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object:George Bernard Shaw
philosopher class:author
subject class:Philosophy
subject:Philosophy



--- WIKI
George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856 2 November 1950), known at his insistence simply as Bernard Shaw, was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist and political activist. His influence on Western theatre, culture and politics extended from the 1880s to his death and beyond. He wrote more than sixty plays, including major works such as Man and Superman (1902), Pygmalion (1912) and Saint Joan (1923). With a range incorporating both contemporary satire and historical allegory, Shaw became the leading dramatist of his generation, and in 1925 was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. Born in Dublin, Shaw moved to London in 1876, where he struggled to establish himself as a writer and novelist, and embarked on a rigorous process of self-education. By the mid-1880s he had become a respected theatre and music critic. Following a political awakening, he joined the gradualist Fabian Society and became its most prominent pamphleteer. Shaw had been writing plays for years before his first public success, Arms and the Man in 1894. Influenced by Henrik Ibsen, he sought to introduce a new realism into English-language drama, using his plays as vehicles to disseminate his political, social and religious ideas. By the early twentieth century his reputation as a dramatist was secured with a series of critical and popular successes that included Major Barbara, The Doctor's Dilemma and Caesar and Cleopatra. Shaw's expressed views were often contentious; he promoted eugenics and alphabet reform, and opposed vaccination and organised religion. He courted unpopularity by denouncing both sides in the First World War as equally culpable, and although not a republican, castigated British policy on Ireland in the postwar period. These stances had no lasting effect on his standing or productivity as a dramatist; the inter-war years saw a series of often ambitious plays, which achieved varying degrees of popular success. In 1938 he provided the screenplay for a filmed version of Pygmalion for which he received an Academy Award. His appetite for politics and controversy remained undiminished; by the late 1920s he had largely renounced Fabian Society gradualism and often wrote and spoke favourably of dictatorships of the right and lef the expressed admiration for both Mussolini and Stalin. In the final decade of his life he made fewer public statements, but continued to write prolifically until shortly before his death, aged ninety-four, having refused all state honours, including the Order of Merit in 1946. Since Shaw's death scholarly and critical opinion about his works has varied, but he has regularly been rated among British dramatists as second only to Shakespeare; analysts recognise his extensive influence on generations of English-language playwrights. The word Shavian has entered the language as encapsulating Shaw's ideas and his means of expressing them.
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   14 George Bernard Shaw

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

1378 George Bernard Shaw
   11 Anonymous
   5 Timothy Ferriss
   3 John C Maxwell
   3 Angela Duckworth
   2 William Shakespeare
   2 Stanley Bing
   2 Mortimer J Adler
   2 Malcolm Gladwell
   2 Kerry Greenwood
   2 Eric Weiner
   2 Earl Nightingale
   2 Dale Carnegie
   2 Bill Bryson
   2 A C Grayling

1:Common people do not pray, they only beg.
   ~ George Bernard Shaw,
2:In heaven an angel is no one in particular. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
3:Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
4:Make it a rule never to give a child a book you would not read yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
5:You use a glass mirror to see your face; you use works of art to see your soul. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
6:We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." ~ George Bernard Shaw,
7:Better keep yourself clean and bright; you are the window through which you must see the world. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
8:Do not do unto others as you would they should do unto you. Their tastes may not be the same.
   ~ George Bernard Shaw,
9:The frontier between hell and heaven is only the difference between two ways of looking at things. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
10:This is the true joy in life, the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one.
   ~ George Bernard Shaw,
11:Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything ... ~ George Bernard Shaw,
12:Don't think you can frighten me by telling me that I am alone. France is alone. God is alone. And the loneliness of God is His strength. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
13:Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself." ~ George Bernard Shaw, (1856 - 1950), Irish playwright, critic, polemicist and political activist, Wikipedia.,
14:The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." ~ George Bernard Shaw, (1856 - 1950), Irish playwright, critic, polemicist and political activist, Wikipedia.,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Youth is wasted on the young. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
2:Beauty is a short-lived tyranny. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
3:Hell is full of musical amateurs. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
4:Virtue is insufficient temptation. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
5:The worst sin is to be indifferent. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
6:All progress means war with society. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
7:Every man over forty is a scoundrel. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
8:I want to be all used up when I die. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
9:All great truths begin as blasphemies. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
10:I'm an atheist and I thank God for it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
11:Lack of money is the root of all evil. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
12:He who can does; he who cannot teaches. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
13:Most people do not pray; they only beg. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
14:My reputation grows with every failure. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
15:Success covers a multitude of blunders. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
16:A happy family is but an earlier heaven. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
17:God is on the side of the big battalions. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
18:In heaven an angel is nobody in particular. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
19:All genuinely intellectual work is humorous. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
20:You cannot be a hero without being a coward. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
21:A fashion is nothing but an induced epidemic. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
22:Decency is indecency's conspiracy of silence. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
23:It is most unwise for people in love to marry. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
24:The love of economy is the root of all virtue. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
25:What is life but a series of inspired follies? ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
26:Even the youngest of us may be wrong sometimes. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
27:Life levels all men. Death reveals the eminent. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
28:Assassination is the extreme form of censorship. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
29:There is no sincerer love than the love of food. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
30:An asylum for the sane would be empty in America. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
31:Do not try to live forever. You will not succeed. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
32:Nothing is ever accomplished by a reasonable man. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
33:The golden rule is that there are no golden rules. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
34:A drama critic is a man who leaves no turn unstoned. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
35:Folly is the direct pursuit of happiness and beauty. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
36:Home is the girl's prison and the woman's workhouse. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
37:I am a Christian. That obliges me to be a Communist. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
38:A man of my spiritual intensity does not eat corpses. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
39:Animals are my friends... and I don't eat my friends. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
40:It's easier to replace a dead man than a good picture. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
41:We must reform society before we can reform ourselves. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
42:I often quote myself. It adds spice to my conversation. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
43:People exaggerate the value of things they haven't got. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
44:To be in hell is to drift; to be in heaven is to steer. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
45:A man never tells you anything until you contradict him. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
46:My specialty is being right when other people are wrong. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
47:Socialism is the same as Communism, only better English. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
48:War does not determine who is right – only who is left.  ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
49:A perpetual holiday is a good working definition of hell. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
50:If you injure your neighbour, better not do it by halves. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
51:It is dangerous to be sincere unless you are also stupid. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
52:Those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
53:Experience fails to teach where there is no desire to learn. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
54:Liberty means responsibility. That is why most men dread it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
55:All government is cruel; for nothing is so cruel as impunity. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
56:The faults of the burglar are the qualities of the financier. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
57:Better see rightly on a pound a week than squint on a million. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
58:Kings are not born: they are made by artificial hallucination. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
59:Nothing is worth doing unless the consequences may be serious. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
60:We learn from experience that men never learn from experience. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
61:An Englishman thinks he is moral when he is only uncomfortable. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
62:Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
63:First love is only a little foolishness and a lot of curiosity. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
64:The more things a man is ashamed of the more respectable he is. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
65:There is nothing more dangerous than the conscience of a bigot. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
66:When in doubt ascribe all quotations to Bernard Shaw. Nigel Rees ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
67:A pessimist is a man who thinks everybody is as nasty as himself. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
68:Political necessities sometime turn out to be political mistakes. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
69:The secret of success is to offend the greatest number of people. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
70:Youth is a wonderful thing; what a crime to waste it on children. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
71:A gentleman is one who puts more into the world than he takes out. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
72:I began as a passion and have ended as a habit, like all husbands. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
73:Martyrdom is the only way a man can become famous without ability. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
74:Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
75:The perfect love affair is one which is conducted entirely by post. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
76:The possibilities are numerous once we decide to act and not react. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
77:A mind of the calibre of mine cannot derive its nutriment from cows. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
78:Baseball has the great advantage over cricket of being sooner ended. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
79:My religion? Well, my dear, I am a Millionaire. That is my religion. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
80:Reason enslaves all whose minds are not strong enough to master her. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
81:There are no secrets better kept than the secrets everybody guesses. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
82:There is no satisfaction in hanging a man who does not object to it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
83:What use are cartridges in battle? I always carry chocolate instead. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
84:England and America are two countries separated by a common language. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
85:England and America are two countries separated by the same language. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
86:Man can climb to the highest summits, but he cannot dwell there long. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
87:Self-sacrifice enables us to sacrifice other people without blushing. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
88:The best place to find God is in a garden. You can dig for him there. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
89:The great advantage of a hotel is that it is a refuge from home life. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
90:Virtue consists, not in abstaining from vice, but in not desiring it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
91:Every person who has mastered a profession is a skeptic concerning it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
92:Few of us have vitality enough to make any of our instincts imperious. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
93:There is only one religion, though there are a hundred versions of it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
94:Without art, the crudeness of reality would make the world unbearable. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
95:An actress is not a lady; at least, when she is, she is not an actress. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
96:It is the mark of a truly intelligent person to be moved by statistics. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
97:We learn from experience that men never learn anything from experience. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
98:A veteran journalist has never had time to think twice before he writes. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
99:Everything happens to everybody sooner or later if there is time enough. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
100:Make it a rule never to give a child a book you would not read yourself. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
101:Men have to do some awfully mean things to keep up their respectability. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
102:Never fret for an only son, the idea of failure will never occur to him. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
103:We are the only real aristocracy in the world: the aristocracy of money. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
104:I enjoy convalescence. It is the part that makes the illness worth while. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
105:Only lawyers and mental defectives are automatically exempt for jury duty. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
106:Take care to get what you like or you will be forced to like what you get. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
107:Dancing: the vertical expression of a horizontal desire legalized by music. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
108:Hell, in short, is a place where you have nothing to do but amuse yourself. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
109:If you cannot get rid of the family skeleton you may as well make it dance. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
110:I have to live for others and not for myself: that's middle-class morality. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
111:My way of joking is to tell the truth. It's the funniest joke in the world. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
112:As long as I have a want, I have a reason for living. Satisfaction is death. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
113:Cruelty must be whitewashed by a moral excuse, and a pretense of reluctance. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
114:If all the economists were laid end to end, they'd never reach a conclusion. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
115:Martyrdom: the only way in which a man can become famous without ability.    ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
116:Consistency is the enemy of enterprise, just as symmetry is the enemy of art. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
117:Science becomes dangerous only when it imagines that it has reached its goal. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
118:The things most people want to know about are usually none of their business. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
119:A lifetime of happiness: no man alive could bear it; it would be hell on earth. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
120:Doing what needs to be done may not make you happy, but it will make you great. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
121:Human beings are the only animals of which I am thoroughly and cravenly afraid. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
122:A man's interest in the world is only the overflow from his interest in himself. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
123:If there was nothing wrong in the world there wouldn't be anything for us to do. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
124:Statistics show that of those who contract the habit of eating very few survive. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
125:The most tragic thing in the world is a man of genius who is not a man of honor. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
126:Statistics show that of those who contract the habit of eating, very few survive. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
127:A doctor's reputation is made by the number of eminent men who die under his care. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
128:A doctor’s reputation is made by the number of eminent men who die under his care. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
129:A government that robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the support of Paul. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
130:Democracy is a device that insures we shall be governed no better than we deserve. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
131:Forgive him, for he believes that the customs of his tribe are the laws of nature. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
132:My mother married a very good man and she is not at all keen on my doing the same. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
133:The thought of two thousand people crunching celery at the same time horrified me. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
134:Americans adore me and will go on adoring me until I say something nice about them. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
135:I choose not to make a graveyard of my body for the rotting corpses of dead animals. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
136:If women were particular about men's characters, they would never get married at all. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
137:Love is a gross exaggeration of the difference between one person and everybody else. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
138:The natural term of the affection of the human animal for its offspring is six years. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
139:Old men are dangerous: it doesn't matter to them what is going to happen to the world. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
140:The surest way to ruin a man who doesn't know how to handle money is to give him some. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
141:If you take too long in deciding what to do with your life, you'll find you've done it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
142:A government that robs Peter to pay Paul can as a rule calculate on the support of Paul. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
143:Best keep yourself clean and bright; you are the window through which you see the world. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
144:In order to fully realize how bad a popular play can be it is necessary to see it twice. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
145:Remember that the progress of the world depends on your knowing better than your elders. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
146:A man of great common sense and good taste is a man without originality or moral courage. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
147:I would like to take you seriously but to do so would be an affront to your intelligence. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
148:There is no subject on which more dangerous nonsense is talked and thought than marriage. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
149:Democracy substitutes election by the incompetent many for appointment by the corrupt few. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
150:Men are wise in proportion, not to their experience, but to their capacity for experience. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
151:He knows nothing and thinks he knows everything; that points clearly to a political career. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
152:The chief objection of playing wind instruments is that it prolongs the life of the player. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
153:Home life as we understand it is no more natural to us than a cage is natural to a cockatoo. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
154:The trouble with her is that she lacks the power of conversation but not the power of speech. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
155:Do not do unto others as you expect they should do unto you. Their tastes may not be the same. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
156:I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig; you get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
157:There are two tragedies in life; one is not to get your heart's desire the other is to get it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
158:When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
159:A broken heart is a very pleasant complaint for a man in London if he has a comfortable income. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
160:Cruelty would be delicious if one could only find some sort of cruelty that didn't really hurt. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
161:Life contains but two tragedies. One is not to get your heart's desire; the other is to get it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
162:Why should we take advice on sex from the pope? If he knows anything about it, he shouldn't!    ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
163:Custom will reconcile people to any atrocity; and fashion will drive them to acquire any custom. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
164:I never resist temptation, because I have found that things that are bad for me do not tempt me. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
165:Power does not corrupt men; fools, however, if they get into a position of power, corrupt power. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
166:A photographer is like a cod, which produces a million eggs in order that one may reach maturity. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
167:Success does not consist in never making mistakes but in never making the same one a second time. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
168:The heretic is always better dead. And mortal eyes cannot distinguish the saint from the heretic. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
169:You must not suppose, because I am a man of letters, that I never tried to earn an honest living. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
170:Choose silence of all virtues, for by it you hear other men's imperfections, and conceal your own. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
171:Marriage is popular because it combines the maximum of temptation with the maximum of opportunity. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
172:The frontier between hell and heaven is only the difference between two ways of looking at things. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
173:Rich men without convictions are more dangerous in modern society than poor women without chastity. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
174:The domestic career is no more natural to all women than the military career is natural to all men. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
175:If more than ten per cent of the population likes a painting it should be burned for it must be bad. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
176:What we want is to see the child in pursuit of knowledge, and not knowledge in pursuit of the child. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
177:Capitalism has destroyed our belief in any effective power but that of self interest backed by force. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
178:I never thought much of the courage of a lion tamer. Inside the cage he is at least safe from people. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
179:Patriotism is the conviction that your country is superior to all others because you were born in it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
180:Progress is impossible without change and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
181:Death is for many of us the gate of hell; but we are inside on the way out, not outside on the way in. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
182:I am a sort of collector of religions: and the curious thing is that I find I can believe in them all. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
183:Patriotism is your conviction that this country is superior to all others because you were born in it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
184:The fickleness of the women I love is only equaled by the infernal constancy of the women who love me. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
185:Hegel was right when he said that we learn from history that man can never learn anything from history. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
186:If I were a woman, I'd simply refuse to speak to any man or do anything for men until I'd got the vote. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
187:A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable but more useful than a life spent doing nothing. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
188:Creation is a miracle of daily recurrence. &
189:Find enough clever things to say, and you're a Prime Minister; write them down and you're a Shakespeare. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
190:Life does not cease to be funny when people die any more than it ceases to be serious when people laugh. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
191:Marriage is good enough for the lower classes: they have facilities for desertion that are denied to us. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
192:Give a man health and a course to steer, and he'll never stop to trouble about whether he's happy or not. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
193:No man ever believes that the Bible means what it says: He is always convinced that it says what he means. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
194:“You see things; and you say, &
195:Life does not cease to be funny when people die any more than it ceases to be serious when people laugh.    ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
196:The only way to avoid being miserable is not to have enough leisure to wonder whether you are happy or not. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
197:Beware of the man who does not return your blow: he neither forgives you nor allows you to forgive yourself. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
198:Independence? That's middle class blasphemy. We are all dependent on one another, every soul of us on earth. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
199:When a man wants to murder a tiger he calls it sport; when a tiger wants to murder him he calls it ferocity. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
200:Which painting in the National Gallery would I save if there was a fire? The one nearest the door of course. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
201:The truth is, hardly any of us have ethical energy enough for more than one really inflexible point of honor. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
202:What a man believes may be ascertained, not from his creed, but from the assumptions on which habitually acts. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
203:Clever and attractive women do not want to vote; they are willing to let men govern as long as they govern men. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
204:Alcohol enables Parliament to do things at eleven at night that no sane person would do at eleven in the morning. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
205:My method is to take the utmost trouble to find the right thing to say and then to say it with the utmost levity. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
206:All my life affection has been showered upon me, and every forward step I have made has been taken in spite of it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
207:An election is a moral horror, as bad as a battle except for the blood; a mud bath for every soul concerned in it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
208:Except during the nine months before he draws his first breath, no man manages his affairs as well as a tree does. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
209:My method is to take the utmost trouble to find the right thing to say, and then to say it with the utmost levity. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
210:A man who has no office to go to&
211:Censorship ends in logical completeness when nobody is allowed to read any books except the books that nobody reads. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
212:If history repeats itself, and the unexpected always happens, how incapable must Man be of learning from experience! ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
213:I am afraid we must make the world honest before we can honestly say to our children that honesty is the best policy. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
214:I want to be thoroughly used up when I die, for the harder I work the more I live. I rejoice in life for its own sake. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
215:We don't bother much about dress and manners in England, because as a nation we don't dress well and we've no manners. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
216:If you must hold yourself up to your children as an object lesson, hold yourself up as a warning and not as an example. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
217:Vulgarity is a necessary part of a complete author's equipment; and the clown is sometimes the best part of the circus. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
218:A learned man is an idler who kills time with study. Beware of his false knowledge: it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
219:Parentage is a very important profession, but no test of fitness for it is ever imposed in the interest of the children. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
220:Both optimists and pessimists contribute to the society. The optimist invents the aeroplane, the pessimist the parachute. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
221:Perhaps the greatest social service that can be rendered by anybody to the country and to mankind is to bring up a family. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
222:While we ourselves are the living graves of murdered animals, how can we expect any ideal living conditions on this earth? ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
223:A fool's brain digests philosophy into folly, science into superstition, and art into pedantry. Hence University education. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
224:I can forgive Alfred Nobel for having invented dynamite but only a fiend in human form could have invented the Nobel Prize. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
225:No sooner had Jesus knocked over the dragon of superstition than Paul boldly set it on its legs again in the name of Jesus. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
226:Nowadays a parlor maid as ignorant as Queen Victoria was when she came to the throne would be classed as mentally defective. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
227:A little learning is a dangerous thing, but we must take that risk because a little is as much as our biggest heads can hold. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
228:I am the most spontaneous speaker in the world because every word every gesture and every retort has been carefully rehearsed. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
229:The confusion of marriage with morality has done more to destroy the conscience of the human race than any other single error. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
230:I am not a teacher: only a fellow-traveler of whom you asked the way.  I pointed ahead&
231:I am of the opinion that my life belongs to the community, and as long as I live it is my privilege to do for it whatever I can. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
232:The moment we want to believe something, we suddenly see all the arguments for it, and become blind to the arguments against it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
233:I make a fortune from criticizing the policy of the government, and then hand it over to the government in taxes to keep it going. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
234:Marriage is an alliance entered into by a man who can't sleep with the window shut, and a woman who can't sleep with the window open. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
235:Revolutionary movements attract those who are not good enough for established institutions as well as those who are too good for them. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
236:There are some experiences in life which should not be demanded twice from any man and one of them is listening to the Brahms Requiem. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
237:That is the whole secret of successful fighting. Get your enemy at a disadvantage; and never, on any account, fight him on equal terms. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
238:I want to destroy ownership in order that possession and enjoyment may be raised to the highest point in every section of the community. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
239:The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
240:Why, except as a means of livelihood, a man should desire to act on the stage when he has the whole world to act in, is not clear to me. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
241:Chess ... a foolish expedient for making idle people believe they are doing something very clever when they are only wasting their time. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
242:Do not waste your time on Social Questions. What is the matter with the poor is Poverty; what is the matter with the rich is Uselessness. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
243:My method of getting a play across the footlights is like a revolver shooting: every line has a bullet in it and comes with an explosion. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
244:Security, the chief pretense of civilization, cannot exist where the worst of dangers, the danger of poverty, hangs over everyone’s head. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
245:Few people think more than two or three times a year; I have made an international reputation for myself by thinking once or twice a week. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
246:The man with a toothache thinks everyone happy whose teeth are sound. The poverty- stricken man makes the same mistake about the rich man. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
247:Nature holds no brief for the human experiment: it must stand or fall by its results. If Man will not serve, Nature will try another experiment. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
248:What is the use of writing plays, what is the use of writing anything, if there is not a will which finally moulds chaos itself into a race of gods. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
249:A love affair should always be a honeymoon. And the only way to make sure of that is to keep changing the man; for the same man can never keep it up. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
250:The salvation of the world depends on the men who will not take evil good-humouredly, and whose laughter destroys the fool instead of encouraging him. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
251:You can always tell an old soldier by the inside of his holsters and cartridge boxes. The young ones carry pistols and cartridges; the old ones, grub. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
252:The true artist will let his wife starve, his children go barefoot, his mother drudge for a living at seventy, sooner than work at anything but his art. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
253:Man gives every reason for his conduct save one, every excuse for his crimes save one, every plea for his safety save one; and that one is his cowardice. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
254:Think of the fierce energy concentrated in an acorn! You bury it in the ground, and it explodes into an oak! Bury a sheep, and nothing happens but decay. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
255:If you strike a child, take care that you strike it in anger, even at the risk of maiming it for life. A blow in cold blood neither can nor should be forgiven. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
256:I have a strong feeling that I shall be glad when I am dead and done for - scrapped at last to make room for somebody better, cleverer, more perfect than myself. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
257:Men are not governed by justice, but by law or persuasion. When they refuse to be governed by law or persuasion, they have to be governed by force or fraud, or both. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
258:Art is the magic mirror you make to reflect your invisible dreams in visible pictures. You use a glass mirror to see your face: you use works of art to see your soul. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
259:No diet will remove all the fat from your body because the brain is entirely fat. Without a brain, you might look good, but all you could do is run for public office. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
260:I, who said forty years ago that we should have had Socialism already but for the Socialists, am quite willing to drop the name if dropping it will help me to get the thing. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
261:Everything I eat has been proved by some doctor or other to be a deadly poison, and everything I don't eat has been proved to be indispensable for life. But I go marching on. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
262:The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
263:There is the eternal war between those who are in the world for what they can get out of it and those who are in the world to make it a better place for everybody to live in. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
264:The only man I know who behaves sensibly is my tailor; he takes my measurements anew each time he sees me. The rest go on with their old measurements and expect me to fit them. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
265:We have in England a curious belief in first-rate people meaning all the people we do not know; and this consoles us for the undeniable second-rateness of the people we do know. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
266:When will we realize that the fact that we can become accustomed to anything, however disgusting at first, makes it necessary to examine carefully everything we have become accustomed to. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
267:Human misery is so appalling nowadays that if we allowed ourselves to dwell on it we should only add imaginary miseries of our own to the real miseries of others without doing them any good. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
268:The open mind never acts: when we have done our utmost to arrive at a reasonable conclusion, we still - must close our minds for the moment with a snap, and act dogmatically on our conclusions. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
269:The censorship method ... is that of handing the job over to some frail and erring mortal man and making him omnipotent on the assumption that his official status will make him infallible and omniscient. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
270:Marriage is popular because it combines the maximum of temptation with the maximum of opportunity. George Bernard Shaw ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
271:The English are not very spiritual people so they invented cricket to give them some idea of eternity. George Bernard Shaw ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
272:The seven deadly sins... food, clothing, firing, rent, taxes, respectability and children. Nothing can lift those seven millstones from man's neck but money; and the spirit cannot soar until the millstones are lifted. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
273:As the playwright George Bernard Shaw once put it: The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
274:It is a curious sensation: the sort of pain that goes mercifully beyond our powers of feeling. When your heart is broken, your boats are burned: nothing matters any more. It is the end of happiness and the beginning of peace. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
275:People are always blaming circumstances for what they are. I don't believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and, if they can't find them, make them. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
276:If a group of beings from another planet were to land on Earth — beings who considered themselves as superior to you as you feel yourself to be to other animals — would you concede them the rights over you that you assume over other animals? ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
277:I dread success. To have succeeded is to have finished one’s business on earth, like the male spider, who is killed by the female the moment he has succeeded in his courtship. I like a state of continual becoming, with a goal in front and not behind. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
278:Christianity as a specific doctrine was slain with Jesus, suddenly and utterly. He was hardly cold in his grave, or high in his heaven (as you please), before the apostles dragged the tradition of him down to the level of the thing it has remained ever since. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
279:If you're not producing as much as you consume, or perhaps a little more, then clearly we cannot use the big organization of our society for the purpose of keeping you alive, because your life does not benefit us, and it can't be of very much use to yourself. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
280:George Bernard Shaw of England stopped over just long enough to make one speech in Bombay, India, started a war and 100 Indians killed each other. That's what I call good speech-making. The only enthusiasm any of our speakers can rouse is a demand to kill the speaker. ~ will-rogers, @wisdomtrove
281:A statesman who confines himself to popular legislation - or, for the matter of that, a playwright who confines himself to popular plays - is like a blind man's dog who goes wherever the blind man pulls him, on the ground that both of them want to go to the same place. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
282:If a woman can, by careful selection of a father and nourishment of herself, produce a citizen with efficient senses, sound organs and a good digestion, she should clearly be secured a sufficient reward for that natural service to make her willing to undertake and repeat it. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
283:In socialism, private property is anathema, and equal distribution of income the first consideration. In capitalism, private property is cardinal, and distribution left to ensue from the play of free contract and selfish interest on that basis, no matter what anomalies it may present. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
284:All censorships exist to prevent anyone from challenging current conceptions and existing institutions. All progress is initiated by challenging current conceptions and executed by supplanting existing institutions. Consequently, the first condition of progress is the removal of censorship. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
285:I want to be thoroughly used up when I die, for the harder I work, the more I live. I rejoice in life for its own sake. Life is no “brief candle” to me. It is a sort of splendid torch which I have got hold of for the moment, and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
286:This is the true joy in life being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one; being thoroughly worn out before you are thrown in the scrap heap; being a force of nature instead of a feverish selfish little clod of ailments and grievances, complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you consistent. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
287:People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don’t believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and, they can’t find them, MAKE THEM. —George Bernard Shaw ~ les-brown, @wisdomtrove
288:Those who talk most about the blessings of marriage and the constancy of its vows are the very people who declare that if the chain were broken and the prisoners left free to choose, the whole social fabric would fly asunder. You cannot have the argument both ways. If the prisoner is happy, why lock him in? If he is not, why pretend that he is? ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
289:Of Life only is there no end; and though of its million starry mansions many are empty and many still unbuilt, and though its vast domain is as yet unbearably desert, my seed shall one day fill it and master its matter to its uttermost confines. And for what may be beyond, the eyesight of Lilith is too short. It is enough that there is a beyond. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
290:When a man of normal habits is ill, everyone hastens to assure him that he is going to recover. When a vegetarian is ill (which fortunately very seldom happens), everyone assures him that he is going to die, and that they told him so, and that it serves him right. They implore him to take at least a little gravy, so as to give himself a chance of lasting out the night. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
291:My situation is a solemn one. Life is offered to me on condition of eating beefsteaks. But death is better than cannibalism. My will contains directions for my funeral, which will be followed not by mourning coaches, but by oxen, sheep, flocks of poultry, and a small traveling aquarium of live fish, all wearing white scarfs in honor of the man who perished rather than eat his fellow creatures. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
292:George Bernard Shaw was right. He summed it all up when he said: "The secret of being miserable is to have the leisure to bother about whether you are happy or not." So don't bother to think about it! Spit on your hands and get busy. Your blood will start circulating; your mind will start ticking-and pretty soon this whole positive upsurge of life in your body will drive worry from your mind. Get busy. Keep busy. It's the cheapest kind of medicine there is on this earth-and one of the best. ~ dale-carnegie, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Better never than late. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
2:A great social reformer. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
3:Altogether too many sheep ~ George Bernard Shaw,
4:Stimulate the phagocytes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
5:Brains are not everything. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
6:I work as my father drank. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
7:Whisky is liquid sunshine. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
8:All Artists are Anarchists. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
9:Syllables govern the world. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
10:Never repeat old grievances. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
11:An index is a great leveller. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
12:Write your Sad times in Sand, ~ George Bernard Shaw,
13:Youth is wasted on the young. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
14:General consultant to mankind. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
15:Paradoxes are the only truths. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
16:Property is organized robbery. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
17:Remember that I too am mortal. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
18:Fashions are induced epidemics. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
19:Morality is not respectability. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
20:The 100% American is 99% idiot. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
21:Fear is choosing the safe course ~ George Bernard Shaw,
22:Heartbreak is life educating us. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
23:Morals are a luxury of the rich. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
24:Hell is full of musical amateurs. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
25:Golf is typical capitalist luncay. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
26:I never expect a soldier to think. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
27:Music is the brandy of the damned. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
28:The harder I work the more I live. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
29:The philosopher is Nature's pilot. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
30:This souls'prison we call England. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
31:Virtue is insufficient temptation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
32:Why not give Christianity a trial? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
33:Every girl has a right to be loved. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
34:No Englishman is ever fairly beaten ~ George Bernard Shaw,
35:The stock actor is a stage calamity ~ George Bernard Shaw,
36:All progress means war with society. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
37:Every man over forty is a scoundrel. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
38:I want to be all used up when I die. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
39:Style is effectiveness of assertion. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
40:Those who understand evil pardon it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
41:Happiness and Beauty are by-products. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
42:My way of joking is to tell the truth ~ George Bernard Shaw,
43:Youth is just wasted on young people. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
44:All great truths begin as blasphemies. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
45:History, sir, will tell lies as usual. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
46:I'm an atheist and I thank God for it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
47:In the arts of peace Man is a bungler. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
48:Very few people can afford to be poor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
49:Activity is the only road to knowledge. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
50:Most people do not pray; they only beg. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
51:My reputation grows with every failure. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
52:Nothing makes a man so selfish as work. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
53:Success covers a multitude of blunders. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
54:A happy family is but an earlier heaven. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
55:He who has never hoped can never despair ~ George Bernard Shaw,
56:Imprisonment is as irrevocable as death. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
57:To be a champion you must live like one. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
58:Death is for many of us the gate of hell; ~ George Bernard Shaw,
59:Defeatism is the wretchedest of policies. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
60:God is on the side of the big battalions. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
61:He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
62:Imagination is the beginning of creation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
63:It's a pity youth is wasted on the young. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
64:Lack of money is the root of of all evil. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
65:Liberty is the breath of life to nations. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
66:Life is a first draft... with NO rewrite. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
67:Nobody could stand an eternity of Heaven. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
68:There is nothing in religion but fiction. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
69:There is only one universal passion fear. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
70:The worst sin... is... to be indifferent. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
71:All great Truth first starts as Blasphemy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
72:Any belief worth having must survive doubt ~ George Bernard Shaw,
73:Hell is not all paved with bad intentions. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
74:Indifference is the essence of inhumanity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
75:All great art and literature is propaganda. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
76:I dislike feeling at home when I am abroad. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
77:In heaven an angel is nobody in particular. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
78:Principles without programs are platitudes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
79:Violence is the repartee of the illiterate. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
80:A critic is one who leaves no turn unstoned. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
81:Beware of the man whose God is in the skies. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
82:Common people do not pray, they only beg.
   ~ George Bernard Shaw,
83:Decency is indecency's conspiracy of silence ~ George Bernard Shaw,
84:Fine art is the only teacher except torture. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
85:Get out of my way; for I won't stop for you. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
86:Hate is the revenge of a coward intimidated. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
87:I do not know what I think until I write it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
88:In heaven an angel is no one in particular. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
89:The criminal law is no use to decent people. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
90:We are the living graves of murdered beasts. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
91:Who is this Baby Ruth? And what does she do? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
92:You cannot be a hero without being a coward. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
93:Youth, what a pity to waste it on the young. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
94:A fashion is nothing but an induced epidemic. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
95:All problems are finally scientific problems. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
96:All progress depends on the unreasonable man. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
97:Life's no brief candle-it's a splendid torch! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
98:Money is a most important thing in the world. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
99:Stop being Jews and start being human beings. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
100:Decency cannot be discussed without indecency! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
101:It is most unwise for people in love to marry. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
102:My only policy is to profess evil and do good. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
103:The love of economy is the root of all virtue. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
104:The most sincere form of love is love for food ~ George Bernard Shaw,
105:Tradition will accustom people to any atrocity ~ George Bernard Shaw,
106:What is life but a series of inspired follies. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
107:Women have been a ghastly nuisance in my life. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
108:All progress is due to the unreasonable person. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
109:English is the easiest language to speak badly. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
110:Even the youngest of us may be wrong sometimes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
111:I claim to be a conscientiously immoral writer. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
112:I was a freethinker before I knew how to think. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
113:Life is too short for men to take it seriously. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
114:Life levels all men. Death reveals the eminent. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
115:Life would be tolerable but for its amusements. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
116:Like fingerprints, all marriages are different. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
117:What's the use of money if you have to earn it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
118:What you are to do without me I cannot imagine. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
119:Woman reduces us all to the common denominator. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
120:Assassination is the extreme form of censorship. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
121:Compassion is the fellow-feeling of the unsound. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
122:Don't wait for the right opportunity: create it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
123:Fashions, after all, are only induced epidemics. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
124:Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
125:Greatness is one of the sensations of littleness ~ George Bernard Shaw,
126:I have my own soul. My own spark of divine fire. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
127:I try to follow his example, not to imitate him. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
128:Religion is a good invention in times of stress. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
129:Silence is the most perfect expression of scorn. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
130:There is no love sincerer than the love of food. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
131:There is no sincerer love than the love of food. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
132:The sound body is the product of the sound mind. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
133:Vitality is a woman is a blind fury of creation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
134:We sing in a church, why can we not dance there? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
135:What is the matter with the rich is Uselessness. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
136:After all, the wrong road always leads somewhere. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
137:Always do what you are afraid to do. —GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ Scott Jurek,
138:An asylum for the sane would be empty in America. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
139:Do not try to live forever. You will not succeed. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
140:If you teach a man anything, he will never learn. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
141:It is the first duty of every man not to be poor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
142:No man manages his affairs as well as a tree does ~ George Bernard Shaw,
143:Nothing is ever accomplished by a reasonable man. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
144:The most anxious man in a prison is the governor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
145:The road to ignorance is paved with good editors. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
146:War does not decide who is right but who is left. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
147:When men die of disease they are said to die from ~ George Bernard Shaw,
148:Who are those we love? Only those we do not hate. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
149:A learned man is an idler who kills time by study. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
150:All progress depends upon the unreasonable person. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
151:The golden rule is that there are no golden rules. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
152:The ideal love affair should be conducted by post. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
153:The quality of a play is the quality of its ideas. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
154:All great truths begin as blasphemies. GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ A C Grayling,
155:All professions are conspiracies against the laity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
156:Every profession is a conspiracy against the laity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
157:Female murderers get sheaves of offers of marriage. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
158:Grain by grain, a loaf. Stone upon stone, a palace. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
159:Happy is the man who can make a living by his hobby ~ George Bernard Shaw,
160:I wish people would stop talking about my birthday. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
161:Our necessities are few, but our wants are endless. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
162:A drama critic is a man who leaves no turn unstoned. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
163:Animals are my friends...and I don't eat my friends. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
164:Get married, but never to a man who is home all day. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
165:He who bears the brand of Cain shall rule the earth. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
166:Home is the girl's prison and the woman's workhouse. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
167:I am a Christian. That obliges me to be a Communist. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
168:Telling the truth is the funniest joke in the world. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
169:The devil can quote Shakespeare for his own purpose. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
170:The person I miss most is the one I could have been. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
171:The truth is the one thing that nobody will believe. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
172:A man of my spiritual intensity does not eat corpses. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
173:Anarchism is a game at which the police can beat you. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
174:Animals are my friends... and I don't eat my friends. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
175:A soldier is an anachronism of which we must get rid. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
176:Hatred is the coward's revenge for being intimidated. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
177:Hypocrisy ... is only bad when it is improperly used. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
178:The churches must learn humility as well as teach it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
179:The worst cliques are those which consist of one man. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
180:Use your health, even to the point of wearing it out. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
181:What is virtue but the Trade Unionism of the married? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
182:When we know what God is, we shall be gods ourselves. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
183:A miracle, my friend, is an event which creates faith. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
184:God help England if she had no Scots to think for her. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
185:Have you no morals, man?' 'Can't afford them,Governor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
186:It is the end of happiness and the beginning of peace. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
187:It's easier to replace a dead man than a good picture. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
188:Justice is impartiality. Only strangers are impartial. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
189:Marriage is the most licentious of human institutions. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
190:The art of government is the organisation of idolatry. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
191:The best way to get your point across is to entertain. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
192:The only secrets are the secrets that keep themselves. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
193:We must reform society before we can reform ourselves. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
194:An idiot child screaming in a hospital." (on George Bernard Shaw) ~ H G Wells,
195:I no longer desire happiness: life is nobler than that. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
196:I often quote myself. It adds spice to my conversation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
197:The heart of an Irishman is nothing but his imagination ~ George Bernard Shaw,
198:To be in hell is to drift; to be in heaven is to steer. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
199:Where equality is undisputed, so also is subordination. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
200:A family is a tyranny ruled over by it's weakest member. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
201:A man never tells you anything until you contradict him. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
202:A thing that nobody believes cannot be proved too often. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
203:My specialty is being right when other people are wrong. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
204:Patriotism is a pernicious, psychopathic form of idiocy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
205:Reminiscences make one feel so deliciously aged and sad. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
206:Socialism is the same as Communism, only better English. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
207:To me the sole hope of human salvation lies in teaching. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
208:Vulgarity in a king flatters the majority of the nation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
209:You will think less of the art, when you know the artist ~ George Bernard Shaw,
210:An idea that no one believes can not be proved too often. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
211:A perpetual holiday is a good working definition of hell. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
212:I don't want to talk grammar. I want to talk like a lady. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
213:If you injure your neighbour, better not do it by halves. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
214:I'm only a beer teetotaller, not a champagne teetotaller. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
215:I must have been an insufferable child; all children are. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
216:It is dangerous to be sincere unless you are also stupid. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
217:Patriotism is a word which always commemorates a robbery. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
218:People expect too much of one year and too little of ten. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
219:Poverty doesn't bring unhappiness; it brings degradation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
220:Taxes are the chief business of a conqueror of the world. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
221:The greatest of evils and the worst of crimes is poverty. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
222:The minorities are sometimes right. The majorities never. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
223:Those who can’t change their minds can’t change anything. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
224:We learn from history that we learn nothing from history. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
225:When you find something funny search it for hidden truth. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
226:Where there is no religion, hypocrisy becomes good taste. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
227:Take the utmost care to get well born and well brought up. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
228:Christianity might be a good thing if anyone ever tried it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
229:Democracy is a word all public men use and none understand. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
230:Don't ask me for promises until I know what I am promising. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
231:Effectiveness of assertion is the alpha and omega of style. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
232:How you ought properly to spell 'fish' in English: 'goti' . ~ George Bernard Shaw,
233:If parents would only realize how they bore their children. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
234:I would exchange every painting of Christ for one snapshot. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
235:[Man] progresses in all things by making a fool of himself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
236:Most people go to their grave with their music inside them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
237:Nobody supposes that doctors are less virtuous than judges; ~ George Bernard Shaw,
238:Those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
239:What man really wishes to do he will find a means of doing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
240:Where there is no knowledge ignorance calls itself science. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
241:Every man deserves to be judged in the context of his times. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
242:Experience fails to teach where there is no desire to learn. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
243:I like a bit of mongrel myself, whether it's a man or a dog. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
244:Liberty means responsibility. That is why most men dread it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
245:People get nothing out of books but what they bring to them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
246:The buried truth germinates and breaks through to the light. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
247:The happiness of credulity is a cheap and dangerous quality. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
248:We veneer civilization by doing unkind things in a kind way. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
249:All government is cruel; for nothing is so cruel as impunity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
250:All roads end at the grave, which is the gate to nothingness. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
251:All sorts of bodily diseases are produced by half-used minds. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
252:Dancing is a perpendicular expression of a horizontal desire. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
253:Has fear ever held a man back from anything he really wanted? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
254:I do not want to make my stomach a graveyard of dead animals. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
255:I don't believe in morality . I'm a disciple of Bernard Shaw. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
256:In gambling the many must lose in order that the few may win. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
257:It's not that I'm so clever, it is that others are so stupid. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
258:The faults of the burglar are the qualities of the financier. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
259:The first condition of progress is the removal of censorship. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
260:The real Brahms is nothing more than a sentimental voluptuary ~ George Bernard Shaw,
261:Those who do not know how to live must make a merit of dying. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
262:All dress is fancy dress, is it not, except our natural skins? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
263:Better see rightly on a pound a week than squint on a million. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
264:I can't talk religion to a man with bodily hunger in his eyes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
265:If pity is akin to love, gratitude is akin to the other thing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
266:I never accepted a knighthood because to me, is honour enough? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
267:Islam is the best religion and Muslims are the worst followers ~ George Bernard Shaw,
268:Kings are not born: they are made by artificial hallucination. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
269:No man fully capable of his own language ever masters another. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
270:Nothing is worth doing unless the consequences may be serious. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
271:Poverty does not produce unhappiness: It produces degradation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
272:Revelations: A curious record of the visions of a drug addict. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
273:Truth telling is not compatible with the defence of the realm. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
274:When a thing is funny, search it carefully for a hidden truth. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
275:An Englishman thinks he is moral when he is only uncomfortable. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
276:Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
277:Dancing is a very crude attempt to get into the rhythm of life. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
278:First love is only a little foolishness and a lot of curiosity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
279:If there is anything I hate in a woman, it's want of character. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
280:Only in books has mankind known perfect truth, love and beauty. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
281:Peace is not only better than war, but infinitely more arduous. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
282:Spend all you have before you die, and do not outlive yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
283:The educated man is a greater nuisance than the uneducated one. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
284:There is nothing more dangerous than the conscience of a bigot. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
285:The test of good education is seeing how it behaves in a fight. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
286:You can lose a man like that by your own death, but not by his. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
287:Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
288:Hell is a place where you have nothing to do but amuse yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
289:I aint such a mug as to put up my children to all I know myself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
290:I hate the poor and look forward eagerly to their extermination. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
291:It is in the hour of trial that a man finds his true profession. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
292:My heart, my heart, be whole and free: Love is thine only enemy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
293:My rank is the highest known in Switzerland: I'm a free citizen. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
294:The more things a man is ashamed of, the more respectable he is. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
295:The play was a great success, but audience was a dismal failure. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
296:Woman's happiness begins with her first love and ends about then ~ George Bernard Shaw,
297:Although I cannot lay an egg, I am a very good judge of omelettes ~ George Bernard Shaw,
298:Assassination on the scaffold is the worst form of assassination. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
299:If the English can survive their food, they can survive anything. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
300:It is not enough to know what is good: you must be able to do it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
301:Never wrestle with pigs. You both get dirty and the pig likes it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
302:Political necessities sometime turn out to be political mistakes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
303:Remember always that the least plain sister is the family beauty. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
304:Sherlock Holmes was a drug addict without a single amiable trait. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
305:The secret to success is to offend the greatest number of people. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
306:The world is populated in the main by people who should not exist ~ George Bernard Shaw,
307:Youth is a wonderful thing. What a crime to waste it on children. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
308:A gentleman is one who puts more into the world than he takes out. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
309:Blasphemy and sedition (meaning the truth about Church and State). ~ George Bernard Shaw,
310:What really flatters a man is that you think him worth flattering. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
311:Alcohol is the anesthesia by which we endure the operation of life. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
312:A man who desires to get married should know everything or nothing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
313:A mind of the caliber of mine cannot derive its nutrient from cows. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
314:It is not disbelief that is dangerous to our society; it is belief. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
315:Let not the right side of your brain know what the left side doeth. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
316:Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
317:Man's inhumanity to man is only surpassed by his cruelty to animals ~ George Bernard Shaw,
318:The man who has never made a mistake will never make anything else. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
319:The perfect love affair is one which is conducted entirely by post. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
320:The possibilities are numerous once we decide to act and not react. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
321:The real moment of success is not the moment apparent to the crowd. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
322:What, or who, led you to take up photography, and about what date ? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
323:A man thinking or working is always alone, let him be where he will. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
324:Baseball has the great advantage over cricket of being sooner ended. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
325:Have you ever met a man of good character where women are concerned? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
326:In this world there is always danger for those who are afraid of it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
327:Is the devil to have all the passions as well as all the good tunes? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
328:My religion? Well, my dear, I am a Millionaire. That is my religion. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
329:Reason enslaves all whose minds are not strong enough to master her. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
330:Reformers have the idea that change can be achieved by brute sanity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
331:The only time my education was interrupted was when I was in school. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
332:There are no secrets better kept than the secrets everybody guesses. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
333:There are two things necessary to Salvation.... Money and gunpowder. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
334:There is no satisfaction in hanging a man who does not object to it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
335:What use are cartridges in battle? I always carry chocolate instead. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
336:England and America are two countries separated by the same language. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
337:From Mozart I learnt to say important things in a conversational way. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
338:It is not that I am so clever; it is that everyone else is so stupid. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
339:Man can climb to the highest summits, but he cannot dwell there long. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
340:Man is the only animals of which I am thoroughly and cravenly afraid. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
341:Self-sacrifice enables us to sacrifice other people without blushing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
342:The business man - the man to whom age brings golf instead of wisdom. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
343:The great advantage of a hotel is that it is a refuge from home life. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
344:The poor silly-clever Irishman takes off his hat to God's Englishman. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
345:Virtue consists, not in abstaining from vice, but in not desiring it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
346:We want a few mad people now. See where the sane ones have landed us! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
347:While we have prisons it matters little which of us occupy the cells. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
348:Words are only postage stamps delivering the object for you to unwrap ~ George Bernard Shaw,
349:Every person who has mastered a profession is a skeptic concerning it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
350:Few of us have vitality enough to make any of our instincts imperious. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
351:He never does a proper thing without giving an improper reason for it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
352:It is well to be off with the old woman before you're on with the new. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
353:It's so hard to know what to do when one wishes earnestly to do right. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
354:Make money and the whole nation will conspire to call you a gentleman. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
355:Science can never solve one problem without raising ten more problems. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
356:There is only one religion, though there are a hundred versions of it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
357:The test of a man or woman's breeding is how they behave in a quarrel. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
358:We must all share in the evils of the world or move to another planet. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
359:Without art, the crudeness of reality would make the world unbearable. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
360:An actress is not a lady; at least, when she is, she is not an actress. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
361:I knew if I waited around long enough something like this would happen. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
362:It is the mark of a truly intelligent person to be moved by statistics. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
363:The only power a god can teach is the power of doing without happiness. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
364:The price of ability does not depend on merit but on supply and demand. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
365:The statesman cannot govern without stability of belief, true or false. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
366:The vilest abortionist is he who attempts to mould a child's character. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
367:We learn from experience that men never learn anything from experience. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
368:You don't get tired of muffins, but you don't find inspiration in them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
369:A veteran journalist has never had time to think twice before he writes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
370:Every dream is a prophecy: every jest is an earnest in the womb of Time. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
371:Every step of progress means a duty repudiated, and a scripture torn up. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
372:Everything happens to everybody sooner or later if there is time enough. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
373:Home life is no more natural to us than a cage is natural to a cockatoo. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
374:It's just as unpleasant to get more than you bargain for as to get less. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
375:Life is a constant becoming: all stages lead to the beginning of others. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
376:Make it a rule never to give a child a book you would not read yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
377:Men have to do some awfully mean things to keep up their respectability. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
378:Never fret for an only son, the idea of failure will never occur to him. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
379:Never resist temptation: prove all things: hold fast that which is good. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
380:Your father is a fool skin deep; but you are a fool to your very marrow. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
381:Hell is paved with good intentions, not with bad ones. All men mean well. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
382:I enjoy convalescence. It is the part that makes the illness worth while. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
383:If more than 10% of the people like a painting, you can be sure it's bad. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
384:If you cannot have what you believe in you must believe in what you have. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
385:Make it a rule never to give a child a book you would not read yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
386:The most intolerable pain is produced by prolonging the keenest pleasure. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
387:This planet is obviously being used as an insane asylum by other planets. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
388:Trade unionism is not socialism. It is the capitalism of the proletariat. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
389:Cruelty must be whitewashed by a moral excuse, and pretense of reluctance. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
390:From a very early age, I've had to interrupt my education to go to school. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
391:I believe in the discipline of silence, and could talk for hours about it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
392:If ever I utter an oath again may my soul be blasted to eternal damnation! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
393:I like a state of continual becoming, with a goal in front and not behind. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
394:I'm only a beer teetotaler, not a champagne teetotaler; I don't like beer. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
395:I never climbed any ladder: I have achieved eminence by sheer gravitation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
396:Just do what must be done. This may not be happiness, but it is greatness. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
397:Morality consists of suspecting other people of not being legally married. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
398:Obedience simulates subordination as fear of the police simulates honesty. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
399:Only Lawyers and mental defectives are automatically exempt for jury duty. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
400:Take care to get what you like or you will be forced to like what you get. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
401:The righteous man takes his life in his hand whenever he utters the truth. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
402:Those who are looking for paradise on Earth should come and see Dubrovnik. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
403:Those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” —George Bernard Shaw ~ John Assaraf,
404:When a man says money can do anything, that settles it: he hasn't got any. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
405:When Satan makes impure verses, Allah sends a divine tune to cleanse them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
406:Wise kings wear shabby clothes, and leave the gold lace to the drum major. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
407:A conquered nation is like a man with cancer: he can think of nothing else. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
408:A contract for better for worse is a contract that should not be tolerated. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
409:If I bind the future I bind my will. If I bind my will I strangle creation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
410:I have to live for others and not for myself: that's middle-class morality. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
411:I know I began as a passion and have ended as a habit , like all husbands . ~ George Bernard Shaw,
412:My way of joking is to tell the truth. It's the funniest joke in the world. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
413:No man can be a pure specialist without being in the strict sense an idiot. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
414:Our lives are shaped not as much by our experiences as by our expectations. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
415:The British soldier can stand up to anything except the British War Office. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
416:The Englishmen is at his best on the links and at his worst in the Cabinet. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
417:The universal regard for money is the one hopeful fact in our civilization. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
418:Time enough to think of the future when you haven't any future to think of. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
419:A married man is a man with a past, while a bachelor is a man with a future. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
420:As long as I have a want, I have a reason for living. Satisfaction is death. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
421:At present there is not a single credible established religion in the world. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
422:A tranquil woman can go on sewing longer than an angry man can go on fuming. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
423:Beware of the man whose god is in the skies. ~ George Bernard Shaw, Maxims for Revolutionists, #83,
424:If all the economists were laid end to end, they'd never reach a conclusion. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
425:If you cannot get rid of the family skeleton, you may as well make it dance. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
426:It was from Handel that I learned that style consists in force of assertion. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
427:Modern poverty is not the poverty that was blest in the Sermon on the Mount. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
428:Our ideals, like the gods of old, are constantly demanding human sacrifices. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
429:Self-denial is not a virtue; it is only the effect of prudence on rascality. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
430:The more I see of the moneyed classes, the more I understand the guillotine. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
431:We learn from history that we learn nothing from history. —George Bernard Shaw ~ Michael J Tougias,
432:Build a system that even a fool can use, and only a fool will want to use it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
433:Consistency is the enemy of enterprise, just as symmetry is the enemy of art. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
434:Crime is only the retail department of what, in wholesale, we call penal law. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
435:If more than ten percent of the public likes a painting, it should be burned. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
436:If you do not write for publication, there is little point in writing at all. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
437:Liberty means responsibility. That is why most men dread it. —GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ Timothy Ferriss,
438:Martyrdom is the only path to immortality that requires no talent whatsoever. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
439:No question is so difficult to answer as that to which the answer is obvious. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
440:People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
441:Science becomes dangerous only when it imagines that it has reached its goal. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
442:Somemenare bornkings; and someare bornstatesmen. The two are seldom the same. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
443:The things most people want to know about are usually none of their business. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
444:Those who won't hesitate to vivisect, won't hesitate to lie about it as well. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
445:You see things and you say, 'Why?'. But I dream things and I say, 'Why not?'. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
446:Audacious ribald: your laughter will finish in hideous boredom before morning. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
447:If you teach a man anything he will never learn it. ~ George Bernard Shaw, Back to Methuselah (1922),
448:I have defined the hundred per cent American as ninety-nine per cent an idiot. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
449:It is feeling that sets a man thinking, and not thought that sets him feeling. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
450:I was a cannibal for twenty-five years. For the rest I have been a vegetarian. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
451:Only where there is pecuniary equality can the distinction of merit stand out. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
452:Our political experiment of democracy, the last refuge of cheap misgovernment. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
453:Reading made Don Quixote a gentleman, but believing what he read made him mad. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
454:The greatest thing in life is to die young - but delay it as long as possible. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
455:The joy in life is to be used for a purpose. I want to be used up when I die. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
456:With the exception of capitalism, there is nothing so revolting as revolution. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
457:A lifetime of happiness! No man alive could bear it: it would be hell on earth. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
458:A man's interest in the world is only an overflow from his interest in himself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
459:Doing what needs to be done may not make you happy, but it will make you great. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
460:How can what an Englishman believes be hearsay? It is a contradiction in terms. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
461:I hate performers who debase great works of art; I long for their annihilation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
462:Justice is justice though it's always delayed and finally done only by mistake. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
463:Life is not meant to be easy, my child; but take courage: it can be delightful. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
464:There is nothing on earth intended for innocent people so horrible as a school. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
465:Unless the law of marriage were first made human, it could never become divine. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
466:We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
467:What the world calls originality is only an unaccustomed method of tickling it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
468:When you read a biography remember that the truth is never fit for publication. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
469:You use a glass mirror to see your face; you use works of art to see your soul. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
470:A man without an address is a vagabond; a man with two addresses is a libertine. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
471:Bütün büyük hakikatler, kutsal şeylere küfür edilmesiyle ortaya çıkar. GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ Anonymous,
472:If there was nothing wrong in the world there wouldn't be anything for us to do. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
473:Money enables us to get what we want instead of what other people think we want. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
474:Prawda jest jedyną rzeczą, w którą nikt nie zechce uwierzyć. GEORGE BERNARD SHAW 1856-1950 ~ Anonymous,
475:Put an Irishman on the spit and you can always get another Irishman to turn him. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
476:Sexually,Woman is Nature's contrivance for perpetuating its highest achievement. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
477:The best reformers the world has ever seen are those who commence on themselves. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
478:The goal of an artist is to create the definitive work that cannot be surpassed. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
479:The most tragic thing in the world is a man of genius who is not a man of honor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
480:The only sensible person is my tailor. He measures me anew each time he sees me. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
481:When it comes to the point, really bad men are just as rare as really good ones. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
482:You use a glass mirror to see your face; you use works of art to see your soul. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
483:Criminals do not die by the hands of the law. They die by the hands of other men. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
484:Freedom, my good girl, means being able to count on how other people will behave. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
485:Give women the vote, and in five years there will be a crushing tax on bachelors. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
486:I'm sick of all the reasonable people: they see all the reasons for doing nothing ~ George Bernard Shaw,
487:Statistics show that of those who contract the habit of eating, very few survive. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
488:A doctor's reputation is made by the number of eminent men who die under his care. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
489:A government that robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the support of Paul. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
490:Democracy is a device that insures we shall be governed no better than we deserve. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
491:Forgive him, for he believes that the customs of his tribe are the laws of nature! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
492:If the wicked flourish and the fittest survive, Nature must be the god of rascals. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
493:If you can’t appreciate what you’ve got, you’d better get what you can appreciate. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
494:If you can't get rid of the skeleton in your closet, you'd best teach it to dance. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
495:If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
496:People get tired of everything, and of nothing sooner than of what they most like. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
497:The thought of two thousand people crunching celery at the same time horrified me. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
498:Treat persons who profess to be able to cure disease as you treat fortune tellers. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
499:All evolution in thought and conduct must at first appear as heresy and misconduct. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
500:Americans adore me and will go on adoring me until I say something nice about them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
501:Besides, do any of us understand what we are doing? If we did, would we ever do it? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
502:Emotional excitement reaches men through tea, tobacco, opium, whisky, and religion. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
503:How can you dare teach a man to read until you've taught him everything else first? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
504:I love little children too but I don't cut off their heads and stick them in vases. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
505:It is courage, courage, courage, that raises the blood of life to crimson splendor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
506:It's all that the young can do for the old, to shock them and keep them up to date. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
507:No severity of punishment deters when detection is uncertain, as it always must be. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
508:Oh, well, if you want original conversations, you'd better go and talk to yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
509:One man that has a mind and knows it can always beat ten men who haven't and don't. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
510:The more a man possesses over and above what he uses, the more careworn he becomes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
511:What God hath joined together no man shall put asunder: God will take care of that. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
512:You have learnt something. That always feels at first as if you had lost something. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
513:A woman whose face looked as if it had been made of sugar and someone had licked it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
514:Be as romantic as you please about love ... but you mustn't be romantic about money. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
515:Even if animal experimentation was proved to be of value, it would be morally wrong. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
516:God has given us a world that nothing but our own folly keeps from being a paradise. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
517:I choose not to make a graveyard of my body for the rotting corpses of dead animals. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
518:It seems as though every time you learn something new you have to give up something. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
519:It would positively be a relief to me to dig Shakespeare up and throw stones at him. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
520:Reminiscences make one feel so deliciously aged and sad. ~ George Bernard Shaw, The Irrational Knot, 1905.,
521:The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
522:When a lion meets another with a louder roar, the first lion thinks the last a bore. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
523:You'll never have a quiet world till you knock the patriotism out of the human race. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
524:Discussing vaccination with a doctor is like discussing vegetarianism with a butcher. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
525:Gambling promises the poor what property performs for the rich-something for nothing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
526:If a farmer calls me to a sick animal, he couldn't care less if I were George Bernard Shaw. ~ James Herriot,
527:Love is a gross exaggeration of the difference between one person and everybody else. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
528:Nature holds no brief for the human experiment; it must stand or fall by its results. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
529:The natural term of the affection of the human animal for its offspring is six years. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
530:There is no accomplishment so easy to acquire as politeness and none more profitable. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
531:We are sick of war, we don't want to fight, And yet we gorge ourselves upon the dead. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
532:God made the world as an artist and that is why the world must learn from its artists. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
533:If you cannot attain knowledge without torturing a dog, you must do without knowledge. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
534:I occasionally swank a little because people like it; a modest man is such a nuisance. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
535:My mother married a very good man ... and she is not at all keen on my doing the same. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
536:Nobody can say a word against Greek: it stamps a man at once as an educated gentlemen. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
537:Of all the damnable waste of human life that ever was invented, clerking is the worst. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
538:Old men are dangerous: it doesn't matter to them what is going to happen to the world. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
539:Rebecca [West] can handle a pen as brilliantly as ever I could and much more savagely. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
540:The surest way to ruin a man who doesn't know how to handle money is to give him some. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
541:Though all society is founded on intolerance, all improvement is founded on tolerance. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
542:Though I can make my extravaganzas appear credible, I cannot make the truth appear so. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
543:When domestic servants are treated as human beings it is not worth while to keep them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
544:Civilized society is one huge bourgeoisie: no nobleman dares now shock his greengrocer. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
545:I assume that to prevent illness in later life, you should never have been born at all. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
546:I don't like the idea of killing my fellow creatures in order to eat their dead bodies. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
547:If only for a half hour a day, a child should do something serviceable to the community ~ George Bernard Shaw,
548:If we women were particular about men's characters, we should never get married at all. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
549:If you take too long in deciding what to do with your life, you'll find you've done it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
550:No elaboration of physical or moral accomplishment can atone for the sin of parasitism. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
551:Of all the anti-social vested interests the worst is the vested interest in ill-health. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
552:Only fools repeat the same things over and over, expecting to obtain different results. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
553:You see things; you say, 'Why?' But I dream things that never were; and I say 'Why not? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
554:A pessimist is a man who thinks everybody is as nasty as himself, and hates them for it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
555:A revolutionist is one who desires to discard the existing social order and try another. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
556:Once the divinity we worshipped made itself visible and comprehensible, we crucified it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
557:Remember that the progress of the world depends on your knowing better than your elders. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
558:A man ought to be able to be fond of his wife without making a fool of himself about her. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
559:Be like the sun and meadow, which are not in the least concerned about the coming winter. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
560:Great art is never produced for its own sake. It is too difficult to be worth the effort. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
561:In order to fully realize how bad a popular play can be, it is necessary to see it twice. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
562:Ladies and gentlemen are permitted to have friends in the kennel, but not in the kitchen. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
563:Must then a Christ perish in torment in every age to save those that have no imagination. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
564:People must not be forced to adopt me as their favourite author, even for their own good. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
565:The conversion of a savage to Christianity is the conversion of Christianity to savagery. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
566:There is no satisfaction in hanging a man who does not object to it. —George Bernard Shaw ~ Matthew FitzSimmons,
567:There is no subject on which more dangerous nonsense is talked and thought than marriage. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
568:Very nice sort of place, Oxford, I should think, for people that like that sort of place. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
569:A succession of eye-openers each involving the repudiation of some previously held belief. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
570:Democracy substitutes election by the incompetent many for appointment by the corrupt few. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
571:Happiness and beauty are by-products. Folly is the direct pursuit of happiness and beauty. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
572:I was always unlawful; I broke the law when I was born because my parents weren't married. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
573:I would like to take you seriously, but to do so would be an affront to your intelligence. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
574:Men are wise in proportion, not to their experience, but to their capacity for experience. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
575:Nothing is more dangerous than a poor doctor: not even a poor employer or a poor landlord. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
576:Nothing remains beautiful and interesting except thought, because the thought is the life. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
577:Power is the faculty or capacity to act, the strength and potency to accomplish something. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
578:The more I see of the moneyed class, the more I understand the guillotine.” -George Bernard Shaw ~ Angela Roquet,
579:The notion that disarmament can put a stop to war is contradicted by the nearest dogfight. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
580:All religions begin with a revolt against morality, and perish when morality conquers them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
581:A man who loses his money gains, at the least, experience, and sometimes, something better. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
582:Bourgeois morality is largely a system of making cheap virtues a cloak for expensive vices. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
583:He knows nothing and thinks he knows everything. That points clearly to a political career. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
584:I am a brigand: I live by robbing the rich.' 'I am a gentleman: I live by robbing the poor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
585:I can't talk religion to a man with bodily hunger in his eyes. ~ George Bernard Shaw, Major Barbara Act II (1905),
586:Imitation is not just the sincerest form of flattery - it's the sincerest form of learning. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
587:Our first duty, to which every other consideration should be sacrificed, is not to be poor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
588:The chief objection to playing wind instruments is that it prolongs the life of the player. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
589:There is not one single established religion that an intelligent, educated man can believe. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
590:Titles distinguish the mediocre, embarrass the superior, and are disgraced by the inferior. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
591:You cannot learn to skate without making yourself ridiculous - the ice of life is slippery. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
592:You know, Tolstoy, like myself, wasn't taken in by superstitions like science and medicine. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
593:Fashions are the only induced epidemics, proving that epidemics can be induced by tradesmen. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
594:Science is always simple and always profound. It is only the half-truths that are dangerous. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
595:The real pleasure of one's life is the devotion to a great objective of one's consideration. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
596:What Englishman will give his mind to politics as long as he can afford to keep a motor car? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
597:When asked which dog wins, he reflected for a moment and replied, "The one I feed the most." ~ George Bernard Shaw,
598:When the military man approaches, the world locks up its spoons and packs off its womankind. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
599:Why should we take advice on sex from the pope? If he knows anything about it, he shouldn't! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
600:You see things; and you say, ‘Why?’ But I dream things that never were; and I say, ‘Why not? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
601:Absolute honesty is as absurd an abstraction as an absolute temperature or an absolute value. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
602:All young women begin by believing they can change and reform the men they marry. They can't. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
603:Being a mother means that your heart is no longer yours; it wanders wherever your children do ~ George Bernard Shaw,
604:If women were as fastidious as men, morally or physically, there would be an end of the race. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
605:It is not pleasure that makes life worth living. It is life that makes pleasure worth having. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
606:Journalists are too poorly paid in this country to know anything that is fit for publication. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
607:People become attached to their burdens sometimes more than the burdens are attached to them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
608:Some people look at the world and say 'why?' Some people look at the world and say 'why not?' ~ George Bernard Shaw,
609:There are two tragedies in life. One is to lose your heart's desire. The other is to gain it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
610:The trouble with her is that she lacks the power of conversation but not the power of speech. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
611:Those who minister to poverty and disease are accomplices in the two worst of all the crimes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
612:We are told that when Jehovah created the world he saw that it was good what would he say now ~ George Bernard Shaw,
613:Being hurt by someone you truly care about leaves a hole in you heart that only love can fill. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
614:Civilization is a disease produced by the practice of building societies with rotten material. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
615:Do not do unto others as you expect they should do unto you. Their tastes may not be the same. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
616:Gentle Jesus, meek and mild' is a snivelling modern invention, with no warrant in the gospels. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
617:German and Spanish are accessible to foreigners: English is not accessible even to Englishmen. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
618:I am oppressed with a dread of living forever. That is the only disadvantage of vegetarianism. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
619:I become more convinced that beings from other planets are using the Earth as a lunatic asylum ~ George Bernard Shaw,
620:If a woman rebels against high-heeled shoes, she should take care to do it in a very smart hat ~ George Bernard Shaw,
621:I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
622:Imprisonment, as it exists today, is a worse crime than any of those committed by its victims. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
623:I really don't think I could consent to go to Heaven if I thought there were no animals there. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
624:Like all young men, you greatly exaggerate the difference between one young woman and another. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
625:Liquor is the chloroform which enables the poor man to endure the painful operation of living. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
626:The difference between a lady and a flower girl is not how she behaves, but how she’s treated. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
627:The English have no respect for their language, and will not teach their children to speak it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
628:The savage bows down to idols of wood and stone, the civilized man to idols of flesh and blood ~ George Bernard Shaw,
629:We don’t stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.” —George Bernard Shaw, ~ Mark Sisson,
630:When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
631:A broken heart is a very pleasant complaint for a man in London if he has a comfortable income. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
632:A cigarette is a pinch of tobacco rolled in paper with fire at one end and a fool at the other. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
633:Better keep yourself clean and bright; you are the window through which you must see the world. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
634:Cruelty would be delicious if one could only find some sort of cruelty that didn't really hurt. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
635:He knows nothing; and he thinks he knows everything. That points clearly to a political career. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
636:His only weakness was the habit of prophesying war within the next fortnight. George Bernard Shaw ~ Barbara W Tuchman,
637:If you go to Heaven without being naturally qualified for it you will not enjoy yourself there. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
638:In an ugly and unhappy world the richest man can purchase nothing but ugliness and unhappiness. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
639:Life contains but two tragedies. One is not to get your heart's desire; the other is to get it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
640:Medical science is as yet very imperfectly differentiated from common cure-mongering witchcraft ~ George Bernard Shaw,
641:Shall I turn up the light for you? No, give me deeper darkness. Money is not made in the light. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
642:The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place. —GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ Anonymous,
643:We are made wise not by the recollection of our past, but by the responsibility for our future. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
644:We are the masters at the moment, and not only at the moment, but for a very long time to come. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
645:We must not stay as we are, doing always what was done last time; or we shall stick in the mud. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
646:Whether you think Jesus was God or not, you must admit he was a first-rate political economist. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
647:Art You use a glass mirror to see your face; you use works of art to see your soul. GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ A C Grayling,
648:As well consult a butcher on the value of vegetarianism as a doctor on the worth of vaccination. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
649:Better keep yourself clean and bright; you are the window through which you must see the world. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
650:Conceive. That is the word that means both the beginning in imagination and the end in creation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
651:Custom will reconcile people to any atrocity, and fashion will drive them to acquire any custom. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
652:Do not do unto others as you would they should do unto you. Their tastes may not be the same.
   ~ George Bernard Shaw,
653:I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a friend... if you have one. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
654:I can't control what life did to me, but I can control how I react. Therein lies the difference. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
655:I never resist temptation, because I have found that things that are bad for me do not tempt me. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
656:No doubt it is easy to demostrate that property will destroy society unless society destroys it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
657:Nothing is ever done in this world until men are prepared to kill one another if it is not done. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
658:Power does not corrupt men; fools, however, if they get into a position of power, corrupt power. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
659:Set me anything to do as a task, and it is inconceivable the desire I have to do something else. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
660:The ability to make witty observations is commonly refered to as "cynism" by people who lack it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
661:There is a terrible truthfulness about photography that sometimes makes a thing look ridiculous. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
662:The whole world is strewn with snares, traps, gins and pitfalls for the capture of men by women. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
663:Whenever you wish to do anything against the law, Cicely, always consult a good solicitor first. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
664:Women are called womanly only when they regard themselves as existing solely for the use of men. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
665:A photographer is like a cod, which produces a million eggs in order that one may reach maturity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
666:It is one of the mysterious ways of Allah to make women troublesome when he makes them beautiful. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
667:Literature is like any other trade; you will never sell anything unless you go to the right shop. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
668:Nobel Prize money is a life-belt thrown to a swimmer who has already reached the shore in safety. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
669:Oh, the frontier of hell and heaven is only the difference between two ways of looking at things. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
670:Success does not consist in never making mistakes but in never making the same one a second time. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
671:The heretic is always better dead. And mortal eyes cannot distinguish the saint from the heretic. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
672:The novelties of one generation are only the resuscitated fashions of the generation before last. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
673:You must not suppose, because I am a man of letters, that I never tried to earn an honest living. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
674:Choose silence of all virtues, for by it you hear other men's imperfections, and conceal your own. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
675:I learned more from the first stupid woman who fell in love with me than ever my brains taught me. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
676:La vida no se trata de encontrarte a ti mismo, la vida se trata de crearte a ti mismo. GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ Walter Riso,
677:Marriage is popular because it combines the maximum of temptation with the maximum of opportunity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
678:Never waste jealousy on a real man: it is the imaginary man that supplants us all in the long run. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
679:Only on paper has humanity yet achieved glory, beauty, truth, knowledge, virtue, and abiding love. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
680:People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don't believe in circumstances. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
681:The nation's morals are like its teeth: the more decayed they are the more it hurts to touch them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
682:The utmost I can bear for myself in my best days is that I was one of the hundred best playwrights ~ George Bernard Shaw,
683:This is the true joy in life, the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
684:We are all victims of the violence that animals suffer... their liberation is also our liberation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
685:Well, upon my soul! You are not ashamed to stand there and confess yourself a disgusting drunkard. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
686:When a thing is funny, search it carefully for a hidden truth.” ​— ​George Bernard Shaw, Back to Methuselah ~ Penny Reid,
687:Atrocities are not less atrocities when they occur in laboratories and are called medical research. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
688:Hegel was right when he said that we learn from history that men never learn anything from history. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
689:If the announcer can produce the impression that he is a gentleman, he may pronounce as he pleases. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
690:Opera is when a tenor and soprano want to make love, but are prevented from doing so by a baritone. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
691:Rich men without convictions are more dangerous in modern society than poor women without chastity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
692:The domestic career is no more natural to all women than the military career is natural to all men. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
693:We don’t stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.”—George Bernard Shaw ~ Karen Amster Young,
694:When we want to read of the deeds that are done for love, whither do we turn? To the murder column. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
695:All autobiographies are lies. I do not mean unconscious, unintentional lies: I mean deliberate lies. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
696:But to admire a strong person and to live under that strong person’s thumb are two different things. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
697:The lesson intended by an author is hardly ever the lesson the world chooses to learn from his book. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
698:Vegetarians claim to be immune from most diseases but they have been known to die from time to time. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
699:What we want is to see the child in pursuit of knowledge, and not knowledge in pursuit of the child. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
700:George Bernard Shaw observó: “El mayor problema con la comunicación es la ilusión de que se llevó a cabo”. ~ John C Maxwell,
701:George Bernard Shaw: “We don’t stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing. ~ Scott Barry Kaufman,
702:In a stupid nation the man of genius becomes a god : everybody worships him and nobody does his will. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
703:I never thought much of the courage of a lion tamer. Inside the cage he is at least safe from people. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
704:I sold flowers. I didn't sell myself. Now you've made a lady of me I'm not fit to sell anything else. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
705:I've posed nude for a photographer in the manner of Rodin's Thinker, but I merely looked constipated. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
706:Make me a beautiful word for doing things tomorrow; for that surely is a great and blessed invention. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
707:People who are hard, grasping and always ready to take advantage of their neighbors become very rich. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
708:Start with the belief that your life can indeed be changed, and that you have the power to change it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
709:There was only one virtue, pugnacity; only one vice, pacifism. That is an essential condition of war. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
710:This is the true joy in life, the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one.
   ~ George Bernard Shaw,
711:We all go about longing for love: it is the first need of our natures, the loudest cry of our hearts. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
712:We know there is intention and purpose in the universe, because there is intention and purpose in us. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
713:I am a sort of collector of religions: and the curious thing is that I find I can believe in them all. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
714:Love is an appetite which, like all other appetites, is destroyed for the moment by its gratification. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
715:Love is a simple thing and a deep thing: it is an act of life and not an illusion. Art is an illusion. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
716:Marry Ann; and at the end of a week you'll find no more inspiration in her than in a plate of muffins. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
717:Patriotism is your conviction that this country is superior to all others because you were born in it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
718:Progress is impossible without change; and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
719:Revolutions have never lightened the burden of tyranny; they have only shifted it to another shoulder. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
720:Think what cowards men would be if they had to bear children. Women are altogether a superior species. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
721:All censorships exist to prevent anyone from challenging current conceptions and existing institutions. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
722:A man has no business to marry a woman who can't make him miserable. It means she can't make him happy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
723:As an old soldier, I admit the cowardice: it's as universal as seasickness, and matters just as little. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
724:Newspaper : A device unable to distinguish between a bicycle accident and the collapse of civilisation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
725:The fickleness of the women I love is only equalled by the infernal constancy of the women who love me. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
726:There are only two classes in good society in England: the equestrian classes and the neurotic classes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
727:There is in man a specific lust for cruelty which infects even his passion of pity and makes it savage. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
728:A man of great common sense and good taste - meaning thereby a man without originality or moral courage. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
729:A socialist is somebody who doesn't have anything, and is ready to divide it up equally among everybody. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
730:Englishmen hate Liberty and Equality too much to understand them. But every Englishman loves a pedigree. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
731:Find enough clever things to say, and you're a Prime Minister; write them down and you're a Shakespeare. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
732:If all the statisticians in the world were laid head to toe, they wouldn't be able to reach a conclusion ~ George Bernard Shaw,
733:I like to quote myself frequently and often, it makes me sound much more intelligent than I actually am. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
734:It is long and hard and painful to create life: it is short and easy to steal the life others have made. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
735:Marriage is good enough for the lower classes: they have facilities for desertion that are denied to us. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
736:Property, said Proudhon, is theft. This is the only perfect truism that has been uttered on the subject. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
737:The most revolutionary invention of the Nineteenth Century was the artificial sterilization of marriage. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
738:The road to ignorance is paved with good editions. Only the illiterate can afford to buy good books now. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
739:The way to deal with worldly people is to frighten them by repeating their scandalous whisperings aloud. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
740:A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
741:A man's own self is the last person to believe in him, and is harder to cheat than the rest of the world. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
742:A man who has no office to go, to I don't care who he is, is a trial of which you can have no conception. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
743:Changeable women are more endurable that monotonous ones; they are sometimes murdered but never deserted. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
744:Give a man health and a course to steer, and he'll never stop to trouble about whether he's happy or not. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
745:If you say that God is good, great, blessed, wise or any such thing, the starting point is this : God is. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
746:I must ... warn my readers that my attacks are directed against themselves, not against my stage figures. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
747:Our prejudices are so deeply rooted that we never think of them as prejudices but call them common sense. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
748:Sister, you're trying to keep me alive as an old curiosity, but I'm done, I'm finished, I'm going to die. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
749:The English are not a very spiritual people, so they invented cricket to give them some idea of eternity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
750:The longer I live, the more convinced am I that this planet is used by other planets as a lunatic asylum. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
751:An American has no sense of privacy. He does not know what it means.There is no such thing in the country. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
752:Beauty is all very well at first sight; but who ever looks at it when it has been in the house three days? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
753:Keep away from books and from men who get their ideas from books, and your own books will always be fresh. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
754:No man ever believes that the Bible means what it says: he is always convinced that it says what he means. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
755:The liar's punishment is not in the least that he is not believed, but that he cannot believe anyone else. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
756:There are no perfectly honorable men; but every true man has one main point of honor and a few minor ones. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
757:The whole strength of England lies in the fact that the enormous majority of the English people are snobs. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
758:Those who admire modern civilization usually identify it with the steam engine and the electric telegraph. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
759:We must always think about things, and we must think about things as they are, not as they are said to be. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
760:Whenever I see the word Operation, especially Trifling Operation, I at once write off the patient as dead. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
761:You see things and you say, ‘Why?’ But I dream things that never were And say, ‘Why not?’” —George Bernard Shaw ~ Kristin Hannah,
762:An English army led by an Irish general: that might be a match for a French army led by an Italian general. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
763:Englishmen never will be slaves; they are free to do whatever the government and public opinion allow them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
764:Everyone can see that the people who hunt are the right people and the people who don't are the wrong ones. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
765:Man is the only animal which esteems itself rich in proportion to the number and voracity of its parasites. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
766:The liar's punishment is, not in the least that he is not believed, but that he cannot believe anyone else. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
767:The only way to avoid being miserable is not to have enough leisure to wonder whether you are happy or not. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
768:The person who is ignorant enough to believe that his nourishment depends on meat is in a horrible dilemma. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
769:The word morality, if we met it in the Bible, would surprise us as much as the word telephone or motor car. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
770:When I was young, I observed that nine out of ten things I did were failures. So I did ten times more work. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
771:Beware of the man who does not return your blow: he neither forgives you nor allows you to forgive yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
772:Independence? That's middle class blasphemy. We are all dependent on one another, every soul of us on earth. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
773:My father must have had some elementary education for he could read and write and keep accounts inaccurately ~ George Bernard Shaw,
774:No man who is occupied in doing a very difficult thing, and doing it very well, ever loses his self-respect. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
775:There is only one person an English girl hates more than she hates her elder sister; and that is her mother. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
776:We have no more right to consume happiness without producing it than to consume wealth without producing it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
777:What is wrong with the prosaic Englishman is what is wrong with the prosaic men of all countries: stupidity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
778:When a man wants to murder a tiger he calls it sport; when a tiger wants to murder him he calls it ferocity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
779:Which painting in the National Gallery would I save if there was a fire? The one nearest the door of course. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
780:A book is like a child: it is easier to bring it into the world than to control it when it is launched there. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
781:A vegetarian is not a person who lives on vegetables, any more than a Catholic is a person who lives on cats. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
782:It is a woman's business to get married as soon as possible, and a man's to keep unmarried as long as he can. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
783:The theory that music has a depraving effect on morals has now been abandoned to the old women of both sexes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
784:The truth is, hardly any of us have ethical energy enough for more than one really inflexible point of honor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
785:Everybody who does not live in a prostitute's bed and on a diet of cocaine snow is called an ascetic nowadays. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
786:It is impossible for an Englishman to open his mouth without making some other Englishman hate or despise him. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
787:It is the highest creatures who take the longest to mature, and are the most helpless during their immaturity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
788:O Lord! I don't know which is the worst of the country, the walking or the sitting at home with nothing to do. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
789:The great secret...is not having bad manners or good manners...but having the same manner for all human souls. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
790:Clever and attractive women do not want to vote; they are willing to let men govern as long as they govern men. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
791:George Bernard Shaw: “There are two tragedies in life. One is to lose your heart’s desire. The other is to gain it. ~ Henry Kissinger,
792:It is difficult, if not impossible, for most people to think otherwise than in the fashion of their own period. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
793:It is easier to put people in chains than to remove them if the chains bring prestige, said George Bernard Shaw. ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
794:Martyrdom, sir, is what these people like: it is the only way in which a man can become famous without ability. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
795:The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw. ~ Maloy Krishna Dhar,
796:The test to which all methods of treatment are finally brought is whether they are lucrative to doctors or not. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
797:We educate one another; and we cannot do this if half of us consider the other half not good enough to talk to. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
798:I can think of no other edifice constructed by man as altruistic as a lighthouse. They were built only to serve. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
799:I don't know if there are men on the moon, but if there are they must be using the earth as their lunatic asylum ~ George Bernard Shaw,
800:If you cannot get rid of the family skeleton, you may as well make it dance,”’ quotes Veronika. ‘George Bernard Shaw. ~ Liane Moriarty,
801:Well, sir, you never can tell. That's a principle in life with me, sir, if you'll excuse my having such a thing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
802:If any religion had a chance of ruling over England, nay Europe within the next hundred years, it could be Islam. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
803:It is assumed that the woman must wait, motionless, until she is wooed. That is how the spider waits for the fly. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
804:The man who writes about himself and his own time is the only man who writes about all people and about all time. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
805:What a man believes may be ascertained, not from his creed, but from the assumptions on which he habitually acts. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
806:All my life affection has been showered upon me, and every forward step I have made has been taken in spite of it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
807:An election is a moral horror, as bad as a battle except for the blood; a mud bath for every soul concerned in it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
808:Except during the nine months before he draws his first breath, no man manages his affairs as well as a tree does. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
809:Let wife and child perish, and lay bricks for your last crust, rather than part with an iota of your [copy]rights. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
810:My method is to take the utmost trouble to find the right thing to say, and then to say it with the utmost levity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
811:Of the two lots, the woman's lot of perpetual motherhood, and the man's of perpetual babyhood, I prefer the man's. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
812:There is nothing that can be changed more completely than human nature when the job is taken in hand early enough. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
813:The unconscious self is the real genius. Your breathing goes wrong the moment your conscious self meddles with it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
814:Vivisection is a social evil because if it advances human knowledge, it does so at the expense of human character. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
815:You can rave about Stravinsky without the slightest risk of being classified as a lunatic by the next generation . ~ George Bernard Shaw,
816:A married man forms married habits and becomes dependent on marriage just as a sailor becomes dependent on the sea. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
817:I can't turn your soul on. Leave me those feelings; and you can take away the voice and the face. They are not you. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
818:I prefer the man who calls his nonsense a mystery to him who who pretends it is a weighed, measured, analyzed fact. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
819:Most married couples spend the whole day apart, the woman in the house, the man in the office or study or workshop. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
820:The British churchgoer prefers a severe preacher because he thinks a few home truths will do his neighbors no harm. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
821:Thus, I blush to add, you can not be a philosopher and a good man, though you may be a philosopher and a great one. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
822:When our relatives are at home, we have to think of all their good points or it would be impossible to endure them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
823:A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing.—George Bernard Shaw. ~ Anonymous,
824:If history repeats itself, and the unexpected always happens, how incapable must Man be of learning from experience. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
825:I showed my appreciation of my native land in the usual Irish way: by getting out of it as soon as I possibly could. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
826:Life is a disease; and the only difference between on man and another is the stage of the disease at which he lives. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
827:Progress is impossible without change; and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” George Bernard Shaw ~ Nancy Duarte,
828:The capacity of any conqueror is more likely than not to be an illusion produced by the incapacity of his adversary. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
829:We are members one of another; so that you cannot injure or help your neighbor without injuring or helping yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
830:When God created man and woman, he did not take a patent. That's why any imbecile has been able to do so ever since. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
831:Your heart and your mouth wil be in two separate parts of your body if you again forget in whose presence you stand. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
832:Both optimists and pessimists contribute to society. The optimist invents the aeroplane, the pessimist the parachute. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
833:Communism, being the lay form of Catholicism, and indeed meaning the same thing, has never had any lack of chaplains. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
834:I am afraid we must make the world honest before we can honestly say to our children that honesty is the best policy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
835:Nobody can read Freud without realizing that he was the scientific equivalent of another nuisance, George Bernard Shaw. ~ Robert M Hutchins,
836:Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything. — George Bernard Shaw ~ Wayne W Dyer,
837:There is at bottom only one genuinely scientific treatment for all diseases, and that is to stimulate the phagocytes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
838:Until the men of action clear out the talkers we who have social consciences are at the mercy of those who have none. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
839:What is the use of straining after an amiable view of things, when a cynical view is most likely to be the true one?. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
840:Don't waste time collecting other people's autographs; rather devote it to making your own autograph worth collecting. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
841:I'm not a teacher: only a fellow traveler of whom you asked the way. I pointed ahead - ahead of myself as well as you. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
842:I want to be thoroughly used up when I die, for the harder I work the more I live. I rejoice in life for its own sake. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
843:My schooling did me a great deal of harm and no good whatever; it was simply dragging a child's soul through the dirt. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
844:The great dramatist has something better to do than to amuse either himself or his audience. He has to interpret life. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
845:The problem with the press is that they can't tell the difference between a bicycle crash and the end of civilization. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
846:The trouble with the media is that it seems unable to distinguish between the end of the world and a bicycle accident. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
847:Treat a friend as a person who may someday become your enemy; an enemy as a person who may someday become your friend. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
848:We don't bother much about dress and manners in England, because as a nation we don't dress well and we've no manners. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
849:You have a choice of trusting the natural stability of gold, or the honesty and intelligence of members of government. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
850:Censorship ends in logical completeness when nobody is allowed to read any books except the books that nobody can read. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
851:If all you are going to do in life are the things that are convenient and comfortable, the great things never get done. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
852:If the governments devalue the currency in order to betray all creditors, you politely call this procedure 'inflation'. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
853:If you must hold yourself up to your children as an object lesson, hold yourself up as a warning and not as an example. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
854:Money is the counter that enables life to be lived socially; it is life as truly as sovereigns and banknotes are money. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
855:Nothing soothes me more after a long and maddening course of pianoforte recitals than to sit and have my teeth drilled. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
856:The degree of tolerance attainable at any moment depends on the strain under which society is maintaining its cohesion. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
857:The function of the actor is to make the audience imagine for the moment that real things are happening to real people. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
858:Vulgarity is a necessary part of a complete author's equipment; and the clown is sometimes the best part of the circus. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
859:We are made wise not by the recollection of our past, but by the responsibility for our future.” – George Bernard Shaw ~ Jacqueline Novogratz,
860:We should all be obliged to appear before a board every five years and justify our existence... on pain of liquidation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
861:You practically do not use semicolons at all. This is a symptom of mental defectiveness, probably induced by camp life. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
862:Parentage is a very important profession, but no test of fitness for it is ever imposed in the interest of the children. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
863:Suppose the world were only one of God's jokes, would you work any the less to make it a good joke instead of a bad one? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
864:To make Democracy work, you need an aristocratic democracy. To make Aristocracy work, you need a democratic aristocracy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
865:George Bernard Shaw once observed: “People become attached to their burdens sometimes more than the burdens are attached to them. ~ William Ury,
866:I like flowers, I also like children, but I do not chop their heads off and keep them in bowls of water around the house. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
867:In the right key one can say anything. In the wrong key, nothing: the only delicate part is the establishment of the key. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
868:It is nearly 50 years since I was assured by a conclave of doctors that if I did not eat meat I should die of starvation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
869:Miracles, in the sense of phenomena we cannot explain, surround us on every hand: life itself is the miracle of miracles. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
870:Seemingly unreasonable people attempt to adapt the world to themselves. Much progress, therefore, depends on such people. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
871:Some men see things as they are, and say, ‘Why?’ I dream of things that never were, and say, ‘Why not?’” —GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ Anthony Robbins,
872:The great danger of conversion in all ages has been that when the religion of the high mind is offered to the lower mind, ~ George Bernard Shaw,
873:You don't learn to hold your own in the world by standing on guard, but by attacking, and getting well hammered yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
874:Youth, which is forgiven everything, forgives itself nothing: age, which forgives itself everything, is forgiven nothing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
875:Any sort of plain speaking is better than the nauseous sham good fellowship our democratic public men get up for shop use. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
876:Assasination on the scaffold is the worst form of assasination, because there it is invested with the approval of society. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
877:If you begin by sacrificing yourself to those you love, you will end by hating those to whom you have sacrificed yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
878:If you leave the smallest corner of your head vacant for a moment, other people's opinions will rush in from all quarters. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
879:Perhaps the greatest social service that can be rendered by anybody to the country and to mankind is to bring up a family. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
880:To the person with a toothache, even if the world is tottering, there is nothing more important than a visit to a dentist. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
881:What a man is depends on his character; but what he does, and what we think of what he does, depends on his circumstances. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
882:While we ourselves are the living graves of murdered animals, how can we expect any ideal living conditions on this earth? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
883:You are going to let the fear of poverty govern you life and your reward will be that you will eat, but you will not live. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
884:A fool's brain digests philosophy into folly, science into superstition, and art into pedantry. Hence University education. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
885:George Bernard Shaw writes like a Pakistani who has learned English when he was twelve years old in order to become an accountant. ~ John Osborne,
886:If at age 20 you are not a Communist then you have no heart. If at age 30 you are not a Capitalist then you have no brains. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
887:I have found, after a good deal of consideration, that the best place to seek God is in a garden. You can dig for Him here. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
888:No sooner had Jesus knocked over the dragon of superstition than Paul boldly set it on its legs again in the name of Jesus. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
889:Not everybody is strong enough to endure life without an anesthetic. Drink probably averts more gross crime than it causes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
890:The best bought-up children are those who have seen thier parents as they are. Hypocrisy is not the first duty of a parent. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
891:You cannot have power for good without having power for evil too. Even mother's milk nourishes murderers as well as heroes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
892:I can forgive Alfred Nobel for having invented dynamite, but only a fiend in human form could have invented the Nobel Prize. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
893:If 'Pygmalion' is not good enough for your friends with its own verbal music, their talent must be altogether extraordinary. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
894:In literature the ambition of the novice is to acquire the literary language; the struggle of the adept is to get rid of it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
895:Jesus remains unshaken as the practical man; and we stand exposed as the fools, the blunderers, the unpractical visionaries. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
896:Let a short Act of Parliament be passed, placing all street musicians outside the protection of the law, so that any citizen ~ George Bernard Shaw,
897:Nothing is more dreadful than a husband who keeps telling you everything he thinks, and always wants to know what you think. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
898:Nowadays a parlor maid as ignorant as Queen Victoria was when she came to the throne would be classed as mentally defective. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
899:We are not taught to think decently on sex subjects, and consequently we have no language for them except indecent language. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
900:When the master has come to do everything through the slave, the slave becomes his master, since he cannot live without him. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
901:You sometimes have to answer a woman according to her womanliness, just as you have to answer a fool according to his folly. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
902:A little learning is a dangerous thing, but we must take that risk because a little is as much as our biggest heads can hold. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
903:Patriotism is, fundamentally, a conviction that a particular country is the best in the world because you were born in it.... ~ George Bernard Shaw,
904:The only way for a woman to provide for herself decently is for her to be good to some man that can afford to be good to her. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
905:The philosopher is Nature's pilot. And there you have our difference: to be in hell is to drift: to be in heaven is to steer. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
906:Two people getting together to write a book is like three people getting together to have a baby. One of them is superfluous. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
907:As long as more people will pay admission to a theater to see a naked body than to see a naked brain, the drama will languish. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
908:As playwright George Bernard Shaw observed, “The greatest problem with communication is the illusion that it has been accomplished. ~ John C Maxwell,
909:The confusing of marriage with morality has done more to destroy the conscience of the human race than any other single error. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
910:There is only one religion, though there are a hundred versions of it. ~ George Bernard Shaw, Plays Pleasant and Unpleasant, Vol. II, preface (1898),
911:This is my father. Try what you can with him! He won't listen to me, because he remembers what a fool I was when I was a baby. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
912:Assassination is the extreme form of censorship; and it seems hard to justify an incitement to it on anti-censorial principles. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
913:George Bernard Shaw once famously said that if you can’t get rid of the skeleton in your closet, you might as well teach it to dance. ~ Robert B Baer,
914:HIGGINS. Have you no morals, man? DOOLITTLE [unabashed] Cant afford them, Governor. Neither could you if you was as poor as me. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
915:If in the library of your house you do not have the works of the ancient Greek writers, then you live in a house with no light. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
916:Marriage is tolerable enough in its way if youre easygoing and dont expect too much from it. But it doesnt bear thinking about. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
917:Reviewing has one advantage over suicide: in suicide you take it out on yourself; in reviewing you take it out on other people. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
918:The worst sin toward our fellow creatures is not to hate them, but to be indifferent to them: that's the essence of inhumanity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
919:When a heretic wishes to avoid martyrdom he speaks of "Orthodoxy, True and False" and demonstrates that the True is his heresy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
920:A serious illness or a death advertises the doctor exactly as a hanging advertises the barrister who defended the person hanged. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
921:Every drunken skipper trusts to Providence. But one of the ways of Providence with drunken skippers is to run them on the rocks. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
922:For four wicked centuries the world has dreamed this foolish dream of efficiency; and the end is not yet. But the end will come. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
923:I am the most spontaneous speaker in the world because every word, every gesture, and every retort has been carefully rehearsed. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
924:Idiots are always in favour of inequality of income (their only chance of eminence), and the really great in favour of equality. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
925:In a battle all you need to make you fight is a little hot blood and the knowledge that it's more dangerous to lose than to win. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
926:Let no one suppose that the words doctor and patient can disguise from the parties the fact that they are employer and employee. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
927:Of all human struggles there is none so treacherous and remorseless as the struggle between the artist man and the mother woman. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
928:Optimistic lies have such immense therapeutic value that a doctor who cannot tell them convincingly has mistaken his profession. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
929:The British are apt to make merits of their stupidities, and to represent their various incapacities as points of good breeding. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
930:The moment we want to believe something, we suddenly see all the arguments for it, and become blind to the arguments against it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
931:If a man is indolent, let him be poor. If he is drunken, let him be poor.... Also--somewhat inconsistently--blessed are the poor! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
932:I hope you have lost your good looks, for while they last any fool can adore you, and the adoration of fools is bad for the soul. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
933:There is only one belief that can rob death of its sting and the grave of its victory. For without that you cannot be born again. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
934:If you leave your art, the world will beat you back to it. The world has not an ambition worth sharing, or a prize worth handling. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
935:I make a fortune from criticizing the policy of the government, and then hand it over to the government in taxes to keep it going. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
936:It is easy - terribly easy - to shake a man's faith in himself. To take advantage of that to break a man's spirit is devil's work. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
937:You accepted Allah or you had your throat cut by someone who did accept him, and who went to Paradise for having sent you to Hell. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
938:Financiers live in a world of illusion. They count on something which they call the capital of the country, which has no existence. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
939:I have studied him - the wonderful man - and in my opinion far from being an anti-Christ he must be called the saviour of humanity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
940:It is more dangerous to be a great prophet or poet than to promote twenty companies for swindling simple folk out of their savings. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
941:Never believe anything a writer tells you about himself. A man comes to believe in the end the lies he tells himself about himself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
942:The hand of the painter is incurably mechanical: his technique is incurably artificial... The camera... is so utterly unmechanical. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
943:Those who understand the steam engine and the electric telegraph spend their lives in trying to replace them with something better. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
944:When an apparent miracle happened.it proved divine mission to the credulous, and proved a contract with the devil to the skeptical. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
945:Consciousness of a fact is not knowing it: if it were, the fish would know more of the sea than the geographers and the naturalists. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
946:Revolutionary moments attract those who are not good enough for established institutions as well as those who are too good for them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
947:The conversion of Paul was no conversion at all; it was Paul who converted the religion that has raised one man above sin and death. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
948:We mustn't be stiff and stand-off, you know. We must be thoroughly democratic, and patronize everybody without distinction of class. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
949:What is life but a series of inspired follies? The difficulty is to find them to do. Never lose a chance: it doesn’t come every day. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
950:When a prisoner sees the door of his dungeon open, he dashes for it without stopping to think where he shall get his dinner outside. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
951:Marriage is an alliance entered into by a man who can't sleep with the window shut, and a woman who can't sleep with the window open. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
952:The mathematician is fascinated with the marvelous beauty of the forms he constructs, and in their beauty he finds everlasting truth. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
953:There are scores of thousands of human insects who are ready at a moment's notice to reveal the Will of God on every possible subject ~ George Bernard Shaw,
954:You have nothing to do but mention the quantum theory, and people will take your voice for the voice of science, and belive anything. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
955:For nearly twenty years I have been a published author... But I have never yet seen a book of mine offered for sale in a shop window. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
956:He who confuses political liberty with freedom and political equality with similarity has never thought for five minutes about either. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
957:I am of the opinion that my life belongs to the whole community and as long as I live, it is my privilege to do for it whatever I can. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
958:If you can say a thing with one stroke, unanswerably you have style; if not, you are at best a marchande de plaisir; a decorative litt ~ George Bernard Shaw,
959:Imagination is the beginning of creation. You imagine what you desire, you will what you imagine and at last you create what you will. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
960:It is always necessary to overstate a cast startlingly to make people sit up and listen to it, and to frighten them into acting on it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
961:The moment we face it frankly we are driven to the conclusion that the community has a right to put a price on the right to live in it ~ George Bernard Shaw,
962:That is the whole secret of successful fighting. Get your enemy at a disadvantage; and never, on any account, fight him on equal terms. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
963:There are some experiences in life which should not be demanded twice from any man, and one of them is listening to the Brahms Requiem. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
964:There may be some doubt as to who are the best people to have charge of children, but there can be no doubt that parents are the worst. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
965:The truth sticks in our throats with all the sauces it is served with: it will never go down until we take it without any sauce at all. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
966:When I speak of The Case for Equality I mean human equality; and that, of course, can only mean one thing: it means equality of income. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
967:Without music we shall surely perish of drink, morphia, and all sorts of artificial exaggerations of the cruder delights of the senses. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
968:Don't think you can frighten me by telling me that I am alone. France is alone. God is alone. And the loneliness of God is His strength. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
969:He who desires a lifetime of happiness with a beautiful woman desires to enjoy the taste of wine by keeping his mouth always full of it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
970:The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
971:Why, except as a means of livelihood, a man should desire to act on the stage when he has the whole world to act in, is not clear to me. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
972:Women upset everything. When you let them into your life, you find that the woman is driving at one thing and you're driving at another. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
973:As people get their opinions so largely from the newspapers they read... But the Press is not free, the newspapers are owned by rich men. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
974:Do not waste your time on Social Questions. What is the matter with the poor is Poverty; what is the matter with the rich is Uselessness. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
975:Don't think you can frighten me by telling me that I am alone. France is alone. God is alone. And the loneliness of God is His strength. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
976:Security, the chief pretense of civilization, cannot exist where the worst of dangers, the danger of poverty, hangs over everyone's head. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
977:The man with a toothache thinks everyone happy whose teeth are sound. The poverty-stricken man makes the same mistake about the rich man. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
978:The pianoforte is the most important of all musical instruments; its invention was to music what the invention of printing was to poetry. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
979:Use your health, even to the point of wearing it out. That is what it is for. Spend all you have before you die; do not outlive yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
980:[Chess] is a foolish expedient for making idle people believe they are doing something very clever, when they are only wasting their time. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
981:Disobedience, the rarest and most courageous of the virtues, is seldom distinguished from neglect, the laziest and commonest of the vices. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
982:Few people think more than two or three times a year; I have made an international reputation for myself by thinking once or twice a week. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
983:It is ridiculous to say that art has nothing to do with morality. What is true is that the artist's business is not that of the policeman. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
984:In a hospital they throw you out into the street before you are half cured, but in a nursing home they don't let you out till you are dead. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
985:My main reason for adopting literature as a profession was that, as the author is never seen by his clients, he need not dress respectably. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
986:People exaggerate the value of things they haven't got everybody worships truth and unselfishness because they have no experience with them ~ George Bernard Shaw,
987:Poverty blights whole cities; spreads horrible pestilences; strikes dead the very souls of all who come within sight, sound, or smell of it ~ George Bernard Shaw,
988:The function of comedy is to dispelunconsciousness by turning the searchlight of the keenest moral and intellectual analysisright on to it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
989:What is happiness? George Bernard Shaw writes: “This is true joy in life: the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one. ~ Joel S Goldsmith,
990:Any man who is not a communist at the age of twenty is a fool. Any man who is still a communist at the age of thirty is an even bigger fool. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
991:Brigham Young lived to become immortal in history as an American Moses by leading his people through the wilderness into an unpromised land. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
992:I am justified. For I chose wisdom and the knowledge of good and evil ; and now there is no evil; and wisdom and good are one. It is enough. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
993:Education can and should do much influence social, moral and intellectual discovery by stimulating critical attitudes of thought in the young ~ George Bernard Shaw,
994:The only person who acts sensibly is my tailor. He takes my measure anew every time he sees me. Everyone else goes by their old measurements. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
995:We should have had socialism already, but for the socialists, am quite willing to drop the name if dropping it will help me to get the thing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
996:Every doctor will allow a colleague to decimate a whole countryside sooner than violate the bond of professional etiquette by giving him away. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
997:God's trustiest lieutenants often lack official credentials. They may be professed atheists who are also men of honour and high public spirit. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
998:It's a dangerous thing to be married right up to the hilt, like my daughter's husband. The man is at home all day, like a damned soul in hell. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
999:Now that we have learned to fly the air like birds, swim under water like fish, we lack one thing - to learn to live on earth as human beings. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1000:The cinema is going to form the mind of England. The national conscience, the national ideals and tests of conduct, will be those of the film. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1001:The early Christian rules of life were not made to last, because the early Christians did not believe that the world itself was going to last. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1002:The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want and if they can't find them, make them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1003:We throw the whole drudgery of creation on one sex, and then imply that no female of any delicacy would initiate any effort in that direction. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1004:Man is the only animal of which I am thoroughly and cravenly afraid...There is no harm in a well-fed lion. It has no ideals, no sect, no party. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1005:You know well I couldn't bear to live with a low common man after you two; and it's wicked and cruel of you to insult me by pretending I could. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1006:Never forget that if you leave your law to judges and your religion to bishops, you will presently find yourself without either law or religion. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1007:Alcohol is a very necessary article. It enables Parliament to do things at eleven at night that no sane person would do at eleven in the morning. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1008:First really like is just a little bit foolishness as well as a lot of curiosity. No actually self-respecting girl would reap the benefits of it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1009:If Despotism failed only for want of a capable benevolent despot, what chance has Democracy, which requires a whole population of capable voters. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1010:A man learns to skate by staggering about and making a fool of himself. Indeed he progresses in all things by resolutely making a fool of himself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1011:If associations to control burglary and murder were tolerated we should take it for granted that the members should all be burglers and murderers. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1012:It is not true that men can be divided into absolutely honest persons and absolutely dishonest ones. Our honesty varies with the strain put on it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1013:My friend, when a man has anything to tell in this world, the difficulty is not to make him tell it, but to prevent him from telling it too often. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1014:The camera can represent flesh so superbly that, if I dared, I would never photograph a figure without asking that figure to take its clothes off. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1015:A fool-proof method for sculpting an elephant: first, get a huge block of marble; then you chip away everything that doesn't look like an elephant. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1016:A moderately honest man with a moderately faithful wife, moderate drinkers both, in a moderately healthy house: that is the true middle class unit. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1017:I have never admitted the right of an elderly author to alter the work of a young author, even when the young author happens to be his former self. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1018:Some persons, by hating vice too much, come to love men too little. Hatred is self-punishment. Hatred is the cowards revenge for being intimidated. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1019:The right to know is like the right to live. It is fundamental and unconditional in its assumption that knowledge, like life, is a desirable thing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1020:When commenting on the turmoil and disorder of the world, If the other planets are inhabited, they must be using this earth as their insane asylum. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1021:You may well ask me why...I took the time to write [books]. I can only reply that I do not know. There was no why about it. I had to: that was all. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1022:Imagination is the beginning of creation. You imagine what you desire, you will what you imagine, and at last you create what you will” (George Bernard Shaw). ~ Anonymous,
1023:It is clear that a novel cannot be too bad to be worth publishing. . . . It certainly is possible for a novel to be too good to be worth publishing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1024:The only service a friend can really render is to keep up your courage by holding up to you a mirror in which you can see a noble image of yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1025:To a mathematician the eleventh means only a single unit: to the bushman who cannot count further than his ten fingers it is an incalculable myriad. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1026:A love affair should always be a honeymoon. And the only way to make sure of that is to keep changing the man; for the same man can never keep it up. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1027:Every fool believes what his teachers tell him, and calls his credulity science or morality as confidently as his father called it divine revelation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1028:In a living society every day is a day of judgment; and its recognition as such is not the end of all things but the beginning ofa real civilization. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1029:Instead of Otello being an Italian opera written in the style of Shakespeare, Othello is a play written by Shakespeare in the style of Italian opera. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1030:I was convinced that Ceylon is the cradle of the human race because everybody there looks an original. All other nations are obviously mass produced. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1031:The American white relegates the black to the rank of shoeshine boy; and he concludes from this that the black is good for nothing but shining shoes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1032:I do not, like the Fundamentalists, believe that creation stopped six thousand years ago after a week of hard work. Creation is going on all the time. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1033:If you eliminate smoking and gambling, you will be amazed to find that almost all an Englishman's pleasures can be, and mostly are, shared by his dog. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1034:Ireland, sir, for good or evil, is like no other place under heaven, and no man can touch its sod or breathe its air without becoming better or worse. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1035:The salvation of the world depends on the men who will not take evil good-humouredly, and whose laughter destroys the fool instead of encouraging him. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1036:When people shake their heads because we are living in a restless age, ask them how they would like to life in a stationary one, and do without change ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1037:You can always tell an old soldier by the inside of his holsters and cartridge boxes. The young ones carry pistols and cartridges; the old ones, grub. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1038:[...] any fool can make a discovery. Every baby has to discover more in the first years of its life than Roger Bacon ever discovered in his laboratory. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1039:I loathe the mess of mean superstitions and misunderstood prophecies which is still rammed down the throats of children under the name of Christianity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1040:Money is indeed the most important thing in the world; and all sound and successful personal and national morality should have this fact for its basis. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1041:Once there was a time when all people believed in God and the church ruled. This time is called the Dark Ages. He who can, does. He who cannot teaches. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1042:The fact is that the intrinsic worth of the book, play or whatever the author is trying to sell is the least, last factor in the the whole transaction. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1043:You can easily find people who are ten times as rich at sixty as they were at twenty but not one of them will tell you that they are ten times as happy ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1044:A true artist will let his wife starve, his children go barefoot, his mother drudge for his living at seventy, sooner than work at anything but his art. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1045:Faith in reason as a prime motor is no longer the criterion of the sound mind, any more than faith in the Bible is the criterion of righteous intention. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1046:Man gives every reason for his conduct save one, every excuse for his crimes save one, every plea for his safety save one; and that one is his cowardice ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1047:The notion that the colonel need be a better man than the private is as confused as the notion that the keystone need be stronger than the coping stone. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1048:He said that private practice in medicine ought to be put down by law. When I asked him why, he said that private doctors were ignorant licensed murders. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1049:The greatest evils and the worst of crimes is poverty; our first duty, a duty to which every other consideration should be sacrificed, is not to be poor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1050:The most sublime courage I have ever witnessed has been among that class too poor to know they possessed it, and too humble for the world to discover it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1051:I have not wasted my life trifling with literary fools in taverns, as Johnson did, when he should have been shaking England with the thunder of his spirit ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1052:Think of the fierce energy concentrated in an acorn! You bury it in the ground, and it explodes into an oak! Bury a sheep, and nothing happens but decay. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1053:Democracy means the organization of society for the benefit and at the expense of everybody indiscriminately and not for the benefit of a privileged class. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1054:Life is a flame that is always burning itself out; but it catches fire again every time a child is born. Life is greater than death, and hope than despair. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1055:That is what all poets do: they talk to themselves out loud; and the world overhears them. But it's horribly lonely not to hear someone else talk sometimes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1056:You're only a beginner; and what you think is love, and interest, and all that, is not real love at all: three quarters of it is only unsatisfied curiosity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1057:I do not want actors and actresses to understand my plays. That is not necessary. If they will only pronounce the correct sounds I can guarantee the results. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1058:The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and, if they can’t find them, make them. —GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ Mel Robbins,
1059:Though the Life Force supplies us with its own purpose, it has no other brains to work with than those it has painfully and imperfectly evolved in our heads. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1060:An Englishman does everything on principle: he fights you on patriotic principles; he robs you on business principles; he enslaves you on imperial principles. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1061:George Bernard Shaw was right. He summed it all up when he said: “The secret of being miserable is to have the leisure to bother about whether you are happy or not. ~ Dale Carnegie,
1062:The roulette table pays nobody except him that keeps it. Nevertheless a passion for gaming is common, though a passion for keeping roulette tables is unknown. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1063:The sex illusion is not a fixed quantity: not what mathematicians call a constant. It varies from zero in my wife's case to madness in that of our stepsister. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1064:BORN: 1856 George Bernard Shaw (Man and Superman, Major Barbara), Dublin 1894 Aldous Huxley (Brave New World, Crome Yellow), Godalming, England DIED: 1934 Winsor McCay ~ Tom Nissley,
1065:If you strike a child, take care that you strike it in anger, even at the risk of maiming it for life. A blow in cold blood neither can nor should be forgiven. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1066:Just as I cannot remember any time when I could not read and write, I cannot remember any time when I did not exercise my imagination in daydreams about women. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1067:New opinions often appear first as jokes and fancies, then as blasphemies and treason, then as questions open to discussion, and finally as established truths. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1068:The first prison I ever saw had inscribed on it CEASE TO DO EVIL: LEARN TO DO WELL; but as the inscription was on the outside, the prisoners could not read it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1069:I am highly susceptible to the force of all truly religious music, especially to the music of my own church, the church of Shelley, Michelangelo, and Beethoven. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1070:I don't. I look my age; and I am my age. It is the other people who look older than they are. What can you expect from people who eat corpses and drink spirits? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1071:It is very doubtful whether man is enough of a political animal to produce a good, sensible, serious and efficient constitution. All the evidence is against it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1072:That older and greater church to which I belong: the church where the oftener you laugh the better, because by laughter only can you destroy evil without malice ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1073:The Jews generally give value. They make you pay; but they deliver the goods. In my experience the men who want something for nothing are invariably Christians. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1074:Murder and capital punishment are not opposites that cancel one another, but similars that breed their kind. It is the deed that teaches not the name we give it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1075:The fact that we can become accustomed to anything, however disgusting at first, makes it necessary to examine carefully everything we have become accustomed to. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1076:When you prevent me from doing anything I want to do, that is persecution; when I prevent you from doing anything you want to do, that is law, order, and morals. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1077:I appeal to the chemists to discover a humane gas that will kill instantly and painlessly. In short- a gentlemanly gas deadly by all means, but humane, not cruel. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1078:If there was twenty ways of telling the truth and only one way of telling a lie, the Government would find it out. It's in the nature of governments to tell lies. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1079:The world was to Shakespeare a great stage of fools on which he was utterly bewildered. His pregnant observations of life are not coordinated into any philosophy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1080:We are the living graves of murdered beasts, slaughtered to satisfy our appetites. How can we hope in this world to attain the peace we say we are so anxious for? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1081:I tell you that as long as I can conceive something better than myself I cannot be easy unless I am striving to bring it into existence or clearing the way for it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1082:The haughty American nation ... makes the Negro clean its boots and then proves the moral and physical inferiority of the Negro by the fact that he is a bootblack. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1083:There is nothing so bad or so good that you will not find Englishmen doing it; but you will never find an Englishman in the wrong. He does everything on principle. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1084:The popular definition of tragedy is heavy drama in which everyone is killed in the last act, comedy being light drama in which everyone is married in the last act. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1085:The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1086:What is the matter with universities is that the students are school children, whereas it is of the very essence of university education that they should be adults. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1087:A man is like a phonograph with half-a-dozen records. You soon get tired of them all; and yet you have to sit at table whilst he reels them off to every new visitor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1088:from George Bernard Shaw’s Caesar and Cleopatra: “Pardon him, Theodotus: he is a barbarian, and thinks that the customs of his tribe and island are the laws of nature. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
1089:In George Bernard Shaw’s words, ‘The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. ~ Richard Dawkins,
1090:Men are not governed by justice, but by law or persuasion. When they refuse to be governed by law or persuasion, they have to be governed by force or fraud, or both. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1091:Taking all the round of professions and occupations, you will find that every man is the worse for being poor; and the doctor is a specially dangerous man when poor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1092:When the world goes mad, one must accept madness as sanity; since sanity is, in the last analysis, nothing but the madness on which the whole world happens to agree. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1093:No diet will remove all the fat from your body because the brain is entirely fat. Without a brain, you might look good, but all you could do is run for public office. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1094:If you do not say a thing in an irritating way, you may as well not say it at all because people will not trouble themselves about anything that does not trouble them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1095:You propound a complicated arithmetical problem: say cubing a number containing four digits. Give me a slate and half an hour's time, and I can produce a wrong answer. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1096:A pornographic novelist is one who exploits the sexual instinct as a prostitute does. A legitimate sex novel elucidates it or brings out its poetry, tragedy, or comedy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1097:Experience is a wonderful thing. It enables you to recognize a mistake when you make it again. If all economists were laid end to end they would not reach a conclusion. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1098:The longer I live, the more I realize that I am never wrong about anything, and that all the pains I have so humbly taken to verify my notions have only wasted my time! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1099:The politician who once had to learn to flatter Kings has now to learn how to fascinate, amuse, coax, humbug, frighten, or otherwise strike the fancy of the electorate. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1100:NAPOLEON: What shall we do with this soldier, Giuseppe? Everything he says is wrong. GIUSEPPE: Make him a general, Excellency, and then everything he says will be right. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1101:A nap, my friend, is a brief period of sleep which overtakes superannuated persons when they endeavor to entertain unwelcome visitors or to listen to scientific lectures. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1102:A newspaper, not having to act on its descriptions and reports, but only to sell them to idly curious people, has nothing but honor to lose by inaccuracy and non-veracity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1103:To withhold deserved praise lest it should make its object conceited is as dishonest as to withhold payment of a just debt lest your creditor should spend the money badly. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1104:Every Englishman believes that Handel now occupies an important position in heaven. If so, le bon Dieu must feel toward him very much as Louis Treize felt toward Richelieu. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1105:Laws, religions, creeds, and systems of ethics, instead of making society better than its best unit, make it worse than its average unit, because they are never up to date. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1106:The doctor learns that if he gets ahead of the superstitions of his patients he is a ruined man; and the result is that he instinctively takes care not to get ahead of them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1107:There is a disease to which plays as well as men become liable with advancing years. In men it is called doting, in plays dating.The more topical the play the more it dates. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1108:It is the inefficiency and sham of ... our schools ... that save us from being dashed on the rocks of false doctrine instead of drifting down the midstream of mere ignorance. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1109:The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1110:There is the eternal war between those who are in the world for what they can get out of it and those who are in the world to make it a better place for everybody to live in. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1111:To disbelieve in marriage is easy: to love a married woman is easy; but to betray a comrade, to be disloyal to a host, to break the covenant of bread and salt, is impossible. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1112:Everything I eat has been proved by some doctor or other to be a deadly poison, and everything I don't eat has been proved to be indispensable for life. But I go marching on. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1113:It is not the number of years we have behind us, but the number we have before us, that makes us careful and responsible and determined to find out the truth about everything. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1114:Go anywhere in England where there are natural wholesome, contented and really nice English people; and what do you find? That the stables are the real centre of the household. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1115:No use slaving for me and then saying you want to be cared for: who cares for a slave? If you come back, come back for the sake of good fellowship; for you’ll get nothing else. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1116:Bible worship, though at its best it may achieve sublimity by keeping its head in the skies, may also make itself both ridiculousand dangerous by having its feet off the ground. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1117:I find it easy to forgive the man who invented a devilish instrument like dynamite, but how can one ever forgive the diabolical mind that invented the Nobel Prize in Literature? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1118:If you would stick to the concrete, and put your discoveries in the form of entertaining anecdotes about your adventures with women, your conversation would be easier to follow. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1119:It is doubtless wise, when a reform is introduced, to try to persuade the British public that it is not a reform at all; but appearances must be kept up to some extent at least. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1120:Make it compulsory for a doctor using a brass plate to have inscribed on it, in addition to the letters indicating his qualifications, the words 'Remember that I too am mortal'. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1121:Men are always thinking that they are going to do something grandly wicked to their enemies; but when it comes to the point, really bad men are just as rare as really good ones. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1122:What right has any human being to talk of bringing up a child? You do not bring up a tree or a plant. It brings itself up. You have to give it a fair chance by tilling the soil. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1123:Christmas is forced upon a reluctant and disgusted nation by the shopkeepers and the press; on its own merits it would wither and shrivel in the fiery breath of universal hatred. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1124:George Bernard Shaw said that thinking was the greatest of all human endeavors, but I would say that feeling was. Allowing yourself to feel things, to feel love or wrath, hatred, rage. ~ Marlon Brando,
1125:Of the three official objects of our prison system: vengeance, deterrence, and reformation of the criminal, only one is achieved; and that is the one which is nakedly abominable. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1126:The more reasonable a student was in mathematics, the more unreasonable she was in the affairs of real life, concerning which fewtrustworthy postulates have yet been ascertained. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1127:We have in England a curious belief in first-rate people, meaning all the people we do not know; and this consoles us for the undeniable second-rateness of the people we do know. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1128:And so, to the end of history, murder shall breed murder, always in the name of right and honor and peace, until the gods are tired of blood and create a race that can understand. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1129:He who has nothing to assert has no style and can have none: he who has something to assert will go as far in power of style as its momentousness and his conviction will carry him ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1130:If the lesser mind could measure the greater as a foot-rule can measure a pyramid, there would be finality in universal suffrage. As it is, the political problem remains unsolved. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1131:What we are confronted with now is a growing perception that if we desire a certain type of civilization and culture we must exterminate the sort of people who do not fit into it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1132:A healthy nation is as unconscious of its nationality as a healthy man of his bones. But if you break a person's nationality it will think of nothing else but getting it set again. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1133:I ... must continue to strive for more knowledge and more power, though the new knowledge always contradicts the old and the new power is the destruction of the fools who misuse it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1134:Now of all the idealist abominations that make society pestiferous I doubt if there be any so mean as that of forcing self-sacrifice on a woman under the pretense that she likes it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1135:The one point on which all women are in furious secret rebellion against the existing law is the saddling of the right to a child with the obligation to become the servant of a man. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1136:The real Brahms is nothing more than a sentimental voluptuary. rather tiresomely addicted to dressing himself up as Handel or Beethoven and making a prolonged and intolerable noise. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1137:You don't expect me to know what to say about a play when I don't know who the author is, do you? . . . If it's by a good author, it's a good play, naturally. That stands to reason. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1138:Captain Shotover: How much does your soul eat? Ellie: Oh, a lot. It eats music and pictures and books and mountains and lakes and beautiful things to wear and nice people to be with. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1139:Most of my recent plays were written in the railway train between Hatfield and Kings Cross. I write anywhere, on the top of omnibuses or wherever I may be; it is all the same to me. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1140:Oh, come! That boot is on the other leg. Why should you call me to account for eating decently? If I battened on the scorched corpses of animals, you might well ask me why I did that ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1141:A day's work is a day's work, neither more nor less, and the man or woman who does it needs a day's sustenance, a night's repose and due leisure, whether they be painter or ploughman. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1142:A man's behaviour may be quite harmless and even beneficial, when he ismorally behaving like a scoundrel. And he may do great harm when he is morally acting on the highest principles. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1143:Every man is a revolutionist concerning the thing he understands. For example, every person who has mastered a profession is a skeptic concerning it, and consequently a revolutionist. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1144:Churchill was one of the few men I have met who even in the flesh give me the impression of genius. George Bernard Shaw is another. It is amusing to know that each thinks the other is overrated. ~ David Low,
1145:George Bernard Shaw’s famous spelling of “fish” as “ghoti”—the first two letters pronounced as the last two in “tough,” the middle letter as in “women,” and the last two as in “nation. ~ William J Bernstein,
1146:I am very sorry, but I cannot learn languages. I have tried hard, only to find that men of ordinary capacity can learn Sanskrit in less time that it takes me to buy a German Dictionary ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1147:It's prudent to gain the whole world and lose your own soul. But don't forget that your soul sticks to you if you stick to it; but the world has a way of slipping through your fingers. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1148:Marriage is to me apostasy, profanation of the sanctuary of my soul, violation of my manhood, sale of my birthright, shameful surrender, ignominious capitulation, acceptance of defeat. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1149:Reasonable men adapt themselves to their environment; unreasonable men try to adapt their environment to themselves. Thus all progress is the result of the efforts of unreasonable men. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1150:Religion is a great force - the only real motive force in the world; but what you fellows don't understand is that you must get at a man through his own religion and not through yours. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1151:The plain working truth is that it is not only good for people to be shocked occasionally, but absolutely necessary to the progress of society that they should be shocked pretty often. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1152:Unless comedy touches me as well as amuses me, it leaves me with a sense of having wasted my evening. I go to the theatre to be moved to laughter, not to be tickled or bustled into it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1153:My opportunities were still there, nay, they multiplied tenfold; but the strength and youth to cope with them began to fail, and to need eking out with the shifty cunning of experience. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1154:Pasteboard pies and paper flowers are being banished from the stage by the growth of that power of accurate observation which is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it... ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1155:The sex relation is not a personal relation. It can be irresistibly desired and rapturously consummated between persons who could not endure one another for a day in any other relation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1156:Would the world ever have been made if its maker had been afraid of making trouble?Making life means making trouble. There’s only one way of escaping trouble; and that’s killing things. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1157:People always get tired of one another. I grow tired of myself whenever I am left alone for ten minutes, and I am certain that I am fonder of myself than anyone can be of another person. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1158:A child hasn't a grown-up person's appetite for affection. A little of it goes a long way with them; and they like a good imitation of it better than the real thing, as every nurse knows. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1159:Reasonable people adapt themselves to the world. Unreasonable people attempt to adapt the world to themselves. All progress, therefore, depends on unreasonable people. —GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ Nicholas D Kristof,
1160:The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ Stanley Bing,
1161:A modern gentleman [rich person] is necessarily the enemy of his country. Even in war he does not fight to defend it, but to prevent his power of preying on it from passing to a foreigner. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1162:Orchestras only need to be sworn at, and a German is consequently at an advantage with them, as English profanity, except in America, has not gone beyond a limited technology of perdition. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1163:An author who gives a manager or publisher any rights in his work except those immediately and specifically required for its publication or performance is for business purposes an imbecile. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1164:What we call education and culture is for the most part nothing but the substitution of reading for experience, of literature for life, of the obsolete fictitious for the contemporary real. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1165:When a man teaches something he does not know to somebody else who has no aptitude for it, and gives him a certificate of proficiency, the latter has completed the education of a gentleman. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1166:As 99 per cent of English authors and 100 per cent of American ones [authors] are just such imbeciles, managers and publishers make a practice of asking for every right the author possesses. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1167:Human misery is so appalling nowadays that if we allowed ourselves to dwell on it we should only add imaginary miseries of our own to the real miseries of others without doing them any good. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1168:No king on earth is as safe in his job as a Trade Union official. There is only one thing that can get him sacked; and that is drink. Not even that, as long as he doesn't actually fall down. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1169:A third variety of drama ... begins as tragedy with scraps of fun in it ... and ends in comedy without mirth in it, the place of mirth being taken by a more or less bitter and critical irony. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1170:The open mind never acts: when we have done our utmost to arrive at a reasonable conclusion, we still must close our minds for the moment with a snap, and act dogmatically on our conclusions. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1171:Even a vortex is a vortex in something. You can't have a whirlpool without water; and you can't have a vortex without gas, or molecules or atoms or ions or electrons or something, not nothing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1172:Hurrah for revolution and more cannon-shot! A beggar upon horseback lashes a beggar on foot. Hurrah for revolution and cannon come again! The beggars have changed places, but the lash goes on. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1173:The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. —GEORGE BERNARD SHAW, ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1174:The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” –George Bernard Shaw ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1175:To a professional critic (I have been one myself) theatre-going is the curse of Adam. The play is the evil he is paid to endure in the sweat of his brow; and the sooner it is over, the better. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1176:A miracle is an event which creates faith. That is the purpose and nature of miracles. Frauds deceive. An event which creates faith does not deceive: therefore it is not a fraud, but a miracle. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1177:When your eyes are fixed in the stare of unconsciousness, and your throat coughs the last gasping breath - as one dragged in the dark to a great precipice - what assistance are a wife and child? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1178:An interesting play cannot in the nature of things mean anything but a play in which problems of conduct and character of personalimportance to the audience are raised and suggestively discussed. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1179:No community has ever yet passed beyond the initial phases in which its pugnacity and fanaticism enabled it to found a nation, and its cupidity to establish and develop a commercial civilization. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1180:We know now that the soul is the body, and the body the soul. They tell us they are different because they want to persuade us that we can keep our souls if we let them make slaves of our bodies. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1181:Though justice be Thy plea, consider this: That in the course of justice none of us should see salvation. We do pray for mercy, And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1182:Do you think that the things people make fools of themselves about are any less real and true than the things they behave sensibly about? They are more true: they are the only things that are true. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1183:I am very subtle; but Man is deeper in his thought than I am. The woman knows that there is no such thing as nothing: the man knows that there is no such day as tomorrow. I do well to worship them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1184:The public want actresses, because they think all actresses bad. They don't want music or poetry because they know that both are good. So actors and actresses thrive and poets and composers starve. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1185:The reasonable man will adjust to the demands of his environment. The unreasonable man expects his environment to adjust to his own needs. Therefore, all progress depends upon the unreasonable man. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1186:Plato long ago pointed out the importance of being governed by men with sufficient sense of responsibility and comprehension of public duties to be very reluctant to undertake the work of governing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1187:Wicked people means people who have no love: therefore, they have no shame. They have the power to ask love because the don't need it: they have the power to offer it because they have none to give. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1188:I find that socialism is often misunderstood by its least intelligent supporters and opponents to mean simply unrestrained indulgence of our natural propensity to heave bricks at respectable persons. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1189:Life is no brief candle to me. It is a sort of splendid torch which I have got a hold of for the moment, and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1190:Very nice sort of place, Oxford, I should think, for people that like that sort of place. They teach you to be a gentleman there. In the polytechnic they teach you to be an engineer or such like. See? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1191:It is a monstrous thing to force a child to learn Latin or Greek or mathematics on the ground that they are an indispensable gymnastic for the mental powers. It would be monstrous even if it were true. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1192:War can so easily be gilt with romance and heroism and solemn national duty and patriotism and the like by persons whose superficial literary and oratorical talent covers an abyss of Godforsaken folly. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1193:Man is unique in that he has plans, purpose and goals which require the need for criteria of choice. The need for ethical value is within man whose future may largely be determined by the choice he make ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1194:It is necessary for the welfare of society that genius should be privileged to utter sedition, to blaspheme, to outrage good taste, to corrupt the youthful mind, and generally to scandalize one's uncles. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1195:What I say today everybody will say tomorrow, though they will not remember who put it into their heads. Indeed they will be right for I never remember who puts things into my head : it is the Zeitgeist. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1196:Capitalism justified itself and was adopted as an economic principle on the express ground that it provides selfish motives for doing good, and that human beings will do nothing except for selfish motives ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1197:My schooling not only failed to teach me what it professed to be teaching, but prevented me from being educated to an extent which infuriates me when I think of all I might have learned at home by myself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1198:The censorship method ... is that of handing the job over to some frail and erring mortal man, and making him omnipotent on the assumption that his official status will make him infallible and omniscient. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1199:You can feel nothing but a torment, and believe nothing but a lie. You will not raise your head to look at all the miracles of life that surround you; but you will run ten miles to see a fight or a death. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1200:George Bernard Shaw once put it: “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
1201:Pothinus: "Is it possible that Caesar, the conqueror of the world, has time to occupy himself with such a trifle as our taxes?" Caesar: "My friend, taxes are the chief business of a conqueror of the world. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1202:My own education has been entirely controversial: that is why I know what I am writing about; and appear eccentric to dogmatically educated Old School Ties whose heads are stuffed with obsolete shibboleths. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1203:A sensitive boy's humiliations may be very good fun for ordinary thick-skinned grown-ups; but to the boy himself theyareso acute, so ignominious, that he cannot confess themcannot but deny them passionately. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1204:I fought linotype and montype for some time because it would not justify as well as handset could be made to do; but at last, as always happens, the machine outdid the hand, and got all the best types on it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1205:I shall always be a flower girl to Professor Higgins, because he always treats me as a flower girl, and always will; but I know I can be a lady to you, because you always treat me as a lady, and always will. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1206:Nothing can save us from a perpetual headlong fall into a bottomless abyss but a solid footing of dogma; and we no sooner agree to that than we find that the only trustworthy dogma is that there is no dogma. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1207:The Indian way of life provides the vision of the natural, real way of life. We veil ourselves with unnatural masks. On the face of India are the tender expressions which carry the mark of the Creators hand. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1208:The technical history of modern harmony is a history of growth of toleration by the human ear of chords that at first sounded discordant and senseless to the main body of contemporary professional musicians. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1209:The wheels are turning, but the hamsters are all dead. Make it idiot-proof and someone will make a better idiot. I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig, you get dirty; and besides, the pig likes it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1210:Worst of all, there is no sign of any relaxation of antisemitism. Logically it has nothing to do with Fascism. But the human raceis imitative rather than logical; and as Fascism spreads antisemitism spreads. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1211:Life is no brief candle for me. It is a sort of splendid torch which I have got hold of for the moment, and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations. George Bernard Shaw ~ Anonymous,
1212:Money is the most important thing in the world. It represents health, strength, honor, generosity, and beauty as conspicuously as the want of it represents illness, weakness, disgrace, meanness, and ugliness. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1213:The ordinary man is an anarchist. He wants to do as he likes. He may want his neighbour to be governed, but he himself doesn't want to be governed. He is mortally afraid of government officials and policemen. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1214:Here there is no hope, and consequently no duty, no work, nothing to be gained by praying, nothing to be lost by doing what you like. Hell, in short, is a place where you have nothing to do but amuse yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1215:The shot Irishmen will now take their places beside Emmet and the Manchester Martyrs in Ireland, and beside the heroes of Poland and Sérbia and Belgium in Europe; and nothing in heaven or earth can prevent it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1216:«El hombre razonable se adapta al mundo; el irrazonable persiste en intentar adaptar el mundo a él. Por consiguiente, todo progreso depende del hombre irrazonable.» GEORGE BERNARD SHAW, Máximas para revolucionarios ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1217:George Bernard Shaw lo expresó a la perfección: «El hombre sensato se adapta al mundo. El hombre insensato insiste en intentar que el mundo se adapte a él. Por lo tanto, todo el progreso depende de hombres insensatos». ~ Richard Koch,
1218:George Bernard Shaw: “The true joy in life is to be a force of fortune instead of a feverish, selfish little clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy.”27 ~ Angela Duckworth,
1219:It is monstrous that custom should force us to display our faces ostentatiously, however worn and wrinkled and mean they may be, whilst carefully concealing all our other parts, however shapely and well preserved. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1220:The danger of crippling thought, the danger of obstructing the formation of the public mind by specially suppressing ... representations is far greater than any real danger that there is from such representations. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1221:A part of eugenic politics would finally land us in an extensive use of the lethal chamber. A great many people would have to be put out of existence simply because it wastes other people's time to look after them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1222:We must not stay as we are, doing always what was done last time, or we shall stick in the mud. Yet neither must we undertake a new world as catastrophic Utopians, and wreck our civilization in our hurry to mend it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1223:If all the Churches of Europe closed their doors until the drums ceased rolling they would act as a most powerful reminder that though the glory of war is a famous and ancient glory, it is not the final glory of God. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1224:Ninguna dieta te hará eliminar toda la grasa de tu cuerpo porque el cerebro está hecho enteramente de grasa. Quizá te verás bien sin cerebro, pero lo único a lo que aspirarás será a ser funcionario público. GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ Anonymous,
1225:You have no right to say that I am not sincere. I have found a happiness in art that real life has never given me. I am intensely in earnest about art. There is is a magic and mystery in art that you know nothing of. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1226:Heaven, as conventionally conceived, is a place so inane, so dull, so useless, so miserable that nobody has ever ventured to describe a whole day in heaven, though plenty of people have described a day at the seaside. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1227:Our way of getting an army able to fight the German army is to declare war on Germany just as if we had such an army, and then trust to the appalling resultant peril and disaster to drive us into wholesale enlistment. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1228:The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. —GEORGE BERNARD SHAW, “MAXIMS FOR REVOLUTIONISTS, ~ Ray Kurzweil,
1229:The seven deadly sins... food, clothing, firing, rent, taxes, respectability and children. Nothing can lift those seven millstones from Man's neck but money; and the spirit cannot soar until the millstones are lifted. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1230:Life on board a pleasure steamer violates every moral and physical condition of healthy life except fresh air. . . . It is a guzzling, lounging, gambling, dog's life. The only alternative to excitement is irritability. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1231:Ralph Waldo Emerson said that “the invariable mark of wisdom is to see the miraculous in the common.” And George Bernard Shaw said, “If we could see the miracle of a single flower clearly, our whole life would change.” Still, ~ Eric Metaxas,
1232:Schools and schoolmasters, as we have them today, are not popular as places of education and teachers, but rather prisons and turnkeys in which children are kept to prevent them disturbing and chaperoning their parent. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1233:The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. —GEORGE BERNARD SHAW, Maxims for Revolutionists ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1234:If you demand my authorities for this and that, I must reply that only those who have never hunted up the authorities as I have believe that there is any authority who is not contradicted flatly by some other authority. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1235:What is any respectable girl brought up to do but to catch some rich man's fancy and get the benefit of his money by marrying him?--as if a marriage ceremony could make any difference in the right or wrong of the thing! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1236:When you loved me I gave you the whole sun and stars to play with. I gave you eternity in a single moment, strength of the mountains in one clasp of your arms, and the volume of all the seas in one impulse of your soul. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1237:I believe in Michelangelo, Velasquez, and Rembrandt; in the might of design, the mystery of color, the redemption of all things by Beauty everlasting, and the message of Art that has made these hands blessed. Amen. Amen. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1238:I find that the moment I let a woman make friends with me, she becomes jealous, exacting, suspicious, and a damned nuisance. I find that the moment I let myself make friends with a woman, I become selfish and tyrannical. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1239:I myself have been particularly careful never to say a civil word to the United States. I have scoffed at their inhabitants as a nation of villagers. I have defined the 100 % American as 99 % an idiot. And they adore me. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1240:As you say, I am honoured and famous and rich. But as I have to do all the hard work, and suffer an increasing multitude of fools gladly, it does not feel any better than being reviled, infamous and poor, as I used to be. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1241:We should find ourselves committed to killing a great many people whom we now leave living, and to leave living a great many people whom we at present kill. We should have to get rid of all ideas about capital punishment. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1242:Physically there is nothing to distinguish human society from the farm-yard except that children are more troublesome and costly than chickens and calves and that men and women are not so completely enslaved as farm stock. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1243:When a bishop at the first shot abandons the worship of Christ and rallies his flock round the altar of Mars, he may be acting patriotically... but that does not justify him in pretending...that Christ is, in effect, Mars. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1244:As the playwright George Bernard Shaw once put it: “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man. ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
1245:Dying is a troublesome business: there is pain to be suffered, and it wrings one's heart; but death is a splendid thing -a warfare accomplished, a beginning all over again, a triumph. You can always see that in their faces. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1246:I made use of the college library by borrowing books other than scientific books, such as all of the plays by George Bernard Shaw, the writing of Edgar Allan Poe. The college library helped me to develop a broader aspect on life. ~ Linus Pauling,
1247:Only in the problem play is there any real drama, because drama is no mere setting up of the camera to nature: it is the presentation in parable of the conflict between Man's will and his environment: in a word, of problem. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1248:Always strive to find out what to do by thinking, without asking anybody. If you continually do this, you will soon act like a grown-up woman. For want of doing this, a very great number of grown-up people act like children. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1249:Most of the money given by rich people in "charity" is made up of conscience money, "ransom," political bribery, and bids for titles.... One buys moral credit by signing a cheque, which is easier than turning a prayer wheel. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1250:Remember that you are a human being with a soul and the divine gift of articulate speech: that your native language is the language of Shakespeare and Milton and The Bible; and don't sit there crooning like a bilious pigeon. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1251:As long as you don't fly openly in the face of society, society doesn't ask any inconvenient questions; and it makes precious short work of the cads who do. There are no secrets better kept than the secrets everybody guesses. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1252:If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange these apples then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1253:It is a curious sensation: the sort of pain that goes mercifully beyond our powers of feeling. When your heart is broken, your boats are burned: nothing matters any more. It is the end of happiness and the beginning of peace. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1254:It is said that every people has the Government it deserves. It is more to the point that every Government has the electorate it deserves; for the orator of the front bench can edify or debauch an ignorant electorate at will. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1255:No age or condition is without its heroes . The least incapable general in a nation is its Cæsar, the least imbecile statesman its Solon , the least confused thinker its Socrates , the least commonplace poet its Shakespeare . ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1256:The more ignorant men are, the more convinced are they that their little parish and their little chapel is an apex to which civilization and philosophy has painfully struggled up the pyramid of time from a desert of savagery. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1257:All classes in proportion to their lack of travel and familiarity with foreign literature are bellicose, prejudiced against foreigners, fond of fighting as a cruel sport - in short, dog-like in their notions of foreign policy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1258:The American Constitution, one of the few modern political documents drawn up by men who were forced by the sternest circumstances to think out what they really had to face, instead of chopping logic in a university classroom. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1259:What a heartbreaking job it is trying to combine authors for their own protection... the first lesson I learned was that when you take the field for the authors you will be safer without a breastplate than without a backplate. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1260:I'm one of the undeserving poor: that's what I am. Think of what that means to a man. It means that he's up agen middle class morality all the time.... What is middle class morality? Just an excuse for never giving me anything. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1261:Affection between adults - if they are really adult in mind and not merely grown up children - and creatures so relatively selfish and cruel as children necessarily are without knowing it or meaning it, cannot be called natural. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1262:As to spelling the very frequent word though with six letters instead of two, it is impossible to discuss it, as it is outside the range of common sanity. In comparison such a monstrosity as phlegm for flem is merely disgusting. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1263:If you don't begin to be a revolutionist at the age of twenty, then at fifty you will be a most impossible old fossil. If you area red revolutionary at the age of twenty, you have some chance of being up-to-date when you are forty! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1264:I was taught when I was young that if people would only love one another, all would be well with the world. I found when I tried to put that into practice, not only were other people seldom lovable but I wasn't very lovable myself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1265:I feel nothing but the accursed happiness I have dreaded all my life long: the happiness that comes as life goes, the happiness of yielding and dreaming instead of resisting and doing, the sweetness of the fruit that is going rotten. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1266:We call the one side [of humanity] religion, and we call the other science. Religion is always right. ... Science is always wrong; it is the very artifice of men. Science can never solve one problem without raising ten more problems. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1267:What is wrong with priests and popes is that instead of being apostles and saints, they are nothing but empirics who say I know instead of I am learning, and pray for credulity and inertia as wise men pray for skepticism and activity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1268:Whenever an obviously well founded statement is made in England by a person specially well acquainted with the facts, that unlucky person is instantly and frantically contradicted by all the people who obviously know nothing about it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1269:I object to publishers: the one service they have done me is to teach me to do without them. They combine commercial rascality with artistic touchiness and pettishness, without being either good business men or fine judges of literature. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1270:Leisure may be defined as free activity, labor as compulsory activity. Leisure does what it likes, labor does what it must, the compulsion being that of Nature, which in these latitudes leaves men no choice between labor and starvation. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1271:What is really important in Man is the part of him that we do not understand. Of much of it we are not even conscious, just as we are not normally conscious of keeping up our circulation by our heart-pump, though if we neglect it we die. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1272:We live in an atmosphere of shame. We are ashamed of everything that is real about us; ashamed of ourselves, of our relatives, of our incomes, of our accents, of our opinions, of our experience, just as we are ashamed of our naked skins. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1273:A critic recently described me, with deadly acuteness, as having 'a kindly dislike of my fellow-creatures.' Perhaps dread would have been nearer the mark than dislike; for man is the only animal of which I am thoroughly and cravenly afraid. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1274:All this struggling and striving to make the world better is a great mistake. Not that it's wrong to try to improve the world if you know how but simply because struggling and striving are the worst possible ways to go about doing anything! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1275:When the horrors of anarchy force us to set up laws that forbid us to fight and torture one another for sport, we still snatch at every excuse for declaring individuals outside the protection of law and torturing them to our hearts content. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1276:Don't lose faith. Promise yourself that you will be a success story, and I promise you that all the forces of the universe will unite to come to your aid; you might not feel today or for a while, but the longer you wait the bigger the prize. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1277:If a group of beings from another planet were to land on Earth - beings who considered themselves as superior to you as you feel yourself to be to other animals - would you concede them the rights over you that you assume over other animals? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1278:In your Salvation shelter I saw poverty, misery, cold and hunger. You gave them bread and treacle and dreams of heaven. I give from thirty shillings a week to twelve thousand a year. They find their own dreams; but I look after the drainage. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1279:The art of government is the organization of idolatry. The bureaucracy consists of functionaries; the aristocracy, of idols; the democracy, of idolaters. The populace cannot understand the bureaucracy: it can only worship the national idols. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1280:Live in contact with dreams and you will get something of their charm: live in contact with facts and you will get something of their brutality. I wish I could find a country to live in where the facts were not brutal and the dreams not real. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1281:People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don't believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and if they can't find them, make them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1282:Without danger I cannot be great. That is how I pay for Abel's blood. Danger and fear follow my steps everywhere. Without them courage would have no sense. And it is courage, courage, courage that raises the blood of life to crimson splendor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1283:I sing, not arms and the hero, but the philosophic man: he who seeks in contemplation to discover the inner will of the world, ininvention to discover the means of fulfilling that will, and in action to do that will by the so-discovered means. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1284:If we have come to think that the nursery and the kitchen are the natural sphere of a woman, we have done so exactly as English children come to think that a cage is the natural sphere of a parrot: because they have never seen one anywhere else. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1285:The notion that inspiration is something that happened thousands of years ago, and was then finished and done with. . . the theory that God retired from business at that period and has not been heard from since, is as silly as it is blasphemous. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1286:You have set up in New York Harbor a monstrous idol which you call Liberty. The only thing that remains to complete that monument is to put on its pedestal the inscription written by Dante on the gate of hell: All hope abandon ye who enter here. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1287:They tell me that So-and-So, who does not write prefaces, is no charlatan. Well, I am. I first caught the ear of the British public on a cart in Hyde Park, to the blaring of brass bands,and this . . . because . . . I am a natural-born mountebank. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1288:In an article on Bunyan lately published in the "Contemporary Review" - the only article on the subject worth reading on the subject I ever saw (yes, thank you, I am familiar with Macaulay's patronizing prattle about "The Pilgrim's Progress") etc. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1289:In your dread of dictators you established a state of society in which every ward boss is a dictator, every private employer a dictator, every financier a dictator, all with the livelihood of the workers at his mercy, and no public responsibility. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1290:Social progress takes effect through the replacement of all institutions by new ones; and since every institution involves the recognition of the duty of conforming to it, progress must involve the repudiation of an established duty at every step. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1291:To endure the pain of living, we all drug ourselves more or less with gin, with literature, with superstitions, with romance, with idealism, political, sentimental, and moral, with every possible preparation of that universal hashish: imagination. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1292:It's usually pointed out that women are not fit for political power, and ought not to be trusted with a vote because they are politically ignorant, socially prejudiced, narrow-minded, and selfish. True enough, but precisely the same is true of men! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1293:A genius is a person who is seeing further and probing deeper than other people has a different set of ethical valuations from their and has energy enough to give effect to this extra vision and its valuations in whatever manner best suits his or her ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1294:Schools must not become the agencies through which propaganda advocated by any section of society is spread. The method of control always a crucial problem should be in harmony with the fundamental values and principles of the states and the entire e ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1295:Eternal is the fact that the human creature born in Ireland and brought up in its air is Irish. I have lived for twenty years in Ireland and for seventy-two in England; but the twenty came first and in Britain I am still a foreigner and shall die one. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1296:I dread success. To have succeeded is to have finished one's business on earth, like the male spider who is killed by the female the moment he has succeeded in his courtship. I like the state of continual becoming, with a goal in front and not behind. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1297:People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don’t believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and, they can’t find them, MAKE THEM.   —George Bernard Shaw ~ Les Brown,
1298:People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don’t believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and, if they can’t find them, make them. —George Bernard Shaw ~ Anonymous,
1299:People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don’t believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and, if they can’t find them, make them. —George Bernard Shaw ~ David Allen,
1300:Life at its noblest leaves mere happiness far behind; and indeed cannot endure it. Happiness is not the object of life: life has no object: it is an end in itself; and courage consists in the readiness to sacrifice happiness for an intenser quality of life. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1301:Nietzche . . . he was a confirmed Life Force worshipper. It was he who raked up the Superman, who is as old as Prometheus; and the 20th century will run after this newest of the old crazes when it gets tired of the world, the flesh, and your humble servant. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1302:Christianity as a specific doctrine was slain with Jesus, suddenly and utterly. He was hardly cold in his grave, or high in his heaven (as you please), before the apostles dragged the tradition of him down to the level of the thing it has remained ever since. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1303:Deep knowledge is not knowledge of the thing itself, but knowledge of a thing like the thing. Then, you gain not one knowledge, but two knowledges. Of the thing. And of the original thing with is like the thing. Which is the barbarism of the privileged class. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1304:Just as the liar 's punishment is, not in the least that he is not believed , but that he cannot believe any one else; so a guilty society can more easily be persuaded that any apparently innocent act is guilty than that any apparently guilty act is innocent. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1305:Dogmatic toleration is nonsense: I would no more tolerate the teaching of Calvinism to children if I had power to persecute it than the British Raj tolerated suttee in India. Every civilized authority must draw a line between the tolerable and the intolerable. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1306:This is the true joy of life-the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one, the being thoroughly worn out before you are thrown to the scrap-heap; the being a force of nature instead of a feverish, selfish clod of ailments and grievances. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1307:When two people are under the influence of the most violent, most insane, most delusive, and most transient of passions, they are required to swear that they will remain in that excited, abnormal, and exhausting condition continuously until death do them part. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1308:The writer who aims at producing the platitudes which are "not for an age, but for all time" has his reward in being unreadable inall ages.... The man who writes about himself and his own time is the only sort of man who writes about all people and about all time. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1309:With the single exception of Homer, there is no eminent writer, not even Sir Walter Scott, whom I can despise so entirely as I despise Shakespeare when I measure my mind against his. . . . It would positively be a relief to me to dig him up and throw stones at him. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1310:George Bernard Shaw said: "People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don't believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and if they can't find them, make them. ~ Earl Nightingale,
1311:I don't know what to say about this book. The experience on which it is founded is so extraordinary, that an honest record of it should be preserved . . . But it would have driven me mad; and I am not sure that the author came out of it without a slight derangement. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1312:When Jennie, mother of Winston Churchill invited playwright George Bernard Shaw to lunch, he telegraphed: "Certainly not. What have I done to provoke such an attack on my well-known habits?" She replied, "Know nothing of your habits; hope they are better than your manners." ~ Anne Sebba,
1313:What is self-control? It is nothing but a highly developed vital sense, dominating and regulating the mere appetites. To overlook the very existence of this supreme sense; to miss the obvious inference that it is the quality that distinguishes the fittest to survive. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1314:The only way in which a nation can make itself wealthy and prosperous is by good housekeeping: that is, by providing for its wants in the order of their importance, and allowing no money to be wasted on whims and luxuries until necessities have been thoroughly served. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1315:Unless the people can choose their leaders and rulers, and can revoke their choice at intervals long enough to test their measuresby results, the government will be a tyranny exercised in the interests of whatever classes or castes or mobs or cliques have this choice. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1316:George Bernard Shaw said: "People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don't believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and if they can't find them, make them." Well, ~ Earl Nightingale,
1317:If you do things merely because you think some other fool expects you to do them, and he expects you to do them because he thinks you expect him to expect you to do them, it will end in everybody doing what nobody wants to do, which is in my opinion a silly state of things. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1318:Playwright George Bernard Shaw asserted, "A life spent in making mistakes is not only more honorable but more useful than a life spent doing nothing." To overcome fear and break the cycle, you have to be willing to recognize that you will spend much of your life making mistakes. ~ John C Maxwell,
1319:When you see a rich man’s wife shaking her head over the thriftlessness of the poor because they do not save, pity the lady’s ignorance; but do not irritate the poor by repeating her nonsense to them. George Bernard Shaw The Intelligent Woman’s Guide to Socialism and Capitalism ~ Kerry Greenwood,
1320:You have to choose between trusting to the natural stability of gold and the natural stability of the honesty and intelligence of the members of the government. And, with due respect to these gentlemen, I advise you, as long as the capitalist system lasts, to vote for gold. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1321:Am reserving two tickets for you for my premiere. Come and bring a friend - if you have one. Telegram inviting Winston Churchill to opening night of Pygmalion. Churchill wired back: Impossible to be present for the first performance. Will attend the second - if there is one. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1322:Don't order any black things. Rejoice in his memory; and be radiant: leave grief to the children. Wear violet and purple. Be patient with the poor people who will snivel: they don't know; and they think they will live for ever, which makes death a division instead of a bond. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1323:I finished my first book seventy-six years ago. I offered it to every publisher on the English-speaking earth I had ever heard of. Their refusals were unanimous: and it did not get into print until, fifty years later; publishers would publish anything that had my name on it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1324:You are my inspiration and my folly. You are my light across the sea, my million nameless joys, and my day's wage. You are my divinity, my madness, my selfishness, my transfiguration and purification. You are my rapscallionly fellow vagabond, my tempter and star. I want you. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1325:I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a friend ... if you have one."
George Bernard Shaw, playwright (to Winston Churchill)
"Cannot possibly attend first night; will attend second, if there is one."
— Churchill's response ~ Winston S Churchill,
1326:As George Bernard Shaw observed: "All great truths begin as blasphemies." Yet I have to say, the idea that there is intelligent life elsewhere in the cosmos does not seem terribly radical to me, nor does the notion that we could be receiving help from outside of our dimension. ~ Neale Donald Walsch,
1327:The great secret, Eliza, is not having bad manners or good manners or any other particular sort of manners, but having the same manner for all human souls: in short, behaving as if you were in Heaven, where there are no thirdclass carriages, and one soul is as good as another. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1328:Capitalism has destroyed our belief in any effective power but that of self interest backed by force. But even Capitalist cynicism will admit that however unconscionable we may be when our own interests are affected, we can be most indignantly virtuous at the expense of others. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1329:The English have no respect for their language, and will not teach their children to speak it. They spell it so abominably that no man can teach himself what it soundslike.It isimpossible foran Englishmanto openhis mouth without making some other Englishman hate or despise him. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1330:At present, intelligent people do not have their children vaccinated, nor does the law now compel them to. The result is not, as the Jennerians prophesied, the extermination of the human race by smallpox; on the contrary more people are now killed by vaccination than by smallpox. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1331:I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a friend ... if you have one."
George Bernard Shaw, playwright (to Winston Churchill)

"Cannot possibly attend first night; will attend second, if there is one."
— Churchill's response ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1332:Every child has a right to its own bent. . . . It has a right to find its own way and go its own way, whether that way seems wise or foolish to others, exactly as an adult has. It has a right to privacy as to its own doings and its own affairs as much as if it were its own father. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1333:I lay my eternal curse on whomsoever shall now or at any time hereafter make schoolbooks of my works and make me hated as Shakespeare is hated. My plays were not designed as instruments of torture. All the schools that lust after them get this answer, and will never get any other. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1334:It has taken me nearly twenty years of studied self-restraint, aided by the natural decay of my faculties, to make myself dull enough to be accepted as a serious person by the British public; and I am not sure that I am not still regarded as a suspicious character in some quarters. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1335:All the sweetness of religion is conveyed to the world by the hands of storytellers and image-makers. Without their fictions the truths of religion would for the multitude be neither intelligible nor even apprehensible; and the prophets would prophesy and the teachers teach in vain. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1336:Do not mistake your objection to defeat for an objection to fighting, your objection to being a slave for an objection to slavery, your objection to not being as rich as your neighbor for an objection to poverty. The cowardly, the insubordinate, and the envious share your objections. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1337:Girls, like men, want to be petted, pitied, and made much of, when they are diffident, in low spirits, or in unrequited love. These are services which the weak cannot render to the strong and which the strong will not render to the weak, except when there is also a difference of sex. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1338:Not until he acquires European manners does the American anarchist become the gentleman who assures you that people cannot be mademoral by Act of Parliament (the truth being that it is only by Acts of Parliament that men in large communities can be made moral, even when they want to). ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1339:People have pointed out evidences of personal feeling in my notices as if they were accusing me of a misdemeanor, not knowing that criticism written without personal feeling is not worth reading. It is the capacity for making good or bad art a personal matter that makes a man a critic. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1340:She is immensely interested in him. She has even secret mischievous moments in which she wishes she could get him alone, on a desert island, away from all ties and with nobody else in the world to consider, and just drag him off his pedestal and see him making love like any common man. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1341:Go on writing plays, my boy, One of these days one of these London producers will go into his office and say to his secretary, "Is there a play from Shaw this morning?" and when she says, "No," he will say, "Well, then we'll have to start on the rubbish." And that's your chance, my boy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1342:I have never thought much of the courage of a lion tamer. Inside the cage he is at least safe from other men. There is not much harm in a lion. He has no ideals, no religion, no politics, no chivalry, no gentility; in short, no reason for destroying anything that he does not want to eat ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1343:I hope you have lost your good looks, for while they last any fool can adore you, and the adoration of fools is bad for the soul. No, give me a ruined complexion and a lost figure and sixteen chins on a farmyard of Crow's feet and an obvious wig. Then you shall see me coming out strong. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1344:Nationalism must now be added to the refuse pile of superstitions. We are now citizens of the world, and the man who divides the race into elect Irishmen and reprobate foreign devils (especially Englishmen) had better live on the Blaskets where he can admire himself without disturbance. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1345:Men get tired of everything, of heaven no less than of hell; and that all history is nothing but a record of the oscillations of the world between these two extremes. An epoch is but a swing of the pendulum; and each generation thinks the world is progressing because it is always moving. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1346:Social questions are too sectional, too topical, too temporal to move a man to the mighty effort which is needed to produce greatpoetry. Prison reform may nerve Charles Reade to produce an effective and businesslike prose melodrama; but it could never produce Hamlet, Faust, or Peer Gynt. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1347:If I refuse to allow my leg to be amputated, its mortification and my death may prove that I was wrong; but if I let the leg go, nobody can ever prove that it would not have mortified had I been obstinate. Operation is therefore the safe side for the surgeon as well as the lucrative side. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1348:I do not waste my time writing pot-boilers: the pot must be boiled, and even my pot au feu has some chunks of fresh meat in it. ...I have no time to boil myself down; and anyhow I could not do so and preserve all the necessary nutriment and the flavoring on which the digestibility depends. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1349:In the arts of life main invents nothing; but in the arts of death he outdoes Nature herself, and produces by chemistry and machinery all the slaughter of plague, pestilence and famine. ... There is nothing in Man's industrial machinery but his greed and sloth: his heart is in his weapons. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1350:Soldiering, my dear madam, is the coward’s art of attacking mercilessly when you are strong, and keeping out of harm’s way when you are weak. That is the whole secret of successful fighting. Get your enemy at a disadvantage; and never, on any account, fight him on equal terms. George Bernard Shaw ~ Stanley Bing,
1351:All censorships exist to prevent anyone from challenging current conceptions and existing institutions. All progress is initiated by challenging current conceptions, and executed by supplanting existing institutions. Consequently, the first condition of progress is the removal of censorship. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1352:As I write, there is a craze for what is called psychoanalysis, or the cure of diseases by explaining to the patient what is the matter with him: an excellent plan if you happen to know what is the matter with him, especially when the explanation is that there is nothing the matter with him. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1353:It is a noteworthy fact that kicking and beating have played so considerable a part in the habits which necessity has imposed on mankind in past ages that the only way of preventing civilized men from beating and kicking their wives is to organize games in which they can kick and beat balls. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1354:An Irishman's imagination never lets him alone, never convinces him, never satisfies him; but it makes him that he can't face reality nor deal with it nor handle it nor conquer it: he can only sneer at them that do, and be 'agreeable to strangers', like a good-for-nothing woman on the streets. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1355:Every man to whom salvation is offered has an inalienable natural right to say 'No, thank you: I prefer to retain my full moral responsibility: it is not good for me to be able to load a scapegoat with my sins: I should be less careful how I committed them if I knew they would cost me nothing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1356:There is nothing on earth more exquisite than a bonny book, with well-placed columns of rich black writing in beautiful borders, and illuminated pictures cunningly inset. But nowadays, instead of looking at books, people read them. A book might as well be one of those orders for bacon and bran. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1357:[To an author who asked his opinion of his writing]
I find your work both original and good. Unfortunately, what is original is not good, and what is good is not original.

2. I have found only three things wrong with your work, the beginning, the middle, and the end. –George Bernard Shaw ~ Samuel Johnson,
1358:When you see a rich man’s wife shaking her head
over the thriftlessness of the poor
because they do not save,
pity the lady’s ignorance;
but do not irritate the poor
by repeating her nonsense to them. George Bernard Shaw
The Intelligent Woman’s Guide
to Socialism and Capitalism ~ Kerry Greenwood,
1359:the first core value—We don’t whine—and its corresponding quote, courtesy of playwright George Bernard Shaw: “The true joy in life is to be a force of fortune instead of a feverish, selfish little clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy. ~ Angela Duckworth,
1360:But whether the risks to which liberty exposes us are moral or physical our right to liberty involves the right to run them. A man who is not free to risk his neck as an aviator or his soul as a heretic is not free at all; and the right to liberty begins, not at the age of 21 years but 21 seconds. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1361:Even under the most perfect Social Democracy we should, without Communism, still be living like hogs, except that each hog would get his fair share of grub.... Whilst we are hogs, let us at least be well-fed, healthy, reciprocally useful hogs, instead of--well, instead of the sort we are at present. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1362:Such poverty as we have today in all our great cities degrades the poor, and infects with its degradation the whole neighborhood in which they live. And whatever can degrade a neighborhood can degrade a country and a continent and finally the whole civilized world, which is only a large neighborhood. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1363:Men trifle with their business and their politics but never trifle with their games. It brings truth home to them. They cannot pretend they have won when they have lost nor that they had a magnificent drive when they foozled it. The Englishman is at his best on the links and at his worst in the Cabinet. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1364:A Native American elder once described his own inner struggles in this manner: Inside of me there are two dogs. One of the dogs is mean and evil. The other dog is good. The mean dog fights the good dog all the time. When asked which dog wins, he reflected for a moment and replied, The one I feed the most. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1365:George Bernard Shaw once said, “It is a pity that youth has been wasted on the young.” The contrary is true. It is no secret at all that the Good Lord knew that it was better to put the illusions of life at the beginning in order that as we grew closer to eternity, we might the better see the purpose of living. ~ Fulton J Sheen,
1366:I want to be thoroughly used up when I die, for the harder I work, the more I live. Life is no “brief candle” to me. It is a sort of splendid torch which I have got hold of for the moment; and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations. —George Bernard Shaw ~ Hillary Rodham Clinton,
1367:The notion that Nature does not proceed by jumps is only one of the budget of plausible lies that we call classical education. Nature always proceeds by jumps. She may spend twenty thousand years making up her mind to jump; but when she makes it up at last, the jump is big enough to take us into a new age. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1368:I have very carefully studied Islam and the life of its Prophet (PBUH). I have done so both as a student of history and as a critic. And I have come to conclusion that Muhammad (PBUH) was indeed a great man and a deliverer and benefactor of mankind which was till then writhing under the most agonising Pain. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1369:The medical profession (is) a conspiracy to hide its own shortcomings. No doubt the same may be said of all professions. They are all conspiracies against the laity... (U)ntil there is a practicable alternative to blind trust in the doctor, the truth about the doctor is so terrible that we dare not face it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1370:There have been summits of civilization at which heretics like Socrates , who was killed because he was wiser than his neighbors, have not been tortured, but ordered to kill themselves in the most painless manner known to their judges. But from that summit there was a speedy relapse into our present savagery. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1371:The universal regard for money is the one hopeful fact in our civilization. Money is the most important thing in the world. It represents health, strength, honor, generosity and beauty . . . . Not the least of its virtues is that it destroys basic people as certainly as it fortifies and dignifies noble people. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1372:The practical question, then, is what to do with the children. Tolerate them at home we will not. Let them run loose in the streets we dare not until our streets become safe places for children, which, to our utter shame, they are not at present, though they can hardly be worse than some homes and some schools. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1373:I was told that my diet was so poor that I could not repair the bones that were broken and operated on. So I have just had an Xradiograph taken; and lo! perfectly mended solid bone so beautifully white that I have left instructions that, if I die, a glove stretcher is to be made of me and sent to you as a souvenir ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1374:Nobody can live in society without conventions. The reason why sensible people are as conventional as they can bear to be is that conventionality saves so much time and thought and trouble and social friction of one sort or another that it leaves them much more leisure time for freedom than unconventionality does. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1375:All industries are brought under the control of such people [film producers] by Capitalism. If the capitalists let themselves be seduced from their pursuit of profits to the enchantments of art, they would be bankrupt before they knew where they were. You cannot combine the pursuit of money with the pursuit of art. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1376:During the last considerable epidemic at the turn of the century, I was a member of the Health Committee of London Borough Council, and I learned how the credit of vaccination is kept up statistically by diagnosing all the revaccinated cases (of smallpox) as pustular eczema, varioloid or what not---except smallpox. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1377:You do not settle whether an argument is justified by merely showing that it is of some use. The distinction is not between useful and useless experiments but between barbarous and civilized behaviour. Vivisection is a social evil because if it advances human knowledge, it does so at the expense of human character. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1378:The secret of being miserable is to have leisure to bother about whether you are happy or not. The cure for it is occupation, because occupation means pre-occupation; and the pre-occupied person is neither happy nor unhappy, but simply alive and active. That is why it is necessary to happiness that one should be tired. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1379:You are all fundamentalists with a top dressing of science. That is why you are the stupidest of conservatives and reactionists in politics and the most bigoted of obstructionists in science itself. When it comes to getting a move on you are all of the same opinion: stop it, flog it, hang it, dynamite it, stamp it out. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1380:Geniuses are horrid, intolerant, easily offended, sleeplessly self-conscious men, who expect their wives to be angels with no further business in life than to pet and worship their husbands. Even at the best they are not comfortable men to live with; and a perfect husband is one who is perfectly comfortable to live with. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1381:Instruction in sex is as important as instruction in food; yet not only are our adolescents not taught the physiology of sex, but never warned that the strongest sexual attraction may exist between persons so incompatible in tastes and capacities that they could not endure living together for a week much less a lifetime. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1382:What is both surprising and delightful is that the spectators are allowed, and even expected, to join in the vocal part of the game...There is no reason why the field should not try to put the batsman off his stroke at the critical moment by neatly timed disparagements of his wife's fidelity and his mother's respectability. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1383:After studying the Hungarian language for years, I can confidently conclude that had Hungarian been my mother tongue, it would have been more precious. Simply because through this extraordinary, ancient and powerful language it is possible to precisely describe the tiniest differences and the most secretive tremors of emotions. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1384:To me the sole hope of human salvation lies in teaching Man to regard himself as an experiment in the realization of God, to regard his hands as God's hand, his brain as God's brain, his purpose as God's purpose. He must regard God as a helpless Longing, which longed him into existence by its desperate need for an executive organ. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1385:Perhaps the greatest social service that can be rendered by anybody to the country and to mankind is to bring up a family. But here again, because there is nothing to sell, there is a very general disposition to regard a married woman's work as no work at all, and to take it as a matter of course that she should not be paid for it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1386:It exasperated her to think that the dungeon in which she had languished for so many unhappy years had been unlocked all the time, and that the impulses she had so carefully struggled with and stifled for the sake of keeping well with society, were precisely those by which alone she could have come into any sort of sincere human contact. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1387:The absurdly talented George Bernard Shaw—a world-class writer and a founder of the London School of Economics—noted this thought deficit many years ago. “Few people think more than two or three times a year,” Shaw reportedly said. “I have made an international reputation for myself by thinking once or twice a week.” We too try to think once. ~ Steven D Levitt,
1388:This is the true joy in life: being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one, being thoroughly worn out before you are thrown on the scrap heap, being a force of nature instead of a feverish, selfish, little clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy. —GEORGE BERNARD SHAW ~ David Richo,
1389:Our laws make law impossible; our liberties destroy all freedom; our property is organized robbery; our morality an impudent hypocrisy; our wisdom is administered by inexperienced or mal-experienced dupes; our power wielded by cowards and weaklings; and our honour false in all its points. I am an enemy of the existing order for good reasons ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1390:While browsing in a second-hand bookshop one day, George Bernard Shaw was amused to find a copy of one of his own works which he himself had inscribed for a friend: "To ----, with esteem, George Bernard Shaw." He immediately purchased the book and returned it to the friend with a second inscription: "With renewed esteem, George Bernard Shaw. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1391:A dinner! How horrible! I am to be made the pretext for killing all those wretched animals and birds, and fish! Thank you for nothing. Now if it were to be a fast instead of a feast; say a solemn three days' abstention from corpses in my honour, I could at least pretend to believe that it was disinterested. Blood sacrifices are not in my line ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1392:Popular Christianity has for its emblem a gibbet, for its chief sensation a sanginary execution after torture, for its central mystery is an insane vengeance bought off by a trumpery expiation. But there is a nobler and profounder Christianity which affirms the sacred mystery of equality and forbids the glaring futility and folly of vengeance. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1393:A man of genius is not a man who sees more than other men do. On the contrary, it is very often found that he is absentminded andobserves much less than other people.... Why is it that the public have such an exaggerated respect for him--after he is dead? The reason is that the man of genius understands the importance of the few things he sees. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1394:Those who talk most about the blessings of marriage and the constancy of its vows are the very people who declare that if the chain were broken and the prisoners left free to choose, the whole social fabric would fly asunder. You cannot have the argument both ways. If the prisoner is happy, why lock him in? If he is not, why pretend that he is? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1395:If you lived in London, where the whole system is one of false good-fellowship, and you may know a man for twenty years without finding out that he hates you like poison, you would soon have your eyes opened. There we do unkind things in a kind way: we say bitter things in a sweet voice: we always give our friends chloroform when we tear them to pieces. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1396:I have prophesied about the faith of Muhammad that it would be acceptable to the Europe of tomorrow as it is beginning to be acceptable to the Europe of today. ... I believe that if a man like him were to assume the dictatorship of the modern world he would succeed in solving its problems in a way that would bring it the much-needed peace and happiness. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1397:When an Englishman wants something, George Bernard Shaw observed, he never publicly admits to his wanting it; instead, his want is expressed as ‘a burning conviction that it is his moral and religious duty to conquer those who possess the thing he wants’. Durant is scathing about this pretence: ‘Hypocrisy was added to brutality, while the robbery went on.’ And ~ Shashi Tharoor,
1398:Every Englishman is born with a certain miraculous power that makes him master of the world. When he wants a thing, he never tells himself that he wants it. He waits patiently until there comes into his mind, no one knows how, a burning conviction that it is his moral and religious duty to conquer those who have got the thing he wants. —GEORGE BERNARD SHAW, 1897 ~ Michelle Moran,
1399:The average age (longevity) of a meat eater is 63. I am on the verge of 85 and still work as hard as ever. I have lived quite long enough and am trying to die; but I simply cannot do it. A single beef-steak would finish me; but I cannot bring myself to swallow it. I am oppressed with a dread of living forever. That is the only disadvantage of vegetarianism. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1400:The body was the slave of the vortex; but the slave has become the master; and we must free ourselves from that tyranny. It is this stuff [ indicating her body ], this flesh and blood and bone and all the rest of it, that is intolerable. Even prehistoric man dreamed of what he called an astral body, and asked who would deliver him from the body of this death. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1401:We are more gullible and superstitious today than we were in the Middle Ages, and an example of modern credulity is the widespread belief that the Earth is round. The average man can advance not a single reason for thinking that the Earth is round. He merely swallows this theory because there is something about it that appeals to the twentieth century mentality. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1402:A man's interest in the world is only the overflow from his interest in himself. When you are a child your vessel is not yet full;so you care for nothing but your own affairs. When you grow up, your vessel overflows; and you are a politician, a philosopher, or an explorer and adventurer. In old age the vessel dries up: there is no overflow: you are a child again. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1403:By senior year, Anson’s athletes know all twelve by heart, beginning with the first core value—We don’t whine—and its corresponding quote, courtesy of playwright George Bernard Shaw: “The true joy in life is to be a force of fortune instead of a feverish, selfish little clod of ailments and grievances complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy. ~ Angela Duckworth,
1404:I must remind you that our credulity is not to be measured by the truth of the things we believe. When men believed that the earthwas flat, they were not credulous: they were using their common sense, and, if asked to prove that the earth was flat, would have said simply, "Look at it." Those who refuse to believe that it is round are exercising a wholesome skepticism. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1405:When a man of normal habits is ill, everyone hastens to assure him that he is going to recover. When a vegetarian is ill (which fortunately very seldom happens), everyone assures him that he is going to die, and that they told him so, and that it serves him right. They implore him to take at least a little gravy, so as to give himself a chance of lasting out the night ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1406:No child should be brought up to suppose that its food and clothes come down from heaven or are miraculously conjured from empty space by papa. Loathsome as we have made the idea of duty (like the idea of work) we must habituate children to a sense of repayable obligation to the community for what they consume and enjoy, and inculcate the repayment as a point of honor. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1407:That is the injustice of a woman's lot. A woman has to bring up her children; and that means to restrain them, to deny them things they want, to set them tasks, to punish them when they do wrong, to do all the unpleasant things. And then the father, who has nothing to do but pet them and spoil them, comes in when all her work is done and steals their affection from her. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1408:Even to this day it is easier than it ought to be for me to get a rise out of an American by telling him something about himself which is equally true about every human being on the face of the globe. He at once resents this as a disparagement and an assertion on my part that people in other parts of the globe are not like that, and are loftily superior to such weaknesses. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1409:Give me the artist who breathes it like a native, and goes about his work in it as quietly as a common man goes about his ordinary business. Mozart did so; and that is why I like him. Even if I did not, I should pretend to; for a taste in his music is a mark of caste among musicians, and should be worn, like a tall hat, by the amateur who wishes to pass for a true Brahmin. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1410:Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw smelled the Malthusian morbidity underlying natural selection, lamenting, “When its whole significance dawns on you, your heart sinks into a heap of sand within you.” Shaw lamented natural selection’s “hideous fatalism,” and complained of its “damnable reduction of beauty and intelligence, of strength and purpose, of honor and aspiration.”4 ~ Christopher Ryan,
1411:When I see that the nineteenth century has crowned the idolatry of Art with the deification of Love, so that every poet is supposed to have pierced to the holy of holies when he has announced that Love is the Supreme, or the Enough, or the All, I feel that Art was safer in the hands of the most fanatical of Cromwell's major generals than it will be if ever it gets into mine. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1412:I am giving you examples of the fact that this creature man, who in his own selfish affairs is a coward to the backbone, will fight for an idea like a hero. . . . I tell you, gentlemen, if you can shew a man a piece of what he now calls God's work to do, and what he will later call by many new names, you can make him entirely reckless of the consequences to himself personally. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1413:The epithet beautiful is used by surgeons to describe operations which their patients describe as ghastly, by physicists to describe methods of measurement which leave sentimentalists cold, by lawyers to describe cases which ruin all the parties to them, and by lovers to describe the objects of their infatuation, however unattractive they may appear to the unaffected spectators. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1414:Women are not angels. They are as foolish as men in many ways; but they have had to devote themselves to life whilst men have had to devote themselves to death; and that makes a vital difference in male and female religion. Women have been forced to fear whilst men have been forced to dare: the heroism of a woman is to nurse and protect life, and of a man to destroy it and court death. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1415:Fine art is the subtlest, the most seductive, the most effective instrument of moral propaganda in the world, excepting only the example of personal conduct; and I waive even this exception in favor of the art of the stage, because it works by exhibiting examples of personal conduct made intelligible and moving to crowds of unobservant unreflecting people to whom real life means nothing. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1416:Your wits can't thicken in that soft moist air, on those white springy roads, in those misty rushes and brown bogs, on those hillsides of granite rocks and magenta heather. You've no such colours in the sky, no such lure in the distances, no such sadness in the evenings. Oh the dreaming! the dreaming! the torturing, heart-scalding, never satisfying dreaming, dreaming, dreaming, dreaming! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1417:I have always held the religion of Muhammad in high estimation because of its wonderful vitality. It is the only religion which appears to me to possess that assimilating capability to the changing phase of existence which can make itself appeal to every age... I have studied him - the wonderful man, and in my opinion far from being an Anti-Christ he must be called the Saviour of Humanity. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1418:The Anti-Vivisector does not deny that physiologists must make experiments and even take chances with new methods. He says that they must not seek knowledge by criminal methods, just as they must not make money by criminal methods. He does not object to Galileo dropping cannon balls from the top of the leaning tower of Pisa; but he would object to shoving off two dogs or American tourists. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1419:I wish to boast that Pygmalion has been an extremely successful play all over Europe and North America as well as at home. It is so intensely and deliberately didactic, and its subject is esteemed so dry, that I delight in throwing it at the heads of the wiseacres who repeat the parrot cry that art should never be didactic. It goes to prove my contention that art should never be anything else. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1420:When you want to put something into your part that is not in the play, you must ask the author-or some other author-to lead up to the interpolation for you. Never forget that the effect of a line may depend not on its delivery, but on something said earlier in the play, either by somebody else or by yourself, and that if you change it, it may be necessary to change the whole first act as well. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1421:You are all alike, you respectable people. You can't tell me the bursting strain of a ten-inch gun, which is a very simple matter;but you all think you can tell me the bursting strain of a man under temptation. You daren't handle high explosives; but you're all ready to handle honesty and truth and justice and the whole duty of man, and kill one another at that game. What a country! What a world! ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1422:Ye poor posterity, think not that ye are the first. Other fools before ye have seen the sun rise and set, and the moon change her shape and her hour. As they were so ye are; and yet not so great; for the pyramids my people built stand to this day; whilst the dustheaps on which ye slave, and which ye call empires, scatter in the wind even as ye pile your dead sons' bodies on them to make yet more dust. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1423:When rehearsals for Pygmalion ended at His Majesty's theatre, with Mrs. Patrick Campbell, Jenny's husband's mistress playing Eliza Doolittle, GBS [George Bernard Shaw] wired Winston, "I am reserving two tickets for you for my premiere. Come and bring a friend, if you have one."

Churchill wired back. "Impossible to be present for the first performance. Will attend the second, if there is one. ~ William Manchester,
1424:In truth , mankind cannot be saved from without, by schoolmasters or any other sort of masters: it can only be lamed and enslaved by them. It is said that if you wash a cat it will never again wash itself. This may or may not be true : what is certain is that if you teach a man anything he will never learn it; and if you cure him of a disease he will be unable to cure himself the next time it attacks him. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1425:In 1913, George Bernard Shaw described witnessing the cremation of his mother. Her body was placed in a violet coffin and loaded feet-first into the flames. “And behold!” he wrote. “The feet burst miraculously into streaming ribbons of garnet coloured lovely flame, smokeless and eager, like Pentecostal tongues, and as the whole coffin passed in it sprang into flame all over; and my mother became that beautiful fire. ~ Anonymous,
1426:There is nothing so bad or so good that you will not find Englishmen doing it; but you will never find an Englishman in the wrong. He does everything on principle. He fights you on patriotic principles; he robs you on business principles; he enslaves you on imperial principles; he bullies you on manly principles; he supports his king on loyal principles and cuts off his king's head on republican principles. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1427:We all have--to put it as nicely as I can--our lower centres and our higher centres. Our lower centres act: they act with terriblepower that sometimes destroys us; but they don't talk.... Since the war the lower centres have become vocal. And the effect is that of an earthquake. For they speak truths that have never been spoken before--truths that the makers of our domestic institutions have tried to ignore. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1428:I talk democracy to these men and women. I tell them that they have the vote, and that theirs is the kingdom and the power and the glory. I say to them You are supreme: exercise your power. They say, That's right: tell us what to do; and I tell them. I say Exercise our vote intelligently by voting for me. And they do. That's democracy; and a splendid thing it is too for putting the right men in the right place. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1429:But a mother is like a broomstick or like the sun in the heavens, it does not matter which as far as one's knowledge of her is concerned: the broomstick is there and the sun is there; and whether the child is beaten by it or warmed and enlightened by it, it accepts it as a fact in nature, and does not conceive it as having had youth, passions, and weaknesses, or as still growing, yearning, suffering, and learning. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1430:My wife thinks I think I'm such hot stuff. She's wrong. I don't think I'm such hot stuff.

My hero George Bernard Shaw, socialist, and shrewd and funny playwright, said in his eighties that if he was considered smart, he sure pitied people who were considered dumb. He said that, having lived as long as he had, he was at last sufficiently wise to serve as a reasonably competent office boy.

That's how I feel. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
1431:Just as the historian can teach no real history until he has cured his readers of the romantic delusion that the greatness of a queen consists in her being a pretty woman and having her head cut off, so the playwright of the first order can do nothing with his audience until he has cured them of looking at the stage through the keyhole, and sniffing round the theatre as prurient people sniff round the divorce court. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1432:In my dreams is a country where the State is the Church and the Church the people: three in one and one in three. It is a commonwealth in which work is play and play is life: three in one and one in three. It is a temple in which the priest is the worshiper and the worshiper the worshipped: three in one and one in three. It is a godhead in which all life is human and all humanity divine: three in one and one in three. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1433:Tan sólo la consagración ética dedicada a un propósito trascendente puede superar la finitud de la existencia. Como dijo George Bernard Shaw en Hombre y superhombre: “Esta es la verdadera dicha de la vida, ser útil a un propósito que reconoces como algo poderoso, ser una fuerza de la naturaleza en lugar de un patán egoísta y afiebrado, lleno de dolencias y resentimientos, quejándote de que el mundo no está dedicado a hacerte feliz”. ~ Anonymous,
1434:Hollywood keeps before its child audiences a string of glorified young heroes, everyone of whom is an unhesitating and violent Anarchist. His one answer to everything that annoys him or disparages his country or his parents or his young lady or his personal code of manly conduct is to give the offender a "sock" in the jaw.... My observation leads me to believe that it is not the virtuous people who are good at socking jaws. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1435:The law is equal before all of us; but we are not all equal before the law. Virtually there is one law for the rich and another for the poor, one law for the cunning and another for the simple, one law for the forceful and another for the feeble, one law for the ignorant and another for the learned, one law for the brave and another for the timid, and within family limits one law for the parent and no law at all for the child. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1436:The schoolmaster is the person who takes the children off the parents' hands for a consideration. That is to say, he establishes a child prison, engages a number of employee schoolmasters as turnkeys, and covers up the essential cruelty and unnaturalness of the situation by torturing the children if they do not learn, and calling this process, which is within the capacity of any fool or blackguard, by the sacred name of Teaching. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1437:The apparent multiplication of gods is bewildering at the first glance, but you soon discover that they are the same GOD. There is always one uttermost God who defies personification. This makes Hinduism the most tolerant religion in the world, because its one transcendent God includes all possible gods. In fact Hinduism is so elastic and so subtle that the most profound Methodist, and crudest idolater, are equally at home with it. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1438:The word "utopia" has two meanings. It means both "good place" and "nowhere". That's the way it should be. The happiest places, I think, are the ones that reside just this side of paradise. The perfect person would be insufferable to live with; likewise, we wouldn't want to live in the perfect place, either. "A life time of happiness! No man could bear it: It would be hell on earth," wrote George Bernard Shaw, in his play Man and Superman. ~ Eric Weiner,
1439:For the pre-Darwinian age had come to be regarded as a Dark Age in which men still believed that the book of Genesis was a standard scientific treatise, and that the only additions to it were Galileo'a demonstration of Leonardo da Vinci's simple remark that the earth is a moon of the sun, Sir Humphrey Davy's invention of the safety lamp, the discovery of electricity, the application of steam to industrial purposes, and the penny post. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1440:I also made it quite clear that Socialism means equality of income or nothing, and that under socialism you would not be allowed to be poor. You would be forcibly feed, clothed, lodged, taught, and employed whether you like it or not. If it were discovered that you had not character enough to be worth all this trouble, you might possibly be executed in a kindly manner; but whilst you were permitted to live you would have to live well. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1441:My religious convictions and scientific views cannot at present be more specifically defined than as those of a believer in creative revolution. I desire that no public monument or work of art or inscription or sermon or ritual service commemorating me shall suggest that I accepted the tenets peculiar to any established church or denomination nor take the form of a cross or any other instrument of torture or symbol of blood sacrifice. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1442:We are compelled by the theory of God's already achieved perfection to make Him a devil as well as a god, because of the existenceof evil. The god of love, if omnipotent and omniscient, must be the god of cancer and epilepsy as well.... Whoever admits that anything living is evil must either believe that God is malignantly capable of creating evil, or else believe that God has made many mistakes in His attempts to make a perfect being. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1443:In the Middle Ages people believed that the earth was flat, for which they had at least the evidence of their senses: we believe it to be round, not because as many as 1 percent of us could give physical reasons for so quaint a belief, but because modern science has convinced us that nothing that is obvious is true, and that everything that is magical, improbable, extraordinary, gigantic, microscopic, heartless, or outrageous is scientific. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1444:We're human beings we are - all of us - and that's what people are liable to forget. Human beings don't like peace and goodwill and everybody loving everybody else. However much they may think they do, they don't really because they're not made like that. Human beings love eating and drinking and loving and hating. They also like showing off, grabbing all they can, fighting for their rights and bossing anybody who'll give them half a chance. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1445:The notion that persons should be safe from extermination as long as they do not commit willful murder, or levy war against the Crown, or kidnap, or throw vitriol, is not only to limit social responsibility unnecessarily, and to privilege the large range of intolerable misconduct that lies outside them, but to divert attention from the essential justification for extermination, which is always incorrigible social incompatibility and nothing else. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1446:It is quite useless to declare that all men are born free if you deny that they are born good . Guarantee a man's goodness and his liberty will take care of itself. To guarantee his freedom on condition that you approve of his moral character is formally to abolish all freedom whatsoever, as every man's liberty is at the mercy of a moral indictment which any fool can trump up against everyone who violates custom, whether as a prophet or as a rascal. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1447:Capitalism drives the employers to do their worst to the employed, and the employed to do the least for them. And it boasts all the time of the incentive it provides to both to do their best! . . . The reason the Capitalist system has worked so far without jamming for more than a few months at a time, and then only in places, is that it has not yet succeeded in making a conquest of human nature so complete that everybody acts on strictly business principles. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1448:Unbounded hopes were placed on each successive extension of the electoral franchise, culminating in the enfranchisement of women.These hopes have been disappointed, because the voters, male and female, being politically untrained and uneducated, have (a) no grasp of constructive measures; (b) loathe taxation as such; (c) dislike being governed at all; and (d) dread and resent any extension of official interference as an encroachment on their personal liberty. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1449:During the Suffragette revolt of 1913 I[urged] that what was needed was not the vote, but a constitutional amendment enactingthat all representative bodies shall consist of women and men in equal numbers, whether elected or nominated or coopted or registered or picked up in the street like a coroner's jury. In the case of elected bodies the only way of effecting this is by the Coupled Vote. The representative unit must not be a man or a woman but a man and a woman. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1450:Marx's Kapital is not a treatise on socialism; it is a gerrymand against the bourgeoisie. It was supposed to be written for the working class, but the working man respects the bourgeoisie and wants to be a bourgeoisie. Marx never got a hold of him for a moment. It was the revolting sons of the bourgeoisie itself, like myself, that painted the flag red. The middle and upper classes are the revolutionary element in society. The proletariat is the conservative element. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1451:The art of manipulating public opinion, which is a necessary art for the democratic politician, and, like other arts, is sometimespractised with greater virtuosity by knaves than by honest men (who are apt to disdain it), has a different technique in different countries. For instance, in England we excel in whitewashing: in America they excel in tarring and feathering. We strain our nerves and stretch our consciences to avoid a scandal: Americans do the same to make one. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1452:We cut the throat of a calf and hang it up by the heels to bleed to death so that our veal cutlet may be white; we nail geese to a board and cram them with food because we like the taste of liver disease; we tear birds to pieces to decorate our women's hats; we mutilate domestic animals for no reason at all except to follow an instinctively cruel fashion; and we connive at the most abominable tortures in the hope of discovering some magical cure for our own diseases by them. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1453:Consejos para vivir La vida no es la búsqueda de uno mismo. La vida es más bien la creación de uno mismo. GEORGE BERNARD SHAW Es impresionante lo que uno puede conseguir, si no se preocupa de quién se llevará la fama. H. S. TRUMAN Nos podemos convertir en unos miserables o en unas personas fuertes. La cantidad de trabajo necesaria será siempre la misma. CARLOS CASTANEDA Lo que tenemos delante o lo que tenemos detrás es mínimo en comparación con lo que tenemos dentro. RALPH WALDO EMERSON ~ Tony Hsieh,
1454:Perhaps you know some well-off families who do not seem to suffer from their riches. They do not overeat themselves; they find occupations to keep themselves in health; they do not worry about their position; they put their money into safe investments and are content with a low rate of interest; and they bring up their children to live simply and do useful work. But this means that they do not live like rich people at all, and might therefore just as well have ordinary incomes. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1455:The thief who is in prison is not necessarily more dishonest than his fellows at large, but mostly one who, through ignorance or stupidity [or racism or poverty! - Draffan] steals in a way that is not customary. He snatches a loaf from the baker's counter and is promptly run into gaol. Another man snatches bread from the table of hundreds of widows and orphans and similar credulous souls who do not know the ways of company promoters; and, as likely as not, he is run into Parliament. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1456:George Bernard Shaw was right. He summed it all up when he said: "The secret of being miserable is to have the leisure to bother about whether you are happy or not." So don't bother to think about it! Spit on your hands and get busy. Your blood will start circulating; your mind will start ticking-and pretty soon this whole positive upsurge of life in your body will drive worry from your mind. Get busy. Keep busy. It's the cheapest kind of medicine there is on this earth-and one of the best. ~ Dale Carnegie,
1457:This kind of love can be thrilling and overwhelming and sometimes a hell of a lot of fun, but it is not the only “real” kind of love, nor is it always a good basis for an ongoing relationship. Yet as George Bernard Shaw famously remarked, “When two people are under the influence of the most violent, most insane, most delusive, and most transient of passions, they are required to swear that they will remain in that excited, abnormal, and exhausting condition continuously until death do them part. ~ Dossie Easton,
1458:My situation is a solemn one: life is offered to me on the condition of eating beefsteaks. But death is better than cannibalism. My will contains directions for my funeral, which will be followed, not by mourning coaches, but by oxen, sheep, flocks of poultry, and a small traveling aquarium of live fish, all wearing white scarves in honor of the man who perished rather than eat his fellow creatures. It will be, without the exception of Noah's Ark, the most remarkable thing of its kind ever seen. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1459:The medieval doctors of divinity who did not pretend to settle how many angels could dance on the point of a needle cut a very poor figure as far as romantic credulity is concerned beside the modern physicists who have settled to the billionth of a millimetre every movement and position in the dance of the electrons. Not for worlds would I question the precise accuracy of these calculations or the existence of electrons (whatever they may be). The fate of Joan is a warning to me against such heresy. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1460:Elsewhere I have argued that civilizations are divided into three phases. The first phase is barbarism, a time when people believe that the laws of their own village are the laws of nature, as George Bernard Shaw put it. The second phase is civilization, where people continue to believe in the justice of their ways but harbor openness to the idea that they might be in error. The third phase, decadence, is the moment in which people come to believe that there is no truth, or that all lies are equally true. ~ George Friedman,
1461:I have never been a poster boy for serenity, but I knew I needed to restore some semblance of inner peace. In search of a fix much quicker than my weekly forays into the talking cure, I came upon an ancient and proven practice, one that exists in every culture and religious tradition as a means to attaining calm and an alternate plane of consciousness: an extended fast. Buddha did it, Jesus did it, even Pythagoras and George Bernard Shaw did it. It's like a Cole Porter song from the world's least-fun musical. ~ David Rakoff,
1462:I am sorry to have to introduce the subject of Christmas. It is an indecent subject; a cruel, gluttonous subject; a drunken, disorderly subject; a wasteful, disastrous subject; a wicked, cadging, lying, filthy, blasphemous and demoralizing subject. Christmas is forced on a reluctant and disgusted nation by the shopkeepers and the press: on its own merits it would wither and shrivel in the fiery breath of universal hatred; and anyone who looked back to it would be turned into a pillar of greasy sausages. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1463:You can be a thorough-going Neo-Darwinian without imagination, metaphysics, poetry, conscience, or decency. For 'Natural Selection' has no moral significance: it deals with that part of evolution which has no purpose, no intelligence, and might more appropriately be called accidental selection, or better still, Unnatural Selection, since nothing is more unnatural than an accident. If it could be proved that the whole universe had been produced by such Selection, only fools and rascals could bear to live. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1464:As people get their opinions so largely from the newspapers they read, the corruption of the schools would not matter so much if the Press were free. But the Press is not free. As it costs at least a quarter of a million of money to establish a daily newspaper in London, the newspapers are owned by rich men. And they depend on the advertisements of other rich men. Editors and journalists who express opinions in print that are opposed to the interests of the rich are dismissed and replaced by subservient ones. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1465:The policy of letting things alone, in the practical sense that the Government should never interfere with business or go into business itself, is called Laisser-faire by economists and politicians. It has broken down so completely in practice that it is now discredited; but it was all the fashion in politics a hundred years ago, and is still influentially advocated by men of business and their backers who naturally would like to be allowed to make money as they please without regard to the interest of the public. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1466:My feelings about Das Kapital are the same as my feelings about the Koran. I know that it is historically important and I know that many people, not all of whom are idiots, find it a sort of Rock of Ages and containing inspiration. Yet when I look into it, it is to me inexplicable that it can have this effect. Its dreary, out-of-date, academic controversialising seems so extraordinarily unsuitable as material for the purpose … How could either of these books carry fire and sword round half the world? It beats me. [writing to George Bernard Shaw] ~ John Maynard Keynes,
1467:This is the true joy in life: Being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one, being a force of nature instead of a feverish, selfish little clod of ailments and grievances, complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy. I am of the opinion that my life belongs to the whole community and as long as I live, it is my privilege to do for it what I can. It is a sort of splendid torch which I have got hold of for the moment and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1468:You must all know half a dozen people at least who are no use in this world, who are more trouble than they are worth. Just put them there and say Sir, or Madam, now will you be kind enough to justify your existence? If you can't justify your existence, if you're not pulling your weight in the social boat, if you're not producing as much as you consume or perhaps a little more, then, clearly, we cannot use the organizations of our society for the purpose of keeping you alive, because your life does not benefit us and it can't be of very much use to yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1469:Perhaps I had better inform my Protestant readers that the famous Dogma of Papal Infallibility is by far the most modest pretension of the kind in existence. Compared with our infallible democracies, our infallible medical councils, our infallible astronomers, our infallible judges, and our infallible parliaments, the Pope is on his knees in the dust confessing his ignorance before the throne of God, asking only that as to certain historical matters on which he has clearly more sources of information open to him than anyone else his decision shall be taken as final. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1470:The moment we face it frankly we are driven to the conclusion that the community has a right to put a price on the right to live in it ... If people are fit to live, let them live under decent human conditions. If they are not fit to live, kill them in a decent human way. Is it any wonder that some of us are driven to prescribe the lethal chamber as the solution for the hard cases which are at present made the excuse for dragging all the other cases down to their level, and the only solution that will create a sense of full social responsibility in modern populations? ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1471:There is, on the whole, nothing on earth intended for innocent people so horrible as a school. To begin with, it is a prison. But in some respects more cruel than a prison. In a prison, for instance, you are not forced to read books written by the warders and the governor. . . .In the prison you are not forced to sit listening to turnkeys discoursing without charm or interest on subjects that they don't understand and don't care about, and therefore incapable of making you understand or care about. In a prison they may torture your body; but they do not torture your brains. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1472:The sexual mechanisms of the two genders are just not compatible, that’s the horrible truth of it. (...)

This is a truth we dare not acknowledge these days - because sameness is our religion and heretics are no more welcome now than they ever were - but I’m going to acknowledge it, because I’ve always felt that humility before the facts is the only thing that keeps a rational man together. Be humble in the face of facts, and proud in the face of opinions, as George Bernard Shaw once said.

He didn’t, actually. I just wanted to put some authority behind this observation of mine, because I know you’re not going to like it. ~ Hugh Laurie,
1473:121. George Bernard Shaw – Plays and Prefaces
122. Max Planck – Origin and Development of the Quantum Theory; Where Is Science Going?; Scientific Autobiography
123. Henri Bergson – Time and Free Will; Matter and Memory; Creative Evolution; The Two Sources of Morality and Religion
124. John Dewey – How We Think; Democracy and Education; Experience and Nature; Logic; the Theory of Inquiry
125. Alfred North Whitehead – An Introduction to Mathematics; Science and the Modern World; The Aims of Education and Other Essays; Adventures of Ideas
126. George Santayana – The Life of Reason; Skepticism and Animal Faith; Persons and Places
127. Vladimir Lenin – The State and Revo ~ Mortimer J Adler,
1474:Religion is a great force — the only real motive force in the world; but what you fellows don't understand is that you must get at a man through his own religion and not through yours. Instead of facing that fact, you persist in trying to convert all men to your own little sect, so that you can use it against them afterwards. You are all missionaries and proselytizers trying to uproot the native religion from your neighbor's flowerbeds and plant your own in its place. You would rather let a child perish in ignorance than have it taught by a rival sectary. You can talk to me of the quintessential equality of coal merchants and British officers; and yet you can't see the quintessential equality of all the religions. ~ George Bernard Shaw in Getting Married (1908),
1475:inside “VIRTUE,” according to George Bernard Shaw, “is insufficient temptation.” But new research on the consumption patterns of the environmentally minded suggests that virtue and self-indulgence often go hand-in-hand. A recent paper* by Uma Karmarkar of Harvard Business School and Bryan Bollinger of Duke Fuqua School of Business finds that shoppers who bring their own bags when they buy groceries like to reward themselves for it. For two years the authors tracked transactions at a supermarket in America. Perhaps unsurprisingly, shoppers who brought their own bags bought more green products than those who used the store’s bags. But the eco-shoppers were also more likely to buy sweets, ice cream and crisps. Psychologists call this sort of behaviour “moral ~ Anonymous,
1476:A very intelligent group of revolutionary fellows in the United Kingdom created a political movement called the Fabian Society, named after the Cunctator, based on opportunistically delaying the revolution. The society included George Bernard Shaw, H. G. Wells, Leonard and Virginia Woolf, Ramsay MacDonald, and even Bertrand Russell for a moment. In retrospect, it turned out to be a very effective strategy, not so much as a way to achieve their objectives, but rather to accommodate the fact that these objectives are moving targets. Procrastination turned out to be a way to let events take their course and give the activists the chance to change their minds before committing to irreversible policies. And of course members did change their minds after seeing the failures and horrors of Stalinism and similar regimes. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
1477:De Forest came up with the idea of imprinting the sound directly onto the film. That meant that no matter what happened with the film, sound and image would always be perfectly aligned. Failing to find backers in America, he moved to Berlin in the early 1920s and there developed a system that he called Phonofilm. De Forest made his first Phonofilm movie in 1921 and by 1923 he was back in America giving public demonstrations. He filmed Calvin Coolidge making a speech, Eddie Cantor singing, George Bernard Shaw pontificating, and DeWolf Hopper reciting “Casey at the Bat.” By any measure, these were the first talking pictures. However, no Hollywood studio would invest in them. The sound quality still wasn’t ideal, and the recording system couldn’t quite cope with multiple voices and movement of a type necessary for any meaningful dramatic presentation. ~ Bill Bryson,
1478:In fact, many of the most famous anti-Christian polemicists of the last 200 years—who sought to use science to justify their unbelief—never themselves set foot in a laboratory or conducted a single field observation. That includes the Marquis de Sade (a writer), Percy Bysshe Shelley (a poet), Friedrich Nietzsche (a philologist by training), Algernon Swinburne (a poet), Bertrand Russell (a philosopher), Karl Marx (a philosopher), Robert Ingersoll (a lecturer), George Bernard Shaw (a playwright), Vladimir Lenin (a communist revolutionary), Joseph Stalin (a communist dictator), H. L. Mencken (a newspaper columnist), Jean-Paul Sartre (a philosopher), Benito Mussolini (a fascist dictator), Luis Buñuel (Spanish filmmaker), Clarence Darrow (a lawyer), Ayn Rand (a novelist), Christopher Hitchens (a journalist), Larry Flynt (a pornographer), George Soros and Warren Buffett (investors), and Penn and Teller (magicians). ~ Robert J Hutchinson,
1479:And here’s an example of deliberate violation of a Fake Rule:   Fake Rule: The generic pronoun in English is he. Violation: “Each one in turn reads their piece aloud.”   This is wrong, say the grammar bullies, because each one, each person is a singular noun and their is a plural pronoun. But Shakespeare used their with words such as everybody, anybody, a person, and so we all do when we’re talking. (“It’s enough to drive anyone out of their senses,” said George Bernard Shaw.) The grammarians started telling us it was incorrect along in the sixteenth or seventeenth century. That was when they also declared that the pronoun he includes both sexes, as in “If a person needs an abortion, he should be required to tell his parents.” My use of their is socially motivated and, if you like, politically correct: a deliberate response to the socially and politically significant banning of our genderless pronoun by language legislators enforcing the notion that the male sex is the only one that counts. I consistently break a rule I consider to be not only fake but pernicious. I know what I’m doing and why. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
1480:The young activist who recycles Robert F. Kennedy’s line “There are those who look at things the way they are, and ask why . . . I dream of things that never were, and ask why not?” has no idea he’s a walking, talking cliché, a non-conformist in theory while a predictable conformist in fact. But he also has no idea he’s tapping into his inner utopian....

RFK didn’t coin the phrase (JFK didn’t either, but he did use it first). The line actually comes from one of the worst people of the 20th century, George Bernard Shaw (admittedly he’s on the B-list of worst people since he never killed anybody; he just celebrated people who did).

That much a lot of people know. But the funny part is the line comes from Shaw’s play Back to Methuselah. Specifically, it’s what the Serpent says to Eve in order to sell her on eating the apple and gaining a kind of immortality through sex (or something like that). Of course, Shaw’s Serpent differs from the biblical serpent, because Shaw — a great rationalizer of evil — is naturally sympathetic to the serpent. Still, it’s kind of hilarious that legions of Kennedy worshippers invoke this line as a pithy summation of the idealistic impulse, putting it nearly on par with Kennedy’s nationalistic “Ask Not” riff, without realizing they’re stealing lines from . . . the Devil.

​I don’t think this means you can march into the local high school, kick open the door to the student government offices with a crucifix extended, shouting “the power of Christ compels you!” while splashing holy water on every kid who uses that “RFK” quote on his Facebook page. But it is interesting. ~ Jonah Goldberg,
1481:When I visited George Bernard Shaw, in 1948, at his home in Aylot, a suburb of London, he was extremely anxious for me to tell him all that I knew about Ingersoll. During the course of the conversation, he told me that Ingersoll had made a tremendous impression upon him, and had exercised an influence upon him probably greater than that of any other man. He seemed particularly anxious to impress me with the importance of Ingersoll's influence upon his intellectual endeavors and accomplishments.

In view of this admission, what percentage of the greatness of Shaw belongs to Ingersoll? If Ingersoll's influence upon so great an intellect as George Bernard Shaw was that extensive, what must have been his influence upon others?

What seed of wisdom did he plant into the minds of others, and what accomplishments of theirs should be attributed to him? The world will never know.

What about the countless thousands from whom he lifted the clouds of darkness and fear, and who were emancipated from the demoralizing dogmas and creeds of ignorance and superstition?

What will be Ingersoll's influence upon the minds of future generations, who will come under the spell of his magic words, and who will be guided into the channels of human betterment by the unparalleled example of his courageous life?

The debt the world owes Robert G. Ingersoll can never be paid. ~ Joseph Lewis,
1482:was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon" (or simply "The Bard"). His surviving works consist of 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems. His plays have been translated into every major living language, and are performed more often than those of any other playwright. Shakespeare was born and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon. At the age of 18 he married Anne Hathaway, who bore him three children: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith. Between 1585 and 1592 he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of the playing company the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men. He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613, where he died three years later. Few records of Shakespeare's private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his sexuality, religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by others. Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1590 and 1613. His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the sixteenth century. Next he wrote mainly tragedies until about 1608, including Hamlet, King Lear, and Macbeth, considered some of the finest examples in the English language. In his last phase, he wrote tragicomedies, also known as romances, and collaborated with other playwrights. Many of his plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy during his lifetime, and in 1623 two of his former theatrical colleagues published the First Folio, a collected edition of his dramatic works that included all but two of the plays now recognised as Shakespeare's. Shakespeare was a respected poet and playwright in his own day, but his reputation did not rise to its present heights until the nineteenth century. The Romantics, in particular, acclaimed Shakespeare's genius, and the Victorians hero-worshipped Shakespeare with a reverence that George Bernard Shaw called "bardolatry". In the twentieth century, his work was repeatedly adopted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. His plays remain highly popular today and are consistently performed and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the world. Source: Wikipedia ~ William Shakespeare,
1483:William Shakespeare (baptised 26 April 1564 – died 23 April 1616) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon" (or simply "The Bard"). His surviving works consist of 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems. His plays have been translated into every major living language, and are performed more often than those of any other playwright. Shakespeare was born and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon. At the age of 18 he married Anne Hathaway, who bore him three children: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith. Between 1585 and 1592 he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of the playing company the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men. He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613, where he died three years later. Few records of Shakespeare's private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his sexuality, religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by others. Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1590 and 1613. His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the sixteenth century. Next he wrote mainly tragedies until about 1608, including Hamlet, King Lear, and Macbeth, considered some of the finest examples in the English language. In his last phase, he wrote tragicomedies, also known as romances, and collaborated with other playwrights. Many of his plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy during his lifetime, and in 1623 two of his former theatrical colleagues published the First Folio, a collected edition of his dramatic works that included all but two of the plays now recognised as Shakespeare's. Shakespeare was a respected poet and playwright in his own day, but his reputation did not rise to its present heights until the nineteenth century. The Romantics, in particular, acclaimed Shakespeare's genius, and the Victorians hero-worshipped Shakespeare with a reverence that George Bernard Shaw called "bardolatry". In the twentieth century, his work was repeatedly adopted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. His plays remain highly popular today and are consistently performed and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the world. Source: Wikipedia ~ William Shakespeare,
1484:ultimately, most of us would choose a rich and meaningful life over an empty, happy one, if such a thing is even possible. “Misery serves a purpose,” says psychologist David Myers. He’s right. Misery alerts us to dangers. It’s what spurs our imagination. As Iceland proves, misery has its own tasty appeal. A headline on the BBC’s website caught my eye the other day. It read: “Dirt Exposure Boosts Happiness.” Researchers at Bristol University in Britain treated lung-cancer patients with “friendly” bacteria found in soil, otherwise known as dirt. The patients reported feeling happier and had an improved quality of life. The research, while far from conclusive, points to an essential truth: We thrive on messiness. “The good life . . . cannot be mere indulgence. It must contain a measure of grit and truth,” observed geographer Yi-Fu Tuan. Tuan is the great unheralded geographer of our time and a man whose writing has accompanied me throughout my journeys. He called one chapter of his autobiography “Salvation by Geography.” The title is tongue-in-cheek, but only slightly, for geography can be our salvation. We are shaped by our environment and, if you take this Taoist belief one step further, you might say we are our environment. Out there. In here. No difference. Viewed that way, life seems a lot less lonely. The word “utopia” has two meanings. It means both “good place” and “nowhere.” That’s the way it should be. The happiest places, I think, are the ones that reside just this side of paradise. The perfect person would be insufferable to live with; likewise, we wouldn’t want to live in the perfect place, either. “A lifetime of happiness! No man could bear it: It would be hell on Earth,” wrote George Bernard Shaw, in his play Man and Superman. Ruut Veenhoven, keeper of the database, got it right when he said: “Happiness requires livable conditions, but not paradise.” We humans are imminently adaptable. We survived an Ice Age. We can survive anything. We find happiness in a variety of places and, as the residents of frumpy Slough demonstrated, places can change. Any atlas of bliss must be etched in pencil. My passport is tucked into my desk drawer again. I am relearning the pleasures of home. The simple joys of waking up in the same bed each morning. The pleasant realization that familiarity breeds contentment and not only contempt. Every now and then, though, my travels resurface and in unexpected ways. My iPod crashed the other day. I lost my entire music collection, nearly two thousand songs. In the past, I would have gone through the roof with rage. This time, though, my anger dissipated like a summer thunderstorm and, to my surprise, I found the Thai words mai pen lai on my lips. Never mind. Let it go. I am more aware of the corrosive nature of envy and try my best to squelch it before it grows. I don’t take my failures quite so hard anymore. I see beauty in a dark winter sky. I can recognize a genuine smile from twenty yards. I have a newfound appreciation for fresh fruits and vegetables. Of all the places I visited, of all the people I met, one keeps coming back to me again and again: Karma Ura, ~ Eric Weiner,
1485:76. David Hume – Treatise on Human Nature; Essays Moral and Political; An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding
77. Jean-Jacques Rousseau – On the Origin of Inequality; On the Political Economy; Emile – or, On Education, The Social Contract
78. Laurence Sterne – Tristram Shandy; A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy
79. Adam Smith – The Theory of Moral Sentiments; The Wealth of Nations
80. Immanuel Kant – Critique of Pure Reason; Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals; Critique of Practical Reason; The Science of Right; Critique of Judgment; Perpetual Peace
81. Edward Gibbon – The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; Autobiography
82. James Boswell – Journal; Life of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D.
83. Antoine Laurent Lavoisier – Traité Élémentaire de Chimie (Elements of Chemistry)
84. Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison – Federalist Papers
85. Jeremy Bentham – Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation; Theory of Fictions
86. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe – Faust; Poetry and Truth
87. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier – Analytical Theory of Heat
88. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel – Phenomenology of Spirit; Philosophy of Right; Lectures on the Philosophy of History
89. William Wordsworth – Poems
90. Samuel Taylor Coleridge – Poems; Biographia Literaria
91. Jane Austen – Pride and Prejudice; Emma
92. Carl von Clausewitz – On War
93. Stendhal – The Red and the Black; The Charterhouse of Parma; On Love
94. Lord Byron – Don Juan
95. Arthur Schopenhauer – Studies in Pessimism
96. Michael Faraday – Chemical History of a Candle; Experimental Researches in Electricity
97. Charles Lyell – Principles of Geology
98. Auguste Comte – The Positive Philosophy
99. Honoré de Balzac – Père Goriot; Eugenie Grandet
100. Ralph Waldo Emerson – Representative Men; Essays; Journal
101. Nathaniel Hawthorne – The Scarlet Letter
102. Alexis de Tocqueville – Democracy in America
103. John Stuart Mill – A System of Logic; On Liberty; Representative Government; Utilitarianism; The Subjection of Women; Autobiography
104. Charles Darwin – The Origin of Species; The Descent of Man; Autobiography
105. Charles Dickens – Pickwick Papers; David Copperfield; Hard Times
106. Claude Bernard – Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine
107. Henry David Thoreau – Civil Disobedience; Walden
108. Karl Marx – Capital; Communist Manifesto
109. George Eliot – Adam Bede; Middlemarch
110. Herman Melville – Moby-Dick; Billy Budd
111. Fyodor Dostoevsky – Crime and Punishment; The Idiot; The Brothers Karamazov
112. Gustave Flaubert – Madame Bovary; Three Stories
113. Henrik Ibsen – Plays
114. Leo Tolstoy – War and Peace; Anna Karenina; What is Art?; Twenty-Three Tales
115. Mark Twain – The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; The Mysterious Stranger
116. William James – The Principles of Psychology; The Varieties of Religious Experience; Pragmatism; Essays in Radical Empiricism
117. Henry James – The American; The Ambassadors
118. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche – Thus Spoke Zarathustra; Beyond Good and Evil; The Genealogy of Morals;The Will to Power
119. Jules Henri Poincaré – Science and Hypothesis; Science and Method
120. Sigmund Freud – The Interpretation of Dreams; Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis; Civilization and Its Discontents; New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis
121. George Bernard Shaw – Plays and Prefaces ~ Mortimer J Adler,
1486:If talking pictures could be said to have a father, it was Lee De Forest, a brilliant but erratic inventor of electrical devices of all types. (He had 216 patents.) In 1907, while searching for ways to boost telephone signals, De Forest invented something called the thermionic triode detector. De Forest’s patent described it as “a System for Amplifying Feeble Electric Currents” and it would play a pivotal role in the development of broadcast radio and much else involving the delivery of sound, but the real developments would come from others. De Forest, unfortunately, was forever distracted by business problems. Several companies he founded went bankrupt, twice he was swindled by his backers, and constantly he was in court fighting over money or patents. For these reasons, he didn’t follow through on his invention. Meanwhile, other hopeful inventors demonstrated various sound-and-image systems—Cinematophone, Cameraphone, Synchroscope—but in every case the only really original thing about them was their name. All produced sounds that were faint or muddy, or required impossibly perfect timing on the part of the projectionist. Getting a projector and sound system to run in perfect tandem was basically impossible. Moving pictures were filmed with hand-cranked cameras, which introduced a slight variability in speed that no sound system could adjust to. Projectionists also commonly repaired damaged film by cutting out a few frames and resplicing what remained, which clearly would throw out any recording. Even perfect film sometimes skipped or momentarily stuttered in the projector. All these things confounded synchronization. De Forest came up with the idea of imprinting the sound directly onto the film. That meant that no matter what happened with the film, sound and image would always be perfectly aligned. Failing to find backers in America, he moved to Berlin in the early 1920s and there developed a system that he called Phonofilm. De Forest made his first Phonofilm movie in 1921 and by 1923 he was back in America giving public demonstrations. He filmed Calvin Coolidge making a speech, Eddie Cantor singing, George Bernard Shaw pontificating, and DeWolf Hopper reciting “Casey at the Bat.” By any measure, these were the first talking pictures. However, no Hollywood studio would invest in them. The sound quality still wasn’t ideal, and the recording system couldn’t quite cope with multiple voices and movement of a type necessary for any meaningful dramatic presentation. One invention De Forest couldn’t make use of was his own triode detector tube, because the patents now resided with Western Electric, a subsidiary of AT&T. Western Electric had been using the triode to develop public address systems for conveying speeches to large crowds or announcements to fans at baseball stadiums and the like. But in the 1920s it occurred to some forgotten engineer at the company that the triode detector could be used to project sound in theaters as well. The upshot was that in 1925 Warner Bros. bought the system from Western Electric and dubbed it Vitaphone. By the time of The Jazz Singer, it had already featured in theatrical presentations several times. Indeed, the Roxy on its opening night in March 1927 played a Vitaphone feature of songs from Carmen sung by Giovanni Martinelli. “His voice burst from the screen with splendid synchronization with the movements of his lips,” marveled the critic Mordaunt Hall in the Times. “It rang through the great theatre as if he had himself been on the stage. ~ Bill Bryson,

IN CHAPTERS [2/2]



   1 Integral Yoga






2.01 - On Books, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Integral Yoga
   Joan of Arc by George Bernard Shaw.
   Sri Aurobindo: These men, Chesterton and G. B. S., try to be clever at any cost. It seems that G. B. S. wants to put in here the idea of evolution.

The Immortal, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
    The story ends with a brief postscript which discusses the fictional book A Coat of Many Colours by Dr. Nahum Cordovero, which argues that the tale of Rufus/Cartaphilus is apocryphal, on the basis of its interpolations of texts by Pliny, Thomas de Quincey, Rene Descartes, and George Bernard Shaw. The postscript ends with the unknown author of the postscript rejecting Cordovero's claim.
  ------

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun george_bernard_shaw

The noun george bernard shaw has 1 sense (no senses from tagged texts)
            
1. Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw ::: (British playwright (born in Ireland); founder of the Fabian Society (1856-1950))


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun george_bernard_shaw

1 sense of george bernard shaw                    

Sense 1
Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author
     => communicator
       => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
         => organism, being
           => living thing, animate thing
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity
         => causal agent, cause, causal agency
           => physical entity
             => entity
   INSTANCE OF=> dramatist, playwright
     => writer, author
       => communicator
         => person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
           => organism, being
             => living thing, animate thing
               => whole, unit
                 => object, physical object
                   => physical entity
                     => entity
           => causal agent, cause, causal agency
             => physical entity
               => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun george_bernard_shaw
                                    


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun george_bernard_shaw

1 sense of george bernard shaw                    

Sense 1
Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   INSTANCE OF=> writer, author
   INSTANCE OF=> dramatist, playwright




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun george_bernard_shaw

1 sense of george bernard shaw                    

Sense 1
Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
  -> writer, author
   => abstractor, abstracter
   => alliterator
   => authoress
   => biographer
   => coauthor, joint author
   => commentator, reviewer
   => compiler
   => contributor
   => cyberpunk
   => drafter
   => dramatist, playwright
   => essayist, litterateur
   => folk writer
   => framer
   => gagman, gagster, gagwriter
   => ghostwriter, ghost
   => Gothic romancer
   => hack, hack writer, literary hack
   => journalist
   => librettist
   => lyricist, lyrist
   => novelist
   => pamphleteer
   => paragrapher
   => poet
   => polemicist, polemist, polemic
   => rhymer, rhymester, versifier, poetizer, poetiser
   => scenarist
   => scriptwriter
   => space writer
   => speechwriter
   => tragedian
   => wordmonger
   => word-painter
   => wordsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aiken, Conrad Aiken, Conrad Potter Aiken
   HAS INSTANCE=> Alger, Horatio Alger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Algren, Nelson Algren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Andersen, Hans Christian Andersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anderson, Sherwood Anderson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aragon, Louis Aragon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Asch, Sholem Asch, Shalom Asch, Sholom Asch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Asimov, Isaac Asimov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Auchincloss, Louis Auchincloss, Louis Stanton Auchincloss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Austen, Jane Austen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baldwin, James Baldwin, James Arthur Baldwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baraka, Imamu Amiri Baraka, LeRoi Jones
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barth, John Barth, John Simmons Barth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barthelme, Donald Barthelme
   HAS INSTANCE=> Baum, Frank Baum, Lyman Frank Brown
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beauvoir, Simone de Beauvoir
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beckett, Samuel Beckett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beerbohm, Max Beerbohm, Sir Henry Maxmilian Beerbohm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Belloc, Hilaire Belloc, Joseph Hilaire Peter Belloc
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bellow, Saul Bellow, Solomon Bellow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benchley, Robert Benchley, Robert Charles Benchley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Benet, William Rose Benet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bierce, Ambrose Bierce, Ambrose Gwinett Bierce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boell, Heinrich Boell, Heinrich Theodor Boell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bontemps, Arna Wendell Bontemps
   HAS INSTANCE=> Borges, Jorge Borges, Jorge Luis Borges
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boswell, James Boswell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Boyle, Kay Boyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bradbury, Ray Bradbury, Ray Douglas Bradbury
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Charlotte Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Emily Bronte, Emily Jane Bronte, Currer Bell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bronte, Anne Bronte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Browne, Charles Farrar Browne, Artemus Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Buck, Pearl Buck, Pearl Sydenstricker Buck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Bunyan, John Bunyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burgess, Anthony Burgess
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burnett, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, Edgar Rice Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Burroughs, William Burroughs, William S. Burroughs, William Seward Burroughs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Butler, Samuel Butler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cabell, James Branch Cabell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Caldwell, Erskine Caldwell, Erskine Preston Caldwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calvino, Italo Calvino
   HAS INSTANCE=> Camus, Albert Camus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Canetti, Elias Canetti
   HAS INSTANCE=> Capek, Karel Capek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cather, Willa Cather, Willa Sibert Cather
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chandler, Raymond Chandler, Raymond Thornton Chandler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chateaubriand, Francois Rene Chateaubriand, Vicomte de Chateaubriand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cheever, John Cheever
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chesterton, G. K. Chesterton, Gilbert Keith Chesterton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chopin, Kate Chopin, Kate O'Flaherty Chopin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Christie, Agatha Christie, Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Churchill, Winston Churchill, Winston S. Churchill, Sir Winston Leonard Spenser Churchill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Clemens, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Mark Twain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cocteau, Jean Cocteau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Claudine Colette
   HAS INSTANCE=> Collins, Wilkie Collins, William Wilkie Collins
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conan Doyle, A. Conan Doyle, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Conrad, Joseph Conrad, Teodor Josef Konrad Korzeniowski
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cooper, James Fenimore Cooper
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crane, Stephen Crane
   HAS INSTANCE=> cummings, e. e. cummings, Edward Estlin Cummings
   HAS INSTANCE=> Day, Clarence Day, Clarence Shepard Day Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Defoe, Daniel Defoe
   HAS INSTANCE=> De Quincey, Thomas De Quincey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dickens, Charles Dickens, Charles John Huffam Dickens
   HAS INSTANCE=> Didion, Joan Didion
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dinesen, Isak Dinesen, Blixen, Karen Blixen, Baroness Karen Blixen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Doctorow, E. L. Doctorow, Edgard Lawrence Doctorow
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dos Passos, John Dos Passos, John Roderigo Dos Passos
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoevsky, Feodor Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Feodor Dostoevski, Fyodor Dostoevski, Feodor Dostoevsky, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dreiser, Theodore Dreiser, Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dumas, Alexandre Dumas
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, George du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> du Maurier, Daphne du Maurier, Dame Daphne du Maurier
   HAS INSTANCE=> Durrell, Lawrence Durrell, Lawrence George Durrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ehrenberg, Ilya Ehrenberg, Ilya Grigorievich Ehrenberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, George Eliot, Mary Ann Evans
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ellison, Ralph Ellison, Ralph Waldo Ellison
   HAS INSTANCE=> Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Farrell, James Thomas Farrell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ferber, Edna Ferber
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fielding, Henry Fielding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fitzgerald, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald
   HAS INSTANCE=> Flaubert, Gustave Flaubert
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fleming, Ian Fleming, Ian Lancaster Fleming
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ford, Ford Madox Ford, Ford Hermann Hueffer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Forester, C. S. Forester, Cecil Scott Forester
   HAS INSTANCE=> France, Anatole France, Jacques Anatole Francois Thibault
   HAS INSTANCE=> Franklin, Benjamin Franklin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fuentes, Carlos Fuentes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaboriau, Emile Gaboriau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Galsworthy, John Galsworthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gardner, Erle Stanley Gardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gaskell, Elizabeth Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn Stevenson Gaskell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Geisel, Theodor Seuss Geisel, Dr. Seuss
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gibran, Kahlil Gibran
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gide, Andre Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gjellerup, Karl Gjellerup
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gogol, Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol
   HAS INSTANCE=> Golding, William Golding, Sir William Gerald Golding
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goldsmith, Oliver Goldsmith
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gombrowicz, Witold Gombrowicz
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Edmond de Goncourt, Edmond Louis Antoine Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goncourt, Jules de Goncourt, Jules Alfred Huot de Goncourt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gordimer, Nadine Gordimer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gorky, Maksim Gorky, Gorki, Maxim Gorki, Aleksey Maksimovich Peshkov, Aleksey Maximovich Peshkov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grahame, Kenneth Grahame
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grass, Gunter Grass, Gunter Wilhelm Grass
   HAS INSTANCE=> Graves, Robert Graves, Robert Ranke Graves
   HAS INSTANCE=> Greene, Graham Greene, Henry Graham Greene
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grey, Zane Grey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Jakob Grimm, Jakob Ludwig Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Grimm, Wilhelm Grimm, Wilhelm Karl Grimm
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haggard, Rider Haggard, Sir Henry Rider Haggard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haldane, Elizabeth Haldane, Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hale, Edward Everett Hale
   HAS INSTANCE=> Haley, Alex Haley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hall, Radclyffe Hall, Marguerite Radclyffe Hall
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hammett, Dashiell Hammett, Samuel Dashiell Hammett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hamsun, Knut Hamsun, Knut Pedersen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hardy, Thomas Hardy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Frank Harris, James Thomas Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harris, Joel Harris, Joel Chandler Harris
   HAS INSTANCE=> Harte, Bret Harte
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hasek, Jaroslav Hasek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hawthorne, Nathaniel Hawthorne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hecht, Ben Hecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heinlein, Robert A. Heinlein, Robert Anson Heinlein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heller, Joseph Heller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hesse, Hermann Hesse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyse, Paul Heyse, Paul Johann Ludwig von Heyse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Heyward, DuBois Heyward, Edwin DuBois Hayward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Higginson, Thomas Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Storrow Higginson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoffmann, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Holmes, Oliver Wendell Holmes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Howells, William Dean Howells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hoyle, Edmond Hoyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hubbard, L. Ron Hubbard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hughes, Langston Hughes, James Langston Hughes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hunt, Leigh Hunt, James Henry Leigh Hunt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, John Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Irving, Washington Irving
   HAS INSTANCE=> Isherwood, Christopher Isherwood, Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jackson, Helen Hunt Jackson, Helen Maria Fiske Hunt Jackson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, Jane Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jacobs, W. W. Jacobs, William Wymark Jacobs
   HAS INSTANCE=> James, Henry James
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jensen, Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Johnson, Samuel Johnson, Dr. Johnson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jong, Erica Jong
   HAS INSTANCE=> Joyce, James Joyce, James Augustine Aloysius Joyce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kafka, Franz Kafka
   HAS INSTANCE=> Keller, Helen Keller, Helen Adams Keller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kerouac, Jack Kerouac, Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kesey, Ken Kesey, Ken Elton Kesey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kipling, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Rudyard Kipling
   HAS INSTANCE=> Koestler, Arthur Koestler
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Fontaine, Jean de La Fontaine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lardner, Ring Lardner, Ringgold Wilmer Lardner
   HAS INSTANCE=> La Rochefoucauld, Francois de La Rochefoucauld
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, D. H. Lawrence, David Herbert Lawrence
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lawrence, T. E. Lawrence, Thomas Edward Lawrence, Lawrence of Arabia
   HAS INSTANCE=> le Carre, John le Carre, David John Moore Cornwell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Leonard, Elmore Leonard, Elmore John Leonard, Dutch Leonard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lermontov, Mikhail Yurievich Lermontov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Doris Lessing, Doris May Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, C. S. Lewis, Clive Staples Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lewis, Sinclair Lewis, Harry Sinclair Lewis
   HAS INSTANCE=> London, Jack London, John Griffith Chaney
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lowry, Malcolm Lowry, Clarence Malcolm Lowry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lyly, John Lyly
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lytton, First Baron Lytton, Bulwer-Lytton, Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mailer, Norman Mailer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malamud, Bernard Malamud
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malory, Thomas Malory, Sir Thomas Malory
   HAS INSTANCE=> Malraux, Andre Malraux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mann, Thomas Mann
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mansfield, Katherine Mansfield, Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp
   HAS INSTANCE=> Manzoni, Alessandro Manzoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marquand, John Marquand, John Philip Marquand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marsh, Ngaio Marsh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mason, A. E. W. Mason, Alfred Edward Woodley Mason
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maugham, Somerset Maugham, W. Somerset Maugham, William Somerset Maugham
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maupassant, Guy de Maupassant, Henri Rene Albert Guy de Maupassant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mauriac, Francois Mauriac, Francois Charles Mauriac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maurois, Andre Maurois, Emile Herzog
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCarthy, Mary McCarthy, Mary Therese McCarthy
   HAS INSTANCE=> McCullers, Carson McCullers, Carson Smith McCullers
   HAS INSTANCE=> McLuhan, Marshall McLuhan, Herbert Marshall McLuhan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Melville, Herman Melville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Merton, Thomas Merton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Michener, James Michener, James Albert Michener
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Henry Miller, Henry Valentine Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Milne, A. A. Milne, Alan Alexander Milne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitchell, Margaret Mitchell, Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Nancy Mitford, Nancy Freeman Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mitford, Jessica Mitford, Jessica Lucy Mitford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montaigne, Michel Montaigne, Michel Eyquem Montaigne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Montgomery, L. M. Montgomery, Lucy Maud Montgomery
   HAS INSTANCE=> More, Thomas More, Sir Thomas More
   HAS INSTANCE=> Morrison, Toni Morrison, Chloe Anthony Wofford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Munro, H. H. Munro, Hector Hugh Munro, Saki
   HAS INSTANCE=> Murdoch, Iris Murdoch, Dame Jean Iris Murdoch
   HAS INSTANCE=> Musset, Alfred de Musset, Louis Charles Alfred de Musset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nabokov, Vladimir Nabokov, Vladimir vladimirovich Nabokov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nash, Ogden Nash
   HAS INSTANCE=> Nicolson, Harold Nicolson, Sir Harold George Nicolson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Norris, Frank Norris, Benjamin Franklin Norris Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Oates, Joyce Carol Oates
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Brien, Edna O'Brien
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Connor, Flannery O'Connor, Mary Flannery O'Connor
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Flaherty, Liam O'Flaherty
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Hara, John Henry O'Hara
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ondaatje, Michael Ondaatje, Philip Michael Ondaatje
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orczy, Baroness Emmusca Orczy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Orwell, George Orwell, Eric Blair, Eric Arthur Blair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Page, Thomas Nelson Page
   HAS INSTANCE=> Parker, Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Rothschild Parker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pasternak, Boris Pasternak, Boris Leonidovich Pasternak
   HAS INSTANCE=> Paton, Alan Paton, Alan Stewart Paton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Percy, Walker Percy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Petronius, Gaius Petronius, Petronius Arbiter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plath, Sylvia Plath
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Elder, Gaius Plinius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pliny, Pliny the Younger, Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Poe, Edgar Allan Poe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, William Sydney Porter, O. Henry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Porter, Katherine Anne Porter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Post, Emily Post, Emily Price Post
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pound, Ezra Pound, Ezra Loomis Pound
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, John Cowper Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Theodore Francis Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Powys, Llewelyn Powys
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pyle, Howard Pyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pynchon, Thomas Pynchon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rand, Ayn Rand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Richler, Mordecai Richler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roberts, Kenneth Roberts
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Roth, Philip Roth, Philip Milton Roth
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Rousseau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Runyon, Damon Runyon, Alfred Damon Runyon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rushdie, Salman Rushdie, Ahmed Salman Rushdie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Russell, George William Russell, A.E.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sade, de Sade, Comte Donatien Alphonse Francois de Sade, Marquis de Sade
   HAS INSTANCE=> Salinger, J. D. Salinger, Jerome David Salinger
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sand, George Sand, Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin, Baroness Dudevant
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sandburg, Carl Sandburg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Saroyan, William Saroyan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sayers, Dorothy Sayers, Dorothy L. Sayers, Dorothy Leigh Sayers
   HAS INSTANCE=> Schiller, Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scott, Walter Scott, Sir Walter Scott
   HAS INSTANCE=> Service, Robert William Service
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shelley, Mary Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mary Godwin Wollstonecraft Shelley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shute, Nevil Shute, Nevil Shute Norway
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simenon, Georges Simenon, Georges Joseph Christian Simenon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sinclair, Upton Sinclair, Upton Beall Sinclair
   HAS INSTANCE=> Singer, Isaac Bashevis Singer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Smollett, Tobias Smollett, Tobias George Smollett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Snow, C. P. Snow, Charles Percy Snow, Baron Snow of Leicester
   HAS INSTANCE=> Solzhenitsyn, Alexander Isayevich Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sontag, Susan Sontag
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spark, Muriel Spark, Dame Muriel Spark, Muriel Sarah Spark
   HAS INSTANCE=> Spillane, Mickey Spillane, Frank Morrison Spillane
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stael, Madame de Stael, Baronne Anne Louise Germaine Necker de Steal-Holstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steele, Sir Richrd Steele
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stein, Gertrude Stein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Steinbeck, John Steinbeck, John Ernst Steinbeck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stendhal, Marie Henri Beyle
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stephen, Sir Leslie Stephen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sterne, Laurence Sterne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stevenson, Robert Louis Stevenson, Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stockton, Frank Stockton, Francis Richard Stockton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoker, Bram Stoker, Abraham Stoker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Styron, William Styron
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sue, Eugene Sue
   HAS INSTANCE=> Symonds, John Addington Symonds
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Sir Rabindranath Tagore
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tarbell, Ida Tarbell, Ida M. Tarbell, Ida Minerva Tarbell
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thackeray, William Makepeace Thackeray
   HAS INSTANCE=> Thoreau, Henry David Thoreau
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tocqueville, Alexis de Tocqueville, Alexis Charles Henri Maurice de Tocqueville
   HAS INSTANCE=> Toklas, Alice B. Toklas
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolkien, J.R.R. Tolkien, John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tolstoy, Leo Tolstoy, Count Lev Nikolayevitch Tolstoy
   HAS INSTANCE=> Trollope, Anthony Trollope
   HAS INSTANCE=> Turgenev, Ivan Turgenev, Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev
   HAS INSTANCE=> Undset, Sigrid Undset
   HAS INSTANCE=> Untermeyer, Louis Untermeyer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Updike, John Updike, John Hoyer Updike
   HAS INSTANCE=> Van Doren, Carl Van Doren, Carl Clinton Van Doren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vargas Llosa, Mario Vargas Llosa, Jorge Mario Pedro Vargas Llosa
   HAS INSTANCE=> Verne, Jules Verne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vidal, Gore Vidal, Eugene Luther Vidal
   HAS INSTANCE=> Voltaire, Arouet, Francois-Marie Arouet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vonnegut, Kurt Vonnegut
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wain, John Wain, John Barrington Wain
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walker, Alice Walker, Alice Malsenior Walker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wallace, Edgar Wallace, Richard Horatio Edgar Wallace
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walpole, Horace Walpole, Horatio Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford
   HAS INSTANCE=> Walton, Izaak Walton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ward, Mrs. Humphrey Ward, Mary Augusta Arnold Ward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Warren, Robert Penn Warren
   HAS INSTANCE=> Waugh, Evelyn Waugh, Evelyn Arthur Saint John Waugh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webb, Beatrice Webb, Martha Beatrice Potter Webb
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wells, H. G. Wells, Herbert George Wells
   HAS INSTANCE=> Welty, Eudora Welty
   HAS INSTANCE=> Werfel, Franz Werfel
   HAS INSTANCE=> West, Rebecca West, Dame Rebecca West, Cicily Isabel Fairfield
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wharton, Edith Wharton, Edith Newbold Jones Wharton
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, E. B. White, Elwyn Brooks White
   HAS INSTANCE=> White, Patrick White, Patrick Victor Martindale White
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wiesel, Elie Wiesel, Eliezer Wiesel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Sir Angus Wilson, Angus Frank Johnstone Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilson, Harriet Wilson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wister, Owen Wister
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wodehouse, P. G. Wodehouse, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Clayton Wolfe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wolfe, Tom Wolfe, Thomas Wolfe, Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr.
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wood, Mrs. Henry Wood, Ellen Price Wood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Woolf, Virginia Woolf, Adeline Virginia Stephen Woolf
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wouk, Herman Wouk
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Richard Wright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wright, Willard Huntington Wright, S. S. Van Dine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zangwill, Israel Zangwill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Zweig, Stefan Zweig
  -> dramatist, playwright
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aeschylus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Albee, Edward Albee, Edward Franklin Albeen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anderson, Maxwell Anderson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Anouilh, Jean Anouilh
   HAS INSTANCE=> Aristophanes
   HAS INSTANCE=> Barrie, James Barrie, J. M. Barrie, James Matthew Barrie, Sir James Matthew Barrie
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beaumont, Francis Beaumont
   HAS INSTANCE=> Beckett, Samuel Beckett
   HAS INSTANCE=> Brecht, Bertolt Brecht
   HAS INSTANCE=> Calderon, Calderon de la Barca, Pedro Calderon de la Barca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Capek, Karel Capek
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cervantes, Miguel de Cervantes, Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
   HAS INSTANCE=> Chekhov, Chekov, Anton Chekhov, Anton Chekov, Anton Pavlovich Chekhov, Anton Pavlovich Chekov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Congreve, William Congreve
   HAS INSTANCE=> Corneille, Pierre Corneille
   HAS INSTANCE=> Coward, Noel Coward, Sir Noel Pierce Coward
   HAS INSTANCE=> Crouse, Russel Crouse
   HAS INSTANCE=> Cyrano de Bergerac, Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dekker, Decker, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Decker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Dryden, John Dryden
   HAS INSTANCE=> Eliot, T. S. Eliot, Thomas Stearns Eliot
   HAS INSTANCE=> Euripides
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fletcher, John Fletcher
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fry, Christopher Fry
   HAS INSTANCE=> Fugard, Athol Fugard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Garcia Lorca, Frederico Garcia Lorca, Lorca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Genet, Jean Genet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Gide, Andre Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide
   HAS INSTANCE=> Giraudoux, Jean Giraudoux, Hippolyte Jean Giraudoux
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Goldoni, Carlo Goldoni
   HAS INSTANCE=> Granville-Barker, Harley Granville-Barker
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hart, Moss Hart
   HAS INSTANCE=> Havel, Vaclav Havel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hebbel, Friedrich Hebbel, Christian Friedrich Hebbel
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hellman, Lillian Hellman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Hugo, Victor Hugo, Victor-Marie Hugo
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ibsen, Henrik Ibsen, Henrik Johan Ibsen
   HAS INSTANCE=> Inge, William Inge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ionesco, Eugene Ionesco
   HAS INSTANCE=> Jonson, Ben Jonson, Benjamin Jonson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kaufman, George S. Kaufman, George Simon Kaufman
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kleist, Heinrich von Kleist, Bernd Heinrich Wilhelm von Kleist
   HAS INSTANCE=> Kyd, Kid, Thomas Kyd, Thomas Kid
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing
   HAS INSTANCE=> Lindsay, Howard Lindsay
   HAS INSTANCE=> Luce, Clare Booth Luce
   HAS INSTANCE=> Maeterlinck, Count Maurice Maeterlinck
   HAS INSTANCE=> Mamet, David Mamet
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marlowe, Christopher Marlowe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Marstan, John Marstan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Menander
   HAS INSTANCE=> Middleton, Thomas Middleton
   HAS INSTANCE=> Miller, Arthur Miller
   HAS INSTANCE=> Moliere, Jean-Baptiste Poquelin
   HAS INSTANCE=> Molnar, Ferenc Molnar
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Casey, Sean O'Casey
   HAS INSTANCE=> Odets, Clifford Odets
   HAS INSTANCE=> O'Neill, Eugene O'Neill, Eugene Gladstone O'Neill
   HAS INSTANCE=> Osborne, John Osborne, John James Osborne
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pinter, Harold Pinter
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pirandello, Luigi Pirandello
   HAS INSTANCE=> Pitt, George Pitt, George Dibdin Pitt, George Dibdin-Pitt
   HAS INSTANCE=> Plautus, Titus Maccius Plautus
   HAS INSTANCE=> Racine, Jean Racine, Jean Baptiste Racine
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rattigan, Terence Rattigan, Sir Terence Mervyn Rattigan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rice, Elmer Rice, Elmer Leopold Rice, Elmer Reizenstein
   HAS INSTANCE=> Robinson, Lennox Robinson, Esme Stuart Lennox Robinson
   HAS INSTANCE=> Rostand, Edmond Rostand
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sartre, Jean-Paul Sartre
   HAS INSTANCE=> Scribe, Augustin Eugene Scribe
   HAS INSTANCE=> Seneca, Lucius Annaeus Seneca
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, Shakspere, William Shakspere, Bard of Avon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shaw, G. B. Shaw, George Bernard Shaw
   HAS INSTANCE=> Shepard, Sam Shepard
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sheridan, Richard Brinsley Sheridan
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sherwood, Robert Emmet Sherwood
   HAS INSTANCE=> Simon, Neil Simon, Marvin Neil Simon
   HAS INSTANCE=> Sophocles
   HAS INSTANCE=> Stoppard, Tom Stoppard, Sir Tom Stoppard, Thomas Straussler
   HAS INSTANCE=> Strindberg, August Strindberg, Johan August Strindberg
   HAS INSTANCE=> Synge, J. M. Synge, John Millington Synge, Edmund John Millington Synge
   HAS INSTANCE=> Terence, Publius Terentius Afer
   HAS INSTANCE=> Tirso de Molina, Gabriel Tellez
   HAS INSTANCE=> Ustinov, Sir Peter Ustinov, Peter Alexander Ustinov
   HAS INSTANCE=> Vega, Lope de Vega, Lope Felix de Vega Carpio
   HAS INSTANCE=> Webster, John Webster
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilde, Oscar Wilde, Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wilder, Thornton Wilder, Thornton Niven Wilder
   HAS INSTANCE=> Williams, Tennessee Williams, Thomas Lanier Williams
   HAS INSTANCE=> Wycherley, William Wycherley
   HAS INSTANCE=> Yeats, William Butler Yeats, W. B. Yeats




--- Grep of noun george_bernard_shaw
george bernard shaw



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