters I make known my thoughts and charms. I am a fire afar off, a sword laid aside. Those whom I have inspired with love by letting them see me, I have by words undeceived, and if their longings live on hope—and I have given none to Chrysostom or to any other—it cannot justly be said that the death of any is my doing, for it was rather his own obstinacy than my cruelty that killed him; and if it be made a charge against me that his wishes were honourable, and that therefore I was bound to yield to them, I answer that when on this very spot where now his grave is made he declared to me his purity of purpose, I told him that mine was to live in perpetual solitude, and that the earth alone should enjoy the fruits of my retirement and the spoils of my beauty; and if, after this open avowal, he chose to persist against hope and steer against the wind, what wonder is it that he should sink in the depths of his infatuation? If I had encouraged him, I should be false; if I had gratified him, I should have acted against my own better resolution and purpose. He was persistent in spite of warning, he despaired without being hated. Bethink you now if it be reasonable that his suffering should be laid to my charge. Let him who has been deceived complain, let him give way to despair whose encouraged hopes have proved vain, let him flatter himself whom I shall entice, let him boast whom I shall receive; but let not him call me cruel or homicide to whom I make no promise, upon whom I practise no deception, whom I neither entice nor receive. It has not been so far the will of Heaven that I should love by fate, and to expect me to love by choice is idle. Let this general declaration serve for each of my suitors on his own account, and let it be understood from this time forth that if anyone dies for me it is not of jealousy or misery he dies, for she who loves no one can give no cause for jealousy to any, and candour is not to be confounded with scorn. Let him who calls me wild beast and basilisk, leave me alone as something noxious and evil; let him who calls me ungrateful, withhold his service; who calls me wayward, seek not my acquaintance; who calls me cruel, pursue me not; for this wild beast, this basilisk, this ungrateful, cruel, wayward being has no kind of desire to seek, serve, know, or follow them. If Chrysostom's impatience and violent passion killed him, why should my modest behaviour and circumspection be blamed? If I preserve my purity in the society of the trees, why should he who would have me preserve it among men, seek to rob me of it? I have, as you know, wealth of my own, and I covet not that of others; my taste is for freedom, and I have no relish for constraint; I neither love nor hate anyone; I do not deceive this one or court that, or trifle with one or play with another. The modest converse of the shepherd girls of these hamlets and the care of my goats are my recreations; my desires are bounded by these mountains, and if they ever wander hence it is to contemplate the beauty of the heavens, steps by which the soul travels to its primeval abode. ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra,
480:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer – Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus – Tragedies
4. Sophocles – Tragedies
5. Herodotus – Histories
6. Euripides – Tragedies
7. Thucydides – History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates – Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes – Comedies
10. Plato – Dialogues
11. Aristotle – Works
12. Epicurus – Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid – Elements
14. Archimedes – Works
15. Apollonius of Perga – Conic Sections
16. Cicero – Works
17. Lucretius – On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil – Works
19. Horace – Works
20. Livy – History of Rome
21. Ovid – Works
22. Plutarch – Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus – Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa – Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus – Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy – Almagest
27. Lucian – Works
28. Marcus Aurelius – Meditations
29. Galen – On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus – The Enneads
32. St. Augustine – On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njál
36. St. Thomas Aquinas – Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri – The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer – Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci – Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli – The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus – The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus – On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More – Utopia
44. Martin Luther – Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais – Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin – Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne – Essays
48. William Gilbert – On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser – Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon – Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare – Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei – Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler – Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey – On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes – Leviathan
57. René Descartes – Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton – Works
59. Molière – Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal – The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens – Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza – Ethics
63. John Locke – Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine – Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton – Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz – Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67. Daniel Defoe – Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift – A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve – The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley – Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope – Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu – Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire – Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding – Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson – The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets ~ Mortimer J Adler,
481:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus - Tragedies
4. Sophocles - Tragedies
5. Herodotus - Histories
6. Euripides - Tragedies
7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes - Comedies
10. Plato - Dialogues
11. Aristotle - Works
12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid - Elements
14.Archimedes - Works
15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections
16. Cicero - Works
17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil - Works
19. Horace - Works
20. Livy - History of Rome
21. Ovid - Works
22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy - Almagest
27. Lucian - Works
28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus - The Enneads
32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njal
36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More - Utopia
44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays
48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan
57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton - Works
59. Molière - Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics
63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve - The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
   ~ Mortimer J Adler,

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--- Overview of noun miguel_de_cervantes

The noun miguel de cervantes has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
            
1. Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra ::: (Spanish writer best remembered for `Don Quixote' which satirizes chivalry and influenced the development of the novel form (1547-1616))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun miguel_de_cervantes

1 sense of miguel de cervantes                    

Sense 1
Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author
     => communicator
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity
   INSTANCE OF=> dramatist, playwright
     => writer, author
       => communicator
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun miguel_de_cervantes
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun miguel_de_cervantes

1 sense of miguel de cervantes                    

Sense 1
Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author
   INSTANCE OF=> dramatist, playwright




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun miguel_de_cervantes

1 sense of miguel de cervantes                    

Sense 1
Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
  -> writer, author
   => abstractor, abstracter
   => alliterator
   => authoress
   => biographer
   => coauthor, joint author
   => commentator, reviewer
   => compiler
   => contributor
   => cyberpunk
   => drafter
   => dramatist, playwright
   => essayist, litterateur
   => folk writer
   => framer
   => gagman, gagster, gagwriter
   => ghostwriter, ghost
   => Gothic romancer
   => hack, hack writer, literary hack
   => journalist
   => librettist
   => lyricist, lyrist
   => novelist
   => pamphleteer
   => paragrapher
   => poet
   => polemicist, polemist, polemic
   => rhymer, rhymester, versifier, poetizer, poetiser
   => scenarist
   => scriptwriter
   => space writer
   => speechwriter
   => tragedian
   => wordmonger
   => word-painter
   => wordsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aiken, Conrad Aiken, Conrad Potter Aiken
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alger, Horatio Alger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Algren, Nelson Algren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Andersen, Hans Christian Andersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anderson, Sherwood Anderson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aragon, Louis Aragon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Asch, Sholem Asch, Shalom Asch, Sholom Asch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Asimov, Isaac Asimov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Auchincloss, Louis Auchincloss, Louis Stanton Auchincloss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Austen, Jane Austen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baldwin, James Baldwin, James Arthur Baldwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baraka, Imamu Amiri Baraka, LeRoi Jones
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barth, John Barth, John Simmons Barth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barthelme, Donald Barthelme
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baum, Frank Baum, Lyman Frank Brown
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beauvoir, Simone de Beauvoir
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beckett, Samuel Beckett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beerbohm, Max Beerbohm, Sir Henry Maxmilian Beerbohm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Belloc, Hilaire Belloc, Joseph Hilaire Peter Belloc
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bellow, Saul Bellow, Solomon Bellow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benchley, Robert Benchley, Robert Charles Benchley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benet, William Rose Benet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bierce, Ambrose Bierce, Ambrose Gwinett Bierce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boell, Heinrich Boell, Heinrich Theodor Boell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bontemps, Arna Wendell Bontemps
   HAS INSTANCE=> Borges, Jorge Borges, Jorge Luis Borges
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boswell, James Boswell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boyle, Kay Boyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bradbury, Ray Bradbury, Ray Douglas Bradbury
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Charlotte Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Emily Bronte, Emily Jane Bronte, Currer Bell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Anne Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Browne, Charles Farrar Browne, Artemus Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Buck, Pearl Buck, Pearl Sydenstricker Buck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bunyan, John Bunyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burgess, Anthony Burgess
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burnett, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, Edgar Rice Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, William Burroughs, William S. Burroughs, William Seward Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Butler, Samuel Butler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cabell, James Branch Cabell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Caldwell, Erskine Caldwell, Erskine Preston Caldwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calvino, Italo Calvino
   HAS INSTANCE=> Camus, Albert Camus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Canetti, Elias Canetti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Capek, Karel Capek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cather, Willa Cather, Willa Sibert Cather
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chandler, Raymond Chandler, Raymond Thornton Chandler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chateaubriand, Francois Rene Chateaubriand, Vicomte de Chateaubriand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cheever, John Cheever
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chesterton, G. K. Chesterton, Gilbert Keith Chesterton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chopin, Kate Chopin, Kate O'Flaherty Chopin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Christie, Agatha Christie, Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Churchill, Winston Churchill, Winston S. Churchill, Sir Winston Leonard Spenser Churchill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clemens, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Mark Twain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cocteau, Jean Cocteau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Claudine Colette
   HAS INSTANCE=> Collins, Wilkie Collins, William Wilkie Collins
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conan Doyle, A. Conan Doyle, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conrad, Joseph Conrad, Teodor Josef Konrad Korzeniowski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cooper, James Fenimore Cooper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crane, Stephen Crane
   HAS INSTANCE=> cummings, e. e. cummings, Edward Estlin Cummings
   HAS INSTANCE=> Day, Clarence Day, Clarence Shepard Day Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Defoe, Daniel Defoe
   HAS INSTANCE=> De Quincey, Thomas De Quincey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dickens, Charles Dickens, Charles John Huffam Dickens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Didion, Joan Didion
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dinesen, Isak Dinesen, Blixen, Karen Blixen, Baroness Karen Blixen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Doctorow, E. L. Doctorow, Edgard Lawrence Doctorow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dos Passos, John Dos Passos, John Roderigo Dos Passos
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoevsky, Feodor Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Feodor Dostoevski, Fyodor Dostoevski, Feodor Dostoevsky, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dreiser, Theodore Dreiser, Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dumas, Alexandre Dumas
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, George du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, Daphne du Maurier, Dame Daphne du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Durrell, Lawrence Durrell, Lawrence George Durrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ehrenberg, Ilya Ehrenberg, Ilya Grigorievich Ehrenberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, George Eliot, Mary Ann Evans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ellison, Ralph Ellison, Ralph Waldo Ellison
   HAS INSTANCE=> Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Farrell, James Thomas Farrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ferber, Edna Ferber
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fielding, Henry Fielding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fitzgerald, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald
   HAS INSTANCE=> Flaubert, Gustave Flaubert
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fleming, Ian Fleming, Ian Lancaster Fleming
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ford, Ford Madox Ford, Ford Hermann Hueffer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Forester, C. S. Forester, Cecil Scott Forester
   HAS INSTANCE=> France, Anatole France, Jacques Anatole Francois Thibault
   HAS INSTANCE=> Franklin, Benjamin Franklin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fuentes, Carlos Fuentes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaboriau, Emile Gaboriau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Galsworthy, John Galsworthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gardner, Erle Stanley Gardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaskell, Elizabeth Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn Stevenson Gaskell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Geisel, Theodor Seuss Geisel, Dr. Seuss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gibran, Kahlil Gibran
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gide, Andre Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gjellerup, Karl Gjellerup
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gogol, Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol
   HAS INSTANCE=> Golding, William Golding, Sir William Gerald Golding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goldsmith, Oliver Goldsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gombrowicz, Witold Gombrowicz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Edmond de Goncourt, Edmond Louis Antoine Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Jules de Goncourt, Jules Alfred Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gordimer, Nadine Gordimer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gorky, Maksim Gorky, Gorki, Maxim Gorki, Aleksey Maksimovich Peshkov, Aleksey Maximovich Peshkov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grahame, Kenneth Grahame
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grass, Gunter Grass, Gunter Wilhelm Grass
   HAS INSTANCE=> Graves, Robert Graves, Robert Ranke Graves
   HAS INSTANCE=> Greene, Graham Greene, Henry Graham Greene
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grey, Zane Grey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Jakob Grimm, Jakob Ludwig Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Wilhelm Grimm, Wilhelm Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haggard, Rider Haggard, Sir Henry Rider Haggard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haldane, Elizabeth Haldane, Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hale, Edward Everett Hale
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haley, Alex Haley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hall, Radclyffe Hall, Marguerite Radclyffe Hall
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hammett, Dashiell Hammett, Samuel Dashiell Hammett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hamsun, Knut Hamsun, Knut Pedersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hardy, Thomas Hardy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Frank Harris, James Thomas Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Joel Harris, Joel Chandler Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harte, Bret Harte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hasek, Jaroslav Hasek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hawthorne, Nathaniel Hawthorne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hecht, Ben Hecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heinlein, Robert A. Heinlein, Robert Anson Heinlein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heller, Joseph Heller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hesse, Hermann Hesse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyse, Paul Heyse, Paul Johann Ludwig von Heyse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyward, DuBois Heyward, Edwin DuBois Hayward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Higginson, Thomas Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Storrow Higginson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoffmann, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Holmes, Oliver Wendell Holmes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Howells, William Dean Howells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoyle, Edmond Hoyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hubbard, L. Ron Hubbard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hughes, Langston Hughes, James Langston Hughes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hunt, Leigh Hunt, James Henry Leigh Hunt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, John Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, Washington Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Isherwood, Christopher Isherwood, Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jackson, Helen Hunt Jackson, Helen Maria Fiske Hunt Jackson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, Jane Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, W. W. Jacobs, William Wymark Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, Henry James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jensen, Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Dr. Johnson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jong, Erica Jong
   HAS INSTANCE=> Joyce, James Joyce, James Augustine Aloysius Joyce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kafka, Franz Kafka
   HAS INSTANCE=> Keller, Helen Keller, Helen Adams Keller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kerouac, Jack Kerouac, Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kesey, Ken Kesey, Ken Elton Kesey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kipling, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Rudyard Kipling
   HAS INSTANCE=> Koestler, Arthur Koestler
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Fontaine, Jean de La Fontaine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lardner, Ring Lardner, Ringgold Wilmer Lardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Rochefoucauld, Francois de La Rochefoucauld
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, D. H. Lawrence, David Herbert Lawrence
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, T. E. Lawrence, Thomas Edward Lawrence, Lawrence of Arabia
   HAS INSTANCE=> le Carre, John le Carre, David John Moore Cornwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leonard, Elmore Leonard, Elmore John Leonard, Dutch Leonard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lermontov, Mikhail Yurievich Lermontov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Doris Lessing, Doris May Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, C. S. Lewis, Clive Staples Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, Sinclair Lewis, Harry Sinclair Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> London, Jack London, John Griffith Chaney
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowry, Malcolm Lowry, Clarence Malcolm Lowry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lyly, John Lyly
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lytton, First Baron Lytton, Bulwer-Lytton, Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mailer, Norman Mailer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malamud, Bernard Malamud
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malory, Thomas Malory, Sir Thomas Malory
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malraux, Andre Malraux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mann, Thomas Mann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mansfield, Katherine Mansfield, Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp
   HAS INSTANCE=> Manzoni, Alessandro Manzoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marquand, John Marquand, John Philip Marquand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marsh, Ngaio Marsh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mason, A. E. W. Mason, Alfred Edward Woodley Mason
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maugham, Somerset Maugham, W. Somerset Maugham, William Somerset Maugham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maupassant, Guy de Maupassant, Henri Rene Albert Guy de Maupassant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mauriac, Francois Mauriac, Francois Charles Mauriac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maurois, Andre Maurois, Emile Herzog
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCarthy, Mary McCarthy, Mary Therese McCarthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCullers, Carson McCullers, Carson Smith McCullers
   HAS INSTANCE=> McLuhan, Marshall McLuhan, Herbert Marshall McLuhan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Melville, Herman Melville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Merton, Thomas Merton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Michener, James Michener, James Albert Michener
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Henry Miller, Henry Valentine Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Milne, A. A. Milne, Alan Alexander Milne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitchell, Margaret Mitchell, Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Nancy Mitford, Nancy Freeman Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Jessica Mitford, Jessica Lucy Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montaigne, Michel Montaigne, Michel Eyquem Montaigne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montgomery, L. M. Montgomery, Lucy Maud Montgomery
   HAS INSTANCE=> More, Thomas More, Sir Thomas More
   HAS INSTANCE=> Morrison, Toni Morrison, Chloe Anthony Wofford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Munro, H. H. Munro, Hector Hugh Munro, Saki
   HAS INSTANCE=> Murdoch, Iris Murdoch, Dame Jean Iris Murdoch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Musset, Alfred de Musset, Louis Charles Alfred de Musset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nabokov, Vladimir Nabokov, Vladimir vladimirovich Nabokov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nash, Ogden Nash
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nicolson, Harold Nicolson, Sir Harold George Nicolson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Norris, Frank Norris, Benjamin Franklin Norris Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Oates, Joyce Carol Oates
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Brien, Edna O'Brien
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Connor, Flannery O'Connor, Mary Flannery O'Connor
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Flaherty, Liam O'Flaherty
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Hara, John Henry O'Hara
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ondaatje, Michael Ondaatje, Philip Michael Ondaatje
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orczy, Baroness Emmusca Orczy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orwell, George Orwell, Eric Blair, Eric Arthur Blair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Page, Thomas Nelson Page
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parker, Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Rothschild Parker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pasternak, Boris Pasternak, Boris Leonidovich Pasternak
   HAS INSTANCE=> Paton, Alan Paton, Alan Stewart Paton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Percy, Walker Percy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Petronius, Gaius Petronius, Petronius Arbiter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plath, Sylvia Plath
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Elder, Gaius Plinius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Younger, Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Poe, Edgar Allan Poe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, William Sydney Porter, O. Henry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, Katherine Anne Porter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Post, Emily Post, Emily Price Post
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pound, Ezra Pound, Ezra Loomis Pound
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, John Cowper Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Theodore Francis Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Llewelyn Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pyle, Howard Pyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pynchon, Thomas Pynchon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rand, Ayn Rand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Richler, Mordecai Richler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roberts, Kenneth Roberts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roth, Philip Roth, Philip Milton Roth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Rousseau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Runyon, Damon Runyon, Alfred Damon Runyon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rushdie, Salman Rushdie, Ahmed Salman Rushdie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, George William Russell, A.E.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sade, de Sade, Comte Donatien Alphonse Francois de Sade, Marquis de Sade
   HAS INSTANCE=> Salinger, J. D. Salinger, Jerome David Salinger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sand, George Sand, Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin, Baroness Dudevant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sandburg, Carl Sandburg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Saroyan, William Saroyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sayers, Dorothy Sayers, Dorothy L. Sayers, Dorothy Leigh Sayers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schiller, Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scott, Walter Scott, Sir Walter Scott
   HAS INSTANCE=> Service, Robert William Service
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shelley, Mary Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mary Godwin Wollstonecraft Shelley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shute, Nevil Shute, Nevil Shute Norway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simenon, Georges Simenon, Georges Joseph Christian Simenon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sinclair, Upton Sinclair, Upton Beall Sinclair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Singer, Isaac Bashevis Singer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smollett, Tobias Smollett, Tobias George Smollett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Snow, C. P. Snow, Charles Percy Snow, Baron Snow of Leicester
   HAS INSTANCE=> Solzhenitsyn, Alexander Isayevich Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sontag, Susan Sontag
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spark, Muriel Spark, Dame Muriel Spark, Muriel Sarah Spark
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spillane, Mickey Spillane, Frank Morrison Spillane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stael, Madame de Stael, Baronne Anne Louise Germaine Necker de Steal-Holstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steele, Sir Richrd Steele
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stein, Gertrude Stein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steinbeck, John Steinbeck, John Ernst Steinbeck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stendhal, Marie Henri Beyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stephen, Sir Leslie Stephen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sterne, Laurence Sterne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stevenson, Robert Louis Stevenson, Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stockton, Frank Stockton, Francis Richard Stockton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoker, Bram Stoker, Abraham Stoker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Styron, William Styron
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sue, Eugene Sue
   HAS INSTANCE=> Symonds, John Addington Symonds
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Sir Rabindranath Tagore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tarbell, Ida Tarbell, Ida M. Tarbell, Ida Minerva Tarbell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thackeray, William Makepeace Thackeray
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thoreau, Henry David Thoreau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tocqueville, Alexis de Tocqueville, Alexis Charles Henri Maurice de Tocqueville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Toklas, Alice B. Toklas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolkien, J.R.R. Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolstoy, Leo Tolstoy, Count Lev Nikolayevitch Tolstoy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trollope, Anthony Trollope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Turgenev, Ivan Turgenev, Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Undset, Sigrid Undset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Untermeyer, Louis Untermeyer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Updike, John Updike, John Hoyer Updike
   HAS INSTANCE=> Van Doren, Carl Van Doren, Carl Clinton Van Doren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vargas Llosa, Mario Vargas Llosa, Jorge Mario Pedro Vargas Llosa
   HAS INSTANCE=> Verne, Jules Verne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vidal, Gore Vidal, Eugene Luther Vidal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Voltaire, Arouet, Francois-Marie Arouet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vonnegut, Kurt Vonnegut
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wain, John Wain, John Barrington Wain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walker, Alice Walker, Alice Malsenior Walker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wallace, Edgar Wallace, Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walpole, Horace Walpole, Horatio Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walton, Izaak Walton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ward, Mrs. Humphrey Ward, Mary Augusta Arnold Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Warren, Robert Penn Warren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Waugh, Evelyn Waugh, Evelyn Arthur Saint John Waugh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webb, Beatrice Webb, Martha Beatrice Potter Webb
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wells, H. G. Wells, Herbert George Wells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Welty, Eudora Welty
   HAS INSTANCE=> Werfel, Franz Werfel
   HAS INSTANCE=> West, Rebecca West, Dame Rebecca West, Cicily Isabel Fairfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wharton, Edith Wharton, Edith Newbold Jones Wharton
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, E. B. White, Elwyn Brooks White
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, Patrick White, Patrick Victor Martindale White
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wiesel, Elie Wiesel, Eliezer Wiesel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Sir Angus Wilson, Angus Frank Johnstone Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Harriet Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wister, Owen Wister
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wodehouse, P. G. Wodehouse, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Clayton Wolfe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Tom Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wood, Mrs. Henry Wood, Ellen Price Wood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Woolf, Virginia Woolf, Adeline Virginia Stephen Woolf
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wouk, Herman Wouk
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Richard Wright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Willard Huntington Wright, S. S. Van Dine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zangwill, Israel Zangwill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zweig, Stefan Zweig
  -> dramatist, playwright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aeschylus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Albee, Edward Albee, Edward Franklin Albeen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anderson, Maxwell Anderson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anouilh, Jean Anouilh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aristophanes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barrie, James Barrie, J. M. Barrie, James Matthew Barrie, Sir James Matthew Barrie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beaumont, Francis Beaumont
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beckett, Samuel Beckett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brecht, Bertolt Brecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calderon, Calderon de la Barca, Pedro Calderon de la Barca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Capek, Karel Capek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chekhov, Chekov, Anton Chekhov, Anton Chekov, Anton Pavlovich Chekhov, Anton Pavlovich Chekov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Congreve, William Congreve
   HAS INSTANCE=> Corneille, Pierre Corneille
   HAS INSTANCE=> Coward, Noel Coward, Sir Noel Pierce Coward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crouse, Russel Crouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cyrano de Bergerac, Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dekker, Decker, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Decker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dryden, John Dryden
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, T. S. Eliot, Thomas Stearns Eliot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Euripides
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fletcher, John Fletcher
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fry, Christopher Fry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fugard, Athol Fugard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Garcia Lorca, Frederico Garcia Lorca, Lorca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Genet, Jean Genet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gide, Andre Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide
   HAS INSTANCE=> Giraudoux, Jean Giraudoux, Hippolyte Jean Giraudoux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goldoni, Carlo Goldoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Granville-Barker, Harley Granville-Barker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hart, Moss Hart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Havel, Vaclav Havel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hebbel, Friedrich Hebbel, Christian Friedrich Hebbel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hellman, Lillian Hellman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hugo, Victor Hugo, Victor-Marie Hugo
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ibsen, Henrik Ibsen, Henrik Johan Ibsen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Inge, William Inge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ionesco, Eugene Ionesco
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jonson, Ben Jonson, Benjamin Jonson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kaufman, George S. Kaufman, George Simon Kaufman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kleist, Heinrich von Kleist, Bernd Heinrich Wilhelm von Kleist
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kyd, Kid, Thomas Kyd, Thomas Kid
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lindsay, Howard Lindsay
   HAS INSTANCE=> Luce, Clare Booth Luce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maeterlinck, Count Maurice Maeterlinck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mamet, David Mamet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marlowe, Christopher Marlowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marstan, John Marstan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Menander
   HAS INSTANCE=> Middleton, Thomas Middleton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Arthur Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moliere, Jean-Baptiste Poquelin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Molnar, Ferenc Molnar
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Casey, Sean O'Casey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Odets, Clifford Odets
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Neill, Eugene O'Neill, Eugene Gladstone O'Neill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Osborne, John Osborne, John James Osborne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pinter, Harold Pinter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pirandello, Luigi Pirandello
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pitt, George Pitt, George Dibdin Pitt, George Dibdin-Pitt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plautus, Titus Maccius Plautus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Racine, Jean Racine, Jean Baptiste Racine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rattigan, Terence Rattigan, Sir Terence Mervyn Rattigan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rice, Elmer Rice, Elmer Leopold Rice, Elmer Reizenstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Robinson, Lennox Robinson, Esme Stuart Lennox Robinson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rostand, Edmond Rostand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sartre, Jean-Paul Sartre
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scribe, Augustin Eugene Scribe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, Shakspere, William Shakspere, Bard of Avon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shepard, Sam Shepard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sheridan, Richard Brinsley Sheridan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sherwood, Robert Emmet Sherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simon, Neil Simon, Marvin Neil Simon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sophocles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoppard, Tom Stoppard, Sir Tom Stoppard, Thomas Straussler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Strindberg, August Strindberg, Johan August Strindberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Synge, J. M. Synge, John Millington Synge, Edmund John Millington Synge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Terence, Publius Terentius Afer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tirso de Molina, Gabriel Tellez
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ustinov, Sir Peter Ustinov, Peter Alexander Ustinov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vega, Lope de Vega, Lope Felix de Vega Carpio
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webster, John Webster
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Williams, Tennessee Williams, Thomas Lanier Williams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wycherley, William Wycherley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Yeats, William Butler Yeats, W. B. Yeats




--- Grep of noun miguel_de_cervantes
miguel de cervantes
miguel de cervantes saavedra



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