classes ::: author, Sufism, Poetry, Mysticism, Logic, Ethics,
children :::
branches ::: Saadi

bookmarks: Instances - Definitions - Quotes - Chapters - Wordnet - Webgen


object:Saadi
object:Saadi Shirazi
class:author
subject class:Sufism
subject class:Poetry
subject class:Mysticism
subject class:Logic
subject class:Ethics

Genre:Poetry, Literature, Travel

Influences:Abu Hamed Ghazali, Sanai, Ferdowsi, Anvari

Wikipedia
Born - 1210[1] Shiraz, Khwarazmian Empire
Died - 1291 or 1292[1] Shiraz, Ilkhanate
School - Persian poetry, Persian literature
Main interests - Poetry, Mysticism, Logic, Ethics, Sufism



dob:March 04, 1208 - December 02, 1291

see also :::

questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or
join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers



now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Infinite_Library

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
1.rwe_-_Saadi

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME
1.sdi_-_All_Adams_offspring_form_one_family_tree
1.sdi_-_Have_no_doubts_because_of_trouble_nor_be_thou_discomfited
1.sdi_-_How_could_I_ever_thank_my_Friend?
1.sdi_-_If_one_His_praise_of_me_would_learn
1.sdi_-_In_Love
1.sdi_-_The_man_of_God_with_half_his_loaf_content
1.sdi_-_The_world,_my_brother!_will_abide_with_none
1.sdi_-_To_the_wall_of_the_faithful_what_sorrow,_when_pillared_securely_on_thee?

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
1.poe_-_Al_Aaraaf-_Part_2
1.rwe_-_Saadi
1.sdi_-_All_Adams_offspring_form_one_family_tree
1.sdi_-_Have_no_doubts_because_of_trouble_nor_be_thou_discomfited
1.sdi_-_How_could_I_ever_thank_my_Friend?
1.sdi_-_If_one_His_praise_of_me_would_learn
1.sdi_-_In_Love
1.sdi_-_The_man_of_God_with_half_his_loaf_content
1.sdi_-_The_world,_my_brother!_will_abide_with_none
1.sdi_-_To_the_wall_of_the_faithful_what_sorrow,_when_pillared_securely_on_thee?
the_Eternal_Wisdom

PRIMARY CLASS

author
SIMILAR TITLES
Saadi

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

Saadia, ben Joseph: (Arabic Sa'id Al-Fayyumi) (892-942) Born and educated in Egypt, he left his native country in 915 and settled in Babylonia where he was appointed in 928 Gaon of the Academy of Sura. He translated the Bible into Arabic and wrote numerous works, both in Hebrew and Arabic, in the fields of philology, exegesis, Talmudics, polemics, Jewish history, and philosophy. His chief philosophical work is the Kitab Al-Amanat wa'l-Itikadat, better known by its Hebrew title, Emunot we-Deott, i.e., Doctrines and Religious Beliefs. Its purpose is to prove the compatibility of the principles of Judaism with reason and to interpret them in such a way that their rationality be evident The first nine sections establish philosophically the ten fundamental articles of faith, and the tenth deals with ethics. Philosophically, Saadia was influenced by the teachings of the Mutazilia. See Jewish Philosophy. -- Q.V.

Saadia B. Joseph was of the opinion that they were visions seen during prophetic ecstasy rather than outward reali¬

Saadia Gaon ::: (882-942) Saadia ben Joseph; philosopher; halakhist, poet, and Bible commentator; head of the Sura academy in Babylon.

Saadiah b. Joseph (Gaon). Book of Beliefs and Opinions.


TERMS ANYWHERE

Almost all Jewish philosophers with the exception of Gabirol, ha-Levi, and Gersonides produce proofs for the existence of God. These proofs are based primarily on principles of physics. In the case of the Western philosophers, they are Aristotelian, while in the case of the Eastern, they are a combination of Aristotelian and those of the Mutazilites. The Eastern philosophers, such as Saadia and others and also Bahya of the Western prove the existence of God indirectly, namely that the world was created and consequently there is a creator. The leading Western thinkers, such as Ibn Daud (q.v.) and Maimonides employ the Aristotelian argument from motion, even to positing hypothetically the eternity of the world. Ha-LevI considers the conception of the existence of God an intuition with which man is endowed by God Himself. Crescas, who criticized Aristotle's conception of space and the infinite, in his proof for the existence of God, proves it by positing the need of a being necessarily existent, for it is absurd to posit a world of possibles.

Al-Mukamis, David Ibn Merwan: Early Jewish philosopher (died c. 937). His philosophic work, Book of Twenty Tractates shows influence of the teachings of the Kalam (q.v.) reasoning follows along lines similar to that of Saadia. -- M.W.

Another means of revelation is prophecy. The authenticity of prophecy, says Saadia, is not based on the miracles by which it is demonstrated but on its intrinsic worth. Maimonides says the prophet must possess great intellectual ability, rich phantasy, and perfect ethical conduct; only then he may be called by the divine spirit.

Book of Beliefs and Opinions, by Saadia Gaon. See

Saadia, ben Joseph: (Arabic Sa'id Al-Fayyumi) (892-942) Born and educated in Egypt, he left his native country in 915 and settled in Babylonia where he was appointed in 928 Gaon of the Academy of Sura. He translated the Bible into Arabic and wrote numerous works, both in Hebrew and Arabic, in the fields of philology, exegesis, Talmudics, polemics, Jewish history, and philosophy. His chief philosophical work is the Kitab Al-Amanat wa'l-Itikadat, better known by its Hebrew title, Emunot we-Deott, i.e., Doctrines and Religious Beliefs. Its purpose is to prove the compatibility of the principles of Judaism with reason and to interpret them in such a way that their rationality be evident The first nine sections establish philosophically the ten fundamental articles of faith, and the tenth deals with ethics. Philosophically, Saadia was influenced by the teachings of the Mutazilia. See Jewish Philosophy. -- Q.V.

Saadia B. Joseph was of the opinion that they were visions seen during prophetic ecstasy rather than outward reali¬

Saadia Gaon ::: (882-942) Saadia ben Joseph; philosopher; halakhist, poet, and Bible commentator; head of the Sura academy in Babylon.

Saadiah b. Joseph (Gaon). Book of Beliefs and Opinions.

(by SaadiahGaon). New Haven: Yale U.P., 1948.

his Book of Beliefs and Opinions, Saadiah Gaoii (10th

On the whole, there can be distinguished two currents in the entire stream of Jewish philosophy which flowed for about five hundred years, the Oriental and the Occidental. The first was limited to the lands of the East, such as Babylonia and the neighboring countries, and the leading representatives of which were Saadia (q.v.) among the Rabbanites and Aaron ben Elijah (q.v.) among the Karaites. The second developed primarily in Spain and the Provence, and among its leading thinkers were Bahya (q.v.), Gabirol (q.v.), Maimonides (q.v.), Gersonides (q.v.) and Crescas (q.v.). Since Jewish philosophy, during a large part of its existence, was developed within the Arabic world, it consequently reflects the influence of the various systems of thought dominant within that sphere.

person to whom death is coming.” Saadiah then

The differences begin when the questions of the mode of creation and mediators between God and the world are dealt with. In these matters there are to be noted three variations. Saadia rejected entirely the theory of the emanation of separate intelligences, and teaches God's creation from nothing of all beings in the sublunar and upper worlds. He posits that God created first a substratum or the first air which was composed of the hyle and form and out of this element all beings were created, not only the four elements, the components of bodies in the lower world, but also the angels, stars, and the spheres. Bahya's conception is similar to that of Saadia. The Aristotelians, Ibn Daud, Maimonides, and Gersonides accepted the theory of the separate intelligences which was current in Arabic philosophy. This theory teaches that out of the First Cause there emanated an intelligence, and out of this intelligence another one up to nine, corresponding to the number of spheres. Each of these intelligences acts as the object of the mind of a sphere and is the cause of its movement. The tenth intelligence is the universal intellect, an emanation of all intelligences which has in its care the sublunar world. This theory is a combination of Aristotelian and neo-PIatonic teachings; Ibn Daud posits, however, in addition to the intelligences also the existence of angels, created spiritual beings, while Maimonides seems to identify the angels with the intelligences, and also says that natural forces are also called angels in the Bible. As for creation, Ibn Daud asserts that God created the hyle or primal matter and endowed it with general form from which the specific forms later developed. Maimonides seems to believe that God first created a substance consisting of primal matter and primal form, and that He determined by His will that parts of it should form the matter of the spheres which is imperishable, while other parts should form the matter of the four elements. These views, however, are subject to various interpretations by historians. Gabirol and Gersonides posit the eternal existence of the hyle and limit creation to endowing it with form and organization -- a view close to the Platonic.

The next step is to demonstrate God's unity for which various proofs are given. Saadia and the followers prove it from the conception of creator; the others, including Maimonides, deduce it from the concept of an unmoved mover from which His incorporeality is also deduced. The argument that harmony of the universe is due to one creator or one first cause is also frequently employed.

The origin, nature, and the continued existence or immortality of the soul is widely discussed in Jewish philosophy. As to origin, Saadia believes that each individual soul is created by God -- considering, of course, creation a continuous process -- and that it is of a fine spiritual substance. As to its faculties, he accepts the Aristotelian-Platonic division of the soul into three parts, namely, the appetitive, emotional, and cognitive. Ibn Daud thinks that the soul exists prior to the body potentially, i.e., that the angels endow the body with form; he further considers it a substance but says that it undergoes a process of development. The more it thinks the more perfect it becomes, and the thoughts are called acquired reason, it is this acquired reason, or being perfected which remains immortal. Maimonides does not discuss the origin of the soul, but deals more with its parts. To the three of Saadia he adds the imaginative and the conative. Gersonides' view resembles somewhat that of Ibn Daud, except that he does not speak of its origin and limits himself to the intellect. The intellect, says he, is only a capacity residing in the lower soul, and that capacity is gradually developed by the help of the Active Intellect into an acquired and ultimately into an active reason. All thinkers insist on immortality, but with Saadia and ha-Levi it seems that the entire soul survives, while the Aristotelians assert that only the intellect is immortal. Maimonides is not explicit on the subject, yet we may surmise that even the more liberal thinkers did not subscribe to Averroes' theory of unitas intellectus, and they believed that the immortal intellect is endowed with consciousness of personality. To this trend of connecting immortality with rational reflection Crescas took exception, and asserts that it is not pure thought which leads to survival, but that the soul is immortal because it is a spiritual being, and it is perfected by its love for God and the doing of good.

The problem of attributes gave rise to extensive discussions. In general, the attempt is made to convey some knowledge about God and yet maintain that His essence is inconceivable. The number of attributes varies with individual philosophers, from three of Bahya to eight of Ibn Daud. Saadia counts one, living, potent and wise as essential attributes; Bahya one, existent, and eternal. Ha-Levi substitutes living for existent. Ibn Daud adds to those of Saadia and Bahya three more: true, willing, and potent. Maimonides considers living, potent, wise, and willing as those agreed upon by philosophers. The difficulty, however, does not consist in the number but in their content, or in other words, how to speak of essential attributes and not to impair the simplicity of God's essence. Bahya was the first to assert that their content is negative, e.g., existent means not non-existent. He was followed in this by all others. Maimonides is especially insistent upon the negative meaning and asserts that they are to be applied to God and man in an absolute homonymic manner, i.e., there is no possible relation between God and other beings. Gersonides and Crescas, on the other hand, believe that the essential attributes are positive though we cannot determine their content. There are, of course, other attributes which are descriptive of His action, but these are not essential.

There is, however, greater difficulty in making freedom of the will compatible with divine prescience of human action. The question arises, does God know beforehand what man will do or not? If he does, it follows that the action is determined, or if man can choose, His knowledge is not true. Various answers were proposed by Jewish philosophers to this difficult problem. Saadia says that God's knowledge is like gazing in a mirror of the future which does not influence human action. He knows the ultimate result. Maimonides says that God's knowledge is so totally different from human that it remains indefinable, and consequently He may know things beforehand, and yet not impair the possibility of man to choose between two actions. Ibn Daud and Gersonides limit God's knowledge and say that He only knows that certain actions will be present to man for choice but not the way he will choose. Crescas is more logical and comes to the conclusion that action is possible only per se, i.e., when looked upon singly, but is necessary through the causes. Free will is in this case nominal and consist primarily in the fact that man is ignorant of the real situation and he is rewarded and punished for his exertion to do good or for his neglect to exert himself.

The relation of God to the world includes, as we have seen, a number of problems. The general conception of the world with almost all Jewish philosophers is mainly Aristotelian. All, not excluding Saadia, who was to a considerable degree under the influence of the Mutazilites, all except Aristotle's theory of matter and form, i.e., that all bodies are composed of two elements, the substratum or the hyle and the particular form with which it is endewed. They all speak of primal matter which was the first creation, and all accept his view of the four elements, i.e., fire, air, water, and earth which are the components of all things in the lower world. They also accept his cosmogony, namely, the division of the universe of the upper world of the spheres and the lower or sublunar world, and also posit the influence of the spheres upon the course of events in this world. On the other hand, all oppose his view of the eternity of the world and champion creation de novo with slight variations.

Tower of Babel. [Rf. Saadiah, Polemic against Hiwi



QUOTES [20 / 20 - 285 / 285]


KEYS (10k)

   16 Saadi
   4 Saadi

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

  224 Saadi
   28 Raphael Saadiq
   15 Idries Shah
   6 Cayla Kluver
   4 Saadi Youssef
   2 John C Maxwell

1:Ants, fighting together, will vanquish the lion. ~ Saadi,
2:The remedy against want is to moderate your desires. ~ Saadi,
3:To pardon the oppressor is to deal harshly with the oppressed. ~ Saadi,
4:Have patience. All things are difficult before they become easy. ~ Saadi,
5:It is not long before those who are obedient in service obtain command. ~ Saadi,
6:The name of human you cannot retain. ~ Saadi, @Sufi_Path
7:The severity of the master is more useful than the indulgence of the father. ~ Saadi,
8:A lovely face is the solace of wounded hearts and the key of locked-up gates. ~ Saadi,
9:A wise man among the ignorant is as a beautiful girl in the company of blind men. ~ Saadi,
10:The rose and thorn, the treasure and dragon, joy and sorrow, all mingle into one. ~ Saadi,
11:Because he who obtained knowledge has not returned. ~ Saadi, @Sufi_Path
12:Better is the sinner who hath thoughts about God, than the saint who hath only the show of sanctity. ~ Saadi,
13:The fool who burns by day a camphor-light
Will soon not have an oil-lamp for the night. ~ Saadi, Gulistan,
14:Nothing is so good for an ignorant man as silence; and if he was sensible of this he would not be ignorant. ~ Saadi,
15:Roam abroad in the world, and take thy fill of its enjoyments before the day shall come when thou must quit it for good. ~ Saadi,
16:Wilt thou that thy heart should be free from sorrow ? Forget not the hearts that sorrow devours. ~ Saadi, the Eternal Wisdom
17:The world is not a courtroom
There is no judge no jury no plaintiff.
This is a caravan filled with eccentric beings telling wondrous stories about God. ~ Saadi,
18:He has so many creations, and yet He never forgets me, but I only have One Creator, and I've forgotten him countless of times." ~ Saadi, @Sufi_Path
19:Your love renders you impatient and disturbed.
With such sincerity you have placed your head at her feet that you are oblivious to the world.

When in the eyes of your beloved riches don't count, gold and dust are as one to you.
You say that she dwells in your eyes - if they be closed, she is in your mind.
If she demands your life, you place it in her hand; if she places a sword upon your head, you hold it forward.

When earthly love produces such confusion and demands such obedience, don't you wonder if travelers of the road of God remain engulfed in the Ocean of Reality? ~ Saadi,
20:In the name of Him Who created and sustains the world, the Sage Who endowed tongue with speech.
He attains no honor who turns the face from the doer of His mercy.
The kings of the earth prostate themselves before Him in supplication.
He seizes not in haste the disobedient, nor drives away the penitent with violence. The two worlds are as a drop of water in the ocean of His knowledge.
He withholds not His bounty though His servants sin; upon the surface of the earth has He spread a feast, in which both friend and foe may share.
Peerless He is, and His kingdom is eternal. Upon the head of one He placed a crown another he hurled from the throne to the ground.
The fire of His friend He turned into a flower garden; through the water of the Nile He sended His foes to perdition.
Behind the veil He sees all, and concealed our faults with His own goodness.

He is near to them that are downcast, and accepts the prayers of them that lament.
He knows of the things that exist not, of secrets that are untold.
He causes the moon and the sun to revolve, and spreads water upon the earth.
In the heart of a stone hath He placed a jewel; from nothing had He created all that is.
Who can reveal the secret of His qualities; what eye can see the limits of His beauty?
The bird of thought cannot soar to the height of His presence, nor the hand of understanding reach to the skirt of His praise.
Think not, O Saadi, that one can walk in the road of purity except in the footsteps of Mohammed (Peace and Blessings be Upon Him)
~ Saadi, The Bustan of Sa'di,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Human beings are members of a whole, ~ Saadi,
2:Be not in the desire of thine own ease. ~ Saadi,
3:Who eat their corn while yet 'tis green ~ Saadi,
4:In the sea there are countless treasures, ~ Saadi,
5:A little beauty is preferable to much wealth. ~ Saadi,
6:No person learned the art of archery from me, ~ Saadi,
7:Poison kills only where there is no antidote. ~ Saadi,
8:Posion kills only where there is no antidote. ~ Saadi,
9:Virtue is in the mind, not in the appearance. ~ Saadi,
10:None can be so true to your secret as yourself. ~ Saadi,
11:A grateful dog is better than an ungrateful man. ~ Saadi,
12:Ants, fighting together, will vanquish the lion. ~ Saadi,
13:The rich man is everywhere expected and at home. ~ Saadi,
14:Ants, fighting together, will vanquish the lion. ~ Saadi,
15:Poverty snatches the reins out of the hand of piety. ~ Saadi,
16:The remedy against want is to moderate your desires. ~ Saadi,
17:The stranger has no friend, unless it be a stranger. ~ Saadi,
18:Whatever is produced in haste goes hastily to waste. ~ Saadi,
19:A traveler without knowledge is a bird without wings. ~ Saadi,
20:He who is a slave to his stomach seldom worships God. ~ Saadi,
21:The remedy against want is to moderate your desires. ~ Saadi,
22:You can have a zillion nothings and still have nothing ~ Saadi,
23:An enemy to whom you show kindness becomes your friend. ~ Saadi,
24:Astride a horse I am not, nor camel-like carry a load, ~ Saadi,
25:A handsome woman is a jewel; a good woman is a treasure. ~ Saadi,
26:I have never seen a man lost who was on a straight path. ~ Saadi,
27:Joy and sorrow, beauty and deformity, equally pass away. ~ Saadi,
28:To the eye of enmity virtue appears the ugliest blemish. ~ Saadi,
29:Have patience. Everything is difficult before it is easy. ~ Saadi,
30:The hand of liberality is stronger than the arm of power. ~ Saadi,
31:A garden is a delight to the eye and a solace for the soul. ~ Saadi,
32:Engin deniz taş atmakla bulamaz. Gücenen Arif henüz sığ sudur. ~ Saadi,
33:The greedy man is incontent with a whole world set before him. ~ Saadi,
34:To pardon the oppressor is to deal harshly with the oppressed. ~ Saadi,
35:I cried because I had no shoes till I met a man who had no feet ~ Saadi,
36:To pardon the oppressor is to deal harshly with the oppressed. ~ Saadi,
37:Have patience. All things are difficult before they become easy. ~ Saadi,
38:I fear God and next to God I mostly fear them that fear him not. ~ Saadi,
39:Holiness comes by holy deeds. Not starving flesh of daily needs. ~ Saadi,
40:I cried because I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet. ~ Saadi,
41:O Contentment, make me rich! for without thee there is no wealth. ~ Saadi,
42:Patience accomplishes its object, while hurry speeds to its ruin. ~ Saadi,
43:Pride thyself on what virtue thou hast, and not on thy parentage. ~ Saadi,
44:Fear not the proud and the haughty; fear rather him who fears God. ~ Saadi,
45:Sormaz ki bilsin, bilse sorardı.. bilmez ki sorsun, sorsa bilirdi. ~ Saadi,
46:Whatever makes an impression on the heart seems lovely in the eye. ~ Saadi,
47:When the ruler is obedient to God, God is his protector and friend. ~ Saadi,
48:I fear God the most, but after Him, I fear those who don't fear Him. ~ Saadi,
49:İki şey ruhumuzu karartır; konuşacakken susmak, susacakken konuşmak. ~ Saadi,
50:The rose and the thorn, and sorrow and gladness are linked together. ~ Saadi,
51:Whoever gives advice to a heedless man is himself in need of advice. ~ Saadi,
52:Si ton cœur est plein de perles, imite l'huître, ferme bien ton cœur. ~ Saadi,
53:A peace-mingling falsehood is preferable to a mischief-stirring truth. ~ Saadi,
54:God gives sleep to the bad, in order that the good may be undisturbed. ~ Saadi,
55:It is not long before those who are obedient in service obtain command. ~ Saadi,
56:Do to me, O Allah, what is worthy of Thee; And not what is worthy of me. ~ Saadi,
57:It is not long before those who are obedient in service obtain command. ~ Saadi,
58:Saadi: Be a true renouncer, (zahid) and [you can even] ware satin. ~ Idries Shah,
59:Whoever has his foe at his mercy, and does not kill him, is his own enemy ~ Saadi,
60:A man of virtue, judgment, and prudence speaks not until there is silence. ~ Saadi,
61:Every person thinks his own intellect perfect, and his own child handsome. ~ Saadi,
62:It's no virtue to gain the whole world. Just gain the heart of one person. ~ Saadi,
63:Si tu souffres, sois patient et espère. Le jour ne naît-il pas de la nuit? ~ Saadi,
64:Le véritable ami est celui qui ôte les pierres et les ronces devant nos pas. ~ Saadi,
65:O wise man, wash your hands of that friend who associates with your enemies. ~ Saadi,
66:Saadi: Sé un verdadero renunciador (zahid) e incluso podrás usar raso. ~ Idries Shah,
67:The severity of the master is more useful than the indulgence of the father. ~ Saadi,
68:To him who is stinted of food a boiled turnip will relish like a roast fowl. ~ Saadi,
69:A lovely face is the solace of wounded hearts and the key of locked-up gates. ~ Saadi,
70:Consacre tes loisirs à essuyer la poussière qui ternit le miroir de ton cœur. ~ Saadi,
71:Do good even to the wicked; it is as well to shut a dog's mouth with a crumb. ~ Saadi,
72:The severity of the master is more useful than the indulgence of the father. ~ Saadi,
73:A lovely face is the solace of wounded hearts and the key of locked-up gates. ~ Saadi,
74:A man is insensible to the relish of prosperity until he has tasted adversity. ~ Saadi,
75:Be not so severe as to cause shyness, nor so clement as to encourage boldness. ~ Saadi,
76:Take care what you say before a wall, as you cannot tell who may be behind it. ~ Saadi,
77:...
بر حدیث من و حسن تو نیفزاید کس
حد همین است سخندانی و زیبایی را
... ~ Saadi,
78:However much you are read in theory, if thou hast no practice thou art ignorant ~ Saadi,
79:Oh God, I say not hear my prayers! I say: Blot with forgiving pen my sins away! ~ Saadi,
80:The true disciple should aim to live for the gospel, rather than to die for it. ~ Saadi,
81:Forgiveness is commendable, but apply not ointment to the wound of an oppressor. ~ Saadi,
82:That knave preserves the pearl in his purse who considers all people purse-cuts. ~ Saadi,
83:Virtue pardons the wicked, as the sandal-tree perfumes the axe which strikes it. ~ Saadi,
84:A wise man among the ignorant is as a beautiful girl in the company of blind men. ~ Saadi,
85:Have patience. All things are difficult before they become easy.” —Saadi ~ John C Maxwell,
86:Independence is of more value than any gifts; and to receive gifts is to lose it. ~ Saadi,
87:The rose and thorn, the treasure and dragon, joy and sorrow, all mingle into one. ~ Saadi,
88:A wise man among the ignorant is as a beautiful girl in the company of blind men. ~ Saadi,
89:N'attache de prix qu'aux trésors que tu pourras emporter avec toi dans le paradis. ~ Saadi,
90:Si no te reprochas a ti mismo”, dice Saadi, “no aceptarás el reproche ajeno. ~ Idries Shah,
91:The rose and thorn, the treasure and dragon, joy and sorrow, all mingle into one. ~ Saadi,
92:If thou covetest riches, ask not but for contentment, which is an immense treasure. ~ Saadi,
93:Where the hand of tyranny is long we do not see the lips of men open with laughter. ~ Saadi,
94:Better hold the hand for coin, though small, Than lose, for one half a dang, it all. ~ Saadi,
95:Wherever the tree of beneficence takes root, it sends forth branches beyond the sky! ~ Saadi,
96:So long as money can answer, it were wrong in any business to put the life in danger. ~ Saadi,
97:To be over much facetious is the accomplishment of courtiers and blemish of the wise. ~ Saadi,
98:We will walk to God
barefoot:
our feet lacerated,
our limbs wounded. ~ Saadi Youssef,
99:Ne kadar okursan oku; bilgine yakışır şekilde davranmadığın sürece, cahilsin demektir. ~ Saadi,
100:If thou art wise, incline to truth; for truth, not the semblance, remains in its place. ~ Saadi,
101:If wisdom was to cease throughout the world, no one would suspect himself of ignorance. ~ Saadi,
102:Make no friendship with an elephant keeper If you have no room to entertain an elephant ~ Saadi,
103:Ne kadar okursan oku, bilgine yakışır şekilde davranmadığın müddetçe cahilsin demektir. ~ Saadi,
104:Publish not men's secret faults, for by disgracing them you make yourself of no repute. ~ Saadi,
105:Capacity without education is deplorable, and education without capacity is thrown away. ~ Saadi,
106:He who lives upon the fruit of his own labor, escapes the contempt of haughty benefactors. ~ Saadi,
107:He will deal harshly by a stranger who has not been himself often a traveller or stranger. ~ Saadi,
108:When a man appreciates only eating and sleeping, what excellence has he over the reptiles? ~ Saadi,
109:He who is indifferent to the suffering of others is a traitor to that which is truly human. ~ Saadi,
110:Whoever acquires knowledge but does not practice it is as one who ploughs but does not sow. ~ Saadi,
111:He, who learns and makes no use of his learning, is a beast of burden, with a load of books. ~ Saadi,
112:Inflict not on an enemy every injury in your power, for he may afterwards become your friend. ~ Saadi,
113:It is better to break off a thousand friendships, than to endure the sight of a single enemy. ~ Saadi,
114:Religion is only in the service of the people; it is not in the rosary and the prayer-carpet. ~ Saadi,
115:Riches are intended for the comfort of life, and not life for the purpose of hoarding riches. ~ Saadi,
116:The whelp of a wolf must prove a wolf at last, notwithstanding he may be brought up by a man. ~ Saadi,
117:You who feel no pain at the suffering of others It is not fitting for you to be called human. ~ Saadi,
118:If a gem falls into mud it is still valuable. If dust ascends to heaven, it remains valueless. ~ Saadi,
119:Kazara bir sapan taşı, bir altın kâseye değse; Ne kıymeti artar taşın, ne kıymetten düşer kâse. ~ Saadi,
120:Poor greedy one, wherever he runs
He's after food, and death is after him.
(Saadi) ~ Idries Shah,
121:That sorrow which is the harbinger of joy is preferable to the joy which is followed by sorrow. ~ Saadi,
122:The sons of Adam are formed from dust; if not humble as the dust, they fall short of being men. ~ Saadi,
123:When the belly is empty, the body becomes spirit; and when it is full, the spirit becomes body. ~ Saadi,
124:If you will not reprove yourself,’ Saadi says, ‘you will not welcome reproof from another. ~ Idries Shah,
125:La bonté est une graine qui produit toujours des fruits, mais il faut savoir semer cette graine. ~ Saadi,
126:Saadi’s dictum, in the Bostan: ‘The Path is not in the rosary, the prayer-mat and the robe ~ Idries Shah,
127:Wilt thou that thy heart should be free from sorrow ? Forget not the hearts that sorrow devours. ~ Saadi,
128:Shut the door of that house of pleasure which you hear resounding with the loud voice of a woman. ~ Saadi,
129:Were the diver to think on the jaws of the shark, he would never lay hands on the precious pearl. ~ Saadi,
130:Whoever recounts to you the faults of your neighbour will doubtless expose your defects to others. ~ Saadi,
131:Be sure, either that thou art stronger than thine enemy, or that thou hast a swifter pair of heels. ~ Saadi,
132:It is safer to be silent than to reveal one's secret to any one, and telling him not to mention it. ~ Saadi,
133:Better is the sinner who hath thoughts about God, than the saint who hath only the show of sanctity. ~ Saadi,
134:If thou art of elephant-strength or of lion-claw, still peace is, in my opinion, better than strife. ~ Saadi,
135:Use a sweet tongue, courtesy, and gentleness, and thou mayest manage to guide an elephant by a hair. ~ Saadi,
136:Better is the sinner who hath thoughts about God, than the saint who hath only the show of sanctity. ~ Saadi,
137:No one ever sowed the grain of generosity who gathered not up the harvest of the desire of his heart. ~ Saadi,
138:That which is not allotted the hand cannot reach; what is allotted you will find wherever you may be. ~ Saadi,
139:Every leaf of the tree becomes a page of the book, once the heart is opened and it has learnt to read. ~ Saadi,
140:The covetous map explores the whole world in pursuit of a subsistence, and fate is close at his heels. ~ Saadi,
141:Great God, have pity on the wicked, for thou didst everything for the good, when thou madest them good! ~ Saadi,
142:Saadi en su Bostán: “El Sendero no se encuentra en el rosario, la alfombra de oración y el manto”. ~ Idries Shah,
143:Most of the birds of the Old World can be found here, as Oman is on a strategic route for migrating birds ~ Saadi,
144:Now that another is suffering pain at thy hand, trust not that thy heart shall be exempt from affliction. ~ Saadi,
145:God preserve us! If men knew what is done in secret, no one would be free from the interference of others. ~ Saadi,
146:To tell a falsehood is like the cut of a saber: for though the wound may heal, the scar of it will remain. ~ Saadi,
147:Keep belly lightly loaded, if mind would wisdom see;For bodies crammed to bursting, make empty souls to be. ~ Saadi,
148:Kings stand more in need of the company of the intelligent than the intelligent do of the society of kings. ~ Saadi,
149:Nothing is so good for an ignorant man as silence; and if he was sensible of this he would not be ignorant. ~ Saadi,
150:The heart is like a musical instrument of many strings, all the chords of which require putting in harmony. ~ Saadi,
151:He taught people with his best way. He showed his beauty. He was all good so peace be on him and his family. ~ Saadi,
152:Nothing is so good for an ignorant man as silence; and if he was sensible of this he would not be ignorant. ~ Saadi,
153:Though someday we may become as eloquent as Sahban, but we might also miss the essence of the Forgiving One. ~ Saadi,
154:Whenever thy hand can reach it, tear out the foe's brain, for such an opportunity washes anger from the mind. ~ Saadi,
155:Much contention and strife will arise in that house where the wife shall get up dissatisfied with her husband. ~ Saadi,
156:Pobre avaro, donde quiera que vaya,
él persigue alimentos, y la muerte lo persigue a él.
(Saadi) ~ Idries Shah,
157:In the faculty of speech man excels the brute; but if thou utterest what is improper, the brute is they superior. ~ Saadi,
158:The wise man tells not what he knows. It is not prudent to sport with one's head by revealing the king's secrets. ~ Saadi,
159:A dog will never forget the crumb thou gavest him, though thou mayst afterwards throw a hundred stones at his head. ~ Saadi,
160:There is no great difficulty to separate the soul from the body, but it is not so easy to restore life to the dead. ~ Saadi,
161:If a piece of worthless stone can bruise a cup of gold, its worth is not increased, nor that of the gold diminished. ~ Saadi,
162:An enemy to whom you show kindness becomes your friend, excepting lust, the indulgence of which increases its enmity. ~ Saadi,
163:I have often found a small stream at its fountain-head, that, when followed up, carried away the camel with his load. ~ Saadi,
164:To use the hands in making quicklime into mortar is better than to cross them on the breast in attendance on a prince. ~ Saadi,
165:Do they know that honey,
the universe,
and the end
are under the shirt?
– That pollen is quivering? ~ Saadi Youssef,
166:Almost every day I am reminded of Saadi's reflection that there is no senseless tyranny like that of subordinates. ~ Idries Shah,
167:Expose not the secret failings of mankind, otherwise you must verily bring scandal upon them and distrust upon yourself. ~ Saadi,
168:Roam abroad in the world, and take thy fill of its enjoyments before the day shall come when thou must quit it for good. ~ Saadi,
169:Two orders of mankind are the enemies of church and state; the king without clemency, and the holy man without learning. ~ Saadi,
170:A tree, freshly rooted, may be pulled up by one man on his own. Give it time, and it will not be moved, even with a crane ~ Saadi,
171:Be generous, and pleasant-tempered, and forgiving; even as God scatter favors over thee, do thou scatter over the people. ~ Saadi,
172:Roam abroad in the world, and take thy fill of its enjoyments before the day shall come when thou must quit it for good. ~ Saadi,
173:Ne te lance pas sur l'océan de l'amour. Mais, si tu tentes l'aventure, sois hardi et plonge jusqu'au fond de ses gouffres. ~ Saadi,
174:Oman overall has great animal and plant biodiversity because it has mountains, desert, coastal areas and rich coral reefs. ~ Saadi,
175:Bois l'amer breuvage de mes conseils: je l'ai passé au crible de la sagesse, et le sucre de la poésie en atténue l'acidité. ~ Saadi,
176:Generosity is also marked by doing what one says one will do. Saadi teaches: ‘when the generous promise, they perform ~ Idries Shah,
177:The bad fortune of the good turns their faces up to heaven; the good fortune of the bad bows their heads down to the earth. ~ Saadi,
178:If thou tellest the sorrows of thy heart, let it be to him in whose countenance thou mayst be assured of prompt consolation. ~ Saadi,
179:La generosidad se caracteriza por hacer lo que uno dice que hará. Saadi enseña: “Cuando los generosos prometen, cumplen. ~ Idries Shah,
180:People are crying up the rich and variegated plumage of the peacock, and he is himself blushing at the sight of his ugly feet. ~ Saadi,
181:Saadi, what do you think you're doing?" I demanded.
"Well I thought I was helping you. As it turns out, I'm bleeding. ~ Cayla Kluver,
182:Court the society of a superior, and make much of the opportunity; for in the company of an equal thy good fortune must decline. ~ Saadi,
183:There is a difference between him who claspeth his mistress in his arms, and him whose eyes are fixed on the door expecting her. ~ Saadi,
184:Obedience is not truly performed by the body of him whose heart is dissatisfied. The shell without a kernel is not fit for store. ~ Saadi,
185:Casi todos los días recuerdo la reflexión de Saadi que que no existe una tiranía tan sin sentido como la de los subordinados. ~ Idries Shah,
186:He who learns the rules of wisdom, without conforming to them in his life, is like a man who labored in his fields, but did not sow ~ Saadi,
187:Whenever you argue with another wiser than yourself in order that others may admire your wisdom, they will discover your ignorance. ~ Saadi,
188:Be thou good thyself, and let people speak evil of thee; it is better than to be wicked, and that they should consider thee as good. ~ Saadi,
189:En lo profundo del mar hay riquezas incomparables. Pero si buscas seguridad, está en la orilla.

Saadi, Jardín de Rosas. ~ Idries Shah,
190:Whoever interrupts the conversation of others to make a display of his fund of knowledge, makes notorious his own stock of ignorance. ~ Saadi,
191:Je compare ton cœur à une ville où les justes et les méchants vivent pêle-mêle. Tu es le sultan de cette ville, et ton vizir est la raison. ~ Saadi,
192:Q: How can I help myself?
A: By remembering the proverb: ‘The Path is not to be found anywhere except in human service’, from Saadi. ~ Idries Shah,
193:The best loved by God are those that are rich, yet have the humility of the poor, and those that are poor and have the magnanimity of the rich. ~ Saadi,
194:Tell no one the secret that you want to keep, although he may be worthy of confidence; for no one will be so careful of your secret as yourself. ~ Saadi,
195:P: ¿Cómo puedo ayudarme a mí mismo?
R: Recordando: “El Sendero no ha de ser encontrado en lugar alguno mas en el servicio humano”, de Saadi ~ Idries Shah,
196:When thou seest thine enemy in trouble, curl not thy whiskers in contempt; for in every bone there is marrow, and within every jacket there is a man. ~ Saadi,
197:A little and a little, collected together, becomes a great deal; the heap in the barn consists of single grains, and drop and drop make the inundation. ~ Saadi,
198:The world is not a courtroom There is no judge no jury no plaintiff. This is a caravan filled with eccentric beings telling wondrous stories about God. ~ Saadi,
199:It is wrong to follow the advice of an adversary; nevertheless it is right to hear it, that you may do the contrary; and this is the essence of good policy. ~ Saadi,
200:The world is not a courtroom
There is no judge no jury no plaintiff.
This is a caravan filled with eccentric beings telling wondrous stories about God. ~ Saadi,
201:That’s my bedroom window,” I whispered, pointing straight up, and he redirected my finger. “I sleep there.”
Saadi wasn’t surprised by this revelation. ~ Cayla Kluver,
202:The world is not a courtroom
There is no judge no jury no plaintiff.
This is a caravan filled with eccentric beings telling wondrous stories about God. ~ Saadi,
203:Beware the build-up of an inward wound,
For it will at last burst forth;
Avoid, while you can, distress to one heart,
For a single moan can quake the Earth. ~ Saadi,
204:Man is, beyond dispute, the most excellent of created beings, and the vilest animal is a dog; but the sages agree that a grateful dog is better than an ungrateful man. ~ Saadi,
205:Anger that has no limit causes terror, and unseasonable kindness does away with respect. Be not so severe as to cause disgust, nor so lenient as to make people presume. ~ Saadi,
206:Obedience insures greatness, whilst disobedience leads to a repulse. Whosoever possesseth the qualities of righteousness placeth his head on the threshold of obedience. ~ Saadi,
207:The bird alighteth not on the spread net when it beholds another bird in the snare. Take warning by the misfortunes of others, that others may not take example from you. ~ Saadi,
208:Whosoever formeth an intimacy with the enemies of his friends, does so to injure the latter. O wise man! wash your hands of that friend who associates with your enemies. ~ Saadi,
209:Le tumultueux torrent qui descend des montagnes va se perdre dans les ravins, mais la plus modeste goutte de rosée est aspirée par le soleil qui l'élève jusqu'aux étoiles. ~ Saadi,
210:No reliance can be placed on the friendship of kings, nor vain hope put in the melodious voice of boys; for that passes away like a vision, and this vanishes like a dream. ~ Saadi,
211:When you see contention amongst your enemies, go and sit at ease with your friends; but when you see them of one mind, string your bow, and place stones upon the ramparts. ~ Saadi,
212:Liberty is of more value than any gifts; and to receive gifts is to lose it. Be assured that men most commonly seek to oblige thee only that they may engage thee to serve them. ~ Saadi,
213:He who is intoxicated with wine will be sober again in the course of the night, but he who is intoxicated by the cupbearer will not recover his senses until the day of judgement. ~ Saadi,
214:He who learns, and makes no use of his learning, is a beast of burden with a load of books. Does the ass comprehend whether he carries on his back a library or a bundle of faggots? ~ Saadi,
215:The sea does not contain all the pearls, the earth does not enclose all the treasures, and the flint-stone does not inclose all the diamonds, since the head of man encloses wisdom. ~ Saadi,
216:All is going well so far. There are some remarks here and there and there are some complaints here and there but we expect to resolve those questions or complaints Sunday and the next day. ~ Saadi,
217:Précieux ami, j'avoue que mon esclave est insupportable, mais je lui dois d'être devenu meilleur. Il m'a rendu si patient, que je puis maintenant tout supporter de la part de mes semblables. ~ Saadi,
218:Précieux ami, j'avoue que mon esclave est insupportable, mais je lui doit d'être devenu meilleur. Il m'a rendu si patient, que je puis maintenant tout supporter de la part de mes semblables. ~ Saadi,
219:A saint prayed to God in the following way: “O God, please be kind to evil people as much as you are to kind people. Kind people already feel good, because they are kind.” —MUSLIH-UD-DIN SAADI ~ Leo Tolstoy,
220:However much you study, you cannot know without action. A donkey laden with books is neither an intellectual nor a wise man. Empty of essence, what learning has he whether upon him is firewood or book? ~ Saadi,
221:He who, when he hath the power, doeth not good, when he loses the means will suffer distress. There is not a more unfortunate wretch than the oppressor; for in the day of adversity nobody is his friend. ~ Saadi,
222:Avoid that which an enemy tells you to do; for if you follow his advice, you will smite your, knees with the hand of sorrow. If he shows you a road straight as an arrow, turn from it and go the other way. ~ Saadi,
223:However much you study, you cannot know without action.
A donkey laden with books is neither an intellectual nor a wise man.
Empty of essence, what learning has he whether upon him is firewood or book? ~ Saadi,
224:Reveal not every secret you have to a friend, for how can you tell but that friend may hereafter become and enemy. And bring not all mischief you are able to upon an enemy, for he may one day become your friend. ~ Saadi,
225:Saadi? It’s been a really good night. Thank you.”
“I know. Just don’t worry and go to bed.”
“But Saadi? Is it okay if I love you, too?”
“It’s definitely okay. But see how you feel when you’re sober. ~ Cayla Kluver,
226:A friend whom you have been gaining during your whole life, you ought not to be displeased with in a moment. A stone is many years becoming a ruby - take care that you do not destroy it in an instant against another stone. ~ Saadi,
227:Of journeying the benefits are many: the freshness it bringeth to the heart, the seeing and hearing of marvelous things, the delight of beholding new cities, the meeting of unknown friends, and the learning of high manners. ~ Saadi,
228:All human beings are limbs of the same body. God created them from the same essence. If one part of the body suffers pain, then the whole body is affected. If you are indifferent to this pain, you cannot be called a human being. ~ Saadi,
229:Human beings are members of a whole
In creation of one essence and soul
If one member is afflicted with pain
Other members uneasy will remain
If you have no sympathy for human pain
The name of human you cannot retain ~ Saadi,
230:When a mean wretch cannot vie with another in virtue, out of his wickedness he begins to slander. The abject envious wretch will slander the virtuous man when absent, but when brought face to face his loquacious tongue becomes dumb. ~ Saadi,
231:Human beings are members of a whole,
In creation of one essence and soul.
If one member is afflicted with pain,
Other members uneasy will remain.
If you've no sympathy for human pain,
The name of human you cannot retain! ~ Saadi,
232:But for the cravings of the belly not a bird would have fallen into the snare; nay, nay, the fowler would not have spread his net. The belly is chains to the hands and fetters to the feet. He who is a slave to his belly seldom worships God. ~ Saadi,
233:Take care how you listen to the voice of the flatterer, who, in return for his little stock, expects to derive from you considerable advantage. If one day you do not comply with his wishes, be imputes to you two hundred defects instead of perfections. ~ Saadi,
234:Riches are for the comfort of life, and not life for the accumulation of riches. I asked a holy wise man, "Who is fortunate and who is unfortunate?" He replied: "He was fortunate who ate and sowed, and he was unfortunate who died without having enjoyed. ~ Saadi,
235:The sons of Adam are limbs of each other, Having been created of one essence. When the calamity of time affects one limb, the other limbs cannot remain at rest. If you have no sympathy for the troubles of others, You are unworthy to be called by the name of a human. ~ Saadi,
236:/Farsi If one His praise of me would learn, What of the traceless can the tongueless tell? Lovers are killed by those they love so well; No voices from the slain return. [bk1sm.gif] -- from The Gulistan of Sadi: The Rose Garden, Translated by Edward B. Eastwick

~ Saadi, If one His praise of me would learn
,
237:/Farsi The man of God with half his loaf content, To darweshes the remnant will present; But though a king seven regions should subdue, He'll still another conquest keep in view. [bk1sm.gif] -- from The Gulistan of Sadi: The Rose Garden, Translated by Edward B. Eastwick

~ Saadi, The man of God with half his loaf content
,
238:O du, der Du nirgendwo einen Platz hast.
Und doch, was für ein Wunder! überall bist!
Der unaufhörlich erscheint,
Überall innerhalb dieser kreisenden Welt,
Und doch von meinen Augen nicht erfasst werden kannst.

– Sa'adi (Saʿdī oder Moscharref od-Din Abdullah, persisch سعدی, * um 1190 in Schiraz; † 1283 oder 1291) ~ Saadi,
239:author class:Saadi
/Farsi To the wall of the faithful what sorrow, when pillared securely on thee? What terror where Nuh is the pilot, though rages the storm-driven sea? [bk1sm.gif] -- from The Gulistan of Sadi: The Rose Garden, Translated by Edward B. Eastwick
~ the wall of the faithful what sorrow, when pillared securely on thee?
,
240:Vous le savez bien, nous autres Afghans adorons notre poésie. Même les moins instruits peuvent réciter des vers de Hafez, de Khayyam ou de Saadi. Vous rappelez-vous, monsieur Markus, lorsque vous m'avez dit l'année dernière combien vous aimiez les Afghans? Je vous ai demandé pourquoi et vous m'avez répondu en riant : "parce que même vos tagueurs citent Rumi sur les murs". ~ Khaled Hosseini,
241:Persian poet Saadi instructed, “Have patience. All things are difficult before they become easy.” That’s wise advice. Most people never realize how close they are to achieving significant things, because they give up too soon. Everything worthwhile in life takes dedication and time. The people who grow and achieve the most are the ones who harness the power of patience and persistence. ~ John C Maxwell,
242:You took to the trenches and said: war is more beautiful,
you shall never see my feet again.
I will seek the roads and taverns,
I am the blind poet.
The frowning autumn gives music for colors –
sunset gives me the opulence of roses
and I ask about you. I ask about you
but as a stung man does after something has afflicted his blood.
Peace be . . .
– I do not want your reply. ~ Saadi Youssef,
243:/Farsi Have no doubts because of trouble nor be thou discomfited; For the water of life's fountain springeth from a gloomy bed. Ah! ye brothers of misfortune! be not ye with grief oppressed, Many are the secret mercies which with the All-bounteous rest. [bk1sm.gif] -- from The Gulistan of Sadi: The Rose Garden, Translated by Edward B. Eastwick

~ Saadi, Have no doubts because of trouble nor be thou discomfited
,
244:/Farsi The world, my brother! will abide with none, By the world's Maker let thy heart be won. Rely not, nor repose on this world's gain, For many a son like thee she has reared and slain. What matters, when the spirit seeks to fly, If on a throne or on bare earth we die? [bk1sm.gif] -- from The Gulistan of Sadi: The Rose Garden, Translated by Edward B. Eastwick

~ Saadi, The world, my brother! will abide with none
,
245:Une goutte de pluie tomba dans la mer, et fut tout interdite. "Ô mer, s'écria-t-elle, je suis si peu de chose dans ton immensité!"
Pour la récompense de son humilité, Dieu ordonna à un coquillage de l'abriter et de la nourrir. Elle se transforma en une perle splendide, que l'on incrusta dans la couronne d'un roi.
Dieu lui fit cet honneur, parce qu'elle avait été humble. Elle vécut, parce qu'elle s'était comparée au néant. ~ Saadi,
246:/Farsi In Love there are no days or nights, For lovers it is all the same. The musicians have gone, yet the Sufis listen; In Love there is a beginning but no end. Each has a name for his Beloved, But for me my Beloved is nameless. Sa'di, if you destroy an idol, Then destroy the idol of the self. [2469.jpg] -- from Islamic Mystical Poetry: Sufi Verse from the Early Mystics to Rumi, Translated by Mahmood Jamal

~ Saadi, In Love
,
247:/Farsi All Adam's offspring form one family tree, from the beginning, the same life and spirit and quality. When one limb is bent with pain, the entire living tree naturally feels the strain. Thus he indifferent to the agony of another, cannot be named human alongside his brother. [2676.jpg] -- from Diamond Cutters: Visionary Poets in America, Britain & Oceania, Edited by Andrew Harvey / Edited by Jay Ramsay

~ Saadi, All Adams offspring form one family tree
,
248:Your love renders you impatient and disturbed.
With such sincerity you have placed your head at her feet that you are oblivious to the world.

When in the eyes of your beloved riches don't count, gold and dust are as one to you.
You say that she dwells in your eyes - if they be closed, she is in your mind.
If she demands your life, you place it in her hand; if she places a sword upon your head, you hold it forward.

When earthly love produces such confusion and demands such obedience, don't you wonder if travelers of the road of God remain engulfed in the Ocean of Reality? ~ Saadi,
249:With no plans and no pressure, I jogged up the stairs to my bedroom, flopping gracelessly on the bed. I wondered what Cannan was doing right now, what Steldor and Galen were doing. Then my thoughts shifted to Saadi. What was he doing? Was he smoothing his hair? Was he fighting with his sister? Was he breaking up some brawl in the street? Or was he thinking of me?
Believing I had hit on the truth with the last possibility, I curled up on my side, permitting myself to daydream and doze. It was quite a pleasant way to pass the time, especially since I could see his freckled face behind my closed eyelids. ~ Cayla Kluver,
250:Your love renders you impatient and disturbed.
With such sincerity you have
placed your head at her feet that
you are oblivious to the world.

When in the eyes of your beloved riches don't count, gold and dust are as one to you.
You say that she dwells in your eyes - if they be closed, she is in your mind.
If she demands your life, you place
it in her hand; if she places a sword
upon your head, you hold it forward.

When earthly love produces such confusion and demands such obedience, don't you wonder if travelers of the road of God remain engulfed in the Ocean of Reality? ~ Saadi,
251:The lover I am; it befits me to burn;
but what is the reason for your weeping and burning?
The candle replied: ‘Oh my ill-fated lover,
a honey-sweet [shirin] friend went away from me.
Someone like Shirin has deserted me;
there is fire on my head, as it was on Farhad’s.’
The candle continued, while a painful flood
each moment gushed down on his yellow cheeks:
'Pretender, this love is not your game,
as you have no patience, no strength to stand.
Untouched you shrink from a single flame,
whereas I stand still until I am consumed.
If the fire of love has scorched your wings,
look at me: it burned me from head to foot. ~ Saadi,
252:Cloves

Where is the scent of cloves coming from?
her hair?
armpit?
or her dress
thrown on the Tunisian rug?
From the third step in the house?
Layla
makes everything smell of cloves.
Layla
is the orchard when it’s wet.
She is
what the orchard breathes
when it’s watered at night.
Layla knows now
that I am drunk with the scent of cloves,
she stiches together my clouds
and then scatters them together
in a sky like a sheet
as she clasps me.
Layla
feels that my fingers are numb,
over the dunes she knows
my pulse is hers,
my water is hers.
Layla
leaves me sleeping,
rocking between clouds
and cloves. ~ Saadi Youssef,
253:Commander,” Saadi greeted him, but this was ignored by Narian, who instead issued orders.
“There’s nothing to be gained by this. Free her.”
“Rava will be displeased,” Saadi warned. “The High Priestess will be displeased.”
“The longer you argue, the more displeased I will be. How do you think the Hytanicans will react to our making an example of a young woman? Release her. I will report the matter to the High Priestess.”
This time when my Cokyrian captor glanced at me, I dared to look back, noticing his bronze hair and the freckles that danced across his nose. I shifted self-consciously, unable to believe that I was thinking of my appearance. Damn Cokyrians and their damn freckles. ~ Cayla Kluver,
254:I hastened onto the thoroughfare, spotting Saadi by his distinctive gait. It was easy, yet confident. I blushed, feeling silly for admiring him from afar, but I couldn’t make myself stop. He was tall, he was strong and those damn freckles constantly got the best of me. He picked up his pace, walking straight toward me, having seen me, as well.
“I’ve learned it’s best to approach you from the front, for the sake of my well-being,” he quipped upon reaching me.
“For the sake of your dignity, perhaps you should also forfeit the race,” I suggested, and he chuckled, falling into step with me.
“Shaselle, I wouldn’t be so arrogant if I were you. I may be a mere man, but I am not without skills.”
“We’ll see, won’t we?”
I was enjoying our banter, feeling strangely giddy. I was happy, an emotion I had never again expected to experience. This was good, and right--and wrong. What would my mother, my uncle, Steldor, Galen and the rest of my family think if they knew with whom I was spending time? But that wasn’t important now. I had a mission. ~ Cayla Kluver,
255:/Farsi How could I ever thank my Friend? No thanks could ever begin to be worthy. Every hair of my body is a gift from Him; How could I thank Him for each hair? Praise that lavish Lord forever Who from nothing conjures all living beings! Who could ever describe His goodness? His infinite glory lays all praise waste. Look, He has graced you a robe of splendor From childhood's first cries to old age! He made you pure in His own image; stay pure. It is horrible to die blackened by sin. Never let dust settle on your mirror's shining; Let it once grow dull and it will never polish. When you work in the world to earn your living Do not, for one moment, rely on your own strength. Self-worshiper, don't you understand anything yet? It is God alone that gives your arms their power. If, by your striving, you achieve something good, Don't claim the credit all for yourself; It is fate that decides who wins and who loses And all success streams only from the grace of God. In this world you never stand by your own strength; It is the Invisible that sustains you every moment.

~ Saadi, How could I ever thank my Friend?
,
256:We went toward the military base, my anxiety ratcheting up the closer to our destination we came. The Cokyrians now controlled this area, and no Hytanicans were allowed to enter; but Saadi ignored the odd looks of the guards, who did not question him, confirming my suspicions about his status. He took me to the stables that my father had once controlled, and where I had unsuccessfully attempted my prank, and we walked up and down the line of stalls.
“Is this the one then?” Saadi asked, when I stopped to give Briar a pat.
I shook my head. While I would have loved to reclaim the mare, she was young and refined, without the power and stamina required for racing.
“My father’s stallion--the black-and-white. That’s the horse I want to ride.”
I heard his low whistle from behind me. “That’s a mighty spirited animal. Are you sure you can handle that much horse?”
“If I can’t, you’ll have an easy victory,” I retorted, turning to face him.
Saadi considered me, one eyebrow raised, no doubt trying to assess my riding ability, not because I was a woman, but because I was a Hytanican woman. Then he stepped past me, motioning for me to follow.
“To the stallion barn,” he said. His tone was patronizing, but I didn’t care. I would have my father’s prized stallion back.
Saadi’s horse was a gelding, and we shared a laugh at the problems we might have had if he’d happened to pick a mare. The animal was strong and long-legged, good for distance running, but Saadi had no idea what my father’s King could do. ~ Cayla Kluver,
257:And until then?” The dim, flickering light of the lantern created an eerie atmosphere and seemed to finish my question: Can we trust her?
“Honestly?” Narian said, staring into my eyes and unintentionally increasing my foreboding. “I don’t want to think about it.”
“Well, then, is there anything I can do for you?”
His brow furrowed. “What do you mean?”
“From what I knew of Saadi, he was not only respected, but well-liked. And you would have known him better than I. You must feel his loss yourself.”
“He was a good man.” Narian stretched out on his back, and I tucked pillows underneath his head. “Saadi made it possible for me to believe that our goals were attainable, that Hytanicans and Cokyrians could come to understand one another and to cooperate with each other. His death, especially under suspicious circumstances, leaves me feeling defeated.”
He put his arm around me, and I curled up at his side, and I could almost feel him becoming more introspective.
“In some ways, Alera,” he quietly revealed, “I had more in common with Saadi than I did with any other Cokyrian stationed here.”
“You know, we Hytanicans have a name for someone like Saadi. We would call him a friend.”
“Interesting,” Narian said, and I knew I had given him even more to think about.
“Are you tired?” I asked, aware that he could not sleep on his back.
“Not particularly.”
“Good. Then I don’t have to move.”
He gave a soft laugh and kissed the top of my head.
“I will make any sacrifice for you,” he murmured, letting me drift into sleep. ~ Cayla Kluver,
258:In the name of Him Who created and sustains the world, the Sage Who endowed tongue with speech.
He attains no honor who turns the face from the doer of His mercy.
The kings of the earth prostate themselves before Him in supplication.
He seizes not in haste the disobedient, nor drives away the penitent with violence. The two worlds are as a drop of water in the ocean of His knowledge.
He withholds not His bounty though His servants sin; upon the surface of the earth has He spread a feast, in which both friend and foe may share.
Peerless He is, and His kingdom is eternal. Upon the head of one He placed a crown another he hurled from the throne to the ground.
The fire of His friend He turned into a flower garden; through the water of the Nile He sended His foes to perdition.
Behind the veil He sees all, and concealed our faults with His own goodness.

He is near to them that are downcast, and accepts the prayers of them that lament.
He knows of the things that exist not, of secrets that are untold.
He causes the moon and the sun to revolve, and spreads water upon the earth.
In the heart of a stone hath He placed a jewel; from nothing had He created all that is.
Who can reveal the secret of His qualities; what eye can see the limits of His beauty?
The bird of thought cannot soar to the height of His presence, nor the hand of understanding reach to the skirt of His praise.
Think not, O Saadi, that one can walk in the road of purity except in the footsteps of Mohammed (Peace and Blessings be Upon Him)
~ Saadi, The Bustan of Sa'di,
259:In the name of Him Who created and
sustains the world, the Sage Who
endowed tongue with speech.
He attains no honor who turns the face from the doer of His mercy.
The kings of the earth prostate themselves before Him in supplication.
He seizes not in haste the disobedient, nor drives away the penitent with
violence. The two worlds are as a drop of water in the ocean of His knowledge.
He withholds not His bounty though His
servants sin; upon
the surface of the earth has He spread a feast, in which both friend and foe may share.
Peerless He is, and His kingdom is eternal. Upon the head of one He placed a crown another he hurled from the throne to the ground.
The fire of His friend He turned into a
flower garden; through the water of the
Nile He sended His foes to perdition.
Behind the veil He sees all, and conceal
ed our faults with His own goodness.

He is near to them that are downcast,
and accepts the prayers of them that
lament.
He knows of the things that exist not, of secrets that are untold.
He causes the moon and the sun to revolve, and spreads water upon the
earth.
In the heart of a stone hath He placed
a jewel; from nothing had He created all that is.
Who can reveal the secret of His qualities; what eye can see the limits of His
beauty?
The bird of thought cannot soar to the height of His presence, nor the hand of
understanding reach to the skirt of His praise.
Think not, O Saadi, that one can walk
in the road of purity except in the
footsteps of Mohammed (Peace and Blessings be Upon Him) ~ Saadi,
260:We finished two dances, and I would have taken a break had the musicians not begun to play a lament. Grayden drew me close, swaying side to side, but even with the slower pace, I couldn’t seem to catch my breath.
“Would you like to know something, Shaselle?”
“Just don’t tell me I have food in my teeth.”
“No, silly,” he said with a grin. “It’s just that I’ve never been happier than I am now. And I was wondering…that is, I was thinking…” He took a deep breath and blurted, “I’d like to ask your uncle for permission to court you.”
“I thought we were courting. Or is that a secret?” I felt euphoric from his closeness, my head swimming, my heart light. So naturally, I had to tease him.
“I just want to do things the right way.” He hesitated, gazing into my eyes, before softly adding, “But if we are courting, then I believe certain liberties may be taken.”
He touched his lips to mine in a kiss so sweet that it threatened to halt my breath altogether.
“What do you say, Shaselle?” he murmured, raising his hands to my face, his touch tender. “May I speak with your uncle?”
I scanned his dark hair, sparkling green eyes and upturned nose, thoughts of other suitors I had met, of Saadi, of my mother’s and Cannan’s plans for my future tumbling over each other. In the fallout from everything that had happened, I had never expected to feel truly happy, wasn’t certain I deserved it. But this was the course my life was supposed to take, and if the fates were willing to include happiness along with it, I wasn’t going to pass it by.
“Yes,” I said with a wistful smile. “I think courting is an intriguing possibility.”
He threaded his fingers through mine and led me aside, an exuberant grin affixed in place. ~ Cayla Kluver,
261:The baskets, both of which I had filled, were growing heavy. I held one in each hand and glanced around for a place I might sit until Dahnath was ready to go home. I was about to dodge across the street when my load lightened, one of the baskets having been taken away. Thinking a thief, I shouted and swung around, arm outstretched, and my nails scratched someone or something.
“Enough of that!” a man yelped, and the moment my eyes fell on him, I groaned.
Saadi, what do you think you’re doing?” I demanded.
“Well, I thought I was helping you. As it turns out, I’m bleeding.”
“No, you’re not!”
I stepped closer to inspect the tracks on his cheek where my nails had made contact, and gently lay my fingers on the scratches. He winced and took my hand, holding it away from his lightly freckled face. Acutely aware of his touch, I blushed. He was adorable, as much as I’d fought against admitting it. His pale blue eyes examined me for a moment, confused by my reaction, then he grinned.
“So…sewing?” he asked.
“For my sisters.”
“Oh. How many?”
“Four. And a brother.”
“Full house. Rava is my only sibling.”
My mood dipped at mention of his sister. He put a hand gently on my back, guiding me to the side of a building and out of the way of traffic.
“We don’t get along, if it helps,” he added, aware of my feelings.
I laughed. “Do siblings ever get along?”
“I think so. At least, most siblings who argue will apologize and enjoy each other’s company until the next fight comes along. I don’t remember ever enjoying Rava.”
“That’s said,” I murmured.
He grinned again. “Well, would you enjoy her?”
I don’t know her, other than as an enemy. Maybe I’d like her if we’d grown up together. ~ Cayla Kluver,
262:A Persian, a Turk, an Arab, and a Greek were traveling to a distant land when they began arguing over how to spend the single coin they possessed among themselves. All four craved food, but the Persian wanted to spend the coin on angur; the Turk, on uzum; the Arab, on inab; and the Greek, on stafil. The argument became heated as each man insisted on having what he desired. A linguist passing by overheard their quarrel. “Give the coin to me,” he said. “I undertake to satisfy the desires of all of you.” Taking the coin, the linguist went to a nearby shop and bought four small bunches of grapes. He then returned to the men and gave them each a bunch. “This is my angur!” cried the Persian. “But this is what I call uzum,” replied the Turk. “You have brought me my inab,” the Arab said. “No! This in my language is stafil,” said the Greek. All of a sudden, the men realized that what each of them had desired was in fact the same thing, only they did not know how to express themselves to each other. The four travelers represent humanity in its search for an inner spiritual need it cannot define and which it expresses in different ways. The linguist is the Sufi, who enlightens humanity to the fact that what it seeks (its religions), though called by different names, are in reality one identical thing. However—and this is the most important aspect of the parable—the linguist can offer the travelers only the grapes and nothing more. He cannot offer them wine, which is the essence of the fruit. In other words, human beings cannot be given the secret of ultimate reality, for such knowledge cannot be shared, but must be experienced through an arduous inner journey toward self-annihilation. As the transcendent Iranian poet, Saadi of Shiraz, wrote, I am a dreamer who is mute, And the people are deaf. I am unable to say, And they are unable to hear. ~ Reza Aslan,
263:A shadow passed over me, then Saadi lay down beside me.
“You won,” he said.
“You let me.”
There was a silence--he hadn’t expected me to know. Then I heard the grass rustle as he shrugged. “You’re right. I did.”
Laughing at his candor, I sat up and looked at him. He was relaxing with his arms behind his head, his bronze hair damp and sticking to his forehead.
“Why did you let me win? You know that means I don’t have to spend any more time with you.”
He propped himself up on his elbows, perusing my face. “That doesn’t bother me.”
I frowned. Did he no longer desire my company?
“I never wanted to force you to spend time with me, Shaselle. I wanted you to want to spend time with me.”
“You’re a poet,” I joked, amused by his graceless word choice, and he grinned.
“Besides, a victory is a victory. You won and now have the best of everything--you get your father’s horse, and you can be rid of me if you want.”
With a mischievous glint in my eye, I put my hands on the ground on either side of his waist. “I would have won, anyway.”
He chuckled, once more lying down flat. “You’re shameless.”
I rolled back to my original position, and we both quieted, but there was an aspect of my victory that still bothered me.
“Tell me, why did it matter to you who won? I mean, even if you’d won, you still could have released me from the bargain. You could have said I didn’t have to spend those two days with you.”
“I could have,” he acknowledged. “But after…after you told me about your father, I wanted you to have his horse back. Rava should have had more respect for his memory. She shouldn’t have taken him--them--away.”
Tears stung my eyes, and I swallowed several times to loosen my throat. What a stupid reaction.
“Thank you,” I murmured, and I felt his hand close around mine, giving it a squeeze. I sighed contentedly, letting myself enjoy the moment. ~ Cayla Kluver,
264:I tugged at his arm when my house came into view, shushing him loudly.
“My mother’s in there,” I hissed.
“Isn’t she asleep?”
I hit him on the arm with a breathy giggle. “She is!”
“Then let’s go!”
“Go where?”
“To your home. I want to see it.”
I took his hand and dug my heels into the ground to keep him from moving forward. “No. Saadi, no!”
“Just show me quick and then I’ll leave. I promise.”
His blue eyes glistened with curiosity, robbing me of both the desire and strength to resist, and I relented. He followed me onto the property and we crept along the side of the house until we came to the sturdy oak that had twice enabled me to escape.
“That’s my bedroom window,” I whispered, pointing straight up, and he redirected my finger. “I sleep there.”
Saadi wasn’t surprised by this revelation. I went over to the tree, needing a boost from him to get into it. Given his height, he had no difficulty pulling up behind me, which proved to be a good idea. I would surely have lost my balance swinging my leg through the window had he not steadied me.
“We made it.” He chortled, pulling himself inside. “I believe that’s cause for celebration.”
He handed me his flask, and I poured wine into my mouth, feeling some of it dribble down my chin. I fell upon the bed, holding the drink out to him, and he drained it, landing beside me when he tipped his head too far back.
“Do you want to know something, Shaselle?”
“If you want me to know something.” I giggled. He was very funny.
He took a breath, then proclaimed, “Lady Shaselle of Hytanica, I am in love with you.”
I burst into laughter, pulling my legs up to ease my aching stomach muscles. He rolled onto his side to look at me, propping his head up with his hand.
“I’m serious,” he insisted, grinning foolishly at me.
“You’re drunk.”
“True, but even drunks can be in love.”
“But that’s just stupid!”
“Being in love with you is stupid?”
“Well, yes! ~ Cayla Kluver,
265:Well, for a century, our takeover of your kingdom has been inevitable. You should have acclimated yourselves to the idea by now.”
“You’re right. This is our fault, really. We’ve never been superb at preparation here in Hytanica.”
Saadi shrugged, and I thought for one stunned moment that he had taken my statements to be sincere. Then his expression changed, and he looked at me with what appeared to be sympathy, perhaps even regret.
“I do understand it, Shaselle. Being second tier, overrun, overlooked. Not having influence.”
It disturbed me that he not only remembered my relation to Cannan and Steldor, but also my name. Yet I did not flee.
“You have to take what you’re handed and make what you can of it,” he finished. “That’s the sorry truth.”
“I plan to make them pay,” I snarled, hating his words and how similar they were to the message Queen Alera had been trying to send for weeks.
Them? What about me?”
“Stop it!” I stamped my foot, not even sure what was upsetting me. “You killed my father!”
“And you want revenge. Naturally. Just like the butcher in there. But the problem is, Shaselle, revenge isn’t a very satisfying goal. It eats away at you, destroys you from the inside out. You end up bitter and empty just like that butcher. And that’s not a pretty sight.”
“What is wrong with you? You think you know everything about me! You don’t. Stay out of my way and out of my business.”
I spun on my heel and began to stride away, but he called me back.
“Don’t you want this?”
I turned to see that he was still holding my canvas bag filled with fruit. I breathed in and out heavily, my stomach complaining, my pride aching just as much.
“So far, it’s been you who’s getting in my way.” He chuckled. “If you don’t like it, let that uncle of yours catch up with you.”
I warily returned to him to reclaim my bag, but he held it away from me for a moment longer.
“There is the matter of the damages for the door,” he said, and my heart sank, for lack of money was what had gotten me into this mess in the first place. But before I could speak, he added, “I’ll cover the cost for now. But you’ll owe me.”
Annoyed that I would be in his debt, I snatched my bag from his hand, then sprinted in the other direction, his laughter nipping at my heels. ~ Cayla Kluver,
266:Why don’t you get along with her?”
His expression sobered. “Rava is who she is. Being older than me and of more importance, she was raised differently and never felt the need to have much of a relationship with me. That’s not to say she doesn’t care about me--she does. I think she’s even proud of me, in her own way.” He touched the officer’s insignia tacked to the shoulder of his black, asymmetrically cut uniform jacket. “I fought to achieve this rank, not an easy task, for men are not generally placed in command positions. We’re too hotheaded, as a group. Still, she has no trouble stepping on and over me, which you can probably appreciate.”
“Perhaps,” I said, though his words confused me. Certain activities were not deemed appropriate for me since I was a woman, but for the most part, I did not resent my lot in life. But Saadi was strong, intelligent and extremely capable. In Hytanica, he would have been the pride of his family. How could he have been overlooked in Cokyri? Had Rava been the pride of his family instead?
“This place. It’s so different from Cokyri,” he continued, content to accept my simple answer.
“Not that different,” I replied with a short laugh. “We eat and work and sleep.”
“That’s not what I mean.” He rolled his eyes. “It’s how people look at me. It’s not the same at all.”
“People hate you because you’re Cokyrian. Did you expect to take pleasure in that?”
“That’s not it, either.” He thought for a moment. “It’s strange, the level of fear in the eyes of your women. Belligerence I expect, from everyone, but the fear primarily radiates from the women.” He shrugged, suddenly self-conscious. “But what do I know? Listen, I haven’t even seen half of what there is to see in Hytanica. You could show me one day.”
“You seem to be everywhere in this city,” I scoffed. “There can’t be much left for you to explore. Or have you just been following me around?”
“Well, you’re the most interesting feature of the city I’ve come across.”
He smirked, and I gave him a sideways glance. Was he admitting to stalking me? Then he chuckled.
“As long as I’m assigned to oversee the city, we’re bound to run into each other. I would be lying, however, if I denied that I look forward to our encounters.”
Heat again flooded my face. Saadi was making me uncomfortable. I was in danger of liking him too much. ~ Cayla Kluver,
267:Shaselle!” he cried, eliciting another spasm of giggles from me. “You’ve spilled the wine.”
“No, no, no. You’re the one who spilled the wine.”
I tossed my hair back, my upper body weirdly following the motion, and would probably have hit the cobblestone street had he not caught my arm.
“Don’t worry--I have something.” He dropped his hands to his belt and untied his water flask, presenting it to me like it was the legendary Holy Grail, and I stared stupidly at him.
“Do you know what this is?” he crowed, his words slurring together.
“That’s your water, silly!” I leaned back against him, craning my neck in an attempt to see his face. His balance was fortunately better than mine, and he managed to keep us both upright.
“Do you really think I would keep water in here?” he asked.
I gasped and lunged for his great discovery. He stepped away, laughing.
“Come and get it!”
I did my best, zigzagging after him down the street, while he dodged and stole swigs from the flask.
“You’re going to drink it all!” I shouted, then pointed helplessly at him, trying to find the words to tell him we were no longer alone. He took another step backward, right into the horse of the Cokyrian soldier we had avoided earlier, bouncing off to land gracelessly upon the ground on his rear end.
He stared up at the woman, making no attempt to stand.
“Your horse is very solid,” he slurred. “Congratulations on having such a fine mount.”
Saadi, what are you doing?” she muttered, banishing my initial fear that we would be taken to Rava. I should have remembered how well known he was among the Cokyrians.
“Ah!” he exclaimed. “A friend of mine!” He brandished an arm toward me, struggling to his feet. “She’s a friend of mine, too. That…that girl over there. She’s helping me take care of important business.”
“I can see that,” the woman said, humoring her young comrade. “I’ll leave you to get on with it. But, Saadi, let me remind you that you’re to report to Rava first thing in the morning.”
He nodded, giving a small salute. “Yes, I plan to do that very thing.”
The soldier sighed wistfully. “Oh, how I wish I could be there.” She nudged her horse forward, adding, “Enjoy the rest of your night.”
She headed up the street, continuing her patrol, and Saadi turned to me.
“See how I handled that?” he proudly said. “She didn’t have a clue. ~ Cayla Kluver,
268:Servants entered with soup and bread, no doubt delicious, but neither Grayden nor I had much of an appetite. We didn’t speak, either. This, ironically, Steldor found interesting. His eyes flicked to me several times during the meal, and he made no effort to hide his mirth.
Finally, my suitor managed to ask, “How have you been?”
“Well.”
The awful silence recommenced, and I started counting the seconds, hoping Steldor would interrupt and take me home. He didn’t; he was enjoying our plight.
“How h-have you been?” I stuttered.
“Oh, I’ve been well, as well.”
I laughed. “’Well, as well.’ How very…articulate.”
I paled, for he could consider my comment an insult. I needed to win him over in a hurry if I were to salvage our time together.
Grayden chuckled, rescuing me from embarrassment. “I thought I heard your uncle say that you have been ill. Is that true?”
And here I thought the situation could not get any more awkward.
“My uncle is an honest man,” I said, trying to dodge the topic.
“Of course! I certainly didn’t mean to imply otherwise.”
“And I didn’t mean to imply that you meant to imply…anything.”
We stared at each other, and I could see that Grayden was on the verge of laughing. I probably would have laughed myself, but the spatter of freckles across his nose forced me to look down at my napkin. My eyes welled at the powerful recollections sweeping through me, and at the images of handsome, strong, charismatic Saadi that rose unbidden in my mind.
“Are you all right?” Grayden asked.
I raised my gaze to his and forced my tone to brighten. “Yes, I’m sorry, just a speck of dust in my eye.”
“I understand. Perhaps some fresh air would help.” He was unexpectedly astute, but at least was not asking any more questions. He glanced at Steldor, who motioned us from the room with but one piece of advice for me.
“You’ll have to scream more loudly from out there.”
Grayden escorted me into the corridor and through a back door that I anticipated would open upon a garden. But what I saw instead was my version of Eden--a row of paddocks beside a large stable, all filled with beautiful horses.
“I’m afraid it’s not exactly fresh air,” Grayden jested, walking to lean against the nearest fence, leaving me to follow.
“It’s fresh enough.”
I gaped at the well-bred animals, not even aware of Grayden’s eyes on me.
“Your uncle told me of your love for horses, Shaselle,” he said, startling me out of my trance. ~ Cayla Kluver,
269:With these uneasy thoughts urging me onward, I hurried toward home, praying I would make it in time for dinner and thereby avoid having to answer to my mother. That was the only way my day could get worse. I was forced to adjust that conclusion, however, when I spotted Saadi loitering nearby. The moment he laid eyes on me, I knew he’d been waiting for me, and I groaned. Why couldn’t he leave me alone?
“Shaselle!” he called, coming toward me.
I gritted my teeth, knowing I could not escape. The traffic on the thoroughfare had thinned, as was generally the case at this time of day, no longer providing the cover I needed to dart past him. He came abreast of me, but I didn’t slow or acknowledge him.
“I’m glad I caught you,” he said, and in my peripheral vision, I could see him smoothing that damn bronze hair forward, an impossible task, for as always it kinked upward at the midpoint of his hairline.
“Can’t say the same.”
“I didn’t take you to my sister.” He sounded like this small mercy should be eliciting gratitude from me.
“I realize that.”
Saadi exhaled, baffled and exasperated. “How can you be angry with me?”
I halted and stared at him in disbelief. “I’m not! You’re the Cokyrian soldier who arrested me when I broke the law. Our relationship ends there. It would be a waste of my time to be angry with you.”
“That’s it?” he said, eyebrows rising, and I was sure I detected disappointment. “I thought…I don’t know. I thought you were angry with me before, for not having mentioned I’m Rava’s brother. Weren’t you?”
“No,” I lied.
I still didn’t understand why it upset me to know that this annoying tag-along was related to the woman I hated with such intensity that my insides burned. But there was no reason to complicate things by letting him know the truth.
“Well, I saved you today, didn’t I? Just like I saved you before. You walked out of the Bastion free, without a scratch, and if any Cokyrian but me had caught you with that dagger, you might be drawn and quartered by now.”
“You didn’t save me from that butcher,” I said irritably. “But you’re right. About today, I mean.” I could sense his satisfaction, which irritated me all the more. “So accept my thanks, but stay away from me. We’re not friends, you know.”
I was nearing my neighborhood and didn’t want anyone to see me with him. He stepped in front of me, forcing me to stop.
“We’re not friends yet. But you’ve thought about it. And you just thanked me.”
“Are you delusional?”
“No. You just said thank you to the faceless Cokyrian soldier who arrested you.”
“Don’t you ever stop?” I demanded, trying in vain to move around him.
“I haven’t even started.”
“What does that mean? ~ Cayla Kluver,
270:Listen, I haven’t even seen half of what there is to see in Hytanica. You could show me one day.”
“You seem to be everywhere in this city,” I scoffed. “There can’t be much left for you to explore. Or have you just been following me around?”
“Well, you’re the most interesting feature of the city I’ve come across.”
He smirked, and I gave him a sideways glance. Was he admitting to stalking me? Then he chuckled.
“As long as I’m assigned to oversee the city, we’re bound to run into each other. I would be lying, however, if I denied that I look forward to our encounters.”
Heat again flooded my face. Saadi was making me uncomfortable. I was in danger of liking him too much.
“That reminds me,” I said. “I owe you for a lock.”
I glanced to see that Dahnath was still talking to Drael. He was holding her hands, preparing to depart. Knowing from the general length of their goodbyes that it would be at least five minutes more, I removed a coin from my pocket.
Saadi grinned. “I thought you had forgotten.”
“Not at all.” I pressed the coin into his hand. “But you have to go. My sister will be coming to find me at any moment. She can’t see us together or she’ll tell my mother and probably Cannan. We could both end up in dismal straits.”
I expected him to ridicule me for being afraid of my mother, but he did not.
“What do you say, Shaselle? Two days from now I’ll be off duty.”
“You really want to see me?”
“Yes,” he confirmed, pale blue eyes sparkling, his bronze hair sticking erratically up in front.
“All right then.”
“Wonderful. I can meet you whenever, wherev--”
“On one condition.”
His smile faded and his tone grew wary. “Which is?”
“I’ll spend a day with you only if you can beat me in a horse race.”
He laughed and shook his head. “Of course I can beat you.”
“Then prove it. We’ll each pick a mount and race--I’ll need to borrow one from your Cokyrian stables. Take it or leave it. Either way, I have to go now. But I wouldn’t be so cocky if I were you, boy.”
He smiled, intrigued by my challenge. “I’ll take it, but let’s raise the stakes. Make it more worthwhile.”
Curious, I motioned for him to go on.
“If I win, you agree to spend two days with me, when I’m off duty. If you win, you get to keep the horse you chose to ride.”
I stared into his eyes for a long moment, until I was certain he wasn’t toying with me. He knew as well as I did that I would choose one of my father’s horses--one that had been stolen by his sister. He was giving me a chance to bring one of them home. My spirits soared, and I extended my hand. Saadi shook it, then shoved the basket at me, turning to stride away. Just in time, too, for Dahnath was approaching. ~ Cayla Kluver,
271:Well?” the guard who discovered me prompted.
“I recognize her,” Saadi answered, staring directly at the woman. “She works for my sister as an errand girl.”
I briefly closed my eyes in relief. Saadi waved the guard back to her post and issued an order to the man behind him to retrieve his cloak. When it was thrust into his hands, he escorted me back across the base, not speaking until we were out of earshot of those on patrol.
“So, Rava has a message for me?”
I shoved him unthinkingly, teasingly, and he laughed, jumping away.
You wanted to see me, remember?” I pointed out. “But you never picked a time or place!”
“So you decided to do it for me. Fair enough, but I’m dying to know what you have in mind to do.”
“I don’t have anything in mind.”
We had reached the thoroughfare, and he chuckled. “You braved Cokyrian soldiers and the stronghold of the military base, but don’t have a thing in mind for us to do?”
“That’s right,” I admitted, irritated that he was laughing at me. “Would you grow up please?”
“Shaselle, there’s nothing ‘grown-up’ about what we’re doing. I assume you snuck away from home to see me, and I have a five o’clock call in the morning.”
I came to a halt and turned to face him, my eyes issuing a challenge. “If you want to go back, feel free. Tell those soldiers that Rava just wanted to make sure her baby brother went to bed on time.”
He grinned, enjoying my feisty responses, and smoothed his bronze hair forward, a habit I still found annoying. It also served to make my heart flutter.
“Trust me, I’ve survived many a night without sleep.” He came closer, putting his hands on my hips, and I spontaneously leaned in to kiss him. He drew me close, his mouth more hungry than it had been in the barn, and a tingle ran from my lips to my toes. Then I pulled away, smiling mischievously, loving how reckless my actions were.
He took my hand, kissing each of my fingers before tugging me down the street.
“Come on, Shaselle.”
“Where are we going?”
Saadi didn’t answer, but led me in the direction of the Market District. As a Cokyrian solider on horseback trotted by, he pulled me into the shadows of a storefront, placing a finger upon his lips.
“I’ve thought of something for us to do,” he whispered. “Since you came so unprepared.”
Once more he took my hand, and I went with him blindly, happily, until we reached the shop from which I’d stolen fruit and wine when I’d run away from home.
“What are you--?”
He gave the door a strong kick, and I winced at the crack of the wood in the stillness.
Saadi!” I hissed, glancing around, expecting the mounted Cokyrian to come galloping back.
He ignored me, pushing the door open.
“Come on now. No errand girl of Rava’s would be such a coward! ~ Cayla Kluver,
272:What happened?” I croaked, and she came to my side, offering me a cool drink.
“You’re fine,” she soothed. “Both of you are fine. Just lie still.”
“But…how did I come to be here?”
“You and my son passed out. No one knows how or why, but a lot of people lost consciousness. The Cokyrian commander summoned physicians to treat everyone, then my Lord Landru found you and brought you both here.”
“I need to go home. My mother must be frantic.” I struggled to sit upright, then fell back, my head pounding, nausea sweeping through me that was so debilitating I would have gladly traded it for a hangover.
“Shaselle, are you all right?” It was Grayden, his voice weak and confused. His mother replaced the damp cloth on my brow, then went to offer him something to drink.
“I think I will be,” I managed in response.
I heard voices in the foyer, then Lord Landru strode into the parlor.
“She’s there, Cannan,” he said, and my uncle approached, his atypical worry lines relaxing when he realized I was conscious.
“How are you, Shaselle?”
“Never better.”
He laughed in pure relief. “I’m going to let you rest here for a while yet. Then I’ll return and take you home. But you’re going to be just fine.”
“What went wrong, Uncle? Everyone was so happy, and then…it was chaos.”
“I know. There was a disturbance--Hytanican caused, I’m afraid. But the Cokyrians were only too eager to respond. Feebly armed Hytanicans in various stages of inebriation were no match for sober, well-armed and well-trained Cokyrian soldiers. It would have been a bloodbath had it not been for Commander Narian.” Cannan shook his head, as if trying to figure something out. “I’m not sure what he did, but he must have been anticipating trouble. He released some type of poison--no, not a poison. But some type of airborne substance that knocked everybody off their feet. Shut the fighting down at once.”
He placed a hand on my cheek, brushing away a few wisps of my hair.
“You no doubt feel poorly right now, but I’ve been told the effects wear off in a few hours. You’ll be back to normal after that.”
“Captain, sir?” It was Grayden.
My uncle gazed over at him in surprise. “Yes?”
“This may not be the ideal time to ask, but, would you please permit me to court Shaselle?”
There was stunned silence in the room, then loud laughter.
“I’d be a fool to deny you a chance with my niece. Assuming Shaselle favors the idea.”
“I do, Uncle,” I assured him, easily slipping back toward sleep, images of Grayden and Saadi drifting through my head. Then a remembrance of Queen Alera and Commander Narian came to the forefront--how deferential he had been with her when I had been caught with that dagger, how she had looked at him. And I knew two things with absolute certainty. She was in love with him, and he had to be a good man. ~ Cayla Kluver,
273:Tell me, why did it matter to you who won? I mean, even if you’d won, you still could have released me from the bargain. You could have said I didn’t have to spend those two days with you.”
“I could have,” he acknowledged. “But after…after you told me about your father, I wanted you to have his horse back. Rava should have had more respect for his memory. She shouldn’t have taken him--them--away.”
Tears stung my eyes, and I swallowed several times to loosen my throat. What a stupid reaction.
“Thank you,” I murmured, and I felt his hand close around mine, giving it a squeeze. I sighed contentedly, letting myself enjoy the moment. “What was your father like?”
“I don’t know,” he said offhandedly.
“What do you mean, you don’t know?” As usual, my typical phrasing was somewhat coarse, driven by my curiosity, and I caught myself, adopting a more considerate tone. “Did he die when you were young?”
“No, he’s still alive.”
I turned my head to gape at him, greatly confused. “He left you?”
“No.”
“Then what?
I sat up again, close to exasperation; he just looked at me, bemused, my hand still in his.
“Father’s don’t raise their children in Cokyri. They aren’t trusted with such an important responsibility. I never knew mine.”
This was not an answer I could have foreseen, and I shifted uneasily, trying to figure out how to proceed.
“I’m sorry,” I said lamely.
He was quiet at first, his eyes fixed on the darkened sky as he pondered our different experiences.
“I never felt sorry about it. My mother was a good woman--she and her maidens took care of me. But like I told you before, I had to work harder than you can imagine to achieve my military rank, and only because I’m a man. I can do everything Rava can do. I always could, but no one would see it, not even her. A struggle like that makes you question things.”
“So now you wish you’d known your father?”
Again, he reflected. “No. I wish I’d known yours.
I looked away, once more fighting tears. I didn’t understand how he could affect me so deeply.
“I’m not sure my father would have been to your liking,” I finally said, meeting his eyes. “I found him brave for his willingness to fight, even when there was no more hope. You would probably have found him weak.”
He sat up and gazed earnestly at me. “There is a way to accomplish things, but it’s rarely to declare a war, private or otherwise.”
“Sometimes the war is not of your making,” I retorted. “You must fight, otherwise you’re a lamb. And lambs are slaughtered, Saadi.”
His brows drew together, and we stared at each other for much longer than we should have, and I knew I had rattled him. Then he shook his head.
“See those lights up there? They’re called stars.”
I laughed. “I can take a hint. We should go back.”
We caught and saddled our mounts, then took our time returning to the city, neither of us really wanting the day to end. ~ Cayla Kluver,
274:Rava approached Steldor and removed a dagger from a sheath at her hip. With her left hand, she smoothed the collar of his white shirt, then yanked the fabric away from his chest, slicing through it in a single motion. Spying the silver wolf’s head talisman that he always wore, she seized it, ripping it free of his neck.
“Whether for good luck or good fortune, you’ll have no need of this,” she sneered, dropping the pendant into a pouch that hung from her belt.
“I’m sorry it’s not strong enough to cover your stench,” he icily replied, for the mixture inside the talisman was the source of his rich, masculine scent.
Rava stared at Steldor, then stalked around him to tear the remnants of his shirt from his back, trying without success to strip him of his pride. She perused his muscular torso, and when she faced him once more, her eyes came to rest on the scar beneath his rib cage--the one that marked the life-threatening wound given to him by a Cokyrian blade--and placed the tip of the dagger she still held against it.
“Only slightly marred.” She traced the knife’s point along the jagged white line, leaving a trail of red. “I’ll see what I can do to change that.”
She tucked the weapon back into its sheath and gave a nod to the soldiers who had brought Steldor out of the Bastion. As they tied his wrists with rope, she went to the woman who had brought the box and lifted its lid. With a satisfied chuckle, she removed a whip more fearsome than any I had ever seen, cradling it like a mother would an infant, and the gathered throng fell silent. It was indeed rawhide, but uncoiled it reached four feet in length before meeting a silver ring, on the other end of which another two feet of metal-studded leather waited to strike. I looked to Narian and Cannan, and knew by both of their expressions that this was not what they had expected. Indeed, Rava purposefully made eye contact with Narian, her demeanor haughty, before returning her attention to her prey.
“On your knees,” Rava growled, dangling the whip in front of Steldor. He obeyed, his eyes never leaving her face, continuing to radiate strength and insolence.
“How can a flag be of consequence in a dead kingdom?” she taunted. “It is cloth. It is meaningless. And it can be burned.”
She ticked a finger for one of the many soldiers around us to come forward, and I recognized Saadi. He extended our rolled Hytanican flag, and Rava took it, letting it unfurl until the end touched the ground. She held out her other hand and Saadi passed her a lit torch, which she touched to the banner of my homeland, letting flames consume it. The courtyard’s white stone walkway would now and forever be scorched.
Steldor’s upper lip lifted away from his teeth, but aside from this snarl, he showed no reaction.
“Tell me, does it seem worth it to you to suffer this punishment for a rag?
“Without question,” Steldor forcefully answered, and cheers rolled like thunder through the Hytanicans who had gathered to watch, sending chills down my spine. ~ Cayla Kluver,
275:Two hours I’ve been searching for you boys. Having fun?” The captain was irked, but that didn’t forestall Galen.
“Yes, sir,” he declared, with an impudent grin.
Cannan almost rolled his eyes, then he dropped his volume. “The manor house, half an hour. Understood?”
Steldor and Galen nodded, then Cannan’s eyes fell on me.
“Shaselle, you should go back to the faire,” he decreed, a warning underlying his tone.
I knew I should obey, and I certainly knew Cannan wasn’t likely to give me permission to remain with Steldor and Galen. Still, something was up, and I wanted to be a part of it. I stayed put, peering sheepishly up at him.
“Shaselle,” he prompted.
“I’d like to come,” I murmured, fearful of his reaction. “I’ll stay out of the way and won’t cause any trouble.”
The captain crossed his arms. “No, there is too much at risk.”
“Uncle, please! I may be able to help. Perhaps messages need to be delivered. You might all be under surveillance, but no one would be watching me.”
“She already knows where we’re meeting,” Steldor pointed out, an argument that had not yet come to me.
“So there’s not much point in trying to keep her away,” Galen finished, looking at me with understanding in his eyes. He had heard my confession about Saadi and probably wanted to show that he still trusted me.
Cannan glared at his son by blood and his son by familiarity and responsibility. To my astonishment, he relented.
“She can come, but one of you takes her when we split up. I don’t want her getting lost.”
I bounced on the balls of my feet, exhilarated by the captain’s decision, then froze when his stern eyes fell on me. He did not see this as cause for celebration.
“Half an hour,” he grumbled in reminder, walking away.
I went with Steldor, and we surreptitiously departed the festival grounds, heading up the hillside and stopping a few times to talk with folks. I worried we would be late, but my cousin was not bothered.
“Trust me, stealth is much more important here than punctuality,” he told me with a smirk.
When the crowd began to thin, my heartbeat calmed, for we were making better progress. We passed through the Market District only to be slowed once more when we reached the thoroughfare.
“We are late by now,” I harassed.
“My father will either assume we’re dead or that I’m up to my usual tricks. If I’m not worried, you shouldn’t be.”
His eyes glinted wickedly, suggesting he enjoyed needling his father, perhaps even to the same extent he enjoyed his popularity.
I shrugged, keeping my silence the rest of the trek to Cannan’s manor house, where Steldor had grown up. He rapped four times on the door and we were ushered inside by Galen, who locked the door before heading through the kitchen and down a flight of stairs into a cellar. Only a single torch was lit in the small, clammy space, making it difficult to distinguish the faces of the men who had gathered.
“Delayed?” Cannan asked with a touch of sarcasm.
“Come now, Father. I had baggage,” Steldor shot back, and I shoved him, not appreciating his gibe. ~ Cayla Kluver,
276:It was then that I noticed the canvas bag at Saadi’s feet. He must have seen flight in my eyes, for he started running at almost the same moment I did. He caught me before I passed the next shop, snatching my upper arm just as the butcher had. I cried out, hoping he would think me in pain and let me go, but he did not, cocking an eyebrow and strengthening his grip.
“I take it you’re responsible for this?” he said, hauling the bag of fruit, which he had slung over his shoulder, up to eye level with his other hand.
I kept my mouth shut.
“Despite the fact that you’re breaking the law, you’re lucky. The evidence you left at your previous site of conquest sent me on a search for you.”
“Lucky, because you did a lot of saving,” I scoffed.
Releasing me, he smoothed his bronze hair forward, but it stuck up at the center of his hairline, which I suspected was the opposite of his intention.
“I was getting there.”
He was mumbling, disagreeable, an attitude I did not expect. Why was he bothering to make conversation with a Hytanican criminal? And why did he keep smoothing that stupid hair of his?
“I haven’t done anything,” I said, inching backward in preparation for my grand escape, the details of which I was sure would come to me at any moment. Motioning to the bag, I lied again. “That’s not mine.”
“Yes, it is.”
“No, it isn’t.”
“But it is.”
No, it isn’t.”
“You know, the more you deny it, the more likely I am to arrest you.”
I stared wide-eyed at him. “You weren’t planning to?”
“No, it doesn’t look like you’ve caused any real harm--a couple of coins in payment for the broken lock should resolve the problem. I have a feeling if I arrested you, you wouldn’t make it out this time, not with what your uncle and cousin are guilty of.”
“Bravery?”
“Corza spends an hour terrifying you and I get a confession after a few minutes.”
Shocked and annoyed, I exclaimed, “I didn’t confess anything!”
Saadi smirked. “Nothing I’m going to share. Women and men shouldn’t be killed for bravery.”
“I suppose you condone the pranks and riots then?” I challenged. He was unbelievable--making things up to manipulate me.
“I don’t condone them,” he said more seriously. “I have a different idea of what bravery is.”
“What--compliance?”
“In a sense. Acceptance, resiliency. How strong must one be to throw a temper tantrum?”
“Is that what you’d call this? You and your people storm our homeland, take us all prisoner and any form of resistance is a temper tantrum in your eyes?”
He pondered this for a moment, his freckled nose crinkling. “Yes.”
I threw up my hands, not sure exactly what was going on or why I was still here with my enemy, but not willing to let this go.
“How do you justify that?”
“Well, for a century, our takeover of your kingdom has been inevitable. You should have acclimated yourselves to the idea by now.”
“You’re right. This is our fault, really. We’ve never been superb at preparation here in Hytanica.”
Saadi shrugged, and I thought for one stunned moment that he had taken my statements to be sincere. ~ Cayla Kluver,
277:I turned and flipped the latch on the door, then pulled hard on the handle, stumbling over the threshold into the fresh air. I would have fallen in the dirt for the second time that day except that someone standing outside caught me. Terrified that my escape was being thwarted, I struck out at whoever it was, feeling a sharp pain when my fist connected with the person’s jaw.
Empress, you hit hard!” a male voice exclaimed, then he captured my arms and trapped them behind my back. By the strange expletive he had used, I knew him to be Cokyrian--my luck was golden. “What’s going on here?”
The butcher staggered into the doorway, squinting in the sunlight.
“Your girl’s a thief,” he muttered at sight of the man who held me, sparing a glower for me as though warning me to be quiet. I ground my teeth and looked away, intending to do just that.
Now that I had stopped struggling, the Cokyrian soldier released me, and I considered whether or not to run. Then I saw who had been restraining me--Saadi, the man with whom Narian and my uncle had dealt after my failed prank. There would be no point in running if he remembered who I was.
“My girl?” Saadi repeated, his pale blue eyes calculating. “She is no Cokyrian. Besides, I would expect you to show any comrade of mine more respect than that.”
“My apologies,” the butcher forced himself to say, and rage filled me at his newly respectful attitude. “She broke into my store and I assumed from her clothing…I also assume you’ll see her punished for her crime.”
“You were about to punish her yourself, weren’t you?”
Saadi scrutinized me, noting the red marks around my wrists and perhaps the beginnings of the bruises I would have across my mouth.
“In Cokyri, you would be killed for what you did to her--what you tried to do.”
“It’s good we’re not in Cokyri then,” the butcher sneered.
Saadi’s jaw clenched, and he seemed to be fighting a deep urge to pummel the merchant who stood before him.
“I should take you to join the men at the gallows.”
“I would welcome it.”
“I can see why,” Saadi coldly retorted, with a subtle look up and down at the heavyset man. “But I’m afraid the lack of your business might dampen the economy in the province, and that is something my sister would frown upon. She’ll be disappointed, though--she does so enjoy seeing men like you hang.”
“And I enjoy seeing women in skirts as God intended.”
Another strained moment passed, then Saadi laughed. “Perhaps if your God had paid less attention to clothing and more to abilities, you and your kind wouldn’t be in this position right now.”
The butcher shifted uncomfortably, and Saadi quickly dispensed with him. “If you want me to arrest her for thievery, I’ll also arrest you for assault. So I would advise that you go back to your meat and your customers, may they be few.”
The man did not need to be told twice. He slammed the door in our faces, and I could hear the lock click into place. It was then that I noticed the canvas bag at Saadi’s feet. He must have seen flight in my eyes, for he started running at almost the same moment I did. ~ Cayla Kluver,
278:Whoa,” I murmured, trying to calm the animal enough to set it loose, not wanting it to come to harm.
I gripped the reins, but the horse, its eyes wild with fear, snapped its head back, catching my hand in the leather strap, and I inhaled sharply from the sting. How long had the poor thing been out here? My senses on full alert, I glanced behind me at the busy street, weighing my options. Seeing no one, I hoisted up my skirt, and unsheathed the dagger I had kept. The instant I cut the reins, the horse bolted past me, almost knocking me over. Its owner would not be happy, but at least the animal would live to see another day.
It wasn’t until someone clamped an arm around my waist, seizing the knife, that I realized I was no longer alone. So much for having reliable senses.
“Well, aren’t you just incorrigible?”
Imprisonment or execution was the punishment for bearing weapons in this new Hytanica. The dagger itself was a small loss, but I had to get away. I brought my elbow back, my mother’s reluctance to let me leave the house flashing like lightning in my brain. If I were arrested, killed, she would never forgive herself, even though she would bear no fault.
Empress, the bruises you’ve given me are too many to count!”
I whirled around, dismayed that I had not succeeded in getting the Cokyrian to release me, at the same time recognizing the voice and the curse. Saadi pushed me against the side of the shop, leaning in so close to me that I could feel his breath upon my cheek, and his pale blue eyes stared me into submission.
“I can’t call you a horse thief for what you just did,” he told me, glancing after the gelding. “At least, not a very good horse thief. But I can, and I must, bring you in for this little utensil of yours. Some niece of the captain you are.”
“Are you going to take me to your sister?” I spat, and he grimaced, contemplating me for an instant before disregarding the barb. Gripping me by the upper arm, he hauled me toward the thoroughfare.
“Come on. To the Bastion.”
Though my question about Rava appeared to have had its intended effect, I was numb with fear. What if he did take me to her? Rava had been the one to order me lashed for my failed prank, she’d been the one to inflict punishment upon Steldor. It seemed no one could exert control over her, a thought that made me ill.
The nearer we came to our destination, the more rapidly my heart beat, and by the time we reached the palace gates, I was again fighting Saadi.
“Let…me…go!” I howled, unexpectedly pulling out of his grasp, but one of the Cokyrian sentries caught me, laughing at my plight.
“Need some help, Saadi?” the burly man offered, shoving me back at my captor, who was rather slight in comparison to his comrade.
“No,” Saadi grumbled and the sentry moved ahead to open the gates for us.
As we passed through, the large man called, “Rava is at the city headquarters, minding the peacekeeping force. If you were looking for her, that is.”
“I wasn’t.” Even though my circumstances were inarguably bleak, a wave of relief washed over me. She, at least, would not be the one to show me the error of my ways. ~ Cayla Kluver,
279:When we reached the street that branched off into the western section of the city, I expected Saadi to conintue north, but he did not. We dismounted and walked side by side, leading our horses, until my house came into view.
“You should leave,” I said to him, hoping I didn’t sound rude.
“Let me help you take King to your stable.”
I hesitated, unsure of the idea, then motioned for him to follow me as I cut across the property to approach the barn from the rear. After putting King in his private stall at the back of the building, sectioned off from the mares, I lit a lantern and grabbed a bucket. While Saadi watched me from the open door of the building, I went to the well to fill it.
“You should really go now,” I murmured upon my return, not wanting anyone to see us or the light.
He nodded and hung the lantern on its hook, but he did not leave. Instead, he took the bucket from me, placing it in King’s stall, and I noticed he had tossed in some hay. Brushing off his hands, he approached me.
“Tell your family I returned the horse to your care, that our stable master found him too unruly and disruptive to serve us other than to sire an occasional foal.”
“Yes, I will,” I mumbled, grateful for the lie he had provided. I had been so focused on recovering the stallion that explaining his reappearance had not yet entered my mind. Then an image of Rava, standing outside the barn tapping the scroll against her palm, surfaced. What was to prevent her return?
“And your sister? What will you tell her?”
He smirked. “You seem to think Rava is in charge of everything. Well, she’s not in charge of our stables. And our stable master will be content as long as we can still use the stallion for breeding. As for Rava, keep the horse out of sight and she’ll likely never know he’s back in your hands.”
“But what if you’re wrong and she does find out?”
“Then I’ll tell her that I have been currying a friendship with you. That you have unwittingly become an informant. That the return of the stallion, while retaining Cokyrian breeding rights, furthered that goal.”
I gaped at him, for his words flowed so easily, I wondered if there was truth behind them.
“And is that what this is really all about?”
I studied his blue eyes, almost afraid of what they might reveal. But they were remarkably sincere when he addressed the question.
“In a way, I suppose, for I am learning much from you.” He smiled and reached out to push my hair back from my face. “But it is not the sort of information that would be of interest to Rava.”
His hand caressed my cheek, and he slowly leaned toward me until his lips met mine. I moved my mouth against his, following his lead, and a tingle went down my spine. With my knees threatening to buckle, I put my hands on his chest for balance, feeling his heart beating beneath my palms. Then he was gone.
I stood dumbfounded, not knowing what to do, then traced my still-moist lips, the taste of him lingering. This was the first time I’d been kissed, and the experience, I could not deny, had been a good one. I no longer cared that Saadi was Cokyrian, for my feelings on the matter were clear. I’d kiss him again if given the chance. ~ Cayla Kluver,
280:Report,” Narian ordered, umbrage in his tone. He did not appreciate the lack of respect Saadi was displaying by coming straight to him.
Saadi pulled my dagger from somewhere on his belt, flipping it around to hand it to his commanding officer.
“I caught her with this illegal weapon on the street, sir. Considering the interest you took in her welfare last time, I thought it best this matter be brought directly to you.”
“A good decision,” Narian said, examining the knife. “Now return to your post.”
Saadi gave a deferential nod to him and, to my surprise, a slight bow to Queen Alera before departing.
In the silence that briefly reigned, Cannan’s gaze fell upon me, unwavering, unwelcoming and especially dark considering the reprimand he’d given me in the barn. I was in so much trouble.
“Where did you get this?” Narian asked, and my attention snapped from my uncle to the Cokyrian commander, who was brandishing my dagger. Which of them was the fiercer opponent? I didn’t speak, afraid to find out, certain this was how a cornered animal felt.
“Shaselle, from whom did you obtain that weapon?” It was Queen Alera addressing me now, her voice softer, kinder, but I hardly looked at her, for she was not where the problem lay.
When I still did not answer, Narian turned to Cannan. “You tell us then.”
“I have no more knowledge than do you,” the former captain said, not outwardly disturbed by the fact that my conduct had brought him under suspicion.
“I need to know how she came by this dagger,” Narian said more forcefully, but I knew he was wasting his breath. Cannan was not about to be intimidated--certainly not by a young man of my age, regardless of whatever mythical powers he possessed. “These have been outlawed and removed from Hytanican hands. No young girl could wrangle one. Not unless she had access to some that were kept from my soldiers. Not unless she was the captain’s niece.”
“My answer remains the same,” Cannan replied, unflappable as ever. “I suggest you stop accusing me.”
A silent challenge passed between the powerful men, to be interrupted by the Queen, who spoke but one word--the Cokyrian commander’s name. He looked to her more quickly than I would have believed possible, and his demeanor changed along with his focus, becoming softer, more cooperative.
“May I see the dagger?” she asked.
Without demanding a reason, he passed her the blade. Perhaps she had more influence than I thought.
She perused the weapon with a crease in her brow. “I think I recognize this.”
“You do?” Narian sounded skeptical, while I was flabbergasted, and Cannan’s eyebrows lifted ever so slightly.
“I believe this was Lord Baelic’s. It must have been missed by the Cokyrians sweeping his home. A house of Hytanican women--they might not have been thorough.” She paused and met my gaze. “This is your father’s, is it not, Shaselle?”
I started nodding before I could even process what was happening. Was she mistaken? Did she actually believe the weapon had belonged to my papa? Or was she trying to help me? Whatever the case, I wasn’t about to argue with her, seizing the excuse and hoping it would be good enough to save me, at least from Cokyrian punishment.
Narian scrutinized both me and the Queen with eyes so deeply blue I could not break away from them. I was glad he was no longer questioning me, for those eyes made me want to tell him everything. At the same time, those eyes revealed something to me. Was he in love with Alera? ~ Cayla Kluver,
281:To the river?” he suggested, pointing ahead down the road.
The Recorah River, which flowed south out of the Nineyre Mountains before curving to the west, marked both our eastern and southern borders, and was the reason construction of the wall was necessitated only along the boundary we shared with the Kingdom of Sarterad.
“Won’t there be patrols?”
He shook his head. “One of my duties is to regulate the patrols. I know exactly where they are. So--to the river?”
I nodded, and we lined our horses up as best we could, for our mounts had caught our excitement and were straining against their bits. We locked eyes and counted down together.
“Three, two, one--” I dug my heels into King’s sides and he sprang almost violently forward.
My father had never liked me racing. It was dangerous--the horse could fall, I could drop the reins or lose my seat, and at a full gallop, my chances of survival would be slim. But he had always loved to do it, and so had I. There was such freedom in letting a horse have its head, such joyful abandonment in the feel of the animal’s hooves striking the earth time after time, as fast and as hard as they could go. There was power and exhilaration in leaning forward, moving with the animal, feeling the wind on my cheeks, my hair whipping back. There was a oneness that could not be achieved in any other way, a single purpose represented by the finish line that loomed ahead.
King and I had the advantage at the start, and I turned my head to grin at Saadi before giving my full concentration to the task at hand. I would leave him far behind, but there was no point in testing fate. It wasn’t long before my confidence and my lead were challenged--I caught sight of the gelding’s front legs to my left, gaining ground as they arched and reached in beautiful rhythm. We bumped and battled, following the winding road, the horses breathing hard.
Then it was Saadi’s turn to grin. He gave me a nod, urging his horse up the slight incline that lay before us, gradually inching ahead until he succeeded in passing me completely as we flew down the other side. Knowing the race would be won or lost on the remaining flat ground from here to the river, I lay low against King’s neck, and the stallion pressed forward, sensing my urgency. Race for Papa, King, I thought. You can win for Papa.
The Recorah River spread before us, and both Saadi and I would have to slow soon to avoid surging into it. King’s burst of speed was enough to put us neck-and-neck once more, but my frustration flared, for I doubted we could push ahead. At best, the race would be a tie. And a tie wasn’t good enough, not when King needed to come home with me.
Then suddenly I was in front. I glanced over at Saadi in confusion, and saw him check his gelding, letting me win. King did not want to stop, but I pulled him down just before the river, swerving to let him canter, then trot, along its bank. Saadi came alongside me and we halted, dismounting at the same time. I leaned for a moment against my saddle, panting from my own exertion, then slid it off King’s back. Without a word, Saadi likewise stripped his mount, and we freed the horses to go to the water for a drink. Muscles aching, I flopped down on the grass and stared up through the branches of a tree to the graying sky above.
A shadow passed over me, then Saadi lay down beside me.
“You won,” he said.
“You let me.”
There was a silence--he hadn’t expected me to know. Then I heard the grass rustle as he shrugged. “You’re right. I did.”
Laughing at his candor, I sat up and looked at him. He was relaxing with his arms behind his head, his bronze hair damp and sticking to his forehead. ~ Cayla Kluver,
282:You there! What are you doing?” A sentry was approaching, her strides swift and purposeful. “Identify yourself!”
She held a lantern close to me, and I squinted in the light, my heart thrumming loudly. On the chance that I could still pull off the charade, I attempted to mimic a Cokyrian accent. The inflection was subtle, but not terribly different from our own, and I hoped that guard would be none the wiser.
“I was sent to deliver a message.”
“And what message is that?” Her voice was skeptical and she laid a hand on the hilt of the sword at her hip.
“The message is not for you.”
The sentry laughed. “Get out of here, girl. I have no interest in arresting you. I’ll consider this an amusing part of my night duty as long as you don’t cause any trouble.”
“The message is from Rava,” I tried again, my natural stubbornness overcoming my fear. “For her brother.”
“Messages should be taken to the main building,” she pronounced, no longer confident that she should send me away.
“Rava instructed me to deliver it to no one but Saadi. She said he would be in the officer’s barracks.”
The woman deliberated, looking dubiously at me, although she ultimately decided in my favor.
“Then I’ll take you to him. We’ll see what he has to say about this.”
The sentry grabbed my arm and led me toward the building. There were two guards at its entrance, and she instructed one of them to fetch Saadi.
Despite the coolness of the weather, I could feel myself sweating. If Saadi refused to come, I would be locked up and likely taken to Rava in the morning. But if he did come, how did I know he would be happy to see me? He might not approve of the game I was playing. Nausea roiled my stomach, and I glanced at the Cokyrians on each side of me, trying to decide if I should beat a hasty retreat. Too afraid of the consequences if I failed to get away, I waited, praying the fates would smile upon me.
It wasn’t long before footfalls reached my ears, and the door to the barracks swung open. Saadi stood there in breeches and a loose, unlaced shirt, strapping on his weapons, obviously having been awakened. Would he be angry that I had disturbed his sleep?
“Well?” the guard who discovered me prompted.
“I recognize her,” Saadi answered, staring directly at the woman. “She works for my sister as an errand girl.”
I briefly closed my eyes in relief. Saadi waved the guard back to her post and issued an order to the man behind him to retrieve his cloak. When it was thrust into his hands, he escorted me back across the base, not speaking until we were out of earshot of those on patrol.
“So, Rava has a message for me?”
I shoved him unthinkingly, teasingly, and he laughed, jumping away.
You wanted to see me, remember?” I pointed out. “But you never picked a time or place!”
“So you decided to do it for me. Fair enough, but I’m dying to know what you have in mind to do.”
“I don’t have anything in mind.”
We had reached the thoroughfare, and he chuckled. “You braved Cokyrian soldiers and the stronghold of the military base, but don’t have a thing in mind for us to do?”
“That’s right,” I admitted, irritated that he was laughing at me. “Would you grow up please?”
“Shaselle, there’s nothing ‘grown-up’ about what we’re doing. I assume you snuck away from home to see me, and I have a five o’clock call in the morning.”
I came to a halt and turned to face him, my eyes issuing a challenge. “If you want to go back, feel free. Tell those soldiers that Rava just wanted to make sure her baby brother went to bed on time.”
He grinned, enjoying my feisty responses, and smoothed his bronze hair forward, a habit I still found annoying. It also served to make my heart flutter. ~ Cayla Kluver,
283:Well, I saved you today, didn’t I? Just like I saved you before. You walked out of the Bastion free, without a scratch, and if any Cokyrian but me had caught you with that dagger, you might be drawn and quartered by now.”
“You didn’t save me from that butcher,” I said irritably. “But you’re right. About today, I mean.” I could sense his satisfaction, which irritated me all the more. “So accept my thanks, but stay away from me. We’re not friends, you know.”
I was nearing my neighborhood and didn’t want anyone to see me with him. He stepped in front of me, forcing me to stop.
“We’re not friends yet. But you’ve thought about it. And you just thanked me.”
“Are you delusional?”
“No. You just said thank you to the faceless Cokyrian soldier who arrested you.”
“Don’t you ever stop?” I demanded, trying in vain to move around him.
“I haven’t even started.”
“What does that mean?”
There was silence as Saadi glanced up and down the street. “I want to know where you got that dagger. Or at least what story you told.”
“Why don’t you ask Commander Narian? The two of you seemed fairly close.”
“Quit making jokes.”
“I haven’t made a single one.”
“Well?”
“It was my father’s,” I said, clinging to the lie Queen Alera had provided, whether by mistake or not.
“Oh.” This seemed to take Saadi aback.
“And now, because of you, I don’t have it anymore.” I knew I was pressing my luck, but I wanted to make him feel bad.
“I’m sorry,” he muttered, seeming sincere enough.
Thinking I had maybe, finally, succeeded in getting him to leave me alone, I stepped around him.
“Shaselle?”
I stopped again, without the slightest idea why.
“Your father--what was he like?”
The question shocked me; I also wasn’t sure I could answer it without crying. But Saadi appeared so genuinely interested that I couldn’t disregard him.
“You have no right to ask me that,” I answered out of principle. “But for your information, he was the strongest, bravest, kindest and best-humored man I ever knew. And none of it was because he took what was handed to him.”
For the second time, I attempted a dramatic departure.
“Shaselle?”
“What now?” I incredulously exclaimed.
“Do you have plans tomorrow?”
“What?”
“I have a day off duty. We could--”
“No!” I shouted. “What is this? You expect me to spend a day with you, a Cokyrian--a Cokyrian I can’t stand?”
“Yes,” he affirmed, despite my outburst.
I laughed in disbelief. “I won’t. This is ridiculous. You’re ridiculous. Enjoy your time off duty with your own kind.”
Turning, I sprinted down the street, and though he called after me yet again, I ignored him. As I neared my house, I glanced behind once or twice to assure myself he wasn’t following. He was nowhere in sight.
I reached the security of my home just in time for dinner, and just in time to cut off Mother’s growing displeasure--the first step in her progression to anger. I smiled at her, hurried to wash, and was a perfect lady throughout the meal. Afterward I retired to my room, picking a book from my shelf to occupy me until my eyes drooped. Instead of words on pages, however, I kept seeing Saadi’s face--his clear blue eyes, that irritating hair, those freckles across his nose that made me lose willpower.
What if I had offended him earlier? He had only asked to spend time with me, and I had mocked him. But he was Cokyrian. It was ludicrous for him to be pursuing my company. It was dangerous for me to be in his. And that, I suddenly realized, was part of the reason I very much wanted to be with him. Saadi aggravated me, confused me, scared me, and yet I could no longer deny that he intrigued me in a way no one else ever had. ~ Cayla Kluver,
284:Trees in groves,
Kine in droves,
In ocean sport the scaly herds,
Wedge-like cleave the air the birds,
To northern lakes fly wind-borne ducks,
Browse the mountain sheep in flocks,
Men consort in camp and town,
But the poet dwells alone.

God who gave to him the lyre,
Of all mortals the desire,
For all breathing men's behoof,
Straitly charged him, "Sit aloof;"
Annexed a warning, poets say,
To the bright premium,
Ever when twain together play,
Shall the harp be dumb.
Many may come,
But one shall sing;
Two touch the string,
The harp is dumb.
Though there come a million
Wise Saadi dwells alone.

Yet Saadi loved the race of men,
No churl immured in cave or den,
In bower and hall
He wants them all,
Nor can dispense
With Persia for his audience;
They must give ear,
Grow red with joy, and white with fear,
Yet he has no companion,
Come ten, or come a million,
Good Saadi dwells alone.

Be thou ware where Saadi dwells.
Gladly round that golden lamp
Sylvan deities encamp,
And simple maids and noble youth
Are welcome to the man of truth.
Most welcome they who need him most,
They feed the spring which they exhaust:
For greater need
Draws better deed:
But, critic, spare thy vanity,
Nor show thy pompous parts,
To vex with odious subtlety
The cheerer of men's hearts.

Sad-eyed Fakirs swiftly say
Endless dirges to decay;
Never in the blaze of light
Lose the shudder of midnight;
And at overflowing noon,
Hear wolves barking at the moon;
In the bower of dalliance sweet
Hear the far Avenger's feet;
And shake before those awful Powers
Who in their pride forgive not ours.
Thus the sad-eyed Fakirs preach;
"Bard, when thee would Allah teach,
And lift thee to his holy mount,
He sends thee from his bitter fount,
Wormwood; saying, Go thy ways,
Drink not the Malaga of praise,
But do the deed thy fellows hate,
And compromise thy peaceful state.
Smite the white breasts which thee fed,
Stuff sharp thorns beneath the head
Of them thou shouldst have comforted.
For out of woe and out of crime
Draws the heart a lore sublime."
And yet it seemeth not to me
That the high gods love tragedy;
For Saadi sat in the sun,
And thanks was his contrition;
For haircloth and for bloody whips,
Had active hands and smiling lips;
And yet his runes he rightly read,
And to his folk his message sped.
Sunshine in his heart transferred
Lighted each transparent word;
And well could honoring Persia learn
What Saadi wished to say;
For Saadi's nightly stars did burn
Brighter than Dschami's day.

Whispered the muse in Saadi's cot;
O gentle Saadi, listen not,
Tempted by thy praise of wit,
Or by thirst and appetite
For the talents not thine own,
To sons of contradiction.
Never, sun of eastern morning,
Follow falsehood, follow scorning,
Denounce who will, who will, deny,
And pile the hills to scale the sky;
Let theist, atheist, pantheist,
Define and wrangle how they list,
Fierce conserver, fierce destroyer,
But thou joy-giver and enjoyer,
Unknowing war, unknowing crime,
Gentle Saadi, mind thy rhyme.
Heed not what the brawlers say,
Heed thou only Saadi's lay.

Let the great world bustle on
With war and trade, with camp and town.
A thousand men shall dig and eat,
At forge and furnace thousands sweat,
And thousands sail the purple sea,
And give or take the stroke of war,
Or crowd the market and bazaar.
Oft shall war end, and peace return,
And cities rise where cities burn,
Ere one man my hill shall climb,
Who can turn the golden rhyme;
Let them manage how they may,
Heed thou only Saadi's lay.
Seek the living among the dead:
Man in man is imprisoned.
Barefooted Dervish is not poor,
If fate unlock his bosom's door.
So that what his eye hath seen
His tongue can paint, as bright, as keen,
And what his tender heart hath felt,
With equal fire thy heart shall melt.
For, whom the muses shine upon,
And touch with soft persuasion,
His words like a storm-wind can bring
Terror and beauty on their wing;
In his every syllable
Lurketh nature veritable;
And though he speak in midnight dark,
In heaven, no star; on earth, no spark;
Yet before the listener's eye
Swims the world in ecstasy,
The forest waves, the morning breaks,
The pastures sleep, ripple the lakes,
Leaves twinkle, flowers like persons be,
And life pulsates in rock or tree.
Saadi! so far thy words shall reach;
Suns rise and set in Saadi's speech.

And thus to Saadi said the muse;
Eat thou the bread which men refuse;
Flee from the goods which from thee flee;
Seek nothing; Fortune seeketh thee.
Nor mount, nor dive; all good things keep
The midway of the eternal deep;
Wish not to fill the isles with eyes
To fetch thee birds of paradise;
On thine orchard's edge belong
All the brass of plume and song;
Wise Ali's sunbright sayings pass
For proverbs in the market-place;
Through mountains bored by regal art
Toil whistles as he drives his cart.
Nor scour the seas, nor sift mankind,
A poet or a friend to find;
Behold, he watches at the door,
Behold his shadow on the floor.
Open innumerable doors,
The heaven where unveiled Allah pours
The flood of truth, the flood of good,
The seraph's and the cherub's food;
Those doors are men; the pariah kind
Admits thee to the perfect Mind.
Seek not beyond thy cottage wall
Redeemer that can yield thee all.
While thou sittest at thy door,
On the desert's yellow floor,
Listening to the gray-haired crones,
Foolish gossips, ancient drones,
Saadi, see, they rise in stature
To the height of mighty nature,
And the secret stands revealed
Fraudulent Time in vain concealed,
That blessed gods in servile masks
Plied for thee thy household tasks.
by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson, Saadi
,
285:Al Aaraaf
PART I
O! nothing earthly save the ray
(Thrown back from flowers) of Beauty's eye,
As in those gardens where the day
Springs from the gems of CircassyO! nothing earthly save the thrill
Of melody in woodland rillOr (music of the passion-hearted)
Joy's voice so peacefully departed
That like the murmur in the shell,
Its echo dwelleth and will dwellOh, nothing of the dross of oursYet all the beauty- all the flowers
That list our Love, and deck our bowersAdorn yon world afar, afarThe wandering star.
'Twas a sweet time for Nesace- for there
Her world lay lolling on the golden air,
Near four bright suns- a temporary restAn oasis in desert of the blest.
Away- away- 'mid seas of rays that roll
Empyrean splendor o'er th' unchained soulThe soul that scarce (the billows are so dense)
Can struggle to its destin'd eminence,To distant spheres, from time to time, she rode
And late to ours, the favor'd one of GodBut, now, the ruler of an anchor'd realm,
She throws aside the sceptre- leaves the helm,
And, amid incense and high spiritual hymns,
Laves in quadruple light her angel limbs.
Now happiest, loveliest in yon lovely Earth,
Whence sprang the 'Idea of Beauty' into birth,
(Falling in wreaths thro' many a startled star,
Like woman's hair 'mid pearls, until, afar,
It lit on hills Achaian, and there dwelt)
She looked into Infinity- and knelt.
15
Rich clouds, for canopies, about her curledFit emblems of the model of her worldSeen but in beauty- not impeding sight
Of other beauty glittering thro' the lightA wreath that twined each starry form around,
And all the opal'd air in color bound.
All hurriedly she knelt upon a bed
Of flowers: of lilies such as rear'd the head
On the fair Capo Deucato, and sprang
So eagerly around about to hang
Upon the flying footsteps of- deep prideOf her who lov'd a mortal- and so died.
The Sephalica, budding with young bees,
Upreared its purple stem around her knees:And gemmy flower, of Trebizond misnam'dInmate of highest stars, where erst it sham'd
All other loveliness:- its honied dew
(The fabled nectar that the heathen knew)
Deliriously sweet, was dropp'd from Heaven,
And fell on gardens of the unforgiven
In Trebizond- and on a sunny flower
So like its own above that, to this hour,
It still remaineth, torturing the bee
With madness, and unwonted reverie:
In Heaven, and all its environs, the leaf
And blossom of the fairy plant in grief
Disconsolate linger- grief that hangs her head,
Repenting follies that full long have Red,
Heaving her white breast to the balmy air,
Like guilty beauty, chasten'd and more fair:
Nyctanthes too, as sacred as the light
She fears to perfume, perfuming the night:
And Clytia, pondering between many a sun,
While pettish tears adown her petals run:
And that aspiring flower that sprang on Earth,
And died, ere scarce exalted into birth,
Bursting its odorous heart in spirit to wing
Its way to Heaven, from garden of a king:
And Valisnerian lotus, thither flown'
From struggling with the waters of the Rhone:
And thy most lovely purple perfume, Zante!
16
Isola d'oro!- Fior di Levante!
And the Nelumbo bud that floats for ever
With Indian Cupid down the holy riverFair flowers, and fairy! to whose care is given
To bear the Goddess' song, in odors, up to Heaven:
'Spirit! that dwellest where,
In the deep sky,
The terrible and fair,
In beauty vie!
Beyond the line of blueThe boundary of the star
Which turneth at the view
Of thy barrier and thy barOf the barrier overgone
By the comets who were cast
From their pride and from their throne
To be drudges till the lastTo be carriers of fire
(The red fire of their heart)
With speed that may not tire
And with pain that shall not partWho livest- that we knowIn Eternity- we feelBut the shadow of whose brow
What spirit shall reveal?
Tho' the beings whom thy Nesace,
Thy messenger hath known
Have dream'd for thy Infinity
A model of their ownThy will is done, O God!
The star hath ridden high
Thro' many a tempest, but she rode
Beneath thy burning eye;
And here, in thought, to theeIn thought that can alone
Ascend thy empire and so be
A partner of thy throneBy winged Fantasy,
My embassy is given,
Till secrecy shall knowledge be
In the environs of Heaven.'
17
She ceas'd- and buried then her burning cheek
Abash'd, amid the lilies there, to seek
A shelter from the fervor of His eye;
For the stars trembled at the Deity.
She stirr'd not- breath'd not- for a voice was there
How solemnly pervading the calm air!
A sound of silence on the startled ear
Which dreamy poets name 'the music of the sphere.'
Ours is a world of words: Quiet we call
'Silence'- which is the merest word of all.
All Nature speaks, and ev'n ideal things
Flap shadowy sounds from visionary wingsBut ah! not so when, thus, in realms on high
The eternal voice of God is passing by,
And the red winds are withering in the sky:'What tho 'in worlds which sightless cycles run,
Linked to a little system, and one sunWhere all my love is folly and the crowd
Still think my terrors but the thunder cloud,
The storm, the earthquake, and the ocean-wrath(Ah! will they cross me in my angrier path?)
What tho' in worlds which own a single sun
The sands of Time grow dimmer as they run,
Yet thine is my resplendency, so given
To bear my secrets thro' the upper Heaven!
Leave tenantless thy crystal home, and fly,
With all thy train, athwart the moony skyApart- like fire-flies in Sicilian night,
And wing to other worlds another light!
Divulge the secrets of thy embassy
To the proud orbs that twinkle- and so be
To ev'ry heart a barrier and a ban
Lest the stars totter in the guilt of man!'
Up rose the maiden in the yellow night,
The single-mooned eve!- on Earth we plight
Our faith to one love- and one moon adoreThe birth-place of young Beauty had no more.
As sprang that yellow star from downy hours
Up rose the maiden from her shrine of flowers,
18
And bent o'er sheeny mountains and dim plain
Her way, but left not yet her Therasaean reign.
PART II
High on a mountain of enamell'd headSuch as the drowsy shepherd on his bed
Of giant pasturage lying at his ease,
Raising his heavy eyelid, starts and sees
With many a mutter'd 'hope to be forgiven'
What time the moon is quadrated in HeavenOf rosy head that, towering far away
Into the sunlit ether, caught the ray
Of sunken suns at eve- at noon of night,
While the moon danc'd with the fair stranger lightUprear'd upon such height arose a pile
Of gorgeous columns on th' unburthen'd air,
Flashing from Parian marble that twin smile
Far down upon the wave that sparkled there,
And nursled the young mountain in its lair.
Of molten stars their pavement, such as fall
Thro' the ebon air, besilvering the pall
Of their own dissolution, while they dieAdorning then the dwellings of the sky.
A dome, by linked light from Heaven let down,
Sat gently on these columns as a crownA window of one circular diamond, there,
Look'd out above into the purple air,
And rays from God shot down that meteor chain
And hallow'd all the beauty twice again,
Save, when, between th' empyrean and that ring,
Some eager spirit Flapp'd his dusky wing.
But on the pillars Seraph eyes have seen
The dimness of this world: that greyish green
That Nature loves the best Beauty's grave
Lurk'd in each cornice, round each architraveAnd every sculptur'd cherub thereabout
That from his marble dwelling peered out,
Seem'd earthly in the shadow of his nicheAchaian statues in a world so rich!
Friezes from Tadmor and PersepolisFrom Balbec, and the stilly, clear abyss
19
Of beautiful Gomorrah! O, the wave
Is now upon thee- but too late to save!
Sound loves to revel in a summer night:
Witness the murmur of the grey twilight
That stole upon the ear, in Eyraco,
Of many a wild star-gazer long agoThat stealeth ever on the ear of him
Who, musing, gazeth on the distance dim,
And sees the darkness coming as a cloudIs not its form- its voice- most palpable and loud?
But what is this?- it cometh, and it brings
A music with it- 'tis the rush of wingsA pause- and then a sweeping, falling strain
And Nesace is in her halls again.
From the wild energy of wanton haste
Her cheeks were flushing, and her lips apart;
And zone that clung around her gentle waist
Had burst beneath the heaving of her heart.
Within the centre of that hall to breathe,
She paused and panted, Zanthe! all beneath,
The fairy light that kiss'd her golden hair
And long'd to rest, yet could but sparkle there.
Young flowers were whispering in melody
To happy flowers that night- and tree to tree;
Fountains were gushing music as they fell
In many a star-lit grove, or moon-lit dell;
Yet silence came upon material thingsFair flowers, bright waterfalls and angel wingsAnd sound alone that from the spirit sprang
Bore burthen to the charm the maiden sang:
''Neath the blue-bell or streamerOr tufted wild spray
That keeps, from the dreamer,
The moonbeam awayBright beings! that ponder,
With half closing eyes,
On the stars which your wonder
Hath drawn from the skies,
20
Till they glance thro' the shade, and
Come down to your brow
Like- eyes of the maiden
Who calls on you nowArise! from your dreaming
In violet bowers,
To duty beseeming
These star-litten hoursAnd shake from your tresses
Encumber'd with dew
The breath of those kisses
That cumber them too(O! how, without you, Love!
Could angels be blest?)
Those kisses of true Love
That lull'd ye to rest!
Up!- shake from your wing
Each hindering thing:
The dew of the nightIt would weigh down your flight
And true love caressesO, leave them apart!
They are light on the tresses,
But lead on the heart.
Ligeia! Ligeia!
My beautiful one!
Whose harshest idea
Will to melody run,
O! is it thy will
On the breezes to toss?
Or, capriciously still,
Like the lone Albatros,
Incumbent on night
(As she on the air)
To keep watch with delight
On the harmony there?
Ligeia! wherever
Thy image may be,
No magic shall sever
Thy music from thee.
21
Thou hast bound many eyes
In a dreamy sleepBut the strains still arise
Which thy vigilance keepThe sound of the rain,
Which leaps down to the flowerAnd dances again
In the rhythm of the showerThe murmur that springs
From the growing of grass
Are the music of thingsBut are modell'd, alas!Away, then, my dearest,
Oh! hie thee away
To the springs that lie clearest
Beneath the moon-rayTo lone lake that smiles,
In its dream of deep rest,
At the many star-isles
That enjewel its breastWhere wild flowers, creeping,
Have mingled their shade,
On its margin is sleeping
Full many a maidSome have left the cool glade, and
Have slept with the beeArouse them, my maiden,
On moorland and leaGo! breathe on their slumber,
All softly in ear,
Thy musical number
They slumbered to hearFor what can awaken
An angel so soon,
Whose sleep hath been taken
Beneath the cold moon,
As the spell which no slumber
Of witchery may test,
The rhythmical number
Which lull'd him to rest?'
Spirits in wing, and angels to the view,
22
A thousand seraphs burst th' Empyrean thro',
Young dreams still hovering on their drowsy flightSeraphs in all but 'Knowledge,' the keen light
That fell, refracted, thro' thy bounds, afar,
O Death! from eye of God upon that star:
Sweet was that error- sweeter still that deathSweet was that error- even with us the breath
Of Science dims the mirror of our joyTo them 'twere the Simoom, and would destroyFor what (to them) availeth it to know
That Truth is Falsehood- or that Bliss is Woe?
Sweet was their death- with them to die was rife
With the last ecstasy of satiate lifeBeyond that death no immortalityBut sleep that pondereth and is not 'to be'!And there- oh! may my weary spirit dwellApart from Heaven's Eternity- and yet how far from Hell!
What guilty spirit, in what shrubbery dim,
Heard not the stirring summons of that hymn?
But two: they fell: for Heaven no grace imparts
To those who hear not for their beating hearts.
A maiden-angel and her seraph-loverO! where (and ye may seek the wide skies over)
Was Love, the blind, near sober Duty known?
Unguided Love hath fallen- 'mid 'tears of perfect moan.'
He was a goodly spirit- he who fell:
A wanderer by moss-y-mantled wellA gazer on the lights that shine aboveA dreamer in the moonbeam by his love:
What wonder? for each star is eye-like there,
And looks so sweetly down on Beauty's hairAnd they, and ev'ry mossy spring were holy
To his love-haunted heart and melancholy.
The night had found (to him a night of woe)
Upon a mountain crag, young AngeloBeetling it bends athwart the solemn sky,
And scowls on starry worlds that down beneath it lie.
Here sat he with his love- his dark eye bent
With eagle gaze along the firmament:
Now turn'd it upon her- but ever then
It trembled to the orb of EARTH again.
23
'Ianthe, dearest, see- how dim that ray!
How lovely 'tis to look so far away!
She seem'd not thus upon that autumn eve
I left her gorgeous halls- nor mourn'd to leave.
That eve- that eve- I should remember wellThe sun-ray dropp'd in Lemnos, with a spell
On th' arabesque carving of a gilded hall
Wherein I sate, and on the draperied wallAnd on my eyelids- O the heavy light!
How drowsily it weigh'd them into night!
On flowers, before, and mist, and love they ran
With Persian Saadi in his Gulistan:
But O that light!- I slumber'd- Death, the while,
Stole o'er my senses in that lovely isle
So softly that no single silken hair
Awoke that slept- or knew that he was there.
'The last spot of Earth's orb I trod upon
Was a proud temple call'd the Parthenon;
More beauty clung around her column'd wall
Than ev'n thy glowing bosom beats withal,
And when old Time my wing did disenthral
Thence sprang I- as the eagle from his tower,
And years I left behind me in an hour.
What time upon her airy bounds I hung,
One half the garden of her globe was flung
Unrolling as a chart unto my viewTenantless cities of the desert too!
Ianthe, beauty crowded on me then,
And half I wish'd to be again of men.'
'My Angelo! and why of them to be?
A brighter dwelling-place is here for theeAnd greener fields than in yon world above,
And woman's loveliness- and passionate love.'
'But, list, Ianthe! when the air so soft
Fail'd, as my pennon'd spirit leapt aloft,
Perhaps my brain grew dizzy- but the world
I left so late was into chaos hurl'dSprang from her station, on the winds apart.
And roll'd, a flame, the fiery Heaven athwart.
24
Methought, my sweet one, then I ceased to soar
And fell- not swiftly as I rose before,
But with a downward, tremulous motion thro'
Light, brazen rays, this golden star unto!
Nor long the measure of my falling hours,
For nearest of all stars was thine to oursDread star! that came, amid a night of mirth,
A red Daedalion on the timid Earth.'
'We came- and to thy Earth- but not to us
Be given our lady's bidding to discuss:
We came, my love; around, above, below,
Gay fire-fly of the night we come and go,
Nor ask a reason save the angel-nod
She grants to us, as granted by her GodBut, Angelo, than thine grey Time unfurl'd
Never his fairy wing O'er fairier world!
Dim was its little disk, and angel eyes
Alone could see the phantom in the skies,
When first Al Aaraaf knew her course to be
Headlong thitherward o'er the starry seaBut when its glory swell'd upon the sky,
As glowing Beauty's bust beneath man's eye,
We paused before the heritage of men,
And thy star trembled- as doth Beauty then!'
Thus, in discourse, the lovers whiled away
The night that waned and waned and brought no day.
They fell: for Heaven to them no hope imparts
Who hear not for the beating of their hearts.
~ Edgar Allan Poe,

IN CHAPTERS [3/3]



   2 Poetry
   1 Philsophy






1.poe - Al Aaraaf- Part 2, #Poe - Poems, #unset, #Integral Yoga
     With Persian Saadi in his Gulistan:
     But O that light!- I slumber'd- Death, the while,

1.rwe - Saadi, #Emerson - Poems, #Ralph Waldo Emerson, #Philosophy
  object:1.rwe - Saadi
  author class:Ralph Waldo Emerson
  --
  Wise Saadi dwells alone.
  Yet Saadi loved the race of men,
  No churl immured in cave or den,
  --
  Good Saadi dwells alone.
  Be thou ware where Saadi dwells.
  Gladly round that golden lamp
  --
  For Saadi sat in the sun,
  And thanks was his contrition;
  --
  What Saadi wished to say;
  For Saadi's nightly stars did burn
  Brighter than Dschami's day.
  Whispered the muse in Saadi's cot;
  O gentle Saadi, listen not,
  Tempted by thy praise of wit,
  --
  Gentle Saadi, mind thy rhyme.
  Heed not what the brawlers say,
  Heed thou only Saadi's lay.
  Let the great world bustle on
  --
  Heed thou only Saadi's lay.
  Seek the living among the dead:
  --
  Suns rise and set in Saadi's speech.
  And thus to Saadi said the muse;
  Eat thou the bread which men refuse;

the Eternal Wisdom, #unset, #Anonymous, #Various
  17) Wilt thou that thy heart should be free from sorrow ? Forget not the hearts that sorrow devours. ~ Saadi
  The Supramental Instruments-Thought-Process View Similar Charity

WORDNET














IN WEBGEN [10000/0]




convenience portal:
recent: Section Maps - index table - favorites
Savitri -- Savitri extended toc
Savitri Section Map -- 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
authors -- Crowley - Peterson - Borges - Wilber - Teresa - Aurobindo - Ramakrishna - Maharshi - Mother
places -- Garden - Inf. Art Gallery - Inf. Building - Inf. Library - Labyrinth - Library - School - Temple - Tower - Tower of MEM
powers -- Aspiration - Beauty - Concentration - Effort - Faith - Force - Grace - inspiration - Presence - Purity - Sincerity - surrender
difficulties -- cowardice - depres. - distract. - distress - dryness - evil - fear - forget - habits - impulse - incapacity - irritation - lost - mistakes - obscur. - problem - resist - sadness - self-deception - shame - sin - suffering
practices -- Lucid Dreaming - meditation - project - programming - Prayer - read Savitri - study
subjects -- CS - Cybernetics - Game Dev - Integral Theory - Integral Yoga - Kabbalah - Language - Philosophy - Poetry - Zen
6.01 books -- KC - ABA - Null - Savitri - SA O TAOC - SICP - The Gospel of SRK - TIC - The Library of Babel - TLD - TSOY - TTYODAS - TSZ - WOTM II
8 unsorted / add here -- Always - Everyday - Verbs


change css options:
change font "color":
change "background-color":
change "font-family":
change "padding":
change "table font size":
last updated: 2022-04-29 21:17:47
54946 site hits