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object:meaning
word class:verb
word class:adjective

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Big_Mind,_Big_Heart
Blazing_the_Trail_from_Infancy_to_Enlightenment
Epigrams_from_Savitri
Essays_On_The_Gita
Essential_Integral
Faust
Flow_-_The_Psychology_of_Optimal_Experience
Full_Circle
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
Guru_Bhakti_Yoga
Heart_of_Matter
How_to_Practice__The_Way_to_a_Meaningful_Life
Hymn_of_the_Universe
Infinite_Library
Know_Yourself
Lamp_of_Mahamudra__The_Immaculate_Lamp_that_Perfectly_and_Fully_Illuminates_the_Meaning_of_Mahamudra,_the_Essence_of_all_Phenomena
Laughter__An_Essay_on_the_Meaning_of_the_Comic
Let_Me_Explain
Letters_On_Yoga
Letters_On_Yoga_I
Letters_On_Yoga_III
Letters_On_Yoga_IV
Life_without_Death
Machik's_Complete_Explanation__Clarifying_the_Meaning_of_Chod
Mans_Search_for_Meaning
Maps_of_Meaning
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
Mysterium_Coniunctionis
On_Interpretation
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Philosophy_of_Dreams
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_01
Process_and_Reality
Questions_And_Answers_1955
Savitri
Spiral_Dynamics
The_Act_of_Creation
The_Archetypes_and_the_Collective_Unconscious
The_Bible
The_Blue_Cliff_Records
the_Book
The_Book_of_Lies
The_Book_of_Light
The_Book_of_Miracle
The_Book_of_Secrets__Keys_to_Love_and_Meditation
The_Categories
The_Diamond_Sutra
The_Divine_Companion
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Essential_Songs_of_Milarepa
The_Future_of_Man
The_Golden_Bough
The_Heros_Journey
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Integral_Yoga
The_Life_Divine
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Secret_Doctrine
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Yoga_Sutras
Toward_the_Future
Twilight_of_the_Idols
Writings_In_Bengali_and_Sanskrit

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_The_Highest_Meaning_of_the_Holy_Truths
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1955-05-25_-_Religion_and_reason_-_true_role_and_field_-_an_obstacle_to_or_minister_of_the_Spirit_-_developing_and_meaning_-_Learning_how_to_live,_the_elite_-_Reason_controls_and_organises_life_-_Nature_is_infrarational
1.jm_-_The_Profound_Definitive_Meaning
1.mm_-_Wouldst_thou_know_my_meaning?
1.tm_-_The_Sowing_of_Meanings
2.23_-_The_Core_of_the_Gita.s_Meaning
4.03_-_The_Meaning_of_Human_Endeavor
4.2.2.01_-_The_Meaning_of_Psychic_Opening
4.2.3.01_-_The_Meaning_of_Coming_to_the_Front
4.4.1.01_-_The_Meaning_of_Spiritual_Transformation
6.04_-_THE_MEANING_OF_THE_ALCHEMICAL_PROCEDURE
6.08_-_THE_CONTENT_AND_MEANING_OF_THE_FIRST_TWO_STAGES
Maps_of_Meaning_text

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
0_0.01_-_Introduction
00.02_-_Mystic_Symbolism
00.03_-_Upanishadic_Symbolism
00.05_-_A_Vedic_Conception_of_the_Poet
0.00a_-_Introduction
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.00_-_THE_GOSPEL_PREFACE
0.00_-_The_Wellspring_of_Reality
0.01_-_I_-_Sri_Aurobindos_personality,_his_outer_retirement_-_outside_contacts_after_1910_-_spiritual_personalities-_Vibhutis_and_Avatars_-__transformtion_of_human_personality
0.03_-_Letters_to_My_little_smile
0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life
0.05_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Systems
0.06_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Sadhak
01.01_-_A_Yoga_of_the_Art_of_Life
01.01_-_The_One_Thing_Needful
01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn
01.02_-_The_Issue
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
01.03_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Souls_Release
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge
01.05_-_Rabindranath_Tagore:_A_Great_Poet,_a_Great_Man
01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness
01.06_-_Vivekananda
01.07_-_The_Bases_of_Social_Reconstruction
01.08_-_A_Theory_of_Yoga
01.08_-_Walter_Hilton:_The_Scale_of_Perfection
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.11_-_Aldous_Huxley:_The_Perennial_Philosophy
01.11_-_The_Basis_of_Unity
01.12_-_Goethe
0.11_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.12_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0.14_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0_1955-03-26
0_1955-04-04
0_1956-09-14
0_1956-10-07
0_1958-01-01
0_1958-07-02
0_1958-09-19
0_1958-11-04_-_Myths_are_True_and_Gods_exist_-_mental_formation_and_occult_faculties_-_exteriorization_-_work_in_dreams
0_1958-11-15
0_1958-11-22
0_1959-04-24
0_1959-06-03
0_1959-06-17
0_1959-10-06_-_Sri_Aurobindos_abode
0_1960-04-07
0_1960-06-04
0_1960-07-26_-_Mothers_vision_-_looking_up_words_in_the_subconscient
0_1960-09-02
0_1960-10-02a
0_1960-10-08
0_1960-10-15
0_1960-10-22
0_1960-11-15
0_1960-12-23
0_1961-01-12
0_1961-01-24
0_1961-02-04
0_1961-02-18
0_1961-02-25
0_1961-03-04
0_1961-03-17
0_1961-03-21
0_1961-04-18
0_1961-04-29
0_1961-05-19
0_1961-06-06
0_1961-06-20
0_1961-06-24
0_1961-07-07
0_1961-07-18
0_1961-08-02
0_1961-10-30
0_1961-11-16a
0_1961-12-20
0_1962-01-12_-_supramental_ship
0_1962-01-21
0_1962-02-06
0_1962-03-11
0_1962-05-15
0_1962-05-27
0_1962-05-31
0_1962-06-12
0_1962-07-11
0_1962-07-14
0_1962-07-21
0_1962-08-08
0_1962-09-05
0_1962-10-30
0_1962-11-07
0_1962-11-27
0_1962-12-04
0_1962-12-15
0_1963-01-12
0_1963-01-30
0_1963-02-19
0_1963-05-11
0_1963-05-25
0_1963-05-29
0_1963-06-19
0_1963-07-06
0_1963-07-10
0_1963-07-20
0_1963-07-24
0_1963-08-07
0_1963-08-21
0_1963-09-28
0_1963-10-05
0_1963-10-16
0_1963-12-07_-_supramental_ship
0_1963-12-11
0_1963-12-21
0_1963-12-31
0_1964-01-22
0_1964-02-26
0_1964-03-07
0_1964-03-18
0_1964-03-28
0_1964-08-14
0_1964-09-18
0_1964-10-24a
0_1964-11-12
0_1964-11-14
0_1965-03-10
0_1965-03-20
0_1965-03-24
0_1965-04-07
0_1965-04-28
0_1965-05-08
0_1965-05-29
0_1965-06-02
0_1965-06-05
0_1965-06-14
0_1965-06-23
0_1965-07-14
0_1965-07-21
0_1965-07-24
0_1965-08-07
0_1965-08-21
0_1965-10-27
0_1965-11-13
0_1965-11-23
0_1965-11-30
0_1965-12-07
0_1965-12-10
0_1965-12-25
0_1966-03-04
0_1966-03-09
0_1966-03-19
0_1966-03-26
0_1966-03-30
0_1966-05-07
0_1966-06-02
0_1966-06-29
0_1966-07-27
0_1966-08-03
0_1966-09-21
0_1966-09-28
0_1966-10-08
0_1966-10-22
0_1966-10-29
0_1966-11-15
0_1966-11-19
0_1966-12-07
0_1966-12-31
0_1967-01-14
0_1967-01-21
0_1967-02-18
0_1967-02-25
0_1967-03-02
0_1967-04-19
0_1967-05-10
0_1967-05-24
0_1967-05-26
0_1967-05-27
0_1967-06-07
0_1967-06-14
0_1967-06-24
0_1967-07-15
0_1967-07-26
0_1967-07-29
0_1967-08-26
0_1967-08-30
0_1967-10-11
0_1967-12-06
0_1967-12-20
0_1968-01-10
0_1968-01-12
0_1968-02-14
0_1968-03-13
0_1968-04-03
0_1968-06-03
0_1968-06-15
0_1968-07-17
0_1968-07-20
0_1968-09-28
0_1968-11-27
0_1969-01-04
0_1969-01-08
0_1969-02-05
0_1969-03-19
0_1969-03-26
0_1969-04-09
0_1969-05-10
0_1969-05-28
0_1969-06-25
0_1969-07-19
0_1969-07-30
0_1969-08-23
0_1969-10-11
0_1969-10-18
0_1969-11-19
0_1969-11-22
0_1969-11-29
0_1969-12-06
0_1969-12-17
0_1970-01-03
0_1970-01-17
0_1970-01-31
0_1970-04-18
0_1970-04-22
0_1970-04-29
0_1970-05-02
0_1970-06-03
0_1970-06-17
0_1970-09-05
0_1970-09-30
0_1971-01-16
0_1971-03-13
0_1971-04-17
0_1971-05-15
0_1971-06-12
0_1971-07-31
0_1971-08-21
0_1971-10-27
0_1971-10-30
0_1971-11-27
0_1971-12-11
0_1971-12-13
0_1972-01-12
0_1972-01-19
0_1972-01-30
0_1972-02-07
0_1972-02-09
0_1972-03-29a
0_1972-04-15
0_1972-09-13
0_1973-04-14
02.02_-_Lines_of_the_Descent_of_Consciousness
02.02_-_Rishi_Dirghatama
02.02_-_The_Kingdom_of_Subtle_Matter
02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life
02.05_-_Federated_Humanity
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Life
02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night
02.08_-_The_World_of_Falsehood,_the_Mother_of_Evil_and_the_Sons_of_Darkness
02.10_-_Independence_and_its_Sanction
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.11_-_Hymn_to_Darkness
02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind
02.12_-_The_Heavens_of_the_Ideal
02.13_-_On_Social_Reconstruction
02.13_-_Rabindranath_and_Sri_Aurobindo
03.01_-_Humanism_and_Humanism
03.01_-_The_Evolution_of_Consciousness
03.01_-_The_Malady_of_the_Century
03.02_-_The_Adoration_of_the_Divine_Mother
03.02_-_Yogic_Initiation_and_Aptitude
03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation
03.04_-_The_Body_Human
03.05_-_Some_Conceptions_and_Misconceptions
03.05_-_The_World_is_One
03.06_-_Divine_Humanism
03.06_-_Here_or_Otherwhere
03.06_-_The_Pact_and_its_Sanction
03.07_-_The_Sunlit_Path
03.08_-_The_Standpoint_of_Indian_Art
03.09_-_Art_and_Katharsis
03.09_-_Sectarianism_or_Loyalty
03.11_-_Modernist_Poetry
03.11_-_The_Language_Problem_and_India
03.12_-_Communism:_What_does_it_Mean?
03.13_-_Human_Destiny
03.15_-_Towards_the_Future
04.01_-_The_Birth_and_Childhood_of_the_Flame
04.01_-_The_March_of_Civilisation
04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame
04.03_-_Consciousness_as_Energy
04.03_-_The_Call_to_the_Quest
04.03_-_The_Eternal_East_and_West
04.04_-_The_Quest
04.05_-_The_Immortal_Nation
04.07_-_Readings_in_Savitri
04.08_-_To_the_Heights_VIII_(Mahalakshmi)
04.09_-_Values_Higher_and_Lower
05.01_-_At_the_Origin_of_Ignorance
05.02_-_Satyavan
05.03_-_Satyavan_and_Savitri
05.04_-_The_Measure_of_Time
05.05_-_In_Quest_of_Reality
05.07_-_Man_and_Superman
05.08_-_True_Charity
05.09_-_The_Changed_Scientific_Outlook
05.12_-_The_Soul_and_its_Journey
05.16_-_A_Modernist_Mentality
05.17_-_Evolution_or_Special_Creation
05.26_-_The_Soul_in_Anguish
06.01_-_The_End_of_a_Civilisation
06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain
06.11_-_The_Steps_of_the_Soul
06.22_-_I_Have_Nothing,_I_Am_Nothing
07.01_-_The_Joy_of_Union;_the_Ordeal_of_the_Foreknowledge
07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul
07.03_-_This_Expanding_Universe
07.05_-_The_Finding_of_the_Soul
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.08_-_The_Divine_Truth_Its_Name_and_Form
07.11_-_The_Problem_of_Evil
07.16_-_Things_Significant_and_Insignificant
07.30_-_Sincerity_is_Victory
08.01_-_Choosing_To_Do_Yoga
08.03_-_Death_in_the_Forest
08.04_-_Doing_for_Her_Sake
08.17_-_Psychological_Perfection
08.20_-_Are_Not_The_Ascetic_Means_Helpful_At_Times?
08.24_-_On_Food
09.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
09.17_-_Health_in_the_Ashram
100.00_-_Synergy
1.001_-_The_Aim_of_Yoga
10.01_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Ideal
10.02_-_Beyond_Vedanta
10.03_-_Life_in_and_Through_Death
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
10.07_-_The_World_is_One
1.008_-_The_Principle_of_Self-Affirmation
1.00a_-_DIVISION_A_-_THE_INTERNAL_FIRES_OF_THE_SHEATHS.
1.00a_-_Introduction
1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00c_-_DIVISION_C_-_THE_ETHERIC_BODY_AND_PRANA
1.00e_-_DIVISION_E_-_MOTION_ON_THE_PHYSICAL_AND_ASTRAL_PLANES
1.00g_-_Foreword
1.00_-_Introduction_to_Alchemy_of_Happiness
1.00_-_Main
1.00_-_PREFACE
1.00_-_PREFACE_-_DESCENSUS_AD_INFERNOS
1.00_-_The_Constitution_of_the_Human_Being
1.00_-_The_way_of_what_is_to_come
1.010_-_Self-Control_-_The_Alpha_and_Omega_of_Yoga
1.012_-_Sublimation_-_A_Way_to_Reshuffle_Thought
1.013_-_Defence_Mechanisms_of_the_Mind
10.13_-_Go_Through
10.14_-_Night_and_Day
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_An_Accomplished_Westerner
1.01_-_Appearance_and_Reality
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_Asana
1.01_-_BOOK_THE_FIRST
1.01_-_Economy
1.01f_-_Introduction
1.01_-_Foreward
1.01_-_Fundamental_Considerations
1.01_-_Historical_Survey
1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?
1.01_-_Isha_Upanishad
1.01_-_Maitreya_inquires_of_his_teacher_(Parashara)
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_MAXIMS_AND_MISSILES
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_On_renunciation_of_the_world
1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita
1.01_-_Prayer
1.01_-_Principles_of_Practical_Psycho_therapy
1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA
1.01_-_Soul_and_God
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.01_-_the_Call_to_Adventure
1.01_-_The_Castle
1.01_-_The_Cycle_of_Society
1.01_-_The_Divine_and_The_Universe
1.01_-_The_First_Steps
1.01_-_The_Four_Aids
1.01_-_The_Highest_Meaning_of_the_Holy_Truths
1.01_-_The_Mental_Fortress
1.01_-_THE_STUFF_OF_THE_UNIVERSE
1.01_-_What_is_Magick?
1.01_-_Who_is_Tara
1.020_-_The_World_and_Our_World
10.23_-_Prayers_and_Meditations_of_the_Mother
1.024_-_Affiliation_With_Larger_Wholes
10.25_-_How_to_Read_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
1.028_-_Bringing_About_Whole-Souled_Dedication
1.02.9_-_Conclusion_and_Summary
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Meditating_on_Tara
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_On_the_Service_of_the_Soul
1.02_-_ON_THE_TEACHERS_OF_VIRTUE
1.02_-_Pranayama,_Mantrayoga
1.02_-_Prayer_of_Parashara_to_Vishnu
1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA
1.02_-_Skillful_Means
1.02_-_Taras_Tantra
1.02_-_The_7_Habits__An_Overview
1.02_-_The_Child_as_growing_being_and_the_childs_experience_of_encountering_the_teacher.
1.02_-_The_Concept_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.02_-_The_Development_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Thought
1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher
1.02_-_The_Eternal_Law
1.02_-_The_Great_Process
1.02_-_The_Magic_Circle
1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND
1.02_-_The_Pit
1.02_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Call
1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation
1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds
1.02_-_The_Ultimate_Path_is_Without_Difficulty
1.02_-_What_is_Psycho_therapy?
1.031_-_Intense_Aspiration
10.32_-_The_Mystery_of_the_Five_Elements
10.33_-_On_Discipline
10.35_-_The_Moral_and_the_Spiritual
1.035_-_The_Recitation_of_Mantra
1.036_-_The_Rise_of_Obstacles_in_Yoga_Practice
1.038_-_Impediments_in_Concentration_and_Meditation
1.03_-_A_CAUCUS-RACE_AND_A_LONG_TALE
1.03_-_A_Parable
1.03_-_APPRENTICESHIP_AND_ENCULTURATION_-_ADOPTION_OF_A_SHARED_MAP
1.03_-_Bloodstream_Sermon
1.03_-_Concerning_the_Archetypes,_with_Special_Reference_to_the_Anima_Concept
1.03_-_Hieroglypics__Life_and_Language_Necessarily_Symbolic
1.03_-_Invocation_of_Tara
1.03_-_Master_Ma_is_Unwell
1.03_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Meeting_with_others
1.03_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_World.
1.03_-_ON_THE_AFTERWORLDLY
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers
1.03_-_Reading
1.03_-_Self-Surrender_in_Works_-_The_Way_of_The_Gita
1.03_-_Tara,_Liberator_from_the_Eight_Dangers
1.03_-_The_Desert
1.03_-_The_End_of_the_Intellect
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_The_Human_Disciple
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Exorcism)
1.03_-_The_Sunlit_Path
1.03_-_The_Tale_of_the_Alchemist_Who_Sold_His_Soul
1.03_-_The_Two_Negations_2_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Ascetic
1.03_-_The_Uncreated
1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii
1.03_-_VISIT_TO_VIDYASAGAR
1.03_-_YIBHOOTI_PADA
1.040_-_Re-Educating_the_Mind
1.045_-_Piercing_the_Structure_of_the_Object
1.04_-_ADVICE_TO_HOUSEHOLDERS
1.04_-_ALCHEMY_AND_MANICHAEISM
1.04_-_Body,_Soul_and_Spirit
1.04_-_Descent_into_Future_Hell
1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD
1.04_-_Homage_to_the_Twenty-one_Taras
1.04_-_Narayana_appearance,_in_the_beginning_of_the_Kalpa,_as_the_Varaha_(boar)
1.04_-_Of_other_imperfections_which_these_beginners_are_apt_to_have_with_respect_to_the_third_sin,_which_is_luxury.
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_Religion_and_Occultism
1.04_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_PROGRESS
1.04_-_Sounds
1.04_-_Te_Shan_Carrying_His_Bundle
1.04_-_The_Aims_of_Psycho_therapy
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Conditions_of_Esoteric_Training
1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching
1.04_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Nation-Soul
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Paths
1.04_-_The_Praise
1.04_-_The_Sacrifice_the_Triune_Path_and_the_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.04_-_The_Self
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.05_-_2010_and_1956_-_Doomsday?
1.052_-_Yoga_Practice_-_A_Series_of_Positive_Steps
1.053_-_A_Very_Important_Sadhana
1.056_-_Lack_of_Knowledge_is_the_Cause_of_Suffering
1.057_-_The_Four_Manifestations_of_Ignorance
1.05_-_Adam_Kadmon
1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women
1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self
1.05_-_Consciousness
1.05_-_Hsueh_Feng's_Grain_of_Rice
1.05_-_Hymns_of_Bharadwaja
1.05_-_Knowledge_by_Aquaintance_and_Knowledge_by_Description
1.05_-_On_the_Love_of_God.
1.05_-_Pratyahara_and_Dharana
1.05_-_Prayer
1.05_-_Problems_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.05_-_Qualifications_of_the_Aspirant_and_the_Teacher
1.05_-_Ritam
1.05_-_Some_Results_of_Initiation
1.05_-_Splitting_of_the_Spirit
1.05_-_The_Activation_of_Human_Energy
1.05_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_-_The_Psychic_Being
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_The_Magical_Control_of_the_Weather
1.05_-_The_New_Consciousness
1.05_-_THE_NEW_SPIRIT
1.05_-_The_Universe__The_0_=_2_Equation
1.060_-_Tracing_the_Ultimate_Cause_of_Any_Experience
1.06_-_Agni_and_the_Truth
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_Definition_of_Tragedy.
1.06_-_Dhyana
1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi
1.06_-_Gestalt_and_Universals
1.06_-_Incarnate_Teachers_and_Incarnation
1.06_-_LIFE_AND_THE_PLANETS
1.06_-_Man_in_the_Universe
1.06_-_Psycho_therapy_and_a_Philosophy_of_Life
1.06_-_Quieting_the_Vital
1.06_-_Raja_Yoga
1.06_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_2_The_Works_of_Love_-_The_Works_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Breaking_of_the_Limits
1.06_-_THE_FOUR_GREAT_ERRORS
1.06_-_The_Literal_Qabalah
1.06_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES
1.06_-_The_Sign_of_the_Fishes
1.06_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_1
1.06_-_Yun_Men's_Every_Day_is_a_Good_Day
1.070_-_The_Seven_Stages_of_Perfection
1.075_-_Self-Control,_Study_and_Devotion_to_God
1.078_-_Kumbhaka_and_Concentration_of_Mind
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_Bridge_across_the_Afterlife
1.07_-_Hui_Ch'ao_Asks_about_Buddha
1.07_-_Incarnate_Human_Gods
1.07_-_Jnana_Yoga
1.07_-_Medicine_and_Psycho_therapy
1.07_-_Note_on_the_word_Go
1.07_-_Production_of_the_mind-born_sons_of_Brahma
1.07_-_Raja-Yoga_in_Brief
1.07_-_Samadhi
1.07_-_Savitri
1.07_-_Standards_of_Conduct_and_Spiritual_Freedom
1.07_-_The_Continuity_of_Consciousness
1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature
1.07_-_The_Fire_of_the_New_World
1.07_-_The_Ideal_Law_of_Social_Development
1.07_-_The_Literal_Qabalah_(continued)
1.07_-_The_Magic_Wand
1.07_-_The_Mantra_-_OM_-_Word_and_Wisdom
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.07_-_The_Prophecies_of_Nostradamus
1.07_-_The_Psychic_Center
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.080_-_Pratyahara_-_The_Return_of_Energy
1.081_-_The_Application_of_Pratyahara
1.089_-_The_Levels_of_Concentration
1.08a_-_The_Ladder
1.08_-_Attendants
1.08_-_Information,_Language,_and_Society
1.08_-_Origin_of_Rudra:_his_becoming_eight_Rudras
1.08_-_Psycho_therapy_Today
1.08_-_RELIGION_AND_TEMPERAMENT
1.08_-_SOME_REFLECTIONS_ON_THE_SPIRITUAL_REPERCUSSIONS_OF_THE_ATOM_BOMB
1.08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Descent_into_Death
1.08_-_The_Change_of_Vision
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_The_Historical_Significance_of_the_Fish
1.08_-_The_Magic_Sword,_Dagger_and_Trident
1.08_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY_CELEBRATION_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.08_-_The_Methods_of_Vedantic_Knowledge
1.08_-_The_Splitting_of_the_Human_Personality_during_Spiritual_Training
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Will
1.08_-_THINGS_THE_GERMANS_LACK
1.096_-_Powers_that_Accrue_in_the_Practice
1.097_-_Sublimation_of_Object-Consciousness
1.098_-_The_Transformation_from_Human_to_Divine
1.099_-_The_Entry_of_the_Eternal_into_the_Individual
1.09_-_ADVICE_TO_THE_BRAHMOS
1.09_-_A_System_of_Vedic_Psychology
1.09_-_Civilisation_and_Culture
1.09_-_Concentration_-_Its_Spiritual_Uses
1.09_-_Fundamental_Questions_of_Psycho_therapy
1.09_-_Man_-_About_the_Body
1.09_-_Saraswati_and_Her_Consorts
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE
1.09_-_Sleep_and_Death
1.09_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Big_Bang
1.09_-_Stead_and_Maskelyne
1.09_-_Taras_Ultimate_Nature
1.09_-_The_Crown,_Cap,_Magus-Band
1.09_-_The_Furies_and_Medusa._The_Angel._The_City_of_Dis._The_Sixth_Circle__Heresiarchs.
1.09_-_The_Greater_Self
1.09_-_The_Worship_of_Trees
1.1.01_-_The_Divine_and_Its_Aspects
11.01_-_The_Eternal_Day__The_Souls_Choice_and_the_Supreme_Consummation
1.1.02_-_Sachchidananda
1.1.04_-_Philosophy
1.1.04_-_The_Self_or_Atman
1.107_-_The_Bestowal_of_a_Divine_Gift
1.10_-_ALICE'S_EVIDENCE
1.10_-_Concentration_-_Its_Practice
1.10_-_Conscious_Force
1.10_-_Harmony
1.10_-_Laughter_Of_The_Gods
1.10_-_Life_and_Death._The_Greater_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.10_-_On_our_Knowledge_of_Universals
1.10_-_Relics_of_Tree_Worship_in_Modern_Europe
1.10_-_The_descendants_of_the_daughters_of_Daksa_married_to_the_Rsis
1.10_-_The_Image_of_the_Oceans_and_the_Rivers
1.10_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES_(II)
1.10_-_The_Methods_and_the_Means
1.10_-_Theodicy_-_Nature_Makes_No_Mistakes
1.10_-_The_Revolutionary_Yogi
1.10_-_The_Scolex_School
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.10_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Intelligent_Will
1.10_-_THINGS_I_OWE_TO_THE_ANCIENTS
1.11_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Problem
1.11_-_GOOD_AND_EVIL
1.11_-_Oneness
1.11_-_(Plot_continued.)_Reversal_of_the_Situation,_Recognition,_and_Tragic_or_disastrous_Incident_defined_and_explained.
1.11_-_Powers
1.11_-_The_Kalki_Avatar
1.11_-_The_Magical_Belt
1.11_-_The_Master_of_the_Work
1.11_-_The_Seven_Rivers
1.11_-_Works_and_Sacrifice
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_Independence
1.1.2_-_Intellect_and_the_Intellectual
1.12_-_Love_The_Creator
1.12_-_Sleep_and_Dreams
1.12_-_The_Divine_Work
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Herds_of_the_Dawn
1.12_-_The_Left-Hand_Path_-_The_Black_Brothers
1.12_-_The_Office_and_Limitations_of_the_Reason
1.12_-_The_Sacred_Marriage
1.12_-_The_Significance_of_Sacrifice
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1.12_-_Truth_and_Knowledge
1.13_-_Conclusion_-_He_is_here
1.13_-_Dawn_and_the_Truth
1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self
1.13_-_Knowledge,_Error,_and_Probably_Opinion
1.13_-_SALVATION,_DELIVERANCE,_ENLIGHTENMENT
1.13_-_The_Divine_Maya
1.13_-_THE_HUMAN_REBOUND_OF_EVOLUTION_AND_ITS_CONSEQUENCES
1.13_-_The_Lord_of_the_Sacrifice
1.13_-_THE_MASTER_AND_M.
1.13_-_The_Pentacle,_Lamen_or_Seal
1.13_-_Under_the_Auspices_of_the_Gods
1.14_-_Bibliography
1.14_-_INSTRUCTION_TO_VAISHNAVS_AND_BRHMOS
1.14_-_Noise
1.14_-_The_Principle_of_Divine_Works
1.14_-_The_Secret
1.14_-_The_Structure_and_Dynamics_of_the_Self
1.14_-_The_Succesion_to_the_Kingdom_in_Ancient_Latium
1.14_-_TURMOIL_OR_GENESIS?
1.15_-_Conclusion
1.15_-_Index
1.15_-_In_the_Domain_of_the_Spirit_Beings
1.15_-_LAST_VISIT_TO_KESHAB
1.15_-_On_incorruptible_purity_and_chastity_to_which_the_corruptible_attain_by_toil_and_sweat.
1.15_-_ON_THE_THOUSAND_AND_ONE_GOALS
1.15_-_The_Possibility_and_Purpose_of_Avatarhood
1.15_-_The_Suprarational_Good
1.15_-_The_world_overrun_with_trees;_they_are_destroyed_by_the_Pracetasas
1.16_-_Dianus_and_Diana
1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being
1.16_-_THE_ESSENCE_OF_THE_DEMOCRATIC_IDEA
1.16_-_The_Process_of_Avatarhood
1.16_-_The_Season_of_Truth
1.16_-_The_Suprarational_Ultimate_of_Life
1.17_-_Astral_Journey__Example,_How_to_do_it,_How_to_Verify_your_Experience
1.17_-_DOES_MANKIND_MOVE_BIOLOGICALLY_UPON_ITSELF?
1.17_-_M._AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.17_-_Religion_as_the_Law_of_Life
1.17_-_The_Divine_Birth_and_Divine_Works
1.17_-_The_Seven-Headed_Thought,_Swar_and_the_Dashagwas
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_FAITH
1.18_-_Hiranyakasipu's_reiterated_attempts_to_destroy_his_son
1.18_-_M._AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.18_-_The_Divine_Worker
1.18_-_The_Human_Fathers
1.18_-_The_Infrarational_Age_of_the_Cycle
1.19_-_Dialogue_between_Prahlada_and_his_father
1.19_-_ON_THE_PROBABLE_EXISTENCE_AHEAD_OF_US_OF_AN_ULTRA-HUMAN
1.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_HIS_INJURED_ARM
1.19_-_The_Victory_of_the_Fathers
1.200-1.224_Talks
1.2.01_-_The_Call_and_the_Capacity
12.01_-_The_Return_to_Earth
1.2.01_-_The_Upanishadic_and_Purancic_Systems
12.02_-_The_Stress_of_the_Spirit
1.2.03_-_Purity
1.2.03_-_The_Interpretation_of_Scripture
1.2.04_-_Sincerity
1.2.05_-_Aspiration
1.2.07_-_Surrender
1.2.08_-_Faith
1.20_-_Death,_Desire_and_Incapacity
1.20_-_ON_CHILD_AND_MARRIAGE
1.20_-_RULES_FOR_HOUSEHOLDERS_AND_MONKS
1.20_-_TANTUM_RELIGIO_POTUIT_SUADERE_MALORUM
1.20_-_The_Hound_of_Heaven
1.2.1.03_-_Psychic_and_Esoteric_Poetry
1.2.1.04_-_Mystic_Poetry
1.2.1.06_-_Symbolism_and_Allegory
1.2.10_-_Opening
1.21_-_A_DAY_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.21_-_Chih_Men's_Lotus_Flower,_Lotus_Leaves
1.21_-_My_Theory_of_Astrology
1.21_-_Tabooed_Things
1.21_-_The_Spiritual_Aim_and_Life
1.22_-_EMOTIONALISM
1.22_-_ON_THE_GIFT-GIVING_VIRTUE
1.22_-_Tabooed_Words
1.22_-_THE_END_OF_THE_SPECIES
1.22_-_The_Necessity_of_the_Spiritual_Transformation
1.2.2_-_The_Place_of_Study_in_Sadhana
1.23_-_FESTIVAL_AT_SURENDRAS_HOUSE
1.23_-_Improvising_a_Temple
1.240_-_1.300_Talks
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_Matter
1.24_-_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.24_-_RITUAL,_SYMBOL,_SACRAMENT
1.2.4_-_Speech_and_Yoga
1.24_-_The_Advent_and_Progress_of_the_Spiritual_Age
1.25_-_Critical_Objections_brought_against_Poetry,_and_the_principles_on_which_they_are_to_be_answered.
1.25_-_On_the_destroyer_of_the_passions,_most_sublime_humility,_which_is_rooted_in_spiritual_feeling.
1.25_-_SPIRITUAL_EXERCISES
1.25_-_Temporary_Kings
1.26_-_FESTIVAL_AT_ADHARS_HOUSE
1.26_-_Mental_Processes_-_Two_Only_are_Possible
1.27_-_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.27_-_CONTEMPLATION,_ACTION_AND_SOCIAL_UTILITY
1.27_-_On_holy_solitude_of_body_and_soul.
1.27_-_Structure_of_Mind_Based_on_that_of_Body
1.27_-_The_Sevenfold_Chord_of_Being
1.28_-_Need_to_Define_God,_Self,_etc.
1.2_-_Katha_Upanishads
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
13.01_-_A_Centurys_Salutation_to_Sri_Aurobindo_The_Greatness_of_the_Great
1.3.02_-_Equality__The_Chief_Support
1.3.03_-_Quiet_and_Calm
1.3.05_-_Silence
13.08_-_The_Return
1.30_-_Do_you_Believe_in_God?
1.3.1.02_-_The_Object_of_Our_Yoga
1.31_-_Continues_the_same_subject._Explains_what_is_meant_by_the_Prayer_of_Quiet._Gives_several_counsels_to_those_who_experience_it._This_chapter_is_very_noteworthy.
1.33_-_The_Gardens_of_Adonis
1.33_-_Treats_of_our_great_need_that_the_Lord_should_give_us_what_we_ask_in_these_words_of_the_Paternoster__Panem_nostrum_quotidianum_da_nobis_hodie.
1.3.4.04_-_The_Divine_Superman
1.34_-_The_Tao_1
1.3.5.03_-_The_Involved_and_Evolving_Godhead
1.3.5.04_-_The_Evolution_of_Consciousness
1.35_-_Describes_the_recollection_which_should_be_practised_after_Communion._Concludes_this_subject_with_an_exclamatory_prayer_to_the_Eternal_Father.
1.37_-_Death_-_Fear_-_Magical_Memory
1.37_-_Describes_the_excellence_of_this_prayer_called_the_Paternoster,_and_the_many_ways_in_which_we_shall_find_consolation_in_it.
1.39_-_Prophecy
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.3_-_Mundaka_Upanishads
1.400_-_1.450_Talks
1.4.01_-_The_Divine_Grace_and_Guidance
14.01_-_To_Read_Sri_Aurobindo
1.4.02_-_The_Divine_Force
14.08_-_A_Parable_of_Sea-Gulls
1.41_-_Are_we_Reincarnations_of_the_Ancient_Egyptians?
1.41_-_Isis
1.41_-_Speaks_of_the_fear_of_God_and_of_how_we_must_keep_ourselves_from_venial_sins.
1.42_-_Osiris_and_the_Sun
1.42_-_This_Self_Introversion
1.439
1.450_-_1.500_Talks
1.46_-_The_Corn-Mother_in_Many_Lands
1.47_-_Lityerses
1.48_-_Morals_of_AL_-_Hard_to_Accept,_and_Why_nevertheless_we_Must_Concur
1.48_-_The_Corn-Spirit_as_an_Animal
1.49_-_Ancient_Deities_of_Vegetation_as_Animals
15.06_-_Words,_Words,_Words...
1.50_-_Eating_the_God
1.52_-_Family_-_Public_Enemy_No._1
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.54_-_On_Meanness
1.54_-_Types_of_Animal_Sacrament
1.550_-_1.600_Talks
1.57_-_Public_Scapegoats
1.58_-_Do_Angels_Ever_Cut_Themselves_Shaving?
1.58_-_Human_Scapegoats_in_Classical_Antiquity
1.59_-_Geomancy
1.59_-_Killing_the_God_in_Mexico
1.62_-_The_Fire-Festivals_of_Europe
1.63_-_Fear,_a_Bad_Astral_Vision
1.64_-_The_Burning_of_Human_Beings_in_the_Fires
1.65_-_Balder_and_the_Mistletoe
1.67_-_Faith
1.68_-_The_God-Letters
1.71_-_Morality_2
1.72_-_Education
1.75_-_The_AA_and_the_Planet
1.78_-_Sore_Spots
1.82_-_Epistola_Penultima_-_The_Two_Ways_to_Reality
19.08_-_Thousands
19.24_-_The_Canto_of_Desire
1929-04-07_-_Yoga,_for_the_sake_of_the_Divine_-_Concentration_-_Preparations_for_Yoga,_to_be_conscious_-_Yoga_and_humanity_-_We_have_all_met_in_previous_lives
1929-04-14_-_Dangers_of_Yoga_-_Two_paths,_tapasya_and_surrender_-_Impulses,_desires_and_Yoga_-_Difficulties_-_Unification_around_the_psychic_being_-_Ambition,_undoing_of_many_Yogis_-_Powers,_misuse_and_right_use_of_-_How_to_recognise_the_Divine_Will_-_Accept_things_that_come_from_Divine_-_Vital_devotion_-_Need_of_strong_body_and_nerves_-_Inner_being,_invariable
1929-04-21_-_Visions,_seeing_and_interpretation_-_Dreams_and_dreaml_and_-_Dreamless_sleep_-_Visions_and_formulation_-_Surrender,_passive_and_of_the_will_-_Meditation_and_progress_-_Entering_the_spiritual_life,_a_plunge_into_the_Divine
1929-04-28_-_Offering,_general_and_detailed_-_Integral_Yoga_-_Remembrance_of_the_Divine_-_Reading_and_Yoga_-_Necessity,_predetermination_-_Freedom_-_Miracles_-_Aim_of_creation
1929-05-05_-_Intellect,_true_and_wrong_movement_-_Attacks_from_adverse_forces_-_Faith,_integral_and_absolute_-_Death,_not_a_necessity_-_Descent_of_Divine_Consciousness_-_Inner_progress_-_Memory_of_former_lives
1929-05-26_-_Individual,_illusion_of_separateness_-_Hostile_forces_and_the_mental_plane_-_Psychic_world,_psychic_being_-_Spiritual_and_psychic_-_Words,_understanding_speech_and_reading_-_Hostile_forces,_their_utility_-_Illusion_of_action,_true_action
1929-06-23_-_Knowledge_of_the_Yogi_-_Knowledge_and_the_Supermind_-_Methods_of_changing_the_condition_of_the_body_-_Meditation,_aspiration,_sincerity
1929-07-28_-_Art_and_Yoga_-_Art_and_life_-_Music,_dance_-_World_of_Harmony
1929-08-04_-_Surrender_and_sacrifice_-_Personality_and_surrender_-_Desire_and_passion_-_Spirituality_and_morality
1950-12-21_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams
1950-12-30_-_Perfect_and_progress._Dynamic_equilibrium._True_sincerity.
1951-01-13_-_Aim_of_life_-_effort_and_joy._Science_of_living,_becoming_conscious._Forces_and_influences.
1951-02-03_-_What_is_Yoga?_for_what?_-_Aspiration,_seeking_the_Divine._-_Process_of_yoga,_renouncing_the_ego.
1951-02-10_-_Liberty_and_license_-_surrender_makes_you_free_-_Men_in_authority_as_representatives_of_the_divine_Truth_-_Work_as_offering_-_total_surrender_needs_time_-_Effort_and_inspiration_-_will_and_patience
1951-02-12_-_Divine_force_-_Signs_indicating_readiness_-_Weakness_in_mind,_vital_-_concentration_-_Divine_perception,_human_notion_of_good,_bad_-_Conversion,_consecration_-_progress_-_Signs_of_entering_the_path_-_kinds_of_meditation_-_aspiration
1951-02-15_-_Dreams,_symbolic_-_true_repose_-_False_visions_-_Earth-memory_and_history
1951-02-22_-_Surrender,_offering,_consecration_-_Experiences_and_sincerity_-_Aspiration_and_desire_-_Vedic_hymns_-_Concentration_and_time
1951-03-01_-_Universe_and_the_Divine_-_Freedom_and_determinism_-_Grace_-_Time_and_Creation-_in_the_Supermind_-_Work_and_its_results_-_The_psychic_being_-_beauty_and_love_-_Flowers-_beauty_and_significance_-_Choice_of_reincarnating_psychic_being
1951-04-14_-_Surrender_and_sacrifice_-_Idea_of_sacrifice_-_Bahaism_-_martyrdom_-_Sleep-_forgetfulness,_exteriorisation,_etc_-_Dreams_and_visions-_explanations_-_Exteriorisation-_incidents_about_cats
1951-04-19_-_Demands_and_needs_-_human_nature_-_Abolishing_the_ego_-_Food-_tamas,_consecration_-_Changing_the_nature-_the_vital_and_the_mind_-_The_yoga_of_the_body__-_cellular_consciousness
1951-04-21_-_Sri_Aurobindos_letter_on_conditions_for_doing_yoga_-_Aspiration,_tapasya,_surrender_-_The_lower_vital_-_old_habits_-_obsession_-_Sri_Aurobindo_on_choice_and_the_double_life_-_The_old_fiasco_-_inner_realisation_and_outer_change
1951-05-03_-_Money_and_its_use_for_the_divine_work_-_problems_-_Mastery_over_desire-_individual_and_collective_change
1951-05-07_-_A_Hierarchy_-_Transcendent,_universal,_individual_Divine_-_The_Supreme_Shakti_and_Creation_-_Inadequacy_of_words,_language
1951-05-11_-_Mahakali_and_Kali_-_Avatar_and_Vibhuti_-_Sachchidananda_behind_all_states_of_being_-_The_power_of_will_-_receiving_the_Divine_Will
1951-05-12_-_Mahalakshmi_and_beauty_in_life_-_Mahasaraswati_-_conscious_hand_-_Riches_and_poverty
1953-03-25
1953-04-22
1953-07-29
1953-10-07
1953-10-21
1953-10-28
1953-11-04
1953-11-18
1953-11-25
1953-12-30
1954-02-17_-_Experience_expressed_in_different_ways_-_Origin_of_the_psychic_being_-_Progress_in_sports_-Everything_is_not_for_the_best
1954-04-07_-_Communication_without_words_-_Uneven_progress_-_Words_and_the_Word
1954-05-19_-_Affection_and_love_-_Psychic_vision_Divine_-_Love_and_receptivity_-_Get_out_of_the_ego
1954-06-23_-_Meat-eating_-_Story_of_Mothers_vegetable_garden_-_Faithfulness_-_Conscious_sleep
1954-06-30_-_Occultism_-_Religion_and_vital_beings_-_Mothers_knowledge_of_what_happens_in_the_Ashram_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Drawing_on_Mother
1954-07-14_-_The_Divine_and_the_Shakti_-_Personal_effort_-_Speaking_and_thinking_-_Doubt_-_Self-giving,_consecration_and_surrender_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Ornaments_and_protection
1954-08-04_-_Servant_and_worker_-_Justification_of_weakness_-_Play_of_the_Divine_-_Why_are_you_here_in_the_Ashram?
1954-09-15_-_Parts_of_the_being_-_Thoughts_and_impulses_-_The_subconscient_-_Precise_vocabulary_-_The_Grace_and_difficulties
1954-10-20_-_Stand_back_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Seeing_images_in_meditation_-_Berlioz_-Music_-_Mothers_organ_music_-_Destiny
1954-11-03_-_Body_opening_to_the_Divine_-_Concentration_in_the_heart_-_The_army_of_the_Divine_-_The_knot_of_the_ego_-Streng_thening_ones_will
1954-12-08_-_Cosmic_consciousness_-_Clutching_-_The_central_will_of_the_being_-_Knowledge_by_identity
1954-12-15_-_Many_witnesses_inside_oneself_-_Children_in_the_Ashram_-_Trance_and_the_waking_consciousness_-_Ascetic_methods_-_Education,_spontaneous_effort_-_Spiritual_experience
1955-02-09_-_Desire_is_contagious_-_Primitive_form_of_love_-_the_artists_delight_-_Psychic_need,_mind_as_an_instrument_-_How_the_psychic_being_expresses_itself_-_Distinguishing_the_parts_of_ones_being_-_The_psychic_guides_-_Illness_-_Mothers_vision
1955-03-09_-_Psychic_directly_contacted_through_the_physical_-_Transforming_egoistic_movements_-_Work_of_the_psychic_being_-_Contacting_the_psychic_and_the_Divine_-_Experiences_of_different_kinds_-_Attacks_of_adverse_forces
1955-04-06_-_Freuds_psychoanalysis,_the_subliminal_being_-_The_psychic_and_the_subliminal_-_True_psychology_-_Changing_the_lower_nature_-_Faith_in_different_parts_of_the_being_-_Psychic_contact_established_in_all_in_the_Ashram
1955-05-25_-_Religion_and_reason_-_true_role_and_field_-_an_obstacle_to_or_minister_of_the_Spirit_-_developing_and_meaning_-_Learning_how_to_live,_the_elite_-_Reason_controls_and_organises_life_-_Nature_is_infrarational
1955-08-17_-_Vertical_ascent_and_horizontal_opening_-_Liberation_of_the_psychic_being_-_Images_for_discovery_of_the_psychic_being_-_Sadhana_to_contact_the_psychic_being
1955-09-21_-_Literature_and_the_taste_for_forms_-_The_characters_of_The_Great_Secret_-_How_literature_helps_us_to_progress_-_Reading_to_learn_-_The_commercial_mentality_-_How_to_choose_ones_books_-_Learning_to_enrich_ones_possibilities_...
1955-11-16_-_The_significance_of_numbers_-_Numbers,_astrology,_true_knowledge_-_Divines_Love_flowers_for_Kali_puja_-_Desire,_aspiration_and_progress_-_Determining_ones_approach_to_the_Divine_-_Liberation_is_obtained_through_austerities_-_...
1955-11-23_-_One_reality,_multiple_manifestations_-_Integral_Yoga,_approach_by_all_paths_-_The_supreme_man_and_the_divine_man_-_Miracles_and_the_logic_of_events
1956-01-25_-_The_divine_way_of_life_-_Divine,_Overmind,_Supermind_-_Material_body__for_discovery_of_the_Divine_-_Five_psychological_perfections
1956-02-01_-_Path_of_knowledge_-_Finding_the_Divine_in_life_-_Capacity_for_contact_with_the_Divine_-_Partial_and_total_identification_with_the_Divine_-_Manifestation_and_hierarchy
1956-03-28_-_The_starting-point_of_spiritual_experience_-_The_boundless_finite_-_The_Timeless_and_Time_-_Mental_explanation_not_enough_-_Changing_knowledge_into_experience_-_Sat-Chit-Tapas-Ananda
1956-04-11_-_Self-creator_-_Manifestation_of_Time_and_Space_-_Brahman-Maya_and_Ishwara-Shakti_-_Personal_and_Impersonal
1956-04-18_-_Ishwara_and_Shakti,_seeing_both_aspects_-_The_Impersonal_and_the_divine_Person_-_Soul,_the_presence_of_the_divine_Person_-_Going_to_other_worlds,_exteriorisation,_dreams_-_Telling_stories_to_oneself
1956-05-09_-_Beginning_of_the_true_spiritual_life_-_Spirit_gives_value_to_all_things_-_To_be_helped_by_the_supramental_Force
1956-05-23_-_Yoga_and_religion_-_Story_of_two_clergymen_on_a_boat_-_The_Buddha_and_the_Supramental_-_Hieroglyphs_and_phonetic_alphabets_-_A_vision_of_ancient_Egypt_-_Memory_for_sounds
1956-05-30_-_Forms_as_symbols_of_the_Force_behind_-_Art_as_expression_of_contact_with_the_Divine_-_Supramental_psychological_perfection_-_Division_of_works_-_The_Ashram,_idle_stupidities
1956-06-06_-_Sign_or_indication_from_books_of_revelation_-_Spiritualised_mind_-_Stages_of_sadhana_-_Reversal_of_consciousness_-_Organisation_around_central_Presence_-_Boredom,_most_common_human_malady
1956-07-18_-_Unlived_dreams_-_Radha-consciousness_-_Separation_and_identification_-_Ananda_of_identity_and_Ananda_of_union_-_Sincerity,_meditation_and_prayer_-_Enemies_of_the_Divine_-_The_universe_is_progressive
1956-08-01_-_Value_of_worship_-_Spiritual_realisation_and_the_integral_yoga_-_Symbols,_translation_of_experience_into_form_-_Sincerity,_fundamental_virtue_-_Intensity_of_aspiration,_with_anguish_or_joy_-_The_divine_Grace
1956-09-26_-_Soul_of_desire_-_Openness,_harmony_with_Nature_-_Communion_with_divine_Presence_-_Individuality,_difficulties,_soul_of_desire_-_personal_contact_with_the_Mother_-_Inner_receptivity_-_Bad_thoughts_before_the_Mother
1956-10-03_-_The_Mothers_different_ways_of_speaking_-_new_manifestation_-_new_element,_possibilities_-_child_prodigies_-_Laws_of_Nature,_supramental_-_Logic_of_the_unforeseen_-_Creative_writers,_hands_of_musicians_-_Prodigious_children,_men
1956-10-17_-_Delight,_the_highest_state_-_Delight_and_detachment_-_To_be_calm_-_Quietude,_mental_and_vital_-_Calm_and_strength_-_Experience_and_expression_of_experience
1956-10-31_-_Manifestation_of_divine_love_-_Deformation_of_Love_by_human_consciousness_-_Experience_and_expression_of_experience
1956-11-14_-_Conquering_the_desire_to_appear_good_-_Self-control_and_control_of_the_life_around_-_Power_of_mastery_-_Be_a_great_yogi_to_be_a_good_teacher_-_Organisation_of_the_Ashram_school_-_Elementary_discipline_of_regularity
1956-11-28_-_Desire,_ego,_animal_nature_-_Consciousness,_a_progressive_state_-_Ananda,_desireless_state_beyond_enjoyings_-_Personal_effort_that_is_mental_-_Reason,_when_to_disregard_it_-_Reason_and_reasons
1956-12-19_-_Preconceived_mental_ideas_-_Process_of_creation_-_Destructive_power_of_bad_thoughts_-_To_be_perfectly_sincere
1956-12-26_-_Defeated_victories_-_Change_of_consciousness_-_Experiences_that_indicate_the_road_to_take_-_Choice_and_preference_-_Diversity_of_the_manifestation
1957-01-02_-_Can_one_go_out_of_time_and_space?_-_Not_a_crucified_but_a_glorified_body_-_Individual_effort_and_the_new_force
1957-01-16_-_Seeking_something_without_knowing_it_-_Why_are_we_here?
1957-01-30_-_Artistry_is_just_contrast_-_How_to_perceive_the_Divine_Guidance?
1957-09-04_-_Sri_Aurobindo,_an_eternal_birth
1957-10-09_-_As_many_universes_as_individuals_-_Passage_to_the_higher_hemisphere
1958-01-01_-_The_collaboration_of_material_Nature_-_Miracles_visible_to_a_deep_vision_of_things_-_Explanation_of_New_Year_Message
1958-03-19_-_General_tension_in_humanity_-_Peace_and_progress_-_Perversion_and_vision_of_transformation
1958-05-07_-_The_secret_of_Nature
1958-07-16_-_Is_religion_a_necessity?
1958-08-13_-_Profit_by_staying_in_the_Ashram_-_What_Sri_Aurobindo_has_come_to_tell_us_-_Finding_the_Divine
1958-09-10_-_Magic,_occultism,_physical_science
1958_09_12
1958-09-24_-_Living_the_truth_-_Words_and_experience
1958-10-22_-_Spiritual_life_-_reversal_of_consciousness_-_Helping_others
1958-10-29_-_Mental_self-sufficiency_-_Grace
1958-11-12_-_The_aim_of_the_Supreme_-_Trust_in_the_Grace
1960_01_12
1960_03_30
1960_04_20
1960_11_11?_-_48
1961_01_28
1961_03_11_-_58
1961_03_17_-_57
1961_04_26_-_59
1962_01_12
1962_02_03
1965_05_29
1965_12_26?
1969_09_17
1969_10_01?_-_166
1970_03_15
1970_05_17
1.A_-_ANTHROPOLOGY,_THE_SOUL
1.ac_-_On_-_On_-_Poet
1.anon_-_The_Seven_Evil_Spirits
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Deaf,_Dumb,_and_Blind
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Walls_of_Eryx
1f.lovecraft_-_Pickmans_Model
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Beast_in_the_Cave
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Challenge_from_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Diary_of_Alonzo_Typer
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Disinterment
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hoard_of_the_Wizard-Beast
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Museum
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Night_Ocean
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Thing_on_the_Doorstep
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Transition_of_Juan_Romero
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_Till_A_the_Seas
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1.fs_-_Genius
1.fs_-_The_Count_Of_Hapsburg
1.fs_-_The_Walk
1.fs_-_The_Words_Of_Belief
1.fs_-_The_Words_Of_Error
1.hs_-_Meditation
1.hs_-_To_Linger_In_A_Garden_Fair
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_II
1.jk_-_Meg_Merrilies
1.jk_-_Sleep_And_Poetry
1.jk_-_The_Cap_And_Bells;_Or,_The_Jealousies_-_A_Faery_Tale_.._Unfinished
1.jk_-_To_......
1.jm_-_I_Have_forgotten
1.jm_-_Song_to_the_Rock_Demoness
1.jm_-_The_Profound_Definitive_Meaning
1.jm_-_The_Song_of_Perfect_Assurance_(to_the_Demons)
1.kbr_-_Poem_2
1.kbr_-_The_Swan_flies_away
1.lovecraft_-_Fungi_From_Yuggoth
1.lovecraft_-_Waste_Paper-_A_Poem_Of_Profound_Insignificance
1.mah_-_Seeking_Truth,_I_studied_religion
1.ml_-_Realisation_of_Dreams_and_Mind
1.mm_-_Wouldst_thou_know_my_meaning?
1.ms_-_Incomparable_Verse_Valley
1.nrpa_-_The_Summary_of_Mahamudra
1.pbs_-_Alastor_-_or,_the_Spirit_of_Solitude
1.pbs_-_HERE_I_sit_with_my_paper
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Mont_Blanc_-_Lines_Written_In_The_Vale_of_Chamouni
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_Peter_Bell_The_Third
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_I.
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_IV.
1.pbs_-_Rosalind_and_Helen_-_a_Modern_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Scenes_From_The_Faust_Of_Goethe
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Retrospect_-_CWM_Elan,_1812
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Life
1.poe_-_Elizabeth
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_Tamerlane
1.poe_-_The_Raven
1.rb_-_An_Epistle_Containing_the_Strange_Medical_Experience_of_Kar
1.rb_-_A_Toccata_Of_Galuppi's
1.rb_-_Fra_Lippo_Lippi
1.rb_-_Introduction:_Pippa_Passes
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_III_-_Paracelsus
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_II_-_Noon
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fourth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Third
1.rb_-_The_Flight_Of_The_Duchess
1.rb_-_Waring
1.rt_-_(75)_Thy_gifts_to_us_mortals_fulfil_all_our_needs_(from_Gitanjali)
1.rt_-_Babys_Way
1.rt_-_Fireflies
1.rt_-_Gitanjali
1.rt_-_Lamp_Of_Love
1.rt_-_On_The_Seashore
1.rt_-_Our_Meeting
1.rt_-_Sit_Smiling
1.rt_-_The_Child-Angel
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_XLV_-_To_The_Guests
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_XXVIII_-_Your_Questioning_Eyes
1.rt_-_Ungrateful_Sorrow
1.rwe_-_Celestial_Love
1.rwe_-_Initial_Love
1.rwe_-_My_Garden
1.rwe_-_The_Sphinx
1.rwe_-_The_Test
1.rwe_-_The_Visit
1.rwe_-_Threnody
1.rwe_-_Woodnotes
1.srmd_-_He_and_I_are_one
1.srm_-_The_Necklet_of_Nine_Gems
1.srm_-_The_Song_of_the_Poppadum
1.tc_-_Autumn_chrysanthemums_have_beautiful_color
1.tm_-_The_Sowing_of_Meanings
1.vpt_-_The_moon_has_shone_upon_me
1.wby_-_A_Dramatic_Poem
1.wby_-_Easter_1916
1.wby_-_Paudeen
1.wby_-_The_Old_Age_Of_Queen_Maeve
1.wby_-_The_Phases_Of_The_Moon
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_The_Shadowy_Waters
1.wby_-_The_Two_Kings
1.wby_-_Vacillation
1.whitman_-_As_I_Sat_Alone_By_Blue_Ontarios_Shores
1.whitman_-_A_Woman_Waits_For_Me
1.whitman_-_Brother_Of_All,_With_Generous_Hand
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Occupations
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Words
1.whitman_-_Crossing_Brooklyn_Ferry
1.whitman_-_I_Sing_The_Body_Electric
1.whitman_-_Italian_Music_In_Dakota
1.whitman_-_On_Old_Mans_Thought_Of_School
1.whitman_-_Out_of_the_Cradle_Endlessly_Rocking
1.whitman_-_Red_Jacket_(From_Aloft)
1.whitman_-_Respondez!
1.whitman_-_Sea-Shore_Memories
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_II
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XIV
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXV
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Open_Road
1.whitman_-_Starting_From_Paumanok
1.whitman_-_That_Music_Always_Round_Me
1.whitman_-_The_Indications
1.whitman_-_To_The_Garden_The_World
1.whitman_-_With_Antecedents
1.ww_-_2_-_Houses_and_rooms_are_full_of_perfumes,_the_shelves_are_crowded_with_perfumes
1.ww_-_2-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_Book_Eighth-_Retrospect--Love_Of_Nature_Leading_To_Love_Of_Man
1.ww_-_Book_Seventh_[Residence_in_London]
1.ww_-_Book_Sixth_[Cambridge_and_the_Alps]
1.ww_-_Book_Third_[Residence_at_Cambridge]
1.ww_-_From_The_Cuckoo_And_The_Nightingale
1.ww_-_Michael-_A_Pastoral_Poem
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_II-_Book_First-_The_Wanderer
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_V-_Book_Fouth-_Despondency_Corrected
1.ww_-_The_Force_Of_Prayer,_Or,_The_Founding_Of_Bolton,_A_Tradition
1.ww_-_The_Last_Supper,_by_Leonardo_da_Vinci,_in_the_Refectory_of_the_Convent_of_Maria_della_GraziaMilan
1.ww_-_The_Prioresss_Tale_[from_Chaucer]
2.01_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE
2.01_-_Habit_1__Be_Proactive
2.01_-_Indeterminates,_Cosmic_Determinations_and_the_Indeterminable
2.01_-_Isha_Upanishad__All_that_is_world_in_the_Universe
2.01_-_Mandala_One
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_On_the_Concept_of_the_Archetype
2.01_-_The_Attributes_of_Omega_Point_-_a_Transcendent_God
2.01_-_The_Picture
2.01_-_The_Therapeutic_value_of_Abreaction
2.01_-_The_Yoga_and_Its_Objects
2.02_-_Brahman,_Purusha,_Ishwara_-_Maya,_Prakriti,_Shakti
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind
2.02_-_On_Letters
2.02_-_The_Bhakta.s_Renunciation_results_from_Love
2.02_-_THE_DURGA_PUJA_FESTIVAL
2.02_-_THE_EXPANSION_OF_LIFE
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.02_-_The_Mother_Archetype
2.02_-_The_Synthesis_of_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.02_-_Yoga
2.03_-_DEMETER
2.03_-_Indra_and_the_Thought-Forces
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_The_Christian_Phenomenon_and_Faith_in_the_Incarnation
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.03_-_THE_MASTER_IN_VARIOUS_MOODS
2.03_-_The_Pyx
2.04_-_ADVICE_TO_ISHAN
2.04_-_Agni,_the_Illumined_Will
2.04_-_Concentration
2.04_-_On_Art
2.04_-_Positive_Aspects_of_the_Mother-Complex
2.04_-_The_Divine_and_the_Undivine
2.04_-_The_Living_Church_and_Christ-Omega
2.04_-_The_Secret_of_Secrets
2.05_-_Apotheosis
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.05_-_Renunciation
2.05_-_The_Cosmic_Illusion;_Mind,_Dream_and_Hallucination
2.05_-_The_Divine_Truth_and_Way
2.05_-_The_Tale_of_the_Vampires_Kingdom
2.05_-_Universal_Love_and_how_it_leads_to_Self-Surrender
2.05_-_VISIT_TO_THE_SINTHI_BRAMO_SAMAJ
2.06_-_Reality_and_the_Cosmic_Illusion
2.06_-_The_Higher_Knowledge_and_the_Higher_Love_are_one_to_the_true_Lover
2.06_-_The_Wand
2.06_-_Two_Tales_of_Seeking_and_Losing
2.06_-_WITH_VARIOUS_DEVOTEES
2.06_-_Works_Devotion_and_Knowledge
2.07_-_BANKIM_CHANDRA
2.07_-_I_Also_Try_to_Tell_My_Tale
2.07_-_On_Congress_and_Politics
2.07_-_The_Cup
2.07_-_The_Knowledge_and_the_Ignorance
2.07_-_The_Mother__Relations_with_Others
2.07_-_The_Supreme_Word_of_the_Gita
2.08_-_ALICE_IN_WONDERLAND
2.08_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE_(II)
2.08_-_God_in_Power_of_Becoming
2.08_-_On_Non-Violence
2.08_-_The_God_of_Love_is_his_own_proof
2.08_-_The_Sword
2.08_-_Three_Tales_of_Madness_and_Destruction
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.09_-_SEVEN_REASONS_WHY_A_SCIENTIST_BELIEVES_IN_GOD
2.09_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY
2.09_-_The_Pantacle
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.01_-_God_The_One_Reality
21.01_-_The_Mother_The_Nature_of_Her_Work
2.1.02_-_Nature_The_World-Manifestation
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
2.10_-_Knowledge_by_Identity_and_Separative_Knowledge
2.10_-_On_Vedic_Interpretation
2.10_-_THE_MASTER_AND_NARENDRA
2.10_-_The_Primordial_Kings__Their_Shattering
2.10_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_Time_the_Destroyer
2.1.1_-_The_Nature_of_the_Vital
2.11_-_The_Shattering_And_Fall_of_The_Primordial_Kings
2.11_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_The_Double_Aspect
2.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_IN_CALCUTTA
2.12_-_THE_MASTERS_REMINISCENCES
2.12_-_The_Origin_of_the_Ignorance
2.12_-_The_Way_and_the_Bhakta
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.13_-_The_Book
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.1.3_-_Wrong_Movements_of_the_Vital
2.14_-_AT_RAMS_HOUSE
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.1.5.1_-_Study_of_Works_of_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
2.1.5.2_-_Languages
2.1.5.5_-_Other_Subjects
2.15_-_CAR_FESTIVAL_AT_BALARMS_HOUSE
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.15_-_Reality_and_the_Integral_Knowledge
2.15_-_The_Cosmic_Consciousness
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.16_-_The_Integral_Knowledge_and_the_Aim_of_Life;_Four_Theories_of_Existence
2.16_-_VISIT_TO_NANDA_BOSES_HOUSE
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.17_-_December_1938
2.17_-_THE_MASTER_ON_HIMSELF_AND_HIS_EXPERIENCES
2.17_-_The_Progress_to_Knowledge_-_God,_Man_and_Nature
2.17_-_The_Soul_and_Nature
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.18_-_The_Evolutionary_Process_-_Ascent_and_Integration
2.18_-_The_Soul_and_Its_Liberation
2.19_-_Out_of_the_Sevenfold_Ignorance_towards_the_Sevenfold_Knowledge
2.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_DR._SARKAR
2.19_-_THE_SOOTHSAYER
2.2.01_-_The_Problem_of_Consciousness
2.2.01_-_Work_and_Yoga
2.2.02_-_Consciousness_and_the_Inconscient
2.2.03_-_The_Divine_Force_in_Work
2.2.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
2.2.03_-_The_Science_of_Consciousness
2.20_-_Nov-Dec_1939
2.20_-_THE_MASTERS_TRAINING_OF_HIS_DISCIPLES
2.20_-_The_Philosophy_of_Rebirth
2.21_-_1940
2.21_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.21_-_Towards_the_Supreme_Secret
2.22_-_Rebirth_and_Other_Worlds;_Karma,_the_Soul_and_Immortality
2.22_-_THE_MASTER_AT_COSSIPORE
2.22_-_THE_STILLEST_HOUR
2.22_-_The_Supreme_Secret
2.23_-_A_Virtuous_Woman_is_a_Crown_to_Her_Husband
2.2.3_-_Depression_and_Despondency
2.23_-_Man_and_the_Evolution
2.23_-_The_Conditions_of_Attainment_to_the_Gnosis
2.23_-_The_Core_of_the_Gita.s_Meaning
2.23_-_THE_MASTER_AND_BUDDHA
2.24_-_Note_on_the_Text
2.2.4_-_Taittiriya_Upanishad
2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man
2.24_-_THE_MASTERS_LOVE_FOR_HIS_DEVOTEES
2.24_-_The_Message_of_the_Gita
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.26_-_The_Ascent_towards_Supermind
2.2.7.01_-_Some_General_Remarks
2.27_-_The_Gnostic_Being
2.27_-_The_Two_Types_of_Unions
2.28_-_The_Divine_Life
2.2.9.02_-_Plato
2.3.01_-_Aspiration_and_Surrender_to_the_Mother
2.3.01_-_Concentration_and_Meditation
2.3.02_-_Mantra_and_Japa
2.3.02_-_Opening,_Sincerity_and_the_Mother's_Grace
2.3.02_-_The_Supermind_or_Supramental
2.3.03_-_Integral_Yoga
2.3.03_-_The_Mother's_Presence
2.3.04_-_The_Mother's_Force
2.3.05_-_Sadhana_through_Work_for_the_Mother
2.3.06_-_The_Mother's_Lights
2.3.07_-_The_Mother_in_Visions,_Dreams_and_Experiences
2.3.1.08_-_The_Necessity_and_Nature_of_Inspiration
2.3.1_-_Ego_and_Its_Forms
2.4.01_-_Divine_Love,_Psychic_Love_and_Human_Love
29.09_-_Some_Dates
2_-_Other_Hymns_to_Agni
3.00.1_-_Foreword
30.01_-_World-Literature
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.03_-_Spirituality_in_Art
30.05_-_Rhythm_in_Poetry
30.07_-_The_Poet_and_the_Yogi
3.00_-_Hymn_To_Pan
3.00_-_Introduction
3.00_-_The_Magical_Theory_of_the_Universe
30.10_-_The_Greatness_of_Poetry
30.11_-_Modern_Poetry
30.15_-_The_Language_of_Rabindranath
30.17_-_Rabindranath,_Traveller_of_the_Infinite
3.01_-_Fear_of_God
3.01_-_Forms_of_Rebirth
3.01_-_The_Soul_World
3.02_-_King_and_Queen
3.02_-_Mysticism
3.02_-_The_Formulae_of_the_Elemental_Weapons
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret
3.02_-_The_Practice_Use_of_Dream-Analysis
3.02_-_The_Psychology_of_Rebirth
3.03_-_SULPHUR
3.03_-_The_Ascent_to_Truth
3.03_-_The_Consummation_of_Mysticism
3.03_-_The_Four_Foundational_Practices
3.03_-_The_Godward_Emotions
3.03_-_THE_MODERN_EARTH
3.04_-_Immersion_in_the_Bath
3.04_-_LUNA
3.04_-_The_Formula_of_ALHIM
3.05_-_SAL
3.05_-_The_Conjunction
3.05_-_The_Formula_of_I.A.O.
3.06_-_Death
3.06_-_The_Delight_of_the_Divine
3.06_-_Thought-Forms_and_the_Human_Aura
3.07_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Soul
3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail
3.08_-_Of_Equilibrium
3.08_-_Purification
3.08_-_The_Thousands
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
3.09_-_The_Return_of_the_Soul
3.1.01_-_Distinctive_Features_of_the_Integral_Yoga
31.01_-_The_Heart_of_Bengal
3.1.01_-_The_Problem_of_Suffering_and_Evil
3.1.02_-_A_Theory_of_the_Human_Being
3.1.03_-_A_Realistic_Adwaita
31.03_-_The_Trinity_of_Bengal
3.1.04_-_Transformation_in_the_Integral_Yoga
31.09_-_The_Cause_of_Indias_Decline
3.10_-_Of_the_Gestures
3.10_-_The_New_Birth
3.11_-_Epilogue
3.12_-_Of_the_Bloody_Sacrifice
3.12_-_ON_OLD_AND_NEW_TABLETS
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.15_-_Of_the_Invocation
3.16.2_-_Of_the_Charge_of_the_Spirit
3.16_-_THE_SEVEN_SEALS_OR_THE_YES_AND_AMEN_SONG
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
31_Hymns_to_the_Star_Goddess
3.2.01_-_On_Ideals
3.2.02_-_The_Veda_and_the_Upanishads
3.2.03_-_Conservation_and_Progress
3.2.03_-_Jainism_and_Buddhism
32.04_-_The_Human_Body
3.2.06_-_The_Adwaita_of_Shankaracharya
32.06_-_The_Novel_Alchemy
32.07_-_The_God_of_the_Scientist
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
32.08_-_Fit_and_Unfit_(A_Letter)
32.10_-_A_Letter
3.2.10_-_Christianity_and_Theosophy
32.11_-_Life_and_Self-Control_(A_Letter)
32.12_-_The_Evolutionary_Imperative
3.2.1_-_Food
3.2.3_-_Dreams
3.2.4_-_Sex
33.01_-_The_Initiation_of_Swadeshi
33.09_-_Shyampukur
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.17_-_Two_Great_Wars
33.18_-_I_Bow_to_the_Mother
3.3.1_-_Illness_and_Health
3.4.01_-_Evolution
3.4.03_-_Materialism
3.5.01_-_Aphorisms
3-5_Full_Circle
3.6.01_-_Heraclitus
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
37.01_-_Yama_-_Nachiketa_(Katha_Upanishad)
37.02_-_The_Story_of_Jabala-Satyakama
37.05_-_Narada_-_Sanatkumara_(Chhandogya_Upanishad)
3.7.1.02_-_The_Reincarnating_Soul
3.7.1.04_-_Rebirth_and_Soul_Evolution
3.7.1.05_-_The_Significance_of_Rebirth
3.7.1.06_-_The_Ascending_Unity
3.7.1.07_-_Involution_and_Evolution
3.7.1.08_-_Karma
3.7.1.10_-_Karma,_Will_and_Consequence
3.7.1.11_-_Rebirth_and_Karma
3.7.1.12_-_Karma_and_Justice
3.7.2.01_-_The_Foundation
3.7.2.03_-_Mind_Nature_and_Law_of_Karma
3.7.2.04_-_The_Higher_Lines_of_Karma
38.01_-_Asceticism_and_Renunciation
3.8.1.02_-_Arya_-_Its_Significance
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
4.01_-_Introduction
4.01_-_THE_COLLECTIVE_ISSUE
4.01_-_The_Principle_of_the_Integral_Yoga
4.02_-_Difficulties
4.02_-_THE_CRY_OF_DISTRESS
4.02_-_The_Integral_Perfection
4.02_-_The_Psychology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_Prayer_of_Quiet
4.03_-_Prayer_to_the_Ever-greater_Christ
4.03_-_The_Meaning_of_Human_Endeavor
4.03_-_The_Special_Phenomenology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION_OF_THE_KING
4.04_-_Conclusion
4.04_-_In_the_Total_Christ
4.04_-_THE_REGENERATION_OF_THE_KING
4.04_-_Weaknesses
4.05_-_THE_DARK_SIDE_OF_THE_KING
4.07_-_THE_RELATION_OF_THE_KING-SYMBOL_TO_CONSCIOUSNESS
4.08_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Spirit
4.09_-_REGINA
4.0_-_NOTES_TO_ZARATHUSTRA
4.0_-_The_Path_of_Knowledge
4.1.01_-_The_Intellect_and_Yoga
4.11_-_The_Perfection_of_Equality
4.12_-_The_Way_of_Equality
4.13_-_The_Action_of_Equality
4.1.4_-_Resistances,_Sufferings_and_Falls
4.14_-_The_Power_of_the_Instruments
4.19_-_THE_DRUNKEN_SONG
4.19_-_The_Nature_of_the_supermind
4.1_-_Jnana
4.21_-_The_Gradations_of_the_supermind
4.2.1_-_The_Right_Attitude_towards_Difficulties
4.2.2.01_-_The_Meaning_of_Psychic_Opening
4.2.3.01_-_The_Meaning_of_Coming_to_the_Front
4.24_-_The_supramental_Sense
4.2.5_-_Dealing_with_Depression_and_Despondency
4.26_-_The_Supramental_Time_Consciousness
4.2_-_Karma
4.3.2.04_-_Degrees_in_the_Higher_Consciousness
4.4.1.01_-_The_Meaning_of_Spiritual_Transformation
4.43_-_Chapter_Three
4.4.5.03_-_Descent_and_Other_Experiences
5.01_-_EPILOGUE
5.02_-_Perfection_of_the_Body
5.02_-_THE_STATUE
5.03_-_ADAM_AS_THE_FIRST_ADEPT
5.04_-_THE_POLARITY_OF_ADAM
5.05_-_THE_OLD_ADAM
5.06_-_Supermind_in_the_Evolution
5.06_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION
5.07_-_ROTUNDUM,_HEAD,_AND_BRAIN
5.08_-_ADAM_AS_TOTALITY
5.08_-_Supermind_and_Mind_of_Light
5.1.01.1_-_The_Book_of_the_Herald
5.1.01_-_Terminology
5.1.02_-_Ahana
5.2.01_-_The_Descent_of_Ahana
5.2.01_-_Word-Formation
5.2.02_-_Aryan_Origins_-_The_Elementary_Roots_of_Language
5.2.03_-_The_An_Family
5.3.04_-_Roots_in_M
5.3.05_-_The_Root_Mal_in_Greek
5.4.01_-_Notes_on_Root-Sounds
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.01_-_THE_ALCHEMICAL_VIEW_OF_THE_UNION_OF_OPPOSITES
6.02_-_STAGES_OF_THE_CONJUNCTION
6.04_-_THE_MEANING_OF_THE_ALCHEMICAL_PROCEDURE
6.05_-_THE_PSYCHOLOGICAL_INTERPRETATION_OF_THE_PROCEDURE
6.07_-_THE_MONOCOLUS
6.08_-_THE_CONTENT_AND_MEANING_OF_THE_FIRST_TWO_STAGES
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
6.10_-_THE_SELF_AND_THE_BOUNDS_OF_KNOWLEDGE
7.10_-_Order
7.15_-_The_Family
7.16_-_Sympathy
7.3.10_-_The_Lost_Boat
7.3.13_-_Ascent
7.5.32_-_Krishna
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
Aeneid
Apology
Appendix_4_-_Priest_Spells
APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A.
A_Secret_Miracle
Averroes_Search
Big_Mind_(non-dual)
Big_Mind_(ten_perfections)
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Blazing_P2_-_Map_the_Stages_of_Conventional_Consciousness
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IX._-_Of_those_who_allege_a_distinction_among_demons,_some_being_good_and_others_evil
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Book_of_Psalms
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_VII._-_Of_the_select_gods_of_the_civil_theology,_and_that_eternal_life_is_not_obtained_by_worshipping_them
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XII._-_Of_the_creation_of_angels_and_men,_and_of_the_origin_of_evil
BOOK_XIV._-_Of_the_punishment_and_results_of_mans_first_sin,_and_of_the_propagation_of_man_without_lust
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XXI._-_Of_the_eternal_punishment_of_the_wicked_in_hell,_and_of_the_various_objections_urged_against_it
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
Chapter_I_-_WHICH_TREATS_OF_THE_CHARACTER_AND_PURSUITS_OF_THE_FAMOUS_GENTLEMAN_DON_QUIXOTE_OF_LA_MANCHA
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_V
COSA_-_BOOK_VI
COSA_-_BOOK_X
COSA_-_BOOK_XII
COSA_-_BOOK_XIII
Cratylus
DM_2_-_How_to_Meditate
DS2
DS3
DS4
ENNEAD_01.08_-_Of_the_Nature_and_Origin_of_Evils.
ENNEAD_02.02_-_About_the_Movement_of_the_Heavens.
ENNEAD_02.04a_-_Of_Matter.
ENNEAD_02.05_-_Of_the_Aristotelian_Distinction_Between_Actuality_and_Potentiality.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.02_-_Of_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.04_-_Of_Our_Individual_Guardian.
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Entities_(Soul_and_and_Matter).
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.07_-_Of_the_Immortality_of_the_Soul:_Polemic_Against_Materialism.
ENNEAD_04.08_-_Of_the_Descent_of_the_Soul_Into_the_Body.
ENNEAD_05.01_-_The_Three_Principal_Hypostases,_or_Forms_of_Existence.
ENNEAD_05.03_-_The_Self-Consciousnesses,_and_What_is_Above_Them.
ENNEAD_05.05_-_That_Intelligible_Entities_Are_Not_External_to_the_Intelligence_of_the_Good.
ENNEAD_06.01_-_Of_the_Ten_Aristotelian_and_Four_Stoic_Categories.
ENNEAD_06.02_-_The_Categories_of_Plotinos.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.06_-_Of_Numbers.
ENNEAD_06.07_-_How_Ideas_Multiplied,_and_the_Good.
ENNEAD_06.08_-_Of_the_Will_of_the_One.
ENNEAD_06.09_-_Of_the_Good_and_the_One.
Euthyphro
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Gods_Script
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
Ion
Liber
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
LUX.04_-_LIBERATION
LUX.05_-_AUGOEIDES
Maps_of_Meaning_text
Meno
MMM.01_-_MIND_CONTROL
MoM_References
Phaedo
Prayers_and_Meditations_by_Baha_u_llah_text
r1912_01_13
r1912_07_13
r1912_07_15
r1912_07_19
r1912_12_28
r1912_12_31
r1913_01_13
r1914_01_10
r1914_03_12
r1914_03_19
r1914_03_26
r1914_04_14
r1914_04_27
r1914_07_06
r1914_07_27
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_001-025
Talks_026-050
Talks_051-075
Talks_076-099
Talks_125-150
Talks_225-239
Talks_500-550
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Dream_of_a_Ridiculous_Man
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Egg
The_Fearful_Sphere_of_Pascal
The_First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Corinthians
The_Five,_Ranks_of_The_Apparent_and_the_Real
The_Gold_Bug
The_Gospel_of_Thomas
The_Hidden_Words_text
The_Last_Question
The_Letter_to_the_Hebrews
The_Library_of_Babel
The_Library_Of_Babel_2
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Lottery_in_Babylon
The_Mirror_of_Enigmas
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Revelation_of_Jesus_Christ_or_the_Apocalypse
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
The_Zahir
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

SIMILAR TITLES
434 - Maps of Meaning
How to Practice The Way to a Meaningful Life
L02 - object and meaning
Lamp of Mahamudra The Immaculate Lamp that Perfectly and Fully Illuminates the Meaning of Mahamudra, the Essence of all Phenomena
Laughter An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic
Machik's Complete Explanation Clarifying the Meaning of Chod
Mans Search for Meaning
Maps of Meaning
meaning
What is the meaning of Life

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

meaning ::: 1. The end, purpose, or significance of something. 2. What is intended to be, or actually is, expressed or indicated; signification; import. meanings.

meaning a messenger. In Arabic the word is

meaning double. (see Ma'navi and Rumi below)

meaning elements, constituents: secrets of the elements.

meaning five, and āb meaning water; a reference to the five rivers flowing through the area in northwest India known as the Punjab.

meaning 'from Persia'. Parsi is the name given to the Zoroastrian community in India who originally fled the religious persecution of eighth century Persia as Islam when being imposed as the religion of the state. Interestingly, the Arabs, who lacked a "p" sound in their alphabet, used the letter "f" instead, and thus created the word Farsi.

meaning from Rum, Byzantine. Commonly used as the name of the great mystical poet Jalāluddīn Muhammad Rūmī (1207-1273

meaningful ::: full of meaning, significance, purpose, or value.

meaningless ::: without meaning, significance, purpose, or value; purposeless; insignificant.

meaning of Torah (i.e., the Pentateuch), the angel

meaning ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Mean ::: n. --> That which is meant or intended; intent; purpose; aim; object; as, a mischievous meaning was apparent.
That which is signified, whether by act lanquage; signification; sence; import; as, the meaning of a hint.


meaning presented, intended, or implied; import.

meaning sons of man rather than sons of God—

meaning 'that (is) thou'.

meaning to dance, to dance with joy, to set to a swinging motion, to move. (in some texts as rakhs)

Meaning: A highly ambiguous term, with at least four pivotal senses, involving intention or purpose, designation or reference, definition or translation, causal antecedents or consequences. Each of these provides overlapping families of cases generated by some or all of the following types of systematic ambiguity: -- Arising from a contrast between the standpoints of speaker and interpreter. arising from contrast between the meaning of specific utterances (tokens) and that of the general (type) symbol. arising from attention to one rather than another use of language (e.g., to the expressive rather than the evocative or referential uses). Some of these ambiguities are normally eliminated by attention to the context in which the term 'meaning' occurs. Adequate definition, would, accordingly, involve a detailed analysis of the types of context which are most common. The following is a preliminary outline. "What does X {some event, not necessarily linguistic) mean?" =   "Of what is X an index?"   "Of what is X a sign?" "What does S (a speaker) mean by X (an utterance)?" =   "What are S's interests, intentions, purposes in uttering X?"   "To whom (what) is he referring?"   "What effect does he wish to produce in the hearer?"   "What other utterance could he have used to express the same interest, make the same reference, or produce the same effect?" "What does X (an utterance of a speaker) mean to an interpreter?" =   "What does I take S to have meant by X (in any of the senses listed under B)?" "What does X (a type symbol) mean in language L?"   "What symbols (in L) can be substituted for X (in specified contexts) without appreciable loss of expressive, evocative or referential function?"   In a translation from L into another language M, either of X or of a more complex symbol containing X as part, what portion of the end-product corresponds to X?"   In addition to the above, relatively nontechnical senses, many writers use the word in divergent special ways based upon and implying favored theories about meaning.

Meaning, Kinds of: In semiotic (q. v.) several kinds of meaning, i.e. of the function of an expression in language and the content it conveys, are distinguished. An expression (sentence) has cognitive (or theoretical, assertive) meaning, if it asserts something and hence is either true or false. In this case, it is called a cognitive sentence or (cognitive, genuine) statement; it has usually the form of a declarative sentence. If an expression (a sentence) has cognitive meaning, its truth-value (q. v.) depends in general upon both   the (cognitive, semantical) meaning of the terms occurring, and   some facts referred to by the sentence. If it does depend on both (a) and (b), the sentence has factual (synthetic, material) meaning and is called a factual (synthetic, material) sentence. If, however, the truth-value depends upon (a) alone, the sentence has a (merely) logical meaning (or formal meaning, see Formal 1). In this case, if it is true, it is called logically true or analytic (q. v.); if it is false, it is called logically false or contradictory. An expression has an expressive meaning (or function) in so far as it expresses something of the state of the speaker; this kind of meaning may for instance contain pictorial, emotive, and volitional components (e.g. lyrical poetry, exclamations, commands). An expression may or may not have, in addition to its expressive meaning, a cognitive meaning; if not, it is said to have a merely expressive meaning. If an expression has a merely expressive meaning but is mistaken as being a cognitive statement, it is sometimes called a pseudo-statement. According to logical positivism (see Scientific Empiricism, IC) many sentences in metaphysics are pseudo-statements (compare Anti-metaphysics, 2).

Meaningless repetition of words or phrases, not necessarily requirin external stimulus to elicit (as opposed to perseveration, which is an inappropriately persistent response to a stimulus). ref. Kaplan & Sadock (2003) Synopsis of Psychiatry, 9th Ed., Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Meaning of the Glorious Koran, (tr.) Mohammed M.

Meaning relation: See: Name relation.

Meaning the same as essentially, so that the predicate which is said to belong the subject formally, enters into the essence and definition of the subject. Thus man is formally animal. Formally, so understood has various correlatives, according to the various aspects under which the essence of a thing can be considered:

Meaning the same as truly and properly -- then it has as correlatives: apparently, metaphorically.


TERMS ANYWHERE

1. Lacking substance, value, or basis. 2. Meaningless; senseless. 3. Futile; unavailing.

1. Not yielding the desired outcome; fruitless; valueless; insignificant. 2. Worthless. 3. Empty; meaningless. 4. Excessively proud of one"s appearance, accomplishments, qualities; conceited. 5. in vain. To no avail; without success.

1. THE PROPOSITIONAL CALCULUS formalizes the use of the sentential connectives and, or, not, if . . . then. Various systems of notation are current, of which we here adopt a particular one for purposes of exposition. We use juxtaposition to denote conjunction ("pq" to mean "p and q"), the sign ∨ to denote inclusive disjunction ("p ∨ q" to mean ("p or q or both"), the sign + to denote exclusive disiunction ("p + q" to mean "p or q but not both"), the sign ∼ to denote negation ("∼p" to mean "not p"), the sign ⊃ to denote the conditional ("p ⊃ q" to mean "if p then q," or "not both p and not-q"), the sign ≡ to denote the biconditional ("p ≡ q" to mean "p if and only if q," or "either p and q or not-p and not-q"), and the sign | to denote alternative denial ("p | q" to mean "not both p and q"). -- The word or is ambiguous in ordinary English usage between inclusive disjunction and exclusive disjunction, and distinct notations are accordingly provided for the two meanings of the word, The notations "p ⊃ q" and "p ≡ q" are sometimes read as "p implies q" and "p is equivalent to q" respectively. These readings must, however, be used with caution, since the terms implication and equivalence are often used in a sense which involves some relationship between the logical forms of the propositions (or the sentences) which they connect, whereas the validity of p ⊃ q and of p ≡ q requires no such relationship. The connective ⊃ is also said to stand for "material implication," distinguished from formal implication (§ 3 below) and strict implication (q. v.). Similarly the connective ≡ is said to stand for "material equivalence."

(3) A proposition about the nature of meaning, ideas, concepts, or universals: that they (and thus, some contend, knowledge) "consist of" or "are reducible to" references to directly presented data or content of experience; or that signs standing for meanings, ideas, concepts, or universals refer to experienced content only or primarily; or that the meaning of a term consists simply of the sum of its possible consequences in experience; or that if all possible experiential consequences of two propositions are identical, their meanings are identical.

3. In logic, an "aggregate meaning" is a form of common or universal opinion or thought held by more than one person.

4. In the philosophy of nature, aggregate has various meanings: it is a mass formed into clusters (anat.); a compound or an organized mass of individuals (zool.); an agglomerate (bot.) an agglomeration of distinct minerals separable by mechanical means (geol.); or, in general, a compound mass in which the elements retain their essential individuality. -- T.G.

ablative ::: a. --> Taking away or removing.
Applied to one of the cases of the noun in Latin and some other languages, -- the fundamental meaning of the case being removal, separation, or taking away. ::: --> The ablative case.


ablaut ::: n. --> The substitution of one root vowel for another, thus indicating a corresponding modification of use or meaning; vowel permutation; as, get, gat, got; sing, song; hang, hung.

  A body of mystical Jewish teachings based on an interpretation of hidden meanings in the Hebrew Scriptures. Among its central doctrines are, all creation is an emanation from the Deity and the soul exists from eternity. 2. Any secret or occult doctrine or science. 3.”Esoteric system of interpretation of the Hebrew scriptures based on the assumption that every word, letter, number, and accent in them has an occult meaning. The system, oral at first, claimed great antiquity, but was really the product of the Middle Ages, arising in the 7th century and lasting into the 18th. It was popular chiefly among Jews, but spread to Christians as well. (Col. Enc). Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo’s Works

abracadabra ::: n. --> A mystical word or collocation of letters written as in the figure. Worn on an amulet it was supposed to ward off fever. At present the word is used chiefly in jest to denote something without meaning; jargon.

Abstractionism: (Lat. ab, from + trahere, to draw) The illegitimate use of abstraction, and especially the tendency to mistake abstractions for concrete realities. Cf. W. James, The Meaning of Truth, ch XIII. Equivalent to A. N. Whitehead's "Fallacy of misplaced concreteness." -- L.W.

Abstractive: That meaning of cognition which lacks one of the two requisites for intuitive knowledge: for in abstrictive cogniti n either we know things through other things, and not through their proper images -- or we know th'ngs that are not present: e.g., the knowledge we now have of God, through creatures -- or the knowledge we have of Adam, a being not present to us.

acceptation ::: n. --> Acceptance; reception; favorable reception or regard; state of being acceptable.
The meaning in which a word or expression is understood, or generally received; as, term is to be used according to its usual acceptation.


acception ::: n. --> Acceptation; the received meaning.

A certain self-gathered state of our whole existence lifted into that superconscient truth, unity and infinity of self-aware, self-blissful existence is the aim and culmination; and that is the meaning we shall give to the term Samadhi. Not merely a state withdrawn from all consciousness of the outward, withdrawn even from all consciousness of the inward into that which exists beyond both whether as seed of both or transcendent even of their seed-state; but a settled existence in the One and Infinite, united and identified with it, and this status to remain whether we abide in the waking condition in which we are conscious of the forms of things or we withdraw into the inward activity which dwells in the play of the principles of things, the play of their names and typal forms or we soar to the condition of static inwardness where we arrive at the principles themselves and at the principle of all principles, the seed of name and form.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 321


aero- ::: --> The combining form of the Greek word meaning air.

A formula of the pure functional calculus of first order which contains no free individual variables is said to be satisfiable if it is possible to determine the underlying non-empty domain of individuals and to give meanings to the propositional and functional variables contained -- namely to each propositional variable a meaning as a particular proposition and to each n-adic functional variable a meaning as an n-adic propositional function of individuals (of the domain in question) -- in such a way that (under the accepted meanings of the sentential connectives, the quantifiers, and application of function to argument) the formula becomes true. The meaning of the last word, even for abstract, not excluding infinite, domains, must be presupposed -- a respect in which this definition differs sharply from most others made in this article.

agglutinate ::: v. t. --> To unite, or cause to adhere, as with glue or other viscous substance; to unite by causing an adhesion of substances. ::: a. --> United with glue or as with glue; cemented together.
Consisting of root words combined but not materially altered as to form or meaning; as, agglutinate forms, languages, etc.


Agglutination: (Lat. ad + glutinare, to paste) Philologically, a method of formation in language whereby a modification of meaning or of relation is given to a word by adherence or incorporation of distinct parts or elements. -- H.H.

agglutination ::: n. --> The act of uniting by glue or other tenacious substance; the state of being thus united; adhesion of parts.
Combination in which root words are united with little or no change of form or loss of meaning. See Agglutinative, 2.


Aksara: (Skr.) "Imperishable", a descriptive synonym for brahman (q.v.), the Absolute, in the Upanishads (q.v.); has also the meaning of "syllable". -- K.F.L.

Al Kindi, Al Farabi, and Ibn Sina (Avicenna) were the first great philosophers who made large use of Aristotelian books. Their writings are of truly encyclopedic character and comprise the whole edifice of knowledge in their time. Their Aristotelianism is, however, mainly Neo-Platonism with addition of certain peripatetic notions. Avicenna is more of an Aristotelian than his predecessors. Al Farabi, e.g., held that cognition is ultimately due to an illumination, whereas Avicenna adopted a more Aristotelian theory. While these thinkers had an original philosophy, Averroes (Ibn Roshd) endeavored to clarify the meaning of the Aristotelian texts by extensive and minute commentaries. Translations from these writings first made known to medieval philosophy the non-logical works of the "Philosopher", although there existed, at the same time, some translations made directly from Greek texts.

"All depends on the meaning you attach to words used; it is a matter of nomenclature. Ordinarily, one says a man has intellect if he can think well; the nature and process and field of the thought do not matter. If you take intellect in that sense, then you can say that intellect has different strata, and Ford belongs to one stratum of intellect, Einstein to another — Ford has a practical and executive business intellect, Einstein a scientific discovering and theorising intellect. But Ford too in his own field theorises, invents, discovers. Yet would you call Ford an intellectual or a man of intellect? I would prefer to use for the general faculty of mind the word intelligence. Ford has a great and forceful practical intelligence, keen, quick, successful, dynamic. He has a brain that can deal with thoughts also, but even there his drive is towards practicality. He believes in rebirth (metempsychosis), for instance, not for any philosophic reason, but because it explains life as a school of experience in which one gathers more and more experience and develops by it. Einstein has, on the other hand, a great discovering scientific intellect, not, like Marconi, a powerful practical inventive intelligence for the application of scientific discovery. All men have, of course, an ‘intellect" of a kind; all, for instance, can discuss and debate (for which you say rightly intellect is needed); but it is only when one rises to the realm of ideas and moves freely in it that you say, ‘This man has an intellect".” Letters on Yoga

“All depends on the meaning you attach to words used; it is a matter of nomenclature. Ordinarily, one says a man has intellect if he can think well; the nature and process and field of the thought do not matter. If you take intellect in that sense, then you can say that intellect has different strata, and Ford belongs to one stratum of intellect, Einstein to another—Ford has a practical and executive business intellect, Einstein a scientific discovering and theorising intellect. But Ford too in his own field theorises, invents, discovers. Yet would you call Ford an intellectual or a man of intellect? I would prefer to use for the general faculty of mind the word intelligence. Ford has a great and forceful practical intelligence, keen, quick, successful, dynamic. He has a brain that can deal with thoughts also, but even there his drive is towards practicality. He believes in rebirth (metempsychosis), for instance, not for any philosophic reason, but because it explains life as a school of experience in which one gathers more and more experience and develops by it. Einstein has, on the other hand, a great discovering scientific intellect, not, like Marconi, a powerful practical inventive intelligence for the application of scientific discovery. All men have, of course, an ‘intellect’ of a kind; all, for instance, can discuss and debate (for which you say rightly intellect is needed); but it is only when one rises to the realm of ideas and moves freely in it that you say, ‘This man has an intellect’.” Letters on Yoga

allegory ::: n. --> A figurative sentence or discourse, in which the principal subject is described by another subject resembling it in its properties and circumstances. The real subject is thus kept out of view, and we are left to collect the intentions of the writer or speaker by the resemblance of the secondary to the primary subject.
Anything which represents by suggestive resemblance; an emblem.
A figure representation which has a meaning beyond notion


Al-Musawwir ::: The fashioner of forms. The One who exhibits ‘meanings’ as ‘forms’ and devises the mechanism in the perceiver to perceive them.

A logistic system need not be given any meaning or interpretation, but may be put forward merely as a formal discipline of interest for its own sake; and in this case the words proof, theorem, valid inference, etc., are to be dissociated from their every-day meanings and taken purely as technical terms. Even when an interpretation of the system is intended, it is a requirement of rigor that no use shall be made of the interpretation (as such) in the determination whether a sequence of symbols is a formula, whether a sequence of formulas is a proof, etc.

already ::: 1. Core Meaning: an adverb indicating that something has happened before now. 2. Happened in the past before a particular time, or will have happened by or before a particular time in the future. 3. Unexpectedly early.

ambi- ::: --> A prefix meaning about, around; -- used in words derived from the Latin.

ambiguities ::: uncertainties of meaning or intentions.

ambiguity ::: n. --> The quality or state of being ambiguous; doubtfulness or uncertainty, particularly as to the signification of language, arising from its admitting of more than one meaning; an equivocal word or expression.

ambiguous ::: 1. Open to or having several possible meanings or interpretations; equivocal; questionable; indistinct, obscure, not clearly defined. 2. Of doubtful or uncertain nature; difficult to comprehend, distinguish, or classify; admitting more than one interpretation, or explanation; of double meaning. 3. Of oracles, people, using words of double meaning. ambiguously.

ambiguously ::: adv. --> In an ambiguous manner; with doubtful meaning.

amen ::: interj., adv., & n. --> An expression used at the end of prayers, and meaning, So be it. At the end of a creed, it is a solemn asseveration of belief. When it introduces a declaration, it is equivalent to truly, verily. ::: v. t. --> To say Amen to; to sanction fully.

amphibological ::: a. --> Of doubtful meaning; ambiguous.

amphibology ::: n. --> A phrase, discourse, or proposition, susceptible of two interpretations; and hence, of uncertain meaning. It differs from equivocation, which arises from the twofold sense of a single term.

amphibolous ::: a. --> Ambiguous; doubtful.
Capable of two meanings.


amphigory ::: n. --> A nonsense verse; a rigmarole, with apparent meaning, which on further attention proves to be meaningless.

Ampliative: (Lat. ampliare, to make wider; Ger. Erweiterungsurteil) Synthetic; serving to expand. In an ampliative judgment the predicate adds something not already contained in the meaning of the subject-term. Contrasted with analytic or explicative. -- O.F.K.

an adjective suffix meaning "without” (childless, peerless). Sri Aurobindo forms a number of new words utilizing this suffix.

anagoge ::: n. --> An elevation of mind to things celestial.
The spiritual meaning or application; esp. the application of the types and allegories of the Old Testament to subjects of the New.


anagogical ::: a. --> Mystical; having a secondary spiritual meaning; as, the rest of the Sabbath, in an anagogical sense, signifies the repose of the saints in heaven; an anagogical explication.

Analogy: Originally a mathematical term, Analogia, meaning equality of ratios (Euclid VII Df. 20, V. Dfs. 5, 6), which entered Plato's philosophy (Republic 534a6), where it also expressed the epistemological doctrine that sensed things are related as their mathematical and ideal correlates. In modern usage analogy was identified with a weak form of reasoning in which "from the similarity of two things in certain particulars, their similarity in other particulars is inferred." (Century Dic.) Recently, the analysis of scientific method has given the term new significance. The observable data of science are denoted by concepts by inspection, whose complete meaning is given by something immediately apprehendable; its verified theory designating unobservable scientific objects is expressed by concepts by postulation, whose complete meaning is prescribed for them by the postulates of the deductive theory in which they occur. To verify such theory relations, termed epistemic correlations (J. Un. Sc. IX: 125-128), are required. When these are one-one, analogy exists in a very precise sense, since the concepts by inspection denoting observable data are then related as are the correlated concepts by postulation designating unobservable scientific objects. -- F.S.C.N. Analogy of Pythagoras: (Gr. analogia) The equality of ratios, or proportion, between the lengths of the strings producing the consonant notes of the musical scale. The discovery of these ratios is credited to Pythagoras, who is also said to have applied the principle of mathematical proportion to the other arts, and hence to have discovered, in his analogy, the secret of beauty in all its forms. -- G.R.M.

Analyticity: See Meaning, Kinds of; Truth, semantical; Valid. Analytic Judgment: (Ger. analytisches Urteil) In Kant: A judgment in which the predicate concept is included within the subject concept, as analysis should or does disclose. Such a judgment does not require verification by experience; its sole criterion is the law of contradiction. (See Kantianism.) -- O.F.K.

“An eternal infinite self-existence is the supreme reality, but the supreme transcendent eternal Being, Self and Spirit,—an infinite Person, we may say, because his being is the essence and source of all personality,—is the reality and meaning of self-existence: so too the cosmic Self, Spirit, Being, Person is the reality and meaning of cosmic existence; the same Self, Spirit, Being or Person manifesting its multiplicity is the reality and meaning of individual existence.” The Life Divine

Angiras (Angirasa) ::: the rsi who represents the seer-will, in later times regarded as one of the original sages, progenitor of a clan of rsis that went by his name, however it is clear that the word is used in the Veda not merely as a name of a certain family of rsis, but with a distinct meaning inherent in the word: it must have meant flaming, glowing; used as an epithet, a name of Agni, etc. [Ved.]

anglo- ::: --> A combining form meaning the same as English; or English and, or English conjoined with; as, Anglo-Turkish treaty, Anglo-German, Anglo-Irish.

Antar-atman: (Skr.) "Inner self", a term for the self found in the Upanishads (q.v.). A similar concept is antar-yamin, meaning "inner controller." -- K.F.L.

antero- ::: --> A combining form meaning anterior, front; as, antero-posterior, front and back; antero-lateral, front side, anterior and at the side.

anti ::: --> A prefix meaning against, opposite or opposed to, contrary, or in place of; -- used in composition in many English words. It is often shortened to ant-; as, antacid, antarctic.

Anti-metaphysics: 1. Agnosticism (q.v.). 2. Logical Positivism (see Scientific Empiricism (1)) holds that those metaphysical statements which are not confirmable by experiences (see Verification 4, 5) have no cognitive meaning and hence are pseudo-statements (see Meaning, Kinds of, 1, 5), -- R.C.

antiphrasis ::: n. --> The use of words in a sense opposite to their proper meaning; as when a court of justice is called a court of vengeance.

antonym ::: n. --> A word of opposite meaning; a counterterm; -- used as a correlative of synonym.

A parte ante: A phrase the literal meaning of which is, from the part before, referring to duration previous to a given event. -- J.J.R.

A parte post: A phrase the literal meaning of which is, from the part after, referring to duration subsequent to a given event. -- J.J.R.

"A passive Force has no meaning — Force is always dynamic. Only a Force can act on a basis of calm passivity just as in the material world the Force acts on the basis of inertia.” Letters on Yoga

“A passive Force has no meaning—Force is always dynamic. Only a Force can act on a basis of calm passivity just as in the material world the Force acts on the basis of inertia.” Letters on Yoga

Apsaras ::: Sri Aurobindo: “The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana.

apsaras ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana.

Apsaras ::: “The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana.

Aranyaka: (Skr.) One of early Indian treatises composed in the forest (aranya) by Brahmans retired from life and devoting their time to an interpretation of the meaning of Vedic (q.v.) ritual and usage. -- K.F.L.

Arbitrium, liberum: Livy used the expression, libera arbitria, signifying free decisions. Tertullian used either liberum arbitrium or libertas arbitrii, meaning freedom of choice. Augustine spoke of the liberum voluntatis arbitrium, free choice of the will. He held that voluntas and liberum are the same. Since liberum arbitrium implies the power to do evil, it is distinct from libertas, which is the good use of the liberum arbitrium. God is free, but He can do no wrong, Anselm preferred the term, libertas arbitrii. Thomas Aquinas taught that voluntas and liberum arbitrium are one potency. The expression has come to mean free will or choice. -- J.J.R.

archy ::: a. --> Arched; as, archy brows. ::: --> A suffix properly meaning a rule, ruling, as in monarchy, the rule of one only. Cf. -arch.

Aristocracy: 1. In its original and etymological meaning (Greek: aristos-best, kratos-power), the government by the best; and by extension, the class of the chief persons in a country. As the standards by which the best can be determined and selected may vary, it is difficult to give a general definition of this term (Cf. C. Lewis, Political Terms, X. 73). But in particular, the implications of aristocracy may be rational, historical, political, pragmatic or analogical.

artha ::: 1. [one of the four human interests]: interest; material, economic and other aims and needs of the mind and body. ::: 2. object, thing. ::: 3. meaning, significance [of a word]. ::: 4. arthan [accusative plural]

artha ::: meaning.

arthabodha (arthabodha; artha-bodha) ::: perception of the meaning.

artifice ::: 1530s,”workmanship,” from M.Fr. artifice”skill, cunning” (14c.), from L. artificium”making by art, craft,” from artifex(gen.artificis)”craftsman,artist,” from ars”art” (see art (n.)) + facere”do” (see factitious). Meaning”device, trick” (theusualmodernsense)isfrom1650s.

artifice ::: n. --> A handicraft; a trade; art of making.
Workmanship; a skillfully contrived work.
Artful or skillful contrivance.
Crafty device; an artful, ingenious, or elaborate trick. [Now the usual meaning.]


As against the faulty ethical procedures of the past and of his own day, therefore, Kant very early conceived and developed the more critical concept of "form," -- not in the sense of a "mould" into which content is to be poured (a notion which has falselv been taken over by Kant-students from his theoretical philosophy into his ethics), but -- as a method of rational (not ratiocinative, but inductive) reflection; a method undetermined by, although not irrespective of, empirical data or considerations. This methodologically formal conception constitutes Kant's major distinctive contribution to ethical theory. It is a process of rational reflection, creative construction, and transition, and as such is held by him to be the only method capable if coping with the exigencies of the facts of hunnn experience and with the needs of moral obligation. By this method of creative construction the reflective (inductive) reason is able to create, as each new need for a next reflectively chosen step arises, a new object of "pure" -- that is to say, empirically undetermined -- "practical reason." This makes possible the transition from a present no longer adequate ethical conception or attitude to an untried and as yet "indemonstrable" object. No other method can guarantee the individual and social conditions of progress without which the notion of morality loses all assignable meaning. The newly constructed object of "pure practical reason" is assumed, in the event, to provide a type of life and conduct which, just because it is of my own construction, will be likely to be accompanied by the feeling of self-sufficiency which is the basic pre-requisite of any worthy human happiness. It is this theory which constitutes Kant's ethical formalism. See also Autonomy, Categorical Imperative, Duty, End(s), Freedom, Happiness, Law, Moral, Practical Imperative, Will. -- P. A.S.

(A situation often arising in practice is that a word -- or symbol or notation -- which already has a vague meaning is to be given a new exact meaning, which is vaguely, or as nearly as possible, the same as the old. This is done by a nominal or semantical definition rather than a real definition; nevertheless it is usual in such a case to speak either of defining the word or of defining the associated notion.)

assassinate ::: v. t. --> To kill by surprise or secret assault; to murder by treacherous violence.
To assail with murderous intent; hence, by extended meaning, to maltreat exceedingly. ::: n. --> An assassination, murder, or murderous assault.


as.t.asiddhi (ashtasiddhi; ashta siddhi) ::: the eight siddhis or superastasiddhi normal powers (prakamya, vyapti, vasita, aisvarya, isita, mahima, laghima and an.ima), constituting the third member of the vijñana catus.t.aya. When the members of the vijñana catus.t.aya are listed as five rather than four, with rūpadr.s.t.i as the third, as.t.asiddhi is omitted and is replaced by tapas, meaning the siddhis of power (vasita, aisvarya and isita), as the fourth member; the siddhis of knowledge (prakamya and vyapti) are then treated as belonging to trikaladr.s.t.i, and the siddhis of the body (mahima, laghima and an.ima) are regarded as part of utthapana.

astro- ::: --> The combining form of the Greek word &

Atheism: (Gr. a, no; theos, god) Two uses of the term: The belief that there is no God. Some philosophers have been called "atheistic" because they have not held to a belief in a personal God. Atheism in this sense means "not theistic." The former meaning of the term is a literal rendering. The latter meaning is a less rigorous use of the term although widely current in the history of thought. -- V.F.

Atomism, psychological: See Psychological Atomism. Atonement: Religious act of expressing consciousness of one's sins, penitence, reconciliation, giving satisfaction. Specifically, a theological doctrine meaning the reconciliation between God and man who had sinned against God, hence given offense to Him. This was effected through the Incarnation of Christ, the Son of God, His sufferings and death on the cross, who consequently is the Saviour and Redeemer of the human race. This voluntary death and vicarious sacrifice constituted a full reparation for the sins of humanity and satisfied the debt to divine justice, thus making it again possible for men to attain eternal happiness in heaven. -- J.J.R.

Attribute: Commonly, what is proper to a thing (Latm, ad-tribuere, to assign, to ascribe, to bestow). Loosely assimilated to a quality, a property, a characteristic, a peculiarity, a circumstance, a state, a category, a mode or an accident, though there are differences among all these terms. For example, a quality is an inherent property (the qualities of matter), while an attribute refers to the actual properties of a thing only indirectly known (the attributes of God). Another difference between attribute and quality is that the former refers to the characteristics of an infinite being, while the latter is used for the characteristics of a finite being. In metaphysics, an attribute is what is indispensable to a spiritual or material substance; or that which expresses the nature of a thing; or that without which a thing is unthinkable. As such, it implies necessarily a relation to some substance of which it is an aspect or conception. But it cannot be a substance, as it does not exist by itself. The transcendental attributes are those which belong to a being because it is a being: there are three of them, the one, the true and the good, each adding something positive to the idea of being. The word attribute has been and still is used more readily, with various implications, by substantialist systems. In the 17th century, for example, it denoted the actual manifestations of substance. [Thus, Descartes regarded extension and thought as the two ultimate, simple and original attributes of reality, all else being modifications of them. With Spinoza, extension and thought became the only known attributes of Deity, each expressing in a definite manner, though not exclusively, the infinite essence of God as the only substance. The change in the meaning of substance after Hume and Kant is best illustrated by this quotation from Whitehead: "We diverge from Descartes by holding that what he has described as primary attributes of physical bodies, are really the forms of internal relationships between actual occasions and within actual occasions" (Process and Reality, p. 471).] The use of the notion of attribute, however, is still favoured by contemporary thinkers. Thus, John Boodin speaks of the five attributes of reality, namely: Energy (source of activity), Space (extension), Time (change), Consciousness (active awareness), and Form (organization, structure). In theodicy, the term attribute is used for the essential characteristics of God. The divine attributes are the various aspects under which God is viewed, each being treated as a separate perfection. As God is free from composition, we know him only in a mediate and synthetic way thrgugh his attributes. In logic, an attribute is that which is predicated or anything, that which Is affirmed or denied of the subject of a proposition. More specifically, an attribute may be either a category or a predicable; but it cannot be an individual materially. Attributes may be essential or accidental, necessary or contingent. In grammar, an attribute is an adjective, or an adjectival clause, or an equivalent adjunct expressing a characteristic referred to a subject through a verb. Because of this reference, an attribute may also be a substantive, as a class-name, but not a proper name as a rule. An attribute is never a verb, thus differing from a predicate which may consist of a verb often having some object or qualifying words. In natural history, what is permanent and essential in a species, an individual or in its parts. In psychology, it denotes the way (such as intensity, duration or quality) in which sensations, feelings or images can differ from one another. In art, an attribute is a material or a conventional symbol, distinction or decoration.

Aufklärung: In general, this German word and its English equivalent Enlightenment denote the self-emancipation of man from mere authority, prejudice, convention and tradition, with an insistence on freer thinking about problems uncritically referred to these other agencies. According to Kant's famous definition "Enlightenment is the liberation of man from his self-caused state of minority, which is the incapacity of using one's understanding without the direction of another. This state of minority is caused when its source lies not in the lack of understanding, but in the lack of determination and courage to use it without the assistance of another" (Was ist Aufklärung? 1784). In its historical perspective, the Aufklärung refers to the cultural atmosphere and contrlbutions of the 18th century, especially in Germany, France and England [which affected also American thought with B. Franklin, T. Paine and the leaders of the Revolution]. It crystallized tendencies emphasized by the Renaissance, and quickened by modern scepticism and empiricism, and by the great scientific discoveries of the 17th century. This movement, which was represented by men of varying tendencies, gave an impetus to general learning, a more popular philosophy, empirical science, scriptural criticism, social and political thought. More especially, the word Aufklärung is applied to the German contributions to 18th century culture. In philosophy, its principal representatives are G. E. Lessing (1729-81) who believed in free speech and in a methodical criticism of religion, without being a free-thinker; H. S. Reimarus (1694-1768) who expounded a naturalistic philosophy and denied the supernatural origin of Christianity; Moses Mendelssohn (1729-86) who endeavoured to mitigate prejudices and developed a popular common-sense philosophy; Chr. Wolff (1679-1754), J. A. Eberhard (1739-1809) who followed the Leibnizian rationalism and criticized unsuccessfully Kant and Fichte; and J. G. Herder (1744-1803) who was best as an interpreter of others, but whose intuitional suggestions have borne fruit in the organic correlation of the sciences, and in questions of language in relation to human nature and to national character. The works of Kant and Goethe mark the culmination of the German Enlightenment. Cf. J. G. Hibben, Philosophy of the Enlightenment, 1910. --T.G. Augustinianism: The thought of St. Augustine of Hippo, and of his followers. Born in 354 at Tagaste in N. Africa, A. studied rhetoric in Carthage, taught that subject there and in Rome and Milan. Attracted successively to Manicheanism, Scepticism, and Neo-Platontsm, A. eventually found intellectual and moral peace with his conversion to Christianity in his thirty-fourth year. Returning to Africa, he established numerous monasteries, became a priest in 391, Bishop of Hippo in 395. Augustine wrote much: On Free Choice, Confessions, Literal Commentary on Genesis, On the Trinity, and City of God, are his most noted works. He died in 430.   St. Augustine's characteristic method, an inward empiricism which has little in common with later variants, starts from things without, proceeds within to the self, and moves upwards to God. These three poles of the Augustinian dialectic are polarized by his doctrine of moderate illuminism. An ontological illumination is required to explain the metaphysical structure of things. The truth of judgment demands a noetic illumination. A moral illumination is necessary in the order of willing; and so, too, an lllumination of art in the aesthetic order. Other illuminations which transcend the natural order do not come within the scope of philosophy; they provide the wisdoms of theology and mysticism. Every being is illuminated ontologically by number, form, unity and its derivatives, and order. A thing is what it is, in so far as it is more or less flooded by the light of these ontological constituents.   Sensation is necessary in order to know material substances. There is certainly an action of the external object on the body and a corresponding passion of the body, but, as the soul is superior to the body and can suffer nothing from its inferior, sensation must be an action, not a passion, of the soul. Sensation takes place only when the observing soul, dynamically on guard throughout the body, is vitally attentive to the changes suffered by the body. However, an adequate basis for the knowledge of intellectual truth is not found in sensation alone. In order to know, for example, that a body is multiple, the idea of unity must be present already, otherwise its multiplicity could not be recognized. If numbers are not drawn in by the bodily senses which perceive only the contingent and passing, is the mind the source of the unchanging and necessary truth of numbers? The mind of man is also contingent and mutable, and cannot give what it does not possess. As ideas are not innate, nor remembered from a previous existence of the soul, they can be accounted for only by an immutable source higher than the soul. In so far as man is endowed with an intellect, he is a being naturally illuminated by God, Who may be compared to an intelligible sun. The human intellect does not create the laws of thought; it finds them and submits to them. The immediate intuition of these normative rules does not carry any content, thus any trace of ontologism is avoided.   Things have forms because they have numbers, and they have being in so far as they possess form. The sufficient explanation of all formable, and hence changeable, things is an immutable and eternal form which is unrestricted in time and space. The forms or ideas of all things actually existing in the world are in the things themselves (as rationes seminales) and in the Divine Mind (as rationes aeternae). Nothing could exist without unity, for to be is no other than to be one. There is a unity proper to each level of being, a unity of the material individual and species, of the soul, and of that union of souls in the love of the same good, which union constitutes the city. Order, also, is ontologically imbibed by all beings. To tend to being is to tend to order; order secures being, disorder leads to non-being. Order is the distribution which allots things equal and unequal each to its own place and integrates an ensemble of parts in accordance with an end. Hence, peace is defined as the tranquillity of order. Just as things have their being from their forms, the order of parts, and their numerical relations, so too their beauty is not something superadded, but the shining out of all their intelligible co-ingredients.   S. Aurelii Augustini, Opera Omnia, Migne, PL 32-47; (a critical edition of some works will be found in the Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum, Vienna). Gilson, E., Introd. a l'etude de s. Augustin, (Paris, 1931) contains very good bibliography up to 1927, pp. 309-331. Pope, H., St. Augustine of Hippo, (London, 1937). Chapman, E., St. Augustine's Philos. of Beauty, (N. Y., 1939). Figgis, J. N., The Political Aspects of St. Augustine's "City of God", (London, 1921). --E.C. Authenticity: In a general sense, genuineness, truth according to its title. It involves sometimes a direct and personal characteristic (Whitehead speaks of "authentic feelings").   This word also refers to problems of fundamental criticism involving title, tradition, authorship and evidence. These problems are vital in theology, and basic in scholarship with regard to the interpretation of texts and doctrines. --T.G. Authoritarianism: That theory of knowledge which maintains that the truth of any proposition is determined by the fact of its having been asserted by a certain esteemed individual or group of individuals. Cf. H. Newman, Grammar of Assent; C. S. Peirce, "Fixation of Belief," in Chance, Love and Logic, ed. M. R. Cohen. --A.C.B. Autistic thinking: Absorption in fanciful or wishful thinking without proper control by objective or factual material; day dreaming; undisciplined imagination. --A.C.B. Automaton Theory: Theory that a living organism may be considered a mere machine. See Automatism. Automatism: (Gr. automatos, self-moving) (a) In metaphysics: Theory that animal and human organisms are automata, that is to say, are machines governed by the laws of physics and mechanics. Automatism, as propounded by Descartes, considered the lower animals to be pure automata (Letter to Henry More, 1649) and man a machine controlled by a rational soul (Treatise on Man). Pure automatism for man as well as animals is advocated by La Mettrie (Man, a Machine, 1748). During the Nineteenth century, automatism, combined with epiphenomenalism, was advanced by Hodgson, Huxley and Clifford. (Cf. W. James, The Principles of Psychology, Vol. I, ch. V.) Behaviorism, of the extreme sort, is the most recent version of automatism (See Behaviorism).   (b) In psychology: Psychological automatism is the performance of apparently purposeful actions, like automatic writing without the superintendence of the conscious mind. L. C. Rosenfield, From Beast Machine to Man Machine, N. Y., 1941. --L.W. Automatism, Conscious: The automatism of Hodgson, Huxley, and Clifford which considers man a machine to which mind or consciousness is superadded; the mind of man is, however, causally ineffectual. See Automatism; Epiphenomenalism. --L.W. Autonomy: (Gr. autonomia, independence) Freedom consisting in self-determination and independence of all external constraint. See Freedom. Kant defines autonomy of the will as subjection of the will to its own law, the categorical imperative, in contrast to heteronomy, its subjection to a law or end outside the rational will. (Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals, § 2.) --L.W. Autonomy of ethics: A doctrine, usually propounded by intuitionists, that ethics is not a part of, and cannot be derived from, either metaphysics or any of the natural or social sciences. See Intuitionism, Metaphysical ethics, Naturalistic ethics. --W.K.F. Autonomy of the will: (in Kant's ethics) The freedom of the rational will to legislate to itself, which constitutes the basis for the autonomy of the moral law. --P.A.S. Autonymy: In the terminology introduced by Carnap, a word (phrase, symbol, expression) is autonymous if it is used as a name for itself --for the geometric shape, sound, etc. which it exemplifies, or for the word as a historical and grammatical unit. Autonymy is thus the same as the Scholastic suppositio matertalis (q. v.), although the viewpoint is different. --A.C. Autotelic: (from Gr. autos, self, and telos, end) Said of any absorbing activity engaged in for its own sake (cf. German Selbstzweck), such as higher mathematics, chess, etc. In aesthetics, applied to creative art and play which lack any conscious reference to the accomplishment of something useful. In the view of some, it may constitute something beneficent in itself of which the person following his art impulse (q.v.) or playing is unaware, thus approaching a heterotelic (q.v.) conception. --K.F.L. Avenarius, Richard: (1843-1896) German philosopher who expressed his thought in an elaborate and novel terminology in the hope of constructing a symbolic language for philosophy, like that of mathematics --the consequence of his Spinoza studies. As the most influential apostle of pure experience, the posltivistic motive reaches in him an extreme position. Insisting on the biologic and economic function of thought, he thought the true method of science is to cure speculative excesses by a return to pure experience devoid of all assumptions. Philosophy is the scientific effort to exclude from knowledge all ideas not included in the given. Its task is to expel all extraneous elements in the given. His uncritical use of the category of the given and the nominalistic view that logical relations are created rather than discovered by thought, leads him to banish not only animism but also all of the categories, substance, causality, etc., as inventions of the mind. Explaining the evolution and devolution of the problematization and deproblematization of numerous ideas, and aiming to give the natural history of problems, Avenarius sought to show physiologically, psychologically and historically under what conditions they emerge, are challenged and are solved. He hypothesized a System C, a bodily and central nervous system upon which consciousness depends. R-values are the stimuli received from the world of objects. E-values are the statements of experience. The brain changes that continually oscillate about an ideal point of balance are termed Vitalerhaltungsmaximum. The E-values are differentiated into elements, to which the sense-perceptions or the content of experience belong, and characters, to which belongs everything which psychology describes as feelings and attitudes. Avenarius describes in symbolic form a series of states from balance to balance, termed vital series, all describing a series of changes in System C. Inequalities in the vital balance give rise to vital differences. According to his theory there are two vital series. It assumes a series of brain changes because parallel series of conscious states can be observed. The independent vital series are physical, and the dependent vital series are psychological. The two together are practically covariants. In the case of a process as a dependent vital series three stages can be noted: first, the appearance of the problem, expressed as strain, restlessness, desire, fear, doubt, pain, repentance, delusion; the second, the continued effort and struggle to solve the problem; and finally, the appearance of the solution, characterized by abating anxiety, a feeling of triumph and enjoyment.   Corresponding to these three stages of the dependent series are three stages of the independent series: the appearance of the vital difference and a departure from balance in the System C, the continuance with an approximate vital difference, and lastly, the reduction of the vital difference to zero, the return to stability. By making room for dependent and independent experiences, he showed that physics regards experience as independent of the experiencing indlvidual, and psychology views experience as dependent upon the individual. He greatly influenced Mach and James (q.v.). See Avenarius, Empirio-criticism, Experience, pure. Main works: Kritik der reinen Erfahrung; Der menschliche Weltbegriff. --H.H. Averroes: (Mohammed ibn Roshd) Known to the Scholastics as The Commentator, and mentioned as the author of il gran commento by Dante (Inf. IV. 68) he was born 1126 at Cordova (Spain), studied theology, law, medicine, mathematics, and philosophy, became after having been judge in Sevilla and Cordova, physician to the khalifah Jaqub Jusuf, and charged with writing a commentary on the works of Aristotle. Al-mansur, Jusuf's successor, deprived him of his place because of accusations of unorthodoxy. He died 1198 in Morocco. Averroes is not so much an original philosopher as the author of a minute commentary on the whole works of Aristotle. His procedure was imitated later by Aquinas. In his interpretation of Aristotelian metaphysics Averroes teaches the coeternity of a universe created ex nihilo. This doctrine formed together with the notion of a numerical unity of the active intellect became one of the controversial points in the discussions between the followers of Albert-Thomas and the Latin Averroists. Averroes assumed that man possesses only a disposition for receiving the intellect coming from without; he identifies this disposition with the possible intellect which thus is not truly intellectual by nature. The notion of one intellect common to all men does away with the doctrine of personal immortality. Another doctrine which probably was emphasized more by the Latin Averroists (and by the adversaries among Averroes' contemporaries) is the famous statement about "two-fold truth", viz. that a proposition may be theologically true and philosophically false and vice versa. Averroes taught that religion expresses the (higher) philosophical truth by means of religious imagery; the "two-truth notion" came apparently into the Latin text through a misinterpretation on the part of the translators. The works of Averroes were one of the main sources of medieval Aristotelianlsm, before and even after the original texts had been translated. The interpretation the Latin Averroists found in their texts of the "Commentator" spread in spite of opposition and condemnation. See Averroism, Latin. Averroes, Opera, Venetiis, 1553. M. Horten, Die Metaphysik des Averroes, 1912. P. Mandonnet, Siger de Brabant et l'Averroisme Latin, 2d ed., Louvain, 1911. --R.A. Averroism, Latin: The commentaries on Aristotle written by Averroes (Ibn Roshd) in the 12th century became known to the Western scholars in translations by Michael Scottus, Hermannus Alemannus, and others at the beginning of the 13th century. Many works of Aristotle were also known first by such translations from Arabian texts, though there existed translations from the Greek originals at the same time (Grabmann). The Averroistic interpretation of Aristotle was held to be the true one by many; but already Albert the Great pointed out several notions which he felt to be incompatible with the principles of Christian philosophy, although he relied for the rest on the "Commentator" and apparently hardly used any other text. Aquinas, basing his studies mostly on a translation from the Greek texts, procured for him by William of Moerbecke, criticized the Averroistic interpretation in many points. But the teachings of the Commentator became the foundation for a whole school of philosophers, represented first by the Faculty of Arts at Paris. The most prominent of these scholars was Siger of Brabant. The philosophy of these men was condemned on March 7th, 1277 by Stephen Tempier, Bishop of Paris, after a first condemnation of Aristotelianism in 1210 had gradually come to be neglected. The 219 theses condemned in 1277, however, contain also some of Aquinas which later were generally recognized an orthodox. The Averroistic propositions which aroused the criticism of the ecclesiastic authorities and which had been opposed with great energy by Albert and Thomas refer mostly to the following points: The co-eternity of the created word; the numerical identity of the intellect in all men, the so-called two-fold-truth theory stating that a proposition may be philosophically true although theologically false. Regarding the first point Thomas argued that there is no philosophical proof, either for the co-eternity or against it; creation is an article of faith. The unity of intellect was rejected as incompatible with the true notion of person and with personal immortality. It is doubtful whether Averroes himself held the two-truths theory; it was, however, taught by the Latin Averroists who, notwithstanding the opposition of the Church and the Thomistic philosophers, gained a great influence and soon dominated many universities, especially in Italy. Thomas and his followers were convinced that they interpreted Aristotle correctly and that the Averroists were wrong; one has, however, to admit that certain passages in Aristotle allow for the Averroistic interpretation, especially in regard to the theory of intellect.   Lit.: P. Mandonnet, Siger de Brabant et l'Averroisme Latin au XIIIe Siecle, 2d. ed. Louvain, 1911; M. Grabmann, Forschungen über die lateinischen Aristotelesübersetzungen des XIII. Jahrhunderts, Münster 1916 (Beitr. z. Gesch. Phil. d. MA. Vol. 17, H. 5-6). --R.A. Avesta: See Zendavesta. Avicehron: (or Avencebrol, Salomon ibn Gabirol) The first Jewish philosopher in Spain, born in Malaga 1020, died about 1070, poet, philosopher, and moralist. His main work, Fons vitae, became influential and was much quoted by the Scholastics. It has been preserved only in the Latin translation by Gundissalinus. His doctrine of a spiritual substance individualizing also the pure spirits or separate forms was opposed by Aquinas already in his first treatise De ente, but found favor with the medieval Augustinians also later in the 13th century. He also teaches the necessity of a mediator between God and the created world; such a mediator he finds in the Divine Will proceeding from God and creating, conserving, and moving the world. His cosmogony shows a definitely Neo-Platonic shade and assumes a series of emanations. Cl. Baeumker, Avencebrolis Fons vitae. Beitr. z. Gesch. d. Philos. d. MA. 1892-1895, Vol. I. Joh. Wittman, Die Stellung des hl. Thomas von Aquino zu Avencebrol, ibid. 1900. Vol. III. --R.A. Avicenna: (Abu Ali al Hosain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina) Born 980 in the country of Bocchara, began to write in young years, left more than 100 works, taught in Ispahan, was physician to several Persian princes, and died at Hamadan in 1037. His fame as physician survived his influence as philosopher in the Occident. His medical works were printed still in the 17th century. His philosophy is contained in 18 vols. of a comprehensive encyclopedia, following the tradition of Al Kindi and Al Farabi. Logic, Physics, Mathematics and Metaphysics form the parts of this work. His philosophy is Aristotelian with noticeable Neo-Platonic influences. His doctrine of the universal existing ante res in God, in rebus as the universal nature of the particulars, and post res in the human mind by way of abstraction became a fundamental thesis of medieval Aristotelianism. He sharply distinguished between the logical and the ontological universal, denying to the latter the true nature of form in the composite. The principle of individuation is matter, eternally existent. Latin translations attributed to Avicenna the notion that existence is an accident to essence (see e.g. Guilelmus Parisiensis, De Universo). The process adopted by Avicenna was one of paraphrasis of the Aristotelian texts with many original thoughts interspersed. His works were translated into Latin by Dominicus Gundissalinus (Gondisalvi) with the assistance of Avendeath ibn Daud. This translation started, when it became more generally known, the "revival of Aristotle" at the end of the 12th and the beginning of the 13th century. Albert the Great and Aquinas professed, notwithstanding their critical attitude, a great admiration for Avicenna whom the Arabs used to call the "third Aristotle". But in the Orient, Avicenna's influence declined soon, overcome by the opposition of the orthodox theologians. Avicenna, Opera, Venetiis, 1495; l508; 1546. M. Horten, Das Buch der Genesung der Seele, eine philosophische Enzyklopaedie Avicenna's; XIII. Teil: Die Metaphysik. Halle a. S. 1907-1909. R. de Vaux, Notes et textes sur l'Avicennisme Latin, Bibl. Thomiste XX, Paris, 1934. --R.A. Avidya: (Skr.) Nescience; ignorance; the state of mind unaware of true reality; an equivalent of maya (q.v.); also a condition of pure awareness prior to the universal process of evolution through gradual differentiation into the elements and factors of knowledge. --K.F.L. Avyakta: (Skr.) "Unmanifest", descriptive of or standing for brahman (q.v.) in one of its or "his" aspects, symbolizing the superabundance of the creative principle, or designating the condition of the universe not yet become phenomenal (aja, unborn). --K.F.L. Awareness: Consciousness considered in its aspect of act; an act of attentive awareness such as the sensing of a color patch or the feeling of pain is distinguished from the content attended to, the sensed color patch, the felt pain. The psychologlcal theory of intentional act was advanced by F. Brentano (Psychologie vom empirischen Standpunkte) and received its epistemological development by Meinong, Husserl, Moore, Laird and Broad. See Intentionalism. --L.W. Axiological: (Ger. axiologisch) In Husserl: Of or pertaining to value or theory of value (the latter term understood as including disvalue and value-indifference). --D.C. Axiological ethics: Any ethics which makes the theory of obligation entirely dependent on the theory of value, by making the determination of the rightness of an action wholly dependent on a consideration of the value or goodness of something, e.g. the action itself, its motive, or its consequences, actual or probable. Opposed to deontological ethics. See also teleological ethics. --W.K.F. Axiologic Realism: In metaphysics, theory that value as well as logic, qualities as well as relations, have their being and exist external to the mind and independently of it. Applicable to the philosophy of many though not all realists in the history of philosophy, from Plato to G. E. Moore, A. N. Whitehead, and N, Hartmann. --J.K.F. Axiology: (Gr. axios, of like value, worthy, and logos, account, reason, theory). Modern term for theory of value (the desired, preferred, good), investigation of its nature, criteria, and metaphysical status. Had its rise in Plato's theory of Forms or Ideas (Idea of the Good); was developed in Aristotle's Organon, Ethics, Poetics, and Metaphysics (Book Lambda). Stoics and Epicureans investigated the summum bonum. Christian philosophy (St. Thomas) built on Aristotle's identification of highest value with final cause in God as "a living being, eternal, most good."   In modern thought, apart from scholasticism and the system of Spinoza (Ethica, 1677), in which values are metaphysically grounded, the various values were investigated in separate sciences, until Kant's Critiques, in which the relations of knowledge to moral, aesthetic, and religious values were examined. In Hegel's idealism, morality, art, religion, and philosophy were made the capstone of his dialectic. R. H. Lotze "sought in that which should be the ground of that which is" (Metaphysik, 1879). Nineteenth century evolutionary theory, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and economics subjected value experience to empirical analysis, and stress was again laid on the diversity and relativity of value phenomena rather than on their unity and metaphysical nature. F. Nietzsche's Also Sprach Zarathustra (1883-1885) and Zur Genealogie der Moral (1887) aroused new interest in the nature of value. F. Brentano, Vom Ursprung sittlicher Erkenntnis (1889), identified value with love.   In the twentieth century the term axiology was apparently first applied by Paul Lapie (Logique de la volonte, 1902) and E. von Hartmann (Grundriss der Axiologie, 1908). Stimulated by Ehrenfels (System der Werttheorie, 1897), Meinong (Psychologisch-ethische Untersuchungen zur Werttheorie, 1894-1899), and Simmel (Philosophie des Geldes, 1900). W. M. Urban wrote the first systematic treatment of axiology in English (Valuation, 1909), phenomenological in method under J. M. Baldwin's influence. Meanwhile H. Münsterberg wrote a neo-Fichtean system of values (The Eternal Values, 1909).   Among important recent contributions are: B. Bosanquet, The Principle of Individuality and Value (1912), a free reinterpretation of Hegelianism; W. R. Sorley, Moral Values and the Idea of God (1918, 1921), defending a metaphysical theism; S. Alexander, Space, Time, and Deity (1920), realistic and naturalistic; N. Hartmann, Ethik (1926), detailed analysis of types and laws of value; R. B. Perry's magnum opus, General Theory of Value (1926), "its meaning and basic principles construed in terms of interest"; and J. Laird, The Idea of Value (1929), noteworthy for historical exposition. A naturalistic theory has been developed by J. Dewey (Theory of Valuation, 1939), for which "not only is science itself a value . . . but it is the supreme means of the valid determination of all valuations." A. J. Ayer, Language, Truth and Logic (1936) expounds the view of logical positivism that value is "nonsense." J. Hessen, Wertphilosophie (1937), provides an account of recent German axiology from a neo-scholastic standpoint.   The problems of axiology fall into four main groups, namely, those concerning (1) the nature of value, (2) the types of value, (3) the criterion of value, and (4) the metaphysical status of value.   (1) The nature of value experience. Is valuation fulfillment of desire (voluntarism: Spinoza, Ehrenfels), pleasure (hedonism: Epicurus, Bentham, Meinong), interest (Perry), preference (Martineau), pure rational will (formalism: Stoics, Kant, Royce), apprehension of tertiary qualities (Santayana), synoptic experience of the unity of personality (personalism: T. H. Green, Bowne), any experience that contributes to enhanced life (evolutionism: Nietzsche), or "the relation of things as means to the end or consequence actually reached" (pragmatism, instrumentalism: Dewey).   (2) The types of value. Most axiologists distinguish between intrinsic (consummatory) values (ends), prized for their own sake, and instrumental (contributory) values (means), which are causes (whether as economic goods or as natural events) of intrinsic values. Most intrinsic values are also instrumental to further value experience; some instrumental values are neutral or even disvaluable intrinsically. Commonly recognized as intrinsic values are the (morally) good, the true, the beautiful, and the holy. Values of play, of work, of association, and of bodily well-being are also acknowledged. Some (with Montague) question whether the true is properly to be regarded as a value, since some truth is disvaluable, some neutral; but love of truth, regardless of consequences, seems to establish the value of truth. There is disagreement about whether the holy (religious value) is a unique type (Schleiermacher, Otto), or an attitude toward other values (Kant, Höffding), or a combination of the two (Hocking). There is also disagreement about whether the variety of values is irreducible (pluralism) or whether all values are rationally related in a hierarchy or system (Plato, Hegel, Sorley), in which values interpenetrate or coalesce into a total experience.   (3) The criterion of value. The standard for testing values is influenced by both psychological and logical theory. Hedonists find the standard in the quantity of pleasure derived by the individual (Aristippus) or society (Bentham). Intuitionists appeal to an ultimate insight into preference (Martineau, Brentano). Some idealists recognize an objective system of rational norms or ideals as criterion (Plato, Windelband), while others lay more stress on rational wholeness and coherence (Hegel, Bosanquet, Paton) or inclusiveness (T. H. Green). Naturalists find biological survival or adjustment (Dewey) to be the standard. Despite differences, there is much in common in the results of the application of these criteria.   (4) The metaphysical status of value. What is the relation of values to the facts investigated by natural science (Koehler), of Sein to Sollen (Lotze, Rickert), of human experience of value to reality independent of man (Hegel, Pringle-Pattlson, Spaulding)? There are three main answers:   subjectivism (value is entirely dependent on and relative to human experience of it: so most hedonists, naturalists, positivists);   logical objectivism (values are logical essences or subsistences, independent of their being known, yet with no existential status or action in reality);   metaphysical objectivism (values   --or norms or ideals   --are integral, objective, and active constituents of the metaphysically real: so theists, absolutists, and certain realists and naturalists like S. Alexander and Wieman). --E.S.B. Axiom: See Mathematics. Axiomatic method: That method of constructing a deductive system consisting of deducing by specified rules all statements of the system save a given few from those given few, which are regarded as axioms or postulates of the system. See Mathematics. --C.A.B. Ayam atma brahma: (Skr.) "This self is brahman", famous quotation from Brhadaranyaka Upanishad 2.5.19, one of many alluding to the central theme of the Upanishads, i.e., the identity of the human and divine or cosmic. --K.F.L.

auto- ::: --> A combining form, with the meaning of self, one&

ava (madhurabhava; madhur bhava)—the sweet (madhura) relation (bhava) between the jiva and the isvara (or between Kali and Kr.s.n.a), the relation of lover and beloved which "is the most intense and blissful of all and carries up all the rest into its heights"(see composite bhava); the spiritual emotion proper to that relation, in which "the turning of human emotion Godwards finds its full meaning and discovers all the truth of which love is the human symbol, all its essential instincts divinised, raised, satisfied in the bliss from which our life was born and towards which by oneness it returns in the Ananda of the divine existence where love is absolute, eternal and unalloyed". madhura madhur a d dasi

“Avatarhood would have little meaning if it were not connected with the evolution. The Hindu procession of the ten Avatars is itself, as it were, a parable of evolution. First the Fish Avatar, then the amphibious animal between land and water, then the land animal, then the Man-Lion Avatar, bridging man and animal, then man as dwarf, small and undeveloped and physical but containing in himself the godhead and taking possession of existence, then the rajasic, sattwic, nirguna Avatars, leading the human development from the vital rajasic to the sattwic mental man and again the overmental superman. Krishna, Buddha and Kalki depict the last three stages, the stages of the spiritual development—Krishna opens the possibility of overmind, Buddha tries to shoot beyond to the supreme liberation but that liberation is still negative, not returning upon earth to complete positively the evolution; Kalki is to correct this by bringing the Kingdom of the Divine upon earth, destroying the opposing Asura forces. The progression is striking and unmistakable.” Letters on Yoga

babble ::: 1. v. To utter sounds or words imperfectly, indistinctly, or without meaning. 2.* **n. *A murmuring sound or a confusion of sounds.

babble ::: v. i. --> To utter words indistinctly or unintelligibly; to utter inarticulate sounds; as a child babbles.
To talk incoherently; to utter unmeaning words.
To talk much; to chatter; to prate.
To make a continuous murmuring noise, as shallow water running over stones.
To utter in an indistinct or incoherent way; to repeat, as words, in a childish way without understanding.


(b) An epistemologist who rejects an extreme or agnostic scepticism, may very properly seek to determine the limits of knowledge and to assert that genuine knowledge is, within certain prescribed limits, possible yet beyond those limits impossible. There are, of course, innumerable ways of delimiting the knowable from the unknowable -- a typical instance of the sceptical delimitation of knowledge is the Kantian distinction between the phenomenal and noumenal world. See Phenomenon; Noumenon. A similar epistemological position is involved in the doctrine of certain recent positivists and radical empiricists that the knowable coincides with the meaningful and the verifiable, the unknowable with trie meaningless and unverifiable. See Positivism, Logical; Empiricism, Radical.

barrack ::: n. --> A building for soldiers, especially when in garrison. Commonly in the pl., originally meaning temporary huts, but now usually applied to a permanent structure or set of buildings.
A movable roof sliding on four posts, to cover hay, straw, etc. ::: v. t.


bead ::: n. --> A prayer.
A little perforated ball, to be strung on a thread, and worn for ornament; or used in a rosary for counting prayers, as by Roman Catholics and Mohammedans, whence the phrases to tell beads, to at one&


be- ::: --> A prefix, originally the same word as by;
To intensify the meaning; as, bespatter, bestir.
To render an intransitive verb transitive; as, befall (to fall upon); bespeak (to speak for).
To make the action of a verb particular or definite; as, beget (to get as offspring); beset (to set around).


beauty ::: the quality present in a thing or person that gives intense pleasure or deep satisfaction to the mind, whether arising from sensory manifestations (as shape, colour, sound, etc.), a meaningful design or pattern, or something else, (as a personality in which high spiritual qualities are manifest). Beauty, beauty"s, Beauty"s, beauty-drenched, earth-beauty"s.

Being, hierarchy of: (Scholastic) The Neo-Platonic conception of a hierarchy of "emanations" from the "One" persisted throughout the Middle-Ages, though it was given another meaning. Emanationism properly speaking is incompatible with the notion of creation. But the medieval writers agree that there is a hierarchy, comprising within the visible world inanimate beings, plants, animals, and rational beings, men; above them rank the immaterial substances (subsistent forms, angels) and finally God Who, however, is so far distant from any created being that he cannot be placed in line. Whatever is asserted of God is so only "analogically" (see Analogy). There is analogy also between the grades of created beings; their various levels are not of one kind, no transition exists between inanimate and animate bodies, or between material and spiritual substances. Though the original meaning has been abandoned, the term "emanation" is still used, even by Aquinas. -- R.A.

Berdyayev, Nikolai Alexandrovitch: (1874-1948) Is a contemporary Russian teacher and writer on the philosophy of religion. He was born in Kiev, exiled to Vologda when twenty-five; threatened with expulsion from the Russian Orthodox Church in 1917, he became professor of philosophy at the University of Moscow. In 1922, he was expelled from the Soviet Union and he went to Berlin, where he established his Academy of Religious Philosophy. He moved his school to Paris and established a Russian review called Putj (The Way). His thought resembles that of the Christian Gnostics (see Gnosticism), and it owes a good deal to German idealism and mysticism (Boehme). He is a trenchant critic of systems as diverse as Communism and Thomistic Scholasticism. His most noted works are: Smyisl Istorii (The Meaning of History), Berlin, 1923; Novoye Srednevyekovye (transl. as The End of Our Time, N.Y., 1933), Berlin, 1924; Freedom and the Spirit, N. Y., 1935. V. J. Bourke, "The Gnosticism of N. Berdyaev", Thought, XI (1936), 409-22. -- VJ.B.

Berkeley, George: (1685-1753) Pluralistic idealist, reflecting upon the spatial attributes of distance, size, and situation, possessed, according to Locke, by external objects in themselves apart from our perception of them, concluded that the discrepancy between the visual and the tactual aspects of these attributes robbed them of all objective validity and reduced them to the status of secondary qualities existing only in and for consciousness. Moreover, the very term "matter," like all other "universals," is found upon analysis to mean and stand for nothing but complexes of experienced qualities. Indeed, "existence" except as presence to consciousness, is meaningless. Hence, nothing can be said to exist except minds (spirits) and mental content (ideas). Esse = percipi or percipere.

Bewusstsein Ueberhaupt: German expression meaning "consciousness in general" that is, consciousness conceived as a real entity over and above individual conscious centers. See Consciousness. -- L.W.

bhava ::: becoming; state of being (sometimes added to an adjective to bhava form an abstract noun and translatable by a suffix such as "-ness", as in br.hadbhava, the state of being br.hat [wide], i.e., wideness); condition of consciousness; subjectivity; state of mind and feeling; physical indication of a psychological state; content, meaning (of rūpa); spiritual experience, realisation; emotion, "moved spiritualised state of the affective nature"; (madhura bhava, etc.) any of several types of relation between the jiva and the isvara, each being a way in which "the transcendent and universal person of the Divine conforms itself to our individualised personality and accepts a personal relation with us, at once identified with us as our supreme Self and yet close and different as our Master, Friend, Lover, Teacher"; attitude; mood; temperament; aspect; internal manifestation of the Goddess (devi), in . her total divine Nature (daivi prakr.ti or devibhava) or in the "more seizable because more defined and limited temperament" of any of her aspects, as in Mahakali bhava; a similar manifestation of any personality or combination of personalities of the deva or fourfold isvara, as in Indrabhava or Aniruddha bhava; in the vision of Reality (brahmadarsana), any of the "many aspects of the Infinite" which "disclose themselves, separate, combine, fuse, are unified together" until "there shines through it all the supreme integral Reality"; especially, the various "states of perception" in which the divine personality (purus.a) is seen in the impersonality of the brahman, ranging from the "general personality" of sagun.a brahman to the "vivid personality" of Kr.s.n.akali. bh bhavasamrddhi

"Birth is an assumption of a body by the spirit, death is the casting off [of] the body; there is nothing original in this birth, nothing final in this death. Before birth we were; after death we shall be. Nor are our birth and death a single episode without continuous meaning or sequel; it is one episode out of many, scenes of our drama of existence with its denouement far away in time.” Essays Divine and Human*

“Birth is an assumption of a body by the spirit, death is the casting off [of] the body; there is nothing original in this birth, nothing final in this death. Before birth we were; after death we shall be. Nor are our birth and death a single episode without continuous meaning or sequel; it is one episode out of many, scenes of our drama of existence with its denouement far away in time.” Essays Divine and Human

B. Lotze, Rudolph Hermann: (1817-1881) Empiricist in science, teleological idealist in philosophy, theist in religion, poet and artist at heart, Lotze conceded three spheres; Necessary truths, facts, and values. Mechanism holds sway in the field of natural science; it does not generate meaning but is subordinated to value and reason which evolved a specific plan for the world. Lotze's psycho-physically oriented medical psychology is an applied metaphysics in which the concept soul stands for the unity of experience. Science attempts the demonstration of a coherence in nature; being is that which is in relationship; "thing" is not a conglomeration of qualities but a unity achieved through law; mutual effect or influence is as little explicable as being: It is the monistic Absolute working upon itself. The ultimate, absolute substance, God, is the good and is personal, personality being the highest value, and the most valuable is also the most real. Lotze disclaimed the ability to know all answers: they rest with God. Unity of law, matter, force, and all aspects of being produce beauty, while aesthetic experience consists in Einfühlung. Main works: Metaphysik, 1841; Logik, 1842; Medezinische Psychologie, 1842; Gesch. der Aesthetik im Deutschland, 1868; Mikrokosmos, 3 vols., 1856-64 (Eng. tr. 1885); Logik 1874; Metaphysik, 1879 (Eng. tr. 1884). --K. F. L. Love: (in Max Scheler) Giving one's self to a "total being" (Gesamtwesen); it therefore discloses the essence of that being; for this reason love is, for Scheler, an aspect of phenomonelogical knowledge. -- P. A.

meaning ::: 1. The end, purpose, or significance of something. 2. What is intended to be, or actually is, expressed or indicated; signification; import. meanings.

meaningful ::: full of meaning, significance, purpose, or value.

meaningless ::: without meaning, significance, purpose, or value; purposeless; insignificant.

meaning ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Mean ::: n. --> That which is meant or intended; intent; purpose; aim; object; as, a mischievous meaning was apparent.
That which is signified, whether by act lanquage; signification; sence; import; as, the meaning of a hint.


meaning presented, intended, or implied; import.

bombastry ::: n. --> Swelling words without much meaning; bombastic language; fustian.

brahmanas. :::commentaries on the meaning and the use of the vedic hymns contained in the four

Brahmanas ::: [the portion of the Veda, distinct from its mantra (hymnal) portion, which contains rules for the employment of the mantras at various sacrifices, and also detailed explanations of the origin and meaning of the mantras and numerous old legends].

broad ::: superl. --> Wide; extend in breadth, or from side to side; -- opposed to narrow; as, a broad street, a broad table; an inch broad.
Extending far and wide; extensive; vast; as, the broad expanse of ocean.
Extended, in the sense of diffused; open; clear; full.
Fig.: Having a large measure of any thing or quality; not limited; not restrained; -- applied to any subject, and retaining the literal idea more or less clearly, the precise meaning depending


by-law ::: n. --> A local or subordinate law; a private law or regulation made by a corporation for its own government.
A law that is less important than a general law or constitutional provision, and subsidiary to it; a rule relating to a matter of detail; as, civic societies often adopt a constitution and by-laws for the government of their members. In this sense the word has probably been influenced by by, meaning secondary or aside.


cabala ::: n. --> A kind of occult theosophy or traditional interpretation of the Scriptures among Jewish rabbis and certain mediaeval Christians, which treats of the nature of god and the mystery of human existence. It assumes that every letter, word, number, and accent of Scripture contains a hidden sense; and it teaches the methods of interpretation for ascertaining these occult meanings. The cabalists pretend even to foretell events by this means.
Secret science in general; mystic art; mystery.


cabalistical ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to the cabala; containing or conveying an occult meaning; mystic.

cabbala ::: 1 A body of mystical Jewish teachings based on an interpretation of hidden meanings in the Hebrew Scriptures. Among its central doctrines are, all creation is an emanation from the Deity and the soul exists from eternity. 2. Any secret or occult doctrine or science. 3. "Esoteric system of interpretation of the Hebrew scriptures based on the assumption that every word, letter, number, and accent in them has an occult meaning. The system, oral at first, claimed great antiquity, but was really the product of the Middle Ages, arising in the 7th century and lasting into the 18th. It was popular chiefly among Jews, but spread to Christians as well. (Col. Enc.)” Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo"s Works

Carnap's contributions to the study of epistemological and philosophical problems may be characterized as applications of the methods of logical analysis to the languages of everyday life and of science. His books contain applications to the fundamental problems of epistemology, expound the principles of physicalism (q.v.) which was developed by Carnap and Neurath and which offers, amongst others, a basis for a more cautious version of the ideas of older behaviorism and for the construction of one common unified language for all branches of empirical science (see Unity of Science). Main works: Logische Aufblou der Welt; Abriss der Logistik; Logische Syntax der Sprache "Testability and Meaning," Phil. of Sci. (1916). -- C.G.H.

Causa sui: Cause of itself; necessary existence. Causa sui conveys both a negative and a positive meaning. Negatively, it signifies that which is from itself (a se), that which does not owe its being to something else; i.e., absolute independence of being, causelessness (God as uncaused). Positively, causa sui means that whose very nature or essence involves existence; i.e., God is the ground of his own being, and regarded as "cause" of his own being, he is, as it were, efficient cause of his own existence (Descartes). Since existence necessarily follows from the very essence of that which is cause of itself, causa sui is defined as that whose nature cannot be conceived as not existing (Spinoza). -- A.G.A.B. Causality: (Lat. causa) The relationship between a cause and its effect. This relationship has been defined as a relation between events, processes, or entities in the same time series, such that   when one occurs, the other necessarily follows (sufficient condition),   when the latter occurs, the former must have preceded (necessary condition),   both conditions a and b prevail (necessary and sufficient condition),   when one occurs under certain conditions, the other necessarily follows (contributory, but not sufficient, condition) ("multiple causality" would be a case involving several causes which are severally contributory and jointly sufficient); the necessity in these cases is neither that of logical implication nor that of coercion; a relation between events, processes, or entities in the same time series such that when one occurs the other invariably follows (invariable antecedence), a relation between events, processes, or entities such that one has the efficacy to produce or alter the other; a relation between events, processes, or entities such that without one the other could not occur, as in the relation between   the material out of which a product is made and the finished product (material cause),   structure or form and the individual embodying it (formal cause),   a goal or purpose (whether supposed to exist in the future as a special kind of entity, outside a time series, or merely as an idea of the pur-poser) and the work fulfilling it (final cause),   a moving force and the process or result of its action (efficient cause); a relation between experienced events, processes, or entities and extra-experiential but either temporal or non-temporal events, processes, or entities upon whose existence the former depend; a relation between a thing and itself when it is dependent upon nothing else for its existence (self-causality); a relation between an event, process, or entity and the reason or explanation for its being; a relation between an idea and an experience whose expectation the idea arouses because of customary association of the two in this sequence; a principle or category introducing into experience one of the aforesaid types of order; this principle may be inherent in the mind, invented by the mind, or derived from experience; it may be an explanatory hypothesis, a postulate, a convenient fiction, or a necessary form of thought. Causality has been conceived to prevail between processes, parts of a continuous process, changing parts of an unchanging whole, objects, events, ideas, or something of one of these types and something of another. When an entity, event, or process is said to follow from another, it may be meant that it must succeed but can be neither contemporaneous with nor prior to the other, that it must either succeed or be contemporaneous with and dependent upon but cannot precede the other, or that one is dependent upon the other but they either are not in the same time series or one is in no time series at all.

Champaklal: “What is the meaning of this blue lotus?”

Chang Heng-ch'u: (Chang Tsai, Chang Tzu-hou, 1021-1077) Was a typical Confucian government official and teacher. When young, he was interested in military strategy. He studied the Chung Yung (Golden Mean) at the advice of a prominent scholar, and went on to Taoist and Buddhist works. But he finally returned to the Confucian classics, explored their meanings and discussed them with the Ch'eng brothers. His works called Chang Heng-ch'u Hsien-sheng Ch'uan-chi (complete works of Master Chang Heng-ch'u) are indispensable to the study of the Neo-Confucian (li hsueh) movement. -- W.T.C.

charactery ::: n. --> The art or means of characterizing; a system of signs or characters; symbolism; distinctive mark.
That which is charactered; the meaning.


chondro- ::: --> A combining form meaning a grain, granular, granular cartilage, cartilaginous; as, the chondrocranium, the cartilaginous skull of the lower vertebrates and of embryos.

C. K. Ogden and I. A. Richards, The Meaning of Meaning.

code ::: 1. A system of symbols, letters, or words given certain arbitrary meanings, used for transmitting messages requiring secrecy or brevity. 2. A systematic collection of regulations and rules of procedure or conduct. codes.

Cognitive Meaning, Cognitive Sentence: See Meaning, Kinds of, 1. Cognoscendum: (pl. cognoscenda) (Lat. cognoscere, to know) The object of a cognition. Cognoscenda may be real and existent e.g. in veridical perception and memory; abstract and ideal e.g. in conception and valuation; fictitious, e.g. in imagination and hallucination. See Object, Objective. -- L.W.

comment ::: v. i. --> To make remarks, observations, or criticism; especially, to write notes on the works of an author, with a view to illustrate his meaning, or to explain particular passages; to write annotations; -- often followed by on or upon. ::: v. t. --> To comment on.

Communication: (Lat. communicare, to share) Intercourse between minds or selves whereby sensations, imagery or conceptional meanings are transferred from one to another. Communication includes: ordinary sense-mediated communication by means of speech, writing, gesture, facial expression and bodily attitude and allegedly direct contact between minds by mental telepathy and other occult means. See Telegnosts; Telepathy. -- L.W.

comprehend ::: v. t. --> To contain; to embrace; to include; as, the states comprehended in the Austrian Empire.
To take in or include by construction or implication; to comprise; to imply.
To take into the mind; to grasp with the understanding; to apprehend the meaning of; to understand.


Conatus: The drive, force, or urge possessed by a thing which is directed towards the preservation of its own being. Since, for Spinoza, all things are animated, the term is used by him in a broader meaning than that accorded it, for example, in the Stoic philosophy. Spinoza maintains that there is no conatus for self-destruction (Ethica, III, 4; see also IV, 20 Schol., etc.); rather, the conatus relates to a thing's "power of existence", and he thus speaks of it as a kind of amour propre (natuurlyke Liefde) which characterizes a specific thing. See Short Tr., App. H. -- W.S.W.

Confusion: (logical) May be due to the ambiguity which is always a possible accompaniment of the use of words or terms with respect to their several meanings. It may also refer to any logical misapprehension which results in a semi-formal or material fallacy. -- C.K.D.

conico- ::: a. --> A combining form, meaning somewhat resembling a cone; as, conico-cylindrical, resembling a cone and a cylinder; conico-hemispherical; conico-subulate.

Conjunction: See Logic, formal, § 1. Connexity: A dyadic relation R is cilled connected if, for every two different members x, y of its field, at least one of xRy, yRx holds. Connotation: The sum of the constitutive notes of the essence of a concept as it is in itself and not as it is for us. This logical property is thus measured by the sum of the notes of the concept, of the higher genera it implies, of the various essential attributes of its nature as such. This term is synonymous with intension and comprehension; yet, the distinctions between them have been the object of controversies. J. S. Mill identifies connotation with signification and meaning, and includes in it much less than under comprehension or intension. The connotation of a general term (singular terms except descriptions are non-connotative) is the aggregate of all the other general terms necessarily implied by it is an abstract possibility and apart from exemplification in the actual world. It cannot be determined by denotation because necessity does not always refer to singular facts. Logicians who adopt this view distinguish connotation from comprehension by including in the latter contingent characters which do not enter in the former. Comprehension is thus the intensional reference of the concept, or the reference to universals of both general and singular terms. The determination of the comprehension of a concept is helped by its denotation, considering that reference is made also to singular, contingent, or particular objects exhibiting certain characteristics. In short, the connotation of a concept is its intensional reference determined intensionally; while its comprehension is its intensional reference extensionally determined. It may be observed that such a distinction and the view that the connotation of a concept contains only the notes which serve to define it, involves the nominalist principle that a concept may be reduced to what we are actually and explicitely thinking about the several notes we use to define it. Thus the connotation of a concept is much poorer than its actual content. Though the value of the concept seems to be saved by the recognition of its comprehension, it may be argued that the artificial introduction into the comprehension of both necessary and contingent notes, that is of actual and potential characteristics, confuses and perverts the notion of connotation as a logical property of our ideas. See Intension. -- T.G.

connote ::: v. t. --> To mark along with; to suggest or indicate as additional; to designate by implication; to include in the meaning; to imply.
To imply as an attribute.


context ::: 1. The part of a text or statement that surrounds a particular word or passage and determines its meaning. 2. The set of circumstances or facts that surround a particular event, situation, etc.

context ::: a. --> Knit or woven together; close; firm. ::: n. --> The part or parts of something written or printed, as of Scripture, which precede or follow a text or quoted sentence, or are so intimately associated with it as to throw light upon its meaning.

Contingency: (Lat. contingere, to touch on all sides) In its broadest philosophical usage a state of affairs is said to be contingent if it may and also may not be. A certain event, for example, is contingent if, and only if, it may come to pass and also may not come to pass. For this reason contingency is not quite equivalent in meaning to possibility (q.v.); for while a possible state of affairs is one which may be, it may at the same time be necessary, and hence it would be false to say that it may not be.

Contrasted with the Coherence Theory of Truth. Cf. B. Russell, An Inquiry into Meaning and Truth, 1941, for defence, and F. H. Bradley, Essays on Truth and Reality, for criticisms of the theory. -- M.B.

Copula: The traditional analysis of a proposition into subject and predicate involves a third part, the copula (is, are, is not, are not), binding the subject and predicate together into an assertion either of affirmation or of denial. It is now, however, commonly held that several wholly different meanings of the verb to be should be distinguished in this connection, including at least the following: predication of a monadic propositional function of its argument (the sun is hot, 7 is a prime number, mankind is numerous); formal implication (gold is heavy, a horse is a quadruped, mankind is sinful); identity (China is Cathay, that is the sun, I am the State); formal equivalence (lightning is an electric discharge between parts of a cloud and the earth). -- A.C.

cosmic Self ::: Sri Aurobindo: "When one has the cosmic consciousness, one can feel the cosmic Self as one"s own self, one can feel one with other beings in the cosmos, one can feel all the forces of Nature as moving in oneself, all selves as one"s own self. There is no why except that it is so, since all is the One.” Letters on Yoga (See also Cosmic Spirit)

"Impersonality is the first character of cosmic self; . . . .” *The Life Divine

"An eternal infinite self-existence is the supreme reality, but the supreme transcendent eternal Being, Self and Spirit, — an infinite Person, we may say, because his being is the essence and source of all personality, — is the reality and meaning of self-existence: so too the cosmic Self, Spirit, Being, Person is the reality and meaning of cosmic existence; the same Self, Spirit, Being or Person manifesting its multiplicity is the reality and meaning of individual existence.” The Life Divine

"But this cosmic self is spiritual in essence and in experience; it must not be confused with the collective existence, with any group soul or the life and body of a human society or even of all mankind.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"It is the Cosmic Self and Spirit that is in and behind all things and beings, from which and in which all is manifested in the universe — although it is now a manifestation in the Ignorance.” Letters on Yoga*


counter ::: adv. --> A prefix meaning contrary, opposite, in opposition; as, counteract, counterbalance, countercheck. See Counter, adv. & a.
Contrary; in opposition; in an opposite direction; contrariwise; -- used chiefly with run or go.
In the wrong way; contrary to the right course; as, a hound that runs counter.
At or against the front or face.
The after part of a vessel&


crank ::: n. --> A bent portion of an axle, or shaft, or an arm keyed at right angles to the end of a shaft, by which motion is imparted to or received from it; also used to change circular into reciprocating motion, or reciprocating into circular motion. See Bell crank.
Any bend, turn, or winding, as of a passage.
A twist or turn in speech; a conceit consisting in a change of the form or meaning of a word.
A twist or turn of the mind; caprice; whim; crotchet; also,


Cross-Roads Hypothesis: Theory of the relation between the mental and the physical which holds that an identical item (e.g. a red color patch) may in one relational context be considered physical and in another context be mental. The neutral entity may accordingly be represented as the point of intersection of the physical and mental cross-roads. Cf. W. James, Essays m Radical Empiricism, Chaps. I, II and VIII and The Meaning of Truth, pp. 46-50. See Neutral Monism. -- L.W.

cryptic ::: 1. Secret; occult. 2. Mysterious in meaning; puzzling; ambiguous.

C. S. Peirce, Collected Papers. See also Communication, Meaning, Referent, Semiotic, Sign, Symbol, Functions of Language, Scientific Empiricism.- -- M.B.

(c) The result of this elaborate critique of Platonism is sometimes called the Aristotelian-Thomistic synthesis. It is better, however, to call it simply a Thornistic synthesis, not only because St. Thomas criticized Aristotle on several occasions, but also because the real and historical meaning of Aristotle as a philosopher in the fourth century B.C. is still very much in dispute. In any case it ought to be pretty much beyond dispute that St. Thomas was quite aware that Aristotle was not the author of all the doctrines which he attributed to him.

daitya ::: an enemy of the gods (devas), the "opposing or too violently forward-striving Titan"; any of the sons of Diti, meaning "the division, the separative consciousness", who is the mother of the Titans as Aditi is the mother of the gods.

darkened ::: 1. Became or made dark by lack of light; lit. and fig. **2.* Fig.* Made dark or obscure in meaning or intelligibility.

DARK PATH. ::: The dark path is there and there are many who make a Gospel of spiritual suffering; many hold it to be the unavoidable price of victory. It may be so under certain circumstances, as it has been in so many lives at the beginning. or one may choose to make it so. But then the price has to be paid with resignation, fortitude or a tenacious resilience. Borne that way, the attacks of the dark forces or the ordeals they impose have a meaning. After each victory gained over them, there is then a sensible advance; often they seem to show us the difficulties in ourselves which we have to overcome. But all the same it is a too dark and difficult way which nobody need follow on whom the necessity does not lie.

demeaning ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Demean

decipher ::: v. t. --> To translate from secret characters or ciphers into intelligible terms; as, to decipher a letter written in secret characters.
To find out, so as to be able to make known the meaning of; to make out or read, as words badly written or partly obliterated; to detect; to reveal; to unfold.
To stamp; to detect; to discover.


define ::: v. t. --> To fix the bounds of; to bring to a termination; to end.
To determine or clearly exhibit the boundaries of; to mark the limits of; as, to define the extent of a kingdom or country.
To determine with precision; to mark out with distinctness; to ascertain or exhibit clearly; as, the defining power of an optical instrument.
To determine the precise signification of; to fix the meaning of; to describe accurately; to explain; to expound or


definition ::: n. --> The act of defining; determination of the limits; as, a telescope accurate in definition.
Act of ascertaining and explaining the signification; a description of a thing by its properties; an explanation of the meaning of a word or term; as, the definition of "circle;" the definition of "wit;" an exact definition; a loose definition.
Description; sort.
An exact enunciation of the constituents which make up


deponent ::: v. t. --> One who deposes or testifies under oath; one who gives evidence; usually, one who testifies in writing.
A deponent verb. ::: a. --> Having a passive form with an active meaning, as certain latin and Greek verbs.


deportment ::: n. --> Manner of deporting or demeaning one&

descend ::: “The word ‘descend’ has various meanings according to the context—I used it here in the sense of the psychic being coming down into the human consciousness and body ready for it.” Letters on Yoga

detort ::: v. t. --> To turn form the original or plain meaning; to pervert; to wrest.

deuteroscopy ::: n. --> Second sight.
That which is seen at a second view; a meaning beyond the literal sense; the second intention; a hidden signification.


dextro- ::: --> A prefix, from L. dexter, meaning, pertaining to, or toward, the right
having the property of turning the plane of polarized light to the right; as, dextrotartaric acid.


Dialectic: (Gr. dia + legein, discourse) The beginning of dialectic Aristotle is said to have attributed to Zeno of Elea. But as the art of debate by question and answer, its beginning is usually associated with the Socrates of the Platonic dialogues. As conceived by Plato himself, dialectic is the science of first principles which differs from other sciences by dispensing with hypotheses and is, consequently, "the copingstone of the sciences" -- the highest, because the clearest and hence the ultimate, sort of knowledge. Aristotle distinguishes between dialectical reasoning, which proceeds syllogistically from opinions generally accepted, and demonstrative reasoning, which begins with primary and true premises; but he holds that dialectical reasoning, in contrast with eristic, is "a process of criticism wherein lies the path to the principles of all inquiries." In modern philosophy, dialectic has two special meanings. Kant uses it as the name of that part of his Kritik der reinen Vernunft which deals critically with the special difficulties (antinomies, paralogisms and Ideas) arising out of the futile attempt (transcendental illusion) to apply the categories of the Understanding beyond the only realm to which they can apply, namely, the realm of objects in space and time (Phenomena). For Hegel, dialectic is primarily the distinguishing characteristic of speculative thought -- thought, that is, which exhibits the structure of its subject-matter (the universal, system) through the construction of synthetic categories (synthesis) which resolve (sublate) the opposition between other conflicting categories (theses and antitheses) of the same subject-matter. -- G.W.C.

diazo- ::: --> A combining form (also used adjectively), meaning pertaining to, or derived from, a series of compounds containing a radical of two nitrogen atoms, united usually to an aromatic radical; as, diazo-benzene, C6H5.N2.OH.

dictionary ::: n. --> A book containing the words of a language, arranged alphabetically, with explanations of their meanings; a lexicon; a vocabulary; a wordbook.
Hence, a book containing the words belonging to any system or province of knowledge, arranged alphabetically; as, a dictionary of medicine or of botany; a biographical dictionary.


diffuseness ::: n. --> The quality of being diffuse; especially, in writing, the use of a great or excessive number of word to express the meaning; copiousness; verbosity; prolixity.

dilogical ::: a. --> Ambiguous; of double meaning.

Diorism: The Greek term in Plato's usage signifies division, distinction; in that of Aristotle, distinction, definition, which is also the meaning today. In mathematics, a statement of the conditions needed in order to solve a problem. -- J.J.R.

distinctly ::: adv. --> With distinctness; not confusedly; without the blending of one part or thing another; clearly; plainly; as, to see distinctly.
With meaning; significantly.


distortion ::: n. --> The act of distorting, or twisting out of natural or regular shape; a twisting or writhing motion; as, the distortions of the face or body.
A wresting from the true meaning.
The state of being distorted, or twisted out of shape or out of true position; crookedness; perversion.
An unnatural deviation of shape or position of any part of the body producing visible deformity.


divarication ::: n. --> A separation into two parts or branches; a forking; a divergence.
An ambiguity of meaning; a disagreement of difference in opinion.
A divergence of lines of color sculpture, or of fibers at different angles.


doctor ::: n. --> A teacher; one skilled in a profession, or branch of knowledge learned man.
An academical title, originally meaning a men so well versed in his department as to be qualified to teach it. Hence: One who has taken the highest degree conferred by a university or college, or has received a diploma of the highest degree; as, a doctor of divinity, of law, of medicine, of music, or of philosophy. Such diplomas may confer an honorary title only.


Dogma: The Greek term signified a public ordinance of decree, also an opinion. A present meaning: an established, or generally admitted, philosophic opinion explicitly formulated, in a depreciative sense; one accepted on authority without the support of demonstration or experience. Kant calls a directly synthetical proposition grounded on concepts a dogma which he distinguishes from a mathema, which is a similar proposition effected by a construction of concepts. In the history of Christianity dogmas have come to mean definition of revealed truths proposed by the supreme authority of the Church as articles of faith which must be accepted by all its members. -- J.J.R.

domination ::: n. --> The act of dominating; exercise of power in ruling; dominion; supremacy; authority; often, arbitrary or insolent sway.
A ruling party; a party in power.
A high order of angels in the celestial hierarchy; -- a meaning given by the schoolmen.


double ::: 1. Composed of two like or unlike parts. 2. Twofold in character or meaning, dual.

doubtfulness ::: n. --> State of being doubtful.
Uncertainty of meaning; ambiguity; indefiniteness.
Uncertainty of event or issue.


DREAMS. ::: Sometimes they are the formations of your own mind or vital ; sometimes they are the formations of other minds wth an exact or modified transcription in yours ; sometimes for- mations come that are made by the non-human forces or beings of these other planes. These things are not true and need not become true in the physical world, but they may still have effects on the physical if they are framed wlh that purpose or that tendency and, if they are allowed, they may realise their events or their meaning — for they are most often symbolic or sche- ‘ matic — in the inner or the outer life.

There are other dreams that have not the same character but are a representation or transcription of things that actually hap- pen on other planes, in other worlds under other conditions than ours. There are, again, some dreams that are purely symbolic and some that indicate existing movements and propensities in us.

Symbolic dreams may symbolize anything, forces at play, the underlying structure and tissue of things done or experienced, actual or potential happenings, real or suggested movements or changes in the inner or outer nature. The exact meaning varies with the mind and the condition of the one who sees them.


drift ::: n. 1. A driving movement or force; impulse; impetus; pressure. 2. A gradual deviation from an original course, model, method, or intention. 3. Tendency, trend, meaning, or purport. 4. A bank or pile, as of sand or snow, heaped up by currents of air or water. 5. Something moving along in a current of air or water. 6. Any group of stars having a random distribution of velocities; usually applied to a group of stars with an apparent systematic motion towards some point in the sky. v. 7. To be carried along by or as if by currents of air or water. 8. To move leisurely or sporadically from place to place, especially without purpose. drifts, drifted, drifting, sleet-drift, slow-drifting.

drift ::: n. --> A driving; a violent movement.
The act or motion of drifting; the force which impels or drives; an overpowering influence or impulse.
Course or direction along which anything is driven; setting.
The tendency of an act, argument, course of conduct, or the like; object aimed at or intended; intention; hence, also, import or meaning of a sentence or discourse; aim.
That which is driven, forced, or urged along


Dyadic: (Gr. duas, two) Term meaning duality. Human experience is said to be dyadic, i.e. man's nature is dual in conflicts between good intentions and bad accomplishments, in oppositional strains and stresses. The personality of God is held to be dyadic in the confronting of difficulties or frustrations to his good will. Reality is spoken of as dyadic when it is said to be characteristically dual, e.g. both One and Many, static and dynamic, free and determined, abstract and concrete, universal and particular. -- V.F.

dyke ::: n. --> See Dike. The spelling dyke is restricted by some to the geological meaning.

"Each person follows in the world his own line of destiny which is determined by his own nature and actions — the meaning and necessity of what happens in a particular life cannot be understood except in the light of the whole course of many lives. But this can be seen by those who can get beyond the ordinary mind and feelings and see things as a whole, that even errors, misfortunes, calamities are steps in the journey, — the soul gathering experience as it passes through and beyond them until it is ripe for the transition which will carry it beyond these things to a higher consciousness and higher life.” Letters on Yoga*

“Each person follows in the world his own line of destiny which is determined by his own nature and actions—the meaning and necessity of what happens in a particular life cannot be understood except in the light of the whole course of many lives. But this can be seen by those who can get beyond the ordinary mind and feelings and see things as a whole, that even errors, misfortunes, calamities are steps in the journey,—the soul gathering experience as it passes through and beyond them until it is ripe for the transition which will carry it beyond these things to a higher consciousness and higher life.” Letters on Yoga

e- ::: --> A Latin prefix meaning out, out of, from; also, without. See Ex-.

Either sort of enquiry involves an investigation into the meaning of ethical statements, their truth and falsity, their objectivity and subjectivity, and the possibility of systematizing them under one or more first principles. In neither case is ethics concerned with our conduct or our ethical judgments simply as a matter of historical or anthropological record. It is, however, often said that the first kind of enquiry is not ethics but psychology. In both cases it may be said that the aim of ethics, as a part of philosophy, is theory not practice, cognition not action, even though it be added at once that its theory is for the sake of practice and its cognition a cognition of how to live. But some mornlists who take the second approach do deny that ethics is a cognitive discipline or science, namely those who hold that ethical first principles are resolutions or preferences, not propositions which may be true or false, e.g., Nietzsche, Santayana, Russell.

ekakshara. ::: a common term for OM meaning the single syllable

Emotive Meaning: Emotive, as distinguished from the cognitive, meaning of a statement is its ability to communicate an attitude or emotion, to inspire an act of will without conveying truth. Exclamations, commands and perhaps ethical and aesthetic judgments are emotive but not cognitive. -- L.W.

emptied ::: holding or containing nothing of meaning, or certain specified qualities.

en- ::: --> A prefix signifying in or into, used in many English words, chiefly those borrowed from the French. Some English words are written indifferently with en-or in-. For ease of pronunciation it is commonly changed to em-before p, b, and m, as in employ, embody, emmew. It is sometimes used to give a causal force, as in enable, enfeeble, to cause to be, or to make, able, or feeble; and sometimes merely gives an intensive force, as in enchasten. See In-.
A prefix from Gr. / in, meaning in; as, encephalon, entomology.


enigma ::: n. --> A dark, obscure, or inexplicable saying; a riddle; a statement, the hidden meaning of which is to be discovered or guessed.
An action, mode of action, or thing, which cannot be satisfactorily explained; a puzzle; as, his conduct is an enigma.


Enlightenment: When Kant, carried by the cultural enthusiasm of his time, explained "enlightenment" as man's coming of age from the state of infancy which rendered him incapable of using his reason without the aid of others, he gave only the subjective meaning of the term. Objectively, enlightenment is a cultural period distinguished by the fervent efforts of leading personalities to make reason the absolute ruler of human life, and to shed the light of knowledge upon the mind and conscience of any individual. Such attempts are not confined to a particular time, or nation, as history teaches; but the term is generally applied to the European enlightenment stretching from the early 17th to the beginning of the 19th century, especially fostered by English, Dutch, French, and German philosophers. It took its start in England from the empiricism of F. Bacon, Th. Hobbes, J. Locke, it found a religious version in the naturalism of Edw. H. Cherbury, J. Toland, M. Tindal, H. Bolingbroke, and the host of "freethinkers", while the Earl of Shaftesbury imparted to it a moral on the "light of reason". Not so constructive but radical in their sarcastic criticism of the past were the French enlighteners, showing that their philosophy got its momentum from the moral corruption at the royal court and abuse of kinglv power in France. Descartes' doctrine of the "clear and perspicuous ideas," Spinoza's critical attitude towards religion, and Leibniz-Wolff's "reasonable thinking" prepared the philosophy of P. Bayle, Ch. Montesquieu, F. M. Voltaire, and J. J. Rousseau. The French positive contribution to the subject was the "Encyclopedie ou Dictionaire raisonne des sciences, arts et metiers", 1751-72, in 28 volumes, edited by Diderot, D'Alembert, Helvetius, Holbach, J. L. Lagrane, etc. What, in England and France, remained on the stage of mere ideas and utopic dreams became reality in the new commonwealth of the U.S.A. The "fathers of the constitution" were enlightened, outstanding among them B. Franklin, Th. Jefferson, J. Adams, A. Hamilton, and Th. Paine their foremost literary propagandist.

epi- ::: --> A prefix, meaning upon, beside, among, on the outside, above, over. It becomes ep-before a vowel, as in epoch, and eph-before a Greek aspirate, as in ephemeral.

epiphany ::: 1. An appearance or manifestation, esp. of a deity. 2. A sudden intuitive perception of or insight into the reality or essential meaning of something. epiphanies.

equi- ::: --> A prefix, meaning equally; as, equidistant; equiangular.

equivalent ::: a. --> Equal in wortir or value, force, power, effect, import, and the like; alike in significance and value; of the same import or meaning.
Equal in measure but not admitting of superposition; -- applied to magnitudes; as, a square may be equivalent to a triangle.
Contemporaneous in origin; as, the equivalent strata of different countries.


equivocal ::: a. --> (Literally, called equally one thing or the other; hence:) Having two significations equally applicable; capable of double interpretation; of doubtful meaning; ambiguous; uncertain; as, equivocal words; an equivocal sentence.
Capable of being ascribed to different motives, or of signifying opposite feelings, purposes, or characters; deserving to be suspected; as, his actions are equivocal.
Uncertain, as an indication or sign; doubtful.


Equivocation is any fallacy arising from ambiguity of a word, or of a phrase playing the role of a single word in the reasoning in question, the word or phrase being used at different places with different meanings and an inference drawn which is formally correct if the word or phrase is treated as being the same word or phrase throughout. -- A. C.

Essence: (Lat. essentia, fr. essens, participle of esse, to be) The being or power of a thing; necessary internal relation or function. The Greek philosophers identified essence and substance in the term, ousia. In classic Latin essence was the idea or law of a thing. But in scholastic philosophy the distinction between essence and substance became important. Essence began to be identified, as in its root meaning, with being, or power. For Locke, the being whereby a thing is what it is. For Kant, the primary internal principle of all that belongs to the being of a thing. For Peirce, the intelligible element of the possibility of being. (a) In logic: definition or the elements of a thing; the genus and differentia. See Definition. (b) In epistemology: that intelligible character which defines what an indefinite predicate asserts. The universal possibility of a thing. Opposite of existence. Syn. with being, possibility. See Santayana's use of the term in Realm of Essence, as a hybrid of intuited datum and scholastic essence (q.v.). See Eternal object. -- J.K.F.

etymology ::: n. --> That branch of philological science which treats of the history of words, tracing out their origin, primitive significance, and changes of form and meaning.
That part of grammar which relates to the changes in the form of the words in a language; inflection.


Event-particle: A. N. Whitehead's term meaning a material event with all its dimensions ideally restricted. -- R.B.W.

ex- ::: --> A prefix from the latin preposition, ex, akin to Gr. &

explain ::: a. --> To flatten; to spread out; to unfold; to expand.
To make plain, manifest, or intelligible; to clear of obscurity; to expound; to unfold and illustrate the meaning of; as, to explain a chapter of the Bible. ::: v. i. --> To give an explanation.


Explanation: In general: the process, art, means or method of making a fact or a statement intelligible; the result and the expression of what is made intelligible; the meaning attributed to anything by one who makes it intelligible; a genetic description, causal development, systematic clarification, rational exposition, scientific interpretation, intelligible connection, ordered manifestation of the elements of a fact or a statement. A. More technically, the method of showing discursively that a phenomenon or a group of phenomena obeys a law, by means of causal relations or descriptive connections, or briefly, the methodical analysis of a phenomenon for the purpose of stating its cause. The process of explanation suggests the real preformation or potential presence of the consequent in the antecedent, so that the phenomenon considered may be evolved, developed, unrolled out of its conditioning antecedents. The process and the value of a scientific explanation involve the question of the relation between cause and law, as these two terms may be identified (Berkeley) or distinguished (Comte). Hence modern theories range between extreme idealism and logical positivism. Both these extremes seem to be unsatisfactory: the former would include too much into science, while the latter would embrace a part of it only, namely the knowledge of the scientific laws. Taking into account Hume's criticism of causality and Mill's reasons for accepting causality, Russell proposes what seems to be a middle course, namely that regular sequences suggest causal relations, that causal relations are one special class of scientific generalization, that is one-way sequences in time, and that causal relations as such should not be used in the advanced stages of scientific generalization, functional relations being sufficient in all cases. However satisfactory in methodology, this view may not cover all the implications of the problem. B. There are three specific types of causal explanation, and their results may be combined: genetic or in terms of the direct and immediate conditions or causes producing a phenomenon (formal and efficient cause); descriptive, or in terms of the material elements of the phenomenon (material cause); teleological, or in terms of the ultimate end to be attained (final cause), either in accordance with the nature of the event or with the intention of the agent. The real causes of a phenomenon cannot be identified always, because the natural process of change or becoming escapes complete rationalization. But the attempt to rationalize the real by causal explanation, need not be abandoned in favor of a limited genetic description (postulational or functional) of the laws which may account for the particular phenomenon.

explanation ::: n. --> The act of explaining, expounding, or interpreting; the act of clearing from obscurity and making intelligible; as, the explanation of a passage in Scripture, or of a contract or treaty.
That which explains or makes clear; as, a satisfactory explanation.
The meaning attributed to anything by one who explains it; definition; interpretation; sense.
A mutual exposition of terms, meaning, or motives,


explicate ::: a. --> Evolved; unfolded. ::: v. t. --> To unfold; to expand; to lay open.
To unfold the meaning or sense of; to explain; to clear of difficulties or obscurity; to interpret.


explicit ::: a. --> A word formerly used (as finis is now) at the conclusion of a book to indicate the end.
Not implied merely, or conveyed by implication; distinctly stated; plain in language; open to the understanding; clear; not obscure or ambiguous; express; unequivocal; as, an explicit declaration.
Having no disguised meaning or reservation; unreserved; outspoken; -- applied to persons; as, he was earnest and explicit in


explicitly ::: adv. --> In an explicit manner; clearly; plainly; without disguise or reservation of meaning; not by inference or implication; as, he explicitly avows his intention.

exposition ::: n. --> The act of exposing or laying open; a setting out or displaying to public view.
The act of expounding or of laying open the sense or meaning of an author, or a passage; explanation; interpretation; the sense put upon a passage; a law, or the like, by an interpreter; hence, a work containing explanations or interpretations; a commentary.
Situation or position with reference to direction of view or accessibility to influence of sun, wind, etc.; exposure; as, an


expound ::: v. t. --> To lay open; to expose to view; to examine.
To lay open the meaning of; to explain; to clear of obscurity; to interpret; as, to expound a text of Scripture, a law, a word, a meaning, or a riddle.


expression ::: n. --> The act of expressing; the act of forcing out by pressure; as, the expression of juices or oils; also, of extorting or eliciting; as, a forcible expression of truth.
The act of declaring or signifying; declaration; utterance; as, an expression of the public will.
Lively or vivid representation of meaning, sentiment, or feeling, etc.; significant and impressive indication, whether by language, appearance, or gesture; that manner or style which gives life


expressive ::: a. --> Serving to express, utter, or represent; indicative; communicative; -- followed by of; as, words expressive of his gratitude.
Full of expression; vividly representing the meaning or feeling meant to be conveyed; significant; emphatic; as, expressive looks or words.


Expressive Meaning: See Meaning, Kinds of, 4. Extension: (Lat. ex + tendere, to stretch) Physical space, considered as a single concrete, continuum as contrasted with the abstract conceptual space of mathematics. The distinction between extension and "space" in the abstract sense is clearly drawn by Descartes (1596-1650) in The Principles of Philosophy, part II, Princ. IV-XV. -- L.W.

fact ::: n. --> A doing, making, or preparing.
An effect produced or achieved; anything done or that comes to pass; an act; an event; a circumstance.
Reality; actuality; truth; as, he, in fact, excelled all the rest; the fact is, he was beaten.
The assertion or statement of a thing done or existing; sometimes, even when false, improperly put, by a transfer of meaning, for the thing done, or supposed to be done; a thing supposed or


Factual: See Meaning, Kinds of, 2. Faculty: (Scholastic) Medieval psychology distinguishes several faculties of the soul which are said to be really distinct from each other and from the substance of the soul. According to Aquinas the distinction is based on objects and operations. The faculties are conceived as accidents of the soul's substance, but as pertaining essentially to its nature, therefore "proper accidents". The soul operates by means of the faculties. Much misunderstood and deteriorated, this theory remained alive until recent times and is still maintained, in its original and pure form, by Neo-Scholasticism. A certain rapprochement to the older notion may he observed in the modern theory of "general factors". Most of the criticisms directed against the faculty-psychology are based on modern experimental and nominalistic approaches. The faculties listed by Aquinas are: The sensory faculties, which to operate need a bodily organ;   The external senses,   The internal senses, sensus communis, memory, imagination, vis aestimativa (in animals) or cogitativa (in man),   The sensory appetites, subdivided in the concupiscible appetite aiming at the attainable good or fleeing the avoidable evil, the irascible appetite related to good and evil whose attainment or avoidance encounters obstacles. The vegetative faculties, comprising the achievements of nutrition, growth and procreation. While the sensory appetites are common sto man and animals, the vegetative are observed also in plants. The locomotive faculty, characteristic of animals and, therefore, also of man. The rational faculties, found with man alone;   Intellect, whose proper object is the universal nature of things and whose achievements are abstraction, reasoning, judging, syllogistic thought,   Rational Will, directed towards the good as such and relying in its operation on particulars on the co-operation of the appetites, just as intellect needs for the formation of its abstract notions the phantasm, derived from sense impressions and presented to the intellect by imagination. The vis cogitativa forms a link between rational universal will and particular strivings; it is therefore also called ratio particularis.   Ch. A. Hart, The Thomisttc Theory of Mental Faculties, Washington, D. C, 1930. -- R.A.

Fallacy is any unsound step or process of reasoning, especially one which has a deceptive appearance of soundness or is falsely accepted as sound. The unsoundness may consist either in a mistake of formal logic, or in the suppression of a premiss whose unacceptability might have been recognized if it had been stated, or in a lack of genuine adaptation of the reasoning to its purpose. Of the traditional names which purport to describe particular kinds of fallacies, not all have a sufficiently definite or generally accepted meaning to justify notice. See, however, the following:

fate ::: “The Indian explanation of fate is Karma. We ourselves are our own fate through our actions, but the fate created by us binds us; for what we have sown, we must reap in this life or another. Still we are creating our fate for the future even while undergoing old fate from the past in the present. That gives a meaning to our will and action and does not, as European critics wrongly believe, constitute a rigid and sterilising fatalism. But again, our will and action can often annul or modify even the past Karma, it is only certain strong effects, called utkata karma, that are non-modifiable. Here too the achievement of the spiritual consciousness and life is supposed to annul or give the power to annul Karma. For we enter into union with the Will Divine, cosmic or transcendent, which can annul what it had sanctioned for certain conditions, new-create what it had created, the narrow fixed lines disappear, there is a more plastic freedom and wideness. Neither Karma nor Astrology therefore points to a rigid and for ever immutable fate.” Letters on Yoga

Finally, intellect and will are brought into meaningful relation (Critique of Judgment, 1789-1793) in the feelings of aesthetic (i.e., "artistic") enjoyment and natural purposiveness. The appreciation of beauty, "aesthetic judgment", arises from the harmony of an object of cognition with the forms of knowledge; the perfect compatibility, in other words, of Nature and freedom, best exemplified in genius. Natural purposiveness, on the other hand, is not necessarily a real attribute of Nature, but an a priori, heuristic principle, an irresistible hypothesis, by which we regard Nature as a supreme end or divine form in order to give the particular contents of Nature meaning and significance.

flasque ::: Sri Aurobindo: "‘Flasque" is a French word meaning ‘slack", ‘loose", ‘flaccid" etc. I have more than once tried to thrust in a French word like this, for instance, ‘A harlot empress in a bouge" – somewhat after the manner of Eliot and Ezra Pound.” Letters on Savitri.

flasque ::: Sri Aurobindo: “‘Flasque’ is a French word meaning ‘slack’, ‘loose’, ‘flaccid’ etc. I have more than once tried to thrust in a French word like this, for instance, ‘A harlot empress in a bouge’—somewhat after the manner of Eliot and Ezra Pound.” Letters on Savitri.

for- ::: --> A prefix to verbs, having usually the force of a negative or privative. It often implies also loss, detriment, or destruction, and sometimes it is intensive, meaning utterly, quite thoroughly, as in forbathe.

forked ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Fork ::: a. --> Formed into a forklike shape; having a fork; dividing into two or more prongs or branches; furcated; bifurcated; zigzag; as, the forked lighting.
Having a double meaning; ambiguous; equivocal.


Formal: 1. In the traditional use: valid independently of the specific subject-mattei; having a merely logical meaning (see Meaning. Kinds of, 3). 2. Narrower sense, in modern logic: independent of, without reference to meaning (compare Semiotic, 3). -- R.C.

Formalism (mathematical) is a name which has been given to any one of various accounts of the foundations of mathematics which emphasize the formal aspects of mathematics as against content or meaning, or which, in whole or in part, deny content to mathematical formulas. The name is often applied, in particular, to the doctrines of Hilbert (see Mathematics), although Hilbert himself calls his method axiomatic, and gives to his syntactical or metamathematical investigations the name Beweistheorie (proof theory, (q. v.). -- A.C.

For man to become divine in consciousness and act and to live inwardly and outwardly the divine life is what is meant by spirituality; all lesser meanings given to the word are inadequate fumblings or impostures.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 25, Page: 262-63


Form: (in Kant) That a priori element in experience in virtue of which the manifold of sense is synthcsized and unified into meaningful perceptions and judgments. Kant attributed the form of experience to mind and reason, the matter to sensuous intuition. See Kantianism. -- O.F.K.

Form, logical: See Logic, formal. Forma: Latin noun meaning shape, figure, appearance, image; also plan, pattern, stamp, mould. As a philosophic term used by Cicero and Augustine in the sense of species, and similarly by Scotus Eriugena. Boethius and fhe mediaeval writers employed it in the Aristotelian sense of a constituent of being, synonymous with causa formalis. Generally speaking it is an intrinsic, determining, perfective principle of existence of any determinate essence. More strictly it is a forma substantialis, or that constitutive element of a substance which is the principle or source of its activity, and which determines it to a definite species, or class, and differentiates it from any other substance. It is distinguished from a forma accidentalis which confers a sort of secondary being on a substance already constituted in its proper species and determines it to one or other accidental mode, thus a man may become a musician. A forma corporeitatis is one by which a being is a body, on which its corporeal nature and essence depend and which is its principle of life. A forma non-subsistens or materialis is one whose existence depends on matter without which it cannot exist and be active. It is distinguished from a forma subsistens or immaterialis which can exist and act separately from matter. An immaterial form may be an incomplete substance, like the human soul, which is created to be united with a body to complete its own species, or a complete substance, a pure spirit, which is not destined to be united with matter to which it cannot communicate its being, hence it is also called a forma separata. -- J.J.R.

Frege meets the same difficulties, without construing descriptions as incomplete symbols, by distinguishing two kinds of meaning, the sense (Sinn) and the denotation (Bedeutung) of an expression (formula, phrase, sentence, etc.). Scott and the author of Waverley have the same denotation, namely the man Scott, but not the same sense. The King of France has a sense but no denotation; so likewise the sentence, The King of France is bald. Two expressions having the same sense must have the same denotation if they have a denotation. When a constituent part of an expression is replaced by another part having the same sense, the sense of the whole is not altered. When a constituent part of an expression is replaced by another having the same denotation, the denotation of the whole (if any) is not altered, but the sense may be. The denotation of an (unasserted) declarative sentence (if any) is a truth-value, whereas the sense is the thought or content of the sentence. But where a sentence is used in indirect discourse (as in saying that so-and-so says that . . ., believes that . . ., is glad that . . ., etc.) the meaning is different in such a context the denotation of the sentence is that which would be its sense in direct discourse. (In quoting some one in indirect discourse, one reproduces neither the literal wording nor the truth-value, but the sense, of what he said.)

gabble ::: v. i. --> To talk fast, or to talk without meaning; to prate; to jabber.
To utter inarticulate sounds with rapidity; as, gabbling fowls. ::: n. --> Loud or rapid talk without meaning.


gab ::: n. --> The hook on the end of an eccentric rod opposite the strap. See. Illust. of Eccentric. ::: v. i. --> The mouth; hence, idle prate; chatter; unmeaning talk; loquaciousness.
To deceive; to lie.


galimatias ::: n. --> Nonsense; gibberish; confused and unmeaning talk; confused mixture.

Gautama Buddha: (Skr. Gautama, a patronymic, meaning of the tribe of Gotama; Buddha, the enlightened one) The founder of Buddhism. born about 563 B.C. into a royal house at Kapilavastu. As Prince Siddhartha (Siddhattha) he had all worldly goods and pleasures at his disposal, married, had a son, but was so stirred by sights of disease, old age, and death glimpsed on stolen drives through the city that he renounced all when but 29 years of age, became a mendicant, sought instruction in reaching an existence free from these evils and tortures, fruitlessly however, till at the end of seven years of search while sitting under the Bodhi-tree, he became the Buddha, the Awakened One, and attained the true insight. Much that is legendary and reminds one of the Christian mythos surrounds Buddha's life as retold in an extensive literature which also knows of his former and future existences. Mara, the Evil One, tempted Buddha to enter nirvana (s.v.) directly, withholding thus knowledge of the path of salvation from the world; but the Buddha was firm and taught the rightful path without venturing too far into metaphysics, setting all the while an example of a pure and holy life devoted to the alleviation of suffering. At the age of 80, having been offered and thus compelled to partake of pork, he fell ill and in dying attained nirvana. -- K.F.L.

Gazali: Born 1059 in Tus, in the country of Chorasan, taught at Bagdad, lived for a time in Syria, died in his home town 1111. He started as a sceptic in philosophy and became a mystic and orthodox afterwards. Philosophy is meaningful only as introduction to theology. His attitude resembles Neo-Platonic mysticism and is anti-Aristotelian. He wrote a detailed report on the doctrines of Farabi and Avicenna only to subject them to a scathing criticism in Destructio philosophorum where he points out the self-contradictions of philosophers. His main works are theological. In his writings on logic he wants to ensure to theology a reliable method of procedure. His metaphysics also is mainly based on theology: creation of the world out of nothing, resurrection, and so forth. Cf. H. Bauer, Die Dogmatik Al-Ghazalis, 1912. -- R.A.

Generalization ::: The tendency to associate stimuli, and therefore respond similarly to, due to their closeness on some variable such as size, shape, color, or meaning.

Generic Image: (Lat. genus, kind) A mental image which is sufficiently vague and indeterminate to represent a number of different members of a class and thus to provide the imaginal basis of a concept. A generic image is thus intermediate between a concrete image and a generic concept. The vagueness of the generic image contrasts with the specificity of the concrete image, yet the generic image lacks the fullness of meaning requisite to a genuine concept. The doctrine of the generic image was introduced by Francis Galton who drew the analogy with composite photography (Inquiries into Human Faculty, 1883 appendix on Generic Images) and is adopted by Huxley (Hume, Ch. IV). The existence of non-specific or generic images would be challenged by most contemporary psychologists. -- L.W.

Gestalt ::: German word typically translated as meaning &

gibberish ::: v. i. --> Rapid and inarticulate talk; unintelligible language; unmeaning words; jargon. ::: a. --> Unmeaning; as, gibberish language.

gloze ::: v. i. --> To flatter; to wheedle; to fawn; to talk smoothly.
To give a specious or false meaning; to ministerpret. ::: v. t. --> To smooth over; to palliate. ::: n.


godhead ::: Sri Aurobindo: ". . . the Godhead is all that is universe and all that is in the universe and all that is more than the universe. The Gita lays stress first on his supracosmic existence. For otherwise the mind would miss its highest goal and remain turned towards the cosmic only or else attached to some partial experience of the Divine in the cosmos. It lays stress next on his universal existence in which all moves and acts. For that is the justification of the cosmic effort and that is the vast spiritual self-awareness in which the Godhead self-seen as the Time-Spirit does his universal works. Next it insists with a certain austere emphasis on the acceptance of the Godhead as the divine inhabitant in the human body. For he is the Immanent in all existences, and if the indwelling divinity is not recognised, not only will the divine meaning of individual existence be missed, the urge to our supreme spiritual possibilities deprived of its greatest force, but the relations of soul with soul in humanity will be left petty, limited and egoistic. Finally, it insists at great length on the divine manifestation in all things in the universe and affirms the derivation of all that is from the nature, power and light of the one Godhead.” *Essays on the Gita

Godhead ::: “… the Godhead is all that is universe and all that is in the universe and all that is more than the universe. The Gita lays stress first on his supracosmic existence. For otherwise the mind would miss its highest goal and remain turned towards the cosmic only or else attached to some partial experience of the Divine in the cosmos. It lays stress next on his universal existence in which all moves and acts. For that is the justification of the cosmic effort and that is the vast spiritual self-awareness in which the Godhead self-seen as the Time-Spirit does his universal works. Next it insists with a certain austere emphasis on the acceptance of the Godhead as the divine inhabitant in the human body. For he is the Immanent in all existences, and if the indwelling divinity is not recognised, not only will the divine meaning of individual existence be missed, the urge to our supreme spiritual possibilities deprived of its greatest force, but the relations of soul with soul in humanity will be left petty, limited and egoistic. Finally, it insists at great length on the divine manifestation in all things in the universe and affirms the derivation of all that is from the nature, power and light of the one Godhead.” Essays on the Gita

graphic characters or figures that indicate the meaning of a thing without indicating the sounds used to express it.

grovel ::: 1. To lie or creep or crawl in a prostrate position with the face down as in subservience, fear or humility. 2. To behave in a servile or demeaning manner; cringe. 3. To take pleasure in mean or base things. grovels, grovelling.

Heidegger, Martin: (1889-) Trained in Husserl's radical structural analysis of pure consciousness, Heidegger shares with phenomenology the effort to methodically analyze and describe the conceptual meanings of single phenomena. He aimed at a phenomenological analysis of human existence in respect to its temporal and historical character. Concentrating on the Greek tradition, and endeavoring to open a totally different approach from that of the Greek thinkers to the problem of being, he seeks to find his way back to an inner independence of philosophy from the special sciences. Before a start can be made in the radical analysis of human existence, the road has to be cleared of the objections of philosophical tradition, science, logic and common sense. As the moderns have forgotten the truths the great thinkers discovered, have lost the ability to penetrate to the real origins, the recovery of the hard-won, original, uncorrupted insights of man into metaphysical reality, is only possible through a "destructive" analysis of the traditional philosophies. By this recovery of the hidden sources, Heidegger aims to revive the genuine philosophizing which, not withstanding appearances, has vanished from us in the Western world because of autonomous science serious disputing of the position of philosophy. As human reality is so structured that it discloses itself immediately, he writes really an idealistic philosophy of homo faber. But instead of being a rationalistic idealist reading reason into the structure of the really real, he takes a more avowedly emotional phenomenon as the center of a new solution of the Seinsfrage.

hermeneutics ::: n. --> The science of interpretation and explanation; exegesis; esp., that branch of theology which defines the laws whereby the meaning of the Scriptures is to be ascertained.

hieroglyphical ::: a. --> Emblematic; expressive of some meaning by characters, pictures, or figures; as, hieroglyphic writing; a hieroglyphic obelisk.
Resembling hieroglyphics; not decipherable.


highest representative ideality ::: in October 1920, equivalent to logos vijñana in the sense of full revelatory ideality; also called representative vijñana, which is said to have three elements: representative, interpretative and imperative. The meaning of "representative" earlier . 68 in 1920, when it referred to the highest intuitive revelatory logistis, was preserved at this time in the definition of logos reason as the "lower representative idea".

Hilbert has given a formalization of arithmetic which takes the shape of a logistic system having primitive symbols some of a logical and some of an arithmetical character, so that logic and arithmetic are formalized together without taking logic as prior; similarly also for analysis. This would not of itself be opposed to the Frege-Russell view, since it is to be expected that the choice as to which symbols shall be taken as primitive in the formalization can be made in more than one way. Hilbert, however, took the position that many of the theorems of the system are ideale Aussagen, mere formulas, which are without meaning in themselves but are added to the reale Aussagen or genuinely meaningful formulas in order to avoid formal difficulties otherwise arising. In this respect Hilbert differs sharply from Frege and Russell, who would give a meaning (namely as propositions of logic) to all formulas (sentences) appearing. -- Concerning Hilbert's associated program for a consistency proof see the article Proof theory.

History, Philosophy of: History investigates the theories concerning the development of man as a social being within the limits of psychophysical causality. Owing to this double puipose the philosophy of history has to study the principles of historiography, and, first of all, their background, their causes and underlying laws, their meaning and motivation. This can be called the metaphysics of history. Secondly, it concerns itself with the cognitive part, i.e. with historic understanding, and then it is called the logic of history. While in earlier times the philosophy of history was predominantly metaphysics, it has turned more and more to the methodology or logic of history. A complete philosophy of history, however, ought to consider the metaphysical as well as the logical problems involved.

Hocking, William Ernest: (1873) Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Harvard. Has endeavored to blend idealism vvith pragmatism while making some concessions to realism, even is in current theory he strives for a reconciliation between laissez faire liberalism and collectivism through a midground found in the worth of the individual in a "commotive union in the coagent state," a notion comparable to the "conjunct self" of George Herbert Palmer only with a more individualistic emphasis and a current flavor. Among his works are: The Meaning of God in Human Experience, Man and the State, Types of Philosophy, Lasting Elements of Individualism and Living Religions and a World Faith. -- L.E.D.

homograph ::: n. --> One of two or more words identical in orthography, but having different derivations and meanings; as, fair, n., a market, and fair, a., beautiful.

homonym ::: n. --> A word having the same sound as another, but differing from it in meaning; as the noun bear and the verb bear.

homonymous ::: a. --> Having the same name or designation; standing in the same relation; -- opposed to heteronymous.
Having the same name or designation, but different meaning or relation; hence, equivocal; ambiguous.


homophone ::: n. --> A letter or character which expresses a like sound with another.
A word having the same sound as another, but differing from it in meaning and usually in spelling; as, all and awl; bare and bear; rite, write, right, and wright.


hyperbole ::: n. --> A figure of speech in which the expression is an evident exaggeration of the meaning intended to be conveyed, or by which things are represented as much greater or less, better or worse, than they really are; a statement exaggerated fancifully, through excitement, or for effect.

Hypostasis: Literally the Greek word signifies that which stands under and serves as a support. In philosophy it means a singular substance, also called a supposite, suppositum, by the Scholastics, especially if the substance is a completely subsisting one, whether non-living or living, irrational or rational. However, a rational hypostasis has the same meaning as the term, person. -- J.J.R.

I: Change (often spelled yi), a fundamental principle of the universe, arising out of the interaction of the two cosmic forces of yin and yang, or passive and active principles, and manifested in natural phenomena, human affairs, and ideas. According to Confucian and Nco-Confucian cosmology, "In the system of Change, there is the Great Ultimate (T'ai Chi) which engenders the Two Modes (i). The Two Modes engender the Four Secondary Modes (hsiang), which in turn give rise to the Eight Trigirams (pa kua). These Eight Trigrams (or Elements) determine all good and evil and the great complexity of life." Thus it involves in the first place, the meaning of i, or simplicity from which complexity is evolved, in the second place, the meaning of hsiang, that is, phenomenon, image, form, and in the third place, the idea of "production and reproduction." -- W.T.C.

Identity, law of: Given by traditional logicians as "A is A." Because of the various possible meanings of the copula (q.v.) and the uncertainty as to the range of the variable A, this formulation is ambiguous. The traditional law is perhaps best identified with the theorem x = x, either of the functional calculus of first order with equality, or in the theory of types (with equality defined), or in the algebra of classes, etc. It has been, or may be, also identified with either of the theorems of the propositional calculus, p ⊃ p, p ≡ p, or with the theorem of the functional calculus of first order, F(x) ⊃x F(x). Many writers understand, however, by the law of identity a semantical principle -- that a word or other symbol may (or must) have a fixed referent in its various occurrences in a given context (so, e.g., Ledger Wood in his The Analysis of Knowledge). Some, it would seem, confuse such a semantical principle with a proposition of formal logic. -- A.C.

idio- ::: --> A combining form from the Greek /, meaning private, personal, peculiar, distinct.

idiomatical ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to, or conforming to, the mode of expression peculiar to a language; as, an idiomatic meaning; an idiomatic phrase.

..if we suppose the unity to be unbroken, we then arrive at the existence of consciousness in all forms of the Force which is at work in the world. Even if there be no conscient or superconscient Purusha inhabiting all forms, yet is there in those forms a conscious force of being of which even their outer parts overtly or inertly partake. Necessarily, in such a view, the word consciousness changes its meaning. It is no longer synonymous with mentality but indicates a self-aware force of existence of which mentality is a middle term; below mentality it sinks into vital and material movements which are for us subconscient; above, it rises into the supramental which is for us the superconscient. But in all it is one and the same thing organising itself differently. This is, once more, the Indian conception of Chit which, as energy, creates the worlds. Essentially, we arrive at that unity which materialistic Science perceives from the other end when it asserts that Mind cannot be another force than Matter, but must be merely development and outcome of material energy. Indian thought at its deepest affirms on the other hand that Mind and Matter are rather different grades of the same energy, different organisations of one conscious Force of Existence.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 95-96 ::: The essence of consciousness is the power to be aware of itself and its objects, and in its true nature this power must be direct, self-fulfilled and complete: if it is in us indirect, incomplete, unfulfilled in its workings, dependent on constructed instruments, it is because consciousness here is emerging from an original veiling Inconscience and is yet burdened and enveloped with the first Nescience proper to the Inconscient.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 21-22, Page: 1053


II. Metaphysics of History: The metaphysical interpretations of the meaning of history are either supra-mundane or intra-mundane (secular). The oldest extra-mundane, or theological, interpretation has been given by St. Augustine (Civitas Dei), Dante (Divma Commedia) and J. Milton (Paradise Lost and Regained). All historic events are seen as having a bearing upon the redemption of mankind through Christ which will find its completion at the end of this world. Owing to the secularistic tendencies of modern times the Enlightenment Period considered the final end of human history as the achievement of public welfare through the power of reason. Even the ideal of "humanity" of the classic humanists, advocated by Schiller, Goethe, Fichte, Rousseau, Lord Byron, is only a variety of the philosophy of the Enlightenment, and in the same line of thought we find A. Comte, H. Spencer ("human moral"), Engels and K. Marx. The German Idealism of Kant and Hegel saw in history the materialization of the "moral reign of freedom" which achieves its perfection in the "objective spirit of the State". As in the earlier systems of historical logic man lost his individuality before the forces of natural laws, so, according to Hegel, he is nothing but an instrument of the "idea" which develops itself through the three dialectic stages of thesis, antithesis, and synthesis. (Example. Absolutism, Democracy, Constitutional Monarchy.) Even the great historian L. v. Ranke could not break the captivating power of the Hegelian mechanism. Ranke places every historical epoch into a relation to God and attributes to it a purpose and end for itself. Lotze and Troeltsch followed in his footsteps. Lately, the evolutionistic interpretation of H. Bergson is much discussed and disputed. His "vital impetus" accounts for the progressiveness of life, but fails to interpret the obvious setbacks and decadent civilizations. According to Kierkegaard and Spranger, merely human ideals prove to be too narrow a basis for the tendencies, accomplishments, norms, and defeats of historic life. It all points to a supra-mundane intelligence which unfolds itself in history. That does not make superfluous a natural interpretation, both views can be combined to understand history as an endless struggle between God's will and human will, or non-willing, for that matter. -- S.V.F.

Imageless Thought: Conceptual meanings not embodied in sensuous imagery. The existence of imageless thought was a subject of controversy among American and German psychologists about 1910; imageless thought was affirmed by Kulpe, and Bühler, but was rejected by Titchener. -- L.W.

imperator ::: n. --> A commander; a leader; an emperor; -- originally an appellation of honor by which Roman soldiers saluted their general after an important victory. Subsequently the title was conferred as a recognition of great military achievements by the senate, whence it carried wiht it some special privileges. After the downfall of the Republic it was assumed by Augustus and his successors, and came to have the meaning now attached to the word emperor.

importance ::: n. --> The quality or state of being important; consequence; weight; moment; significance.
Subject; matter.
Import; meaning; significance.
Importunity; solicitation.


importing ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Import ::: a. --> Full of meaning.

importless ::: a. --> Void of meaning.

import ::: v. t. --> To bring in from abroad; to introduce from without; especially, to bring (wares or merchandise) into a place or country from a foreign country, in the transactions of commerce; -- opposed to export. We import teas from China, coffee from Brasil, etc.
To carry or include, as meaning or intention; to imply; to signify.
To be of importance or consequence to; to have a bearing on; to concern.


Impressionism: As a general artistic movement, the theory that art should strive only to reveal the felt quality of an object, scene, or event; i.e. the total effect that it creates in the artist. Specifically in painting, the general idea underling practice is to render the immediate visual appearance of the object, independently of its physical structure and its meaning for the mind. Emphasis is placed on capturing ephemeral surface aspects of things as disclosed by changes in light, neglecting any supposed real thing which undergoes these changes and underlies these aspects. -- I.J. In

impressions left in it by our past inner and outer life, Nvoven in a fantastic way which docs not easily yield any due of meaning to the waking mind's remembrance, or arc fragmentary records, mostly distorted, of experiences which arc going on behind the

In addition to syntactical or nominal definition we may distinguish another kind of definition, which is applicable only in connection with interpreted logistic systems, and which we shall call semantical definition. This consists in introducing a new symbol or notation by assigning a meaning to it. In an interpreted logistic system, a nominal definition carries with it implicitly a semantical definition, in that it is intended to give to the definiendum the meaning expressed by the definiens; but two different nominal definitions may correspond to the same semantical definition. Consider, for example, the two following schemata of nominal definition in the propositional calculus (Logic, formal, § 1): [A] ⊃ [B] → ∼A ∨ B. [A] ⊃ [B] → ∼[A ∼B]. As nominal definitions these are inconsistent, since they represent [A] ⊃ [B] as standing for different formulas: either one, but not both, could be used in a development of the propositional calculus. But the corresponding semantical definitions would be identical if -- as would be possible -- our interpretation of the propositional calculus were such that the two definientia had the same meaning for any particular A and B.

incoherent ::: without logical or meaningful connection; disjointed; rambling. incoherence, incoherencies.

In common usage, "'denotation'' has a less special meaning, denote being approximately synonymous with designate (q.v.). A proper name may be said to denote that of which it is a name. Or, e.g., in the equation 2 + 2=4, the sign + may be said to denote addition and the sign = to denote equality (even without necessarily intending to construe these signs as proper names).

Incomplete symbol: A symbol (or expression) which has no meaning in isolation but which may occur as a constituent part in, and contribute to the meaning of, an expression which does have a meaning. Thus -- as ordinarily employed -- a terminal parenthesis ) is an incomplete symbol, likewise the letter λ which appears in the notation for functional abstraction (q. v.), etc.

inconscient ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The Inconscient and the Ignorance may be mere empty abstractions and can be dismissed as irrelevant jargon if one has not come in collision with them or plunged into their dark and bottomless reality. But to me they are realities, concrete powers whose resistance is present everywhere and at all times in its tremendous and boundless mass.” *Letters on Savitri

". . . in its actual cosmic manifestation the Supreme, being the Infinite and not bound by any limitation, can manifest in Itself, in its consciousness of innumerable possibilities, something that seems to be the opposite of itself, something in which there can be Darkness, Inconscience, Inertia, Insensibility, Disharmony and Disintegration. It is this that we see at the basis of the material world and speak of nowadays as the Inconscient — the Inconscient Ocean of the Rigveda in which the One was hidden and arose in the form of this universe — or, as it is sometimes called, the non-being, Asat.” Letters on Yoga

"The Inconscient itself is only an involved state of consciousness which like the Tao or Shunya, though in a different way, contains all things suppressed within it so that under a pressure from above or within all can evolve out of it — ‘an inert Soul with a somnambulist Force".” Letters on Yoga

"The Inconscient is the last resort of the Ignorance.” Letters on Yoga

"The body, we have said, is a creation of the Inconscient and itself inconscient or at least subconscient in parts of itself and much of its hidden action; but what we call the Inconscient is an appearance, a dwelling place, an instrument of a secret Consciousness or a Superconscient which has created the miracle we call the universe.” Essays in Philosophy and Yoga :::

"The Inconscient is a sleep or a prison, the conscient a round of strivings without ultimate issue or the wanderings of a dream: we must wake into the superconscious where all darkness of night and half-lights cease in the self-luminous bliss of the Eternal.” The Life Divine

"Men have not learnt yet to recognise the Inconscient on which the whole material world they see is built, or the Ignorance of which their whole nature including their knowledge is built; they think that these words are only abstract metaphysical jargon flung about by the philosophers in their clouds or laboured out in long and wearisome books like The Life Divine. Letters on Savitri :::

   "Is it really a fact that even the ordinary reader would not be able to see any difference between the Inconscient and Ignorance unless the difference is expressly explained to him? This is not a matter of philosophical terminology but of common sense and the understood meaning of English words. One would say ‘even the inconscient stone" but one would not say, as one might of a child, ‘the ignorant stone". One must first be conscious before one can be ignorant. What is true is that the ordinary reader might not be familiar with the philosophical content of the word Inconscient and might not be familiar with the Vedantic idea of the Ignorance as the power behind the manifested world. But I don"t see how I can acquaint him with these things in a single line, even with the most. illuminating image or symbol. He might wonder, if he were Johnsonianly minded, how an Inconscient could be teased or how it could wake Ignorance. I am afraid, in the absence of a miracle of inspired poetical exegesis flashing through my mind, he will have to be left wondering.” Letters on Savitri

  **inconscient, Inconscient"s.**


indeed ::: adv. --> In reality; in truth; in fact; verily; truly; -- used in a variety of sense. Esp.: (a) Denoting emphasis; as, indeed it is so. (b) Denoting concession or admission; as, indeed, you are right. (c) Denoting surprise; as, indeed, is it you? Its meaning is not intrinsic or fixed, but depends largely on the form of expression which it accompanies.

Indian Philosophy: General name designating a plethora of more or less systematic thinking born and cultivated in the geographic region of India among the Hindus who represent an amalgamation of adventitious and indigenous peoples, but confined at first exclusively to the caste-conscious Indo-germanic conquerors of the lands of the Indus and Ganges. Its beginnings are lost in the dim past, while a distinct emergence in tangible form is demonstrable from about 1000 B.C. Hindu idiosyncrasies are responsible for our inability to date with any degree of accuracy many of the systems, schools, and philosophers, or in some cases even to refer to the latter by name. Inasmuch as memory, not writing, has been universally favored in India, an aphoristic form (cf. sutra), subtended by copious commentaries, give Indian Philosophy its distinctive appearance. The medium is Sanskrit and the dialects derived from it. There are translations in all major Asiatic and European languages. The West became familiar with it when philologists discovered during last century the importance of Sanskrit. As a type of thinking employing unfamiliar conceptions and a terminology fluctuating in meaning (cf., e.g., rasa), it is distinct from Western speculations. Several peaks have been reached in the past, yet Indian Philosophy does not cease to act fructifyingly upon the present mind in India as elsewhere. Various factions advance conflicting claims as to the value of Indian speculation, because interpretations have not as yet become standardized. Textual criticism is now making strides, but with varying successes. Among larger histories of Indian Philosophy may be mentioned those of Deussen, Das Gupta, Bel-valkar and Ranade, and Radhakrishnan.

inexpressive ::: a. --> Inexpressible.
Without expression or meaning; not expressive; dull; unintelligent; as, an inexpressive countenance.


In genera, Anglo-Catholic philosophy has been an incarnational or sacramental one, finding God in the Biblical revelation culminating in Christ, but unwilling to limit his self-disclosure to that series of events. Incarnationalism provides, it is said, the setting for the historic Incarnation; general revelation is on sacramental lines, giving meaning to the particular sacraments. For Anglo-Catholic philosophical theology, in its central stream, the key to dogma is the cumulative experience of Christian people, tested by the Biblical revelation as source and standard of that experience and hence "classical" in its value. Revelation is the ultimate authority; the Church possesses a trustworthiness about her central beliefs, but statement of these may change from age to age. Sometimes this main tendency of Anglo-Catholic thought has been sharply criticized by thinkers, themselves Anglicans (cf. Tennant's Philosophical Theology); but these have, in general, served as useful warnings rather than as normal expressions of the Anglican mind.

In its narrower meaning, the fine arts and literature. The problem of the distinction and classification of the arts originated with Lessing in reaction to the interference of poetical values in painting and vice versa. He distinguished poetry dealing with consecutive actions from painting concerned with figures coexisting in space. Later, aestheticians divided the arts into many classifications. Zimmermann, a pupil of Herbart, distinguished three groups: arts of material representation (architecture, sculpture, etc.), arts of perceptive representation (painting, music). arts of the representation of thought (poetry). This partition suggested to Fiedler the aesthetics of pure visibility, to Hanslick the aesthetics of pure musicality. And from Fiedler's idea was derived the so-called Science of Art independent of aesthetics. -- L.V.

In order to appreciate fully the meaning of the universe, man must comprehend Reason. This can be done by "investigating things to the utmost" (ko wu), that is, by "investigating the Reason of things to the utmost (ch'iung li)." When sufficient effort is made, and understanding naturally comes, one's nature will be realized and his destiny will be fulfilled, since "the exhaustive investigation of Reason, the full realization of one's nature, and the fulfillment of destiny are simultaneous." When one understands Reason, he will find that "All people are brothers and sisters, and all things are my companions," because all men have the same Reason in them. Consequently one should not entertain any distinction between things and the ego. This is the foundation of the Neo-Confucian ethics of jen, true manhood, benevolence or love. Both the understanding of Reason and the practice of jen require sincerity (ch'eng) and seriousness (ching) which to the Neo-Confucians almost assumed religious significance. As a matter of fact these have a certain correspondence with the Buddhist dhyana and prajna or meditation and insight. Gradually the Neo-Confucian movement became an inward movement, the mind assuming more and more importance.

"In our errors is the substance of a truth which labours to reveal its meaning to our groping intelligence. The human intellect cuts out the error and the truth with it and replaces it by another half-truth half-error; but the Divine Wisdom suffers our mistakes to continue until we are able to arrive at the truth hidden and protected under every false cover.” The Synthesis of Yoga

“In our errors is the substance of a truth which labours to reveal its meaning to our groping intelligence. The human intellect cuts out the error and the truth with it and replaces it by another half-truth half-error; but the Divine Wisdom suffers our mistakes to continue until we are able to arrive at the truth hidden and protected under every false cover.” The Synthesis of Yoga

in- ::: prep. --> A prefix from Eng. prep. in, also from Lat. prep. in, meaning in, into, on, among; as, inbred, inborn, inroad; incline, inject, intrude. In words from the Latin, in- regularly becomes il- before l, ir- before r, and im- before a labial; as, illusion, irruption, imblue, immigrate, impart. In- is sometimes used with an simple intensive force. :::

in ::: prep. --> The specific signification of in is situation or place with respect to surrounding, environment, encompassment, etc. It is used with verbs signifying being, resting, or moving within limits, or within circumstances or conditions of any kind conceived of as limiting, confining, or investing, either wholly or in part. In its different applications, it approaches some of the meanings of, and sometimes is interchangeable with, within, into, on, at, of, and among.
With reference to space or place; as, he lives in Boston; he


In Principia Mathematica descriptions (or notations serving the same purpose in context) are introduced is incomplete symbols (q. v.). Russell maintains that descriptions not only may but must be thus construed as incomplete symbols -- briefly, for the following reasons. The alternative is to construe a description as a proper name, so that, e.g., the description the author of Waverley denotes the man Scott and is therefore synonymous with the name Scott. But then the sentences "Scott is the author of Waverley" and "Scott is Scott" ought to be synonymous -- which they clearly are not (although both are true). Moreover, such a desription as the King of France cannot be a proper name, since there is no King of France whom it may denote; nevertheless, a sentence such as "The King of France is bald" should be construed to have a meaning, since it may be falsely asserted or believed by one who falsely asserts or believes that there is a King of France.

insignificance ::: n. --> The condition or quality of being insignificant; want of significance, sense, or meaning; as, the insignificance of words or phrases.
Want of force or effect; unimportance; pettiness; inefficacy; as, the insignificance of human art.
Want of claim to consideration or notice; want of influence or standing; meanness.


insignificant ::: 1. Too small to be important. 2. Unimportant, trifling, or petty; of no consequence, influence or distinction. 3. Without meaning. insignificance.

insignificant ::: a. --> Not significant; void of signification, sense, or import; meaningless; as, insignificant words.
Having no weight or effect; answering no purpose; unimportant; valueless; futile.
Without weight of character or social standing; mean; contemptible; as, an insignificant person.


insignificative ::: a. --> Not expressing meaning; not significant.

:::   ". . . in such a view, the word consciousness changes its meaning. It is no longer synonymous with mentality but indicates a self-aware force of existence of which mentality is a middle term; below mentality it sinks into vital and material movements which are for us subconscient; above, it rises into the supramental which is for us the superconscient. But in all it is one and the same thing organising itself differently. This is, once more, the Indian conception of Chit which, as energy, creates the worlds.” *The Life Divine

“… in such a view, the word consciousness changes its meaning. It is no longer synonymous with mentality but indicates a self-aware force of existence of which mentality is a middle term; below mentality it sinks into vital and material movements which are for us subconscient; above, it rises into the supramental which is for us the superconscient. But in all it is one and the same thing organising itself differently. This is, once more, the Indian conception of Chit which, as energy, creates the worlds.” The Life Divine

intelligence ::: 1. A capacity for learning, reasoning, understanding, and similar forms of mental activity; aptitude in grasping truths, relationships, facts, meanings, etc. 2. Superior understanding. 3. An intelligent being, esp. one that is not embodied. Intelligence, Arch-Intelligence.

Intelligible: Understandable; comprehensible; knowable; meaningful; Orderly; logical; coherent; rational; Communicable; expressible; Having unity of principle; capable of complete rational explanation or understanding; capable of causal explanation; Clear to natural or pure reason; apprehensible by the intellect (q.v.) only as against apprehensible through the senses; conceptual as against perceptual; conceptually describable or explainable; Capable of being known synoptically or as it is in itself or in essence; capable of being known through itself as against by agency of something else; graspable by in tuition, self-explanatory; Capable of being appreciated or sympathized with; Super-sensible; of the nature of mind, reason, or their higher powers. . -- M.T.K Intension and extension: The intension of a concept consists of the qualities or properties which go to make up the concept. The extension of a concept consists of the things which fall under the concept; or, according to another definition, the extension of a concept consists of the concepts which are subsumed under it (determine subclasses). This is the old distinction between intension and extension, and coincides approximately with the distinction between a monadic proposittonal function (q. v.) in intension and a class (q. v.). The words intension and extension are also used in connection with a number of distinctions related or analogous to this one, the adjective extensional being applied to notions or points of view which in some respect confine attention to truth-values of propositions as opposed to meanings constituting propositions. In the case of (interpreted) calculi of propositions or propositional functions, the adjective intensional may mean that account is taken of modality, extensional that all functions of propositions which appear are truth-functions. The extreme of the extensional point of view does away with propositions altogether and retains only truth-values in their place. -- A.C.

intendment ::: n. --> Charge; oversight.
Intention; design; purpose.
The true meaning, understanding, or intention of a law, or of any legal instrument.


internatal ::: A word coined by Sri Aurobindo. A combination of inter, meaning between, and natal, referring to birth; hence, between births.

internatal ::: a word coined by Sri Aurobindo. A combination of inter, meaning between, and natal, referring to birth; hence, between births.

interpret ::: 1. To give or provide the meaning of; explain; explicate; elucidate. 2. To conceive the significance of; construe. interpreted, interpreting, interpreter, interpreters, interpretation, interpretation"s, world-interpreting.

interpretation ::: n. --> The act of interpreting; explanation of what is obscure; translation; version; construction; as, the interpretation of a foreign language, of a dream, or of an enigma.
The sense given by an interpreter; exposition or explanation given; meaning; as, commentators give various interpretations of the same passage of Scripture.
The power or explaining.
An artist&


interpret ::: v. t. --> To explain or tell the meaning of; to expound; to translate orally into intelligible or familiar language or terms; to decipher; to define; -- applied esp. to language, but also to dreams, signs, conduct, mysteries, etc.; as, to interpret the Hebrew language to an Englishman; to interpret an Indian speech.
To apprehend and represent by means of art; to show by illustrative representation; as, an actor interprets the character of Hamlet; a musician interprets a sonata; an artist interprets a


In the second part, the "Transcendental Logic", Kant treats of the synthetic forms of the understanding. (Verstand), which he calls "categories" or "pure principles of the understanding". Of these he recognizes twelve in all, arranged in groups of threes under the heads: quantity, quality, relation and modality. The sensuous materials embedded in the forms of sensibility constitute percepts, while reason, through the understanding, supplies the concepts and principles by means of which percepts are synthesized into meaningful judgments of Nature. In the celebrated "deduction of the categories", Kant shows that without these forms there could be no knowledge or experience of Nature. Just therein and only therein lies their va1idity.

  "In the spiritual sense, however, sacrifice has a different meaning — it does not so much indicate giving up what is held dear as an offering of oneself, one"s being, one"s mind, heart, will, body, life, actions to the Divine. It has the original sense of ‘making sacred" and is used as an equivalent of the word yajna. When the Gita speaks of the ‘sacrifice of knowledge", it does not mean a giving up of anything, but a turning of the mind towards the Divine in the search for knowledge and an offering of oneself through it. It is in this sense, too, that one speaks of the offering or sacrifice of works. The Mother has written somewhere that the spiritual sacrifice is joyful and not painful in its nature. On the spiritual path, very commonly, if a seeker still feels the old ties and responsibilities strongly he is not asked to sever or leave them, but to let the call in him grow till all within is ready. Many, indeed, come away earlier because they feel that to cut loose is their only chance, and these have to go sometimes through a struggle. But the pain, the struggle, is not the essential character of this spiritual self-offering.” Letters on Yoga

“In the spiritual sense, however, sacrifice has a different meaning—it does not so much indicate giving up what is held dear as an offering of oneself, one’s being, one’s mind, heart, will, body, life, actions to the Divine. It has the original sense of ‘making sacred’ and is used as an equivalent of the word yajna. When the Gita speaks of the ‘sacrifice of knowledge’, it does not mean a giving up of anything, but a turning of the mind towards the Divine in the search for knowledge and an offering of oneself through it. It is in this sense, too, that one speaks of the offering or sacrifice of works. The Mother has written somewhere that the spiritual sacrifice is joyful and not painful in its nature. On the spiritual path, very commonly, if a seeker still feels the old ties and responsibilities strongly he is not asked to sever or leave them, but to let the call in him grow till all within is ready. Many, indeed, come away earlier because they feel that to cut loose is their only chance, and these have to go sometimes through a struggle. But the pain, the struggle, is not the essential character of this spiritual self-offering.” Letters on Yoga

In the theory of obligation we find on the question of the meaning and status of right and wrong the same variety of views as obtain in the theory of value: "right," e.g., has only an emotive meaning (Ayer); or it denotes an intuited indefinable objective quality or relation of an act (Price, Reid, Clarke, Sidgwick, Ross, possibly Kant); or it stands for the attitude of some mind or group of minds towards an act (the Sophists, Hume, Westermarck). But it is also often defined as meaning that the act is conducive to the welfare of some individual or group -- the agent himself, or his group, or society as a whole. Many of the teleological and utilitarian views mentioned below include such a definition.

In the theory of value the first question concerns the meaning of value-terms and the status of goodness. As to meaning the main point is whether goodness is definable or not, and if so, how. As to status the main point is whether goodness is subjective or objective, relative or absolute. Various positions are possible. Recent emotive meaning theories e.g. that of A. J. Ayer, hold that "good" and other value-terms have only an emotive meaning, Intuitionists and non-naturalists often hold that goodness is an indefinable intrinsic (and therefore objective or absolute) property, e.g., Plato, G. E. Moore, W. D. Ross, J. Laird, Meinong, N. Hartman. Metaphysical and naturalistic moralists usually hold that goodness can be defined in metaphysical or in psychological terms, generally interpreting "x is good" to mean that a certain attitude is taken toward x by some mind or group of minds. For some of them value is objective or absolute in the sense of having the same locus for everyone, e.g., Aristotle in his definition of the good as that at which all things aim, (Ethics, bk. I). For others the locus of value varies from individual to individual or from group to group, i.e. different things will be good for different individuals or groups, e.g., Hobbes, Westermarck, William James, R. B. Perry.

intrapetiolar ::: a. --> Situated between the petiole and the stem; -- said of the pair of stipules at the base of a petiole when united by those margins next the petiole, thus seeming to form a single stipule between the petiole and the stem or branch; -- often confounded with interpetiolar, from which it differs essentially in meaning.

“Is it really a fact that even the ordinary reader would not be able to see any difference between the Inconscient and Ignorance unless the difference is expressly explained to him? This is not a matter of philosophical terminology but of common sense and the understood meaning of English words. One would say ‘even the inconscient stone’ but one would not say, as one might of a child, ‘the ignorant stone’. One must first be conscious before one can be ignorant. What is true is that the ordinary reader might not be familiar with the philosophical content of the word Inconscient and might not be familiar with the Vedantic idea of the Ignorance as the power behind the manifested world. But I don’t see how I can acquaint him with these things in a single line, even with the most. illuminating image or symbol. He might wonder, if he were Johnsonianly minded, how an Inconscient could be teased or how it could wake Ignorance. I am afraid, in the absence of a miracle of inspired poetical exegesis flashing through my mind, he will have to be left wondering.” Letters on Savitri

Islam: Name peculiar to the religion founded by Mohammed, embracing all sects found among his followers. Etymologically the term means "to resign oneself". The word means not fatalistic submission to the deity, but striving after righteousness, the practice of the law, obedience to rules and formal performance of outward duties. Meaning the acceptance of the divine will, Islam stresses the legal and external performance of religion. -- H.H.

itihasa ::: historical tradition, a historico-mythic epic narrative; ancient historical or legendary tradition turned to creative use as a significant mythus or tale expressive of some spiritual or religious or ethical or ideal meaning.

It will be seen that the scope we give to the idea of renunciation is different from the meaning currently attached to it. Currently its meaning is self-denial, inhibition of pleasure, rejection of the objects of pleasure. Self-denial is a necessary discipline for the soul of man, because his heart is ignorantly attached; inhibition of pleasure is necessary because his sense is caught and clogged in the mud-honey of sensuous satisfactions; rejection of the objects of pleasure is imposed because the mind fixes on the object and will not leave it to go beyond it and within itself. If the mind of man were not thus ignorant, attached, bound even in its restless inconstancy, deluded by the forms of things, renunciation would not have been needed; the soul could have travelled on the path of delight, from the lesser to the greater, from joy to diviner joy. At present that is not practicable. It must give up from within everything to which it is attached in order that it may gain that which they are in their reality. The external renunciation is not the essential, but even that is necessary for a time, indispensable in many things and sometimes useful in all; we may even say that a complete external renunciation is a stage through which the soul must pass at some period of its progress,—though always it should be without those self-willed violences and fierce self-torturings which are an offence to the Divine seated within us. But in the end this renunciation or self-denial is always an instrument and the period for its use passes. The rejection of the object ceases to be necessary when the object can no longer ensnare us because what the soul enjoys is no longer the object as an object but the Divine which it expresses; the inhibition of pleasure is no longer needed when the soul no longer seeks pleasure but possesses the delight of the Divine in all things equally without the need of a personal or physical possession of the thing itself; self-denial loses its field when the soul no longer claims anything, but obeys consciously the will of the one Self in all beings.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 333


Jehovah: (Hebrew Yahveh, of doubtful origin and meaning) Personal name of God or the supreme being in Hebrew theological and philosophical writings, common only since the 14th century; the national god of Israel since Mosaic times. Neither name was originally pronounced as written on account of its holiness, but was replaced by Elohim and Adonai. -- K.F.L.

Jhumur: “I have often wondered if this has anything to do with the passion-play. I feel that. In the root meaning of the word in Latin is there a sense of the word as suffering? In the French you have patir, patir is to suffer. To me it always brings in the holocaust and the coming down of the avatar into the human condition. [Ed. note: ML passiõn—(s. of passiõ) Christ’s sufferings on the cross, any of the Biblical accounts of these. ( late OE passiõn-), special use of LL passiõ suffering, submission, deriv. of L passus , ptp, of patî to suffer, submit.]

jossa ::: interj. --> A command to a horse, probably meaning "stand still."

Kami: (Japanese) Originally denoting anything that inspires and overawes man with a sense of holiness, the word assumed a meaning in Japanese equivalent to spirit (also ancestral spirit), divinity, and God. It is a central concept in the pre-Confucian and pre-Buddhistic native religion which holds the sun supreme and still enjoys national support, while it may also take on a more abstract philosophic significance. -- K.F.L.

kavyani kavaye nivacana ::: seer-wisdoms that utter their inner meaning to the seer. [cf. RV 4.3.16]

key-book ::: a book or other text containing the system or explanatory scheme for the interpretation of a cipher, code, or other composition of hidden or veiled meaning.

Kosa: (Skr.) "Sheath", one of the envelopes of the soul or self concealing its real nature, which is pure consciousness. The Vedanta knows three: the anandamaya, vijnanamaya, and annamaya koias, i.e., the sheaths of pleasure, intellect, and food, composing respectively the karana, suksma, and sthula larira, meaning the causal, subtile, and gross frame or body. -- K.F.L.

Kosmos ::: 1. A Pythagorean term meaning the pattern or order that connects the universe throughout its many dimensions of physical, mental, and spiritual existence. 2. In Integral Theory, the sum total of the manifest universe when contrasted with Spirit as the unmanifest or Emptiness. When used alone, the sum total of the manifest and the unmanifest, including Spirit.

kyrie eleison ::: --> Greek words, meaning "Lord, have mercy upon us," used in the Mass, the breviary offices, the litany of the saints, etc.
The name given to the response to the Commandments, in the service of the Church of England and of the Protestant Episcopal Church.


latescent ::: a. --> Slightly withdrawn from view or knowledge; as, a latescent meaning.

Latitudinarianism: (1) A party in the Church of England (middle of the 17th century) aiming to reconcile contending parties by seeking a broad basis in common doctrines. (2) A term applied to a liberal opinion which allows diversity in unity. (3) A term used derisively as meaning indifference to religious doctrines. -- V.F.

Legal Philosophy: Deals with the philosophic principles of law and justice. The origin is to be found in ancient philosophy. The Greek Sophists criticized existing laws and customs by questioning their validity: All human rules are artificial, created by enactment or convention, as opposed to natural law, based on nature. The theory of a law of nature was further developed by Aristotle and the Stoics. According to the Stoics the natural law is based upon the eternal law of the universe; this itself is an outgrowth of universal reason, as man's mind is an offshoot of the latter. The idea of a law of nature as being innate in man was particularly stressed and popularized by Cicero who identified it with "right reason" and already contrasted it with written law that might be unjust or even tyrannical. Through Saint Augustine these ideas were transmitted to medieval philosophy and by Thomas Aquinas built into his philosophical system. Thomas considers the eternal law the reason existing in the divine mind and controlling the universe. Natural law, innate in man participates in that eternal law. A new impetus was given to Legal Philosophy by the Renaissance. Natural Jurisprudence, properly so-called, originated in the XVII. century. Hugo Grotius, Thomas Hobbes, Benedictus Spinoza, John Locke, Samuel Pufendorf were the most important representatives of that line of thought. Grotius, continuing the Scholastic tradition, particularly stressed the absoluteness of natural hw (it would exist even if God did not exist) and, following Jean Bodin, the sovereignty of the people. The idea of the social contract traced all political bodies back to a voluntary compact by which every individual gave up his right to self-government, or rather transferred it to the government, abandoning a state of nature which according to Hobbes must have been a state of perpetual war. The theory of the social compact more and more accepts the character of a "fiction" or of a regulative idea (Kant). In this sense the theory means that we ought to judge acts of government by their correspondence to the general will (Rousseau) and to the interests of the individuals who by transferring their rights to the commonwealth intended to establish their real liberty. Natural law by putting the emphasis on natural rights, takes on a revolutionary character. It played a part in shaping the bills of rights, the constitutions of the American colonies and of the Union, as well as of the French declaration of the rights of men and of citizens. Natural jurisprudence in the teachings of Christian Wolff and Thomasius undergoes a kind of petrification in the vain attempt to outline an elaborate system of natural law not only in the field of international or public law, but also in the detailed regulations of the law of property, of contract, etc. This sort of dogmatic approach towards the problems of law evoked the opposition of the Historic School (Gustav Hugo and Savigny) which stressed the natural growth of laws ind customs, originating from the mysterious "spirit of the people". On the other hand Immanuel Kant tried to overcome the old natural law by the idea of a "law of reason", meaning an a priori element in all existing or positive law. In his definition of law ("the ensemble of conditions according to which everyone's will may coexist with the will of every other in accordance with a general rule of liberty"), however, as in his legal philosophy in general, he still shares the attitude of the natural law doctrine, confusing positive law with the idea of just law. This is also true of Hegel whose panlogism seemed to lead in this very direction. Under the influence of epistemological positivism (Comte, Mill) in the later half of the nineteenth century, legal philosophy, especially in Germany, confined itself to a "general theory of law". Similarily John Austin in England considered philosophy of law concerned only with positive law, "as it necessarily is", not as it ought to be. Its main task was to analyze certain notions which pervade the science of law (Analytical Jurisprudence). In recent times the same tendency to reduce legal philosophy to logical or at least methodological tasks was further developed in attempting a pure science of law (Kelsen, Roguin). Owing to the influence of Darwinism and natural science in general the evolutionist and biological viewpoint was accepted in legal philosophy: comparative jurisprudence, sociology of law, the Freirecht movement in Germany, the study of the living law, "Realism" in American legal philosophy, all represent a tendency against rationalism. On the other hand there is a revival of older tendencies: Hegelianism, natural law -- especially in Catholic philosophy -- and Kantianism (beginning with Rudolf Stammler). From here other trends arose: the critical attitude leads to relativism (f.i. Gustav Radbruch); the antimetaphysical tendency towards positivism -- though different from epistemological positivism -- and to a pure theory of law. Different schools of recent philosophy have found their applications or repercussions in legal philosophy: Phenomenology, for example, tried to intuit the essences of legal institutions, thus coming back to a formalist position, not too far from the real meaning of analytical jurisprudence. Neo-positivism, though so far not yet explicitly applied to legal philosophy, seems to lead in the same direction. -- W.E.

Life ::: The English word life does duty for many very different shades of meaning; but theword Prana familiar in the Upanishad and in the language of Yoga is restricted to the life-force whether viewed in itself or in its functionings.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 18, Page: 63


literal ::: a. --> According to the letter or verbal expression; real; not figurative or metaphorical; as, the literal meaning of a phrase.
Following the letter or exact words; not free.
Consisting of, or expressed by, letters.
Giving a strict or literal construction; unimaginative; matter-of fast; -- applied to persons. ::: n.


literalization ::: n. --> The act of literalizing; reduction to a literal meaning.

literalize ::: v. t. --> To make literal; to interpret or put in practice according to the strict meaning of the words; -- opposed to spiritualize; as, to literalize Scripture.

lodging ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Lodge ::: n. --> The act of one who, or that which, lodges.
A place of rest, or of temporary habitation; esp., a sleeping apartment; -- often in the plural with a singular meaning.
Abiding place; harbor; cover.


Logical meaning: See meaning, kinds of, 3. Logical Positivism: See Scientific Empiricism. Logical truth: See Meaning, kinds of, 3; and Truth, semantical. Logistic: The old use of the word logistic to mean the art of calculation, or common arithmetic, is now nearly obsolete. In Seventeenth Century English the corresponding adjective was also sometimes used to mean simply logical. Leibniz occasionally employed logistica (as also logica mathematica) as one of various alternative names for his calculus ratiocinator. The modern use of logistic (French logistique) as a synonym for symbolic logic (q. v.) dates from the International Congress of Philosophy of 1904, where it was proposed independently by Itelson, Lalande, and Couturat. The word logistic has been employed by some with special reference to the Frege-Russell doctrine that mathematics is reducible to logic, but it would seem that the better usage makes it simply a synonym of symbolic logic. -- A. C.

Logic, formal: Investigates the structure of propositions and of deductive reasoning by a method which abstracts from the content of propositions which come under consideration and deals only with their logical form. The distinction between form and content can be made definite with the aid of a particular language or symbolism in which propositions are expressed, and the formal method can then be characterized by the fact that it deals with the objective form of sentences which express propositions and provides in these concrete terms criteria of meaningfulness and validity of inference. This formulation of the matter presupposes the selection of a particular language which is to be regarded as logically exact and free from the ambiguities and irregularities of structure which appear in English (or other languages of everyday use) -- i.e., it makes the distinction between form and content relative to the choice of a language. Many logicians prefer to postulate an abstract form for propositions themselves, and to characterize the logical exactness of a language by the uniformity with which the concrete form of its sentences reproduces or parallels the form of the propositions which they express. At all events it is practically necessary to introduce a special logical language, or symbolic notation, more exact than ordinary English usage, if topics beyond the most elementary are to be dealt with (see logistic system, and semiotic).

logistics ::: n. --> That branch of the military art which embraces the details of moving and supplying armies. The meaning of the word is by some writers extended to include strategy.
A system of arithmetic, in which numbers are expressed in a scale of 60; logistic arithmetic.


Madhav: “A kakemono is a Japanese painting which is hung on the wall. It is a print in many colours, many designs. And this world picture is compared to a kakemono of significant forms. Each form is significant, each line is meaningful.” The Book of the Divine Mother

magneto- ::: --> A prefix meaning pertaining to, produced by, or in some way connected with, magnetism.

Man alive, your proposed emendations are an admirable exposition of the art of bringing a line down the steps till my poor "slow miraculous” above-mind line meant to give or begin the concrete portrayal of an act of some hidden Godhead finally becomes a mere metaphor thrown out from its more facile mint by a brilliantly imaginative poetic intelligence. First of all, you shift my "dimly” out of the way and transfer it to something to which it does not inwardly belongs make it an epithet of the gesture or an adverb qualifying its epithet instead of something that qualifies the atmosphere in which the act of the Godhead takes place. That is a preliminary havoc which destroys what is very important to the action, its atmosphere. I never intended the gesture to be dim, it is a luminous gesture, but forcing its way through the black quietude it comes dimly. Then again the bald phrase "a gesture came” without anything to psychicise it becomes simply something that "happened”, "came” being a poetic equivalent for "happened”, instead of the expression of the slow coming of the gesture. The words "slow” and "dimly” assure this sense of motion and this concreteness to the word"s sense here. Remove one or both whether entirely or elsewhere and you ruin the vision and change altogether its character. That is at least what happens wholly in your penultimate version and as for the last its "came” gets another meaning and one feels that somebody very slowly decided to let out the gesture from himself and it was quite a miracle that it came out at all! "Dimly miraculous” means what precisely or what "miraculously dim” — it was miraculous that it managed to be so dim or there was something vaguely miraculous about it after all? No doubt they try to mean something else — but these interpretations come in their way and trip them over. The only thing that can stand is the first version which is no doubt fine poetry, but the trouble is that it does not give the effect I wanted to give, the effect which is necessary for the dawn"s inner significance. Moreover, what becomes of the slow lingering rhythm of my line which is absolutely indispensable? Letters on Savitri

Man alive, your proposed emendations are an admirable exposition of the art of bringing a line down the steps till my poor”slow miraculous” above-mind line meant to give or begin the concrete portrayal of an act of some hidden Godhead finally becomes a mere metaphor thrown out from its more facile mint by a brilliantly imaginative poetic intelligence. First of all, you shift my”dimly” out of the way and transfer it to something to which it does not inwardly belongs make it an epithet of the gesture or an adverb qualifying its epithet instead of something that qualifies the atmosphere in which the act of the Godhead takes place. That is a preliminary havoc which destroys what is very important to the action, its atmosphere. I never intended the gesture to be dim, it is a luminous gesture, but forcing its way through the black quietude it comes dimly. Then again the bald phrase”a gesture came” without anything to psychicise it becomes simply something that”happened”,”came” being a poetic equivalent for”happened”, instead of the expression of the slow coming of the gesture. The words”slow” and”dimly” assure this sense of motion and this concreteness to the word’s sense here. Remove one or both whether entirely or elsewhere and you ruin the vision and change altogether its character. That is at least what happens wholly in your penultimate version and as for the last its”came” gets another meaning and one feels that somebody very slowly decided to let out the gesture from himself and it was quite a miracle that it came out at all!”Dimly miraculous” means what precisely or what”miraculously dim”—it was miraculous that it managed to be so dim or there was something vaguely miraculous about it after all? No doubt they try to mean something else—but these interpretations come in their way and trip them over. The only thing that can stand is the first version which is no doubt fine poetry, but the trouble is that it does not give the effect I wanted to give, the effect which is necessary for the dawn’s inner significance. Moreover, what becomes of the slow lingering rhythm of my line which is absolutely indispensable? Letters on Savitri

Matter ::: There is no need to put "the" before "quality"— in English that would alter the sense. Matter is not regarded in this passage as a quality of being perceived by sense; I don’t think that would have any meaning. It is regarded as a result of a certain power and action of consciousness which presents forms of itself to sense perception and it is this quality of sense-perceivedness, so to speak, that gives them the appearance of Matter, i.e. of a certain kind of substantiality inherent in themselves—but in fact they are not self-existent substantial objects but forms of consciousness. The point is that there is no such thing as the self-existent Matter posited by nineteenth-century Science.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 13, Page: 92


may ::: v. --> An auxiliary verb qualifyng the meaning of another verb, by expressing: (a) Ability, competency, or possibility; -- now oftener expressed by can. ::: n. --> A maiden.
The fifth month of the year, containing thirty-one days.


Meaning: A highly ambiguous term, with at least four pivotal senses, involving intention or purpose, designation or reference, definition or translation, causal antecedents or consequences. Each of these provides overlapping families of cases generated by some or all of the following types of systematic ambiguity: -- Arising from a contrast between the standpoints of speaker and interpreter. arising from contrast between the meaning of specific utterances (tokens) and that of the general (type) symbol. arising from attention to one rather than another use of language (e.g., to the expressive rather than the evocative or referential uses). Some of these ambiguities are normally eliminated by attention to the context in which the term 'meaning' occurs. Adequate definition, would, accordingly, involve a detailed analysis of the types of context which are most common. The following is a preliminary outline. "What does X {some event, not necessarily linguistic) mean?" =   "Of what is X an index?"   "Of what is X a sign?" "What does S (a speaker) mean by X (an utterance)?" =   "What are S's interests, intentions, purposes in uttering X?"   "To whom (what) is he referring?"   "What effect does he wish to produce in the hearer?"   "What other utterance could he have used to express the same interest, make the same reference, or produce the same effect?" "What does X (an utterance of a speaker) mean to an interpreter?" =   "What does I take S to have meant by X (in any of the senses listed under B)?" "What does X (a type symbol) mean in language L?"   "What symbols (in L) can be substituted for X (in specified contexts) without appreciable loss of expressive, evocative or referential function?"   In a translation from L into another language M, either of X or of a more complex symbol containing X as part, what portion of the end-product corresponds to X?"   In addition to the above, relatively nontechnical senses, many writers use the word in divergent special ways based upon and implying favored theories about meaning.

Meaning the same as essentially, so that the predicate which is said to belong the subject formally, enters into the essence and definition of the subject. Thus man is formally animal. Formally, so understood has various correlatives, according to the various aspects under which the essence of a thing can be considered:

Meaning the same as truly and properly -- then it has as correlatives: apparently, metaphorically.

metaphysics ::: Traditionally, metaphysics is the branch of philosophy that deals with issues of ontology (what is being or reality?) and epistemology (how do we know it?). In Integral Theory, any assertion without injunctions is considered metaphysics, or a meaningless assertion (i.e., postulating a referent for which there is no means of verification). The term is also used in its traditional sense given the lack of alternatives.

met- ::: --> A prefix meaning between, with, after, behind, over, about, reversely; as, metachronism, the error of placing after the correct time; metaphor, lit., a carrying over; metathesis, a placing reversely.
Other; duplicate, corresponding to; resembling; hence, metameric; as, meta-arabinic, metaldehyde.
That two replacing radicals, in the benzene nucleus, occupy the relative positions of 1 and 3, 2 and 4, 3 and 5, 4 and 6, 5 and 1, or 6 and 2; as, metacresol, etc. See Ortho-, and Para-.


misapprehension ::: n. --> A mistaking or mistake; wrong apprehension of one&

mistake ::: v. t. --> To make or form amiss; to spoil in making.
To take or choose wrongly.
To take in a wrong sense; to misunderstand misapprehend, or misconceive; as, to mistake a remark; to mistake one&


misunderstanding ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Misunderstand ::: n. --> Mistake of the meaning; error; misconception.
Disagreement; difference of opinion; dissension; quarrel.


Moksha ::: The pessimists have made moksha synonymous with annihilation or dissolution, but its true meaning is freedom.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 12, Essays Divine and Human, Page: 6


motion ::: 1. The action or process of changing position or place. 2. The ability or power to move. 3. A meaningful or expressive change in the position of the body or a part of the body; a gesture. motion"s, motions, motion-parable myriad-motioned.

multivocal ::: a. --> Signifying many different things; of manifold meaning; equivocal. ::: n. --> A multivocal word.

mystical ::: a. --> Remote from or beyond human comprehension; baffling human understanding; unknowable; obscure; mysterious.
Importing or implying mysticism; involving some secret meaning; allegorical; emblematical; as, a mystic dance; mystic Babylon.


neo- ::: --> A prefix meaning new, recent, late; and in chemistry designating specifically that variety of metameric hydrocarbons which, when the name was applied, had been recently classified, and in which at least one carbon atom in connected directly with four other carbon atoms; -- contrasted with normal and iso-; as, neopentane; the neoparaffins. Also used adjectively.

"Next it [the Gita] insists with a certain austere emphasis on the acceptance of the Godhead as the divine inhabitant in the human body. For he is the Immanent in all existences, and if the indwelling divinity is not recognised, not only will the divine meaning of individual existence be missed, the urge to our supreme spiritual possibilities deprived of its greatest force, but the relations of soul with soul in humanity will be left petty, limited and egoistic.” Essays on the Gita

“Next it [the Gita] insists with a certain austere emphasis on the acceptance of the Godhead as the divine inhabitant in the human body. For he is the Immanent in all existences, and if the indwelling divinity is not recognised, not only will the divine meaning of individual existence be missed, the urge to our supreme spiritual possibilities deprived of its greatest force, but the relations of soul with soul in humanity will be left petty, limited and egoistic.” Essays on the Gita

nirukta ::: etymology; philology, part of sahitya: the study of the origins and development of language, especially with reference to Sanskrit, with the aim of creating "a science which can trace the origins, growth & structure of the Sanscrit language, discover its primary, secondary & tertiary forms & the laws by which they develop from each other, trace intelligently the descent of every meaning of a word in Sanscrit from its original root sense, account for all similarities & identities of sense, discover the reason of unexpected divergences, trace the deviations which separated Greek & Latin from the Indian dialect, discover & define the connection of all three with the Dravidian forms of speech".

Nolini: Chance is like a child at play. That is to say, it laughs and goes about, there is no rule about anything it does; laughter at play. There is no wisdom in its movements. The wisdom is behind and comes out of the irregular movements of Chance. It is not meaningless, there is some knowledge behind.

nominal ::: a. --> Of or pertaining to a name or names; having to do with the literal meaning of a word; verbal; as, a nominal definition.
Existing in name only; not real; as, a nominal difference. ::: n. --> A nominalist.
A verb formed from a noun.


Nominal: Is discourse (language, speech, oratio) by which the meaning of a term is explained.

Nominal Scale ::: Any scale that contains no magnitude. Often nominal is thought of as name only, meaning that the variables of a nominal scale can be identified but not measured.

nonsense ::: n. --> That which is not sense, or has no sense; words, or language, which have no meaning, or which convey no intelligible ideas; absurdity.
Trifles; things of no importance.


nonsensical ::: a. --> Without sense; unmeaning; absurb; foolish; irrational; preposterous.

not meaning anything; devoid of intelligence, sense, or significance, as words or actions; pointless; empty.

*"No, that [‘pours” instead of "poured") would take away all meaning from ‘new fair world" — it is the attempted conquest of earth by life when earth had been created — a past event though still continuing in its sequel and result.” Letters on Savitri*

“No, that [‘pours” instead of”poured’) would take away all meaning from ‘new fair world’—it is the attempted conquest of earth by life when earth had been created—a past event though still continuing in its sequel and result.” Letters on Savitri

null ::: a. --> Of no legal or binding force or validity; of no efficacy; invalid; void; nugatory; useless. ::: n. --> Something that has no force or meaning.
That which has no value; a cipher; zero.
One of the beads in nulled work.


obvious ::: a. --> Opposing; fronting.
Exposed; subject; open; liable.
Easily discovered, seen, or understood; readily perceived by the eye or the intellect; plain; evident; apparent; as, an obvious meaning; an obvious remark.


octa- ::: --> A prefix meaning eight. See Octo-.
A combining form meaning eight; as in octodecimal, octodecimal, octolocular.


Of quite a different kind are so-called real definitions, which are not conventions for introducing new symbols or notations -- as syntactical and semantical definitions are -- but are propositions of equivalence (material, formal, etc.) between two abstract entities (propositions, concepts, etc.) of which one is called the definiendum and the other the definiens. Not all such propositions of equivalence, however, are real definitions, but only those in which the definiens embodies the "essential nature" (essentia, ουσια) of the definiendum. The notion of a real definition thus has all the vagueness of the quoted phrase, but the following may be given as an example. If all the notations appearing, including ⊃x, have their usual meanings (regarded as given in advance), the proposition expressed by (F)(G)[[F(x) ⊃x G(x)] ≡ (x)[∼F(x) ∨ G(x)]] is a real definition of formal implication -- to be contrasted with the nominal definition of the ¦notation for formal implication which is given in the article Logic, formal, § 3. This formula, expressing a real definition of formal implication, might appear, e.g., as a primitive formula in a logistic system.

pachy- ::: --> A combining form meaning thick; as, pachyderm, pachydactyl.

paleo- ::: --> A combining form meaning old, ancient; as, palearctic, paleontology, paleothere, paleography.

parable ::: 1. A short allegorical story designed to illustrate or teach some truth, spiritual principle, or moral lesson. 2. A statement or comment that conveys a meaning indirectly by the use of comparison, analogy, or the like, esp. concerning morality or ethics.

parallelism ::: n. --> The quality or state of being parallel.
Resemblance; correspondence; similarity.
Similarity of construction or meaning of clauses placed side by side, especially clauses expressing the same sentiment with slight modifications, as is common in Hebrew poetry; e. g.: --//At her feet he bowed, he fell:/Where he bowed, there he fell down dead. Judg. v. 27.


paramarthika. ::: Self; the only real or true existence; an epithet of Arjuna, meaning "He who destroys his enemy"

paraphrase ::: n. --> A restatement of a text, passage, or work, expressing the meaning of the original in another form, generally for the sake of its clearer and fuller exposition; a setting forth the signification of a text in other and ampler terms; a free translation or rendering; -- opposed to metaphrase. ::: v. t.

paronymous ::: a. --> Having the same derivation; allied radically; conjugate; -- said of certain words, as man, mankind, manhood, etc.
Having a similar sound, but different orthography and different meaning; -- said of certain words, as al/ and awl; hair and hare, etc.


penetrate ::: v. t. --> To enter into; to make way into the interior of; to effect an entrance into; to pierce; as, light penetrates darkness.
To affect profoundly through the senses or feelings; to touch with feeling; to make sensible; to move deeply; as, to penetrate one&


periods ::: rather large intervals of time that are meaningful in the life of a person, in history, etc., because of its particular characteristics.

Philosophers have in the past been concerned with two questions covered by our definition, though attempts to organize the subject as an autonomous department of philosophy are of recent date. Enquiries into the origin of language (e.g. in Plato's Kratylos) once a favorite subject for speculation, are now out of fashion, both with philosophers and linguists. Enquiries as to the nature of language (as in Descartes, Leibniz, and many others) are, however, still central to all philosophical interest in language. Such questions as "What are the most general characters of symbolism?", "How is 'Language' to be defined?", "What is the essence of language?", "How is communication possible?", "What would be the nature of a perfect language?", are indicative of the varying modulations which this theme receives in the works of contemporaries.   Current studies in the philosophy of language can be classified under five hends:   Questions of method, relation to other disciplines, etc. Much discussion turns here upon the proposal to establish a science and art of symbolism, variously styled semiotic, semantics or logical syntax,   The analysis of meaning. Problems arising here involve attention to those under the next heading.   The formulation of general descriptive schemata. Topics of importance here include the identification and analysis of different ways in which language is used, and the definition of men crucial notions as "symbol'', "grammar", "form", "convention", "metaphor", etc.   The study of fully formalized language systems or "calculi". An increasingly important and highly technical division which seeks to extend and adapt to all languages the methods first developed in "metamathematics" for the study of mathematical symbolism.   Applications to problems in general philosophy. Notably the attempt made to show that necessary propositions are really verbal; or again, the study of the nature of the religious symbol. Advance here awaits more generally acceptable doctrine in the other divisions.   References:

picaresque ::: a. --> Applied to that class of literature in which the principal personage is the Spanish picaro, meaning a rascal, a knave, a rogue, an adventurer.

pioned ::: a. --> A Shakespearean word of disputed meaning; perh., "abounding in marsh marigolds."

pittle-pattle ::: v. i. --> To talk unmeaningly; to chatter or prattle.

pointless ::: without force, meaning, or relevance.

postero ::: --> - (/). A combining form meaning posterior, back; as, postero-inferior, situated back and below; postero-lateral, situated back and at the side.

pranava. ::: a title of OM, meaning life-ness or life-giver.

pregnant ::: 1. Fraught, filled or abounding. 2. Teeming or fertile; rich. 3. Of great importance; momentous. 4. Full of meaning or significance.

preran.a ::: inspiration, especially when it "comes as the actual word prerana . . . revealing its meaning"; inspiration as part of the linguistic faculty (bhas.asakti), giving the meanings of unknown words; writing in various languages received by inspiration.

profound ::: n. 1. That which is eminently deep, or the deepest part of something; a vast depth; an abyss. lit. and fig; chiefly poetical. adj. 2. Situated at or extending to great depth; too deep to have been sounded or plumbed. 3. Coming as if from the depths of one"s being. 4. Of deep meaning; of great and broadly inclusive significance. 5. Being or going far beneath what is superficial, external, or obvious. 6. Showing or requiring great knowledge or understanding. profounder.

protean ::: readily taking on varied shapes, forms, or meanings.

psychic ::: of or relating to the soul (as distinguished from the mind and vital). Used in the sense of the Greek word "psyche", meaning "soul", the term "psychic" refers to all the movements and experiences of the soul, those which rise >from or directly touch the psychic being. It does not refer to all the more inward and all the abnormal experiences in which the mind and vital predominate; such experiences, in Sri Aurobindo's terminology, would be called psychological (surface or occult), not psychic.

punctuate ::: v. t. --> To mark with points; to separate into sentences, clauses, etc., by points or stops which mark the proper pauses in expressing the meaning.

punctuation ::: n. --> The act or art of punctuating or pointing a writing or discourse; the art or mode of dividing literary composition into sentences, and members of a sentence, by means of points, so as to elucidate the author&

pun ::: v. t. --> To pound.
To persuade or affect by a pun. ::: n. --> A play on words which have the same sound but different meanings; an expression in which two different applications of a word present an odd or ludicrous idea; a kind of quibble or equivocation.


purportless ::: a. --> Without purport or meaning.

purport ::: n. --> Design or tendency; meaning; import; tenor.
Disguise; covering.
To intend to show; to intend; to mean; to signify; to import; -- often with an object clause or infinitive.


purposeful ::: 1. Having a purpose; intentional. 2. Full of meaning; significant.

purposeless ::: having no purpose or apparent meaning.

quadri- ::: --> A combining form meaning four, four times, fourfold; as, quadricapsular, having four capsules.

queck ::: v. i. --> A word occurring in a corrupt passage of Bacon&

quinque- ::: --> A combining form meaning five, five times, fivefold; as, quinquefid, five-cleft; quinquedentate, five-toothed.

quipu ::: n. --> A contrivance employed by the ancient Peruvians, Mexicans, etc., as a substitute for writing and figures, consisting of a main cord, from which hung at certain distances smaller cords of various colors, each having a special meaning, as silver, gold, corn, soldiers. etc. Single, double, and triple knots were tied in the smaller cords, representing definite numbers. It was chiefly used for arithmetical purposes, and to register important facts and events.

raca ::: a. --> A term of reproach used by the Jews of our Savior&

reduplication ::: n. --> The act of doubling, or the state of being doubled.
A figure in which the first word of a verse is the same as the last word of the preceding verse.
The doubling of a stem or syllable (more or less modified), with the effect of changing the time expressed, intensifying the meaning, or making the word more imitative; also, the syllable thus added; as, L. tetuli; poposci.


reference ::: meaning or denotation.

religion ::: Sri Aurobindo: "There is no word so plastic and uncertain in its meaning as the word religion. The word is European and, therefore, it is as well to know first what the Europeans mean by it. In this matter we find them, — when they can be got to think clearly on the matter at all, which is itself unusual, — divided in opinion. Sometimes they use it as equivalent to a set of beliefs, sometimes as equivalent to morality coupled with a belief in God, sometimes as equivalent to a set of pietistic actions and emotions. Faith, works and pious observances, these are the three recognised elements of European religion . . . . ::: Religion in India is a still more plastic term and may mean anything from the heights of Yoga to strangling your fellowman and relieving him of the worldly goods he may happen to be carrying with him. It would therefore take too long to enumerate everything that can be included in Indian religion. Briefly, however, it is Dharma or living religiously, the whole life being governed by religion.” *From an unpublished essay

religion ::: “There is no word so plastic and uncertain in its meaning as the word religion. The word is European and, therefore, it is as well to know first what the Europeans mean by it. In this matter we find them,—when they can be got to think clearly on the matter at all, which is itself unusual,—divided in opinion. Sometimes they use it as equivalent to a set of beliefs, sometimes as equivalent to morality coupled with a belief in God, sometimes as equivalent to a set of pietistic actions and emotions. Faith, works and pious observances, these are the three recognised elements of European religion . . . .

remean ::: v. t. --> To give meaning to; to explain the meaning of; to interpret.

resiled ::: “It is a perfectly good English word, meaning originally to leap back, rebound (like an elastic)—so to draw back from, recoil, retreat (in military language it means to fall back from a position gained or to one’s original position): but it is specially used for withdrawing from a contract, agreement, previous statement.” Letters on Savitri.

resiled ::: Sri Aurobindo: "It is a perfectly good English word, meaning originally to leap back, rebound (like an elastic) — so to draw back from, recoil, retreat (in military language it means to fall back from a position gained or to one"s original position): but it is specially used for withdrawing from a contract, agreement, previous statement.” Letters on Savitri.

restrict ::: a. --> Restricted. ::: v. t. --> To restrain within bounds; to limit; to confine; as, to restrict worlds to a particular meaning; to restrict a patient to a certain diet.

rewel bone ::: --> An obsolete phrase of disputed meaning, -- perhaps, smooth or polished bone.

rote ::: n. --> A root.
A kind of guitar, the notes of which were produced by a small wheel or wheel-like arrangement; an instrument similar to the hurdy-gurdy.
The noise produced by the surf of the sea dashing upon the shore. See Rut.
A frequent repetition of forms of speech without attention to the meaning; mere repetition; as, to learn rules by rote.


royalty ::: n. --> The state of being royal; the condition or quality of a royal person; kingship; kingly office; sovereignty.
The person of a king or sovereign; majesty; as, in the presence of royalty.
An emblem of royalty; -- usually in the plural, meaning regalia.
Kingliness; spirit of regal authority.
Domain; province; sphere.


rump-fed ::: a. --> A Shakespearean word of uncertain meaning. Perhaps "fattened in the rump, pampered."

Samadhi ::: A certain self-gathered state of our whole existence lifted into that superconscient truth, unity and infinity of self-aware, self-blissful existence is the aim and culmination; and that is the meaning we shall give to the term Samadhi. Not merely a state withdrawn from all consciousness of the outward, withdrawn even from all consciousness of the inward into that which exists beyond both whether as seed of both or transcendent even of their seed-state; but a settled existence in the One and Infinite, united and identified with it, and this status to remain whether we abide in the waking condition in which we are conscious of the forms of things or we withdraw into the inward activity which dwells in the play of the principles of things, the play of their names and typal forms or we soar to the condition of static inwardness where we arrive at the principles themselves and at the principle of all principles, the seed of name and form.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 23-24, Page: 321


scrabble ::: v. t. --> To scrape, paw, or scratch with the hands; to proceed by clawing with the hands and feet; to scramble; as, to scrabble up a cliff or a tree.
To make irregular, crooked, or unmeaning marks; to scribble; to scrawl.
To mark with irregular lines or letters; to scribble; as, to scrabble paper.


See also Meaning, Kinds of.

selah ::: n. --> A word of doubtful meaning, occuring frequently in the Psalms; by some, supposed to signify silence or a pause in the musical performance of the song.

self-seeking ::: [Ed. note: In this instance the meaning of the word is seeking for itself, rather than the usual definition which is the seeking of one"s own interest or selfish ends.]

semantics ::: The meaning of any sign or symbol. In Integral Theory, meaning refers to the collective signifieds of cultural intersubjectivity and is typically associated with the Lower-Left quadrant. More broadly, meaning is the means of redeeming a validity claim (i.e., truth, truthfulness, mutual understanding, or functional fit) and is inherently connected to the referent of that claim. See Integral Semiotics.

senseful ::: a. --> Full of sense, meaning, or reason; reasonable; judicious.

senseless ::: 1. Without sense or meaning; unmeaning, meaningless, purposeless. 2. Lacking or devoid of sensation or consciousness; 3. That is unresponsive to stimulation; in a state of unconsciousness.

sense ::: n. 1. Any of the faculties, as sight, hearing, smell, taste, or touch, by which humans and animals perceive stimuli originating from outside or inside the body. 2. Meaning, signification. 3. A more or less vague perception or impression. 4. Any special capacity or perception, estimation, appreciation, etc. 5. A mental or spiritual discernment, realization, or recognition of a dream, or of anything cryptic or symbolical. sense"s, senses, senses", sense-appeal, sense-formed, sense-life"s, sense-pangs, sense-pleasures, sense-railed, sense-shackled, soul-sense. v. 6. To apprehend, detect, or perceive, without or in advance of the evidence of the senses; to perceive instinctively. 7. To be inwardly aware; conscious of. sensed, sensing. *adj. *sensed.

sentence ::: n. --> Sense; meaning; significance.
An opinion; a decision; a determination; a judgment, especially one of an unfavorable nature.
A philosophical or theological opinion; a dogma; as, Summary of the Sentences; Book of the Sentences.
In civil and admiralty law, the judgment of a court pronounced in a cause; in criminal and ecclesiastical courts, a judgment passed on a criminal by a court or judge; condemnation


sententious ::: a. --> Abounding with sentences, axioms, and maxims; full of meaning; terse and energetic in expression; pithy; as, a sententious style or discourse; sententious truth.
Comprising or representing sentences; sentential.


septi- ::: --> A combining form meaning seven; as, septifolious, seven-leaved; septi-lateral, seven-sided.

sex- ::: --> A combining form meaning six; as, sexdigitism; sexennial.

significance ::: 1. A meaning that is expressed. 2. Meaning; suggestiveness. 3. Importance, consequence. significances.

significancy ::: n. --> The quality or state of being significant.
That which is signified; meaning; import; as, the significance of a nod, of a motion of the hand, or of a word or expression.
Importance; moment; weight; consequence.


significant ::: 1. Having or expressing a meaning; meaningful. 2. Having or expressing a covert meaning; suggestive; indicative.

significant ::: a. --> Fitted or designed to signify or make known somethingl having a meaning; standing as a sign or token; expressive or suggestive; as, a significant word or sound; a significant look.
Deserving to be considered; important; momentous; as, a significant event. ::: n.


signification ::: n. --> The act of signifying; a making known by signs or other means.
That which is signified or made known; that meaning which a sign, character, or token is intended to convey; as, the signification of words.


significative ::: a. --> Betokening or representing by an external sign.
Having signification or meaning; expressive of a meaning or purpose; significant.


sign ::: n. 1. An act or gesture used to convey an idea, a desire, information, or a command. 2. Any object, action, event, pattern, etc., that conveys a meaning. 3. A mark used to mean something; a symbol that sets something apart from others of its kind. 4. Something that indicates or acts as a token of a fact, condition, etc., that is not immediately or outwardly observable. 5. A signal. 6. A conventional figure or device that stands for a word, phrase, or operation; a symbol, as in mathematics or in musical notation. 7. A displayed structure such as a banner bearing lettering or symbols. 8. An act or significant event that is experienced as indication of divine intervention. 9. A portent of things to come. Sign, sign"s, signs, signless, sign-burdened, flame-signs. v. 10. To affix one"s signature to. 11. To indicate by or as if by a sign; betoken. signs, signed, signing.

slug-horn ::: a. --> An erroneous form of the Scotch word slughorne, or sloggorne, meaning slogan.

Sometimes, however, the distinction between nominal definitions and real definitions is made on the basis that the latter convey an assertion of existence, of the defimendum, or rather, where the definiendum is a concept, of things falling thereunder (Saccheri, 1697); or the distinction may be made on the basis that real definitions involve the possibility of what is defined (Leibniz, 1684). Ockham makes the distinction rather on the basis that real definitions state the whole nature of a thing and nominal definitions state the meaning of a word or phrase, but adds that non-existents (as chimaera) and such parts of speech as verbs, adverbs, and conjunctions may therefore have only nominal definition. -- A.C.

soul ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The word ‘soul", as also the word ‘psychic", is used very vaguely and in many different senses in the English language. More often than not, in ordinary parlance, no clear distinction is made between mind and soul and often there is an even more serious confusion, for the vital being of desire — the false soul or desire-soul — is intended by the words ‘soul" and ‘psychic" and not the true soul, the psychic being.” *Letters on Yoga

  "The word soul is very vaguely used in English — as it often refers to the whole non-physical consciousness including even the vital with all its desires and passions. That was why the word psychic being has to be used so as to distinguish this divine portion from the instrumental parts of the nature.” *Letters on Yoga

  "The word soul has various meanings according to the context; it may mean the Purusha supporting the formation of Prakriti, which we call a being, though the proper word would be rather a becoming; it may mean, on the other hand, specifically the psychic being in an evolutionary creature like man; it may mean the spark of the Divine which has been put into Matter by the descent of the Divine into the material world and which upholds all evolving formations here.” *Letters on Yoga

  "A distinction has to be made between the soul in its essence and the psychic being. Behind each and all there is the soul which is the spark of the Divine — none could exist without that. But it is quite possible to have a vital and physical being supported by such a soul essence but without a clearly evolved psychic being behind it.” *Letters on Yoga

  "The soul and the psychic being are practically the same, except that even in things which have not developed a psychic being, there is still a spark of the Divine which can be called the soul. The psychic being is called in Sanskrit the Purusha in the heart or the Chaitya Purusha. (The psychic being is the soul developing in the evolution.)” *Letters on Yoga

  "The soul or spark is there before the development of an organised vital and mind. The soul is something of the Divine that descends into the evolution as a divine Principle within it to support the evolution of the individual out of the Ignorance into the Light. It develops in the course of the evolution a psychic individual or soul individuality which grows from life to life, using the evolving mind, vital and body as its instruments. It is the soul that is immortal while the rest disintegrates; it passes from life to life carrying its experience in essence and the continuity of the evolution of the individual.” *Letters on Yoga

  ". . . for the soul is seated within and impervious to the shocks of external events. . . .” *Essays on the Gita

  ". . . the soul is at first but a spark and then a little flame of godhead burning in the midst of a great darkness; for the most part it is veiled in its inner sanctum and to reveal itself it has to call on the mind, the life-force and the physical consciousness and persuade them, as best they can, to express it; ordinarily, it succeeds at most in suffusing their outwardness with its inner light and modifying with its purifying fineness their dark obscurities or their coarser mixture. Even when there is a formed psychic being able to express itself with some directness in life, it is still in all but a few a smaller portion of the being — ‘no bigger in the mass of the body than the thumb of a man" was the image used by the ancient seers — and it is not always able to prevail against the obscurity or ignorant smallness of the physical consciousness, the mistaken surenesses of the mind or the arrogance and vehemence of the vital nature.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

". . . the soul is an eternal portion of the Supreme and not a fraction of Nature.” The Life Divine

"The true soul secret in us, — subliminal, we have said, but the word is misleading, for this presence is not situated below the threshold of waking mind, but rather burns in the temple of the inmost heart behind the thick screen of an ignorant mind, life and body, not subliminal but behind the veil, — this veiled psychic entity is the flame of the Godhead always alight within us, inextinguishable even by that dense unconsciousness of any spiritual self within which obscures our outward nature. It is a flame born out of the Divine and, luminous inhabitant of the Ignorance, grows in it till it is able to turn it towards the Knowledge. It is the concealed Witness and Control, the hidden Guide, the Daemon of Socrates, the inner light or inner voice of the mystic. It is that which endures and is imperishable in us from birth to birth, untouched by death, decay or corruption, an indestructible spark of the Divine.” The Life Divine

*Soul, soul"s, Soul"s, souls, soulless, soul-bridals, soul-change, soul-force, Soul-Forces, soul-ground, soul-joy, soul-nature, soul-range, soul-ray, soul-scapes, soul-scene, soul-sense, soul-severance, soul-sight, soul-slaying, soul-space,, soul-spaces, soul-strength, soul-stuff, soul-truth, soul-vision, soul-wings, world-soul, World-Soul.



"Spirituality respects the freedom of the human soul, because it is itself fulfilled by freedom; and the deepest meaning of freedom is the power to expand and grow towards perfection by the law of one"s own nature, dharma.” The Human Cycle

“Spirituality respects the freedom of the human soul, because it is itself fulfilled by freedom; and the deepest meaning of freedom is the power to expand and grow towards perfection by the law of one’s own nature, dharma.” The Human Cycle

spiritualize ::: v. t. --> To refine intellectiually or morally; to purify from the corrupting influence of the world; to give a spiritual character or tendency to; as, to spiritualize soul.
To give a spiritual meaning to; to take in a spiritual sense; -- opposed to literalize.
To extract spirit from; also, to convert into, or impregnate with, spirit.


Sri Aurobindo: A symbol, as I understand it, is the form on one plane that represents a truth of another. For instance, a flag is the symbol of a nation…. But generally all forms are symbols. This body of ours is a symbol of our real being and everything is a symbol of some higher reality. There are, however, different kinds of symbols: 1. Conventional symbols, such as the Vedic Rishis formed with objects taken from their surroundings. The cow stood for light because the same word `go ‘ meant both ray and cow, and because the cow was their most precious possession which maintained their life and was constantly in danger of being robbed and concealed. But once created, such a symbol becomes alive. The Rishis vitalised it and it became a part of their realisation. It appeared in their visions as an image of spiritual light. The horse also was one of their favourite symbols, and a more easily adaptable one, since its force and energy were quite evident. 2. What we might call Life-symbols, such as are not artificially chosen or mentally interpreted in a conscious deliberate way, but derive naturally from our day-to-day life and grow out of the surroundings which condition our normal path of living. To the ancients the mountain was a symbol of the path of yoga, level above level, peak upon peak. A journey, involving the crossing of rivers and the facing of lurking enemies, both animal and human, conveyed a similar idea. Nowadays I dare say we would liken yoga to a motor-ride or a railway-trip. 3. Symbols that have an inherent appositeness and power of their own. Akasha or etheric space is a symbol of the infinite all-pervading eternal Brahman. In any nationality it would convey the same meaning. Also, the Sun stands universally for the supramental Light, the divine Gnosis. 4.* Mental symbols, instances of which are numbers or alphabets. Once they are accepted, they too become active and may be useful. Thus geometrical figures have been variously interpreted. In my experience the square symbolises the supermind. I cannot say how it came to do so. Somebody or some force may have built it before it came to my mind. Of the triangle, too, there are different explanations. In one position it can symbolise the three lower planes, in another the symbol is of the three higher ones: so both can be combined together in a single sign. The ancients liked to indulge in similar speculations concerning numbers, but their systems were mostly mental. It is no doubt true that supramental realities exist which we translate into mental formulas such as Karma, Psychic evolution, etc. But they are, so to speak, infinite realities which cannot be limited by these symbolic forms, though they may be somewhat expressed by them; they might be expressed as well by other symbols, and the same symbol may also express many different ideas. Letters on Yoga

Sri Aurobindo, Avatar and Poet Supreme, has enriched Savitri, his magnum opus, with words from a number of languages. In fact he has also coined words when no word would suffice to convey the mantric power and meaning required.

Sri Aurobindo: "Avatarhood would have little meaning if it were not connected with the evolution. The Hindu procession of the ten Avatars is itself, as it were, a parable of evolution. First the Fish Avatar, then the amphibious animal between land and water, then the land animal, then the Man-Lion Avatar, bridging man and animal, then man as dwarf, small and undeveloped and physical but containing in himself the godhead and taking possession of existence, then the rajasic, sattwic, nirguna Avatars, leading the human development from the vital rajasic to the sattwic mental man and again the overmental superman. Krishna, Buddha and Kalki depict the last three stages, the stages of the spiritual development — Krishna opens the possibility of overmind, Buddha tries to shoot beyond to the supreme liberation but that liberation is still negative, not returning upon earth to complete positively the evolution; Kalki is to correct this by bringing the Kingdom of the Divine upon earth, destroying the opposing Asura forces. The progression is striking and unmistakable.” *Letters on Yoga

*Sri Aurobindo: "The Indian explanation of fate is Karma. We ourselves are our own fate through our actions, but the fate created by us binds us; for what we have sown, we must reap in this life or another. Still we are creating our fate for the future even while undergoing old fate from the past in the present. That gives a meaning to our will and action and does not, as European critics wrongly believe, constitute a rigid and sterilising fatalism. But again, our will and action can often annul or modify even the past Karma, it is only certain strong effects, called utkata karma, that are non-modifiable. Here too the achievement of the spiritual consciousness and life is supposed to annul or give the power to annul Karma. For we enter into union with the Will Divine, cosmic or transcendent, which can annul what it had sanctioned for certain conditions, new-create what it had created, the narrow fixed lines disappear, there is a more plastic freedom and wideness. Neither Karma nor Astrology therefore points to a rigid and for ever immutable fate.” Letters on Yoga

*Sri Aurobindo: "The Mask is mentioned not twice but four times in this opening passage and it is purposely done to keep up the central connection of the idea running through the whole. The ambassadors wear this grey Mask, so your criticism cannot stand since there is no separate mask coming as part of a new idea but a very pointed return to the principal note indicating the identity of the influence throughout. It is not a random recurrence but a purposeful touch carrying a psychological meaning.” — 1948 Letters on Savitri*

Sri Aurobindo: "The word ‘descend" has various meanings according to the context — I used it here in the sense of the psychic being coming down into the human consciousness and body ready for it.” Letters on Yoga

stereo- ::: --> A combining form meaning solid, hard, firm, as in stereo-chemistry, stereography.

subtle ::: 1. So slight as to be difficult to detect or describe; elusive. 2. Fine or delicate in meaning or intent; difficult to perceive or understand. 3. Delicate or faint and mysterious. 4. Operating in a hidden, usually injurious way; insidious. 5. Characterized by skill or ingenuity; clever. 6. Insidious in operation. 7. Crafty or sly; devious; cunning. subtler, subtle-souled.

superlife ::: A word coined by Sri Aurobindo. super. A prefix occurring originally in loanwords from Latin with the basic meaning”above, beyond.” An individual, thing, or property that exceeds customary norms or levels.

superlife ::: a word coined by Sri Aurobindo. super. A prefix occurring originally in loanwords from Latin with the basic meaning "above, beyond.” An individual, thing, or property that exceeds customary norms or levels.

swasti. ::: an expression of salutation meaning

symbol ::: A symbol, as I understand it, is the form on one plane that represents a truth of another. For instance, a flag is the symbol of a nation…. But generally all forms are symbols. This body of ours is a symbol of our real being and everything is a symbol of some higher reality. There are, however, different kinds of symbols: 1. Conventional symbols, such as the Vedic Rishis formed with objects taken from their surroundings. The cow stood for light because the same word `go ‘ meant both ray and cow, and because the cow was their most precious possession which maintained their life and was constantly in danger of being robbed and concealed. But once created, such a symbol becomes alive. The Rishis vitalised it and it became a part of their realisation. It appeared in their visions as an image of spiritual light. The horse also was one of their favourite symbols, and a more easily adaptable one, since its force and energy were quite evident. 2. What we might call Life-symbols, such as are not artificially chosen or mentally interpreted in a conscious deliberate way, but derive naturally from our day-to-day life and grow out of the surroundings which condition our normal path of living. To the ancients the mountain was a symbol of the path of yoga, level above level, peak upon peak. A journey, involving the crossing of rivers and the facing of lurking enemies, both animal and human, conveyed a similar idea. Nowadays I dare say we would liken yoga to a motor-ride or a railway-trip. 3. Symbols that have an inherent appositeness and power of their own. Akasha or etheric space is a symbol of the infinite all-pervading eternal Brahman. In any nationality it would convey the same meaning. Also, the Sun stands universally for the supramental Light, the divine Gnosis. 4. Mental symbols, instances of which are numbers or alphabets. Once they are accepted, they too become active and may be useful. Thus geometrical figures have been variously interpreted. In my experience the square symbolises the supermind. I cannot say how it came to do so. Somebody or some force may have built it before it came to my mind. Of the triangle, too, there are different explanations. In one position it can symbolise the three lower planes, in another the symbol is of the three higher ones: so both can be combined together in a single sign. The ancients liked to indulge in similar speculations concerning numbers, but their systems were mostly mental. It is no doubt true that supramental realities exist which we translate into mental formulas such as Karma, Psychic evolution, etc. But they are, so to speak, infinite realities which cannot be limited by these symbolic forms, though they may be somewhat expressed by them; they might be expressed as well by other symbols, and the same symbol may also express many different ideas. Letters on Yoga

tattle ::: v. i. --> To prate; to talk idly; to use many words with little meaning; to chat.
To tell tales; to communicate secrets; to be a talebearer; as, a tattling girl. ::: n. --> Idle talk or chat; trifling talk; prate.


tautology ::: n. --> A repetition of the same meaning in different words; needless repetition of an idea in different words or phrases; a representation of anything as the cause, condition, or consequence of itself, as in the following lines: --//The dawn is overcast, the morning lowers,/And heavily in clouds brings on the day. Addison.

Tehmi: : “Put their claim to. That is the first and simplest meaning. Put their claim to.”

tenor ::: n. --> A state of holding on in a continuous course; manner of continuity; constant mode; general tendency; course; career.
That course of thought which holds on through a discourse; the general drift or course of thought; purport; intent; meaning; understanding.
Stamp; character; nature.
An exact copy of a writing, set forth in the words and figures of it. It differs from purport, which is only the substance or


tetra-mesh ::: The act whereby a holon meshes or fits with the selection pressures (i.e., the validity claims) of all four quadrants. In order to tetra-mesh, each holon must, to some degree, be able to register its own exterior accurately enough (truth), its own interior accurately enough (truthfulness), understand its cultural milieu (mutual understanding), and fit within its social system (functional fit). Also referred to as tetra-enactment or tetraevolution, meaning that all four selection pressures must be dealt with adequately in order for a holon to evolve.

That gives a meaning to our will and action. Our will and action can often annul or modify even the past karma, it is only cer- tain strong effects, called tiikata karma, that arc non-modifiable.

The meaning of spirituality is a new and greater inner life of man founded in the consciousness of his true, his inmost, highest and largest self and spirit by which he receives the whole of existence as a progressive manifestation of the self in the universe and his own life as a field of a possible transformation in which its divine sense will be found, its potentialities highly evolved, the now imperfect forms changed into an image of the divine perfection, and an effort not only to see but to live out these greater possibilities of his being.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 26, Page: 270


The formalization as a logistic system of the functional calculus of order omega with axiom of infinity leads, by a method which cannot be given here, to a (definite but quite complicated) proposition of arithmetic which is equivalent to -- in a certain sense, expresses -- the consistency of the system. This proposition of arithmetic can be represented within the system by a formula A containing no free variables, and the following second form of gödel's incompleteness theorem can then be proved: If the system is consistent, then the formula A, although its meaning is a true proposition of arithmetic, is not a theorem of the system. We might, of course, add A to the system as a new primitive formula -- we would then have a new system, whose consistency would correspond to a new proposition of arithmetic, represented by a new formula B (containing no free variables), and we would still have in the new system, if consistent, that B was not a theorem.

The kind of an interpretation, or assignment of meaning, which is normally intended for a logistic system is indicated by the technical terminology employed. This is namely such an interpretation that the formulas, some or all of them, mean or express propositions; the theorems express true propositions; and the proofs and valid inferences represent proofs and valid inferences in the ordinary sense. (Formulas which do not mean propositions may be interpreted as names of things other than propositions, or may be interpreted as containing free variables and having only an ambiguous denotation -- see variable.) A logistic system may thus be regarded as a device for obtaining -- or, rather stating -- an objective, external criterion for the validity of proofs and inferences (which are expressible in a given notation).

The problem of attributes gave rise to extensive discussions. In general, the attempt is made to convey some knowledge about God and yet maintain that His essence is inconceivable. The number of attributes varies with individual philosophers, from three of Bahya to eight of Ibn Daud. Saadia counts one, living, potent and wise as essential attributes; Bahya one, existent, and eternal. Ha-Levi substitutes living for existent. Ibn Daud adds to those of Saadia and Bahya three more: true, willing, and potent. Maimonides considers living, potent, wise, and willing as those agreed upon by philosophers. The difficulty, however, does not consist in the number but in their content, or in other words, how to speak of essential attributes and not to impair the simplicity of God's essence. Bahya was the first to assert that their content is negative, e.g., existent means not non-existent. He was followed in this by all others. Maimonides is especially insistent upon the negative meaning and asserts that they are to be applied to God and man in an absolute homonymic manner, i.e., there is no possible relation between God and other beings. Gersonides and Crescas, on the other hand, believe that the essential attributes are positive though we cannot determine their content. There are, of course, other attributes which are descriptive of His action, but these are not essential.

the ::: v. i. --> See Thee. ::: definite article. --> A word placed before nouns to limit or individualize their meaning. ::: adv.

“The word soul has various meanings according to the context; it may mean the Purusha supporting the formation of Prakriti, which we call a being, though the proper word would be rather a becoming; it may mean, on the other hand, specifically the psychic being in an evolutionary creature like man; it may mean the spark of the Divine which has been put into Matter by the descent of the Divine into the material world and which upholds all evolving formations here.” Letters on Yoga

"The world we live in is not a meaningless accident that has unaccountably taken place in the void of Space; it is the scene of an evolution in which an eternal Truth has been embodied, hidden in a form of things, and is secretly in process of unfoldment through the ages. There is a meaning in our existence, a purpose in our birth and death and travail, a consummation of all our labour. All are parts of a single plan; nothing has been idly made in the universe; nothing is vain in our life.” Essays Divine and Human

“The world we live in is not a meaningless accident that has unaccountably taken place in the void of Space; it is the scene of an evolution in which an eternal Truth has been embodied, hidden in a form of things, and is secretly in process of unfoldment through the ages. There is a meaning in our existence, a purpose in our birth and death and travail, a consummation of all our labour. All are parts of a single plan; nothing has been idly made in the universe; nothing is vain in our life.” Essays Divine and Human

"They” means nobody in particular but corresponds to the French "On dit” meaning vaguely "people in general”. This is a use permissible in English; for instance, "They say you are not so scrupulous as you should be.” Letters on Savitri— 1948

“They” means nobody in particular but corresponds to the French”On dit” meaning vaguely”people in general”. This is a use permissible in English; for instance,”They say you are not so scrupulous as you should be.” Letters on Savitri—1948

This isomorphism between the algebra of classes and the indicated part of the functional calculus of first order can be taken as representing a parallelism of meaning. In fact, the meanings become identical if we wish to construe the functional calculus in extension, (see the article propositional function); or, inversely, if we wish to construe the algebra of classes in intension, instead of the usual construction.

This rebuilding of the notion of creature permits St. Thomas also to analyze the problems that Averroism was making more and more prominent. Philosophical truth was discovered by the Greeks and the Arabians neither completely nor adequately nor without error. What the Christian thinker must do in their presence is not to divide his allegiance between them and Christianity, but to discover the meaning of reason and the conditions of true thinking. That discovery will enable him to learn from the Greeks without also learning their errors; and it would thus show him the possibility of the harmony between reason and revelation. He must learn to be a philosopher, to discover the philosopher within the Christian man, in order to meet philosophers. In exploring the meaning of a creature, St. Thomas was building a philosophy which permitted his contemporaries (at least, if they listened to him) to free themselves from the old eternalistic and rigid world of the Greeks and to free their thinking, therefore, from the antinomies which this world could raise up for them. In the harmony of faith and reason which St. Thomas defended against Averroism, we must see the culminating point of his activity. For such a harmony meant ultimately not only a judicious and synthetic diagnosis of Greek philosophy, as well as a synthetic incorporation of Greek ideas in Christian thought, it meant also the final vindication of the humanism and the naturalism of Thomistic philosophy. The expression and the defense of this Christian humanism constitute one of St. Thomas' most enduring contributions to European thought. -- A.C.P.

This something larger is the cosmic drama written, staged, and acted by the Absolute, who is artist and actor as well as a rational intelligence, intent no less upon dramatic than upon intelligible unity and self-expression. The world-process is tragic, witness the sin and suffering and imperfection with which it is fraught. But in the infinite tragedy, as well as in the tragedies composed by men, evil is contributory to the perfection of the whole, and, when seen and accepted as such by the finite individual, not only loses its sting but produces a "catharsis" of his attitude towards it, in which he cheerfully accepts it, battles with it, and finds his triumph over it in nobly enduring it. This "catharsis," identifying him as it does with the meaning of the life of the Absolute, is his peace and his salvation. Main works: Logic, 1888; The Philosophical Theory of the State, 1899; Value and Destiny of the Individual, 1913. -- B.A.G.F.

"This universal aesthesis of beauty and delight does not ignore or fail to understand the differences and oppositions, the gradations, the harmony and disharmony obvious to the ordinary consciousness; but, first of all, it draws a Rasa from them and with that comes the enjoyment, Bhoga. and the touch or the mass of the Ananda. It sees that all things have their meaning, their value, their deeper or total significance which the mind does not see, for the mind is only concerned with a surface vision, surface contacts and its own surface reactions. When something expresses perfectly what it was meant to express, the completeness brings with it a sense of harmony, a sense of artistic perfection; it gives even to what is discordant a place in a system of cosmic concordances and the discords become part of a vast harmony, and wherever there is harmony, there is a sense of beauty. ” Letters on Savitri*

“This universal aesthesis of beauty and delight does not ignore or fail to understand the differences and oppositions, the gradations, the harmony and disharmony obvious to the ordinary consciousness; but, first of all, it draws a Rasa from them and with that comes the enjoyment, Bhoga. and the touch or the mass of the Ananda. It sees that all things have their meaning, their value, their deeper or total significance which the mind does not see, for the mind is only concerned with a surface vision, surface contacts and its own surface reactions. When something expresses perfectly what it was meant to express, the completeness brings with it a sense of harmony, a sense of artistic perfection; it gives even to what is discordant a place in a system of cosmic concordances and the discords become part of a vast harmony, and wherever there is harmony, there is a sense of beauty.” Letters on Savitri

throne ::: n. --> A chair of state, commonly a royal seat, but sometimes the seat of a prince, bishop, or other high dignitary.
Hence, sovereign power and dignity; also, the one who occupies a throne, or is invested with sovereign authority; an exalted or dignified personage.
A high order of angels in the celestial hierarchy; -- a meaning given by the schoolmen.


tirrit ::: n. --> A word from the vocabulary of Mrs. Quickly, the hostess in Shakespeare&

toadstone ::: n. --> A local name for the igneous rocks of Derbyshire, England; -- said by some to be derived from the German todter stein, meaning dead stone, that is, stone which contains no ores.
Bufonite, formerly regarded as a precious stone, and worn as a jewel. See Bufonite.


" To become ourselves by exceeding ourselves, — so we may turn the inspired phrases of a half-blind seer who knew not the self of which he spoke, — is the difficult and dangerous necessity, the cross surmounted by an invisible crown which is imposed on us, the riddle of the true nature of his being proposed to man by the dark Sphinx of the Inconscience below and from within and above by the luminous veiled Sphinx of the infinite Consciousness and eternal Wisdom confronting him as an inscrutable divine Maya. To exceed ego and be our true self, to be aware of our real being, to possess it, to possess a real delight of being, is therefore the ultimate meaning of our life here; it is the concealed sense of our individual and terrestrial existence.” The Life Divine*

“ To become ourselves by exceeding ourselves,—so we may turn the inspired phrases of a half-blind seer who knew not the self of which he spoke,—is the difficult and dangerous necessity, the cross surmounted by an invisible crown which is imposed on us, the riddle of the true nature of his being proposed to man by the dark Sphinx of the Inconscience below and from within and above by the luminous veiled Sphinx of the infinite Consciousness and eternal Wisdom confronting him as an inscrutable divine Maya. To exceed ego and be our true self, to be aware of our real being, to possess it, to possess a real delight of being, is therefore the ultimate meaning of our life here; it is the concealed sense of our individual and terrestrial existence.” The Life Divine

“To become ourselves by exceeding ourselves,—so we may turn the inspired phrases of a half-blind seer who knew not the self of which he spoke,—is the difficult and dangerous necessity, the cross surmounted by an invisible crown which is imposed on us, the riddle of the true nature of his being proposed to man by the dark Sphinx of the Inconscience below and from within and above by the luminous veiled Sphinx of the infinite Consciousness and eternal Wisdom confronting him as an inscrutable divine Maya. To exceed ego and be our true self, to be aware of our real being, to possess it, to possess a real delight of being, is therefore the ultimate meaning of our life here; it is the concealed sense of our individual and terrestrial existence.” The Life Divine

“‘Transformation’ is a word that I have brought in myself (like ‘supermind’) to express certain spiritual concepts and spiritual facts of the integral yoga. People are now taking them up and using them in senses which have nothing to do with the significance which I put into them. Purification of the nature by the ‘influence’ of the Spirit is not what I mean by transformation; purification is only part of a psychic change or a psycho-spiritual change—the word besides has many senses and is very often given a moral or ethical meaning which is foreign to my purpose.” Letters on Yoga

transformation ::: Sri Aurobindo: "Transformation means that the higher consciousness or nature is brought down into the mind, vital and body and takes the place of the lower. There is a higher consciousness of the true self, which is spiritual, but it is above; if one rises above into it, then one is free as long as one remains there, but if one comes down into or uses mind, vital or body — and if one keeps any connection with life, one has to do so, either to come down and act from the ordinary consciousness or else to be in the self but use mind, life and body, then the imperfections of these instruments have to be faced and mended — they can only be mended by transformation.” *Letters on Yoga

  "‘Transformation" is a word that I have brought in myself (like ‘supermind") to express certain spiritual concepts and spiritual facts of the integral yoga. People are now taking them up and using them in senses which have nothing to do with the significance which I put into them. Purification of the nature by the ‘influence" of the Spirit is not what I mean by transformation; purification is only part of a psychic change or a psycho-spiritual change — the word besides has many senses and is very often given a moral or ethical meaning which is foreign to my purpose.” *Letters on Yoga

"It is indeed as a result of our evolution that we arrive at the possibility of this transformation. As Nature has evolved beyond Matter and manifested Life, beyond Life and manifested Mind, so she must evolve beyond Mind and manifest a consciousness and power of our existence free from the imperfection and limitation of our mental existence, a supramental or truth-consciousness and able to develop the power and perfection of the spirit. Here a slow and tardy change need no longer be the law or manner of our evolution; it will be only so to a greater or less extent so long as a mental ignorance clings and hampers our ascent; but once we have grown into the truth-consciousness its power of spiritual truth of being will determine all. Into that truth we shall be freed and it will transform mind and life and body. Light and bliss and beauty and a perfection of the spontaneous right action of all the being are there as native powers of the supramental truth-consciousness and these will in their very nature transform mind and life and body even here upon earth into a manifestation of the truth-conscious spirit. The obscurations of earth will not prevail against the supramental truth-consciousness, for even into the earth it can bring enough of the omniscient light and omnipotent force of the spirit conquer. All may not open to the fullness of its light and power, but whatever does open must that extent undergo the change. That will be the principle of transformation.” The Supramental Manifestation

The Mother: "Transformation. The change by which all the elements and all the movements of the being become ready to manifest the supramental Truth.”

"One thing you must know and never forget: in the work of transformation all that is true and sincere will always be kept; only what is false and insincere will disappear.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 15.


translation ::: n. --> The act of translating, removing, or transferring; removal; also, the state of being translated or removed; as, the translation of Enoch; the translation of a bishop.
The act of rendering into another language; interpretation; as, the translation of idioms is difficult.
That which is obtained by translating something a version; as, a translation of the Scriptures.
A transfer of meaning in a word or phrase, a metaphor;


tri- ::: --> A prefix meaning three, thrice, threefold; as in tricolored, tridentate.
A prefix (also used adjectively) denoting three proportional or combining part, or the third degree of that to the name of which it is prefixed; as in trisulphide, trioxide, trichloride.


truelove ::: n. --> One really beloved.
A plant. See Paris.
An unexplained word occurring in Chaucer, meaning, perhaps, an aromatic sweetmeat for sweetening the breath.


twig ::: v. t. --> To twitch; to pull; to tweak.
To understand the meaning of; to comprehend; as, do you twig me?
To observe slyly; also, to perceive; to discover.
To beat with twigs. ::: n.


twisted ::: 1. Altered or distorted the intended meaning or form of. Also fig. **2.** Altered or distorted the mental, moral, or emotional character of.

twist ::: v. t. --> To contort; to writhe; to complicate; to crook spirally; to convolve.
Hence, to turn from the true form or meaning; to pervert; as, to twist a passage cited from an author.
To distort, as a solid body, by turning one part relatively to another about an axis passing through both; to subject to torsion; as, to twist a shaft.
To wreathe; to wind; to encircle; to unite by


un- ::: --> An inseparable verbal prefix or particle. It is prefixed: (a) To verbs to express the contrary, and not the simple negative, of the action of the verb to which it is prefixed; as in uncoil, undo, unfold. (b) To nouns to form verbs expressing privation of the thing, quality, or state expressed by the noun, or separation from it; as in unchild, unsex. Sometimes particles and participial adjectives formed with this prefix coincide in form with compounds of the negative prefix un- (see 2d Un-); as in undone (from undo), meaning unfastened, ruined; and

unmeaning ::: a. --> Having no meaning or signification; as, unmeaning words.
Not indicating intelligence or sense; senseless; expressionless; as, an unmeaning face.


unmeaning :::

undersong ::: n. --> The burden of a song; the chorus; the refrain.
Accompanying strain; subordinate and underlying meaning; accompaniment; undertone.


understand ::: v. t. --> To have just and adequate ideas of; to apprehended the meaning or intention of; to have knowledge of; to comprehend; to know; as, to understand a problem in Euclid; to understand a proposition or a declaration; the court understands the advocate or his argument; to understand the sacred oracles; to understand a nod or a wink.
To be apprised, or have information, of; to learn; to be informed of; to hear; as, I understand that Congress has passed


univocal ::: a. --> Having one meaning only; -- contrasted with equivocal.
Having unison of sound, as the octave in music. See Unison, n., 2. ::: n. --> Having always the same drift or tenor; uniform; certain; regular.


univocation ::: n. --> Agreement of name and meaning.

unsensed ::: a. --> Wanting a distinct meaning; having no certain signification.

v. 1. Lacking definite shape, form, or character; indistinct. 2. Not definitely established, determined, confirmed, or known; uncertain. 3. Indefinite or indistinct in nature or character. 4. Not clearly expressed; inexplicit. 5. Not clear in meaning or application. n. 6. An empty or obscure expanse.

violent ::: 1. Intense in force, effect, etc.; severe; extreme. 2. Roughly or immoderately vehement or ardent. 3. Marked by, acting with, or resulting from great force. 4. Characterized by an undue use of force; severe; harsh. 5. Tending to distort or injure meaning, phrasing, or intent.

vocable ::: n. --> A word; a term; a name; specifically, a word considered as composed of certain sounds or letters, without regard to its meaning.

wappened ::: a. --> A word of doubtful meaning used once by Shakespeare.

warps ::: distorts or causes to distort from the truth, fact, true meaning, etc.; falsifies.

weetless ::: a. --> Unknowing; also, unknown; unmeaning.

weight ::: 1. A measure of the heaviness of an object. Also fig. **2. A body of determinate mass, as of metal, for using on a balance or scale in weighing objects, substances, etc. 3. Any heavy load or burden. Also fig. 4. Influence, importance, or authority. 5. Consequence, or effective influence. weights. v. weighted. 6.** Added weight to, gave greater meaning or importance to.

well-meaning ::: a. --> Having a good intention.

what ::: pron., a., & adv. --> As an interrogative pronoun, used in asking questions regarding either persons or things; as, what is this? what did you say? what poem is this? what child is lost?
As an exclamatory word: -- (a) Used absolutely or independently; -- often with a question following.
Used adjectively, meaning how remarkable, or how great; as, what folly! what eloquence! what courage!
Sometimes prefixed to adjectives in an


While most writers on language agree us to the value of making some such distinctions, there is little agreement as to the number and kinds of functions which may usefully be recognised. There is even less agreement about nomenclature. The account given follows that of Kretschmer (Sprache, 61 ff. in Gercke and Norden, Einleitung in die Altertumszvissenschaft, I) and Bühlcr (Sprachtheorie, passim). Ogden and Richards distinguish five functions (Meaning of Meaning, 357 fF.). The broad distinction between "referential" and "emotive" uses of language, due to the same authors, has been widely accepted. -- M.B.

While not abandoning its interest in beauty, artistic value, and other normative concepts, recent aesthetics has tended to lay increasing emphasis on a descriptive, factual approach to the phenomena of art and aesthetic experience. It differs from art history, archeology, and cultural history in stressing a theoretical organization of materials in terms of recurrent types and tendencies, rather than a chronological or genetic one. It differs from general psychology in focusing upon certain selected phases in psycho-physical activity, and on their application to certain types of objects and situations, especially those of art. It investigates the forms and characteristics of art, which psychology does not do. It differs from art criticism in seeking a more general, theoretical understanding of the arts than is usual in that subject, and in attempting a more consistently objective, impersonal attitude. It maintains a philosophic breadth, in comparing examples of all the arts, and in assembling data and hypotheses from many sources, including philosophy, psychology, cultural history, and the social sciences. But it is departing from traditional conceptions of philosophy in that writing labelled "aesthetics" now often includes much detailed, empirical study of particular phenomena, instead of restricting itself as formerly to abstract discussion of the meaning of beauty, the sublime, and other categories, their objective or subjective nature, their relation to pleasure and moral goodness, the purpose of art, the nature of aesthetic value, etc. There has been controversy over whether such empirical studies deserve to be called "aesthetics", or whether that name should be reserved for the traditional, dialectic or speculative approach; but usage favors the extension in cases where the inquiry aims at fairly broad generalizations.

William James, who first adopted this philosophical position, and so named it, described it in The Meaning of Truth (Preface, xii-xiii) as consisting "first of a postulate, next of a statement of fact, and finally of a generalized conclusion.

W. James, The Meaning of Truth, 1909.

wrest ::: v. t. --> To turn; to twist; esp., to twist or extort by violence; to pull of force away by, or as if by, violent wringing or twisting.
To turn from truth; to twist from its natural or proper use or meaning by violence; to pervert; to distort.
To tune with a wrest, or key. ::: n.


write ::: v. t. --> To set down, as legible characters; to form the conveyance of meaning; to inscribe on any material by a suitable instrument; as, to write the characters called letters; to write figures.
To set down for reading; to express in legible or intelligible characters; to inscribe; as, to write a deed; to write a bill of divorcement; hence, specifically, to set down in an epistle; to communicate by letter.


y- ::: --> Alt. of I-
A prefix of obscure meaning, originally used with verbs, adverbs, adjectives, nouns, and pronouns. In the Middle English period, it was little employed except with verbs, being chiefly used with past participles, though occasionally with the infinitive Ycleped, or yclept, is perhaps the only word not entirely obsolete which shows this use.




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   38 Sri Aurobindo
   7 Jordan Peterson
   6 Sri Ramakrishna
   5 The Mother
   4 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   3 Thomas Keating
   3 Carl Jung
   2 Wikipedia
   2 Taigu Ryokan
   2 Sri Aurobindo
   2 Rene Guenon
   2 Peter J Carroll
   2 Manly P Hall
   2 Joseph Campbell
   2 Carl Sagan
   2 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   2 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   2 Kobayashi Issa
   1 Zhuangzi
   1 W V O Quine
   1 William S Burroughs
   1 Werner Heisenberg
   1 Vladimir Solovyov
   1 Vincent van Gogh
   1 Viktor Frankl
   1 Unknown
   1 Timothy Snyder
   1 The anagogy shows us where we end our strife.
   1 Stratford Caldecott
   1 Sogyal Rinpoche
   1 Seth Bernadette
   1 Ronald Decker and Thierry Depaulis and Michael Dummett
   1 Robert Spaemann
   1 Robert Anton Wilson
   1 Ramesh Balsekar
   1 Ramakrishna
   1 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   1 Rabindranath Tagore
   1 Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel
   1 Peter Ouspensky
   1 P D Ouspensky
   1 Pavel Florensky
   1 Novalis
   1 my appetite for the absolute and for unity and the impossibility of reducing this world to a rational and reasonable principle
   1 Muhammad Ali
   1 Mr. Ouspensky🕊
   1 Mitsugi Saotome
   1 Masaaki Hatsumi
   1 Martin Heidegger
   1 M Alan Kazlev
   1 Mage the Ascension
   1 Ludwig Wittgenstein
   1 Longchenpa
   1 Kurt Godel
   1 Kibir
   1 ken-wilber
   1 Keiji Nishitani
   1 Josef Pieper
   1 John Kerecz. How to start a stress-releasing zen journey
   1 John Henry Newman
   1 Jiddu Krishnamurti
   1 Jean Borella
   1 Jean Baudrillard
   1 Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa
   1 G K Chesterton
   1 Gerald G. Jampolsky
   1 Georg C Lichtenberg
   1 Gary Gygax
   1 Fyodor Dostoevsky
   1 Friedrich Schiller
   1 Friedrich Nietzsche
   1 Ernest Becker
   1 Dion Fortune
   1 David Steindl-Rast
   1 Dalai Lama
   1 C S Lewis
   1 Charles S Peirce
   1 Charles Baudelaire
   1 Carl Rogers
   1 Boye De Mente
   1 Arthur Schopenhauer
   1 a reaction will set in against this communal dissociation. You know
   1 Angelus Silesius
   1 Anaïs Nin
   1 Al-Kalabadhi
   1 Alfred North Whitehead
   1 Aldous Huxley
   1 Albert Camus
   1 Alan Wilson
   1 Alan Watts
   1 Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
   1 Jetsun Milarepa
   1 Ibn Arabi
   1 Epictetus
   1 Aleister Crowley
   1 Abraham Joshua Heschel

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   31 Viktor E Frankl
   16 Anonymous
   13 Paulo Coelho
   13 Carl Jung
   10 Mason Cooley
   9 Haruki Murakami
   8 Paul Kalanithi
   8 Leo Tolstoy
   8 Friedrich Nietzsche
   7 William Shakespeare
   7 John Green
   7 Dean Koontz
   7 Bryant McGill
   6 T S Eliot
   6 Malcolm Gladwell
   6 Lois Lowry
   6 Elena Ferrante
   6 Dalai Lama
   5 Ursula K Le Guin
   5 Rumi

1:Then I finally understood the unspoken meaning. ~ Taigu Ryokan, 1758-1831,
2:am its disciple. How many are there alive who have taken in its meaning." ~ Kibir,
3:First learn the meaning of what you say, and then speak. ~ Epictetus,
4:The real meaning of detachment is to be separated inwardly from what is unreal. ~ Al-Kalabadhi,
5:The moral meaning gives us the rule of daily life. ~ The anagogy shows us where we end our strife.,
6:It is only when we realize that life is taking us nowhere that it begins to have meaning. ~ Mr. Ouspensky🕊,
7:We live in a world where there is more and more information, and less and less meaning.
   ~ Jean Baudrillard,
8:The literal meaning of life is whatever you're doing that prevents you from killing yourself
   ~ Albert Camus,
9:Death is a mirror in which the entire meaning of life is reflected. ~ Sogyal Rinpoche, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying,
10:Man only plays when in the full meaning of the word he is a man, and he is only completely a man when he plays. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
11:As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light of meaning in the darkness of mere being. ~ Carl Jung,
12:Do you know the meaning of karmayoga? It is to surrender to God the fruit of all action. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
13:Just as there are polysyllabic words that say very little, so there are also monosyllabic words of infinite meaning. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
14:It is futile to seek human reason, purpose or meaning in the events of life, which are in fact impersonal and not human at all. ~ Ramesh Balsekar,
15:Life has no meaning. Each of us has meaning and we bring it to life. It is a waste to be asking the question when you are the answer. ~ Joseph Campbell,
16:There is no meaning in attributing responsibility and motive to the One before it becomes many. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
17:The meaning of our self is not to be found in its separateness from God and others, but in the ceaseless realisation of yoga, of union. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
18:To live in the world without becoming aware of the meaning of the world is like wandering about in a great library without touching the books. ~ Manly P Hall,
19:In silence seek God's meaning in thy depths, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
20:There is a meaning in each play of Chance, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
21:With Christians, a poetical view of things is a duty. We are bid to color all things with hues of faith, to see a divine meaning in every event. ~ John Henry Newman,
22:Nothing is more helpful to reduce pride than the actual experience of self-knowledge. If we are discouraged by it, we have misunderstood its meaning. ~ Thomas Keating,
23:Friend let this be enough. If thou wouldst go on reading. Go thyself and become the writing and the meaning ~ Angelus Silesius, Selections from The Cherubinic Wanderer,
24:Eyes see only light, ears hear only sound, but a listening heart perceives meaning." ~ David Steindl-Rast, (born July 12, 1926) American Catholic Benedictine monk, Wikipedia.,
25:The deepest things are those thought seizes not;
Our spirits live their hidden meaning out. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories, Act III,
26:Perhaps what is inexpressible (what I find mysterious and am not able to express) is the background against which whatever I could express has its meaning. ~ Ludwig Wittgenstein,
27:The harmony of the inner and outer man which is the true meaning of civilisation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Renaissance in India, "Is India Civilised?" - I,
28:All the facts of nature are nouns of the intellect, and make the grammar of the eternal language. Every word has a double, trebleor centuple use and meaning. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
29:Our regeneration is indissolubly bound up with the regeneration of the universe and with the transformation of its forms of space and time. ~ Vladimir Solovyov, The Meaning of Love,
30:As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light of meaning in the darkness of mere being.
   ~ Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections ch. II (1962),
31:Words have value; what is of value in words is meaning. Meaning has something it is pursuing, but the thing that it is pursuing cannot be put into words and handed down. ~ Zhuangzi, [T5],
32:However beautiful a song may be,
   it is just a tune to those
   who do not understand its meaning.
   ~ Jetsun Milarepa, The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa,
33:Science is clearly one of the most profound methods that humans have yet devised for discovering truth, while religion remains the single greatest force for generating meaning. ~ ken-wilber,
34:A luminous moon the wind in the pine a long evening a transcendent view; But what is the meaning of this? What is the meaning of life? ~ John Kerecz. How to start a stress-releasing zen journey,
35:The great decisions of human life have as a rule far more to do with the instincts and other mysterious unconscious factors than with conscious will and well-meaning reasonableness. ~ Carl Jung,
36:Looking for the meaning of life, one man can discover the order of the universe. To discover the truth, to achieve. a higher spiritual state, that is the true meaning of ninja. ~ Masaaki Hatsumi,
37:The sense [of the symbol] is only accomplished in the analogy and through the analogy. To say that an object has a meaning is to discover what it is analogous to. ~ Jean Borella, Pense l'analogie,
38:A chain is no stronger than its weakest link, and if one of the team cannot handle the forces, everybody is going to suffer. A ritual lodge is no place for the well-meaning ineffectual.
   ~ Dion Fortune,
39:Friendship is the hardest thing in the world to explain. It's not something you learn in school. But if you haven't learned the meaning of friendship, you really haven't learned anything. ~ Muhammad Ali,
40:The deepest meaning of freedom is the power to expand and grow towards perfection by the law of one's own nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle, Religion as the Law of Life,
41:The hidden Word was found, the long-sought clue,
Revealed was the meaning of our spirit's birth, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
42:To Romanticize means to endow base matters with noble meaning, ordinary matters with a mysterious status, familiar matters with the dignity of the unknown, finite matter with the appearance of infinity. ~ Novalis,
43:Remember that there is meaning beyond absurdity. Know that every deed counts, that every word is power...Above all, remember that you must build your life as if it were a work of art. ~ Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel,
44:The highest and widest seeing is the wisest; for then all knowledge is unified in its one comprehensive meaning. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, The Progress to Knowledge - God, Man and Nature,
45:In this passage, however, word is better interpreted as meaning a relation, not only to the Father, but also to those things which are made by His power ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (DV 4.5sc).,
46:The harmony of the inner and outer man which is the true meaning of civilisation and the efficient condition of a true progress. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Renaissance in India, "Is India Civilised?" - I,
47:To philosophize means… to concentrate our gaze upon the totality of encountered phenomena and methodically to investigate the coherency of them all and the ultimate meaning of the Whole.... ~ Josef Pieper, Guide to Thomas Aquinas,
48:with a radish." ~ Kobayashi Issa, (1763 - 1828) Japanese poet and lay Buddhist priest, known for his haiku poems and journals. He is better known as simply Issa, a pen name meaning Cup-of-Tea, Wikipedia.,
49:Expedience is the following of blind impulse. It's short-term gain. It's narrow, and selfish. It lies to get its way. It takes nothing into account. It's immature and irresponsible. Meaning is its mature replacement. ~ Jordan Peterson,
50:We can take birth-pangs as meaning anxiety felt over them, that they should be born in Christ; or again, that he is suffering because he sees them surrounded by dangers. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
51:A radical and total change of consciousness is not only the whole meaning but, in an increasing force and by progressive stages, the whole method of the integral Yoga.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga,
52:Philosophy comprehends the apparent manifold of things and the single truth of their meaning.... There is a coincidence in philosophy and only in philosophy of the understanding of all human things with the human good. ~ Seth Bernadette,
53:we have to bring a wider meaning into our human life and manifest in it the much more that we secretly are. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, The Integral Knowledge and the Aim of Life; Four Theories of Existence,
54:The cosmos is no accident in Time;
There is a meaning in each play of Chance,
There is a freedom in each face of Fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
55:It is other life, it is love, which gives your life meaning…We must discover the joy of each other, the joy of challenge, the joy of growth." ~ Mitsugi Saotome, (b. 1937) a Japanese aikido instructor currently living in the United States, Wikipedia.,
56:An idea,
Each deemed Truth's intimate fount and summit force,
The heart of the meaning of the universe,
Perfection's key, passport to Paradise. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Heavens of the Ideal,
57:Both states of consciousness, sleep and the waking state, are equally subjective. Only by beginning to remember himself does a man really awaken. And then all surrounding life acquires for him a different aspect and a different meaning. ~ Peter Ouspensky,
58:The soul is a teleological structure [in and for itself]... It is the soul that makes the thing the center of its own environment, creating meaning in other things relative to itself. If something is hungry, it has a soul. ~ Robert Spaemann, Persons (156),
59:Be not forgetful of prayer. Every time you pray, if your prayer is sincere, there will be new feeling and new meaning in it, which will give you fresh courage, and you will understand that prayer is an education. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov,
60:The name 'Emmanuel,' meaning 'God with us,' refers to the cause of salvation, which is the union of the Divine and human natures in the Person of the Son of God, whereby 'God is with us' ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 3.37.2ad1).,
61:Gregory the Great (sixth century), summarizing the Christian contemplative tradition, expressed it as "resting in God." This was the classical meaning of Contemplative Prayer in the Christian tradition for the first sixteen centuries. ~ Thomas Keating, On Prayer,
62:Flying out from the Great Buddha's nose: a swallow." ~ Kobayashi Issa, (1763 - 1828) Japanese poet and lay Buddhist priest, known for his haiku poems and journals, better known as simply Issa, a pen name meaning Cup-of-tea, Wikipedia.,
63:If a man gathers his whole, mind and fixes it on Me, then, indeed, he achieves everything. "But what am I? It is all He. I am the machine and He is its Operator. It is God alone who exists in this [meaning his body]. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
64:To live is to suffer, to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering." ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, (1844 - 1900) German philosopher, cultural critic, composer, poet, philologist, whose work has exerted a profound influence on modern intellectual history, Wikipedia.,
65:For us, philosophy has become something like an intellectual exercise; for the Greeks it was not an external decoration of life but the inner beauty of the latter and an elucidation of it psychophysical and social structure. ~ Pavel Florensky, The Meaning of Idealism,
66:When you want to realise something, you make quite spontaneously the necessary effort; this concentrates your energies on the thing to be realised and that gives a meaning to your life. 13 Jan 1951 ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951,
67:It is only a lazy and worldly person or one who is ignorant or uneducated who will rest content with the literal and superficial sense and refuse to penetrate the deeper meaning ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, The City of God, 20.21).,
68:Life's meaning
A mighty life-self with its inner powers
Supports the dwarfish modicum we call life;
It can graft upon our crawl two puissant wings. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
69:This environmental milieu…does not consist just of things, objects, which are then conceived as meaning this and this; rather, the meaningful is primary and immediately given to me without any mental detours across thing-oriented apprehension. ~ Martin Heidegger, TDP p. 61,
70:This growth of the conscious being, an expansion, an increasing self-expression, a more and more harmonised development of his constituent members is the whole meaning and all the pith of human existence.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga,
71:Remember that there is meaning beyond absurdity. Know that every deed counts, that every word is power...Above all, remember that you must build your life as if it were a work of art." ~ Abraham Joshua Heschel, (1907-1972) a Polish-born American rabbi and mystic. Wikipedia.,
72:A purpose mingled with the whims of Time,
A meaning met the stumbling pace of Chance
And Fate revealed a chain of seeing Will ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Yoga of the King, The Yoga of the Spirit's Freedom and Greatness,
73:In northwest India the bride holds a knife in her hand at the time of marriage. The meaning is that the bridegroom, with the help of the bride, who is the embodiment of the divine Power, will sever the bondage of illusion." ~ Ramakrishna, (1836-1886), Hindu mystic, Wikipedia.,
74:Why do we exist at all?…If there is a meaning or significance to it all [i.e human life], where do we find it? When we come to doubt the meaning of our existence in this way, when we have become a question to ourselves, the religious quest awakens within us. ~ Keiji Nishitani,
75:One cannot understand the meaning of the scriptures without practicing spiritual discipline. What is the use of merely repeating, 'There is butter in the milk'? Turn the milk into curd and churn it. Only then will you get butter. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
76:The music born in Matter's silences
Plucked nude out of the Ineffable's fathomlessness
The meaning it had held but could not voice. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Yoga of the King, The Yoga of the Spirit's Freedom and Greatness,
77:An improvisation :::
For hours, since I sat facing you, you have stayed mute.
Your meaning, ampler than words, addresses itself to me.
Cases removed, books lie open, scattered by the bedside.
Beyond the bamboo screen, a shower falls on a plum tree. ~ Taigu Ryokan,
78:For me, reason is the natural organ of truth; but imagination is the organ of meaning. Imagination, producing new metaphors or revivifying old, is not the cause of truth, but its condition. ~ C S Lewis, "Bluspels and Flalansferes: A Semantic Nightmare", Rehabilitations and Other Essays (1939),
79:Mortals, your end is beatitude, rapture eternal his meaning:
Joy, which he most now denies, is his purpose: the hedges, the screening
Were but the rules of his play; his denials came to lure farther. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems, Ahana,
80:Only for you, children of doctrine and learning, have we written this work. Examine this book, ponder the meaning we have dispersed in various places and gathered again; what we have concealed in one place we have disclosed in another, that it may be understood by your wisdom. ~ Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa,
81:A man who becomes conscious of the responsibility he bears toward a human being who affectionately waits for him, or to an unfinished work, will never be able to throw away his life. He knows the 'why' for his existence, and will be able to bear almost any 'how'.
   ~ Viktor Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning,
82:This world was not built with random bricks of Chance,
A blind god is not destiny's architect;
A conscious power has drawn the plan of life,
There is a meaning in each curve and line. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
83:Because the Son receives from the Father that the Holy Spirit proceeds from Him, it can be said that the Father spirates the Holy Spirit through the Son, or that the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father through the Son, which has the same meaning ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ST 1.36.3).,
84:Augoeides is an obscure term meaning luminous body and thought to refer to the planets. Aleister Crowley considered the term to refer to the Holy Guardian Angel of Abramelin; the Atman of Hinduism the Daemon of the ancient Greeks. Robert Lomas associates the term with the Higher Self or soul of the individual
   ~ Wikipedia,
85:Weight of the event and its surface we bear, but the meaning is hidden.
Earth sees not; life's clamour deafens the ear of the spirit:
Man knows not; least knows the messenger chosen for the summons.
Only he listens to the voice of his thoughts, his ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry, Ilion,
86:The existing scientific concepts cover always only a very limited part of reality, and the other part that has not yet been understood is infinite. Whenever we proceed from the known into the unknown we may hope to understand, but we may have to learn at the same time a new meaning of the word 'understanding'.
   ~ Werner Heisenberg,
87:Beyond a given point man is not helped by more "knowing," but only by living and doing in a partly self-forgetful way. As Goethe put it, we must plunge into experience and then reflect on the meaning of it. All reflection and no plunging drives us mad; all plunging and no reflection, and we are brutes. ~ Ernest Becker, The Denial of Death,
88:It is the origin and the master-clue,
A Silence overhead, an inner Voice,
A living image seated in the heart,
An unwalled wideness and a fathomless point,
The truth of all these cryptic shows in space,
The Real towards which our strivings move,
The secret grandiose meaning of our lives. ||10.26|| ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, 1:3, 10.26,
89:Since this name "God" ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Deus), is apparently derived from the Greek name Theos, which comes from theasthai, meaning to see or to consider, the very name of God makes it clear that He is intelligent and consequently that He wills ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (CT 1.35).,
90:Overpassing lines that please the outward eyes
But hide the sight of that which lives within
Sculpture and painting concentrated sense
Upon an inner vision's motionless verge,
Revealed a figure of the invisible,
Unveiled all Nature's meaning in ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Growth of the Flame,
91:A DEVOTEE: "Sir, how can one see God?"
MASTER: "Can you ever see God if you do not direct your whole mind toward Him? The Bhagavata speaks about Sukadeva. When he walked about he looked like a soldier with fixed bayonet. His gaze did not wander; it had only one goal and that was God. This is the meaning of yoga. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
92:It is terrible to see how a single unclear idea, a single formula without meaning, lurking in a young man's head, will sometimes act like an obstruction of inert matter in an artery, hindering the nutrition of the brain, and condemning its victim to pine away in the fullness of his intellectual vigor and in the midst of intellectual plenty. (402) ~ Charles S Peirce,
93:What is the true meaning of tapasya?
Tapasya is the discipline one imposes upon oneself to arrive at the discovery of the Divine.

Are tapasya and aspiration the same thing?
No, you cant do tapasya without aspiration. Aspiration is first, the will to attain something. Tapasya is the process there is indeed a process, a method. ~ The Mother, 1950-1951
94:The real meaning of persona is a mask, such as actors were accustomed to wear on the ancient stage; and it is quite true that no one shows himself as he is, but wears his mask and plays his part. Indeed, the whole of our social arrangements may be likened to a perpetual comedy; and this is why a man who is worth anything finds society so insipid, while a blockhead is quite at home in it. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, Essays Vol 4,
95:A cry came of the world's delight to be,
   The grandeur and greatness of its will to live,
   Recall of the soul's adventure into space,
   A traveller through the magic centuries
   And being's labour in Matter's universe,
   Its search for the mystic meaning of its birth
   And joy of high spiritual response,
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Yoga of the King The Yoga of the Souls Release,
96:The Divine Grace and Power can do anything, but with the full assent of the sadhak.
   To learn to give the full assent, is the whole meaning of the sadhana. It may take time either because of ideas in the mind, desires in the vital or inertia in the physical consciousness, but these things have to be and can be removed with the aid or by calling in the action of the Divine Force.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II, [T9],
97:There is a meaning in each curve and line.
It is an architecture high and grand
By many named and nameless masons built
In which unseeing hands obey the Unseen, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain
Meaning of this World
Our means must be as great as our ends. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga, The Ideal of the Karmayogin,
98:One of the things that struck me as near miraculous about music, especially in a rather nihilistic and atheistic society, is that it really does fill the void which was left by the death of God. And it's because you cannot rationally critique music. It speaks to you, it speaks of meaning, and no matter what you say about it, no matter how cynical you are, you cannot put a crowbar underneath that and toss it aside. ~ Jordan Peterson, Drinking from the firehose with Howard Bloom,
99:Religion is the vision of something which stands beyond, behind, and within, the passing flux of immediate things; something which is real, and yet waiting to be realised; something which is a remote possibility, and yet the greatest of present facts; something that gives meaning to all that passes, and yet eludes apprehension; something whose possession is the final good, and yet is beyond all reach; something which is the ultimate ideal, and the hopeless quest. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
100:Would you please explain to me how doing Yoga brings you near to the Divine? And what is the real meaning of Yoga? Is it only contortive body-exercises or is there a yoga of the mind also?

   This has nothing to do with a spiritual life, not even with religion. X will explain to you in detail, but I can tell you that Yoga is not only an aspiration of the mind towards the Divine but also and chiefly a yearning of the heart.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
101:The Dzogchen of the basis is to determine the nature of the mind.
The Dzogchen of the path is to strike the target of freedom from the extremes.
The Dzogchen of the result is to send hopes and doubts into extinction.
The Dzogchen of the object is to let appearances go free by not grasping at them.
The Dzogchen of the mind is to let thoughts arise as friends.
The Dzogchen of the meaning is to let flickering thoughts dissolve naturally.
Whoever realizes these points is a great king of yogis. ~ Longchenpa,
102:What is the good of words if they aren't important enough to quarrel over? Why do we choose one word more than another if there isn't any difference between them? If you called a woman a chimpanzee instead of an angel, wouldn't there be a quarrel about a word? If you're not going to argue about words, what are you going to argue about? Are you going to convey your meaning to me by moving your ears? The Church and the heresies always used to fight about words, because they are the only thing worth fighting about. ~ G K Chesterton,
103:Ordinary life does not interest me. I seek only the high moments. I am in accord with the surrealists, searching for the marvelous. I want to be a writer who reminds others that these moments exist; I want to prove that there is infinite space, infinite meaning, infinite dimension. But I am not always in what I call a state of grace. I have days of illuminations and fevers. I have days when the music in my head stops. Then I mend socks, prune trees, can fruits, polish furniture. But while I am doing this I feel I am not living. ~ Anaïs Nin,
104:In Japanese language, kata (though written as 方) is a frequently-used suffix meaning way of doing, with emphasis on the form and order of the process. Other meanings are training method and formal exercise. The goal of a painter's practicing, for example, is to merge his consciousness with his brush; the potter's with his clay; the garden designer's with the materials of the garden. Once such mastery is achieved, the theory goes, the doing of a thing perfectly is as easy as thinking it
   ~ Boye De Mente, Japan's Secret Weapon - The Kata Factor,
105:Mr. Venkatakrishnayya, a lawyer-devotee, visited Sri Bhagavan ten years before and asked Him what he should do to improve himself.

Sri Bhagavan told him to perform Gayatri Japa. The young man went away satisfied. When he returned after some years, he asked:
D.: If I meditate on the meaning of the Gayatri mantra, my mind again wanders. What is to be done?
M.: Were you told to meditate on the mantra or its meaning? You must think of the one who repeats the mantra. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks, 606,
106:You are not entering this world in the usual manner, for you are setting forth to be a Dungeon Master. Certainly there are stout fighters, mighty magic-users, wily thieves, and courageous clerics who will make their mark in the magical lands of D&D adventure. You however, are above even the greatest of these, for as DM you are to become the Shaper of the Cosmos. It is you who will give form and content to the all the universe. You will breathe life into the stillness, giving meaning and purpose to all the actions which are to follow. ~ Gary Gygax,
107:Tell me, enigmatical man, whom do you love best, your father,
Your mother, your sister, or your brother?
I have neither father, nor mother, nor sister, nor brother.
Your friends?
Now you use a word whose meaning I have never known.
Your country?
I do not know in what latitude it lies.
Beauty?
I could indeed love her, Goddess and Immortal.
Gold?
I hate it as you hate God.
Then, what do you love, extraordinary stranger?
I love the clouds the clouds that pass up there
Up there the wonderful clouds!
   ~ Charles Baudelaire,
108:To take symbolism seriously is to accept the 'analogy of being' between different levels of reality... More than the sum of its parts, the figure is the appearing-to-us of an infinite depth that cannot be fully revealed in time. Every symbol is a kind of gestalt, in which a universal meaning can be glimpsed. Eventually, every created thing can be seen as a manifestation of its own interior essence, and the world is transformed into a radiant book to be read with eyes sensitive to spiritual light. ~ Stratford Caldecott, Beauty for Truth's Sake: On the Re-enchantment of Education,
109:The falsification of everything has been shown to be one of the characteristic features of our period, but falsification is not in itself subversion properly so-called, though contributing directly to the preparation for it. Perhaps the clearest indication of this is what may be called the falsification of language, taking the form of the misuse of certain words that have been diverted from their true meaning; misuse of this kind is to some extent imposed by constant suggestion on the part of everyone who exercises any kind of influence over the mentality of the public. ~ Rene Guenon,
110:I don't know whether this world has a meaning that transcends it. But I know that I cannot know that meaning and that it is impossible for me just now to know it. What can a meaning outside my condition mean to me? I can understand only in human terms. What I touch, what resists me ~ that I understand. And these two certainties ~ my appetite for the absolute and for unity and the impossibility of reducing this world to a rational and reasonable principle ~ I also know that I cannot reconcile them. What other truth can I admit without lying, without bringing in a hope I lack and which means nothing within the limits of my conditions?,
111:What Brahman is cannot be described in words. Somebody once said that everything in the world has been made impure, like food that has touched the tongue, and that Brahman alone remains undefiled. The meaning is this: All scriptures and holy books — the Vedas, the Puranas, the Tantras, and so forth — may be said to have been defiled because their contents have been uttered by the tongues of men; but what Brahman is no tongue has yet been able to describe. Therefore Brahman is still undefiled. One cannot describe in words the joy of play and communion with Satchidananda. He alone knows, who has realized it. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
112:So one of the things I do when a client comes is I just do a rough walk through of those dimensions its like does anybody care if youre alive or dead, you know, do you have any friends, do you have anybody that loves you, do you have an intimate relationship, how are things going with your family, do you have a job, are you as educated as you are intelligent, do you have any room for advancement in the future, do you do anything interesting outside of your job and if the answer to all of those is no.. its like your not depressed my friend you just are screwed. really. ~ Jordan Peterson, 015 Maps of Meaning 4: Narrative, Neuropsychology & Mythology II / Part 1,
113:Indeed, some of the problems commonly engaging the attention of philosophical thought appear to be deprived, not only of all importance, but of any meaning as well; a host of problems arise resting solely upon some ambiguity or upon a confusion of points of view, problems that only exist in fact because they are badly expressed, and that normally should not arise at all. In most cases therefore, it would in itself be sufficient to set these problems forth correctly in order to cause them to disappear, were it not that philosophy has an interest in keeping them alive, since it thrives largely upon ambiguities. ~ Rene Guenon, Introduction to the Study of the Hindu Doctrines,
114:Working of Magick Art the changed aspect of the world whose culmination is the keeping of the oath "I will interpret every phenomenon as a particular dealing of God with my soul" was present with me. This aspect is difficult to describe; one is indifferent to everything and yet interested in it. The meaning of things is lost, pending the inception of their Spiritual Meaning; just as, on putting one's eye to the microscope, the drop of water on the slide is gone, and a world of life discovered, though the real import of that world is not apprehended, until one's knowledge becomes far greater than a single glance can make it. ~ Aleister Crowley,
115:The Kingdom is most powerful where we least expect to find it. God does not take away our problems and trials but rather joins us in them. Such is the profound meaning of the incarnation: God becoming a human being. The Kingdom will manifest itself, not because of our efforts to keep trying, even when all effort seems hopeless, but because God loves us so much that God won't be able to stand seeing us struggle and always failing. God will do the impossible. He will give us a new attitude toward suffering. Such is the heart of the Christian ascesis, or self-discipline, and the mystery of transformation. It is the meaning of the Gospel as Therese perceived it. ~ Thomas Keating, St. Therese of Lisieux: A Transformation in Christ,
116:Krishna:::
At last I find a meaning of soul's birth
Into this universe terrible and sweet,
I who have felt the hungry heart of earth
Aspiring beyond heaven to Krishna's feet.

I have seen the beauty of immortal eyes,
And heard the passion of the Lover's flute,
And known a deathless ecstasy's surprise
And sorrow in my heart for ever mute.

Nearer and nearer now the music draws,
Life shudders with a strange felicity;
All Nature is a wide enamoured pause
Hoping her lord to touch, to clasp, to be.

For this one moment lived the ages past;
The world now throbs fulfilled in me at last. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems,
117:Theres another class of people and I would say this is one of the pathologies of being creative so if your a high open person and you have all those things its not going to be enough. you are going to have to pick another domain where you are working on something positive and revolutiony because like the creative impulse for someone who is open we know it is a fundamental personallity dimension, ... and if the ones who are high in openness arent doing something creative they are like dead sticks adn cant live properly. And I think those are the people who benefit particularly from depth psychological approaches, especially Jungian approaches. ~ Jordan Peterson, 015 Maps of Meaning 4: Narrative, Neuropsychology & Mythology II / Part 1,
118:Jordan Peterson's Book List
1. Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
2. 1984 - George Orwell
3. Road To Wigan Pier - George Orwell
4. Crime And Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky
5. Demons - Fyodor Dostoevsky
6. Beyond Good And Evil - Friedrich Nietzsche
7. Ordinary Men - Christopher Browning
8. The Painted Bird - Jerzy Kosinski
9. The Rape of Nanking - Iris Chang
10. Gulag Archipelago (Vol. 1, Vol. 2, & Vol. 3) - Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
11. Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl
12. Modern Man in Search of A Soul - Carl Jung
13. Maps Of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief - Jordan B. Peterson
14. A History of Religious Ideas (Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3) - Mircea Eliade
15. Affective Neuroscience - Jaak Panksepp ~ Jordan Peterson,
119:The other day I told you the meaning of bhakti. It is to adore God with body, mind, and words. 'With body' means to serve and worship God with one's hands, go to holy places with one's feet, hear the chanting of the name and glories of God with one's ears, and behold the divine image with one's eyes. 'With mind' means to contemplate and meditate on God constantly and to remember and think of His lila. 'With words' means to sing hymns to Him and chant His name and glories.
Devotion as described by Narada is suited to the Kaliyuga. It means to chant constantly the name and glories of God. Let those who have no leisure worship God at least morning and evening by whole-heartedly chanting His name and clapping their hands. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
120:The human soul's individual liberation and enjoyment of union with the Divine in spiritual being, consciousness and delight must always be the first object of the Yoga; its free enjoyment of the cosmic unity of the Divine becomes a second object; but out of that a third appears, the effectuation of the meaning of the divine unity with all beings by a sympathy and participation in the spiritual purpose of the Divine in humanity. The individual Yoga then turns from its separateness and becomes a part of the collective Yoga of the divine Nature in the human race. The liberated individual being, united with the Divine in self and spirit, becomes in his natural being a self-perfecting instrument for the perfect outflowering of the Divine in humanity.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo,
121:so you distill these stories great authors distill stories and we have soties that are very very very old they are usually religious stories they could be fairy tales because some people ahve traced fairy tales back 10 000 years ... a story that has been told for 10000 years is a funny kind of story its like people have remembered it and obviously modified it, like a game of telephone that has gone on for generations and all that is left is what people remember and maybe they remember whats important, because you tend to remember what's important and its not necessarily the case that you know what the hell it means ... and you dont genereally know what a book that you read means not if its profound it means more than you can understand because otherwise why read it? ~ Jordan Peterson, Maps of Meaning 2017 - 1,
122:So, it is a basic function of education to help you to find out what you really love to do, so that you can give your whole mind and heart to it, because that creates human dignity, that sweeps away mediocrity, the petty bourgeois mentality. That is why it is very important to have the right teachers, the right atmosphere, so that you will grow up with the love which expresses itself in what you are doing. Without this love your examinations, your knowledge, your capacities, your position and possessions are just ashes, they have no meaning; without this love your actions are going to bring more wars, more hatred, more mischief and destruction. All this may mean nothing to you, because outwardly you are still very young, but I hope it will mean something to your teachers-and also to you, somewhere inside. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
123:Seek ye first the kingdom of Heaven and its righteousness, and all other things shall be added unto you." The alchemist, therefore is assured that if he achieved the inner mystery, the fulfillment of the outer part will be inevitable. But practically every charlatan in alchemy has determined primarily to achieve the physical purpose first. His primary interest has been to make gold, or perhaps one of the other aspects of it, such as a medicine against illness. He has wanted the physical effect first but because the physical effect was not intended to be first, when he starts to study and explore the various texts, he comes upon a dilemma, HIS OWN INTERNAL RESOURCES CANNOT DISCOVER THE CORRECT INSTRUCTIONS. The words may be there but the meaning eludes him because the meaning is not part of his own present spiritual integrity. ~ Manly P Hall,
124:When the resolution has been taken, when you have decided that the whole of your life shall be given to the Divine, you have still at every moment to remember it and carry it out in all the details of your existence. You must feel at every step that you belong to the Divine; you must have the constant experience that, in whatever you think or do, it is always the Divine Consciousness that is acting through you. You have no longer anything that you can call your own; you feel everything as coming from the Divine, and you have to offer it back to its source. When you can realise that, then even the smallest thing to which you do not usually pay much attention or care, ceases to be trivial and insignificant; it becomes full of meaning and it opens up a vast horizon beyond."
Questions and Answers 1929 (28 April)
~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953,
125:Then the matter is as we have confirmed. So know that you are imagination and that which you perceive and of which you say, "It is not me" is also imagination. All of existence is imagination within imagination. True existence is Allah, the Real, in particular in respect to essence and source, not in respect to His Names, because the Names have two meanings. One meaning is His source which is the same as the "Named", and the other meaning is what it indicates and that by which the Name is separate from this other Name, and so distinct. The Ever-Forgiving is separate from the Manifest and the Hidden, and the First is distinct from the Last. Thus it is clear to you that each Name is the same as the other Name, and yet it is not the other Name. Inasmuch as the Name is the same, it is the Real, and inasmuch as it is not it, it is the imaginary Real which we discussed. ~ Ibn Arabi,
126: The purpose of creation, is lila. The concept of lila escapes all the traditional difficulties in assigning purpose to the creator. Lila is a purpose-less purpose, a natural outflow, a spontaneous self-manifestation of the Divine. The concept of lila, again, emphasizes the role of delight in creation. The concept of Prakriti and Maya fail to explain the bliss aspect of Divine. If the world is manifestation of the Force of Satcitananda, the deployment of its existence and consciousness, its purpose can be nothing but delight. This is the meaning of delight. Lila, the play, the child's joy, the poet's joy, the actor's joy, the mechanician's joy of the soul of things eternally young, perpetually inexhaustible, creating and recreating Himself in Himself for the sheer bliss of that self-creation, of that self-representation, Himself the play, Himself the player, Himself the playground ~ Sri Aurobindo, Philosophy of Social Development, pp-39-40
127:DISCIPLE: It is said that the psychic is a spark of the Divine.
SRI AUROBINDO: Yes.
DISCIPLE: Then it seems that the function of the psychic being is the same as that of Vedic Agni, who is the leader of the journey?
SRI AUROBINDO: Yes. Agni is the God of the Psychic and, among the other things it does, it leads the upward journey.
DISCIPLE: How does the psychic carry the personalities formed in this life into another life?
SRI AUROBINDO: After death, it gathers its elements and carries them onward to another birth. But it is not the same personality that is born. People easily misunderstand these things, specially when they are put in terms of the mind. The past personality is taken only as the basis but a new personality is put forward. If it was the same personality, then it would act exactly in the same manner and there would be no meaning in that. ~ Sri Aurobindo, EVENING TALKS WITH SRI AUROBINDO, RECORDED BY A B PURANI (page no 665-666),
128:The fourth condition is study. One must cultivate the mind, know what others have thought, open the mental being to this impact of the higher vibrations of knowledge. A mental knowledge is not tantamount to realization, it is true, but still one must know mentally where one is going, what has happened to others, how they have achieved, what are the hindrances and the helping points. This education of oneself by study, study of spiritual writings, suddhydya as it is called, a disciplined reading and incorporation of the knowledge contained in scriptures and authentic texts - that is a very important part. Even when you don't understand a text, still if you persist at it, the force that is in that book creates certain new grooves in your brain and the second or the third time when you read it, it begins to make some meaning. This is the meaning of studying, of exposing your mind to the constant vibrations of higher levels of knowledge. Incidentally, the mind gets developed, a mental climate is created, a climate of spiritual culture.
   ~ M P Pandit, The Advent 1981, 30,
129:Abrahadabra is a word that first publicly appeared in The Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema . Its author, Aleister Crowley, described it as the Word of the Aeon, which signifieth The Great Work accomplished. This is in reference to his belief that the writing of Liber Legis (another name for The Book of the Law) heralded a new Aeon for mankind that was ruled by the godRa-Hoor-Khuit (a form of Horus). Abrahadabra is, therefore, the magical formula of this new age. It is not to be confused with the Word of the Law of the Aeon, which is Thelema, meaning Will. ... Abrahadabra is also referred to as the Word of Double Power. More specifically, it represents the uniting of the Microcosm with the Macrocosm
   represented by the pentagram and the hexagram, the rose and the cross, the circle and the square, the 5 and the 6 (etc.), as also called the attainment of the Knowledge and Conversation of ones Holy Guardian Angel. In Commentaries (1996), Crowley says that the word is a symbol of the establishment of the pillar or phallus of the Macrocosm...in the void of the Microcosm.
   ~ Wikipedia,
130:[invocation] Let us describe the magical method of identification. The symbolic form of the god is first studied with as much care as an artist would bestow upon his model, so that a perfectly clear and unshakeable mental picture of the god is presented to the mind. Similarly, the attributes of the god are enshrined in speech, and such speeches are committed perfectly to memory. The invocation will then begin with a prayer to the god, commemorating his physical attributes, always with profound understanding of their real meaning. In the second part of the invocation, the voice of the god is heard, and His characteristic utterance is recited. In the third portion of the invocation the Magician asserts the identity of himself with the god. In the fourth portion the god is again invoked, but as if by Himself, as if it were the utterance of the will of the god that He should manifest in the Magician. At the conclusion of this, the original object of the invocation is stated.
   ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA, Book 4, Magick, Part 3, The Formuale of the Elemental Weapons [149] [T4],
131:This concentration proceeds by the Idea, using thought, form and name as keys which yield up to the concentrating mind the Truth that lies concealed behind all thought, form and name; for it is through the Idea that the mental being rises beyond all expression to that which is expressed, to that of which the Idea itself is only the instrument. By concentration upon the Idea the mental existence which at present we are breaks open the barrier of our mentality and arrives at the state of consciousness, the state of being, the state of power of conscious-being and bliss of conscious-being to which the Idea corresponds and of which it is the symbol, movement and rhythm. Concentration by the Idea is, then, only a means, a key to open to us the superconscient planes of our existence; a certain self-gathered state of our whole existence lifted into that superconscient truth, unity and infinity of self-aware, self-blissful existence is the aim and culmination; and that is the meaning we shall give to the term Samadhi.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Integral Knowledge, Concentration [321],
132:THE PROGRESSIVE revelation of a great, a transcendent, a luminous Reality with the multitudinous relativities of this world that we see and those other worlds that we do not see as means and material, condition and field, this would seem then to be the meaning of the universe, - since meaning and aim it has and is neither a purposeless illusion nor a fortuitous accident.

   For the same reasoning which leads us to conclude that world-existence is not a deceptive trick of Mind, justifies equally the certainty that it is no blindly and helplessly self-existent mass of separate phenomenal existences clinging together and struggling together as best they can in their orbit through eternity, no tremendous self-creation and self-impulsion of an ignorant Force without any secret Intelligence within aware of its starting-point and its goal and guiding its process and its motion.

   An existence, wholly self-aware and therefore entirely master of itself, possesses the phenomenal being in which it is involved, realises itself in form, unfolds itself in the individual. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.6-1,
133:The Profound Definitive Meaning :::
For the mind that masters view the emptiness dawns
In the content seen not even an atom exists
A seer and seen refined until they're gone
This way of realizing view, it works quite well

When meditation is clear light river flow
There is no need to confine it to sessions and breaks
Meditator and object refined until they're gone
This heart bone of meditation, it beats quite well

When you're sure that conducts work is luminous light
And you're sure that interdependence is emptiness
A doer and deed refined until they're gone
This way of working with conduct, it works quite well

When biased thinking has vanished into space
No phony facades, eight dharmas, nor hopes and fears,
A keeper and kept refined until they're gone
This way of keeping samaya, it works quite well

When you've finally discovered your mind is dharmakaya
And you're really doing yourself and others good
A winner and won refined until they're gone
This way of winning results, it works quite well. ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
134:witness and non-dual states ::: The Witness and Non-Dual states are everpresent capacities which hold the special relationship to the other states. The Witness state, or Witnessing, is the capacity to observe, see or witness phenomenon arising in the other states. Meaning for example, its the capacity to hold unbroken attention in the gross states, and the capacity to witness the entire relative world of form arise as object viewed by the pure witness, the pure subject that is never itself a seen object but always the pure seer or pure Self, that is actually no-self. Next we have Non-Dual which refers to both the suchness and is-ness of reality right now. It is the not-two-ness or everpresent unity of subject and object, form and emptiness, heaven and earth, relative and absolute. When the Witness dissolves and pure seer and all that is seen become not seperate or not two, the Non-Duality of absolute emptiness and relative form or the luminous identity of unqualifiable spirit and all of its manifestations appear as play of radiant natural and spontaneous and present love. Absolute and relative are already always not-two but nor are they one, nor both nor neither. ~ Essential Integral, L5-18,
135:The Apsaras are the most beautiful and romantic conception on the lesser plane of Hindu mythology. From the moment that they arose out of the waters of the milky Ocean, robed in ethereal raiment and heavenly adornment, waking melody from a million lyres, the beauty and light of them has transformed the world. They crowd in the sunbeams, they flash and gleam over heaven in the lightnings, they make the azure beauty of the sky; they are the light of sunrise and sunset and the haunting voices of forest and field. They dwell too in the life of the soul; for they are the ideal pursued by the poet through his lines, by the artist shaping his soul on his canvas, by the sculptor seeking a form in the marble; for the joy of their embrace the hero flings his life into the rushing torrent of battle; the sage, musing upon God, sees the shining of their limbs and falls from his white ideal. The delight of life, the beauty of things, the attraction of sensuous beauty, this is what the mystic and romantic side of the Hindu temperament strove to express in the Apsara. The original meaning is everywhere felt as a shining background, but most in the older allegories, especially the strange and romantic legend of Pururavas as we first have it in the Brahmanas and the Vishnoupurana. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
136:All advance in thought is made by collecting the greatest possible number of facts, classifying them, and grouping them.
   The philologist, though perhaps he only speaks one language, has a much higher type of mind than the linguist who speaks twenty.
   This Tree of Thought is exactly paralleled by the tree of nervous structure.
   Very many people go about nowadays who are exceedingly "well-informed," but who have not the slightest idea of the meaning of the facts they know. They have not developed the necessary higher part of the brain. Induction is impossible to them.
   This capacity for storing away facts is compatible with actual imbecility. Some imbeciles have been able to store their memories with more knowledge than perhaps any sane man could hope to acquire.
   This is the great fault of modern education - a child is stuffed with facts, and no attempt is made to explain their connection and bearing. The result is that even the facts themselves are soon forgotten.
   Any first-rate mind is insulted and irritated by such treatment, and any first-rate memory is in danger of being spoilt by it.
   No two ideas have any real meaning until they are harmonized in a third, and the operation is only perfect when these ideas are contradictory. This is the essence of the Hegelian logic.
   ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA, Book 4, The Cup,
137:John Ruskin did not go to school. Nor did Queen Victoria, nor John Stuart Mill, George Eliot or Harriet Martineau. It would be absurd to suggest that Disraeli, Dickens, Newman or Darwin, to name four very different figures, who attended various schools for short spells in their boyhood, owed very much to their schooling. Had they been born in a later generation, school would have loomed much larger in their psychological stories, if only because they would have spent so much longer there, and found themselves preparing for public examinations. It is hard not to feel that a strong 'syllabus', or a school ethos, might have cramped the style of all four and that in their different ways - Disraeli, comparatively rich, anarchically foppish, indiscriminately bookish; Darwin, considered a dunce, but clearly - as he excitedly learned to shoot, to fish and to bird-watch - beginning his revolutionary relationship with the natural world; Newman, imagining himself an angel; Dickens, escaping the ignominy of his circumstances through theatrical and comedic internalized role-play - they were lucky to have been born before the Age of Control. For the well-meaning educational reforms of the 1860s were the ultimate extension of those Benthamite exercises in control which had begun in the 1820s and 1830s. Having exercised their sway over the poor, the criminals, the agricultural and industrial classes, the civil service and - this was next - the military, the controllers had turned to the last free spirits left, the last potential anarchists: the children. ~ A N Wilson,
138:...that personality, like consciousness, life, soul is not a brief-lived stranger in an impersonal Eternity, but contains the very meaning of existence. This fine flower of the cosmic Energy carries in it a forecast of the aim and a hint of the very motive of the universal labour. As an occult vision opens in him, he becomes aware of worlds behind in which consciousness and personality hold an enormous place and assume a premier value; even here in the material world to this occult vision the inconscience of Matter fills with a secret pervading consciousness, its inanimation harbours a vibrant life, its mechanism is the device of an indwelling Intelligence, God and soul are everywhere. Above all stands an infinite conscious Being who is variously self-expressed in all these worlds; impersonality is only a first means of that expression. It is a field of principles and forces, an equal basis of manifestation; but these forces express themselves through beings, have conscious spirits at their head and are the emanation of a One Conscious Being who is their sorce. A multiple innumberable personality expressing that One is the very sense and central aim of the manifestation and if now personality seems to be narrow, fragmentary, restrictive, it is only because it has not opened to its source or flowered into its own divine truth and fullness packing itself with the universal and the infinite. Thus the world-creation is no more an illusion, a fortuitous mechanism, a play that need not have happened, a flux without consequence; it is an intimate dynamism of the conscious and living Eternal.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Yoga of Divine Works, The Sacrifice and the Lord of the Sacrifice, 127,
139:She"
  
   How shall I welcome not this light
   Or, wakened by it, greet with doubt
   This beam as palpable to sight
   As visible to touch? How not,
   Old as I am and (some say) wise,
   Revive beneath her summer eyes?
  
   How not have all my nights and days,
   My spirit ranging far and wide,
   By recollections of her grace
   Enlightened and preoccupied?
   Preoccupied: the Morning Star
   How near the Sun and yet how far!
  
   Enlightened: true, but more than true,
   Or why must I discover there
   The meaning in this taintless dew,
   The dancing wave, this blessed air
   Enchanting in its morning dress
   And calm as everlastingness?
  
   The flame that in the heart resides
   Is parcel of that central Fire
   Whose energy is winds and tides-
   Is rooted deep in the Desire
   That smilingly unseals its power
   Each summer in each springing flower.
  
   Oh Lady Nature-Proserpine,
   Mistress of Gender, star-crowned Queen!
   Ah Rose of Sharon-Mistress mine,
   My teacher ere I turned fourteen,
   When first I hallowed from afar
   Your Beautyship in avatar!
  
   I sense the hidden thing you say,
   Your subtle whisper how the Word
   From Alpha on to Omega
   Made all things-you confide my Lord
   Himself-all, all this potent Frame,
   All save the riddle of your name.
  
   Wisdom! I heard a voice that said:
   "What riddle? What is that to you?
   How! By my follower betrayed!
   Look up-for shame! Now tell me true:
   Where meet you light, with love and grace?
   Still unacquainted with my face?"
  
   Dear God, the erring heart must live-
   Through strength and weakness, calm and glow-
   That answer Wisdom scorns to give.
   Much have I learned. One problem, though,
   I never shall unlock: Who then,
   Who made Sophia feminine?
   ~ Owen Barfield, 1978,
140:IN OUR scrutiny of the seven principles of existence it was found that they are one in their essential and fundamental reality: for if even the matter of the most material universe is nothing but a status of being of Spirit made an object of sense, envisaged by the Spirit's own consciousness as the stuff of its forms, much more must the life-force that constitutes itself into form of Matter, and the mind-consciousness that throws itself out as Life, and the Supermind that develops Mind as one of its powers, be nothing but Spirit itself modified in apparent substance and in dynamism of action, not modified in real essence. All are powers of one Power of being and not other than that All-Existence, All-Consciousness, All-Will, All-Delight which is the true truth behind every appearance. And they are not only one in their reality, but also inseparable in the sevenfold variety of their action. They are the seven colours of the light of the divine consciousness, the seven rays of the Infinite, and by them the Spirit has filled in on the canvas of his self-existence conceptually extended, woven of the objective warp of Space and the subjective woof of Time, the myriad wonders of his self-creation great, simple, symmetrical in its primal laws and vast framings, infinitely curious and intricate in its variety of forms and actions and the complexities of relation and mutual effect of all upon each and each upon all. These are the seven Words of the ancient sages; by them have been created and in the light of their meaning are worked out and have to be interpreted the developed and developing harmonies of the world we know and the worlds behind of which we have only an indirect knowledge. The Light, the Sound is one; their action is sevenfold.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine, 7 - The Knowledge and the Ignorance, 499,
141:the aim of our yoga :::
   The aim set before our Yoga is nothing less than to hasten this supreme object of our existence here. Its process leaves behind the ordinary tardy method of slow and confused growth through the evolution of Nature. For the natural evolution is at its best an uncertain growth under cover, partly by the pressure of the environment, partly by a groping education and an ill-lighted purposeful effort, an only partially illumined and half-automatic use of opportunities with many blunders and lapses and relapses; a great portion of it is made up of apparent accidents and circumstances and vicissitudes, - though veiling a secret divine intervention and guidance. In Yoga we replace this confused crooked crab-motion by a rapid, conscious and self-directed evolution which is planned to carry us, as far as can be, in a straight line towards the goal set before us. In a certain sense it may be an error to speak of a goal anywhere in a progression which may well be infinite. Still we can conceive of an immediate goal, an ulterior objective beyond our present achievement towards which the soul in man can aspire. There lies before him the possibility of a new birth; there can be an ascent into a higher and wider plane of being and its descent to transform his members. An enlarged and illumined consciousness is possible that shall make of him a liberated spirit and a perfected force - and, if spread beyond the individual, it might even constitute a divine humanity or else a new, a supramental and therefore a superhuman race. It is this new birth that we make our aim: a growth into a divine consciousness is the whole meaning of our Yoga, an integral conversion to divinity not only of the soul but of all the parts of our nature.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, Self-Surrender in Works - The Way of the Gita, 89-90,
142:Song To The Rock Demoness :::
River, ripples, and waves, these three,
When emerging, arise from the ocean itself.
When disappearing, they disappear into the ocean itself.

Habitual thinking, love, and possessiveness, these three,
When arising, arise from the alaya consciousness itself.
When disappearing, they disappear into the alaya consciousness itself.

Self-awareness, self-illumination, self-liberation, these three,
When arising, arise from the mind itself.
When disappearing, they disappear into the mind itself.

The unborn, unceasing, and unexpressed, these three,
When emerging, arise from the nature of being itself.
When disappearing, they disappear into the nature of being itself.

The visions of demons, clinging to demons, and thoughts of demons,
When arising, arise from the Yogin himself.
When disappearing, they disappear into the Yogin himself.

Since demons are the phantoms of the mind,
If it is not understood by the Yogin that they are empty appearances,
And even if he thinks they are real, meditation is confused.

But the root of the delusion is in his own mind.
By observation of the nature of manifestations,
He realizes the identity of manifestation and void,
And by understanding, he knows that the two are not different.

Meditation and not meditation are not two but one,
The cause of all errors is to look upon the two things as different.
From the ultimate point of view, there is no view.

If you make comparison between the nature of the mind
And the nature of the heavens,
Then the true nature of being itself is penetrated.

See, now, that you look into the true meaning which is beyond thought.
Arrange to enter into undisturbed meditation.
And be mindful of the Unceasing Intuitive Sensation! ~ Jetsun Milarepa,
143:This inner Guide is often veiled at first by the very intensity of our personal effort and by the ego's preoccupation with itself and its aims. As we gain in clarity and the turmoil of egoistic effort gives place to a calmer self-knowledge, we recognise the source of the growing light within us. We recognise it retrospectively as we realise how all our obscure and conflicting movements have been determined towards an end that we only now begin to perceive, how even before our entrance into the path of the Yoga the evolution of our life has been designedly led towards its turning point. For now we begin to understand the sense of our struggles and efforts, successes and failures. At last we are able to seize the meaning of our ordeals and sufferings and can appreciate the help that was given us by all that hurt and resisted and the utility of our very falls and stumblings. We recognise this divine leading afterwards, not retrospectively but immediately, in the moulding of our thoughts by a transcendent Seer, of our will and actions by an all-embracing Power, of our emotional life by an all-attracting and all-assimilating Bliss and Love. We recognise it too in a more personal relation that from the first touched us or at the last seizes us; we feel the eternal presence of a supreme Master, Friend, Lover, Teacher. We recognise it in the essence of our being as that develops into likeness and oneness with a greater and wider existence; for we perceive that this miraculous development is not the result of our own efforts; an eternal Perfection is moulding us into its own image. One who is the Lord or Ishwara of the Yogic philosophies, the Guide in the conscious being ( caitya guru or antaryamin ), the Absolute of the thinker, the Unknowable of the Agnostic, the universal Force of the materialist, the supreme Soul and the supreme Shakti, the One who is differently named and imaged by the religions, is the Master of our Yoga.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Four Aids, 62 [T1],
144:I know some individuals who make this their daily practice: starting at the beginning and reading a canto or half a canto every day till they reach the end and then starting at the beginning again, and in that way they have gone through the whole of Savitri many times. When this is done in groups there's really no doubt that by this going through the whole soundbody of the epic from beginning to end aloud, there must be built up a very strong force field of vibrations. It is definitely of benefit to the people who participate in it. But again I would say that the effect or benefit of this sacrifice will be richer to the extent that the reading is done with understanding and above all with soul surrender. It shouldn't become a mere ritual.
Sri Aurobindo's mantric lines, repeated one after the other, will always have their power; but the power will be much greater if the mind can participate, and the will and the heart.
I have also heard of some groups who select one line that seems to have a particular mantric power and then within the group they chant that line many, many times. They concentrate on that one special line, and try to take its vibrations deep into themselves. Again I am sure that this is very beneficial to those who practice it.
In that way the words enter very deeply into the consciousness. There they resonate and do their work, and perhaps not just the surface meaning but the deeper meaning and the deeper vibrations may reveal their full depth to those who undertake this exercise if it is done with self-dedication, with a true aspiration to internalise the heart of the meaning, not just as a mere repetition.
At another end of the spectrum of possible approaches to Savitri, we can say there would be the aesthetic approach, the approach of enjoying it for its poetic beauty. I met a gentleman a couple of months ago, who told me, "We have faith in Sri Aurobindo, but it is so difficult to understand his books. We tried with The Life Divine, we tried with The Synthesis of Yoga but we found them so difficult. ~ collab summer & fall 2011,
145:And therefore, all of those for whom authentic transformation has deeply unseated their souls must, I believe, wrestle with the profound moral obligation to shout form the heart-perhaps quietly and gently, with tears of reluctance; perhaps with fierce fire and angry wisdom; perhaps with slow and careful analysis; perhaps by unshakable public example-but authentically always and absolutely carries a a demand and duty: you must speak out, to the best of your ability, and shake the spiritual tree, and shine your headlights into the eyes of the complacent. You must let that radical realization rumble through your veins and rattle those around you.
   Alas, if you fail to do so, you are betraying your own authenticity. You are hiding your true estate. You don't want to upset others because you don't want to upset your self. You are acting in bad faith, the taste of a bad infinity.
   Because, you see, the alarming fact is that any realization of depth carries a terrible burden: those who are allowed to see are simultaneously saddled with the obligation to communicate that vision in no uncertain terms: that is the bargain. You were allowed to see the truth under the agreement that you would communicate it to others (that is the ultimate meaning of the bodhisattva vow). And therefore, if you have seen, you simply must speak out. Speak out with compassion, or speak out with angry wisdom, or speak out with skillful means, but speak out you must.
   And this is truly a terrible burden, a horrible burden, because in any case there is no room for timidity. The fact that you might be wrong is simply no excuse: You might be right in your communication, and you might be wrong, but that doesn't matter. What does matter, as Kierkegaard so rudely reminded us, is that only by investing and speaking your vision with passion, can the truth, one way or another, finally penetrate the reluctance of the world. If you are right, or if you are wrong, it is only your passion that will force either to be discovered. It is your duty to promote that discovery-either way-and therefore it is your duty to speak your truth with whatever passion and courage you can find in your heart. You must shout, in whatever way you can. ~ Ken Wilber, One Taste,
146:I know perfectly well that pain and suffering and struggle and excesses of despair are natural - though not inevitable - on the way, - not because they are helps, but because they are imposed on us by the darkness of this human nature out of which we have to struggle into the Light. . . .

The dark path is there and there are many who make like the Christians a gospel of spiritual suffering; many hold it to be the unavoidable price of victory. It may be so under certain circumstances, as it has been in so many lives at least at the beginning, or one may choose to make it so. But then the price has to be paid with resignation, fortitude or a tenacious resilience. I admit that if borne in that way the attacks of the Dark Forces or the ordeals they impose have a meaning. After each victory gained over them, there is then a sensible advance; often they seem to show us the difficulties in ourselves which we have to overcome and to say, "Here you must conquer us and here."

But all the same it is a too dark and difficult way which nobody should follow on whom the necessity does not lie.

In any case one thing can never help and that is to despond always and say, "I am unfit; I am not meant for the Yoga." And worse still are these perilous mental formations such as you are always accepting that you must fare like X (one whose difficulty of exaggerated ambition was quite different from yours) and that you have only six years etc. These are clear formations of the Dark Forces seeking not only to sterilise your aspiration but to lead you away and so prevent your sharing in the fruit of the victory hereafter. I do not know what Krishnaprem has said but his injunction, if you have rightly understood it, is one that cannot stand as valid, since so many have done Yoga relying on tapasya or anything else but not confident of any Divine Grace. It is not that, but the soul's demand for a higher Truth or a higher life that is indispensable. Where that is, the Divine Grace whether believed in or not, will intervene. If you believe, that hastens and facilitates things; if you cannot yet believe, still the soul's aspiration will justify itself with whatever difficulty and struggle. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV,
147:What is the ape to a human? A laughing stock or a painful embarrassment. And that is precisely what the human shall be to the overman: a laughing stock or a painful embarrassment.

You have made your way from worm to human, and much in you is still worm. Once you were apes, and even now a human is still more ape than any ape.

But whoever is wisest among you is also just a conflict and a cross between plant and ghost. But do I implore you to become ghosts or plants?

Behold, I teach you the overman!

The overman is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the overman shall be the meaning of the earth!

I beseech you, my brothers, remain faithful to the earth and do not believe those who speak to you of extraterrestrial hopes! They are mixers of poisons whether they know it or not.

They are despisers of life, dying off and self-poisoned, of whom the earth is weary: so let them fade away!

Once the sacrilege against God was the greatest sacrilege, but God died, and then all these desecrators died. Now to desecrate the earth is the most terrible thing, and to esteem the bowels of the unfathomable higher than the meaning of the earth!

Once the soul gazed contemptuously at the body, and then such contempt was the highest thing: it wanted the body gaunt, ghastly, starved.

Thus it intended to escape the body and the earth.

Oh this soul was gaunt, ghastly and starved, and cruelty was the lust of this soul!

But you, too, my brothers, tell me: what does your body proclaim about your soul? Is your soul not poverty and filth and a pitiful contentment?

Truly, mankind is a polluted stream. One has to be a sea to take in a polluted stream without becoming unclean.

Behold, I teach you the overman: he is this sea, in him your great contempt can go under.

What is the greatest thing that you can experience? It is the hour of your great contempt. The hour in which even your happiness turns to nausea and likewise your reason and your virtue.

The hour in which you say: 'What matters my happiness? It is poverty and filth, and a pitiful contentment. But my happiness ought to justify existence itself!' ~ Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, trans. Fred Kaufmann,
148:But even before that highest approach to identity is achieved, something of the supreme Will can manifest in us as an imperative impulsion, a God-driven action; we then act by a spontaneous self-determining Force but a fuller knowledge of meaning and aim arises only afterwards. Or the impulse to action may come as an inspiration or intuition, but rather in the heart and body than in the mind; here an effective sight enters in but the complete and exact knowledge is still deferred and comes, if at all, lateR But the divine Will may descend too as a luminous single command or a total perception or a continuous current of perception of what is to be done into the will or into the thought or as a direction from above spontaneously fulfilled by the lower members. When the Yoga is imperfect, only some actions can be done in this way, or else a general action may so proceed but only during periods of exaltation and illumination. When the Yoga is perfect, all action becomes of this character. We may indeed distinguish three stages of a growing progress by which, first, the personal will is occasionally or frequently enlightened or moved by a supreme Will or conscious Force beyond it, then constantly replaced and, last, identified and merged in that divine Power-action. The first is the stage when we are still governed by the intellect, heart and senses; these have to seek or wait for the divine inspiration and guidance and do not always find or receive it. The second is the stage when human intelligence is more and more replaced by a high illumined or intuitive spiritualised mind, the external human heart by the inner psychic heart, the senses by a purified and selfless vital force. The third is the stage when we rise even above spiritualised mind to the supramental levels. In all three stages the fundamental character of the liberated action is the same, a spontaneous working of Prakriti no longer through or for the ego but at the will and for the enjoyment of the supreme Purusha. At a higher level this becomes the Truth of the absolute and universal Supreme expressed through the individual soul and worked out consciously through the nature, - no longer through a half-perception and a diminished or distorted effectuation by the stumbling, ignorant and all-deforming energy of lower nature in us but by the all-wise transcendent and universal Mother. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Supreme Will, 218,
149:meta-systemic operations ::: As the 1950's and 60s begin to roll around the last stage of first tier emerged as a cultural force. With the Green Altitude we see the emergence of Pluralistic, Multicultural, Post-Modern world-views.

Cognition is starting to move beyond formal-operations into the realm of co-ordinating systems of abstractions, in what is called Meta-systemic Cognition. While formal-operations acted upon the classes and relations between members of classes. Meta-systemic operations start at the level of relating systems to systems. The focus of these investigations is placed upon comparing, contrasting, transforming and synthesizing entire systems, rather than components of one system. This emergent faculty allows self-sense to focus around a heightened sense of individuality and an increased ability for emotional resonance. The recognition of individual differences, the ability to tolerate paradox and contradiction, and greater conceptual complexity all provide for an understanding of conflict as being both internally and externally caused. Context plays a major role in the creation of truth and individual perspective. With each being context dependent and open to subjective interpretation, meaning each perspective and truth are rendered relative and are not able to be judged as better or more true than any other. This fuels a value set that centers on softness over cold rationality. Sensitivity and preference over objectivity.

Along with a focus on community harmony and equality which drives the valuing of sensitivity to others, reconcilation, consensus, dialogue, relationship, human development, bonding, and a seeking of a peace with the inner-self. Moral decisions are based on rights, values, or principles that are agreeable to all individuals composing a society based on fair and beneficial practices. All of this leads to the Equality movements and multiculturalism. And to the extreme form of relativitism which we saw earlier as context dependant nature of all truth including objective facts.

Faith at the green altitude is called Conjunctive, and allows the self to integrate what was unrecognized by the previous stages self-certainty and cognitive and affective adaptation to reality. New features at this level of faith include the unification of symbolic power with conceptual meaning, an awareness of ones social unconscious, a reworking of ones past, and an opening to ones deeper self. ~ Essential Integral, 4.1-52, Meta-systemic Operations,
150:reading :::
   Self-Help Reading List:
   James Allen As a Man Thinketh (1904)
   Marcus Aurelius Meditations (2nd Century)
   The Bhagavad-Gita
   The Bible
   Robert Bly Iron John (1990)
   Boethius The Consolation of Philosophy (6thC)
   Alain de Botton How Proust Can Change Your Life (1997)
   William Bridges Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes (1980)
   David Brooks The Road to Character (2015)
   Brené Brown Daring Greatly (2012)
   David D Burns The New Mood Therapy (1980)
   Joseph Campbell (with Bill Moyers) The Power of Myth (1988)
   Richard Carlson Don't Sweat The Small Stuff (1997)
   Dale Carnegie How to Win Friends and Influence People (1936)
   Deepak Chopra The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success (1994)
   Clayton Christensen How Will You Measure Your Life? (2012)
   Paulo Coelho The Alchemist (1988)
   Stephen Covey The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (1989)
   Mihaly Cziksentmihalyi Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience (1991)
   The Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler The Art of Happiness (1999)
   The Dhammapada (Buddha's teachings)
   Charles Duhigg The Power of Habit (2011)
   Wayne Dyer Real Magic (1992)
   Ralph Waldo Emerson Self-Reliance (1841)
   Clarissa Pinkola Estes Women Who Run With The Wolves (1996)
   Viktor Frankl Man's Search For Meaning (1959)
   Benjamin Franklin Autobiography (1790)
   Shakti Gawain Creative Visualization (1982)
   Daniel Goleman Emotional Intelligence (1995)
   John Gray Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus (1992)
   Louise Hay You Can Heal Your Life (1984)
   James Hillman The Soul's Code: In Search of Character and Calling (1996)
   Susan Jeffers Feel The Fear And Do It Anyway (1987)
   Richard Koch The 80/20 Principle (1998)
   Marie Kondo The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up (2014)
   Ellen Langer Mindfulness: Choice and Control in Everyday Life (1989)
   Lao-Tzu Tao-te Ching (The Way of Power)
   Maxwell Maltz Psycho-Cybernetics (1960)
   Abraham Maslow Motivation and Personality (1954)
   Thomas Moore Care of the Soul (1992)
   Joseph Murphy The Power of Your Subconscious Mind (1963)
   Norman Vincent Peale The Power of Positive Thinking (1952)
   M Scott Peck The Road Less Traveled (1990)
   Anthony Robbins Awaken The Giant Within (1991)
   Florence Scovell-Shinn The Game of Life and How To Play It (1923)
   Martin Seligman Learned Optimism (1991)
   Samuel Smiles Self-Help (1859)
   Pierre Teilhard de Chardin The Phenomenon of Man (1955)
   Henry David Thoreau Walden (1854)
   Marianne Williamson A Return To Love (1993)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Self-Help,
151:Who could have thought that this tanned young man with gentle, dreamy eyes, long wavy hair parted in the middle and falling to the neck, clad in a common coarse Ahmedabad dhoti, a close-fitting Indian jacket, and old-fashioned slippers with upturned toes, and whose face was slightly marked with smallpox, was no other than Mister Aurobindo Ghose, living treasure of French, Latin and Greek?" Actually, Sri Aurobindo was not yet through with books; the Western momentum was still there; he devoured books ordered from Bombay and Calcutta by the case. "Aurobindo would sit at his desk," his Bengali teacher continues, "and read by the light of an oil lamp till one in the morning, oblivious of the intolerable mosquito bites. I would see him seated there in the same posture for hours on end, his eyes fixed on his book, like a yogi lost in the contemplation of the Divine, unaware of all that went on around him. Even if the house had caught fire, it would not have broken this concentration." He read English, Russian, German, and French novels, but also, in ever larger numbers, the sacred books of India, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Ramayana, although he had never been in a temple except as an observer. "Once, having returned from the College," one of his friends recalls, "Sri Aurobindo sat down, picked up a book at random and started to read, while Z and some friends began a noisy game of chess. After half an hour, he put the book down and took a cup of tea. We had already seen him do this many times and were waiting eagerly for a chance to verify whether he read the books from cover to cover or only scanned a few pages here and there. Soon the test began. Z opened the book, read a line aloud and asked Sri Aurobindo to recite what followed. Sri Aurobindo concentrated for a moment, and then repeated the entire page without a single mistake. If he could read a hundred pages in half an hour, no wonder he could go through a case of books in such an incredibly short time." But Sri Aurobindo did not stop at the translations of the sacred texts; he began to study Sanskrit, which, typically, he learned by himself. When a subject was known to be difficult or impossible, he would refuse to take anyone's word for it, whether he were a grammarian, pandit, or clergyman, and would insist upon trying it himself. The method seemed to have some merit, for not only did he learn Sanskrit, but a few years later he discovered the lost meaning of the Veda. ~ Satprem, Sri Aurobindo Or The Adventure of Consciousness,
152:Workshops, churches, and palaces were full of these fatal works of art; he had even helped with a few himself. They were deeply disappointing be­ cause they aroused the desire for the highest and did not fulfill it. They lacked the most essential thing-mystery. That was what dreams and truly great works of art had in common : mystery. Goldmund continued his thought: It is mystery I love and pursue. Several times I have seen it beginning to take shape; as an artist, I would like to capture and express it. Some day, perhaps, I'll be able to. The figure of the universal mother, the great birthgiver, for example. Unlike other fi gures, her mystery does not consist of this or that detail, of a particular voluptuousness or sparseness, coarseness or delicacy, power or gracefulness. It consists of a fusion of the greatest contrasts of the world, those that cannot otherwise be combined, that have made peace only in this figure. They live in it together: birth and death, tenderness and cruelty, life and destruction. If I only imagined this fi gure, and were she merely the play of my thoughts, it would not matter about her, I could dismiss her as a mistake and forget about her. But the universal mother is not an idea of mine; I did not think her up, I saw her! She lives inside me. I've met her again and again. She appeared to me one winter night in a village when I was asked to hold a light over the bed of a peasant woman giving birth: that's when the image came to life within me. I often lose it; for long periods it re­ mains remote; but suddenly it Hashes clear again, as it did today. The image of my own mother, whom I loved most of all, has transformed itself into this new image, and lies encased within the new one like the pit in the cherry.

   As his present situation became clear to him, Goldmund was afraid to make a decision. It was as difficult as when he had said farewell to Narcissus and to the cloister. Once more he was on an impor­ tant road : the road to his mother. Would this mother-image one day take shape, a work of his hands, and become visible to all? Perhaps that was his goal, the hidden meaning of his life. Perhaps; he didn't know. But one thing he did know : it was good to travel toward his mother, to be drawn and called by her. He felt alive. Perhaps he'd never be able to shape her image, perhaps she'd always remain a dream, an intuition, a golden shimmer, a sacred mystery. At any rate, he had to follow her and submit his fate to her. She was his star.

   And now the decision was at his fingertips; everything had become clear. Art was a beautiful thing, but it was no goddess, no goal-not for him. He was not to follow art, but only the call of his mother.

   ~ Hermann Hesse, Narcissus and Goldmund,
153:Worthy The Name Of Sir Knight
Sir Knight of the world's oldest order,
Sir Knight of the Army of God,
You have crossed the strange mystical border,
The ground floor of truth you have trod;
You have entered the sanctum sanctorum,
Which leads to the temple above,
Where you come as a stone, and a Christ-chosen one,
In the kingdom of Friendship and Love.
II
As you stand in this new realm of beauty,
Where each man you meet is your friend,
Think not that your promise of duty
In hall, or asylum, shall end;
Outside, in the great world of pleasure,
Beyond, in the clamor of trade,
In the battle of life and its coarse daily strife
Remember the vows you have made.
III
Your service, majestic and solemn,
Your symbols, suggestive and sweet,
Your uniformed phalanx in column
On gala days marching the street;
Your sword and your plume and your helmet,
Your 'secrets' hid from the world's sight;
These things are the small, lesser parts of the all
Which are needed to form the true Knight.
IV
The martyrs who perished rejoicing
In Templary's glorious laws,
Who died 'midst the fagots while voicing
The glory and worth of their cause-
935
They honored the title of 'Templar'
No more than the Knight of to-day
Who mars not the name with one blemish of shame,
But carries it clean through life's fray.
To live for a cause, to endeavor
To make your deeds grace it, to try
And uphold its precepts forever,
Is harder by far than to die.
For the battle of life is unending,
The enemy, Self, never tires,
And the true Knight must slay that sly foe every day
Ere he reaches the heights he desires.
VI
Sir Knight, have you pondered the meaning
Of all you have heard and been told?
Have you strengthened your heart for its weaning
From vices and faults loved of old?
Will you honor, in hours of temptation,
Your promises noble and grand?
Will your spirit be strong to do battle with wrong,
'And having done all, to stand?'
VII
Will you ever be true to a brother
In actions as well as in creed?
Will you stand by his side as no other
Could stand in the hour of his need?
Will you boldly defend him from peril,
And lift him from poverty's curseWill the promise of aid which you willingly made,
Reach down from your lips to your purse?
VIII
The world's battle field is before you!
Let Wisdom walk close by your side,
936
Let Faith spread her snowy wings o'er you,
Let Truth be your comrade and guide;
Let Fortitude, Justice and Mercy
Direct all your conduct aright,
And let each word and act tell to men the proud fact,
You are worthy the name of 'Sir Knight'.
~ Ella Wheeler Wilcox,
154:- for every well-made and significant poem, picture, statue or building is an act of creative knowledge, a living discovery of the consciousness, a figure of Truth, a dynamic form of mental and vital self-expression or world-expression, - all that seeks, all that finds, all that voices or figures is a realisation of something of the play of the Infinite and to that extent can be made a means of God-realisation or of divine formation. But the Yogin has to see that it is no longer done as part of an ignorant mental life; it can be accepted by him only if by the feeling, the remembrance, the dedication within it, it is turned into a movement of the spiritual consciousness and becomes a part of its vast grasp of comprehensive illuminating knowledge.
   For all must be done as a sacrifice, all activities must have the One Divine for their object and the heart of their meaning. The Yogin's aim in the sciences that make for knowledge should be to discover and understand the workings of the Divine Consciousness-Puissance in man and creatures and things and forces, her creative significances, her execution of the mysteries, the symbols in which she arranges the manifestation. The Yogin's aim in the practical sciences, whether mental and physical or occult and psychic, should be to enter into the ways of the Divine and his processes, to know the materials and means for the work given to us so that we may use that knowledge for a conscious and faultless expression of the spirit's mastery, joy and self-fulfilment. The Yogin's aim in the Arts should not be a mere aesthetic, mental or vital gratification, but, seeing the Divine everywhere, worshipping it with a revelation of the meaning of its own works, to express that One Divine in ideal forms, the One Divine in principles and forces, the One Divine in gods and men and creatures and objects. The theory that sees an intimate connection between religious aspiration and the truest and greatest Art is in essence right; but we must substitute for the mixed and doubtful religious motive a spiritual aspiration, vision, interpreting experience. For the wider and more comprehensive the seeing, the more it contains in itself the sense of the hidden Divine in humanity and in all things and rises beyond a superficial religiosity into the spiritual life, the more luminous, flexible, deep and powerful will the Art be that springs from that high motive. The Yogin's distinction from other men is this that he lives in a higher and vaster spiritual consciousness; all his work of knowledge or creation must then spring from there: it must not be made in the mind, - for it is a greater truth and vision than mental man's that he has to express or rather that presses to express itself through him and mould his works, not for his personal satisfaction, but for a divine purpose. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Ascent of the Sacrifice - 1, 142 [T4],
155:reading :::
   50 Psychology Classics: List of Books Covered:
   Alfred Adler - Understanding Human Nature (1927)
   Gordon Allport - The Nature of Prejudice (1954)
   Albert Bandura - Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control (1997)
   Gavin Becker - The Gift of Fear (1997)
   Eric Berne - Games People Play (1964)
   Isabel Briggs Myers - Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type (1980)
   Louann Brizendine - The Female Brain (2006)
   David D Burns - Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy (1980)
   Susan Cain - Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (2012)
   Robert Cialdini - Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (1984)
   Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Creativity (1997)
   Carol Dweck - Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006)
   Albert Ellis & Robert Harper - (1961) A Guide To Rational Living(1961)
   Milton Erickson - My Voice Will Go With You (1982) by Sidney Rosen
   Eric Erikson - Young Man Luther (1958)
   Hans Eysenck - Dimensions of Personality (1947)
   Viktor Frankl - The Will to Meaning (1969)
   Anna Freud - The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (1936)
   Sigmund Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams (1901)
   Howard Gardner - Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983)
   Daniel Gilbert - Stumbling on Happiness (2006)
   Malcolm Gladwell - Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005)
   Daniel Goleman - Emotional Intelligence at Work (1998)
   John M Gottman - The Seven Principles For Making Marriage Work (1999)
   Temple Grandin - The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed (2013)
   Harry Harlow - The Nature of Love (1958)
   Thomas A Harris - I'm OK - You're OK (1967)
   Eric Hoffer - The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951)
   Karen Horney - Our Inner Conflicts (1945)
   William James - Principles of Psychology (1890)
   Carl Jung - The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (1953)
   Daniel Kahneman - Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)
   Alfred Kinsey - Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953)
   RD Laing - The Divided Self (1959)
   Abraham Maslow - The Farther Reaches of Human Nature (1970)
   Stanley Milgram - Obedience To Authority (1974)
   Walter Mischel - The Marshmallow Test (2014)
   Leonard Mlodinow - Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (2012)
   IP Pavlov - Conditioned Reflexes (1927)
   Fritz Perls - Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality (1951)
   Jean Piaget - The Language and Thought of the Child (1966)
   Steven Pinker - The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (2002)
   VS Ramachandran - Phantoms in the Brain (1998)
   Carl Rogers - On Becoming a Person (1961)
   Oliver Sacks - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1970)
   Barry Schwartz - The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less (2004)
   Martin Seligman - Authentic Happiness (2002)
   BF Skinner - Beyond Freedom & Dignity (1953)
   Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen - Difficult Conversations (2000)
   William Styron - Darkness Visible (1990)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Psychology Classics,
156:HOW CAN I READ SAVITRI?
An open reply by Dr Alok Pandey to a fellow devotee

A GIFT OF LOVE TO THE WORLD
Most of all enjoy Savitri. It is Sri Aurobindo's gift of Love to the world. Read it from the heart with love and gratitude as companions and drown in its fiery bliss. That is the true understanding rather than one that comes by a constant churning of words in the head.

WHEN
Best would be to fix a time that works for you. One can always take out some time for the reading, even if it be late at night when one is done with all the daily works. Of course, a certain receptivity is needed. If one is too tired or the reading becomes too mechanical as a ritual routine to be somehow finished it tends to be less effective, as with anything else. Hence the advice is to read in a quiet receptive state.

THE PACE
As to the pace of reading it is best to slowly build up and keep it steady. To read a page or a passage daily is better than reading many pages one day and then few lines or none for days. This brings a certain discipline in the consciousness which makes one receptive. What it means is that one should fix up that one would read a few passages or a page or two daily, and then if an odd day one is enjoying and spontaneously wants to read more then one can go by the flow.

COMPLETE OR SELECTIONS?
It is best to read at least once from cover to cover. But if one is not feeling inclined for that do read some of the beautiful cantos and passages whose reference one can find in various places. This helps us familiarise with the epic and the style of poetry. Later one can go for the cover to cover reading.

READING ALOUD, SILENTLY, OR WRITING DOWN?
One can read it silently. Loud reading is needed only if one is unable to focus with silent reading. A mantra is more potent when read subtly. I am aware that some people recommend reading it aloud which is fine if that helps one better. A certain flexibility in these things is always good and rigid rules either ways are not helpful.

One can also write some of the beautiful passages with which one feels suddenly connected. It is a help in the yoga since such a writing involves the pouring in of the consciousness of Savitri through the brain and nerves and the hand.

Reflecting upon some of these magnificent lines and passages while one is engaged in one\s daily activities helps to create a background state for our inner being to get absorbed in Savitri more and more.

HOW DO I UNDERSTAND THE MEANING? DO I NEED A DICTIONARY?
It is helpful if a brief background about the Canto is known. This helps the mind top focus and also to keep in sync with the overall scene and sense of what is being read.

But it is best not to keep referring to the dictionary while reading. Let the overall sense emerge. Specifics can be done during a detailed reading later and it may not be necessary at all. Besides the sense that Sri Aurobindo has given to many words may not be accurately conveyed by the standard dictionaries. A flexibility is required to understand the subtle suggestions hinted at by the Master-poet.

In this sense Savitri is in the line of Vedic poetry using images that are at once profound as well as commonplace. That is the beauty of mystic poetry. These are things actually experienced and seen by Sri Aurobindo, and ultimately it is Their Grace that alone can reveal the intrinsic sense of this supreme revelation of the Supreme. ~ Dr Alok Pandey,
157:In the process of this change there must be by the very necessity of the effort two stages of its working. First, there will be the personal endeavour of the human being, as soon as he becomes aware by his soul, mind, heart of this divine possibility and turns towards it as the true object of life, to prepare himself for it and to get rid of all in him that belongs to a lower working, of all that stands in the way of his opening to the spiritual truth and its power, so as to possess by this liberation his spiritual being and turn all his natural movements into free means of its self-expression. It is by this turn that the self-conscious Yoga aware of its aim begins: there is a new awakening and an upward change of the life motive. So long as there is only an intellectual, ethical and other self-training for the now normal purposes of life which does not travel beyond the ordinary circle of working of mind, life and body, we are still only in the obscure and yet unillumined preparatory Yoga of Nature; we are still in pursuit of only an ordinary human perfection. A spiritual desire of the Divine and of the divine perfection, of a unity with him in all our being and a spiritual perfection in all our nature, is the effective sign of this change, the precursory power of a great integral conversion of our being and living. By personal effort a precursory change, a preliminary conversion can be effected; it amounts to a greater or less spiritualising of our mental motives, our character and temperament, and a mastery, stilling or changed action of the vital and physical life. This converted subjectivity can be made the base of some communion or unity of the soul in mind with the Divine and some partial reflection of the divine nature in the mentality of the human being. That is as far as man can go by his unaided or indirectly aided effort, because that is an effort of mind and mind cannot climb beyond itself permanently: at most it arises to a spiritualised and idealised mentality. If it shoots up beyond that border, it loses hold of itself, loses hold of life, and arrives either at a trance of absorption or a passivity. A greater perfection can only be arrived at by a higher power entering in and taking up the whole action of the being. The second stage of this Yoga will therefore be a persistent giving up of all the action of the nature into the hands of this greater Power, a substitution of its influence, possession and working for the personal effort, until the Divine to whom we aspire becomes the direct master of the Yoga and effects the entire spiritual and ideal conversion of the being. Two rules there are that will diminish the difficulty and obviate the danger. One must reject all that comes from the ego, from vital desire, from the mere mind and its presumptuous reasoning incompetence, all that ministers to these agents of the Ignorance. One must learn to hear and follow the voice of the inmost soul, the direction of the Guru, the command of the Master, the working of the Divine Mother. Whoever clings to the desires and weaknesses of the flesh, the cravings and passions of the vital in its turbulent ignorance, the dictates of his personal mind unsilenced and unillumined by a greater knowledge, cannot find the true inner law and is heaping obstacles in the way of the divine fulfilment. Whoever is able to detect and renounce those obscuring agencies and to discern and follow the true Guide within and without will discover the spiritual law and reach the goal of the Yoga. A radical and total change of consciousness is not only the whole meaning but, in an increasing force and by progressive stages, the whole method of the integral Yoga.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Yoga of Self-Perfection, The Integral Perfection [618],
158:The true Mantra must come from within OR it must be given by a Guru

Nobody can give you the true mantra. It's not something that is given; it's something that wells up from within. It must spring from within all of a sudden, spontaneously, like a profound, intense need of your being - then it has power, because it's not something that comes from outside, it's your very own cry.

I saw, in my case, that my mantra has the power of immortality; whatever happens, if it is uttered, it's the Supreme that has the upper hand, it's no longer the lower law. And the words are irrelevant, they may not have any meaning - to someone else, my mantra is meaningless, but to me it's full, packed with meaning. And effective, because it's my cry, the intense aspiration of my whole being.

A mantra given by a guru is only the power to realize the experience of the discoverer of the mantra. The power is automatically there, because the sound contains the experience. I saw that once in Paris, at a time when I knew nothing of India, absolutely nothing, only the usual nonsense. I didn't even know what a mantra was. I had gone to a lecture given by some fellow who was supposed to have practiced "yoga" for a year in the Himalayas and recounted his experience (none too interesting, either). All at once, in the course of his lecture, he uttered the sound OM. And I saw the entire room suddenly fill with light, a golden, vibrating light.... I was probably the only one to notice it. I said to myself, "Well!" Then I didn't give it any more thought, I forgot about the story. But as it happened, the experience recurred in two or three different countries, with different people, and every time there was the sound OM, I would suddenly see the place fill with that same light. So I understood. That sound contains the vibration of thousands and thousands of years of spiritual aspiration - there is in it the entire aspiration of men towards the Supreme. And the power is automatically there, because the experience is there.

It's the same with my mantra. When I wanted to translate the end of my mantra, "Glory to You, O Lord," into Sanskrit, I asked for Nolini's help. He brought his Sanskrit translation, and when he read it to me, I immediately saw that the power was there - not because Nolini put his power into it (!), God knows he had no intention of "giving" me a mantra! But the power was there because my experience was there. We made a few adjustments and modifications, and that's the japa I do now - I do it all the time, while sleeping, while walking, while eating, while working, all the time.[[Mother later clarified: "'Glory to You, O Lord' isn't MY mantra, it's something I ADDED to it - my mantra is something else altogether, that's not it. When I say that my mantra has the power of immortality, I mean the other, the one I don't speak of! I have never given the words.... You see, at the end of my walk, a kind of enthusiasm rises, and with that enthusiasm, the 'Glory to You' came to me, but it's part of the prayer I had written in Prayers and Meditations: 'Glory to You, O Lord, all-triumphant Supreme' etc. (it's a long prayer). It came back suddenly, and as it came back spontaneously, I kept it. Moreover, when Sri Aurobindo read this prayer in Prayers and Meditations, he told me it was very strong. So I added this phrase as a kind of tail to my japa. But 'Glory to You, O Lord' isn't my spontaneous mantra - it came spontaneously, but it was something written very long ago. The two things are different."

And that's how a mantra has life: when it wells up all the time, spontaneously, like the cry of your being - there is no need of effort or concentration: it's your natural cry. Then it has full power, it is alive. It must well up from within.... No guru can give you that. ~ The Mother, Agenda, May 11 1963,
159:There's an idea in Christianity of the image of God as a Trinity. There's the element of the Father, there's the element of the Son, and there's the element of the Holy Spirit. It's something like the spirit of tradition, human beings as the living incarnation of that tradition, and the spirit in people that makes relationship with the spirit and individuals possible. I'm going to bounce my way quickly through some of the classical, metaphorical attributes of God, so that we kind of have a cloud of notions about what we're talking about, when we return to Genesis 1 and talk about the God who spoke chaos into Being.

There's a fatherly aspect, so here's what God as a father is like. You can enter into a covenant with it, so you can make a bargain with it. Now, you think about that. Money is like that, because money is a bargain you make with the future. We structured our world so that you can negotiate with the future. I don't think that we would have got to the point where we could do that without having this idea to begin with. You can act as if the future's a reality; there's a spirit of tradition that enables you to act as if the future is something that can be bargained with. That's why you make sacrifices. The sacrifices were acted out for a very long period of time, and now they're psychological. We know that you can sacrifice something valuable in the present and expect that you're negotiating with something that's representing the transcendent future. That's an amazing human discovery. No other creature can do that; to act as if the future is real; to know that you can bargain with reality itself, and that you can do it successfully. It's unbelievable.

It responds to sacrifice. It answers prayers. I'm not saying that any of this is true, by the way. I'm just saying what the cloud of ideas represents. It punishes and rewards. It judges and forgives. It's not nature. One of the things weird about the Judeo-Christian tradition is that God and nature are not the same thing, at all. Whatever God is, partially manifest in this logos, is something that stands outside of nature. I think that's something like consciousness as abstracted from the natural world. It built Eden for mankind and then banished us for disobedience. It's too powerful to be touched. It granted free will. Distance from it is hell. Distance from it is death. It reveals itself in dogma and in mystical experience, and it's the law. That's sort of like the fatherly aspect.

The son-like aspect. It speaks chaos into order. It slays dragons and feeds people with the remains. It finds gold. It rescues virgins. It is the body and blood of Christ. It is a tragic victim, scapegoat, and eternally triumphant redeemer simultaneously. It cares for the outcast. It dies and is reborn. It is the king of kings and hero of heroes. It's not the state, but is both the fulfillment and critic of the state. It dwells in the perfect house. It is aiming at paradise or heaven. It can rescue from hell. It cares for the outcast. It is the foundation and the cornerstone that was rejected. It is the spirit of the law.

The spirit-like aspect. It's akin to the human soul. It's the prophetic voice. It's the still, small voice of conscience. It's the spoken truth. It's called forth by music. It is the enemy of deceit, arrogance, and resentment. It is the water of life. It burns without consuming. It's a blinding light.

That's a very well-developed set of poetic metaphors. These are all...what would you say...glimpses of the transcendent ideal. That's the right way of thinking about it. They're glimpses of the transcendent ideal, and all of them have a specific meaning. In part, what we're going to do is go over that meaning, as we continue with this series. What we've got now is a brief description, at least, of what this is. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series, 1,
160:Chapter LXXXII: Epistola Penultima: The Two Ways to Reality
Cara Soror,
Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

How very sensible of you, though I admit somewhat exacting!

You write-Will you tell me exactly why I should devote so much of my valuable time to subjects like Magick and Yoga.

That is all very well. But you ask me to put it in syllogistic form. I have no doubt this can be done, though the task seems somewhat complicated. I think I will leave it to you to construct your series of syllogisms yourself from the arguments of this letter.

In your main question the operative word is "valuable. Why, I ask, in my turn, should you consider your time valuable? It certainly is not valuable unless the universe has a meaning, and what is more, unless you know what that meaning is-at least roughly-it is millions to one that you will find yourself barking up the wrong tree.

First of all let us consider this question of the meaning of the universe. It is its own evidence to design, and that design intelligent design. There is no question of any moral significance-"one man's meat is another man's poison" and so on. But there can be no possible doubt about the existence of some kind of intelligence, and that kind is far superior to anything of which we know as human.

How then are we to explore, and finally to interpret this intelligence?

It seems to me that there are two ways and only two. Imagine for a moment that you are an orphan in charge of a guardian, inconceivably learned from your point of view.

Suppose therefore that you are puzzled by some problem suitable to your childish nature, your obvious and most simple way is to approach your guardian and ask him to enlighten you. It is clearly part of his function as guardian to do his best to help you. Very good, that is the first method, and close parallel with what we understand by the word Magick.

We are bothered by some difficulty about one of the elements-say Fire-it is therefore natural to evoke a Salamander to instruct you on the difficult point. But you must remember that your Holy Guardian Angel is not only far more fully instructed than yourself on every point that you can conceive, but you may go so far as to say that it is definitely his work, or part of his work; remembering always that he inhabits a sphere or plane which is entirely different from anything of which you are normally aware.

To attain to the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel is consequently without doubt by far the simplest way by which you can yourself approach that higher order of being.

That, then, is a clearly intelligible method of procedure. We call it Magick.

It is of course possible to strengthen the link between him and yourself so that in course of time you became capable of moving and, generally speaking, operating on that plane which is his natural habitat.

There is however one other way, and one only, as far as I can see, of reaching this state.

It is at least theoretically possible to exalt the whole of your own consciousness until it becomes as free to move on that exalted plane as it is for him. You should note, by the way, that in this case the postulation of another being is not necessary. There is no way of refuting the solipsism if you feel like that. Personally I cannot accede to its axiom. The evidence for an external universe appears to me perfectly adequate.

Still there is no extra charge for thinking on those lines if you so wish.

I have paid a great deal of attention in the course of my life to the method of exalting the human consciousness in this way; and it is really quite legitimate to identify my teaching with that of the Yogis.

I must however point out that in the course of my instruction I have given continual warnings as to the dangers of this line of research. For one thing there is no means of checking your results in the ordinary scientific sense. It is always perfectly easy to find a subjective explanation of any phenomenon; and when one considers that the greatest of all the dangers in any line of research arise from egocentric vanity, I do not think I have exceeded my duty in anything that I have said to deter students from undertaking so dangerous a course as Yoga.

It is, of course, much safer if you are in a position to pursue in the Indian Jungles, provided that your health will stand the climate and also, I must say, unless you have a really sound teacher on whom you can safely rely. But then, if we once introduce a teacher, why not go to the Fountain-head and press towards the Knowledge and conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel?

In any case your Indian teacher will ultimately direct you to seek guidance from that source, so it seems to me that you have gone to a great deal of extra trouble and incurred a great deal of unnecessary danger by not leaving yourself in the first place in the hands of the Holy Guardian Angel.

In any case there are the two methods which stand as alternatives. I do not know of any third one which can be of any use whatever. Logically, since you have asked me to be logical, there is certainly no third way; there is the external way of Magick, and the internal way of Yoga: there you have your alternatives, and there they cease.

Love is the law, love under will.

Fraternally,

666 ~ Aleister Crowley, Magick Without Tears,
161:For instance, a popular game with California occultists-I do not know its inventor-involves a Magic Room, much like the Pleasure Dome discussed earlier except that this Magic Room contains an Omniscient Computer.
   To play this game, you simply "astrally project" into the Magic Room. Do not ask what "astral projection" means, and do not assume it is metaphysical (and therefore either impossible, if you are a materialist, or very difficult, if you are a mystic). Just assume this is a gedankenexperiment, a "mind game." Project yourself, in imagination, into this Magic Room and visualize vividly the Omniscient Computer, using the details you need to make such a super-information-processor real to your fantasy. You do not need any knowledge of programming to handle this astral computer. It exists early in the next century; you are getting to use it by a species of time-travel, if that metaphor is amusing and helpful to you. It is so built that it responds immediately to human brain-waves, "reading" them and decoding their meaning. (Crude prototypes of such computers already exist.) So, when you are in this magic room, you can ask this Computer anything, just by thinking of what you want to know. It will read your thought, and project into your brain, by a laser ray, the correct answer.
   There is one slight problem. The computer is very sensitive to all brain-waves. If you have any doubts, it registers them as negative commands, meaning "Do not answer my question." So, the way to use it is to start simply, with "easy" questions. Ask it to dig out of the archives the name of your second-grade teacher. (Almost everybody remembers the name of their first grade teacher-imprint vulnerability again-but that of the second grade teacher tends to get lost.)
   When the computer has dug out the name of your second grade teacher, try it on a harder question, but not one that is too hard. It is very easy to sabotage this machine, but you don't want to sabotage it during these experiments. You want to see how well it can be made to perform.
   It is wise to ask only one question at a time, since it requires concentration to keep this magic computer real on the field of your perception. Do not exhaust your capacities for imagination and visualization on your first trial runs.
   After a few trivial experiments of the second-grade-teacher variety, you can try more interesting programs. Take a person toward whom you have negative feelings, such as anger, disappointment, feeling-of-betrayal, jealousy or whatever interferes with the smooth, tranquil operation of your own bio-computer. Ask the Magic Computer to explain that other person to you; to translate you into their reality-tunnel long enough for you to understand how events seem to them. Especially, ask how you seem to them.
   This computer will do that job for you; but be prepared for some shocks which might be disagreeable at first. This super-brain can also perform exegesis on ideas that seem obscure, paradoxical or enigmatic to us. For instance, early experiments with this computer can very profitably turn on asking it to explain some of the propositions in this book which may seem inexplicable or perversely wrong-headed to you, such as "We are all greater artists than we realize" or "What the Thinker thinks, the Prover proves" or "mind and its contents are functionally identical."
   This computer is much more powerful and scientifically advanced than the rapture-machine in the neurosomatic circuit. It has total access to all the earlier, primitive circuits, and overrules any of them. That is, if you put a meta-programming instruction into this computer; it will relay it downward to the old circuits and cancel contradictory programs left over from the past. For instance, try feeding it on such meta-programming instructions as: 1. I am at cause over my body. 2. I am at cause over my imagination. 3.1 am at cause over my future. 4. My mind abounds with beauty and power. 5.1 like people, and people like me.
   Remember that this computer is only a few decades ahead of present technology, so it cannot "understand" your commands if you harbor any doubts about them. Doubts tell it not to perform. Work always from what you can believe in, extending the area of belief only as results encourage you to try for more dramatic transformations of your past reality-tunnels.
   This represents cybernetic consciousness; the programmer becoming self-programmer, self-metaprogrammer, meta-metaprogrammer, etc. Just as the emotional compulsions of the second circuit seem primitive, mechanical and, ultimately, silly to the neurosomatic consciousness, so, too, the reality maps of the third circuit become comic, relativistic, game-like to the metaprogrammer. "Whatever you say it is, it isn't, " Korzybski, the semanticist, repeated endlessly in his seminars, trying to make clear that third-circuit semantic maps are not the territories they represent; that we can always make maps of our maps, revisions of our revisions, meta-selves of our selves. "Neti, neti" (not that, not that), Hindu teachers traditionally say when asked what "God" is or what "Reality" is. Yogis, mathematicians and musicians seem more inclined to develop meta-programming consciousness than most of humanity. Korzybski even claimed that the use of mathematical scripts is an aid to developing this circuit, for as soon as you think of your mind as mind 1 , and the mind which contemplates that mind as mind2 and the mind which contemplates mind2 contemplating mind 1 as mind3, you are well on your way to meta-programming awareness. Alice in Wonderland is a masterful guide to the metaprogramming circuit (written by one of the founders of mathematical logic) and Aleister Crowley soberly urged its study upon all students of yoga. ~ Robert Anton Wilson, Prometheus Rising,
162:The Two Paths Of Yoga :::
   14 April 1929 - What are the dangers of Yoga? Is it especially dangerous to the people of the West? Someone has said that Yoga may be suitable for the East, but it has the effect of unbalancing the Western mind.

   Yoga is not more dangerous to the people of the West than to those of the East. Everything depends upon the spirit with which you approach it. Yoga does become dangerous if you want it for your own sake, to serve a personal end. It is not dangerous, on the contrary, it is safety and security itself, if you go to it with a sense of its sacredness, always remembering that the aim is to find the Divine.
   Dangers and difficulties come in when people take up Yoga not for the sake of the Divine, but because they want to acquire power and under the guise of Yoga seek to satisfy some ambition. if you cannot get rid of ambition, do not touch the thing. It is fire that burns.
   There are two paths of Yoga, one of tapasya (discipline), and the other of surrender. The path of tapasya is arduous. Here you rely solely upon yourself, you proceed by your own strength. You ascend and achieve according to the measure of your force. There is always the danger of falling down. And once you fall, you lie broken in the abyss and there is hardly a remedy. The other path, the path of surrender, is safe and sure. It is here, however, that the Western people find their difficulty. They have been taught to fear and avoid all that threatens their personal independence. They have imbibed with their mothers' milk the sense of individuality. And surrender means giving up all that. In other words, you may follow, as Ramakrishna says, either the path of the baby monkey or that of the baby cat. The baby monkey holds to its mother in order to be carried about and it must hold firm, otherwise if it loses its grip, it falls. On the other hand, the baby cat does not hold to its mother, but is held by the mother and has no fear nor responsibility; it has nothing to do but to let the mother hold it and cry ma ma.
   If you take up this path of surrender fully and sincerely, there is no more danger or serious difficulty. The question is to be sincere. If you are not sincere, do not begin Yoga. If you were dealing in human affairs, then you could resort to deception; but in dealing with the Divine there is no possibility of deception anywhere. You can go on the Path safely when you are candid and open to the core and when your only end is to realise and attain the Divine and to be moved by the Divine. There is another danger; it is in connection with the sex impulses. Yoga in its process of purification will lay bare and throw up all hidden impulses and desires in you. And you must learn not to hide things nor leave them aside, you have to face them and conquer and remould them. The first effect of Yoga, however, is to take away the mental control, and the hungers that lie dormant are suddenly set free, they rush up and invade the being. So long as this mental control has not been replaced by the Divine control, there is a period of transition when your sincerity and surrender will be put to the test. The strength of such impulses as those of sex lies usually in the fact that people take too much notice of them; they protest too vehemently and endeavour to control them by coercion, hold them within and sit upon them. But the more you think of a thing and say, "I don't want it, I don't want it", the more you are bound to it. What you should do is to keep the thing away from you, to dissociate from it, take as little notice of it as possible and, even if you happen to think of it, remain indifferent and unconcerned. The impulses and desires that come up by the pressure of Yoga should be faced in a spirit of detachment and serenity, as something foreign to yourself or belonging to the outside world. They should be offered to the Divine, so that the Divine may take them up and transmute them. If you have once opened yourself to the Divine, if the power of the Divine has once come down into you and yet you try to keep to the old forces, you prepare troubles and difficulties and dangers for yourself. You must be vigilant and see that you do not use the Divine as a cloak for the satisfaction of your desires. There are many self-appointed Masters, who do nothing but that. And then when you are off the straight path and when you have a little knowledge and not much power, it happens that you are seized by beings or entities of a certain type, you become blind instruments in their hands and are devoured by them in the end. Wherever there is pretence, there is danger; you cannot deceive God. Do you come to God saying, "I want union with you" and in your heart meaning "I want powers and enjoyments"? Beware! You are heading straight towards the brink of the precipice. And yet it is so easy to avoid all catastrophe. Become like a child, give yourself up to the Mother, let her carry you, and there is no more danger for you.
   This does not mean that you have not to face other kinds of difficulties or that you have not to fight and conquer any obstacles at all. Surrender does not ensure a smooth and unruffled and continuous progression. The reason is that your being is not yet one, nor your surrender absolute and complete. Only a part of you surrenders; and today it is one part and the next day it is another. The whole purpose of the Yoga is to gather all the divergent parts together and forge them into an undivided unity. Till then you cannot hope to be without difficulties - difficulties, for example, like doubt or depression or hesitation. The whole world is full of the poison. You take it in with every breath. If you exchange a few words with an undesirable man or even if such a man merely passes by you, you may catch the contagion from him. It is sufficient for you to come near a place where there is plague in order to be infected with its poison; you need not know at all that it is there. You can lose in a few minutes what it has taken you months to gain. So long as you belong to humanity and so long as you lead the ordinary life, it does not matter much if you mix with the people of the world; but if you want the divine life, you will have to be exceedingly careful about your company and your environment.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
163:How to Meditate
Deep meditation is a mental procedure that utilizes the nature of the mind to systematically bring the mind to rest. If the mind is given the opportunity, it will go to rest with no effort. That is how the mind works.
Indeed, effort is opposed to the natural process of deep meditation. The mind always seeks the path of least resistance to express itself. Most of the time this is by making more and more thoughts. But it is also possible to create a situation in the mind that turns the path of least resistance into one leading to fewer and fewer thoughts. And, very soon, no thoughts at all. This is done by using a particular thought in a particular way. The thought is called a mantra.
For our practice of deep meditation, we will use the thought - I AM. This will be our mantra.
It is for the sound that we will use I AM, not for the meaning of it.
The meaning has an obvious significance in English, and I AM has a religious meaning in the English Bible as well. But we will not use I AM for the meaning - only for the sound. We can also spell it AYAM. No meaning there, is there? Only the sound. That is what we want. If your first language is not English, you may spell the sound phonetically in your own language if you wish. No matter how we spell it, it will be the same sound. The power of the sound ...I AM... is great when thought inside. But only if we use a particular procedure. Knowing this procedure is the key to successful meditation. It is very simple. So simple that we will devote many pages here to discussing how to keep it simple, because we all have a tendency to make things more complicated. Maintaining simplicity is the key to right meditation.
Here is the procedure of deep meditation: While sitting comfortably with eyes closed, we'll just relax. We will notice thoughts, streams of thoughts. That is fine. We just let them go by without minding them. After about a minute, we gently introduce the mantra, ...I AM...
We think the mantra in a repetition very easily inside. The speed of repetition may vary, and we do not mind it. We do not intone the mantra out loud. We do not deliberately locate the mantra in any particular part of the body. Whenever we realize we are not thinking the mantra inside anymore, we come back to it easily. This may happen many times in a sitting, or only once or twice. It doesn't matter. We follow this procedure of easily coming back to the mantra when we realize we are off it for the predetermined time of our meditation session. That's it.
Very simple.
Typically, the way we will find ourselves off the mantra will be in a stream of other thoughts. This is normal. The mind is a thought machine, remember? Making thoughts is what it does. But, if we are meditating, as soon as we realize we are off into a stream of thoughts, no matter how mundane or profound, we just easily go back to the mantra.
Like that. We don't make a struggle of it. The idea is not that we have to be on the mantra all the time. That is not the objective. The objective is to easily go back to it when we realize we are off it. We just favor the mantra with our attention when we notice we are not thinking it. If we are back into a stream of other thoughts five seconds later, we don't try and force the thoughts out. Thoughts are a normal part of the deep meditation process. We just ease back to the mantra again. We favor it.
Deep meditation is a going toward, not a pushing away from. We do that every single time with the mantra when we realize we are off it - just easily favoring it. It is a gentle persuasion. No struggle. No fuss. No iron willpower or mental heroics are necessary for this practice. All such efforts are away from the simplicity of deep meditation and will reduce its effectiveness.
As we do this simple process of deep meditation, we will at some point notice a change in the character of our inner experience. The mantra may become very refined and fuzzy. This is normal. It is perfectly all right to think the mantra in a very refined and fuzzy way if this is the easiest. It should always be easy - never a struggle. Other times, we may lose track of where we are for a while, having no mantra, or stream of thoughts either. This is fine too. When we realize we have been off somewhere, we just ease back to the mantra again. If we have been very settled with the mantra being barely recognizable, we can go back to that fuzzy level of it, if it is the easiest. As the mantra refines, we are riding it inward with our attention to progressively deeper levels of inner silence in the mind. So it is normal for the mantra to become very faint and fuzzy. We cannot force this to happen. It will happen naturally as our nervous system goes through its many cycles ofinner purification stimulated by deep meditation. When the mantra refines, we just go with it. And when the mantra does not refine, we just be with it at whatever level is easy. No struggle. There is no objective to attain, except to continue the simple procedure we are describing here.

When and Where to Meditate
How long and how often do we meditate? For most people, twenty minutes is the best duration for a meditation session. It is done twice per day, once before the morning meal and day's activity, and then again before the evening meal and evening's activity.
Try to avoid meditating right after eating or right before bed.
Before meal and activity is the ideal time. It will be most effective and refreshing then. Deep meditation is a preparation for activity, and our results over time will be best if we are active between our meditation sessions. Also, meditation is not a substitute for sleep. The ideal situation is a good balance between meditation, daily activity and normal sleep at night. If we do this, our inner experience will grow naturally over time, and our outer life will become enriched by our growing inner silence.
A word on how to sit in meditation: The first priority is comfort. It is not desirable to sit in a way that distracts us from the easy procedure of meditation. So sitting in a comfortable chair with back support is a good way to meditate. Later on, or if we are already familiar, there can be an advantage to sitting with legs crossed, also with back support. But always with comfort and least distraction being the priority. If, for whatever reason, crossed legs are not feasible for us, we will do just fine meditating in our comfortable chair. There will be no loss of the benefits.
Due to commitments we may have, the ideal routine of meditation sessions will not always be possible. That is okay. Do the best you can and do not stress over it. Due to circumstances beyond our control, sometimes the only time we will have to meditate will be right after a meal, or even later in the evening near bedtime. If meditating at these times causes a little disruption in our system, we will know it soon enough and make the necessary adjustments. The main thing is that we do our best to do two meditations every day, even if it is only a short session between our commitments. Later on, we will look at the options we have to make adjustments to address varying outer circumstances, as well as inner experiences that can come up.
Before we go on, you should try a meditation. Find a comfortable place to sit where you are not likely to be interrupted and do a short meditation, say ten minutes, and see how it goes. It is a toe in the water.
Make sure to take a couple of minutes at the end sitting easily without doing the procedure of meditation. Then open your eyes slowly. Then read on here.
As you will see, the simple procedure of deep meditation and it's resulting experiences will raise some questions. We will cover many of them here.
So, now we will move into the practical aspects of deep meditation - your own experiences and initial symptoms of the growth of your own inner silence. ~ Yogani, Deep Meditation,
164:
   Can a Yogi attain to a state of consciousness in which he can know all things, answer all questions, relating even to abstruse scientific problems, such as, for example, the theory of relativity?


Theoretically and in principle it is not impossible for a Yogi to know everything; all depends upon the Yogi.

   But there is knowledge and knowledge. The Yogi does not know in the way of the mind. He does not know everything in the sense that he has access to all possible information or because he contains all the facts of the universe in his mind or because his consciousness is a sort of miraculous encyclopaedia. He knows by his capacity for a containing or dynamic identity with things and persons and forces. Or he knows because he lives in a plane of consciousness or is in contact with a consciousness in which there is the truth and the knowledge.

   If you are in the true consciousness, the knowledge you have will also be of the truth. Then, too, you can know directly, by being one with what you know. If a problem is put before you, if you are asked what is to be done in a particular matter, you can then, by looking with enough attention and concentration, receive spontaneously the required knowledge and the true answer. It is not by any careful application of theory that you reach the knowledge or by working it out through a mental process. The scientific mind needs these methods to come to its conclusions. But the Yogi's knowledge is direct and immediate; it is not deductive. If an engineer has to find out the exact position for the building of an arch, the line of its curve and the size of its opening, he does it by calculation, collating and deducing from his information and data. But a Yogi needs none of these things; he looks, has the vision of the thing, sees that it is to be done in this way and not in another, and this seeing is his knowledge.

   Although it may be true in a general way and in a certain sense that a Yogi can know all things and can answer all questions from his own field of vision and consciousness, yet it does not follow that there are no questions whatever of any kind to which he would not or could not answer. A Yogi who has the direct knowledge, the knowledge of the true truth of things, would not care or perhaps would find it difficult to answer questions that belong entirely to the domain of human mental constructions. It may be, he could not or would not wish to solve problems and difficulties you might put to him which touch only the illusion of things and their appearances. The working of his knowledge is not in the mind. If you put him some silly mental query of that character, he probably would not answer. The very common conception that you can put any ignorant question to him as to some super-schoolmaster or demand from him any kind of information past, present or future and that he is bound to answer, is a foolish idea. It is as inept as the expectation from the spiritual man of feats and miracles that would satisfy the vulgar external mind and leave it gaping with wonder.

   Moreover, the term "Yogi" is very vague and wide. There are many types of Yogis, many lines or ranges of spiritual or occult endeavour and different heights of achievement, there are some whose powers do not extend beyond the mental level; there are others who have gone beyond it. Everything depends on the field or nature of their effort, the height to which they have arrived, the consciousness with which they have contact or into which they enter.

   Do not scientists go sometimes beyond the mental plane? It is said that Einstein found his theory of relativity not through any process of reasoning, but through some kind of sudden inspiration. Has that inspiration anything to do with the Supermind?

The scientist who gets an inspiration revealing to him a new truth, receives it from the intuitive mind. The knowledge comes as a direct perception in the higher mental plane illumined by some other light still farther above. But all that has nothing to do with the action of Supermind and this higher mental level is far removed from the supramental plane. Men are too easily inclined to believe that they have climbed into regions quite divine when they have only gone above the average level. There are many stages between the ordinary human mind and the Supermind, many grades and many intervening planes. If an ordinary man were to get into direct contact even with one of these intermediate planes, he would be dazzled and blinded, would be crushed under the weight of the sense of immensity or would lose his balance; and yet it is not the Supermind.

   Behind the common idea that a Yogi can know all things and answer all questions is the actual fact that there is a plane in the mind where the memory of everything is stored and remains always in existence. All mental movements that belong to the life of the earth are memorised and registered in this plane. Those who are capable of going there and care to take the trouble, can read in it and learn anything they choose. But this region must not be mistaken for the supramental levels. And yet to reach even there you must be able to silence the movements of the material or physical mind; you must be able to leave aside all your sensations and put a stop to your ordinary mental movements, whatever they are; you must get out of the vital; you must become free from the slavery of the body. Then only you can enter into that region and see. But if you are sufficiently interested to make this effort, you can arrive there and read what is written in the earth's memory.

   Thus, if you go deep into silence, you can reach a level of consciousness on which it is not impossible for you to receive answers to all your questions. And if there is one who is consciously open to the plenary truth of the supermind, in constant contact with it, he can certainly answer any question that is worth an answer from the supramental Light. The queries put must come from some sense of the truth and reality behind things. There are many questions and much debated problems that are cobwebs woven of mere mental abstractions or move on the illusory surface of things. These do not pertain to real knowledge; they are a deformation of knowledge, their very substance is of the ignorance. Certainly the supramental knowledge may give an answer, its own answer, to the problems set by the mind's ignorance; but it is likely that it would not be at all satisfactory or perhaps even intelligible to those who ask from the mental level. You must not expect the supramental to work in the way of the mind or demand that the knowledge in truth should be capable of being pieced together with the half-knowledge in ignorance. The scheme of the mind is one thing, but Supermind is quite another and it would no longer be supramental if it adapted itself to the exigencies of the mental scheme. The two are incommensurable and cannot be put together.

   When the consciousness has attained to supramental joys, does it no longer take interest in the things of the mind?

The supramental does not take interest in mental things in the same way as the mind. It takes its own interest in all the movements of the universe, but it is from a different point of view and with a different vision. The world presents to it an entirely different appearance; there is a reversal of outlook and everything is seen from there as other than what it seems to the mind and often even the opposite. Things have another meaning; their aspect, their motion and process, everything about them, are watched with other eyes. Everything here is followed by the supermind; the mind movements and not less the vital, the material movements, all the play of the universe have for it a very deep interest, but of another kind. It is about the same difference as that between the interest taken in a puppet-play by one who holds the strings and knows what the puppets are to do and the will that moves them and that they can do only what it moves them to do, and the interest taken by another who observes the play but sees only what is happening from moment to moment and knows nothing else. The one who follows the play and is outside its secret has a stronger, an eager and passionate interest in what will happen and he gives an excited attention to its unforeseen or dramatic events; the other, who holds the strings and moves the show, is unmoved and tranquil. There is a certain intensity of interest which comes from ignorance and is bound up with illusion, and that must disappear when you are out of the ignorance. The interest that human beings take in things founds itself on the illusion; if that were removed, they would have no interest at all in the play; they would find it dry and dull. That is why all this ignorance, all this illusion has lasted so long; it is because men like it, because they cling to it and its peculiar kind of appeal that it endures.

   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931, 93?
,
165:
   The whole question.


The whole question? And now, do you understand?... Not quite? I told you that you did not understand because it was muddled up; in one question three different ideas were included. So naturally it created a confusion. But taken separately they are what I explained to you just now, most probably; that is to say, one has this altogether ignorant and obliterated consciousness and is convinced that he is the cause and effect, the origin and result of himself, separate from all others, separate with a limited power to act upon others and a little greater capacity to be set in movement by others or to react to others' influence. That is how people think usually, something like that, isn't that so? How do you feel, you? What effect do you have upon yourself? And you? And you?... You have never thought about it? You have never looked into yourself to see what effect you exercise upon yourself? Never thought over it? No? How do you feel? Nobody will tell me? Come, you tell me that. Never tried to understand how you feel? Yes? No? How strange! Never sought to understand how, for example, decisions take place in you? From where do they come? What makes you decide one thing rather than another? And what is the relation between a decision of yours and your action? And to what extent do you have the freedom of choice between one thing and another? And how far do you feel you are able to, you are free to do this or that or that other or nothing at all?... You have pondered over that? Yes? Is there any one among the students who has thought over it? No? Nobody put the question to himself? You? You?...

Even if one thinks over it, perhaps one is not able to answer!

One cannot explain?

No.

It is difficult to explain? Even this simple little thing, to see where in your consciousness the wills that come from outside meet your will (which you call yours, which comes from within), at what place the two join together and to what extent the one from outside acts upon that from within and the one from within acts upon that from outside? You have never tried to find this out? It has never seemed to you unbearable that a will from outside should have an action upon your will? No?

I do not know.

Oh! I am putting very difficult problems! But, my children, I was preoccupied with that when I was a child of five!... So I thought you must have been preoccupied with it since a long time. In oneself, there are contradictory wills. Yes, many. That is one of the very first discoveries. There is one part which wants things this way; and then at another moment, another way, and a third time, one wants still another thing! Besides, there is even this: something that wants and another which says no. So? But it is exactly that which has to be found if you wish in the least to organise yourself. Why not project yourself upon a screen, as in the cinema, and then look at yourself moving on it? How interesting it is!

This is the first step.

You project yourself on the screen and then observe and see all that is moving there and how it moves and what happens. You make a little diagram, it becomes so interesting then. And then, after a while, when you are quite accustomed to seeing, you can go one step further and take a decision. Or even a still greater step: you organise - arrange, take up all that, put each thing in its place, organise in such a way that you begin to have a straight movement with an inner meaning. And then you become conscious of your direction and are able to say: "Very well, it will be thus; my life will develop in that way, because that is the logic of my being. Now, I have arranged all that within me, each thing has been put in its place, and so naturally a central orientation is forming. I am following this orientation. One step more and I know what will happen to me for I myself am deciding it...." I do not know, I am telling you this; to me it seemed terribly interesting, the most interesting thing in the world. There was nothing, no other thing that interested me more than that.

This happened to me.... I was five or six or seven years old (at seven the thing became quite serious) and I had a father who loved the circus, and he came and told me: "Come with me, I am going to the circus on Sunday." I said: "No, I am doing something much more interesting than going to the circus!" Or again, young friends invited me to attend a meeting where we were to play together, enjoy together: "No, I enjoy here much more...." And it was quite sincere. It was not a pose: for me, it was like this, it was true. There was nothing in the world more enjoyable than that.

And I am so convinced that anybody who does it in that way, with the same freshness and sincerity, will obtain most interesting results.... To put all that on a screen in front of yourself and look at what is happening. And the first step is to know all that is happening and then you must not try to shut your eyes when something does not appear pleasant to you! You must keep them wide open and put each thing in that way before the screen. Then you make quite an interesting discovery. And then the next step is to start telling yourself: "Since all that is happening within me, why should I not put this thing in this way and then that thing in that way and then this other in this way and thus wouldn't I be doing something logical that has a meaning? Why should I not remove that thing which stands obstructing the way, these conflicting wills? Why? And what does that represent in the being? Why is it there? If it were put there, would it not help instead of harming me?" And so on.

And little by little, little by little, you see clearer and then you see why you are made like that, what is the thing you have got to do - that for which you are born. And then, quite naturally, since all is organised for this thing to happen, the path becomes straight and you can say beforehand: "It is in this way that it will happen." And when things come from outside to try and upset all that, you are able to say: "No, I accept this, for it helps; I reject that, for that harms." And then, after a few years, you curb yourself as you curb a horse: you do whatever you like, in the way you like and you go wherever you like.

It seems to me this is worth the trouble. I believe it is the most interesting thing.

...

You must have a great deal of sincerity, a little courage and perseverance and then a sort of mental curiosity, you understand, curious, seeking to know, interested, wanting to learn. To love to learn: that, one must have in one's nature. To find it impossible to stand before something grey, all hazy, in which nothing is seen clearly and which gives you quite an unpleasant feeling, for you do not know where you begin and where you end, what is yours and what is not yours and what is settled and what is not settled - what is this pulp-like thing you call yourself in which things get intermingled and act upon one another without even your being aware of it? You ask yourself: "But why have I done this?" You know nothing about it. "And why have I felt that?" You don't know that, either. And then, you are thrown into a world outside that is only fog and you are thrown into a world inside that is also for you another kind of fog, still more impenetrable, in which you live, like a cork thrown upon the waters and the waves carry it away or cast it into the air, and it drops and rolls on. That is quite an unpleasant state. I do not know, but to me it appears unpleasant.

To see clearly, to see one's way, where one is going, why one is going there, how one is to go there and what one is going to do and what is the kind of relation with others... But that is a problem so wonderfully interesting - it is interesting - and you can always discover things every minute! One's work is never finished.

There is a time, there is a certain state of consciousness when you have the feeling that you are in that condition with all the weight of the world lying heavy upon you and besides you are going in blinkers and do not know where you are going, but there is something which is pushing you. And that is truly a very unpleasant condition. And there is another moment when one draws oneself up and is able to see what is there above, and one becomes it; then one looks at the world as though from the top of a very very high mountain and one sees all that is happening below; then one can choose one's way and follow it. That is a more pleasant condition. This then is truly the truth, you are upon earth for that, surely. All individual beings and all the little concentrations of consciousness were created to do this work. It is the very reason for existence: to be able to become fully conscious of a certain sum of vibrations representing an individual being and put order there and find one's way and follow it.

And so, as men do not know it and do not do it, life comes and gives them a blow here: "Oh! that hurts", then a blow there: "Ah! that's hurting me." And the thing goes on like that and all the time it is like that. And all the time they are getting pain somewhere. They suffer, they cry, they groan. But it is simply due to that reason, there is no other: it is that they have not done that little work. If, when they were quite young, there had been someone to teach them to do the work and they had done it without losing time, they could have gone through life gloriously and instead of suffering they would have been all-powerful masters of their destiny.

This is not to say that necessarily all things would become pleasant. It is not at all that. But your reaction towards things becomes the true reaction and instead of suffering, you learn; instead of being miserable, you go forward and progress. After all, I believe it is for this that you are here - so that there is someone who can tell you: "There, well, try that. It is worth trying." ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953, 199,
166:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.
The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.
The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.
It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.
As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.

And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.

It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!
This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.
My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?

A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.
Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.

Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.
If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.
First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!
Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"
I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.
Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.
These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."
Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.
If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'
The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passage

Omnes eodem cogimur, omnium
Versatur urna serius ocius
Sors exitura et nos in aeternum
Exilium impositura cymbae.

Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?
And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'
We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?
And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.
I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!

"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,
'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'
Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,
Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vain
Upon the axis of its pain,
Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,
Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."

Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.
But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!
One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.
But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!

'Farewell, farewell! but this I tell
To thee, thou Wedding-Guest!
He prayeth well, who loveth well
Both man and bird and beast.
He prayeth best, who loveth best
All things both great and small;
For the dear God who loveth us,
He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno,

*** WISDOM TROVE ***

1:Love gives life purpose and meaning. ~ joyce-meyer, @wisdomtrove
2:The meaning of life is that it stops. ~ franz-kafka, @wisdomtrove
3:To be and to have meaning are the same. ~ parmenides, @wisdomtrove
4:Despair is suffering without meaning. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
5:We are the custodians of life's meaning. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
6:Life without pain has no meaning. ~ arthur-schopenhauer, @wisdomtrove
7:Love life more than the meaning of it? ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
8:The meaning lies in the appropriation. ~ soren-kierkegaard, @wisdomtrove
9:The meaning of life is that it is to be lived. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
10:The sole meaning of life is to serve humanity. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
11:Om is the greatest, meaning the Absolute. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
12:We had the experience, but we missed the meaning. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
13:My life carries its own meaning in itself. ~ albert-schweitzer, @wisdomtrove
14:Connection gives purpose and meaning to our lives. ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
15:I can bear any pain as long as it has meaning. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
16:In every object there is inexhaustible meaning. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
17:love only variously everyday The meaning of love ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
18:Great marketers don't make stuff. They make meaning. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
19:I don't believe there's an atom of meaning in it. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
20:The meaning that you give an event is the event.   ~ deepak-chopra, @wisdomtrove
21:Return to the root and you will find the meaning. ~ jianzhi-sengcan, @wisdomtrove
22:The meaning of Life is whatever we Choose. ~ jonathan-lockwood-huie, @wisdomtrove
23:We needed to stop asking about the meaning of life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
24:First learn the meaning of what you say, and then speak. ~ epictetus, @wisdomtrove
25:What is the meaning of life? To be happy and useful.     ~ dalai-lama, @wisdomtrove
26:When words lose their meaning, people lose their liberty. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
27:If there are none [gods], All our toil is without meaning. ~ euripedes, @wisdomtrove
28:Life has meaning only if you do what is meaningful to you. ~ alan-cohen, @wisdomtrove
29:Words may show a man's wit but actions his meaning. ~ benjamin-franklin, @wisdomtrove
30:Attraversiamo (meaning "Lets cross over" in Italian) ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
31:Power is a word the meaning of which we do not understand. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
32:Friend is sometimes a word devoid of meaning; enemy, never. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
33:Life belongs to man, but the meaning of life is beyond him. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
34:Life has no meaning except in terms of responsibility. ~ reinhold-niebuhr, @wisdomtrove
35:This is the meaning of true love, to give until it hurts. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
36:No poet, no artist of any art, has his complete meaning alone. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
37:The meaning of life consists in the love and service of God. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
38:Connect, create meaning, make a difference, matter, be missed. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
39:Trust that which gives you meaning and accept it as your guide. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
40:Just when I discovered the meaning of life, they changed it. ~ george-carlin, @wisdomtrove
41:Man's search for meaning is the chief motivation of his life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
42:If justice perishes, human life on Earth has lost its meaning. ~ immanuel-kant, @wisdomtrove
43:There is within every soul a thirst for happiness and meaning. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
44:In the act of tearing something apart, you lose its meaning. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
45:It might be possible that the world itself is without meaning. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
46:There is within every soul a thirst for happiness and meaning. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
47:When a man cannot find meaning, he numbs himself with pleasure. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
48:Somewhere we know that without silence, words lose their meaning. ~ henri-nouwen, @wisdomtrove
49:The meaning of my life is to help others find meaning in theirs. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
50:A life of kindness is the primary meaning of divine worship. ~ emanuel-swedenborg, @wisdomtrove
51:Always engage in the quest for life's meaning, which is inner peace. ~ longchenpa, @wisdomtrove
52:Intelligence plus character is the true meaning of education. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
53:In the morning there is meaning, in the evening there is feeling. ~ gertrude-stein, @wisdomtrove
54:What do you want a meaning for? Life is a desire, not a meaning. ~ charlie-chaplan, @wisdomtrove
55:Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
56:Grow spiritually and help others to do so. It is the meaning of life. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
57:Hard work is a prison sentence only if it does not have meaning. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
58:Human beings given hope by meaning can face the inevitability of death. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
59:Life in itself has no meaning. Life is an opportunity to create meaning. ~ rajneesh, @wisdomtrove
60:No finite point has meaning without an infinite reference point. ~ jean-paul-sartre, @wisdomtrove
61:Our main motivation for living is our will to find meaning in life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
62:Though we speak nonsense, God will pick out the meaning of it. ~ nathaniel-hawthorne, @wisdomtrove
63:I am sustained by the certainty that life has meaning... as does death. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
64:Neurosis is the suffering of a soul which has not discovered its meaning. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
65:I wonder is illiterate people know the full meaning of alphabet soup? ~ jerry-seinfeld, @wisdomtrove
66:Time has no meaning in itself unless we choose to give it significance ~ leo-buscaglia, @wisdomtrove
67:If I asked for a cup of coffee, someone would search for the double meaning. ~ mae-west, @wisdomtrove
68:Meaning is in contribution, in living for something higher than self. ~ stephen-r-covey, @wisdomtrove
69:The aim of every human being is to understand the meaning of total love. ~ paulo-coelho, @wisdomtrove
70:The quest for meaning is the key to mental health and human flourishing ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
71:To be truly happy, you need a clear sense of meaning and purpose in life. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
72:Thought itself is harmless, an empty concept until we fill it with meaning. ~ wayne-dyer, @wisdomtrove
73:Life has no meaning the moment you lose the illusion of being eternal. ~ jean-paul-sartre, @wisdomtrove
74:Man can only find meaning for his existence in something outside himself. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
75:Power to translate is the test of having really understood one's own meaning. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
76:Storytelling reveals meaning without committing the error of defining it. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
77:Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
78:First, believe in the world - that there is meaning behind everything. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
79:In speaking, it is best to be clear and say just enough to convey the meaning. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
80:I see the meaning of apocalypse as an unveiling of our deeper self. ~ barbara-marx-hubbard, @wisdomtrove
81:Reason is the natural order of truth; but imagination is the organ of meaning. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
82:True love is rare, and it's the only thing that gives life real meaning. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
83:Om Namah Shivaya, meaning, I honor the divinity that resides within me. ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
84:The richest source of creation is feeling, followed by a vision of its meaning. ~ anais-nin, @wisdomtrove
85:..Yet if today has no meaning, the past was a Blank and the future is a Chaos. ~ henry-ford, @wisdomtrove
86:Chasing meaning is better for your health than trying to avoid discomfort. ~ kelly-mcgonigal, @wisdomtrove
87:I don't know the meaning of life, but I know compassion is the key. ~ jonathan-lockwood-huie, @wisdomtrove
88:If there is meaning in life at all, then there must be meaning in suffering. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
89:The more we live by our intellect, the less we understand the meaning of life. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
90:To know is to know that you know nothing. That is the meaning of true knowledge. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
91:To know, is to know that you know nothing. That is the meaning of true knowledge.  ~ socrates, @wisdomtrove
92:Bhuta ia, dewa ia. (Bali expression meaning Man is a demon, man is a god.) ~ elizabeth-gilbert, @wisdomtrove
93:Pay attention to where you are going because without meaning you might get nowhere. ~ a-a-milne, @wisdomtrove
94:The meaning of our existence is not invented by ourselves, but rather detected. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
95:We are more curious about the meaning of dreams than about things we see when awake. ~ diogenes, @wisdomtrove
96:What humans want is not just happiness. They want justice; they want meaning. ~ martin-seligman, @wisdomtrove
97:The meaning I picked, the one that changed my life: Overcome fear, behold wonder. ~ richard-bach, @wisdomtrove
98:The mind gives meaning to anything but the meaning it gives is meaningless. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
99:The true office of any faith is to give life a meaning which death cannot destroy. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
100:The works of nature first acquire a meaning in the commentaries they provoke. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
101:Life has to be given a meaning because of the obvious fact that it has no meaning. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
102:My cat knows the meaning of life, but has no interest in sharing the secret. ~ ashleigh-brilliant, @wisdomtrove
103:My meaning is, that no man can expect his children to respect what he degrades. ~ charles-dickens, @wisdomtrove
104:The only important thing in a book is the meaning that it has for you. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
105:Politics: Poli a Latin word meaning many and tics meaning bloodsucking creatures. ~ robin-williams, @wisdomtrove
106:The meaning of life is just to be alive. It is so plain and so obvious and so simple. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
107:When children reach the age of sixteen, they discover the meaning of life: car keys. ~ erma-bombeck, @wisdomtrove
108:Words exist because of meaning; once you’ve gotten the meaning, you can forget the words. ~ zhuangzi, @wisdomtrove
109:Challenging the meaning of life is the truest expression of the state of being human. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
110:Divorce, from the Latin word meaning to rip out a man’s genitals through his wallet. ~ robin-williams, @wisdomtrove
111:It was like the beginning of life and laughter. It was the real meaning of the sun ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
112:No birth is an accident, No experience is without meaning, and no life is without value. ~ gary-zukav, @wisdomtrove
113:Politics: Poli a Latin word meaning many; and "tics" meaning bloodsucking creatures. ~ robin-williams, @wisdomtrove
114:Suffering doesn’t come from the fact; it comes from the meaning we assign to the fact. ~ tony-robbins, @wisdomtrove
115:Ah, Lord Jesus! I never knew Your love till I understood the meaning of Your death. ~ charles-spurgeon, @wisdomtrove
116:..finally he was just another ant, working and working until he died without meaning. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
117:Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence. ~ aristotle, @wisdomtrove
118:The meaning of good and bad, of better and worse, is simply helping or hurting.   ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
119:Life is never made unbearable by circumstances, but only by lack of meaning and purpose. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
120:Man's progress is but a gradual discovery that his questions have no meaning. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
121:People want to find a meaning in everything and everyone. That's the disease of our age. ~ pablo-picasso, @wisdomtrove
122:The meaning of life is found in openness to being and "being present" in full awareness. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
123:What the meaning of human life may be I don't know: I incline to suspect that it has none. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
124:Pleasure is the least consequential... engagement and meaning are much more important. ~ martin-seligman, @wisdomtrove
125:When a person can’t find a deep sense of meaning, they distract themselves with pleasure. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
126:An individual piece only has meaning when it is seen as part of the whole. ~ georg-wilhelm-friedrich-hegel, @wisdomtrove
127:I meet a man with a thousand dollars and leave him with two; that's the meaning of subtraction. ~ mae-west, @wisdomtrove
128:Life may have no meaning. Or even worse, it may have a meaning of which I disapprove. ~ ashleigh-brilliant, @wisdomtrove
129:Only fanatics in religion as well as in politics can find a meaning in someone else’s death. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
130:The universe gives birth to consciousness, and consciousness gives meaning to the universe. ~ john-wheeler, @wisdomtrove
131:To live in the presence of God who is Truth - this indeed is the meaning of satsang. ~ anandamayi-ma, @wisdomtrove
132:You shall not, for the sake of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity. ~ jane-austen, @wisdomtrove
133:The least of things with a meaning is worth more in life than the greatest of things without it. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
134:Am I a weed, carried this way, that way, on a tide that comes twice a day without a meaning? ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
135:Life in itself is so beautiful that to ask the question of the meaning of life is simply nonsense. ~ rajneesh, @wisdomtrove
136:The Bible was composed in such a way that as beginners mature, its meaning grows with them. ~ saint-augustine, @wisdomtrove
137:We are as ignorant of the meaning of the dragon as we are of the meaning of the universe. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
138:Life has meaning only if one barters it day by day for something other than itself. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
139:Death is our constant companion, and it is death that gives each person's life its true meaning. ~ paulo-coelho, @wisdomtrove
140:Meaning and reality were not hidden somewhere behind things, they were in them, in all of them. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
141:Most of the things that give life its depth, meaning, and value are impervious to science. ~ rachel-naomi-remen, @wisdomtrove
142:Oh, it is not death that frightens me, but the impossibility of imparting some meaning to my past. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
143:The external forces conceal from the eyes the deep meaning of existence; True faith resides in the heart. ~ kabir, @wisdomtrove
144:The very reason for nature's existence is the education of the soul; it has no other meaning. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
145:To study history means submitting to chaos and nevertheless retaining faith in order and meaning. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
146:Laws are a dead letter without courts to expound and define their true meaning and operation. ~ alexander-hamilton, @wisdomtrove
147:One of the hardest things in the world is to convey a meaning accurately from one mind to another. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
148:Our obligation is to give meaning to life and in doing so to overcome the passive, indifferent life. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
149:Philosophers can debate the meaning of life, but you need a Lord who can declare the meaning of life. ~ max-lucado, @wisdomtrove
150:Ah, yes, divorce . . . from the Latin word meaning to rip out a man’s genitals through his wallet. ~ robin-williams, @wisdomtrove
151:I simply painted images of what was before my eyes; it is for others to find hidden meaning in them. ~ pablo-picasso, @wisdomtrove
152:love-why can't you leave me alone? Which is a rhetorical question meaning: for heaven's sake, don't. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
153:Man’s main concern is not to gain pleasure or to avoid pain but rather to see a meaning in his life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
154:Tantric Buddhists don't believe in sin. Stupidity, yes, meaning we make ourselves or others suffer. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
155:You want to change your life? Control the only thing you can control: the meaning you give something. ~ tony-robbins, @wisdomtrove
156:Above the unity of being is the union of love. Love is the meaning and purpose of duality. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
157:Man is a goal seeking animal. His life only has meaning if he is reaching out and striving for his goals. ~ aristotle, @wisdomtrove
158:The meaning of things lies not in the things themselves, but in our attitude towards them. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
159:The things she most wanted to tell him would lose their meaning the moment she put them into words. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
160:The word Fascism has now no meaning except in so far as it signifies &
161:Life takes on meaning when you become motivated, set goals and charge after them in an unstoppable manner. ~ les-brown, @wisdomtrove
162:We don’t ask to be eternal beings. We only ask that things do not lose all their meaning. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
163:Real success means creating a life of meaning through service that fulfills your reason for being here. ~ oprah-winfrey, @wisdomtrove
164:When you are afraid of someone, they can gain power over you, meaning they can drop your energy level. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
165:In every object there is inexhaustible meaning; the eye sees in it what the eye brings means of seeing. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
166:It is not what you hear, it is where you listen from within yourself that gives meaning to the message. ~ lyania-vanzant, @wisdomtrove
167:My whole being was seeking for something still unknown which might confer meaning upon the banality of life. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
168:Om is a living phenomenon and it has its own mood. Depending on its mood the meaning will be revealed to you. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
169:What gave money its true meaning was its dark-night namelessness, its breathtaking interchangeability. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
170:When the deep meaning of things is not understood the mind’s essential peace is disturbed to no avail. ~ jianzhi-sengcan, @wisdomtrove
171:When the shriveled skin of the ordinary is stuffed out with meaning, it satisfies the senses amazingly. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
172:Religion reveals the meaning of life, and science only applies this meaning to the course of circumstances. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
173:When goals go, meaning goes. When meaning goes, purpose goes. When purpose goes, life goes dead on our hands. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
174:Love is our true destiny. We do not find the meaning of life by ourselves alone - we find it with another. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
175:We have children to pursue other elements of well-being. We want meaning in life. We want relationships. ~ martin-seligman, @wisdomtrove
176:Words mean more than what is set down on paper. It takes the human voice to infuse them with deeper meaning. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
177:It seems to me, however, that human beings need meaning as much as they need food and shelter … perhaps more so? ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
178:Love cannot remain by itself - it has no meaning. Love has to be put into action and that action is service. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
179:A psychoneurosis must be understood, ultimately, as the suffering of a soul which has not discovered its meaning. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
180:Esteem must be founded on some sort of preference. Bestow it on everybody and it ceases to have any meaning at all. ~ moliere, @wisdomtrove
181:It was SHE. Whoever has loved knows all the radiant meaning contained in the three letters of this word ‘she. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
182:Unfortunately, the only meaning that society attributes to life today is an opportunity to make money. ~ mata-amritanandamayi, @wisdomtrove
183:In the uttermost meaning of the words, thought is devout, and devotion is thought. Deep calls unto deep. ~ ralph-waldo-emerson, @wisdomtrove
184:Words differently arranged have a different meaning, and meanings differently arranged have different effects. ~ blaise-pascal, @wisdomtrove
185:Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning. ~ benjamin-franklin, @wisdomtrove
186:The meaning in life is not out there but inbetween our ears. In many ways this makes us the lords of creation. ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
187:Yet in truth the lives of most people have meaning only within the network of stories they tell one another. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
188:I wasn’t lonely. I experienced no self-pity. I was just caught up in a life in which I could Ô¨Ånd no meaning. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
189:Go after what it is that creates meaning in your life and then trust yourself to handle the stress that follows. ~ kelly-mcgonigal, @wisdomtrove
190:We had the experience but missed the meaning. And approach to the meaning restores the experience in a different form. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
191:A bird sings, a child prattles, but it is the same hymn; hymn indistinct, inarticulate, but full of profound meaning. ~ victor-hugo, @wisdomtrove
192:In some ways suffering ceases to be suffering at the moment it finds a meaning, such as the meaning of a sacrifice. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
193:Mere color, unspoiled by meaning, and unallied with definite form, can speak to the soul in a thousand different ways. ~ oscar-wilde, @wisdomtrove
194:There are many truths of which the full meaning cannot be realized until personal experience has brought it home. ~ john-stuart-mill, @wisdomtrove
195:Geometry is knowledge that appears to be produced by human beings, yet whose meaning is totally independent of them. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
196:The meaning of service is to do the work assigned ungrudgingly and without thought of personal reward material or moral. ~ d-t-suzuki, @wisdomtrove
197:These two enormous forces - truth and meaning - are at war in today's world... And something sooner or later has to give. ~ ken-wilber, @wisdomtrove
198:These two enormous forces — truth and meaning — are at war in today's world... .And something sooner or later has to give. ~ ken-wilber, @wisdomtrove
199:Yes, that's right... love should come before logic ... Only then will man come to understand the meaning of life. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
200:Ultimately, man should not ask what the meaning of his life is, but rather he must recognize that it is he who is asked. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
201:In times of crisis, people reach for meaning. Meaning is strength. Our survival may depend on our seeking and finding it. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
202:It is my conviction that no normal man ever fell in love, within the ordinary meaning of the term, after the age of thirty. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
203:Saying yes means getting up and acting on your belief that you can create meaning and purpose in whatever life hands you. ~ susan-jeffers, @wisdomtrove
204:The appreciation of the merits of art (of the emotions it conveys) depends upon an understanding of the meaning of life... ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
205:Stop talking, stop thinking, and there is nothing you will not understand. Return to the root and you will find Meaning. ~ jianzhi-sengcan, @wisdomtrove
206:A whole lifetime was too short to bring out, the full flavour; to extract every ounce of pleasure, every shade of meaning. ~ virginia-woolf, @wisdomtrove
207:I am not asking for sensational revelations, but I would like to sense the meaning of that minute, to feel it's urgency. ~ jean-paul-sartre, @wisdomtrove
208:Inner peace is more a question of cultivating perspective, meaning, and wisdom even as life touches you with its pain. ~ rachel-naomi-remen, @wisdomtrove
209:Isn't it funny the way some combinations of words can give you&
210:One must love life before loving its meaning ... yes, and when the love of life disappears, no meaning can console us. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
211:The best stories have many meanings; their meaning changes as our capacity to understand and appreciate meaning grows. ~ rachel-naomi-remen, @wisdomtrove
212:The lies (Western slander) which well-meaning zeal has heaped round this man (Muhammad) are disgraceful to ourselves only. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
213:The primitive stages can always be re-established; the primitive mind is, in the fullest meaning of the word, imperishable. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
214:We are hardwired to connect with others, it's what gives purpose and meaning to our lives, and without it there is suffering. ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
215:Art is a form of supremely delicate awareness and atonement — meaning atoneness, the state of being at one with the object. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
216:Atheism turns out to be too simple. If the whole universe has no meaning, we should never have found out that it has no meaning. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
217:The highest ensign that men ever met and embraced under, the Cross itself, had no meaning save an accidental extrinsic one. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
218:Truth is something which can't be told in a few words. Those who simplify the universe only reduce the expansion of its meaning. ~ anais-nin, @wisdomtrove
219:You can have meaning, accomplishment, engagement and good relationships, even if you are dull on the positive affect side. ~ martin-seligman, @wisdomtrove
220:I don't believe people are looking for the meaning of life as much as they are looking for the experience of being alive.   ~ joseph-campbell, @wisdomtrove
221:Speak English!' said the Eaglet. &
222:Your spirit is the part of you that seeks meaning and purpose. It's the part drawn to hope, that will not give in to despair. ~ caroline-myss, @wisdomtrove
223:A work should contain its total meaning within itself and should impress it on the spectator before he even knows the subject. ~ henri-matisse, @wisdomtrove
224:The meaning of life is that it is to be lived, and it is not to be traded and conceptualized and squeezed into a patter of systems. ~ bruce-lee, @wisdomtrove
225:When I took up the cross I recognized it's meaning. The cross is something that you bear, and ultimately, that you die on. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
226:Critics don't really affect the fact that we live in this paradise and what the meaning of that [is]. And what luck to have this! ~ alice-walker, @wisdomtrove
227:Grief is a healthy emotion, and it's healthy to embrace it. By accepting loss, we clarify our values and the meaning of our lives. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
228:Life has no meaning. Rejoice! It has no meaning. Dance, sing, enjoy! It has no meaning. You need not be serious. It is a cosmic joke. ~ rajneesh, @wisdomtrove
229:The meaning of life. The wasted years of life. The poor choices of life. God answers the mess of life with one word: &
230:A life of short duration... could be so rich in joy and love that it could contain more meaning than a life lasting eighty years. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
231:Books had shown me, however, that all people everywhere wanted their lives to have purpose and meaning. This longing was universal. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
232:Existence is random. Has no pattern save what we imagine after staring at it for too long. No meaning save what we choose to impose. ~ alan-moore, @wisdomtrove
233:Each man must look to himself to teach him the meaning of life. It is not something discovered: it is something molded. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
234:I wanna live. I don’t wanna die. That’s the whole meaning of life: Not dying! I figured that shit out by myself in the third grade ~ george-carlin, @wisdomtrove
235:I would rather feel compassion than know the meaning of it. I would hope to act with compassion without thinking of personal gain. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
236:To each individual the world will take on a different connotation of meaning-the important lies in the desire to search for an answer. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
237:We can discover this meaning in life in three different ways: 1. by doing a deed; 2. by experiencing a value; and 3. by suffering. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
238:Action has meaning only in relationship, and without understanding relationship, action on any level will only breed conflict. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
239:I think that people get experiences, and out of those experiences come meaning and ideas. It's like watching a rose bush grow. ~ rachel-naomi-remen, @wisdomtrove
240:I would rather feel compassion than know the meaning of it. I would hope to act with compassion without thinking of personal gain. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
241:Meaningless combinations of words do not suddenly acquire meaning simply because we prefix to them the two other words &
242:Your spirit is the part of you that seeks meaning and purpose. It's the part drawn to hope, that will not give in to despair. ~ norman-vincent-peale, @wisdomtrove
243:Except if it has some historical meaning for them to have Tibet under their control. I don't understand why [ Chinese] want it so much. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
244:I'm a Bhakti, meaning I practice devotional yoga and the heart and love, so I say to people, start with your ego and go down to your heart. ~ ram-das, @wisdomtrove
245:The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
246:We live not by things, but by the meaning of things. It is needful to transmit the passwords from generation to generation. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
247:How many times have you noticed that it's the little quiet moments in the midst of life that seem to give the rest extra-special meaning? ~ fred-rogers, @wisdomtrove
248:It is here that we encounter the central theme of existentialism: to live is to suffer, to survive is to find meaning in the suffering. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
249:The future belongs to the competent. It belongs to those who are very, very good at what they do. It does not belong to the well meaning. ~ brian-tracy, @wisdomtrove
250:Life has no meaning. Each of us has meaning and we bring it to life. It is a waste to be asking the question when you are the answer.  ~ joseph-campbell, @wisdomtrove
251:Life is without meaning. You bring the meaning to it. The meaning of life is whatever you ascribe it to be. Being alive is the meaning. ~ joseph-campbell, @wisdomtrove
252:Preachers in pulpits talked about what a great message is in the book. No matter what you do, somebody always imputes meaning into your books. ~ dr-seuss, @wisdomtrove
253:If language is not rectified, words do not correspond to meaning, and if words do not correspond to meaning, our deeds cannot be accomplished. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
254:Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness, and the word “happiness” would lose it’s meaning if it were not balanced by sadness. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
255:In the Book of Poetry there are three hundred poems, but the meaning of all of them may be put in a single sentence: Have no debasing thoughts. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
256:Life is without meaning. You bring the meaning to it. The meaning of life is whatever you ascribe it to be. Being alive is the meaning.   ~ joseph-campbell, @wisdomtrove
257:Do not wait another day to become fully engaged in your life, to learn to love and to forgive, and to live with greater purpose & meaning. ~ debbie-ford, @wisdomtrove
258:My political opinions lean more and more to Anarchy (philosophically understood, meaning abolition of control not whiskered men with bombs). ~ j-r-r-tolkien, @wisdomtrove
259:And this is the final meaning of work: the extension of human consciousness. The lesser meaning of work is the achieving of self-preservation. ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
260:Once an individual's search for meaning is successful, it not only renders him happy but also gives him the capability to cope with suffering ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
261:How high your awareness level is determines how much meaning you get from your world. Photography can teach you to improve your awareness level. ~ amsel-adams, @wisdomtrove
262:It is not that the meaning cannot be explained. But there are certain meanings that are lost forever the moment they are explained in words. ~ haruki-murakami, @wisdomtrove
263:When thanksgiving is filled with true meaning and is not just the formality of a polite &
264:The true meaning of Christ's teaching consists in the recognition of love as the supreme law of life, and therefore not admitting any exceptions. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
265:Nothing ever happens but once in all this world. What I do now I do once for all. It is over and gone, with all its eternity of solemn meaning. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
266:What it's like to be a parent: It's one of the hardest things you'll ever do but in exchange it teaches you the meaning of unconditional love. ~ nicholas-sparks, @wisdomtrove
267:Before you come alive, life is nothing; it &
268:The progress of our soul is like a perfect poem. It has an infinite idea which, once realised, makes all movements full of meaning and joy. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
269:You cannot create a life of fulfillment, joy, and meaning while you are barricading yourself from others and from the opportunities Life offers you. ~ gary-zukav, @wisdomtrove
270:You may have thousands of lives to go between now and before you're a real hard-core seeker of enlightenment, hardcore meaning you just love it. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
271:I want to be a writer who reminds others that these moments exist; I want to prove that there is infinite space, infinite meaning, infinite dimension. ~ anais-nin, @wisdomtrove
272:The well-meaning contention that all ideas have equal merit seems to me little different from the disastrous contention that no ideas have any merit. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
273:Let yourself go. Pull out from the depths those thoughts that you do not understand, and spread them out in the sunlight and know the meaning of them. ~ e-m-forster, @wisdomtrove
274:There is to my mind no doubt that the concept of beautiful had its roots in sexual excitation and that its original meaning was sexually stimulating. ~ sigmund-freud, @wisdomtrove
275:As for me, to love you alone, to make you happy, to do nothing which would contradict your wishes, this is my destiny and the meaning of my life. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
276:Now the answer ... is plain, but it is so unpalatable that most men will not face it. There is no reason for life and life has no meaning. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
277:On certain continents poverty is more spiritual than material, a poverty that consists of loneliness, discouragement, and the lack of meaning in life. ~ mother-teresa, @wisdomtrove
278:The more you create authentic power, the more the characteristics of authentic power become yours, and the more meaning, purpose and joy enter your life. ~ gary-zukav, @wisdomtrove
279:We ought not to criticize, explain, or judge the Scriptures by our mere reason, but diligently, with prayer, meditate thereon, and seek their meaning. ~ martin-luther, @wisdomtrove
280:The correct meaning of the statement The Vedas are beginningless and eternal is that the law or truth revealed by them is permanent and changeless. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
281:The people who ask what is the meaning of life are the people who have missed life, who are alive because they are still breathing; otherwise they are dead. ~ rajneesh, @wisdomtrove
282:Connection is why we’re here. We are hardwired to connect with others, it’s what gives purpose and meaning to our lives, and without it there is suffering. ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
283:Sometimes the events of my life are so pregnant with symbolic meaning I find myself asking ‘If this were a dream what would this be showing me about myself ?’ ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
284:The problem of reconciling human suffering with the existence of a God who loves, is only insoluble so long as we attach a trivial meaning to the word "love." ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
285:We get to CHOOSE the meaning for our lives. Our lives mean exactly what we say they do - no more, no less. Each of us chooses their path in life. ~ jonathan-lockwood-huie, @wisdomtrove
286:Stop asking yourself questions that have no meaning. Or if they have, you'll find out when you need to - find out both the questions and the answers. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
287:The struggle for existence is a struggle &
288:When art critics get together they talk about Form and Structure and Meaning. When artists get together they talk about where you can buy cheap turpentine. ~ pablo-picasso, @wisdomtrove
289:As the struggle for survival has subsided, the question has emerged: survival for what? Ever more people have the means to live, but no meaning to live for. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
290:God gave you that gifted tongue of yours, and set it between your teeth, to make known your true meaning to us, not to be rattled like a muffin man's bell. ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
291:We decided that it was no good asking what is the meaning of life, because life isn't an answer, life is the question, and you, yourself, are the answer. ~ ursula-k-le-guin, @wisdomtrove
292:It is much easier to live with the fantasy, because the fantasy gives meaning to the suffering. Priests discovered this principle thousands of years ago. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
293:Love in your mind produces love in your life. This is the meaning of Heaven. Fear in your mind produces fear in your life. This is the meaning of hell. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
294:Somewhere we know that without silence words lose their meaning, that without listening speaking no longer heals, that without distance closeness cannot cure. ~ henri-nouwen, @wisdomtrove
295:For man to be able to live he must either not see the infinite, or have such an explanation of the meaning of life as will connect the finite with the infinite. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
296:When a person does something, it has the man or woman look about it. It drips with humanity. You can follow the logic of it and see the meaning behind it. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
297:By using stale metaphors, similes and idioms, you save much mental effort, at the cost of leaving your meaning vague, not only for your reader but for yourself. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
298:I do not deal with the text [of the Bible] scientifically. I read it, I'm interested in its layers of meaning, but my relation to it is much more an emotional one. ~ elie-wiesel, @wisdomtrove
299:I don’t know whether this world has a meaning that transcends it. But I know that I cannot know that meaning and that it is impossible for me just now to know it. ~ albert-camus, @wisdomtrove
300:Then I grasped the meaning of the greatest secret that human poetry and human thought and belief have to impart: The salvation of man is through love and in love. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
301:By learning to identify your energy patterns, you will be able to gain a much greater vision of the meaning and purpose of your many experiences and relationships. ~ caroline-myss, @wisdomtrove
302:For men may prove and use their friends, as the poet expresses it, usque ad aras, meaning that a friend should not be required to act contrary to the law of God. ~ miguel-de-cervantes, @wisdomtrove
303:Haven’t you noticed how full of significant patterns and strange coincidences your experience is? As if there is some hidden meaning? Well, that’s because this is a dream. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
304:I have always believed, and I still believe, that whatever good or bad fortune may come our way we can always give it meaning and transform it into something of value. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
305:Well-being cannot exist just in your own head. Well-being is a combination of feeling good as well as actually having meaning, good relationships and accomplishment. ~ martin-seligman, @wisdomtrove
306:The Bhagavad-Gita is a true scripture of the human race a living creation rather than a book, with a new message for every age and a new meaning for every civilization. ~ sri-aurobindo, @wisdomtrove
307:These tasks, and therefore the meaning of life, differ from man to man, and from moment to moment. Thus it is impossible to define the meaning in life in a general way. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
308:Most of us lead far more meaningful lives than we know. Often finding meaning is not about doing things differently; it is about seeing familiar things in new ways. ~ rachel-naomi-remen, @wisdomtrove
309:The muffled syllables that Nature speaks Fill us with deeper longing for her word; She hides a meaning that the spirit seeks, She makes a sweeter music than is heard. ~ george-santayana, @wisdomtrove
310:By learning to identify your energy patterns, you will be able to gain a much greater vision of the meaning and purpose of your many experiences and relationships. ~ norman-vincent-peale, @wisdomtrove
311: He does not always remain bent over pages; he often leans back and closes his eyes over a line he has been reading again, and its meaning spreads through his blood. ~ rainer-maria-rilke, @wisdomtrove
312:People assume that the meaning of a song is vested in the lyrics. To me, that has never been the case. There are very few songs that I can think of where I remember the words. ~ brian-eno, @wisdomtrove
313:I expect to retire to a fine-grained heaven where the temperatures are always consistent, where the images slide before one's eyes in a continual cascade of form and meaning. ~ amsel-adams, @wisdomtrove
314:In certain kinds of writing, particularly in art criticism and literary criticism, it is normal to come across long passages which are almost completely lacking in meaning. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
315:He does not always remain bent over the pages; he often leans back and closes his eyes over a line he has been reading again, and its meaning spreads through his blood. ~ rainer-maria-rilke, @wisdomtrove
316:HELPED are those who love the entire cosmos rather than their own tiny country, city, or farm, for to them will be shown the unbroken web of life and the meaning of infinity. ~ alice-walker, @wisdomtrove
317:I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed; We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
318:Science is clearly one of the most profound methods that humans have yet devised for discovering truth, while religion remains the single greatest force for generating meaning. ~ ken-wilber, @wisdomtrove
319:Hard work is a prison sentence only if it does not have meaning. Once it does, it becomes the kind of thing that makes you grab your wife around the waist and dance a jig. ~ malcolm-gladwell, @wisdomtrove
320:It all depends on how we look at things, and not on how things are in themselves. The least of things with a meaning is worth more in life than the greatest of things without it. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
321:I use the word totally too much. I need to change it up and use a word that is different but has the same meaning. Mitch do you like submarine sandwiches? All-encompassingly. ~ mitch-hedberg, @wisdomtrove
322:In the search for reality, energy creates its own discipline. But mere discipline, without full comprehension of all this, has no meaning, it is a most destructive thing. ~ jiddu-krishnamurti, @wisdomtrove
323:Let your beauty manifest itself without talking and calculation. You are silent. It says for you: I am. And comes in meaning thousandfold, come at long last over everyone. ~ rainer-maria-rilke, @wisdomtrove
324:There is nothing in the world, I venture to say, that would so effectively help one to survive even the worst conditions as the knowledge that there is a meaning in one's life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
325:Subatomic particles have no meaning as isolated entities, but can only be understood as interconnections between the preparation of an experiment and the subsequent measurement. ~ fritjof-capra, @wisdomtrove
326:[T]hroughout the ages to be educated meant to be unproductive... . our word "school" - and its equivalent in all European languages - derives from a Greek word meaning "leisure. ~ peter-drucker, @wisdomtrove
327:It is the function of art to renew our perception. What we are familiar with we cease to see. The writer shakes up the familiar scene, and as if by magic, we see a new meaning in it. ~ anais-nin, @wisdomtrove
328:It is the function of art to renew our perception. What we are familiar with we cease to see. The writer shakes up the familiar scene, and, as if by magic, we see a new meaning in it. ~ anais-nin, @wisdomtrove
329:Let your beauty manifest itself without talking and calculation.​ You are silent. It says for you: I am. And comes in meaning thousandfold​, comes at long last over everyone. ~ rainer-maria-rilke, @wisdomtrove
330:When we don't allow ourselves to hope, we don't allow ourselves to have purpose. Without purpose, without meaning, life is dark. We've no light within, and we're just living to die. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
331:Any time some well-meaning person forces you to demonstrate you have no talent and rubs your nose in the fact you're a failure at the only dream you ever had, take another drink. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
332:If men were ever to lose the appetite for meaning we call thinking, they would lose the capacity for asking all the unanswerable questions upon which every civilization is founded. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
333:[Political] prose consists less and less of words chosen for the sake of their meaning, and more and more of phrases tacked together like the sections of a prefabricated hen-house. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
334:Because of this inner busyness, which is going on almost all the time, we are liable either to miss a lot of the texture of our life experience or to discount its value and meaning. ~ jon-kabat-zinn, @wisdomtrove
335:A LAW, by the very meaning of the term, includes supremacy. It is a rule which those to whom it is prescribed are bound to observe. This results from every political association. ~ alexander-hamilton, @wisdomtrove
336:For it was not so much that by means of words I came to a complete understanding of things, as that from things I somehow had an experience which enabled me to follow the meaning of words. ~ plutarch, @wisdomtrove
337:We have in England a curious belief in first-rate people meaning all the people we do not know; and this consoles us for the undeniable second-rateness of the people we do know. ~ george-bernard-shaw, @wisdomtrove
338:In most people's vocabularies, design means veneer. It's interior decorating. It's the fabric of the curtains and the sofa. But to me, nothing could be further from the meaning of design. ~ steve-jobs, @wisdomtrove
339:My life is full of meaning to me. The life around me must be full of significance to itself.  If I am to expect others to respect my life, then I must respect the other life I see. ~ albert-schweitzer, @wisdomtrove
340:For me, reason is the natural organ of truth; but imagination is the organ of meaning. Imagination, producing new metaphors or revivifying old, is not the cause of truth, but its condition. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
341:One method of destroying a concept is by diluting its meaning. Observe that by ascribing rights to the unborn, i.e., the nonliving, the anti-abortionists obliterate the rights of the living. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
342:There is not one big cosmic meaning for all, there is only the meaning we each give to our life, an individual meaning, an individual plot, like an individual novel, a book for each person. ~ anais-nin, @wisdomtrove
343:When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase, which has a meaning for me, and it becomes part of me. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
344:It is an ambassador's duty to stand up for his nation's foreign policy in any era and under any government whatsoever. Ambassadors are, in the full meaning of the term, titled spies. ~ napoleon-bonaparte, @wisdomtrove
345:There is no longer a single idea explaining everything, but an infinite number of essences giving a meaning to an infinite number of objects. The world comes to a stop, but also lights up. ~ albert-camus, @wisdomtrove
346:The sole meaning of life is to serve humanity by contributing to the establishment of the kingdom of God, which can only be done by the recognition and profession of the truth by every man. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
347:Whenever I write anything that sets up controversy its meaning is distorted almost instantly. Even the editorial writers of newspapers seem to be unable to understand the plainest sentence. ~ h-l-mencken, @wisdomtrove
348:For, of course, being a girl, one’s whole dignity and meaning in life consisted in the achievement of an absolute, a perfect, a pure and noble freedom. What else did a girl’s life mean? ~ d-h-lawrence, @wisdomtrove
349:Lives with no more sense of spiritual meaning than that provided by shopping malls, ordinary television, and stagnant workplaces are barren lives indeed. Spirituality enriches culture. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
350:The great silent man! Looking round on the noisy inanity of the world,&
351:To know, is to know that you know nothing. That is the meaning of true knowledge. When you say something, say what you know. When you don't know something, say you don't know. That is knowledge. ~ confucius, @wisdomtrove
352:At various points in our lives, or on a quest, and for reasons that often remain obscure, we are driven to make decisions which prove with hindsight to be loaded with meaning. ~ swami-satchidananda-saraswati, @wisdomtrove
353:Standing alone, photographs promise an understanding they cannot deliver. In the company of words, they take on meaning, but they slough off one meaning and take on another with alarming ease. ~ susan-sontag, @wisdomtrove
354:We do not pray for immortality, but only not to see our acts and all things stripped suddenly of all their meaning; for then it is the utter emptiness of everything reveals itself. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
355:When we attempt to find meaning in the pursuit of pleasure, the commitment to a job, or through plumbing intellectual depths, we all eventually find in each of these pursuits a dead end. ~ charles-r-swindoll, @wisdomtrove
356:In one sheet of paper, we see everything else, the cloud, the forest, the logger. I am, therefore you are. You are, therefore I am. That is the meaning of the word "interbeing." We interare. ~ thich-nhat-hanh, @wisdomtrove
357:When we attach value to things that aren’t love—the money, the car, the house, the prestige—we are loving things that can’t love us back. We are searching for meaning in the meaningless. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
358:Think of everything you've ever experienced that was painful; that's the meaning of Good Friday. Think of all the ways that love ultimately healed your heart; that's the meaning of Easter. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
359:We have oftener than once endeavoured to attach some meaning to that aphorism, vulgarly imputed to Shaftesbury, which however we can find nowhere in his works, that "ridicule is the test of truth." ~ john-keats, @wisdomtrove
360:There is a certain poetic value, and that a genuine one, in this sense of having missed the full meaning of things. There is beauty, not only in wisdom, but in this dazed and dramatic ignorance. ~ g-k-chesterton, @wisdomtrove
361:This is the core of the human spirit ... If we can find something to live for - if we can find some meaning to put at the center of our lives - even the worst kind of suffering becomes bearable. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
362:It's an astonishing skill that people can read, and read well. Very few people can read well. For instance, I have to be very careful with irony, saying something while meaning the exact opposite. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
363:The meaning of life is just to be alive. It is so plain and so obvious and so simple. And yet, everybody rushes around in a great panic as if it were necessary to achieve something beyond themselves. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
364:Words enable us to transfer our thoughts from inside our own mind into the mind of another. They have the power to alter history, to describe the past, and to bring meaning and substance to the present. ~ jim-rohn, @wisdomtrove
365:You see, it’s never the environment; it’s never the events of our lives, but the meaning we attach to the events – how we interpret them – that shapes who we are today and who we’ll become tomorrow. ~ tony-robbins, @wisdomtrove
366:If it were a dog, it would have bitten you already. Actual Twents: "At e ne hond was, dan e oew allange ebettene." Meaning: Said to someone who is looking for something which is right under his nose. ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
367:Everyone now knows how to find the meaning of life within himself. But mankind wasn't always so lucky. Less than a century ago, men and women did not have easy access to the puzzle boxes within them. ~ kurt-vonnegut, @wisdomtrove
368:There's been rumors of war and wars that have been The meaning of life has been lost in the wind And some people thinkin' that the end is close by &
369:I hope Americans will read and study the Bible in the coming year. It's my firm belief that the enduring values, as I say, presented in its pages have a great meaning for each of us and for our nation. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
370:Logotherapy . . . considers man as a being whose main concern consists in fulfilling a meaning and in actualizing values, rather than in the mere gratification and satisfaction of drives and instincts. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
371:But the only important thing in a book is the meaning it has for you; it may have other and much more profound meanings for the critic, but at second-hand they can be of small service to you. ~ william-somerset-maugham, @wisdomtrove
372:Religious externals may have meaning for the God-inhabited soul; for any others they are not only useless but may actually become snares, deceiving them into a false and perilous sense of security. ~ aiden-wilson-tozer, @wisdomtrove
373:But the word "right" is one of the most deceptive of pitfalls; it is so easy to slip from a qualified meaning in the premise to an unqualified one in the conclusion. Most rights are qualified. ~ oliver-wendell-holmes-jr, @wisdomtrove
374:If there is meaning in life at all, then there must be a meaning in suffering. Suffering is an ineradicable part of life, even as fate and death. Without suffering and death human life cannot be complete. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
375:... .it is of the very essence of Christianity to face suffering and death not because they are good, not because they have meaning, but because the resurrection of Jesus has robbed them of their meaning. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
376:Penetrate deep into the word "Om". Gradually the word will disappear and only the silence will remain. The word is a support. The meaning is within you. Om brings out that meaning which is hidden in your soul. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
377:If my life were not a dangerous, painful experiment, if I did not constantly skirt the abyss and feel the void under my feet, my life would have no meaning and I would not have been able to write anything. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
378:In all the modern talk about energy, efficiency, social service and the rest of it, what meaning is there except "Get money, get it legally, and get a lot of it"? Money has become the grand test of virtue. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
379:How you're still always trapped. How your head is the cave, your eyes the cave mouth. How you live inside your head and only see what you want. How you only watch the shadows and make up your own meaning. ~ chuck-palahniuk, @wisdomtrove
380:I am powerful and I am loving. I have much to give to this world. I am a person of worth. I deserve love. I am a capable person. My life has meaning. My life is unfolding perfectly. There is plenty of time. ~ susan-jeffers, @wisdomtrove
381:... The idea of God, as meaning an infinitely intelligent, wise and good Being, arises from reflecting on the operations of our own mind, and augmenting, without limit, those qualities of goodness and wisdom. ~ david-hume, @wisdomtrove
382:If there's no meaning in it," said the King, "that saves a world of trouble, you know, as we needn't try to find any. And yet I don't know," he went on [... ]; "I seem to see some meaning in them, after all. ~ lewis-carroll, @wisdomtrove
383:No matter how ruined man and his world may seem to be, and no matter how terrible man's despair may become, as long as he continues to be a man his very humanity continues to tell him that life has a meaning. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
384:What a poem means is as much what it means to others as what it means to the author; and indeed, in the course of time a poet may become merely reader in respect to his own works, forgetting his original meaning. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
385:Feel the underlying meaning of the teachings that are espoused by me or anyone else. The word's don't mean much. Words are supposed to be catalysts for higher states of attention. That is where the action is. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
386:Life is not primarily a quest for pleasure, as Freud believed, or a quest for power, as Alfred Adler taught, but a quest for meaning. The greatest task for any person is to find meaning in his or her own life. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
387:He could not be mistaken. There were no other eyes like those in the world. There was only one creature in the world who could concentrate for him all the brightness and meaning of life. It was she. It was Kitty. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
388:Synchronicities happen so often, sometimes I take them for granted. And to me this suggests that life is full of implicit meaning. It may be impossible to say what the meaning is, but meaning is obvious everywhere. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
389:The most important thing in arithmetic is not the shapes of the numbers but the reality living in them. This living reality has much more meaning for the spiritual world than what lives in reading and writing. ~ rudolf-steiner, @wisdomtrove
390:You and I have the courage to say to our enemies, &
391:The problem with words is that they easily lose their meaning. Say something often enough and it becomes a tic, not an expression of how you actually feel. Not only that, but words rarely change things. Actions do. ~ seth-godin, @wisdomtrove
392:They must be real people. And this means that every word in every line of speech must be accurate and full of some kind of meaning which stretches not only forward in the book but stems from before in the book. ~ john-steinbeck, @wisdomtrove
393:We are all part of the One Spirit. When you experience the true meaning of religion, which is to know God, you will realize that He is your Self, and that He exists equally and impartially in all beings. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
394:If any philosopher had been asked for a definition of infinity, he might have produced some unintelligible rigmarole, but he would certainly not have been able to give a definition that had any meaning at all. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
395:I have been speculating last night what makes a man a discoverer of undiscovered things. As far as I can conjecture the art consists in habitually searching for the causes and meaning of everything which occurs. ~ charles-darwin, @wisdomtrove
396:Love is the essential reality and our purpose on earth. To be consciously aware of it, to experience love in ourselves and others, is the meaning of life. Meaning does not lie in things. Meaning lies in us. ~ marianne-williamson, @wisdomtrove
397:The word ‘bread’: neither can you eat nor live by it; it merely conveys an idea. It acquires meaning only with the actual eating. In the same sense am I telling you that the normal state is not verbal. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
398:The habit of looking to the future and thinking that the whole meaning of the present lies in what it will bring forth is a pernicious one. There can be no value in the whole unless there is value in the parts. ~ bertrand-russell, @wisdomtrove
399:There are many ways to find meaning and purpose. One is to establish a metric by which our life will be judged and, from today, to resolve to live each day in such a way that our life will be graded a success. ~ sonja-lyubomirsky, @wisdomtrove
400:You don't have to search so hard for meaning and destiny. If you focus on keeping yourself clear and in balance and you live from your heart, destiny and your highest-good path will unfold naturally at your feet. ~ melody-beattie, @wisdomtrove
401:I am thankful, however, that some of our white brothers have grasped the meaning of this social revolution and committed themselves to it. They are still all too small in quantity, but they are big in quality. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
402:So if you want to know the truth about the universe, about the meaning of life, and about your own identity, the best place to start is by observing suffering and exploring what it is. The answer isn’t a story. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
403:What do you suppose is the use of a child without any meaning? Even a joke should have some meaning&
404:Nature never taught me that there exists a God of glory and of infinite majesty. I had to learn that in other ways. But nature gave the word glory a meaning for me. I still do not know where else I could have found one. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
405:Be not forgetful of prayer. Every time you pray, if your prayer is sincere, there will be new feeling and new meaning in it, which will give you fresh courage, and you will understand that prayer is an education. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
406:but my life now, my whole life apart from anything that can happen to me, every minute of it is no more meaningless, as it was before, but it has the positive meaning of goodness, which I have the power to put into it. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
407:View life as a series of movie frames, the ending and meaning may not be apparent until the very end of the movie, and yet, each of the hundreds of individual frames has meaning within the context of the whole movie. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
408:A name with meaning could bring up a child, Taking the child out of the parents' hands. Better a meaningless name, I should say, As leaving more to nature and happy chance. Name children some names and see what you do. ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
409:Thus, human existence-at least as long as it has not been neurotically distorted-is always directed to something, or someone, other than itself, be it a meaning to fulfill or another human being to encounter lovingly. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
410:We need to help people to discover the true meaning of love. Love is generally confused with dependence. Those of us who have grown in true love know that we can love only in proportion to our capacity for independence. ~ fred-rogers, @wisdomtrove
411:I maintain there is much more wonder in science than in pseudoscience. And in addition, to whatever measure this term has any meaning, science has the additional virtue, and it is not an inconsiderable one, of being true. ~ carl-sagan, @wisdomtrove
412:Real love is never perplexed, never qualifies, never rejects, never demands. It replenishes, by grace of restoring unlimited circulation. It burns, because it knows the true meaning of sacrifice. It is life illuminated. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
413:They clichés will construct your sentences for you - even think your thoughts for you, to a certain extent - and at need they will perform the important service of partially concealing your meaning even from yourself. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
414:All that's visible springs from causes intimate to you. While walking, sitting, lying down, the body itself is complete truth. If someone asks the inner meaning of this: Inside the treasury of dharma eye a single grain of dust. ~ dogen, @wisdomtrove
415:Beliefs have the power to create and the power to destroy. Human beings have the awesome ability to take any experience of their lives and create a meaning that disempowers them or one that can literally save their lives. ~ tony-robbins, @wisdomtrove
416:For the meaning of life differs from man to man, from day to day and from hour to hour. What matters, therefore, is not the meaning of life in general but rather the specific meaning of a person's life at a given moment. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
417:Admittedly, there is a risk in any course we follow other than this, but every lesson in history tells us that the greater risk lies in appeasement, and this is the specter our well-meaning liberal friends refuse to face. ~ ronald-reagan, @wisdomtrove
418:Poets in our civilization, as it exists at present, must be difficult... The poet must become more and more comprehensive, more allusive, more indirect, in order to force, to dislocate if necessary, language into its meaning. ~ t-s-eliot, @wisdomtrove
419:If you do not know your place in the world and the meaning of your life, you should know there is something to blame; and it is not the social system, or your intellect, but the way in which you have directed your intellect. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
420:The meaning of song goes deep. Who in logical words can explain the effect music has on us? A kind of inarticulate, unfathomable speech, which leads us to the edge of the infinite, and lets us for a moment gaze into that! ~ thomas-carlyle, @wisdomtrove
421:If one wanted to crush and destroy a man entirely, to mete out to him the most terrible punishment, all one would have to do would be to make him do work that was completely and utterly devoid of usefulness and meaning. ~ fyodor-dostoevsky, @wisdomtrove
422:The one thing that matters is the effort. It continues, whereas the end to be attained is but an illusion of the climber, as he fares on and on from crest to crest; and once the goal is reached it has no meaning. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
423:The touch of an infinite mystery passes over the trivial and the familiar, making it break out into ineffable music... The trees, the stars, and the blue hills ache with a meaning which can never be uttered in words. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
424:You will follow me, if we are what we are, you and I, if we live, if the world exists, if you know the meaning of this moment and can't let it slip by, as others let it slip, into the senselessness of the unwilled and unreached. ~ ayn-rand, @wisdomtrove
425:What happens after death is so unspeakably glorious that our imagination and our feelings do not suffice to form even an approximate conception of it. The dissolution of our time-bound form in eternity brings no loss of meaning. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
426:Nothing happens by chance, my friend... No such thing as luck. A meaning behind every little thing, and such a meaning behind this. Part for you, part for me, may not see it all real clear right now, but we will, before long. ~ richard-bach, @wisdomtrove
427:Q: So you say I should try to stop thinking and stay steady in the idea: &
428:When the bubble of ignorance bursts the self realizes its oneness with the indivisible Self. Words that proceed from the Source of Truth have real meaning. But when men speakthese words as their own, the words become meaningless. ~ meher-baba, @wisdomtrove
429:It was all a lie, it all stank, stank of lies, it all gave the illusion of meaning and happiness and beauty, and all of it was just putrefaction that no one would admit to. Bitter was the taste of the world. Life was a torment. ~ hermann-hesse, @wisdomtrove
430:The meaning of what is said is according to the motive for saying it: because things are not subject to speech, but speech to things. Therefore we should take account of the motive of the lawgiver, rather than of his very words. ~ denis-diderot, @wisdomtrove
431:To grasp the meaning of the world of today we use a language created to express the world of yesterday. The life of the past seems to us nearer our true natures, but only for the reason that it is nearer our language. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
432:And people get all fouled up because they want the world to have meaning as if it were words... As if you had a meaning, as if you were a mere word, as if you were something that could be looked up in a dictionary. You are meaning. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
433:The meaning of what is said is according to the motive for saying it: because things are not subject to speech, but speech to things. Therefore we should take account of the motive of the lawgiver, rather than of his very words. ~ thomas-aquinas, @wisdomtrove
434:The role of the artist, like that of the scholar, consists of seizing current truths often repeated to him, but which will take on new meaning for him and which he will make his own when he has grasped their deepest significance. ~ henri-matisse, @wisdomtrove
435:the search for meaning is really the search for the lost chord. When the lost chord is discovered by humankind, the discord in the world will be healed and the symphony of the universe will come into complete harmony with itself. ~ john-odonohue, @wisdomtrove
436:I am quite serious when I say that I do not believe there are, on the whole earth besides, so many intensified bores as in these United States. No man can form an adequate idea of the real meaning of the word, without coming here. ~ warren-buffet, @wisdomtrove
437:I try to teach people to continually search and question the meaning of everything they are taught and everything they believe in. My job is not so much to impart a philosophy but to train people in the methods of self-discovery. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
438:My understanding of the meaning of a book is that the book itself disappears from sight, that it is chewed alive, digested and incorporated into the system as flesh and blood which in turn creates new spirit and reshapes the world. ~ henry-miller, @wisdomtrove
439:Remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. If you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away. ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
440:The life of our class, of the wealthy and the learned, was not only repulsive to me but had lost all meaning. The sum of our action and thinking, of our science and art, all of it struck me as the overindulgences of a spoiled child. ~ leo-tolstoy, @wisdomtrove
441:Character is far more important than intellect in making a man a good citizen or successful at his calling- meaning by character not only such qualities as honesty and truthfulness, but courage, perseverance and self-reliance. ~ theodore-roosevelt, @wisdomtrove
442:There is hope for a man who has never read Malory or Boswell or Tristam Shandy or Shakespeare's Sonnets: but what can you do with a man who says he "has read" them, meaning he has read them once, and thinks that this settles the matter? ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
443:What's my philosophy? In a word, integral. And what on earth — or in heaven — do I mean by integral? The dictionary meaning is fairly simple: comprehensive, balanced, inclusive, essential for completeness. Short definition, tall order. ~ ken-wilber, @wisdomtrove
444:Courage, the original definition of courage, when it first came into the English language - it's from the Latin word "cor," meaning "heart" - and the original definition was to tell the story of who you are with your whole heart. ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
445:Meaning and authority always go hand in hand. Whoever determines the meaning of our actions – whether they are good or evil, right or wrong, beautiful or ugly – also gains the authority to tell us what to think and how to behave. ~ yuval-noah-harari, @wisdomtrove
446:The life of the individual has meaning only insofar as it aids in making the life of every living thing nobler and more beautiful.  Life is sacred, that is to say, it is the supreme value, to which all other values are subordinate. ~ albert-einstein, @wisdomtrove
447:When social forces press for the rejection of age-old Truth, then those who reject it will seek meaning in their own truth. These truths will rarely be Truth at all; they will be only collections of personal preferences and prejudices. ~ dean-koontz, @wisdomtrove
448:In the last analysis, the individual person is responsible for living his own life and for &
449:I believe every act of violence is also a message that needs to be understood. Violence should not be answered just by greater violence but by real understanding. We must ask: &
450:If I can listen to what he can tell me, if I can understand how it seems to him; if I can see its personal meaning for him, if I can sense the emotional flavor which it has for him, then I will be releasing potent forces of change in him. ~ carl-rogers, @wisdomtrove
451:The meaning of this observation is unclear, but it raises the unfortunate possibility of ambiguous triplets; that is, triplets which may code more than one amino acid. However one would certainly expect such triplets to be in a minority. ~ francis-crick, @wisdomtrove
452:To believe in an invisible order, a divine or implicate order, as quantum physics calls it, or the order beneath the disorder that chaos theory describes, is a healthier, more interesting choice than seeing no meaning in life whatsoever. ~ caroline-myss, @wisdomtrove
453:Love heals. Heals and liberates. I use the word love, not meaning sentimentality, but a condition so strong that it may be that which holds the stars in their heavenly positions and that which causes the blood to flow orderly in our veins. ~ maya-angelou, @wisdomtrove
454:If the whole universe has no meaning, we should never have found out that it has no meaning: just as, if there were no light in the universe and therefore no creatures with eyes, we should never know it was dark. Dark would be without meaning. ~ c-s-lewis, @wisdomtrove
455:From the perspective of your entire life, what is it that you most care about and what gives meaning to your life? What do you want to be and do in your life? A written mission statement encapsulates what you want to become and achieve.    ~ stephen-r-covey, @wisdomtrove
456:God has given us two hands - one to receive with and the other to give with. We are cisterns made for hoarding; we are channels made for sharing. If we fail to fulfill this divine duty and privilege we have missed the meaning of Christianity. ~ billy-graham, @wisdomtrove
457:I think the Messianic concept, which is the Jewish offering to mankind, is a great victory. What does it mean? It means that history has a sense, a meaning, a direction; it goes somewhere, and necessarily in a good direction&
458:The way to recover the meaning of life and the worthwhileness of life is to recover the power of experience, to have impulse voices from within, and to be able to hear these impulse voices from within — and make the point: This can be done. ~ abraham-maslow, @wisdomtrove
459:It’s not so much that nothing means anything but more that it keeps meaning nothing. there’s no release, just gurus and self- appointed gods and hucksters. the more people say, the less there is to say. even the best books are dry sawdust. ~ charles-bukowski, @wisdomtrove
460:The meaning of our self is not to be found in its separateness from God and others, but in the ceaseless realization of yoga, of union; not on the side of the canvas where it is blank, but on the side where the picture is being painted. ~ rabindranath-tagore, @wisdomtrove
461:The serious problems in life... are never fully solved. If ever they should appear to be so it is a sure sign that something has been lost. The meaning and purpose of a problem seem to lie not in its solution but in our working at it incessantly. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
462:When we have become free, we need not go mad and throw up society and rush off to die in the forest or the cave; we shall remain where we were but we shall understand the whole thing. The same phenomena will remain but with a new meaning. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
463:Every day the word &
464:I try to teach people that I believe God wants us to be positive toward ourselves, meaning that, you know what, I like the way I look, I like the way I sound, I'm happy with what I'm doing in my career - and not always be beating ourselves down. ~ joel-osteen, @wisdomtrove
465:Through every trial we grow. All suffering we experience has a meaning. Though it seems very cruel, it is like the fire that smelts the iron ore: the steel that emerges from that furnace is beautifully strong, useful for many purposes. ~ paramahansa-yogananda, @wisdomtrove
466:a man can radically change his life and attain to a deeper meaning, a more perfect integration, a more complete fulfillment, a more total liberty of spirit than are possible in the routines of a purely active existence centered on money-making. ~ thomas-merton, @wisdomtrove
467:I can't verbalize the internal meaning of pictures whatsoever. Some of my friends can at very mystical levels, but I prefer to say that, if I feel something strongly, I would make a photograph, that would be the equivalent of what I saw and felt. ~ amsel-adams, @wisdomtrove
468:To believe in an invisible order, a divine or implicate order, as quantum physics calls it, or the order beneath the disorder that chaos theory describes, is a healthier, more interesting choice than seeing no meaning in life whatsoever. ~ norman-vincent-peale, @wisdomtrove
469:If the church of today does not recapture the sacrificial spirit of the early church, it will lose its authentic ring, forfeit the loyalty of millions, and be dismissed as an irrelevant social club with no meaning for the twentieth century. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
470:What man actually needs is not a tensionless state but rather the striving and struggling for some goal worthy of him. What he needs is not the discharge of tension at any cost, but the call of a potential meaning waiting to be fulfilled by him. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
471:Give your heart and mind to brooding over the &
472:Love goes very far beyond the physical person of the beloved. It finds its deepest meaning in its spiritual being, his inner self. Whether or not he is actually present, whether or not he is still alive at all, ceases somehow to be of importance. ~ viktor-frankl, @wisdomtrove
473:Q: What remains to discover?  M: The universe without and the immensity within as they are in reality, in the great mind and heart of God. The meaning and purpose of existence, the secret of suffering, life's redemption from ignorance. ~ sri-nisargadatta-maharaj, @wisdomtrove
474:A human being would certainly not grow to be seventy or eighty years old if this longevity had no meaning for the species. The afternoon of human life must also have a significance of its own and cannot be merely a pitiful appendage to life's morning. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
475:One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away. ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
476:One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don’t throw it away. ~ stephen-hawking, @wisdomtrove
477:Transforming leadership, [is defined as] leadership that builds on man's need for meaning, leadership that creates institutional purpose ... he is the value-shaper, the exemplar, the maker of meanings ... he is the true artist, the true pathfinder. ~ tom-peters, @wisdomtrove
478:I know of one semibarbarous zone whose librarians repudiate the "vain and superstitious habit" of trying to find sense in books, equating such a quest with attempting to find meaning in dreams or in the chaotic lines on the palms of one's hand. ~ jorge-luis-borges, @wisdomtrove
479:The meaning of things lies not in the things themselves, but in our attitude towards them in particular caused by what we compare it to: something worse and we feel grateful for what we have; something better and we feel somehow let down. ~ antoine-de-saint-exupery, @wisdomtrove
480:It reminded us that propaganda in some form or other lurks in every book, that every work of art has a meaning and a purpose - a political, social and religious purpose - that our aesthetic judgements are always coloured by our prejudices and beliefs ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
481:On the surface, things may seem random and without consequence. But I sense a hidden meaning, which expresses itself symbolically in the flow of events. Strange synchronicities punctuate my adventures. Patterns emerge suggestive of a secret significance. ~ tim-freke, @wisdomtrove
482:The more closely we analyze what we consider &
483:If we want to make meaning, we need to make art. Cook, write, draw, doodle, paint, scrapbook, take pictures, collage, knit, rebuild an engine, sculpt, dance, decorate, act, sing - it doesn't matter.  As long as we're creating, we're cultivating meaning. ~ brene-brown, @wisdomtrove
484:The meaning of life changes as you change dimensional planes. The way human beings perceive the world is only one simple method of seeing. There are many ways to see life. Life has many meanings, and self realization is the understanding of all this. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove
485:When I'm ready to make a photograph, I think I quite obviously see in my minds eye something that is not literally there in the true meaning of the word. I'm interested in something which is built up from within, rather than just extracted from without. ~ amsel-adams, @wisdomtrove
486:Synchronicity takes the coincidence of events in space and time as meaning something more than mere chance, namely, a peculiar interdependence of objective events among themselves as well as with the subjective (psychic) states of the observer or observers. ~ carl-jung, @wisdomtrove
487:Doeg, though without knowing how or why, Made still a blundering kind of melody; Spurr'd boldly on, and dash'd through thick and thin, Through sense and nonsense, never out nor in; Free from all meaning whether good or bad, And in one word, heroically mad. ~ john-dryden, @wisdomtrove
488:Like a piece of ice on a hot stove the poem must ride on its own melting. . . . Read it a hundred times; it will forever keep its freshness as a metal keeps its fragrance. It can never lose its sense of a meaning that once unfolded by surprise as it went. ~ robert-frost, @wisdomtrove
489:The need of reason is not inspired by the quest for truth but by the quest for meaning. And truth and meaning are not the same. The basic fallacy , taking precedence over all specific metaphysical fallacies, is to interpret meaning on the model of truth. ~ hannah-arendt, @wisdomtrove
490:As a well cut diamond has many facets, each reflecting a different color of light, so does the word yoga, each facet reflecting a different shade of meaning and revealing different aspects of the entire range of human endeavor to win inner peace and happiness. ~ b-k-s-iyengar, @wisdomtrove
491:The meaning and purpose of dancing is the dance. Like music also, it is fulfilled in each moment of its course. You do not play a sonata in order to reach the final chord, and if the meaning of things were simply in ends, composers would write nothing but finales. ~ alan-watts, @wisdomtrove
492:I question and soul-search constantly into myself to be as certain as I can that I am fulfilling the true meaning of my work, that I am maintaining my sense of purpose, that I am holding fast to my ideals, that I am guiding my people in the right direction. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
493:There is only that moment, and the incredible certainty that everything under the sun has been written by one hand only. It is the hand that evokes love, and creates a twin soul for every person in the world. Without such love, one's dreams would have no meaning. ~ paulo-coelho, @wisdomtrove
494:I'm not a master. I'm a student-master, meaning that I have the knowledge of a master and the expertise of a master, but I'm still learning. So I'm a student-master. I don't believe in the word &
495:What is the meaning of Om? Om is the mysterious cosmic energy that is the substratum of all the things and all the beings of the entire universe. It is an eternal song of the Divine. It is continuously resounding in silence on the background of everything that exists. ~ amit-ray, @wisdomtrove
496:Everybody has the blues. Everybody longs for meaning. Everybody needs to love and be loved. Everybody needs to clap hands and be happy. Everybody longs for faith. In music, especially this broad category called jazz, there is a stepping-stone to all of these. ~ martin-luther-king, @wisdomtrove
497:If I ask you to plunge into the Ganga or to jump from the roof of a house, meaning it all for your good, could you do even that without any hesitations Just think of it even now; otherwise don't rush forward on the spur of the moment to accept me as your Guru. ~ swami-vivekananda, @wisdomtrove
498:It is almost universally felt that when we call a country democratic we are praising it; consequently, the defenders of every kind of regime claim that it is a democracy, and fear that they might have to stop using the word if it were tied down to any one meaning. ~ george-orwell, @wisdomtrove
499:P is positive emotion, E is engagement, R is relationships, M is meaning and A is accomplishment. Those are the five elements of what free people chose to do. Pretty much everything else is in service of one of or more of these goals. That's the human dashboard. ~ martin-seligman, @wisdomtrove
500:The earth is alive. There are places on the earth that are very powerful. Meaning that on another dimensional level, there is an interfacing dimension where there is a crossover point between dimensions and a tremendous amount of energy is passing back and forth. ~ frederick-lenz, @wisdomtrove

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Life without meaning ~ Dean Koontz,
2:Truth implies meaning. ~ Lukas Foss,
3:meaning ‘four-oaring ~ Giles Kristian,
4:Rhythm must have meaning. ~ Ezra Pound,
5:Man’s Search for Meaning: ~ Russ Harris,
6:The meaning of life is to see. ~ Huineng,
7:context is not meaning. ~ Claudia Rankine,
8:The line comes before meaning. ~ Paul Reps,
9:Time is measured in meaning ~ Rene Denfeld,
10:Jazz is rhythm and meaning. ~ Henri Matisse,
11:Man’s Search for Meaning. ~ Stephen R Covey,
12:The meaning is in the waiting. ~ R S Thomas,
13:Man is a being in search of meaning. ~ Plato,
14:We are meaning-making creatures ~ Ed Catmull,
15:Love, life, meaning...over. ~ Stephenie Meyer,
16:Rhythm must have meaning. ~ Ezra Pound,
17:the meaning of life is to give life ~ Unknown,
18:Buy calmly and with meaning. ~ Sophie Kinsella,
19:Don't confuse meaning with truth. ~ Thucydides,
20:Meaning well is a poor defense, ~ Isaac Asimov,
21:The meaning of life is happiness. ~ Dalai Lama,
22:Despair = Suffering - Meaning. ~ James Altucher,
23:Find the meaning in the reading ~ Helen Gardner,
24:No action is safe from meaning. ~ Karan Mahajan,
25:Man lives in a world of meaning. ~ George H Mead,
26:Repetition did not alter meaning. ~ Claire North,
27:The meaning of my star is war. ~ Rudyard Kipling,
28:Is there some meaning to this life? ~ Dean Koontz,
29:Learning is the making of meaning. ~ Robert Kegan,
30:Senatus populus quis Romanus, meaning ~ Jim Marrs,
31:The meaning is the ending. ~ Apostolos K Doxiadis,
32:Circumstance points to deeper meaning. ~ T F Hodge,
33:How does the brain create meaning? ~ Michael Lewis,
34:The will to meaning comes from within. ~ Anonymous,
35:Words have meaning, type has spirit. ~ Paula Scher,
36:Work is a search for daily meaning ~ Studs Terkel,
37:our sacrifice did have a meaning. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
38:The meaning of life is that it stops. ~ Franz Kafka,
39:Time has no meaning to the heart ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
40:We are meaning-seeking creatures. ~ Karen Armstrong,
41:Abstraction is the enemy of meaning. ~ Marshall Ganz,
42:Beauty loses its meaning when you’re ~ Dot Hutchison,
43:her. “What’ll you do?” I asked, meaning ~ Rod Duncan,
44:There's meaning in thy snores. ~ William Shakespeare,
45:Time has no meaning to the heart. ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
46:To be and to have meaning are the same. ~ Parmenides,
47:What touches your heart is meaning. ~ John de Ruiter,
48:Everything has a new meaning with you. ~ Karina Halle,
49:Insanity is the insistence on meaning. ~ Frank Bidart,
50:The more the words, the less the meaning, ~ Anonymous,
51:The sea has neither meaning nor pity. ~ Anton Chekhov,
52:To order space is to give it meaning. ~ Isamu Noguchi,
53:Touch is the meaning of being human. ~ Andrea Dworkin,
54:We are the custodians of life's meaning. ~ Carl Sagan,
55:culture – the collectively shared meaning ~ David Bohm,
56:Everyone gets meaning in different ways. ~ Sally Quinn,
57:If you make meaning, you'll make money. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
58:Ordinary is a word that has no meaning. ~ Robin Morgan,
59:the metamessage yields heart meaning. ~ Deborah Tannen,
60:Time has no meaning, Love will endure. ~ Jude Deveraux,
61:What's the meaning of life? Other people. ~ John Green,
62:but emotionally – meaning irrationally ~ Graeme Simsion,
63:Culture is public, because meaning is ~ Clifford Geertz,
64:Death too quickly. Death without meaning. ~ Erin Hunter,
65:Despair is suffering without meaning. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
66:Hear the meaning within the word. ~ William Shakespeare,
67:It is not peace we seek but meaning. ~ Lawrence Durrell,
68:I’ve been meaning to tell you something… ~ Sam Sisavath,
69:I will find new meaning in every joy and sorrow. ~ Rumi,
70:Life without dreaming is a life without meaning. ~ Wale,
71:Life without pain has no meaning. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer,
72:The Universe does not owe us meaning. ~ Richard Dawkins,
73:Life takes on the meaning that you give it. ~ Liz Murray,
74:The meaning of life is to become a saint. ~ Peter Kreeft,
75:There's more meaning than magic to this ~ Peter S Beagle,
76:We are cruel enough without meaning to be. ~ John Updike,
77:What's the meaning of life?
Other people ~ John Green,
78:Meaning, not beauty, is what we are after. ~ Peter London,
79:We had the experience but missed the meaning. ~ T S Eliot,
80:Weigh the meaning and look not at the words. ~ Ben Jonson,
81:You can find the meaning of life in a book. ~ Nicola Yoon,
82:A name with meaning could bring up a child, ~ Robert Frost,
83:Love life more than the meaning of it? ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
84:One should never mistake pattern for meaning. ~ Iain Banks,
85:The meaning lies in the appropriation. ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
86:The meaning of life is that it is to be lived. ~ Bruce Lee,
87:The meaning of religious truth is hope. ~ Andrei Tarkovsky,
88:The meaning of the story is the story. ~ Flannery O Connor,
89:Time has no meaning,
Love will endure.. ~ Jude Deveraux,
90:Vision is meaning. Meaning is historical. ~ Nic Pizzolatto,
91:Why does man need a meaning to life? ~ Peter Wessel Zapffe,
92:A change of style is a change of meaning. ~ Wallace Stevens,
93:Do you still find meaning in sunrises? ~ Laura van den Berg,
94:Every little movement has a meaning of its own. ~ Tony Sarg,
95:Life has more meaning in the face of Death. ~ Robert Greene,
96:Love has no meaning without understanding ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
97:Love life more than the meaning of it? ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
98:Only an artist can interpret the meaning of life. ~ Novalis,
99:Return to the root and you will find the meaning. ~ Sengcan,
100:The meaning of life is to give life a meaning. ~ Wendy Mass,
101:. . . all meaning comes from analogies. ~ Douglas Hofstadter,
102:days that were full of purpose and meaning. ~ Paul Kalanithi,
103:Death must exist for life to have meaning. ~ Neal Shusterman,
104:FUBAR, meaning “fucked up beyond all recognition. ~ Gene Kim,
105:I don't know the true meaning of happiness. ~ Jonathan Davis,
106:I doubt not God is good, well-meaning, kind ~ Countee Cullen,
107:In short, words change their meaning over time. ~ D A Carson,
108:The meaning of life is to get meaning for life. ~ Wayne Dyer,
109:The real meaning of a poem is to stop time. ~ Ralph Fletcher,
110:The sole meaning of life is to serve humanity. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
111:We speak for them. We imbue them with meaning. ~ Nate Silver,
112:Algebra is rich in structure but weak in meaning. ~ Rene Thom,
113:finding God brings meaning into every moment—I ~ Steven James,
114:himself. This is the meaning of his coming. This ~ John Piper,
115:If you make money, you might not make meaning. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
116:Is death that which gives meaning to life? ~ Donald Barthelme,
117:Ish #28 "Give you child a name with meaning. ~ Regina Griffin,
118:It is only life that has meaning, not death, ~ Jack L Chalker,
119:Om is the greatest, meaning the Absolute. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
120:Poke gave him life. Ender gave it meaning. ~ Orson Scott Card,
121:The meaning of being alive is just being alive ~ Alan W Watts,
122:to write is to give meaning to suffering ~ Alejandra Pizarnik,
123:We had the experience, but we missed the meaning. ~ T S Eliot,
124:what is the meaning of that.. can anyone help me. ~ Jos Rizal,
125:Without philosophy, action has no meaning. ~ Sebastien Foucan,
126:Your vocabulary drives meaning in your life. ~ Robin S Sharma,
127:A deep meaning often lies in old customs. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
128:An absence of meaning opens a gap in time. ~ Michel de Certeau,
129:Clem tried to marshal his meaning to his tongue, ~ K J Charles,
130:Deep meaning lies often in childish play. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
131:For me 'Thank You'. This word has a very deep meaning. ~ Yunho,
132:For me the meaning of my work is much more fluid. ~ Thom Mayne,
133:I swear," said Adrian, meaning it, "because I must. ~ Ali Shaw,
134:Knowing your purpose gives meaning to your life. ~ Rick Warren,
135:Meaning is not in things but in between them. ~ Norman O Brown,
136:Meaning Michael Milton; meaning the whole thing. ~ John Irving,
137:My life carries its own meaning in itself. ~ Albert Schweitzer,
138:One should never mistake pattern … for meaning. ~ Iain M Banks,
139:proclaiming the same thing. That life has meaning. ~ Anonymous,
140:The Meaning of Culture by John Cowper Powys, ~ Timothy Ferriss,
141:The meaning of life is to get meaning for life. ~ Wayne W Dyer,
142:The meaning of life is to give life meaning. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
143:There’s more meaning than magic to this.” The ~ Peter S Beagle,
144:I was looking for what the meaning of life was. ~ Shakti Gawain,
145:Live is meaningful only if you gave it a meaning. ~ T Harv Eker,
146:Men's lives have meaning, not their deaths. ~ George R R Martin,
147:The term al-ʿIraq (meaning the shore of a great ~ Charles Tripp,
148:To try to make some meaning out of all this seems ~ Donna Tartt,
149:Words held meaning, but voices held emotion. ~ Kimberly Derting,
150:Art is skill, that is the first meaning of the word. ~ Eric Gill,
151:Connection gives purpose and meaning to our lives. ~ Brene Brown,
152:I can bear any pain as long as it has meaning. ~ Haruki Murakami,
153:In every object there is inexhaustible meaning. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
154:love only variously everyday The meaning of love ~ Mother Teresa,
155:Putting it into words will destroy any meaning ~ Haruki Murakami,
156:There is no meaning. Only balance. Only symmetry. ~ Megan Chance,
157:We are the ink that gives the white page a meaning. ~ Jean Genet,
158:We never ask the meaning of life when we are in love. ~ Rajneesh,
159:Great marketers don't make stuff. They make meaning. ~ Seth Godin,
160:I don't believe there's an atom of meaning in it. ~ Lewis Carroll,
161:It's only a game if there is an absence of meaning. ~ Rachel Cohn,
162:Life can have any meaning you desire it to have. ~ Vaughn Heppner,
163:My only armor is my belief that life has meaning... ~ Dean Koontz,
164:Nintendo, a term meaning “leave luck to heaven.”! ~ Steven L Kent,
165:Putting it into words will destroy any meaning. ~ Haruki Murakami,
166:Resist doing things that have no meaning for life. ~ Pablo Casals,
167:To know values is to know the meaning of the market ~ Charles Dow,
168:What is the meaning of life? To be happy and useful. ~ Dalai Lama,
169:Without challenge, life had no meaning. ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,
170:Complexity implies meaning. We're afraid of meaning. ~ Dean Koontz,
171:Discipline? I don't know the meaning of the word. ~ Liam Gallagher,
172:Everything in this world has a hidden meaning. ~ Nikos Kazantzakis,
173:Except for memory, time would have no meaning at all. ~ Pat Conroy,
174:God made life, and God alone can tell us its meaning. ~ J I Packer,
175:I don't want to be a tree; I want to be its meaning. ~ Orhan Pamuk,
176:I guess people naturally try to find meaning in music. ~ Girl Talk,
177:It is weight that gives meaning to weightlessness. ~ Isamu Noguchi,
178:meaning equals emotion, and emotion equals life. ~ Anthony Robbins,
179:People are unkind sometimes without meaning to be. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
180:What is the short meaning of the long speech? ~ Friedrich Schiller,
181:When people are finding meaning in things - beware. ~ Edward Gorey,
182:A story is not only meaning, it's music as well. ~ Aharon Appelfeld,
183:Books have meaning. They have depth. They are alive. ~ Sarah Noffke,
184:Don't play the notes. Play the meaning of the notes. ~ Pablo Casals,
185:Hope—for such a simple word its meaning is profound. ~ Sejal Badani,
186:No pattern should be without some sort of meaning. ~ William Morris,
187:The tears of God are the meaning of history ~ Nicholas Wolterstorff,
188:The world is nothing but 'world-as-meaning. ~ Maurice Merleau Ponty,
189:To love and be loved. That is the meaning of life. ~ Cheryl Strayed,
190:When people are finding meaning in things -- beware. ~ Edward Gorey,
191:A door loses its meaning if you don’t ever go through it. ~ Paul Pen,
192:Everything has a meaning, if only we could read it. ~ Philip Pullman,
193:First learn the meaning of what you say, and then speak. ~ Epictetus,
194:If you make meaning, you’ll probably also make money. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
195:Meaning is context bound, but context is boundless ~ Jonathan Culler,
196:The meaning of life is to create meaning for your life. ~ Tucker Max,
197:the sobering realization of the meaning of progress. ~ W E B Du Bois,
198:The tears of God are the meaning of history. ~ Nicholas Wolterstorff,
199:Things without meaning are the most beautiful ones. ~ Elena Ferrante,
200:What is the meaning of life?Whatever you want it to be. ~ James Frey,
201:What the foul fiend is the meaning of all this? ~ E D E N Southworth,
202:Where words lose their meaning, people lose their lives. ~ Confucius,
203:Words may show a man's wit, actions his meaning. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
204:A lack of direction and meaning can leave you empty. ~ Benjamin Stone,
205:always try to read form as content, style as meaning. ~ David Shields,
206:Does freedom have a meaning if you're trapped in your ways? ~ Cormega,
207:First learn the meaning of what you say, and then speak. ~ Epictetus,
208:If particulars are to have meaning, there must be universals. ~ Plato,
209:In the beginngless beginning there was the Meaning ~ Frederick Franck,
210:My dog doesn’t worry about the meaning of life. ~ Charlotte Joko Beck,
211:Nothing has meaning except for the meaning you give it. ~ T Harv Eker,
212:…the book creates meaning, the meaning creates life. ~ Roland Barthes,
213:The meaning of today will not be clear until tomorrow. ~ Mason Cooley,
214:The meaning of world is the separation of wish and fact. ~ Kurt G del,
215:The meaning of world is the separation of wish and fact. ~ Kurt Godel,
216:the prospect of losing meaning and agency agonizing. ~ Paul Kalanithi,
217:The soul needs meaning as much as the body needs food. ~ Richard Rohr,
218:We needed to stop asking about the meaning of life. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
219:When words lose their meaning, people lose their freedom. ~ Confucius,
220:When words lose their meaning, people lose their liberty. ~ Confucius,
221:Without such love , one's dreams would have no meaning ~ Paulo Coelho,
222:Without such love, one's dreams would have no meaning. ~ Paulo Coelho,
223:a quest can bring purpose and meaning to your life, ~ Chris Guillebeau,
224:As Kafka said, “The meaning of life is that it ends. ~ Caitlin Doughty,
225:CHURCH, not CHOCOLATE, is the TRUE MEANING of EASTER!! ~ Joanne Harris,
226:Dhoni is one guy who doesn't know the meaning of fear. ~ Shoaib Akhtar,
227:Dialogue concentrates meaning; conversation dilutes it. ~ Robert McKee,
228:Disaster' is an astrological term meaning 'bad star. ~ Neal Stephenson,
229:I don't talk things, sir. I talk the meaning of things. ~ Ray Bradbury,
230:If there are none [gods], All our toil is without meaning. ~ Euripides,
231:In the long run, the only cure for boredom is meaning. ~ Eric Greitens,
232:Life has meaning for anyone who takes an interest in it. ~ Sidney Hook,
233:Live with fewer things that have greater meaning. ~ Dominique Browning,
234:Meaning is like pornography, you know it when you see it. ~ Seth Lloyd,
235:No experience is ever wasted. Everything has meaning. ~ Oprah Winfrey,
236:Only through communication can human life hold meaning. ~ Paulo Freire,
237:sometimes ordinary words have such extraordinary meaning ~ Jewel E Ann,
238:the irrational invalidates any meaning attached to it. ~ Hermann Broch,
239:The whole meaning of prayer is that we may know God. ~ Oswald Chambers,
240:What is the meaning of life?

'To give life meaning. ~ Anonymous,
241:Where is it written that lives should have a meaning? ~ Elena Ferrante,
242:A room without books is like a life without meaning. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
243:Biology, meaning the science of all life, is a late notion. ~ Leon Kass,
244:Defeat? I do not recognize the meaning of the word. ~ Margaret Thatcher,
245:Despite everything, life is full of beauty and meaning. ~ Etty Hillesum,
246:Each life contains as much meaning as all of history. ~ Catherine Chung,
247:Forever has no meaning when you're living in the moment ~ Ellen Hopkins,
248:groping uncertainly for the meaning of her own flesh. ~ Haruki Murakami,
249:I prayed, but the words fell to the ground meaning nothing. ~ Jean Rhys,
250:I was almost put out of business by a well-meaning corpse. ~ W C Fields,
251:Life has meaning only if you do what is meaningful to you. ~ Alan Cohen,
252:Life is without meaning. You bring the meaning to it. ~ Joseph Campbell,
253:love only variously everyday

The meaning of love ~ Mother Teresa,
254:Meaning in art isn’t the same as meaning in science. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
255:Most important pursuit in history: the search for meaning. ~ John Green,
256:parents why they chose Khantun, meaning “Iron Queen,” but ~ Peter David,
257:sometimes ordinary words have such extraordinary meaning. ~ Jewel E Ann,
258:The haiku lets meaning float; the aphorism pins it down. ~ Mason Cooley,
259:The meaning of a communication is the result you get. ~ Richard Bandler,
260:the meaning of a word is its use in the language. ~ Ludwig Wittgenstein,
261:The meaning of the universe lies outside the universe. ~ Jonathan Sacks,
262:...things without meaning are the most beautiful ones. ~ Elena Ferrante,
263:To believe in God is to see that life has meaning ~ Ludwig Wittgenstein,
264:Wisdom is not in words; Wisdom is meaning within words. ~ Khalil Gibran,
265:Words may show a man's wit but actions his meaning. ~ Benjamin Franklin,
266:All you can do is make your life have meaning, make it good— ~ Anne Rice,
267:a Man Thinketh (James Allen), Man’s Search for Meaning ~ Timothy Ferriss,
268:Attraversiamo (meaning "Lets cross over" in Italian) ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
269:Forever has no meaning when you're living in the moment. ~ Ellen Hopkins,
270:If my life had no meaning there was no reason not to end it. ~ Dan Wells,
271:Power is a word the meaning of which we do not understand. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
272:Suffering ceases to be suffering when it finds meaning ~ Viktor E Frankl,
273:The meaning of everything is the meaning I give it ~ Neale Donald Walsch,
274:The meaning of life is simply the meaning we give to it. ~ Bryant McGill,
275:There is no particular reason to search for meaning. ~ William Eggleston,
276:you, the woman who justified my life and gave it meaning. ~ Paulo Coelho,
277:Each movement was a syllable leading to a greater meaning. ~ Lisa Kleypas,
278:Empathy is an essential part of living a life of meaning. ~ Daniel H Pink,
279:Everything I do is a symbol. Everything, has a meaning. ~ Philippe Starck,
280:Fiction is a piece of truth that turns lies to meaning. ~ Dorothy Allison,
281:For a finite being, an infinite path has no meaning! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
282:Friend is sometimes a word devoid of meaning; enemy, never. ~ Victor Hugo,
283:Happiness will come from materialism, not from meaning. ~ Andrei Platonov,
284:Hard work is a prison only if it does not have meaning ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
285:He called it a ptero-dactyle, meaning ‘wing-fingered. ~ Elizabeth Kolbert,
286:It depends upon what the meaning of the word 'is' is. ~ William J Clinton,
287:Life belongs to man, but the meaning of life is beyond him. ~ Elie Wiesel,
288:Life has no meaning except in terms of responsibility. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr,
289:Masturbating the meaning of life since 1987. #lovewithmeneverdies ~ Pat R,
290:meaning can be found not only in work but also in love. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
291:Normal? Hateful word, normal. No meaning whatsoever. ~ William Hjortsberg,
292:things without meaning are the most beautiful ones. It’s ~ Elena Ferrante,
293:This is the meaning of true love, to give until it hurts. ~ Mother Teresa,
294:Weapons are like money; no one knows the meaning of enough. ~ Martin Amis,
295:we find nothing that gives our lives an objective meaning. ~ Stefan Klein,
296:We look for meaning and purpose; children bring that. ~ Johnathon Schaech,
297:Without courage all other virtues lose their meaning. ~ Winston Churchill,
298:Your words and my words are the same, but not our meaning. ~ Mason Cooley,
299:Do the stars have a meaning? Then my life has a meaning. ~ Leonard Peltier,
300:Friend' is sometimes a word devoid of meaning; enemy, never. ~ Victor Hugo,
301:Has your drawing the meaning you saw in the model at first? ~ Robert Henri,
302:justice hath no meaning lest it be tempered with mercy.”26 ~ William Irwin,
303:No poet, no artist of any art, has his complete meaning alone. ~ T S Eliot,
304:The life of which meaning one never ponders is not worth living ~ Socrates,
305:The meaning of life can be revealed but never explained. ~ Kenneth Rexroth,
306:The meaning of life consists in the love and service of God. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
307:There is only one meaning of life: the act of living itself. ~ Erich Fromm,
308:The root of great companies is make meaning vs. make money. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
309:To believe in God is to see that life has a meaning. ~ Ludwig Wittgenstein,
310:Trust that which gives you meaning and accept it as your guide ~ Carl Jung,
311:We wouldn’t be capable of hope, if hope had no meaning. ~ Gordon R Dickson,
312:Without context words and actions have no meaning at all ~ Gregory Bateson,
313:Zischeln is a useful German verb meaning “to whisper angrily. ~ John Lloyd,
314:Connect, create meaning, make a difference, matter, be missed. ~ Seth Godin,
315:horrifically painful as it is, find meaning in our own Isaac ~ Carol J Kent,
316:I am empty of everything I crave: good food, meaning, love. ~ Hannah Howard,
317:If I knew what the meaning of art was, I wouldn't tell you. ~ Pablo Picasso,
318:Meaning is not what you start with, but what you end up with. ~ Peter Elbow,
319:My fear was not of death itself, but a death without meaning. ~ Huey Newton,
320:Nothing has any meaning save the meaning you give it. ~ Neale Donald Walsch,
321:Nothing is more odious than music without hidden meaning. ~ Frederic Chopin,
322:On the Meaning of Life, which was published in 1932. ~ Emily Esfahani Smith,
323:Rhyme and meter force gaps in meaning so the muse can enter. ~ Mason Cooley,
324:symbols because critics have conferred meaning upon them. It’s ~ Jade Chang,
325:The meaning of life is that nobody knows the meaning of life. ~ Woody Allen,
326:The meaning of peace is the absence of opposition to socialism. ~ Karl Marx,
327:the monks called it Jew-dô, meaning the way of the Jew. ~ Christopher Moore,
328:The old phrases crack and meaning shakes out wet and new. ~ Nadine Gordimer,
329:Things do not have meaning. We assign meaning to everything. ~ Tony Robbins,
330:Uruz Meaning: The Aurochs, Health, Wisdom, Vital Strength ~ Eoghan Odinsson,
331:We all struggle to find meaning in a sometimes painful world. ~ Scott Jurek,
332:We know the meaning so long as no one asks us to define it. ~ William James,
333:What meaning has a compliment if one hears it night and day. ~ Irving Stone,
334:what was meaning anyway but a burden that weighed them down? ~ Lev Grossman,
335:Without courage all other virtues lose their meaning. ~ Winston S Churchill,
336:A statute is written to entrap meaning, a poem to escape it. ~ Hilary Mantel,
337:Creativity is the production of meaning by synthesis. ~ Alex Faickney Osborn,
338:Each day is an adventure in discovering the meaning of life. ~ Jack Canfield,
339:Existence is not a mystery unless you think it has a meaning. ~ Mason Cooley,
340:Fear is just one of the many words I don't know the meaning of. ~ John Wayne,
341:Happiness is the overall experience of pleasure and meaning ~ Tal Ben Shahar,
342:If you knew the meaning of life, would you necessarily like it? ~ N D Wilson,
343:In being meaning, you naturally find meaning in everything. ~ John de Ruiter,
344:Just when I discovered the meaning of life, they changed it. ~ George Carlin,
345:Man is troubled not by events, but by the meaning he gives them. ~ Epictetus,
346:Some old guy once said that the meaning of life is that it ends. ~ Lee Child,
347:The absurd has meaning only in so far as it is not agreed to. ~ Albert Camus,
348:The meaning of your communication is the response you get. ~ Gregory Bateson,
349:The search for meaning was the cornerstone of human disquiet. ~ Blake Crouch,
350:What do you want meaning for? Life is desire, not meaning. ~ Charlie Chaplin,
351:you can't know the meaning of the lesson until class is over! ~ Pearl Cleage,
352:Don't look for meaning in the words. Listen to the silences. ~ Samuel Beckett,
353:How much wrong have we done unintentionally, meaning the best ~ Tracy Hickman,
354:I could either study meaning or I could experience it. After ~ Paul Kalanithi,
355:I do kind of transcend the song and give it a different meaning. ~ Klaus Nomi,
356:If Scripture has more than one meaning, it has no meaning at all. ~ John Owen,
357:I live monastically,” Mathilde said, meaning, of course, more. ~ Lauren Groff,
358:In a single wave of meaning the triumphant purity of being. ~ Boris Pasternak,
359:In scene after scene, meaning sneaks in and sometimes roars. ~ Manohla Dargis,
360:Love is only a word, until someone arrives to give it meaning. ~ Paulo Coelho,
361:Meaning arises from loving life, not from goals or narratives. ~ Julio Olalla,
362:My fear was not of death itself, but a death without meaning. ~ Huey P Newton,
363:Of course they needed to care. It was the meaning of everything. ~ Lois Lowry,
364:Only by awakening can you know the true meaning of that word. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
365:‎Perfect? How can you define a word without concrete meaning? ~ Ellen Hopkins,
366:Right and wrong were shades of meaning, not sides of a coin. ~ Louise Erdrich,
367:The meaning of the world does not reside in the world. ~ Apostolos K Doxiadis,
368:The meaning or value of a thing consists of what it affords. ~ James J Gibson,
369:The sound of a word is at least as important as the meaning. ~ Jack Prelutsky,
370:Those who glitter with the glory of the hummingbird meaning death ~ T S Eliot,
371:Words. And meaning. You can't own one and not the other. ~ Randa Abdel Fattah,
372:But of course not meaning harm isn’t the same as not doing harm. ~ John Scalzi,
373:Don’t worry about your stuff. Worry about making meaning instead. ~ Seth Godin,
374:Drink in the beauty and wonder at the meaning of what you see. ~ Rachel Carson,
375:Every thoughtful, well-meaning and conscientious human being ~ Albert Einstein,
376:Fehu Meaning: Livestock, Wealth, Energy, Fertility, Creation ~ Eoghan Odinsson,
377:❝ fiction is a piece of truth that turns lies into meaning.❞ ~ Dorothy Allison,
378:If justice perishes, human life on Earth has lost its meaning. ~ Immanuel Kant,
379:If life has no meaning, why don't we create a meaning for it? ~ Naguib Mahfouz,
380:Man tries to swallow meaning whole as a dog would eat his dinner. ~ Walt Kelly,
381:Meaning makes a great many things endurable---per haps everything. ~ Carl Jung,
382:Nothing in life has any meaning except the meaning you give it. ~ Tony Robbins,
383:Passionate hatred can give meaning and purpose to an empty life. ~ Eric Hoffer,
384:[S]he might yet reveal depths of strangeness, if not of meaning. ~ E M Forster,
385:That was messages without meaning: telepathy without brains. ~ Terry Pratchett,
386:The meaning of yes is created by the ability to say no. ~ Lois McMaster Bujold,
387:There is meaning in all things. But are you paying attention? ~ Yasmin Mogahed,
388:The sum total of all sums total is eternal (meaning the universe). ~ Lucretius,
389:You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life. ~ Albert Camus,
390:for many people traveling can have deep psychological meaning. ~ Helene Deutsch,
391:gamos, meaning a marriage or conjoining of hunter and prey. ~ Loreth Anne White,
392:Idealism is not a reliable guide to the meaning of Revelation. ~ Mark Hitchcock,
393:I like patterns in words. I'm not really interested in meaning. ~ Roddy Woomble,
394:In the act of tearing something apart, you lose its meaning. ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
395:It might be possible that the world itself is without meaning. ~ Virginia Woolf,
396:Life in itself has no meaning. Life is an opportunity to create meaning. ~ Osho,
397:Love your calling with passion, it is the meaning of your life. ~ Auguste Rodin,
398:Man is troubled not by events, but by the meaning he gives to them. ~ Epictetus,
399:Man's search for meaning is the chief motivation of his life. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
400:People make events into stories. Stories give events meaning. ~ Scarlett Thomas,
401:The only true meaning in existence is the ability to form meaning ~ Mark Manson,
402:The thing to do is to exploit the meaning of the life you have. ~ Ralph Ellison,
403:The word “robot” is from a Czech word meaning “compulsory labor. ~ Isaac Asimov,
404:time was just a hangover from the past with no present meaning ~ Norman Maclean,
405:To give life a meaning, one must have a purpose larger than self. ~ Will Durant,
406:We no longer get work out of our children; today we get meaning. ~ Esther Perel,
407:Whatever may be happening today, peace is the meaning of tomorrow ~ Victor Hugo,
408:Work is about a search for daily meaning as well as daily bread. ~ Studs Terkel,
409:You get to consciously decide what has meaning and what doesn't. ~ David Foster,
410:A craft can only have meaning when it serves a spiritual way. ~ Titus Burckhardt,
411:Death never gave meaning to life: it was always the other way round. ~ Greg Egan,
412:Do you think my life has meaning? Did I make the right choices? ~ Paul Kalanithi,
413:Even the world view that there is no meaning is a message. ~ Francis A Schaeffer,
414:Every meaning is a projection of the viewer's inarticulate moods. ~ James Elkins,
415:If you cross a line and nothing happens, the line loses meaning. ~ Lauren Oliver,
416:If youre not interested in life, then photography has no meaning ~ Ruth Bernhard,
417:In our factions, we find meaning, we find purpose, we find life. ~ Veronica Roth,
418:Like the meaning of my name, questions follow me wherever I go. ~ Joseph Bruchac,
419:Man’s search for meaning is the primary motivation in his life ~ Viktor E Frankl,
420:Nothing in life has any meaning except the meaning we give it. ~ Anthony Robbins,
421:Rather than becoming the best, I want to become a singer with meaning. ~ Taeyang,
422:sometimes it’s the quest that holds the meaning, not the reward. ~ Dot Hutchison,
423:Somewhere we know that without silence, words lose their meaning. ~ Henri Nouwen,
424:The pursuit of meaning, not happiness, is what makes life worthwhile. ~ Tom Rath,
425:There is One God. We have an epistemic center. There is meaning. ~ Tariq Ramadan,
426:The word amateur comes from the Latin root meaning "to love. ~ Steven Pressfield,
427:What oxygen is to the lungs, such is hope to the meaning of life. ~ Emil Brunner,
428:While we are pushed by drives, we are pulled by meaning, and ~ Tom Butler Bowdon,
429:Without wisdom, the future has no meaning, no valuable purpose. ~ Herbie Hancock,
430:Writing, for me, makes the world shiver and flame with meaning. ~ Lauren B Davis,
431:A life of kindness is the primary meaning of divine worship. ~ Emanuel Swedenborg,
432:Always engage in the quest for life's meaning, which is inner peace. ~ Longchenpa,
433:And the soul craves meaning the way the body craves oxygen. ~ Marianne Williamson,
434:A PERFUME SHOULD BE AS IMBUED WITH MEANING AS IT IS LIGHT TO WEAR. ~ Paco Rabanne,
435:Doing well is a conservative idea; meaning well is a liberal idea ~ Dennis Prager,
436:...drink in the beauty and wonder at the meaning of what you see. ~ Rachel Carson,
437:Everyone faces the challenge of finding meaning to their suffering. ~ Phil McGraw,
438:If language did not affect behavior, it could have no meaning. ~ Kenneth Lee Pike,
439:If you say the same word a million times will it lose its meaning? ~ Nancy Huston,
440:If you want meaning in your life you must give your life meaning. ~ Bryant McGill,
441:In which the meaning of myth, its value and expression are elaborated ~ Anonymous,
442:Just because there’s an end doesn’t mean existence has meaning. ~ Haruki Murakami,
443:Kaohinani is a Hawaiian word meaning “gatherer of beautiful things. ~ Rob Brezsny,
444:Nothing in theatre has any meaning before or after. Meaning is now. ~ Peter Brook,
445:The blues tells a story. Every line of the blues has a meaning. ~ John Lee Hooker,
446:There is a profound difference between information and meaning. ~ Warren G Bennis,
447:The truth is, clocks don’t tell time. Time is measured in meaning. ~ Rene Denfeld,
448:When a man cannot find meaning, he numbs himself with pleasure. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
449:...words are not only meaning but music and magic and power. ~ Frederick Buechner,
450:Writing for me is cutting out the fat and getting to the meaning. ~ James McBride,
451:Yes means yes and no means no, but what is the meaning of silence? ~ Tayari Jones,
452:You're talking about meaning. I want to talk about the picture. ~ Garry Winogrand,
453:A black belt doesn't mean anything. The meaning is in the journey. ~ Gunnar Nelson,
454:Amphibians—the word comes from the Greek meaning ‘double life. ~ Elizabeth Kolbert,
455:Art distills sensations and embodies it with enhanced meaning. ~ Miguel de Unamuno,
456:Beauty loses its meaning when you’re surrounded by too much of it. ~ Dot Hutchison,
457:Dreaming or awake, we perceive only events that have meaning to us. ~ Jane Roberts,
458:Education gives us the power to turn information into meaning. ~ Robert T Kiyosaki,
459:Everyone now knows how to find the meaning of life within himself. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
460:If you look for a meaning, you'll miss everything that happens. ~ Andrei Tarkovsky,
461:If you look for a meaning, you’ll miss everything that happens. ~ Andrei Tarkovsky,
462:If you want to find the meaning, stop chasing after so many things. ~ Pema Ch dr n,
463:In the morning there is meaning, in the evening there is feeling. ~ Gertrude Stein,
464:I read a book not to find its meaning, but to find my happiness. ~ Carson Cistulli,
465:Liesel was tempted to ask her the meaning, but it never eventuated. ~ Markus Zusak,
466:Love has a reason There's a meaning to the world We're giving love. ~ Gavin DeGraw,
467:Love is just a word until someone comes along and gives it meaning. ~ Paulo Coelho,
468:Meaning cannot be found, it should be created every hour of every day ~ Sharon Nir,
469:Meaning is socially, historically, and rhetorically constructed. ~ Clifford Geertz,
470:No matter what you do, somebody always imputes meaning into your books. ~ Dr Seuss,
471:Of course they needed to care. It was the meaning of everything. “And ~ Lois Lowry,
472:Photography has a meaning only if it exhausts all possible images. ~ Italo Calvino,
473:Poetry is language surprised in the act of changing into meaning. ~ Stanley Kunitz,
474:[Ray to Livvy] Aren't you used to people meaning what they say? ~ Ann Howard Creel,
475:The meaning of my life is to help others find meaning in theirs. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
476:There is no one religion, no one truth and no myth lacks meaning ~ Cassandra Clare,
477:There’s no meaning to be found in tragedy. Only in our response to it. ~ Greg Iles,
478:The simpler the message, the broader the meaning, in many respects. ~ Paul Rodgers,
479:To truly recover, one must find a deep sense of purpose and meaning. ~ Mary Pipher,
480:Wanting to become stronger than everybody else has no meaning. ~ Christian Tissier,
481:What actually gives life meaning is the willingness to live it. ~ Michael A Singer,
482:What do you want a meaning for? Life is a desire, not a meaning. ~ Charlie Chaplin,
483:What is the meaning of the immense silence that surrounds the dead? ~ Ernst J nger,
484:Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. ~ Stephen Hawking,
485:You can use the power of words to bury meaning or to excavate it. ~ Rebecca Solnit,
486:You should try it again. The meaning changes every time you read it. ~ Nicola Yoon,
487:Chaos is more freedom; in fact, total freedom. But no meaning. ~ Audrey Niffenegger,
488:communication comes from the Latin word communis, meaning “common. ~ John C Maxwell,
489:Fate.
A word meaning destiny.
Fate.
A word meaning doom. ~ Colleen Hoover,
490:Grow spiritually and help others to do so. It is the meaning of life. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
491:Hard work is a prison sentence only if it does not have meaning. ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
492:I am sustained by the certainty that life has meaning. As does death. ~ Dean Koontz,
493:I scarcely know the meaning of your question; much less can I answer it. ~ Boethius,
494:Life is filled with meaning as soon as Jesus Christ enters into it. ~ Stephen Neill,
495:Meaning is not found in things; meaning is what you make of things. ~ Robert Holden,
496:No finite point has meaning without an infinite reference point. ~ Jean Paul Sartre,
497:Perhaps, then, the words male and female have no general meaning. ~ Richard Dawkins,
498:Suffering ceases to be suffering at the moment it finds a meaning ~ Viktor E Frankl,
499:The hardest thing was to give meaning to what appeared to have none. ~ Tatjana Soli,
500:The power of a thing or an act is in the meaning and the understanding. ~ Black Elk,
501:There is no life without death. That is the true meaning of yin and yang ~ Lisa See,
502:The Sadducees were materialists.” “Meaning what? They drove BMWs? ~ Neal Stephenson,
503:the words become inevitable through my connection with their meaning, ~ Terry Gross,
504:We know the meaning of nothing but the words we use to describe it. ~ Anthony Marra,
505:What is the meaning of life? Life has the meaning that you give it. ~ Steve Redhead,
506:Even a small act of compassion grants meaning and purpose to our lives. ~ Dalai Lama,
507:Fine words lack all meaning when we are confronted by real suffering. ~ Paulo Coelho,
508:Hard world is a prison sentence only if it does not have meaning. ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
509:I am sustained by the certainty that life has meaning...as does death. ~ Dean Koontz,
510:Imparting trust, the real meaning of delegation, is a powerful thing. ~ Scott Berkun,
511:It is what it is. It, meaning terrorism. Terrorism is what it is. ~ Gretchen Carlson,
512:I work from a personal place, and the work has personal meaning for me. ~ Jim Hodges,
513:Joy is always possible. Whenever, meaning—now; wherever, meaning—here. ~ Ann Voskamp,
514:Love is the only thing which gives meaning to our poor ways on earth ~ Malcolm Lowry,
515:Meaning lies as much in the mind of the reader as in the Haiku. ~ Douglas Hofstadter,
516:Motion is the context of living. We find meaning my and in our doing. ~ Robert Kegan,
517:Painting gave meaning to my life which without it would not have had ~ Francis Bacon,
518:Shannon's most radical insight was that meaning was irrelevant. ~ William Poundstone,
519:She was not to look beyond herself for the meaning of her life. ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
520:Sometimes people do much wrong unintentionally, meaning for the best ~ Tracy Hickman,
521:suffering ceases to be suffering at the moment it finds a meaning, ~ Viktor E Frankl,
522:Tantra is the left-handing path, meaning it is the road less taken. ~ Frederick Lenz,
523:There is always meaning in old stories, even if we have forgotten them, ~ M L Forman,
524:The whole of life is symbolic because the whole of it has meaning. ~ Boris Pasternak,
525:Though we speak nonsense, God will pick out the meaning of it. ~ Nathaniel Hawthorne,
526:we don’t seek the meaning of life, but the experience of being alive. ~ Sean Patrick,
527:Without the existence of the opposite, the concept has no meaning. ~ Stephenie Meyer,
528:Yes, and when the love of life disappears, no meaning can console us. ~ Albert Camus,
529:Adolf Hitler facts had no meaning except as they served his purpose. ~ Upton Sinclair,
530:All reality seemed to hinge on those infinitesimal bundles of meaning. ~ Iain M Banks,
531:And my life . . . my life felt big, filled with love and with meaning. ~ Mia Sheridan,
532:A spiritual search in art is looking for meaning outside of yourself. ~ Ross Bleckner,
533:Busy? The word loses all meaning under the canopy of this sky. ~ Barbara Brown Taylor,
534:Death is a mirror in which the entire meaning of life is reflected. ~ Sogyal Rinpoche,
535:Every time you use the phrase all my life it has a different meaning. ~ George Carlin,
536:Good God! Willloughby, what is the meaning of this?" -Marianne Dashwood ~ Jane Austen,
537:Home

...Home.
...the word,
...has
...no
...meaning ~ Ellen Hopkins,
538:I had the sense that the deeper meaning of the story was in the gaps. ~ Edith Wharton,
539:It is the role of religious symbols to give a meaning to the life of man. ~ Carl Jung,
540:I want to write songs with meaning. I have high standards for my work. ~ Brett Dennen,
541:Love is a word used so freely that it’s lost a lot of its meaning, ~ Georgia Bockoven,
542:Meaning grows in the mind, but the shape and form of the act remains. ~ Ralph Ellison,
543:Neurosis is the suffering of a soul which has not discovered its meaning. ~ Carl Jung,
544:Our main motivation for living is our will to find meaning in life. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
545:The hardest song to write is a protest song, a topical song with meaning. ~ Joan Baez,
546:The meaning of life is found by diving deep, deep within. ~ Vishnudevananda Saraswati,
547:There is no meaning to life unless there is commitment and love. ~ Constance O Banyon,
548:There is within every soul a thirst for happiness and meaning. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
549:The search for meaning will fill you with a sense of meaning. Otherwise ~ Anne Lamott,
550:The very best pictures adapt themselves to many changes in meaning. ~ John Szarkowski,
551:we give our suffering meaning by the way in which we respond to it. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
552:A door loses its meaning if you don’t ever go through it. It becomes a wall ~ Paul Pen,
553:Art should startle the viewer into thinking about the meaning of life. ~ Antoni Tapies,
554:Each move is dictated by the previous one--that is the meaning of order ~ Tom Stoppard,
555:Everybody cryin' mercy / When they don't know the meaning of the word. ~ Mose Allison,
556:Failure and pain and hardship have the meaning we choose to give them. ~ Eric Greitens,
557:Focus on what makes you happy, and do what gives meaning to your life ~ Barry Schwartz,
558:Home had a new meaning now. Jago watched him, and was satisfied. Like ~ Alexander Kent,
559:Hope is life's essential nutrient, and love is what gives life meaning ~ Dick Van Dyke,
560:I like to think that death gives life meaning. I like that philosophy. ~ Kirsten Dunst,
561:I’ve questioned the meaning of my life, but never again. He is the meaning ~ Ker Dukey,
562:I wonder is illiterate people know the full meaning of alphabet soup? ~ Jerry Seinfeld,
563:Life took on quite a special meaning in this early morning solitude. ~ Henning Mankell,
564:Love is just a word until someone comes along and gives it meaning. ~ Georgia Le Carre,
565:people seek peace and meaning amid the material concerns of modern life; ~ Jo Marchant,
566:The investigation of the meaning of words is the beginning of education. ~ Antisthenes,
567:The meaning of life is contained in every single expression of life. ~ Michael Jackson,
568:The true meaning of Christmas is actually centuries of gullibility. ~ Anthony Jeselnik,
569:Things gain meaning by being used in a shared experience or joint action. ~ John Dewey,
570:Time has a way of putting things in perspective, of assigning meaning. ~ Cindy Chupack,
571:Wading through sewage gave a whole new meaning to being up shit’s creek. ~ E J Stevens,
572:Acts are demanded, suicidal acts perhaps, but acts fraught with meaning. ~ Henry Miller,
573:A door loses its meaning if you don’t ever go through it. It becomes a wall. ~ Paul Pen,
574:An A versus a B—one step on the spectrum and yet miles apart in meaning. ~ Sejal Badani,
575:Art is the splendor of reality before everything has become meaning. ~ Frederick Sommer,
576:Beauty loses its meaning when you’re surrounded by too much of it. “So, ~ Dot Hutchison,
577:Empty and sad. A name without meaning, it’s like having night without day. ~ Shobha Rao,
578:Human life is a voyage on a sea of meaning, not a net of information. ~ Gregory Benford,
579:Intellectually, I loved my job, but I didn't get any meaning from it. ~ Chelsea Clinton,
580:Jesus,” Roland said, not meaning the little Cuban but the other Jesus. ~ Elmore Leonard,
581:Life has no guarantees, but my life has no meaning if you're not in it. ~ Robin Bielman,
582:Love is just a word untill you and that someone who comes along give it meaning ~ Livia,
583:Relating a person to the whole world: that is the meaning of cinema. ~ Andrei Tarkovsky,
584:S-l-o-w-ness--it gave meaning to everything. It made everything royal. ~ John Steinbeck,
585:Such tensions without sense push us to formulate questions of meaning. ~ Elena Ferrante,
586:The aim of every human being is to understand the meaning of total love. ~ Paulo Coelho,
587:The meaning of prayer is that I want to evoke that Divinity within me. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
588:The past is devoid of meaning like the present, and a refuge for cowards. ~ E M Forster,
589:There's a difference between silence meaning agreement and being silenced. ~ Mavis Leno,
590:"The word happy would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness." ~ Carl Jung,
591:We create order out of chaos, beauty and meaning out of ugly randomness. ~ Rick Riordan,
592:Whoever controls information, whoever controls meaning, acquires power ~ Laura Esquivel,
593:You said, ‘Life is a tragedy, but its meaning lies in how we face the tragedy. ~ Ha Jin,
594:You will never know what the meaning of Jazz is if ask what it means. ~ Louis Armstrong,
595:Blasphemy and sedition (meaning the truth about Church and State). ~ George Bernard Shaw,
596:Contemporary poetry ... tries to transform the sign back into meaning: ~ Roland Barthes,
597:Dare to err and to dream. Deep meaning often lies in childish play. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
598:Death is like a mirror in which the true meaning of life is reflected. ~ Sogyal Rinpoche,
599:"Even small acts of compassion bring meaning and purpose to our lives." ~ Dalai Lama XIV,
600:Hard work is a prison sentence only if it does not have meaning. Once ~ Malcolm Gladwell,
601:It is likely I will die next to a pile of things I was meaning to read. ~ Daniel Handler,
602:Knowing life's purpose would invest everything one did with meaning. ~ Kentetsu Takamori,
603:Love was just a word to me. Until you came along and gave it meaning. ~ James Earl Jones,
604:Man can find meaning in life only through devoting himself to society. ~ Albert Einstein,
605:Soldiers have no imagination, meaning they're capable of vast surprises ~ Steven Erikson,
606:The meaning of your life is to help others find the meaning of theirs. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
607:The only true thoughts are those which do not grasp their own meaning ~ Theodor W Adorno,
608:The original ancient Greek meaning of the word planet was simply “wanderer, ~ Mike Brown,
609:The public buys "art" - but the word is drained of its meaning. ~ Michelangelo Antonioni,
610:There is meaning in every journey that is unknown to the traveler. ~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer,
611:The spiritual quest begins, for most people, as a search for meaning. ~ Marilyn Ferguson,
612:The very meaninglessness of life forces man to create his own meaning. ~ Stanley Kubrick,
613:Time has no meaning in itself unless we choose to give it significance ~ Leo F Buscaglia,
614:To assert as truth that which has no meaning is the core mission of humanity. ~ Tom King,
615:When you're true to your heart, you're infusing your self with meaning. ~ John de Ruiter,
616:which we also get the loanword yoga from Sanskrit, meaning “connection ~ Jostein Gaarder,
617:By itself, a tree is meaningless, but it is the meaning of the word “tree. ~ Alan W Watts,
618:Consequences cannot alter statutes, but may help to fix their meaning. ~ Benjamin Cardozo,
619:Dare to err and to dream. Deep meaning often lies in childish plays. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
620:I'm into the true meaning of Christmas - Faith, Family, and Facial hair. ~ Jase Robertson,
621:Life has no meaning the moment you lose the illusion of being eternal. ~ Jean Paul Sartre,
622:Love only has logic, only has meaning, when it takes the form of the cross. ~ Ann Voskamp,
623:Morality's just comfort food -- it holds no meaning outside of our minds. ~ Rick Remender,
624:Power to translate is the test of having really understood one's own meaning. ~ C S Lewis,
625:Respect only has meaning as respect for those with whom I do not agree. ~ Karen Armstrong,
626:Selfless acts are a source of profound meaning for your self and your life. ~ Ron Kaufman,
627:Storytelling reveals meaning without committing the error of defining it. ~ Hannah Arendt,
628:The greatest task for any person is to find meaning in his or her life. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
629:The “meaning of life” is really the center about which the novel moves. ~ Walter Benjamin,
630:The process of reclaiming the self is one of reconciliation with meaning. ~ Tariq Ramadan,
631:The quest for meaning is the key to mental health and human flourishing ~ Viktor E Frankl,
632:The work of rehearsal is looking for meaning and then making it meaningful. ~ Peter Brook,
633:To name God as a god of love is to strip love of all its precious meaning. ~ C J Anderson,
634:Writing can give full meaning to characters and avoid pure stereotype. ~ James Earl Jones,
635:Anything might have been anything else and had as much meaning to it. ~ Tennessee Williams,
636:Avid readers are enchanted by meaning, which is available chiefly in books. ~ Mason Cooley,
637:death is the light by which the shadow of all of life’s meaning is measured. ~ Mark Manson,
638:During the '70s I was interested in words and meaning as a way of making art. ~ Sol LeWitt,
639:Everything's connected, and everything has meaning if you look for it. ~ Michelle Williams,
640:First, believe in the world - that there is meaning behind everything. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
641:Gratitude is the golden frame through which we see the meaning of life. ~ Brendon Burchard,
642:If you say any word over and over fast enough, it loses all it's meaning ~ Cassandra Clare,
643:I love sport as long as its kept as an entertainment - not a meaning of life. ~ David Icke,
644:In speaking, it is best to be clear and say just enough to convey the meaning. ~ Confucius,
645:I see the meaning of apocalypse as an unveiling of our deeper self. ~ Barbara Marx Hubbard,
646:I suppose I had some meaning when I wrote it; I believe I understood it then. ~ Lord Byron,
647:It’s your heart, not the dictionary, that gives meaning to your words. ~ Eugene H Peterson,
648:I've always said that people are desperate to find meaning in their lives. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
649:Life has no meaning, the moment you lose the illusion of being eternal. ~ Jean Paul Sartre,
650:Maybe there isn't a meaning to life. Maybe there's only a meaning to living. ~ Kami Garcia,
651:Most of all, he needed a challenge—because that was what gave life meaning. ~ Terry Brooks,
652:People are always meaning well,' said Edward. 'That's often the trouble. ~ Penelope Lively,
653:Reason is the natural order of truth; but imagination is the organ of meaning. ~ C S Lewis,
654:Refuse any image that could have a rational meaning or any memory or culture ~ Luis Bunuel,
655:The Kingdom of Heaven is not for the well-meaning: it is for the desperate. ~ James Denney,
656:The neurotic believes that life has meaning, but that his life hasn't. ~ Mignon McLaughlin,
657:The real meaning of economic equality is "To each according to his need." ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
658:traditions that have lost their meaning are the hardest of all to destroy. ~ Edith Wharton,
659:True love is rare, and it's the only thing that gives life real meaning. ~ Nicholas Sparks,
660:What is happening outside of the circle? And what is the meaning of happening? ~ T S Eliot,
661:Without action and fruit, all the theology in the world has little meaning. ~ Francis Chan,
662:You won’t take a bullet for pleasure or power, but you will for meaning. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
663:At least be sure you go to the author to find his meaning, not to find yours. ~ John Ruskin,
664:Could you love someone so much that, even without meaning to, you hurt them? ~ Jodi Picoult,
665:Every muscular rigidity contains the history and the meaning of its origin. ~ Wilhelm Reich,
666:How strangely will the Tools of a Tyrant pervert the plain Meaning of Words! ~ Samuel Adams,
667:I have said it before, but I don't think I have ever came so near meaning it. ~ Kate Chopin,
668:I think Easter is most profoundly about meaning, not mechanism. ~ Katharine Jefferts Schori,
669:Just when I discovered the meaning of life, they changed it. George Carlin ~ Liane Moriarty,
670:Man can only find meaning for his existence in something outside himself. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
671:meaning someone without the necessary skills and tools to navigate real life. ~ Henry Cloud,
672:Om Namah Shivaya, meaning, I honor the divinity that resides within me. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
673:People find meaning and redemption in the most unusual human connections. ~ Khaled Hosseini,
674:Reading functions as hallucinating a meaning between letters and lines. ~ Friedrich Kittler,
675:Recovery is about purpose and meaning in life, not “sobriety” and meetings. ~ Stanton Peele,
676:Sometimes I wonder if people don't want freedom as much as they want meaning. ~ Zadie Smith,
677:Sometimes I wonder if people don’t want freedom as much as they want meaning, ~ Zadie Smith,
678:The earthly meaning of eternal life was death, and she refused to die. ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
679:The meaning of a photo lies in the excitement and joy you feel when taking it. ~ Marie Kond,
680:The meaning of fiction is not abstract meaning but experienced meaning. ~ Flannery O Connor,
681:The only important thing in a book is the meaning that it has for you. ~ W Somerset Maugham,
682:The only way to cure the disease is to find happiness and meaning now. ~ Marshall Goldsmith,
683:The richest source of creation is feeling, followed by a vision of its meaning. ~ Anais Nin,
684:Time has no meaning here, but if it did, it would be a little after tea-time. ~ Jonny Nexus,
685:Victory loses its meaning without the memory of what you've vanquished. ~ Alastair Reynolds,
686:Without consciousness and intelligence, the universe would lack meaning. ~ Clifford D Simak,
687:..Yet if today has no meaning, the past was a Blank and the future is a Chaos. ~ Henry Ford,
688:You won't know the meaning of success without knowing how it feels to fail. ~ Kazu Kibuishi,
689:And in poetry, beauty is no ornament; it is the meaning. It is the truth. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
690:An outward observance without any real inward meaning is only a ceremony. ~ Alfred Edersheim,
691:Be sure that you go to the author to get at his meaning, not to find yours. ~ Salman Rushdie,
692:Chasing meaning is better for your health than trying to avoid discomfort. ~ Kelly McGonigal,
693:Compassion and love give meaning to our activities and makes them constructive. ~ Dalai Lama,
694:Context is the necessary link that gives meaning to everything we observe. ~ Gavin de Becker,
695:Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
696:Existence doesn't have more meaning in one direction than it does in any other. ~ Charles Yu,
697:Give a real meaning to what you wear; wear what has a real meaning. ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
698:If women didn't exist, all the money in the world would have no meaning. ~ Aristotle Onassis,
699:In time, words might enchant an enchanter. Do you take my meaning Gunslinger? ~ Stephen King,
700:I suffer migraines. I do not suffer fools. I like a twist of meaning. I endure. ~ E Lockhart,
701:I wanted to be that quirky girl who writes funny songs that still have meaning. ~ Katy Perry,
702:Life is an accomplishment and each moment has a meaning and you must use it. ~ Jeanne Moreau,
703:Life's deepest meaning is not found in accomplishments , but in relationships ~ Gary Chapman,
704:Love can go away, or people can, without even meaning to. Nothing is guaranteed. ~ Anonymous,
705:Love can go away, or people can, without even meaning to. Nothing is guaranteed. ~ Jenny Han,
706:Meaning lies as much
in the mind of the reader
as in the Haiku. ~ Douglas R Hofstadter,
707:the all too human need to conjure symbolic meaning from meaningless events. ~ Steven Erikson,
708:The meaning, Captain,” the Quill said softly, “is that death does not stop life. ~ Sam Sykes,
709:The more we live by our intellect, the less we understand the meaning of life. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
710:The purpose of existence is to exist. It is too fantastic to have a meaning. ~ Jaggi Vasudev,
711:"The word happiness’ would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness." ~ Carl Jung,
712:The words of genius have a wider meaning than the thought that prompted them. ~ George Eliot,
713:To know, is to know that you know nothing. That is the meaning of true knowledge. ~ Socrates,
714:What distresses us is not loosing life, but losing what gives it meaning. ~ Raymond Radiguet,
715:Words,’ sniffed Mary, ‘words,’ and I jeered, ‘Words, what we like is meaning. ~ Rebecca West,
716:Either the world is at fault, or we’re looking for meaning in the wrong places. ~ J G Ballard,
717:He had this way of lading a whole sentence worth of meaning onto one word. “Let’s ~ Guy Haley,
718:He who has never been deceived by a lie does not know the meaning of bliss. ~ Albert Einstein,
719:I loved voices, I always had. Words held meaning, but voices held emotion. ~ Kimberly Derting,
720:I love voices, i always have. Words held meaning, but voices held emotion. ~ Kimberly Derting,
721:"In science I missed the factor of meaning; and in religion, that of empiricism." ~ Carl Jung,
722:In the meantime, I would drink, rest, and ponder the meaning of this mob. ~ Hunter S Thompson,
723:Nobody talks about music as having intrinsic meaning, how it engages the mind. ~ Tod Machover,
724:Reading functions as hallucinating a meaning between letters and lines. ~ Friedrich A Kittler,
725:The fact that life has no meaning is a reason to live-moreover, the only one. ~ Emil M Cioran,
726:The literal meaning of the Chinese characters for revolution is elimination of life ~ Ma Jian,
727:"The word 'happiness' would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness." ~ Carl Jung,
728:To know is to know that you know nothing. That is the meaning of true knowledge. ~ Confucius,
729:To live is to experience things, not sit around pondering the meaning of life. ~ Paulo Coelho,
730:When he came in first, he was happy to find all sorts of meaning in the results. ~ H W Brands,
731:Wisdom isn't about knowing; it's an understanding that meaning is inexhaustible. ~ Irwin Kula,
732:Worse, the language of politics itself has been vacated of substance and meaning. ~ Tony Judt,
733:Bhuta ia, dewa ia. (Bali expression meaning Man is a demon, man is a god.) ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
734:If there is meaning in life at all, then there must be meaning in suffering. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
735:I'm afraid that if you look at a thing long enough, it loses all of its meaning. ~ Andy Warhol,
736:I’m afraid that if you look at a thing long enough, it loses all of its meaning. ~ Andy Warhol,
737:In love, we worry more about the meaning of silences than the meaning of words. ~ Mason Cooley,
738:I think meaning is something that's really unnecessary in music, at least for me. ~ Tim Rutili,
739:I try to find meaning or value in most things and be as diverse as possible. ~ Francois Arnaud,
740:It’s you versus you.” Meaning, you’re the only thing standing in your own way. ~ Amber Tamblyn,
741:I've struggled all my life to get maximum meaning in the simplest possible form. ~ Anne Truitt,
742:Meaning equals emotion and emotion equals life. Choose consciously and wisely. ~ Tony Robbins,
743:Not being able to find meaning can be just as powerful as finding meaning. ~ Bret Easton Ellis,
744:Nothing is absolutely dead: every meaning will have its homecoming festival. ~ Mikhail Bakhtin,
745:Only the poor knew the meaning of life; the rich and the safe had to guess. ~ Charles Bukowski,
746:Our lives are programmed at conception and are endowed with purpose and meaning. ~ Jeane Dixon,
747:Programmers must avoid leaving false clues that obscure the meaning of code. ~ Robert C Martin,
748:The real meaning of the spoken word has to be demonstrated by practical deeds ~ Nelson Mandela,
749:To live is to suffer,to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
750:When man can’t find meaning in his life, he distracts himself with pleasure. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
751:Without death, life loses its meaning - without meaning, you were already dead. ~ Kevin Bohacz,
752:Act with courage and dignity; stick to the ideals that give meaning to life. ~ Jawaharlal Nehru,
753:a man is also
a woman; he wants to find someone, to give meaning to his life. ~ Paulo Coelho,
754:Everything worthwhile in your life draws its meaning from the fact you will die. ~ Derren Brown,
755:It is better to live in a world of poetic meaning rather than hardcore reality. ~ Mark Gonzales,
756:I understood the meaning of the word swoon — I had become the very definition. ~ Lauren Blakely,
757:Modern marriage has lost its meaning--consequently it is being abolished. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
758:Om Namah Shivaya, meaning,
I honor the divinity that resides within me. ~ Elizabeth Gilbert,
759:Only work which is the product of inner compulsion can have spiritual meaning. ~ Walter Gropius,
760:Passionate hatred can give meaning and purpose to an empty life.’ Eric Hoffer ~ Minette Walters,
761:Pay attention to where you are going because without meaning you might get nowhere. ~ A A Milne,
762:Search your own heart with all diligence - for out of it flows the meaning of life. ~ Anonymous,
763:She loved the way you could transform the meaning of a scene with how you played it. ~ Amy Sohn,
764:that the chance to shape one’s story is essential to sustaining meaning in life; ~ Atul Gawande,
765:The causes of life's history [cannot] resolve the riddle of life's meaning. ~ Stephen Jay Gould,
766:The fact that life has no meaning is a reason to live --moreover, the only one. ~ Emil M Cioran,
767:The Greek meaning of the word "blessed" is "supreme happiness." [see Matthew 5:3-5] ~ Eric Ludy,
768:The job of leadership today is not just to make money, it's to make meaning. ~ John Seely Brown,
769:the meaning of President Kimball’s teachings. ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
770:The meaning of your life is to help others find the meaning of theirs.” “That ~ Viktor E Frankl,
771:The world must be romanticized. In this way the originary meaning may be found again. ~ Novalis,
772:They contributed one third of the fee, meaning you had to fork out the other third. ~ Jo Watson,
773:We are more curious about the meaning of dreams than about things we see when awake. ~ Diogenes,
774:What is the meaning of having more than one wife when threesome is not allowed? ~ M F Moonzajer,
775:Without meaning, without substance, without aim: a mere 'public opinion'. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
776:Aren't we forgeting the true meaning of Christmas? You know, the birth of Santa. ~ Matt Groening,
777:As a memoirist, it’s your job to impose order and meaning on the chaos of life. ~ Julia Scheeres,
778:Ever more people today have the means to live,
but no meaning to live for. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
779:Everyone asks what the meaning of life is, but no one asks about the meaning of death. ~ Jo Nesb,
780:Every single human soul has more meaning and value than the whole of history. ~ Nikolai Berdyaev,
781:Fear in your mind produces fear in your life. This is the meaning of hell. ~ Marianne Williamson,
782:For all their strength, all their power, they still know the meaning of fear. ~ Victoria Aveyard,
783:Happiness does not have a simple meaning and should not be used as if it does. ~ Daniel Kahneman,
784:His hidden meaning lies in our endeavors;
Our valors are our best gods. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
785:I don't think the meaning in my paintings comes from just using broken dishes. ~ Julian Schnabel,
786:I'm a very message-oriented artist, and each song has a totally different meaning. ~ Claudia Lee,
787:I'm killing time while I wait for life to shower me with meaning and happiness. ~ Bill Watterson,
788:I’m killing time while I wait for life to shower me with meaning and happiness. ~ Bill Watterson,
789:Lucky for us, we can give meaning to each other for free. Just by being alive. ~ Daniel H Wilson,
790:Millions of people acknowledge today that they do not know the meaning of life. ~ James C Dobson,
791:Money is a blank slate that gets its value from the energy and meaning we give it. ~ Jen Sincero,
792:Our lives are not a random series of events; they tell a Story that has meaning. ~ John Eldredge,
793:The fact that life has no meaning is a reason to live - moreover, the only one. ~ Emile M Cioran,
794:The meaning I picked, the one that changed my life: Overcome fear, behold wonder. ~ Richard Bach,
795:The Meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away ~ Pablo Picasso,
796:The mind gives meaning to anything but the meaning it gives is meaningless. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
797:The poet can only write the poems; it takes the reader to complete the meaning. ~ Nikki Giovanni,
798:There is a vast difference between meaning to do something and actually doing it. ~ Ren e Ahdieh,
799:The true office of any faith is to give life a meaning which death cannot destroy. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
800:The works of nature first acquire a meaning in the commentaries they provoke. ~ George Santayana,
801:To leave is to suffer,to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
802:To live is to suffer, to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
803:To live is to suffer; to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
804:To look for a meaning in anything is less the act of a naif than of a masochist. ~ Emil M Cioran,
805:American society will never completely understand the true meaning of equality. ~ Bryant H McGill,
806:A poem compresses much in a small space and adds music, thus heightening its meaning. ~ E B White,
807:Does a being who requires meaning find meaning in a universe that has no meaning? ~ Irvin D Yalom,
808:Dreaming or awake, we perceive only events that have meaning to us - Jane Roberts ~ Aleatha Romig,
809:Human beings are repetitive animals. All meaning is generated through repetition. ~ Siri Hustvedt,
810:I believe that! Events in our life have meaning because we choose to give it to them. ~ Dan Chaon,
811:If we can structure meaning and freedom into our work now, we see the Tom Sawyer ~ Taylor Pearson,
812:Information may travel at light speed, but meaning spreads at the speed of dark. ~ Richard Powers,
813:"Knowing thyself is the only way to experience the meaning and significance of existence." ~ Osho,
814:Life has to be given a meaning because of the obvious fact that it has no meaning. ~ Henry Miller,
815:life is short. Eat dessert first
-Wendy Mass, Jeremy Fink And The Meaning Of Life ~ Wendy Mass,
816:Looking for meaning in the ordinary seems like the most urgent thing that we can do. ~ Ian Bogost,
817:My meaning is, that no man can expect his children to respect what he degrades. ~ Charles Dickens,
818:My principles are about love and doing it because there’s meaning and commitment. ~ Richelle Mead,
819:Paul,” he said, “do you think my life has meaning? Did I make the right choices? ~ Paul Kalanithi,
820:she’d felt as though she understood the meaning of the word sorrow for the first time. ~ Etaf Rum,
821:the biological mind is the essence and the very meaning of the human condition. ~ Edward O Wilson,
822:The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away. ~ David Viscott,
823:The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away. ~ Pablo Picasso,
824:The meaning of life is to find your gift, the purpose of life is to give it away. ~ Pablo Picasso,
825:The meaning of our existence is not invented by ourselves, but rather detected. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
826:The word “lepton” derives from the Greek leptos, meaning “light” or “small. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
827:Those only can thoroughly feel the meaning of death who know what is perfect love. ~ George Eliot,
828:When silence is prolonged over a certain period of time, it takes on new meaning. ~ Yukio Mishima,
829:Writing, like drawing is an art, and whatever conveys the meaning is justified. ~ Maxwell Perkins,
830:Because your question searches for deep meaning, I shall explain in simple words ~ Dante Alighieri,
831:Every single human soul has more meaning and value than the whole of history. ~ Nikolai A Berdyaev,
832:How is it possible to find meaning in a finite world, given my waist and shirt size? ~ Woody Allen,
833:If there is a meaning in life at all, then there must be a meaning in suffering. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
834:If women become too much like men, men lose purpose, meaning, and inspiration in life. ~ John Gray,
835:In giving of yourself, you will discover a whole new life full of meaning and love. ~ Cesar Chavez,
836:I suffer migraines. I do not suffer fools.
I like a twist of meaning.
I endure. ~ E Lockhart,
837:It's true that I can write a song and not really be sure what the meaning of it is. ~ James Taylor,
838:Life is more than breath and a heartbeat; meaning and purpose are the life of life. ~ Desmond Tutu,
839:Love in your mind produces love in your life. This is the meaning of Heaven. ~ Marianne Williamson,
840:Maybe I should tell her that things without a meaning are the most beautiful ones ~ Elena Ferrante,
841:Not to speak would have infused the moment with more meaning than it deserved. ~ Galt Niederhoffer,
842:One often speaks without seeing, without knowing, without meaning what one says. ~ Jacques Derrida,
843:Or to be naked with her friend in bed An hour or more, not meaning any harm? ~ William Shakespeare,
844:Politics: Poli a Latin word meaning many and tics meaning bloodsucking creatures. ~ Robin Williams,
845:She was incapable of insulting us, because the words have to have meaning to hurt. ~ Dot Hutchison,
846:Sometimes I wonder if suicides aren't in fact sad guardians of the meaning of life. ~ Vaclav Havel,
847:Sometimes I wonder if suicides aren't in fact sad guardians of the meaning of life. ~ V clav Havel,
848:That's the whole meaning of life, isn't it? Trying to find a place for your stuff. ~ George Carlin,
849:The meaning of life is just to be alive. It is so plain and so obvious and so simple. ~ Alan Watts,
850:The meaning resides in one's own experience, making the everyday the exceptional. ~ Samuel Mockbee,
851:The only important thing in a book is the meaning it has for you. —W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM ~ Wendy Wax,
852:there is a rabbinic principle: “Scripture does not depart from its plain meaning. ~ Jonathan Sacks,
853:The tattoo has a profound meaning: the superficiality of modern man's existence. ~ Anthony Daniels,
854:To utter a word and meaning nothing by it is unworthy of a philosopher. Berkeley ~ Simon Critchley,
855:We are all migrants. We are exiled from the place where meaning meant something. ~ Gregory Maguire,
856:What is the meaning of life? It is too great a phenomenon to fit into any meaning. ~ Jaggi Vasudev,
857:You see, there is no more purpose or meaning in the world than you put into it. ~ Hans Reichenbach,
858:Cassirer asks the question, How can a sensory content become the vehicle of meaning? ~ Walker Percy,
859:Dear God, please make me believe that life has some sort of meaning and purpose. ~ Donald O Donovan,
860:Every generation rediscovers and re-evaluates the meaning of infancy and childhood. ~ Arnold Gesell,
861:For a journey without challenge, has no meaning; one without purpose, has no soul. ~ Phil Cousineau,
862:If everything is really meaningless―then we should create the meaning for ourselves. ~ Mitch Cullin,
863:I have one aim only: to impart a fraction of the meaning of the word now. ~ Frederick Salomon Perls,
864:Life is like art. You have to work hard to keep it simple and still have meaning. ~ Charles de Lint,
865:Living for its own sake isn’t life. People need meaning as much as they need air. ~ Daniel H Wilson,
866:Maybe these desert birds could explain to him the meaning of love without ownership. ~ Paulo Coelho,
867:Readers travel so fast they don't stop to decipher the meaning of obscure headlines. ~ David Ogilvy,
868:That's what a poem is. Words which have a hidden meaning. A poem is like a secret. ~ Monique Roffey,
869:The Navy speaks in symbols and you may suit what meaning you choose to the words. ~ Patrick O Brian,
870:The true meaning of life is to plant trees whose shade you never expect to sit under. ~ Gina Holmes,
871:Time and space have no meaning, just as your conscious thoughts are meaningless. ~ Stephen Richards,
872:When children reach the age of sixteen, they discover the meaning of life: car keys. ~ Erma Bombeck,
873:When life has meaning, you can bear almost anything; without it, nothing is bearable. ~ Rick Warren,
874:Amidst such Soulful exploration each passage - is given new meaning, wisdom & insight. ~ Eleesha,
875:...and I discovered something: the meaning of my life was whatever I wanted it to be. ~ Paulo Coelho,
876:A poem need not have a meaning and like most things in nature often does not have. ~ Wallace Stevens,
877:Becoming saints is the meaning of life. It is why we exist. It is why God created us. ~ Peter Kreeft,
878:Fearing death meant also fearing life, which stole all meaning from the act of living. ~ Dean Koontz,
879:Great literature is simply language charged with meaning to the utmost possible degree. ~ Ezra Pound,
880:If human rights are supposed to have any meaning, then they have to be discussed openly. ~ Ai Weiwei,
881:If one must choose between rigour and meaning, I shall unhesitatingly choose the latter. ~ Rene Thom,
882:In a poem the words should be as pleasing to the ear as the meaning is to the mind. ~ Marianne Moore,
883:Is there any meaning in my life that the inevitable death awaiting me does not destory? ~ Ian McEwan,
884:Is there any meaning in my life that the inevitable death awaiting me does not destory? ~ Ian Mcewan,
885:I told them that we spend far too much time at work for it not to have deep meaning. ~ Satya Nadella,
886:Knowing the truth has meaning only as a first step to living the truth day by day. ~ Nancy R Pearcey,
887:life holds a potential meaning under any conditions, even the most miserable ones. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
888:Love is just a word until someone comes along and gives it meaning ~ Samantha Towle ~ Samantha Towle,
889:people disagree because they don’t share the same understanding of the meaning of words. ~ Anonymous,
890:Security is not the meaning of my life. Great opportunities are worth the risk. ~ Shirley Hufstedler,
891:Surely the gestures of murmuring priests must contain some deep meaning ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
892:The companies that are successful, they start out to make meaning, not to make money. ~ Guy Kawasaki,
893:"The meaning of life is just to be alive. It is so plain and so obvious and so simple." ~ Alan Watts,
894:The moment you stop believing is the instant everything loses meaning.” —Braelyn Miller ~ Harloe Rae,
895:The power of speech does not rely upon meaning. Words carry energy all by themselves. ~ Daniel Black,
896:The real meaning of enlightenment is to gaze with undimmed eyes on all darkness. ~ Nikos Kazantzakis,
897:There is no glory in illness. There is no meaning to it. There is no honor in dying of. ~ John Green,
898:There’s a name for a person who finds no emotion or meaning in anything: a psychopath. ~ Mark Manson,
899:The strip-mining of “relevant content” replaces the slow excavation of meaning.   IT ~ Nicholas Carr,
900:The true inner meaning of success is to be successful at the enterprise of living. A ~ Joseph Murphy,
901:The true meaning of money yet remains to be popularly explained and comprehended. ~ Theodore Dreiser,
902:The writer shakes up the familiar scene, and as if by magic, we see a new meaning in it. ~ Ana s Nin,
903:What are you that makes me feel thus? Who are you for whom time has no meaning? ~ Jeanette Winterson,
904:When intervening becomes routine, meaning there is no reason for it, only risks remain. ~ Henci Goer,
905:Because your question searches for deep meaning,
I shall explain in simple words ~ Dante Alighieri,
906:Breaking a woman’s spirit… what will be the consequences? And will that love have meaning ~ V F Mason,
907:...but every day felt full of life, and of the relationships that give life meaning. ~ Paul Kalanithi,
908:By stripping down an image to essential meaning, an artist can simplify that meaning. ~ Scott McCloud,
909:for we are engaged here in the most important pursuit in history: the search for meaning ~ John Green,
910:He could never admit to himself that it was death that had given his life meaning. ~ Richard Flanagan,
911:I don't talk things, sir. I talk the meaning of things. I sit here and know I'm alive. ~ Ray Bradbury,
912:If you haven't learned the meaning of friendship, you really haven't learned anything. ~ Muhammad Ali,
913:I have a more developed sense of my priorities. Life has so much more meaning now. ~ Mariska Hargitay,
914:In the beginning we were making tape music, meaning, we were making music on tape. ~ Pauline Oliveros,
915:Is there any meaning in my life that the inevitable death awaiting me does not destroy? ~ Leo Tolstoy,
916:It was like the beginning of life and laughter. It was the real meaning of the sun ~ Charles Bukowski,
917:Life's battle is a conquest for the strong; The meaning shows in the defeated thing. ~ John Masefield,
918:Meaning does not interest me and has almost nothing to do with my decisions or judgments. ~ Jeff Wall,
919:Meaning was the frame human beings placed around the chaos of being to give it shape ~ Salman Rushdie,
920:Most social acts have to be understood in their setting, and lose meaning if isolated. ~ Solomon Asch,
921:No birth is an accident, No experience is without meaning, and no life is without value. ~ Gary Zukav,
922:Thanks to the oval I have discovered the meaning of the horizontal and the vertical. ~ Georges Braque,
923:The cross means suffering. Suffering's meaning is to be learned through the cross. ~ Elisabeth Elliot,
924:The fertilising conflict of individualities is the ultimate meaning of the personal life. ~ H G Wells,
925:The meaning of good and bad, of better and worse, is simply helping or hurting. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
926:The pieces of my sister's body. I stood there, letting the meaning of those words sink in. ~ Otsuichi,
927:There is no meaning but what we assign. We create our own reality. I can live with that. ~ Libba Bray,
928:There may or may not be an idea, and the meaning may just be that the painting exists. ~ Jasper Johns,
929:The very impulse to write springs from an inner chaos crying for order - for meaning. ~ Arthur Miller,
930:To find meaning in the mystery of existence is life’s final and fascinating challenge. ~ Huston Smith,
931:When the real is no longer what it used to be, nostalgia assumes its full meaning. ~ Jean Baudrillard,
932:You, my dear, have already found your meaning. All there is left to do now…is dance. ~ Colleen Hoover,
933:Ah, Lord Jesus! I never knew Your love till I understood the meaning of Your death. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
934:A man interested in the meaning of words, not one whose interests leave words meaningless. ~ Ali Smith,
935:But the heart of the issue is that semantics, meaning, is more than the meaning of words. ~ D A Carson,
936:Challenging the meaning of life is the truest expression of the state of being human ~ Viktor E Frankl,
937:deep down inside, we don’t seek the meaning of life, but the experience of being alive. ~ Sean Patrick,
938:He gave a grim meaning to this threat by killing three of his Sikh opponents in one week. ~ Mark Tully,
939:I am trying to talk about what blue means, or what it means to me, apart from meaning. ~ Maggie Nelson,
940:I know how to give the meaning of a word but not how to give the intention of a word. ~ Stanley Cavell,
941:I like having associations with locations beyond their meaning for the specific movie. ~ Noah Baumbach,
942:It's dangerous to watch staggering butterflies. They have a plan but it has no meaning. ~ Gunter Grass,
943:It's the intellectual who transforms the concept of the world into the problem of meaning. ~ Max Weber,
944:Maybe there isn't a meaning to life. Maybe there's only a meaning to living. -- Ethan ~ Margaret Stohl,
945:The fact that you don’t grasp the meaning of something doesn’t mean it has none. ~ Catherine Ryan Hyde,
946:The hardest of all the arts to speak of is music, because music has no meaning to speak of ~ Ned Rorem,
947:the infinite capacity of humans to wound one another without meaning or wanting to ~ Margaret Laurence,
948:The meaning of life is to find your gift,the purpose of life is to give it away. ~ William Shakespeare,
949:The meaning of poetry has no sureness of direction; is like the sling, it is not under control. ~ Rumi,
950:The meaning we find in life is not transacendent, but it's no less meaningful for that. ~ Sean Carroll,
951:there is no glory in illness. There is no meaning to it. There is no honor in dying of. a ~ John Green,
952:The word 'happiness' does indeed have meaning, doesn't it? I shall go out in search of it. ~ Mariama B,
953:What are you doing? Why are you concerning yourself with the meaning of meaning? ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
954:And if my mind breaks up In all so many ways I know the meaning of The words, "I love you ~ Cat Stevens,
955:Better prepare for a new journey than contemplate the meaning of the one I had just taken, ~ Julia Fine,
956:Calling can refer not only to ways of doing - meaning work - but also to ways of being. ~ James Hillman,
957:Challenging the meaning of life is the truest expression of the state of being human. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
958:Common sense dictates the term hot fudge sundae has a totally different meaning in prison. ~ Dana Gould,
959:Even meaning and destiny themselves can be read in ordinary things, if you have the gift. ~ Stephen Fry,
960:Everyone is on the verge of insanity ... insanity meaning on the verge of the unknown. ~ Frederick Lenz,
961:Everything has meaning, or nothing has meaning. Which world would you rather live in? ~ Neal Shusterman,
962:..finally he was just another ant, working and working until he died without meaning. ~ Haruki Murakami,
963:Freedom and destiny are solemnly promised to one another and linked together in meaning. ~ Martin Buber,
964:GET RID OF MEANING. YOUR MIND IS A NIGHTMARE THAT HAS BEEN EATING YOU: NOW EAT YOUR MIND. ~ Kathy Acker,
965:Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence. ~ Aristotle,
966:He didn't know what books meant to her, that books were symbols of truth and meaning. ~ Cassandra Clare,
967:I certainly do not begin with any meaning. It is as though my hands do all the thinking. ~ Quentin Bell,
968:Ignorance is not bliss. Bliss is knowing the full meaning of what you have been given. ~ David Levithan,
969:Life has no meaning but what we give it. I wish a few more of ye would give it a little. ~ Ed Greenwood,
970:Nothing takes place in the world whose meaning is not that of some maximum or minimum. ~ Leonhard Euler,
971:The context in which a photograph is seen affects the meaning the viewer draws from it. ~ Stephen Shore,
972:The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away. ~ William Shakespeare,
973:There was no meaning in it, not then and now now, but you can't write that, can you? ~ Richard Flanagan,
974:The search for meaning, much like the search for pleasure, must be conducted obliquely. ~ Irvin D Yalom,
975:The true meaning of the 'samurai' is one who serves and adheres to the power of love. ~ Morihei Ueshiba,
976:The word compassion is derived from the Latin words pati and cum, meaning “to suffer with. ~ Bren Brown,
977:When you have three teenagers, it gives a whole new meaning to "homeland security." ~ Bruce Springsteen,
978:Action can make you laugh. But just because you are glad. Even if there is no meaning. ~ Jean Luc Godard,
979:All the great doctrinal debates were at their cores debates about the meaning of Scripture. ~ D A Carson,
980:Eyes see only light, ears hear only sound, but a listening heart perceives meaning. ~ David Steindl Rast,
981:Faith has to come to birth as a free act, not a forced one. Otherwise it has no meaning. ~ Jacques Ellul,
982:For him the death is now only on this side, For him, danger and safety have another meaning. ~ T S Eliot,
983:Happiness is the meaning and purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence. ~ Gretchen Rubin,
984:Human life is inexplicable, and still without meaning: a fool may decide its fate. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
985:If it lacks meaning, I don’t know that we should call it art. Perhaps ‘decoration,’ instead. ~ Anonymous,
986:If we knew the meaning to everything that is happening to us, then there would be no meaning. ~ Idi Amin,
987:If you really understand the meaning of be-bop, you understand the meaning of freedom. ~ Thelonious Monk,
988:I tried to speak insipidly, yet everything I said seemed to take on a double meaning. ~ Ursula K Le Guin,
989:Life has no meaning unless one lives it with a will, at least to the limit of one's will. ~ Paul Gauguin,
990:Man's progress is but a gradual discovery that his questions have no meaning. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
991:Maybe life didn’t make sense but then it was our business, I guess, to impose meaning on it. ~ Ed Gorman,
992:Me, I was growing up scrambling for meaning and I was full of confusion and fear. ~ William Kent Krueger,
993:My life hadn’t ended, but without anyone else in it, it had ceased to have any meaning. ~ Matthew Mather,
994:Normally the meaning of the songs, if there is any, occurs to me after I've written the song. ~ St Lucia,
995:our deeds have no higher meaning than the context of the moment in which they occur. ~ Alastair Reynolds,
996:Pleasure is the least consequential... engagement and meaning are much more important. ~ Martin Seligman,
997:polymorphism means that the meaning of an operation depends on the object being operated on. ~ Mark Lutz,
998:reporting concepts as well as the relationships between concepts and other semantic meaning. ~ Anonymous,
999:Searching for a boy in high school is as useless as searching for meaning in a Pauly Shore movie. ~ Cher,
1000:She believed because it was that faith alone that gave her own life any kind of meaning. ~ Chinua Achebe,
1001:The meaning of life is found in openness to being and "being present" in full awareness. ~ Thomas Merton,
1002:the meaning of life is to find your gift
the purpose of life is to give it away ~ William Shakespeare,
1003:The world must become romanticized, and in that way we find again its original meaning for us. ~ Novalis,
1004:This is perhaps the most profound meaning of the book of Job, the best example of wisdom. ~ Paul Ricoeur,
1005:Uthlubul ilma walau bisshin,” meaning, “Seek knowledge, even if it’s as far as China.” -17 ~ Ahmad Fuadi,
1006:We are more curious about the meaning of dreams than about things we see when awake. ~ Diogenes La rtius,
1007:well-meaning people are often trying to solve a problem by answering the wrong question. ~ Warren Berger,
1008:We yearn for there to be meaning to our lives, balanced with a sense of inner peace & joy. ~ Allan Lokos,
1009:What the meaning of human life may be I don't know: I incline to suspect that it has none. ~ H L Mencken,
1010:You taught me the meaning of loneliness, because when I don’t see you, I feel alone. You ~ Ilona Andrews,
1011:An empty cart rattles loudly,” she said, meaning, One who lacks substance boasts loudest. ~ Alan Brennert,
1012:A sense of concern for others gives our lives meaning; it is the root of all human happiness ~ Dalai Lama,
1013:Crossing the Rubicon of absolute pain is the only journey of purpose and meaning in life. ~ Bryant McGill,
1014:Deep down inside, we don't seek the meaning of life, but the experience of being alive. ~ Joseph Campbell,
1015:For me, writing clarifies things. It gives meaning, and it makes me see the connections. ~ Firoozeh Dumas,
1016:he who speaks parables knows and understands the real meaning of parables better ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
1017:History is the shit that keeps meaning something when everything else starts to mean nothing. ~ Anonymous,
1018:I don't know what they call Hollywood anymore. The whole meaning of the town has changed. ~ Claire Trevor,
1019:In whatever form it takes, life sings because it has a song. The meaning is in the lyrics. ~ Robert Lanza,
1020:It is only when we realize that life is taking us nowhere that it begins to have meaning. ~ P D Ouspensky,
1021:Spiritual Intelligence represents our drive for meaning and connection with the infinite. ~ Stephen Covey,
1022:The beauty of the moonlight has no meaning for the bats and for the unfeeling minds! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
1023:The past isn't fixed and frozen in place. Instead, its meaning changes as life unfolds. ~ Parker J Palmer,
1024:The power of speech does not rely upon meaning. Words carry energy all by themselves. They ~ Daniel Black,
1025:The primary and literal meaning of the Bible, then, is its centripetal or poetic meaning. ~ Northrop Frye,
1026:this, this is the meaning of
"a fortunate life": it means
to exist in the present. ~ Louise Gl ck,
1027:We are meaning-making creatures who read other people’s subtle clues just as they read ours. ~ Ed Catmull,
1028:You’re only alive because you’re not dead. Life has meaning because it can be taken away. ~ Emily Goodwin,
1029:An individual piece only has meaning when it is seen as part of the whole. ~ Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel,
1030:Either your understanding of the meaning of music is there from the beginning or it is not. ~ Gordon Getty,
1031:Happiness is a consolation for those whose lives have lost or not yet found meaning. ~ Mokokoma Mokhonoana,
1032:He didn't know what books meant to her, that books were symbols of truth and meaning ... ~ Cassandra Clare,
1033:I don't know what folk music means anymore, because the meaning of that just keeps changing. ~ Angel Olsen,
1034:If you've found meaning in your life, you don't want to go back. You want to go forward. ~ Morrie Schwartz,
1035:It is looking at things for a long time that ripens you and gives you a deeper meaning. ~ Vincent Van Gogh,
1036:It is looking at things for a long time that ripens you and gives you a deeper meaning. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
1037:I try not to interpret things of the world into a single meaning. Rather, I try the opposite. ~ Kim Ki duk,
1038:Let’s just say, I embraced my weirdness.” He smiled. “Meaning?” “I liked being different. ~ Amanda Stevens,
1039:Life is never made unbearable by circumstances, but only by lack of meaning and purpose. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
1040:Life may have no meaning. Or even worse, it may have a meaning of which I disapprove. ~ Ashleigh Brilliant,
1041:People want to find a meaning in everything and everyone. That's the disease of our age... ~ Pablo Picasso,
1042:She made the decision that her existence had lost its meaning. And you cannot judge that. ~ Jack Kevorkian,
1043:Spirit is the presence of what concerns us ultimately, the ground of our being and meaning. ~ Paul Tillich,
1044:The deeper and more debilitating form of powerlessness is to be cut off from making meaning. ~ Andy Crouch,
1045:The marvelous thing about a joke with a double meaning is that it can only mean one thing. ~ Ronnie Barker,
1046:The more one loves, the heavier the meaning of death becomes, and the deeper the sense of loss. ~ Otsuichi,
1047:There is a widespread sense of loss here, if not always of God, then at least of meaning. ~ Charles Taylor,
1048:The strong manly ones in life are those who understand the meaning of the word patience. ~ Ieyasu Tokugawa,
1049:the truth of a poem is its form and its content, its music and its meaning are the same. ~ Muriel Rukeyser,
1050:The ugliness of bigotry stands in direct contradiction to the very meaning of America. ~ Hubert H Humphrey,
1051:The ultimate meaning of the active life is to make possible the happiness of contemplation. ~ Josef Pieper,
1052:We are born for meaning, not pleasure, unless it is pleasure that is steeped in meaning. ~ Jacob Needleman,
1053:We discover that meaning and purpose only when we make God the reference point of our lives. ~ Rick Warren,
1054:We live in a world where there is more and more information, and less and less meaning. ~ Jean Baudrillard,
1055:You can't do without philosophy, since everything has its hidden meaning which we must know. ~ Maxim Gorky,
1056:All true meaning resides in the personal relationship to a phenomenon, what it means to you. ~ Jon Krakauer,
1057:A story has to have muscle as well as meaning, and the meaning has to be in the muscle. ~ Flannery O Connor,
1058:As we shall see, the concept of time has no meaning before the beginning of the universe. ~ Stephen Hawking,
1059:Cheese!" I exclaimed. It was a secret prayer, whose meaning was known only to God and to me. ~ Alan Bradley,
1060:Composition gives proper meaning to the natural streams of sound that penetrate the world. ~ Toru Takemitsu,
1061:I never had the... common anxiety as to whether abstract painting had a given 'meaning. ~ Robert Motherwell,
1062:In fiction if nowhere else, I must have a little meaning, a little coherence, or I will go mad. ~ Anne Rice,
1063:Innocence is like a dumb leper who has lost his bell, wandering the world, meaning no harm. ~ Graham Greene,
1064:The least of things with a meaning is worth more in life than the greatest of things without it ~ Carl Jung,
1065:the meaning of life is to FIND YOUR GIFT.
the purpose of life is to GIVE IT AWAY. ~ William Shakespeare,
1066:"There is no expression with deeper meaning than that of the word 'just' in 'just sitting.'" ~ Motoko Ikebe,
1067:The true meaning of religion is thus not simply morality, but morality touched by emotion. ~ Matthew Arnold,
1068:The two biggest self-deceptions of all are that life has a 'meaning'and each of us is unique. ~ David Byrne,
1069:Those fuckers,” Janice said, meaning the football players, “they get me doing hate Kegels. ~ William Gibson,
1070:Time isn't made of anything. It is an abstraction. Just a meaning that we impose upon motion. ~ Anne Carson,
1071:WHAT IS THE MEANING OF THIS?’ Wadjet roared. ‘YOU DARE TAKE A SELFIE WITH THE COBRA GODDESS? ~ Rick Riordan,
1072:WHAT IS THE MEANING OF THIS?” Wadjet roared. “YOU DARE TAKE A SELFIE WITH THE COBRA GODDESS? ~ Rick Riordan,
1073:When a person can't find a deep sense of meaning, they distract themselves with pleasure. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
1074:When a person can’t find a deep sense of meaning, they distract themselves with pleasure. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
1075:Your eyes in which I travel Have given to signs along the roads A meaning alien to the earth. ~ Paul Eluard,
1076:You shall not, for the sake of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity, ~ Jane Austen,
1077:You shall not, for the sake of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity. ~ Jane Austen,
1078:Because there is no glory in illness. There is no meaning to it. There is no honor in dying of. ~ John Green,
1079:Better the rudest work that tells a story or records a fact, than the richest without meaning. ~ John Ruskin,
1080:But whether a couple is a man and a woman has everything to do with the meaning of marriage. ~ Jack Kingston,
1081:Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence. ~ Gretchen Rubin,
1082:He wished the man would honor the true meaning of words, instead of using them as ammunition. ~ Rachel Joyce,
1083:If you cannot create a meaning, the things you see will always look meaningless to you! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
1084:Lives with no meaning go straight past you, like trains that don't stop at your station. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
1085:Meaning that if you live in the moment, so to speak, we play today, and tonight we're done. ~ Alex Van Halen,
1086:My study of religion, which I regard in many ways as an art form, is a search for meaning. ~ Karen Armstrong,
1087:Overly literal translations, far from being faithful, actually distort meaning by obscuring sense. ~ Ken Liu,
1088:people have enough to live by but nothing to live for; they have the means but no meaning. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
1089:People want to find a 'meaning' in everything and everyone. That's the disease of our age... ~ Pablo Picasso,
1090:Philosophy... is the creative perception by the spirit of the meaning of human existence. ~ Nikolai Berdyaev,
1091:She repeated continually, "My God! my God!" But neither "God" nor "my" had any meaning to her. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
1092:So in this sense, our Universe doesn’t give life meaning, but life gives our Universe meaning. ~ Max Tegmark,
1093:The least of things with a meaning is worth more in life than the greatest of things without it. ~ Carl Jung,
1094:The literal meaning of life is whatever you're doing that prevents you from killing yourself. ~ Albert Camus,
1095:The longer we live, the more we are obliged to confront the deeper meaning of what it is we do. ~ David Toop,
1096:The nature of language may determine what most people say, but I always speak my own meaning. ~ Mason Cooley,
1097:The purpose of life is to discover your gift. The meaning of life is to give your gift away. ~ David Viscott,
1098:The writer who has a definite meaning to express will not take refuge in such vagueness. ~ William Strunk Jr,
1099:This is the true meaning of exile : some insurmountable force that keeps you from going back. ~ Suketu Mehta,
1100:We yearn for there to be meaning to our lives, balanced with a sense of inner peace & joy. ~ Allan Lokos,
1101:what happens when people repeat the same gestures for forty years after they lose all meaning. ~ Hari Kunzru,
1102:When meaning is drawn from killing, the risk is that more killing would bring more meaning. ~ Timothy Snyder,
1103:Always remember that the true meaning of Budo is that soft overcomes hard, small overcomes large. ~ Mas Oyama,
1104:Am I a weed, carried this way, that way, on a tide that comes twice a day without a meaning? ~ Virginia Woolf,
1105:Ask very pointed questions. Sharp as sword blades, or laser blasts, if you catch my meaning. ~ Michael Monroe,
1106:a terrible scorching light showed him the hidden letters that changed the meaning of the past. ~ George Eliot,
1107:Cowardly? Bleh. Tell you what: Let’s debate the meaning of honor and see who lives longer. The ~ Kevin Hearne,
1108:Created meaning is a less rational way to live life than doing so with discovered meaning. ~ Timothy J Keller,
1109:He gazed out to sea for a moment, then added, “One should never mistake pattern … for meaning. ~ Iain M Banks,
1110:How are we to avoid those in office becoming deeply corrupt when everything is devoid of meaning? ~ Anonymous,
1111:If you don’t grasp what the Bible is and how it came to be, you’ll never fully grasp its meaning. ~ Anonymous,
1112:It's only a game if there is an absence of meaning. And we've already gone too far for that. ~ David Levithan,
1113:Liberal and conservative have lost their meaning in America. I represent the distracted center. ~ Jon Stewart,
1114:Life in itself is so beautiful that to ask the question of the meaning of life is simply nonsense. ~ Rajneesh,
1115:My words did not seem to reach her. Or, if they did, she was unable to grasp their meaning. ~ Haruki Murakami,
1116:The Bible was composed in such a way that as beginners mature, its meaning grows with them. ~ Saint Augustine,
1117:The lesson here is that a little sweat equity pays us back in meaning—and that is a high return. ~ Dan Ariely,
1118:The meaning of life consists in the fact that it makes no sense to say that life has no meaning. ~ Niels Bohr,
1119:The painting rises from the brushstrokes as a poem rises from the words. The meaning comes later. ~ Joan Miro,
1120:The question is not to know what is the meaning of life, but what meaning I can give to my life. ~ Dalai Lama,
1121:The soil needs the seed, and the seed needs the soil. The one only has meaning with the other. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1122:The task is not to search for meaning, but to bring meaning to every situation you are in. ~ Alberto Villoldo,
1123:...the transformation would be accomplished not in the dimension of time but in that of meaning. ~ C sar Aira,
1124:We are as ignorant of the meaning of the dragon as we are of the meaning of the universe. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
1125:We live in a world where there is more and more information, and less and less meaning.
   ~ Jean Baudrillard,
1126:What's the meaning of life?"
"I have been programmed by Hexus to reply 'meatballs,'" it says. ~ Lydia Kang,
1127:When you answer them, you try to put meaning in every word. That's why... their many lies cut you. ~ Otsuichi,
1128:Would I ever find forever love? Do I really want to, when forever was a word without meaning? ~ Ellen Hopkins,
1129:You know, the one with all the well meaning rules that don't work out in real life, uh, Christianity. ~ Homer,
1130:As we celebrate the evolution of the life of one so special, we embrace the meaning of life, itself. ~ Eleesha,
1131:Because if you've found meaning in your life, you don't want to go back. You want to go forward. ~ Mitch Albom,
1132:Developing compassion and wisdom and helping those in need is the true meaning of life. ~ Geshe Kelsang Gyatso,
1133:gifts — that strange word, a signifier meaning disappointment you can hold in your hands. ~ Jeanette Winterson,
1134:How does meaning get into the image? Where does it end? And if it ends, what is there beyond? ~ Roland Barthes,
1135:Humility adds lessons to our pain and suffering, turning the seemingly senseless into meaning. ~ Bryant McGill,
1136:If the expression "metaphysical exile" had no meaning, my existence alone would afford it one. ~ Emil M Cioran,
1137:I have no patience for books that pretend life has meaning. I have no patience for happy endings ~ Nicola Yoon,
1138:I love pizza, meaning: Even when I’m in the middle of eating pizza, I wish I were eating pizza. ~ Jandy Nelson,
1139:In acute suffering the need for meaning is as strong or stronger than the need for happiness. ~ Peter L Berger,
1140:In silence seek God’s meaning in thy depths, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
1141:It's incredible to realize that what we do each day has meaning in the big picture of God's plan ~ Bill Hybels,
1142:Let me live. Keep me alive. Both sentences so close in English, but very different meaning. ~ Aleksandr Voinov,
1143:Life has meaning only if one barters it day by day for something other than itself. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
1144:Life is a story told by an idiot, full of noise and emotion, but without any meaning. [A ~ William Shakespeare,
1145:Maybe they understood, in fact, that beauty and meaning had nothing to do with one another. ~ Ottessa Moshfegh,
1146:Meaning is man-created. And because you constantly look for meaning, you start to feel meaninglessness. ~ Osho,
1147:Only fanatics — in religion as well as in politics — can find a meaning in someone else’s death. ~ Elie Wiesel,
1148:People don’t really change; they just find something else to give their life meaning. ~ Shaun David Hutchinson,
1149:that there’s some meaning, some willfulness to life. Fairness. Basic decency. Good things happen ~ Nicola Yoon,
1150:"The least of things with a meaning is worth more in life than the greatest of things without it." ~ Carl Jung,
1151:“The least of things with a meaning is worth more in life than the greatest of things without it.” ~ Carl Jung,
1152:The literal meaning of life is whatever you're doing that prevents you from killing yourself
   ~ Albert Camus,
1153:The only meaning to life is the one that you give it, and don't let anyone tell you diffrent. ~ Matthew Mather,
1154:The source of sorrows lies not in leaving life, but in leaving that which gives it meaning. ~ Raymond Radiguet,
1155:The source of sorrows lies not in leaving life, but in leaving that which gives it meaning. ~ Raymond Radiguet,
1156:The subject was the meaning of life. It was taught from experience.

The teaching goes on. ~ Mitch Albom,
1157:The word NO, carries a lot more meaning when spoken by a parent who also knows how to say yes. ~ Joyce Maynard,
1158:Through faith man experiences the meaning of the world through action he is to give to it meaning. ~ Leo Baeck,
1159:To be sure, man’s search for meaning may arouse inner tension rather than inner equilibrium. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
1160:We cannot change our memories, but we can change their meaning and the power they have over us. ~ Scott Bolzan,
1161:With women, you don’t get to pick the meaning of what you mean. They do. All men understand this. ~ Tim Dorsey,
1162:You love her. (Shanus) I barely know her. (Wulf) Time has no meaning to the heart. (Shanus) ~ Sherrilyn Kenyon,
1163:Battle For The Planet Of The Apes', was just a film for kids and didn't have any deep meaning. ~ J Lee Thompson,
1164:...Because what's the meaning of doing dishes if you're not driven by something beyond necessity. ~ Don DeLillo,
1165:Being reactionary means that you’re always thinking about the meaning behind cultural change. ~ Gary Vaynerchuk,
1166:Books are my friends, my companions. They make me laugh and cry and find meaning in life. ~ Christopher Paolini,
1167:Could it be that we allow the conditions in our lives to distract us from the meaning of our lives? ~ T D Jakes,
1168:Death is our constant companion, and it is death that gives each person's life its true meaning. ~ Paulo Coelho,
1169:Everything isn't subjective. Reality also matters. Truth matters. It is still a word with meaning. ~ David Brin,
1170:Forever has no meaning when you're living in the moment. I wasn't ready for that moment to end. ~ Ellen Hopkins,
1171:Gratefulness is the inner gesture of giving meaning to our life by receiving life as gift. ~ David Steindl Rast,
1172:Handwriting, by contrast, resists the eye, reveals its meaning slowly, and is as intimate as skin. ~ Ruth Ozeki,
1173:Here then - the after math of meaning. A liftime finished between the space of two frames. ~ Mark Z Danielewski,
1174:If nothing had any meaning, you would be right. But there is something that still has a meaning. ~ Albert Camus,
1175:In the Trump language, words change their meaning day by day depending on his own political needs. ~ E J Dionne,
1176:I think as women and men become more conscious, the terms "woman/man" begin to lose meaning. ~ Elizabeth Lesser,
1177:It is not what we get. But who we become, what we contribute... that gives meaning to our lives. ~ Tony Robbins,
1178:it was impossible; trying to find a meaning in everything meant he had to remain alert and tense ~ Paulo Coelho,
1179:Meaning and reality were not hidden somewhere behind things, they were in them, in all of them. ~ Hermann Hesse,
1180:Names gave people weight, life, substance. Meaning, when she wanted everything to be meaningless. ~ Cole McCade,
1181:search for me like the meaning of words search for me where you left me and i will no longer be there ~ R H Sin,
1182:Siri, what is the meaning of life? She answers: To think about questions like this. Huh. Good one. ~ Kim Wright,
1183:Subjectivism takes place when we distort the objective meaning of terms to suit our own interests. ~ R C Sproul,
1184:The Intentionality of the mind not only creates the possibility of meaning, but limits its forms. ~ John Searle,
1185:The pain in itself is not joy. It is simply pain. But the meaning of the pain, that is joy. ~ Michael D O Brien,
1186:There can be no meaning in what will someday be lost. Passing glory is not true glory at all. ~ Haruki Murakami,
1187:There is no meaning to life except the meaning man gives his life by the unfolding of his powers. ~ Erich Fromm,
1188:There is not built-in meaning to anything, we are free to add any meaning we choose to give it. ~ Seamus Heaney,
1189:These are the diamonds I picked from the darkness, that shine with meaning only for me. ~ Nora McInerny Purmort,
1190:The supreme meaning is the beginning and the end. It is the bridge of going across and fulfillment. ~ Carl Jung,
1191:The true meaning of existence is disclosed in moments of living in the presence of God ~ Abraham Joshua Heschel,
1192:The way you see the world, the meaning you give to what you witness, changes the way you feel. ~ Dalai Lama XIV,
1193:The word Fascism has now no meaning except in so far as it signifies 'something not desirable.' ~ George Orwell,
1194:They didn’t mean any harm in it. But of course not meaning harm isn’t the same as not doing harm. ~ John Scalzi,
1195:This is the meaning of life, my friend. To know when you are well off and to hate or envy no man. ~ Philip Kerr,
1196:To live in the presence of God who is Truth ( satya ) -- this indeed is the meaning of satsang. ~ Anandamayi Ma,
1197:We use our eyes to see the world. But, as every conjurer knows, it is the mind that makes meaning. ~ Rod Duncan,
1198:Words lead us to the doorway of Truth, but only by contemplating their meaning can we pass through. ~ Tim Freke,
1199:You are not going to know the meaning of God or prayer unless you reduce yourself to a cipher. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
1200:you can easily switch the letters of a word around to see another hidden meaning, such is life. ~ Penelope Ward,
1201:You know, funny is this weird word for me. I hear is so many times it has no meaning anymore. ~ Bruce McCulloch,
1202:Ah, yes, divorce... from the Latin word meaning to rip out a man's genitals through his wallet. ~ Robin Williams,
1203:And so it is that Simon—whom Jesus renames Peter, meaning “rock”—becomes Jesus’s first disciple. ~ Bill O Reilly,
1204:A “routine” is a string of habits, and a “ritual” is a habit charged with transcendent meaning. ~ Gretchen Rubin,
1205:Dear God. When did language and meaning divorce each other and decide to go their separate ways? ~ Kate Atkinson,
1206:Exercising adaptive leadership is about giving meaning to your life beyond your own ambition. ~ Ronald A Heifetz,
1207:Good's a pretty funny word. Never seems to have the same meaning to any two people" -T. Walker ~ Holly Schindler,
1208:However beautiful a song may be,
it is just a tune to those
who do not understand its meaning. ~ Milarepa,
1209:How terrible it would be if all my people had been turned human by well-meaning wizards—exiled, ~ Peter S Beagle,
1210:I cannot be convinced that great artists are moralists. Art is first appearances, then meaning. ~ Camille Paglia,
1211:I just provide the words. I let the client provide most of the meaning and all of the significance. ~ Tim Tigner,
1212:I said what might have been a bad word meaning excrement, but I hope that I used a polite synonym. ~ Dean Koontz,
1213:I was you before you were born and you will be me after I am gone. That is the meaning of family. ~ Tan Twan Eng,
1214:I woke up, smiling to myself at this dream with its allegorical aspects but with no real meaning. ~ Jean de Berg,
1215:life’s meaning, its virtue, had something to do with the depth of the relationships we form. It ~ Paul Kalanithi,
1216:Most important, however, is the third avenue to meaning in life: even the helpless victim of a ~ Viktor E Frankl,
1217:My fans are who I am. You give meaning to my life. You will never know the connection I feel to you. ~ Lady Gaga,
1218:My meaning in saying he is a good man, is to have you understand me that he is sufficient. ~ William Shakespeare,
1219:Often, in death, everything else fails. We are left only with the music and the meaning of poetry. ~ Kevin Young,
1220:Oh, it is not death that frightens me, but the impossibility of imparting some meaning to my past. ~ Elie Wiesel,
1221:Once we have learned to read, meaning of words can somehow register without consciousness. ~ Katherine Mansfield,
1222:Philosophy contemplates the world in every facet—its creation, its beauty, its flaws, its meaning. ~ Tillie Cole,
1223:Religion looks at existence as a whole, and attempts to determine its meaning and value for mankind. ~ Anonymous,
1224:Sometimes thou seem'st not as thyself alone, But as the meaning of all things that are. ~ Dante Gabriel Rossetti,
1225:"The least of things with a meaning is worth more in life than the greatest of things without it." - ~ Carl Jung,
1226:the simple fact of bearing a responsibility can be something that gives meaning to life. ~ John Ajvide Lindqvist,
1227:The world is what it is, no less and no more, and therein lies its entire and sufficient meaning. ~ Edward Abbey,
1228:What answer to the meaning of existence should one require beyond the right to exercise one's gifts? ~ W H Auden,
1229:When somebody on the outside fits with your inner image, you fall in love -- that is the meaning of love. ~ Osho,
1230:Amy likes to play God when she’s not happy. Old Testament God.” “Meaning?” “She doles out punishment, ~ Anonymous,
1231:An intention that rejects what has no meaning in fact is a rejection of the entirety of being. ~ Georges Bataille,
1232:Apparently it was cheap pig lard that had inspired the term ham, meaning a poor-quality performer. ~ Juliette Fay,
1233:A sentence has meaning in the sense that a train has a track, not that a train has a passenger. ~ Samuel R Delany,
1234:Behind the hieroglyphic streets there would either be a transcendent meaning, or only the earth. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
1235:For me, the meaning of life is pretty clear: Living things strive to pass their genes into the future. ~ Bill Nye,
1236:His words are lost in the din, which swallows meaning and nuance and shits out a homogenous roar. ~ Tade Thompson,
1237:Humility puts others first because "first" takes on new meaning through the practice of humility. ~ Bryant McGill,
1238:If I understand Dirac correctly, his meaning is this: there is no God, and Dirac is his Prophet. ~ Wolfgang Pauli,
1239:If the mind can find no meaning, then the senses give it. Live for this, wretched being that you are. ~ Anne Rice,
1240:I like to look at everything and appreciate seeing the different things that have meaning to people. ~ Jeff Koons,
1241:I like to think of power back in its Latin root, its meaning comes from posse - to be able. ~ Frances Moore Lappe,
1242:I’m filled with a desire for clarity and meaning within a world and condition that offers neither. ~ Albert Camus,
1243:I try to find meaning anywhere I can. It's the only way I know how to validate my existence. ~ Tiffanie DeBartolo,
1244:Language lives in the mind, moves around with the tongue and gets its meaning in action! ~ Ernest Agyemang Yeboah,
1245:...meaning his stuffed bear who was as real to him as his mother or me. Or else as imaginary. ~ Andrew Sean Greer,
1246:People who look for symbolic meaning fail to grasp the inherent poetry and mystery of the images. ~ Rene Magritte,
1247:Philosophers have debated the meaning of life for centuries, rarely coming to the same conclusion. ~ Stephen King,
1248:Poetry is concerned not just with the meaning of experience, but with the experience of meaning. ~ Terry Eagleton,
1249:The external forces conceal from the eyes the deep meaning of existence; True faith resides in the heart. ~ Kabir,
1250:there is no best and no worst, ...those judgments have no real meaning because there is only what is ~ John Green,
1251:The very reason for nature's existence is the education of the soul; it has no other meaning. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
1252:The word ‘darshan’ has a double meaning: view as well as worldview, sight as well as insight. ~ Devdutt Pattanaik,
1253:They are the four pillars of meaning: belonging, purpose, storytelling, and transcendence. ~ Emily Esfahani Smith,
1254:This is the true meaning of alone; Levi Jedediah Calder suddenly realizing he no longer exists. ~ Neal Shusterman,
1255:Till death do us part takes on a whole new meaning with you and Walker. Who's dead isn't specified. ~ Duffy Brown,
1256:To believe in God means to see that life has a meaning. ~ Ludwig Wittgenstein Journal entry (8 July 1916), p. 74e,
1257:To say a few words with great meaning is better than to ramble on with nothing of value.” I ~ Judith McCoy Miller,
1258:To study history means submitting to chaos and nevertheless retaining faith in order and meaning. ~ Hermann Hesse,
1259:Unraveling external selves and coming home to our real identity is the true meaning of soul work. ~ Sue Monk Kidd,
1260:What is important is family, friends, giving back to your community and finding meaning in life. ~ Adrian Grenier,
1261:what we call a chaotic system—meaning that its adjacent solutions diverge exponentially in time. ~ Anne McCaffrey,
1262:Work that is devoid of meaning, interest, and joy can lead to lives that feel very empty indeed. ~ Teresa Amabile,
1263:A lot of the lyrical ideas do have a lot of meaning in a way, although it is somewhat abstracted. ~ Thurston Moore,
1264:And now I’m sleepy, because I think – I don’t know why – that the meaning of it all is to sleep. ~ Fernando Pessoa,
1265:As a rule, they tended to avoid questions like “How sane are we?” and “Do our lives have meaning? ~ Michael Chabon,
1266:A woman could be totally powerless, and still give meaning to her life by dreaming about flight. ~ Fatema Mernissi,
1267:But he thought that if the world was layered with meaning, then she was the evidence, right here. ~ Lauren Myracle,
1268:But the hidden meaning of life is that life has no hidden meaning.” Abel knew Pessoa’s poetry well. ~ Jos Saramago,
1269:Cinema for me only has meaning when it has a relationship with what I see outside on the street. ~ Jacques Audiard,
1270:Every garden looks beautiful in May.' Meaning: Everyone is somewhat attractive when she's young. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
1271:Great communicators don't just hear the words. Great communicators hear the meaning behind the words ~ Simon Sinek,
1272:I'd love to have a family one day. Having kids is the meaning of life and I can't wait to be a mom. ~ Paris Hilton,
1273:In our time’, Thomas Mann remarked, ‘the destiny of man presents its meaning in political terms. ~ Kenneth Minogue,
1274:I think the Universe has meaning. It has a purpose. It might not be our purpose, but we’re part of it. ~ Anonymous,
1275:I thought I'd had wild monkey sex.
I didn't know the meaning of it until Shy taught it to me. ~ Kristen Ashley,
1276:Laws are a dead letter without courts to expound and define their true meaning and operation. ~ Alexander Hamilton,
1277:Life should be about purpose and meaning and cause and fulfil