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object:measure
word class:verb

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
City_of_God
Enchiridion_text
Epigrams_from_Savitri
Faust
Full_Circle
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Heart_of_Matter
Infinite_Library
Journey_to_the_Lord_of_Power_-_A_Sufi_Manual_on_Retreat
Let_Me_Explain
Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King
Life_without_Death
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_01
Process_and_Reality
Psychological_Assessment_of_Adult_Posttraumatic_States__Phenomenology,_Diagnosis,_and_Measurement
Savitri
The_Act_of_Creation
The_Categories
The_Diamond_Sutra
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Ever-Present_Origin
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Yoga_Sutras
Three_Books_on_Occult_Philosophy
Toward_the_Future
Vishnu_Purana

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
05.04_-_The_Measure_of_Time
1.03_-_Measure_of_time,_Moments_of_Kashthas,_etc.
1.jwvg_-_Measure_Of_Time

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
00.02_-_Mystic_Symbolism
00.04_-_The_Beautiful_in_the_Upanishads
00.05_-_A_Vedic_Conception_of_the_Poet
0.00a_-_Introduction
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_THE_GOSPEL_PREFACE
0.01f_-_FOREWARD
0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature
01.01_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_The_Age_of_Sri_Aurobindo
01.02_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_Ahana_and_Other_Poems
01.02_-_The_Issue
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
01.03_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_his_School
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge
01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness
01.06_-_On_Communism
01.08_-_A_Theory_of_Yoga
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.11_-_Aldous_Huxley:_The_Perennial_Philosophy
01.12_-_Three_Degrees_of_Social_Organisation
0_1957-07-03
0_1958-11-22
0_1961-01-10
0_1961-01-31
0_1961-02-11
0_1961-04-18
0_1961-07-15
0_1961-07-18
0_1961-10-30
0_1962-01-12_-_supramental_ship
0_1962-05-27
0_1962-11-17
0_1963-07-31
0_1963-08-31
0_1964-01-04
0_1964-07-31
0_1964-09-30
0_1964-10-07
0_1964-11-12
0_1965-03-10
0_1965-03-20
0_1965-03-24
0_1965-05-29
0_1965-06-05
0_1965-06-23
0_1965-07-24
0_1965-09-25
0_1966-01-26
0_1966-06-02
0_1966-08-31
0_1967-01-21
0_1967-02-04
0_1967-02-08
0_1967-07-22
0_1967-09-09
0_1967-11-15
0_1968-06-29
0_1968-08-28
0_1968-12-11
0_1969-02-15
0_1969-02-19
0_1969-05-28
0_1969-08-23
0_1970-01-17
0_1970-01-28
0_1970-03-18
0_1970-07-25
0_1971-03-17
0_1971-10-20
0_1972-03-08
0_1972-03-15
0_1972-04-04
0_1972-08-30
0_1972-12-10
02.01_-_Our_Ideal
02.03_-_The_Glory_and_the_Fall_of_Life
02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_Vansittartism
02.09_-_The_Paradise_of_the_Life-Gods
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
02.14_-_The_World-Soul
02.15_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Greater_Knowledge
03.01_-_Humanism_and_Humanism
03.02_-_Yogic_Initiation_and_Aptitude
03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation
03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon
03.05_-_Some_Conceptions_and_Misconceptions
03.06_-_Divine_Humanism
03.07_-_Some_Thoughts_on_the_Unthinkable
03.08_-_The_Standpoint_of_Indian_Art
03.12_-_The_Spirit_of_Tapasya
03.13_-_Human_Destiny
03.14_-_Mater_Dolorosa
03.16_-_The_Tragic_Spirit_in_Nature
04.01_-_The_Birth_and_Childhood_of_the_Flame
04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame
04.03_-_Consciousness_as_Energy
04.03_-_The_Eternal_East_and_West
04.04_-_The_Quest
04.05_-_The_Immortal_Nation
04.10_-_To_the_Heights-X
04.41_-_To_the_Heights-XLI
05.01_-_The_Destined_Meeting-Place
05.02_-_Physician,_Heal_Thyself
05.03_-_The_Body_Natural
05.04_-_Of_Beauty_and_Ananda
05.04_-_The_Measure_of_Time
05.05_-_Man_the_Prototype
05.06_-_Physics_or_philosophy
05.07_-_Man_and_Superman
05.07_-_The_Observer_and_the_Observed
05.18_-_Man_to_be_Surpassed
05.29_-_Vengeance_is_Mine
05.34_-_Light,_more_Light
06.01_-_The_End_of_a_Civilisation
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
06.02_-_Darkness_to_Light
06.36_-_The_Mother_on_Herself
07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge
07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul
07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries
07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces
07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul
07.07_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Cosmic_Spirit_and_the_Cosmic_Consciousness
07.08_-_The_Divine_Truth_Its_Name_and_Form
07.30_-_Sincerity_is_Victory
08.25_-_Meat-Eating
08.27_-_Value_of_Religious_Exercises
08.37_-_The_Significance_of_Dates
09.01_-_Towards_the_Black_Void
09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness
09.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
09.13_-_On_Teachers_and_Teaching
100.00_-_Synergy
10.01_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Ideal
10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal
10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death
10.04_-_Lord_of_Time
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
10.05_-_Mind_and_the_Mental_World
1.00c_-_DIVISION_C_-_THE_ETHERIC_BODY_AND_PRANA
1.00e_-_DIVISION_E_-_MOTION_ON_THE_PHYSICAL_AND_ASTRAL_PLANES
1.00f_-_DIVISION_F_-_THE_LAW_OF_ECONOMY
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PREFACE
1.00_-_PRELUDE_AT_THE_THEATRE
1.00_-_PROLOGUE_IN_HEAVEN
1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come
1.010_-_Self-Control_-_The_Alpha_and_Omega_of_Yoga
1.013_-_Defence_Mechanisms_of_the_Mind
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_Economy
1.01_-_Fundamental_Considerations
1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?
1.01_-_Introduction
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_Seeing
1.01_-_Soul_and_God
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.01_-_The_Ego
1.01_-_The_Four_Aids
1.01_-_The_Mental_Fortress
1.01_-_THE_STUFF_OF_THE_UNIVERSE
1.01_-_What_is_Magick?
10.24_-_Savitri
1.025_-_Sadhana_-_Intensifying_a_Lighted_Flame
1.02_-_BOOK_THE_SECOND
1.02_-_Groups_and_Statistical_Mechanics
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_Self-Consecration
1.02_-_The_Age_of_Individualism_and_Reason
1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND
1.02_-_THE_POOL_OF_TEARS
1.02_-_The_Shadow
1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation
1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds
1.02_-_The_Vision_of_the_Past
10.30_-_India,_the_World_and_the_Ashram
10.35_-_The_Moral_and_the_Spiritual
10.37_-_The_Golden_Bridge
1.03_-_BOOK_THE_THIRD
1.03_-_Concerning_the_Archetypes,_with_Special_Reference_to_the_Anima_Concept
1.03_-_Fire_in_the_Earth
1.03_-_Measure_of_time,_Moments_of_Kashthas,_etc.
1.03_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_World.
1.03_-_ON_THE_AFTERWORLDLY
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers
1.03_-_Reading
1.03_-_.REASON._IN_PHILOSOPHY
1.03_-_Sympathetic_Magic
1.03_-_The_Desert
1.03_-_The_Divine_and_Man
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.03_-_The_House_Of_The_Lord
1.03_-_THE_ORPHAN,_THE_WIDOW,_AND_THE_MOON
1.03_-_The_Phenomenon_of_Man
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Exorcism)
1.03_-_The_Sunlit_Path
1.03_-_The_Syzygy_-_Anima_and_Animus
1.03_-_Time_Series,_Information,_and_Communication
1.03_-_VISIT_TO_VIDYASAGAR
1.04_-_Body,_Soul_and_Spirit
1.04_-_Feedback_and_Oscillation
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_Magic_and_Religion
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Conditions_of_Esoteric_Training
1.04_-_The_Control_of_Psychic_Prana
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_Origin_and_Development_of_Poetry.
1.04_-_The_Paths
1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.04_-_The_Self
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Compact)
1.05_-_AUERBACHS_CELLAR
1.05_-_CHARITY
1.05_-_Computing_Machines_and_the_Nervous_System
1.05_-_Consciousness
1.05_-_Hymns_of_Bharadwaja
1.05_-_Mental_Education
1.05_-_Prayer
1.05_-_Problems_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.05_-_Solitude
1.05_-_The_Activation_of_Human_Energy
1.05_-_The_Creative_Principle
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Magical_Control_of_the_Weather
1.05_-_THE_NEW_SPIRIT
1.05_-_The_Principle_of_Earth
1.05_-_The_Universe__The_0_=_2_Equation
1.05_-_War_And_Politics
1.06_-_A_Summary_of_my_Phenomenological_View_of_the_World
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_Five_Dreams
1.06_-_Gestalt_and_Universals
1.06_-_Hymns_of_Parashara
1.06_-_LIFE_AND_THE_PLANETS
1.06_-_Magicians_as_Kings
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_Origin_of_the_four_castes
1.06_-_Psycho_therapy_and_a_Philosophy_of_Life
1.06_-_THE_FOUR_GREAT_ERRORS
1.06_-_The_Four_Powers_of_the_Mother
1.06_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES
1.06_-_The_Objective_and_Subjective_Views_of_Life
1.078_-_Kumbhaka_and_Concentration_of_Mind
1.07_-_A_STREET
1.07_-_Bridge_across_the_Afterlife
1.07_-_Cybernetics_and_Psychopathology
1.07_-_Incarnate_Human_Gods
1.07_-_Of_imperfections_with_respect_to_spiritual_envy_and_sloth.
1.07_-_Production_of_the_mind-born_sons_of_Brahma
1.07_-_The_Fourth_Circle__The_Avaricious_and_the_Prodigal._Plutus._Fortune_and_her_Wheel._The_Fifth_Circle__The_Irascible_and_the_Sullen._Styx.
1.07_-_THE_.IMPROVERS._OF_MANKIND
1.07_-_The_Infinity_Of_The_Universe
1.07_-_The_Magic_Wand
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.08_-_Attendants
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_Civilisation_and_Barbarism
1.08_-_Information,_Language,_and_Society
1.08_-_Psycho_therapy_Today
1.08_-_RELIGION_AND_TEMPERAMENT
1.08_-_Stead_and_the_Spirits
1.08_-_The_Change_of_Vision
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY_CELEBRATION_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.08_-_The_Methods_of_Vedantic_Knowledge
1.08_-_The_Splitting_of_the_Human_Personality_during_Spiritual_Training
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Discovery
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Will
1.09_-_A_System_of_Vedic_Psychology
1.09_-_Fundamental_Questions_of_Psycho_therapy
1.09_-_Man_-_About_the_Body
1.09_-_Saraswati_and_Her_Consorts
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE
1.09_-_Sleep_and_Death
1.09_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Big_Bang
1.09_-_Talks
1.09_-_The_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.09_-_The_Pure_Existent
1.09_-_The_Worship_of_Trees
11.01_-_The_Eternal_Day__The_Souls_Choice_and_the_Supreme_Consummation
11.03_-_Cosmonautics
1.1.04_-_Philosophy
1.10_-_Conscious_Force
1.10_-_Relics_of_Tree_Worship_in_Modern_Europe
1.10_-_THE_FORMATION_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
1.10_-_The_Magical_Garment
1.10_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES_(II)
1.10_-_THE_NEIGHBORS_HOUSE
1.10_-_Theodicy_-_Nature_Makes_No_Mistakes
1.10_-_The_Roughly_Material_Plane_or_the_Material_World
1.10_-_THINGS_I_OWE_TO_THE_ANCIENTS
11.15_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.11_-_BOOK_THE_ELEVENTH
1.11_-_FAITH_IN_MAN
1.11_-_Higher_Laws
1.11_-_Oneness
1.11_-_The_Change_of_Power
1.1.1_-_The_Mind_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Solution
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.1.2_-_Intellect_and_the_Intellectual
1.12_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_RIGHTS_OF_MAN
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Left-Hand_Path_-_The_Black_Brothers
1.12_-_The_Office_and_Limitations_of_the_Reason
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1.13_-_Conclusion_-_He_is_here
1.13_-_Reason_and_Religion
1.13_-_The_Divine_Maya
1.13_-_THE_HUMAN_REBOUND_OF_EVOLUTION_AND_ITS_CONSEQUENCES
1.14_-_FOREST_AND_CAVERN
1.14_-_The_Limits_of_Philosophical_Knowledge
1.14_-_The_Principle_of_Divine_Works
1.14_-_The_Structure_and_Dynamics_of_the_Self
1.14_-_The_Supermind_as_Creator
1.14_-_TURMOIL_OR_GENESIS?
1.15_-_Conclusion
1.15_-_In_the_Domain_of_the_Spirit_Beings
1.15_-_On_incorruptible_purity_and_chastity_to_which_the_corruptible_attain_by_toil_and_sweat.
1.15_-_ON_THE_THOUSAND_AND_ONE_GOALS
1.15_-_THE_DIRECTIONS_AND_CONDITIONS_OF_THE_FUTURE
1.15_-_The_Suprarational_Good
1.15_-_The_Supreme_Truth-Consciousness
1.15_-_The_Transformed_Being
1.15_-_The_Value_of_Philosophy
1.16_-_Advantages_and_Disadvantages_of_Evocational_Magic
1.16_-_MARTHAS_GARDEN
1.16_-_On_Self-Knowledge
1.16_-_The_Process_of_Avatarhood
1.17_-_DOES_MANKIND_MOVE_BIOLOGICALLY_UPON_ITSELF?
1.17_-_Legend_of_Prahlada
1.17_-_M._AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.17_-_On_Teaching
1.17_-_The_Spiritus_Familiaris_or_Serving_Spirits
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_Asceticism
1.18_-_M._AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.18_-_Mind_and_Supermind
1.18_-_The_Divine_Worker
1.18_-_THE_HEART_OF_THE_PROBLEM
1.18_-_The_Perils_of_the_Soul
1.19_-_Dialogue_between_Prahlada_and_his_father
1.19_-_Life
1.19_-_NIGHT
1.19_-_Tabooed_Acts
1.201_-_Socrates
1.2.01_-_The_Call_and_the_Capacity
12.02_-_The_Stress_of_the_Spirit
1.2.05_-_Aspiration
12.09_-_The_Story_of_Dr._Faustus_Retold
1.20_-_Death,_Desire_and_Incapacity
1.20_-_Equality_and_Knowledge
1.20_-_On_Time
1.20_-_RULES_FOR_HOUSEHOLDERS_AND_MONKS
1.20_-_The_End_of_the_Curve_of_Reason
1.20_-_The_Hound_of_Heaven
1.21_-_Tabooed_Things
1.21_-_WALPURGIS-NIGHT
1.22_-_OBERON_AND_TITANIA's_GOLDEN_WEDDING
1.22_-_On_the_many_forms_of_vainglory.
1.22_-_Tabooed_Words
1.23_-_Conditions_for_the_Coming_of_a_Spiritual_Age
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_(Epic_Poetry_continued.)_Further_points_of_agreement_with_Tragedy.
1.24_-_On_meekness,_simplicity,_guilelessness_which_come_not_from_nature_but_from_habit,_and_about_malice.
1.24_-_RITUAL,_SYMBOL,_SACRAMENT
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_On_the_destroyer_of_the_passions,_most_sublime_humility,_which_is_rooted_in_spiritual_feeling.
1.25_-_SPIRITUAL_EXERCISES
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.27_-_On_holy_solitude_of_body_and_soul.
1.27_-_The_Sevenfold_Chord_of_Being
1.28_-_Describes_the_nature_of_the_Prayer_of_Recollection_and_sets_down_some_of_the_means_by_which_we_can_make_it_a_habit.
1.28_-_The_Killing_of_the_Tree-Spirit
1.29_-_The_Myth_of_Adonis
1.29_-_What_is_Certainty?
1.2_-_Katha_Upanishads
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
1.3.02_-_Equality__The_Chief_Support
13.04_-_A_Note_on_Supermind
1.3.04_-_Peace
13.05_-_A_Dream_Of_Surreal_Science
1.30_-_Concerning_the_linking_together_of_the_supreme_trinity_among_the_virtues.
1.31_-_Adonis_in_Cyprus
1.31_-_The_Giants,_Nimrod,_Ephialtes,_and_Antaeus._Descent_to_Cocytus.
1.32_-_Expounds_these_words_of_the_Paternoster__Fiat_voluntas_tua_sicut_in_coelo_et_in_terra._Describes_how_much_is_accomplished_by_those_who_repeat_these_words_with_full_resolution_and_how_well
1.32_-_How_can_a_Yogi_ever_be_Worried?
1.32_-_The_Ritual_of_Adonis
1.33_-_The_Golden_Mean
1.3.4.01_-_The_Beginning_and_the_End
1.37_-_Oriential_Religions_in_the_West
1.38_-_The_Myth_of_Osiris
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.400_-_1.450_Talks
1.4.03_-_The_Guru
1.42_-_Treats_of_these_last_words_of_the_Paternoster__Sed_libera_nos_a_malo._Amen._But_deliver_us_from_evil._Amen.
1.439
1.450_-_1.500_Talks
1.46_-_The_Corn-Mother_in_Many_Lands
1.47_-_Lityerses
15.04_-_The_Mother_Abides
15.07_-_Souls_Freedom
1.50_-_Eating_the_God
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.53_-_The_Propitation_of_Wild_Animals_By_Hunters
1.54_-_On_Meanness
1.54_-_Types_of_Animal_Sacrament
1.55_-_Money
1.57_-_Public_Scapegoats
1.61_-_Power_and_Authority
1.63_-_Fear,_a_Bad_Astral_Vision
1.66_-_Vampires
1.69_-_Farewell_to_Nemi
17.02_-_Hymn_to_the_Sun
17.04_-_Hymn_to_the_Purusha
17.05_-_Hymn_to_Hiranyagarbha
1.75_-_The_AA_and_the_Planet
1.77_-_Work_Worthwhile_-_Why?
1.78_-_Sore_Spots
1.79_-_Progress
18.04_-_Modern_Poems
18.05_-_Ashram_Poets
1.80_-_Life_a_Gamble
19.07_-_The_Adept
1912_12_03p
1913_02_08p
1914_05_12p
19.14_-_The_Awakened
1929-04-14_-_Dangers_of_Yoga_-_Two_paths,_tapasya_and_surrender_-_Impulses,_desires_and_Yoga_-_Difficulties_-_Unification_around_the_psychic_being_-_Ambition,_undoing_of_many_Yogis_-_Powers,_misuse_and_right_use_of_-_How_to_recognise_the_Divine_Will_-_Accept_things_that_come_from_Divine_-_Vital_devotion_-_Need_of_strong_body_and_nerves_-_Inner_being,_invariable
1929-06-16_-_Illness_and_Yoga_-_Subtle_body_(nervous_envelope)_-_Fear_and_illness
1929-06-23_-_Knowledge_of_the_Yogi_-_Knowledge_and_the_Supermind_-_Methods_of_changing_the_condition_of_the_body_-_Meditation,_aspiration,_sincerity
1929-08-04_-_Surrender_and_sacrifice_-_Personality_and_surrender_-_Desire_and_passion_-_Spirituality_and_morality
1950-12-23_-_Concentration_and_energy
1951-01-13_-_Aim_of_life_-_effort_and_joy._Science_of_living,_becoming_conscious._Forces_and_influences.
1951-02-17_-_False_visions_-_Offering_ones_will_-_Equilibrium_-_progress_-_maturity_-_Ardent_self-giving-_perfecting_the_instrument_-_Difficulties,_a_help_in_total_realisation_-_paradoxes_-_Sincerity_-_spontaneous_meditation
1951-02-22_-_Surrender,_offering,_consecration_-_Experiences_and_sincerity_-_Aspiration_and_desire_-_Vedic_hymns_-_Concentration_and_time
1951-03-14_-_Plasticity_-_Conditions_for_knowing_the_Divine_Will_-_Illness_-_microbes_-_Fear_-_body-reflexes_-_The_best_possible_happens_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_True_knowledge_-_a_work_to_do_-_the_Ashram
1951-03-17_-_The_universe-_eternally_new,_same_-_Pralaya_Traditions_-_Light_and_thought_-_new_consciousness,_forces_-_The_expanding_universe_-_inexpressible_experiences_-_Ashram_surcharged_with_Light_-_new_force_-_vibrating_atmospheres
1951-03-22_-_Relativity-_time_-_Consciousness_-_psychic_Witness_-_The_twelve_senses_-_water-divining_-_Instinct_in_animals_-_story_of_Mothers_cat
1951-05-03_-_Money_and_its_use_for_the_divine_work_-_problems_-_Mastery_over_desire-_individual_and_collective_change
1953-09-16
1953-09-30
1954-02-03_-_The_senses_and_super-sense_-_Children_can_be_moulded_-_Keeping_things_in_order_-_The_shadow
1954-08-11_-_Division_and_creation_-_The_gods_and_human_formations_-_People_carry_their_desires_around_them
1954-08-25_-_Ananda_aspect_of_the_Mother_-_Changing_conditions_in_the_Ashram_-_Ascetic_discipline_-_Mothers_body
1954-09-22_-_The_supramental_creation_-_Rajasic_eagerness_-_Silence_from_above_-_Aspiration_and_rejection_-_Effort,_individuality_and_ego_-_Aspiration_and_desire
1954-12-15_-_Many_witnesses_inside_oneself_-_Children_in_the_Ashram_-_Trance_and_the_waking_consciousness_-_Ascetic_methods_-_Education,_spontaneous_effort_-_Spiritual_experience
1955-05-04_-_Drawing_on_the_universal_vital_forces_-_The_inner_physical_-_Receptivity_to_different_kinds_of_forces_-_Progress_and_receptivity
1956-01-11_-_Desire_and_self-deception_-_Giving_all_one_is_and_has_-_Sincerity,_more_powerful_than_will_-_Joy_of_progress_Definition_of_youth
1956-02-08_-_Forces_of_Nature_expressing_a_higher_Will_-_Illusion_of_separate_personality_-_One_dynamic_force_which_moves_all_things_-_Linear_and_spherical_thinking_-_Common_ideal_of_life,_microscopic
1956-03-28_-_The_starting-point_of_spiritual_experience_-_The_boundless_finite_-_The_Timeless_and_Time_-_Mental_explanation_not_enough_-_Changing_knowledge_into_experience_-_Sat-Chit-Tapas-Ananda
1956-05-16_-_Needs_of_the_body,_not_true_in_themselves_-_Spiritual_and_supramental_law_-_Aestheticised_Paganism_-_Morality,_checks_true_spiritual_effort_-_Effect_of_supramental_descent_-_Half-lights_and_false_lights
1956-07-18_-_Unlived_dreams_-_Radha-consciousness_-_Separation_and_identification_-_Ananda_of_identity_and_Ananda_of_union_-_Sincerity,_meditation_and_prayer_-_Enemies_of_the_Divine_-_The_universe_is_progressive
1956-08-01_-_Value_of_worship_-_Spiritual_realisation_and_the_integral_yoga_-_Symbols,_translation_of_experience_into_form_-_Sincerity,_fundamental_virtue_-_Intensity_of_aspiration,_with_anguish_or_joy_-_The_divine_Grace
1956-08-15_-_Protection,_purification,_fear_-_Atmosphere_at_the_Ashram_on_Darshan_days_-_Darshan_messages_-_Significance_of_15-08_-_State_of_surrender_-_Divine_Grace_always_all-powerful_-_Assumption_of_Virgin_Mary_-_SA_message_of_1947-08-15
1957-02-06_-_Death,_need_of_progress_-_Changing_Natures_methods
1957-10-09_-_As_many_universes_as_individuals_-_Passage_to_the_higher_hemisphere
1958-09-03_-_How_to_discipline_the_imagination_-_Mental_formations
1958-10-22_-_Spiritual_life_-_reversal_of_consciousness_-_Helping_others
1960_07_06
1962_01_12
1965_05_29
1969_08_28
1970_03_17
1.A_-_ANTHROPOLOGY,_THE_SOUL
1.ac_-_Happy_Dust
1.ac_-_The_Garden_of_Janus
1.ac_-_The_Mantra-Yoga
1.anon_-_Enuma_Elish_(When_on_high)
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_VII
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_XI_The_Story_of_the_Flood
1.anon_-_The_Seven_Evil_Spirits
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Collapsing_Cosmoses
1f.lovecraft_-_Dagon
1f.lovecraft_-_Herbert_West-Reanimator
1f.lovecraft_-_Hypnos
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Beast_in_the_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Challenge_from_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Colour_out_of_Space
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Moon-Bog
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Very_Old_Folk
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1.fs_-_Cassandra
1.fs_-_Fridolin_(The_Walk_To_The_Iron_Factory)
1.fs_-_Friendship
1.fs_-_Hymn_To_Joy
1.fs_-_The_Artists
1.fs_-_The_Battle
1.fs_-_The_Complaint_Of_Ceres
1.fs_-_The_Conflict
1.fs_-_The_Cranes_Of_Ibycus
1.fs_-_The_Dance
1.fs_-_The_Eleusinian_Festival
1.fs_-_The_Fight_With_The_Dragon
1.fs_-_The_Lay_Of_The_Bell
1.fs_-_The_Proverbs_Of_Confucius
1.fs_-_The_Walk
1.fs_-_To_Laura_(Mystery_Of_Reminiscence)
1.grh_-_Gorakh_Bani
1.hs_-_I_Know_The_Way_You_Can_Get
1.hs_-_No_tongue_can_tell_Your_secret
1.ia_-_An_Ocean_Without_Shore
1.is_-_I_Hate_Incense
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_I
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Sonnet_III._Written_On_The_Day_That_Mr._Leigh_Hunt_Left_Prison
1.jk_-_Sonnet._The_Human_Seasons
1.jk_-_To_Charles_Cowden_Clarke
1.jlb_-_Limits
1.jr_-_I_Will_Beguile_Him_With_The_Tongue
1.jr_-_Like_This
1.jt_-_In_losing_all,_the_soul_has_risen_(from_Self-Annihilation_and_Charity_Lead_the_Soul...)
1.jt_-_Oh,_the_futility_of_seeking_to_convey_(from_Self-Annihilation_and_Charity_Lead_the_Soul...)
1.jwvg_-_Epiphanias
1.jwvg_-_General_Confession
1.jwvg_-_Measure_Of_Time
1.jwvg_-_Reciprocal_Invitation_To_The_Dance
1.jwvg_-_The_Pupil_In_Magic
1.khc_-_Idle_Wandering
1.lovecraft_-_Astrophobos
1.lovecraft_-_Fungi_From_Yuggoth
1.lovecraft_-_The_Poe-ets_Nightmare
1.pbs_-_Alastor_-_or,_the_Spirit_of_Solitude
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_Hymn_To_Mercury
1.pbs_-_Invocation
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Love-_Hope,_Desire,_And_Fear
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Heaven
1.pbs_-_Peter_Bell_The_Third
1.pbs_-_Prince_Athanase
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_I.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_V.
1.pbs_-_Rosalind_and_Helen_-_a_Modern_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Song
1.pbs_-_Stanzas_Written_in_Dejection,_Near_Naples
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Cyclops
1.pbs_-_The_Daemon_Of_The_World
1.pbs_-_The_Fugitives
1.pbs_-_The_Irishmans_Song
1.pbs_-_The_Mask_Of_Anarchy
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Life
1.pbs_-_To_A_Skylark
1.pbs_-_To_Harriet_--_It_Is_Not_Blasphemy_To_Hope_That_Heaven
1.pbs_-_To_Sophia_(Miss_Stacey)
1.poe_-_Al_Aaraaf-_Part_2
1.poe_-_A_Valentine
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_Israfel
1.poe_-_The_Conversation_Of_Eiros_And_Charmion
1.raa_-_Circles_4_(from_Life_of_the_Future_World)
1.rb_-_A_Grammarian's_Funeral_Shortly_After_The_Revival_Of_Learning
1.rb_-_How_They_Brought_The_Good_News_From_Ghent_To_Aix
1.rb_-_Introduction:_Pippa_Passes
1.rb_-_Old_Pictures_In_Florence
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_III_-_Paracelsus
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_V_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pauline,_A_Fragment_of_a_Question
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_IV_-_Night
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fifth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_First
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Third
1.rb_-_The_Flight_Of_The_Duchess
1.rb_-_Women_And_Roses
1.rmr_-_Little_Tear-Vase
1.rt_-_Gitanjali
1.rt_-_Light
1.rt_-_Stream_Of_Life
1.rwe_-_Character
1.rwe_-_Fate
1.rwe_-_May-Day
1.rwe_-_Merlin_II
1.rwe_-_Monadnoc
1.rwe_-_Quatrains
1.rwe_-_Solution
1.rwe_-_Water
1.srm_-_The_Marital_Garland_of_Letters
1.wby_-_A_Dialogue_Of_Self_And_Soul
1.wby_-_A_Dramatic_Poem
1.wby_-_In_Memory_Of_Major_Robert_Gregory
1.wby_-_Shepherd_And_Goatherd
1.wby_-_The_Fairy_Pendant
1.wby_-_The_Old_Age_Of_Queen_Maeve
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_The_Shadowy_Waters
1.wby_-_The_Statues
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_I
1.wby_-_The_Winding_Stair
1.wby_-_To_Ireland_In_The_Coming_Times
1.wby_-_Tom_ORoughley
1.wby_-_Under_Ben_Bulben
1.wby_-_Under_The_Round_Tower
1.whitman_-_A_Carol_Of_Harvest_For_1867
1.whitman_-_A_Noiseless_Patient_Spider
1.whitman_-_As_I_Ebbd_With_the_Ocean_of_Life
1.whitman_-_Brother_Of_All,_With_Generous_Hand
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Occupations
1.whitman_-_Elemental_Drifts
1.whitman_-_I_Hear_America_Singing
1.whitman_-_I_Sing_The_Body_Electric
1.whitman_-_Manhattan_Streets_I_Saunterd,_Pondering
1.whitman_-_Night_On_The_Prairies
1.whitman_-_On_Old_Mans_Thought_Of_School
1.whitman_-_Prayer_Of_Columbus
1.whitman_-_Proud_Music_Of_The_Storm
1.whitman_-_Recorders_Ages_Hence
1.whitman_-_Sing_Of_The_Banner_At_Day-Break
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLVI
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXV
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Broad-Axe
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Exposition
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Universal
1.whitman_-_The_Mystic_Trumpeter
1.whitman_-_The_Sleepers
1.whitman_-_To_A_Locomotive_In_Winter
1.whitman_-_To_Oratists
1.whitman_-_When_I_Heard_the_Learnd_Astronomer
1.whitman_-_When_Lilacs_Last_in_the_Dooryard_Bloomd
1.whitman_-_Whispers_Of_Heavenly_Death
1.ww_-_Address_To_My_Infant_Daughter
1.ww_-_A_Fact,_And_An_Imagination,_Or,_Canute_And_Alfred,_On_The_Seashore
1.ww_-_A_noiseless_patient_spider
1.ww_-_Book_Eleventh-_France_[concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_Fifth-Books
1.ww_-_Book_First_[Introduction-Childhood_and_School_Time]
1.ww_-_Book_Fourth_[Summer_Vacation]
1.ww_-_Book_Ninth_[Residence_in_France]
1.ww_-_Book_Seventh_[Residence_in_London]
1.ww_-_Book_Thirteenth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_Concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_Twelfth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_]
1.ww_-_Dion_[See_Plutarch]
1.ww_-_Extempore_Effusion_upon_the_Death_of_James_Hogg
1.ww_-_From_The_Cuckoo_And_The_Nightingale
1.ww_-_Hint_From_The_Mountains_For_Certain_Political_Pretenders
1.ww_-_Lines_Written_In_Early_Spring
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803_X._Rob_Roys_Grave
1.ww_-_Ode
1.ww_-_Resolution_And_Independence
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_II-_Book_First-_The_Wanderer
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_V-_Book_Fouth-_Despondency_Corrected
1.ww_-_The_Morning_Of_The_Day_Appointed_For_A_General_Thanksgiving._January_18,_1816
1.ww_-_The_Passing_of_the_Elder_Bards
1.ww_-_The_Pet-Lamb
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
1.ww_-_The_Thorn
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_First
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_Second
1.ww_-_To_Dora
1.ww_-_To_My_Sister
1.ww_-_To_The_Same_Flower
1.ww_-_Written_In_A_Blank_Leaf_Of_Macpherson's_Ossian
1.ww_-_Written_With_A_Slate_Pencil_On_A_Stone,_On_The_Side_Of_The_Mountain_Of_Black_Comb
1.ww_-_Yarrow_Visited
20.01_-_Charyapada_-_Old_Bengali_Mystic_Poems
2.01_-_Habit_1__Be_Proactive
2.01_-_Mandala_One
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_On_the_Concept_of_the_Archetype
2.01_-_THE_ADVENT_OF_LIFE
2.01_-_The_Object_of_Knowledge
2.01_-_The_Sefirot
2.01_-_The_Therapeutic_value_of_Abreaction
2.02_-_Atomic_Motions
2.02_-_Brahman,_Purusha,_Ishwara_-_Maya,_Prakriti,_Shakti
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind
2.02_-_THE_EXPANSION_OF_LIFE
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.03_-_Atomic_Forms_And_Their_Combinations
2.03_-_DEMETER
2.03_-_Indra_and_the_Thought-Forces
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_The_Altar
2.03_-_The_Christian_Phenomenon_and_Faith_in_the_Incarnation
2.03_-_The_Supreme_Divine
2.04_-_Concentration
2.04_-_Positive_Aspects_of_the_Mother-Complex
2.04_-_The_Divine_and_the_Undivine
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_Infinite_Worlds
2.05_-_The_Line_of_Light_and_The_Impression
2.06_-_On_Beauty
2.06_-_The_Infinite_Light
2.06_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Disciplines_of_Knowledge
2.06_-_WITH_VARIOUS_DEVOTEES
2.07_-_BANKIM_CHANDRA
2.07_-_I_Also_Try_to_Tell_My_Tale
2.07_-_The_Knowledge_and_the_Ignorance
2.07_-_The_Mother__Relations_with_Others
2.07_-_The_Upanishad_in_Aphorism
2.08_-_ALICE_IN_WONDERLAND
2.08_-_Concentration
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.08_-_Memory,_Self-Consciousness_and_the_Ignorance
2.08_-_The_Branches_of_The_Archetypal_Man
2.08_-_The_Sword
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.01_-_God_The_One_Reality
2.1.02_-_Love_and_Death
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
2.10_-_Knowledge_by_Identity_and_Separative_Knowledge
2.12_-_THE_MASTERS_REMINISCENCES
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.1.4.3_-_Discipline
2.14_-_AT_RAMS_HOUSE
2.14_-_The_Origin_and_Remedy_of_Falsehood,_Error,_Wrong_and_Evil
2.14_-_The_Two_Hundred_and_Eighty-Eight_Sparks
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.15_-_The_Cosmic_Consciousness
2.17_-_December_1938
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_Maeroprosopus_and_Maeroprosopvis
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_DR._SARKAR
2.2.01_-_The_Problem_of_Consciousness
2.2.01_-_Work_and_Yoga
2.2.02_-_Consciousness_and_the_Inconscient
2.20_-_The_Infancy_and_Maturity_of_ZO,_Father_and_Mother,_Israel_The_Ancient_and_Understanding
2.20_-_THE_MASTERS_TRAINING_OF_HIS_DISCIPLES
2.20_-_The_Philosophy_of_Rebirth
2.21_-_The_Order_of_the_Worlds
2.21_-_The_Three_Heads,_The_Beard_and_The_Mazela
2.2.2_-_Sorrow_and_Suffering
2.2.2_-_The_Mandoukya_Upanishad
2.22_-_Vijnana_or_Gnosis
2.23_-_A_Virtuous_Woman_is_a_Crown_to_Her_Husband
2.23_-_Man_and_the_Evolution
2.23_-_The_Conditions_of_Attainment_to_the_Gnosis
2.23_-_THE_MASTER_AND_BUDDHA
2.24_-_Gnosis_and_Ananda
2.2.4_-_Taittiriya_Upanishad
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.25_-_List_of_Topics_in_Each_Talk
2.25_-_Mercies_and_Judgements_of_Knowledge
2.25_-_The_Triple_Transformation
2.27_-_The_Gnostic_Being
2.3.01_-_Aspiration_and_Surrender_to_the_Mother
2.3.06_-_The_Mind
2.3.07_-_The_Vital_Being_and_Vital_Consciousness
2.3.08_-_The_Mother's_Help_in_Difficulties
23.10_-_Observations_II
2.3.2_-_Desire
2.3.3_-_Anger_and_Violence
2.4.02_-_Bhakti,_Devotion,_Worship
24.03_-_Notes_on_Savitri_II
24.05_-_Vision_of_Dante
2.4.2_-_Interactions_with_Others_and_the_Practice_of_Yoga
2_-_Other_Hymns_to_Agni
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.02_-_Greek_Drama
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.03_-_Spirituality_in_Art
30.05_-_Rhythm_in_Poetry
30.07_-_The_Poet_and_the_Yogi
3.00_-_Introduction
3.00_-_The_Magical_Theory_of_the_Universe
30.11_-_Modern_Poetry
30.13_-_Rabindranath_the_Artist
30.14_-_Rabindranath_and_Modernism
30.15_-_The_Language_of_Rabindranath
30.17_-_Rabindranath,_Traveller_of_the_Infinite
3.01_-_Hymn_to_Matter
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.02_-_King_and_Queen
3.02_-_THE_DEPLOYMENT_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret
3.02_-_The_Psychology_of_Rebirth
3.03_-_SULPHUR
3.03_-_The_Consummation_of_Mysticism
3.03_-_THE_MODERN_EARTH
3.04_-_LUNA
3.04_-_On_Thought_-_III
3.04_-_The_Spirit_in_Spirit-Land_after_Death
3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail
3.08_-_Purification
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
3.0_-_THE_ETERNAL_RECURRENCE
31.04_-_Sri_Ramakrishna
3.1.05_-_A_Vision_of_Science
31.07_-_Shyamakanta
3.1.08_-_To_the_Sea
31.10_-_East_and_West
3.1.15_-_Rebirth
3.1.16_-_The_Triumph-Song_of_Trishuncou
3.1.19_-_Parabrahman
3.11_-_Spells
3.1.23_-_The_Rishi
3.1.2_-_Levels_of_the_Physical_Being
3.12_-_Of_the_Bloody_Sacrifice
3.1.3_-_Difficulties_of_the_Physical_Being
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.16.2_-_Of_the_Charge_of_the_Spirit
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
3.2.02_-_The_Veda_and_the_Upanishads
3.2.03_-_Conservation_and_Progress
3.2.07_-_Tantra
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
32.08_-_Fit_and_Unfit_(A_Letter)
32.09_-_On_Karmayoga_(A_Letter)
3.20_-_Of_the_Eucharist
3.2.10_-_Christianity_and_Theosophy
3.2.3_-_Dreams
3.3.02_-_All-Will_and_Free-Will
33.05_-_Muraripukur_-_II
33.06_-_Alipore_Court
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.14_-_I_Played_Football
34.01_-_Hymn_To_Indra
34.09_-_Hymn_to_the_Pillar
34.10_-_Hymn_To_Earth
3-5_Full_Circle
3.6.01_-_Heraclitus
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
36.08_-_A_Commentary_on_the_First_Six_Suktas_of_Rigveda
37.02_-_The_Story_of_Jabala-Satyakama
37.04_-_The_Story_Of_Rishi_Yajnavalkya
3.7.1.07_-_Involution_and_Evolution
3.7.1.08_-_Karma
3.7.1.12_-_Karma_and_Justice
3.7.2.01_-_The_Foundation
3.7.2.02_-_The_Terrestial_Law
3.7.2.03_-_Mind_Nature_and_Law_of_Karma
3.7.2.04_-_The_Higher_Lines_of_Karma
3.7.2.05_-_Appendix_I_-_The_Tangle_of_Karma
3.8.1.03_-_Meditation
3.8.1.06_-_The_Universal_Consciousness
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
4.01_-_Conclusion_-_My_intellectual_position
4.01_-_Sweetness_in_Prayer
4.01_-_THE_COLLECTIVE_ISSUE
4.01_-_The_Presence_of_God_in_the_World
4.02_-_BEYOND_THE_COLLECTIVE_-_THE_HYPER-PERSONAL
4.02_-_The_Psychology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_Prayer_to_the_Ever-greater_Christ
4.03_-_The_Meaning_of_Human_Endeavor
4.03_-_The_Senses_And_Mental_Pictures
4.03_-_THE_ULTIMATE_EARTH
4.04_-_In_the_Total_Christ
4.04_-_Weaknesses
4.07_-_Purification-Intelligence_and_Will
4.09_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Nature
4.0_-_NOTES_TO_ZARATHUSTRA
4.1.01_-_The_Intellect_and_Yoga
4.10_-_The_Elements_of_Perfection
4.1.4_-_Resistances,_Sufferings_and_Falls
4.14_-_The_Power_of_the_Instruments
4.15_-_Soul-Force_and_the_Fourfold_Personality
4.17_-_THE_AWAKENING
4.19_-_The_Nature_of_the_supermind
4.1_-_Jnana
4.2.2_-_Steps_towards_Overcoming_Difficulties
4.22_-_The_supramental_Thought_and_Knowledge
4.25_-_Towards_the_supramental_Time_Vision
5.01_-_EPILOGUE
5.02_-_Perfection_of_the_Body
5.04_-_Formation_Of_The_World
5.04_-_THE_POLARITY_OF_ADAM
5.05_-_Supermind_and_Humanity
5.07_-_Beginnings_Of_Civilization
5.1.01.1_-_The_Book_of_the_Herald
5.1.01.2_-_The_Book_of_the_Statesman
5.1.01.3_-_The_Book_of_the_Assembly
5.1.01.5_-_The_Book_of_Achilles
5.1.01.6_-_The_Book_of_the_Chieftains
5.1.01.7_-_The_Book_of_the_Woman
5.1.01.8_-_The_Book_of_the_Gods
5.1.02_-_Ahana
5.2.01_-_The_Descent_of_Ahana
5.3.04_-_Roots_in_M
5.3.05_-_The_Root_Mal_in_Greek
5.4.01_-_Notes_on_Root-Sounds
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
6.10_-_THE_SELF_AND_THE_BOUNDS_OF_KNOWLEDGE
7.01_-_The_Soul_(the_Psychic)
7.16_-_Sympathy
7.4.03_-_The_Cosmic_Dance
7.6.02_-_The_World_Game
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
9.99_-_Glossary
Aeneid
Appendix_4_-_Priest_Spells
A_Secret_Miracle
Averroes_Search
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Blazing_P2_-_Map_the_Stages_of_Conventional_Consciousness
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_III._-_The_external_calamities_of_Rome
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
Book_of_Exodus
Book_of_Genesis
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_VII._-_Of_the_select_gods_of_the_civil_theology,_and_that_eternal_life_is_not_obtained_by_worshipping_them
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XII._-_Of_the_creation_of_angels_and_men,_and_of_the_origin_of_evil
BOOK_XIV._-_Of_the_punishment_and_results_of_mans_first_sin,_and_of_the_propagation_of_man_without_lust
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XXI._-_Of_the_eternal_punishment_of_the_wicked_in_hell,_and_of_the_various_objections_urged_against_it
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
COSA_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_II
COSA_-_BOOK_IX
COSA_-_BOOK_V
COSA_-_BOOK_VII
COSA_-_BOOK_VIII
COSA_-_BOOK_X
COSA_-_BOOK_XI
COSA_-_BOOK_XII
COSA_-_BOOK_XIII
Cratylus
DS4
ENNEAD_01.02_-_Concerning_Virtue.
ENNEAD_01.05_-_Does_Happiness_Increase_With_Time?
ENNEAD_01.06_-_Of_Beauty.
ENNEAD_01.08_-_Of_the_Nature_and_Origin_of_Evils.
ENNEAD_02.04a_-_Of_Matter.
ENNEAD_02.08_-_Of_Sight,_or_of_Why_Distant_Objects_Seem_Small.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.05_-_Psychological_Questions_III._-_About_the_Process_of_Vision_and_Hearing.
ENNEAD_04.06a_-_Of_Sensation_and_Memory.
ENNEAD_04.07_-_Of_the_Immortality_of_the_Soul:_Polemic_Against_Materialism.
ENNEAD_04.08_-_Of_the_Descent_of_the_Soul_Into_the_Body.
ENNEAD_05.01_-_The_Three_Principal_Hypostases,_or_Forms_of_Existence.
ENNEAD_05.02_-_Of_Generation_and_of_the_Order_of_Things_that_Follow_the_First.
ENNEAD_05.03_-_Of_the_Hypostases_that_Mediate_Knowledge,_and_of_the_Superior_Principle.
ENNEAD_05.05_-_That_Intelligible_Entities_Are_Not_External_to_the_Intelligence_of_the_Good.
ENNEAD_05.08_-_Concerning_Intelligible_Beauty.
ENNEAD_06.01_-_Of_the_Ten_Aristotelian_and_Four_Stoic_Categories.
ENNEAD_06.02_-_The_Categories_of_Plotinos.
ENNEAD_06.03_-_Plotinos_Own_Sense-Categories.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.06_-_Of_Numbers.
ENNEAD_06.07_-_How_Ideas_Multiplied,_and_the_Good.
ENNEAD_06.08_-_Of_the_Will_of_the_One.
Epistle_to_the_Romans
Euthyphro
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
IS_-_Chapter_1
I._THE_ATTRACTIVE_POWER_OF_GOD
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
Meno
MoM_References
Phaedo
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1913_11_13
r1914_10_31
r1917_09_02
r1918_05_24
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_051-075
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Book_of_Job
The_Book_of_Joshua
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Isaiah
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Micah
The_Book_of_Wisdom
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Dream_of_a_Ridiculous_Man
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Ephesians
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Gold_Bug
The_Golden_Verses_of_Pythagoras
The_Gospel_According_to_John
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Gospel_According_to_Mark
The_Gospel_According_to_Matthew
The_Gospel_of_Thomas
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Lottery_in_Babylon
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Revelation_of_Jesus_Christ_or_the_Apocalypse
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
The_Theologians
The_Wall_and_the_BOoks
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

SIMILAR TITLES
measure
Psychological Assessment of Adult Posttraumatic States Phenomenology, Diagnosis, and Measurement
The effective fullness of our concentration on the one thing needful to the exclusion of all else will be the measure of our self-consecration to the One who is alone desirable.

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

measure: A concept of assigning a set of points (e.g. on a line, plane) that is a generalisation of length, area and volume etc.

measured ::: 1. Deliberate and restrained; careful; carefully weighed or considered. 2. Regular in rhythm, movement and number. 3. Ascertained or apportioned by measure. 4. Accurately regulated or proportioned.

measured ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Measure ::: a. --> Regulated or determined by a standard; hence, equal; uniform; graduated; limited; moderated; as, he walked with measured steps; he expressed himself in no measured terms.

measureless ::: a. --> Without measure; unlimited; immeasurable.

measureless ::: too large or great to be measured; unlimited; immeasurable; boundless.

measurement ::: n. --> The act or result of measuring; mensuration; as, measurement is required.
The extent, size, capacity, amount. or quantity ascertained by measuring; as, its measurement is five acres.


measurement "testing" The act or process of measuring; a figure, extent, or amount obtained by measuring. (1996-12-27)

measurement ::: (testing) The act or process of measuring; a figure, extent, or amount obtained by measuring. (1996-12-27)

measurement: The ratio of the observation of an aspect of an object to that of standard reference objects sharing in property of that same aspect.

measure ::: n. 1. A unit of standard of measurement. 2. The extent, quantity, dimensions, etc. of (something), ascertained esp. by comparison with a standard. 3. Bounds or limits. 4. A definite or known quality or quantity measured out. 5. A short rhythmical movement or arrangement, as in poetry or music. measures. *v. 6. To determine the size, amount, etc. 7. To estimate the relative amount, value, etc., of, by comparison with some standard. 8. To travel or move over as if measuring. *measured, measuring.

measure ::: n. --> A standard of dimension; a fixed unit of quantity or extent; an extent or quantity in the fractions or multiples of which anything is estimated and stated; hence, a rule by which anything is adjusted or judged.
An instrument by means of which size or quantity is measured, as a graduated line, rod, vessel, or the like.
The dimensions or capacity of anything, reckoned according to some standard; size or extent, determined and stated; estimated


measure of dispersion: a measurement of the spread or variability in a set of scores.

measurer ::: a person who takes measurements. measurers.

measurer ::: n. --> One who measures; one whose occupation or duty is to measure commondities in market.

measures ::: actions or procedures intended as a means to an end.

measures of dispersion: A statistic which has certain (possibly loosely defined) properties and obeys certain (also possibly loosely defined) rules which is generally considered to be essential such that the value of from a given data set is representative of the variability (dispersion) of the data set.

measures of location:A statistic which has certain (possibly loosely defined) properties and obeys certain (also possibly loosely defined) rules which is generally considered to be essential such that the value of from a given data set is representative of the location of the data set considered as a whole.

measure "testing" To ascertain or appraise by comparing to a {standard}; to apply a {metric}. (1996-12-27)

measure ::: (testing) To ascertain or appraise by comparing to a standard; to apply a metric. (1996-12-27)

measure (US): also "bar," the period of a musical piece that encompasses a complete cycle of the time signature, e.g., in 4/4 time, a measure has four quarter-note beats

Measurement: (Lat. metiri, to measure) The process of ascribing a numerical value to an object or quality either on the basis of the number of times some given unit quantity is contained in it, or on the basis of its position in a series of greater and lesser quantities of like kind. See Intensive, Extensive Quantity. -- A.C.B.

Measurement, Scales of ::: Categories of data based on their numerical characteristics (See Ratio, Interval, Ordinal, and Nominal Scales)

Measure of Central Tendency ::: An average (see Mean, Median, and/or Mode)


TERMS ANYWHERE

1. Done in an hour or measured by the hour. 2. Occurring every hour.

1. Incapable of being fully ascertained, explored, exhausted, etc. 2. Incapable of being fathomed or measured; unsoundable, immeasurable, vast.

1. The expenditure of something, such as time or labour, necessary for the attainment of a goal. Also fig. **2. The price paid or required for acquiring, producing, or maintaining something, usually measured in money, time, or energy; expense or expenditure; outlay. 3. **Suffering or sacrifice; loss; penalty.

1. Uncounted; unreckoned. 2. Unmeasured, unlimited.

aam ::: n. --> A Dutch and German measure of liquids, varying in different cities, being at Amsterdam about 41 wine gallons, at Antwerp 36 1/2, at Hamburg 38 1/4.

abolitionism ::: n. --> The principles or measures of abolitionists.

abounds ::: present in overflowing measure; plentiful; prevails widely.

above ::: prep. --> In or to a higher place; higher than; on or over the upper surface; over; -- opposed to below or beneath.
Figuratively, higher than; superior to in any respect; surpassing; beyond; higher in measure or degree than; as, things above comprehension; above mean actions; conduct above reproach.
Surpassing in number or quantity; more than; as, above a hundred. (Passing into the adverbial sense. See Above, adv., 4.)


abundantly ::: adv. --> In a sufficient degree; fully; amply; plentifully; in large measure.

accurate ::: a. --> In exact or careful conformity to truth, or to some standard of requirement, the result of care or pains; free from failure, error, or defect; exact; as, an accurate calculator; an accurate measure; accurate expression, knowledge, etc.
Precisely fixed; executed with care; careful.


acetabulum ::: n. --> A vinegar cup; socket of the hip bone; a measure of about one eighth of a pint, etc.
The bony cup which receives the head of the thigh bone.
The cavity in which the leg of an insect is inserted at its articulation with the body.
A sucker of the sepia or cuttlefish and related animals.
The large posterior sucker of the leeches.


acidimetry ::: n. --> The measurement of the strength of acids, especially by a chemical process based on the law of chemical combinations, or the fact that, to produce a complete reaction, a certain definite weight of reagent is required.

actinometric ::: a. --> Pertaining to the measurement of the intensity of the solar rays, either (a) heating, or (b) actinic.

actinometry ::: n. --> The measurement of the force of solar radiation.
The measurement of the chemical or actinic energy of light.


admeasurer ::: n. --> One who admeasures.

admeasure ::: v. t. --> To measure.
To determine the proper share of, or the proper apportionment; as, to admeasure dower; to admeasure common of pasture.
The measure of a thing; dimensions; size.
Formerly, the adjustment of proportion, or ascertainment of shares, as of dower or pasture held in common. This was by writ of admeasurement, directed to the sheriff.


admensuration ::: n. --> Same as Admeasurement.

after-note ::: n. --> One of the small notes occur on the unaccented parts of the measure, taking their time from the preceding note.

air poise ::: --> An instrument to measure the weight of air.

aleconner ::: n. --> Orig., an officer appointed to look to the goodness of ale and beer; also, one of the officers chosen by the liverymen of London to inspect the measures used in public houses. But the office is a sinecure. [Also called aletaster.]

alla breve ::: --> With one breve, or four minims, to measure, and sung faster like four crotchets; in quick common time; -- indicated in the time signature by /.

almude ::: n. --> A measure for liquids in several countries. In Portugal the Lisbon almude is about 4.4, and the Oporto almude about 6.6, gallons U. S. measure. In Turkey the "almud" is about 1.4 gallons.

alnage ::: n. --> Measurement (of cloth) by the ell; also, a duty for such measurement.

alnager ::: n. --> A measure by the ell; formerly a sworn officer in England, whose duty was to inspect and measure woolen cloth, and fix upon it a seal.

altitude ::: n. --> Space extended upward; height; the perpendicular elevation of an object above its foundation, above the ground, or above a given level, or of one object above another; as, the altitude of a mountain, or of a bird above the top of a tree.
The elevation of a point, or star, or other celestial object, above the horizon, measured by the arc of a vertical circle intercepted between such point and the horizon. It is either true or apparent; true when measured from the rational or real horizon,


altitudinal ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to height; as, altitudinal measurements.

anapestic ::: a. --> Pertaining to an anapest; consisting of an anapests; as, an anapestic meter, foot, verse. ::: n. --> Anapestic measure or verse.

— anger and sensitiveness and pride as well as desire and the rest, — not to let them get hold of the emotional being and disturb the inner peace, not to speak and act in the rush and impulsion of thesS things, always to act and speak out of a calm inner poise of the spirit. It is not easy to have this equality in any full perfect measure, but one should always try more and more to make it the basis of one's inner state and outer movements.

anglemeter ::: n. --> An instrument to measure angles, esp. one used by geologists to measure the dip of strata.

angular ::: a. --> Relating to an angle or to angles; having an angle or angles; forming an angle or corner; sharp-cornered; pointed; as, an angular figure.
Measured by an angle; as, angular distance.
Fig.: Lean; lank; raw-boned; ungraceful; sharp and stiff in character; as, remarkably angular in his habits and appearance; an angular female.


anker ::: n. --> A liquid measure in various countries of Europe. The Dutch anker, formerly also used in England, contained about 10 of the old wine gallons, or 8/ imperial gallons.

anthropometry ::: n. --> Measurement of the height and other dimensions of human beings, especially at different ages, or in different races, occupations, etc.

anything ::: n. --> Any object, act, state, event, or fact whatever; thing of any kind; something or other; aught; as, I would not do it for anything.
Expressing an indefinite comparison; -- with as or like. ::: adv. --> In any measure; anywise; at all.


a person who is practised in or who studies geometry, the branch of mathematics that deals with the deduction of the properties, measurement, and relationships of points, lines, angles, and figures in space from their defining conditions by means of certain assumed properties of space. World-Geometer"s.

approve ::: v. t. --> To show to be real or true; to prove.
To make proof of; to demonstrate; to prove or show practically.
To sanction officially; to ratify; to confirm; as, to approve the decision of a court-martial.
To regard as good; to commend; to be pleased with; to think well of; as, we approve the measured of the administration.
To make or show to be worthy of approbation or


areometrical ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or measured by, an areometer.

are ::: --> The present indicative plural of the substantive verb to be; but etymologically a different word from be, or was. Am, art, are, and is, all come from the root as. ::: n. --> The unit of superficial measure, being a square of which each side is ten meters in length; 100 square meters, or about 119.6 square

argue ::: v. i. --> To invent and offer reasons to support or overthrow a proposition, opinion, or measure; to use arguments; to reason.
To contend in argument; to dispute; to reason; -- followed by with; as, you may argue with your friend without convincing him. ::: v. t.


aristocratical ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to an aristocracy; consisting in, or favoring, a government of nobles, or principal men; as, an aristocratic constitution.
Partaking of aristocracy; befitting aristocracy; characteristic of, or originating with, the aristocracy; as, an aristocratic measure; aristocratic pride or manners.


arpen ::: n. --> Formerly, a measure of land in France, varying in different parts of the country. The arpent of Paris was 4,088 sq. yards, or nearly five sixths of an English acre. The woodland arpent was about 1 acre, 1 rood, 1 perch, English.

arrangement ::: n. --> The act of arranging or putting in an orderly condition; the state of being arranged or put in order; disposition in suitable form.
The manner or result of arranging; system of parts disposed in due order; regular and systematic classification; as, arrangement of one&


arroba ::: n. --> A Spanish weight used in Mexico and South America = 25.36 lbs. avoir.; also, an old Portuguese weight, used in Brazil = 32.38 lbs. avoir.
A Spanish liquid measure for wine = 3.54 imp. gallons, and for oil = 2.78 imp. gallons.


arshine ::: n. --> A Russian measure of length = 2 ft. 4.246 inches.

assert ::: v. t. --> To affirm; to declare with assurance, or plainly and strongly; to state positively; to aver; to asseverate.
To maintain; to defend.
To maintain or defend, as a cause or a claim, by words or measures; to vindicate a claim or title to; as, to assert our rights and liberties.


assize ::: n. --> An assembly of knights and other substantial men, with a bailiff or justice, in a certain place and at a certain time, for public business.
A special kind of jury or inquest.
A kind of writ or real action.
A verdict or finding of a jury upon such writ.
A statute or ordinance in general. Specifically: (1) A statute regulating the weight, measure, and proportions of ingredients


assizer ::: n. --> An officer who has the care or inspection of weights and measures, etc.

astrometry ::: n. --> The art of making measurements among the stars, or of determining their relative magnitudes.

atmo ::: n. --> The standard atmospheric pressure used in certain physical measurements calculations; conventionally, that pressure under which the barometer stands at 760 millimeters, at a temperature of 0¡ Centigrade, at the level of the sea, and in the latitude of Paris.

aune ::: n. --> A French cloth measure, of different parts of the country (at Paris, 0.95 of an English ell); -- now superseded by the meter.

auxanometer ::: n. --> An instrument to measure the growth of plants.

available ::: a. --> Having sufficient power, force, or efficacy, for the object; effectual; valid; as, an available plea.
Such as one may avail one&


baculometry ::: n. --> Measurement of distance or altitude by a staff or staffs.

bandle ::: n. --> An Irish measure of two feet in length.

baric ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to barium; as, baric oxide.
Of or pertaining to weight, esp. to the weight or pressure of the atmosphere as measured by the barometer.


barleycorn ::: n. --> A grain or "corn" of barley.
Formerly , a measure of length, equal to the average length of a grain of barley; the third part of an inch.


barometry ::: n. --> The art or process of making barometrical measurements.

bathymetrical ::: a. --> Pertaining to bathymetry; relating to the measurement of depths, especially of depths in the sea.

bigha ::: n. --> A measure of land in India, varying from a third of an acre to an acre.

biometry ::: n. --> Measurement of life; calculation of the probable duration of human life.

measured ::: 1. Deliberate and restrained; careful; carefully weighed or considered. 2. Regular in rhythm, movement and number. 3. Ascertained or apportioned by measure. 4. Accurately regulated or proportioned.

measured ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Measure ::: a. --> Regulated or determined by a standard; hence, equal; uniform; graduated; limited; moderated; as, he walked with measured steps; he expressed himself in no measured terms.

measureless ::: a. --> Without measure; unlimited; immeasurable.

measureless ::: too large or great to be measured; unlimited; immeasurable; boundless.

measurement ::: n. --> The act or result of measuring; mensuration; as, measurement is required.
The extent, size, capacity, amount. or quantity ascertained by measuring; as, its measurement is five acres.


measure ::: n. 1. A unit of standard of measurement. 2. The extent, quantity, dimensions, etc. of (something), ascertained esp. by comparison with a standard. 3. Bounds or limits. 4. A definite or known quality or quantity measured out. 5. A short rhythmical movement or arrangement, as in poetry or music. measures. *v. 6. To determine the size, amount, etc. 7. To estimate the relative amount, value, etc., of, by comparison with some standard. 8. To travel or move over as if measuring. *measured, measuring.

measure ::: n. --> A standard of dimension; a fixed unit of quantity or extent; an extent or quantity in the fractions or multiples of which anything is estimated and stated; hence, a rule by which anything is adjusted or judged.
An instrument by means of which size or quantity is measured, as a graduated line, rod, vessel, or the like.
The dimensions or capacity of anything, reckoned according to some standard; size or extent, determined and stated; estimated


measurer ::: a person who takes measurements. measurers.

measurer ::: n. --> One who measures; one whose occupation or duty is to measure commondities in market.

measures ::: actions or procedures intended as a means to an end.

bole ::: n. --> The trunk or stem of a tree, or that which is like it.
An aperture, with a wooden shutter, in the wall of a house, for giving, occasionally, air or light; also, a small closet.
A measure. See Boll, n., 2.
Any one of several varieties of friable earthy clay, usually colored more or less strongly red by oxide of iron, and used to color and adulterate various substances. It was formerly used in medicine. It is composed essentially of hydrous silicates of alumina, or more rarely


boll ::: n. --> The pod or capsule of a plant, as of flax or cotton; a pericarp of a globular form.
A Scotch measure, formerly in use: for wheat and beans it contained four Winchester bushels; for oats, barley, and potatoes, six bushels. A boll of meal is 140 lbs. avoirdupois. Also, a measure for salt of two bushels. ::: v. i.


bovate ::: n. --> An oxgang, or as much land as an ox can plow in a year; an ancient measure of land, of indefinite quantity, but usually estimated at fifteen acres.

breadth ::: 1. The measure or the second largest dimension of a plane or solid figure; width. 2. Freedom from narrowness or restraint; liberality. 3. Tolerance; broadmindedness. breadths.

breadth ::: a. --> Distance from side to side of any surface or thing; measure across, or at right angles to the length; width.

broad ::: superl. --> Wide; extend in breadth, or from side to side; -- opposed to narrow; as, a broad street, a broad table; an inch broad.
Extending far and wide; extensive; vast; as, the broad expanse of ocean.
Extended, in the sense of diffused; open; clear; full.
Fig.: Having a large measure of any thing or quality; not limited; not restrained; -- applied to any subject, and retaining the literal idea more or less clearly, the precise meaning depending


bulse ::: n. --> A purse or bag in which to carry or measure diamonds, etc.

buoyancy ::: n. --> The property of floating on the surface of a liquid, or in a fluid, as in the atmosphere; specific lightness, which is inversely as the weight compared with that of an equal volume of water.
The upward pressure exerted upon a floating body by a fluid, which is equal to the weight of the body; hence, also, the weight of a floating body, as measured by the volume of fluid displaced.
Cheerfulness; vivacity; liveliness; sprightliness; -- the


burette ::: n. --> An apparatus for delivering measured quantities of liquid or for measuring the quantity of liquid or gas received or discharged. It consists essentially of a graduated glass tube, usually furnished with a small aperture and stopcock.

bushel ::: n. --> A dry measure, containing four pecks, eight gallons, or thirty-two quarts.
A vessel of the capacity of a bushel, used in measuring; a bushel measure.
A quantity that fills a bushel measure; as, a heap containing ten bushels of apples.
A large indefinite quantity.
The iron lining in the nave of a wheel. [Eng.] In the


cab ::: n. --> A kind of close carriage with two or four wheels, usually a public vehicle.
The covered part of a locomotive, in which the engineer has his station.
A Hebrew dry measure, containing a little over two (2.37) pints.


cadrans ::: n. --> An instrument with a graduated disk by means of which the angles of gems are measured in the process of cutting and polishing.

calorimetry ::: n. --> Measurement of the quantities of heat in bodies.

cambistry ::: n. --> The science of exchange, weight, measures, etc.

canicular ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or measured, by the rising of the Dog Star.

canna ::: n. --> A measure of length in Italy, varying from six to seven feet. See Cane, 4.
A genus of tropical plants, with large leaves and often with showy flowers. The Indian shot (C. Indica) is found in gardens of the northern United States.


cantarro ::: n. --> A weight used in southern Europe and East for heavy articles. It varies in different localities; thus, at Rome it is nearly 75 pounds, in Sardinia nearly 94 pounds, in Cairo it is 95 pounds, in Syria about 503 pounds.
A liquid measure in Spain, ranging from two and a half to four gallons.


cardiometry ::: n. --> Measurement of the heart, as by percussion or auscultation.

cathetometer ::: n. --> An instrument for the accurate measurement of small differences of height; esp. of the differences in the height of the upper surfaces of two columns of mercury or other fluid, or of the same column at different times. It consists of a telescopic leveling apparatus (d), which slides up or down a perpendicular metallic standard very finely graduated (bb). The telescope is raised or depressed in order to sight the objects or surfaces, and the differences in vertical height are thus shown on the graduated

caucus ::: n. --> A meeting, especially a preliminary meeting, of persons belonging to a party, to nominate candidates for public office, or to select delegates to a nominating convention, or to confer regarding measures of party policy; a political primary meeting. ::: v. i. --> To hold, or meet in, a caucus or caucuses.

centare ::: n. --> A measure of area, the hundredth part of an are; one square meter, or about 1/ square yards.

centilitre ::: n. --> The hundredth part of a liter; a measure of volume or capacity equal to a little more than six tenths (0.6102) of a cubic inch, or one third (0.338) of a fluid ounce.

centimetre ::: n. --> The hundredth part of a meter; a measure of length equal to rather more than thirty-nine hundredths (0.3937) of an inch. See Meter.

cess ::: n. --> A rate or tax.
Bound; measure. ::: v. t. --> To rate; to tax; to assess. ::: v. i.


chaconne ::: n. --> An old Spanish dance in moderate three-four measure, like the Passacaglia, which is slower. Both are used by classical composers as themes for variations.

chaldron ::: n. --> An English dry measure, being, at London, 36 bushels heaped up, or its equivalent weight, and more than twice as much at Newcastle. Now used exclusively for coal and coke.

chetvert ::: n. --> A measure of grain equal to 0.7218 of an imperial quarter, or 5.95 Winchester bushels.

chopin ::: n. --> A liquid measure formerly used in France and Great Britain, varying from half a pint to a wine quart.
See Chopine.


chronometrical ::: a. --> Pertaining to a chronometer; measured by a chronometer.

circuit ::: n. --> The act of moving or revolving around, or as in a circle or orbit; a revolution; as, the periodical circuit of the earth round the sun.
The circumference of, or distance round, any space; the measure of a line round an area.
That which encircles anything, as a ring or crown.
The space inclosed within a circle, or within limits.
A regular or appointed journeying from place to place in


circulation ::: n. --> The act of moving in a circle, or in a course which brings the moving body to the place where its motion began.
The act of passing from place to place or person to person; free diffusion; transmission.
Currency; circulating coin; notes, bills, etc., current for coin.
The extent to which anything circulates or is circulated; the measure of diffusion; as, the circulation of a


closure ::: v. t. --> The act of shutting; a closing; as, the closure of a chink.
That which closes or shuts; that by which separate parts are fastened or closed.
That which incloses or confines; an inclosure.
A conclusion; an end.
A method of putting an end to debate and securing an immediate vote upon a measure before a legislative body. It is similar


coal-meter ::: n. --> A licensed or official coal measurer in London. See Meter.

cocket ::: n. --> Pert; saucy.
A customhouse seal; a certified document given to a shipper as a warrant that his goods have been duly entered and have paid duty.
An office in a customhouse where goods intended for export are entered.
A measure for bread.


coda ::: n. --> A few measures added beyond the natural termination of a composition.

commeasure ::: v. t. --> To be commensurate with; to equal.

commeasurable ::: a. --> Having the same measure; commensurate; proportional.

commensurable ::: a. --> Having a common measure; capable of being exactly measured by the same number, quantity, or measure.

commensurately ::: adv. --> In a commensurate manner; so as to be equal or proportionate; adequately.
With equal measure or extent.


commensurate ::: v. t. --> To reduce to a common measure.
To proportionate; to adjust. ::: a. --> Having a common measure; commensurable; reducible to a common measure; as, commensurate quantities.
Equal in measure or extent; proportionate.


comparator ::: n. --> An instrument or machine for comparing anything to be measured with a standard measure; -- applied especially to a machine for comparing standards of length.

congiary ::: n. --> A present, as of corn, wine, or oil, made by a Roman emperor to the soldiers or the people; -- so called because measured to each in a congius.

congius ::: n. --> A liquid measure containing about three quarts.
A gallon, or four quarts.


*consciousforce. ::: Sri Aurobindo: "In actual fact Mind measures Time by event and Space by Matter; but it is possible in pure mentality to disregard the movement of event and the disposition of substance and realise the pure movement of Conscious-Force which constitutes Space and Time; these two are then merely two aspects of the universal force of Consciousness which in their intertwined interaction comprehend the warp and woof of its action upon itself. And to a consciousness higher than Mind which should regard our past, present and future in one view, containing and not contained in them, not situated at a particular moment of Time for its point of prospection, Time might well offer itself as an eternal present. And to the same consciousness not situated at any particular point of Space, but containing all points and regions in itself, Space also might well offer itself as a subjective and indivisible extension, — no less subjective than Time.” The Life Divine

coomb ::: n. --> A dry measure of four bushels, or half a quarter.
Alt. of Coombe


corded ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Cord ::: a. --> Bound or fastened with cords.
Piled in a form for measurement by the cord.
Made of cords.
Striped or ribbed with cords; as, cloth with a corded


cord ::: n. --> A string, or small rope, composed of several strands twisted together.
A solid measure, equivalent to 128 cubic feet; a pile of wood, or other coarse material, eight feet long, four feet high, and four feet broad; -- originally measured with a cord or line.
Fig.: Any moral influence by which persons are caught, held, or drawn, as if by a cord; an enticement; as, the cords of the wicked; the cords of sin; the cords of vanity.


core ::: n. --> A body of individuals; an assemblage.
A miner&


cor ::: n. --> A Hebrew measure of capacity; a homer.

cortes ::: n. pl. --> The legislative assembly, composed of nobility, clergy, and representatives of cities, which in Spain and in Portugal answers, in some measure, to the Parliament of Great Britain.

coss ::: n. --> A Hindoo measure of distance, varying from one and a half to two English miles.
A thing (only in phrase below).


coudee ::: n. --> A measure of length; the distance from the elbow to the end of the middle finger; a cubit.

coulomb ::: n. --> The standard unit of quantity in electrical measurements. It is the quantity of electricity conveyed in one second by the current produced by an electro-motive force of one volt acting in a circuit having a resistance of one ohm, or the quantity transferred by one ampere in one second. Formerly called weber.

countergage ::: n. --> An adjustable gage, with double points for transferring measurements from one timber to another, as the breadth of a mortise to the place where the tenon is to be made.

countertime ::: n. --> The resistance of a horse, that interrupts his cadence and the measure of his manege, occasioned by a bad horseman, or the bad temper of the horse.
Resistance; opposition.


crane ::: n. --> A measure for fresh herrings, -- as many as will fill a barrel.
A wading bird of the genus Grus, and allied genera, of various species, having a long, straight bill, and long legs and neck.
A machine for raising and lowering heavy weights, and, while holding them suspended, transporting them through a limited lateral distance. In one form it consists of a projecting arm or jib of timber or iron, a rotating post or base, and the necessary tackle, windlass,


crotcheted ::: a. --> Marked or measured by crotchets; having musical notation.

c ::: --> The keynote of the normal or "natural" scale, which has neither flats nor sharps in its signature; also, the third note of the relative minor scale of the same.
C after the clef is the mark of common time, in which each measure is a semibreve (four fourths or crotchets); for alla breve time it is written /.
The "C clef," a modification of the letter C, placed on any line of the staff, shows that line to be middle C.


cubited ::: a. --> Having the measure of a cubit.

cubit ::: n. --> The forearm; the ulna, a bone of the arm extending from elbow to wrist.
A measure of length, being the distance from the elbow to the extremity of the middle finger.


dakir ::: n. --> A measure of certain commodities by number, usually ten or twelve, but sometimes twenty; as, a daker of hides consisted of ten skins; a daker of gloves of ten pairs.

dance ::: v. i. --> To move with measured steps, or to a musical accompaniment; to go through, either alone or in company with others, with a regulated succession of movements, (commonly) to the sound of music; to trip or leap rhythmically.
To move nimbly or merrily; to express pleasure by motion; to caper; to frisk; to skip about.
The leaping, tripping, or measured stepping of one who dances; an amusement, in which the movements of the persons are


day ::: n. --> The time of light, or interval between one night and the next; the time between sunrise and sunset, or from dawn to darkness; hence, the light; sunshine.
The period of the earth&


deca- ::: --> A prefix, from Gr. de`ka, signifying ten; specifically (Metric System), a prefix signifying the weight or measure that is ten times the principal unit.

decalitre ::: n. --> A measure of capacity in the metric system; a cubic volume of ten liters, equal to about 610.24 cubic inches, that is, 2.642 wine gallons.

decametre ::: n. --> A measure of length in the metric system; ten meters, equal to about 393.7 inches.

decastere ::: n. --> A measure of capacity, equal to ten steres, or ten cubic meters.

decilitre ::: n. --> A measure of capacity or volume in the metric system; one tenth of a liter, equal to 6.1022 cubic inches, or 3.38 fluid ounces.

decimalism ::: n. --> The system of a decimal currency, decimal weights, measures, etc.

decimetre ::: n. --> A measure of length in the metric system; one tenth of a meter, equal to 3.937 inches.

deep ::: superl. --> Extending far below the surface; of great perpendicular dimension (measured from the surface downward, and distinguished from high, which is measured upward); far to the bottom; having a certain depth; as, a deep sea.
Extending far back from the front or outer part; of great horizontal dimension (measured backward from the front or nearer part, mouth, etc.); as, a deep cave or recess or wound; a gallery ten seats deep; a company of soldiers six files deep.


definite ::: a. --> Having certain or distinct; determinate in extent or greatness; limited; fixed; as, definite dimensions; a definite measure; a definite period or interval.
Having certain limits in signification; determinate; certain; precise; fixed; exact; clear; as, a definite word, term, or expression.
Determined; resolved.
Serving to define or restrict; limiting; determining; as,


degree ::: n. --> A step, stair, or staircase.
One of a series of progressive steps upward or downward, in quality, rank, acquirement, and the like; a stage in progression; grade; gradation; as, degrees of vice and virtue; to advance by slow degrees; degree of comparison.
The point or step of progression to which a person has arrived; rank or station in life; position.
Measure of advancement; quality; extent; as, tastes differ


deliberate ::: a. --> Weighing facts and arguments with a view to a choice or decision; carefully considering the probable consequences of a step; circumspect; slow in determining; -- applied to persons; as, a deliberate judge or counselor.
Formed with deliberation; well-advised; carefully considered; not sudden or rash; as, a deliberate opinion; a deliberate measure or result.
Not hasty or sudden; slow.


deliberation ::: n. --> The act of deliberating, or of weighing and examining the reasons for and against a choice or measure; careful consideration; mature reflection.
Careful discussion and examination of the reasons for and against a measure; as, the deliberations of a legislative body or council.


dendrometer ::: n. --> An instrument to measure the height and diameter of trees.

depth ::: 1. The quality of a state of consciousness. 2. Beyond one"s knowledge or capability. 3. Emotional intensity, profundity. 4. The quality of being deep; deepness. 5. Complexity or profundity. 6. The extent, measurement, or distance downwards, backwards, or inwards. depths, depths", spirit-depths, wave-depths.

depthless ::: a. --> Having no depth; shallow.
Of measureless depth; unfathomable.


depth ::: n. --> The quality of being deep; deepness; perpendicular measurement downward from the surface, or horizontal measurement backward from the front; as, the depth of a river; the depth of a body of troops.
Profoundness; extent or degree of intensity; abundance; completeness; as, depth of knowledge, or color.
Lowness; as, depth of sound.
That which is deep; a deep, or the deepest, part or place;


diagometer ::: n. --> A sort of electroscope, invented by Rousseau, in which the dry pile is employed to measure the amount of electricity transmitted by different bodies, or to determine their conducting power.

diaphemetric ::: a. --> Relating to the measurement of the tactile sensibility of parts; as, diaphemetric compasses.

difference ::: n. --> The act of differing; the state or measure of being different or unlike; distinction; dissimilarity; unlikeness; variation; as, a difference of quality in paper; a difference in degrees of heat, or of light; what is the difference between the innocent and the guilty?
Disagreement in opinion; dissension; controversy; quarrel; hence, cause of dissension; matter in controversy.
That by which one thing differs from another; that


dilatory ::: a. --> Inclined to defer or put off what ought to be done at once; given the procrastination; delaying; procrastinating; loitering; as, a dilatory servant.
Marked by procrastination or delay; tardy; slow; sluggish; -- said of actions or measures.


dimension ::: 1. A property of space; extension in a given direction; extension in time. 2. Measurement in length, width and thickness; scope, importance. dimensions.

dimension ::: n. --> Measure in a single line, as length, breadth, height, thickness, or circumference; extension; measurement; -- usually, in the plural, measure in length and breadth, or in length, breadth, and thickness; extent; size; as, the dimensions of a room, or of a ship; the dimensions of a farm, of a kingdom.
Extent; reach; scope; importance; as, a project of large dimensions.
The degree of manifoldness of a quantity; as, time is


dimeter ::: a. --> Having two poetical measures or meters. ::: n. --> A verse of two meters.

dipody ::: n. --> Two metrical feet taken together, or included in one measure.

discolith ::: n. --> One of a species of coccoliths, having an oval discoidal body, with a thick strongly refracting rim, and a thinner central portion. One of them measures about / of an inch in its longest diameter.

dissuasive ::: a. --> Tending to dissuade or divert from a measure or purpose; dehortatory; as, dissuasive advice. ::: n. --> A dissuasive argument or counsel; dissuasion; dehortation.

distance ::: n. --> The space between two objects; the length of a line, especially the shortest line joining two points or things that are separate; measure of separation in place.
Remoteness of place; a remote place.
A space marked out in the last part of a race course.
Relative space, between troops in ranks, measured from front to rear; -- contrasted with interval, which is measured from right to left.


diurnal ::: a. --> Relating to the daytime; belonging to the period of daylight, distinguished from the night; -- opposed to nocturnal; as, diurnal heat; diurnal hours.
Daily; recurring every day; performed in a day; going through its changes in a day; constituting the measure of a day; as, a diurnal fever; a diurnal task; diurnal aberration, or diurnal parallax; the diurnal revolution of the earth.
Opening during the day, and closing at night; -- said of


doggerel ::: a. --> Low in style, and irregular in measure; as, doggerel rhymes. ::: n. --> A sort of loose or irregular verse; mean or undignified poetry.

doubtful ::: a. --> Not settled in opinion; undetermined; wavering; hesitating in belief; also used, metaphorically, of the body when its action is affected by such a state of mind; as, we are doubtful of a fact, or of the propriety of a measure.
Admitting of doubt; not obvious, clear, or certain; questionable; not decided; not easy to be defined, classed, or named; as, a doubtful case, hue, claim, title, species, and the like.
Characterized by ambiguity; dubious; as, a doubtful


drop ::: n. --> The quantity of fluid which falls in one small spherical mass; a liquid globule; a minim; hence, also, the smallest easily measured portion of a fluid; a small quantity; as, a drop of water.
That which resembles, or that which hangs like, a liquid drop; as a hanging diamond ornament, an earring, a glass pendant on a chandelier, a sugarplum (sometimes medicated), or a kind of shot or slug.
Same as Gutta.


dynameter ::: n. --> A dynamometer.
An instrument for determining the magnifying power of telescopes, consisting usually of a doubleimage micrometer applied to the eye end of a telescope for measuring accurately the diameter of the image of the object glass there formed; which measurement, compared with the actual diameter of the glass, gives the magnifying power.


dynam ::: n. --> A unit of measure for dynamical effect or work; a foot pound. See Foot pound.

dynamometrical ::: a. --> Relating to a dynamometer, or to the measurement of force doing work; as, dynamometrical instruments.

easting ::: n. --> The distance measured toward the east between two meridians drawn through the extremities of a course; distance of departure eastward made by a vessel.

ecstatic ::: n. --> Pertaining to, or caused by, ecstasy or excessive emotion; of the nature, or in a state, of ecstasy; as, ecstatic gaze; ecstatic trance.
Delightful beyond measure; rapturous; ravishing; as, ecstatic bliss or joy.
An enthusiast.


elextrometry ::: n. --> The art or process of making electrical measurements.

ell ::: n. --> A measure for cloth; -- now rarely used. It is of different lengths in different countries; the English ell being 45 inches, the Dutch or Flemish ell 27, the Scotch about 37.
See L.


em ::: n. --> The portion of a line formerly occupied by the letter m, then a square type, used as a unit by which to measure the amount of printed matter on a page; the square of the body of a type.

endosmometric ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or designed for, the measurement of endosmotic action.

energetical ::: a. --> Having energy or energies; possessing a capacity for vigorous action or for exerting force; active.
Exhibiting energy; operating with force, vigor, and effect; forcible; powerful; efficacious; as, energetic measures; energetic laws.


enormity ::: n. --> The state or quality of exceeding a measure or rule, or of being immoderate, monstrous, or outrageous.
That which is enormous; especially, an exceeding offense against order, right, or decency; an atrocious crime; flagitious villainy; an atrocity.


enormous ::: a. --> Exceeding the usual rule, norm, or measure; out of due proportion; inordinate; abnormal.
Exceedingly wicked; outrageous; atrocious; monstrous; as, an enormous crime.


enrapture ::: v. t. --> To transport with pleasure; to delight beyond measure; to enravish.

entropy ::: n. --> A certain property of a body, expressed as a measurable quantity, such that when there is no communication of heat the quantity remains constant, but when heat enters or leaves the body the quantity increases or diminishes. If a small amount, h, of heat enters the body when its temperature is t in the thermodynamic scale the entropy of the body is increased by h / t. The entropy is regarded as measured from some standard temperature and pressure. Sometimes called the thermodynamic function.

eosaurus ::: n. --> An extinct marine reptile from the coal measures of Nova Scotia; -- so named because supposed to be of the earliest known reptiles.

epha ::: n. --> A Hebrew dry measure, supposed to be equal to two pecks and five quarts. ten ephahs make one homer.

equal ::: adj. 1. As great as; the same as (often followed by to or with). 2. Having the same quantity, value, or measure as another. 3. Evenly proportioned or balanced. 4. Tranquil; equable; undisturbed. 5. Impartial; just; equitable. n. 6. One who is equal to another in any specified quality. v. **7. To become equal or level with. equalled.**

equivalent ::: a. --> Equal in wortir or value, force, power, effect, import, and the like; alike in significance and value; of the same import or meaning.
Equal in measure but not admitting of superposition; -- applied to magnitudes; as, a square may be equivalent to a triangle.
Contemporaneous in origin; as, the equivalent strata of different countries.


esthesiometer ::: n. --> An instrument to measure the degree of sensation, by determining at how short a distance two impressions upon the skin can be distinguished, and thus to determine whether the condition of tactile sensibility is normal or altered.
Same as Aesthesiometer.


eudiometer ::: n. --> An instrument for the volumetric measurement of gases; -- so named because frequently used to determine the purity of the air.

exceeding ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Exceed ::: a. --> More than usual; extraordinary; more than sufficient; measureless. ::: adv.

exceed ::: v. t. --> To go beyond; to proceed beyond the given or supposed limit or measure of; to outgo; to surpass; -- used both in a good and a bad sense; as, one man exceeds another in bulk, stature, weight, power, skill, etc.; one offender exceeds another in villainy; his rank exceeds yours. ::: v. i.

excess ::: n. --> The state of surpassing or going beyond limits; the being of a measure beyond sufficiency, necessity, or duty; that which exceeds what is usual or prover; immoderateness; superfluity; superabundance; extravagance; as, an excess of provisions or of light.
An undue indulgence of the appetite; transgression of proper moderation in natural gratifications; intemperance; dissipation.
The degree or amount by which one thing or number exceeds another; remainder; as, the difference between two numbers is the


extent ::: a. --> Extended. ::: n. --> Space or degree to which a thing is extended; hence, superficies; compass; bulk; size; length; as, an extent of country or of line; extent of information or of charity.
Degree; measure; proportion.


extraordinary ::: a. --> Beyond or out of the common order or method; not usual, customary, regular, or ordinary; as, extraordinary evils; extraordinary remedies.
Exceeding the common degree, measure. or condition; hence, remarkable; uncommon; rare; wonderful; as, extraordinary talents or grandeur.
Employed or sent upon an unusual or special service; as, an ambassador extraordinary.


factious ::: a. --> Given to faction; addicted to form parties and raise dissensions, in opposition to government or the common good; turbulent; seditious; prone to clamor against public measures or men; -- said of persons.
Pertaining to faction; proceeding from faction; indicating, or characterized by, faction; -- said of acts or expressions; as, factious quarrels.


fail ::: v. i. --> To be wanting; to fall short; to be or become deficient in any measure or degree up to total absence; to cease to be furnished in the usual or expected manner, or to be altogether cut off from supply; to be lacking; as, streams fail; crops fail.
To be affected with want; to come short; to lack; to be deficient or unprovided; -- used with of.
To fall away; to become diminished; to decline; to decay; to sink.


fanega ::: n. --> A dry measure in Spain and Spanish America, varying from 1/ to 2/ bushels; also, a measure of land.

fathomless ::: 1. Impossible to measure the depth of; bottomless. 2. Impossible to understand; incomprehensible. fathomlessness.

fathom ::: n. --> A measure of length, containing six feet; the space to which a man can extend his arms; -- used chiefly in measuring cables, cordage, and the depth of navigable water by soundings.
The measure or extant of one&


fat ::: n. --> A large tub, cistern, or vessel; a vat.
A measure of quantity, differing for different commodities.
An oily liquid or greasy substance making up the main bulk of the adipose tissue of animals, and widely distributed in the seeds of plants. See Adipose tissue, under Adipose.
The best or richest productions; the best part; as, to live on the fat of the land.
Work. containing much blank, or its equivalent, and,


faux pas ::: --> A false step; a mistake or wrong measure.

ferding ::: n. --> A measure of land mentioned in Domesday Book. It is supposed to have consisted of a few acres only.

finger ::: n. --> One of the five terminating members of the hand; a digit; esp., one of the four extermities of the hand, other than the thumb.
Anything that does work of a finger; as, the pointer of a clock, watch, or other registering machine; especially (Mech.) a small projecting rod, wire, or piece, which is brought into contact with an object to effect, direct, or restrain a motion.
The breadth of a finger, or the fourth part of the hand; a measure of nearly an inch; also, the length of finger, a measure in


firkin ::: n. --> A varying measure of capacity, usually being the fourth part of a barrel; specifically, a measure equal to nine imperial gallons.
A small wooden vessel or cask of indeterminate size, -- used for butter, lard, etc.


firlot ::: n. --> A dry measure formerly used in Scotland; the fourth part of a boll of grain or meal. The Linlithgow wheat firlot was to the imperial bushel as 998 to 1000; the barley firlot as 1456 to 1000.

fitness ::: n. --> The state or quality of being fit; as, the fitness of measures or laws; a person&

fitting ::: 1. Appropriate or proper; suitable. 2. Used with prefixed adverbs to denote an appropriate or inappropriate fit. 3. Of a manufactured article: Of the right measure or size; made to fit, accurate in fit, well or close-fitting. close-fitting, ill-fitting.

footbreadth ::: n. --> The breadth of a foot; -- used as a measure.

forestall ::: v. t. --> To take beforehand, or in advance; to anticipate.
To take possession of, in advance of some one or something else, to the exclusion or detriment of the latter; to get ahead of; to preoccupy; also, to exclude, hinder, or prevent, by prior occupation, or by measures taken in advance.
To deprive; -- with of.
To obstruct or stop up, as a way; to stop the passage of on highway; to intercept on the road, as goods on the way to market.


forwardness ::: n. --> The quality of being forward; cheerful readiness; promtness; as, the forwardness of Christians in propagating the gospel.
An advanced stage of progress or of preparation; advancement; as, his measures were in great forwardness.
Eagerness; ardor; as, it is difficult to restrain the forwardness of youth.
Boldness; confidence; assurance; want of due reserve or modesty.


fungibles ::: n. pl. --> Things which may be furnished or restored in kind, as distinguished from specific things; -- called also fungible things.
Movable goods which may be valued by weight or measure, in contradistinction from those which must be judged of individually.


furlong ::: a. --> A measure of length; the eighth part of a mile; forty rods; two hundred and twenty yards.

gager ::: n. --> A measurer. See Gauger.

gallon ::: n. --> A measure of capacity, containing four quarts; -- used, for the most part, in liquid measure, but sometimes in dry measure.

galvanometric ::: a. --> Of, pertaining to, or measured by, a galvanometer.

gasometrical ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the measurement of gases; as, gasometric analysis.

gators or creators often of vast and formidable inner upheavals or of action that overpass the normal human measure. There may also be an awareness of influences, presences, beings that do not seem to belong to other worlds beyond us but are here as a hidden element behind the veil in terrestrial nature. As contact wth the supraphysical is possible, a contact can also take place subjective or objective — or at_ least objectivised — between our own consciousness and the consciousness of other once embodied beings who have passed into a supraphysicaj status in these other regions of existence. It is possible also to pass beyond a subjective contact or a sahiie-scnse perception and, in certain subliminal states of consciousness, to enter actually into other worlds and know something of their secrets, ft is the wore objective order of other-worldly experience that seized most the imagination of mankind in the past, but it was put by popular belief into a gross objective statement which unduly assimilated these phenomena to those of the physical world with which we are familiar for it is the normal tendency of our mind to turn everything into forms or symbols proper to its own kind and terms of expericoce.

gauge ::: 1. To determine the exact dimensions, capacity, quantity, or force of; measure. 2. To appraise, estimate, or judge; assess; evaluate. gauged.

gauged ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Gauge ::: p. a. --> Tested or measured by, or conformed to, a gauge.

gauge ::: v. t. --> To measure or determine with a gauge.
To measure or to ascertain the contents or the capacity of, as of a pipe, barrel, or keg.
To measure the dimensions of, or to test the accuracy of the form of, as of a part of a gunlock.
To draw into equidistant gathers by running a thread through it, as cloth or a garment.
To measure the capacity, character, or ability of; to


geodesy ::: n. --> That branch of applied mathematics which determines, by means of observations and measurements, the figures and areas of large portions of the earth&

geometry ::: n. --> That branch of mathematics which investigates the relations, properties, and measurement of solids, surfaces, lines, and angles; the science which treats of the properties and relations of magnitudes; the science of the relations of space.
A treatise on this science.


girth ::: n. --> A band or strap which encircles the body; especially, one by which a saddle is fastened upon the back of a horse.
The measure round the body, as at the waist or belly; the circumference of anything.
A small horizontal brace or girder. ::: v. t.


gomer ::: n. --> A Hebrew measure. See Homer.
A conical chamber at the breech of the bore in heavy ordnance, especially in mortars; -- named after the inventor.


gravimetric ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to measurement by weight; measured by weight.

gry ::: n. --> A measure equal to one tenth of a line.
Anything very small, or of little value.


Guru is the channel or the representative or the manifestation of the Divine, according to (be measure of his personality or his attainment ; but whatever he is, it is to the Divine that one opens in opening to him ; and if something is determined by the power of the channel, more is determined by the inherent and intrinsic attitude of the lecciving consciousness, an element that comes out in the surface mind as simple trust or direct uncondi- tional self-giving, and once that is there, the essential things can be gained even from one who seems to others than the disciple an inferior spiritual source, and the rest will grow up in the sadhaka of itself by the Grace of the Divine, even if the human being in the Guru cannot it.

haematachometry ::: n. --> The measurement of the velocity of the blood.

hardness ::: n. --> The quality or state of being hard, literally or figuratively.
The cohesion of the particles on the surface of a body, determined by its capacity to scratch another, or be itself scratched;-measured among minerals on a scale of which diamond and talc form the extremes.
The peculiar quality exhibited by water which has mineral salts dissolved in it. Such water forms an insoluble compound with


hectare ::: n. --> A measure of area, or superficies, containing a hundred ares, or 10,000 square meters, and equivalent to 2.471 acres.

hectogram ::: n. --> A measure of weight, containing a hundred grams, or about 3.527 ounces avoirdupois.

hectolitre ::: n. --> A measure of liquids, containing a hundred liters; equal to a tenth of a cubic meter, nearly 26/ gallons of wine measure, or 22.0097 imperial gallons. As a dry measure, it contains ten decaliters, or about 2/ Winchester bushels.

hectometre ::: n. --> A measure of length, equal to a hundred meters. It is equivalent to 328.09 feet.

hectostere ::: n. --> A measure of solidity, containing one hundred cubic meters, and equivalent to 3531.66 English or 3531.05 United States cubic feet.

heer ::: n. --> A yarn measure of six hundred yards or / of a spindle. See Spindle.
Hair.


height ::: n. --> The condition of being high; elevated position.
The distance to which anything rises above its foot, above that on which in stands, above the earth, or above the level of the sea; altitude; the measure upward from a surface, as the floor or the ground, of animal, especially of a man; stature.
Degree of latitude either north or south.
That which is elevated; an eminence; a hill or mountain; as, Alpine heights.


heliometer ::: n. --> An instrument devised originally for measuring the diameter of the sun; now employed for delicate measurements of the distance and relative direction of two stars too far apart to be easily measured in the field of view of an ordinary telescope.

hemadynamometer ::: n. --> An instrument by which the pressure of the blood in the arteries, or veins, is measured by the height to which it will raise a column of mercury; -- called also a haemomanometer.

hematinometric ::: a. --> Relating to the measurement of the amount of hematin or hemoglobin contained in blood, or other fluids.

hemina ::: n. --> A measure of half a sextary.
A measure equal to about ten fluid ounces.


hesp ::: n. --> A measure of two hanks of linen thread.

high ::: v. i. --> To hie.
To rise; as, the sun higheth. ::: superl. --> Elevated above any starting point of measurement, as a line, or surface; having altitude; lifted up; raised or extended in the direction of the zenith; lofty; tall; as, a high mountain, tower, tree;


hin ::: n. --> A Hebrew measure of liquids, containing three quarts, one pint, one gill, English measure.

hogshead ::: n. --> An English measure of capacity, containing 63 wine gallons, or about 52/ imperial gallons; a half pipe.
A large cask or barrel, of indefinite contents; esp. one containing from 100 to 140 gallons.


holometer ::: n. --> An instrument for making of angular measurements.

homer ::: n. --> A carrier pigeon remarkable for its ability to return home from a distance.
See Hoemother.
A Hebrew measure containing, as a liquid measure, ten baths, equivalent to fifty-five gallons, two quarts, one pint; and, as a dry measure, ten ephahs, equivalent to six bushels, two pecks, four quarts.


horizontal ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or near, the horizon.
Parallel to the horizon; on a level; as, a horizontalline or surface.
Measured or contained in a plane of the horizon; as, horizontal distance.


how ::: adv. --> In what manner or way; by what means or process.
To what degree or extent, number or amount; in what proportion; by what measure or quality.
For what reason; from what cause.
In what state, condition, or plight.
By what name, designation, or title.
At what price; how dear.


hydrodynamometer ::: n. --> An instrument to measure the velocity of a liquid current by the force of its impact.

hydrometrical ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to an hydrometer, or to the determination of the specific gravity of fluids.
Of or pertaining to measurement of the velocity, discharge, etc., of running water.
Made by means of an hydrometer; as, hydrometric observations.


hyper- ::: --> A prefix signifying over, above; as, hyperphysical, hyperthyrion; also, above measure, abnormally great, excessive; as, hyperaemia, hyperbola, hypercritical, hypersecretion.
A prefix equivalent to super- or per-; as hyperoxide, or peroxide. [Obs.] See Per-.


hypercatalectic ::: a. --> Having a syllable or two beyond measure; as, a hypercatalectic verse.

hypercritic ::: n. --> One who is critical beyond measure or reason; a carping critic; a captious censor. ::: a. --> Hypercritical.

hypermetrical ::: a. --> Having a redundant syllable; exceeding the common measure.

hypsometry ::: n. --> That branch of the science of geodesy which has to do with the measurement of heights, either absolutely with reference to the sea level, or relatively.

(I) if he uses them during his sadhana solely to train him* self in possessing things without attachment or desire and leam to use them rightly, in harmony with the Divine Will, with a proper handling, a just organisation, arrangement and measure — or, (2) if he has already attained a true freedom from desire and attachment and is not in the least moved or affected in any way by loss or withholding or deprival.

immeasured ::: a. --> Immeasurable.

immeasurable ::: a. --> Incapble of being measured; indefinitely extensive; illimitable; immensurable; vast.

immeasurable ::: Incapable of being measured; limitless; immense. Immeasurable. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

immensurate ::: a. --> Unmeasured; unlimited.

impolitic ::: a. --> Not politic; contrary to, or wanting in, policy; unwise; imprudent; indiscreet; inexpedient; as, an impolitic ruler, law, or measure.

imponderables ::: things that cannot be precisely determined, measured, or evaluated.

“In actual fact Mind measures Time by event and Space by Matter; but it is possible in pure mentality to disregard the movement of event and the disposition of substance and realise the pure movement of Conscious-Force which constitutes Space and Time; these two are then merely two aspects of the universal force of Consciousness which in their intertwined interaction comprehend the warp and woof of its action upon itself. And to a consciousness higher than Mind which should regard our past, present and future in one view, containing and not contained in them, not situated at a particular moment of Time for its point of prospection, Time might well offer itself as an eternal present. And to the same consciousness not situated at any particular point of Space, but containing all points and regions in itself, Space also might well offer itself as a subjective and indivisible extension,—no less subjective than Time.” The Life Divine

incapable of being measured; limitless; immense. Immeasurable. (Sri Aurobindo also employs the word as an adj.)

inch ::: n. --> An island; -- often used in the names of small islands off the coast of Scotland, as in Inchcolm, Inchkeith, etc.
A measure of length, the twelfth part of a foot, commonly subdivided into halves, quarters, eights, sixteenths, etc., as among mechanics. It was also formerly divided into twelve parts, called lines, and originally into three parts, called barleycorns, its length supposed to have been determined from three grains of barley placed end to end lengthwise. It is also sometimes called a prime (&


inc ::: n. --> A Japanese measure of length equal to about two and one twelfth yards.

incommensurable ::: a. --> Not commensurable; having no common measure or standard of comparison; as, quantities are incommensurable when no third quantity can be found that is an aliquot part of both; the side and diagonal of a square are incommensurable with each other; the diameter and circumference of a circle are incommensurable. ::: n.

incommensurate ::: a. --> Not commensurate; not admitting of a common measure; incommensurable.
Not of equal of sufficient measure or extent; not adequate; as, our means are incommensurate to our wants.


indefinite ::: a. --> Not definite; not limited, defined, or specified; not explicit; not determined or fixed upon; not precise; uncertain; vague; confused; obscure; as, an indefinite time, plan, etc.
Having no determined or certain limits; large and unmeasured, though not infinite; unlimited; as indefinite space; the indefinite extension of a straight line.
Boundless; infinite.
Too numerous or variable to make a particular


indentation ::: n. --> The act of indenting or state of being indented.
A notch or recess, in the margin or border of anything; as, the indentations of a leaf, of the coast, etc.
A recess or sharp depression in any surface.
The act of beginning a line or series of lines at a little distance within the flush line of the column or page, as in the common way of beginning the first line of a paragraph.
The measure of the distance; as, an indentation of one


indicated ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Indicate ::: a. --> Shown; denoted; registered; measured.

inefficient ::: a. --> Not efficient; not producing the effect intended or desired; inefficacious; as, inefficient means or measures.
Incapable of, or indisposed to, effective action; habitually slack or remiss; effecting little or nothing; as, inefficient workmen; an inefficient administrator.


inestimable ::: a. --> Incapable of being estimated or computed; especially, too valuable or excellent to be measured or fully appreciated; above all price; as, inestimable rights or privileges.

inexpediency ::: n. --> The quality or state of being inexpedient; want of fitness; unsuitableness to the end or object; impropriety; as, the inexpedience of some measures.

infinite ::: n. 1. That which has no limit. infinite"s. adj. 2. Immeasurably great or large; boundless; without limit. 3. Existing beyond or being greater than any arbitrarily large value or measurement.

initiative ::: a. --> Serving to initiate; inceptive; initiatory; introductory; preliminary. ::: n. --> An introductory step or movement; an act which originates or begins.
The right or power to introduce a new measure or course


injudicious ::: a. --> Not judicious; wanting in sound judgment; undiscerning; indiscreet; unwise; as, an injudicious adviser.
Not according to sound judgment or discretion; unwise; as, an injudicious measure.


integrator ::: n. --> That which integrates; esp., an instrument by means of which the area of a figure can be measured directly, or its moment of inertia, or statical moment, etc., be determined.

intercolumniation ::: n. --> The clear space between two columns, measured at the bottom of their shafts.

intonate ::: v. i. --> To thunder.
To sound the tones of the musical scale; to practice the sol-fa.
To modulate the voice in a musical, sonorous, and measured manner, as in reading the liturgy; to intone. ::: v. t.


intone ::: v. t. --> To utter with a musical or prolonged note or tone; to chant; as, to intone the church service. ::: v. i. --> To utter a prolonged tone or a deep, protracted sound; to speak or recite in a measured, sonorous manner; to intonate.

isometrical ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or characterized by, equality of measure.
Noting, or conforming to, that system of crystallization in which the three axes are of equal length and at right angles to each other; monometric; regular; cubic. Cf. Crystallization.


jacobin ::: n. --> A Dominican friar; -- so named because, before the French Revolution, that order had a convent in the Rue St. Jacques, Paris.
One of a society of violent agitators in France, during the revolution of 1789, who held secret meetings in the Jacobin convent in the Rue St. Jacques, Paris, and concerted measures to control the proceedings of the National Assembly. Hence: A plotter against an existing government; a turbulent demagogue.
A fancy pigeon, in which the feathers of the neck form a


jar ::: n. --> A turn. [Only in phrase.]
A deep, broad-mouthed vessel of earthenware or glass, for holding fruit, preserves, etc., or for ornamental purposes; as, a jar of honey; a rose jar.
The measure of what is contained in a jar; as, a jar of oil; a jar of preserves.
A rattling, tremulous vibration or shock; a shake; a harsh sound; a discord; as, the jar of a train; the jar of harsh sounds.


juger ::: n. --> A Roman measure of land, measuring 28,800 square feet, or 240 feet in length by 120 in breadth.

kilderkin ::: n. --> A small barrel; an old liquid measure containing eighteen English beer gallons, or nearly twenty-two gallons, United States measure.

kilogramme ::: n. --> A measure of weight, being a thousand grams, equal to 2.2046 pounds avoirdupois (15,432.34 grains). It is equal to the weight of a cubic decimeter of distilled water at the temperature of maximum density, or 39¡ Fahrenheit.

kilogrammetre ::: n. --> A measure of energy or work done, being the amount expended in raising one kilogram through the height of one meter, in the latitude of Paris.

kilolitre ::: n. --> A measure of capacity equal to a cubic meter, or a thousand liters. It is equivalent to 35.315 cubic feet, and to 220.04 imperial gallons, or 264.18 American gallons of 321 cubic inches.

kilometre ::: n. --> A measure of length, being a thousand meters. It is equal to 3,280.8 feet, or 62137 of a mile.

kilostere ::: n. --> A cubic measure containing 1000 cubic meters, and equivalent to 35,315 cubic feet.

latitude ::: n. --> Extent from side to side, or distance sidewise from a given point or line; breadth; width.
Room; space; freedom from confinement or restraint; hence, looseness; laxity; independence.
Extent or breadth of signification, application, etc.; extent of deviation from a standard, as truth, style, etc.
Extent; size; amplitude; scope.
Distance north or south of the equator, measured on a


latitudes ::: distances on the globe, north or south of the equator, measured in degrees.

lavish ::: 1. To expend or give in great amounts or without limit. 2. Expending or bestowing without stint or measure; unboundedly liberal or profuse; prodigal. lavishing, lavishly.

league ::: n. --> A measure of length or distance, varying in different countries from about 2.4 to 4.6 English statute miles of 5.280 feet each, and used (as a land measure) chiefly on the continent of Europe, and in the Spanish parts of America. The marine league of England and the United States is equal to three marine, or geographical, miles of 6080 feet each.
A stone erected near a public road to mark the distance of a league.


lea ::: n. --> A measure of yarn; for linen, 300 yards; for cotton, 120 yards; a lay.
A set of warp threads carried by a loop of the heddle.
A meadow or sward land; a grassy field.


length ::: 1. The state, quality, or fact of being long. 2. The measurement of the extent of something along its greatest dimension.

length ::: a. --> The longest, or longer, dimension of any object, in distinction from breadth or width; extent of anything from end to end; the longest line which can be drawn through a body, parallel to its sides; as, the length of a church, or of a ship; the length of a rope or line.
A portion of space or of time considered as measured by its length; -- often in the plural.
The quality or state of being long, in space or time;


li ::: n. --> A Chinese measure of distance, being a little more than one third of a mile.
A Chinese copper coin; a cash. See Cash.


lineal ::: a. --> Descending in a direct line from an ancestor; hereditary; derived from ancestors; -- opposed to collateral; as, a lineal descent or a lineal descendant.
Inheriting by direct descent; having the right by direct descent to succeed (to).
Composed of lines; delineated; as, lineal designs.
In the direction of a line; of or pertaining to a line; measured on, or ascertained by, a line; linear; as, lineal magnitude.


litre ::: n. --> A measure of capacity in the metric system, being a cubic decimeter, equal to 61.022 cubic inches, or 2.113 American pints, or 1.76 English pints.
Same as Liter.


log ::: n. --> A Hebrew measure of liquids, containing 2.37 gills.
A bulky piece of wood which has not been shaped by hewing or sawing.
An apparatus for measuring the rate of a ship&


logometric ::: a. --> Serving to measure or ascertain chemical equivalents; stoichiometric.

longitude ::: n. --> Length; measure or distance along the longest line; -- distinguished from breadth or thickness; as, the longitude of a room; rare now, except in a humorous sense.
The arc or portion of the equator intersected between the meridian of a given place and the meridian of some other place from which longitude is reckoned, as from Greenwich, England, or sometimes from the capital of a country, as from Washington or Paris. The longitude of a place is expressed either in degrees or in time; as,


longitudes ::: distances, measured in degrees on the map, of places that are east or west of a standard north-south line, usually that which passes through Greenwich.

lunar ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the moon; as, lunar observations.
Resembling the moon; orbed.
Measured by the revolutions of the moon; as, a lunar month.
Influenced by the moon, as in growth, character, or properties; as, lunar herbs. ::: n.


magnetometric ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or employed in, the measurement of magnetic forces; obtained by means of a magnetometer; as, magnetometric instruments; magnetometric measurements.

march ::: n. --> The third month of the year, containing thirty-one days.
A territorial border or frontier; a region adjacent to a boundary line; a confine; -- used chiefly in the plural, and in English history applied especially to the border land on the frontiers between England and Scotland, and England and Wales.
The act of marching; a movement of soldiers from one stopping place to another; military progress; advance of troops.
Hence: Measured and regular advance or movement, like that


m ::: --> As a numeral, M stands for one thousand, both in English and Latin. ::: n. --> A quadrat, the face or top of which is a perfect square; also, the size of such a square in any given size of type, used as the unit of measurement for that type: 500 m&

massage ::: n. --> A rubbing or kneading of the body, especially when performed as a hygienic or remedial measure.

mass ::: n. 1. A body of coherent matter, usually of indefinite shape and often of considerable size. 2. A large amount or number, such as a great body of people. masses, flower-masses. 3. Bulk, size, expanse, or massiveness. 4. The main body, bulk, or greater part of anything. 5. Physics. A measure of the amount of matter contained in or constituting a physical body. adj. 6. Of, involving, composed of masses of people (or things) or the majority of people (or a society, group, etc.); done, made, etc., on a large scale. v. 7. To gather into or dispose in a mass or masses; assemble. massed.

Maya ::: “Maya in its original sense meant a comprehending and containing consciousness capable of embracing, measuring and limiting and therefore formative; it is that which outlines, measures out, moulds forms in the formless, psychologises and seems to make knowable the Unknowable, geometrises and seems to make measurable the limitless. Later the word came from its original sense of knowledge, skill, intelligence to acquire a pejorative sense of cunning, fraud or illusion, and it is in the figure of an enchantment or illusion that it is used by the philosophical systems.” The Life Divine

Maya ::: Sri Aurobindo: “Maya in its original sense meant a comprehending and containing consciousness capable of embracing, measuring and limiting and therefore formative; it is that which outlines, measures out, moulds forms in the formless, psychologises and seems to make knowable the Unknowable, geometrises and seems to make measurable the limitless. Later the word came from its original sense of knowledge, skill, intelligence to acquire a pejorative sense of cunning, fraud or illusion, and it is in the figure of an enchantment or illusion that it is used by the philosophical systems.” The Life Divine

maya ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Maya in its original sense meant a comprehending and containing consciousness capable of embracing, measuring and limiting and therefore formative; it is that which outlines, measures out, moulds forms in the formless, psychologises and seems to make knowable the Unknowable, geometrises and seems to make measurable the limitless. Later the word came from its original sense of knowledge, skill, intelligence to acquire a pejorative sense of cunning, fraud or illusion, and it is in the figure of an enchantment or illusion that it is used by the philosophical systems.” *The Life Divine

mazurka ::: n. --> A Polish dance, or the music which accompanies it, usually in 3-4 or 3-8 measure, with a strong accent on the second beat.

measurable ::: a. --> Capable of being measured; susceptible of mensuration or computation.
Moderate; temperate; not excessive.


measurable ::: possible to be measured.

measuring ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Measure ::: a. --> Used in, or adapted for, ascertaining measurements, or dividing by measure.

megadyne ::: n. --> One of the larger measures of force, amounting to one million dynes.

megafarad ::: n. --> One of the larger measures of electrical capacity, amounting to one million farads; a macrofarad.

megavolt ::: n. --> One of the larger measures of electro-motive force, amounting to one million volts.

megerg ::: n. --> One of the larger measures of work, amounting to one million ergs; -- called also megalerg.

megohm ::: n. --> One of the larger measures of electrical resistance, amounting to one million ohms.

mensurable ::: a. --> Capable of being measured; measurable.

mensural ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to measure.

mensurate ::: v. --> To measure.

metage ::: v. --> Measurement, especially of coal.
Charge for, or price of, measuring.


metely ::: a. --> According to measure or proportion; proportionable; proportionate.

mete ::: n. --> Meat.
Measure; limit; boundary; -- used chiefly in the plural, and in the phrase metes and bounds. ::: v. t. & i. --> To meet.


metergram ::: n. --> A measure of energy or work done; the power exerted in raising one gram through the distance of one meter against gravitation.

meter ::: n. --> One who, or that which, metes or measures. See Coal-meter.
An instrument for measuring, and usually for recording automatically, the quantity measured.
A line above or below a hanging net, to which the net is attached in order to strengthen it.
Alt. of Metre


meteyard ::: n. --> A yard, staff, or rod, used as a measure.

met ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Meet ::: --> imp. & p. p. of Meet.
imp. & p. p. of Mete, to measure.
p. p. of Mete, to dream.


metred ::: v. 1. Composed verses; set to poetry. adj. **2.** Divided into a rhythmic pattern, or in a measured arrangement.

metre ::: n. --> Rhythmical arrangement of syllables or words into verses, stanzas, strophes, etc.; poetical measure, depending on number, quantity, and accent of syllables; rhythm; measure; verse; also, any specific rhythmical arrangements; as, the Horatian meters; a dactylic meter.
A poem.
A measure of length, equal to 39.37 English inches, the standard of linear measure in the metric system of weights and


metrical ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the meter; arranged in meter; consisting of verses; as, metrical compositions.
Of or pertaining to measurement; as, the inch, foot, yard, etc., are metrical terms; esp., of or pertaining to the metric system.


metric ::: a. --> Relating to measurement; involving, or proceeding by, measurement.
Of or pertaining to the meter as a standard of measurement; of or pertaining to the decimal system of measurement of which a meter is the unit; as, the metric system; a metric measurement.


metrology ::: n. --> The science of, or a system of, weights and measures; also, a treatise on the subject.

metronome ::: n. --> An instrument consisting of a short pendulum with a sliding weight. It is set in motion by clockwork, and serves to measure time in music.

metronomy ::: n. --> Measurement of time by an instrument.

microampere ::: n. --> One of the smaller measures of electrical currents; the millionth part of one ampere.

microcoulomb ::: n. --> A measure of electrical quantity; the millionth part of one coulomb.

micrometer ::: n. --> An instrument, used with a telescope or microscope, for measuring minute distances, or the apparent diameters of objects which subtend minute angles. The measurement given directly is that of the image of the object formed at the focus of the object glass.

micron ::: n. --> A measure of length; the thousandth part of one millimeter; the millionth part of a meter.

microvolt ::: n. --> A measure of electro-motive force; the millionth part of one volt.

mile ::: n. --> A certain measure of distance, being equivalent in England and the United States to 320 poles or rods, or 5,280 feet.

milligramme ::: n. --> A measure of weight, in the metric system, being the thousandth part of a gram, equal to the weight of a cubic millimeter of water, or .01543 of a grain avoirdupois.

millilitre ::: n. --> A measure of capacity in the metric system, containing the thousandth part of a liter. It is a cubic centimeter, and is equal to .061 of an English cubic inch, or to .0338 of an American fluid ounce.

millimetre ::: n. --> A lineal measure in the metric system, containing the thousandth part of a meter; equal to .03937 of an inch. See 3d Meter.

Mind and the Divine Sakti ::: Be on your guard and do not try to understand and judge the Divine Mother by your little earthly mind that loves to subject even the things that arc beyond it to its own norms and standards, its narrow reasonings and erring impressions, its bottomless aggressive ignorance and its petty self-confident knowledge. The human mind shut in the prison of its half-lit obscurity cannot follow the many-sided freedom of the steps of the Divine Shakti. The rapidity and com- plexity of her vision and action outrun its stumbling comprehen- sion ; the measures of her movement are not its measures. Open rather your soul to her and be content to feel her with the psychic nature and see her with the psychic vision that alone make a straight response to the Truth.

“Mind in its essence is a consciousness which measures, limits, cuts out forms of things from the indivisible whole and contains them as if each were a separate integer.” The Life Divine

“Mind is an instrument of analysis and synthesis, but not of essential knowledge. Its function is to cut out something vaguely from the unknown Thing in itself and call this measurement or delimitation of it the whole, and again to analyse the whole into its parts which it regards as separate mental objects.” The Life Divine

mind ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The ‘Mind" in the ordinary use of the word covers indiscriminately the whole consciousness, for man is a mental being and mentalises everything; but in the language of this yoga the words ‘mind" and ‘mental" are used to connote specially the part of the nature which has to do with cognition and intelligence, with ideas, with mental or thought perceptions, the reactions of thought to things, with the truly mental movements and formations, mental vision and will, etc., that are part of his intelligence.” *Letters on Yoga

"Mind in its essence is a consciousness which measures, limits, cuts out forms of things from the indivisible whole and contains them as if each were a separate integer.” The Life Divine

"Mind is an instrument of analysis and synthesis, but not of essential knowledge. Its function is to cut out something vaguely from the unknown Thing in itself and call this measurement or delimitation of it the whole, and again to analyse the whole into its parts which it regards as separate mental objects.” The Life Divine

"The mind proper is divided into three parts — thinking Mind, dynamic Mind, externalising Mind — the former concerned with ideas and knowledge in their own right, the second with the putting out of mental forces for realisation of the idea, the third with the expression of them in life (not only by speech, but by any form it can give).” Letters on Yoga

"The difference between the ordinary mind and the intuitive is that the former, seeking in the darkness or at most by its own unsteady torchlight, first, sees things only as they are presented in that light and, secondly, where it does not know, constructs by imagination, by uncertain inference, by others of its aids and makeshifts things which it readily takes for truth, shadow projections, cloud edifices, unreal prolongations, deceptive anticipations, possibilities and probabilities which do duty for certitudes. The intuitive mind constructs nothing in this artificial fashion, but makes itself a receiver of the light and allows the truth to manifest in it and organise its own constructions.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"He [man] has in him not a single mentality, but a double and a triple, the mind material and nervous, the pure intellectual mind which liberates itself from the illusions of the body and the senses, and a divine mind above intellect which in its turn liberates itself from the imperfect modes of the logically discriminative and imaginative reason.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"Our mind is an observer of actuals, an inventor or discoverer of possibilities, but not a seer of the occult imperatives that necessitate the movements and forms of a creation. . . .” *The Life Divine

"The human mind is an instrument not of truth but of ignorance and error.” Letters on Yoga

"For Mind as we know it is a power of the Ignorance seeking for Truth, groping with difficulty to find it, reaching only mental constructions and representations of it in word and idea, in mind formations, sense formations, — as if bright or shadowy photographs or films of a distant Reality were all that it could achieve.” The Life Divine

The Mother: "The true role of the mind is the formation and organization of action. The mind has a formative and organizing power, and it is that which puts the different elements of inspiration in order for action, for organizing action. And if it would only confine itself to that role, receiving inspirations — whether from above or from the mystic centre of the soul — and simply formulating the plan of action — in broad outline or in minute detail, for the smallest things of life or the great terrestrial organizations — it would amply fulfil its function. It is not an instrument of knowledge. But is can use knowledge for action, to organize action. It is an instrument of organization and formation, very powerful and very capable when it is well developed.” Questions and Answers 1956, MCW Vol. 8.*


minim ::: n. --> Anything very minute; as, the minims of existence; -- applied to animalcula; and the like.
The smallest liquid measure, equal to about one drop; the sixtieth part of a fluid drachm.
A small fish; a minnow.
A little man or being; a dwarf.
One of an austere order of mendicant hermits of friars founded in the 15th century by St. Francis of Paola.


minuet ::: n. --> A slow graceful dance consisting of a coupee, a high step, and a balance.
A tune or air to regulate the movements of the dance so called; a movement in suites, sonatas, symphonies, etc., having the dance form, and commonly in 3-4, sometimes 3-8, measure.


mismeasurement ::: n. --> Wrong measurement.

mismeasure ::: v. t. --> To measure or estimate incorrectly.

misurato ::: a. --> Measured; -- a direction to perform a passage in strict or measured time.

modicum ::: n. --> A little; a small quantity; a measured simply.

modiolar ::: a. --> Shaped like a bushel measure.

modius ::: n. --> A dry measure, containing about a peck.

modular ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to mode, modulation, module, or modius; as, modular arrangement; modular accent; modular measure.

module ::: n. --> A model or measure.
The size of some one part, as the diameter of semi-diameter of the base of a shaft, taken as a unit of measure by which the proportions of the other parts of the composition are regulated. Generally, for columns, the semi-diameter is taken, and divided into a certain number of parts, called minutes (see Minute), though often the diameter is taken, and any dimension is said to be so many modules and minutes in height, breadth, or projection.


modulus ::: n. --> A quantity or coefficient, or constant, which expresses the measure of some specified force, property, or quality, as of elasticity, strength, efficiency, etc.; a parameter.

monopody ::: n. --> A measure of but a single foot.

monostrophic ::: a. --> Having one strophe only; not varied in measure; written in unvaried measure.

muchkin ::: n. --> A liquid measure equal to four gills, or an imperial pint.

myrialitre ::: n. --> A metric measure of capacity, containing ten thousand liters. It is equal to 2641.7 wine gallons.

myriametre ::: n. --> A metric measure of length, containing ten thousand meters. It is equal to 6.2137 miles.

myriare ::: n. --> A measure of surface in the metric system containing ten thousand ares, or one million square meters. It is equal to about 247.1 acres.

n ::: n. --> A measure of space equal to half an M (or em); an en.

noggin ::: n. --> A small mug or cup.
A measure equivalent to a gill.


Nolini: “The image is that of the comoposition of an army or that of a mathematical series (e.g., arithmetical or geometrical progression). It is composed of regularised uits of different values (group of sums), but all measured and definite and precise—e.g.., in the case of an army—company, brigade, battalion, army—an ascending scale, the whole also forming one big unit, taken in at a single glance—that is the nature of overmind vision.

northing ::: n. --> Distance northward from any point of departure or of reckoning, measured on a meridian; -- opposed to southing.
The distance of any heavenly body from the equator northward; north declination.


numerous ::: a. --> Consisting of a great number of units or individual objects; being many; as, a numerous army.
Consisting of poetic numbers; rhythmical; measured and counted; melodious; musical.


objector ::: n. --> One who objects; one who offers objections to a proposition or measure.

octant ::: n. --> The eighth part of a circle; an arc of 45 degrees.
The position or aspect of a heavenly body, as the moon or a planet, when half way between conjunction, or opposition, and quadrature, or distant from another body 45 degrees.
An instrument for measuring angles (generally called a quadrant), having an arc which measures up to 9O¡, but being itself the eighth part of a circle. Cf. Sextant.
One of the eight parts into which a space is divided by


oddly ::: adv. --> In an odd manner; unevently.
In a peculiar manner; strangely; queerly; curiously.
In a manner measured by an odd number.


odometer ::: n. --> An instrument attached to the wheel of a vehicle, to measure the distance traversed; also, a wheel used by surveyors, which registers the miles and rods traversed.

odometrical ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the odometer, or to measurements made with it.

odometrous ::: a. --> Serving to measure distance on a road.

odometry ::: n. --> Measurement of distances by the odometer.

of or pertaining to geometry, the branch of mathematics that deals with the deduction of the properties, measurement, and relationships of points, lines, angles, and figures in space.

of undetermined or indefinitely great extent or amount; unlimited; measureless.

ohm ::: n. --> The standard unit in the measure of electrical resistance, being the resistance of a circuit in which a potential difference of one volt produces a current of one ampere. As defined by the International Electrical Congress in 1893, and by United States Statute, it is a resistance substantially equal to 109 units of resistance of the C.G.S. system of electro-magnetic units, and is represented by the resistance offered to an unvarying electric current by a column of mercury at the temperature of melting ice 14.4521 grams

oke ::: n. --> A Turkish and Egyptian weight, equal to about 2/ pounds.
An Hungarian and Wallachian measure, equal to about 2/ pints.


omer ::: n. --> A Hebrew measure, the tenth of an ephah. See Ephah.

"Ordinarily we mean by it [consciousness] our first obvious idea of a mental waking consciousness such as is possessed by the human being during the major part of his bodily existence, when he is not asleep, stunned or otherwise deprived of his physical and superficial methods of sensation. In this sense it is plain enough that consciousness is the exception and not the rule in the order of the material universe. We ourselves do not always possess it. But this vulgar and shallow idea of the nature of consciousness, though it still colours our ordinary thought and associations, must now definitely disappear out of philosophical thinking. For we know that there is something in us which is conscious when we sleep, when we are stunned or drugged or in a swoon, in all apparently unconscious states of our physical being. Not only so, but we may now be sure that the old thinkers were right when they declared that even in our waking state what we call then our consciousness is only a small selection from our entire conscious being. It is a superficies, it is not even the whole of our mentality. Behind it, much vaster than it, there is a subliminal or subconscient mind which is the greater part of ourselves and contains heights and profundities which no man has yet measured or fathomed.” Letters on Yoga

“Ordinarily we mean by it [consciousness] our first obvious idea of a mental waking consciousness such as is possessed by the human being during the major part of his bodily existence, when he is not asleep, stunned or otherwise deprived of his physical and superficial methods of sensation. In this sense it is plain enough that consciousness is the exception and not the rule in the order of the material universe. We ourselves do not always possess it. But this vulgar and shallow idea of the nature of consciousness, though it still colours our ordinary thought and associations, must now definitely disappear out of philosophical thinking. For we know that there is something in us which is conscious when we sleep, when we are stunned or drugged or in a swoon, in all apparently unconscious states of our physical being. Not only so, but we may now be sure that the old thinkers were right when they declared that even in our waking state what we call then our consciousness is only a small selection from our entire conscious being. It is a superficies, it is not even the whole of our mentality. Behind it, much vaster than it, there is a subliminal or subconscient mind which is the greater part of ourselves and contains heights and profundities which no man has yet measured or fathomed.” Letters on Yoga

ordinate ::: a. --> Well-ordered; orderly; regular; methodical. ::: n. --> The distance of any point in a curve or a straight line, measured on a line called the axis of ordinates or on a line parallel to it, from another line called the axis of abscissas, on which the corresponding abscissa of the point is measured.

outmeasure ::: v. t. --> To exceed in measure or extent; to measure more than.

overmeasure ::: v. t. --> To measure or estimate too largely. ::: n. --> Excessive measure; the excess beyond true or proper measure; surplus.

overdelighted ::: a. --> Delighted beyond measure.

oxhide ::: n. --> The skin of an ox, or leather made from it.
A measure of land. See 3d Hide.


ozonometry ::: n. --> The measurement or determination of the quantity of ozone.

palm ::: n. --> The inner and somewhat concave part of the hand between the bases of the fingers and the wrist.
A lineal measure equal either to the breadth of the hand or to its length from the wrist to the ends of the fingers; a hand; -- used in measuring a horse&


pantometry ::: n. --> Universal measurement.

parasang ::: n. --> A Persian measure of length, which, according to Herodotus and Xenophon, was thirty stadia, or somewhat more than three and a half miles. The measure varied in different times and places, and, as now used, is estimated at from three and a half to four English miles.

parcel ::: n. --> A portion of anything taken separately; a fragment of a whole; a part.
A part; a portion; a piece; as, a certain piece of land is part and parcel of another piece.
An indiscriminate or indefinite number, measure, or quantity; a collection; a group.
A number or quantity of things put up together; a bundle; a package; a packet.


partly ::: adv. --> In part; in some measure of degree; not wholly.

paspy ::: n. --> A kind of minuet, in triple time, of French origin, popular in the reign of Queen Elizabeth and for some time after; -- called also passing measure, and passymeasure.

passacaglio ::: n. --> An old Italian or Spanish dance tune, in slow three-four measure, with divisions on a ground bass, resembling a chaconne.

passymeasure ::: n. --> See Paspy.

peck ::: n. --> The fourth part of a bushel; a dry measure of eight quarts; as, a peck of wheat.
A great deal; a large or excessive quantity.
A quick, sharp stroke, as with the beak of a bird or a pointed instrument. ::: v.


pedometrical ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or measured by, a pedometer.

penitentiary ::: a. --> Relating to penance, or to the rules and measures of penance.
Expressive of penitence; as, a penitentiary letter.
Used for punishment, discipline, and reformation. ::: n. --> One who prescribes the rules and measures of penance.


pentapody ::: n. --> A measure or series consisting of five feet.

peri- ::: --> A prefix used to signify around, by, near, over, beyond, or to give an intensive sense; as, perimeter, the measure around; perigee, point near the earth; periergy, work beyond what is needed; perispherical, quite spherical.

perimetry ::: n. --> The art of using the perimeter; measurement of the field of vision.

photometrician ::: n. --> One engaged in the scientific measurement of light.

photometry ::: n. --> That branch of science which treats of the measurement of the intensity of light.

pic ::: n. --> A Turkish cloth measure, varying from 18 to 28 inches.

pint ::: n. --> A measure of capacity, equal to half a quart, or four gills, -- used in liquid and dry measures. See Quart.
The laughing gull.


pipette ::: n. --> A small glass tube, often with an enlargement or bulb in the middle, and usually graduated, -- used for transferring or delivering measured quantities.

place ::: n. --> Any portion of space regarded as measured off or distinct from all other space, or appropriated to some definite object or use; position; ground; site; spot; rarely, unbounded space.
A broad way in a city; an open space; an area; a court or short part of a street open only at one end.
A position which is occupied and held; a dwelling; a mansion; a village, town, or city; a fortified town or post; a stronghold; a region or country.


plethrum ::: n. --> A long measure of 100 Greek, or 101 English, feet; also, a square measure of 10,000 Greek feet.

pneumometry ::: n. --> Measurement of the capacity of the lungs for air.

poem ::: n. --> A metrical composition; a composition in verse written in certain measures, whether in blank verse or in rhyme, and characterized by imagination and poetic diction; -- contradistinguished from prose; as, the poems of Homer or of Milton.
A composition, not in verse, of which the language is highly imaginative or impassioned; as, a prose poem; the poems of Ossian.


polka ::: n. --> A dance of Polish origin, but now common everywhere. It is performed by two persons in common time.
A lively Bohemian or Polish dance tune in 2-4 measure, with the third quaver accented.


polonaise ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the Poles, or to Poland. ::: n. --> The Polish language.
An article of dress for women, consisting of a body and an outer skirt in one piece.
A stately Polish dance tune, in 3-4 measure, beginning


pottle ::: n. --> A liquid measure of four pints.
A pot or tankard.
A vessel or small basket for holding fruit.


precaution ::: n. --> Previous caution or care; caution previously employed to prevent mischief or secure good; as, his life was saved by precaution.
A measure taken beforehand to ward off evil or secure good or success; a precautionary act; as, to take precautions against accident. ::: v. t.


precipitate ::: a. --> Overhasty; rash; as, the king was too precipitate in declaring war.
Lacking due deliberation or care; hurried; said or done before the time; as, a precipitate measure.
Falling, flowing, or rushing, with steep descent; headlong.
Ending quickly in death; brief and fatal; as, a precipitate case of disease.


preliminary ::: a. --> Introductory; previous; preceding the main discourse or business; prefatory; as, preliminary observations to a discourse or book; preliminary articles to a treaty; preliminary measures; preliminary examinations. ::: n. --> That which precedes the main discourse, work, design,

preparatory ::: a. --> Preparing the way for anything by previous measures of adaptation; antecedent and adapted to what follows; introductory; preparative; as, a preparatory school; a preparatory condition.

proceeding ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Proceed ::: n. --> The act of one who proceeds, or who prosecutes a design or transaction; progress or movement from one thing to another; a measure or step taken in a course of business; a transaction; as, an illegal proceeding; a cautious or a violent proceeding.

proceed ::: v. i. --> To move, pass, or go forward or onward; to advance; to continue or renew motion begun; as, to proceed on a journey.
To pass from one point, topic, or stage, to another; as, to proceed with a story or argument.
To issue or come forth as from a source or origin; to come from; as, light proceeds from the sun.
To go on in an orderly or regulated manner; to begin and carry on a series of acts or measures; to act by method; to


productive ::: a. --> Having the quality or power of producing; yielding or furnishing results; as, productive soil; productive enterprises; productive labor, that which increases the number or amount of products.
Bringing into being; causing to exist; producing; originative; as, an age productive of great men; a spirit productive of heroic achievements.
Producing, or able to produce, in large measure;


projet ::: n. --> A plan proposed; a draft of a proposed measure; a project.

prose ::: n. --> The ordinary language of men in speaking or writing; language not cast in poetical measure or rhythm; -- contradistinguished from verse, or metrical composition.
Hence, language which evinces little imagination or animation; dull and commonplace discourse.
A hymn with no regular meter, sometimes introduced into the Mass. See Sequence.


proud ::: 1. Having, proceeding from, or showing a high opinion, dignity, importance, or superiority. 2. Feeling or showing justifiable self-respect. 3. Feeling pleasurable satisfaction over an act, possession, quality, or relationship by which one measures one"s stature or self-worth. 4. Of lofty dignity or distinction. 5. Majestic; magnificent. 6. In a bad sense: filled with or showing excessive self-esteem. 7. Highly honourable or creditable.

prove ::: v. t. --> To try or to ascertain by an experiment, or by a test or standard; to test; as, to prove the strength of gunpowder or of ordnance; to prove the contents of a vessel by a standard measure.
To evince, establish, or ascertain, as truth, reality, or fact, by argument, testimony, or other evidence.
To ascertain or establish the genuineness or validity of; to verify; as, to prove a will.
To gain experience of the good or evil of; to know by


provision ::: n. --> The act of providing, or making previous preparation.
That which is provided or prepared; that which is brought together or arranged in advance; measures taken beforehand; preparation.
Especially, a stock of food; any kind of eatables collected or stored; -- often in the plural.
That which is stipulated in advance; a condition; a previous agreement; a proviso; as, the provisions of a contract; the


public-spirited ::: a. --> Having, or exercising, a disposition to advance the interest of the community or public; as, public-spirited men.
Dictated by a regard to public good; as, a public-spirited project or measure.


pulse ::: n. --> Leguminous plants, or their seeds, as beans, pease, etc.
The beating or throbbing of the heart or blood vessels, especially of the arteries.
Any measured or regular beat; any short, quick motion, regularly repeated, as of a medium in the transmission of light, sound, etc.; oscillation; vibration; pulsation; impulse; beat; movement. ::: v. i.


Purani: “The ‘Dwarf’ here brings to our mind the Vamana—‘The divine Dwarf’, an incarnation of Vishnu who measured the three worlds—the material, the vital and the mental—in his three steps. In the Rig Veda there is a symbolic reference to this which is enlarged as usual, in the Puranas.”“Savitri”—An Approach and a Study

purpose ::: n. --> That which a person sets before himself as an object to be reached or accomplished; the end or aim to which the view is directed in any plan, measure, or exertion; view; aim; design; intention; plan.
Proposal to another; discourse.
Instance; example. ::: v. t.


pursue ::: v. t. --> To follow with a view to overtake; to follow eagerly, or with haste; to chase; as, to pursue a hare.
To seek; to use or adopt measures to obtain; as, to pursue a remedy at law.
To proceed along, with a view to some and or object; to follow; to go in; as, Captain Cook pursued a new route; the administration pursued a wise course.
To prosecute; to be engaged in; to continue.


quadrantal ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to a quadrant; also, included in the fourth part of a circle; as, quadrantal space. ::: n. --> A cubical vessel containing a Roman cubic foot, each side being a Roman square foot; -- used as a measure.
A cube.


quart ::: n. --> The fourth part; a quarter; hence, a region of the earth.
A measure of capacity, both in dry and in liquid measure; the fourth part of a gallon; the eighth part of a peck; two pints.
A vessel or measure containing a quart.
In cards, four successive cards of the same suit. Cf. Tierce, 4.


questman ::: n. --> One legally empowered to make quest of certain matters, esp. of abuses of weights and measures.
A churchwarden&


quintal ::: n. --> A hundredweight, either 112 or 100 pounds, according to the scale used. Cf. Cental.
A metric measure of weight, being 100,000 grams, or 100 kilograms, equal to 220.46 pounds avoirdupois.


radian ::: n. --> An arc of a circle which is equal to the radius, or the angle measured by such an arc.

raip ::: n. --> A rope; also, a measure equal to a rod.

rate ::: v. t. & i. --> To chide with vehemence; to scold; to censure violently. ::: n. --> Established portion or measure; fixed allowance.
That which is established as a measure or criterion; degree; standard; rank; proportion; ratio; as, a slow rate of movement; rate of


reasonable ::: n. --> Having the faculty of reason; endued with reason; rational; as, a reasonable being.
Governed by reason; being under the influence of reason; thinking, speaking, or acting rationally, or according to the dictates of reason; agreeable to reason; just; rational; as, the measure must satisfy all reasonable men.
Not excessive or immoderate; within due limits; proper; as, a reasonable demand, amount, price.


remeasure ::: v. t. --> To measure again; to retrace.

reel ::: n. --> A lively dance of the Highlanders of Scotland; also, the music to the dance; -- often called Scotch reel.
A frame with radial arms, or a kind of spool, turning on an axis, on which yarn, threads, lines, or the like, are wound; as, a log reel, used by seamen; an angler&


regime ::: n. --> Mode or system of rule or management; character of government, or of the prevailing social system.
The condition of a river with respect to the rate of its flow, as measured by the volume of water passing different cross sections in a given time, uniform regime being the condition when the flow is equal and uniform at all the cross sections.


remonstrate ::: v. t. --> To point out; to show clearly; to make plain or manifest; hence, to prove; to demonstrate. ::: v. i. --> To present and urge reasons in opposition to an act, measure, or any course of proceedings; to expostulate; as, to remonstrate with a person regarding his habits; to remonstrate against

repressive ::: a. --> Having power, or tending, to repress; as, repressive acts or measures.

result ::: v. i. --> To leap back; to rebound.
To come out, or have an issue; to terminate; to have consequences; -- followed by in; as, this measure will result in good or in evil.
To proceed, spring, or rise, as a consequence, from facts, arguments, premises, combination of circumstances, consultation, thought, or endeavor.


resumptive ::: a. --> Taking back; resuming, or tending toward resumption; as, resumptive measures.

retaliatory ::: a. --> Tending to, or involving, retaliation; retaliative; as retaliatory measures.

revolutionary ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to a revolution in government; tending to, or promoting, revolution; as, revolutionary war; revolutionary measures; revolutionary agitators. ::: n. --> A revolutionist.

revolution ::: n. --> The act of revolving, or turning round on an axis or a center; the motion of a body round a fixed point or line; rotation; as, the revolution of a wheel, of a top, of the earth on its axis, etc.
Return to a point before occupied, or to a point relatively the same; a rolling back; return; as, revolution in an ellipse or spiral.
The space measured by the regular return of a revolving body; the period made by the regular recurrence of a measure of time,


rheometry ::: n. --> The measurement of the force or intensity of currents.
The calculus; fluxions.


rhyme ::: n. --> An expression of thought in numbers, measure, or verse; a composition in verse; a rhymed tale; poetry; harmony of language.
Correspondence of sound in the terminating words or syllables of two or more verses, one succeeding another immediately or at no great distance. The words or syllables so used must not begin with the same consonant, or if one begins with a vowel the other must begin with a consonant. The vowel sounds and accents must be the same, as also the sounds of the final consonants if there be any.


rhythm ::: 1. Procedure marked by the regular recurrence of particular elements, phases, etc.; flow, pulse, cadence. 2. Regular recurrence of elements in a system of motion. 3. Music. The pattern of regular or irregular pulses caused in music by the occurrence of strong and weak melodic and harmonic beats. 4. Measured movement, as in dancing. 5. Physiol. The regular recurrence of an action of function, as of the beat of the heart. 6. The arrangement of words into a more or less regular sequence of stressed and unstressed or long and short syllables. 7. Pros. Metrical or rhythmical form; metre; a particular kind of metrical form or metrical movement. rhythms, rhythm-beats, fire-rhythm, jewel-rhythm, world-rhythms. (Sri Aurobindo also employs rhythms as a v., rhythmed as a v. and an adj., and rhythming as a v. and an adj.)

rhythmical ::: 1. Having a flowing rhythm. 2. Of, relating to, or having rhythm; recurring with measured regularity.

rhythm ::: n. --> In the widest sense, a dividing into short portions by a regular succession of motions, impulses, sounds, accents, etc., producing an agreeable effect, as in music poetry, the dance, or the like.
Movement in musical time, with periodical recurrence of accent; the measured beat or pulse which marks the character and expression of the music; symmetry of movement and accent.
A division of lines into short portions by a regular


rood ::: n. --> A representation in sculpture or in painting of the cross with Christ hanging on it.
A measure of five and a half yards in length; a rod; a perch; a pole.
The fourth part of an acre, or forty square rods.


roussette ::: n. --> A fruit bat, especially the large species (Pieropus vulgaris) inhabiting the islands of the Indian ocean. It measures about a yard across the expanded wings.
Any small shark of the genus Scyllium; -- called also dogfish. See Dogfish.


rytina ::: n. --> A genus of large edentulous sirenians, allied to the dugong and manatee, including but one species (R. Stelleri); -- called also Steller&

sack ::: n. --> A name formerly given to various dry Spanish wines.
A bag for holding and carrying goods of any kind; a receptacle made of some kind of pliable material, as cloth, leather, and the like; a large pouch.
A measure of varying capacity, according to local usage and the substance. The American sack of salt is 215 pounds; the sack of wheat, two bushels.
Originally, a loosely hanging garment for women, worn like a


sagene ::: n. --> A Russian measure of length equal to about seven English feet.

saltarello ::: n. --> A popular Italian dance in quick 3-4 or 6-8 time, running mostly in triplets, but with a hop step at the beginning of each measure. See Tarantella.

sanitarian ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to health, or the laws of health; sanitary. ::: n. --> An advocate of sanitary measures; one especially interested or versed in sanitary measures.

sanitation ::: n. --> The act of rendering sanitary; the science of sanitary conditions; the preservation of health; the use of sanitary measures; hygiene.

satisfy ::: a. --> In general, to fill up the measure of a want of (a person or a thing); hence, to grafity fully the desire of; to make content; to supply to the full, or so far as to give contentment with what is wished for.
To pay to the extent of claims or deserts; to give what is due to; as, to satisfy a creditor.
To answer or discharge, as a claim, debt, legal demand, or the like; to give compensation for; to pay off; to requite; as, to


scale ::: n. 1. A progressive or graduated series or classification. 2. An ascending or descending collection of pitches proceeding by a specified scheme of intervals. 3. A standard of measurement or judgment; a criterion. 4. Relative or proportionate size or extent; degree, proportion. slow-scaled. *v. 5. To climb; ascend; move upward; mount. *scales.

schene ::: n. --> An Egyptian or Persian measure of length, varying from thirty-two to sixty stadia.

scherzo ::: n. --> A playful, humorous movement, commonly in 3-4 measure, which often takes the place of the old minuet and trio in a sonata or a symphony.

scrutinize ::: v. t. --> To examine closely; to inspect or observe with critical attention; to regard narrowly; as, to scrutinize the measures of administration; to scrutinize the conduct or motives of individuals. ::: v. i. --> To make scrutiny.

seah ::: n. --> A Jewish dry measure containing one third of an an ephah.

sealer ::: n. --> One who seals; especially, an officer whose duty it is to seal writs or instruments, to stamp weights and measures, or the like.
A mariner or a vessel engaged in the business of capturing seals.


seismometric ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to seismometry, or seismometer; as, seismometric instruments; seismometric measurements.

sextary ::: n. --> An ancient Roman liquid and dry measure, about equal to an English pint.
A sacristy.


sextile ::: a. --> Measured by sixty degrees; fixed or indicated by a distance of sixty degrees. ::: n. --> The aspect or position of two planets when distant from each other sixty degrees, or two signs. This position is marked thus: /.

sextuple ::: a. --> Six times as much; sixfold.
Divisible by six; having six beats; as, sixtuple measure.


shaftment ::: n. --> A measure of about six inches.

shorten ::: a. --> To make short or shorter in measure, extent, or time; as, to shorten distance; to shorten a road; to shorten days of calamity.
To reduce or diminish in amount, quantity, or extent; to lessen; to abridge; to curtail; to contract; as, to shorten work, an allowance of food, etc.
To make deficient (as to); to deprive; -- with of.
To make short or friable, as pastry, with butter, lard, pot liquor, or the like.


shrinkage ::: n. --> The act of shrinking; a contraction into less bulk or measurement.
The amount of such contraction; the bulk or dimension lost by shrinking, as of grain, castings, etc.
Decrease in value; depreciation.


siciliano ::: n. --> A Sicilian dance, resembling the pastorale, set to a rather slow and graceful melody in 12-8 or 6-8 measure; also, the music to the dance.

skinch ::: v. t. & i. --> To give scant measure; to squeeze or pinch in order to effect a saving.

solar ::: a. --> A loft or upper chamber; a garret room.
Of or pertaining to the sun; proceeding from the sun; as, the solar system; solar light; solar rays; solar influence. See Solar system, below.
Born under the predominant influence of the sun.
Measured by the progress or revolution of the sun in the ecliptic; as, the solar year.
Produced by the action of the sun, or peculiarly affected by


somewhat ::: n. --> More or less; a certain quantity or degree; a part, more or less; something.
A person or thing of importance; a somebody. ::: adv. --> In some degree or measure; a little.


sound ::: 1. To investigate (water, etc.) by the use of the line and lead or other means, in order to ascertain the depth or the quality of the bottom; to measure or examine in some way resembling this. 2. In fig. contexts: To measure, fathom or ascertain, as by sounding. sounded.

span ::: n. 1. A very small extent, distance or space. 2. The complete duration or extent of a person"s life. 3. The extent or measure of space between two points or extremities, as of a bridge or roof; the breadth. spans. v. 4. To stretch or extend across, over, around, as a bridge or an arch. Also transf. or fig. **spanned, spanning.**

spectrometer ::: n. --> A spectroscope fitted for measurements of the luminious spectra observed with it.

stinted ::: gave in scanty measure; limited.

The process of the integral yoga has three stages, not indeed sharply distingnlsbed or ^parate, but in a certain measure suc- cessive. There must be, first, the effort towards at least an initial and enabling self-transcendence and contact with the Divine ; next, the reception of that which transcends, that with which we have gained communion, into ourselves for the transformation of our whole conscious being ; fast, the utilisation of our trans- formed hiunanity as a divine centre in the world.

"The Word has its seed-sounds — suggesting the eternal syllable of the Veda, A U M, and the seed-sounds of the Tantriks — which carry in them the principles of things; it has its forms which stand behind the revelatory and inspired speech that comes to man"s supreme faculties, and these compel the forms of things in the universe; it has its rhythms, — for it is no disordered vibration, but moves out into great cosmic measures, — and according to the rhythm is the law, arrangement, harmony, processes of the world it builds. Life itself is a rhythm of God.” The Upanishads

“The Word has its seed-sounds—suggesting the eternal syllable of the Veda, A U M, and the seed-sounds of the Tantriks—which carry in them the principles of things; it has its forms which stand behind the revelatory and inspired speech that comes to man’s supreme faculties, and these compel the forms of things in the universe; it has its rhythms,—for it is no disordered vibration, but moves out into great cosmic measures,—and according to the rhythm is the law, arrangement, harmony, processes of the world it builds. Life itself is a rhythm of God.” The Upanishads

Thought was not there nor the measurer, strong-eyed toil,

Time is a field of circumstances and forces meeting and work- ing out a resultant progression whose course it measures. To the ego It is a tyrant or a resistance, to the Divine an instrument.

"Time is a field of circumstances and forces meeting and working out a resultant progression whose course it measures. To the ego it is a tyrant or a resistance, to the Divine an instrument. Therefore, while our effort is personal, Time appears as a resistance, for it presents to us all the obstruction of the forces that conflict with our own. When the divine working and the personal are combined in our consciousness, it appears as a medium and a condition. When the two become one, it appears as a servant and instrument.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“Time is a field of circumstances and forces meeting and working out a resultant progression whose course it measures. To the ego it is a tyrant or a resistance, to the Divine an instrument. Therefore, while our effort is personal, Time appears as a resistance, for it presents to us all the obstruction of the forces that conflict with our own. When the divine working and the personal are combined in our consciousness, it appears as a medium and a condition. When the two become one, it appears as a servant and instrument.” The Synthesis of Yoga

to an immeasurable degree; beyond measurement.

To keep up work helps to keep up the balance between the internal experience and the external development; otherwise one-sidedness and want of measure and balance may develop. hforcover, it is necessary to keep the .sadhana of work for t e

triple heavens ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Vishnu is the wide-moving one. He is that which has gone abroad — as it is put in the language of the Isha Upanishad, sa paryagât, — triply extending himself as Seer, Thinker and Former, in the superconscient Bliss, in the heaven of mind, in the earth of the physical consciousness, tredhâ vicakramânah. In those three strides he has measured out, he has formed in all their extension the earthly worlds; for in the Vedic idea the material world which we inhabit is only one of several steps leading to and supporting the vital and mental worlds beyond. In those strides he supports upon the earth and mid-world, — the earth the material, the mid-world the vital realms of Vayu, Lord of the dynamic Life-principle, — the triple heaven and its three luminous summits, trîni rocanâ. These heavens the Rishi describes as the higher seat of the fulfilling. Earth, the mid-world and heaven are the triple place of the conscious being"s progressive self-fulfilling, trishadhastha, earth the lower seat, the vital world the middle, heaven the higher. All these are contained in the threefold movement of Vishnu.” The Secret of the Veda

unmeasured :::

unprovided for; not backed by measures taken beforehand or other means for meeting a need.

“Vishnu is the wide-moving one. He is that which has gone abroad—as it is put in the language of the Isha Upanishad, sa paryagât,—triply extending himself as Seer, Thinker and Former, in the superconscient Bliss, in the heaven of mind, in the earth of the physical consciousness, tredhâ vicakramânah. In those three strides he has measured out, he has formed in all their extension the earthly worlds; for in the Vedic idea the material world which we inhabit is only one of several steps leading to and supporting the vital and mental worlds beyond. In those strides he supports upon the earth and mid-world,—the earth the material, the mid-world the vital realms of Vayu, Lord of the dynamic Life-principle,—the triple heaven and its three luminous summits, trîni rocanâ. These heavens the Rishi describes as the higher seat of the fulfilling. Earth, the mid-world and heaven are the triple place of the conscious being’s progressive self-fulfilling, trishadhastha, earth the lower seat, the vital world the middle, heaven the higher. All these are contained in the threefold movement of Vishnu.” The Secret of the Veda

weight ::: 1. A measure of the heaviness of an object. Also fig. **2. A body of determinate mass, as of metal, for using on a balance or scale in weighing objects, substances, etc. 3. Any heavy load or burden. Also fig. 4. Influence, importance, or authority. 5. Consequence, or effective influence. weights. v. weighted. 6.** Added weight to, gave greater meaning or importance to.



QUOTES [66 / 66 - 1500 / 6612]


KEYS (10k)

   18 Sri Aurobindo
   4 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   3 Heraclitus
   2 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux
   2 The Mother
   1 Zelda Fitzgerald
   1 William Blake
   1 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   1 Sheng yen
   1 Saint John Chrysostom
   1 Saint Gregory of Nyssa
   1 Saint Faustina Kowalska
   1 Saint Catherine of Siena
   1 Saint Augustine
   1 Saint Angela Merici
   1 Ramakrishna
   1 Polycarp to the Philippians
   1 Oscar Wilde
   1 Neville Goddard
   1 Miyamoto Musashi
   1 Maya Angelou
   1 Masashi Kishimoto
   1 Joseph Ratzinger
   1 Jiddu Krishnamurti
   1 Jean Danielou
   1 Imitation of Christ
   1 Howard Gardner
   1 Hermes
   1 Henry David Thoreau
   1 Geshe Kelsang Gyatso
   1 Geraldine Brooks
   1 George?
   1 Evagrius of Pontus
   1 Charles Fort
   1 Chamtrul Rinpoche
   1 Bruce Feirstein
   1 Basil the Great
   1 Albert Einstein
   1 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   1 Saint Teresa of Avila
   1 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   1 Jorge Luis Borges

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   27 Anonymous
   17 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   10 Timothy Ferriss
   9 John C Maxwell
   8 William Shakespeare
   8 Mahatma Gandhi
   7 Seth Godin
   7 Lord Kelvin
   7 Cassandra Clare
   6 W Edwards Deming
   6 Samuel Johnson
   6 Ren e Ahdieh
   6 Peter Drucker
   6 Marcus Aurelius
   6 Henry David Thoreau
   6 George Herbert
   5 The Mother
   5 Oswald Chambers
   5 Mother Teresa
   5 J K Rowling

1:To manage quality you must measure it.
   ~ George?,
2:The measure of love is love without measure. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
3:For to know a man's library is, in some measure, to know his mind.
   ~ Geraldine Brooks,
4:The true measure of loving God is to love Him without measure." ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
5:It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
6:The hours of folly are measured by the clock; but of wisdom, no clock can measure." ~ William Blake,
7:Love is the measure of our ability to bear crosses. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
8:You are rewarded not according to your work or your time but according to the measure of your love." ~ Saint Catherine of Siena,
9:The measure of the sincerity is the measure of the success.
23 April 1968
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
10:Being with you and not being with you is the only way I have to measure time.
   ~ Jorge Luis Borges, [T1],
11:This cosmic Nature's balance is not ours
Nor the mystic measure of her need and use. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
12:There should be even in deep feeling a calm, a control, a purifying restraint and measure. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Bhakti, Devotion, Worship,
13:The individual consciousness by the attempt to measure the Impersonal loses its individual egoism and becomes one with Him. ~ Ramakrishna, the Eternal Wisdom
14:When we contemplate the sufferings of Jesus He grants us, according to the measure of our faith, the grace to practice the virtues He revealed during those sacred hours." ~ Saint Angela Merici,
15:The firmness of our resolution gives the measure of our progress and a great diligence is needed if one wishes to advance. ~ Imitation of Christ, the Eternal Wisdom
16:All things are divinely arranged in a proportionate way. This is why it is said in the Book of Wisdom ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (11:20) that God made all things, "in weight, number and measure.",
17:All contraries were true in one huge spirit
Surpassing measure, change and circumstance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Discovery of the Cosmic Spirit and the Cosmic Consciousness,
18:The cup which Christ offered to the disciples at the Last Supper was not made of gold. Yet it was precious above all measure. If you want to honor Christ, do it when you see Him naked, in the person of the poor. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
19:Fourthly, the way of the artisan. The way of the carpenter is to become proficient in the use of his tools, first to lay his plans with true measure and then perform his work according to plan. Thus he passes through life. ~ Miyamoto Musashi,
20:A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving … ~ Albert Einstein,
21:In Nature there are no errors but only the deliberate measure of her paces traced and retraced in a prefigured rhythm. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, The Ancient Cycle of Prenational Empire-Building - The Modern Cycle of Nation-Building,
22:Remember what the Lord taught when he said, 'Do not judge, that you may not be judged; forgive and you will be forgiven; be merciful and you will receive mercy. For whatever you measure out to other people will be measured out to you also.' ~ Polycarp to the Philippians,
23:The absolute is not in itself a thing of magnitude; it is beyond measure, not in the sole sense of vastness, but in the freedom of its essential being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, The Origin and Remedy of Falsehood, Error, Wrong and Evil,
24:For each created thing there is not only a single logos, but a large number, according to the measure of each one. For the holy powers attain to the true logoi of the objects, but not unto the first, that which is known solely by Christ. ~ Evagrius of Pontus, Gnostikos 40,
25:When a Nietzsche, a Dostoyevsky, a Kierkegaard uncovers a human universe for us, when the material universe displays [before us] the depths of the history of the earth or spaces between the stars, theological thought is obliged to broaden itself to their measure. ~ Jean Danielou,
26:Like the sunshine, permeating the atmosphere, spreading over land & sea, & yet is enjoyed by each person as though it were for him alone, so the Spirit pours forth his grace in full measure, sufficient for all, & yet is present as though exclusively to everyone. ~ Basil the Great,
27:Work is part of the sadhana, and in sadhana the question of usefulness does not arise, that is an outward practical measure of things, though even in the outward ordinary life utility is not the only measure. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Work and Yoga,
28:our worth lies only in the measure of our effort to exceed ourselves, and to exceed ourselves is to attain the Divine. Human mediocrity is intolerable. We aspire for a knowledge truly knowing, for a power truly powerful, for a love that truly loves.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
29:The Holy Spirit is given in measure, not in respect to his ESSENCE or POWER, according to which he is infinite, but in respect to his GIFTS, which are given in a measured way: "Grace has been given to each of us according to measure" ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Eph 4:7)(Commentary on John 3, lect. 6).,
30:Priding oneself on the strengths or accomplishments of one's practice as well as lamenting one's inability to measure up to the practice are both egotistical attitudes. They are riddled with self-centeredness. The proper way to practice Buddha-mindfulness is to try to nourish the spiritual qualities that the Buddha represents. ~ Sheng yen,
31:Now intelligence seemed quantifiable. You could measure someone's actual or potential height, and now, it seemed, you could also measure someone's actual or potential intelligence. We had one dimension of mental ability along which we could array everyone... The whole concept has to be challenged; in fact, it has to be replaced. ~ Howard Gardner,
32:All things are subject to sweet pleasure,
But three things keep her richest measure,
The breeze that visits heaven
And knows the planets seven,
The green spring with its flowery truth
Creative and the luminous heart of youth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Songs to Myrtilla,
33:Just as full sunlight completely dispels all darkness but even a few rays provide a measure of light, so, if we complete the practice of training the mind, we will totally dispel the darkness of our ignorance, but if we engage in only some parts of the practice, this will still help to reduce our ignorance and self-cherishing . ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
34:Vainly the divine whispers seek us; the heights are rejected.
Man to his earth drawn always prefers his nethermost promptings,
Man, devouring, devoured who is slayer and slain through the ages
Since by the beast he soars held and exceeds not that pedestals measure. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ilion,
35:D.: In the practice of meditation are there any signs of the nature of subjective experience or otherwise, which will indicate the aspirant's progress towards Self-Realisation
M.: The degree of freedom from unwanted thoughts and the degree of concentration on a single thought are the measure to gauge the progress.
~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks, 427,
36:Surely, my child, I have no intention of leaving you and you need not worry; one thing you must know and never forget: all that is true and sincere will always be kept. Only what is false and insincere will disappear.
   In the measure in which your need for me is sincere and genuine, it will be fulfilled. 5 October 1955
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I, I am With You,
37:Insofar as he makes use of his healthy senses, man himself is the best and most exact scientific instrument possible. The greatest misfortune of modern physics is that its experiments have been set apart from man, as it were, physics refuses to recognize nature in anything not shown by artificial instruments, and even uses this as a measure of its accomplishments. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
38:For the first time, we have the power to decide the fate of our planet and ourselves. This is a time of great danger, but our species is young, and curious, and brave. It shows much promise.
   We wish to pursue the truth no matter where it leads. But to find the truth, we need imagination and skepticism both. We will not be afraid to speculate, but we will be careful to distinguish speculation from fact. The cosmos is full beyond measure of elegant truths; of exquisite interrelationships; of the awesome machinery of nature. ~ Carl Sagan,
39:Each time he took a walk, he felt as though he were leaving himself behind, and by giving himself up to the movement of the streets, by reducing himself to a seeing eye, he was able to escape the obligation to think, and this, more than anything else, brought him a measure of peace, a salutary emptiness within... By wandering aimlessly, all places became equal and it no longer mattered where he was. On his best walks he was able to feel that he was nowhere. And this, finally was all he ever asked of things: to be nowhere. ~ Paul Auster, The New York Trilogy,
40:So long as the contact with the Divine is not in some considerable degree established, so long as there is not some measure of sustained identity, sayujya, the element of personal effort must normally predominate. But in proportion as this contact establishes itself, the sadhaka must become conscious that a force other than his own, a force transcending his egoistic endeavour and capacity, is at work in him and to this Power he learns progressively to submit himself and delivers up to it the charge of his Yoga.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga,
41:This light of history is pitiless; it has a strange and divine quality that, luminous as it is, and precisely because it is luminous, often casts a shadow just where we saw a radiance; out of the same man it makes two different phantoms, and the one attacks and punishes the other, the darkness of the despot struggles with the splendor of the captain. Hence a truer measure in the final judgment of the nations. Babylon violated diminishes Alexander; Rome enslaved diminishes Caesar; massacred Jerusalem diminishes Titus. Tyranny follows the tyrant. Woe to the man who leaves behind a shadow that bears his form. ~ Vicktor Hugo,
42:How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people ~ first of all for those upon whose smiles and well-being our own happiness is wholly dependent, and then for the many, unknown to us, to whose destinies we are bound by the ties of sympathy. A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving.,
43:The Yoga must start with an effort or at least a settled turn towards this total concentration. A constant and unfailing will of consecration of all ourselves to the Supreme is demanded of us, an offering of our whole being and our many-chambered nature to the Eternal who is the All. The effective fullness of our concentration on the one thing needful to the exclusion of all else will be the measure of our self-consecration to the One who is alone desirable. But this exclusiveness will in the end exclude nothing except the falsehood of our way of seeing the world and our will's ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, [T5],
44:the lord of the sacrifice and the measure of our works :::
   The Divine, the Eternal is the Lord of our sacrifice of works and union with him in all our being and consciousness and in its expressive instruments is the one object of the sacrifice; the steps of the sacrifice of works must therefore be measured, first, by the growth in our nature of something that brings us nearer to the Divine Nature, but secondly also by an experience of the Divine, his presence, his manifestation to us, an increasing closeness and union with that Presence.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Sacrifice, The Triune Path and the Lord of the Sacrifice,
45:Direct not thy mind to the vast surfaces of the earth; for the Plant of Truth grows not upon the ground. Nor measure the motions of the Sun, collecting rules, for he is carried by the Eternal Will of the Father, and not for your sake alone. Dismiss from your mind the impetuous course of the Moon, for she moveth always by the power of Necessity. The progression of the Stars was not generated for your sake. The wide aerial flight of birds gives no true knowledge, nor the dissection of the entrails of victims; they are all mere toys, the basis of mercenary fraud: flee from these if you would enter the sacred paradise of piety where Virtue, Wisdom, and Equity are assembled." ~ Zoroaster,
46:But if human mind can become capable of the glories of the divine Light, human emotion and sensibility can be transformed into the mould and assume the measure and movement of the supreme Bliss, human action not only represent but feel itself to be the motion of a divine and non-egoistic Force and the physical substance of our being suffiently partake of the purity of the supernal essence, suffiently unify plasticity and durable constancy to support and prolong these highest experiences and agencies, then all the long labour of Nature will end in a crowning justification and her evolutions reveal their profound significance.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga,
47:The art of using it consists principally in referring all our ideas to it, discovering thus the common nature of certain things and the essential differences between others, so that ultimately one obtains a simple view of the incalculably vast complexity of the Universe.

The whole subject must be studied in the Book 777, and the main attributions committed to memory: then when by constant use the system is at last understood—as opposed to being merely memorised—the student will find fresh light break in on him at every turn as he continues to measure every item of new knowledge that he attains by this Standard. For to him the Universe will then begin to appear as a coherent and a necessary Whole. ~ Aleister Crowley, Little Essays Towards Truth, "Man",
48:Savitri is neither fantasy nor yet mere philosophical thought, but vision and revelation of the actual structure of the inner Cosmos and of the pilgrim of life within its sphere — the Stairway of the Worlds reveals itself to our gaze — worlds of Light above, worlds of Darkness beneath, and we see also ever-encircling life ('kindled in measure and quenched in measure') ascending that stair under the calm unwinking gaze of the Cosmic Gods who shine forth now as of old. Poetry is indeed the full manifestation of the Logos and, when as here, it is no mere iridescence dependent on some special standpoint, but the wondrous structure of the mighty Cosmos, the 'Adored One', that is revealed, then in truth does it manifest its full, its highest grandeur.
It is an omen of the utmost significance and hope that in these years of darkness and despair such a poem as Savitri should have appeared. ~ Krishnaprem,
49:A word that rose to honor at the time of the Renaissance, and that summarized in advance the whole program of modern civilization is 'humanism'. Men were indeed concerned to reduce everything to purely human proportions, to eliminate every principle of a higher order, and, one might say, symbolically to turn away from the heavens under pretext of conquering the earth; the Greeks, whose example they claimed to follow, had never gone as far in this direction, even at the time of their greatest intellectual decadence, and with them utilitarian considerations had at least never claimed the first place, as they were very soon to do with the moderns. Humanism was form of what has subsequently become contemporary secularism; and, owing to its desire to reduce everything to the measure of man as an end in himself, modern civilization has sunk stage by stage until it has reached the level of the lowest elements in man and aims at little more than satisfying the needs inherent in the material side of his nature, an aim that is in any case quite illusory since it constantly creates more artificial needs than it can satisfy. ~ Rene Guenon, The Crisis of the Modern World
50:By religion, then, I understand a propitiation or conciliation of powers superior to man which are believed to direct and control the course of nature and of human life. Thus defined, religion consists of two elements, a theoretical and a practical, namely, a belief in powers higher than man and an attempt to propitiate or please them. Of the two, belief clearly comes first, since we must believe in the existence of a divine being before we can attempt to please him. But unless the belief leads to a corresponding practice, it is not a religion but merely a theology; in the language of St. James, "faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone." In other words, no man is religious who does not govern his conduct in some measure by the fear or love of God. On the other hand, mere practice, divested of all religious belief, is also not religion. Two men may behave in exactly the same way, and yet one of them may be religious and the other not. If the one acts from the love or fear of God, he is religious; if the other acts from the love or fear of man, he is moral or immoral according as his behaviour comports or conflicts with the general good. ~ James George Frazer, The Golden Bough,
51:Two Paths Of Yoga :::
   There are two paths of Yoga, one of tapasya (discipline), and the other of surrender. The path of tapasya is arduous. Here you rely solely upon yourself, you proceed by your own strength. You ascend and achieve according to the measure of your force. There is always the danger of falling down. And once you fall, you lie broken in the abyss and there is hardly a remedy. The other path, the path of surrender. is a safe and sure. It is here, however, that the Western people find their difficulty. They have been taught to fear and avoid all that threatens their personal independence. They have imbibed with their mothers milk the sense of individuality. And surrender means giving up all that. In other words, you may follow, as Ramakrishna says, either the path of the baby monkey or that of the baby cat. The baby monkey holds to its mother in order to be carried about and it must hold firm, otherwise if it loses its grip, it falls. On the other hand, the baby cat does not hold to its mother, but is held by the mother and has no fear nor responsibility; it to nor has nothing do but to let the mother hold it and cry ma ma.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
52:For our concentration on the Eternal will be consummated by the mind when we see constantly the Divine in itself and the Divine in ourselves, but also the Divine in all things and beings and happenings. It will be consummated by the heart when all emotion is summed up in the love of the Divine, - of the Divine in itself and for itself, but love too of the Divine in all its beings and powers and personalities and forms in the Universe. It will be consummated by the will when we feel and receive always the divine impulsion and accept that alone as our sole motive force; but this will mean that, having slain to the last rebellious straggler the wandering impulses of the egoistic nature, we have universalised ourselves and can accept with a constant happy acceptance the one divine working in all things. This is the first fundamental siddhi of the integral Yoga.
   It is nothing less that is meant in the end when we speak of the absolute consecration of the individual to the Divine. But this total fullness of consecration can only come by a constant progression when the long and difficult process of transforming desire out of existence is completed in an ungrudging measure. Perfect self-consecration implies perfect self-surrender.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, 85-86, [T1],
53:The great men of the past have given us glimpses of what is possible in the way of personality, of intellectual understanding, of spiritual achievement, of artistic creation. But these are scarcely more than Pisgah glimpses. We need to explore and map the whole realm of human possibility, as the realm of physical geography has been explored and mapped. How to create new possibilities for ordinary living? What can be done to bring out the latent capacities of the ordinary man and woman for understanding and enjoyment; to teach people the techniques of achieving spiritual experience (after all, one can acquire the technique of dancing or tennis, so why not of mystical ecstasy or spiritual peace?)...
   The zestful but scientific exploration of possibilities and of the techniques for realizing them will make our hopes rational, and will set our ideals within the framework of reality, by showing how much of them are indeed realizable. Already, we can justifiably hold the belief that these lands of possibility exist, and that the present limitations and miserable frustrations of our existence could be in large measure surmounted. We are already justified in the conviction that human life as we know it in history is a wretched makeshift, rooted in ignorance; and that it could be transcended by a state of existence based on the illumination of knowledge and comprehension, just as our modern control of physical nature based on science transcends the tentative fumblings of our ancestors, that were rooted in superstition and professional secrecy. ~ Julian Huxley, Transhumanism,
54:The second condition of consciousness is potential only to the human being and gained by an inner enlightening and transformation of the mind of ignorance; it is that in which the mind seeks for its source of knowledge rather within than without and becomes to its own feeling and self-experience, by whatever means, a mind, not of original ignorance, but of self-forgetful knowledge. This mind is conscious that the knowledge of all things is hidden within it or at least somewhere in the being, but as if veiled and forgotten, and the knowledge comes to it not as a thing acquired from outside, but always secretly there and now remembered and known at once to be true, - each thing in its own place, degree, manner and measure. This is its attitude to knowledge even when the occasion of knowing is some external experience, sign or indication, because that is to it only the occasion and its reliance for the truth of the knowledge is not on the external indication or evidence but on the inner confirming witness. The true mind is the universal within us and the individual is only a projection on the surface, and therefore this second state of consciousness we have either when the individual mind goes more and more inward and is always consciously or subconsciously near and sensitive to the touches of the universal mentality in which all is contained, received, capable of being made manifest, or, still more powerfully, when we live in the consciousness of universal mind with the personal mentality only as a projection, a marking board or a communicating switch on the surface. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Towards the Supramental Time Vision, 887,
55:Philosophy, like all other studies, aims primarily at knowledge. The knowledge it aims at is the kind of knowledge which gives unity and system to the body of the sciences, and the kind which results from a critical examination of the grounds of our convictions, prejudices, and beliefs. But it cannot be maintained that philosophy has had any very great measure of success in its attempts to provide definite answers to its questions. If you ask a mathematician, a mineralogist, a historian, or any other man of learning, what definite body of truths has been ascertained by his science, his answer will last as long as you are willing to listen. But if you put the same question to a philosopher, he will, if he is candid, have to confess that his study has not achieved positive results such as have been achieved by other sciences. It is true that this is partly accounted for by the fact that, as soon as definite knowledge concerning any subject becomes possible, this subject ceases to be called philosophy, and becomes a separate science. The whole study of the heavens, which now belongs to astronomy, was once included in philosophy; Newton's great work was called 'the mathematical principles of natural philosophy'. Similarly, the study of the human mind, which was a part of philosophy, has now been separated from philosophy and has become the science of psychology. Thus, to a great extent, the uncertainty of philosophy is more apparent than real: those questions which are already capable of definite answers are placed in the sciences, while those only to which, at present, no definite answer can be given, remain to form the residue which is called philosophy.
   ~ Bertrand Russell,
56:Musa Spiritus :::

O Word concealed in the upper fire,
Thou who hast lingered through centuries,
Descend from thy rapt white desire,
Plunging through gold eternities.

Into the gulfs of our nature leap,
Voice of the spaces, call of the Light!
Break the seals of Matter's sleep,
Break the trance of the unseen height.

In the uncertain glow of human mind,
Its waste of unharmonied thronging thoughts,
Carve thy epic mountain-lined
Crowded with deep prophetic grots.

Let thy hue-winged lyrics hover like birds
Over the swirl of the heart's sea.
Touch into sight with thy fire-words
The blind indwelling deity.

O Muse of the Silence, the wideness make
In the unplumbed stillness that hears thy voice,
In the vast mute heavens of the spirit awake
Where thy eagles of Power flame and rejoice.

Out, out with the mind and its candles flares,
Light, light the suns that never die.
For my ear the cry of the seraph stars
And the forms of the Gods for my naked eye!

Let the little troubled life-god within
Cast his veils from the still soul,
His tiger-stripes of virtue and sin,
His clamour and glamour and thole and dole;

All make tranquil, all make free.
Let my heart-beats measure the footsteps of God
As He comes from His timeless infinity
To build in their rapture His burning abode.

Weave from my life His poem of days,
His calm pure dawns and His noons of force.
My acts for the grooves of His chariot-race,
My thoughts for the tramp of His great steeds' course! ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems,
57:the second aid, the need for effort and aspiration, utsaha :::
   The development of the experience in its rapidity, its amplitude, the intensity and power of its results, depends primarily, in the beginning of the path and long after, on the aspiration and personal effort of the sadhaka. The process of Yoga is a turning of the human soul from the egoistic state of consciousness absorbed in the outward appearances and attractions of things to a higher state in which the Transcendent and Universal can pour itself into the individiual mould and transform it. The first determining element in the siddhi is, therefore, the intensity of the turning, the force which directs the soul inward. The power of aspiration of the heart, the force of the will, the concentration of the mind, the perseverance and determination of the applied energy are the measure of that intensity. The ideal sadhaka should be able to say in the Biblical phrase, 'My zeal for the Lord has eaten me up.' It is this zeal for the Lord, -utsaha, the zeal of the whole nature for its divine results, vyakulata, the heart's eagerness for the attainment of the Divine, - that devours the ego and breaks up the petty limitations ...
   So long as the contact with the Divine is not in some considerable degree established, so long as there is not some measure of sustained identity, sayujya, the element of personal effort must normally predominate. But in proportion as this contact establishes itself, the sadhaka must become conscious that a force other than his own, a force transcending his egoistic endeavour and capacity, is at work in him and to this Power he learns progressively to submit himself and delivers up to it the charge of his Yoga.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Four Aids,
58:But this is only one side of the force that works for perfection. The process of the integral Yoga has three stages, not indeed sharply distinguished or separate, but in a certain measure successive. There must be, first, the effort towards at least an initial and enabling self-transcendence and contact with the Divine; next, the reception of that which transcends, that with which we have gained communion, into ourselves for the transformation of our whole conscious being; last, the utilisation of our transformed humanity as a divine centre in the world. So long as the contact with the Divine is not in some considerable degree established, so long as there is not some measure of sustained identity, sayujya, the element of personal effort must normally predominate. But in proportion as this contact establishes itself, the sadhaka must become conscious that a force other than his own, a force transcending his egoistic endeavour and capacity, is at work in him and to this Power he learns progressively to submit himself and delivers up to it the charge of his Yoga. In the end his own will and force become one with the higher Power; he merges them in the divineWill and its transcendent and universal Force. He finds it thenceforward presiding over the necessary transformation of his mental, vital and physical being with an impartial wisdom and provident effectivity of which the eager and interested ego is not capable. It is when this identification and this self-merging are complete that the divine centre in the world is ready. Purified, liberated, plastic, illumined, it can begin to serve as a means for the direct action of a supreme Power in the larger Yoga of humanity or superhumanity, of the earth's spiritual progression or its transformation.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, [T2],
59:There is, indeed, a higher form of the buddhi that can be called the intuitive mind or intuitive reason, and this by its intuitions, its inspirations, its swift revelatory vision, its luminous insight and discrimination can do the work of the reason with a higher power, a swifter action, a greater and spontaneous certitude. It acts in a self-light of the truth which does not depend upon the torch-flares of the sense-mind and its limited uncertain percepts; it proceeds not by intelligent but by visional concepts: It is a kind of truth-vision, truth-hearing, truth-memory, direct truth-discernment. This true and authentic intuition must be distinguished from a power of the ordinary mental reason which is too easily confused with it, that power of Involved reasoning that reaches its conclusion by a bound and does not need the ordinary steps of the logical mind. The logical reason proceeds pace after pace and tries the sureness of each step like a marl who is walking over unsafe ground and has to test by the hesitating touch of his foot each span of soil that he perceives with his eye. But this other supralogical process of the reason is a motion of rapid insight or swift discernment; it proceeds by a stride or leap, like a man who springs from one sure spot to another point of sure footing, -- or at least held by him to be sure. He sees this space he covers in one compact and flashing view, but he does not distinguish or measure either by eye or touch its successions, features and circumstances. This movement has something of the sense of power of the intuition, something of its velocity, some appearance of its light and certainty, arid we always are apt to take it for the intuition. But our assumption is an error and, if we trust to it, it may lead us into grievous blunders.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga,
60:See how, like lightest waves at play, the airy dancers fleet;
   And scarcely feels the floor the wings of those harmonious feet.
   Ob, are they flying shadows from their native forms set free?
   Or phantoms in the fairy ring that summer moonbeams see?
   As, by the gentle zephyr blown, some light mist flees in air,
   As skiffs that skim adown the tide, when silver waves are fair,
   So sports the docile footstep to the heave of that sweet measure,
   As music wafts the form aloft at its melodious pleasure,
   Now breaking through the woven chain of the entangled dance,
   From where the ranks the thickest press, a bolder pair advance,
   The path they leave behind them lost--wide open the path beyond,
   The way unfolds or closes up as by a magic wand.
   See now, they vanish from the gaze in wild confusion blended;
   All, in sweet chaos whirled again, that gentle world is ended!
   No!--disentangled glides the knot, the gay disorder ranges--
   The only system ruling here, a grace that ever changes.
   For ay destroyed--for ay renewed, whirls on that fair creation;
   And yet one peaceful law can still pervade in each mutation.
   And what can to the reeling maze breathe harmony and vigor,
   And give an order and repose to every gliding figure?
   That each a ruler to himself doth but himself obey,
   Yet through the hurrying course still keeps his own appointed way.
   What, would'st thou know? It is in truth the mighty power of tune,
   A power that every step obeys, as tides obey the moon;
   That threadeth with a golden clue the intricate employment,
   Curbs bounding strength to tranquil grace, and tames the wild enjoyment.
   And comes the world's wide harmony in vain upon thine ears?
   The stream of music borne aloft from yonder choral spheres?
   And feel'st thou not the measure which eternal Nature keeps?
   The whirling dance forever held in yonder azure deeps?
   The suns that wheel in varying maze?--That music thou discernest?
   No! Thou canst honor that in sport which thou forgettest in earnest.
   ~ Friedrich Schiller,
61:Has any one at the end of the nineteenth century any distinct notion of what poets of a stronger age understood by the word inspiration? If not, I will describe it. If one had the smallest vestige of superstition left in one, it would hardly be possible completely to set aside the idea that one is the mere incarnation, mouthpiece, or medium of an almighty power. The idea of revelation, in the sense that something which profoundly convulses and upsets one becomes suddenly visible and audible with indescribable certainty and accuracy―describes the simple fact. One hears―one does not seek; one takes―one does not ask who gives. A thought suddenly flashes up like lightening; it comes with necessity, without faltering. I have never had any choice in the matter. There is an ecstasy so great that the immense strain of it is sometimes relaxed by a flood of tears, during which one's steps now involuntarily rush and anon involuntarily lag. There is the feeling that one is utterly out of hand, with the very distinct consciousness of an endless number of fine thrills and titillations descending to one's very toes. There is a depth of happiness in which the most painful and gloomy parts do not act as antitheses to the rest, but are produced and required as necessary shades of color in such an overflow of light. There is an instinct of rhythmic relations which embraces a whole world of forms (length, the need of a wide-embracing rhythm, is almost the measure of the force of an inspiration, a sort of counterpart to its pressure and tension). Everything happens quite involuntary, as if in a tempestuous outburst of freedom, of absoluteness, of power and divinity. The involuntary nature of the figures and similes is the most remarkable thing; everything seems to present itself as the readiest, the truest, and simplest means of expression. It actually seems, to use one of Zarathustra's own phrases, as if all things came to one, and offered themselves as similes. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra [trans. Thomas_Common] (1999),
62:The way of integral knowledge supposes that we are intended to arrive at an integral self-fulfilment and the only thing that is to be eliminated is our own unconsciousness, the Ignorance and the results of the Ignorance. Eliminate the falsity of the being which figures as the ego; then our true being can manifest in us. Eliminate the falsity of the life which figures as mere vital craving and the mechanical round of our corporeal existence; our true life in the power of the Godhead and the joy of the Infinite will appear. Eliminate the falsity of the senses with their subjection to material shows and to dual sensations; there is a greater sense in us that can open through these to the Divine in things and divinely reply to it. Eliminate the falsity of the heart with its turbid passions and desires and its dual emotions; a deeper heart in us can open with its divine love for all creatures and its infinite passion and yearning for the responses of the Infinite. Eliminate the falsity of the thought with its imperfect mental constructions, its arrogant assertions and denials, its limited and exclusive concentrations; a greater faculty of knowledge is behind that can open to the true Truth of God and the soul and Nature and the universe. An integral self-fulfilment, - an absolute, a culmination for the experiences of the heart, for its instinct of love, joy, devotion and worship; an absolute, a culmination for the senses, for their pursuit of divine beauty and good and delight in the forms of things; an absolute, a culmination for the life, for its pursuit of works, of divine power, mastery and perfection; an absolute, a culmination beyond its own limits for the thought, for its hunger after truth and light and divine wisdom and knowledge. Not something quite other than themselves from which they are all cast away is the end of these things in our nature, but something supreme in which they at once transcend themselves and find their own absolutes and infinitudes, their harmonies beyond measure.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Object of Knowledge,
63:reading :::
   Self-Help Reading List:
   James Allen As a Man Thinketh (1904)
   Marcus Aurelius Meditations (2nd Century)
   The Bhagavad-Gita
   The Bible
   Robert Bly Iron John (1990)
   Boethius The Consolation of Philosophy (6thC)
   Alain de Botton How Proust Can Change Your Life (1997)
   William Bridges Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes (1980)
   David Brooks The Road to Character (2015)
   Brené Brown Daring Greatly (2012)
   David D Burns The New Mood Therapy (1980)
   Joseph Campbell (with Bill Moyers) The Power of Myth (1988)
   Richard Carlson Don't Sweat The Small Stuff (1997)
   Dale Carnegie How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936)
   Deepak Chopra The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success (1994)
   Clayton Christensen How Will You Measure Your Life? (2012)
   Paulo Coelho The Alchemist (1988)
   Stephen Covey The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (1989)
   Mihaly Cziksentmihalyi Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience (1991)
   The Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler The Art of Happiness (1999)
   The Dhammapada (Buddha's teachings)
   Charles Duhigg The Power of Habit (2011)
   Wayne Dyer Real Magic (1992)
   Ralph Waldo Emerson Self-Reliance (1841)
   Clarissa Pinkola Estes Women Who Run With The Wolves (1996)
   Viktor Frankl Man's Search For Meaning (1959)
   Benjamin Franklin Autobiography (1790)
   Shakti Gawain Creative Visualization (1982)
   Daniel Goleman Emotional Intelligence (1995)
   John Gray Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus (1992)
   Louise Hay You Can Heal Your Life (1984)
   James Hillman The Soul's Code: In Search of Character and Calling (1996)
   Susan Jeffers Feel The Fear And Do It Anyway (1987)
   Richard Koch The 80/20 Principle (1998)
   Marie Kondo The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up (2014)
   Ellen Langer Mindfulness: Choice and Control in Everyday Life (1989)
   Lao-Tzu Tao-te Ching (The Way of Power)
   Maxwell Maltz Psycho-Cybernetics (1960)
   Abraham Maslow Motivation and Personality (1954)
   Thomas Moore Care of the Soul (1992)
   Joseph Murphy The Power of Your Subconscious Mind (1963)
   Norman Vincent Peale The Power of Positive Thinking (1952)
   M Scott Peck The Road Less Traveled (1990)
   Anthony Robbins Awaken The Giant Within (1991)
   Florence Scovell-Shinn The Game of Life and How To Play It (1923)
   Martin Seligman Learned Optimism (1991)
   Samuel Smiles Self-Help (1859)
   Pierre Teilhard de Chardin The Phenomenon of Man (1955)
   Henry David Thoreau Walden (1854)
   Marianne Williamson A Return To Love (1993)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Self-Help,
64:The Two Paths Of Yoga :::
   14 April 1929 - What are the dangers of Yoga? Is it especially dangerous to the people of the West? Someone has said that Yoga may be suitable for the East, but it has the effect of unbalancing the Western mind.

   Yoga is not more dangerous to the people of the West than to those of the East. Everything depends upon the spirit with which you approach it. Yoga does become dangerous if you want it for your own sake, to serve a personal end. It is not dangerous, on the contrary, it is safety and security itself, if you go to it with a sense of its sacredness, always remembering that the aim is to find the Divine.
   Dangers and difficulties come in when people take up Yoga not for the sake of the Divine, but because they want to acquire power and under the guise of Yoga seek to satisfy some ambition. if you cannot get rid of ambition, do not touch the thing. It is fire that burns.
   There are two paths of Yoga, one of tapasya (discipline), and the other of surrender. The path of tapasya is arduous. Here you rely solely upon yourself, you proceed by your own strength. You ascend and achieve according to the measure of your force. There is always the danger of falling down. And once you fall, you lie broken in the abyss and there is hardly a remedy. The other path, the path of surrender, is safe and sure. It is here, however, that the Western people find their difficulty. They have been taught to fear and avoid all that threatens their personal independence. They have imbibed with their mothers' milk the sense of individuality. And surrender means giving up all that. In other words, you may follow, as Ramakrishna says, either the path of the baby monkey or that of the baby cat. The baby monkey holds to its mother in order to be carried about and it must hold firm, otherwise if it loses its grip, it falls. On the other hand, the baby cat does not hold to its mother, but is held by the mother and has no fear nor responsibility; it has nothing to do but to let the mother hold it and cry ma ma.
   If you take up this path of surrender fully and sincerely, there is no more danger or serious difficulty. The question is to be sincere. If you are not sincere, do not begin Yoga. If you were dealing in human affairs, then you could resort to deception; but in dealing with the Divine there is no possibility of deception anywhere. You can go on the Path safely when you are candid and open to the core and when your only end is to realise and attain the Divine and to be moved by the Divine. There is another danger; it is in connection with the sex impulses. Yoga in its process of purification will lay bare and throw up all hidden impulses and desires in you. And you must learn not to hide things nor leave them aside, you have to face them and conquer and remould them. The first effect of Yoga, however, is to take away the mental control, and the hungers that lie dormant are suddenly set free, they rush up and invade the being. So long as this mental control has not been replaced by the Divine control, there is a period of transition when your sincerity and surrender will be put to the test. The strength of such impulses as those of sex lies usually in the fact that people take too much notice of them; they protest too vehemently and endeavour to control them by coercion, hold them within and sit upon them. But the more you think of a thing and say, "I don't want it, I don't want it", the more you are bound to it. What you should do is to keep the thing away from you, to dissociate from it, take as little notice of it as possible and, even if you happen to think of it, remain indifferent and unconcerned. The impulses and desires that come up by the pressure of Yoga should be faced in a spirit of detachment and serenity, as something foreign to yourself or belonging to the outside world. They should be offered to the Divine, so that the Divine may take them up and transmute them. If you have once opened yourself to the Divine, if the power of the Divine has once come down into you and yet you try to keep to the old forces, you prepare troubles and difficulties and dangers for yourself. You must be vigilant and see that you do not use the Divine as a cloak for the satisfaction of your desires. There are many self-appointed Masters, who do nothing but that. And then when you are off the straight path and when you have a little knowledge and not much power, it happens that you are seized by beings or entities of a certain type, you become blind instruments in their hands and are devoured by them in the end. Wherever there is pretence, there is danger; you cannot deceive God. Do you come to God saying, "I want union with you" and in your heart meaning "I want powers and enjoyments"? Beware! You are heading straight towards the brink of the precipice. And yet it is so easy to avoid all catastrophe. Become like a child, give yourself up to the Mother, let her carry you, and there is no more danger for you.
   This does not mean that you have not to face other kinds of difficulties or that you have not to fight and conquer any obstacles at all. Surrender does not ensure a smooth and unruffled and continuous progression. The reason is that your being is not yet one, nor your surrender absolute and complete. Only a part of you surrenders; and today it is one part and the next day it is another. The whole purpose of the Yoga is to gather all the divergent parts together and forge them into an undivided unity. Till then you cannot hope to be without difficulties - difficulties, for example, like doubt or depression or hesitation. The whole world is full of the poison. You take it in with every breath. If you exchange a few words with an undesirable man or even if such a man merely passes by you, you may catch the contagion from him. It is sufficient for you to come near a place where there is plague in order to be infected with its poison; you need not know at all that it is there. You can lose in a few minutes what it has taken you months to gain. So long as you belong to humanity and so long as you lead the ordinary life, it does not matter much if you mix with the people of the world; but if you want the divine life, you will have to be exceedingly careful about your company and your environment.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
65:Mental Education

OF ALL lines of education, mental education is the most widely known and practised, yet except in a few rare cases there are gaps which make it something very incomplete and in the end quite insufficient.

   Generally speaking, schooling is considered to be all the mental education that is necessary. And when a child has been made to undergo, for a number of years, a methodical training which is more like cramming than true schooling, it is considered that whatever is necessary for his mental development has been done. Nothing of the kind. Even conceding that the training is given with due measure and discrimination and does not permanently damage the brain, it cannot impart to the human mind the faculties it needs to become a good and useful instrument. The schooling that is usually given can, at the most, serve as a system of gymnastics to increase the suppleness of the brain. From this standpoint, each branch of human learning represents a special kind of mental gymnastics, and the verbal formulations given to these various branches each constitute a special and well-defined language.

   A true mental education, which will prepare man for a higher life, has five principal phases. Normally these phases follow one after another, but in exceptional individuals they may alternate or even proceed simultaneously. These five phases, in brief, are:

   (1) Development of the power of concentration, the capacity of attention.
   (2) Development of the capacities of expansion, widening, complexity and richness.
   (3) Organisation of one's ideas around a central idea, a higher ideal or a supremely luminous idea that will serve as a guide in life.
   (4) Thought-control, rejection of undesirable thoughts, to become able to think only what one wants and when one wants.
   (5) Development of mental silence, perfect calm and a more and more total receptivity to inspirations coming from the higher regions of the being.

   It is not possible to give here all the details concerning the methods to be employed in the application of these five phases of education to different individuals. Still, a few explanations on points of detail can be given.

   Undeniably, what most impedes mental progress in children is the constant dispersion of their thoughts. Their thoughts flutter hither and thither like butterflies and they have to make a great effort to fix them. Yet this capacity is latent in them, for when you succeed in arousing their interest, they are capable of a good deal of attention. By his ingenuity, therefore, the educator will gradually help the child to become capable of a sustained effort of attention and a faculty of more and more complete absorption in the work in hand. All methods that can develop this faculty of attention from games to rewards are good and can all be utilised according to the need and the circumstances. But it is the psychological action that is most important and the sovereign method is to arouse in the child an interest in what you want to teach him, a liking for work, a will to progress. To love to learn is the most precious gift that one can give to a child: to love to learn always and everywhere, so that all circumstances, all happenings in life may be constantly renewed opportunities for learning more and always more.

   For that, to attention and concentration should be added observation, precise recording and faithfulness of memory. This faculty of observation can be developed by varied and spontaneous exercises, making use of every opportunity that presents itself to keep the child's thought wakeful, alert and prompt. The growth of the understanding should be stressed much more than that of memory. One knows well only what one has understood. Things learnt by heart, mechanically, fade away little by little and finally disappear; what is understood is never forgotten. Moreover, you must never refuse to explain to a child the how and the why of things. If you cannot do it yourself, you must direct the child to those who are qualified to answer or point out to him some books that deal with the question. In this way you will progressively awaken in the child the taste for true study and the habit of making a persistent effort to know.

   This will bring us quite naturally to the second phase of development in which the mind should be widened and enriched.

   You will gradually show the child that everything can become an interesting subject for study if it is approached in the right way. The life of every day, of every moment, is the best school of all, varied, complex, full of unexpected experiences, problems to be solved, clear and striking examples and obvious consequences. It is so easy to arouse healthy curiosity in children, if you answer with intelligence and clarity the numerous questions they ask. An interesting reply to one readily brings others in its train and so the attentive child learns without effort much more than he usually does in the classroom. By a choice made with care and insight, you should also teach him to enjoy good reading-matter which is both instructive and attractive. Do not be afraid of anything that awakens and pleases his imagination; imagination develops the creative mental faculty and through it study becomes living and the mind develops in joy.

   In order to increase the suppleness and comprehensiveness of his mind, one should see not only that he studies many varied topics, but above all that a single subject is approached in various ways, so that the child understands in a practical manner that there are many ways of facing the same intellectual problem, of considering it and solving it. This will remove all rigidity from his brain and at the same time it will make his thinking richer and more supple and prepare it for a more complex and comprehensive synthesis. In this way also the child will be imbued with the sense of the extreme relativity of mental learning and, little by little, an aspiration for a truer source of knowledge will awaken in him.

   Indeed, as the child grows older and progresses in his studies, his mind too ripens and becomes more and more capable of forming general ideas, and with them almost always comes a need for certitude, for a knowledge that is stable enough to form the basis of a mental construction which will permit all the diverse and scattered and often contradictory ideas accumulated in his brain to be organised and put in order. This ordering is indeed very necessary if one is to avoid chaos in one's thoughts. All contradictions can be transformed into complements, but for that one must discover the higher idea that will have the power to bring them harmoniously together. It is always good to consider every problem from all possible standpoints so as to avoid partiality and exclusiveness; but if the thought is to be active and creative, it must, in every case, be the natural and logical synthesis of all the points of view adopted. And if you want to make the totality of your thoughts into a dynamic and constructive force, you must also take great care as to the choice of the central idea of your mental synthesis; for upon that will depend the value of this synthesis. The higher and larger the central idea and the more universal it is, rising above time and space, the more numerous and the more complex will be the ideas, notions and thoughts which it will be able to organise and harmonise.

   It goes without saying that this work of organisation cannot be done once and for all. The mind, if it is to keep its vigour and youth, must progress constantly, revise its notions in the light of new knowledge, enlarge its frame-work to include fresh notions and constantly reclassify and reorganise its thoughts, so that each of them may find its true place in relation to the others and the whole remain harmonious and orderly.

   All that has just been said concerns the speculative mind, the mind that learns. But learning is only one aspect of mental activity; the other, which is at least equally important, is the constructive faculty, the capacity to form and thus prepare action. This very important part of mental activity has rarely been the subject of any special study or discipline. Only those who want, for some reason, to exercise a strict control over their mental activities think of observing and disciplining this faculty of formation; and as soon as they try it, they have to face difficulties so great that they appear almost insurmountable.

   And yet control over this formative activity of the mind is one of the most important aspects of self-education; one can say that without it no mental mastery is possible. As far as study is concerned, all ideas are acceptable and should be included in the synthesis, whose very function is to become more and more rich and complex; but where action is concerned, it is just the opposite. The ideas that are accepted for translation into action should be strictly controlled and only those that agree with the general trend of the central idea forming the basis of the mental synthesis should be permitted to express themselves in action. This means that every thought entering the mental consciousness should be set before the central idea; if it finds a logical place among the thoughts already grouped, it will be admitted into the synthesis; if not, it will be rejected so that it can have no influence on the action. This work of mental purification should be done very regularly in order to secure a complete control over one's actions.

   For this purpose, it is good to set apart some time every day when one can quietly go over one's thoughts and put one's synthesis in order. Once the habit is acquired, you can maintain control over your thoughts even during work and action, allowing only those which are useful for what you are doing to come to the surface. Particularly, if you have continued to cultivate the power of concentration and attention, only the thoughts that are needed will be allowed to enter the active external consciousness and they then become all the more dynamic and effective. And if, in the intensity of concentration, it becomes necessary not to think at all, all mental vibration can be stilled and an almost total silence secured. In this silence one can gradually open to the higher regions of the mind and learn to record the inspirations that come from there.

   But even before reaching this point, silence in itself is supremely useful, because in most people who have a somewhat developed and active mind, the mind is never at rest. During the day, its activity is kept under a certain control, but at night, during the sleep of the body, the control of the waking state is almost completely removed and the mind indulges in activities which are sometimes excessive and often incoherent. This creates a great stress which leads to fatigue and the diminution of the intellectual faculties.

   The fact is that like all the other parts of the human being, the mind too needs rest and it will not have this rest unless we know how to provide it. The art of resting one's mind is something to be acquired. Changing one's mental activity is certainly one way of resting; but the greatest possible rest is silence. And as far as the mental faculties are concerned a few minutes passed in the calm of silence are a more effective rest than hours of sleep.

   When one has learned to silence the mind at will and to concentrate it in receptive silence, then there will be no problem that cannot be solved, no mental difficulty whose solution cannot be found. When it is agitated, thought becomes confused and impotent; in an attentive tranquillity, the light can manifest itself and open up new horizons to man's capacity. Bulletin, November 1951

   ~ The Mother, On Education,
66:The Supreme Discovery
   IF WE want to progress integrally, we must build within our conscious being a strong and pure mental synthesis which can serve us as a protection against temptations from outside, as a landmark to prevent us from going astray, as a beacon to light our way across the moving ocean of life.
   Each individual should build up this mental synthesis according to his own tendencies and affinities and aspirations. But if we want it to be truly living and luminous, it must be centred on the idea that is the intellectual representation symbolising That which is at the centre of our being, That which is our life and our light.
   This idea, expressed in sublime words, has been taught in various forms by all the great Instructors in all lands and all ages.
   The Self of each one and the great universal Self are one. Since all that is exists from all eternity in its essence and principle, why make a distinction between the being and its origin, between ourselves and what we place at the beginning?
   The ancient traditions rightly said:
   "Our origin and ourselves, our God and ourselves are one."
   And this oneness should not be understood merely as a more or less close and intimate relationship of union, but as a true identity.
   Thus, when a man who seeks the Divine attempts to reascend by degrees towards the inaccessible, he forgets that all his knowledge and all his intuition cannot take him one step forward in this infinite; neither does he know that what he wants to attain, what he believes to be so far from him, is within him.
   For how could he know anything of the origin until he becomes conscious of this origin in himself?
   It is by understanding himself, by learning to know himself, that he can make the supreme discovery and cry out in wonder like the patriarch in the Bible, "The house of God is here and I knew it not."
   That is why we must express that sublime thought, creatrix of the material worlds, and make known to all the word that fills the heavens and the earth, "I am in all things and all beings."When all shall know this, the promised day of great transfigurations will be at hand. When in each atom of Matter men shall recognise the indwelling thought of God, when in each living creature they shall perceive some hint of a gesture of God, when each man can see God in his brother, then dawn will break, dispelling the darkness, the falsehood, the ignorance, the error and suffering that weigh upon all Nature. For, "all Nature suffers and laments as she awaits the revelation of the Sons of God."
   This indeed is the central thought epitomising all others, the thought which should be ever present to our remembrance as the sun that illumines all life.
   That is why I remind you of it today. For if we follow our path bearing this thought in our hearts like the rarest jewel, the most precious treasure, if we allow it to do its work of illumination and transfiguration within us, we shall know that it lives in the centre of all beings and all things, and in it we shall feel the marvellous oneness of the universe.
   Then we shall understand the vanity and childishness of our meagre satisfactions, our foolish quarrels, our petty passions, our blind indignations. We shall see the dissolution of our little faults, the crumbling of the last entrenchments of our limited personality and our obtuse egoism. We shall feel ourselves being swept along by this sublime current of true spirituality which will deliver us from our narrow limits and bounds.
   The individual Self and the universal Self are one; in every world, in every being, in every thing, in every atom is the Divine Presence, and man's mission is to manifest it.
   In order to do that, he must become conscious of this Divine Presence within him. Some individuals must undergo a real apprenticeship in order to achieve this: their egoistic being is too all-absorbing, too rigid, too conservative, and their struggles against it are long and painful. Others, on the contrary, who are more impersonal, more plastic, more spiritualised, come easily into contact with the inexhaustible divine source of their being.But let us not forget that they too should devote themselves daily, constantly, to a methodical effort of adaptation and transformation, so that nothing within them may ever again obscure the radiance of that pure light.
   But how greatly the standpoint changes once we attain this deeper consciousness! How understanding widens, how compassion grows!
   On this a sage has said:
   "I would like each one of us to come to the point where he perceives the inner God who dwells even in the vilest of human beings; instead of condemning him we would say, 'Arise, O resplendent Being, thou who art ever pure, who knowest neither birth nor death; arise, Almighty One, and manifest thy nature.'"
   Let us live by this beautiful utterance and we shall see everything around us transformed as if by miracle.
   This is the attitude of true, conscious and discerning love, the love which knows how to see behind appearances, understand in spite of words, and which, amid all obstacles, is in constant communion with the depths.
   What value have our impulses and our desires, our anguish and our violence, our sufferings and our struggles, all these inner vicissitudes unduly dramatised by our unruly imagination - what value do they have before this great, this sublime and divine love bending over us from the innermost depths of our being, bearing with our weaknesses, rectifying our errors, healing our wounds, bathing our whole being with its regenerating streams?
   For the inner Godhead never imposes herself, she neither demands nor threatens; she offers and gives herself, conceals and forgets herself in the heart of all beings and things; she never accuses, she neither judges nor curses nor condemns, but works unceasingly to perfect without constraint, to mend without reproach, to encourage without impatience, to enrich each one with all the wealth he can receive; she is the mother whose love bears fruit and nourishes, guards and protects, counsels and consoles; because she understands everything, she can endure everything, excuse and pardon everything, hope and prepare for everything; bearing everything within herself, she owns nothing that does not belong to all, and because she reigns over all, she is the servant of all; that is why all, great and small, who want to be kings with her and gods in her, become, like her, not despots but servitors among their brethren.
   How beautiful is this humble role of servant, the role of all who have been revealers and heralds of the God who is within all, of the Divine Love that animates all things....
   And until we can follow their example and become true servants even as they, let us allow ourselves to be penetrated and transformed by this Divine Love; let us offer Him, without reserve, this marvellous instrument, our physical organism. He shall make it yield its utmost on every plane of activity.
   To achieve this total self-consecration, all means are good, all methods have their value. The one thing needful is to persevere in our will to attain this goal. For then everything we study, every action we perform, every human being we meet, all come to bring us an indication, a help, a light to guide us on the path.
   Before I close, I shall add a few pages for those who have already made apparently fruitless efforts, for those who have encountered the pitfalls on the way and seen the measure of their weakness, for those who are in danger of losing their self-confidence and courage. These pages, intended to rekindle hope in the hearts of those who suffer, were written by a spiritual worker at a time when ordeals of every kind were sweeping down on him like purifying flames.
   You who are weary, downcast and bruised, you who fall, who think perhaps that you are defeated, hear the voice of a friend. He knows your sorrows, he has shared them, he has suffered like you from the ills of the earth; like you he has crossed many deserts under the burden of the day, he has known thirst and hunger, solitude and abandonment, and the cruellest of all wants, the destitution of the heart. Alas! he has known too the hours of doubt, the errors, the faults, the failings, every weakness.
   But he tells you: Courage! Hearken to the lesson that the rising sun brings to the earth with its first rays each morning. It is a lesson of hope, a message of solace.
   You who weep, who suffer and tremble, who dare not expect an end to your ills, an issue to your pangs, behold: there is no night without dawn and the day is about to break when darkness is thickest; there is no mist that the sun does not dispel, no cloud that it does not gild, no tear that it will not dry one day, no storm that is not followed by its shining triumphant bow; there is no snow that it does not melt, nor winter that it does not change into radiant spring.
   And for you too, there is no affliction which does not bring its measure of glory, no distress which cannot be transformed into joy, nor defeat into victory, nor downfall into higher ascension, nor solitude into radiating centre of life, nor discord into harmony - sometimes it is a misunderstanding between two minds that compels two hearts to open to mutual communion; lastly, there is no infinite weakness that cannot be changed into strength. And it is even in supreme weakness that almightiness chooses to reveal itself!
   Listen, my little child, you who today feel so broken, so fallen perhaps, who have nothing left, nothing to cover your misery and foster your pride: never before have you been so great! How close to the summits is he who awakens in the depths, for the deeper the abyss, the more the heights reveal themselves!
   Do you not know this, that the most sublime forces of the vasts seek to array themselves in the most opaque veils of Matter? Oh, the sublime nuptials of sovereign love with the obscurest plasticities, of the shadow's yearning with the most royal light!
   If ordeal or fault has cast you down, if you have sunk into the nether depths of suffering, do not grieve - for there indeed the divine love and the supreme blessing can reach you! Because you have passed through the crucible of purifying sorrows, the glorious ascents are yours.
   You are in the wilderness: then listen to the voices of the silence. The clamour of flattering words and outer applause has gladdened your ears, but the voices of the silence will gladden your soul and awaken within you the echo of the depths, the chant of divine harmonies!
   You are walking in the depths of night: then gather the priceless treasures of the night. In bright sunshine, the ways of intelligence are lit, but in the white luminosities of the night lie the hidden paths of perfection, the secret of spiritual riches.
   You are being stripped of everything: that is the way towards plenitude. When you have nothing left, everything will be given to you. Because for those who are sincere and true, from the worst always comes the best.
   Every grain that is sown in the earth produces a thousand. Every wing-beat of sorrow can be a soaring towards glory.
   And when the adversary pursues man relentlessly, everything he does to destroy him only makes him greater.
   Hear the story of the worlds, look: the great enemy seems to triumph. He casts the beings of light into the night, and the night is filled with stars. He rages against the cosmic working, he assails the integrity of the empire of the sphere, shatters its harmony, divides and subdivides it, scatters its dust to the four winds of infinity, and lo! the dust is changed into a golden seed, fertilising the infinite and peopling it with worlds which now gravitate around their eternal centre in the larger orbit of space - so that even division creates a richer and deeper unity, and by multiplying the surfaces of the material universe, enlarges the empire that it set out to destroy.
   Beautiful indeed was the song of the primordial sphere cradled in the bosom of immensity, but how much more beautiful and triumphant is the symphony of the constellations, the music of the spheres, the immense choir that fills the heavens with an eternal hymn of victory!
   Hear again: no state was ever more precarious than that of man when he was separated on earth from his divine origin. Above him stretched the hostile borders of the usurper, and at his horizon's gates watched jailers armed with flaming swords. Then, since he could climb no more to the source of life, the source arose within him; since he could no more receive the light from above, the light shone forth at the very centre of his being; since he could commune no more with the transcendent love, that love offered itself in a holocaust and chose each terrestrial being, each human self as its dwelling-place and sanctuary.
   That is how, in this despised and desolate but fruitful and blessed Matter, each atom contains a divine thought, each being carries within him the Divine Inhabitant. And if no being in all the universe is as frail as man, neither is any as divine as he!
   In truth, in truth, in humiliation lies the cradle of glory! 28 April 1912 ~ The Mother, Words Of Long Ago, The Supreme Discovery,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Good marketers measure. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
2:If you measure it, it will improve. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
3:Relief loosens tongues beyond measure. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
4:You can't manage what you don't measure. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
5:Action is the real measure of intelligence. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
6:Leave to Heaven the measure and the choice. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
7:If you can't measure it, you can't change it. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
8:Intense love does not measure, it just gives. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
9:A man is as big as the measure of his thinking. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
10:The measure of a man is way he bears up under misfortune ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
11:The measure of love is to love without measuring. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
12:You measure success by how much good you do for others. ~ zig-ziglar, @wisdomtrove
13:Ancient travelers guessed; modern travelers measure. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
14:To be absolutely nothing is to be beyond measure. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
15:The measure of intelligence is the ability to change. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
16:to measure myself as part of anything. I’m an utter egotist. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
17:A man's bewilderment is the measure of his wisdom. ~ nathaniel-hawthorne, @wisdomtrove
18:Bring out number weight and measure in a year of dearth. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
19:The measure of a man is the way he bears up under misfortune. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
20:Spirit is a more accurate measure of success than the ruler. ~ alan-cohen, @wisdomtrove
21:My persistence is the measure of the belief I have in myself. ~ walt-disney, @wisdomtrove
22:The measure of who we are is what we do with what we have. ~ vince-lombardi, @wisdomtrove
23:You can often measure a person by the size of his dream. ~ robert-h-schuller, @wisdomtrove
24:Persistence is the great measure of individual human character. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
25:Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
26:If you want it, measure it. If you can't measure it, forget it. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
27:To love others as God loves you, that is the measure of success ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
28:Measure your success by your inner scorecard versus an outer one. ~ robin-sharma, @wisdomtrove
29:Who can ever measure the benefit of a mother's inspiration? ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
30:The cause of America is in great measure the cause of all mankind. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
31:Just because something is easy to measure doesn't mean it's important. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
32:Don't measure the size of the mountain; talk to the One who can move it. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
33:Like a ghostly roll of drums remorselessly beat the measure of life. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
34:The measure of a man's life is the well spending of it, and not the length. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
35:The only true measure of success is the amount of joy we are feeling.   ~ esther-hicks, @wisdomtrove
36:Measure your emotions. You don't need an atomic explosion for a minor point. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
37:Be faithful to your love and you mill be recompensed beyond measure. ~ albert-schweitzer, @wisdomtrove
38:God is a being who gives everything but punishment in over measure. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
39:Measure not the work until the day's out and the labor done. ~ elizabeth-barrett-browning, @wisdomtrove
40:Measure the success of your days by the lives touched vs the hours passed. ~ robin-sharma, @wisdomtrove
41:Before any great achievement, some measure of depression is very usual. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
42:The sun proceeds unmoved To measure off another day For an approving God. ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
43:All governments are in equal measure good and evil. The best ideal is anarchy. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
44:Measure your wealth by what you'd have left if you lost all your money. ~ h-jackson-brown-jr, @wisdomtrove
45:The measure of mental health is the disposition to see good everywhere. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
46:But you see, the measure of hell you're able to endure is the measure of your love. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
47:Do not measure your life by your goals but what you are doing to achieve them. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
48:Measure your net worth not by how much you have, but by many people you impact. ~ robin-sharma, @wisdomtrove
49:Our ability to handle life's challenges is a measure of our strength of character. ~ les-brown, @wisdomtrove
50:The true measure of the value of any business leader and manager is performance. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
51:Those who speak most of progress measure it by quantity and not by quality. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
52:If you give your life as a prayer, you intensify the prayer beyond all measure. ~ peace-pilgrim, @wisdomtrove
53:It's no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
54:Being with you and not being with you is the only way I have to measure time. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
55:It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
56:The empowered woman is powerful beyond measure and beautiful beyond description. ~ steve-maraboli, @wisdomtrove
57:The hours of folly are measured by the clock; but of wisdom, no clock can measure. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
58:Bear in mind that the measure of a man is the worth of the things he cares about. ~ marcus-aurelius, @wisdomtrove
59:Four seasons fill the measure of the year; there are four seasons in the minds of men. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
60:One's distance from Heaven is in proportion to the measure of one's self-love. ~ emanuel-swedenborg, @wisdomtrove
61:Four seasons fill the measure of the year; / There are four seasons in the mind of man. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
62:The measure of your life will not be in what you accumulate, but in what you give away. ~ wayne-dyer, @wisdomtrove
63:Customers don't measure you on how hard you tried, they measure you on what you deliver. ~ steve-jobs, @wisdomtrove
64:For so it is, O Lord my God, I measure it! But what it is I measure, I do not know. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
65:No one but a fool would measure their satisfaction by what the world thinks of it. ~ oliver-goldsmith, @wisdomtrove
66:If you have talent, you will receive some measure of success - but only if you persist. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
67:The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good. ~ samuel-johnson, @wisdomtrove
68:I don't measure my life by the money I've made. Other people might, but certainly don't. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
69:I have thought a sufficient measure of civilization is the influence of good women. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
70:Your conscience is the measure of the honesty of your selfishness. Listen to it carefully. ~ richard-bach, @wisdomtrove
71:Humor: Keep a sense of Humor, especially about yourself. It is a strength beyond all measure ~ dan-millman, @wisdomtrove
72:I was going to thrash them within an inch of their lives, but I didn't have a tape measure. ~ groucho-marx, @wisdomtrove
73:The way you give your name to others is a measure of how much you like and respect yourself. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
74:The real measure of success is the number of experiments that can be crowded into 24 hours. ~ thomas-edison, @wisdomtrove
75:I measure success by how many people love me. And the best way to be loved is to be lo veable. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
76:As with marathon runs and lengths of toilet paper, there had to be standards to measure up to. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
77:Perfection is the measure of heaven, and the wish to be perfect the measure of man. ~ johann-wolfgang-von-goethe, @wisdomtrove
78:The relish of good and evil depends in a great measure upon the opinion we have of them.   ~ michel-de-montaigne, @wisdomtrove
79:Traveling on every path, you will not find the boundaries of soul by going; so deep is its measure. ~ heraclitus, @wisdomtrove
80:We should measure welfare's success by how many people leave welfare, not by how many are added. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
81:Do not measure success by today's harvest. Measure success by the seeds you plant today. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
82:things cannot be expected to turn up of themselves. We must in a measure assist to turn them up ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
83:Civilized people have exchanged some part of their chances of happiness for a measure of security. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
84:Control your temper. Remember, you can measure the size of a person by what makes him or her angry. ~ dale-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
85:It is circumstance and proper measure that give an action its character, and make it either good or bad. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
86:A man does not measure its height in moments of comfort, but in terms of change and controversy ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
87:There are words and accents by which this grief can be assuaged, and the disease in a great measure removed. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
88:Do actions agree with words? There's your measure of reliability. Never confine yourself to the words. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
89:Who shall measure the hat and violence of the poet's heart when caught and tangled in a woman's body? ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
90:Measurement is fabulous. Unless you're busy measuring what's easy to measure as opposed to what's important ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
91:You can measure opportunity with the same yardstick that measures the risk involved. They go together. ~ earl-nightingale, @wisdomtrove
92:Let us measure ourselves by our Master, and not by our fellow-servants : then pride will be impossible. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
93:The amount you laugh in your relationships with others is the true measure of the health of your personality. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
94:You measure the size of the accomplishment by the obstacles you have to overcome to reach your goals. ~ booker-t-washington, @wisdomtrove
95:The best measure of a man's honesty isn't his income tax return. It's the zero adjust on his bathroom scale. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
96:All social cooperation on a larger scale than the most intimate social group requires a measure of coercion. ~ reinhold-niebuhr, @wisdomtrove
97:Can one invent verbs? I want to tell you one: I sky you, so my wings extend so large to love you without measure. ~ frida-kahlo, @wisdomtrove
98:Don't measure yourself by what you have accomplished, but by what you should have accomplished with your ability. ~ john-wooden, @wisdomtrove
99:When it becomes necessary to do a thing, the whole heart and soul should go into the measure, or not attempt it. ~ thomas-paine, @wisdomtrove
100:All the sciences are, in some measure, linked with each other, and before the one is ended, the other begins. ~ oliver-goldsmith, @wisdomtrove
101:Stop trying to &
102:I do not confer praise or blame: I accept. I am the measure of all things. I am the center of the world. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
103:I measure every grief I meet with narrow, probing eyes - I wonder if it weighs like mine - or has an easier size. ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
104:God expects us to measure the church not against tradition but against the standards & promises of His Word. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
105:Make every occasion a great occasion, for you can never tell who may be taking your measure for a higher place. ~ orison-swett-marden, @wisdomtrove
106:The cosmos doesn’t measure sweat and hours for reward. The cosmos deals in the currencies of joy and satisfaction. ~ danielle-laporte, @wisdomtrove
107:The grace of God is infinite and beyond our ability to measure. His grace has no beginning and therefore no end. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
108:The hope or climbing aspiration of a divine child is to receive and achieve Peace, Light and Bliss in infinite measure. ~ sri-chinmoy, @wisdomtrove
109:A writer is dear and necessary for us only in the measure of which he reveals to us the inner workings of his very soul. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
110:The cosmos is full beyond measure of elegant truths; of exquisite interrelationships; of the awesome machinery of nature. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
111:I know of no better thermometer to your spiritual temperature than this, the measure of the intensity of your prayer. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
112:The way we measure productivity is flawed. People checking their BlackBerry over dinner is not the measure of productivity. ~ tim-ferris, @wisdomtrove
113:You can measure your power in your ability to stop thought. The longer you can stop thought, the more powerful you are. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
114:Determine a single measure that you can use to grade your progress and success in each area of your life. Refer to it daily. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
115:Act after having made assessments. The one who first knows the measure of far and near wins - this is the rule of armed struggle. ~ sun-tzu, @wisdomtrove
116:... I think he revalued everything in his house according to the measure of response it drew from her well-loved eyes. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
117:Time cannot children, poets, lovers tell - measure imagine,  mystery, a kiss -not though mankind would rather know than feel ~ e-e-cummings, @wisdomtrove
118:Time is a measure of space, just as a range-finder is a measure of space, but measuring locks us into the place we measure. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
119:The degree in which a poet's imagination dominates reality is, in the end, the exact measure of his importance and dignity. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
120:There is one certain criterion by which you can measure your success in this practice: the degree of peace that you feel within. ~ eckhart-tolle, @wisdomtrove
121:A good scientist values criticism almost higher than friendship: no, in science criticism is the height and measure of friendship. ~ francis-crick, @wisdomtrove
122:The measure of the moral worth of a man is his happiness. The better the man, the more happiness. Happiness is the synonym of well-being ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
123:On the whole, the longing for solitude is a sign that there still is spirit in a person and is a measure of what spirit there is. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
124:Do not compare, do not measure. No other way is like yours. All other ways deceive and tempt you. You must fulfill the way that is in you. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
125:One must marry one's feelings to one's beliefs and ideas. That is probably the only way to achieve a measure of harmony in one's life. ~ napoleon-hill, @wisdomtrove
126:To be happy you must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion, and learned your place in the world. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
127:If you went in search of it, you would not find the boundaries of the soul, though you traveled every road-so deep is its measure [logos]. ~ heraclitus, @wisdomtrove
128:Read anything I write for the pleasure of reading it. Whatever else you find will be the measure of what you brought to the reading. ~ ernest-hemingway, @wisdomtrove
129:Whatever you believe cosmologically, we all know the tears of the world. We each carry a certain measure of those tears in our hearts. ~ jack-kornfield, @wisdomtrove
130:No charter of freedom will be worth looking at which does not ensure the same measure of freedom for the minorities as for the majority. ~ mahatma-gandhi, @wisdomtrove
131:Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness, and the word “happiness” would lose it’s meaning if it were not balanced by sadness. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
132:In political administration, no problem is ever simple. It can never be reduced to the question whether a certain measure is good or not. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
133:While we measure our own success in terms of our personal comfort and security, the universe measures our success by how much we have learned. ~ caroline-myss, @wisdomtrove
134:I am convinced that words are things, and we simply don't have the machinery to measure what they are. I believe that words are tangible things. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
135:You cannot measure a man by his failures. You must know what use he makes of them. What did they mean to him. What did he get out of them. ~ orison-swett-marden, @wisdomtrove
136:Judge not, that you be not judged. For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. ~ jesus-christ, @wisdomtrove
137:Forever is a measure of time used by people who share an ordinary love. Our extraordinary love is immeasurable ... for us, forever just won't do. ~ steve-maraboli, @wisdomtrove
138:If you truly want to measure the success of a man, you do not measure it by a position he has achieved, but by the obstacles he has overcome. ~ booker-t-washington, @wisdomtrove
139:For there is in mankind an unfortunate propensity to make themselves, their views and their works, the measure of excellence in every thing whatsoever ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
140:While we measure our own success in terms of our personal comfort and security, the universe measures our success by how much we have learned. ~ norman-vincent-peale, @wisdomtrove
141:Am I too fast, too facile? I do not know. I do not know myself sometimes, or how to measure and name and count out the grains that make me what I am. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
142:Quality is not an absolute measure. It doesn't mean &
143:For one true measure of a nation is its success in fulfilling the promise of a better life for each of its members. Let this be the measure of our nation. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
144:The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
145:I think, for years, people have been pushed down by religion, and I don't say that disrespectfully, but they've been shown a God that you can't measure up to. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
146:This entire most beautiful order of good things is going to pass away after its measure has been exhausted; for both morning and evening were made in them. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
147:The degree to which I can create relationships, which facilitate the growth of others as separate persons, is a measure of the growth I have achieved in myself. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
148:I think we ought always to entertain our opinions with some measure of doubt. I shouldn't wish people dogmatically to believe any philosophy, not even mine. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
149:You can measure the happiness of a marriage by the number of scars that each partner carries on their tongues, earned from years of biting back angry words. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
150:Like all writers, he measured the achievements of others by what they had accomplished, asking of them that they measure him by what he envisaged or planned. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
151:But the Lacedaemonians, who make it their first principle of action to serve their country's interest, know not any thing to be just or unjust by any measure but that. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
152:Time can also be a place... . Everything depends on where you are standing, on where you look or what you hear. The measure of it is found in consciousness itself. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
153:A comparison between the triplets tentatively deduced by these methods with the changes in amino acid sequence produced by mutation shows a fair measure of agreement. ~ francis-crick, @wisdomtrove
154:There comes an end to all things; the most capacious measure is filled at last; and this brief condescension to evil finally destroyed the balance of my soul. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
155:The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good. Ann Landers It's not whether you get knocked down; it's whether you get back up. ~ vince-lombardi, @wisdomtrove
156:Fantasy remains a human right: we make in our measure and in our derivative mode, because we are made: and not only made, but made in the image and likeness of a Maker. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
157:Goals are what give your mission statement momentum. They create a plan of action and help measure whether or not you are successfully living your mission statement.   ~ stephen-r-covey, @wisdomtrove
158:You have no idea, unless you have tried it, how endlessly long is a summer's day, that you measure out only by hunger, and bring to an end only when you are drowsy. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
159:There's nothing of any importance in life ‚ except how well you do your work. Nothing. Only that. Whatever else you are, will come from that. It's the only measure of human value. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
160:You can't measure time by days, the way you measure money by dollars and cents, because dollars are all the same while every day is different and maybe every hour as well. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
161:Don't measure anything unless the data helps you make a better decision or change your actions. If you're not prepared to change your diet or your workouts, don't get on the scale. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
162:Truly a legend in our time, John Templeton understands that the real measure of a person's success in life is not financial accomplishment but moral integrity and inner character. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
163:Radio stations have constructed a narrow door[way], and that's because they don't understand how complex and paradoxical our snap judgments are. It's hard to measure new songs. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
164:But our minds are bound to the yardstick of yesterday, today and tomorrow, and with that yardstick we try to inquire into the unknown, to measure that which is not measurable. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
165:The Stamp Act imposed on the colonies by the Parliament of Great Britain is an ill-judged measure. Parliament has no right to put its hands into our pockets without our consent. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
166:The imagination enlarges little objects so as to fill our souls with a fantastic estimate; and, with rash insolence, it belittles the great to its own measure, as when talking of God. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
167:When you get to my age, youll measure your success in life by how many of the people you want to have love you actually do love you. Thats the ultimate test of how youve lived your life. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
168:It's folly that women measure their happiness with the pleasures of the bed, but they do. And when the pleasure cools or their man goes missing, all they once lived for turns dark and hateful. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
169:Life is rather above the measure of us all (save for a very few perhaps). We all need literature that is above our measure&
170:To see, in some measure, like God. His love and His knowledge are not distinct from one another, not from Him. We could almost say He sees because He loves, and therefore loves although He sees. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
171:Life exists only at this very moment, and in this moment it is infinite and eternal, for the present moment is infinitely small; before we can measure it, it has gone, and yet it exists forever. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
172:This is the true measure of love, When we believe that we alone can love, That no one could ever have loved so before us, And that no one will ever love in the same way after us. ~ johann-wolfgang-von-goethe, @wisdomtrove
173:Exploration was for those with a measure of peasant blood, those with big thighs and thick ankles who could take punishment as they took bread and salt, on every inch of flesh and spirit. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
174:In seeking the help of the Congress and our countrymen, I pledged no easy answers. I pledged, and asked, only toil and dedication. These the Congress and the people have given in good measure. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
175:Vulnerability is not winning or losing; it’s having the courage to show up and be seen when we have no control over the outcome. Vulnerability is not weakness; it’s our greatest measure of courage. ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
176:There is a proper measure in all things, certain limits beyond which and short of which right is not to be found. Who so cultivates the golden mean avoids the poverty of a hovel and the envy of a palace. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
177:Man is manifestly not the measure of all things. This universe is shot through with mystery. The very fact of its being, and of our own, is a mystery absolute, and the only miracle worthy of the name. ~ sam-harris, @wisdomtrove
178:The infinite wonders of the universe are revealed to us in exact measure as we are capable of receiving them. The keenness of our vision depends not on how much we can see, but on how much we feel. ~ hellen-keller, @wisdomtrove
179:The way we measure awareness is by how long you can stop thought. If you can't stop thought at all, then you are not powerful. You might be quite evolved, but you have no access to that evolution. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
180:When you've been in the business 5-years, as a person, it's like you're 5-years old - like a child. 10-years and you're 10-years old, 20... Etcetera. That's how I measure maturity in this industry. ~ jerry-seinfeld, @wisdomtrove
181:And as the divine that goes forth from the Lord is the good of love and the truth of faith, the angels are angels and are heaven in the measure in which they receive good and truth from the Lord. ~ emanuel-swedenborg, @wisdomtrove
182:There is a stability in the Universe because of the orderly and balanced process of change, the same measure coming out as going in, as if reality were a huge fire that inhaled and exhaled equal amounts. ~ heraclitus, @wisdomtrove
183:I am now convinced that the simplest approach will prove to be the most effective - the solution to poverty is to abolish it directly by a now widely discussed measure: the guaranteed income. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
184:I believe that any man who takes the liberty of another into his keeping is bound to become a tyrant, and that any man who yields up his liberty, in however slight the measure, is bound to become a slave. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
185:We must not see any person as an abstraction. Instead, we must see in every person a universe with its own secrets, with its own treasures, with its own sources of anguish, and with some measure of triumph. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
186:Your persistence is, in fact, the true measure of your belief in yourself and your ability to succeed. Each time that you persist in the face of adversity and disappointment, you build the habit of persistence. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
187:In truth, so far modern medicine hasn’t extended our natural life span by a single year. Its great achievement has been to save us from premature death, and allow us to enjoy the full measure of our years. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
188:The paradox in Christian truth is invariably due to the fact that it is the truth that exists for God. The standard of measure and the end is superhuman; and there is only one relationship possible: faith. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
189:Freedom from fear and injustice and oppression will be ours only in the measure that men who value such freedom are ready to sustain its possession - to defend it against every thrust from within or without. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
190:The sigh of all the seas breaking in measure round the isles soothed them; the night wrapped them; nothing broke their sleep, until, the birds beginning and the dawn weaving their thin voices in to its whiteness ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
191:There is more in you of good than you know, child of the kindly West. Some courage and some wisdom, blended in measure. If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
192:The fruitfulness of our lives depends in large measure in our ability to doubt our own words and to question the value of our own work. The man who completely trusts his own estimate of himself is doomed to sterility. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
193:I maintain there is much more wonder in science than in pseudoscience. And in addition, to whatever measure this term has any meaning, science has the additional virtue, and it is not an inconsiderable one, of being true. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
194:A well-developed sense of self is a necessary if not sufficient condition of your well-being. Its presence does not guarantee fulfillment, but its absence guarantees some measure of anxiety, frustration, or despair. ~ nathaniel-branden, @wisdomtrove
195:Men are not gentle, friendly creatures wishing for love, who simply defend themselves if they are attacked, but ... a powerful measure of desire for aggression had to be reckoned as part of their instinctual endowment. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
196:The impression forces itself upon one that men measure by false standards, that everyone seeks power, success, riches for himself, and admires others who attain them, while undervaluing the truly precious thing in life. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
197:The constitution vests the power of declaring war in Congress; therefore no offensive expedition of importance can be undertaken until after they shall have deliberated upon the subject and authorized such a measure. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
198:The true measure of a successful leader is their ability to discover the hidden talent in those they lead and challenge them to achieve greatness. If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you are right. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
199:I would say that the quality of each man's life is the full measure of that man's commitment of excellence and victory - whether it be football, whether it be business, whether it be politics or government or what have you. ~ vince-lombardi, @wisdomtrove
200:We are all equal in that we can all strive to become the best we are capable of becoming. We can always improve but we shouldn't compare ourselves to others. We get in trouble when we start trying to measure up to someone else. ~ john-wooden, @wisdomtrove
201:Pride consists in a man making his personality the only test, instead of making truth the test. The sceptic feels himself too large to measure life by the largest things; and ends by measuring it by the smallest thing of all. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
202:The gist is that good and evil are foreordained. What is foreordained comes necessarily to be after a prior act of divine volition... Rather, everything small and large is written and comes to be in a known and expected measure. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
203:Apparently with no surprise To any happy Flower The Frost beheads it at its play - In accidental power - The blonde Assassin passes on - The Sun proceeds unmoved To measure off another Day For an Approving God. ~ emily-dickinson, @wisdomtrove
204:Falsehood and delusion are allowed in no case whatever; but, as in the exercise of all the virtues, there is an economy of truth. It is a sort of temperance, by which a man speaks truth with measure, that he may speak it the longer. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
205:A hundred times a day I remind myself that my inner and outer life depends on the labor of other people, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
206:Security isn't what the wise person looks for; it's opportunity. And once we begin looking for that, we find it on every side. You can measure opportunity with the same yardstick that measures the risk involved. They go together. ~ earl-nightingale, @wisdomtrove
207:It is not great faith, but true faith, that saves; and the salvation lies not in the faith, but in the Christ in whom faith trusts... It is not the measure of faith, but the sincerity of faith, which is the point to be considered. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
208:In ancient times, bodily strength and dexterity, being of greater use and importance in war, was also much more esteemed and valued, than at present. ... In short, the different ranks of men are, in a great measure, regulated by riches. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
209:The unknown is not measurable by the known. Time cannot measure the timeless, the eternal, that immensity which has no beginning and no end... when we try to measure something which is not measurable, we only get caught in words. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
210:True greatness is not measured by the headlines a person commands or the wealth he or she accumulates. The inner character of a person-the undergirding moral and spiritual values and commitments-is the true measure of lasting greatness. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
211:Love to Jesus is the basis of all true piety, and the intensity of this love will ever be the measure of our zeal for His glory. Let us love Him with all our hearts, and then diligent labor, and consistent living will be sure to follow. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
212:One of the best pieces of advice that my dad has given me is this: &
213:You've got a way with words. You got me smiling even when it hurts. There's no way to measure what your love is worth, I can't believe the way you get through to me. ~ Shania Twain If you can make a girl laugh, you can make her do anything ~ marilyn-monroe, @wisdomtrove
214:The opinions that are held with passion are always those for which no good ground exists; indeed the passion is the measure of the holders lack of rational conviction. Opinions in politics and religion are almost always held passionately. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
215:Every acknowledgment of gratitude is a circumstance of humiliation; and some are found to submit to frequent mortifications of this kind, proclaiming what obligations they owe, merely because they think it in some measure cancels the debt. ~ oliver-goldsmith, @wisdomtrove
216:The stars are far brighter Than gems without measure, The moon is far whiter Than silver in treasure; The fire is more shining On hearth in the gloaming Than gold won by mining, So why go a-roaming? O! Tra-la-la-lally Come back to the Valley. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
217:The basic rule [of writing] given us was simple and heartbreaking. A story to be effective had to convey something from the writer to the reader, and the power of its offering was the measure of its excellence. Outside of that, there were no rules. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
218:Every writer making a secondary world wishes in some measure to be a real maker, or hopes that he is drawing on reality: hopes that the peculiar quality of this secondary world (if not all the details) are derived from Reality, or are flowing into it. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
219:It's just easier to talk about product attributes that you can measure with a number. Focus on price, screen size, that's easy. But there's a more difficult path, and that's to make better products, ones where maybe you can't measure their value empirically. ~ jony-ive, @wisdomtrove
220:Our conflict is not likely to cease so soon as every good man would wish. The measure of iniquity is not yet filled; and unless we can return a little more to first principles, and act a little more upon patriotic ground, I do not know when it will. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
221:But the only measure that he knows is desire desire for power and so he judges all hearts. Into his heart the thought will not enter that any will refuse it that having the Ring we may seek to destroy it. If we seek this we shall put him out of reckoning. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
222:He [Groucho's father] had absolutely no training, and if you had ever seen one of his suits, you'd realize what an accurate statement that is. You see, Pop never used a tape measure. He didn't believe in it. He said he could just look at a man and tell hi. ~ groucho-marx, @wisdomtrove
223:The measure of woman's distaste for any part of her life lies not in the loudness of her lamentations (these are only an attempt to buy a martyr's crown at a reduced price) but in her persistent pursuit of that occupation of which she never ceases to complain. ~ quentin-crisp, @wisdomtrove
224:No measure can be more desirable, whether viewed with an eye to its intrinsic importance, or to the general sentiment and wish of the Nation than to establish a systematic and effectual arrangement for the regular redemption and discharge of the public debt. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
225:The things I thought were so important - because of the effort I put into them - have turned out to be of small value. And the things I never thought about, the things I was never able to either to measure or to expect, were the things that mattered. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
226:Lions don't have to roar. There is power in silence, confidence, and persistence. Those who work don't talk, and those who talk don't work. Handle your business. Measure your efforts by results. Focus your time, energy, and activity on mastering and executing a plan. ~ les-brown, @wisdomtrove
227:Just because we didn’t measure up to some standard of achievement doesn’t mean that we don’t possess gifts and talents that only we can bring to the world. Just because someone failed to see the value in what we can create or achieve doesn’t change its worth or ours. ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
228:Life has three rules: Paradox, Humor, and Change. - Paradox: Life is a mystery; don't waste your time trying to figure it out. - Humor: Keep a sense of humor, especially about yourself. It is a strength beyond all measure - Change: Know that nothing ever stays the same. ~ dan-millman, @wisdomtrove
229:What is time? The shadow on the dial, the striking of the clock, the running of the sand, day and night, summer and winter, months, years, centuries-these are but arbitrary and outward signs, the measure of Time, not Time itself. Time is the Life of the Soul. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
230:You must keep sending work out; you must never let a manuscript do nothing but eat its head off in a drawer. You send that work out again and again, while you're working on another one. If you have talent, you will receive some measure of success - but only if you persist. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
231:Oh, we can populate the dark with horrors, even we who think ourselves informed and sure, believing nothing we cannot measure or weigh. I know beyond all doubt that the dark things crowding in on me either did not exist or were not dangerous to me, and still I was afraid. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
232:We're entering our third century now, but it's wrong to judge our nation by its years. The calendar can't measure America because we were meant to be an endless experiment in freedom, with no limits to our reaches, no boundaries to what we can do, no end point to our hopes. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
233:Among many other weighty objections to the Measure, it has been suggested, that it has a tendency to introduce religious disputes into the Army, which above all things should be avoided, and in many instances would compel men to a mode of Worship which they do not profess. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
234:Sufficiency isn't two steps up from poverty or one step short of abundance. It isn't a measure of barely enough or more than enough. Sufficiency isn't an amount at all. It is an experience, a context we generate, a declaration, a knowing that there is enough, and that we are enough. ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
235:I'm not averse to making a lot of money. But where does that end? I hang out with people with hundreds of millions of dollars. Is that the standard by which I should measure myself? Where does that take you if you're in my business? I think it takes you to pretty dark, corrupt places. ~ tim-ferris, @wisdomtrove
236:Mere poets are sottish as mere drunkards are, who live in a continual mist, without seeing or judging anything clearly. A man should be learned in several sciences, and should have a reasonable, philosophical and in some measure a mathematical head, to be a complete and excellent poet. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
237:I have come to believe that energy medicine is a practice of healing that is dependent upon the energy of time. Whereas allopathic medicine uses linear time as a fundamental healing measure. Energy medicine needs to understand the dynamic of chiros time, that is the time without time. ~ caroline-myss, @wisdomtrove
238:We are one in Christ; let us be friends with one another; but let us never be friends with one another's error. If I be wrong, rebuke me sternly; I can bear it, and bear it cheerfully; and if ye be wrong, expect the like measure from me, and neither peace nor parley with your mistakes. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
239:I have come to believe that energy medicine is a practice of healing that is dependent upon the energy of time. Whereas allopathic medicine uses linear time as a fundamental healing measure. Energy medicine needs to understand the dynamic of chiros time, that is the time without time. ~ norman-vincent-peale, @wisdomtrove
240:The premises being thus settled, I proceed to observe that the concatenation of self-existence, proceeding in a reciprocal duplicate ratio, naturally produces a problematical dialogism, which in some measure proves that the essence of spirituality may be referred to the second predicable. ~ oliver-goldsmith, @wisdomtrove
241:Even though we have lost yardsticks by which to measure, and rules under which to subsume the particular, a being whose essence is a beginning may have enough of origin within himself to understand without preconceived categories and to judge without the set of customary rules which is morality. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
242:Christianity affirms that at the heart of reality is a Heart, a loving Father who works through history for the salvation of His children. Man cannot save himself, for man is not the measure of all things and humanity is not God. Bound by the chains of his own sin and finiteness, man needs a Savior. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
243:Thus love is the most easy and agreeable, and gratitude the most humiliating, affection of the mind. We never reflect on the man we love without exulting in our choice, while he who has bound us to him by benefits alone rises to our ideas as a person to whom we have in some measure forfeited our freedom. ~ oliver-goldsmith, @wisdomtrove
244:He hadn’t once ceased looking at Daisy, and I think he revalued everything in his house according to the measure of response it drew from her well-loved eyes. Sometimes, too, he stared around at his possessions in a dazed way, as though in her actual and astounding presence none of it was any longer real. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
245:When Theodore Roosevelt was in the White House, he confessed that if he could be right 75 percent of the time, he would reach the highest measure of his expectation. . . . If that was the highest rating that one of the most distinguished men of the twentieth century could hope to obtain, what about you and me? ~ dale-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
246:My rather puritanical view is that any investment manager, whether operating as broker, investment counselor of a trust department, investment company, etc., should be willing to state unequivocally what he is going to attempt to accomplish and how he proposes to measure the extent to which he gets the job done. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
247:Human happiness seems to consist in three ingredients; action, pleasure and indolence. And though these ingredients ought to be mixed in different proportions, according to the disposition of the person, yet no one ingredient can be entirely wanting without destroying in some measure the relish of the whole composition. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
248:There is nothing little in God; His mercy is like Himself-it is infinite. You cannot measure it. His mercy is so great that it forgives great sins to great sinners, after great lengths of time, and then gives great favours and great privileges, and raises us up to great enjoyments in the great heaven of the great God. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
249:Let your actions always speak for you, but be forever on guard against the terrible traps of false pride and conceit that can halt your progress. The next time you are tempted to boast, just place your fist in a full pail of water, and when you remove it, the hole remaining will give you a correct measure of your importance. ~ og-mandino, @wisdomtrove
250:It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. We have lost it, or we have never had it; and, because we do not know how to judge anything, we have been led here and pushed there, beaten up, driven, politically, religiously and socially. We don't know, but it is difficult to say we don't know. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
251:At least one indication of unbelief is the tendency to measure life's challenges against our own adequacy instead of God's promises. To enter our Sabbath rest, we must put an end to self-reliance - trusting in our own abilities to overcome difficulties, rise above challenges, escape tragedies, or achieve personal greatness. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
252:It’s true, the scale can only give you a numerical reflection of your relationship with gravity. That’s it. It cannot measure beauty, talent, purpose, life force, possibility, strength, or love. Don’t give the scale more power than it has earned. Take note of the number, then get off the scale and live your life. You are beautiful! ~ steve-maraboli, @wisdomtrove
253:Yet magic is no more than the art of employing consciously invisible means to produce visible effects. Will, love and imagination are magic powers that everyone possesses; and whoever knows how to develop them to their fullest extent is a magician. Magic has but one dogma, namely, that the seen is the measure of the unseen. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
254:We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
255:Marriage is those two thousand indistinguishable conversations, chatted over two thousand indistinguishable breakfasts, where intimacy turns like a slow wheel. How do you measure the worth of becoming that familiar to somebody—so utterly well-known and so thoroughly ever-present that you become an almost invisible necessity, like air? ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
256:Marriage is those two thousand indistinguishable conversations, chatted over two thousand indistuinguishable breakfasts, where intimacy turns like a slow wheel. How do you measure the worth of becoming that familiar to somebody—so utterly well known and so thoroughly ever-present that you become an almost invisible necessity, like air? ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
257:Marriage is those two thousand indistinguishable conversations, chatted over two thousand indistuinguishable breakfasts, where intimacy turns like a slow wheel. How do you measure the worth of becoming that familiar to somebody‚ so utterly well known and so thoroughly ever-present that you become an almost invisible necessity, like air? ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
258:According to the ‘uncertainty principle’ of quantum physics, on an elementary level the physical universe is a collection of possibilities. Scientists have discovered that there has to be a conscious observer to ‘collapse’ the quantum possibilities, which stops particles being in two places at once and creates a world we can examine and measure. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
259:Alas! we know that ideals can never be completely embodied in practice. Ideals must ever lie a great way off&
260:The measure of our rationality determines the degree of vividness with which we appreciate the needs of other life, the extent to which we become conscious of the real character of our own motives and impulses, the ability to harmonize conflicting impulses in our own life and in society, and the capacity to choose adequate means for approved ends. ~ reinhold-niebuhr, @wisdomtrove
261:All things are in flux; the flux is subject to a unifying measure or rational principle. This principle (logos, the hidden harmony behind all change) bound opposites together in a unified tension, which is like that of a lyre, where a stable harmonious sound emerges from the tension of the opposing forces that arise from the bow bound together by the string. ~ heraclitus, @wisdomtrove
262:... we must realize that a vast majority of believers are still searching and will continue to search for the being who is the "source of human good." Those who seek with clear heads and sincere hearts will in some measure find. Of course the true seeker will realize that there is no one way to find God. To be sure, there are many possible ways of finding God. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
263:But though I was initially disappointed at being categorized as an extremist, as I continued to think about the matter I gradually gained a measure of satisfaction from the label. Was not Jesus an extremist for love: &
264:I go on working for the same reason that a hen goes on laying eggs. There is in every living creature an obscure but powerful impulse to active functioning. Life demands to be lived. Inaction, save as a measure of recuperation between bursts of activity, is painful and dangerous to the healthy organism- in fact, it is almost impossible. Only the dying can be really idle. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
265:And what about ‘happiness’? So far biological research has failed to come up with a clear definition of happiness or a way to measure it objectively. Most biological studies acknowledge only the existence of pleasure, which is more easily defined and measured. So ‘life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness’ should be translated into ‘life and the pursuit of pleasure’. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
266:Don't measure yourself by what you have accomplished, but by what you should have accomplished with your ability. Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do. Be more concerned with your character than with your reputation. Your character is what you really are while your reputation is merely what others think you are. Failure to prepare is preparing to fail. ~ john-wooden, @wisdomtrove
267:All the sciences have a relation, greater or less, to human nature; and... however wide any of them may seem to run from it, they still return back by one passage or another. Even Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and Natural Religion, are in some measure dependent on the science of MAN; since they lie under the cognizance of men, and are judged of by their powers and faculties. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
268:It is in the very nature of a beginning to carry with itself a measure of complete arbitrariness. Not only is it not bound into a reliable chain of cause and effect, a chain in which each effect immediately turns into the cause for future developments, the beginning has, as it were, nothing whatever to hold on to; it is as though it came out of nowhere in either time or space. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
269:The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands in times of challenge and controversy. The true neighbor will risk his position, his prestige, and even his life for the welfare of others. In dangerous valleys and hazardous pathways, he will lift some bruised and beaten brother to a higher and more noble life. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
270:Intuitive guidance means having the self-esteem to recognize that the discomfort or confusion that a person feels is actually directing him to take charge of his life and make choices that will break him out of stagnation or misery. And, while we measure our own success in terms of our personal comfort and security, the universe measures our success by how much we have learned. ~ caroline-myss, @wisdomtrove
271:The supreme duty of the Nation is the conservation of human resources through an enlightened measure of social and industrial justice. We pledge ourselves to work unceasingly in State and Nation for ... the protection of home life against the hazards of sickness, irregular employment and old age through the adoption of a system of social insurance adapted to American use. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
272:To acknowledge our ancestors means we are aware that we did not make ourselves, that the line stretches all the way back, perhaps to God; or to Gods. We remember them because it is an easy thing to forget: that we are not the first to suffer, rebel, fight, love and die. The grace with which we embrace life, in spite of the pain, the sorrow, is always a measure of what has gone before. ~ alice-walker, @wisdomtrove
273:Intuitive guidance means having the self-esteem to recognize that the discomfort or confusion that a person feels is actually directing him to take charge of his life and make choices that will break him out of stagnation or misery. And, while we measure our own success in terms of our personal comfort and security, the universe measures our success by how much we have learned. ~ norman-vincent-peale, @wisdomtrove
274:Vulnerability is not weakness, and the uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure we face every day are not optional. Our only choice is a question of engagement. Our willingness to own and engage with our vulnerability determines the depth of our courage and the clarity of our purpose; the level to which we protect ourselves from being vulnerable is a measure of our fear and disconnection. ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
275:Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure, or fear. To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed. You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion, and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you. To be happy, you must be wise. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
276:Everything was a trap: women, drugs, whiskey, wine, scotch, beer - even beer - cigars, and cigarettes. Traps: Work or no work. Traps: Artistry or no artistry; everything sucked you into some spiderweb. I disdained the use of the needle for the same reason that I disdained some so-called beautiful women - the price was far beyond the measure of the worth. I didn't want to hustle that hard. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
277:My good friends, we are all waiting. We are waiting, if not for the Messiah, as such, we are waiting for the messianic moment. And the messianic moment is what each and every one of us tries to build, meaning a certain area of humanity that links us to all those who are human and, therefore, desperately trying to fight despair as humanly as possible and - I hope - with some measure of success. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
278:When young men or women are beginning life, the most important period, it is often said, is that in which their habits are formed. That is a very important period. But the period in which the ideals of the young are formed and adopted is more important still. For the ideal with which you go forward to measure things determines the nature, so far as you are concerned, of everything you meet. ~ henry-ward-beecher, @wisdomtrove
279:In order to learn how to do something well, you have to fail sometimes. In order to fail, there has to be a measurement system. And that's the problem with most philanthropy - there's no measurement system. You give somebody some money to do something and most of the time you can really never measure whether you failed or succeeded in your judgment of that person or his ideas or their implementation. ~ steve-jobs, @wisdomtrove
280:There's nothing of any importance in life - except how well you do your work. Nothing. Only that. Whatever else you are, will come from that. It's the only measure of human value. All the codes of ethics they'll try to ram down your throat are just so much paper money put out by swindlers to fleece people of their virtues. The code of competence is the only system of morality that's on a gold standard. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
281:Teach us, O God, that nothing is necessary to Thee. Were anything necessary to Thee that thing would be the measure of Thine imperfection: and how could we worship one who is imperfect? If nothing is necessary to Thee, then no one is necessary, and if no one, then not we. Thou dost seek us though Thou does not need us. We seek Thee because we need Thee, for in Thee we live and move and have our being. Amen. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
282:It seems then, say I, that you leave politics entirely out of the question, and never suppose, that a wise magistrate can justly be jealous of certain tenets of philosophy, such as those of Epicurus, which, denying a divine existence, and consequently a providence and a future state, seem to loosen, in a great measure, the ties of morality, and may be supposed, for that reason, pernicious to the peace of civil society. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
283:Not only do I have a great love for the game of golf - no matter how badly I play it - but I have also the belief that through every kind of meeting, through every kind of activity to which we can bring together more often and more intimately peoples of our several countries, by that measure we will do something to solve the difficulties and the tensions that this poor old world seems nowadays to so much endure. ~ dwight-eisenhower, @wisdomtrove
284:That moment - to this ... may be years in the way they measure, but it's only one sentence back in my mind - there are so many days when living stops and pulls up and sits and waits like a train on the rails. I pass the hotel at 8 and at 5; there are cats in the alleys and bottles and bums, and I look up at the window and think, I no longer know where you are, and I walk on and wonder where the living goes when it stops. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
285:I want to be in the arena. I want to be brave with my life. And when we make the choice to dare greatly, we sign up to get our asses kicked. We can choose courage or we can choose comfort, but we can’t have both. Not at the same time. Vulnerability is not winning or losing; it’s having the courage to show up and be seen when we have no control over the outcome. Vulnerability is not weakness; it’s our greatest measure of courage. ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
286:I think a lot of people believe that they have to be poor to serve God, that they can't have anything. They don't really even know how to give. And one of the main principles in the Bible is you'll reap what you sew, and that if you give into the lives of others, that it shall be given back to you, good measure, pressed down and shaken together. If you go plant one tomato seed, you don't get back one tomato; you get a vine of tomatoes. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
287:The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. Nothing worthwhile is easy. Your ability to overcome unfavorable situations will provide you with time to demonstrate your true strength and determination for success. Always set your standards high, your greatest achievements lie within the infinite feats you achieve in your life. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
288:Man has been placed on that summit where he contains within him the source of self-impulsion toward good and evil in equal measure; the nexus of the principles within him is not a bond of necessity but of freedom. He stands at the dividing line; whatever he chooses will be his act, but he cannot remain in indecision because God must necessarily reveal himself and because nothing at all in creation can remain ambiguous. ~ friedrich-wilhelm-joseph-schelling, @wisdomtrove
289:We cannot look upon our lives as dreams of a dreamer who has no awakening in all time. We have a personality to which matter and force are unmeaning unless related to something infinitely personal, whose nature we have discovered, in some measure, in human love, in the greatness of the good, in the martyrdom of heroic souls, in the ineffable beauty of nature, which can never be a mere physical fact nor anything but an expression of personality. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
290:It only take a few minutes of meditation to directly realize we are a river of sensations, feelings, thoughts, perceptions. How can we navigate this evanescent river of life wisely? With mindful awareness and love it becomes clear. You can fight against the river of change, or use its wisdom to teach you how to graciously move and create and flow with the full measure of joy and sorrow, gain and loss, praise and blame that make up every human incarnation. ~ jack-kornfield, @wisdomtrove
291:A man who tells secrets or stories must think of who is hearing or reading, for a story has as many versions as it has readers. Everyone takes what he wants or can from it and thus changes it to his measure. Some pick out parts and reject the rest, some strain the story through their mesh of prejudice, some paint it with their own delight. A story must have some points of contact with the reader to make him feel at home in it. Only then can he accept wonders. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
292:The best taxes are such as are levied upon consumptions, especially those of luxury; because such taxes are least felt by the people. They seem, in some measure, voluntary; since a man may choose how far he will use the commodity: They naturally produce sobriety and frugality, if judiciously imposed: And being confounded with the natural price of the commodity, they are scarcely perceived by the consumers. Their only disadvantage is that they are expensive in the levying. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
293:R is a velocity of measure, defined as a reasonable speed of travel that is consistent with health, mental well-being, and not being more than, say, five minutes late. It is therefore clearly as almost infinite variable figure according to circumstances, since the first two factors vary not only with speed as an absolute, but also with awareness of the third factor. Unless handled with tranquility, this equation can result in considerable stress, ulcers, and even death. ~ douglas-adams, @wisdomtrove
294:A man who has cured himself of all ridiculous prepossessions, and is fully, sincerely, and steadily convinced, from experience as well as philosophy, that the difference of fortune makes less difference in happiness than is vulgarly imagined; such a one does not measure out degrees of esteem according to the rent-rolls of his acquaintance. ... his internal sentiments are more regulated by the personal characters of men, than by the accidental and capricious favors of fortune. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
295:Before anything else the One must exist eternally; from his power derives everything that always is or will ever be. He is the Eternal and embraces all times. He knows profoundly all events and He himself is everything. He creates everything beyond any beginning of time and beyond any limit of place and space. He is not subject to any numerical law, or to any law of measure or order. He himself is law, number, measure, limit without limit, end without end, act without form. ~ giordano-bruno, @wisdomtrove
296:The sweetness of dogs (fifteen) What do you say, Percy? I am thinking of sitting out on the sand to watch the moon rise. Full tonight. So we go and the moon rises, so beautiful it makes me shudder, makes me think about time and space, makes me take measure of myself: one iota pondering heaven. Thus we sit, I thinking how grateful I am for the moon’s perfect beauty and also, oh! How rich it is to love the world. Percy, meanwhile, leans against me and gazes up into my face. As though I were his perfect moon. ~ mary-oliver, @wisdomtrove
297:The extraordinary woman depends on the ordinary woman. It is only when we know what were the conditions of the average woman's life - the number of children, whether she had money of her own, if she had a room to herself, whether she had help bringing up her family, if she had servants, whether part of the housework was her task - it is only when we can measure the way of life and experience made possible to the ordinary woman that we can account for the success or failure of the extraordinary woman as a writer. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
298:The Shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge, and it therefore, as a rule, meets with considerable resistance. Indeed, self-knowledge as a psychotherapuetic measure frequently requires much painstaking work extending over a long period of time. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
299:Our experience of love is more of a measure of whether we're connected with the universal source of this energy. In other words, there's some life energy that we have and sort of share with people we might be relating to that takes place, that operates whether we're sort of feeling in a state of love or not. But love is the measure of whether we're really connected with the internal source of this energy where we can consciously sort of fill up and amplify the amount of energy that we're able to take in from the inside. ~ james-redfield, @wisdomtrove
300:We see that God has implanted in all things a natural desire to exist with the fullest measure of existence that is compatible with their particular nature. To this end they are endowed with suitable faculties and activities; and by means of these there is in them a discernment that is natural and in keeping with the purpose of their knowledge, which ensures their natural inclination serving its purpose and being able to reach its fulfilment in that object towards which it is attracted by the weight of its own nature. ~ nicholas-of-cusa, @wisdomtrove
301:Nothing is more dangerous than to stop working. It is a habit that can soon be lost, one that is easily neglected and hard to resume. A measure of day-dreaming is a good thing, like a drug prudently used ... But too much submerges and drowns. Woe to the intellectual worker who allows himself to lapse wholly from positive thinking into day-dreaming. He thinks he can easily change back, and tells himself that it is all one. He is wrong! To substitute day-dreaming for thought is to confuse poison with a source of nourishment. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
302:If you were an eighteen-year-old youth in a small village 5,000 years ago you’d probably think you were good-looking because there were only fifty other men in your village and most of them were either old, scarred and wrinkled, or still little kids. But if you are a teenager today you are a lot more likely to feel inadequate. Even if the other guys at school are an ugly lot, you don’t measure yourself against them but against the movie stars, athletes and supermodels you see all day on television, Facebook and giant billboards. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
303:Human beings are not like sheep; and even sheep are not undistinguishably alike. A man cannot get a coat or a pair oboots to fit him, unless they are either made to his measure, or he has a whole warehouseful to choose from: and is it easier to fit him with a life than with a coat, or are human beings more like one another in their whole physical and spiritual conformation than in the shape of their feet? If it were only that people have diversities of taste, that is reason enough for not attempting to shape them all after one model. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
304:Stressing the practice of living purposefully as essential to fully realized self-esteem is not equivalent to measuring an individual's worth by his or her external achievements. We admire achievements-in ourselves and others-and it is natural and appropriate for us to do so. But that is not the same thing as saying that our achievements are the measure or grounds of our self-esteem. The root of our self-esteem is not our achievements but those internally generated practices that, among other things, make it possible for us to achieve. ~ nathaniel-branden, @wisdomtrove
305:We do not seek the unanimity that comes to those who water down all issues to the lowest common denominator - or to those who conceal their differences behind fixed smiles - or to those who measure unity by standards of popularity and affection, instead of trust and respect. We are allies. This is a partnership, not an empire. We are bound to have differences and disappointments - and we are equally bound to bring them out into the open, to settle them where they can be settled, and to respect each other's views when they cannot be settled. ~ john-f-kennedy, @wisdomtrove
306:Progress has brought us both unbounded opportunities and unbridled difficulties. Thus, the measure of our civilization will not be that we have done much, but what we have done with that much. I believe that the next half century will determine if we will advance the cause of Christian civilization or revert to the horrors of brutal paganism. The thought of modern industry in the hands of Christian charity is a dream worth dreaming. The thought of industry in the hands of paganism is a nightmare beyond imagining. The choice between the two is upon us. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
307:He who has learnt to control his tongue has attained self-control in a great measure. When such a person speaks he will be heard with respect and attention. His words will be remembered, for they will be good and true. When one who is established in truth prays with a pure heart, then things he really needs come to him when they are really needed: he does not have to run after them. The man firmly established in truth gets the fruit of his actions without apparently doing anything. God, the source of all truth, supplies his needs and looks after his welfare. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
308:Our conflict is not likely to cease so soon as every good man would wish. The measure of iniquity is not yet filled; and unless we can return a little more to first principles, and act a little more upon patriotic ground, I do not know when it will-or-what may be the issue of the contest. Speculation-peculation-engrossing-forestalling-with all their concomitants, afford too many melancholy proofs of the decay of public virtue; and too glaring instances of its being the interest and desire of too many, who would wish to be thought friends, to continue the war. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
309:Four Seasons fill the measure of the year; There are four seasons in the mind of man: He has his lusty Spring, when fancy clear Takes in all beauty with an easy span: He has his Summer, when luxuriously Spring's honey'd cud of youthful thought he loves To ruminate, and by such dreaming high Is nearest unto heaven: quiet coves His soul has in its Autumn, when his wings He furleth close; contented so to look On mists in idleness—to let fair things Pass by unheeded as a threshold brook. He has his Winter too of pale misfeature, Or else he would forego his mortal nature. ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
310:A small knowledge of human nature will convince us, that, with far the greatest part of mankind, interest is the governing principle... Few men are capable of making a continual sacrifice of all views of private interest, or advantage, to the common good. It is vain to exclaim against the depravity of human nature on this account; the fact is so, the experience of every age and nation has proved it and we must in a great measure, change the constitution of man, before we can make it otherwise. No institution, not built on the presumptive truth of these maxims can succeed. ~ george-washington, @wisdomtrove
311:If happiness is determined by expectations, then two pillars of our society – mass media and the advertising industry – may unwittingly be depleting the globe’s reservoirs of contentment. If you were an eighteen-year-old youth in a small village 5,000 years ago you’d probably think you were good-looking because there were only fifty other men in your village and most of them were either old, scarred and wrinkled, or still little kids. But if you are a teenager today you are a lot more likely to feel inadequate. Even if the other guys at school are an ugly lot, you don’t measure yourself against them but against the movie stars, athletes and supermodels you see all day on television, Facebook and giant billboards. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
312:A person functioning exclusively in the Cartesian mode may be free from manifest symptoms but cannot be considered mentally healthy. Such individuals typically lead ego-centred, competitive, goal-oriented lives. Overpreoccupied with their past and their future, they tend to have a limited awarenessof the present and thus a limited ability to derive satisfaction from ordinary activities in everyday life. They concentrate on manipulating the external world and measure their living standard by the quantity of material possessions, while they become ever more alienated from their inner world and unable to appreciate the process of life. For people whose existence is dominated by this mode of experience no level of wealth, power, or fame will bring genuine satisfaction ~ fritjof-capra, @wisdomtrove
313:T hat wisdom (which all men by their very nature desire to know and consequently seek after with such great affection of mind) is known in no other way than that it is higher than all knowledge and utterly unknowable and unspeakable in all language. It is unintelligible to all understanding, immeasurable by all measure, improportionable by every proportion, incomparable by all comparison, infigurable by all figuration, unformable by all. formation, ... imimaginable by all imagination, ... inapprehensible in all apprehension and unaffirmable in all affirmation, undeniable in all negation, indoubtable in ail doubt, inopinionable in all opinion; and because in all speech it is inexpressible, there can be no limit to the means of expressing it, being incognitable in all cognition… ~ nicholas-of-cusa, @wisdomtrove
314:Because in proportion as we ascend higher our speech is contracted to the limits of our view of the purely intelligible; and so now, when we enter that darkness which is above understanding, we pass not merely into brevity of speech, but even into absolute silence, and the negation of thought. Thus in the other treatises our subject took us from the highest to the lowest, and in the measure of this descent our treatment of it extended itself; whereas now we rise from beneath to that which is the highest, and accordingly our speech is restrained in proportion to the height of our ascent; but when our ascent is accomplished, speech will cease altogether, and be absorbed into the ineffable. But why, you will ask, do we add in the first and begin to abstract in the last? The reason is that we affirmed that which is above all affirmation by comparison with that which is most nearly related to it, and were therefore compelled to make a hypothetical affirmation; but when we abstract that which is above all abstraction, we must distinguish it also from those things which are most remote from it. Is not God more nearly life and goodness than air or a stone; must we not deny more fully that He is drunken or enraged, than that He can be spoken of or understood? ~ pseudo-dionysius-the-areopagite, @wisdomtrove
315:Following Homo sapiens, domesticated cattle, pigs and sheep are the second, third and fourth most widespread large mammals in the world. From a narrow evolutionary perspective, which measures success by the number of DNA copies, the Agricultural Revolution was a wonderful boon for chickens, cattle, pigs and sheep. Unfortunately, the evolutionary perspective is an incomplete measure of success. It judges everything by the criteria of survival and reproduction, with no regard for individual suffering and happiness. Domesticated chickens and cattle may well be an evolutionary success story, but they are also among the most miserable creatures that ever lived. The domestication of animals was founded on a series of brutal practices that only became crueller with the passing of the centuries. The natural lifespan of wild chickens is about seven to twelve years, and of cattle about twenty to twenty-five years. In the wild, most chickens and cattle died long before that, but they still had a fair chance of living for a respectable number of years. In contrast, the vast majority of domesticated chickens and cattle are slaughtered at the age of between a few weeks and a few months, because this has always been the optimal slaughtering age from an economic perspective. (Why keep feeding a cock for three years if it has already reached its maximum weight after three months?) Egg-laying hens, dairy cows and draught animals are sometimes allowed to live for many years. But the price is subjugation to a way of life completely alien to their urges and desires. It’s reasonable to assume, for example, that bulls prefer to spend their days wandering over open prairies in the company of other bulls and cows rather than pulling carts and ploughshares under the yoke of a whip-wielding ape. In order for humans to turn bulls, horses, donkeys and camels into obedient draught animals, their natural instincts and social ties had to be broken, their aggression and sexuality contained, and their freedom of movement curtailed. Farmers developed techniques such as locking animals inside pens and cages, bridling them in harnesses and leashes, training them with whips and cattle prods, and mutilating them. The process of taming almost always involves the castration of males. This restrains male aggression and enables humans selectively to control the herd’s procreation. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:So often we measure ~ Peter Gizzi,
2:The true measure ~ John C Maxwell,
3:For without a measure ~ Ren e Ahdieh,
4:Good marketers measure. ~ Seth Godin,
5:To measure is to know. ~ Lord Kelvin,
6:Sin is a measure of evil, ~ Anonymous,
7:The only way to measure a lover ~ Rumi,
8:There is measure in all things. ~ Horace,
9:Weening is not measure. ~ George Herbert,
10:measure twice, cut once. ~ Stephen R Covey,
11:You measure a person by what it ~ Bo Ryan,
12:Measure twice; cut once. ~ Alistair MacLeod,
13:Might was the measure of right. ~ F L Lucas,
14:Measure your life in love. ~ Jonathan Larson,
15:33 PI is a measure of time. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
16:BUILD-MEASURE-LEARN FEEDBACK LOOP ~ Eric Ries,
17:Effort is a measure of a Man. ~ William James,
18:How do you measure your value? ~ Loretta Lynn,
19:Man is the measure of all things. ~ Protagoras,
20:We are the measure of all things. ~ Jonas Mekas,
21:If you measure it, it will improve. ~ Seth Godin,
22:How can you measure acting in inches? ~ James Dean,
23:OrbiTape One-handed Tape Measure ~ Timothy Ferriss,
24:The best things beyond their measure cloy. ~ Homer,
25:Courage is life's only measure. ~ S ren Kierkegaard,
26:Reason is the measure of all things. ~ Kate Elliott,
27:To manage quality you must measure it.
   ~ George?,
28:You measure a player from the head up. ~ Al McGuire,
29:it’s important to define and measure it. ~ Anonymous,
30:the measure of a person was her ideas ~ Jason Fagone,
31:If you can’t measure it, you can’t fix it. ~ DJ Patil,
32:Relief loosens tongues beyond measure. ~ Stephen King,
33:There's a measure in all things. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
34:Waight and measure take away strife. ~ George Herbert,
35:Why is the measure of love loss? ~ Jeanette Winterson,
36:You can't control what you can't measure ~ Tom DeMarco,
37:Feed by measure, and defy the physician. ~ John Heywood,
38:humans are not the measure of all things. ~ Carl Safina,
39:Never use money to measure wealth, son. ~ Robert Duvall,
40:To measure the man, measure his heart. ~ Malcolm Forbes,
41:You know only insofar as you can measure. ~ Lord Kelvin,
42:Each of us has a measure of criminality. ~ Ahmed Saadawi,
43:(I measure time by how a body sways.) ~ Theodore Roethke,
44:The measure of a man is what he does with power. ~ Plato,
45:You can't manage what you don't measure. ~ Peter Drucker,
46:Do not measure God's mind by your own. ~ George MacDonald,
47:We're both clever and stupid in equal measure. ~ Brian Cox,
48:wit beyond measure is mans greatest treasure ~ J K Rowling,
49:You can't measure what's inside a man's heart. ~ Joe Rogan,
50:Action is the real measure of intelligence. ~ Napoleon Hill,
51:humility is the true measure of wisdom. ~ Devdutt Pattanaik,
52:If you can measure it, you can manage it. ~ Robert S Kaplan,
53:Wit beyond measure is man’s greatest treasure ~ J K Rowling,
54:Age is never so old as youth would measure it. ~ Jack London,
55:All artist of some measure contemplative. ~ Evelyn Underhill,
56:God is a concept by which we measure our pain. ~ John Lennon,
57:Intense love does not measure it just gives. ~ Mother Teresa,
58:It seems to me a measure of the true perversity ~ Otto Gross,
59:Leave to Heaven the measure and the choice. ~ Samuel Johnson,
60:measure up - disillusion us by showing ~ John Howard Griffin,
61:The measure of a society is its compassion. ~ Kristin Hannah,
62:Truth always comes with some measure of pain ~ Greg F Gifune,
63:Wit beyond measure is man’s greatest treasure. ~ J K Rowling,
64:If you can't measure it, you can't change it. ~ Peter Drucker,
65:Intense love does not measure, it just gives. ~ Mother Teresa,
66:It's hard for parents just to measure schools. ~ David Brooks,
67:Justice always whirls in equal measure. ~ William Shakespeare,
68:Clemency is also a revolutionary measure. ~ Camille Desmoulins,
69:Come not within the measure of my wrath. ~ William Shakespeare,
70:Every man should measure himself by his own standard. ~ Horace,
71:I measure the moment in the heartbeats I skip ~ David Levithan,
72:Wit beyond measure is a man's greatest treasure. ~ J K Rowling,
73:A man is as big as the measure of his thinking. ~ Napoleon Hill,
74:If you cannot measure it, then it is not science. ~ Lord Kelvin,
75:No test can measure anything important.   On ~ Naomi Shihab Nye,
76:Quality, not quantity, is my measure. ~ Douglas William Jerrold,
77:Stats don't measure an athlete's hunger. ~ Khang Kijarro Nguyen,
78:The measure of a superhero is always his nemesis. ~ David Lyons,
79:The measure of civilized behavior is compassion. ~ Paul Theroux,
80:chibok. (the immutable measure of black life.) ~ Nayyirah Waheed,
81:How many people you bless is how you measure success ~ Rick Ross,
82:If you can not measure it, you can not improve it. ~ Lord Kelvin,
83:If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
84:Since labour is motion, time is its natural measure. ~ Karl Marx,
85:The measure of a man is in the lives he’s touched. ~ Ernie Banks,
86:The measure of love is a love without measure. ~ Cassandra Clare,
87:The measure of love is to love without measuring, ~ Jillian Dodd,
88:The world didn't have words to measure hate. ~ Maggie Stiefvater,
89:You cannot measure love by a scale of degrees. ~ Kristin Cashore,
90:You can't measure other people's love, Sugar. ~ Suzanne Palmieri,
91:Before you measure the years, you measure the days. ~ Mitch Albom,
92:I measure the moment
in the heartbeats I skip ~ David Levithan,
93:Others can measure their visions by what we see. ~ Allen Ginsberg,
94:Our are speculations are not the measure of our God. ~ J I Packer,
95:The idol is the measure of the worshipper. ~ James Russell Lowell,
96:You can't measure success if you have never failed. ~ Steffi Graf,
97:You don't measure life by receiving awards. ~ Mikhail Baryshnikov,
98:Every bad precedent originated as a justifiable measure. ~ Sallust,
99:History is still in large measure poetry to me. ~ Jacob Burckhardt,
100:Love is the measure by which we shall be judged. ~ Juan de la Cruz,
101:Memories are not always the best measure of things. ~ Amy Neftzger,
102:Set measurable goals, measure relative to competition. ~ Joe Kraus,
103:The measure of love is to love without measure. ~ Francis de Sales,
104:To measure success with material things is failure! ~ Tony Robbins,
105:Was it possible to measure what the heart felt? ~ Rachel Hawthorne,
106:A sense of humor is the main measure of sanity. ~ Hunter S Thompson,
107:Common sense is the measure of the possible. ~ Henri Frederic Amiel,
108:Measure your mind's height by the shade it casts. ~ Robert Browning,
109:plan, organize, integrate, motivate, and measure. ~ Peter F Drucker,
110:The carpenter’s rule is “measure twice, cut once. ~ Stephen R Covey,
111:The measure of love is to love without measuring. ~ Saint Augustine,
112:To a close shorn sheep, God gives wind by measure. ~ George Herbert,
113:God created everything by number, weight and measure. ~ Isaac Newton,
114:I want people to see the full measure of Donald Trump. ~ Megyn Kelly,
115:Loss could be used as a measure of beauty in a woman. ~ Alice Sebold,
116:The measure of a man is, does he know how to love. ~ Jennifer Weiner,
117:We cannot measure, what it is we do not know to value. ~ Brian Solis,
118:Ancient travelers guessed; modern travelers measure. ~ Samuel Johnson,
119:Complexity of thought is no measure of originality. ~ Arthur Koestler,
120:God doesn't measure His bounty, but oh how we do! ~ Mignon McLaughlin,
121:In suffering, we find the true measure of our strength. ~ Brent Weeks,
122:The form is always the measure of the obsession. ~ Alberto Giacometti,
123:And, just for good measure, here are a handful of runners up: ~ Virgil,
124:Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness. ~ Carl Jung,
125:I measure my success by how much fun I’m having. ~ Gabrielle Bernstein,
126:It doesn't take much of a rule to measure a mean man. ~ Malcolm Forbes,
127:Take the wheat, not the measure in which it is contained ~ Idries Shah,
128:The measure of a man is what he does when he has power. ~ Pierce Brown,
129:To be absolutely nothing is to be beyond measure. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
130:To each thing belongs it's measure. Occasion is best to know. ~ Pindar,
131:What people believe is a measure of what they suffer. ~ Peter De Vries,
132:Whip ‘em out boys. We’ll measure them right here and now. ~ N M Facile,
133:Measure me while I live - after it will be too late. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
134:The joy of the mind is the measure of its strength. ~ Ninon de L Enclos,
135:The measure of intelligence is the ability to change. ~ Albert Einstein,
136:The one measure of true love is: you can insult the other ~ Slavoj i ek,
137:Time passes, and we “measure out our lives in coffee spoons. ~ ntideva,
138:You cannot manage or improve something until you measure ~ Darren Hardy,
139:You can't measure love, it has no start it has no end ~ Christofer Drew,
140:A man's bewilderment is the measure of his wisdom. ~ Nathaniel Hawthorne,
141:"Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness." ~ Carl Jung,
142:For me, the measure of a poem is the word, not the line. ~ John Kinsella,
143:God is a concept by which we measure our pain. ~ John Lennon, God (1970),
144:Power is in nature the essential measure of right. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
145:The best measure of success, is how you deal with failure ~ Ronnie Radke,
146:The measure of a man is the way he bears up under misfortune. ~ Plutarch,
147:The measure of love is to love without measure. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
148:Though a promise means little without a measure of trust. ~ Ren e Ahdieh,
149:Under the ideal measure of values there lurks the hard cash. ~ Karl Marx,
150:A woman's passion is not the measure of a man's love. ~ Franz Grillparzer,
151:Intention is the measure for rendering actions true, so that, ~ Al Nawawi,
152:No man can in any measure resemble the scripture saints. ~ Charles Simeon,
153:One can't measure how a mood of confidence comes about. ~ Nadine Gordimer,
154:The measure of love is love without measure. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
155:The patterns of our lives reveal us. Our habits measure us. ~ Mary Oliver,
156:Conscience. Conscience is the ultimate measure of a man. ~ G Willow Wilson,
157:Feudalism made land the measure and the master of all things. ~ Lord Acton,
158:If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it” – Lord Kelvin ~ Anonymous,
159:Skin is made in large measure of a protein called collagen. ~ Michael Behe,
160:The measure of a man is how he treats the women in his family. ~ J D Vance,
161:The measure of love is to love without measure. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
162:There are more ways than one to measure profits and losses. ~ Randy Pausch,
163:The way one tries to measure inequality is never neutral. ~ Thomas Piketty,
164:We measure morality by what happens. Not what is intended. ~ Dennis Prager,
165:You measure system capability; you do not prescribe it. ~ Mary Poppendieck,
166:All I ever seek from good deeds is a measure of respect. ~ Walter Annenberg,
167:A person is ruined by taking the measure of other persons. ~ Gautama Buddha,
168:Don't eat me. I am an inchworm. I am useful. I measure things. ~ Leo Lionni,
169:I look at her, I see her heart and her warts in equal measure. ~ Penny Reid,
170:My persistence is the measure of the belief I have in myself. ~ Walt Disney,
171:The measure of a man's power is the depth of his mercy. ~ Christopher Moore,
172:The measure of who we are is what we do with what we have. ~ Vince Lombardi,
173:Therefore, why use money as a means to measure my self-worth? ~ Mark Manson,
174:The truth brings with it a great measure of absolution, always. ~ R D Laing,
175:You cannot manage or improve something until you measure it. ~ Darren Hardy,
176:Be the measure great or small, let it be honest in every part. ~ John Bright,
177:Entropy is a measure of unpredictability of information content. ~ Anonymous,
178:I began to measure things in absence instead of presence. ~ Marya Hornbacher,
179:I have trod a measure, I have flattered a lady, I have ~ William Shakespeare,
180:Measure your growth in grace by your sensitiveness to sin. ~ Oswald Chambers,
181:Opinion is a powerful party, bold, and without measure. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
182:The true measure of a man is how he behaves when death is close. ~ Alma Katsu,
183:Where does it say that being a couple is a measure of anything? ~ Sue Grafton,
184:Yeah, sure,” I say, and then, for good measure: “Whatever. ~ Courtney Summers,
185:All artist are of necessity in some measure contemplatives. ~ Evelyn Underhill,
186:All artists are of necessity in some measure contemplative. ~ Evelyn Underhill,
187:every measure of talent brings with it nine measures of work. ~ Naomi Alderman,
188:I love you, and you're the measure of my wrath.

Declan. ~ Ilona Andrews,
189:In large measure, writing is the spatialization of thought. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
190:Is not our capacity to laugh and cry the measure of our humanity? ~ Paul Scott,
191:Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. ~ Marianne Williamson,
192:The literature of impotence is about to develop beyond measure. ~ Julien Torma,
193:The measure of my success is the measure of my happiness. ~ William John Locke,
194:the measure of society is how it treats the weakest members ~ Thomas Jefferson,
195:The measure of who we are is what we do with what we have. ~ Vince Lombardi Jr,
196:What do we know to be important but are unable to measure? ~ Marcus Buckingham,
197:All things, and man as well, should be like nature, without measure. ~ Hans Arp,
198:Be careful not to measure your holiness by other people's sins. ~ Martin Luther,
199:Endurance, I reminded myself, is the true measure of existence. ~ Anthony Marra,
200:gift that is so . . . so immense, that it is impossible to measure. ~ T M Logan,
201:I don't measure success by how many buildings have my name on it. ~ Marco Rubio,
202:If you want it, measure it. If you can't measure it, forget it. ~ Peter Drucker,
203:It is no measure of health to be well-adjusted to a sick society. ~ Johann Hari,
204:Let the degree of egotism be the measure of confidence. ~ Johann Kaspar Lavater,
205:The extent of your difficulties gives you the measure of your ego. ~ The Mother,
206:The greatness of a man's power is the measure of his surrender. ~ William Booth,
207:There's no greater gift than a love returned in equal measure. ~ Lorraine Heath,
208:They worshipped themselves as the measure of all significance, ~ R Scott Bakker,
209:To love others as God loves you, that is the measure of success ~ Mother Teresa,
210:True creativity is impossible without some measure of passion. ~ Teresa Amabile,
211:Your faith will grow only in the measure that you give it away. ~ Robert Barron,
212:Happiness simply cannot be relied upon as a measure of success. ~ John C Maxwell,
213:I say to myself: "Who are you to measure infinite power? ~ Jean Jacques Rousseau,
214:Like all strong people, she suffered always a measure of loneliness; ~ Anne Rice,
215:Love consumes us only in the measure of our self-surrender. ~ Saint Therese of Lisieux,
216:Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so ~ Galileo Galilei,
217:Measure yourself by...what you have accomplished with your ability ~ John Wooden,
218:Measure your success by your inner scorecard versus an outer one. ~ Robin Sharma,
219:The measure of her bitterness was the measure of her failure. ~ Elizabeth Goudge,
220:there comes a time when you measure how much you have to lose! ~ Michelle Monkou,
221:The way I measure my life is 'Am I better than I was last year?' ~ Satya Nadella,
222:Things happen to us and reaction is sometimes tough to measure. ~ Richard Schiff,
223:To measure a leader, put a tape around his heart, not his head. ~ John C Maxwell,
224:We note our place with bookmarkers
That measure what we've lost. ~ Paul Simon,
225:Who will you measure Me with, so that we should be like each other?  ~ Anonymous,
226:You cannot measure what counts in education—the human qualities, ~ Amanda Ripley,
227:Exile is courage. True exile is the true measure of each writer. ~ Roberto Bola o,
228:I view the measure problem as the greatest crisis in physics today. ~ Max Tegmark,
229:Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so. ~ Galileo Galilei,
230:Simple people always reduce everything to their own simple measure. ~ Norah Lofts,
231:The cause of America is in great measure the cause of all mankind. ~ Thomas Paine,
232:The only preventative measure one can take is to live irregularly. ~ Adolf Hitler,
233:The wealthy measure everything with the weight of their money. ~ Paolo Bacigalupi,
234:Voices beyond my ability to measure suddenly hushing all at once. ~ Cameron Dokey,
235:Vulnerability is not weakness; it’s our greatest measure of courage. ~ Bren Brown,
236:Watches and clocks measure our perception of time, not time itself. ~ Dean Koontz,
237:we almost always measure time in relation to what matters most to us ~ John Green,
238:Where has the Scripture made merit the rule or measure of charity?. ~ William Law,
239:Books are still the main yardstick by which I measure true wealth. ~ Tamora Pierce,
240:Funny how you can measure time by pets that were not even your own. ~ Lori Lansens,
241:Time is change; we measure its passage by how much things alter. ~ Nadine Gordimer,
242:You measure yourself by the people who measure themselves by you.” I ~ Phil Knight,
243:You measure yourself by the people who measure themselves by you. ~ Morgan Freeman,
244:Early rising is no pleasure; early drinking's just the measure. ~ Francois Rabelais,
245:Faith without a measure of doubt ain't worth a brass farthin. ~ Howard Frank Mosher,
246:I can measure the motion of bodies but I cannot measure human folly. ~ Isaac Newton,
247:I don’t measure America by its achievement but by its potential. ~ Shirley Chisholm,
248:It's crucial that people are on the right measure at the right time. ~ Glenn Branca,
249:Just because something is easy to measure doesn't mean it's important. ~ Seth Godin,
250:Measure your health by your sympathy with morning and Spring. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
251:The cause of America is in a great measure the cause of all mankind. ~ Thomas Paine,
252:The supreme measure of a man, is what he would risk his life for. ~ George S Patton,
253:To achieve results. This is the only true measure of a team P.42 ~ Patrick Lencioni,
254:When you cannot measure, your knowledge is meager and unsatisfactory. ~ Lord Kelvin,
255:you can measure the size of a person by what makes him or her angry ~ Dale Carnegie,
256:A place . . . a time . . . where a man can live his life full measure. ~ Rod Serling,
257:But how could you measure your own pain against the pain of the world? ~ Maile Meloy,
258:Enough madness? Enough? And how do you measure madness? - The Joker ~ Grant Morrison,
259:Faith without a measure of doubt ain't worth a brass farthin'. ~ Howard Frank Mosher,
260:I learned that in suffering, we find the true measure of our strength. ~ Brent Weeks,
261:In the long run no individual prospers beyond the measure of his faith. ~ Joe Vitale,
262:It is by that which cannot be taken away that we can measure ourselves. ~ Mia Farrow,
263:Men measure not only other men, but all other things, by themselves. ~ Thomas Hobbes,
264:Perhaps the measure of the best art is that it does not excite envy. ~ Norman Mailer,
265:The only true measure of success is the amount of joy we are feeling. ~ Esther Hicks,
266:There is no greater ache than this: guilt and regret in equal measure. ~ Nathan Hill,
267:The way is the beginning of all beings and the measure of right and wrong. ~ Han Fei,
268:You are the ruler of my heart. There is no measure greater than this. ~ Truth Devour,
269:Don't measure the size of the mountain; talk to the One who can move it. ~ Max Lucado,
270:For to know a man's library is, in some measure, to know his mind. ~ Geraldine Brooks,
271:Genius has never been accepted without a measure of condonement. ~ Seneca the Younger,
272:It is a fool’s curse, to measure oneself in endless dissatisfaction. ~ Steven Erikson,
273:It is much more difficult to measure nonperformance than performance. ~ Harold Geneen,
274:Like a ghostly roll of drums remorselessly beat the measure of life. ~ Virginia Woolf,
275:Only poetry can measure the distance between ourselves and the Other. ~ Charles Simic,
276:Thinking can only serve to measure out the helplessness of thought. ~ H Rider Haggard,
277:To know a man's library is, in some measure, to know a man's mind. ~ Geraldine Brooks,
278:Trying to measure up to others leads to disappointment and low self-esteem. ~ Various,
279:We can achieve the fullest measure of life by living it for others. ~ Seth Adam Smith,
280:For without a measure of arrogance, how can one attempt the impossible? ~ Ren e Ahdieh,
281:Gun Control: A measure to ensure that guns always point in one direction. ~ CrimethInc,
282:In the long run no individual prospers beyond the measure of his faith. ~ Bruce Barton,
283:Love consumes us only in the measure of our self-surrender. ~ Saint Therese of Lisieux,
284:Measure what is important, don't make important what you can measure ~ Robert McNamara,
285:Tell me how you measure me, and I will tell you how I will behave ~ Eliyahu M Goldratt,
286:The measure of a man's life is the well spending of it, and not the length. ~ Plutarch,
287:The measure of a society can be how well its people treat its animals ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
288:The measure of intelligence is the ability to change. —ALBERT EINSTEIN ~ James Rollins,
289:the story of any one of us is in some measure the story of us all ~ Frederick Buechner,
290:Time is the one thing that is given to everyone in equal measure. ~ Seneca the Younger,
291:You can't measure love by time put in, but the weight of those moments. ~ Sarah Dessen,
292:Build-Measure-Learn feedback loop is at the core of the Lean Startup model. ~ Eric Ries,
293:In our darkest moments, we come to know the true measure of our souls. ~ Brian Rathbone,
294:Love is the measure of life; only so far as we love do we really live. ~ John Burroughs,
295:Measure your emotions. You don't need an atomic explosion for a minor point. ~ Jim Rohn,
296:Perpetual modernism is the measure of merit in every work of art. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
297:Society is what decides who's sane and who isn't, so you got to measure up. ~ Ken Kesey,
298:Spirituality is NOT the gauge at which we should measure our humanity. ~ Steve Maraboli,
299:The measure of your success will be the measure of your generosity. ~ Pope John Paul II,
300:The true measure of what you put in, is what's received on the other end. ~ Ron Kaufman,
301:Whenever things were frightening, it was a good idea to measure them. ~ Daniel Kehlmann,
302:As a measure of acting skills, film can be very deceptive. ~ Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio,
303:Attainment is a poor measure of capacity, and ignorance no proof of defect. ~ Cyril Burt,
304:Be faithful to your love and you mill be recompensed beyond measure. ~ Albert Schweitzer,
305:For to know a man's library is, in some measure, to know his mind.
   ~ Geraldine Brooks,
306:God is a being who gives everything but punishment in over measure. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
307:He had been trying to measure the distance between the earth and God. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
308:Income is the natural and rational gauge and measure of respectability. ~ Ambrose Bierce,
309:Just because you can measure everything doesn't mean that you should. ~ W Edwards Deming,
310:Only in the doing can the measure be made, and then only in hindsight. ~ Ian C Esslemont,
311:THE MEASURE OF A SPIRITUAL LIFE IS NOT IN ITS ECSTASIES BUT IN ITS OBEDIENCE ~ Anonymous,
312:The measure of progress of civilization is the progress of the people. ~ George Bancroft,
313:There is no way to measure it ... because there's no one to measure it. ~ Frederick Lenz,
314:Trahern had been gifted with the rare, full measure of a sorcerer’s power. ~ Dani Harper,
315:You measure your people and you take action on those that don't measure up. ~ Jack Welch,
316:A true measure of strength is to use your hands to incapacitate somebody. ~ Aaron Eckhart,
317:Being best is a false goal, you have to measure success on your own terms. ~ Damien Hirst,
318:Books formed the basis of my world, my unit of measure was the printed word, ~ Magda Szab,
319:Every life has a measure of sorrow, and sometimes this is what awakens us. ~ Steven Tyler,
320:Everything is good in due measure and strong sensations know not measure. ~ Anton Chekhov,
321:evil beyond measure, madness, and the power of a masterfully skilled Bocor. ~ Dean Koontz,
322:Love will be an impulse that will inspire and ruin in equal measure. ~ Neil Gaiman,
323:Measure not the work until the day's out and the labor done. ~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning,
324:Measure the success of your days by the lives touched vs the hours passed. ~ Robin Sharma,
325:Psychology helps to measure the probability that an aim is attainable. ~ Edward Thorndike,
326:The accurate measure of a human being is what he or she actually gets done. ~ George Lois,
327:The one measure of true love is: you can insult the other. --Slavoj Zizek ~ Russell Brand,
328:We must measure what leads to results, not simply what is easy to measure. ~ Charles Koch,
329:While my stuff is decreasing, what matters is increasing in equal measure. ~ Jen Hatmaker,
330:Wise is the person at either end. Who can in due measure spare as well as spend. ~ Lucian,
331:You must strike in measure, when there are many to strike on one Anvile. ~ George Herbert,
332:Before any great achievement, some measure of depression is very usual. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
333:But all our differences hardly measure up to the values we all hold in common. ~ Joe Biden,
334:How a society treats its disabled is the true measure of a civilization. ~ Chen Guangcheng,
335:I don't think you can be a Catholic without an accompanying measure of guilt. ~ Mia Farrow,
336:is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. ~ Michael Finkel,
337:It is a human tendency "to measure truth and error by our capacity." ~ Michel de Montaigne,
338:Kiss a lover
Dance a measure,
Find your name
And buried treasure... ~ Neil Gaiman,
339:Measure not by the scale of perfection the meager product of reality. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
340:Observe due measure, for right timing is in all things the most important factor. ~ Hesiod,
341:The condition of women in a nation is the real measure of its progress. ~ Ng g wa Thiong o,
342:The measure of a life, after all, is not its duration, but its donation. ~ Corrie ten Boom,
343:There never was a God. 'God is dead' is a halfway measure I won't go with. ~ Penn Jillette,
344:The true measure of leadership is influence - nothing more, nothing less. ~ John C Maxwell,
345:Tragedy took your measure. It tested you, to see what you were capable of. ~ Julie LeMense,
346:You can't measure time the way you measure the distance between two points. ~ Paulo Coelho,
347:You'll never be able to really measure anything, right? Including teachers. ~ Cathy O Neil,
348:As Angelo discovered in Measure for Measure, nothing corrupts like virtue. ~ Germaine Greer,
349:Exceed due measure, and the most delightful things become the least delightful. ~ Epictetus,
350:How will I be remembered by my children? This is the true measure of a man. ~ Brian Herbert,
351:Measure the success of your days by the lives touched vs the hours passed. ~ Robin S Sharma,
352:The reason why we have never found measure of wealth. We never sought it. ~ George S Clason,
353:There is no shortage of mechanisms by which to measure almost anything. ~ Marcus Buckingham,
354:The true measure of loving God is to love him without measure. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
355:We gain our first measure of intelligence when we first admit our own ignorance. ~ Socrates,
356:you can measure the size of a person by what makes him or her angry. Listen ~ Dale Carnegie,
357:According to Aquinas, effort may not be the best measure of our virtue. ~ Jen Pollock Michel,
358:All governments are in equal measure good and evil. The best ideal is anarchy. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
359:Civilization, as we know it today, is defined in large measure by science. ~ Pervez Hoodbhoy,
360:[Courage] arises in a great measure from the consciousness of strength . . . ~ Edward Gibbon,
361:Don't let anyone else take the measure of your worth and capabilities. ~ Margaret Spellings,
362:God never measures the mind... He always put His tape measure in the HEART ~ Corrie ten Boom,
363:Greed is satisfied by nothing, but nature finds satisfaction even in scant measure. ~ Seneca,
364:Measure what can be measured, and make measurable what cannot be measured. ~ Galileo Galilei,
365:On a fulcrum in my chest, grief and relief are balanced in equal measure. ~ Nayomi Munaweera,
366:OPPORTUNITIES MAY COME AND GO, BUT IN THE END, HARD WORK IS ALL WE CAN MEASURE. ~ Jeff Goins,
367:The measure of a decent human being is how he or she treats the defenseless. ~ Bill O Reilly,
368:Tilth is something every farmer can recognize but no scientist can measure. ~ Walter Russell,
369:To obtain wealth beyond measure, seek to make more friends than money. ~ Richelle E Goodrich,
370:We must not measure greatness from the mansion down, but from the manger up. ~ Jesse Jackson,
371:You can measure a man's worth by the breed of person he throws out of his office. ~ Dave Sim,
372:All religion is founded on prayer, and in prayer it has its test and measure. ~ Peter Forsyth,
373:Almost all the joyful things of life are outside the measure of IQ tests. ~ Madeleine L Engle,
374:From then on I began to measure my life not by years but by decades. ~ Gabriel Garc a M rquez,
375:in our Christian lives, success is obedience to God, not results we can measure. ~ Beth Moore,
376:It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. ~ Michael Finkel,
377:Life was meant to be lived full measure, flat out, pedal to the metal ~ J Michael Straczynski,
378:Love first. Questions later. Grace beyond measure. All of it unconditional. ~ Karen Kingsbury,
379:Measure what can be measured, and make measureable what cannot be measured. ~ Galileo Galilei,
380:no measure of tine with you will be long enough but lets start with forever ~ Stephanie Meyer,
381:ocean was like an uncaring God, endlessly dangerous, power beyond measure. ~ William Finnegan,
382:That One Who is greater than us is near - nearer than we could measure. ~ Amy Layne Litzelman,
383:The fears of one class of men are not the measure of the rights of another. ~ George Bancroft,
384:There is nothing more difficult to measure than the value of visible emotion. ~ Gertrude Bell,
385:There is only one person who can measure your success. That person is you. ~ David McCullough,
386:You can measure a man's character by the choices he makes under pressure. ~ Winston Churchill,
387:You can't measure love by the time put in, but by the weight of those moments. ~ Sarah Dessen,
388:You're given a large measure of freedom here. If you abuse it, you'll regret it. ~ John Green,
389:A chronometer will measure intervals precisely, but not the passage of time. ~ L E Modesitt Jr,
390:Do not measure your life by your goals but what you are doing to achieve them. ~ Peter Drucker,
391:Don't pay any attention to what they write about you. Just measure it in inches. ~ Andy Warhol,
392:Man cannot measure the bounds nor fathom the depths of divine forgiveness... ~ James E Talmage,
393:Measure your net worth not by how much you have, but by many people you impact. ~ Robin Sharma,
394:Our ability to handle life's challenges is a measure of our strength of character. ~ Les Brown,
395:So long as I'm the president, my measure of success is victory -- and success. ~ George W Bush,
396:Sometimes we measure someone from the position of our own years and experience. ~ Jeff Wheeler,
397:The best measure of a spiritual life is not its ecstasies but its obedience. ~ Oswald Chambers,
398:The degree of your anger over correction equals the measure of your pride. ~ John Paul Jackson,
399:The game has to be real. You have to mean it. The game is a measure of you. ~ Michael E Gerber,
400:The measure of mental health is the disposition to find good everywhere. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
401:The measure of your solitude is the measure of your capacity for communion. ~ Henri J M Nouwen,
402:The secondary function of a bathroom mirror is to measure murmurs in mental mud. ~ Tom Robbins,
403:The true measure of something’s worth is the hours it takes to acquire it. ~ Peter H Diamandis,
404:Those who speak most of progress measure it by quantity and not by quality. ~ George Santayana,
405:When thou art above measure angry, bethink thee how momentary is man's life. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
406:Why do people measure life by the years instead of how good the years were? ~ Gabriel Iglesias,
407:Even the formal measure of the Seasons seemed suspended in the wintry silence. ~ Anthony Powell,
408:If the measure of a man was the size of his hat, these were great men indeed. ~ Joe Abercrombie,
409:It seems to me that we generally do not have a correct measure of our own wisdom. ~ R K Narayan,
410:Music can measure how broad our horizons are. My mind wants to see to infinity. ~ Stevie Wonder,
411:No measure of time with you will be long enough. But let's start with forever ~ Stephenie Meyer,
412:Our values determine the metrics by which we measure ourselves and everyone else. ~ Mark Manson,
413:She was everything he wanted from his life, the very measure of his dreams. ~ Jennifer Donnelly,
414:The ancient Egyptian Royal Cubit was originally defined as a measure of time. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
415:The distance between who I am, and who I want to be is measure only, by my actions. ~ Anonymous,
416:You can't measure a man by his size. You measure him by the fight he has inside. ~ Renzo Gracie,
417:You win by trying. And failing. Test, try, fail, measure, evolve, repeat, persist. ~ Seth Godin,
418:God is more generous than men and will measure them by a different standard. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
419:I like my afterglow with you in motion. I measure time by how your body sways. ~ Jennifer Crusie,
420:I measure my life in pages. If I have pages at dawn, it's been a good night. ~ Hunter S Thompson,
421:information is the measure of the number of possible alternatives for something. ~ Carlo Rovelli,
422:Intelligence is a measure of how well you function within your level of awareness. ~ Scott Adams,
423:It's no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
424:No measure of time with you will be long enough, but we'll start with forever. ~ Stephenie Meyer,
425:The measure of an individual's success should be determined by deeds, not dollars. ~ Al Boudreau,
426:The measure of love is to love without measure. —attributed to Saint Augustine ~ Cassandra Clare,
427:The measure of who we are is how we react to something that doesn't go our way. ~ Gregg Popovich,
428:The measure of your holiness is proportionate to the goodness of your will. ~ John of Ruysbroeck,
429:the real measure of a human was what they did in the dark, when nobody was watching. ~ Seth King,
430:Whose foot is to be the measure to which ours are all to be cut or stretched? ~ Thomas Jefferson,
431:Audacity in wooing is a great virtue, but a man must measure even his virtues. ~ Anthony Trollope,
432:Being with you and not being with you is the only way I have to measure time. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
433:Every day is a fresh start; don't measure yourself by yesterday's troubles. ~ Dagny Scott Barrios,
434:How we treat the least of our brethren,... that's the measure of this country. ~ Abraham Verghese,
435:I didn't have a mother; I had a mama. I measure other women by the stature of my mama. ~ Al Green,
436:If we try to measure Now, we find it's always gone, has become part of the past. ~ Aidan Chambers,
437:Indeed, the more we find to love, the more we add to the measure of our hearts. ~ Lloyd Alexander,
438:It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
439:It’s not what you get, but what you give that is God’s true measure of a life. ~ Elizabeth George,
440:Man is the microcosm; man is the measure of all things; man is the image of God. ~ G K Chesterton,
441:Our fear is not that we are inadequate, but that we are powerful beyond measure. ~ Nelson Mandela,
442:The empowered woman is powerful beyond measure and beautiful beyond description. ~ Steve Maraboli,
443:The measure of love is to love without measure. - attributed to Saint Augustine ~ Cassandra Clare,
444:Wealth is a measure of a person's ability to survive so many days forward. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
445:... But he believed that every great love was in some measure a terrible mistake. ~ Michael Chabon,
446:for a time beyond measure there were no rooms
and now many have forgotten the sky ~ W S Merwin,
447:Grades don't measure anything other than your relevant obedience to a manager. ~ John Taylor Gatto,
448:He taught me that the measure of a man lies not in what he says but what he does. ~ Grant Morrison,
449:I begin to suspect that the man's bewilderment is the measure of his wisdom. ~ Nathaniel Hawthorne,
450:I run with heart and determination, and that's what you can't measure-heart. ~ LaDainian Tomlinson,
451:Never measure your generosity by what you give, but rather by what you have left. ~ Fulton J Sheen,
452:The hours of folly are measur’d by the clock, but of wisdom: no clock can measure. ~ William Blake,
453:The hours of folly are measured by the clock; but of wisdom, no clock can measure. ~ William Blake,
454:The measure of a man is not how many servants he has but how many men he serves . ~ Dwight L Moody,
455:The measure of a society is not only what it does but the quality of its aspirations. ~ Wade Davis,
456:The method of magnitude estimation provided a direct measure of sensation. ~ Stanley Smith Stevens,
457:The real measure of our power is the freedom and opportunity we create for others. ~ Erwin McManus,
458:The true measure of success is how many times you can bounce back from failure. ~ Stephen Richards,
459:Time is a player. Time is part of today, not simply a measure of its passing. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
460:We are wrong in looking forward to death: in great measure it's past already. ~ Seneca the Younger,
461:We must overact our part in some measure, in order to produce any effect at all. ~ William Hazlitt,
462:All measure, and all language, I should pass,
Should I tell what a miracle she was. ~ John Donne,
463:a new generation owes a measure of thanks to every member of the previous generation. ~ Amor Towles,
464:A true measure of an entrepreneur / successful-person is how they deal with adversity. ~ Noah Kagan,
465:Bear in mind that the measure of a man is the worth of the things he cares about. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
466:Considering things in the ecumenical measure, we are the microbes of the Universe. ~ Sahara Sanders,
467:Decline can be a hard thing to measure, especially when you’re in the midst of it. ~ Michelle Obama,
468:Everyone made mistakes. The measure of a person was what happened afterward. Later, ~ Susan Mallery,
469:Four seasons fill the measure of the year; there are four seasons in the minds of men. ~ John Keats,
470:He was good at that. Good at robbing the world of light, even in its barest measure. ~ Ren e Ahdieh,
471:How fast a company can respond in an emergency is a measure of its corporate reflexes. ~ Bill Gates,
472:if we could measure the cumulative effects of hatred, racism and indignity. ~ Patrisse Khan Cullors,
473:It's hard for me to measure them, or to assess my books because I'm so close to them. ~ Roddy Doyle,
474:make constant adjustments with a steering wheel called the Build-Measure-Learn feedback ~ Eric Ries,
475:One's distance from Heaven is in proportion to the measure of one's self-love. ~ Emanuel Swedenborg,
476:Sometimes the most important things that we do are things we cannot measure. ~ Jacqueline Novogratz,
477:Steel blades such as you and I do not measure against the standards for ordinary women ~ Kate Quinn,
478:The indignation of politicians is NOT a good measure of the gravity of any situation. ~ Paul Harvey,
479:The measure of a man is not in how he gets knocked to the mat, it is in how he gets up. ~ Jeph Loeb,
480:The more successful you become, the longer the yardstick people use to measure you by. ~ Tom Landry,
481:The only meaningful measure for a leader is whether the team succeeds or fails. For ~ Jocko Willink,
482:The way people behave towards each other is a measure of their value as human beings. ~ Lynne Truss,
483:You measure peace with guns, progress in megatons. Who's left when the war is won? ~ Jackson Browne,
484:Beloved, there is no way to measure the continuing influence of one godly mother. ~ Elizabeth George,
485:How do the flawed and damaged living ever measure up to the perfection of the dead? ~ Felice Stevens,
486:I don't measure my success anymore by the Grammys. I can't because I'll just end up crushed. ~ Drake,
487:Measure, time and number are nothing but modes of thought or rather of imagination. ~ Baruch Spinoza,
488:Memory is each man's own last measure, and for some, the only achievement. ~ William Least Heat Moon,
489:Not time is the measure of movement but: ...each constant periodic appearance of ideas. ~ John Locke,
490:Success financially is a measure of creative success, it is the same in all arts. ~ Stella McCartney,
491:The measure of your life will not be in what you accumulate, but in what you give away. ~ Wayne Dyer,
492:The right measure is not how many customers you've got, but how closely you hold them. ~ Ron Kaufman,
493:The type of measure used placed constraints on which statistics can be used. ~ Stanley Smith Stevens,
494:We measure our own humanity by how we respond to the unprogrammed, the unpredictable. ~ Ian McDonald,
495:As a measure of our consternation, one or two people nearly put down their cups of tea. ~ Jodi Taylor,
496:Carbon is the currency of how you measure climate change, but water will be the teeth. ~ Jim Yong Kim,
497:Customers don't measure you on how hard you tried, they measure you on what you deliver. ~ Steve Jobs,
498:everyone felt some measure of relief. Drug trafficking was dealt a severe blow, though ~ John Grisham,
499:For so it is, O Lord my God, I measure it! But what it is I measure, I do not know. ~ Saint Augustine,
500:Grace beyond measure. All of it unconditional. Because love like this was from God. ~ Karen Kingsbury,
501:Chasidah. Angel. I love you beyond all measure. That is the only real truth. ~ Linnea Sinclair,
502:I'd rather climb 14a and eat whatever I want than climb 14d and measure out my food. ~ Sonnie Trotter,
503:No one but a fool would measure their satisfaction by what the world thinks of it. ~ Oliver Goldsmith,
504:On assessment: measure what you value instead of valuing only what you can measure. ~ Andy Hargreaves,
505:Our powers, whether of mind or tongue, cannot embrace that measure of understanding ~ Dante Alighieri,
506:Temperature is a measure of the average kinetic energy of a collection of particles. ~ Randall Munroe,
507:That seemed fair to me, as if fairness were a measure the universe cared anything about. ~ Emma Cline,
508:Us girls have our moments of crazy, the measure of a man is how well he copes with them. ~ B J Harvey,
509:You don't usually get to choose the measure of suffering or the degree of joy you have. ~ Ally Condie,
510:How you measure the performance of your managers directly affects the way they act. ~ Gustave Flaubert,
511:I am beginning to measure myself in strength, not pounds. Sometimes in smiles. ~ Laurie Halse Anderson,
512:If you can't measure it, you probably can't manage it Things you measure tend to improve. ~ Ed Seykota,
513:If you have talent, you will receive some measure of success - but only if you persist. ~ Isaac Asimov,
514:It is by standing up for the rights of girls and women that we truly measure up as men. ~ Desmond Tutu,
515:It is not the project but the living process that will be the measure of our actions. ~ David Holmgren,
516:It is the measure of my individual struggle from darkness toward some measure of light. ~ Dylan Thomas,
517:mercy, we all need justice, and—perhaps—we all need some measure of unmerited grace. ~ Bryan Stevenson,
518:Our ability to measure and apportion time affords an almost endless source of comfort. ~ Richard Yates,
519:The cloth of a person is never a true measure of his wisdom and understanding ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
520:The measurement we get when we measure something is not a property of the thing measured. ~ Niels Bohr,
521:The measure of love is to love without measure. ~ Cassandra ClareSaint Augustine ~ Cassandra Clare,
522:The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good. ~ Samuel Johnson,
523:The way I like to measure greatness is... How many people can you make want to be better? ~ Will Smith,
524:We measure minds by their stature; it would be better to esteem them by their beauty. ~ Joseph Joubert,
525:By the hurts we accumulate, we measure both our follies and our accomplishments.. ~ Christopher Paolini,
526:Fortunately, the mass of humankind reveres its saints and despises them in equal measure. ~ John N Gray,
527:He was such a bastard. Maybe he should have Remy shoot him again, just for good measure. ~ Abigail Roux,
528:How can you choose the lesser of two evils, when both evils are too great to measure? ~ Neal Shusterman,
529:I loved the bike because it gave me some measure of independence that I did not have. ~ Paul F Tompkins,
530:Knowing what to measure, and how to measure it, can make a complicated world less so. ~ Steven D Levitt,
531:Knowing what to measure and how to measure it makes a complicated world much less so. ~ Steven D Levitt,
532:Liberals measure compassion by counting the number of people receiving government help. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
533:Oh,” said Strether, “what I want is a thing I’ve ceased to measure or even to understand. ~ Henry James,
534:One of the best ways to measure people is how they behave when something free is offered. ~ Ann Landers,
535:Our values determine the metrics by which we measure ourselves and everyone else. Onoda’s ~ Mark Manson,
536:She hadn’t really counted on having to measure pedagogic dick length with a whole tribe. ~ Magnus Flyte,
537:The true measure of a man is the degree to which he has managed to subjugate his ego. ~ Albert Einstein,
538:the true measure of a person is how they treat someone who can do them aboslutely no good ~ Ann Landers,
539:We measure the excellency of other men by some excellency we conceive to be in ourselves. ~ John Selden,
540:34For he whom God has sent utters the words of God, for he gives the Spirit without measure. ~ Anonymous,
541:Simplicity and Repose are qualities that measure the true value of any work of art. ~ Frank Lloyd Wright,
542:The amount of freedom you have in your life is not the measure of the worth of your life. ~ Atul Gawande,
543:The drift in Menkaure's position has been set using the measure of creation; six days. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
544:The measure of a great teacher isn’t what he or she knows; it’s what the students know. ~ John C Maxwell,
545:The measure of a life well lived is how many good dogs you can fit into it.
[or cats] ~ Marion Lennox,
546:the things that she took for granted gave the measure of those she had rebelled against. ~ Edith Wharton,
547:where you live is just geography. And you can’t measure happiness in dollars and cents. ~ Tilly Bagshawe,
548:You are magnificent beyond measure, perfect in your imperfections, and wonderfully made. ~ Abiola Abrams,
549:You are not weak. You are not indecisive. You are strong. Fierce. Capable beyond measure. ~ Ren e Ahdieh,
550:A man of few words will rarely be thoughtless in his speech; he will measure every word. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
551:And so when studying faces, we do indeed measure them, but as painters, not as surveyors. ~ Marcel Proust,
552:Embryology furnishes, also, the best measure of true affinities existing between animals. ~ Louis Agassiz,
553:God releases more of His power and presence according to the measure of our hunger for Him. ~ Mike Bickle,
554:I believe in the old saying that if you can’t measure something, you can’t improve it. ~ Patrick Lencioni,
555:I don't measure my life by the money I've made. Other people might, but certainly don't. ~ Warren Buffett,
556:I have thought a sufficient measure of civilization is the influence of good women. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
557:I measure the progress of a community by the degree of progress which women have achieved. ~ B R Ambedkar,
558:Joy is a big stress buster too. Measure your success by how much fun you're having. ~ Gabrielle Bernstein,
559:Life is short is what some niggaz said; not if you measure life - by how one lives and what he did. ~ Nas,
560:O love, be moderate, allay thy ecstasy, In measure rain thy joy, scant this excess! ~ William Shakespeare,
561:REMEMBER: it is impossible to evaluate, or even understand, anything that you cannot measure. ~ Anonymous,
562:So you choose to measure by the only standard that allows your life to be meaningless? ~ Orson Scott Card,
563:The measure of a man is not what he does for wages but what he does with his free time. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
564:What is character, if not a man's measure of himself against his friends and enemies? ~ Christopher Moore,
565:Your conscience is the measure of the honesty of your selfishness. Listen to it carefully. ~ Richard Bach,
566:Being with you and not being with you is the only way I have to measure time.
   ~ Jorge Luis Borges, [T1],
567:but human beings measure risk and privation within the compass of their personal knowledge. ~ Max Hastings,
568:Can we today measure devotion to husband and children by our indifference to everything else? ~ Golda Meir,
569:Her throat ached: adoration, heartbreak, in equal measure. “Kiss me,” she said. “Please. ~ Cassandra Clare,
570:I'm surrounded by good people. That's the measure of a good life. All the rest is flotsam. ~ Roger Daltrey,
571:I've often thought that the unit of measure that best suits prose is the human breath ~ Charles D Ambrosio,
572:I was going to thrash them within an inch of their lives, but I didn't have a tape measure. ~ Groucho Marx,
573:Sometimes the measure of a person can only be gleaned through his interactions with others. ~ Anne Mallory,
574:That sucks, huge, so huge it's impossible to measure how huge that sucks, it's that huge. ~ Kristen Ashley,
575:The measure of all love is its giving. The measure of the love of God is the cross of Christ. ~ J I Packer,
576:The measure of a people is found in how it treats those who have sacrificed for its survival. ~ Luke Scull,
577:The measure of choosing well, is, whether a man likes and finds good in what he has chosen. ~ Charles Lamb,
578:The measure of the sincerity is the measure of the success.
23 April 1968
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
579:The true measure of any society can be found in how it treats its most vulnerable members ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
580:Time has no independent existence apart from the order of events by which we measure it. ~ Albert Einstein,
581:We should always measure a government's environmental rhetoric against its environmental record ~ John Key,
582:You always have to measure your desires and goals against your ego and your humility. ~ Sebastian Copeland,
583:Acceptance by government of a dissident press is a measure of the maturity of a nation. ~ William O Douglas,
584:But presidential approval also became a surrogate measure of national unity and patriotism. ~ Thomas E Mann,
585:How do you know if you don't measure if you have a system that simply suckles kids through? ~ George W Bush,
586:I think only a massive public outcry would result in my receiving any measure of justice. ~ Leonard Peltier,
587:It is no measure of health to be well-adjusted to a profoundly sick society. —KRISHNAMURTI ~ Ethan Nichtern,
588:It is wrong to suppose that if you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it – a costly myth ~ W Edwards Deming,
589:Of one thing I am certain, the body is not the measure of healing, peace is the measure. ~ Phyllis McGinley,
590:One of the things that Africa needs, everybody seems to agree, is some measure of debt relief. ~ Gwen Ifill,
591:The depressed individual is unable to measure up; he is tired of having to become himself. ~ Byung Chul Han,
592:The measure of a Christian is not in the height of his grasp but in the depth of his love ~ Clarence Jordan,
593:The realities of the world seldom measure up to the sublime designs of human imagination. ~ Bryant H McGill,
594:Before you measure the years, you measure the days. And before the days, you measure the moon. ~ Mitch Albom,
595:For all the compasses in the world, there's only one direction, and time is its only measure. ~ Tom Stoppard,
596:Greatness is not a measure of how great you are but how great others came to be because of you ~ Cus D Amato,
597:He gave man speech, and speech created thought, Which is the measure of the universe. ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley,
598:In advocating any measure we must consider not only its justice but its practicability. ~ Theodore Roosevelt,
599:Measure the hope of that moment, that feeling. Everything else will be measured against it. ~ David Levithan,
600:The entrance His words find with me, will be the measure of the power of any words with Him. ~ Andrew Murray,
601:The main measure of your devotion to God is not your devotional life. It is simply your life. ~ John Ortberg,
602:The measure of a civilization is in the courage, not of its soldiers, but of its bystanders. ~ Jack McDevitt,
603:the measure of a man is how he treats the women in his family.” His wisdom came from experience, ~ J D Vance,
604:The measure of a society is found in how they treat their weakest and most helpless citizens. ~ Jimmy Carter,
605:There has to be a measure of difficulty or problem-solving in travel for it to be worthwhile. ~ Paul Theroux,
606:The true measure of success isn't winning, it's whether you won & could actually deliver. ~ Arlene Dickinson,
607:What was the measure of a marriage? These moments of caring and bliss? Or the secrets withheld? ~ A J Banner,
608:Your conscience is the measure of the honesty of your selfishness.
Listen to it carefully. ~ Richard Bach,
609:a man's worldly success will be in the measure that he sacrifices his confused animal thoughts, ~ James Allen,
610:But fear is no fit means to measure anyone, for fools have no fear, or so I've heard it said. ~ Cameron Dokey,
611:By virtually any measure, the record of the Republican Majority is an appalling failure. ~ Sheila Jackson Lee,
612:Choosing writing as a career, just by itself, is a measure of not being a calculating person. ~ Justin Cronin,
613:Do not measure the number of tragedies you suffer, quantify the success derived from the. ~ Jacqueline Susann,
614:Don't measure anything unless the data helps you make a better decision or change your actions. ~ Seth Godin,
615:It wasn't until I'd met everyone else's measure of success that I realized I'd failed myself. ~ Rick Remender,
616:Know how to behave at a fine restaurant, which is a telltale measure of social maturity. ~ Marilyn vos Savant,
617:Let yourself feel the pain you’ve been avoiding, and you will become powerful in equal measure. ~ Keith Ablow,
618:Men do not know how to appreciate and measure luck except that of others. Their own never. ~ Indro Montanelli,
619:Mrs. Merriweather played her voice like an organ; every word she said received its full measure: ~ Harper Lee,
620:one line in The Bucket List. “You measure yourself by the people who measure themselves by you. ~ Phil Knight,
621:She repeated the thought again for good measure—and because she liked to hear herself think. ~ Jennifer Shirk,
622:Success is not the measure of a man but a triumph over those who choose to hold him back. ~ William J Clinton,
623:The ability to show hospitality has been a measure of one’s character across cultures and time. ~ Brett McKay,
624:The real measure of success is the number of experiments that can be crowded into 24 hours. ~ Thomas A Edison,
625:Time has no independent existence apart from the
order of events by which we measure it. ~ Albert Einstein,
626:what we do, good or bad, is returned in full measure in this life rather than in the hereafter. ~ Ruskin Bond,
627:A simple way to take measure of a country is to look at how many want in.. And how many want out. ~ Tony Blair,
628:A simple way to take measure of a country is to look at how many want in...And how many want out. ~ Tony Blair,
629:Because love has been so perverted, it has in many cases come to involve a measure of hatred. ~ Germaine Greer,
630:He who does not prefer exile to slavery is not free by any measure of freedom, truth and duty. ~ Khalil Gibran,
631:If you want to see the true measure of a man, watch how he treats his inferiors, not his equals. ~ J K Rowling,
632:Krishnamurti said, “It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. ~ Katy Bowman,
633:Loss was not a skill, not a measure of a life. And yet I still felt I had something to lose. ~ Haruki Murakami,
634:No amount of flowers or pretty compliments could ever measure up to a man who did housework. ~ Karin Slaughter,
635:Only when a tree has fallen can you take the measure of it. It is the same with a man. ~ Anne Morrow Lindbergh,
636:The relish of good and evil depends in a great measure upon the opinion we have of them. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
637:The way you give your name to others is a measure of how much you like and
respect yourself. ~ Brian Tracy,
638:You can measure a man's sorrow, and the world's, in the number of stories that perish unheard. ~ Jacob M Appel,
639:Control your temper. Remember, you can measure the size of a person by what makes him or her angry. ~ Anonymous,
640:Don’t pay any attention to what they write about you, just measure it in inches.”—Andy Warhol ~ Timothy Ferriss,
641:Doubt contains some measure of faith, while disbelief is the total and absolute lack of hope. ~ Seth Adam Smith,
642:Guns are like thermometers, only instead of measuring body temperatures they measure our fear. ~ Jean Zimmerman,
643:I measure success by how many people love me. And the best way to be loved is to be lo veable. ~ Warren Buffett,
644:I measure success in terms of the contributions an individual makes to her fellow human beings. ~ Margaret Mead,
645:It is not easy to measure the ocean, but we can be measured by it, confront it, and be in it. ~ Terence McKenna,
646:I've laid down with love and woke up with lies. What's it all, worth only the heart can measure. ~ Stevie Nicks,
647:Love! Beyond measure — beyond death — it nearly kills. But one wouldn't have been without it. ~ John Galsworthy,
648:Measure the hope of that moment, that feeling.
Everything else will be measured against it. ~ David Levithan,
649:She sat down again. “Oh, Dominic, love has no measure.” “What?” “I mean, yes, please kiss me. ~ Jeanne Birdsall,
650:The measure of a country's greatness is its ability to retain compassion in time of crisis. ~ Thurgood Marshall,
651:The measure of a man is not how much he suffers in the test, but how he comes out at the end. ~ Neal Shusterman,
652:The ultimate test of our spirituality is the measure of our amazement at the grace of God. ~ Martyn Lloyd Jones,
653:Working from reality is a similar idea. You can “measure” one piece against another by eye, such ~ Garrett Hack,
654:As with marathon runs and lengths of toilet paper, there had to be standards to measure up to. ~ Haruki Murakami,
655:It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.” —J. Krishnamurti ~ Timothy Ferriss,
656:money, after all, is just one measure of a thriving company and usually not the most meaningful one. ~ Anonymous,
657:Perfection is the measure of heaven, and the wish to be perfect the measure of man. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
658:Traveling on every path, you will not find the boundaries of soul by going; so deep is its measure. ~ Heraclitus,
659:We should measure welfare's success by how many people leave welfare, not by how many are added. ~ Ronald Reagan,
660:Who is moving in the distance? It is the clock's pendulum, Hired by the god of death To measure life. ~ Gu Cheng,
661:You can't measure the mutual affection of two human beings by the number of words they exchange. ~ Milan Kundera,
662:A man comes to measure his greatness by the regrets, envies and hatreds of his competitors. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
663:Do not measure success by today's harvest. Measure success by the seeds you plant today. ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
664:Equality is the measure of all things, and bad behavior is less bad if everyone indulges in it. ~ Anthony Daniels,
665:Every builder builds somewhat for unknown purposes, and is in a measure a prophet. ~ Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman,
666:Our obsession with security is a measure of the power we have granted the future to hold over us. ~ Wendell Berry,
667:Some things get written more quickly than others, but I can't really measure degrees of difficulty. ~ Paul Auster,
668:There is no measure in the occasion that breeds;
therefore the sadness is without limit. ~ William Shakespeare,
669:The true measure of greatness of a human being is their ability to express love in relationship. ~ Walter Russell,
670:things cannot be expected to turn up of themselves. We must in a measure assist to turn them up ~ Charles Dickens,
671:To measure up to all that is demanded of him, a man must overestimate his capacities ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
672:To some men there’s no poison worse than a gift, none worse than a measure of pity. I would know. ~ Mark Lawrence,
673:Utility then is not the measure of exchangeable value, although it is absolutely essential to it. ~ David Ricardo,
674:We, the people, still believe that every citizen deserves a basic measure of security and dignity. ~ Barack Obama,
675:When money functions as measure of value it must truly represent the values it helps to circulate. ~ David Harvey,
676:Women have a less accurate measure of time than men; there is a clock in Adam, none in Eve. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
677:You can measure your worth by your dedication to your path, not by your successes or failures ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
678:You don’t usually get to choose the measure of suffering or the degree of joy you have - Ky Markham ~ Ally Condie,
679:Air power is the most difficult of military force to measure or even express in precise terms. ~ Winston Churchill,
680:Civilized people have exchanged some part of their chances of happiness for a measure of security. ~ Sigmund Freud,
681:Here is how I take the measure of my progress in life: I imagine myself as I was, back there in ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
682:I love the pride whose measure is its own eminence and not the insignificance of someone else. ~ Franz Grillparzer,
683:I measure my success by how happy I am, not how big the business is or how much money I've made. ~ Gary Vaynerchuk,
684:Managers who don't know how to measure what they want settle for wanting what they can measure. ~ Russell L Ackoff,
685:She arched and farted like Mona Lisa if you really looked at her and for good fruitarian measure. ~ Joseph McElroy,
686:She is more beautiful than I have words for. And last night, I was blessed beyond measure to serve her. ~ J R Ward,
687:There's many reason music exists and we are beginning to no only understand that, but measure that. ~ Tod Machover,
688:They say one should never trust a thin chef. By this measure, Chef Maurice was very trustworthy indeed. ~ J A Lang,
689:To measure up to all that is demanded of him, a man must overestimate his capacities. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
690:We die. That may be the meaning of life. But we do language. That may be the measure of our lives. ~ Toni Morrison,
691:You can measure your worth by your dedication to your path, not by your successes or failures. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
692:You don’t usually get to choose the measure of suffering or the degree of joy you have. (Ky Markham) ~ Ally Condie,
693:You get one pass at life. That's all. Only one. And the lasting measure of that life is Jesus Christ. ~ John Piper,
694:You get one pass at life. That’s all. Only one. And the lasting measure of that life is Jesus Christ. ~ John Piper,
695:A common fallacy: to imagine a measure will be easy because we have private motives for desiring it. ~ George Eliot,
696:Always compare yourself to the best. Even if you never measure up, it can't help but make you better. ~ Tom Robbins,
697:Be attentive, feel nothing in vain, measure and compare: this is the whole law of philosophy. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
698:Control your temper. Remember, you can measure the size of a person by what makes him or her angry. ~ Dale Carnegie,
699:I'm doing stuff on Kaballah and Scientology and a little bit more racial stuff, for good measure. ~ Sarah Silverman,
700:It is circumstance and proper measure that give an action its character, and make it either good or bad. ~ Plutarch,
701:Lord, make me to know mine end, and the measure of my days, what it is: that I may know how frail I am. ~ Anonymous,
702:Measure your wealth not by the things you have, but by the things for which you would not take money. ~ Dave Ramsey,
703:Prove it. I'll measure your words against your actions, and from that I will determine your worth. ~ Jackie Kessler,
704:REMEMBER: it is impossible to evaluate, or even understand, anything that you cannot measure.” 80 ~ Timothy Ferriss,
705:She was pissed and aroused in equal measure. Being more aroused than pissed, pissed her off even more. ~ Celia Kyle,
706:the greater the sin you forgive them of, the greater the measure of the Spirit that will come to you. ~ R T Kendall,
707:The measure of self-motivation in a young person will become the best way to predict upward mobility. ~ Tyler Cowen,
708:as Krishnamurti said, “It is no measure of health to be well-adjusted to a profoundly sick society. ~ Jay Michaelson,
709:Disorder increases with time because we measure time in the direction in which disorder increases. ~ Stephen Hawking,
710:GDP per capita is between two and four times higher for China than India, depending on how you measure ~ Clay Shirky,
711:I believe we need heroes...we need certain people who we can measure our own shortcomings by. ~ Richard Attenborough,
712:I’d mistaken familiarity for insight and equated hours spent together as a measure of understanding. ~ Tom Rob Smith,
713:I don't measure a man's success by how high he climbs but how high he bounces when he hits bottom. ~ George S Patton,
714:If you can measure success in this business based on happiness alone I feel like I've hit the lottery. ~ Justin Long,
715:Sanitation Initiative,” Miss Hilly say. “As a disease-preventative measure.” I’m surprised by how ~ Kathryn Stockett,
716:The true measure of a person can be seen in the way they treat those less powerful than themselves. ~ Brian Rathbone,
717:The true measure of your education is not what you know, but how you share what you know with others. ~ Kent Nerburn,
718:We have all made mistakes in this life. How we learn from our mistakes is the measure of who we are. ~ Steve Gleason,
719:Well, paycheck protection is an important ingredient for a successful campaign finance reform measure. ~ Andrew Card,
720:when however small a measure of jealousy is mixed with misunderstanding, there is going to be trouble. ~ John Irving,
721:All living things contain a measure of madness that moves them in strange, sometimes inexplicable ways. ~ Yann Martel,
722:As leaders, we understand that intangibles are important, but we don't have a clue how to measure them. ~ Chip Conley,
723:  Control your temper. Remember, you can measure the size of a person by what makes him or her angry. ~ Dale Carnegie,
724:Everything about her was amazing to him. Even her power to hurt him, which she held in great measure. ~ Susan Sleeman,
725:focus on the boring stuff: how to measure progress, how to set up milestones, and how to prioritize work. ~ Eric Ries,
726:I think the best-written films or television series have a measure of the opposite of what they are. ~ Bryan Cranston,
727:I've always believed the best measure of a product's worth is customer acceptance in the marketplace. ~ Paul Otellini,
728:Let none presume to measure the irregularities of Michael Angelo or Socrates by village scales. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
729:No one measures a life in weeks and days. You measure life in years and by the things that happen to you. ~ Sara Zarr,
730:On the scale of relevance, public approval or disapproval of a woman's choices should not merit measure. ~ Roxane Gay,
731:People can't measure the amount of heart you have and how much you're willing to fight for something. ~ Blake Griffin,
732:Power is also like love, easier to experience than to define or measure, but no less real for that. ~ Joseph S Nye Jr,
733:The measure of a man's real character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out. ~ Thomas B Macaulay,
734:There are words and accents by which this grief can be assuaged, and the disease in a great measure removed. ~ Horace,
735:The solution to adult problems tomorrow depends on large measure upon how our children grow up today. ~ Margaret Mead,
736:To measure time, one must begin. To grow futureward, one must root. Deep into the ground with blood. ~ Steven Erikson,
737:weeping...betraying a sense of loss so huge and irreparable that the mind balks at taking its measure. ~ Jon Krakauer,
738:Yoga is an exact science in the form of poetry when we measure the flow of neurotransmitters in the brain. ~ Amit Ray,
739:You can also volunteer or freelance in certain fields to gain a feel for them and measure your response. ~ Kate White,
740:Do actions agree with words? There's your measure of reliability. Never confine yourself to the words. ~ Frank Herbert,
741:I measured the skies, now the shadows I measure. Sky-bound was the mind, Earth-bound the body rests. ~ Johannes Kepler,
742:Jiddu Krishnamurti, 26 who explained: “It is no measure of health to be well-adjusted to a sick society. ~ Johann Hari,
743:The applause of all but very good men is no more than the precise measure of their possible hostility. ~ Alec Guinness,
744:The measure of a leader is not the number of people who serve him but the number of people he serves. ~ John C Maxwell,
745:The measure of our success will be the condition on which we leave the world for the next generation. ~ Robert Redford,
746:We must understand that the highest form of freedom carries with it the greatest measure of discipline. ~ Cesar Chavez,
747:Who shall measure the hat and violence of the poet's heart when caught and tangled in a woman's body? ~ Virginia Woolf,
748:You can measure a programmer's perspective by noting his attitude on the continuing vitality of FORTRAN. ~ Alan Perlis,
749:You can measure your worth by your dedication to your path, not by your successes or failures. You ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
750:You can't really measure your game. You can shoot seven under and lose and you can shoot even and win. ~ Retief Goosen,
751:You take whatever victories you find in this game, and you measure success in the smallest of increments. ~ Joe Layden,
752:All living things contain a measure of madness that moves them in a strange, sometimes inexplicable ways. ~ Yann Martel,
753:A lot of people measure a man by what he's got. I've decided to measure myself by what I can give up. ~ Geoff Nicholson,
754:A man does not measure its height in moments of comfort, but in terms of change and controversy ~ Martin Luther King Jr,
755:Anyone with gumption and a sharp mind will take the measure of two things: what's said and what's done. ~ Seamus Heaney,
756:Don’t let disappointment be the measure of your relationship with a person. Let trust be the measure. ~ Nicole Williams,
757:...do you actually think that how long a person grieves is a measure of how much they loved someone? ~ David Wroblewski,
758:Each man begins with his own world to conquer, and his education is the measure of his conquest. ~ Charles Evans Hughes,
759:I believe the measure of a man isn't just the road he's traveled; it's the choices he's made along the way. ~ Joe Biden,
760:If you try to measure the future, you will never risk the present. Playing it safe. A ghastly game. ~ Catherine Deneuve,
761:The earth and myself are of one mind. The measure of the land and the neasure of our bodies are the same ~ Chief Joseph,
762:The measure of a bookstore is not its receipts, but its friends,” he says, “and here, we are rich indeed. ~ Robin Sloan,
763:The measure of a leader is not the number of people who serve him, but the number of people he serves. ~ John C Maxwell,
764:The money you attract is the exact measure of value of the ideas you have succeeded in externalizing. ~ Elizabeth Towne,
765:There is no choice we can make that will help us avoid heartache or suffering or loss, in some measure. ~ Nora McInerny,
766:We humans make so much of 'our' time on earth. We measure it, we compare it, we put it in our tombstones. ~ Mitch Albom,
767:When you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it. ~ Lord Kelvin,
768:A better measure of our success is to look at the people on our team and see how they are working together. ~ Ed Catmull,
769:A more or less accurate measure of class in America is TV size: the bigger your TV, the lower your class. ~ Paul Fussell,
770:As long as your feelings, faith, honesty and understanding are alive, there is no need to measure your love. ~ Raj Singh,
771:By any reasonable measure of achievement, the faith of the Enlightenment thinkers in science was justified. ~ E O Wilson,
772:I dont really ever compare myself to other people, I dont even measure myself in terms of anyone but myself. ~ Lady Gaga,
773:If allowed to be, the heart is self-policing, and a reasonable measure of guilt guards against corruption. ~ Dean Koontz,
774:If you dont measure yourself by achievement, how are you going to set achievement levels for other people? ~ Bing Gordon,
775:In most cases, no matter what it is, if you measure it and reward it, people will try to excel at it ~ Marcus Buckingham,
776:Lately, I’ve noticed that the measure of a person’s worth is the degree of hatred towards President Trump. ~ Maura Stone,
777:Measurement is fabulous. Unless you're busy measuring what's easy to measure as opposed to what's important ~ Seth Godin,
778:People are yearning to be asked to use the full measure of their potential for something they care about. ~ Dan Pallotta,
779:The measure of a society, he said, is how well it transforms pain and suffering into something worthwhile. ~ Eric Weiner,
780:The true measure of the justice of a system is the amount of protection it guarantees to the weakest. ~ Aung San Suu Kyi,
781:This is one of those times when explaining a feeling cannot measure up to actually having the feeling ~ Adriana Trigiani,
782:You don’t realize how big somebody was in your life, until you measure the space of their absence. ~ Christina L Rozelle,
783:A great measure of a man is how he reacts to a midnight awakening when there's no fire or burglar in sight. ~ Kate Jacobs,
784:Avoid irreverent, empty speech, for this will produce an even greater measure of godlessness. 2 Timothy 2:16 ~ Beth Moore,
785:Crime and bad lives are the measure of a State's failure, all crime in the end is the crime of the community. ~ H G Wells,
786:Do not measure the number of tragedies you sustain, but to quantify the success you derive from them. ~ Jacqueline Susann,
787:Evidently he had the first quality of an angler, which is not to measure the pleasure by the catch. ~ Winston S Churchill,
788:Freedom is fragile and must be protected. To sacrifice it, even as a temporary measure, is to betray it. ~ Germaine Greer,
789:Happiness lies in a large measure of self-forgetfulness, either in work . . . or in the love of others. ♥ ~ Everett Ruess,
790:If you don't measure up to your expectations, realize that you should just be life without expectations. ~ Frederick Lenz,
791:It is the sign of a great mind to dislike greatness, and prefer things in measure to things in excess. ~ Seneca the Elder,
792:...it would be unfair to measure him against a fictional standard that he could never possibly achieve. ~ Karen Witemeyer,
793:keeping a well-supplied larder was one way to buy at least a small measure of security, a way to feel safe. ~ Dean Koontz,
794:Non-cooperation is a measure of discipline and sacrifice, and it demands respect for the opposite views. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
795:Sita. He loved you and you loved him. You can’t measure that love by how many days you spent together. ~ Christopher Pike,
796:To understand God's thoughts, one must study statistics, for these are the measure of His purpose. ~ Florence Nightingale,
797:You bring joy and pain in equal measure. Joy because you are with me, but pain because it wont be for long. ~ Yann Martel,
798:By no means run in debt: take thine own measure, Who cannot live on twenty pound a year, Cannot on forty. ~ George Herbert,
799:[God's] Word abides in us in the measure that it governs our lives - in the measure that we act upon it. ~ Kenneth E Hagin,
800:Gross compassion quotient (GCQ) of a country is the measure of the level of compassion of the country as whole. ~ Amit Ray,
801:If self-validation were our most significant societal measure - we would give trophies to ourselves. ~ Mary Anne Radmacher,
802:Let us measure ourselves by our Master, and not by our fellow-servants : then pride will be impossible. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
803:One can measure the greatness and the moral progress of a nation by looking at how it treats its animals. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
804:Proper respect to others is the most prudent rule of directing the measure of reverence due to ourselves. ~ Norm MacDonald,
805:The erotic is a measure between the beginnings of our sense of self and the chaos of our strongest feelings. ~ Audre Lorde,
806:The measure of a master is his success in bringing all men around to his opinion twenty years later. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
807:The measure of civilization in a people is to be found in its just appreciation of the wrongfulness of war. ~ Arthur Helps,
808:There's no preventative measure between the Palestinians, between those terrorists to the state of Israel. ~ Silvan Shalom,
809:"The secret to living well and longer is:eat half, walk double, laugh triple, and love without measure." ~ Tibetan proverb,
810:The way I like to measure greatness is . . . How many people can you make want to be better?” —WILL SMITH ~ John C Maxwell,
811:To take the measure of a man, watch not how he treats his friends, watch how he treats a conquered foe. ~ Aleksandr Voinov,
812:We do not measure a culture by its output of undisguised trivialities but by what it claims as significant. ~ Neil Postman,
813:What is it about the moment you fall in love? How can such a small measure of time contain such enormity? ~ David Levithan,
814:You can’t look at someone with your eyes and take their measure.
You have to look with the heart. ~ Karen Marie Moning,
815:You're an actor - people judge you and criticize you, and praise you and say you're great in equal measure. ~ Laurence Fox,
816:24 THE MEASURE OF LOVE The measure of love is to love without measure. —attributed to Saint Augustine The ~ Cassandra Clare,
817:Courage - a perfect sensibility of the measure of danger, and a mental willingness to endure it. ~ William Tecumseh Sherman,
818:Hope, Patrick knew, was the exact measure of distance
between himself and the person who’d come for help. ~ Jodi Picoult,
819:How do you measure love? Is it by the things we’re willing to do? By the sacrifices we’re willing to make? ~ Krista Ritchie,
820:I guess I'll never measure up to anyone's expectations. I surely don't measure up to what I'd like to be. ~ Beatrice Sparks,
821:It is dangerous to make everybody go forward by the same road: and worse to measure others by oneself. ~ Ignatius of Loyola,
822:[...] it is not easy to talk [...] religion to men who measure excellence by forbidden meats [...] ~ Richard Francis Burton,
823:It's madness to envy other people's happiness. Happiness doesn't come of the peg, it has to be made to measure. ~ Andr Gide,
824:Never measure the height of a mountain until you have reached the top. Then you will see how low it was. ~ Dag Hammarskjold,
825:Poetry is emotion put into measure. The emotion must come by nature, but the measure can be acquired by art. ~ Thomas Hardy,
826:Stop trying to 'fix' yourself; you're NOT broken! You are perfectly imperfect and powerful beyond measure. ~ Steve Maraboli,
827:the quadrature problem is a measure of the greatest difficulty, since it was shown in 1882 to be impossible. ~ Paul J Nahin,
828:The rate of inflation can't be judged accurately by a few items the government arbitrarily chooses to measure. ~ James Cook,
829:What I worry about is climate change, because that would have untold effects that we can't even measure yet. ~ Susan George,
830:What you measure affects what you do. If you don't measure the right thing, you don't do the right thing. ~ Joseph Stiglitz,
831:when however small a measure of jealousy is mixed with misunderstanding, there is always going to be trouble. ~ John Irving,
832:You measure the size of the accomplishment by the obstacles you have to overcome to reach your goals. ~ Booker T Washington,
833:And I know now too that in some small measure I have the power to hurt him and also the power to make it better. ~ Jenny Han,
834:But sometimes, it’d be nice just to hold something real in your hands that felt like a measure of your worth. ~ Shannon Hale,
835:Capital punishment would be more effective as a preventive measure if it were administered prior to the crime. ~ Woody Allen,
836:Firms and employers and monitors will be able to measure economic value with a sometimes oppressive precision. ~ Tyler Cowen,
837:I measure my success in life by the added value my presence brought to those whom I loved, and who loved me. ~ R A Salvatore,
838:I'm so deeply in love with you it's hard to fathom. No words could provide quantifiable resonance or measure. ~ Truth Devour,
839:It is my great misfortune that I have to measure your love by the money gifts you give for Daridranarayana. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
840:Never measure the height of a mountain, until you have reached the top. Then you will see how low it was. ~ Dag Hammarskj ld,
841:No one can measure the loss of business that may arise from a defective item that goes out to a customer. ~ W Edwards Deming,
842:She couldn't see the tree, but she knew it was there. That always gave her a small measure of comfort. ~ Sarah Addison Allen,
843:The measure of great men should always be measured by the means they have used to acquire it. ~ Francois de La Rochefoucauld,
844:The measure of the state's success is that the word anarchy frightens people, while the word state does not. ~ Joseph Sobran,
845:There is no technique, there is just the way to do it. Now, are we going to measure or are we going to cook? ~ Frances Mayes,
846:When I express my opinions it is so as to reveal the measure of my sight not the measure of the thing. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
847:And here's the good part: He got a tongue could measure twenty-one inches. Bet Mrs. Giraffe likes that one. ~ Janet Evanovich,
848:Eratosthenes, the mapmaker who was the first man to accurately measure the size of the Earth, was a librarian. ~ Ken Jennings,
849:For ages men had used sticks to club and spear each other—Anaximander of Miletus used the stick to measure time. ~ Carl Sagan,
850:How do you measure what’s real, what’s true? How do you stack up all that’s pure against all that’s evil? ~ Jennifer Handford,
851:I do not confer praise or blame: I accept. I am the measure of all things. I am the center of the world. ~ W Somerset Maugham,
852:If we could measure the damage to corporations from gossip, it might be more than the GNP of the Third World! ~ Harvey Mackay,
853:It's impossible to measure the type of mental strength and determination that's required to be an elite wrestler. ~ Joe Rogan,
854:Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure ~ Marianne Williamson,
855:The best measure of a successful life is the way we turn away, we renounce, and even by the way we depart it. ~ Tariq Ramadan,
856:The man who can make others laugh secures more votes for a measure than the man who forces them to think. ~ Malcolm De Chazal,
857:The measure of performance of any given agent is the amount of money it accumulates through its actions. ~ John Henry Holland,
858:The measure of the worth of our public activity for God is the private profound communion we have with Him. ~ Oswald Chambers,
859:The measure of your quality as a public person, as a citizen, is the gap between what you do and what you say. ~ Ramsey Clark,
860:The only real failure is the failure to try, and the measure of success is how we cope with disappointment. ~ Deborah Moggach,
861:Traction is a measure of your product’s engagement with its market. Investors care about traction over everything ~ Anonymous,
862:We can't value only what is easy to measure; measurable outcomes may be the least important results of learning. ~ Alfie Kohn,
863:And some by hours; Some measure days by dreams And some by flowers; My heart alone records My days and hours. ~ Madison Cawein,
864:But I do not see this as a shortcoming. For without a measure of arrogance, how can one attempt the impossible? ~ Ren e Ahdieh,
865:By this measure (on the gap between Fischer & his contemporaries), I consider him the greatest world champion ~ Garry Kasparov,
866:I have long since learned, as a measure of elementary hygiene, to be on guard when anyone quotes Pascal. ~ Jos Ortega y Gasset,
867:I think that hurting gives us a way to measure being happy. How can you know one without knowing the other. ~ Lurlene McDaniel,
868:Keep in mind that the true measure of an individual is how he treats a person who can do him absolutely no good. ~ Ann Landers,
869:Man is the measure of all things, of the reality of those which are, and of the unreality of those which are not. ~ Protagoras,
870:Man is the measure of all things, of things that are that they are, and of things that are not that they are not. ~ Protagoras,
871:My dad always said, 'Champ, the measure of a man is not how often he is knocked down, but how quickly he gets up.' ~ Joe Biden,
872:Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. ~ Marianne Williamson,
873:skepticism should be directed at things that are actually untrue rather than things that are difficult to measure. ~ Anonymous,
874:Success has always been easy to measure. It is the distance between one's origins and one's final achievement. ~ Michael Korda,
875:The best measure of a man's honesty isn't his income tax return. It's the zero adjust on his bathroom scale. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
876:The measure of artistic merit is the length to which a writer is willing to go in following his own compulsions. ~ John Updike,
877:The only real measure of the effectiveness of my teaching is what happens in the mind of the person learning. ~ Erika Andersen,
878:There might not be a measure of happiness left in a life, but there could be beauty and grace and endless love. ~ Peter Heller,
879:The soul is no longer honored as it once was, but it still keeps appetite from being the measure of all things. ~ Mason Cooley,
880:The true measure of your worth includes all the benefits others have gained from your success." – Cullen Hightower ~ Pat Flynn,
881:You are rewarded not according to your work or your time but according to the measure of your love. ~ Saint Catherine of Siena,
882:2 country music: good-time urban cowboy fare with a hint of honky-tonk and a healthy measure of rock. ~ Oxford University Press,
883:All social cooperation on a larger scale than the most intimate social group requires a measure of coercion. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr,
884:An estimated value is a precarious measure of justice, compared with the specific thing. ~ William Murray 1st Earl of Mansfield,
885:Can one invent verbs? I want to tell you one: I sky you, so my wings extend so large to love you without measure. ~ Frida Kahlo,
886:Don't measure yourself by what you have accomplished, but by what you should have accomplished with your ability. ~ John Wooden,
887:Every time I get injured I measure it's severity by asking myself 'Would this stop me from going to Disneyland?' ~ Chris Colfer,
888:In the hour of strait and need, we measure men's stature not by the body, but the soul! ~ Edward Bulwer Lytton 1st Baron Lytton,
889:one cannot “predict future events exactly if one cannot even measure the present state of the universe precisely! ~ Bill Bryson,
890:our soul is a mixture and harmony of those things when they c are mixed with each other rightly and in due measure. ~ Anonymous,
891:The measure of a country's greatness should be based on how well it cares for its most vulnerable populations. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
892:There is no technique, there is just the way to do it.
Now, are we going to measure or are we going to cook? ~ Frances Mayes,
893:The rewards of wealth beyond measure had proved cold; only the hungry desire for that wealth hissed with heat. ~ Steven Erikson,
894:They say my verse is sad: no wonder; Its narrow measure spans Tears of eternity, and sorrow, Not mine. but man's. ~ A E Housman,
895:Was music once a proof of God’s existence? As long as it admits things beyond measure, That supposition stands. ~ Seamus Heaney,
896:When it becomes necessary to do a thing, the whole heart and soul should go into the measure, or not attempt it. ~ Thomas Paine,
897:You can't always measure the effects of activist work; you just have to wish and pray that the message gets through. ~ Yoko Ono,
898:You don’t measure love in the number of chances you’re willing to give someone. Love doesn’t run out of chances. ~ Caisey Quinn,
899:Adversity is another way to measure the greatness of individuals. I never had a crisis that didn't make me stronger. ~ Lou Holtz,
900:All the sciences are, in some measure, linked with each other, and before the one is ended, the other begins. ~ Oliver Goldsmith,
901:Let us measure ourselves by our Master, and not by our fellow-servants, then pride will be impossible. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
902:proliferation of mobile phones makes it possible to leap beyond demographics to directly measure human behavior. ~ Alex Pentland,
903:The American president just won the nobel peace prize, by any reasonable measure, all Americans should be proud. ~ Rachel Maddow,
904:The privilege and pleasure That we treasure beyond measure Is to run on little errands for the Ministers of State. ~ W S Gilbert,
905:How do we measure the benefits of free goods or services that were unavailable at any price in previous eras? ~ Erik Brynjolfsson,
906:If Christianity is going to mean anything at all for us now, then the humanity of God cannot be a half measure. ~ Christian Wiman,
907:In order to know virtue, we must acquaint ourselves with vice. Only then can we know the true measure of a man. ~ Marquis de Sade,
908:It is dangerous to make everybody go forward by the same road: and worse to measure others by oneself. ~ Saint Ignatius of Loyola,
909:Market competition is the only form of organization which can afford a large measure of freedom to the individual. ~ Frank Knight,
910:Measure your worth by the dedication to your path, not by your successes or failures." Elizabeth Gilbert, Big Magic ~ Joanna Penn,
911:Money is a stupid measure of achievement, but unfortunately it is the only universal measure we have. ~ Charles Proteus Steinmetz,
912:No man shall ever behold the glory of Christ by sight hereafter who does not in some measure behold it here by faith. ~ John Owen,
913:One cannot enter a State legislature or a prison for felons without becoming, in some measure, a dubious character. ~ H L Mencken,
914:Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate.
Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. ~ Marianne Williamson,
915:She felt some measure of relief knowing that in the very least, on the open road she would have some time to think. ~ Dave Eggers,
916:The ability to portray people in still life and in motion requires the highest measure of intuition and talent. ~ Albert Einstein,
917:The Cosmos is rich beyond measure—in elegant facts, in exquisite interrelationships, in the subtle machinery of awe. ~ Carl Sagan,
918:The first person to measure the rate of acceleration of a free falling body was Father Giambattista Riccioli. ~ Thomas E Woods Jr,
919:The gospel is good news to those who know they don't measure up. It's offensive to those who think they do. ~ Tullian Tchividjian,
920:Thus the metaphysical took the measure of, and mastered, the physical. ~ Buckminster Fuller, Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth,
921:Raising kids isn't carpentry," he said "Forget measuring twice and cutting once, You measure over and over everyday ~ Rachel Simon,
922:The principle here is that a new generation owes a measure of thanks to every member of the previous generation. Our ~ Amor Towles,
923:There is more than one way to measure profits and losses. On every level, institutions can and should have a heart. ~ Randy Pausch,
924:The solution to adult problems tomorrow depends on large measure upon how our children grow up today. —MARGARET MEAD ~ Lisa Bevere,
925:to drag it out of him that they had spent the day at the fair, with Alex and Max tagging along for good measure. I ~ Ginger Voight,
926:Wealth did not, he realised, guarantee happiness, but it did offer a measure of security and opportunity. ~ Hannah Mary Rothschild,
927:By all accounts, we're damned regardless. But I hope,maybe foolishly, we'll get some measure of credit for trying ~ Stephenie Meyer,
928:I measure every grief I meet with narrow, probing eyes - I wonder if it weighs like mine - or has an easier size. ~ Emily Dickinson,
929:Leia knew how to learn the true measure of an individual: Watch what he does to someone he believes is at his mercy. ~ Claudia Gray,
930:That sort of strength…it did things to men like me. It made me want to break her and shelter her in equal measure. ~ Pepper Winters,
931:The grace with which we embrace life, in spite of the pain, the sorrows, is always a measure of what has gone before ~ Alice Walker,
932:the receiver has to expend energy to measure the electromagnetic waves in the vacuum disturbed by the long-gone photon. ~ Anonymous,
933:The said truth is that it is the greatest happiness of the greatest number that is the measure of right and wrong. ~ Jeremy Bentham,
934:This cosmic Nature’s balance is not ours
Nor the mystic measure of her need and use. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Word of Fate,
935:We measure success and reward performance without knowing how governance and culture impact individuals and teams. ~ Peter Morville,
936:What's possible today isn't bound by what was possible yesterday, and is never a measure of what's possible tomorrow. ~ Ron Kaufman,
937:You measure democracy by the freedom it gives its dissidents, not the freedom it gives its assimilated conformists. ~ Abbie Hoffman,
938:All science ever did was measure a teensy sliver of the universe and assume that everything else behaved the same way. ~ Peter Watts,
939:I stopped knowing what to fight against.”
“May you find some measure of happiness in your surrender. May we all. ~ Kiersten White,
940:Laws are important and valuable in the exact natural sciences, in the measure that those sciences are universally valid. ~ Max Weber,
941:One can measure the importance of a scientific work by the number of earlier publications rendered superfluous by it ~ David Hilbert,
942:One way to measure your own fears is to count the number of personal questions you've allowed others to answer for you. ~ Guy Finley,
943:The greatest mathematicians, as Archimedes, Newton, and Gauss, always united theory and applications in equal measure. ~ Felix Klein,
944:There is a measure in everything. There are fixed limits beyond which and short of which right cannot find a resting place. ~ Horace,
945:There was, in his mind, no truer measure of stupidity than to imagine that the world could be reduced to two sides, ~ Steven Erikson,
946:When chess masters err, ordinary wood pushers tend to derive a measure of satisfaction, if not actual glee. ~ Israel Albert Horowitz,
947:With maturity comes the wish to economize - to be more simple. Maturity is the period when one finds the just measure. ~ Bela Bartok,
948:God didn't create universe in six days of human measure.
God's still working, then hasn't yet reached the seventh day. ~ Toba Beta,
949:I’m not a woman who often looks back. I measure actions by results, and peering into the past rarely yields any. ~ Karen Marie Moning,
950:Like all Herondales, his ability to love without measure, without end, was both his great gift and his great curse. ~ Cassandra Clare,
951:Make every occasion a great occasion, for you can never tell who may be taking your measure for a higher place. ~ Orison Swett Marden,
952:The hope or climbing aspiration of a divine child is to receive and achieve Peace, Light and Bliss in infinite measure. ~ Sri Chinmoy,
953:The man who wants his wedding garments to suit him must allow plenty of time for the measure. ~ Edward Bulwer Lytton 1st Baron Lytton,
954:The measure of a man, she said finally, is not the words that mark his end, but everything he’s done since his beginning. ~ T J Klune,
955:Time cannot children,poets,lovers tell- measure imagine,mystery,a kiss -not though mankind would rather know than feel ~ e e cummings,
956:We measure the value of a civilized society by the number of #‎ libraries it opens, not the number it closes down. ~ Philip Pullman,
957:What would your prayers look like if you believed that the cross really was the measure of God's compassion for someone? ~ J D Greear,
958:Why do you have to look to the people around you to get a measure of what's the right thing to think or like or do? ~ Sarah Singleton,
959:William Booth, founder of the Salvation Army, said, “The greatness of a man’s power is in the measure of his surrender. ~ Rick Warren,
960:Within half an hour almost all the women were drunk, a yardstick Laing had long used to measure the success of a party. ~ J G Ballard,
961:You measure a democracy by the freedom it gives its dissidents, not the freedom it gives its assimilated conformists. ~ Abbie Hoffman,
962:Your ability to face setbacks and disappointments without giving up will be the measure of your ability to succeed. ~ Calvin Coolidge,
963:Adversity is another way to measure
the greatness of individuals. I never had
a crisis that didn't make me stronger. ~ Lou Holtz,
964:A writer is dear and necessary for us only in the measure of which he reveals to us the inner workings of his very soul. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
965:Beguildy looked at me over the rim of a great measure of mead. 'Saddle your dreams afore you ride 'em, my wench,' he said. ~ Mary Webb,
966:If you measure your happiness by the amount of liquid you have in your glass, you are either a cliché or an alcoholic. ~ Caprice Crane,
967:I'm not a pacifist by any measure, but I'm also fully aware that the reasons I might go to war could be very dubious. ~ Sherman Alexie,
968:In Hinduism we have got an admirable foot-rule to measure every shastra and every rule of conduct, and that is truth. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
969:Lord of hosts! When I swim in the merciful waters of your grace I find that I can neither plumb nor measure the depths. ~ Menno Simons,
970:Measure what you can, evaluate what you measure, and appreciate that you cannot measure the vast majority of what you do. ~ Ed Catmull,
971:People naturally see themselves in the light of their intentions, but they measure others according to their actions. ~ John C Maxwell,
972:Someone once said that one measure of sentience was how much energy a sophont spent on matters other than survival. Fiben ~ David Brin,
973:The cosmos is full beyond measure of elegant truths; of exquisite interrelationships; of the awesome machinery of nature. ~ Carl Sagan,
974:The professional's grasp of the numbers is a measure of the control he has over the events that the figures represent. ~ Harold Geneen,
975:The union of the mathematician with the poet, fervor with measure, passion with correctness, this surely is the ideal. ~ William James,
976:To know the good from the bad, measure the heart. Actions reveal the true coloring of one's heart, not their intentions. ~ Suzy Kassem,
977:What is the impact of not being valued?
How do you measure the loss of what a human being does not receive? ~ Patrisse Khan Cullors,
978:You don't measure your maturity by comparing yourself with others. You judge maturity by comparing yourself to Jesus. ~ Darrin Patrick,
979:All living things contain a measure of madness that moves them in strange, sometimes inexplicable ways. - "The Life of Pi ~ Yann Martel,
980:As much as we have free choice, absolute destiny is immutable. What is meant to happen does, through one measure or another. ~ J R Ward,
981:Get a version 1.0 out there as soon as you can. Until you have some users to measure, you're optimizing based on guesses. ~ Paul Graham,
982:Good leadership is hard to measure on a daily basis which is why so many default to doing what's easy to measure instead. ~ Simon Sinek,
983:How do you measure your life? What moments have changed your life … or will change your life? Are you living or existing? ~ Buzz Aldrin,
984:Intelligence is little more than a short foot-rule by which we measure the infinite achievements of Circumstances. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
985:I think he revalued everything in his house according to the measure of response it drew from her well-loved eyes. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
986:It is this by which we measure a man, by what he does with his life, by what he creates to leave behind. —Louis L’Amour ~ Louis L Amour,
987:many entrepreneurs focus only on short-term growth. They have an excuse: growth is easy to measure, but durability isn’t. ~ Peter Thiel,
988:More and more, even with a measure of success, I'm not sure what it is people are seeing when they see a movie I've made. ~ Hal Hartley,
989:Sacrifice must be weighed by the pain of what is surrendered, and this alone was the true measure of a virtue’s worth. ~ Steven Erikson,
990:Self-discipline, although difficult, and not always easy while combating negative emotions, should be a defensive measure. ~ Dalai Lama,
991:This world may be full of greed and tragedy and darkness, but I am fortunate beyond measure to have such people about me. ~ John Gwynne,
992:We can't keep measuring success by how much money are we throw at programs. We have to measure success as, 'Is it working?' ~ Paul Ryan,
993:We teach children how to measure and how to weigh. We fail to teach them how to revere, how to sense wonder and awe. ~ Harold S Kushner,
994:We will instead have to measure our economy by the health of the ecosystems and human communities where we do our work. ~ Wendell Berry,
995:You could not measure yourself against the dead, they retained their perfection while your flesh got weaker and weaker. ~ Philipp Meyer,
996:But I did what I thought was right in the moment. In the end, that’s all a man has to measure his life, and it’s plenty. ~ Justin Cronin,
997:God gives each of us our own grace, a special measure of blessings that line up exactly with his purposes for our lives. ~ Brian Houston,
998:I don't believe in statistics. There are too many factors that can't be measured. You can't measure a ballplayer's heart. ~ Red Auerbach,
999:If we are to accomplish anything in this world, it will in equal measure be due to the work and achievements of others. ~ Nelson Mandela,
1000:If you want to change how you see your problems, you have to change what you value and/or how you measure failure/success. ~ Mark Manson,
1001:I know of no better thermometer to your spiritual temperature than this, the measure of the intensity of your prayer. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
1002:It is given to us to calculate, to weigh, to measure, to observe, this is natural philosophy; almost all the rest is chimera. ~ Voltaire,
1003:It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.” —J. Krishnamurti “In the end, winning is ~ Timothy Ferriss,
1004:I used to measure the skies, now I measure the shadows of Earth.
Sky-bound was the mind, earthbound the body rests. ~ Johannes Kepler,
1005:Thank you...for gracing my life with your lovely presence, for adding the sweet measure of your soul to my existence. ~ Richard Matheson,
1006:The measure of a man's culture is the measure of his appreciation. We are ourselves what we appreciate and no more. ~ Frank Lloyd Wright,
1007:The measure of your enlightenment is the degree to which you are comfortable with paradox, contradiction, and ambiguity. ~ Deepak Chopra,
1008:We can have reasonable, thoughtful gun control measure that I think respect the Second Amendment and people's traditions. ~ Barack Obama,
1009:We measure success by accumulation. The measure is false. The true measure is appreciation. He who loves most has most. ~ Henry Van Dyke,
1010:You can measure your power in your ability to stop thought. The longer you can stop thought, the more powerful you are. ~ Frederick Lenz,
1011:a human being is the measure of all things. of the things that are, that they are, and of things that are not, that they are not. ~ Plato,
1012:Because in this house there’s no such thing as being sick unless you can measure it with a thermometer under the tongue. ~ Jennifer Niven,
1013:Eastern philosopher Jiddu Krishnamurti,26 who explained: “It is no measure of health to be well-adjusted to a sick society. ~ Johann Hari,
1014:easy to identify the relevant lead measure: time spent in a state of deep work dedicated toward your wildly important goal. ~ Cal Newport,
1015:For whatever we do in our lives, discipline and control over our own actions ultimately measure the level of our success. ~ R A Salvatore,
1016:Friendship is the inexpressible comfort of feeling safe with a person, having neither to weigh thoughts nor measure words. ~ George Eliot,
1017:He’d shut the door on the subject of loss, thrown all the bolts, and shoved a heavy table up against it for good measure. ~ Cecilia Grant,
1018:I measured the skies, now the shadows I measure, Sky-bound was the mind, earth-bound the body rests. [Kepler's epitaph] ~ Johannes Kepler,
1019:In all human affairs there are efforts, and there are results, and the strength of the effort is the measure of the result. ~ James Allen,
1020:one of the most accurate ways to detect and measure the activity of God is to note the amount of opposition that is present. ~ Nik Ripken,
1021:Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. ~ Marianne Williamson,
1022:Shakespeare wrote sculduddery because he liked it, and for no other reason; his sensuality is the measure of his vitality. ~ Aristophanes,
1023:The attendant smiled a goodbye at the door. “You look much better.” “I’ve achieved a measure of peace with my uncertainty. ~ Robert Crais,
1024:The way we measure productivity is flawed. People checking their BlackBerry over dinner is not the measure of productivity. ~ Tim Ferriss,
1025:When the self is ones exclusive subject and limit, reference and measure, one has no choice but to make a world of words. ~ Wendell Berry,
1026:Words are important to me. I listen to each one, weigh and measure it. If I cannot trust your words, how can I trust you? ~ Julie Klassen,
1027:Work is not a curse; it is the prerogative of intelligence, the only means to manhood, and the measure of civilization. ~ Calvin Coolidge,
1028:At the end of the day, when we measure our healthcare, it will not be by the diseases cured, but by the diseases prevented. ~ Rebecca Onie,
1029:Every time I compare myself with someone else, I can never measure up because I am comparing my insides with their outsides. ~ Renee Swope,
1030:I'd been so fascinated by the notion, that I'd forgotten to measure what it was bringing forth. I'd been asleep, dreaming. ~ Ralph Ellison,
1031:If you want to change how you see your problems, you have to change what you value and/ or how you measure failure/ success. ~ Mark Manson,
1032:Intelligence is little more than a short foot-rule by which we measure the infinite achievements of Circumstances. "I ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
1033:...I think he revalued everything in his house according to the measure of response it drew from her well-loved eyes. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
1034:No institution which does not continually test its ideals, techniques and measure of accomplishment can claim real vitality. ~ John Milton,
1035:Order is information that fits a purpose. The measure of order is the measure of how well the information fits the purpose. ~ Ray Kurzweil,
1036:Our lives are not the measure of all things: consider sublime places for a reminder of human insignificance and frailty. ~ Alain de Botton,
1037:The measure of a man isn’t how popular he is with his friends, but how he treats those who have nothing to give him. ~ Jennifer Beckstrand,
1038:The philosopher says that God's knowledge is the measure of things, and that things are the measure of man's knowledge. ~ Jacques Maritain,
1039:You get pseudo-order when you seek order; you only get a measure of order and control when you embrace randomness. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
1040:Act after having made assessments. The one who first knows the measure of far and near wins - this is the rule of armed struggle. ~ Sun Tzu,
1041:A dwarf who brings a standard along with him to measure his own size, take my word, is a dwarf in more articles than one. ~ Laurence Sterne,
1042:And what is love? My measure of it is that I should have died to spare her. Her measure is for us to be together longer. I ~ Harold Brodkey,
1043:Every man must, in a measure, be alone in the world. No heart was ever cast in the same mould as that which we bear within us. ~ Eric Berne,
1044:If we believe something does not exist unless we measure it, then we put aside: love, feeling, intuition, art and philosophy. ~ Peter Block,
1045:If you want to change how you see your problems, you have to change what you value and/or how you measure failure/success. As ~ Mark Manson,
1046:I measure every Grief I meet
With narrow, probing, Eyes;
I wonder if It weighs like Mine,
Or has an Easier size. ~ Emily Dickinson,
1047:I measure what's going on, and I adapt to it. I try to get my ego out of the way. The market is smarter than I am so I bend. ~ Martin Zweig,
1048:In all pursuits men complain of failure when they have not attained the measure of success they proposed to themselves. ~ Charles Tomlinson,
1049:"Indeed, self-knowledge as a psychotherapeutic measure frequently requires much painstaking work extending over a long period." ~ Carl Jung,
1050:In proportion to the size of the vessel of faith, brought by us to the Lord, is the measure we draw out of His overflowing grace. ~ Cyprian,
1051:I try to measure the amount of truth in a work rather than just looking at the generic distinction between comedy and drama. ~ Harold Ramis,
1052:knowledge depends on the mode of the knower; for what is known is in the knower according to the measure of his mode ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
1053:Often have I sighed to measure By myself a lonely pleasure,- Sighed to think I read a book, Only read, perhaps, by me. ~ William Wordsworth,
1054:Rule One, boy: shoot first then ask questions Rulw Two, Double tap just for good measure. Better safe then sorry. -Bubba ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1055:The greatest measure of the nineteenth century was passed by corruption, aided and abetted by the purest man in America. ~ Thaddeus Stevens,
1056:The measure of a civilization is how it treats those at the dawn of life, the margins of life and the twilight of life. ~ Hubert H Humphrey,
1057:The measure of biblical truth that we have grasped is not determined by the size of our heads, but the breadth of our hearts. ~ Paul Washer,
1058:The measure of greatness in a scientific idea is the extent to which it stimulates thought and opens up new lines of research. ~ Paul Dirac,
1059:The result may be important but it’s not the actual measure. The measure is the feeling you have made contact with something. ~ Eric Maisel,
1060:The work of a generation is beginning here, with your hearings, and you have the full measure of my gratitude and support. ~ Edward Snowden,
1061:Time cannot children,poets,lovers tell-
measure imagine,mystery,a kiss
-not though mankind would rather know than feel ~ E E Cummings,
1062:Time is a measure of space, just as a range-finder is a measure of space, but measuring locks us into the place we measure. ~ Frank Herbert,
1063:We should measure a man by what they’re prepared to do themselves. Not by what they’re prepared to have others do for them. ~ Tom Rob Smith,
1064:Beneath the vast diamond sky, I felt both all important and utterly significant, the goddess and the damned in equal measure. ~ Sarah Ockler,
1065:I live to create value in peoples' lives and I measure myself by their reactions. I'm a love merchant. I trade in intangibles. ~ Tim Sanders,
1066:It is easier to measure the entire sea with a tiny cup than to grasp God's ineffable greatness with the human mind.”10 But, ~ Kallistos Ware,
1067:justice itself is a chimera, a delusion. Justice is not a flat yardstick, applied in equal measure to an equal situation. ~ Carson McCullers,
1068:...one of the most accurate ways to detect and measure the activity of God is to note the amount of opposition that is present. ~ Nik Ripken,
1069:So you may say,
Greek flower; Greek ecstasy
Reclaims Forever
One who died
Following
Intricate Song’s lost Measure. ~ H D,
1070:The best measure of how a democracy is functioning is how it allocates the goods of the land, the public trust assets. ~ Robert F Kennedy Jr,
1071:The measure of a man’s culture is the measure of his appreciation,” he said. “We are ourselves what we appreciate and no more. ~ Nancy Horan,
1072:The measure of a man's truth is the measure of his love, and Truth is far removed from him whose life is not governed by Love. ~ James Allen,
1073:There are two worlds: The world that we can measure with line and rule, and the world we feel with our hearts and imaginations. ~ Leigh Hunt,
1074:The wonder of nature does not become smaller because one cannot measure it by the standards of human moral and human aims. ~ Albert Einstein,
1075:Why does our species always have to take our full measure of God-given misery and terror and mortality and then make it worse? ~ Dan Simmons,
1076:Feeling burdened rather than uplifted by everyday duties is more a mindset than a measure of what is going on in your life. ~ Kelly McGonigal,
1077:I find that plans kill the spirit of an adventure because the experience has to measure up to the plan and is not of itself. ~ Lesley Thomson,
1078:I measure Your love for me by the magnitude of the wrath I deserved, and the wonder of Your mercy by putting Christ in my place. ~ John Piper,
1079:In modern times, if the sole measure of what’s out there flows from your five senses then a precarious life awaits you. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
1080:I've experienced tons of failure. I've been making music for 30 years, and I'd say failure and success have happened in equal measure. ~ Moby,
1081:Never measure the height of a mountain, until you have reached the top. Then you will see how low it was. Dag Hammarskjöld ~ Howard Sasportas,
1082:The individual consciousness by the attempt to measure the Impersonal loses its individual egoism and becomes one with Him. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
1083:As to the evil which results from censorship, it is impossible to measure it, because it is impossible to tell where it ends. ~ Jeremy Bentham,
1084:Booker T. Washington said, “You measure the size of the accomplishment by the obstacles you have to overcome to reach your goals. ~ Zig Ziglar,
1085:But I cherished our filterless relationship and considered it the truest measure of a best friend, greater than pure affection. ~ Emily Giffin,
1086:I believe the only measure of government response shouldn't be how much we spend on a situation, but rather how well we spend. ~ Chris Chocola,
1087:If my cup won't hold but a pint and yourn holds a quart, wouldn't ye be mean not to let me have my little half-measure full? ~ Sojourner Truth,
1088:If you want to convince the world that a fish can sense your emotions, only one statistical measure will suffice: the p-value. ~ Charles Seife,
1089:It is the concept of likelihood that a real understanding of probability resides, and we must learn how to measure it. ~ Anthony Stafford Beer,
1090:I used to measure the Heavens, now I measure the shadows of Earth. The mind belonged to Heaven, the body's shadow lies here. ~ Johannes Kepler,
1091:Many people want only enough money to provide general security and some small measure of amusement, and are satisfied with that. ~ Elliott Kay,
1092:One common desire that every human being has is to love and be loved. At the end of our lives, it's how we measure our lives. ~ Denise Di Novi,
1093:Painted canvases I visit Now I’m not chained To any one place Travelling free as a bird I measure my life in two suitcases. ~ Vickie Johnstone,
1094:Rule One, boy: shoot first then ask questions
Rulw Two, Double tap just for good measure. Better safe then sorry. -Bubba ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1095:The degree in which a poet's imagination dominates reality is, in the end, the exact measure of his importance and dignity. ~ George Santayana,
1096:The measure of achievement is not winning awards. It's doing something that you appreciate, something you believe is worthwhile. ~ Julia Child,
1097:This book was composed in large measure as a response to the irrational “Satanic scare” of the late 1980s and early 1990s. ~ Stephen E Flowers,
1098:To help all created things, that is the measure of all our responsibility; to be helped by all, that is the measure of our hope. ~ Gerald Vann,
1099:37And they were  k astonished beyond measure, saying, “He has done all things well. He even makes the deaf hear and the mute speak. ~ Anonymous,
1100:A king who is renowned for mercy," said the Arobern, with heavy irony, "must also be renowned in equal measure for injustice. ~ Rachel Neumeier,
1101:A natural leader by any measure, Paul became a great spiritual leader when his heart and mind were captured by Jesus Christ. ~ J Oswald Sanders,
1102:Cheveyo shuffled to the door, cutting in front of Dane, a measure meant to protect but which came with a side order of humiliation. ~ G P Ching,
1103:Do not measure her on a scale of what a girl should be. Measure her on a scale of being the best version of herself. ~ Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie,
1104:How now!" they shouted; "Dar'st thou measure this our god! That's for us." "Aye, priests—well, how long do ye make him, then? ~ Herman Melville,
1105:Perhaps all the questions we ask of love, to measure, test, probe, and save it, have the additional effect of cutting it short. ~ Milan Kundera,
1106:Seventeen years being neither a very short nor a very long time, Phillip was remembered and misremembered in equal measure. ~ Diane Setterfield,
1107:That night longer than all my life before it. No scale or measure in this world can ever be held constant. We are always slipping. ~ David Vann,
1108:The good life . . . cannot be mere indulgence. It must contain a measure of grit and truth,” observed geographer Yi-Fu Tuan. Tuan ~ Eric Weiner,
1109:The measure of greatness in a scientific idea is the extent to which it stimulates thought and opens up new lines of research. ~ Paul A M Dirac,
1110:The true measure of our character is how we treat the poor, the disfavored, the accused, the incarcerated, and the condemned. ~ Bryan Stevenson,
1111:to have on her head a most wonderful bonnet like a Grenadier wooden measure, and good measure too, or a great Stilton cheese, ~ Charles Dickens,
1112:We are all tested in this life. The measure of a man is not how much he suffers in the test, but how he comes out at the end. ~ Neal Shusterman,
1113:We are the children of our landscape; it dictates behavior and even thought in the measure to which we are responsive to it. ~ Lawrence Durrell,
1114:What are the three most important rules of the chemist?" This I knew from Ben. "Label clearly. Measure twice. Eat elsewhere. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
1115:Why is it that we lose the things we love, and things cavalier cling to us and will be the measure of our worth after we're gone? ~ Patti Smith,
1116:I am dwelling on things I love, even if a measure of tragedy is stitched into everything, if you follow the thread long enough ~ Sebastian Barry,
1117:I can be of use wherever we go. All I have to do is look around and see who needs an extra measure of love, then pitch in. ~ Sarah Loudin Thomas,
1118:It is an encouraging observation that no good measure was ever proposed which, if duly pursued, failed to prevail in the end. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
1119:Man is the measure of all things: of things which are, that they are, and of things which are not, that they are not. ~ Plato Protagoras ~ Plato,
1120:... some important factor doesn't lose its "share of force" just because some "expert" can better measure other types of force. ~ Charlie Munger,
1121:tests of cognitive ability (like IQ tests) tend to measure cultural learning and not pure innate intelligence, whatever that is. ~ Jared Diamond,
1122:The firmness of our resolution gives the measure of our progress and a great diligence is needed if one wishes to advance. ~ Imitation of Christ,
1123:What could change if we started to measure society’s successes not in wars won but in moments in which we countered injustice? ~ Katherine Locke,
1124:Ah, Fitz, you should know by now that every moment of my life is spent dancing. And with every partner, I tread a different measure. ~ Robin Hobb,
1125:At that moment I understood what it meant to be blessed. To be granted something beyond measure, beyond deserving, beyond myself. ~ Christa Allan,
1126:How much more infinite a sea is man? Be not so childish as to measure him from head to foot and think you have found his borders. ~ Mikhail Naimy,
1127:I don’t think success or failure is the measure. It’s the trying. It’s doing your best to try and follow what you think is right. ~ Victor Methos,
1128:I've come to believe that how we choose to live with pain, or injustice, or death....is the true measure of the Divine within us. ~ Alan Brennert,
1129:Like all strong people, she suffered always a measure of loneliness; she was a marginal outsider, a secret infidel of a certain sort. ~ Anne Rice,
1130:Nay, Socrates," said Glaucon, "the measure of listening to such discussions is the whole of life for reasonable men". The Republic, 450c. ~ Plato,
1131:Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.” - Marianne Williamson ~ Blake Northcott,
1132:the difference between how a person treats the powerless versus the powerful is as good a measure of human character as I know. ~ Robert I Sutton,
1133:The question is not whether we evaluate ourselves against others; rather, the question is by what standard do we measure ourselves? ~ Mark Manson,
1134:we can only avoid chaos in the world of human affairs by having an agreed standard for the measure of a unit of morality. ~ Gregory David Roberts,
1135:You must make up your mind to the prospect of sustaining a certain measure of pain and trouble in you'r passage through life. ~ John Henry Newman,
1136:A good scientist values criticism almost higher than friendship: no, in science criticism is the height and measure of friendship. ~ Francis Crick,
1137:Because politics rests on an irreducible measure of coercion, it can never become a perfect realm of perfect love and justice. ~ Christopher Lasch,
1138:By anyone's measure, [Warren Beatty] is proven himself. But he still sets out to make something as great as it possibly can be. ~ Alden Ehrenreich,
1139:Common sense is the measure of the possible; it is composed of experience and prevision; it is calculation applied to life. ~ Henri Frederic Amiel,
1140:If you don't step across the threshold of what you already know into the world of challenges, you never truly measure yourself. ~ Mariel Hemingway,
1141:I mean to explore you thoroughly this time.”

“Take heed, Captain. I’m prepared to answer all threats measure for measure. ~ Sherri Browning,
1142:I was still amazed at how much i loved him, and more so, that he returned it in the same measure. I couldn't ask for anything more. ~ Kahlen Aymes,
1143:May beings everywhere who suffer Torment in their minds and bodies Have, by virtue of my merit, Joy and happiness in boundless measure. ~ ntideva,
1144:She is more beautiful than I have words for.” He lifted his eyes to Phury’s. “And last night I was blessed beyond measure to serve her. ~ J R Ward,
1145:Sometimes the way you respond to horrific, evil deeds is the measure of one's self as a man, as a nation, as people, as a community. ~ James Woods,
1146:The peculiar circumstances of the moment may render a measure more or less wise, but cannot render it more or less constitutional. ~ John Marshall,
1147:The reason for loving God is God Himself. As to how He is to be loved, there is only one measure: It is immeasurable! ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
1148:The true measure of our character is how we treat the poor, the disfavored, the accused, the incarcerated, and the condemned. We ~ Bryan Stevenson,
1149:We can only do the best we can with what we have. That, after all, is the measure of success: what we do with what we have. ~ Marguerite de Angeli,
1150:When you have to fight for the things you love, you have to measure the value of those things in ways you may not in any other way. ~ Mark Ruffalo,
1151:When you're very young you take people as you find them. It's only when you've had experience that you begin to measure and weigh. ~ D E Stevenson,
1152:When you try to measure performance, particularly the performance of knowledge workers, you’re positively courting dysfunction. ~ Mary Poppendieck,
1153:Would you say...that you're yourself around her? I always think that's the true measure of how good a friend is" -Mrs. Murphy ~ Lynda Mullaly Hunt,
1154:You can't measure everyone by your own yardstick. For the people I have loved I have a different yardstick. - Lenka Procházková ~ Mariusz Szczygie,
1155:Every conscientious husband and wife should measure their marriage by the unchanging standard of the principles found in God’s Word. ~ Myles Munroe,
1156:I must admit that I personally measure success in terms of the contributions an individual makes to her or his fellow human beings. ~ Margaret Mead,
1157:So many Christians today see a system in which they cannot measure up and so they feel unworthy. The church seems to have failed them. ~ Ted Dekker,
1158:Sometimes what we think we need isn't what we need at all, and what gets thrown in for good measure is that which fills our hearts. ~ Philip Gulley,
1159:The depth of darkness to which you can descend and still live is an exact measure of the height to which you can aspire to reach. ~ Pliny the Elder,
1160:The old story is a story of measurement. And the New Story is to bring measurement and meaning together. You cannot measure meaning. ~ Satish Kumar,
1161:There is nothing impossible with God. All the impossibility is with us when we measure God by the limitations of our unbelief. ~ Smith Wigglesworth,
1162:There we measure shadows, and we search among ghostly errors of measurement for landmarks that are scarcely more substantial. ~ Edwin Powell Hubble,
1163:the value of a unit of currency is not the measure of the value of an object, but the measure of one’s trust in other human beings. ~ David Graeber,
1164:Those who know the true use of money, and regulate the measure of wealth according to their needs, live contented with few things. ~ Baruch Spinoza,
1165:Ultimately, we measure ourselves against our own ideas of idealism and perfection, and we don't always come very close to them. ~ Joyce Carol Oates,
1166:We measure success and depth by length of time, but it is possible to have a deep relationship that doesn't always stay the same. ~ Barbara Hershey,
1167:What is the destiny of man, but to fill up the measure of his sufferings, and to drink his allotted cup of bitterness? ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
1168:when you teach children to measure themselves from their success, they then measure themselves from their failure as well. Finally, ~ Carol S Dweck,
1169:You shun your spirit,' he murmured, 'every time you agree to sell your days to the city, to measure out your life at the city's pace. ~ Martin Amis,
1170:...a world where a sparrow's fate and that of a man can be decided in the blink of a cat's eye, such is the true measure of time. ~ Abraham Verghese,
1171:Both men and women are extremely vulnerable to the force of sex, because, during sex, pleasure and fear are present in equal measure. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1172:But this is an impossibility.23 You cannot get an identity through self-recognition; it must come in a great measure from others. ~ Timothy J Keller,
1173:Creating fake facts does require a measure of haphazard research, insofar as they need to not just be possible, but also interesting. ~ John Hodgman,
1174:Entropy—already a difficult and poorly understood concept—is a measure of disorder in thermodynamics, the science of heat and energy. ~ James Gleick,
1175:Even here - running for our lives, sleeping exposed, facing death - even here, in her arms, I was able to find some measure of peace. ~ Ransom Riggs,
1176:Hands on a clock, numbers on a bathroom scale, weren’t they only ways of trying to measure invisible forces that had visible effects? ~ Stephen King,
1177:I believe that the best measure of whether a nation is going to be successful is whether they are tapping the talents of their women. ~ Barack Obama,
1178:In loving things and the being in them man should rather draw things up to the human level than reduce humanity to their measure. ~ Jacques Maritain,
1179:I think lives are worth more than the sum of their parts,” Lydia said. “I don’t think it’s fair to measure them in accomplishments... ~ Jeff Zentner,
1180:I think that if you were somehow able to measure the weight of human kindness, it would have weighed more on 9/11 than it ever had. ~ David Levithan,
1181:I think you can measure how pathetic your life is by how much joy you get from learning about other people's faults and troubles. ~ Bradford Winters,
1182:I’ve come to believe that how we choose to live with pain, or injustice, or death . . . is the true measure of the Divine within us. ~ Alan Brennert,
1183:Love is an emotion. It can't be seen or touched, and it is experienced differently by everyone, therefore it is difficult to measure. ~ Marian Keyes,
1184:Measure the hate you feel now, and the shame. That quantity is your capacity also to love and to feel joy and to have compassion. ~ Joanne Greenberg,
1185:...THAT FROM THESE HONORED DEAD WE TAKE INCREASED DEVOTION TO THAT CAUSE FOR WHICH THEY GAVE THE LAST FULL MEASURE OF DEVOTION;... ~ Abraham Lincoln,
1186:The corporations are worried about their reputational damage and a lot of the social media inflicts that, but it's hard to measure it. ~ Ralph Nader,
1187:We ask for long life, but 'tis deep life, or noble moments that signify. Let the measure of time be spiritual, not mechanical. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1188:What would our hospitality look like if we believed that Jesus’s death on the cross was the measure of God’s compassion for someone? ~ Gloria Furman,
1189:A man's hope measures his civilization. The attainability of the hope measures, or may measure, the civilization of his nation and time. ~ Ezra Pound,
1190:A measure of earth under your feet that you could call your own. Was there a more primitive concept? But nobody lives in the ether. ~ David Bezmozgis,
1191:A story, after all, does not only belong to the one who is telling it. It belongs, in equal measure, to the one who is listening. ~ Michelle Richmond,
1192:Because of the indefinite nature of the human mind, wherever it is lost in ignorance man makes himself the measure of all things. ~ Giambattista Vico,
1193:Breath is perhaps the first thing we have in life. It's how we measure the starting of life and it's how we measure the ending of life. ~ Paul Harvey,
1194:I read somewhere... how important it is in life not necessarily to be strong, but to feel strong... to measure yourself at least once. ~ Jon Krakauer,
1195:I shot him in the chest. Three times. And then three or four times more for good measure, because he was looking kind of stubborn. ~ Christopher Bunn,
1196:It is by thoughtful reflection that the elusive moments of the past draw near to us in present reality and gain a measure of permanence. ~ Yi Fu Tuan,
1197:Its actually really important that you succeed at what youre succeeding at, but that isnt going to be the measure of your life. ~ Clayton Christensen,
1198:Love doesn't measure that way... you may blame me for your feelings, but it isn't fair to blame me for how you've chosen to behave. ~ Kristin Cashore,
1199:On the whole, the longing for solitude is a sign that there still is spirit in a person and is a measure of what spirit there is. ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
1200:The measure of a master is his success in bringing all men round to his opinion twenty years later. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Conduct of Life (1860),
1201:The measure of the moral worth of a man is his happiness. The better the man, the more happiness. Happiness is the synonym of well-being ~ Bruce Lee,
1202:The modern meaning of life's end-when does it end? How does it end? How should it end? What is the value of life? How do we measure it? ~ Don DeLillo,
1203:The true measure of a man has nothing to do with years and everything to do with how well he looks after those who depend upon him. ~ Teresa Medeiros,
1204:The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge. ~ Darren Hardy,
1205:We Americans sit at the head of the banquet table, as we have done for a century. Our standard of living is luxurious by any measure. ~ Deepak Chopra,
1206:We ask for long life, but 'tis deep life, or grand moments, that signify. Let the measure of time be spiritual, not mechanical. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1207:A great measure of the real value of the things we have is how we feel when such things become scarce and absent in our lives ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
1208:At the same time, we held back. Because she was different. Different. We had no one to compare her to, no one to measure her against. ~ Jerry Spinelli,
1209:But here, as of riches, it is indisputable that the greatest fame does not bring with it any equal measure of gratification. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
1210:Do not compare, do not measure. No other way is like yours. All other ways deceive and tempt you. You must fulfill the way that is in you. ~ Carl Jung,
1211:Hands on a clock, numbers on a bathroom scale, weren’t they only ways of trying to measure invisible forces that had invisible effects? ~ Stephen King,
1212:I adore the way he looks at me sometimes, as if love is a quantity he cannot measure scientifically, because it multiplies too quickly. ~ Jodi Picoult,
1213:Make every occasion a great occasion, for you can never tell when someone may be taking your measure for a larger place” (Marsden). ~ Warren W Wiersbe,
1214:Merton ... humbly warned, however, "It's a wrong perception to believe that you can eliminate risk just because you can measure it. ~ Roger Lowenstein,
1215:One must marry one's feelings to one's beliefs and ideas. That is probably the only way to achieve a measure of harmony in one's life. ~ Napoleon Hill,
1216:Poetry wants to make things mean more than they mean, says someone, as if we knew how much things meant, and in what unit of measure. ~ Rae Armantrout,
1217:Research is four things: brains with which to think, eyes with which to see, machines with which to measure and, fourth, money. ~ Albert Szent Gyorgyi,
1218:Skin color is basically a measure of the local ultraviolet levels, and it is controlled by relatively minor adaptive changes in the genome. ~ Bill Nye,
1219:That should be the measure of success for everyone. It's not money, it's not fame, it's not celebrity; my index of success is happiness. ~ Lupe Fiasco,
1220:The Difficulty lies, in finding out an exact Measure but eat for Necessity, not Pleasure, for Lust knows not where Necessity ends. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
1221:The number of different aspects that the face of a man has assumed may be taken almost as a physiognomical measure of his ... genius. ~ Otto Weininger,
1222:The thing which makes one man greater than another, the quality by which we ought to measure greatness, is a man's capacity for loving. ~ Arthur Helps,
1223:To be happy you must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion, and learned your place in the world. ~ George Santayana,
1224:To declare the Cold War over, and declare democracy has won out over totalitarianism, is a measure of arrogance and wrong-headedness. ~ Alexander Haig,
1225:What are the three most important rules of the chemist?"

This I knew from Ben. "Label clearly. Measure twice. Eat elsewhere. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
1226:When considering a man's motives, remember you must not measure his wheat with your bushel. He may not be using the same standard at all. ~ Robin Hobb,
1227:When considering a man’s motives, remember you must not measure his wheat with your bushel. He may not be using the same standard at all. ~ Robin Hobb,
1228:Words are an unreliable way to measure the heart“, she said. “I’m more inclined to trust what I observe rather than what someone tells me. ~ Ami McKay,
1229:You can measure the true strength of a man by how well he controls others, but you measure his true power by how well he controls himself ~ Amari Soul,
1230:Aam AAM, noun [Chaldee for a cubit, a measure containing 5 or 6 palms.] A measure of liquids among the Dutch equal to 288 English pints. ~ Noah Webster,
1231:As if reasoning were any kind of writing or talking which tends to convince people that some doctrine or measure is true and right. ~ Catharine Beecher,
1232:Because time is a drop in the ocean, and you cannot measure off one drop against another to see which one is bigger, which one is smaller. ~ Elif Safak,
1233:Can we be happy for Goliath from behind a sheet of glass and a net and a fence? Maybe a ring of fire for good measure?" asked Enrique ~ Roshani Chokshi,
1234:Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness, and the word happy would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness. ~ Mia Sheridan,
1235:For what is time, but a measure of things that have already happened or have not happened yet? What is time, but a measure of nothing. ~ Karpov Kinrade,
1236:He glanced at her in what she thought seemed a normal way. Everyone else was trying to peer into her soul, to measure the pain inside. ~ Peter Abrahams,
1237:If you went in search of it, you would not find the boundaries of the soul, though you traveled every road-so deep is its measure [logos]. ~ Heraclitus,
1238:In some parts of life, like mathematics and science, yeah, I was a genius. I would top all the top scores you could ever measure it by. ~ Steve Wozniak,
1239:I think if you're behind the times, you've failed. I think the only way to measure success is being right on time with what people want. ~ Chuck Barris,
1240:Read anything I write for the pleasure of reading it. Whatever else you find will be the measure of what you brought to the reading. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
1241:The measure of success is not whether you have a tough problem to deal with, but whether it is the same problem you had last year. ~ John Foster Dulles,
1242:There were three PROs looking after us – a measure of how the army and the mass media were now coexisting and being mutually supportive. ~ William Boyd,
1243:The true measure of a leader is not only what you accomplish while in office but also the feelings and memories that linger once you leave. ~ Anonymous,
1244:The true value of a human being is determined primarily by the measure and the sense in which he has obtained liberation from self. ~ Madeleine L Engle,
1245:The tuning up of an orchestra can be itself delightful, but only to those who can in some measure, however little, anticipate the symphony. ~ C S Lewis,
1246:We get to control what our problems mean based on how much we choose to think about them, the standard by which we choose to measure them ~ Mark Manson,
1247:Whatever you believe cosmologically, we all know the tears of the world. We each carry a certain measure of those tears in our hearts. ~ Jack Kornfield,
1248:Why?” he screamed, letting the noise bellow out loud and ferocious. “Why can I not have some measure of peace?” he questioned. ~ Charlotte Featherstone,
1249:You can never get a true measure of a person—you can never fully understand yourself, even—because life is always throwing new things at us. ~ K M Shea,
1250:You must make up your mind to the prospect of sustaining a certain measure of pain and trouble in you'r passage through life. ~ Saint John Henry Newman,
1251:And you read your emily dickinson,
And I my robert frost.
And we note our place with bookmarkers
That measure what weve lost. ~ Paul Simon,
1252:Cowardice and courage are never without a measure of affectation. Nor is love. Feelings are never true. They play with their mirrors. ~ Jean Baudrillard,
1253:Disbelief in futurity loosens in a great measure the ties of morality, and may be for that reason pernicious to the peace of civil society. ~ David Hume,
1254:G.D.P. is not a measure of how much value is produced for consumers. Everybody should recognize that G.D.P. is not a welfare metric. ~ Erik Brynjolfsson,
1255:How do you measure love? Quantify it? It's not something you can put on a scale or pour into a beaker to examine its volume and viscosity. ~ Ann Aguirre,
1256:How few things can a man measure with the tape of his understanding ; How many greater things might he be seeing in the meanwhile. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
1257:I began to think that he had just the right measure of unhappiness and dissatisfaction with life to be someone I could get along with. ~ Catherine Lacey,
1258:I’ll never pause again, never stand still, till either death hath closed these eyes of mine, or fortune given me measure of revenge.’  ~ Cassandra Clare,
1259:Liberals measure compassion by how many people are given welfare. Conservatives measure compassion by how many people no longer need it. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
1260:No man can fight his way to the top and stay at the top without exercising the fullest measure of grit, courage, determination, resolution. ~ B C Forbes,
1261:Others live on in a careless and lukewarm state - not appearing to fill Longfellow's measure: 'Into each life, some rain must fall.' ~ Mary Todd Lincoln,
1262:there is nothing in the whole world madder than bringing matters down to the measure of our own capacities and potentialities. How ~ Michel de Montaigne,
1263:The true value of a human being is determined primarily by the measure and the sense in which he has attained liberation from the self. ~ Eben Alexander,
1264:We with our quick dividing eyes measure, distinguish and are gone. The forest burns, the tree frog dies, yet one is all and all are one. ~ Judith Wright,
1265:You are rewarded not according to your work or your time but according to the measure of your love.” Saint Catherine of Siena (1347-1380) ~ Rhonda Byrne,
1266:You only fail if you don't finish the game. If you finish you win. You have to measure what you started out with by what you overcome. ~ Mike Webster,
1267:42: You can measure a programmer's perspective by noting his attitude on the continuing vitality of FORTRAN. ~ Alan Perlis, Epigrams on Programming, 1982,
1268:As far as immortality went, that was obviously not any sort of good at all. Who had ever met death without some partial measure of joy? ~ Daniel Polansky,
1269:As one matures, a greater tolerance of ambiguity is essential both for growth and as a measure of respect for the autonomy of the mystery. ~ James Hollis,
1270:Give,’ he said, ‘and it shall be given unto you; good measure, pressed down and shaken together, and running over.’ ‘Luke 6,’ supplied Vee. ~ Lissa Evans,
1271:He was the measure of the failure of his father's body, and also perhaps a portending of the failure of his own.~ Marilynne Robinson ~ Marilynne Robinson,
1272:How much truth can a spirit bear, how much truth can a spirit dare? ... that became for me more and more the real measure of value. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1273:..it is by justice that we can authentically measure man's value or his nullity... the absence of justice is the absence of what makes him a man, ~ Plato,
1274:It is the storytellers task to elicit sympathy and a measure of understanding for those who lie outside the boundaries of State approval. ~ Graham Greene,
1275:No charter of freedom will be worth looking at which does not ensure the same measure of freedom for the minorities as for the majority. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1276:On being charged with the fact, the poor girl confirmed the suspicion in a grat measure by her extreme confusion of manner. ~ Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley,
1277:One measure for promoting both stability and fairness across financial market segments is a small sales tax on all financial transactions. ~ Noam Chomsky,
1278:Persons who have a painful affection in any part of the body, and are in a great measure sensible of the pain, are disordered in intellect. ~ Hippocrates,
1279:The external freedom won't be given to us but in the exact measure as we've known at a given moment, to developing our internal freedom. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1280:The ultimate measure of love is not when both like each other
Its when one ignores but the other continues to love till the end. ~ William Shakespeare,
1281:What’s friendship’s realest measure? I’ll tell you. The amount of precious time you’ll squander on someone else’s calamities and fuck-ups. ~ Richard Ford,
1282:You couldn’t educate hate out of people who needed someone less than themselves, someone they could point at and measure their lives by. They ~ Nick Cole,
1283:By placing His image in us, God assumes an extra measure of ownership and responsibility for our lives. We are His brand, His trademark. ~ Hannah Anderson,
1284:He would measure the world against the rigid grid of his heart and put each man in charge of a domain no more and no less than his just deserts. ~ Ken Liu,
1285:In large measure, who we are with respect to any choice is where we are, attentionally, in the moment before the choice. ~ Robert B Cialdini,
1286:It is the storyteller's task to elicit sympathy and a measure of understanding for those who lie outside the boundaries of State approval. ~ Graham Greene,
1287:Many people are afraid of running because between 30 to 70 percent (depending on how you measure it) of runners get injured every year. ~ Daniel Lieberman,
1288:the true measure of a society’s freedom is how it treats its dissidents and other marginalized groups, not how it treats good loyalists. ~ Glenn Greenwald,
1289:Everything must have its measure, even your personal anger, otherwise the anger will take over your being and extinguish reason forever. ~ Vasily Mahanenko,
1290:I used to measure the heavens
Now the Earth's shadows I measure
My mind was in the heavens,
Now the shadow of my body rests here ~ Johannes Kepler,
1291:Miller didn't write Death of a Salesman. He released it. It was there inside him, waiting to be turned loose. That's the measure of its merit. ~ Elia Kazan,
1292:Oh the things that hide secretly in our children, lying in wait, doing untold damage, yearning to be free. Alarming us beyond all measure. ~ Laurie Frankel,
1293:Quality is not an absolute measure. It doesn't mean 'deluxeness' or 'perfection'. It means keeping the promise the customer wants you to make. ~ Seth Godin,
1294:The measure of the greatness of a society is found in the way it treats those most in need, those who have nothing apart from their poverty! ~ Pope Francis,
1295:Therefore, do not fear your limitations or measure the day’s demands against your strength. What I require of you is to stay connected to Me, ~ Sarah Young,
1296:There is something that pretends to be christianity which is mostly mood. The measure of its faith is merely the measure of its feeling. ~ Elisabeth Elliot,
1297:Ultimately, what economics attempts to measure, underneath money, is the totality of all that human beings make and do for each other. ~ Charles Eisenstein,
1298:we don’t live in Plato’s Commonwealth, and when we can’t have perfection we ought to comply with the measure that is least remote from it. ~ Bernard Bailyn,
1299:What is the first step to take and how do you measure your progress? How far have you gone and how close are you to getting to your goals? ~ Michael Gerber,
1300:When considering a man’s motives, remember you must not measure his wheat with your bushel. He may not be using the same standard at all.” And ~ Robin Hobb,
1301:Becoming more than a good Bible study girl means I separate my shortcomings from my identity and let Jesus be the only measure of my worth. ~ Lysa TerKeurst,
1302:In very large measure each of us holds the key to the blessings of the Almighty upon us. If we wish the blessing, we must pay the price. ~ Gordon B Hinckley,
1303:… It is not healing to see your childhood home, but it helps you measure whether you are broken, and how and why, assuming you want to know. ~ Thomas Harris,
1304:Real friends are there no matter what. Real friends are people you love and hate in equal measure but who are as much a part of you as yourself. ~ C J Tudor,
1305:She is more beautiful than I have words for." He lifted his eyes to Phury's. "And last night I was blessed beyond measure to serve her." -Zsadist ~ J R Ward,
1306:The insight to see possible new paths, the courage to try them, the judgment to measure results - these are the qualities of a leader. ~ Mary Parker Follett,
1307:The measure of action is the sentiment from which it proceeds. The greatest action may easily be one of the most private circumstance. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1308:There should be even in deep feeling a calm, a control, a purifying restraint and measure. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II, Bhakti, Devotion, Worship,
1309:The true value of a human being is determined primarily by the measure and the sense in which he has attained to liberation from the self. ~ Albert Einstein,
1310:The world is your canvas and your teacher.Take a day to reflect, measure and adjust on your goals; progress is essential to continued success. ~ Bob Proctor,
1311:Time is a brisk wind, for each hour it brings something new... but who can understand and measure its sharp breath, its mystery and its design? ~ Paracelsus,
1312:Time means nothing.Time is just the way we measure the gaps between not knowing something and knowing it or not doing something and doing it. ~ Richard Bach,
1313:To take the measure of oneself by reference to one's colleagues leads to envy or complacency rather than constructive self-examination. ~ Benno C Schmidt Jr,
1314:Using volatility as a measure of risk is nuts. Risk to us is 1) the risk of permanent loss of capital, or 2) the risk of inadequate return. ~ Charlie Munger,
1315:What's friendship's realest measure?
I'll tell you. The amount of precious time you'll squander on someone else's calamities and fuck-ups. ~ Richard Ford,
1316:Words, Natasha thinks, should behave more like units of measure. A meter is a meter is a meter. Words shouldn't be allowed to change meanings. ~ Nicola Yoon,
1317:Lila had never really bought into fate, but like most people who disavowed religion, she could summon a measure of belief when it was necessary. ~ V E Schwab,
1318:measure, he put some slugs into a couple men rushing forward, tugging at their guns. They spun as they were hit, crying out and falling ~ William W Johnstone,
1319:Men of genius themselves were great only by bringing all their power to bear on the point on which they had decided to show their full measure. ~ Cal Newport,
1320:The Full Measure of a man is not to be found in the man himself, but in the colors and textures that come alive in others because of him. ~ Albert Schweitzer,
1321:The human intellect owes its superiority over that of the lower animals in great measure to the stimulus which alcohol has given imagination. ~ Samuel Butler,
1322:The ideas by which people . . . interpret their existence and in measure guide their behavior, were not forged in a world of wealth. ~ John Kenneth Galbraith,
1323:The measure of every man’s virtue is best revealed in time of adversity - adversity that does not weaken a man but rather shows what he is. ~ Thomas a Kempis,
1324:The Observable Universe is a measure of our Lord's Bounty, Patience and Mercy upon us; just like the distance between Belief and disbelief. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
1325:The only thing you can justifiably claim that life owes you is an equal measure of what you have given out. And even that is debatable. ~ Richelle E Goodrich,
1326:There is the need for someone against which our characters can measure themselves. Without a ruler, you won't make the crooked straight. ~ Seneca the Younger,
1327:words of a man were meaningless. But actions spoke volumes, and it was always through deeds that the true measure of a man could be ascertained. ~ Maya Banks,
1328:You tell everyone or anyone that has ever doubted, thought they didn't measure up or wanted to quit - look up get up and don't ever give up. ~ Michael Irvin,
1329:But the true measure of a society’s freedom is how it treats its dissidents and other marginalized groups, not how it treats good loyalists. ~ Glenn Greenwald,
1330:Creativity is not like the weather: You can do something about it. And you can measure it well enough to determine its effect on sales and profits. ~ John Kao,
1331:Every endeavor of importance in life, whether it is creative, athletic, interpersonal, or academic, brings with it a measure of discomfort, ~ Patrick Lencioni,
1332:God doesn’t measure big the way people measure big. Jesus had just twelve followers.” He blinked a few times. “Fame is a demanding mistress. ~ Karen Kingsbury,
1333:How do you measure the expense of an erosion of effort and engagement, or a waning of agency and autonomy, or a subtle deterioration of skill? ~ Nicholas Carr,
1334:I had not then learned the measure of “man’s inhumanity to man,” nor to what limitless extent of wickedness he will go for the love of gain. ~ Solomon Northup,
1335:I'm more comfortable with whatever's wrong with me than my father was whenever he felt he failed or didn't measure up to the standard he set. ~ John Malkovich,
1336:In political administration, no problem is ever simple. It can never be reduced to the question whether a certain measure is good or not. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte,
1337:It does not matter how fast we can build. It does not matter how fast we can measure. What matters is how fast we can get through the entire loop. ~ Eric Ries,
1338:I`ve spend my whole life hating and loving my brother with equal measure. I never though I would be the one to help drive a stake through his heart. ~ Rebecca,
1339:I was in and out of the hospital almost daily from then on.
They X-rayed, poked, and prodded me, and then they did it again for good measure. ~ Bear Grylls,
1340:Moreover, pupil dilation, blinking rate, voice pitch elevation, and other reliable cues not only measure cognitive load but emotional responses as ~ Anonymous,
1341:Nature is a frugal mother, and never gives without measure. When she has work to do, she qualifies men for that and sends them equipped. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1342:One measure of friendship consists not in the number of things friends can discuss, but in the number of things they need no longer mention. ~ Clifton Fadiman,
1343:The division between faith and reason is a half-measure, till it is frankly admitted that faith has to do with fiction, and reason with fact. ~ Leslie Stephen,
1344:The Indian writer Jiddu Krishnamurti has been quoted as saying, “It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. ~ Michael Finkel,
1345:The measure of space & time creates an echo of haunting distance between us, yet we are close, we are united in the love we forge together. ~ Truth Devour,
1346:The more I help out, the more successful I become. But I measure success in what it has done for the people around me. That is the real accolade. ~ Adam Grant,
1347:The question, therefore, is, not whether a man is strong or weak, but whether he is able to endure the measure of his sufferings. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
1348:The true poet, is like a man who's happy anywhere, in endless measure, if he's allowed to look at leaves and grass, to see the sun rise and set. ~ Jacob Grimm,
1349:the true value of a human being is determined primarily by the measure and sense in which he has attained liberation from the self.” Einstein ~ Jon Kabat Zinn,
1350:While we measure our own success in terms of our personal comfort and security, the universe measures our success by how much we have learned. ~ Caroline Myss,
1351:Women ought to be free—as free as we are," he declared, making a discovery of which he was too irritated to measure the terrific consequences. ~ Edith Wharton,
1352:He measured the achievements of others by what they had accomplished, asking of them that they measure him by what he envisaged or planned. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
1353:I am convinced that words are things, and we simply don't have the machinery to measure what they are. I believe that words are tangible things. ~ Maya Angelou,
1354:In life, there is only the present moment, the now. You can't measure time the way you measure distance between two points. "Time" doesn't pass. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1355:In the measure that we pay attention and take care to carry out what we hear, God will always enlighten us and make us understand His will. ~ Dorotheus of Gaza,
1356:Relieved beyond measure, Boyd gave Sin an 'I told you so' look to which Sin replied with a 'No you fucking didn't, you were just lucky' look. ~ Santino Hassell,
1357:Risks are a measure of people. People who won't take them are trying to preserve what they have. People who do take them often end up having more. ~ Paul Arden,
1358:There’s nothing wrong with having a desire to want nice things. It’s when we place that as a measure of the value of ourselves that it goes askew. ~ Demi Moore,
1359:(Those who) possessed in a lower degree those attributes (sought how) not to lose them, and therefore they did not possess them (in fullest measure). ~ Lao Tzu,
1360:We who live in prison, and in whose lives there is no event but sorrow, have to measure time by throbs of pain, and the record of bitter moments. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1361:Apple’s MirrorPhone played a measure of One Reflection’s single “You Don’t Know You’re Charming” to announce she’d received another hext message. ~ Shannon Hale,
1362:Forever is a measure of time used by people who share an ordinary love. Our extraordinary love is immeasurable...for us, forever just won’t do. ~ Steve Maraboli,
1363:I’m almost one hundred percent certain he dates women that peel the skin off their grapes and measure their protein intake with a thimble. Needles ~ P Dangelico,
1364:Medical science begin to notice for good health, peace of mind, self-confidence, optimism is something very important. And also preventive measure. ~ Dalai Lama,
1365:The cause of America is in a great measure the cause of all mankind. Many circumstances have, and will arise, which are not local, but universal, ~ Thomas Paine,
1366:There is an easy way to measure our inner levels of abjectness and friendliness to ourselves: we should examine how well we response to noise. ~ Alain de Botton,
1367:the strength of character gained will be the measure of
his true success, and this will form a new starting point for future power and triumph. ~ James Allen,
1368:We know it's all just daydreaming...But sometimes, it'd be nice just to hold something real in your hands that felt like a measure of your worth. ~ Shannon Hale,
1369:What is objectively true about your situation is not as important as how you come to see the situation, how you choose to measure it and value it. ~ Mark Manson,
1370:When we try to observe things that are very small, the act of observation itself will significantly disturb the state we are seeking to measure. ~ John D Barrow,
1371:Women ought to be free - as free as we are,' he declared, making a discovery of which he was too irritated to measure the terrific consequences. ~ Edith Wharton,
1372:You cannot measure a man by his failures. You must know what use he makes of them. What did they mean to him. What did he get out of them. ~ Orison Swett Marden,
1373:Are the axioms of logic adequate to reality or are they a means and measure for us to create reality, the concept “reality”, for ourselves? ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1374:At twenty-two, I had the callowest possible definition of interesting and, by the measure of my own calipers, was far from interesting myself. ~ Karen Joy Fowler,
1375:Berman’s foot measure. Then he turned it around and I put my right foot in. That’s another reason why my mother thinks Mr. Berman is good at selling ~ Judy Blume,
1376:Dark matter and dark energy are two things we measure in the universe that are making things happen, and we have no idea what the cause is. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
1377:Everyone experiences tough times, it is a measure of your determination and dedication how you deal with them and how you can come through them. ~ Lakshmi Mittal,
1378:it was the measure of you if you could endure the shit that came with life and still find it in you to focus on the good and put that out there. ~ Kristen Ashley,
1379:One way to measure a particular doctor's openness and attitude toward women in general is simply to ask about the doctor's opinion of midwifery. ~ Marsden Wagner,
1380:Speech, after all, is in some measure an expression of character, and flexibility in its use is a good way to tell your friends from the robots. ~ Jacques Barzun,
1381:(Those who) possessed in highest degree the attributes (of the Tao) did not (seek) to show them, and therefore they possessed them (in fullest measure) ~ Lao Tzu,
1382:We are free, we are civilised, to little purpose, if we grudge to any portion of the human race an equal measure of freedom and civilisation. ~ Thomas B Macaulay,
1383:We know it's all just daydreaming... But sometimes, it'd be nice just to hold something real in your hands that felt like a measure of your worth. ~ Shannon Hale,
1384:Contrary to nature’s rule of “survival of the fittest,” we humans measure civilization by how we respond to the most vulnerable and the suffering. ~ Philip Yancey,
1385:Desire is creation, is the magical element in that process. If there were an instrument by which to measure desire, one could foretell achievement. ~ Willa Cather,
1386:Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness, and the word happy would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness." Carl Jung ~ Mia Sheridan,
1387:Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have the exact measure of the injustice and wrong which will be imposed on them. ~ Frederick Douglass,
1388:Here, there is nothing my size. There's nobody around here to make himself the measure of everything, to praise or condemn others for their size ~ Haruki Murakami,
1389:... how important it is in life not necessarily to be strong but to feel strong, to measure yourself at least once, to find yourself at least once... ~ Primo Levi,
1390:In this sense, the value of a unit of currency is not the measure of the value of an object, but the measure of one’s trust in other human beings. ~ David Graeber,
1391:It’s not about weight or size or fat—weight is a measure of gravity and nothing else—it’s about living joyfully inside your body, as it is, today. ~ Emily Nagoski,
1392:Nothing of the greater good comes without struggle and sacrifice in equal measure, be you man or woman, and in this way are we freed from tyranny. ~ Kathleen Kent,
1393:Once I had asked God for one or two extra inches in height, but instead he made me as tall as the sky, so high that I could not measure myself. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
1394:That spiked measure of awe—of oof—feels like a general slowing, even though what’s really taking place is nothing short of a general quickening. ~ Durga Chew Bose,
1395:The measure of any man's virtue is what he would do, if he had neither the laws nor public opinion, nor even his own prejudices, to control him. ~ William Hazlitt,
1396:There is no half-measure--NO scratching on the surface of the rubbish heap of tradition will bring about Reform, the only method is Absolute Demolition ~ Mina Loy,
1397:(Those who) possessed in highest degree the attributes (of the Tao) did not (seek) to show them, and therefore they possessed them (in fullest measure). ~ Lao Tzu,
1398:We want something we can detect and observe, but can’t objectively measure, and we use objective measures that consistently extinguish the spark. ~ Oliver DeMille,
1399:Who are we people, in all that global greatness of the space? …Considering things in the ecumenical measure, we are the microbes of the Universe. ~ Sahara Sanders,
1400:You don’t really know who you are until you have gone through suffering. We can measure our spiritual growth by the way we behave under pressure. ~ Edward T Welch,
1401:Alas! I had not then learned the measure of "man's inhumanity to man," nor to what limitless extent of wickedness he will go for the love of gain ~ Solomon Northup,
1402:all conscious thought is a process in time; so that to think consciously about Time is like trying to use a foot-rule to measure its own length. ~ Dorothy L Sayers,
1403:Fairness of face is a gift or curse from God. You cannot take credit for it. Your nature, intelligence, and behavior are the true measure of beauty. ~ Katy Madison,
1404:I am strong. And I am stylish beyond all measure.

Allow me to leave you with a final thought:
So are you.

With love,
Charlie Dean. ~ Susan Juby,
1405:If you truly want to measure the success of a man, you do not measure it by a position he has achieved, but by the obstacles he has overcome. ~ Booker T Washington,
1406:In these matters, the cardinal says, there is no measure of time; these spirits slip from our hands and through the ages, serpentine, mutable, sly. ~ Hilary Mantel,
1407:I think in show business, it's really kind of easy to perpetuate that feeling of, like, Oh, I don't measure up. Or always having to prove yourself. ~ Molly Shannon,
1408:I think that the measure of whether a life has been a good one is how much love there has been in that life--love both given and received. ~ Alexander McCall Smith,
1409:It's hazardous, though, being that much to someone. When you're the yardstick that everything else is measure against, eventually, you just fail. ~ Brenna Yovanoff,
1410:My son . . . guilt, in proper measure, can be a useful emotion. However, when indulged to excess it becomes self-defeating, and even worse, tedious. ~ Lisa Kleypas,
1411:Oh, hey,” I said. “Looks like the whole Vegas Metro SWAT division is here. Plus the FBI, Homeland Security, and probably the IRS for good measure. ~ Craig Schaefer,
1412:Pride and resentment do not create bread that will rise. Bread, like a good life, can only be created by honest measure, patience, warmth, and time. ~ Lisa Wingate,
1413:Squeals of laughter erupted from the women in the parlor as Rasputin squeezed their breasts. “I can measure your spirit this way,” he explained. ~ Gwendolyn Womack,
1414:The only person who acts sensibly is my tailor. He takes my measure anew every time he sees me. Everyone else goes by their old measurements. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
1415:Alas! I had not then learned the measure of "man's inhumanity to man," nor to what limitless extent of wickedness he will go for the love of gain. ~ Solomon Northup,
1416:Alas! I had not then learned the measure of “man’s inhumanity to man,” nor to what limitless extent of wickedness he will go for the love of gain. ~ Solomon Northup,
1417:...also took for granted that secret services were the only real measure of a nations political health, the only real expression of its subconscious. ~ John le Carr,
1418:I do not know to whom the aphorism 'There are no sound studies, only ones that haven't been busted yet' belongs, but it has measure of truth in it. ~ Mark Dvoretsky,
1419:In our lust for measurement, we frequently measure that which we can rather than that which we wish to measure... and forget that there is a difference. ~ Udny Yule,
1420:It seemed that it was not only live magicians which Mr. Norrell despised. He had taken the measure of all the dead ones too and found them wanting. ~ Susanna Clarke,
1421:La, tout n’est qu’ordre et beauté Luxe, calme et volupté There, there is nothing else but grace and measure, Richness, quietness, and pleasure. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
1422:The fixed mindset says yes. You can simply measure the fixed ability right now and project it into the future. Just give the test or ask the expert. ~ Carol S Dweck,
1423:Yet the penalty for sin is not determined by our measure of it. Instead, the penalty for sin is determined by the magnitude of the one sinned against. ~ David Platt,
1424:...also took for granted that secret services were the only real measure of a nations political health, the only real expression of its subconscious. ~ John le Carre,
1425:Demand is best measured in terms of spending. You know, I think in traditional economics, it's a mistake to measure it in terms of the quantity of goods. ~ Ray Dalio,
1426:For there is in mankind an unfortunate propensity to make themselves, their views and their works, the measure of excellence in every thing whatsoever ~ Edmund Burke,
1427:Generally speaking, as knowledge work makes more complex demands of the labor force, it becomes harder to measure the value of an individual’s efforts. ~ Cal Newport,
1428:I believe that the things we put numbers on are not necessarily the things that count the most. you can't measure the stuff that makes us human. ~ Lynda Mullaly Hunt,
1429:It's actually very hard to find an area of the economy that doesn't fundamentally change in the measure that we are able to read and write life code. ~ Juan Enriquez,
1430:It's somehow more comforting to imagine that one's suffering is unique, and to measure against what one doesn't know, rather than against what one does. ~ Chris Ware,
1431:Newspapers necessarilyand inevitably reflect, and therefore, in greater or lesser measure, intensify, the defective organization of public opinion. ~ Walter Lippmann,
1432:Our spiritual life cannot be measured by success as the world measures it, but only by what God pours through us- and we cannot measure that at all ~ Oswald Chambers,
1433:The highest measure of democracy is neither the 'extent of freedom' nor the 'extent of equality', but rather the highest measure of participation. ~ Alain de Benoist,
1434:The history of the 20th century West is in large measure the history of efforts to answer these questions. The responses proved spectacularly successful: ~ Tony Judt,
1435:[T]here is no way to measure the happiness of others, and it is always easy to call a situation that one would like to impose on others happy... ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
1436:The spiritual atrophying of contemporary culture may be due in large measure to its loss of sensitivity to processes in the collective unconscious. ~ Terence McKenna,
1437:The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy”— ~ James Comey,
1438:When we abandon all to Him, He takes a tender care of us, and His Providence for us is great or small according to the measure of our abandonment. ~ Francis de Sales,
1439:Am I too fast, too facile? I do not know. I do not know myself sometimes, or how to measure and name and count out the grains that make me what I am. ~ Virginia Woolf,
1440:As to a media personality, well that just happened in large measure because people found me amusing, and I did lots and lots of T.V. news interview shows. ~ Ben Stein,
1441:Basically they were just assholes, though, and took it as the measure of God’s satisfaction with them that everybody else thought they were assholes. ~ William Gibson,
1442:Blessedness, not material possessions, is the measure of right thought; wretchedness, not lack of material possessions, is the measure of wrong thought. ~ James Allen,
1443:I have enjoyed the trees & scenery of KY exceedingly. How shall I ever tell of the miles & miles of beauty that have been flowing into me in such measure? ~ John Muir,
1444:I measure my life out in books."
"You should be measuring your life by living. Correction: you shouldn't be measuring your life. What's the point? ~ Claire Messud,
1445:I measure the amount of shows I should do by my hair. If my hair isn't good for campaigns and editorials, then obviously I am not going to look good. ~ Lindsey Wixson,
1446:In the middle of a recession no tax increase is justified because it kills jobs, and any tax increase is a job-killing measure and should be defeated. ~ Newt Gingrich,
1447:I thought that loving someone acted as a kind of protective measure, like they'd understand the scale and intensity of your feelings and act accordingly. ~ Emma Cline,
1448:Our limited perspective, our hopes and fears become our measure of life, and when circumstances don't fit our ideas, they become our difficulties. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
1449:Remark 1.4.20. The empty set axiom is needed in order to rule out the degenerate situation in which every set (including the empty set) has innite measure ~ Anonymous,
1450:Spirituality leaps where science cannot yet follow, because science must always test and measure, and much of reality and human experience is immeasurable. ~ Starhawk,
1451:To place the measure of a living being’s worth above that of another simply because that being wears the same color skin as I belittles my principles. ~ R A Salvatore,
1452:We have a saying that time has no single measure, that time can be like frost or lightning or a tear or siege or storm or sunset, or even like a rock. ~ James Clavell,
1453:Alas! I had not then learned the measure of "man's inhumanity to man," nor to what limitless extent of wickedness he will go for the love of gain. ~ Frederick Douglass,
1454:....a man both handsome and repulsive in equal measure-as if his good looks were plastered over a rotten centre, a hero's face with a henchman's heart. ~ Tom Rob Smith,
1455:Do not expect to be acknowledged for what you are, much less for what you would be; since no one can well measure a great man but upon the bier. ~ Walter Savage Landor,
1456:Every minute of his life since then has been marked by her absence, every action has lacked dimension because she is not there to measure against. ~ Audrey Niffenegger,
1457:Every minute of his life since then has been marked by her absence, every action has lacked dimension because she is not there to measure againts. ~ Audrey Niffenegger,
1458:Guns held in praying hands, flat against their chests. The thrill of the search, along with the terror of the truth, etched in equal measure on their faces. ~ Ali Land,
1459:If any of you would bring judgment the unfaithful wife, let him also weight the heart of her husband in scales, and measure his soul with measurements. ~ Khalil Gibran,
1460:no happiness exists without its woe, no wealth without its cost, and no life without its full measure, sooner or later, of sorrowing and death. ~ Gregory David Roberts,
1461:Pain exists in the universe; some measure of it is unavoidable. Learning to deal with it is not pessimism, but a very pragmatic form of optimism. ~ Henepola Gunaratana,
1462:people in new york are authorized by convention to snoop around and mentally measure and pass comment on any real estate they're invited to step into. ~ Joseph O Neill,
1463:The law doesn’t always know what it’s doing,” he adds for good measure. “Humans have a far greater instinct for what’s right in life than lawyers do. ~ Sophie Kinsella,
1464:The measure would set criminal penalties, the same as those that would apply if harm or death happened to the pregnant woman, for those who harm a fetus. ~ Ken Calvert,
1465:There's something about first love, isn't there? she said. It's untouchable to those who played no part in it. But it's the measure of all that follows. ~ Sarah Winman,
1466:The true measure of a man is not how he behaves in moments of comfort and convenience but how he stands at times of controversy and challenges. ~ Martin Luther King Jr,
1467:The true measure of runway is how many pivots a startup has left: the number of opportunities it has to make a fundamental change to its business strategy. ~ Eric Ries,
1468:The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. ~ Fali S Nariman,
1469:We may fail of our happiness, strive we ever so bravely; but we are less likely to fail if we measure with judgement our chances and our capabilities. ~ Agnes Repplier,
1470:What has philosophy got to do with measuring anything? It's the mathematicians you have to trust, and they measure the skies like we measure a field. ~ Galileo Galilei,
1471:After two full revolutions of the heavens around the Giza Plateau, the anchoring of the Vernal equinox is fulfilled by the measure of the Royal cubit. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
1472:Do not test the measure of his love for you by the way he expresses his body's heat. He is not thinking of you at those times. He is thinking of himself. ~ Pearl S Buck,
1473:God does not measure the precepts of his law by human strength, but, after ordering what is right, freely bestows on his elect the power of fulfilling it. ~ John Calvin,
1474:Google is in a sense serving as a time machine, and we’re just now being able to measure the effect this has on publishing, advertising, and attention. ~ Chris Anderson,
1475:How I measure success is getting to make another record and being able to the come back to the same town and play again cause you sold out the last time. ~ Bonnie Raitt,
1476:I realized that Sandra and I had been getting social mileage out of our children’s good behavior, and, in our eyes, this son simply didn’t measure up. ~ Stephen R Covey,
1477:It's so tedious writing cookbooks or writing the recipes because I've never been much of a measurer. But to write a book, you have to measure everything. ~ Maya Angelou,
1478:So she listened hard. And she began to evolve, because stories work their magic that way. They build conviction and erode conviction in equal measure. ~ Gregory Maguire,
1479:The average ground temperature of the Earth is impossible to measure since most of the Earth is ocean...So this average ground temperature is a fiction. ~ Freeman Dyson,
1480:The real wants of nature are the measure of enjoyments, as the foot is the measure of the shoe. We can call only the want of what is necessary poverty. ~ Pope Clement I,
1481:Time keeps no measure when true friends are parted, No record day by day; the sands move not for those who, loyal-hearted, friendship's firm laws obey. ~ Jack Nicholson,
1482:To know oneself is, above all, to know what one lacks. It is to measure oneself against Truth, and not the other way around. —Flannery O’Connor ~ Hillary Rodham Clinton,
1483:We all choose our sins, and their measure. The ones we believe will render us unforgivable, and the ones that we will wash off with a morning prayer. ~ Hanif Abdurraqib,
1484:We don't measure our people's success in how they're doing in government. We measure how they are doing in the real world and the private sector economy. ~ Bobby Jindal,
1485:You can't measure love by time put in, but the weight of those moments. Some in life are light, like a touch. Others, you can't help but stagger beneath. ~ Sarah Dessen,
1486:You can’t measure love by time put in, but the weight of those moments. Some in life are light, like a touch. Others, you can’t help but stagger beneath. ~ Sarah Dessen,
1487:aFor with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged; and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
1488:All the religions of the world say God is the creator. If he is really the creator, then the only way to meet him will be to become a creator in some measure. ~ Rajneesh,
1489:I'm up and down and round about, Yet all the world can't find me out; Though hundreds have employed their leisure, They never yet could find my measure. ~ Jonathan Swift,
1490:It is not how high I climb, nor how far I go; the true measure of me as a person is how far I bounce after a fall, and whether or not I land on my feet. ~ Emma Gingerich,
1491:I try to hold both history and wilderness in mind, that my poems may the true measure of things and stand against the unbalance and ignorance of our times. ~ Gary Snyder,
1492:I used to weigh myself every day at a certain time of day. Then I would write down the number and measure my body fat. It wasn't a healthy way to live. ~ Katherine Heigl,
1493:Man's feet are the measure for distance, his hands are the measure for ownership, his body is the measure for all that is lovable and desirable and strong. ~ E M Forster,
1494:Never measure yourself against magazine covers. Every 'perfect' body you see in a bikini is a result of weeks of dieting and exercise. And airbrushing. ~ Chalene Johnson,
1495:... technically, just like with the rings of a tree or Carbon-14, it had to be possible to measure the passage of time by the melting of vanilla ice cream. ~ Herman Koch,
1496:The exact measure of the progress of civilization is the degree in which the intelligence of the common mind has prevailed over wealth and brute force. ~ George Bancroft,
1497:The true measure of a best friend is where they are when you “make” the biggest decision of your life, not where they were during the decision process. ~ Shannon L Alder,
1498:The way I would measure leadership is this: of the people that are working with me, how many wake up in the morning thinking that the company is theirs? ~ David M Kelley,
1499:Three measures of Gordon’s, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it’s ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon-peel. ~ Ian Fleming,
1500:Truth . . . and if mine eyes Can bear its blaze, and trace its symmetries, Measure its distance, and its advent wait, I am no prophet - I but calculate. ~ Charles Mackay,

IN CHAPTERS [150/1004]



  277 Integral Yoga
  220 Poetry
  100 Christianity
   81 Occultism
   74 Philosophy
   47 Fiction
   27 Yoga
   22 Psychology
   16 Science
   15 Mysticism
   12 Integral Theory
   10 Kabbalah
   8 Philsophy
   8 Cybernetics
   6 Hinduism
   5 Sufism
   5 Baha i Faith
   4 Theosophy
   4 Mythology
   2 Education
   1 Alchemy


  218 Sri Aurobindo
  100 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   93 The Mother
   63 Satprem
   33 William Wordsworth
   32 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   29 Walt Whitman
   27 Plotinus
   27 Aleister Crowley
   26 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   26 H P Lovecraft
   25 James George Frazer
   25 Carl Jung
   24 Percy Bysshe Shelley
   22 Sri Ramakrishna
   16 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   12 William Butler Yeats
   12 Friedrich Schiller
   12 Anonymous
   10 Robert Browning
   10 Rabbi Moses Luzzatto
   10 Plato
   10 Aldous Huxley
   9 Friedrich Nietzsche
   9 Franz Bardon
   8 Saint John of Climacus
   8 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   8 Norbert Wiener
   8 Nirodbaran
   8 A B Purani
   7 Lucretius
   7 Jorge Luis Borges
   6 Rudolf Steiner
   6 John Keats
   6 Edgar Allan Poe
   6 Baha u llah
   5 Vyasa
   4 Swami Krishnananda
   4 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   4 Saint Teresa of Avila
   4 Ovid
   4 Henry David Thoreau
   4 George Van Vrekhem
   4 Al-Ghazali
   3 Rabindranath Tagore
   3 Jordan Peterson
   3 Alice Bailey
   2 Rainer Maria Rilke
   2 Paul Richard
   2 Mahendranath Gupta
   2 Jean Gebser
   2 Jalaluddin Rumi
   2 Jacopone da Todi
   2 Aristotle


   37 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   33 Wordsworth - Poems
   30 Savitri
   28 Whitman - Poems
   26 Lovecraft - Poems
   25 The Golden Bough
   24 Shelley - Poems
   21 The Life Divine
   21 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   19 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07
   18 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03
   17 City of God
   16 Magick Without Tears
   16 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   15 Collected Poems
   14 The Bible
   13 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04
   13 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02
   13 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01
   12 Yeats - Poems
   12 The Phenomenon of Man
   12 Schiller - Poems
   12 Faust
   12 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 05
   11 Letters On Yoga IV
   11 Letters On Yoga II
   10 The Perennial Philosophy
   10 The Future of Man
   10 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   10 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 03
   10 General Principles of Kabbalah
   10 Browning - Poems
   9 Liber ABA
   8 Twelve Years With Sri Aurobindo
   8 The Ladder of Divine Ascent
   8 The Human Cycle
   8 Questions And Answers 1950-1951
   8 Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   8 Emerson - Poems
   8 Cybernetics
   8 Agenda Vol 06
   7 Twilight of the Idols
   7 The Practice of Psycho therapy
   7 The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious
   7 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   7 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 02
   7 Of The Nature Of Things
   7 Essays On The Gita
   7 Essays Divine And Human
   7 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 08
   7 5.1.01 - Ilion
   6 Vedic and Philological Studies
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 Questions And Answers 1956
   6 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 01
   6 Let Me Explain
   6 Keats - Poems
   6 Aion
   6 Agenda Vol 08
   6 Agenda Vol 02
   5 Vishnu Purana
   5 The Practice of Magical Evocation
   5 Talks
   5 Poe - Poems
   5 On Thoughts And Aphorisms
   5 On the Way to Supermanhood
   5 Mysterium Coniunctionis
   5 Labyrinths
   5 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   5 Agenda Vol 13
   5 Agenda Vol 05
   4 Words Of The Mother II
   4 Walden
   4 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   4 The Alchemy of Happiness
   4 Record of Yoga
   4 Questions And Answers 1957-1958
   4 Questions And Answers 1954
   4 Questions And Answers 1929-1931
   4 Preparing for the Miraculous
   4 Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 04
   4 Metamorphoses
   4 Kena and Other Upanishads
   4 Initiation Into Hermetics
   4 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   4 Hymn of the Universe
   4 Goethe - Poems
   4 Anonymous - Poems
   4 Agenda Vol 11
   3 Words Of Long Ago
   3 The Way of Perfection
   3 The Secret Of The Veda
   3 The Red Book Liber Novus
   3 The Mother With Letters On The Mother
   3 The Book of Certitude
   3 The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
   3 Tagore - Poems
   3 Prayers And Meditations
   3 Maps of Meaning
   3 Letters On Yoga I
   3 Isha Upanishad
   3 Crowley - Poems
   3 Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 06
   3 A Treatise on Cosmic Fire
   3 Agenda Vol 09
   3 Agenda Vol 07
   3 Agenda Vol 03
   3 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah
   2 Thus Spoke Zarathustra
   2 The Problems of Philosophy
   2 The Ever-Present Origin
   2 The Divine Comedy
   2 Symposium
   2 Rumi - Poems
   2 Rilke - Poems
   2 Questions And Answers 1955
   2 Questions And Answers 1953
   2 Poetics
   2 On Education
   2 Agenda Vol 12
   2 Agenda Vol 10
   2 Agenda Vol 04
   2 Agenda Vol 01
   2 Advanced Dungeons and Dragons 2E


00.02 - Mystic Symbolism, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   These other worlds are constituted in other ways than ours. Their contents are different and the laws that obtain there are also different. It would be a gross blunder to attempt a chart of any of these other systems, to use an Einsteinian term, with the measures and conventions of the system to which our external waking consciousness belongs. For, there "the sun shines not, nor the moon, nor the stars, neither these lightnings nor this fire." The difficulty is further enhanced by the fact that there are very many unseen worlds and they all differ from the seen and from one another in manner and degree. Thus, for example, the Upanishads speak of the swapna, the suupta, and the turya, domains beyond the jgrat which is that where the rational being with its mind and senses lives and moves. And there are other systems and other ways in which systems exist, and they are practically innumerable.
   If, however, we have to speak of these other worlds, then, since we can speak only in the terms of this world, we have to use them in a different sense from those they usually bear; we must employ them as figures and symbols. Even then they may prove inadequate and misleading; so there are Mystics who are averse to all speech and expression they are mauni; in silence they experience the inexpressible and in silence they communicate it to the few who have the capacity to receive in silence.
   But those who do speak, how do they choose their figures and symbols? What is their methodology? For it might be said, since the unseen and the seen differ out and out, it does not matter what forms or signs are taken from the latter; for any meaning and significance could be put into anything. But in reality, it does not so happen. For, although there is a great divergence between figures and symbols on the one hand and the things figured and symbolised on the other, still there is also some link, some common measure. And that is why we see not unoften the same or similar figures and symbols representing an identical experience in ages and countries far apart from each other.
   We can make a distinction here between two types of expression which we have put together indiscriminately, figures and symbols. Figures, we may say, are those that are constructed by the rational mind, the intellect; they are mere metaphors and similes and are not organically related to the thing experienced, but put round it as a robe that can be dropped or changed without affecting the experience itself. Thus, for example, when the Upanishad says, tmnam rathinam viddhi (Know that the soul is the master of the chariot who sits within it) or indriyi haynhu (The senses, they say, are the horses), we have here only a comparison or analogy that is common and natural to the poetic manner. The particular figure or simile used is not inevitable to the idea or experience that it seeks to express, its part and parcel. On the other hand, take this Upanishadic perception: hirayamayena patrea satyasyphitam mukham (The face of the Truth lies hidden under the golden orb). Here the symbol is not mere analogy or comparison, a figure; it is one with the very substance of the experience the two cannot be separated. Or when the Vedas speak of the kindling of the Fire, the rushing of the waters or the rise of the Dawn, the images though taken from the material world, are not used for the sake of mere comparison, but they are the embodiments, the living forms of truths experienced in another world.

00.04 - The Beautiful in the Upanishads, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   And what else is the true character, the soul of beauty than light and delight? "A thing of beauty is a joy for ever." And a thing of joy is a thing of light. Joy is the radiance rippling over a thing of beauty. Beauty is always radiant: the charm, the loveliness of an object is but the glow of light that it emanates. And it would not be a very incorrect mensuration to measure the degree of beauty by the degree of light radiated. The diamond is not only a thing of value, but a thing of beauty also, because of the concentrated and undimmed light that it enshrines within itself. A dark, dull and dismal thing, devoid of interest and attraction becomes aesthetically precious and significant as soon as the artist presents it in terms of the values of light. The entire art of painting is nothing but the expression of beauty, in and through the modalities of light.
   And where there is light, there is cheer and joy. Rasamaya and jyotirmayaare thus the two conjoint characteristics fundamental to the nature of the ultimate reality. Sometimes these two are named as the 'solar and the lunar aspect. The solar aspect refers obviously to the Light, that is to say, to the Truth; the lunar aspect refers to the rasa (Soma), to Immortality, to Beauty proper,

00.05 - A Vedic Conception of the Poet, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   On this Earth they hold everywhere in themselves all the secrets. They make Earth and Heaven move together, so that they may realise their heroic strength. They measure them with their rhythmic measurings, they hold in their controlled grasp the vast and great twins, and unite them and establish between them the mid-world of Delight for the perfect poise.30
   All the gods are poetstheir forms are perfect, surpa, suda, their Names full of beauty,cru devasya nma.31 This means also that the gods embody the different powers that constitute the poetic consciousness. Agni is the Seer-Will, the creative vision of the Poet the luminous energy born of an experience by identity with the Truth. Indra is the Idea-Form, the architectonic conception of the work or achievement. Mitra and Varuna are the large harmony, the vast cadence and sweep of movement. The Aswins, the Divine Riders, represent the intense zest of well-yoked Life-Energy. Soma is Rasa, Ananda, the Supreme Bliss and Delight.

0.00a - Introduction, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  In view of this situation it is doubly reassuring to know that, even in the midst of chaotic concepts and conditions there still remains a door through which man, individually, can enter into a vast store-house of knowledge, knowledge as dependable and immutable as the measured tread of Eternity.
  For this reason I am especially pleased to be writing an introduction to a new edition of A Garden of Pomegranates. I feel that never, perhaps, was the need more urgent for just such a roadmap as the Qabalistic system provides. It should be equally useful to any who chooses to follow it, whether he be Jew, Christian or Buddhist, Deist, Theosophist, agnostic or atheist.
  --
  The importance of the book to me was and is five-fold. 1) It provided a yardstick by which to measure my personal progress in the understanding of the Qabalah. 2) Therefore it can have an equivalent value to the modern student. 3) It serves as a theoretical introduction to the Qabalistic foundation of the magical work of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. 4) It throws considerable light on the occasionally obscure writings of Aleister Crowley. 5) It is dedicated to Crowley, who was the Ankh-af-na-Khonsu mentioned in The Book of the Law -a dedication which served both as a token of personal loyalty and devotion to Crowley, but was also a gesture of my spiritual independence from him.
  In his profound investigation into the origins and basic nature of man, Robert Ardrey in African Genesis recently made a shocking statement. Although man has begun the conquest of outer space, the ignorance of his own nature, says Ardrey, "has become institutionalized, universalized and sanctified." He further states that were a brotherhood of man to be formed today, "its only possible common bond would be ignorance of what man is."

0.00 - INTRODUCTION, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
   About this time, on the Sivaratri night, consecrated to the worship of Siva, a dramatic performance was arranged. The principal actor, who was to play the part of Siva, suddenly fell ill, and Gadadhar was persuaded to act in his place. While friends were dressing him for the role of Siva — smearing his body with ashes, matting his locks, placing a trident in his hand and a string of rudraksha beads around his neck — the boy appeared to become absent-minded. He approached the stage with slow and measured step, supported by his friends. He looked the living image of Siva. The audience loudly applauded what it took to be his skill as an actor, but it was soon discovered that he was really lost in meditation. His countenance was radiant and tears flowed from his eyes. He was lost to the outer world. The effect of this scene on the audience was tremendous. The people felt blessed as by a vision of Siva Himself. The performance had to be stopped, and the boy's mood lasted till the following morning.
   Gadadhar himself now organized a dramatic company with his young friends. The stage was set in the mango orchard. The themes were selected from the stories of the Ramayana and the Mahabharata. Gadadhar knew by heart almost all the roles, having heard them from professional actors. His favourite theme was the Vrindavan episode of Krishna's life, depicting those exquisite love-stories of Krishna and the milkmaids and the cowherd boys. Gadadhar would play the parts of Radha or Krishna and would often lose himself in the character he was portraying. His natural feminine grace heightened the dramatic effect. The mango orchard would ring with the loud kirtan of the boys. Lost in song and merry-making, Gadadhar became indifferent to the routine of school.
  --
   In 1858 there came to Dakshineswar a cousin of Sri Ramakrishna, Haladhari by name, who was to remain there about eight years. On account of Sri Ramakrishna's indifferent health, Mathur appointed this man to the office of priest in the Kali temple. He was a complex character, versed in the letter of the scriptures, but hardly aware of their spirit. He loved to participate in hair-splitting theological discussions and, by the measure of his own erudition, he proceeded to gauge Sri Ramakrishna. An orthodox brahmin, he thoroughly disapproved of his cousin's unorthodox actions, but he was not unimpressed by Sri Ramakrishna's purity of life, ecstatic love of God, and yearning for realization.
   One day Haladhari upset Sri Ramakrishna with the statement that God is incomprehensible to the human mind. Sri Ramakrishna has described the great moment of doubt when he wondered whether his visions had really misled him: "With sobs I prayed to the Mother, 'Canst Thou have the heart to deceive me like this because I am a fool?' A stream of tears flowed from my eyes. Shortly afterwards I saw a volume of mist rising from the floor and filling the space before me. In the midst of it there appeared a face with flowing beard, calm, highly expressive, and fair. Fixing its gaze steadily upon me, it said solemnly, 'Remain in bhavamukha, on the threshold of relative consciousness.' This it repeated three times and then it gently disappeared in the mist, which itself dissolved. This vision reassured me."
  --
   From now on Sri Ramakrishna began to seek the company of devotees and holy men. He had gone through the storm and stress of spiritual disciplines and visions. Now he realized an inner calmness and appeared to others as a normal person. But he could not bear the company of worldly people or listen to their talk. Fortunately the holy atmosphere of Dakshineswar and the liberality of Mathur attracted monks and holy men from all parts of the country. Sadhus of all denominations — monists and dualists, Vaishnavas and Vedantists, Saktas and worshippers of Rama — flocked there in ever increasing numbers. Ascetics and visionaries came to seek Sri Ramakrishna's advice. Vaishnavas had come during the period of his Vaishnava sadhana, and Tantriks when he practised the disciplines of Tantra. Vedantists began to arrive after the departure of Totapuri. In the room of Sri Ramakrishna, who was then in bed with dysentery, the Vedantists engaged in scriptural discussions, and, forgetting his own physical suffering, he solved their doubts by referring directly to his own experiences. Many of the visitors were genuine spiritual souls, the unseen pillars of Hinduism, and their spiritual lives were quickened in no small measure by the sage of Dakshineswar. Sri Ramakrishna in turn learnt from them anecdotes concerning the ways and the conduct of holy men, which he subsequently narrated to his devotees and disciples. At his request Mathur provided him with large stores of food-stuffs, clothes, and so forth, for distribution among the wandering monks.
   "Sri Ramakrishna had not read books, yet he possessed an encyclopedic knowledge of religions and religious philosophies. This he acquired from his contacts with innumerable holy men and scholars. He had a unique power of assimilation; through meditation he made this knowledge a part of his being. Once, when he was asked by a disciple about the source of his seemingly inexhaustible knowledge, he replied; "I have not read; but I have heard the learned. I have made a garland of their knowledge, wearing it round my neck, and I have given it as an offering at the feet of the Mother."
  --
   In 1872 Sarada Devi paid her first visit to her husband at Dakshineswar. Four years earlier she had seen him at Kamarpukur and had tasted the bliss of his divine company. Since then she had become even more gentle, tender, introspective, serious, and unselfish. She had heard many rumours about her husband's insanity. People had shown her pity in her misfortune. The more she thought, the more she felt that her duty was to be with him, giving him, in whatever measure she could, a wife's devoted service. She was now eighteen years old. Accompanied by her father, she arrived at Dakshineswar, having come on foot the distance of eighty miles. She had had an attack of fever on the way. When she arrived at the temple garden the Master said sorrowfully: "Ah! You have come too late. My Mathur is no longer here to look after you." Mathur had passed away the previous year.
   The Master took up the duty of instructing his young wife, and this included everything from housekeeping to the Knowledge of Brahman. He taught her how to trim a lamp, how to behave toward people according to their differing temperaments, and how to conduct herself before visitors. He instructed her in the mysteries of spiritual life — prayer, meditation, japa, deep contemplation, and samadhi. The first lesson that Sarada Devi received was: "God is everybody's Beloved, just as the moon is dear to every child. Everyone has the same right to pray to Him. Out of His grace He reveals Himself to all who call upon Him. You too will see Him if you but pray to Him."
  --
   Gradually other Brahmo leaders began to feel Sri Ramakrishna's influence. But they were by no means uncritical admirers of the Master. They particularly disapproved of his ascetic renunciation and condemnation of "woman and gold".1 They measured him according to their own ideals of the householder's life. Some could not understand his samadhi and described it as a nervous malady. Yet they could not resist his magnetic personality.
   Among the Brahmo leaders who knew the Master closely were Pratap Chandra Mazumdar, Vijaykrishna Goswami, Trailokyanath Sannyal, and Shivanath Shastri.
  --
   Two more young men, Sarada Prasanna and Tulasi, complete the small band of the Master's disciples later to embrace the life of the wandering monk. With the exception of the elder Gopal, all of them were in their teens or slightly over. They came from middle-class Bengali families, and most of them were students in school or college. Their parents and relatives had envisaged for them bright worldly careers. They came to Sri Ramakrishna with pure bodies, vigorous minds, and uncontaminated souls. All were born with unusual spiritual attributes. Sri Ramakrishna accepted them, even at first sight, as his children, relatives, friends, and companions. His magic touch unfolded them. And later each according to his measure reflected the life of the Master, becoming a torch-bearer of his message across land and sea.
   --- WOMAN DEVOTEES
  --
   "I shall make the whole thing public before I go", the Master had said some time before. On January 1, 1886, he felt better and came down to the garden for a little stroll. It was about three o'clock in the afternoon. Some thirty lay disciples were in the hall or sitting about under the trees. Sri Ramakrishna said to Girish, "Well, Girish, what have you seen in me, that you proclaim me before everybody as an Incarnation of God?" Girish was not the man to be taken by surprise. He knelt before the Master and said, with folded hands, "What can an insignificant person like myself say about the One whose glory even sages like Vyasa and Valmiki could not adequately measure?" The Master was profoundly moved. He said: "What more shall I say? I bless you all. Be illumined!" He fell into a spiritual mood. Hearing these words the devotees, one and all, became overwhelmed with emotion. They rushed to him and fell at his feet. He touched them all, and each received an appropriate benediction. Each of them, at the touch of the Master, experienced ineffable bliss. Some laughed, some wept, some sat down to meditate, some began to pray. Some saw light, some had visions of their Chosen Ideals, and some felt within their bodies the rush of spiritual power.
   Narendra, consumed with a terrific fever for realization, complained to the Master that all the others had attained peace and that he alone was dissatisfied. The Master asked what he wanted. Narendra begged for samadhi, so that he might altogether forget the world for three or four days at a time. "You are a fool", the Master rebuked him. "There is a state even higher than that. Isn't it you who sing, 'All that exists art Thou'? First of all settle your family affairs and then come to me. You will experience a state even higher than samadhi."

0.00 - THE GOSPEL PREFACE, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  But, all doctrinal writing is in some measure formal and impersonal, while the autobiographer tends to omit what he regards as trifling matters and suffers from the further disadvantage of being unable to say how he strikes other people and in what way he affects their lives. Moreover, most saints have left neither writings nor self-portraits, and for knowledge of their lives, their characters and their teachings, we are forced to rely upon the records made by their disciples who, in most cases, have proved themselves singularly incompetent as reporters and biographers. Hence the special interest attaching to this enormously detailed account of the daily life and conversations of Sri Ramakrishna.
  "M", as the author modestly styles himself, was peculiarly qualified for his task. To a reverent love for his master, to a deep and experiential knowledge of that master's teaching, he added a prodigious memory for the small happenings of each day and a happy gift for recording them in an interesting and realistic way. Making good use of his natural gifts and of the circumstances in which he found himself, "M" produced a book unique, so far as my knowledge goes, in the literature of hagiography. No other saint has had so able and indefatigable a Boswell. Never have the small events of a contemplative's daily life been described with such a wealth of intimate detail. Never have the casual and unstudied utterances of a great religious teacher been set down with so minute a fidelity. To Western readers, it is true, this fidelity and this wealth of detail are sometimes a trifle disconcerting; for the social, religious and intellectual frames of reference within which Sri Ramakrishna did his thinking and expressed his feelings were entirely Indian. But after the first few surprises and bewilderments, we begin to find something peculiarly stimulating and instructive about the very strangeness and, to our eyes, the eccentricity of the man revealed to us in "M's" narrative. What a scholastic philosopher would call the "accidents" of Ramakrishna's life were intensely Hindu and therefore, so far as we in the West are concerned, unfamiliar and hard to understand; its "essence", however, was intensely mystical and therefore universal. To read through these conversations in which mystical doctrine alternates with an unfamiliar kind of humour, and where discussions of the oddest aspects of Hindu mythology give place to the most profound and subtle utterances about the nature of Ultimate Reality, is in itself a liberal, education in humility, tolerance and suspense of judgment. We must be grateful to the translator for his excellent version of a book so curious and delightful as a biographical document, so precious, at the same time, for what it teaches us of the life of the spirit.

0.01f - FOREWARD, #The Phenomenon of Man, #Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, #Christianity
  gift of existence. And this, in superior measure, is man's condition.
  But if it is true that it is so vital and so blessed to know, let us
  --
  series and measureless distances of time, which a sort of sluggish-
  ness of mind tends continually to condense for us in a thin layer
  --
  and its measureless horizons : we incline to all that is bad in
  anthropocentrism. And it is this that still leads scientists to refuse

0.02 - The Three Steps of Nature, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  If the bodily life is what Nature has firmly evolved for us as her base and first instrument, it is our mental life that she is evolving as her immediate next aim and superior instrument. This in her ordinary exaltations is the lofty preoccupying thought in her; this, except in her periods of exhaustion and recoil into a reposeful and recuperating obscurity, is her constant pursuit wherever she can get free from the trammels of her first vital and physical realisations. For here in man we have a distinction which is of the utmost importance. He has in him not a single mentality, but a double and a triple, the mind material and nervous, the pure intellectual mind which liberates itself from the illusions of the body and the senses, and a divine mind above intellect which in its turn liberates itself from the imperfect modes of the logically discriminative and imaginative reason. Mind in man is first emmeshed in the life of the body, where in the plant it is entirely involved and in animals always imprisoned. It accepts this life as not only the first but the whole condition of its activities and serves its needs as if they were the entire aim of existence. But the bodily life in man is a base, not the aim, his first condition and not his last determinant. In the just idea of the ancients man is essentially the thinker, the Manu, the mental being who leads the life and the body,3 not the animal who is led by them. The true human existence, therefore, only begins when the intellectual mentality emerges out of the material and we begin more and more to live in the mind independent of the nervous and physical obsession and in the measure of that liberty are able to accept rightly and rightly to use the life of the body. For freedom and not a skilful subjection is the true means of mastery. A free, not a compulsory acceptance of the conditions, the enlarged and sublimated conditions of our physical being, is the high human ideal. But beyond this intellectual mentality is the divine.
  The mental life thus evolving in man is not, indeed, a
  --
   to this conclusion that mental life, far from being a recent appearance in man, is the swift repetition in him of a previous achievement from which the Energy in the race had undergone one of her deplorable recoils. The savage is perhaps not so much the first forefa ther of civilised man as the degenerate descendant of a previous civilisation. For if the actuality of intellectual achievement is unevenly distributed, the capacity is spread everywhere. It has been seen that in individual cases even the racial type considered by us the lowest, the negro fresh from the perennial barbarism of Central Africa, is capable, without admixture of blood, without waiting for future generations, of the intellectual culture, if not yet of the intellectual accomplishment of the dominant European. Even in the mass men seem to need, in favourable circumstances, only a few generations to cover ground that ought apparently to be measured in the terms of millenniums. Either, then, man by his privilege as a mental being is exempt from the full burden of the tardy laws of evolution or else he already represents and with helpful conditions and in the right stimulating atmosphere can always display a high level of material capacity for the activities of the intellectual life.
  It is not mental incapacity, but the long rejection or seclusion from opportunity and withdrawal of the awakening impulse that creates the savage. Barbarism is an intermediate sleep, not an original darkness.
  --
  The immanence itself would have no credible reason for being if it did not end in such a transfiguration. But if human mind can become capable of the glories of the divine Light, human emotion and sensibility can be transformed into the mould and assume the measure and movement of the supreme Bliss, human action not only represent but feel itself to be the motion of a divine and non-egoistic Force and the physical substance of our being sufficiently partake of the purity of the supernal essence, sufficiently unify plasticity and durable constancy to support and prolong these highest experiences and agencies, then all the long labour of Nature will end in a crowning justification and her evolutions reveal their profound significance.
  So dazzling is even a glimpse of this supreme existence and so absorbing its attraction that, once seen, we feel readily justified in neglecting all else for its pursuit. Even, by an opposite exaggeration to that which sees all things in Mind and the mental life as an exclusive ideal, Mind comes to be regarded as an unworthy deformation and a supreme obstacle, the source of an illusory universe, a negation of the Truth and itself to be denied and all its works and results annulled if we desire the final liberation. But this is a half-truth which errs by regarding only the actual limitations of Mind and ignores its divine intention.

01.01 - Sri Aurobindo - The Age of Sri Aurobindo, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Indeed, looking from a standpoint that views the working of the forces that act and achieve and not the external facts and events and arrangements aloneone finds that things that are achieved on the material plane are first developed and matured and made ready behind the veil and at a given moment burst out and manifest themselves often unexpectedly and suddenly like a chick out of the shell or the young butterfly out of the cocoon. The Gita points to that truth of Nature when it says: "These beings have already been killed by Me." It is not that a long or strenuous physical planning and preparation alone or in the largest measure brings about a physical realisation. The deeper we go within, the farther we are away from the surface, the nearer we come to the roots and sources of things even most superficial. The spiritual view sees and declares that it is the Brahmic consciousness that holds, inspires, builds up Matter, the physical body and form of Brahman.
   The highest ideal, the very highest which God and Nature and Man have in view, is not and cannot be kept in cold storage: it is being worked out even here and now, and it has to be worked out here and now. The ideal of the Life Divine embodies a central truth of existence, and however difficult or chimerical it may appear to be to the normal mind, it is the preoccupation of the inner being of manall other ways or attempts of curing human ills are faint echoes, masks, diversions of this secret urge at the source and heart of things. That ideal is a norm and a force that is ever dynamic and has become doubly so since it has entered the earth atmosphere and the waking human consciousness and is labouring there. It is always safer and wiser to recognise that fact, to help in the realisation of that truth and be profited by it.

01.02 - Sri Aurobindo - Ahana and Other Poems, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   That measure tread.3
   or take again such daring lines as:
  --
   In the due measure that they chose of old.. . .
   The superb and the right imperial tone instinct with a concentrated force of

01.02 - The Issue, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And with her nude spirit measure the Infinite's night.
  3.16
  --
  Her walk kept still the measures of the gods.
  4.4
  --
  He measured the difficulty with the might
  And dug more deep the gulf that all must cross.
  --
  One slow move forward on a measureless board
  In the chess-play of the earth-soul with Doom,--
  --
  An answering touch might shatter all measures made
  And earth sink down with the weight of the Infinite.

01.03 - Mystic Poetry, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   My soul unhorizoned widens to measureless sight,
   My body is God's happy living tool,

01.03 - Sri Aurobindo and his School, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   European science is conquering Nature in a way. It has attained to a certain kind and measure, in some fields a great measure, of control and conquest; but however great or striking it may be in its own province, it does not touch man in his more intimate reality and does not bring about any true change in his destiny or his being. For the most vital part of nature is the region of the life-forces, the powers of disease and age and death, of strife and greed and lustall the instincts of the brute in man, all the dark aboriginal forces, the forces of ignorance that form the very groundwork of man's nature and his society. And then, as we rise next to the world of the mind, we find a twilight region where falsehood masquerades as truth, where prejudices move as realities, where notions rule as ideals.
   This is the present nature of man, with its threefold nexus of mind and life and body, that stands there to be fought and conquered. This is the inferior nature, of which the ancients spoke, that holds man down inexorably to a lower dharma, imperfect mode of life the life that is and has been the human order till today. No amount of ceaseless action, however selflessly done, can move this wheel of Nature even by a hair's breadth away from the path that it has carved out from of old. Human nature and human society have been built up and are run by the forces of this inferior nature, and whatever shuffling and reshuffling we may make in its apparent factors and elements, the general scheme and fundamental form of life will never change. To displace earth (and to conquer nature means nothing less than that) and give it another orbit, one must find a fulcrum outside earth.

01.04 - The Poetry in the Making, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   But the Yogi is a wholly conscious being; a perfect Yogi is he who possesses a conscious and willed control over his instruments, he silences them, as and when he likes, and makes them convey and express with as little deviation as possible truths and realities from the Beyond. Now the question is, is it possible for the poet also to do something like that, to consciously create and not to be a mere unconscious or helpless channel? Conscious artistry, as we have said, means to be conscious on two levels of consciousness at the same time, to be at home in both equally and simultaneously. The general experience, however, is that of "one at a time": if the artist dwells more in the one, the other retires into the background to the same measure. If he is in the over-consciousness, he is only half-conscious in his brain consciousness, or even not conscious at allhe does not know how he has created, the sources or process of his creative activity, he is quite oblivious of them" gone through them all as if per saltum. Such seems to have been the case with the primitives, as they are called, the elemental poetsShakespeare and Homer and Valmiki. In some others, who come very near to them in poetic genius, yet not quite on a par, the instrumental intelligence is strong and active, it helps in its own way but in helping circumscribes and limits the original impulsion. The art here becomes consciously artistic, but loses something of the initial freshness and spontaneity: it gains in correctness, polish and elegance and has now a style in lieu of Nature's own naturalness. I am thinking of Virgil and Milton and Kalidasa. Dante's place is perhaps somewhere in between. Lower in the rung where the mental medium occupies a still more preponderant place we have intellectual poetry, poetry of the later classical age whose representatives are Pope and Dryden. We can go farther down and land in the domain of versificationalthough here, too, there can be a good amount of beauty in shape of ingenuity, cleverness and conceit: Voltaire and Delille are of this order in French poetry.
   The three or four major orders I speak of in reference to conscious artistry are exampled characteristically in the history of the evolution of Greek poetry. It must be remembered, however, at the very outset that the Greeks as a race were nothing if not rational and intellectual. It was an element of strong self-consciousness that they brought into human culture that was their special gift. Leaving out of account Homer who was, as I said, a primitive, their classical age began with Aeschylus who was the first and the most spontaneous and intuitive of the Great Three. Sophocles, who comes next, is more balanced and self-controlled and pregnant with a reasoned thought-content clothed in polished phrasing. We feel here that the artist knew what he was about and was exercising a conscious control over his instruments and materials, unlike his predecessor who seemed to be completely carried away by the onrush of the poetic enthousiasmos. Sophocles, in spite of his artistic perfection or perhaps because of it, appears to be just a little, one remove, away from the purity of the central inspiration there is a veil, although a thin transparent veil, yet a veil between which intervenes. With the third of the Brotherhood, Euripides, we slide lower downwe arrive at a predominantly mental transcription of an experience or inner conception; but something of the major breath continues, an aura, a rhythm that maintains the inner contact and thus saves the poetry. In a subsequent age, in Theocritus, for example, poetry became truly very much 'sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought', so much of virtuosity and precocity entered into it; in other words, the poet then was an excessively self-conscious artist. That seems to be the general trend of all literature.

01.04 - The Secret Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  His image in the human measure cast
  That to his divine measure we might rise;
  Then in a figure of divinity

01.05 - The Yoga of the King - The Yoga of the Spirits Freedom and Greatness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Our measures cannot hold his measureless mind;
  He has turned from the voices of the narrow realm
  --
  As from her failing hand the measures fell,
  Atomic looked the things that loomed so large.
  --
  A boundless being in a measureless Time
  Invaded Nature with the infinite;

01.06 - On Communism, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Now, a spiritual communism embraces individualism and collectivism, fuses them in a higher truth, establishes them in an intimate and absolute harmony. The individual is the centre, the group is the circumference and the two form one whore circle. The individual by fulfilling the truth of his real individuality fulfils also the truth of a commonality. There are no different laws for the two. The individuals do not stand apart from and against one another, the dharma of one does not clash with the dharma of the other. The ripples in the bosom of the sea, however distinct and discrete in appearance, form but a single mass, all follow the same law of hydrodynamics that the mother sea incarnates. Stars and planets and nebulae, each separate heavenly body has its characteristic form and nature and function and yet all fulfil the same law of gravitation and beat the measure of the silent symphony of spaces. Individualities are the freedoms of the collective being and collectivity the concentration of individual beings. The same soul looking inward appears as the individual being and looking outward appears as the collective being.
   Communism takes man not as ego or the vital creature; it turns him upside downurdhomulo' vaksakhah and establishes him upon his soul, his inner godhead. Thus established the individual soul finds and fulfils the divine law that by increasing itself it increases others and by increasing others it increases itself and thus by increasing one another they attain the supreme good. Unless man goes beyond himself and reaches this self, this godhead above, he will not find any real poise, will always swing between individualism and collectivism, he will remain always boundbound either in his freedom or in his bondage.

01.08 - A Theory of Yoga, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   There are three lines, as the Psycho-analysts point out along which this control or censuring of the primary instincts acts. First, there is the line of Defence Reaction. That is to say, the mind automatically takes up an attitude directly contrary to the impulse, tries to shut it out and deny altogether its existence and the measure of the insistence of the impulse is also the measure of the vehemence of the denial. It is the case of the lady protesting too much. So it happens that where subconsciously there is a strong current of a particular impulse, consciously the mind is obliged to take up a counteracting opposite impulse. Thus in presence of a strong sexual craving the mind as if to guard and save itself engenders by a reflex movement an ascetic and puritanic mood. Similarly a strong unthinking physical attraction translates itself on the conscious plane as an equally strong repulsion.
   Secondly, there is the line of Substitution. Here the mind does not stand in an antagonistic and protestant mood to combat and repress the impulse, but seeks to divert it into other channels, use it to other purposes which do not demand equal sacrifice, may even, on the other hand, be considered by the conscious mind as worthy of human pursuit. Thus the energy that normally would seek sexual gratification might find its outlet in the cultivation of art and literature. It is a common thing in novels to find the heroine disappointed in love taking finally to works of charity and beneficence and thus forgetting her disappointment. Another variety of this is what is known as "drowning one's sorrow in drinking."

01.11 - Aldous Huxley: The Perennial Philosophy, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   We fear Mr. Huxley has completely missed the point of the cryptic sentence. He seems to take it as meaning that human kindness and morality are a means to the recovery of the Lost Way-although codes of ethics and deliberate choices are not sufficient in themselves, they are only a second best, yet they mark the rise of self-consciousness and have to be utilised to pass on into the unitive knowledge that is Tao. This explanation or amplification seems to us somewhat confused and irrelevant to the idea expressed in the apophthegm. What is stated here is much simpler and transparent. It is this that when the Divine is absent and the divine Knowledge, then comes in man with his human mental knowledge: it is man's humanity that clouds the Divine and to reach the' Divine one must reject the human values, all the moralities, sarva dharmn, seek only the Divine. The lesser way lies through the dualities, good and evil, the Great Way is beyond them and cannot be limited or measured by the relative standards. Especially in the modern age we see the decline and almost the disappearance of the Greater Light and instead a thousand smaller lights are lighted which vainly strive to dispel the gathering darkness. These do not help, they are false lights and men are apt to cling to them, shutting their eyes to the true one which is not that that one worships here and now, nedam yadidam upsate.
   There is a beautiful quotation from the Chinese sage, Wu Ch'ng-n, regarding the doubtful utility of written Scriptures:

01.12 - Three Degrees of Social Organisation, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   One might claim also on behalf of the doctrine of Right that the right kind of Right brings no harm, it is as already stated another name for liberty, for the privilege of living and it includes the obligation to let live. One can do what one likes provided one does not infringe on an equal right of others to do the same. The measure of one's liberty is equal to the measure of others' liberty.
   Here is the crux of the question. The dictum of utilitarian philosophers is a golden rule which is easy to formulate but not so to execute. For the line of demarcation between one's own rights and the equal rights of others is so undefinable and variable that a title suit is inevitable in each case. In asserting and establishing and even maintaining one's rights there is always the possibilityalmost the certaintyof encroaching upon others' rights.

0 1957-07-03, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   It went something like this: somewhere, in the center of this enormous edifice, there was a room reservedas it seemed in the story for a mother and her daughter. The mother was a lady, an elderly lady, a very influential matron who had a great deal of authority and her own views concerning the entire organization. Her daughter seemed to have a power of movement and activity enabling her to be everywhere at once while at the same time remaining in her room, which was well, a bit more than a roomit was a kind of apartment which, above all, had the characteristic of being very central. But she was constantly arguing with her mother. The mother wanted to keep things just as they were, with their usual rhythm, which precisely meant the habit of tearing down one thing to rebuild another, then again tearing down that to build still another, thus giving the building an appearance of frightful confusion. But the daughter did not like this, and she had another plan. Most of all, she wanted to bring something completely new into the organization: a kind of super-organization that would render all this confusion unnecessary. Finally, as it was impossible for them to reach an understanding, the daughter left the room to go on a kind of general inspection She went out, looked everything over, and then wanted to return to her room to decide upon some final measures. But this is where something rather peculiar began happening.
   She clearly remembered where her room was, but each time she set out to go there, either the staircase disappeared or things were so changed that she could no longer find her way! So she went here and there, up and down, searched, went in and out but it was impossible to find the way to her room! Since all of this assumed a physical appearanceas I said, a very familiar and very common appearance, as is always the case in these symbolic visions there was somewhere (how shall I put it?) the hotels administrative office and a woman who seemed to be the manager, who had all the keys and who knew where everyone was staying. So the daughter went to this person and asked her, Could you show me the way to my room?But of course! Easily! Everyone around the manager looked at her as if to say, How can you say that? However, she got up, and with authority asked for a key the key to the daughters roomsaying, I shall take you there. And off she went along all kinds of paths, but all so complicated, so bizarre! The daughter was following along behind her very attentively, you see, so as not to lose sight of her. But just as they should have come to the place where the daughters room was supposed to be, suddenly the manageress (let us call her the manageress), both the manageress and her key vanished! And the sense of this vanishing was so acute that at the same time, everything vanished!

0 1958-11-22, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   But I always had a presentiment of the true thing: that only a VERY COURAGEOUS act of self-giving could efface the thingnot courageous or difficult from the material point of view, not that There is a certain zone of the vital in you, a mentalized vital but still very material, which is very much under the influence of circumstances and which very much believes in the effectiveness of outer measuresthis is what is resisting.
   That is all I know.

0 1961-01-10, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   But as its all-powerful, a certain receptivity must be prepared on earth so its effects are not devastating. Sri Aurobindo has explained it in one of his letters. Someone asked him, Why doesnt this Love come now?, and he replied something like this: If divine Love in its essence were to manifest on earth, it would be like an explosion; for the earth is not supple enough or receptive enough to widen to the measure of this Love. The earth must not only open itself but become wide and supple. Matternot just physical Matter, but the substance of the physical consciousness as wellis still much too rigid.
   ***

0 1961-01-31, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   In the equations of Einstein's Theory of Relativity, quantities as 'immutable' as the mass of a body, the frequency of a vibration, or the time separating two events, are linked to the speed of the system where the physical event takes place. Recent experiments in outer space have allowed the validity of Einstein's equations to be verified. Thus a clock on a satellite in constant rotation around the Earth will measure sixty seconds between two audio signals, while an identical clock on Earth measures sixty-one seconds between the same two signals: time 'slows down' as speed increases. It is like the story of the space traveler returning to Earth less aged than his twin: you pass into another 'frame of reference.'
   It is striking that Mother's body-experiences very often parallel recent theories of modern physics, as if mathematical equations were the means of formulating in human language certain complex phenomena, remote from our day to day reality, which Mother was living spontaneously in her bodyperhaps 'at the speed of light.'

0 1961-02-11, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I have asked to be forewarned, not for reasons of. It can happen any time at all, I am always ready. I can do nothing more for the work than what I am doing now, and I havent a single practical measure to take because I have already taken them all. So that isnt why, but to AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE to withdraw from the body all that has been put into it. There is such an accumulation inside it of force, consciousness, power, oh! All the cells are impregnated and it would take some time if it all had to be taken out.
   But I have had no indication of this, neither by night nor by day, neither awake nor in tranceno indication. The indication rather points to all that must be clarified, purified so the physical may keep what it received from that experience [of January 24, 1961].

0 1961-04-18, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Once again, Mother's experience coincides with modern science, which is beginning to discover that time and space are not fixed and INDEPENDENT quantitiesas, from the Greeks right up to Newton, we had been accustomed to believe but a four-dimensional system, with three coordinates of space and one of time, DEPENDENT UPON THE PHYSICAL PHENOMENA DEVELOPING THEREIN. Such is 'Riemann's Space,' used by Einstein in his General Theory of Relativity. Thus, a trajectoryi.e., in principle, a fixed distance, a quantity of space to be traversed-is a function of the time taken to traverse it: there is no straight line between two points, or rather the I straight' line is a function of the rate of speed. There is no 'fixed' quantity of space, but rather rates of speed which determine their own space (or their own measure of space). Space-time is thus no longer a fixed quantity, but, according to science, the PRODUCT ... of what? Of a certain rate of unfolding? But what is unfolding? A rocket, a train, muscles?... Or a certain brain which has generated increasingly perfected instruments adapted to its own mode of being, like a flying fish flying farther and farther (and faster and faster) but finally failing back into its own oceanic fishbowl. Yet what would this space-time be for another kind of fishbowl, another kind of consciousness: a supramental consciousness, for example, which can be instantaneously at any point in 'space'there is no more space! And no more time. There is no more 'trajectory': the trajectory is within itself. The fishbowl is shattered, and the whole evolutionary succession of little fishbowls as well. Thus, as Mother tells it, space and time are a 'PRODUCT Of the movement of consciousness.' A variable space-time, which not only changes according to our mechanical equipment, but according to the consciousness utilizing the equipment, and which ultimately utilizes only itself; consciousness, at the end of the evolutionary curve, has become its own equipment and the sole mechanism of the universe.
   ***

0 1961-07-15, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Oh, its measured out with such wisdom! I mean the awarenessnot exactly consciousness, but a state between consciousness and perception the awareness of the stupendous difficulty of the thing is given to me drop by drop so that it wont be crushing.
   But there has evidently been some rather considerable progress, because lately the enormity of the thing has been shown to me far more concretely, oh! I tell you, it has reached the point where all spiritual life, all these peoples and races who have been trying since the beginning of the earth, who have made so many efforts to realize somethingit all seems like nothing, like childs play. Its nothing: you smile and then you are joyous. Its nothing at all, nothing at all!

0 1961-07-18, #Agenda Vol 02, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Note that modern astronomy is divided between the theory of endless phases of contraction-explosion-expansion, and the theory of a universe in infinite expansion starting with a 'Big Bang,' which seems quite as catastrophic, since the universe is then plunging at vertiginous speed into an increasingly cold, empty, and fatal infinity, like a bullet released from all restraints of gravity, until... until what? According to astronomers, an exact measurement of the quantity of matter in a cubic meter of the present universe (one atom for every 400 liters of space) should enable us to decide between these two theories and learn which way it will be best for us to die. If there is more than one atom per 400 liters of space, this quantity of matter will create sufficient gravitation to halt the present expansion of galaxies and induce a contraction, ending with an explosion within an infinitesimal space. If there is less than one atom per 400 liters of space, the quantity of matter and thus the gravitational effect will be insufficient to retain the galaxies within their invisible net, and everything will spin off endlesslyunless we discover, with Mother, a third position, that of a 'progressive equilibrium,' in which the quantity of matter in the universe proves in fact to be a quantity of consciousness, whose contraction or expansion will be regulated by the laws of consciousness.
   When the veil of falsehood has gone: the supramental consciousness.

0 1962-01-12 - supramental ship, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   So long as theres no question of physical transformation, the psychological and in large part, the subjective point of view is sufficientand thats relatively easy. But when it comes to incorporating matter into the work, matter as it is in this world where the very starting point is false (we start off in unconsciousness and ignorance), well, its very difficult. Because, to recover the consciousness it has lost, Matter has had to individualize itself, and for that for the form to last and retain this possibility of individualityit has been created with a certain indispensable measure of rigidity. And that rigidity is the main obstacle to the expansion, to the plasticity and suppleness necessary for receiving the Supermind. I constantly find myself facing this problem, which is utterly concrete, absolutely material when youre dealing with cells that have to remain cells and not vaporize into some nonphysical reality, and at the same time have to have a suppleness, a lack of rigidity, enabling them to widen indefinitely.
   There have been times, while working in the most material mind (the mind ingrained in the material substance), when I felt my brain swelling and swelling and swelling, and my head becoming so large it seemed about to burst! On two occasions I was forced to stop, because it was (was it only an impression, or was it a fact?) in any event it seemed dangerous, as if the head would burst, because what was inside was becoming too tremendous (it was that power in Matter, that very powerful deep blue light which has such powerful vibrations; it is able to heal, for example, and change the functioning of the organsreally a very powerful thing materially). Well then, thats what was filling my head, more and more, more and more, and I had the feeling that my skull was (it was painful, you know) that there was a pressure inside my skull pushing out, pushing everything out. I wondered what was going to happen. Then, instead of following the movement, helping it along and going with it, I became immobile, passive, to see what would happen. And both times it stopped. I was no longer helping the movement along, you see, I simply remained passive and it came to a halt, there was a sort of stabilization.

0 1962-05-27, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   But there are a certain number of beingsnot manywho have come back on earth ONLY to take part in a particular work, in a particular way. And outer things, personal and individual things, are virtually sacrificed to that. Certain faculties, for instance, whose source is the higher entity, faculties that in an ordinary life would result in a measure of power or fame or success or realization, are placed under conditions where their outer effect is subordinated to the needs of a particular work.
   Let me put it to you more clearly: your physical body, for example, should have been either stronger or more supple or endowed with certain very strong vital compensations, so that you wouldnt suffer from your working conditions. Of course, for someone following a yogic ascent, whose soul is in the process of formation, the external conditions of life are normally what is best for inner development, whatever that may beeven if, on the surface, those conditions arent good. So the only advice you can give such a person is, Well, either renounce the spiritual life or else putup with it. But thats not your case. There is a Mission, a work, and a kind of gap between a certain physical formation and that Mission. So if you ask me plainly what I see, I can tell you plainly, instead of saying as I would to certain sadhaks or anyone sincerely wanting to do yoga, Take it or leave it; you must learn to transform yourself inwardly to the point where you can master the body and its needs. I cant tell you that, because thats not how it is for you.

0 1962-11-17, #Agenda Vol 03, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I do not know why you want a line of thought to be indicated to you for your guidance in the affair of Korea. There is nothing to hesitate about there, the whole affair is as plain as a pike-staff. It is the first move in the Communist plan of campaign to dominate and take possession first of these northern parts and then of South East Asia as a preliminary to their manoeuvres with regard to the rest of the continentin passing, Tibet as a gate opening to India.9 If they succeed, there is no reason why domination of the whole world should not follow by steps until they are ready to deal with America. That is, provided the war can be staved off with America until Stalin can choose his time. Truman seems to have understood the situation if we can judge from his moves in Korea, but it is to be seen whether he is strong enough and determined enough to carry the matter through. The measures he has taken are likely to be incomplete and unsuccessful, since they do not include any actual military intervention except on sea and in the air. That seems to be the situation; we have to see how it develops. One thing is certain that if there is too much shillyshallying and if America gives up now her defence of Korea, she may be driven to yield position after position until it is too late: at one point or another she will have to stand and face the necessity of drastic action even if it leads to war. Stalin also seems not to be ready to face at once the risk of a world war and, if so, Truman can turn the tables on him by constantly facing him with the onus of either taking that risk or yielding position after position to America. I think that is all that I can see at present; for the moment the situation is as grave as it can be.10
   Sri Aurobindo

0 1963-07-31, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   But then, as I had worked hard for the elimination, the battle was quite formidablewhen it exceeds a certain measure, the heart has trouble, and then I need to rest. Thats how it happened. But it was so clear, so obvious! And the entire process was SEEN from the beginning, every single step of it, its a marvel! A marvel of consciousness, of measure, of dosage, to allow the purification and transformation to take place without disrupting the balance, so that dissolution does not occur. Its based on the capacity to endure and withstand (naturally, if the body were unable to endure, that work couldnt be done).
   And now the body KNOWS (in the beginning it didnt, it thought it was attacks from the outside, adverse forces; and it can always be explained like that, it was true in a certain way, but it wasnt the true truth, the deepest truth), now the body KNOWS where it all comes from, and its so marvelous! A marvel of wisdom. It puts everything in its place, it makes you REALIZE that all that play of the adverse forces is a way of seeing things (a necessary way at a given time, maybeby necessary, I mean practical), but its still an illusion; illnesses are a necessary way of seeing things to enable you to resist properly, to fight properly, but its still an illusion. And now, the BODY itself knows all thisas long as it was only the mind that knew it, it was a remote notion in the realm of ideas, but now the body itself knows it. And it is full not only of goodwill but also of an infinite gratitudeit always wonders (thats its first movement), Do I have the capacity? And it always gets the same answer, It isnt YOUR capacity. Will I have the strength?It isnt YOUR strength. Even that sense of infirmity disappears in the joy of infinite gratitude the thing is done with such goodness, such insight, such thoughtfulness, such care to maintain, as far as possible, a progressive balance.

0 1963-08-31, #Agenda Vol 04, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   These last few days, I had an opportunity to work on the proportion between the expression and the fact. Let me explain: for example, you have an experience (there are two cases where its very clear) first you have the experience, then comes the expression of that experience; and the proportion between the divine simplicity of the experience and the realizing power of the expression is what gives the measure of perfect sincerity the ratio between the two must be perfectly true.
   I saw in that almost a key to assess sincerity.
   The same goes for a teaching, in the sense that you have a certain power, which acts with a view to a result on those who, naturally, are receptivea certain power intended to produce a certain result or effectand owing to the worlds condition, which is almost exclusively mental, there is a need to add words (what people call a teaching) to that power. And thats where there should be an exact proportion between the sentence and the power: the sentence shouldnt express more or less than the power, it should be an exact expression of the powersay neither too much nor too little but say exactly the appropriate words that will clo the the power (in a mentally receivable way), that will be a vehicle of the power. And the proportion between the two gives the exact measure of the sincerity.
   I dont know if I can make myself understood, but for two days I was engrossed in that work of establishing an absolutely true ratiowhich in fact can be true only in a complete simplicity and complete sincerity. I saw the power that acts in the words and the power that acts without words, and the proportion between the two powers must be exact, entirely correct, to have a complete sincerity. You follow?

0 1964-01-04, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Imperial MAHESHWARI is seated in the wideness above the thinking mind and will and sublimates and greatens them into wisdom and largeness or floods with a splendour beyond them. For she is the mighty and wise One who opens us to the supramental infinities and the cosmic vastness, to the grandeur of the supreme Light, to a treasure-house of miraculous knowledge, to the measureless movement of the Mothers eternal forces. Tranquil is she and wonderful, great and calm for ever. Nothing can move her because all wisdom is in her; nothing is hidden from her that she chooses to know; she comprehends all things and all beings and their nature and what moves them and the law of the world and its times and how all was and is and must be. A strength is in her that meets everything and masters and none can prevail in the end against her vast intangible wisdom and high tranquil power. Equal, patient and unalterable in her will she deals with men according to their nature and with things and happenings according to their Force and the truth that is in them. Partiality she has none, but she follows the decrees of the Supreme and some she raises up and some she casts down or puts away from her into the darkness. To the wise she gives a greater and more luminous wisdom; those that have vision she admits to her counsels; on the hostile she imposes the consequence of their hostility; the ignorant and foolish she leads according to their blindness. In each man she answers and handles the different elements of his nature according to their need and their urge and the return they call for, puts on them the required pressure or leaves them to their cherished liberty to prosper in the ways of the Ignorance or to perish. For she is above all, bound by nothing, attached to nothing in the universe. Yet has she more than any other the heart of the universal Mother. For her compassion is endless and inexhaustible; all are to her eyes her children and portions of the One, even the Asura and Rakshasa and Pisacha6 and those that are revolted and hostile. Even her rejections are only a postponement, even her punishments are a grace. But her compassion does not blind her wisdom or turn her action from the course decreed; for the Truth of things is her one concern, knowledge her centre of power and to build our soul and our nature into the divine Truth her mission and her labour.
   Ganapati, or Ganesh: the son of the supreme Mother, god of material knowledge and wealth. He is represented with an elephant's head.

0 1964-07-31, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   But the more sophisticated those machines are, the more sensitive they are. A few years ago, when I was still downstairs, they brought me a machine that measured the vibratory waves of speech. They use it, but I dont know what for. They brought it to show it to me. I said, Wait, lets make an experiment. I dont remember exactly, but I remember having said the same thing twice: once, with my usual concentration, and once, with a full charge of the Lords Presence. You know, those machines draw kinds of graphsit started dancing! Everyone could see it, there was no mistake. And as far as I was concerned, I said the same thing in the same way; only, in the first case I said it without special concentration, while in the second case, I put the full charge and concentrationit started jumping and jumping! I said, See!
   Those machines have a sensitivity.1

0 1964-09-30, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   And its completely outsideoutsidehuman feelings, human thoughts, human perceptions, which means it can go to someone very close, very intimate, just as it can go to someone very remote; it can go to someone full of goodwill just as it can go to someone full of ill willwith perfect impartiality. Its very interesting, there are no nuances in its action, no nuances. There may be a dosage, but the dosage seems to be measured according to the resistance. But no nuances, which means that, for its action, everyone and everything is IDENTICALabsolutely identical; there arent those for and those against, that doesnt exist anymore; theres only something that isnt as it ought to be: it isnt as it ought to bebang! (Mother laughs)
   It came again just yesterday.

0 1964-10-07, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I quite understand: some people dont like the idea of a Divine because it immediately gets mixed up with all the European or Western conceptions (which are dreadful), and so it makes their lives a little bit more complicated but we dont need that! The something we need, the Perfection we need, the Light we need, the Love we need, the Truth we need, the supreme Perfection we need and thats all. The formulas the fewer the formulas, the better. A need, a need, a need that THE Thing alone can satisfy, nothing else, no half measure. That alone. And then, move on! Move on! Your path will be your path, it doesnt matter; any path, any path whatever, even the follies of todays American youth can be a path, it doesnt matter.
   As Sri Aurobindo said, if you cant have Gods love (I am translating), well then, find a way to fight with God and have a wrestlers relationship with Him.1

0 1964-11-12, #Agenda Vol 05, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   With those faintings of sorts I told you about the other day, I observed (it went on the whole day), and I saw (saw with the inner vision): it is like the travelat times as quick as a flash, at other times slow and very measuredof a force that starts from one point to reach another one. That force travels along a precise route, which isnt always the same and seems to include certain cells on its way: the starting point and the arrival point (Mother draws a curve in the air). If you arent on your guard, if you are taken by surprise, during the passage of the force (whether long or short) you feel the same sensation (you, meaning the body), the same sensation as before fainting: its the phenomenon that precedes fainting. But if you are attentive, if you stay still and look, you see that it starts from one point, reaches another point, and then its overwhat that force had to do has been done, and there is no APPARENT consequence in the rest of the body.
   I mentioned (not with so many details) the fact to the doctor, not in the hope that he would know, but because (its amusing) when I speak to him, he tries to understand, of course, and then there is the mirror of his mental knowledge, and in that mirror, sometimes I find the key! (Laughing) You understand, the scientific key of whats going on.

0 1965-03-10, #Agenda Vol 06, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   In all cases the extent of the damage gives the measure of the imperfection and must be taken as a lesson for indispensable progress.
   Yes, its the sequel to what you said the other day: those vibrations that enter only insofar as they meet a response.

0 1965-03-20, #Agenda Vol 06, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   It gave me an interesting measure of the interdependence.
   The body follows the action very well and does all that it has to do, but when around it there are consciousnesses that feel or think otherwise, that still has a considerable action; although the consciousness isnt affected: its perfectly lucid, it sees the whole play all the time, and it is conscious of the forces that come and of the whole play. So how is it that, the consciousness being conscious of the forces that come, those forces still have the power to act on the cells directly? Thats a problem.

0 1965-03-24, #Agenda Vol 06, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   And I will add a detail (not a very pleasant one, but it gives the measure of the truth): there were two bits of tooth she had to extract; first she extracted one, and it was just about normal, then she pulled the second one out, and there was a sort of hemorrhage: a huge quantity of blood had accumulated, thick and black the blood of a dangerous congestion. But I had felt it (there was a pain in the brain, a pain in the ear, a pain), and I thought, Thats not good, I should take care. The body was conscious that something was amiss. And quite an unusual hemorrhage. I even remarked to T., Its good it came out. She said, Oh, yes!
   All this to tell you that the thought is absolutely still, everything takes place directly: questions of vibrations. Well, thats the only way to know what has to be done. If it goes through the mindespecially through that physical thought, which is absolutely idiotic, absolutelyyou cant know; as long as that works, you are always driven to do what you shouldnt do, particularly to have the wrong reaction: the reaction that helps the forces of disorder and darkness instead of contradicting them. And I am not talking about anxiety because its a long, a very long time since my body stopped having any anxietya long time, years but anxiety is like swallowing a cup of poison.

0 1965-05-29, #Agenda Vol 06, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   The only point (I dont know if science has solved it) is the unpredictability of the future. But maybe they say thats because they havent yet reached the perfection of their instruments and methods! For instance, maybe they think that just when man appeared on the earth, if there had been the instruments they now have, they would have been able to foresee the transformation from animal to man, or the appearance of man as a result of something in the animal I am not aware (Mother smiles) of their most modern pretensions. In that case, they should be able to measure or perceive the difference in the atmosphere now, with the intrusion of something that wasnt therebecause that still belongs to the material field.3 But I dont think thats what Sri Aurobindo meant; I think he meant that the world of the soul and the inner realities are so much more wonderful than the physical realities that all the physical wonders make you smileits rather that.
   But the key you speak of, that key they dont have, is it not precisely the soul? A power of the soul over Matter, a power to change Matterto work physical wonders, too. Does the soul have that power?

0 1965-06-05, #Agenda Vol 06, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   measures against honest people.
   It hasnt been published. Those papers are actions: occult actions. I write them, keep them, and then I recharge them.

0 1965-06-23, #Agenda Vol 06, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   You leave free hands to the bandits and take insulting measures against the honest people.
   It will be like that so long as the country is not governed by the wisest people.
  --
   You leave free hands to the bandits and take insulting measures against the honest people.
   So the reply:

0 1965-07-24, #Agenda Vol 06, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   And what gave me an indication of the falsity of that consciousness and its activities was when I made that efforta tremendous effortto recall that my brother had died years earlier; from that I saw the distance between my true consciousness and the consciousness I was in for that dream. I saw the distance of falsity of that consciousness. It gave me a very clear indication. Instead of that quiet and peaceful consciousness which is like an undulationan undulation of light that always goes like this (gesture of great wings beating in the Infinite), a very vast, very peaceful movement of the consciousness, yet which follows the universal movement very quietlyinstead of that, there was something strained (gesture to the temples), it was as hard as wood or iron and strained, tense, oh! Then I knew how false it was. It gave me the exact measure.
   (long silence)

0 1965-09-25, #Agenda Vol 06, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Yes, but it acts, only its an infinitesimal action. Thats why millions of years are nothing. This stagnation, for instance, exists only for our consciousness; its because the human consciousness, after all, measures everything on its own scale. For it, the history of the earth is an infiniteit isnt so in universal history, but for the human being, the impression is of an infinite (he knows very well that it isnt so, but thats theoretical knowledge), so then, on this scale, nothing changes but thats not true.
   Yes, but it should be done in the space of one lifetime.

0 1966-01-26, #Agenda Vol 07, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Last night it was about hygienic measures concerning food, and there was such a comical demonstration of how ignorant the precautions we take are and of all sorts of prejudices we have with scenes and pictures that would make priceless comedies on the stage, oh!
   It was about shrimps to be eaten (!) and it called to my mind how people are in Europe; they arent at all like here, hounded by the thought of the possible contamination of the food they eat: in Europe, if you see a fruit, you take it and eat it. Shrimps, I remember having bought some on display in a big grocery, but it was on the pavement, outside, anywayyou never gave it a thought. And nothing happens to you! It was very early this morning, and so comical! Like the funniest farcewhoever wrote those farces? (Mother vainly tries to recall the name) I dont remember now. You know, names come on a tangent, and then all the similar sounds come on the other side. I tried to recall the name, something came by on a tangent, and on the other side, there came like a joke, cartilage! (Mother laughs) Whatever is the name of that modern who wrote farces, but wrote them very well?
  --
   It was about those big shrimps that are called jumbo prawns here: they are as big as crayfish. Someone (a disciple here), who died rather a long time ago, came and brought me prawns; that is to say, I met him in the rooms downstairs There are rooms that are reproduced somewhere, in a sort of subconscient, in fact the subconscient that has to be transformed, organized and so on, and there exists a sort of reproduction of the rooms downstairs [below Mothers room], but not exactly the same (yet with the same layout), and a certain category of activities takes place there. Thats where we were together once, I told you: you were trying to clarify peoples ideas (!) Its the same place. Its not physical here, its in the subconscient. So then, there was that tall fellow who watched over the Samadhi for a long time, Haradhan; he was there. And when he saw me arrive, he told me, I have brought something for you. And in a sort of dark-blue cloth, he had wrapped two big prawns, which he gave me! There were already cooked, ready to be eaten. The cloth wasnt very much to my liking! So I thought, How can I make them a little cleaner before eating them? (Laughing) You know, its a farcea farce to make you understand your stupidity. I began by removing the (what is it called?), its not skin Oh, here too the word hasnt come, but on a tangent came cuirass! (Laughing) Cuirass and cartilage! Anyway I removed that, and as soon as I had removed it, I said to myself, You fool! Now its even more exposed than before! I looked for a way, and I ran to a corner (in the place of Pavitras laboratory), found a water tap and put my prawn under the tap. Immediately someone told me (not someone, the inner voice told me [laughing]), Your water is even dirtier than the cloth! So the consciousness came along with the light, and I was shown with such a clear vision the relativity of the measures we take, which are all preconceived ideas, based on no true knowledge. And finally he told me, Come on, eat, thats the best you can do! So I ate my prawn, and it was very good!
   You know, we could write a farce. And scenes of such buffoonery!

0 1966-06-02, #Agenda Vol 07, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I have also heard that other scientists have discovered immediate transmission, which doesnt follow the slow curve of wave transmissions or even of more ethereal transmissions, through what they call (I think) a sort of pendulum or counterweight, so that what is done here is automatically reproduced there; if it goes down here, it goes up there, and if it goes down there, it goes up here, automatically. Its imitation (because they cant understand what it is), but its intuitive communication, of course. It seems they have an instrument to measure itits fantastic!
   Theyll end up having everything except the key.

0 1966-08-31, #Agenda Vol 07, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   And immediately after that, the certitudeso peaceful that everything was necessaryeverything, but everything: from the most marvelous for the human consciousness to the most horrible, the most repulsiveeverything was necessary. But strangely, all those things, all those experiences, all that life is what becomes unrealunreal, worse than an act you put on for yourself: unreal. And it is in its unreality that it was necessary for the consciousness. All appreciations are purely humanpurely human because they alter the measure, the proportion. Even physical suffering, material suffering, which is one of the things most difficult to feel as illusory: a lamentable act you put on for yourself, for the cells. And I am speaking from experience, with convincing examples. Its very interesting.
   ***

0 1967-01-21, #Agenda Vol 08, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   There are as if great waves of all the ordinary movements, ordinary ways of being, ordinary habits, which are pushed back and which come back again, and try to engulf and are pushed back again. And I can see that for years the body and the whole body consciousness used to rush back into the old way to seek safety, as a measure of safety, in order to elude; but now, the body has been persuaded not to do it any more and on the contrary to accept, Well, if its dissolution, let it be dissolution. But it accepts what will be.
   Mentally, when that happens in the physical mind (it was years ago, but I had observed that), its what gives people the feeling that theyre going insane, and they get frightened (and with fear things happen), so they rush back into ordinary common sense to escape it. Its the equivalentnot the same thing, but the equivalent of what happens in the material: you feel all the usual stability is vanishing. Well, for a long timea long timethere was that retreat into habit, and then you are quite at peace and you start all over again. But now, the cells no longer want that Come what may, well see! The great adventure.

0 1967-02-04, #Agenda Vol 08, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   There were constant obstructions there, between the nose and the throat, and I was silly enough to complain about it; I said it really wasnt reasonable and it had better go, and then drastic measures.
   But this morning I was told to rest, that is, to go within. I said I had other things to do; then it came over me forcibly! That is, suddenly something comes to me that I see, and then quite naturally, I concentrate on it, and I realize Ive gone off!

0 1967-02-08, #Agenda Vol 08, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Each illness represents its own vibratory mode. Each illness has its own vibratory mode; it represents a whole field of vibrations to be corrected. Its the EXACT measure of what in Matter resists the divine Influence the exact measure, down to the atom.
   Oh, how interesting it is, if you knew how interesting. Take coughing, for instance (not in the chest, in the throat). So, the first vibration: an irritation that draws your attention in order to make you cough. It has a certain kind of vibration which we may call pointed, but its not violent: its light, annoying. Its the first little vibration. So with that vibration: awakening of the attention in the surrounding consciousness (of the throat cells); then a refusal to accept the cough, a rejection here (in the throat), which at first almost causes nausea (all this is seen through a microscope, you understand, they are very tiny things). The attention is focused. Then, at that point, there are several possible factors, which are sometimes simultaneous and sometimes one drives away the other; one is anxiety: something goes wrong and there is apprehension at whats going to happen; the other is a will that nothing should be disturbed by the irritation; and then all of a sudden, the faith that the Force is capable of restoring order everywhere immediately (none of this is intellectual: its vibrations).

0 1967-07-22, #Agenda Vol 08, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Thats precisely the big quarrel with the Government! The Government says, We cant recognize you as a research School because the progress of yoga cant be measured. Exactly what Sri Aurobindo says! If we published this letter, it would give the Government weapons!
   You remember, in America a society or university or whatever held a kind of contest to prove life after death,1 and they gave two or three questions to be resolved. And I was asked, Why dont you answer? I said, the questions are not properly formulated, theyre put by ignorant people, so how can one answer? (I told you that long ago, I think.) Well, its the same thing here. What they ask is ignorant, it isnt properly formulated; its formulated by people who dont understand anything, so how can one answer them!

0 1967-09-09, #Agenda Vol 08, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   As soon as you want to do something, everything contrary rises up in a mass to a degree of stupidity beyond all measure. You want to create Harmony: everyone quarrels! Intelligent people seem to become foolish, they do foolish thingssince morning I have been spending my time writing to stop people from doing foolish things Strange. They are intelligent, responsible people, people who have worked for a long time but nonsense.
   Oh, as soon as there is a little power the power of light, power of truth, power of love (the aspect of power in things)as soon as that manifests (gesture of uprising), it creates a terrible confusion: everyone feels full of energy, and with that energy does foolish things! Then, if you withdraw the Power (gesture of flattening) flat outno one does anything anymore!

0 1967-11-15, #Agenda Vol 08, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Not understood, of course. Someone, C., wanted to translate Notes on the Way and A Propos into Hindi, in one volume. He spoke to R. about it, and R. wrote to me, People dont understand anything, and he feels the human language is unfit to express that, so how will it turn out in a translation?A platitude. It would be better to wait. I fully agree, I told him it would be better to wait. But it gave me the exact measure. Because R. and C. are people who are expected to understand, and they clearly dont understand anything. And then, Nolini was there, I gave him the letter to read, and he said, Oh, yes!For him too its the same thing, he hasnt understood! So its general. Because many people quote to me what I have said, or experiences theyve had, explanations they give in accordance with those Notes on the Way, and every time I see that they havent understood ANYTHING.
   So it seems to me to be a general incomprehension.

0 1968-06-29, #Agenda Vol 09, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Its like a studya really accelerated study, you cant imagine, one minute after another, like this (snowballing gesture)from the standpoint of the work, that is, the purpose of physical existence in a body, and the usefulness of physical presence. And the absolutely clear, precise vision, in minutes detail, of whats real and whats illusory, whats truly necessary and whats only imagination (that of others, but also, at times, ones own). But I would need hours to tell it all. With (is it a basis?) the perception in the consciousness (but a detailed perception I dont mean ideas, it has nothing to do with ideas or principles, etc.: theres no mental translation), the perception of what, in the work, demands or depends on the bodily presence (I am purposely not saying physical presence, because theres a subtle physical presence thats independent of the body), the bodily presence. And then, at the same time, such a clear, precise, detailed vision of the relationship each one has with this body (a relationship which is thought, feelings and physical reactions all at once), and thats what gives the impression of the necessity of bodily presencegives its measure also. So there is, at the same time, the perception of the TRUE usefulness of physical presence and the perception of the reaction in individuals. Its a world! A world, because of the fantastic amount of details. A world unfolding every second. And accompanied by an inner perception, first, of the effect it has on the cells, and then that the cohesion has now really become, I may say, the result of a supreme Will, to the extent that its necessary for lets say for the experience, or the work (anythingwe can call it what we like). In other words, there is the aspect of progress of the cells as an aggregate. There is hardlyhardly, very weakly the sense of a personality or a physical individuality, its hardly that; neither is it a habit of being together, because its very fluid in there: its truly held together by a higher Will with a definite aim in view, but that too is fluidnothing is fixed.
   (silence)

0 1968-08-28, #Agenda Vol 09, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   There were no watches, you understand! It was the body which said with a childs simplicity, You speak of billions of years, but what did you measure them with!
   Is it sure that what we call a year has always represented the same thing? During this recent period, I have had the awareness of the nonreality of our usual notion of time. At times, one minute seemed interminable; at other times, hours and even a day went by apparently without having lasted.

0 1968-12-11, #Agenda Vol 09, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   The experience is continuing and becoming increasingly conscious and almost practical. When someone comes, I seem to see almost to measure the quantity of veils preventing him from seeing and feeling the supreme Consciousness. It has become very interesting: someone is in front of me, I look at him or her, concentrating and concentrating and concentrating until the contact with the supreme Consciousness is established, and I can measure the reaction: with some, when they are here, its very difficult to make contact; with others (and its very unexpected, it has nothing to do with what one may thinkits extraordinary, extraordinary!), with some others, instantly it goes hup! like this (gesture of piercing a veil) and contact is made sometimes with quite unexpected people; with others who do the sadhana, who are quite consecrated, who it takes such labor! Its really interesting. Really interesting. But then, some people, once contact has been made, wont budge anymore! (I doubt they are aware of what it is, but they wont budge anymore.) Others, on the contrary, start going like this (tremulous gesture), they wouldnt mind leaving! (Mother laughs) Its hugely interesting!
   I remember the time when I used to speak of a bath of the Lord which I gave [people]that business seems to me quite outdated, its not that! Its The Lord is there, everywhere and always! (I say the Lord so as to avoid making lengthy sentences, but sometimes I say the supreme Consciousness to be lesswhat shall I say?less childish, because all that is childish, everything we say.) But the experience is becoming more and more wonderful.

0 1969-02-19, #Agenda Vol 10, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I am entirely convinced that things are as they must be, and that its simply the body that lacks suppleness, tranquillity, trust. So I cant even say that things grate (they dont grate at all), but You understand, the work consists in changing the conscious base of all the cells but not all at once! Because that would be impossible; even little by little is very difficult: the moment when the conscious base is changed is There is almost a sort of panic in the cells, and the impression, Ooh! Whats going to happen? And since there are still lots and lots of them So now and then, its difficult. Its by group, almost by faculty or part of faculty, and some of them are a little difficult. I dont know (since its quite new), I dont know if it would be easier if I werent doing anything? Probably not, because its not so much the work [to be done], its not that: its peoples general attitude. It makes for a kind of collective support at the moment of the transition. At the moment when the consciousness that ordinarily supports the cells fades away for the new one to take the place, the cells need (the cells, I dont know if its them), but there has to be the support of (how can I put it?) in people it gets expressed as the need of the Presence, but thats not what is necessary: its a sort of collaboration of the collective forces. Its not much, its not indispensable, but it helps a little, in some measure. There is a moment when theres almost an anguish, you know, youre suspended like that; it may be a few seconds, but those few seconds are terrible. This morning again there was a moment like that. I remember that at the time of the darshans, for two days Sri Aurobindo didnt want me to do any work for others (to see them, read letters, reply, all that), but he was here, so it was he who acted as support. Because I see that the work began long ago (in a subordinate and very little conscious way), but now its in full swing. So the cells feel some slight panic. Generally, a few minutes concentration is enough, but it causes a sort of wearinessweariness in the cells, a need not to do anything (Mother points at the clock, which reads 11).
   If I hadnt known, if the body hadnt known what it was, well, ordinarily I would have lain down without seeing anyone. But the consciousness was there to say that the unpleasantness of it [the second of transition], the unpleasant consequence of it would have been worse than the fact of being tired.

0 1969-08-23, #Agenda Vol 10, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Its only the pressure of the Consciousness on the inconscientand then, in people, the measure of the resistance or of the receptivity. its like that. In some people (and not always the apparently bad ones), theres such resistance! Its like like iron. While others
   Its going much faster. Things are moving fast just now.

0 1970-01-17, #Agenda Vol 11, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Theres also a question of measurement. According to the plan, you gave 24 meters [78 feet 9 inches]12 meters on each side of the globe. But could some more distance be kept for the outer circle? The plan has 24 meters in diameter and 15.2 meters [49 feet 10 inches] in height.
   Oh?

0 1970-01-28, #Agenda Vol 11, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   In the end, the value of an experience is measured by its power to transform life; otherwise, we are before an empty dream or a hallucination.
   Sri Aurobindo leads us to a twofold discovery which we urgently need if we want not only to find a way out of our suffocating chaos, but also to transform our world. By following him step by step in his prodigious explorationhis technique of inner spaces, if we may say sowe are led to the most important discovery of all times, to the threshold of the Great Secret which is to change the face of this world, namely, that consciousness is power. Hypnotized as we are by the present inescapable scientific conditions in which we were born, we seem to find hope only in an ever more enormous proliferation of machines, which will see better than we do, hear better than we do, calculate better than we do, heal better than we doand finally perhaps live better than we do.

0 1970-03-18, #Agenda Vol 11, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   No external measure can enable us to react against the harm caused by mental faith in the necessity of drugs. It is only by emerging from the minds prison and consciously soaring into the light of the spirit that, through a conscious union with the Divine, we will be able to let Him give us back the balance and health which we have lost.
   Supramental transformation is the only true remedy.

0 1970-07-25, #Agenda Vol 11, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I must say that certain things contri buted to the experience: in answer to certain questions, yesterday Z told me about the age of the earth, and how they have now managed to measure it (things that are the mental approach to the problem), and suddenly, when he spoke, suddenly there came this sort of union and (what should I say?) almost a sensation, in the body, of the earth returning to the Divine Consciousness. So the conjunction, combination of all that resulted in this experience.
   (silence)

0 1971-03-17, #Agenda Vol 12, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Oh, yeseverything is divine. There is ONLY the Divine. But He is broken up into opposites. And the extreme opposite can be touched, overcome, if you will, transformed by the divine extremehalfway measures wont work. It is the divine extreme that will be able to transform the dark extreme: by absorbing (gesture of taking into herself), absorbing and blotting out the darkness. By absorbing it, it can blot out its action.
   But a tremendous power is needed.

0 1971-10-20, #Agenda Vol 12, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   One must rely on the Divine and yet do some enabling sadhana the Divine gives the fruit not by the measure of the sadhana but by the measure of the souls sincerity and its aspiration. Also, worrying does no good I shall be this, I shall be that, what shall I be? Say: I am ready to be not what I want but what the Divine wants me to be,all the rest should go on that base.
   April 13, 1935
  --
   They have found some letterssome old lettersfrom Sri Aurobindo to Barin and the lawyer1extraordinary! They are incredible. They give the measure of Sri Aurobindo as a man of action. Even in 1920, he intended to undertake an action. To organize centers all over India, the world, oh! a plan! And that was before the liberation of the country!
   He says that he has completely withdrawn to find his yoga, but once he had found it, he is going to start his action2.

0 1972-03-08, #Agenda Vol 13, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Well, this is it. Something like: No half measures, no compromises, no halfways, no Noneits like this (Mother brings down her fist).
   And thats how it is for the body. Every instant is imperative: life or death. No halfways. You know, we have spent centuries being neither too uncomfortable nor too comfortable. Well, that time is over.
   The body knows this is necessary for the supramental body to be formed: it must be ENTIRELY under the Influence of the Divine. No compromises, no half measures, no It will come later. Just like this (Mother brings down her fist): a dreadful Will.
   And thats the only way for things to go fast.

0 1972-03-15, #Agenda Vol 13, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   (Satprem reads Mother some parts of the conversation of March 8 for the next "Bulletin": "No compromises, no half measures, no 'It will come later'... it's like a constant feeling of hovering between life and death...".)
   Its very true. And it keeps getting more and more acute, more and more acute. Thats it. All the time, all the time like that.

0 1972-04-04, #Agenda Vol 13, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   Auroville is burdened by a small group of people who are contaminating its life and spirit and jeopardizing its progress. They thwart any effort to implement safety and hygiene measures, working decisions, and they behave in contradiction to Aurovilles ideal. One solution would be to send some of these people back home and, for a certain period, to limit newcomers to those elements directly useful to the building of Auroville.
   We see that, in practice, this possibility has not been endorsed by you. Is the presence of these elementswhich according to us are undesirablenecessary to Auroville for reasons known to the Divine Consciousness? Are we supposed to build Auroville amidst the difficulties they represent? And are they useful to Aurovilles development?
  --
   (The architect:) Well, Mother, I simply wanted to know if we are supposed to accept the presence of these seemingly undesirable people as a necessity for Aurovilles growth, and if so, well just have to act accordingly and face the difficulties they represent; or should we take definite measures to solve the problems of safety, the problems of hygiene.
   What problems of hygiene? What problems of safety?

0 1972-08-30, #Agenda Vol 13, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   But, you know, Im sure your condition is intentional, because as I can perceive it in my small measure, I feel you are a kind of colossal power transmitter in your immobility.
   Yes, I know. I know, its colossal! Yes, a Force thats. And even in my hands: an incredible power.

0 1972-12-10, #Agenda Vol 13, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   I now wonder whether I was not, in my own measure, beginning to learn the painful lesson of oneness, which starts with all the ambient ill-will. Now I understand fully well that there must be no more "person" in order to withstand all that. If there is "somebody-who," it is painful and dangerous.
   ***

02.01 - Our Ideal, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The inevitability arises from the very fact of this evolutionary urge that a stage will come when Matter will undergo another, more radical and crucial change; it will be taken up by a higher reality than mind and suffused with a light and power belonging to that reality: a spiritual consciousness will emerge and with it spiritualised Matter, even as a mental consciousness emerged and mentalised (however inadequately) Matter, and yet anterior to that a vital consciousness emerged and vitalised Matter. There cannot be a limit to the degree of spiritualisation also; for the degree of the Spirit that Nature manifests in an earthly body will also be the measure to which the body itself is spiritualised. A perfectly dynamic spiritual consciousness will have the power to perfectly spiritualise the body and life and mind. And this grade and power of the supreme Spirit Sri Aurobindo calls the Supermind.
   We will try to understand the nature of sublimation and transformation by analogy and illustration. Mind, for example, we know, is an instrument which by itself is incapable of attaining to the knowledge of the Spirit or the consciousness of the Truth. As it is constituted at present, it is not only not capable of that knowledge and consciousness, but is an obstacle to them. Its vibrations and formulations disturb and vitiate the higher rhythm. That is why it is repeated so often in the Upanishads:
  --
   A mind that is not rigidly limited to the ratiocinative process, but has been remoulded in the light and rhythm of inspiration and intuition and revelation and other higher sources still beyond becomes at once a transfigured vessel, an apt instrument to incarnate and dynamise in the physical and material field truths and realities that normally lie far and above. Something of the kind, though in a small measure, happens, for example, in a poet or an artist. A poet who moves by vision and inspiration is not, at least need not be, devoid of mind: the mind in ills case is not annihilated or even kept in abeyance, but sublimated, undergoing a reorientation and reorganisation, acquiring a new magnitude. Even if there is a suspension of the ratiocinative faculty, it would not mean a suspension of the mental power in itself, but rather an enhancement in a new degree. The same may happen to the other parts and planes of human consciousness and existence.
   Of course, if one chooses, one can sidetrack these intervening ranges of consciousness between the Spirit and Matter, and strike something like a chord line between the two; but also one need not follow this bare straight ascetic line of ascension; one can pursue a wider, a circular or global movement which not only arrives but fulfils. The latter is Nature's method of activity, Nature being all reality. The exclusive line is meant for individuals, and even as such it has a value and sense in the global view, for this too is contri butory to the total urge and its total consummation.

02.03 - The Glory and the Fall of Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Exploring the measures of the rhythms of God,
  At will she wove her wizard wonder-dance,

02.04 - The Kingdoms of the Little Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A little curve cut off in measureless Space,
  A little span of life in all vast Time.

02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  All models they corrupt, all measures cheat,
  Make knowledge a poison, virtue a pattern dull
  --
  A visioned measure guided her rhythmic steps;
  Thought bordered her instincts with a frame of will
  --
  Capture the mystic Morse whose measured lilt
  Transmits the messages of the cosmic Force.
  --
  To Science the giantess, measurer of her field,
  As she pores on the record of her close survey
  --
  The vague Inconscient's dark and measureless cave.
  48.6

02.06 - Vansittartism, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Hence it is suggested that for the postwar reconstruction of Germany what is required is the re-education of its people. For, only a psychological change can bring about a durable and radical change. But certain proposals towards this end raise serious misgivings, since they mean iron regimentation under foreign control. Even if such a thing were possible and feasible, it is doubtful if the purpose could be best served in this way. measures have to be taken, no doubt, to uproot Prussianism and Junkerism and prevent their revival, no false mercy or sympathy should be extended to the enemies of God and man. But this is only a negative step, and cannot be sufficient by itself. A more positive and more important work lies ahead. The re-education of Germany must come from within, if it is to be permanent and effective. What others can do is to help her in this new orientation. As we have said, there are the progressive elements in Germany too, although submerged for the moment. The task of reconstruction will precisely consist in calling up and organising and marshalling these forces that are for the Light. The Allied organisation, it may be noted, itself has grown up in this way. When one remembers how Britain stood alone at one time against the all-sweeping victorious march of the Titan, how slowly and gradually America was persuaded to join hands, at first in a lukewarm way, finally with all its heart and soul and might and main, how a new France is being built up out of a mass of ruins, we can hope that the same process will be adopted in the work that lies ahead even after victory, with regard to Italy and with regard to Germany. In the second case the task is difficult but it has got to be done.
   ***

02.09 - The Paradise of the Life-Gods, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  But measureless to life its gain of joy;
  All the untold Beyond is mirrored there.

02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A master Magician of measure and device
  Has made an eternity from recurring forms
  --
  A measured Greatness keeps its vaster plan,
  A fathomless sameness rhythms the tread of life;

02.11 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Moulders and measurers of fragmented Space,
  They have made their plan of the concealed and known
  --
  The Illimitable they measured with number's rods
  And traced the last formula of limited things,

02.14 - The World-Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A measureless secure eternity
  Of truth and beauty and good and joy made one.

02.15 - The Kingdoms of the Greater Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  AFTER a measureless moment of the soul
  Again returning to these surface fields
  --
  The multiple measures of the upbuilding force,
  The lines of the World-Geometer's technique,
  --
  It judged not, measured not, nor strove to know,
  But listened for the veiled all-seeing Thought

03.01 - Humanism and Humanism, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   A good many European scholars and philosophers have found Indian spirituality and Indian culture, at bottom, lacking in what is called "humanism."1 So our scholars and philosophers on their side have been at pains to re but the charge and demonstrate the humanistic element in our tradition. It may be asked however, if such a vindication is at all necessary, or if it is proper to apply a European standard of excellence to things Indian. India may have other measures, other terms of valuation. Even if it is proved that humanism as defined and understood in the West is an unknown thing in India, yet that need not necessarily be taken as a sign of inferiority or deficiency.
   But first of all we must know what exactly is meant by humanism. It is, of course, not a doctrine or dogma; it is an attitude, an outlook the attitude, the outlook that views and weighs the worth of man as man. The essential formula was succinctly given by the Latin poet when he said that nothing human he considered foreign to him.2 It is the characteristic of humanism to be interested in man as man and in all things that interest man as man. To this however an important corollary is to be added, that it does not concern itself with things that do not concern man's humanity. The original father of humanism was perhaps Socrates whose mission it was, as he said, to bring down philosophy from heaven to live among men. More precisely, the genesis should be ascribed rather to the Aristotelian tradition of Socratic teaching.
  --
   It is the cult of the Divine Human which enunciates the mystic truth that man is greater than all and surpasses the Vedic Law (which aims usually at the impersonal Absolute). But Man here is to be understood as the Divine Person in his human norm, not at all the human man, as modern humanists of our country would like to have. It does not mean the glorification of man's human attributes and movements, even if they be most sattwic and idealistic; it refers rather to the divinised type, the archetype that is eternal in the super-consciousness. And when such a Man lives and acts upon earth he does so in manner and measure that do not belong to this plane.
   Only the other day I found a critic in The Manchester Guardian referring to The Gita as something frigid (and confused)!

03.02 - Yogic Initiation and Aptitude, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Only one thing, represented by one small homely wordCall. Whatever may be the case with other paths of sadhana, for Sri Aurobindo's Path this is the keynote. Has the call come to you, have you received the call? That is everything. If you have this call it does not matter in the least whether you have other qualities, be they good, be they bad. That serves as proof and pointer that you are meant for this Path. If you have this one thing needful you have everything, and if you have it not, you have nothing, absolutely nothing. You may be wise beyond measure, your virtues and austerities may be incalculable, yet if you lack is, you lack the fitness for Sri Aurobindo's Yoga. On the other hand, if you have no virtues worth the name, if you are uneducated or ill-educated, if you are weak and miserable, if your nature is full of flaws and lapses, yet if the call is there in you secreted somewhere, then all else will come to you, will be called in as it were inevitably: riches and strengths will grow and develop in you, you will transcend all obstacles and dangers, all your wants will be made good, all your wear and tear will be whole. In the words of the Upanishad: Sin will not be able to traverse you, you will traverse all sin, sin will not burn you, you will burn it away.4
   Now what exactly is this wonderful thing? This power that brings into being the non-being, realises the impossible? Whose is this Call, from where does it come? It is none other than the call of your own inmost being, of your secret self. It is the categorical imperative of the Divine seated within your heart. Indeed, the first dawning of the spiritual life means the coming forward, the unveiling of this inner being. The ignorant and animal life of man persists so long as the inner being remains in the background, away from the dynamic life, so long as man is subject to the needs and impulses of his mind and life and body. True, through the demands and urges of this lower complex, it is always the inner being that gains and has its dictates carried out and is always the secret lord and enjoyer; but that is an indirect effect and it is a phenomenon that takes place behind the veil. The evolution, in other words, of the inner or psychic being proceeds through many and diverse experiencesmental, vital and physical. Its consciousness, on the one hand, grows, that is, enlarges itself, becomes wider and wider, from what was infinitesimal it moves towards infinity, and on the other, streng thens, intensifies itself, comes up from behind and takes its stand in front visibly and dynamically. Man's true individual being starts on its career of evolution as a tiny focus of consciousness totally submerged under the huge surface surge of mind and life and body consciousness. It stores up in itself and assimilates the essence of the various experiences that the mind and life and body bring to it in its unending series of incarnations; as it enriches itself thus, it increases in substance and potency, even like fire that feeds upon fuels. A time comes when the pressure of the developed inner being upon the mind and life and body becomes so great that they begin to lose their aboriginal and unregenerate freedom the freedom of doing as they like; they have now to pause in their unreflecting career, turn round, as it were, and imbibe and acquire the habit of listening to the deeper, the inner voice, and obey the direction, the comm and of the Call. This is the Word inviolate (anhata-vn) of which the sages speak; this is also referred to as the still small voice, for indeed it is scarcely audible at present amidst the din and clamour of the wild surges of the body and life and mind consciousness.

03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Laid on his limbs the Spirit's measureless seal,
  Infinity swallowed him into shoreless trance.
  --
  Afar from all that makes the measured world,
  Plunging to hidden eternities it withdrew
  --
  Its equal measure of the true and false
  In that immobile and immutable realm

03.04 - The Vision and the Boon, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And the dull measure of terrestrial things,
  I who have seen behind the cosmic mask

03.05 - Some Conceptions and Misconceptions, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The exclusive concentration was the logical and inevitable final term of a movement of separativity and exteriorisation. It had its necessity and utility. Its special function was utilised by Nature for precision and perfection in details of execution in the most material order of reality. Indeed, what can be more exact and accurate than the laws of physics, the mathematical laws that govern the movements of the material particles? Furthermore, if we look at the scientist himself, do we not find in him an apt image of the same phenomenon? A scientist means a specialist the more specialised and restricted his view, the surer he is likely to be in his particular domain. And specialised knowledge means a withdrawal from other fields and viewpoints of knowledge, an ignorance of them. Likewise, a workman who moulds the head of a pin is all concentrated upon that single point of existencehe forgets the whole world and himself in that act whose perfect execution seems to depend upon the measure of his self-oblivion. But evidently this is not bound to be so. A one-pointed self-absorption that is Ignoranceis certainly an effective way of dealing with material objectsthings of Ignorance; but it is not the only way. It is a way or mechanism adopted by Nature in a certain status under certain conditions. One need not always forget oneself in the act in order to do the act perfectly. An unconscious instinctive act is not always best doneit can be done best consciously, intuitively. A wider knowledge, a greater acquaintance with objects and facts and truths of other domains too is being more and more insisted upon as a surer basis of specialisation. The pinpointed (one might almost say geometrically pointed) consciousness in Matter that resolves itself into unconsciousness acts perfectly but blindly; the vast consciousness also acts there with absolute perfection but consciouslyconscious in the highest degree.
   As we have said, super-consciousness does not confine itself to the supreme status alone, to the domain of pure infinity, but it comes down and embraces the most inferior status too, the status of the finite. Precisely because it is infinity, it is not bound to its infinity but can express its infinity in and through infinite limits.

03.06 - Divine Humanism, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   A good many European scholars and philosophers have found Indian spirituality and Indian culture, at bottom, lacking in what is called 'humanism'. 1 So our scholars and philosophers on their side have been at pains to re but the charge and demonstrate the humanistic element in our tradition. It may be asked, however, if such a vindication is at all necessary, or if it is proper to apply a European standard of excellence to things Indian. India may have other measures, other terms of valuation. Even if it is proved that humanism as defined and understood in the West is an unknown thing in India, yet that need not necessarily be taken as a sign of inferiority or deficiency.
   But first of all we must know what exactly is meant by humanism. It is, of course, not a doctrine or dogma; it is an attitude, an outlook the attitude, the outlook that views and weighs the worth of man as man. The essential formula was succinctly given by the Latin poet when he said that nothing human he considered foreign to him. It is the characteristic of humanism to be interested in man as man and in all things that interest man as man. To this, however, an important corollary is to be added, that it does not concern itself with things that do not concern man's humanity. The original father of humanism was perhaps the father of European culture itself, Socrates, whose mission it was, as he said, to bring down philosophy from heaven to live among men. More precisely the genesis should be ascribed to the Aristotelian tradition of Socratic teaching.
  --
   It is the cult of the Divine Human which enunciates the mystic truth that Man is greater than all and surpasses even the Vedic Law (which aims usually at the impersonal Absolute). But Man -here is to be understood as the Divine Person in his human norm, not the human man at all, as modern humanists of our country would like to have it. It does not mean the glorification of man's human attributes and movements, even if they be most sattwic and idealistic; it refers rather to the divinised type, the archetype that is eternally in the super-consciousness. And when such a Man lives and acts on earth, he does so in a manner and measure that do not belong to this plane of humanity familiar to us.
   Only the other day I found a critic in the Manchester Guardian referring to the Gita as something frigid and confused !!

03.07 - Some Thoughts on the Unthinkable, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The thing may not happen today or within a short period, according to the human standard. Man's smallness, in its impatience, once could not contemplate a span of more than a few thousand years. But we have been forced to learn to calculate earth's life and evolution in astronomical figures, and the human stage is being found to have extended farther and farther into a dim and immemorial past. Millenniums are nothing in the march of the cosmic play. Things are done here in the measures of eternity; it is only the narrowness of the human consciousness that wants to cut up what is eternal and infinite into convenient bits and parcels.
   The Day will come towards which the whole creation has been moving since the beginning of time, it will come inevitably in due courseit may be today or tomorrow, it may be a decade hence, or it may even be a century or a millennium hence; it will come all the same.

03.08 - The Standpoint of Indian Art, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   It is this quality which has sometimes made Indian art seem deficient in its human appeal: the artist chose deliberately to be non-human, even in the portrayal of human subjects, in order to bring out the universal and the transcendent element in the truth and beauty of things. Man is not the measure of creation, nor human motives the highest or the deepest of nature's movements: at best, man is but a symbol of truths beyond his humanity.
   It is this characteristic that struck the European mind in its first contact with the Indian artistic world and called forth the criticism that Indian culture lacks in humanism. It is true, a very sublimated humanism finds remarkable expression in Ajanta, and perhaps it is here that the Western eye began to learn and appreciate the Indian style of beauty; even in Ajanta, however, in the pieces where the art reaches its very height, mere humanism seems to be at its minimum. And if we go beyond these productions that reflect the mellowness and humaneness of the Buddhist Compassion, if we go into the sanctuary of the Brahmanic art, we find that the experiences embodied there and the method of expression become more and more "anonymous"; they have not, that is to say, the local colour of humanity, which alone makes the European mind feel entirely at home. Europe's revulsion of feeling against Indian art came chiefly from her first meeting with the multiple-headed, multiple-armed, expressionless, strangely poised Hindu gods and goddesses, so different in every way from ordinary human types.

03.12 - The Spirit of Tapasya, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Tapasya (Asceticism) is usually understood to mean the capacity to undergo physical discomfort and suffering. We are familiar with various types of Tapasya: sitting in summer with blazing fire all around and the fiery noonday sun overhead (Panchagnivrata), exposing one's bare limbs to the cold biting blasts among the eternal snows, lying down on a bed of sharp nails, betaking oneself to sack-cloth and ashes, fasting even to the point of death: there is no end to the variety of ways and means which man's ingenuity has invented to torture himself. Somehow the feeling has grown among spiritual, religious and even moral aspirants as well that the body is the devil that has to be curbed and controlled with bit and bridle and whip. Indeed the popular view measures the greatness of a saint by the amount of his physical privations.
   One seems not to know that the devil cannot be so easily checkmated or beguiled. For, indeed, it is easy for the body to take punishment, to submit to all kinds of rigours, yet feel as if it was making ample amends and atonement in that way rather than really give up its aboriginal instincts and impulses. Often one deceives oneself, succeeds in hiding, in secretly preserving one's unsaintliness behind a smoke-screen of the utmost physical tapasya.

03.13 - Human Destiny, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   On a comparatively shorter view of the human evolution we observe as, for example, Spengler has shown, a serial or serials of the rise and fall of races and nations and cultures. Is that a mere repetition, more or less of the same or very similar facts of life, or is there a running thread that points to a growth, at least a movement towards some goal or purpose to attain and fulfil? The present cycle of humanity, which we may call and is usually called the historic age, dates from the early Egyptians and, in India, from the ancestral Vedic sages (prve pitra). On a longer outlook, what has been the nature of man's curve of life since then to the present day? Races and cultures have risen and have perished, but they have been pursuing one line, moving towards one direction the growth of homo fabricus the term coined by NietzscheMan the artisan. Man has become man through the discovery and use of toolsfrom tools of stone to tools of iron, that marks his growth from primitiveness to civilisation. And the degree of civilisation, the distance he has travelled from his origins is measured precisely by the development of his tools in respect of precision, variety, efficiency, serviceability. Viewed from that standpoint the modern man has travelled indeed very far and has civilised himself consummately. For the tools have become the whole man; man has lost his human element and almost become a machine. A machine cannot run indefinitely, it has got to stop when life is not there. So it is often prognosticated now that man is at the end of his career. He is soon going to be a thing of the past, an extinct racelike one of the prehistoric species that died out because they could not change with the circumstances of life, because they became unchanging, hard and brittle, soto say, and fell to pieces, or otherwise they continued to exist but in a degraded, a mere vegetative form.
   But, as we have said, man seems to have yet retained his youthfulness. He always just falls short of the perfect perfection, that is to say, in any single form or expression of life. Life did become stereotyped, mechanised, and therefore fossilised, more or less, in Egypt of the later Dynasties; in India too life did not become less inert and vegetative during two long periods, once just preceding the advent of the Buddha,.

03.14 - Mater Dolorosa, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   It is not to say that other remediesless radical but more normal to human naturecannot be undertaken in the meanwhile. The higher truths do not rule out the lower. These too have their place and utility in Nature's integral economy. An organisation based on science and ethicism can be of help as a palliative and measure of relief; it may be even immediately necessary under the circumstances, but however imperative at the moment it does not go to the root of the matter.
   The action of the three gunas is the subject matter of the Veda: but do thou become free from the triple guna, O Arjuna.The Gita, II.45

03.16 - The Tragic Spirit in Nature, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The Evil, we have said, is nothing else than the basis of unconsciousness or Inconscience in Nature. It is this which pulls the beingwhatever structure of consciousness can be reared upon itdown to decay and frustration. It is the force of gravitation or inertia. Matter is unconsciousness; the body, formed basically of matter, is unconsciousness too. The natural tendency of Matter is towards disintegration and dissolution; the body, therefore, is mortalbhasmntamidam arram. The scope and range of mortality is measured by the scope and range of unconsciousness. Matter is the most concrete and solid form of unconsciousness; but it casts its shadow upon the higher levels toolife and mind always lie in the penumbra of this original evil.
   A great personality means a great rise in consciousness, therefore it means also a strain upon the normal consciousness and hence a snap or scission sometime and somewhere. As the poet describes the tragic phenomenon

04.01 - The Birth and Childhood of the Flame, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And her rhythm measured the long whirl of Time.
  In ceaseless motion round the purple rim

04.02 - The Growth of the Flame, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  But could not match the measure of her soul.
  A friend and yet too great wholly to know,
  --
  Her measure they could not reach but bore her touch,
  Answering with the flower's answer to the sun

04.03 - Consciousness as Energy, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   A live wirethrough which an electric current, say of several thousand volts, is passinglooks quite innocent, motionless, inactive, almost inert. The appearance, needless to say, is deceptive. Even so the still life of a Yogin. Action does not consist merely in mechanical motion visible to the eye: intra-atomic movements that are subtle, invisible, hard to detect even by the most sensitive instruments, possess a tremendous potency, even to unimaginable degrees. Likewise in man, the extent of muscular flexions does not give the measure or potential of his activity. One cannot say that the first-line infantryman who rushes and charges, shoots, bayonets, kills and is killed is more active and dynamic than the general who sits quiet behind in a cabin and merely sends out orders. Vivekananda wandered about the whole of India, crossed the seas, traversed continents, undertook whirlwind campaignstalking, debating, lecturing: it was a life superbly rich in muscular movements. By his side, Ramakrishna would appear quite tameinactive, introvert: fewer physical displacements or muscular exercises marked his life. And yet, ask anyone who is in touch with the inner life of these great souls, he will tell you, Vivekananda is only a spark from the mighty and concentrated Energy that Ramakrishna was.
   What is this spiritual or Yogic Energy? Ordinary people, people with a modern mind, would concede at the most that there are two kinds of activity: (1) real activityphysical action, work, labour with muscle and nerve, and (2) passive activityactivity of mind and thought. According to the pragmatic standard especial, if not entire, importance is given the first category; the other category, sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, is held at a discount. The thoughtful people are philosophers at the most, they are ineffectual angels in this workaday world of ours. We need upon earth people of sterner stuff, dynamic people who are not thought-bound, but know how to apply and execute their ideas, whatever they may be. Lenin was great, not because he had revolutionary ideas, but because he gave a muscular frame to them. Such people alone are the pragmatic, dynamic, useful category of humanity. The others are, according to the more radical leftist view, merely parasitic, and according to a more generous liberal view, chiefly decorative elements in human society. Mind-energy can draw dream pictures, beautiful perhaps, but inane; it is only muscular energy that gives a living and material bodya local habitation and a nameto what otherwise would be airy nothing.

04.03 - The Eternal East and West, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The East does not consider the individual in his social behaviour in terms of freedom and liberty but of service and obligation, not in terms of rights but of duties. The Indian term for right and duty is the sameadhikar. The word originally and usually meant duty, one's sphere of work or service, capacity: the meaning of "right" was secondary and only latterly, probably as a result of the impact from the West, has gained predominance. The West measures human progress by the amount of rights gained for the individual or for the group. It does not seem to have any other standard: submission, obedience, any diminution of the sense of separate individuality meant slavery and loss of human value and dignity. It was the Greek perhaps, with Socrates as the great pioneer, who first declared the supremacy of the individual reason (although he himself obeyed in all things his guardian angel, the Daemon). In India, generally in the East, the value of the individual is estimated in another way. So long as he is in the society, the individual is bound by its demands: he has to serve it according to his best capacity. That is the dharma the Law that one has to observe conscientiously. But if he chooses, he can break the bonds forthwith, come out, come out of the society altogether and be free absolutely that is the only meaning of freedom. In the West the individual is taught to remain in the world and with the society, maintain his individuality and independence and gradually enlarge them in and through the natural fetters and bondages that a collective life and efficient organisation demands and inevitably imposes. The East, on the contrary, asks the individual never to protest and assert his individuality, which is in their view only another name for Ignorant egoism, but to know his position in the social scheme and fulfil the duties and obligations of that position. But the individual has the freedom not to enter into the social frame at all. If he chooses freedom as his ideal, it is the supreme freedom that he must choose, out of the chain of a terrestrial life. He can become the spiritual "outlaw", the sanysi, the word means one who has abandoned everything totally and absolutely.
   The contrast points to a synthesis parallel to or an extension of the one we spoke of earlier. The first thing to note is that the individual is the source of all progress; the individual has the right, as it is also his duty to maintain himself and fulfil himself, grow to his largest and highest dimensions! Secondly, the individual has to take cognisance of the others, the whole humanity, in fact, even for the sake of his own progress. The individual is not an isolated entity, a freak product in Nature, but is integrated into it, a part and parcel of its texture and composition. Indeed the individual has a double role to perform, first to increase himself and secondly to increase others. Using the terms which the Sartrian view of existence has put into vogue, we can say, the individual en soi (in himself) is the individual in commonalty with others, living and moving in and through every other person; and then there is the individual pour soi (for himself), that is to say, existing for himself, apart and away from others, in his own inner absolute autonomy. The individual is individualised, i.e. raises and lifts himself and then becomes the spearhead breaking through the level where Nature stands fixed, leading others to follow and raise themselves. The individual is the power of organised self-consciousness; the growth of the individual means the growth of this power of organised consciousness. And growth means ascension or evolution from level to level. The individual starts from the organic cell, that is the lower end, it progresses through various gradations of the vital and mental worlds till he reaches the culmination of its growth in the Spirit as tman. But this vertical growth must be reflected in a horizontal growth too. There is a solidarity among the individuals forming the collective humanity so that the progress of one means the progress of others in the same direction, at least a chance and possibility opened for an advance. On the other hand, it may be noted that unless the collectivity rises to a certain level the individual too cannot go very far from it. A higher lift in the individual presupposes a corresponding or some minimum lift in others. There cannot or should not be too great a rift between the individual and the collective.

04.04 - The Quest, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Attendants on his destiny's measured walk
  Leading to joys he has won and pains he has called,

04.05 - The Immortal Nation, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   It is about the life-span of peoples. The life-span of peoples is not uniform: it differs with different peoples and differs considerably. The Spanish or Portuguese hegemony in modern Europe was after all rather briefa matter of one century or twoin comparison with the lease enjoyed by Rome or Greece. Indeed it might seem that the older the nation the longer it lived. Take, for example, the oldest nation recognized as such in history, Egypt; her life-span is to be measured not by centuries but by millenniums. The Hellenic civilisation that succeeded the Egyptian did not last as long and yet it lasted more than its own successor, the Roman, did. How was it then the more ancient people resisted more successfully the forces of decline and disintegration? What was it that made the later and younger nations less successful in the battle of life?
   Another fact. The Asiatic peoples or nations endured generally longer than their European brethren. I have spoken of India and China, I may now refer to Persia, the old Persia that has a glorious story to tell for more than a thousand years (from Cyrus to the last of the Sassanides) ending or suffering a sea-change with the advent of the Arabs. The Arabs themselves and also the Hebrews were likewise long-lived peoples, although both of them have this especial characteristic that theirs is not a land-locked civilisation, that is to say, they were not peoples wedded to their own land, a mother-country of their own, theirs was a peripatetic genius which went abroad and sought to make their own or make themselves over to and enter into other countries and other cultures. Perhaps this is their way of securing a long life.
  --
   Viewed from this standpoint India stands as a case sui generis. She did not stop short satisfied with the lesser gods. She aspired for the highest One, the supreme spiritual reality and it was her mission, her destiny, to foster it and keep guard over it for the sake of humanity. Whatever the outer vicissitudes, she maintained throughout the inner continuity of her spiritual life and realisation. That is where she drank of the nectar of immortality and that is how she could always revive and renew herself after a period of decline and almost disintegration, because she possessed the mystery of the self. Other peoples were busy about many other things important or unimportant in some measure, but here was a race that never forgot the one thing needful. India of today, we repeat, is fundamentally and essentially the India of the Vedas, even in a more literal sense than that China of Mao-tse- Tung (or Sun-yat-Sen) is the China of Lao-tse.
   A race dies out altogether or continues to lead a superficial mechanical existence, that is to say, vegetates as an inchoate mass, when it knows to live only in its body, confined only to the demands of the barest physical necessities. The life of a race gains a meaning and a new vitality when a higher light and aspiration inspire and move its spirit; when a deeper and finer sensibility, a nobler ambition stir its affections, when a superior intelligence and understanding illumine its mental horizon, its lease of life is increased by that and also its power of recuperation and renewal. And the further it enters into these basic constants of existence the greater that power of rejuvenation. 1

04.10 - To the Heights-X, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   On this troubled world, distracted beyond measure,
   Erring in the double darkness of ignorance and ill-will,

04.41 - To the Heights-XLI, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   But weigh not the measure of Response,
   Nor repine if it seems doled out scantily, niggardly.

05.01 - The Destined Meeting-Place, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Thought was not there nor the measurer, strong-eyed toil,
  Life had not learned its discord with its aim.

05.02 - Physician, Heal Thyself, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Each man is given his little domain within him and he is master of that domain. Nobody is given more (or less even) than what he can successfully manage: the charge is accurately measured according to capacity. One can be indeed a roi fainant, if one chooses to be so; but that is not man's inevitable destiny; he can truly be the ruling king and exercise, to the full, his authority. It is a simple truth that man has a will and can wield it. This will he can consciously develop, increase and enlarge, make it an extremely powerful, if not invincible, instrument for action.
   Will is a twofold power: it is energy and it is light. True will, will in essential purity, that is to say, when one is perfectly sincere and determined to follow up one's sincerity, impels rightly and impels infallibly. The consciousness is there of the right thing to do and the energy is also there inherent in that consciousness to work it out inevitably. There is a will be longing to a lower level, to the mind which is only a variant of wish, and in reference to that only it is said that even if the spirit is willing, the flesh is weak. This will is a light, but without the fire that vivifies: and that is because there is a division in the consciousness, one can love and yet one can betray, in the words of a famous novelist.
  --
   And when he has done so, when he has salvaged himself, by that he will have salvaged the world too around him. The measure of the success within will be the measure of the success without.
   ***

05.03 - The Body Natural, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Physician, Heal Thyself The measure of Time
   Other Authors Nolini Kanta Gupta Part FiveThe Body Natural
  --
   Physician, Heal Thyself The measure of Time

05.04 - Of Beauty and Ananda, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Speech is self-expression. It is the organ of self-consciousness. The nature of the speech shows the nature of the self-consciousness. The degree of perfection in utterance measures also the extent to which one is conscious of oneself.
   Beauty is the soul's delight perfectly articulate and organised.
  --
   Beauty is not merely balance, symmetry, measure, a regular disposition of features. A form, an embodiment, need not be pretty to be beautiful.
   Mere formal beauty is a power, but a surface power; there is a deeper unity of rhythm in the embodiment that is beautiful by its transparent soul-expression.
  --
   The element of divine harmony and rhythm is the measure of the beautiful in Art.
   Even so it is with the art of life.

05.04 - The Measure of Time, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
  object:05.04 - The measure of Time
  author class:Nolini Kanta Gupta
  --
   Other Authors Nolini Kanta Gupta Part FiveThe measure of Time
   The measure of Time
   When it is said that the Realisation is decreed, is it meant also that the time for it has been fixed? If so, all individual effort and freedom of action seem to go out of the picture, being irrelevantnei ther hastening nor retarding the process. The fact is somewhat different, not so simple and trenchant.

05.05 - Man the Prototype, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The measure of Time The Role of Evil
   Other Authors Nolini Kanta Gupta Part FiveMan the Prototype
  --
   The measure of Time The Role of Evil

05.06 - Physics or philosophy, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Well, the old-world spirit has had its revenge complete and absolute in a strange manner. We are coming to that presently. Now, the constants or absolutes of which we spoke, which were the bed-rock of Modern Science, were gradually found to be rather shakyvery inconstant and relative. Take, for example, the principle of conservation of matter. The principle posited that in a given system the quantity of matter is constant in and through all transformations. Modern Science has found out that this law holds good only in respect of gross matter belonging to man-size Nature. But as soon as we enter into the domain 'of the ultimate constituents of matter, the units of electric charges, the infinitesimals, we find that matter is destroyed and is or can be recreated: material particles are dematerialised into light waves or quanta, and light quanta are precipitated back again into electric particles of matter. Similarly, the law of conservation of energy that energy= mv (m being mass, v velocity)does not hold good in respect of particles that move with the speed of light: mass is not a constant as in Newtonian mechanics, but varies with velocity. Again, in classical mechanics, position and velocity are two absolute determinates for all scientific measurement, and Science after all is nothing if not a system of measurements. Now, in the normal size world, the two are easily determined; but in the sub-atomic world things are quite different; only one can be determined accurately; the more accurate the one, the less so the other; and if both are to be determined, it can be only approximatively, the closer the approximation, the hazier the measure, and the farther the approximation, the more definite the measure. That is to say, here we find not the exact measures of things, but only the probable measures. Indeed, not fixity and accuracy, but probability has become the central theme of modern physical calculation.
   The principle of indeterminacy carries two revolutionary implications. First, that it is not possible to determine the movement of the ultimate particles of matter individually and severally, it is not possible even theoretically to follow up the chain of modulations of an electron from its birth to its dissolution (if such is the curve of its destiny), as Laplace considered it quite possible for his super-mathematician. One cannot trace the complete evolution of each and every or even one particular particle, not because of a limitation in the human capacity, but because of an inherent impossibility in the nature of things. In radioactive substances, for example, there is no ground or data from which one can determine which particle will go off or not, whether it will go off the chance that seems to reign here. In radiation too, there is no formula, and no formula can be framed for determining the course of a photon in relation to a half-reflecting surface, whether it will pass through or be reflected. In this field of infinitesimals what we know is the total behaviour of an assemblage of particles, and the laws of nature are only laws of average computation. Statistics has ousted the more exact and rigid arithmetics. And statistics, we know, is a precarious science: the knowledge it gives is contingent, contingent upon the particular way of arranging and classifying the data. However, the certainty of classical mechanistic knowledge is gone, gone too the principle of uniformity of nature.

05.07 - Man and Superman, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   In spite of all the achievements he has had in the past, and in spite of the cul-de-sac or the blind alley into which he seems now to be stagnating, there is yet possibility enough for man to progress further, that is to say, even as a human being without taking the more audacious jump into supermanhood. The present miseries of human society, the maldistribution of the necessities of life, the ravages of illness and disease, the prevalence of ignorance, are not and need not after all be a permanent and irrevocable feature of human organisation. They can be remedied to a large extent, and society made more decent to live in, even though it may not be transfigured into the City of God. Man, without foregoing his present human nature, can yet be a more humane and humanistic creature, that is to say, more truly human and less animal and demoniac that he is trying to be. To this end the advent and the presence of the divine race will surely contri bute in a large measure. The influence which the individuals of such a race will exert by the force of their luminous consciousness and the impact of their purified living, the sympathy and knowledge and comprehension which their very presence carries, will materially alter the nature and composition of the normal man and his society. There will emerge a sort of higher humanityan intermediary between the present more or less animal, degraded humanity and the divine humanity of the future. The two humanities may very well live amicably together and be of help and service to each other.
   We may mention here the other extreme possibility also. If, for example, the old humanity in a body rejects the New Man and will not allow him an inch of ground on the earth which it holds now as its fief and domainas it may very well doin view of the evidence that we have of the envy, jealousy, hatred, incomprehension moving normal men when they come in contact with men who do not follow their mode of life, who seem to pursue avocations that are meaningless and even perhaps injurious to them; if such is the case, then, we say, it would mean either the end of humanity, in the same way as some species have become in fact extinct, or its reversion to a wild savage state, something like that (or perhaps worse) out of which it came.

05.07 - The Observer and the Observed, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   But in the end a difficulty arose in the operation of observation. It proved to be not a simple process. The scientific observer requires for his observation the yard-stick and the time-piece. Now, we have been pushed to admit a queer phenomenon (partly by observation and partly by a compelling deduction) that these two measuring units are not constant; they change with the change of system, that is to say, according to the velocity of the system. In other words, each observer has his own unit of space and time measure. So the elimination of the personal element of the observer has become a complicated mathematical problem, even if one is sure of it finally.
   There is still something more. The matter of calculating and measuring objectively was comparatively easy when the object in view was of medium size, neither too big nor too small. But in the field of the infinite and the infinitesimal, when from the domain of mechanical forces we enter into the region of electric and radiant energy, we find our normal measuring apparatus almost breaks down. Here accurate observation cannot be made because of the very presence of the observer, because of the very fact of observation. The ultimates that are observed are trails of light particles: now when the observer directs his eye (or the beam oflight replacing the eye) upon the light particle, its direction and velocity are interfered with: the photon is such a tiny infinitesimal that a ray from the observer's eye is sufficient to deflect and modify its movement. And there is no way of determining or eliminating this element of deflection or interference. The old Science knew certainly that a thermometer dipped in the water whose temperature it is to measure itself changes the initial temperature. But that was something calculable and objective. Here the position of the observer is something like a "possession", imbedded, ingrained, involved in the observed itself.
   The crux of the difficulty is this. We say the observing eye or whatever mechanism is made to function for it, disturbs the process of observation. Now to calculate that degree or measure of disturbance one has to fall back upon another observing eye, and this again has to depend upon yet another behind. Thus there is an infinite regress and no final solution. So, it has been declared, in the ultimate analysis, scientific calculation gives us only the average result, and it is only average calculations that are possible.
   Now we come to the sanctum, the Shekinah, of the problem. For there is a still deeper mystery. And pre-eminently it is an Einsteinian discovery. It is not merely the measuring ray of light, not merely the beam in the eye of the observer that is the cause of interference: the very mind behind the eye is involved in a strange manner. The mind is not a tabula rasa, it comes into the field with certain presuppositionsaxioms and postulates, as it calls themdue to its angle of vision and perhaps to the influence upon it of immediate sense perception. It takes for granted, for example, that light travels in a straight line, that parallels do not meet, indeed all the theorems and deductions of Euclidean geometry. There is a strong inclination in the mind to view things as arranged according to that pattern. Einstein has suggested that the spherical scheme can serve as well or even better our observations. Riemann's non-Euclidean geometry has assumed momentous importance in contemporary scientific enquiry. It is through that scheme that Einstein proposes to find the equation that will subsume the largest number of actual and possible or potential facts and bring about the reconciliation of such irreconcilables as wave and particle, gravitation and electricity.

05.18 - Man to be Surpassed, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Erich Kahler (a Czech now become an American citizen) in his book Man the measureseeks to strike a balance, but as the title indicates, evidently leans more to the second, the reactionary, than to the original ideal. He posits that man's humanity is to be preserved and fostered, that is to say, his true humanity, that which distinguishes him from mere animality. The Greek ideal, according to Kahler, was an advance upon the animal man; it brought in the ideal of the rational man. And yet the Greek ideal, in spite of its acceptance of the whole manmens sana in corpore sanoembracing as it did his physical, ethical and sthetic development, laid on the whole a greater emphasis upon reason, upon ration-alising, that is, ordering life according to a rational pattern. And then the Greek ideal was more for the individual; it was for the culture and growth of the individuality in man. Society was considered as composed of such individualised units. The degree of personal choice, of individual liberty, of free understanding that a Greek citizen enjoyed marked the evolution secured by man out of the primitive society. Still the integral man is not the rationalistic man, even as he is not the mere biological man: and he is not predominantly individualistic either.
   Yes, man's true humanity, says Kahler, almost echoing Nietzcshe, consists precisely in his capacity to surpass himself. The animal is wholly engrossed in its natural nature and activities; but man is capable of standing back, can separate from his biological self, observe, control and direct. For him "existence" truly means (as the Existentialist declares today) ex+sistere or ex+stare, to stay or stand outside. That is the surpassing enjoyed by him and demanded of himgoing beyond one's natural or normal self. But there is a danger here. For there can be a too much surpassing, a going away altogether, as religion or spirituality usually enjoins. Christianity, for example, which is in many senses a movement contrary to the Greek spirit, taught a transcendence that was for luring or driving the human soul away from the world and men towards an extra-terrestrial summum bonum.

05.34 - Light, more Light, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Light is its own au thenticity. Modern knowledge has reduced the material universe to light particles: that is the ultimate reality which is cognisable to the human sense, beyond which there is no means to go. All other objects are reflections, measures or derivations of this single primordial substanceat least all have to reach our perception through this intermediary. And its movement, its velocity too is the standard of measure for all movements: the velocity is constant and nothing can exceed it (that is Einstein).
   There is an inner light too. The virtues of the outer light only translate something of the nature of the inner light. You cannot prove the existence of light, inner or outer; it exists in its own light and itself serves to prove things that exist. Not only that. Light is not only a power of knowledge, it is also a power of action: it not only illumines, but also purifies. It clears up and as well cleans up.

06.01 - The End of a Civilisation, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   And yet if the civilisation really goes, it will not be a small thing, even when measured on the cosmic scale. A civilisation is to be judged and valued not at its nadir, but at its zenith, in its total effect and not by a temporary phase in its course. Civilisation really means preparation of the instrument: the human instrument that is to express the Divine. The purpose of creation, we have often said, is the establishment of the highest spiritual consciousness in the embodied life on earth. The embodied life means man's body and life and mind; individually and socially these constitute the instrument through which the higher light is to manifest itself. The instrument has to be prepared, made ready for the purpose; Actually it is obscure, ignorant, narrow, weak; at the outset and for a long time it expresses only or mainly the inferior animal nature. Civilisation is an attempt to raise this inferior nature, to refine, enlarge and heighten it, to cultivate and increase its potentialities and capacities. The present civilisation, we have said, is a growth of thousands of years-at least five thousand years according to the most modest archaeological computation. In this period man has developed his brain, his rational intelligence, has unravelled some of the great mysteries of nature; he has controlled and organised life to an extent that has opened new possibilities of growth and achievement; even with respect to the body he has learnt to treat it with greater skill and endowed it with finer and more potent efficiencies. There have been aberrations and misuses, no doubt; but the essence of things achieved still remains and is always an invaluable asset: that must not be allowed to go.
   If the civilisation goes, it means the instrument is gone, the basis on which the edifice for the Divine Consciousness is to be raised is removed, nothing remains to stand firmly on. So the labour has to start again: one must begin from the beginning. The work has to be done and will be done, it cannot be allowed to terminate into a labour of Sisyphus.

06.01 - The Word of Fate, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  His eyes measured the spaces, gauged the depths,
  His inner gaze the movements of the soul,
  --
  While in his measured chant the heavenly seer
  Spoke of the toils of men and what the gods
  --
  Only a larger measure given of tears.
  Aspiring to the nature of the gods,
  --
  Nor the mystic measure of her need and use.
  A single word lets loose vast agencies;
  --
  Of work and thought and measured grave delight
  As steps to climb to God's far secret heights.

06.02 - Darkness to Light, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The Darkness is the measure of the Light. The world as it is is exactly the opposite of what it has to be and shall be. And in order to be what it shall be it had to become what it is now, just not that which it will be. The antipodes go together unavoidably: the depth of the precipice is the precise measure of the height. Man's fall represents the ascent he has to make, he is destined to make. .
   Hurdles and obstacles are put there in the way: not merely to test your strength, but to train it, to increase it, to discipline it. Difficulties abound precisely because by overcoming them you attain to the fullness of your perfection. You have been built with elements and forces that are exactly in keeping with what you are expected to do with them: you are placed in the midst of conditions and circumstances that are absolutely in proportion to what you have to realise. Indeed you carry within yourself all the difficulties that are necessary to make your realisation perfection itself.
   When you receive a blow, do not draw back or blink and sink down: hold up your head with courage and fortitude and say to yourself, here is another opportunity given to take another step forward. The blow is a finger of light pointed towards a dark spot to be illumined, a weak link that has to be forged anew. In meeting and surmounting a difficulty you add another degree to your ascension, another sinew as it were to your muscle. Remember a difficulty is never out of proportion to your strength: it comes in the exact measure of your power to face it. It is your mind, your notion that makes the contrary suggestion, a kind of illusion possesses you that you are beyond your depth and must go adrift.
   You may not be able to do the ideal things at a given moment. You may not comm and the perfect gesture that is expected of you in a set of circumstances; the Divine may seem to be veiled from you and you do not hear the direct voice. But it does not matter. What is expected of you is to do your best, do the best' that you are capable of at that moment. That highest that is present to you, the summit available for the time and under the circumstances that should be the source and inspiration of your act. Act on the heights where you stand and aspire for still higher heights.

06.36 - The Mother on Herself, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The truth I bring will manifest itself and will be embodied upon earth; for, it is the earth's and world's inevitable destiny. The question of time is not relevant. In one respect the truth which I say will be made manifest is already fully manifest, is already realised and established: there is no question of time there. It is in a consciousness timeless or eternally present. There is a process, a play of translation between that timeless poise and the poise in time that we know here below. The measure of that hiatus is very relative, relative to the consciousness that measures, long or short according to the yardstick each one brings. But that is not the essence of the problem: the essence is that the truth is there active, in the process of materialisation, only one should have the eye to see it and the soul to greet it.
   ***

07.01 - The Joy of Union; the Ordeal of the Foreknowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Her spirit stretched measureless in strength divine,
  An anvil for the blows of Fate and Time:

07.02 - The Parable of the Search for the Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Her heart listened to its slow measured beats,
  Her mind renouncing thought heard and was mute:
  --
  A vast subliminal is man's measureless part.
  The dim subconscient is his cavern base.

07.03 - The Entry into the Inner Countries, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Tamed to the modesty of a measured pace,
  She kept no more her vehement stride and rush;

07.05 - The Finding of the Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Reset the balance and measures of the world.
  Each shape showed its occult design, unveiled

07.07 - The Discovery of the Cosmic Spirit and the Cosmic Consciousness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  She was all vastness and one measureless point,
  She was a height beyond heights, a depth beyond depths,
  --
  Surpassing measure, change and circumstance.
  An individual, one with cosmic self

07.08 - The Divine Truth Its Name and Form, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   You expect to see a divine form in each and all things? It may happen so. But I am not sure; I have the impression that there is a large part of imagination in such experiences. You may, for example, see the form of Krishna or Christ or Buddha in every being or thing. But I say that much of human conception enters into this perception. Otherwise what I was telling you just now would not be true. I said all who have the consciousness of the Divine, all who get the contact with the Divine, wherever one may be, to whatever age or country he may belong, all have the same essential experience. If it were not so, the Hindus would always see one of their gods, the Europeans one of theirs, the Japanese a third variety and so on. This may be an addition of each one's own mental formation, but it would not be the Reality in its essence or purity which is beyond all form. One can have a perception of the Divine Presence, a very concrete perception, one can have even a personal contact with the Divine, but it need not happen in and through the kind of form you imagine; it is something inexpressible, beyond all explanation or definition, it is evident only to one who has the experience. It may be as you are suddenly lifted up into a peculiar condition, you find yourself in the presence of the Divine which takes a form familiar to you, a form you have been accustomed to associate with the Divine, because of your education, your up-bringing and tradition. But, as I say, it is not the supreme essence of the experience: the form gives after all a limitation to the experience, takes away from it its universality and a large measure of its power.
   ***

07.30 - Sincerity is Victory, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 03, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   To be sincere and to be candid are not the same thing. To be candid means a simplicity based, in a large measure, upon an ignorance of things. A child is candid, because he is simple and ignorant and hides nothing; he is incapable of it and has no will to deceive anyone. But sincerity is different.
   Sincerity is a most difficult thing to have, but it is also the most effective of things. If you have sincerity, you are sure of victory. But it must be true sincerity. Sincerity means that all the elements of your being, all its movements, each and every one, from the most spiritual to the most physical, from the inmost to the outermost, from the top-most to the bottom-most, all parts, severally and wholly and equally are turned to the Divine,' they ask for nothing else than the Divine, they live for and by the Divine.

08.25 - Meat-Eating, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   I will tell you then a story. I knew a young woman, Swedish, who was doing Sadhana. Normally she was a vegetarian, by habit as well as by inclination. One day she was invited to a dinner. She was given fowl to eat. She did not like to make a fuss and quietly ate her fowl. Now at night she found herself, in dream of course, in a basket and her head in between two bits of sticks and being shaken to and fro. She felt very unhappy, very miserable. And then she saw herself head down and legs up in the air and being shaken, shaken continually. She was thoroughly miserable. All on a sudden she felt she was being skinned, flayed and how painful it all was! And then someone came with a knife and cut off her head. She woke up at that. She told me the story and said she had never had such a frightful nightmare in her life. She had thought nothing of this kind before going to bed; it must have been simply the consciousness of the poor chicken that entered into her and she experienced in dream all the agonies of this creature when it was being carried to the market, her feathers pulled out and in the end the head severed. That is what happens. In other words, along with the meal that you take, you absorb also, in a large or small measure, the consciousness of the animal whose flesh you swallow. Of course it is nothing serious, but it is not always pleasant. Yet obviously it does not help you to be more on the side of man than on that of the animal kind. Primitive men, we know, were much nearer the animal level and used to take raw meat: that gave them evidently more strength and energy than cooked meat. They used to kill an animal, tear it to pieces and bite into the flesh. That is how they were robust and strong. Also it was for this reason perhaps that there was in their intestines an organ called appendix of a much bigger size than it is now: for it had to digest raw meat. As men however started cooking their food and found it more palatable that way the organ too gradually diminished in size and fell into atrophy; now it does not serve any purpose, it is an encumbrance and often a source of illness. This means that it is time to change the diet and take to something less bestial. It depends, however, on the state of the consciousness of each person. An ordinary man, who leads an ordinary life, has ordinary aspirations, thinks of nothing else than earning his livelihood, keeping good health and rearing a family, need not pick and choose, except on purely hygienic grounds. He may eat meat or anything else that he considers helpful and useful, doing good to him.
   But if you wish to move from the ordinary life to a higher life, the problem acquires an interest. And again, for a higher life if you wish to move up still farther and prepare yourself for transformation, then the problem becomes very important. For there are certain foods that help the body to become more refined and others that keep it down to the level of animalhood. But it is only then that the question acquires an importance, not before. Before you come to that point, you have a lot of other things to do. It is certainly better to purify your mind, purify your vital before you think of purifying your body. For even if you take all possible precautions and live physically with every care to eat only the things that help to refine the body, but the mind and the vital remain full of desire and inconscience and obscurity and all the rest, your care will serve no purpose. Your body will become perhaps weak, disharmonious with your inner life and drop off one day.

08.27 - Value of Religious Exercises, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   These things, if they help you, are all right; if they do not, naturally they are of no use. The value is quite relative. It is worth only the effect it has on you or the measure of your belief in it. If it is an aid to your concentration, then, as I say, it is welcome. The ordinary consciousness takes to the thing through a kind of superstition; one thinks, "If I go to the temple or to the church once a week, for example, if I say my prayers regularly, something good will happen to me." It is a superstition spread all over the world, but it has no spiritual value.
   I have been to holy places. I have seen monuments considered as very highly religious, in France, in Japan and elsewhere; they were not always the same kind of temples or churches nor were they the same gods but the impression they left on me, my experiences of them were everywhere almost the same, with but slight differences. There is usually a force concentrated at the place, but its character depends entirely upon the faith of the faithful; also there is a difference between the force as it really exists and the form in which it appears to the faithful. For instance, in a most famous and most beautiful place of worship which was, from the standpoint of art, the most magnificent creation one could imagine, I saw within its holy of holies a huge black Spider that had spread its net all around, caught within it and absorbed all the energies emanating from the devotion of the people, their prayers and all that. It was not a very pleasant spectacle. But the people who were there and prayed felt the divine contact, they received all kinds of benefit from their prayers. And yet the truth of the matter was what I saw. The people had the faith and their faith changed what was bad into something that was good to them. Now if I had gone and told them: 'you think it is God you are praying to! it is only a formidable vital Spider that is sucking your force,' surely it would not have been very charitable on my part. But everywhere it is almost the same thing. There is a vital Force presiding. And vital beings feed upon the vibrations of human emotion. Very few are they, a microscopic number, who go to the temples and churches and holy places with the true religious feeling, that is to say, not to pray or beg something of God, but to offer themselves, to express gratitude, to aspire, to surrender. One in a million would be too many. These when they are there, get some touch of the Divine just for the moment. But all others go only out of superstition, egoism, self-interest and create the atmosphere as it is found and it is that that you usually brea the in when you go to a holy place; only as you go there with a good feeling, you say to yourself "what a peace-giving spot!"

08.37 - The Significance of Dates, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   But if your calendar is adopted by almost the whole of mankind, then the symbol is capable of acting upon a very wide field. You can act upon the major bulk population through this formation. As it is purely conventional, I repeat, it is fruitful only in the measure in which it has been accepted. If instead of millions of people who are now following the European calendar there were only three or four persons, then it would be symbolic only for these few. The thing itself has no value, its value depends upon the use you make of it.
   The conventions are useful as symbols, I said,that is, they are a means to put you in contact with what is more subtle, to put what is material in contact with the more subtle. That is their use.

09.01 - Towards the Black Void, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  She measured not her loss with helpless thoughts,
  Nor rent with tears the marble seals of pain:
  --
  And measureless above our striving wills,
  Its gaze controls the turbulent whirl of things.
  --
  Dare not to outstep man's bound and measured force:
  Ignorant and stumbling, in brief boundaries pent,

09.02 - The Journey in Eternal Night and the Voice of the Darkness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Is measured by the throbs of the soul's pain,
  In an unreal darkness empty and drear

09.03 - The Psychic Being, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   There are not very many fully developed souls upon earth. Evidently those who have reached a certain culture, a certain growth, a certain individualisation have instinctively the tendency to come together and form groups. It is then that we come across in particular epochs and climes fully formed beings gathering together. But you must not believe that that gives in any way the exact measure of human culture and growth. That is only a spray of foam on the surface. Even among those who already form a selection, there is not perhaps one in a thousand who can be called truly an individual being, conscious of himself, united with his psychic being, governed by his inner law and therefore partially at least if not wholly free from external influences; because being a conscious entity when these influences come he sees them, those that seem to agree with his inner growth and normal development he accepts and those that contradict he rejects. And instead of being a chaos, or in any case a frightful mixture, he is an organised individual being, conscious of himself, moving in life, knowing where he wants to go and how to go.
   That is the best of mankind that Nature is capable of producing. They are men still, but the top of mankind. They are ready to become something else. But unless and until one becomes that, one remains in greater part an animal with only just a little beginning of manhood. It is only that that one can call Man. And I am saying this in the hope that you will become such a one.

09.13 - On Teachers and Teaching, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   So then look within yourself at the difference there is between what is and what should be; that will give you the measure of your lack of success in the class.
   Now I would like to add one word, since I have the occasion. We have asked many of our students, when they are grown up and know something, to teach others. There are some, I believe, who know the reason why; but there are others who think that it is because it is good to serve in some-way or other, because teachers are needed after all and that we are glad to have them. But I tell you, for it is a fact, I have never asked any of those who were educated here to give lessons unless I saw that that was the best way for them to acquire self-discipline, to learn what they are to teach, to attain an inner perfection which they would not do except by being teachers and having this opportunity, an exceptionally severe one, for self-discipline.

100.00 - Synergy, #Synergetics - Explorations in the Geometry of Thinking, #R Buckminster Fuller, #Science
  learn __ as did Einstein __ of the plurality of different, instrumentally measured, time-
  angle-and-size aspects of the same phenomena as viewed from different given

10.01 - The Dream Twilight of the Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Or they paced to the mighty measure of their thoughts
  Led by a low far chanting of the gods.

10.02 - The Gospel of Death and Vanity of the Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And wove the measures of a marvellous dance.
  There in its circles and its magic turns

10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  He built life new, measured the universe,
  Opposed his fate and wrestled with unseen Powers,

10.04 - Lord of Time, #Writings In Bengali and Sanskrit, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The period measured in the assembly of the century,
  In the blink of an eye of a traditional deity

10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Upraised estates of Mind and measureless.
  There man can visit but there he cannot live.
  --
  In a golden country keeps her measureless house;
  In its corridor she hears the tread that comes

10.05 - Mind and the Mental World, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The world of the mind is a vast field, even vaster it seems than the physical world. The physical world extends, science tells us, to millions of light-years. We may say practically, it is an infinite extension and mind is a thing which surrounds, envelops this measureless extension. Mind surpasses the physical on another count, that is to say, in respect of speed. A material body at its best travels at the speed of light, that is to say, in a second it goes about 200,000 miles (a little less). But thought does not meet any obstruction in respect of distance; whatever the distance, it reaches its goal immediately, it does not take account of time.
   Perhaps because of its expansiveness and its speed, a Vedic Rishi sends up a prayer to it not to be so elusive, not to go away too far but to return and dwell in its home. Evidently the Rishi speaks of gathering and collecting together the dispersed uncontrolled thoughts and settling them in an ordered way in his consciousness. We must note, however, that mind and matter are two different categories and have different dimensions. Material space is not the same as mental space and the speed of light and the speed of thought are not commensurable.

1.00c - DIVISION C - THE ETHERIC BODY AND PRANA, #A Treatise on Cosmic Fire, #Alice Bailey, #Occultism
  We can work this out in connection with the planetary Logos and the human unit, for the analogy holds good. We have a correspondence on a tiny scale in the fact that each human life period sees a man taking a more evolved physical body of a greater responsiveness, tuned to a higher key, of more adequate refinement, and vibrating to a different measure. In these three thoughts lies much information, if they are carefully studied and logically extended.
  d. By the transmutation of the violet into the blue. This we cannot enlarge on. We simply make the statement, and leave its working out to those students whose karma permits and whose intuition suffices.

1.00e - DIVISION E - MOTION ON THE PHYSICAL AND ASTRAL PLANES, #A Treatise on Cosmic Fire, #Alice Bailey, #Occultism
  I would point out primarily and emphasize the fact that the motion we are considering is that due to the fire latent in matter itself, a motion that is the prime characteristic and basic quality of the Primordial Ray of Active Intelligence. To express it otherwise: it is the outstanding faculty of the third Logos, of Brahma [142] viewed as the Creator, and this faculty is the product or result of an earlier manifestation. Each of the three Logoi, when in manifestation and thus personified, is exemplifying some one quality which predominates over the others. Each, more or less, exemplifies all, but each demonstrates one of the three aspects so profoundly as to be recognised as that aspect itself. In much the same way, for instance, the different incarnating jivas carry a vibration which is their main measure, though they may also have lesser vibrations that are subsidiary to them. Let us get this clear, for the truth embodied is fundamental.
  1. The threefold goal,
  --
  The Third Logos. The third Logos, or Brahma, is characterised by active intelligence; His mode of action is that which we call rotary, or that measured revolution of the matter of the system, first as a grand totality, setting in movement the material circumscribed by the entire ring-pass-not, and secondly differentiating it, according to seven vibratory rates or measures into the seven planes. On each of these planes the process is pursued, and the matter of any plane within the plane ring-pass-not shows first as a totality and then as a sevenfold differentiation. This differentiation of matter is brought about by rotary motion, and is controlled by the Law of Economy (one of the cosmic laws) with which we will deal later, only pausing here to say that this Law of Economy might be considered as the controlling factor in the life of the third Logos. Therefore:
  a. His goal is the perfect blending of Spirit and matter.

1.00f - DIVISION F - THE LAW OF ECONOMY, #A Treatise on Cosmic Fire, #Alice Bailey, #Occultism
  1. The Law of Vibration, dealing with the key note or measure of the matter of each plane. By knowledge of this law the material of any plane in its seven divisions can be controlled.
  2. The Law of Adaptation, is the law governing the rotary movement of any atom on every plane and subplane.
  --
  a. An atom vibrates to a certain measure.
  b. It rotates at a certain speed.

1.00 - Main, #The Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  Say: O leaders of religion! Weigh not the Book of God with such standards and sciences as are current amongst you, for the Book itself is the unerring Balance established amongst men. In this most perfect Balance whatsoever the peoples and kindreds of the earth possess must be weighed, while the measure of its weight should be tested according to its own standard, did ye but know it.
  100
  --
  We shall, if it be God's will and purpose, set forth erelong the measure of its assessment. He, verily, expoundeth whatsoever He desireth by virtue of His own knowledge, and He, of a truth, is Omniscient and All-Wise.
  147
  --
  Recite ye the verses of God every morn and eventide. Whoso faileth to recite them hath not been faithful to the Covenant of God and His Testament, and whoso turneth away from these holy verses in this Day is of those who throughout eternity have turned away from God. Fear ye God, O My servants, one and all. Pride not yourselves on much reading of the verses or on a multitude of pious acts by night and day; for were a man to read a single verse with joy and radiance it would be better for him than to read with lassitude all the Holy Books of God, the Help in Peril, the Self-Subsisting. Read ye the sacred verses in such measure that ye be not overcome by languor and despondency. Lay not upon your souls that which will weary them and weigh them down, but rather what will lighten and uplift them, so that they may soar on the wings of the Divine verses towards the Dawning-place of His manifest signs; this will draw you nearer to God, did ye but comprehend.
  150
  --
  O concourse of divines! When My verses were sent down, and My clear tokens were revealed, We found you behind the veils. This, verily, is a strange thing. Ye glory in My Name, yet ye recognized Me not at the time your Lord, the All-Merciful, appeared amongst you with proof and testimony. We have rent the veils asunder. Beware lest ye shut out the people by yet another veil. Pluck asunder the chains of vain imaginings, in the name of the Lord of all men, and be not of the deceitful. Should ye turn unto God and embrace His Cause, spread not disorder within it, and measure not the Book of God with your selfish desires. This, verily, is the counsel of God aforetime and hereafter, and to this God's witnesses and chosen ones, yea, each and every one of Us, do solemnly attest.
  166
  --
  O people of the Bayan! We, verily, set foot within the School of God when ye lay slumbering; and We perused the Tablet while ye were fast asleep. By the one true God! We read the Tablet ere it was revealed, while ye were unaware, and We had perfect knowledge of the Book when ye were yet unborn. These words are to your measure, not to God's. To this testifieth that which is enshrined within His knowledge, if ye be of them that comprehend; and to this the tongue of the Almighty doth bear witness, if ye be of those who understand. I swear by God, were We to lift the veil, ye would be dumbfounded.
  177

1.00 - PREFACE, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  even more so. Finally, the value of an experience is measured by its capacity to transform life; otherwise, it is simply an empty dream or an hallucination.
  Sri Aurobindo leads us to a twofold discovery, which we so urgently need if we want to find an intelligible meaning to the suffocating chaos we live in, as well as a key for transforming our world. By following him step by step in his prodigious exploration,

1.00 - PRELUDE AT THE THEATRE, #Faust, #Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, #Poetry
  When, like a fount, the crowding measures
  Uninterrupted gushed and sprang!

1.00 - PROLOGUE IN HEAVEN, #Faust, #Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, #Poetry
  Draw power, whose measure none can say;
  The lofty works, uncomprehended,

1.00 - The way of what is to come, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Zen
    One laughs about it, and laughter, too, is. Do you believe, man of this time, that laughter is lower than worship? Where is your measure, false measurer?13 The sum of life decides in laughter and in worship, not your judgment."
    I must also speak the ridiculous. You coming men! You will recognize the supreme meaning by the fact that he is laughter and worship, a bloody laughter and a bloody worship. A sacrificial blood binds the poles. Those who know this laugh and worship in the same breath.
  --
    13. Lit. Vermessener. This also carries the connotation of the adjective vermessen, that is, a lack or loss of measure, and thus implies overconfidence, presumptuousness
    14. A reference to the vision that follows.

1.010 - Self-Control - The Alpha and Omega of Yoga, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  The whole of yoga is self-control in one word, 'self-mastery' in the sense that the rays of the mind and the senses, the projecting powers of individuality, have to be brought back to their source in order that there may be consciousness of the cause. There cannot be a consciousness of the cause as long as the cause is not the object of consciousness, inasmuch as the latter is involved in the externalised activity of the mind and the senses. We cannot know an object unless the consciousness follows this cognitive act and enlivens the senses, activates them towards the object which is seen, cognised or perceived by them. On account of this engagement of consciousness through the mind and the senses in respect of objects outside and in all acts of perception and cognition, it finds no time to revert to its cause. We have no time. The consciousness cannot find time to become aware of its own background, inasmuch as it is heavily engaged and is very busy throughout the day and the night in attending to the needs of the mind and the senses in their activity of projection externally to objects. So, to become aware of the cause would be to enable the consciousness to revert itself in that direction inwardly for which purpose it has to be withdrawn, tentatively at least, in an appreciable measure, from its engagement in objective perception through the mind and the senses.
  All perceptions are, therefore, engagements of consciousness, which prevents it from knowing its own background and conditions of action, so that when we are busily engaged in the perceptions and cognitions through the mind and the senses, we cannot know our own background, and we look helpless. The necessity for self-control arises merely because of the fact that the object of our quest is inherently present in the very act of our individual experience, and it cannot be observed by the ordinary means of an academic character or a scientific nature. Here we need no instruments, no types of apparatus either for observation or knowledge, because the object here is the background of our own self. There are causes behind causes, extending one behind the other, and lying one behind the other in larger and larger expansiveness one implying the other, and one inclusive of the other. The causes that are precedent are inclusive of the causes that are succeeding, so that when we go higher up we do not lose anything that is lower, but get everything that is lower in a refined form by transcendence.

1.013 - Defence Mechanisms of the Mind, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  Broadly speaking, there are various phases of the individual the physical needs and the psychological needs experienced by us daily which make us hang on to things, like slaves. We cannot bear extreme heat; we cannot bear extreme cold; we cannot bear hunger; we cannot bear thirst. These are the immediate creature needs of the individual which makes it totally dependent on external factors. We cannot control these urges by any amount of effort. There are other vital needs of the individual which press it forward towards fulfilment. The vital urges are forceful impulses which drive the mind and the senses towards their objects of fulfilment, and these are, again, the weak spots. If we are in a position to fulfil the needs of the body, the mind and the senses in any measure whatsoever, we become friends. A friend is one who can fulfil our needs; and this is, of course, how we usually define a friend. My needs have to be fulfilled, whatever the needs may be, and when the needs are analysed threadbare, the structure of the mind and the senses are automatically analysed also.
  In a medical examination, the diagnosis is the more important part of treatment. Proper diagnosis precedes any prescription of medicine. So, the order for self-control, atma nigrah, may be regarded as a prescription for the illness of the individual, but this prescription can be given only after a thorough diagnosis of the individual's case. Although every individual may be said to be sick in some way or the other, everyone does not suffer from the same kind of sickness uniformly.

1.01 - A NOTE ON PROGRESS, #The Future of Man, #Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, #Christianity
  and measure the extent of Progress we must look resolutely beyond
  the individual viewpoint. It is Mankind as a whole, collective hu-
  --
  neither we nor our adversaries have sufficiently measured the
  powers of growth with which Christ endowed his Church?

1.01 - Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious, #The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  some measure from its outer object. In the case of astrology, for
  instance, this age-old "scientia intuitiva" came to be branded as

1.01 - Economy, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  The whole ground of human life seems to some to have been gone over by their predecessors, both the heights and the valleys, and all things to have been cared for. According to Evelyn, the wise Solomon prescribed ordinances for the very distances of trees; and the Roman prtors have decided how often you may go into your neighbors land to gather the acorns which fall on it without trespass, and what share belongs to that neighbor. Hippocrates has even left directions how we should cut our nails; that is, even with the ends of the fingers, neither shorter nor longer. Undoubtedly the very tedium and ennui which presume to have exhausted the variety and the joys of life are as old as Adam. But mans capacities have never been measured; nor are we to judge of what he can do by any precedents, so little has been tried. Whatever have been thy failures hitherto, be not afflicted, my child, for who shall assign to thee what thou hast left undone?
  We might try our lives by a thousand simple tests; as, for instance, that the same sun which ripens my beans illumines at once a system of earths like ours. If I had remembered this it would have prevented some mistakes. This was not the light in which I hoed them. The stars are the apexes of what wonderful triangles! What distant and different beings in the various mansions of the universe are contemplating the same one at the same moment! Nature and human life are as various as our several constitutions. Who shall say what prospect life offers to another? Could a greater miracle take place than for us to look through each others eyes for an instant? We should live in all the ages of the world in an hour; ay, in all the worlds of the ages. History, Poetry,
  --
  When I ask for a garment of a particular form, my tailoress tells me gravely, They do not make them so now, not emphasizing the They at all, as if she quoted an authority as impersonal as the Fates, and I find it difficult to get made what I want, simply because she cannot believe that I mean what I say, that I am so rash. When I hear this oracular sentence, I am for a moment absorbed in thought, emphasizing to myself each word separately that I may come at the meaning of it, that I may find out by what degree of consanguinity _They_ are related to _me_, and what authority they may have in an affair which affects me so nearly; and, finally, I am inclined to answer her with equal mystery, and without any more emphasis of the they,It is true, they did not make them so recently, but they do now. Of what use this measuring of me if she does not measure my character, but only the breadth of my shoulders, as it were a peg to hang the coat on? We worship not the Graces, nor the Parc, but Fashion. She spins and weaves and cuts with full authority. The head monkey at Paris puts on a travellers cap, and all the monkeys in America do the same. I sometimes despair of getting anything quite simple and honest done in this world by the help of men. They would have to be passed through a powerful press first, to squeeze their old notions out of them, so that they would not soon get upon their legs again, and then there would be some one in the company with a maggot in his head, hatched from an egg deposited there nobody knows when, for not even fire kills these things, and you would have lost your labor. Nevertheless, we will not forget that some Egyptian wheat was handed down to us by a mummy.
  On the whole, I think that it cannot be maintained that dressing has in this or any country risen to the dignity of an art. At present men make shift to wear what they can get. Like shipwrecked sailors, they put on what they can find on the beach, and at a little distance, whether of space or time, laugh at each others masquerade. Every generation laughs at the old fashions, but follows religiously the new. We are amused at beholding the costume of Henry VIII., or Queen Elizabeth, as much as if it was that of the King and Queen of the Cannibal Islands.
  --
  Notwithstanding much cant and hypocrisy,chaff which I find it difficult to separate from my wheat, but for which I am as sorry as any man,I will brea the freely and stretch myself in this respect, it is such a relief to both the moral and physical system; and I am resolved that I will not through humility become the devils attorney. I will endeavor to speak a good word for the truth. At Cambridge College the mere rent of a students room, which is only a little larger than my own, is thirty dollars each year, though the corporation had the advantage of building thirty-two side by side and under one roof, and the occupant suffers the inconvenience of many and noisy neighbors, and perhaps a residence in the fourth story. I cannot but think that if we had more true wisdom in these respects, not only less education would be needed, because, forsooth, more would already have been acquired, but the pecuniary expense of getting an education would in a great measure vanish. Those conveniences which the student requires at
  Cambridge or elsewhere cost him or somebody else ten times as great a sacrifice of life as they would with proper management on both sides.
  --
  I certain it is desirable that there should be. However, _I_ should never have broken a horse or bull and taken him to board for any work he might do for me, for fear I should become a horse-man or a herds-man merely; and if society seems to be the gainer by so doing, are we certain that what is one mans gain is not anothers loss, and that the stable-boy has equal cause with his master to be satisfied? Granted that some public works would not have been constructed without this aid, and let man share the glory of such with the ox and horse; does it follow that he could not have accomplished works yet more worthy of himself in that case? When men begin to do, not merely unnecessary or artistic, but luxurious and idle work, with their assistance, it is inevitable that a few do all the exchange work with the oxen, or, in other words, become the slaves of the strongest. Man thus not only works for the animal within him, but, for a symbol of this, he works for the animal without him. Though we have many substantial houses of brick or stone, the prosperity of the farmer is still measured by the degree to which the barn overshadows the house. This town is said to have the largest houses for oxen, cows, and horses hereabouts, and it is not behindh and in its public buildings; but there are very few halls for free worship or free speech in this county. It should not be by their architecture, but why not even by their power of abstract thought, that nations should seek to commemorate themselves? How much more admirable the Bhagvat-Geeta than all the ruins of the East! Towers and temples are the luxury of princes. A simple and independent mind does not toil at the bidding of any prince. Genius is not a retainer to any emperor, nor is its material silver, or gold, or marble, except to a trifling extent. To what end, pray, is so much stone hammered? In
  Arcadia, when I was there, I did not see any hammering stone. Nations are possessed with an insane ambition to perpetuate the memory of themselves by the amount of hammered stone they leave. What if equal pains were taken to smooth and polish their manners? One piece of good sense would be more memorable than a monument as high as the moon. I love better to see stones in place. The grandeur of Thebes was a vulgar grandeur. More sensible is a rod of stone wall that bounds an honest mans field than a hundred-gated Thebes that has wandered farther from the true end of life. The religion and civilization which are barbaric and hea thenish build splendid temples; but what you might call
  --
  $25.21 on the one side,this being very nearly the means with which I started, and the measure of expenses to be incurred, and on the other, beside the leisure and independence and health thus secured, a comfortable house for me as long as I choose to occupy it.
  These statistics, however accidental and therefore uninstructive they may appear, as they have a certain completeness, have a certain value also. Nothing was given me of which I have not rendered some account.

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun measure

The noun measure has 9 senses (first 6 from tagged texts)
                    
1. (5) measure, step ::: (any maneuver made as part of progress toward a goal; "the situation called for strong measures"; "the police took steps to reduce crime")
2. (5) measure, quantity, amount ::: (how much there is or how many there are of something that you can quantify)
3. (2) bill, measure ::: (a statute in draft before it becomes law; "they held a public hearing on the bill")
4. (2) measurement, measuring, measure, mensuration ::: (the act or process of assigning numbers to phenomena according to a rule; "the measurements were carefully done"; "his mental measurings proved remarkably accurate")
5. (1) standard, criterion, measure, touchstone ::: (a basis for comparison; a reference point against which other things can be evaluated; "the schools comply with federal standards"; "they set the measure for all subsequent work")
6. (1) meter, metre, measure, beat, cadence ::: ((prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse)
7. measure, bar ::: (musical notation for a repeating pattern of musical beats; "the orchestra omitted the last twelve bars of the song")
8. measuring stick, measure, measuring rod ::: (measuring instrument having a sequence of marks at regular intervals; used as a reference in making measurements)
9. measure ::: (a container of some standard capacity that is used to obtain fixed amounts of a substance)

--- Overview of verb measure

The verb measure has 4 senses (first 4 from tagged texts)
                    
1. (35) measure, mensurate, measure out ::: (determine the measurements of something or somebody, take measurements of; "Measure the length of the wall")
2. (20) quantify, measure ::: (express as a number or measure or quantity; "Can you quantify your results?")
3. (14) measure ::: (have certain dimensions; "This table surfaces measures 20inches by 36 inches")
4. (10) measure, evaluate, valuate, assess, appraise, value ::: (evaluate or estimate the nature, quality, ability, extent, or significance of; "I will have the family jewels appraised by a professional"; "access all the factors when taking a risk")


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun measure

9 senses of measure                          

Sense 1
measure, step
   => maneuver, manoeuvre, tactical maneuver, tactical manoeuvre
     => move
       => decision, determination, conclusion
         => choice, selection, option, pick
           => action
             => act, deed, human action, human activity
               => event
                 => psychological feature
                   => abstraction, abstract entity
                     => entity

Sense 2
measure, quantity, amount
   => abstraction, abstract entity
     => entity

Sense 3
bill, measure
   => legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument
     => document, written document, papers
       => writing, written material, piece of writing
         => written communication, written language, black and white
           => communication
             => abstraction, abstract entity
               => entity

Sense 4
measurement, measuring, measure, mensuration
   => activity
     => act, deed, human action, human activity
       => event
         => psychological feature
           => abstraction, abstract entity
             => entity

Sense 5
standard, criterion, measure, touchstone
   => system of measurement, metric
     => measure, quantity, amount
       => abstraction, abstract entity
         => entity

Sense 6
meter, metre, measure, beat, cadence
   => poetic rhythm, rhythmic pattern, prosody
     => versification
       => form
         => writing style, literary genre, genre
           => expressive style, style
             => communication
               => abstraction, abstract entity
                 => entity

Sense 7
measure, bar
   => musical notation
     => notation, notational system
       => writing
         => written communication, written language, black and white
           => communication
             => abstraction, abstract entity
               => entity

Sense 8
measuring stick, measure, measuring rod
   => measuring instrument, measuring system, measuring device
     => instrument
       => device
         => instrumentality, instrumentation
           => artifact, artefact
             => whole, unit
               => object, physical object
                 => physical entity
                   => entity

Sense 9
measure
   => container
     => instrumentality, instrumentation
       => artifact, artefact
         => whole, unit
           => object, physical object
             => physical entity
               => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun measure

8 of 9 senses of measure                        

Sense 1
measure, step
   => countermeasure
   => shark repellent, porcupine provision
   => precaution, safeguard, guard

Sense 2
measure, quantity, amount
   => probability, chance
   => quantum
   => value, economic value
   => fundamental quantity, fundamental measure
   => definite quantity
   => indefinite quantity
   => relative quantity
   => system of measurement, metric
   => cordage
   => octane number, octane rating
   => magnetization, magnetisation
   => radical
   => volume
   => volume
   => proof
   => time unit, unit of time
   => point, point in time
   => playing period, period of play, play
   => time interval, interval

Sense 3
bill, measure
   => appropriation bill
   => bill of attainder
   => bottle bill
   => farm bill
   => trade bill

Sense 4
measurement, measuring, measure, mensuration
   => seismography
   => quantitative analysis, quantitative chemical analysis
   => actinometry
   => algometry
   => anemography
   => anemometry
   => angulation
   => anthropometry
   => arterial blood gases
   => audiometry
   => bathymetry, plumbing
   => calorimetry
   => cephalometry
   => densitometry
   => dosimetry
   => fetometry, foetometry
   => hydrometry, gravimetry
   => hypsometry, hypsography
   => mental measurement
   => micrometry
   => observation
   => pelvimetry
   => photometry
   => quantification
   => radioactive dating
   => reading, meter reading
   => sampling
   => sounding
   => sound ranging
   => scaling
   => spirometry
   => surveying
   => telemetry
   => thermometry
   => thermogravimetry
   => tonometry
   => viscometry, viscosimetry

Sense 5
standard, criterion, measure, touchstone
   => benchmark
   => earned run average, ERA
   => grade point average, GPA
   => procrustean standard, procrustean rule, procrustean bed
   => yardstick
   => medium of exchange, monetary system
   => scale, scale of measurement, graduated table, ordered series
   => gauge, standard of measurement
   => baseline
   => norm

Sense 6
meter, metre, measure, beat, cadence
   => catalexis
   => scansion
   => common measure, common meter
   => metrical foot, foot, metrical unit

Sense 8
measuring stick, measure, measuring rod
   => board rule
   => rule, ruler
   => size stick

Sense 9
measure
   => measuring cup


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun measure

9 senses of measure                          

Sense 1
measure, step
   => maneuver, manoeuvre, tactical maneuver, tactical manoeuvre

Sense 2
measure, quantity, amount
   => abstraction, abstract entity

Sense 3
bill, measure
   => legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument

Sense 4
measurement, measuring, measure, mensuration
   => activity

Sense 5
standard, criterion, measure, touchstone
   => system of measurement, metric

Sense 6
meter, metre, measure, beat, cadence
   => poetic rhythm, rhythmic pattern, prosody

Sense 7
measure, bar
   => musical notation

Sense 8
measuring stick, measure, measuring rod
   => measuring instrument, measuring system, measuring device

Sense 9
measure
   => container




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun measure

9 senses of measure                          

Sense 1
measure, step
  -> maneuver, manoeuvre, tactical maneuver, tactical manoeuvre
   => parking
   => device, gimmick, twist
   => feint
   => footwork
   => ploy, gambit, stratagem
   => ruse, artifice
   => measure, step

Sense 2
measure, quantity, amount
  -> abstraction, abstract entity
   => psychological feature
   => attribute
   => group, grouping
   => relation
   => communication
   => measure, quantity, amount
   => otherworld
   => set

Sense 3
bill, measure
  -> legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument
   => articles of incorporation
   => derivative instrument, derivative
   => negotiable instrument
   => passport
   => ship's papers
   => manifest
   => debenture
   => power of attorney
   => letters of administration
   => letters testamentary
   => working papers, work papers, work permit
   => act, enactment
   => law
   => bill, measure
   => brief, legal brief
   => will, testament
   => living will
   => deed, deed of conveyance, title
   => assignment
   => trust deed, deed of trust
   => conveyance
   => tax return, income tax return, return
   => license, licence, permit
   => patent, letters patent
   => opinion, legal opinion, judgment, judgement
   => acquittance, release
   => writ, judicial writ
   => mandate, authorization, authorisation
   => affidavit
   => written agreement
   => indictment, bill of indictment
   => impeachment
   => arraignment
   => security, certificate

Sense 4
measurement, measuring, measure, mensuration
  -> activity
   => variation, variance
   => space walk
   => domesticity
   => operation
   => operation
   => practice, pattern
   => diversion, recreation
   => cup of tea, bag, dish
   => follow-up, followup
   => game
   => turn, play
   => music
   => acting, playing, playacting, performing
   => liveliness, animation
   => burst, fit
   => work
   => works, deeds
   => service
   => occupation, business, job, line of work, line
   => occupation
   => writing, committal to writing
   => role
   => wrongdoing, wrongful conduct, misconduct, actus reus
   => waste, wastefulness, dissipation
   => attempt, effort, endeavor, endeavour, try
   => control
   => protection
   => sensory activity
   => education, instruction, teaching, pedagogy, didactics, educational activity
   => training, preparation, grooming
   => representation
   => creation, creative activity
   => dismantling, dismantlement, disassembly
   => puncture
   => search, hunt, hunting
   => use, usage, utilization, utilisation, employment, exercise
   => operation, military operation
   => measurement, measuring, measure, mensuration
   => calibration, standardization, standardisation
   => organization, organisation
   => grouping
   => support, supporting
   => continuance, continuation
   => procedure, process
   => ceremony
   => ceremony
   => worship
   => energizing, activating, activation
   => concealment, concealing, hiding
   => placement, location, locating, position, positioning, emplacement
   => provision, supply, supplying
   => demand
   => pleasure
   => enjoyment, delectation
   => lamentation, mourning
   => laughter
   => market, marketplace, market place
   => politics
   => preparation, readying
   => aid, assist, assistance, help
   => support
   => behavior, behaviour, conduct, doings
   => behavior, behaviour
   => leadership, leading
   => precession, precedence, precedency
   => solo
   => buzz
   => fun
   => sin, hell
   => release, outlet, vent
   => last
   => mystification, obfuscation
   => negotiation
   => verbalization, verbalisation
   => perturbation, disturbance
   => timekeeping

Sense 5
standard, criterion, measure, touchstone
  -> system of measurement, metric
   => standard, criterion, measure, touchstone
   => system of weights and measures
   => point system
   => information measure
   => utility
   => Brix scale
   => circular measure
   => board measure
   => Beaufort scale
   => system of weights, weight
   => temperature scale

Sense 6
meter, metre, measure, beat, cadence
  -> poetic rhythm, rhythmic pattern, prosody
   => meter, metre, measure, beat, cadence
   => sprung rhythm

Sense 7
measure, bar
  -> musical notation
   => bar line
   => tablature
   => scale, musical scale
   => interval, musical interval
   => staff, stave
   => clef
   => key signature, signature
   => key, tonality
   => atonality, atonalism
   => time signature, musical time signature
   => measure, bar
   => rest
   => note, musical note, tone
   => slur
   => sharp
   => flat
   => natural, cancel
   => accidental
   => fermata
   => solmization, solmisation
   => segno
   => sforzando

Sense 8
measuring stick, measure, measuring rod
  -> measuring instrument, measuring system, measuring device
   => accelerometer
   => actinometer
   => algometer
   => altazimuth
   => altimeter
   => atmometer, evaporometer
   => audiometer, sonometer
   => barometer
   => bathymeter, bathometer
   => bolometer
   => burette, buret
   => caliper, calliper
   => calorimeter
   => chronoscope
   => colorimeter, tintometer
   => counter tube
   => craniometer
   => cryoscope
   => declinometer, transit declinometer
   => densimeter, densitometer
   => densitometer
   => dosemeter, dosimeter
   => dynamometer, ergometer
   => electrodynamometer
   => electroscope
   => eudiometer
   => gauge, gage
   => graduate
   => gravimeter, gravity meter
   => heliometer
   => hematocrit, haematocrit
   => hydrometer, gravimeter
   => hygrometer
   => inclinometer, dip circle
   => integrator, planimeter
   => interferometer
   => ionization chamber, ionization tube
   => katharometer
   => Kundt's tube
   => lidar
   => log
   => measuring stick, measure, measuring rod
   => meter
   => nephoscope
   => octant
   => oximeter
   => pedometer
   => pelvimeter
   => photometer
   => piezometer
   => pipet, pipette
   => Pitot-static tube, Pitot head, Pitot tube
   => Pitot tube, Pitot
   => plethysmograph
   => potentiometer
   => quadrant
   => radar, microwave radar, radio detection and ranging, radiolocation
   => rangefinder, range finder
   => refractometer
   => rheometer
   => scale, weighing machine
   => sclerometer
   => sector
   => seismograph
   => sensitometer
   => sextant
   => sonar, echo sounder, asdic
   => spherometer
   => spirograph
   => spirometer
   => static tube
   => synchroscope, synchronoscope, synchronizer, synchroniser
   => tachometer, tach
   => tape, tapeline, tape measure
   => tensiometer
   => tensiometer
   => tensiometer
   => thermometer
   => timepiece, timekeeper, horologe
   => tonometer
   => torsion balance
   => variometer
   => Venturi tube
   => viscometer, viscosimeter
   => wattmeter

Sense 9
measure
  -> container
   => bag
   => bag, handbag, pocketbook, purse
   => basket, handbasket
   => bin
   => bowl, pipe bowl
   => box
   => bread-bin, breadbox
   => bunker
   => can, tin, tin can
   => canister, cannister, tin
   => capsule
   => cargo container
   => case
   => case, display case, showcase, vit