classes ::: Genre, subject,
children :::
branches ::: Fiction, fictional characters, fictional place, Science Fiction, Selected Non-Fictions, Theological Fiction

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object:Fiction
class:Genre
class:subject

see also :::

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH
Arthur_C_Clarke
Charles_Dickens
C._S._Lewis
Frank_Herbert
G_K_Chesterton
Hermann_Hesse
H_G_Wells
H_P_Lovecraft
Italo_Calvino
James_Joyce
James_S_A_Corey
Jorge_Luis_Borges
J_R_R_Tolkien
Lewis_Carroll
Mark_Twain
Michael_Ende
Neil_Gaiman
Pablo_Neruda
Percy_Bysshe_Shelley
Stephen_King
Ursula_K_Le_Guin
William_Butler_Yeats
William_Gibson

BOOKS
Alice_in_Wonderland
Candide
Collected_Fictions
Crime_and_Punishment
Dune
Epigrams_from_Savitri
Full_Circle
Infinite_Library
Invisible_Cities
Labyrinths
Letters_On_Poetry_And_Art
Leviathan_Wakes
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
Narcissus_and_Goldmund
Neuromancer
One_Thousand_and_One_Nights
Process_and_Reality
Ready_Player_One
Snow_Crash
Sylvie_and_Bruno
The_Castle_of_Crossed_Destinies
The_Divine_Comedy
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh
The_Left_Hand_of_Darkness
The_Republic
The_Secret_Doctrine
The_Shack
the_Stack
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
3.4.1.05_-_Fiction-Writing_and_Sadhana

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1f.lovecraft_-_A_Reminiscence_of_Dr._Samuel_Johnson
1f.lovecraft_-_Ashes
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Azathoth
1f.lovecraft_-_Beyond_the_Wall_of_Sleep
1f.lovecraft_-_Celephais
1f.lovecraft_-_Collapsing_Cosmoses
1f.lovecraft_-_Cool_Air
1f.lovecraft_-_Dagon
1f.lovecraft_-_Deaf,_Dumb,_and_Blind
1f.lovecraft_-_Discarded_Draft_of
1f.lovecraft_-_Ex_Oblivione
1f.lovecraft_-_Facts_concerning_the_Late
1f.lovecraft_-_From_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_He
1f.lovecraft_-_Herbert_West-Reanimator
1f.lovecraft_-_H.P._Lovecrafts
1f.lovecraft_-_Hypnos
1f.lovecraft_-_Ibid
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Vault
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Walls_of_Eryx
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_Memory
1f.lovecraft_-_Nyarlathotep
1f.lovecraft_-_Old_Bugs
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_Pickmans_Model
1f.lovecraft_-_Poetry_and_the_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_Polaris
1f.lovecraft_-_Sweet_Ermengarde
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Battle_that_Ended_the_Century
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Beast_in_the_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Book
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Cats_of_Ulthar
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Challenge_from_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Colour_out_of_Space
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Crawling_Chaos
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Curse_of_Yig
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Descendant
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Diary_of_Alonzo_Typer
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Disinterment
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Doom_That_Came_to_Sarnath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Electric_Executioner
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Evil_Clergyman
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Festival
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Ghost-Eater
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Green_Meadow
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Haunter_of_the_Dark
1f.lovecraft_-_The_History_of_the_Necronomicon
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hoard_of_the_Wizard-Beast
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Martins_Beach
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Burying-Ground
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Museum
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Little_Glass_Bottle
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Loved_Dead
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Lurking_Fear
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Man_of_Stone
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Moon-Bog
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Music_of_Erich_Zann
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mysterious_Ship
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mystery_of_the_Grave-Yard
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Night_Ocean
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Other_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Picture_in_the_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Quest_of_Iranon
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Rats_in_the_Walls
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Secret_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Slaying_of_the_Monster
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Statement_of_Randolph_Carter
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Strange_High_House_in_the_Mist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Street
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Terrible_Old_Man
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Thing_on_the_Doorstep
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tomb
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Transition_of_Juan_Romero
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree_on_the_Hill
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Unnamable
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Very_Old_Folk
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_The_White_Ship
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_Till_A_the_Seas
1f.lovecraft_-_Two_Black_Bottles
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1f.lovecraft_-_What_the_Moon_Brings
1f.lovecraft_-_Winged_Death
1.pbs_-_A_Bridal_Song
1.pbs_-_A_Dialogue
1.pbs_-_A_Dirge
1.pbs_-_Adonais_-_An_elegy_on_the_Death_of_John_Keats
1.pbs_-_A_Fragment_-_To_Music
1.pbs_-_A_Hate-Song
1.pbs_-_A_Lament
1.pbs_-_Alas!_This_Is_Not_What_I_Thought_Life_Was
1.pbs_-_Alastor_-_or,_the_Spirit_of_Solitude
1.pbs_-_An_Allegory
1.pbs_-_And_like_a_Dying_Lady,_Lean_and_Pale
1.pbs_-_And_That_I_Walk_Thus_Proudly_Crowned_Withal
1.pbs_-_A_New_National_Anthem
1.pbs_-_An_Exhortation
1.pbs_-_An_Ode,_Written_October,_1819,_Before_The_Spaniards_Had_Recovered_Their_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Another_Fragment_to_Music
1.pbs_-_Archys_Song_From_Charles_The_First_(A_Widow_Bird_Sate_Mourning_For_Her_Love)
1.pbs_-_Arethusa
1.pbs_-_A_Romans_Chamber
1.pbs_-_Art_Thou_Pale_For_Weariness
1.pbs_-_A_Serpent-Face
1.pbs_-_Asia_-_From_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_A_Summer_Evening_Churchyard_-_Lechlade,_Gloucestershire
1.pbs_-_A_Tale_Of_Society_As_It_Is_-_From_Facts,_1811
1.pbs_-_Autumn_-_A_Dirge
1.pbs_-_A_Vision_Of_The_Sea
1.pbs_-_A_Widow_Bird_Sate_Mourning_For_Her_Love
1.pbs_-_Beautys_Halo
1.pbs_-_Bereavement
1.pbs_-_Bigotrys_Victim
1.pbs_-_Catalan
1.pbs_-_Charles_The_First
1.pbs_-_Chorus_from_Hellas
1.pbs_-_Dark_Spirit_of_the_Desart_Rude
1.pbs_-_Death
1.pbs_-_Death_In_Life
1.pbs_-_Death_Is_Here_And_Death_Is_There
1.pbs_-_Despair
1.pbs_-_Dirge_For_The_Year
1.pbs_-_English_translationItalian
1.pbs_-_Epigram_III_-_Spirit_of_Plato
1.pbs_-_Epigram_II_-_Kissing_Helena
1.pbs_-_Epigram_I_-_To_Stella
1.pbs_-_Epigram_IV_-_Circumstance
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_(Excerpt)
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_-_Passages_Of_The_Poem,_Or_Connected_Therewith
1.pbs_-_Epitaph
1.pbs_-_Epithalamium
1.pbs_-_Epithalamium_-_Another_Version
1.pbs_-_Evening_-_Ponte_Al_Mare,_Pisa
1.pbs_-_Evening._To_Harriet
1.pbs_-_Eyes_-_A_Fragment
1.pbs_-_Faint_With_Love,_The_Lady_Of_The_South
1.pbs_-_Feelings_Of_A_Republican_On_The_Fall_Of_Bonaparte
1.pbs_-_Fiordispina
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_A_Gentle_Story_Of_Two_Lovers_Young
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_"Amor_Aeternus"
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Apostrophe_To_Silence
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_A_Wanderer
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Follow_To_The_Deep_Woods_Weeds
1.pbs_-_Fragment_From_The_Wandering_Jew
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Great_Spirit
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Home
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_"Igniculus_Desiderii"
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Is_It_That_In_Some_Brighter_Sphere
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Love_The_Universe_To-Day
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Miltons_Spirit
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_My_Head_Is_Wild_With_Weeping
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_A_Ghost_Story
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_A_Satire_On_Satire
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_A_Sonnet._Farewell_To_North_Devon
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_A_Sonnet_-_To_Harriet
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_The_Elegy_On_The_Death_Of_Adonis
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_The_Elegy_On_The_Death_Of_Bion
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Omens
1.pbs_-_Fragment,_Or_The_Triumph_Of_Conscience
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Rain
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Satan_Broken_Loose
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Of_An_Unfinished_Drama
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Supposed_To_Be_Parts_Of_Otho
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Such_Hope,_As_Is_The_Sick_Despair_Of_Good
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Sufficient_Unto_The_Day
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Supposed_To_Be_An_Epithalamium_Of_Francis_Ravaillac_And_Charlotte_Corday
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Written_For_Hellas
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_The_Lakes_Margin
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_There_Is_A_Warm_And_Gentle_Atmosphere
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_The_Vine-Shroud
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Thoughts_Come_And_Go_In_Solitude
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_To_A_Friend_Released_From_Prison
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_To_Byron
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_To_One_Singing
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_To_The_Moon
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_To_The_People_Of_England
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Wedded_Souls
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_What_Mary_Is_When_She_A_Little_Smiles
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_What_Men_Gain_Fairly
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Ye_Gentle_Visitations_Of_Calm_Thought
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Yes!_All_Is_Past
1.pbs_-_From
1.pbs_-_From_The_Arabic_-_An_Imitation
1.pbs_-_From_the_Arabic,_an_Imitation
1.pbs_-_From_The_Greek_Of_Moschus
1.pbs_-_From_The_Greek_Of_Moschus_-_Pan_Loved_His_Neighbour_Echo
1.pbs_-_From_The_Original_Draft_Of_The_Poem_To_William_Shelley
1.pbs_-_From_Vergils_Fourth_Georgic
1.pbs_-_From_Vergils_Tenth_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Ghasta_Or,_The_Avenging_Demon!!!
1.pbs_-_Ginevra
1.pbs_-_Good-Night
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_HERE_I_sit_with_my_paper
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_Castor_And_Pollux
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_Minerva
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_The_Earth_-_Mother_Of_All
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_The_Moon
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_The_Sun
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_Venus
1.pbs_-_Hymn_of_Apollo
1.pbs_-_Hymn_of_Pan
1.pbs_-_Hymn_to_Intellectual_Beauty
1.pbs_-_Hymn_To_Mercury
1.pbs_-_I_Arise_from_Dreams_of_Thee
1.pbs_-_I_Faint,_I_Perish_With_My_Love!
1.pbs_-_Invocation
1.pbs_-_Invocation_To_Misery
1.pbs_-_I_Stood_Upon_A_Heaven-cleaving_Turret
1.pbs_-_I_Would_Not_Be_A_King
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Letter_To_Maria_Gisborne
1.pbs_-_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Life_Rounded_With_Sleep
1.pbs_-_Lines_--_Far,_Far_Away,_O_Ye
1.pbs_-_Lines_-_That_time_is_dead_for_ever,_child!
1.pbs_-_Lines_-_The_cold_earth_slept_below
1.pbs_-_Lines_To_A_Critic
1.pbs_-_Lines_To_A_Reviewer
1.pbs_-_Lines_-_We_Meet_Not_As_We_Parted
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_Among_The_Euganean_Hills
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_During_The_Castlereagh_Administration
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_in_the_Bay_of_Lerici
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_On_Hearing_The_News_Of_The_Death_Of_Napoleon
1.pbs_-_Love
1.pbs_-_Love-_Hope,_Desire,_And_Fear
1.pbs_-_Loves_Philosophy
1.pbs_-_Loves_Rose
1.pbs_-_Marenghi
1.pbs_-_Mariannes_Dream
1.pbs_-_Matilda_Gathering_Flowers
1.pbs_-_May_The_Limner
1.pbs_-_Melody_To_A_Scene_Of_Former_Times
1.pbs_-_Methought_I_Was_A_Billow_In_The_Crowd
1.pbs_-_Mighty_Eagle
1.pbs_-_Mont_Blanc_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Vale_of_Chamouni
1.pbs_-_Music
1.pbs_-_Music(2)
1.pbs_-_Music_And_Sweet_Poetry
1.pbs_-_Mutability
1.pbs_-_Mutability_-_II.
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Heaven
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Naples
1.pbs_-_Ode_to_the_West_Wind
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_On_A_Faded_Violet
1.pbs_-_On_A_Fete_At_Carlton_House_-_Fragment
1.pbs_-_On_An_Icicle_That_Clung_To_The_Grass_Of_A_Grave
1.pbs_-_On_Death
1.pbs_-_One_sung_of_thee_who_left_the_tale_untold
1.pbs_-_On_Fanny_Godwin
1.pbs_-_On_Keats,_Who_Desired_That_On_His_Tomb_Should_Be_Inscribed--
1.pbs_-_On_Leaving_London_For_Wales
1.pbs_-_On_Robert_Emmets_Grave
1.pbs_-_On_The_Dark_Height_of_Jura
1.pbs_-_On_The_Medusa_Of_Leonardo_da_Vinci_In_The_Florentine_Gallery
1.pbs_-_Orpheus
1.pbs_-_O_That_A_Chariot_Of_Cloud_Were_Mine!
1.pbs_-_Otho
1.pbs_-_O_Thou_Immortal_Deity
1.pbs_-_Ozymandias
1.pbs_-_Passage_Of_The_Apennines
1.pbs_-_Pater_Omnipotens
1.pbs_-_Peter_Bell_The_Third
1.pbs_-_Poetical_Essay
1.pbs_-_Prince_Athanase
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_I.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_II.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_III.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_IV.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_IX.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_V.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VI.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_Vi_(Excerpts)
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VII.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VIII.
1.pbs_-_Remembrance
1.pbs_-_Revenge
1.pbs_-_Rome_And_Nature
1.pbs_-_Rosalind_and_Helen_-_a_Modern_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Saint_Edmonds_Eve
1.pbs_-_Scene_From_Tasso
1.pbs_-_Scenes_From_The_Faust_Of_Goethe
1.pbs_-_Similes_For_Two_Political_Characters_of_1819
1.pbs_-_Sister_Rosa_-_A_Ballad
1.pbs_-_Song
1.pbs_-_Song._Cold,_Cold_Is_The_Blast_When_December_Is_Howling
1.pbs_-_Song._Come_Harriet!_Sweet_Is_The_Hour
1.pbs_-_Song._Despair
1.pbs_-_Song._--_Fierce_Roars_The_Midnight_Storm
1.pbs_-_Song_For_Tasso
1.pbs_-_Song_From_The_Wandering_Jew
1.pbs_-_Song._Hope
1.pbs_-_Song_Of_Proserpine_While_Gathering_Flowers_On_The_Plain_Of_Enna
1.pbs_-_Song._Sorrow
1.pbs_-_Song._To_--_[Harriet]
1.pbs_-_Song._To_[Harriet]
1.pbs_-_Song_To_The_Men_Of_England
1.pbs_-_Song._Translated_From_The_German
1.pbs_-_Song._Translated_From_The_Italian
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_England_in_1819
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_From_The_Italian_Of_Cavalcanti
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_From_The_Italian_Of_Dante
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_Lift_Not_The_Painted_Veil_Which_Those_Who_Live
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_On_Launching_Some_Bottles_Filled_With_Knowledge_Into_The_Bristol_Channel
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_Political_Greatness
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_To_A_Balloon_Laden_With_Knowledge
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_To_Byron
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_--_Ye_Hasten_To_The_Grave!
1.pbs_-_Stanza
1.pbs_-_Stanza_From_A_Translation_Of_The_Marseillaise_Hymn
1.pbs_-_Stanzas._--_April,_1814
1.pbs_-_Stanzas_From_Calderons_Cisma_De_Inglaterra
1.pbs_-_Stanzas_Written_in_Dejection,_Near_Naples
1.pbs_-_Stanza-_Written_At_Bracknell
1.pbs_-_St._Irvynes_Tower
1.pbs_-_Summer_And_Winter
1.pbs_-_The_Aziola
1.pbs_-_The_Birth_Place_of_Pleasure
1.pbs_-_The_Boat_On_The_Serchio
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Cloud
1.pbs_-_The_Cyclops
1.pbs_-_The_Daemon_Of_The_World
1.pbs_-_The_Death_Knell_Is_Ringing
1.pbs_-_The_Deserts_Of_Dim_Sleep
1.pbs_-_The_Devils_Walk._A_Ballad
1.pbs_-_The_Drowned_Lover
1.pbs_-_The_False_Laurel_And_The_True
1.pbs_-_The_First_Canzone_Of_The_Convito
1.pbs_-_The_Fitful_Alternations_of_the_Rain
1.pbs_-_The_Fugitives
1.pbs_-_The_Indian_Serenade
1.pbs_-_The_Irishmans_Song
1.pbs_-_The_Isle
1.pbs_-_The_Magnetic_Lady_To_Her_Patient
1.pbs_-_The_Mask_Of_Anarchy
1.pbs_-_The_Past
1.pbs_-_The_Pine_Forest_Of_The_Cascine_Near_Pisa
1.pbs_-_The_Question
1.pbs_-_The_Retrospect_-_CWM_Elan,_1812
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Rude_Wind_Is_Singing
1.pbs_-_The_Sensitive_Plant
1.pbs_-_The_Sepulchre_Of_Memory
1.pbs_-_The_Solitary
1.pbs_-_The_Spectral_Horseman
1.pbs_-_The_Sunset
1.pbs_-_The_Tower_Of_Famine
1.pbs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Life
1.pbs_-_The_Two_Spirits_-_An_Allegory
1.pbs_-_The_Viewless_And_Invisible_Consequence
1.pbs_-_The_Wandering_Jews_Soliloquy
1.pbs_-_The_Waning_Moon
1.pbs_-_The_Witch_Of_Atlas
1.pbs_-_The_Woodman_And_The_Nightingale
1.pbs_-_The_Worlds_Wanderers
1.pbs_-_The_Zucca
1.pbs_-_Time
1.pbs_-_Time_Long_Past
1.pbs_-_To--
1.pbs_-_To_A_Skylark
1.pbs_-_To_A_Star
1.pbs_-_To_Coleridge
1.pbs_-_To_Constantia
1.pbs_-_To_Constantia-_Singing
1.pbs_-_To_Death
1.pbs_-_To_Edward_Williams
1.pbs_-_To_Emilia_Viviani
1.pbs_-_To_Harriet
1.pbs_-_To_Harriet_--_It_Is_Not_Blasphemy_To_Hope_That_Heaven
1.pbs_-_To_Ianthe
1.pbs_-_To--_I_Fear_Thy_Kisses,_Gentle_Maiden
1.pbs_-_To_Ireland
1.pbs_-_To_Italy
1.pbs_-_To_Jane_-_The_Invitation
1.pbs_-_To_Jane_-_The_Keen_Stars_Were_Twinkling
1.pbs_-_To_Jane_-_The_Recollection
1.pbs_-_To_Mary_-
1.pbs_-_To_Mary_Shelley
1.pbs_-_To_Mary_Shelley_(2)
1.pbs_-_To_Mary_Who_Died_In_This_Opinion
1.pbs_-_To_Mary_Wollstonecraft_Godwin
1.pbs_-_To-morrow
1.pbs_-_To--_Music,_when_soft_voices_die
1.pbs_-_To_Night
1.pbs_-_To--_Oh!_there_are_spirits_of_the_air
1.pbs_-_To--_One_word_is_too_often_profaned
1.pbs_-_To_Sophia_(Miss_Stacey)
1.pbs_-_To_The_Lord_Chancellor
1.pbs_-_To_The_Men_Of_England
1.pbs_-_To_The_Mind_Of_Man
1.pbs_-_To_the_Moon
1.pbs_-_To_The_Moonbeam
1.pbs_-_To_The_Nile
1.pbs_-_To_The_Queen_Of_My_Heart
1.pbs_-_To_The_Republicans_Of_North_America
1.pbs_-_To_William_Shelley
1.pbs_-_To_William_Shelley.
1.pbs_-_To_William_Shelley._Thy_Little_Footsteps_On_The_Sands
1.pbs_-_To_Wordsworth
1.pbs_-_To--_Yet_look_on_me
1.pbs_-_Ugolino
1.pbs_-_Unrisen_Splendour_Of_The_Brightest_Sun
1.pbs_-_Verses_On_A_Cat
1.pbs_-_Wake_The_Serpent_Not
1.pbs_-_War
1.pbs_-_When_A_Lover_Clasps_His_Fairest
1.pbs_-_When_Soft_Winds_And_Sunny_Skies
1.pbs_-_When_The_Lamp_Is_Shattered
1.pbs_-_Wine_Of_The_Fairies
1.pbs_-_With_A_Guitar,_To_Jane
1.pbs_-_Written_At_Bracknell
1.pbs_-_Zephyrus_The_Awakener
A_Secret_Miracle
Averroes_Search
Deutsches_Requiem
Emma_Zunz
Gods_Script
Story_of_the_Warrior_and_the_Captive
The_Theologians
The_Waiting

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
01.07_-_Blaise_Pascal_(1623-1662)
0_1960-11-08
0_1968-11-13
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.15_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Greater_Knowledge
03.05_-_The_Spiritual_Genius_of_India
06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain
10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal
1.01_-_Principles_of_Practical_Psycho_therapy
1.01_-_The_Cycle_of_Society
1.01_-_The_King_of_the_Wood
1.01_-_Who_is_Tara
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Prana
1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA
1.02_-_The_Concept_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher
1.03_-_ON_THE_AFTERWORLDLY
1.03_-_Tara,_Liberator_from_the_Eight_Dangers
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_The_House_Of_The_Lord
1.03_-_The_Two_Negations_2_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Ascetic
1.04_-_Reality_Omnipresent
1.04_-_The_Aims_of_Psycho_therapy
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_Wake-Up_Sermon
1.05_-_Solitude
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_The_Breaking_of_the_Limits
1.06_-_THE_FOUR_GREAT_ERRORS
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_Medicine_and_Psycho_therapy
1.07_-_The_Fire_of_the_New_World
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.09_-_Civilisation_and_Culture
1.09_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Big_Bang
1.09_-_Taras_Ultimate_Nature
1.09_-_The_Pure_Existent
1.10_-_Concentration_-_Its_Practice
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.13_-_The_Divine_Maya
1.14_-_The_Victory_Over_Death
1.15_-_The_Transformed_Being
1.16_-_The_Season_of_Truth
1.18_-_Mind_and_Supermind
1.19_-_The_Curve_of_the_Rational_Age
1.201_-_Socrates
12.04_-_Love_and_Death
1.20_-_The_End_of_the_Curve_of_Reason
1.24_-_Matter
1.25_-_Temporary_Kings
1.28_-_Supermind,_Mind_and_the_Overmind_Maya
1.3.4.01_-_The_Beginning_and_the_End
1.34_-_The_Myth_and_Ritual_of_Attis
1.439
1.72_-_Education
1970_04_01
1f.lovecraft_-_A_Reminiscence_of_Dr._Samuel_Johnson
1f.lovecraft_-_Ashes
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Azathoth
1f.lovecraft_-_Beyond_the_Wall_of_Sleep
1f.lovecraft_-_Celephais
1f.lovecraft_-_Collapsing_Cosmoses
1f.lovecraft_-_Cool_Air
1f.lovecraft_-_Dagon
1f.lovecraft_-_Deaf,_Dumb,_and_Blind
1f.lovecraft_-_Discarded_Draft_of
1f.lovecraft_-_Ex_Oblivione
1f.lovecraft_-_Facts_concerning_the_Late
1f.lovecraft_-_From_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_He
1f.lovecraft_-_Herbert_West-Reanimator
1f.lovecraft_-_H.P._Lovecrafts
1f.lovecraft_-_Hypnos
1f.lovecraft_-_Ibid
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Vault
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Walls_of_Eryx
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_Memory
1f.lovecraft_-_Nyarlathotep
1f.lovecraft_-_Old_Bugs
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_Pickmans_Model
1f.lovecraft_-_Poetry_and_the_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_Polaris
1f.lovecraft_-_Sweet_Ermengarde
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Battle_that_Ended_the_Century
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Beast_in_the_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Book
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Cats_of_Ulthar
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Challenge_from_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Colour_out_of_Space
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Crawling_Chaos
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Curse_of_Yig
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Descendant
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Diary_of_Alonzo_Typer
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Disinterment
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Doom_That_Came_to_Sarnath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Electric_Executioner
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Evil_Clergyman
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Festival
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Ghost-Eater
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Green_Meadow
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Haunter_of_the_Dark
1f.lovecraft_-_The_History_of_the_Necronomicon
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hoard_of_the_Wizard-Beast
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Martins_Beach
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Burying-Ground
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Museum
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Little_Glass_Bottle
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Loved_Dead
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Lurking_Fear
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Man_of_Stone
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Moon-Bog
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Music_of_Erich_Zann
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mysterious_Ship
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mystery_of_the_Grave-Yard
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Night_Ocean
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Other_Gods
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Picture_in_the_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Quest_of_Iranon
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Rats_in_the_Walls
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Secret_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Slaying_of_the_Monster
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Statement_of_Randolph_Carter
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Strange_High_House_in_the_Mist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Street
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Temple
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Terrible_Old_Man
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Thing_on_the_Doorstep
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tomb
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Transition_of_Juan_Romero
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree_on_the_Hill
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Unnamable
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Very_Old_Folk
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_The_White_Ship
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_Till_A_the_Seas
1f.lovecraft_-_Two_Black_Bottles
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1f.lovecraft_-_What_the_Moon_Brings
1f.lovecraft_-_Winged_Death
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jlb_-_The_Other_Tiger
1.pbs_-_A_Bridal_Song
1.pbs_-_A_Dialogue
1.pbs_-_A_Dirge
1.pbs_-_Adonais_-_An_elegy_on_the_Death_of_John_Keats
1.pbs_-_A_Fragment_-_To_Music
1.pbs_-_A_Hate-Song
1.pbs_-_A_Lament
1.pbs_-_Alas!_This_Is_Not_What_I_Thought_Life_Was
1.pbs_-_Alastor_-_or,_the_Spirit_of_Solitude
1.pbs_-_An_Allegory
1.pbs_-_And_like_a_Dying_Lady,_Lean_and_Pale
1.pbs_-_And_That_I_Walk_Thus_Proudly_Crowned_Withal
1.pbs_-_A_New_National_Anthem
1.pbs_-_An_Exhortation
1.pbs_-_An_Ode,_Written_October,_1819,_Before_The_Spaniards_Had_Recovered_Their_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Another_Fragment_to_Music
1.pbs_-_Archys_Song_From_Charles_The_First_(A_Widow_Bird_Sate_Mourning_For_Her_Love)
1.pbs_-_Arethusa
1.pbs_-_A_Romans_Chamber
1.pbs_-_Art_Thou_Pale_For_Weariness
1.pbs_-_A_Serpent-Face
1.pbs_-_Asia_-_From_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_A_Summer_Evening_Churchyard_-_Lechlade,_Gloucestershire
1.pbs_-_A_Tale_Of_Society_As_It_Is_-_From_Facts,_1811
1.pbs_-_Autumn_-_A_Dirge
1.pbs_-_A_Vision_Of_The_Sea
1.pbs_-_A_Widow_Bird_Sate_Mourning_For_Her_Love
1.pbs_-_Beautys_Halo
1.pbs_-_Bereavement
1.pbs_-_Bigotrys_Victim
1.pbs_-_Catalan
1.pbs_-_Charles_The_First
1.pbs_-_Chorus_from_Hellas
1.pbs_-_Dark_Spirit_of_the_Desart_Rude
1.pbs_-_Death
1.pbs_-_Death_In_Life
1.pbs_-_Death_Is_Here_And_Death_Is_There
1.pbs_-_Despair
1.pbs_-_Dirge_For_The_Year
1.pbs_-_English_translationItalian
1.pbs_-_Epigram_III_-_Spirit_of_Plato
1.pbs_-_Epigram_II_-_Kissing_Helena
1.pbs_-_Epigram_I_-_To_Stella
1.pbs_-_Epigram_IV_-_Circumstance
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_(Excerpt)
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_-_Passages_Of_The_Poem,_Or_Connected_Therewith
1.pbs_-_Epitaph
1.pbs_-_Epithalamium
1.pbs_-_Epithalamium_-_Another_Version
1.pbs_-_Evening_-_Ponte_Al_Mare,_Pisa
1.pbs_-_Evening._To_Harriet
1.pbs_-_Eyes_-_A_Fragment
1.pbs_-_Faint_With_Love,_The_Lady_Of_The_South
1.pbs_-_Feelings_Of_A_Republican_On_The_Fall_Of_Bonaparte
1.pbs_-_Fiordispina
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_A_Gentle_Story_Of_Two_Lovers_Young
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_"Amor_Aeternus"
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Apostrophe_To_Silence
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_A_Wanderer
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Follow_To_The_Deep_Woods_Weeds
1.pbs_-_Fragment_From_The_Wandering_Jew
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Great_Spirit
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Home
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_"Igniculus_Desiderii"
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Is_It_That_In_Some_Brighter_Sphere
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Love_The_Universe_To-Day
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Miltons_Spirit
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_My_Head_Is_Wild_With_Weeping
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_A_Ghost_Story
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_A_Satire_On_Satire
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_A_Sonnet._Farewell_To_North_Devon
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_A_Sonnet_-_To_Harriet
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_The_Elegy_On_The_Death_Of_Adonis
1.pbs_-_Fragment_Of_The_Elegy_On_The_Death_Of_Bion
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Omens
1.pbs_-_Fragment,_Or_The_Triumph_Of_Conscience
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Rain
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Satan_Broken_Loose
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Of_An_Unfinished_Drama
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Supposed_To_Be_Parts_Of_Otho
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Such_Hope,_As_Is_The_Sick_Despair_Of_Good
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Sufficient_Unto_The_Day
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Supposed_To_Be_An_Epithalamium_Of_Francis_Ravaillac_And_Charlotte_Corday
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Written_For_Hellas
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_The_Lakes_Margin
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_There_Is_A_Warm_And_Gentle_Atmosphere
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_The_Vine-Shroud
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Thoughts_Come_And_Go_In_Solitude
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_To_A_Friend_Released_From_Prison
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_To_Byron
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_To_One_Singing
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_To_The_Moon
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_To_The_People_Of_England
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Wedded_Souls
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_What_Mary_Is_When_She_A_Little_Smiles
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_What_Men_Gain_Fairly
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Ye_Gentle_Visitations_Of_Calm_Thought
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Yes!_All_Is_Past
1.pbs_-_From
1.pbs_-_From_The_Arabic_-_An_Imitation
1.pbs_-_From_the_Arabic,_an_Imitation
1.pbs_-_From_The_Greek_Of_Moschus
1.pbs_-_From_The_Greek_Of_Moschus_-_Pan_Loved_His_Neighbour_Echo
1.pbs_-_From_The_Original_Draft_Of_The_Poem_To_William_Shelley
1.pbs_-_From_Vergils_Fourth_Georgic
1.pbs_-_From_Vergils_Tenth_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Ghasta_Or,_The_Avenging_Demon!!!
1.pbs_-_Ginevra
1.pbs_-_Good-Night
1.pbs_-_Hellas_-_A_Lyrical_Drama
1.pbs_-_HERE_I_sit_with_my_paper
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_Castor_And_Pollux
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_Minerva
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_The_Earth_-_Mother_Of_All
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_The_Moon
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_The_Sun
1.pbs_-_Homers_Hymn_To_Venus
1.pbs_-_Hymn_of_Apollo
1.pbs_-_Hymn_of_Pan
1.pbs_-_Hymn_to_Intellectual_Beauty
1.pbs_-_Hymn_To_Mercury
1.pbs_-_I_Arise_from_Dreams_of_Thee
1.pbs_-_I_Faint,_I_Perish_With_My_Love!
1.pbs_-_Invocation
1.pbs_-_Invocation_To_Misery
1.pbs_-_I_Stood_Upon_A_Heaven-cleaving_Turret
1.pbs_-_I_Would_Not_Be_A_King
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Letter_To_Maria_Gisborne
1.pbs_-_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Life_Rounded_With_Sleep
1.pbs_-_Lines_--_Far,_Far_Away,_O_Ye
1.pbs_-_Lines_-_That_time_is_dead_for_ever,_child!
1.pbs_-_Lines_-_The_cold_earth_slept_below
1.pbs_-_Lines_To_A_Critic
1.pbs_-_Lines_To_A_Reviewer
1.pbs_-_Lines_-_We_Meet_Not_As_We_Parted
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_Among_The_Euganean_Hills
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_During_The_Castlereagh_Administration
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_in_the_Bay_of_Lerici
1.pbs_-_Lines_Written_On_Hearing_The_News_Of_The_Death_Of_Napoleon
1.pbs_-_Love
1.pbs_-_Love-_Hope,_Desire,_And_Fear
1.pbs_-_Loves_Philosophy
1.pbs_-_Loves_Rose
1.pbs_-_Marenghi
1.pbs_-_Mariannes_Dream
1.pbs_-_Matilda_Gathering_Flowers
1.pbs_-_May_The_Limner
1.pbs_-_Melody_To_A_Scene_Of_Former_Times
1.pbs_-_Methought_I_Was_A_Billow_In_The_Crowd
1.pbs_-_Mighty_Eagle
1.pbs_-_Mont_Blanc_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Vale_of_Chamouni
1.pbs_-_Music
1.pbs_-_Music(2)
1.pbs_-_Music_And_Sweet_Poetry
1.pbs_-_Mutability
1.pbs_-_Mutability_-_II.
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Heaven
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Naples
1.pbs_-_Ode_to_the_West_Wind
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_On_A_Faded_Violet
1.pbs_-_On_A_Fete_At_Carlton_House_-_Fragment
1.pbs_-_On_An_Icicle_That_Clung_To_The_Grass_Of_A_Grave
1.pbs_-_On_Death
1.pbs_-_One_sung_of_thee_who_left_the_tale_untold
1.pbs_-_On_Fanny_Godwin
1.pbs_-_On_Keats,_Who_Desired_That_On_His_Tomb_Should_Be_Inscribed--
1.pbs_-_On_Leaving_London_For_Wales
1.pbs_-_On_Robert_Emmets_Grave
1.pbs_-_On_The_Dark_Height_of_Jura
1.pbs_-_On_The_Medusa_Of_Leonardo_da_Vinci_In_The_Florentine_Gallery
1.pbs_-_Orpheus
1.pbs_-_O_That_A_Chariot_Of_Cloud_Were_Mine!
1.pbs_-_Otho
1.pbs_-_O_Thou_Immortal_Deity
1.pbs_-_Ozymandias
1.pbs_-_Passage_Of_The_Apennines
1.pbs_-_Pater_Omnipotens
1.pbs_-_Peter_Bell_The_Third
1.pbs_-_Poetical_Essay
1.pbs_-_Prince_Athanase
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_I.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_II.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_III.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_IV.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_IX.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_V.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VI.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_Vi_(Excerpts)
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VII.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_VIII.
1.pbs_-_Remembrance
1.pbs_-_Revenge
1.pbs_-_Rome_And_Nature
1.pbs_-_Rosalind_and_Helen_-_a_Modern_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Saint_Edmonds_Eve
1.pbs_-_Scene_From_Tasso
1.pbs_-_Scenes_From_The_Faust_Of_Goethe
1.pbs_-_Similes_For_Two_Political_Characters_of_1819
1.pbs_-_Sister_Rosa_-_A_Ballad
1.pbs_-_Song
1.pbs_-_Song._Cold,_Cold_Is_The_Blast_When_December_Is_Howling
1.pbs_-_Song._Come_Harriet!_Sweet_Is_The_Hour
1.pbs_-_Song._Despair
1.pbs_-_Song._--_Fierce_Roars_The_Midnight_Storm
1.pbs_-_Song_For_Tasso
1.pbs_-_Song_From_The_Wandering_Jew
1.pbs_-_Song._Hope
1.pbs_-_Song_Of_Proserpine_While_Gathering_Flowers_On_The_Plain_Of_Enna
1.pbs_-_Song._Sorrow
1.pbs_-_Song._To_--_[Harriet]
1.pbs_-_Song._To_[Harriet]
1.pbs_-_Song_To_The_Men_Of_England
1.pbs_-_Song._Translated_From_The_German
1.pbs_-_Song._Translated_From_The_Italian
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_England_in_1819
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_From_The_Italian_Of_Cavalcanti
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_From_The_Italian_Of_Dante
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_Lift_Not_The_Painted_Veil_Which_Those_Who_Live
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_On_Launching_Some_Bottles_Filled_With_Knowledge_Into_The_Bristol_Channel
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_Political_Greatness
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_-_To_A_Balloon_Laden_With_Knowledge
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_To_Byron
1.pbs_-_Sonnet_--_Ye_Hasten_To_The_Grave!
1.pbs_-_Stanza
1.pbs_-_Stanza_From_A_Translation_Of_The_Marseillaise_Hymn
1.pbs_-_Stanzas._--_April,_1814
1.pbs_-_Stanzas_From_Calderons_Cisma_De_Inglaterra
1.pbs_-_Stanzas_Written_in_Dejection,_Near_Naples
1.pbs_-_Stanza-_Written_At_Bracknell
1.pbs_-_St._Irvynes_Tower
1.pbs_-_Summer_And_Winter
1.pbs_-_The_Aziola
1.pbs_-_The_Birth_Place_of_Pleasure
1.pbs_-_The_Boat_On_The_Serchio
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Cloud
1.pbs_-_The_Cyclops
1.pbs_-_The_Daemon_Of_The_World
1.pbs_-_The_Death_Knell_Is_Ringing
1.pbs_-_The_Deserts_Of_Dim_Sleep
1.pbs_-_The_Devils_Walk._A_Ballad
1.pbs_-_The_Drowned_Lover
1.pbs_-_The_False_Laurel_And_The_True
1.pbs_-_The_First_Canzone_Of_The_Convito
1.pbs_-_The_Fitful_Alternations_of_the_Rain
1.pbs_-_The_Fugitives
1.pbs_-_The_Indian_Serenade
1.pbs_-_The_Irishmans_Song
1.pbs_-_The_Isle
1.pbs_-_The_Magnetic_Lady_To_Her_Patient
1.pbs_-_The_Mask_Of_Anarchy
1.pbs_-_The_Past
1.pbs_-_The_Pine_Forest_Of_The_Cascine_Near_Pisa
1.pbs_-_The_Question
1.pbs_-_The_Retrospect_-_CWM_Elan,_1812
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Rude_Wind_Is_Singing
1.pbs_-_The_Sensitive_Plant
1.pbs_-_The_Sepulchre_Of_Memory
1.pbs_-_The_Solitary
1.pbs_-_The_Spectral_Horseman
1.pbs_-_The_Sunset
1.pbs_-_The_Tower_Of_Famine
1.pbs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Life
1.pbs_-_The_Two_Spirits_-_An_Allegory
1.pbs_-_The_Viewless_And_Invisible_Consequence
1.pbs_-_The_Wandering_Jews_Soliloquy
1.pbs_-_The_Waning_Moon
1.pbs_-_The_Witch_Of_Atlas
1.pbs_-_The_Woodman_And_The_Nightingale
1.pbs_-_The_Worlds_Wanderers
1.pbs_-_The_Zucca
1.pbs_-_Time
1.pbs_-_Time_Long_Past
1.pbs_-_To--
1.pbs_-_To_A_Skylark
1.pbs_-_To_A_Star
1.pbs_-_To_Coleridge
1.pbs_-_To_Constantia
1.pbs_-_To_Constantia-_Singing
1.pbs_-_To_Death
1.pbs_-_To_Edward_Williams
1.pbs_-_To_Emilia_Viviani
1.pbs_-_To_Harriet
1.pbs_-_To_Harriet_--_It_Is_Not_Blasphemy_To_Hope_That_Heaven
1.pbs_-_To_Ianthe
1.pbs_-_To--_I_Fear_Thy_Kisses,_Gentle_Maiden
1.pbs_-_To_Ireland
1.pbs_-_To_Italy
1.pbs_-_To_Jane_-_The_Invitation
1.pbs_-_To_Jane_-_The_Keen_Stars_Were_Twinkling
1.pbs_-_To_Jane_-_The_Recollection
1.pbs_-_To_Mary_-
1.pbs_-_To_Mary_Shelley
1.pbs_-_To_Mary_Shelley_(2)
1.pbs_-_To_Mary_Who_Died_In_This_Opinion
1.pbs_-_To_Mary_Wollstonecraft_Godwin
1.pbs_-_To-morrow
1.pbs_-_To--_Music,_when_soft_voices_die
1.pbs_-_To_Night
1.pbs_-_To--_Oh!_there_are_spirits_of_the_air
1.pbs_-_To--_One_word_is_too_often_profaned
1.pbs_-_To_Sophia_(Miss_Stacey)
1.pbs_-_To_The_Lord_Chancellor
1.pbs_-_To_The_Men_Of_England
1.pbs_-_To_The_Mind_Of_Man
1.pbs_-_To_the_Moon
1.pbs_-_To_The_Moonbeam
1.pbs_-_To_The_Nile
1.pbs_-_To_The_Queen_Of_My_Heart
1.pbs_-_To_The_Republicans_Of_North_America
1.pbs_-_To_William_Shelley
1.pbs_-_To_William_Shelley.
1.pbs_-_To_William_Shelley._Thy_Little_Footsteps_On_The_Sands
1.pbs_-_To_Wordsworth
1.pbs_-_To--_Yet_look_on_me
1.pbs_-_Ugolino
1.pbs_-_Unrisen_Splendour_Of_The_Brightest_Sun
1.pbs_-_Verses_On_A_Cat
1.pbs_-_Wake_The_Serpent_Not
1.pbs_-_War
1.pbs_-_When_A_Lover_Clasps_His_Fairest
1.pbs_-_When_Soft_Winds_And_Sunny_Skies
1.pbs_-_When_The_Lamp_Is_Shattered
1.pbs_-_Wine_Of_The_Fairies
1.pbs_-_With_A_Guitar,_To_Jane
1.pbs_-_Written_At_Bracknell
1.pbs_-_Zephyrus_The_Awakener
1.poe_-_Elizabeth
1.rb_-_Cleon
1.ww_-_0-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons_-_Dedication
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Book_Fifth-Books
1.ww_-_Book_Sixth_[Cambridge_and_the_Alps]
1.ww_-_Book_Tenth_{Residence_in_France_continued]
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_V-_Book_Fouth-_Despondency_Corrected
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_VII-_Book_Sixth-_The_Churchyard_Among_the_Mountains
1.ww_-_The_Fary_Chasm
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
1.ww_-_Vaudracour_And_Julia
2.01_-_The_Object_of_Knowledge
2.03_-_The_Eternal_and_the_Individual
2.04_-_On_Art
2.04_-_The_Divine_and_the_Undivine
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.05_-_The_Cosmic_Illusion;_Mind,_Dream_and_Hallucination
2.06_-_Reality_and_the_Cosmic_Illusion
2.06_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Disciplines_of_Knowledge
2.07_-_The_Supreme_Word_of_the_Gita
2.09_-_Memory,_Ego_and_Self-Experience
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.01_-_God_The_One_Reality
2.13_-_Exclusive_Concentration_of_Consciousness-Force_and_the_Ignorance
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.14_-_The_Origin_and_Remedy_of_Falsehood,_Error,_Wrong_and_Evil
2.18_-_January_1939
2.20_-_The_Lower_Triple_Purusha
2.21_-_The_Order_of_the_Worlds
2.22_-_Vijnana_or_Gnosis
2.25_-_List_of_Topics_in_Each_Talk
3.00.2_-_Introduction
3.03_-_The_Naked_Truth
3.05_-_The_Divine_Personality
31.06_-_Jagadish_Chandra_Bose
3.1.15_-_Rebirth
3.2.03_-_Conservation_and_Progress
3.2.04_-_The_Conservative_Mind_and_Eastern_Progress
3.4.1.05_-_Fiction-Writing_and_Sadhana
3-5_Full_Circle
3.7.1.01_-_Rebirth
4.3_-_Bhakti
5.03_-_The_Divine_Body
5.4.01_-_Notes_on_Root-Sounds
Aeneid
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
A_Secret_Miracle
Avatars_of_the_Tortoise
Averroes_Search
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
BOOK_IX._-_Of_those_who_allege_a_distinction_among_demons,_some_being_good_and_others_evil
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_VII._-_Of_the_select_gods_of_the_civil_theology,_and_that_eternal_life_is_not_obtained_by_worshipping_them
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
COSA_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_III
COSA_-_BOOK_IV
COSA_-_BOOK_VI
Deutsches_Requiem
DS3
DS4
Emma_Zunz
ENNEAD_02.04a_-_Of_Matter.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Gods_Script
Gorgias
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
MoM_References
Partial_Magic_in_the_Quixote
Phaedo
r1914_11_04
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Story_of_the_Warrior_and_the_Captive
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Talks_026-050
Talks_500-550
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Fearful_Sphere_of_Pascal
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_1
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_2
The_Immortal
The_Library_Of_Babel_2
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Lottery_in_Babylon
The_One_Who_Walks_Away
The_Theologians
The_Waiting
Timaeus
Ultima_Thule_-_Dedication_to_G._W._G.

PRIMARY CLASS

Genre
subject
SIMILAR TITLES
Collected Fictions
Fiction
fictional characters
fictional place
Science Fiction
Selected Non-Fictions
Theological Fiction

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Fictionism: An extreme form of pragmatism or instrumentalism according to which the basic concepts and principles of natural science, mathematics, philosophy, ethics, religion and jurisprudence are pure fictions which, though lacking objective truth, are useful instruments of action. The theory is advanced under the influence of Kant, by the German philosopher H. Vaihinger in his Philosophie des Als Ob, 1911. Philosophv of the "As If." English translation by C. K. Ogden.) See Fiction, Construction. -- L. W.

Fiction: Whenever a symbol, as part of an utterance, occurs in such a context that the truth of any utterance of the same form would normally guarantee the existence of an individual denoted by that symbol, whereas in the case considered no such implication holds, the symbol may be said to occur fictitiously in that context. Thus in the utterance "The average man is six feet tall" the phrase "the average man" occurs fictitiously. For "X is less thin six feet tall" normally implies that there is an individual denoted by "X". But there is no individual denoted by "the average man".

fictional ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or characterized by, fiction; fictitious; romantic.

fictional character: An imaginary person represented in a work of fiction (play or film or story).

fictional The Revolt of the Angels. Here Abdiel is

fiction ::: an imaginative creation or a pretence that does not represent actuality but has been invented; made-up. fictions.

fiction, he serves as archdeacon to Bishop Broug¬

fictionist ::: n. --> A writer of fiction.

fiction ::: n. --> The act of feigning, inventing, or imagining; as, by a mere fiction of the mind.
That which is feigned, invented, or imagined; especially, a feigned or invented story, whether oral or written. Hence: A story told in order to deceive; a fabrication; -- opposed to fact, or reality.
Fictitious literature; comprehensively, all works of imagination; specifically, novels and romances.


FICTIONS Mental fictions include all fancies, freaks, guesses, suppositions, assumptions, etc., as well as the hypotheses and theories of science, all being mental constructions that do not have all the facts put in their correct contexts. K 2.18.3

The content even of .lite thinking is for the most part made up of fictions
(conceptions without real correspondences), due to lack of facts about existence. It is only the facts of esoterics that make it possible to think in accordance with reality. K 1.20.7


fiction: This term refers to a story devised by a writer, using their imagination. Fiction usually contains little or no truth.


TERMS ANYWHERE

(9) An assertion, belief, hypothesis, assumption, postulation, or attitude favoring any of the above propositions, practices, methods, or methodologies; or an attitude of dependence upon sense rather than intellect, or an insistence upon fact as against fiction, fancy, or interpretation of fact (supposing fact and interpretation separable); or an attitude favorable to application of scientific attitude or method to inquiry, or a temperament close to common sense and practicality; or a "tough-minded" temperament or attitude involving considerable disillusionment and holding facts (q.v.) worthy of utmost intellectual respect; or a tendency to rely on things' being as they appear.

9PAC "tool" 709 PACkage. A {report generator} for the {IBM 7090}, developed in 1959. [Sammet 1969, p.314. "IBM 7090 Prog Sys, SHARE 7090 9PAC Part I: Intro and Gen Princs", IBM J28-6166, White Plains, 1961]. (1995-02-07):-) {emoticon}; {semicolon}" {less than}"g" "chat" grin. An alternative to {smiley}. [{Jargon File}] (1998-01-18)"gr&d" "chat" Grinning, running and ducking. See {emoticon}. (1995-03-17)= {equals}" {greater than}? {question mark}?? "programming" A {Perl} quote-like {operator} used to delimit a {regular expression} (RE) like "?FOO?" that matches FOO at most once. The normal "/FOO/" form of regular expression will match FOO any number of times. The "??" operator will match again after a call to the "reset" operator. The operator is usually referred to as "??" but, taken literally, an empty RE like this (or "//") actually means to re-use the last successfully matched regular expression or, if there was none, empty string (which will always match). {Unix manual page}: perlop(1). (2009-05-28)@ {commercial at}@-party "event, history" /at'par-tee/ (Or "@-sign party") An antiquated term for a gathering of {hackers} at a science-fiction convention (especially the annual Worldcon) to which only people who had an {electronic mail address} were admitted. The term refers to the {commercial at} symbol, "@", in an e-mail address and dates back to the era when having an e-mail address was a distinguishing characteristic of the select few who worked with computers. Compare {boink}. [{Jargon File}] (2012-11-17)@Begin "text" The {Scribe} equivalent of {\begin}. [{Jargon File}] (2014-11-06)@stake "security, software" A computer security development group and consultancy dedicated to researching and documenting security flaws that exist in {operating systems}, {network} {protocols}, or software. @stake publishes information about security flaws through advisories, research reports, and tools. They release the information and tools to help system administrators, users, and software and hardware vendors better secure their systems. L0pht merged with @stake in January 2000. {@stake home (http://atstake.com/research/redirect.html)}. (2003-06-12)@XX "programming" 1. Part of the syntax of a {decorated name}, as used internally by {Microsoft}'s {Visual C} or {Visual C++} {compilers}. 2. The name of an example {instance variable} in the {Ruby} {programming language}. (2018-08-24)[incr Tcl] "language" An extension of {Tcl} that adds {classes} and {inheritence}. The name is a pun on {C++} - an {object-oriented} extension of {C} - [incr variable] is the Tcl {syntax} for adding one to a variable. [Origin? Availability?] (1998-11-27)\ {backslash}\begin "text, chat" The {LaTeX} command used with \end to delimit an environment within which the text is formatted in a certain way. E.g. \begin{table}...\end{table}. Used humorously in writing to indicate a context or to remark on the surrounded text. For example: \begin{flame} Predicate logic is the only good programming language. Anyone who would use anything else is an idiot. Also, all computers should be tredecimal instead of binary. \end{flame} {Scribe} users at {CMU} and elsewhere used to use @Begin/@End in an identical way (LaTeX was built to resemble Scribe). On {Usenet}, this construct would more frequently be rendered as ""FLAME ON"" and ""FLAME OFF"" (a la {HTML}), or "

abolitionist literature: Texts such as Literature, poetry, pamphlets, or propagandawhich had been written with the purpose of criticising those who owned slaves and encouraged slave owners to give freedom to their slaves. The main aim of this type of writing was to canvas support for the abolition of slavery. The writing may be in the form of autobiographical writings (in the case of many slave narratives) or fictional accounts such as Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin. These texts often rely heavily on pathos for rhetorica ltechnique.

Adossia (fictional)—a supervising archangel in

Alaciel (fictional) [Nectaire]

Als Ob: (Ger. as if) Fictional; hypothetical; postulated; pragmatic. The term was given currency by Hans Vaihinger's Die Philosophic des Als Ob (1911), which developed the thesis that our knowledge rests on a network of artfully contrived fictions which are not verifiable but pragmatically justifiable. While such fictions, employed in all fields of human knowledge and endeavor, deliberately falsify or circumvent the stream of immediate impressions, they greatly enhance reality. -- O.F.K.

IDEAS OF THE CAUSAL WORLD
The ideas of the world of ideas are objective forms as well as being subjective, and thus the ideas are faithful representations of enduring objective and subjective realities. Every intuition corresponds to a mental system of reality ideas. Lower worlds exist in the ideas of the world of ideas and thus the knowledge of these lower worlds is contained in the idea systems of the intuitions. &


Angel of the Odd (fictional)—in Edgar Allan

anti-novel: An experimental type of fiction, which intentionally challenges the conventions of the traditional novel. Some possible aspects include alternative beginnings and endings.

Arcade (fictional)—in Anatole France’s Revolt

Artificial general intelligence (AGI) - the intelligence of a (hypothetical) machine that could successfully perform any intellectual task that a human being can. It is a primary goal of artificial intelligence research and an important topic for science fiction writers and futurists. See /r/agi

autobiographical novel: In contrast with the autobiography , an autobiographical novel is a semi-fictional account established in part on the author's life experience, but these experiences are often transposed onto a fictional character or intermixed with fictional events.

Bagdial (fictional)—a corpulent angel in charge

Bentham, Jeremy: (1748-1832) Founder of the English Utilitarian School of Philosophy. In law, he is remembered for his criticism of Blackstone's views of the English constitution, for his examination of the legal fiction and for his treatment of the subject of evidence. In politics, he is most famous for his analysis of the principles of legislation and, in ethics, for his greatest happiness principle. See Hedonic Calculus; Utilitarianism. J. Bentham, Principles of Morals and Legislation, 1789; Outline of a New System of Logic, 1827; Deontology. -- L.E.D.

Fictionism: An extreme form of pragmatism or instrumentalism according to which the basic concepts and principles of natural science, mathematics, philosophy, ethics, religion and jurisprudence are pure fictions which, though lacking objective truth, are useful instruments of action. The theory is advanced under the influence of Kant, by the German philosopher H. Vaihinger in his Philosophie des Als Ob, 1911. Philosophv of the "As If." English translation by C. K. Ogden.) See Fiction, Construction. -- L. W.

Fiction: Whenever a symbol, as part of an utterance, occurs in such a context that the truth of any utterance of the same form would normally guarantee the existence of an individual denoted by that symbol, whereas in the case considered no such implication holds, the symbol may be said to occur fictitiously in that context. Thus in the utterance "The average man is six feet tall" the phrase "the average man" occurs fictitiously. For "X is less thin six feet tall" normally implies that there is an individual denoted by "X". But there is no individual denoted by "the average man".

biography: A non-fictional account of a person's life and character by another person

blackmass ::: Black Mass The Black Mass was a way of lampooning the Catholic Mass, practiced occasionally by wealthy opponents of the Church in the 'Dark Ages'. 'Black Masses' used to be performed by priests to curse enemies, but this practice was condemned by the church. During the witch trials of the Spanish Inquisition, witches were accused of this practice, but it is considered highly unlikely that it was practiced by commoners. So, contrary to popular belief, it is not a standard practice in ancient or modern witchcraft. Similarly, traditional (as opposed to secular) Satanists have been accused of conducting rituals which are specifically aimed at attacking Christian beliefs and practices (particularly the Roman Catholic Church), rituals in which they recite the Lord's Prayer backwards, or desecrate and use the host and wine stolen from a cathedral! This is pure fiction which can be traced back to the Inquisition and to books written during the late Middle Ages and Renaissance periods. Examples of traditional Satanism are extremely rare, and testimonies of 'alleged former Satanists' and Satanic Ritual abuse have long since been discredited. Cleromancy, when all the dominoes have been turned face-down and shuffled, the collection/set of randomised tiles is referred to as the "boneyard". The sitter draws tiles from the boneyard to form his/her spread.

"But the gnosis is not only light, it is force; it is creative knowledge, it is the self-effective truth of the divine Idea. This idea is not creative imagination, not something that constructs in a void, but light and power of eternal substance, truth-light full of truth-force; and it brings out what is latent in being, it does not create a fiction that never was in being.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“But the gnosis is not only light, it is force; it is creative knowledge, it is the self-effective truth of the divine Idea. This idea is not creative imagination, not something that constructs in a void, but light and power of eternal substance, truth-light full of truth-force; and it brings out what is latent in being, it does not create a fiction that never was in being.” The Synthesis of Yoga

called Wormwood. In another piece of fiction—

Carter, Angela: Carter was an English novelist and journalist, born on 7 May 1940. She is best known for her writings on feminism and science fiction. Notable works by Carter include the set of short stories The Bloody Chamber and The Passion of New Eve. She died on 16 February 1992

CAUSAL SELF Monad that has its most important kind of subjective and objective self-consciousness in atomic world 47:1 and molecular world 47:2,3 within the solar system. Causal selves belonging to mankind are at the stage of ideality and have consciousness in 47:2,3, causal selves in the fifth natural kingdom have consciousness in
47:1.

The causal self is able to study all its previous lives as a man, is able independently and quickly to acquire the facts necessary to comprehend all realities in the worlds of man, achieving more in one hour (in 47:1) than the most efficient mental thinker could manage in one hundred years. Fictions are precluded. K 1.20.10

The causal self can ascertain that the esoteric world view and life view agrees with facts in the five worlds of man (47- 49). (K 4.11.8)


Causa sui: Cause of itself; necessary existence. Causa sui conveys both a negative and a positive meaning. Negatively, it signifies that which is from itself (a se), that which does not owe its being to something else; i.e., absolute independence of being, causelessness (God as uncaused). Positively, causa sui means that whose very nature or essence involves existence; i.e., God is the ground of his own being, and regarded as "cause" of his own being, he is, as it were, efficient cause of his own existence (Descartes). Since existence necessarily follows from the very essence of that which is cause of itself, causa sui is defined as that whose nature cannot be conceived as not existing (Spinoza). -- A.G.A.B. Causality: (Lat. causa) The relationship between a cause and its effect. This relationship has been defined as a relation between events, processes, or entities in the same time series, such that   when one occurs, the other necessarily follows (sufficient condition),   when the latter occurs, the former must have preceded (necessary condition),   both conditions a and b prevail (necessary and sufficient condition),   when one occurs under certain conditions, the other necessarily follows (contributory, but not sufficient, condition) ("multiple causality" would be a case involving several causes which are severally contributory and jointly sufficient); the necessity in these cases is neither that of logical implication nor that of coercion; a relation between events, processes, or entities in the same time series such that when one occurs the other invariably follows (invariable antecedence), a relation between events, processes, or entities such that one has the efficacy to produce or alter the other; a relation between events, processes, or entities such that without one the other could not occur, as in the relation between   the material out of which a product is made and the finished product (material cause),   structure or form and the individual embodying it (formal cause),   a goal or purpose (whether supposed to exist in the future as a special kind of entity, outside a time series, or merely as an idea of the pur-poser) and the work fulfilling it (final cause),   a moving force and the process or result of its action (efficient cause); a relation between experienced events, processes, or entities and extra-experiential but either temporal or non-temporal events, processes, or entities upon whose existence the former depend; a relation between a thing and itself when it is dependent upon nothing else for its existence (self-causality); a relation between an event, process, or entity and the reason or explanation for its being; a relation between an idea and an experience whose expectation the idea arouses because of customary association of the two in this sequence; a principle or category introducing into experience one of the aforesaid types of order; this principle may be inherent in the mind, invented by the mind, or derived from experience; it may be an explanatory hypothesis, a postulate, a convenient fiction, or a necessary form of thought. Causality has been conceived to prevail between processes, parts of a continuous process, changing parts of an unchanging whole, objects, events, ideas, or something of one of these types and something of another. When an entity, event, or process is said to follow from another, it may be meant that it must succeed but can be neither contemporaneous with nor prior to the other, that it must either succeed or be contemporaneous with and dependent upon but cannot precede the other, or that one is dependent upon the other but they either are not in the same time series or one is in no time series at all.

con ::: [SF fandom] A science-fiction convention. Not used of other sorts of conventions, such as professional meetings. This term, unlike many others of SF-fan slang, is widely recognised even by hackers who aren't fans. We'd been corresponding on the net for months, then we met face-to-face at a con.[Jargon File]

Construct, Imaginative: (Lat. construere, to build) See Construction, Psychological. Construction: (Lat. constructio, from construere, to build) The mental process of devising imaginative constructs or the products of such constructional activities. A construction, in contrast to an ordinary hypothesis which professes to represent an actual state of affairs, is largely arbitrary and fictional. -- L.W.

Corinne (fictional)—a female angel (so named)

crime novel: The term covers both detective fiction and other kinds of crime stories.

cyberpunk: A genre of science fiction.

dark lady sonnets: A number of sonnets written by Shakespeare (sonnet numbers 127-152) addressing a dark lady (a reference due to her colouring). It is unknown whether she is an actual person, someone Shakespeare knew or a fictional character.

Da Tang Xiyu ji. (J. Dai To Saiiki ki; K. Tae Tang Soyok ki 大唐西域). In Chinese, "The Great Tang Record of [Travels to] the Western Regions"; a travelogue of a pilgrimage to India by the Chinese translator and exegete XUANZANG (600/602-664) written in 646 at the request of the Tang emperor Taizong and edited by the monk Bianji (d. 652). Xuanzang was already a noted Buddhist scholiast in China when he decided to make the dangerous trek from China, through the Central Asian oases, to the Buddhist homeland of India. Xuanzang was especially interested in gaining access to the full range of texts associated with the YOGĀCĀRA school, only a few of which were then currently available in Chinese translation. He left on his journey in 627 and eventually spent fourteen years in India (629-643), where he traveled among many of the Buddhist sacred sites, collected manuscripts of Buddhist materials as yet untranslated into Chinese, and studied Sanskrit texts with various eminent teachers, most notably DHARMAPĀLA'S disciple sĪLABHADRA, who taught at the Buddhist university of NĀLANDĀ. The Da Tang xiyu ji provides a comprehensive overview of the different countries that Xuanzang visited during his travels in India and Central Asia, offering detailed descriptions of the geography, climate, customs, languages, and religious practices of these various countries. Xuanzang paid special attention to the different ways in which the teachings of Buddhism were cultivated in different areas of the Western Regions. The Da Tang xiyou ji thus serves as an indispensible tool in the study of the geography and Buddhist history of these regions. Xuanzang's travelogue was later fictionalized in the narrative Xiyou ji ("Journey to the West"), written c. 1592 during the Ming dynasty and attributed to Wu Cheng'en. The Xiyou ji is one of the greatest of Chinese vernacular novels and is deservedly famous for its fanciful accounts of the exploits of the monk-pilgrim, here called Sanzang (TREPItAKA), and especially of his protector, Monkey. See also CHENG WEISHI LUN.

de-rezz "jargon" /dee-rez'/ (Or "derez") "de-resolve" via the film "Tron". 1. To disappear or dissolve; the image that goes with it is of an object breaking up into raster lines and static and then dissolving. Occasionally used of a person who seems to have suddenly "fuzzed out" mentally rather than physically. Usage: extremely silly, also rare. This verb was actually invented as *fictional* hacker jargon, and adopted in a spirit of irony by real hackers years after the fact. 2. The Macintosh resource decompiler. On a Macintosh, many program structures (including the code itself) are managed in small segments of the program file known as "resources"; "Rez" and "DeRez" are a pair of utilities for compiling and decompiling resource files. Thus, decompiling a resource is "derezzing". Usage: very common. [{Jargon File}]

descriptive writing: This is creative writing, which can be both fictional and non-fictional. Important to creating descriptive writing are the five senses, description,literary devices and abstract language.

detective fiction: Fiction in which the mystery is solved by a detective.

dystopia: The representation of an unpleasant fictional world, which is the opposite of a utopia. Dystopias often project a writer's vision of an ominous future. Notable examples include Huxley's Brave new world and Orwell’s Nineteen eighty-four.

electron model "electronics" A {model} of {semiconductor} behaviour in which {donors} contribute the {charge} of an {electron}, and {acceptors} contribute a space for same, in effect contributing a fictional positive charge of similiar magnitude. Physicists use the {electron model}. Some language theorists consider language and the {electron} to be {models} in themselves. Contrast {hole model}. (1995-10-06)

elvish "character" 1. The Tengwar of Feanor, a table of letterforms resembling the beautiful Celtic half-uncial hand of the "Book of Kells". Invented and described by J.R.R. Tolkien in "The Lord of The Rings" as an orthography for his fictional "elvish" languages, this system (which is both visually and phonetically {elegant}) has long fascinated hackers (who tend to be intrigued by artificial languages in general). It is traditional for graphics printers, plotters, window systems, and the like to support a Feanorian typeface as one of their demo items. By extension, the term might be used for any odd or unreadable typeface produced by a graphics device. 2. The typeface mundanely called "B"ocklin", an art-decoish {display font}. [Why?] [{Jargon File}] (1998-04-28)

EMOTIONAL WORLD Atomic world 48 in the cosmos and solar system, molecular world 48:2-7 in the planets of the solar system. The molecular emotional world can be said to be the particular world of animals where consciousness is concerned. (K
1.11.5)

What one gets to know in the emotional world is not the knowledge of existence, reality, and life. Like the mental world, it is intended to be a sojourn for rest pending a new incarnation. It is only in the physical and causal worlds that man is able to ascertain real facts, not in the emotional and mental worlds. In these worlds one cannot know whether what one sees is nature's enduring reality or not.

In the emotional world one has confirmation of all one&


escape literature: Fiction written with the primary purpose being for the reader to escape from reality.

ESOTERIC HISTORY AFTER 1875 The instrument the planetary hierarchy had chosen for the task of publicizing the knowledge which had been kept secret since Atlantis was H. P. Blavatsky (1831-1891). Blavatsky was enjoined not to give out any esoteric facts without special permission in each individual case. She was not to mention anything about the planetary hierarchy.

The truth, or the knowledge of reality, is only to be given gradually, with sparing facts, to a mankind unprepared to receive it. It is necessary to find connections to established fictions of which people have heard enough for them to believe that they comprehend what it all is about. A new, revolutionary system of ideas would be rejected off hand as a mere fantastic invention. It could not be comprehended, let alone understood, without careful preparation.

The most important reason, which probably only esotericians are able to understand, is the fact of the dynamic energy of ideas.

Once the esoteric knowledge was permitted to be published there was no longer any need of initiation into the old knowledge orders, nobody having been initiated into anyone of them since 1875. Although those initiated in previous incarnations were not given the opportunity to revive all their old knowledge, enough was made known, and besides hinted at, for them to be able to discover the most essential by themselves.

The most important esoteric facts to be found in the works of Sinnett, Judge, and
Hartmann &


ESOTERIC HISTORY BEFORE 1875 Members of this planetary hierarchy incarnated in mankind, eventually to make up what in the esoteric history has been called the &

ESOTERICIAN The esoterician has once and for all left the world of illusions and fictions, which mankind prefers living in, to enter into the world of reality. K 1.43.6

The mystic thinks that man&


extraterritoriality ::: n. --> The state of being beyond the limits of a particular territory
A fiction by which a public minister, though actually in a foreign country, is supposed still to remain within the territory of his own sovereign or nation.


fable ::: n. --> A Feigned story or tale, intended to instruct or amuse; a fictitious narration intended to enforce some useful truth or precept; an apologue. See the Note under Apologue.
The plot, story, or connected series of events, forming the subject of an epic or dramatic poem.
Any story told to excite wonder; common talk; the theme of talk.
Fiction; untruth; falsehood.


fabulize ::: v. i. --> To invent, compose, or relate fables or fictions.

fantasy: Fiction with a large amount of imagination in it.

fictional ::: a. --> Pertaining to, or characterized by, fiction; fictitious; romantic.

fictional character: An imaginary person represented in a work of fiction (play or film or story).

fictional The Revolt of the Angels. Here Abdiel is

fiction ::: an imaginative creation or a pretence that does not represent actuality but has been invented; made-up. fictions.

fiction, he serves as archdeacon to Bishop Broug¬

fictionist ::: n. --> A writer of fiction.

fiction ::: n. --> The act of feigning, inventing, or imagining; as, by a mere fiction of the mind.
That which is feigned, invented, or imagined; especially, a feigned or invented story, whether oral or written. Hence: A story told in order to deceive; a fabrication; -- opposed to fact, or reality.
Fictitious literature; comprehensively, all works of imagination; specifically, novels and romances.


FICTIONS Mental fictions include all fancies, freaks, guesses, suppositions, assumptions, etc., as well as the hypotheses and theories of science, all being mental constructions that do not have all the facts put in their correct contexts. K 2.18.3

The content even of .lite thinking is for the most part made up of fictions
(conceptions without real correspondences), due to lack of facts about existence. It is only the facts of esoterics that make it possible to think in accordance with reality. K 1.20.7


fiction: This term refers to a story devised by a writer, using their imagination. Fiction usually contains little or no truth.

figment ::: n. --> An invention; a fiction; something feigned or imagined.

furnace ::: n. --> An inclosed place in which heat is produced by the combustion of fuel, as for reducing ores or melting metals, for warming a house, for baking pottery, etc.; as, an iron furnace; a hot-air furnace; a glass furnace; a boiler furnace, etc.
A place or time of punishment, affiction, or great trial; severe experience or discipline.
To throw out, or exhale, as from a furnace; also, to put into a furnace.


games "games" "The time you enjoy wasting is not time wasted." -- {Bertrand Russell}. Here are some games-related pages on the {Web}: {Imperial Nomic (http://mit.edu:8001/people/achmed/fascist/)}, {Thoth's games and recreations page (http://cis.ufl.edu/~thoth/library/recreation.html)}, {Games Domain (http://wcl-rs.bham.ac.uk/GamesDomain)}, {Zarf's List of Games on the Web (http://leftfoot.com/games.html)}, {Dave's list of pointers to games resources (http://wcl-rs.bham.ac.uk/~djh/index.html)}, {Collaborative Fiction (http://asylum.cid.com/fiction/fiction.html)}. See also {3DO}, {ADL}, {ADVENT}, {ADVSYS}, {alpha/beta pruning}, {Amiga}, {CHIP-8}, {Core Wars}, {DROOL}, {empire}, {I see no X here.}, {Infocom}, {Inglish}, {initgame}, {life}, {minimax}, {moria}, {mudhead}, {multi-user Dimension}, {nethack}, {ogg}, {plugh}, {rogue}, {SPACEWAR}, {virtual reality}, {wizard mode}, {wumpus}, {xyzzy}, {ZIL}, {zorkmid}. See also {game theory}. (1996-03-03)

genre: A category of literature or film marked by defined shared features orconventions. The three broadest categories of genre are poetry, drama, and fiction. These general genres are often subdivided, for example murder mysteries, westerns, sonnets, lyric poetry, epics and tragedies.

GOOD AND EVIL All good and evil that befalls the individual is his own work, the result of his own application of his limited conception of right and wrong. All reap what they have sown in previous lives and often in the same life. Nothing can happen to the individual which he has not deserved by defying the Law.
K 1.41.19f (K 4.11.3)

Good is all that promotes, evil all that counteracts, consciousness development, individually as well as collectively. To the greatest and the most fatal mistakes that can be made belongs spreading ignorance's emotional illusions and mental fictions, resulting in idiotization. K 3.4.20

For the individual, good is the steps above his level, and particularly the immediately higher step. Evil is the lower, that which is below his level and, usually, in particular degree just the one he has recently left. In this is the subjectivity of the conception of right but not any relativity, which nullifies the necessary opposition between good and evil. P 3.16.10


gripe ::: n. --> A vulture; the griffin.
Grasp; seizure; fast hold; clutch.
That on which the grasp is put; a handle; a grip; as, the gripe of a sword.
A device for grasping or holding anything; a brake to stop a wheel.
Oppression; cruel exaction; affiction; pinching distress; as, the gripe of poverty.


hacker humour ::: A distinctive style of shared intellectual humour found among hackers, having the following marked characteristics:1. Fascination with form-vs.-content jokes, paradoxes, and humour having to do with confusion of metalevels (see meta). One way to make a hacker laugh: hold a red index card in front of him/her with GREEN written on it, or vice-versa (note, however, that this is funny only the first time).2. Elaborate deadpan parodies of large intellectual constructs, such as specifications (see write-only memory), standards documents, language descriptions (see INTERCAL), and even entire scientific theories (see quantum bogodynamics, computron).3. Jokes that involve screwily precise reasoning from bizarre, ludicrous, or just grossly counter-intuitive premises.4. Fascination with puns and wordplay.5. A fondness for apparently mindless humour with subversive currents of intelligence in it - for example, old Warner Brothers and Rocky & Bullwinkle Humour that combines this trait with elements of high camp and slapstick is especially favoured.6. References to the symbol-object antinomies and associated ideas in Zen Buddhism and (less often) Taoism. See has the X nature, Discordianism, zen, ha ha only serious, AI koan.See also filk and retrocomputing. If you have an itchy feeling that all 6 of these traits are really aspects of one thing that is incredibly difficult to traits are also recognizable (though in a less marked form) throughout science-fiction fandom. (1995-12-18)

hacker humour A distinctive style of shared intellectual humour found among hackers, having the following marked characteristics: 1. Fascination with form-vs.-content jokes, paradoxes, and humour having to do with confusion of metalevels (see {meta}). One way to make a hacker laugh: hold a red index card in front of him/her with "GREEN" written on it, or vice-versa (note, however, that this is funny only the first time). 2. Elaborate deadpan parodies of large intellectual constructs, such as specifications (see {write-only memory}), standards documents, language descriptions (see {INTERCAL}), and even entire scientific theories (see {quantum bogodynamics}, {computron}). 3. Jokes that involve screwily precise reasoning from bizarre, ludicrous, or just grossly counter-intuitive premises. 4. Fascination with puns and wordplay. 5. A fondness for apparently mindless humour with subversive currents of intelligence in it - for example, old Warner Brothers and Rocky & Bullwinkle cartoons, the Marx brothers, the early B-52s, and Monty Python's Flying Circus. Humour that combines this trait with elements of high camp and slapstick is especially favoured. 6. References to the symbol-object antinomies and associated ideas in Zen Buddhism and (less often) Taoism. See {has the X nature}, {Discordianism}, {zen}, {ha ha only serious}, {AI koan}. See also {filk} and {retrocomputing}. If you have an itchy feeling that all 6 of these traits are really aspects of one thing that is incredibly difficult to talk about exactly, you are (a) correct and (b) responding like a hacker. These traits are also recognizable (though in a less marked form) throughout {science-fiction fandom}. (1995-12-18)

HAL ::: 1. (computer) HAL 9000, the murdering computer on the spaceship in the science fiction classic 2001, A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clark.HAL is IBM with each letter changed to the one before and there is an unconfirmed rumour that 9000 is the sum of the various IBM computer numbers that denies that HAL's name is supposed to be one step ahead of IBM. It is, rather, short for heuristic algorithm.2. (operating system) Hardware Abstraction Layer. (1995-11-09)

HAL 1. "computer" HAL 9000, the murdering computer on the spaceship in the science fiction classic "2001, A Space Odyssey" by Arthur C. Clark. "HAL" is "{IBM}" with each letter changed to the one before and there is an unconfirmed rumour that 9000 is the sum of the various IBM computer numbers that were in service at the time. However, in the sequel "2010", Clarke emphatically denies that HAL's name is supposed to be "one step ahead of IBM". It is, rather, short for "heuristic algorithm". 2. "operating system" {Hardware Abstraction Layer}. (1995-11-09)

Hariton (fictional)—an archangel who figures

high moby /hi:' mohb'ee/ The high half of a 512K {PDP-10}'s physical address space; the other half was of course the low moby. This usage has been generalised in a way that has outlasted the {PDP-10}; for example, at the 1990 Washington D.C. Area Science Fiction Conclave (Disclave), when a miscommunication resulted in two separate wakes being held in commemoration of the shutdown of MIT's last {ITS} machines, the one on the upper floor was dubbed the "high moby" and the other the "low moby". All parties involved {grok}ked this instantly. See {moby}. [{Jargon File}]

historical novel: A novel where real historical events are featured, with the combination of fictional characters.

Hizo hoyaku. (秘藏寶鑰). In Japanese, "Jeweled Key to the Secret Treasury," a text composed by the Japanese SHINGONSHu monk KuKAI. The Hizo hoyaku is a summary (one-fifth the length) of Kukai's dense magnum opus HIMITSU MANDARA JuJuSHINRON. The title refers metaphorically to the "jeweled key" of the special teachings that will unlock the "secret treasury" that is the buddha-nature (C. FOXING) of all sentient beings. In contrast to the Himitsu mandara jujushinron, the Hizo hoyaku provides far fewer supporting references and introduces a fictional debate between a Confucian official and a Buddhist priest and a set of questions and answers from the Sok Mahayon non.

hole ::: (electronics) The absence of an electron in a semiconductor material. In the electron model, a hole can be thought of as an incomplete outer electron shell in a doping substance. Holes can also be thought of as positive charge carriers; while this is in a sense a fiction, it is a useful abstraction. (1995-10-06)

horror story: A genre of prose fiction that aims to create a sense of fear, disgust, or horror in the reader.

Hugo award: Award for Science fiction works.

Hume's theory that belief is a feeling of vividness attaching to a perception or memory but not to a fiction of the imagination is an example of (a) (An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, § 5 Pt. II). Bain and James Mill represent (b), while W. James represents (c). (The Will to Believe, Etc., 1896). -- L.W.

Huyin Daoji. (J. Koin Dosai; K. Hoŭn Toje 湖隱道濟) (1150-1209). Chinese monk and thaumaturge who is associated with the YANGQI PAI of the LINJI ZONG of CHAN school; he is most commonly known in Chinese as JIGONG (Sire Ji) and sometimes as Jidian (Crazy Ji). A popular subject in vernacular Chinese fiction and plays, it has become difficult to separate the historical Jigong from the legend. Jigong is said to have been a native of Linhai in present-day Zhejiang province. He later visited the Chan master Xiatang Huiyuan (1103-1176), received the full monastic precepts at his monastery of Lingyinsi (present-day Jiangsu province), and became his disciple. After he left Xiatang's side, Jigong is said to have led the life of an itinerant holy man. During this period, Jigong's antinomian behavior, most notably his drinking and meat eating, along with his accomplishments as a trickster and wonderworker, became the subject of popular folklore. His unconventional behavior seems to have led to his ostracism from the SAMGHA. Jigong later moved to the monastery of Jingcisi, where he died in 1209. His teachings are recorded in the Jidian chanshi yulu (first printed in 1569).

hyperfocus: is an intense form of mental concentration or visualisation that focuses consciousness on a narrow subject, or beyond objective reality and onto subjective mental planes, daydreams, concepts, fiction, the imagination, and other objects of the mind.

IDIOTIZATION Substitution of the mental fictions and emotional illusions of ignorance for generally valid, objective perception of reality.

If "S" occurs fictitiously it is customary to say that S is a fictitious entity or a fiction. (The language is unfortunate as falsely suggesting that in such case there is a special kind of entity denoted by S and having the property of being fictitious.)

ILLUSIONIST PHILOSOPHY In each world the monad consciousness apprehends reality totally differently. This is what was originally meant by the saying that all apprehension of reality is maya, or &

imbroglio ::: n. --> An intricate, complicated plot, as of a drama or work of fiction.
A complicated and embarrassing state of things; a serious misunderstanding.


infinity ::: “We see at once that if such an Existence is, it must be, like the Energy, infinite. Neither reason nor experience nor intuition nor imagination bears witness to us of the possibility of a final terminus. All end and beginning presuppose something beyond the end or beginning. An absolute end, an absolute beginning is not only a contradiction in terms, but a contradiction of the essence of things, a violence, a fiction. Infinity imposes itself upon the appearances of the finite by its ineffugable self-existence.” The Life Divine

initgame ::: (games) /in-it'gaym/ [IRC] An IRC version of the venerable trivia game 20 questions, in which one user changes his nick to the initials of a famous Male, American, Alive, Real (as opposed to fictional). Initgame can be surprisingly addictive. See also hing.[Jargon File]

initgame "games" /in-it'gaym/ [IRC] An {IRC} version of the venerable trivia game "20 questions", in which one user changes his {nick} to the initials of a famous person or other named entity, and the others on the channel ask yes or no questions, with the one to guess the person getting to be "it" next. As a courtesy, the one picking the initials starts by providing a 4-letter hint of the form sex, nationality, life-status, reality-status. For example, MAAR means "Male, American, Alive, Real" (as opposed to "fictional"). Initgame can be surprisingly addictive. See also {hing}. [{Jargon File}]

interactive novel: A type of fiction in digital form where the use of hyperlinks can create different aspects of the story.

invention ::: n. --> The act of finding out or inventing; contrivance or construction of that which has not before existed; as, the invention of logarithms; the invention of the art of printing.
That which is invented; an original contrivance or construction; a device; as, this fable was the invention of Esop; that falsehood was her own invention.
Thought; idea.
A fabrication to deceive; a fiction; a forgery; a


kremvax ::: /krem-vaks/ Originally, a fictitious Usenet site at the Kremlin, named like the then large number of Usenet VAXen with names of the form foovax. Kremvax was notion that Usenet might ever penetrate the Iron Curtain seemed so totally absurd at the time.In fact, it was only six years later that the first genuine site in Moscow, demos.su, joined Usenet. Some readers needed convincing that the postings from it frequently in his own postings, and at one point twitted some credulous readers by blandly asserting that he *was* a hoax!Eventually he even arranged to have the domain's gateway site *named* kremvax, thus neatly turning fiction into truth and demonstrating that the hackish sense of humour transcends cultural barriers. Mr. Antonov also contributed some Russian-language material for the Jargon File.In an even more ironic historical footnote, kremvax became an electronic centre of the anti-communist resistance during the bungled hard-line coup of August perestroika made kremvax one of the timeliest means of their outreach to the West.[Jargon File]

kremvax /krem-vaks/ (Or kgbvax) Originally, a fictitious {Usenet} site at the Kremlin, named like the then large number of {Usenet} {VAXen} with names of the form foovax. Kremvax was announced on April 1, 1984 in a posting ostensibly originated there by Soviet leader Konstantin Chernenko. The posting was actually forged by Piet Beertema as an April Fool's joke. Other fictitious sites mentioned in the hoax were moskvax and {kgbvax}. This was probably the funniest of the many April Fool's forgeries perpetrated on {Usenet} (which has negligible security against them), because the notion that {Usenet} might ever penetrate the Iron Curtain seemed so totally absurd at the time. In fact, it was only six years later that the first genuine site in Moscow, demos.su, joined {Usenet}. Some readers needed convincing that the postings from it weren't just another prank. Vadim Antonov, senior programmer at Demos and the major poster from there up to mid-1991, was quite aware of all this, referred to it frequently in his own postings, and at one point twitted some credulous readers by blandly asserting that he *was* a hoax! Eventually he even arranged to have the domain's gateway site *named* kremvax, thus neatly turning fiction into truth and demonstrating that the hackish sense of humour transcends cultural barriers. Mr. Antonov also contributed some Russian-language material for the {Jargon File}. In an even more ironic historical footnote, kremvax became an electronic centre of the anti-communist resistance during the bungled hard-line coup of August 1991. During those three days the Soviet UUCP network centreed on kremvax became the only trustworthy news source for many places within the USSR. Though the sysops were concentrating on internal communications, cross-border postings included immediate transliterations of Boris Yeltsin's decrees condemning the coup and eyewitness reports of the demonstrations in Moscow's streets. In those hours, years of speculation that totalitarianism would prove unable to maintain its grip on politically-loaded information in the age of computer networking were proved devastatingly accurate - and the original kremvax joke became a reality as Yeltsin and the new Russian revolutionaries of "glasnost" and "perestroika" made kremvax one of the timeliest means of their outreach to the West. [{Jargon File}]

Kvikkalkul "language" /kveek`kahl-kool'/ A deliberately cryptic programming language said to have been devised by the Swedish Navy in the 1950s as part of their abortive attempt at a nuclear weapons program. What little is known about it comes from a series of an anonymous posts to {Usenet} in 1994. The poster described the language, saying that he had programmed in Kvikkalkul when he worked for the Swedish Navy in the 1950s. It is an open question whether the posts were a {troll}, a subtle parody or truth stranger than fiction could ever be. Assuming it existed, Kvikkalkul is so much a {bondage-and-discipline language} that it is, in its own ways, even more bizarre than the deliberate parody language {INTERCAL}. Among its notable "features", all symbols in Kvikkalkul, including variable names and program labels, can consist only of digits. Operators consist entirely of the punctuation symbols (, ), -, and :. Kvikkalkul allows no {comments} - they might not correspond with the code. Kvikkalkul's only data type is the signed fixed-point fractional number, i.e. a number between (but not including) -1 and 1. Dealings with the {Real World} that require numbers outside that range are done with functions that notionally map that range to a larger range (e.g., -16383 to -16383) and back. Kvikkalkul had a probabilistic jump operator which, if given a negative probability, would act like a {COME FROM}. This was, sadly, deleted in later versions of the language. {(http://prefect.com/home24/kvikkalkul/)}. (1998-11-14)

Kvikkalkul ::: (language) /kveek`kahl-kool'/ A deliberately cryptic programming language said to have been devised by the Swedish Navy in the 1950s as part of their posts were a troll, a subtle parody or truth stranger than fiction could ever be.Assuming it existed, Kvikkalkul is so much a bondage-and-discipline language that it is, in its own ways, even more bizarre than the deliberate parody jump operator which, if given a negative probability, would act like a COME FROM. This was, sadly, deleted in later versions of the language. . (1998-11-14)

language code "human language, standard" A set of standard names and abbreviations maintained by {ISO} for identifying human languages, natural and invented, past and present. Each language has a list of English and French names and an ISO 639-2 three-letter code. Some also have an ISO 639-1 two-letter code. The list even includes the Klingon language from the Star Trek science fiction series. {Latest list (http://www.loc.gov/standards/iso639-2/php/English_list.php)}. There are also {country codes}. (2006-12-11)

Legal Philosophy: Deals with the philosophic principles of law and justice. The origin is to be found in ancient philosophy. The Greek Sophists criticized existing laws and customs by questioning their validity: All human rules are artificial, created by enactment or convention, as opposed to natural law, based on nature. The theory of a law of nature was further developed by Aristotle and the Stoics. According to the Stoics the natural law is based upon the eternal law of the universe; this itself is an outgrowth of universal reason, as man's mind is an offshoot of the latter. The idea of a law of nature as being innate in man was particularly stressed and popularized by Cicero who identified it with "right reason" and already contrasted it with written law that might be unjust or even tyrannical. Through Saint Augustine these ideas were transmitted to medieval philosophy and by Thomas Aquinas built into his philosophical system. Thomas considers the eternal law the reason existing in the divine mind and controlling the universe. Natural law, innate in man participates in that eternal law. A new impetus was given to Legal Philosophy by the Renaissance. Natural Jurisprudence, properly so-called, originated in the XVII. century. Hugo Grotius, Thomas Hobbes, Benedictus Spinoza, John Locke, Samuel Pufendorf were the most important representatives of that line of thought. Grotius, continuing the Scholastic tradition, particularly stressed the absoluteness of natural hw (it would exist even if God did not exist) and, following Jean Bodin, the sovereignty of the people. The idea of the social contract traced all political bodies back to a voluntary compact by which every individual gave up his right to self-government, or rather transferred it to the government, abandoning a state of nature which according to Hobbes must have been a state of perpetual war. The theory of the social compact more and more accepts the character of a "fiction" or of a regulative idea (Kant). In this sense the theory means that we ought to judge acts of government by their correspondence to the general will (Rousseau) and to the interests of the individuals who by transferring their rights to the commonwealth intended to establish their real liberty. Natural law by putting the emphasis on natural rights, takes on a revolutionary character. It played a part in shaping the bills of rights, the constitutions of the American colonies and of the Union, as well as of the French declaration of the rights of men and of citizens. Natural jurisprudence in the teachings of Christian Wolff and Thomasius undergoes a kind of petrification in the vain attempt to outline an elaborate system of natural law not only in the field of international or public law, but also in the detailed regulations of the law of property, of contract, etc. This sort of dogmatic approach towards the problems of law evoked the opposition of the Historic School (Gustav Hugo and Savigny) which stressed the natural growth of laws ind customs, originating from the mysterious "spirit of the people". On the other hand Immanuel Kant tried to overcome the old natural law by the idea of a "law of reason", meaning an a priori element in all existing or positive law. In his definition of law ("the ensemble of conditions according to which everyone's will may coexist with the will of every other in accordance with a general rule of liberty"), however, as in his legal philosophy in general, he still shares the attitude of the natural law doctrine, confusing positive law with the idea of just law. This is also true of Hegel whose panlogism seemed to lead in this very direction. Under the influence of epistemological positivism (Comte, Mill) in the later half of the nineteenth century, legal philosophy, especially in Germany, confined itself to a "general theory of law". Similarily John Austin in England considered philosophy of law concerned only with positive law, "as it necessarily is", not as it ought to be. Its main task was to analyze certain notions which pervade the science of law (Analytical Jurisprudence). In recent times the same tendency to reduce legal philosophy to logical or at least methodological tasks was further developed in attempting a pure science of law (Kelsen, Roguin). Owing to the influence of Darwinism and natural science in general the evolutionist and biological viewpoint was accepted in legal philosophy: comparative jurisprudence, sociology of law, the Freirecht movement in Germany, the study of the living law, "Realism" in American legal philosophy, all represent a tendency against rationalism. On the other hand there is a revival of older tendencies: Hegelianism, natural law -- especially in Catholic philosophy -- and Kantianism (beginning with Rudolf Stammler). From here other trends arose: the critical attitude leads to relativism (f.i. Gustav Radbruch); the antimetaphysical tendency towards positivism -- though different from epistemological positivism -- and to a pure theory of law. Different schools of recent philosophy have found their applications or repercussions in legal philosophy: Phenomenology, for example, tried to intuit the essences of legal institutions, thus coming back to a formalist position, not too far from the real meaning of analytical jurisprudence. Neo-positivism, though so far not yet explicitly applied to legal philosophy, seems to lead in the same direction. -- W.E.

legend: A story which has been passed down through the generations and is believed to have some historical truth (although legends are fictions).

lie ::: n. --> See Lye.
A falsehood uttered or acted for the purpose of deception; an intentional violation of truth; an untruth spoken with the intention to deceive.
A fiction; a fable; an untruth.
Anything which misleads or disappoints.
The position or way in which anything lies; the lay, as of land or country.


LIFE BETWEEN INCARNATIONS, HUMAN When the individual leaves his worn-out organism with its etheric envelope, he goes on living in his emotional envelope and, when this is dissolved, in his mental envelope, and when this too is dissolved, he waits, asleep in his causal envelope, to be reborn into the physical world which is incomparably the most important, since it is in this world that all human qualities must be acquired, and it is only in this world that he has the possibility of freeing himself from emotional illusions and mental fictions. Life between incarnations is a period of rest in which man does not learn anything new. The more quickly the self can free itself from its incarnation envelopes, the more quickly it develops. K 1.34.25

magic realism: The expression refers to fiction that merges realistic elements with the fantastic. Texts renowned for the use of magic realism include Rushdie'sMidnight's children. Other writers who apply magic realism include Esquival’s Like Water for Chocolate.

Main works: Histoire naturelle de l'ame, 1745; L'homme-machine, 1747; L'homme-plante, 1748; Discours sur le bonheur, 1748; Le systeme d' Epicure, 1750. --R.B.W. Lange, Friedrich Albert: (1828-1875) Celebrated for his History of Materialism, based upon a qualified Kantian point of view, he demonstrated the philosophical limitations of metaphysical materialism, and his appreciation of the value of materialism as a stimulus to critical thinking. He worked for a greater understanding of Kant's work and anticipated fictionalism. -- H.H.

make-believe ::: n. --> A feigning to believe, as in the play of children; a mere pretense; a fiction; an invention. ::: a. --> Feigned; insincere.

Malbushiel (fictional, from “malbush,” cloth-

Man Booker Prize: The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, also known in short as the Booker Prize, is a literary prize awarded each year for the best original full-lengthnovel, written in the English language, by a citizen of either the Commonwealth of Nations, Ireland, or Zimbabwe.

McWilliams, Sandy (fictional)—a bald-

MENTAL LIBERATION FROM EMOTIONALITY During incarnation the emotional and mental envelopes coalesce so as to form, as it were, one single envelope from the functional point of view. Since the emotional is incomparably more developed, it completely dominates the mental. A prerequisite of liberating the mental from the dependence on the emotional is that the coalescence be discontinued. This also results in mental objective consciousness. The method will remain esoteric until mankind has become humanized. Until then, the lowest mental (47:7) can at best dominate the two lowest emotional ones (48:6,7) and the two lowest mental ones (47:6,7) the four lower emotional
(48:4-7). K 6.8.8

From this it follows that only 47:5, perspective thinking, can control the higher emotionality (48:2,3). This explains why the great majority of people have difficulty in discovering the untenability of fictions that appeal to wishful thinking.


mind uploading ::: (application) The science fiction concept of copying one's mind into an artificial body or computer. . (1995-04-10)

mind uploading "application" The science fiction concept of copying one's mind into an artificial body or computer. {Home (http://sunsite.unc.edu/jstrout/uploading/MUHomePage.html)}. (1995-04-10)

Missing definition "introduction" First, this is an (English language) __computing__ dictionary. It includes lots of terms from related fields such as mathematics and electronics, but if you're looking for (or want to submit) words from other subjects or general English words or other languages, try {(http://wikipedia.org/)}, {(http://onelook.com/)}, {(http://yourdictionary.com/)}, {(http://www.dictionarist.com/)} or {(http://reference.allrefer.com/)}. If you've already searched the dictionary for a computing term and it's not here then please __don't tell me__. There are, and always will be, a great many missing terms, no dictionary is ever complete. I use my limited time to process the corrections and definitions people have submitted and to add the {most frequently requested missing terms (missing.html)}. Try one of the sources mentioned above or {(http://techweb.com/encyclopedia/)}, {(http://whatis.techtarget.com/)} or {(http://google.com/)}. See {the Help page (help.html)} for more about missing definitions and bad cross-references. (2014-09-20)! {exclamation mark}!!!Batch "language, humour" A daft way of obfuscating text strings by encoding each character as a different number of {exclamation marks} surrounded by {question marks}, e.g. "d" is encoded as "?!!!!?". The language is named after the {MSDOS} {batch file} in which the first converter was written. {esoteric programming languages} {wiki entry (http://esolangs.org/wiki/!!!Batch)}. (2014-10-25)" {double quote}

moral realism ::: The conjunction of the following three claims: 1) moral judgments express beliefs, 2) these beliefs are either true or false, and 3) therefore objective moral values exist. It contrasts with expressivist or non-cognitivist theories of moral judgment, error theories of moral judgments, fictionalist theories of moral judgment, and constructivist or relativist theories of the nature of moral facts.

munchausenism ::: n. --> An extravagant fiction embodying an account of some marvelous exploit or adventure.

mundane "jargon" Someone outside some group that is implicit from the context, such as the computer industry or science fiction fandom. The implication is that those in the group are special and those outside are just ordinary. (2000-07-22)

mundane ::: (jargon) Someone outside some group that is implicit from the context, such as the computer industry or science fiction fandom. The implication is that those in the group are special and those outside are just ordinary.(2000-07-22)

Myth: (Gr. mythes, legend) The truth, symbolically, or affectively, presented. Originally, the legends of the Gods concerning cosmogonical or cosmological questions. Later, a fiction presented as historically true but lacking factual basis; a popular and traditional falsehood. A presentation of cosmology, employing the affective method of symbolic representation in order to escape from the limitations of literal meaning. -- J.K.F.

Myth, Mythology [from Greek mythos a secret word, secret speech] An occult tale or mystic legend; the modern use varies from an allegorical story to pure fiction. Myths are after all ancient history and are built on facts or on a substratum of fact, as has proved true in the case of Troy and Crete. A symbolic record of archaic truths, universally prevalent among mankind, as in such stories as that of the Ark, which are almost universally discoverable and identical not in detail but in essential underlying features among the most widely sundered peoples. Myths contain the universal keys which can be applied to anything, and preserve undying and essential truths, so that variations of external form are unimportant. Such truths, being preserved in the racial memory of mankind, can always be kept essentially true to standard; and thus this means of handing-on can correct itself.

Nebula award: An award given for Science Fiction and fantasy writers in America.

Necronomicon ::: In the fictional Cthulu Mythos it is a grimoire of dark magic and evocations that drives the story. It also refers to the Simon Necronomicon, which actually exists, and which is an anonymous grimoire inspired by elements of the Cthulu Mythos and Middle Eastern mythology.

Nectaire (fictional)—in Anatole France, Revolt

Nefta (fictional)—an angel (female) loved by

neophilia ::: /neeoh-fil-ee-*/ The trait of being excited and pleased by novelty. Common among most hackers, SF fans, and members of several other connected leading-edge seem to share characteristic hacker tropisms for science fiction, music, and oriental food. The opposite tendency is neophobia.[Jargon File] (1999-06-04)

neophilia /nee"oh-fil"-ee-*/ The trait of being excited and pleased by novelty. Common among most hackers, SF fans, and members of several other connected leading-edge subcultures, including the pro-technology "Whole Earth" wing of the ecology movement, space activists, many members of Mensa, and the Discordian/neo-pagan underground. All these groups overlap heavily and (where evidence is available) seem to share characteristic hacker tropisms for science fiction, music, and oriental food. The opposite tendency is "neophobia". [{Jargon File}] (1999-06-04)

network address "networking" 1. The network portion of an {IP address}. For a {class A} network, the network address is the first {byte} of the IP address. For a {class B network}, the network address is the first two bytes of the IP address. For a {class C network}, the network address is the first three bytes of the IP address. In each case, the remainder is the {host address}. In the {Internet}, assigned network addresses are globally unique. See also {subnet address}, {Internet Registry}. 2. (Or "net address") An {electronic mail} address on {the network}. In the 1980s this might have been a {bang path} but now (1997) it is nearly always a {domain address}. Such an address is essential if one wants to be to be taken seriously by {hackers}; in particular, persons or organisations that claim to understand, work with, sell to, or recruit from among hackers but *don't* display net addresses are quietly presumed to be clueless poseurs and mentally {flush}ed. Hackers often put their net addresses on their business cards and wear them prominently in contexts where they expect to meet other hackers face-to-face (e.g. {science-fiction fandom}). This is mostly functional, but is also a signal that one identifies with hackerdom (like lodge pins among Masons or tie-dyed T-shirts among Grateful Dead fans). Net addresses are often used in e-mail text as a more concise substitute for personal names; indeed, hackers may come to know each other quite well by network names without ever learning each others' real monikers. See also {sitename}, {domainist}. [{Jargon File}] (1997-05-10)

network, the 1. "jargon, networking" (Or "the net") The union of all the major noncommercial, academic and hacker-oriented networks, such as {Internet}, the old {ARPANET}, {NSFnet}, {BITNET}, and the virtual {UUCP} and {Usenet} "networks", plus the corporate in-house networks and commercial {time-sharing} services (such as {CompuServe}) that gateway to them. A site was generally considered "on the network" if it could be reached by {electronic mail} through some combination of Internet-style (@-sign) and UUCP ({bang-path}) addresses. Since the explosion of the Internet in the mid 1990s, the term is now synonymous with the Internet. See {network address}. 2. "body" A fictional conspiracy of libertarian hacker-subversives and anti-authoritarian monkeywrenchers described in Robert Anton Wilson's novel "Schrödinger's Cat", to which many {hackers} have subsequently decided they belong (this is an example of {ha ha only serious}). [{Jargon File}] (1999-01-26)

network, the ::: 1. (jargon, networking) (Or the net) The union of all the major noncommercial, academic and hacker-oriented networks, such as Internet, the old corporate in-house networks and commercial time-sharing services (such as CompuServe) that gateway to them.A site was generally considered on the network if it could be reached by electronic mail through some combination of Internet-style (@-sign) and UUCP (bang-path) addresses. Since the explosion of the Internet in the mid 1990s, the term is now synonymous with the Internet.See network address.2. (body) A fictional conspiracy of libertarian hacker-subversives and anti-authoritarian monkeywrenchers described in Robert Anton Wilson's novel Schr�dinger's Cat, to which many hackers have subsequently decided they belong (this is an example of ha ha only serious).[Jargon File] (1999-01-26)

newsgroup "messaging" One of {Usenet}'s huge collection of topic groups or {fora}. {Usenet} groups can be "unmoderated" (anyone can post) or "moderated" (submissions are automatically directed to a {moderator}, who edits or filters and then posts the results). Some newsgroups have parallel {mailing lists} for {Internet} people with no netnews access, with postings to the group automatically propagated to the list and vice versa. Some moderated groups (especially those which are actually gatewayed {Internet} {mailing lists}) are distributed as "{digests}", with groups of postings periodically collected into a single large posting with an index. Among the best-known are comp.lang.c (the {C}-language forum), comp.arch (on computer architectures), comp.Unix.wizards (for {Unix wizards}), rec.arts.sf-lovers (for science-fiction fans), and talk.politics.misc (miscellaneous political discussions and {flamage}). Barry Shein "bzs@world.std.com" is alleged to have said, "Remember the good old days when you could read all the group names in one day?" This gives a good idea of the growth and size of {Usenet}. See also {netiquette}. [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-13)

newsgroup ::: (messaging) One of Usenet's huge collection of topic groups or fora. Usenet groups can be unmoderated (anyone can post) or moderated (submissions groups of postings periodically collected into a single large posting with an index.Among the best-known are comp.lang.c (the C-language forum), comp.arch (on computer architectures), comp.Unix.wizards (for Unix wizards), rec.arts.sf-lovers (for science-fiction fans), and talk.politics.misc (miscellaneous political discussions and flamage).Barry Shein is alleged to have said, Remember the good old days when you could read all the group names in one day? This gives a good idea of the growth and size of Usenet.See also netiquette.[Jargon File] (1994-12-13)

novel: Generally speaking a novel is any extended fictional prose narrative that focuses on a few crucial characters but often involves scores of secondary characters. The novel can cover any subject from any view point. Within English there are a few contenders for the first 'true novel': Bunyan's Pilgrims's progress,Defoe's Robinson Crusoe or Moll Flanders. After the birth of the novel in the 18th century, the 19th century saw a rise in the production of the novel, with the advent of novelists such as Austen and the Bronte sisters.

novelize ::: v. i. --> To innovate. ::: v. t. --> To innovate.
To put into the form of novels; to represent by fiction.


novella: An extended fictional prose narrative that is not quite as long as a novel, but longer than a short story. A novelette is a similar type of writing, but often refers to trivial romances.

Orwell, George: Originally named Eric Arthur Blair, George Orwell used a pseudonym for his published work. The English author and journalist was born in 1903 and died in 1950. His most renowned works include Nineteen Eighty-four and Animal Farm, both of which comment upon dictatorships. See science fiction and dystopia.

paramānu. (T. rdul phra rab; C. jiwei; J. gokumi; K. kŭngmi 極微). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "particle" or "atom"; the smallest unit of matter. Buddhist schools take a variety of positions on the ontological status of such atoms, especially as to whether or not they were divisible or indivisible. Both the SAUTRĀNTIKA and the SARVĀSTIVĀDA schools of mainstream Buddhism, for example, held that each paramānu was an indivisible unit of matter, but differed on the exact nature of the objects formed through the coalescence of these particles. By contrast, the MADHYAMAKA school of MAHĀYĀNA philosophy rejected any such notion of particles, since it did not accept that there was anything in the universe that possessed independent existence (NIḤSVABHĀVA), and thus the notion of such atoms was simply a convenient fiction. Numerous Mahāyāna SuTRAs, notably the AVATAMSAKASuTRA, extol the ability of a buddha to place entire world systems within a single particle without changing either's size. These Buddhist debates have parallels within both the JAINA and Hindu traditions. Modern Buddhists have also sought to suggest that apparent parallels between the notion of paramānu and modern atomic theory are evidence that Buddhism is consistent with science.

Past-Time: All the extent of time preceding a given event or experience, the term is occasionally confined to that extent of preceding time which is relevant to a given event or experience. Obviously enough, past-time is not a permanent condition unrelated to the succession of events: anything that is past has been present and also future before it became present The ontologlcal status of the past is uncertain, insofar as it has no existence at the moment when it is called past yet cannot be designated as unconditionally non-existent in the sense applicable to fiction or untruth. -- R.B.W.

Paula (fictional)—a female angel mentioned in

plot: The writer's structure and the relationship of actions, characters and events in a fictional work. The organization of the narrative.

Post-human - a concept originating in the fields of science fiction, futurology, contemporary art, and philosophy that literally means a person or entity that exists in a state beyond being human.

pulp fiction: Poor quality or sensational writing, originally printed on low-grade paper.

reality ::: n. --> The state or quality of being real; actual being or existence of anything, in distinction from mere appearance; fact.
That which is real; an actual existence; that which is not imagination, fiction, or pretense; that which has objective existence, and is not merely an idea.
Loyalty; devotion.
See 2d Realty, 2.


reconcile ::: v. t. --> To cause to be friendly again; to conciliate anew; to restore to friendship; to bring back to harmony; to cause to be no longer at variance; as, to reconcile persons who have quarreled.
To bring to acquiescence, content, or quiet submission; as, to reconcile one&


retcon /ret'kon/ retroactive continuity. The common situation in fiction where a new story "reveals" things about events in previous stories, usually leaving the "facts" the same (thus preserving continuity) while completely changing their interpretation. For example, revealing that a whole season of "Dallas" was a dream was a retcon. This term was once thought to have originated on the {Usenet} newsgroup {news:rec.arts.comics} but is now believed to have been used earlier in comic fandom. [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-08)

retcon ::: /ret'kon/ retroactive continuity.The common situation in fiction where a new story reveals things about events in previous stories, usually leaving the facts the same (thus preserving continuity) while completely changing their interpretation. For example, revealing that a whole season of Dallas was a dream was a retcon.This term was once thought to have originated on the Usenet newsgroup rec.arts.comics but is now believed to have been used earlier in comic fandom.[Jargon File] (1994-12-08)

Riff (fictional)—a cherub in Daniels, Clash of

romance: Traditionally, a long fictional prose narrative about unlikely events involving characters that are very different from ordinary people, e.g knights. Nowadays the modern romance novel is a prescribed love story, where boy meets girl, obstacles get in the way, they are then overcome and the couple live happily ever after.

roundhead ::: n. --> A nickname for a Puritan. See Roundheads, the, in the Dictionary of Noted Names in Fiction.

Rubi (fictional)—the 2nd angel, a cherub, in

science fiction: A genre of literature that features an alternative society that is founded on the imagined technology of the future. The genre stretches the imagination by rooting the fantasy of the future in recognizable elements of modern life. This type of fantasy literature, typically takes the form of a short story or novel.

Seconds (fictional)—the name of an angel in

Sereda (fictional)—in Cabell’s Jurgen, Mother

SERVICE According to the planetary hierarchy, the serving attitude to life is the easiest, safest, quickest path to the fifth natural kingdom. All kingdoms capable of it have as their foremost task of life serving those at lower stages of development, so that they will be able to reach higher ones. Without this help there would be no evolution, or evolution would take tremendously longer time. He who gives shall receive. Those who serve mankind unselfishly are given more and more opportunities of doing so. Service itself develops all requisite qualities and abilities, frees from emotional illusions and mental fictions. K 7.20.3 (K 7.15.15, 7.23.7ff)

short story: A prose narrative of fiction, which is relatively short and more concise, often depicting only one event or climax.

Shub-Internet /shuhb in't*r-net/ (MUD, from H. P. Lovecraft's evil fictional deity "Shub-Niggurath", the Black Goat with a Thousand Young) The harsh personification of the {Internet}, Beast of a Thousand Processes, Eater of Characters, Avatar of Line Noise, and Imp of Call Waiting; the hideous multi-tendriled entity formed of all the manifold connections of the net. A sect of {MUD}ders worships Shub-Internet, sacrificing objects and praying for good connections. To no avail - its purpose is malign and evil, and is the cause of all network slowdown. Often heard as in "Freela casts a tac nuke at Shub-Internet for slowing her down." (A forged response often follows along the lines of: "Shub-Internet gulps down the tac nuke and burps happily.") Also cursed by users of {FTP} and {telnet} when the system slows down. The dread name of Shub-Internet is seldom spoken aloud, as it is said that repeating it three times will cause the being to wake, deep within its lair beneath the Pentagon. [{Jargon File}] (1994-11-04)

Shub-Internet ::: /shuhb in't*r-net/ (MUD, from H. P. Lovecraft's evil fictional deity Shub-Niggurath, the Black Goat with a Thousand Young) The harsh Shub-Internet is seldom spoken aloud, as it is said that repeating it three times will cause the being to wake, deep within its lair beneath the Pentagon.[Jargon File] (1994-11-04)

Since the Consciousness-Force of the eternal Existence is the universal creatrix, the nature of a given world will depend on whatever self-formulation of that Consciousness expresses itself in that world. Equally, for each individual being, his seeing or representation to himself of the world he lives in will depend on the poise or make which that Consciousness has assumed in him. Our human mental consciousness sees the world in sections cut by the reason and sense and put together in a formation which is also sectional; the house it builds is planned to accommodate one or another generalised formulation of Truth, but excludes the rest or admits some only as guests or dependents in the house. Overmind Consciousness is global in its cognition and can hold any number of seemingly fundamental differences together in a reconciling vision. Thus the mental reason sees Person and the Impersonal as opposites: it conceives an impersonal Existence in which person and personality are fictions of the Ignorance or temporary constructions; or, on the contrary, it can see Person as the primary reality and the impersonal as a mental abstraction or only stuff or means of manifestation. To the Overmind intelligence these are separable Powers of the one Existence which can pursue their independent self-affirmation and can also unite together their different modes of action, creating both in their independence and in their union different states of consciousness and being which can be all of them valid and all capable of coexistence. A purely impersonal existence and consciousness is true and possible, but also an entirely personal consciousness and existence; the Impersonal Divine, Nirguna Brahman, and the Personal Divine, Saguna Brahman, are here equal and coexistent aspects of the Eternal. Impersonality can manifest with person subordinated to it as a mode of expression; but, equally, Person can be the reality with impersonality as a mode of its nature: both aspects of manifestation face each other in the infinite variety of conscious Existence. What to the mental reason are irreconcilable differences present themselves to the Overmind intelligence as coexistent correlatives; what to the mental reason are contraries are to the Overmind intelligence complementaries. Our mind sees that all things are born from Matter or material Energy, exist by it, go back into it; it concludes that Matter is the eternal factor, the primary and ultimate reality, Brahman. Or it sees all as born of Life-Force or Mind, existing by Life or by Mind, going back into the universal Life or Mind, and it concludes that this world is a creation of the cosmic Life-Force or of a cosmic Mind or Logos. Or again it sees the world and all things as born of, existing by and going back to the Real-Idea or Knowledge-Will of the Spirit or to the Spirit itself and it concludes on an idealistic or spiritual view of the universe. It can fix on any of these ways of seeing, but to its normal separative vision each way excludes the others. Overmind consciousness perceives that each view is true of the action of the principle it erects; it can see that there is a material world-formula, a vital world-formula, a mental world-formula, a spiritual world-formula, and each can predominate in a world of its own and at the same time all can combine in one world as its constituent powers. The self-formulation of Conscious Force on which our world is based as an apparent Inconscience that conceals in itself a supreme Conscious-Existence and holds all the powers of Being together in its inconscient secrecy, a world of universal Matter realising in itself Life, Mind, Overmind, Supermind, Spirit, each of them in its turn taking up the others as means of its self-expression, Matter proving in the spiritual vision to have been always itself a manifestation of the Spirit, is to the Overmind view a normal and easily realisable creation. In its power of origination and in the process of its executive dynamis Overmind is an organiser of many potentialities of Existence, each affirming its separate reality but all capable of linking themselves together in many different but simultaneous ways, a magician craftsman empowered to weave the multicoloured warp and woof of manifestation of a single entity in a complex universe. …

Slattery (fictional)—an angel referred to in the

Sophar (fictional)—in Anatole France, Revolt

Sri Aurobindo: "We see at once that if such an Existence is, it must be, like the Energy, infinite. Neither reason nor experience nor intuition nor imagination bears witness to us of the possibility of a final terminus. All end and beginning presuppose something beyond the end or beginning. An absolute end, an absolute beginning is not only a contradiction in terms, but a contradiction of the essence of things, a violence, a fiction. Infinity imposes itself upon the appearances of the finite by its ineffugable self-existence.” *The Life Divine

State: (Lat. status, Ital. stato; the term introduced by Machiavelli) A political organization based upon a common territory and exercising control over the inhabitants of that territory. Essential for a state is the existence of a government, and in the "legal state", a written or unwritten constitution. By the pure theory of law (Kelsen), the state is identified with law. By others (Duguit) considered a mere fiction, devised to conceal the matter of fact preponderance of particular persons or groups. The state is sometimes explained as the positive or actual organization of the legislative or judicial powers. (In America also: one of the commonwealths which form the United States of America, Brazil, Mexico). -- W.E.

Sturgeon's Law ::: Ninety percent of everything is crap. Derived from a quote by science fiction author Theodore Sturgeon, who once said, Sure, 90% of science fiction is crud. Rule. Though this maxim originated in SF fandom, most hackers recognise it and are all too aware of its truth.[Jargon File]

Sturgeon's Law "Ninety percent of everything is crap". Derived from a quote by science fiction author Theodore Sturgeon, who once said, "Sure, 90% of science fiction is crud. That's because 90% of everything is crud." Oddly, when Sturgeon's Law is cited, the final word is almost invariably changed to "crap". Compare {Ninety-Ninety Rule}. Though this maxim originated in SF fandom, most hackers recognise it and are all too aware of its truth. [{Jargon File}]

style: The distinguishing way writers employ language and their words choice to accomplish certain effects. A significant ingredient of interpreting and understanding fiction is paying attention to the way the author uses words. Syntax, structure and narrative technique are also important.

Talmudic lore, poetic fiction, etc.]

TANSTAAFL /tan'stah-fl/ (From Robert Heinlein's classic "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress") "There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch". Often invoked when someone is balking at the prospect of using an unpleasantly {heavyweight} technique, or at the poor quality of some piece of {free software}, or at the {signal-to-noise ratio} of unmoderated {Usenet} newsgroups. "What? Don't tell me I have to implement a {database} back end to get my address book program to work!" "Well, TANSTAAFL you know." This phrase owes some of its popularity to the high concentration of science-fiction fans and political libertarians in hackerdom. [{Jargon File}] (1995-02-28)

TANSTAAFL ::: /tan'stah-fl/ (From Robert Heinlein's classic The Moon is a Harsh Mistress) There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch.Often invoked when someone is balking at the prospect of using an unpleasantly heavyweight technique, or at the poor quality of some piece of free software, or the high concentration of science-fiction fans and political libertarians in hackerdom.[Jargon File] (1995-02-28)

tartufe ::: n. --> A hypocritical devotee. See the Dictionary of Noted Names in Fiction.

teen ::: n. --> Grief; sorrow; affiction; pain.
To excite; to provoke; to vex; to affict; to injure. ::: v. t. --> To hedge or fence in; to inclose.


Terraforming - (especially in science fiction) transform (a planet) so as to resemble the earth, especially so that it can support human life.

The definition is suggested by that of Jeremy Bentham. Reference: C. K. Ogden, Bentham's Theory of Fictions, 12. See also Incomplete Symbol, Construction. -- M.B.

"The individual ego is a pragmatic and effective fiction, a translation of the secret self into the terms of surface consciousness, or a subjective substitute for the true self in our surface experience. . . .”The Life Divine

“The individual ego is a pragmatic and effective fiction, a translation of the secret self into the terms of surface consciousness, or a subjective substitute for the true self in our surface experience….”The Life Divine

Theophile (fictional)—in Anatole France, The

The philosophies which recognise Mind alone as the creator of the worlds or accept an original principle with Mind as the only mediator between it and the forms of the universe, may be divided into the purely noumenal and the idealistic. The purely noumenal recognise in the cosmos only the work of Mind, Thought, Idea: but Idea may be purely arbitrary and have no essential relation to any real Truth of existence; such Truth, if it exists, may be regarded as a mere Absolute aloof from all relations and irreconcilable with a world of relations. The idealistic interpretation supposes a relation between the Truth behind and the conceptive phenomenon in front, a relation which is not merely that of an antinomy and opposition. The view I am presenting goes farther in idealism; it sees the creative Idea as Real-Idea, that is to say, a power of Conscious Force expressive of real being, born out of real being and partaking of its nature and neither a child of the Void nor a weaver of fictions. It is conscious Reality throwing itself into mutable forms of its own imperishable and immutable substance.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 125


"The view I am presenting goes farther in idealism; it sees the creative Idea as Real-Idea, that is to say, a power of Conscious Force expressive of real being, born out of real being and partaking of its nature and neither a child of the Void nor a weaver of fictions. It is conscious Reality throwing itself into mutable forms of its own imperishable and immutable substance. The world is therefore not a figment of conception in the universal Mind, but a conscious birth of that which is beyond Mind into forms of itself.” The Life Divine

“The view I am presenting goes farther in idealism; it sees the creative Idea as Real-Idea, that is to say, a power of Conscious Force expressive of real being, born out of real being and partaking of its nature and neither a child of the Void nor a weaver of fictions. It is conscious Reality throwing itself into mutable forms of its own imperishable and immutable substance. The world is therefore not a figment of conception in the universal Mind, but a conscious birth of that which is beyond Mind into forms of itself.” The Life Divine

town his flight. In fiction, “Red Samael the

twonkie ::: /twon'kee/ The software equivalent of a Twinkie (a variety of sugar-loaded junk food, or (in gay slang) the male equivalent of chick); a useless feature added to look sexy and placate a marketroid.Compare Saturday-night special.The term may also be related to The Twonky, title menace of a classic SF short story by Lewis Padgett (Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore), first published in the September 1942 Astounding Science Fiction and subsequently much anthologised.[Jargon File] (1994-10-20)

twonkie /twon'kee/ The software equivalent of a Twinkie (a variety of sugar-loaded junk food, or (in gay slang) the male equivalent of "chick"); a useless "feature" added to look sexy and placate a {marketroid}. Compare {Saturday-night special}. The term may also be related to "The Twonky", title menace of a classic SF short story by Lewis Padgett (Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore), first published in the September 1942 "Astounding Science Fiction" and subsequently much anthologised. [{Jargon File}] (1994-10-20)

utopia ::: n. --> An imaginary island, represented by Sir Thomas More, in a work called Utopia, as enjoying the greatest perfection in politics, laws, and the like. See Utopia, in the Dictionary of Noted Names in Fiction.
Hence, any place or state of ideal perfection.


virus "security" (By analogy with biological viruses, via science fiction) A program or piece of code, a type of {malware}, written by a {cracker}, that "infects" one or more other programs by embedding a copy of itself in them, so that they become {Trojan horses}. When these programs are executed, the embedded virus is executed too, thus propagating the "infection". This normally happens invisibly to the user. A virus has an "engine" - code that enables it to propagate and optionally a "payload" - what it does apart from propagating. It needs a "host" - the particular hardware and software environment on which it can run and a "trigger" - the event that starts it running. Unlike a {worm}, a virus cannot infect other computers without assistance. It is propagated by vectors such as humans trading programs with their friends (see {SEX}). The virus may do nothing but propagate itself and then allow the program to run normally. Usually, however, after propagating silently for a while, it starts doing things like writing "cute" messages on the terminal or playing strange tricks with the display (some viruses include {display hacks}). Viruses written by particularly antisocial {crackers} may do irreversible damage, like deleting files. By the 1990s, viruses had become a serious problem, especially among {IBM PC} and {Macintosh} users (the lack of security on these machines enables viruses to spread easily, even infecting the operating system). The production of special {antivirus software} has become an industry, and a number of exaggerated media reports have caused outbreaks of near hysteria among users. Many {lusers} tend to blame *everything* that doesn't work as they had expected on virus attacks. Accordingly, this sense of "virus" has passed into popular usage where it is often incorrectly used for other types of {malware} such as {worms} or {Trojan horses}. See {boot virus}, {phage}. Compare {back door}. See also {Unix conspiracy}. [{Jargon File}] (2003-06-20)

William Gibson "person" Author of {cyberpunk} novels such as Neuromancer (1984), Count Zero (1986), Mona Lisa Overdrive, and Virtual Light (1993). Neuromancer, a novel about a computer {hacker}/criminal "cowboy" of the future helping to free an {artificial intelligence} from its programmed bounds, won the Hugo and Nebula science fiction awards and is credited as the seminal cyberpunk novel and the origin of the term "{cyberspace}". Gibson does not have a technical background and supposedly purchased his first computer in 1992. (1996-06-11)

William Gibson ::: (person) Author of cyberpunk novels such as Neuromancer (1984), Count Zero (1986), Mona Lisa Overdrive, and Virtual Light (1993).Neuromancer, a novel about a computer hacker/criminal cowboy of the future helping to free an artificial intelligence from its programmed bounds, won the Hugo and Nebula science fiction awards and is credited as the seminal cyberpunk novel and the origin of the term cyberspace.Gibson does not have a technical background and supposedly purchased his first computer in 1992. (1996-06-11)

WILL TO UNITY The will to unity is no will to uniformity, no standardization into robotism. The will to unity does not fight against other views or against dissidents. It is so rational that it need never fear criticism. It leaves everybody&

ygdrasyl ::: n. --> See in the Dictionary of Noted Names in Fiction.

Zaraph (fictional)—the 3rd angel, a seraph, in

ZIL "games" Zork Implementation Language. Language used by {Infocom}'s Interactive Fiction adventure games. Interpreted by the {zmachine}, for {Unix} and {Amiga}. {(ftp://plains.nodak.edu/Minix/st.contrib.Infocom.tar.Z)}.

ZIL ::: (games) Zork Implementation Language. Language used by Infocom's Interactive Fiction adventure games. Interpreted by the zmachine, for Unix and Amiga. .



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   2 Mark Twain
   2 Sri Aurobindo
   1 William Blake
   1 Stephen King
   1 really fast. I'm puzzling over something
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   1 Michio Kaku
   1 Lawrence Durrell
   1 Joseph Campbell
   1 Jean-Pierre Camus de Pontcarré
   1 Hurrychund Chintamon
   1 Henry James
   1 Hannah Arendt
   1 Gary Gygax
   1 Flannery O'Connor
   1 Farley Mowat
   1 but if you write your biography
   1 Bertrand Russell
   1 Arundhati Roy
   1 Arthur C Clarke
   1 Jorge Luis Borges
   1 A E van Vogt

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   29 Stephen King
   15 Neil Gaiman
   15 Mark Twain
   15 Anonymous
   14 Ray Bradbury
   13 Ursula K Le Guin
   10 Arthur C Clarke
   9 Roxane Gay
   8 Theodore Sturgeon
   8 Terry Pratchett
   8 Orson Scott Card
   7 Jodi Picoult
   7 Haruki Murakami
   7 George Saunders
   7 Frederik Pohl
   6 William Gibson
   6 Paul Theroux
   6 Jeanette Winterson
   6 Dean Koontz
   5 Virginia Woolf

1:Fiction is the truth inside the lie. ~ Stephen King,
2:Do what you will, this world's a fiction and is made up of contradiction ~ William Blake,
3:Don't make a big distinction between fiction and non-fiction. These are arbitrary distinctions. ~ Farley Mowat,
4:What's made up in the head is the fiction. What comes out of the heart is a myth. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero's Journey,
5:Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn't. ~ Mark Twain,
6:Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; truth isn't. ~ Mark Twain,
7:But please remember: this is only a work of fiction. The truth, as always, will be far stranger.
   ~ Arthur C Clarke,
8:Truth is a shining goddess, always veiled, always distant, never wholly approachable, but worthy of all the devotion of which the human spirit is capable. ~ Bertrand Russell, Fact and Fiction,
9:So often, science fiction helps to get young people interested in science. That's why I don't mind talking about science fiction. It has a real role to play: to seize the imagination. ~ Michio Kaku,
10:Science fiction is a field of writing where, month after month, every printed word implies to hundreds of thousands of people: 'There is change. Look, today's fantastic story is tomorrow's fact. ~ A E van Vogt,
11:Fiction and non-fiction are only different techniques of story telling. For reasons I do not fully understand, fiction dances out of me. Non-fiction is wrenched out by the aching, broken world I wake up to every morning. ~ Arundhati Roy,
12:He who believes himself to be far advanced in the spiritual life has not made a good beginning." ~ Jean-Pierre Camus de Pontcarré, (1584 - 1652) was a French bishop, preacher, and author of works of fiction and spirituality, Wikipedia.,
13:It's a feature of our age that if you write a work of fiction, everyone assumes that the people and events in it are disguised biography ~ but if you write your biography, it's equally assumed you're lying your head off. ~ Margaret Atwood,
14:The fiction writer presents mystery through manners, grace through nature, but when he finishes there always has to be left over that sense of Mystery which cannot be accounted for by any human formula. ~ Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners,
15:The individual ego is a pragmatic and effective fiction, a translation of the secret self into the terms of surface consciousness ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, The Origin and Remedy of Falsehood, Error, Wrong and Evil,
16:Experience is never limited and it is never complete; it is an immense sensibility, a kind of huge spider web of the finest silken threads suspended in the chamber of consciousness and catching every airborne particle in its tissue. ~ Henry James, The Art of Fiction,
17:The illusionist sub-class sprang from my reading. So many spellworkers in fable and fiction used only the illusory, not "real magic" that had actual substance and effect, that I thought it would be fun to include such an option in the game. ~ Gary Gygax, ENWorld, Q&A with Gary Gygax part 1, 2002,
18:The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the convinced Communist, but people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction (i.e., the reality of experience) and the distinction between true and false (i.e., the standards of thought) no longer exist. ~ Hannah Arendt, Origins of Totalitarianism,
19:In all fiction, when a man is faced with alternatives he chooses one at the expense of the others. In the almost unfathomable Ts'ui Pen, he chooses - simultaneously - all of them. He thus creates various futures, various times which start others that will in their turn branch out and bifurcate in other times. That is the cause of the contradictions in the novel." ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Garden Of Forking Paths,
20:In both writing and sleeping, we learn to be physically still at the same time we are encouraging our minds to unlock from the humdrum rational thinking of our daytime lives. And as your mind and body grow accustomed to a certain amount of sleep each night ~ six hours, seven, maybe the recommended eight ~ so can you train your waking mind to sleep creatively and work out the vividly imagined waking dreams which are successful works of fiction.,
21:I had forgotten what fiction was to me as a boy, forgotten what it was like in the library: fiction was an escape from the intolerable, a doorway into impossibly hospitable worlds where things had rules and could be understood; stories had been a way of learning about life without experiencing it, or perhaps of experiencing it as an eighteenth-century poisoner dealt with poisons, taking them in tiny doses, such that the poisoner could cope with ingesting things that would kill someone who was not inured to them. Sometimes fiction is a way of coping with the poison of the world in a way that lets us survive it. ~ Neil Gaiman,
22:For the last three weeks I've been working on a open world game in Inform 7. The initial seed for my idea came when I was playing Rune Factory 3 a game for my DS. And I thought, Hey look if I can run a farm here why can't I somehow implement this in a interactive fiction. So I sat myself down and began to type away furiously at my keyboard. And the more I sat the more complicated my farming implementation got, requiring water and fertilizer, levels of sunlight ect

And then, finally, I finished it. And my mind began to wander. Why just stop there why not keep going. And soon I was adding mining, weather and a form of crafting items. Now if I get this done, and don't fall into the trap of to create everything, of which I am slowly making the maddening descent, I could have a open world IF game ready within a few months. Maybe more than a few. ~ KGentle, intfiction.org,
23:This is the integral knowledge, for we know that everywhere and in all conditions all to the eye that sees is One, to a divine experience all is one block of the Divine. It is only the mind which for the temporary convenience of its own thought and aspiration seeks to cut an artificial line of rigid division, a fiction of perpetual incompatibility between one aspect and another of the eternal oneness. The liberated knower lives and acts in the world not less than the bound soul and ignorant mind but more, doing all actions, sarvakrt, only with a true knowledge and a greater conscient power. And by so doing he does not forfeit the supreme unity nor falls from the supreme consciousness and highest knowledge. For the Supreme, however hidden now to us, Is here in the world no less than he could be in the most utter and Ineffable self-extinction, the most intolerant Nirvana. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, 2:1,
24:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.
The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.
The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.
It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.
As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.

And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.

It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!
This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.
My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?

A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.
Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.

Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.
If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.
First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!
Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"
I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.
Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.
These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."
Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.
If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'
The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passage

Omnes eodem cogimur, omnium
Versatur urna serius ocius
Sors exitura et nos in aeternum
Exilium impositura cymbae.

Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?
And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'
We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?
And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.
I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!

"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,
'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'
Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,
Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vain
Upon the axis of its pain,
Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,
Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."

Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.
But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!
One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.
But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!

'Farewell, farewell! but this I tell
To thee, thou Wedding-Guest!
He prayeth well, who loveth well
Both man and bird and beast.
He prayeth best, who loveth best
All things both great and small;
For the dear God who loveth us,
He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:... at it's best fiction is medicine. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
2:Fiction is the truth inside the lie. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
3:Fiction is an improvement on life ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
4:Truth is more of a stranger than fiction. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
5:I don't have too much time for fiction. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
6:The truer the facts the better the fiction. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
7:The truth was stranger than the official fiction. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
8:For truth is always strange; stranger than fiction. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
9:I shall speak facts; but some will say I deal in fiction. ~ ovid, @wisdomtrove
10:Literature is a luxury; fiction is a necessity. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
11:Fiction reveals truth that reality obscures. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
12:Today's science fiction is tomorrow's science fact. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
13:When it comes to the past, everyone writes fiction. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
14:When I die, I'm leaving my body to science fiction. ~ steven-wright, @wisdomtrove
15:Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities. Truth isn’t. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
16:Wondrous strong are the spells of fiction. ~ henry-wadsworth-longfellow, @wisdomtrove
17:The best fiction is far more true than any journalism. ~ william-faulkner, @wisdomtrove
18:... writing fiction... is no job for intellectual cowards. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
19:Reality, if rightly interpreted, is grander than fiction. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
20:Science fiction is not prescriptive; it is descriptive. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
21:Fiction is to grown men what play is to the child. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
22:I am all the time thinking about poetry and fiction and you. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
23:Fiction intended to please, should resemble truth as much as possible. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
24:Fiction—and poetry and drama— cleanse the doors of perception. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
25:The ego is just a useful fiction. Use it, but don’t be deceived by it. ~ rajneesh, @wisdomtrove
26:The shape I'm in, I could donate my body to science fiction. ~ rodney-dangerfield, @wisdomtrove
27:Memory is like fiction; or else it's fiction that's like memory. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
28:Everything of this life as a mortal is fiction. It seems real, but... ~ richard-bach, @wisdomtrove
29:A man's face is his autobiography. A woman's face is her work of fiction. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
30:Ours is the first generation that has grown up with science-fiction ideas. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
31:Women and fiction remain, so far as I am concerned, unsolved problems. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
32:The good ended happily, and the bad unhappily. That is what fiction means. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
33:The success of a science fiction writer is if he can write a good read. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
34:Do what you will, this world's a fiction and is made up of contradiction. ~ william-blake, @wisdomtrove
35:A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
36:Sometimes life coughs up coincidences no writer of fiction would dare copy. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
37:Truth is so hard to tell, it sometimes needs fiction to make it plausible. ~ francis-bacon, @wisdomtrove
38:Poetry is a comforting piece of fiction set to more or less lascivious music. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
39:Romance has been elegantly defined as the offspring of fiction and love. ~ benjamin-disraeli, @wisdomtrove
40:Politicians should read science fiction, not westerns and detective stories. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
41:If you look for me, I'm in the fiction section. Romance has its own section. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
42:I only read biographies, metaphysics and psychology. I can dream up my own fiction. ~ mae-west, @wisdomtrove
43:Truth would quickly cease to be stranger than fiction, once we got as used to it. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
44:Why shouldn't truth be stranger than fiction? Fiction, after all, has to make sense. ~ mark-twain, @wisdomtrove
45:Fiction lags after truth, invention is unfruitful, and imagination cold and barren. ~ edmund-burke, @wisdomtrove
46:I don't write tracts, I write novels. I'm not a preacher, I'm a fiction writer. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
47:Literary fiction, as a strict genre, is all but dead. Meanwhile, most genres flourish. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
48:If science fiction is the mythology of modern technology, then its myth is tragic. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
49:I hope to build a reputation as a science-fiction writer. That's the pitch. We'll see. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
50:I think most people live in fiction... That's how you keep your fragile body intact. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
51:One of the things [fiction] does is lead you to recognize what you did not know before. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
52:Fiction is such a world of freedom, it's wonderful. If you want someone to fly, they can fly. ~ alice-walker, @wisdomtrove
53:I was uncomfortable writing fiction. My love was the personal essay rather than the novel. ~ alain-de-botton, @wisdomtrove
54:Dramatic fiction - William Shakespeare made his biggest mark writing dramatic love stories. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
55:It's your fiction that interests me. Your studies of the interplay of human motives and emotion. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
56:Science fiction annoyed me because it was like, Why is the world as it is not enough for you? ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
57:The function of science fiction is not always to predict the future but sometimes to prevent it. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
58:The reader can't take much for granted in a fiction where the scenery can eat the characters. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
59:But please remember: this is only a work of fiction. The truth, as always, will be far stranger. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
60:In all fiction, when a man is faced with alternatives he chooses one at the expense of others. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
61:People who write fiction, if they had not taken it up, might have become very successful liars. ~ ernest-hemingway, @wisdomtrove
62:I find science so much more fascinating than science fiction. It also has the advantage of being true. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
63:A writer is congenitally unable to tell the truth and that is why we call what he writes fiction. ~ william-faulkner, @wisdomtrove
64:Outlines are the last resource of bad fiction writers who wish to God they were writing masters' theses. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
65:Every autobiography ... becomes an absorbing work of fiction, with something of the charm of a cryptogram. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
66:Reporting the extreme things as if they were the average things will start you on the art of fiction. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
67:Truth, of course, must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for we have made fiction to suit ourselves. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
68:Kids, fiction is the truth inside the lie, and the truth of this fiction is simple enough: the magic exists. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
69:Science fiction seldom attempts to predict the future. More often than not, it tries to prevent the future. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
70:Any amount of theology can now be smuggled into people's minds under the cover of fiction without their knowing it. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
71:That's the harm of Close Encounters: that it convinces tens of millions that that's what just science fiction is. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
72:Perhaps this is the purpose of all art, all writing, on the murders, fiction and non-fiction: Simply to participate. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
73:Let it be fact, one feels, or let it be fiction; the imagination will not serve under two masters simultaneously. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
74:The artist whose medium is fiction does this in words. The novelist says in words what cannot be said in words. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
75:This body is a combination. It is only a fiction to say that I have one body, you another, and the sun another. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
76:The reason we write fiction is because it's so much easier to exist spending part of each day in an imaginary world. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
77:It's always great when you want scientific fact to get a really good science fiction writer to talk to you about it. ~ robin-williams, @wisdomtrove
78:How do I know the past is not a fiction conceived to reconcile the difference between my state of mind and the present. ~ douglas-adams, @wisdomtrove
79:Modern science fiction is the only form of literature that consistently considers the nature of the changes that face us. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
80:I took the liberty in Snowboarding to Nirvana to do a type of parody of what I suppose you would call "New Age fiction." ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
81:It's better to read first rate science fiction than second rate science-it's a lot more fun, and no more likely to be wrong. ~ martin-rees, @wisdomtrove
82:What do my science fiction stories have in common with pornography? Fantasies of an impossibly hospitable world, I'm told. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
83:A fiction about soft or easy deaths is part of the mythology of most diseases that are not considered shameful or demeaning. ~ susan-sontag, @wisdomtrove
84:Journalism is popular, but it is popular mainly as fiction. Life is one world, and life seen in the newspapers is another. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
85:Science fiction writers foresee the inevitable, and although problems and catastrophes may be inevitable, solutions are not. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
86:Part of the particular interest and beauty of science fiction and fantasy: writer and reader collaborate in world-making. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
87:Whoever knows that the mind is a fiction and devoid of anything real knows that his own mind neither exists nor doesn't exist. ~ bodhidharma, @wisdomtrove
88:I keep losing and regaining my equilibrium, which is the basic plot of all popular fiction. And I myself am a work of fiction. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
89:[Social] science fiction is that branch of literature which is concerned with the impact of scientific advance on human beings. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
90:Good fiction doesn't come out of the basic conflict of good versus bad. Instead, it comes out of a conflict between good and good. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
91:Fiction is to the grown man what play is to the child; it is there that he changes the atmosphere and tenor of his life. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
92:In high school I was drawn to the study of literature, poetry Shakespeare, contemporary fiction, drama, you name it - I read it. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
93:To think that realistic fiction is by definition superior to imaginative fiction is to think imitation is superior to invention. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
94:I don't read many business books. I read good fiction. Business is about people, so my favorite business books are anything by Dickens. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
95:The world is a very complex and interesting place and that is what I really want my fiction to say: wake up to how amazing the world is. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
96:I like science fiction movies, but I think they are useful for giving us ideas and I think science fiction is very good at giving ideas. ~ roger-penrose, @wisdomtrove
97:The day I was born songs were on records, phones were tied down, computers needed rooms and the web was fiction. Change the world. You can. ~ steve-jobs, @wisdomtrove
98:Who would not spout the family teapot in order to talk with Keats for an hour about poetry, or with Jane Austen about the art of fiction? ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
99:There are certain themes of which the interest is all-absorbing, but which are too entirely horrible for the purposes of legitimate fiction. ~ edgar-allan-poe, @wisdomtrove
100:The use of imaginative fiction is to deepen your understanding of your world, and your fellow men, and your own feelings, and your destiny. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
101:For a fiction writer, a storyteller, the world is full of stories, and when a story is there, it's there, and you just reach up and pick it. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
102:One can be absolutely truthful and sincere even though admittedly the most outrageous liar. Fiction and invention are of the very fabric of life. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
103:So, next time you see someone sleeping, make believe you're in a science fiction movie. And whisper, &
104:There is quite enough sorrow and shame and suffering and baseness in real life, and there is no need for meeting it unnecessarily in fiction. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
105:God, how that stings! I've spent a lifetime loving science fiction and now I find that you must expect nothing of something that's just science fiction. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
106:But I hate things all fiction... there should always be some foundation of fact for the most airy fabric - and pure invention is but the talent of a liar. ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
107:Education must enable one to sift and weigh evidence, to discern the true from the false, the real from the unreal, and the facts from the fiction. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
108:The times are so peculiar now, so mediaeval so unreasonable that for the first time in a hundred years truth is really stranger than fiction. Any truth. ~ gertrude-stein, @wisdomtrove
109:I have two pairs of reading glasses. One pair is for reading fiction, the other for non-fiction. I've read the Bible twice wearing each pair, and it's the same. ~ steven-wright, @wisdomtrove
110:Whether in music or in fiction, the most basic thing is rhythm. Your style needs to have good, natural, steady rhythm, or people won't keep reading your work. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
111:Fiction is like a spider's web, attached ever so slightly perhaps, but still attached to life at all four corners. Often the attachment is scarcely perceptible. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
112:I'm a slow reader, but I usually get through seventy or eighty books a year, most fiction. I don't read in order to study the craft; I read because I like to read ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
113:How can I tell," said the man, "that the past isn't a fiction designed to account for the discrepancy between my immediate physical sensations and my state of mind? ~ douglas-adams, @wisdomtrove
114:If you didn't know what sleep was, and you had only seen it in a science fiction movie, you would think it was weird and tell all your friends about the movie you'd seen. ~ george-carlin, @wisdomtrove
115:I suppose all fictional characters, especially in adventure or heroic fiction, at the end of the day are our dreams about ourselves. And sometimes they can be really revealing. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
116:If the reader prefers, this book may be regarded as fiction. But there is always the chance that such a book of fiction may throw some light on what has been written as fact. ~ ernest-hemingway, @wisdomtrove
117:Arthur Clarke says that I am first in science and second in science fiction in accordance with an agreement we have made. I say he is first in science fiction and second in science. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
118:Tis strange,-but true; for truth is always strange; Stranger than fiction: if it could be told, How much would novels gain by the exchange! How differently the world would men behold! ~ lord-byron, @wisdomtrove
119:I have been a soreheaded occupant of a file drawer labeled "Science Fiction" and I would like out, particularly since so many serious critics regularly mistake the drawer for a urinal. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
120:While I find inspiration in real life, the actual stories are, thankfully, works of fiction - which, given the considerable turmoil in my character's lives, is probably a good thing! ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
121:Unfortunately, in many cases, people who write science fiction violate the laws of nature, not because they want to make a point, but because they don't know what the laws of nature are. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
122:For my part, I love to give myself up to the illusion of poetry. A hero of fiction that never existed is just as valuable to me as a hero of history that existed a thousand years ago. ~ washington-irving, @wisdomtrove
123:I am conscious of trying to stretch the boundaries of non-fiction writing. It's always surprised me how little attention many non-fiction writers pay to the formal aspects of their work. ~ alain-de-botton, @wisdomtrove
124:The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated communist, but people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
125:Fiction is of the essence of poetry as well as of painting; there is a resemblance in one of human bodies, things, and actions which are not real, and in the other of a true story by fiction. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
126:I have been a soreheaded occupant of a file drawer labeled "science fiction" ... and I would like out, particularly since so many serious critics regularly mistake the drawer for a urinal. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
127:In reading, in literature and poetry, I found an artistic freedom that I didn't see at Woolworth's. I would read everything from Shakespeare to science fiction ... sometimes a book a day. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
128:&
129:The proper stuff of fiction' does not exist; everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
130:Genre fiction was looked at as a ghetto, but I wonder now if realist fiction, sealing itself off in the glum suburbs of a dysfunctional society, denying the use of imagination, was the ghetto. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
131:If you're a fiction writer, though, I can tell you how to let people talk through you. Listen. Just be quiet, and listen. Let the character talk. Don't censor, don't control. Listen, and write. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
132:He would write it for the reason he felt that all great literature, fiction and nonfiction, was written: truth comes out, in the end it always comes out. He would write it because he felt he had to. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
133:There was a gay fiction among us that we were constantly enjoying ourselves, and a skeleton truth that we never did. To the best of my belief, our case was in the last respect a rather common one. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
134:Children are not deceived by fairy-tales; they are often and gravely deceived by school-stories. Adults are not deceived by science-fiction ; they can be deceived by the stories in the women's magazines. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
135:My experience of life is that it is not divided up into genres; it's a horrifying, romantic, tragic, comical, science-fiction cowboy detective novel. You know, with a bit of pornography if you're lucky. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
136:The reason that fiction is more interesting than any other form of literature, to those who really like to study people, is that in fiction the author can really tell the truth without humiliating himself. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
137:What interests me about fiction is plot. And what interests me about plot is whether someone tells a story that moves me within the constraints of storytelling. And I have narrowly defined storytelling. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
138:Most books about writing are filled with bullshit. Fiction writers, present company included, don’t understand very much about what they do‚ not why it works when it’s good, not why it doesn’t when it’s bad. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
139:Abraham Lincoln said you cannot deceive everybody all the time. Well, that’s wishful thinking. In practice, the power of human cooperation networks depends on a delicate balance between truth and fiction. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
140:I read a fair amount [of science fiction], and you know it was certainly inspirational. I have to pinch myself to think that we might be able to make some of [what I've read in science fiction books] come true. ~ richard-branson, @wisdomtrove
141:It was strange to think that all the great women of fiction were, until Jane Austen's day, not only seen by the other sex, but seen only in relation to the other sex. And how small a part of woman's life is that. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
142:One of the biggest roles of science fiction is to prepare people to accept the future without pain and to encourage a flexibility of the mind. Politicians should read science fiction, not westerns and detective stories. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
143:I tend not to read or watch Science Fiction, particularly not comedy Science Fiction. The point is that if it's less good than what I do, there's no point in reading it, if it's better than what I do it makes me depressed ~ douglas-adams, @wisdomtrove
144:Attempting to define science fiction is an undertaking almost as difficult, though not so popular, as trying to define pornography... In both pornography and SF, the problem lies in knowing exactly where to draw the line. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
145:Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today - but the core of science fiction, its essence has become crucial to our salvation if we are to be saved at all. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
146:... if we can imagine the art of fiction come alive and standing in our midst, she would undoubtedly bid us to break her and bullyher, as well as honour and love her, for so her youth is renewed and her sovereignty assured. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
147:Every good book should be entertaining. A good book will be more; it must not be less. Entertainment…is like a qualifying examination. If a fiction can’t provide that, we may be excused from inquiring into its higher qualities. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
148:For if the proper study of mankind is man, it is evidently more sensible to occupy yourself with the coherent, substantial and significant creatures of fiction than with the irrational and shadowy figures of real life. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
149:I enjoy the writings of all of these authors and they have been very inspirational for me. But I think that it is important as writers of metaphysical, New Age, occult fiction and nonfiction to not  take ourselves too seriously. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
150:The purpose of a work of fiction is to appeal to the lingering after-effects in the reader's mind as differing from, say, the purpose of oratory or philosophy which respectively leave people in a fighting or thoughtful mood. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
151:I think what's happening is, it's all - fantasy, science fiction, ghosts, trolls, whatever - finally being called, being admitted to be literature. The way it used to be, before the Realists and the bloody Modernists took over. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
152:Dragons are more dangerous, and a good deal commoner, than bears. Fantasy is nearer to poetry, to mysticism, and to insanity than naturalistic fiction is. It is a real wilderness, and those who go there should not feel too safe. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
153:In accordance with the terms of the Clarke-Asimov treaty, the second-best science writer dedicates this book to the second-best science-fiction writer. [dedication to Isaac Asimov from Arthur C. Clarke in his book Report on Planet Three] ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
154:Most people have made this mistake of thinking Middle-earth is a particular kind of earth or is another planet of the science fiction sort but it's just an old fashioned word for this world we live in, as imagined surrounded by the Ocean. ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
155:It's just science fiction so it's allowed to be silly, and childish, and stupid. It's just science fiction, so it doesn't have to make sense. It's just science fiction, so you must ask nothing more of it than loud noises and flashing lights. ~ isaac-asimov, @wisdomtrove
156:George Orwell is half journalist, half fiction writer. I'm 100 percent fiction writer... I don't want to write messages. I want to write good stories. I think of myself as a political person, but I don't state my political messages to anybody. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
157:[Among the books he chooses, a statesman] ought to read interesting books on history and government, and books of science and philosophy; and really good books on these subjects are as enthralling as any fiction ever written in prose or verse. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
158:The movies have never been a big deal to me. The movies are the movies. They just make them. If they're good, that's terrific. If they're not, they're not. But I see them as a lesser medium than fiction, than literature, and a more ephemeral medium. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
159:&
160:Another proof of the conquest of a soul for Christ will be found in a real change of life. If the man does not live differently from what he did before, both at home and abroad, his repentance needs to be repented of and his conversion is a fiction ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
161:Language does not always have to wear a tie and lace-up shoes. The object of fiction isn't grammatical correctness but to make the reader welcome and then tell a story... To make him/her forget, whenever possible, that he/she is reading a story at all. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
162:My remembrance of the past is a novel I am constantly recomposing; and it would not be a historical novel, but sheer fiction, if the material events which mark and ballast my career had not their public dates and characters scientifically discoverable. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
163:I am honorary President of the American Humanist Society, having succeeded the late, great science fiction writer Isaac Asimov in that utterly functionless capacity. We Humanists behave as well as we can, without any rewards or punishments in an Afterlife. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
164:If woman had no existence save in the fiction written by men, one would imagine her a person of utmost importance; very various; heroic and mean; splendid and sordid; infinitely beautiful and hideous in the extreme; as great as a man; some think even greater. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
165:Returning to writing fiction after 13 years away from it. Returning to the rootstock of my whole life as a writer. It's what I had wanted to be for my entire life, since I can remember, since my particular time immemorial. It's how I got my start as a writer. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
166:A happy ending was imperative. I shouldn't have bothered to write otherwise. I was determined that in fiction anyway two men should fall in love and remain in it for the ever and ever that fiction allows, and in this sense, Maurice and Alec still roam the greenwood. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
167:Truth is a well-known pathological liar. It invariably turns out to be Fiction wearing a fancy frock. Self-proclaimed Fiction, on the other hand, is entirely honest. You can tell this, because it comes right out and says, "I'm a Liar," right there on the dust jacket. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
168:My novels are in the literature section as opposed to the romance section of bookstores because they're not romance novels. If I tried to have them published as romances, they'd be rejected. I write dramatic fiction; a further sub-genre would classify them as love stories. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
169:Yes, I’ve made a great deal of dough from my fiction, but I never set a single word down on paper with the thought of being paid for it... I have written because it fulfilled me. ... I did it for the pure joy of the things. And if you can do it for joy, you can do it forever. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
170:Ven you read the speeches in the papers, and see as vun gen'lman says of another, &
171:&
172:Records can be destroyed if they do not suit the prejudices of ruling cliques, lost if they become incomprehensible, distorted if a copyist wishes to impose a new meaning upon them, misunderstood if we lack the information to interpret them. The past is like a huge library, mostly fiction. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
173:The religious paradigm and the science fiction paradigm are different. Apologies to science fiction fans, but the paradigm there is to create a new world and describe it with a kind of specificity that we describe the world we inhabit. Religiosity, on the other hand, does none of that. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
174:Understand now, I'm purely a fiction writer and do not profess to be an earnest student of political science, but I believe strongly that such a law as one prohibiting liquor is foolish, and all the writers, keenly interested in human welfare whom I know, laugh at the prohibition law. ~ f-scott-fitzgerald, @wisdomtrove
175:I came into science fiction at a very good time, when the doors were getting thrown open to all kinds of more experimental writing, more literary writing, riskier writing. It wasn't all imitation Heinlein or Asimov. And of course, women were creeping in, infiltrating. Infesting the premises. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
176:I don't think people are averse to thinking about things in a deep way, but we have limited time and opportunity to think about things in a deep way. I think that's why there is an appetite for non-fiction - it gives people the opportunity to reexamine ordinary experience and be smarter about it. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
177:Science fiction, because it ventures into no man's lands, tends to meet some of the requirements posed by Jung in his explorations of archetypes, myth structures and self-understanding. It may be that the primary attraction of science fiction is that it helps us understand what it means to be human. ~ frank-herbert, @wisdomtrove
178:We still leave unblotted in the leaves of our statute book, for the reverence and admiration of successive ages, the just and wholesome law which declares that the sturdy felon shall be fed and clothed, and that the penniless debtor shall be left to die of starvation and nakedness. This is no fiction. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
179:Our easiest approach to a definition of any aspect of fiction is always by considering the sort of demand it makes on the reader. Curiosity for the story, human feelings and a sense of value for the characters, intelligence and memory for the plot. What does fantasy ask of us? It asks us to pay something extra. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
180:Much blood has also been spilled on the carpet in attempts to distinguish between science fiction and fantasy. I have suggested an operational definition: science fiction is something that COULD happen - but usually you wouldn't want it to. Fantasy is something that COULDN'T happen - though often you only wish that it could. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
181:Science fiction properly conceived, like all serious fiction, however funny, is a way of trying to describe what is in fact going on, what people actually do and feel, how people relate to everything else in this vast sack, this belly of the universe, this womb of things to be and tomb of things that were, this unending story. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
182:Truth is not only stranger than fiction, it is more telling. To know that a thing actually happened gives it a poignancy, touches a chord, which a piece of acknowledged fiction misses. It is to touch this chord that some authors have done everything they could to give you the impression that they are telling the plain truth. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
183:Science fiction that's just about people wandering around in space ships shooting each other with ray guns is very dull. I like it when it enables you to do fairly radical reinterpretations of human experience, just to show all the different interpretations that can be put on apparently fairly simple and commonplace events. That I find fun. ~ douglas-adams, @wisdomtrove
184:There are very real differences between science fiction and realistic fiction, between horror and fantasy, between romance and mystery. Differences in writing them, in reading them, in criticizing them. Vive les différences! They're what gives each genre its singular flavor and savor, its particular interest for the reader - and the writer. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
185:The goal in blogging/ business/ inspiring non-fiction is to share a truth, or at least a truth as the writer sees it. To not just share it, but to spread it and to cause change to happen. You can do that in at least three ways: with research (your own or reporting on others), by building and describing conceptual structures, or with stories that resonate. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
186:Authors of so-called &
187:The aim of the poet is to inform or delight, or to combine together, in what he says, both pleasure and applicability to life. In instructing, be brief in what you say in order that your readers may grasp it quickly and retain it faithfully. Superfluous words simply spill out when the mind is already full. Fiction invented in order to please should remain close to reality. ~ horace, @wisdomtrove
188:Bitter criticism caused the sensitive Thomas Hardy, one of the finest novelists ever to enrich English literature, to give up forever the writing of fiction. Criticism drove Thomas Chatterton, the English poet, to suicide. . . . Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain - and most fools do. But it takes character and self-control to be understanding and forgiving. ~ dale-carnegie, @wisdomtrove
189:The most influential books, and the truest in their influence, are works of fiction. They repeat, they re-arrange, they clarify the lessons of life; they disengage us from ourselves, they constrain us to the acquaintance of others; and they show us the web of experience, but with a singular change-that monstrous, consuming ego of ours being, nonce, struck out. ~ robert-louis-stevenson, @wisdomtrove
190:We all have love stories that go terribly wrong; we all have horribly broken hearts. And somehow we endure. We're not destroyed by it. We endure and go on to do interesting things and have worthy lives, even though we carry our heartbreaks with us. That's a kind of personal story of mine that I don't think I would tell in memoir but I do think I can tell in fiction. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
191:Few people ask from books what books can give us. Most commonly we come to books with blurred and divided minds, asking of fiction that it shall be true, of poetry that it shall be false, of biography that it shall be flattering, of history that it shall enforce our own prejudices. If we could banish all such preconceptions when we read, that would be an admirable beginning. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
192:I do not pretend to be able to prove that there is no God. I equally cannot prove that Satan is a fiction. The Christian god may exist; so may the gods of Olympus, or of ancient Egypt, or of Babylon. But no one of these hypotheses is more probable than any other: they lie outside the region of even probable knowledge, and therefore there is no reason to consider any of them. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
193:To be a science fiction writer you must be interested in the future and you must feel that the future will be different and hopefully better than the present. Although I know that most - that many science fiction writings have been anti-utopias. And the reason for that is that it's much easier and more exciting to write about a really nasty future than a - placid, peaceful one. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
194:Memory is like fiction; or else it's fiction that's like memory. This really came home to me once I started writing fiction, that memory seemd a kind of fiction, or vice versa. Either way, no matter how hard you try to put everything neatly into shape, the context wanders this way and that, until finally the context isn't even there anymore... Warm with life, hopeless unstable. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
195:As a young man just beginning to publish some short fiction in the t&a magazines, I was fairly optimistic about my chances of getting published; I knew that I had some game, as the basketball players say these days, and I also felt that time was on my side; sooner or later the best-selling writers of the sixties and seventies would either die or go senile, making room for newcomers like me. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
196:I have spent a good many years since‚ too many, I think‚ being ashamed about what I write. I think I was forty before I realized that almost every writer of fiction or poetry who has ever published a line has been accused by someone of wasting his or her God-given talent. If you write (or paint or dance or sculpt or sing, I suppose), someone will try to make you feel lousy about it, that's all. ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
197:We spent as much money as we could and got as little for it as people could make up their minds to give us. We were always more or less miserable, and most of our acquaintance were in the same condition. There was a gay fiction among us that we were constantly enjoying ourselves, and a skeleton truth that we never did. To the best of my belief, our case was in the last aspect a rather common one. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
198:As you see, I bear some resentment and some scars from the years of anti-genre bigotry. My own fiction, which moves freely around among realism, magical realism, science fiction, fantasy of various kinds, historical fiction, young adult fiction, parable, and other subgenres, to the point where much of it is ungenrifiable, all got shoved into the Sci Fi wastebasket or labeled as kiddilit - subliterature. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
199:Fantasy is not antirational, but pararational; not realistic but surrealistic, a heightening of reality. In Freud's terminology, it employs primary not secondary process thinking. It employs archetypes which, as Jung warned us, are dangerous things. Fantasy is nearer to poetry, to mysticism, and to insanity than naturalistic fiction is. It is a wilderness, and those who go there should not feel too safe. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
200:There's no real objection to escapism, in the right places... We all want to escape occasionally. But science fiction is often very far from escapism, in fact you might say that science fiction is escape into reality... It's a fiction which does concern itself with real issues: the origin of man; our future. In fact I can't think of any form of literature which is more concerned with real issues, reality. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
201:Do remember, though, that unless you're a playwright, the result [dialogue] isn't what you want; it's only an element of what you want. Actors embody and re-create the words of drama. In fiction, a tremendous amount of story and character may be given through the dialogue, but the story-world and its people have to be created by the storyteller. If there's nothing in it but disembodied voices, too much is missing. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
202:You know that fiction, prose rather, is possibly the roughest trade of all in writing. You do not have the reference, the old important reference. You have the sheet of blank paper, the pencil, and the obligation to invent truer than things can be true. You have to take what is not palpable and make it completely palpable and also have it seem normal and so that it can become a part of experience of the person who reads it. ~ ernest-hemingway, @wisdomtrove
203:A precondition for being a science fiction writer other than an interest in the future is that, an interest - at least an understanding of science, not necessarily a science degree but you must have a feeling for the science and its possibilities and its impossibilities, otherwise you're writing fantasy. Now, fantasy is also fine, but there is a distinction, although no one's ever been able to say just where the dividing lines come. ~ arthur-c-carke, @wisdomtrove
204:The pornography of violence of course far exceeds, in volume and general acceptance, sexual pornography, in this Puritan land of ours. Exploiting the apocalypse, selling the holocaust, is a pornography. For the ultimate selling job on ultimate violence one must read those works of fiction issued by our government as manuals of civil defense, in which you learn that there's nothing to be afraid of if you've stockpiled lots of dried fruit. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
205:Because, as we know, almost anything can be read into any book if you are determined enough. This will be especially impressed on anyone who has written fantastic fiction. He will find reviewers, both favourable and hostile, reading into his stories all manner of allegorical meanings which he never intended. (Some of the allegories thus imposed on my own books have been so ingenious and interesting that I often wish I had thought of them myself.) ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
206:Fiction writers, at least in their braver moments, do desire the truth: to know it, speak it, serve it. But they go about it in a peculiar and devious way, which consists in inventing persons, places, and events which never did and never will exist or occur, and telling about these fictions in detail and at length and with a great deal of emotion, and then when they are done writing down this pack of lies, they say, There! That's the truth! ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
207:I don’t think ‘science fiction’ is a very good name for it, but it’s the name that we’ve got. It is different from other kinds of writing, I suppose, so it deserves a name of its own. But where I can get prickly and combative is, if I’m just called a sci-fi writer. I’m not. I’m a novelist and poet. Don’t shove me into your damn pigeonhole, where I don’t fit, because I’m all over. My tentacles are coming out of the pigeonhole in all directions. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
208:Journalism only tells us what men are doing; it is fiction that tells us what they are thinking, and still more what they are feeling. If a new scientific theory finds the soul of a man in his dreams, at least it ought not to leave out his day-dreams. And all fiction is only a diary of day-dreams instead of days. And this profound preoccupation of men's minds with certain things always eventually has an effect even on the external expression of the age. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
209:What are the hallmarks of a competent writer of fiction? The first, it seems to me, is that he should be immensely interested in human beings, and have an eye sharp enough to see into them, and a hand clever enough to draw them as they are. The second is that he should be able to set them in imaginary situations which display the contents of their psyches effectively, and so carry his reader swiftly and pleasantly from point to point of what is called a good story. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
210:... fiction is made out of the writer's experience, his whole life from infancy on, everything he's thought and done and seen and read and dreamed. But experience isn't something you go and get - it's a gift, and the only prerequisite for receiving it is that you be open to it. A closed soul can have the most immense adventures, go through a civil war or a trip to the moon, and have nothing to show for all that "experience"; whereas the open soul can do wonders with nothing. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
211:Sci-fi uses the images that sf - starting with H.G. Wells - made familiar: space travel, aliens, galactic wars and federations, time machines, et cetera, taking them literally, not caring if they are possible or even plausible. It has no interest in or relation to real science or technology. It's fantasy in space suits. Spectacle. Wizards with lasers. Kids with ray guns. I've written both, but I have to say I respect science fiction enough that I wince when people call it sci-fi. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
212:Science fiction is not predictive; it is descriptive... . Prediction is the business of prophets, clairvoyants, and futurologists. It is not the business of novelists. A novelist's business is lying... . Open your eyes; listen, listen. That is what the novelists say. But they don't tell you what you will see and hear. All they can tell you is what they have seen and heard, in their time in this world, a third of it spent in sleep and dreaming, another third of it spent in telling lies. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
213:How did Homo sapiens manage to cross this critical threshold, eventually founding cities comprising tens of thousands of inhabitants and empires ruling hundreds of millions? The secret was probably the appearance of fiction. Large numbers of strangers can cooperate successfully by believing in common myths. Any large-scale human cooperation – whether a modern state, a medieval church, an ancient city or an archaic tribe – is rooted in common myths that exist only in people’s collective imagination. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
214:Remember the words of Christ: "Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you." These words are literally true, not figures or fiction. They were the outflow of the heart's blood of one of the greatest sons of God who have ever come to this world of ours; words which came as the fruit of realisation, from a man who had felt and realised God himself; who had spoken with God, lived with God, a hundred times more intensely than you or I see this building. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
215:Science fiction - and the correct shortcut is &
216:Fiction is like a spider's web, attached ever so lightly perhaps, but still attached to life at all four corners. Often the attachment is scarcely perceptible; Shakespeare's plays, for instance, seem to hang there complete by themselves. But when the web is pulled askew, hooked up at the edge, torn in the middle, one remembers that these webs are not spun in midair by incorporeal creatures, but are the work of suffering human beings, and are attached to the grossly material things, like health and money and the houses we live in. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
217:Here is one of the fundamental defects of American fiction&
218:The design of a book is the pattern of a reality controlled and shaped by the mind of the writer. This is completely understood about poetry or fiction, but it is too seldom realized about books of fact. And yet the impulse which drives a man to poetry will send another man into the tide pools and force him to try to report what he finds there... . It would be good to know the impulse truly, not to be confused by the &
219:Truth is always stranger than fiction. We craft fiction to match our sense of how things ought to be, but truth cannot be crafted. Truth is, and truth has a way of astonishing us to our knees. Reminding us, that the universe does not exist to fulfill our expectations. Because we are imperfect beings who are self-blinded to the truth of the world’s stunning complexity, we shave reality to paper thin theories and ideologies that we can easily grasp and we call them truths. But the truth of a sea in all it’s immensity cannot be embodied in one tidewashed pebble. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
220:There's two kinds of evil that horror fiction always deals with. One kind is the sort of evil that comes from inside people, like in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The other kind of evil is predestined evil. It falls on you like a stroke of lightning. That's the scary stuff, but, in a way, it's the stuff you don't have to worry about. I gotta worry whether or not I'm getting cavities. I gotta worry about whether cigarettes are giving me cancer. Those are things I can change. Don't give me lightning out of a clear sky. If that hits me I just say, "That's probably the way God meant it to be." ~ stephen-king, @wisdomtrove
221:Scientists, for their part, need to be far more engaged with current public debates. They should not be afraid of making their voice heard when the debate wanders into their field of expertise, be it medicine or history. Silence isn’t neuatrality; it is supporting the status quo. Of course, it is extremely important to go on doing academic research and to publish the results in scientific journals that only a few experts read. But it is equally important to communicate the latest scientific theories to the general public through popular-science books, and even through the skilful use of art and fiction. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
222:When a thousand people believe some made-up story for one month, that’s fake news. When a billion people believe it for a thousand years, that’s a religion, and we are admonished not to call it fake news in order not to hurt the feelings of the faithful (or incur their wrath). Note, however, that I am not denying the effectiveness or potential benevolence of religion. Just the opposite. For better or worse, fiction is among the most effective tools in humanity’s tool kit. By bringing people together, religious creeds make large-scale human cooperation possible. They inspire people to build hospitals, schools, and bridges in addition to armies and prisons. Adam and Eve never existed, but Chartres Cathedral is still beautiful. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
223:Fiction isn't bad. It is vital. Without commonly accepted stories about things like money, states or corporations, no complex human society can function. We can't play football unless everyone believes in the same made-up rules, and we can't enjoy the benefits of markets and courts without similar make-believe stories. But stories are just tools. They shouldn't become our goals or our yardsticks. When we forget that they are mere fiction, we lose touch with reality. Then we begin entire wars `to make a lot of money for the corporation' or &
224:But fiction has enabled us not merely to imagine things, but to do so collectively. We can weave common myths such as the biblical creation story, the Dreamtime myths of Aboriginal Australians, and the nationalist myths of modern states. Such myths give Sapiens the unprecedented ability to cooperate flexibly in large numbers. Ants and bees can also work together in huge numbers, but they do so in a very rigid manner and only with close relatives. Wolves and chimpanzees cooperate far more flexibly than ants, but they can do so only with small numbers of other individuals that they know intimately. Sapiens can cooperate in extremely flexible ways with countless numbers of strangers. That’s why Sapiens rule the world, whereas ants eat our leftovers and chimps are locked up in zoos and research laboratories. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
225:How did Homo sapiens manage to cross this critical threshold, eventually founding cities comprising tens of thousands of inhabitants and empires ruling hundreds of millions? The secret was probably the appearance of fiction. Large numbers of strangers can cooperate successfully by believing in common myths. Any large-scale human cooperation – whether a modern state, a medieval church, an ancient city or an archaic tribe – is rooted in common myths that exist only in people’s collective imagination. Churches are rooted in common religious myths. Two Catholics who have never met can nevertheless go together on crusade or pool funds to build a hospital because they both believe that God was incarnated in human flesh and allowed Himself to be crucified to redeem our sins. States are rooted in common national myths. Two Serbs who have never met might risk their lives to save one another because both believe in the existence of the Serbian nation, the Serbian homeland and the Serbian flag. Judicial systems are rooted in common legal myths. Two lawyers who have never met can nevertheless combine efforts to defend a complete stranger because they both believe in the existence of laws, justice, human rights – and the money paid out in fees. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Fiction Is My Addiction ~ Dr Seuss,
2:statistical fiction, ~ Louis Menand,
3:All memory is fiction. ~ Kwame Dawes,
4:romantic fiction. She ~ Julia London,
5:found science in fiction. ~ Anonymous,
6:Being safe is fiction. ~ Tom Hodgkinson,
7:Fiction creating reality. ~ Paul Auster,
8:I love science fiction. ~ Moon Bloodgood,
9:I tend to read non-fiction. ~ Gary Oldman,
10:Traded reality for fiction. ~ A M Johnson,
11:Fiction gives me power. ~ Maureen A Miller,
12:I don't do flash fiction. ~ Charles Stross,
13:I put my trust in fiction ~ Erika Johansen,
14:I quite enjoy science fiction. ~ Lexa Doig,
15:My fan fiction is canon. ~ Dwayne McDuffie,
16:The best fiction is true. ~ Kinky Friedman,
17:Brain out, sponge in’ fiction. ~ Hal Duncan,
18:I don't read fiction at all. ~ Brent Spiner,
19:Fiction is the unreal estate. ~ Stephen King,
20:I don't read Science Fiction. ~ Brent Spiner,
21:Most fan fiction is terrible. ~ Neal Pollack,
22:Fiction is best served alone. ~ Courtney Cole,
23:In Paris, love is born of fiction. ~ Stendhal,
24:Fiction is a branch of neurology ~ J G Ballard,
25:Fiction is empathy technology. ~ Steven Pinker,
26:Truth is stranger than fiction... ~ Mark Twain,
27:Every fiction has its base in fact, ~ Anonymous,
28:Fiction is the truth in the lie. ~ Stephen King,
29:Fiction novels, that's my game. ~ David Benioff,
30:All autobiography is fiction. ~ Sandra Tsing Loh,
31:Fiction is always really a labor. ~ Ann Patchett,
32:Fiction is socially meaningful. ~ David Guterson,
33:Humanity lives in its fiction. ~ Blaise Cendrars,
34:I prefer fact to fiction. ~ Richard Attenborough,
35:I transform fiction into memory. ~ Miguel Syjuco,
36:A public is a necessary fiction. ~ Rowan Williams,
37:Fiction is the truth inside a lie. ~ Stephen King,
38:Great fiction tells unknown truths. ~ Jess Walter,
39:...at it's best fiction is medicine. ~ Dean Koontz,
40:Every fiction has its base in fact, ~ Gayle Forman,
41:Every fiction has its base in fact. ~ Gayle Forman,
42:Fiction is the truth inside the lie ~ Stephen King,
43:Human life is fiction's only theme. ~ Eudora Welty,
44:I'm a huge science fiction fan... ~ Emma Caulfield,
45:Real life is crazier than fiction. ~ Lauren Bowles,
46:Fiction is the truth inside the lie. ~ Stephen King,
47:I just love historical fiction. ~ Jennifer Donnelly,
48:Truth is stranger than fiction ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
49:You learn a lot, writing fiction. ~ Penelope Lively,
50:Fiction is an improvement on life ~ Charles Bukowski,
51:Fiction is the history of the obscure. ~ Jill Lepore,
52:Fiction is the truth inside the lie. ~ Stephen King,
53:Good fiction creates its own reality. ~ Nora Roberts,
54:I'm the Jerry Lewis of crime fiction. ~ Harlan Coben,
55:Sometimes fact is stranger than fiction. ~ Carol Alt,
56:Don't they understand what fiction is? ~ Lauren Groff,
57:Fiction is an improvement on life. ~ Charles Bukowski,
58:I craved the escape that fiction provided ~ E L James,
59:I do not love fiction, I love history. ~ Duane Hanson,
60:I don't generally read a lot of fiction. ~ Bill Gates,
61:Life is a means of extracting fiction. ~ Robert Stone,
62:The best fiction is truer than history ~ Thomas Hardy,
63:All fiction is autobiographical fantasy. ~ James Joyce,
64:Fiction is a necessity. GK Chesterton ~ G K Chesterton,
65:Happy endings are a luxury of fiction. ~ Trudi Canavan,
66:It’s not a lie. It’s a gift for fiction. ~ David Mamet,
67:My portal to another world was fiction. ~ Ransom Riggs,
68:Nonfiction is easy and fiction is hard. ~ Ann Patchett,
69:Real life is much stranger than fiction, man. ~ Mike D,
70:The thing is, all memory is fiction. ~ Robert Goolrick,
71:Truth is always duller than fiction. ~ Piers Paul Read,
72:Truth is more of a stranger than fiction. ~ Mark Twain,
73:And truth severe, by fairy fiction drest. ~ Thomas Gray,
74:Fiction is about stuff that's screwed up. ~ Nancy Kress,
75:I donated my body to science...fiction. ~ Steven Wright,
76:I don't have too much time for fiction. ~ Ronald Reagan,
77:I read a lot of lot non-demanding fiction. ~ Dave Barry,
78:Length is weight in fiction, pretty much. ~ Joan Silber,
79:Memoirs lie, but fiction tells the truth. ~ Philip Roth,
80:Science Fiction is the jazz of literature. ~ David Brin,
81:Where does fiction end and reality begin? ~ Dean Koontz,
82:Anything processed by memory is fiction. ~ David Shields,
83:Fiction isn't what 'was'. It's 'what if'? ~ Richard Peck,
84:I do enjoy reading some science fiction. ~ Colin Farrell,
85:I'm a science fiction and fantasy geek. ~ China Mieville,
86:No one in life can ever match fiction ~ Sabrina Jeffries,
87:Oh, the accident necessary to fiction! ~ Gregory Maguire,
88:Whiteness is not the default in my fiction. ~ Roxane Gay,
89:All of this is fiction And all of it is true ~ Megan Hart,
90:Fiction is a lie that tells deep truths ~ Mark Rubinstein,
91:Fiction is life with the dull bits left out ~ Clive James,
92:If it's fiction, then it better be true. ~ Sherman Alexie,
93:It's in a neighbor's house fiction begins. ~ Dermot Healy,
94:Science fiction is an extension of science. ~ Len Wiseman,
95:The best liars write the best fiction. ~ Robert M Roberts,
96:Truth is stranger than fiction, after all. ~ Sara Shepard,
97:Writing fiction for money is a mug's game. ~ Stephen King,
98:After all, fiction is only fact minus time. ~ Mark Forsyth,
99:Fiction becomes visual by becoming verbal ~ William H Gass,
100:Fiction is life with the dull bits left out. ~ Clive James,
101:I'm donating my body to science...fiction. ~ Steven Wright,
102:I rather like getting away from fiction. ~ Penelope Lively,
103:Most books aren't pure nonfiction or fiction. ~ James Frey,
104:The world is a fiction the brain constructs ~ Megan Abbott,
105:Truth is not always injured by fiction. ~ Charlotte Lennox,
106:When history gives out, fiction takes over. ~ Edmund White,
107:Bad prose is the bugbear of genre fiction. ~ Adrian McKinty,
108:Fact is stranger than fiction. ~ Thomas Chandler Haliburton,
109:Fiction is the microscope of truth. ~ Alphonse de Lamartine,
110:I didn't lie! I just created fiction with my mouth! ~ Homer,
111:I tend to prefer the shelter of fiction. ~ Armistead Maupin,
112:LIFE HAS NO PLOT, WHY MUST FILMS OR FICTION? ~ Jim Jarmusch,
113:Life has no plot, why must films or fiction? ~ Jim Jarmusch,
114:The Golden Age of science fiction is thirteen. ~ Terry Carr,
115:Fact and fiction are different truths. ~ Patricia MacLachlan,
116:Fiction, on the other hand, is like swamp fire. ~ Joy Kogawa,
117:Fiction or fable allures to instruction. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
118:I'd always been a science fiction enthusiast. ~ Ivan Reitman,
119:The truer the facts the better the fiction. ~ Virginia Woolf,
120:This is a work of fiction. Any resemblance ~ Lili St Germain,
121:All remembrance of things past is fiction. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
122:All worlds of fiction are alternative realities. ~ Hal Duncan,
123:Fiction writing feels more honest to me. ~ David James Duncan,
124:People who don't read fiction really scare me. ~ Tenaya Jayne,
125:Science fiction is a literature of possibilities. ~ Liu Cixin,
126:I've always been interested in science fiction ~ Martin Landau,
127:I was a science fiction junkie for a long time. ~ William Hurt,
128:I was a very keen reader of science fiction. ~ Terry Pratchett,
129:Reality, as usual, beats fiction out of sight. ~ Joseph Conrad,
130:Science fiction is very healthy in its form. ~ Robert Sheckley,
131:What seems real one moment is fiction the next ~ David Budbill,
132:You can do anything you like, it's all fiction. ~ John Gossage,
133:All serious work in fiction is autobiographical. ~ Thomas Wolfe,
134:fiction is the great lie that tells the truth ~ Dorothy Allison,
135:Fiction is the lie that tells the truth, after all. ~ Anonymous,
136:I read the same amount of nonfiction and fiction. ~ Anne Lamott,
137:it's true, reality really is stranger than fiction. ~ Anonymous,
138:I've always been drawn to historical fiction. ~ Karin Slaughter,
139:My mom introduced me to science-fiction. ~ Logan Marshall Green,
140:Only the writing of fiction keeps fiction alive. ~ Eudora Welty,
141:The Internet of Things is not just science fiction; ~ Anonymous,
142:There is nothing in religion but fiction. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
143:The truth was stranger than the official fiction. ~ Dean Koontz,
144:What we remember is probably fiction anyway. ~ Beryl Bainbridge,
145:With science fiction there's endless possibilities. ~ Anna Torv,
146:Writing fiction is fundamentally an irrational act. ~ Dale Peck,
147:But they went through this fiction every day. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
148:Fantasy and science fiction are where my brain lives. ~ Marie Lu,
149:For truth is always strange; stranger than fiction. ~ Lord Byron,
150:Im a massive science fiction and fantasy geek. ~ Robert Kazinsky,
151:I need fiction like you need to eat or exercise. ~ Arundhati Roy,
152:In some ways truth is stranger than fiction. ~ Mario Van Peebles,
153:I shall speak facts; but some will say I deal in fiction. ~ Ovid,
154:Life's much more fun if you pretend it's fiction. ~ Jamie Delano,
155:Literature is a luxury; fiction is a necessity. ~ G K Chesterton,
156:People read fiction for emotion-not information ~ Sinclair Lewis,
157:Reader, be assured this narrative is no fiction. ~ W E B Du Bois,
158:The aim of fiction is absolute and honest truth. ~ Anton Chekhov,
159:The aim of fiction is honest and absolute truth. ~ Anton Chekhov,
160:the memoir-novel “dumbed down fiction and traduced ~ John Irving,
161:Truth is weirder than any fiction I've seen. ~ Hunter S Thompson,
162:Every fiction has its base in fact,” he tells her. ~ Gayle Forman,
163:Farscape is not what you call hard science fiction. ~ Ben Browder,
164:Fiction is not photography, it's oil painting. ~ Robertson Davies,
165:Fiction is the lie that tells the truth, after all. ~ Neil Gaiman,
166:Fiction’s nice. Fiction lets you select and simplify. ~ Jo Walton,
167:I do love science-fiction and horror movies. ~ Nicolas Ghesquiere,
168:In [writing] fiction, every sentence is its own reward. ~ Amy Tan,
169:I think fiction recues history from its confusions. ~ Don DeLillo,
170:my Kindle loaded with mystery and detective fiction. ~ R P Dahlke,
171:Pretty much all memory is fiction and heavily edited. ~ Iain Reid,
172:Science Fiction has rivets, fantasy has trees. ~ Orson Scott Card,
173:Science fiction is the very literature of change. ~ Frederik Pohl,
174:Science fiction works best when it stimulates debate. ~ Greg Bear,
175:We all write fiction when we write about the past. ~ Stephen King,
176:A well-told lie can heal. Otherwise, what's fiction? ~ Jerry Pinto,
177:A well-told lie can heal. Otherwise, what’s fiction? ~ Jerry Pinto,
178:Fiction described reality better than non-fiction. ~ Tommy Wallach,
179:Fiction is the lie through which we tell the truth. ~ Albert Camus,
180:Fiction reveals truth that reality obscures. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
181:I didn't lie, I was writing fiction with my mouth. ~ Matt Groening,
182:I read mostly fiction, a lot of 19th-century novels. ~ Ken Follett,
183:I've called science fiction 'reality ahead of schedule' ~ Syd Mead,
184:there are elements of truth in all great fiction ~ Teresa Medeiros,
185:Today's science fiction is tomorrow's science fact. ~ Isaac Asimov,
186:When it comes to the past, everyone writes fiction. ~ Stephen King,
187:Why not make a fiction of the mind's fictions? ~ Natasha Trethewey,
188:By definition, fiction writers lie for a living. ~ Janette Rallison,
189:Fear is essential in horror fiction. Gore is optional. ~ Rayne Hall,
190:Fiction gives us a second chance that life denies us ~ Paul Theroux,
191:He is contemporary fiction’s alchemist of the ordinary. ~ Anonymous,
192:He rolled his eyes. "Fiction lies for the truth. ~ Kristine Grayson,
193:I'm a huge historical fiction and non-fiction fan. ~ Gale Anne Hurd,
194:I think science fiction is very bad at prediction. ~ China Mieville,
195:It's hard to do fiction and nonfiction simultaneously. ~ Erica Jong,
196:It was hard to separate the fact from the fiction... ~ Jodi Picoult,
197:I've only read fiction, so I don't know anything actual ~ Anna Torv,
198:Science fiction is for real, space opera is for fun. ~ Brian Aldiss,
199:Fiction gives us a second chance that life denies us. ~ Paul Theroux,
200:Fiction is history, human history, or it is nothing. ~ Joseph Conrad,
201:Fiction is the lie that helps us understand the truth. ~ Tim O Brien,
202:Fiction writers can’t be trusted. They make things up. ~ Dan Poynter,
203:I have replaced his tin life with a silver-gilt fiction ~ Mark Twain,
204:LARRY NIVEN is best known as a science-fiction writer. ~ Neil Gaiman,
205:Man is a poetical animal, and delights in fiction. ~ William Hazlitt,
206:Quand il s'agit du passé, on écrit tous de la fiction ~ Stephen King,
207:When it comes to the past, everyone writes fiction. ♥ ~ Stephen King,
208:Women readers kept fiction alive—here was another one. ~ John Irving,
209:All wars are full of stories that sound like fiction. ~ Javier Cercas,
210:Compelling fiction often obscures the humble truth. ~ Danielle Teller,
211:I came to the conclusion that I am not a fiction writer. ~ Tim LaHaye,
212:Science fiction is for real, space opera is for fun. ~ Brian W Aldiss,
213:This novel is fiction, except for the parts that aren’t. ~ A G Riddle,
214:Changing imagination into fiction is what I love to do. ~ Eveli Acosta,
215:Children's fiction is the most important fiction of all. ~ Neil Gaiman,
216:Fiction can accommodate ambivalence as polemic cannot ~ Claire Tomalin,
217:Fiction gives us the second chance that life denies us. ~ Paul Theroux,
218:Fiction is meant to illuminate, to explode, to refresh. ~ John Cheever,
219:Fiction is true. It doesn’t have to factual to be true. ~ Ben Monopoli,
220:I learned a lot about morality from fiction, from movies. ~ Rob Morrow,
221:It's fiction, the improbable is very probable in my worlds ~ H Q Frost,
222:Literature is a luxury; fiction is a necessity. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
223:Other than fiction and poetry I tend to read history. ~ Stephen Dobyns,
224:Science Fiction is a branch of children's literature. ~ Thomas M Disch,
225:This isn’t fiction, the man says. This is the Post Office. ~ Ali Smith,
226:What is a writer of fiction but a liar with a licence? ~ Joanne Harris,
227:Blue uniforms are real. Cops are a social fiction ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
228:Facts never have to be plausible; fiction does.” “So ~ Jonathan Strahan,
229:Fiction is about what it is to be a human being. ~ David Foster Wallace,
230:Happily, fantastic fiction is slowly gaining in status. ~ Karin Tidbeck,
231:history becomes fiction in the…act of being written down ~ Jack Kerouac,
232:I don't think Pulp Fiction is hard to watch at all. ~ Quentin Tarantino,
233:I tend to resist invitations to interpret my own fiction. ~ J M Coetzee,
234:It's never too late - in fiction or in life - to revise. ~ Nancy Thayer,
235:Let your fiction grow out of the land beneath your feet. ~ Willa Cather,
236:Most science fiction, quite frankly, is silly nonsense. ~ Alfred Bester,
237:Science Fiction is just Fantasy with technicalities. ~ Nicholas P Adams,
238:Science fiction is the agent provocateur of literature. ~ Dana Stabenow,
239:'Star Wars' is more fairy tale than true science fiction. ~ Mark Hamill,
240:The facts of life are the impossibilities of fiction. ~ Jerome K Jerome,
241:Their [politicians] fiction mechanisms are immune to trauma. ~ Dario Fo,
242:There is a real connection between Philosopy and fiction. ~ Ken Follett,
243:What’s fiction?” “Fiction is an improvement on life. ~ Charles Bukowski,
244:Wondrous strong are the spells of fiction. ~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,
245:...writing fiction...is no job for intellectual cowards. ~ Stephen King,
246:fiction can’t be written to comply with winning arguments. ~ Zadie Smith,
247:Fiction is a lie that tells us true things, over and over. ~ Neil Gaiman,
248:Fiction is the only way to redeem the formlessness of life ~ Martin Amis,
249:Fiction was fine, but real life was the true freak show. ~ Mary H K Choi,
250:Fiction writing is great. You can make up almost anything. ~ Ivana Trump,
251:I believe the novella is the perfect form of prose fiction. ~ Ian Mcewan,
252:I'm a complete and utter fiction. Then again, we all are. ~ Colum McCann,
253:I want to be the Cecil B. DeMille of science fiction. ~ Steven Spielberg,
254:Life is much weirder than fiction; nothing's more absurd. ~ Peter Mullan,
255:Never trust anything a fiction writer says about himself. ~ Stephen King,
256:Real life doesn't have to be convincing, but fiction does. ~ Neil Gaiman,
257:Science fiction is becoming more of a diverse kind of genre. ~ Anna Torv,
258:Science fiction is not predictive; it is descriptive. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
259:The science fiction and fantasy field has balkanized, ~ Jonathan Strahan,
260:Writing fiction is like remembering what never happened. ~ Siri Hustvedt,
261:But fiction has the unique power of revealing something true. ~ Ali Smith,
262:Fiction is a lie that tells us true things, over and over. ~ Ray Bradbury,
263:Fiction is a piece of truth that turns lies to meaning. ~ Dorothy Allison,
264:Fiction merely allows us a glimpse of the alternative. ~ Anthony Horowitz,
265:Graphic design is the fiction that anticipates the fact. ~ Michael Bierut,
266:I don't read other science fiction. I don't read any at all. ~ Jack Vance,
267:I likes me some ‘Shit Blows Up’ fiction, don’t get me wrong. ~ Hal Duncan,
268:Just because it's fiction doesn't mean it's any less true. ~ Jodi Picoult,
269:Poetry, far more than fiction, reveals the soul of humanity. ~ Amy Lowell,
270:Science fiction is a kind of archaeology of the future. ~ Clifton Fadiman,
271:Science fiction is the fantasy that science always works. ~ Dexter Palmer,
272:...sense of reality is important in any work of fiction... ~ Stephen King,
273:The best fiction is far more true than any journalism. ~ William Faulkner,
274:The difference between me and you is that I do good fiction. ~ Tom Clancy,
275:Theology, like fiction, is largely autobiographical. ~ Frederick Buechner,
276:There is only one genre in fiction, the genre is called book. ~ Matt Haig,
277:Truth titillates the imagination far less than fiction. ~ Marquis de Sade,
278:what is fiction in particular is truth in general. ~ Eduard Douwes Dekker,
279:Who needed facts when fiction was so much more titillating? ~ Dee Tenorio,
280:you can tell the deepest truths with the lies of fiction ~ Isabel Allende,
281:A play is fiction and fiction is fact distilled into truth. ~ Edward Albee,
282:Fiction is about intimacy with characters, events, places. ~ Robert Morgan,
283:Fiction is only fiction because it is yet to be proven. ~ Robert M Roberts,
284:If someone doesn't like your fiction, it's really insulting. ~ Ethan Canin,
285:It is more important to detect corruption than fiction. ~ Charlotte Lennox,
286:It’s Walking with Shadows by Luke Romyn. A famous fiction ~ Alan McDermott,
287:Mr. Henry James writes fiction as if it were a painful duty. ~ Oscar Wilde,
288:My mom is an artist and my own fiction is deeply visual. ~ Jeff VanderMeer,
289:Reality, if rightly interpreted, is grander than fiction. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
290:Reality is in the business of killing off fiction. ~ Will Christopher Baer,
291:Science fiction is a literature that belongs to all humankind. ~ Liu Cixin,
292:Science fiction is anything published as science fiction. ~ Norman Spinrad,
293:Science fiction is not prescriptive; it is descriptive. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
294:The art of fiction is freedom of will for your characters. ~ Cynthia Ozick,
295:The fiction writer is, first and foremost, an emotionalist. ~ Ray Bradbury,
296:There is no doubt fiction makes a better job of the truth. ~ Doris Lessing,
297:When we front a fiction, we are destined for loneliness. ~ Craig Groeschel,
298:Yeah I loved, as a kid growing up, I loved science-fiction. ~ Jeff Bridges,
299:But that’s one advantage of fiction, you can speed up time. ~ Julian Barnes,
300:Dialogue in fiction is what characters do to one another. ~ Elizabeth Bowen,
301:Everything is fiction except
for what hides in the heart. ~ Sholeh Wolp,
302:Fiction is a lie that tells us true things, over and over. I ~ Ray Bradbury,
303:Fiction is to grown men what play is to the child. ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
304:I have never been a critic of science fiction as a whole. ~ Robert Sheckley,
305:I'm fond of science fiction. But not all science fiction. ~ Richard Dawkins,
306:I'm pretty catholic about what constitutes science fiction. ~ Frederik Pohl,
307:In an infinite multiverse, there is no such thing as fiction. ~ Scott Adsit,
308:I never really saw myself as writing science fiction anyway. ~ Nigel Kneale,
309:Olaf Stapledon’s classic work of science fiction, Star Maker: ~ Michio Kaku,
310:Science fiction is fantasy with bolts painted on outside. ~ Terry Pratchett,
311:Science fiction was never my thing. I have no interest in it. ~ Denis Leary,
312:Sometimes science fiction does become scientific discovery. ~ John Brockman,
313:Space or science fiction has become a dialect for our time. ~ Doris Lessing,
314:This novel is fiction, except for the parts that aren't. ~ Michael Crichton,
315:Truth maybe stranger than fiction, but fiction is truer. ~ Frederic Raphael,
316:We're living in science fiction, but we don't realize it. ~ Terry Pratchett,
317:75% of what happens to Paul Gascoigne in his life is fiction. ~ Glenn Hoddle,
318:All the things we value in society don't mean much in fiction. ~ Martin Amis,
319:Fiction should always steer clear of political considerations. ~ Paul Bowles,
320:If utopian fiction became the new trend, I wouldn't read it. ~ Veronica Roth,
321:I’m a reader who uses fiction as a way of worrying about life. ~ Lorin Stein,
322:It's a love story, so one might consider it science fiction. ~ Renee Carlino,
323:MEMORY IS LIKE FICTION; or else it’s fiction that’s like memory. ~ Anonymous,
324:Real life. The greatest interactive fiction of them all. ~ Donald E Westlake,
325:Science fiction and comedy are generally a pretty bumpy mix. ~ Matt Groening,
326:Science fiction tends to be philosophy for stupid people. ~ Chuck Klosterman,
327:The most sustained feat of imagination in mystery fiction today. ~ Lee Child,
328:There are some subjects that can only be tackled in fiction. ~ John le Carre,
329:The science fiction method is dissection and reconstruction. ~ Frederik Pohl,
330:While fiction is often impossible, it should not be implausible. ~ Aristotle,
331:Drama is the key. Conflict is central. Even in non-fiction. ~ Mark Rubinstein,
332:Fiction can do more than entertain you; it can change you ~ Alisa Hope Wagner,
333:Fiction is my home, I came from fiction, I like to tell stories. ~ Fatih Ak n,
334:History holds up one side of our lives and fiction the other. ~ Samantha Hunt,
335:I am all the time thinking about poetry and fiction and you. ~ Virginia Woolf,
336:I believe some people are just too damn smart to write fiction. ~ Harry Crews,
337:I think fiction is about small ambition, small failed ambition. ~ Ethan Canin,
338:Many fiction writers who put the science in dont get it right. ~ Kathy Reichs,
339:might be stranger than fiction, but it needs a better editor. ~ David Benioff,
340:Never underestimate the power of fiction to tell the truth. ~ Leslie Feinberg,
341:Of all forms of fiction, autobiography is the most gratuitous. ~ Tom Stoppard,
342:Reality is a crutch for people who can't handle science fiction. ~ Gene Wolfe,
343:Science fiction is the art of the possible not the impossible. ~ Ray Bradbury,
344:Science fiction is what I point at when I say science fiction. ~ Damon Knight,
345:Why might not the world WHICH CONCERNS US—be a fiction? ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
346:All fiction that does not violate the laws of physics is fact. ~ David Deutsch,
347:A novel, though fiction, often speaks to the largest truths. ~ Mark Rubinstein,
348:fiction happens in the belly, it doesn't happen in the brain. ~ Isabel Allende,
349:Fiction is a lie. And GOOD fiction is the truth inside the lie. ~ Stephen King,
350:Fiction is a lie, and good fiction is the truth inside the lie. ~ Stephen King,
351:❝ fiction is a piece of truth that turns lies into meaning.❞ ~ Dorothy Allison,
352:Fiction’s about what it is to be a fucking human being. ~ David Foster Wallace,
353:I love science fiction stuff - I'm a bit of a dweeb like that. ~ Rebecca Mader,
354:In the end, fiction is the craft of telling truth through lies. ~ Lauren Groff,
355:longing to trust someone; I was making life a fiction, or writing ~ Hilton Als,
356:Most civilizations had more fiction than they did real history. ~ Vernor Vinge,
357:People seem to want to read more nonfiction than fiction. ~ Bonnie Jo Campbell,
358:There is no fiction. There's only truth disguised as fiction ~ Mark Rubinstein,
359:The secret of successful fiction is a continual slight novelty. ~ Edmund Gosse,
360:A film is - or should be - more like music than like fiction. ~ Stanley Kubrick,
361:A lot of men just don't read. They don't read fiction at all. ~ Karin Slaughter,
362:Being is a fiction invented by those who suffer from becoming. ~ Coleman Dowell,
363:Fiction, however, sometimes ensures disappointment with reality ~ Miguel Syjuco,
364:Fiction intended to please, should resemble truth as much as possible. ~ Horace,
365:For me the purest and truest art in the world is science fiction. ~ C J Cherryh,
366:he is even better than books.   - fiction has nothing on you. ~ Amanda Lovelace,
367:Isn´t it cool? Words, books, fiction all have the power to kill. ~ Project Itoh,
368:I think human beings wouldn't be human without narrative fiction. ~ Paul Auster,
369:Unfortunately, the story wasn’t a novel, and it wasn’t fiction. ~ Aleatha Romig,
370:A book is a good substitute for a man. Fiction, preferably ~ Kamala Suraiyya Das,
371:But I don't read a lot of fiction. I prefer the nonfiction stuff. ~ Andy Richter,
372:Comics also led a lot of young people to science fiction. ~ Kerry James Marshall,
373:Every word is autobiographical, and every word is fiction. ~ William S Burroughs,
374:Fiction and nonfiction, for me, involve very different processes. ~ Chad Harbach,
375:In real life we avoid crisis events. In fiction we seek them out. ~ Steven James,
376:Larger than life is your fiction in a universe made up of one. ~ Sarah McLachlan,
377:Myth is the facts of the mind made manifest in a fiction of matter. ~ Maya Deren,
378:Only through fiction can we think about the unthinkable... ~ Stephen King,
379:The writing of fiction is endlessly surprising to the writer. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
380:American fiction is good. It would be nice if somebody read it. ~ Gary Shteyngart,
381:An upset stomach was a small price to pay for fiction made real. ~ Erika Johansen,
382:Beyond the fiction of reality, there is the reality of the fiction. ~ Slavoj i ek,
383:Fact is only what you believe and fact and fiction work as a team. ~ Jack Johnson,
384:Far from being opposed to the truth, fiction is only its by-product. ~ Paul Veyne,
385:Fiction—and poetry and drama— cleanse the doors of perception. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
386:Fiction is a bridge to the truth that journalism can't reach. ~ Hunter S Thompson,
387:Fiction is an expressionist painting rather than a photograph. ~ Josip Novakovich,
388:Fiction is based on reality unless you're a fairytale artist. ~ Hunter S Thompson,
389:I collect books, primarily first-edition 20th-century fiction. ~ John Larroquette,
390:I love science fiction but especially his because it's so humane. ~ Alice Hoffman,
391:In science fiction, you can also test out your own realities. ~ Theodore Sturgeon,
392:I write essays to clear my mind. I write fiction to open my heart. ~ Taiye Selasi,
393:Memory is like fiction: or else it' fiction that's like memory. ~ Haruki Murakami,
394:Science-fiction balances you on the cliff. Fantasy shoves you off. ~ Ray Bradbury,
395:The kind of fiction I'm trying to write is about telling the truth. ~ Paul Auster,
396:The shape I'm in, I could donate my body to science fiction. ~ Rodney Dangerfield,
397:The truth is stranger than fiction . . . and often more incriminating. ~ Greg Cox,
398:We have escapist fiction, so why not escapist biography? ~ John Kenneth Galbraith,
399:Women’s fiction” doesn’t sound like anything but a slur to my ears. ~ Sheila Heti,
400:Anybody who grew up with the space program is a fan of science fiction. ~ Bill Nye,
401:Beyond the fiction of reality, there is the reality of the fiction. ~ Slavoj Zizek,
402:Fiction just makes it all more interesting. Truth is so boring. ~ Charlaine Harris,
403:I create situations that do not exist. I seek the truth from fiction. ~ Sarah Moon,
404:[I like to read] spiritual books, non-fiction, fiction, I have my moods. ~ MC Lyte,
405:It could be that this record set before you now is a fiction. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
406:It's fun to tease people about where fiction and life intersect. ~ Dorothy Allison,
407:MEMORY IS LIKE FICTION; or else it’s fiction that’s like memory. ~ Haruki Murakami,
408:Memory is like fiction: or else it's fiction that's like memory. ~ Haruki Murakami,
409:Memory is like fiction; or else it's fiction that's like memory. ~ Haruki Murakami,
410:There is absolutely everything in great fiction but a clear answer. ~ Eudora Welty,
411:Truth is more peculiar than fiction. Life is really a startling place. ~ Mira Nair,
412:When fiction writers like my poems I feel like I've hit the jackpot. ~ Cate Marvin,
413:gossip ... is only fiction produced by non-professionals. ~ Dorothy Canfield Fisher,
414:Reality and Fiction are different in that fiction has to make sense. ~ Ray Bradbury,
415:Science fiction is the sovereign prophylactic against future shock. ~ Alvin Toffler,
416:The difference between fiction and reality? Fiction has to make sense. ~ Tom Clancy,
417:Truth might be stranger than fiction, but it needs a better editor. ~ David Benioff,
418:When we risk no contradiction, It prompts the tongue to deal in fiction. ~ John Gay,
419:Amazing, the power of fiction, even cheap popular fiction, to evoke. ~ Philip K Dick,
420:Character in decay is the theme of the great bulk of superior fiction. ~ H L Mencken,
421:Doesn't every previous era feel like fiction once it's gone? ~ Karen Thompson Walker,
422:Everything of this life as a mortal is fiction. It seems real, but... ~ Richard Bach,
423:Expectation is a statistical fiction, like having 2.5 children. ~ William Poundstone,
424:Fiction works when it makes a reader feel something strongly. ~ Jonathan Safran Foer,
425:History is bright and fiction dull with homely men who have charmed women. ~ O Henry,
426:I always say that 'Futurama' is real, and 'The Simpsons' is fiction. ~ Matt Groening,
427:I got into science fiction by being interested in astronomy first. ~ Terry Pratchett,
428:In fear we are acting on fiction and in love we are acting on truth ~ Richard Gerber,
429:In fiction I think we should have no agenda but to tell the truth. ~ Wallace Stegner,
430:In journalism I can only tell what happened. In fiction, I can show it. ~ David Frum,
431:I write contemporary fiction, and that is what my readers want to read. ~ Alex Flinn,
432:I write fiction because it's a way of making statements I can disown. ~ Tom Stoppard,
433:Nothing in fiction is so fantastic as is this truth of the Incarnation. ~ J I Packer,
434:Or so it felt, his touch making her believe in the fiction of them. ~ Lauren Blakely,
435:The most underrated of all contemporary American writers of fiction. ~ William March,
436:All fiction becomes autobiographical when the author has true talent. ~ Jeanne Moreau,
437:Be curious. Question everything. A present fact is just a future fiction. ~ Matt Haig,
438:Being a writer of fiction isn't like being a compulsive liar, honestly. ~ Neil Gaiman,
439:For feel-good fiction to work, there has to be an element of darkness. ~ Marian Keyes,
440:Have at you, Builders! You can’t keep a science-fiction writer in Hell! ~ Larry Niven,
441:I enjoy writing fiction more than writing anything else. Wouldn't anyone? ~ C S Lewis,
442:In other words, fiction is payback for those who have wronged you. ~ Colson Whitehead,
443:It seems like there's a real appetite for science fiction in the States. ~ Matt Smith,
444:It's hard to get justice in the real world. It's possible in fiction. ~ Lauren Beukes,
445:Life is just as deadly as it looks, but fiction is more forgiving. ~ Richard Thompson,
446:Once it gets off the ground into space, all science fiction is fantasy. ~ J G Ballard,
447:Real life is too sloppy a model for good fiction,” Juan Diego had said. ~ John Irving,
448:[She] always knew he was a fiction but believed in him anyway. ~ Jonathan Safran Foer,
449:The moment fiction becomes dishonest is the moment it ceases to matter. ~ K M Weiland,
450:The only imaginative fiction being written today is income tax returns. ~ Herman Wouk,
451:... the very concept of happiness is conditional, a fiction. ~ Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn,
452:An unhappy ending makes it literature rather than romantic fiction. ~ Victoria Clayton,
453:Basically, fiction is people. You can't write fiction about ideas. ~ Theodore Sturgeon,
454:But Roy Rockwood, it was science fiction for the sake of science fiction. ~ Jack Vance,
455:Dedicated to helping you create strong, vibrant, and beautiful fiction ~ David Farland,
456:I didnt have any particular talent for fiction. I took a class in college. ~ Ira Glass,
457:Income tax returns are the most imaginative fiction being written today. ~ Herman Wouk,
458:I shall try to tell the truth, but the result will be fiction. ~ Katherine Anne Porter,
459:I treated Art as the supreme reality and life as a mere mode of fiction. ~ Oscar Wilde,
460:It's no wonder truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense. ~ Mark Twain,
461:Non-fiction can distort; facts can be realigned. But fiction never lies. ~ V S Naipaul,
462:Some of the best fiction writers got their start writing airline menus. ~ Erma Bombeck,
463:There are pieces of me, small pieces, still in love with a fiction. ~ Victoria Aveyard,
464:We live in a science fiction universe. We have done for a long time. ~ Terry Pratchett,
465:When you confidently defend fiction, think about reality also ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
466:A man's face is his autobiography. A woman's face is her work of fiction. ~ Oscar Wilde,
467:Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora ~ Sheree Thomas,
468:I could talk more directly in a nonfiction voice than I could in fiction. ~ Joan Didion,
469:Ours is the first generation that has grown up with science-fiction ideas. ~ Carl Sagan,
470:Real life isn't required to be logical, but fiction has to make sense. ~ Leigh Michaels,
471:Sometimes even lovers of fiction can be satisfied only by the truth. I ~ Michael Chabon,
472:The good thing about writing fiction is that you can get back at people. ~ John Grisham,
473:Women and fiction remain, so far as I am concerned, unsolved problems. ~ Virginia Woolf,
474:All interpretation or observation of reality is necessarily fiction. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
475:Any subject we exclude from fiction will drop from our culture's memory. ~ Emma Donoghue,
476:Do what you will this life's a fiction, And is made up of contradiction. ~ William Blake,
477:Facts are the images of history, just as images are the facts of fiction. ~ E L Doctorow,
478:Fiction and essays can create empathy for the theoretical stranger. ~ Barbara Kingsolver,
479:I believe that reality TV should be called 'not reality' TV; it's fiction. ~ Hill Harper,
480:I didn't lie, I was writing fiction with my mouth."

Homer Simpson ~ Matt Groening,
481:Imagination and fiction make up more than three quarters of our real life. ~ Simone Weil,
482:I think fiction goes to poetry for the intensity of its use of language. ~ Edward Hirsch,
483:Like most science-fiction writers, he knew almost nothing about science. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
484:Nothing factual that I write or say will be as truthful as my fiction. ~ Nadine Gordimer,
485:Science fiction could now be made far more convincing by science fact. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
486:Science fiction is trying to find alternative ways of looking at realities. ~ Iain Banks,
487:Science fiction writers, I am sorry to say, really do not know anything. ~ Philip K Dick,
488:The best readers come to fiction to be free of ... all that isn't fiction. ~ Philip Roth,
489:The good ended happily, and the bad unhappily. That is what fiction means. ~ Oscar Wilde,
490:The history of science fiction tends to be the history of its editors. ~ Samuel R Delany,
491:You cannot be a good writer of serious fiction if you are not depressed. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
492:Do what you will, this world's a fiction and is made up of contradiction ~ William Blake,
493:Humans find their dreams in the virtual world. That's why fiction survives. ~ Shikha Kaul,
494:I suspect that one of the reasons we create fiction is to make sex exciting. ~ Gore Vidal,
495:It's clear that science and science fiction have overlapping populations. ~ Frederik Pohl,
496:Like every fiction, Holly Golightly was a composite of multiple nonfictions. ~ Sam Wasson,
497:One believes in Stephen Dedalus as one believes in few characters in fiction. ~ H G Wells,
498:Property exists by grace of the law. It is not a fact, but a legal fiction. ~ Max Stirner,
499:Science fiction tells us truths that we mightn't listen to any other way. ~ Dean F Wilson,
500:That's science fiction shit,"
"It's only fiction until science catches up. ~ J D Robb,
501:The best science fiction is as good as the best fiction in any field. ~ Theodore Sturgeon,
502:The fiction is not autobiographical. Maybe to some extent it is, of course. ~ Paul Auster,
503:the lies in fiction are such an effective way to tell emotional truths. ~ Charles de Lint,
504:The success of a science fiction writer is if he can write a good read. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
505:...true story of quantum mechanics, a truth far stranger than any fiction. ~ John Gribbin,
506:Writers, at least writers of fiction, are always full of anxiety and worry. ~ Peter Carey,
507:Analog, or Asimov's Magazine, or The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. ~ David Brin,
508:At its best, fiction is not a diversion but a means of knowing the world. ~ Charles Baxter,
509:A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction. ~ Virginia Woolf,
510:Blurring reality and fiction: Fiction written to provoke and to entertain ~ Ronald S Barak,
511:Fiction has always evoked pictures and provoked ideas and sounds in my mind. ~ Vernon Reid,
512:I am constantly amazed by how much stranger science is than science fiction ~ Marcus Chown,
513:if you continue to write fiction, every character you create is partly you. ~ Stephen King,
514:In science fiction a fantastic event or development is considered rationally. ~ James Gunn,
515:People read fiction... to learn something about how to live their lives. ~ Ronald Sukenick,
516:Sometimes life coughs up coincidences no writer of fiction would dare copy. ~ Stephen King,
517:That's part of fiction, creating a world better than the one you live in. ~ Padgett Powell,
518:The Help, I have decided, is science fiction, creating an alternate universe. ~ Roxane Gay,
519:The pictures were the only items in the file that weren’t complete fiction. ~ Lee Goldberg,
520:Tis strange - but true; for Truth is always strange,
Stranger than Fiction ~ Lord Byron,
521:Truth is not only stranger than fiction, it is more interesting. ~ William Randolph Hearst,
522:Truth is so hard to tell, it sometimes needs fiction to make it plausible. ~ Francis Bacon,
523:Why are you always so averse to fiction, when we’ve made it our meal ticket? ~ Scott Lynch,
524:Writers of historical fiction would be lost without libraries and archives. ~ Ruta Sepetys,
525:Writing poetry helps me to write my fiction; each thing helps the other. ~ Sandra Cisneros,
526:Writing romantic fiction is the second chance that loved ones denied us. ~ Shannon L Alder,
527:All fiction has to have a certain amount of truth in it to be powerful. ~ George R R Martin,
528:All the stories are fictions. What matters is which fiction you believe. ~ Orson Scott Card,
529:a truth does not take too long to tell, only a fiction requires so much thought ~ Tami Hoag,
530:fiction always surpasses reality but reality is always richer than fiction. ~ Javier Cercas,
531:Fiction is too complicated and too elusive to break down into a set of tricks. ~ Ben Marcus,
532:for my own purpose, I defined the art of fiction as experience illuminated. ~ Ellen Glasgow,
533:If there were genders to genres, fiction would be unquestionably feminine. ~ William H Gass,
534:Im a devotee of Dracula, which was a pathfinder in horror and vampire fiction. ~ Tanith Lee,
535:It's no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense. ~ Mark Twain,
536:Literary fiction is kept alive by women. Women read more fiction, period. ~ Khaled Hosseini,
537:Poetry is a comforting piece of fiction set to more or less lascivious music. ~ H L Mencken,
538:'Pulp Fiction' is an amazing film, and I haven't made one nearly as good. ~ Martin McDonagh,
539:Science is my territory, but science fiction is the landscape of my dreams. ~ Freeman Dyson,
540:The meaning of fiction is not abstract meaning but experienced meaning. ~ Flannery O Connor,
541:This is only a work of fiction , The Truth as always will be far stranger ~ Arthur C Clarke,
542:What an imprecise science was medicine. It was more an art than was fiction. ~ Graham Moore,
543:Why is autobiography the most popular form of fiction for modern readers? ~ Jill Ker Conway,
544:all fiction is better with explosions' said Jared. 'Basic fact of life. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
545:Do what you will, this life's a fiction, And it is made up of contradiction. ~ William Blake,
546:Fiction is a careful combination of observation, inspiration, and imagination. ~ Luke Taylor,
547:Fiction may be said to be the caricature of history. ~ Edward Bulwer Lytton 1st Baron Lytton,
548:For me, writing essays, prose and fiction is a great way to be self-indulgent. ~ Diablo Cody,
549:If people cannot be flawed in fiction there's no place left for us to be human. ~ Roxane Gay,
550:I never would have guessed I would be making science fiction and horror films. ~ Matt Reeves,
551:I was raised to believe that religion is a beautiful thing, but it's fiction. ~ Winona Ryder,
552:I was really into writing short fiction and also photography when I was a kid. ~ Sean Durkin,
553:...People don't necessarily like to be experimented on. Not even by fiction. ~ Theodora Goss,
554:Romance has been elegantly defined as the offspring of fiction and love. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
555:The Bible, I've said it before, is a beautifully written work of fiction. ~ Janeane Garofalo,
556:The fiction Im most interested in has lines of reference to the real world. ~ Raymond Carver,
557:The first lie of a map—also the first lie of fiction—is that it is the truth. ~ Peter Turchi,
558:The good ended happily, and the bad unhappily. That is what fiction means. ~ Richard Dawkins,
559:All historical novels are science fiction since they are about time travel, ~ Thornton Wilder,
560:Category:
Inner-space fiction
For there is never anywhere to go but in. ~ Doris Lessing,
561:Fiction is fun because you get to steal an identity and try to make it authentic. ~ Dan Chaon,
562:If your fiction is good and true, your novel's ending will discover itself. ~ Mark Rubinstein,
563:I instantly chucked my academic ambitions and began writing fiction full-time. ~ Peter Straub,
564:I'm a huge science fiction fan, and I'm a huge fan of J. Michael Straczynski. ~ Jamie Clayton,
565:I think you can get away with being a bit more political in science fiction. ~ Rupert Sanders,
566:Life is not a matter of fact. What is fact or fiction is a matter of perspective. ~ Anonymous,
567:No one wants to be part of a fiction, and even less so if that fiction is real. ~ Paul Auster,
568:Of the two, I would think of my work as closer to Science Fiction than Fantasy. ~ Jean M Auel,
569:Writing fiction is the act of extending empathy to or beyond its natural limits. ~ Donal Ryan,
570:Fiction has the ability to show us what we don’t know and what doesn’t happen. ~ Javier Mar as,
571:Fiction is about feeling, which is to say that short stories are about all of us. ~ Tom Bailey,
572:Fiction is experimentation; when it ceases to be that, it ceases to be fiction. ~ John Cheever,
573:If you look for me, I'm in the fiction section. Romance has its own section. ~ Nicholas Sparks,
574:I’m the story of Sheresa. I write a little bit of the fiction of me every day. ~ Samantha Hunt,
575:I only read biographies, metaphysics and psychology. I can dream up my own fiction. ~ Mae West,
576:It looked to her like an image out of a Steven Spielberg science fiction movie. ~ Stephen King,
577:like literary fiction, mathematical imagination entertains pure possibilities. ~ Daniel Tammet,
578:Politicians should read science fiction, not westerns and detective stories. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
579:Science Fiction has always been and will always be a fable teacher of morality. ~ Ray Bradbury,
580:The doer is merely a fiction added to the deed ? the deed is everything. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
581:there are no inferior types of fiction, only inferior practitioners
of them ~ David Morrell,
582:This is the real magic of fantasy fiction: it can feed souls and change lives. ~ David Gemmell,
583:What we search for in fiction is not so much reality, but the epiphany of truth. ~ Azar Nafisi,
584:A lie, sometimes, can be truer than the truth, which is why fiction gets written. ~ Tim O Brien,
585:Going back to the noir fiction of the 30s, 40s and 50s. It's very contemporary. ~ Jeff Goldblum,
586:I believe that all fiction is personal and all writing is at some level personal. ~ Kwame Dawes,
587:I feel a terrible loss when I (eventually must) complete a work of fiction. ~ Joyce Carol Oates,
588:I have to conclude that fiction is better at 'the truth' than a factual record. ~ Doris Lessing,
589:I think fiction allows us to sit for a while with people we would rather not meet. ~ Uwem Akpan,
590:It's funny with fiction - once you cut something, it hasn't happened anymore. ~ George Saunders,
591:I write fiction"
"What’s fiction?"
"Fiction is an improvement on life. ~ Charles Bukowski,
592:Literature takes its revenge on reality by making it the slave of fiction. ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
593:My briefest ever definition of science fiction is 'Hubris clobbered by Nemesis.' ~ Brian Aldiss,
594:Part of the beauty of fiction is that we come alive in a body that we don't own. ~ Colum McCann,
595:Richard Dawkins's The Selfish Gene is a classic example of science fiction. ~ Pope Benedict XVI,
596:Science fiction at its best should be crazy and dangerous, not sane and safe. ~ Paul Di Filippo,
597:[Science fiction is] a mode of romance with a strong inherent tendency to myth. ~ Northrop Frye,
598:stories are better than fiction, so let’s hope for some real-life sequels. ~ Katherine Ramsland,
599:The problem with fiction, it has to be plausible. That's not true with non-fiction. ~ Tom Wolfe,
600:There's a time and place for everything, and I believe it’s called 'fan fiction'. ~ Joss Whedon,
601:Truth would quickly cease to be stranger than fiction, once we got as used to it. ~ H L Mencken,
602:why did i so passionately require the truth? because all great fiction is true ~ Kinky Friedman,
603:Ego is a social fiction for which one person at a time gets all the blame. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
604:Every day, I read books on philosophy and science fiction and human consciousness. ~ Tom DeLonge,
605:Fiction is like that, once it is released into the world: contagious, persistent. ~ Jodi Picoult,
606:Fiction should be specific rather than general, because people are specific. ~ Jeffrey Eugenides,
607:Good fiction is made of that which is real, and reality is difficult to come by. ~ Ralph Ellison,
608:I believe that historical fiction is the closest thing we have to time travel. ~ Cassandra Clare,
609:I'm interested in the possibility of fiction which straddles narrative and essay. ~ Susan Sontag,
610:Is there a character in all of fiction more isolated than the little red hen? ~ Karen Joy Fowler,
611:I wish life were a fiction novel. Then everyone would have to do what I say. ~ Michelle M Pillow,
612:More wisdom is contained in the best
crime fiction than in philosophy. ~ Ludwig Wittgenstein,
613:My music is pretty honest. I can't rap on science fiction. Punk is from the street. ~ Rick James,
614:Our first ideas of life are generally taken from fiction rather than fact. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer,
615:put it this way: fiction—writing it, reading it—is an act of the imagination. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
616:Starring in a science-fiction film doesn't mean you have to act science fiction. ~ Harrison Ford,
617:The boundary between science fiction and social reality is an optical illusion ~ Donna J Haraway,
618:There is no such thing as science fiction, there is only science eventuality. ~ Steven Spielberg,
619:The way an institution works is that you go along with the prevailing fiction. ~ Howard Jacobson,
620:Why is life a constant disappointment?’ ‘Because we read fiction,’ Mia said, ~ Victoria Connelly,
621:As with all other aspects of fiction, the key to writing good dialogue is honesty. ~ Stephen King,
622:Fiction is very important to me. It's what I do, it's what I do with my life. ~ Theodore Sturgeon,
623:First-rate science fiction was, and remains, more interesting than second-rate art. ~ Clive James,
624:If you write science fiction you can spell things the way you like, sometimes. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
625:I read everything: fiction, history, science, mathematics, biography, travel. ~ Martin Lewis Perl,
626:It had the austere simplicity of fiction rather than the tangled woof of fact. ~ Raymond Chandler,
627:I think I write fiction for the opportunity to get beyond the limits of my own life. ~ Wally Lamb,
628:It's said truth is stranger than fiction, but fiction makes truth a friend, not a stranger. ~ Avi,
629:Keeping up the fiction. You have to keep it up, sometimes, no matter how you feel. ~ Stephen King,
630:Murderer who lives in my building. His name is Dan Bevacqua. Hes a fiction writer. ~ Arda Collins,
631:My book group has one rule: no books for adults. We read young adult fiction only. ~ Lev Grossman,
632:My boy?
he is even
better than
books.
-fiction has nothing on you. ~ Amanda Lovelace,
633:No matter what decade science fiction comes from, it's representing the present. ~ Don Hertzfeldt,
634:People want movies to be one thing or another; they want it be fact or fiction. ~ Laurel Nakadate,
635:Real science can be far stranger than science fiction and much more satisfying. ~ Stephen Hawking,
636:Science fiction is not necessarily either fiction or anything to do with science. ~ Judith Merril,
637:There are plenty of images of women in science fiction. There are hardly any women. ~ Joanna Russ,
638:Truth is only stranger than fiction if you’re a stranger to the truth. Which ~ Pseudonymous Bosch,
639:Truth is stranger than fiction-to some people, but I am measurably familiar with it. ~ Mark Twain,
640:Why shouldn't truth be stranger than fiction? Fiction, after all, has to make sense. ~ Mark Twain,
641:All fiction is largely autobiographical and much autobiography is, of course, fiction. ~ P D James,
642:All our ancient history, as one of our wits remarked, is no more than accepted fiction. ~ Voltaire,
643:A True Born Englishman's a contradiction!
In speech and irony, in fact a fiction ~ Daniel Defoe,
644:Collins masterfully blends fact and fiction...transcends the historical thriller. ~ Jeffery Deaver,
645:Fiction is the great liar that tells the truth about how the world really lives. ~ Dorothy Allison,
646:Fiction lags after truth, invention is unfruitful, and imagination cold and barren. ~ Edmund Burke,
647:I don't read a great deal of fiction, to my shame, other than the classics. ~ Richard Attenborough,
648:I don't write tracts, I write novels. I'm not a preacher, I'm a fiction writer. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
649:I like to think of multicultural fiction as a flavor rather than a genre of its own. ~ Emlyn Chand,
650:In fiction, conceptualizing, I've found, produces dull and over-controlled text. ~ George Saunders,
651:In science-fiction films the monster should always be bigger than the leading lady. ~ Roger Corman,
652:I think that horror fiction is one of the ways to approach these problems of death. ~ Clive Barker,
653:I was someone who really loved fantasy novels and science fiction novels. ~ Matthew Tobin Anderson,
654:Male novelists made up words in their fiction: “phallomaterialism”; “ero-tectonics. ~ Meg Wolitzer,
655:Science fiction does not remain fiction for long. And certainly not on the Internet. ~ Vinton Cerf,
656:The only difference between reality and fiction is that fiction needs to be credible. ~ Mark Twain,
657:There is no longer any such thing as fiction or nonfiction; there's only narrative. ~ E L Doctorow,
658:The science fiction world has a lot of people doing seriously imaginative thinking. ~ Paul Krugman,
659:All fiction is lies – if it weren’t, it would be biography, history, or reportage. ~ Norman Spinrad,
660:A predilection for genre fiction is symptomatic of a kind of arrested development. ~ Thomas M Disch,
661:Experience tells me that fiction is fiction and that hope leads to disappointment. ~ Courtney Milan,
662:Fiction is the most joyous, beautiful, sophisticated, wonderful thing in the world. ~ Arundhati Roy,
663:fiction writers are the writer-directors of the cinema of inner consciousness, ~ Robert Olen Butler,
664:For books, I don't read much fiction, but like travel essays and good pop-science. ~ Dennis Ritchie,
665:If you don’t know the fantasy life of a country, it’s hard to write fiction about it. ~ Philip Roth,
666:Just as some things are too strange for fiction, others are too true for journalism. ~ P J O Rourke,
667:life rarely finds its exact likeness in a novel, that is hardly fiction’s purpose, ~ Katie Kitamura,
668:my boy?
he is even
better than
books.
-fiction has nothing on you. ~ Amanda Lovelace,
669:Nonfiction is a form of literature that lies halfway between fiction and fact. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
670:Not everyone is capable of writing junk fiction: It requires an authentic junk mind. ~ John Gardner,
671:Sure, 90% of science fiction is crud. That's because 90% of everything is crud. ~ Theodore Sturgeon,
672:There is nothing to be learned from history anymore. We're in science fiction now. ~ Allen Ginsberg,
673:What's made up in the head is the fiction. What comes out of the heart is a myth. ~ Joseph Campbell,
674:A writer of fiction, a professional liar, is paradoxically obsessed with what is true. ~ John Updike,
675:Fiction is a solution, the best solution, to the problem of existential solitude. ~ Jonathan Franzen,
676:For me, all stories are fiction. The only question is: Does it rattle the soul or not? ~ Peter Orner,
677:If I couldn't be a fiction writer, I would be a roller coaster designer for theme parks ~ Mike Wells,
678:I lay off a lot modern fiction and only rely on living writers for non-fiction work. ~ Henry Rollins,
679:I love stories, but writing fiction is another craft and I don't feel as if I have it. ~ Joan Larkin,
680:In fiction, I tend to write fairly realistic dialogue-not always, and it tends to vary ~ Don DeLillo,
681:I've written 17 novels, and I've found out that fiction can't keep up with real life. ~ John Grisham,
682:Literary fiction, as a strict genre, is all but dead. Meanwhile, most genres flourish. ~ Dean Koontz,
683:My first and biggest love was always fiction writing. But it is a very lonely pastime. ~ Etgar Keret,
684:The best of fiction, as we know, of course, doesn't tell the truth; it tales the truth. ~ Criss Jami,
685:The function of science fiction is not only to predict the future, but to prevent it. ~ Ray Bradbury,
686:There is only one kind of immorality in fiction, and that is when you write badly. ~ Anthony Burgess,
687:There's a perilous word fiction writers need to watch out for. The word is 'had.' ~ James Scott Bell,
688:Writing fiction has become a priestly business in countries that have lost their faith. ~ Gore Vidal,
689:Books, and especially fiction, do not proceed from ideas. They are born from feelings ~ Julius Lester,
690:Equality may be a fiction but nonetheless one must accept it as a governing principle. ~ B R Ambedkar,
691:Even people that were never interested in science fiction are interested in STAR TREK. ~ Michael Dorn,
692:Fiction is open to whoever comes in the door, as long as you come in energetically. ~ George Saunders,
693:How do you document real life, when real life's getting more like fiction each day. ~ Jonathan Larson,
694:I'd never been to a science-fiction convention until I became a professional writer. ~ China Mieville,
695:If science fiction is the mythology of modern technology, then its myth is tragic. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
696:I have a longing for fiction - to try to believe in it and to disappear into it. ~ Karl Ove Knausgard,
697:I think most people live in fiction...That's how you keep your fragile body intact. ~ Haruki Murakami,
698:It's kind of strange- in fiction you get to tell lies and are applauded for it. ~ Robert James Waller,
699:Poetry is written with tears, fiction with blood, and history with invisible ink. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
700:Poetry is written with tears, fiction with blood, and history with invisible ink. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zafon,
701:The practice of fiction can be dangerous: it puts ideas into the head of the world. ~ Anthony Burgess,
702:the world is a wonder, but the portions are small” —Rebecca Hazelton, “Slash Fiction ~ Rebecca Makkai,
703:What's hard, in hacking as in fiction, is not writing, it's deciding what to write. ~ Neal Stephenson,
704:When you have so much real drama in your life, it’s hard to think about fiction. ~ Jacqueline Woodson,
705:You can include essay elements in fiction; this is a very nineteenth century practice. ~ Susan Sontag,
706:As a publisher and author, I'm a big fan of historical fiction and also memoir. ~ Andrea Davis Pinkney,
707:Books, and especially fiction, do not proceed from ideas. They are born from feelings ~ Julius Lester,
708:But real science can be far stranger than science fiction, and much more satisfying. ~ Stephen Hawking,
709:Despite what your science fiction writers dream, we simply don't have the technology ~ Stephenie Meyer,
710:Don't get me wrong, I love literary fiction. It's faux literary fiction I can't stand. ~ Dennis Lehane,
711:Fantasy deals with the immeasurable while science-fiction deals with the measurable. ~ Walter Wangerin,
712:Fiction is harder for me than nonfiction - more gratifying, as a result, when it succeeds. ~ Rick Bass,
713:History tells us what people do; historical fiction helps us imagine how they felt. ~ Guy Vanderhaeghe,
714:Imagination is the key to my lyrics. The rest is painted with a little science fiction. ~ Jimi Hendrix,
715:I'm a reluctant writer of non-fiction, in part because I don't really feel qualified. ~ William Gibson,
716:I'm defending fiction as a human capacity more than as a popular or dying literary genre. ~ Ben Lerner,
717:In non-fiction you have to stay true to historical events, be they personal or national . ~ Andrew Lam,
718:In this age when reality is built on big lies, what better place for truth than fiction? ~ Mat Johnson,
719:It's much harder when you're writing about your life, than when you're writing fiction. ~ Leigh Newman,
720:I've always thought of science fiction as being, at some level, a 19th-century business. ~ Robert Reed,
721:I would never never read a work of fiction and want to know about the person's life. ~ Jamaica Kincaid,
722:Let us say that science fiction is a kind of conceptual disorientation of the familiar. ~ Adam Roberts,
723:Never believe that the fiction writing life makes sense.... It's insanity by definition. ~ Jo Beverley,
724:Now I was truly offended. “I don’t read romance novels,” I hissed, “I read gay fiction. ~ Nick Pageant,
725:Science fiction, to me, has not only things that wouldn't happen, but other planets. ~ Margaret Atwood,
726:She made him smile, and it was enough… to make him feel real in a world full of fiction. ~ A M Johnson,
727:Simply put, Redeeming Love is the most powerful work of fiction you will ever read. ~ Liz Curtis Higgs,
728:Steven Pinker says, the invention of printing and the widespread appearance of fiction - ~ Martin Amis,
729:The principle that characters do not want to change applies to more than just fiction. ~ Donald Miller,
730:The Sword the burning decieved rising the science fiction the betrayed the spy the souls ~ Moira Young,
731:The trouble with writing fiction is that it has to make sense, whereas real life doesn't. ~ Iain Banks,
732:Walking the plank is a Victorian fiction, and I will not have it on my ship! ~ George MacDonald Fraser,
733:Writing fiction is the act of weaving a series of lies to arrive at a greater truth. ~ Khaled Hosseini,
734:You can't be a serious writer of fiction unless you believe the story you are telling. ~ Norman Mailer,
735:As I keep saying, fiction is truth. I think fiction is the truest thing there ever was. ~ Arundhati Roy,
736:'Breaking Bad.' Because it's the best American narrative fiction of the last ten years. ~ David Benioff,
737:Fantasy is the impossible made probable. Science Fiction is the improbable made possible. ~ Rod Serling,
738:Fiction either moves mountains or it's boring; it moves mountains or it sits on its ass. ~ David Foster,
739:Fiction, the time-honoured resource of the ill-at-ease, would have to come to her aid, ~ Anita Brookner,
740:He tortured, not to force you to reveal a fact, but to force you to collude in a fiction. ~ Martin Amis,
741:I don't read an awful lot of fiction and when I do, it tends to be lightweight stuff. ~ Terry Pratchett,
742:I like science fiction. I took all the accelerated classes in school. I'm kind of a dork. ~ Anson Mount,
743:I started out writing much more science fictiony stuff and writing about science fiction. ~ Neil Gaiman,
744:I think I'm out of crime fiction now, and I think the dividing line is American Tabloid. ~ James Ellroy,
745:I've loved science fiction my whole life. But I've never made a science fiction movie. ~ Don Hertzfeldt,
746:Key to all fiction, long or short, is to remember that the wolfman did not want the moon. ~ Ron Carlson,
747:Science fiction is about what could be but isn't; fantasy is about what couldn't be. ~ Orson Scott Card,
748:Sex, without society as its landscape, has never been of much interest to fiction. ~ Elizabeth Hardwick,
749:Sometimes fiction is more easily understood than true events. Reality is often pathetic. ~ Young Ha Kim,
750:The idea of a flip book still really appeals to me. That idea of fiction and non-fiction. ~ Yann Martel,
751:We fiction writers have to preserve the right to wear many hats – including sombreros. ~ Lionel Shriver,
752:When I was a kid, I read the science-fiction shelves, and I read the fantasy shelves. ~ Terry Pratchett,
753:Writing fiction feels like an adventurous act, nudging aside reality a word at a time. ~ James Van Pelt,
754:A common misconception is women’s fiction is synonymous with romance. That is so not true. ~ Emlyn Chand,
755:Fantasy is the oldest form of literature and science fiction is just a new twist on it. ~ Katharine Kerr,
756:Fiction give life to places in expressive ways that no history book can begin to suggest. ~ Paul Theroux,
757:fiction is founded on truth....unless things did happen,people couldn't think of them. ~ Agatha Christie,
758:Good writers may “tell” about almost anything in fiction except the characters’ feelings. ~ John Gardner,
759:I can't read historical fiction because I find the real thing so much more interesting. ~ Antonia Fraser,
760:I exaggerate a lot and I get fiction and reality mixed up, but I don't actually ever lie. ~ Lucia Berlin,
761:If this were played upon a stage now, I could condemn it as an improbable fiction. ~ William Shakespeare,
762:I grew up obsessed with science fiction, and when I was really young, I wanted to be a scientist. ~ Moby,
763:I think that fiction has a part to play in urging us, as a species, toward compassion. ~ George Saunders,
764:It's part of a cycle of stories I'm writing where I deconstruct classic science fiction. ~ Cory Doctorow,
765:One benefit of fiction: it puts your mind off your reality when your reality is off-putting. ~ Anonymous,
766:Some of the food in Liquor is food I've really eaten filtered through a veil of fiction. ~ Poppy Z Brite,
767:That is partly why women marry - to keep up the fiction of being in the hub of things. ~ Elizabeth Bowen,
768:That is why fiction existed, as a way to look at the world without being broken by it. ~ Olen Steinhauer,
769:The God of the Old testament is arguably the most unpleasant character in all fiction. ~ Richard Dawkins,
770:The primary subject of fiction is and has always been human emotion, values, and beliefs. ~ John Gardner,
771:The trouble with writing fiction is that it has to make sense, whereas real life doesn't. ~ Iain M Banks,
772:This is one of the problems with reality: the extent to which it resembles bad fiction. ~ Mark O Connell,
773:Truth may be stranger than fiction, goes the old saw, but it is never as strange as lies. ~ John Hodgman,
774:We make fiction because we are fiction ... It lived us into being and it lives us still. ~ Russell Hoban,
775:36 Arguments for the Existence of God: A Work of Fiction by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein ~ Timothy Ferriss,
776:fiction is founded on truth... unless things did happen, people couldn't think of them. ~ Agatha Christie,
777:Fiction is ideally suited to re-creating the important emotional aspects of history. ~ Alix Kates Shulman,
778:Fiction is the only way I know a human being can inhabit the mind of another human being. ~ Jhumpa Lahiri,
779:First of all, writing at best - certainly fiction writing - more and more I think is magic. ~ Kathy Acker,
780:I define science fiction as the art of the possible. Fantasy is the art of the impossible. ~ Ray Bradbury,
781:I first read science fiction in the old British Chum annual when I was about 12 years old. ~ A E van Vogt,
782:I'm a novelist. I think fiction is important or I wouldn't be doing it, but most of it's bad. ~ Dale Peck,
783:It's very strange writing science fiction in a world that moves as fast as ours does. ~ Daniel Keys Moran,
784:I’ve often thought the Bible should have a disclaimer in the front saying this is fiction. ~ Ian Mckellen,
785:I was hardly fit for human society. Thus destiny shaped me to be a science fiction writer. ~ Brian Aldiss,
786:Kneading memory makes the dough of fiction; which we know, sometimes never stops rising. ~ Barry Unsworth,
787:No matter how many books I write, I will eventually get to fiction. That is where I'm going. ~ Neil Young,
788:remember: not all that is fiction is fictional, and not all that is true is transparent. ~ Bentley Little,
789:so I decided to fall into fiction in order to forget about reality for a while. When ~ Brittainy C Cherry,
790:Sometimes the song isn't strong enough to contain the fiction, because memories are fictions. ~ Nick Cave,
791:The difference between fiction and nonfiction is that fiction must be absolutely believable. ~ Mark Twain,
792:The difference between nonfiction and fiction is that fiction must be absolutely believable. ~ Mark Twain,
793:The dilemma felt by science fiction writers will be perceived in other creative endeavors. ~ Vernor Vinge,
794:The president already has a Nobel Prize for peace. I think he's shooting for one in fiction. ~ Trey Gowdy,
795:There's a big overlap with the people you meet at the fantasy and science fiction cons. ~ Fred Saberhagen,
796:Truth becomes fiction when the fiction's true. Real becomes Not-Real when the Unreal's Real. ~ Cao Xueqin,
797:Truth becomes fiction when the fiction’s true; Real becomes not-real when the unreal’s real. ~ Cao Xueqin,
798:We cannot separate violence in fiction from violence in the world no matter how hard we try. ~ Roxane Gay,
799:What child didn't wish to know if his bedtime stories were the stuff of fiction or of truth? ~ V E Schwab,
800:When I was growing up, the exam system didn't allow you to write fiction, so you never did. ~ Roddy Doyle,
801:After I'd been a lawyer for about five or six years, I started playing around with fiction. ~ John Grisham,
802:As a kid, I didn't read a great deal of fiction, and I've forgotten most of what I did read. ~ Mark Haddon,
803:As a kid I was enamored with fiction, most of it utterly forgettable and long forgotten. ~ Andrew Bacevich,
804:Better to have a small role in God's story than to cast yourself as the lead in your own fiction. ~ LeCrae,
805:familiar with Scandinavian crime fiction – Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö, Karin Fossum, Håkan ~ Stieg Larsson,
806:Fiction gives us a second chance that life denies us.
-Paul Theroux, novelist (b. 1941) ~ Paul Theroux,
807:Geoff Nelder inhabits Science Fiction the way other people inhabit their clothes. ~ Jon Courtenay Grimwood,
808:I have to say that writing about my writing process is more daunting than writing non-fiction. ~ Sefi Atta,
809:I’m not sure what’s real and what’s fiction anymore.", Celestra Caine from FADE by Kailin Gow ~ Kailin Gow,
810:I'm sure there's an alternate universe where I got to become a pulpy science fiction writer. ~ Neil Gaiman,
811:I think biography can be more personal than fiction, and certainly can be more expressive. ~ Peter Ackroyd,
812:One of the things [fiction] does is lead you to recognize what you did not know before. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
813:To me, it's science fiction for me to do the things I've been blessed to do in this industry. ~ Will Smith,
814:Truth becomes fiction when the fiction’s true; Real becomes not-real where the unreal’s real. ~ Cao Xueqin,
815:What might sound like science fiction elsewhere in the world at DARPA was future science. ~ Annie Jacobsen,
816:writing fiction is the best thing there is because absolutely everything is possible! ~ Mario Vargas Llosa,
817:You don't get rich writing science fiction. If you want to get rich, you start a religion. ~ L Ron Hubbard,
818:You don’t get rich writing science fiction. If you want to get rich, you start a religion. ~ L Ron Hubbard,
819:Actually, I'm addicted to science fiction. Let me make my diction clear - I love sci-fi. ~ John Rhys Davies,
820:Even fiction—perhaps especially fiction—has more truth in it than the author knows. ~ Marion Zimmer Bradley,
821:Every photo is almost a fiction or a dream. If it's really good, it's another form of life. ~ Sylvia Plachy,
822:Fantasies are things that can't happen, and science fiction is about things that can happen. ~ Ray Bradbury,
823:fiction works because a part of the mind forgets that it’s fiction while we’re reading it. ~ Lawrence Block,
824:I love writing fiction - you can take just what you want from a place, and leave the rest. ~ Kate Grenville,
825:In fiction if nowhere else, I must have a little meaning, a little coherence, or I will go mad. ~ Anne Rice,
826:I started writing short fiction very briefly, as I imagine is the case for some novelists. ~ William Gibson,
827:I think the great unspoken theme in noir fiction is male self-pity. It pervades noir movies. ~ James Ellroy,
828:I think the least important thing about science fiction for me is its predictive capacity. ~ William Gibson,
829:I’ve reached the point where tedium is a person, the incarnate fiction of my own company. ~ Fernando Pessoa,
830:I would be more frightened as a writer if people thought my movies were like science fiction. ~ Neil LaBute,
831:Just tell your story. Pretty much all memory is fiction and heavily edited. So just keep going. ~ Iain Reid,
832:Love at first sight might be fiction, but most fiction has a grain of truth in it, right? ~ Pauline Creeden,
833:Many fiction writers eventually want to feel that their work forms a single, unified entity. ~ Peter Straub,
834:Me, I have a science fiction writer's conviction that the damn robot is supposed to speak ~ Spider Robinson,
835:Myths are not fiction, but history seen with a poet's eyes and recounted in a poet's terms. ~ Frank Herbert,
836:Science fiction is about using speculative scenarios as a lens to examine the human condition. ~ Ted Chiang,
837:Science fiction is no more written for scientists than ghost stories are written for ghosts. ~ Brian Aldiss,
838:Their excessive consumption of fiction was an essential distraction from their broken home. ~ Michael Ebner,
839:Those who say truth is stranger than fiction have wasted their time on poorly written fiction. ~ Mark Twain,
840:Time is, as you are probably aware, merely a convenient fiction. There is no such thing as time. ~ E Nesbit,
841:What is truth, and what fiction? You must understand that truth is fiction, and fiction truth. ~ Cao Xueqin,
842:When you are writing fiction your task is to reflect the fullest complications of the world ~ Julian Barnes,
843:Apparently I’ve been typecast in science fiction: I’m a Russian bisexual telepathic Jew. ~ Claudia Christian,
844:As with a love affair, the battered heart needs time to recover from a good work of fiction. ~ Michael Dirda,
845:Fiction happens in the womb. It doesn't get processed in the mind until you do the editing. ~ Isabel Allende,
846:Fiction is a particularly effective way for strangers to connect across time and distance ~ Jonathan Franzen,
847:Fiction is such a world of freedom, it's wonderful. If you want someone to fly, they can fly. ~ Alice Walker,
848:Good horror fiction deals with taboos. It must always go to the limits of what is acceptable. ~ Clive Barker,
849:I believe the word "perfection" should be changed to "pure fiction" - it's just not possible! ~ Arielle Ford,
850:I do enjoy Gothic fiction or books about zombies if they are well written and I like vampires. ~ Roddy Doyle,
851:I love reading fiction about people who are connecting intellectually. I find that exhilarating. ~ Lily King,
852:In some ways, I think it's the closest that we come to the truth — is in the form of fiction. ~ Laila Lalami,
853:I really like stories, so in a way it doesn't matter for me if they are real or fiction. ~ Volker Bertelmann,
854:It is good fiction, so largely ignored now, that brings us so much closer to the real facts. ~ J B Priestley,
855:I was uncomfortable writing fiction. My love was the personal essay rather than the novel. ~ Alain de Botton,
856:One of benefit of fiction: it puts your mind off your reality when your reality is off-putting. ~ Neil Smith,
857:One of the nice things about science fiction is that it lets us carry out thought experiments. ~ Rudy Rucker,
858:Stories are consoling, fiction is one of the consolation prizes for having lived in the world. ~ Don DeLillo,
859:To be honest, Im not that much of a reader of Korean fiction, since so little is translated. ~ Chang Rae Lee,
860:Why do we write fiction?” Professor Piper asked. Cath looked down at her notebook. To disappear. ~ Anonymous,
861:Write fiction about your life and pay with your life, at least three times. Here is the ax. ~ Alexander Chee,
862:All the great plots of AI fiction are still to be told. Or we can simply wait for the headlines. ~ Hugh Howey,
863:A writer's job is to imagine everything so personally that the fiction is as vivid as memories. ~ John Irving,
864:Dramatic fiction - William Shakespeare made his biggest mark writing dramatic love stories. ~ Nicholas Sparks,
865:Even a fiction film is hard to end. You can going on shooting and editing a documentary forever. ~ Leos Carax,
866:Every writer dreams about the day they can step into their fiction and wander its hallways. ~ Shannon L Alder,
867:I find the title How to Be Good. Curious, I open it up. I'm disappointed to find it's fiction. ~ Jael McHenry,
868:If you're going to make a science fiction movie, then have a hover craft chase, for God's sake. ~ Joss Whedon,
869:Is good fiction more likely to be about the air we breathe or the nose we breathe it through? ~ Richard Russo,
870:Let us rid ourselves of the fiction that low oil prices are somehow good for the United States. ~ Dick Cheney,
871:Life wasn’t like fiction. Most of the time, he never learned why. Not that it mattered, really. ~ Diane Capri,
872:Now, being a science fiction writer, when I see a natural principle, I wonder if it could fail. ~ Rudy Rucker,
873:Once confined to fantasy and science fiction, time travel is now simply an engineering problem. ~ Michio Kaku,
874:People tend to think of their lives as having a dramatic arc, because they read too much fiction. ~ Will Self,
875:Science fiction is no more written for scientists than ghost stories are written for ghosts. ~ Brian W Aldiss,
876:She knew the difference between fact and fiction, but she couldn’t abandon her love stories. ~ Kristin Hannah,
877:There may always be another reality to make fiction of the truth we think we've arrived at. ~ Christopher Fry,
878:Truth becomes fiction when the fiction's true;
Real becomes not-real where the unreal's real. ~ Cao Xueqin,
879:Was the dividing line between life and fiction as hazy for other people as it was for a writer? ~ Dean Koontz,
880:A good science fiction story should be able to predict not the automobile but the traffic jam. ~ Frederik Pohl,
881:A science fiction writer should try to combine the intimately human with the grandly cosmic. ~ Robert J Sawyer,
882:But I opened my mind and came to appreciate that even in fiction there can be morsels of truth. ~ Sejal Badani,
883:Cała literatura jest literaturą o Obcych. Science fiction zakłada tylko trochę jaskrawsze maski. ~ Jacek Dukaj,
884:Don't make a big distinction between fiction and non-fiction. These are arbitrary distinctions. ~ Farley Mowat,
885:Fiction becomes a place where I face certain fears such as losing language or losing my children. ~ Ben Marcus,
886:Films are always a fiction, not documentary. Even a documentary is a kind of fiction. ~ Philip Seymour Hoffman,
887:I'm a huge fan of science fiction and fantasy - not so much horror because I get a bit scared. ~ Michael Sheen,
888:It seems that fiction no longer produces work that makes one feel the human condition deeply. ~ Vivian Gornick,
889:I've always been a big fan of science fiction and of the worlds of the spiritual and the mystic. ~ Dan Aykroyd,
890:I've written fiction for as long as I can remember; it's always been my preferred form of play. ~ Taiye Selasi,
891:Men read science fiction to build the future. Women don't need to read it. They are the future. ~ Ray Bradbury,
892:People as me how I do research for my science fiction. The answer is, I never do any research. ~ Frederik Pohl,
893:The more fiction you read and write, the more you'll find your paragraphs forming on their own. ~ Stephen King,
894:the true subject of science fiction is death, not life. It will all end. The totality of it. ~ Gary Shteyngart,
895:All you need do, Bernie,”she gulped her toast soaked in coffee, “is present the truth as fiction. ~ James Purdy,
896:Because sadly, this trait, the inability to get out of one’s head, is not restricted to fiction. ~ Ryan Holiday,
897:Don't make a big distinction between fiction and non-fiction. These are arbitrary distinctions. ~ Farley Mowat,
898:Dutton, the home of Winnie the Pooh, would find a second identity as a home for gay fiction. ~ Christopher Bram,
899:Emotional truths can sometimes be conveyed more effectively, more compellingly, through fiction. ~ Diana Ossana,
900:Fiction has this special power. It has a power to clarify, to galvanize, to prophesy, and warn. ~ Ben H Winters,
901:Fiction is not the opposite of truth—indeed, it is sometimes the most persuasive vehicle for it. ~ Randy Alcorn,
902:God is a fiction invented by people so they do not have to face the reality of their condition. ~ Michel Onfray,
903:I am not a science fiction writer. I am a fantasy writer. But the label got put on me and stuck. ~ Ray Bradbury,
904:If you can’t get your head around facts then stick with all the possibilities fiction gives. ~ Stephen Richards,
905:In really, really good science fiction the line between the science and the fiction is blurry. ~ Damon Lindelof,
906:I read very, very little fiction as a kid. All the books I can remember are junior science books. ~ Mark Haddon,
907:I think if I'm going to do a science fiction, I'm going to go down a new path that I want to do. ~ Ridley Scott,
908:It's your fiction that interests me. Your studies of the interplay of human motives and emotion. ~ Isaac Asimov,
909:Ive lost much of my heart and the spark or fire that once created, or produced, the art of fiction. ~ Rick Bass,
910:Literature is not an instruction manual. For obvious reasons, this is rarely noted in fiction. ~ Charles Baxter,
911:So they were trying to re-invent themselves and their universe. Science fiction was a big help. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
912:Speaking a beautiful lie is a great art, which is often presented to us in the form of fiction. ~ Awdhesh Singh,
913:The novel doesn't come into existence until certain methods of reproducing fiction come along. ~ Leslie Fiedler,
914:There's a fine line between fiction and non-fiction and I think I snorted it somewhere in 1979 ~ Kinky Friedman,
915:Well, to be honest I think I tell less truth when I write journalism than when I write fiction. ~ Julian Barnes,
916:What you can eliminate from fiction is the description of things that most readers have seen. ~ Haruki Murakami,
917:A lot of books in the self-help section of your bookstore really belong in the fiction section. ~ Steve Maraboli,
918:By it's mimetic intention, the world of fiction leads us to the heart of the real world of action. ~ Paul Ric ur,
919:Calling one thing 'literature' and another 'fiction' is a way to create status where there is none. ~ Tucker Max,
920:Does Playboy still run fiction?”
“I have absolutely no idea, Melinda,” he said, grinning. ~ Robyn Carr,
921:Every writer knows he is spurious; every fiction writer would rather be credible than authentic. ~ John le Carre,
922:I don't really see science fiction as fiction. I can imagine colonies on Mars and everything. ~ Sigourney Weaver,
923:I just think that fiction that isn't exploring what it means to be human today isn't art. ~ David Foster Wallace,
924:In the age of globalization—an ad hoc, temp-job, fiercely competitive age—hope is not a fiction. ~ Katherine Boo,
925:It’s not the word made flesh we want in writing, in poetry and fiction, but the flesh made word ~ William H Gass,
926:Observe, Chagatai, the protagonist of every work of fiction is Humanity, and the antagonist is God. ~ Ada Palmer,
927:Part fact part fiction is what life is. And it is always a cover story. I wrote my way out. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
928:Science Fiction has always attracted more talented writers than it could reward adequately. ~ Walter M Miller Jr,
929:Science fiction is really a rather tiny business compared with its giant cousin, which is fantasy. ~ Robert Reed,
930:The function of science fiction is not always to predict the future but sometimes to prevent it. ~ Frank Herbert,
931:The great thing about growing up with science fiction is that you have an interest in everything. ~ Ray Bradbury,
932:The reader can't take much for granted in a fiction where the scenery can eat the characters. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
933:Too many words for one book--truth might be stranger than fiction, but it needs a better editor. ~ David Benioff,
934:You read a script and its based on 'Reservoir Dogs' and 'Pulp Fiction', and it goes right in the bin. ~ Tim Roth,
935:Fiction brings salvation to characters in stories that would otherwise have no salvation at all. ~ Hiromu Arakawa,
936:However strange or macabre some of the following incidents may seem, this is not a work of fiction. ~ Erik Larson,
937:If you can't see the joy and wonder to be found in genre fiction, that's your problem, not mine. ~ William Meikle,
938:If you continually write and read yourself as a fiction, you can change what's crushing you. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
939:I got nice rejections explaining that historical fiction was a difficult sell. But I kept trying. ~ Anita Diament,
940:I think there's nothing more wonderful than using fiction to reflect real-world cultural ideas. ~ Jesse Eisenberg,
941:Science fiction writers put characters into a world with arbitrary rules and work out what happens. ~ Rudy Rucker,
942:Sometimes fiction is a way of coping with the poison of the world in a way that lets us survive it. ~ Neil Gaiman,
943:The best fiction rarely provides answers; but it does formulate the questions exceptionally well. ~ Julian Barnes,
944:the great advantage of really contemporary fiction is that one finds oneself mirror on every page ~ Peter Ackroyd,
945:... the main concern of the fiction writer is with mystery as it is incarnated in human life. ~ Flannery O Connor,
946:There's not a strong autobiographical strain in my fiction. A few bits of fact here and there. ~ Donald Barthelme,
947:This is fiction, and if people cannot be flawed in fiction there’s no place left for us to be human. ~ Roxane Gay,
948:We are now in a position to determine just what sort of science fiction story this really is. ~ Theodore Sturgeon,
949:When I was a teenager, I was a voracious reader of crime fiction, but only contemporary books. ~ Michael Connelly,
950:Anyone who says businessmen deal in facts, not fiction, has never read old five-year projections. ~ Malcolm Forbes,
951:Archaeology is the anthropology of the past, and science fiction is the anthropology of the future. ~ Joan D Vinge,
952:But please remember: this is only a work of fiction. The truth, as always, will be far stranger. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
953:Fiction is one of the few experiences where loneliness can be both confronted and relieved. ~ David Foster Wallace,
954:fiction is the truth inside the lie, and the truth of this fiction is simple enough: the magic exists. ~ Anonymous,
955:Goodreads.com is actually about fiction not dreading goo. But I have a profile there, anyway... ~ Michael A Arnzen,
956:In all fiction, when a man is faced with alternatives he chooses one at the expense of others. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
957:I think Junior is certainly a science fiction premise as is Twins, as is Dave, beyond Ghostbusters. ~ Ivan Reitman,
958:I think one of the big challenges about science fiction is finding truth to relate to as an actor. ~ Amanda Schull,
959:I think that one of the compelling themes of fiction is this confrontation between good and evil. ~ William Styron,
960:I think the highest purpose of fiction is to show that all people are fundamentally worthy of mercy. ~ Tom Bissell,
961:It's doubtful that anyone with an internet connection at his workplace is writing good fiction. ~ Jonathan Franzen,
962:It would be easier to write a novel without reader input, but I feel the fiction is richer for it. ~ Piers Anthony,
963:I was always fascinated by science-fiction shows, shows like 'Star Trek' and 'Lost in Space.' ~ Michael P Anderson,
964:People who write fiction, if they had not taken it up, might have become very successful liars. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
965:Poetry, at the best, does us a kind of violence that prose fiction rarely attempts or accomplishes. ~ Harold Bloom,
966:Science fiction annoyed me because it was like, "Why is the world as it is not enough for you?" ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
967:Science fiction is filled with Martians and space travel to other planets, and things like that. ~ Margaret Atwood,
968:Science fiction is one of the smartest genres around because you have to have so much forethought. ~ Amanda Schull,
969:The story you are about to read is a work of fiction. Nothing - and everything - about it is real. ~ Todd Strasser,
970:To create a past that seemed authentic but would be a fiction, you need an invented language. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
971:Wars produce many stories of fiction, some of which are told until they are believed to be true. ~ Ulysses S Grant,
972:Where radio is different than fiction is that even mediocre fiction needs purpose, a driving question. ~ Ira Glass,
973:But the task of science fiction is not to predict the future. Rather, it contemplates possible futures. ~ Anonymous,
974:Does it strike you, Mr. Keller, that we live every day in the science fiction of our youth? ~ Robert Charles Wilson,
975:Fiction is not imagination. It is what anticipates imagination by giving it the form of reality. ~ Jean Baudrillard,
976:Fiction wouldn't be much fun without its fair share of scoundrels, and they have to live somewhere. ~ Jasper Fforde,
977:For after my marriage I had made various attempts to write fiction. They were clearly failures. ~ Mary Augusta Ward,
978:Hijacking by pseudoscience and bad science fiction is a threat to our legitimate sense of wonder. ~ Richard Dawkins,
979:I cannot say that truth is stranger than fiction, because I have never had acquaintance with either. ~ Charles Fort,
980:I didn’t even know what my best move was anymore, I’d gotten so lost in this fiction I was living. ~ Robert J Crane,
981:I find science so much more fascinating than science fiction. It also has the advantage of being true. ~ Carl Sagan,
982:I just think the whole disease model of addiction is crap. It's rooted in fiction and junk science. ~ Charlie Sheen,
983:I love the opportunity to just let my imagination run riot! Non-fiction can be very restrictive. ~ Raymond Buckland,
984:It is better, perhaps, to be thought of as a fiction than to be discarded from memory completely. ~ Roshani Chokshi,
985:It is so common to write autobiographical fiction in which your own experience is thinly disguised. ~ David Leavitt,
986:I used to distinguish between my fiction and nonfiction in terms of superiority or inferiority. ~ Peter Matthiessen,
987:Ninety percent of SF [science fiction] is crud, but then, ninety percent of everything is crud. ~ Theodore Sturgeon,
988:Science fiction makes the implausible possible, while science fantasy makes the impossible plausible. ~ Rod Serling,
989:Science fiction really is the only genre that lets you use your imagination without limitations. ~ Steven Spielberg,
990:Speculative fiction includes all stories that take place in a setting contrary to known reality. ~ Orson Scott Card,
991:That's why we read fiction, isn't it? To remind us that whatever we suffer, we're not the only ones? ~ Jodi Picoult,
992:That's why we read fiction, isn’t it? To remind us that whatever we suffer, we’re not the only ones? ~ Jodi Picoult,
993:That’s why we read fiction, isn’t it? To remind us that whatever we suffer, we’re not the only ones? ~ Jodi Picoult,
994:the great advantage of really contemporary fiction is that one finds oneself mirrored on every page ~ Peter Ackroyd,
995:The more I discovered the lyrical quality of our lives, the more my own life became a web of fiction. ~ Azar Nafisi,
996:There is no such thing as a normal period of history. Normality is a fiction of economic textbooks. ~ Joan Robinson,
997:The state is that great fiction by which everyone tries to live at the expense of everyone else. ~ Fr d ric Bastiat,
998:Writing is very castrating in the moment. Fiction in general, it has no function, nobody asks for it. ~ Etgar Keret,
999:A writer is congenitally unable to tell the truth and that is why we call what he writes fiction. ~ William Faulkner,
1000:Conflict and character are the heart of good fiction, and good mystery has both of those in spades. ~ Diana Gabaldon,
1001:Everything, as Peyman said, may be a fiction – but the Future is the biggest shaggy-dog story of all. ~ Tom McCarthy,
1002:Fiction must stick to facts, and the truer the facts the better the fiction — so we are told. ~ Virginia Euwer Wolff,
1003:Good fiction necessarily encompasses our limited understandings of one another, and of ourselves. ~ Matthew Specktor,
1004:I quit my job just to quit. I didn't quit my job to write fiction. I just didn't want to work anymore. ~ Don DeLillo,
1005:Journalism allows its readers to witness history; fiction gives its readers an opportunity to live it. ~ John Hersey,
1006:knocking back the wine and reaching for the cheap consolations of kimchee-scented Kleenex fiction ~ Maureen Corrigan,
1007:My fiction-writing career owes it start to the bad navigation of an 18th century pirate. For it was ~ Paul Kemprecos,
1008:Nonfiction gives you subjects. Writing fiction I can have more fun, but I have to invent my subject. ~ Lynne Tillman,
1009:Nothing is deader than yesterday’s science-fiction— and Verne belongs to the day before yesterday. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
1010:Reading fiction builds empathy. You learn that everybody else out there in the world is a me, as well. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1011:The art that speaks [truth] most unmistakably, most directly, most variously, most fully, is fiction. ~ Eudora Welty,
1012:The future is there... looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. ~ William Gibson,
1013:The truth of history crowds out the truth of fiction - as if one were obliged to choose between them. ~ Susan Sontag,
1014:Writing criticism is to writing fiction and poetry as hugging the shore is to sailing in the open sea. ~ John Updike,
1015:At one time in my career, Barnes and Noble bookstores categorized my books as religious fiction. ~ Richard Paul Evans,
1016:Dianetics, Hayakawa noted, was neither science nor fiction, but something else: “fictional science. ~ Lawrence Wright,
1017:Fiction is a way of exploring possibilities present but undreamt of in the living of a single life. ~ Nadine Gordimer,
1018:Fiction offers the best means of understanding people different from oneself, short of experience. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
1019:For as Oscar Wilde once said, “The good ended happily, and the bad unhappily. That is what fiction means. ~ Cat Grant,
1020:I learned to write fiction the way I learned to read fiction - by skipping the parts that bored me. ~ Jonathan Lethem,
1021:In fiction: we find the predictable boring. In real life: we find the unpredictable terrifying. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
1022:I think fiction writers write what they do because no one else has written it and they want to read it. ~ Alan Cheuse,
1023:It’s a good thing you write fiction. If you had to describe the real world, nobody would recognize it. ~ Peter Straub,
1024:My entire career, in fiction or nonfiction, I have reported and written about people who are not like me. ~ Tom Wolfe,
1025:No more fiction, for now we calculate; but that we may calculate, we had to make fiction first. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1026:No one ever got into science fiction for the sex or prestige. They got into it because they love it. ~ China Mieville,
1027:Obviously, my changing everything into fiction is simply a means of concealing something from myself. ~ Doris Lessing,
1028:Sometimes fiction is a way of coping with the poison of the world in a way that lets us survive it. And ~ Neil Gaiman,
1029:Spreadsheets are fiction. Believing in what you're doing and what you're building is what's important. ~ Vinod Khosla,
1030:The fiction writer is the ombudsman who argues our humble, dubious case in the halls of eternal record. ~ John Updike,
1031:The kneading of memory makes the dough of fiction, which, as we know, can go on yeasting for ever... ~ Barry Unsworth,
1032:without fiction, either life would be insufficient or the winds from the north would blow too cold. ~ Elizabeth Bowen,
1033:Writers who have the vision and the ability to produce real fiction do not produce unreal fiction. ~ Raymond Chandler,
1034:You write fiction, you're writing memoir, and when you're writing memoir, you're writing fiction. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
1035:adage that fact is stranger than fiction seems to be especially true for the workings of the brain. ~ V S Ramachandran,
1036:And I grew up on a steady diet of science fiction, especially apocalyptic and postapocalyptic fiction. ~ Justin Cronin,
1037:Fiction offers escape but it also interrogates the world we live in, whether the past, present or future. ~ Roxane Gay,
1038:I think you will find that, if you continue to write fiction, every character you create is partly you. ~ Stephen King,
1039:My taste in watching things runs from dramas and low-budget films to high-end fantasy/science fiction. ~ Michael Sheen,
1040:Nothing trains you better to write fiction than being really good at writing about your own interiority. ~ Emily Gould,
1041:That's all science fiction was ever about. Hating the way things are, wanting to make things different. ~ Ray Bradbury,
1042:That's what fiction is for. It's for getting at the truth when the truth isn't sufficient for the truth. ~ Tim O Brien,
1043:That’s what fiction is for. It’s for getting at the truth when the truth isn’t sufficient for the truth. ~ Tim O Brien,
1044:The best part of the fiction in many novels is the notice that the characters are purely imaginary. ~ Franklin P Adams,
1045:There was part of me listening that didn't think what I said was fiction. I was making up a true story. ~ Richard Bach,
1046:A million people can call the mountains a fiction, yet it need not trouble you as you stand atop them. ~ Randall Munroe,
1047:Even a third-rate science fiction writer out of his nut on LSD couldn’t contrive the real nature of matter. ~ T J Brown,
1048:For me, at least, fiction is the only way i can even begin to twist my lying memories into something true. ~ John Green,
1049:God, in the orthodox view, causes famine, plague, and flood. Was God evil? Evil is a convenient fiction. ~ Peter Straub,
1050:Good fiction challenges us as much as it entertains and these days, we could do with both of these things. ~ Roxane Gay,
1051:I cannot say that truth is stranger than fiction, because I have never had acquaintance with either, ~ Jeffrey J Kripal,
1052:I have great faith in the future of books - no matter what form they may take - and of science fiction. ~ Connie Willis,
1053:I just had a crazy, wild imagination all my life, and science fiction is the greatest outlet for me. ~ Steven Spielberg,
1054:Impotence, fetishism, bisexuality, and bondage are all facts of life, and our fiction should reflect that. ~ Rick Moody,
1055:I think it's hard to write a book about happiness because fiction requires tension and complication. ~ Edwidge Danticat,
1056:I write in the morning at a table, longhand on yellow legal pads, just like Nixon, when I’m doing fiction. ~ Gore Vidal,
1057:Life is always going to be stranger than fiction, because fiction has to be convincing, and life doesn't. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1058:Once you get that instinct for the fictiveness, the fictionality of fiction, it kind of sets you free. ~ Salman Rushdie,
1059:Outlines are the last resource of bad fiction writers who wish to God they were writing masters' theses. ~ Stephen King,
1060:Science Fiction will never run out of things to wonder about until the human race ceases to use its brain. ~ Julian May,
1061:She took refuge on the firm ground of fiction, through which indeed there curled the blue river of truth. ~ Henry James,
1062:Critics have been amusing themselves for a long time by auscultating fiction for signs of heart failure. ~ Storm Jameson,
1063:Empathy. Carlin always said it was the great value of fiction, to put us inside the minds of strangers. ~ Erika Johansen,
1064:Every autobiography ... becomes an absorbing work of fiction, with something of the charm of a cryptogram. ~ H L Mencken,
1065:Fiction takes us to places that we would never otherwise go, and puts us behind eyes that are not our own. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1066:Fiction writing is very seldom a matter of saying things; it is a matter of showing things. However, ~ Flannery O Connor,
1067:I believe that fiction with its untrammelled nature, speaks to no one, and by so doing, speaks to all. ~ Chigozie Obioma,
1068:I don't remember learning to read, but the first thing I remember reading is a science fiction novel. ~ Vonda N McIntyre,
1069:If you write genre fiction, you follow the rules, and you have to follow them because readers expect that. ~ Yann Martel,
1070:Truth is not a saga of alarming episodes; it is a detail, usually a small one, that gives a fiction life. ~ Paul Theroux,
1071:We’d never know what was real and what wasn’t about each other. That was the beauty of our shared fiction. ~ Leah Raeder,
1072:Well, that's science fiction television for you, though," Abnett said. "Someone's got to be the red shirt. ~ John Scalzi,
1073:Whenever I have had to write fiction, I've always had to invent a character who roughly has my background. ~ V S Naipaul,
1074:As a genre-bending blend of police procedural and science fiction, The Silk Code delivers on its promises. ~ Gerald Jonas,
1075:but as his years advanced Lewis had seen less and less purpose in distinguishing between fact and fiction. ~ Clive Barker,
1076:But please remember: this is only a work of fiction.

The truth, as always, will be far stranger. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
1077:But please remember: this is only a work of fiction. The truth, as always, will be far stranger. A.C.C. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
1078:But the mind must have the story and, missing the truth, will piece together a fiction from ragged scraps. ~ Jodi Daynard,
1079:Critical design aims to really push the boundaries of design and to reconsider the element of fiction. ~ Nelly Ben Hayoun,
1080:Expressing political opinion can be a powerful way to establish a character's voice when writing fiction. ~ Jen Lancaster,
1081:Fact is often stranger than fiction because most writers of fiction try to make their stories plausible. ~ Richard Posner,
1082:For me, a kitchen is like science fiction. I only go there to open the refrigerator and take something out. ~ Ann Margret,
1083:if poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world, science-fiction writers are its court jesters. ~ William Gibson,
1084:If what we are doing is not seen by some people as science fiction, it's probably not transformative enough ~ Sergey Brin,
1085:I love the fact that it's not only about Star Trek, but about science fiction in general, and science. ~ Rene Auberjonois,
1086:In his 30 years of broadcasting and publishing fiction, Garrison Keillor has set the laugh bar pretty high. ~ Jane Smiley,
1087:It's always seemed to me that photography tends to deal with facts whereas film tends to deal with fiction. ~ Diane Arbus,
1088:I've always been a fan of science fiction films, and I've never been able to put my particular spin on it. ~ Ivan Reitman,
1089:Real life was messier than fiction, and in it you didn't always have time to do or say the right things. ~ Bentley Little,
1090:That's why I write fiction, because I want to write these stories that people will read and find universal. ~ Jesmyn Ward,
1091:The danger that may really threaten (crime fiction) is that soon there will be more writers than readers ~ Jacques Barzun,
1092:The protocols of science fiction and the protocols of science are not separate-they'r e woven together. ~ Ellen Gallagher,
1093:There are people who think that things that happen in fiction do not really happen. These people are wrong. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1094:The trouble with fiction," said John Rivers, "is that it makes too much sense. Reality never makes sense. ~ Aldous Huxley,
1095:Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn't. ~ Mark Twain,
1096:A masterpiece of fiction is an original world and as such is not likely to fit the world of the reader. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
1097:An autobiography can distort; facts can be realigned. But fiction never lies: it reveals the writer totally. ~ V S Naipaul,
1098:But I think, and hope, that the novels can be understood and enjoyed as science fiction, on their own terms. ~ Dan Simmons,
1099:Fiction doesn’t tell us something we don’t know, it tells us something we know but don’t know that we know. ~ Walker Percy,
1100:I also read modern novels - I have just had to read 60 as I am one of the judges for the Orange Fiction Prize. ~ Kate Adie,
1101:I learned to write fiction the way I learned to read fiction - by skipping the parts that bored me.
~ Jonathan Lethem,
1102:I'm a big fan of science fiction, animation, and things of that nature. Other worlds and that type of stuff. ~ Lupe Fiasco,
1103:Is it the freedom of characters in fiction that we find so inspiring, or the way that freedom transforms them? ~ Marc Levy,
1104:I think it's hard to have a full-time job and write fiction, but for essays, you need to be in the world. ~ Sloane Crosley,
1105:I think love is a huge factor in fiction and in real life. Is there a risk? Always. In fiction and in life ~ Alice Hoffman,
1106:It's in literature that true life can be found. It's under the mask of fiction that you can tell the truth. ~ Gao Xingjian,
1107:Literature and fiction are two entirely different things. Literature is a luxury; fiction is a necessity. ~ G K Chesterton,
1108:Morality is a fiction used by a herd of inferior human beings to hold back the few superior ones..!! ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1109:Movies feel like work, and reading fiction feels like work, whereas reading nonfiction feels like pleasure. ~ Peter Morgan,
1110:Or in other words, science fiction is about what could be but isn't; fantasy is about what couldn't be. ~ Orson Scott Card,
1111:People look for morals in fiction because there has always been a confusion between fiction and philosophy. ~ John Cheever,
1112:Reporting the extreme things as if they were the average things will start you on the art of fiction. ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
1113:Some people just don't seem to understand the concept of fiction. It is fiction; it ain't true, folks ~ Laurell K Hamilton,
1114:The gospel is fiction when judged by the empire, but the empire is fiction when judged by the gospel. ~ Walter Brueggemann,
1115:There are trappings of science fiction which I kind of embrace, but there are also cliches which I run from. ~ David Twohy,
1116:Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; truth isn't. ~ Mark Twain,
1117:Truth, of course, must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for we have made fiction to suit ourselves. ~ G K Chesterton,
1118:Well you can't believe everything you read. After all, by definition, fiction writers lie for a living. ~ Janette Rallison,
1119:If I might offer any apology for so exaggerated a fiction as the Barnacles and the Circumlocution Office, ~ Charles Dickens,
1120:If pleasure could be had only through fiction, then she would happily dream.

-Jacqueline's thoughts ~ Katharine Ashe,
1121:If there were a better, clearer, shorter way of saying what the fiction says, then why not scrap the fiction? ~ J M Coetzee,
1122:I’m attracted to those tragic, brooding boys in the novels, and I should learn to separate reality from fiction. ~ Jo Raven,
1123:I read a bit of Ray Bradbury when I was a younger man. I don't read a lot of fiction anymore... like, none. ~ Henry Rollins,
1124:It is not extraordinary that the extraterrestrial origin of women was a recurrent theme of science fiction. ~ Kingsley Amis,
1125:I've always had a great fondness for English detective fiction such as Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers. ~ Kazuo Ishiguro,
1126:I would never ever condone any violence of any kind. But in the theater of fiction, blood is delightful. ~ Jonathan Raymond,
1127:Kids, fiction is the truth inside the lie, and the truth of this fiction is simple enough: the magic exists. ~ Stephen King,
1128:[T]he great, irreplaceable potentiality of fiction is that it makes possible the imagining of possibilities. ~ Amitav Ghosh,
1129:The reason why truth is so much stranger than fiction is that there is no requirement for it to be consistent. ~ Mark Twain,
1130:the Times reported last week that reading literary fiction increases one’s empathy and emotional intelligence. ~ Kelly Luce,
1131:We all aspire to be ourselves, an original character in a litany of fiction so vast that we know we cannot. ~ Jasper Fforde,
1132:What I like about non-fiction is that it covers such a huge territory. The best non-fiction is also creative ~ Tracy Kidder,
1133:A childhood is what anyone wants to remember of it.  It leaves behind no fossils, except perhaps in fiction. ~ Carol Shields,
1134:All true readers have a book, a moment when real life is never going to be able to compete with fiction again. ~ Kate Morton,
1135:But when it comes to fiction, the writer's only responsibility is to look for the truth inside his own heart. ~ Stephen King,
1136:Democracy rests upon this legal fiction, that the majority has not only force but reason on its side. ~ Henri Fr d ric Amiel,
1137:Fiction is all too often one rationalisation away from reality.
(from the acknowledgements of "Unwind") ~ Neal Shusterman,
1138:I adore [photography's] uneasy mix of fact and fiction - its dubious claim to truth - its status as history. ~ Eleanor Antin,
1139:I don't read much fiction because I already read a lot of scripts, so I want to learn about the world. ~ Kirby Bliss Blanton,
1140:I grew up reading crime fiction and, especially in the '80s, women were just there to be saved or screwed. ~ Karin Slaughter,
1141:I learned that lesson a long time ago. When you write popular fiction, you're going to get bashed by critics. ~ John Grisham,
1142:I think any reading is good reading, even if it's commercial fiction. A good story well told is worth the time ~ Lynn Cahoon,
1143:I think science fiction and sound is a really interesting thing. You might as well think of it as sonic fiction. ~ DJ Spooky,
1144:I think that truth is stranger than fiction, and it's nice to know the people you're making a movie about. ~ Julian Schnabel,
1145:My generation of young female writers discovered that we could dictate the form and content of our own fiction. ~ Erica Jong,
1146:Poetry is a kind of gasp, and there it is, a spark on the page. Fiction, on the other hand, is like swamp fire. ~ Joy Kogawa,
1147:There's no such thing as fiction", Annie told him once. "If you can imagine something, then it's happened. ~ Charles de Lint,
1148:"The Wolfpack" is a real life clash of life and fiction and the saving power of brotherhood and make-believe. ~ James Franco,
1149:Adolescents are still children in that they can't yet tell the difference between make believe and fiction. ~ Heather O Neill,
1150:All of fiction is truthful. What you create is your own truth and no one can take that away or change it. ~ Walter Dean Myers,
1151:Fiction and poetry are doses, medicines. What they heal is the rupture reality makes on the imagination. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
1152:History is said to be written by the victors. Fiction, by contrast, is largely the work of injured bystanders. ~ Edna O Brien,
1153:Isherwood did not so much find himself in Berlin as reinvent himself; Isherwood became a fiction, a work of art. ~ Ian Buruma,
1154:It is with fiction as with religion: it should present another world, and yet one to which we feel the tie. ~ Herman Melville,
1155:I was born in 1950 and watched science fiction and horror movies on TV and was always really fascinated by them. ~ Rick Baker,
1156:Morality is just a fiction used by the herd of inferior human beings to hold back the few superior men. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
1157:Science fiction seldom attempts to predict the future. More often than not, it tries to prevent the future. ~ Arthur C Clarke,
1158:Speculative fiction is where my heart lies. It's what I read growing up, and it's what I read as an adult. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
1159:The art of writing fiction is to sail as dangerously close to the truth as possible without sinking the ship ~ Kinky Friedman,
1160:The older I've got the less I find myself going back and re-reading or really reading new fiction or poetry. ~ Reynolds Price,
1161:You can't write good satirical fiction in America because reality will quickly outdo anything you might invent. ~ Philip Roth,
1162:But please remember: this is only a work of fiction. The truth, as always, will be far stranger.
   ~ Arthur C Clarke, #2index,
1163:fiction: the ocean i dive headfirst into when i can no longer breathe in reality.   - a mermaid escapist II. ~ Amanda Lovelace,
1164:I always say that writing non-fiction versus writing fiction is a bit like architecture versus abstract painting. ~ Andrew Lam,
1165:I think fiction is a very serious thing, that while it is fiction, it is also a revelation of truth, or facts. ~ John McGahern,
1166:Rethinking Our Past: Recognizing Facts, Fiction, and Lies in American History Social Science in the Courtroom ~ James W Loewen,
1167:Science always interested me, and science, real science, was more science fiction than science fiction. ~ Lynn Hershman Leeson,
1168:there simply is no way to describe the past without lying. Our memories are not like fiction. They are fiction. ~ Jonah Lehrer,
1169:The road, Hwel felt, had to go somewhere. This geographical fiction has been the death of many people. Roads ~ Terry Pratchett,
1170:Truth be told, I liked that blurriness. That line where reality and fiction jutted up against each other. ~ Brittany Cavallaro,
1171:When I was a kid, I was a big science fiction fan, but current horror books were harder to get your hands on. ~ John Darnielle,
1172:All forms of literature are dangerous; but in none is the danger more acute than in historical fiction... ~ John Julius Norwich,
1173:Any amount of theology can now be smuggled into people's minds under the cover of fiction without their knowing it. ~ C S Lewis,
1174:Anyone who claims that truth is stranger than fiction has never gazed into a writer's mind, or read my stories. ~ Lucian Barnes,
1175:Government is the great fiction, through which everybody endeavors to live at the expense of everybody else. ~ Fr d ric Bastiat,
1176:If you would understand your own age, read the works of fiction produced in it. People in disguise speak freely. ~ Arthur Helps,
1177:I hadn’t read a real series like that since I was a kid, and it was exciting to live again in an infinite fiction. ~ John Green,
1178:I have always regarded historical fiction and fantasy as sisters under the skin, two genres separated at birth. ~ Maurice Druon,
1179:I love fairytales. I like fantasy a lot, science fiction, I like magic. I like to create magic. I love magic. ~ Michael Jackson,
1180:In the beginning, God created the heavens and the Earth," the long out-of-print science fiction writer went on. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
1181:Life isn't meant to be believable. It's meant to be magical. Haven't you heard? Truth is stranger than fiction. ~ Rebecca Serle,
1182:Life isn’t meant to be believable. It’s meant to be magical. Haven’t you heard? Truth is stranger than fiction. ~ Rebecca Serle,
1183:Oh no, real life is escape. The great terrors, the horrors--we hope--of your life come from reading fiction. ~ Orson Scott Card,
1184:Reality always outstrips fiction. Whatever you make up, something more incredible always pops up in real life. ~ David Walliams,
1185:The boundary between philosophy and fiction is not as clear cut as you may think and the two definitely interact. ~ Ken Follett,
1186:The fire flashed through Fiction, consuming as it traveled. It reached for the cookbooks. The cookbooks roasted. ~ Susan Orlean,
1187:The hardest piece of nonfiction I ever wrote isn't anywhere close to the easiest piece of fiction I never wrote. ~ Ann Patchett,
1188:There's a tradition in American fiction that is deadly serious and earnest - like the Steinbeckian social novel. ~ John Hodgman,
1189:This then was English fiction, this was English criticism, and farce, after all, was but an ill-played tragedy. ~ Arthur Machen,
1190:Writing fiction is an endless and always defeated effort to capture some quality of life without killing it. ~ Rose Wilder Lane,
1191:A lot of what the 'Culture' is about is a reaction to all the science fiction I was reading in my very early teens. ~ Iain Banks,
1192:Anakana Schofield is part of a new wave of wonderful Irish fiction-international in scope and electrically alive. ~ Colum McCann,
1193:Everything in a science-fiction novel should be mentioned at least twice (in at least two different contexts). ~ Samuel R Delany,
1194:fiction is like a spider’s web, attached ever so slightly perhaps, but still attached to life at all four corners. ~ Azar Nafisi,
1195:Fiction offered me tools that allowed me to approach a wider variety of issues than the events of my own life would. ~ Phil Klay,
1196:Government is that great fiction, through which everybody endeavors to live at the expense of everybody else. ~ Fr d ric Bastiat,
1197:I just think there's something in the non-fiction form that allows you to see things clearly, if you're patient. ~ Robert Greene,
1198:In fact, one could argue that the skill of the fiction writer boils down to the ability to exploit intensity. ~ James Scott Bell,
1199:I sometimes feel fiction is the ideal preservation for real memories. Fiction is such a good place to keep things. ~ Wim Wenders,
1200:I think the darker aspect of my fiction-or anybody's fiction-is by its very nature somehow easier to talk about. ~ Richard Russo,
1201:It took me years to learn that sentences in fiction must do much more than stand around and look pretty. ~ Karen Thompson Walker,
1202:I want my fiction to feel real most of the time, so it makes sense to pay attention to life and to how people work. ~ Nick Earls,
1203:Kids, fiction is the truth inside the lie, and the truth of this fiction is simple enough: the magic exists. S.K. ~ Stephen King,
1204:Literature and fiction are two entirely different things. Literature is a luxury; fiction is a necessity. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
1205:Literature is invention. Fiction is fiction. To call a story a true story is an insult to both art and truth. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
1206:Literature is invention. Fiction is fiction. To call a story a true story is an insult to both truth and art. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
1207:Popular escapist fiction enchants adult readers without challenging them to be educated for critical consciousness. ~ Bell Hooks,
1208:Science fiction films are not about science. They are about disaster, which is one of the oldest subjects of art. ~ Susan Sontag,
1209:Science fiction made me aware of how big and strange the universe was, leaving aside the whole question of aliens. ~ Ken MacLeod,
1210:That's the harm of Close Encounters: that it convinces tens of millions that that's what just science fiction is. ~ Isaac Asimov,
1211:There's an explosion of Indian fiction of all kinds, from military thrillers to chicklit. I think that's exciting. ~ Hari Kunzru,
1212:Truth, of course, must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for we have made fiction to suit ourselves. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
1213:what makes a work of fiction safe from larvae and rust is not its social importance but its art, only its art ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
1214:All fiction is based on fact and moves into fantasy. It is the writer's task to make the unbelievable believable. ~ Chloe Thurlow,
1215:Empathy. Carlin always said it was the great value of fiction, to put us inside the minds of strangers. Lazarus, ~ Erika Johansen,
1216:Fiction is a sort of inter-human magic, allowing you to travel into a scene and feel it tingle on your skin. ~ Barbara Kingsolver,
1217:Fiction. . . . It's like goading a mongoose and a cobra into battle and staying with them to see who wins. ~ Shauna Singh Baldwin,
1218:I couldn't write—or wouldn't write, at any rate—unable to face the grueling self-scrutiny that fiction demands ~ Armistead Maupin,
1219:I have always felt cookbooks were fiction and the most beautiful words in the English language were 'room service. ~ Erma Bombeck,
1220:I have a severe Google Reader habit. I think people will use blog forms and twitter to contrive fiction. ~ Patrick Nielsen Hayden,
1221:I sometimes get asked if I think about film stuff while I'm writing fiction, and the answer is, of course not. ~ Matthew Specktor,
1222:Like most science-fiction writers, Trout knew almost nothing about science, was bored stiff by technical details. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
1223:Obviously not a Stephen King level writer, but I'd written short stories and short fiction, from the time I was 12. ~ Mick Garris,
1224:Perhaps this is the purpose of all art, all writing, on the murders, fiction and non-fiction: Simply to participate. ~ Alan Moore,
1225:Perhaps this is why one reads fiction to begin with - to live a more interesting reality than one's daily life. ~ Steven Rigolosi,
1226:Science fiction, outside of poetry, is the only literary field which has no limits, no parameters whatsoever. ~ Theodore Sturgeon,
1227:The future,” science-fiction writer William Gibson once said, “is already here. It’s just not evenly distributed.”21 ~ Joichi Ito,
1228:There is a insularity within American fiction even for adults. It's very tough for books in translation in the US. ~ Laila Lalami,
1229:the world often seemed more like a template for fiction than something that should be indulged in for its own sake. ~ Dan Simmons,
1230:Thus, she had learned a romance book was fiction. A hero who truly cared for the heroine was called a fantasy. ~ Cherise Sinclair,
1231:Amazing, the power of fiction, even cheap popular fiction, to evoke. No wonder it’s banned within Reich territory; ~ Philip K Dick,
1232:As the popularity of science-fiction increases, so inevitably does the volume of clownish imprecation against it. ~ Edmund Crispin,
1233:I believe fiction writers are the most honest of liars. They expose their innermost thoughts through deception. ~ Nicholas P Adams,
1234:I'd love to do a movie where the monster is human, where the issue is not otherworldly, or horror or science fiction. ~ J J Abrams,
1235:I don't think I have ever created an entire fiction piece or followed a historical piece and made that into a sermon. ~ Max Lucado,
1236:If you’re fanatical enough about enacting and enforcing your fiction, it becomes indistinguishable from nonfiction ~ Kurt Andersen,
1237:I know, but it is a pleasant fiction, my dear, and the sheer impossibility of a quest is no reason to abandon it. ~ Graham McNeill,
1238:In all ages of the world this eminently plausible fiction has lured the obtuse infant to financial ruin and disaster. ~ Mark Twain,
1239:Let it be fact, one feels, or let it be fiction; the imagination will not serve under two masters simultaneously. ~ Virginia Woolf,
1240:Science fiction is the only genre that enables African writers to envision a future from our African perspective. ~ Nnedi Okorafor,
1241:The adage that fact is stranger than fiction seems to be especially true for the workings of the brain. ~ Vilayanur S Ramachandran,
1242:The challenge for any fiction writer is that your job involves simply sitting at a desk for a very, very long time. ~ Chad Harbach,
1243:The Tanzanian told her that all fiction was therapy, some sort of therapy, no matter what anybody said. ~ Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie,
1244:Truth be told, I liked that blurriness. That line where reality and fiction jutted up against each other. And ~ Brittany Cavallaro,
1245:When I was very young I was reading a lot of Latin American fiction, which later would be called "boom fiction." ~ Sandra Cisneros,
1246:When we see the brain we realize that we are, at one level, no more than meat; and, on another, no more than fiction. ~ Paul Broks,
1247:A book is a story, even if it's non-fiction, and once I've read it, I have the story with me inside my head always. ~ Sara Sheridan,
1248:Fiction and poetry are my first loves, but the really beautiful lyrical essay can do so much that other forms cannot. ~ Chris Abani,
1249:Fiction challenges us and works its miracles by placing us in the skin of another human being and teaching us empathy. ~ Hugh Howey,
1250:Fiction has a unique role in conveying Truth. In fact, only fiction that is Truth with a capital T is worthwhile. ~ Jerry B Jenkins,
1251:Fiction is not fact, but fiction is fact selected and understood, fiction is fact arranged and charged with purpose. ~ Thomas Wolfe,
1252:For the fiction writer himself the whole story is the meaning, because it is an experience, not an abstraction. ~ Flannery O Connor,
1253:I always knew I wanted to write really imaginative fiction - fiction that was very different from my real life. ~ Danielle Trussoni,
1254:If I might offer any apology for so exaggerated a fiction as the Barnacles and the Circumlocution Office, I would ~ Charles Dickens,
1255:If you’re fanatical enough about enacting and enforcing your fiction, it becomes indistinguishable from nonfiction. ~ Kurt Andersen,
1256:I have always held the old-fashioned opinion that the primary object of work of fiction should be to tell a story. ~ Wilkie Collins,
1257:I have always regarded historical fiction and fantasy as sisters under the skin, two genres separated at birth. ~ George R R Martin,
1258:I love writing fiction because I can totally lose myself and I get to make up the rules of the world that I'm writing. ~ Roxane Gay,
1259:I'm in love. And I like how that feels. And I hate how that feels. Because love is an invention of fiction writers. ~ Ellen Hopkins,
1260:I’m in love. And I like how that feels. And I hate how that feels. Because love is an invention of fiction writers. ~ Ellen Hopkins,
1261:I'm sold as a literary writer in Holland; I'm sold as crime fiction in England. I think of it as just literature. ~ Karin Slaughter,
1262:in favor of southern womanhood as much as anybody, but not for preserving polite fiction at the expense of human life. ~ Harper Lee,
1263:In terms of stories I would buy for a science fiction magazine, if they take place in the future, that might do it. ~ Frederik Pohl,
1264:I think anyone who writes suspense fiction and says that King isn't an influence is either lying or being foolish. ~ Michael Koryta,
1265:I will never do Pulp [Fiction] 2 but having said that, I could very well do other movies with these characters. ~ Quentin Tarantino,
1266:Mary Shelley may well have invented science fiction. I think she did! But after that it seemed to be a boys' game. ~ William Gibson,
1267:Nothing, except the weather report or a general maxim of conduct, is so unsafe to rely upon as a theory of fiction. ~ Ellen Glasgow,
1268:The only form of fiction in which real characters do not seem out of place is history. In novels they are detestable. ~ Oscar Wilde,
1269:The science fiction approach doesn't mean it's always about the future; it's an awareness that this is different. ~ Neal Stephenson,
1270:This body is a combination. It is only a fiction to say that I have one body, you another, and the sun another. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
1271:As a fiction writer, of course, you need to take some leeway with certain aspects of history to make the story work. ~ Joseph Boyden,
1272:Everyone who works in the domain of fiction is a bit crazy. The problem is to render this craziness interesting. ~ Francois Truffaut,
1273:Fiction is in danger of becoming a kind of poetry. Only other poets read it. Only other fiction writers care about it. ~ John Updike,
1274:His chief interest was in reading fiction, then trying to analyze what he had read, fitting it into a larger pattern. ~ Stephen King,
1275:I am a being comprised of letters, a character created by sentences, a figment of imagination formed through fiction. ~ Tahereh Mafi,
1276:I began to write fiction on the assumption that the true enemies of the novel were plot, character, setting and theme. ~ John Hawkes,
1277:I like fantasy. I like horror, science fiction because I can get avant-garde with those performances in those movies. ~ Nicolas Cage,
1278:In Bosnian, there's no distinction in literature between fiction and nonfiction; there's no word describing that. ~ Aleksandar Hemon,
1279:I write science fiction because that is what publishers call my books. Left to myself, I should call them novels. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
1280:Realism is to fiction what gravity is to walking: a confinement that allows dancing under the right circumstances. ~ George Saunders,
1281:specialize in small cast/single reader long fiction so I only compete against other podcasts of novels in that form. ~ Nathan Lowell,
1282:The difference between science fiction and fantasy…is simply this, science fiction has rivets, fantasy has trees. ~ Orson Scott Card,
1283:Writing is such a solitary thing, so its nice, when Im discouraged, to see people still have such faith in fiction. ~ Robert Boswell,
1284:Fiction is Truth's elder sister. Obviously. No one in the world knew what truth was till some one had told a story. ~ Rudyard Kipling,
1285:I have to have music as a soundtrack to writing fiction. I listen to it at other times, too, but it helps me write. ~ Jeff VanderMeer,
1286:In terms of fiction, I'd rather go out and have a good time than read a book about someone having a good or bad time. ~ Joni Mitchell,
1287:It's always great when you want scientific fact to get a really good science fiction writer to talk to you about it. ~ Robin Williams,
1288:I wasn't sure I could believe a word she was saying. But I wanted to hear it all. Truth or fiction, I needed a story. ~ Ed Tarkington,
1289:of fiction. Period. Any resemblance to actual persons, places, things, or events is just a lucky coincidence. ~ Pamela Fagan Hutchins,
1290:Science fiction is the great opportunity to speculate on what could happen. It does give me, as a futurist, scenarios. ~ Ray Kurzweil,
1291:Sometimes life kicks you in the teeth with an irony that a self-respecting fiction writer would be ashamed to invent. ~ David Morrell,
1292:The blurring of fact and fiction has great commercial potential, which is bound to be corrupting in historical terms. ~ Antony Beevor,
1293:…the novel is a liberal form…and the act of fiction writing is a performance of sympathy with people you are not . ~ Jonathan Franzen,
1294:All truth is fiction, really, for the teller tells it as he sees it, and it might be different from some other teller. ~ Witi Ihimaera,
1295:Although the facts are technically fiction. But they're only called fiction by the people who don't know the facts. ~ Kathy McCullough,
1296:Creating the fictional background for a game world isn't significantly different from creating a background for fiction. ~ John M Ford,
1297:Cut quarrels out of literature, and you will have very little history or drama or fiction or epic poetry left. ~ Robert Staughton Lynd,
1298:I am a being compromised of letters, a character created by sentences, a figment of imagination formed through fiction. ~ Tahereh Mafi,
1299:I can remember when Pulp Fiction came out. I was, like, 10 years old. But I remember the impact that it had. ~ Mary Elizabeth Winstead,
1300:I just want fiction to remain a vital force for entertainment and not just for contemplation. Both things can exist. ~ Gary Shteyngart,
1301:I'm not a science fiction writer, I'm a physicist. These are scientists who are making the future in their laboratories. ~ Michio Kaku,
1302:In a mad world you keep the fiction going, he thought; stick to it till the bitter end and leave the first bite to him. ~ John le Carr,
1303:In the end, the discipline of verification is what separates journalism from entertainment, propaganda, fiction, or art. ~ Bill Kovach,
1304:I read recipes the same way I read science fiction. I get to the end and say to myself "well, that's not going to happen ~ Rita Rudner,
1305:I see myself as a storyteller, I don't mind if the story is fact or fiction, if it's a good story I'd like to tell it. ~ Leanne Pooley,
1306:It is true that some of my fiction was based on actual events. But the events took place after the fiction was written. ~ Edward Abbey,
1307:I've said in many interviews that I like my fiction to be unpredictable. I like there to be considerable suspense. ~ George R R Martin,
1308:I wrote fiction during my entire childhood, from age 4 to 18, and started writing plays when I went to Yale and Oxford. ~ Taiye Selasi,
1309:Many of the concepts we once thought belonged to speculation or science fiction are now part of our understood reality. ~ Michael Helm,
1310:Na salonach różnica między „pisarzem” i „pisarzem science fiction” odpowiada różnicy między „aktorem” i „aktorem porno”. ~ Jacek Dukaj,
1311:Successfully (whatever that may mean) or unsuccessfully, we all overact the part of our favorite character in fiction. ~ Aldous Huxley,
1312:'There's no need for fiction in medicine,' remarks Foster... 'for the facts will always beat anything you fancy.' ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
1313:This might sound a little nutty, but to write fiction is to live in an invented world with a set of imaginary friends. ~ April Lindner,
1314:You need to read more science fiction. Nobody who reads science fiction comes out with this crap about the end of history ~ Iain Banks,
1315:A good story should make you laugh, and a moment later break your heart."
— Chuck Palahniuk, Stranger Than Fiction ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1316:Fiction is nothing less than the subtlest instrument for self-examination and self-display that Mankind has invented yet. ~ John Updike,
1317:How do I know the past is not a fiction conceived to reconcile the difference between my state of mind and the present. ~ Douglas Adams,
1318:I take care to only teach courses about fiction film. I believe that this balances and broadens my documentary work. ~ Arnon Goldfinger,
1319:It can be hard to write a skillfully entertaining fiction, but a great book wants to be more, and wants more from us. ~ Guy Gavriel Kay,
1320:I think the idea was to make a horror film that became a science-fiction film with a lot of melodramatic tropes. ~ Nicolas Winding Refn,
1321:It's not difficult to be encyclopedic in a work of fiction; it's damned difficult to be encyclopedic, I suppose, in truth. ~ John Barth,
1322:Science fiction is always about the time it’s written in. 1984 was always about 1948. Science fiction is social fiction. ~ Warren Ellis,
1323:Sturgeon’s definition of science fiction—“[a story] which would not have happened at all without its scientific content. ~ Damon Knight,
1324:The doctrine that all men are, in any sense, or have been, at any time, free and equal, is an utterly baseless fiction. ~ Thomas Huxley,
1325:Through my fiction, I make mainstream readers see the new Americans as complex human beings, not as just The Other. ~ Bharati Mukherjee,
1326:Writing fiction, there are no limits to what you write as long as it increases the value of the paper you are writing on. ~ Buddy Ebsen,
1327:A poet's mission is to make others confound fiction and reality in order to render them, for an hour, mysteriously happy. ~ Isak Dinesen,
1328:[Fiction and poetry] are medicines, they're doses, and they heal the rupture that reality makes on the imagination. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
1329:Fiction has always been a thorn in my side, because I've always wanted to be a writer but I can't seem to really do it. ~ Sufjan Stevens,
1330:Fiction is like wrestling with angels-you do not expect to win, but you do expect to come away from the experience changed. ~ Jane Yolen,
1331:Good fiction always begins with story and progresses to theme; it almost never begins with theme and progresses to story. ~ Stephen King,
1332:His chief interest was in reading fiction, then trying to analyze what he had read, fitting into a larger pattern. ~ Stephen King,
1333:If Im going to invest the time in a novel, I want something more than the entertainment you get out of most genre fiction. ~ Glen Duncan,
1334:If you really want you people to innovate, buy a science fiction book, tear off the covers, and tell them it's history. ~ Nolan Bushnell,
1335:I just had a crazy, wild imagination all my life, and science fiction is the greatest outlet for me. Steven Spielberg ~ Steven Spielberg,
1336:I like writing non-fiction - and when you pick a [non-fiction] subject, it saves you the hassle of coming up with a plot. ~ Richard Hell,
1337:In fiction the story lives the more everyone comes to life, the more each character seems to exist in his or her own right. ~ Brian Boyd,
1338:I spend most of my time reading non-fiction of all sorts. Then poetry. Then fiction to blurb. Then fiction I want to read. ~ Jim Shepard,
1339:I think she likes post-apocalyptic fiction so much because she’s genuinely happy at the thought that the world might end. ~ Cath Crowley,
1340:It is simply science fiction fantasy to say that, if you do not raise the debt ceiling, that everything is going to collapse. ~ Mike Lee,
1341:I very rarely read any fiction. I love biographies; I read about all kinds of people. I love theology and some philosophy. ~ Al Sharpton,
1342:Let me tell you something: you can not write good fiction about ideas. You can only write good fiction about people. ~ Theodore Sturgeon,
1343:Modern science fiction is the only form of literature that consistently considers the nature of the changes that face us. ~ Isaac Asimov,
1344:Science fiction invites the writer to grandly explore alternative worlds and pose questions about meaning and destiny. ~ Lawrence Wright,
1345:Science fiction is hard to define because it is the literature of change and it changes while you are trying to define it. ~ Tom Shippey,
1346:Sometimes I think fiction exists to model the way God might think of us, if God had the time and inclination to do so. ~ George Saunders,
1347:Speculative fiction encompasses that which we could actually do. Sci-fi is that which we're probably not going to see. ~ Margaret Atwood,
1348:The pace of Swedish crime fiction is slower - Stieg Larsson's the exception. And I think we use the environment more. ~ Camilla Lackberg,
1349:There's no division on my bookshelf between fiction and nonfiction. As far as I'm concerned, fiction is about the truth. ~ Arundhati Roy,
1350:There was a gay fiction among us that we were constantly enjoying ourselves and a skeleton of truth that we never did. ~ Charles Dickens,
1351:truth is not in what happens but in what it tells us about who we are. Fiction is the lie that tells the truth, after all. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1352:Writing fiction means putting a lot of what you believe about the world at risk, because you have to follow your characters. ~ Phil Klay,
1353:Wrote a science fiction novel about a man who wins an argument with his wife, but it was rejected for being too farfetched. ~ Dana Gould,
1354:And is it any wonder that the poor woman broke out into fairies when she had been deprived of any fiction in her youth? ~ Kerry Greenwood,
1355:Fiction is an illusion wrought with many small, conventionally symbolic marks, triggering visions in the minds of others ~ William Gibson,
1356:History is the recital of facts represented as true. Fable, on the other hand, is the recital of facts represented as fiction. ~ Voltaire,
1357:I am created for fiction but I am real. As is Kane. As are all the characters created by Scribblers in the realm of Octava! ~ Lucian Bane,
1358:I live in a peculiar world," she said, "in a place where reality ends and a fiction begins. Maybe that's why I love you. ~ Michael Faudet,
1359:I love making fiction films as well as nonfiction ones, and hope to keep challenging myself to make better and better work. ~ Lucy Walker,
1360:I used to read only fiction. Now I don't read much, only occasionally, such as a Cormac McCarthy or a Jim Harrison novel. ~ David Quammen,
1361:I use my fiction to explore my own unconscious issues. I usually don't even know what's going on with me until I'm writing. ~ Janet Fitch,
1362:I've always thought that science and fiction writing have a lot in common because they're both about modeling reality. ~ Scott Westerfeld,
1363:My most memorable science fiction experience was Star Wars and seeing R2D2 and C3PO. I fell in love with those robots. ~ Cynthia Breazeal,
1364:On the cover of this book, it says “Fiction.” A: That’s what people write when they want to get away with telling the truth. ~ Kyle Minor,
1365:Pulp Fiction is a, uh, gritty, urban satire. Pump Friction is a uh-uh, a bunch of uh, dudes and ladies having dirty sex. ~ Norm MacDonald,
1366:Science fiction can be exciting and very gripping, but it doesn't tell us anything about the universe in which we live. ~ Stephen Hawking,
1367:Science fiction is always about the time it’s written in. 1984 was always about 1948. Science fiction is social fiction. I ~ Warren Ellis,
1368:[Science fiction is] the attempt to deal rationally with alternate possibilities in a manner which will be entertaining. ~ Lester del Rey,
1369:Surely the job of fiction is to actually tell the truth. It's a paradox that's at the heart of any kind of storytelling. ~ Jeremy Northam,
1370:That's what fiction is about, isn't it, the selective transforming of reality? The twisting of it to bring out its essence? ~ Yann Martel,
1371:The difference between science fiction and fantasy … is simply this: science fiction has rivets and fantasy has trees. ~ Orson Scott Card,
1372:The training of a journalist, of working with words for thousands of hours, is extraordinarily useful for a fiction writer. ~ Tom Rachman,
1373:Ceri loves Sci-Fi - " Game of Thrones "
also - Harry Hole , Lisbeeth Salander, Funky Scando Fiction, Supports Swans, Nirvana, ~ Jo Nesb,
1374:Fiction is a branch of neurology: the scenarios of nerve and blood vessels are the written mythologies of memory and desire. ~ J G Ballard,
1375:fiction is both artifice and verisimilitude, and that there is nothing difficult in holding together these two possibilities. ~ James Wood,
1376:Horseshit? Fuck you. I will defend my Belle and Mulan awesome warrior princess road comedy fan fiction to the fucking death. ~ Lila Monroe,
1377:I can't read fiction without visualizing every scene. The result is it becomes a series of pictures rather than a book. ~ Alfred Hitchcock,
1378:I don't go out of my way to write Weird Fiction, or in any other genre. Some of my stuff easily slips into the Weird slot. ~ Karin Tidbeck,
1379:I don't think there's such a thing as autobiographical fiction. If I say it happened, it happened, even if only in my mind. ~ Maya Angelou,
1380:If fiction and politics ever really do become interchangeable,I'm going to kill myself,because I won't know what else to do ~ Stephen King,
1381:I have friends, political scientists, sociologists, who all share an interest at least in certain kinds of science fiction. ~ Paul Krugman,
1382:Impotence, fetishism, bisexuality, and bondage are all facts of life, and our fiction should reflect that.

Rick Moody ~ Rick Moody,
1383:It could be a work of fiction, or history, or both—a long book exploding out of this central place in a hundred directions. ~ Stephen King,
1384:I took the liberty in Snowboarding to Nirvana to do a type of parody of what I suppose you would call "New Age fiction." ~ Frederick Lenz,
1385:It's better to read first rate science fiction than second rate science-it's a lot more fun, and no more likely to be wrong. ~ Martin Rees,
1386:Karl wondered how many scientists read this science fiction stuff. Maybe they couldn’t get good books out in New Mexico? ~ Gregory Benford,
1387:My life is kinda like a story that if I told you about it, you probably wouldn't believe. It would seem like fiction. That's me. ~ The Rev,
1388:That is the joy of reading fiction: when all is said and done, the novel belongs to the reader and his or her imagination. ~ Alice Hoffman,
1389:The beauty of literature - also its limit - is that it is inescapably personal, even if you're writing science fiction. ~ Aleksandar Hemon,
1390:The fiction writer has to engage in a continual examination of conscience. He has to be aware of the freak in himself. ~ Flannery O Connor,
1391:Yes - 90% of fantasy is crap. And so is 90% of science fiction and 90% of mystery fiction and 90% of literary fiction. ~ George R R Martin,
1392:A classical education saves you from being fooled by pretentiousness, which is what most current fiction is too full of. ~ Raymond Chandler,
1393:A fiction about soft or easy deaths is part of the mythology of most diseases that are not considered shameful or demeaning. ~ Susan Sontag,
1394:All writers have roots they draw from - travel, work, family. My roots are in science and it is fertile ground for fiction. ~ Alan Lightman,
1395:A rustic setting always suggests fantasy; to suggest science fiction, you need sheet metal and plastic. You need rivets. ~ Orson Scott Card,
1396:Fiction is a tower of glass built from a million tiny truths, grains of sand fused together to make a single, gleaming lie. ~ Joanne Harris,
1397:Fiction shows the external effects of internal conditions. Be aware of the tension between internal and external movement. ~ Raymond Carver,
1398:If contemporary literary fiction doesn't read a bit like science fiction then it's probably not all that contemporary, is it ~ Warren Ellis,
1399:I'm not writing great literature. I'm writing commercial fiction for people to enjoy the stories and to like the characters. ~ Kathy Reichs,
1400:I'm writing books. They're still a mix of fact and fiction and will continue to be. I think it's an interesting place to work. ~ James Frey,
1401:I think it's true that that's something that poetry can go to school on fiction. I think poetry can go to fiction to learn. ~ Edward Hirsch,
1402:I want to do some fiction writing, I've had some pretty good luck with short stories, I'd like to do a couple of larger things. ~ Janis Ian,
1403:One of the many things that surprised me about Wool is how many of its fans don't consider themselves science fiction readers. ~ Hugh Howey,
1404:Read everything. Read fiction and non-fiction, read hot best sellers and the classics you never got around to in college. ~ Jennifer Weiner,
1405:Science fiction writers foresee the inevitable, and although problems and catastrophes may be inevitable, solutions are not. ~ Isaac Asimov,
1406:The story of what has happened to women in Afghanistan, however, is a very important one, and fertile ground for fiction. ~ Khaled Hosseini,
1407:Two things can keep the common reader going, argument or story. (Both are always involved, however subtly, in good fiction.) ~ John Gardner,
1408:Underneath the forms of fiction and poetry, you can bet your ass the ground comes from someone's actual life experience. ~ Lidia Yuknavitch,
1409:Unless your aim is to deceive, there's not a meaningful distinction between memoir and fiction. They're marketing categories. ~ Emily Gould,
1410:As much as I love historical fiction, my problem with historical fiction is that you always know what's going to happen. ~ George R R Martin,
1411:In life, you will hear many fantastical and astounding things, what is important is sorting out the fact from the fiction. ~ T B Christensen,
1412:I read nonfiction. There's very little fiction that I enjoy enough to spend my time reading. I am generally a nonfiction guy. ~ Peter Morgan,
1413:I think one of the paradoxes of writing fiction is when people enjoy it, they want it to be real. So they look for connections. ~ Junot Diaz,
1414:I think there may be more truth in fiction than in real life. Or at least truth condensed so that it’s more easily understood. ~ Dean Koontz,
1415:Its a heartening fact about the human race that utopian fiction precedes dystopian fiction in the evolution of literature. ~ Paul Di Filippo,
1416:Now it is done. Now the story ends. And there is no way to tell it. The art of fiction is dead. Reality has strangled invention. ~ Red Smith,
1417:Part of the particular interest and beauty of science fiction and fantasy: writer and reader collaborate in world-making. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
1418:Read everything. Read fiction and non-fiction, read hot best sellers and the classics you never got around to in college. ~ Jennifer Weiner,
1419:The reader may ask how to tell fact from fiction. A rough guide: anything that seems particularly unlikely is probably true. ~ Hilary Mantel,
1420:The trick is not becoming a writer. The trick is staying a writer. ~ Voices of Vision: Creators of Science Fiction and Fantasy, page 182 [2],
1421:What was the point of having a situation worthy of fiction if the protagonist didn't behave as he would have done in a book? ~ Julian Barnes,
1422:What was the point of having a situation worthy of fiction if the protagonist didn’t behave as he would have done in a book? ~ Julian Barnes,
1423:Whoever knows that the mind is a fiction and devoid of anything real knows that his own mind neither exists nor doesn't exist. ~ Bodhidharma,
1424:Why is life a constant disappointment?'
'Because we read fiction,' Mia said, and Shelley nodded, knowing it was true. ~ Victoria Connelly,
1425:Y'know, we're all wasting our time writing this hack science fiction! You wanta make real money, you gotta start a religion! ~ L Ron Hubbard,
1426:You should have more faith in fiction. It lets you come sideways at the truth, which is the only way anyone ever gets near it. ~ Dean Koontz,
1427:And there are rules for crime fiction. Or if not rules, at least expectations and you have to give the audience what it wants. ~ Tod Goldberg,
1428:Fact and fiction carry the same intrinsic weight in the marketplace of ideas. Fortunately, reality has no advertising budget. ~ Daniel Suarez,
1429:Hack fiction exploits curiosity without really satisfying it or making connections between it and anything else in the world. ~ Vincent Canby,
1430:I had a teacher who told me fiction is the future. Nonfiction is the past. One can be shaped and created. One cannot,” she said. ~ Amy Harmon,
1431:I have a lot of theories about the beneficial effects of fiction, but I'm always trying to get away from them a little bit. ~ George Saunders,
1432:I think a child should be allowed to take his father's or mother's name at will on coming of age. Paternity is a legal fiction. ~ James Joyce,
1433:I think fiction may be, whatever else, an exercise in the capacity for imaginative love, or sympathy, or identification. ~ Marilynne Robinson,
1434:I think it's what fiction is for: to illuminate that gap between our secret selves and our more visible and apparent ones. ~ Matthew Specktor,
1435:It may be that the most avid readers of new fiction in America today are film producers, an indication of the trouble were in. ~ E L Doctorow,
1436:I tried writing fiction as a little kid, but had a teacher humiliate me, so didn't write again until I was a senior in college. ~ Janet Fitch,
1437:I was determined that in fiction anyway two men should fall in love and remain in it for the ever and ever that fiction allows. ~ E M Forster,
1438:My point has always been that, ever since the Industrial Revolution, science fiction has been the most important genre there is. ~ Iain Banks,
1439:Reading is important. Books are important. Librarians are important... Children's fiction is the most important fiction of all. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1440:The pleasant fact is that the British are not much good at violent crime except in fiction, which is of course as it should be. ~ Bill Bryson,
1441:[The Women's Room] is one of those pieces of fiction that reveals itself in a different way every time. It's incredible. ~ June Diane Raphael,
1442:When I think about what fiction does morally, I'm happier thinking of a person full of multiplicities - sort of fragmented. ~ George Saunders,
1443:Fact and fiction carry the same intrinsic weight in the marketplace of ideas. Unfortunately reality has no advertising budget. ~ Daniel Suarez,
1444:Fiction writing is a strange business when you think about it. You sit down and weave a network of lies to explore deeper truths. ~ Wally Lamb,
1445:I hate my life. I'm at the point where I want to hear about other people's lives. it's like switching from fiction to biography. ~ Don DeLillo,
1446:I love the detail about the workings of the human heart and mind that only fiction can provide - film can't get in close enough. ~ Nick Hornby,
1447:I've always felt that the basic unit of writing fiction is the sentence, and the basic unit of the screenplay is the scene. ~ Matthew Specktor,
1448:Money doesn't mind if we say it's evil, it goes from strength to strength. It's a fiction, an addiction, and a tacit conspiracy. ~ Martin Amis,
1449:[Social] science fiction is that branch of literature which is concerned with the impact of scientific advance on human beings. ~ Isaac Asimov,
1450:Some ideas you have to chew on, then roll them around a lot, play with them before you can turn them into funky science fiction. ~ Rudy Rucker,
1451:the chief offense in bad fiction: we sense that characters are being manipulated, forced to do things they would not really do. ~ John Gardner,
1452:the world loves a ghost, yet we like to take our ghosts vicariously, preferably in fiction. We'd rather see than be one. ~ Dorothy Scarborough,
1453:Truth must necessarily be stranger than fiction; for fiction is the creation of the human mind and therefore congenial to it. ~ G K Chesterton,
1454:As a rule reading fiction is as hard to me as trying to hit a target by hurling feathers at it. I need resistance to celebrate! ~ William James,
1455:As a science fiction writer who began as a fan, I do not use my fiction as a disguised way to criticize the reality of the present. ~ Liu Cixin,
1456:Carlton Mellick III is one of bizarro fiction's most talented practitioners, a virtuoso of the surreal, science fictional tale. ~ Cory Doctorow,
1457:Fantastic fiction covers fantasy, horror and science fiction - and it doesn't get the attention it deserves from the literati. ~ China Mieville,
1458:Fiction gives us empathy: it puts us inside the minds of other people, gives us the gifts of seeing the world through their eyes. ~ Neil Gaiman,
1459:For faith, as well intentioned as it may be, must be built on facts, not fiction - faith in fiction is a damnable false hope. ~ Thomas A Edison,
1460:For me, writing historical fiction is all about finding a balance between reading, traveling, looking, imagining, and dreaming. ~ Anthony Doerr,
1461:Ironically, in today's marketplace successful nonfiction has to be unbelievable, while successful fiction must be believable. ~ Jerry B Jenkins,
1462:It is not the office of a novelist to show us how to behave ourselves; it is not the business of fiction to teach us anything. ~ Agnes Repplier,
1463:It's kind of alarming for me to realize that, when I'm writing stories about times I remember, it's already historical fiction. ~ Wendell Berry,
1464:I was a little resentful that when a woman writes, her personal story becomes part of the story, even though the novel is fiction. ~ Roxane Gay,
1465:Like all stories, it has pieces which are true, and pieces which are fiction. Nothing is ever really what it seems. Remember ~ Jennifer McMahon,
1466:Me, I have a science fiction writer's conviction that the damn robot is supposed to speak
human, not the other way around. ~ Spider Robinson,
1467:Number one rule for fiction: Coincidence can be used to worsen a character’s predicament, but never to solve his problems. ~ Vivian Vande Velde,
1468:Science fiction without the science just becomes, you know, sword and sorcery, basically stories about heroism and not much more. ~ Michio Kaku,
1469:That's what I always liked about science fiction - you can make the world end. Humour is my multiple warhead delivery system. ~ Gary Shteyngart,
1470:The older I get and the more fiction I write, the more I outline, the more I think about plot before I dive in and plunge too far. ~ Dave Barry,
1471:True history," said Hearst, with a smile that was, for once, almost charming, "is the final fiction. I thought even you knew that. ~ Gore Vidal,
1472:When you walk to the end of a fiction, its procedure is 1) intuitive; and 2) emotional. Its intelligence is emotional, I think. ~ Fred D Aguiar,
1473:With fiction, there’s no reason why everything you write shouldn’t be amazing. Nobody’s stopping you from making up better stuff. ~ Wells Tower,
1474:You read American fiction to learn about dysfunctional white folk doing things that are weird to normal white folks. ~ Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie,
1475:C.S. Lewis says that fiction is able to sneak past the watchful dragons of religion. It becomes more powerful to speak in poetry. ~ Jon Foreman,
1476:Eavesdropping is a habit fiction writers get into. Fiction writing will lead you into a number of socially unacceptable practices. ~ Jane Smiley,
1477:Good fiction doesn't come out of the basic conflict of good versus bad. Instead, it comes out of a conflict between good and good. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
1478:If someone likes my fiction more for the quality of my prose rather than the quality of my storytelling, I'm doing something wrong. ~ Jamie Ford,
1479:I like to think of myself as a fiction writer who liked art enough to write about it for a while, and then went on to his fiction. ~ Tom Robbins,
1480:In my imagination, the Editor meditated in a mountain-cave, espoused the rules of grammar, and frowned upon speculative fiction. ~ Josh Malerman,
1481:I think if someone could demonstrate to me that fiction did no good, I would still do it, because I think it does good for me. ~ George Saunders,
1482:I think I'm too lazy a writer to do something like historical fiction. You have to do so much research. I just write what I know. ~ Sarah Dessen,
1483:I try and make non-fiction films that feel like fiction, so I'm always looking for the subtext and that's what really excites me. ~ Brett Morgen,
1484:I've read more truth in fiction than in nonfiction, partly because fiction can deal with the numinous, and nonfiction rarely does. ~ Dean Koontz,
1485:Pornography is one of the branches of literature - science fiction is another - aiming at disorientation, at psychic dislocation. ~ Susan Sontag,
1486:There are some themes, some subjects, too large for adult fiction; they can only be dealt with adequately in a children's book. ~ Philip Pullman,
1487:There is an odd sense of responsibility attached to appearing in a drama about a real piece of history. A work of fiction is fun. ~ James D arcy,
1488:The science fiction master Arthur C. Clarke gave us the law ‘Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic ~ Derren Brown,
1489:Think of it. Going to sleep and waking up later in a science fiction future. It'll be fantastic. The shock and the wonder of it. ~ Dexter Palmer,
1490:a novel of biographical and historical fiction that hews closely to what happened to Pino Lella between June 1943 and May 1945. ~ Mark T Sullivan,
1491:Fiction is to the grown man what play is to the child; it is there that he changes the atmosphere and tenor of his life. ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
1492:her job as a writer of fiction was to report on the human condition, to tell us who we are and what we think and what we do. A ~ Elizabeth Strout,
1493:I do love a good yarn, fiction and fiber. The only thing that equals my joy in knitting is the pleasure of reading!” —Priscilla ~ Debbie Macomber,
1494:I have no interest in non-fiction. I don't read it and don't watch it and don't write it, other than a little journalistic column. ~ W P Kinsella,
1495:I know I'm a rare person, a trained scientist who writes fiction, because so few contemporary novelists engage with science. ~ Barbara Kingsolver,
1496:In high school I was drawn to the study of literature, poetry Shakespeare, contemporary fiction, drama, you name it - I read it. ~ Frederick Lenz,
1497:In some ways all of my fiction is like a conversation I'm having with the writers I read when I was first falling in love with books. ~ Dan Chaon,
1498:I tend to wait for true stories to mature into fiction. Most of my fiction grew out of a long-germinating real-life situation. ~ Aleksandar Hemon,
1499:Journalism is popular, but it is popular mainly as fiction. Life is one world, and life seen in the newspapers is another. ~ Gilbert K Chesterton,
1500:My colleague Bruce Sterling has defined a thriller as a science fiction novel that includes the President of the United States. ~ Neal Stephenson,

IN CHAPTERS [162/162]



   32 Integral Yoga
   18 Christianity
   15 Poetry
   14 Philosophy
   8 Psychology
   6 Occultism
   5 Yoga
   3 Fiction
   2 Hinduism
   1 Science
   1 Alchemy


   48 Sri Aurobindo
   15 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   8 William Wordsworth
   8 Jorge Luis Borges
   7 Plato
   6 Satprem
   6 Carl Jung
   4 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   4 A B Purani
   3 Swami Vivekananda
   3 Sri Ramakrishna
   3 James George Frazer
   3 H P Lovecraft
   3 Friedrich Nietzsche
   2 The Mother
   2 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   2 Plotinus
   2 Jorge Luis Borges
   2 Jordan Peterson
   2 Aleister Crowley
   2 Aldous Huxley


   15 The Life Divine
   12 City of God
   8 Wordsworth - Poems
   7 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   7 Savitri
   6 Labyrinths
   5 The Secret Doctrine
   5 The Practice of Psycho therapy
   5 On the Way to Supermanhood
   4 The Human Cycle
   4 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   4 Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   4 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   3 Vedic and Philological Studies
   3 The Golden Bough
   3 Lovecraft - Poems
   3 Essays Divine And Human
   2 Twilight of the Idols
   2 The Perennial Philosophy
   2 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   2 Talks
   2 Symposium
   2 Selected Fictions
   2 Raja-Yoga
   2 Maps of Meaning
   2 Essays On The Gita


0.00 - INTRODUCTION, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
   As his love for God deepened, he began either to forget or to drop the formalities of worship. Sitting before the image, he would spend hours singing the devotional songs of great devotees of the Mother, such as Kamalakanta and Ramprasad. Those rhapsodical songs, describing the direct vision of God, only intensified Sri Ramakrishna's longing. He felt the pangs of a child separated from its mother. Sometimes, in agony, he would rub his face against the ground and weep so bitterly that people, thinking he had lost his earthly mother, would sympathize with him in his grief. Sometimes, in moments of scepticism, he would cry: "Art Thou true, Mother, or is it all Fiction — mere poetry without any reality? If Thou dost exist, why do I not see Thee? Is religion a mere fantasy and art Thou only a figment of man's imagination?" Sometimes he would sit on the prayer carpet for two hours like an inert object. He began to behave in an abnormal manner
  , most of the time unconscious of the world. He almost gave up food; and sleep left him altogether.
  --
   is, ultimately speaking, as illusory as the experience of any other object. Man attains his liberation, therefore, by piercing the veil of maya and rediscovering his total identity with Brahman. Knowing himself to be one with the Universal Spirit, he realizes ineffable Peace. Only then does he go beyond the Fiction of birth and death; only then does he become immortal. 'And this is the ultimate goal of all religions — to dehypnotize the soul now hypnotized by its own ignorance.
   The path of the Vedantic discipline is the path of negation, "neti", in which, by stern determination, all that is unreal is both negated and renounced. It is the path of jnana, knowledge, the direct method of realizing the Absolute. After the negation of everything relative, including the discriminating ego itself, the aspirant merges in the One without a Second, in the bliss of nirvikalpa samadhi, where subject and object are alike dissolved. The soul goes beyond the realm of thought. The domain of duality is transcended. Maya is left behind with all its changes and modifications. The Real Man towers above the delusions of creation, preservation, and destruction. An avalanche of indescribable Bliss sweeps away all relative ideas of pain and pleasure, good and evil. There shines in the heart the glory of the Eternal Brahman, Existence-Knowledge-Bliss Absolute. Knower, knowledge, and known are dissolved in the Ocean of one eternal Consciousness; love, lover, and beloved merge in the unbounded Sea of supreme Felicity; birth, growth, and death vanish in infinite Existence. All doubts and misgivings are quelled for ever; the oscillations of the mind are stopped; the momentum of past actions is exhausted. Breaking down the ridge-pole of the tabernacle in which the soul has made its abode for untold ages, stilling the body, calming the mind, drowning the ego, the sweet joy of Brahman wells up in that superconscious state. Space disappears into nothingness, time is swallowed in eternity, and causation becomes a dream of the past. Only Existence is. Ah! Who can describe what the soul then feels in its communion with the Self?

01.07 - Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 02, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   About doubt, Pascal says that the perfect doubter, the Pyrrhonian as he is called, is a Fiction. Pascal asks:
   "What will men do in such a state? Will he doubt everything?... Will he doubt whether he doubts ? Will he doubt whether he exists?. . . In fact there has never been a perfectly effective Pyrrhonian."6

0 1960-11-08, #Agenda Vol 01, #unset, #Zen
   The mistake we make is to remain there too long, for if you spend your whole life in that, well, youll probably need many more lifetimes. But once the chance to get out of it comes, you can look at it with a smile and say, Yes, its really a sort of love for Fiction!people love Fiction, they want Fiction, they need Fiction! Otherwise its boring and all much too flat.
   All this came to me yesterday. I kept Z with me for more than half an hour, nearly 45 minutes. He told me some very interesting things. What he said was quite good and I encouraged him a great dealsome action on the right lines which will be quite useful, and then a book unfortunately mixed with an influence from that artificial world (but actually, even that can be used as a link to attract people). He must have spoken to you about this. He wants to write a kind of dialogue to introduce Sri Aurobindos ideasits a good idealike the conversations in Les Hommes de Bonne Volont by Jules Romain. He wants to do it, and I told him it was an excellent idea. And not only one typehe should take all types of people who for the moment are closed to this vision of life, from the Catholic, the fervent believer, right to the utmost materialist, men of science, etc. It could be very interesting.

02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  We seem to live in a Fiction of our thoughts
  Pieced from sensation's fanciful traveller's tale,

02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Her many-imaged Fictions of the Self
  And thousand fashions of one Reality.
  --
  And her Fictions drawn from spirit's au thentic fact,
  Her caprices and conceits and meanings locked,

02.07 - The Descent into Night, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    And Truth a Fiction needed by the mind:
    The chase of joy was now a tired hunt;

02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Cherished the soul's childhood and on Fictions fed
  Far richer in their sweet and nectarous sap

02.15 - The Kingdoms of the Greater Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Delivered from the Fictions of the mind
  Time's triple dividing step baffled no more;

03.05 - The Spiritual Genius of India, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 01, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   The whole world, in fact, was more or less religious in the early stages of its evolution; for it is characteristic of the primitive nature of man to be god-fearing and addicted to religious rite and ceremony. And Europe too, when she entered on a new cycle of life and began to reconstruct herself after the ruin of the Grco-Latin culture, started with the religion of the Christ and experimented with it during a long period of time. But that is what wasTroja fuit. Europe has outgrown her nonage and for a century and a half, since the mighty upheaval of the French Revolution, she has been rapidly shaking off the last vestiges of her mediaevalism. Today she stands clean shorn of all superstition, which she only euphemistically calls religion or spirituality. Not Theology but Science, not Revelation but Reason, not Magic but Logic, not Fiction but Fact, governs her thoughts and guides her activities. Only India, in part under the stress of her own conservative nature, in part under compelling circumstances, still clings to her things of the past, darknesses that have been discarded by the modern illumination. Indian spirituality is nothing but consolidated mediaevalism; it has its companion shibboleth in the cry, "Back to the village" or "Back to the bullock-cart"! One of the main reasons, if not the one reason why India has today no place in the comity of nations, why she is not in the vanguard of civilisation, is precisely this obstinate atavism, this persistent survival of a spirit subversive of all that is modern and progressive.
   It is not my purpose here to take up the cause of spirituality and defend it against materialism. Taking it for granted that real spirituality embodies a truth and power by far higher and mightier than anything materialism can offer, and that man's supreme ideal lies there, let us throw a comparing glance on the two types of spirituality,the one that India knows and the other that Europe knew in the Middle Ages.

06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Eternal self a Fiction sensed in trance."
  Then after a silence Narad made reply:

10.02 - The Gospel of Death and Vanity of the Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A noble Fiction of thy yearnings made,
  Thy human imperfection it must share:

1.01 - Principles of Practical Psycho therapy, #The Practice of Psycho therapy, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  power-drives and conscious Fictions; Schultzs autogenic trainingto
  name only the better known methods. Each of them rests on specialpsychological assumptions and produces special psychological results;
  --
  inferiority with power Fictions. One can of course explain all neuroses in
  Freudian or Adlerian terms, but in practice it is better to examine the case

1.01 - The Cycle of Society, #The Human Cycle, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Or let us take, for this example will serve us best, the Vedic institution of the fourfold order, caturvara, miscalled the system of the four castes,for caste is a conventional, vara a symbolic and typal institution. We are told that the institution of the four orders of society was the result of an economic evolution complicated by political causes. Very possibly;1 but the important point is that it was not so regarded and could not be so regarded by the men of that age. For while we are satisfied when we have found the practical and material causes of a social phenomenon and do not care to look farther, they cared little or only subordinately for its material factors and looked always first and foremost for its symbolic, religious or psychological significance. This appears in the Purushasukta of the Veda, where the four orders are described as having sprung from the body of the creative Deity, from his head, arms, thighs and feet. To us this is merely a poetical image and its sense is that the Brahmins were the men of knowledge, the Kshatriyas the men of power, the Vaishyas the producers and support of society, the Shudras its servants. As if that were all, as if the men of those days would have so profound a reverence for mere poetical figures like this of the body of Brahma or that other of the marriages of Sury, would have built upon them elaborate systems of ritual and sacred ceremony, enduring institutions, great demarcations of social type and ethical discipline. We read always our own mentality into that of these ancient forefa thers and it is therefore that we can find in them nothing but imaginative barbarians. To us poetry is a revel of intellect and fancy, imagination a plaything and caterer for our amusement, our entertainer, the nautch-girl of the mind. But to the men of old the poet was a seer, a revealer of hidden truths, imagination no dancing courtesan but a priestess in Gods house commissioned not to spin Fictions but to image difficult and hidden truths; even the metaphor or simile in the Vedic style is used with a serious purpose and expected to convey a reality, not to suggest a pleasing artifice of thought. The image was to these seers a revelative symbol of the unrevealed and it was used because it could hint luminously to the mind what the precise intellectual word, apt only for logical or practical thought or to express the physical and the superficial, could not at all hope to manifest. To them this symbol of the Creators body was more than an image, it expressed a divine reality. Human society was for them an attempt to express in life the cosmic Purusha who has expressed himself otherwise in the material and the supraphysical universe. Man and the cosmos are both of them symbols and expressions of the same hidden Reality.
  From this symbolic attitude came the tendency to make everything in society a sacrament, religious and sacrosanct, but as yet with a large and vigorous freedom in all its forms,a freedom which we do not find in the rigidity of savage communities because these have already passed out of the symbolic into the conventional stage though on a curve of degeneration instead of a curve of growth. The spiritual idea governs all; the symbolic religious forms which support it are fixed in principle; the social forms are lax, free and capable of infinite development. One thing, however, begins to progress towards a firm fixity and this is the psychological type. Thus we have first the symbolic idea of the four orders, expressingto employ an abstractly figurative language which the Vedic thinkers would not have used nor perhaps understood, but which helps best our modern understanding the Divine as knowledge in man, the Divine as power, the Divine as production, enjoyment and mutuality, the Divine as service, obedience and work. These divisions answer to four cosmic principles, the Wisdom that conceives the order and principle of things, the Power that sanctions, upholds and enforces it, the Harmony that creates the arrangement of its parts, the Work that carries out what the rest direct. Next, out of this idea there developed a firm but not yet rigid social order based primarily upon temperament and psychic type2 with a corresponding ethical discipline and secondarily upon the social and economic function.3 But the function was determined by its suitability to the type and its helpfulness to the discipline; it was not the primary or sole factor. The first, the symbolic stage of this evolution is predominantly religious and spiritual; the other elements, psychological, ethical, economic, physical are there but subordinated to the spiritual and religious idea. The second stage, which we may call the typal, is predominantly psychological and ethical; all else, even the spiritual and religious, is subordinate to the psychological idea and to the ethical ideal which expresses it. Religion becomes then a mystic sanction for the ethical motive and discipline, Dharma; that becomes its chief social utility, and for the rest it takes a more and more other-worldly turn. The idea of the direct expression of the divine Being or cosmic Principle in man ceases to dominate or to be the leader and in the forefront; it recedes, stands in the background and finally disappears from the practice and in the end even from the theory of life.
  --
  For the typal passes naturally into the conventional stage. The conventional stage of human society is born when the external supports, the outward expressions of the spirit or the ideal become more important than the ideal, the body or even the clothes more important than the person. Thus in the evolution of caste, the outward supports of the ethical fourfold order,birth, economic function, religious ritual and sacrament, family custom,each began to exaggerate enormously its proportions and its importance in the scheme. At first, birth does not seem to have been of the first importance in the social order, for faculty and capacity prevailed; but afterwards, as the type fixed itself, its maintenance by education and tradition became necessary and education and tradition naturally fixed themselves in a hereditary groove. Thus the son of a Brahmin came always to be looked upon conventionally as a Brahmin; birth and profession were together the double bond of the hereditary convention at the time when it was most firm and faithful to its own character. This rigidity once established, the maintenance of the ethical type passed from the first place to a secondary or even a quite tertiary importance. Once the very basis of the system, it came now to be a not indispensable crown or pendent tassel, insisted upon indeed by the thinker and the ideal code-maker but not by the actual rule of society or its practice. Once ceasing to be indispensable, it came inevitably to be dispensed with except as an ornamental Fiction. Finally, even the economic basis began to disintegrate; birth, family custom and remnants, deformations, new accretions of meaningless or fanciful religious sign and ritual, the very scarecrow and caricature of the old profound symbolism, became the riveting links of the system of caste in the iron age of the old society. In the full economic period of caste the priest and the Pundit masquerade under the name of the Brahmin, the aristocrat and feudal baron under the name of the Kshatriya, the trader and money-getter under the name of the Vaishya, the half-fed labourer and economic serf under the name of the Shudra. When the economic basis also breaks down, then the unclean and diseased decrepitude of the old system has begun; it has become a name, a shell, a sham and must either be dissolved in the crucible of an individualist period of society or else fatally affect with weakness and falsehood the system of life that clings to it. That in visible fact is the last and present state of the caste system in India.
  The tendency of the conventional age of society is to fix, to arrange firmly, to formalise, to erect a system of rigid grades and hierarchies, to stereotype religion, to bind education and training to a traditional and unchangeable form, to subject thought to infallible authorities, to cast a stamp of finality on what seems to it the finished life of man. The conventional period of society has its golden age when the spirit and thought that inspired its forms are confined but yet living, not yet altogether walled in, not yet stifled to death and petrified by the growing hardness of the structure in which they are cased. That golden age is often very beautiful and attractive to the distant view of posterity by its precise order, symmetry, fine social architecture, the admirable subordination of its parts to a general and noble plan. Thus at one time the modern litterateur, artist or thinker looked back often with admiration and with something like longing to the mediaeval age of Europe; he forgot in its distant appearance of poetry, nobility, spirituality the much folly, ignorance, iniquity, cruelty and oppression of those harsh ages, the suffering and revolt that simmered below these fine surfaces, the misery and squalor that was hidden behind that splendid faade. So too the Hindu orthodox idealist looks back to a perfectly regulated society devoutly obedient to the wise yoke of the Shastra, and that is his golden age,a nobler one than the European in which the apparent gold was mostly hard burnished copper with a thin gold-leaf covering it, but still of an alloyed metal, not the true Satya Yuga. In these conventional periods of society there is much indeed that is really fine and sound and helpful to human progress, but still they are its copper age and not the true golden; they are the age when the Truth we strive to arrive at is not realised, not accomplished,4 but the exiguity of it eked out or its full appearance imitated by an artistic form, and what we have of the reality has begun to fossilise and is doomed to be lost in a hard mass of rule and order and convention.

1.01 - The King of the Wood, #The Golden Bough, #James George Frazer, #Occultism
  allow us to dismiss it as an idle Fiction. Rather we may suppose
  that it refers to some ancient restoration or reconstruction of the

1.02 - MAPS OF MEANING - THREE LEVELS OF ANALYSIS, #Maps of Meaning, #Jordan Peterson, #Psychology
  necessary Fiction; a form about which nothing can be experienced, and less accurately stated. We carve
  out the world as a consequence of our direct interactions with the unknown most notably, with our hands,
  --
  with Fictional narratives: pretended descriptions of the current and desired future states of the world, with
  plans of action appended, designed to change the former into the latter. To play means to set or to
   Fictionally transform Fictional goals. Such Fictional goals give valence to phenomena that would, in
  other contexts, remain meaningless (but valence that is informative, without being serious). Play allows us
  --
  real behavior and to benefit emotionally, in the process. The goals of play are Fictional; the incentive
  rewards, however, that accompany movement to a fictitious goal these are real (although bounded, like

1.02 - Prana, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  In this universe there is one continuous substance on every plane of existence. Physically this universe is one: there is no difference between the sun and you. The scientist will tell you it is only a Fiction to say the contrary. There is no real difference between the table and me; the table is one point in the mass of matter, and I another point. Each form represents, as it were, one whirlpool in the infinite ocean of matter, of which not one is constant. Just as in a rushing stream there may be millions of whirlpools, the water in each of which is different every moment, turning round and round for a few seconds, and then passing out, replaced by a fresh quantity, so the whole universe is one constantly changing mass of matter, in which all forms of existence are so many whirlpools. A mass of matter enters into one whirlpool, say a human body, stays there for a period, becomes changed, and goes out into another, say an animal body this time, from which again after a few years, it enters into another whirlpool, called a lump of mineral. It is a constant change. Not one body is constant. There is no such thing as my body, or your body, except in words. Of the one huge mass of matter, one point is called a moon, another a sun, another a man, another the earth, another a plant, another a mineral. Not one is constant, but everything is changing, matter eternally concreting and disintegrating. So it is with the mind. Matter is represented by the ether; when the action of Prana is most subtle, this very ether, in the finer state of vibration, will represent the mind and there it will be still one unbroken mass. If you can simply get to that subtle vibration, you will see and feel that the whole universe is composed of subtle vibrations. Sometimes certain drugs have the power to take us, while as yet in the senses, to that condition. Many of you may remember the celebrated experiment of Sir Humphrey Davy, when the laughing gas overpowered him how, during the lecture, he remained motionless, stupefied and after that, he said that the whole universe was made up of ideas. For, the time being, as it were, the gross vibrations had ceased, and only the subtle vibrations which he called ideas, were present to him. He could only see the subtle vibrations round him; everything had become thought; the whole universe was an ocean of thought, he and everyone else had become little thought whirlpools.
  Thus, even in the universe of thought we find unity, and at last, when we get to the Self, we know that that Self can only be One. Beyond the vibrations of matter in its gross and subtle aspects, beyond motion there is but One. Even in manifested motion there is only unity. These facts can no more be denied. Modern physics also has demonstrated that the sum total of the energies in the universe is the same throughout. It has also been proved that this sum total of energy exists in two forms. It becomes potential, toned down, and calmed, and next it comes out manifested as all these various forces; again it goes back to the quiet state, and again it manifests. Thus it goes on evolving and involving through eternity. The control of this Prana, as before stated, is what is called Pranayama.

1.02 - SADHANA PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  study in this case? Not study of novels, or Fiction, or story
  books, but study of those books which teach the liberation of
  --
  combination. It is only a Fiction to say that I have one body,
  you another, and the sun another. The whole universe is one

1.02 - The Concept of the Collective Unconscious, #The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  come almost a Fiction in the world of today. The man of the
  past who lived in a world of archaic "representations collec-

1.02 - The Divine Teacher, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Kurukshetra may be something more than a dramatic Fiction. In the Mahabharata Krishna is represented both as the historical character and the Avatar; his worship and Avatarhood must therefore have been well established by the time - apparently from the fifth to the first centuries B.C. - when the old story and poem or epic tradition of the Bharatas took its present form. There is a hint also in the poem of the story or legend of the Avatar's early life in Vrindavan which, as developed by the Puranas into an intense and powerful spiritual symbol, has exercised so profound an influence on the religious mind of
  India. We have also in the Harivansha an account of the life of

1.03 - ON THE AFTERWORLDLY, #Thus Spoke Zarathustra, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  dream the world then seemed to me, and the Fiction
  of a god: colored smoke before the eyes of a dissatisfied deity. Good and evil and joy and pain and I and

1.03 - THE GRAND OPTION, #The Future of Man, #Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, #Christianity
  is more than a flight of fancy. The four roads are not a Fiction.
  They exist in reality and all of us know people embarked upon one

1.03 - The House Of The Lord, #Twelve Years With Sri Aurobindo, #Nirodbaran, #Integral Yoga
  I have mentioned that Sri Aurobindo used to keep his upper body always bare. In this, as in many other habits, he was very much an Indian, though he was brought up in English ways. For instance, he was not accustomed to use slippers in the room. He always went about barefoot. When a pair of slippers was offered to him, he said, "I don't use them. Let them be given to Nolini who likes shoes." During severe cold weather we have seen him use only a chaddar. But it intrigued me very much to see that he kept his feet always exposed, projecting out of the wrap. It seems odd, for our feet feel the cold more than other parts. Did it imply that at all moments, even at night, the feet of the Divine must be available as the haven of refuge to the needy and the devoted? It may not be too fantastic to suppose that many beings came in their subtle bodies to offer their pranams at his feet. My hypothesis is not altogether a Fiction, for we have now learnt from the Mother that Sri Aurobindo has built a home in the subtle-physical plane and many of us visit him at night in our subtle bodies. She has also told us that we visit her or she visits us during our sleep. In the morning she has often asked, "Do you know anything about it?" Well, as all this is true, surely beings could also come in their subtle forms to do pranam to Sri Aurobindo. "But why bare feet?" one may ask. "That is the Indian custom", would be my, answer.
  "Did he sleep at night?" was the question very often asked. To all appearance he did sleep and quite sufficiently. The Mother and he always insist on observing normal rules of health. We must eat well and sleep well, So, if there was a physical need for food, there could be a need for sleep as with us, but with a difference. For our sleep is a heavy plunge into inconscience where we forget everything, whereas a Yogi sleeps awake. There is also a state in which the physical body is apparently asleep, while the subtle body goes out visiting various persons in their sleep. The Mother has said that she does most of the subtle work in this way at night. Sri Aurobindo wrote to me, "In former days when she was spending the night in a trance and out working in the Ashram, she brought back with her the knowledge of all that was happening to everybody... I often know from her what has happened before it is reported by anyone."

1.03 - The Two Negations 2 - The Refusal of the Ascetic, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  9:If we push the materialist conclusion far enough, we arrive at an insignificance and unreality in the life of the individual and the race which leaves us, logically, the option between either a feverish effort of the individual to snatch what he may from a transient existence, to "live his life", as it is said, or a dispassionate and objectless service of the race and the individual, knowing well that the latter is a transient Fiction of the nervous mentality and the former only a little more long-lived collective form of the same regular nervous spasm of Matter. We work or enjoy under the impulsion of a material energy which deceives us with the brief delusion of life or with the nobler delusion of an ethical aim and a mental consummation. Materialism like spiritual Monism arrives at a Maya that is and yet is not, - is, for it is present and compelling, is not, for it is phenomenal and transitory in its works. At the other end, if we stress too much the unreality of the objective world, we arrive by a different road at similar but still more trenchant conclusions, - the fictitious character of the individual ego, the unreality and purposelessness of human existence, the return into the Non-Being or the relationless Absolute as the sole rational escape from the meaningless tangle of phenomenal life.
  10:And yet the question cannot be solved by logic arguing on the data of our ordinary physical existence; for in those data there is always a hiatus of experience which renders all argument inconclusive. We have, normally, neither any definitive experience of a cosmic mind or supermind not bound up with the life of the individual body, nor, on the other hand, any firm limit of experience which would justify us in supposing that our subjective self really depends upon the physical frame and can neither survive it nor enlarge itself beyond the individual body. Only by an extension of the field of our consciousness or an unhoped-for increase in our instruments of knowledge can the ancient quarrel be decided.

1.04 - Reality Omnipresent, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  7:But again we find that we are being misled by words, deceived by the trenchant oppositions of our limited mentality with its fond reliance on verbal distinctions as if they perfectly represented ultimate truths and its rendering of our supramental experiences in the sense of those intolerant distinctions. NonBeing is only a word. When we examine the fact it represents, we can no longer be sure that absolute non-existence has any better chance than the infinite Self of being more than an ideative formation of the mind. We really mean by this Nothing something beyond the last term to which we can reduce our purest conception and our most abstract or subtle experience of actual being as we know or conceive it while in this universe. This Nothing then is merely a something beyond positive conception. We erect a Fiction of nothingness in order to overpass, by the method of total exclusion, all that we can know and consciously are. Actually when we examine closely the Nihil of certain philosophies, we begin to perceive that it is a zero which is All or an indefinable Infinite which appears to the mind a blank, because mind grasps only finite constructions, but is in fact the only true Existence.3
  8:And when we say that out of Non-Being Being appeared, we perceive that we are speaking in terms of Time about that which is beyond Time. For what was that portentous date in the history of eternal Nothing on which Being was born out of it or when will come that other date equally formidable on which an unreal all will relapse into the perpetual void? Sat and Asat, if they have both to be affirmed, must be conceived as if they obtained simultaneously. They permit each other even though they refuse to mingle. Both, since we must speak in terms of Time, are eternal. And who shall persuade eternal Being that it does not really exist and only eternal Non-Being is? In such a negation of all experience how shall we find the solution that explains all experience?

1.04 - The Aims of Psycho therapy, #The Practice of Psycho therapy, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  that neurosis, resistance, repression, transference, guiding Fictions, and so
  forth should have one meaning in the young person and quite another in the

1.04 - THE APPEARANCE OF ANOMALY - CHALLENGE TO THE SHARED MAP, #Maps of Meaning, #Jordan Peterson, #Psychology
  Douglas Hofstadter presented a similar idea, in a Fictional discussion between Achilles, the Greek hero, and
  a tortoise (of Zenos paradox fame):
  --
  assumption [on the (necessary) Fiction] that through historical process perfection might be attained. This
  myth even in its earliest ritual incarnation therefore provides the basis for the idea of progress itself.
  --
  The Fictional characters of Shakespeare and Dostoevski respond like the flesh-and-blood man, Tolstoy, to
  the same historically-determined set of circumstances to the death of god, in Nietzsches terminology,

1.04 - The Gods of the Veda, #Vedic and Philological Studies, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  We do not find that the Rishi Mahachamasya succeeded in getting his fourth vyahriti accepted by the great body of Vedantic thinkers. With a little reflection we can see the reason why. The vijnana or mahat is superior to reasoning. It sees and knows, hears and knows, remembers & knows by the ideal principles of drishti, sruti and smriti; it does not reason and know.Or withdrawing into the Mahan Atma, it is what it exercises itself upon and therefore knowsas it were, by conscious identity; for that is the nature of the Mahan Atma to be everything separately and collectively & know it as an object of his Knowledge and yet as himself. Always vijnana knows things in the whole & therefore in the part, in the mass & therefore in the particular. But when ideal knowledge, vijnana, looks out on the phenomenal world in its separate details, it then acquires an ambiguous nature. So long as it is not assailed by mind, it is still the pure buddhi and free from liability to errors. The pure buddhi may assign its reasons, but it knows first & reasons afterwards,to explain, not to justify. Assailed by mind, the ideal buddhi ceases to be pure, ceases to be ideal, becomes sensational, emotional, is obliged to found itself on data, ends not in knowledge but in opinion and is obliged to hold doubt with one hand even while it tries to grasp certainty by the other. For it is the nature of mind to be shackled & frightened by its data. It looks at things as entirely outside itself, separate from itself and it approaches them one by one, groups them & thus arrives at knowledge by synthesis; or if [it] looks at things in the mass, it has to appreciate them vaguely and then take its parts and qualities one by one, arriving at knowledge by a process of analysis. But it cannot be sure that the knowledge it acquires, is pure truth; it can never be safe against mixture of truth & error, against one-sided knowledge which leads to serious misconception, against its own sensations, passions, prejudices and false associations. Such truth as it gets can only be correct even so far as it goes, if all the essential data have been collected and scrupulously weighed without any false weights or any unconscious or semi-conscious interference with the balance. A difficult undertaking! So we can form reliable conclusions, and then too always with some reserve of doubt,about the past & the present.Of the future the mind can know nothing except in eternally fixed movements, for it has no data. We try to read the future from the past & present and make the most colossal blunders. The practical man of action who follows there his will, his intuition & his instinct, is far more likely to be correct than the scientific reasoner. Moreover, the mind has to rely for its data on the outer senses or on its own inner sensations & perceptions & it can never be sure that these are informing it correctly or are, even, in their nature anything but lying instruments. Therefore we say we know the objective world on the strength of a perpetual hypothesis. The subjective world we know only as in a dream, sure only of our own inner movements & the little we can learn from them about others, but there too sure only of this objective world & end always in conflict of transitory opinions, a doubt, a perhaps. Yet sure knowledge, indubitable Truth, the Vedic thinkers have held, is not only possible to mankind, but is the goal of our journey. Satyam eva jayate nanritam satyena pantha vitato devayanah yenakramantyrishayo hyaptakama yatra tat satyasya paramam nidhanam. Truth conquers and not falsehood, by truth the path has been extended which the gods follow, by which sages attaining all their desire arrive where is that Supreme Abode of Truth. The very eagerness of man for Truth, his untameable yearning towards an infinite reality, an infinite extension of knowledge, the fact that he has the conception of a fixed & firm truth, nay the very fact that error is possible & persistent, mare indications that pure Truth exists.We follow no chimaera as a supreme good, nor do the Powers of Darkness fight against a mere shadow. The ideal Truth is constantly coming down to us, constantly seeking to deliver us from our slavery to our senses and the magic circle of our limited data. It speaks to our hearts & creates the phenomenon of Faith, but the heart has its lawless & self-regarding emotions & disfigures the message. It speaks to the Imagination, our great intellectual instrument which liberates us from the immediate fact and opens the mind to infinite possibility; but the imagination has her pleasant Fictions & her headlong creative impulse and exaggerates the truth & distorts & misplaces circumstances. It speaks to the intellect itself, bids it criticise its instruments by vichara and creates the critical reason, bids it approach the truth directly by a wide passionless & luminous use of the pure judgment, and creates shuddha buddhi or Kants pure reason; bids it divine truth & learn to hold the true divination & reject the counterfeit, and creates the intuitive reason & its guardian, intuitive discrimination or viveka. But the intellect is impatient of error, eager for immediate results and hurries to apply what it receives before it has waited & seen & understood. Therefore error maintains & even extends her reign. At last come the logician & modern rationalist thinker; disgusted with the exaggeration of these movements, seeing their errors, unable to see their indispensable utility, he sets about sweeping them away as intellectual rubbish, gets rid of faith, gets rid of flexibility of mind, gets rid of sympathy, pure reason & intuition, puts critical reason into an ill lightened dungeon & thinks now, delivered from these false issues, to compass truth by laborious observation & a rigid logic. To live on these dry & insufficient husks is the last fate of impure vijnanam or buddhi confined in the data of the mind & sensesuntil man wronged in his nature, cabined in his possibilities revolts & either prefers a luminous error or resumes his broadening & upward march.
  It was this aspect of impure mahas, vijnanam working not in its own home, swe dame but in the house of a stranger, as a servant of an inferior faculty, reason as we call it, which led the Rishi Mahachamasya to include mahas among the vyahritis. But vijnana itself is an integral part of the supreme movement, it is divine thought in divine being,therefore not a vyahriti. The Veda uses to express this pure Truth &ideal knowledge another word, equivalent in meaning to mahat,the word brihat and couples with it two other significant expressions, satyam & ritam. This trinity of satyam ritam brihatSacchidananda objectivisedis the Mahan Atma. Satyam is Truth, the principle of infinite & divine Being, Sat objectivised to Knowledge as the Truth of things self-manifested; Ritam is Law, the motion of things thought out, the principle of divine self-aware energy, Chit-shakti objectivised to knowledge as the Truth of things selfarranged; Brihat is full content & fullness, satisfaction, Nature, the principle of divine Bliss objectivised to knowledge as the Truth of things contented with its own manifestation in law of being & law of action. For, as the Vedanta tells us, there is no lasting satisfaction in the little, in the unillumined or half-illumined things of mind & sense, satisfaction there is only in the large, the self-true & self-existent. Nalpe sukham asti bhumaiva sukham. Bhuma, brihat, mahat, that is God. It is Ananda therefore that insists on largeness & constitutes the mahat or brihat. Ananda is the soul of Nature, its essentiality, creative power & peace. The harmony of creative power & peace, pravritti & nivritti, jana & shama, is the divine state which we feelas Wordsworth felt itwhen we go back to the brihat, the wide & infinite which, containing & contented with its works, says of it Sukritam, What I have made, is good. Whoever enters this kingdom of Mahat, this Maho Arnas or great sea of ideal knowledge, comes into possession of his true being, true knowledge, true bliss. He attains the ideal powers of drishti, sruti, smritisees truth face to face, hears her unerring voice or knows her by immediate recognising memoryjust as we say of a friend This is he and need no reasoning of observation, comparison, induction or deduction to tell us who he is or to explain our knowledge to ourselvesthough we may, already knowing the truth, use a self-evident reasoning masterfully in order to convince others. The characteristic of ideal knowledge is first that it is direct in its approach, secondly, that it is self-evident in its revelation, swayamprakasha, thirdly, that it is unerring fact of being, sat, satyam in its substance. Moreover, it is always perfectly satisfied & divinely pleasurable; it is atmarati & atmastha, confines itself to itself & does not reach out beyond itself to grasp at error or grope within itself to stumble over ignorance. It is, too, perfectly effective whether for knowledge, speech or action, satyakarma, satyapratijna, satyavadi. The man who rising beyond the state of the manu, manishi or thinker which men are now, becomes the kavi or direct seer, containing what he sees,he who draws the manomaya purusha up into the vijnanamaya,is in all things true. Truth is his characteristic, his law of being, the stamp that God has put upon him. But even for the manishi ideal Truth has its bounties. For from thence come the intuitions of the poet, the thinker, the artist, scientist, man of action, merchant, craftsman, labourer each in his sphere, the seed of the great thoughts, discoveries, faiths that help the world and save our human works & destinies from decay & dissolution. But in utilising these messages from our higher selves for the world, in giving them a form or a practical tendency, we use our intellects, feelings or imaginations and alter to their moulds or colour with their pigments the Truth. That alloy seems to be needed to make this gold from the mines above run current among men. This then is Maho Arnas.The psychological conceptions of our remote forefa thers concerning it have so long been alien to our thought & experience that they may be a little difficult to follow & more difficult to accept mentally. But we must understand & grasp them in their fullness if we have any desire to know the meaning of the Veda. For they are the very centre & keystone of Vedic psychology. Maho Arnas, the Great Ocean, is the stream of our being which at once divides & connects the human in us from the divine, & to cross over from the human to the divine, from this small & divided finite to that one, great & infinite, from this death to that immortality, leaving Diti for Aditi, alpam for bhuma, martyam for amritam is the great preoccupation & final aim of Veda & Vedanta.

1.04 - Wake-Up Sermon, #The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, #Bodhidharma, #Buddhism
  aggregates55 are Fictions, that no such things can be located
  anywhere in the body, understands the language of buddhas. The
  --
  Whoever knows that the mind is a Fiction and devoid of
  anything real knows that his own mind neither exists nor doesn't

1.05 - Solitude, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  With thinking we may be beside ourselves in a sane sense. By a conscious effort of the mind we can stand aloof from actions and their consequences; and all things, good and bad, go by us like a torrent. We are not wholly involved in Nature. I may be either the drift-wood in the stream, or Indra in the sky looking down on it. I _may_ be affected by a theatrical exhibition; on the other hand, I _may not_ be affected by an actual event which appears to concern me much more. I only know myself as a human entity; the scene, so to speak, of thoughts and affections; and am sensible of a certain doubleness by which I can stand as remote from myself as from another. However intense my experience, I am conscious of the presence and criticism of a part of me, which, as it were, is not a part of me, but spectator, sharing no experience, but taking note of it; and that is no more I than it is you. When the play, it may be the tragedy, of life is over, the spectator goes his way. It was a kind of Fiction, a work of the imagination only, so far as he was concerned. This doubleness may easily make us poor neighbors and friends sometimes.
  I find it wholesome to be alone the greater part of the time. To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome and dissipating. I love to be alone. I never found the companion that was so companionable as solitude. We are for the most part more lonely when we go abroad among men than when we stay in our chambers. A man thinking or working is always alone, let him be where he will. Solitude is not measured by the miles of space that intervene between a man and his fellows. The really diligent student in one of the crowded hives of Cambridge College is as solitary as a dervish in the desert. The farmer can work alone in the field or the woods all day, hoeing or chopping, and not feel lonesome, because he is employed; but when he comes home at night he cannot sit down in a room alone, at the mercy of his thoughts, but must be where he can see the folks, and recreate, and as he thinks remunerate himself for his days solitude; and hence he wonders how the student can sit alone in the house all night and most of the day without ennui and the blues; but he does not realize that the student, though in the house, is still at work in _his_ field, and chopping in _his_ woods, as the farmer in his, and in turn seeks the same recreation and society that the latter does, though it may be a more condensed form of it.

1.06 - MORTIFICATION, NON-ATTACHMENT, RIGHT LIVELIHOOD, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  That the mortified are, in some respects, often much worse than the unmortified is a commonplace of history, Fiction and descriptive psychology. Thus, the Puritan may practice all the cardinal virtuesprudence, fortitude, temperance and chastity and yet remain a thoroughly bad man; for, in all too many cases, these virtues of his are accompanied by, and indeed causally connected with, the sins of pride, envy, chronic anger and an uncharitableness pushed sometimes to the level of active cruelty. Mistaking the means for the end, the Puritan has fancied himself holy because he is stoically austere. But stoical austerity is merely the exaltation of the more creditable side of the ego at the expense of the less creditable. Holiness, on the contrary, is the total denial of the separative self, in its creditable no less than its discreditable aspects, and the abandonment of the will to God. To the extent that there is attachment to I, me, mine, there is no attachment to, and therefore no unitive knowledge of, the divine Ground. Mortification has to be carried to the pitch of non-attachment or (in the phrase of St. Franois de Sales) holy indifference; otherwise it merely transfers self-will from one channel to another, not merely without decrease in the total volume of that self-will, but sometimes with an actual increase. As usual, the corruption of the best is the worst. The difference between the mortified, but still proud and self-centred stoic and the unmortified hedonist consists in this: the latter, being flabby, shiftless and at heart rather ashamed of himself, lacks the energy and the motive to do much harm except to his own body, mind and spirit; the former, because he has all the secondary virtues and looks down on those who are not like himself, is morally equipped to wish and to be able to do harm on the very largest scale and with a perfectly untroubled conscience. These are obvious facts; and yet, in the current religious jargon of our day the word immoral is reserved almost exclusively for the carnally self-indulgent. The covetous and the ambitious, the respectable toughs and those who cloak their lust for power and place under the right sort of idealistic cant, are not merely unblamed; they are even held up as models of virtue and godliness. The representatives of the organized churches begin by putting haloes on the heads of the people who do most to make wars and revolutions, then go on, rather plaintively, to wonder why the world should be in such a mess.
  Mortification is not, as many people seem to imagine, a matter, primarily, of severe physical austerities. It is possible that, for certain persons in certain circumstances, the practice of severe physical austerities may prove helpful in advance towards mans final end. In most cases, however, it would seem that what is gained by such austerities is not liberation, but something quite different the achievement of psychic powers. The ability to get petitionary prayer answered, the power to heal and work other miracles, the knack of looking into the future or into other peoples mindsthese, it would seem, are often related in some kind of causal connection with fasting, watching and the self-infliction of pain. Most of the great theocentric saints and spiritual teachers have admitted the existence of supernormal powers, only, however, to deplore them. To think that such Siddhis, as the Indians call them, have anything to do with liberation is, they say, a dangerous illusion. These things are either irrelevant to the main issue of life, or, if too much prized and attended to, an obstacle in the way of spiritual advance. Nor are these the only objections to physical austerities. Carried to extremes, they may be dangerous to health and without health the steady persistence of effort required by the spiritual life is very difficult of achievement. And being difficult, painful and generally conspicuous, physical austerities are a standing temptation to vanity and the competitive spirit of record breaking. When thou didst give thyself up to physical mortification, thou wast great, thou wast admired. So writes Suso of his own experiencesexperiences which led him, just as Gautama Buddha had been led many centuries before, to give up his course of bodily penance. And St. Teresa remarks how much easier it is to impose great penances upon oneself than to suffer in patience, charity and humbleness the ordinary everyday crosses of family life (which did not prevent her, incidentally, from practising, to the very day of her death, the most excruciating forms of self-torture. Whether these austerities really helped her to come to the unitive knowledge of God, or whether they were prized and persisted in because of the psychic powers they helped to develop, there is no means of determining).

1.06 - The Breaking of the Limits, #On the Way to Supermanhood, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  We had set out in search of a self amid all this inner and outer machinery; we so much needed something other than this generic sum, this legal Fiction, this curriculum vitae which is like a curriculum of death, this sum of actions and daily gestures adding up to zero or perpetually in hope of an inscrutable and elusive something, this crest of existence forever slipping away from under our feet and receding into the distance, toward another wave, the more or less happy repetition of the same old story, of the same program stored in the computer with our parents' chromosomes, our studies, our formative and deformative years; something that was not the attach case we lug around everywhere, nor the stethoscope, nor the pen, not the sum of our feelings nor the sum of our changeless thoughts that leave us forever the same and alone in our little island of self which is not self, which is millions of things crammed into us from the outside, from around and above and below us, from life, from the world, from other beings where is the self? What is me in all that? Where am I? The question had become so unbearable that one day we stepped outside stepped into nothing, which was perhaps something, but it was everything, the only way out of the leaden island. Then, little by little, in the tiny empty interval between this shadow of mechanical self and that something, or nothing, which watches it all, we saw a flame of need grow in us, a need that became more and more intense and burning as the darkness grew thicker in and around us, an inexplicable flame leaping in that stifling nothingness. And slowly, very slowly, like a vague dawn emerging from under the night, like a faraway city wrapped in fog, we saw twinkling little lights start to appear, faint signs, so faint they looked like lights floating on a dark sea, which could have been ten feet or ten miles away, unless they were the reflection of stars or the phosphorescence of noctilucas beneath the waves. But even that nothing was already something in a world filled with such unsurpassed nothingness. So we persevered. The little flame of need settled in us (or was it outside us, or in our stead?); it became our companion, our presence amid an absence of everything, our gauge, our ever-burning intimacy. And the more it grew, calling out from within us, calling so desperately in this empty and suffocating nothing, the brighter the signs grew, twinkled a little everywhere beneath our steps, as if to say, See? See?, as if calling the new world brought it to birth, as if something answered, became steadier, formed into lines, coordinates, channels, and we began to enter another country, another consciousness, another way of being but where is me in all this, the one who directs and owns, that singular traveler, the center that is neither of the ape nor of man?
  So we looked intently right and left: where is me, who is me?... There is no me! Not a trace, not a single ripple of it. What is the use? There is this little shadow in front, which appropriated and piled up feelings, thoughts, powers, plans, like a beggar afraid of being robbed, afraid of destitution; it hoarded desperately on its island, yet kept dying of thirst, a perpetual thirst in the middle of the lovely sheet of water; it kept building lines of defense and fortresses against that overwhelming vastness. But we left the leaden island; we let the stronghold fall, which was not so strong as all that. We entered another current that seemed inexhaustible, a treasure giving itself unsparingly: why should we hold back anything from the present minute when at the next one there were yet other riches? Why should we think or plan anything when life organized itself according to another plan, which foiled all the old plans and, sometimes, for a second, in a sort of ripple of laughter, let us catch a glimpse of an unexpected marvel, a sudden freedom, a complete disengagement from the old program, a light and unfettered little law that opened all doors, toppled the ineluctable consequences and all the old iron laws with the flick of a finger, and left us stunned for a minute, on the threshold of an inconceivable expanse of sunlight, as though we had stepped into another solar system which is perhaps not a system at all as if breaking the mechanical limits inside had caused the same breaking of the mechanical limits outside. Maybe because the Machinery we are facing is one and the same: The world of man is what he thinks it; its laws are the result of his own constraint.

1.06 - THE FOUR GREAT ERRORS, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  latter. And as for the ego! It has become legendary, Fictional, a
  play upon words: it has ceased utterly and completely from thinking,

1.07 - Medicine and Psycho therapy, #The Practice of Psycho therapy, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  rather should know that its proper concern is not the Fiction of a neurosis
  but the distorted totality of the human being. True, it too has tried to treat

1.07 - The Fire of the New World, #On the Way to Supermanhood, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  We suggest that there is a better materialism, less impoverishing, and that matter is less stupid than is usually said. Our materialism is a relic of the age of religions, one could almost say its inevitable companion, like good and evil, black and white, and all the dualities stemming from a linear vision of the world which sees one tuft of grass after another, a bump after a hole, and sets the mountains against the plains, without realizing that everything together is equally and totally true and makes a perfect geography in which there is not a single hole to fill, a single bump to take away, without impoverishing all the rest. There is nothing to suppress; there is everything to view in the global truth. There are no contradictions; there are only limited visions. We thus claim that matter our matter is capable of greater wonders than all the mechanical miracles we try to wrest from it. Matter is not coerced with impunity. It is more conscious than we believe, less closed than our mental fortress it goes along for a while, because it is slow, then takes its revenge, mercilessly. But one has to know the right lever. We have tried to find that lever by dissecting it scientifically or religiously; we have invented microscopes and scalpels, and still more microscopes that probed deeper, saw bigger, and discovered smaller and smaller and still smaller reality, which always seemed to be the coveted key but merely opened the door onto another, smaller existence, endlessly pushing back the limits enclosed in other limits that enclosed other limits and the key kept escaping us, even as it let loose a few monsters on us in the process. We peered at an ant that was growing bigger and bigger but kept perpetually having six legs despite the superacids and superparticles we discovered in its ant belly. Perhaps we will be able to manufacture another one, even a three-legged ant. Some breakthrough! We do not need another ant, even an improved one. We need something else. Religiously, too, we have tried to dissect matter, to reduce it to a Fiction of God, a vale of transit, a kingdom of the devil and the flesh, the thousand and one particles of our theological telescopes. We peered higher and higher into heaven, more and more divinely, but the ant kept painfully having six legs or three between one birth and another, eternally the same. We do not need an ant's salvation; we need something other than an ant. Ultimately, we may not need to see bigger or higher or farther, but simply here, under our nose, in this small living aggregate which contains its own key, like the lotus seed in the mud, and to pursue a third path, which is neither that of science nor that of religion although it may one day combine both within its rounded truth, with all our whites and blacks, goods and evils, heavens and hells, bumps and holes, in a new human or superhuman geography that all these goods and evils, holes and bumps were meticulously and accurately preparing.
  This new materialism has a most powerful microscope: a ray of truth that does not stop at any appearance but travels far, far, everywhere, capturing the same frequency of truth in all things, all beings, under all the masks or scrambling interferences. It has an infallible telescope: a look of truth that meets itself everywhere and knows, because it is what it touches. But that truth has first to be unscrambled in ourselves before it can be unscrambled everywhere; if the medium is clear, everything is clear. As we have said, man has a self of fire in the center of his being, a little flame, a pure cry of being under the ruins of the machine. This fire is the one that clarifies. This fire is the one that sees. For it is a fire of truth in the center of the being, and there is one and the same Fire everywhere, in all beings and all things and all movements of the world and the stars, in this pebble beside the path and that winged seed wafted by the wind. Five thousand years ago the Vedic Rishis were already singing its praises: O Fire, that splendour of thine, which is in heaven and which is in the earth and in growths and its waters... is a brilliant ocean of light in which is divine vision...9 He is the child of the waters, the child of the forests, the child of things stable and the child of things that move. Even in the stone he is there for man, he is there in the middle of his house...10 O Fire... thou art the navel-knot of the earths and their inhabitants.11 That fire the Rishis had discovered five thousand years before the scientists they had found it even in water. They called it the third fire, the one that is neither in the flame nor in lightning: saura agni, the solar fire,12 the sun in darkness.13 And they found it solely by the power of direct vision of Truth, without instruments, solely by the knowledge of their own inner Fire from the like to the like. While through their microscopes the scientists have only discovered the material support the atom of that fundamental Fire which is at the heart of things and the beginning of the worlds. They have found the effect, not the cause. And because they have found only the effect, the scientists do not have the true mastery, or the key to transforming matter our matter and making it yield the real miracle that is the goal of all evolution, the point of otherness that will open the door to a new world.

1.07 - TRUTH, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  Away, then, with the Fictions and workings of discursive reason, either for or against Christianity! They are only the wanton spirit of the mind, whilst ignorant of God and insensible of its own nature and condition. Death and life are the only things in question; life is God living and working in the soul; death is the soul living and working according to the sense and reason of bestial flesh and blood. Both this life and this death are of their own growth, growing from their own seed within us, not as busy reason talks and directs, but as the heart turns either to the one or to the other.
  William Law

1.09 - Civilisation and Culture, #The Human Cycle, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The Philistine is not dead,quite the contrary, he abounds,but he no longer reigns. The sons of Culture have not exactly conquered, but they have got rid of the old Goliath and replaced him by a new giant. This is the sensational man who has got awakened to the necessity at least of some intelligent use of the higher faculties and is trying to be mentally active. He has been whipped and censured and educated into that activity and he lives besides in a maelstrom of new information, new intellectual fashions, new ideas and new movements to which he can no longer be obstinately impervious. He is open to new ideas, he can catch at them and hurl them about in a rather confused fashion; he can understand or misunderstand ideals, organise to get them carried out and even, it would appear, fight and die for them. He knows he has to think about ethical problems, social problems, problems of science and religion, to welcome new political developments, to look with as understanding an eye as he can attain to at all the new movements of thought and inquiry and action that chase each other across the modern field or clash upon it. He is a reader of poetry as well as a devourer of Fiction and periodical literature,you will find in him perhaps a student of Tagore or an admirer of Whitman; he has perhaps no very clear ideas about beauty and aesthetics, but he has heard that Art is a not altogether unimportant part of life. The shadow of this new colossus is everywhere. He is the great reading public; the newspapers and weekly and monthly reviews are his; Fiction and poetry and art are his mental caterers, the theatre and the cinema and the radio exist for him: Science hastens to bring her knowledge and discoveries to his doors and equip his life with endless machinery; politics are shaped in his image. It is he who opposed and then brought about the enfranchisement of women, who has been evolving syndicalism, anarchism, the war of classes, the uprising of labour, waging what we are told are wars of ideas or of cultures,a ferocious type of conflict made in the very image of this new barbarism,or bringing about in a few days Russian revolutions which the century-long efforts and sufferings of the intelligentsia failed to achieve. It is his coming which has been the precipitative agent for the reshaping of the modern world. If a Lenin, a Mussolini, a Hitler have achieved their rapid and almost stupefying success, it was because this driving force, this responsive quick-acting mass was there to carry them to victorya force lacking to their less fortunate predecessors.
  The first results of this momentous change have been inspiriting to our desire of movement, but a little disconcerting to the thinker and to the lover of a high and fine culture; for if it has to some extent democratised culture or the semblance of culture, it does not seem at first sight to have elevated or streng thened it by this large accession of the half-redeemed from below. Nor does the world seem to be guided any more directly by the reason and intelligent will of her best minds than before. Commercialism is still the heart of modern civilisation; a sensational activism is still its driving force. Modern education has not in the mass redeemed the sensational man; it has only made necessary to him things to which he was not formerly accustomed, mental activity and occupations, intellectual and even aesthetic sensations, emotions of idealism. He still lives in the vital substratum, but he wants it stimulated from above. He requires an army of writers to keep him mentally occupied and provide some sort of intellectual pabulum for him; he has a thirst for general information of all kinds which he does not care or has not time to coordinate or assimilate, for popularised scientific knowledge, for such new ideas as he can catch, provided they are put before him with force or brilliance, for mental sensations and excitation of many kinds, for ideals which he likes to think of as actuating his conduct and which do give it sometimes a certain colour. It is still the activism and sensationalism of the crude mental being, but much more open and free. And the cultured, the intelligentsia find that they can get a hearing from him such as they never had from the pure Philistine, provided they can first stimulate or amuse him; their ideas have now a chance of getting executed such as they never had before. The result has been to cheapen thought and art and literature, to make talent and even genius run in the grooves of popular success, to put the writer and thinker and scientist very much in a position like that of the cultured Greek slave in a Roman household where he has to work for, please, amuse and instruct his master while keeping a careful eye on his tastes and preferences and repeating trickily the manner and the points that have caught his fancy. The higher mental life, in a word, has been democratised, sensationalised, activised with both good and bad results. Through it all the eye of faith can see perhaps that a yet crude but an enormous change has begun. Thought and Knowledge, if not yet Beauty, can get a hearing and even produce rapidly some large, vague, yet in the end effective will for their results; the mass of culture and of men who think and strive seriously to appreciate and to know has enormously increased behind all this surface veil of sensationalism, and even the sensational man has begun to undergo a process of transformation. Especially, new methods of education, new principles of society are beginning to come into the range of practical possibility which will create perhaps one day that as yet unknown phenomenon, a race of mennot only a classwho have to some extent found and developed their mental selves, a cultured humanity.

1.09 - Sri Aurobindo and the Big Bang, #Preparing for the Miraculous, #George Van Vrekhem, #Integral Yoga
  is hardly a cosmological theory in science Fiction that is not
  backed up by theoretical physics, or made acceptable by the
  --
  Paul Steinhardt is not a science Fiction writer, he is Al
  bert Einstein Professor of Science at Princeton. His opinion:

1.09 - The Pure Existent, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  4:But to settle the account we have to know what is this All, this infinite and omnipotent energy. And here we come to a fresh complication. For it is asserted to us by the pure reason and it seems to be asserted to us by Vedanta that as we are subordinate and an aspect of this Movement, so the movement is subordinate and an aspect of something other than itself, of a great timeless, spaceless Stability, sthan.u, which is immutable, inexhaustible and unexpended, not acting though containing all this action, not energy, but pure existence. Those who see only this world-energy can declare indeed that there is no such thing: our idea of an eternal stability, an immutable pure existence is a Fiction of our intellectual conceptions starting from a false idea of the stable: for there is nothing that is stable; all is movement and our conception of the stable is only an artifice of our mental consciousness by which we secure a standpoint for dealing practically with the movement. It is easy to show that this is true in the movement itself. There is nothing there that is stable. All that appears to be stationary is only a block of movement, a formulation of energy at work which so affects our consciousness that it seems to be still, somewhat as the earth seems to us to be still, somewhat as a train in which we are travelling seems to be still in the midst of a rushing landscape. But is it equally true that underlying this movement, supporting it, there is nothing that is moveless and immutable? Is it true that existence consists only in the action of energy? Or is it not rather that energy is an output of Existence?
  5:We see at once that if such an Existence is, it must be, like the Energy, infinite. Neither reason nor experience nor intuition nor imagination bears witness to us of the possibility of a final terminus. All end and beginning presuppose something beyond the end or beginning. An absolute end, an absolute beginning is not only a contradiction in terms, but a contradiction of the essence of things, a violence, a Fiction. Infinity imposes itself upon the appearances of the finite by its ineffugable self-existence.
  6:But this is infinity with regard to Time and Space, an eternal duration, interminable extension. The pure Reason goes farther and looking in its own colourless and austere light at Time and Space points out that these two are categories of our consciousness, conditions under which we arrange our perception of phenomenon. When we look at existence in itself, Time and Space disappear. If there is any extension, it is not a spatial but a psychological extension; if there is any duration, it is not a temporal but a psychological duration; and it is then easy to see that this extension and duration are only symbols which represent to the mind something not translatable into intellectual terms, an eternity which seems to us the same all-containing ever-new moment, an infinity which seems to us the same all-containing all-pervading point without magnitude. And this conflict of terms, so violent, yet accurately expressive of something we do perceive, shows that mind and speech have passed beyond their natural limits and are striving to express a Reality in which their own conventions and necessary oppositions disappear into an ineffable identity.
  7:But is this a true record? May it not be that Time and Space so disappear merely because the existence we are regarding is a Fiction of the intellect, a fantastic Nihil created by speech, which we strive to erect into a conceptual reality? We regard again that Existence-in-itself and we say, No. There is something behind the phenomenon not only infinite but indefinable. Of no phenomenon, of no totality of phenomena can we say that absolutely it is. Even if we reduce all phenomena to one fundamental, universal irreducible phenomenon of movement or energy, we get only an indefinable phenomenon. The very conception of movement carries with it the potentiality of repose and betrays itself as an activity of some existence; the very idea of energy in action carries with it the idea of energy abstaining from action; and an absolute energy not in action is simply and purely absolute existence. We have only these two alternatives, either an indefinable pure existence or an indefinable energy in action and, if the latter alone is true, without any stable base or cause, then the energy is a result and phenomenon generated by the action, the movement which alone is. We have then no Existence, or we have the Nihil of the Buddhists with existence as only an attribute of an eternal phenomenon, of Action, of Karma, of Movement. This, asserts the pure reason, leaves my perceptions unsatisfied, contradicts my fundamental seeing, and therefore cannot be. For it brings us to a last abruptly ceasing stair of an ascent which leaves the whole staircase without support, suspended in the Void.
  8:If this indefinable, infinite, timeless, spaceless Existence is, it is necessarily a pure absolute. It cannot be summed up in any quantity or quantities, it cannot be composed of any quality or combination of qualities. It is not an aggregate of forms or a formal substratum of forms. If all forms, quantities, qualities were to disappear, this would remain. Existence without quantity, without quality, without form is not only conceivable, but it is the one thing we can conceive behind these phenomena.
  --
  11:In reality, this opposition of actual insight into being to the conceptual Fictions of the pure Reason is fallacious. If indeed intuition in this matter were really opposed to intelligence, we could not confidently support a merely conceptual reasoning against fundamental insight. But this appeal to intuitive experience is incomplete. It is valid only so far as it proceeds and it errs by stopping short of the integral experience. So long as the intuition fixes itself only upon that which we become, we see ourselves as a continual progression of movement and change in consciousness in the eternal succession of Time. We are the river, the flame of the Buddhist illustration. But there is a supreme experience and supreme intuition by which we go back behind our surface self and find that this becoming, change, succession are only a mode of our being and that there is that in us which is not involved at all in the becoming. Not only can we have the intuition of this that is stable and eternal in us, not only can we have the glimpse of it in experience behind the veil of continually fleeting becomings, but we can draw back into it and live in it entirely, so effecting an entire change in our external life, and in our attitude, and in our action upon the movement of the world. And this stability in which we can so live is precisely that which the pure Reason has already given us, although it can be arrived at without reasoning at all, without knowing previously what it is, - it is pure existence, eternal, infinite, indefinable, not affected by the succession of Time, not involved in the extension of Space, beyond form, quantity, quality, - Self only and absolute.
  12:The pure existent is then a fact and no mere concept; it is the fundamental reality. But, let us hasten to add, the movement, the energy, the becoming are also a fact, also a reality. The supreme intuition and its corresponding experience may correct the other, may go beyond, may suspend, but do not abolish it. We have therefore two fundamental facts of pure existence and of worldexistence, a fact of Being, a fact of Becoming. To deny one or the other is easy; to recognise the facts of consciousness and find out their relation is the true and fruitful wisdom.

1.10 - Concentration - Its Practice, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  According to this aphorism, both the powers of soul and nature become manifest when they are in conjunction. Then all manifestations are thrown out. Ignorance is the cause of this conjunction. We see every day that the cause of our pain or pleasure is always our joining ourselves with the body. If I were perfectly certain that I am not this body, I should take no notice of heat and cold, or anything of the kind. This body is a combination. It is only a Fiction to say that I have one body, you another, and the sun another. The whole universe is one ocean of matter, and you are the name of a little particle, and I of another, and the sun of another. We know that this matter is continuously changing. What is forming the sun one day, the next day may form the matter of our bodies.
  24. Ignorance is its cause.

1.10 - The Secret of the Veda, #Vedic and Philological Studies, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The distinction is of the greatest importance; for not only does it show that the substance of our religious mentality and discipline goes back to the prehistoric antiquity of the Upanishads, but it justifies the hypothesis that the Vedantins of the Upanishads themselves held it as an inheritance from their Vedic forefa thers. If the Upanishads were only a record of intellectual speculations, the theory of a progression from Vedic materialism to new modes of thought would be entirely probable and no other hypothesis could hold the field without first destroying the rationalistic theory by new and unsuspected evidence. But the moment we perceive that the Upanishads are the result of this ancient & indigenous system of truth-finding, we are liberated from the burden of European examples. Evidently, we have here to deal with phenomena of thought which do not fall within the European scheme of a rapid transition from gross savage superstition to subtle metaphysical speculation. We have phenomena which are either sui generis or, if at any time common to humanity both within and outside India, then more ancient or at any rate earlier in the progression of mind than the modern intellectual methods first universalised by the Hellenic & Latin races; we have an intuitive and experiential method of truth finding, a fixed psychological theory and discipline, a system in which observation & comparison of subjective experiences forms the basis of fixed & verifiable psychological truth, just as nowadays in Europe observation & comparison of objective experiences forms the basis of fixed and verifiable physical truth. The difference between the speculative method and the experiential is that the speculative aims only at logical harmony and, due to the rigid abstract tendency, drives towards new blocks of thought and new mental attitudes; the experiential aims at verification by experience and drives towards the progressive discovery or restatement of eternal truths and their application to varying conditions. The indispensable basis of all Science is the invariability of the same result from the same experiment, given the same conditions; the same experiment with oxygen & hydrogen will always, in whatever age or clime it is applied, have one invariable result, the appearance of water. The indispensable basis of all Yoga is the same invariability in psychological experiments & their results. The same experiment with the limited waking or manifest consciousness and the unlimited unmanifest consciousness from which it is a selection and formation will always, in whatever age or clime it is applied, have the same result, the dissolution, gradual or rapid, complete or partial according to the instruments and conditions of the experiment, of the waking ego into the cosmic consciousness. In each method, physical Science or psychological Science, different Scientists or different teachers may differ as to some of the final generalisations to be drawn from the facts & the most appropriate terms to be used, or invent different instruments in the hope of arriving at a more rapid or a more delicate process, but the facts and the fundamental truths remain common to all, even if stated in different terms, because they are the subjects of a common experience. Now the facts discovered by the Indian method, the duality of Purusha and Prakriti, the triple states of conscious being, the relation between the macrocosm & the microcosm, the fivefold and sevenfold principles of consciousness, the existence of more than one bodily case in which, simultaneously, we dwell, these and a number of other fixed ideas which the modern Yogins hold not as speculative propositions but as observable and verifiable facts of experience, are to be found in the Upanishads already enounced in more ancient formulae and in a slightly different language. The question arises, when did they originate? If they are facts, when were they first discovered? If they are hallucinations, when were the methods of subjective experiment which result so persistently in these hallucinations, first evolved and fixed? Not at the time of the Upanishads, for the Upanishads professedly record the traditional knowledge of older Rishis which is still verifiable by the moderns, prvebhir rishibhir dyo ntanair uta.Then, some time before the composition of the Upanishads, either by the earlier or later Vedic Rishis or by predecessors of the Vedic Rishis or in the interval between the Vedic hymns and the first Vedantic compositions. But for the period between Veda & Vedanta we have no documents, no direct & plain evidence. The question therefore can only be decided by an examination of the Vedic hymns themselves. Only by settling the meaning of Veda can we decide whether the early Vedantins were right in supposing that they were merely restating in more modern terms the substantial ideas & experiences of Vedic Rishis or whether this grand assumption of the Upanishads must take its rank among those pious Fictions or willing & half honest errors which have often been immensely helpful to the advance of human knowledge but are none the less impostures upon posterity.
  European scholars believe that they have fixed finally the meaning of Veda. Using as their tools the Sciences of Comparative Philology & Comparative Mythology, itself a part of the strangely termed Science of Comparative Religion, they have excavated for us out of the ancient Veda a buried world, a forgotten civilisation, lost names of kings and nations, wars & battles, institutions, social habits & cultural ideas which the men of Vedantic times & their forerunners never dreamed were lying concealed in the revered & sacred words used daily by them in their worship and the fount and authority for their richest spiritual experiences deepest illuminated musings. The picture these discoveries constitute is a remarkable composition, imposing in its mass, brilliant and attractive in its details. The one lingering objection to them is a possible doubt of the truth of these discoveries, the soundness of the methods used to arrive at them. Are the conclusions of Vedic scholarship so undoubtedly true or so finally authoritative as to preclude a totally different hypothesis even though it may lead possibly to an interpretation which will wash out every colour & negative every detail of this great recovery? We must determine, first, whether the foundations of the European theory of Veda are solid & certain fact or whether it has been reared upon a basis of doubtful inference and conjecture. If the former, the question of the Veda is closed, its problem solved; if the latter, the European results may even then be true, but equally they may be false and replaceable by a more acceptable theory and riper conclusions.
  --
  Nor does the philological reasoning on which the astronomical interpretation of Vedic hymns is supported, inspire, when examined, or deserve any more certain confidence. To identify the Aswins with the two sons of the Greek Dyaus, Kastor and Polydeuces, and again these two pairs conjecturally with two stars of the constellation Gemini is easy & carries with it a great air of likelihood; but an air of likelihood is not proof. We need more for anything like rational conviction or certainty. In the Veda there are a certain number of hymns to the Aswins & a fair number also of passages in which they are described and invoked; if indeed the purport of their worship is astronomical and the sense of their personality in the Veda merely a Fiction about the stars and if they really bore that aspect to the Vedic Rishis, all these passages, & all their epithets, actions, functions & the prayers offered to them ought to be entirely explicable on that theory; or if other ideas have crept in, we must be shown what are these ideas, how they have crept in, in what way these are in the minds of the ancient Rishis superimposed on the original astronomical conception and reconciled with it. Then only can we accept it as a proved probability, if not a proved certainty, that the Aswins are the constellation Gemini and, in that known character, worshipped in the sacred chants. For we must remember that the Aswins might easily have been the constellation Gemini in an original creed & yet be worshipped in a quite different character at the time of the Vedic Rishis. In the Vedic hymns as they are at present rendered whether by Sayana or by Roth, there is no clear statement of this character of the Aswins; the whole theory rests on metaphor and parable, and it is easy to see how dangerous, how open to the flights of mere ingenuity is the system of interpretation by metaphor. There ought to be at least a kernel of direct statement in the loose & uncertain mass of metaphor. We are told that the Aswins are lords of light, ubhaspat, and certainly the starry Twins are luminous; they are rudravartan, which interpreted of the red path, may very well apply to stars moving through heaven; they are somewhere described as vrisharath, bull-charioted, & Gemini is next in order & vicinity to Taurus, the constellation of the bull; Sry, daughter of the Sun, mounts on their chariot & Sry is very possibly such & such a star whose motion may be described by this figurative ascension; the Aswins get honey from the bees and there is a constellation near Gemini called by the Greeks the Bees whose light falls on the Twins. All this is brilliant, attractive, captivating; it does immense credit to the ingenuity of the human intellect. But if we examine sceptically the proofs that are offered us, we find ourselves face to face with amass of ingenious & hazardous guesses; it is not explained why the Aswins particularly more than other gods, should have this distinctive epithet of ubhaspat, as peculiar to them in the Veda as is sahasaspati to Agni; rudra in the sense of red is a novel & conjectural significance; vrisharatha interpreted consistently as bull-charioted in connection with Taurus, would make hopeless ravages in the sense of other passages of the Veda; the identification of Sry, daughter of the Sun is unproved, it is an airy conjecture depending on the proof of the identity of the Aswins not itself proving it; madhu in the passage about the Bees need not mean honey and much more probably means the honeyed wine of Soma, the rendering bees is one of the novel, conjectural & highly doubtful suggestions of European scholarship. All the other proofs that are heaped on us are of a like nature & brilliantly flimsy ingenuity, & we end our sceptical scrutiny admiring, but still sceptical. We feel after all that an accumulation of conjectures does not constitute proof and that a single clear & direct substantial statement in one sense or the other would outweigh all these ingenious inferences, these brilliant imaginings. To begin with a hypothesis is always permissible,it is the usual mode of scientific discovery; but a hypothesis must be supported by facts. To support it by a mass of other hypotheses is to abuse & exceed the permissibility of conjecture in scientific research.
  I have thus dwelt on the fragility of the European theory in this introduction because I wish to avoid in the body of the volume the burden of adverse discussion with other theories & rival interpretations. I propose to myself an entirely positive method,the development of a constructive rival hypothesis, not the disproof of those which hold the field. But, since they do hold the field, I am bound to specify before starting those general deficiencies in them which disqualify them at least from prohibiting fresh discussion and shutting out an entirely new point of departure. Possibly Sayana is right and the Vedas are only the hymn-book of a barbarous & meaningless mythological ritual. Possibly, the European theory is more correct and the Vedic religion & myth was of the character of a materialistic Nature worship & the metaphorical, poetical & wholly fanciful personification of heavenly bodies & forces of physical Nature. But neither of these theories is so demonstrably right, that other hypotheses are debarred from appearing and demanding examination. Such a new hypothesis I wish to advance in the present volume. The gods of the Veda are in my view Nature Powers, but Powers at once of moral & of physical Nature, not of physical Nature only; moreover their moral aspect is the substantial part of their physiognomy, the physical though held to be perfectly real & effective, is put forward mainly as a veil, dress or physical type of their psychological being. The ritual of the Veda is a symbolic ritual supposed by those who used it to be by virtue of its symbolism practically effective of both inner & outer results in life & the world. The hymnology of the Veda rests on the ancient theory that speech is in itself both morally & physically creative & effective, the secret executive agent of the divine powers in manifesting & compelling mental & material phenomena. The substance of the Vedic hymns is the record of certain psychological experiences which are the natural results, still attainable & repeatable in our own experience, of an ancient type of Yoga practised certainly in India, practised probably in ancient Greece, Asia Minor & Egypt in prehistoric times. Finally, the language of the Vedas is an ambiguous tongue, with an ambiguity possible only to the looser fluidity belonging to the youth of human speech & deliberately used to veil the deeper psychological meaning of the Riks. I hold that it was the traditional knowledge of this deep religious & psychological character of the Vedas which justified in the eyes of the ancient Indians the high sanctity attached to them & the fixed idea that these were the repositories of an august, divine & hardly attainable truth.

1.1.2 - Commentary, #Kena and Other Upanishads, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  can never really cage in our intellectual and verbal Fictions that
  infinite totality. Yet it is through the principles manifested in the

1.13 - The Divine Maya, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  11:The philosophies which recognise Mind alone as the creator of the worlds or accept an original principle with Mind as the only mediator between it and the forms of the universe, may be divided into the purely noumenal and the idealistic. The purely noumenal recognise in the cosmos only the work of Mind, Thought, Idea: but Idea may be purely arbitrary and have no essential relation to any real Truth of existence; such Truth, if it exists, may be regarded as a mere Absolute aloof from all relations and irreconcilable with a world of relations. The idealistic interpretation supposes a relation between the Truth behind and the conceptive phenomenon in front, a relation which is not merely that of an antinomy and opposition. The view I am presenting goes farther in idealism; it sees the creative Idea as Real-Idea, that is to say, a power of Conscious Force expressive of real being, born out of real being and partaking of its nature and neither a child of the Void nor a weaver of Fictions. It is conscious Reality throwing itself into mutable forms of its own imperishable and immutable substance. The world is therefore not a figment of conception in the universal Mind, but a conscious birth of that which is beyond Mind into forms of itself. A Truth of conscious being supports these forms and expresses itself in them, and the knowledge corresponding to the truth thus expressed reigns as a supramental Truth-consciousness organising real ideas in a perfect harmony before they are cast into the mental-vital-material mould. Mind, Life and Body are an inferior consciousness and a partial expression which strives to arrive in the mould of a various evolution at that superior expression of itself already existent to the Beyond-Mind. That which is in the Beyond-Mind is the ideal which in its own conditions it is labouring to realise.
  12:From our ascending point of view we may say that the Real is behind all that exists; it expresses itself intermediately in an Ideal which is a harmonised truth of itself; the Ideal throws out a phenomenal reality of variable conscious-being which, inevitably drawn towards its own essential Reality, tries at last to recover it entirely whether by a violent leap or normally through the Ideal which put it forth. It is this that explains the imperfect reality of human existence as seen by the Mind, the instinctive aspiration in the mental being towards a perfectibility ever beyond itself, towards the concealed harmony of the Ideal, and the supreme surge of the spirit beyond the ideal to the transcendental. The very facts of our consciousness, its constitution and its necessity presuppose such a triple order; they negate the dual and irreconcilable antithesis of a mere Absolute to a mere relativity.

1.14 - The Victory Over Death, #On the Way to Supermanhood, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  Hence, it is not through an arbitrary and morbid decision of his own that the seeker will undertake this dark descent for a long time he has stopped willing anything, he only obeys the little rhythm, the flowing that is growing in him, and directs it here or there according to where it presses. The descent takes place gradually, almost unknown to him, but it is accompanied, as it were, by certain phenomena which become increasingly clear and define the psychological conditions of the descent. These psychological conditions are threefold. There is that little flowing we have often spoken about, there is that rhythm, and there is that fire of being which opens the doors of the new world. One may be tempted to think that this is a poetic Fiction, an imagery for children, but it is nothing of the sort, and the whole world is a poem becoming true, an image becoming clear, a rhythm taking body. Little by little, a Child looks at the world with eyes of Truth and discovers the lovely Image that was always there; he listens to an undying Rhythm and, attuned to that Rhythm, he enters the immortality he had never ceased to be. That flowing actually grows, that rhythm becomes clearer, that fire intensifies as the first mental and vital layers are clarified. In fact, it is no longer simply a flowing but a sort of continuous current, a descending mass that envelops first the crown of the head and the nape of the neck, then the chest, the heart, the solar plexus, the abdomen, the sex organs, the legs, and which even seems to reach under the feet, as if there were an extension of being all the way down there, an abyss of existence. The farther the current descends, the warmer and more compact and denser, almost solid, it becomes it feels like an unmoving cataract. The descent is proportionate to our degree of clarification and the downthrust of the Force (which grows as we become clearer). No mental or psychoanalytical machinery has the power to reach those deeper layers. The movement is irresistibly powerful, sometimes even doubling one over, as if crushing one under the pressure. But at the same time as the power grows so does the stability, as if finally, at the end of the descent, there were a motionless mass of energy or with such an intense vibration, so swift and instantaneous, that it seems solidified, immobile, yet moving unbelievably fast in place a powdering of warm gold, says Mother. That is what Sri Aurobindo called the supramental Force. It would almost seem as if it became supramental, or acquired supramental qualities, as it descends into matter (that is to say, as we consent to let it go through, as the resistances fall away under its pressure and it victoriously penetrates all the way down to the bottom). We say supramental, but it is the same with this word as with everything else: there is only one Force, as there is only one moon, which gradually becomes full to our vision, but the moon was always full and the Force always the same. It is our receptivity which changes and makes it look different from what it always was. It is that flowing which spontaneously, automatically, without any will or decision on our part (all our wills add more confusion), effects the descent, overturns obstacles, exposes falsehoods under its relentless searchlight, exposes the gray elf, brings to light all our hiding places, cleanses, purifies, widens and brings infinity to each level and into each cranny and does not give up, does not stop for a second until everything, down to the least detail, the smallest movement, is restored to its original joy, its infinity, its light, its clear vision, its right will and divine acquiescence. This is the Force of the yoga, the Consciousness-Force Sri Aurobindo spoke of. It is the one which forges the superman, the one which will forge the supramental being the one which will forge itself in that forgetfulness of itself.
  Thy golden Light came down into my brain

1.15 - The Transformed Being, #On the Way to Supermanhood, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  For there is also a Rhythm, which is not a Fiction either, any more than that fire or flowing is. They are one and the same thing with a triple face,55 in its individual and universal aspects, in its human condensation or interstellar space, in this rock or that bird. Each thing, each being has its rhythm, as well as each event and the return of the birds from the north. It is the world's great Rite, its indivisible symphony from which we are separated in a little mental body. But that rhythm is there, in the heart of everything and in spite of everything, for without it everything would disintegrate and be scattered. It is the prime bonding agent, the musical network that ties thing together, their innermost vibration, the color of their soul and their note. The ancient Tantric texts said, The Natural Name of anything is the sound which is produced by the action of the moving forces that constitute it.56 It is the real Name of each thing, its power of being, and our real and unique name among the billions of appearances. It is what we are and what is behind all the vocabularies and pseudonyms that science and law inflict upon us and upon the world. And perhaps this whole quest of the world, this tormented evolution, this struggle of things and beings, is a slow quest for its real name, its singular identity, its true music under this enormous parody we are no longer anybody! We are anyone at all in the mental hubbub that passes from one to another; and yet, we are a unique note, a little note which struggles toward its greater music, which rasps and grates and suffers because it cannot be sung. We are an irreplaceable person behind this carnival of false names; we are a Name that is our unique tonality, our little beacon of being, our simple consecration in the great Consecration of the world, and yet which connects us secretly to all other beacons and all other names. To know that Name is to know all names. To name a thing is to be able to recreate it by its music, to seize the similar forces in their harmonic network. The supramental being is first and foremost the knower of the Word the Vedic Rishis spoke of, the priest of the Word,57 the one who does by simply invoking the truth of things, poits he is the Poet of the future age. And his poem is an outpouring of truth whose every fact-creating and matter-creating syllable is attuned to the Great Harmony: a re-creation of matter through the music of truth in matter. He is the Poet of Matter. Through this music, he transmutes; through this music, he communicates; through this music, he knows and loves because, in truth, that Rhythm is the very vibration of the Love that conceived the worlds and carries them forever in its song.
  We have forgotten that little note, the simple note that fills hearts and fills everything, as if the world were suddenly bemisted in orange tenderness, vast and profound as a fathomless love, so old, so old it seems to embrace the ages, to well up from the depths of time, from the depths of sorrow, all the sorrows of the earth and all its nights, its wanderings, its millions of painful paths life after life, its millions of departed faces, its extinct and annihilated loves, which suddenly come back to seize us again amid that orange explosion as if we had been all those pains and faces and beings on the millions of paths of the earth, and all their songs of hope and despair, all their lost and departed loves, all their never-extinguished music in that one little golden note which bursts out for a second on the wild foam and fills everything with an indescribable orange communion, a total comprehension, a music of triumphant sweetness behind the pain and chaos, an overflowing instantaneousness, as if we were in the Goal forever.

1.16 - The Season of Truth, #On the Way to Supermanhood, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  There still remains the irritating secret of the transition between the body of light and this body of darkness, that body of truth and this mortal body. We have spoken of transfusion or perhaps reabsorption of one into the other, and also of transmutation of one by the other. But these are words that hide our ignorance. How will this husk, as She who continued Sri Aurobindo's work used to call it (and who dared the perilous adventure, the last great saltus of material evolution), be opened, give way to that long-nurtured flower of fire? How will that new material substance the substance of the new world make its appearance, materialize? For it is already there; it will not fall from the sky. It is already radiating for those who have the truth-vision. It has been built, condensed, by the flame of aspiration of a few bodies. It almost seems as if a mere nothing would be enough to bring it out into the open, visible and tangible to all but we do not know what that nothing is, that impalpable veil, that ultimate screen, or what will make it fall. It is nothing, really, scarcely a husk, and behind, throbbing and vibrating, is the new world, so intense, radiant and warm, with such a swift rhythm and vivid light, so much more vivid and true than the earth's present light that one really wonders how living in this old callous, narrow, thick and awkward substance is still possible, and that the entire life as it is does seem like an old dried-up husk, thin and flat and colorless, a sort of caricature of the real life, a two-dimensional image of another material world full of depths and vibrancy, of superimposed and fused meanings, of real life, real joy, real movement. Here, outside, there are only little puppets of being moving about, passing figures in a shadow dance, lit up by something else, cast by something else, which is the life of their shadow, the light of their night, the sacred meaning of their futile little gesture, the real body of their pale silhouette. And yet, it is a material world, absolutely material, not some glorious Fiction, not a hallucination with eyes closed, not a vague area of little saints. It is there. It is like real matter, Sri Aurobindo used to say. It is knocking at our doors, seeking to exist for our eyes and in our bodies, hammering away at the world, as if the great eternal Image were trying to enter the small one, the true world to enter this caricature which is coming to grief on all sides, the Truth of matter to enter this false and illusory coating as though the illusion were actually on this side, in this false look at matter, this false mental structure which prevents us from seeing things as they are. For they already are, as the fullness of the moon already is, only hidden to our shadow vision.
  This solidity of the shadow, this effectiveness of the illusion, is probably the little nothing that stands in the way. Could the caterpillar have prevented itself from seeing a linear world, so concrete and objective for it, so incomplete and subjective for us? Our earth is not complete; our life is not complete; our matter itself is not complete. It is knocking, knocking to become one and full. It could well be that the whole falsehood of the earth lies in its false look, which results in a false life, a false action, a false being that is not, that cries out to be, that knocks and knocks on our doors and on the doors of the world. And yet, this husk does exist it suffers, it dies. It is not an illusion, even if, behind, lies the light of its shadow, the source of its gesture, the real face of its mask. What prevents the connection?... Perhaps simply something in the old substance that still takes itself for its shadow instead of taking itself for its sun perhaps is it only a matter of a conversion of our material consciousness, of its total and integral changeover from the small shadow to the great Person? A changeover which is like a death, a swing into such a radical otherness that it amounts to a disintegration of the old fellow. An instantaneous death-resurrection? A sudden other view, a plunge into Life true life which abolishes or unrealizes the old shadow?

1.18 - Mind and Supermind, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  6:Mind, first, the chained and hampered sovereign of our human living. Mind in its essence is a consciousness which measures, limits, cuts out forms of things from the indivisible whole and contains them as if each were a separate integer. Even with what exists only as obvious parts and fractions, Mind establishes this Fiction of its ordinary commerce that they are things with which it can deal separately and not merely as aspects of a whole. For, even when it knows that they are not things in themselves, it is obliged to deal with them as if they were things in themselves; otherwise it could not subject them to its own characteristic activity. It is this essential characteristic of Mind which conditions the workings of all its operative powers, whether conception, perception, sensation or the dealings of creative thought. It conceives, perceives, senses things as if rigidly cut out from a background or a mass and employs them as fixed units of the material given to it for creation or possession. All its action and enjoyment deal thus with wholes that form part of a greater whole, and these subordinate wholes again are broken up into parts which are also treated as wholes for the particular purposes they serve. Mind may divide, multiply, add, subtract, but it cannot get beyond the limits of this mathematics. If it goes beyond and tries to conceive a real whole, it loses itself in a foreign element; it falls from its own firm ground into the ocean of the intangible, into the abysms of the infinite where it can neither perceive, conceive, sense nor deal with its subject for creation and enjoyment. For if Mind appears sometimes to conceive, to perceive, to sense or to enjoy with possession the infinite, it is only in seeming and always in a figure of the infinite. What it does thus vaguely possess is simply a formless Vast and not the real spaceless infinite. The moment it tries to deal with that, to possess it, at once the inalienable tendency to delimitation comes in and the Mind finds itself again handling images, forms and words. Mind cannot possess the infinite, it can only suffer it or be possessed by it; it can only lie blissfully helpless under the luminous shadow of the Real cast down on it from planes of existence beyond its reach. The possession of the Infinite cannot come except by an ascent to those supramental planes, nor the knowledge of it except by an inert submission of Mind to the descending messages of the Truth-conscious Reality.
  7:This essential faculty and the essential limitation that accompanies it are the truth of Mind and fix its real nature and action, svabhava and svadharma; here is the mark of the divine fiat assigning it its office in the complete instrumentation of the supreme Maya, - the office determined by that which it is in its very birth from the eternal self-conception of the Self-existent. That office is to translate always infinity into the terms of the finite, to measure off, limit, depiece. Actually it does this in our consciousness to the exclusion of all true sense of the Infinite; therefore Mind is the nodus of the great Ignorance, because it is that which originally divides and distributes, and it has even been mistaken for the cause of the universe and for the whole of the divine Maya. But the divine Maya comprehends Vidya as well as Avidya, the Knowledge as well as the Ignorance. For it is obvious that since the finite is only an appearance of the Infinite, a result of its action, a play of its conception and cannot exist except by it, in it, with it as a background, itself form of that stuff and action of that force, there must be an original consciousness which contains and views both at the same time and is intimately conscious of all the relations of the one with the other. In that consciousness there is no ignorance, because the infinite is known and the finite is not separated from it as an independent reality; but still there is a subordinate process of delimitation, - otherwise no world could exist, - a process by which the ever dividing and reuniting consciousness of Mind, the ever divergent and convergent action of Life and the infinitely divided and self-aggregating substance of Matter come, all by one principle and original act, into phenomenal being. This subordinate process of the eternal Seer and Thinker, perfectly luminous, perfectly aware of Himself and all, knowing well what He does, conscious of the infinite in the finite which He is creating, may be called the divine Mind. And it is obvious that it must be a subordinate and not really a separate working of the Real-Idea, of the Supermind, and must operate through what we have described as the apprehending movement of the Truth-consciousness.

1.19 - The Curve of the Rational Age, #The Human Cycle, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The natural remedy for the first defects of the individualistic theory in practice would seem to be education; for if man is not by nature, we may hope at least that he can be made by education and training something like a rational being. Universal education, therefore, is the inevitable second step of the democratic movement in its attempt to rationalise human society. But a rational education means necessarily three things, first, to teach men how to observe and know rightly the facts on which they have to form a judgment; secondly, to train them to think fruitfully and soundly; thirdly, to fit them to use their knowledge and their thought effectively for their own and the common good. Capacity of observation and knowledge, capacity of intelligence and judgment, capacity of action and high character are required for the citizenship of a rational order of society; a general deficiency in any of these difficult requisites is a sure source of failure. Unfortunately,even if we suppose that any training made available to the millions can ever be of this rare character,the actual education given in the most advanced countries has not had the least relation to these necessities. And just as the first defects and failures of democracy have given occasion to the enemy to blaspheme and to vaunt the superiority or even the quite imaginary perfection of the ideal past, so also the first defects of its great remedy, education, have led many superior minds to deny the efficacy of education and its power to transform the human mind and driven them to condemn the democratic ideal as an exploded Fiction.
  Democracy and its panacea of education and freedom have certainly done something for the race. To begin with, the people are, for the first time in the historical period of history, erect, active and alive, and where there is life, there is always a hope of better things. Again, some kind of knowledge and with it some kind of active intelligence based on knowledge and streng thened by the habit of being called on to judge and decide between conflicting issues and opinions in all sorts of matters have been much more generalised than was formerly possible. Men are being progressively trained to use their minds, to apply intelligence to life, and that is a great gain. If they have not yet learned to think for themselves or to think soundly, clearly and rightly, they are at least more able now to choose with some kind of initial intelligence, however imperfect as yet it may be, the thought they shall accept and the rule they shall follow. Equal educational equipment and equal opportunity of life have by no means been acquired; but there is a much greater equalisation than was at all possible in former states of society. But here a new and enormous defect has revealed itself which is proving fatal to the social idea which engendered it. For given even perfect equality of educational and other opportunity, and that does not yet really exist and cannot in the individualistic state of society,to what purpose or in what manner is the opportunity likely to be used? Man, the half infrarational being, demands three things for his satisfaction, power, if he can have it, but at any rate the use and reward of his faculties and the enjoyment of his desires. In the old societies the possibility of these could be secured by him to a certain extent according to his birth, his fixed status and the use of his capacity within the limits of his hereditary status. That basis once removed and no proper substitute provided, the same ends can only be secured by success in a scramble for the one power left, the power of wealth. Accordingly, instead of a harmoniously ordered society there has been developed a huge organised competitive system, a frantically rapid and one-sided development of industrialism and, under the garb of democracy, an increasing plutocratic tendency that shocks by its ostentatious grossness and the magnitudes of its gulfs and distances. These have been the last results of the individualistic ideal and its democratic machinery, the initial bankruptcies of the rational age.

1.201 - Socrates, #Symposium, #Plato, #Philosophy
  Probably a Fictional character; see Glossary of names. 144 sophos.
  Athens was struck by a devastating plague in 430 BC. 146 See elenchein. 147 sophia. or the doxa; some translators and commentators translate as true belief or right opinion. All three translations mean the same thing.

12.04 - Love and Death, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 04, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   A different, almost a contrary denouement attends Love in Rodogune. Love here passes through the normal tragic trials and tribulations, even through the final trial, even death. But for love it is not the end nor defeat, rather a higher fulfilment. Real gold brightens up, shines gloriously when passed through fire. The end of the body is not the end of love, it exists even while in the body apart from the body and maintains its autonomous existence undimmed by external barriers and difficulties even by the disappearance of the body. The legend of loves frustrated in this life but reunited in another world is not pure Fiction but a truth obvious to the seeing eye. In fact Love is an immortal being and human persons are its receptacles and formations for a special play upon this earth. Earthly fate only serves to increase the delight that forms the true body of love.
   The Viziers of Bassora represents Love in its mood of frolicsome, almost frivolous dalliance, clothed, it would appear, in a body purely made of the fluid, i.e., playful senses. There is no need, no question of moral or social inhibitionslove is in its absolute spontaneous sportive natural state, natural to an earthly being. The beauty that unhindered love displays here has no stain in it, a stain that a more sophisticated and cultured nature contracts: it is the smiling radiance of the unspoiled limpid consciousness of a child. Yes, it is the Brindaban-lila of Love in its very human, very secular movement. Love is here of earth and of an earthy mode and yet somehow it has maintained its purity, its very spontaneity and simplicity has, as it were, miraculously by its very naturalness purified it of its dross and made it akin to something aerial and heavenly.

1.20 - The End of the Curve of Reason, #The Human Cycle, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  If it be objected that to bring about this result in its completeness the liberty of the individual will have to be destroyed or reduced to an almost vanishing quantity, it might be answered that the right of the individual to any kind of egoistic freedom as against the State which represents the mind, the will, the good and interest of the whole community, sarva brahma, is a dangerous Fiction, a baneful myth. Individual liberty of life and actioneven if liberty of thought and speech is for a time conceded, though this too can hardly remain unimpaired when once the socialistic State has laid its grip firmly on the individual,may well mean in practice an undue freedom given to his infrarational parts of nature, and is not that precisely the thing in him that has to be thoroughly controlled, if not entirely suppressed, if he is to become a reasonable being leading a reasonable life? This control can be most wisely and effectively carried out by the collective reason and will of the State which is larger, better, more enlightened than the individuals; for it profits, as the average individual cannot do, by all the available wisdom and aspiration in the society. Indeed, the enlightened individual may well come to regard this collective reason and will as his own larger mind, will and conscience and find in a happy obedience to it a strong delivery from his own smaller and less rational self and therefore a more real freedom than any now claimed by his little separate ego. It used already to be argued that the disciplined German obeying the least gesture of the policeman, the State official, the military officer was really the freest, happiest and most moral individual in all Europe and therefore in the whole world. The same reasoning in a heightened form might perhaps be applied to the drilled felicities of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany. The State, educating and governing the individual, undertakes to intellectualise, ethicise, practicalise and generally perfect him and to see to it that he remains, whether he will or no, always and in all thingsstrictly on the lines approved by the Stateintellectual, ethical, practical and thoroughly perfect.
  The pity of it is that this excellent theory, quite as much as the individualist theory that ran before it, is sure to stumble over a discrepancy between its set ideas and the actual facts of human nature; for it ignores the complexity of mans being and all that that complexity means. And especially it ignores the soul of man and its supreme need of freedom, of the control also of his lower members, no doubt,for that is part of the total freedom towards which he is struggling,but of a growing self-control, not a mechanical regulation by the mind and will of others. Obedience too is a part of its perfection,but a free and natural obedience to a true guiding power and not to a mechanised government and rule. The collective being is a fact; all mankind may be regarded as a collective being: but this being is a soul and life, not merely a mind or a body. Each society develops into a sort of sub-soul or group-soul of this humanity and develops also a general temperament, character, type of mind, evolves governing ideas and tendencies that shape its life and its institutions. But the society has no discoverable common reason and will belonging alike to all its members; for the group-soul rather works out its tendencies by a diversity of opinions, a diversity of wills, a diversity of life, and the vitality of the group-life depends largely upon the working of this diversity, its continuity, its richness. Since that is so, government by the organised State must mean always government by a number of individuals,whether that number be in theory the minority or the majority makes in the end little fundamental difference. For even when it is the majority that nominally governs, in fact it is always the reason and will of a comparatively few effective men and not really any common reason and will of all that rules and regulates things with the consent of the half-hypnotised mass.1 There is no reason to suppose that the immediate socialisation of the State would at all alter, the mass of men not being yet thoroughly rationalised and developed minds, this practical necessity of State government.

1.24 - Matter, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  8:But Mind by its very nature tends to know and sense substance of conscious-being, not in its unity or totality but by the principle of division. It sees it, as it were, in infinitesimal points which it associates together in order to arrive at a totality, and into these view-points and associations cosmic Mind throws itself and dwells in them. So dwelling, creative by its inherent force as the agent of Real-Idea, bound by its own nature to convert all its perceptions into energy of life, as the All-Existent converts all His self-aspectings into various energy of His creative Force of consciousness, cosmic Mind turns these, its multiple viewpoints of universal existence, into standpoints of universal Life; it turns them in Matter into forms of atomic being instinct with the life that forms them and governed by the mind and will that actuate the formation. At the same time, the atomic existences which it thus forms must by the very law of their being tend to associate themselves, to aggregate; and each of these aggregates also, instinct with the hidden life that forms and the hidden mind and will that actuate them, bears with it a Fiction of a separated individual existence. Each such individual object or existence is supported, according as the mind in it is implicit or explicit, unmanifest or manifest, by its mechanical ego of force, in which the will-to-be is dumb and imprisoned but none the less powerful, or by its self-aware mental ego in which the will-to-be is liberated, conscious, separately active.
  9:Thus not any eternal and original law of eternal and original Matter, but the nature of the action of cosmic Mind is the cause of atomic existence. Matter is a creation, and for its creation the infinitesimal, an extreme fragmentation of the Infinite, was needed as the starting-point or basis. Ether may and does exist as an intangible, almost spiritual support of Matter, but as a phenomenon it does not seem, to our present knowledge at least, to be materially detectable. Subdivide the visible aggregate or the formal atom into essential atoms, break it up into the most infinitesimal dust of being, we shall still, because of the nature of the Mind and Life that formed them, arrive at some utmost atomic existence, unstable perhaps but always reconstituting itself in the eternal flux of force, phenomenally, and not at a mere unatomic extension incapable of contents. Unatomic extension of substance, extension which is not an aggregation, coexistence otherwise than by distribution in space are realities of pure existence, pure substance; they are a knowledge of supermind and a principle of its dynamism, not a creative concept of the dividing Mind, though Mind can become aware of them behind its workings. They are the reality underlying Matter, but not the phenomenon which we call Matter. Mind, Life, Matter itself can be one with that pure existence and conscious extension in their static reality, but not operate by that oneness in their dynamic action, self-perception and self-formation.

1.25 - Temporary Kings, #The Golden Bough, #James George Frazer, #Occultism
  has all the air of a Fiction devised to explain an old custom, of
  which the real meaning and origin had been forgotten.

1.28 - Supermind, Mind and the Overmind Maya, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  10:Since the Consciousness-Force of the eternal Existence is the universal creatrix, the nature of a given world will depend on whatever self-formulation of that Consciousness expresses itself in that world. Equally, for each individual being, his seeing or representation to himself of the world he lives in will depend on the poise or make which that Consciousness has assumed in him. Our human mental consciousness sees the world in sections cut by the reason and sense and put together in a formation which is also sectional; the house it builds is planned to accommodate one or another generalised formulation of Truth, but excludes the rest or admits some only as guests or dependents in the house. Overmind Consciousness is global in its cognition and can hold any number of seemingly fundamental differences together in a reconciling vision. Thus the mental reason sees Person and the Impersonal as opposites: it conceives an impersonal Existence in which person and personality are Fictions of the Ignorance or temporary constructions; or, on the contrary, it can see Person as the primary reality and the impersonal as a mental abstraction or only stuff or means of manifestation. To the Overmind intelligence these are separable Powers of the one Existence which can pursue their independent self-affirmation and can also unite together their different modes of action, creating both in their independence and in their union different states of consciousness and being which can be all of them valid and all capable of coexistence. A purely impersonal existence and consciousness is true and possible, but also an entirely personal consciousness and existence; the Impersonal Divine, Nirguna Brahman, and the Personal Divine, Saguna Brahman, are here equal and coexistent aspects of the Eternal. Impersonality can manifest with person subordinated to it as a mode of expression; but, equally, Person can be the reality with impersonality as a mode of its nature: both aspects of manifestation face each other in the infinite variety of conscious Existence. What to the mental reason are irreconcilable differences present themselves to the Overmind intelligence as coexistent correlatives; what to the mental reason are contraries are to the Overmind intelligence complementaries. Our mind sees that all things are born from Matter or material Energy, exist by it, go back into it; it concludes that Matter is the eternal factor, the primary and ultimate reality, Brahman. Or it sees all as born of Life-Force or Mind, existing by Life or by Mind, going back into the universal Life or Mind, and it concludes that this world is a creation of the cosmic Life-Force or of a cosmic Mind or Logos. Or again it sees the world and all things as born of, existing by and going back to the Real Idea or Knowledge-Will of the Spirit or to the Spirit itself and it concludes on an idealistic or spiritual view of the universe. It can fix on any of these ways of seeing, but to its normal separative vision each way excludes the others. Overmind consciousness perceives that each view is true of the action of the principle it erects; it can see that there is a material world-formula, a vital world-formula, a mental world-formula, a spiritual worldformula, and each can predominate in a world of its own and at the same time all can combine in one world as its constituent powers. The self-formulation of Conscious Force on which our world is based as an apparent Inconscience that conceals in itself a supreme Conscious-Existence and holds all the powers of Being together in its inconscient secrecy, a world of universal Matter realising in itself Life, Mind, Overmind, Supermind, Spirit, each of them in its turn taking up the others as means of its selfexpression, Matter proving in the spiritual vision to have been always itself a manifestation of the Spirit, is to the Overmind view a normal and easily realisable creation. In its power of origination and in the process of its executive dynamis Overmind is an organiser of many potentialities of Existence, each affirming its separate reality but all capable of linking themselves together in many different but simultaneous ways, a magician craftsman empowered to weave the multicoloured warp and woof of manifestation of a single entity in a complex universe.
  11:In this simultaneous development of multitudinous independent or combined Powers or Potentials there is yet - or there is as yet - no chaos, no conflict, no fall from Truth or Knowledge. The Overmind is a creator of truths, not of illusions or falsehoods: what is worked out in any given overmental energism or movement is the truth of the Aspect, Power, Idea, Force, Delight which is liberated into independent action, the truth of the consequences of its reality in that independence. There is no exclusiveness asserting each as the sole truth of being or the others as inferior truths: each God knows all the Gods and their place in existence; each Idea admits all other ideas and their right to be; each Force concedes a place to all other forces and their truth and consequences; no delight of separate fulfilled existence or separate experience denies or condemns the delight of other existence or other experience. The Overmind is a principle of cosmic Truth and a vast and endless catholicity is its very spirit; its energy is an all-dynamism as well as a principle of separate dynamisms: it is a sort of inferior Supermind, - although it is concerned predominantly not with absolutes, but with what might be called the dynamic potentials or pragmatic truths of Reality, or with absolutes mainly for their power of generating pragmatic or creative values, although, too, its comprehension of things is more global than integral, since its totality is built up of global wholes or constituted by separate independent realities uniting or coalescing together, and although the essential unity is grasped by it and felt to be basic of things and pervasive in their manifestation, but no longer as in the Supermind their intimate and ever-present secret, their dominating continent, the overt constant builder of the harmonic whole of their activity and nature.

1.3.4.01 - The Beginning and the End, #Essays Divine And Human, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  It is neither personal nor impersonal and yet at once personal and impersonal. Personality is a Fiction of the impersonal; impersonality the mask of a Person. That impersonal Brahman was all the time a world-transcendent Personality and universal
  Person, is the truth of things as it is represented by life and consciousness. "I am" is the eternal assertion. Analytic thought
  --
  The finite is a transience or a recurrence in the infinite, therefore Infinity alone is utterly real. But since that Real casts always this shadow of itself and since it is by the finite that its reality becomes conceivable, we must suppose that the phenomenon also is not a Fiction.
  The Infinite defines itself in the finite, the finite conceives itself in the Infinite. Each is necessary to the other's complete joy of being.

1.34 - The Myth and Ritual of Attis, #The Golden Bough, #James George Frazer, #Occultism
  blood of the bull. For some time afterwards the Fiction of a new
  birth was kept up by dieting him on milk like a new-born babe. The

1.439, #Talks, #Sri Ramana Maharshi, #Hinduism
  Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi with the name. Therefore the name signifies something and it is not a mere Fiction. Similarly, Gods name is effective. Repetition of the name is remembrance of what it signifies. Hence its merit.
  But the man did not look satisfied. Finally he wanted to retire and prayed for Sri Bhagavans Grace.

1.72 - Education, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  Books are not the only medium even of learning; more, what they teach is partial, prejudiced, meagre, sterile, uncertain, and alien to reality. It follows that all the best books are those which make no pretence to accuracy: poetry, theatre, Fiction. All others date. Another point is that Truth abides above and aloof from intellectual expression, and consequently those books which bear the Magic Keys of the Portal of the Intelligible by dint of inspiration and suggestion come more nearly to grips with Reality than those whose appeal is only to the Intellect. "Didactic" poetry, "realistic" plays and novels, are contradictions in terms.
  P.P.S. One more effort: the above reminds me that I have said no word about the other side of the medal. There are many children who cannot be educated at all in any sense of the word. It is an abonin- able waste of both of them and of the teacher to push against brick walls.

1970 04 01, #On Thoughts And Aphorisms, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   433The Mayavadin talks of my Personal God as a dream and prefers to dream of Impersonal Being; the Buddhist puts that aside too as a Fiction and prefers to dream of Nirvana and the bliss of nothingness. Thus all the dreamers are busy reviling each others visions and parading their own as the panacea. What the soul utterly rejoices in, is for thought the ultimate reality.
   434Beyond Personality the Mayavadin sees indefinable Existence; I followed him there and found my Krishna beyond in indefinable Personality.

1f.lovecraft - A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   the Members of this Generation as a young Man, giving out the Fiction
   that I was born in 1890, in America. I am now, however, resolvd to

1f.lovecraft - The Unnamable, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   presumably been the hero of my Fiction. I told him why the boy had gone
   to that shunned, deserted house, and remarked that he ought to be

1f.lovecraft - The Very Old Folk, #Lovecraft - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   horror, that I verily believe I shall some day employ it in Fiction.
   Roman dreams were no uncommon features of my youthI used to follow the

1.jk - Endymion - Book II, #Keats - Poems, #John Keats, #Poetry
  (line 31): The reference is of course not to the story of Hero and Leander but to the tears of Hero in Much Ado About Nothing, shed when she was falsely accused; and Imogen must, equally of course, be Shakespeare's heroine in Cymbeline, though she is not the only Imogen of Fiction who has swooned. For Pastorella see Faerie Queene, Book VI, Canto II, stanza I. et seq.
  (line 168): For the three occasions which Endymion had seen Diana, refer to the account given to Peona; beginning with line 540, Book I, -- to the passage about the well, line 896, Book I, -- and to the passage in which he hurried into the grotto, line 971, Book I.

1.jlb - The Other Tiger, #Borges - Poems, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  It becomes a Fiction not a living beast,
  Not a tiger out roaming the wilds of earth.

1.poe - Elizabeth, #Poe - Poems, #unset, #Zen
   The muses thro' their bowers of Truth or Fiction,
   Has studied very little of his part,

1.rb - Cleon, #Browning - Poems, #Robert Browning, #Poetry
   Long since, I imaged, wrote the Fiction out,
   That he or other god descended here

1.ww - 0- The White Doe Of Rylstone, Or, The Fate Of The Nortons - Dedication, #Wordsworth - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  or us the stream of Fiction ceased to flow,
  For us the voice of melody was mute.

1.ww - Book Eighth- Retrospect--Love Of Nature Leading To Love Of Man, #Wordsworth - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  These Fictions, as in some sort, in their turn,
  They burnished her. From touch of this new power

1.ww - Book Sixth [Cambridge and the Alps], #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Of magic Fiction, verse of mine perchance
  May never tread; but scarcely Spenser's self
  --
  In dreams and Fictions, pensively composed:      
  Dejection taken up for pleasure's sake,

1.ww - Book Tenth {Residence in France continued], #Wordsworth - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  From tragic Fictions or true history,
  Remembrances and dim admonishments.

1.ww - The Excursion- V- Book Fouth- Despondency Corrected, #Wordsworth - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  Of the gross Fictions chanted in the streets
  By wandering Rhapsodists; and in contempt

1.ww - The Fary Chasm, #Wordsworth - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  No Fiction was it of the antique age:
  A sky-blue stone, within this sunless cleft,

1.ww - The Recluse - Book First, #Wordsworth - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  Or a mere Fiction of what never was?
  For the discerning intellect of Man,

1.ww - Vaudracour And Julia, #Wordsworth - Poems, #unset, #Zen
  Arabian Fiction never filled the world
  With half the wonders that were wrought for him.    

2.01 - The Object of Knowledge, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  16:This is the integral knowledge, for we know that everywhere and in all conditions all to the eye that sees is One, to a divine experience all is one block of the Divine. It is only the mind which for the temporary convenience of its own thought and aspiration seeks to cut an artificial line of rigid division, a Fiction of perpetual incompatibility between one aspect and another of the eternal oneness. The liberated knower lives and acts in the world not less than the bound soul and ignorant mind but more, doing all actions, sarvakrt, only with a true knowledge and a greater conscient power. And by so doing he does not forfeit the supreme unity nor falls from the supreme consciousness and highest knowledge. For the Supreme, however hidden now to us, Is here in the world no less than he could be in the most utter and Ineffable self-extinction, the most intolerant Nirvana.
  next: 2.02 - The Status of Knowledge

2.03 - The Eternal and the Individual, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Our mistake is that in trying to define the indefinable we think we have succeeded when we have described by an allexclusive negation this Absolute which we are yet compelled to conceive of as a supreme positive and the cause of all positives. It is not surprising that so many acute thinkers, with their eye on the facts of being and not on verbal distinctions, should be driven to infer that the Absolute is a Fiction of the intelligence, an idea born of words and verbal dialectics, a zero, non-existent, and to conclude that an eternal Becoming is the only truth of our existence. The ancient sages spoke indeed ofBrahman negatively, - they said of it, neti neti, it is not this, it is not that, - but they took care also to speak of it positively; they said of it too, it is this, it is that, it is all: for they saw that to limit it either by positive or negative definitions was to fall away from its truth. Brahman, they said, is Matter, is Life, is Mind, is Supermind, is cosmic Delight, is Sachchidananda; yet it cannot really be defined by any of these things, not even by our largest conception of Sachchidananda. In the world as we see it, for our mental consciousness however high we carry it, we find that to every positive there is a negative. But the negative is not a zero, - indeed whatever appears to us a zero is packed with force, teeming with power of existence, full of actual or potential contents. Neither does the existence of the negative make its corresponding positive non-existent or an unreality; it only makes the positive an incomplete statement of the truth of things and even, we may say, of the positive's own truth. For the positive and the negative exist not only side by side, but in relation to each other and by each other; they complete and would to the all-view, which a limited mind cannot reach, explain one another. Each by itself is not really known; we only begin to know it in its deeper truth when we can read into it the suggestions of its apparent opposite. It is through such a profounder catholic intuition and
   not by exclusive logical oppositions that our intelligence ought to approach the Absolute.
  --
  The things they represent are not Fictions, they are realities, but they are not rightly known if they are set in irreconcilable opposition to or separation from each other; for there is no such irreconcilable opposition or separation of them in the all-view of the Absolute. This is the weakness not only of our scientific divisions and metaphysical distinctions, but of our exclusive spiritual realisations which are only exclusive because to arrive at them we have to start from our limiting and dividing mental consciousness. We have to make the metaphysical distinctions in order to help our intelligence towards a truth which exceeds it, because it is only so that it can escape from the confusions of our first undistinguishing mental view of things; but if we bind ourselves by them to the end, we make chains of what should only have been first helps. We have to make use too of distinct spiritual realisations which may at first seem contrary to each other, because as mental beings it is difficult or impossible for us to seize at once largely and completely what is beyond our mentality; but we err if we intellectualise them into sole truths, - as when we assert that the Impersonal must be the one ultimate realisation and the rest creation of Maya or declare the Saguna, the Divine in its qualities, to be that and thrust away the impersonality from our spiritual experience. We have to see that both these realisations of the great spiritual seekers are equally valid in themselves, equally invalid against each other; they are one and the same Reality experienced on two sides which are both necessary for the full knowledge and experience of each other and of that which they both are. So is it with the One and the Many, the finite and the infinite, the transcendent and the cosmic, the individual and the universal; each is the other as well as itself and neither can be entirely known without the other and without exceeding their appearance of contrary oppositions.
  We see then that there are three terms of the one existence, transcendent, universal and individual, and that each of these always contains secretly or overtly the two others. The Transcendent possesses itself always and controls the other two as the basis of its own temporal possibilities; that is the Divine, the eternal all-possessing God-consciousness, omnipotent, omniscient, omnipresent, which informs, embraces, governs all existences.

2.04 - On Art, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Zen
   Sri Aurobindo: So they don't read poetry in India as they don't in England. Nowadays, at least for the last 20 years and more, the field has been captured by Fiction novels, short stories, etc.
   Disciple: Is it possible to write spiritual stories, I mean stories with a spiritual content?

2.04 - The Divine and the Undivine, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  But even when we thus regard the universe, we cannot and ought not to dismiss as entirely and radically false and unreal the values that are given to it by our own limited human consciousness. For grief, pain, suffering, error, falsehood, ignorance, weakness, wickedness, incapacity, non-doing of what should be done and wrong-doing, deviation of will and denial of will, egoism, limitation, division from other beings with whom we should be one, all that makes up the effective figure of what we call evil, are facts of the world-consciousness, not Fictions and unrealities, although they are facts whose complete sense or true value is not that which we assign to them in our ignorance.
  Still our sense of them is part of a true sense, our values of them are necessary to their complete values. One side of the truth of these things we discover when we get into a deeper and larger consciousness; for we find then that there is a cosmic and individual utility in what presents itself to us as adverse and evil. For without experience of pain we would not get all the infinite value of the divine delight of which pain is in travail; all ignorance is a penumbra which environs an orb of knowledge, every error is significant of the possibility and the effort of a

2.05 - On Poetry, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Zen
   The law of Ananda governs these activities. Some parts of literature have their own laws: for instance, Fiction. Its law is to represent life.
   If the writer has spirituality in himself, it is bound to express itself in his poetry or art.

2.05 - The Cosmic Illusion; Mind, Dream and Hallucination, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  This then is the dual possibility that arises before us. There is, we may suppose, an original consciousness and power creative of illusions and unrealities with mind as its instrument or medium in the human and animal consciousness, so that the differentiated universe we see is unreal, a Fiction of Maya, and only some indeterminable and undifferentiated Absolute is real.
  Or there is, we may equally suppose, an original, a supreme or cosmic Truth-Consciousness creative of a true universe, but with mind acting in that universe as an imperfect consciousness, ignorant, partly knowing, partly not knowing, - a consciousness which is by its ignorance or limitation of knowledge capable of error, mispresentation, mistaken or misdirected development from the known, of uncertain gropings towards the unknown, of partial creations and buildings, a constant half-position between truth and error, knowledge and nescience. But this ignorance in fact proceeds, however stumblingly, upon knowledge and towards knowledge; it is inherently capable of shedding the limitation, the mixture, and can turn by that liberation into the

2.06 - Reality and the Cosmic Illusion, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  This idea, then, of a subjective action of consciousness creating a world of Fictions other than or distorting the sole true object looks like an imposition on the Brahman by our mind; it imposes on the pure and perfect Reality a feature of its own imperfection, not truly attri butable to the perception of a Supreme Being. On the other hand, the distinction between the consciousness and the being of Brahman could not be valid, unless Brahman being and Brahman consciousness are two distinct entities, - the consciousness imposing its experiences on the pure existence of the being but unable to touch or affect or penetrate it. Brahman, then, whether as the supreme sole Self-Existence or the Self of the real-unreal individual in Maya, would be aware by his true consciousness of the illusions imposed on him and would know them as illusions; only some energy of Maya-nature or something in it would be deluded by its own inventions, - or else, not being really deluded, still persist in behaving and feeling as if it were deluded. This duality is what happens to our consciousness in the Ignorance when it separates itself from the works of Nature and is aware within of the Self as the sole truth and the rest as not-self and not-real, but has on the surface to act as if the rest too were real. But this solution negates the sole and indivisible pure existence and pure awareness of the Brahman; it creates a dualism within its featureless unity which is not other in its purport than the dualism of the double Principle in the
  Sankhya view of things, Purusha and Prakriti, Soul and Nature.
  --
  It is difficult to see why, once any reality is conceded to ourselves and to the universe, it should not be a true reality within its limits. It may be admitted that the manifestation must be on its surface a more restricted reality than the Manifested; our universe is, we may say, one of the rhythms of Brahman and not, except in its essential being, the whole reality: but that is not a sufficient reason for it to be set aside as unreal. It is no doubt so felt by mind withdrawing from itself and its structures: but this is only because the mind is an instrument of Ignorance and, when it withdraws from its constructions, from its ignorant and imperfect picture of the universe, it is impelled to regard them as nothing more than its own Fictions and formations, unfounded, unreal; the gulf between its ignorance and the supreme Truth and Knowledge disables it from discovering the true connections of the transcendent Reality and the cosmic Reality. In a higher status of consciousness the difficulty disappears, the connection
  Reality and the Cosmic Illusion
  --
   is established; the sense of unreality recedes and a theory of illusion becomes superfluous and inapplicable. It cannot be the final truth that the Supreme Consciousness has no regard upon the universe or that it regards it as a Fiction which its self in Time upholds as real. The cosmic can only exist by dependence on the supracosmic, Brahman in Time must have some significance for Brahman in timeless eternity; otherwise there could be no self and spirit in things and therefore no basis for the temporal existence.
  But the universe is condemned as ultimately unreal because it is temporary and not eternal, a perishable form of being imposed on the Formless and Imperishable. This relation can be illustrated by the analogy of earth and the pot made out of earth: the pot and other forms so created perish and go back to the reality, earth, they are only evanescent forms; when they disappear there is left the formless and essential earth and nothing else. But this analogy can tell more convincingly the other way; for the pot is real by right of its being made out of the substance of earth which is real; it is not an illusion and, even when it is dissolved into the original earth, its past existence cannot be thought to have been unreal or an illusion. The relation is not that of an original reality and a phenomenal unreality, but of an original,
  --
  A theory of Maya in the sense of illusion or the unreality of cosmic existence creates more difficulties than it solves; it does not really solve the problem of existence, but rather renders it for ever insoluble. For, whether Maya be an unreality or a nonreal reality, the ultimate effects of the theory carry in them a devastating simplicity of nullification. Ourselves and the universe fade away into nothingness or else keep for a time only a truth which is little better than a Fiction. In the thesis of the pure unreality of Maya, all experience, all knowledge as well as all ignorance, the knowledge that frees us no less than the ignorance that binds us, world-acceptance and world-refusal, are two sides of an illusion; for there is nothing to accept or refuse, nobody to accept or refuse it. All the time it was only the immutable superconscient Reality that at all existed; the bondage and release were only appearances, not a reality. All attachment to world-existence is an illusion, but the call for liberation is also a circumstance of the illusion; it is something that was created in Maya which by its liberation is extinguished in Maya. But this nullification cannot be compelled to stop short in its devastating advance at the boundary fixed for it by a spiritual Illusionism. For if all other experiences of the individual consciousness in the universe are illusions, then what guarantee is there that its spiritual experiences are not illusions, including even its absorbed self-experience of the supreme Self which is conceded to us as utterly real? For if cosmos is untrue, our experience of the cosmic consciousness, of the universal Self, of
  484

2.06 - The Synthesis of the Disciplines of Knowledge, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The central aim of Knowledge is the recovery of the Self, of our true self-existence, and this aim presupposes the admission that our present mode of being is not our true self-existence. No doubt, we have rejected the trenchant solutions which cut the knot of the riddle of the universe; we recognise it neither as a Fiction of material appearance created by Force, nor as an unreality set up by the Mind, nor as a bundle of sensations, ideas and results of idea and sensation with a great Void or a great blissful Zero behind it to strive towards as our true truth of eternal non-existence. We accept the Self as a reality and the universe as a reality of the Self, a reality of its consciousness and not of mere material force and formation, but none the less or rather all the more for that reason a reality. Still, though the universe is a fact and not a Fiction, a fact of the divine and universal and not a Fiction of the individual self, our state of existence here is a state of ignorance, not the true truth of our being. We conceive of ourselves falsely, we see ourselves as we are not; we live in a false relation with our environment, because we know neither the universe nor ourselves for what they really are but with an imperfect view founded on a temporary Fiction which the Soul and Nature have established between themselves for the convenience of the evolving ego. And this falsity is the root of a general perversion, confusion and suffering which besiege at every step both our internal life and our relations with our environment. Our personal life and our communal life, our commerce with ourselves and our commerce with our fellows are founded on a falsity and are therefore false in their recognised principles and methods, although through all this error a growing truth continually seeks to express itself. Hence the supreme importance to man of Knowledge, not what is called the practical knowledge of life, but of the profoundest knowledge of the Self and Nature321 on which alone a true practice of life can be founded.
  The error proceeds from a false identification. Nature has created within her material unity separate-seeming bodies which the Soul manifested in material Nature enfolds, inhabits, possesses, uses; the Soul forgetting itself experiences only this single knot in Matter and says, "I am this body." It thinks of itself as the body, suffers with the body, enjoys with the body, is born with the body, is dissolved with the body; or so at least it views its self-existence. Again, Nature has created within her unity of universal life separate-seeming currents of life which form themselves into a whorl of vitality around and in each body, and the Soul manifested in vital Nature seizes on and is seized by that current. Is imprisoned momentarily in that little whirling vortex of life. The Soul, still forgetting itself, says "I am this life"; it thinks of itself as the life, craves with its cravings or desires, wallows in its pleasures, bleeds with its wounds, rushes or stumbles with its movements. If it is still mainly governed by the body-sense, it identifies its own existence with that of the whorl and thinks "When this whorl is dissipated by the dissolution of the body round which it has formed itself, then I shall be no more." If it has been able to sense the current of life which has formed the vortex, it thinks of itself as that current and says "I am this stream of life; I have entered upon the possession of this body, I shall leave it and enter upon the possession of other bodies: I am an immortal life revolving in a cycle of constant rebirth."

2.07 - The Supreme Word of the Gita, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  But the weakness of the kinetic and the emotional religions is that they are too much absorbed in some divine Personality and in the divine values of the finite. And, even when they have a conception of the infinite Godhead, they do not give us the full satisfaction of knowledge because they do not follow it out into its most ultimate and supernal tendencies. These religions fall short of a complete absorption in the Eternal and the perfect union by identity, - and yet to that identity in some other way, if not in the abstractive, since there all oneness has its basis, the spirit that is in man must one day arrive. On the other hand, the weakness of a contemplative quietistic spirituality is that it arrives at this result by a too absolute abstraction and in the end it turns into a nothing or a Fiction the human soul whose aspiration was yet all the time the whole sense of this attempt at union; for without the soul and its aspiration liberation and union could have no meaning. The little that this way of thinking recognises of his other powers of existence, it relegates to an inferior preliminary action which never arrives at any full or satisfying realisation in the Eternal and Infinite. Yet these things too which it restricts unduly, the potent will, the strong yearning of love, the positive light and all-embracing intuition
  340

2.09 - Memory, Ego and Self-Experience, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
   forms arrives thus far that it is aware of all its superficially conscious becoming as related to an "I" which it always is. That "I" it partly identifies with the conscious becoming, partly thinks of it as something other than the becoming and superior to it, even perhaps eternal and unchanging. In the last resort, by the aid of its reason which distinguishes in order to co-ordinate, it may fix its self-experience on the becoming only, on the constantly changing self and reject the idea of something other than it as a Fiction of the mind; there is then no being, only becoming. Or it may fix its self-experience into a direct consciousness of its own eternal being and reject the becoming, even when it is compelled to be aware of it, as a Fiction of the mind and the senses or the vanity of a temporary inferior existence.
  But it is evident that a self-knowledge based on the separative ego-sense is imperfect and that no knowledge founded upon it alone or primarily or on a reaction against it can be secure or assured of completeness. First, it is a knowledge of our superficial mental activity and its experiences and, with regard to all the large rest of our becoming that is behind, it is an Ignorance. Secondly, it is a knowledge only of being and becoming as limited to the individual self and its experiences; all the rest of the world is to it not-self, something, that is to say, which it does not realise as part of its own being but as some outside existence presented to its separate consciousness.

2.0 - THE ANTICHRIST, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  to understand at what moment in history the dualistic Fiction of a
  good and an evil God first became possible. With the same instinct by

2.1.01 - God The One Reality, #Essays Divine And Human, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  All is existence. Non-existence is a Fiction of the mind; for we describe as non-existent all that has never been within the range of our limited consciousness or is not in that range at the moment or was there once but has gone beyond it.
  Being is not Parabrahman nor is Non-Being Parabrahman; these are only affirmative & negative terms in which Consciousness envisages its self-existence.

2.13 - Exclusive Concentration of Consciousness-Force and the Ignorance, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
   the All-conscient could, though in only a partial action of his conscious energy, succeed in arriving at even this superficial ignorance and inconscience. Even if it were so, it would be worth while to fix the exact action of this mystery, its nature, its limits, so that we may not be appalled by it and misled from the real purpose it serves and the opportunity it gives. But the mystery is a Fiction of the dividing intellect which, because it finds or creates a logical opposition between two concepts, thinks there is a real opposition of the two facts observed and therefore an impossibility of coexistence and unity between them. This
  Ignorance is, as we have seen, really a power of the Knowledge to limit itself, to concentrate itself on the work in hand, an exclusive concentration in practice which does not prevent the full existence and working of the whole conscious being behind, but a working in the conditions chosen and self-imposed on the nature. All conscious self-limitation is a power for its special purpose, not a weakness; all concentration is a force of conscious being, not a disability. It is true that while the Supermind is capable of an integral, comprehensive, multiple, infinite selfconcentration, this is dividing and limited; it is true also that it creates perverse as well as partial and, in so far, false or only halftrue values of things: but we have seen the object of the limitation and of this partiality of knowledge; and the object being admitted, the power to fulfil it must be admitted also in the absolute force of the absolute Being. This power of self-limitation for a particular working, instead of being incompatible with the absolute conscious-force of that Being, is precisely one of the powers we should expect to exist among the manifold energies of the Infinite.

2.13 - THE MASTER AT THE HOUSES OF BALARM AND GIRISH, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  "At Jadu Mallick's garden house Narendra said to me, The forms of God that you see are the Fiction of your mind.' I was amazed and said to him, 'But they speak too! 'Narendra answered, 'Yes, one may think so.' I went to the temple and wept before the Mother. 'O
  Mother,' I said, 'what is this? Then is this all false? How could Narendra say that?'

2.14 - The Origin and Remedy of Falsehood, Error, Wrong and Evil, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  For the emergence of the life-ego is, as we have seen, a machinery of cosmic Nature for the affirmation of the individual, for his self-disengagement from the indeterminate mass substance of the subconscient, for the appearance of a conscious being on a ground prepared by the Inconscience; the principle of life-affirmation of the ego is the necessary consequence. The individual ego is a pragmatic and effective Fiction, a translation of the secret self into the terms of surface consciousness, or a subjective substitute for the true self in our surface experience:
  The Origin of Falsehood and Evil

2.18 - January 1939, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Zen
   As regards government, life shows that there is a truth in monarchy whether hereditary or elective, there is a man at the top who governs. Life also shows that there is a truth in aristocracy, whether it is of strong men, or rich men, or intellectuals. The current Fiction is that it is the majority that rules, but the fact is that it is the minority, the aristocracy. Life also shows that the rule of the king or the aristocracy should be with the consent, silent or vocal, of the people.
   In ancient India, they recognised the truth of these things. That is why India has lasted through millenniums and China also.

2.20 - The Lower Triple Purusha, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Such is the constituent principle of the various worlds of cosmic existence and the various planes of our being; they are as if a ladder plunging down into Matter and perhaps below it, rising up into the heights of the Spirit, even perhaps to the point at which existence escapes out of cosmic being into ranges of a supra-cosmic Absolute, -- so at least it is averred in the world-system of the Buddhists. But to our ordinary materialised consciousness all this does not exist because it is hidden from us by our preoccupation with our existence in a little corner of the material universe and with the petty experiences of the little hour of time which is represented by our life in a single body upon this earth. To that consciousness the world is a mass of material things and forces thrown into some kind of shape and harmonised into a system of regulated movements by a number of fixed self-existent laws which we have to obey, by which we are governed and circumscribed and of which we have to get the best knowledge we can so as to make the most of this one brief existence which begins with birth, ends with death and has no second recurrence. Our own being is a sort of accident or at least a very small and minor circumstance in the universal life of Matter or the eternal continuity of the workings of material Force. Somehow or other a soul or mind has come to exist in a body and it stumbles about among things and forces which it does not very well understand, at first preoccupied with the difficulty of managing to live in a dangerous and largely hostile world and then with the effort to understand its laws and use them so as to make life as tolerable or as happy as possible so long as it lasts. If we were really nothing more than such a minor movement of individualised mind in Matter, existence would have nothing more to offer us; its best part would be at most this struggle of an ephemeral intellect and will with eternal Matter and with the difficulties of Life supplemented and eased by a play of imagination and by the consoling Fictions presented to us by religion and art and all the wonders dreamed of by the brooding mind and restless fancy of man.
  But because he is a soul and not merely a living body, man can never for long remain satisfied that this first view of his existence, the sole view justified by the external and objective facts of life, is the real truth or the whole knowledge: his subjective being is full of hints and inklings of realities beyond, it is open to the sense of infinity and immortality, it is easily convinced of other worlds, higher possibilities of being, larger fields of experience for the soul. Science gives us the objective truth of existence and the superficial knowledge of our physical and vital being; but we feel that there are truths beyond which possibly through the cultivation of our subjective being and the enlargement of its powers may come to lie more and more open to us. When the knowledge of this world is ours, we are irresistibly impelled to seek for the knowledge of other states of existence beyond, and that is the reason why an age of strong materialism and scepticism is always followed by an age of occultism, of mystical creeds, of new religions and profounder seekings after the Infinite and the Divine. The knowledge of our superficial mentality and the laws of our bodily life is not enough; it brings us always to all that mysterious and hidden depth of subjective existence below and behind of which our surface consciousness is only a fringe or an outer court. We come to see that what is present to our physical senses is only the material shell of cosmic existence and what is obvious in our superficial mentality is only the margin of immense continents which lie behind unexplored. To explore them must be the work of another knowledge than that of physical science or of a superficial psychology.

2.21 - The Order of the Worlds, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  There are, no doubt, several possible originations of cosmic existence by which such an extreme and rigid world-balancement could have conceivably come into being. There could have been a conception of this kind and a fiat in an All-Will, or an idea, a movement of the soul towards an egoistic material life of the Ignorance. The eternal individual soul urged by some inexplicable desire arising within it can be supposed to have sought the adventure of the darkness and taken a plunge from its native Light into the depths of a Nescience out of which arose this world of Ignorance; or a collectivity of souls may have been so moved, the Many: for an individual being cannot constitute a cosmos; a cosmos must be either impersonal or multipersonal or the creation or self-expression of a universal or infinite Being. This desire may have drawn down an All-Soul with it to build a world based upon the power of the Inconscient. If not that, then the eternally omniscient All-Soul itself may have abruptly plunged its self-knowledge into this darkness of the Inconscience, carrying the individual souls within it to begin their upward evolution through an ascending scale of life and consciousness. Or, if the individual is not pre-existent, if we are only a creation of the All-consciousness or a Fiction of the phenomenal Ignorance, either creatrix may have conceived all these myriads of individual beings by the evolution of names and forms out of an original indiscriminate Prakriti; the soul would be a temporary product of the indiscriminate stuff of inconscient force-substance which is the first appearance of things in the material universe.
  On that supposition, or on any of them, there could be only two planes of existence: on one side there is the material universe created out of the Inconscient by the blind nescience of Force or Nature obedient perhaps to some inner unfelt Self which governs its somnambulist activities; on the other side there is the superconscient One to which we return out of the Inconscience and Ignorance. Or else we may imagine that there is one plane only, the material existence; there is no superconscient apart from the Soul of the material universe. If we find that there are other planes of conscious being and that there already exist other worlds than the material universe, these ideas might become difficult to substantiate; but we can escape from that annulment if we suppose that these worlds have been subsequently created by or for the evolving Soul in the course of its ascent out of the Inconscience. In any of these views the whole cosmos would be an evolution out of the Inconscient, either with the material universe as its sole and sufficient stage and scene or else with an ascending scale of worlds, one evolving out of the other, helping to grade our return to the original Reality. Our own view has been that the cosmos is a self-graded devolution out of the superconscient Sachchidananda; but in this idea it would be nothing but an evolution of the Inconscience towards some kind of knowledge sufficient to allow, by the annihilation of some primal ignorance or some originating desire, the extinction of a misbegotten soul or an escape out of a mistaken world-adventure.

2.22 - Vijnana or Gnosis, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  If we would describe the gnosis as it is in its own awareness, not thus imperfectly as it is to us in contrast with our own reason and intelligence, it is hardly possible to speak of it except in figures and symbols. And first we must remember that the gnostic level, Mahat, Vijnana, is not the supreme plane of our consciousness but a middle or link plane. Interposed between the triune glory of the utter Spirit, the infinite existence, consciousness and bliss of the Eternal and our lower triple being and nature, it is as if it stood there as the mediating, formulated, organising and creative wisdom, power and joy of the Eternal. In the gnosis Sachchidananda gathers up the light of his unseizable existence and pours it out on the soul in the shape and power of a divine knowledge, a divine will and a divine bliss of existence. It is as if infinite light were gathered up into the compact orb of the sun and lavished on all that depends upon the sun in radiances that continue for ever. But the gnosis is not only light, it is force; it is creative knowledge, it is the self-effective truth of the divine Idea. This idea is not creative imagination, not something that constructs in void, but light and power of eternal substance, truth-light full of truth-force; and it brings out what is latent in being, it does not create a Fiction that never was in being. The ideation of the gnosis is radiating light-stuff of the consciousness of the eternal Existence; each ray is a truth. The will in the gnosis is a conscious force of eternal knowledge; it throws the consciousness and substance of being into infallible forms of truth-power, forms that embody the idea and make it faultlessly effective, and it works out each truth-power and each truth-form spontaneously and rightly according to its nature. Because it carries this creative force of the divine Idea, the Sun, the lord arid symbol of the gnosis, is described in the Veda as the Light which is the father of all things, Surya Savitri, the Wisdom-Luminous who is the bringer-out into manifest existence. This creation is inspired by the divine delight, the eternal Ananda; it is full of the joy of its own truth and power, it creates in bliss, creates out of bliss, creates that which is blissful. Therefore the world of the gnosis, the supramental world is the true and the happy creation, rtam, bhadram, since all in it shares in the perfect joy that made it. A divine radiance of undeviating knowledge, a divine power of unfaltering will and a divine ease of unstumbling bliss are the nature or prakriti of the soul in supermind, in vijnana. The stuff of the gnostic or supramental plane is made of the perfect absolutes of all that is here imperfect and relative and its movement of the reconciled interlockings and happy fusions of all that here are opposites. For behind the appearance of these opposites are their truths and the truths of the eternal are not in conflict with each other; our mind's and life's opposites transformed in the supermind into their own true spirit link together and are seen as tones and colourings of an eternal Reality and everlasting Ananda. supermind or gnosis is the supreme Truth, the supreme Thought, the supreme Word, the supreme Light, the supreme Will-Idea; it is the inner and outer extension of the Infinite who is beyond Space, the unfettered Time of the Eternal who is timeless, the supernal harmony of all absolutes of the Absolute.
  To the envisaging mind there are three powers of the Vijnana. Its supreme power knows and receives into it from above all the infinite existence, consciousness and bliss of the ' Ishwara; it is in its highest height the absolute knowledge and force of eternal Sachchidananda. Its second power concentrates the Infinite into a dense luminous consciousness, caitanyaghana or cidghana, the seed-state of the divine consciousness in which are contained living and concrete all the immutable principles of the divine being and all the inviolable truths of the divine conscious-idea and nature. Its third power brings or looses out these things by the effective ideation, vision, au thentic identities of the divine knowledge, movement of the divine will-force, vibration of the divine delight-intensities into a universal harmony, an illimitable diversity, a manifold rhythm of their powers, forms and interplay of living consequences. The mental Purusha rising into the vijnanamaya must ascend into these three powers. It must turn by conversion of its movements into the movements of the gnosis, its mental perception, ideation, will, pleasure into radiances of the divine knowledge, pulsations of the divine will-force, waves and floods of the divine delight-seas. It must convert its conscious stuff of mental nature into the cidghara or dense self-luminous consciousness. It must transform its conscious substance into a gnostic self or Truth-self of infinite Sachchidananda. These three movements are described in the lsha Upanishad, the first as vyuha, the marshalling of the rays of the Sun of gnosis in the order of the Truth-consciousness, the second as samuha, the gathering together of the rays into the body of the Sun of gnosis, the third as the vision of that Sun's fairest form of all in which the soul most intimately possesses its oneness with the infinite Purusha.467 The Supreme above, in him, around, everywhere and the soul dwelling in the Supreme and one with it, -- the infinite power and truth of the Divine concentrated in his own concentrated luminous soul nature, -- a radiant activity of the divine knowledge, will and joy perfect in the natural action of the prakriti, -- this is the fundamental experience of the mental being transformed and fulfilled and sublimated in the perfection of the gnosis.

2.25 - List of Topics in Each Talk, #Evening Talks With Sri Aurobindo, #unset, #Zen
   | 11-01-39 | German art; modern poetry and Fiction, Cross, Shakespeare; Scott |
   | 24-01-39 | Art books don't sell; Greek art |

3.00.2 - Introduction, #The Practice of Psycho therapy, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  called the self. No longer a mere selection of suitable Fictions, but a
  string of hard facts, which together make up the cross we all have to carry

3.03 - The Naked Truth, #The Practice of Psycho therapy, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  no longer be repressed by Fictions and illusions. In this way man becomes
  for himself the difficult problem he really is. He must always remain

3.05 - The Divine Personality, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  On the other hand, the way of devotion is impossible if the personality of the Divine cannot be taken as a reality, a real reality and not a hypostasis of the illusion. There can be no love without a lover and beloved. If our personality is an illusion and the Personality to whom our adoration rises only a primary aspect of the illusion, and if we believe that, then love and adoration must at once be killed, or can only survive in the illogical passion of the heart denying by its strong beats of life the clear and dry truths of the reason. To love and adore a shadow of our minds or a bright cosmic phenomenon which vanishes from the eye of Truth, may be possible, but the way of salvation cannot be built upon a foundation of wilful self-deception. The bhakta indeed does not allow these doubts of the intellect to come in his way; he has the divinations of his heart, and these are to him sufficient. But the sadhaka of the integral Yoga has to know the eternal and ultimate Truth and not to persist to the end in the delight of a Shadow. If the impersonal is the sole enduring truth, then a firm synthesis is impossible. He can at most take the divine personality as a symbol, a powerful and effective Fiction, but he will have in the end to overpass it and to abandon devotion for the sole pursuit of the ultimate knowledge. He will have to empty being of all its symbols, values, contents in order to arrive at the featureless Reality.
  We have said, however, that personality and impersonality, as our minds understand them, are only aspects of the Divine and both are contained in his being; they are one thing which we see from two opposite sides and into which we enter by two gates. We have to see this more clearly in order to rid ourselves of any doubts with which the intellect may seek to afflict us as we follow the impulse of devotion and the intuition of love or to pursue us into the joy of the divine union. They fall away indeed from that joy, but if we are too heavily weighted with the philosophical mind, they may follow us almost up to its threshold. It is well therefore to discharge ourselves of them as early as may be by perceiving the limits of the intellect, the rational philosophic mind, in its peculiar way of approaching the truth and the limits even of the spiritual experience which sets out from the approach through the intellect, to see that it need not be the whole integrality of the highest and widest spiritual experience. Spiritual intuition is always a more luminous guide than the discriminating reason, and spiritual intuition addresses itself to us not only through the reason, but through the rest of our being as well, through the heart and the life also. The integral knowledge will then be that which takes account of all and unifies their diverse truths. The intellect itself will be more deeply satisfied if it does not confine itself to its own data, but accepts truth of the heart and the life also and gives to them their absolute spiritual value.
  --
  Looked at from one side, it would seem as if an impersonal Thought were at work and created the Fiction of the thinker for the convenience of its action, an impersonal Power at work creating the Fiction of the doer, an impersonal existence in operation which uses the Fiction of a personal being who has a conscious personality and a personal delight. Looked at from the other side, it is the thinker who expresses himself in thoughts which without him could not exist and our general notion of thought symbolises simply the power of the nature of the thinker; the Ishwara expresses himself by will and power and force; the Existent extends himself in all the forms integral and partial, direct, inverse and perverse of his existence, consciousness and bliss, and our abstract general notion of these things is only an intellectual representation of the triple power of his nature of being. All impersonality seems in its turn to become a Fiction and existence in its every movement and its every particle nothing but the life, the consciousness, the power, the delight of the one and yet innumerable Personality, the infinite Godhead, the self-aware and self-unfolding Purusha. Both views are true, except that the idea of Fiction, which is borrowed from our own intellectual processes, has to be exiled and each must be given its proper validity. The integral seeker has to see in this light that he can reach one and the same Reality on both lines, either successively or simultaneously, as if on two connected wheels travelling on parallel lines, but parallel lines which in defiance of intellectual logic but in obedience to their own inner truth of unity do meet in infinity.
  We have to look at the divine Personality from this standpoint. When we speak of personality, we mean by it at first something limited, external and separative, and our idea of a personal God assumes the same imperfect character. Our personality is to us at first a separate creature, a limited mind, body, character which we conceive of as the person we are, a fixed quantity; for although in reality it is always changing, yet there is a sufficient element of stability to give a kind of practical justification to this notion of fixedness. We conceive of God as such a person, only without body, a separate person different from all others with a mind and character limited by certain qualities. At first in our primitive conceptions this deity is a thing of much inconstancy, freak and caprice, an enlarged edition of our human character; but afterwards we conceive of the divine nature of personality as a quite fixed quantity and we attribute to it those qualities alone which we regard as divine and ideal, while all the others are eliminated. This limitation compels us to account for all the rest by attri buting them to a Devil, or by lending to man an original creative capacity for all that we consider evil, or else, when we perceive that this will not quite do, by erecting a power which we call Nature and attri buting to that all the lower quality and mass of action for which we do not wish to make the Divine responsible. At a higher pitch the attri bution of mind and character to God becomes less anthropomorphic and we regard him as an infinite Spirit, but still a separate person, a spirit with certain fixed divine qualities as his attri butes. So are conceived the ideas of the divine Personality, the personal God which vary so much in various religions.
  --
  If we subject these notions of the divine Personality to the discrimination of the intellect, we shall be inclined to reduce them, according to our bent, to Fictions of the imagination or to psychological symbols, in any case, the response of our sensitive personality to something which is not this at all, but is purely impersonal. We may say that That is in reality the very opposite of our humanity and our personality and therefore in order to enter into relations with it we are impelled to set up these human Fictions and these personal symbols so as to make it nearer to us. But we have to judge by spiritual experience, and in a total spiritual experience we shall find that these things are not Fictions and symbols, but truths of divine being in their essence, however imperfect may have been our representations of them. Even our first idea of our own personality is not an absolute error, but only an incomplete and superficial view beset by many mental errors. Greater self-knowledge shows us that we are not fundamentally the particular formulation of form, powers, properties, qualities with a conscious I identifying itself with them, which we at first appear to be. That is only a temporary fact, though still a fact, of our partial being on the surface of our active consciousness. We find within an infinite being with the potentiality of all qualities, of infinite quality, ananta-guna, which can be combined in any number of possible ways, and each combination is a revelation of our being. For all this personality is the self-manifestation of a Person, that is to say of a being who is conscious of his manifestation.
  But we see too that this being does not seem to be composed even of infinite quality, but has a status of his complex reality in which he seems to stand back from it and to become an indefinable conscious existence, anirdesyam. Even consciousness seems to be drawn back and leave merely a timeless pure existence. And again even this pure self of our being seems at a certain pitch to deny its own reality, or to be a projection from a self-less Footnote:{anatmyam anilayanam. Taittiriya Upanishad.} baseless unknowable, which we may conceive of either as a nameless somewhat, or as a Nihil. It is when we would fix upon this exclusively and forget all that it has withdrawn into itself that we speak of pure impersonality or the void Nihil as the highest truth. But a more integral vision shows us that it is the Person and the personality and all that it had manifested which has thus cast itself upward into its own unexpressed absolute. And if we carry up our heart as well as our reasoning mind to the Highest, we shall find that we can reach it through the absolute Person as well as through an absolute impersonality. But all this self-knowledge is only the type within ourselves of the corresponding truth of the Divine in his universality. There too we meet him in various forms of divine personality; in formulations of quality which variously express him to us in his nature; in infinite quality, the Ananta-guna; in the divine Person who expresses himself through infinite quality; in absolute impersonality, an absolute existence or an absolute non-existence, which is yet all the time the unexpressed Absolute of this divine Person, this conscious Being who manifests himself through us and through the universe.

31.06 - Jagadish Chandra Bose, #Collected Works of Nolini Kanta Gupta - Vol 07, #Nolini Kanta Gupta, #Integral Yoga
   Again, the scientist can at the same time be a poet, can have feeling, can be contemplative, can be spiritual. But that is a matter entirely for another field, another world. When the scientist is occupied with science he must shut the door on this his other aspect. A combination of the two creates confusion. Scientific research has to be carried on under the strict vigilance of the brain and the senses. If into that there intrude hopes, desires, feelings of the heart, life or imagination, then in place of science there will emerge romance, Fiction. Eddington and Lodge, despite their being great scientists, have not escaped this fault. They have always brought in extraneous things and mixed them up with things scientific. This is the mental attitude or the viewpoint of the orthodox scientist. Perhaps ordinary lovers of science will also support it.
   About science and scientists this is no doubt the prevailing canon. But in actual practice we find something else. What distinguishes Jagadish Chandra Bose is that he is a scientist, yet, while being a scientist in the true sense of the term, he is also a kavi,a poet; and this, his poetic part, is not something different from his scientific self. It not only is not separate but is the very spring and mystery, the hidden power of his scientific genius. The poet does not mean a weaver of words; the poet is one who has a divine vision and who creates by the force of that vision. By virtue of this power Jagadish Chandra often appears more like a miracle-maker than a scientist. This is not to say that Jagadish Chandra is unique and matchless in this respect. In all creative spirits even in the realm of science we find in a more or less degree an evidence of this power; for at the root of all creation this power is bound to exist. In the' brain of all discoverers from Galileo to Einstein has played the high light of a supersensuous, supra-intellectual vision. All their achievements, at any rate all the achievements of Jagadish Chandra, show how this vision has been brought down into the framework of the mind and the senses, proved and objectified.

3.2.03 - Conservation and Progress, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  All human action as all human thought suffers from these disabilities. For it is seduced by a trenchant idea which it follows without proper attention to collateral issues, to necessary companion ideas, to the contrary forces in operation, or else it regards these merely as enemies, brands them as pure falsehood and evil and strives with more or less violence to crush them out of existence. Then it sees other ideas which it attempts to realise in turn, either adding them to its past notions and possessions or else rejecting these entirely for the new light; it makes a fresh war and a new clearance and denies its past work in the interest of a future attainment. But it has also its repentances, its returns, its recalls and re-enthronings of banished gods and even of lifeless ghosts and phantoms to which it gives a temporary and false appearance of life. And on the way it has continually its doubts, scruples, hesitations, its portentous assumptions of a sage moderation and a gradual and cautious advance. But human moderation is usually a wiseacre and a botcher; it sews a patch of new velvet on old fustian or of new fustian on old velvet and admires its deplorable handiwork. And its cautious advance means an accumulation of shams, Fictions and dead conventions till the burden of falsehood becomes too great for life to bear and a violent revolution is necessary to deliver the soul of humanity out of the immobilising cerements of the past. Such is the type of our progress; it is the advance of an ignorant and purblind but always light-attracted spirit, a being half-animal, half-god, stumbling forward through the bewildering jungle of its own errors.
  This characteristic of human mentality shows itself in the opposition we create between conservation and progress. Nothing in the universe can really stand still because everything there is a mould of Time and the very essence of Time is change by a movement forward. It is true that the worlds movement is not in a straight line; there are cycles, there are spirals; but still it circles, not round the same point always, but round an ever advancing centre, and therefore it never returns exactly upon its old path and never goes really backward. As for standing still, it is an impossibility, a delusion, a Fiction. Only the spirit is stable; the soul and body of things are in eternal motion. And in this motion there are the three determining powers of the past, future and present,the present a horizontal and constantly shifting line without breadth between a vast realised infinity that both holds back and impels and a vast unrealised infinity that both repels and attracts.
  The past is both a drag and a force for progress. It is all that has created the present and a great part of the force that is creating the future. For the past is not dead; its forms are gone and had to go, otherwise the present would not have come into being: but its soul, its power, its essence lives veiled in the present and ever-accumulating, growing, deepening will live on in the future. Every human being holds in and behind him all the past of his own race, of humanity and of himself; these three things determine his starting-point and pursue him through his lifes progress. It is in the force of this past, in the strength which its huge conservations give to him that he confronts the unillumined abysses of the future and plunges forward into the depths of its unrealised infinities. But also it is a drag, partly because man afraid of the unknown clings to the old forms of which he is sure, the old foundations which feel so safe under his feet, the old props round which so many of his attachments and associations cast their tenacious tendrils, but also partly because the forces of the past keep their careful hold on him so as to restrain him in his uncertain course and prevent the progress from becoming a precipitation.

3.2.04 - The Conservative Mind and Eastern Progress, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  In the East, on the contrary, the great revolutions have been spiritual and cultural; the political and social changes, although they have been real and striking, if less profound than in Europe, fall into the shade and are apt to be overlooked; besides, this unobtrusiveness is increased by their want of relief, the slow subtlety of their process and the instinctive persistence and reverence with which old names and formulas have been preserved while the thing itself was profoundly modified until its original sense remained only as a pious Fiction. Thus Japan kept its sacrosanct Mikado as a cover for the change to an aristocratic and feudal government and has again brought him forward in modern times to cover and facilitate without too serious a shock the transition from a mediaeval form of society into the full flood of modernism. In India the continued Fiction of the ancient fourfold order of society based on spiritual idealism, social type, ethical discipline and economic function is still used to cover and justify the quite different, complex and chaotic order of caste which, while it still preserves some confused fragments of the old motives, is really founded upon birth, privilege, local custom and religious formalism. The evolution from one type of society to another so opposed to it in its psychological motives and real institutions without any apparent change of formula is one of the most curious phenomena in the social history of mankind and still awaits intelligent study.
  Our minds are apt to seize things in the rough and to appreciate only what stands out in bold external relief; we miss the law of Natures subtleties and disguises. We can see and fathom to some extent the motives, necessities, process of great revolutions and marked changes and we can consider and put in their right place the brief reactions which only modified without actually preventing the overt realisation of new ideas. We can see for instance that the Sullan restoration of Roman oligarchy, the Stuart restoration in England or the brief return of monarchy in France with the Bourbons were no real restorations, but a momentary damming of the tide attended with insufficient concessions and forced developments which determined, not a return to the past, but the form and pace of the inevitable revolution. It is more difficult but still possible to appreciate the working of an idea against all obstacles through many centuries; we can comprehend now, for instance, that we must seek the beginnings of the French Revolution, not in Rousseau or Mirabeau or the blundering of Louis XVI, but in movements which date back to the Capet and the Valois, while the precise fact which prepared its tremendous outbreak and victory and determined its form was the defeat of the Calvinistic reformation in France and the absolute triumph of the monarchical system over the nobility and the bourgeoisie in the reigns of Louis XIII and Louis XIV. That double victory determined the destruction of the monarchy in France, the downfall of the Church and, by the failure of the nobles to lead faithfully the liberal cause whether in religion or politics, the disappearance of aristocracy.
  But Nature has still more subtle and disguised movements in her dealings with men by which she leads them to change without their knowing that they have changed. It is because she has employed chiefly this method in the vast masses of the East that the conservative habit of mind is so much stronger there than in the West. It is able to nourish the illusion that it has not changed, that it is immovably faithful to the ideas of remote forefa thers, to their religion, their traditions, their institutions, their social ideals, that it has preserved either a divine or an animal immobility both in thought and in the routine of life and has been free from the human law of mutation by which man and his social organisations must either progress or degenerate but can in no case maintain themselves unchanged against the attack of Time. Buddhism has come and gone and the Hindu still professes to belong to the Vedic religion held and practised by his Aryan forefa thers; he calls his creed the Aryan dharma, the eternal religion. It is only when we look close that we see the magnitude of the illusion. Buddha has gone out of India indeed, but Buddhism remains; it has stamped its giant impress on the spirit of the national religion, leaving the forms to be determined by the Tantricism with which itself had made alliance and some sort of fusion in its middle growth; what it destroyed no man has been able to restore, what it left no man has been able to destroy. As a matter of fact, the double cycle which India has described from the early Vedic times to India of Buddha and the philosophers and again from Buddha to the time of the European irruption was in its own way as vast in change religious, social, cultural, even political and administrative as the double cycle of Europe; but because it preserved old names for new things, old formulas for new methods and old coverings for new institutions and because the change was always marked in the internal but quiet and unobtrusive in the external, we have been able to create and preserve the Fiction of the unchanging East. There has also been this result that while the European conservative has learned the law of change in human society, knows that he must move and quarrels with the progressist only over the right pace and the exact direction, the Eastern or rather the Indian conservative still imagines that stability may be the true law of mortal being, practises a sort of Yogic sana on the flood of Time and because he does not move himself, thinks for he keeps his eyes shut and is not in the habit of watching the banks that he can prevent the stream also from moving on.
  This conservative principle has its advantages even as rapid progress has its vices and its perils. It helps towards the preservation of a fundamental continuity which makes for the longevity of civilisations and the persistence of what was valuable in humanitys past. So, in India, if religion has changed immensely its form and temperament, the religious spirit has been really eternal, the principle of spiritual discipline is the same as in the earliest times, the fundamental spiritual truths have been preserved and even enriched in their contents and the very forms can all be traced back through their mutations to the seed of the Veda. On the other hand this habit of mind leads to the accumulation of a great mass of accretions which were once valuable but have lost their virtue and to the heaping up of dead forms and shibboleths which no longer correspond to any vital truth nor have any understood and helpful significance. All this putrid waste of the past is held to be too sacred to be touched by any profane hand and yet it chokes up the streams of the national life or corrupts its waters. And if no successful process of purification takes place, a state of general ill-health in the social body supervenes in which the principle of conservation becomes the cause of dissolution.
  --
  India, the heart of the Orient, has to change as the whole West and the whole East are changing, and it cannot avoid changing in the sense of the problems forced upon it by Europe. The new Orient must necessarily be the result either of some balance and fusion or of some ardent struggle between progressive and conservative ideals and tendencies. If therefore the conservative mind in this country opens itself sufficiently to the necessity of transformation, the resulting culture born of a resurgent India may well bring about a profound modification in the future civilisation of the world. But if it remains shut up in dead Fictions, or tries to meet the new needs with the mind of the schoolman and the sophist dealing with words and ideas in the air rather than actual fact and truth and potentiality, or struggles merely to avoid all but a scanty minimum of change, then, since the new ideas cannot fail to realise themselves, the future India will be formed in the crude mould of the Westernised social and political reformer whose mind, barren of original thought and unenlightened by vital experience, can do nothing but reproduce the forms and ideas of Europe and will turn us all into halting apes of the West. Or else, and that perhaps is the best thing that can happen, a new spiritual awakening must arise from the depths of this vast life that shall this time more successfully include in its scope the great problems of earthly life as well as those of the soul and its transmundane destinies, an awakening that shall ally itself closely with the renascent spiritual seeking of the West and with its yearning for the perfection of the human race. This third and as yet unknown quantity is indeed the force needed throughout the East. For at present we have only two extremes of a conservative immobility and incompetence imprisoned in the shell of past conventions and a progressive force hardly less blind and ineffectual because second-hand and merely imitative of nineteenth-century Europe, with a vague floating mass of uncertainty between. The result is a continual fiasco and inability to evolve anything large, powerful, sure and vital, a drifting in the stream of circumstance, a constant grasping at details and unessentials and failure to reach the heart of the great problems of life which the age is bringing to our doors. Something is needed which tries to be born; but as yet, in the phrase of the Veda, the Mother holds herself compressed in smallness, keeps the Birth concealed within her being and will not give it forth to the Father. When she becomes great in impulse and conception, then we shall see it born.
  ***

3.4.1.05 - Fiction-Writing and Sadhana, #Letters On Poetry And Art, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  object:3.4.1.05 - Fiction-Writing and Sadhana
  author class:Sri Aurobindo

3.7.1.01 - Rebirth, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  I doubt whether, even if we could have evidence of the physical memory of past lives or of such a psychical awakening, the theory would be considered any better proved than before. We now hear of many such instances confidently alleged though without that apparatus of verified evidence responsibly examined which gives weight to the results of psychical research. The sceptic can always challenge them as mere Fiction and imagination unless and until they are placed on a firm basis of evidence. Even if the facts alleged are verified, he has the resource of affirming that they are not really memories but were known to the person alleging them by ordinary physical means or were suggested to him by others and have been converted into reincarnate memory either by conscious deception or by a process of self-deception and self-hallucination. And even supposing the evidence were too strong and unexceptionable to be got rid of by these familiar devices, they might yet not be accepted as proof of rebirth; the mind can discover a hundred theoretical explanations for a single group of facts. Modern speculation and research have brought in this doubt to overhang all psychical theory and generalisation.
  We know for instance that in the phenomena, say, of automatic writing or of communication from the dead, it is disputed whether the phenomena proceed from outside, from disembodied minds, or from within, from the subliminal consciousness, or whether the communication is actual and immediate from the released personality or is the uprising to the surface of a telepathic impression which came from the mind of the then living man but has remained submerged in our subliminal mentality. The same kind of doubts might be opposed to the evidences of reincarnate memory. It might be maintained that they prove the power of a certain mysterious faculty in us, a consciousness that can have some inexplicable knowledge of past events, but that these events may belong to other personalities than ours and that our attri bution of them to our own personality in past lives is an imagination, a hallucination, or else an instance of that self-appropriation of things and experiences perceived but not our own which is one out of the undoubted phenomena of mental error. Much would be proved by an accumulation of such evidences but not, to the sceptic at least, rebirth. Certainly, if they were sufficiently ample, exact, profuse, intimate, they would create an atmosphere which would lead in the end to a general acceptance of the theory by the human race as a moral certitude. But proof is a different matter.

4.3 - Bhakti, #Essays Divine And Human, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  432. The Mayavadin talks of my Personal God as a dream and prefers to dream of Impersonal Being; the Buddhist puts that aside too as a Fiction and prefers to dream of Nirvana and the bliss of nothingness. Thus all the dreamers are busy reviling each other's visions and parading their own as the panacea. What the soul utterly rejoices in, is for thought the ultimate reality.
  433. Beyond Personality the Mayavadin sees indefinable Existence; I followed him there and found my Krishna beyond in indefinable Personality.

5.03 - The Divine Body, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  But what would be the internal or external form and structure and what the instrumentation of this divine body? The material history of the development of the animal and human body has left it bound to a minutely constructed and elaborated system of organs and a precarious order of their functioning which can easily become a disorder, open to a general or local disorganisation, dependent on an easily disturbed nervous system and commanded by a brain whose vibrations are supposed to be mechanical and automatic and not under our conscious control. According to the materialist all this is a functioning of Matter alone whose fundamental reality is chemical. We have to suppose that the body is constructed by the agency of chemical elements building up atoms and molecules and cells and these again are the agents and only conductors at the basis of a complicated physical structure and instrumentation which is the sole mechanical cause of all our actions, thoughts, feelings, the soul a Fiction and mind and life only a material and mechanical manifestation and appearance of this machine which is worked out and automatically driven with a figment of consciousness in it by the forces inherent in inconscient Matter. If that were the truth it is obvious that any divinisation or divine transformation of the body or of anything else would be nothing but an illusion, an imagination, a senseless and impossible chimera. But even if we suppose a soul, a conscious will at work in this body it could not arrive at a divine transformation if there were no radical change in the bodily instrument itself and in the organisation of its material workings. The transforming agent will be bound and stopped in its work by the physical organisms unalterable limitations and held up by the unmodified or imperfectly modified original animal in us. The possibility of the disorders, derangements, maladies native to these physical arrangements would still be there and could only be shut out by a constant vigilance or perpetual control obligatory on the corporeal instruments spiritual inhabitant and master. This could not be called a truly divine body; for in a divine body an inherent freedom from all these things would be natural and perpetual; this freedom would be a normal and native truth of its being and therefore inevitable and unalterable. A radical transformation of the functioning and, it may well be, of the structure and certainly of the too mechanical and material impulses and driving forces of the bodily system would be imperative.
  What agency could we find which we could make the means of this all-important liberation and change? Something there is in us or something has to be developed, perhaps a central and still occult part of our being containing forces whose powers in our actual and present make-up are only a fraction of what could be, but if they became complete and dominant would be truly able to bring about with the help of the light and force of the soul and the supramental truth-consciousness the necessary physical transformation and its consequences. This might be found in the system of Chakras revealed by Tantric knowledge and accepted in the systems of Yoga, conscious centres and sources of all the dynamic powers of our being organising their action through the plexuses and arranged in an ascending series from the lowest physical to the highest mind centre and spiritual centre called the thousand-petalled lotus where ascending Nature, the Serpent Power of the Tantrics, meets the Brahman and is liberated into the Divine Being. These centres are closed or half-closed within us and have to be opened before their full potentiality can be manifested in our physical nature: but once they are opened and completely active, no limit can easily be set to the development of their potencies and the total transformation to be possible.

5.4.01 - Notes on Root-Sounds, #Vedic and Philological Studies, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
   fraud, deceit .. plea, pretext, disguise .. roguery, knavery, wickedness .. Fiction .. design, device, intention. (to cover, cut, hurt. cf , ) .. family cf , , , , , , , (swindling)
  , bark, rind .. spreading creeper .. offspring, progeny, posterity. cf

Aeneid, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  and what was Fiction, chanting that Aeneas,
  one born of Trojan blood, had come, that lovely

APPENDIX I - Curriculum of A. A., #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  SECTION 2. ::: Other books, principally Fiction, of a generally suggestive and helpful kind
  SECTION 3. ::: Official publications of the A.'. A.'. (aka Liber. modified with contents from holybooks)
  --
  

SECTION 2. ::: Other books, principally Fiction, of a generally suggestive and helpful kind


      Zanoni, by Sir Edward Bulwer Lytton. ::: Valuable for its facts and suggestions about Mysticism.

Avatars of the Tortoise, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  reasoning. He adds that numbers do not exist, that they are mere logical Fictions.
  195rediscovers it. 34

Blazing P1 - Preconventional consciousness, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  appears: language, symbolic play (the beginning of Fictional invention), deferred imitation,
  i.e., occurring some time after the original event, and that kind of internalized imitation

BOOK II. - A review of the calamities suffered by the Romans before the time of Christ, showing that their gods had plunged them into corruption and vice, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  But, some one will interpose, these are the fables of poets, not the deliverances of the gods themselves. Well, I have no mind to arbitrate between the lewdness of theatrical entertainments and of mystic rites; only this I say, and history bears me out in making the assertion, that those same entertainments, in which the Fictions of poets are the main attraction, were not introduced in the festivals of the gods by the ignorant devotion of the Romans, but that the gods themselves gave the most urgent commands to this effect, and indeed extorted from the Romans these solemnities and celebrations in their honour. I touched on this in the preceding book, and mentioned that dramatic entertainments were first inaugurated at Rome on occasion of a pestilence, and by authority of the pontiff. And what man is there who is not more likely to adopt, for the regulation of his own life, the examples that are represented in plays which have a divine sanction, rather than the precepts written and promulgated with no more than human authority? If the poets gave a false representation of Jove in describing him as adulterous, then it were to be expected that the chaste gods should in anger avenge so wicked a Fiction, in place of encouraging the games which circulated it. Of these plays, the most inoffensive are comedies and tragedies, that is to say, the dramas which poets write for the stage, and which, though they often handle impure subjects, yet do so without the filthiness of language which characterizes many other performances; and it is these dramas which boys are obliged by their seniors to read and learn as a part of what is called a liberal and gentlemanly education.[96]
  9. That the poetical licence which the Greeks, in obedience to their gods, allowed, was restrained by the ancient Romans.
  The opinion of the ancient Romans on this matter is attested by Cicero in his work De Republica, in which Scipio, one of the interlocutors, says, "The lewdness of comedy could never have been suffered by audiences, unless the customs of society had previously sanctioned the same lewdness." And[Pg 58] in the earlier days the Greeks preserved a certain reasonableness in their licence, and made it a law, that whatever comedy wished to say of any one, it must say it of him by name. And so in the same work of Cicero's, Scipio says, "Whom has it not aspersed? Nay, whom has it not worried? Whom has it spared? Allow that it may assail demagogues and factions, men injurious to the commonwealtha Cleon, a Cleophon, a Hyperbolus. That is tolerable, though it had been more seemly for the public censor to brand such men, than for a poet to lampoon them; but to blacken the fame of Pericles with scurrilous verse, after he had with the utmost dignity presided over their state alike in war and in peace, was as unworthy of a poet, as if our own Plautus or Nvius were to bring Publius and Cneius Scipio on the comic stage, or as if Ccilius were to caricature Cato." And then a little after he goes on: "Though our Twelve Tables attached the penalty of death only to a very few offences, yet among these few this was one: if any man should have sung a pasquinade, or have composed a satire calculated to bring infamy or disgrace on another person. Wisely decreed. For it is by the decisions of magistrates, and by a well-informed justice, that our lives ought to be judged, and not by the flighty fancies of poets; neither ought we to be exposed to hear calumnies, save where we have the liberty of replying, and defending ourselves before an adequate tribunal." This much I have judged it advisable to quote from the fourth book of Cicero's De Republica; and I have made the quotation word for word, with the exception of some words omitted, and some slightly transposed, for the sake of giving the sense more readily. And certainly the extract is pertinent to the matter I am endeavouring to explain. Cicero makes some further remarks, and concludes the passage by showing that the ancient Romans did not permit any living man to be either praised or blamed on the stage. But the Greeks, as I said, though not so moral, were more logical in allowing this licence which the Romans forbade: for they saw that their gods approved and enjoyed the scurrilous language of low comedy when directed not only against men, but even against themselves; and this, whether the infamous actions imputed to them were the Fictions of[Pg 59] poets, or were their actual iniquities commemorated and acted in the theatres. And would that the spectators had judged them worthy only of laughter, and not of imitation! Manifestly it had been a stretch of pride to spare the good name of the leading men and the common citizens, when the very deities did not grudge that their own reputation should be blemished.
  10. That the devils, in suffering either false or true crimes to be laid to their charge, meant to do men a mischief.
  --
  We have still to inquire why the poets who write the plays, and who by the law of the twelve tables are prohibited from injuring the good name of the citizens, are reckoned more estimable than the actors, though they so shamefully asperse the character of the gods? Is it right that the actors of these poetical and God-dishonouring effusions be branded, while their authors are honoured? Must we not here award the palm to a Greek, Plato, who, in framing his ideal republic,[100] conceived that poets should be banished from the city as enemies of the state? He could not brook that the gods be[Pg 64] brought into disrepute, nor that the minds of the citizens be depraved and besotted, by the Fictions of the poets. Compare now human nature as you see it in Plato, expelling poets from the city that the citizens be uninjured, with the divine nature as you see it in these gods exacting plays in their own honour. Plato strove, though unsuccessfully, to persuade the light-minded and lascivious Greeks to abstain from so much as writing such plays; the gods used their authority to extort the acting of the same from the dignified and sober-minded Romans. And not content with having them acted, they had them dedicated to themselves, consecrated to themselves, solemnly celebrated in their own honour. To which, then, would it be more becoming in a state to decree divine honours,to Plato, who prohibited these wicked and licentious plays, or to the demons who delighted in blinding men to the truth of what Plato unsuccessfully sought to inculcate?
  This philosopher, Plato, has been elevated by Labeo to the rank of a demigod, and set thus upon a level with such as Hercules and Romulus. Labeo ranks demigods higher than heroes, but both he counts among the deities. But I have no doubt that he thinks this man whom he reckons a demigod worthy of greater respect not only than the heroes, but also than the gods themselves. The laws of the Romans and the speculations of Plato have this resemblance, that the latter pronounces a wholesale condemnation of poetical Fictions, while the former restrain the licence of satire, at least so far as men are the objects of it. Plato will not suffer poets even to dwell in his city: the laws of Rome prohibit actors from being enrolled as citizens; and if they had not feared to offend the gods who had asked the services of the players, they would in all likelihood have banished them altogether. It is obvious, therefore, that the Romans could not receive, nor reasonably expect to receive, laws for the regulation of their conduct from their gods, since the laws they themselves enacted far surpassed and put to shame the morality of the gods. The gods demand stage-plays in their own honour; the Romans exclude the players from all civic honours:[101] the former commanded that they should be celebrated by the scenic representation[Pg 65] of their own disgrace; the latter commanded that no poet should dare to blemish the reputation of any citizen. But that demigod Plato resisted the lust of such gods as these, and showed the Romans what their genius had left incomplete; for he absolutely excluded poets from his ideal state, whether they composed Fictions with no regard to truth, or set the worst possible examples before wretched men under the guise of divine actions. We for our part, indeed, reckon Plato neither a god nor a demigod; we would not even compare him to any of God's holy angels, nor to the truth-speaking prophets, nor to any of the apostles or martyrs of Christ, nay, not to any faithful Christian man. The reason of this opinion of ours we will, God prospering us, render in its own place. Nevertheless, since they wish him to be considered a demigod, we think he certainly is more entitled to that rank, and is every way superior, if not to Hercules and Romulus (though no historian could ever narrate nor any poet sing of him that he had killed his brother, or committed any crime), yet certainly to Priapus, or a Cynocephalus,[102] or the Fever,[103]divinities whom the Romans have partly received from foreigners, and partly consecrated by home-grown rites. How, then, could gods such as these be expected to promulgate good and wholesome laws, either for the prevention of moral and social evils, or for their eradication where they had already sprung up?gods who used their influence even to sow and cherish profligacy, by appointing that deeds truly or falsely ascribed to them should be published to the people by means of theatrical exhibitions, and by thus gratuitously fanning the flame of human lust with the breath of a seemingly divine approbation. In vain does Cicero, speaking of poets, exclaim against this state of things in these words: "When the plaudits and acclamation of the people, who sit as infallible judges, are won by the poets, what darkness benights the mind, what fears invade, what passions inflame it!"[104]
  [Pg 66]

BOOK II. -- PART I. ANTHROPOGENESIS., #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  poetical Fiction has now taken root in the Church as a revealed dogma.
  Did the allegory of the Dragon and his supposed conqueror in
  --
  only by stone and wood."*** De Rougemont treats this as a pure Fiction of Theopompus ("Peuple
  Primitif," vol. iii. 157) and even sees a fraud (supercherie) in the assertion of the Saitic priests. This
  --
  double evolution. Whence even the Chinese teachings upon the subject, if it is but a Fiction? Have they
  not recorded the existence once upon a time of a holy island beyond the sun (Tcheou), and beyond
  --
  The amount of malicious fancy and Fiction bestowed on that "Host" by various fanatical writers is
  quite extraordinary. Azazel and his "host" are simply the Hebrew "Prometheus," and ought to be
  --
  Cumberl and has but to follow that deluge into the land of Fiction. Indeed it seems rather fanciful to any
  impartial observer to be told that there were "two distinct races of Kabiri," the first consisting of Ham
  --
  Those legends have now passed into popular tales, the folklore of Persia, as many a real Fiction has
  found its way into our universal History. The stories of King Arthur and his knights of the Round
  --
  Do the Greeks, accused of borrowing a Hindu Fiction (Atala), and inventing from it another (Atlantis),
  stand also accused of getting their geographical notions and the number seven from them? (Vide in
  --
  anthropomorphic Fiction itself. Because, the serpent of wisdom, represented in the Sabasian mysteries
  by the anthropomorphised Logos, the unity of spiritual and physical Powers, will have begotten in
  --
  a Fiction; the travels of Marco Polo laughed at and called as absurd a fable as one of Baron
  Munchausen's tales, why should the writer of "Isis Unveiled" and of the "Secret Doctrine" be any
  --
  as at present) in the future. Hence that our Sixth and Seventh Root Races are Fictions.
  To this it is again answered: How do you know? Your experience is limited to a few thousand years, to

BOOK II. -- PART III. ADDENDA. SCIENCE AND THE SECRET DOCTRINE CONTRASTED, #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  downfall of the Fourth, on a lower level of Fiction and self-delusion than the Haeckelian "plastidular,"
  or the inorganic "molecular Souls of the Protista"? Between the evolution of the spiritual nature of
  --
  known data of modern discovery in Zoology. It is simply absurd, even as a Fiction. As de Quatrefages
  demonstrates in a few words, Haeckel "admits the existence of an absolutely theoretical pithecoid
  --
  And indeed we find in the romances as in all the so-called scientific Fictions and spiritistic revelations
  from moon, stars, and planets, merely fresh combinations or modifications of the men and things, the
  --
  since the very earliest, has ever been entirely based on Fiction, as none was the object of special
  revelation; and that it is dogma alone which has ever been killing primeval truth. Finally, that no

BOOK II. -- PART II. THE ARCHAIC SYMBOLISM OF THE WORLD-RELIGIONS, #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  Rig Veda. Therefore, he can by no means be "a later Fiction of the Brahmins," but is a very old
  personation indeed.
  --
  poetical Fiction, all those dreams of the golden age, let us imagine -- argue the modern scholars -- in
  all its gross realism, the first miserable state of humanity, the striking picture of which was traced for
  --
  the FIRE remain wherein they are, that is to say within the Egyptian darkness of theological Fictions
  and dead-letter interpretations.
  --
  such narratives are pronounced meaningless Fictions and absurdities. But -- Truth is the daughter of
  Time, verily; and time will show.

BOOK I. -- PART I. COSMIC EVOLUTION, #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  ------ARE GIANTS A Fiction? ... 277
  The Seven Virgin Youths ... 281
  --
  altogether Fictions, but that they are as old as the world itself.
  To my judges, past and future, therefore -- whether they are serious literary critics, or those howling
  --
  down on this work as a fairy tale indeed -- a Fiction of some modern brain.
  Thus, the Past shall help to realise the PRESENT, and the latter to better appreciate the PAST. The
  --
  speculative Fiction which now passes under that name, he was higher than we are with all our sciences
  and the degraded civilization of the day: at any rate, the Lemuro-Atlantean of the closing Third Race
  --
  path of Fiction, raised into dogma through human falsification and hierarchic ambition.
  [[Vol. 1, Page]] 265 MAN, THE SHADOW OF HIS PROTOTYPE.
  --
  ** Now, what "god" is meant here? Not God "the Father," the anthropomorphic Fiction; for that god is
  the Elohim collectively, and has no being apart from the Host. Besides, such a god is finite and

BOOK I. -- PART III. SCIENCE AND THE SECRET DOCTRINE CONTRASTED, #The Secret Doctrine, #H P Blavatsky, #Theosophy
  or vacuum, therefore, the eternal MOTION of and in Cosmos (regarded as infinite Space) is a Fiction -only shows once more that such words as "pure space," "pure Being," "the Absolute," etc., of Eastern
  metaphysics have never been understood in the West.
  --
  these only the Fictions of the alchemists, or dreams of the Mystics, such men as Paracelsus,
  Philale thes, Van Helmont, and so many others, would have to be regarded as worse than visionaries:
  --
  mankind. The name vril may be a Fiction; the Force itself is a fact doubted as little in India as the
  existence itself of their Rishis, since it is mentioned in all the secret works.
  --
  their prototypes, the Dhyan-Chohans, the Devas and Pitris, of the East, are no real Beings but Fictions.
  On this point Materialistic Science is inexorable. To support its position, it upsets its own axiomatic
  --
  It is now amply proved that even horoscopes and judiciary astrology are not quite based on a Fiction,
  and that stars and constellations, consequently, have an occult and mysterious influence on, and
  --
  metaphysics is Fiction, like poetry. The man of Science takes nothing on trust; rejects everything that
  is not proven to him, while the Theologian accepts everything on blind faith. The Theosophist and the

BOOK IV. - That empire was given to Rome not by the gods, but by the One True God, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  that is, into the bosom of Tellus, or the earth. Although here, also, they will have it that there are some differences, and think that in the earth herself Terra is one thing, Tellus another, and Tellumo another. And they have all these as gods, called by their own names, distinguished by their own offices, and venerated with their own altars and rites. This same earth also they call the mother of the gods, so that even the Fictions of the poets are more tolerable, if, according, not to their poetical but sacred books, Juno is not only the sister and wife, but also the mother of Jove. The same earth they worship as Ceres, and also as Vesta; while yet they more frequently affirm that Vesta is nothing else than fire, pertaining to the hearths, without which the city cannot exist; and therefore virgins are wont to serve her, because as nothing is born of a virgin, so nothing is born of fire;but all this[Pg 148] nonsense ought to be completely abolished and extinguished by Him who is born of a virgin. For who can bear that, while they ascribe to the fire so much honour, and, as it were, chastity, they do not blush sometimes even to call Vesta Venus, so that honoured virginity may vanish in her handmaidens? For if Vesta is Venus, how can virgins rightly serve her by abstaining from venery? Are there two Venuses, the one a virgin, the other not a maid? Or rather, are there three, one the goddess of virgins, who is also called Vesta, another the goddess of wives, and another of harlots? To her also the Phenicians offered a gift by prostituting their daughters before they united them to husbands.[167] Which of these is the wife of Vulcan? Certainly not the virgin, since she has a husband. Far be it from us to say it is the harlot, lest we should seem to wrong the son of Juno and fellow-worker of Minerva. Therefore it is to be understood that she belongs to the married people; but we would not wish them to imitate her in what she did with Mars. "Again," say they, "you return to fables." What sort of justice is that, to be angry with us because we say such things of their gods, and not to be angry with themselves, who in their theatres most willingly behold the crimes of their gods? And,a thing incredible, if it were not thoroughly well proved,these very theatric representations of the crimes of their gods have been instituted in honour of these same gods.
  11. Concerning the many gods whom the pagan doctors defend as being one and the same Jove.
  --
  "But," says Cicero, "Homer invented these things, and transferred things human to the gods: I would rather transfer things divine to us."[172] The poet, by ascribing such crimes to the gods, has justly displeased the grave man. Why, then, are the scenic plays, where these crimes are habitually spoken of, acted, exhibited, in honour of the gods, reckoned among things divine by the most learned men? Cicero should exclaim, not against the inventions of the poets, but against the customs of the ancients. Would not they have exclaimed in reply, What have we done? The gods themselves have loudly demanded that these plays should be exhibited in their honour, have fiercely exacted them, have menaced destruction unless this was performed, have avenged its neglect with great severity, and have manifested pleasure at the reparation of such neglect. Among their virtuous and wonderful deeds the following is related. It was announced in a dream to Titus Latinius, a Roman rustic, that he should go to the senate and tell them to recommence the games of Rome, because on the first day of their celebration a condemned criminal had been led to punishment in sight of the people, an incident so sad as to disturb the gods who were seeking amusement from the games. And when the peasant who had received this intimation was afraid on the following day to deliver it to the senate, it was renewed next night in a severer form: he lost his son, because of his neglect. On the third night he was warned that a yet graver punishment was impending, if he should still refuse obedience. When even thus he did not dare to obey, he fell into a virulent and horrible disease. But then, on the advice of his friends, he gave information to the magistrates, and was carried in a litter into the senate, and having, on declaring his dream, immediately recovered strength, went away on his own feet whole.[173] The senate, amazed at so great a miracle, decreed that the[Pg 166] games should be renewed at fourfold cost. What sensible man does not see that men, being put upon by malignant demons, from whose domination nothing save the grace of God through Jesus Christ our Lord sets free, have been compelled by force to exhibit to such gods as these, plays which, if well advised, they should condemn as shameful? Certain it is that in these plays the poetic crimes of the gods are celebrated, yet they are plays which were re-established by decree of the senate, under compulsion of the gods. In these plays the most shameless actors celebrated Jupiter as the corrupter of chastity, and thus gave him pleasure. If that was a Fiction, he would have been moved to anger; but if he was delighted with the representation of his crimes, even although fabulous, then, when he happened to be worshipped, who but the devil could be served? Is it so that he could found, extend, and preserve the Roman empire, who was more vile than any Roman man whatever, to whom such things were displeasing? Could he give felicity who was so infelicitously worshipped, and who, unless he should be thus worshipped, was yet more infelicitously provoked to anger?
  27. Concerning the three kinds of gods about which the pontiff Scvola has discoursed.

BOOK IX. - Of those who allege a distinction among demons, some being good and others evil, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  Some have advanced the opinion that there are both good and bad gods; but some, thinking more respectfully of the gods have attributed to them so much honour and praise as to preclude the supposition of any god being wicked. But those who have maintained that there are wicked gods as well as good ones have included the demons under the name "gods," and sometimes, though more rarely, have called the gods demons; so that they admit that Jupiter, whom they make the king and head of all the rest, is called a demon by Homer.[329] Those, on the other hand, who maintain that the gods are all good, and far more excellent than the men who are justly called good, are moved by the actions of the demons, which they can neither deny nor impute to the gods whose goodness they affirm, to distinguish between gods and demons; so that, whenever they find anything offensive in the deeds or sentiments by which unseen spirits manifest their power, they believe this to proceed not from the gods, but from the demons. At the same time they believe that, as no god can hold direct intercourse with men, these demons hold the position of mediators, ascending with prayers, and returning with gifts. This is the opinion of the Platonists, the ablest and most esteemed of their philosophers, with whom we therefore chose to debate this question,whether the worship of a number of gods is of[Pg 354] any service towards obtaining blessedness in the future life. And this is the reason why, in the preceding book, we have inquired how the demons, who take pleasure in such things as good and wise men loa the and execrate, in the sacrilegious and immoral Fictions which the poets have written, not of men, but of the gods themselves, and in the wicked and criminal violence of magical arts, can be regarded as more nearly related and more friendly to the gods than men are, and can mediate between good men and the good gods; and it has been demonstrated that this is absolutely impossible.
  2. Whether among the demons, inferior to the gods, there are any good spirits under whose guardianship the human soul might reach true blessedness.
  --
  But if any one says that it is not of all the demons, but only of the wicked, that the poets, not without truth, say that they violently love or hate certain men,for it was of them Apuleius said that they were driven about by strong currents of emotion,how can we accept this interpretation, when Apuleius, in the very same connection, represents all the demons, and not only the wicked, as intermediate between gods and men by their aerial bodies? The Fiction of the poets, according to him, consists in their making gods of demons, and giving them the names of gods, and assigning them as allies or enemies to individual men, using this poetical licence, though they profess that the gods are very different in character from the demons, and far exalted above them by their celestial abode and wealth of beatitude. This, I say, is the poets' Fiction, to say that these are gods who are not gods, and that, under the names of gods, they fight among themselves about the men whom they love or hate with keen partisan feeling. Apuleius says that this is not far from the truth, since, though they are wrongfully called by the names of the gods, they are described in their own proper character as demons. To this category, he says, belongs the Minerva of Homer, "who interposed in the ranks of the Greeks to restrain Achilles."[340] For that this was Minerva he supposes to be poetical Fiction; for he thinks that Minerva is a goddess, and he places her among the gods whom he believes to be all good and blessed in the sublime ethereal region, remote from intercourse with men. But that there was a demon favourable to the Greeks and adverse to the Trojans, as another, whom the same poet mentions under the name of Venus or Mars (gods exalted above earthly affairs in their heavenly habitations), was the Trojans' ally and the foe of the Greeks, and that these demons fought for those they loved against those they hated,in all this he owned that the poets stated something[Pg 362] very like the truth. For they made these statements about beings to whom he ascribes the same violent and tempestuous passions as disturb men, and who are therefore capable of loves and hatreds not justly formed, but formed in a party spirit, as the spectators in races or hunts take fancies and prejudices. It seems to have been the great fear of this Platonist that the poetical Fictions should be believed of the gods, and not of the demons who bore their names.
  8. How Apuleius defines the gods who dwell in heaven, the demons who occupy the air, and men who inhabit earth.

Book of Imaginary Beings (text), #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
   Fiction in the Greco-Roman Fiction of the wind that makes
  mares fertile. In the third book of the Georgics, Virgil has set
  --
  object. This Fiction may be found in the book Medizinische
  Psychologie (); it has been praised by Hans Vaihinger.
  --
  the boldest, most imaginative piece of Fiction.
  Let us now consider a thirteenth-century text by al-Qaswini, the Persian cosmographer who wrote in Arabic. It

BOOK VIII. - Some account of the Socratic and Platonic philosophy, and a refutation of the doctrine of Apuleius that the demons should be worshipped as mediators between gods and men, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
    AUGUSTINE COMES NOW TO THE THIRD KIND OF THEOLOGY, THAT IS, THE NATURAL, AND TAKES UP THE QUESTION, WHETHER THE WORSHIP OF THE GODS OF THE NATURAL THEOLOGY IS OF ANY AVAIL TOWARDS SECURING BLESSEDNESS IN THE LIFE TO COME. THIS QUESTION HE PREFERS TO DISCUSS WITH THE PLATONISTS, BECAUSE THE PLATONIC SYSTEM IS "FACILE PRINCEPS" AMONG PHILOSOPHIES, AND MAKES THE NEAREST APPROXIMATION TO CHRISTIAN TRUTH. IN PURSUING THIS ARGUMENT, HE FIRST REFUTES APULEIUS, AND ALL WHO MAINTAIN THAT THE DEMONS SHOULD BE WORSHIPPED AS MESSENGERS AND MEDIATORS BETWEEN GODS AND MEN; DEMONSTRATING THAT BY NO POSSIBILITY CAN MEN BE RECONCILED TO GOOD GODS BY DEMONS, WHO ARE THE SLAVES OF VICE, AND WHO DELIGHT IN AND PATRONIZE WHAT GOOD AND WISE MEN ABHOR AND CONDEMN,THE BLASPHEMOUS FictionS OF POETS, THEATRICAL EXHIBITIONS, AND MAGICAL ARTS.
  1. That the question of natural theology is to be discussed with those philosophers who sought a more excellent wisdom.
  --
  There is, say they, a threefold division of all animals endowed[Pg 326] with a rational soul, namely, into gods, men, and demons. The gods occupy the loftiest region, men the lowest, the demons the middle region. For the abode of the gods is heaven, that of men the earth, that of the demons the air. As the dignity of their regions is diverse, so also is that of their natures; therefore the gods are better than men and demons. Men have been placed below the gods and demons, both in respect of the order of the regions they inhabit, and the difference of their merits. The demons, therefore, who hold the middle place, as they are inferior to the gods, than whom they inhabit a lower region, so they are superior to men, than whom they inhabit a loftier one. For they have immortality of body in common with the gods, but passions of the mind in common with men. On which account, say they, it is not wonderful that they are delighted with the obscenities of the theatre, and the Fictions of the poets, since they are also subject to human passions, from which the gods are far removed, and to which they are altogether strangers. Whence we conclude that it was not the gods, who are all good and highly exalted, that Plato deprived of the pleasure of theatric plays, by reprobating and prohibiting the Fictions of the poets, but the demons.
  Of these things many have written: among others Apuleius, the Platonist of Madaura, who composed a whole work on the subject, entitled, Concerning the God of Socrates. He there discusses and explains of what kind that deity was who attended on Socrates, a sort of familiar, by whom it is said he was admonished to desist from any action which would not turn out to his advantage. He asserts most distinctly, and proves at great length, that it was not a god but a demon; and he discusses with great diligence the opinion of Plato concerning the lofty estate of the gods, the lowly estate of men, and the middle estate of demons. These things being so, how did Plato dare to take away, if not from the gods, whom he removed from all human contagion, certainly from the demons, all the pleasures of the theatre, by expelling the poets from the state? Evidently in this way he wished to admonish the human soul, although still confined in these moribund members, to despise the shameful commands of the demons,[Pg 327] and to detest their impurity, and to choose rather the splendour of virtue. But if Plato showed himself virtuous in answering and prohibiting these things, then certainly it was shameful of the demons to comm and them. Therefore either Apuleius is wrong, and Socrates' familiar did not belong to this class of deities, or Plato held contradictory opinions, now honouring the demons, now removing from the well-regulated state the things in which they delighted, or Socrates is not to be congratulated on the friendship of the demon, of which Apuleius was so ashamed that he entitled his book On the God of Socrates, whilst according to the tenor of his discussion, wherein he so diligently and at such length distinguishes gods from demons, he ought not to have entitled it, Concerning the God, but Concerning the Demon of Socrates. But he preferred to put this into the discussion itself rather than into the title of his book. For, through the sound doctrine which has illuminated human society, all, or almost all men have such a horror at the name of demons, that every one who, before reading the dissertation of Apuleius, which sets forth the dignity of demons, should have read the title of the book, On the Demon of Socrates, would certainly have thought that the author was not a sane man. But what did even Apuleius find to praise in the demons, except subtlety and strength of body and a higher place of habitation? For when he spoke generally concerning their manners, he said nothing that was good, but very much that was bad. Finally, no one, when he has read that book, wonders that they desired to have even the obscenity of the stage among divine things, or that, wishing to be thought gods, they should be delighted with the crimes of the gods, or that all those sacred solemnities, whose obscenity occasions laughter, and whose shameful cruelty causes horror, should be in agreement with their passions.
  --
  In vain, therefore, have Apuleius, and they who think with him, conferred on the demons the honour of placing them in the air, between the ethereal heavens and the earth, that they may carry to the gods the prayers of men, to men the answers of the gods; for Plato held, they say, that no god has intercourse with man. They who believe these things have thought it unbecoming that men should have intercourse with the gods, and the gods with men, but a befitting thing that the demons should have intercourse with both gods and men, presenting to the gods the petitions of men, and conveying to men what the gods have granted; so that a chaste man, and one who is a stranger to the crimes of the magic arts, must use as patrons, through whom the gods may be induced to hear him, demons who love these crimes, although the very fact of his not loving them ought to have recommended him to them as one who deserved to be listened to with greater readiness and willingness on their part. They love the abominations of the stage, which chastity does not love. They love, in the sorceries of the magicians, "a thousand arts of inflicting harm,"[309] which innocence does not love. Yet both chastity and innocence, if they wish to obtain anything from the gods, will not be able to do so by their own merits, except their enemies act as mediators on their behalf. Apuleius need not attempt to justify the Fictions of the poets, and the mockeries of the stage. If human modesty can act so faithlessly towards itself as not only to love shameful things, but even to think that they are[Pg 333] pleasing to the divinity, we can cite on the other side their own highest authority and teacher, Plato.
  19. Of the impiety of the magic art, which is dependent on the assistance of malign spirits.
  --
  But herein, no doubt, lies the great necessity for this absurdity, so unworthy of the gods, that the ethereal gods, who are concerned about human affairs, would not know what terrestrial men were doing unless the aerial demons should bring them intelligence, because the ether is suspended far away from the earth and far above it, but the air is contiguous[Pg 336] both to the ether and to the earth. O admirable wisdom! what else do these men think concerning the gods who, they say, are all in the highest degree good, but that they are concerned about human affairs, lest they should seem unworthy of worship, whilst, on the other hand, from the distance between the elements, they are ignorant of terrestrial things? It is on this account that they have supposed the demons to be necessary as agents, through whom the gods may inform themselves with respect to human affairs, and through whom, when necessary, they may succour men; and it is on account of this office that the demons themselves have been held as deserving of worship. If this be the case, then a demon is better known by these good gods through nearness of body, than a man is by goodness of mind. O mournful necessity! or shall I not rather say detestable and vain error, that I may not impute vanity to the divine nature! For if the gods can, with their minds free from the hindrance of bodies, see our mind, they do not need the demons as messengers from our mind to them; but if the ethereal gods, by means of their bodies, perceive the corporeal indices of minds, as the countenance, speech, motion, and thence understand what the demons tell them, then it is also possible that they may be deceived by the falsehoods of demons. Moreover, if the divinity of the gods cannot be deceived by the demons, neither can it be ignorant of our actions. But I would they would tell me whether the demons have informed the gods that the Fictions of the poets concerning the crimes of the gods displease Plato, concealing the pleasure which they themselves take in them; or whether they have concealed both, and have preferred that the gods should be ignorant with respect to this whole matter, or have told both, as well the pious prudence of Plato with respect to the gods as their own lust, which is injurious to the gods; or whether they have concealed Plato's opinion, according to which he was unwilling that the gods should be defamed with falsely alleged crimes through the impious licence of the poets, whilst they have not been ashamed nor afraid to make known their own wickedness, which make them love theatrical plays, in which the infamous deeds of the gods are celebrated. Let them choose which[Pg 337] they will of these four alternatives, and let them consider how much evil any one of them would require them to think of the gods. For if they choose the first, they must then confess that it was not possible for the good gods to dwell with the good Plato, though he sought to prohibit things injurious to them, whilst they dwelt with evil demons, who exulted in their injuries; and this because they suppose that the good gods can only know a good man, placed at so great a distance from them, through the mediation of evil demons, whom they could know on account of their nearness to themselves.[314] If they shall choose the second, and shall say that both these things are concealed by the demons, so that the gods are wholly ignorant both of Plato's most religious law and the sacrilegious pleasure of the demons, what, in that case, can the gods know to any profit with respect to human affairs through these mediating demons, when they do not know those things which are decreed, through the piety of good men, for the honour of the good gods against the lust of evil demons? But if they shall choose the third, and reply that these intermediary demons have communicated, not only the opinion of Plato, which prohibited wrongs to be done to the gods, but also their own delight in these wrongs, I would ask if such a communication is not rather an insult? Now the gods, hearing both and knowing both, not only permit the approach of those malign demons, who desire and do things contrary to the dignity of the gods and the religion of Plato, but also, through these wicked demons, who are near to them, send good things to the good Plato, who is far away from them; for they inhabit such a place in the concatenated series of the elements, that they can come into contact with those by whom they are accused, but not with him by whom they are defended,knowing the truth on both sides, but not being able to change the weight of the air and the earth. There remains the fourth supposition; but it is worse than the rest. For who will suffer it to be said that the demons have made known the calumnious Fictions of the poets concerning the immortal gods, and also the disgraceful mockeries of the theatres, and their own most ardent lust after, and most sweet[Pg 338] pleasure in these things, whilst they have concealed from them that Plato, with the gravity of a philosopher, gave it as his opinion that all these things ought to be removed from a well-regulated republic; so that the good gods are now compelled, through such messengers, to know the evil doings of the most wicked beings, that is to say, of the messengers themselves, and are not allowed to know the good deeds of the philosophers, though the former are for the injury, but these latter for the honour of the gods themselves?
  22. That we must, notwithstanding the opinion of Apuleius, reject the worship of demons.

BOOK VII. - Of the select gods of the civil theology, and that eternal life is not obtained by worshipping them, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  However, any one who eagerly seeks for celebrity and renown, might congratulate those select gods, and call them fortunate, were it not that he saw that they have been selected more to their injury than to their honour. For that low crowd of gods have been protected by their very meanness[Pg 265] and obscurity from being overwhelmed with infamy. We laugh, indeed, when we see them distributed by the mere Fiction of human opinions, according to the special works assigned to them, like those who farm small portions of the public revenue, or like workmen in the street of the silversmiths,[254] where one vessel, in order that it may go out perfect, passes through the hands of many, when it might have been finished by one perfect workman. But the only reason why the combined skill of many workmen was thought necessary, was, that it is better that each part of an art should be learned by a special workman, which can be done speedily and easily, than that they should all be compelled to be perfect in one art throughout all its parts, which they could only attain slowly and with difficulty. Nevertheless there is scarcely to be found one of the non-select gods who has brought infamy on himself by any crime, whilst there is scarce any one of the select gods who has not received upon himself the brand of notable infamy. These latter have descended to the humble works of the others, whilst the others have not come up to their sublime crimes. Concerning Janus, there does not readily occur to my recollection anything infamous; and perhaps he was such an one as lived more innocently than the rest, and further removed from misdeeds and crimes. He kindly received and entertained Saturn when he was fleeing; he divided his kingdom with his guest, so that each of them had a city for himself,[255]the one Janiculum, and the other Saturnia. But those seekers after every kind of unseemliness in the worship of the gods have disgraced him, whose life they found to be less disgraceful than that of the other gods, with an image of monstrous deformity, making it sometimes with two faces, and sometimes, as it were, double, with four faces.[256] Did they wish that, as the most of the select gods had lost shame[257] through the perpetration of shameful crimes, his greater innocence should be marked by a greater number of faces?[258]
  [Pg 266]
  --
  But let us hear their own physical interpretations by which they attempt to colour, as with the appearance of profounder doctrine, the baseness of most miserable error. Varro, in the first place, commends these interpretations so strongly as to say, that the ancients invented the images, badges, and adornments of the gods, in order that when those who went to the mysteries should see them with their bodily eyes, they might with the eyes of their mind see the soul of the world, and its parts, that is, the true gods; and also that the meaning which was intended by those who made their images with the human form, seemed to be this,namely, that the mind of mortals, which is in a human body, is very like to the immortal mind,[259] just as vessels might be placed to represent the gods, as, for instance, a wine-vessel might be placed in the temple of Liber, to signify wine, that which is contained being signified by that which contains. Thus by an image which had the human form the rational soul was signified, because the human form is the vessel, as it were, in which that nature is wont to be contained which they attri bute to God, or to the gods. These are the mysteries of doctrine to which that most learned man penetrated in order that he might bring them forth to the light. But, O thou most acute man, hast thou lost among those mysteries that prudence which led thee to form the sober opinion, that those who first established those images for the people took away fear from the citizens and added error, and that the ancient Romans honoured the gods more chastely without images? For it was through consideration of them that thou wast emboldened to speak these things against the later Romans. For if those most ancient Romans also had worshipped images, perhaps thou wouldst have suppressed by the silence of fear all those sentiments (true sentiments, nevertheless) concerning the folly of setting up images, and wouldst have extolled more loftily, and more loquaciously, those mysterious doctrines consisting of these vain and pernicious Fictions. Thy soul, so learned and so clever (and for this I grieve much for thee), could never through these mysteries have reached its God; that[Pg 267] is, the God by whom, not with whom, it was made, of whom it is not a part, but a work,that God who is not the soul of all things, but who made every soul, and in whose light alone every soul is blessed, if it be not ungrateful for His grace.
  But the things which follow in this book will show what is the nature of these mysteries, and what value is to be set upon them. Meanwhile, this most learned man confesses as his opinion that the soul of the world and its parts are the true gods, from which we perceive that his theology (to wit, that same natural theology to which he pays great regard) has been able, in its completeness, to extend itself even to the nature of the rational soul. For in this book (concerning the select gods) he says a very few things by anticipation concerning the natural theology; and we shall see whether he has been able in that book, by means of physical interpretations, to refer to this natural theology that civil theology, concerning which he wrote last when treating of the select gods. Now, if he has been able to do this, the whole is natural; and in that case, what need was there for distinguishing so carefully the civil from the natural? But if it has been distinguished by a veritable distinction, then, since not even this natural theology with which he is so much pleased is true (for though it has reached as far as the soul, it has not reached to the true God who made the soul), how much more contemptible and false is that civil theology which is chiefly occupied about what is corporeal, as will be shown by its very interpretations, which they have with such diligence sought out and enucleated, some of which I must necessarily mention!
  --
  Now this would have been rightly said had the first parts of things which are done been distinguished from the highest parts; as, for instance, it is the beginning of a thing done to set out, the highest part to arrive. The commencing to learn is the first part of a thing begun, the acquirement of knowledge is the highest part. And so of all things: the beginnings are first, the ends highest. This matter, however, has been already discussed in connection with Janus and Terminus. But the causes which are attri buted to Jupiter are things effecting, not things effected; and it is impossible for them to be prevented in time by things which are made or done, or by the beginnings of such things; for the thing which makes is always prior to the thing which is made. Therefore, though the beginnings of things which are made or done pertain to Janus, they are nevertheless not prior to the efficient causes which they attri bute to Jupiter. For as nothing takes place without being preceded by an efficient cause, so without an efficient cause nothing begins to take place. Verily, if the people call this god Jupiter, in whose power are all the causes of all natures which have been made, and of all natural things, and worship him with such insults and infamous criminations, they are guilty of more shocking sacrilege than if they should totally deny the existence of any god. It would therefore be better for them to call some other god by the name of Jupitersome one worthy of base and criminal honours; substituting instead of Jupiter some vain Fiction (as Saturn is said to have had a stone given to him to devour instead of his son), which they might make the subject of their blasphemies, rather than speak of that god as both thundering and committing adultery,ruling the whole world, and laying himself out for the commission of so many licentious acts,having in his[Pg 272] power nature and the highest causes of all natural things, but not having his own causes good.
  Next, I ask what place they find any longer for this Jupiter among the gods, if Janus is the world; for Varro defined the true gods to be the soul of the world, and the parts of it. And therefore whatever falls not within this definition, is certainly not a true god, according to them. Will they then say that Jupiter is the soul of the world, and Janus the body that is, this visible world? If they say this, it will not be possible for them to affirm that Janus is a god. For even, according to them, the body of the world is not a god, but the soul of the world and its parts. Wherefore Varro, seeing this, says that he thinks God is the soul of the world, and that this world itself is God; but that as a wise man, though he consists of soul and body, is nevertheless called wise from the soul, so the world is called God from the soul, though it consists of soul and body. Therefore the body of the world alone is not God, but either the soul of it alone, or the soul and the body together, yet so as that it is God not by virtue of the body, but by virtue of the soul. If, therefore, Janus is the world, and Janus is a god, will they say, in order that Jupiter may be a god, that he is some part of Janus? For they are wont rather to attri bute universal existence to Jupiter; whence the saying, "All things are full of Jupiter."[265] Therefore they must think Jupiter also, in order that he may be a god, and especially king of the gods, to be the world, that he may rule over the other godsaccording to them, his parts. To this effect, also, the same Varro expounds certain verses of Valerius Soranus[266] in that book which he wrote apart from the others concerning the worship of the gods. These are the verses:

BOOK VI. - Of Varros threefold division of theology, and of the inability of the gods to contri bute anything to the happiness of the future life, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  Now what are we to say of this proposition of his, namely, that there are three kinds of theology, that is, of the account which is given of the gods; and of these, the one is called mythical, the other physical, and the third civil? Did the Latin usage permit, we should call the kind which he has placed first in order fabular,[235] but let us call it fabulous,[236] for mythical is derived from the Greek , a fable; but that the second should be called natural, the usage of speech now admits; the third he himself has designated in Latin, calling it civil.[237] Then he says, "they call that kind mythical which the poets chiefly use; physical, that which the philosophers use; civil, that which the people use. As to the first I have mentioned," says he, "in it are many Fictions, which are contrary to the dignity and nature of the immortals. For we find in it that one god has been born from the head, another from the thigh, another from drops of blood; also, in this we find that gods have stolen, committed adultery, served men; in a word, in this all manner of things are attributed to the gods, such as may befall, not merely any man, but even the most contemptible man." He certainly, where he could, where he dared, where he thought he could do it with impunity, has manifested, without any of the haziness of ambiguity, how great injury was done to the nature of the gods by lying fables; for he was speaking, not concerning natural theology, not concerning civil, but concerning[Pg 239] fabulous theology, which he thought he could freely find fault with.
  Let us see, now, what he says concerning the second kind. "The second kind which I have explained," he says, "is that concerning which philosophers have left many books, in which they treat such questions as these: what gods there are, where they are, of what kind and character they are, since what time they have existed, or if they have existed from eternity; whether they are of fire, as Heraclitus believes; or of number, as Pythagoras; or of atoms, as Epicurus says; and other such things, which men's ears can more easily hear inside the walls of a school than outside in the Forum." He finds fault with nothing in this kind of theology which they call physical, and which belongs to philosophers, except that he has related their controversies among themselves, through which there has arisen a multitude of dissentient sects. Nevertheless he has removed this kind from the Forum, that is, from the populace, but he has shut it up in schools. But that first kind, most false and most base, he has not removed from the citizens. Oh, the religious ears of the people, and among them even those of the Romans, that are not able to bear what the philosophers dispute concerning the gods! But when the poets sing and stage-players act such things as are derogatory to the dignity and the nature of the immortals, such as may befall not a man merely, but the most contemptible man, they not only bear, but willingly listen to. Nor is this all, but they even consider that these things please the gods, and that they are propitiated by them.
  --
  That theology, therefore, which they call natural, being put aside for a moment, as it is afterwards to be discussed, we ask if any one is really content to seek a hope for eternal life from poetical, theatrical, scenic gods? Perish the thought! The true God avert so wild and sacrilegious a madness! What, is eternal life to be asked from those gods whom these things pleased, and whom these things propitiate, in which their own crimes are represented? No one, as I think, has arrived at such a pitch of headlong and furious impiety. So then, neither by the fabulous nor by the civil theology does any one obtain eternal life. For the one sows base things concerning the gods by feigning them, the other reaps by cherishing them; the one scatters lies, the other gathers them together; the one pursues divine things with false crimes, the other incorporates among divine things the plays which are made up of these crimes; the one sounds[Pg 242] abroad in human songs impious Fictions concerning the gods, the other consecrates these for the festivities of the gods themselves; the one sings the misdeeds and crimes of the gods, the other loves them; the one gives forth or feigns, the other either attests the true or delights in the false. Both are base; both are damnable. But the one which is theatrical teaches public abomination, and that one which is of the city adorns itself with that abomination. Shall eternal life be hoped for from these, by which this short and temporal life is polluted? Does the society of wicked men pollute our life if they insinuate themselves into our affections, and win our assent? and does not the society of demons pollute the life, who are worshipped with their own crimes?if with true crimes, how wicked the demons! if with false, how wicked the worship!
  When we say these things, it may perchance seem to some one who is very ignorant of these matters that only those things concerning the gods which are sung in the songs of the poets and acted on the stage are unworthy of the divine majesty, and ridiculous, and too detestable to be celebrated, whilst those sacred things which not stage-players but priests perform are pure and free from all unseemliness. Had this been so, never would any one have thought that these theatrical abominations should be celebrated in their honour, never would the gods themselves have ordered them to be performed to them. But men are in nowise ashamed to perform these things in the theatres, because similar things are carried on in the temples. In short, when the fore-mentioned author attempted to distinguish the civil theology from the fabulous and natural, as a sort of third and distinct kind, he wished it to be understood to be rather tempered by both than separated from either. For he says that those things which the poets write are less than the people ought to follow, whilst what the philosophers say is more than it is expedient for the people to pry into. "Which," says he, "differ in such a way, that nevertheless not a few things from both of them have been taken to the account of the civil theology; wherefore we will indicate what the civil theology has in common with that of the poet, though it ought to be more closely connected with[Pg 243] the theology of philosophers." Civil theology is therefore not quite disconnected from that of the poets. Nevertheless, in another place, concerning the generations of the gods, he says that the people are more inclined toward the poets than toward the physical theologists. For in this place he said what ought to be done; in that other place, what was really done. He said that the latter had written for the sake of utility, but the poets for the sake of amusement. And hence the things from the poets' writings, which the people ought not to follow, are the crimes of the gods; which, nevertheless, amuse both the people and the gods. For, for amusement's sake, he says, the poets write, and not for that of utility; nevertheless they write such things as the gods will desire, and the people perform.
  --
  Now had these things been feigned by the poets and acted by the mimics, they would without any doubt have been said to pertain to the fabulous theology, and would have been judged worthy to be separated from the dignity of the civil theology. But when these shameful things,not of the poets, but of the people; not of the mimics, but of the sacred things; not of the theatres, but of the temples, that is, not of the fabulous, but of the civil theology,are reported by so great an author, not in vain do the actors represent with theatrical art the baseness of the gods, which is so great; but surely in vain do the priests attempt, by rites called sacred, to represent their nobleness of character, which has no existence. There are sacred rites of Juno; and these are celebrated in her beloved island, Samos, where she was given in marriage to Jupiter. There are sacred rites of Ceres, in which Proserpine is sought for, having been carried off by Pluto. There are sacred rites Venus, in which, her beloved Adonis being slain by a boar's tooth, the lovely youth is lamented. There are sacred rites of the mother of the gods, in which the beautiful youth Atys, loved by her, and castrated by her through a woman's jealousy, is deplored by men who have suffered the like calamity, whom they call Galli. Since, then, these things are more unseemly than all scenic abomination, why is it that they strive to separate, as it were, the fabulous Fictions of the poet concerning the gods, as, forsooth, pertaining to the theatre, from the civil theology which they wish to belong to the city, as though they were separating from noble and worthy things, things unworthy and base? Wherefore there is more reason to thank the stage-actors, who have spared the eyes of men, and have not laid bare by theatrical exhibition all the things which are hid by the walls of the temples. What good is to be thought of their sacred rites which are concealed in darkness, when[Pg 246] those which are brought forth into the light are so detestable? And certainly they themselves have seen what they transact in secret through the agency of mutilated and effeminate men. Yet they have not been able to conceal those same men miserably and vilely enervated and corrupted. Let them persuade whom they can that they transact anything holy through such men, who, they cannot deny, are numbered, and live among their sacred things. We know not what they transact, but we know through whom they transact; for we know what things are transacted on the stage, where never, even in a chorus of harlots, hath one who is mutilated or an effeminate appeared. And, nevertheless, even these things are acted by vile and infamous characters; for, indeed, they ought not to be acted by men of good character. What, then, are those sacred rites, for the performance of which holiness has chosen such men as not even the obscenity of the stage has admitted?
  8. Concerning the interpretations, consisting of natural explanations, which the pagan teachers attempt to show for their gods.

BOOK V. - Of fate, freewill, and God's prescience, and of the source of the virtues of the ancient Romans, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  It is to no purpose, therefore, that that famous Fiction about the potter's wheel is brought forward, which tells of the answer which Nigidius is said to have given when he was perplexed with this question, and on account of which he was called Figulus.[186] For, having whirled round the potter's wheel with all his strength, he marked it with ink, striking it twice with the utmost rapidity, so that the strokes seemed to fall on the very same part of it. Then, when the rotation had ceased, the marks which he had made were found upon the rim of the wheel at no small distance apart. Thus, said he, considering the great rapidity with which the celestial sphere revolves, even though twins were born with as short an interval between their births as there was between the strokes which I gave this wheel, that brief interval of time is equivalent to a very great distance in the celestial sphere. Hence, said he, come whatever dissimilitudes may be remarked in the habits and fortunes of twins. This argument is more fragile than the vessels which are fashioned by the rotation of that wheel. For if there is so much significance in the heavens which cannot be comprehended by observation of the constellations, that, in the case of twins, an inheritance may fall to the one and not to the other, why, in the case of others who are not twins, do they dare, having examined their constellations, to declare such things as pertain to that secret which no one can comprehend, and to attri bute them to the precise moment of the birth of each individual? Now, if such predictions in connection with the[Pg 182] natal hours of others who are not twins are to be vindicated on the ground that they are founded on the observation of more extended spaces in the heavens, whilst those very small moments of time which separated the births of twins, and correspond to minute portions of celestial space, are to be connected with trifling things about which the mathematicians are not wont to be consulted,for who would consult them as to when he is to sit, when to walk abroad, when and on what he is to dine?how can we be justified in so speaking, when we can point out such manifold diversity both in the habits, doings, and destinies of twins?
  4. Concerning the twins Esau and Jacob, who were very unlike each other both in their character and actions.
  --
  Do not those very persons whom the medical sagacity of Hippocrates led him to suspect to be twins, because their disease was observed by him to develope to its crisis and to subside again in the same time in each of them,do not these, I say, serve as a sufficient refutation of those who wish to attri bute to the influence of the stars that which was owing to a similarity of bodily constitution? For wherefore were they both sick of the same disease, and at the same time, and not the one after the other in the order of their birth? (for certainly they could not both be born at the same time.) Or, if the fact of their having been born at different times by no means necessarily implies that they must be sick at different times, why do they contend that the difference in the time of their births was the cause of their difference in other things? Why could they travel in foreign parts at different times, marry at different times, beget children at different times, and do many other things at different times, by reason of their having been born at different times, and yet could not, for the same reason, also be sick at different times? For if a difference in the moment of birth changed the horoscope, and occasioned dissimilarity in all other things, why has that simultaneousness which belonged to their conception remained in their attacks of sickness? Or, if the destinies of health are involved in the time of conception, but those of other things be said to be attached to the time of birth, they ought not to predict anything concerning health from examination of the constellations of birth, when the hour of conception is not also given, that its constellations may be inspected. But if they say that they predict attacks of sickness without examining the horoscope of conception, because these are indicated by the moments of birth, how could they inform either[Pg 184] of these twins when he would be sick, from the horoscope of his birth, when the other also, who had not the same horoscope of birth, must of necessity fall sick at the same time? Again, I ask, if the distance of time between the births of twins is so great as to occasion a difference of their constellations on account of the difference of their horoscopes, and therefore of all the cardinal points to which so much influence is attri buted, that even from such change there comes a difference of destiny, how is it possible that this should be so, since they cannot have been conceived at different times? Or, if two conceived at the same moment of time could have different destinies with respect to their births, why may not also two born at the same moment of time have different destinies for life and for death? For if the one moment in which both were conceived did not hinder that the one should be born before the other, why, if two are born at the same moment, should anything hinder them from dying at the same moment? If a simultaneous conception allows of twins being differently affected in the womb, why should not simultaneousness of birth allow of any two individuals having different fortunes in the world? and thus would all the Fictions of this art, or rather delusion, be swept away. What strange circumstance is this, that two children conceived at the same time, nay, at the same moment, under the same position of the stars, have different fates which bring them to different hours of birth, whilst two children, born of two different mothers, at the same moment of time, under one and the same position of the stars, cannot have different fates which shall conduct them by necessity to diverse manners of life and of death? Are they at conception as yet without destinies, because they can only have them if they be born? What, therefore, do they mean when they say that, if the hour of the conception be found, many things can be predicted by these astrologers? from which also arose that story which is reiterated by some, that a certain sage chose an hour in which to lie with his wife, in order to secure his begetting an illustrious son. From this opinion also came that answer of Posidonius, the great astrologer and also philosopher, concerning those twins who were attacked with sickness at the same time, namely, "That this[Pg 185] had happened to them because they were conceived at the same time, and born at the same time." For certainly he added "conception," lest it should be said to him that they could not both be born at the same time, knowing that at any rate they must both have been conceived at the same time; wishing thus to show that he did not attri bute the fact of their being similarly and simultaneously affected with sickness to the similarity of their bodily constitutions as its proximate cause, but that he held that even in respect of the similarity of their health, they were bound together by a sidereal connection. If, therefore, the time of conception has so much to do with the similarity of destinies, these same destinies ought not to be changed by the circumstances of birth; or, if the destinies of twins be said to be changed because they are born at different times, why should we not rather understand that they had been already changed in order that they might be born at different times? Does not, then, the will of men living in the world change the destinies of birth, when the order of birth can change the destinies they had at conception?
  6. Concerning twins of different sexes.

BOOK XIX. - A review of the philosophical opinions regarding the Supreme Good, and a comparison of these opinions with the Christian belief regarding happiness, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  But let us suppose a man such as poetry and mythology speak of,a man so insociable and savage as to be called rather[Pg 317] a semi-man than a man.[640] Although, then, his kingdom was the solitude of a dreary cave, and he himself was so singularly bad-hearted that he was named , which is the Greek word for bad; though he had no wife to soo the him with endearing talk, no children to play with, no sons to do his bidding, no friend to enliven him with intercourse, not even his father Vulcan (though in one respect he was happier than his father, not having begotten a monster like himself); although he gave to no man, but took as he wished whatever he could, from whomsoever he could, when he could; yet in that solitary den, the floor of which, as Virgil[641] says, was always reeking with recent slaughter, there was nothing else than peace sought, a peace in which no one should molest him, or disquiet him with any assault or alarm. With his own body he desired to be at peace; and he was satisfied only in proportion as he had this peace. For he ruled his members, and they obeyed him; and for the sake of pacifying his mortal nature, which rebelled when it needed anything, and of allaying the sedition of hunger which threatened to banish the soul from the body, he made forays, slew, and devoured, but used the ferocity and savageness he displayed in these actions only for the preservation of his own life's peace. So that, had he been willing to make with other men the same peace which he made with himself in his own cave, he would neither have been called bad, nor a monster, nor a semi-man. Or if the appearance of his body and his vomiting smoky fires frightened men from having any dealings with him, perhaps his fierce ways arose not from a desire to do mischief, but from the necessity of finding a living. But he may have had no existence, or, at least, he was not such as the poets fancifully describe him, for they had to exalt Hercules, and did so at the expense of Cacus. It is better, then, to believe that such a man or semi-man never existed, and that this, in common with many other fancies of the poets, is mere Fiction. For the most savage animals (and he is said to have been almost a wild beast) encompass their own species with a ring of protecting peace. They cohabit, beget, produce, suckle, and bring up their young, though very many of them are not gregarious, but solitary,not like sheep, deer, pigeons, starlings,[Pg 318] bees, but such as lions, foxes, eagles, bats. For what tigress does not gently purr over her cubs, and lay aside her ferocity to fondle them? What kite, solitary as he is when circling over his prey, does not seek a mate, build a nest, hatch the eggs, bring up the young birds, and maintain with the mother of his family as peaceful a domestic alliance as he can? How much more powerfully do the laws of man's nature move him to hold fellowship and maintain peace with all men so far as in him lies, since even wicked men wage war to maintain the peace of their own circle, and wish that, if possible, all men belonged to them, that all men and things might serve but one head, and might, either through love or fear, yield themselves to peace with him! It is thus that pride in its perversity apes God. It abhors equality with other men under Him; but, instead of His rule, it seeks to impose a rule of its own upon its equals. It abhors, that is to say, the just peace of God, and loves its own unjust peace; but it cannot help loving peace of one kind or other. For there is no vice so clean contrary to nature that it obliterates even the faintest traces of nature.
  He, then, who prefers what is right to what is wrong, and what is well-ordered to what is perverted, sees that the peace of unjust men is not worthy to be called peace in comparison with the peace of the just. And yet even what is perverted must of necessity be in harmony with, and in dependence on, and in some part of the order of things, for otherwise it would have no existence at all. Suppose a man hangs with his head downwards, this is certainly a perverted attitude of body and arrangement of its members; for that which nature requires to be above is beneath, and vice vers. This perversity disturbs the peace of the body, and is therefore painful. Nevertheless the spirit is at peace with its body, and labours for its preservation, and hence the suffering; but if it is banished from the body by its pains, then, so long as the bodily framework holds together, there is in the remains a kind of peace among the members, and hence the body remains suspended. And inasmuch as the earthy body tends towards the earth, and rests on the bond by which it is suspended, it tends thus to its natural peace, and the voice of its own weight demands a place for it to rest; and though now lifeless and without feeling, it does[Pg 319] not fall from the peace that is natural to its place in creation, whether it already has it, or is tending towards it. For if you apply embalming preparations to prevent the bodily frame from mouldering and dissolving, a kind of peace still unites part to part, and keeps the whole body in a suitable place on the earth,in other words, in a place that is at peace with the body. If, on the other hand, the body receive no such care, but be left to the natural course, it is disturbed by exhalations that do not harmonize with one another, and that offend our senses; for it is this which is perceived in putrefaction until it is assimilated to the elements of the world, and particle by particle enters into peace with them. Yet throughout this process the laws of the most high Creator and Governor are strictly observed, for it is by Him the peace of the universe is administered. For although minute animals are produced from the carcase of a larger animal, all these little atoms, by the law of the same Creator, serve the animals they belong to in peace. And although the flesh of dead animals be eaten by others, no matter where it be carried, nor what it be brought into contact with, nor what it be converted and changed into, it still is ruled by the same laws which pervade all things for the conservation of every mortal race, and which bring things that fit one another into harmony.

BOOK X. - Porphyrys doctrine of redemption, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  But here we have another and a much more learned Platonist than Apuleius, Porphyry, to wit, asserting that, by I know not what theurgy, even the gods themselves are subjected to passions and perturbations; for by adjurations they were so bound and terrified that they could not confer purity of soul,were so terrified by him who imposed on them a wicked command, that they could not by the same theurgy be freed from that terror, and fulfil the righteous behest of him who prayed to them, or do the good he sought. Who does not see that all these things are Fictions of deceiving demons, unless he be a wretched slave of theirs, and an alien from the grace of the true Liberator? For if the Chaldan had been dealing with good gods, certainly a well-disposed man, who sought to purify his own soul, would have had more influence with them than an evil-disposed man seeking to hinder him. Or, if the gods were just, and considered the man unworthy of the purification he sought, at all events they should not have been terrified by an envious person, nor hindered, as Porphyry avows, by the fear of a stronger deity, but should have simply denied the boon on their own free judgment. And it is surprising that that well-disposed Chaldan, who desired to purify his soul by theurgical rites, found no superior deity who could either terrify the frightened gods still more, and force them to confer the boon, or compose their fears, and so enable them to do good without compulsion,even supposing that the good theurgist had no rites by which he himself might purge away the taint of fear from the gods whom he invoked for the purification of his own soul. And why is it that there is a god who has power to terrify the inferior gods, and none who has[Pg 397] power to free them from fear? Is there found a god who listens to the envious man, and frightens the gods from doing good? and is there not found a god who listens to the well-disposed man, and removes the fear of the gods that they may do him good? O excellent theurgy! O admirable purification of the soul!a theurgy in which the violence of an impure envy has more influence than the entreaty of purity and holiness. Rather let us abominate and avoid the deceit of such wicked spirits, and listen to sound doctrine. As to those who perform these filthy cleansings by sacrilegious rites, and see in their initiated state (as he further tells us, though we may question this vision) certain wonderfully lovely appearances of angels or gods, this is what the apostle refers to when he speaks of "Satan transforming himself into an angel of light."[399] For these are the delusive appearances of that spirit who longs to entangle wretched souls in the deceptive worship of many and false gods, and to turn them aside from the true worship of the true God, by whom alone they are cleansed and healed, and who, as was said of Proteus, "turns himself into all shapes,"[400] equally hurtful, whether he assaults us as an enemy, or assumes the disguise of a friend.
  11. Of Porphyry's epistle to Anebo, in which he asks for information about the differences among demons.
  --
  However, he pursues this subject, and, still in the character of an inquirer, mentions some things which no sober judgment could attri bute to any but malicious and deceitful powers.[Pg 399] He asks why, after the better class of spirits have been invoked, the worse should be commanded to perform the wicked desires of men; why they do not hear a man who has just left a woman's embrace, while they themselves make no scruple of tempting men to incest and adultery; why their priests are commanded to abstain from animal food for fear of being polluted by the corporeal exhalations, while they themselves are attracted by the fumes of sacrifices and other exhalations; why the initiated are forbidden to touch a dead body, while their mysteries are celebrated almost entirely by means of dead bodies; why it is that a man addicted to any vice should utter threats, not to a demon or to the soul of a dead man, but to the sun and moon, or some of the heavenly bodies, which he intimidates by imaginary terrors, that he may wring from them a real boon,for he threatens that he will demolish the sky, and such like impossibilities,that those gods, being alarmed, like silly children, with imaginary and absurd threats, may do what they are ordered. Porphyry further relates that a man Chremon, profoundly versed in these sacred or rather sacrilegious mysteries, had written that the famous Egyptian mysteries of Isis and her husb and Osiris had very great influence with the gods to compel them to do what they were ordered, when he who used the spells threatened to divulge or do away with these mysteries, and cried with a threatening voice that he would scatter the members of Osiris if they neglected his orders. Not without reason is Porphyry surprised that a man should utter such wild and empty threats against the gods,not against gods of no account, but against the heavenly gods, and those that shine with sidereal light, and that these threats should be effectual to constrain them with resistless power, and alarm them so that they fulfil his wishes. Not without reason does he, in the character of an inquirer into the reasons of these surprising things, give it to be understood that they are done by that race of spirits which he previously described as if quoting other people's opinions,spirits who deceive not, as he said, by nature, but by their own corruption, and who simulate gods and dead men, but not, as he said, demons, for demons they really are. As to his idea that by means of herbs, and stones, and animals, and[Pg 400] certain incantations and noises, and drawings, sometimes fanciful, and sometimes copied from the motions of the heavenly bodies, men create upon earth powers capable of bringing about various results, all that is only the mystification which these demons practise on those who are subject to them, for the sake of furnishing themselves with merriment at the expense of their dupes. Either, then, Porphyry was sincere in his doubts and inquiries, and mentioned these things to demonstrate and put beyond question that they were the work, not of powers which aid us in obtaining life, but of deceitful demons; or, to take a more favourable view of the philosopher, he adopted this method with the Egyptian who was wedded to these errors, and was proud of them, that he might not offend him by assuming the attitude of a teacher, nor discompose his mind by the altercation of a professed assailant, but, by assuming the character of an inquirer, and the humble attitude of one who was anxious to learn, might turn his attention to these matters, and show how worthy they are to be despised and relinquished. Towards the conclusion of his letter, he requests Anebo to inform him what the Egyptian wisdom indicates as the way to blessedness. But as to those who hold intercourse with the gods, and pester them only for the sake of finding a runaway slave, or acquiring property, or making a bargain of a marriage, or such things, he declares that their pretensions to wisdom are vain. He adds that these same gods, even granting that on other points their utterances were true, were yet so ill-advised and unsatisfactory in their disclosures about blessedness, that they cannot be either gods or good demons, but are either that spirit who is called the deceiver, or mere Fictions of the imagination.
  12. Of the miracles wrought by the true God through the ministry of the holy angels.

BOOK XVIII. - A parallel history of the earthly and heavenly cities from the time of Abraham to the end of the world, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  After the death of Joshua the son of Nun, the people of God had judges, in whose times they were alternately humbled by afflictions on account of their sins, and consoled by prosperity through the compassion of God. In those times were invented the fables about Triptolemus, who, at the comm and of Ceres, borne by winged snakes, bestowed corn on the needy lands in flying over them; about that beast the Minotaur, which was shut up in the Labyrinth, from which men who entered its inextricable mazes could find no exit; about the Centaurs, whose form was a compound of horse and man; about Cerberus, the three-headed dog of hell; about Phryxus and his sister Hellas, who fled, borne by a winged ram; about the Gorgon, whose hair was composed of serpents, and who turned those who looked on her into stone; about Bellerophon, who was carried by a winged horse called Pegasus; about Amphion, who charmed and attracted the stones by the sweetness of his harp; about the artificer Ddalus and his son Icarus, who flew on wings they had fitted on; about dipus, who compelled a certain four-footed monster with a human face, called a sphynx, to destroy herself by casting herself headlong, having solved the riddle she was wont to propose as insoluble; about Antus, who was the son of the earth, for which reason, on falling on the earth, he was wont to rise up stronger, whom Hercules slew; and perhaps there are others which I have forgotten. These fables, easily found in histories containing a true account of events, bring us down to the Trojan war, at which Marcus Varro has closed his second book about the race of the Roman people; and they[Pg 232] are so skilfully invented by men as to involve no scandal to the gods. But whoever have pretended as to Jupiter's rape of Ganymede, a very beautiful boy, that king Tantalus committed the crime, and the fable ascribed it to Jupiter; or as to his impregnating Dane as a golden shower, that it means that the woman's virtue was corrupted by gold: whether these things were really done or only fabled in those days, or were really done by others and falsely ascribed to Jupiter, it is impossible to tell how much wickedness must have been taken for granted in men's hearts that they should be thought able to listen to such lies with patience. And yet they willingly accepted them, when, indeed, the more devotedly they worshipped Jupiter, they ought the more severely to have punished those who durst say such things of him. But they not only were not angry at those who invented these things, but were afraid that the gods would be angry at them if they did not act such Fictions even in the theatres. In those times Latona bore Apollo, not him of whose oracle we have spoken above as so often consulted, but him who is said, along with Hercules, to have fed the flocks of king Admetus; yet he was so believed to be a god, that very many, indeed almost all, have believed him to be the selfsame Apollo. Then also Father Liber made war in India, and led in his army many women called Bacch, who were notable not so much for valour as for fury. Some, indeed, write that this Liber was both conquered and bound; and some that he was slain in Persia, even telling where he was buried; and yet in his name, as that of a god, the unclean demons have instituted the sacred, or rather the sacrilegious, Bacchanalia, of the outrageous vileness of which the senate, after many years, became so much ashamed as to prohibit them in the city of Rome. Men believed that in those times Perseus and his wife Andromeda were raised into heaven after their death, so that they were not ashamed or afraid to mark out their images by constellations, and call them by their names.
  14. Of the theological poets.

BOOK XVI. - The history of the city of God from Noah to the time of the kings of Israel, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  Isaac's two sons, Esau and Jacob, grew up together. The primacy of the elder was transferred to the younger by a bargain and agreement between them, when the elder immoderately lusted after the lentiles the younger had prepared for food, and for that price sold his birthright to him, confirming it with an oath. We learn from this that a person is to be blamed, not for the kind of food he eats, but for immoderate greed. Isaac grew old, and old age deprived him of his eyesight. He wished to bless the elder son, and instead of the elder, who was hairy, unwittingly blessed the younger, who put himself under his father's hands, having covered himself with kid-skins, as if bearing the sins of others. Lest we should think this guile of Jacob's was fraudulent guile, instead of seeking in it the mystery of a great thing, the Scripture has predicted in the words just before, "Esau[Pg 154] was a cunning hunter, a man of the field; and Jacob was a simple man, dwelling at home."[320] Some of our writers have interpreted this, "without guile." But whether the Greek means "without guile," or "simple," or rather "without feigning," in the receiving of that blessing what is the guile of the man without guile? What is the guile of the simple, what the Fiction of the man who does not lie, but a profound mystery of the truth? But what is the blessing itself? "See," he says, "the smell of my son is as the smell of a full field which the Lord hath blessed: therefore God give thee of the dew of heaven, and of the fruitfulness of the earth, and plenty of corn and wine: let nations serve thee, and princes adore thee: and be lord of thy brethren, and let thy father's sons adore thee: cursed be he that curseth thee, and blessed be he that blesseth thee."[321] The blessing of Jacob is therefore a proclamation of Christ to all nations. It is this which has come to pass, and is now being fulfilled. Isaac is the law and the prophecy: even by the mouth of the Jews Christ is blessed by prophecy as by one who knows not, because it is itself not understood. The world like a field is filled with the odour of Christ's name: His is the blessing of the dew of heaven, that is, of the showers of divine words; and of the fruitfulness of the earth, that is, of the gathering together of the peoples: His is the plenty of corn and wine, that is, the multitude that gathers bread and wine in the sacrament of His body and blood. Him the nations serve, Him princes adore. He is the Lord of His brethren, because His people rules over the Jews. Him His Father's sons adore, that is, the sons of Abraham according to faith; for He Himself is the son of Abraham according to the flesh. He is cursed that curseth Him, and he that blesseth Him is blessed. Christ, I say, who is ours is blessed, that is, truly spoken of out of the mouths of the Jews, when, although erring, they yet sing the law and the prophets, and think they are blessing another for whom they erringly hope. So, when the elder son claims the promised blessing, Isaac is greatly afraid, and wonders when he knows that he has blessed one instead of the other, and demands who he is; yet he does not complain that[Pg 155] he has been deceived, yea, when the great mystery is revealed to him, in his secret heart he at once eschews anger, and confirms the blessing. "Who then," he says, "hath hunted me venison, and brought it me, and I have eaten of all before thou camest, and have blessed him, and he shall be blessed?"[322] Who would not rather have expected the curse of an angry man here, if these things had been done in an earthly manner, and not by inspiration from above? O things done, yet done prophetically; on the earth, yet celestially; by men, yet divinely! If everything that is fertile of so great mysteries should be examined carefully, many volumes would be filled; but the moderate compass fixed for this work compels us to hasten to other things.
    38. Of Jacob's mission to Mesopotamia to get a wife, and of the vision which he saw in a dream by the way, and of his getting four women when he sought one wife.

BOOK XXII. - Of the eternal happiness of the saints, the resurrection of the body, and the miracles of the early Church, #City of God, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  Let us here recite the passage in which Tully expresses his astonishment that the apotheosis of Romulus should have been credited. I shall insert his words as they stand: "It is most worthy of remark in Romulus, that other men who are said to have become gods lived in less educated ages, when there was a greater propensity to the fabulous, and when the uninstructed were easily persuaded to believe anything. But the age of Romulus was barely six hundred years ago, and already literature and science had dispelled the errors that attach to an uncultured age." And a little after he says of the same Romulus words to this effect: "From this we may perceive that Homer had flourished long before Romulus, and that there was now so much learning in individuals, and so generally diffused an enlightenment, that scarcely any room was left for fable. For antiquity admitted fables, and sometimes even very clumsy ones; but this age [of Romulus] was sufficiently enlightened to reject whatever had not the air of truth." Thus one of the most learned men, and certainly the most eloquent, M. Tullius Cicero, says that it is surprising that the divinity of Romulus was believed in, because the times were already so enlightened that they would not accept a fabulous Fiction. But who believed that Romulus was a god except Rome, which was itself small and in its infancy? Then afterwards it was necessary that succeeding generations should preserve the tradition of their ancestors; that, drinking in this superstition with their mother's milk, the state might grow and come to such power that it might dictate this belief, as from a point of vantage, to all the nations over whom its sway extended. And these nations, though they might not believe that Romulus was a god, at least said so, that they might not give offence to their sovereign state by refusing to give its founder that title which was given him by Rome, which had adopted this belief, not by a love of error, but an error of love. But though Christ is the founder of the heavenly and eternal city, yet it did not believe Him to be God because it was founded by Him, but rather it[Pg 481] is founded by Him, in virtue of its belief. Rome, after it had been built and dedicated, worshipped its founder in a temple as a god; but this Jerusalem laid Christ, its God, as its foundation, that the building and dedication might proceed. The former city loved its founder, and therefore believed him to be a god; the latter believed Christ to be God, and therefore loved Him. There was an antecedent cause for the love of the former city, and for its believing that even a false dignity attached to the object of its love; so there was an antecedent cause for the belief of the latter, and for its loving the true dignity which a proper faith, not a rash surmise, ascribed to its object. For, not to mention the multitude of very striking miracles which proved that Christ is God, there were also divine prophecies heralding Him, prophecies most worthy of belief, which being already accomplished, we have not, like the fathers, to wait for their verification. Of Romulus, on the other hand, and of his building Rome and reigning in it, we read or hear the narrative of what did take place, not prediction which beforeh and said that such things should be. And so far as his reception among the gods is concerned, history only records that this was believed, and does not state it as a fact; for no miraculous signs testified to the truth of this. For as to that wolf which is said to have nursed the twin-brothers, and which is considered a great marvel, how does this prove him to have been divine? For even supposing that this nurse was a real wolf and not a mere courtezan, yet she nursed both brothers, and Remus is not reckoned a god. Besides, what was there to hinder any one from asserting that Romulus or Hercules, or any such man, was a god? Or who would rather choose to die than profess belief in his divinity? And did a single nation worship Romulus among its gods, unless it were forced through fear of the Roman name? But who can number the multitudes who have chosen death in the most cruel shapes rather than deny the divinity of Christ? And thus the dread of some slight indignation, which it was supposed, perhaps groundlessly, might exist in the minds of the Romans, constrained some states who were subject to Rome to worship Romulus as a god; whereas the dread, not of a slight mental shock, but of severe and various punishments,[Pg 482] and of death itself, the most formidable of all, could not prevent an immense multitude of martyrs throughout the world from not merely worshipping but also confessing Christ as God. The city of Christ, which, although as yet a stranger upon earth, had countless hosts of citizens, did not make war upon its godless persecutors for the sake of temporal security, but preferred to win eternal salvation by abstaining from war. They were bound, imprisoned, beaten, tortured, burned, torn in pieces, massacred, and yet they multiplied. It was not given to them to fight for their eternal salvation except by despising their temporal salvation for their Saviour's sake.
  I am aware that Cicero, in the third book of his De Republica, if I mistake not, argues that a first-rate power will not engage in war except either for honour or for safety. What he has to say about the question of safety, and what he means by safety, he explains in another place, saying, "Private persons frequently evade, by a speedy death, destitution, exile, bonds, the scourge, and the other pains which even the most insensible feel. But to states, death, which seems to emancipate individuals from all punishments, is itself a punishment; for a state should be so constituted as to be eternal. And thus death is not natural to a republic as to a man, to whom death is not only necessary, but often even desirable. But when a state is destroyed, obliterated, annihilated, it is as if (to compare great things with small) this whole world perished and collapsed." Cicero said this because he, with the Platonists, believed that the world would not perish. It is therefore agreed that, according to Cicero, a state should engage in war for the safety which preserves the state permanently in existence, though its citizens change; as the foliage of an olive or laurel, or any tree of this kind, is perennial, the old leaves being replaced by fresh ones. For death, as he says, is no punishment to individuals, but rather delivers them from all other punishments, but it is a punishment to the state. And therefore it is reasonably asked whether the Saguntines did right when they chose that their whole state should perish rather than that they should break faith with the Roman republic; for this deed of theirs is applauded by the citizens of the earthly republic. But I do not see how they could[Pg 483] follow the advice of Cicero, who tells us that no war is to be undertaken save for safety or for honour; neither does he say which of these two is to be preferred, if a case should occur in which the one could not be preserved without the loss of the other. For manifestly, if the Saguntines chose safety, they must break faith; if they kept faith, they must reject safety; as also it fell out. But the safety of the city of God is such that it can be retained, or rather acquired, by faith and with faith; but if faith be abandoned, no one can attain it. It is this thought of a most stedfast and patient spirit that has made so many noble martyrs, while Romulus has not had, and could not have, so much as one to die for his divinity.

BS 1 - Introduction to the Idea of God, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Artists observe one another, and they observe people. Then they represent what they see, and transmit the message of what they see, to us. That teaches us to see. We dont necessarily know what it is that were learning from them, but were learning somethingor, at least, were acting like were learning something. We go to movies; we watch stories; we immerse ourselves in Fiction, constantly. Thats an artistic production, and, for many people, the world of the arts is a living world. Thats particularly true if youre a creative person.
  Its the creative, artistic people that move the knowledge of humanity forward. They do that with their artistic productions, first. Theyre on the edge. The dancers, poets, visual artists, and musicians do that, and were not sure what they're doing. Were not sure what musicians are doing. What the hell are they doing? Why do you like music? It gives you deep intimations of the significance of things, and no one questions it. You go to a concert; youre thrilled. Its a quasi-religious experience, particularly if the people really get themselves together, and get the crowd moving. Theres something incredibly intense about it, but it makes no sense whatsoever.
  --
  The question still remains: where does the information in dreams come from? I think where it comes from is that we watch the patterns that everyone acts out. We watch that forever, and weve got some representations of those patterns thats part of our cultural history. Thats whats embedded in Fictional accounts of stories between good and evil, the bad guy and the good guy, and the romance. These are canonical patterns of Being, for people, and they deeply affect us, because they represent what it is that we will act out in the world. We flesh that out with the individual information we have about ourselves and other people. Theres waves of behavioural patterns that manifest themselves in the crowd, across time. Great dramas are played on the crowd, across time. The artists watch that, and they get intimations of what that is. They write it down, tell us, and were a little clearer about what were up to.
  A great dramatist, like Shakespearewe know that what he wrote is Fiction. Then we say, Fiction isnt true. But then you think, well, wait a minute. Maybe its true like numbers are true. Numbers are an abstraction from the underlying reality, but no one in their right mind would really think that numbers arent true. You could even make a case that the numbers are more real than the things that they represent, because the abstraction is so insanely powerful.
  Once you have mathematics, youre just deadly. You can move the world with mathematics. Its not obvious that the abstraction is less real than the more concrete reality. You take a work of Fiction, like Hamlet, and you think, well, its not true, because its Fiction. But then you think, wait a minutewhat kind of explanation is that? Maybe its more true than non Fiction. It takes the story that needs to be told about you, and the story that needs to be told about you, and you, and you, and you, and you, and it abstracts that out, and says, heres something thats a key part of the human experience as such. Its an abstraction from this underlying, noisy substrate. People are affected by it because they see that the thing thats represented is part of the pattern of their being. Thats the right way to think about it.
  With these old stories these ancient storiesit seems, to me, like that process has been occurring for thousands of years. Its like we watched ourselves, and we extracted out some stories. We imitated each other, and we represented that in drama, and then we distilled the drama, and we got a representation of the distillation. And then we did it again, and at the end of that processit took God only knows how long. Theyve traced some fairy tales back 10,000 years, in relatively unchanged form.
  --
  This is the idea to begin with. We have the unknown as such, and then we act in it like animals act. They act first; they dont think. They dont imagine; they act, and thats where we started. We started by acting, and then we started to be able to represent how we acted, and then we started to talk about how we represented how we acted. That enabled us to tell stories, because that is what a story is: its to tell about how you represent how you act. You know that, because if you read a book, what happens? You read the book, and images come to mind of the people in the book behaving. Its one step from acting it out. You dont act it out, because you can abstract. You can represent action without having to act it out. Its an amazing thing, and thats part of the development of the prefrontal cortex. Its part of the capacity for human abstract thought. You can pull the representation of the behaviour away from the behaviour and manipulate the representation before you enact it. Thats why you think, so that you can generate a pattern of action and test it out in a Fictional world before you embody it and die because youre foolish. You let the representation die, not you. Thats why you think, and thats partly what were trying to do with these stories.
  Section IV
  --
  Phenomenology is the fact that at the center of my vision my hands are clear, and out in the periphery they disappear. Phenomenology is the way things smell and the way things taste, and the fact that they matter. You could say, in some sense, that phenomenology is the study of what matters, rather than matter. Its a given, from the phenomenological perspective, that things have meaning. Even if youre a rationalist, a cynic, and a nihilist, and say nothing has any meaning, you still run into the problem of pain. Pain undercuts your arguments and has a meaning. Theres no escaping from the meaning. You can pretty much demolish all the positive parts of it, but trying to think your way out of the negative parts...Good luck with that, because that just doesnt work. The Bible storiesand I think this is true of Fiction in generalis phenomenological. It concentrates on trying to elucidate the nature of human experience. That is not the same as the objective world. Its also a form of truth, because it is true that you have a field of experience and that it is has qualities. The question is, what are the qualities?
  Ancient representations of reality were sort of a weird meld of observable phenomenathings we would consider objective factsand the projection of subjective truth. Ill show you how the Mesopotamians viewed the world. They had a model of the world as a disc. If you go out in a field at night, what does the world look like? Well, its a disc. Its got a dome on top of it. That was basically the Mesopotamian view of the world, and the view of the world of people who wrote the first stories in the Bible. There was water on top of the dome. Well, obviously. It rains, right? Where does the water come from? Theres water around the dome. The disc is made of land, and then underneath that theres water. How do you know that? Well, drill. Youll hit water; its under the earth. Otherwise, how would you hit the water? And then whats under that? Fresh water. And then whats under that? If you go to the edge of the disc, you hit the ocean. Its salt water. So its a dome with water outside of it, and then its a disc that the dome sits on, and then underneath that theres fresh water, and then underneath that theres salt water. That was roughly the Mesopotamian world.
  --
  His character, Stavrogin, also acts out the presupposition that human beings have no intrinsic nature and no intrinsic value. Its another brilliant investigation. Dostoevsky prophesized what will happen to a society if it goes down that road, and he was dead, exactly accurate. Its uncanny to read Dostoevsky's The Possessedor The Devils, depending on the translation and to read Aleksandr Solzhenitsyns Gulag Archipelago. One is Fiction and prophecy, and the second is, hey, lookit turned out exactly the way Dostoevsky said it would, for exactly the same reasons. Its quite remarkable. So the question is, do you contend seriously with the idea that, A, theres something cosmically constitutive about consciousness? and B, that that might well be considered divine? and C, that that is instantiated in every person? And then ask yourselfif youre not a criminalif you dont act it out? And then ask yourself what that means. Is that reflective of a reality? Is it a metaphor? Maybe its a complex metaphor that we have to use to organize our societies. It could well be. But even as a metaphor, its true enough so that we mess with it at our peril. It also took people a very long time to figure out.
  This is Genesis 1, and Im probably going to stop there because I believe its 9:30. We didnt even get to the first line. I want to read you a couple of things that well use as a prodromos for the next lecture. Ill just bounce through a collection of ideas thats associated with the notion of divinity. Well turn back to the first lines when we start the next lecture. I have no idea how far Im going to get through the Biblical stories, by the way, because Im trying to figure this out as I go along.

COSA - BOOK I, #The Confessions of Saint Augustine, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  "Not so, not so. Far better was that first study." For, lo, I would readily forget the wanderings of Aeneas and all the rest, rather than how to read and write. But over the entrance of the Grammar School is a vail drawn! true; yet is this not so much an emblem of aught recondite, as a cloak of error. Let not those, whom I no longer fear, cry out against me, while I confess to Thee, my God, whatever my soul will, and acquiesce in the condemnation of my evil ways, that I may love Thy good ways. Let not either buyers or sellers of grammar-learning cry out against me. For if I question them whether it be true that Aeneas came on a time to Carthage, as the poet tells, the less learned will reply that they know not, the more learned that he never did. But should I ask with what letters the name "Aeneas" is written, every one who has learnt this will answer me aright, as to the signs which men have conventionally settled. If, again, I should ask which might be forgotten with least detriment to the concerns of life, reading and writing or these poetic Fictions? who does not foresee what all must answer who have not wholly forgotten themselves? I sinned, then, when as a boy I preferred those empty to those more profitable studies, or rather loved the one and hated the other. "One and one, two"; "two and two, four"; this was to me a hateful singsong: "the wooden horse lined with armed men," and "the burning of Troy," and "Creusa's shade and sad similitude," were the choice spectacle of my vanity.
  Why then did I hate the Greek classics, which have the like tales? For
  Homer also curiously wove the like Fictions, and is most sweetly vain, yet was he bitter to my boyish taste. And so I suppose would Virgil be to Grecian children, when forced to learn him as I was Homer.
  Difficulty, in truth, the difficulty of a foreign tongue, dashed, as it were, with gall all the sweetness of Grecian fable. For not one word of it did I understand, and to make me understand I was urged vehemently with cruel threats and punishments. Time was also (as an infant) I knew no Latin; but this I learned without fear or suffering, by mere observation, amid the caresses of my nursery and jests of friends, smiling and sportively encouraging me. This I learned without any pressure of punishment to urge me on, for my heart urged me to give birth to its conceptions, which I could only do by learning words not of those who taught, but of those who talked with me; in whose ears also I gave birth to the thoughts, whatever I conceived. No doubt, then, that a free curiosity has more force in our learning these things, than a frightful enforcement. Only this enforcement restrains the rovings of that freedom, through Thy laws, O my God, Thy laws, from the master's cane to the martyr's trials, being able to temper for us a wholesome bitter, recalling us to Thyself from that deadly pleasure which lures us from Thee.
  --
  But woe is thee, thou torrent of human custom! Who shall stand against thee? how long shalt thou not be dried up? how long roll the sons of Eve into that huge and hideous ocean, which even they scarcely overpass who climb the cross? Did not I read in thee of Jove the thunderer and the adulterer? both, doubtless, he could not be; but so the feigned thunder might countenance and pander to real adultery. And now which of our gowned masters lends a sober ear to one who from their own school cries out, "These were Homer's Fictions, transferring things human to the gods; would he had brought down things divine to us!" Yet more truly had he said, "These are indeed his Fictions; but attri buting a divine nature to wicked men, that crimes might be no longer crimes, and whoso commits them might seem to imitate not abandoned men, but the celestial gods."
  And yet, thou hellish torrent, into thee are cast the sons of men with rich rewards, for compassing such learning; and a great solemnity is made of it, when this is going on in the forum, within sight of laws appointing a salary beside the scholar's payments; and thou lashest thy rocks and roarest, "Hence words are learnt; hence eloquence; most necessary to gain your ends, or maintain opinions." As if we should have never known such words as "golden shower," "lap," "beguile," "temples of the heavens," or others in that passage, unless Terence had brought a lewd youth upon the stage, setting up Jupiter as his example of seduction.
  --
  Which words I had heard that Juno never uttered; but we were forced to go astray in the footsteps of these poetic Fictions, and to say in prose much what he expressed in verse. And his speaking was most applauded, in whom the passions of rage and grief were most preeminent, and clothed in the most fitting language, maintaining the dignity of the character.
  What is it to me, O my true life, my God, that my declamation was applauded above so many of my own age and class? is not all this smoke and wind? and was there nothing else whereon to exercise my wit and tongue? Thy praises, Lord, Thy praises might have stayed the yet tender shoot of my heart by the prop of Thy Scriptures; so had it not trailed away amid these empty trifles, a defiled prey for the fowls of the air.

COSA - BOOK III, #The Confessions of Saint Augustine, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  the actor of these Fictions the more, the more he grieves. And if the
  calamities of those persons (whether of old times, or mere Fiction)
  be so acted, that the spectator is not moved to tears, he goes away
  --
  hearing their Fictions should lightly scratch the surface; upon which,
  as on envenomed nails, followed inflamed swelling, impostumes, and a

COSA - BOOK IV, #The Confessions of Saint Augustine, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  such Fictions, commit fornication against Thee, trust in things unreal,
  and feed the wind? Still I would not forsooth have sacrifices offered
  --
  volumes; revolving within me corporeal Fictions, buzzing in the ears
  of my heart, which I turned, O sweet truth, to thy inward melody,

COSA - BOOK VI, #The Confessions of Saint Augustine, #Saint Augustine of Hippo, #Christianity
  not against the Catholic faith, but against the Fictions of carnal
  imaginations. For so rash and impious had I been, that what I ought by

DS3, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  perception. But the birth, the appearance, and the perception of all beings are a Fiction. Since they are
   Fictions, beings do not really exist. Only our delusions exist.

DS4, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  include all beings simply part of a single thought. But the ten directions are Fictions and remind us that
  we ourselves and all others and all things are likewise Fictions.
  Textual note: Kumarajiva and Bodhiruci do not include samantad dashasu dikshu (or in any of the

ENNEAD 02.04a - Of Matter., #Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 01, #Plotinus, #Christianity
  The principle which informs matter will give it form as something foreign to its nature; it will also introduce magnitude and all the real properties. Otherwise, it would be enslaved to the magnitude of matter, and could not decide of the magnitude of matter, and magnitude would be dependent on the disposition of matter. A theory of a consultation between it and the magnitude of matter would be an absurd Fiction. On the contrary, if the efficient cause precede matter, matter will be exactly as desired by the efficient cause, and be capable of docilely receiving any kind of form, including magnitude. If matter possessed magnitude, it would also possess figure, and would thus be rather difficult to fashion. Form therefore enters into matter by importing into it (what constitutes corporeal being); now every form contains a magnitude and a quantity which are determined by reason ("being"), and with reason. That is why in all kinds of beings, quantity is determined only along with form; for the quantity (the magnitude) of man is not the quantity of the bird. It would be absurd to insist on the difference between giving to matter the quantity of a bird, and impressing its quality on it, that quality is a reason, while quantity is not a form; for quantity is both measure and number.
  ANTI-STOIC POLEMIC, AGAINST THE CORPOREITY OF MATTER AND QUANTITY.

ENNEAD 02.09 - Against the Gnostics; or, That the Creator and the World are Not Evil., #Plotinus - Complete Works Vol 02, #Plotinus, #Christianity
  2. In the intelligible world, therefore, we shall not recognize more than three principles (Unity, Intelligence, and Soul), without those superfluous and incongruous603 Fictions. We shall insist that there is a single Intelligence that is identical, and immutable, which imitates its Father so far as it can. Then there is our soul, of which one part ever remains among the intelligibles, while one part descends to sense-objects, and another abides in an intermediary region.289 As our soul is one nature in several powers, she may at times entirely rise to the intelligible world, with the best part of herself and of essence; at other times the soul's lower part allows itself to be dragged down to the earth, carrying with it the intermediate portion; for the soul cannot be entirely dragged down.290 This being dragged down occurs only because the soul does not abide in the better region.291 While dwelling in it, the Soul, which is not a part (of it) and of which we are not a part,292 has given to the body of the universe all the perfections of which she was capable. The Soul governs it by remaining quiet, without reasoning, without having to correct anything. With wonderful power she beautifies the universe by the contemplation of the intelligible world. The more the Soul attaches herself to contemplation, the more powerful and beautiful she is; what she receives from above, she communicates to the sense-world, and illuminates because she herself is always illuminated (by Intelligence).
  THE WORLD AS ETERNALLY BEGOTTENGOD'S NEED TO GIVE.
  --
  6. We hardly know what to say of the other new conceptions they have injected into the universe, such as exiles,308 antitypes,309 and repentances.310 If by609 "repentances" and "exiles" they mean certain states of the Soul (in the normal meaning of the word, where a soul) yields to repentance; and if by "antitypes" they mean the images of the intelligible beings that the Soul contemplates before contemplating the intelligible beings themselves, they are using meaningless words, invented merely as catchwords and terms for their individual sect; for they imagine such Fictions merely because they have failed clearly to understand the ancient wisdom of the Greeks. Before them the Greeks, clearly and simply, had spoken of "ascensions" of souls that issued from the "cavern," and which insensibly rise to a truer contemplation. The doctrines of these (Gnostics) are partly stolen from Plato, while the remainder, which were invented merely to form their own individual system, are innovations contrary to truth. It is from Plato that they borrowed their judgments, the rivers of Hades.311 They do speak of several intelligible principles, such as essence, intelligence, the second demiurgic creator or universal Soul; but all that comes from Plato's Timaeus,312 which says, "Likewise as the ideas contained in the existing Organism were seen by Intelligence, so he [the creator of this universe313] thought that the latter should contain similar and equally numerous (natures)." But, not clearly understanding Plato, the Gnostics here imagined (three principles), an intelligence at rest, which contains all (beings), a second intelligence that contemplates them (as they occur) in the first intelligence, and a third intelligence that thinks them discursively. They often consider this discursive intelligence as the creative soul, and they consider this to be the demiurgic creator mentioned by Plato, because they were entirely ignorant of the true nature of this demiurgic creator. In general, they alter entirely the idea of creation, as well as many other doctrines of Plato, and they give out an entirely610 erroneous interpretation thereof. They imagine that they alone have rightly conceived of intelligible nature, while Plato and many other divine intellects never attained thereto. By speaking of a multitude of intelligible principles, they think that they seem to possess an exact knowledge thereof, while really they degrade them, assimilating them to lower, and sensual beings, by increasing their number.314 The principles that exist on high must be reduced to the smallest number feasible; we must recognize that the principle below the First contains all (the essences), and so deny the existence of any intelligible (entities) outside of it, inasmuch as it contains all beings, by virtue of its being primary "Being," of primary Intelligence, and of all that is beautiful beneath the First Himself. The Soul must be assigned to the third rank. The differences obtaining between souls must further be explained by the difference of their conditions or nature.315
  THE GNOSTICS MAY WELL BORROW FROM THE GREEKS, BUT SHOULD NOT DEPRECIATE THEM.

For a Breath I Tarry, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  genre:Science Fiction
  DESC

Gorgias, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  (2) Although Socrates professes to be convinced by reason only, yet the argument is often a sort of dialectical Fiction, by which he conducts himself and others to his own ideal of life and action. And we may sometimes wish that we could have suggested answers to his antagonists, or pointed out to them the rocks which lay concealed under the ambiguous terms good, pleasure, and the like. But it would be as useless to examine his arguments by the requirements of modern logic, as to criticise this ideal from a merely utilitarian point of view. If we say that the ideal is generally regarded as unattainable, and that mankind will by no means agree in thinking that the criminal is happier when punished than when unpunished, any more than they would agree to the stoical paradox that a man may be happy on the rack, Plato has already admitted that the world is against him. Neither does he mean to say that Archelaus is tormented by the stings of conscience; or that the sensations of the impaled criminal are more agreeable than those of the tyrant drowned in luxurious enjoyment. Neither is he speaking, as in the Protagoras, of virtue as a calculation of pleasure, an opinion which he afterwards repudiates in the Phaedo. What then is his meaning? His meaning we shall be able to illustrate best by parallel notions, which, whether justifiable by logic or not, have always existed among mankind. We must remind the reader that Socrates himself implies that he will be understood or appreciated by very few.
  He is speaking not of the consciousness of happiness, but of the idea of happiness. When a martyr dies in a good cause, when a soldier falls in battle, we do not suppose that death or wounds are without pain, or that their physical suffering is always compensated by a mental satisfaction. Still we regard them as happy, and we would a thousand times rather have their death than a shameful life. Nor is this only because we believe that they will obtain an immortality of fame, or that they will have crowns of glory in another world, when their enemies and persecutors will be proportionably tormented. Men are found in a few instances to do what is right, without reference to public opinion or to consequences. And we regard them as happy on this ground only, much as Socrates' friends in the opening of the Phaedo are described as regarding him; or as was said of another, 'they looked upon his face as upon the face of an angel.' We are not concerned to justify this idealism by the standard of utility or public opinion, but merely to point out the existence of such a sentiment in the better part of human nature.
  --
  d. A few minor points still remain to be summed up: (1) The extravagant irony in the reason which is assigned for the pilot's modest charge; and in the proposed use of rhetoric as an instrument of self-condemnation; and in the mighty power of geometrical equality in both worlds. (2) The reference of the mythus to the previous discussion should not be overlooked: the fate reserved for incurable criminals such as Archelaus; the retaliation of the box on the ears; the nakedness of the souls and of the judges who are stript of the clothes or disguises which rhetoric and public opinion have hitherto provided for them (compare Swift's notion that the universe is a suit of clothes, Tale of a Tub). The Fiction seems to have involved Plato in the necessity of supposing that the soul retained a sort of corporeal likeness after death. (3) The appeal of the authority of Homer, who says that Odysseus saw Minos in his court 'holding a golden sceptre,' which gives verisimilitude to the tale.
  It is scarcely necessary to repeat that Plato is playing 'both sides of the game,' and that in criticising the characters of Gorgias and Polus, we are not passing any judgment on historical individuals, but only attempting to analyze the 'dramatis personae' as they were conceived by him. Neither is it necessary to enlarge upon the obvious fact that Plato is a dramatic writer, whose real opinions cannot always be assumed to be those which he puts into the mouth of Socrates, or any other speaker who appears to have the best of the argument; or to repeat the observation that he is a poet as well as a philosopher; or to remark that he is not to be tried by a modern standard, but interpreted with reference to his place in the history of thought and the opinion of his time.
  --
  Yet the true office of a poet or writer of Fiction is not merely to give amusement, or to be the expression of the feelings of mankind, good or bad, or even to increase our knowledge of human nature. There have been poets in modern times, such as Goe the or Wordsworth, who have not forgotten their high vocation of teachers; and the two greatest of the Greek dramatists owe their sublimity to their ethical character. The noblest truths, sung of in the purest and sweetest language, are still the proper material of poetry. The poet clothes them with beauty, and has a power of making them enter into the hearts and memories of men. He has not only to speak of themes above the level of ordinary life, but to speak of them in a deeper and tenderer way than they are ordinarily felt, so as to awaken the feeling of them in others. The old he makes young again; the familiar principle he invests with a new dignity; he finds a noble expression for the common-places of morality and politics. He uses the things of sense so as to indicate what is beyond; he raises us through earth to heaven. He expresses what the better part of us would fain say, and the half-conscious feeling is streng thened by the expression. He is his own critic, for the spirit of poetry and of criticism are not divided in him. His mission is not to disguise men from themselves, but to reveal to them their own nature, and make them better acquainted with the world around them. True poetry is the remembrance of youth, of love, the embodiment in words of the happiest and holiest moments of life, of the noblest thoughts of man, of the greatest deeds of the past. The poet of the future may return to his greater calling of the prophet or teacher; indeed, we hardly know what may not be effected for the human race by a better use of the poetical and imaginative faculty. The reconciliation of poetry, as of religion, with truth, may still be possible. Neither is the element of pleasure to be excluded. For when we substitute a higher pleasure for a lower we raise men in the scale of existence. Might not the novelist, too, make an ideal, or rather many ideals of social life, better than a thousand sermons? Plato, like the Puritans, is too much afraid of poetic and artistic influences. But he is not without a true sense of the noble purposes to which art may be applied (Republic).
  Modern poetry is often a sort of plaything, or, in Plato's language, a flattery, a sophistry, or sham, in which, without any serious purpose, the poet lends wings to his fancy and exhibits his gifts of language and metre. Such an one seeks to gratify the taste of his readers; he has the 'savoir faire,' or trick of writing, but he has not the higher spirit of poetry. He has no conception that true art should bring order out of disorder; that it should make provision for the soul's highest interest; that it should be pursued only with a view to 'the improvement of the citizens.' He ministers to the weaker side of human nature (Republic); he idealizes the sensual; he sings the strain of love in the latest fashion; instead of raising men above themselves he brings them back to the 'tyranny of the many masters,' from which all his life long a good man has been praying to be delivered. And often, forgetful of measure and order, he will express not that which is truest, but that which is strongest. Instead of a great and nobly-executed subject, perfect in every part, some fancy of a heated brain is worked out with the strangest incongruity. He is not the master of his words, but his wordsperhaps borrowed from anotherthe faded reflection of some French or German or Italian writer, have the better of him. Though we are not going to banish the poets, how can we suppose that such utterances have any healing or life-giving influence on the minds of men?
  --
  The myths of Plato are a phenomenon unique in literature. There are four longer ones: these occur in the Phaedrus, Phaedo, Gorgias, and Republic. That in the Republic is the most elaborate and finished of them. Three of these greater myths, namely those contained in the Phaedo, the Gorgias and the Republic, relate to the destiny of human souls in a future life. The magnificent myth in the Phaedrus treats of the immortality, or rather the eternity of the soul, in which is included a former as well as a future state of existence. To these may be added, (1) the myth, or rather fable, occurring in the Statesman, in which the life of innocence is contrasted with the ordinary life of man and the consciousness of evil: (2) the legend of the Island of Atlantis, an imaginary history, which is a fragment only, commenced in the Timaeus and continued in the Critias: (3) the much less artistic Fiction of the foundation of the Cretan colony which is introduced in the preface to the Laws, but soon falls into the background: (4) the beautiful but rather artificial tale of Prometheus and Epimetheus narrated in his rhetorical manner by Protagoras in the dialogue called after him: (5) the speech at the beginning of the Phaedrus, which is a parody of the orator Lysias; the rival speech of Socrates and the recantation of it. To these may be added (6) the tale of the grasshoppers, and (7) the tale of Thamus and of Theuth, both in the Phaedrus: (8) the parable of the Cave (Republic), in which the previous argument is recapitulated, and the nature and degrees of knowledge having been previously set forth in the abstract are represented in a picture: (9) the Fiction of the earth-born men (Republic; compare Laws), in which by the adaptation of an old tradition Plato makes a new beginning for his society: (10) the myth of Aristophanes respecting the division of the sexes, Sym.: (11) the parable of the noble captain, the pilot, and the mutinous sailors (Republic), in which is represented the relation of the better part of the world, and of the philosopher, to the mob of politicians: (12) the ironical tale of the pilot who plies between Athens and Aegina charging only a small payment for saving men from death, the reason being that he is uncertain whether to live or die is better for them (Gor.): (13) the treatment of freemen and citizens by physicians and of slaves by their apprentices,a somewhat laboured figure of speech intended to illustrate the two different ways in which the laws speak to men (Laws). There also occur in Plato continuous images; some of them extend over several pages, appearing and reappearing at intervals: such as the bees stinging and stingless (paupers and thieves) in the Eighth Book of the Republic, who are generated in the transition from timocracy to oligarchy: the sun, which is to the visible world what the idea of good is to the intellectual, in the Sixth Book of the Republic: the composite animal, having the form of a man, but containing under a human skin a lion and a many-headed monster (Republic): the great beast, i.e. the populace: and the wild beast within us, meaning the passions which are always liable to break out: the animated comparisons of the degradation of philosophy by the arts to the dishonoured maiden, and of the tyrant to the parricide, who 'beats his father, having first taken away his arms': the dog, who is your only philosopher: the grotesque and rather paltry image of the argument wandering about without a head (Laws), which is repeated, not improved, from the Gorgias: the argument personified as veiling her face (Republic), as engaged in a chase, as breaking upon us in a first, second and third wave:on these figures of speech the changes are rung many times over. It is observable that nearly all these parables or continuous images are found in the Republic; that which occurs in the Theaetetus, of the midwifery of Socrates, is perhaps the only exception. To make the list complete, the mathematical figure of the number of the state (Republic), or the numerical interval which separates king from tyrant, should not be forgotten.
  The myth in the Gorgias is one of those descriptions of another life which, like the Sixth Aeneid of Virgil, appear to contain reminiscences of the mysteries. It is a vision of the rewards and punishments which await good and bad men after death. It supposes the body to continue and to be in another world what it has become in this. It includes a Paradiso, Purgatorio, and Inferno, like the sister myths of the Phaedo and the Republic. The Inferno is reserved for great criminals only. The argument of the dialogue is frequently referred to, and the meaning breaks through so as rather to destroy the liveliness and consistency of the picture. The structure of the Fiction is very slight, the chief point or moral being that in the judgments of another world there is no possibility of concealment: Zeus has taken from men the power of foreseeing death, and brings together the souls both of them and their judges naked and undisguised at the judgment-seat. Both are exposed to view, stripped of the veils and clothes which might prevent them from seeing into or being seen by one another.
  The myth of the Phaedo is of the same type, but it is more cosmological, and also more poetical. The beautiful and ingenious fancy occurs to Plato that the upper atmosphere is an earth and heaven in one, a glorified earth, fairer and purer than that in which we dwell. As the fishes live in the ocean, mankind are living in a lower sphere, out of which they put their heads for a moment or two and behold a world beyond. The earth which we inhabit is a sediment of the coarser particles which drop from the world above, and is to that heavenly earth what the desert and the shores of the ocean are to us. A part of the myth consists of description of the interior of the earth, which gives the opportunity of introducing several mythological names and of providing places of torment for the wicked. There is no clear distinction of soul and body; the spirits beneath the earth are spoken of as souls only, yet they retain a sort of shadowy form when they cry for mercy on the shores of the lake; and the philosopher alone is said to have got rid of the body. All the three myths in Plato which relate to the world below have a place for repentant sinners, as well as other homes or places for the very good and very bad. It is a natural reflection which is made by Plato elsewhere, that the two extremes of human character are rarely met with, and that the generality of mankind are between them. Hence a place must be found for them. In the myth of the Phaedo they are carried down the river Acheron to the Acherusian lake, where they dwell, and are purified of their evil deeds, and receive the rewards of their good. There are also incurable sinners, who are cast into Tartarus, there to remain as the penalty of atrocious crimes; these suffer everlastingly. And there is another class of hardly-curable sinners who are allowed from time to time to approach the shores of the Acherusian lake, where they cry to their victims for mercy; which if they obtain they come out into the lake and cease from their torments.

Liber 46 - The Key of the Mysteries, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
   is the sanction of illegitimate authority, or, rather, the Fiction of
   power not sanctioned by authority. {79}
  --
   Matter is all, and spirit is only a Fiction of this matter demented.
   Form is more than idea, woman more than man, pleasure more than

Liber 71 - The Voice of the Silence - The Two Paths - The Seven Portals, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
   would be difficult to distinguish it from a pious Fiction. The only
   reason that can be given for assuming the Soul of Nature to be pure,

MoM References, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Oatley, K. (1994). A taxonomy of the emotions of literary response and a theory of identification in Fictional narrative. Poetics, 23, 53-74.
  Obrist, P.A., Light, K.C., Langer, A.W., Grignolo, A., & McCubbin, J.A. (1978). Behavioural-cardiac interactions: The psychosomatic hypothesis. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 22, 301-325.
  --
  Vaihinger, H. (1924). The philosophy of as if: A system of the theoretical, practical, and religious Fictions of mankind (C.K. Ogden, Trans.). New York: Harcourt, Brace, and Company.
  Vinogradova, O. (1961). The orientation reaction and its neuropsychological mechanisms. Moscow:

Partial Magic in the Quixote, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  suggest that if the characters of a Fictional work can be readers or spectators,
  we, its readers or spectators, can be fictitious. In 1833, Carlyle observed that

Phaedo, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  21. The ethical proof of the immortality of the soul is derived from the necessity of retri bution. The wicked would be too well off if their evil deeds came to an end. It is not to be supposed that an Ardiaeus, an Archelaus, an Ismenias could ever have suffered the penalty of their crimes in this world. The manner in which this retri bution is accomplished Plato represents under the figures of mythology. Doubtless he felt that it was easier to improve than to invent, and that in religion especially the traditional form was required in order to give verisimilitude to the myth. The myth too is far more probable to that age than to ours, and may fairly be regarded as 'one guess among many' about the nature of the earth, which he cleverly supports by the indications of geology. Not that he insists on the absolute truth of his own particular notions: 'no man of sense will be confident in such matters; but he will be confident that something of the kind is true.' As in other passages (Gorg., Tim., compare Crito), he wins belief for his Fictions by the moderation of his statements; he does not, like Dante or Swedenborg, allow himself to be deceived by his own creations.
  The Dialogue must be read in the light of the situation. And first of all we are struck by the calmness of the scene. Like the spectators at the time, we cannot pity Socrates; his mien and his language are so noble and fearless. He is the same that he ever was, but milder and gentler, and he has in no degree lost his interest in dialectics; he will not forego the delight of an argument in compliance with the jailer's intimation that he should not heat himself with talking. At such a time he naturally expresses the hope of his life, that he has been a true mystic and not a mere retainer or wand-bearer: and he refers to passages of his personal history. To his old enemies the Comic poets, and to the proceedings on the trial, he alludes playfully; but he vividly remembers the disappointment which he felt in reading the books of Anaxagoras. The return of Xanthippe and his children indicates that the philosopher is not 'made of oak or rock.' Some other traits of his character may be noted; for example, the courteous manner in which he inclines his head to the last objector, or the ironical touch, 'Me already, as the tragic poet would say, the voice of fate calls;' or the depreciation of the arguments with which 'he comforted himself and them;' or his fear of 'misology;' or his references to Homer; or the playful smile with which he 'talks like a book' about greater and less; or the allusion to the possibility of finding another teacher among barbarous races (compare Polit.); or the mysterious reference to another science (mathematics?) of generation and destruction for which he is vainly feeling. There is no change in him; only now he is invested with a sort of sacred character, as the prophet or priest of Apollo the God of the festival, in whose honour he first of all composes a hymn, and then like the swan pours forth his dying lay. Perhaps the extreme elevation of Socrates above his own situation, and the ordinary interests of life (compare his jeu d'esprit about his burial, in which for a moment he puts on the 'Silenus mask'), create in the mind of the reader an impression stronger than could be derived from arguments that such a one has in him 'a principle which does not admit of death.'

r1914 11 04, #Record of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
   In dream, there was once more absolute & long coherence, other dreams supplying omitted & collateral parts of the first, & entire absence of present ego & associations. But all was in the nature of a tale or Fiction, rather than actual event.
   In swapna samadhi, there was long continued coherent conversation, not sufficiently sthula, & rather in the nature of a monologue.

Sayings of Sri Ramakrishna (text), #Sayings of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  of the Absolute in Samadhi. Then alone are set at rest for ever all such questions of delusion and nondelusion, fact and Fiction.
  848. As long as you are a person, your Absolute must imply a 'relative', your Nitya (the Changeless),

Sophist, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  There is little worthy of remark in the characters of the Sophist. The most noticeable point is the final retirement of Socrates from the field of argument, and the substitution for him of an Eleatic stranger, who is described as a pupil of Parmenides and Zeno, and is supposed to have descended from a higher world in order to convict the Socratic circle of error. As in the Timaeus, Plato seems to intimate by the withdrawal of Socrates that he is passing beyond the limits of his teaching; and in the Sophist and Statesman, as well as in the Parmenides, he probably means to imply that he is making a closer approach to the schools of Elea and Megara. He had much in common with them, but he must first submit their ideas to criticism and revision. He had once thought as he says, speaking by the mouth of the Eleatic, that he understood their doctrine of Not-being; but now he does not even comprehend the nature of Being. The friends of ideas (Soph.) are alluded to by him as distant acquaintances, whom he criticizes ab extra; we do not recognize at first sight that he is criticizing himself. The character of the Eleatic stranger is colourless; he is to a certain extent the reflection of his father and master, Parmenides, who is the protagonist in the dialogue which is called by his name. Theaetetus himself is not distinguished by the remarkable traits which are attributed to him in the preceding dialogue. He is no longer under the spell of Socrates, or subject to the operation of his midwifery, though the Fiction of question and answer is still maintained, and the necessity of taking Theaetetus along with him is several times insisted upon by his partner in the discussion. There is a reminiscence of the old Theaetetus in his remark that he will not tire of the argument, and in his conviction, which the Eleatic thinks likely to be permanent, that the course of events is governed by the will of God. Throughout the two dialogues Socrates continues a silent auditor, in the Statesman just reminding us of his presence, at the commencement, by a characteristic jest about the statesman and the philosopher, and by an allusion to his namesake, with whom on that ground he claims relationship, as he had already claimed an affinity with Theaetetus, grounded on the likeness of his ugly face. But in neither dialogue, any more than in the Timaeus, does he offer any criticism on the views which are propounded by another.
  The style, though wanting in dramatic power,in this respect resembling the Philebus and the Laws,is very clear and accurate, and has several touches of humour and satire. The language is less fanciful and imaginative than that of the earlier dialogues; and there is more of bitterness, as in the Laws, though traces of a similar temper may also be observed in the description of the 'great brute' in the Republic, and in the contrast of the lawyer and philosopher in the Theaetetus. The following are characteristic passages: 'The ancient philosophers, of whom we may say, without offence, that they went on their way rather regardless of whether we understood them or not;' the picture of the materialists, or earth-born giants, 'who grasped oaks and rocks in their hands,' and who must be improved before they can be reasoned with; and the equally humourous delineation of the friends of ideas, who defend themselves from a fastness in the invisible world; or the comparison of the Sophist to a painter or maker (compare Republic), and the hunt after him in the rich meadow-lands of youth and wealth; or, again, the light and graceful touch with which the older philosophies are painted ('Ionian and Sicilian muses'), the comparison of them to mythological tales, and the fear of the Eleatic that he will be counted a parricide if he ventures to lay hands on his father Parmenides; or, once more, the likening of the Eleatic stranger to a god from heaven.All these passages, notwithstanding the decline of the style, retain the impress of the great master of language. But the equably diffused grace is gone; instead of the endless variety of the early dialogues, traces of the rhythmical monotonous cadence of the Laws begin to appear; and already an approach is made to the technical language of Aristotle, in the frequent use of the words 'essence,' 'power,' 'generation,' 'motion,' 'rest,' 'action,' 'passion,' and the like.

Symposium translated by B Jowett, #Symposium, #Plato, #Philosophy
  The divine image of beauty which resides within Socrates has been revealed; the Silenus, or outward man, has now to be exhibited. The description of Socrates follows immediately after the speech of Socrates; one is the complement of the other. At the height of divine inspiration, when the force of nature can no further go, by way of contrast to this extreme idealism, Alcibiades, accompanied by a troop of revellers and a flute-girl, staggers in, and being drunk is able to tell of things which he would have been ashamed to make known if he had been sober. The state of his affections towards Socrates, unintelligible to us and perverted as they appear, affords an illustration of the power ascribed to the loves of man in the speech of Pausanias. He does not suppose his feelings to be peculiar to himself: there are several other persons in the company who have been equally in love with Socrates, and like himself have been deceived by him. The singular part of this confession is the combination of the most degrading passion with the desire of virtue and improvement. Such an union is not wholly untrue to human nature, which is capable of combining good and evil in a degree beyond what we can easily conceive. In imaginative persons, especially, the God and beast in man seem to part asunder more than is natural in a well-regulated mind. The Platonic Socrates (for of the real Socrates this may be doubted: compare his public rebuke of Critias for his shameful love of Euthydemus in Xenophon, Memorabilia) does not regard the greatest evil of Greek life as a thing not to be spoken of; but it has a ridiculous element (Plato's Symp.), and is a subject for irony, no less than for moral reprobation (compare Plato's Symp.). It is also used as a figure of speech which no one interpreted literally (compare Xen. Symp.). Nor does Plato feel any repugnance, such as would be felt in modern times, at bringing his great master and hero into connexion with nameless crimes. He is contented with representing him as a saint, who has won 'the Olympian victory' over the temptations of human nature. The fault of taste, which to us is so glaring and which was recognized by the Greeks of a later age (Athenaeus), was not perceived by Plato himself. We are still more surprised to find that the philosopher is incited to take the first step in his upward progress (Symp.) by the beauty of young men and boys, which was alone capable of inspiring the modern feeling of romance in the Greek mind. The passion of love took the spurious form of an enthusiasm for the ideal of beautya worship as of some godlike image of an Apollo or Antinous. But the love of youth when not depraved was a love of virtue and modesty as well as of beauty, the one being the expression of the other; and in certain Greek states, especially at Sparta and Thebes, the honourable attachment of a youth to an elder man was a part of his education. The 'army of lovers and their beloved who would be invincible if they could be united by such a tie' (Symp.), is not a mere Fiction of Plato's, but seems actually to have existed at Thebes in the days of Epaminondas and Pelopidas, if we may believe writers cited anonymously by Plutarch, Pelop. Vit. It is observable that Plato never in the least degree excuses the depraved love of the body (compare Charm.; Rep.; Laws; Symp.; and once more Xenophon, Mem.), nor is there any Greek writer of mark who condones or approves such connexions. But owing partly to the puzzling nature of the subject these friendships are spoken of by Plato in a manner different from that customary among ourselves. To most of them we should hesitate to ascribe, any more than to the attachment of Achilles and Patroclus in Homer, an immoral or licentious character. There were many, doubtless, to whom the love of the fair mind was the noblest form of friendship (Rep.), and who deemed the friendship of man with man to be higher than the love of woman, because altogether separated from the bodily appetites. The existence of such attachments may be reasonably attri buted to the inferiority and seclusion of woman, and the want of a real family or social life and parental influence in Hellenic cities; and they were encouraged by the practice of gymnastic exercises, by the meetings of political clubs, and by the tie of military companionship. They were also an educational institution: a young person was specially entrusted by his parents to some elder friend who was expected by them to train their son in manly exercises and in virtue. It is not likely that a Greek parent committed him to a lover, any more than we should to a schoolmaster, in the expectation that he would be corrupted by him, but rather in the hope that his morals would be better cared for than was possible in a great household of slaves.
  It is difficult to adduce the authority of Plato either for or against such practices or customs, because it is not always easy to determine whether he is speaking of 'the heavenly and philosophical love, or of the coarse Polyhymnia:' and he often refers to this (e.g. in the Symposium) half in jest, yet 'with a certain degree of seriousness.' We observe that they entered into one part of Greek literature, but not into another, and that the larger part is free from such associations. Indecency was an element of the ludicrous in the old Greek Comedy, as it has been in other ages and countries. But effeminate love was always condemned as well as ridiculed by the Comic poets; and in the New Comedy the allusions to such topics have disappeared. They seem to have been no longer tolerated by the greater refinement of the age. False sentiment is found in the Lyric and Elegiac poets; and in mythology 'the greatest of the Gods' (Rep.) is not exempt from evil imputations. But the morals of a nation are not to be judged of wholly by its literature. Hellas was not necessarily more corrupted in the days of the Persian and Peloponnesian wars, or of Plato and the Orators, than England in the time of Fielding and Smollett, or France in the nineteenth century. No one supposes certain French novels to be a representation of ordinary French life. And the greater part of Greek literature, beginning with Homer and including the tragedians, philosophers, and, with the exception of the Comic poets (whose business was to raise a laugh by whatever means), all the greater writers of Hellas who have been preserved to us, are free from the taint of indecency.

Talks 026-050, #Talks, #Sri Ramana Maharshi, #Hinduism
    D.: Do they possess a vyavahara satya, i.e., phenomenal existence, like my body? Or are they Fictions like the horn of a hare?
    M.: They do exist.
  --
    D.: But I can create pure Fictions e.g., hares horn or only part truths, e.g. mirage, while there are also facts irrespective of my imagination. Do the gods Iswara or Vishnu exist like that?
    M.: Yes.

Talks 500-550, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi with the name. Therefore the name signifies something and it is not a mere Fiction. Similarly, God's name is effective. Repetition of the name is remembrance of what it signifies. Hence its merit.
  But the man did not look satisfied. Finally he wanted to retire and prayed for Sri Bhagavan's Grace.

Talks With Sri Aurobindo 1, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  SRI AUROBINDO: What about Shakespeare's statement that poetry creates Fictions, tells lies?
  DR. MANILAL: He is not a poet of that sort. How is it that some people lose at
  --
  tuals. The Fiction is that it is the majority that rules, but the fact that it is the
  minority, the aristocracy. Life shows again that the rule of the monarch or

The Act of Creation text, #The Act of Creation, #Arthur Koestler, #Psychology
  cal novel, and so on into the abyss of pure Fiction. As we move along
  the sloping curve, the dimension of 'objective verifiability' is seen to
  --
  is a useful Fiction. However much its definitions and connotations
  ,, differ according to various schools it has in fact been the central
  --
  best thing in Fiction the English have ever done." '
  Nearly all the stories that I have quoted show the technique of
  --
  in popular Fiction from Jules Verne's Captain Nemo and H. G. Wells'
  Dr. Moreau to Caligari, Frankenstein, and the monsters of the horror-
  --
  and the mummified dons of Anglo-Saxon Fiction. At his worst, he
  incarnates the pathological aspects in the development of science:
  --
  we strip them of the gaudy adornments which folklore and Fiction
  bestowed upon them, the figure of the Black Magician will turn out to
  --
  To p. 2$o. In the only excursion into science Fiction of which I am guilty, I
  made a visiting maiden from an alien planet explain the basic doctrine of its
  --
  or the absence of sex in Victorian Fiction.
  The measure of an artist's originality, put into the simplest terms, is
  --
  But in a Fiction, in a dream of passion,
  Could force his soul so to his own conceit
  --
  hates, or loves the Fictional character. In order to love or hate some-
  thing which exists only as a series of signs made with printer's ink, the
  --
  must be all the more true regarding our images of Fictional characters
  which lack any sensory basis. A character may indeed be 'alive' with
  --
  descriptions whether factual or Fictional (or a combination of both).
  The dream knows no distinction between factual and fictitious charac-
  --
  bringing a Fictional character alive in our minds mainly by the nature
  of the pointers. A bland face at a cocktail party uttering the conven-
  --
  flesh. The distinction between fact and Fiction is a late acquisition of
  rational thought unknown to the unconscious, and largely ignored
  --
  Dimitri Karamazov, or any of the countless heroes of Fiction who
  progress through crisis to awakening. For I must repeat that Jonah's
  --
  'pure vision', unsullied by any meaning. The 'innocent eye' is a Fiction,
  based on the absurd notion that what we perceive in the present can be
  --
  blurred; they became for me a Fiction, and then they disappeared
  altogether, or rather they were transformed into all kinds of
  --
  ton considered as no more than a 'useful Fiction , has become an
  anachronism * The Pavlovian conditioned reflex was another useful
  --
  various other parts ... the simple reflex is a convenient, if not a probable, Fiction*
  (Sherrington, 1906, p. 8).
  --
  Which, When Rightly Understood, Go Far In Breaking Down the Fiction
  That There Is Any Such Thing As "Mental" Life.' In this chapter, the

Theaetetus, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Within or behind space there is another abstraction in many respects similar to ittime, the form of the inward, as space is the form of the outward. As we cannot think of outward objects of sense or of outward sensations without space, so neither can we think of a succession of sensations without time. It is the vacancy of thoughts or sensations, as space is the void of outward objects, and we can no more imagine the mind without the one than the world without the other. It is to arithmetic what space is to geometry; or, more strictly, arithmetic may be said to be equally applicable to both. It is defined in our minds, partly by the analogy of space and partly by the recollection of events which have happened to us, or the consciousness of feelings which we are experiencing. Like space, it is without limit, for whatever beginning or end of time we fix, there is a beginning and end before them, and so on without end. We speak of a past, present, and future, and again the analogy of space assists us in conceiving of them as coexistent. When the limit of time is removed there arises in our minds the idea of eternity, which at first, like time itself, is only negative, but gradually, when connected with the world and the divine nature, like the other negative infinity of space, becomes positive. Whether time is prior to the mind and to experience, or coeval with them, is (like the parallel question about space) unmeaning. Like space it has been realized gradually: in the Homeric poems, or even in the Hesiodic cosmogony, there is no more notion of time than of space. The conception of being is more general than either, and might therefore with greater plausibility be affirmed to be a condition or quality of the mind. The a priori intuitions of Kant would have been as unintelligible to Plato as his a priori synthetical propositions to Aristotle. The philosopher of Konigsberg supposed himself to be analyzing a necessary mode of thought: he was not aware that he was dealing with a mere abstraction. But now that we are able to trace the gradual developement of ideas through religion, through language, through abstractions, why should we interpose the Fiction of time between ourselves and realities? Why should we single out one of these abstractions to be the a priori condition of all the others? It comes last and not first in the order of our thoughts, and is not the condition precedent of them, but the last generalization of them. Nor can any principle be imagined more suicidal to philosophy than to assume that all the truth which we are capable of attaining is seen only through an unreal medium. If all that exists in time is illusion, we may well ask with Plato, 'What becomes of the mind?'
  Leaving the a priori conditions of sensation we may proceed to consider acts of sense. These admit of various degrees of duration or intensity; they admit also of a greater or less extension from one object, which is perceived directly, to many which are perceived indirectly or in a less degree, and to the various associations of the object which are latent in the mind. In general the greater the intension the less the extension of them. The simplest sensation implies some relation of objects to one another, some position in space, some relation to a previous or subsequent sensation. The acts of seeing and hearing may be almost unconscious and may pass away unnoted; they may also leave an impression behind them or power of recalling them. If, after seeing an object we shut our eyes, the object remains dimly seen in the same or about the same place, but with form and lineaments half filled up. This is the simplest act of memory. And as we cannot see one thing without at the same time seeing another, different objects hang together in recollection, and when we call for one the other quickly follows. To think of the place in which we have last seen a thing is often the best way of recalling it to the mind. Hence memory is dependent on association. The act of recollection may be compared to the sight of an object at a great distance which we have previously seen near and seek to bring near to us in thought. Memory is to sense as dreaming is to waking; and like dreaming has a wayward and uncertain power of recalling impressions from the past.
  --
  The system which has thus arisen appears to be a kind of metaphysic narrowed to the point of view of the individual mind, through which, as through some new optical instrument limiting the sphere of vision, the interior of thought and sensation is examined. But the individual mind in the abstract, as distinct from the mind of a particular individual and separated from the environment of circumstances, is a Fiction only. Yet facts which are partly true gather around this Fiction and are naturally described by the help of it. There is also a common type of the mind which is derived from the comparison of many minds with one another and with our own. The phenomena of which Psychology treats are familiar to us, but they are for the most part indefinite; they relate to a something inside the body, which seems also to overleap the limits of space. The operations of this something, when isolated, cannot be analyzed by us or subjected to observation and experiment. And there is another point to be considered. The mind, when thinking, cannot survey that part of itself which is used in thought. It can only be contemplated in the past, that is to say, in the history of the individual or of the world. This is the scientific method of studying the mind. But Psychology has also some other supports, specious rather than real. It is partly sustained by the false analogy of Physical Science and has great expectations from its near relationship to Physiology. We truly remark that there is an infinite complexity of the body corresponding to the infinite subtlety of the mind; we are conscious that they are very nearly connected. But in endeavouring to trace the nature of the connexion we are baffled and disappointed. In our knowledge of them the gulf remains the same: no microscope has ever seen into thought; no reflection on ourselves has supplied the missing link between mind and matter...These are the conditions of this very inexact science, and we shall only know less of it by pretending to know more, or by assigning to it a form or style to which it has not yet attained and is not really entitled.
  Experience shows that any system, however baseless and ineffectual, in our own or in any other age, may be accepted and continue to be studied, if it seeks to satisfy some unanswered question or is based upon some ancient tradition, especially if it takes the form and uses the language of inductive philosophy. The fact therefore that such a science exists and is popular, affords no evidence of its truth or value. Many who have pursued it far into detail have never examined the foundations on which it rests. The have been many imaginary subjects of knowledge of which enthusiastic persons have made a lifelong study, without ever asking themselves what is the evidence for them, what is the use of them, how long they will last? They may pass away, like the authors of them, and 'leave not a wrack behind;' or they may survive in fragments. Nor is it only in the Middle Ages, or in the literary desert of China or of India, that such systems have arisen; in our own enlightened age, growing up by the side of Physics, Ethics, and other really progressive sciences, there is a weary waste of knowledge, falsely so-called. There are sham sciences which no logic has ever put to the test, in which the desire for knowledge invents the materials of it.

The Aleph, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
    As in many of Borges' short stories, the protagonist is a Fictionalized version of the author. At the beginning of the story, he is mourning the recent death of a woman whom he loved, named Beatriz Viterbo, and resolves to stop by the house of her family to pay his respects. Over time, he comes to know her first cousin, Carlos Argentino Daneri, a mediocre poet with a vastly exaggerated view of his own talent who has made it his lifelong quest to write an epic poem that describes every single location on the planet in excruciatingly fine detail.
    Later in the story, a business on the same street attempts to tear down Daneri's house in the course of its expansion. Daneri becomes enraged, explaining to the narrator that he must keep the house in order to finish his poem, because the cellar contains an Aleph which he is using to write the poem. Though by now he believes Daneri to be quite insane, the narrator proposes without waiting for an answer to come to the house and see for himself.
  --
  I arrive now at the ineffable core of my story. And here begins my despair as a writer. All language is a set of symbols whose use among its speakers assumes a shared past. How, then, can I translate into words the limitless Aleph, which my floundering mind can scarcely encompass? Mystics, faced with the same problem, fall back on symbols: to signify the godhead, one Persian speaks of a bird that somehow is all birds; Alanus de Insulis, of a sphere whose center is everywhere and circumference is nowhere; Ezekiel, of a four-faced angel who at one and the same time moves east and west, north and south. (Not in vain do I recall these inconceivable analogies; they bear some relation to the Aleph.) Perhaps the gods might grant me a similar metaphor, but then this account would become contaminated by literature, by Fiction. Really, what I want to do is impossible, for any listing of an endless series is doomed to be infinitesimal. In that single gigantic instant I saw millions of acts both delightful and awful; not one of them occupied the same point in space, without overlapping or transparency. What my eyes beheld was simultaneous, but what I shall now write down will be successive, because language is successive. Nonetheless, I'll try to recollect what I can.
  On the back part of the step, toward the right, I saw a small iridescent sphere of almost unbearable brilliance. At first I thought it was revolving; then I realised that this movement was an illusion created by the dizzying world it bounded. The Aleph's diameter was probably little more than an inch, but all space was there, actual and undiminished. Each thing (a mirror's face, let us say) was infinite things, since I distinctly saw it from every angle of the universe. I saw the teeming sea; I saw daybreak and nightfall; I saw the multitudes of America; I saw a silvery cobweb in the center of a black pyramid; I saw a splintered labyrinth (it was London); I saw, close up, unending eyes watching themselves in me as in a mirror; I saw all the mirrors on earth and none of them reflected me; I saw in a backyard of Soler Street the same tiles that thirty years before I'd seen in the entrance of a house in Fray Bentos; I saw bunches of grapes, snow, tobacco, lodes of metal, steam; I saw convex equatorial deserts and each one of their grains of sand; I saw a woman in Inverness whom I shall never forget; I saw her tangled hair, her tall figure, I saw the cancer in her breast; I saw a ring of baked mud in a sidewalk, where before there had been a tree; I saw a summer house in Adrogu and a copy of the first English translation of Pliny -- Philemon Holland's -- and all at the same time saw each letter on each page (as a boy, I used to marvel that the letters in a closed book did not get scrambled and lost overnight); I saw a sunset in Quertaro that seemed to reflect the colour of a rose in Bengal; I saw my empty bedroom; I saw in a closet in Alkmaar a terrestrial globe between two mirrors that multiplied it endlessly; I saw horses with flowing manes on a shore of the Caspian Sea at dawn; I saw the delicate bone structure of a hand; I saw the survivors of a battle sending out picture postcards; I saw in a showcase in Mirzapur a pack of Spanish playing cards; I saw the slanting shadows of ferns on a greenhouse floor; I saw tigers, pistons, bison, tides, and armies; I saw all the ants on the planet; I saw a Persian astrolabe; I saw in the drawer of a writing table (and the handwriting made me tremble) unbelievable, obscene, detailed letters, which Beatriz had written to Carlos Argentino; I saw a monument I worshipped in the Chacarita cemetery; I saw the rotted dust and bones that had once deliciously been Beatriz Viterbo; I saw the circulation of my own dark blood; I saw the coupling of love and the modification of death; I saw the Aleph from every point and angle, and in the Aleph I saw the earth and in the earth the Aleph and in the Aleph the earth; I saw my own face and my own bowels; I saw your face; and I felt dizzy and wept, for my eyes had seen that secret and conjectured object whose name is common to all men but which no man has looked upon -- the unimaginable universe.

The Dwellings of the Philosophers, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  preparation of mercury under the Fiction of a nymph who guides and directs him in this labor.
  As for Nicolas Flamel, he strays from the beaten paths and time-honored fables; more original
  --
  with him a copy of the images, is a work of the same nature and similar quality. Thus Fiction,
  substituted for reality, takes shape and asserts itself as the trip toward Compostella. We know
  --
  skillful and very ingenious Fiction of the alchemical labor which the charitable and to which
  the learned man devoted himself. What remains now is to speak of the mysterious work, of
  --
  body, and two, the other the metallic body. This external similitude further reconciles Fiction
  with physical reality, but resolutely deviates from operative esotericism.
  --
  this Fictional character, of incontestably hermetic characteristics, were for the initiates marked
  with the symbolic seal, and devoted to alchemical esotericism.
  --
  ask to explain to us what Aristotles master wanted to reveal by this Fiction of a sinister
  nature. For we indeed believe that beyond doubt, Plate became the propagator of very ancient

The Fearful Sphere of Pascal, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  Xenophanes had denounced were demoted to figures of poetic Fiction, or to
  demonsalthough it was reported that one of them, Hermes Trismegistus,

The Garden of Forking Paths 1, #Selected Fictions, #unset, #Zen
  "Naturally, my attention was caught by the sentence, 'I leave to various future times, but not to all, my garden of forking paths: I had no sooner read this, than I understood. The Garden of Forking Paths was the chaotic novel itself. The phrase 'to various future times, but not to all' suggested the image of bifurcating in time, not in space. Rereading the whole work confirmed this theory. In all Fiction, when a man is faced with alternatives he chooses one at the expense of the others. In the almost unfathomable Ts'ui Pen, he chooses - simultaneously - all of them. He thus creates various futures, various times which start others that will in their turn branch out and bifurcate in other times. This is the cause of the contradictions in the novel.
  "Fang, let us say, has a secret. A stranger knocks at his door. Fang makes up his mind to kill him. Naturally there are various possible outcomes. Fang can kill the intruder, the intruder can kill Fang, both can be saved, both can die and so on and so on. In

The Garden of Forking Paths 2, #Selected Fictions, #unset, #Zen
  "Before unearthing this letter, I had questioned myself about the ways in which a book can be infinite. I could think of nothing other than a cyclic volume, a circular one. A book whose last page was identical with the first, a book which had the possibility of continuing indefinitely. I remembered too that night which is at the middle of the Thousand and One Nights when Scheherazade (through a magical oversight of the copyist) begins to relate word for word the story of the Thousand and One Nights, establishing the risk of coming once again to the night when she must repeat it, and thus on to infinity. I imagined as well a Platonic, hereditary work, transmitted from father to son, in which each new individual adds a chapter or corrects with pious care the pages of his elders. These conjectures diverted me; but none seemed to correspond, not even remotely, to the contradictory chapters of Ts'ui Pen. In the midst of this perplexity, I received from Oxford the manuscript you have examined. I lingered, naturally, on the sentence: I leave to the various futures (not to all) my garden of forking paths. Almost instantly, I understood: 'the garden of forking paths' was the chaotic novel; the phrase 'the various futures (not to all)' suggested to me the forking in time, not in space. A broad rereading of the work confirmed the theory. In all Fictional works, each time a man is confronted with several alternatives, he chooses one and eliminates the others; in the Fiction of Ts'ui Pen, he chooses-simultaneously-all of them. He creates, in this way, diverse futures, diverse times which themselves also proliferate and fork. Here, then, is the explanation of the novel's contradictions. Fang, let us say, has a secret; a stranger calls at his door; Fang resolves to kill him. Naturally, there are several possible outcomes: Fang can kill the intruder, the intruder can kill Fang, they both can escape, they both can die, and so forth. In the work of Ts'ui Pen, all possible outcomes occur; each one is the point of departure for other forkings. Sometimes, the paths of this labyrinth converge: for example, you arrive at this house, but in one of the possible pasts you are my enemy, in another, my friend. If you will resign yourself to my incurable pronunciation, we shall read a few pages."
  His face, within the vivid circle of the lamplight, was unquestionably that of an old man, but with something unalterable about it, even immortal. He read with slow precision two versions of the same epic chapter. In the first, an army marches to a battle across a lonely mountain; the horror of the rocks and shadows makes the men undervalue their lives and they gain an easy victory. In the second, the same army traverses a palace where a great festival is taking place; the resplendent battle seems to them a continuation of the celebration and they win the victory. I listened with proper veneration to these ancient narratives, perhaps less admirable in themselves than the fact that they had been created by my blood and were being restored to me by a man of a remote empire, in the course of a desperate adventure, on a Western isle. I remember the last words, repeated in each version like a secret commandment: Thus fought the heroes, tranquil their admirable hearts, violent their swords, resigned to kill and to die.

The Immortal, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  class book:Collected Fictions
  class:short story
  --
    The story ends with a brief postscript which discusses the Fictional book A Coat of Many Colours by Dr. Nahum Cordovero, which argues that the tale of Rufus/Cartaphilus is apocryphal, on the basis of its interpolations of texts by Pliny, Thomas de Quincey, Rene Descartes, and George Bernard Shaw. The postscript ends with the unknown author of the postscript rejecting Cordovero's claim.
  ------

The Logomachy of Zos, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  Any fact or Fiction has no difficulty in finding relatables as supporting
  reality when instantly and simultaneous to time and place. Our difficulty
  --
  (Our) Fictions constantly interacting create a co-essential supposition,
  seek blood, joi
  --
  (whether Fictional or non- Fictional, either will serve).
  dress, of masquerading, is true translatable
  symbolism: one Fiction guising another.
  There are conventions of asking, giving, receiving and taking. How remiss
  --
  A Fictions is unattri butable to anything known and nothing is known for
  certain.
  --
  and striving for realization, yet always originating through the Fictional
  supposition from reality. Thus Man creates his conceptions from his
  --
  We distort facts into Fictions and our Fictions serve as facts: Truth.
  "Suggestio falsi": But to my naive mind, a naked bottom is a naked
  --
  The State, the Community, and Democracy are Fictions- a small and
  greedy hierarchy well hidden by political and religious facades, with all
  --
  In a mad world mad Fictions almost become essential, and I, for one,
  believe that it is not essential to survival to have such madness.
  --
   Fictions are provable, or not, by such casuistry. Our Fiction of geometry
  must therefore be our method of proving Fictional evaluations.
  From the amoral phenomenal world we form our ethics. If (as usually
  --
  The phenomenal is the positivistic Fiction
  of thought, the absolute negation of reality. Therefore, the Cosmos-
  --
  is often to marry a Fiction. Our work and behaviour is the truer portrait,
  When thought dissociates itself from the correspondences and gradations

The Lottery in Babylon, #Labyrinths, #Jorge Luis Borges, #Poetry
  Our historians, the orb's most perspicacious, have invented a method for correcting chance. It is well known that the operations of this method are (in general) trustworthy; although, naturally, they are not divulged without a measure of deceit. In any case, there is nothing so contaminated with Fiction as the history of the Company...
  A paleographic document, exhumed in a temple, could well be the result of a drawing from the previous day or the previous century. No book is published without some variation between copies. Scribes take a secret oath to omit, interpolate, vary. Indirect falsehood is also practiced.

The One Who Walks Away, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  The application of those two sentences to this story, and to science Fiction, and to all thinking
  about the future, is quite direct. Ideals as "the probable causes of future experience"-that is

Timaeus, #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  One more aspect of the Timaeus remains to be consideredthe mythological or geographical. Is it not a wonderful thing that a few pages of one of Plato's dialogues have grown into a great legend, not confined to Greece only, but spreading far and wide over the nations of Europe and reaching even to Egypt and Asia? Like the tale of Troy, or the legend of the Ten Tribes (Ewald, Hist. of Isr.), which perhaps originated in a few verses of II Esdras, it has become famous, because it has coincided with a great historical fact. Like the romance of King Arthur, which has had so great a charm, it has found a way over the seas from one country and language to another. It inspired the navigators of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries; it foreshadowed the discovery of America. It realized the Fiction so natural to the human mind, because it answered the enquiry about the origin of the arts, that there had somewhere existed an ancient primitive civilization. It might find a place wherever men chose to look for it; in North, South, East, or West; in the Islands of the Blest; before the entrance of the Straits of Gibraltar, in Sweden or in Palestine. It mattered little whether the description in Plato agreed with the locality assigned to it or not. It was a legend so adapted to the human mind that it made a habitation for itself in any country. It was an island in the clouds, which might be seen anywhere by the eye of faith. It was a subject especially congenial to the ponderous industry of certain French and Swedish writers, who delighted in heaping up learning of all sorts but were incapable of using it.
  M. Martin has written a valuable dissertation on the opinions entertained respecting the Island of Atlantis in ancient and modern times. It is a curious chapter in the history of the human mind. The tale of Atlantis is the fabric of a vision, but it has never ceased to interest mankind. It was variously regarded by the ancients themselves. The stronger heads among them, like Strabo and Longinus, were as little disposed to believe in the truth of it as the modern reader in Gulliver or Robinson Crusoe. On the other hand there is no kind or degree of absurdity or fancy in which the more foolish writers, both of antiquity and of modern times, have not indulged respecting it. The Neo-Platonists, loyal to their master, like some commentators on the Christian Scriptures, sought to give an allegorical meaning to what they also believed to be an historical fact. It was as if some one in our own day were to convert the poems of Homer into an allegory of the Christian religion, at the same time maintaining them to be an exact and veritable history. In the Middle Ages the legend seems to have been half-forgotten until revived by the discovery of America. It helped to form the Utopia of Sir Thomas More and the New Atlantis of Bacon, although probably neither of those great men were at all imposed upon by the Fiction. It was most prolific in the seventeenth or in the early part of the eighteenth century, when the human mind, seeking for Utopias or inventing them, was glad to escape out of the dulness of the present into the romance of the past or some ideal of the future. The later forms of such narratives contained features taken from the Edda, as well as from the Old and New Testament; also from the tales of missionaries and the experiences of travellers and of colonists.
  The various opinions respecting the Island of Atlantis have no interest for us except in so far as they illustrate the extravagances of which men are capable. But this is a real interest and a serious lesson, if we remember that now as formerly the human mind is liable to be imposed upon by the illusions of the past, which are ever assuming some new form.
  --
  Secondly, passing from the external to the internal evidence, we may remark that the story is far more likely to have been invented by Plato than to have been brought by Solon from Egypt. That is another part of his legend which Plato also seeks to impose upon us. The verisimilitude which he has given to the tale is a further reason for suspecting it; for he could easily 'invent Egyptian or any other tales' (Phaedrus). Are not the words, 'The truth of the story is a great advantage,' if we read between the lines, an indication of the Fiction? It is only a legend that Solon went to Egypt, and if he did he could not have conversed with Egyptian priests or have read records in their temples. The truth is that the introduction is a mosaic work of small touches which, partly by their minuteness, and also by their seeming probability, win the confidence of the reader. Who would desire better evidence than that of Critias, who had heard the narrative in youth when the memory is strongest at the age of ten from his grandfa ther Critias, an old man of ninety, who in turn had heard it from Solon himself? Is not the famous expression'You Hellenes are ever children and there is no knowledge among you hoary with age,' really a compliment to the Athenians who are described in these words as 'ever young'? And is the thought expressed in them to be attri buted to the learning of the Egyptian priest, and not rather to the genius of Plato? Or when the Egyptian says'Hereafter at our leisure we will take up the written documents and examine in detail the exact truth about these things'what is this but a literary trick by which Plato sets off his narrative? Could any war between Athens and the Island of Atlantis have really coincided with the struggle between the Greeks and Persians, as is sufficiently hinted though not expressly stated in the narrative of Plato? And whence came the tradition to Egypt? or in what does the story consist except in the war between the two rival powers and the submersion of both of them? And how was the tale transferred to the poem of Solon? 'It is not improbable,' says Mr. Grote, 'that Solon did leave an unfinished Egyptian poem' (Plato). But are probabilities for which there is not a tittle of evidence, and which are without any parallel, to be deemed worthy of attention by the critic? How came the poem of Solon to disappear in antiquity? or why did Plato, if the whole narrative was known to him, break off almost at the beginning of it?
  While therefore admiring the diligence and erudition of M. Martin, we cannot for a moment suppose that the tale was told to Solon by an Egyptian priest, nor can we believe that Solon wrote a poem upon the theme which was thus suggested to hima poem which disappeared in antiquity; or that the Island of Atlantis or the antediluvian Athens ever had any existence except in the imagination of Plato. Martin is of opinion that Plato would have been terrified if he could have foreseen the endless fancies to which his Island of Atlantis has given occasion. Rather he would have been infinitely amused if he could have known that his gift of invention would have deceived M. Martin himself into the belief that the tradition was brought from Egypt by Solon and made the subject of a poem by him. M. Martin may also be gently censured for citing without sufficient discrimination ancient authors having very different degrees of authority and value.
  --
  And therefore, as Hermocrates has told you, on my way home yesterday I at once communicated the tale to my companions as I remembered it; and after I left them, during the night by thinking I recovered nearly the whole of it. Truly, as is often said, the lessons of our childhood make a wonderful impression on our memories; for I am not sure that I could remember all the discourse of yesterday, but I should be much surprised if I forgot any of these things which I have heard very long ago. I listened at the time with childlike interest to the old man's narrative; he was very ready to teach me, and I asked him again and again to repeat his words, so that like an indelible picture they were branded into my mind. As soon as the day broke, I rehearsed them as he spoke them to my companions, that they, as well as myself, might have something to say. And now, Socrates, to make an end of my preface, I am ready to tell you the whole tale. I will give you not only the general heads, but the particulars, as they were told to me. The city and citizens, which you yesterday described to us in Fiction, we will now transfer to the world of reality. It shall be the ancient city of Athens, and we will suppose that the citizens whom you imagined, were our veritable ancestors, of whom the priest spoke; they will perfectly harmonize, and there will be no inconsistency in saying that the citizens of your republic are these ancient Athenians. Let us divide the subject among us, and all endeavour according to our ability gracefully to execute the task which you have imposed upon us. Consider then, Socrates, if this narrative is suited to the purpose, or whether we should seek for some other instead.
  SOCRATES: And what other, Critias, can we find that will be better than this, which is natural and suitable to the festival of the goddess, and has the very great advantage of being a fact and not a Fiction? How or where shall we find another if we abandon this? We cannot, and therefore you must tell the tale, and good luck to you; and I in return for my yesterday's discourse will now rest and be a listener.
  CRITIAS: Let me proceed to explain to you, Socrates, the order in which we have arranged our entertainment. Our intention is, that Timaeus, who is the most of an astronomer amongst us, and has made the nature of the universe his special study, should speak first, beginning with the generation of the world and going down to the creation of man; next, I am to receive the men whom he has created, and of whom some will have profited by the excellent education which you have given them; and then, in accordance with the tale of Solon, and equally with his law, we will bring them into court and make them citizens, as if they were those very Athenians whom the sacred Egyptian record has recovered from oblivion, and thenceforward we will speak of them as Athenians and fellow-citizens.

Ultima Thule - Dedication to G. W. G., #unset, #Arthur C Clarke, #Fiction
  That land of Fiction and of truth,
  The lost Atlantis of our youth!

WORDNET



--- Overview of noun fiction

The noun fiction has 2 senses (first 1 from tagged texts)
                    
1. (14) fiction ::: (a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact)
2. fabrication, fiction, fable ::: (a deliberately false or improbable account)


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun fiction

2 senses of fiction                          

Sense 1
fiction
   => literary composition, literary work
     => writing, written material, piece of writing
       => written communication, written language, black and white
         => communication
           => abstraction, abstract entity
             => entity

Sense 2
fabrication, fiction, fable
   => falsehood, falsity, untruth
     => statement
       => message, content, subject matter, substance
         => communication
           => abstraction, abstract entity
             => entity


--- Hyponyms of noun fiction

2 senses of fiction                          

Sense 1
fiction
   => dystopia
   => novel
   => fantasy, phantasy
   => story
   => utopia

Sense 2
fabrication, fiction, fable
   => canard


--- Synonyms/Hypernyms (Ordered by Estimated Frequency) of noun fiction

2 senses of fiction                          

Sense 1
fiction
   => literary composition, literary work

Sense 2
fabrication, fiction, fable
   => falsehood, falsity, untruth




--- Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun fiction

2 senses of fiction                          

Sense 1
fiction
  -> literary composition, literary work
   => acrostic
   => belles-lettres, belles lettres
   => dialogue, dialog
   => fiction
   => fictionalization, fictionalisation
   => hagiology
   => lucubration
   => pastoral
   => poem, verse form
   => potboiler
   => tushery

Sense 2
fabrication, fiction, fable
  -> falsehood, falsity, untruth
   => dodge, dodging, scheme
   => lie, prevarication
   => fabrication, fiction, fable
   => misrepresentation, deceit, deception
   => contradiction, contradiction in terms




--- Grep of noun fiction
fiction
fictional animal
fictional character
fictionalisation
fictionalization
nonfiction
science fiction



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