classes ::: subjects, Education, the_School,
children :::
branches ::: courses

Instances, Classes, See Also, Object in Names
Definitions, . Quotes . - . Chapters .


object:courses
class:subjects
class:Education
class:the School

--- BY SUBJECTS
  Psychology
    Psychology 434 - Maps of Meaning

  Philosophy

  Computer Science
    Ablesons -

  History

  Science

  Religion

  Linguistics

--- BY SCHOOL



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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [5]


230h_Personality_and_its_Transformations
430H_-_Self-Deception
434_-_Maps_of_Meaning
Biblical_Series
lectures

--- PRIMARY CLASS


Education
subjects
summary
text
the_School

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [2]


1.10 - Farinata and Cavalcante de' Cavalcanti. Discourse on the Knowledge of the Damned.
A Course in Miracles
coursehero Thus Spoke Zarathustra Summary
courses
Discourse on Method
Start Here A Crash Course in Understanding, Navigating, and Healing From Narcissistic Abuse
The Connected Discourses of the Buddha A Translation of the Samyutta Nikaya
The Heart Treasure of the Enlightened Ones The Practice of View, Meditation, and Action A Discourse Virtuous in the Beginning, Middle, and End
The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha A Translation of the Majjhima Nikaya
The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha A Complete Translation of the Anguttara Nikaya
The Suttanipata An Ancient Collection of the Buddha's Discourses Together with its Commentaries
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards (table), project, project 0001, Savitri, Savitri (extended toc), the Temple of Sages, three js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the Bad, the God object, the Good, the most important, the Ring, the source of inspirations, the Stack, the Tarot, the Word, top priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


course ::: 1. A direction or route taken or to be taken. 2. The path, route, or channel along which anything moves. 3. Advance or progression in a particular direction; forward or onward movement. 4. The continuous passage or progress through time or a succession of stages. chariot-course. :::

coursed ::: proceeded or moved swiftly along a specified course or path. coursing. :::

course ::: n. --> The act of moving from one point to another; progress; passage.
The ground or path traversed; track; way.
Motion, considered as to its general or resultant direction or to its goal; line progress or advance.
Progress from point to point without change of direction; any part of a progress from one place to another, which is in a straight line, or on one direction; as, a ship in a long voyage makes

coursed ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Course ::: a. --> Hunted; as, a coursed hare.
Arranged in courses; as, coursed masonry.

courser ::: n. --> One who courses or hunts.
A swift or spirited horse; a racer or a war horse; a charger.
A grallatorial bird of Europe (Cursorius cursor), remarkable for its speed in running. Sometimes, in a wider sense, applied to running birds of the Ostrich family.

coursey ::: n. --> A space in the galley; a part of the hatches.

Course Author Language
(CAL) The {CAI} language for the {IBM 360}.
["Design of a Programming Language for Computer Assisted
Learning", F.M. Tonge, Proc IFIP Congress 1968, v2].
(1994-11-08)

courseware
Programs and data used in {Computer-Based
Training}.
(1995-03-13)

Coursewriter III
A simple {CAI} language, developed
around 1976.
["Coursewriter III, Version 3 Author's Guide", SH20-1009,
IBM].
(1995-03-13)

course ::: n. --> The act of moving from one point to another; progress; passage.
The ground or path traversed; track; way.
Motion, considered as to its general or resultant direction or to its goal; line progress or advance.
Progress from point to point without change of direction; any part of a progress from one place to another, which is in a straight line, or on one direction; as, a ship in a long voyage makes

coursed ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Course ::: a. --> Hunted; as, a coursed hare.
Arranged in courses; as, coursed masonry.

courser ::: n. --> One who courses or hunts.
A swift or spirited horse; a racer or a war horse; a charger.
A grallatorial bird of Europe (Cursorius cursor), remarkable for its speed in running. Sometimes, in a wider sense, applied to running birds of the Ostrich family.

coursey ::: n. --> A space in the galley; a part of the hatches.

courses willingly on the fall [of the angels] but

course.

course refused to divulge. For the story, see Enoch

course.”] Here it is revealed that the cherubim

course,” p. 64.]

course,” p. 51.]

course.

course.

course.

course.

course,” p. 72.]

Course Author Language ::: (language) (CAL) The CAI language for the IBM 360.[Design of a Programming Language for Computer Assisted Learning, F.M. Tonge, Proc IFIP Congress 1968, v2]. (1994-11-08)

courseware ::: (application) Programs and data used in Computer-Based Training. (1995-03-13)

Coursewriter III ::: (language, education) A simple CAI language, developed around 1976.[Coursewriter III, Version 3 Author's Guide, SH20-1009, IBM]. (1995-03-13)

coursework: Essays or work done in a student’s own time, rather than in examination conditions. The mark from coursework contributes to a candidate's overall grade or qualification.

course ::: 1. A direction or route taken or to be taken. 2. The path, route, or channel along which anything moves. 3. Advance or progression in a particular direction; forward or onward movement. 4. The continuous passage or progress through time or a succession of stages. chariot-course. :::

coursed ::: proceeded or moved swiftly along a specified course or path. coursing. :::


--- QUOTES [119 / 119 - 500 / 31508] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   28 Sri Aurobindo
   16 The Mother
   8 Aleister Crowley
   3 Jordan Peterson
   3 James S A Corey
   3 Alfred Korzybski
   2 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   2 Sri Ramakrishna
   2 Nikola Tesla
   2 Joseph Campbell
   2 Chamtrul Rinpoche
   1 Zoroaster
   1 Tom Butler-Bowdon
   1 Terry Pratchett
   1 Taisen Deshimaru
   1 Swami Satyananda Saraswati
   1 Susan Sontag
   1 Saint Germain
   1 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   1 Robert Heinlein
   1 Rishi Nityabodhananda
   1 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   1 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
   1 Peter J Carroll
   1 Neil deGrasse Tyson
   1 M Scott Peck
   1 Mortimer J Adler
   1 M Alan Kazlev
   1 Leo Tolstoy
   1 Larry Wall
   1 Kwn Wilber
   1 Ken Wilber?
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   1 J R R Tolkien
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   1 Haruki Murakami
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   1 Dr Robert A Hatch
   1 Dr Alok Pandey
   1 Dion Fortune
   1 Dante Alighieri
   1 C S Lewis
   1 C.G. Jung
   1 Bertrand Russell
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   1 Anonymous
   1 Alfred North Whitehead
   1 Aleister Crowley?
   1 Alan Turing
   1 Agrippa
   1 A E van Vogt

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   8 Anonymous
   7 William Shakespeare
   7 Stephen King
   5 Robert Frost
   4 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   4 John Green
   4 C S Lewis
   4 A Course in Miracles
   3 Stephenie Meyer
   3 Ovid
   3 Neil Gaiman
   3 Julian Barnes
   3 John Irving
   3 J K Rowling
   3 E L James
   3 Courtney Allison Moulton
   3 Andrea Dworkin
   3 Agatha Christie
   2 Winston S Churchill
   2 Walter Scott
   2 Thomas Pynchon
   2 Stylo Fantome
   2 Shirley MacLaine
   2 Robert T Kiyosaki
   2 Robert Anton Wilson
   2 Rick Riordan
   2 Quentin Crisp
   2 Osho
   2 Mason Cooley
   2 Mark Twain
   2 Marilyn Monroe
   2 Kurt Vonnegut
   2 Kristin Hannah
   2 K F Breene
   2 Katherine Dunn
   2 Kate Morton
   2 Jeff Lindsay
   2 Haruki Murakami
   2 George Herbert
   2 Diane Setterfield
   2 Charles Bukowski
   2 Atul Gawande
   2 Aristotle
   2 Ally Condie

1:My course is set for an uncharted sea. ~ Dante Alighieri,
2:Partial surrender is certainly possible for all. In course of time that will lead to complete surrender. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
3:When we set our course for God, He will always be there to direct our path ~ Anonymous, The Bible Prov. 16:9,
4:Any one who considers arithmetical methods of producing random digits is, of course, in a state of sin. ~ Jon von Neumann,
5:The lyric which is poetry’s native expression. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Course of English Poetry - II,
6:Nothing we think or do is void or vain;Each is an energy loosed and holds its course. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.04 - The Quest,
7:In all very great drama the true movement and result is psychological. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Course of English Poetry - II,
8:By policy, LISP has never really catered to mere mortals. And, of course, mere mortals have never really forgiven LISP for not catering to them. ~ Larry Wall,
9:If you pray hard enough, you can make water run uphill. How hard? Why, hard enough to make water run uphill, of course! ~ Robert Heinlein, Expanded Universe. ,
10:Fantasy is an exercise bicycle for the mind. It might not take you anywhere, but it tones up the muscles that can. Of course, I could be wrong. ~ Terry Pratchett,
11:Philosophy is of course a creation of the mind but its defect is not that it is false. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV The Place of Study in Sadhana,
12:Drama is the poet’s vision of some part of the world-act in the life of the human soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Course of English Poetry - II,
13:Men in their ordinary utilitarian course of life do not feel called upon to serve anyone except themselves. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Work and Ideal,
14:Evolution proceeds relentlessly in its course trampling to pieces all that it no longer needs. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings The National Value of Art,
15:Tests come sometimes from the hostile forces, sometimes in the course of Nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV The Hostile Forces and the Difficulties of Yoga,
16:A man really writes for an audience of about ten persons. Of course if others like it that is clear gain. But if those ten are satisfied he is content. ~ Alfred North Whitehead,
17:Of course you must study the dharma to know exactly what you have to do, but you must also understand that an inch of practice can sometimes be worth a mile of theory. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
18:If we want to have conversations with God (of course within us), is it possible? If yes, on what condition? God does not indulge in conversation. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
19:Games give you a chance to excel, and if you're playing in good company you don't even mind if you lose because you had the enjoyment of the company during the course of the game. ~ Gary Gygax,
20:Ordinary men pronounce a sackful of discourses on religion, but do not put a grain into practice, while the sage speaks little, but his whole life is religion put in to action ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
21:To those who want to practise the integral Yoga, it is strongly advised to abstain from three things: 1) Sexual intercourse 2) Smoking 3) Drinking alcohol ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
22:Intuition and inspiration are not only spiritual in their essence, they are the characteristic means of all spiritual vision and utterance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Course of English Poetry - V,
23:There are, of course, few Probationers who understand themselves sufficiently to be able to formulate this will to themselves, and therefore at the end of their probation they choose a new name. ~ Aleister Crowley?,
24:Wisdom is greater than all terrestrial sciences and than all human knowledge. She renders a man indifferent to the joys of the world and permits him to consider with an impassive heart their precipitous and tumultous course. ~ Fa.khen-pi.u,
25:If you have a glass full of liquid you can discourse forever on its qualities, discuss whether it is cold, warm, whether it is really and truly composed of H-2-O, or even mineral water, or saki. Meditation is Drinking it! ~ Taisen Deshimaru,
26:Instead of trying to produce a programme to simulate the adult mind, why not rather try to produce one which simulates the child's? If this were then subjected to an appropriate course of education one would obtain the adult brain. ~ Alan Turing,
27:When we speak of the Path we mean much more than a course of study. The Path is a way of life and on it the whole being must co-operate if the heights are to be won. ~ Dion Fortune, Esoteric Orders and Their Work and The Training and Work of the Initiate ,
28:I desired dragons with a profound desire. Of course, I in my timid body did not wish to have them in the neighborhood. But the world that contained even the imagination of Fafnir was richer and more beautiful, at whatever the cost of peril. ~ J R R Tolkien, On Fairy-Stories ,
29:'In order for an individual to consciously let go of a thing, he must have something that he feels is stronger to which he can anchor. As students become conscious of this, the confidence and strength will come to them to take the step.' ~ Saint Germain, The I am discourses ,
30:I am convinced that the act of thinking logically cannot possibly be natural to the human mind. If it were, then mathematics would be everybody's easiest course at school and our species would not have taken several millennia to figure out the scientific method. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
31:If you could take the bliss and happiness that comes from meditation, and put it into a bottle, it would be the most popular drink in the world. Of course, this is not possible. But the good news is that it is free, it is good for your health, and it is always available. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
32:This is the burden of man that he acts from his heart and his passions,Stung by the goads of the gods he hews at the ties that are dearest.Lust was the guide they sent us, wrath was a whip for his coursers,Madness they made the heart’s comrade, r ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
33:We must recognize that the attempt to set forth the temporal course commonly referred to as the "evolution of mankind" is merely an attempt to structure events for convenient accessibility. Consequently, we must exclude from our discussion as far as possible such misleading notions as "development" and "progress." ~ Jean Gebser,
34:There distance was his own huge spirit’s extent;Delivered from the fictions of the mindTime’s triple dividing step baffled no more;Its inevitable and continuous stream,The long flow of its manifesting course,Was held in spirit’s single wide ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.15 - The Kingdoms of the Greater Knowledge,
35:Give me yourself, O my God, give yourself back to me. Lo, I love you, but if my love is too mean, let me love more passionately. I cannot gauge my love, nor know how far it fails, how much more love I need for my life to set its course straight into your arms, never swerving until hidden in the covert of your face. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
36:Bhagavan: God is of course necessary, for most people. They can go on with one, till they find out that they and God are not different.The Swami continued, "In actual practice, sadhakas, even sincere ones, sometimes become dejected and lose faith in God. How to restore their faith? What should we do for them?" ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Day by Day ,
37:There are gods of the Overmind who are the great creators of the earth - until now. There are the gods of the Vedas who are mentioned in everything that has come down from the Rishis. And there are the gods of the Supermind, those who are going to manifest on earth, although of course they exist from all eternity on their own plane. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958 ,
38:The Divine Grace alone has the power to intervene and change the course of Universal Justice. The great work of the Avatar is to manifest the Divine Grace upon earth. To be a disciple of the Avatar is to become an instrument of the Divine Grace. The Mother is the great dispensatrix-through identity-of the Divine Grace, with a perfect knowledge-through identity-of the absolute mechanism of Universal Justice. ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II ,
39:One must find out for oneself, and make sure beyond doubt, 'who' one is, 'what' one is, 'why' one is... Being thus conscious of the proper course to pursue, the next thing is to understand the conditions necessary to following it out. After that, one must eliminate from oneself every element alien or hostile to success, and develop those parts of oneself which are specially needed to control the aforesaid conditions. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA ,
40:When we are young, we spend much time and pains in filling our note-books with all definitions of Religion, Love, Poetry, Politics, Art, in the hope that, in the course of a few years, we shall have condensed into our encyclopaedia the net value of all the theories at which the world has yet arrived. But year after year our tables get no completeness, and at last we discover that our curve is a parabola, whose arcs will never meet. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
41:You assume far too readily that man is a paragon of justice, forgetting, apparently, that he has a long and savage history. He has killed other animals not only for meat but for pleasure; he has enslaved his neighbors, murdered his opponents, and obtained the most unholy sadistical joy from the agony of others. It is not impossible that we shall, in the course of our travels, meet other intelligent creatures far more worthy than man to rule the universe. ~ A E van Vogt,
42:It should never be forgotten for a single moment that the central and essential work of the Magician is the attainment of the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel. Once he has achieved this he must of course be left entirely in the hands of that Angel, who can be invariably and inevitably relied upon to lead him to the further great step-crossing of the Abyss and the attainment of the grade of Master of the Temple. ~ Aleister Crowley, Magic Without Tears ,
43:They are now beginning to realise that even the most objective of their observations are steeped in the conventions they adopted at the outset and by forms or habits of thought developed in the course of the growth of research; so that, when they reach the end of their analyses they cannot tell with any certainty whether the structure they have reached is the essence of the matter they are studying, or the reflection of their own thought. ~ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Phenomenon Of Man ,
44:Why does an apple fall when it is ripe? Is it brought down by the force of gravity? Is it because its stalk withers? Because it is dried by the sun, because it grows too heavy, or because the boy standing under the tree wants to eat it? None of these is the cause.... Every action of theirs, that seems to them an act of their own freewill is in the historical sense not free at all but is bound up with the whole course of history and preordained from all eternity. ~ Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace ,
45:Though collecting quotations could be considered as merely an ironic mimetism -- victimless collecting, as it were... in a world that is well on its way to becoming one vast quarry, the collector becomes someone engaged in a pious work of salvage. The course of modern history having already sapped the traditions and shattered the living wholes in which precious objects once found their place, the collector may now in good conscience go about excavating the choicer, more emblematic fragments. ~ Susan Sontag,
46:It is often tragic to see how blatantly a man bungles his own life and the lives of others yet remains totally incapable of seeing how much the whole tragedy originates in himself, and how he continually feeds it and keeps it going. Not consciously, of course-for consciously he is engaged in bewailing and cursing a faithless world that recedes further and further into the distance. Rather, it is an unconscious factor which spins the illusions that veil his world. And what is being spun is a cocoon, which in the end will completely envelop him. ~ C.G. Jung, Aion ,
47:The aim of a complete course of development is to divest the basic structures of any sense of exclusive self, and thus free the basic needs from their contamination by the needs of the separate self sense. When the basic structures are freed from the immortality projects of the separate self, they are free to return to their natural functional relationships .... when hungry, we eat; when tired, we sleep. The self has been returned to the Self, all self-needs have been met and discarded; and the basic needs alone remain. ~ Kwn Wilber, Integral Psychology p. 253,
48:Few of us can escape being neurotic or character disordered to at least some degree (which is why essentially everyone can benefit from psychotherapy if he or she is seriously willing to participate in the process). The reason for this is that the problem of distinguishing what we are and what we are not responsible for in this life is one of the greatest problems of human existence. It is never completely solved; for the entirety of our lives we must continually assess and reassess where our responsibilities lie in the ever-changing course of events. ~ M Scott Peck,
49:Narrow minds devoid of imagination. Intolerance, theories cut off from reality, empty terminology, usurped ideals, inflexible systems. Those are the things that really frighten me. What I absolutely fear and loathe. Of course it's important to know what's right and what's wrong. Individual errors in judgment can usually be corrected. As long as you have the courage to admit mistakes, things can be turned around. But intolerant, narrow minds with no imagination are like parasites that transform the host, change form and continue to thrive. They're a lost cause. ~ Haruki Murakami,
50:Reading is merely a substitute for one's own thoughts. A man allows his thoughts to be put into leading-strings.Further, many books serve only to show how many wrong paths there are, and how widely a man may stray if he allows himself to be led by them. But he who is guided by his genius, that is to say, he who thinks for himself, who thinks voluntarily and rightly, possesses the compass wherewith to find the right course. A man, therefore, should only read when the source of his own thoughts stagnates; which is often the case with the best of minds. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer,
51:Weekly Reviews ::: Dedicate at least one afternoon or entire evening during the weekend to review all of your courses. Make certain you have an understanding of where each course is going and that your study schedule is appropriate. Do the 4x6 thing: One card for each chapter. Then ask yourself how each chapter relates to other chapters, and then, how the readings relate to each of the lectures. Are there contradictions? Differences of opinion, approach, method? What evidence is there to support the differences of opinion? What are your views? Can you defend them? A good exercise. ~ Dr Robert A Hatch, How to Study ,
52:The Japanese have a proverb: "The gods only laugh when men pray to them for wealth." The boon bestowed on the worshiper is always scaled to his stature and to the nature of his dominant desire: the boon is simply a symbol of life energy stepped down to the requirements of a certain specific case. The irony, of course, lies in the fact that, whereas the hero who has won the favor of the god may beg for the boon of perfect illumination, what he generally seeks are longer years to live, weapons with which to slay his neighbor, or the health of his child. ~ Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces The Ultimate Boon,
53:If you want to totally free yourself from suffering, it is important to distinguish what to do from what not to do since you can not hope to taste the fruit of beneficial actions that you have not done, nor escape the consequences of your own harmful actions. After death, you will follow the course traced by your actions, good and bad. Now that you have a choice between two paths, one that leads up and one that leads down, do not act in a way opposed to your deepest wishes. Practice all possible beneficial actions, even the smallest. Doesn't the accumulation of little drops end up filling a large jar? ~ Jetsun Mingyur Paldron,
54:I feel all kinds of.... Yes, yes, of course, it's inevitable. But you must call in tranquillity, that's the only thing.... It keeps coming and coming from all sides; but when you feel things going badly, when you're uneasy or thoroughly upset, you must remember to call in tranquillity. But it's about you, directed against you, all sorts of suggestions that make me.... That want to cut you off from me. Yes, I know perfectly well. It's like that for everybody, not just for you. We must keep going right to the end, that's all - there's nothing else to do. January 31, 1961 ~ The Mother, Agenda Vol 4 Satprem,
55:DR. MANILAL: How can one succeed in meditation?SRI AUROBINDO: By quietude of mind. There is not only the Infinite in itself, but also an infinite sea of peace, joy, light, power above the head. The golden Lid, Hiranmaya Patram, intervenes between the mind and what is above the mind. Once you break this lid ( making a movement of the hands above the head ) they can come down any time at your will. But for that, quietude is essential. Of course, there are people who can get them without first establishing the quietude, but it is very difficult. ( On 13-12-1938 ) ~ Sri Aurobindo, TALKS WITH SRI AUROBINDO VOLUME 1 BY NIRODBARAN (Page no.17),
56:The universities better becareful, cause they are dumping their content online as fast as they can. They are going to make themselves completely superfluous. And some smart person, Ive been thinking about this for 20 years, is going to take over accreditation end. Cause you know, all you would have to do, is set up a series of well designed examinations online. And only let a minority of people pass, you have instant accreditation credibility. Heres an entire 3 years of Psychology courses, heres the exams, you take them, only 15% of the people pass. ... It makes the accreditation valuable. ~ Jordan Peterson, Joe Rogan Experience 877 - Jordan Peterson 1:40:00,
57:"Direct not thy mind to the vast surfaces of the earth; for the Plant of Truth grows not upon the ground. Nor measure the motions of the Sun, collecting rules, for he is carried by the Eternal Will of the Father, and not for your sake alone. Dismiss from your mind the impetuous course of the Moon, for she moveth always by the power of Necessity. The progression of the Stars was not generated for your sake. The wide aerial flight of birds gives no true knowledge, nor the dissection of the entrails of victims; they are all mere toys, the basis of mercenary fraud: flee from these if you would enter the sacred paradise of piety where Virtue, Wisdom, and Equity are assembled." ~ Zoroaster,
58:The vital can rise to the head in two ways - one to cloud the mind with the vital impulses, the other to aspire and join with the higher Consciousness. If you noticed the aspiration, it was evidently the latter movement. It is true that for the external vital an outer discipline is necessary for the purification, otherwise it remains restless and fanciful and at the mercy of its own impulses - so that no basis can be built there for a quiet and abiding higher consciousness to remain firmly. The attitude you have taken for the work is of course the best one and, applying it steadily, the progress you feel was bound to come and is sure to increase. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV The Vital Being and Sadhana,
59:Then miracle is made the common rule, One mighty deed can change the course of things; A lonely thought becomes omnipotent. All now seems Nature's massed machinery; An endless servitude to material rule And long determination's rigid chain, Her firm and changeless habits aping Law, Her empire of unconscious deft device Annul the claim of man's free human will. He too is a machine amid machines; A piston brain pumps out the shapes of thought, A beating heart cuts out emotion's modes; An insentient energy fabricates a soul. Or the figure of the world reveals the signs Of a tied Chance repeating her old steps In circles around Matter's binding-posts. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.02 - The Issue,
60:The physical form of a magical weapon is no more than a convenient handle or anchor for its aetheric form.The Sword and Pentacle are weapons of analysis and synthesis respectively. Upon the pentacle aetheric forms, images, and powers are assembled when the magical will and perception vitalize the imagination. The magician may create hundreds of pentacles in the course of his sorceries, yet there is a virtue in having a general purpose weapon of this class, for its power increases with use, and it can be employed as an altar for the consecration of lesser pentacles. For many operations of an evocatory type, the pentacle is placed on the cup and the conjuration performed with the wand. ~ Peter J Carroll, Liber Null ,
61:But we now come to speak of the holy and sacred Pentacles and Sigils. Now these pentacles, are as it were certain holy signes preserving us from evil chances and events, and helping and assisting us to binde, exterminate, and drive away evil spirits, and alluring the good spirits, and reconciling them unto us. And these pentacles do consist either of Characters of the good spirits of the superiour order, or of sacred pictures of holy letters or revelations, with apt and fit versicles, which are composed either of Geometrical figures and holy names of God, according to the course and maner of many of them; or they are compounded of all of them, or very many of them mixt. ~ Agrippa, A Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy ,
62:Masters of Worldbuilding. Creating imaginary worlds is certainly one of the more satisfying and addictive of creative pastimes. Of course, no one has ever surpassed Tolkien in worldbuilding stakes. And Frank Herbert should be included in 2nd place on this honourable list. Other worthwhile mentions are Lovecraft (Cthulhu mythos), Asimov (Foundation), Niven (Known Space), Jack Kirby (Marvel), William Gibson (the Sprawl), Stephen Baxter (Xeelee), Marc Miller (Traveller), C.J.Cherryh (Alliance-Union), Dan Simmons (Hyperion Cantos), David Weber (Honorverse), Iain M Banks (Culture), Alastair Reynolds (Revelation Space/Galactic North), Kameron Hurley (Bel Dames), and Ann Lecke (Ancillary trilogy), to name just a few. ~ M Alan Kazlev,
63:One memory alone was left: the thought of his beautiful wife. This thought possessed his mind with such intensity that he did not notice his loss of memory for the rest of the world. His whole nature became obsessed by her image, and like a madman, who losing his own identity becomes the being whose image possesses him, Puranjana found him self transformed into a lovely young girl like his wife. "The young girl he had now become forgot her previous identity to such an extent that when she met with King Malayadhvaja, she fell in love with him and married him. When in the course of time the king passed away and she was left alone, lamenting his death and her bereavement, an unknown brahm in came to her and said: ~ Rishi Nityabodhananda, Ajna Chakra ,
64:The Pentagram [Dedicated to George Raffalovich] In the Years of the Primal Course, in the dawn of terrestrial birth, Man mastered the mammoth and horse, and Man was the Lord of the Earth. He made him an hollow skin from the heart of an holy tree, He compassed the earth therien, and Man was the Lord of the Sea. He controlled the vigour of steam, he harnessed the lightning for hire; He drove the celestial team, and man was the Lord of the Fire. Deep-mouthed from their thrones deep-seated, the choirs of the æeons declare The last of the demons defeated, for Man is the Lord of the Air. Arise, O Man, in thy strength! the kingdom is thine to inherit, Till the high gods witness at lenght that Man is the Lord of his spirit. ~ Aleister Crowley,
65:Sweet Mother, What exactly is the soul or psychic being? And what is meant by the evolution of the psychic being? What is its relation to the Supreme? The soul and the psychic being are not exactly the same thing, although their essence is the same. The soul is the divine spark that dwells at the centre of each being; it is identical with its Divine Origin; it is the divine in man. The psychic being is formed progressively around this divine centre, the soul, in the course of its innumerable lives in the terrestrial evolution, until the time comes when the psychic being, fully formed and wholly awakened, becomes the conscious sheath of the soul around which it is formed. And thus identified with the Divine, it becomes His perfect instrument in the world. 16 July 1960 ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother 244,
66:11. The Ultimate Boon:The gods and goddesses then are to be understood as embodiments and custodians of the elixir of Imperishable Being but not themselves the Ultimate in its primary state. What the hero seeks through his intercourse with them is therefore not finally themselves, but their grace, i.e., the power of their sustaining substance. This miraculous energy-substance and this alone is the Imperishable; the names and forms of the deities who everywhere embody, dispense, and represent it come and go. This is the miraculous energy of the thunderbolts of Zeus, Yahweh, and the Supreme Buddha, the fertility of the rain of Viracocha, the virtue announced by the bell rung in the Mass at the consecration, and the light of the ultimate illumination of the saint and sage. Its guardians dare release it only to the duly proven. ~ Joseph Campbell,
67:The ship creaked and gravity shifted a degree to Miller's right. Course correction. Nothing interesting. Miller closed his eyes and tried to will himself to sleep. His mind was full of dead men and Julie and love and sex. There was something Holden had said about the war that was important, but he couldn't make the pieces fit. They kept changing. Miller sighed, shifted his weight so that he blocked one of his drainage tubes and had to shift back to stop the alarm. When the blood pressure cuff fired off again, it was Julie holding him, pulling herself so close her lips brushed his ear. His eyes opened, his mind seeing both the imaginary girl and the monitors that she would have blocked if she'd really been there. I love you too, she said, and I will take care of you. He smiled at seeing the numbers change as his heart raced. ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes ,
68:It is no good asking for a simple religion. After all, real things are not simple. They look simple, but they are not. The table I am sitting at looks simple: but ask a scientist to tell you what it is really made of-all about the atoms and how the light waves rebound from them and hit my eye and what they do to the optic nerve and what it does to my brain-and, of course, you find that what we call "seeing a table" lands you in mysteries and complications which you can hardly get to the end of. A child saying a child's prayer looks simple. And if you are content to stop there, well and good. But if you are not--and the modern world usually is not--if you want to go on and ask what is really happening, then you must be prepared for something difficult. If we ask for something more than simplicity, it is silly then to complain that the something more is not simple. ~ C S Lewis, Mere Christianity ,
69:Maheshwari can appear too calm and great and distant for the littleness of earthly nature to approach or contain her, Mahakali too swift and formidable for its weakness to bear; but all turn with joy and longing to Mahalakshmi. For she throws the spell of the intoxicating sweetness of the Divine: to be close to her is a profound happiness and to feel her within the heart is to make the existence a rapture and a marvel; grace and charm and tenderness flow from her like the light from the sun and wherever she fixes her wonderful gaze or lets fall of the loveliness of her smile, the soul is seized and made captive and plunged into the depths of an unfathomable bliss. Magnetic is the touch of her hands and their occult and delicate influence refines the mind and life and body and where she presses her feet course miraculous streams of an entrancing Ananda. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother ,
70:... if we conceive of a being whose faculties are so sharpened that he can follow every molecule in its course, such a being, whose attributes are as essentially finite as our own, would be able to do what is impossible to us. For we have seen that molecules in a vessel full of air at uniform temperature are moving with velocities by no means uniform, though the mean velocity of any great number of them, arbitrarily selected, is almost exactly uniform. Now let us suppose that such a vessel is divided into two portions, A and B, by a division in which there is a small hole, and that a being, who can see the individual molecules, opens and closes this hole, so as to allow only the swifter molecules to pass from A to B, and only the slower molecules to pass from B to A. He will thus, without expenditure of work, raise the temperature of B and lower that of A, in contradiction to the second law of thermodynamics. ~ James Clerk Maxwell,
71:You must ask yourself, if for 10 years if you didnt avoid doing what you knew you needed to do, by your own definitions right, within the value structure that you've created to the degree that youve done that, what would you be like? Well you know there are remarkable people who come into the world from time to time and there are people who do find out over decades long periods what they could be like if they were who they were if they said... if they spoke their being forward, and theyd get stronger and stronger. you do not know the limits to that, we do not know the limits to that and so you could say well in part perhaps the reason that you're suffering unbearably can be left at your feet because you are not everything you could be and you know it. and of course thats a terrible thing to admit and its a terrible thing to consider but theres real promise in it. perhaps theres another way you could look at the world and another way you could act in the world. .. Imagine many people did that. ~ Jordan Peterson,
72:Ah, yeah. We're gonna go to Mars. And then of course we're gonna colonize deep space. With our microwave hot dogs and plastic vomit, fake dog shit and cinnamon dental floss, lemon-scented toilet paper and sneakers with lights in the heels. And all these other impressive things we've done down here. But let me ask you this: what are we gonna tell the intergalactic council of ministers the first time one of our teenage mothers throws their newborn baby into a dumpster? How are we gonna explain that to the space people? How are we gonna let them know that our ambassador was only late for the meeting because his breakfast was cold and he had to spend half an hour punching his wife around the kitchen? And what are they gonna think when they find out, its just a local custom, that over 80 million women in the Third world have had their clitorises forcibly removed in order to reduce their sexual pleasure so they won't cheat on their husbands? Can't you just sense how eager the rest of the universe is for us to show up? ~ George Carlin,
73:Nature may reach the same result in many ways. Like a wave in the physical world, in the infinite ocean of the medium which pervades all, so in the world of organisms, in life, an impulse started proceeds onward, at times, may be, with the speed of light, at times, again, so slowly that for ages and ages it seems to stay, passing through processes of a complexity inconceivable to men, but in all its forms, in all its stages, its energy ever and ever integrally present. A single ray of light from a distant star falling upon the eye of a tyrant in bygone times may have altered the course of his life, may have changed the destiny of nations, may have transformed the surface of the globe, so intricate, so inconceivably complex are the processes in Nature. In no way can we get such an overwhelming idea of the grandeur of Nature than when we consider, that in accordance with the law of the conservation of energy, throughout the Infinite, the forces are in a perfect balance, and hence the energy of a single thought may determine the motion of a universe. ~ Nikola Tesla,
74:Sails across the sea of life in the twinkling of an eye.' One attains the vision of God if Mahamaya steps aside from the door. Mahamaya's grace is necessary: hence the worship of Sakti. You see, God is near us, but it is not possible to know Him because Mahamaya stands between. Rama, Lakshmana, and Sita were walking along. Rama walked ahead, Sita in the middle, and Lakshmana last. Lakshmana was only two and a half cubits away from Rama, but he couldn't see Rama because Sita - Mahamaya - was in the way."While worshipping God, one should assume a definite attitude. I have three attitudes: the attitude of a child, the attitude or a maidservant, and the attitude of a friend. For a long time I regarded myself as a maidservant and a woman companion of God; at that time I used to wear skirts and ornaments, like a woman. The attitude of a child is very good."The attitude of a 'hero' is not good. Some people cherish it. They regard themselves as Purusha and woman as Prakriti; they want to propitiate woman through intercourse with her. But this method often causes disaster. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
75:In the early part of the sadhana - and by early I do not mean a short part - effort is indispensable. Surrender of course, but surrender is not a thing that is done in a day. The mind has its ideas and it clings to them; the human vital resists surrender, for what it calls surrender in the early stages is a doubtful kind of self-giving with a demand in it; the physical consciousness is like a stone and what it calls surrender is often no more then inertia. It is only the psychic that knows how to surrender and the psychic is usually very much veiled in the beginning. When the psychic awakens, it can bring a sudden and true surrender of the whole being, for the difficulty of the rest is rapidly dealt with and disappears. But till then effort is indispensable. Or else it is necessary till the Force comes flooding down into the being from above and takes up the sadhana, does it for one more and more and leaves less and less to individual effort - but even then, it not effort, at least aspiration and vigilance are needed till the possession of mind, will, life and body by the Divine Power is complete. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
76:By religion, then, I understand a propitiation or conciliation of powers superior to man which are believed to direct and control the course of nature and of human life. Thus defined, religion consists of two elements, a theoretical and a practical, namely, a belief in powers higher than man and an attempt to propitiate or please them. Of the two, belief clearly comes first, since we must believe in the existence of a divine being before we can attempt to please him. But unless the belief leads to a corresponding practice, it is not a religion but merely a theology; in the language of St. James, "faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone." In other words, no man is religious who does not govern his conduct in some measure by the fear or love of God. On the other hand, mere practice, divested of all religious belief, is also not religion. Two men may behave in exactly the same way, and yet one of them may be religious and the other not. If the one acts from the love or fear of God, he is religious; if the other acts from the love or fear of man, he is moral or immoral according as his behaviour comports or conflicts with the general good. ~ James George Frazer, The Golden Bough ,
77:If we do not objectify, and feel instinctively and permanently that words are not the things spoken about, then we could not speak abouth such meaningless subjects as the 'beginning' or the 'end' of time. But, if we are semantically disturbed and objectify, then, of course, since objects have a beginning and an end, so also would 'time' have a 'beggining' and an 'end'. In such pathological fancies the universe must have a 'beginning in time' and so must have been made., and all of our old anthropomorphic and objectified mythologies follow, including the older theories of entropy in physics. But, if 'time' is only a human form of representation and not an object, the universe has no 'beginning in time' and no 'end in time'; in other words, the universe is 'time'-less. The moment we realize, feel permanently, and utilize these realizations and feelings that words are not things, then only do we acquire the semantic freedom to use different forms of representation. We can fit better their structure to the facts at hand, become better adjusted to these facts which are not words, and so evaluate properly m.o (multi-ordinal) realities, which evaluation is important for sanity. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics ,
78:the fourth aid, time, kala ::: The sadhaka who has all these aids is sure of his goal. Even a fall will be for him only a means of rising and death a passage towards fulfilment. For once on this path, birth and death become only processes in the development of his being and the stages of his journey. Time is the remaining aid needed for the effectivity of the process. Time presents itself to human effort as an enemy or a friend, as a resistance, a medium or an instrument. But always it is really the instrument of the soul. Time is a field of circumstances and forces meeting and working out a resultant progression whose course it measures. To the ego it is a tyrant or a resistance, to the Divine an instrument. Therefore, while our effort is personal, Time appears as a resistance, for it presents to us all the obstruction of the forces that conflict with our own. When the divine working and the personal are combined in our consciousness, it appears as a medium and a condition. When the two become one, it appears as a servant and instrument. The ideal attitude of the sadhaka towards Time is to have an endless patience as if he had all eternity for his fulfilment and yet to develop the energy that shall realise now and with an ever-increasing mastery and pressure of rapidity till it reaches the miraculous instantaneousness of the supreme divine Transformation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.01 - The Four Aids,
79:When love beckons to you follow him, Though his ways are hard and steep. And when his wings enfold you yield to him, Though the sword hidden among his pinions may wound you. And when he speaks to you believe in him, Though his voice may shatter your dreams as the north wind lays waste the garden. For even as love crowns you so shall he crucify you. Even as he is for your growth so is he for your pruning. Even as he ascends to your height and caresses your tenderest branches that quiver in the sun, So shall he descend to your roots and shake them in their clinging to the earth...... But if in your fear you would seek only love's peace and love's pleasure, Then it is better for you that you cover your nakedness and pass out of love's threshing-floor, Into the seasonless world where you shall laugh, but not all of your laughter, and weep, but not all of your tears. Love gives naught but itself and takes naught but from itself.>p>Love possesses not nor would it be possessed; For love is sufficient unto love. And think not you can direct the course of love, if it finds you worthy, directs your course. Love has no other desire but to fulfil itself. But if you love and must needs have desires, let these be your desires: To melt and be like a running brook that sings its melody to the night. To know the pain of too much tenderness. To be wounded by your own understanding of love; And to bleed willingly and joyfully. ~ Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet ,
80:Life clung to its seat with cords of gasping breath; Lapped was his body by a tenebrous tongue. Existence smothered travailed to survive; Hope strangled perished in his empty soul, Belief and memory abolished died And all that helps the spirit in its course. There crawled through every tense and aching nerve Leaving behind its poignant quaking trail A nameless and unutterable fear. As a sea nears a victim bound and still, The approach alarmed his mind for ever dumb Of an implacable eternity Of pain inhuman and intolerable. This he must bear, his hope of heaven estranged; He must ever exist without extinction's peace In a slow suffering Time and tortured Space, An anguished nothingness his endless state. A lifeless vacancy was now his breast, And in the place where once was luminous thought, Only remained like a pale motionless ghost An incapacity for faith and hope And the dread conviction of a vanquished soul Immortal still but with its godhead lost, Self lost and God and touch of happier worlds. But he endured, stilled the vain terror, bore The smothering coils of agony and affright; Then peace returned and the soul's sovereign gaze. To the blank horror a calm Light replied: Immutable, undying and unborn, Mighty and mute the Godhead in him woke And faced the pain and danger of the world. He mastered the tides of Nature with a look: He met with his bare spirit naked Hell. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.07 - The Descent into Night,
81:Inspiration is always a very uncertain thing; it comes when it chooses, stops suddenly before it has finished its work, refuses to descend when it is called. This is a well-known affliction, perhaps of all artists, but certainly of poets. There are some who can command it at will; those who, I think, are more full of an abundant poetic energy than careful for perfection; others who oblige it to come whenever they put pen to paper but with these the inspiration is either not of a high order or quite unequal in its levels. Again there are some who try to give it a habit of coming by always writing at the same time; Virgil with his nine lines first written, then perfected every morning, Milton with his fifty epic lines a day, are said to have succeeded in regularising their inspiration. It is, I suppose, the same principle which makes Gurus in India prescribe for their disciples a meditation at the same fixed hour every day. It succeeds partially of course, for some entirely, but not for everybody. For myself, when the inspiration did not come with a rush or in a stream,-for then there is no difficulty,-I had only one way, to allow a certain kind of incubation in which a large form of the thing to be done threw itself on the mind and then wait for the white heat in which the entire transcription could rapidly take place. But I think each poet has his own way of working and finds his own issue out of inspiration's incertitudes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry Inspiration and Effort - I,
82:Supermind, on the other hand, as a basic structure-rung (conjoined with nondual Suchness) can only be experienced once all the previous junior levels have emerged and developed, and as in all structure development, stages cannot be skipped. Therefore, unlike Big Mind, supermind can only be experienced after all 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-tier junior stages have been passed through. While, as Genpo Roshi has abundantly demonstrated, Big Mind state experience is available to virtually anybody at almost any age (and will be interpreted according to the View of their current stage), supermind is an extremely rare recognition. Supermind, as the highest structure-rung to date, has access to all previous structures, all the way back to Archaic-and the Archaic itself, of course, has transcended and included, and now embraces, every major structural evolution going all the way back to the Big Bang. (A human being literally enfolds and embraces all the major transformative unfoldings of the entire Kosmic history-strings to quarks to subatomic particles to atoms to molecules to cells, all the way through the Tree of Life up to its latest evolutionary emergent, the triune brain, the most complex structure in the known natural world.) Supermind, in any given individual, is experienced as a type of omniscience-the supermind, since it transcends and includes all of the previous structure-rungs, and inherently is conjoined with the highest nondual Suchness state, has a full and complete knowledge of all of the potentials in that person. It literally knows all, at least for the individual. ~ Ken Wilber?,
83:Musa Spiritus ::: O Word concealed in the upper fire, Thou who hast lingered through centuries, Descend from thy rapt white desire, Plunging through gold eternities. Into the gulfs of our nature leap, Voice of the spaces, call of the Light! Break the seals of Matter's sleep, Break the trance of the unseen height. In the uncertain glow of human mind, Its waste of unharmonied thronging thoughts, Carve thy epic mountain-lined Crowded with deep prophetic grots. Let thy hue-winged lyrics hover like birds Over the swirl of the heart's sea. Touch into sight with thy fire-words The blind indwelling deity. O Muse of the Silence, the wideness make In the unplumbed stillness that hears thy voice, In the vast mute heavens of the spirit awake Where thy eagles of Power flame and rejoice. Out, out with the mind and its candles flares, Light, light the suns that never die. For my ear the cry of the seraph stars And the forms of the Gods for my naked eye! Let the little troubled life-god within Cast his veils from the still soul, His tiger-stripes of virtue and sin, His clamour and glamour and thole and dole; All make tranquil, all make free. Let my heart-beats measure the footsteps of God As He comes from His timeless infinity To build in their rapture His burning abode. Weave from my life His poem of days, His calm pure dawns and His noons of force. My acts for the grooves of His chariot-race, My thoughts for the tramp of His great steeds' course! ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems ,
84:Sweet Mother, how can we cut the knot of the ego? How to cut it? Take a sword and strike it (laughter), when one becomes conscious of it. For usually one is not; we think it quite normal, what happens to us; and in fact it is very normal but we think it quite good also. So to begin with one must have a great clear-sightedness to become aware that one is enclosed in all these knots which hold one in bondage. And then, when one is aware that there's something altogether tightly closed in there - so tightly that one has tried in vain to move it - then one imagines one's will to be a very sharp sword-blade, and with all one's force one strikes a blow on this knot (imaginary, of course, one doesn't take up a sword in fact), and this produces a result. Of course you can do this work from the psychological point of view, discovering all the elements constituting this knot, the whole set of resistances, habits, preferences, of all that holds you narrowly closed in. So when you grow aware of this, you can concentrate and call the divine Force and the Grace and strike a good blow on this formation, these things so closely held, like that, that nothing can separate them. And at that moment you must resolve that you will no longer listen to these things, that you will listen only to the divine Consciousness and will do no other work except the divine work without worrying about personal results, free from all attachment, free from all preference, free from all wish for success, power, satisfaction, vanity, all this.... All this must disappear and you must see only the divine Will incarnated in your will and making you act. Then, in this way, you are cured. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954 ,
85:[the first aid, shastra, the lotus of the eternal knowledge:] The supreme Shastra of the Integral Yoga is the eternal Veda secret in the heart of every thinking and living being. The lotus of the eternal knowledge and the eternal perfection is a bud closed and folded up within us. It opens swiftly or gradually, petal by petal, through successive realisations, once the mind of man begins to turn towards the Eternal, once his heart, no longer compressed and confined by attachment to finite appearances, becomes enamoured, in whatever degree, of the Infinite. All life, all thought, all energising of the faculties, all experiences passive or active, become thenceforward so many shocks which disintegrate the teguments of the soul and remove the obstacles to the inevitable efflorescence. He who chooses the Infinite has been chosen by the Infinite. He has received the divine touch without which there is no awakening, no opening of the spirit; but once it is received, attainment is sure, whether conquered swiftly in the course of one human life or pursued patiently through many stadia of the cycle of existence in the manifested universe. Nothing can be taught to the mind which is not already concealed as potential knowledge in the unfolding soul of the creature. So also all perfection of which the outer man is capable, is only a realising of the eternal perfection of the Spirit within him. We know the Divine and become the Divine, because we are That already in our secret nature. All teaching is a revealing, all becoming is an unfolding. Self-attainment is the secret; self-knowledge and an increasing consciousness are the means and the process. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Four Aids [53],
86:Sweet Mother, how can we cut the knot of the ego? How to cut it? Take a sword and strike it (laughter), when one becomes conscious of it. For usually one is not; we think it quite normal, what happens to us; and in fact it is very normal but we think it quite good also. So to begin with one must have a great clear-sightedness to become aware that one is enclosed in all these knots which hold one in bondage. And then, when one is aware that there's something altogether tightly closed in there - so tightly that one has tried in vain to move it - then one imagines one's will to be a very sharp sword-blade, and with all one's force one strikes a blow on this knot (imaginary, of course, one doesn't take up a sword in fact), and this produces a result. Of course you can do this work from the psychological point of view, discovering all the elements constituting this knot, the whole set of resistances, habits, preferences, of all that holds you narrowly closed in. So when you grow aware of this, you can concentrate and call the divine Force and the Grace and strike a good blow on this formation, these things so closely held, like that, that nothing can separate them. And at that moment you must resolve that you will no longer listen to these things, that you will listen only to the divine Consciousness and will do no other work except the divine work without worrying about personal results, free from all attachment, free from all preference, free from all wish for success, power, satisfaction, vanity, all this.... All this must disappear and you must see only the divine Will incarnated in your will and making you act. Then, in this way, you are cured. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954 ,
87:Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. These passions, like great winds, have blown me hither and thither, in a wayward course, over a great ocean of anguish, reaching to the very verge of despair. I have sought love, first, because it brings ecstasy - ecstasy so great that I would often have sacrificed all the rest of life for a few hours of this joy. I have sought it, next, because it relieves loneliness--that terrible loneliness in which one shivering consciousness looks over the rim of the world into the cold unfathomable lifeless abyss. I have sought it finally, because in the union of love I have seen, in a mystic miniature, the prefiguring vision of the heaven that saints and poets have imagined. This is what I sought, and though it might seem too good for human life, this is what--at last--I have found. With equal passion I have sought knowledge. I have wished to understand the hearts of men. I have wished to know why the stars shine. And I have tried to apprehend the Pythagorean power by which number holds sway above the flux. A little of this, but not much, I have achieved. Love and knowledge, so far as they were possible, led upward toward the heavens. But always pity brought me back to earth. Echoes of cries of pain reverberate in my heart. Children in famine, victims tortured by oppressors, helpless old people a burden to their sons, and the whole world of loneliness, poverty, and pain make a mockery of what human life should be. I long to alleviate this evil, but I cannot, and I too suffer. This has been my life. I have found it worth living, and would gladly live it again if the chance were offered me. ~ Bertrand Russell,
88:To analyse the classes of life we have to consider two very different kinds of phenomena: the one embraced under the collective name-Inorganic chemistry-the other under the collective nameOrganic chemistry, or the chemistry of hydro-carbons. These divisions are made because of the peculiar properties of the elements chiefly involved in the second class. The properties of matter are so distributed among the elements that three of them- Oxygen, Hydrogen, and Carbon-possess an ensemble of unique characteristics. The number of reactions in inorganic chemistry are relatively few, but in organic chemistry-in the chemistry of these three elements the number of different compounds is practically unlimited. Up to 1910, we knew of more than 79 elements of which the whole number of reactions amounted to only a few hundreds, but among the remaining three elements-Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen-the reactions were known to be practically unlimited in number and possibilities; this fact must have very far reaching consequences. As far as energies are concerned, we have to take them as nature reveals them to us. Here more than ever, mathematical thinking is essential and will help enormously. The reactions in inorganic chemistry always involve the phenomenon of heat, sometimes light, and in some instances an unusual energy is produced called electricity. Until now, the radioactive elements represent a group too insufficiently known for an enlargement here upon this subject. The organic compounds being unlimited in number and possibilities and with their unique characteristics, represent of course, a different class of phenomena, but being, at the same time, chemical they include the basic chemical phenomena involved in all chemical reactions, but being unique in many other respects, they also have an infinitely vast field of unique characteristics. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity Questions And Answers 1953,
89:More often, he listened to the voice of Eros. Sometimes he watched the video feeds too, but usually, he just listened. Over the hours and days, he began to hear, if not patterns, at least common structures. Some of the voices spooling out of the dying station were consistent-broadcasters and entertainers who were overrepresented in the audio files archives, he guessed. There seemed to be some specific tendencies in, for want of a better term, the music of it too. Hours of random, fluting static and snatched bits of phrases would give way, and Eros would latch on to some word or phrase, fixating on it with greater and greater intensity until it broke apart and the randomness poured back in. "... are, are, are, ARE, ARE, ARE... " Aren't, Miller thought, and the ship suddenly shoved itself up, leaving Miller's stomach about half a foot from where it had been. A series of loud clanks followed, and then the brief wail of a Klaxon. "Dieu! Dieu!" someone shouted. "Bombs son vamen roja! Going to fry it! Fry us toda!" There was the usual polite chuckle that the same joke had occasioned over the course of the trip, and the boy who'd made it-a pimply Belter no more than fifteen years old-grinned with pleasure at his own wit. If he didn't stop that shit, someone was going to beat him with a crowbar before they got back to Tycho. But Miller figured that someone wasn't him. A massive jolt forward pushed him hard into the couch, and then gravity was back, the familiar 0.3 g. Maybe a little more. Except that with the airlocks pointing toward ship's down, the pilot had to grapple the spinning skin of Eros' belly first. The spin gravity made what had been the ceiling the new floor; the lowest rank of couches was now the top; and while they rigged the fusion bombs to the docks, they were all going to have to climb up onto a cold, dark rock that was trying to fling them off into the vacuum. Such were the joys of sabotage. ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes ,
90:Why are some people intelligent and others not? Why can some people do certain things while others can't?"It is as though you asked why everybody was not the same! Then it would mean that there would only be one single thing, one single thing indefinitely repeated which would constitute the whole universe.... I don't know, but it seems to me that it wouldn't be worth the trouble having a universe for that, it would be enough to have just one thing!But the moment one admits the principle of multiplicity and that no two things are alike in the universe, how can you ask why they are not the same! It is just because they are not, because no two things are alike.Behind that there is something else which one is not conscious of, but which is very simple and very childish. It is this: "Since there is an infinite diversity, since some people are of one kind and others of a lesser kind, well" - here of course one doesn't say this to oneself but it is there, hidden in the depths of the being, in the depths of the ego - "why am I not of the best kind?" There we are. In fact it amounts to complaining that perhaps one is not of the best kind! If you look attentively at questions like this: "Why do some have much and others little?" "Why are some wise and not others? Why are some intelligent and not others?" etc., behind that there is "Why don't I have all that can be had and why am I not all that one can be?..." Naturally, one doesn't say this to oneself, because one would feel ridiculous, but it is there.There then. Now has anyone anything to add to what we have just said?... Have you all understood quite well? Everything I have said? Nobody wants to say...(A teacher) Our daily routine seems a little "impossible" to us.Well, wait a century or two and it will become possible! (Laughter)You are told that today's impossibility is the possibility of tomorrow - but these are very great tomorrows! ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers Volume-8,
91:See how, like lightest waves at play, the airy dancers fleet; And scarcely feels the floor the wings of those harmonious feet. Ob, are they flying shadows from their native forms set free? Or phantoms in the fairy ring that summer moonbeams see? As, by the gentle zephyr blown, some light mist flees in air, As skiffs that skim adown the tide, when silver waves are fair, So sports the docile footstep to the heave of that sweet measure, As music wafts the form aloft at its melodious pleasure, Now breaking through the woven chain of the entangled dance, From where the ranks the thickest press, a bolder pair advance, The path they leave behind them lost--wide open the path beyond, The way unfolds or closes up as by a magic wand. See now, they vanish from the gaze in wild confusion blended; All, in sweet chaos whirled again, that gentle world is ended! No!--disentangled glides the knot, the gay disorder ranges-- The only system ruling here, a grace that ever changes. For ay destroyed--for ay renewed, whirls on that fair creation; And yet one peaceful law can still pervade in each mutation. And what can to the reeling maze breathe harmony and vigor, And give an order and repose to every gliding figure? That each a ruler to himself doth but himself obey, Yet through the hurrying course still keeps his own appointed way. What, would'st thou know? It is in truth the mighty power of tune, A power that every step obeys, as tides obey the moon; That threadeth with a golden clue the intricate employment, Curbs bounding strength to tranquil grace, and tames the wild enjoyment. And comes the world's wide harmony in vain upon thine ears? The stream of music borne aloft from yonder choral spheres? And feel'st thou not the measure which eternal Nature keeps? The whirling dance forever held in yonder azure deeps? The suns that wheel in varying maze?--That music thou discernest? No! Thou canst honor that in sport which thou forgettest in earnest. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
92:My method is different. I do not rush into actual work. When I get an idea, I start at once building it up in my imagination. I change the construction, make improvements and operate the device in my mind. It is absolutely immaterial to me whether I run my turbine in thought or test it in my shop. I even note if it is out of balance. There is no difference whatever; the results are the same. In this way I am able to rapidly develop and perfect a conception without touching anything. When I have gone so far as to embody in the invention every possible improvement I can think of and see no fault anywhere, I put into concrete form this final product of my brain. Invariably my device works as I conceived that it should, and the experiment comes out exactly as I planned it. In twenty years there has not been a single exception. Why should it be otherwise? Engineering, electrical and mechanical, is positive in results. There is scarcely a subject that cannot be examined beforehand, from the available theoretical and practical data. The carrying out into practice of a crude idea as is being generally done, is, I hold, nothing but a waste of energy, money, and time. My early affliction had however, another compensation. The incessant mental exertion developed my powers of observation and enabled me to discover a truth of great importance. I had noted that the appearance of images was always preceded by actual vision of scenes under peculiar and generally very exceptional conditions, and I was impelled on each occasion to locate the original impulse. After a while this effort grew to be almost automatic and I gained great facility in connecting cause and effect. Soon I became aware, to my surprise, that every thought I conceived was suggested by an external impression. Not only this but all my actions were prompted in a similar way. In the course of time it became perfectly evident to me that I was merely an automation endowed with power OF MOVEMENT RESPONDING TO THE STIMULI OF THE SENSE ORGANS AND THINKING AND ACTING ACCORDINGLY. ~ Nikola Tesla, The Strange Life of Nikola Tesla ,
93:How often there is a kind of emptiness in the course of life, an unoccupied moment, a few minutes, sometimes more. And what do you do? Immediately you try to distract yourself, and you invent some foolishness or other to pass your time. That is a common fact. All men, from the youngest to the oldest, spend most of their time in trying not to be bored. Their pet aversion is boredom and the way to escape from boredom is to act foolishly. Well, there is a better way than that - to remember. When you have a little time, whether it is one hour or a few minutes, tell yourself, "At last, I have some time to concentrate, to collect myself, to relive the purpose of my life, to offer myself to the True and the Eternal." If you took care to do this each time you are not harassed by outer circumstances, you would find out that you were advancing very quickly on the path. Instead of wasting your time in chattering, in doing useless things, reading things that lower the consciousness - to choose only the best cases, I am not speaking of other imbecilities which are much more serious - instead of trying to make yourself giddy, to make time, that is already so short, still shorter only to realise at the end of your life that you have lost three-quarters of your chance - then you want to put in double time, but that does not work - it is better to be moderate, balanced, patient, quiet, but never to lose an opportunity that is given to you, that is to say, to utilise for the true purpose the unoccupied moment before you. When you have nothing to do, you become restless, you run about, you meet friends, you take a walk, to speak only of the best; I am not referring to things that are obviously not to be done. Instead of that, sit down quietly before the sky, before the sea or under trees, whatever is possible (here you have all of them) and try to realise one of these things - to understand why you live, to learn how you must live, to ponder over what you want to do and what should be done, what is the best way of escaping from the ignorance and falsehood and pain in which you live. 16 May 1958 ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931 ,
94:So then let the Adept set this sigil upon all the Words he hath writ in the book of the Works of his Will. And let him then end all, saying: Such are the Words!2 For by this he maketh proclamation before all them that be about his Circle that these Words are true and puissant, binding what he would bind, and loosing what he would loose. Let the Adept perform this ritual right, perfect in every part thereof, once daily for one moon, then twice, at dawn and dusk, for two moons; next thrice, noon added, for three moons; afterwards, midnight making up his course, for four moons four times every day. Then let the Eleventh Moon be consecrated wholly to this Work; let him be instant in constant ardour, dismissing all but his sheer needs to eat and sleep.3 For know that the true Formula4 whose virtue sufficed the Beast in this Attainment, was thus:INVOKE OFTENSo may all men come at last to the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel: thus sayeth The Beast, and prayeth his own Angel that this Book be as a burning Lamp, and as a living Spring, for Light and Life to them that read therein.1. There is an alternative spelling, TzBA-F, where the Root, "an Host," has the value of 93. The Practicus should revise this Ritual throughout in the Light of his personal researches in the Qabalah, and make it his own peculiar property. The spelling here suggested implies that he who utters the Word affirms his allegiance to the symbols 93 and 6; that he is a warrior in the army of Will, and of the Sun. 93 is also the number of AIWAZ and 6 of The Beast.2. The consonants of LOGOS, "Word," add (Hebrew values) to 93 [reading the Sigma as Samekh = 60; reading it as Shin = 300 gives 333], and ΕΠΗ, "Words" (whence "Epic") has also that value; ΕΙ∆Ε ΤΑ ΕΠΗ might be the phrase here intended; its number is 418. This would then assert the accomplishment of the Great Work; this is the natural conclusion of the Ritual. Cf. CCXX, III, 75.3. These needs are modified during the process of Initiation both as to quantity and quality. One should not become anxious about one's phyiscal or mental health on à priori grounds, but pay attention only to indubitable symptoms of distress should such arise. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber Samekh ,
95:The one high and reasonable course for the individual human being, - unless indeed he is satisfied with pursuing his personal purposes or somehow living his life until it passes out of him, - is to study the laws of the Becoming and take the best advantage of them to realise, rationally or intuitionally, inwardly or in the dynamism of life, its potentialities in himself or for himself or in or for the race of which he is a member; his business is to make the most of such actualities as exist and to seize on or to advance towards the highest possibilities that can be developed here or are in the making. Only mankind as a whole can do this with entire effect, by the mass of individual and collective action, in the process of time, in the evolution of the race experience: but the individual man can help towards it in his own limits, can do all these things for himself to a certain extent in the brief space of life allotted to him; but, especially, his thought and action can be a contribution towards the present intellectual, moral and vital welfare and the future progress of the race. He is capable of a certain nobility of being; an acceptance of his inevitable and early individual annihilation does not preclude him from making a high use of the will and thought which have been developed in him or from directing them to great ends which shall or may be worked out by humanity. Even the temporary character of the collective being of humanity does not so very much matter, - except in the most materialist view of existence; for so long as the universal Becoming takes the form of human body and mind, the thought, the will it has developed in its human creature will work itself out and to follow that intelligently is the natural law and best rule of human life. Humanity and its welfare and progress during its persistence on earth provide the largest field and the natural limits for the terrestrial aim of our being; the superior persistence of the race and the greatness and importance of the collective life should determine the nature and scope of our ideals. But if the progress or welfare of humanity be excluded as not our business or as a delusion, the individual is there; to achieve his greatest possible perfection or make the most of his life in whatever way his nature demands will then be life's significance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
96:Imperial Maheshwari is seated in the wideness above the thinking mind and will and sublimates and greatens them into wisdom and largeness or floods with a splendour beyond them. For she is the mighty and wise One who opens us to supramental infinities and the cosmic vastness, to the grandeur of the supreme Light, to a treasure-house of miraculous knowledge, to the measureless movement of the Mother's eternal forces. Tranquil is she and wonderful, great and calm for ever. Nothing can move her because all wisdom is in her; nothing is hidden from her that she chooses to know; she comprehends all things and all beings and their nature and what moves them and the law of the world and its times and how all was and is and must be. A strength is in her that meets everything and masters and none can prevail in the end against her vast intangible wisdom and high tranquil power. Equal, patient, unalterable in her will she deals with men according to their nature and with things and happenings according to their Force and truth that is in them. Partiality she has none, but she follows the decrees of the Supreme and some she raises up and some she casts down or puts away into the darkness. To the wise she gives a greater and more luminous wisdom; those that have vision she admits to her counsels; on the hostile she imposes the consequence of their hostility; the ignorant and foolish she leads them according to their blindness. In each man she answers and handles the different elements of his nature according to their need and their urge and the return they call for, puts on them the required pressure or leaves them to their cherished liberty to prosper in the ways of the Ignorance or to perish. For she is above all, bound by nothing, attached to nothing in the universe. Yet she has more than any other the heart of the universal Mother. For her compassion is endless and inexhaustible; all are to her eyes her children and portions of the One, even the Asura and Rakshasa and Pisacha and those that are revolted and hostile. Even her rejections are only a postponement, even her punishments are a grace. But her compassion does not blind her wisdom or turn her action from the course decreed; for the Truth of things is her one concern, knowledge her centre of power and to build our soul and our nature into the divine Truth her mission and her labour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother game test3,
97:reading ::: 50 Spiritual Classics: List of Books Covered: Muhammad Asad - The Road To Mecca (1954) St Augustine - Confessions (400) Richard Bach - Jonathan Livingston Seagull (1970) Black Elk Black - Elk Speaks (1932) Richard Maurice Bucke - Cosmic Consciousness (1901) Fritjof Capra - The Tao of Physics (1976) Carlos Castaneda - Journey to Ixtlan (1972) GK Chesterton - St Francis of Assisi (1922) Pema Chodron - The Places That Scare You (2001) Chuang Tzu - The Book of Chuang Tzu (4th century BCE) Ram Dass - Be Here Now (1971) Epictetus - Enchiridion (1st century) Mohandas Gandhi - An Autobiography: The Story of My Experiments With Truth (1927) Al-Ghazzali - The Alchemy of Happiness (1097) Kahlil Gibran - The Prophet (1923) GI Gurdjieff - Meetings With Remarkable Men (1960) Dag Hammarskjold - Markings (1963) Abraham Joshua Heschel - The Sabbath (1951) Hermann Hesse - Siddartha (1922) Aldous Huxley - The Doors of Perception (1954) William James - The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902) Carl Gustav Jung - Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1955) Margery Kempe - The Book of Margery Kempe (1436) J Krishnamurti - Think On These Things (1964) CS Lewis - The Screwtape Letters (1942) Malcolm X - The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1964) Daniel C Matt - The Essential Kabbalah (1994) Dan Millman - The Way of the Peaceful Warrior (1989) W Somerset Maugham - The Razor's Edge (1944) Thich Nhat Hanh - The Miracle of Mindfulness (1975) Michael Newton - Journey of Souls (1994) John O'Donohue - Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom (1998) Robert M Pirsig - Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974) James Redfield - The Celestine Prophecy (1994) Miguel Ruiz - The Four Agreements (1997) Helen Schucman & William Thetford - A Course in Miracles (1976) Idries Shah - The Way of the Sufi (1968) Starhawk - The Spiral Dance: A Rebirth of the Ancient Religion of the Great Goddess (1979) Shunryu Suzuki - Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind (1970) Emanuel Swedenborg - Heaven and Hell (1758) Teresa of Avila - Interior Castle (1570) Mother Teresa - A Simple Path (1994) Eckhart Tolle - The Power of Now (1998) Chogyam Trungpa - Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism (1973) Neale Donald Walsch - Conversations With God (1998) Rick Warren - The Purpose-Driven Life (2002) Simone Weil - Waiting For God (1979) Ken Wilber - A Theory of Everything (2000) Paramahansa Yogananda - Autobiography of a Yogi (1974) Gary Zukav - The Seat of the Soul (1990) ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Spirital Classics (2017 Edition) ,
98:Disciple: What are the conditions of success in this yoga?Sri Aurobindo: I have often told of them. Those go through who have the central sincerity. It does not mean that the sincerity is there in all the parts of the being. In that sense no one is entirely ready. But if the central sincerity is there it is possible to establish it in all the parts of the being.The second thing necessary is a certain receptivity in the being, what we call, the "opening" up of all the planes to the Higher Power.The third thing required is the power of holding the higher Force, a certain ghanatwa - mass - that can hold the Power when it comes down.And about the thing that pushes there are two things that generally push: One is the Central Being. The other is destiny. If the Central Being wants to do something it pushes the man. Even when the man goes off the line he is pushed back again to the path. Of course, the Central Being may push through the mind or any other part of the being. Also, if the man is destined he is pushed to the path either to go through or to get broken,Disciple: There are some people who think they are destined or chosen and we see that they are not "chosen".Sri Aurobindo: Of course, plenty of people think that they are specially "chosen" and that they are the first and the "elect" and so on. All that is nothing.Disciple: Then, can you. say who is fit out of all those that have come?Sri Aurobindo: It is very difficult to say. But this can be said that everyone of those who have come in has some chance to go through if he can hold on to it.Disciple: There is also a chance of failure.Sri Aurobindo: Of course, and besides, the whole universe is a play of forces and one can't always wait till all the conditions of success have been fulfilled. One has to take risks and take his chance.Disciple: What is meant by "chance"? Does it mean that it is only one possibility out of many others, or does it mean that one would be able to succeed in yoga?Sri Aurobindo: It means only that he can succeed if he takes his chance properly. For instance, X had his chance.Disciple: Those who fall on the path or slip, do they go down in their evolution?Sri Aurobindo: That depends. Ultimately, the Yoga may be lost to him.Disciple: The Gita says: Na hi kalyānkṛt - nothing that is beneficial - comes to a bad end.Sri Aurobindo: That is from another standpoint. You must note the word is kalyān kṛt - it is an important addition. ~ Sri Aurobindo, EVENING TALKS WITH SRI AUROBINDO RECORDED BY A B PURANI (20-09-1926),
99:He continuously reflected on her image and attributes, day and night. His bhakti was such that he could not stop thinking of her. Eventually, he saw her everywhere and in everything. This was his path to illumination. He was often asked by people: what is the way to the supreme? His answer was sharp and definite: bhakti yoga. He said time and time again that bhakti yoga is the best sadhana for the Kali Yuga (Dark Age) of the present. His bhakti is illustrated by the following statement he made to a disciple: To my divine mother I prayed only for pure love. At her lotus feet I offered a few flowers and I prayed: Mother! here is virtue and here is vice; Take them both from me. Grant me only love, pure love for Thee. Mother! here is knowledge and here is ignorance; Take them both from me. Grant me only love, pure love for Thee. Mother! here is purity and impurity; Take them both from me. Grant me only love, pure love for Thee. Ramakrishna, like Kabir, was a practical man. He said: "So long as passions are directed towards the world and its objects, they are enemies. But when they are directed towards a deity, then they become the best of friends to man, for they take him to illumination. The desire for worldly things must be changed into longing for the supreme; the anger which you feel for fellow man must be directed towards the supreme for not manifesting himself to you . . . and so on, with all other emotions. The passions cannot be eradicated, but they can be turned into new directions." A disciple once asked him: "How can one conquer the weaknesses within us?" He answered: "When the fruit grows out of the flower, the petals drop off themselves. So when divinity in you increases, the weaknesses of human nature will vanish of their own accord." He emphasized that the aspirant should not give up his practices. "If a single dive into the sea does not bring you a pearl, do not conclude that there are no pearls in the sea. There are countless pearls hidden in the sea. So if you fail to merge with the supreme during devotional practices, do not lose heart. Go on patiently with the practices, and in time you will invoke divine grace." It does not matter what form you care to worship. He said: "Many are the names of the supreme and infinite are the forms through which he may be approached. In whatever name and form you choose to worship him, through that he will be realized by you." He indicated the importance of surrender on the path of bhakti when he said: ~ Swami Satyananda Saraswati, A Systematic Course in the Ancient Tantric Techniques of Yoga and Kriya ,
100:What is the difference between meditation and concentration? Meditation is a purely mental activity, it interests only the mental being. One can concentrate while meditating but this is a mental concentration; one can get a silence but it is a purely mental silence, and the other parts of the being are kept immobile and inactive so as not to disturb the meditation. You may pass twenty hours of the day in meditation and for the remaining four hours you will be an altogether ordinary man because only the mind has been occupied-the rest of the being, the vital and the physical, is kept under pressure so that it may not disturb. In meditation nothing is directly done for the other parts of the being. Certainly this indirect action can have an effect, but... I have known in my life people whose capacity for meditation was remarkable but who, when not in meditation, were quite ordinary men, even at times ill-natured people, who would become furious if their meditation was disturbed. For they had learnt to master only their mind, not the rest of their being. Concentration is a more active state. You may concentrate mentally, you may concentrate vitally, psychically, physically, and you may concentrate integrally. Concentration or the capacity to gather oneself at one point is more difficult than meditation. You may gather together one portion of your being or consciousness or you may gather together the whole of your consciousness or even fragments of it, that is, the concentration may be partial, total or integral, and in each case the result will be different. If you have the capacity to concentrate, your meditation will be more interesting and easieR But one can meditate without concentrating. Many follow a chain of ideas in their meditation - it is meditation, not concentration. Is it possible to distinguish the moment when one attains perfect concentration from the moment when, starting from this concentration, one opens oneself to the universal Energy? Yes. You concentrate on something or simply you gather yourself together as much as is possible for you and when you attain a kind of perfection in concentration, if you can sustain this perfection for a sufficiently long time, then a door opens and you pass beyond the limit of your ordinary consciousness-you enter into a deeper and higher knowledge. Or you go within. Then you may experience a kind of dazzling light, an inner wonder, a beatitude, a complete knowledge, a total silence. There are, of course, many possibilities but the phenomenon is always the same. To have this experience all depends upon your capacity to maintain your concentration sufficiently long at its highest point of perfection. ~ The Mother,
101:Our culture, the laws of our culture, are predicated on the idea that people are conscious. People have experience; people make decisions, and can be held responsible for them. There's a free will element to it. You can debate all that philosophically, and fine, but the point is that that is how we act, and that is the idea that our legal system is predicated on. There's something deep about it, because you're subject to the law, but the law is also limited by you, which is to say that in a well-functioning, properly-grounded democratic system, you have intrinsic value. That's the source of your rights. Even if you're a murderer, we have to say the law can only go so far because there's something about you that's divine.Well, what does that mean? Partly it means that there's something about you that's conscious and capable of communicating, like you're a whole world unto yourself. You have that to contribute to everyone else, and that's valuable. You can learn new things, transform the structure of society, and invent a new way of dealing with the world. You're capable of all that. It's an intrinsic part of you, and that's associated with the idea that there's something about the logos that is necessary for the absolute chaos of the reality beyond experience to manifest itself as reality. That's an amazing idea because it gives consciousness a constitutive role in the cosmos. You can debate that, but you can't just bloody well brush it off. First of all, we are the most complicated things there are, that we know of, by a massive amount. We're so complicated that it's unbelievable. So there's a lot of cosmos out there, but there's a lot of cosmos in here, too, and which one is greater is by no means obvious, unless you use something trivial, like relative size, which really isn't a very sophisticated approach.Whatever it is that is you has this capacity to experience reality and to transform it, which is a very strange thing. You can conceptualize the future in your imagination, and then you can work and make that manifest-participate in the process of creation. That's one way of thinking about it. That's why I think Genesis 1 relates the idea that human beings are made in the image of the divine-men and women, which is interesting, because feminists are always criticizing Christianity as being inexorably patriarchal. Of course, they criticize everything like that, so it's hardly a stroke of bloody brilliance. But I think it's an absolute miracle that right at the beginning of the document it says straightforwardly, with no hesitation whatsoever, that the divine spark which we're associating with the word, that brings forth Being, is manifest in men and women equally. That's a very cool thing. You got to think, like I said, do you actually take that seriously? Well, what you got to ask is what happens if you don't take it seriously, right? Read Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. That's the best investigation into that tactic that's ever been produced. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series 1,
102:The Mother once described the characteristics of the unity-body, of the future supramental body, to a young Ashramite: 'You know, if there is something on that window-sill and if I [in a supramental body] want to take it, I stretch out my hand and it becomes - wow! - long, and I have the thing in my hand without even having to get up from my chair ... Physically, I shall be able to be here and there at the same time. I shall be able to communicate with many people at the same time. To have something in my hand, I'll just have to wish for it. I think about something and I want it and it is already in my hand. With this transformed body I shall be free of the fetters of ignorance, pain, of mortality and unconsciousness. I shall be able to do many things at the same time. The transparent, luminous, strong, light, elastic body won't need any material things to subsist on ... The body can even be lengthened if one wants it to become tall, or shrunk when one wants it to be small, in any circumstances ... There will be all kinds of changes and there will be powers without limit. And it won't be something funny. Of course, I am giving you somewhat childish examples to tease you and to show the difference. 'It will be a true being, perfect in proportion, very, very beautiful and strong, light, luminous or else transparent. It will have a supple and malleable body endowed with extraordinary capacities and able to do everything; a body without age, a creation of the New Consciousness or else a transformed body such as none has ever imagined ... All that is above man will be within its reach. It will be guided by the Truth alone and nothing less. That is what it is and more even than has ever been conceived.'895 This the Mother told in French to Mona Sarkar, who noted it down as faithfully as possible and read it out to her for verification. The supramental body will not only be omnipotent and omniscient, but also omnipresent. And immortal. Not condemned to a never ending monotonous immortality - which, again, is one of our human interpretations of immortality - but for ever existing in an ecstasy of inexhaustible delight in 'the Joy that surpasses all understanding.' Moment after moment, eternity after eternity. For in that state each moment is an eternity and eternity an ever present moment. If gross matter is not capable of being used as a permanent coating of the soul in the present phase of its evolution, then it certainly is not capable of being the covering of the supramental consciousness, to form the body that has, to some extent, been described above. This means that the crux of the process of supramental transformation lies in matter; the supramental world has to become possible in matter, which at present still is gross matter. - Sri Aurobindo and the Mother were supramentalized in their mental and vital, but their enormous problem was the supramentalization of the physical body, consisting of the gross matter of the Earth. As the Mother said: 'It is matter itself that must change so that the Supramental may manifest. A new kind of matter no longer corresponding with Mendeleyev's periodic table of the elements? Is that possible? ~ Georges Van Vrekhem,
103:28 August 1957Mother, Sri Aurobindo says here: "Whether the whole of humanity would be touched [by the Supramental influence] or only a part of it ready for the change would depend on what was intended or possible in the continued order of the universe."The Supramental Manifestation, SABCL, Vol. 16, p. 56What is meant by "what was intended or possible"? The two things are different. So far you have said that if humanity changes, if it wants to participate in the new birth...It is the same thing. But when you look at an object on a certain plane, you see it horizontally, and when you look at the same object from another plane, you see it vertically. (Mother shows the cover and the back of her book.) So, if one looks from above, one says "intended"; if one looks from below, one says "possible".... But it is absolutely the same thing, only the point of view is different.But in that case, it is not our incapacity or lack of will to change that makes any difference.We have already said this many a time. If you remain in a consciousness which functions mentally, even if it is the highest mind, you have the notion of an absolute determinism of cause and effect and feel that things are what they are because they are what they are and cannot be otherwise.It is only when you come out of the mental consciousness completely and enter a higher perception of things - which you may call spiritual or divine - that you suddenly find yourself in a state of perfect freedom where everything is possible.(Silence)Those who have contacted that state or lived in it, even if only for a moment, try to describe it as a feeling of an absolute Will in action, which immediately gives to the human mentality the feeling of being arbitrary. And because of that distortion there arises the idea - which I might call traditional - of a supreme and arbitrary God, which is something most unacceptable to every enlightened mind. I suppose that this experience badly expressed is at the origin of this notion. And in fact it is incorrect to express it as an absolute Will: it is very, very, very different. It is something else altogether. For, what man understands by "Will" is a decision that is taken and carried out. We are obliged to use the word "will", but in its truth the Will acting in the universe is neither a choice nor a decision that is taken. What seems to me the closest expression is "vision". Things are because they are seen. But of course "seen", not seen as we see with these eyes.(Mother touches her eyes...) All the same, it is the nearest thing.It is a vision - a vision unfolding itself.The universe becomes objective as it is progressively seen.And that is why Sri Aurobindo has said "intended or possible". It is neither one nor the other. All that can be said is a distortion.(Silence)Objectivisation - universal objectivisation - is something like a projection in space and time, like a living image of what is from all eternity. And as the image is gradually projected on the screen of time and space, it becomes objective:The Supreme contemplating His own Image. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958 ,
104:What do you mean by these words: 'When you are in difficulty, widen yourself'?I am speaking, of course, of difficulties on the path of yoga, incomprehension, limitations, things like obstacles, which prevent you from advancing. And when I say "widen yourself", I mean widen your consciousness.Difficulties always arise from the ego, that is, from your more or less egoistic personal reaction to circumstances, events and people around you, to the conditions of your life. They also come from that feeling of being closed up in a sort of shell, which prevents your consciousness from uniting with higher and vaster realities.One may very well think that one wants to be vast, wants to be universal, that all is the expression of the Divine, that one must have no egoism - one may think all sorts of things - but that is not necessarily a cure, for very often one knows what one ought to do, and yet one doesn't do it, for one reason or another.But if, when you have to face anguish, suffering, revolt, pain or a feeling of helplessness - whatever it may be, all the things that come to you on the path and which precisely are your difficulties-if physically, that is to say, in your body- consciousness, you can have the feeling of widening yourself, one could say of unfolding yourself - you feel as it were all folded up, one fold on another like a piece of cloth which is folded and refolded and folded again - so if you have this feeling that what is holding and strangling you and making you suffer or paralysing your movement, is like a too closely, too tightly folded piece of cloth or like a parcel that is too well-tied, too well-packed, and that slowly, gradually, you undo all the folds and stretch yourself out exactly as one unfolds a piece of cloth or a sheet of paper and spreads it out flat, and you lie flat and make yourself very wide, as wide as possible, spreading yourself out as far as you can, opening yourself and stretching out in an attitude of complete passivity with what I could call "the face to the light": not curling back upon your difficulty, doubling up on it, shutting it in, so to say, into yourself, but, on the contrary, unfurling yourself as much as you can, as perfectly as you can, putting the difficulty before the Light - the Light which comes from above - if you do that in all the domains, and even if mentally you don't succeed in doing it - for it is sometimes difficult - if you can imagine yourself doing this physically, almost materially, well, when you have finished unfolding yourself and stretching yourself out, you will find that more than three-quarters of the difficulty is gone. And then just a little work of receptivity to the Light and the last quarter will disappear.This is much easier than struggling against a difficulty with one's thought, for if you begin to discuss with yourself, you will find that there are arguments for and against which are so convincing that it is quite impossible to get out of it without a higher light. Here, you do not struggle against the difficulty, you do not try to convince yourself; ah! you simply stretch out in the Light as though you lay stretched on the sands in the sun. And you let the Light do its work. That's all. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers Volume-8,
105:(Novum Organum by Francis Bacon.) 34. "Four species of idols beset the human mind, to which (for distinction's sake) we have assigned names, calling the first Idols of the Tribe, the second Idols of the Den, the third Idols of the Market, the fourth Idols of the Theatre. 40. "The information of notions and axioms on the foundation of true induction is the only fitting remedy by which we can ward off and expel these idols. It is, however, of great service to point them out; for the doctrine of idols bears the same relation to the interpretation of nature as that of the confutation of sophisms does to common logic. 41. "The idols of the tribe are inherent in human nature and the very tribe or race of man; for man's sense is falsely asserted to be the standard of things; on the contrary, all the perceptions both of the senses and the mind bear reference to man and not to the Universe, and the human mind resembles these uneven mirrors which impart their own properties to different objects, from which rays are emitted and distort and disfigure them. 42. "The idols of the den are those of each individual; for everybody (in addition to the errors common to the race of man) has his own individual den or cavern, which intercepts and corrupts the light of nature, either from his own peculiar and singular disposition, or from his education and intercourse with others, or from his reading, and the authority acquired by those whom he reverences and admires, or from the different impressions produced on the mind, as it happens to be preoccupied and predisposed, or equable and tranquil, and the like; so that the spirit of man (according to its several dispositions), is variable, confused, and, as it were, actuated by chance; and Heraclitus said well that men search for knowledge in lesser worlds, and not in the greater or common world. 43. "There are also idols formed by the reciprocal intercourse and society of man with man, which we call idols of the market, from the commerce and association of men with each other; for men converse by means of language, but words are formed at the will of the generality, and there arises from a bad and unapt formation of words a wonderful obstruction to the mind. Nor can the definitions and explanations with which learned men are wont to guard and protect themselves in some instances afford a complete remedy-words still manifestly force the understanding, throw everything into confusion, and lead mankind into vain and innumerable controversies and fallacies. 44. "Lastly, there are idols which have crept into men's minds from the various dogmas of peculiar systems of philosophy, and also from the perverted rules of demonstration, and these we denominate idols of the theatre: for we regard all the systems of philosophy hitherto received or imagined, as so many plays brought out and performed, creating fictitious and theatrical worlds. Nor do we speak only of the present systems, or of the philosophy and sects of the ancients, since numerous other plays of a similar nature can be still composed and made to agree with each other, the causes of the most opposite errors being generally the same. Nor, again, do we allude merely to general systems, but also to many elements and axioms of sciences which have become inveterate by tradition, implicit credence, and neglect. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity ,
106:HOW CAN I READ SAVITRI?An open reply by Dr Alok Pandey to a fellow devoteeA GIFT OF LOVE TO THE WORLDMost of all enjoy Savitri. It is Sri Aurobindo's gift of Love to the world. Read it from the heart with love and gratitude as companions and drown in its fiery bliss. That is the true understanding rather than one that comes by a constant churning of words in the head.WHENBest would be to fix a time that works for you. One can always take out some time for the reading, even if it be late at night when one is done with all the daily works. Of course, a certain receptivity is needed. If one is too tired or the reading becomes too mechanical as a ritual routine to be somehow finished it tends to be less effective, as with anything else. Hence the advice is to read in a quiet receptive state.THE PACEAs to the pace of reading it is best to slowly build up and keep it steady. To read a page or a passage daily is better than reading many pages one day and then few lines or none for days. This brings a certain discipline in the consciousness which makes one receptive. What it means is that one should fix up that one would read a few passages or a page or two daily, and then if an odd day one is enjoying and spontaneously wants to read more then one can go by the flow.COMPLETE OR SELECTIONS?It is best to read at least once from cover to cover. But if one is not feeling inclined for that do read some of the beautiful cantos and passages whose reference one can find in various places. This helps us familiarise with the epic and the style of poetry. Later one can go for the cover to cover reading.READING ALOUD, SILENTLY, OR WRITING DOWN?One can read it silently. Loud reading is needed only if one is unable to focus with silent reading. A mantra is more potent when read subtly. I am aware that some people recommend reading it aloud which is fine if that helps one better. A certain flexibility in these things is always good and rigid rules either ways are not helpful.One can also write some of the beautiful passages with which one feels suddenly connected. It is a help in the yoga since such a writing involves the pouring in of the consciousness of Savitri through the brain and nerves and the hand.Reflecting upon some of these magnificent lines and passages while one is engaged in one\s daily activities helps to create a background state for our inner being to get absorbed in Savitri more and more.HOW DO I UNDERSTAND THE MEANING? DO I NEED A DICTIONARY?It is helpful if a brief background about the Canto is known. This helps the mind top focus and also to keep in sync with the overall scene and sense of what is being read.But it is best not to keep referring to the dictionary while reading. Let the overall sense emerge. Specifics can be done during a detailed reading later and it may not be necessary at all. Besides the sense that Sri Aurobindo has given to many words may not be accurately conveyed by the standard dictionaries. A flexibility is required to understand the subtle suggestions hinted at by the Master-poet.In this sense Savitri is in the line of Vedic poetry using images that are at once profound as well as commonplace. That is the beauty of mystic poetry. These are things actually experienced and seen by Sri Aurobindo, and ultimately it is Their Grace that alone can reveal the intrinsic sense of this supreme revelation of the Supreme. ~ Dr Alok Pandey,
107:Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]1. Homer - Iliad, Odyssey2. The Old Testament3. Aeschylus - Tragedies4. Sophocles - Tragedies5. Herodotus - Histories6. Euripides - Tragedies7. Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War8. Hippocrates - Medical Writings9. Aristophanes - Comedies10. Plato - Dialogues11. Aristotle - Works12. Epicurus - Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus13. Euclid - Elements14.Archimedes - Works15. Apollonius of Perga - Conic Sections16. Cicero - Works17. Lucretius - On the Nature of Things18. Virgil - Works19. Horace - Works20. Livy - History of Rome21. Ovid - Works22. Plutarch - Parallel Lives; Moralia23. Tacitus - Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania24. Nicomachus of Gerasa - Introduction to Arithmetic25. Epictetus - Discourses; Encheiridion26. Ptolemy - Almagest27. Lucian - Works28. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations29. Galen - On the Natural Faculties30. The New Testament31. Plotinus - The Enneads32. St. Augustine - On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine33. The Song of Roland34. The Nibelungenlied35. The Saga of Burnt Njal36. St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologica37. Dante Alighieri - The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy38. Geoffrey Chaucer - Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales39. Leonardo da Vinci - Notebooks40. Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy41. Desiderius Erasmus - The Praise of Folly42. Nicolaus Copernicus - On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres43. Thomas More - Utopia44. Martin Luther - Table Talk; Three Treatises45. François Rabelais - Gargantua and Pantagruel46. John Calvin - Institutes of the Christian Religion47. Michel de Montaigne - Essays48. William Gilbert - On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies49. Miguel de Cervantes - Don Quixote50. Edmund Spenser - Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene51. Francis Bacon - Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis52. William Shakespeare - Poetry and Plays53. Galileo Galilei - Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences54. Johannes Kepler - Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World55. William Harvey - On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals56. Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan57. René Descartes - Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy58. John Milton - Works59. Molière - Comedies60. Blaise Pascal - The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises61. Christiaan Huygens - Treatise on Light62. Benedict de Spinoza - Ethics63. John Locke - Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education64. Jean Baptiste Racine - Tragedies65. Isaac Newton - Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology67.Daniel Defoe - Robinson Crusoe68. Jonathan Swift - A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal69. William Congreve - The Way of the World70. George Berkeley - Principles of Human Knowledge71. Alexander Pope - Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu - Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws73. Voltaire - Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary74. Henry Fielding - Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones75. Samuel Johnson - The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets ~ Mortimer J Adler,
108:The true Mantra must come from within OR it must be given by a GuruNobody can give you the true mantra. It's not something that is given; it's something that wells up from within. It must spring from within all of a sudden, spontaneously, like a profound, intense need of your being - then it has power, because it's not something that comes from outside, it's your very own cry.I saw, in my case, that my mantra has the power of immortality; whatever happens, if it is uttered, it's the Supreme that has the upper hand, it's no longer the lower law. And the words are irrelevant, they may not have any meaning - to someone else, my mantra is meaningless, but to me it's full, packed with meaning. And effective, because it's my cry, the intense aspiration of my whole being.A mantra given by a guru is only the power to realize the experience of the discoverer of the mantra. The power is automatically there, because the sound contains the experience. I saw that once in Paris, at a time when I knew nothing of India, absolutely nothing, only the usual nonsense. I didn't even know what a mantra was. I had gone to a lecture given by some fellow who was supposed to have practiced "yoga" for a year in the Himalayas and recounted his experience (none too interesting, either). All at once, in the course of his lecture, he uttered the sound OM. And I saw the entire room suddenly fill with light, a golden, vibrating light.... I was probably the only one to notice it. I said to myself, "Well!" Then I didn't give it any more thought, I forgot about the story. But as it happened, the experience recurred in two or three different countries, with different people, and every time there was the sound OM, I would suddenly see the place fill with that same light. So I understood. That sound contains the vibration of thousands and thousands of years of spiritual aspiration - there is in it the entire aspiration of men towards the Supreme. And the power is automatically there, because the experience is there.It's the same with my mantra. When I wanted to translate the end of my mantra, "Glory to You, O Lord," into Sanskrit, I asked for Nolini's help. He brought his Sanskrit translation, and when he read it to me, I immediately saw that the power was there - not because Nolini put his power into it (!), God knows he had no intention of "giving" me a mantra! But the power was there because my experience was there. We made a few adjustments and modifications, and that's the japa I do now - I do it all the time, while sleeping, while walking, while eating, while working, all the time.[[Mother later clarified: "'Glory to You, O Lord' isn't MY mantra, it's something I ADDED to it - my mantra is something else altogether, that's not it. When I say that my mantra has the power of immortality, I mean the other, the one I don't speak of! I have never given the words.... You see, at the end of my walk, a kind of enthusiasm rises, and with that enthusiasm, the 'Glory to You' came to me, but it's part of the prayer I had written in Prayers and Meditations: 'Glory to You, O Lord, all-triumphant Supreme' etc. (it's a long prayer). It came back suddenly, and as it came back spontaneously, I kept it. Moreover, when Sri Aurobindo read this prayer in Prayers and Meditations, he told me it was very strong. So I added this phrase as a kind of tail to my japa. But 'Glory to You, O Lord' isn't my spontaneous mantra - it came spontaneously, but it was something written very long ago. The two things are different."And that's how a mantra has life: when it wells up all the time, spontaneously, like the cry of your being - there is no need of effort or concentration: it's your natural cry. Then it has full power, it is alive. It must well up from within.... No guru can give you that. ~ The Mother, Agenda May 11 1963,
109:Of course we do." Dresden's voice was cutting. "But you're thinking too small. Building humanity's greatest empire is like building the world's largest anthill. Insignificant. There is a civilization out there that built the protomolecule and hurled it at us over two billion years ago. They were already gods at that point. What have they become since then? With another two billion years to advance?" With a growing dread, Holden listened to Dresden speak. This speech had the air of something spoken before. Perhaps many times. And it had worked. It had convinced powerful people. It was why Protogen had stealth ships from the Earth shipyards and seemingly limitless behind-the-scenes support. "We have a terrifying amount of catching up to do, gentlemen," Dresden was saying. "But fortunately we have the tool of our enemy to use in doing it." "Catching up?" a soldier to Holden's left said. Dresden nodded at the man and smiled. "The protomolecule can alter the host organism at the molecular level; it can create genetic change on the fly. Not just DNA, but any stable replicatoR But it is only a machine. It doesn't think. It follows instructions. If we learn how to alter that programming, then we become the architects of that change." Holden interrupted. "If it was supposed to wipe out life on Earth and replace it with whatever the protomolecule's creators wanted, why turn it loose?" "Excellent question," Dresden said, holding up one finger like a college professor about to deliver a lecture. "The protomolecule doesn't come with a user's manual. In fact, we've never before been able to actually watch it carry out its program. The molecule requires significant mass before it develops enough processing power to fulfill its directives. Whatever they are." Dresden pointed at the screens covered with data around them. "We are going to watch it at work. See what it intends to do. How it goes about doing it. And, hopefully, learn how to change that program in the process." "You could do that with a vat of bacteria," Holden said. "I'm not interested in remaking bacteria," Dresden said. "You're fucking insane," Amos said, and took another step toward Dresden. Holden put a hand on the big mechanic's shoulder. "So," Holden said. "You figure out how the bug works, and then what?" "Then everything. Belters who can work outside a ship without wearing a suit. Humans capable of sleeping for hundreds of years at a time flying colony ships to the stars. No longer being bound to the millions of years of evolution inside one atmosphere of pressure at one g, slaves to oxygen and water. We decide what we want to be, and we reprogram ourselves to be that. That's what the protomolecule gives us." Dresden had stood back up as he'd delivered this speech, his face shining with the zeal of a prophet. "What we are doing is the best and only hope of humanity's survival. When we go out there, we will be facing gods." "And if we don't go out?" Fred asked. He sounded thoughtful. "They've already fired a doomsday weapon at us once," Dresden said. The room was silent for a moment. Holden felt his certainty slip. He hated everything about Dresden's argument, but he couldn't quite see his way past it. He knew in his bones that something about it was dead wrong, but he couldn't find the words. Naomi's voice startled him. "Did it convince them?" she asked. "Excuse me?" Dresden said. "The scientists. The technicians. Everyone you needed to make it happen. They actually had to do this. They had to watch the video of people dying all over Eros. They had to design those radioactive murder chambers. So unless you managed to round up every serial killer in the solar system and send them through a postgraduate program, how did you do this?" "We modified our science team to remove ethical restraints." Half a dozen clues clicked into place in Holden's head. ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes ,
110:PRATYAHARAPRATYAHARA is the first process in the mental part of our task. The previous practices, Asana, Pranayama, Yama, and Niyama, are all acts of the body, while mantra is connected with speech: Pratyahara is purely mental. And what is Pratyahara? This word is used by different authors in different senses. The same word is employed to designate both the practice and the result. It means for our present purpose a process rather strategical than practical; it is introspection, a sort of general examination of the contents of the mind which we wish to control: Asana having been mastered, all immediate exciting causes have been removed, and we are free to think what we are thinking about. A very similar experience to that of Asana is in store for us. At first we shall very likely flatter ourselves that our minds are pretty calm; this is a defect of observation. Just as the European standing for the first time on the edge of the desert will see nothing there, while his Arab can tell him the family history of each of the fifty persons in view, because he has learnt how to look, so with practice the thoughts will become more numerous and more insistent. As soon as the body was accurately observed it was found to be terribly restless and painful; now that we observe the mind it is seen to be more restless and painful still. (See diagram opposite.) A similar curve might be plotted for the real and apparent painfulness of Asana. Conscious of this fact, we begin to try to control it: "Not quite so many thoughts, please!" "Don't think quite so fast, please!" "No more of that kind of thought, please!" It is only then that we discover that what we thought was a school of playful porpoises is really the convolutions of the sea-serpent. The attempt to repress has the effect of exciting. When the unsuspecting pupil first approaches his holy but wily Guru, and demands magical powers, that Wise One replies that he will confer them, points out with much caution and secrecy some particular spot on the pupil's body which has never previously attracted his attention, and says: "In order to obtain this magical power which you seek, all that is necessary is to wash seven times in the Ganges during seven days, being particularly careful to avoid thinking of that one spot." Of course the unhappy youth spends a disgusted week in thinking of little else. It is positively amazing with what persistence a thought, even a whole train of thoughts, returns again and again to the charge. It becomes a positive nightmare. It is intensely annoying, too, to find that one does not become conscious that one has got on to the forbidden subject until one has gone right through with it. However, one continues day after day investigating thoughts and trying to check them; and sooner or later one proceeds to the next stage, Dharana, the attempt to restrain the mind to a single object. Before we go on to this, however, we must consider what is meant by success in Pratyahara. This is a very extensive subject, and different authors take widely divergent views. One writer means an analysis so acute that every thought is resolved into a number of elements (see "The Psychology of Hashish," Section V, in Equinox II). Others take the view that success in the practice is something like the experience which Sir Humphrey Davy had as a result of taking nitrous oxide, in which he exclaimed: "The universe is composed exclusively of ideas." Others say that it gives Hamlet's feeling: "There's nothing good or bad but thinking makes it so," interpreted as literally as was done by Mrs. Eddy. However, the main point is to acquire some sort of inhibitory power over the thoughts. Fortunately there is an unfailing method of acquiring this power. It is given in Liber III. If Sections 1 and 2 are practised (if necessary with the assistance of another person to aid your vigilance) you will soon be able to master the final section. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA ,
111:I have never been able to share your constantly recurring doubts about your capacity or the despair that arises in you so violently when there are these attacks, nor is their persistent recurrence a valid ground for believing that they can never be overcome. Such a persistent recurrence has been a feature in the sadhana of many who have finally emerged and reached the goal; even the sadhana of very great Yogis has not been exempt from such violent and constant recurrences; they have sometimes been special objects of such persistent assaults, as I have indeed indicated in Savitri in more places than one - and that was indeed founded on my own experience. In the nature of these recurrences there is usually a constant return of the same adverse experiences, the same adverse resistance, thoughts destructive of all belief and faith and confidence in the future of the sadhana, frustrating doubts of what one has known as the truth, voices of despondency and despair, urgings to abandonment of the Yoga or to suicide or else other disastrous counsels of déchéance. The course taken by the attacks is not indeed the same for all, but still they have strong family resemblance. One can eventually overcome if one begins to realise the nature and source of these assaults and acquires the faculty of observing them, bearing, without being involved or absorbed into their gulf, finally becoming the witness of their phenomena and understanding them and refusing the mind's sanction even when the vital is still tossed in the whirl or the most outward physical mind still reflects the adverse suggestions. In the end these attacks lose their power and fall away from the nature; the recurrence becomes feeble or has no power to last: even, if the detachment is strong enough, they can be cut out very soon or at once. The strongest attitude to take is to regard these things as what they really are, incursions of dark forces from outside taking advantage of certain openings in the physical mind or the vital part, but not a real part of oneself or spontaneous creation in one's own nature. To create a confusion and darkness in the physical mind and throw into it or awake in it mistaken ideas, dark thoughts, false impressions is a favourite method of these assailants, and if they can get the support of this mind from over-confidence in its own correctness or the natural rightness of its impressions and inferences, then they can have a field day until the true mind reasserts itself and blows the clouds away. Another device of theirs is to awake some hurt or rankling sense of grievance in the lower vital parts and keep them hurt or rankling as long as possible. In that case one has to discover these openings in one's nature and learn to close them permanently to such attacks or else to throw out intruders at once or as soon as possible. The recurrence is no proof of a fundamental incapacity; if one takes the right inner attitude, it can and will be overcome. The idea of suicide ought never to be accepted; there is no real ground for it and in any case it cannot be a remedy or a real escape: at most it can only be postponement of difficulties and the necessity for their solution under no better circumstances in another life. One must have faith in the Master of our life and works, even if for a long time he conceals himself, and then in his own right time he will reveal his Presence. I have tried to dispel all the misconceptions, explain things as they are and meet all the points at issue. It is not that you really cannot make progress or have not made any progress; on the contrary, you yourself have admitted that you have made a good advance in many directions and there is no reason why, if you persevere, the rest should not come. You have always believed in the Guruvada: I would ask you then to put your faith in the Guru and the guidance and rely on the Ishwara for the fulfilment, to have faith in my abiding love and affection, in the affection and divine goodwill and loving kindness of the Mother, stand firm against all attacks and go forward perseveringly towards the spiritual goal and the all-fulfilling and all-satisfying touch of the All-Blissful, the Ishwara. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV ,
112:To arrive then at this settled divine status must be the object of our concentration. The first step in concentration must be always to accustom the discursive mind to a settled unwavering pursuit of a single course of connected thought on a single subject and this it must do undistracted by all lures and alien calls on its attention. Such concentration is common enough in our ordinary life, but it becomes more difficult when we have to do it inwardly without any outward object or action on which to keep the mind; yet this inward concentration is what the seeker of knowledge must effect. Nor must it be merely the consecutive thought of the intellectual thinker, whose only object is to conceive and intellectually link together his conceptions. It is not, except perhaps at first, a process of reasoning that is wanted so much as a dwelling so far as possible on the fruitful essence of the idea which by the insistence of the soul's will upon it must yield up all the facets of its truth. Thus if it be the divine Love that is the subject of concentration, it is on the essence of the idea of God as Love that the mind should concentrate in such a way that the various manifestation of the divine Love should arise luminously, not only to the thought, but in the heart and being and vision of the Sadhaka. The thought may come first and the experience afterwards, but equally the experience may come first and the knowledge arise out of the experience. Afterwards the thing attained has to be dwelt on and more and more held till it becomes a constant experience and finally the Dharma or law of the being. This is the process of concentrated meditation; but a more strenuous method is the fixing of the whole mind in concentration on the essence of the idea only, so as to reach not the thought-knowledge or the psychological experience of the subject, but the very essence of the thing behind the idea. In this process thought ceases and passes into the absorbed or ecstatic contemplation of the object or by a merging into it m an inner Samadhi. If this be the process followed, then subsequently the state into which we rise must still be called down to take possession of the lower being, to shed its light, power and bliss on our ordinary consciousness. For otherwise we may possess it, as many do, in the elevated condition or in the inward Samadhi, but we shall lose our hold of it when we awake or descend into the contacts of the world; and this truncated possession is not the aim of an integral Yoga. A third process is neither at first to concentrate in a strenuous meditation on the one subject nor in a strenuous contemplation of the one object of thought-vision, but first to still the mind altogether. This may be done by various ways; one is to stand back from the mental action altogether not participating in but simply watching it until, tired of its unsanctioned leaping and running, it falls into an increasing and finally an absolute quiet. Another is to reject the thought-suggestions, to cast them away from the mind whenever they come and firmly hold to the peace of the being which really and always exists behind the trouble and riot of the mind. When this secret peace is unveiled, a great calm settles on the being and there comes usually with it the perception and experience of the all-pervading silent Brahman, everything else at first seeming to be mere form and eidolon. On the basis of this calm everything else may be built up in the knowledge and experience no longer of the external phenomena of things but of the deeper truth of the divine manifestation. Ordinarily, once this state is obtained, strenuous concentration will be found no longer necessary. A free concentration of will using thought merely for suggestion and the giving of light to the lower members will take its place. This Will will then insist on the physical being, the vital existence, the heart and the mind remoulding themselves in the forms of the Divine which reveal themselves out of the silent Brahman. By swifter or slower degrees according to the previous preparation and purification of the members, they will be obliged with more or less struggle to obey the law of the will and its thought-suggestion, so that eventually the knowledge of the Divine takes possession of our consciousness on all its planes and the image of the Divine is formed in our human existence even as it was done by the old Vedic Sadhakas. For the integral Yoga this is the most direct and powerful discipline. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Yoga of Integral Knowledge,
113:A God's LabourI have gathered my dreams in a silver air Between the gold and the blueAnd wrapped them softly and left them there, My jewelled dreams of you.I had hoped to build a rainbow bridge Marrying the soil to the skyAnd sow in this dancing planet midge The moods of infinity.But too bright were our heavens, too far away, Too frail their ethereal stuff;Too splendid and sudden our light could not stay; The roots were not deep enough.He who would bring the heavens here Must descend himself into clayAnd the burden of earthly nature bear And tread the dolorous way.Coercing my godhead I have come down Here on the sordid earth,Ignorant, labouring, human grown Twixt the gates of death and birth.I have been digging deep and long Mid a horror of filth and mireA bed for the golden river's song, A home for the deathless fire.I have laboured and suffered in Matter's night To bring the fire to man;But the hate of hell and human spite Are my meed since the world began.For man's mind is the dupe of his animal self; Hoping its lusts to win,He harbours within him a grisly Elf Enamoured of sorrow and sin.The grey Elf shudders from heaven's flame And from all things glad and pure;Only by pleasure and passion and pain His drama can endure.All around is darkness and strife; For the lamps that men call sunsAre but halfway gleams on this stumbling life Cast by the Undying Ones.Man lights his little torches of hope That lead to a failing edge;A fragment of Truth is his widest scope, An inn his pilgrimage.The Truth of truths men fear and deny, The Light of lights they refuse;To ignorant gods they lift their cry Or a demon altar choose.All that was found must again be sought, Each enemy slain revives,Each battle for ever is fought and refought Through vistas of fruitless lives.My gaping wounds are a thousand and one And the Titan kings assail,But I dare not rest till my task is done And wrought the eternal will.How they mock and sneer, both devils and men! "Thy hope is Chimera's headPainting the sky with its fiery stain; Thou shalt fall and thy work lie dead."Who art thou that babblest of heavenly ease And joy and golden roomTo us who are waifs on inconscient seas And bound to life's iron doom?"This earth is ours, a field of Night For our petty flickering fires.How shall it brook the sacred Light Or suffer a god's desires?"Come, let us slay him and end his course! Then shall our hearts have releaseFrom the burden and call of his glory and force And the curb of his wide white peace."But the god is there in my mortal breast Who wrestles with error and fateAnd tramples a road through mire and waste For the nameless Immaculate.A voice cried, "Go where none have gone! Dig deeper, deeper yetTill thou reach the grim foundation stone And knock at the keyless gate."I saw that a falsehood was planted deep At the very root of thingsWhere the grey Sphinx guards God's riddle sleep On the Dragon's outspread wings.I left the surface gauds of mind And life's unsatisfied seasAnd plunged through the body's alleys blind To the nether mysteries.I have delved through the dumb Earth's dreadful heart And heard her black mass' bell.I have seen the source whence her agonies part And the inner reason of hell.Above me the dragon murmurs moan And the goblin voices flit;I have pierced the Void where Thought was born, I have walked in the bottomless pit.On a desperate stair my feet have trod Armoured with boundless peace,Bringing the fires of the splendour of God Into the human abyss.He who I am was with me still; All veils are breaking now.I have heard His voice and borne His will On my vast untroubled brow.The gulf twixt the depths and the heights is bridged And the golden waters pourDown the sapphire mountain rainbow-ridged And glimmer from shore to shore.Heaven's fire is lit in the breast of the earth And the undying suns here burn;Through a wonder cleft in the bounds of birth The incarnate spirits yearnLike flames to the kingdoms of Truth and Bliss: Down a gold-red stairway wendThe radiant children of Paradise Clarioning darkness' end.A little more and the new life's doors Shall be carved in silver lightWith its aureate roof and mosaic floors In a great world bare and bright.I shall leave my dreams in their argent air, For in a raiment of gold and blueThere shall move on the earth embodied and fair The living truth of you. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems A God's Labour,
114:CHAPTER XIIIOF THE BANISHINGS: AND OF THE PURIFICATIONS.Cleanliness is next to Godliness, and had better come first. Purity means singleness. God is one. The wand is not a wand if it has something sticking to it which is not an essential part of itself. If you wish to invoke Venus, you do not succeed if there are traces of Saturn mixed up with it.That is a mere logical commonplace: in magick one must go much farther than this. One finds one's analogy in electricity. If insulation is imperfect, the whole current goes back to earth. It is useless to plead that in all those miles of wire there is only one-hundredth of an inch unprotected. It is no good building a ship if the water can enter, through however small a hole.That first task of the Magician in every ceremony is therefore to render his Circle absolutely impregnable. If one littlest thought intrude upon the mind of the Mystic, his concentration is absolutely destroyed; and his consciousness remains on exactly the same level as the Stockbroker's. Even the smallest baby is incompatible with the virginity of its mother. If you leave even a single spirit within the circle, the effect of the conjuration will be entirely absorbed by it.> {101}The Magician must therefore take the utmost care in the matter of purification, "firstly", of himself, "secondly", of his instruments, "thirdly", of the place of working. Ancient Magicians recommended a preliminary purification of from three days to many months. During this period of training they took the utmost pains with diet. They avoided animal food, lest the elemental spirit of the animal should get into their atmosphere. They practised sexual abstinence, lest they should be influenced in any way by the spirit of the wife. Even in regard to the excrements of the body they were equally careful; in trimming the hair and nails, they ceremonially destroyed> the severed portion. They fasted, so that the body itself might destroy anything extraneous to the bare necessity of its existence. They purified the mind by special prayers and conservations. They avoided the contamination of social intercourse, especially the conjugal kind; and their servitors were disciples specially chosen and consecrated for the work.In modern times our superior understanding of the essentials of this process enables us to dispense to some extent with its external rigours; but the internal purification must be even more carefully performed. We may eat meat, provided that in doing so we affirm that we eat it in order to strengthen us for the special purpose of our proposed invocation.> {102}By thus avoiding those actions which might excite the comment of our neighbours we avoid the graver dangers of falling into spiritual pride.We have understood the saying: "To the pure all things are pure", and we have learnt how to act up to it. We can analyse the mind far more acutely than could the ancients, and we can therefore distinguish the real and right feeling from its imitations. A man may eat meat from self-indulgence, or in order to avoid the dangers of asceticism. We must constantly examine ourselves, and assure ourselves that every action is really subservient to the One Purpose.It is ceremonially desirable to seal and affirm this mental purity by Ritual, and accordingly the first operation in any actual ceremony is bathing and robing, with appropriate words. The bath signifies the removal of all things extraneous to antagonistic to the one thought. The putting on of the robe is the positive side of the same operation. It is the assumption of the fame of mind suitable to that one thought.A similar operation takes place in the preparation of every instrument, as has been seen in the Chapter devoted to that subject. In the preparation of theplace of working, the same considerations apply. We first remove from that place all objects; and we then put into it those objects, and only those {103} objects, which are necessary. During many days we occupy ourselves in this process of cleansing and consecration; and this again is confirmed in the actual ceremony.The cleansed and consecrated Magician takes his cleansed and consecrated instruments into that cleansed and consecrated place, and there proceeds to repeat that double ceremony in the ceremony itself, which has these same two main parts. The first part of every ceremony is the banishing; the second, the invoking. The same formula is repeated even in the ceremony of banishing itself, for in the banishing ritual of the pentagram we not only command the demons to depart, but invoke the Archangels and their hosts to act as guardians of the Circle during our pre-occupation with the ceremony proper.In more elaborate ceremonies it is usual to banish everything by name. Each element, each planet, and each sign, perhaps even the Sephiroth themselves; all are removed, including the very one which we wished to invoke, for that force ... ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA ,
115:Chapter LXXXII: Epistola Penultima: The Two Ways to RealityCara Soror,Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.How very sensible of you, though I admit somewhat exacting!You write-Will you tell me exactly why I should devote so much of my valuable time to subjects like Magick and Yoga.That is all very well. But you ask me to put it in syllogistic form. I have no doubt this can be done, though the task seems somewhat complicated. I think I will leave it to you to construct your series of syllogisms yourself from the arguments of this letter.In your main question the operative word is "valuable. Why, I ask, in my turn, should you consider your time valuable? It certainly is not valuable unless the universe has a meaning, and what is more, unless you know what that meaning is-at least roughly-it is millions to one that you will find yourself barking up the wrong tree.First of all let us consider this question of the meaning of the universe. It is its own evidence to design, and that design intelligent design. There is no question of any moral significance-"one man's meat is another man's poison" and so on. But there can be no possible doubt about the existence of some kind of intelligence, and that kind is far superior to anything of which we know as human.How then are we to explore, and finally to interpret this intelligence?It seems to me that there are two ways and only two. Imagine for a moment that you are an orphan in charge of a guardian, inconceivably learned from your point of view.Suppose therefore that you are puzzled by some problem suitable to your childish nature, your obvious and most simple way is to approach your guardian and ask him to enlighten you. It is clearly part of his function as guardian to do his best to help you. Very good, that is the first method, and close parallel with what we understand by the word Magick.We are bothered by some difficulty about one of the elements-say Fire-it is therefore natural to evoke a Salamander to instruct you on the difficult point. But you must remember that your Holy Guardian Angel is not only far more fully instructed than yourself on every point that you can conceive, but you may go so far as to say that it is definitely his work, or part of his work; remembering always that he inhabits a sphere or plane which is entirely different from anything of which you are normally aware.To attain to the Knowledge and Conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel is consequently without doubt by far the simplest way by which you can yourself approach that higher order of being.That, then, is a clearly intelligible method of procedure. We call it Magick.It is of course possible to strengthen the link between him and yourself so that in course of time you became capable of moving and, generally speaking, operating on that plane which is his natural habitat.There is however one other way, and one only, as far as I can see, of reaching this state.It is at least theoretically possible to exalt the whole of your own consciousness until it becomes as free to move on that exalted plane as it is for him. You should note, by the way, that in this case the postulation of another being is not necessary. There is no way of refuting the solipsism if you feel like that. Personally I cannot accede to its axiom. The evidence for an external universe appears to me perfectly adequate.Still there is no extra charge for thinking on those lines if you so wish.I have paid a great deal of attention in the course of my life to the method of exalting the human consciousness in this way; and it is really quite legitimate to identify my teaching with that of the Yogis.I must however point out that in the course of my instruction I have given continual warnings as to the dangers of this line of research. For one thing there is no means of checking your results in the ordinary scientific sense. It is always perfectly easy to find a subjective explanation of any phenomenon; and when one considers that the greatest of all the dangers in any line of research arise from egocentric vanity, I do not think I have exceeded my duty in anything that I have said to deter students from undertaking so dangerous a course as Yoga.It is, of course, much safer if you are in a position to pursue in the Indian Jungles, provided that your health will stand the climate and also, I must say, unless you have a really sound teacher on whom you can safely rely. But then, if we once introduce a teacher, why not go to the Fountain-head and press towards the Knowledge and conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel?In any case your Indian teacher will ultimately direct you to seek guidance from that source, so it seems to me that you have gone to a great deal of extra trouble and incurred a great deal of unnecessary danger by not leaving yourself in the first place in the hands of the Holy Guardian Angel.In any case there are the two methods which stand as alternatives. I do not know of any third one which can be of any use whatever. Logically, since you have asked me to be logical, there is certainly no third way; there is the external way of Magick, and the internal way of Yoga: there you have your alternatives, and there they cease.Love is the law, love under will.Fraternally,666 ~ Aleister Crowley, Magick Without Tears ,
116:SECTION 1. Books for Serious Study Liber CCXX. (Liber AL vel Legis.) The Book of the Law. This book is the foundation of the New Æon, and thus of the whole of our work. The Equinox. The standard Work of Reference in all occult matters. The Encyclopaedia of Initiation. Liber ABA (Book 4). A general account in elementary terms of magical and mystical powers. In four parts: (1) Mysticism (2) Magical (Elementary Theory) (3) Magick in Theory and Practice (this book) (4) The Law. Liber II. The Message of the Master Therion. Explains the essence of the new Law in a very simple manner. Liber DCCCXXXVIII. The Law of Liberty. A further explanation of The Book of the Law in reference to certain ethical problems. Collected Works of A. Crowley. These works contain many mystical and magical secrets, both stated clearly in prose, and woven into the Robe of sublimest poesy. The Yi King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XVI], Oxford University Press.) The "Classic of Changes"; give the initiated Chinese system of Magick. The Tao Teh King. (S. B. E. Series [vol. XXXIX].) Gives the initiated Chinese system of Mysticism. Tannhäuser, by A. Crowley. An allegorical drama concerning the Progress of the Soul; the Tannhäuser story slightly remodelled. The Upanishads. (S. B. E. Series [vols. I & XV.) The Classical Basis of Vedantism, the best-known form of Hindu Mysticism. The Bhagavad-gita. A dialogue in which Krishna, the Hindu "Christ", expounds a system of Attainment. The Voice of the Silence, by H.P. Blavatsky, with an elaborate commentary by Frater O.M. Frater O.M., 7°=48, is the most learned of all the Brethren of the Order; he has given eighteen years to the study of this masterpiece. Raja-Yoga, by Swami Vivekananda. An excellent elementary study of Hindu mysticism. His Bhakti-Yoga is also good. The Shiva Samhita. An account of various physical means of assisting the discipline of initiation. A famous Hindu treatise on certain physical practices. The Hathayoga Pradipika. Similar to the Shiva Samhita. The Aphorisms of Patanjali. A valuable collection of precepts pertaining to mystical attainment. The Sword of Song. A study of Christian theology and ethics, with a statement and solution of the deepest philosophical problems. Also contains the best account extant of Buddhism, compared with modern science. The Book of the Dead. A collection of Egyptian magical rituals. Dogme et Rituel de la Haute Magie, by Eliphas Levi. The best general textbook of magical theory and practice for beginners. Written in an easy popular style. The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage. The best exoteric account of the Great Work, with careful instructions in procedure. This Book influenced and helped the Master Therion more than any other. The Goetia. The most intelligible of all the mediæval rituals of Evocation. Contains also the favourite Invocation of the Master Therion. Erdmann's History of Philosophy. A compendious account of philosophy from the earliest times. Most valuable as a general education of the mind. The Spiritual Guide of [Miguel de] Molinos. A simple manual of Christian Mysticism. The Star in the West. (Captain Fuller). An introduction to the study of the Works of Aleister Crowley. The Dhammapada. (S. B. E. Series [vol. X], Oxford University Press). The best of the Buddhist classics. The Questions of King Milinda. (S. B. E. Series [vols. XXXV & XXXVI].) Technical points of Buddhist dogma, illustrated bydialogues. Liber 777 vel Prolegomena Symbolica Ad Systemam Sceptico-Mysticæ Viæ Explicandæ, Fundamentum Hieroglyphicam Sanctissimorum Scientiæ Summæ. A complete Dictionary of the Correspondences of all magical elements, reprinted with extensive additions, making it the only standard comprehensive book of reference ever published. It is to the language of Occultism what Webster or Murray is to the English language. Varieties of Religious Experience (William James). Valuable as showing the uniformity of mystical attainment. Kabbala Denudata, von Rosenroth: also The Kabbalah Unveiled, by S.L. Mathers. The text of the Qabalah, with commentary. A good elementary introduction to the subject. Konx Om Pax [by Aleister Crowley]. Four invaluable treatises and a preface on Mysticism and Magick. The Pistis Sophia [translated by G.R.S. Mead or Violet McDermot]. An admirable introduction to the study of Gnosticism. The Oracles of Zoroaster [Chaldæan Oracles]. An invaluable collection of precepts mystical and magical. The Dream of Scipio, by Cicero. Excellent for its Vision and its Philosophy. The Golden Verses of Pythagoras, by Fabre d'Olivet. An interesting study of the exoteric doctrines of this Master. The Divine Pymander, by Hermes Trismegistus. Invaluable as bearing on the Gnostic Philosophy. The Secret Symbols of the Rosicrucians, reprint of Franz Hartmann. An invaluable compendium. Scrutinium Chymicum [Atalanta Fugiens]¸ by Michael Maier. One of the best treatises on alchemy. Science and the Infinite, by Sidney Klein. One of the best essays written in recent years. Two Essays on the Worship of Priapus [A Discourse on the Worship of Priapus &c. &c. &c.], by Richard Payne Knight [and Thomas Wright]. Invaluable to all students. The Golden Bough, by J.G. Frazer. The textbook of Folk Lore. Invaluable to all students. The Age of Reason, by Thomas Paine. Excellent, though elementary, as a corrective to superstition. Rivers of Life, by General Forlong. An invaluable textbook of old systems of initiation. Three Dialogues, by Bishop Berkeley. The Classic of Subjective Idealism. Essays of David Hume. The Classic of Academic Scepticism. First Principles by Herbert Spencer. The Classic of Agnosticism. Prolegomena [to any future Metaphysics], by Immanuel Kant. The best introduction to Metaphysics. The Canon [by William Stirling]. The best textbook of Applied Qabalah. The Fourth Dimension, by [Charles] H. Hinton. The best essay on the subject. The Essays of Thomas Henry Huxley. Masterpieces of philosophy, as of prose. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Appendix I: Literature Recommended to Aspirants,
117:Why do we forget our dreams? Because you do not dream always at the same place. It is not always the same part of your being that dreams and it is not at the same place that you dream. If you were in conscious, direct, continuous communication with all the parts of your being, you would remember all your dreams. But very few parts of the being are in communication. For example, you have a dream in the subtle physical, that is to say, quite close to the physical. Generally, these dreams occur in the early hours of the morning, that is between four and five o'clock, at the end of the sleep. If you do not make a sudden movement when you wake up, if you remain very quiet, very still and a little attentive - quietly attentive - and concentrated, you will remember them, for the communication between the subtle physical and the physical is established - very rarely is there no communication. Now, dreams are mostly forgotten because you have a dream while in a certain state and then pass into another. For instance, when you sleep, your body is asleep, your vital is asleep, but your mind is still active. So your mind begins to have dreams, that is, its activity is more or less coordinated, the imagination is very active and you see all kinds of things, take part in extraordinary happenings.... After some time, all that calms down and the mind also begins to doze. The vital that was resting wakes up; it comes out of the body, walks about, goes here and there, does all kinds of things, reacts, sometimes fights, and finally eats. It does all kinds of things. The vital is very adventurous. It watches. When it is heroic it rushes to save people who are in prison or to destroy enemies or it makes wonderful discoveries. But this pushes back the whole mental dream very far behind. It is rubbed off, forgotten: naturally you cannot remember it because the vital dream takes its place. But if you wake up suddenly at that moment, you remember it. There are people who have made the experiment, who have got up at certain fixed hours of the night and when they wake up suddenly, they do remember. You must not move brusquely, but awake in the natural course, then you remember. After a time, the vital having taken a good stroll, needs to rest also, and so it goes into repose and quietness, quite tired at the end of all kinds of adventures. Then something else wakes up. Let us suppose that it is the subtle physical that goes for a walk. It starts moving and begins wandering, seeing the rooms and... why, this thing that was there, but it has come here and that other thing which was in that room is now in this one, and so on. If you wake up without stirring, you remembeR But this has pushed away far to the back of the consciousness all the stories of the vital. They are forgotten and so you cannot recollect your dreams. But if at the time of waking up you are not in a hurry, you are not obliged to leave your bed, on the contrary you can remain there as long as you wish, you need not even open your eyes; you keep your head exactly where it was and you make yourself like a tranquil mirror within and concentrate there. You catch just a tiny end of the tail of your dream. You catch it and start pulling gently, without stirring in the least. You begin pulling quite gently, and then first one part comes, a little later another. You go backward; the last comes up first. Everything goes backward, slowly, and suddenly the whole dream reappears: "Ah, there! it was like that." Above all, do not jump up, do not stir; you repeat the dream to yourself several times - once, twice - until it becomes clear in all its details. Once that dream is settled, you continue not to stir, you try to go further in, and suddenly you catch the tail of something else. It is more distant, more vague, but you can still seize it. And here also you hang on, get hold of it and pull, and you see that everything changes and you enter another world; all of a sudden you have an extraordinary adventure - it is another dream. You follow the same process. You repeat the dream to yourself once, twice, until you are sure of it. You remain very quiet all the time. Then you begin to penetrate still more deeply into yourself, as though you were going in very far, very far; and again suddenly you see a vague form, you have a feeling, a sensation... like a current of air, a slight breeze, a little breath; and you say, "Well, well...." It takes a form, it becomes clear - and the third category comes. You must have a lot of time, a lot of patience, you must be very quiet in your mind and body, very quiet, and you can tell the story of your whole night from the end right up to the beginning. Even without doing this exercise which is very long and difficult, in order to recollect a dream, whether it be the last one or the one in the middle that has made a violent impression on your being, you must do what I have said when you wake up: take particular care not even to move your head on the pillow, remain absolutely still and let the dream return. Some people do not have a passage between one state and another, there is a little gap and so they leap from one to the other; there is no highway passing through all the states of being with no break of the consciousness. A small dark hole, and you do not remember. It is like a precipice across which one has to extend the consciousness. To build a bridge takes a very long time; it takes much longer than building a physical bridge.... Very few people want to and know how to do it. They may have had magnificent activities, they do not remember them or sometimes only the last, the nearest, the most physical activity, with an uncoordinated movement - dreams having no sense. But there are as many different kinds of nights and sleep as there are different days and activities. There are not many days that are alike, each day is different. The days are not the same, the nights are not the same. You and your friends are doing apparently the same thing, but for each one it is very different. And each one must have his own procedure. Why are two dreams never alike?Because all things are different. No two minutes are alike in the universe and it will be so till the end of the universe, no two minutes will ever be alike. And men obstinately want to make rules! One must do this and not that.... Well! we must let people please themselves. You could have put to me a very interesting question: "Why am I fourteen years old today?" Intelligent people will say: "It is because it is the fourteenth year since you were born." That is the answer of someone who believes himself to be very intelligent. But there is another reason. I shall tell this to you alone.... I have drowned you all sufficiently well! Now you must begin to learn swimming! ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953 36?,
118:The Supermind [Supramental consciousness] is in its very essence a truth-consciousness, a consciousness always free from the Ignorance which is the foundation of our present natural or evolutionary existence and from which nature in us is trying to arrive at self-knowledge and world-knowledge and a right consciousness and the right use of our existence in the universe. The Supermind, because it is a truth-consciousness, has this knowledge inherent in it and this power of true existence; its course is straight and can go direct to its aim, its field is wide and can even be made illimitable. This is because its very nature is knowledge: it has not to acquire knowledge but possesses it in its own right; its steps are not from nescience or ignorance into some imperfect light, but from truth to greater truth, from right perception to deeper perception, from intuition to intuition, from illumination to utter and boundless luminousness, from growing widenesses to the utter vasts and to very infinitude. On its summits it possesses the divine omniscience and omnipotence, but even in an evolutionary movement of its own graded self-manifestation by which it would eventually reveal its own highest heights, it must be in its very nature essentially free from ignorance and error: it starts from truth and light and moves always in truth and light. As its knowledge is always true, so too its will is always true; it does not fumble in its handling of things or stumble in its paces. In the Supermind feeling and emotion do not depart from their truth, make no slips or mistakes, do not swerve from the right and the real, cannot misuse beauty and delight or twist away from a divine rectitude. In the Supermind sense cannot mislead or deviate into the grossnesses which are here its natural imperfections and the cause of reproach, distrust and misuse by our ignorance. Even an incomplete statement made by the Supermind is a truth leading to a further truth, its incomplete action a step towards completeness. All the life and action and leading of the Supermind is guarded in its very nature from the falsehoods and uncertainties that are our lot; it moves in safety towards its perfection. Once the truth-consciousness was established here on its own sure foundation, the evolution of divine life would be a progress in felicity, a march through light to Ananda. Supermind is an eternal reality of the divine Being and the divine Nature. In its own plane it already and always exists and possesses its own essential law of being; it has not to be created or to emerge or evolve into existence out of involution in Matter or out of non-existence, as it might seem to the view of mind which itself seems to its own view to have so emerged from life and Matter or to have evolved out of an involution in life and Matter. The nature of Supermind is always the same, a being of knowledge, proceeding from truth to truth, creating or rather manifesting what has to be manifested by the power of a pre-existent knowledge, not by hazard but by a self-existent destiny in the being itself, a necessity of the thing in itself and therefore inevitable. Its -manifestation of the divine life will also be inevitable; its own life on its own plane is divine and, if Supermind descends upon the earth, it will bring necessarily the divine life with it and establish it here. Supermind is the grade of existence beyond mind, life and Matter and, as mind, life and Matter have manifested on the earth, so too must Supermind in the inevitable course of things manifest in this world of Matter. In fact, a supermind is already here but it is involved, concealed behind this manifest mind, life and Matter and not yet acting overtly or in its own power: if it acts, it is through these inferior powers and modified by their characters and so not yet recognisable. It is only by the approach and arrival of the descending Supermind that it can be liberated upon earth and reveal itself in the action of our material, vital and mental parts so that these lower powers can become portions of a total divinised activity of our whole being: it is that that will bring to us a completely realised divinity or the divine life. It is indeed so that life and mind involved in Matter have realised themselves here; for only what is involved can evolve, otherwise there could be no emergence. The manifestation of a supramental truth-consciousness is therefore the capital reality that will make the divine life possible. It is when all the movements of thought, impulse and action are governed and directed by a self-existent and luminously automatic truth-consciousness and our whole nature comes to be constituted by it and made of its stuff that the life divine will be complete and absolute. Even as it is, in reality though not in the appearance of things, it is a secret self-existent knowledge and truth that is working to manifest itself in the creation here. The Divine is already there immanent within us, ourselves are that in our inmost reality and it is this reality that we have to manifest; it is that which constitutes the urge towards the divine living and makes necessary the creation of the life divine even in this material existence. A manifestation of the Supermind and its truth-consciousness is then inevitable; it must happen in this world sooner or lateR But it has two aspects, a descent from above, an ascent from below, a self-revelation of the Spirit, an evolution in Nature. The ascent is necessarily an effort, a working of Nature, an urge or nisus on her side to raise her lower parts by an evolutionary or revolutionary change, conversion or transformation into the divine reality and it may happen by a process and progress or by a rapid miracle. The descent or self-revelation of the Spirit is an act of the supreme Reality from above which makes the realisation possible and it can appear either as the divine aid which brings about the fulfilment of the progress and process or as the sanction of the miracle. Evolution, as we see it in this world, is a slow and difficult process and, indeed, needs usually ages to reach abiding results; but this is because it is in its nature an emergence from inconscient beginnings, a start from nescience and a working in the ignorance of natural beings by what seems to be an unconscious force. There can be, on the contrary, an evolution in the light and no longer in the darkness, in which the evolving being is a conscious participant and cooperator, and this is precisely what must take place here. Even in the effort and progress from the Ignorance to Knowledge this must be in part if not wholly the endeavour to be made on the heights of the nature, and it must be wholly that in the final movement towards the spiritual change, realisation, transformation. It must be still more so when there is a transition across the dividing line between the Ignorance and the Knowledge and the evolution is from knowledge to greater knowledge, from consciousness to greater consciousness, from being to greater being. There is then no longer any necessity for the slow pace of the ordinary evolution; there can be rapid conversion, quick transformation after transformation, what would seem to our normal present mind a succession of miracles. An evolution on the supramental levels could well be of that nature; it could be equally, if the being so chose, a more leisurely passage of one supramental state or condition of things to something beyond but still supramental, from level to divine level, a building up of divine gradations, a free growth to the supreme Supermind or beyond it to yet undreamed levels of being, consciousness and Ananda. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays In Philosophy And Yoga 558,
119:It does not matter if you do not understand it - Savitri, read it always. You will see that every time you read it, something new will be revealed to you. Each time you will get a new glimpse, each time a new experience; things which were not there, things you did not understand arise and suddenly become clear. Always an unexpected vision comes up through the words and lines. Every time you try to read and understand, you will see that something is added, something which was hidden behind is revealed clearly and vividly. I tell you the very verses you have read once before, will appear to you in a different light each time you re-read them. This is what happens invariably. Always your experience is enriched, it is a revelation at each step. But you must not read it as you read other books or newspapers. You must read with an empty head, a blank and vacant mind, without there being any other thought; you must concentrate much, remain empty, calm and open; then the words, rhythms, vibrations will penetrate directly to this white page, will put their stamp upon the brain, will explain themselves without your making any effort. Savitri alone is sufficient to make you climb to the highest peaks. If truly one knows how to meditate on Savitri, one will receive all the help one needs. For him who wishes to follow this path, it is a concrete help as though the Lord himself were taking you by the hand and leading you to the destined goal. And then, every question, however personal it may be, has its answer here, every difficulty finds its solution herein; indeed there is everything that is necessary for doing the Yoga.*He has crammed the whole universe in a single book.* It is a marvellous work, magnificent and of an incomparable perfection. You know, before writing Savitri Sri Aurobindo said to me, WIKI am impelled to launch on a new adventure; I was hesitant in the beginning, but now I am decided. Still, I do not know how far I shall succeed. I pray for help.* And you know what it was? It was - before beginning, I warn you in advance - it was His way of speaking, so full of divine humility and modesty. He never... *asserted Himself*. And the day He actually began it, He told me: WIKI have launched myself in a rudderless boat upon the vastness of the Infinite.* And once having started, He wrote page after page without intermission, as though it were a thing already complete up there and He had only to transcribe it in ink down here on these pages. In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything. It may then be said that Savitri is a revelation, it is a meditation, it is a quest of the Infinite, the Eternal. If it is read with this aspiration for Immortality, the reading itself will serve as a guide to Immortality. To read Savitri is indeed to practice Yoga, spiritual concentration; one can find there all that is needed to realise the Divine. Each step of Yoga is noted here, including the secret of all other Yogas. Surely, if one sincerely follows what is revealed here in each line one will reach finally the transformation of the Supramental Yoga. It is truly the infallible guide who never abandons you; its support is always there for him who wants to follow the path. Each verse of Savitri is like a revealed Mantra which surpasses all that man possessed by way of knowledge, and I repeat this, the words are expressed and arranged in such a way that the sonority of the rhythm leads you to the origin of sound, which is OM. My child, yes, everything is there: mysticism, occultism, philosophy, the history of evolution, the history of man, of the gods, of creation, of Nature. How the universe was created, why, for what purpose, what destiny - all is there. You can find all the answers to all your questions there. Everything is explained, even the future of man and of the evolution, all that nobody yet knows. He has described it all in beautiful and clear words so that spiritual adventurers who wish to solve the mysteries of the world may understand it more easily. But this mystery is well hidden behind the words and lines and one must rise to the required level of true consciousness to discover it. All prophesies, all that is going to come is presented with the precise and wonderful clarity. Sri Aurobindo gives you here the key to find the Truth, to discover the Consciousness, to solve the problem of what the universe is. He has also indicated how to open the door of the Inconscience so that the light may penetrate there and transform it. He has shown the path, the way to liberate oneself from the ignorance and climb up to the superconscience; each stage, each plane of consciousness, how they can be scaled, how one can cross even the barrier of death and attain immortality. You will find the whole journey in detail, and as you go forward you can discover things altogether unknown to man. That is Savitri and much more yet. It is a real experience - reading Savitri. All the secrets that man possessed, He has revealed, - as well as all that awaits him in the future; all this is found in the depth of Savitri. But one must have the knowledge to discover it all, the experience of the planes of consciousness, the experience of the Supermind, even the experience of the conquest of Death. He has noted all the stages, marked each step in order to advance integrally in the integral Yoga. All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into poetry, into miraculous poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind. These are experiences lived by Him, realities, supracosmic truths. He experienced all these as one experiences joy or sorrow, physically. He walked in the darkness of inconscience, even in the neighborhood of death, endured the sufferings of perdition, and emerged from the mud, the world-misery to breathe the sovereign plenitude and enter the supreme Ananda. He crossed all these realms, went through the consequences, suffered and endured physically what one cannot imagine. Nobody till today has suffered like Him. He accepted suffering to transform suffering into the joy of union with the Supreme. It is something unique and incomparable in the history of the world. It is something that has never happened before, He is the first to have traced the path in the Unknown, so that we may be able to walk with certitude towards the Supermind. He has made the work easy for us. Savitri is His whole Yoga of transformation, and this Yoga appears now for the first time in the earth-consciousness. And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed. And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen. My child, every day you are going to read Savitri; read properly, with the right attitude, concentrating a little before opening the pages and trying to keep the mind as empty as possible, absolutely without a thought. The direct road is through the heart. I tell you, if you try to really concentrate with this aspiration you can light the flame, the psychic flame, the flame of purification in a very short time, perhaps in a few days. What you cannot do normally, you can do with the help of Savitri. Try and you will see how very different it is, how new, if you read with this attitude, with this something at the back of your consciousness; as though it were an offering to Sri Aurobindo. You know it is charged, fully charged with consciousness; as if Savitri were a being, a real guide. I tell you, whoever, wanting to practice Yoga, tries sincerely and feels the necessity for it, will be able to climb with the help of Savitri to the highest rung of the ladder of Yoga, will be able to find the secret that Savitri represents. And this without the help of a Guru. And he will be able to practice it anywhere. For him Savitri alone will be the guide, for all that he needs he will find Savitri. If he remains very quiet when before a difficulty, or when he does not know where to turn to go forward and how to overcome obstacles, for all these hesitations and incertitudes which overwhelm us at every moment, he will have the necessary indications, and the necessary concrete help. If he remains very calm, open, if he aspires sincerely, always he will be as if lead by the hand. If he has faith, the will to give himself and essential sincerity he will reach the final goal. Indeed, Savitri is something concrete, living, it is all replete, packed with consciousness, it is the supreme knowledge above all human philosophies and religions. It is the spiritual path, it is Yoga, Tapasya, Sadhana, in its single body. Savitri has an extraordinary power, it gives out vibrations for him who can receive them, the true vibrations of each stage of consciousness. It is incomparable, it is truth in its plenitude, the Truth Sri Aurobindo brought down on the earth. My child, one must try to find the secret that Savitri represents, the prophetic message Sri Aurobindo reveals there for us. This is the work before you, it is hard but it is worth the trouble. - 5 November 1967 ~ The Mother, Sweet Mother The Mother to Mona Sarkar,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:Of course. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
2:Of course it was. ~ Gillian Flynn,
3:Of course I get hurt. ~ Jackie Chan,
4:that she was course. ~ Anatole France,
5:course. "This ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
6:I know him...of course. ~ Toni Gonzaga,
7:Of course awards matter. ~ Frank Ocean,
8:Of course, Nathan ~ Catherine Ryan Hyde,
9:was burgled, of course. ~ Kendra Elliot,
10:Of course we're Criminals ~ Frank Miller,
11:Safety lies in the middle course. ~ Ovid,
12:And, of course, Kevin Smith. ~ Ernest Cline,
13:course of long observance ~ Solomon Northup,
14:Of course drugs were fun. ~ Anjelica Huston,
15:Leave love to take its course. ~ Mary Balogh,
16:course, if you haven’t received ~ Dani Shapiro,
17:Inspiration before intercourse. ~ Lisa Kessler,
18:Keep a mid course between two extremes. ~ Ovid,
19:Of course the law's not racist. ~ Aasif Mandvi,
20:This, of course, not ~ William Walker Atkinson,
21:I took a lot of writing courses. ~ Danny Strong,
22:Life is, of course, terrible. ~ Anthony Burgess,
23:Of course, I'm no dummy. ~ Paul Thomas Anderson,
24:Time rolls his ceaseless course. ~ Walter Scott,
25:Of course, it has never paid much. ~ Molly Ivins,
26:Of course it's all luck. ~ Henri Cartier Bresson,
27:Of course we did,” said the Count. ~ Amor Towles,
28:Soup is cuisines kindest course ~ Virginia Woolf,
29:Do I read her books? Of course. ~ Debbie Reynolds,
30:No money changed hands, of course. ~ Nancy Pelosi,
31:Of course we´ll get caught. So what? ~ John Green,
32:Sometimes inaction is the best course, ~ K M Shea,
33:There where the course is, ~ William Butler Yeats,
34:course we are reminded of the big man ~ Eva Jordan,
35:Death, of course, lasts forever. ~ Haruki Murakami,
36:Despair is of course the loss of hope. ~ Anonymous,
37:Memory is, of course, a trickster. ~ Frances Mayes,
38:Of course,’ said Tristran, politely. ~ Neil Gaiman,
39:Discourse, the sweeter banquet of the mind. ~ Homer,
40:Of course climate change is real. ~ Tammy Duckworth,
41:Of course I had. That's how I do it. ~ Jeff Lindsay,
42:Of course, I love you for who you are. ~ Kaori Yuki,
43:Of course, western is my native music. ~ Ken Curtis,
44:recommend courses by Jim Kwik. 7. ~ Vishen Lakhiani,
45:See the effect of commercial intercourse. ~ Juvenal,
46:. . . It’s me?”
“Of course it’s you. ~ Kiera Cass,
47:Miss Silver’s fire. ‘Of course, ~ Patricia Wentworth,
48:morning edition. Unless, of course, the ~ Ian Rankin,
49:Of course he bothers me. He's my husband. ~ Gish Jen,
50:on a cough, but of course there was ~ Kristin Hannah,
51:course, but it was more for form than from ~ J D Robb,
52:Of course, it's fun to play with Blacks. ~ Boris Vian,
53:Of course, one person can be the world. ~ Ally Condie,
54:of course, your one of my best friends. ~ Ally Condie,
55:What Writing Is: Telepathy, of course. ~ Stephen King,
56:Why? Because we had the ship, of course. ~ B V Larson,
57:Except cats couldn’t read minds, of course. ~ J R Ward,
58:Fear is choosing the safe course ~ George Bernard Shaw,
59:In the end it didn’t matter of course. ~ Arundhati Roy,
60:I say “you.” Of course I mean “me.” Far ~ Joanna Walsh,
61:It's an honor to win a Grammy, of course. ~ Jonny Lang,
62:Of course I have nightmares-Who doesn't? ~ Darren Shan,
63:Of course it was Loki. It's always Loki. ~ Neil Gaiman,
64:Of course i was in Love with Sridevi ~ Ram Gopal Varma,
65:Of course the Russians under Zhukov were ~ Herman Wouk,
66:Of course you've got to! ~ J K Rowling,
67:religion is the one area of our discourse ~ Sam Harris,
68:The lie, of course, is more interesting. ~ John Irving,
69:Danger for the mind, of course, but not for you. ~ Osho,
70:did that attitude work? Of course not. ~ James Altucher,
71:Of course I'm ill, I'm alive aren't I? ~ Richard Powers,
72:The course of love was never straight. ~ Alison Goodman,
73:To lie, of course, is to engender insanity. ~ Anais Nin,
74:Vic Armstrong is, of course, a legend ~ Martin Scorsese,
75:Ideas shape the course of history. ~ John Maynard Keynes,
76:My course is set for an uncharted sea. ~ Dante Alighieri,
77:Of course I have bad hair days; I’m human. ~ Ryan Lochte,
78:Of course I want to be [prime minister]. ~ Jeremy Corbyn,
79:poachers and Methodies, of course. Oh, ~ Patrick O Brian,
80:Time in its aging course teaches all things. ~ Aeschylus,
81:Violation is a synonym for intercourse. ~ Andrea Dworkin,
82:Of course fashion is definitely playing a part. ~ Pusha T,
83:Of course. My girl? She's incredible. ~ Alexandra Bracken,
84:Of course! This is it! This is what I can do. ~ E L James,
85:Rejection is the natural course of things. ~ Eric Walters,
86:Singing is of course a form of aggression. ~ Iris Murdoch,
87:Whatever you want—nonalcoholic, of course. ~ Rick Riordan,
88:Above all else, I want to See. ~ A Course in Miracles#acim,
89:... A nation has to take its natural course ~ Robert Frost,
90:And of course there must be something wrong ~ Robert Frost,
91:Beautiful? For whom? Why, for myself, of course. ~ Colette,
92:Faith sir! She looks like the Old Course. ~ Old Tom Morris,
93:"Follow the stream, have faith in its course." ~ Sheng-yen,
94:Great sex is, of course, a top priority. ~ Anderson Cooper,
95:Of course, that sort of dramatic email is ~ William Landay,
96:Oh, of course, I always feel unconfident. ~ Katherine Dunn,
97:rumours, of course, as there always were ~ Agatha Christie,
98:The essence of childhood, of course, is play. ~ Bill Cosby,
99:the ground for I know not how long. Of course ~ John Boyne,
100:The peace of God is the goal of the Course ~ Gary R Renard,
101:What the hell, Tylar, of course I know you. ~ Andrea Smith,
102:At my lowest I was making nothing, of course ~ Teri Hatcher,
103:Everyone has a right to his own course of action. ~ Moliere,
104:Free people will set the course of history. ~ George W Bush,
105:him up, of course. I don’t know whether they ~ Harry Truman,
106:I think we ought to have our intercourse now. ~ Don DeLillo,
107:I want to build a course my mum can enjoy. ~ Davis Love III,
108:my blood singing as it courses through my body, ~ E L James,
109:Of course I’ve been lying. I’m a politician. ~ Cynthia Hand,
110:Of course Mason and Logan followed me where I went. ~ Tijan,
111:Of course. You get everything from books. ~ Gregory Maguire,
112:Of course you have a boat. You're a Viking. ~ Mark Lawrence,
113:Oh, of course, I always feel unconfident. ~ Katherine Dunn,
114:The course of true love rarely runs smooth. ~ Jasper Fforde,
115:Waiting rooms were made for books—of course! ~ Stephen King,
116:Why, of course, the people don't want war. ~ Hermann Goring,
117:All government, of course, is against liberty. ~ H L Mencken,
118:And I have my camera."
"Of course you do. ~ Dawn Crandall,
119:And stop calling me sir!"
"Of course, sir. ~ Abigail Roux,
120:Change of weather is the discourse of fools. ~ Thomas Fuller,
121:Chastity is sexual intercourse with affection. ~ Robert Owen,
122:Dancing is the normal prelude to intercourse. ~ Sylvia Plath,
123:FOCUS - Follow One Course Until Successful ~ Robert Kiyosaki,
124:In thy discourse, if thou desire to please; ~ George Herbert,
125:Majorities, of course, start with minorities. ~ Robert Moses,
126:Of course,Behaviourism 'works'. So does torture. ~ W H Auden,
127:Of course, I do everything for money. ~ Christopher Hitchens,
128:Of course I loved book more than people. ~ Diane Setterfield,
129:Of course I want dubs and a candy painted 'lac ~ Macklemore,
130:Of course not. After all, I may be wrong. ~ Bertrand Russell,
131:Of course ya love me. I'm very loveable. ~ Michelle M Pillow,
132:There is a God within us and intercourse with heaven. ~ Ovid,
133:There were more courses than O.J. has alibis. ~ Erin Gruwell,
134:way out.” We all stood in shock. Of course, ~ Amanda Roberts,
135:Do not resist the natural course of your life. ~ Wayne W Dyer,
136:Get it.” I, of course, had to stay in my push-up ~ Chris Kyle,
137:i am
made of water
of course i am emotional ~ Rupi Kaur,
138:I think I'm the best, of course. How could I not? ~ LL Cool J,
139:Not every collision course comes as a surprise. ~ John Irving,
140:Of course he's good-he's too stupid to be bad ~ Edith Wharton,
141:Of course I loved books more than people. ~ Diane Setterfield,
142:Of course I played. It was my only solace. ~ Patrick Rothfuss,
143:The course is perfection and it asks perfection. ~ Nick Faldo,
144:The course of true love never did run smooth. ~ Deepak Chopra,
145:There is chaos behind the civility, of course. ~ Edward Albee,
146:The show had run its course on the Fox network. ~ Will Arnett,
147:Tools, of course, can be the subtlest of traps. ~ Neil Gaiman,
148:Well of course New Zealand isn't anti-American. ~ Helen Clark,
149:You can't take a crash course in serenity. ~ Shirley MacLaine,
150:Faith in oneself is the best and safest course. ~ Michelangelo,
151:FOCUS - Follow One Course Until Successful ~ Robert T Kiyosaki,
152:FOCUS: Follow One Course Until Successful. ~ Robert T Kiyosaki,
153:Hollywood, of course, is the city of illusion. ~ Curtis Hanson,
154:I could not, of course not, not smile at you. ~ Daniel Handler,
155:I have so much to say, so of course I say nothing. ~ T J Klune,
156:I'm gonna try and change the course of hip hop again. ~ Dr Dre,
157:No point in arguing. But of course I argued. ~ Sergei Dovlatov,
158:Of course I do, Jack! You have to beLIEve me! ~ Raymond Benson,
159:Of course I have regrets; I'm not stupid. ~ Marianne Faithfull,
160:Our curriculum is the course that we travel. ~ Sarah Mackenzie,
161:Sexual intercourse vests no property rights. ~ Spider Robinson,
162:Sweet discourse makes short daies and nights. ~ George Herbert,
163:The unconscious is the discourse of the Other. ~ Jacques Lacan,
164:And the answer is, of course, “Ugh, patriarchy. ~ Emily Nagoski,
165:Geometry was the first exciting course I remember. ~ Steven Chu,
166:I can't afford to be a member of a golf course. ~ Jack Abramoff,
167:In a course of a lifetime, what does it matter? ~ Sharon Creech,
168:Of course everybodys thinking evolves over time. ~ Meles Zenawi,
169:Of course I’m shielding her, you broken feather! ~ Kim Harrison,
170:Of course, in the art class, I was the model. ~ Suzanne Farrell,
171:Of course. Men always think war is about them. ~ Kristin Hannah,
172:Of course, there are diseases of which people die. ~ Serge Lang,
173:Sexual intercourse is a slight attack of apoplexy. ~ Democritus,
174:The recounting of a life is a cheat, of course. ~ Carol Shields,
175:A poet's interest in craft never fades, of course. ~ Mary Oliver,
176:Bid me discourse, I will enchant thine ear ~ William Shakespeare,
177:But of course, how else to learn the right signs? ~ Paulo Coelho,
178:I'm really high... I mean the altitude of course. ~ Eddie Vedder,
179:Nothing not built with hands of course is sacred. ~ Robert Frost,
180:Of course I'm funky like fat people having intercourse. ~ Redman,
181:Of course, perspective is a function of experience. ~ Bren Brown,
182:Of course she is a fool, but so are all girls. ~ Georgette Heyer,
183:Society has quite forsaken all her wicked courses, ~ W S Gilbert,
184:Some of it can, of course. The new satirical shows ~ Nick Hornby,
185:Stay at the center and let all things take their course. ~ Laozi,
186:All history, of course, is the history of wars. ~ Penelope Lively,
187:And old movies, of course, brought me and Ed together. ~ A J Finn,
188:Golf is a game that is played on a five-inch course ~ Bobby Jones,
189:Have intercourse with females, acquire wealth. ~ John Stuart Mill,
190:I'll go this minute!' Of course, I remained. ~ Fyodor Dostoyevsky,
191:I'm a dark horse, running on a dark race course ~ George Harrison,
192:I'm Marcus Finch. Of course I have an escape car. ~ Richelle Mead,
193:I refused to beat my head against stone, of course. ~ Herbert Lom,
194:No woman needs intercourse; few women escape it. ~ Andrea Dworkin,
195:Of course animals have a personality and emotions. ~ Jane Goodall,
196:Of course, we're all a mass of contradictions. ~ Shirley MacLaine,
197:Shamanism is not a course, but a life journey. ~ Alberto Villoldo,
198:There is no working middle course in wartime. ~ Winston Churchill,
199:you're just a side dish not the main course! ~ Eric Jerome Dickey,
200:All black, of course. Just like his rotting soul. ~ Jennifer Estep,
201:A Single journey can change the course of a life. ~ Angelina Jolie,
202:Can’t repeat the past?…Why of course you can! ~ F Scott Fitzgerald,
203:Everything you teach you are learning. ~ A Course in Miracles#acim,
204:I have always followed the most passionate course. ~ Jessica Lange,
205:Imagination, of course, is the money of childhood ~ Kinky Friedman,
206: Of course you may go first. When I am dead. ~ Nalini Singh,
207:It’s my idea,” I scoff. “Of course it’s a good one. ~ Keary Taylor,
208:Loneliness is a required course for leadership. ~ Elisabeth Elliot,
209:Love, if it finds you worthy, directs your course. ~ Khalil Gibran,
210:Of course it's trivial, but then most things are. ~ John Malkovich,
211:The Baggio brothers, of course, are not related. ~ George Hamilton,
212:The course of true anything never does run smooth. ~ Samuel Butler,
213:the course of true love never did run smooth ~ William Shakespeare,
214:The course of true love never die run smooth ~ William Shakespeare,
215:There should be a course in the first grade on love. ~ Andy Warhol,
216:The Support Group, of course, was depressing as hell. ~ John Green,
217:Utter originality is, of course, out of the question. ~ Ezra Pound,
218:Well of course I get depressed sometimes, yes I do. ~ Angela Davis,
219:Well, then--our course is chosen--spread the sail-- ~ Walter Scott,
220:What defines a woman? Why, she does, of course. ~ Delilah Marvelle,
221:And, of course, the funniest food of all, kumquats. ~ George Carlin,
222:Bad faith likes discourse on friendship and loyalty. ~ Mason Cooley,
223:careful I promise." I trusted him; of course I knew ~ Jordan Silver,
224:I have cuts and bruises that do not map a course. ~ Margo Jefferson,
225:I'm very romantic and of course I want to be in love. ~ Emma Watson,
226:Isn't it fun to go out on the course and lie in the sun? ~ Bob Hope,
227:Not everything is a war, sweetheart.’ ‘Of course it is, ~ Matt Haig,
228:Of course I have a sly plan. I am a Merit, after all. ~ Chloe Neill,
229:Of course I recovered. I have always been strong. ~ Phyllis T Smith,
230:Of course it happened. Of course it didn't happen. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
231:Of course there is a monkey. There is always a monkey. ~ Doug Dorst,
232:The course of true love never did run smooth. ~ William Shakespeare,
233:War is our only recourse. There is no other remedy. ~ Ronald Takaki,
234:What is our recourse, Mr. Speaker? What is our remedy? ~ Trey Gowdy,
235:What is the course and drift of your compact? ~ William Shakespeare,
236:You, of course, are a rose-- But were always a rose. ~ Robert Frost,
237:A dog is a great promoter of friendly intercourse. ~ Agatha Christie,
238:Comedy is, of course, closely associated with eggs. ~ Harlan Tarbell,
239:Courage isn’t contagious; fear is, of course. ~ Jos Eduardo Agualusa,
240:Do you drink?" "Of course,I just said I was a writer. ~ Stephen King,
241:I am comfortable with my level of public discourse. ~ Neil Armstrong,
242:I enjoy playing it every time I step on the course. ~ Dustin Johnson,
243:If I don't train enough, of course I'm nervous. ~ Haile Gebrselassie,
244:In the course of crime ... the descent is rapid. ~ Frederick Marryat,
245:Life is more than just steering a course around pain. ~ Stephen King,
246:Of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong. ~ Dennis Miller,
247:Of course we fight. What sisters don't battle? ~ Olivia de Havilland,
248:Scientific knowledge is a kind of discourse. ~ Jean Francois Lyotard,
249:The highlight of my career? The Olympics, of course. ~ Tara Lipinski,
250:The stars in their courses were fighting against Weston. ~ C S Lewis,
251:What do I wear in bed? Why, Chanel No. 5, of course ~ Marilyn Monroe,
252:And, of course, eventually, it would change everything. ~ Ally Carter,
253:As our acts vary, our habits will follow in their course. ~ Aristotle,
254:Did I want to dance? Of course I did and that's not all. ~ Erica Jong,
255:Don't be an idiot.Of course I love you.How could I not? ~ Mary Calmes,
256:God, of course, is the greatest philosopher of all. ~ Richard M Nixon,
257:Have I dated a supermodel? Of course not. I'd look ridiculous. ~ Moby,
258:I love music but, of course, I'd choose love over that. ~ Leona Lewis,
259:In crises the most daring course is often safest. ~ Henry A Kissinger,
260:I shall, of course, die with nonviolence on my lips. ~ Mahatma Gandhi,
261:I think about death sometimes. Analytically, of course. ~ Lynne Truss,
262:love is an endless course And I am the runner, euphoric. ~ D M Pulley,
263:Of course, every job I ever had I thought I was born for. ~ Jack Kemp,
264:Of course people think Washington is arrogant. It is. ~ Carly Fiorina,
265:She set the course of his life with just a smile. ~ Christopher Moore,
266:Sometimes a catastrophe is simply a course correction. ~ James A Owen,
267:The course of unbalanced budgets is the road to ruin ~ Herbert Hoover,
268:The unsaid part is the best of every discourse. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
269:Universities are of course hostile to geniuses. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
270:What do I wear in bed? Why, Chanel No. 5, of course. ~ Marilyn Monroe,
271:Yes of course I know it's all a dream. Isn't everything? ~ Iain Banks,
272:You see with your mouth?” “I’m a chef. Of course I do. ~ Tawna Fenske,
273:an occasional birthday dinner, and of course Marathon ~ Michael Palmer,
274:A person plans his course, but the Lord directs his steps. ~ Anonymous,
275:But now I remember, of course, I'm never going to be old. ~ Sara Baume,
276:Course. Doing better next time. That’s what life is. ~ Joe Abercrombie,
277:He wasn't just coming. He was serving full course meals. ~ Dan Skinner,
278:How could music cause so many lives to veer off course? ~ Rick Riordan,
279:I love my lawyer. I have to say that of course! ~ Catherine Zeta Jones,
280:It's all about the writing, and of course, the ghosts. ~ Debi Chestnut,
281:It's really the wand that chooses the wizard, of course. ~ J K Rowling,
282:it’s really the wand that chooses the wizard, of course. ~ J K Rowling,
283:Of course I believe in magic. I believe in storytelling. ~ Luke Taylor,
284:Of course it's alright for librarians to smell of drink. ~ Barbara Pym,
285:Of course the UN brings in a lot of moral authority. ~ Lakhdar Brahimi,
286:Of course, we all carry around false fundamentals. ~ Rachel Held Evans,
287:Of course you have an e-mail, you idiot, just read it! ~ Chris Jericho,
288:On the value of blind shots to golf course design. ~ Alister MacKenzie,
289:resolute, adj. Obstinate in a course that we approve. ~ Ambrose Bierce,
290:Screwy," I said. "Is that a medical term?" "Of course. ~ Ilona Andrews,
291:Sometimes, of course, to say, “please stop doing it. ~ Terry Pratchett,
292:The course of everything goes to teach us faith. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
293:This year, of course, being 1936, there would be no figs. ~ Alan Furst,
294:Yes. Oh, hell yes. I love you. Of course I'll marry you. ~ Jaci Burton,
295:Yesterday is but a memory, Tomorrow an uncharted course, ~ Edgar Cayce,
296:You can put it another way, of course; you always can. ~ Julian Barnes,
297:You, of course, are a rose--
But were always a rose. ~ Robert Frost,
298:Desire sets our compass, but real life steers our course. ~ Mitch Albom,
299:Do you drink?"
"Of course,I just said I was a writer. ~ Stephen King,
300:I'm glad I brought this course, this monster, to its knees. ~ Ben Hogan,
301:laced with sex. “Of course you have!” Marcus shouted. “I’m ~ K F Breene,
302:Of course, a story always begins with such a coincidence. ~ K ji Suzuki,
303:Of course I do. Just be careful out there.” “I always am. ~ Marie Force,
304:Of course we have been to the monster Church of St. Peter, ~ Mark Twain,
305:Of course you like him; everyone enjoys flattery. ~ Christopher Paolini,
306:One day, of course, no one will remember what I remember. ~ Donald Hall,
307:outside. Of course, he didn’t know any other vets either. ~ J L Langley,
308:The process of innovation is, of course, never ending. ~ Alan Greenspan,
309:The Tower trembles; the worlds shudder in their courses. ~ Stephen King,
310:this point I could not show myself, of course, or all would ~ Lee Smith,
311:though of course poverty is no crime—we must remember that! ~ Anonymous,
312:Today, let miracles replace all grievances. ~ A Course in Miracles#acim,
313:Truth is, of course, relative. But then, so is relative. ~ James Sallis,
314:An apology for America's values is never the right course. ~ Mitt Romney,
315:But of course the world consists only of absurd ideas. ~ Thomas Bernhard,
316:Course in Miracles is based on that precise process of ~ David R Hawkins,
317:False attributions are the bane of legitimate discourse. ~ Winston Smith,
318:Golf courses sell real estate and that's why they're built. ~ Ed McMahon,
319:I'm of course nostalgic for Barack Obama all of a sudden. ~ David Brooks,
320:I'm retired 99.9%. Of course, there always is that .1%. ~ Michael Jordan,
321:King Tieren’s men. Stay hidden. Of course I couldn’t obey. ~ Chanda Hahn,
322:Like billiard balls colliding our courses were altered. ~ Linda Collison,
323:Of course, die for the monster spawn. It was so Bella. ~ Stephenie Meyer,
324:Of course, everyone is intolerant of something or someone. ~ John Irving,
325:Of course those that have charm don't really need brains. ~ Evelyn Waugh,
326:percent of medical students take no course in geriatrics, ~ Atul Gawande,
327:Summer was over. Of course you can't tell in Los Angeles. ~ Ray Bradbury,
328:The problem is that most courses teach what is wrong. ~ W Edwards Deming,
329:But of course names were secret things, full of power. And ~ Stephen King,
330:Extremists usually describe the middle course as extreme. ~ Jay Heinrichs,
331:Have you been drinking?” Doc asked. “Of course,” Shane said. ~ Ron Ripley,
332:I am, of course, romanticizing; a chronic tendency of mine. ~ Tana French,
333:I love creating images, of course, because I'm an artist. ~ Steve McQueen,
334:Know her? Of course I know her. Everyone knows Poppy. She's famous. ~ Avi,
335:No intelligent person in Blue believes that, of course. ~ Neal Stephenson,
336:Of course. Ask your librarian. Always the right answer. ~ Marilyn Johnson,
337:Of course, no man is entirely in his right mind at any time. ~ Mark Twain,
338:Of course parents want their children to confide in them. ~ Dirk Nowitzki,
339:Of course, the male-directed films make more money. ~ Catherine Hardwicke,
340:Sexual attraction keeps throwing self-interest off course. ~ Mason Cooley,
341:Sexual intercourse is a poor substitute for masturbation. ~ Quentin Crisp,
342:The Futurists?.... Well, of course, they are already past. ~ Ada Leverson,
343:There is love of course. And then there's life, its enemy. ~ Jean Anouilh,
344:The sacrifice of pleasures is of course itself a pleasure. ~ Muriel Spark,
345:The study of Nature is intercourse with the Highest Mind. ~ Louis Agassiz,
346:[Women] Inferior? Superior! I am sexist, of course. ~ Janusz Korwin Mikke,
347:Being all of thirteen, of course you should be omniscient, ~ Tamora Pierce,
348:But, of course, what is up on Facebook is her edited life. ~ Sherry Turkle,
349:Does it ever end, he wondered. Of course it does. It did. ~ Thomas Pynchon,
350:Fix your course to a star and you can navigate any storm. ~ Robin S Sharma,
351:How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives. ~ Kate Harris,
352:In Southern Europe, we have, of course, very bad governments. ~ Gore Vidal,
353:Keep following your dreams even if you get off course. ~ Gwendolyn Heasley,
354:Nothing, of course, begins at the time you think it did. ~ Lillian Hellman,
355:Not that I don't trust you, of course, but I don't trust you. ~ John Green,
356:Not that I don’t trust you, of course, but I don’t trust you. ~ John Green,
357:Of course there is nothing that cannot be done incorrectly. ~ Joy Williams,
358:Of course we're talking about the DeLorean DMC-12, the one and ~ Anonymous,
359:The attempt to analyse was, of course, an attempt at exorcism. ~ P D James,
360:The institution of sexual intercourse is anti-feminist ~ Ti Grace Atkinson,
361:The key, of course, is to stay away from the losing years. ~ Vince McMahon,
362:The power of belief alone could change the course of history. ~ Ted Dekker,
363:The world is, of course, nothing but our conception of it. ~ Anton Chekhov,
364:Well, robots are, of course, the monkey's natural enemy. ~ Brian K Vaughan,
365:What's happening in the world is a natural course of events. ~ Byron Katie,
366:Yes, of course we were pretentious—what else is youth for? ~ Julian Barnes,
367:Your life must now run the course that's been set for it. ~ Kazuo Ishiguro,
368:Course he isn't safe. But he's good. He's the King, I tell you. ~ C S Lewis,
369:Do I open it? Do I open it? Of course I freaking open it! ~ James Patterson,
370:He also drank too much. That’s what the Irish do, of course. ~ James Runcie,
371:If the part is really good of course I would like to do it. ~ Werner Herzog,
372:I'm a girl; of course I have a built-in miss-o-meter. ~ Alexandra Adornetto,
373:In essence, life is a buffet and love is the main course. ~ Felix Alexander,
374:In medicine the use of the knife is often the kinder course. ~ Stefan Zweig,
375:I, of course, am considered mad, bad and dangerous to know. ~ Kate Atkinson,
376:Is the New York Times a Liberal Newspaper? Of course it is. ~ Daniel Okrent,
377:Of course, being zeroed was just a euphemism for being killed, ~ Joel Ohman,
378:Of course, everyone wants to be mythologized in a great way. ~ Mindy Kaling,
379:Of course he wants something. Gifts are down payments for sex. ~ K F Breene,
380:Of course I do, you silly, beautiful, oversensitive girl. ~ Stephenie Meyer,
381:Of course I'm crazy, but that doesn't mean I'm wrong. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
382:Of course on air I use occasional hyperbole to tell a story. ~ Adam Carolla,
383:Of course one should not drink much, but often. ~ Henri de Toulouse Lautrec,
384:Of course when you have a Bob dog everything is dog food. ~ Janet Evanovich,
385:The Americans, of course, are quite dotty with hospitality. ~ Quentin Crisp,
386:The breath of life of the Senate is, of course, continuity, ~ Robert A Caro,
387:The first essentials, of course, is to know what you want. ~ Robert Collier,
388:The out-of-date returns in due course as the picturesque. ~ Agatha Christie,
389:Though, of course, they haven’t even heard of Schiller. ~ Dmitry Glukhovsky,
390:To move with the times is, of course, to go where all times go. ~ C S Lewis,
391:You realize, of course, that everything I say is horseshit. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
392:A brave man is clear in his discourse, and keeps close to truth. ~ Aristotle,
393:And of course, I absolutely loved making Lost in Space as a kid. ~ Bill Mumy,
394:course, been attempted by Dark wizards, who have created Inferi, ~ Anonymous,
395:Don't you think that any secret course is an unworthy one? ~ Charles Dickens,
396:Fix your course on a star and you'll navigate any storm. ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
397:Good as is discourse, silence is better and shames it. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
398:How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives. ~ Annie Dillard,
399:In fact, of course, I hold that propositions that contemporary ~ Saul Kripke,
400:In what world are you living?” “The one you’re in, of course. ~ Summer Devon,
401:It is of course better to know useless things than to know nothing. ~ Seneca,
402:Like most celebrities, of course, I adore all the Mario games. ~ Josie Maran,
403:Of course, nobody does [want another Cuban Missile Crisis]. ~ Vladimir Putin,
404:Of course, the humans in Haiti have hope. They hope to leave. ~ P J O Rourke,
405:Of course, the medical profession doesn't like D.I.Y. anything. ~ Eric Topol,
406:Of course, the odds have not been very dependable of late. ~ Suzanne Collins,
407:one of those nightmares where it’s the final exam for a course ~ Tim Kreider,
408:There are very few courses around Detroit I haven't played ~ Smokey Robinson,
409:What I'm looking forward to is changing the course America is on. ~ Ted Cruz,
410:Are you kidding? I jumped off a building -- of course I'm hurt. ~ Derek Landy,
411:Art, of course, is a way of thinking, a way of mining reality. ~ John Gardner,
412:But of course, those who live in memories are never really dead ~ Kate Morton,
413:Curt Flood, of course, was in a class by himself, a true hero. ~ W P Kinsella,
414:Do I take criticism of Starbucks personally? Of course I do. ~ Howard Schultz,
415:Eternity, of course, does not mean endless time, but no time. ~ Eckhart Tolle,
416:Even the smallest person can change the course of the future. ~ J R R Tolkien,
417:He that hath the steerage of my course, Direct my sail. ~ William Shakespeare,
418:I live monastically,” Mathilde said, meaning, of course, more. ~ Lauren Groff,
419:I’m a politician, Gwenvael! Of course, I don’t have a conscience. ~ G A Aiken,
420:In my own life, I don't have intercourse. That is my choice. ~ Andrea Dworkin,
421:In Washington, success is just a training course for failure. ~ Simon Hoggart,
422:I was published in Tarbell Course in Magic when I was 12. ~ David Copperfield,
423:Law snorted. “Well of course he’s pissed. You are kind of a dick. ~ S E Jakes,
424:like a tank following a sports car through a slalom course. ~ Jeremy Robinson,
425:Of course, hate speech and racism have no place on Facebook ~ Mark Zuckerberg,
426:Of course, I'm not a doctor; I just watch a lot of ER and House. ~ Tucker Max,
427:Of course. Remember, I’ve seen you in her. And it’s wonderful. ~ Clive Barker,
428:Of course, there are a lot of things I'm angry about in the world. ~ Lykke Li,
429:Of course they needed to care. It was the meaning of everything. ~ Lois Lowry,
430:Of course you aren't scared of me. I'm not the wolf. You are. ~ Stylo Fantome,
431:Of course you know him. Everyone knows a pear-shaped man. ~ George R R Martin,
432:They both knew, of course, that Hal was hearing every word, ~ Arthur C Clarke,
433:With black people, there are 50 Hitlers over the course of history. ~ Chuck D,
434:Yes, of course we were pretentious -- what else is youth for? ~ Julian Barnes,
435:Britain is not the same anymore of course. It's never the same. ~ Van Morrison,
436:But of course not meaning harm isn’t the same as not doing harm. ~ John Scalzi,
437:But of course, those who live in memories are never really dead. ~ Kate Morton,
438:I don't need to know where the green is. Where is the golf course? ~ Babe Ruth,
439:I'm a hypocrite, of course, and I live with that, but I live. ~ David Guterson,
440:Journalism's been a continuing course in adult education for me. ~ Bill Moyers,
441:Money plays the largest part in determining the course of history. ~ Karl Marx,
442:No, no,’ said Sam. ‘Of course not. I’ve got a good friend who ~ Liane Moriarty,
443:Of course anyone can be simple if he has no facts to bother about. ~ C S Lewis,
444:Of course I don't love you. I can't. I don't know what love is ~ Stylo Fantome,
445:Of course. I loved it so much it made me want to spit on you!! ~ Jun Mochizuki,
446:Of course I'm an egoist. Where do you get if you aren't? ~ Winston S Churchill,
447:Of course, it's always complicated to shoot a sex scene. ~ Adele Exarchopoulos,
448:Of course we dance with our demons. Our angels are far too shy. ~ Kayla Krantz,
449:One who ”knows,” knows there is no need to discourse; knowing is enough ~ Osho,
450:Or was he saying, "Hi! Wanna play?" And I did. Of course I did. ~ Jeff Lindsay,
451:The eye that looks ahead to the safe course is closed forever. ~ Frank Herbert,
452:The mind, of course, is just what the brain does for a living. ~ Sharon Begley,
453:The only decent people I ever saw at the racecourse were horses. ~ James Joyce,
454:to describe. It still felt like paper, of course—a medium ~ Charlie N Holmberg,
455:You understand, of course, that everything I say is horseshit. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
456:All we women have are our dreams – so of course we are dreamers. ~ Miriam Toews,
457:A mind troubled by doubt cannot focus on the course of victory. ~ Arthur Golden,
458:At heart, of course, a story itself is consolation's instrument. ~ Richard Ford,
459:But why at least? What a business it is, the human discourse. I ~ John Banville,
460:examined children’s use of apology terms in parent–child discourse. ~ Anonymous,
461:He couldn’t see her face of course but he knew she was smiling. ~ Dalton Trumbo,
462:I have a ninja sitting shotgun. Of course I’m tense. ~ Courtney Allison Moulton,
463:In his mind a man plans his course, but the Lord directs his steps. ~ Anonymous,
464:It was male, of course; menace is always male. ("Nightmare") ~ Cornell Woolrich,
465:No Discourse whatsoever, can End in absolute Knowledge of Fact. ~ Thomas Hobbes,
466:Of course, you’d warm up faster if you took your clothes off. ~ Stephenie Meyer,
467:People think they want knowledge. Until they have it, of course. ~ Lisa Gardner,
468:Scientists and creationists are always at odds, of course. ~ Marilyn vos Savant,
469:Then of course," he said. "I'll follow you anywhere. ~ Courtney Allison Moulton,
470:There is some risk, of course. But risk is the spice of life. ~ Haruki Murakami,
471:Those whose courses are different cannot lay plans for one another. ~ Confucius,
472:what is the course of action that best serves this understanding ~ Atul Gawande,
473:"What should i do if Love seizes me?Start dancing of course!" ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
474:When you want only love, you will see nothing else. ~ A Course in Miracles#acim,
475:Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind. ~ Rudyard Kipling,
476:And I , delivered, shall read my course in the stars. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
477:A young girl must have her lover in all courses of the sun and moon. ~ J M Synge,
478:Every brain is different. And so must be every course of therapy. ~ Wendy Walker,
479:Flirting is a promise of sexual intercourse without a guarantee. ~ Milan Kundera,
480:He that hath the steerage of my course,
Direct my sail. ~ William Shakespeare,
481:I am billed as a humorist, but of course I am a tragedian at heart. ~ Will Cuppy,
482:I have a ninja sitting shotgun. Of course, I'm tense. ~ Courtney Allison Moulton,
483:I love the past. There are parts of the past I hate, of course. ~ Paul McCartney,
484:In the struggle between those seeking power there is no middle course. ~ Tacitus,
485:I was in the ROTC. Of course, ROTC stood for "Running off to Canada." ~ Jay Leno,
486:Just because it's anal intercourse doesn't mean it's not love. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
487:Mischief, thou art afoot. Take thou what course thou wilt. ~ Winston S Churchill,
488:My dominant (no pun intended) discourse seems to be needy as fuck. ~ Alexis Hall,
489:No offense, of course. You’re getting everyone killed swimmingly. ~ Tim Marquitz,
490:Of course bad code can be cleaned up. But it’s very expensive. ~ Robert C Martin,
491:Of course [I'm a feminist]. And everyone I know is a feminist. ~ Chelsea Clinton,
492:Once upon a time there was a beautiful Indian maiden, of course. ~ Stephen Crane,
493:Politics requires sacrifice. The sacrifice of others, of course. ~ Michael Dobbs,
494:Sexual intercourse is kicking death in the ass while singing. ~ Charles Bukowski,
495:Switch Recommends a Coding Career for You and Matches You to Courses ~ Anonymous,
496:Teddy Roosevelt of course was a great outdoorsman all his life. ~ Gaylord Nelson,
497:That which appears anew must also disappear in due course. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
498:The human heart, as of course we all know is essentially good ~ Charles Bukowski,
499:This is all I know, too. Perhaps together we can chart a new course. ~ E L James,
500:We love the Lord, of course, but we often wonder what He finds in us. ~ E W Howe,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



100

  101 Occultism
   44 Yoga
   38 Philosophy
   14 Integral Yoga
   13 Christianity
   7 Hinduism
   4 Kabbalah
   2 Integral Theory
   2 Buddhism


   95 Aleister Crowley
   45 Sri Aurobindo
   26 Aldous Huxley
   25 Swami Krishnananda
   18 Swami Vivekananda
   17 Sri Ramakrishna
   12 The Mother
   12 Satprem
   12 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   12 Carl Jung
   10 Saint Teresa of Avila
   9 Friedrich Nietzsche
   6 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   4 Jorge Luis Borges
   3 Thubten Chodron
   3 Swami Sivananda Saraswati
   3 Patanjali
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   2 Lewis Carroll
   2 Jorge Luis Borges
   2 Jean Gebser
   2 Italo Calvino
   2 Bokar Rinpoche


   70 Magick Without Tears
   33 Liber ABA
   26 The Perennial Philosophy
   25 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   21 Letters On Yoga I
   20 The Life Divine
   20 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   19 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   18 Savitri
   15 Letters On Yoga III
   13 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   13 Letters On Yoga II
   12 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   12 Aion
   11 The Mothers Agenda
   10 Words Of Long Ago
   10 Theosophy
   10 The Divine Comedy
   10 Talks
   10 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   9 The Way of Perfection
   9 The Problems of Philosophy
   9 The Mother With Letters On The Mother
   8 Twilight of the Idols
   8 Essays On The Gita
   8 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   8 Bhakti-Yoga
   8 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah
   7 The Bible
   7 Raja-Yoga
   6 Words Of The Mother II
   6 Walden
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   6 Essays Divine And Human
   5 The Interior Castle or The Mansions
   5 The Hero with a Thousand Faces
   5 Isha Upanishad
   5 Collected Poems
   5 Agenda Vol 1
   4 The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
   4 Liber Null
   3 The Red Book Liber Novus
   3 Sex Ecology Spirituality
   3 Patanjali Yoga Sutras
   3 Kena and Other Upanishads
   3 How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator
   3 General Principles of Kabbalah
   2 Words Of The Mother III
   2 The Secret Of The Veda
   2 The Integral Yoga
   2 The Ever-Present Origin
   2 The Castle of Crossed Destinies
   2 The Blue Cliff Records
   2 Tara - The Feminine Divine
   2 Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   2 Selected Fictions
   2 Poetics
   2 On Education
   2 God Exists
   2 Dark Night of the Soul
   2 Book of Certitude
   2 Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin
   2 Alice in Wonderland
   2 Advanced Dungeons and Dragons 2E


00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri, #Sweet Mother - Harmonies of Light, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  In truth, the entire form of Savitri has descended "en masse" from the highest region and Sri Aurobindo with His genius only arranged the lines - in a superb and magnificent style. Sometimes entire lines were revealed and He has left them intact; He worked hard, untiringly, so that the inspiration could come from the highest possible summit. And what a work He has created! Yes, it is a true creation in itself. It is an unequalled work. Everything is there, and it is put in such a simple, such a clear form; verses perfectly harmonious, limpid and eternally true. My child, I have read so many things, but I have never come across anything which could be compared with Savitri. I have studied the best works in Greek, Latin, English and of course French literature, also in German and all the great creations of the West and the East, including the great epics; but I repeat it, I have not found anywhere anything comparable with Savitri. All these literary works seems to me empty, flat, hollow, without any deep reality - apart from a few rare exceptions, and these too represent only a small fraction of what Savitri is. What grandeur, what amplitude, what reality: it is something immortal and eternal He has created. I tell you once again there is nothing like in it the whole world. Even if one puts aside the vision of the reality, that is, the essential substance which is the heart of the inspiration, and considers only the lines in themselves, one will find them unique, of the highest classical kind. What He has created is something man cannot imagine. For, everything is there, everything.
  

0.03_-_1951-1957._Notes_and_Fragments, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  Time and the course of events will make this abundantly clear.
  

0.04_-_1951-1954, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  Yes, certainly ... had there been any receptivity when She came down and had She been able to manifest with the power with which She came ... But I can tell you one thing: even before Her coming, when, with Sri Aurobindo, I had begun going down (for the Yoga) from the mental plane to the vital plane, when we brought our yoga down from the mental plane into the vital plane, in less than a month (I was forty years old at the time - I didn't seem very old, I looked less than forty, but I was forty anyway), after no more than a month of this yoga, I looked exactly like an 18 year old! And someone who knew me and had stayed with me in Japan 13 came here, and when he saw me, he could scarcely believe his eyes! He said, 'But my god, is it you?' I said, 'Of course!'
  Only when we went down from the vital plane into the physical plane, all this went away - because on the physical plane, the work is much harder and we had so much to do, so many things to change.

0.05_-_1955, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  Otherwise, Mother, there is this block before me that is obscuring all the rest and taking away my taste for everything. I would like to leave, Mother, but not in revolt; may it be an experience to go through that receives your approval. I would not like to be cut off from you by your displeasure or your condemnation, for this would seem to me terrible and leave me no other recourse but to plunge into the worst excesses in order to forget.
  

0.06_-_1956, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  Meditation brings calm and peace, of course, but so does sleep. We are all seeking release, in love, in opium, in action, in war or in power - or in Yoga; but one means is just as vain as the other.
  
  --
  
  I am facing the same difficulties as before my departure to Hyderabad, and I have made the same mistakes. The main reason for this state is that, on the one hand, words and ideas seem to have lost all power over me, and on the other, the vital elan which led me thus far is dead. So upon what shall my faith rest? I still have some faith, of course, but it has become totally ABSTRACT. The vital does not cooperate, so I feel all withered, suspended in a void, nothing seems to give me direction anymore. There is no rebelliousness in me, but rather a void.
  
  --
  For years I have dreamed of going to Chinese Turkestan. Should I head in that direction? Or towards Africa?
  I don't see a thing, nothing. Oh Mother, I turn towards you in this void that is stifling me. Hear my prayer. Tell me what I must do. Give me a sign. Mother, you are my sole recourse, for who else would show me the path to be taken, who else but you would love me? Or is my fate to go off into the night?
  Forgive me, Mother, for loving you so poorly, for giving myself so badly. Mother, you are my only hope, all the rest in me is utter despair.

0.06_-_INTRODUCTION, #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  darkness of the Active and the Passive Nights; they would tell us, too, of the soul's
  further progress towards the Sun's full brightness. It is true, of course, that some
  part of this great gap is filled by St. John of the Cross himself in his other treatises,

0.07_-_1957, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  For more than a year now, I have been hypnotized by the idea that if I give in, I will be
  'condemned' to remain here. Once more, forgive me for speaking so absurdly, for of course I know it is not a 'condemnation'; and yet a part of me feels that it would be.
  
  --
  
  She clearly remembered where her room was, but each time she set out to go there, either the staircase disappeared or things were so changed that she could no longer find her way! So she went here and there, up and down, searched, went in and out ... but it was impossible to find the way to her room! Since all of this assumed a physical appearance - as I said, a very familiar and very common appearance, as is always the case in these symbolic visions - there was somewhere (how shall I put it?) the hotel's administrative office and a woman who seemed to be the manager, who had all the keys and who knew where everyone was staying. So the daughter went to this person and asked her, 'Could you show me the way to my room?' - 'But of course! Easily!' Everyone around the manager looked at her as if to say, 'How can you say that?' However, she got up, and with authority asked for a key - the key to the daughter's room - saying, 'I shall take you there.'
  And off she went along all kinds of paths, but all so complicated, so bizarre! The daughter was following along behind her very attentively, you see, so as not to lose sight of her. But just as they should have come to the place where the daughter's room was supposed to be, suddenly the manageress (let us call her the manageress), both the manageress and her key ... vanished! And the sense of this vanishing was so acute that ... at the same time, everything vanished!
  --
  
  But besides all this, there is a special personal bond of affection between you and me, between all who have turned towards Sri Aurobindo's teaching and me - and of course, distance does not count; you may be in France, at the other end of the world, or in Pondicherry, but this bond remains just as real and as living. Each time there is a call, each time I need to know something to send out a force, an inspiration, a protection or whatever else, a sort of message suddenly comes to me, and I do what is needed. Obviously, these communications come to me at any moment whatsoever, and you may have seen me more than once suddenly stop in the middle of a sentence or some work: it means something, some communication is coming, so I concentrate.
  
  --
  
  6) In the course of time and even in the course of your present life, you can make your choice once and for all, irrevocably, and then you have only to confirm it with every new occasion; or else if you do not take a definite decision from the beginning, you will have to choose anew at each moment between the falsehood and the Truth.
  
  --
  
  But apart from the things that were around you at that minute, apart from that minute of contact with your psychic being, nothing remains. Once the privileged moment has passed, the psychic being sinks back into its inner somnolence and the whole outer life fades into a monotonous gray which leaves no trace. In fact, something of the same phenomenon occurs in the course of your present life: apart from those exceptional moments when you are at the summit of your mental, vital or even physical being, the rest of your existence seems to fade into an uninteresting, dull tonality, and it matters very little whether you have been at this place or some other or whether you have done this thing rather than another. If suddenly you try to look at your life in order to gather its essence - to peer twenty or thirty or forty years behind you - you will see two or three images spontaneously leap before you, and they are the true minutes of your life, but all the rest fades away. A spontaneous choice and a tremendous elimination thus take place in your consciousness.
  
  --
  
  Of course, one's early lives are quite rudimentary and little remains of them, a few scattered memories. But the more you progress in consciousness and the more the psychic being consciously associates itself with the outer activities, the more abundant, coherent and precise do the memories become - yet here too the memory that remains is that of the contact with the soul, and sometimes of the things associated with the psychic revelation - not your civil status nor the ever-changing setting. And this explains why these so-called memories of animal lives partake of the highest fantasies; in animals, the divine spark is too deeply buried to come to the surface consciously and be associated with the outer life. One must become a totally conscious being, in all the parts of the being, and be totally united with one's divine origin before one can truly say that one recalls his past lives.
  

01.02_-_The_Issue, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    Or yield her high destiny up to passing Chance.
    In her own self she found her high recourse;
    She matched with the iron law her sovereign right:
  --
    Then miracle is made the common rule,
    One mighty deed can change the course of things;
    A lonely thought becomes omnipotent.

01.04_-_Motives_for_Seeking_the_Divine, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  But of course that is not the spiritual life, it is only a sort of elementary religious approach. For the spiritual life to give and not to demand is the rule. The sadhak however can ask for the
  Divine Force to aid him in keeping his health or recovering it if he does that as part of his sadhana so that his body may be able and fit for the spiritual life and a capable instrument for the

01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Else to our waking mind's small moment look
  A goalless voyage seems our dubious course
  Some Chance has settled or hazarded some Will,
  --
  Along a path of aeons serpentine
  In the coiled blackness of her nescient course
  The Earth-Goddess toils across the sands of Time.
  --
  And experts of the theorem of world-need,
  Can see the Idea, the Might that change Time's course,
  Come maned with light from undiscovered worlds,
  --
  Here on the earth where we must fill our parts,
  We know not how shall run the drama's course;
  Our uttered sentences veil in their thought.
  --
  His journey through the days is her sun-march;
  He runs upon her roads; hers is his course.
  A witness and student of her joy and dole,
  --
  For love of her and joined to her for ever
  To follow the course of Time's eternity,
  Amid magic dramas of her sudden moods
  --
  His pay doled out from port to neighbour port,
  Content with his safe round's unchanging course,
  He hazards not the new and the unseen.

02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Only it strives to canalise its powers
  And hopes to turn its course to human ends:
  But all its means come from the Inconscient's store.

02.07_-_The_Descent_into_Night, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    Belief and memory abolished died
    And all that helps the spirit in its course.
    There crawled through every tense and aching nerve

02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Copies they made of all her guarded plans,
  For every turn of her mysterious course
  Assigned a reason and unchanging rule.
  --
  Even Nature's ignorance is Truth's instrument;
  Our struggling ego cannot change her course:
  Yet is it a conscious power that moves in us,

02.14_-_The_World-Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Prophetic of new personality
  Arranged the map of their coming destiny's course:
  Heirs of their past, their future's discoverers,

02.15_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Greater_Knowledge, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Its inevitable and continuous stream,
  The long flow of its manifesting course,
  Was held in spirit's single wide regard.
  --
  Thoughts rose in him no earthly mind can hold,
  Mights played that never coursed through mortal nerves:
  He scanned the secrets of the Overmind,

03.02_-_The_Adoration_of_the_Divine_Mother, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  A huge extinction is not God's last word,
  Life's ultimate sense, the close of being's course,
  The meaning of this great mysterious world.
  --
  Affirming in life a hidden ecstasy
  It held the spirit to its miraculous course;
  Carrying immortal values to the hours

03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Yet the divergent lines met not at all.
  Three Powers governed its irrational course,
  

03.03_-_The_Inner_Being_and_the_Outer_Being, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Men do not know themselves and have not learned to distinguish the different parts of their being; for these are usually lumped together by them as mind, because it is through a mentalised perception and understanding that they know or feel them; therefore they do not understand their own states and actions, or, if at all, then only on the surface. It is part of the foundation of
  Yoga to become conscious of the great complexity of our nature, see the different forces that move it and get over it a control of directing knowledge. We are composed of many parts each of which contributes something to the total movement of our consciousness, our thought, will, sensation, feeling, action, but we do not see the origination or the course of these impulsions; we are aware only of their confused pell-mell results on the surface upon which we can at best impose nothing better than a precarious shifting order.
  

04.04_-_The_Quest, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Nothing we think or do is void or vain;
  Each is an energy loosed and holds its course.
  The shadowy keepers of our deathless past
  --
  For sustenance of its short and passing days
  That, transient, keep their old repeated course,
  Unchanging in the circle of a sky

06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Fixing a doom no power could ever reverse
  Unless heaven's will itself could change its course.
  
  --
  It turned the straight path hewn by the body's gods,
  Followed the zigzag of the uncertain course
  Of life that wanders seeking for its aim
  --
  His soul's wide search and ever returning hopes
  Pursue the useless orbit of their course
  In a vain repetition of lost toils

07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Crosses the globe, journeys beneath the stars,
  To subtle worlds takes his ethereal course,
  Visits the Gods on Life's miraculous peaks,

07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  And great communions and uplifting moves,
  Its faith in heaven, its intercourse with hell.
  

09.01_-_Towards_the_Black_Void, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  She knew not to what course: her spirit above
  On the crypt-summit of her secret form

09.02_-_The_Journey_in_Eternal_Night_and_the_Voice_of_the_Darkness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  There was no course, no path, no end or goal:
  Visionless she moved amid insensible gulfs,
  --
  
  Who shall prohibit or hedge in his course,
  

1.001_-_The_Aim_of_Yoga, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  We are gradually led by this proclamation of the Veda into a tremendous vision of life which requires of us to have a superhuman power of will to grasp the interrelationship of things. This difficulty of grasping the meaning of the interrelationship of things is obviated systematically, stage by stage, gradually, by methods of practice. These methods are called yoga the practice of yoga. I have placed before you, perhaps, a very terrible picture of yoga; it is not as simple as one imagines. It is not a simple circus-master's feat, either of the body or the mind, but a superhuman demand of our total being. Mark this definition of mine: a superhuman demand which is made of our total being not an ordinary human demand of a part of our being, but of our total being. From that, a demand is made by the entire structure of life. The total structure of life requires of our total being to be united with it in a practical demonstration of thought, speech and action this is yoga. If this could be missed, and of course it can easily be missed as it is being done every day, then every effort, from the smallest to the biggest, becomes a failure. All our effort ends in no success, because it would be like decorating a corpse without a soul in it. The whole of life would look like a beautiful corpse with nicely dressed features, but it has no vitality, essence or living principle within it. Likewise, all our activities would look wonderful, beautiful, magnificent, but lifeless; and lifeless beauty is no beauty. There must be life in it only then has it a meaning. Life is not something dead; it is quite opposite of what is dead. We can bring vitality and life into our activity only by the introduction of the principle of yoga.
  

10.01_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Ideal, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Forms subtly elusive and half-luminous powers
  Wishing no goal for their unearthly course
  Strayed happily through vague ideal lands,

10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Turning of a wide circling aimless race
  Whose course for ever speeds and is the same.
  
  --
  Light was a luminous torture in his heart,
  Light coursed, a splendid agony, through his nerves;
  His darkness muttered perishing in her blaze.

1.007_-_Initial_Steps_in_Yoga_Practice, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  Life is very large; it is not confined only to our little room or to our body, and so this adjustment may have to be effected in all the fields of life with which we are directly connected. Though it is true that we are ultimately connected with everything in the universe, for the time being it is enough if we take into consideration those visible factors with which we are immediately concerned in our practical life. These factors have to be adjusted with our life, and vice versa. These factors are, of course, of various kinds. What are the factors in life with which we are connected? There are many things physical, geographical, social, political, moral, and intellectual all these, of course, are things with which we are connected. It is no use, therefore, laying emphasis only on the personal level while the person is also connected externally to the geographical, the historical, the political and the social aspects of life.
  

1.008_-_The_Principle_of_Self-Affirmation, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The determinate perceptions or the directly involved factors in our life are: love and hatred, self-assertion, and fear of death, including of course, or equivalent to, love of life. We are terribly fond of our own personal life, and we dread death. The physical individuality is to be protected at any cost by hook or by crook, by the struggle for existence, or as our biologists say, by the application of the law of the survival of the fittest. By struggle, by competition, by any method, we wish to survive. If it is a question of one's survival, one would not mind even the destruction of others, because it is a question of 'my life'.
  
  --
  
  Loves and hatreds change when our condition changes, so that likes and dislikes, loves and hatreds are the reactions set up in respect of certain external objects by the changing pattern of our own personality or individuality. If it is summer, I like to drink water; if it is winter, I like to drink hot tea. My liking for hot tea or for cold water has some connection with what is taking place inside me in my biological and psychological personality. When there is drying up of the system due to heat, there is a need for water I would like to drink cold water. But when it is freezing cold due to the wintry atmosphere, I would like to have hot tea. So our like of hot tea and dislike of cold water in winter is caused by a peculiar condition of our body coupled with the condition of the mind, of course. In summer we would not like to drink hot tea. We would like a soda or cold water, etc., and dislike anything that is hot; we would not like to have hot coffee or hot tea in such climate. "Oh, it is so hot. I will take cold water." We dislike during summer that very thing which we liked in winter. What has happened to us? Why did we like it that day and today we dislike it? It is not because there is something wrong with tea or something wrong with water. They are the same things; nothing has happened to them. But something has happened to us. So today I like that which I disliked the other day, and today I dislike that which I liked the other day. What is the reason? The reason is us only. What has happened to us? Something has happened to us. If one can very carefully go into the deepest recesses of one's nature, one would know why loves and hatreds arise in one's mind. We project upon others, by a peculiar process called a defense-mechanism in psychoanalysis, the counterpart of our own nature. That which will not fit into our present condition is not liked by us. By 'present condition' I mean physical, biological, psychological, social everything. Anything that will fit into our present physical, biological, psychological and social condition is liked or loved by us. Anything that is outside the need of this condition is disliked; it becomes an obstacle. "I don't like it," we say. Why don't we like it? We do not know. "I don't like it; that is all." But if we are good physicians of the mind we will know why it is that we like it, and why it is that we do not like it.
  

1.009_-_Perception_and_Reality, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  We are going from the lower stage to a higher stage, from the immediate experience of a concrete trouble to the causes thereof. We have a complex problem in the form of like and dislike for objects, and we want to maintain this condition of like and dislike. Therefore, there is love of life and fear of death, which, of course, requires the affirmation of the individual subject maintaining this attitude. We have now arrived at the stage where we understand that the reason behind all this psychological activity is the perception of an object as a real something, external to oneself. Why do we perceive the object? We are not deliberately, or of our own accord, perceiving the object; here also, we are forced. Ultimately we will find that everything that we do is under a compulsion. Though people parade under the notion that they are free people and they can do whatever they want, it is not so. There is no free person in this world. Everybody is a slave of an urge, a force, a compulsion that is at the back of all these psychological activities. Just as we cannot see our own back, we cannot see the existence of these forces they are behind.
  

1.00a_-_Introduction, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  I was very glad to gather from your conversation yesterday afternoon that you have a serious intention of taking up the Great Work in the proper spirit. Your criticisms of previous experience in the course of your adventures appeared to be singularly sane and just. As I promised I am writing this letter to cover a few practical points which we had not time to discuss and which in any case I think it better to arrange by correspondence.
  
  --
  
  As it is difficult for you to come to Town except at rare and irregular intervals, may I suggest a plan which has previously proved very useful, and that is a weekly letter. Eliphas Lvi did this with the Baron Spedalieri, and the correspondence is one of the most interesting of his works. You ask such questions as you wish to have answered, and I answer them to the best of my ability. I, of course, add spontaneous remarks which may be elicited by my observations on your progress and the perusal of your magical diary. This, of course, should be written on one side of the paper only, so that the opposite page is free for comments, and an arrangement should be made for it to be inspected at regular intervals.
  
  --
  
  Then again, you ask me questions like "What is purity?" that can be answered in a dozen different ways; and you must understand what is meant by a "universe of discourse." If you asked me "Is this sample of cloride of gold a pure sample?" I can answer you. You must understand the value of precision in speech. I could go on rambling about purity and selflessness for years, and no one would be a penny the better.
  
  --
  
  There is really only one point for your judgment. "By their fruits ye shall know them." You have read Liber LXV and Liber VII; That shows you what states you can attain by this cirriculum. Now read "A Master of the Temple" (Blue Equinox, pp. 127-170) for an account of the early stages of training, and their results. (Of course, your path might not coincide with, or even resemble, his path.)
  
  --
  
  In this motto you have really got several ideas combined, and yet they are really, of course, one idea. Fiat, being 811, is identical with IAO, and therefore FIAT YOD might be read not only as "let there be" (or "Let me become"), the secret source of all creative energy, but as "the secret source of the energy of Jehovah." The two words together, having the value of 831, they contain the secret meanings Pyramis and Phallos, which is the same idea in different forms; thus you have three ways of expressing the creative form, in its geometrical aspect, its human aspect, and its divine aspect. I am making a point of this, because the working out of this motto should give you a very clear idea of the sort of way in which Qabalah should be used. I think it is rather useful to remember what the essence of the Qabalah is in principle; thus, in your correspondence for Malkuth, Yesod, and Hod you are simply writing down some of the ideas which pertain to the numbers 10, 9, and 8 respectively. Naturally, there is a great deal of redundancy and overloading as soon as you get to ideas important enough to be comprehensive; as is mentioned in the article on the Qabalah in Equinox Vol. I, No. 5, it is quite easy to prove 1 = 2 = 3 = 4, etc.
  
  --
  
  I think I am fair if I say that the first step on the Qabalah which may be called success, is when you make an actual discovery which throws light on some problem which has been troubling you. A quarter of a century ago I was in New Orleans, and was very puzzled about my immediate course of action; in fact I may say I was very much distressed. There seemed literally nothing that I could do, so I bethought myself that I had better invoke Mercury. As soon as I got into the appropriate frame of mind, it naturally occurred to me, with a sort of joy, "But I am Mercury." I put it into Latin Mercurius sum, and suddenly something struck me, a sort of nameless reaction which said: "That's not quite right." Like a flash it came to me to put it into Greek, which gave me "' " and adding that up rapidly, I got the number 418, with all the marvellous correspondences which had been so abundantly useful to me in the past (See Equinox of the Gods, p. 138). My troubles disappeared like a flash of lightning.
  
  --
  
  Your expressions about "purifying the feelings" and so on are rather vague to enter into a scientific system like ours. The result which you doubtless refer to is attained automatically in the course of your experiments. Your very soon discover the sort of state of mind which is favourable or unfavourable to the work, and you also discover what is helpful and harmful to these states in your way of life. For instance, the practice like the non-receiving of gifts is all right for a Hindu whose mind is branded for ten thousand incarnations by the shock of accepting a cigarette or a cup of tea. Incidentally, most of the Eastern cults fall down when they come West, simply because they make no allowance for our different temperaments. Also they set tasks which are completely unsuitable to Europeans an immense amount of disappointment has been caused by failure to recognize these facts.
  
  --
  
  It seems to me that you should confine yourself very closely to the actual work in front of you. At the present moment, of course, this includes a good deal of general study; but my point is that the terms employed in that study should always be capable of precise definition. I am not sure whether you have my Little Essays Toward Truth. The first essay in the book entitled "Man" gives a full account of the five principles which go to make up Man according to the Qabalistic system. I have tried to define these terms as accurately as possible, and I think you will find them, in any case, clearer than those to which you have become accustomed with the Eastern systems. In India, by the way, no attempt is ever made to use these vague terms. They always have a very clear idea of what is meant by words like "Buddhi," "Manas" and the like. Attempts at translation are very unsatisfactory. I find that even with such a simple matter as the "Eight limbs of Yoga," as you will see when you come to read my Eight Lectures.
  
  --
  
  You ought to demonstrate your performance of the Pentagram Ritual to me; you are probably making any number of mistakes. I will, of course, take you carefully through the O.T.O. rituals to III as soon as you are fairly familiar with them. The plan of the grades is this:
  0 Attraction to the Solar System
  --
  
  There is thus no connection with the AA system and the Tree of Life. Of course, there are certain analogies.
  
  --
  
  1. That verse (AL. I, 44) condenses the whole magical technique. It makes clearwhen you have understood it the secret of success in the Great Work. Of course at first it appears a paradox. You must have an aim, and one aim only: yet on no account must you want to achieve it!!!
  
  --
  
  Please refrain from the obvious retort: "Then, in the long run, you can't possibly go wrong: so it doesn't matter what you do." Perfectly true, of course! (There is no single grain of dust that shall not attain to Buddhahood:" with some such words did the debauched old reprobate seek to console himself when Time began to take its revenge.) But the answer is simple enough: you happen to be the kind of being that thinks it does matter what course you steer; or, still more haughtily, you enjoy the pleasure of sailing.
  
  --
  
  4. Quite right, dear lady, about your incarnation memories acting as a "Guide to the Way Back." Of course, if you "missed an Egyptian Incarnation," you would not be so likely to be a little Martha, worried "about much serving." Don't get surfeited with knowledge, above all things; it is so very fascinating, so dreadfully easy; and the danger of becoming a pedant "Deuce take all your pedants! say I." Don't "dry-rot at ease 'till the Judgment Day."
  
  --
  
  Still, it would be kind of you to go through a page or so with me, and tell me where the shoe pinches. Of course I have realized the difficulty long ago; but I don't know the solution or if there is a solution. I did think of calling Magick "Magick Without Tears"; and I did try having my work cross-examined as I went on by minds of very inferior education or capacity. In fact, Parts I and II of Book 4 were thus tested.
  

1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  empirical theologians should feel themselves obliged to submit to this handicap,
  goodness only knows. And of course, so long as they confine empirical experience
  within these all too human limits, they are doomed to the perpetual stultification of

1.00_-_Gospel, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  Sri Ramakrishna, the God-man of modern India, was born at Kmrpukur. This village in the Hooghly District preserved during the last century the idyllic simplicity of the rural areas of Bengl. Situated far from the railway, it was untouched by the glamour of the city. It contained rice-fields, tall palms, royal banyans, a few lakes, and two cremation grounds. South of the village a stream took its leisurely course. A mango orchard dedicated by a neighbouring zamindr to the public use was frequented by the boys for their noonday sports. A highway passed through the village to the great temple of Jagannth at Puri, and the villagers, most of whom were farmers and craftsmen, entertained many passing holy men and pilgrims. The dull round of the rural life was broken by lively festivals, the observance of sacred days, religious singing, and other innocent pleasures.
  
  --
  
  When Rmkumr reprimanded Gaddhar for neglecting a "bread-winning education", the inner voice of the boy reminded him that the legacy of his ancestors - the legacy of Rm, Krishna, Buddha, Sankara, Rmnuja, Chaitanya - was not worldly security but the Knowledge of God. And these noble sages were the true representatives of Hindu society. Each of them was seated, as it were, on the crest of the wave that followed each successive trough in the tumultuous course of Indian national life. All demonstrated that the life current of India is spirituality. This truth was revealed to Gaddhar through that inner vision which scans past and future in one sweep, unobstructed by the barriers of time and space. But he was unaware of the history of the profound change that had taken place in the land of his birth during the previous one hundred years.
  
  --
  
  There are two stages of bhakti. The first is known as Vaidhi-Bhakti, or love of God qualified by scriptural injunctions. For the devotees of this stage are prescribed regular and methodical worship, hymns, prayers, the repetition of God's name, and the chanting of His glories. This lower bhakti in course of time matures into Par-Bhakti, or supreme devotion, known also as Prema, the most intense form of divine love. Divine love is an end in itself. It exists potentially in all human hearts, but in the case of bound creatures it is misdirected to earthly objects.
  
  --
  
  Keshab was the leader of the Brhmo Samj, one of the two great movements that, during the latter part of the nineteenth century, played an important part in shaping the course of the renascence of India. The founder of the Brhmo movement had been the great Rj Rmmohan Roy (1774-1833). Though born in an orthodox brhmin family, Rmmohan Roy had shown great sympathy for Islam and Christianity. He had gone to Tibet in search of the Buddhist mysteries. He had extracted from Christianity its ethical system, but had rejected the divinity of Christ as he had denied the Hindu Incarnations.
  
  --
  
  Pratp Chandra Mazumdr, the right-hand man of Keshab and an accomplished Brhmo preacher in Europe and America, bitterly criticized Sri Ramakrishna's use of uncultured language and also his austere attitude toward his wife. But he could not escape the spell of the Master's personality. In the course of an article about Sri Ramakrishna, Pratp wrote in the "Theistic Quarterly Review": "What is there in common between him and me? I, a Europeanized, civilized, self-centered, semi-sceptical, so-called educated reasoner, and he, a poor, illiterate, unpolished, half-idolatrous, friendless Hindu devotee?
  
  --
  
  It broadened their religious views and kindled in their hearts the yearning for God-realization; it made them understand and appreciate the rituals and symbols of Hindu religion, convinced them of the manifestation of God in diverse forms, and deepened their thoughts about the harmony of religions. The Master, too, was impressed by the sincerity of many of the, Brhmo devotees. He told them about his own realizations and explained to them the essence of his teachings, such as the necessity of renunciation, sincerity in the pursuit of one's own course of discipline, faith in God, the performance of one's duties without thought of results, and discrimination between the Real and the unreal.
  
  --
  
  The householder devotees generally visited Sri Ramakrishna on Sunday afternoons and other holidays. Thus a brotherhood was gradually formed, and the Master encouraged their fraternal feeling. Now and then he would accept an invitation to a devotee's home, where other devotees would also be invited. Kirtan would be arranged and they would spend hours in dance and devotional music. The Master would go into trances or open his heart in religious discourses and in the narration of his own spiritual experiences.
  
  --
  
  Similarly, man should be stamped with God before entering the world. Then he will not become attached to worldliness." Fully aware of the future course of their life, he asked them not to marry. The Master asked ashi whether he believed in God with form or in God without form. ashi replied that he was not even sure about the existence of God; so he could not speak one way or the other. This frank answer very much pleased the Master.
  
  --
  
  One early morning at three o'clock, about a year later, Gopl M was about to finish her daily devotions, when she was startled to find Sri Ramakrishna sitting on her left, with his right hand clenched, like the hand of the image of Gopl. She was amazed and caught hold of the hand, whereupon the figure vanished and in its place appeared the real Gopl, her Ideal Deity. She cried aloud with joy. Gopl begged her for butter. She pleaded her poverty and gave Him some dry coconut candies. Gopl sat on her lap, snatched away her rosary, jumped on her shoulders, and moved all about the room. As soon as the day broke she hastened to Dakshinewar like an insane woman. Of course Gopl accompanied her, resting His head on her shoulder. She clearly saw His tiny ruddy feet hanging over her breast. She entered Sri Ramakrishna's room. The Master had fallen into Samdhi. Like a child, he sat on her lap, and she began to feed him with butter, cream, and other delicacies. After some time he regained consciousness and returned to his bed. But the mind of Gopl's Mother was still roaming in another plane.
  
  --
  
  One night he had a haemorrhage of the throat. The doctor now diagnosed the illness as cancer. Narendra was the first to break this heart-rending news to the disciples. Within three days the Master was removed to Calcutta for better treatment. At Balarm's house he remained a week until a suitable place could be found at ympukur, in the northern section of Calcutta. During this week he dedicated himself practically without respite to the instruction of those beloved devotees who had been unable to visit him oftener at Dakshinewar. Discourses incessantly flowed from his tongue, and he often went into Samdhi. Dr. Mahendra Sarkr, the celebrated homeopath of Calcutta, was invited to undertake his treatment.
  

1.00_-_Gospel_Preface, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  As time went on and the number of devotees increased, the staircase room and terrace of the 3rd floor of the Morton Institution became a veritable Naimisaranya of modern times, resounding during all hours of the day, and sometimes of night, too, with the word of God coming from the Rishi-like face of M. addressed to the eager God-seekers sitting around. To the devotees who helped him in preparing the text of the Gospel, he would dictate the conversations of the Master in a meditative mood, referring now and then to his diary. At times in the stillness of midnight he would awaken a nearby devotee and tell him: "Let us listen to the words of the Master in the depths of the night as he explains the truth of the Pranava." ( Vednta Kesari XIX P. 142.) Swami Raghavananda, an intimate devotee of M., writes as follows about these devotional sittings: "In the sweet and warm months of April and May, sitting under the canopy of heaven on the roof-garden of 50 Amherst Street, surrounded by shrubs and plants, himself sitting in their midst like a Rishi of old, the stars and planets in their courses beckoning us to things infinite and sublime, he would speak to us of the mysteries of God and His love and of the yearning that would rise in the human heart to solve the Eternal Riddle, as exemplified in the life of his Master. The mind, melting under the influence of his soft sweet words of light, would almost transcend the frontiers of limited existence and dare to peep into the infinite. He himself would take the influence of the setting and say,'What a blessed privilege it is to sit in such a setting (pointing to the starry heavens), in the company of the devotees discoursing on God and His love!' These unforgettable scenes will long remain imprinted on the minds of his hearers." (Prabuddha Bharata Vol XXXVII P 497.)
  

1.00_-_Main, #Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  
  We have enjoined obligatory prayer upon you, with nine rak'ahs, to be offered at noon and in the morning and the evening unto God, the Revealer of Verses. We have relieved you of a greater number, as a command in the Book of God. He, verily, is the Ordainer, the Omnipotent, the Unrestrained. When ye desire to perform this prayer, turn ye towards the Court of My Most Holy Presence, this Hallowed Spot that God hath made the Centre round which circle the Concourse on High, and which He hath decreed to be the Point of Adoration for the denizens of the Cities of Eternity, and the Source of Command unto all that are in heaven and on earth; and when the Sun of Truth and Utterance shall set, turn your faces towards the Spot that We have ordained for you. He, verily, is Almighty and Omniscient.
  
  --
  
  God hath exempted women who are in their courses from obligatory prayer and fasting. Let them, instead, after performance of their ablutions, give praise unto God, repeating ninety-five times between the noon of one day and the next "Glorified be God, the Lord of Splendour and Beauty". Thus hath it been decreed in the Book, if ye be of them that comprehend.
  
  --
  
  Amongst the people is he whose learning hath made him proud, and who hath been debarred thereby from recognizing My Name, the Self-Subsisting; who, when he heareth the tread of sandals following behind him, waxeth greater in his own esteem than Nimrod. Say: O rejected one! Where now is his abode? By God, it is the nethermost fire. Say: O concourse of divines! Hear ye not the shrill voice of My Most Exalted Pen? See ye not this Sun that shineth in refulgent splendour above the All-Glorious Horizon? For how long will ye worship the idols of your evil passions? Forsake your vain imaginings, and turn yourselves unto God, your Everlasting Lord.
  
  --
  
  Let not your hearts be perturbed, O people, when the glory of My Presence is withdrawn, and the ocean of My utterance is stilled. In My presence amongst you there is a wisdom, and in My absence there is yet another, inscrutable to all but God, the Incomparable, the All-Knowing. Verily, We behold you from Our realm of glory, and shall aid whosoever will arise for the triumph of Our Cause with the hosts of the Concourse on high and a company of Our favoured angels.
  
  --
  
  It hath been decreed by God that, should any one of His servants intend to travel, he must fix for his wife a time when he will return home. If he return by the promised time, he will have obeyed the bidding of his Lord and shall be numbered by the Pen of His behest among the righteous; otherwise, if there be good reason for delay, he must inform his wife and make the utmost endeavour to return to her. Should neither of these eventualities occur, it behoveth her to wait for a period of nine months, after which there is no impediment to her taking another husband; but should she wait longer, God, verily, loveth those women and men who show forth patience. Obey ye My commandments, and follow not the ungodly, they who have been reckoned as sinners in God's Holy Tablet. If, during the period of her waiting, word should reach her from her husband, she should choose the course that is praiseworthy. He, of a truth, desireth that His servants and His handmaids should be at peace with one another; take heed lest ye do aught that may provoke intransigence amongst you. Thus hath the decree been fixed and the promise come to pass. If, however, news should reach her of her husband's death or murder, and be confirmed by general report, or by the testimony of two just witnesses, it behoveth her to remain single; then, upon completion of the fixed number of months, she is free to adopt the course of her choosing. Such is the bidding of Him Who is mighty and powerful in His command.
  
  --
  
  Should resentment or antipathy arise between husband and wife, he is not to divorce her but to bide in patience throughout the course of one whole year, that perchance the fragrance of affection may be renewed between them. If, upon the completion of this period, their love hath not returned, it is permissible for divorce to take place. God's wisdom, verily, hath encompassed all things. The Lord hath prohibited, in a Tablet inscribed by the Pen of His command, the practice to which ye formerly had recourse when thrice ye had divorced a woman. This He hath done as a favour on His part, that ye may be accounted among the thankful. He who hath divorced his wife may choose, upon the passing of each month, to remarry her when there is mutual affection and consent, so long as she hath not taken another husband. Should she have wed again, then, by this other union, the separation is confirmed and the matter is concluded unless, clearly, her circumstances change. Thus hath the decree been inscribed with majesty in this glorious Tablet by Him Who is the Dawning-place of Beauty.
  
  --
  
  Take heed lest the world beguile you as it beguiled the people who went before you! Observe ye the statutes and precepts of your Lord, and walk ye in this Way which hath been laid out before you in righteousness and truth. They who eschew iniquity and error, who adhere to virtue, are, in the sight of the one true God, among the choicest of His creatures; their names are extolled by the Concourse of the realms above, and by those who dwell in this Tabernacle which hath been raised in the name of God.
  
  --
  
  God hath enjoined upon you to observe the utmost cleanliness, to the extent of washing what is soiled with dust, let alone with hardened dirt and similar defilement. Fear Him, and be of those who are pure. Should the garb of anyone be visibly sullied, his prayers shall not ascend to God, and the celestial Concourse will turn away from him. Make use of rose-water, and of pure perfume; this, indeed, is that which God hath loved from the beginning that hath no beginning, in order that there may be diffused from you what your Lord, the Incomparable, the All-Wise, desireth.
  
  --
  
  We have asked nothing from you. For the sake of God We, verily, exhort you, and will be patient as We have been patient in that which hath befallen Us at your hands, O concourse of kings!
  
  --
  
  Thus counselleth you He Who is the Dayspring of Names, as bidden by Him Who is the All-Knowing, the All-Wise. The Promised One hath appeared in this glorified Station, whereat all beings, both seen and unseen, have rejoiced. Take ye advantage of the Day of God. Verily, to meet Him is better for you than all that whereon the sun shineth, could ye but know it. O concourse of rulers! Give ear unto that which hath been raised from the Dayspring of Grandeur: "Verily, there is none other God but Me, the Lord of Utterance, the All-Knowing." Bind ye the broken with the hands of justice, and crush the oppressor who flourisheth with the rod of the commandments of your Lord, the Ordainer, the All-Wise.
  
  --
  
  O people of Constantinople! Lo, from your midst We hear the baleful hooting of the owl. Hath the drunkenness of passion laid hold upon you, or is it that ye are sunk in heedlessness? O Spot that art situate on the shores of the two seas! The throne of tyranny hath, verily, been established upon thee, and the flame of hatred hath been kindled within thy bosom, in such wise that the Concourse on high and they who circle around the Exalted Throne have wailed and lamented. We behold in thee the foolish ruling over the wise, and darkness vaunting itself against the light. Thou art indeed filled with manifest pride. Hath thine outward splendour made thee vainglorious? By Him Who is the Lord of mankind! It shall soon perish, and thy daughters and thy widows and all the kindreds that dwell within thee shall lament. Thus informeth thee the All-Knowing, the All-Wise.
  
  --
  
  O peoples of the world! Give ear unto the call of Him Who is the Lord of Names, Who proclaimeth unto you from His habitation in the Most Great Prison: "Verily, no God is there but Me, the Powerful, the Mighty, the All-Subduing, the Most Exalted, the Omniscient, the All-Wise." In truth, there is no God but Him, the Omnipotent Ruler of the worlds. Were it His Will, He would, through but a single word proceeding from His presence, lay hold on all mankind. Beware lest ye hesitate in your acceptance of this Cause-a Cause before which the Concourse on high and the dwellers of the Cities of Names have bowed down. Fear God, and be not of those who are shut out as by a veil. Burn ye away the veils with the fire of My love, and dispel ye the mists of vain imaginings by the power of this Name through which We have subdued the entire creation.
  
  --
  
  O concourse of divines! When My verses were sent down, and My clear tokens were revealed, We found you behind the veils. This, verily, is a strange thing. Ye glory in My Name, yet ye recognized Me not at the time your Lord, the All-Merciful, appeared amongst you with proof and testimony. We have rent the veils asunder. Beware lest ye shut out the people by yet another veil. Pluck asunder the chains of vain imaginings, in the name of the Lord of all men, and be not of the deceitful. Should ye turn unto God and embrace His Cause, spread not disorder within it, and measure not the Book of God with your selfish desires. This, verily, is the counsel of God aforetime and hereafter, and to this God's witnesses and chosen ones, yea, each and every one of Us, do solemnly attest.
  
  --
  
  Beware lest any name debar you from Him Who is the Possessor of all names, or any word shut you out from this Remembrance of God, this Source of Wisdom amongst you. Turn unto God and seek His protection, O concourse of divines, and make not of yourselves a veil between Me and My creatures. Thus doth your Lord admonish you, and command you to be just, lest your works should come to naught and ye yourselves be oblivious of your plight. Shall he who denieth this Cause be able to vindicate the truth of any cause throughout creation? Nay, by Him Who is the Fashioner of the universe! Yet the people are wrapped in a palpable veil. Say: Through this Cause the day-star of testimony hath dawned, and the luminary of proof hath shed its radiance upon all that dwell on earth. Fear God, O men of insight, and be not of those who disbelieve in Me. Take heed lest the word "Prophet" withhold you from this Most Great Announcement, or any reference to "Vicegerency" debar you from the sovereignty of Him Who is the Vicegerent of God, which overshadoweth all the worlds. Every name hath been created by His Word, and every cause is dependent on His irresistible, His mighty and wondrous Cause. Say: This is the Day of God, the Day on which naught shall be mentioned save His own Self, the omnipotent Protector of all worlds. This is the Cause that hath made all your superstitions and idols to tremble.
  
  --
  
  O concourse of divines! Beware lest ye be the cause of strife in the land, even as ye were the cause of the repudiation of the Faith in its early days. Gather the people around this Word that hath made the pebbles to cry out: "The Kingdom is God's, the Dawning-place of all signs!" Thus doth your Lord admonish you, as a bounty on His part; He, of a truth, is the Ever-Forgiving, the Most Generous.
  

1.00_-_Preface, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  
  I should here call attention to a tract, the author of which is unknown, entitled The Thirty-two Paths of Wisdom, of which splendid translations have been made by W. Wynn Westcott, Arthur E. Waite, and Knut Stenring. In the course of time this appears to have become incorporated into, and affiliated with, the text of the Sepher Yetsirah, although several critics place it at a later date than the genuine Mishnahs of the Sepher Yetsirah. However, in giving the titles of the Paths from this tract, I have named throughout the source as the Sepher Yetsirah to avoid unnecessary confusion. It is to be hoped that no adverse criticism will arise on this point.
  

1.00_-_Preliminary_Remarks, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  I wrote this book down from Frater Perdurabo's dictation at the Villa Caldarazzo, Posilippo, Naples, where I was studying under him, a villa actually prophesied to us long before we reached Naples by that Brother of the A.'.A.'. who appeared to me in Zurich. Any point which was obscure to me was cleared up in some new discourse (the discourses have consequently been re-arranged). Before printing, the whole work was read by several persons of rather less than average intelligence, and any point not quite clear even to them has been elucidated.
  
  --
  
  Of course great men will never conform with the standards of little men, and he whose mission it is to overturn the world can hardly escape the title of revolutionary. The fades of a period always furnish terms of abuse. The fad of Caiaphas was Judaism, and the Pharisees told him that Christ blasphemed. Pilate was a loyal Roman; to him they accused Christ of sedition. When the Pope had all power it was necessary to prove an enemy a heretic. Advancing to-day towards a medical oligarchy, we try to prove that our opponents are insane, and (in a Puritan country) to attack their morals. We should then avoid all rhetoric, and try to investigate with perfect freedom from bias the phenomena which occurred to these great leaders of mankind.
  
  --
  
  Similarly the visions of Joan of Arc were entirely Christian; but she, like all the others we have mentioned, found somewhere the force to do great things. Of course, it may be said that there is a fallacy in the argument; it may be true that all these great people saw God, but it does not follow that every one who sees God will do great things.
  

1.010_-_Self-Control_-_The_Alpha_and_Omega_of_Yoga, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  If we miss the practice even one day, we will miss the link of action, because it is easy to follow the course of the senses and difficult to control them and act in a reverse order. The senses have a peculiar habit if we do not allow them to act according to their whims and fancies even on a single day, the next day they become more powerful and vehement, like a servant who has not been paid his salary and will not do his work. He will murmur, grumble, and he will say all kinds of things because we have not paid his dues. He will say, "I'll go. I will do this or that." Likewise are the senses. They are like servants who have not been paid their dues because of our act of self-control, so they murmur, grumble, and threaten us and tell us, "One day we will do something to you"- and they may even do that if we are careless. They may finish us and see that we are done for ultimately, if as masters we are careless with the servants. So, even for one day we cannot miss the practice.
  

1.012_-_Sublimation_-_A_Way_to_Reshuffle_Thought, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The culture of yoga does not tell us to reject, abandon, or to cut off anything if it is real, because the whole question is an assessment of values, and reality is, of course, the background of every value. What is achieved in spiritual education is a rise of consciousness from a lower degree of reality to a higher degree of reality, and in no degree is there a rejection of reality. It is only a growth from a lower level to a higher one. So when we go to the higher degree of reality, we are not rejecting the lower degree of reality, but rather we have overcome it. We have transcended it, just as when a student goes to a higher class in an educational career, that higher class transcends the lower degrees of kindergarten, first standard, second standard and third standard, but it does not reject them. Rejection is not what is implied; rather it is an absorption of values into a higher inclusive condition of understanding, insight and education.
  
  --
  
  First of all, we must determine the intensity of the desire before we try to deal with it. The desire may be very mild, or it may be very intense. If it is mild, we may take one course of action towards it. If it is very intense, another course may have to be taken. Like a fever suppose it is only a very mild fever, 98.8, for which we need not go to the doctor for medication, and we need not lie down in bed; it is very mild. We can fast one day take a purgative and fast and perhaps it will be all right. But it is not all right if the fever is 105; then we have to do something immediately because it has risen beyond a certain limit.
  
  Likewise is a desire. What is the percentage of the intensity of the desire? Is it irresistible and impossible to control? Has it almost taken charge of us? If so, what are we to do? When the desire is very intense, what are we to do? There is only one way - we go to the Guru. "My desire is very intense. What am I to do at this time?" The Guru will tell us what step to take. If the desire is very mild, then of course we can find the solution by ourselves. Suppose we have a desire to eat a banana. We eat the banana, and the matter is closed; it is not a very serious matter. We want to have a cup of tea. We have a cup of tea and are done with it. But suppose we want to become the President of India. This is a very serious desire. We cannot fulfil it in two or three days, and we may have to take another birth to fulfil it. We have to think very seriously about such desires. "Oh, I have such a desire. I want to become Rashtrapati, and it is an irresistible desire." But the means are such that it is not practicable, and so we will have to take another birth.
  
  --
  
  Another way of dealing with a desire is substitution instead of giving it one thing, we give it another thing. If we have a craving to smoke a cigar, we drink a strong cup of coffee instead; some milder substance is given. Or if a child is crying and throwing a tantrum, demanding a knife that we are holding, for good reason we will not give the knife to the child, so we will substitute another thing such as a sweetmeat or a toy for the knife, saying, "My dear child, this is not a good thing. I will give you something better." Instead of a knife, we give a toy. We substitute one thing for the other thing that was asked for. This is a better way, of course, than suppression, though it is not a complete solution. Merely because we have diverted the course of the river from one direction to another, it does not mean that the intensity of its flow has ceased.
  
  The third way to handle desire, which is the only effective course, is sublimation. Sublimation is the only technique to be adopted. Sublimation means boiling, melting and transforming the desire into a new substance altogether. The desire is no longer a desire; it has become something else. The shape of the desire has changed, and it has now become something quite different from what it was. This is the most difficult of all the techniques of self-control. The emotions are the motive power behind our thoughts, will and actions. Whatever we do is generally driven from behind by an emotion, like a dynamo, and this emotion is connected with desire. The desire is inseparable from an emotion. An emotion need not necessarily be a kind of upheaval of feeling. That upheaval is felt only when the desire is very intense. Otherwise, it is like a mild ripple on the surface of a lake. When it becomes very intense it is like a strong wave on the ocean, throwing everything hither and thither nevertheless, it is an emotion.
  

1.013_-_Defence_Mechanisms_of_the_Mind, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The special term used in the Yoga Vasishtha for this kind of practice of the principle of the Self behind all things is 'brahmabhyasa'. Brahmabhyasa or atmabhyasa is the practice of the presence of God. A Christian mystic called Brother Lawrence used to practise this technique called 'The Practice of the Presence of God'. The technique involved the practise of the presence of God in everything. It is quite clear that the recognition of the presence of God in things will prevent us from going wrong because, in the presence of God, we would not do anything undesirable. So the recognition of the presence of God in all things is the final remedy for the errors of the mind, and subsequently, of course, of the mistaken movements of the senses.
  
  --
  
  Hence, the Yoga Vasishtha prescribes other psychological methods of mind-control apart from this utter dependence on the Absolute, which is meant only for very advanced practioners. Psychological techniques of mind-control are of various types. We have to determine the weaknesses of the mind first. The weak spots and the vulnerable areas of the mind have to be detected before we tackle the mind's functions in respect of objects. Everyone has some weaknesses, and if we touch a weak spot, the person automatically becomes different from his usual self. But in the ordinary course, these weaknesses are always covered over by the veneer of social activity and public etiquette, etc. There is no one without some sort of a vulnerable spot, and that spot is the essential point to be tackled not only in our workaday life, but also in our spiritual life.
  
  --
  
  Broadly speaking, there are various phases of the individual the physical needs and the psychological needs experienced by us daily which make us hang on to things, like slaves. We cannot bear extreme heat; we cannot bear extreme cold; we cannot bear hunger; we cannot bear thirst. These are the immediate creature needs of the individual which makes it totally dependent on external factors. We cannot control these urges by any amount of effort. There are other vital needs of the individual which press it forward towards fulfilment. The vital urges are forceful impulses which drive the mind and the senses towards their objects of fulfilment, and these are, again, the weak spots. If we are in a position to fulfil the needs of the body, the mind and the senses in any measure whatsoever, we become friends. A friend is one who can fulfil our needs; and this is, of course, how we usually define a friend. My needs have to be fulfilled, whatever the needs may be, and when the needs are analysed threadbare, the structure of the mind and the senses are automatically analysed also.
  

1.01_-_Appearance_and_Reality, #The Problems of Philosophy, #Bertrand Russell, #Philosophy
  
  Such an argument, in my opinion, is fallacious; and of course those who advance it do not put it so shortly or so crudely. But whether valid or not, the argument has been very widely advanced in one form or another; and very many philosophers, perhaps a majority, have held that there is nothing real except minds and their ideas. Such philosophers are called
  'idealists'. When they come to explaining matter, they either say, like

1.01_-_Asana, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  In a few days, however, in all cases, the discomforts will begin. As you go on, they will begin earlier in the course of the hour's exercise. The disinclination to practise at all may become almost unconquerable. One must warn the student against imagining that some other position would be easier to master than the one he has selected. Once you begin to change about you are lost.
  

1.01_-_Description_of_the_Castle, #The Interior Castle or The Mansions, #Saint Teresa of Avila, #Christianity
  
  4.: Let us imagine, as I said, that there are many rooms in this castle, of which some are above, some below, others at the side; in the centre, in the very midst of them all, is the principal chamber in which God and the soul hold their most secret intercourse.7' Think over this comparison very carefully; God grant it may enlighten you about the different kinds of graces He is pleased to bestow upon the soul. No one can know all about them, much less a person so ignorant as I am. The knowledge that such things are possible will console you greatly should our Lord ever grant you any of these favours; people themselves deprived of them can then at least praise Him for His great goodness in bestowing them on others. The thought of heaven and the happiness of the saints does us no harm, but cheers and urges us to win this joy for ourselves, nor will it injure us to know that during this exile God can communicate Himself to us loathsome worms; it will rather make us love Him for such immense goodness and infinite mercy.
  

1.01_-_Economy, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  Food and Shelter. The necessaries of life for man in this climate may, accurately enough, be distributed under the several heads of Food,
  Shelter, Clothing, and Fuel; for not till we have secured these are we prepared to entertain the true problems of life with freedom and a prospect of success. Man has invented, not only houses, but clothes and cooked food; and possibly from the accidental discovery of the warmth of fire, and the consequent use of it, at first a luxury, arose the present necessity to sit by it. We observe cats and dogs acquiring the same second nature. By proper Shelter and Clothing we legitimately retain our own internal heat; but with an excess of these, or of Fuel, that is, with an external heat greater than our own internal, may not cookery properly be said to begin? Darwin, the naturalist, says of the inhabitants of Tierra del Fuego, that while his own party, who were well clothed and sitting close to a fire, were far from too warm, these naked savages, who were farther off, were observed, to his great surprise, to be streaming with perspiration at undergoing such a roasting. So, we are told, the New Hollander goes naked with impunity, while the European shivers in his clothes. Is it impossible to combine the hardiness of these savages with the intellectualness of the civilized man? According to Liebig, mans body is a stove, and food the fuel which keeps up the internal combustion in the lungs. In cold weather we eat more, in warm less. The animal heat is the result of a slow combustion, and disease and death take place when this is too rapid; or for want of fuel, or from some defect in the draught, the fire goes out. Of course the vital heat is not to be confounded with fire; but so much for analogy. It appears, therefore, from the above list, that the expression, _animal life_, is nearly synonymous with the expression, _animal heat_; for while Food may be regarded as the Fuel which keeps up the fire within us,and Fuel serves only to prepare that
  Food or to increase the warmth of our bodies by addition from without,Shelter and Clothing also serve only to retain the _heat_ thus generated and absorbed.
  --
  The grand necessity, then, for our bodies, is to keep warm, to keep the vital heat in us. What pains we accordingly take, not only with our
  Food, and Clothing, and Shelter, but with our beds, which are our night-clothes, robbing the nests and breasts of birds to prepare this shelter within a shelter, as the mole has its bed of grass and leaves at the end of its burrow! The poor man is wont to complain that this is a cold world; and to cold, no less physical than social, we refer directly a great part of our ails. The summer, in some climates, makes possible to man a sort of Elysian life. Fuel, except to cook his Food, is then unnecessary; the sun is his fire, and many of the fruits are sufficiently cooked by its rays; while Food generally is more various, and more easily obtained, and Clothing and Shelter are wholly or half unnecessary. At the present day, and in this country, as I find by my own experience, a few implements, a knife, an axe, a spade, a wheelbarrow, &c., and for the studious, lamplight, stationery, and access to a few books, rank next to necessaries, and can all be obtained at a trifling cost. Yet some, not wise, go to the other side of the globe, to barbarous and unhealthy regions, and devote themselves to trade for ten or twenty years, in order that they may live,that is, keep comfortably warm,and die in New England at last. The luxuriously rich are not simply kept comfortably warm, but unnaturally hot; as I implied before, they are cooked, of course _ la mode_.
  
  --
  they were forced to cut their bread very thin for a long season. The secretary of the Province of New Netherland, writing in Dutch, in 1650, for the information of those who wished to take up land there, states more particularly that those in New Netherland, and especially in New
  England, who have no means to build farmhouses at first according to their wishes, dig a square pit in the ground, cellar fashion, six or seven feet deep, as long and as broad as they think proper, case the earth inside with wood all round the wall, and line the wood with the bark of trees or something else to prevent the caving in of the earth; floor this cellar with plank, and wainscot it overhead for a ceiling, raise a roof of spars clear up, and cover the spars with bark or green sods, so that they can live dry and warm in these houses with their entire families for two, three, and four years, it being understood that partitions are run through those cellars which are adapted to the size of the family. The wealthy and principal men in New England, in the beginning of the colonies, commenced their first dwelling houses in this fashion for two reasons; firstly, in order not to waste time in building, and not to want food the next season; secondly, in order not to discourage poor laboring people whom they brought over in numbers from Fatherland. In the course of three or four years, when the country became adapted to agriculture, they built themselves handsome houses, spending on them several thousands.
  
  In this course which our ancestors took there was a show of prudence at least, as if their principle were to satisfy the more pressing wants first. But are the more pressing wants satisfied now? When I think of acquiring for myself one of our luxurious dwellings, I am deterred, for, so to speak, the country is not yet adapted to _human_ culture, and we are still forced to cut our _spiritual_ bread far thinner than our forefathers did their wheaten. Not that all architectural ornament is to be neglected even in the rudest periods; but let our houses first be lined with beauty, where they come in contact with our lives, like the tenement of the shellfish, and not overlaid with it. But, alas! I have been inside one or two of them, and know what they are lined with.
  
  --
  
  Near the end of March, 1845, I borrowed an axe and went down to the woods by Walden Pond, nearest to where I intended to build my house, and began to cut down some tall, arrowy white pines, still in their youth, for timber. It is difficult to begin without borrowing, but perhaps it is the most generous course thus to permit your fellow-men to have an interest in your enterprise. The owner of the axe, as he released his hold on it, said that it was the apple of his eye; but I returned it sharper than I received it. It was a pleasant hillside where I worked, covered with pine woods, through which I looked out on the pond, and a small open field in the woods where pines and hickories were springing up. The ice in the pond was not yet dissolved, though there were some open spaces, and it was all dark colored and saturated with water. There were some slight flurries of snow during the days that I worked there; but for the most part when I came out on to the railroad, on my way home, its yellow sand heap stretched away gleaming in the hazy atmosphere, and the rails shone in the spring sun, and I heard the lark and pewee and other birds already come to commence another year with us. They were pleasant spring days, in which the winter of mans discontent was thawing as well as the earth, and the life that had lain torpid began to stretch itself. One day, when my axe had come off and I had cut a green hickory for a wedge, driving it with a stone, and had placed the whole to soak in a pond hole in order to swell the wood, I saw a striped snake run into the water, and he lay on the bottom, apparently without inconvenience, as long as I stayed there, or more than a quarter of an hour; perhaps because he had not yet fairly come out of the torpid state. It appeared to me that for a like reason men remain in their present low and primitive condition; but if they should feel the influence of the spring of springs arousing them, they would of necessity rise to a higher and more ethereal life.
  
  --
  Those things for which the most money is demanded are never the things which the student most wants. Tuition, for instance, is an important item in the term bill, while for the far more valuable education which he gets by associating with the most cultivated of his contemporaries no charge is made. The mode of founding a college is, commonly, to get up a subscription of dollars and cents, and then following blindly the principles of a division of labor to its extreme, a principle which should never be followed but with circumspection,to call in a contractor who makes this a subject of speculation, and he employs
  Irishmen or other operatives actually to lay the foundations, while the students that are to be are said to be fitting themselves for it; and for these oversights successive generations have to pay. I think that it would be _better than this_, for the students, or those who desire to be benefited by it, even to lay the foundation themselves. The student who secures his coveted leisure and retirement by systematically shirking any labor necessary to man obtains but an ignoble and unprofitable leisure, defrauding himself of the experience which alone can make leisure fruitful. But, says one, you do not mean that the students should go to work with their hands instead of their heads? I do not mean that exactly, but I mean something which he might think a good deal like that; I mean that they should not _play_ life, or _study_ it merely, while the community supports them at this expensive game, but earnestly _live_ it from beginning to end. How could youths better learn to live than by at once trying the experiment of living? Methinks this would exercise their minds as much as mathematics. If I wished a boy to know something about the arts and sciences, for instance, I would not pursue the common course, which is merely to send him into the neighborhood of some professor, where any thing is professed and practised but the art of life;to survey the world through a telescope or a microscope, and never with his natural eye; to study chemistry, and not learn how his bread is made, or mechanics, and not learn how it is earned; to discover new satellites to Neptune, and not detect the motes in his eyes, or to what vagabond he is a satellite himself; or to be devoured by the monsters that swarm all around him, while contemplating the monsters in a drop of vinegar.
  
  --
  
  One young man of my acquaintance, who has inherited some acres, told me that he thought he should live as I did, _if he had the means_. I would not have any one adopt _my_ mode of living on any account; for, beside that before he has fairly learned it I may have found out another for myself, I desire that there may be as many different persons in the world as possible; but I would have each one be very careful to find out and pursue _his own_ way, and not his fathers or his mothers or his neighbors instead. The youth may build or plant or sail, only let him not be hindered from doing that which he tells me he would like to do. It is by a mathematical point only that we are wise, as the sailor or the fugitive slave keeps the polestar in his eye; but that is sufficient guidance for all our life. We may not arrive at our port within a calculable period, but we would preserve the true course.
  
  --
  
  I would not subtract any thing from the praise that is due to philanthropy, but merely demand justice for all who by their lives and works are a blessing to mankind. I do not value chiefly a mans uprightness and benevolence, which are, as it were, his stem and leaves. Those plants of whose greenness withered we make herb tea for the sick, serve but a humble use, and are most employed by quacks. I want the flower and fruit of a man; that some fragrance be wafted over from him to me, and some ripeness flavor our intercourse. His goodness must not be a partial and transitory act, but a constant superfluity, which costs him nothing and of which he is unconscious. This is a charity that hides a multitude of sins. The philanthropist too often surrounds mankind with the remembrance of his own cast-off griefs as an atmosphere, and calls it sympathy. We should impart our courage, and not our despair, our health and ease, and not our disease, and take care that this does not spread by contagion. From what southern plains comes up the voice of wailing? Under what latitudes reside the heathen to whom we would send light? Who is that intemperate and brutal man whom we would redeem? If any thing ail a man, so that he does not perform his functions, if he have a pain in his bowels even,for that is the seat of sympathy,he forthwith sets about reformingthe world.
  

1.01_-_Foreward, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  emerges by this way of understanding the Veda? It is what we
  would expect from the nature of the seeking of the mystics everywhere. It is also, as we should expect from the actual course of
  the development of Indian culture, an early form of the spiritual

1.01_-_Fundamental_Considerations, #The Ever-Present Origin, #Jean Gebser, #Integral
  
  The structuration we have discovered seems to us to reveal the bases of consciousness, thereby enabling us to make a contribution to the understanding of mans emergent consciousness. It is based on the recognition that in the course of mankinds history - and not only Western mans - clearly discernable worlds stand out whose development or unfolding took place in mutations of consciousness. This, then, presents the task of a cultural-historical analysis of the various structures of consciousness as they have proceeded from the various mutations.
  

1.01_-_Historical_Survey, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  Szinessy, one-time Reader in Rabbinic and Talmudic literature at Cambridge, says : " The nucleus of the book is of Mishnic times. Rabbi Shimeon ben Yochai was the author of the Zohar in the same sense that Rabbi Yohanan was the author of the Palestinian Talmud ; i.e., he gave the first impulse to the composition of the book." And I find that Mr. Arthur Edward Waite in his scholarly and classic work The Holy Kaballah, wherein he examines most of the arguments concerning the origin and history of this
  Book of Splendour, inclines to the view hereinbefore set forth, steering a middle course, believing that while much of it does pertain to the era of ben Leon, nevertheless a
  
  --
  It is really a continuation of the old stream of Talmudic and
  Midrashic thought with the admixture of extraneous ele- ments picked up, as was inevitable, by the stream's course through many lands - elements the commingling of which must have, in many ways, transformed the original colour and nature of the stream."
  

1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Occultism
  
  THERE slumber in every human being faculties by means of which he can acquire for himself a knowledge of higher worlds. Mystics, Gnostics, Theosophists-all speak of a world of soul and spirit which for them is just as real as the world we see with our physical eyes and touch with our physical hands. At every moment the listener may say to himself: that, of which they speak, I too can learn, if I develop within myself certain powers which today still slumber within me. There remains only one question-how to set to work to develop such faculties. For this purpose, they only can give advice who already possess such powers. As long as the human race has existed there has always been a method of training, in the course of which individuals
   p. 2
  --
   p. 12
   different aspect. Of course, this rule of life alone will not yet enable him to see, for instance, what is described as the human aura, because for this still higher training is necessary. But he can rise to this higher training if he has previously undergone a rigorous training in devotion. (In the last chapter of his book Theosophy, the author describes fully the Path of Knowledge; here it is intended to give some practical details.)
  
  --
  
  At the very beginning of his course, the student is directed to the path of veneration and the
   p. 18
  --
   p. 25
   to himself: "I will summon all my strength to do my work as well as I possibly can." And he suppresses the thought which makes him faint-hearted; for he knows that this very thought might be the cause of a worse performance on his part, and that in any case it cannot contribute to the improvement of his work. And thus thought after thought, each fraught with advantage to his whole life, flows into the student's outlook. They take the place of those that had a hampering, weakening effect. He begins to steer his own ship on a secure course through the waves of life, whereas it was formerly battered to and fro by these waves.
  
  --
   p. 27
   space is given it. No outward forces can supply space to the inner man. It can only be supplied by the inner calm which man himself gives to his soul. Outward circumstances can only alter the course of his outward life; they can never awaken the inner spiritual man. The student must himself give birth to a new and higher man within himself.
  
  --
   p. 29
   and in quite a different situation. In this way something begins to live within him which ranges above the purely personal. His gaze is directed to worlds higher than those with which every-day life connects him. And thus he begins to feel and realize, as an inner experience, that he belongs to those higher worlds. These are worlds concerning which his senses and his daily occupation can tell him nothing. Thus he now shifts the central point of his being to the inner part of his nature. He listens to the voices within him which speak to him in his moments of tranquility; he cultivates an intercourse with the spiritual world. He is removed from the every-day world. Its noise is silenced. All around him there is silence. He puts away everything that reminds him of such impressions from without. Calm inward contemplation and converse with the purely spiritual world fill his soul.-Such tranquil contemplation must become a natural necessity in the life of the student. He is now plunged in a world of thought. He must develop a living feeling for this silent thought-activity. He must learn to love what the spirit pours into him. He will soon cease to feel that this thought-world is
   p. 30
  --
   p. 34
   revive the memory of experiences beyond the border of life and death. Everyone can attain this knowledge; in each one of us lies the faculty of recognizing and contemplating for ourselves what genuine Mysticism, Spiritual Science, Anthroposophy, and Gnosis teach. Only the right means must be chosen. Only a being with ears and eyes can apprehend sounds and colors; nor can the eye perceive if the light which makes things visible is wanting. Spiritual Science gives the means of developing the spiritual ears and eyes, and of kindling the spiritual light; and this method of spiritual training: (1) Preparation; this develops the spiritual senses. (2) Enlightenment; this kindles the spiritual light. (3) Initiation; this establishes intercourse with the higher spiritual beings.
  

1.01_-_On_Love, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  And think not you can direct the course of love, for love, if it finds you worthy, directs your course.
  

1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  that essence of intelligence is the first step in Yoga, because
  only in this way can the Chitta get into its proper course.
  

1.01_-_Soul_and_God, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Philosophy
  
  The spirit of this time of course allowed me to believe in my reason. He let me see myself in the image of a leader with ripe thoughts. But the spirit of the depths teaches me that I am a servant, in fact the servant of a child: This dictum was repugnant to me and I hated it. But I had to recognize and accept that my soul is a child and that my God in my soul is a child. 57
  

1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  The son looked for it, but could not find it; for the salt, of course, had dissolved.
  
  --
  
  I live, yet not I, but Christ in me. Or perhaps it might be more accurate to use the verb transitively and say, I live, yet not I; for it is the Logos who lives melives me as an actor lives his part. In such a case, of course, the actor is always infinitely superior to the rle. Where real life is concerned, there are no Shakespearean characters, there are only Addisonian Catos or, more often, grotesque Monsieur Perrichons and Charlies Aunts mistaking themselves for Julius Caesar or the Prince of Denmark. But by a merciful dispensation it is always in the power of every dramatis persona to get his low, stupid lines pronounced and supernaturally transfigured by the divine equivalent of a Garrick.
  
  --
  
  The doctrine of the Inner Light achieved a clearer formulation in the writings of the second generation of Quakers. There is, wrote William Penn, something nearer to us than Scriptures, to wit, the Word in the heart from which all Scriptures come. And a little later Robert Barclay sought to explain the direct experience of tat tvam asi in terms of an Augustinian theology that had, of course, to be considerably stretched and trimmed before it could fit the facts. Man, he declared in his famous theses, is a fallen being, incapable of good, unless united to the Divine Light. This Divine Light is Christ within the human soul, and is as universal as the seed of sin. All men, heathen as well as Christian, are endowed with the Inward Light, even though they may know nothing of the outward history of Christs life. Justification is for those who do not resist the Inner Light and so permit of a new birth of holiness within them.
  

1.01_-_The_Ego, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  there is no reason to assign them a psychic nature- unless of
  course one favours the philosophical view that all life-processes
  are psychic anyway. The chief objection to this hardly demon-
  --
  changing, and everywhere identical quality or substrate of the
  psyche per se. This is, of course, no more than a hypothesis. But
  we are driven to it by the peculiar nature of the empirical ma-

1.01_-_The_Four_Aids, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  

SHASTRA


  2:The supreme Shastra of the integral Yoga is the eternal Veda secret in the heart of every thinking and living being. The lotus of the eternal knowledge and the eternal perfection is a bud closed and folded up within us. It opens swiftly or gradually, petal by petal, through successive realisations, once the mind of man begins to turn towards the Eternal, once his heart, no longer compressed and confined by attachment to finite appearances, becomes enamoured, in whatever degree, of the Infinite. All life, all thought, all energising of the faculties, all experiences passive or active, become thenceforward so many shocks which disintegrate the teguments of the soul and remove the obstacles to the inevitable efflorescence. He who chooses the Infinite has been chosen by the Infinite. He has received the divine touch without which there is no awakening, no opening of the spirit; but once it is received, attainment is sure, whether conquered swiftly in the course of one human life or pursued patiently through many stadia of the cycle of existence in the manifested universe.
  
  --
  
  16:But still, in the practical development, each of the three stages has its necessity and utility and must be given its time or its place. It will not do, it cannot be safe or effective to begin with the last and highest alone. It would not be the right course, either, to leap prematurely from one to another. For even if from the beginning we recognise in mind and heart the Supreme, there are elements of the nature which long prevent the recognition from becoming realisation. But without realisation our mental belief cannot become a dynamic reality; it is still only a figure of knowledge, not a living truth, an idea, not yet a power. And even if realisation has begun, it may be dangerous to imagine or to assume too soon that we are altogether in the hands of the Supreme or are acting as his instrument. That assumption may introduce a calamitous falsity; it may produce a helpless inertia or, magnifying the movements of the ego with the Divine Name, it may disastrously distort and ruin the whole course of the Yoga. There is a period, more or less prolonged, of internal effort and struggle in which the individual will has to reject the darkness and distortions of the lower nature and to put itself resolutely or vehemently on the side of the divine Light. The mental energies, the heart's emotions, the vital desires, the very physical being have to be compelled into the right attitude or trained to admit and answer to the right influences. It is only then, only when this has been truly done, that the surrender of the lower to the higher can be effected, because the sacrifice has become acceptable.
  
  --
  
  38:Time is a field of circumstances and forces meeting and working out a resultant progression whose course it measures. To the ego it is a tyrant or a resistance, to the Divine an instrument. Therefore, while our effort is personal. Time appears as a resistance, for it presents to us all the obstruction of the forces that conflict with our own. When the divine working and the personal are combined in our consciousness, it appears as a medium and condition. When the two become one, it appears as a servant and instrument.
  

1.01_-_The_Ideal_of_the_Karmayogin, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  We do not believe that by changing the machinery so as to make our society the ape of Europe we shall effect social renovation. Widow-remarriage, substitution of class for caste, adult marriage, intermarriages, interdining and the other nostrums of the social reformer are mechanical changes which, whatever their merits or demerits, cannot by themselves save the soul of the nation alive or stay the course of degradation and decline.
  

1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa, #Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin, #Hakuin Ekaku, #Zen
  
  The people in the half-dozen stories I related, having turned away from reasonable courses of action, convinced themselves that their transgressions were minor and that any retribution would be minor as well, and because of that they ended up receiving the severe judgment of heaven, dying very unfortunate deaths, leaving behind them names blackened forever as unfilial sons or daughters, and falling into the interminable suffering and torment of the Burning Hells. That this happened because they did not fear the wrath of the gods and were ignorant of heavenly retribution is a matter each and every person should give the greatest care and consideration.
  

1.01_-_What_is_Magick?, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
    7. Every man and every woman has a course, depending partly on the self, and partly on the environment which is natural and necessary for each. Anyone who is forced from his own course, either through not understanding himself, or through external opposition, comes into conflict with the order of the Universe, and suffers accordingly.
  
  --
  
    (Illustration: When a man falls in love, the whole world becomes, to him, nothing but love boundless and immanent; but his mystical state is not contagious; his fellow-men are either amused or annoyed. He can only extend to others the effect which his love has had upon himself by means of his mental and physical qualities. Thus, Catullus, Dante, and Swinburne made their love a mighty mover of mankind by virtue of their power to put their thoughts on the subject in musical and eloquent language. Again, Cleopatra and other people in authority moulded the fortunes of many other people by allowing love to influence their political actions. The Magician, however well he succeeds in making contact with the secret sources of energy in nature, can only use them to the extent permitted by his intellectual and moral qualities. Mohammed's intercourse with Gabriel was only effective because of his statesmanship, soldiership, and the sublimity of his command of Arabic. Hertz's discovery of the rays which we now use for wireless telegraphy was sterile until reflected through the minds and wills of the people who could take his truth, and transmit it to the world of action by means of mechanical and economic instruments.)
  
  --
  
    (Illustration: If a man like Napoleon were actually appointed by destiny to control Europe, he should not be blamed for exercising his rights. To oppose him would be an error. Anyone so doing would have made a mistake as to his own destiny, except in so far as it might be necessary for him to learn the lessons of defeat. The sun moves in space without interference. The order of Nature provides a orbit for each star. A clash proves that one or the other has strayed from its course. But as to each man that keeps his true course, the more firmly he acts, the less likely are others to get in his way. His example will help them to find their own paths and pursue them. Every man that becomes a Magician helps others to do likewise. The more firmly and surely men move, and the more such action is accepted as the standard of morality, the less will conflict and confusion hamper humanity.)
  
  --
  
  "Magick is the study and use of those forms of energy which are (a) subtler than the ordinary physical-mechanical types, (b) accessible only to those who are (in one sense or another) 'Initiates'." I fear that this may sound rather obscurum per obscurius; but this is one of these cases we are likely to encounter many such in the course of our researches in which we understand, quite well enough for all practical purposes, what we mean, but which elude us more and more successfully the more accurately we struggle to define their import.
  

1.020_-_The_World_and_Our_World, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  There are those who think that the object alone is real and the mind is only a stupid something, which merely reflects the nature of an object as it is. This is the realistic, materialistic attitude. They do not give any place for mind in the scheme of things. It is only a kind of exudation of material existences. This is one extreme view - where the objective world alone is the determining factor of every situation in life, and the mind has no place in the scheme of things. The other extreme is that the mind alone is the determining factor of everything and the object has no place in the scheme of things everything is on account of our thought. This is the extreme idealistic point of view, contrary to the extreme materialistic point of view of certain others. The via-media, the middle course, would be that both contribute a percentage of meaning in the perception of objects. And so the act of mind-control, the restraining of the modifications of the mind, would not mean an abolition of the existence of objects at least according to thinkers such as the author of the Panchadasi - but is a withdrawal of those special modifications of the mind, on account of which the mind reads particular subjective meanings in objects.
  
  --
  
  This is perhaps the significance of perception from an organic point of view, while what happens in our case, at present, is that this organic connection between the seer and the seen is lost sight of, and we have only a mechanised form of perception where there is a false evaluation projected on the object by the mind which is perceiving it, on account of its losing contact with the vital issue which is involved in perception, namely its connectedness to the object. Whether in attachment or in aversion, the mind is not properly related to the object. It has an improper relationship with things, both in love and hatred. The impropriety of this relationship arises on account of its false disconnectedness from the object, and we cannot properly understand the way of controlling the mind if we cannot understand the relationship that the mind has with the object. It has a twofold relationship. On the one side, it stands as a perceiver of the object and is obliged to regard the object as an outside something, which is the very meaning of perception, of course. But, on the other side, there is a basic similarity of nature between the seer and the seen, which is the reason why there is the very possibility of perception at all. A consciousness of the object would be impossible if the seer of the object is basically disconnected from the object. Basic disconnection would not be permissible. An utter isolation of the subject from the object would defeat the very purpose of all perception.
  
  --
  
  We have created a world of our own that is jiva srishti. Utter diversity is not possible; utter unity is also not possible. So we have created a world of our own, like trishanku svargam, and here we are ruling like masters. But inasmuch as it is not based on facts and cannot be substantiated finally on logical grounds, it shakes from the very bottom, and so we are very unhappy right from the beginning. We are unhappy when the objects are not with us, we are unhappy when the objects are with us, and we are unhappy when the objects leave us. So when are we happy? Unhappiness is there because the object has not come. Unhappiness is there because the object is there, but the fear is that it may go. So even when it is there we have a fear, "Oh, how long will it be there? I may lose it at any moment." And when the object has gone, of course, there is unhappiness. There is an undercurrent of joylessness in every experience of the individual, because the very existence of the so-called individual is itself an illogical something. It is an unwarranted assumption and something which cannot be finally justified, either logically or scientifically.
  

1.02.2.1_-_Brahman_Oneness_of_God_and_the_World, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  the movement. The gods, therefore, are described as continually
  running in their course. But the Lord is free and unaffected by
  His own movement.
  --
  All things are already realised in Brahman. The running
  of the Others in the course of Nature is only a working out
  (Prakriti), by Causality, in Time and Space, of something that

1.02.4.1_-_The_Worlds_-_Surya, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  HEAVEN AND HELL
  The enjoyment of beatitude in a heaven beyond is also not the supreme consummation. But Vedantic thought did not envisage rebirth as an immediate entry after death into a new body; the mental being in man is not so rigidly bound to the vital and physical, - on the contrary, the latter are ordinarily dissolved together after death, and there must therefore be, before the soul is attracted back towards terrestrial existence, an interval in which it assimilates its terrestrial experiences in order to be able to constitute a new vital and physical being upon earth. During this interval it must dwell in states or worlds beyond and these may be favourable or unfavourable to its future development. They are favourable in proportion as the light of the Supreme Truth of which Surya is a symbol enters into them, but states of intermediate ignorance or darkness are harmful to the soul in its progress. Those enter into them, as has been affirmed in the third verse, who do hurt to themselves by shutting themselves to the light or distorting the natural course of their development. The Vedantic heavens are states of light and the soul's expansion; darkness, self-obscuration and self-distortion are the nature of the Hells which it has to shun.
  

1.025_-_Sadhana_-_Intensifying_a_Lighted_Flame, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The meritorious deeds that we performed in previous lives, the good karmas of our past produce a force called 'apurva' in Mimamsa parlance. The good karmas of the past are present in the mind even now as a kind of prarabdha, and when the prarabdha is of a sattvic nature, it permits the rise of a novel type of asking by the soul, which is called spiritual aspiration. It is this peculiar context - which is inscrutable, of course, to anyone's mind which brings a person in contact with a Guru. How we come in contact with a Guru cannot be understood. It is worked up by mysterious forces from within that are associated with the good deeds of our past lives, etc., and which permit good actions in this present birth. Such forces make it possible for us to think divine thoughts and to take the initial step in the practice of yoga. It is this initial step, as mentioned, which is capable of generating a peculiar potency, enough to carry us forward to the next step. Like the chain reaction of an atomic bomb burst, every step is automatically an urge towards another step.
  
  The more we practise sadhana, the stronger we become and the greater is our capacity to understand, to enlarge our perspective of thinking and to contact reality in deeper profundity. Many factors operate in spiritual practice. The good deeds that we did in the past is one factor. The other factors are the associations that we have established in society with wise people in this present birth, the practical experience that we gain by living in this world, the initiation that we receive from the Guru, and the wisdom that we acquire from the Guru. Finally, the most mysterious, of course, is the grace of God Himself, which is perennially operating, perpetually working, and infinitely and most abundantly contributing to the onward march of the soul towards its goal.
  
  --
  
  Sadhana is nothing but the intensifying of this flame that has already been lit up in us by God Himself, ultimately. You have been led to this study due to God's grace. It is not because you have money to purchase a book. It is not money that has brought you these discourses, it is not your effort that has brought you to these discourses it is nothing of the kind. It is a divine mystery that has operated in a very inscrutable and marvellous manner for a purpose which is cosmic in significance, and not merely individual, as we may imagine. You have been led to this study for a cosmic purpose, and a divine purpose, which is a coincidence and a collocation of factors which can be understood only by the Cosmic Thinker, God Himself. I have always been holding that, ultimately, it appears to be God who is doing sadhana for God-realisation, and nobody else can do it; and meditation is nothing but God thinking God.
  

1.028_-_Bringing_About_Whole-Souled_Dedication, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  Only one step ahead can be seen at a time, and not one hundred steps. This, of course, is an advantage as well as a disadvantage. It is a disadvantage because we do not know what is before us. We are not quite sure as to where we are standing, how much progress we have made, and the things that we may have to encounter in our future; so this is a type of disadvantage. But it also has an advantage that is similar to the advantage of not having any memory of our previous lives. What would happen to us if we knew everything that has happened in all of our previous lives? We would not be able to live in this world. We would perish in a few minutes by the shock of the memories of previous lives. But the abolition of all this memory keeps us constrained to a limited vision of things, and makes us feel that this world is the entire world, and that the people around us are the only realities, and that there is nothing in the past and nothing in the future. This ignorance keeps us happy, somehow or the other. But if the whole universe is opened up before us like Pandora's box, then the entire world would perish in a few days it could not exist.
  
  --
  
  The condition mentioned in the sutra of Patanjali is: sa tu drghakla nairantarya satkra sevita dhabhmi (I.14). A very, very affectionate attitude towards this practice is one condition. We cannot have a greater love for anything in this world than we have for this practice. In fact, this practice is like a parent to us it will take care of us, protect us and provide us with everything that we need. This practice of yoga should be continued until the point of realisation, without asking for immediate results. Karmanyevdhikraste m phaleu kadcana(B.G. II.47), says Bhagavan Sri Krishna in the Bhagavadgita. Our duty is to act according to the discipline prescribed, and not to expect results. The results will follow in the long run, in due course of time.
  

1.02.9_-_Conclusion_and_Summary, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  the reunited knowledge of the One and the Many the state of
  Immortality. This is our proper course and not either to devote
  ourselves exclusively to the life of Avidya or to reject it entirely
  --
  means and not an obstacle to the enjoyment of immortality by
  the lord of this formal habitation.6 This is our proper course and
  not to remain for ever in the chain of birth and death, nor to

1.02_-_Meditating_on_Tara, #How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator, #Thubten Chodron, #unset
  I will take every opportunity to discredit you to your face and behind your
  back. Of course, such a case is always decided in our favor. The verdict is
  that we were right and hes wrong. Case settled. Were always the victor and

1.02_-_Prana, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  In an ocean there are huge waves, like mountains, then smaller waves, and still smaller, down to little bubbles, but back of all these is the infinite ocean. The bubble is connected with the infinite ocean at one end, and the huge wave at the other end. So, one may be a gigantic man, and another a little bubble, but each is connected with that infinite ocean of energy, which is the common birthright of every animal that exists. Wherever there is life, the storehouse of infinite energy is behind it. Starting as some fungus, some very minute, microscopic bubble, and all the time drawing from that infinite store-house of energy, a form is changed slowly and steadily until in course of time it becomes a plant, then an animal, then man, ultimately God. This is attained through millions of aeons, but what is time? An increase of speed, an increase of struggle, is able to bridge the gulf of time. That which naturally takes a long time to accomplish can be shortened by the intensity of the action, says the Yogi. A man may go on slowly drawing in this energy from the infinite mass that exists in the universe, and, perhaps, he will require a hundred thousand years to become a Deva, and then, perhaps, five hundred thousand years to become still higher, and, perhaps, five millions of years to become perfect. Given rapid growth, the time will be lessened. Why is it not possible, with sufficient effort, to reach this very perfection in six months or six years? There is no limit. Reason shows that. If an engine, with a certain amount of coal, runs two miles an hour, it will run the distance in less time with a greater supply of coal. Similarly, why shall not the soul, by intensifying its action, attain perfection in this very life? All beings will at last attain to that goal, we know. But who cares to wait all these millions of aeons? Why not reach it immediately, in this body even, in this human form? Why shall I not get that infinite knowledge, infinite power, now?
  

1.02_-_Pranayama,_Mantrayoga, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  4. Aum shivaya vashi; three trochees. Note that "shi" means rest, the absolute or male aspect of the Deity; "va" is energy, the manifested or female side of the Deity. This Mantra therefore expresses the whole course of the Universe, from Zero through the finite back to Zero.
  
  --
  
    On the whole, the ambulatory practices are more generally useful to the health than the sedentary; for in this way walking and fresh air are assured. But some of the sedentary practice should be done, and combined with meditation. Of course when actually "racing" to get results, walking is a distraction.
  

1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  These are the five pains, the fivefold tie that binds us down.
  Of course ignorance is the mother of all the rest. She is the
  
  --
  future life, because men like their lives so much that they
  desire a future life also. Of course it goes without saying that
  
  --
  arguments for reincarnation, in India. The recurring
  experiences of various fears, in course of time, produce this
  clinging to life. That is why the child is instinctively afraid,
  --
  of the mind alone, that they can draw in as much as they desire
  without recourse to the orindary methods. As a spider makes
  his net out of his own substance, and becomes bound in his
  --
  will never become a Yogi. There must be internal purification
  also. That is obtained by the first-named virtues. Of course
  internal purity is of greater value that external, but both are
  --
  arises disgust for ones own body, and
  non-intercourse with other bodies.
  

1.02_-_Taras_Tantra, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  own point of view. In buddh ism itself, durin g the
  course of time, various philosophical schools have
  been oppos ed to each other. Only a highe r point of

1.02_-_The_7_Habits_An_Overview, #The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, #Stephen Covey, #unset
  
  Of course, we may need to change our circumstances. But the dependence problem is a personal maturity issue that has little to do with circumstances. Even with better circumstances, immaturity and dependence often persist.
  

1.02_-_The_Descent._Dante's_Protest_and_Virgil's_Appeal._The_Intercession_of_the_Three_Ladies_Benedight., #The Divine Comedy, #Dante Alighieri, #Christianity
  Came hither downward from my blessed seat,
  Confiding in thy dignified discourse,
  Which honours thee, and those who've listened to it.'
  --
  Such I became with my exhausted strength,
  And such good courage to my heart there coursed,
  That I began, like an intrepid person:

1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Essays on the Gita
   and hidden guide. That action is the action of a whole world of men and nations, some of whom have come as helpers of an effort and result by which they do not personally profit, and to these he is a leader, some as its opponents and to them he also is an opponent, the baffler of their designs and their slayer and he seems even to some of them an instigator of all evil and destroyer of their old order and familiar world and secure conventions of virtue and good; some are representatives of that which has to be fulfilled and to them he is counsellor, helper, friend. Where the action pursues its natural course or the doers of the work have to suffer at the hands of its enemies and undergo the ordeals which prepare them for mastery, the
  Avatar is unseen or appears only for occasional comfort and aid, but at every crisis his hand is felt, yet in such a way that all imagine themselves to be the protagonists and even Arjuna, his nearest friend and chief instrument, does not perceive that he is an instrument and has to confess at last that all the while he did not really know his divine Friend. He has received counsel from his wisdom, help from his power, has loved and been loved, has even adored without understanding his divine nature; but he has been guided like all others through his own egoism and the counsel, help and direction have been given in the language and received by the thoughts of the Ignorance. Until the moment when all has been pushed to the terrible issue of the struggle on the field of Kurukshetra and the Avatar stands at last, still not as fighter, but as the charioteer in the battle-car which carries the destiny of the fight, he has not revealed Himself even to those whom he has chosen.
  --
  
  And the action in which this divine figure moves is the whole wide action of man in life, not merely the inner life, but all this obscure course of the world which we can judge only by the twilight of the human reason as it opens up dimly before our uncertain advance the little span in front. This is the distinguishing feature of the Gita that it is the culmination of such an action which gives rise to its teaching and assigns that prominence and bold relief to the gospel of works which it enunciates with an emphasis and force we do not find in other Indian Scriptures.
  

1.02_-_The_Doctrine_of_the_Mystics, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  The Vedic deities are names, powers, personalities of the universal Godhead and they represent each some essential puissance of the Divine Being. They manifest the cosmos and are manifest in it. Children of Light, Sons of the Infinite, they recognise in the soul of man their brother and ally and desire to help and increase him by themselves increasing in him so as to possess his world with their light, strength and beauty. The Gods call man to a divine companionship and alliance; they attract and uplift him to their luminous fraternity, invite his aid and offer theirs against the Sons of Darkness and Division. Man in return calls the Gods to his sacrifice, offers to them his swiftnesses and his strengths, his clarities and his sweetnesses, - milk and butter of the shining Cow, distilled juices of the Plant of Joy, the Horse of the Sacrifice, the cake and the wine, the grain for the GodMind's radiant coursers. He receives them into his being and their gifts into his life, increases them by the hymns and the wine and forms perfectly - as a smith forges iron, says the Veda - their great and luminous godheads.
  

1.02_-_The_Human_Soul, #The Interior Castle or The Mansions, #Saint Teresa of Avila, #Christianity
  
  11.: Two advantages are gained by this practice. First, it is clear that white looks far whiter when placed near something black, and on the contrary, black never looks so dark as when seen beside something white. Secondly, our understanding and will become more noble and capable of good in every way when we turn from ourselves to God: it is very injurious never to raise our minds above the mire of our own faults. I described how murky and fetid are the streams that spring from the source of a soul in mortal sin.25' Thus (although the case is not really the same, God forbid! this is only a comparison), while we are continually absorbed in contemplating the weakness of our earthly nature, the springs of our actions will never flow free from the mire of timid, weak, and cowardly thoughts, such as: 'I wonder whether people are noticing me or not! If I follow this course, will harm come to me? Dare I begin this work? Would it not be presumptuous? Is it right for any one as faulty as myself to speak on sublime spiritual subjects?26' Will not people think too well of me, if I make myself singular? Extremes are bad, even in virtue; sinful as I am I shall only fall the lower. Perhaps I shall fail and be a source of scandal to good people; such a person as I am has no need of peculiarities.'
  
  --
  
  14.: Those conscious of being in this state must as often as possible have recourse to His Majesty, taking His Blessed Mother and the saints for their advocates to do battle for them, because we creatures possess little strength for self-defence. Indeed in every state of life all our help must come from God; may He in His mercy grant it us, Amen! What a miserable life we lead! As I have spoken more fully in other writings27' on the ill that results from ignoring the need of humility and self-knowledge, I will treat no more about it here, my daughters, although it is of the first importance. God grant that what I have said may be useful to you.
  

1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  It would be a mistake, of course, to suppose that people who worship one aspect of God to the exclusion of all the rest must inevitably run into the different kinds of trouble described above. If they are not too stubborn in their ready-made beliefs, if they submit with docility to what happens to them in the process of worshipping, the God who is both immanent and transcendent, personal and more than personal, may reveal Himself to them in his fulness. Nevertheless, the fact remains that it is easier for us to reach our goal if we are not handicapped by a set of erroneous or inadequate beliefs about the right way to get there and the nature of what we are looking for.
  

1.02_-_The_Necessity_of_Magick_for_All, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  It is then (you will say) impossible to "do wrong", since all phenomena are equally "Illusion" and the answer is always "Nothing." In theory one can hardly deny this proposition; but in practice how shall I put it? "The state of Illusion which for convenience I call my present consciousness is such that the course of action A is more natural to me that the course of action B?"
  
  --
  
  Let me sum up, very succinctly; as usual, my enthusiasm has lured me into embroidering my sage discourse with Poets' Imagery!
  

1.02_-_The_Philosophy_of_Ishvara, #Bhakti-Yoga, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  THE PHILOSOPHY OF ISHVARA
  Who is Ishvara? Janmdyasya yatah "From whom is the birth, continuation, and dissolution of the universe," He is Ishvara "the Eternal, the Pure, the Ever-Free, the Almighty, the AllKnowing, the All-Merciful, the Teacher of all teachers"; and above all, Sa Ishvarah anirvachaniyapremasvarupah "He the Lord is, of His own nature, inexpressible Love." These certainly are the definitions of a Personal God. Are there then two Gods the "Not this, not this," the Sat-chit-nanda, the Existence-Knowledge-Bliss of the philosopher, and this God of Love of the Bhakta? No, it is the same Sat-chit-ananda who is also the God of Love, the impersonal and personal in one. It has always to be understood that the Personal God worshipped by the Bhakta is not separate or different from the Brahman. All is Brahman, the One without a second; only the Brahman, as unity or absolute, is too much of an abstraction to be loved and worshipped; so the Bhakta chooses the relative aspect of Brahman, that is, Ishvara, the Supreme Ruler. To use a simile: Brahman is as the clay or substance out of which an infinite variety of articles are fashioned. As clay, they are all one; but form or manifestation differentiates them. Before every one of them was made, they all existed potentially in the clay, and, of course, they are identical substantially; but when formed, and so long as the form remains, they are separate and different; the clay-mouse can never become a clay-elephant, because, as manifestations, form alone makes them what they are, though as unformed clay they are all one.
  

1.02_-_The_Pit, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  
  It might, of course, be supplemented by Hindu or other terminology, but to do so would immediately introduce more numerous elements of controversy. 'We should at once be lost in endless discussion as to whether Nibbana was Nirvana, and as to whether extinction or something else was implied; and so on for ever.
  
  The system of the Qabalah, whose terms as we shall see are largely symbolic, is of course superficially open to this last objection. But because it is very largely symbolic, it has the best sanction of those who are considered eminent authorities in the sciences, for the whole of modern science occupies itself with various symbols by which it endeavours to comprehend the physical world-symbols beyond which, however, it frankly confesses itself unable to pass. An illuminating remark occurs in Prof. Eddington's 1928
  Swarthmore Lecture, Science and the Unseen World.!

1.02_-_The_Refusal_of_the_Call, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology
  
  In the above section, and throughout the following pages, I have made no attempt to exhaust the evidence. To have done so (after the manner, for example, of Frazer, in The Golden Bough) would have enlarged my chapters prodigiously without making the main line of the monomyth any clearer. Instead, I am giving in each section a few striking examples from a number of widely scattered, repre sentative traditions. During the course of the work I shift my sources gradually, so that the reader may savor the peculiar qualities of the various styles. By the time he comes to the last page, he will have reviewed an immense number of mythologies. Should he wish to prove whether all might have been cited for every section of the monomyth, he need only turn to some of the source volumes enumerated in the footnotes and ramble through a few of the multitude of tales.
  
  --
  Some of the victims remain spellbound forever (at least, so far as we are told), but others are destined to be saved. Brynhild was preserved for her proper hero and little Briar-rose was res cued by a prince. Also, the young man transformed into a tree dreamed subsequently of the unknown woman who pointed the way, as a mysterious guide to paths unknown. Not all who hesitate are lost. The psyche has many secrets in reserve. And these are not disclosed unless required. So it is that sometimes the predicament following an obstinate refusal of the call proves to be the occasion of a providential revelation of some unsus pected principle of release.
  Willed introversion, in fact, is one of the classic implements of creative genius and can be employed as a deliberate device. It drives the psychic energies into depth and activates the lost con tinent of unconscious infantile and archetypal images. The result, of course; may be a disintegration of consciousness more or less complete (neurosis, psychosis: the plight of spellbound Daphne); but on the other hand, if the personality is able to absorb and integrate the new forces, there will be experienced an almost super-human degree of self-consciousness and masterful control.
  This is a basic principle of the Indian disciplines of yoga. It has been the way, also, of many creative spirits in the West. It can not be described, quite, as an answer to any specific call. Rather, it is a deliberate, terrific refusal to respond to anything but the deepest, highest, richest answer to the as yet unknown demand of some waiting void within: a kind of total strike, or rejection of the offered terms of life, as a result of which some power of trans formation carries the problem to a plane of new magnitudes, where it is suddenly and finally resolved.

1.02_-_The_Shadow, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  he continually feeds it and keeps it going. Not consciously, of
  course- for consciously he is engaged in bewailing and cursing a
  faithless world that recedes further and further into the dis-

1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Occultism
  
  THE information given in the following chapters constitutes steps in an esoteric training, the name and character of which will be understood by all who apply this information in the right way. It refers to the three stages through which the training of the spiritual life leads to a certain degree of initiation. But only so much will here be explained as can be publicly imparted. These are merely indications extracted from a still deeper and more intimate doctrine. In esoteric training itself a quite definite course of instruction is followed. Certain exercises enable the soul to attain to a conscious intercourse with the spiritual world. These exercises bear about the same relation to what will be imparted in the following pages, as the instruction given in
   p. 36
  --
   p. 48
   the soul of the other. Through continued exercise of this kind, sound becomes the right medium for the perception of soul and spirit. Of course it implies the very strictest self-discipline, but the latter leads to a high goal. When these exercises are practiced in connection with the other already given, dealing with the sounds of nature, the soul develops a new sense of hearing. She is now able to perceive manifestations from the spiritual world which do not find their expression in sounds perceptible to the physical ear. The perception of the "inner word" awakens. Gradually truths reveal themselves to the student from the spiritual world. He hears speech uttered to him in a spiritual way. Only to those who, by selfless listening, train themselves to be really receptive from within, in stillness, unmoved by personal opinion or feeling only to such can the higher beings speak of whom spiritual science tells. As long as one hurls any personal opinion or feeling against the speaker to whom one must listen, the beings of the spiritual world remain silent.
  
  --
   p. 65
   will develop to new plants. I again become aware that in what I see, something lies hidden which I cannot see. I fill my mind entirely with the thought: this plant with its form and colors, will in time be no more. But the reflection that it produces seeds teaches me that it will not disappear into nothing. I cannot at present see with my eyes that which guards it from disappearance, any more than I previously could discern the plant in the grain of seed. Thus there is something in the plant which my eyes cannot see. If I let this thought live within me, and if the corresponding feeling be coupled with it, then, in due time, there will again develop in my soul a force which will ripen into a new perception." Out of the plant there again grows a kind of spiritual flame-form, which is, of course, correspondingly larger than the one previously described. The flame can be felt as being greenish-blue in the center, and yellowish-red at the outer edge.
  
  --
  
  In order to meet another objection, which may be raised by certain people who have some psychic experience, let it at once be admitted that there are shorter and simpler ways, and that there are persons who have acquired knowledge of the phenomena of birth and death through personal vision, without first going through all that has here been described. There are, in fact, people with considerable psychic gifts who need but a slight impulse in order to find themselves already developed. But they are the exceptions, and the methods described above are safer and apply equally to all. It is possible to acquire some knowledge of chemistry in an exceptional way, but if you wish to become a chemist you must follow the recognized and reliable course.
  
  --
  
  Recall to mind some person whom you may have observed when he was filled with desire for some object. Direct your attention to this desire. It is best to recall to memory that moment when the desire was at its height, and it was still uncertain whether the object of the desire would be attained. And now fill your mind with this recollection, and reflect on what you can thus observe. Maintain the utmost inner tranquility. Make the greatest possible effort to be blind and deaf to everything that may be going on around you, and take special heed that through the conception thus evoked a feeling should awaken in your soul. Allow this feeling to rise in your soul like a cloud on the cloudless horizon. As a rule, of course, your reflection will be interrupted, because the person whom it concerns was not observed in this particular state of soul for a sufficient length of
   p. 70
  --
   p. 79
   higher stages of knowledge and power is beset with obstacles. A firearm should not be used until sufficient experience has been gained to avoid disaster, caused by its use. A person initiated today without further ado would lack the experience which he will gain during his future incarnations before he can attain to higher knowledge in the normal course of his development. At the portal of initiation, therefore, this experience must be supplied in some other way. Thus the first instructions given to the candidate for initiation serve as a substitute for these future experiences. These are the so-called trials, which he has to undergo, and which constitute a normal course of inner development resulting from due application to such exercises as are described in the preceding chapters.
  
  --
   p. 84
   between the candidate and the initiate in the spheres of higher knowledge. For whatever form the intercourse between an initiate and another person may take in ordinary life, the higher knowledge in its immediate form can only be imparted by the initiate in the above-mentioned sign-language.
  
  --
  
  At this stage of initiation there are duties to be performed for which no outward stimulus is given. The candidate will not be moved to action by external pressure, but only through adherence to the rules of conduct revealed to him in the occult script. He must now show in this second trial that, led by such rules, he can act with the same firmness and precision with which, for instance, an official performs the duties that belong to him. For this purpose, and in the course of his further training, he will find himself faced by a certain definite task. He must perform some action in consequence of observations made on the basis of what he has learned during preparation and enlightenment. The nature of this action can be understood by means of the occult script with
   p. 87
  --
  
  The importance of this trial lies again in the acquisition of a quality. Through his experiences in the higher worlds, the candidate develops this quality in a short time to such a high degree that he would otherwise have to go through many incarnations, in the ordinary course of his development, before he could acquire it to the same extent. It all centers around the fact that he must
   p. 88
   be guided only by the results of his higher perception and reading of the occult script, in order to produce the changes in question in these higher regions of existence. Should he, in the course of his activity, introduce any of his own opinions and desires, or should he diverge for one moment from the laws which he has recognized to be right, in order to follow his own willful inclination, then the result produced would differ entirely from what was intended. He would lose sight of the goal to which his action tended, and confusion would result. Hence ample opportunity is given him in the course of this trial to develop self-control. This is the object in view. Here again, this trial can be more easily passed by those whose life, before initiation, has led them to acquire self-control. Anyone having acquired the faculty of following high principles and ideals, while putting into the background all personal predilection; anyone capable of always performing his duty, even though inclinations and sympathies would like to seduce him from this duty-such a person is unconsciously an initiate in the midst of ordinary life. He will need but little to succeed in this particular trial. Indeed, a certain
   p. 89
  --
   p. 94
   he has learned. These expressions, however, "oath" and "betray", are inappropriate and actually misleading. There is no question of an oath in the ordinary sense of the word, but rather of an experience that comes at this stage of development. The candidate learns how to apply the higher knowledge, how to place it at the service of humanity. He then begins really and truly to understand the world. It is not so much a question of withholding the higher truths, but far more of serving them in the right way and with the necessary tact. The silence he is to keep refers to something quite different. He acquires this fine quality with regard to things he had previously spoken, and especially with regard to the manner in which they were spoken. He would be a poor initiate who did not place all the higher knowledge he had acquired at the service of humanity, as well and as far as this is possible. The only obstacle to giving information in these matters is the lack of understanding on the part of the recipients. It is true, of course, that the higher knowledge does not lend itself to promiscuous talk; but no one having reached the stage of development described above is actually forbidden
   p. 95
  --
  
  If the candidate is found fit for the foregoing experiences, he is then given what is called symbolically the draught of forgetfulness. This means that he is initiated into the secret knowledge that enables him to act without being continually disturbed by the lower memory. This is necessary for the initiate, for he must have full faith in the immediate present. He must be able to destroy the veil of memory which envelops man every moment of his life. If we judge something that happens to us today according to the experience of yesterday, we are exposed to a multitude of errors. Of course this does not mean that experience gained in life should be renounced. It should always be kept in mind as clearly as possible. But the initiate must have the ability to judge every new experience wholly according to what is inherent in it, and let it react upon him, unobscured
   p. 96
  --
  
  The second draught presented to the initiate is the draught of remembrance. Through its agency he acquires the faculty of retaining the knowledge of the higher truths ever present in his soul. Ordinary memory would be unequal to this task. We must unite ourselves and become as one with the higher truths. We must not only know them, but be able, quite as a matter of course, to manifest and administer them in living actions, even as we ordinarily eat and drink.
  

1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds, #The Ever-Present Origin, #Jean Gebser, #Integral
  
  Understood in this light, it is not surprising that around the time of Christ the world of late antiquity shows distinct signs of incipient change. The boldness and incisive nature of this change is evident when we examine the Renaissance era that begins around 1250 A.D. and incorporates stylistic elements that first appear around the time of Christ. We refer, of course, to the first intimations of a perspectival conception of space found in the murals of Pompeii.
  
  --
  
  We shall examine the question of time in detail later in our discussion; here we wish to point out that there is a forgotten but essential interconnection between time and the psyche. The closed horizons of antiquity's celestial cave-like vault express a soul not yet awakened to spatial time-consciousness and temporal quantification. The "heaven of the heart" mentioned by Origen was likewise a self-contained inner heaven first exteriorized into the heavenly landscapes of the frescoes by the brothers Ambrogio and Pietro Lorenzetti in the church of St. Francesco in Assisi (ca. 1327-28). One should note that these early renderings of landscape and sky, which include a realistic rather than symbolic astral-mythical moon, are not merely accidental pictures with nocturnal themes. In contrast to the earlier vaulted sky, the heaven of these frescoes is no longer an enclosure; it is now rendered from the vantage point of the artist and expresses the incipient perspectivity of a confrontation with space, rather than an unperspectival immersion or inherence in it. Man is henceforth not just in the world but begins to possess it; no longer possessed by heaven, he becomes a conscious possessor if not of the heavens, at least of the earth. This shift is, of course, a gain as well as a loss.
  
  --
  
  It is, of course, considered disreputable today to trace or uncover subtle linguistic relationships that exist, for example, between the terms "eight" (acht) and "night" (Nacht). Eventhough language points to such relationships and interconnections, present-day man carefully avoids them, so as to keep them from bothering his conscience. Yet despite this, the things speak for themselves regardless of our attempts to denature them, and their roots remain as long as the word remains that holds them under its spell. It will be necessary, for instance, to discuss in Part Two the significance of the pivotal and ancient word "muse," whose multifarious background of meanings vividly suggests a possible aperspectivity. Here we would only point to the illumination of the nocturnal-unperspectival world which takes place when perspective is enthroned as the eighth art. The old, seven-fold, simple planetary cavern space is suddenly flooded by the light of human consciousness and is rendered visible, as it were, from outside.
  
  --
  
  Like Petrarch, who separated landscape from land, man separates from the whole only that part which his view or thinking can encompass, and forgets those sectors that lie adjacent, beyond, or even behind. One result is the anthropocentrism that has displaced what we might call the the ocentrism previously held. Man, himself a part of the world, endows his sector of awareness with primacy; but he is, of course, only able to perceive a partial view. The sector is given prominence over the circle; the part outweighs the whole. As the whole cannot be approached from a perspectival attitude to the world, we merely superimpose the character of wholeness onto the sector, the result being the familiar "totality."
  
  --
  
  Among the thousands of Leonardo's notes and diary entries, there are several which, if we compare those of presumably earlier with those of presumably later origin, can document the course of his emergent spatial awareness and thus his extrication from the world he inherited.
  
  --
  3. The Aperspectival World
  The full outlines of the aperspectival world can emerge only gradually. It is our hope that it will take on shape and contour as we have occasion to treat its "past prefigurations and contexts; an object becomes clearly visible and distinct, after all, only when placed against a background or substratum which furnishes sufficient contrast to prevent its being misconstrued. Although that requirement may not yet be fulfilled at this stage of our discussion, it would seem to us necessary here to outline the basic nature of aperspectivity in order to indicate how it came to be expressed. Whether this "indication" is understood as a thesis or merely as a point of departure, it will be convincing only when we contrast the recent forms of expression in painting, as in the other arts, with the background which remains to be described in the course of the present work.
  
  --
  
  Every body, to the extent that it is conceived spatially, is nothing but solidified, crystallized, substantivated, and materialized time that requires the formation and solidification of space in order to unfold. Space represents a field of tension; and because of its latent energy, it is an agent of the critical or acute energy of time. Thus both energetic principles, the latency of space as well as the acuteness of time, are mutually dependent. When we formulate this thought in advance of our discussion, it is to emphasize the basic import that we accord to the present, for both space and time exist for the perceptual capacities of our body only in the present via presentiation. The presentiation or making present evident in Picassos drawing was possible only after he was able to actualize, that is, bring to consciousness, all of the temporal structures of the past latent in himself (and in each of us) during the course of his preceding thirty years of painting in a variety of earlier styles.
  

1.02_-_Where_I_Lived,_and_What_I_Lived_For, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  At a certain season of our life we are accustomed to consider every spot as the possible site of a house. I have thus surveyed the country on every side within a dozen miles of where I live. In imagination I have bought all the farms in succession, for all were to be bought, and
  I knew their price. I walked over each farmers premises, tasted his wild apples, discoursed on husbandry with him, took his farm at his price, at any price, mortgaging it to him in my mind; even put a higher price on it,took everything but a deed of it,took his word for his deed, for I dearly love to talk,cultivated it, and him too to some extent, I trust, and withdrew when I had enjoyed it long enough, leaving him to carry it on. This experience entitled me to be regarded as a sort of real-estate broker by my friends. Wherever I sat, there I might live, and the landscape radiated from me accordingly. What is a house but a _sedes_, a seat?better if a country seat. I discovered many a site for a house not likely to be soon improved, which some might have thought too far from the village, but to my eyes the village was too far from it. Well, there I might live, I said; and there I did live, for an hour, a summer and a winter life; saw how I could let the years run off, buffet the winter through, and see the spring come in.
  

1.032_-_Our_Concept_of_God, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  Love of God is something different from ordinary love, because God is not something which we need today and do not need tomorrow. God is not an object of a temporal necessity. He is not a requisite of a particular period of time, or of a given condition. God is a necessity of every condition, of all times, and for every person, at every place. The reason is that God is the presupposition of every condition of being, and hence the love of God cannot be conditional; it is always unconditional. While every other love can be conditioned by circumstances and needs of the time, no such condition can apply to the love of God. But our concept of God is here a very important factor, which rules the destiny of our love for God. If God is extra-cosmic, which means to say that He is outside the world, as a carpenter is outside the table or the chair, then there should be some means of communication between the table and the carpenter, or the world and God. The means of communication is, of course, the very same means that we adopt in coming in contact with anything else in this world. How do we come in contact with any person or thing in this world? We adopt the same means also in respect of God. We cry and shout loudly so that the person will hear us, if the person is far away, and yearn from within for vision and contact of that something which we love.
  

1.037_-_Preventing_the_Fall_in_Yoga, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The reason for this unfortunate condition is manifold. Why are we attacked like this when we are pursuing a right course of action? This is not really an attack in the sense of an inimical reaction of any person or set of forces. It is a natural consequence of certain cleansing processes going on inside, as has been pointed out. There are no enemies, really speaking. Even when there is a counter-posing action taking place somewhere in a most unpleasant manner, it cannot ultimately be regarded as an inimical reaction, because finally, truly speaking, there are no enemies in nature there are only friendly forces. But sometimes they look like enemies for peculiar reasons, one of the main reasons being the inability on the part of the individual to understand the circumstances under which these reactions have been set up.
  
  --
  
  When there is a physical condition of the type of painful illness, the practice should not be diminished. Generally, when we have a little fever, we will not be able to sit for meditation; and of course when there is a headache, it is out of the question. But knowing that these are the necessary and expected consequences of practice, one should not become diffident, and the practice of meditation should not be brought down to a lower level, either in quantity or quality, merely because of these obstacles. They will be there for some days, and sometimes even for months, but they will pass away. Just as when we clean a room with a broom there is a rise of dust, and it may look as if we are worsening the condition in the room rather than cleaning it, that is not the truth, because afterwards all of the dust will vanish and the whole room will be clean. Likewise, in the beginning it may look as if there is something worse happening to us than what has occurred earlier, but it is not true. We are getting cleaned up, and a day will come when the storm will cease and we shall be happy.
  

1.03_-_A_CAUCUS-RACE_AND_A_LONG_TALE, #Alice in Wonderland, #Lewis Carroll, #Fiction
  They were indeed a queer-looking party that assembled on the bank--the birds with draggled feathers, the animals with their fur clinging close to them, and all dripping wet, cross and uncomfortable.
  The first question, of course, was how to get dry again. They had a consultation about this and after a few minutes, it seemed quite natural to Alice to find herself talking familiarly with them, as if she had known them all her life.
  At last the Mouse, who seemed to be a person of some authority among them, called out, "Sit down, all of you, and listen to me! _I'll_ soon make you dry enough!" They all sat down at once, in a large ring, with the Mouse in the middle.
  --
  "Found _what_?" said the Duck.
  "Found _it_," the Mouse replied rather crossly; "of course, you know what 'it' means."
  "I know what 'it' means well enough, when _I_ find a thing," said the
  --
  "What _is_ a Caucus-race?" said Alice.
  "Why," said the Dodo, "the best way to explain it is to do it." First it marked out a race-course, in a sort of circle, and then all the party were placed along the course, here and there. There was no "One, two, three and away!" but they began running when they liked and left off when they liked, so that it was not easy to know when the race was over.
  However, when they had been running half an hour or so and were quite dry again, the Dodo suddenly called out, "The race is over!" and they all crowded 'round it, panting and asking, "But who has won?"
  --
  "But who is to give the prizes?" quite a chorus of voices asked.
  "Why, _she_, of course," said the Dodo, pointing to Alice with one finger; and the whole party at once crowded 'round her, calling out, in a confused way, "Prizes! Prizes!"
  Alice had no idea what to do, and in despair she put her hand into her pocket and pulled out a box of comfits (luckily the salt-water had not got into it) and handed them 'round as prizes. There was exactly one a-piece, all 'round.

1.03_-_Bloodstream_Sermon, #The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, #Bodhidharma, #Buddhism
  Do you ever dream?
  Of course.
  

1.03_-_Hieroglypics_Life_and_Language_Necessarily_Symbolic, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  "But why? Why all this elaborate symbolism? Why not say straight out what you mean? Surely the subject is difficult enough in any case must you put on a mask to make it clear? I know you well enough by now to be sure that you will not fob me off with any Holy-Willie nonsense about the ineffable, about human language being inadequate to reveal such Mysteries, about the necessity of constructing a new language to explain a new system of thought; of course I know that this had to be done in the case of chemistry, of higher mathematics, indeed of almost all technical subjects; but I feel that you have some other, deeper explanation in reserve.
  
  --
  
  Even so, as so often pointed out, all we do is to "record the behaviour of our instruments." Nor are we much better off when we've done it; for our symbol, referring as it does to a phenomenon unique in itself, and not to be apprehended by another, can mean nothing to one's neighbors. What happens, of course, is that similar, though not identical, Point-Events happen to many of us, and so we are able to construct a symbolic language. My memory of the mysterious Reality resembles yours sufficiently to induce us to agree that both belong to the same class.
  

1.03_-_Hymns_of_Gritsamada, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
    4. Delightful is his growth as if one's own increase, rapturous is his vision as he gallops burning on his way. He darts about his tongue mid the growths of the forest and tosses his mane like a chariot courser.
  

1.03_-_Invocation_of_Tara, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  deity. Tantras, if they indicate the necessity for a
  torma, give no precision as to its shape. In the course
  of time, diverse traditions have used a great variety of

1.03_-_Master_Ma_is_Unwell, #The Blue Cliff Records, #Yuanwu Keqin, #Zen
  lucky if they're not seeing off a dead monk in three days. (This
  question) is in the course of humanity and righteousness.
  

1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  The will is free and we are at liberty to identify our being either exclusively with our selfness and its interests, regarded as independent of indwelling Spirit and transcendent Godhead (in which case we shall be passively damned or actively fiendish), or exclusively with the divine within us and without (in which case we shall be saints), or finally with self at one moment or in one context and with spiritual not-self at other moments and in other contexts (in which case we shall be average citizens, too theocentric to be wholly lost, and too egocentric to achieve enlightenment and a total deliverance). Since human craving can never be satisfied except by the unitive knowledge of God and since the mind-body is capable of an enormous variety of experiences, we are free to identify ourselves with an almost infinite number of possible objectswith the pleasures of gluttony, for example, or intemperance, or sensuality; with money, power or fame; with our family, regarded as a possession or actually an extension and projection of our own selfness; with our goods and chattels, our hobbies, our collections; with our artistic or scientific talents; with some favourite branch of knowledge, some fascinating special subject; with our professions, our political parties, our churches; with our pains and illnesses; with our memories of success or misfortune, our hopes, fears and schemes for the future; and finally with the eternal Reality within which and by which all the rest has its being. And we are free, of course, to identify ourselves with more than one of these things simultaneously or in succession. Hence the quite astonishingly improbable combination of traits making up a complex personality. Thus a man can be at once the craftiest of politicians and the dupe of his own verbiage, can have a passion for brandy and money, and an equal passion for the poetry of George Meredith and under-age girls and his mother, for horse-racing and detective stories and the good of his countrythe whole accompanied by a sneaking fear of hell-fire, a hatred of Spinoza and an unblemished record for Sunday church-going. A person born with one kind of psycho-physical constitution will be tempted to identify himself with one set of interests and passions, while a person with another kind of temperament will be tempted to make very different identifications. But these temptations (though extremely powerful, if the constitutional bias is strongly marked) do not have to be succumbed to; people can and do resist them, can and do refuse to identify themselves with what it would be all too easy and natural for them to be; can and do become better and quite other than their own selves. In this context the following brief article on How Men Behave in Crisis (published in a recent issue of Harpers Magazine) is highly significant. A young psychiatrist, who went as a medical observer on five combat missions of the Eighth Air Force in England says that in times of great stress and danger men are likely to react quite uniformly, even though under normal circumstances, they differ widely in personality. He went on one mission, during which the B-17 plane and crew were so severely damaged that survival seemed impossible. He had already studied the on the ground personalities of the crew and had found that they represented a great diversity of human types. Of their behaviour in crisis he reported:
  
  --
  
  Paradoxical as it may seem, it is, for very many persons, much easier to behave selflessly in time of crisis than it is when life is taking its normal course in undisturbed tranquillity. When the going is easy, there is nothing to make us forget our precious selfness, nothing (except our own will to mortification and the knowledge of God) to distract our minds from the distractions with which we have chosen to be identified; we are at perfect liberty to wallow in our personality to our hearts content. And how we wallow! It is for this reason that all the masters of the spiritual life insist so strongly upon the importance of little things.
  
  --
  
  The biographies of the saints testify unequivocally to the fact that spiritual training leads to a transcendence of personality, not merely in the special circumstances of battle, but in all circumstances and in relation to all creatures, so that the saint loves his enemies or, if he is a Buddhist, does not even recognize the existence of enemies, but treats all sentient beings, sub-human as well as human, with the same compassion and disinterested good will. Those who win through to the unitive knowledge of God set out upon their course from the most diverse starting points. One is a man, another a woman; one a born active, another a born contemplative. No two of them inherit the same temperament and physical constitution, and their lives are passed in material, moral and intellectual environments that are profoundly dissimilar. Nevertheless, insofar as they are saints, insofar as they possess the unitive knowledge that makes them perfect as their Father which is in heaven is perfect, they are all astonishingly alike. Their actions are uniformly selfless and they are constantly recollected, so that at every moment they know who they are and what is their true relation to the universe and its spiritual Ground. Of even plain average people it may be said that their name is Legionmuch more so of exceptionally complex personalities, who identify themselves with a wide diversity of moods, cravings and opinions. Saints, on the contrary, are neither double-minded nor half-hearted, but single and, however great their intellectual gifts, profoundly simple. The multiplicity of Legion has given place to one-pointednessnot to any of those evil one-pointednesses of ambition or covetousness, or lust for power and fame, not even to any of the nobler, but still all too human one-pointednesses of art, scholarship and science, regarded as ends in themselves, but to the supreme, more than human one-pointedness that is the very being of those souls who consciously and consistently pursue mans final end, the knowledge of eternal Reality. In one of the Pali scriptures there is a significant anecdote about the Brahman Drona who, seeing the Blessed One sitting at the foot of a tree, asked him, Are you a deva? And the Exalted One answered, I am not. Are you a gandharva? I am not, Are you a yaksha? I am not. Are you a man? I am not a man. On the Brahman asking what he might be, the Blessed One replied, Those evil influences, those cravings, whose non-destruction would have individualized me as a deva, a gandharva, a yaksha (three types of supernatural being), or a man, I have completely annihilated. Know therefore that I am Buddha.
  
  --
  
  The moral of all this is plain. The quantity and quality of the surviving biographical documents are such that we have no means of knowing what the residual personality of Jesus was really like. But if the Gospels tell us very little about the I which was Jesus, they make up for this deficiency by telling us inferentially, in the parables and discourses, a good deal about the spiritual not-I, whose manifest presence in the mortal man was the reason why his disciples called him the Christ and identified him with the eternal Logos.
  
  The biography of a saint or avatar is valuable only insofar as it throws light upon the means by which, in the circumstances of a particular human life, the I was purged away so as to make room for the divine not-I. The authors of the Synoptic Gospels did not choose to write such a biography, and no amount of textual criticism or ingenious surmise can call it into existence. In the course of the last hundred years an enormous sum of energy has been expended on the attempt to make documents yield more evidence than in fact they contain. However regrettable may be the Synoptists lack of interest in biography, and whatever objections may be raised against the theologies of Paul and John, there can still be no doubt that their instinct was essentially sound. Each in his own way wrote about the eternal not-I of Christ rather than the historical I; each in his own way stressed that element in the life of Jesus, in which, because it is more-than-personal, all persons can participate. (The nature of selfness is such that one person cannot be a part of another person. A self can contain or be contained by something that is either less or more than a self, it can never contain or be contained by a self.)
  
  --
  
  The Logos passes out of eternity into time for no other purpose than to assist the beings, whose bodily form he takes, to pass out of time into eternity. If the Avatars appearance upon the stage of history is enormously important, this is due to the fact that by his teaching he points out, and by his being a channel of grace and divine power he actually is, the means by which human beings may transcend the limitations of history. The author of the Fourth Gospel affirms that the Word became flesh; but in another passage he adds that the flesh profiteth nothingnothing, that is to say, in itself, but a great deal, of course, as a means to the union with immanent and transcendent Spirit. In this context it is very interesting to consider the development of Buddhism. Under the forms of religious or mystical imagery, writes R. E. Johnston in his Buddhist China, the Mahayana expresses the universal, whereas Hinayana cannot set itself free from the domination of historical fact. In the words of an eminent orientalist, Ananda K. Coomaraswamy, The Mahayanist believer is warnedprecisely as the worshipper of Krishna is warned in the Vaishnavite scriptures that the Krishna Lila is not a history, but a process for ever unfolded in the heart of manthat matters of historical fact are without religious significance (except, we should add, insofar as they point to or themselves constitute the meanswhether remote or proximate, whether political, ethical or spiritualby which men may come to deliverance from selfness and the temporal order.)
  
  In the West, the mystics went some way towards liberating Christianity from its unfortunate servitude to historic fact. (or, to be more accurate, to those various mixtures of contemporary record with subsequent inference and phantasy, which have, at different epochs, been accepted as historic fact). From the writings of Eckhart, Tauler and Ruysbroeck, of Boehme, William Law and the Quakers, it would be possible to extract a spiritualized and universalized Christianity, whose narratives should refer, not to history as it was, or as someone afterwards thought it ought to be, but to processes forever unfolded in the heart of man. But unfortunately the influence of the mystics was never powerful enough to bring about a radical Mahayanist revolution in the West. In spite of them, Christianity has remained a religion in which the pure Perennial Philosophy has been overlaid, now more, now less, by an idolatrous preoccupation with events and things in timeevents and things regarded not merely as useful means, but as ends, intrinsically sacred and indeed divine. Moreover such improvements on history as were made in the course of centuries were, most imprudently, treated as though they themselves were a part of historya procedure which put a powerful weapon into the hands of Protestant and, later, of Rationalist controversialists. How much wiser it would have been to admit the perfectly avowable fact that, when the sternness of Christ the Judge had been unduly emphasized, men and women felt the need of personifying the divine compassion in a new form, with the result that the figure of the Virgin, mediatrix to the mediator, came into increased prominence. And when, in course of time, the Queen of Heaven was felt to be too awe-inspiring, compassion was re-personified in the homely figure of St. Joseph, who thus became methator to the methatrix to the methator. In exactly the same way Buddhist worshippers felt that the historic Sakyamuni, with his insistence on recollectedness, discrimination and a total dying to self as the principal means of liberation, was too stern and too intellectual. The result was that the love and compassion which Sakyamuni had also inculcated came to be personified in Buddhas such as Amida and Maitreyadivine characters completely removed from history, inasmuch as their temporal career was situated somewhere in the distant past or distant future. Here it may be remarked that the vast numbers of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, of whom the Mahayanist theologians speak, are commensurate with the vastness of their cosmology. Time, for them, is beginningless, and the innumerable universes, every one of them supporting sentient beings of every possible variety, are born, evolve, decay and the, only to repeat the same cycleagain and again, until the final inconceivably remote consummation, when every sentient being in all the worlds shall have won to deliverance out of time into eternal Suchness or Buddhahood This cosmological background to Buddhism has affinities with the world picture of modern astronomyespecially with that version of it offered in the recently published theory of Dr. Weiszcker regarding the formation of planets. If the Weiszcker hypothesis is correct, the production of a planetary system would be a normal episode in the life of every star. There are forty thousand million stars in our own galactic system alone, and beyond our galaxy other galaxies, indefinitely. If, as we have no choice but to believe, spiritual laws governing consciousness are uniform throughout the whole planet-bearing and presumably life-supporting universe, then certainly there is plenty of room, and at the same time, no doubt, the most agonizing and desperate need, for those innumerable redemptive incarnations of Suchness, upon whose shining multitudes the Mahayanists love to dwell.
  
  --
  
  St. Bernards doctrine of the carnal love of Christ has been admirably summed up by Professor tienne Gilson in his book, The Mystical Theology of St Bernard. Knowledge of self already expanded into social carnal love of the neighbour, so like oneself in misery, is now a second time expanded into a carnal love of Christ, the model of compassion, since for our salvation He has become the Man of Sorrows. Here then is the place occupied in Cistercian mysticism by the meditation on the visible Humanity of Christ. It is but a beginning, but an absolutely necessary beginning Charity, of course, is essentially spiritual, and a love of this kind can be no more than its first moment. It is too much bound up with the senses, unless we know how to make use of it with prudence, and to lean on it only as something to be surpassed. In expressing himself thus, Bernard merely codified the teachings of his own experience; for we have it from him that he was much given to the practice of this sensitive love at the outset of his conversion; later on he was to consider it an advance to have passed beyond it; not, that is to say, to have forgotten it, but to have added another, which outweighs it as the rational and spiritual outweigh the carnal. Nevertheless, this beginning is already a summit.
  
  --
  
  Every human being can thus become an Avatar by adoption, but not by his unaided efforts. He must be shown the way, and he must be aided by divine grace. That men and women may be thus instructed and helped, the Godhead assumes the form of an ordinary human being, who has to earn deliverance and enlightenment in the way that is prescribed by the divine Nature of Thingsnamely, by charity, by a total dying to self and a total, one-pointed awareness. Thus enlightened, the Avatar can reveal the way of enlightenment to others and help them actually to become what they already potentially are. Tel quen Lui-mme enfin lternit le change. And of course the eternity which transforms us into Ourselves is not the experience of mere persistence after bodily death. There will be no experience of timeless Reality then, unless there is the same or a similar knowledge within the world of time and matter. By precept and by example, the Avatar teaches that this transforming knowledge is possible, that all sentient beings are called to it and that, sooner or later, in one way or another, all must finally come to it.
  

1.03_-_Questions_and_Answers, #Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  
  4. QUESTION: Should a man go on a journey without specifying a time for his return-without indicating, in other words, the expected period of his absence-and should no word be heard of him thereafter, and all trace of him be lost, what course should be followed by his wife?
  
  ANSWER: Should he have omitted to fix a time for his return despite being aware of the stipulation of the Kitab-i-Aqdas in this regard, his wife should wait for one full year, after which she shall be free either to adopt the course that is praiseworthy, or to choose for herself another husband. If, however, he be unaware of this stipulation, she should abide in patience until such time as God shall please to disclose to her his fate. By the course that is praiseworthy in this connection is meant the exercise of patience.
  
  --
  
  11. QUESTION: If intercourse take place between a couple during their year of patience, and they become estranged again thereafter, must they recommence their year of patience, or may the days preceding the intercourse be included in the reckoning of the year? And once divorce hath taken place, is it necessary that a further period of waiting be observed?
  
  ANSWER: Should affection be renewed between the couple during their year of patience, the marriage tie is valid, and what is commanded in the Book of God must be observed; but once the year of patience hath been completed and that which is decreed by God taketh place, a further period of waiting is not required. Sexual intercourse between husband and wife is forbidden during their year of patience, and whoso committeth this act must seek God's forgiveness, and, as a punishment, render to the House of Justice a fine of nineteen mithqals of gold.
  
  --
  
  ANSWER: This prostration is to compensate for bligatory prayer omitted in the course of travel, and by reason of insecure circumstances. If, at the time of prayer, the traveller should find himself at rest in a secure place, he should perform that prayer. This provision regarding the compensating prostration applieth both at home and on a journey.
  
  --
  
  ANSWER: The definition of a journey is nine hours by the clock. Should the traveller stop in a place, anticipating that he will stay there for no less than one month by the Bayan reckoning, it is incumbent on him to keep the Fast; but if for less than one month, he is exempt from fasting. If he arriveth during the Fast at a place where he is to stay one month according to the Bayan, he should not observe the Fast till three days have elapsed, thereafter keeping it throughout the remainder of its course; but if he come to his home, where he hath heretofore been permanently resident, he must commence his fast upon the first day after his arrival.
  
  --
  
  31. QUESTION: Concerning the sacred verse: "The Lord hath prohibited ... the practice to which ye formerly had recourse when thrice ye had divorced a woman."
  
  --
  
  ANSWER: In each case at any time antipathy occurreth, the year of patience beginneth on that day, and the year must run its full course.
  
  --
  
  73. QUESTION: If, upon completion of the year of patience, the husband refuseth to allow divorce, what course should be adopted by the wife?
  

1.03_-_Reading, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  I think that having learned our letters we should read the best that is in literature, and not be forever repeating our a b abs, and words of one syllable, in the fourth or fifth classes, sitting on the lowest and foremost form all our lives. Most men are satisfied if they read or hear read, and perchance have been convicted by the wisdom of one good book, the Bible, and for the rest of their lives vegetate and dissipate their faculties in what is called easy reading. There is a work in several volumes in our Circulating Library entitled Little Reading, which I thought referred to a town of that name which I had not been to. There are those who, like cormorants and ostriches, can digest all sorts of this, even after the fullest dinner of meats and vegetables, for they suffer nothing to be wasted. If others are the machines to provide this provender, they are the machines to read it. They read the nine thousandth tale about Zebulon and Sephronia, and how they loved as none had ever loved before, and neither did the course of their true love run smooth,at any rate, how it did run and stumble, and get up again and go on! how some poor unfortunate got up on to a steeple, who had better never have gone up as far as the belfry; and then, having needlessly got him up there, the happy novelist rings the bell for all the world to come together and hear, O dear! how he did get down again!
  For my part, I think that they had better metamorphose all such aspiring heroes of universal noveldom into man weathercocks, as they used to put heroes among the constellations, and let them swing round there till they are rusty, and not come down at all to bother honest men with their pranks. The next time the novelist rings the bell I will not stir though the meeting-house burn down. The Skip of the

1.03_-_.REASON._IN_PHILOSOPHY, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  _Proposition Three._ There is no sense in spinning yarns about another
  world, provided, of course, that we do not possess a mighty instinct
  which urges us to slander, belittle, and cast suspicion upon this life:

1.03_-_Self-Surrender_in_Works_-_The_Way_of_The_Gita, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Yoga!
  There are certain semblances of an equal spirit which must not be mistaken for the profound and vast spiritual equality which the Gita teaches. There is an equality of disappointed resignation, an equality of pride, an equality of hardness and indifference: all these are egoistic in their nature. Inevitably they come in the course of the sadhana, but they must be rejected or transformed into the true quietude. There is too, on a higher level, the equality of the stoic, the equality of a devout resignation or a sage detachment, the equality of a soul aloof from the world and indifferent to its doings. These too are insufficient; first approaches they can be, but they are at most early soul-phases only or imperfect mental preparations for our entry into the true and absolute self-existent wide evenness of the spirit.
  

1.03_-_Some_Practical_Aspects, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Occultism
   p. 101
   to his intrinsic worth. And he does whatever must be done to meet the affront with calm and composure, and not in a spirit of anger. Of course it is not a case of simply accepting every affront, but of acting with the same calm composure when dealing with an affront against our own person as we would if the affront were directed against another person, in whose favor we had the right to intervene. It must always be remembered that this training is not carried out in crude outward processes, but in subtle, silent alterations in the life of thought and feeling.
  
  --
   p. 102
   his own self. With a feeling of inner truth he must look his own faults, weaknesses, and unfitness full in the face. The moment he tries to excuse to himself any of his weaknesses, he has placed a stone in his way on the path which is to lead him upward. Such obstacles can only be removed by self-enlightenment. There is only one way to get rid of faults and failings, and that is by a clear recognition of them. Everything slumbers in the human soul and can be awakened. A person can even improve his intellect and reason, if he quietly and calmly makes it clear to himself why he is weak in this respect. Such self- knowledge is, of course, difficult, for the temptation to self-deception is immeasurably great. Anyone making a habit of being truthful with himself opens the portal leading to a deeper insight.
  
  --
   p. 105
   of such an organ are latent in every human being, but remain ineffective as long as he is capable of anger. Yet this organ is not immediately present the moment anger has been combated to a small extent. We must rather persevere in this combating of anger and proceed patiently on our way; then some day we shall find that this eye of the soul has become developed. Of course, anger is not the only failing to be combated for the attainment of this end. Many grow impatient or skeptical, because they have for years combated certain qualities, and yet clairvoyance has not ensued. In that case they have just trained some qualities and allowed others to run riot. The gift of clairvoyance only manifests itself when all those qualities which stunt the growth of the latent faculties are suppressed. Undoubtedly, the beginnings of such seeing and hearing may appear at an earlier period, but these are only young and tender shoots which are subjected to all possible error, and which, if not carefully tended and guarded, may quickly die.
  

1.03_-_Supernatural_Aid, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology
  and so availest, that whoso would have grace, and has not re
  course to thee, would have his desire fly without wings. Thy be
  nignity not only succors him who asks, but oftentimes freely

1.03_-_Tara,_Liberator_from_the_Eight_Dangers, #How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator, #Thubten Chodron, #unset
  calms our mind so that with clarity and wisdom we can consider various
  courses of action and choose one that will bring the most benet and least
  harm to everyone in the situation. With patience, we are able to act rmly

1.03_-_The_Desert, #The Red Book Liber Novus, #unset, #Philosophy
  
  My soul answered and said, You speak to me as if you were a child complaining to its mother. I am not your mother. I do not want to complain, but let me say to you that mine is a long and dusty road. You are to me like a shady tree in the wilderness. I would like to enjoy your shade. But my soul answered, You are pleasure-seeking. Where is your patience? Your time has not yet run its course. Have you forgotten why you went into the desert?
  My faith is weak, my face is blind from all that shimmering blaze of the desert sun. The heat lies on me like lead. Thirst torments me, I dare not think how unendingly long my way is, and above all, I see nothing in front of me. But the soul answered, You speak as if you have still learned nothing. Can you not wait? Should everything fall into your lap ripe and finished? You are full, yes, you teem with intentions and desirousness! Do you still not know that the way to truth stands open only to those without intentions?

1.03_-_The_End_of_the_Intellect, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  For thirteen years Sri Aurobindo would play with fire.
  However, this young man was neither restless nor fanatical: "His smile was simple like that of a child, as limpid and as sweet," wrote his Bengali teacher who lived with him for two years (Sri Aurobindo had naturally begun to study his mother tongue). With touching ingenuousness, his teacher adds: "Before meeting Aurobindo, I had imagined him as a stalwart figure dressed like a European from head to foot, immaculate, with a stern look behind his spectacles, a horrible accent (from Cambridge, of course!) and a very difficult disposition.
  21

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