classes ::: library, the_Library, media, class, object, map, thing, noun,
children ::: books (by alpha), books (quotes), Buddhism (books), Carl Jung (books), Integral Yoga (books), the Library (books)
branches ::: books, Bookstores, Carolinas books, gutenberg books, Holy Books, josh books, Kennys Books, missing books, old bookshelf, Samis Books

Instances, Classes, See Also, Object in Names
Definitions, . Quotes . - . Chapters .


object:books
object:NEWLIB
object:the Bookshelf
object:the Supramental Library
count:2239
class:library

--- BOOKS PER AUTHORS

--- BY SUBJECT?
  BUDDHISM
  araw s:Buddhism | grep s:author | sed 's/.*//g' | getright ":" ## 5 Buddhist Authors
  araw s:Buddhism | grep s:book | sed 's/.*//g' | getright ":" ### 4 Buddhist Books

--- ATTEMPT SORTING 1
  Categories
    Books
  Bartimaeus trilogy
    Comics
    Manga
    short stories
      Asimov - the Last Question

--- BY AUTHOR:
Sri Aurobindo
The Mother
Satprem
Sri Aurobindo, or The Adventure of Consciousness
A. S. Dalal
MP Pandit
Robert Greene - Mastery

--- BY SUBJECT:
Spirituality:
The Synthesis of Yoga SOY
The Life Divine
  Technology:
  Beginning Programming
  belisle book list
  Christianity

--- BY DEPTH

--- BY SCOPE

--- ENMASSE (without order of sorts)
  The Synthesis of Yoga
  Magick/Book ABA
  Book summaries
  Book Reviews
    why did i buy each book. what attracted me. what does it say about me.
  other books


--- FOOTER
quick link:sbooks() { cgrep -i "$*" ~/Documents/Code/KEYS/books_descriptions; }
books to add:On Education, the rest of whatever books are present (see chapters))
books to add2:seven habits

see also ::: Audiobooks

class:the Library
class:media
class:class
class:object
class:map
class:thing
word class:noun

dir:/home/j/Documents/Code/KEYS/NEWLIB





see also ::: read, reading, reading list, curriculum, syllabus,


questions, comments, take-down requests, reporting broken-links etc.
contact me @ integralyogin at gmail dot com

--- OBJECT INSTANCES [690]


1.00_-_Gospel_Preface
8_Secrets_of_Tao_Te_Ching
A_Book_of_Five_Rings_-_The_Classic_Guide_to_Strategy
A_Brief_History_of_Everything
Achieving_Oneness_With_The_Higher_Soul___Meditations_for_Soul_Realization
A_Course_in_Miracles
Advanced_Dungeons_and_Dragons_2E
Advanced_Integral
Advanced_Pranic_Healing
Aeneid
A_Garden_of_Pomegranates_-_An_Outline_of_the_Qabalah
Agenda_Vol_10
Agenda_Vol_11
Agenda_Vol_12
Agenda_Vol_13
Agenda_Vol_2
Agenda_Vol_3
Agenda_Vol_4
Agenda_Vol_5
Agenda_Vol_6
Agenda_Vol_7
Agenda_Vol_8
Agenda_Vol_9
A_Guide_to_the_Words_of_My_Perfect_Teacher
A_History_of_Western_Philosophy
Aion
Alcoholics_Anonymous
Alice_in_Wonderland
A_Manual_Of_Abhidhamma
Analects
Analysis_of_Mind
Anam_Cara__A_Book_of_Celtic_Wisdom
Anarchy
An_Arrow_to_the_Heart__A_Commentary_on_the_Heart_Sutra
Anilbaran_Roy_Interviews_and_Conversations
An_Inquiry_into_the_Nature_and_Causes_of_the_Wealth_of_Nations
Annihilation_of_Caste
An_Outline_of_Occult_Science
Anti-Oedipus__Capitalism_and_Schizophrenia
Apokryphen
Apology
A_Room_of_One's_Own
Art_as_Experience
As_It_Is_-_Volume_I_-_Essential_Teachings_from_the_Dzogchen_Perspective
As_It_Is_-_Volume_II
Aspects_of_Evocation
A_Study_Of_Dogen_His_Philosophy_and_Religion
A_Theory_of_Justice
A_Thousand_Plateaus__Capitalism_and_Schizophrenia
Atlas_Shrugged
Atma_Bodha
A_Trackless_Path
Auguries_of_Innocence
authors_(code)
Avatamsaka_Sutra
A_Vindication_of_the_Rights_of_Woman
Awaken_Every_Day__365_Buddhist_Reflections_to_Invite_Mindfulness_and_Joy
Awaken_the_Giant_Within
Beaten_Down__Silently_Suffering_Trauma
Becoming_the_Compassion_Buddha__Tantric_Mahamudra_for_Everyday_Life
Be_Here_Now
Being_and_knowing_in_wholeness_Chinese_Chan,_Tibetan_Dzogchen,_and_the_logic_of_immediacy_in_contemplation
Being_and_Nothingness
Being_and_Time
Being_Peace
Beowulf
Beyond_Good_and_Evil
Big_Mind,_Big_Heart
Blazing_the_Trail_from_Infancy_to_Enlightenment
Bodhinyana__a_collection_of_Dhamma_talks
Book_of_Certitude
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings
books_(by_alpha)
books_(quotes)
Branching_Streams_flow_in_the_darkness
Breaking_the_Bonds_of_Adult_Child_Abuse__A_Biblical_Textbook_on_Abusive_Narcissistic_Families,_How_They_Operate,_and_How_to_Deal_with_Them
Brihadaranyaka_Upanishad
Buddhahood_in_This_Life__The_Great_Commentary_by_Vimalamitra
Buddhahood_Without_Meditation__A_Visionary_Account_Known_as_Refining_One's_Perception
Candide
chapters
Choiceless_Awareness__A_Selection_of_Passages_for_the_Study_of_the_Teachings_of_J._Krishnamurti
Choosing_Simplicity__A_Commentary_On_The_Bhikshuni_Pratimoksha
City_of_God
Civilization_and_Its_Discontents
class
Classical_Chinese_Poetry__An_Anthology
Cold_Mountain
Collected_Fictions
Collected_Poems
collections
Common_Sense
Compassionate_Action
Complex_PTSD__From_Surviving_to_Thriving
Computer_Power_and_Human_Reason
Concentration_(book)
Confessions
Confusion_Arises_as_Wisdom__Gampopa's_Heart_Advice_on_the_Path_of_Mahamudra
Conscious_Immortality
Contemplation_and_Action
Contingency
Conversations_of_Socrates
Conversations_With_God__An_Uncommon_Dialogue
Core_Integral
Cratylus
Creative_Evolution
Crime_and_Punishment
Crisis_of_European_Sciences_and_Transcendental_Phenomenology
Critique_of_Practical_Reason
Critique_of_Pure_Reason
Crow_With_No_Mouth__Ikkyu
Cultivating_the_Empty_Field__The_Silent_Illumination_of_Zen_Master_Hongzhi
Dark_Night_of_the_Soul
Das_Kapital
Day_by_Day
De_Anima
Deep_Meditation
Demian
Democracy_in_America
Depth_Psychology__Meditations_in_the_Field
Differentiating_Non-Distraction_and_So_Forth
Discipline_and_Punish__The_Birth_of_the_Prison
Discourse_on_Method
DND_DM_Guide_5E
DND_MM_5E
DND_PH_5E
Do_Androids_Dream_of_Electric_Sheep?
Don_Quixote
Don't_Take_Your_Life_Personally
Dragonsfoot
Dune
Early_Buddhist_Meditation__The_Four_Jhanas_as_the_Actualization_of_Insight
Earthbeat
Ecce_Homo
Economy_of_Truth__Practical_Maxims_and_Reflections
Education_As_a_Force_for_Social_Change
Eloquent_Javascript
Enchiridion
Enlightened_Courage__A_Commentary_on_the_Seven_Point_Mind_Training
Ennead_VI
Entrance_To_The_Great_Perfection__A_Guide_To_The_Dzogchen_Preliminary_Practices
Esoteric_Orders_and_Their_Work_and_The_Training_and_Work_of_the_Initiate
Essays_Divine_And_Human
Essays_in_Idleness_-_The_Tsurezuregusa_of_Kenko
Essays_In_Philosophy_And_Yoga
Essays_of_Schopenhauer
Essays_On_The_Gita
Essential_Integral
Ethics
Evening_Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo
Experience_and_Nature
Face_to_Face
Falling_Into_Grace__Insights_on_the_End_of_Suffering
Fathoming_the_Mind__Inquiry_and_Insight_in_Dudjom_Lingpa's_Vajra_Essence
Faust
Fearless_Simplicity__The_Dzogchen_Way_of_Living_Freely_in_a_Complex_World
Fifty_Shades_of_Narcissism__The_Secret_Language_of_Narcissists,_Sociopaths_and_Psychopaths
Finnegans_Wake
Five_Dialogues__Euthyphro
Flower_Adornment_Sutra_(Avatamsaka_Sutra)_Prologue
Foxe's_Book_of_Martyrs
Fragments
Free_thought_and_Official_Propaganda
Full_Circle
Fury
Gandhi__An_autobiography
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Generating_the_Deity
God_Emptiness_and_the_True_Self
Gone_with_the_Wind
Great_Bodhi_Mind
Great_Disciples_of_the_Buddha__Their_Lives,_Their_Works,_Their_Legacy
Guided_Buddhist_Meditations__Essential_Practices_on_the_Stages_of_the_Path
Gullivers_Travels
Guru_Granth_Sahib
Guru_Yoga_(book)
Hamlet
Harry_Potter
Heal_Yourself_by_Clearing_the_Chakras
Hidden_Messages_in_Water
Hojoki__Visions_of_a_Torn_World
Holy_Bible__King_James_Version
Holy_Bible__New_International_Version
Hopscotch
How_to_become_an_Expert_Software_Engineer
How_to_Practice_Shamatha_Meditation__The_Cultivation_of_Meditative_Quiescene
How_to_Practice__The_Way_to_a_Meaningful_Life
How_to_See_Yourself_As_You_Really_Are
How_to_think_like_Leonardo_Da_Vinci
Human_Knowledge
Hymns_to_the_Mystic_Fire
I_Am_That__Talks_with_Sri_Nisargadatta_Maharaj
Infinite_Library
In_His_Steps__What_Would_Jesus_Do?
Initiates_of_Flame
Inner_Teachings_of_Hinduism_Revealed
Integral_Life_Practice
Integral_Psychology
Integral_Spirituality
Integral_Yoga_(books)
Intelligent_Life__Buddhist_Psychology_of_Self-Transformation
Into_the_Heart_of_Life
Introduction_To_The_Middle_Way__Chandrakirti's_Madhyamakavatara_with_Commentary_by_Dzongsar_Jamyang_Khyentse_Rinpoche
Introduction_Zen_Buddhism
Intuitive_Thinking
Invisible_Cities
Isha_Upanishad
Japanese_Spirituality
Job_-_A_Comedy_of_Justice
josh_books
Journey_to_the_East
Karmayogin
Kena_and_Other_Upanishads
Ken_Wilber_-_Thought_as_Passion
Kindness
Knowledge_of_the_Higher_Worlds
Kosmic_Consciousness
Labyrinths.
Lamp_of_Mahamudra__The_Immaculate_Lamp_that_Perfectly_and_Fully_Illuminates_the_Meaning_of_Mahamudra,_the_Essence_of_all_Phenomena
Laughter__An_Essay_on_the_Meaning_of_the_Comic
Leaning_Toward_the_Poet__Eavesdropping_on_the_Poetry_of_Everyday_Life
Leaves_of_Grass
Letters_from_a_Stoic
Letters_On_Himself_And_The_Ashram
Letters_On_Poetry_And_Art
Letters_On_Yoga
Letters_On_Yoga_I
Letters_On_Yoga_II
Letters_On_Yoga_III
Letters_On_Yoga_IV
Let_There_Be_Light!_Scapegoat_of_a_Narcissistic_Mother_"My_Story"
Levels_Of_Knowing_And_Existence__Studies_In_General_Semantics
Leviathan
Leviathan_Wakes
Liao_Fan's_Four_Lessons
Liber
Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_ABA
Liber_Kaos
Liber_Null
Living_Buddha
Living_Dhamma
Logical_Investigations
Logic_and_Ontology
Longchenpa's_Advice_From_The_Heart
Lord_of_the_Flies
Love_and_Compassion_Is_My_Religion__A_Beginner's_Book_Into_Spirituality
Lysis_-_Symposium_-_Gorgias
Machik's_Complete_Explanation__Clarifying_the_Meaning_of_Chod
Magic_-_A_Treatise_on_Esoteric_Ethics
Magick_Without_Tears
Maharshis_Gospel
Mahayana_sutras
Mahayana-Uttaratantra-Shastra
Manhood_of_Humanity
Mans_Search_for_Meaning
Mantras_Of_The_Mother
Manual_of_Zen_Buddhism
Maps_of_Meaning
Marriage_of_Sense_and_Soul
Martin_Luther's_Ninety-Five_Theses
Mastery
mcw
Meditation__Advice_to_Beginners
Meditations
Meditation__The_First_and_Last_Freedom
meditation_(topics)
Mere_Christianity
Metamorphoses
Metaphysics
Mind_at_Ease__Self-Liberation_through_Mahamudra_Meditation
Mindfulness_Of_Breathing
Mind_Training__The_Great_Collection
Mining_for_Wisdom_Within_Delusion__Maitreya's_Distinction_Between_Phenomena_and_the_Nature_of_Phenomena_and_Its_Indian_and_Tibetan_Commentaries
Miracles_Through_Pranic_Healing
Mixed_Collection
Moral_Disengagement__How_Good_People_Can_Do_Harm_and_Feel_Good_About_Themselves
More_Answers_From_The_Mother
Mysticism_and_Logic
Mysticism_at_the_Dawn_of_the_Modern_Age
Mysticism_Christian_and_Buddhist
Nagarjuna's_Middle_Way__Mulamadhyamakakarika
Narcissistic_Personality_Disorder_(NPD)_Catechism
Narcissus_and_Goldmund
Nausea
Nepal
Neuromancer
New_Science
New_World_Translation_of_the_Holy_Scriptures
No_Boundary
Notebooks_of_Lazarus_Long
Notes_from_the_Underground
of_Society
old_bookshelf
Olympian_Odes
On_Belief
On_Education
One_Taste
One_Thousand_and_One_Nights
On_Interpretation
On_Liberty
On_Prayer
On_Savitri_(book)
On_the_Shortness_of_Life
On_the_Universe
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Opening_the_Hand_of_Thought__Foundations_of_Zen_Buddhist_Practice
Orthodoxy
Our_Knowledge_of_the_External_World
Out_of_Syllabus__Poems
Out_of_the_Fog__Moving_From_Confusion_to_Clarity_After_Narcissistic_Abuse
Pantheisticon__A_Modern_English_Translation
Paracelsus_as_a_Spiritual_Phenomenon
Paradise_Lost
Parting_From_The_Four_Attachments__A_Commentary_On_Jetsun_Drakpa_Gyaltsen's_Song_Of_Experience_On_Mind_Training_And_The_View
Path_to_Peace__A_Guide_to_Managing_Life_After_Losing_a_Loved_One
Peace_Is_Every_Step__The_Path_of_Mindfulness_in_Everyday_Life
Pedagogy_of_the_Oppressed
Penses
Persian_Letters
Phaedo
Phenomenology_of_Perception
Phenomenology_of_Spirit
Poems_of_Fernando_Pessoa
Poetics
Practical_Advice_to_Teachers
Practical_Ethics_and_Profound_Emptiness__A_Commentary_on_Nagarjuna's_Precious_Garland
Practical_Psychic_Self_Defense_for_Home_&_Office
Practice_And_All_Is_Coming__Abuse,_Cult_Dynamics,_And_Healing_In_Yoga_And_Beyond
Praise_of_Folly
Pranic_Psychotherapy
Prayers_And_Meditations
Primordial_Purity__Oral_Instructions_on_the_Three_Words_That_Strike_the_Vital_Point
Principles_of_Morals
Process_and_Reality
Progressive_Stages_of_Meditation_on_Emptiness
Psychological_Assessment_of_Adult_Posttraumatic_States__Phenomenology,_Diagnosis,_and_Measurement
Questions_And_Answers_1929-1931
Questions_And_Answers_1950-1951
Questions_And_Answers_1953
Questions_And_Answers_1954
Questions_And_Answers_1955
Questions_And_Answers_1956
Questions_And_Answers_1957-1958
Quotology
Raja-Yoga
Ramayana
Ready_Player_One
Record_of_Yoga
Reflections_on_Silver_River
Religion_and_Science
Renunciation_and_Empowerment_of_Buddhist_Nuns_in_Myanmar-Burma__Building_a_Community_of_Female_Faithful
Revelations_of_Divine_Love
Revolt_Against_the_Modern_World
Rice_Eyes_Enlightenment_in_Dogens_Kitchen
Ride_the_Tiger__A_Survival_Manual_for_the_Aristocrats_of_the_Soul
Rig_Veda
Role_of_the_Intellectual_in_the_Modern_World
Rubaiyat
Rules_of_Sociological_Method
Satipahna__The_Direct_Path_to_Realization
Savitri
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(toc)
Science_and_Sanity
Second_Edition
Secrets_of_Heaven
Sefer_Yetzirah__The_Book_of_Creation__In_Theory_and_Practice
Self-Enquiry
Self-Liberation_Through_Seeing_with_Naked_Awareness
Sermons
Sex_and_the_Narcissist
Sex_Ecology_Spirituality
Shentong_&_Rangtong__Two_Views_of_Emptiness
Siddhartha
Sivananda_Companion_to_Yoga__Sivananda_Companion_to_Yoga
Skeletons
Sky_Above
Snow_Crash
Society
Some_Answers_From_The_Mother
Songs_of_Kabir
Songs_of_Spiritual_Experience
Sparks
Spiral_Dynamics
Spirituality
Sri_Aurobindo_or_the_Adventure_of_Consciousness
Stages_Of_Faith
Starship_Troopers
Start_Here__A_Crash_Course_in_Understanding,_Navigating,_and_Healing_From_Narcissistic_Abuse
Stillness_Flowing__The_Life_and_Teachings_of_Ajahn_Chah
Straight_From_The_Heart__Buddhist_Pith_Instructions
Structure_and_Interpretation_of_Computer_Programs
Studies_in_the_Lankavatara
Success
Suicide__A_Study_in_Sociology
Summa_Theologica
Surprised_by_Joy__The_Shape_of_My_Early_Life
Swampland_Flowers__The_Letters_and_Lectures_of_Zen_Master_Ta_Hui
Sweet_Mother
Sylvie_and_Bruno
Symposium
Talks
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
Tao_Te_Ching
The_5_Dharma_Types
The_7_Habits_of_Highly_Effective_People
The_Abolition_of_Man
The_Act_of_Creation
Theaetetus
The_Analects
The_Anatomy_of_Melancholy
The_Ancient_Wisdom_of_the_Chinese_Tonic_Herbs
The_Art_and_Thought_of_Heraclitus
The_Art_of_Computer_Programming
The_Art_of_Happiness
The_Art_of_Literature
The_Art_of_Living__The_Classical_Manual_on_Virtue
The_Art_of_War
The_Atman_Project
The_Autobiography_of_Malcolm_X
The_Beyond_Mind_Papers__Vol_1_Transpersonal_and_Metatranspersonal_Theory
The_Beyond_Mind_Papers__Vol_2_Steps_to_a_Metatranspersonal_Philosophy_and_Psychology
The_Beyond_Mind_Papers__Vol_3_Further_Steps_to_a_Metatranspersonal_Philosophy_and_Psychology
The_Beyond_Mind_Papers__Vol_4_Further_Steps_to_a_Metatranspersonal_Philosophy_and_Psychology
The_Bhagavad_Gita
The_Bible
The_Birth_of_Tragedy
The_Black_Hole_War_-_My_Battle_with_Stephen_Hawking_to_Make_the_World_Safe_for_Quantum_Mechanics
The_Blue_Cliff_Records
The_Body_Keeps_the_Score__Brain,_Mind,_and_Body_in_the_Healing_of_Trauma
the_Book
The_Book_of_Chuang_Tzu
The_Book_of_Equanimity
The_Book_of_Gates
the_Book_of_God
The_Book_of_Joy__Lasting_Happiness_in_a_Changing_World
The_Book_of_Light
The_Book_of_Miracle
The_Book_of_Mormon__Another_Testament_of_Jesus_Christ
The_Book_of_Secrets__Keys_to_Love_and_Meditation
the_Book_of_Wisdom
The_Book_on_the_Taboo_Against_Knowing_Who_You_Are
The_Buddhist_Revival_in_China
The_Castle_of_Crossed_Destinies
The_Categories
The_Celestine_Prophecy
The_Choice__Embrace_the_Possible
The_Cloud_of_Unknowing_and_Other_Works
The_Coming_Race
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Communist_Manifesto
The_Compass_of_Zen
The_Complete_Dead_Sea_Scrolls_in_English
The_Complete_Essays
The_Confessions_of_Saint_Augustine
The_Connected_Discourses_of_the_Buddha__A_Translation_of_the_Samyutta_Nikaya
The_Consolation_of_Philosophy
The_Conspiracy_Against_the_Human_Race
The_Creative_Mind
The_Crisis_Of_The_Modern_World
The_Decline_of_the_West
The_Deepest_Well__Healing_the_Long-Term_Effects_of_Childhood_Adversity
The_Dhammapada
The_Dharani_Sutra__The_Sutra_of_the_Vast,_Great,_Perfect,_Full,_Unimpeded_Great_Compassion_Heart_Dharani_of_the_Thousand-Handed,_Thousand
The_Diamond_Sutra
The_Diamond_Sutra_and_The_Sutra_of_Hui-Neng
The_Divine_Comedy
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Divinization_of_Matter__Lurianic_Kabbalah,_Physics,_and_the_Supramental_Transformation
The_Doors_of_Perception_&_Heaven_and_Hell
The_Enneads
The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh
The_Essence_of_the_Heart_Sutra__The_Dalai_Lama's_Heart_of_Wisdom_Teachings
The_Essence_of_Truth
The_Essential_Epicurus
The_Essential_Rumi
The_Essentials_of_Buddhist_Meditation
The_Essentials_of_Education
The_Essential_Writings
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_Ever-Present_Origin
The_Everyday_I_Ching
The_Eye_Of_Spirit
The_Fall
The_Federalist_Papers
The_Foundation_of_Buddhist_Practice_(The_Library_of_Wisdom_and_Compassion_Book_2)
The_Fountainhead
The_Four_Loves
The_Fundamental_Wisdom_of_the_Middle_Way__Ngrjuna's_Mlamadhyamakakrik
The_Future_of_Man
The_Future_Poetry
The_Gateless_Gate
The_Gay_Science
The_Genius_of_Language
The_Gift
The_Golden_Bough
The_Golden_Sentences_of_Democrates
The_Golden_Verses_of_Pythagoras
The_Gospel_of_Sri_Ramakrishna
The_Gospel_of_Thomas
The_Great_Exposition_of_Secret_Mantra
The_Great_Gate_for_Accomplishing_Supreme_Enlightenment
The_Great_Secret_of_Mind__Special_Instructions_on_the_Nonduality_of_Dzogchen
The_Great_Sense__Sri_Aurobindo_And_The_Future_Of_The_Earth
The_Guide_for_the_Perplexed
The_Handbook
The_Healthy_Mind_Interviews_VOL_III
The_Heart_Is_Noble__Changing_the_World_from_the_Inside_Out
The_Heart_of_Compassion__The_Thirty-seven_Verses_on_the_Practice_of_a_Bodhisattva
The_Heart_of_the_Buddha's_Teaching__Transforming_Suffering_into_Peace
The_Heart_of_the_Path__Seeing_the_Guru_as_Buddha
The_Heart_Treasure_of_the_Enlightened_Ones__The_Practice_of_View,_Meditation,_and_Action__A_Discourse_Virtuous_in_the_Beginning,_Middle,_and_End
The_Heros_Journey
The_Hero_with_a_Thousand_Faces
The_Hidden_Words
The_Hiding_Place__The_Triumphant_True_Story_of_Corrie_Ten_Boom
The_Hitchhikers_Guide_to_the_Galaxy
The_Holy_Teaching_of_Vimalakirti__A_Mahayana_Scripture
The_Hound_of_Heaven
The_Human_Cycle
The_Human_Use_of_Human_Beings
The_Hundred_Verses_of_Advice__Tibetan_Buddhist_Teachings_on_What_Matters_Most
The_I_Ching_or_Book_of_Changes
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Instructions_of_Gampopa__A_Precious_Garland_of_the_Supreme_Path
The_Integral_Yoga
The_Interior_Castle_or_The_Mansions
The_Interpretation_of_Dreams
The_Jack_of_Too_Many
The_Jewel_Ornament_of_Liberation__The_Wish-Fulfilling_Gem_of_the_Noble_Teachings
The_Journals_of_Kierkegaard
The_Kitab-i-Aqdas__The_Most_Holy_Book
The_Left_Hand_of_Darkness
The_Life_Divine
The_Life_of_Shabkar__Autobiography_of_a_Tibetan_Yogin
The_Little_Prince
The_Logic_of_Scientific_Discovery
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Lotus_Sutra
The_Love_Poems_of_Rumi
The_Master_Key_System
The_Middle_Length_Discourses_of_the_Buddha__A_Translation_of_the_Majjhima_Nikaya
The_Middle_Way__Faith_Grounded_in_Reason
The_Mirror__Advice_On_The_Presence_Of_Awareness
The_Monadology
The_Most_Holy_Book
The_Mothers_Agenda
The_Mother_With_Letters_On_The_Mother
The_Mystical_Teachings_of_Jesus
The_Nag_Hammadi_Library
The_Narcissistic_Abuse_Recovery_Bible__Spiritual_Recovery_from_Narcissistic_and_Emotional_Abuse
The_Nature_of_Consciousness__Essays_on_the_Unity_of_Mind_and_Matter
The_Nectar_of_Manjushri's_Speech__A_Detailed_Commentary_on_Shantideva's_Way_of_the_Bodhisattva
The_Neverending_Story
The_New_Organon
The_Nicomachean_Ethics
The_Numerical_Discourses_of_the_Buddha__A_Complete_Translation_of_the_Anguttara_Nikaya
The_Octavo
The_Odyssey
The_Oresteia__Agamemnon
The_Origin_Of_Modern_Pranic_Healing_And_Arhatic_Yoga
The_Origin_of_Species
Theosophy
The_Paris_Review_Interviews
The_Path_Is_Everywhere__Uncovering_the_Jewels_Hidden_Within_You
The_Path_Of_Serenity_And_Insight__An_Explanation_Of_Buddhist_Jhanas
The_Path_to_Enlightenment
The_Phenomenon_of_Man
The_Philosophy_of_History
The_Places_That_Scare_You_-_A_Guide_to_Fearlessness_in_Difficult_Times
The_Plague
The_Power_of_Myth
The_Precious_Treasury_Of_The_Way_Of_Abiding
The_Prince_(book)
The_Principia__Mathematical_Principles_of_Natural_Philosophy
The_Principles_of_Mathematics
The_Problem_of_China
The_Problems_of_Philosophy
The_Prophet
The_Pythagorean_Sentences_of_Demophilus
The_Recognition_Sutras__Illuminating_a_1,000-Year-Old_Spiritual_Masterpiece
The_Red_Book__Liber_Novus
The_Republic
The_Revolt_of_the_Masses
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Road_to_Serfdom
The_Science_of_Knowing
The_Seat_of_the_Soul
The_Second_Sex
The_Secret_Doctrine
The_Secret_of_the_Golden_Flower
The_Secret_Of_The_Veda
The_Seven_Valleys_and_the_Four_Valleys
The_Shack
The_Shorter_Science_and_Civilisation_in_China
The_Sickness_Unto_Death
The_Six_Dharma_Gates_to_the_Sublime
The_Social_Contract
The_Spirit_of_the_Laws
The_Spiritual_Exercises
the_Stack
The_Stranger
The_Structure_of_Scientific_Revolutions
The_Sunlit_Path_(compliation)
The_Sutta-Nipata
The_Suttanipata__An_Ancient_Collection_of_the_Buddha's_Discourses_Together_with_its_Commentaries
The_Sweet_Dews_of_Chan_Zen
The_Synthesis_Of_Yoga
The_Tao_of_Pooh
The_Tarot_of_Paul_Christian
The_Teachings_of_Don_Juan__A_Yaqui_Way_of_Knowledge
The_Tempest
The_Three_Pillars_of_Zen
The_Tibetan_Book_of_Living_and_Dying
The_Tibetan_Book_of_the_Dead
The_Tibetan_Yogas_of_Dream_and_Sleep
The_Time_Machine
The_Torch_of_Certainty
The_Training_of_the_Zen_Buddhist_Monk
The_Trial_and_Death_of_Socrates
The_Trouble_with_Being_Born
The_Twelve_Caesars
The_Unbearable_Lightness_of_Being
The_Universe_in_a_Single_Atom__The_Convergence_of_Science_and_Spirituality
The_Upanishads
The_Varieties_of_Religious_Experience
The_Wave_in_the_Mind_-_Talks_and_Essays_on_the_Writer
The_Way_(book)
The_Way_of_a_Pilgrim_and_the_Pilgrim_Continues_His_Way
The_Way_Of_Kabbalah
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Way_of_the_Bodhisattva
The_Way_of_the_Realized_Old_Dogs,_Advice_That_Points_Out_the_Essence_of_Mind,_Called_a_Lamp_That_Dispels_Darkness
The_Way_Things_are
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Words_of_My_Perfect_Teacher
The_World_as_Will_and_Idea
The_World_of_Tibetan_Buddhism__An_Overview_of_Its_Philosophy_and_Practice
The_Yoga_Sutras
The_Zen_Koan_as_a_means_of_Attaining_Enlightenment
The_Zen_Teaching_of_Bodhidharma
This_is_It_&_Other_Essays_on_Zen_&_Spiritual_Experience
Three_Books_on_Occult_Philosophy
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra
Tibetan_Yoga__Principles_and_Practices
Tilopa's_Mahamudra_Upadesha__The_Gangama_Instructions_with_Commentary
Timaeus_-_Critias
To_See_a_World
Total_Freedom__The_Essential_Krishnamurti
Tractatus_Logico-Philosophicus
Transcendental_Magic
Transforming_Therapy_through_Horses__Case_Stories_Teaching_the_EAGALA_Model_in_Action
Treasure_Island
Treasure_Trove_of_Scriptural_Transmission__A_Commentary_on_the_Precious_Treasury_of_the_Basic_Space_of_Phenomena
Treasury_of_the_True_Dharma_Eye__Zen_Master_Dogens_Shobo_Genzo
Truth_and_Method
Turning_Confusion_into_Clarity__A_Guide_to_the_Foundation_Practices_of_Tibetan_Buddhism
Twelfth_Night
Twilight_of_the_Idols
Unborn__The_Life_and_Teachings_of_Zen_Master_Bankei
Understanding_Mezcal
Understanding_the_Mind__An_Explanation_of_the_Nature_and_Functions_of_the_Mind
Unfathomable_Depths__Drawing_Wisdom_for_Today_from_a_Classical_Zen_Poem
Universal_Love__The_Yoga_Method_of_Buddha_Maitreya
Up_From_Eden
Utopia
Verses_of_Vemana
Waiting_for_Godot
Walden,_and_On_The_Duty_Of_Civil_Disobedience
Way_of_the_Realized_Old_Dogs
What_the_Ancient_Wisdom_Expects_of_Its_Disciples
What_the_Buddha_Taught
Wherever_You_Go
White_Roses
Who_are_you?
Wild_Ivy__A_Spiritual_Autobiography_of_Zen_Master_Hakuin
Words_Of_Long_Ago
Words_of_the_Mother
Words_Of_The_Mother_I
Words_Of_The_Mother_II
Words_Of_The_Mother_III
Working_With_Emotions_(Tricycle_Teachings_#12)
You_Are_the_Eyes_of_the_World
Zen_(code)
Zen_Letters__Teachings_of_Yuanwu
Zen_Mind,_Beginners_Mind

--- PRIMARY CLASS


book
books
chapter
class
library
map
media
object
quotes
reading_list
the_Library
thing

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [5]


2.13 - The Book
A Book of Five Rings - The Classic Guide to Strategy
Anam Cara A Book of Celtic Wisdom
anew-book
Anton Book list
Ascendance of a Bookworm
Best Philosophy Books
Best Spiritual Books
Book 1 - The Council of the Gods
Book Analysis
BOOK II. -- PART I. ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK II. -- PART III. ADDENDA. SCIENCE AND THE SECRET DOCTRINE CONTRASTED
BOOK II. -- PART II. THE ARCHAIC SYMBOLISM OF THE WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK I. -- PART I. COSMIC EVOLUTION
BOOK I. -- PART III. SCIENCE AND THE SECRET DOCTRINE CONTRASTED
BOOK I. -- PART II. THE EVOLUTION OF SYMBOLISM IN ITS APPROXIMATE ORDER
Book of Certitude
Book of Exodus
Book of Genesis
Book of Imaginary Beings
Book of Imaginary Beings (text)
Book of Proverbs
Book of Psalms
books
books (by alpha)
books (quotes)
Bookstores
Breaking the Bonds of Adult Child Abuse A Biblical Textbook on Abusive Narcissistic Families, How They Operate, and How to Deal with Them
Buddhism (books)
Carl Jung (books)
Carolinas books
COG BOOK I
Concentration (book)
contact book
COSA BOOK I
Essential Books of Computer Science
facebook
facebook groups
firefox bookmarks
Foxe's Book of Martyrs
google chrome bookmarks
Guru Yoga (book)
gutenberg books
Holy Books
Integral Yoga (books)
Jordan Peterson - Great Books
josh books
Kennys Books
Liber 111 - The Book of Wisdom - LIBER ALEPH VEL CXI
Liber 11 - Liber NU - This is the Book of the Cult of the Infinite Without.
Liber 175 - the Book of Uniting
Liber 49 - The Book of Babalon
Liber 555 - Liber HAD - the Book of the Cult of the Infinite Within
Love and Compassion Is My Religion A Beginner's Book Into Spirituality
missing books
Niamh Dempsey books list
Notebooks of Lazarus Long
old bookshelf
online books on drugs
On Savitri (book)
Samis Books
Sefer Yetzirah The Book of Creation In Theory and Practice
the Book
the Book of
The Book of Beginnings
The Book of Chuang Tzu
The Book of Equanimity
The Book of Gates
the Book of God
The Book of Joy Lasting Happiness in a Changing World
The Book of Light
The Book of Miracle
The Book of Mormon Another Testament of Jesus Christ
The Book of Sand
The Book of Secrets Keys to Love and Meditation
The Book of Thoth
the Book of Wisdom
The Book on the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are
The Book (short story)
The Foundation of Buddhist Practice (The Library of Wisdom and Compassion Book 2)
The Handbook
The I Ching or Book of Changes
The Kitab-i-Aqdas The Most Holy Book
the Library (books)
The Most Holy Book
The Most Influential Books in History
The Prince (book)
The Red Book Liber Novus
The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying
The Tibetan Book of the Dead
The Way (book)
The Western Canon - The Books and School of the Ages
Three Books on Occult Philosophy
Zen Buddhism - The Essential Books
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards_(table), project, project_0001, Savitri_(cento), Savitri_(extended_toc), the_Temple_of_Sages, three_js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the_Bad, the_God_object, the_Good, the_most_important, the_Ring, the_source_of_inspirations, the_Stack, the_Tarot, the_Word, top_priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


bookbinder ::: n. --> One whose occupation is to bind books.

bookbindery ::: n. --> A bookbinder&

bookbinding ::: n. --> The art, process, or business of binding books.

book ::: n. --> A collection of sheets of paper, or similar material, blank, written, or printed, bound together; commonly, many folded and bound sheets containing continuous printing or writing.
A composition, written or printed; a treatise.
A part or subdivision of a treatise or literary work; as, the tenth book of "Paradise Lost."
A volume or collection of sheets in which accounts are kept; a register of debts and credits, receipts and expenditures, etc.

bookcase ::: n. --> A case with shelves for holding books, esp. one with glazed doors.

bookcraft ::: n. --> Authorship; literary skill.

booked ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Book ::: a. --> Registered.
On the way; destined.

booker ::: n. --> One who enters accounts or names, etc., in a book; a bookkeeper.

bookful ::: n. --> As much as will fill a book; a book full. ::: a. --> Filled with book learning.

bookholder ::: n. --> A prompter at a theater.
A support for a book, holding it open, while one reads or copies from it.

booking ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Book

booking clerk ::: --> A clerk who registers passengers, baggage, etc., for conveyance, as by railway or steamship, or who sells passage tickets at a booking office.

booking office ::: --> An office where passengers, baggage, etc., are registered for conveyance, as by railway or steamship.
An office where passage tickets are sold.

bookish ::: a. --> Given to reading; fond of study; better acquainted with books than with men; learned from books.
Characterized by a method of expression generally found in books; formal; labored; pedantic; as, a bookish way of talking; bookish sentences.

bookkeeper ::: n. --> One who keeps accounts; one who has the charge of keeping the books and accounts in an office.

bookkeeping ::: n. --> The art of recording pecuniary or business transactions in a regular and systematic manner, so as to show their relation to each other, and the state of the business in which they occur; the art of keeping accounts. The books commonly used are a daybook, cashbook, journal, and ledger. See Daybook, Cashbook, Journal, and Ledger.

bookland ::: n. --> Alt. of Bockland

book-learned ::: a. --> Versed in books; having knowledge derived from books.

bookless ::: a. --> Without books; unlearned.

booklet ::: n. --> A little book.

bookmaker ::: n. --> One who writes and publishes books; especially, one who gathers his materials from other books; a compiler.
A betting man who "makes a book." See To make a book, under Book, n.

bookman ::: n. --> A studious man; a scholar.

bookmark ::: n. --> Something placed in a book to guide in finding a particular page or passage; also, a label in a book to designate the owner; a bookplate.

bookmate ::: n. --> A schoolfellow; an associate in study.

bookmen ::: pl. --> of Bookman

bookmonger ::: n. --> A dealer in books.

book muslin ::: --> A kind of muslin used for the covers of books.
A kind of thin white muslin for ladies&

bookplate ::: n. --> A label, placed upon or in a book, showing its ownership or its position in a library.

bookseller ::: n. --> One who sells books.

bookselling ::: n. --> The employment of selling books.

bookshelf ::: n. --> A shelf to hold books.

bookshelves ::: pl. --> of Bookshelf

bookshop ::: n. --> A bookseller&

bookstall ::: n. --> A stall or stand where books are sold.

bookstand ::: n. --> A place or stand for the sale of books in the streets; a bookstall.
A stand to hold books for reading or reference.

bookstore ::: n. --> A store where books are kept for sale; -- called in England a bookseller&

bookwork ::: n. --> Work done upon a book or books (as in a printing office), in distinction from newspaper or job work.
Study; application to books.

bookworm ::: n. --> Any larva of a beetle or moth, which is injurious to books. Many species are known.
A student closely attached to books or addicted to study; a reader without appreciation.

booky ::: a. --> Bookish.

BOOK vide Symbol

Book ; Some kind of knowledge.

book
1. {e-book}.
2. {book titles}.
3. {MacBook}.
4. {O'Reilly and Associates}.

bookmark
A user's reference to a document on the
{web} or other hypermedia system, usually in the
form of a {URL} and a title or comment string.
Most web and {Gopher} {browsers} can save and load
a file of bookmarks to allow you to quickly locate documents
to which you want to refer again.
(1997-06-09)

Bookreader
{DEC}'s {CD-ROM}-based on-line documentation browser.

book titles
There is a tradition in hackerdom of informally
tagging important textbooks and standards documents with the
dominant colour of their covers or with some other conspicuous
feature of the cover. Many of these are described in {this
dictionary} under their own entries. See {Aluminum Book},
{Blue Book}, {Cinderella Book}, {Devil Book}, {Dragon Book},
{Green Book}, {Orange Book}, {Pink-Shirt Book}, {Purple Book},
{Red Book}, {Silver Book}, {White Book}, {Wizard Book},
{Yellow Book}, {bible}, {rainbow series}.
[{Jargon File}]
(1996-12-03)


--- QUOTES [312 / 1000 - 500 / 500] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   42 Aleister Crowley
   25 The Mother
   15 Sri Aurobindo
   12 Jorge Luis Borges
   9 Robert Heinlein
   7 Book of Wisdom
   5 Robert Anton Wilson
   5 Manly P Hall
   5 Georg C Lichtenberg
   5 Bhagavad Gita
   4 Sri Ramakrishna
   4 Mortimer J Adler
   4 M Alan Kazlev
   4 Koran
   4 H P Lovecraft
   4
   3 Tom Butler-Bowdon
   3 Tao Te Ching
   3 Sogyal Rinpoche
   3 Marcus Aurelius
   3 Franz Kafka
   2 Taittiriya Upanishad
   2 Swami Vivekananda
   2 Stephen King
   2 Robert Burton
   2 Ray Bradbury
   2 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   2 Peter J Carroll
   2 Kabir
   2 Joseph Campbell
   2 Jordan Peterson
   2 Jeffrey J Kripal
   2 Henry David Thoreau
   2 Gospel of Philip
   2 Frank Visser
   2 Ernest Hemingway
   2 Eliphas Levi
   2 C S Lewis
   2 Carl Jung
   1 Winston Churchill
   1 William S Burroughs
   1 Wikipedia
   1 Waking Life
   1 Toni Morrison
   1 Thomas Ehrlich
   1 Thomas Carlyle
   1 The Linux Command Line
   1 The Book of Wisdom
   1 The Book of Thomas
   1 The Bhagavad Gita
   1 Taigu Ryokan
   1 Susan Sontag
   1 Stratford Caldecott
   1 Stephen Brust
   1 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   1 Simone de Beauvoir
   1 S. I. Hayakawa
   1 S Ben Qayin
   1 Satprem
   1 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   1 Saint Teresa of Avila
   1 Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina
   1 Saint Padre Pio
   1 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   1 Richard P Feynman
   1 Rene Descartes
   1 Ray Sherwin
   1 R A Fisher
   1 Pino
   1 Phil Hine
   1 Pablo Neruda
   1 Owen Barfield
   1 Osho
   1 Oscar Wilde
   1 OReilly Linux System Programming
   1 Nikola Tesla
   1 Nik Douglas and Penny Slinger
   1 Neil Gaiman
   1 Nadabindu-Upanishad
   1 M P Pandit
   1 Mortimer Jerome Adler
   1 Michel de Montaigne
   1 Michael Murphy
   1 Matt Mercer
   1 Master Li
   1 Marshall McLuhan
   1 Mark Winborn
   1 Marcus Tomlinson
   1 MacGregor Mathers
   1 Ludwig Feuerbach
   1 Longchenpa
   1 Lewis Carroll
   1 Laura Whitcomb
   1 Ken Wilber
   1 Karma-glin-pa
   1 Jonathan Swift
   1 John Milton
   1 John Cowper Powys
   1 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   1 Jean-Paul Sartre
   1 Jay Kristoff
   1 Jason Bowman
   1 James V. Schall
   1 Italo Calvino
   1 Israel Regardie
   1 Isaac Asimov
   1 Howard Gardner
   1 Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa
   1 Haruki Murakami
   1 HAGAKURE: THE BOOK OF THE SAMURAI
   1 G K Chesterton
   1 George Bernard Shaw
   1 Gary Gygax
   1 Galileo Galilei
   1 Friedrich Nietzsche
   1 Frank Zappa
   1 Ezra Pound
   1 Ernest Cline
   1 Epictetus
   1 Emilia Fox
   1 Emerald Tablets of Thoth
   1 Elon Musk
   1 Editors of Discovery Magazine
   1 Dungeons and Dragons Players Handbook.
   1 Dr Robert A Hatch
   1 Dr E.V. Kenealy
   1 Douglas Adams
   1 Desiderius Erasmus
   1 collab summer & fall 2011
   1 Charles Haddon Spurgeon
   1 Charles Dickens
   1 Carl Sagan
   1 Bulleh Shah
   1 Bill Hicks
   1 Aryeh Kaplan
   1 Arthur Schopenhauer
   1 Aristotle
   1 Anatole France
   1 al-Razi?
   1 Allen Ginsberg
   1 Alfred Korzybski
   1 Aleister Crowey
   1 Agrippa
   1 A Edward Newton
   1 Abu Hamid al-Ghazali
   1 Aaron Koblin

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   23 Anonymous
   8 Thomas Jefferson
   7 Victor Hugo
   7 Jane Austen
   5 Stephen King
   5 Neil Gaiman
   5 John Green
   5 J K Rowling
   4 Ray Bradbury
   3 Walter Isaacson
   3 Various
   3 Umberto Eco
   3 Timothy Ferriss
   3 Robert A Heinlein
   3 Richard Bach
   3 Nikola Tesla
   3 Khaled Hosseini
   3 James Joyce
   3 Callimachus
   2 William Shakespeare
   2 V S Naipaul
   2 Vladimir Nabokov
   2 Unknown
   2 T S Eliot
   2 Terry Pratchett
   2 Seth Godin
   2 Sarah Dessen
   2 Salman Rushdie
   2 Plato
   2 Nadine Gordimer
   2 Murray Bookchin
   2 Mortimer J Adler
   2 Matthew Kelly
   2 Markus Zusak
   2 Marie Force
   2 Malcolm X
   2 Leo Tolstoy
   2 Kerstin Gier
   2 Kami Garcia
   2 John Ruskin
   2 Joaquin Miller
   2 Jasper Fforde
   2 Holly Goldberg Sloan
   2 Harper Lee
   2 George Eliot
   2 E L Doctorow
   2 Edward Gorey
   2 Edward Bulwer Lytton
   2 Dr Seuss
   2 Disha
   2 Dean Koontz
   2 C S Lewis
   2 Clive Barker
   2 Charles Dickens
   2 Cassandra Clare
   2 Cameron Jace
   2 Bren Brown
   2 Benjamin Franklin
   2 Anthony Powell
   2 Adam Smith

1:So many books, so little time. ~ Frank Zappa,
2:Of all things, I liked books best. ~ Nikola Tesla,
3:My Lord! Increase me in knowledge! ~ Koran, 114.php">.php">114 ,
4:Books are a uniquely portable magic. ~ Stephen King,
5:Beware the man of a single book. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
6:Not now, I am trying to read my book! ~ Pino, Ergo Proxy ,
7:There is no friend as loyal as a book. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
8:I am myself the matter of my book. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
9:Liber enim librum aperit. One book opens another. ~ al-Razi?,
10:However much one may have studied books, it is all futile unless one has love and devotion for God, unless one has the desire to realize Him. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
11:Throw away thy books. No longer distract thyself. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
12:My fondness for good books was my salvation. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
13:wither-soever ye turn, there is the Presence of Allah. ~ Koran, 115.php">.php">115 ,
14:The desire for wisdom leads us to the Eternal Kingdom. ~ Book of Wisdom,
15:Wisdom is full of light and her beauty is not withered. ~ Book of Wisdom,
16:Am I allowed to ask my book / whether it's true I wrote it? ~ Pablo Neruda,
17:I had evoked - and the book was indeed all I had suspected. ~ H P Lovecraft,
18:If you want to become full,let yourself be empty. ~ Tao Te Ching, ch.22 ,
19:The book of nature is written in the language of mathematics. ~ Galileo Galilei,
20:We spend our lives waiting for our book and it never comes. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
21:Character is nothing but habit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Book III,
22:Give up your thirst for books, so that you do not die a grouch. ~ Marcus Aurelius,
23:He is everywhere in the world and stands with all in His embrace. ~ Bhagavad Gita,
24:A successful book cannot afford to be more than ten percent new. ~ Marshall McLuhan,
25:All books will become light in proportion as you find light in them. ~ Mortimer J Adler,
26:All the historical books which contain no lies are extremely tedius. ~ Anatole France,
27:Yoga is the practice of tolerating the consequences of being yourself. ~ Bhagavad Gita,
28:It is a good thing for an uneducated man to read books of quotations. ~ Winston Churchill,
29:There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts. ~ Charles Dickens,
30:High winds do not last all morning. Heavy rain does not last all day. ~ Tao Te Ching, ch.23 ,
31:Those who love her discover her easily and those that seek her do find her. ~ Book of Wisdom,
32:Habit is nothing but an operation of memory. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Book III,
33:Make it a rule never to give a child a book you would not read yourself. ~ George Bernard Shaw,
34:Yes, yes; you’ve read thousands of books but you’ve never tried to read your own self; you rush into your temples, into your mosques, but you have never tried to enter your own heart; futile are all your battles with the devil for you have never tried to fight your own desires. ~ Bulleh Shah,
35:Many a book is like a key to unknown chambers within the castle of one's own self. ~ Franz Kafka,
36:All this has been revealed to Me. I do not know much about what your books say. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
37:The books that the world calls immoral are books that show the world its own shame. ~ Oscar Wilde,
38:The book which most deserved to be banned would be a catalog of banned books. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
39:What should I read at present? Sri Aurobindo's books. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
40:Books cannot teach God, but they can destroy ignorance; their action is negative. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
41:Books are the training weights of the mind. ~ Epictetus,
42:Jung's vision for [The Red Book] was ... significantly influenced in form, style, content by The Bible, Dante's Divine Comedy, Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Goethe's Faust, medieval illuminated manuscripts, the illuminated works of William Blake. ~ Mark Winborn,
43:Beware of a man of one book. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
44:Through the study of books one seeks God; by meditation one finds him. ~ Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina,
45:The moment I decided to let them have their way, the irritation disappeared. ~ Osho, The Book of Secrets ,
46:The truly great books are the few books that are over everybody's head all of the time. ~ Mortimer J Adler,
47:Man is in the process of changing to forms of light that are not of this world. ~ Emerald Tablets of Thoth,
48:In the beginning all this was Non-being. From it Being appeared. Itself created itself. ~ Taittiriya Upanishad,
49:The world is a great book, of which they that never stir from home read only a page. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
50:A book is a mirror: if an ape looks into it an apostle is hardly likely to look out. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
51:If there's a book that you want to read, but it hasn't been written yet, then you must write it. ~ Toni Morrison,
52:No one who does good work will ever come to a bad end, either here or in the world to come ~ The Bhagavad Gita,
53:The reading of all good books is like a conversation with the finest minds of past centuries. ~ Rene Descartes,
54:Even as men come to Me, so I accept them. It is my path that men follow from all sides, ~ Bhagavad Gita, (IV.11) ,
55:When I get a little money, I buy books. If any is left, I buy food and clothes. ~ Desiderius Erasmus, (16th cent.) ,
56:In this lamen the Magician must place the secret keys of his power. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
57:Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. ~ , 1 Corinthians 13:7,
58:The Great Work will then form the subject of the design. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
59:As we expand our knowledge of good books, we shrink the circle of men whose company we appreciate. ~ Ludwig Feuerbach,
60:To me a book is a message from the gods to mankind; or, if not, should never be published at all. ~ Aleister Crowley,
61:I had no ambition to be a writer because the books I read were too good, my standards were too high. ~ Haruki Murakami,
62:The buying of more books than one can read is nothing less than the soul reaching toward infinity... ~ A Edward Newton,
63:Blessed is one who is before coming into being. For whoever is, was and will be. ~ Gospel of Philip, Nag Hammadi 64:9-12,
64:Death is a mirror in which the entire meaning of life is reflected. ~ Sogyal Rinpoche, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying ,
65:A red rose absorbs all colors but red; red is therefore the one color that it is not." ~ Aleister Crowley, The Book of Lies ,
66:I can't imagine a man really enjoying a book and reading it only once. ~ C S Lewis, Letter to Arthur Greeves (February 1932) ,
67:If the individual cannot dream of a better future, he cannot live well today. ~ Manly P Hall, The Bible the Story of a Book,
68:I had found my religion: nothing seemed more important to me than a book. I saw the library as a temple. ~ Jean-Paul Sartre,
69:Many good sayings are to be found in holy books, but merely reading them will not make one religious. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
70:Let every page of this Book be filled with song-for it is a Book of incantation! ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
71:The Self cannot be found in books. You have to find it out for yourself, in yourself. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Day by Day 16-3-45,
72:When the student is ready the teacher will appear. When the student is truly ready... The teacher will Disappear. ~ Tao Te Ching,
73:Magick is the Science and Art of causing Change to occur in conformity with Will. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
74:Reading book after book the whole world died, and none ever became learned! ~ Kabir, XXXIII.3 Translated by Charlotte Vaudeville,
75:The magic is only in what books say, how they stitched the patches of the universe together into one garment for us. ~ Ray Bradbury,
76:Or do ye think that ye shall enter the Garden of Bliss without such trials as came to those who passed away before you? ~ Koran, 214.php">.php">214 ,
77:Speaking personally, you can have my gun, but you'll take my book when you pry my cold, dead fingers off of the binding. ~ Stephen King,
78:Students learn best not by reading the Great Books in a closed room but by opening the doors and windows of experience. ~ Thomas Ehrlich,
79:... we should read for power. Man reading should be man intensely alive. The book should be a ball of light in one's hand. ~ Ezra Pound,
80:Library terror - that feeling of being hopelessly overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of available books... ~ Owen Barfield, Night Operation ,
81:A classic is the term given to any book which comes to represent the whole universe, a book on a par with ancient talismans. ~ Italo Calvino,
82:We may idealize freedom, but when it comes to our habits, we are completely enslaved. ~ Sogyal Rinpoche, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying ,
83:Which of Sri Aurobindo's books should I start with?The Life Divine.My blessings.11 March 1941 ~ The Mother, On Education ,
84:There was once a community of scoundrels, that is to say, they were not scoundrels, but ordinary people. ~ Franz Kafka, The Blue Octavo Notebooks ,
85:The Facts were right there waiting for me, hidden in old books written by people who weren't afraid to be honest ~ Ernest Cline, Ready Player One ,
86:A good book is the precious life-blood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life. ~ John Milton, Areopagitica ,
87:Read a lot. Expect something big, something exalting or deepening from a book. No book is worth reading that isn't worth re-reading. ~ Susan Sontag,
88:(Darshan Message) Sri Aurobindo's message is an immortal sunlight radiating over the future. 15 August 1972 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
89:Today I escaped from anxiety. Or no, I discarded it, because it was within me, in my own perceptions--not outside. ~ Marcus Aurelius, Book 9 Verse 13 ,
90:As the Magick Wand is the Will, the Wisdom, the Word of the Magician, so is the Magick Cup his Understanding. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
91:To live in the world without becoming aware of the meaning of the world is like wandering about in a great library without touching the books. ~ Manly P Hall,
92:A growing register of calamitiesIs the past’s account, the future’s book of Fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
93:Critics have found fault with all the world's scriptures, but as yet they have discovered no useful substitutes. ~ Manly P Hall, The Bible the Story of a Book,
94:Fate is a balance drawn in Destiny’s book.Man can accept his fate, he can refuse. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
95:The beginning of wisdom is the sincere desire for instruction. To observe attentively its laws is to establish the perfect purity of the soul. ~ Book of Wisdom,
96:Word should express will: hence the Mystic Name of the Probationer is the expression of his highest Will. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
97:Being but one, she is capable of all; immutable in herself, she renews all things; she diffuses herself among the nations in saintly souls. ~ The Book of Wisdom,
98:Nothing in this book is an attempt to prevent the really resolute misery addicts from continuing their pursuit of frustration and failure. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
99:I have preferred wisdom to kingdoms and thrones and I have believed that riches are nothing before wisdom, for she is an endless treasure for men. ~ Book of Wisdom,
100:What we become depends on what we read after all of the professors have finished with us. The greatest university of all is a collection of books. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
101:According to Aldous Huxley, some of the books on his shelves glowed with a special energy or living power. They were alive, and they were beautiful. ~ Jeffrey J Kripal,
102:Across the threshold's sleep she entered inAnd found herself amid great figures of gods ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Book of Yoga,
103:That which others hear or read of, I felt and practised myself; they get their knowledge by books, I mine by melancholizing. ~ Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy ,
104:The Magick Cup, as was shown above, is also the flower. It is the lotus which opens to the sun, and which collects the dew. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
105:Unless therefore the Magician be first anointed with this Oil, all his work will be wasted and evil. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
106:A Veda-knower of the unwritten bookPerusing the mystic scripture of her forms,He had caught her hierophant significances, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.02 - Satyavan,
107:It is always the same question: have you really read all those books? My answer is always the same: a library is a sign of desire, not of accomplishment. ~ Jeffrey J Kripal,
108:All advance in thought is made by collecting the greatest possible number of facts, classifying them, and grouping them. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
109:If it is permissible to write plays that are not intended to be seen, I should like to see who can prevent me from writing a book no one can read. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
110:30. If Will stops and cries Why, invoking Because, then Will stops & does nought.31. If Power asks why, then is Power weakness. ~ Aleister Crowley, The Book of the Law ,
111:The nearest thing Common Lisp has to a motto is the koan-like description, the programmable programming language. ~ , http://www.gigamonkeys.com/book/introduction-why-lisp.php ,
112:Eternal Presence [facsimile] Sri Aurobindo is constantly among us and reveals himself to those who are ready to see and hear him. 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
113:The Altar represents the solid basis of the Work, the fixed Will* of the Magician; and the law under which he works. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
114:The awakened sages call a person wise when all his undertakings are free from anxiety about results; all his selfish desires have been consumed in the fire of knowledge. ~ Bhagavad Gita,
115:I couldn't live a week without a private library - indeed, I'd part with all my furniture and squat and sleep on the floor before I'd let go of the 1500 or so books I possess. ~ H P Lovecraft,
116:The books we love, they love us back. And just as we mark our places in the pages, those pages leave their marks on us. I can see it in you, sure as I see it in me. ~ Jay Kristoff, Nevernight ,
117:The glory is in works attempted. The shame is in the unrecorded day. It is a permanent book, written carefully and clearly and illustrated where necessary ~ Ray Sherwin, The Book of Results ,
118:The Lord did everything in a mystery. . . He said, 'I came to make the things below like the things above, and the things outside like those inside. I came to unite them. ~ Gospel of Philip,
119:Say: "O my Servants who have transgressed against their souls! Despair not of the Mercy of Allah: for Allah forgives all sins: for He is Oft-Forgiving, Most Merciful. ~ Koran, Carl Jung, Red Book ,
121:Practice is the act of rehearsing a behavior over and over, or engaging in an activity again and again, for the purpose of improving or mastering it, as in the phrase practice makes perfect. ~ ,
122:As I take up my pen I feel myself so full, so equal to my subject, and see my book so clearly before me in embryo, I would almost like to try to say it all in a single word. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
123:To live in the Supreme Truth, if only for a minutes, is worth more than writing or reading hundreds of books on the methods or processes by which to find it. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
124:I wrote the books I should have liked to read. That's always been my reason for writing. People won't write the books I want, so I have to do it for myself. ~ C S Lewis, quoted by Roger Lancelyn Green ,
125:The sacred Book lay on its sanctified deskWrapped in interpretation’s silken strings:A credo sealed up its spiritual sense. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.03 - The Entry into the Inner Countries,
126:Men rarely (if ever) manage to dream up a superior to themselves. Most Gods have the manners and morals of a spoiled child. ~ Robert Heinlein, Notebooks of Lazarus Long from Time Enough for Love (1973).,
127:Sit in a room and read--and read and read. And read the right books by the right people. Your mind is brought onto that level, and you have a nice, mild, slow-burning rapture all the time. ~ Joseph Campbell,
128:Any required Change may be effected by the application of the proper kind and degree of force in the proper manner through the proper medium to the proper object. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
129:One man's theology is another man's belly laugh. ~ Robert Heinlein, Notebooks of Lazarus Long from Time Enough for Love (1973). This is sometimes misquoted as One man's religion is another man's belly laugh.,
130:Strange and terrible books were drawn voluminously from the stack shelves and from secure places of storage; and diagrams and formulae were copied with feverish haste and in bewildering abundance. ~ H P Lovecraft,
131:Leaving behind the babble of the plaza, I enter the Library. I feel, almost physically, the gravitation of the books, the enveloping serenity of order, time magically dessicated and preserved. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
132:Sin lies only in hurting other people unnecessarily. All other sins are invented nonsense. (Hurting yourself is not sinful--just stupid.) ~ Robert Heinlein, Notebooks of Lazarus Long from Time Enough for Love (1973).,
133:... with the heart concentrated by yoga, viewing all things with equal regard, beholds himself in all beings and all beings in himself. In whatever way he leads his life, that one lives in God. ~ Bhagavad Gita, 29.php">.php">29 2020-08-31,
134:Do you know my attitude? Books, scriptures, and things like that only point out the way to reach God. After finding the way, what more need is there of books and scriptures? Then comes the time for action. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
135:Seek out that from which all existences are born, by which being born they live and to which they return...From Delight all these existences were born, by Delight they live, towards Delight they return. ~ Taittiriya Upanishad,
136:Sit in a room and read--and read and read. And read the right books by the right people. Your mind is brought onto that level, and you have a nice, mild, slow-burning rapture all the time. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Power of Myth ,
137:He [Francis Bacon] was a devoutly religious man and was convinced that he would rather believe all the fables of antiquity than deny that the vast fabric of creation is without a mind. ~ Manly P Hall, The Bible the Story of a Book,
138:The Scourge keeps the aspiration keen; the Dagger expresses the determination to sacrifice all; and the Chain restricts and wandering. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
139:God split himself into a myriad parts that he might have friends. This may not be true, but it sounds good, and is no sillier than any other theology. ~ Robert Heinlein, Notebooks of Lazarus Long from Time Enough for Love (1973).,
140:Having thought of these things, meditating on them in my heart and having considered that I shall find immortality in the union with wisdom, I went in search of her on all sides, that I might take her for my companion. ~ Book of Wisdom,
141:It is not by books that Sri Aurobindo ought to be studied but by subjects - what he has said on the Divine, on Unity, on religion, on evolution, on education, on self-perfection, on supermind, etc., etc. ~ The Mother, On Education 205,
142:The best vow, and that of most universal application, is the vow of Holy Obedience; for not only does it lead to perfect freedom, but is a training in that surrender which is the last task. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
143:Was there ever a more horrible blasphemy than the statement that all the knowledge of God is confined to this or that book? How dare men call God infinite, and yet try to compress Him within the covers of a little book! ~ Swami Vivekananda,
144:The Way of Mastery is to break all the rules-but you have to know them perfectly before you can do this; otherwise you are not in a position to transcend them. ~ Aleister Crowley, Magical and Philosophical Commentaries on The Book of the Law ,
145:I never feel lonely if Ive got a book - theyre like old friends. Even if youre not reading them over and over again, you know they are there. And theyre part of your history. They sort of tell a story about your journey through life ~ Emilia Fox,
146:An imprisoned person with no other book than the Tarot, if he knew how to use it, could in a few years acquire Universal Knowledge Gnosis, and would be able to speak on all subjects with unequaled learning and inexhaustible eloquence. ~ Eliphas Levi,
147:Lord Naoshige said, The Way of the Samurai is in desperateness. Ten men or more cannot kill such a man. Common sense will not accomplish such things. Simply become insane and desperate. ~ HAGAKURE: THE BOOK OF THE SAMURAI, YAMAMOTO TSUNETOMO 1650 1720,
148:... maintains that, along with Aurobindo's Life Divine, Heidegger's Being and Time, and Whitehead's Process and Reality, Wilber's Sex Ecology Spirituality [SES] is 'one of the four great books of this [twentieth] century' ~ Michael Murphy, Integral 2004.,
149:He affirms the limitation implied by his devotion to the Great Work. He no longer wanders about aimlessly in the world. ... the uniting of subject and object which is the Great Work, ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
150:Of all the strange crimes that humanity has legislated out of nothing, blasphemy is the most amazing - with obscenity and indecent exposure fighting it out for second and third place. ~ Robert Heinlein, Notebooks of Lazarus Long from Time Enough for Love (1973).,
151:You, therefore, who are undertaking the study of this book, if you persevere to the end and understand it, you will be either a monarch or a madman. Do what you will with this volume, you will be unable to despise or to forget it. ~ Eliphas Levi, Transcendental Magic ,
152:A page of Addison or of Irving will teach more of style than a whole manual of rules, whilst a story of Poe's will impress upon the mind a more vivid notion of powerful and correct description and narration than will ten dry chapters of a bulky textbook. ~ H P Lovecraft,
153:The Book of Spells or of Conjurations is the Record of every thought, word and deed of the Magician; for everything that he has willed is willed to a purpose. It is the same as if he had taken an oath or perform some achievement. ~ Aleister Crowey, Liber ABA 2.13 - The Book,
154:The tendency of modern scientific teaching is to neglect the great books, to lay far too much stress upon relatively unimportant modern work, and to present masses of detail of doubtful truth and questionable weight in such a way as to obscure principles. ~ R A Fisher,
155:I kept asking myself how a book could be infinite. I could not imagine any other than a cyclic volume, circular. A volume whose last page would be the same as the first and so have the possibility of continuing indefinitely. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Garden Of Forking Paths ,
156:A writer who wishes to be read by posterity must not be averse to putting hints which might give rise to whole books, or ideas for learned discussions, in some corner of a chapter so that one should think he can afford to throw them away by the thousand. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
157:But not only are vices of the soul voluntary, but those of the body also for some men, whom we accordingly blame; while no one blames those who are ugly by nature, we blame those who are so owing to want of exercise and care. ~ Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics Book 3,
158:Last night, we (you and I and some others) were together for quite a long time in the permanent dwelling-place of Sri Aurobindo which exists in the subtle physical (what Sri Aurobindo called the true physical). 1 February 1963 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
159:Like all those possessing a library, Aurelian was aware that he was guilty of not knowing his in its entirety; this controversy enabled him to fulfill his obligations with many books which seemed to reproach him for his neglect. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths The Theologians,
160:The red lotus is the flower of Sri Aurobindo, but specially for his centenary we shall choose the blue lotus, which is the colour of his physical aura, to symbolise the centenary of the manifestation of the Supreme upon earth. 21 December 1971 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
161:An improvisation :::For hours, since I sat facing you, you have stayed mute.Your meaning, ampler than words, addresses itself to me.Cases removed, books lie open, scattered by the bedside.Beyond the bamboo screen, a shower falls on a plum tree. ~ Taigu Ryokan,
162:You can understand only what you already know in your own inner self. What strikes you in a book is what you have already experienced deep within you. The knowledge that seems to come to you from outside is only an occasion for bringing out the knowledge that is within you. ~ The Mother,
163:Ts'ui Pe must have said once: I am withdrawing to write a book. And another time: I am withdrawing to construct a labyrinth. Every one imagined two works; to no one did it occur that the book and the maze were one and the same thing." ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Garden Of Forking Paths ,
164:You must write every single day of your life... You must lurk in libraries and climb the stacks like ladders to sniff books like perfumes and wear books like hats upon your crazy heads... may you be in love every day for the next 20,000 days. And out of that love, remake a world. ~ Ray Bradbury,
165:Should I change my priorities? Are there other options that would be better for me right now? Am I using my free time wisely? ~ , https://www.copyblogger.com/water-writing/?utm source=facebook&utm medium=cpc&utm campaign=cb+blog+posts+2017&utm term=prospecting+interests&utm content=08.15.17 ,
166:A book is a physical object in a world of physical objects. It is a set of dead symbols. And then the right reader comes along, and the words-or rather the poetry behind the words, for the words themselves are mere symbols-spring to life, and we have a resurrection of the word. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
167:(Joan,1941) She wrote me a letter asking,"How can I read it?,Its so hard." I told her to start at the beginning and read as far as you can get until you're lost. Then start again at the beginning and keep working through until you can understand the whole book. And thats what she did ~ Richard P Feynman,
168:The idea of organization is the first step, that of interpretation the second. The Master of the Temple, whose grade corresponds to Binah, is sworn to interpret every phenomenon as a particular dealing of God with his soul. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
169:Only for you, children of doctrine and learning, have we written this work. Examine this book, ponder the meaning we have dispersed in various places and gathered again; what we have concealed in one place we have disclosed in another, that it may be understood by your wisdom. ~ Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa,
170:To be born of chaos means to be born a lone wanderer in this world full of those who would gladly be food for a corrupted force. It means to walk alone amongst the blind, to be a lone wolf amongst sheep...that wishes to devour the 'Sheppard' who keeps all in line. ~ S Ben Qayin, The Book of Smokeless Fire ,
171:You say grace before meals. All right. But I say grace before the concert and the opera, and grace before the play and pantomime, and grace before I open a book, and grace before sketching, painting, swimming, fencing, boxing, walking, playing, dancing and grace before I dip the pen in the ink. ~ G K Chesterton,
172:A natural inclination toward the darker side of magic is as good a point as any from which to begin the ultimate quest, and half this book is devoted to the black arts. ... We will begin by discussing the Spirit of Black Magic. Magical power is the key to the heaven-hell of the now. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null ,
173:Writing long books is a laborious and impoverishing act of foolishness: expanding in five hundred pages an idea that could be perfectly explained in a few minutes. A better procedure is to pretend that those books already exist and to offer a summary, a commentary. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Garden Of Forking Paths? ,
174:May your coming year be filled with magic and dreams and good madness. I hope you read some fine books and kiss someone who thinks you're wonderful, and don't forget to make some art - write or draw or build or sing or live as only you can. And I hope, somewhere in the next year, you surprise yourself. ~ Neil Gaiman,
175:To understand any one sacred book completely it is necessary to understand all other sacred books. In spite of human prejudice to the contrary, there is but one religion and one truth and all the great faiths of the world are parts or fragments of the Anscient Wisdom. ~ Manly P Hall, The Students Monthly Letter 1973 ,
176:But, nevertheless, if there is even the slightest recognition, liberation is easy. Should you ask why this is so-it is because once the awesome, terrifying and fearful appearances arise, the awareness does not have the luxury of distraction. The awareness is one-pointedly concentrated. ~ Karma-glin-pa, The Tibetan Book of the Dead ,
177:God is omnipotent, omniscient, and omnibenevolent - it says so right here on the label. If you have a mind capable of believing all three of these attributes simultaneously, I have a wonderful bargain for you. No checks, please. Cash and in small bills. ~ Robert Heinlein, Notebooks of Lazarus Long from Time Enough for Love (1973).,
178:Death makes me realize how deeply I have internalized the agnosticism I preach in all my books. I consider dogmatic belief and dogmatic denial very childish forms of conceit in a world of infinitely whirling complexity. None of us can see enough from one corner of space-time to know "all" about the rest of space-time. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
179:In fact, one of the most cherished goals of the command line is laziness- doing the most work with the fewest keystrokes. Another goal is never having to lift your fingers from the keyboard-never reaching for the mouse. In this chapter, we will look at bash features that make keyboard use faster and more efficient. ~ The Linux Command Line,
180:This Magical Will is the wand in your hand by which the Great Work is accomplished, by which the Daughter is not merely set upon the throne of the Mother, but assumed into the Highest. The Magick Wand is thus the principal weapon of the Magus; and the name of that wand is the Magical Oath. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
181:If a book is easy and fits nicely into all your language conventions and thought forms, then you probably will not grow much from reading it. It may be entertaining, but not enlarging to your understanding. It's the hard books that count. Raking is easy, but all you get is leaves; digging is hard, but you might find diamonds. ~ Mortimer J Adler,
182:A book is made from a tree. It is an assemblage of flat, flexible parts (still called "leaves") imprinted with dark pigmented squiggles. One glance at it and you hear the voice of another person-perhaps someone dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, the author is speaking, clearly and silently, inside your head, directly to you. ~ Carl Sagan,
183:To me a book is a message from the gods to mankind; or, if not, should never be published at all. A message from the gods should be delivered at once. It is damnably blasphemous to talk about the autumn season and so on. How dare the author or publisher demand a price for doing his duty, the highest and most honorable to which a man can be called? ~ Aleister Crowley,
184:They say an elephant never forgets. Well, you are not an elephant. Take notes, constantly. Save interesting thoughts, quotations, films, technologies...the medium doesn't matter, so long as it inspires you. When you're stumped, go to your notes like a wizard to his spellbook. Mash those thoughts together. Extend them in every direction until they meet. ~ Aaron Koblin,
185:Jing naturally transforms into Qi,Qi naturally transforms into Spirit,and Spirit naturally transforms into pure openness,uniting with cosmic space.This is called returning to the root,returning to origin.The path of everlasting lifeand eternal vision is complete. ~ Master Li, The Book of Balance and Harmony (13th century,
186:Wilber discusses five of these tenets in his book The Eye of Spirit. These are: the dialectic of progress, the distinction between differentiation and dissociation, the difference between transcendence and repression, the difference between natural hierarchy and pathological hierarchy, and the fact that higher structures can be hijacked by lower impulses." ~ Ken Wilber, One Taste ,
187:It really makes little difference in the long run whether The Book of the Law was dictated to [Crowley] by preterhuman intelligence named Aiwass or whether it stemmed from the creative deeps of Aleister Crowley. The book was written. And he became the mouthpiece for the Zeitgeist, accurately expressing the intrinsic nature of our time as no one else has done to date. ~ Israel Regardie,
188:Sometimes, looking at the many books I have at home, I feel I shall die before I come to the end of them, yet I cannot resist the temptation of buying new books. Whenever I walk into a bookstore and find a book on one of my hobbies - for example, Old English or Old Norse poetry - I say to myself, "What a pity I can't buy that book, for I already have a copy at home. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
189:The book exists for us perchance which will explain our miracles and and reveal new ones. The at present unutterable things we may find somewhere uttered. These same questions that disturb and puzzle and confound us have in their turn occurred to all the wise men; not one has been omitted; and each has answered them, according to his ability, by his words and his life. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
190:Of all man's instruments, the most wondrous, no doubt, is the book. The other instruments are extensions of his body. The microscope, the telescope, are extensions of his sight; the telephone is the extension of his voice; then we have the plow and the sword, extensions of the arm. But the book is something else altogether: the book is an extension of memory and imagination. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
191:Understanding is the level immediately below Wisdom. It is on the level of Understanding that ideas exist separately, where they can be scrutinized and comprehended. While Wisdom is pure undifferentiated Mind, Understanding is the level where division exists, and where things are delineated and defined as separated objects. ~ Aryeh Kaplan, Sefer Yetzirah: The Book of Creation in Theory and Practice ,
192:History does not record anywhere at any time a religion that has any rational basis. Religion is a crutch for people not strong enough to stand up to the unknown without help. But, like dandruff, most people do have a religion and spend time and money on it and seem to derive considerable pleasure from fiddling with it. ~ Robert Heinlein, Notebooks of Lazarus Long from Time Enough for Love (1973).,
193:The methods advised by all these people have a startling resemblance to one another. They recommend virtue (of various kinds), solitude, absence of excitement, moderation in diet, and finally a practice which some call prayer and some call meditation. (The former four may turn out on examination to be merely conditions favourable to the last.) ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
194:The book, the college, the school of art, the institution of any kind, stop with some past utterance of genius. . . . They look backward and not forward. But genius looks forward: the eyes of man are set in his forehead, not in his hindhead: man hopes: genius creates. Whatever talents may be, if the man create not, the pure efflux of the Deity is not his; - cinders and smoke there may be, but not yet flame. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
195:Your character grows as the game continues. Each monster defeated, each adventure completed, and each treasure recovered not only adds to your continuing story, but also earns your character new abilities. This increase in power is reflected by your character's level; as you continue to play, your character gains more experience, rising in level and mastering new and more powerful abilities. ~ Dungeons and Dragons Players Handbook.,
196:Are you looking for me?I am in the next seat.My shoulder is againstyour own neckYou won't find me in the mosqueor the sadhus temple.You wont find me in holy booksor behind the lips of priests.Nor in eating nothing but vegetablesYou will find me in the tiniest house of time.Kabir says : Student, tell me, what is God?He is the breath inside the breath.... ~ Kabir,
197:A truly good book is something as natural, and as unexpectedly and unaccountably fair and perfect, as a wild flower discovered on the prairies of the West or in the jungles of the East. Genius is a light which makes the darkness visible, like the lightning's flash, which perchance shatters the temple of knowledge itself,--and not a taper lighted at the hearth-stone of the race, which pales before the light of common day. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
198:'Brahman is in all things, all things are in Brahman, all things are Brahman' is the triple formula of the comprehensive Supermind, a single truth of self-manifestation in three aspects which it holds together and inseparably in its self-view as the fundamental knowledge from which it proceeds to the play of the cosmos. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Book 01: Omnipresent Reality and the Universe,
199:The formula of the Cup is not so well suited for Evocations, and the magical Hierarchy is not involved in the same way; for the Cup being passive rather than active, it is not fitting for the magician to use it in respect of anything but the Highest. In practical working it consequently means little but prayer, and that prayer the 'prayer of silence.' ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
200:I pray to the unknown gods that some man-even a single man, tens of centuries ago-has perused and read that book. If the honor and wisdom and joy of such a reading are not to be my own, then let them be for others. Let heaven exist, though my own place be in hell. Let me be tortured and battered and annihilated, but let there be one instant, one creature, wherein thy enormous Library may find its justification. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Library of Babel ,
201:Paul Brunton in his book A Search in Secret Egypt repeatedly speaks of Atlantis. I always thought that belief in Atlantis was only an imagination of the Theosophists. Is there any truth in the belief?Atlantis is not an imagination. Plato heard of this submerged continent from Egyptian sources and geologists are also agreed that such a submersion was one of the great facts of earth history. 22 June 1936 ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Poetry And Art ,
202:When we are young, we spend much time and pains in filling our note-books with all definitions of Religion, Love, Poetry, Politics, Art, in the hope that, in the course of a few years, we shall have condensed into our encyclopaedia the net value of all the theories at which the world has yet arrived. But year after year our tables get no completeness, and at last we discover that our curve is a parabola, whose arcs will never meet. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
203:[My wife] liked to collect old encyclopedias from second-hand bookstores, and at one point we had eight of them. When I wrote my first historical novel--back in 1980, before I was online--I used them often as a research tool. For instance, I learned that the Bastille was either 90 feet high or 100 feet or 120 feet. This led me to formulate Wilson's 22nd Law: 'Certitude belongs exclusively to those who only look in one encyclopedia.' ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
204:If thou shalt perfectly observe these rules, all the following Symbols and an infinitude of others will be granted unto thee by thy Holy Guardian Angel; thou thus living for the Honour and Glory of the True and only God, for thine own good, and that of thy neighbour. Let the Fear of God be ever before the eyes and the heart of him who shall possess this Divine Wisdom and Sacred Magic. ~ MacGregor Mathers, The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage ,
205:In his book: 'Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us', Daniel Pink narrows motivation down to 3 key elements: autonomy, mastery, and purpose. Without a genuine interest in what we do, we will never be proud of it, we will never master it, and we will never feel purposed for it. In short, if you are not interested, you are not motivated, and without motivation, you will not succeed. ~ Marcus Tomlinson, How to become an Expert Software Engineer ,
206:Watch and pray that you not come to be in the flesh, but rather that you come forth from the bondage of the bitterness of this life. And as you pray, you will find rest, for you have left behind the suffering and the disgrace. For when you come forth from the sufferings and passions of the body, you will receive rest from the good one, and you will reign with the King, you joined with Him and He with you, from now on, for ever and ever, Amen. ~ The Book of Thomas,
207:The best protection against propaganda of any sort is the recognition of it for what it is. Only hidden and undetected oratory is really insidious. What reaches the heart without going through the mind is likely to bounce back and put the mind out of business. Propaganda taken in that way is like a drug you do not know you are swallowing. The effect is mysterious; you do not know afterwards why you feel or think the way you do. ~ Mortimer Jerome Adler, How to Read a Book ,
208:The new D&D is too rule intensive. It's relegated the Dungeon Master to being an entertainer rather than master of the game. It's done away with the archetypes, focused on nothing but combat and character power, lost the group cooperative aspect, bastardized the class-based system, and resembles a comic-book superheroes game more than a fantasy RPG where a player can play any alignment desired, not just lawful good. ~ Gary Gygax, GameSpy interview Pt. 2 (16 August 2004),
209:Further Reading:Nightside of Eden - Kenneth GrantShamanic Voices - Joan HalifaxThe Great Mother - NeumannFear & Loathing in Las Vegas - Hunter S. ThompsonCities of the Red Night - William S. BurroughsThe Book of Pleasure - Austin Osman SpareThundersqueak - Angerford & LeaThe Masks of God - Joseph CampbellAn Introduction to Psychology - Hilgard, Atkinson & AtkinsonLiber Null - Pete Carroll ~ Phil Hine, Aspects of Evocation ,
210:I,40: Who calls us Thelemites will do no wrong, if he look but close into the word. For there are therein Three Grades, the Hermit, and the Lover, and the man of Earth. Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.I,41: The word of Sin is Restriction. O man! refuse not thy wife, if she will! O lover, if thou wilt, depart! There is no bond that can unite the divided but love: all else is a curse. Accursed! Accursed be it to the aeons! ~ Aleister Crowley, The Book of the Law ,
211:In other words, all of my books are lies. They are simply maps of a territory, shadows of a reality, gray symbols dragging their bellies across the dead page, suffocated signs full of muffled sound and faded glory, signifying absolutely nothing. And it is the nothing, the Mystery, the Emptiness alone that needs to be realized: not known but felt, not thought but breathed, not an object but an atmosphere, not a lesson but a life. - Ken Wilber ~ Frank Visser, Ken Wilber Thought as Passion 1.01 - Foreward,
212:I often think . . . that the bookstores that will save civilization are not online, nor on campuses, nor named Borders, Barnes & Noble, Dalton, or Crown. They are the used bookstores, in which, for a couple of hundred dollars, one can still find, with some diligence, the essential books of our culture, from the Bible and Shakespeare to Plato, Augustine, and Pascal. ~ James V. Schall, On the Unseriousness of Human Affairs: Teaching 3.8.1.04 - Different Methods of Writing,
213:To read great books does not mean one becomes 'bookish'; it means that something of the terrible insight of Dostoevsky, of the richly-charged imagination of Shakespeare, of the luminous wisdom of Goethe, actually passes into the personality of the reader; so that in contact with the chaos of ordinary life certain free and flowing outlines emerge, like the forms of some classic picture, endowing both people and things with a grandeur beyond what is visible to the superficial glance. ~ John Cowper Powys,
214:MESSAGES FOR CENTRES AND ORGANISATIONS (Suggested programme for a study group) 1. Prayer (Sri Aurobindo, Mother - grant us your help in our endeavour to understand your teaching.) 2. Reading of Sri Aurobindo's book. 3. A moment of silence. 4. One question can be put by whoever wants to put a question on what has been read. 5. Answer to the question. 6. No general discussion. This is not the meeting of a group but simply a class for studying Sri Aurobindo's books. 31 October 1942 ~ The Mother,
215:The most preposterous notion that H. Sapiens has ever dreamed up is that the Lord God of Creation, Shaper and Ruler of all the Universes, wants the saccharine adoration of His creatures, can be swayed by their prayers, and becomes petulant if He does not receive this flattery. Yet this absurd fantasy, without a shred of evidence to bolster it, pays all the expenses of the oldest, largest, and least productive industry in all of history. ~ Robert Heinlein, Notebooks Of Lazarus Long from Time Enough for Love (1973).,
216:I have learnt all that was hidden and all that was yet undiscovered because I was taught by wisdom herself that created everything. For there is in her a spirit of intelligence which is holy, unique, multiple in her effects, fine, copious, agile, spotless, dear, soft, friendly to good, penetrant, which nothing can prevent from acting, benevolent, friendly to men, kind, stable, infallible, calm, that achieves all, that sees all, that can comprehend all minds in itself, that is intelligible, pure and subtle. ~ Book of Wisdom,
217:Help yourself during this troubled period by reading holy books. This reading provides excellent food for the soul and conduces to great progress along the path of perfection. By no means is it inferior to what we obtain through prayer and holy meditation. In prayer and meditation it is ourselves who speak to the Lord, while in holy reading it is God who speaks to us. Before beginning to read, raise your mind to the Lord and implore Him to guide your mind Himself, to speak to your heart and move your will. ~ Saint Padre Pio,
218:How many nights have you remained awake repeating science and poring over books, and have denied yourself sleep. I do not know what the purpose of it was. If it was attaining worldly ends and securing its vanities, and acquiring its dignities, and surpassing your contemporaries, and such like, woe to you and again woe; but if your purpose in it was the vitalizing of the Law of the Prophet, and the training of your character, and breaking the soul commanding to evil, then blessed are you and again blessed. ~ Abu Hamid al-Ghazali,
219:I was in Nashville, Tennesee last year. After the show I went to a Waffle House. I'm not proud of it, I was hungry. And I'm alone, I'm eating and I'm reading a book, right? Waitress walks over to me: 'Hey, whatcha readin' for?' Isn't that the weirdest fuckin' question you've ever heard? Not what am I reading, but what am I reading FOR? Well, godammit, ya stumped me! Why do I read? Well . . . hmmm . . . I dunno . . . I guess I read for a lot of reasons and the main one is so I don't end up being a fuckin' waffle waitress. ~ Bill Hicks,
220:I would say that my most interesting experience with the earlier techniques was the realization that when you make cut-ups you do not get simply random juxtapositions of words, that they do mean something, and often that these meanings refer to some future event. I've made many cut-ups and then later recognized that the cut-up referred to something that I read later in a newspaper or a book, or something that happened... Perhaps events are pre-written and pre-recorded and when you cut word lines the future leaks out. ~ William S Burroughs,
221:Give yourself unto reading. The man who never reads will never be read; he who never quotes will never be quoted. He who will not use the thoughts of other men's brains, proves that he has no brains of his own. You need to read. . . . We are quite persuaded that the very best way for you to be spending your leisure time, is to be either reading or praying. You may get much instruction from books which afterwards you may use as a true weapon in your Lord and Master's service. Paul cries, "Bring the books" - join in the cry. ~ Charles Haddon Spurgeon,
222:Money, after all, is an abstract artifact, like language - merely symbolized by the paper or coin or whatever. If you can fully grasp its abstractedness, especially in the computer age, it becomes quite clear that no group can monopolize this abstraction, except through a series of swindle. If the usurers had been bolder, they might have monopolized language as well as currency, and people would be saying we can't write more books because we don't have enough words, the way they now say we can't build starships, because we don't have enough money. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
223:Elon Musks Reading List J. E. Gordon - Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down Walter Isaacson - Benjamin Franklin: An American Life Walter Isaacson - Einstein: His Life and Universe Nick Bostrom - Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies Erik M. Conway & Naomi Oreskes - Merchants of Doubt William Golding - Lord of the Flies Peter Thiel - Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future Isaac Asimov - The Foundation Trilogy ~ Elon Musk, books.php">CNBC.php">CNBC ,
224:This Magical Will is the wand in your hand by which the Great Work is accomplished, by which the Daughter is not merely set upon the throne of the Mother, but assumed into the Highest.<Aleister Crowley, Book 4 ,
225:The Temple represents the external Universe. The Magician must take it as he finds it, so that it is of no particular shape; yet we find written, \Liber VII,\ V:I:2 \We made us a temple of stones in the shape of the Universem even ashou didst wear openly and I concealed.\ This shape is the vesica piscis; but it is only the greeatest Magicians who can thus fashion the Temple. There may, however, be some choice of rooms; this refers to the power of the Magician to reincarnate in a suitable body. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 04: Magick,
226:To take symbolism seriously is to accept the 'analogy of being' between different levels of reality... More than the sum of its parts, the figure is the appearing-to-us of an infinite depth that cannot be fully revealed in time. Every symbol is a kind of gestalt, in which a universal meaning can be glimpsed. Eventually, every created thing can be seen as a manifestation of its own interior essence, and the world is transformed into a radiant book to be read with eyes sensitive to spiritual light. ~ Stratford Caldecott, Beauty for Truth's Sake: On the Re-enchantment of Education ,
227:Reading is merely a substitute for one's own thoughts. A man allows his thoughts to be put into leading-strings.Further, many books serve only to show how many wrong paths there are, and how widely a man may stray if he allows himself to be led by them. But he who is guided by his genius, that is to say, he who thinks for himself, who thinks voluntarily and rightly, possesses the compass wherewith to find the right course. A man, therefore, should only read when the source of his own thoughts stagnates; which is often the case with the best of minds. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer,
228:To return to the question of the development of the Will. It is always something to pluck up the weeds, but the flower itself needs tending. Having crushed all volitions in ourselves, and if necessary in others, which we find opposing our real Will, that Will itself will grow naturally with greater freedom. But it is not only necessary to purify the temple itself and consecrate it; invocations must be made. Hence it is necessary to be constantly doing things of a positive, not merely of a negative nature, to affirm that Will. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
229:The library smells like old books - a thousand leather doorways into other worlds. I hear silence, like the mind of God. I feel a presence in the empty chair beside me. The librarian watches me suspiciously. But the library is a sacred place, and I sit with the patron saint of readers. Pulsing goddess light moves through me for one moment like a glimpse of eternity instantly forgotten. She is gone. I smell mold, I hear the clock ticking, I see an empty chair. Ask me now and I'll say this is just a place where you can't play music or eat. She's gone. The library sucks. ~ Laura Whitcomb,
230:The profession of shaman has many advantages. It offers high status with a safe livelihood free of work in the dreary, sweaty sense. In most societies it offers legal privileges and immunities not granted to other men. But it is hard to see how a man who has been given a mandate from on High to spread tidings of joy to all mankind can be seriously interested in taking up a collection to pay his salary; it causes one to suspect that the shaman is on the moral level of any other con man. But it is a lovely work if you can stomach it. ~ Robert Heinlein, Notebooks Of Lazarus Long from Time Enough for Love (1973).,
231:Arguably, the best advice for a serious student is to read a few hundred carefully selected books. An orgy of reading 30 or 40 first-rate books in a month ranks at the top of the usual list of human pleasures. If you wish, as an undergraduate, you could do it. You have time and energy, and with luck, you have the curiosity and courage to risk a month or two. Read Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Pascal, Voltaire, Berkeley, Hegel, Marx, and Kanetz. Or you could just play Frisbee on the Plaza of the Americas. Life is choice and there is much to learn. Not making a choice is a choice. ~ Dr Robert A Hatch, How to Study ,
232:The Magician should devise for himself a definite technique for destroying 'evil.' The essence of such a practice will consist in training the mind and the body to confront things which cause fear, pain, disgust, shame and the like. He must learn to endure them, then to become indifferent to them, then to analyze them until they give pleasure and instruction, and finally to appreciate them for their own sake, as aspects of Truth. When this has been done, he should abandon them, if they are really harmful in relation to health and comfort. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
233:Mother, Why didn't You return the letter to me (the one You wrote to me) after I sent it to You this morning with my letter? I want to lie on Your lap, Mother. Poor little one, I very gladly take you on my lap and cradle you to my heart to soothe this heavy sorrow which has no cause and to quell this great revolt which has no reason. Let me take you in my arms, bathe you in my love and wipe away even the memory of this unfortunate incident. I kept the letter to show it to Sri Aurobindo along with your letter of this morning. I am returning it to you in this notebook. - February 27th, 1934 ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother ,
234:I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound or stab us. If the book we're reading doesn't wake us up with a blow to the head, what are we reading for? So that it will make us happy, as you write? Good Lord, we would be happy precisely if we had no books, and the kind of books that make us happy are the kind we could write ourselves if we had to. But we need books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea within us. That is my belief. ~ Franz Kafka,
235:How to open to the Mother? The following are the means:(1) To remember You constantly or from time to time--Good.(2) By taking Your name through Japa [mantra; repeating the Mother's name]--Helpful.(3) With the help of meditation--More difficult if one has not the habit of meditation.(4) By conversation about You with those who love and respect You--Risky because, when talking, often some nonsense or at least some useless things can be said.(5) By reading Your books--Good.(6) By spending time in thoughts of You--Very good.(7) By sincere prayers--Good. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
236:Sri Aurobindo came upon earth to announce the manifestation of the supramental world and not merely did he announce this manifestation but embodied also in part the supramental force and showed by example what one must do to prepare oneself for manifesting it. The best thing we can do is to study all that he has told us and endeavour to follow his example and prepare ourselves for the new manifestation. This gives life its real sense and will help us to overcome all obstacles. Let us live for the new creation and we shall grow stronger and stronger by remaining young and progressive. 30 January 1972 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother I ,
237:the soul's seemingly magical influence ::: If you have within you a psychic being sufficiently awake to watch over you, to prepare your path, it can draw towards you things which help you, draw people, books, circumstances, all sorts of little coincidences which come to you as though brought by some benevolent will and give you an indication, a help, a support to take decisions and turn you in the right direction. But once you have taken this decision, once you have decided to find the truth of your being, once you start sincerely on the road, everything seems to conspire to help you to advance, ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951 ,
238:Patrul Rinpoche tells the story of an old frog who had lived all his life in a dank well. One day a frog from the sea paid him a visit. "Where do you come from?" asked the frog in the well. "From the great ocean," he replied. "How big is your ocean?" "It's gigantic." "You mean about a quarter of the size of my well here?" "Bigger." "Bigger? You mean half as big?" "No, even bigger." "Is it . . . as big as this well?" "There's no comparison." "That's impossible! I've got to see this for myself." They set off together. When the frog from the well saw the ocean, it was such a shock that his head just exploded into pieces. ~ Sogyal Rinpoche, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying ,
239:The Yogi should always listen to the sound (nada) in the interior of his right ear. This sound, when constantly practiced, will drown every sound (dhvani from outside .... By persisting ... the sound will be heard subtler and subtler. At first, it will be like what is produced by the ocean (jaladhi), the cloud (jimuta), the kettle-drum (bheri), and the water-fall (nirjhara) . ... A little later it will be like the sound produced by a tabor (mardala, or small drum), a big bell (ghanta), and a military drum (kahala); and finally like the sound of the tinkling bell (kinkin), the bamboo-flute (vamsa), the harp (vina) and the bee (bhramara). ~ Nadabindu-Upanishad, (verses 31-41) ,
240:All literature consists of whatever the writer thinks is cool. The reader will like the book to the degree that he agrees with the writer about what's cool. And that works all the way from the external trappings to the level of metaphor, subtext, and the way one uses words. In other words, I happen not to think that full-plate armor and great big honking greatswords are cool. I don't like 'em. I like cloaks and rapiers. So I write stories with a lot of cloaks and rapiers in 'em, 'cause that's cool. Guys who like military hardware, who think advanced military hardware is cool, are not gonna jump all over my books, because they have other ideas about what's cool. ~ Stephen Brust,
241:Einstein was remarkable for his powers of concentration; he could work uninterruptedly for hours and even days on the same problem. Some of the topics that interested him remained on his mind for decades. For relaxation he turned to music and to sailing, but often his work would continue during these moments as well; he usually had a notebook in his pocket so that he could jot down any idea that came to him. Once, after the theory of relativity had been put forth, he confessed to his colleague Wolfgang Pauli, "For the rest of my life I want to reflect on what light is." It is perhaps not entirely an accident that a focus on light is also the first visual act of the newborn child. ~ Howard Gardner,
242:It is in the silence of the mind that the strongest and freest action can come, e.g. the writing of a book, poetry, inspired speech etc. When the mind is active it interferes with the inspiration, puts in its own small ideas which get mixed up with the inspiration or starts something from a lower level or simply stops the inspiration altogether by bubbling up with all sorts of mere mental suggestions. So also intuitions or action etc. can come more easily when the ordinary inferior movement of the mind is not there. It is also in the silence of the mind that it is easiest for knowledge to come from within or above, from the psychic or from the higher consciousness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV ,
243:The oil consecrates everything that is touched with it; it is his aspiration; all acts performed in accordance with that are holy. The scourge tortures him; the dagger wounds him; the chain binds him. It is by virtue of these three that his aspiration remains pure, and is able to consecrate all other things. He wears a crown to affirm his lordship, his divinity; a robe to symbolize silence, and a lamen to declare his work. The book of spells or conjurations is his magical record, his Karma. In the East is the Magick Fire, in which all burns up at last. We will now consider each of these matters in detail. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
244:But we now come to speak of the holy and sacred Pentacles and Sigils. Now these pentacles, are as it were certain holy signes preserving us from evil chances and events, and helping and assisting us to binde, exterminate, and drive away evil spirits, and alluring the good spirits, and reconciling them unto us. And these pentacles do consist either of Characters of the good spirits of the superiour order, or of sacred pictures of holy letters or revelations, with apt and fit versicles, which are composed either of Geometrical figures and holy names of God, according to the course and maner of many of them; or they are compounded of all of them, or very many of them mixt. ~ Agrippa, A Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy ,
245:The ambition of every boy is to be an engine-driver. Some attain it, and remain there all their lives. But in the majority of cases the Understanding grows faster than the Will, and long before the boy is in a position to attain his wish he has already forgotten it. In other cases the Understanding never grows beyond a certain point, and the Will persists without intelligence. The business man (for example) has wished for ease and comfort, and to this end goes daily to his office and slaves under a more cruel taskmaster than the meanest of the workmen in his pay; he decides to retire, and finds that life in empty. The end has been swallowed up in the means. Only those are happy who have desired the unattainable. ~ Aleister Crowley, Book 4 ,
246:Jordan Peterson's Book List1. Brave New World - Aldous Huxley2. 1984 - George Orwell3. Road To Wigan Pier - George Orwell4. Crime And Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky5. Demons - Fyodor Dostoevsky6. Beyond Good And Evil - Friedrich Nietzsche7. Ordinary Men - Christopher Browning8. The Painted Bird - Jerzy Kosinski9. The Rape of Nanking - Iris Chang10. Gulag Archipelago (Vol. 1, Vol. 2, & Vol. 3) - Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn11. Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl12. Modern Man in Search of A Soul - Carl Jung13. Maps Of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief - Jordan B. Peterson14. A History of Religious Ideas (Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3) - Mircea Eliade15. Affective Neuroscience - Jaak Panksepp ~ Jordan Peterson,
247:The books I liked became a Bible from which I drew advice and support; I copied out long passages from them; I memorized new canticles and new litanies, psalms, proverbs, and prophecies, and I sanctified every incident in my life by the recital of these sacred texts. My emotions, my tears, and my hopes were no less sincere on account of that; the words and the cadences, the lines and the verses were not aids to make believe: but they rescued from silent oblivion all those intimate adventures of the spirit that I couldn't speak to anyone about; they created a kind of communion between myself and those twin souls which existed somewhere out of reach; instead of living out my small private existence, I was participating in a great spiritual epic. ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
248:so you distill these stories great authors distill stories and we have soties that are very very very old they are usually religious stories they could be fairy tales because some people ahve traced fairy tales back 10 000 years ... a story that has been told for 10000 years is a funny kind of story its like people have remembered it and obviously modified it, like a game of telephone that has gone on for generations and all that is left is what people remember and maybe they remember whats important, because you tend to remember what's important and its not necessarily the case that you know what the hell it means ... and you dont genereally know what a book that you read means not if its profound it means more than you can understand because otherwise why read it? ~ Jordan Peterson, Maps of Meaning 2017 - 1 ,
249:The Magician works in a Temple; the Universe, which is (be it remembered!) conterminous with himself. In this temple a Circle is drawn upon the floor for the limitation of his working. This circle is protected by divine names, the influences on which he relies to keep out hostile thoughts. Within the circle stands an Altar, the solid basis on which he works, the foundation of all. Upon the Altar are his Wand, Cup, Sword, and Pantacle, to represent his Will, his Understanding, his Reason, and the lower parts of his being, respectively. On the Altar, too, is a phial of Oil, surrounded by a Scourge, a Dagger, and a Chain, while above the Altar hangs a Lamp. The Magician wears a Crown, a single Robe, and a Lamen, and he bears a Book of Conjurations and a Bell. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
250:We cannot perceive Chaos directly, for it simultaneously contains the opposite to anything we might think it is. We can, however, occasionally glimpse and make use of partially formed matter which has only probablistic and indeterministic existence. This stuff we can call the aethers. 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ If it makes us feel any better we can call this Chaos, the Tao, or God, and imagine it to be benevolent and human-hearted. There are two schools of thought in magic. One considers the formative agent of the universe to be random and chaotic, and the other considers that it is a force of spiritual consciousness. As they have only themselves on which to base their speculations, they are basically saying that their own natures are either random and chaotic or spiritually conscious. ~ Peter J Carroll, Miscellaneous Excerpts Part 2 ,
251:With many people custom and habit of which ethics is but the social expression are the things most difficult to give up: and it is a useful practice to break any habit just to get into the way of being free from that form of slavery. Hence we have practices for breaking up sleep, for putting our bodies into strained and unnatural positions, for doing difficult exercises of breathing -- all these, apart from any special merit they may have in themselves for any particular purpose, have the main merit that the man forces himself todo them despite any conditions that may exist. Having conquered internal resistance one may conquer external resistance more easily. In a steam boat the engine must first overcome its own inertia before it can attack the resistance of the water. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
252:From these two incontrovertible premises he deduced that the Library is total and that its shelves register all the possible combinations of the twenty-odd orthographical symbols (a number which, though extremely vast, is not infinite): in other words, all that it is given to express, in all languages. Everything: the minutely detailed history of the future, the archangels' autobiographies, the faithful catalogue of the Library, thousands and thousands of false catalogues, the demonstration of the fallacy of those catalogues, the demonstration of the fallacy of the true catalogue, the Gnostic gospel of Basilides, the commentary on that gospel, the commentary on the commentary on that gospel, the true story of your death, the translation of every book in all languages, the interpolations of every book in all books. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Library of Babel ,
253:MATT: Okay. You spiral upward and upward and upward, climbing an extremely long period of time.Your legs begin to ache a little bit. Then another floor opens up. It appears the tower is now divided into two chambers. From the bottom floor up, it's now two sides to a tower and you're on the right side. The hallway curves around the outer edge of the tower. On the opposite side, you can see the staircase continues upward. The interior of this chamber appears to be an incredible arcane laboratory, occupying the center space of the tower inside. You see six overlapping circles of dulled runes and glyphs that encompass the entire 30-foot walkway between here and the stairs. Shelves and tables of countless glass tubes and metallic vices lay out across tables, organized in a near-OCD pattern. Tomes and books line the inner chamber walls. What do you guys do? ~ Matt Mercer, Critical Role ,
254:On the exoteric side if necessary the mind should be trained by the study of any well-developed science, such as chemistry, or mathematics. The idea of organization is the first step, that of interpretation the second. The Master of the Temple, whose grade corresponds to Binah, is sworn to interpret every phenomenon as a particular dealing of God with his soul. {85} But even the beginner may attempt this practice with advantage. Either a fact fits in or it does not; if it does not, harmony is broken; and as the Universal harmony cannot be broken, the discord must be in the mind of the student, thus showing that he is not in tune with that Universal choir. Let him then puzzle out first the great facts, then the little; until one summer, when he is bald and lethargic after lunch, he understands and appreciates the existence of flies! ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
255:When I am working on a book or a story I write every morning as soon after first light as possible. There is no one to disturb you and it is cool or cold and you come to your work and warm as you write. You read what you have written and, as you always stop when you know what is going to happen next, you go on from there. You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again. You have started at six in the morning, say, and may go on until noon or be through before that. When you stop you are as empty, and at the same time never empty but filling, as when you have made love to someone you love. Nothing can hurt you, nothing can happen, nothing means anything until the next day when you do it again. It is the wait until the next day that is hard to get through. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
256:And the first of the adepts covered His shame with a cloth, walking backwards, and was white. And the second of the adepts covered his shame with a cloth, walking sideways, and was yellow. And the third of the adepts made a mock of His nakedness, walking forwards, and was black. And these are the three great schools of the Magi, who are also the three Magi that journeyed unto Bethlehem; and because thou hast not wisdom, thou shalt not know which school prevaileth, or if the three schools be not one.* 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ This doctrine of the Three Schools is of extreme interest. Roughly, it may be said that the White is the Pure Mystic, whose attitude to God is one of reverence. The Yellow School conceals the Mysteries indeed, but examines them as it goes along. The Black School is that of pure Scepticism. We are now ready to study the philosophical bases of these three Schools. ~ Aleister Crowley, Magick Without Tears? 43?,
257:My deepest debt in this book is to the General Semantics ('non-Aristotelian system') of Alfred Korzybski. I have also drawn heavily upon the works of other contributors to semantic thought: especially C. K. Ogden and I. A. Richards, Thorstein Veblen, Edward Sapir, Leonard Bloomfield, Karl R. Popper, Thurman Arnold, Jerome Frank, Jean Piaget, Charles Morris, Wendell Johnson, Irving J. Lee, Ernst Cassirer, Anatol Rapoport, Stuart Chase. I am also deeply indebted to the writings of numerous psychologists and psychiatrists with one or another of the dynamic points of view inspired by Sigmund Freud: Karl Menninger, Trigant Burrow, Carl Rogers, Kurt Lewin, N. R. F. Maier, Jurgen Ruesch, Gregory Bateson, Rudolf Dreikurs, Milton Rokeach. I have also found extremely helpful the writings of cultural anthropologists, especially those of Benjamin Lee Whorf, Ruth Benedict, Clyde Kluckhohn, Leslie A. White, Margaret Mead, Weston La Barre. ~ S. I. Hayakawa,
258:[E]very man hath liberty to write, but few ability. Heretofore learning was graced by judicious scholars, but now noble sciences are vilified by base and illiterate scribblers, that either write for vain-glory, need, to get money, or as Parasites to flatter and collogue with some great men, they put out trifles, rubbish and trash. Among so many thousand Authors you shall scarce find one by reading of whom you shall be any whit better, but rather much worse; by which he is rather infected than any way perfected... What a catalogue of new books this year, all his age (I say) have our Frankfurt Marts, our domestic Marts, brought out. Twice a year we stretch out wits out and set them to sale; after great toil we attain nothing...What a glut of books! Who can read them? As already, we shall have a vast Chaos and confusion of Books, we are oppressed with them, our eyes ache with reading, our fingers with turning. For my part I am one of the number-one of the many-I do not deny it... ~ Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy ,
259:The fourth condition is study. One must cultivate the mind, know what others have thought, open the mental being to this impact of the higher vibrations of knowledge. A mental knowledge is not tantamount to realization, it is true, but still one must know mentally where one is going, what has happened to others, how they have achieved, what are the hindrances and the helping points. This education of oneself by study, study of spiritual writings, suddhydya as it is called, a disciplined reading and incorporation of the knowledge contained in scriptures and authentic texts - that is a very important part. Even when you don't understand a text, still if you persist at it, the force that is in that book creates certain new grooves in your brain and the second or the third time when you read it, it begins to make some meaning. This is the meaning of studying, of exposing your mind to the constant vibrations of higher levels of knowledge. Incidentally, the mind gets developed, a mental climate is created, a climate of spiritual culture. ~ M P Pandit, The Advent 1981 2020-08-30,
260:[invocation] Let us describe the magical method of identification. The symbolic form of the god is first studied with as much care as an artist would bestow upon his model, so that a perfectly clear and unshakeable mental picture of the god is presented to the mind. Similarly, the attributes of the god are enshrined in speech, and such speeches are committed perfectly to memory. The invocation will then begin with a prayer to the god, commemorating his physical attributes, always with profound understanding of their real meaning. In the second part of the invocation, the voice of the god is heard, and His characteristic utterance is recited. In the third portion of the invocation the Magician asserts the identity of himself with the god. In the fourth portion the god is again invoked, but as if by Himself, as if it were the utterance of the will of the god that He should manifest in the Magician. At the conclusion of this, the original object of the invocation is stated. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
261:O King, thy fate is a transaction doneAt every hour between Nature and thy soulWith God for its foreseeing arbiter.Fate is a balance drawn in Destiny's book.Man can accept his fate, he can refuse.Even if the One maintains the unseen decreeHe writes thy refusal in thy credit page:For doom is not a close, a mystic seal.Arisen from the tragic crash of life,Arisen from the body's torture and death,The spirit rises mightier by defeat;Its godlike wings grow wider with each fall.Its splendid failures sum to victory.O man, the events that meet thee on thy road,Though they smite thy body and soul with joy and grief,Are not thy fate, - they touch thee awhile and pass;Even death can cut not short thy spirit's walk:Thy goal, the road thou choosest are thy fate.On the altar throwing thy thoughts, thy heart, thy works,Thy fate is a long sacrifice to the godsTill they have opened to thee thy secret selfAnd made thee one with the indwelling God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06:02 The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
262:Abrahadabra is a word that first publicly appeared in The Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema . Its author, Aleister Crowley, described it as the Word of the Aeon, which signifieth The Great Work accomplished. This is in reference to his belief that the writing of Liber Legis (another name for The Book of the Law) heralded a new Aeon for mankind that was ruled by the godRa-Hoor-Khuit (a form of Horus). Abrahadabra is, therefore, the magical formula of this new age. It is not to be confused with the Word of the Law of the Aeon, which is Thelema, meaning Will. ... Abrahadabra is also referred to as the Word of Double Power. More specifically, it represents the uniting of the Microcosm with the Macrocosm represented by the pentagram and the hexagram, the rose and the cross, the circle and the square, the 5 and the 6 (etc.), as also called the attainment of the Knowledge and Conversation of ones Holy Guardian Angel. In Commentaries (1996), Crowley says that the word is a symbol of the establishment of the pillar or phallus of the Macrocosm...in the void of the Microcosm. ~ Wikipedia,
263:What do you think of the essence of Hell? Hell is when the depths come to you with all that you no longer are or are not yet capable of. Hell is when you can no longer attain what you could attain. Hell is when you must think and feel and do everything that you know you do not want. Hell is when you know that your having to is also a wanting to, and that you yourself are responsible for it. Hell is when you know that everything serious that you have planned with yourself is also laughable, that everything fine is also brutal, that everything good is also bad, that everything high is also low, and that everything pleasant is also shameful.But the deepest Hell is when you realize that Hell is also no Hell, but a cheerful Heaven, not a Heaven in itself, but in this respect a Heaven, and in that respect a Hell.That is the ambiguity of the God: he is born from a dark ambiguity and rises to a bright ambiguity. Unequivocalness is simplicity and leads to death. But ambiguity is the way of life. If the left foot does not move, then the right one does, and you move. The God wills this. ~ Carl Jung, The Red Book ,
264:Supermind is the dynamic form of satcitananda (being-consciousness-bliss), and the necessary conduit, mediator or linkage between satcitananda and the manifest creation. (Life Divine Book I, ch.14-16) ... Supermind is spiritual consciousness acting as a self-luminous knowledge, will, sense, aesthesis, energy, self-creative and unveiling power of its own delight and being. Mind is the action of the same powers, but limited and only very indirectly and partially illumined. Supermind lives in unity though it plays with diversity; mind lives in a separative action of diversity, though it may open to unity. Mind is not only capable of ignorance, but, because it acts always partially and by limitation, it works characteristically as a power of ignorance : it may even and it does forget itself in a complete inconscience, or nescience, awaken from it to the ignorance of a partial knowledge and move from the ignorance towards a complete knowledge, -- that is its natural action in the human being, -- but it can never have by itself a complete knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.03 - The Psychology of Self-Perfection,
265:The PalaceThe Palace is not infinite.The walls, the ramparts, the gardens, the labyrinths, the staircases, the terraces, the parapets, the doors, the galleries, the circular or rectangular patios, the cloisters, the intersections, the cisterns, the anterooms, the chambers, the alcoves, the libraries, the attics, the dungeons, the sealed cells and the vaults, are not less in quantity than the grains of sand in the Ganges, but their number has a limit. From the roofs, towards sunset, many people can make out the forges, the workshops, the stables, the boatyards and the huts of the slaves.It is granted to no one to traverse more than an infinitesimal part of the palace. Some know only the cellars. We can take in some faces, some voices, some words, but what we perceive is of the feeblest. Feeble and precious at the same time. The date which the chisel engraves in the tablet, and which is recorded in the parochial registers, is later than our own death; we are already dead when nothing touches us, neither a word nor a yearning nor a memory. I know that I am not dead. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Book of Sand ,
266:My understanding is that these are interdmensional entities that have an objective existence apart from the tripper's consciousnessThe narcissistic reductionistism of physicalism assumes that either consciousness is an epiphenomnon of brain activity, or, at best, that brain and consciousness are two different aspects of the same reality (e.g. Neutral Monism, Teilhard, Wilber). While the latter option is more receptive of alternate realities, neither of these options acknowledges entities or consciousness existing apart from the empirical material world.Ufo researcher John Keel coined the term "ultraterrestrial." A similar phenomenon may be the case here. These are entities that are more "material" than the imaginal ("astral") world.So, a continuum of being might be something like:- Transcendent- Mind or psyche apart from matter- Imaginal world (sensu Henry Corbin, = Collective Unconscious of Jung)- Interdimensional, Ultraterrestrial, ufos, drug vision entities, high strangeness- Orgone (Reich), linga sharira (Blavatsky), Etheric body- Empirical material reality ~ M Alan Kazlev, Facebook 2020-09-14 ,
267:Here I want to make it very clear that mathematics is not what many people think it is; it is not a system of mere formulas and theorems; but as beautifully defined by Professor Cassius J. Keyser, in his book The Human Worth of Rigorous Thinking (Columbia University Press, 1916), mathematics is the science of "Exact thought or rigorous thinking," and one of its distinctive characteristics is "precision, sharpness, completeness of definitions." This quality alone is sufficient to explain why people generally do not like mathematics and why even some scientists bluntly refuse to have anything to do with problems wherein mathematical reasoning is involved. In the meantime, mathematical philosophy has very little, if anything, to do with mere calculations or with numbers as such or with formulas; it is a philosophy wherein precise, sharp and rigorous thinking is essential. Those who deliberately refuse to think "rigorously"-that is mathematically-in connections where such thinking is possible, commit the sin of preferring the worse to the better; they deliberately violate the supreme law of intellectual rectitude. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
268:An Informal Integral Canon: Selected books on Integral Science, Philosophy and the Integral Transformation Sri Aurobindo - The Life Divine Sri Aurobindo - The Synthesis of Yoga Pierre Teilhard de Chardin - The Phenomenon of Man Jean Gebser - The Ever-Present Origin Edward Haskell - Full Circle - The Moral Force of Unified Science Oliver L. Reiser - Cosmic Humanism and World Unity Christopher Hills - Nuclear Evolution: Discovery of the Rainbow Body The Mother - Mother's Agenda Erich Jantsch - The Self-Organizing Universe - Scientific and Human Implications of the Emerging Paradigm of Evolution T. R. Thulasiram - Arut Perum Jyothi and Deathless Body Kees Zoeteman - Gaiasophy Ken Wilber - Sex Ecology Spirituality: The Spirit of Evolution Don Edward Beck - Spiral Dynamics: Mastering Values, Leadership, and Change Kundan Singh - The Evolution of Integral Yoga: Sri Aurobindo, Sri Ramakrishna, and Swami Vivekananda Sean Esbjorn-Hargens - Integral Ecology: Uniting Multiple Perspectives on the Natural World ~ M Alan Kazlev, books.php">Kheper.php">Kheper ,
269:But before entering into the details of I. A. O. as a magical formula it should be remarked that it is essentially the formula of Yoga or meditation; in fact, of elementary mysticism in all its branches. In beginning a meditation practice, there is always a quiet pleasure, a gentle natural growth; one takes a lively interest in the work; it seems easy; one is quite pleased to have started. This stage represents Isis. Sooner or later it is succeeded by depression-the Dark Night of the Soul, an infinite weariness and detestation of the work. The simplest and easiest acts become almost impossible to perform. Such impotence fills the mind with apprehension and despair. The intensity of this loathing can hardly be understood by any person who has not experienced it. This is the period of Apophis. It is followed by the arising not of Isis, but of Osiris. The ancient condition is not restored, but a new and superior condition is created, a condition only rendered possible by the process of death. The Alchemists themselves taught this same truth. The first matter of the work was base and primitive, though 'natural.' After passing through various stages the 'black dragon' appeared; but from this arose the pure and perfect gold ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
270:All advance in thought is made by collecting the greatest possible number of facts, classifying them, and grouping them. The philologist, though perhaps he only speaks one language, has a much higher type of mind than the linguist who speaks twenty. This Tree of Thought is exactly paralleled by the tree of nervous structure. Very many people go about nowadays who are exceedingly "well-informed," but who have not the slightest idea of the meaning of the facts they know. They have not developed the necessary higher part of the brain. Induction is impossible to them. This capacity for storing away facts is compatible with actual imbecility. Some imbeciles have been able to store their memories with more knowledge than perhaps any sane man could hope to acquire. This is the great fault of modern education - a child is stuffed with facts, and no attempt is made to explain their connection and bearing. The result is that even the facts themselves are soon forgotten. Any first-rate mind is insulted and irritated by such treatment, and any first-rate memory is in danger of being spoilt by it. No two ideas have any real meaning until they are harmonized in a third, and the operation is only perfect when these ideas are contradictory. This is the essence of the Hegelian logic. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
271:JOSHhmm. its so upsetting.. it seems like the book is a perfect symbol for something terribly wrong. I constantly avoid anything Donald Trump related because I find him so repulsive its upsetting. like its too disgusting of a corruption and i just avoid it. but maybe this book is a lukewarm symbol so I can learn to move towards and fight such darknesses.. I dont know.. so upsetting.and people buy into such double-thought inconscience? I cant even comprehend how this can be like this. I guess its like I turn away from disgust it allows people to turn away from reason through that infantile pre-rational regression or something. I mean we all want safety but..the book itself goes against itself from the title.. like its bashing the left for wanting to divide america but thats what the book is doing by attacking them. so I guess if people cant catch the deception from the title they wont catch it in the book? ayahALANYeah it's the whole white male fragility persecution envy trip. Donny Jnr was so triggered he had to write a whole book (I pity the ghostwriter).And yes it is upsetting, we live in a world where the Lord of Falsehood is on the ascendant, through instruments like Trump, Koch, and Murdoch. Some people are particularly susceptible, others are immune. This is the battle for the Earth ~ M Alan Kazlev, Facebook ,
272:It is also the story of a book, a book called The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy - not an Earth book, never published on Earth, and until the terrible catastrophe occurred, never seen or heard of by any Earthman. Nevertheless, a wholly remarkable book.in fact it was probably the most remarkable book ever to come out of the great publishing houses of Ursa Minor - of which no Earthman had ever heard either. Not only is it a wholly remarkable book, it is also a highly successful one - more popular than the Celestial Home Care Omnibus, better selling than Fifty More Things to do in Zero Gravity, and more controversial than Oolon Colluphid's trilogy of philosophical blockbusters Where God Went Wrong, Some More of God's Greatest Mistakes and Who is this God Person Anyway? In many of the more relaxed civilizations on the Outer Eastern Rim of the Galaxy, the Hitch Hiker's Guide has already supplanted the great Encyclopedia Galactica as the standard repository of all knowledge and wisdom, for though it has many omissions and contains much that is apocryphal, or at least wildly inaccurate, it scores over the older, more pedestrian work in two important respects. First, it is slightly cheaper; and secondly it has the words Don't Panic inscribed in large friendly letters on its cover. ~ Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy ,
273:Recommended ReadingDavid Foster Wallace - Infinite JestDH Lawrence - The RainbowGabriel Garcia Marquez - Love in the Time of CholeraKarl Ove Knausgaard - My StruggleVirginia Woolf - To The LighthouseBen Lerner - The Topeka SchoolSally Rooney - Conversations With FriendsNell Zink - The WallcreeperElena Ferrante - The Days of AbandonmentJack Kerouac - Dharma BumsWalt Whitman - Leaves of GrassMichael Murphy - Golf in the KingdomBarbara Kingsolver - Prodigal SummerAlbertine Sarrazin - AstragalRebecca Solnit - The Faraway NearbyMichael Paterniti - Love and Other Ways of DyingRainer Maria Rilke - Book of HoursJames Baldwin - Another CountryRoberto Calasso - KaTranslation by S. Radhakrishan - Principle UpanisadsChogyam Trungpa - Cutting Through Spiritual MaterialismTranslation by Georg Feuerstein - Yoga SutraRichard Freeman - The Mirror of YogaTranslation by S. Radhakrishan - The Bhagavad GitaShrunyu Suzuki - Zen Mind Beginner's MindHeinrich Zimmer - Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and CivilizationSogyal Rinpoche - The Tibetan Book of Living and DyingJoseph Campbell - Myths of LightJoseph Campbell - The Hero With A Thousand FacesSri Aurobindo - SavitriThomas Meyers - Anatomy TrainsWendy Doniger - The Hindus ~ Jason Bowman, http://www.jasonbowmanyoga.com/recommended-reading ,
274:A book like this, a problem like this, is in no hurry; we both, I just as much as my book, are friends of lento. It is not for nothing that I have been a philologist, perhaps I am a philologist still, that is to say, A TEACHER OF SLOW READING:- in the end I also write slowly. Nowadays it is not only my habit, it is also to my taste - a malicious taste, perhaps? - no longer to write anything which does not reduce to despair every sort of man who is 'in a hurry'. For philology is that venerable art which demands of its votaries one thing above all: to go aside, to take time, to become still, to become slow - it is a goldsmith's art and connoisseurship of the WORD which has nothing but delicate, cautious work to do and achieves nothing if it does not achieve it lento. But precisely for this reason it is more necessary than ever today, by precisely this means does it entice and enchant us the most, in the midst of an age of 'work', that is to say, of hurry, of indecent and perspiring haste, which wants to 'get everything done' at once, including every old or new book:- this art does not so easily get anything done, it teaches to read WELL, that is to say, to read slowly, deeply, looking cautiously before and aft, with reservations, with doors left open, with delicate eyes and fingers...My patient friends, this book desires for itself only perfect readers and philologists: LEARN to read me well! ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
275:Integral Psychology presents a very complex picture of the individual. As he did previously in The Atman Project, at the back of the book Wilber has included numerous charts showing how his model relates to the work of a hundred or so different authors from East and West.5757. Wilber compares the models of Huston Smith, Plotinus, Buddhism, Stan Grof, John Battista, kundalini yoga, the Great Chain of Being, James Mark Baldwin, Aurobindo, the Kabbalah, Vedanta, William Tiller, Leadbeater, Adi Da, Piaget, Commons and Richards, Kurt Fisher, Alexander, Pascual-Leone, Herb Koplowitz, Patricia Arlin, Gisela Labouvie-Vief, Jan Sinnot, Michael Basseches, Jane Loevinger, John Broughton, Sullivan, Grant and Grant, Jenny Wade, Michael Washburn, Erik Erikson, Neumann, Scheler, Karl Jaspers, Rudolf Steiner, Don Beck, Suzanne Cook-Greuter, Clare Graves, Robert Kegan, Kohlberg, Torbert, Blanchard-Fields, Kitchener and King, Deirdre Kramer, William Perry, Turner and Powell, Cheryl Armon, Peck, Howe, Rawls, Piaget, Selman, Gilligan, Hazrat Inayat Khan, mahamudra meditation, Fowler, Underhill, Helminiak, Funk, Daniel Brown, Muhyddin Ibn 'Arabi, St. Palamas, classical yoga, highest tantra yoga, St Teresa, Chirban, St Dionysius, Patanjali, St Gregory of Nyssa, transcendental meditation, Fortune, Maslow, Chinen, Benack, Gardner, Melvin Miller, Habermas, Jean Houston, G. Heard, Lenski, Jean Gebser, A. Taylor, Jay Early, Robert Bellah, and Duane Elgin. ~ Frank Visser, Ken Wilber Thought as Passion ,
276:People think of education as something that they can finish. And what's more, when they finish, it's a rite of passage. You're finished with school. You're no more a child, and therefore anything that reminds you of school - reading books, having ideas, asking questions - that's kid's stuff. Now you're an adult, you don't do that sort of thing any more.You have everybody looking forward to no longer learning, and you make them ashamed afterward of going back to learning. If you have a system of education using computers, then anyone, any age, can learn by himself, can continue to be interested. If you enjoy learning, there's no reason why you should stop at a given age. People don't stop things they enjoy doing just because they reach a certain age.What's exciting is the actual process of broadening yourself, of knowing there's now a little extra facet of the universe you know about and can think about and can understand. It seems to me that when it's time to die, there would be a certain pleasure in thinking that you had utilized your life well, learned as much as you could, gathered in as much as possible of the universe, and enjoyed it. There's only this one universe and only this one lifetime to try to grasp it. And while it is inconceivable that anyone can grasp more than a tiny portion of it, at least you can do that much. What a tragedy just to pass through and get nothing out of it. ~ Isaac Asimov, Carl Freedman - Conversations with Isaac Asimov-University Press of Mississippi (2005).pdf ,
277:The Supreme Mind'O God! we acknowledge Thee to be the Supreme MindWho hast disposed and ordered the Universe;Who gave it life and motion at the first,And still continuest to guide and regulate it.From Thee was its primal impulsion;Thou didst bestow on thine Emanated Spirit of Light,Divine wisdom and various powerTo stablish and enforce its transcendent orbits.Thou art the Inconceivable EnergyWhich in the beginning didst cause all things;Of whom shall no created being ever knowA millionth part of thy divine properties.But the Spirit was the Spirit of the Universe-Sacred, Holy, Generating Nature;Which, obedient unto thy will,Preserves and reproduces all that is in the Kosmos.Nothing is superior to the SpiritBut Thou, alone, O God! who art the Creator and Lord;Thou madest the Spirit to be thy servitor,But this thy Spirit transcends all other creatures;This is the Spirit which is in the highest heavens;Whose influence permeates all that lives;As a beautiful Flower diffuses fragrancesBut is not diminished in aught thereby.For all divine essences are the same,Differing only in their degree and power and beauty;But in no wise differing in their principle,Which is the fiery essence of God himself.Such is the animating flame of every existenceBeing in God, purely perfect;But in all other living thingsOnly capable of being made perfect.' ~ Dr E.V. Kenealy, The Book of Fo.
The Supreme Mind. from path of regeneration
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278:... Every one knew how laborious the usual method is of attaining to arts and sciences; whereas, by his contrivance, the most ignorant person, at a reasonable charge, and with a little bodily labour, might write books in philosophy, poetry, politics, laws, mathematics, and theology, without the least assistance from genius or study." He then led me to the frame, about the sides, whereof all his pupils stood in ranks. It was twenty feet square, placed in the middle of the room. The superfices was composed of several bits of wood, about the bigness of a die, but some larger than others. They were all linked together by slender wires. These bits of wood were covered, on every square, with paper pasted on them; and on these papers were written all the words of their language, in their several moods, tenses, and declensions; but without any order. The professor then desired me "to observe; for he was going to set his engine at work." The pupils, at his command, took each of them hold of an iron handle, whereof there were forty fixed round the edges of the frame; and giving them a sudden turn, the whole disposition of the words was entirely changed. He then commanded six-and-thirty of the lads, to read the several lines softly, as they appeared upon the frame; and where they found three or four words together that might make part of a sentence, they dictated to the four remaining boys, who were scribes. This work was repeated three or four times, and at every turn, the engine was so contrived, that the words shifted into new places, as the square bits of wood moved upside down. ~ Jonathan Swift, Gullivers Travels ,
279:science reading list ::: 1. and 2. The Voyage of the Beagle (1845) and The Origin of Species (1859) by Charles Darwin [tie 3. Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy) by Isaac Newton (1687) 4. Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems by Galileo Galilei (1632) 5. De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres) by Nicolaus Copernicus (1543) 6. Physica (Physics) by Aristotle (circa 330 B.C.) 7. De Humani Corporis Fabrica (On the Fabric of the Human Body) by Andreas Vesalius (1543) 8. Relativity: The Special and General Theory by Albert Einstein (1916) 9. The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins (1976) 10. One Two Three . . . Infinity by George Gamow (1947) 11. The Double Helix by James D. Watson (1968) 12. What Is Life? by Erwin Schrodinger (1944) 13. The Cosmic Connection by Carl Sagan (1973) 14. The Insect Societies by Edward O. Wilson (1971) 15. The First Three Minutes by Steven Weinberg (1977) 16. Silent Spring by Rachel Carson (1962) 17. The Mismeasure of Man by Stephen Jay Gould (1981) 18. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales by Oliver Sacks (1985) 19. The Journals of Lewis and Clark by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark (1814) 20. The Feynman Lectures on Physics by Richard P Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, and Matthew Sands (1963) 21. Sexual Behavior in the Human Male by Alfred C. Kinsey et al. (1948) 22. Gorillas in the Mist by Dian Fossey (1983) 23. Under a Lucky Star by Roy Chapman Andrews (1943) 24. Micrographia by Robert Hooke (1665) 25. Gaia by James Lovelock (1979) ~ Editors of Discovery Magazine, books">Website.php">Website ,
280:The capacity for visions, when it is sincere and spontaneous, can put you in touch with events which you are not capable of knowing in your outer consciousness.... There is a very interesting fact, it is that somewhere in the terrestrial mind, somewhere in the terrestrial vital, somewhere in the subtle physical, one can find an exact, perfect, automatic recording of everything that happens. It is the most formidable memory one could imagine, which misses nothing, forgets nothing, records all. And if you are able to enter into it, you can go backward, you can go forward, and in all directions, and you will have the "memory" of all things - not only of things of the past, but of things to come. For everything is recorded there. In the mental world, for instance, there is a domain of the physical mind which is related to physical things and keeps the memory of physical happenings upon earth. It is as though you were entering into innumerable vaults, one following another indefinitely, and these vaults are filled with small pigeon-holes, one above another, one above another, with tiny doors. Then if you want to know something and if you are conscious, you look, and you see something like a small point - a shining point; you find that this is what you wish to know and you have only to concentrate there and it opens; and when it opens, there is a sort of an unrolling of something like extremely subtle manuscripts, but if your concentration is sufficiently strong you begin to read as though from a book. And you have the whole story in all its details. There are thousands of these little holes, you know; when you go for a walk there, it is as though you were walking in infinity. And in this way you can find the exact facts about whatever you want to know. But I must tell you that what you find is never what has been reported in history - histories are always planned out; I have never come across a single "historical" fact which is like history. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951 109,
281:I know some individuals who make this their daily practice: starting at the beginning and reading a canto or half a canto every day till they reach the end and then starting at the beginning again, and in that way they have gone through the whole of Savitri many times. When this is done in groups there's really no doubt that by this going through the whole soundbody of the epic from beginning to end aloud, there must be built up a very strong force field of vibrations. It is definitely of benefit to the people who participate in it. But again I would say that the effect or benefit of this sacrifice will be richer to the extent that the reading is done with understanding and above all with soul surrender. It shouldn't become a mere ritual.Sri Aurobindo's mantric lines, repeated one after the other, will always have their power; but the power will be much greater if the mind can participate, and the will and the heart.I have also heard of some groups who select one line that seems to have a particular mantric power and then within the group they chant that line many, many times. They concentrate on that one special line, and try to take its vibrations deep into themselves. Again I am sure that this is very beneficial to those who practice it.In that way the words enter very deeply into the consciousness. There they resonate and do their work, and perhaps not just the surface meaning but the deeper meaning and the deeper vibrations may reveal their full depth to those who undertake this exercise if it is done with self-dedication, with a true aspiration to internalise the heart of the meaning, not just as a mere repetition.At another end of the spectrum of possible approaches to Savitri, we can say there would be the aesthetic approach, the approach of enjoying it for its poetic beauty. I met a gentleman a couple of months ago, who told me, "We have faith in Sri Aurobindo, but it is so difficult to understand his books. We tried with The Life Divine, we tried with The Synthesis of Yoga but we found them so difficult. ~ collab summer & fall 2011,
282:Sweet Mother, here it is written: "There is a Yoga-Shakti lying coiled or asleep..." How can it be awakened?I think it awakens quite naturally the moment one takes the resolution to do the yoga. If the resolution is sincere and one has an aspiration, it wakes up by itself. In fact, it is perhaps its awakening which gives the aspiration to do yoga. It is possible that it is a result of the Grace... or after some conversation or reading, something that has suddenly given you the idea and aspiration to know what yoga is and to practise it. Sometimes just a simple conversation with someone is enough or a passage one reads from a book; well, it awakens this Yoga-Shakti and it is this which makes you do your yoga. One is not aware of it at first - except that something has changed in our life, a new decision is taken, a turning. What is it, this Yoga-Shakti, Sweet Mother? It is the energy of progress. It is the energy which makes you do the yoga, precisely, makes you progress - consciously. It is a conscious energy. In fact, the Yoga-Shakti is the power to do yoga. Sweet Mother, isn't it more difficult to draw the divine forces from below? I think it is absolutely useless. Some people think that there are more reserves of energy - I have heard this very often: a great reserve of energy - in the earth, and that if they draw this energy into themselves they will be able to do things; but it is always mixed. The divine Presence is everywhere, that's well understood. And in fact, there is neither above nor below. What is called above and below, I think that is rather the expression of a degree of consciousness or a degree of materiality; there is the more unconscious and the less unconscious, there is what is subconscious and what is superconscious, and so we say above and below for the facility of speech. But in fact, the idea is to draw from the energies of the earth which, when you are standing up, are under your feet, that is, below in relation to you. But these energies are always mixed, and mostly they are terribly dark. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955 ,
283:But usually the representative influence occupies a much larger place in the life of the sadhaka. If the Yoga is guided by a received written Shastra, - some Word from the past which embodies the experience of former Yogins, - it may be practised either by personal effort alone or with the aid of a Guru. The spiritual knowledge is then gained through meditation on the truths that are taught and it is made living and conscious by their realisation in the personal experience; the Yoga proceeds by the results of prescribed methods taught in a Scripture or a tradition and reinforced and illumined by the instructions of the Master. This is a narrower practice, but safe and effective within its limits, because it follows a well-beaten track to a long familiar goal.For the sadhaka of the integral Yoga it is necessary to remember that no written Shastra, however great its authority or however large its spirit, can be more than a partial expression of the eternal Knowledge. He will use, but never bind himself even by the greatest Scripture. Where the Scripture is profound, wide, catholic, it may exercise upon him an influence for the highest good and of incalculable importance. It may be associated in his experience with his awakening to crowning verities and his realisation of the highest experiences. His Yoga may be governed for a long time by one Scripture or by several successively, - if it is in the line of the great Hindu tradition, by the Gita, for example, the Upanishads, the Veda. Or it may be a good part of his development to include in its material a richly varied experience of the truths of many Scriptures and make the future opulent with all that is best in the past. But in the end he must take his station, or better still, if he can, always and from the beginning he must live in his own soul beyond the limitations of the word that he uses. The Gita itself thus declares that the Yogin in his progress must pass beyond the written Truth, - sabdabrahmativartate - beyond all that he has heard and all that he has yet to hear, - srotavyasya srutasya ca. For he is not the sadhaka of a book or of many books; he is a sadhaka of the Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.01 - The Four Aids,
284:So then let the Adept set this sigil upon all the Words he hath writ in the book of the Works of his Will. And let him then end all, saying: Such are the Words!2 For by this he maketh proclamation before all them that be about his Circle that these Words are true and puissant, binding what he would bind, and loosing what he would loose. Let the Adept perform this ritual right, perfect in every part thereof, once daily for one moon, then twice, at dawn and dusk, for two moons; next thrice, noon added, for three moons; afterwards, midnight making up his course, for four moons four times every day. Then let the Eleventh Moon be consecrated wholly to this Work; let him be instant in constant ardour, dismissing all but his sheer needs to eat and sleep.3 For know that the true Formula4 whose virtue sufficed the Beast in this Attainment, was thus:INVOKE OFTENSo may all men come at last to the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel: thus sayeth The Beast, and prayeth his own Angel that this Book be as a burning Lamp, and as a living Spring, for Light and Life to them that read therein.1. There is an alternative spelling, TzBA-F, where the Root, "an Host," has the value of 93. The Practicus should revise this Ritual throughout in the Light of his personal researches in the Qabalah, and make it his own peculiar property. The spelling here suggested implies that he who utters the Word affirms his allegiance to the symbols 93 and 6; that he is a warrior in the army of Will, and of the Sun. 93 is also the number of AIWAZ and 6 of The Beast.2. The consonants of LOGOS, "Word," add (Hebrew values) to 93 [reading the Sigma as Samekh = 60; reading it as Shin = 300 gives 333], and ΕΠΗ, "Words" (whence "Epic") has also that value; ΕΙ∆Ε ΤΑ ΕΠΗ might be the phrase here intended; its number is 418. This would then assert the accomplishment of the Great Work; this is the natural conclusion of the Ritual. Cf. CCXX, III, 75.3. These needs are modified during the process of Initiation both as to quantity and quality. One should not become anxious about one's phyiscal or mental health on à priori grounds, but pay attention only to indubitable symptoms of distress should such arise. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber Samekh ,
285:The general characteristics and attributions of these Grades are indicated by their correspondences on the Tree of Life, as may be studied in detail in the Book 777. Student. -- His business is to acquire a general intellectual knowledge of all systems of attainment, as declared in the prescribed books. (See curriculum in Appendix I.) {231} Probationer. -- His principal business is to begin such practices as he my prefer, and to write a careful record of the same for one year. Neophyte. -- Has to acquire perfect control of the Astral Plane. Zelator. -- His main work is to achieve complete success in Asana and Pranayama. He also begins to study the formula of the Rosy Cross. Practicus. -- Is expected to complete his intellectual training, and in particular to study the Qabalah. Philosophus. -- Is expected to complete his moral training. He is tested in Devotion to the Order. Dominus Liminis. -- Is expected to show mastery of Pratyahara and Dharana. Adeptus (without). -- is expected to perform the Great Work and to attain the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel. Adeptus (within). -- Is admitted to the practice of the formula of the Rosy Cross on entering the College of the Holy Ghost. Adeptus (Major). -- Obtains a general mastery of practical Magick, though without comprehension. Adeptus (Exemptus). -- Completes in perfection all these matters. He then either ("a") becomes a Brother of the Left Hand Path or, ("b") is stripped of all his attainments and of himself as well, even of his Holy Guardian Angel, and becomes a babe of the Abyss, who, having transcended the Reason, does nothing but grow in the womb of its mother. It then finds itself a Magister Templi. -- (Master of the Temple): whose functions are fully described in Liber 418, as is this whole initiation from Adeptus Exemptus. See also "Aha!". His principal business is to tend his "garden" of disciples, and to obtain a perfect understanding of the Universe. He is a Master of Samadhi. {232} Magus. -- Attains to wisdom, declares his law (See Liber I, vel Magi) and is a Master of all Magick in its greatest and highest sense. Ipsissimus. -- Is beyond all this and beyond all comprehension of those of lower degrees. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA ,
286:Countless books on divination, astrology, medicine and other subjectsDescribe ways to read signs. They do add to your learning,But they generate new thoughts and your stable attention breaks up.Cut down on this kind of knowledge - that's my sincere advice.You stop arranging your usual living space,But make everything just right for your retreat.This makes little sense and just wastes time.Forget all this - that's my sincere advice.You make an effort at practice and become a good and knowledgeable person.You may even master some particular capabilities.But whatever you attach to will tie you up.Be unbiased and know how to let things be - that's my sincere advice.You may think awakened activity means to subdue skepticsBy using sorcery, directing or warding off hail or lightning, for example.But to burn the minds of others will lead you to lower states.Keep a low profile - that's my sincere advice.Maybe you collect a lot of important writings,Major texts, personal instructions, private notes, whatever.If you haven't practiced, books won't help you when you die.Look at the mind - that's my sincere advice.When you focus on practice, to compare understandings and experience,Write books or poetry, to compose songs about your experienceAre all expressions of your creativity. But they just give rise to thinking.Keep yourself free from intellectualization - that's my sincere advice.In these difficult times you may feel that it is helpfulTo be sharp and critical with aggressive people around you.This approach will just be a source of distress and confusion for you.Speak calmly - that's my sincere advice.Intending to be helpful and without personal investment,You tell your friends what is really wrong with them.You may have been honest but your words gnaw at their heart.Speak pleasantly - that's my sincere advice.You engage in discussions, defending your views and refuting others'Thinking that you are clarifying the teachings.But this just gives rise to emotional posturing.Keep quiet - that's my sincere advice.You feel that you are being loyalBy being partial to your teacher, lineage or philosophical tradition.Boosting yourself and putting down others just causes hard feelings.Have nothing to do with all this - that's my sincere advice. ~ Longchenpa, excerpts from 30 Pieces of Sincere Advice
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287:Who could have thought that this tanned young man with gentle, dreamy eyes, long wavy hair parted in the middle and falling to the neck, clad in a common coarse Ahmedabad dhoti, a close-fitting Indian jacket, and old-fashioned slippers with upturned toes, and whose face was slightly marked with smallpox, was no other than Mister Aurobindo Ghose, living treasure of French, Latin and Greek?" Actually, Sri Aurobindo was not yet through with books; the Western momentum was still there; he devoured books ordered from Bombay and Calcutta by the case. "Aurobindo would sit at his desk," his Bengali teacher continues, "and read by the light of an oil lamp till one in the morning, oblivious of the intolerable mosquito bites. I would see him seated there in the same posture for hours on end, his eyes fixed on his book, like a yogi lost in the contemplation of the Divine, unaware of all that went on around him. Even if the house had caught fire, it would not have broken this concentration." He read English, Russian, German, and French novels, but also, in ever larger numbers, the sacred books of India, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Ramayana, although he had never been in a temple except as an observer. "Once, having returned from the College," one of his friends recalls, "Sri Aurobindo sat down, picked up a book at random and started to read, while Z and some friends began a noisy game of chess. After half an hour, he put the book down and took a cup of tea. We had already seen him do this many times and were waiting eagerly for a chance to verify whether he read the books from cover to cover or only scanned a few pages here and there. Soon the test began. Z opened the book, read a line aloud and asked Sri Aurobindo to recite what followed. Sri Aurobindo concentrated for a moment, and then repeated the entire page without a single mistake. If he could read a hundred pages in half an hour, no wonder he could go through a case of books in such an incredibly short time." But Sri Aurobindo did not stop at the translations of the sacred texts; he began to study Sanskrit, which, typically, he learned by himself. When a subject was known to be difficult or impossible, he would refuse to take anyone's word for it, whether he were a grammarian, pandit, or clergyman, and would insist upon trying it himself. The method seemed to have some merit, for not only did he learn Sanskrit, but a few years later he discovered the lost meaning of the Veda. ~ Satprem, Sri Aurobindo Or The Adventure of Consciousness ,
288:Daemons A daemon is a process that runs in the background, not connecting to any controlling terminal. Daemons are normally started at boot time, are run as root or some other special user (such as apache or postfix), and handle system-level tasks. As a convention, the name of a daemon often ends in d (as in crond and sshd), but this is not required, or even universal. The name derives from Maxwell's demon, an 1867 thought experiment by the physicist James Maxwell. Daemons are also supernatural beings in Greek mythology, existing somewhere between humans and the gods and gifted with powers and divine knowledge. Unlike the demons of Judeo-Christian lore, the Greek daemon need not be evil. Indeed, the daemons of mythology tended to be aides to the gods, performing tasks that the denizens of Mount Olympus found themselves unwilling to do-much as Unix daemons perform tasks that foreground users would rather avoid. A daemon has two general requirements: it must run as a child of init, and it must not be connected to a terminal. In general, a program performs the following steps to become a daemon: 1. Call fork( ). This creates a new process, which will become the daemon. 2. In the parent, call exit( ). This ensures that the original parent (the daemon's grandparent) is satisfied that its child terminated, that the daemon's parent is no longer running, and that the daemon is not a process group leader. This last point is a requirement for the successful completion of the next step. 3. Call setsid( ), giving the daemon a new process group and session, both of which have it as leader. This also ensures that the process has no associated controlling terminal (as the process just created a new session, and will not assign one). 4. Change the working directory to the root directory via chdir( ). This is done because the inherited working directory can be anywhere on the filesystem. Daemons tend to run for the duration of the system's uptime, and you don't want to keep some random directory open, and thus prevent an administrator from unmounting the filesystem containing that directory. 5. Close all file descriptors. You do not want to inherit open file descriptors, and, unaware, hold them open. 6. Open file descriptors 0, 1, and 2 (standard in, standard out, and standard error) and redirect them to /dev/null. Following these rules, here is a program that daemonizes itself: ~ OReilly Linux System Programming,
289:reading ::: 50 Spiritual Classics: List of Books Covered: Muhammad Asad - The Road To Mecca (1954) St Augustine - Confessions (400) Richard Bach - Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1970) Black Elk Black - Elk Speaks (1932) Richard Maurice Bucke - Cosmic Consciousness (1901) Fritjof Capra - The Tao of Physics (1976) Carlos Castaneda - Journey to Ixtlan (1972) GK Chesterton - St Francis of Assisi (1922) Pema Chodron - The Places That Scare You (2001) Chuang Tzu - The Book of Chuang Tzu (4th century BCE) Ram Dass - Be Here Now (1971) Epictetus - Enchiridion (1st century) Mohandas Gandhi - An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments With Truth (1927) Al-Ghazzali - The Alchemy of Happiness (1097) Kahlil Gibran - The Prophet (1923) GI Gurdjieff - Meetings With Remarkable Men (1960) Dag Hammarskjold - Markings (1963) Abraham Joshua Heschel - The Sabbath (1951) Hermann Hesse - Siddartha (1922) Aldous Huxley - The Doors of Perception (1954) William James - The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902) Carl Gustav Jung - Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1955) Margery Kempe - The Book of Margery Kempe (1436) J Krishnamurti - Think On These Things (1964) CS Lewis - The Screwtape Letters (1942) Malcolm X - The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1964) Daniel C Matt - The Essential Kabbalah (1994) Dan Millman - The Way of the Peaceful Warrior (1989) W Somerset Maugham - The Razor's Edge (1944) Thich Nhat Hanh - The Miracle of Mindfulness (1975) Michael Newton - Journey of Souls (1994) John O'Donohue - Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom (1998) Robert M Pirsig - Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974) James Redfield - The Celestine Prophecy (1994) Miguel Ruiz - The Four Agreements (1997) Helen Schucman & William Thetford - A Course in Miracles (1976) Idries Shah - The Way of the Sufi (1968) Starhawk - The Spiral Dance: A Rebirth of the Ancient Religion of the Great Goddess (1979) Shunryu Suzuki - Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind (1970) Emanuel Swedenborg - Heaven and Hell (1758) Teresa of Avila - Interior Castle (1570) Mother Teresa - A Simple Path (1994) Eckhart Tolle - The Power of Now (1998) Chogyam Trungpa - Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism (1973) Neale Donald Walsch - Conversations With God (1998) Rick Warren - The Purpose-Driven Life (2002) Simone Weil - Waiting For God (1979) Ken Wilber - A Theory of Everything (2000) Paramahansa Yogananda - Autobiography of a Yogi (1974) Gary Zukav - The Seat of the Soul (1990) ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Spirital Classics (2017 Edition) ,
290:reading ::: 50 Philosophy Classics: List of Books Covered: 1. Hannah Arendt - The Human Condition (1958) 2. Aristotle - Nicomachean Ethics (4th century BC) 3. AJ Ayer - Language, Truth and Logic (1936) 4. Julian Baggini - The Ego Trick (2011) 5. Jean Baudrillard - Simulacra and Simulation (1981) 6. Simone de Beauvoir - The Second Sex (1952) 7. Jeremy Bentham - Principles of Morals and Legislation (1789) 8. Henri Bergson - Creative Evolution (1911) 9. David Bohm - Wholeness and the Implicate Order (1980) 10. Noam Chomsky - Understanding Power (2002) 11. Cicero - On Duties (44 BC) 12. Confucius - Analects (5th century BC) 13. Rene Descartes - Meditations (1641) 14. Ralph Waldo Emerson - Fate (1860) 15. Epicurus - Letters (3rd century BC) 16. Michel Foucault - The Order of Things (1966) 17. Harry Frankfurt - On Bullshit (2005) 18. Sam Harris - Free Will (2012) 19. GWF Hegel - Phenomenology of Spirit (1803) 20. Martin Heidegger - Being and Time (1927) 21. Heraclitus - Fragments (6th century) 22. David Hume - An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748) 23. William James - Pragmatism (1904) 24. Daniel Kahneman - Thinking: Fast and Slow (2011) 25. Immanuel Kant - Critique of Pure Reason (1781) 26. Soren Kierkegaard - Fear and Trembling (1843) 27. Saul Kripke - Naming and Necessity (1972) 28. Thomas Kuhn - The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962) 29. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Theodicy (1710) 30. John Locke - An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690) 31. Marshall McLuhan - The Medium is the Massage (1967) 32. Niccolo Machiavelli - The Prince (1532) 33. John Stuart Mill - On Liberty (1859) 34. Michel de Montaigne - Essays (1580) 35. Iris Murdoch - The Sovereignty of Good (1970) 36. Friedrich Nietzsche - Beyond Good and Evil (1886) 37. Blaise Pascal - Pensees (1670) 38. Plato - The Republic (4th century BC) 39. Karl Popper - The Logic of Scientific Discovery (1934) 40. John Rawls - A Theory of Justice (1971) 41. Jean-Jacques Rousseau - The Social Contract (1762) 42. Bertrand Russell - The Conquest of Happiness (1920) 43. Michael Sandel - Justice (2009) 44. Jean Paul Sartre - Being and Nothingness (1943) 45. Arthur Schopenhauer - The World as Will and Representation (1818) 46. Peter Singer - The Life You Can Save (2009) 47. Baruch Spinoza - Ethics (1677) 48. Nassim Nicholas - Taleb The Black Swan (2007) 49. Ludwig Wittgenstein - Philosophical Investigations (1953) 50. Slavoj Zizek - Living In The End Times (2010) ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Philosophy Classics ,
291:The last sentence: "...in the Truth-Creation the law is that of a constant unfolding without any Pralaya." What is this constant unfolding?The Truth-Creation... it is the last line? (Mother consults the book) I think we have already spoken about this several times. It has been said that in the process of creation, there is the movement of creation followed by a movement of preservation and ending in a movement of disintegration or destruction; and even it has been repeated very often: "All that begins must end", etc., etc.In fact in the history of our universe there have been six consecutive periods which began by a creation, were prolonged by a force of preservation and ended by a disintegration, a destruction, a return to the Origin, which is called Pralaya; and that is why this tradition is there. But it has been said that the seventh creation would be a progressive creation, that is, after the starting-point of the creation, instead of its being simply followed by a preservation, it would be followed by a progressive manifestation which would express the Divine more and more completely, so that no disintegration and return to the Origin would be necessary. And it has been announced that the period we are in is precisely the seventh, that is, it would not end by a Pralaya, a return to the Origin, a destruction, a disappearance, but that it would be replaced by a constant progress, because it would be a more and more perfect unfolding of the divine Origin in its creation.And this is what Sri Aurobindo says. He speaks of a constant unfolding, that is, the Divine manifests more and more completely; more and more perfectly, in a progressive creation. It is the nature of this progression which makes the return to the Origin, the destruction no longer necessary. All that does not progress disappears, and that is why physical bodies die, it's because they are not progressive; they are progressive up to a certain moment, then there they stop and most often they remain stable for a certain time, and then they begin to decline, and then disappear. It's because the physical body, physical matter as it is at present is not plastic enough to be able to progress constantly. But it is not impossible to make it sufficiently plastic for the perfecting of the physical body to be such that it no longer needs disintegration, that is, death.Only, this cannot be realised except by the descent of the Supermind which is a force higher than all those which have so far manifested and which will give the body a plasticity that will allow it to progress constantly, that is, to follow the divine movement in its unfolding. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955 207-209,
292:How can one awaken his Yoga-shakti?It depends on this: when one thinks that it is the most important thing in his life. That's all.Some people sit in meditation, concentrate on the base of the vertebral column and want it very much to awake, but that's not enough. It is when truly it becomes the most important thing in one's life, when all the rest seems to have lost all taste, all interest, all importance, when one feels within that one is born for this, that one is here upon earth for this, and that it is the only thing that truly counts, then that's enough.One can concentrate on the different centres; but sometimes one concentrates for so long, with so much effort, and has no result. And then one day something shakes you, you feel that you are going to lose your footing, you have to cling on to something; then you cling within yourself to the idea of union with the Divine, the idea of the divine Presence, the idea of the transformation of the consciousness, and you aspire, you want, you try to organise your feelings, movements, impulses around this. And it comes.Some people have recommended all kinds of methods; probably these were methods which had succeeded in their case; but to tell the truth, one must find one's own method, it is only after having done the thing that one knows how it should be done, not before.If one knows it beforehand, one makes a mental construction and risks greatly living in his mental construction, which is an illusion; because when the mind builds certain conditions and then they are realised, there are many chances of there being mostly pure mental construction which is not the experience itself but its image. So for all these truly spiritual experiences I think it is wiser to have them before knowing them. If one knows them, one imitates them, one doesn't have them, one imagines oneself having them; whereas if one knows nothing - how things are and how they ought to happen, what should happen and how it will come about - if one knows nothing about all this, then by keeping very still and making a kind of inner sorting out within one's being, one can suddenly have the experience, and then later knows what one has had. It is over, and one knows how it has to be done when one has done it - afterwards. Like that it is sure.One may obviously make use of his imagination, imagine the Kundalini and try to pull it upwards. But one can also tell himself tales like this. I have had so many instances of people who described their experiences to me exactly as they are described in books, knowing all the words and putting down all the details, and then I asked them just a little question like that, casually: that if they had had the experience they should have known or felt a certain thing, and as this was not in the books, they could not answer. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955 211-212,
293:reading ::: 50 Psychology Classics: List of Books Covered: Alfred Adler - Understanding Human Nature (1927) Gordon Allport - The Nature of Prejudice (1954) Albert Bandura - Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control (1997) Gavin Becker - The Gift of Fear (1997) Eric Berne - Games People Play (1964) Isabel Briggs Myers - Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type (1980) Louann Brizendine - The Female Brain (2006) David D Burns - Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy (1980) Susan Cain - Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (2012) Robert Cialdini - Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (1984) Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Creativity (1997) Carol Dweck - Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006) Albert Ellis & Robert Harper - (1961) A Guide To Rational Living(1961) Milton Erickson - My Voice Will Go With You (1982) by Sidney Rosen Eric Erikson - Young Man Luther (1958) Hans Eysenck - Dimensions of Personality (1947) Viktor Frankl - The Will to Meaning (1969) Anna Freud - The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (1936) Sigmund Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams (1901) Howard Gardner - Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983) Daniel Gilbert - Stumbling on Happiness (2006) Malcolm Gladwell - Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005) Daniel Goleman - Emotional Intelligence at Work (1998) John M Gottman - The Seven Principles For Making Marriage Work (1999) Temple Grandin - The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed (2013) Harry Harlow - The Nature of Love (1958) Thomas A Harris - I'm OK - You're OK (1967) Eric Hoffer - The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951) Karen Horney - Our Inner Conflicts (1945) William James - Principles of Psychology (1890) Carl Jung - The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (1953) Daniel Kahneman - Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011) Alfred Kinsey - Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953) RD Laing - The Divided Self (1959) Abraham Maslow - The Farther Reaches of Human Nature (1970) Stanley Milgram - Obedience To Authority (1974) Walter Mischel - The Marshmallow Test (2014) Leonard Mlodinow - Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (2012) IP Pavlov - Conditioned Reflexes (1927) Fritz Perls - Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality (1951) Jean Piaget - The Language and Thought of the Child (1966) Steven Pinker - The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (2002) VS Ramachandran - Phantoms in the Brain (1998) Carl Rogers - On Becoming a Person (1961) Oliver Sacks - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1970) Barry Schwartz - The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less (2004) Martin Seligman - Authentic Happiness (2002) BF Skinner - Beyond Freedom & Dignity (1953) Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen - Difficult Conversations (2000) William Styron - Darkness Visible (1990) ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Psychology Classics ,
294:28 August 1957Mother, Sri Aurobindo says here: "Whether the whole of humanity would be touched [by the Supramental influence] or only a part of it ready for the change would depend on what was intended or possible in the continued order of the universe."The Supramental Manifestation, SABCL, Vol. 16, p. 56What is meant by "what was intended or possible"? The two things are different. So far you have said that if humanity changes, if it wants to participate in the new birth...It is the same thing. But when you look at an object on a certain plane, you see it horizontally, and when you look at the same object from another plane, you see it vertically. (Mother shows the cover and the back of her book.) So, if one looks from above, one says "intended"; if one looks from below, one says "possible".... But it is absolutely the same thing, only the point of view is different.But in that case, it is not our incapacity or lack of will to change that makes any difference.We have already said this many a time. If you remain in a consciousness which functions mentally, even if it is the highest mind, you have the notion of an absolute determinism of cause and effect and feel that things are what they are because they are what they are and cannot be otherwise.It is only when you come out of the mental consciousness completely and enter a higher perception of things - which you may call spiritual or divine - that you suddenly find yourself in a state of perfect freedom where everything is possible.(Silence)Those who have contacted that state or lived in it, even if only for a moment, try to describe it as a feeling of an absolute Will in action, which immediately gives to the human mentality the feeling of being arbitrary. And because of that distortion there arises the idea - which I might call traditional - of a supreme and arbitrary God, which is something most unacceptable to every enlightened mind. I suppose that this experience badly expressed is at the origin of this notion. And in fact it is incorrect to express it as an absolute Will: it is very, very, very different. It is something else altogether. For, what man understands by "Will" is a decision that is taken and carried out. We are obliged to use the word "will", but in its truth the Will acting in the universe is neither a choice nor a decision that is taken. What seems to me the closest expression is "vision". Things are because they are seen. But of course "seen", not seen as we see with these eyes.(Mother touches her eyes...) All the same, it is the nearest thing.It is a vision - a vision unfolding itself.The universe becomes objective as it is progressively seen.And that is why Sri Aurobindo has said "intended or possible". It is neither one nor the other. All that can be said is a distortion.(Silence)Objectivisation - universal objectivisation - is something like a projection in space and time, like a living image of what is from all eternity. And as the image is gradually projected on the screen of time and space, it becomes objective:The Supreme contemplating His own Image. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958 ,
295:At it's narrowest (although this is a common and perhaps the official position; need to find ref in What is Enlightenment) "integral", "turquois" (Spiral Dynamics), and "second tier" (ditto) are all synonms, and in turn are equivalent to Wilber IV / AQAL/Wilber V "Post-metaphysical" AQAL. This is the position that "Integral = Ken Wilber". It constitutes a new philosophical school or meme-set, in the tradition of charismatic spiritual teachers of all ages, in which an articulate, brilliant, and popular figure would arise, and gather a following around him- or her-self. After the teacher passes on, their teaching remains through books and organisations dedicated to perpetuating that teaching; although without the brilliant light of the Founder, things generally become pretty stultifying, and there is often little or no original development. Even so, the books themselves continue to inspire, and many people benefit greatly from these tecahings, and can contact the original Light of the founders to be inspired by them on the subtle planes. Some late 19th, 20th, and early 21st century examples of such teachers, known and less well-known, are Blavatsky, Theon, Steiner, Aurobindo, Gurdjieff, Crowley, Alice Bailey, Carl Jung, Ann Ree Colton, and now Ken Wilber. Also, many popular gurus belong in this category. It could plausibly be suggested that the founders of the great world religions started out no different, but their teaching really caught on n a big way....At its broadest then, the Integral Community includes not only Wilber but those he cites as his influences and hold universal and evolutionary views or teachings, as well as those who, while influenced by him also differ somewhat, and even those like Arthur M Young that Wilber has apparently never heard of. Nevertheless, all share a common, evolutionary, "theory of everything" position, and, whilst they may differ on many details and even on many major points, taken together they could be considered a wave front for a new paradigm, a memetic revolution. I use the term Daimon of the Integral Movement to refer to the spiritual being or personality of light that is behind and working through this broader movement.Now, this doesn't mean that this daimon is necessarily a negative entity. I see a lot of promise, a lot of potential, in the Integral Approach. From what I feel at the moment, the Integral Deva is a force and power of good.But, as with any new spiritual or evolutionary development, there is duality, in that there are forces that hinder and oppose and distort, as well as forces that help and aid in the evolution and ultimate divinisation of the Earth and the cosmos. Thus even where a guru does give in the dark side (as very often happens with many gurus today) there still remains an element of Mixed Light that remains (one finds this ambiguity with Sai Baba, with Da Free John, and with Rajneesh); and we find this same ambiguity with the Integral Community regarding what seems to me a certain offputting devotional attitude towards Wilber himself. The light will find its way, regardless. However, an Intregral Movement that is caught up in worship of and obedience to an authority figure, will not be able to achieve what a movement unfettered by such shackles could. ~ M Alan Kazlev, Kheper Ken Wilber,
296:The supreme Truth aspect which thus manifests itself to us is an eternal and infinite and absolute self-existence, self-awareness, self-delight of being; this bounds all things and secretly supports and pervades all things. This Self-existence reveals itself again in three terms of its essential nature,-self, conscious being or spirit, and God or the Divine Being. The Indian terms are more satisfactory,-Brahman the Reality is Atman, Purusha, Ishwara; for these terms grew from a root of Intuition and, while they have a comprehensive preciseness, are capable of a plastic application which avoids both vagueness in the use and the rigid snare of a too limiting intellectual concept. The Supreme Brahman is that which in Western metaphysics is called the Absolute: but Brahman is at the same time the omnipresent Reality in which all that is relative exists as its forms or its movements; this is an Absolute which takes all relativities in its embrace. [...] Brahman is the Consciousness that knows itself in all that exists; Brahman is the force that sustains the power of God and Titan and Demon, the Force that acts in man and animal and the forms and energies of Nature; Brahman is the Ananda, the secret Bliss of existence which is the ether of our being and without which none could breathe or live. Brahman is the inner Soul in all; it has taken a form in correspondence with each created form which it inhabits. The Lord of Beings is that which is conscious in the conscious being, but he is also the Conscious in inconscient things, the One who is master and in control of the many that are passive in the hands of Force-Nature. He is the Timeless and Time; He is Space and all that is in Space; He is Causality and the cause and the effect: He is the thinker and his thought, the warrior and his courage, the gambler and his dice-throw. All realities and all aspects and all semblances are the Brahman; Brahman is the Absolute, the Transcendent and incommunicable, the Supracosmic Existence that sustains the cosmos, the Cosmic Self that upholds all beings, but It is too the self of each individual: the soul or psychic entity is an eternal portion of the Ishwara; it is his supreme Nature or Consciousness-Force that has become the living being in a world of living beings. The Brahman alone is, and because of It all are, for all are the Brahman; this Reality is the reality of everything that we see in Self and Nature. Brahman, the Ishwara, is all this by his Yoga-Maya, by the power of his Consciousness-Force put out in self-manifestation: he is the Conscious Being, Soul, Spirit, Purusha, and it is by his Nature, the force of his conscious self-existence that he is all things; he is the Ishwara, the omniscient and omnipotent All-ruler, and it is by his Shakti, his conscious Power, that he manifests himself in Time and governs the universe. These and similar statements taken together are all-comprehensive: it is possible for the mind to cut and select, to build a closed system and explain away all that does not fit within it; but it is on the complete and many-sided statement that we must take our stand if we have to acquire an integral knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Book 02: The Knowledge and the Ignorance - The Spiritual Evolution,
297:DHARANANOW that we have learnt to observe the mind, so that we know how it works to some extent, and have begun to understand the elements of control, we may try the result of gathering together all the powers of the mind, and attempting to focus them on a single point. We know that it is fairly easy for the ordinary educated mind to think without much distraction on a subject in which it is much interested. We have the popular phrase, "revolving a thing in the mind"; and as long as the subject is sufficiently complex, as long as thoughts pass freely, there is no great difficulty. So long as a gyroscope is in motion, it remains motionless relatively to its support, and even resists attempts to distract it; when it stops it falls from that position. If the earth ceased to spin round the sun, it would at once fall into the sun. The moment then that the student takes a simple subject - or rather a simple object - and imagines it or visualizes it, he will find that it is not so much his creature as he supposed. Other thoughts will invade the mind, so that the object is altogether forgotten, perhaps for whole minutes at a time; and at other times the object itself will begin to play all sorts of tricks. Suppose you have chosen a white cross. It will move its bar up and down, elongate the bar, turn the bar oblique, get its arms unequal, turn upside down, grow branches, get a crack around it or a figure upon it, change its shape altogether like an Amoeba, change its size and distance as a whole, change the degree of its illumination, and at the same time change its colour. It will get splotchy and blotchy, grow patterns, rise, fall, twist and turn; clouds will pass over its face. There is no conceivable change of which it is incapable. Not to mention its total disappearance, and replacement by something altogether different! Any one to whom this experience does not occur need not imagine that he is meditating. It shows merely that he is incapable of concentrating his mind in the very smallest degree. Perhaps a student may go for several days before discovering that he is not meditating. When he does, the obstinacy of the object will infuriate him; and it is only now that his real troubles will begin, only now that Will comes really into play, only now that his manhood is tested. If it were not for the Will-development which he got in the conquest of Asana, he would probably give up. As it is, the mere physical agony which he underwent is the veriest trifle compared with the horrible tedium of Dharana. For the first week it may seem rather amusing, and you may even imagine you are progressing; but as the practice teaches you what you are doing, you will apparently get worse and worse. Please understand that in doing this practice you are supposed to be seated in Asana, and to have note-book and pencil by your side, and a watch in front of you. You are not to practise at first for more than ten minutes at a time, so as to avoid risk of overtiring the brain. In fact you will probably find that the whole of your willpower is not equal to keeping to a subject at all for so long as three minutes, or even apparently concentrating on it for so long as three seconds, or three-fifths of one second. By "keeping to it at all" is meant the mere attempt to keep to it. The mind becomes so fatigued, and the object so incredibly loathsome, that it is useless to continue for the time being. In Frater P.'s record we find that after daily practice for six months, meditations of four minutes and less are still being recorded. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA ,
298:THE WAND THE Magical Will is in its essence twofold, for it presupposes a beginning and an end; to will to be a thing is to admit that you are not that thing. Hence to will anything but the supreme thing, is to wander still further from it - any will but that to give up the self to the Beloved is Black Magick - yet this surrender is so simple an act that to our complex minds it is the most difficult of all acts; and hence training is necessary. Further, the Self surrendered must not be less than the All-Self; one must not come before the altar of the Most High with an impure or an imperfect offering. As it is written in Liber LXV, "To await Thee is the end, not the beginning." This training may lead through all sorts of complications, varying according to the nature of the student, and hence it may be necessary for him at any moment to will all sorts of things which to others might seem unconnected with the goal. Thus it is not "a priori" obvious why a billiard player should need a file. Since, then, we may want "anything," let us see to it that our will is strong enough to obtain anything we want without loss of time. It is therefore necessary to develop the will to its highest point, even though the last task but one is the total surrender of this will. Partial surrender of an imperfect will is of no account in Magick. The will being a lever, a fulcrum is necessary; this fulcrum is the main aspiration of the student to attain. All wills which are not dependent upon this principal will are so many leakages; they are like fat to the athlete. The majority of the people in this world are ataxic; they cannot coordinate their mental muscles to make a purposed movement. They have no real will, only a set of wishes, many of which contradict others. The victim wobbles from one to the other (and it is no less wobbling because the movements may occasionally be very violent) and at the end of life the movements cancel each other out. Nothing has been achieved; except the one thing of which the victim is not conscious: the destruction of his own character, the confirming of indecision. Such an one is torn limb from limb by Choronzon. How then is the will to be trained? All these wishes, whims, caprices, inclinations, tendencies, appetites, must be detected, examined, judged by the standard of whether they help or hinder the main purpose, and treated accordingly. Vigilance and courage are obviously required. I was about to add self-denial, in deference to conventional speech; but how could I call that self-denial which is merely denial of those things which hamper the self? It is not suicide to kill the germs of malaria in one's blood. Now there are very great difficulties to be overcome in the training of the mind. Perhaps the greatest is forgetfulness, which is probably the worst form of what the Buddhists call ignorance. Special practices for training the memory may be of some use as a preliminary for persons whose memory is naturally poor. In any case the Magical Record prescribed for Probationers of the A.'.A.'. is useful and necessary. Above all the practices of Liber III must be done again and again, for these practices develop not only vigilance but those inhibiting centres in the brain which are, according to some psychologists, the mainspring of the mechanism by which civilized man has raised himself above the savage. So far it has been spoken, as it were, in the negative. Aaron's rod has become a serpent, and swallowed the serpents of the other Magicians; it is now necessary to turn it once more into a rod. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
299:The Teachings of Some Modern Indian YogisRamana MaharshiAccording to Brunton's description of the sadhana he (Brunton) practised under the Maharshi's instructions,1 it is the Overself one has to seek within, but he describes the Overself in a way that is at once the Psychic Being, the Atman and the Ishwara. So it is a little difficult to know what is the exact reading.*The methods described in the account [of Ramana Maharshi's technique of self-realisation] are the well-established methods of Jnanayoga - (1) one-pointed concentration followed by thought-suspension, (2) the method of distinguishing or finding out the true self by separating it from mind, life, body (this I have seen described by him [Brunton] more at length in another book) and coming to the pure I behind; this also can disappear into the Impersonal Self. The usual result is a merging in the Atman or Brahman - which is what one would suppose is meant by the Overself, for it is that which is the real Overself. This Brahman or Atman is everywhere, all is in it, it is in all, but it is in all not as an individual being in each but is the same in all - as the Ether is in all. When the merging into the Overself is complete, there is no ego, no distinguishable I, or any formed separative person or personality. All is ekakara - an indivisible and undistinguishable Oneness either free from all formations or carrying all formations in it without being affected - for one can realise it in either way. There is a realisation in which all beings are moving in the one Self and this Self is there stable in all beings; there is another more complete and thoroughgoing in which not only is it so but all are vividly realised as the Self, the Brahman, the Divine. In the former, it is possible to dismiss all beings as creations of Maya, leaving the one Self alone as true - in the other it is easier to regard them as real manifestations of the Self, not as illusions. But one can also regard all beings as souls, independent realities in an eternal Nature dependent upon the One Divine. These are the characteristic realisations of the Overself familiar to the Vedanta. But on the other hand you say that this Overself is realised by the Maharshi as lodged in the heart-centre, and it is described by Brunton as something concealed which when it manifests appears as the real Thinker, source of all action, but now guiding thought and action in the Truth. Now the first description applies to the Purusha in the heart, described by the Gita as the Ishwara situated in the heart and by the Upanishads as the Purusha Antaratma; the second could apply also to the mental Purusha, manomayah. pran.asarı̄ra neta of the Upanishads, the mental Being or Purusha who leads the life and the body. So your question is one which on the data I cannot easily answer. His Overself may be a combination of all these experiences, without any distinction being made or thought necessary between the various aspects. There are a thousand ways of approaching and realising the Divine and each way has its own experiences which have their own truth and stand really on a basis, one in essence but complex in aspects, common to all, but not expressed in the same way by all. There is not much use in discussing these variations; the important thing is to follow one's own way well and thoroughly. In this Yoga, one can realise the psychic being as a portion of the Divine seated in the heart with the Divine supporting it there - this psychic being takes charge of the sadhana and turns the ......1 The correspondent sent to Sri Aurobindo two paragraphs from Paul Brunton's book A Message from Arunachala (London: Rider & Co., n.d. [1936], pp. 205 - 7). - Ed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
300:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey2. The Old Testament3. Aeschylus - Tragedies4. Sophocles - Tragedies5. Herodotus - Histories6. Euripides - Tragedies7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings9. Aristophanes - Comedies10. Plato - Dialogues11. Aristotle - Works12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus13. Euclid - Elements14.Archimedes - Works15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections16. Cicero - Works17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things18. Virgil - Works19. Horace - Works20. Livy - History of Rome21. Ovid - Works22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion26. Ptolemy - Almagest27. Lucian - Works28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties30. The New Testament31. Plotinus - The Enneads32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine33. The Song of Roland34. The Nibelungenlied35. The Saga of Burnt Njal36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres43. Thomas More - Utopia44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy58. John Milton - Works59. Molière - Comedies60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal69. William Congreve - The Way of the World70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets ~ Mortimer J Adler,
301:64 Arts 1. Geet vidya: art of singing. 2. Vadya vidya: art of playing on musical instruments. 3. Nritya vidya: art of dancing. 4. Natya vidya: art of theatricals. 5. Alekhya vidya: art of painting. 6. Viseshakacchedya vidya: art of painting the face and body with color 7. Tandula­kusuma­bali­vikara: art of preparing offerings from rice and flowers. 8. Pushpastarana: art of making a covering of flowers for a bed. 9. Dasana­vasananga­raga: art of applying preparations for cleansing the teeth, cloths and painting the body. 10. Mani­bhumika­karma: art of making the groundwork of jewels. 11. Aayya­racana: art of covering the bed. 12. Udaka­vadya: art of playing on music in water. 13. Udaka­ghata: art of splashing with water. 14. Citra­yoga: art of practically applying an admixture of colors. 15. Malya­grathana­vikalpa: art of designing a preparation of wreaths. 16. Sekharapida­yojana: art of practically setting the coronet on the head. 17. Nepathya­yoga: art of practically dressing in the tiring room. 18. Karnapatra­bhanga: art of decorating the tragus of the ear. 19. Sugandha­yukti: art of practical application of aromatics. 20. Bhushana­yojana: art of applying or setting ornaments. 21. Aindra­jala: art of juggling. 22. Kaucumara: a kind of art. 23. Hasta­laghava: art of sleight of hand. 24. Citra­sakapupa­bhakshya­vikara­kriya: art of preparing varieties of delicious food. 25. Panaka­rasa­ragasava­yojana: art of practically preparing palatable drinks and tinging draughts with red color. 26. Suci­vaya­karma: art of needleworks and weaving. 27. Sutra­krida: art of playing with thread. 28. Vina­damuraka­vadya: art of playing on lute and small drum. 29. Prahelika: art of making and solving riddles. 30. Durvacaka­yoga: art of practicing language difficult to be answered by others. 31. Pustaka­vacana: art of reciting books. 32. Natikakhyayika­darsana: art of enacting short plays and anecdotes. 33. Kavya­samasya­purana: art of solving enigmatic verses. 34. Pattika­vetra­bana­vikalpa: art of designing preparation of shield, cane and arrows. 35. Tarku­karma: art of spinning by spindle. 36. Takshana: art of carpentry. 37. Vastu­vidya: art of engineering. 38. Raupya­ratna­pariksha: art of testing silver and jewels. 39. Dhatu­vada: art of metallurgy. 40. Mani­raga jnana: art of tinging jewels. 41. Akara jnana: art of mineralogy. 42. Vrikshayur­veda­yoga: art of practicing medicine or medical treatment, by herbs. 43. Mesha­kukkuta­lavaka­yuddha­vidhi: art of knowing the mode of fighting of lambs, cocks and birds. 44. Suka­sarika­pralapana: art of maintaining or knowing conversation between male and female cockatoos. 45. Utsadana: art of healing or cleaning a person with perfumes. 46. Kesa­marjana­kausala: art of combing hair. 47. Akshara­mushtika­kathana: art of talking with fingers. 48. Dharana­matrika: art of the use of amulets. 49. Desa­bhasha­jnana: art of knowing provincial dialects. 50. Nirmiti­jnana: art of knowing prediction by heavenly voice. 51. Yantra­matrika: art of mechanics. 52. Mlecchita­kutarka­vikalpa: art of fabricating barbarous or foreign sophistry. 53. Samvacya: art of conversation. 54. Manasi kavya­kriya: art of composing verse 55. Kriya­vikalpa: art of designing a literary work or a medical remedy. 56. Chalitaka­yoga: art of practicing as a builder of shrines called after him. 57. Abhidhana­kosha­cchando­jnana: art of the use of lexicography and meters. 58. Vastra­gopana: art of concealment of cloths. 59. Dyuta­visesha: art of knowing specific gambling. 60. Akarsha­krida: art of playing with dice or magnet. 61. Balaka­kridanaka: art of using children's toys. 62. Vainayiki vidya: art of enforcing discipline. 63. Vaijayiki vidya: art of gaining victory. 64. Vaitaliki vidya: art of awakening master with music at dawn. ~ Nik Douglas and Penny Slinger, Sexual Secrets ,
302:What is the exact way of feeling that we belong to the Divine and that the Divine is acting in us? You must not feel with your head (because you may think so, but that's something vague); you must feel with your sense-feeling. Naturally one begins by wanting it with the mind, because that is the first thing that understands. And then one has an aspiration here (pointing to the heart), with a flame which pushes you to realise it. But if you want it to be truly the thing, well, you must feel it. You are doing something, suppose, for example, you are doing exercises, weight-lifting. Now suddenly without your knowing how it happened, suddenly you have the feeling that there is a force infinitely greater than you, greater, more powerful, a force that does the lifting for you. Your body becomes something almost non-existent and there is this Something that lifts. And then you will see; when that happens to you, you will no longer ask how it should be done, you will know. That does happen. It depends upon people, depends upon what dominates in their being. Those who think have suddenly the feeling that it is no longer they who think, that there is something which knows much better, sees much more clearly, which is infinitely more luminous, more conscious in them, which organises the thoughts and words; and then they write. But if the experience is complete, it is even no longer they who write, it is that same Thing that takes hold of their hand and makes it write. Well, one knows at that moment that the little physical person is just a tiny insignificant tool trying to remain as quiet as possible in order not to disturb the experience. Yes, at no cost must the experience be disturbed. If suddenly you say: "Oh, look, how strange it is!"... How can we reach that state? Aspire for it, want it. Try to be less and less selfish, but not in the sense of becoming nice to other people or forgetting yourself, not that: have less and less the feeling that you are a person, a separate entity, something existing in itself, isolated from the rest. And then, above all, above all, it is that inner flame, that aspiration, that need for the light. It is a kind of - how to put it? - luminous enthusiasm that seizes you. It is an irresistible need to melt away, to give oneself, to exist only in the Divine. At that moment you have the experience of your aspiration. But that moment should be absolutely sincere and as integral as possible; and all this must occur not only in the head, not only here, but must take place everywhere, in all the cells of the body. The consciousness integrally must have this irresistible need.... The thing lasts for some time, then diminishes, gets extinguished. You cannot keep these things for very long. But then it so happens that a moment later or the next day or some time later, suddenly you have the opposite experience. Instead of feeling this ascent, and all that, this is no longer there and you have the feeling of the Descent, the Answer. And nothing but the Answer exists. Nothing but the divine thought, the divine will, the divine energy, the divine action exists any longer. And you too, you are no longer there. That is to say, it is the answer to our aspiration. It may happen immediately afterwards - that is very rare but may happen. If you have both simultaneously, then the state is perfect; usually they alternate; they alternate more and more closely until the moment there is a total fusion. Then there is no more distinction. I heard a Sufi mystic, who was besides a great musician, an Indian, saying that for the Sufis there was a state higher than that of adoration and surrender to the Divine, than that of devotion, that this was not the last stage; the last stage of the progress is when there is no longer any distinction; you have no longer this kind of adoration or surrender or consecration; it is a very simple state in which one makes no distinction between the Divine and oneself. They know this. It is even written in their books. It is a commonly known condition in which everything becomes quite simple. There is no longer any difference. There is no longer that kind of ecstatic surrender to "Something" which is beyond you in every way, which you do not understand, which is merely the result of your aspiration, your devotion. There is no difference any longer. When the union is perfect, there is no longer any difference. Is this the end of self-progress? There is never any end to progress - never any end, you can never put a full stop there. ~ The Mother,
303:In the lower planes can't one say what will happen at a particular moment? That depends. On certain planes there are consciousnesses that form, that make formations and try to send them down to earth and manifest them. These are planes where the great forces are at play, forces struggling with each other to organise things in one way or another. On these planes all the possibilities are there, all the possibilities that present themselves but have not yet come to a decision as to which will come down.... Suppose a plane full of the imaginations of people who want certain things to be realised upon earth - they invent a novel, narrate stories, produce all kinds of phenomena; it amuses them very much. It is a plane of form-makers and they are there imagining all kinds of circumstances and events; they play with the forces; they are like the authors of a drama and they prepare everything there and see what is going to happen. All these formations are facing each other; and it is those which are the strongest, the most successful or the most persistent or those that have the advantage of a favourable set of circumstances which dominate. They meet and out of the conflict yet another thing results: you lose one thing and take up another, you make a new combination; and then all of a sudden, you find, pluff! it is coming down. Now, if it comes down with a sufficient force, it sets moving the earth atmosphere and things combine; as for instance, when with your fist you thump the saw-dust, you know surely what happens, don't you? You lift your hand, give a formidable blow: all the dust gets organised around your fist. Well, it is like that. These formations come down into matter with that force, and everything organises itself automatically, mechanically as around the striking fist. And there's your wished object about to be realised, sometimes with small deformations because of the resistance, but it will be realised finally, even as the person narrating the story up above wanted it more or less to be realised. If then you are for some reason or other in the secret of the person who has constructed the story and if you follow the way in which he creates his path to reach down to the earth and if you see how a blow with the fist acts on earthly matter, then you are able to tell what is going to happen, because you have seen it in the world above, and as it takes some time to make the whole journey, you see in advance. And the higher you rise, the more you foresee in advance what is going to happen. And if you pass far beyond, go still farther, then everything is possible. It is an unfolding that follows a wide road which is for you unknowable; for all will be unfolded in the universe, but in what order and in what way? There are decisions that are taken up there which escape our ordinary consciousness, and so it is very difficult to foresee. But there also, if you enter consciously and if you can be present up there... How shall I explain that to you? All is there, absolute, static, eternal: but all that will be unfolded in the material world, naturally more or less one thing after another; for in the static existence all can be there, but in the becoming all becomes in time, that is, one thing after another. Well, what path will the unfolding follow? Up there is the domain of absolute freedom.... Who says that a sufficiently sincere aspiration, a sufficiently intense prayer is not capable of changing the path of the unfolding? This means that all is possible. Now, one must have a sufficient aspiration and a prayer that's sufficiently intense. But that has been given to human nature. It is one of the marvellous gifts of grace given to human nature; only, one does not know how to make use of it. This comes to saying that in spite of the most absolute determinisms in the horizontal line, if one knows how to cross all these horizontal lines and reach the highest Point of consciousness, one is able to make things change, things apparently absolutely determined. So you may call it by any name you like, but it is a kind of combination of an absolute determinism with an absolute freedom. You may pull yourself out of it in any way you like, but it is like that. I forgot to say in that book (perhaps I did not forget but just felt that it was useless to say it) that all these theories are only theories, that is, mental conceptions which are merely more or less imaged representations of the reality; but it is not the reality at all. When you say "determinism" and when you say "freedom", you say only words and all that is only a very incomplete, very approximate and very weak description of what is in reality within you, around you and everywhere; and to be able to begin to understand what the universe is, you must come out of your mental formulas, otherwise you will never understand anything. To tell the truth, if you live only a moment, just a tiny moment, of this absolutely sincere aspiration or this sufficiently intense prayer, you will know more things than by meditating for hours. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 ,
304:Death & FameWhen I dieI don't care what happens to my body throw ashes in the air, scatter 'em in East River bury an urn in Elizabeth New Jersey, B'nai Israel CemeteryBut I want a big funeral St. Patrick's Cathedral, St. Mark's Church, the largest synagogue in ManhattanFirst, there's family, brother, nephews, spry aged Edith stepmother 96, Aunt Honey from old Newark,Doctor Joel, cousin Mindy, brother Gene one eyed one ear'd, sister-in-law blonde Connie, five nephews, stepbrothers & sisters their grandchildren, companion Peter Orlovsky, caretakers Rosenthal & Hale, Bill Morgan--Next, teacher Trungpa Vajracharya's ghost mind, Gelek Rinpoche, there Sakyong Mipham, Dalai Lama alert, chance visiting America, Satchitananda Swami Shivananda, Dehorahava Baba, Karmapa XVI, Dudjom Rinpoche, Katagiri & Suzuki Roshi's phantoms Baker, Whalen, Daido Loorie, Qwong, Frail White-haired Kapleau Roshis, Lama Tarchen --Then, most important, lovers over half-century Dozens, a hundred, more, older fellows bald & rich young boys met naked recently in bed, crowds surprised to see each other, innumerable, intimate, exchanging memories"He taught me to meditate, now I'm an old veteran of the thousandday retreat --""I played music on subway platforms, I'm straight but loved him he loved me""I felt more love from him at 19 than ever from anyone""We'd lie under covers gossip, read my poetry, hug & kiss belly to belly arms round each other""I'd always get into his bed with underwear on & by morning my skivvies would be on the floor""Japanese, always wanted take it up my bum with a master""We'd talk all night about Kerouac & Cassady sit Buddhalike then sleep in his captain's bed.""He seemed to need so much affection, a shame not to make him happy""I was lonely never in bed nude with anyone before, he was so gentle my stomach shuddered when he traced his finger along my abdomen nipple to hips-- ""All I did was lay back eyes closed, he'd bring me to come with mouth & fingers along my waist""He gave great head"So there be gossip from loves of 1948, ghost of Neal Cassady commin-gling with flesh and youthful blood of 1997 and surprise -- "You too? But I thought you were straight!""I am but Ginsberg an exception, for some reason he pleased me.""I forgot whether I was straight gay queer or funny, was myself, tender and affectionate to be kissed on the top of my head, my forehead throat heart & solar plexus, mid-belly. on my prick, tickled with his tongue my behind""I loved the way he'd recite 'But at my back allways hear/ time's winged chariot hurrying near,' heads together, eye to eye, on a pillow --"Among lovers one handsome youth straggling the rear"I studied his poetry class, 17 year-old kid, ran some errands to his walk-up flat, seduced me didn't want to, made me come, went home, never saw him again never wanted to... ""He couldn't get it up but loved me," "A clean old man." "He made sure I came first"This the crowd most surprised proud at ceremonial place of honor--Then poets & musicians -- college boys' grunge bands -- age-old rock star Beatles, faithful guitar accompanists, gay classical con-ductors, unknown high Jazz music composers, funky trum-peters, bowed bass & french horn black geniuses, folksinger fiddlers with dobro tamborine harmonica mandolin auto-harp pennywhistles & kazoosNext, artist Italian romantic realists schooled in mystic 60's India, Late fauve Tuscan painter-poets, Classic draftsman Massa-chusets surreal jackanapes with continental wives, poverty sketchbook gesso oil watercolor masters from American provincesThen highschool teachers, lonely Irish librarians, delicate biblio-philes, sex liberation troops nay armies, ladies of either sex"I met him dozens of times he never remembered my name I loved him anyway, true artist""Nervous breakdown after menopause, his poetry humor saved me from suicide hospitals""Charmant, genius with modest manners, washed sink, dishes my studio guest a week in Budapest"Thousands of readers, "Howl changed my life in Libertyville Illinois""I saw him read Montclair State Teachers College decided be a poet-- ""He turned me on, I started with garage rock sang my songs in Kansas City""Kaddish made me weep for myself & father alive in Nevada City""Father Death comforted me when my sister died Boston l982""I read what he said in a newsmagazine, blew my mind, realized others like me out there"Deaf & Dumb bards with hand signing quick brilliant gesturesThen Journalists, editors's secretaries, agents, portraitists & photo-graphy aficionados, rock critics, cultured laborors, cultural historians come to witness the historic funeral Super-fans, poetasters, aging Beatnicks & Deadheads, autograph-hunters, distinguished paparazzi, intelligent gawkersEveryone knew they were part of 'History" except the deceased who never knew exactly what was happening even when I was aliveFebruary 22, 1997 ~ Allen Ginsberg,
305:Mother, how to change one's consciousness? Naturally, there are many ways, but each person must do it by the means accessible to him; and the indication of the way usually comes spontaneously, through something like an unexpected experience. And for each one, it appears a little differently. For instance, one may have the perception of the ordinary consciousness which is extended on the surface, horizontally, and works on a plane which is simultaneously the surface of things and has a contact with the superficial outer side of things, people, circumstances; and then, suddenly, for some reason or other - as I say for each one it is different - there is a shifting upwards, and instead of seeing things horizontally, of being at the same level as they are, you suddenly dominate them and see them from above, in their totality, instead of seeing a small number of things immediately next to yourself; it is as though something were drawing you above and making you see as from a mountain-top or an aeroplane. And instead of seeing each detail and seeing it on its own level, you see the whole as one unity, and from far above. There are many ways of having this experience, but it usually comes to you as if by chance, one fine day. Or else, one may have an experience which is almost its very opposite but which comes to the same thing. Suddenly one plunges into a depth, one moves away from the thing one perceived, it seems distant, superficial, unimportant; one enters an inner silence or an inner calm or an inward vision of things, a profound feeling, a more intimate perception of circumstances and things, in which all values change. And one becomes aware of a sort of unity, a deep identity which is one in spite of the diverse appearances. Or else, suddenly also, the sense of limitation disappears and one enters the perception of a kind of indefinite duration beginningless and endless, of something which has always been and always will be. These experiences come to you suddenly in a flash, for a second, a moment in your life, you don't know why or how.... There are other ways, other experiences - they are innumerable, they vary according to people; but with this, with one minute, one second of such an existence, one catches the tail of the thing. So one must remember that, try to relive it, go to the depths of the experience, recall it, aspire, concentrate. This is the startingpoint, the end of the guiding thread, the clue. For all those who are destined to find their inner being, the truth of their being, there is always at least one moment in life when they were no longer the same, perhaps just like a lightning-flash - but that is enough. It indicates the road one should take, it is the door that opens on this path. And so you must pass through the door, and with perseverance and an unfailing steadfastness seek to renew the state which will lead you to something more real and more total. Many ways have always been given, but a way you have been taught, a way you have read about in books or heard from a teacher, does not have the effective value of a spontaneous experience which has come without any apparent reason, and which is simply the blossoming of the soul's awakening, one second of contact with your psychic being which shows you the best way for you, the one most within your reach, which you will then have to follow with perseverance to reach the goal - one second which shows you how to start, the beginning.... Some have this in dreams at night; some have it at any odd time: something one sees which awakens in one this new consciousness, something one hears, a beautiful landscape, beautiful music, or else simply a few words one reads, or else the intensity of concentration in some effort - anything at all, there are a thousand reasons and thousands of ways of having it. But, I repeat, all those who are destined to realise have had this at least once in their life. It may be very fleeting, it may have come when they were very young, but always at least once in one's life one has the experience of what true consciousness is. Well, that is the best indication of the path to be followed. One may seek within oneself, one may remember, may observe; one must notice what is going on, one must pay attention, that's all. Sometimes, when one sees a generous act, hears of something exceptional, when one witnesses heroism or generosity or greatness of soul, meets someone who shows a special talent or acts in an exceptional and beautiful way, there is a kind of enthusiasm or admiration or gratitude which suddenly awakens in the being and opens the door to a state, a new state of consciousness, a light, a warmth, a joy one did not know before. That too is a way of catching the guiding thread. There are a thousand ways, one has only to be awake and to watch. First of all, you must feel the necessity for this change of consciousness, accept the idea that it is this, the path which must lead to the goal; and once you admit the principle, you must be watchful. And you will find, you do find it. And once you have found it, you must start walking without any hesitation. Indeed, the starting-point is to observe oneself, not to live in a perpetual nonchalance, a perpetual apathy; one must be attentive. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956 ,
306:For instance, a popular game with California occultists-I do not know its inventor-involves a Magic Room, much like the Pleasure Dome discussed earlier except that this Magic Room contains an Omniscient Computer. To play this game, you simply "astrally project" into the Magic Room. Do not ask what "astral projection" means, and do not assume it is metaphysical (and therefore either impossible, if you are a materialist, or very difficult, if you are a mystic). Just assume this is a gedankenexperiment, a "mind game." Project yourself, in imagination, into this Magic Room and visualize vividly the Omniscient Computer, using the details you need to make such a super-information-processor real to your fantasy. You do not need any knowledge of programming to handle this astral computer. It exists early in the next century; you are getting to use it by a species of time-travel, if that metaphor is amusing and helpful to you. It is so built that it responds immediately to human brain-waves, "reading" them and decoding their meaning. (Crude prototypes of such computers already exist.) So, when you are in this magic room, you can ask this Computer anything, just by thinking of what you want to know. It will read your thought, and project into your brain, by a laser ray, the correct answer. There is one slight problem. The computer is very sensitive to all brain-waves. If you have any doubts, it registers them as negative commands, meaning "Do not answer my question." So, the way to use it is to start simply, with "easy" questions. Ask it to dig out of the archives the name of your second-grade teacher. (Almost everybody remembers the name of their first grade teacher-imprint vulnerability again-but that of the second grade teacher tends to get lost.) When the computer has dug out the name of your second grade teacher, try it on a harder question, but not one that is too hard. It is very easy to sabotage this machine, but you don't want to sabotage it during these experiments. You want to see how well it can be made to perform. It is wise to ask only one question at a time, since it requires concentration to keep this magic computer real on the field of your perception. Do not exhaust your capacities for imagination and visualization on your first trial runs. After a few trivial experiments of the second-grade-teacher variety, you can try more interesting programs. Take a person toward whom you have negative feelings, such as anger, disappointment, feeling-of-betrayal, jealousy or whatever interferes with the smooth, tranquil operation of your own bio-computer. Ask the Magic Computer to explain that other person to you; to translate you into their reality-tunnel long enough for you to understand how events seem to them. Especially, ask how you seem to them. This computer will do that job for you; but be prepared for some shocks which might be disagreeable at first. This super-brain can also perform exegesis on ideas that seem obscure, paradoxical or enigmatic to us. For instance, early experiments with this computer can very profitably turn on asking it to explain some of the propositions in this book which may seem inexplicable or perversely wrong-headed to you, such as "We are all greater artists than we realize" or "What the Thinker thinks, the Prover proves" or "mind and its contents are functionally identical." This computer is much more powerful and scientifically advanced than the rapture-machine in the neurosomatic circuit. It has total access to all the earlier, primitive circuits, and overrules any of them. That is, if you put a meta-programming instruction into this computer; it will relay it downward to the old circuits and cancel contradictory programs left over from the past. For instance, try feeding it on such meta-programming instructions as: 1. I am at cause over my body. 2. I am at cause over my imagination. 3.1 am at cause over my future. 4. My mind abounds with beauty and power. 5.1 like people, and people like me. Remember that this computer is only a few decades ahead of present technology, so it cannot "understand" your commands if you harbor any doubts about them. Doubts tell it not to perform. Work always from what you can believe in, extending the area of belief only as results encourage you to try for more dramatic transformations of your past reality-tunnels. This represents cybernetic consciousness; the programmer becoming self-programmer, self-metaprogrammer, meta-metaprogrammer, etc. Just as the emotional compulsions of the second circuit seem primitive, mechanical and, ultimately, silly to the neurosomatic consciousness, so, too, the reality maps of the third circuit become comic, relativistic, game-like to the metaprogrammer. "Whatever you say it is, it isn't, " Korzybski, the semanticist, repeated endlessly in his seminars, trying to make clear that third-circuit semantic maps are not the territories they represent; that we can always make maps of our maps, revisions of our revisions, meta-selves of our selves. "Neti, neti" (not that, not that), Hindu teachers traditionally say when asked what "God" is or what "Reality" is. Yogis, mathematicians and musicians seem more inclined to develop meta-programming consciousness than most of humanity. Korzybski even claimed that the use of mathematical scripts is an aid to developing this circuit, for as soon as you think of your mind as mind 1, and the mind which contemplates that mind as mind2 and the mind which contemplates mind2 contemplating mind 1 as mind3, you are well on your way to meta-programming awareness. Alice in Wonderland is a masterful guide to the metaprogramming circuit (written by one of the founders of mathematical logic) and Aleister Crowley soberly urged its study upon all students of yoga. ~ Robert Anton Wilson, Prometheus Rising ,
307:SECTION 1. Books for Serious Study Liber CCXX. (Liber AL vel Legis.) The Book of the Law. This book is the foundation of the New Æon, and thus of the whole of our work. The Equinox. The standard Work of Reference in all occult matters. The Encyclopaedia of Initiation. Liber ABA (Book 4). A general account in elementary terms of magical and mystical powers. In four parts: (1) Mysticism (2) Magical (Elementary Theory) (3) Magick in Theory and Practice (this book) (4) The Law. Liber II. The Message of the Master Therion. Explains the essence of the new Law in a very simple manner. Liber DCCCXXXVIII. The Law of Liberty. A further explanation of The Book of the Law in reference to certain ethical problems. Collected Works of A. Crowley. These works contain many mystical and magical secrets, both stated clearly in prose, and woven into the Robe of sublimest poesy. The Yi King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XVI], Oxford University Press.) The "Classic of Changes"; give the initiated Chinese system of Magick. The Tao Teh King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XXXIX].) Gives the initiated Chinese system of Mysticism. Tannhäuser, by A. Crowley. An allegorical drama concerning the Progress of the Soul; the Tannhäuser story slightly remodelled. The Upanishads. (S. B. E. Series [vols. I & XV.) The Classical Basis of Vedantism, the best-known form of Hindu Mysticism. The Bhagavad-gita. A dialogue in which Krishna, the Hindu "Christ", expounds a system of Attainment. The Voice of the Silence, by H.P. Blavatsky, with an elaborate commentary by Frater O.M. Frater O.M., 7°=48, is the most learned of all the Brethren of the Order; he has given eighteen years to the study of this masterpiece. Raja-Yoga, by Swami Vivekananda. An excellent elementary study of Hindu mysticism. His Bhakti-Yoga is also good. The Shiva Samhita. An account of various physical means of assisting the discipline of initiation. A famous Hindu treatise on certain physical practices. The Hathayoga Pradipika. Similar to the Shiva Samhita. The Aphorisms of Patanjali. A valuable collection of precepts pertaining to mystical attainment. The Sword of Song. A study of Christian theology and ethics, with a statement and solution of the deepest philosophical problems. Also contains the best account extant of Buddhism, compared with modern science. The Book of the Dead. A collection of Egyptian magical rituals. Dogme et Rituel de la Haute Magie, by Eliphas Levi. The best general textbook of magical theory and practice for beginners. Written in an easy popular style. The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. The best exoteric account of the Great Work, with careful instructions in procedure. This Book influenced and helped the Master Therion more than any other. The Goetia. The most intelligible of all the mediæval rituals of Evocation. Contains also the favourite Invocation of the Master Therion. Erdmann's History of Philosophy. A compendious account of philosophy from the earliest times. Most valuable as a general education of the mind. The Spiritual Guide of [Miguel de] Molinos. A simple manual of Christian Mysticism. The Star in the West. (Captain Fuller). An introduction to the study of the Works of Aleister Crowley. The Dhammapada. (S. B. E. Series [vol. X], Oxford University Press). The best of the Buddhist classics. The Questions of King Milinda. (S. B. E. Series [vols. XXXV & XXXVI].) Technical points of Buddhist dogma, illustrated bydialogues. Liber 777 vel Prolegomena Symbolica Ad Systemam Sceptico-Mysticæ Viæ Explicandæ, Fundamentum Hieroglyphicam Sanctissimorum Scientiæ Summæ. A complete Dictionary of the Correspondences of all magical elements, reprinted with extensive additions, making it the only standard comprehensive book of reference ever published. It is to the language of Occultism what Webster or Murray is to the English language. Varieties of Religious Experience (William James). Valuable as showing the uniformity of mystical attainment. Kabbala Denudata, von Rosenroth: also The Kabbalah Unveiled, by S.L. Mathers. The text of the Qabalah, with commentary. A good elementary introduction to the subject. Konx Om Pax [by Aleister Crowley]. Four invaluable treatises and a preface on Mysticism and Magick. The Pistis Sophia [translated by G.R.S. Mead or Violet McDermot]. An admirable introduction to the study of Gnosticism. The Oracles of Zoroaster [Chaldæan Oracles]. An invaluable collection of precepts mystical and magical. The Dream of Scipio, by Cicero. Excellent for its Vision and its Philosophy. The Golden Verses of Pythagoras, by Fabre d'Olivet. An interesting study of the exoteric doctrines of this Master. The Divine Pymander, by Hermes Trismegistus. Invaluable as bearing on the Gnostic Philosophy. The Secret Symbols of the Rosicrucians, reprint of Franz Hartmann. An invaluable compendium. Scrutinium Chymicum [Atalanta Fugiens]¸ by Michael Maier. One of the best treatises on alchemy. Science and the Infinite, by Sidney Klein. One of the best essays written in recent years. Two Essays on the Worship of Priapus [A Discourse on the Worship of Priapus &c. &c. &c.], by Richard Payne Knight [and Thomas Wright]. Invaluable to all students. The Golden Bough, by J.G. Frazer. The textbook of Folk Lore. Invaluable to all students. The Age of Reason, by Thomas Paine. Excellent, though elementary, as a corrective to superstition. Rivers of Life, by General Forlong. An invaluable textbook of old systems of initiation. Three Dialogues, by Bishop Berkeley. The Classic of Subjective Idealism. Essays of David Hume. The Classic of Academic Scepticism. First Principles by Herbert Spencer. The Classic of Agnosticism. Prolegomena [to any future Metaphysics], by Immanuel Kant. The best introduction to Metaphysics. The Canon [by William Stirling]. The best textbook of Applied Qabalah. The Fourth Dimension, by [Charles] H. Hinton. The best essay on the subject. The Essays of Thomas Henry Huxley. Masterpieces of philosophy, as of prose. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Appendix I: Literature Recommended to Aspirants,
308:Mother, when one imagines something, does it not exist?When you imagine something, it means that you make a mental formation which may be close to the truth or far from the truth - it also depends upon the quality of your formation. You make a mental formation and there are people who have such a power of formation that they succeed in making what they imagine real. There are not many of these but there are some. They imagine something and their formation is so well made and so powerful that it succeeds in being realised. These are creators; there are not many of them but there are some. If one thinks of someone who doesn't exist or who is dead?Ah! What do you mean? What have you just said? Someone who doesn't exist or someone who is dead? These are two absolutely different things. I mean someone who is dead.Someone who is dead! If this person has remained in the mental domain, you can find him immediately. Naturally if he is no longer in the mental domain, if he is in the psychic domain, to think of him is not enough. You must know how to go into the psychic domain to find him. But if he has remained in the mental domain and you think of him, you can find him immediately, and not only that, but you can have a mental contact with him and a kind of mental vision of his existence. The mind has a capacity of vision of its own and it is not the same vision as with these eyes, but it is a vision, it is a perception in forms. But this is not imagination. It has nothing to do with imagination. Imagination, for instance, is when you begin to picture to yourself an ideal being to whom you apply all your conceptions, and when you tell yourself, "Why, it should be like this, like that, its form should be like this, its thought like that, its character like that," when you see all the details and build up the being. Now, writers do this all the time because when they write a novel, they imagine. There are those who take things from life but there are those who are imaginative, creators; they create a character, a personage and then put him in their book later. This is to imagine. To imagine, for example, a whole concurrence of circumstances, a set of events, this is what I call telling a story to oneself. But it can be put down on paper, and then one becomes a novelist. There are very different kinds of writers. Some imagine everything, some gather all sorts of observations from life and construct their book with them. There are a hundred ways of writing a book. But indeed some writers imagine everything from beginning to end. It all comes out of their head and they construct even their whole story without any support in things physically observed. This truly is imagination. But as I say, if they are very powerful and have a considerable capacity for creation, it is possible that one day or other there will be a physical human being who realises their creation. This too is true. What do you suppose imagination is, eh? Have you never imagined anything, you? And what happens? All that one imagines.You mean that you imagine something and it happens like that, eh? Or it is in a dream... What is the function, the use of the imagination?If one knows how to use it, as I said, one can create for oneself his own inner and outer life; one can build his own existence with his imagination, if one knows how to use it and has a power. In fact it is an elementary way of creating, of forming things in the world. I have always felt that if one didn't have the capacity of imagination he would not make any progress. Your imagination always goes ahead of your life. When you think of yourself, usually you imagine what you want to be, don't you, and this goes ahead, then you follow, then it continues to go ahead and you follow. Imagination opens for you the path of realisation. People who are not imaginative - it is very difficult to make them move; they see just what is there before their nose, they feel just what they are moment by moment and they cannot go forward because they are clamped by the immediate thing. It depends a good deal on what one calls imagination. However... Men of science must be having imagination!A lot. Otherwise they would never discover anything. In fact, what is called imagination is a capacity to project oneself outside realised things and towards things realisable, and then to draw them by the projection. One can obviously have progressive and regressive imaginations. There are people who always imagine all the catastrophes possible, and unfortunately they also have the power of making them come. It's like the antennae going into a world that's not yet realised, catching something there and drawing it here. Then naturally it is an addition to the earth atmosphere and these things tend towards manifestation. It is an instrument which can be disciplined, can be used at will; one can discipline it, direct it, orientate it. It is one of the faculties one can develop in himself and render serviceable, that is, use it for definite purposes. Sweet Mother, can one imagine the Divine and have the contact?Certainly if you succeed in imagining the Divine you have the contact, and you can have the contact with what you imagine, in any case. In fact it is absolutely impossible to imagine something which doesn't exist somewhere. You cannot imagine anything at all which doesn't exist somewhere. It is possible that it doesn't exist on the earth, it is possible that it's elsewhere, but it is impossible for you to imagine something which is not already contained in principle in the universe; otherwise it could not occur. Then, Sweet Mother, this means that in the created universe nothing new is added?In the created universe? Yes. The universe is progressive; we said that constantly things manifest, more and more. But for your imagination to be able to go and seek beyond the manifestation something which will be manifested, well, it may happen, in fact it does - I was going to tell you that it is in this way that some beings can cause considerable progress to be made in the world, because they have the capacity of imagining something that's not yet manifested. But there are not many. One must first be capable of going beyond the manifested universe to be able to imagine something which is not there. There are already many things which can be imagined. What is our terrestrial world in the universe? A very small thing. Simply to have the capacity of imagining something which does not exist in the terrestrial manifestation is already very difficult, very difficult. For how many billions of years hasn't it existed, this little earth? And there have been no two identical things. That's much. It is very difficult to go out from the earth atmosphere with one's mind; one can, but it is very difficult. And then if one wants to go out, not only from the earth atmosphere but from the universal life! To be able simply to enter into contact with the life of the earth in its totality from the formation of the earth until now, what can this mean? And then to go beyond this and enter into contact with universal life from its beginnings up to now... and then again to be able to bring something new into the universe, one must go still farther beyond. Not easy! That's all? (To the child) Convinced? ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955 ,
309:Chapter 18 - Trapped in a Dream(A guy is playing a pinball machine, seemingly the same guy who rode with him in the back of the boat car. This part is played by Richard Linklater, aka, the director.)Hey, man.Hey.Weren't you in a boat car? You know, the guy, the guy with the hat? He gave me a ride in his car, or boat thing, and you were in the back seat with me?I mean, I'm not saying that you don't know what you're talking about, but I don't know what you're talking about.No, you see, you guys let me off at this really specific spot that you gave him directions to let me off at, I get out, and end up getting hit by a car, but then, I just woke up because I was dreaming, and later than that, I found out that I was still dreaming, dreaming that I'd woken up.Oh yeah, those are called false awakenings. I used to have those all the time.Yeah, but I'm still in it now. I, I can't get out of it. It's been going on forever, I keep waking up, but, but I'm just waking up into another dream. I'm starting to get creeped out, too. Like I'm talking to dead people. This woman on TV's telling me about how death is this dreamtime that exists outside of life. I mean, (desperate sigh) I'm starting to think that I'm dead.I'm gonna tell you about a dream I once had. I know that's, when someone says that, then usually you're in for a very boring next few minutes, and you might be, but it sounds like, you know, what else are you going to do, right? Anyway, I read this essay by Philip K. Dick.What, you read it in your dream?No, no. I read it before the dream. It was the preamble to the dream. It was about that book, um Flow My Tears the Policeman Said. You know that one?Uh, yeah yeah, he won an award for that one.Right, right. That's the one he wrote really fast. It just like flowed right out of him. He felt he was sort of channeling it, or something. But anyway, about four years after it was published, he was at this party, and he met this woman who had the same name as the woman character in the book. And she had a boyfriend with the same name as the boyfriend character in the book, and she was having an affair with this guy, the chief of police, and he had the same name as the chief of police in his book. So she's telling him all of this stuff from her life, and everything she's saying is right out of his book. So that's totally freaking him out, but, what can he do?And then shortly after that, he was going to mail a letter, and he saw this kind of, um, you know, dangerous, shady looking guy standing by his car, but instead of avoiding him, which he says he would have usually done, he just walked right up to him and said, "Can I help you?" And the guy said, "Yeah. I, I ran out of gas." So he pulls out his wallet, and he hands him some money, which he says he never would have done, and then he gets home and thinks, wait a second, this guy, you know, he can't get to a gas station, he's out of gas. So he gets back in his car, he goes and finds the guy, takes him to the gas station, and as he's pulling up at the gas station, he realizes, "Hey, this is in my book too. This exact station, this exact guy. Everything."So this whole episode is kind of creepy, right? And he's telling his priest about it, you know, describing how he wrote this book, and then four years later all these things happened to him. And as he's telling it to him, the priest says, "That's the Book of Acts. You're describing the Book of Acts." And he's like, "I've never read the Book of Acts." So he, you know, goes home and reads the Book of Acts, and it's like uncanny. Even the characters' names are the same as in the Bible. And the Book of Acts takes place in 50 A.D., when it was written, supposedly. So Philip K. Dick had this theory that time was an illusion and that we were all actually in 50 A.D., and the reason he had written this book was that he had somehow momentarily punctured through this illusion, this veil of time, and what he had seen there was what was going on in the Book of Acts.And he was really into Gnosticism, and this idea that this demiurge, or demon, had created this illusion of time to make us forget that Christ was about to return, and the kingdom of God was about to arrive. And that we're all in 50 A.D., and there's someone trying to make us forget that God is imminent. And that's what time is. That's what all of history is. It's just this kind of continuous, you know, daydream, or distraction.And so I read that, and I was like, well that's weird. And than that night I had a dream and there was this guy in the dream who was supposed to be a psychic. But I was skeptical. I was like, you know, he's not really a psychic, you know I'm thinking to myself. And then suddenly I start floating, like levitating, up to the ceiling. And as I almost go through the roof, I'm like, "Okay, Mr. Psychic. I believe you. You're a psychic. Put me down please." And I float down, and as my feet touch the ground, the psychic turns into this woman in a green dress. And this woman is Lady Gregory.Now Lady Gregory was Yeats' patron, this, you know, Irish person. And though I'd never seen her image, I was just sure that this was the face of Lady Gregory. So we're walking along, and Lady Gregory turns to me and says, "Let me explain to you the nature of the universe. Now Philip K. Dick is right about time, but he's wrong that it's 50 A.D. Actually, there's only one instant, and it's right now, and it's eternity. And it's an instant in which God is posing a question, and that question is basically, 'Do you want to, you know, be one with eternity? Do you want to be in heaven?' And we're all saying, 'No thank you. Not just yet.' And so time is actually just this constant saying 'No' to God's invitation. I mean that's what time is. I mean, and it's no more 50 A.D. than it's two thousand and one. And there's just this one instant, and that's what we're always in."And then she tells me that actually this is the narrative of everyone's life. That, you know, behind the phenomenal difference, there is but one story, and that's the story of moving from the "no" to the "yes." All of life is like, "No thank you. No thank you. No thank you." then ultimately it's, "Yes, I give in. Yes, I accept. Yes, I embrace." I mean, that's the journey. I mean, everyone gets to the "yes" in the end, right?Right.So we continue walking, and my dog runs over to me. And so I'm petting him, really happy to see him, you know, he's been dead for years. So I'm petting him and I realize there's this kind of gross oozing stuff coming out of his stomach. And I look over at Lady Gregory, and she sort of coughs. She's like [cough] [cough] "Oh, excuse me." And there's vomit, like dribbling down her chin, and it smells really bad. And I think, "Well, wait a second, that's not just the smell of vomit," which is, doesn't smell very good, "that's the smell of like dead person vomit." You know, so it's like doubly foul. And then I realize I'm actually in the land of the dead, and everyone around me is dead. My dog had been dead for over ten years, Lady Gregory had been dead a lot longer than that. When I finally woke up, I was like, whoa, that wasn't a dream, that was a visitation to this real place, the land of the dead.So what happened? I mean how did you finally get out of it?Oh man. It was just like one of those like life altering experiences. I mean I could never really look at the world the same way again, after that.Yeah, but I mean like how did you, how did you finally get out of the dream? See, that's my problem. I'm like trapped. I keep, I keep thinking that I'm waking up, but I'm still in a dream. It seems like it's going on forever. I can't get out of it, and I want to wake up for real. How do you really wake up?I don't know, I don't know. I'm not very good at that anymore. But, um, if that's what you're thinking, I mean you, you probably should. I mean, you know if you can wake up, you should, because you know someday, you know, you won't be able to. So just, um ... But it's easy. You know. Just, just wake up. ~ Waking Life,
310:Mental EducationOF ALL lines of education, mental education is the most widely known and practised, yet except in a few rare cases there are gaps which make it something very incomplete and in the end quite insufficient. Generally speaking, schooling is considered to be all the mental education that is necessary. And when a child has been made to undergo, for a number of years, a methodical training which is more like cramming than true schooling, it is considered that whatever is necessary for his mental development has been done. Nothing of the kind. Even conceding that the training is given with due measure and discrimination and does not permanently damage the brain, it cannot impart to the human mind the faculties it needs to become a good and useful instrument. The schooling that is usually given can, at the most, serve as a system of gymnastics to increase the suppleness of the brain. From this standpoint, each branch of human learning represents a special kind of mental gymnastics, and the verbal formulations given to these various branches each constitute a special and well-defined language. A true mental education, which will prepare man for a higher life, has five principal phases. Normally these phases follow one after another, but in exceptional individuals they may alternate or even proceed simultaneously. These five phases, in brief, are: (1) Development of the power of concentration, the capacity of attention. (2) Development of the capacities of expansion, widening, complexity and richness. (3) Organisation of one's ideas around a central idea, a higher ideal or a supremely luminous idea that will serve as a guide in life. (4) Thought-control, rejection of undesirable thoughts, to become able to think only what one wants and when one wants. (5) Development of mental silence, perfect calm and a more and more total receptivity to inspirations coming from the higher regions of the being. It is not possible to give here all the details concerning the methods to be employed in the application of these five phases of education to different individuals. Still, a few explanations on points of detail can be given. Undeniably, what most impedes mental progress in children is the constant dispersion of their thoughts. Their thoughts flutter hither and thither like butterflies and they have to make a great effort to fix them. Yet this capacity is latent in them, for when you succeed in arousing their interest, they are capable of a good deal of attention. By his ingenuity, therefore, the educator will gradually help the child to become capable of a sustained effort of attention and a faculty of more and more complete absorption in the work in hand. All methods that can develop this faculty of attention from games to rewards are good and can all be utilised according to the need and the circumstances. But it is the psychological action that is most important and the sovereign method is to arouse in the child an interest in what you want to teach him, a liking for work, a will to progress. To love to learn is the most precious gift that one can give to a child: to love to learn always and everywhere, so that all circumstances, all happenings in life may be constantly renewed opportunities for learning more and always more. For that, to attention and concentration should be added observation, precise recording and faithfulness of memory. This faculty of observation can be developed by varied and spontaneous exercises, making use of every opportunity that presents itself to keep the child's thought wakeful, alert and prompt. The growth of the understanding should be stressed much more than that of memory. One knows well only what one has understood. Things learnt by heart, mechanically, fade away little by little and finally disappear; what is understood is never forgotten. Moreover, you must never refuse to explain to a child the how and the why of things. If you cannot do it yourself, you must direct the child to those who are qualified to answer or point out to him some books that deal with the question. In this way you will progressively awaken in the child the taste for true study and the habit of making a persistent effort to know. This will bring us quite naturally to the second phase of development in which the mind should be widened and enriched. You will gradually show the child that everything can become an interesting subject for study if it is approached in the right way. The life of every day, of every moment, is the best school of all, varied, complex, full of unexpected experiences, problems to be solved, clear and striking examples and obvious consequences. It is so easy to arouse healthy curiosity in children, if you answer with intelligence and clarity the numerous questions they ask. An interesting reply to one readily brings others in its train and so the attentive child learns without effort much more than he usually does in the classroom. By a choice made with care and insight, you should also teach him to enjoy good reading-matter which is both instructive and attractive. Do not be afraid of anything that awakens and pleases his imagination; imagination develops the creative mental faculty and through it study becomes living and the mind develops in joy. In order to increase the suppleness and comprehensiveness of his mind, one should see not only that he studies many varied topics, but above all that a single subject is approached in various ways, so that the child understands in a practical manner that there are many ways of facing the same intellectual problem, of considering it and solving it. This will remove all rigidity from his brain and at the same time it will make his thinking richer and more supple and prepare it for a more complex and comprehensive synthesis. In this way also the child will be imbued with the sense of the extreme relativity of mental learning and, little by little, an aspiration for a truer source of knowledge will awaken in him. Indeed, as the child grows older and progresses in his studies, his mind too ripens and becomes more and more capable of forming general ideas, and with them almost always comes a need for certitude, for a knowledge that is stable enough to form the basis of a mental construction which will permit all the diverse and scattered and often contradictory ideas accumulated in his brain to be organised and put in order. This ordering is indeed very necessary if one is to avoid chaos in one's thoughts. All contradictions can be transformed into complements, but for that one must discover the higher idea that will have the power to bring them harmoniously together. It is always good to consider every problem from all possible standpoints so as to avoid partiality and exclusiveness; but if the thought is to be active and creative, it must, in every case, be the natural and logical synthesis of all the points of view adopted. And if you want to make the totality of your thoughts into a dynamic and constructive force, you must also take great care as to the choice of the central idea of your mental synthesis; for upon that will depend the value of this synthesis. The higher and larger the central idea and the more universal it is, rising above time and space, the more numerous and the more complex will be the ideas, notions and thoughts which it will be able to organise and harmonise. It goes without saying that this work of organisation cannot be done once and for all. The mind, if it is to keep its vigour and youth, must progress constantly, revise its notions in the light of new knowledge, enlarge its frame-work to include fresh notions and constantly reclassify and reorganise its thoughts, so that each of them may find its true place in relation to the others and the whole remain harmonious and orderly. All that has just been said concerns the speculative mind, the mind that learns. But learning is only one aspect of mental activity; the other, which is at least equally important, is the constructive faculty, the capacity to form and thus prepare action. This very important part of mental activity has rarely been the subject of any special study or discipline. Only those who want, for some reason, to exercise a strict control over their mental activities think of observing and disciplining this faculty of formation; and as soon as they try it, they have to face difficulties so great that they appear almost insurmountable. And yet control over this formative activity of the mind is one of the most important aspects of self-education; one can say that without it no mental mastery is possible. As far as study is concerned, all ideas are acceptable and should be included in the synthesis, whose very function is to become more and more rich and complex; but where action is concerned, it is just the opposite. The ideas that are accepted for translation into action should be strictly controlled and only those that agree with the general trend of the central idea forming the basis of the mental synthesis should be permitted to express themselves in action. This means that every thought entering the mental consciousness should be set before the central idea; if it finds a logical place among the thoughts already grouped, it will be admitted into the synthesis; if not, it will be rejected so that it can have no influence on the action. This work of mental purification should be done very regularly in order to secure a complete control over one's actions. For this purpose, it is good to set apart some time every day when one can quietly go over one's thoughts and put one's synthesis in order. Once the habit is acquired, you can maintain control over your thoughts even during work and action, allowing only those which are useful for what you are doing to come to the surface. Particularly, if you have continued to cultivate the power of concentration and attention, only the thoughts that are needed will be allowed to enter the active external consciousness and they then become all the more dynamic and effective. And if, in the intensity of concentration, it becomes necessary not to think at all, all mental vibration can be stilled and an almost total silence secured. In this silence one can gradually open to the higher regions of the mind and learn to record the inspirations that come from there. But even before reaching this point, silence in itself is supremely useful, because in most people who have a somewhat developed and active mind, the mind is never at rest. During the day, its activity is kept under a certain control, but at night, during the sleep of the body, the control of the waking state is almost completely removed and the mind indulges in activities which are sometimes excessive and often incoherent. This creates a great stress which leads to fatigue and the diminution of the intellectual faculties. The fact is that like all the other parts of the human being, the mind too needs rest and it will not have this rest unless we know how to provide it. The art of resting one's mind is something to be acquired. Changing one's mental activity is certainly one way of resting; but the greatest possible rest is silence. And as far as the mental faculties are concerned a few minutes passed in the calm of silence are a more effective rest than hours of sleep. When one has learned to silence the mind at will and to concentrate it in receptive silence, then there will be no problem that cannot be solved, no mental difficulty whose solution cannot be found. When it is agitated, thought becomes confused and impotent; in an attentive tranquillity, the light can manifest itself and open up new horizons to man's capacity. Bulletin, November 1951 ~ The Mother, On Education ,
311:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step. But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort. Savitri alone is sufficient to make you climb to the highest peaks. If truly one knows how to meditate on Savitri, one will receive all the help one needs. For him who wishes to follow this path, it is a concrete help as though the Lord himself were taking you by the hand and leading you to the destined goal. And then, every question, however personal it may be, has its answer here, every difficulty finds its solution herein; indeed there is everything that is necessary for doing the Yoga.*He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection. You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, WIKI am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: WIKI have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages. In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything. It may then be said that Savitri is a revelation, it is a meditation, it is a quest of the Infinite, the Eternal. If it is read with this aspiration for Immortality, the reading itself will serve as a guide to Immortality. To read Savitri is indeed to practice Yoga, spiritual concentration; one can find there all that is needed to realise the Divine. Each step of Yoga is noted here, including the secret of all other Yogas. Surely, if one sincerely follows what is revealed here in each line one will reach finally the transformation of the Supramental Yoga. It is truly the infallible guide who never abandons you; its support is always there for him who wants to follow the path. Each verse of Savitri is like a revealed Mantra which surpasses all that man possessed by way of knowledge, and I repeat this, the words are expressed and arranged in such a way that the sonority of the rhythm leads you to the origin of sound, which is OM. My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga. All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind. These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconscience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness. And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed. And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen. My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal. Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic message Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967 ~ The Mother, Sweet Mother The Mother to Mona Sarkar,
312:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passageOmnes eodem cogimur, omniumVersatur urna serius ociusSors exitura et nos in aeternumExilium impositura cymbae.Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vainUpon the axis of its pain,Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!'Farewell, farewell! but this I tellTo thee, thou Wedding-Guest!He prayeth well, who loveth wellBoth man and bird and beast.He prayeth best, who loveth bestAll things both great and small;For the dear God who loveth us,He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno ,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:I fear for my books. ~ Jos Rizal,
2:last Mercy book. ~ Kendra Elliot,
3:Mac in a book. ~ Walter Isaacson,
4:watervalleybooks.com ~ Jeff High,
5:We live for books. ~ Umberto Eco,
6:I believe in books. ~ Carole Maso,
7:I like Books... ~ Suzanne Collins,
8:It’s your book, ~ Walter Isaacson,
9:THE JUNGLE BOOK ~ Rudyard Kipling,
10:Book. Candle. Nico. ~ Lili St Crow,
11:book of Revelation, ~ Paul Theroux,
12:BOOK SECOND—THE FALL ~ Victor Hugo,
13:Ebooks had to happen. ~ Jeff Bezos,
14:i love erotic books. ~ Marilyn Lee,
15:It's a book, jackass. ~ Lane Smith,
16:Jasper eased the book ~ D M Pulley,
17:—Overbooking. ~ Rub n Azor n Ant n,
18:Worthy books ~ Philip James Bailey,
19:Big book, a big bore. ~ Callimachus,
20:Books are a narcotic. ~ Franz Kafka,
21:ebook-reading device on ~ Anonymous,
22:I'm not really book-smart. ~ Eminem,
23:One book opens another. ~ Carl Jung,
24:Read DeBecker’s book. ~ Rory Miller,
25:Bookbag, Pocketshoe. ~ Rebecca Stead,
26:Books are my weakness. ~ Dan Stevens,
27:BOOKS CHANGE LIVES. ~ Grace Burrowes,
28:books=comfort ~ Holly Goldberg Sloan,
29:Books have their destinies. ~ Horace,
30:Good authour Good books ~ Roald Dahl,
31:My books are so tame! ~ Sarah Dessen,
32:putyourFACEinaBOOK ~ Kwame Alexander,
33:Be awesome! Be a book nut! ~ Dr Seuss,
34:Books can be misleading ~ J K Rowling,
35:Book Two AND SO IT BEGINS ~ Anonymous,
36:I am not a fan of books. ~ Kanye West,
37:I was their first book. ~ Neil Gaiman,
38:She’s read many books. ~ Kate Elliott,
39:A book is a loaded gun. ~ Ray Bradbury,
40:BOOK FIFTH.—THE DESCENT. ~ Victor Hugo,
41:Book is a nice companion ~ Leo Tolstoy,
42:Book of the Prophet Isaiah ~ Anonymous,
43:Books, Cats, Life is Good. ~ T S Eliot,
44:Books. Cats. Life is good. ~ T S Eliot,
45:End of the First Book ~ Kate DiCamillo,
46:how can you read books? ~ M lanie Watt,
47:Study nature not books ~ Louis Agassiz,
48:They're book addicts. ~ Daniel Handler,
49:WAR AND PEACE BOOK THREE ~ Leo Tolstoy,
50:drama is a good book ~ Raina Telgemeier,
51:I am a cookbook fanatic. ~ Samantha Bee,
52:I am no fan of books. ~ Stephen Colbert,
53:I bookmark that thought. ~ Alice Feeney,
54:I don't read books much. ~ LeBron James,
55:I don't reread my books. ~ Graham Swift,
56:My books were my friends. ~ Abbi Glines,
57:notsonoblebooks@gmail.com ~ Jules Verne,
58:bestselling cookbooks; ~ Debbie Macomber,
59:Book 3: Fatal Consequences ~ Marie Force,
60:Books are packaged dreams. ~ Dean Koontz,
61:Books can be misleading... ~ J K Rowling,
62:BOOKS… "The Loom of Language ~ Malcolm X,
63:Books which are no books. ~ Charles Lamb,
64:Download A Sample of Books ~ Marie Force,
65:I'm a comic book fan. ~ Michael B Jordan,
66:I'm obsessed with books. ~ David Sylvian,
67:There's ALWAYS a book. ~ Cleolinda Jones,
68:You're such a book girl. ~ Mizuki Nomura,
69:You talk like a book. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
70:A book a day keeps Reality away ~ Various,
71:Books are truer than movies. ~ Adam Levin,
72:Books, Cats, Life is Good. ~ Edward Gorey,
73:Books. Cats. Life is Good. ~ Edward Gorey,
74:Books do furnish a room. ~ Anthony Powell,
75:Books make the soul float. ~ Alan Bradley,
76:Build: Bookworm, but tough ~ Kim Harrison,
77:Character is power. ~ Booker T Washington,
78:Is this a kissing book? ~ William Goldman,
79:My bookshelves help me breathe. ~ Unknown,
80:Often books speak of books. ~ Umberto Eco,
81:phone number to Booker ~ Mary Kay Andrews,
82:share books and other digital ~ Anonymous,
83:used to write her books. ~ Peter Robinson,
84:Wait- there was a book? ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
85:You bookish little pervert. ~ Rachel Cohn,
86:A book? O, rare one, ~ William Shakespeare,
87:Africa? A book one thumbs ~ Countee Cullen,
88:All bookshelves are magical. ~ Neil Gaiman,
89:A poet is always learning. ~ Malika Booker,
90:Books belong to their readers ~ John Green,
91:Books keep stupidity at bay. ~ Nina George,
92:BOOK THIRD.—IN THE YEAR 1817 ~ Victor Hugo,
93:Each book starts from ashes. ~ Philip Roth,
94:His book is the result of long ~ A W Tozer,
95:Home is where your books are. ~ Erica Jong,
96:How This Book Came to Be ~ Walter Isaacson,
97:I am a beau only in my books. ~ Adam Smith,
98:I love comic books. I just do. ~ Megan Fox,
99:I read three books a week. ~ Emma Donoghue,
100:orr we find a typo in a book. ~ Seth Godin,
101:The book ‘wrote itself. ~ David J Schwartz,
102:This book is to be read in bed. ~ Dr Seuss,
103:this is a book about something ~ C S Lewis,
104:You can go anywhere in books ~ Paul Graham,
105:You mean, like a book? ~ Justin Timberlake,
106:A life without books is unlivable ~ Erasmus,
107:Books are absent teachers. ~ Mortimer Adler,
108:Books belong to their readers. ~ John Green,
109:Books dont need batteries ~ Nadine Gordimer,
110:Books equaled permanence ~ Emily Wing Smith,
111:Books exceed authors' lifespan. ~ Toba Beta,
112:Bookworms will rule the world! ~ E S Carter,
113:Drink deeply from good books. ~ John Wooden,
114:Fate's book, but my italics. ~ Don Paterson,
115:Few books today are forgivable. ~ R D Laing,
116:Finished, the book begins. ~ Carlos Fuentes,
117:i really like reading books ~ Dale Carnegie,
118:Let my temptation be a book. ~ Eugene Field,
119:Love is only found in books ~ Ellen Hopkins,
120:Marcus’s book, Lone Survivor.) ~ Chris Kyle,
121:Mr Rimmel’s Book of Perfumes ~ Ruth Goodman,
122:My books are my confessions. ~ Clive Barker,
123:Read a preview of the next book ~ Jenny Han,
124:tastes in books, movies, ~ Jessica Gadziala,
125:The Little Book on CoffeeScript ~ Anonymous,
126:This is a book about winning, ~ Dave Ramsey,
127:Write the book you want to read ~ Anne Rice,
128:You kiss by th' book. ~ William Shakespeare,
129:A book a day keeps reality away. ~ Anonymous,
130:a bookmad girl never dies. ~ Amanda Lovelace,
131:Book lovers never go to bed alone. ~ Various,
132:Bookmark at location 115 | Added ~ Anonymous,
133:books make sense of life. ~ Ravi Subramanian,
134:Books wind into the heart. ~ William Hazlitt,
135:Book the First—Recalled to ~ Charles Dickens,
136:born with a book in her mouth. ~ Jean Sasson,
137:Home is where your books are. ~ Kerstin Gier,
138:I buy way too many books. ~ Orson Scott Card,
139:I don't go by the rule book ~ Princess Diana,
140:I read books, not minds, Guido. ~ Donna Leon,
141:I read books to read myself. ~ Sven Birkerts,
142:Love's bigger than rule books. ~ M L Stedman,
143:NEVER USE HIGHLITER IN MY BOOKS ~ John Green,
144:So many books, so little time. ~ Frank Zappa,
145:The worst thief is a bad book ~ Ian Caldwell,
146:This is a book of raw flesh. ~ H l ne Cixous,
147:we became the books we read. ~ Matthew Kelly,
148:We become the books we read. ~ Matthew Kelly,
149:Why do you love books so much? ~ Robin Sloan,
150:write a book they can’t not buy. ~ Bob Mayer,
151:You can't ever have my books. ~ Ray Bradbury,
152:A big book is a big misfortune. ~ Callimachus,
153:A book is a souvenir of an idea. ~ Seth Godin,
154:A boy has to peddle his book. ~ Truman Capote,
155:Any BOOK Accepted as Cash ~ Robert A Heinlein,
156:Betsy Orlan Orphans Book 8 ~ Kirsten Osbourne,
157:book Happier, Tal Ben-Shahar ~ Gretchen Rubin,
158:Books and marriage go ill together. ~ Moliere,
159:Books are absent teachers. ~ Mortimer J Adler,
160:Books are cold but safe friends ~ Victor Hugo,
161:Books don't need batteries. ~ Nadine Gordimer,
162:eBookNews.SimonandSchuster.com ~ Richard Bach,
163:Every book is a box of ideas. ~ Blue Balliett,
164:Great books conserve time. ~ Holbrook Jackson,
165:I can't live without books ~ Thomas Jefferson,
166:I collect books, a lot of books. ~ Kate Spade,
167:I found my voice in books. ~ James Earl Jones,
168:Laws die. Books never. ~ Edward Bulwer Lytton,
169:Never judge a book by it's cover. ~ Anonymous,
170:Never judge a book by it's movie. ~ Anonymous,
171:Nothing in this book is true. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
172:Rereading, we find a new book. ~ Mason Cooley,
173:Sad stories make good books ~ Khaled Hosseini,
174:Stop taking my book so literally. ~ Anonymous,
175:The book can also be a hat. ~ Stanley Kubrick,
176:The Lawrence book excited me too. ~ Ana s Nin,
177:...the whatness of Allbook. ~ Anthony Burgess,
178:You a slave to a page in my rhyme book. ~ Nas,
179:A book is a suicide postponed. ~ Emil M Cioran,
180:A good book is an event in my life. ~ Stendhal,
181:A good title can save a book, ~ Larry McMurtry,
182:A great book is like great evil. ~ Callimachus,
183:All books are investments (p.134) ~ Monica Ali,
184:A noble book! all men's book! ~ Thomas Carlyle,
185:Any BOOK Accepted as Cash! ~ Robert A Heinlein,
186:Books are cold but safe friends. ~ Victor Hugo,
187:Books are cold but sure friends. ~ Victor Hugo,
188:Books are the best messages and gifts. ~ Disha,
189:Books can be a love-struck wonder! ~ Anonymous,
190:Books make you feel things hard. ~ Deb Caletti,
191:Don't judge a book by its cover ~ George Eliot,
192:e-books "smell like burned fuel ~ Ray Bradbury,
193:I cannot live without books ~ Thomas Jefferson,
194:I like big books and I cannot lie. ~ Anonymous,
195:I’m a bit of an audiobook junkie, ~ L H Cosway,
196:I read books. I know who I am. ~ Daniel Orozco,
197:I was not a big comic-book reader. ~ Brad Bird,
198:May we always find truth in books, ~ Ilie Ruby,
199:Mysteries Book 1) (Methos, Victor) ~ Anonymous,
200:Only the nonreader fears books. ~ Richard Peck,
201:Only your friends steal your books. ~ Voltaire,
202:OUR BOOKS ARE FRIENDS FOR LIFE ~ Marissa Meyer,
203:reading of many books is distraction. ~ Seneca,
204:Sad stories make good books, ~ Khaled Hosseini,
205:Sad stories make good books. ~ Khaled Hosseini,
206:She wrote a self-esteem book. ~ Kody Keplinger,
207:should infinitely prefer a book. ~ Jane Austen,
208:Silver-the first book of dreams ~ Kerstin Gier,
209:Skippy Jon Jones picture book ~ Lauren Blakely,
210:The Bible, The Stuffed Book. ~ Ibrahim Ibrahim,
211:The book you don't read won't help. ~ Jim Rohn,
212:Very little happens in my books. ~ Peter Mayle,
213:Will Metzger’s book Tell the Truth ~ Anonymous,
214:Write the book you want to read ~ Austin Kleon,
215:Yeeres know more then bookes. ~ George Herbert,
216:[..] you dirty little bookworm. ~ J D Salinger,
217:A book is a suicide postponed. ~ Emile M Cioran,
218:...A good Book, has no Ending... ~ E E Cummings,
219:All good books are honest books. ~ Ronald Malfi,
220:book loan for Menopause For Dummies ~ Anonymous,
221:Books are dead men talking. ~ George R R Martin,
222:Books don't harm kids; they arm them. ~ Mem Fox,
223:Books + friendship = book club ~ Kristin Hannah,
224:Books taught me how to think. ~ Candace Fleming,
225:book, Writing to Change the World, ~ Bren Brown,
226:Can’t stop a Nazi with a lawbook. ~ Herman Wouk,
227:Don't judge a book by its cover. ~ George Eliot,
228:Don't judge a book by its cover. ~ Liz Braswell,
229:Don't judge a book by its cover. ~ Ray Bradbury,
230:Facebook is inherently viral. ~ Mark Zuckerberg,
231:good books doing good thingsTM ~ Sulari Gentill,
232:Great Books of the Western World. ~ Kevin Kelly,
233:I can not live without books ~ Thomas Jefferson,
234:I cannot live without books. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
235:I feel I've got 10 books in me. ~ Robert Hunter,
236:I love to listen to books on tape. ~ Angel Haze,
237:It's fun to learn a new playbook. ~ Andrew Luck,
238:I wanted to live among books. ~ Alberto Manguel,
239:Power to the people' can only ~ Murray Bookchin,
240:Some people read books for fun. ~ Richelle Mead,
241:This Book Is About Leverage ~ Robert T Kiyosaki,
242:This book is concerned with fate. ~ Orhan Pamuk,
243:This. That. Those. All the books. ~ Amor Towles,
244:To read too many books is harmful. ~ Mao Zedong,
245:You can't eat books, sweetheart. ~ Markus Zusak,
246:A book is dead until you read it. ~ Clive Barker,
247:Alibaba is worth more than Facebook. ~ Anonymous,
248:a nerd is known by the books he read ~ Anonymous,
249:Audible audiobooks on any device for ~ Anonymous,
250:Banned books always smell suspicious ~ Juan Mars,
251:Beware of the man of one book. ~ Isaac D Israeli,
252:Books always speak of other books. ~ Umberto Eco,
253:Books are humanity in print. ~ Barbara W Tuchman,
254:Books are like my one and only joy. ~ John Lydon,
255:Books were his Achilles heel. She ~ Stephen King,
256:Dad is always hiding in his book. ~ E L Doctorow,
257:Each story in its own right is a book. ~ Various,
258:eBookNews.SimonandSchuster.com ~ Janet Evanovich,
259:Finest kind of dope. Book-Valium. ~ Stephen King,
260:Forget movies - I'd rather choose books! ~ Disha,
261:I can not live without books. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
262:I can't not put humor in a book. ~ Albert Brooks,
263:I cry at the end of every book. ~ Hunter Parrish,
264:I discovered books and read forever ~ John Adams,
265:I don't even hate books anymore. ~ Leonard Cohen,
266:I'm not the biggest comic book fan. ~ Fran Kranz,
267:I never imagined I'd write a book. ~ Simon Sinek,
268:I saw the book thief three times. ~ Markus Zusak,
269:I should infinitely prefer a book. ~ Jane Austen,
270:It is uphill work writing books ~ Charles Darwin,
271:It's a gift. Never lend a book. ~ Ronald D Moore,
272:It's hard to make a book episodic. ~ Sam Heughan,
273:I would always want printed books. ~ J K Rowling,
274:Life’s Little Instruction Book ~ Timothy Ferriss,
275:Mary Pipher’s book Reviving Ophelia ~ Bren Brown,
276:Most books are bought by women. ~ Gloria Steinem,
277:multitude of books is a great evil ~ Clay Shirky,
278:My books are about killing God. ~ Philip Pullman,
279:Never judge a cover by its book. ~ Fran Lebowitz,
280:Of all things I liked books best. ~ Nikola Tesla,
281:People DO judge a book by its cover, ~ Anonymous,
282:spell books and broomsticks? Might ~ J K Rowling,
283:Textbooks are Soviet propaganda. ~ Jerry Falwell,
284:wanted is a good action book ~ Caroline B Cooney,
285:What's life but a big silly book? ~ Cameron Jace,
286:A book is a little empathy machine. ~ Neil Gaiman,
287:A book is a machine to think with. ~ I A Richards,
288:A fellow can’t live on books, ~ Louisa May Alcott,
289:All my book are my favorites. ~ Miguel Angel Ruiz,
290:Authors do not own books, readers do ~ John Green,
291:Books are a habit-forming drug. ~ Agatha Christie,
292:Books were a dependable pleasure. ~ Wendell Berry,
293:Book the First—Recalled to Life ~ Charles Dickens,
294:BOOK TWO COMBATING RESISTANCE ~ Steven Pressfield,
295:Do I read her books? Of course. ~ Debbie Reynolds,
296:Every book should have a romance. ~ Jasper Fforde,
297:I am a beau in nothing but my books. ~ Adam Smith,
298:I am a product [...of] endless books. ~ C S Lewis,
299:I am the worst judge of my books. ~ John Banville,
300:I cannot live without books... ~ Thomas Jefferson,
301:I love the books by Brenda Minton ~ Brenda Minton,
302:I've read all the books but one ~ Kathleen Raine,
303:Laws die, but Books never. ~ Edward Bulwer Lytton,
304:Let's face it. I'm an open book. ~ Natasha Lyonne,
305:My love of books was all that saved me. ~ Robin S,
306:No girl was ever ruined by a book. ~ Jimmy Walker,
307:Nothin’s real scary except in books. ~ Harper Lee,
308:Of all things, I liked books best. ~ Nikola Tesla,
309:Remember, a book is always a gift. ~ Sheridan Hay,
310:The book belongs to the author. ~ Maxwell Perkins,
311:There is no frigate like a book ~ Emily Dickinson,
312:The stitch of a book is its words. ~ Rumer Godden,
313:This is the final book about Brian ~ Gary Paulsen,
314:Time is a river, and books are boats. ~ Dan Brown,
315:Tony Abbott's books are so amazing! ~ Tony Abbott,
316:Too many books. Too few centuries. ~ Jay Kristoff,
317:Vanishing into books, I felt held. ~ Akhil Sharma,
318:What an astonishing thing a book is. ~ Carl Sagan,
319:What's life but a big, silly book? ~ Cameron Jace,
320:Who would chew up a bunch of books? ~ Dean Koontz,
321:A man will be known by his books. ~ William Martin,
322:A mind possessed by unmade books. ~ Michael Faudet,
323:An unread book does nobody any good ~ Brandon Mull,
324:Books are a uniquely portable magic ~ Stephen King,
325:Books are like tweets, except longer. ~ John Green,
326:books=comfort To me anyway. ~ Holly Goldberg Sloan,
327:Books should never be disrespected. ~ Anyta Sunday,
328:Books, the children of the brain. ~ Jonathan Swift,
329:Dani rummaged through her pocketbook ~ Marti Green,
330:Don't join the book burners! ~ Dwight D Eisenhower,
331:Facebook page likes don't read books. ~ N M Silber,
332:Great. Another girl with a notebook. ~ Kami Garcia,
333:I'd like to sell a lot of books. ~ Terry Pratchett,
334:I even love the smell of books. ~ Adriana Trigiani,
335:if i were a book i would be so open ~ Sarah Dessen,
336:I'm not in any sense anti-Facebook. ~ Jaron Lanier,
337:in Seattle, had snagged my first book ~ A J Banner,
338:I should indefinitely prefer a book. ~ Jane Austen,
339:I should infinitely prefer a book... ~ Jane Austen,
340:I sometimes read books on my iPad. ~ David Sedaris,
341:I will say I am the sum of my books. ~ V S Naipaul,
342:Life is too short to read a bad book ~ James Joyce,
343:Life is too short to read bad books. ~ James Joyce,
344:Love of books is the best of all. ~ Jackie Kennedy,
345:nothing furnishes a room like books ~ Terry Fallis,
346:Open books, not legs. Blow minds, not guys ~ Drake,
347:People perish. Books are immortal. ~ Robert Harris,
348:Read much, but not many books! ~ Benjamin Franklin,
349:Read much, but not many books. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
350:Read two old books for every new one. ~ J I Packer,
351:Sigh. Books. I missed them ~ Jennifer L Armentrout,
352:That's right, I am a book kisser. ~ Sherman Alexie,
353:The world is woman's book. ~ Jean Jacques Rousseau,
354:This book is dedicated to my mother. ~ V C Andrews,
355:You don't write a book to show off. ~ Tony Orlando,
356:A book is a work of art. (Again, ~ Mortimer J Adler,
357:A book that is shut is but a block. ~ Thomas Fuller,
358:A book worth reading is worth buying. ~ John Ruskin,
359:A book worth reading is worth owning. ~ John Ruskin,
360:All books are either dreams or swords. ~ Amy Lowell,
361:All of my books come from pain. ~ Bret Easton Ellis,
362:A man of one book, a student of many. ~ John Wesley,
363:A multitude of books distracts the mind. ~ Socrates,
364:A true lover of books knows no time. ~ Rosie Alison,
365:book Psych by Dr. Judd Biasiotto. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
366:Books are a languid pleasure. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
367:Books are a uniquely portable magic. ~ Stephen King,
368:Books are for ugly people. ~ Shaun David Hutchinson,
369:Books are the mirrors of the soul. ~ Virginia Woolf,
370:Books have a world all their own ~ Madeline Hunter,
371:Don't judge my brother; he is not a book. ~ Melanie,
372:Everything in this book may be wrong ~ Richard Bach,
373:Good books are the warehouses of ideas. ~ H G Wells,
374:great books are the ones we need ~ Charles Bukowski,
375:I am simply a book drunkard. ~ Lucy Maud Montgomery,
376:If you love your girl? Buy her books. ~ Kylie Scott,
377:I grew up kissing books and bread, ~ Salman Rushdie,
378:I grew up kissing books and bread. ~ Salman Rushdie,
379:I mainly buy books in my free time. ~ Wesley Snipes,
380:I'm not a comic book guy at all. ~ Darren Aronofsky,
381:I think the Book burned it, poor guy. ~ Kami Garcia,
382:Life is too short to read a bad book. ~ James Joyce,
383:long gaps between sequels to books. ~ Jasper Fforde,
384:Maybe it was a storybook beginning. ~ Daniel Nayeri,
385:My life is pretty much an open book. ~ Jeff Conaway,
386:My longest love affair: with a book. ~ Rebecca Mead,
387:Open a Book and Open Your Mind. ~ Chris Grabenstein,
388:Some books are lies frae end to end. ~ Robert Burns,
389:Some days are not new book days. ~ Rabih Alameddine,
390:Tim Pat Coogan’s book Michael Collins, ~ Amy Harmon,
391:We cannot learn men from books. ~ Benjamin Disraeli,
392:With a book he was regardless of time ~ Jane Austen,
393:Writing a book is an adventure. ~ Winston Churchill,
394:Years teach us more than books. ~ Berthold Auerbach,
395:You can never have enough books, ~ Christina Farley,
396:You can't kill a good comic book series. ~ Stan Lee,
397:Your book is bloated and self-indulgent, ~ J D Robb,
398:A book in hand is worth ten on the shelf ~ Anonymous,
399:Always wanted to be with his books. ~ Brandy Colbert,
400:A novel is a book with a lot of pages. ~ Kathy Acker,
401:Beware the man of the single book ~ Bertrand Russell,
402:Books are immortal sons defying their sires. ~ Plato,
403:Books are keys that open many doors. ~ James Rollins,
404:Books are the liberated spirits of men. ~ Mark Twain,
405:Books were a closed book to Moist. ~ Terry Pratchett,
406:But I wanted to finish your book. ~ Scott Westerfeld,
407:Everything in this book may be wrong. ~ Richard Bach,
408:Facebook to Buy Whatsapp for $16 Billion ~ Anonymous,
409:Get stewed:Books are a load of crap. ~ Philip Larkin,
410:Happily ever after, like in the books, ~ Cathy Glass,
411:Home is where the books are ~ Richard Francis Burton,
412:I cannot live without books . . . ~ Thomas Jefferson,
413:I cannot live without my books" - ~ Thomas Jefferson,
414:I like BIG BOOKS
and I cannot lie! ~ Jos N Harris,
415:I was never without a book in my hand. ~ Elie Wiesel,
416:I was raised as a red diaper baby. ~ Murray Bookchin,
417:My alma mater was books, a good library. ~ Malcolm X,
418:Never underestimate a clown with a book. ~ Rawi Hage,
419:...nothin’s real scary except in books. ~ Harper Lee,
420:Of all things I liked books the best. ~ Nikola Tesla,
421:Read books. They are good for us. ~ Natalie Goldberg,
422:So far it's 43 books in 25 years. ~ Bernard Cornwell,
423:Songs are more powerful than books. ~ Elvis Costello,
424:Stops (Deadly Reunions Book #2): A Novel ~ Anonymous,
425:The peace of great books be for you, ~ Carl Sandburg,
426:The psalms were Jesus’s songbook. ~ Timothy J Keller,
427:Twentieth Century Book of the Dead. ~ Richard Rhodes,
428:WE'VE BEEN READING THE MÖTLEY CRÜE BOOK. ~ M Shadows,
429:With a book he was regardless of time. ~ Jane Austen,
430:A book comes and says, 'Write me. ~ Madeleine L Engle,
431:A book is not complete until it’s read ~ E L Doctorow,
432:a good reader makes a good book ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
433:always busy because of interesting books ~ Lois Lowry,
434:!!!!Any BOOK Accepted as Cash!!!! ~ Robert A Heinlein,
435:A pretty sight, a lady with a book. ~ Shirley Jackson,
436:Are thy fighting or having a bookclub? ~ Mia Sheridan,
437:Books about suicide make lousy gifts. ~ Wilfrid Sheed,
438:Books are immortal sons deifying their sires. ~ Plato,
439:Books were escape. Books were freedom. ~ Stephen King,
440:Books will always be there for you. ~ Cassandra Clare,
441:Boredom is why God invented books. ~ Julie Schumacher,
442:Carpe librum, meant “Seize the book. ~ Jefferson Bass,
443:Comic books are a big passion of mine. ~ Taran Killam,
444:Dreams, books, are each a world. ~ William Wordsworth,
445:God makes trees, he doesn't write books. ~ Bill Maher,
446:her first published book, Once (1965). ~ Alice Walker,
447:Hot, raunchy and funny. —GiveMeBooks ~ Scarlett Avery,
448:I am a machine condemned to devour books. ~ Karl Marx,
449:I cry in movies a lot, and over books. ~ Hayley Mills,
450:I don't read books, I write them. ~ Henry A Kissinger,
451:I don't take drugs, I take books. ~ Ingeborg Bachmann,
452:I don't want to understand Facebook. ~ Charlie Munger,
453:I get a warm feeling among my books. ~ Anthony Powell,
454:I have my books and poetry to protect me ~ Paul Simon,
455:I liked my books and clouds and sunsets. ~ S E Hinton,
456:I often reread books I have written ~ Taylor Caldwell,
457:I put my soul into every book I write. ~ Wilbur Smith,
458:I tried to make sense of the Four Books, ~ Yunus Emre,
459:I Twitter (or Facebook) therefore I am ~ Jayce O Neal,
460:I was a big comic book fan from 13 on. ~ Stephen Root,
461:I was never really a comic-book fanatic. ~ J J Abrams,
462:Life is too short to read a bad book ~ Hildie McQueen,
463:Making a book is such a big enterprise. ~ V S Naipaul,
464:Man's books are but man's alphabet, ~ Joaquin Miller,
465:My home is in whatever town I'm booked. ~ Polly Adler,
466:my hunger for books was constant. ~ Diane Setterfield,
467:Nobody steals books but your friends. ~ Roger Zelazny,
468:on Facebook ‘the user is the product ~ Niall Ferguson,
469:Stupid people should never read books. ~ Andrew Smith,
470:the book like a sleigh left my lap ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
471:THE CASE BOOK OF SHERLOCK HOLMES ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
472:The dream book is always the next book. ~ Ian Christe,
473:The proper study of mankind is books. ~ Aldous Huxley,
474:The reading of the book was a journey. ~ Susan Orlean,
475:There are too many books in the world. ~ Ian McDonald,
476:There's no greater thief than a bad book. ~ Anonymous,
477:there will be books written about Harry ~ J K Rowling,
478:The Rosary is the book of the blind. ~ Fulton J Sheen,
479:The soul that feeds on books alone - ~ Joaquin Miller,
480:Thirteen years I took on this last book. ~ Gay Talese,
481:Through books she could see the world. ~ Cynthia Hand,
482:With a book, he was regardless of time. ~ Jane Austen,
483:You have a book that’s also a face? ~ Cassandra Clare,
484:A BOOK IS A DREAM THAT YOU HOLD IN YOUR HAND ~ Unknown,
485:A book is a dream you hold in your hand. ~ Neil Gaiman,
486:A book is a dream you hold in your hands ~ Neil Gaiman,
487:A book's flaws make it less predictable. ~ Janet Fitch,
488:A man's books are very much himself. ~ Ford Madox Ford,
489:An art book is a museum without walls. ~ Andre Malraux,
490:An unread book is a world unexplored ~ Mark Rubinstein,
491:AVAILABLE WHEREVER BOOKS ARE SOLD ~ John Elder Robison,
492:Being poor is only romantic in books. ~ Sidney Sheldon,
493:book Psych by Dr. Judd Biasiotto. He ~ Timothy Ferriss,
494:books always trumped everything else. ~ Mariah Stewart,
495:Books are a staircase to unknown worlds. ~ Jason Ellis,
496:Books are cold, but sure friends indeed. ~ Victor Hugo,
497:Books are like eggs -- best when fresh. ~ Edward Abbey,
498:Books are often far more than just books. ~ Roxane Gay,
499:Books are solitudes in which we meet. ~ Rebecca Solnit,
500:Books are the ammunition of life. ~ Theodore Roosevelt,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



100

   35 Occultism
   33 Kabbalah
   16 Philosophy
   10 Integral Yoga
   2 Integral Theory
   2 Christianity


  154 Sri Aurobindo
   25 Aleister Crowley
   21 Sri Ramakrishna
   20 Saint Teresa of Avila
   17 The Mother
   14 Friedrich Nietzsche
   8 Jorge Luis Borges
   6 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   2 Kahlil Gibran
   2 Jorge Luis Borges
   2 Italo Calvino


  100 Letters On Yoga III
   78 Collected Poems
   75 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   56 The Life Divine
   50 Liber ABA
   49 Savitri
   34 The Divine Comedy
   32 General Principles of Kabbalah
   32 Essays Divine And Human
   30 Essays On The Gita
   28 Words Of The Mother II
   27 Letters On Yoga I
   26 Poetics
   25 Letters On Yoga II
   25 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   24 Words Of Long Ago
   24 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   19 The Way of Perfection
   15 Isha Upanishad
   14 The Secret Of The Veda
   14 The Mother With Letters On The Mother
   13 Twilight of the Idols
   13 Theosophy
   11 The Mothers Agenda
   11 Talks
   11 Kena and Other Upanishads
   10 The Problems of Philosophy
   10 The Interior Castle or The Mansions
   10 The Integral Yoga
   10 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   10 Dark Night of the Soul
   10 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah
   9 The Hero with a Thousand Faces
   9 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   8 Words Of The Mother III
   8 The Blue Cliff Records
   8 The Bible
   7 Walden
   7 On Education
   7 Liber Null
   7 Agenda Vol 1
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 The Red Book Liber Novus
   6 The Gateless Gate
   5 Sefer Yetzirah The Book of Creation In Theory and Practice
   4 The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
   4 Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin
   3 The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma
   3 The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep
   3 The Lotus Sutra
   3 Sex Ecology Spirituality
   2 Thus Spoke Zarathustra
   2 The Prophet
   2 The Castle of Crossed Destinies
   2 Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   2 Selected Fictions
   2 Notes On The Way
   2 Book of Certitude
   2 Aion
   2 Advanced Dungeons and Dragons 2E


00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri, #Sweet Mother - Harmonies of Light, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  class:chapter
  
  
  --
  
  But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort.
  
  --
  
  *He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection.
  
  --
  
  All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind.
  

0.01_-_Introduction, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

0.01_-_Life_and_Yoga, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  

0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  

0.02_-_Topographical_Note, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

0.03_-_1951-1957._Notes_and_Fragments, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  

0.04_-_1951-1954, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  I don't know to whom I was mentioning this today (I think it was for a Birthday 11 ) ... No, I don't know now. It was to someone who told me he was 18 years old. I said that between the ages of 18 and 20, I had attained a constant and conscious union with the Divine Presence and that I had done this ALL ALONE, without ANYONE'S help, not even books. When a little later I chanced upon Vivekananda's Raja Yoga, it really seemed so wonderful to me that someone could explain something to me! And it helped me realize in only a few months what would have otherwise taken years.
  
  --
  IMPORTANT thing in the world. It took precedence over everything else!
  And when, as I told you, I chanced upon a book or an individual that could give me just a little clue and tell me, 'Here. If you do such and such, you will find your path' - well I charged into it like a cyclone ... and nothing could have stopped me.
  

0.04_-_The_Systems_of_Yoga, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  

0.05_-_1955, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  2. To unfold one's being before Him, to open entirely one's body from head to toe, as one opens a book, spreading open one's centers so as to make all their movements visible in a total SINCERITY that allows nothing to remain hidden.
  
  --
  Pondicherry
  Mother, after seeing you, I received a letter from my Bangalore friends. They have just bought an old Mogul residence and gardens in Hyderabad that used to belong to the Nizam ... They suggest that their new property would be an enchanting setting for writing the book I have felt like writing for years but never wrote because I was always on the move. Anyway, they have made it clear that should I have qualms about staying with them too long, it would be easy for them to find me some lucrative work that would not be too time consuming - which would allow me to write or do whatever I wish - with their friend the Maharajah of Jaipur, or even in Hyderabad.
  

0.05_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Systems, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  

0.06_-_1956, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  All my past is weighing down on me, not because of any attachments, for I regret NOTHING of my past and my only hope is what lies before me. Yet I have not entirely undergone all this like a marionette, it even seems to me that 'I' have created it, composed it like a book - for the last fifteen years, from the time of the concentration camps, I have consciously multiplied my experiences and have passed through a whole range of rebellions and situations in order to gather the basic material for a book. As it happens, this formulation of 'my' book gradually merged with the search for my real Self. Now I know what I was seeking, but this book has grown with me, it is there like a powerful formation weighing down on me, and it weighs on me all the more now, for since my contact with Sri Aurobindo all my past experiences seem charged with meaning and symbolism. I find your hand in it everywhere, and I can now connect all the apparent coincidences and sift out an extraordinary necessity that has led me here; all this makes a dense, living, vibrant book that weighs on me. I need to cast it all out, to free myself, to write this book.
  
  Not only do I need to liquidate this past, but also to renew my choice, to strengthen my presence here - and I feel this book as a commitment, it will help me set my route in a decisive way. It is a test.
  
  --
  
  There is another consideration as well - though if I am deluding myself, please enlighten me. I feel that if this book is successful, it could be useful to others and serve Sri Aurobindo's work. For I have had the opportunity to live concretely, the hard way, many of the questions that others ask themselves. Thus all my past experiences appear to be a living demonstration of a teaching to which
  Sri Aurobindo is the key. What has already been said abstractly or philosophically, I can say in the form of a living and moving novel. I think that I feel in me the power to express these things.
  --
  
  The problem poses itself practically, for I would need a rather long period of uninterrupted work to be rid of all this. Yet I have carried this book in me for so long that it is ready in every detail - I could finish it in six months. Here, I am too occupied with other things to finish it quickly.
  
  --
  Signed: Bernard
  P.S. Can this book serve You?
  
  --
  
  I had thought I could free myself from this conflict by writing a book. But in fact, it is not the mind that needs to be freed, or at least not only that, it is the vital that needs to WEAR ITSELF
  OUT.
  --
  
  I feel a bit lost, cut off from you. The idea of going to the Himalayas is absurd and I am abandoning it. My friends tell me that I may remain with them as long as I wish, but this is hardly a solution; I don't even feel like writing a book any longer - nothing seems to appeal to me except the trees in this garden and the music that fills a large part of my days. There is no solution other than the Ashram or Brazil. You alone can tell me what to do.
  

0.06_-_INTRODUCTION, #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  The first night or purgation is of the sensual part of the soul, which is
  treated in the present stanza, and will be treated in the first part of this book.
  And the second is of the spiritual part; of this speaks the second stanza,
  --
  terrible purgation, as we shall say afterwards.2
  In his three earlier books he has written of the Active Night, of Sense and of
  Spirit; he now proposes to deal with the Passive Night, in the same order. He has
  --
  more reveal the author's skill as a director of souls. They are easy chapters to
  understand, and of great practical utility, comparable to those in the first book of
  the Ascent which deal with the active purgation of the desires of sense.
  --
  comprise St. Bernard's mystical ladder. Chapter xxi describes the soul's 'disguise,'
  from which the book passes on (Chapters xxii, xxiii) to extol the 'happy chance'
  which led it to journey 'in darkness and concealment' from its enemies, both without

0.07_-_1957, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Sweet Mother,
  The conflict that is tearing me apart is between this shadowy part of a past that does not want to die, and the new light. I wonder if, rather than escaping to some desert, it would not be wiser to resolve this conflict by objectify it, by writing this book I spoke to you about.
  
  But I would like to know whether it is really useful for me to write this book, or whether it is not just some inferior task, a makeshift.
  
  --
  
  So what is to be done? I intend asking your permission to leave as soon as the book is finished (I am determined to finish it, for it will rid me of the past it represents). I expect nothing from the world, except a bit of external space, in the absence of another space.
  
  --
  Sweet Mother,
  The book is finished.39 I would like to give it to you personally, if it would not disturb you, whenever you wish.
  
  --
  (On freedom)
  41Of Mother's French translation of these two books by Sri Aurobindo.
  

0.07_-_DARK_NIGHT_OF_THE_SOUL, #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  PROLOGUE
  IN this book are first set down all the stanzas which are to be expounded; afterwards, each of the stanzas is expounded separately, being set down before its exposition; and then each line is expounded separately and in turn, the line itself also being set down before the exposition. In the first two stanzas are expounded the effects of the two spiritual purgations: of the sensual part of man and of the spiritual part. In the other six are expounded various and wondrous effects of the spiritual illumination and union of love with God.
  
  --
  
  book THE FIRST
  Which treats of the Night of Sense.

01.01_-_The_One_Thing_Needful, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga

01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  This was the day when Satyavan must die.
  \t:End of book I - Canto I
  

01.02_-_The_Issue, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
    Writing the unfinished story of her soul
    In thoughts and actions graved in Nature's book,
    She accepted not to close the luminous page,
  --
    And burst the bounds of consciousness and Time.
    End of book I - Canto II
  

01.02_-_The_Object_of_the_Integral_Yoga, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga

01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  And felt the occult impulse behind man's will.
  Time's secrets were to him an oft-read book;
  The records of the future and the past
  --
  Lonely his days and splendid like the sun's.
  \t:End of book I - Canto III
  

01.03_-_Yoga_and_the_Ordinary_Life, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga

01.04_-_Motives_for_Seeking_the_Divine, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga

01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  That Godhead's seed might flower in mindless Space.
  \tEnd of book I - Canto IV

01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
    And there the tables of the sacred Law,
    There is the book of Being's index page;
    The text and glossary of the Vedic truth
  --
    He broke into another Space and Time.
    End of Canto V - End of book I
  

02.01_-_Metaphysical_Thought_and_the_Supreme_Truth, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga

02.01_-_The_World-Stair, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

02.03_-_The_Glory_and_the_Fall_of_Life, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

02.06_-_The_Integral_Yoga_and_Other_Yogas, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  I have never said that my Yoga was something brand new in all its elements. I have called it the integral Yoga and that means that it takes up the essence and many processes of the old Yogas - its newness is in its aim, standpoint and the totality of its method. In the earlier stages which is all I deal with in books like the Riddle or the Lights1 there is nothing in it that distinguishes it from the old Yogas except the aim underlying its comprehensiveness, the spirit in its movements and the ultimate significance it keeps before it - also the scheme of its psychology and its working, but as that was not and could not be developed systematically or schematically in these letters, it has not been grasped by those who are not already acquainted with it by mental familiarity or some amount of practice. The detail or method of the later stages of the Yoga which go into little known or untrodden regions, I have not made public and I do not at present intend to do so.
  

02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  As one who spells illumined characters,
  The key-book of a crabbed magician text,
  He scanned her subtle tangled weird designs

02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Then by the Angel of the Vigil Tower
  A name is struck from the recording book;
  A flame that sang in Heaven sinks quenched and mute;
  --
  The lyric of the love that waits through Time
  And the mystic volume of the book of Bliss
  And the message of the superconscient Fire.

02.09_-_The_Paradise_of_the_Life-Gods, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

02.12_-_The_Heavens_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

02.13_-_In_the_Self_of_Mind, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

02.14_-_The_World-Soul, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

02.15_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Greater_Knowledge, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Uncovered to him their deathless harmony
  And the key to the wonder-book of common things.
  In their uniting law stood up revealed
  --
  END OF CANTO FIFTEEN
  END OF book TWO
  

03.01_-_The_Evolution_of_Consciousness, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga

03.01_-_The_Pursuit_of_the_Unknowable, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  The book of the Divine Mother
  

03.02_-_The_Adoration_of_the_Divine_Mother, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

03.02_-_The_Gradations_of_Consciousness_The_Gradation_of_Planes, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga

03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

03.03_-_The_Inner_Being_and_the_Outer_Being, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga

03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  In the scant field of the ambiguous globe.
  END OF book THREE, CANTO FOUR
  END OF PART ONE

04.01_-_The_Birth_and_Childhood_of_the_Flame, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
   End of book IV - Canto I
  

04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
   End of book IV - Canto II
  

04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
   End of book IV - Canto III
  

04.04_-_The_Quest, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
   End of Canto IV - book IV
  

05.01_-_The_Destined_Meeting-Place, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  book FIVE
  
  The book of Love
  

05.02_-_Satyavan, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  A Veda-knower of the unwritten book
  Perusing the mystic scripture of her forms,

05.03_-_Satyavan_and_Savitri, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  END OF CANTO THREE
  END OF book FIVE
  

06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  book SIX
  
  The book of Fate
  
  --
  The word I have spoken can never be erased,
  It is written in the record book of God.
  

06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  A growing register of calamities
  Is the past's account, the future's book of Fate:
  The centuries pile man's follies and man's crimes
  --
  
  Fate is a balance drawn in Destiny's book.
  
  --
  END OF CANTO TWO
  END OF book SIX
  

07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  book SEVEN
  
  The book of Yoga
  
  --
  Each day a golden leaf torn cruelly out
  From her too slender book of love and joy.
  

07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  The ages' wisdom, shrivelled to scholiast lines,
  Shrank patterned into a copy-book device.
  
  --
  
  The sacred book lay on its sanctified desk
  Wrapped in interpretation's silken strings:
  --
  
  Register thy name in the book of the elite,
  Admitted by the sanction of the few,

07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  All Matter is a book I have perused;
  Only some pages now are left to read.

07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

07.07_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Cosmic_Spirit_and_the_Cosmic_Consciousness, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  END OF CANTO SEVEN
  END OF book SEVEN
  

08.03_-_Death_in_the_Forest, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  book EIGHT
  
  The book of Death
  
  --
  
  The book of Death was taken from Canto Three of an early version of Savitri which had only six cantos and an epilogue. It was slightly revised at a late stage and a number of new lines were added, but it was never fully worked into the final version of the poem. Its original designation, "Canto Three", has been retained as a reminder of this.
  
  --
  
  END OF book EIGHT
  END OF PART TWO

09.01_-_Towards_the_Black_Void, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  PART THREE
  bookS IX - XII
  
  book NINE
  
  The book of Eternal Night
  

09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  END OF CANTO TWO
  END OF book NINE
  

10.01_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  book TEN
  
  The book of the Double Twilight
  

10.02_-_The_Gospel_of_Death_and_Vanity_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real, #Savitri, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Satisfies his little longings like the beast;
  He pores upon life's book with student eyes.
  
  --
  END OF CANTO FOUR
  END OF book TEN
  

1.00_-_Gospel, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  Gaddhar was on the threshold of youth. He had become the pet of the women of the village. They loved to hear him talk, sing, or recite from the holy books. They enjoyed his knack of imitating voices. Their woman's instinct recognized the innate purity and guilelessness of this boy of clear skin, flowing hair, beaming eyes, smiling face, and inexhaustible fun. The pious elderly women looked upon him as Gopl, the Baby Krishna, and the younger ones saw in him the youthful Krishna of Vrindvan. He himself so idealised the love of the gopis for Krishna that he sometimes yearned to be born as a woman, if he must be born again, in order to be able to love Sri Krishna with all his heart and soul.
  
  --
  
  There came to Dakshinewar at this time a brhmin woman who was to play an important part in Sri Ramakrishna's spiritual unfoldment. Born in East Bengl, she was an adept in the Tntrik and Vaishnava methods of worship. She was slightly over fifty years of age, handsome, and garbed in the orange robe of a nun. Her sole possessions were a few books and two pieces of wearing-cloth.
  
  --
  
  Sri Ramakrishna set himself to the task of practising the disciplines of Tantra; and at the bidding of the Divine Mother Herself he accepted the Brhmani as his guru. He performed profound and delicate ceremonies in the Panchavati and under the bel-tree at the northern extremity of the temple compound. He practised all the disciplines of the sixty-four principal Tantra books, and it took him never more than three days to achieve the result promised in any one of them. After the observance of a few preliminary rites, he would be overwhelmed with a strange divine fervour and would go into Samdhi, where his mind would dwell in exaltation. Evil ceased to exist for him. The word "carnal"
  
  --
  
  Now one with Rdh, he manifested the great ecstatic love, the Mah-bhva which had found in her its fullest expression. Later Sri Ramakrishna said: "The manifestation in the same individual of the nineteen different kinds of emotion for God is called, in the books on bhakti, Mah-bhva. An ordinary man takes a whole lifetime to express even a single one of these. But in this body [meaning himself] there has been a complete manifestation of all nineteen."
  
  --
  
  He remains unmoved whether he - that is to say, his body - is worshipped by the good or tormented by the wicked; for he realizes that it is the one Brahman that manifests Itself through everything. The impact of such an experience devastates the body and mind. Consciousness becomes blasted, as it were, with an excess of Light. In the Vednta books it is said that after the experience of nirvikalpa Samdhi the body drops off like a dry leaf. Only those who are born with a special mission for the world can return from this height to the valleys of normal life. They live and move in the world for the welfare of mankind. They are invested with a supreme spiritual power. A divine glory shines through them.
  
  --
  
  Sri Ramakrishna had not read books, yet he possessed an encyclopaedic knowledge of religions and religious philosophies. This he acquired from his contacts with innumerable holy men and scholars. He had a unique power of assimilation; through meditation he made this knowledge a part of his being. Once, when he was asked by a disciple about the source of his seemingly inexhaustible knowledge, he replied: "I have not read; but I have heard the learned. I have made a garland of their knowledge, wearing it round my neck, and I have given it as an offering at the feet of the Mother."
  
  Sri Ramakrishna used to say that when the flower blooms the bees come to it for honey of their own accord. Now many souls began to visit Dakshinewar to satisfy their spiritual hunger. He, the devotee and aspirant, became the Master. Gauri, the great scholar who had been one of the first to proclaim Sri Ramakrishna an Incarnation of God, paid the Master a visit in 1870 and with the Master's blessings renounced the world. Nryan stri, another great pundit, who had mastered the six systems of Hindu philosophy and had been offered a lucrative post by the Maharaja of Jaipur, met the Master and recognized in him one who had realized in life those ideals which he himself had encountered merely in books. Sri Ramakrishna initiated Nryan astri, at his earnest request, into the life of sannys. Pundit Padmalochan, the court pundit of the Maharaja of Burdwan, well known for his scholarship in both the Vednta and the Nyya systems of philosophy, accepted the Master as an Incarnation of God. Krishnakishore, a Vedantist scholar, became devoted to the Master. And there arrived Viwanth Updhyya, who was to become a favourite devotee; Sri Ramakrishna always addressed him as "Captain". He was a high officer of the King of Nepal and had received the title of Colonel in recognition of his merit. A scholar of the Gita, the Bhgavata, and the Vednta philosophy, he daily performed the worship of his Chosen Deity with great devotion. "I have read the Vedas and the other scriptures", he said. "I have also met a good many monks and devotees in different places. But it is in Sri Ramakrishna's presence that my spiritual yearnings have been fulfilled. To me he seems to be the embodiment of the truths of the scriptures."
  
  --
  
  Keshab Chandra Sen and Sri Ramakrishna met for the first time in the garden house of Jaygopl Sen at Belgharia, a few miles from Dakshinewar, where the great Brhmo leader was staying with some of his disciples. In many respects the two were poles apart, though an irresistible inner attraction was to make them intimate friends. The Master had realized God as Pure Spirit and Consciousness, but he believed in the various forms of God as well. Keshab, on the other hand, regarded image worship as idolatry and gave allegorical explanations of the Hindu deities. Keshab was an orator and a writer of books and magazine articles; Sri Ramakrishna had a horror of lecturing and hardly knew how to write his own name. Keshab's fame spread far and wide, even reaching the distant shores of England; the Master still led a secluded life in the village of Dakshinewar. Keshab emphasized social reforms for India's regeneration; to Sri Ramakrishna God-realization was the only goal of life. Keshab considered himself a disciple of Christ and accepted in a diluted form the Christian sacraments and Trinity; Sri Ramakrishna was the simple child of Kli, the Divine Mother, though he too, in a different way, acknowledged Christ's divinity. Keshab was a householder and took a real interest in the welfare of his children, whereas Sri Ramakrishna was a paramahamsa and completely indifferent to the life of the world. Yet, as their acquaintance ripened into friendship, Sri Ramakrishna and Keshab held each other in great love and respect. Years later, at the news of Keshab's death, the Master felt as if half his body had become paralysed. Keshab's concepts of the harmony of religions and the Motherhood of God were deepened and enriched by his contact with Sri Ramakrishna.
  
  --
  
  ivanth, one day, was greatly impressed by the Master's utter simplicity and abhorrence of praise. He was seated with Sri Ramakrishna in the latter's room when several rich men of Calcutta arrived. The Master left the room for a few minutes. In the mean time Hriday, his nephew, began to describe his Samdhi to the visitors. The last few words caught the Master's ear as he entered the room. He said to Hriday: "What a mean-spirited fellow you must be to extol me thus before these rich men! You have seen their costly apparel and their gold watches and chains, and your object is to get from them as much money as you can. What do I care about what they think of me? (Turning to the gentlemen) No, my friends, what he has told you about me is not true. It was not love of God that made me absorbed in God and indifferent to external life. I became positively insane for some time. The sdhus who frequented this temple told me to practise many things. I tried to follow them, and the consequence was that my austerities drove me to insanity." This is a quotation from one of ivanth's books. He took the Master's words literally and failed to see their real import.
  
  --
  
  He claimed to have been initiated by Totpuri and used to say that he had been following the path of knowledge according to his guru's instructions. He possessed a large library of English and Sanskrit books. But though he pretended to have read them, most of the leaves were uncut. The Master knew all his limitations, yet enjoyed listening to him recite from the Vedas and other scriptures. He would always exhort Mahim to meditate on the meaning of the scriptural texts and to practise spiritual discipline.
  
  --
  
  The Master knew Hari's passion for Vednta. But he did not wish any of his disciples to become a dry ascetic or a mere bookworm. So he asked Hari to practise Vednta in life by giving up the unreal and following the Real. "But it is not so easy", Sri Ramakrishna said, "to realize the illusoriness of the world. Study alone does not help one very much.
  
  --
  
  It took the group only a few days to become adjusted to the new environment. The Holy Mother, assisted by Sri Ramakrishna's niece, Lakshmi Devi, and a few woman devotees, took charge of the cooking for the Master and his attendants. Surendra willingly bore the major portion of the expenses, other householders contributing according to their means. Twelve disciples were constant attendants of the Master: Narendra, Rkhl, Bburm, Niranjan, Jogin, Ltu, Trak, the elder Gopl, Kli, ashi, arat, and the younger Gopl. Srad, Harish, Hari, Gangdhar, and Tulasi visited the Master from time to time and practised sdhana at home. Narendra, preparing for his law examination, brought his books to the garden house in order to continue his studies during the infrequent spare moments. He encouraged his brother disciples to intensify their meditation, scriptural studies, and other spiritual disciplines. They all forgot their relatives and their worldly duties.
  

1.00_-_Gospel_Preface, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  author class:Sri Ramakrishna
  class:book
  class:chapter
  --
  
  "M", as the author modestly styles himself, was peculiarly qualified for his task. To a reverent love for his master, to a deep and experiential knowledge of that master's teaching, he added a prodigious memory for the small happenings of each day and a happy gift for recording them in an interesting and realistic way. Making good use of his natural gifts and of the circumstances in which he found himself, "M" produced a book unique, so far as my knowledge goes, in the literature of hagiography. No other saint has had so able and indefatigable a Boswell. Never have the small events of a contemplative's daily life been described with such a wealth of intimate detail. Never have the casual and unstudied utterances of a great religious teacher been set down with so minute a fidelity. To Western readers, it is true, this fidelity and this wealth of detail are sometimes a trifle disconcerting; for the social, religious and intellectual frames of reference within which Sri Ramakrishna did his thinking and expressed his feelings were entirely Indian. But after the first few surprises and bewilderments, we begin to find something peculiarly stimulating and instructive about the very strangeness and, to our eyes, the eccentricity of the man revealed to us in "M's" narrative. What a scholastic philosopher would call the "accidents" of Ramakrishna's life were intensely Hindu and therefore, so far as we in the West are concerned, unfamiliar and hard to understand; its "essence", however, was intensely mystical and therefore universal. To read through these conversations in which mystical doctrine alternates with an unfamiliar kind of humour, and where discussions of the oddest aspects of Hindu mythology give place to the most profound and subtle utterances about the nature of Ultimate Reality, is in itself a liberal, education in humility, tolerance and suspense of judgment. We must be grateful to the translator for his excellent version of a book so curious and delightful as a biographical document, so precious, at the same time, for what it teaches us of the life of the spirit.
  
  --
  
  The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna is the English translation of the Sri Sri Rmakrishna Kathmrita, the conversations of Sri Ramakrishna with his disciples, devotees, and visitors, recorded by Mahendranth Gupta, who wrote the book under the pseudonym of "M." The conversations in Bengali fill five volumes, the first of which was published in 1897 and the last shortly after M.'s death in 1932. Sri Ramakrishna Math, Madras, has published in two volumes an English translation of selected chapters from the monumental Bengali work. I have consulted these while preparing my translation.
  
  M., one of the intimate disciples of Sri Ramakrishna, was present during all the conversations recorded in the main body of the book and noted them down in his diary.
  
  --
  
  But these words were not the product of intellectual cogitation; they were rooted in direct experience. Hence, to students of religion, psychology, and physical science, these experiences of the Master are of immense value for the understanding of religious phenomena in general. No doubt Sri Ramakrishna was a Hindu of the Hindus; yet his experiences transcended the limits of the dogmas and creeds of Hinduism. Mystics of religions other than Hinduism will find in Sri Ramakrishna's experiences a corroboration of the experiences of their own prophets and seers. And this is very important today for the resuscitation of religious values. The sceptical reader may pass by the supernatural experiences; he will yet find in the book enough material to provoke his serious thought and solve many of his spiritual problems.
  
  There are repetitions of teachings and parables in the book. I have kept them purposely. They have their charm and usefulness, repeated as they were in different settings. Repetition is unavoidable in a work of this kind. In the first place, different seekers come to a religious teacher with questions of more or less identical nature; hence the answers will be of more or less identical pattern. Besides, religious teachers of all times and climes have tried, by means of repetition, to hammer truths into the stony soil of the recalcitrant human mind. Finally, repetition does not seem tedious if the ideas repeated are dear to a man's heart.
  
  I have thought it necessary to write a rather lengthy Introduction to the book. In it I have given the biography of the Master, descriptions of people who came in contact with him, short explanations of several systems of Indian religious thought intimately connected with Sri Ramakrishna's life, and other relevant matters which, I hope, will enable the reader better to understand and appreciate the unusual contents of this book. It is particularly important that the Western reader, unacquainted with Hindu religious thought, should first read carefully the introductory chapter, in order that he may fully enjoy these conversations. Many Indian terms and names have been retained in the book for want of suitable English equivalents. Their meaning is given either in the Glossary or in the foot-notes. The Glossary also gives explanations of a number of expressions unfamiliar to Western readers. The diacritical marks are explained under Notes on Pronunciation.
  
  --
  
  The book contains many songs sung either by the Master or by the devotees. These form an important feature of the spiritual tradition of Bengal and were for the most part written by men of mystical experience. For giving the songs their present form I am grateful to Mr. John Moffitt, Jr.
  
  --
  
  May this translation of the first book of its kind in the religious history of the world, being the record of the direct words of a prophet, help stricken humanity to come nearer to the Eternal Verity of life and remove dissension and quarrel from among the different faiths!
  
  --
  
  He was an educationist all his life both in a spiritual and in a secular sense. After he passed out of College, he took up work as headmaster in a number of schools in succession Narail High School, City School, Ripon College School, Metropolitan School, Aryan School, Oriental School, Oriental Seminary and Model School. The causes of his migration from school to school were that he could not get on with some of the managements on grounds of principles and that often his spiritual mood drew him away to places of pilgrimage for long periods. He worked with some of the most noted public men of the time like Iswar Chandra Vidysgar and Surendranath Banerjee. The latter appointed him as a professor in the City and Ripon Colleges where he taught subjects like English, philosophy, history and economics. In his later days he took over the Morton School, and he spent his time in the staircase room of the third floor of it, administering the school and preaching the message of the Master. He was much respected in educational circles where he was usually referred to as Rector Mahashay. A teacher who had worked under him writes thus in warm appreciation of his teaching methods: "Only when I worked with him in school could I appreciate what a great educationist he was. He would come down to the level of his students when teaching, though he himself was so learned, so talented. Ordinarily teachers confine their instruction to what is given in books without much thought as to whether the student can accept it or not. But M., would first of all gauge how much the student could take in and by what means. He would employ aids to teaching like maps, pictures and diagrams, so that his students could learn by seeing. Thirty years ago (from 1953) when the question of imparting education through the medium of the mother tongue was being discussed, M. had already employed Bengali as the medium of instruction in the Morton School." (M The Apostle and the Evangelist by Swami Nityatmananda Part I. P. 15.)
  
  --
  
  While many educated people heard Sri Ramakrishna's talks, it was given to this illustrious personage alone to leave a graphic and exact account of them for posterity, with details like date, hour, place, names and particulars about participants. Humanity owes this great book to the ingrained habit of diary-keeping with which M. was endowed.
  
  Even as a boy of about thirteen, while he was a student in the 3rd class of the Hare School, he was in the habit of keeping a diary. "Today on rising," he wrote in his diary, "I greeted my father and mother, prostrating on the ground before them" (Swami Nityatmananda's 'M The Apostle and the Evangelist' Part I. P 29.) At another place he wrote, "Today, while on my way to school, I visited, as usual, the temples of Kli, the Mother at Tharitharia, and of Mother Sitala, and paid my obeisance to them." About twenty-five years after, when he met the Great Master in the spring of 1882, it was the same instinct of a born diary-writer that made him begin his book, 'unique in the literature of hagiography', with the memorable words: "When hearing the name of Hari or Rma once, you shed tears and your hair stands on end, then you may know for certain that you do not have to perform devotions such as Sandhya any more."
  
  
  In addition to this instinct for diary-keeping, M. had great endowments contributing to success in this line. Writes Swami Nityatmananda who lived in close association with M., in his book entitled M - The Apostle and Evangelist: "M.'s prodigious memory combined with his extraordinary power of imagination completely annihilated the distance of time and place for him. Even after the lapse of half a century he could always visualise vividly, scenes from the life of Sri Ramakrishna. Superb too was his power to portray pictures by words."
  
  --
  
  During the Master's lifetime M. does not seem to have revealed the contents of his diary to any one. There is an unconfirmed tradition that when the Master saw him taking notes, he expressed apprehension at the possibility of his utilising these to publicise him like Keshab Sen; for the Great Master was so full of the spirit of renunciation and humility that he disliked being lionised. It must be for this reason that no one knew about this precious diary of M. for a decade until he brought out selections from it as a pamphlet in English in 1897 with the Holy Mother's blessings and permission. The Holy Mother, being very much pleased to hear parts of the diary read to her in Bengali, wrote to M.: "When I heard the Kathmrita, (Bengali name of the book) I felt as if it was he, the Master, who was saying all that." ( Ibid Part I. P 37.)
  
  --
  
  And Swamiji added a post script to the letter: "Socratic dialogues are Plato all over you are entirely hidden. Moreover, the dramatic part is infinitely beautiful. Everybody likes it here or in the West." Indeed, in order to be unknown, Mahendranath had used the pen-name M., under which the book has been appearing till now. But so great a book cannot remain obscure for long, nor can its author remain unrecognised by the large public in these modern times. M. and his book came to be widely known very soon and to meet the growing demand, a full-sized book, Vol. I of the Gospel, translated by the author himself, was published in 1907 by the Brahmavadin Office, Madras. A second edition of it, revised by the author, was brought out by the Ramakrishna Math, Madras in December 1911, and subsequently a second part, containing new chapters from the original Bengali, was published by the same Math in 1922. The full English translation of the Gospel by Swami Nikhilananda appeared first in 1942.
  
  
  In Bengali the book is published in five volumes, the first part having appeared in 1902
  
  --
  
  M. was, in every respect, a true missionary of Sri Ramakrishna right from his first acquaintance with him in 1882. As a school teacher, it was a practice with him to direct to the Master such of his students as had a true spiritual disposition. Though himself prohibited by the Master to take to monastic life, he encouraged all spiritually inclined young men he came across in his later life to join the monastic Order. Swami Vijnanananda, a direct Sannysin disciple of the Master and a President of the Ramakrishna Order, once remarked to M.: "By enquiry, I have come to the conclusion that eighty percent and more of the Sannysins have embraced the monastic life after reading the Kathmrita (Bengali name of the book) and coming in contact with you." ( M
  

1.00_-_Main, #Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  
  We have enjoined obligatory prayer upon you, with nine rak'ahs, to be offered at noon and in the morning and the evening unto God, the Revealer of Verses. We have relieved you of a greater number, as a command in the book of God. He, verily, is the Ordainer, the Omnipotent, the Unrestrained. When ye desire to perform this prayer, turn ye towards the Court of My Most Holy Presence, this Hallowed Spot that God hath made the Centre round which circle the Concourse on High, and which He hath decreed to be the Point of Adoration for the denizens of the Cities of Eternity, and the Source of Command unto all that are in heaven and on earth; and when the Sun of Truth and Utterance shall set, turn your faces towards the Spot that We have ordained for you. He, verily, is Almighty and Omniscient.
  
  --
  
  We have commanded you to pray and fast from the beginning of maturity; this is ordained by God, your Lord and the Lord of your forefathers. He hath exempted from this those who are weak from illness or age, as a bounty from His Presence, and He is the Forgiving, the Generous. God hath granted you leave to prostrate yourselves on any surface that is clean, for We have removed in this regard the limitation that had been laid down in the book; God, indeed, hath knowledge of that whereof ye know naught. Let him that findeth no water for ablution repeat five times the words "In the Name of God, the Most Pure, the Most Pure", and then proceed to his devotions. Such is the command of the Lord of all worlds. In regions where the days and nights grow long, let times of prayer be gauged by clocks and other instruments that mark the passage of the hours. He, verily, is the Expounder, the Wise.
  
  --
  
  God hath exempted women who are in their courses from obligatory prayer and fasting. Let them, instead, after performance of their ablutions, give praise unto God, repeating ninety-five times between the noon of one day and the next "Glorified be God, the Lord of Splendour and Beauty". Thus hath it been decreed in the book, if ye be of them that comprehend.
  
  --
  
  O Pen of the Most High! Say: O people of the world! We have enjoined upon you fasting during a brief period, and at its close have designated for you Naw-Ruz as a feast. Thus hath the Day-Star of Utterance shone forth above the horizon of the book as decreed by Him Who is the Lord of the beginning and the end. Let the days in excess of the months be placed before the month of fasting. We have ordained that these, amid all nights and days, shall be the manifestations of the letter Ha, and thus they have not been bounded by the limits of the year and its months. It behoveth the people of Baha, throughout these days, to provide good cheer for themselves, their kindred and, beyond them, the poor and needy, and with joy and exultation to hail and glorify their Lord, to sing His praise and magnify His Name; and when they endthese days of giving that precede the season of restraint-let them enter upon the Fast. Thus hath it been ordained by Him Who is the Lord of all mankind. The traveller, the ailing, those who are with child or giving suck, are not bound by the Fast; they have been exempted by God as a token of His grace. He, verily, is the Almighty, the Most Generous.
  
  --
  
  These are the ordinances of God that have been set down in the books and Tablets by His Most Exalted Pen. Hold ye fast unto His statutes and commandments, and be not of those who, following their idle fancies and vain imaginings, have clung to the standards fixed by their own selves, and cast behind their backs the standards laid down by God. Abstain from food and drink from sunrise to sundown, and beware lest desire deprive you of this grace that is appointed in the book.
  
  --
  
  Ye have been forbidden to commit murder or adultery, or to engage in backbiting or calumny; shun ye, then, what hath been prohibited in the holy books and Tablets.
  
  --
  
  Should the deceased leave offspring, but none of the other categories of heirs that have been specified in the book, they shall receive two thirds of the inheritance and the remaining third shall revert to the House of Justice. Such is the command which hath been given, in majesty and glory, by Him Who is the All-Possessing, the Most High.
  
  --
  
  If the deceased should leave none of the specified heirs, but have among his relatives nephews and nieces, whether on his brother's or his sister's side, two thirds of the inheritance shall pass to them; or, lacking these, to his uncles and aunts on both his father's and his mother's side, and after them to their sons and daughters. The remaining third of the inheritance shall, in any case, revert to the Seat of Justice. Thus hath it been laid down in the book by Him Who ruleth over all men.
  
  --
  
  Should the son of the deceased have passed away in the days of his father and have left children, they will inherit their father's share, as prescribed in the book of God. Divide ye their share amongst them with perfect justice. Thus have the billows of the Ocean of Utterance surged, casting forth the pearls of the laws decreed by the Lord of all mankind.
  
  --
  
  The kissing of hands hath been forbidden in the book. This practice is prohibited by God, the Lord of glory and command. To none is it permitted to seek absolution from another soul; let repentance be between yourselves and God. He, verily, is the Pardoner, the Bounteous, the Gracious, the One Who absolveth the repentant.
  
  --
  
  Thou speakest false! By God! What thou dost possess is naught but husks which We have left to thee as bones are left to dogs. By the righteousness of the one true God! Were anyone to wash the feet of all mankind, and were he to worship God in the forests, valleys, and mountains, upon high hills and lofty peaks, to leave no rock or tree, no clod of earth, but was a witness to his worship-yet, should the fragrance of My good pleasure not be inhaled from him, his works would never be acceptable unto God. Thus hath it been decreed by Him Who is the Lord of all. How many a man hath secluded himself in the climes of India, denied himself the things that God hath decreed as lawful, imposed upon himself austerities and mortifications, and hath not been remembered by God, the Revealer of Verses. Make not your deeds as snares wherewith to entrap the object of your aspiration, and deprive not yourselves of this Ultimate Objective for which have ever yearned all such as have drawn nigh unto God. Say: The very life of all deeds is My good pleasure, and all things depend upon Mine acceptance. Read ye the Tablets that ye may know what hath been purposed in the books of God, the All-Glorious, the Ever-Bounteous. He who attaineth to My love hath title to a throne of gold, to sit thereon in honour over all the world; he who is deprived thereof, though he sit upon the dust, that dust would seek refuge with God, the Lord of all Religions.
  
  --
  
  Endowments dedicated to charity revert to God, the Revealer of Signs. None hath the right to dispose of them without leave from Him Who is the Dawning-place of Revelation. After Him, this authority shall pass to the Aghsan, and after them to the House of Justice-should it be established in the world by then-that they may use these endowments for the benefit of the Places which have been exalted in this Cause, and for whatsoever hath been enjoined upon them by Him Who is the God of might and power. Otherwise, the endowments shall revert to the people of Baha who speak not except by His leave and judge not save in accordance with what God hath decreed in this Tablet-lo, they are the champions of victory betwixt heaven and earth-that they may use them in the manner that hath been laid down in the book by God, the Mighty, the Bountiful.
  
  --
  
  He Who is the Dawning-place of God's Cause hath no partner in the Most Great Infallibility. He it is Who, in the kingdom of creation, is the Manifestation of "He doeth whatsoever He willeth". God hath reserved this distinction unto His own Self, and ordained for none a share in so sublime and transcendent a station. This is the Decree of God, concealed ere now within the veil of impenetrable mystery. We have disclosed it in this Revelation, and have thereby rent asunder the veils of such as have failed to recognize that which the book of God set forth and who were numbered with the heedless.
  
  --
  
  Should anyone intentionally destroy a house by fire, him also shall ye burn; should anyone deliberately take another's life, him also shall ye put to death. Take ye hold of the precepts of God with all your strength and power, and abandon the ways of the ignorant. Should ye condemn the arsonist and the murderer to life imprisonment, it would be permissible according to the provisions of the book. He, verily, hath power to ordain whatsoever He pleaseth.
  
  --
  
  No marriage may be contracted without payment of a dowry, which hath been fixed for city-dwellers at nineteen mithqals of pure gold, and for village-dwellers at the same amount in silver. Whoso wisheth to increase this sum, it is forbidden him to exceed the limit of ninety-five mithqals. Thus hath the command been writ in majesty and power. If he content himself, however, with a payment of the lowest level, it shall be better for him according to the book. God, verily, enricheth whomsoever He willeth through both heavenly and earthly means, and He, in truth, hath power over all things.
  
  --
  
  He, truly, is cognizant of what I say. Let none contend with another, and let no soul slay another; this, verily, is that which was forbidden you in a book that hath lain concealed within the Tabernacle of glory. What! Would ye kill him whom God hath quickened, whom He hath endowed with spirit through a breath from Him? Grievous then would be your trespass before His throne! Fear God, and lift not the hand of injustice and oppression to destroy what He hath Himself raised up; nay, walk ye in the way of God, the True One. No sooner did the hosts of true knowledge appear, bearing the standards of Divine utterance, than the tribes of the religions were put to flight, save only those who willed to drink from the stream of everlasting life in a Paradise created by the breath of the All-Glorious.
  
  --
  
  God hath relieved you of the ordinance laid down in the Bayan concerning the destruction of books. We have permitted you to read such sciences as are profitable unto you, not such as end in idle disputation; better is this for you, if ye be of them that comprehend.
  
  --
  
  The day is approaching when thy agitation will have been transmuted into peace and quiet calm. Thus hath it been decreed in the wondrous book.
  
  --
  
  Should anyone acquire one hundred mithqals of gold, nineteen mithqals thereof are God's and to be rendered unto Him, the Fashioner of earth and heaven. Take heed, O people, lest ye deprive yourselves of so great a bounty. This We have commanded you, though We are well able to dispense with you and with all who are in the heavens and on earth; in it there are benefits and wisdoms beyond the ken of anyone but God, the Omniscient, the All-Informed. Say: By this means He hath desired to purify what ye possess and to enable you to draw nigh unto such stations as none can comprehend save those whom God hath willed. He, in truth, is the Beneficent, the Gracious, the Bountiful. O people! Deal not faithlessly with the Right of God, nor, without His leave, make free with its disposal. Thus hath His commandment been established in the holy Tablets, and in this exalted book. He who dealeth faithlessly with God shall in justice meet with faithlessness himself; he, however, who acteth in accordance with God's bidding shall receive a blessing from the heaven of the bounty of his Lord, the Gracious, the Bestower, the Generous, the Ancient of Days. He, verily, hath willed for you that which is yet beyond your knowledge, but which shall be known to you when, after this fleeting life, your souls soar heavenwards and the trappings of your earthly joys are folded up. Thus admonisheth you He in Whose possession is the Guarded Tablet.
  
  --
  
  Say: O leaders of religion! Weigh not the book of God with such standards and sciences as are current amongst you, for the book itself is the unerring Balance established amongst men. In this most perfect Balance whatsoever the peoples and kindreds of the earth possess must be weighed, while the measure of its weight should be tested according to its own standard, did ye but know it.
  
  --
  
  Say: This, verily, is the heaven in which the Mother book is treasured, could ye but comprehend it. He it is Who hath caused the Rock to shout, and the Burning Bush to lift up its voice, upon the Mount rising above the Holy Land, and proclaim: "The Kingdom is God's, the sovereign Lord of all, the All-Powerful, the Loving!"
  
  --
  
  Whoso interpreteth what hath been sent down from the heaven of Revelation, and altereth its evident meaning, he, verily, is of them that have perverted the Sublime Word of God, and is of the lost ones in the Lucid book.
  
  --
  
  When the ocean of My presence hath ebbed and the book of My Revelation is ended, turn your faces toward Him Whom God hath purposed, Who hath branched from this Ancient Root.
  
  --
  
  The number of months in a year, appointed in the book of God, is nineteen. Of these the first hath been adorned with this Name which overshadoweth the whole of creation.
  
  --
  
  Be watchful lest the concerns and preoccupations of this world prevent you from observing that which hath been enjoined upon you by Him Who is the Mighty, the Faithful. Be ye the embodiments of such steadfastness amidst mankind that ye will not be kept back from God by the doubts of those who disbelieved in Him when He manifested Himself, invested with a mighty sovereignty. Take heed lest ye be prevented by aught that hath been recorded in the book from hearkening unto this, the Living book, Who proclaimeth the truth: "Verily, there is no God but Me, the Most Excellent, the All-Praised." Look ye with the eye of equity upon Him Who hath descended from the heaven of Divine will and power, and be not of those who act unjustly.
  
  --
  
  Let none, in this Day, hold fast to aught save that which hath been manifested in this Revelation. Such is the decree of God, aforetime and hereafter-a decree wherewith the Scriptures of the Messengers of old have been adorned. Such is the admonition of the Lord, aforetime and hereafter-an admonition wherewith the preamble to the book of Life hath been embellished, did ye but perceive it. Such is the commandment of the Lord, aforetime and hereafter; beware lest ye choose instead the part of ignominy and abasement. Naught shall avail you in this Day but God, nor is there any refuge to flee to save Him, the Omniscient, the All-Wise. Whoso hath known Me hath known the Goal of all desire, and whoso hath turned unto Me hath turned unto the Object of all adoration. Thus hath it been set forth in the book, and thus hath it been decreed by God, the Lord of all worlds. To read but one of the verses of My Revelation is better than to peruse the Scriptures of both the former and latter generations. This is the Utterance of the All-Merciful, would that ye had ears to hear! Say: This is the essence of knowledge, did ye but understand.
  
  --
  
  Ye have been forbidden in the book of God to engage in contention and conflict, to strike another, or to commit similar acts whereby hearts and souls may be saddened. A fine of nineteen mithqals of gold had formerly been prescribed by Him Who is the Lord of all mankind for anyone who was the cause of sadness to another; in this Dispensation, however, He hath absolved you thereof and exhorteth you to show forth righteousness and piety. Such is the commandment which He hath enjoined upon you in this resplendent Tablet. Wish not for others what ye wish not for yourselves; fear God, and be not of the prideful. Ye are all created out of water, and unto dust shall ye return. Reflect upon the end that awaiteth you, and walk not in the ways of the oppressor. Give ear unto the verses of God which He Who is the sacred Lote-Tree reciteth unto you. They are assuredly the infallible balance, established by God, the Lord of this world and the next. Through them the soul of man is caused to wing its flight towards the Dayspring of Revelation, and the heart of every true believer is suffused with light. Such are the laws which God hath enjoined upon you, such His commandments prescribed unto you in His Holy Tablet; obey them with joy and gladness, for this is best for you, did ye but know.
  
  --
  
  Recite ye the verses of God every morn and eventide. Whoso faileth to recite them hath not been faithful to the Covenant of God and His Testament, and whoso turneth away from these holy verses in this Day is of those who throughout eternity have turned away from God. Fear ye God, O My servants, one and all. Pride not yourselves on much reading of the verses or on a multitude of pious acts by night and day; for were a man to read a single verse with joy and radiance it would be better for him than to read with lassitude all the Holy books of God, the Help in Peril, the Self-Subsisting. Read ye the sacred verses in such measure that ye be not overcome by languor and despondency. Lay not upon your souls that which will weary them and weigh them down, but rather what will lighten and uplift them, so that they may soar on the wings of the Divine verses towards the Dawning-place of His manifest signs; this will draw you nearer to God, did ye but comprehend.
  
  --
  
  Whoso hath not recognized this sublime and fundamental verity, and hath failed to attain this most exalted station, the winds of doubt will agitate him, and the sayings of the infidels will distract his soul. He that hath acknowledged this principle will be endowed with the most perfect constancy. All honour to this all-glorious station, the remembrance of which adorneth every exalted Tablet. Such is the teaching which God bestoweth on you, a teaching that will deliver you from all manner of doubt and perplexity, and enable you to attain unto salvation in both this world and in the next. He, verily, is the Ever-Forgiving, the Most Bountiful. He it is Who hath sent forth the Messengers, and sent down the books to proclaim "There is none other God but Me, the Almighty, the All-Wise".
  
  --
  
  O concourse of divines! When My verses were sent down, and My clear tokens were revealed, We found you behind the veils. This, verily, is a strange thing. Ye glory in My Name, yet ye recognized Me not at the time your Lord, the All-Merciful, appeared amongst you with proof and testimony. We have rent the veils asunder. Beware lest ye shut out the people by yet another veil. Pluck asunder the chains of vain imaginings, in the name of the Lord of all men, and be not of the deceitful. Should ye turn unto God and embrace His Cause, spread not disorder within it, and measure not the book of God with your selfish desires. This, verily, is the counsel of God aforetime and hereafter, and to this God's witnesses and chosen ones, yea, each and every one of Us, do solemnly attest.
  
  --
  
  We, verily, see amongst you him who taketh hold of the book of God and citeth from it proofs and arguments wherewith to repudiate his Lord, even as the followers of every other Faith sought reasons in their Holy books for refuting Him Who is the Help in Peril, the Self-Subsisting. Say: God, the True One, is My witness that neither the Scriptures of the world, nor all the books and writings in existence, shall, in this Day, avail you aught without this, the Living book, Who proclaimeth in the midmost heart of creation: "Verily, there is none other God but Me, the All-Knowing, the All-Wise."
  
  --
  
  O people of the world! When the Mystic Dove will have winged its flight from its Sanctuary of Praise and sought its far-off goal, its hidden habitation, refer ye whatsoever ye understand not in the book to Him Who hath branched from this mighty Stock.
  
  --
  
  O people of the Bayan! We, verily, set foot within the School of God when ye lay slumbering; and We perused the Tablet while ye were fast asleep. By the one true God! We read the Tablet ere it was revealed, while ye were unaware, and We had perfect knowledge of the book when ye were yet unborn. These words are to your measure, not to God's. To this testifieth that which is enshrined within His knowledge, if ye be of them that comprehend; and to this the tongue of the Almighty doth bear witness, if ye be of those who understand. I swear by God, were We to lift the veil, ye would be dumbfounded.
  
  --
  
  This is a book which hath become the Lamp of the Eternal unto the world, and His straight, undeviating Path amidst the peoples of the earth. Say: This is the Dayspring of Divine knowledge, if ye be of them that understand, and the Dawning-place of God's commandments, if ye be of those who comprehend.
  
  --
  
  Burden not an animal with more than it can bear. We, truly, have prohibited such treatment through a most binding interdiction in the book. Be ye the embodiments of justice and fairness amidst all creation.
  
  --
  
  This will be the cause of unity, could ye but comprehend it, and the greatest instrument for promoting harmony and civilization, would that ye might understand! We have appointed two signs for the coming of age of the human race: the first, which is the most firm foundation, We have set down in other of Our Tablets, while the second hath been revealed in this wondrous book.
  
  --
  
  It hath been forbidden you to smoke opium. We, truly, have prohibited this practice through a most binding interdiction in the book. Should anyone partake thereof, assuredly he is not of Me. Fear God, O ye endued with understanding!
  

1.00_-_Preface, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  
  BASED on the versicle in the Song of Songs, " Thy plants are an orchard of Pomegranates ", a book entitled Pardis Rimonim came to be written by Rabbi Moses Cordovero in the sixteenth century. By some authorities this philosopher is considered as the greatest lamp in post-Zoharic days of that spiritual Menorah, the Qabalah, which, with so rare a grace and so profuse an irradiation of the Supernal Light, illuminated the literature and religious philosophy of the Jewish people as well as their immediate and subsequent neighbours in the Dias- pora. The English equivalent of Pardis Rimonim - A Garden of Pomegranates - I have adopted as the title of my own modest work, although I am forced to confess that this latter has but little connection either in actual fact or in historicity with that of Cordovero. In the golden harvest of purely spiritual intimations which the Holy Qabalah brings, I truly feel that a veritable garden of the soul may be builded ; a garden of immense magnitude and lofty significance, wherein may be discovered by each one of us all manner and kind of exotic fruit and gracious flower of exquisite colour. The pomegranate, may I add, has always been for mystics everywhere a favourable object for recon- dite symbolism. The garden or orchard has likewise pro- duced in that book named The book of Splendour an almost inexhaustible treasury of spiritual imagery of superb and magnificent taste.
  
  This book goes forth then in the hope that, as a modern writer has put it:
    "There are not many, those who have no secret garden of the mind. For this garden alone can give refreshment when life is barren of peace or sustenance or satisfactory answer. Such sanctuaries may be reached by a certain philosophy or faith, by the guidance of a beloved author or an understanding friend, by way of the temples of music and art, or by groping after truth through the vast kingdoms of knowledge. They encompass almost always truth and beauty, and are radiant with the light that never was on sea or land."
  --
  
  It is fitting that a note of appreciation to my predecessors in Qabalistic research should accompany this work, in which I have endeavoured to present an exposition of the basic principles underlying the Qabalah, to serve as a text- book for its study. I have scrupulously avoided contention and unnecessary controversy.
  
  I am greatly indebted to Madame H. P. Blavatsky's writings, and I believe I shall not be too egotistical in claiming that a proper understanding of the principles outlined herein will reveal many points of subtlety and philosophic interest in her Secret Doctrine , and aid in the comprehension of this monumental work of hers. The same is also true of S. L. McGregor Mathers' translation of portions of the Zohar, " The Kaballah Unveiled ", and of Arthur E. Waite's excellent compendium of the Zohar, " The Secret Doctrine in Israel ", both of which are closed books, in the main, to most students of mystical lore and philosophy who do not have the specialized comparative knowledge which I have endeavoured to incorporate in this little book.
  
  --
  
  Since the question of Magick has been slightly dealt with in the last chapter of this book, it is perhaps advisable here to state that the interpretations given to certain doctrines and to some of the Hebrew letters border very closely on magical formulae. I have purposely refrained, however, from entering into a deeper consideration of the Practical Qabalah, although several hints of value may be discovered in the explanation of the Tetragrammaton, for example, which may prove of no inconsiderable service. As I have previously remarked, this book is primarily intended as an elementary textbook of the Qabalah, interpreted as a new system for philosophical classification. This must consti- tute my sole excuse for what may appear to be a refusal to deal more adequately with methods of Attainment.
  - Israel Regardie.

1.00_-_The_Constitution_of_the_Human_Being, #Theosophy, #Rudolf Steiner, #Theosophy

1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #C. G. Jung, #Psychology
  
    Yet who today knows this? Who knows the way to the eternally fruitful climes of the soul? You seek the way through mere appearances, you study books and give ear to all kinds of opinion.
  
  --
  
    1. Medieval manuscripts were numbered by folios instead of pages. The front side of the folio is the recto (the right-hand page of an open book), and the back is the verso (the left-hand of an open book). In Liber Primus, Jung followed this practice. He reverted to contemporary pagination in Liber Secundus. All citations for photos refer back to the page in the Red books German Caligraphy Edition.
    2. In 1921, Jung cited the first three verses of this passage (from Luther's Bible), noting: "The birth of the Savior, the development of the redeeming symbol, takes place where one does not expect it, and from precisely where a solution is most improbable" (Psychological Types, CW 6, 439).
  --
  43. The Draft continues: He who strives only for things will sink into poverty as outer wealth increases, and his soul will be afflicted by protracted illness (p. 17).
  44. The Draft continues: This parable about re-finding the soul, my friends, is meant to show you that you have only seen me as half a man, since my soul had lost me. I am certain that you did not notice this; because how many are with their souls today? Yet without the soul, there is no path that leads beyond these times (p. 17). In her diary notes Cary Baynes commented on this passage: February 8th [1924]. I came to your conversation with your soul. All that you say is said in the right way and is sincere. It is no cry of the young man awakening into life but that of the mature man who has lived fully and richly in ways of the world and yet knows almost abruptly one night, say, that he has missed the essence. The vision came at the height of your power, when you could have gone on just as you were with perfect worldly success. I do not know how you were strong enough to give it heed. I am really for everything you say and understand it. Everyone who has lost the connection with his soul or has known how to give it life ought to have a chance to see this book. Every word so far lives for me and strengthens me just where I feel weak, but as you say the world is very far away from it in mood today. That does not matter too much, a book can swing even a whole world if it is written in fire and blood (CFB).
  

1.01_-_Appearance_and_Reality, #The Problems of Philosophy, #Bertrand Russell, #Philosophy
  In daily life, we assume as certain many things which, on a closer scrutiny, are found to be so full of apparent contradictions that only a great amount of thought enables us to know what it is that we really may believe. In the search for certainty, it is natural to begin with our present experiences, and in some sense, no doubt, knowledge is to be derived from them. But any statement as to what it is that our immediate experiences make us know is very likely to be wrong. It seems to me that
  I am now sitting in a chair, at a table of a certain shape, on which I see sheets of paper with writing or print. By turning my head I see out of the window buildings and clouds and the sun. I believe that the sun is about ninety-three million miles from the earth; that it is a hot globe many times bigger than the earth; that, owing to the earth's rotation, it rises every morning, and will continue to do so for an indefinite time in the future. I believe that, if any other normal person comes into my room, he will see the same chairs and tables and books and papers as I see, and that the table which I see is the same as the table which I feel pressing against my arm. All this seems to be so evident as to be hardly worth stating, except in answer to a man who doubts whether I know anything. Yet all this may be reasonably doubted, and all of it requires much careful discussion before we can be sure that we have stated it in a form that is wholly true.
  

1.01_-_Description_of_the_Castle, #The Interior Castle or The Mansions, #Saint Teresa of Avila, #Christianity
  
    1. Plan of this book. 2. The Interior Castle. 3. Our curable self ignorance. 4. God dwells in the centre of the soul. 5. Why all souls do not receive certain favours. 6. Reasons for speaking of these favours. 7. The entrance of the Castle. 8. Entering into oneself. 9. Prayer. 10. Those who dwell in the first mansion. 11. Entering. 12. Difficulties of the subject.
  
  --
  
  8.: Certain books on prayer that you have read advise the soul to enter into itself,10' and this is what I mean. I was recently told by a great theologian that souls without prayer are like bodies, palsied and lame, having hands and feet they cannot use.' Just so, there are souls so infirm and accustomed to think of nothing but earthly matters, that there seems no cure for them. It appears impossible for them to retire into their own hearts; accustomed as they are to be with the reptiles and other creatures which live outside the castle, they have come at last to imitate their habits. Though these souls are by their nature so richly endowed, capable of communion even with God Himself, yet their case seems hopeless. Unless they endeavour to understand and remedy their most miserable plight, their minds will become, as it were, bereft of movement, just as Lot's wife became a pillar of salt for looking backwards in disobedience to God's command.11
  

1.01_-_Economy, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  I should not obtrude my affairs so much on the notice of my readers if very particular inquiries had not been made by my townsmen concerning my mode of life, which some would call impertinent, though they do not appear to me at all impertinent, but, considering the circumstances, very natural and pertinent. Some have asked what I got to eat; if I did not feel lonesome; if I was not afraid; and the like. Others have been curious to learn what portion of my income I devoted to charitable purposes; and some, who have large families, how many poor children I maintained. I will therefore ask those of my readers who feel no particular interest in me to pardon me if I undertake to answer some of these questions in this book. In most books, the _I_, or first person, is omitted; in this it will be retained; that, in respect to egotism, is the main difference. We commonly do not remember that it is, after all, always the first person that is speaking. I should not talk so much about myself if there were anybody else whom I knew as well.
  
  --
  
  But men labor under a mistake. The better part of the man is soon plowed into the soil for compost. By a seeming fate, commonly called necessity, they are employed, as it says in an old book, laying up treasures which moth and rust will corrupt and thieves break through and steal. It is a fools life, as they will find when they get to the end of it, if not before. It is said that Deucalion and Pyrrha created men by throwing stones over their heads behind them:
  
  --
  
  Some of you, we all know, are poor, find it hard to live, are sometimes, as it were, gasping for breath. I have no doubt that some of you who read this book are unable to pay for all the dinners which you have actually eaten, or for the coats and shoes which are fast wearing or are already worn out, and have come to this page to spend borrowed or stolen time, robbing your creditors of an hour. It is very evident what mean and sneaking lives many of you live, for my sight has been whetted by experience; always on the limits, trying to get into business and trying to get out of debt, a very ancient slough, called by the Latins _s alienum_, anothers brass, for some of their coins were made of brass; still living, and dying, and buried by this others brass; always promising to pay, promising to pay, tomorrow, and dying today, insolvent; seeking to curry favor, to get custom, by how many modes, only not state-prison offences; lying, flattering, voting, contracting yourselves into a nutshell of civility or dilating into an atmosphere of thin and vaporous generosity, that you may persuade your neighbor to let you make his shoes, or his hat, or his coat, or his carriage, or import his groceries for him; making yourselves sick, that you may lay up something against a sick day, something to be tucked away in an old chest, or in a stocking behind the plastering, or, more safely, in the brick bank; no matter where, no matter how much or how little.
  
  --
  Let us consider for a moment what most of the trouble and anxiety which
  I have referred to is about, and how much it is necessary that we be troubled, or, at least, careful. It would be some advantage to live a primitive and frontier life, though in the midst of an outward civilization, if only to learn what are the gross necessaries of life and what methods have been taken to obtain them; or even to look over the old day-books of the merchants, to see what it was that men most commonly bought at the stores, what they stored, that is, what are the grossest groceries. For the improvements of ages have had but little influence on the essential laws of mans existence; as our skeletons, probably, are not to be distinguished from those of our ancestors.
  
  --
  The grand necessity, then, for our bodies, is to keep warm, to keep the vital heat in us. What pains we accordingly take, not only with our
  Food, and Clothing, and Shelter, but with our beds, which are our night-clothes, robbing the nests and breasts of birds to prepare this shelter within a shelter, as the mole has its bed of grass and leaves at the end of its burrow! The poor man is wont to complain that this is a cold world; and to cold, no less physical than social, we refer directly a great part of our ails. The summer, in some climates, makes possible to man a sort of Elysian life. Fuel, except to cook his Food, is then unnecessary; the sun is his fire, and many of the fruits are sufficiently cooked by its rays; while Food generally is more various, and more easily obtained, and Clothing and Shelter are wholly or half unnecessary. At the present day, and in this country, as I find by my own experience, a few implements, a knife, an axe, a spade, a wheelbarrow, &c., and for the studious, lamplight, stationery, and access to a few books, rank next to necessaries, and can all be obtained at a trifling cost. Yet some, not wise, go to the other side of the globe, to barbarous and unhealthy regions, and devote themselves to trade for ten or twenty years, in order that they may live,that is, keep comfortably warm,and die in New England at last. The luxuriously rich are not simply kept comfortably warm, but unnaturally hot; as I implied before, they are cooked, of course _ la mode_.
  
  --
  
  Our manners have been corrupted by communication with the saints. Our hymn-books resound with a melodious cursing of God and enduring him forever. One would say that even the prophets and redeemers had rather consoled the fears than confirmed the hopes of man. There is nowhere recorded a simple and irrepressible satisfaction with the gift of life, any memorable praise of God. All health and success does me good, however far off and withdrawn it may appear; all disease and failure helps to make me sad and does me evil, however much sympathy it may have with me or I with it. If, then, we would indeed restore mankind by truly Indian, botanic, magnetic, or natural means, let us first be as simple and well as Nature ourselves, dispel the clouds which hang over our own brows, and take up a little life into our pores. Do not stay to be an overseer of the poor, but endeavor to become one of the worthies of the world.
  

1.01_-_Foreward, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  N ANCIENT times the Veda was revered as a sacred book
  of wisdom, a great mass of inspired poetry, the work of
  --
  of the Upanishads and in the Gita, but both look on the Veda as
  a book of Knowledge. Even, the Sruti including both Veda and
  Upanishad was regarded as the supreme authority for spiritual
  --
  
  It is true that an antique language, obsolete words, - Yaska counts more than four hundred of which he did not know the meaning, - and often a difficult and out-of-date diction helped to obscure their meaning; the loss of the sense of their symbols, the glossary of which they kept to themselves, made them unintelligible to later generations; even in the time of the Upanishads the spiritual seekers of the age had to resort to initiation and meditation to penetrate into their secret knowledge, while the scholars afterwards were at sea and had to resort to conjecture and to concentrate on a mental interpretation or to explain by myths, by the legends of the Brahmanas themselves often symbolic and obscure. But still to make this discovery will be the sole way of getting at the true sense and the true value of the Veda. We must take seriously the hint of Yaska, accept the Rishi's description of the Veda's contents as "seer-wisdoms, secret words", and look for whatever clue we can find to this ancient wisdom. Otherwise the Veda must remain for ever a sealed book; grammarians, etymologists, scholastic conjectures will not open to us the sealed chamber.
  
  --
  
  He is not thinking of the Nature-Power presiding over the outer element of fire or of the fire of the ceremonial sacrifice. Or he speaks of Saraswati as one who impels the words of Truth and awakes to right thinkings or as one opulent with the thought: Saraswati awakes to consciousness or makes us conscious of the "Great Ocean and illumines all our thoughts." It is surely not the River Goddess whom he is thus hymning but the Power, theRiver if you will, of inspiration, the word of the Truth, bringing its light into our thoughts, building up in us that Truth, an inner knowledge. The Gods constantly stand out in their psychological functions; the sacrifice is the outer symbol of an inner work, an inner interchange between the gods and men, - man givingwhat he has, the gods giving in return the horses of power, the herds of light, the heroes of Strength to be his retinue, winning for him victory in his battle with the hosts of Darkness, Vritras, Dasyus, Panis. When the Rishi says, "Let us become conscious whether by the War-Horse or by the Word of a Strength beyond men", his words have either a mystic significance or they have no coherent meaning at all. In the portions translated in this book we have many mystic verses and whole hymns which, however mystic, tear the veil off the outer sacrificial images covering the real sense of the Veda. "Thought", says the Rishi, "has nourished for us human things in the Immortals, in the Great Heavens; it is the milch-cow which milks of itself the wealth of many forms" - the many kinds of wealth, cows, horses and the rest for which the sacrificer prays; evidently this is no material wealth, it is something which Thought, the Thought embodied in the Mantra, can give and it is the result of the same Thought that nourishes our human things in the Immortals, in the Great Heavens. A process of divinisation, and of a bringing down of great and luminous riches, treasures won from the Gods by the inner work of sacrifice, is hinted at in terms necessarily covert but still for one who knows how to read these secret words, nin.ya vacamsi, sufficiently expressive, kavaye nivacana. Again, Night and Dawn the eternal sisters are like "joyful weaving women weaving the weft of our perfected works into the form of a sacrifice."
  
  --
  ghr.tacm, the luminous thought or understanding occur. There
  is a curious passage in one of the hymns translated in this book
  calling on Fire as priest of the sacrifice to flood the offering with
  --
  not quite complete in its scope or composed on a preconceived
  and well-ordered plan it was not published in book-form and
  is therefore not yet available to the reading public.18 It was
  --
  kept close to the text; the renderings of those hymns in the
  second and sixth Mandalas are now published in this book for
  the first time as well as a few from the first Mandala.19 But to

1.01_-_Historical_Survey, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  
  The confusion is also due to the efforts of those theo- logians in mediaeval times who, being desirous of saving their benighted Hebrew brethren from the pangs of eternal torture and damnation in the nether regions, muddled and tampered not only with the original texts but with extreme sectarian interpretations in order to show that the authors of the Qabalistic books were desirous that their Jewish posterity should become apostates to Christianity.
  
  --
  
  This statement is altogether without foundation in fact, for a careful perusal of the books of the Old Testament, the Talmud, and other well-known Rabbinical records which have come down to us, indicate that there the early monumental bases of the Qabalah may be found.
  The Qabalistic doctrine admittedly is not explicit there, but analysis reveals it to be tacitly assumed, and the many cryptic remarks of several of the more important Rabbis can have no particle of meaning without the implication of a mystical philosophy cherished and venerated in their hearts, and affecting the whole of their teaching.
  --
  Qabalah, analyses very carefully these objections advanced by Ginsburg and others, and I am bound to confess that his answers, ad seriatim, confute this theory of the thir- teenth-century origin of the Zohar. Dr. S. M. Schiller-
  Szinessy, one-time Reader in Rabbinic and Talmudic literature at Cambridge, says : " The nucleus of the book is of Mishnic times. Rabbi Shimeon ben Yochai was the author of the Zohar in the same sense that Rabbi Yohanan was the author of the Palestinian Talmud ; i.e., he gave the first impulse to the composition of the book." And I find that Mr. Arthur Edward Waite in his scholarly and classic work The Holy Kaballah, wherein he examines most of the arguments concerning the origin and history of this
  book of Splendour, inclines to the view hereinbefore set forth, steering a middle course, believing that while much of it does pertain to the era of ben Leon, nevertheless a
  
  --
  
  About 1240 a.d. was born Abraham Abulafia, who became a celebrated figure - bringing, however, a great deal of dis- repute to the name of this theosophy. He studied philo- logy* medicine, and philosophy, as well as those few books on the Qabalah which were available at the time. He soon perceived that the Pythagorean Number Philosophy was identical with that expounded in the Sepher Yetsirah, and later, becoming dissatisfied with academic research, he turned towards that aspect of Qabalah termed nbsp n'ova or the Practical Qabalah, which, to-day, we term
  Magick. Unfortunately, the Qabalists in the public eye at that time were not acquainted with the developed specialized technique that is now available, derived as it is from the Collegii ad Spiritum Sanctum. The result was that
  --
  
  The Zohar is the next major development. This book combining, absorbing, and synthesizing the different features and doctrines of the previous schools, made its ddbut, creating a profound sensation in theological and philosophical circles by reason of its speculations concerning
  God, the doctrine of Emanations, the evolution of the
  Universe, the Soul and its transmigrations, and its final return to the Source of All. The new era in the history of the Qabalah created by the appearance of this storehouse of legend, philosophy, and anecdote, has continued right down to the present day. Yet nearly every writer who has since espoused the doctrines of the Qabalah has made the
  Zohar his principal textbook, and its exponents have applied themselves assiduously to commentaries, epitomes, and translations - missing, however, with only a few exceptions, the real underlying possibilities of the Qabalistic
  Tree of Life.
  --
  Cordovero. He himself was a zealous and brilliant student both of the Talmud and Rabbinic lore, but found that the simple retirement of a life of study did not satisfy him.
  He thereupon retired to the banks of the Nile, where he gave himself over exclusively to meditation and ascetic practices, receiving visions of an amazing character. He wrote a book outlining his conceptions of the theory of Reincar- nation ( haGilgolim ). A pupil of his. Rabbi Chayim Vital, produced a large work. The Tree of Life, based on the oral teachings of the Master, thereby giving a tremendous impetus to Qabalistic study and practice.
  
  --
   treatise is devoted. The spiritual revivalist movement inaugurated among the Jews of Poland by Rabbi Israel
  Baal Shem Tov in the first half of the eighteenth century is sufficiently important to warrant some mention here. For although Chassidism, as that movement was called, derives its enthusiasm from contact with nature and the great out-doors of the Carpathians, it has its primary literary origin and significant inspiration in the books which consti- tute the Qabalah. Chassidism gave the doctrines of the
  Aohar to the " Am ha-aretz " in a way in which no previous set of Rabbis had succeeded in doing, and it would, more- over, appear that the Practical Qabalah received a con- siderable impetus at the same time. For we find that

1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Theosophy
   p. 12
   different aspect. Of course, this rule of life alone will not yet enable him to see, for instance, what is described as the human aura, because for this still higher training is necessary. But he can rise to this higher training if he has previously undergone a rigorous training in devotion. (In the last chapter of his book Theosophy, the author describes fully the Path of Knowledge; here it is intended to give some practical details.)
  

1.01_-_'Imitation'_the_common_principle_of_the_Arts_of_Poetry., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Philosophy

1.01_-_Introduction, #The Lotus Sutra, #Anonymous, #Various

1.01_-_Isha_Upanishad, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga

1.01_-_MAXIMS_AND_MISSILES, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy

1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  HE WORLD abounds with scriptures sacred and profane, with revelations and half-revelations, with religions and philosophies, sects and schools and systems. To these the many minds of a half-ripe knowledge or no knowledge at all attach themselves with exclusiveness and passion and will have it that this or the other book is alone the eternal Word of
  God and all others are either impostures or at best imperfectly inspired, that this or that philosophy is the last word of the reasoning intellect and other systems are either errors or saved only by such partial truth in them as links them to the one true philosophical cult. Even the discoveries of physical Science have been elevated into a creed and in its name religion and spirituality banned as ignorance and superstition, philosophy as frippery and moonshine. And to these bigoted exclusions and vain wranglings even the wise have often lent themselves, misled by some spirit of darkness that has mingled with their light and overshadowed it with some cloud of intellectual egoism or spiritual pride. Mankind seems now indeed inclined to grow a little modester and wiser; we no longer slay our fellows in the name of God's truth or because they have minds differently trained or differently constituted from ours; we are less ready to curse and revile our neighbour because he is wicked or presumptuous enough to differ from us in opinion; we are ready even to admit that Truth is everywhere and cannot be our sole monopoly; we are beginning to look at other religions and philosophies for the truth and help they contain and no longer merely in order to damn them as false or criticise what we conceive to be their errors. But we are still apt to declare that our truth gives us the supreme knowledge which other religions or philosophies
  --
  Essays on the Gita
   have missed or only imperfectly grasped so that they deal either with subsidiary and inferior aspects of the truth of things or can merely prepare less evolved minds for the heights to which we have arrived. And we are still prone to force upon ourselves or others the whole sacred mass of the book or gospel we admire, insisting that all shall be accepted as eternally valid truth and no iota or underline or diaeresis denied its part of the plenary inspiration.
  
  --
  5
   its exact content and association that we can never be quite sure of understanding an ancient book of this kind precisely in the sense and spirit it bore to its contemporaries. What is of entirely permanent value is that which besides being universal has been experienced, lived and seen with a higher than the intellectual vision.
  

1.01_-_Sets_down_the_first_line_and_begins_to_treat_of_the_imperfections_of_beginners., #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity

1.01_-_Soul_and_God, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #C. G. Jung, #Psychology
  
  The Red book
  
  31
   teach and learn it? Scholarliness alone is not enough; there is a knowledge of the heart that gives deeper insight. 54 The knowledge of the heart is in no book and is not to be found in the mouth of any teacher, but grows out of you like the green seed from the dark earth. Scholarliness belongs to the spirit of this time, but this spirit in no way grasps the dream, since the soul is everywhere that scholarly knowledge is not.
  
  --
  
  The Red book
  
  --
  
  Your God should not be a man of mockery, rather you yourself will be the man of mockery. You should mock yourself and rise above this. If you have still not learned this from the old holy books, then go there, drink the blood and eat the flesh of him who was mocked 61 and tormented for the sake of our sins, so that you totally become his nature, deny his being-apart-from-you; you should be he himself not Christians but Christ, otherwise you will be of no use to the coming God.
  
  --
  
  The Red book
  
  --
  
  48. The Draft continues: I belonged to men and things. I did not belong to myself In Black book
  2, Jung states that he wandered for eleven years (p. 19). He had stopped writing in this book in
  1902, taking it up again in the autumn of 1913.
  
  49. Black book 2 continues: 'And I found you again only through the soul of the woman (p. 8).
  
  50. Black book 2 continues: Look, I bear a wound that is as yet not healed, my ambition to make an impression (p. 8).
  
  51. Black book 2 continues: I must tell myself most clearly: does He use the image of a child that lives in every man's' soul? Were Horus, Tages, and Christ not children? Dionysus and Heracles were also divine children. Did Christ, the God of man, not call himself the son of man? What was his innermost thought in doing so? Should the daughter of man be God's name? (p. 9).
  
  --
  
  The Red book
  

1.01_-_the_Call_to_Adventure, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology

1.01_-_The_Corporeal_Being_of_Man, #Theosophy, #Rudolf Steiner, #Theosophy

1.01_-_The_Dark_Forest._The_Hill_of_Difficulty._The_Panther,_the_Lion,_and_the_Wolf._Virgil., #The Divine Comedy, #Dante Alighieri, #Christianity

1.01_-_The_Divine_and_The_Universe, #Words Of The Mother III, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

1.01_-_The_Four_Aids, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  3:Nothing can be taught to the mind which is not already concealed as potential knowledge in the unfolding soul of the creature. So also all perfection of which the outer man is capable, is only a realising of the eternal perfection of the Spirit within him. We know the Divine and become the Divine, because we are That already in our secret nature. All teaching is a revealing, all becoming is an unfolding. Self-attainment is the secret; self-knowledge and an increasing consciousness are the means and the process.
  4:The usual agency of this revealing is the Word, the thing heard (sruta). The Word may come to us from within; it may come to us from without. But in either case, it is only an agency for setting the hidden knowledge to work. The word within may be the utterance of the inmost soul in us which is always open to the Divine or it may be the word of the secret and universal Teacher who is seated in the hearts of all. There are rare cases in which none other is needed, for all the rest of the Yoga is an unfolding under that constant touch and guidance; the lotus of the knowledge discloses itself from within by the power of irradiating effulgence which proceeds from the Dweller in the lotus of the heart. Great indeed, but few are those to whom self-knowledge from within is thus sufficient and who do not need to pass under the dominant influence of a written book or a living teacher.
  5:Ordinarily, the Word from without, representative of the Divine, is needed as an aid ill the work of self-unfolding; and it may be either a word from the past or the more powerful word of the living Guru. In some cases this representative word is only taken as a sort of excuse for the inner power to awaken and manifest; it is, as it were, a concession of the omnipotent and omniscient Divine to the generality of a law that governs Nature. Thus it is said in the Upanishads of Krishna, son of Devaki, that he received a word of the Rishi Ghora and had the knowledge. So Ramakrishna, having attained by his own internal effort the central illumination, accepted several teachers in the different paths of Yoga, but always showed in the manner and swiftness of his realisation that this acceptance was a concession to the general rule by which effective knowledge must be received as by a disciple from a Guru.
  6:But usually the representative influence occupies a much larger place in the life of the Sadhaka. If the Yoga is guided by a received written Shastra, -- some Word from the past which embodies the experience of former Yogins, -- it may be practised either by personal effort alone or with the aid of a Guru. The spiritual knowledge is then gained through meditation on the truths that are taught and it is made living and conscious by their realisation in the personal experience; the Yoga proceeds by the results of prescribed methods taught in a Scripture or a tradition and reinforced and illumined by the instructions of the Master. This is a narrower practice, but safe and effective within its limits, because it follows a well-beaten track to a long familiar goal.
  7:For the Sadhaka of the Integral Yoga it is necessary to remember that no written Shastra, however great its authority or however large its spirit, can be more than a partial expression of the eternal Knowledge. He will use, but never bind himself even by the greatest Scripture. Where the Scripture is profound, wide, catholic, it may exercise upon him an influence for the highest good and of incalculable importance. It may be associated in his experience with his awakening to crowning verities and his realisation of the highest experiences. His Yoga may be governed for a long time by one Scripture or by several successively, -- if it is in the line of the great Hindu tradition, by the Gita, for example, the Upanishads, the Veda. Or it may be a good part of his development to include in its material a richly varied experience of the truths of many Scriptures and make the future opulent with all that is best in the past. But in the end he must take his station, or better still, if he can, always and from the beginning he must live in his own soul beyond the written Truth, -- sabdabrahmativartate -- beyond all that he has heard and all that he has yet to hear, -- srotaryasya srutasya ca. For he is not the Sadhaka of a book or of many books; he is a Sadhaka of the Infinite.
  8:Another kind of Shastra is not Scripture, but a statement of the science and methods, the effective principles and way of working of the path of Yoga which the Sadhaka elects to follow. Each path has its Shastra, either written or traditional, passing from mouth to mouth through a long line of Teachers. In India a great authority, a high reverence even is ordinarily attached to the written or traditional teaching. All the lines of the Yoga are supposed to be fixed and the Teacher who has received the Shastra by tradition and realised it in practice guides the disciple along the immemorial tracks. One often even hears the objection urged against a new practice, a new Yogic teaching, the adoption of a new formula, "It is not according to the Shastra." But neither in fact nor in the actual practice of the Yogins is there really any such entire rigidity of an iron door shut against new truth, fresh revelation, widened experience. The written or traditional teaching expresses the knowledge and experiences of many centuries systematised, organised, made attainable to the beginner. Its importance and utility are therefore immense. But a great freedom of variation and development is always practicable. Even so highly scientific a system as Rajayoga can be practised on other lines than the organised method of Patanjali. Each of the three paths, trimarga 51, breaks into many bypaths which meet again at the goal. The general knowledge on which the Yoga depends is fixed, but the order, the succession, the devices, the forms must be allowed to vary, for the needs and particular impulsions of the individual nature have to be satisfied even while the general truths remain firm and constant.
  --
  38:Time is a field of circumstances and forces meeting and working out a resultant progression whose course it measures. To the ego it is a tyrant or a resistance, to the Divine an instrument. Therefore, while our effort is personal. Time appears as a resistance, for it presents to us all the obstruction of the forces that conflict with our own. When the divine working and the personal are combined in our consciousness, it appears as a medium and condition. When the two become one, it appears as a servant and instrument.
  39:The ideal attitude of the Sadhaka towards Time is to have an endless patience as if he had all eternity for his fulfilment and yet to develop the energy that shall realise now and with an ever-increasing mastery and pressure of rapidity till it reaches the miraculous instantaneousness of the supreme divine Transformation.

1.01_-_The_Highest_Meaning_of_the_Holy_Truths, #The Blue Cliff Records, #Yuanwu Keqin, #Zen

1.01_-_The_Human_Aspiration, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  class:chapter
  
  0:She follows to the goal of those that are passing on beyond, she is the first in the eternal succession of the dawns that are coming, - Usha widens bringing out that which lives, awakening someone who was dead. . . . What is her scope when she harmonises with the dawns that shone out before and those that now must shine? She desires the ancient mornings and fulfils their light; projecting forwards her illumination she enters into communion with the rest that are to come. Kutsa Angirasa - Rig Veda.1

1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga

1.01_-_The_Lord_of_hosts, #Sefer Yetzirah The Book of Creation In Theory and Practice, #Anonymous, #Various
  object:1.06 - The Three Mothers or the First Elements
  class:Sefer Yetzirah The book of Creation In Theory and Practice
  class:chapter

1.01_-_The_Path_of_Later_On, #Words Of Long Ago, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga

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