classes ::: author, Buddhism, Zen, Priest,
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object:Nichiren
class:author
subject class:Buddhism
subject:Buddhism
subject class:Zen
subject:Zen
class:Priest
bd:16 February 1222 - 13 October 1282


--- WIKI
Nichiren (; born as Zen-nichi-maro (), Dharma name: Rencho, 16 February 1222 13 October 1282) was a Japanese Buddhist priest of the Kamakura period (11851333), who developed the teachings of Nichiren Buddhism, a branch school of Mahayana Buddhism. Nichiren declared that the Lotus Sutra alone contains the highest truth of Buddhist teachings suited for the Third Age of Buddhism. He advocated the repeated recitation of its title, Nam(u)-myoho-renge-kyo and held that Shakyamuni Buddha and all other Buddhist deities were extraordinary manifestations of a particular Buddha-nature termed MyohoRenge that is equally accessible to all. He declared that believers of the Sutra must propagate it even under persecution. Nichiren was a prolific writer and his biography, temperament, and the evolution of his beliefs has been gleaned primarily from his own writings. After his death, he was bestowed the title Nichiren Dai-Bosatsu () (Great Bodhisattva Nichiren) by Emperor Go-Kgon (1358) and the title Rissh Daishi () (Great Teacher of Rectification) was conferred posthumously in year 1922 by imperial edict. Today, Nichiren Buddhism includes traditional temple schools such as Nichiren-shu and Nichiren Shsh, as well as lay movements such as Soka Gakkai, Rissh Ksei Kai, Reiykai, Kenshkai, Honmon Butsury-sh, Kempon Hokke, and Shshinkai among many others. Each group has varying views of Nichiren's teachings with claims and interpretations of Nichiren's identity ranging from the rebirth of Bodhisattva Visistacaritra to the Primordial or "True Buddha" (: Hon butsu) of the Third Age of Buddhism.

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DEFINITIONS

Nichiren Shōshū

Nichiren Shōshū. (日蓮正宗). In Japanese, “Orthodox School of Nichiren”; one of the principal Japanese Buddhist schools based on the teachings of NICHIREN (1222–1282). Nichiren Shōshū is descended from Nichiren through Nichikō (1246–1332), the alleged sole heir of Nichiren among his six chief disciples. Nichikō was a loyal student and archivist of Nichiren’s writings, who established in 1290 what was then called the Fuji school at TAISEKIJI, a monastery on Mt. Fuji in Shizuoka prefecture. Nichikō’s school later divided into eight subbranches, known collectively as the Fuji Monryū (Fuji schools) or Nichikō Monryū (Nichikō schools). The monk Nichikan (1665–1726), a noted commentator and teacher, was instrumental in resurrecting the observance of Nichiren’s teachings at Taisekiji. He was also the person who systematized and established many of the innovative features of the school, particularly the school’s unique view that Nichiren was the Buddha (see below). The eight associated temples that remained in the Fuji school reunited in 1876 as the Komon sect, later adopting a new name, the Honmon. However, in 1899, Taisekiji split from the other temples and established an independent sect, renaming itself Nichiren Shōshū in 1912. In 1930, MAKIGUCHI TSUNESABURO and Toda Josei established the SŌKA GAKKAI (then called Sōka Kyōiku Gakkai), a lay organization for the promotion of Nichiren Shōshū thought, but quickly ran afoul of the Japanese government’s promotion of the cult of state Shintōism. Makiguchi refused to comply with government promulgation of Shintō worship and was imprisoned for violating the Peace Preservation Law; he died in prison in 1944. Toda was eventually released, and he devoted himself after World War II to promoting Sōka Gakkai and Nichiren Shōshū, which at that time were closely connected. The two groups acrimoniously separated in 1991, Nichiren Shōshū accusing Sōka Gakkai of forming a personality cult around their leader IKEDA DAISAKU (b. 1928) and of improper modifications of Nichiren practice; Sōka Gakkai accusing the Nichiren Shōshū leader Abe Nikken of trying to dominate both organizations. The two groups now operate independently. Nichiren Shōshū has grown to over seven hundreds temples in Japan, as well as a few temples in foreign countries. Nichiren Shōshū distinguishes itself from the other Nichiren schools by its unique view of the person of Nichiren: it regards the founder as the true buddha in this current degenerate age of the dharma (J. mappo; C. MOFA), a buddha whom ŚĀKYAMUNI promised his followers would appear two thousand years in the future; therefore, they refer to Nichiren as daishōnin, or great sage. Other Nichiren schools instead regard the founder as the reincarnation of Jōgyō Bosatsu (the BODHISATTVA VIŚIṢṬACĀRITRA). Nichiren Shōshū’s claim to orthodoxy is based on two documents, not recognized by other Nichiren schools, in which Nichiren claims to transfer his dharma to Nichikō, viz., the Minobu sōjōsho (“Minobu Transfer Document”) and the Ikegami sōjōsho (“Ikegami Transfer Document”), which are believed to have been written in 1282 by Nichiren, the first at Minobu and the second on the day of his death at Ikegami. Nichiren Shōshū practice is focused on the dai-gohonzon maṇḍala, the ultimate object of devotion in the school, which Nichiren created. The DAI-GOHONZON (great object of devotion), a MAṆḌALA (here, a cosmological chart) inscribed by Nichiren in 1279, includes the DAIMOKU (lit., “title”), viz., the phrase “NAMU MYŌHŌRENGEKYŌ” (Homage to the SADDHARMAPUṆḌARĪKASŪTRA), which is considered to be the embodiment of Nichiren’s enlightenment and the ultimate reason for his advent in this world. The gohonzon is placed in a shrine or on a simple altar in the homes of devotees of the sect. This veneration of the gohonzon to the exclusion of all other deities and images of the Buddha distinguishes Nichiren Shōshū from other Nichiren schools. The school interprets the three jewels (RATNATRAYA) of the Buddha, DHARMA, and SAṂGHA to refer, respectively, to Nichiren (the buddha); to namu Myōhōrengekyō and the gohonzon (the dharma); and to his successor Nichikō (the saṃgha). By contrast, other Nichiren schools generally consider Śākyamuni to be the Buddha and Nichiren the saṃgha, and do not include the gohonzon in the dharma, since they question its authenticity. All schools of Nichiren thought accept Nichiren’s acknowledgment of the buddhahood that is latent in all creatures and the ability of all human beings of any class to achieve buddhahood in this lifetime.

Nichirenshū

Nichirenshū. (日蓮宗). In Japanese, “schools [associated with] Nichiren.” There was and is no single “Nichiren School,” but the term is used to designate all of the different schools that trace their origins back to the life and teachings of NICHIREN (1222–1282). At the time of his death, Nichiren left no formal institution in place or instructions for the formation of any such institution. Thus, a number of groups emerged, led by various of his disciples. These groups, which can collectively be referred to as Nichirenshū, disagreed on a number of important points of doctrine and theories of propagation. However, they all shared the fundamental convictions that the SADDHARMAPUṆḌARĪKASŪTRA (“Lotus Sūtra”) was the highest of the Buddha’s teachings; that during the degenerate age (J. mappo; C. MOFA) liberation could be achieved by chanting the title (DAIMOKU) of that scripture; that Nichiren was the true teacher of this practice and Japan its appropriate site; and that all other forms of Buddhist practice were ineffective in this degenerate age and thus should be repudiated. However, Nichiren’s disciples and his followers disagreed on such questions as whether they should have any connections with other Buddhist groups; how aggressively they should proselytize Nichiren’s teachings; and whether the two sections of the Saddharmapuṇḍarīkasūtra—the “SHAKUMON” (Chapters 1–14), or trace teaching, and the “HONMON” (Chapters 15–28), or essential teaching—are of equal importance or whether the “Honmon” is superior. During the Meiji period, specific schools of Nichiren’s teachings were recognized, with six different schools institutionalized in 1874. One of these, which called itself the Nichirenshū, declared the two parts of the sūtra to be of equal importance; the other five declared the superiority of the “Honmon.” One of these five eventually became the NICHIREN SHŌSHŪ.

Nichiren

Nichiren. (日蓮) (1222–1282). Japanese founder of the NICHIRENSHŪ, one of the so-called new schools of Kamakura Buddhism. Nichiren is said to have been born into a commoner family in present-day Chiba prefecture. At the age of twelve he entered the priesthood and was ordained at the age of sixteen. In 1239, he left his rural temple and went first to Kamakura and then to the capital of Kyōto to study at the great monasteries there. Although he draws heavily on TENDAI and TAIMITSU teachings in his own writings, Nichiren seems to have been acquainted with other traditions of Buddhism as well. During this period, Nichiren began to question what he perceived as inconsistencies in the doctrines of the various schools he was studying. In particular, Nichiren disagreed with the JŌDOSHŪ pure land tradition of HŌNEN (1133–1212), and the practice of reciting the buddha’s name (NENBUTSU; C. NIANFO). Nichiren eventually concluded that the SADDHARMAPUṆḌARĪKASŪTRA (“Lotus Sūtra”) contained the Buddha’s ultimate teaching, relegating all other teachings to a provisional status. Armed with this new insight, Nichiren proclaimed in 1253 that people should place their faith in the Saddharmapuṇḍarīkasūtra by reciting its “title” (J. DAIMOKU), viz., NAMU MYŌHŌRENGEKYŌ (Homage to the Saddharmapuṇḍarīkasūtra), an act that he claimed was sufficient for gaining liberation in the time of the decline of the dharma, or mappō (C. MOFA). It was at this point that he adopted the name “Nichiren” (“Lotus of the Sun,”: i.e., Japan) Although Nichiren was a controversial figure, he attracted a large number of followers in Kamakura. In 1260, he wrote the Risshō Ankokuron (“Treatise on Establishing the Right [Teaching] for Securing the Peace of Our Country”), a tract that encouraged the Kamakura military government (bakufu) to rely on the teachings of the Saddharmapuṇḍarīkasūtra in order to avert political disaster and social upheaval and, in turn, to patronize Nichiren’s school over other Buddhist sects. As a result of his lobbying, and his challenge to the pure land tradition, Nichiren was arrested and exiled to Shizuoka prefecture in 1261 but was pardoned two years later. In 1271, a failed assassination plot against Nichiren hardened his resolve. He was arrested again in 1272 and banished to the island of Sado, where he wrote many of his most important treatises, including Kaimokushō (“Opening the Eyes”) and Kanjin no honzonshō (“The Object of Devotion for Observing the Mind”). In 1274, he was once again pardoned and subsequently returned to Kamakura. Failing for a third time to convince the Kamakura bakufu to turn to the Saddharmapuṇḍarīkasūtra for protection and salvation, he retired to Mt. Minobu in Yamanashi prefecture. There, he devoted his time to educating his disciples and writing essays, including Senjishō “(On the Selection of the Time”) and Hō’onshō (“Repaying Indebtedness”). Nichiren died at the age of sixty in the year 1282, leaving behind hundreds of works and divisive infighting for control of his legacy.



QUOTES [20 / 20 - 52 / 52]


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   20 Nichiren

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   31 Nichiren
   20 Nichiren

1:Winter always turns into spring. ~ Nichiren,
2:Faith Alone is what really matters. ~ Nichiren,
3:A coward cannot have any prayer answered. ~ Nichiren,
4:The treasures of the heart are most valuable of all. ~ Nichiren,
5:Could there ever be a more wonderful story than your own? ~ Nichiren,
6:If you light a lantern for another, it will also brighten your own way ~ Nichiren,
7:Whether one has wealth or not, no treasure exceeds the one called life. ~ Nichiren,
8:One should become the master of one's mind rather than let one's mind master him. ~ Nichiren,
9:Never let life's hardships disturb you. No one can avoid problems, not even saints or sages. ~ Nichiren,
10:We ordinary people can see neither our own eyelashes, which are so close, nor the heavens in the distance. ~ Nichiren,
11:Life is the most precious of all treasures. Even one extra day of life is worth more than ten million ryo of gold. ~ Nichiren,
12:That which you give to another will become your own sustenance; if you light a lamp for another, your own way will be lit. ~ Nichiren,
13:A person of wisdom is not one who practices Buddhism apart from worldly affairs but, rather, one who thoroughly understands the principles by which the world is governed. ~ Nichiren,
14:When a tree has been transplanted, though fierce winds may blow, it will not topple if it has a firm stake to hold it up. But even a tree that has grown up in place may fall over if its roots are weak. ~ Nichiren,
15:Summoning up the courage to take action is always the same regardless of how seemingly big or small the challenge. What may look like a small act of courage is courage nonetheless. The important thing is to be willing to take a step forward. ~ Nichiren,
16:Flint has the potential to produce fire, and gems have intrinsic value.
We ordinary people can see neither our own eyelashes, which are so close, nor the heavens in the distance.
Likewise, we do not see that the Buddha exists in our own hearts. ~ Nichiren,
17:By an increase in anger, warfare arises. By an increase of greed, famine arises. By an increase of stupidity, pestilence arises. Because these three calamities occur, the people's earthly desires grow all the more intense, and their false views thrive and multiply. ~ Nichiren,
18:Worthy persons deserve to be called so because they are not carried away by the eight winds: prosperity, decline, disgrace, honor, praise, censure,suffering, and pleasure. They are neither elated by prosperity nor grieved by decline. The heavenly gods will surely protect one who is unbending before the eight winds. ~ Nichiren,
19:Suffer what there is to suffer, enjoy what there is to enjoy. Regard both suffering and joy as facts of life, and continue chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo(1), no matter what happens. How could this be anything other than the boundless joy of the Law?
(1) Devotion to the Mystic Law of the Lotus Sutra or Glory to the Sutra of the Lotus of the Supreme Law ~ Nichiren,
20:A mind now clouded by the illusions of the innate darkness of life is like a tarnished mirror, but when polished, it is sure to become like a clear mirror, reflecting the essential nature of phenomena and the true aspect of reality. Arouse deep faith, and diligently polish your mirror day and night. How should you polish it? Only by chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo ~ Nichiren,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Winter always turns into spring. ~ Nichiren,
2:It is the heart that is important. ~ Nichiren
3:Faith Alone is what really matters. ~ Nichiren
4:Faith Alone is what really matters. ~ Nichiren,
5:A coward cannot have any prayer answered. ~ Nichiren
6:A coward cannot have any prayer answered. ~ Nichiren,
7:Buddhism is reason. Reason will win over your lord. ~ Nichiren
8:The treasures of the heart are most valuable of all. ~ Nichiren
9:The treasures of the heart are most valuable of all. ~ Nichiren,
10:Could there ever be a more wonderful story than your own? ~ Nichiren
11:Could there ever be a more wonderful story than your own? ~ Nichiren,
12:Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the greatest joy for all humankind. ~ Nichiren
13:Life in this world is limited. Never be in the least bit afraid! ~ Nichiren
14:If one lights a fire for others, one will brighten one's own way. ~ Nichiren
15:"If one lights a fire for others, one will brighten one's own way." ~ Nichiren
16:If you light a lantern for another, it will also brighten your own way ~ Nichiren
17:If you light a lantern for another, it will also brighten your own way ~ Nichiren,
18:Whether one has wealth or not, no treasure exceeds the one called life. ~ Nichiren
19:Whether one has wealth or not, no treasure exceeds the one called life. ~ Nichiren,
20:One should become the master of one's mind rather than let one's mind master him. ~ Nichiren
21:One should become the master of one's mind rather than let one's mind master him. ~ Nichiren,
22:Never let life's hardships disturb you. No one can avoid problems, not even saints or sages. ~ Nichiren
23:Never let life's hardships disturb you. No one can avoid problems, not even saints or sages. ~ Nichiren,
24:We ordinary people can see neither our own eyelashes, which are so close, nor the heavens in the distance. ~ Nichiren
25:We ordinary people can see neither our own eyelashes, which are so close, nor the heavens in the distance. ~ Nichiren,
26:Suffer what there is to suffer. Enjoy what there is to enjoy. Regard both suffering and joy as facts of life. ~ Nichiren
27:Life is the most precious of all treasures. Even one extra day of life is worth more than ten million ryo of gold. ~ Nichiren
28:Do not go about complaining how hard it is to live in this world. such behavior is entirely unworthy of a real man. ~ Nichiren
29:Life is the most precious of all treasures. Even one extra day of life is worth more than ten million ryo of gold. ~ Nichiren,
30:Winter always turns into Spring. Never, from ancient times on, has anyone heard or seen of winter turning back to autumn. ~ Nichiren
31:That which you give to another will become your own sustenance; if you light a lamp for another, your own way will be lit. ~ Nichiren
32:That which you give to another will become your own sustenance; if you light a lamp for another, your own way will be lit. ~ Nichiren,
33:More valuable than treasures in a storehouse are the treasures of the body. The most valuable of all are the treasures of the heart. ~ Nichiren
34:If you care anything about your personal security, you should first of all pray for order and tranquility throughout the four quarters of the land. ~ Nichiren
35:A person of wisdom is not one who practices Buddhism apart from worldly affairs but, rather, one who thoroughly understands the principles by which the world is governed. ~ Nichiren
36:A person of wisdom is not one who practices Buddhism apart from worldly affairs but, rather, one who thoroughly understands the principles by which the world is governed. ~ Nichiren,
37:When a tree has been transplanted, though fierce winds may blow, it will not topple if it has a firm stake to hold it up. But even a tree that has grown up in place may fall over if its roots are weak. ~ Nichiren
38:When a tree has been transplanted, though fierce winds may blow, it will not topple if it has a firm stake to hold it up. But even a tree that has grown up in place may fall over if its roots are weak. ~ Nichiren,
39:Summoning up the courage to take action is always the same regardless of how seemingly big or small the challenge. What may look like a small act of courage is courage nonetheless. The important thing is to be willing to take a step forward. ~ Nichiren
40:Summoning up the courage to take action is always the same regardless of how seemingly big or small the challenge. What may look like a small act of courage is courage nonetheless. The important thing is to be willing to take a step forward. ~ Nichiren,
41:Suffer what there is to suffer, enjoy what there is to enjoy. Regard both suffering and joy as facts of life, and continue chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, no matter what happens. How could this be anything other than the boundless joy of the Law? ~ Nichiren
42:Flint has the potential to produce fire, and gems have intrinsic value. We ordinary people can see neither our own eyelashes, which are so close, nor the heavens in the distance. Likewise, we do not see that the Buddha exists in our own hearts. ~ Nichiren
43:Flint has the potential to produce fire, and gems have intrinsic value.
We ordinary people can see neither our own eyelashes, which are so close, nor the heavens in the distance.
Likewise, we do not see that the Buddha exists in our own hearts. ~ Nichiren,
44:By an increase in anger, warfare arises. By an increase of greed, famine arises. By an increase of stupidity, pestilence arises. Because these three calamities occur, the people's earthly desires grow all the more intense, and their false views thrive and multiply. ~ Nichiren
45:By an increase in anger, warfare arises. By an increase of greed, famine arises. By an increase of stupidity, pestilence arises. Because these three calamities occur, the people's earthly desires grow all the more intense, and their false views thrive and multiply. ~ Nichiren,
46:Worthy persons deserve to be called so because they are not carried away by the eight winds: prosperity,decline,disgrace,honor,praise,censure,suffering, and pleasure.They are neither elated by prosperity nor grieved by decline. The heavenly gods will surely protect one who is unbending before the eight winds. ~ Nichiren
47:Worthy persons deserve to be called so because they are not carried away by the eight winds: prosperity, decline, disgrace, honor, praise, censure,suffering, and pleasure. They are neither elated by prosperity nor grieved by decline. The heavenly gods will surely protect one who is unbending before the eight winds. ~ Nichiren,
48:Suffer what there is to suffer, enjoy what there is to enjoy. Regard both suffering and joy as facts of life, and continue chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo(1), no matter what happens. How could this be anything other than the boundless joy of the Law?
(1) Devotion to the Mystic Law of the Lotus Sutra or Glory to the Sutra of the Lotus of the Supreme Law ~ Nichiren,
49:A mind now clouded by the illusions of the innate darkness of life is like a tarnished mirror, but when polished, it is sure to become like a clear mirror, reflecting the essential nature of phenomena and the true aspect of reality. Arouse deep faith, and diligently polish your mirror day and night. How should you polish it? Only by chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo ~ Nichiren
50:A mind now clouded by the illusions of the innate darkness of life is like a tarnished mirror, but when polished, it is sure to become like a clear mirror, reflecting the essential nature of phenomena and the true aspect of reality. Arouse deep faith, and diligently polish your mirror day and night. How should you polish it? Only by chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo ~ Nichiren,
51:The Vimalakirti Sutra states that, when one seeks the Buddhas' emancipation in the minds of ordinary beings, one finds that ordinary beings are the entities of enlightenment, and that the sufferings of birth and death are nirvana. It also states that, if the minds of living beings are impure, their land is also impure, but if their minds are pure, so is their land. There are not two lands, pure or impure in themselves. The difference lies solely in the good or evil of our minds. ~ Nichiren
52:I sat down on the bench in front of the print and made some notes. “Katsushika Hokusai. 1760–1849. Japanese printmaker. Leading Japanese expert on Chinese painting. Master of the Ukiyo-e form. Nichiren Buddhist.” Later, at home, I Googled Hokusai. He died at eighty-nine, and sure enough, on his deathbed—still looking to penetrate deeper into his art—he had exclaimed, “If only heaven will give me just another ten years!… Just another five more years, then I could become a real painter.” Hokusai was a man who saw his work as a means to “penetrate to the essential nature” of things. And he appears to have succeeded. His work, a hundred and fifty years after his death, could reach right off a gallery wall and grab me in the gut. More than anything, I was intrigued by the quality of Hokusai’s passion for his work. He helped me see that a life devoted to dharma can be a deeply ardent life. ~ Stephen Cope

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