classes ::: the_City_of_the_King, place, project, main, POW, Education, noun, the_Astral_Temple,
children ::: the School (notes), the School (old), the School (old2)
branches ::: School

Instances, Classes, See Also, Object in Names
Definitions, . Quotes . - . Chapters .


object:School
object:the School
parts ::: e-school, game dev, AI, social media, discord, goodreads, wikipedia, forum
def ::: A university (Latin: universitas, 'a whole') is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research, which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines. Universities typically provide undergraduate education and postgraduate education.
   The word university is derived from the Latin universitas magistrorum et scholarium, which roughly means "community of teachers and scholars". The modern university system has roots in the European medieval university, which was created in Italy and evolved from cathedral schools for the clergy during the High Middle Ages.

--- the Principal
--- the Charter (Mission Statement)
--- the Open Library
    subjects, authors, books, dictionaries, quotes, magazines, media, tools, guides, web indexes, news?, dbs) (easy to add and take out data (esp for programmers)
    dictionaries (need for each subject and language)
    free exploration of all subjects
--- the Librarian
--- the Community Centers
    I need teachers, so this maybe needs to be first?
    Social programs?, social support,
    tons of pure fun places
    chat rooms, forums, group games, chilling areas, group adventures?
--- Analysis (Assessments, Tests, Questionares)
    why analysis
    self / student analysis (questions, why not reading Savitri?)
      recording all behaviours / movements.
      measuring progress (night assessment?)
      self-knowledge, world-knowledge
    psychometric tests
    profiles (what they want to learn, how they like to learn, where they are and where they want to be, how to get there)
--- Curriculums (Programs, Guides?, Courses)
    2x cwsa + mcw + ta
    Savitri always
    exploratory element, there should be an element of discovery. who knows, maybe there is another person who is as the jump from Ken Wilber to Sri Aurobindo. (or from self-help to spirituality etc)
--- the Archives (alllll the data including the Landfill)
    what im doing, all the time. all behaviours monitored automatically for processable data.
    psychmetrics
    profiles
--- Labs
    experimentation, tests, learning, beginning productions
--- Clubs
--- the Playground
--- the Trust (finances)
--- the OS
    (the offline school for anyone)
--- Staff
  Counsellors, Teachers?, Janitors,
  Junior / training / student staff members
--- Users (Students)
  ability to post, share, message, learn, get media, comment, collaborate
  make profile, control levels of information sharing.
--- Physical Location
  how to build a physical location
  physical components (like open Gymnasium)
--- UNSORTED
  alt names:e-school, online school, OWRPG
  object library:
  :workstations/workshops

--- unsorted:
    - online support for studying sri aurobindo.
    - study the life divine runs.
    - i already have one of these, probably in multiple places, but I kinda want the most important stuff at "home"
    IN VR GAME PLZ
      going to school, everyone having an AI / spirit partner. so good.

--- PAID PSYCHOMETRIC TESTING
    a school that takes in students and gives them tons of tests and psychometrics to create as large of a student profile as the student is willing to do. They can always do more in the future. and if they get paid to take the tests.. then we serious have a game changer.

--- QUOTES
The universities better becareful, cause they are dumping their content online as fast as they can. They are
going to make themselves completely superfluous. And some smart person, Ive been thinking about this for 20 years,
is going to take over accreditation end. Cause you know, all you would have to do, is set up a series of well
designed examinations online. And only let a minority of people pass, you have instant accreditation credibility.
Heres an entire 3 years of Psychology courses, heres the exams, you take them, only 15% of the people pass. ... It
makes the accreditation valuable. ~ Jordan Peterson, Joe Rogan Experience 877 -
Jordan Peterson, 1:40:00



--- FOOTER
class:the City of the King
class:place
class:project
class:main
class:POW
class:Education
word class:noun


object:the e-school
class:the Astral Temple
object:TS




questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or via the comments below
or join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers



--- OBJECT INSTANCES [1]


the_Astral_Temple

--- PRIMARY CLASS


Education
main
place
POW
project
the_Astral_Temple
the_City_of_the_King

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [1]


1.06 - The Three Schools of Magick 1
1.07 - The Three Schools of Magick 2
1.08 - The Three Schools of Magick 3
1.10 - The Scolex School
School
the School (notes)
the School (old)
the School (old2)
The Western Canon - The Books and School of the Ages
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards (table), project, project 0001, Savitri, the Temple of Sages, three js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the Bad, the God object, the Good, the most important, the Ring, the source of inspirations, the Stack, the Tarot, the Word, top priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


schooled ::: educated, trained (a person, his mind, powers, tastes, etc.); to render wise, skilful, or tractable by training or discipline.

schoolman ::: one versed in scholastic learning or engaged in scholastic pursuits.

schoolbook ::: n. --> A book used in schools for learning lessons.

schoolboy ::: n. --> A boy belonging to, or attending, a school.

schooldame ::: n. --> A schoolmistress.

schooled ::: imp. & p. p. --> of School

schoolery ::: n. --> Something taught; precepts; schooling.

schoolfellow ::: n. --> One bred at the same school; an associate in school.

schoolgirl ::: n. --> A girl belonging to, or attending, a school.

schoolhouse ::: n. --> A house appropriated for the use of a school or schools, or for instruction.

schooling ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of School ::: n. --> Instruction in school; tuition; education in an institution of learning; act of teaching.
Discipline; reproof; reprimand; as, he gave his son a good schooling..php{color:

schoolmaid ::: n. --> A schoolgirl.

schoolman ::: n. --> One versed in the niceties of academical disputation or of school divinity.

schoolmaster ::: n. --> The man who presides over and teaches a school; a male teacher of a school.
One who, or that which, disciplines and directs.

schoolmate ::: n. --> A pupil who attends the same school as another.

schoolmen ::: pl. --> of Schoolman

schoolmistress ::: n. --> A woman who governs and teaches a school; a female school-teacher.

schoolroom ::: n. --> A room in which pupils are taught.

school ::: n. --> A shoal; a multitude; as, a school of fish.
A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training; as, the school of the prophets.
A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school.

schoolship ::: n. --> A vessel employed as a nautical training school, in which naval apprentices receive their education at the expense of the state, and are trained for service as sailors. Also, a vessel used as a reform school to which boys are committed by the courts to be disciplined, and instructed as mariners.

school-teacher ::: n. --> One who teaches or instructs a school.

schoolward ::: adv. --> Toward school.

schoolbook ::: n. --> A book used in schools for learning lessons.

schoolboy ::: n. --> A boy belonging to, or attending, a school.

schooldame ::: n. --> A schoolmistress.

schooled ::: imp. & p. p. --> of School

schoolery ::: n. --> Something taught; precepts; schooling.

schoolfellow ::: n. --> One bred at the same school; an associate in school.

schoolgirl ::: n. --> A girl belonging to, or attending, a school.

schoolhouse ::: n. --> A house appropriated for the use of a school or schools, or for instruction.

schooling ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of School ::: n. --> Instruction in school; tuition; education in an institution of learning; act of teaching.
Discipline; reproof; reprimand; as, he gave his son a good schooling..php{color:

schoolmaid ::: n. --> A schoolgirl.

schoolman ::: n. --> One versed in the niceties of academical disputation or of school divinity.

schoolmaster ::: n. --> The man who presides over and teaches a school; a male teacher of a school.
One who, or that which, disciplines and directs.

schoolmate ::: n. --> A pupil who attends the same school as another.

schoolmen ::: pl. --> of Schoolman

schoolmistress ::: n. --> A woman who governs and teaches a school; a female school-teacher.

schoolroom ::: n. --> A room in which pupils are taught.

school ::: n. --> A shoal; a multitude; as, a school of fish.
A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training; as, the school of the prophets.
A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school.

schoolship ::: n. --> A vessel employed as a nautical training school, in which naval apprentices receive their education at the expense of the state, and are trained for service as sailors. Also, a vessel used as a reform school to which boys are committed by the courts to be disciplined, and instructed as mariners.

school-teacher ::: n. --> One who teaches or instructs a school.

schoolward ::: adv. --> Toward school.

Schools of the Prophets “Schools established by Samuel for the training of the Nabiim (prophets). Their method was pursued on the same lines as that of a Chela or candidate for initiation into the occult sciences, i.e., the development of abnormal faculties or clairvoyance leading to Seership. Of such schools there were many in days of old in Palestine and Asia Minor. That the Hebrews worshipped Nebo, the Chaldean god of secret learning, is quite certain, since they adopted his name as an equivalent of Wisdom” (TG 294).

schooled ::: educated, trained (a person, his mind, powers, tastes, etc.); to render wise, skilful, or tractable by training or discipline.

schoolman ::: one versed in scholastic learning or engaged in scholastic pursuits.


--- QUOTES [41 / 41 - 500 / 23632] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   8 Sri Aurobindo
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   2 Manly P Hall
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   1 Seymour Papert
   1 Saint John Bosco
   1 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   1 Peter J Carroll
   1 Noam Chomsky
   1 Neil deGrasse Tyson
   1 Miriam
   1 Mao Zedong
   1 M Alan Kazlev
   1 Lewis Carroll
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   1 Jason Bowman
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NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

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1:A school without music is like a body without a soul ~ Saint John Bosco,
2:Let a hundred flowers bloom, let a hundred schools of thought contend. ~ Mao Zedong,
3:Wisdom is not a product of schooling but of the lifelong attempt to acquire it. ~ Albert Einstein,
4:Much of the material presented in schools strikes students as alien, if not pointless. ~ Howard Gardner,
5:The severest school of anarchism rejects all compromise with communism. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The End of the Curve of Reason,
6:I have realized why corrupt politicians do nothing to improve the quality of public school education. They are terrified of educated voters. ~ Miriam,
7:Did something disappoint you?Did something sadden you?The school of life wanted to teach youan important lesson through that experience. ~ Haemin Sunim,
8:We as economic society are going to have to pay our whole population to go to school and pay it to stay at school. ~ R Buckminster Fuller, Education Automation: Freeing the Scholar to Return to His Studie ,
9:Pain is the touch of our Mother teaching us how to bear and grow in rapture. She has three stages of her schooling, endurance first, next equality of soul, last ecstasy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
10:A schoolman mind had captured life’s large space,But chose to live in bare and paltry roomsParked off from the too vast dangerous universe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.03 - The Entry into the Inner Countries,
11:Are we forming children who are only capable of learning what is already known? Or should we try to develop creative and innovative minds, capable of discovery from the preschool age on, throughout life? ~ Jean Piaget,
12:Every maker of video games knows something that the makers of curriculum don't seem to understand. You'll never see a video game being advertised as being easy. Kids who do not like school will tell you it's not because it's too hard. It's because it's--boring ~ Seymour Papert,
13:I am convinced that the act of thinking logically cannot possibly be natural to the human mind. If it were, then mathematics would be everybody's easiest course at school and our species would not have taken several millennia to figure out the scientific method. ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson,
14:Everything you've learned in school as 'obvious' becomes less and less obvious as you begin to study the universe. For example, there are no solids in the universe. There's not even a suggestion of a solid. There are no absolute continuums. There are no surfaces. There are no straight lines ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
15:A schoolman mind had captured life’s large space,But chose to live in bare and paltry roomsParked off from the too vast dangerous universe,Fearing to lose its soul in the infinite.Even the Idea’s ample sweep was cutInto a system, chained to ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.03 - The Entry into the Inner Countries,
16:Integral theory is a school of philosophy that seeks to integrate all of human wisdom into a new, emergent worldview that is able to accommodate the gifts of all previous worldviews, including those which have been historically at odds: science and religion, Eastern and Western schools of thought, and pre-modern, modern and post-modern worldviews. ~ Daily Evolver,
17:The book, the college, the school of art, the institution of any kind, stop with some past utterance of genius. . . . They look backward and not forward. But genius looks forward: the eyes of man are set in his forehead, not in his hindhead: man hopes: genius creates. Whatever talents may be, if the man create not, the pure efflux of the Deity is not his; - cinders and smoke there may be, but not yet flame. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
18:Student debt is structured to be a burden for life. The indebted cannot declare bankruptcy, unlike Donald Trump. Current student debt is estimated to be over $1.45 trillion. There are ample resources for that simply from waste, including the bloated military and the enormous concentrated private wealth that has accumulated in the financial and general corporate sector under neoliberal policies. There is no economic reason why free education cannot flourish from schools through colleges and university. The barriers are not economic but rather political decisions. ~ Noam Chomsky,
19:The black magician is one who learns to manipulate these forces for selfish and destructive purposes, his own aggrandizement of the fulfillment of desire, while the white magician prays that he may learn to manipulate them as God would have them manipulated - for the salvation of the divine creation. The powers are in the hands of those capable of invoking them; it makes no difference whether for good or ill. For this reason, the schools of white magic conceal these powers from man until, through growth, purification, and unfoldment, he gains the proper incentive for using them. ~ Manly P Hall, Magic: A Treatise on Esoteric Ethics ,
20:Out of all the sciences... the ancients, in their studies, especially selected seven to be mastered by those who were to be educated. These seven they considered so to excel all the rest in usefulness that anyone who had been thoroughly schooled in them might afterward come to knowledge of the others by his own inquiry and effort rather than by listening to a teacher. For these, one might say, constitute the best instruments, the best rudiments, by which the way is prepared for the mind's complete knowledge of philosophic truth. Therefore they are called by the name trivium and quadrivium, because by them, as by certain ways (viae), a quick mind enters into the secret places of wisdom. ~ Hugh of Saint Victor, Didascalicon ,
21:We should do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian Darwinian theory he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living. ~ R Buckminster Fuller,
22:We cannot perceive Chaos directly, for it simultaneously contains the opposite to anything we might think it is. We can, however, occasionally glimpse and make use of partially formed matter which has only probablistic and indeterministic existence. This stuff we can call the aethers. 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ If it makes us feel any better we can call this Chaos, the Tao, or God, and imagine it to be benevolent and human-hearted. There are two schools of thought in magic. One considers the formative agent of the universe to be random and chaotic, and the other considers that it is a force of spiritual consciousness. As they have only themselves on which to base their speculations, they are basically saying that their own natures are either random and chaotic or spiritually conscious. ~ Peter J Carroll, Miscellaneous Excerpts Part 2 ,
23:And the first of the adepts covered His shame with a cloth, walking backwards, and was white. And the second of the adepts covered his shame with a cloth, walking sideways, and was yellow. And the third of the adepts made a mock of His nakedness, walking forwards, and was black. And these are the three great schools of the Magi, who are also the three Magi that journeyed unto Bethlehem; and because thou hast not wisdom, thou shalt not know which school prevaileth, or if the three schools be not one.* 1wordlist AUTHORS BOOKS-INFO cats CHEATSHEETS COMMANDS d20 dc-empty define-1355 DICTIONARIES DICTIONARIES-2020-03-23 DOCS.RACKET DOCS.RACKET_W_LINKS goodreads_books_data goodreads_books_data-raw GRAMMER input.su keys keys_2020-03-29 keys_2020-06-04 keys_2020-06-05 keys_2020-06-27 keys-2020-08-14 keys-2020-10-13 keys.bak-2020-02-11 keys-bak-2020-09-14 LISTS MEDIA_LISTS MEM_AUDIO_199 most new_keys_subject_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged.php_tagged new_keys_subject_tagged_r NEWLIB PARTIAL_FORMATTED plants PROGRAMS QUOTES RESUMES sedrnS19w sss_7418_2019-12-18 style.css subjects subjects_wo_periods syn syn1 synonyms temp temp1 temp_11 test5 thedbs.zip todo twitter_full_s TWITTER-RIPS VG WEB_ADDRESSES WIKI wikit_list.su wordincarnate_SA_4500 wordincarnate_SA_clean wordincarnate_SA_clean2 WORDLIST wordlist wordlist (3rd copy) wordlist (another copy) wordlist-broken maybe wordlist-config wordlist (copy) wordlist-ru wordlist-temp wordlist-u ZZ This doctrine of the Three Schools is of extreme interest. Roughly, it may be said that the White is the Pure Mystic, whose attitude to God is one of reverence. The Yellow School conceals the Mysteries indeed, but examines them as it goes along. The Black School is that of pure Scepticism. We are now ready to study the philosophical bases of these three Schools. ~ Aleister Crowley, Magick Without Tears? 43?,
24:Gradually a separation took place among the schools of the Mysteries. The zeal of the priests to spread their doctrines in many cases apparently exceeded their intelligence. As a result, many were allowed to enter the temples before they had really prepared themselves for the wisdom they were to receive. The result was that these untutored minds, slowly gaining positions of authority, became at last incapable of maintaining the institution because they were unable to contact the spiritual powers behind the material enterprise. So the Mystery Schools vanished. The spiritual hierarchy, served through all generations by a limited number of true and devoted followers, withdrew from the world; while the colossal material organizations, having no longer any contact with the divine source, wandered in circles, daily becoming more involved in the rituals and symbols which they had lost the power of interpreting. ~ Manly P Hall, What the Ancient Wisdom Expects of Its Disciples ,
25:She sets the hard inventions of her brain In a pattern of eternal fixity: Indifferent to the cosmic dumb demand, Unconscious of too close realities, Of the unspoken thought, the voiceless heart, She leans to forge her credos and iron codes And metal structures to imprison life And mechanic models of all things that are. For the world seen she weaves a world conceived: She spins in stiff but unsubstantial lines Her gossamer word-webs of abstract thought, Her segment systems of the Infinite, Her theodicies and cosmogonic charts And myths by which she explains the inexplicable. At will she spaces in thin air of mind Like maps in the school-house of intellect hung, Forcing wide Truth into a narrow scheme, Her numberless warring strict philosophies; Out of Nature's body of phenomenon She carves with Thought's keen edge in rigid lines, Like rails for the World-Magician's power to run, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri ,
26:five schools of yoga ::: For if, leaving aside the complexities of their particular processes, we fix our regard on the central principle of the chief schools of Yoga still prevalent in India, we find that they arrange themselves in an ascending order which starts from the lowest rung of the ladder, the body, and ascends to the direct contact between the individual soul and the transcendent and universal Self. Hathayoga selects the body and the vital functionings as its instruments of perfection and realisation; its concern is with the gross body. Rajayoga selects the mental being in its different parts as its lever-power; it concentrates on the subtle body. The triple Path of Works, of Love and of Knowledge uses some part of the mental being, will, heart or intellect as a starting-point and seeks by its conversion to arrive at the liberating Truth, Beatitude and Infinity which are the nature of the spiritual life.Its method is a direct commerce between the human Purusha in the individual body and the divine Purusha who dwells in everybody and yet transcends all form and name. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Introduction - The Conditions of the Synthesis,
27:Recommended ReadingDavid Foster Wallace - Infinite JestDH Lawrence - The RainbowGabriel Garcia Marquez - Love in the Time of CholeraKarl Ove Knausgaard - My StruggleVirginia Woolf - To The LighthouseBen Lerner - The Topeka SchoolSally Rooney - Conversations With FriendsNell Zink - The WallcreeperElena Ferrante - The Days of AbandonmentJack Kerouac - Dharma BumsWalt Whitman - Leaves of GrassMichael Murphy - Golf in the KingdomBarbara Kingsolver - Prodigal SummerAlbertine Sarrazin - AstragalRebecca Solnit - The Faraway NearbyMichael Paterniti - Love and Other Ways of DyingRainer Maria Rilke - Book of HoursJames Baldwin - Another CountryRoberto Calasso - KaTranslation by S. Radhakrishan - Principle UpanisadsChogyam Trungpa - Cutting Through Spiritual MaterialismTranslation by Georg Feuerstein - Yoga SutraRichard Freeman - The Mirror of YogaTranslation by S. Radhakrishan - The Bhagavad GitaShrunyu Suzuki - Zen Mind Beginner's MindHeinrich Zimmer - Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and CivilizationSogyal Rinpoche - The Tibetan Book of Living and DyingJoseph Campbell - Myths of LightJoseph Campbell - The Hero With A Thousand FacesSri Aurobindo - SavitriThomas Meyers - Anatomy TrainsWendy Doniger - The Hindus ~ Jason Bowman, http://www.jasonbowmanyoga.com/recommended-reading ,
28:People think of education as something that they can finish. And what's more, when they finish, it's a rite of passage. You're finished with school. You're no more a child, and therefore anything that reminds you of school - reading books, having ideas, asking questions - that's kid's stuff. Now you're an adult, you don't do that sort of thing any more.You have everybody looking forward to no longer learning, and you make them ashamed afterward of going back to learning. If you have a system of education using computers, then anyone, any age, can learn by himself, can continue to be interested. If you enjoy learning, there's no reason why you should stop at a given age. People don't stop things they enjoy doing just because they reach a certain age.What's exciting is the actual process of broadening yourself, of knowing there's now a little extra facet of the universe you know about and can think about and can understand. It seems to me that when it's time to die, there would be a certain pleasure in thinking that you had utilized your life well, learned as much as you could, gathered in as much as possible of the universe, and enjoyed it. There's only this one universe and only this one lifetime to try to grasp it. And while it is inconceivable that anyone can grasp more than a tiny portion of it, at least you can do that much. What a tragedy just to pass through and get nothing out of it. ~ Isaac Asimov, Carl Freedman - Conversations with Isaac Asimov-University Press of Mississippi (2005).pdf ,
29:In the Judeo-Christian tradition, it is called 'the resurrection body ' and 'the glorified body.' The prophet Isaiah said, 'The dead shall live, their bodies shall rise' (Isa. 26:19). St. Paul called it 'the celestial body' or 'spiritual body ' (soma pneumatikon) (I Corinthians 15:40). In Sufism it is called 'the most sacred body ' (wujud al-aqdas) and 'supracelestial body ' (jism asli haqiqi). In Taoism, it is called 'the diamond body,' and those who have attained it are called 'the immortals' and 'the cloudwalkers.' In Tibetan Buddhism it is called 'the light body.' In Tantrism and some schools of yoga, it is called 'the vajra body,' 'the adamantine body,' and 'the divine body.' In Kriya yoga it is called 'the body of bliss.' In Vedanta it is called 'the superconductive body.' In Gnosticism and Neoplatonism, it is called 'the radiant body.' In the alchemical tradition, the Emerald Tablet calls it 'the Glory of the Whole Universe' and 'the golden body.' The alchemist Paracelsus called it 'the astral body.' In the Hermetic Corpus, it is called 'the immortal body ' (soma athanaton). In some mystery schools, it is called 'the solar body.' In Rosicrucianism, it is called 'the diamond body of the temple of God.' In ancient Egypt it was called 'the luminous body or being' (akh). In Old Persia it was called 'the indwelling divine potential' (fravashi or fravarti). In the Mithraic liturgy it was called 'the perfect body ' (soma teilion). In the philosophy of Sri Aurobindo, it is called 'the divine body,' composed of supramental substance. In the philosophy of Teilhard de Chardin, it is called 'the ultrahuman'. ~ , http://herebedragons.weebly.com/homo-lumen.php ,
30:science of consciousness, the soul and objective matter ::: When the ancient thinkers of India set themselves to study the soul of man in themselves and others, they, unlike any other nation or school of early thought, proceeded at once to a process which resembles exactly enough the process adopted by modern science in its study of physical phenomena. For their object was to study, arrange and utilise the forms, forces and working movements of consciousness, just as the modern physical Sciences study, arrange and utilize the forms, forces and working movements of objective Matter. The material with which they had to deal was more subtle, flexible and versatile than the most impalpable forces of which the physical Sciences have become aware; its motions were more elusive, its processes harder to fix; but once grasped and ascertained, the movements of consciousness were found by Vedic psychologists to be in their process and activity as regular, manageable and utilisable as the movements of physical forces. The powers of the soul can be as perfectly handled and as safely, methodically and puissantly directed to practical life-purposes of joy, power and light as the modern power of electricity can be used for human comfort, industrial and locomotive power and physical illumination; but the results to which they give room and effect are more wonderful and momentous than the results of motorpower and electric luminosity. For there is no difference of essential law in the physical and the psychical, but only a difference and undoubtedly a great difference of energy, instrumentation and exact process. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human Towards a True Scientific Psychology,
31:Shastra is the knowledge and teaching laid down by intuition, experience and wisdom, the science and art and ethic of life, the best standards available to the race. The half-awakened man who leaves the observance of its rule to follow the guidance of his instincts and desires, can get pleasure but not happiness; for the inner happiness can only come by right living. He cannot move to perfection, cannot acquire the highest spiritual status. The law of instinct and desire seems to come first in the animal world, but the manhood of man grows by the pursuit of truth and religion and knowledge and a right life. The Shastra, the recognised Right that he has set up to govern his lower members by his reason and intelligent will, must therefore first be observed and made the authority for conduct and works and for what should or should not be done, till the instinctive desire nature is schooled and abated and put down by the habit of self-control and man is ready first for a freer intelligent self-guidance and then for the highest supreme law and supreme liberty of the spiritual nature. For the Shastra in its ordinary aspect is not that spiritual law, although at its loftiest point, when it becomes a science and art of spiritual living, Adhyatma-shastra, - the Gita itself describes its own teaching as the highest and most secret Shastra, - it formulates a rule of the self-transcendence of the sattwic nature and develops the discipline which leads to spiritual transmutation. Yet all Shastra is built on a number of preparatory conditions, dharmas; it is a means, not an end. The supreme end is the freedom of the spirit when abandoning all dharmas the soul turns to God for its sole law of action, acts straight from the divine will and lives in the freedom of the divine nature, not in the Law, but in the Spirit. This is the development of the teaching which is prepared by the next question of Arjuna. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays On The Gita ,
32:Ekajaṭī or Ekajaṭā, (Sanskrit: "One Plait Woman"; Wylie: ral gcig ma: one who has one knot of hair),[1] also known as Māhacīnatārā,[2] is one of the 21 Taras. Ekajati is, along with Palden Lhamo deity, one of the most powerful and fierce goddesses of Vajrayana Buddhist mythology.[1][3] According to Tibetan legends, her right eye was pierced by the tantric master Padmasambhava so that she could much more effectively help him subjugate Tibetan demons. Ekajati is also known as "Blue Tara", Vajra Tara or "Ugra Tara".[1][3] She is generally considered one of the three principal protectors of the Nyingma school along with Rāhula and Vajrasādhu (Wylie: rdo rje legs pa). Often Ekajati appears as liberator in the mandala of the Green Tara. Along with that, her ascribed powers are removing the fear of enemies, spreading joy, and removing personal hindrances on the path to enlightenment. Ekajati is the protector of secret mantras and "as the mother of the mothers of all the Buddhas" represents the ultimate unity. As such, her own mantra is also secret. She is the most important protector of the Vajrayana teachings, especially the Inner Tantras and termas. As the protector of mantra, she supports the practitioner in deciphering symbolic dakini codes and properly determines appropriate times and circumstances for revealing tantric teachings. Because she completely realizes the texts and mantras under her care, she reminds the practitioner of their preciousness and secrecy.[4] Düsum Khyenpa, 1st Karmapa Lama meditated upon her in early childhood. According to Namkhai Norbu, Ekajati is the principal guardian of the Dzogchen teachings and is "a personification of the essentially non-dual nature of primordial energy."[5] Dzogchen is the most closely guarded teaching in Tibetan Buddhism, of which Ekajati is a main guardian as mentioned above. It is said that Sri Singha (Sanskrit: Śrī Siṃha) himself entrusted the "Heart Essence" (Wylie: snying thig) teachings to her care. To the great master Longchenpa, who initiated the dissemination of certain Dzogchen teachings, Ekajati offered uncharacteristically personal guidance. In his thirty-second year, Ekajati appeared to Longchenpa, supervising every ritual detail of the Heart Essence of the Dakinis empowerment, insisting on the use of a peacock feather and removing unnecessary basin. When Longchenpa performed the ritual, she nodded her head in approval but corrected his pronunciation. When he recited the mantra, Ekajati admonished him, saying, "Imitate me," and sang it in a strange, harmonious melody in the dakini's language. Later she appeared at the gathering and joyously danced, proclaiming the approval of Padmasambhava and the dakinis.[6] ~ Wikipedia,
33:At it's narrowest (although this is a common and perhaps the official position; need to find ref in What is Enlightenment) "integral", "turquois" (Spiral Dynamics), and "second tier" (ditto) are all synonms, and in turn are equivalent to Wilber IV / AQAL/Wilber V "Post-metaphysical" AQAL. This is the position that "Integral = Ken Wilber". It constitutes a new philosophical school or meme-set, in the tradition of charismatic spiritual teachers of all ages, in which an articulate, brilliant, and popular figure would arise, and gather a following around him- or her-self. After the teacher passes on, their teaching remains through books and organisations dedicated to perpetuating that teaching; although without the brilliant light of the Founder, things generally become pretty stultifying, and there is often little or no original development. Even so, the books themselves continue to inspire, and many people benefit greatly from these tecahings, and can contact the original Light of the founders to be inspired by them on the subtle planes. Some late 19th, 20th, and early 21st century examples of such teachers, known and less well-known, are Blavatsky, Theon, Steiner, Aurobindo, Gurdjieff, Crowley, Alice Bailey, Carl Jung, Ann Ree Colton, and now Ken Wilber. Also, many popular gurus belong in this category. It could plausibly be suggested that the founders of the great world religions started out no different, but their teaching really caught on n a big way....At its broadest then, the Integral Community includes not only Wilber but those he cites as his influences and hold universal and evolutionary views or teachings, as well as those who, while influenced by him also differ somewhat, and even those like Arthur M Young that Wilber has apparently never heard of. Nevertheless, all share a common, evolutionary, "theory of everything" position, and, whilst they may differ on many details and even on many major points, taken together they could be considered a wave front for a new paradigm, a memetic revolution. I use the term Daimon of the Integral Movement to refer to the spiritual being or personality of light that is behind and working through this broader movement.Now, this doesn't mean that this daimon is necessarily a negative entity. I see a lot of promise, a lot of potential, in the Integral Approach. From what I feel at the moment, the Integral Deva is a force and power of good.But, as with any new spiritual or evolutionary development, there is duality, in that there are forces that hinder and oppose and distort, as well as forces that help and aid in the evolution and ultimate divinisation of the Earth and the cosmos. Thus even where a guru does give in the dark side (as very often happens with many gurus today) there still remains an element of Mixed Light that remains (one finds this ambiguity with Sai Baba, with Da Free John, and with Rajneesh); and we find this same ambiguity with the Integral Community regarding what seems to me a certain offputting devotional attitude towards Wilber himself. The light will find its way, regardless. However, an Intregral Movement that is caught up in worship of and obedience to an authority figure, will not be able to achieve what a movement unfettered by such shackles could. ~ M Alan Kazlev, Kheper Ken Wilber,
34:PRATYAHARAPRATYAHARA is the first process in the mental part of our task. The previous practices, Asana, Pranayama, Yama, and Niyama, are all acts of the body, while mantra is connected with speech: Pratyahara is purely mental. And what is Pratyahara? This word is used by different authors in different senses. The same word is employed to designate both the practice and the result. It means for our present purpose a process rather strategical than practical; it is introspection, a sort of general examination of the contents of the mind which we wish to control: Asana having been mastered, all immediate exciting causes have been removed, and we are free to think what we are thinking about. A very similar experience to that of Asana is in store for us. At first we shall very likely flatter ourselves that our minds are pretty calm; this is a defect of observation. Just as the European standing for the first time on the edge of the desert will see nothing there, while his Arab can tell him the family history of each of the fifty persons in view, because he has learnt how to look, so with practice the thoughts will become more numerous and more insistent. As soon as the body was accurately observed it was found to be terribly restless and painful; now that we observe the mind it is seen to be more restless and painful still. (See diagram opposite.) A similar curve might be plotted for the real and apparent painfulness of Asana. Conscious of this fact, we begin to try to control it: "Not quite so many thoughts, please!" "Don't think quite so fast, please!" "No more of that kind of thought, please!" It is only then that we discover that what we thought was a school of playful porpoises is really the convolutions of the sea-serpent. The attempt to repress has the effect of exciting. When the unsuspecting pupil first approaches his holy but wily Guru, and demands magical powers, that Wise One replies that he will confer them, points out with much caution and secrecy some particular spot on the pupil's body which has never previously attracted his attention, and says: "In order to obtain this magical power which you seek, all that is necessary is to wash seven times in the Ganges during seven days, being particularly careful to avoid thinking of that one spot." Of course the unhappy youth spends a disgusted week in thinking of little else. It is positively amazing with what persistence a thought, even a whole train of thoughts, returns again and again to the charge. It becomes a positive nightmare. It is intensely annoying, too, to find that one does not become conscious that one has got on to the forbidden subject until one has gone right through with it. However, one continues day after day investigating thoughts and trying to check them; and sooner or later one proceeds to the next stage, Dharana, the attempt to restrain the mind to a single object. Before we go on to this, however, we must consider what is meant by success in Pratyahara. This is a very extensive subject, and different authors take widely divergent views. One writer means an analysis so acute that every thought is resolved into a number of elements (see "The Psychology of Hashish," Section V, in Equinox II). Others take the view that success in the practice is something like the experience which Sir Humphrey Davy had as a result of taking nitrous oxide, in which he exclaimed: "The universe is composed exclusively of ideas." Others say that it gives Hamlet's feeling: "There's nothing good or bad but thinking makes it so," interpreted as literally as was done by Mrs. Eddy. However, the main point is to acquire some sort of inhibitory power over the thoughts. Fortunately there is an unfailing method of acquiring this power. It is given in Liber III. If Sections 1 and 2 are practised (if necessary with the assistance of another person to aid your vigilance) you will soon be able to master the final section. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA ,
35:GURU YOGA Guru yoga is an essential practice in all schools of Tibetan Buddhism and Bon. This is true in sutra, tantra, and Dzogchen. It develops the heart connection with the masteR By continually strengthening our devotion, we come to the place of pure devotion in ourselves, which is the unshakeable, powerful base of the practice. The essence of guru yoga is to merge the practitioner's mind with the mind of the master. What is the true master? It is the formless, fundamental nature of mind, the primordial awareness of the base of everything, but because we exist in dualism, it is helpful for us to visualize this in a form. Doing so makes skillful use of the dualisms of the conceptual mind, to further strengthen devotion and help us stay directed toward practice and the generation of positive qualities. In the Bon tradition, we often visualize either Tapihritsa* as the master, or the Buddha ShenlaOdker*, who represents the union of all the masters. If you are already a practitioner, you may have another deity to visualize, like Guru Rinpoche or a yidam or dakini. While it is important to work with a lineage with which you have a connection, you should understand that the master you visualize is the embodiment of all the masters with whom you are connected, all the teachers with whom you have studied, all the deities to whom you have commitments. The master in guru yoga is not just one individual, but the essence of enlightenment, the primordial awareness that is your true nature. The master is also the teacher from whom you receive the teachings. In the Tibetan tradition, we say the master is more important than the Buddha. Why? Because the master is the immediate messenger of the teachings, the one who brings the Buddha's wisdom to the student. Without the master we could not find our way to the Buddha. So we should feel as much devotion to the master as we would to the Buddha if the Buddha suddenly appeared in front of us. Guru yoga is not just about generating some feeling toward a visualized image. It is done to find the fundamental mind in yourself that is the same as the fundamental mind of all your teachers, and of all the Buddhas and realized beings that have ever lived. When you merge with the guru, you merge with your pristine true nature, which is the real guide and masteR But this should not be an abstract practice. When you do guru yoga, try to feel such intense devotion that the hair stands upon your neck, tears start down your face, and your heart opens and fills with great love. Let yourself merge in union with the guru's mind, which is your enlightened Buddha-nature. This is the way to practice guru yoga. The Practice After the nine breaths, still seated in meditation posture, visualize the master above and in front of you. This should not be a flat, two dimensional picture-let a real being exist there, in three dimensions, made of light, pure, and with a strong presence that affects the feeling in your body,your energy, and your mind. Generate strong devotion and reflect on the great gift of the teachings and the tremendous good fortune you enjoy in having made a connection to them. Offer a sincere prayer, asking that your negativities and obscurations be removed, that your positive qualities develop, and that you accomplish dream yoga. Then imagine receiving blessings from the master in the form of three colored lights that stream from his or her three wisdom doors- of body, speech, and mind-into yours. The lights should be transmitted in the following sequence: White light streams from the master's brow chakra into yours, purifying and relaxing your entire body and physical dimension. Then red light streams from the master's throat chakra into yours, purifying and relaxing your energetic dimension. Finally, blue light streams from the master's heart chakra into yours, purifying and relaxing your mind. When the lights enter your body, feel them. Let your body, energy, and mind relax, suffused inwisdom light. Use your imagination to make the blessing real in your full experience, in your body and energy as well as in the images in your mind. After receiving the blessing, imagine the master dissolving into light that enters your heart and resides there as your innermost essence. Imagine that you dissolve into that light, and remain inpure awareness, rigpa. There are more elaborate instructions for guru yoga that can involve prostrations, offerings, gestures, mantras, and more complicated visualizations, but the essence of the practice is mingling your mind with the mind of the master, which is pure, non-dual awareness. Guru yoga can be done any time during the day; the more often the better. Many masters say that of all the practices it is guru yoga that is the most important. It confers the blessings of the lineage and can open and soften the heart and quiet the unruly mind. To completely accomplish guru yoga is to accomplish the path. ~ Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche, The Tibetan Yogas Of Dream And Sleep ,
36:Death & FameWhen I dieI don't care what happens to my body throw ashes in the air, scatter 'em in East River bury an urn in Elizabeth New Jersey, B'nai Israel CemeteryBut I want a big funeral St. Patrick's Cathedral, St. Mark's Church, the largest synagogue in ManhattanFirst, there's family, brother, nephews, spry aged Edith stepmother 96, Aunt Honey from old Newark,Doctor Joel, cousin Mindy, brother Gene one eyed one ear'd, sister-in-law blonde Connie, five nephews, stepbrothers & sisters their grandchildren, companion Peter Orlovsky, caretakers Rosenthal & Hale, Bill Morgan--Next, teacher Trungpa Vajracharya's ghost mind, Gelek Rinpoche, there Sakyong Mipham, Dalai Lama alert, chance visiting America, Satchitananda Swami Shivananda, Dehorahava Baba, Karmapa XVI, Dudjom Rinpoche, Katagiri & Suzuki Roshi's phantoms Baker, Whalen, Daido Loorie, Qwong, Frail White-haired Kapleau Roshis, Lama Tarchen --Then, most important, lovers over half-century Dozens, a hundred, more, older fellows bald & rich young boys met naked recently in bed, crowds surprised to see each other, innumerable, intimate, exchanging memories"He taught me to meditate, now I'm an old veteran of the thousandday retreat --""I played music on subway platforms, I'm straight but loved him he loved me""I felt more love from him at 19 than ever from anyone""We'd lie under covers gossip, read my poetry, hug & kiss belly to belly arms round each other""I'd always get into his bed with underwear on & by morning my skivvies would be on the floor""Japanese, always wanted take it up my bum with a master""We'd talk all night about Kerouac & Cassady sit Buddhalike then sleep in his captain's bed.""He seemed to need so much affection, a shame not to make him happy""I was lonely never in bed nude with anyone before, he was so gentle my stomach shuddered when he traced his finger along my abdomen nipple to hips-- ""All I did was lay back eyes closed, he'd bring me to come with mouth & fingers along my waist""He gave great head"So there be gossip from loves of 1948, ghost of Neal Cassady commin-gling with flesh and youthful blood of 1997 and surprise -- "You too? But I thought you were straight!""I am but Ginsberg an exception, for some reason he pleased me.""I forgot whether I was straight gay queer or funny, was myself, tender and affectionate to be kissed on the top of my head, my forehead throat heart & solar plexus, mid-belly. on my prick, tickled with his tongue my behind""I loved the way he'd recite 'But at my back allways hear/ time's winged chariot hurrying near,' heads together, eye to eye, on a pillow --"Among lovers one handsome youth straggling the rear"I studied his poetry class, 17 year-old kid, ran some errands to his walk-up flat, seduced me didn't want to, made me come, went home, never saw him again never wanted to... ""He couldn't get it up but loved me," "A clean old man." "He made sure I came first"This the crowd most surprised proud at ceremonial place of honor--Then poets & musicians -- college boys' grunge bands -- age-old rock star Beatles, faithful guitar accompanists, gay classical con-ductors, unknown high Jazz music composers, funky trum-peters, bowed bass & french horn black geniuses, folksinger fiddlers with dobro tamborine harmonica mandolin auto-harp pennywhistles & kazoosNext, artist Italian romantic realists schooled in mystic 60's India, Late fauve Tuscan painter-poets, Classic draftsman Massa-chusets surreal jackanapes with continental wives, poverty sketchbook gesso oil watercolor masters from American provincesThen highschool teachers, lonely Irish librarians, delicate biblio-philes, sex liberation troops nay armies, ladies of either sex"I met him dozens of times he never remembered my name I loved him anyway, true artist""Nervous breakdown after menopause, his poetry humor saved me from suicide hospitals""Charmant, genius with modest manners, washed sink, dishes my studio guest a week in Budapest"Thousands of readers, "Howl changed my life in Libertyville Illinois""I saw him read Montclair State Teachers College decided be a poet-- ""He turned me on, I started with garage rock sang my songs in Kansas City""Kaddish made me weep for myself & father alive in Nevada City""Father Death comforted me when my sister died Boston l982""I read what he said in a newsmagazine, blew my mind, realized others like me out there"Deaf & Dumb bards with hand signing quick brilliant gesturesThen Journalists, editors's secretaries, agents, portraitists & photo-graphy aficionados, rock critics, cultured laborors, cultural historians come to witness the historic funeral Super-fans, poetasters, aging Beatnicks & Deadheads, autograph-hunters, distinguished paparazzi, intelligent gawkersEveryone knew they were part of 'History" except the deceased who never knew exactly what was happening even when I was aliveFebruary 22, 1997 ~ Allen Ginsberg,
37:Education THE EDUCATION of a human being should begin at birth and continue throughout his life. Indeed, if we want this education to have its maximum result, it should begin even before birth; in this case it is the mother herself who proceeds with this education by means of a twofold action: first, upon herself for her own improvement, and secondly, upon the child whom she is forming physically. For it is certain that the nature of the child to be born depends very much upon the mother who forms it, upon her aspiration and will as well as upon the material surroundings in which she lives. To see that her thoughts are always beautiful and pure, her feelings always noble and fine, her material surroundings as harmonious as possible and full of a great simplicity - this is the part of education which should apply to the mother herself. And if she has in addition a conscious and definite will to form the child according to the highest ideal she can conceive, then the very best conditions will be realised so that the child can come into the world with his utmost potentialities. How many difficult efforts and useless complications would be avoided in this way! Education to be complete must have five principal aspects corresponding to the five principal activities of the human being: the physical, the vital, the mental, the psychic and the spiritual. Usually, these phases of education follow chronologically the growth of the individual; this, however, does not mean that one of them should replace another, but that all must continue, completing one another until the end of his life. We propose to study these five aspects of education one by one and also their interrelationships. But before we enter into the details of the subject, I wish to make a recommendation to parents. Most parents, for various reasons, give very little thought to the true education which should be imparted to children. When they have brought a child into the world, provided him with food, satisfied his various material needs and looked after his health more or less carefully, they think they have fully discharged their duty. Later on, they will send him to school and hand over to the teachers the responsibility for his education. There are other parents who know that their children must be educated and who try to do what they can. But very few, even among those who are most serious and sincere, know that the first thing to do, in order to be able to educate a child, is to educate oneself, to become conscious and master of oneself so that one never sets a bad example to one's child. For it is above all through example that education becomes effective. To speak good words and to give wise advice to a child has very little effect if one does not oneself give him an example of what one teaches. Sincerity, honesty, straightforwardness, courage, disinterestedness, unselfishness, patience, endurance, perseverance, peace, calm, self-control are all things that are taught infinitely better by example than by beautiful speeches. Parents, have a high ideal and always act in accordance with it and you will see that little by little your child will reflect this ideal in himself and spontaneously manifest the qualities you would like to see expressed in his nature. Quite naturally a child has respect and admiration for his parents; unless they are quite unworthy, they will always appear to their child as demigods whom he will try to imitate as best he can. With very few exceptions, parents are not aware of the disastrous influence that their own defects, impulses, weaknesses and lack of self-control have on their children. If you wish to be respected by a child, have respect for yourself and be worthy of respect at every moment. Never be authoritarian, despotic, impatient or ill-tempered. When your child asks you a question, do not give him a stupid or silly answer under the pretext that he cannot understand you. You can always make yourself understood if you take enough trouble; and in spite of the popular saying that it is not always good to tell the truth, I affirm that it is always good to tell the truth, but that the art consists in telling it in such a way as to make it accessible to the mind of the hearer. In early life, until he is twelve or fourteen, the child's mind is hardly open to abstract notions and general ideas. And yet you can train it to understand these things by using concrete images, symbols or parables. Up to quite an advanced age and for some who mentally always remain children, a narrative, a story, a tale well told teach much more than any number of theoretical explanations. Another pitfall to avoid: do not scold your child without good reason and only when it is quite indispensable. A child who is too often scolded gets hardened to rebuke and no longer attaches much importance to words or severity of tone. And above all, take good care never to scold him for a fault which you yourself commit. Children are very keen and clear-sighted observers; they soon find out your weaknesses and note them without pity. When a child has done something wrong, see that he confesses it to you spontaneously and frankly; and when he has confessed, with kindness and affection make him understand what was wrong in his movement so that he will not repeat it, but never scold him; a fault confessed must always be forgiven. You should not allow any fear to come between you and your child; fear is a pernicious means of education: it invariably gives birth to deceit and lying. Only a discerning affection that is firm yet gentle and an adequate practical knowledge will create the bonds of trust that are indispensable for you to be able to educate your child effectively. And do not forget that you have to control yourself constantly in order to be equal to your task and truly fulfil the duty which you owe your child by the mere fact of having brought him into the world. Bulletin, February 1951 ~ The Mother, On Education ,
38:Can a Yogi attain to a state of consciousness in which he can know all things, answer all questions, relating even to abstruse scientific problems, such as, for example, the theory of relativity?Theoretically and in principle it is not impossible for a Yogi to know everything; all depends upon the Yogi. But there is knowledge and knowledge. The Yogi does not know in the way of the mind. He does not know everything in the sense that he has access to all possible information or because he contains all the facts of the universe in his mind or because his consciousness is a sort of miraculous encyclopaedia. He knows by his capacity for a containing or dynamic identity with things and persons and forces. Or he knows because he lives in a plane of consciousness or is in contact with a consciousness in which there is the truth and the knowledge. If you are in the true consciousness, the knowledge you have will also be of the truth. Then, too, you can know directly, by being one with what you know. If a problem is put before you, if you are asked what is to be done in a particular matter, you can then, by looking with enough attention and concentration, receive spontaneously the required knowledge and the true answer. It is not by any careful application of theory that you reach the knowledge or by working it out through a mental process. The scientific mind needs these methods to come to its conclusions. But the Yogi's knowledge is direct and immediate; it is not deductive. If an engineer has to find out the exact position for the building of an arch, the line of its curve and the size of its opening, he does it by calculation, collating and deducing from his information and data. But a Yogi needs none of these things; he looks, has the vision of the thing, sees that it is to be done in this way and not in another, and this seeing is his knowledge. Although it may be true in a general way and in a certain sense that a Yogi can know all things and can answer all questions from his own field of vision and consciousness, yet it does not follow that there are no questions whatever of any kind to which he would not or could not answer. A Yogi who has the direct knowledge, the knowledge of the true truth of things, would not care or perhaps would find it difficult to answer questions that belong entirely to the domain of human mental constructions. It may be, he could not or would not wish to solve problems and difficulties you might put to him which touch only the illusion of things and their appearances. The working of his knowledge is not in the mind. If you put him some silly mental query of that character, he probably would not answer. The very common conception that you can put any ignorant question to him as to some super-schoolmaster or demand from him any kind of information past, present or future and that he is bound to answer, is a foolish idea. It is as inept as the expectation from the spiritual man of feats and miracles that would satisfy the vulgar external mind and leave it gaping with wonder. Moreover, the term "Yogi" is very vague and wide. There are many types of Yogis, many lines or ranges of spiritual or occult endeavour and different heights of achievement, there are some whose powers do not extend beyond the mental level; there are others who have gone beyond it. Everything depends on the field or nature of their effort, the height to which they have arrived, the consciousness with which they have contact or into which they enter. Do not scientists go sometimes beyond the mental plane? It is said that Einstein found his theory of relativity not through any process of reasoning, but through some kind of sudden inspiration. Has that inspiration anything to do with the Supermind?The scientist who gets an inspiration revealing to him a new truth, receives it from the intuitive mind. The knowledge comes as a direct perception in the higher mental plane illumined by some other light still farther above. But all that has nothing to do with the action of Supermind and this higher mental level is far removed from the supramental plane. Men are too easily inclined to believe that they have climbed into regions quite divine when they have only gone above the average level. There are many stages between the ordinary human mind and the Supermind, many grades and many intervening planes. If an ordinary man were to get into direct contact even with one of these intermediate planes, he would be dazzled and blinded, would be crushed under the weight of the sense of immensity or would lose his balance; and yet it is not the Supermind. Behind the common idea that a Yogi can know all things and answer all questions is the actual fact that there is a plane in the mind where the memory of everything is stored and remains always in existence. All mental movements that belong to the life of the earth are memorised and registered in this plane. Those who are capable of going there and care to take the trouble, can read in it and learn anything they choose. But this region must not be mistaken for the supramental levels. And yet to reach even there you must be able to silence the movements of the material or physical mind; you must be able to leave aside all your sensations and put a stop to your ordinary mental movements, whatever they are; you must get out of the vital; you must become free from the slavery of the body. Then only you can enter into that region and see. But if you are sufficiently interested to make this effort, you can arrive there and read what is written in the earth's memory. Thus, if you go deep into silence, you can reach a level of consciousness on which it is not impossible for you to receive answers to all your questions. And if there is one who is consciously open to the plenary truth of the supermind, in constant contact with it, he can certainly answer any question that is worth an answer from the supramental Light. The queries put must come from some sense of the truth and reality behind things. There are many questions and much debated problems that are cobwebs woven of mere mental abstractions or move on the illusory surface of things. These do not pertain to real knowledge; they are a deformation of knowledge, their very substance is of the ignorance. Certainly the supramental knowledge may give an answer, its own answer, to the problems set by the mind's ignorance; but it is likely that it would not be at all satisfactory or perhaps even intelligible to those who ask from the mental level. You must not expect the supramental to work in the way of the mind or demand that the knowledge in truth should be capable of being pieced together with the half-knowledge in ignorance. The scheme of the mind is one thing, but Supermind is quite another and it would no longer be supramental if it adapted itself to the exigencies of the mental scheme. The two are incommensurable and cannot be put together. When the consciousness has attained to supramental joys, does it no longer take interest in the things of the mind?The supramental does not take interest in mental things in the same way as the mind. It takes its own interest in all the movements of the universe, but it is from a different point of view and with a different vision. The world presents to it an entirely different appearance; there is a reversal of outlook and everything is seen from there as other than what it seems to the mind and often even the opposite. Things have another meaning; their aspect, their motion and process, everything about them, are watched with other eyes. Everything here is followed by the supermind; the mind movements and not less the vital, the material movements, all the play of the universe have for it a very deep interest, but of another kind. It is about the same difference as that between the interest taken in a puppet-play by one who holds the strings and knows what the puppets are to do and the will that moves them and that they can do only what it moves them to do, and the interest taken by another who observes the play but sees only what is happening from moment to moment and knows nothing else. The one who follows the play and is outside its secret has a stronger, an eager and passionate interest in what will happen and he gives an excited attention to its unforeseen or dramatic events; the other, who holds the strings and moves the show, is unmoved and tranquil. There is a certain intensity of interest which comes from ignorance and is bound up with illusion, and that must disappear when you are out of the ignorance. The interest that human beings take in things founds itself on the illusion; if that were removed, they would have no interest at all in the play; they would find it dry and dull. That is why all this ignorance, all this illusion has lasted so long; it is because men like it, because they cling to it and its peculiar kind of appeal that it endures. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931 93?
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39:[The Gods and Their Worlds] [...] According to traditions and occult schools, all these zones of realities, these planes of realities have got different names; they have been classified in a different way, but there is an essential analogy, and if you go back far enough into the traditions, you see only the words changing according to the country and the language. Even now, the experiences of Western occultists and those of Eastern occultists offer great similarities. All who set out on the discovery of these invisible worlds and make a report of what they saw, give a very similar description, whether they be from here or there; they use different words, but the experience is very similar and the handling of forces is the same. This knowledge of the occult worlds is based on the existence of subtle bodies and of subtle worlds corresponding to those bodies. They are what the psychological method calls "states of consciousness", but these states of consciousness really correspond to worlds. The occult procedure consists then in being aware of these various inner states of being or subtle bodies and in becoming sufficiently a master of them so as to be able to go out of them successively, one after another. There is indeed a whole scale of subtleties, increasing or decreasing according to the direction in which you go, and the occult procedure consists in going out of a denser body into a subtler body and so on again, up to the most ethereal regions. You go, by successive exteriorisations, into bodies or worlds more and more subtle. It is somewhat as if every time you passed into another dimension. The fourth dimension of the physicists is nothing but the scientific transcription of an occult knowledge. To give another image, one can say that the physical body is at the centre - it is the most material, the densest and also the smallest - and the inner bodies, more subtle, overflow more and more the central physical body; they pass through it, extending themselves farther and farther, like water evaporating from a porous vase and forming a kind of steam all around. And the greater the subtlety, the more the extension tends to unite with that of the universe: one ends by universalising oneself. And it is altogether a concrete process which gives an objective experience of invisible worlds and even enables one to act in these worlds. There are, then, only a very small number of people in the West who know that these gods are not merely subjective and imaginary - more or less wildly imaginary - but that they correspond to a universal truth. All these regions, all these domains are filled with beings who exist, each in its own domain, and if you are awake and conscious on a particular plane - for instance, if on going out of a more material body you awake on some higher plane, you have the same relation with the things and people of that plane as you had with the things and people of the material world. That is to say, there exists an entirely objective relation that has nothing to do with the idea you may have of these things. Naturally, the resemblance is greater and greater as you approach the physical world, the material world, and there even comes a time when the one region has a direct action upon the other. In any case, in what Sri Aurobindo calls the overmental worlds, you will find a concrete reality absolutely independent of your personal experience; you go back there and again find the same things, with the differences that have occurred during your absence. And you have relations with those beings that are identical with the relations you have with physical beings, with this difference that the relation is more plastic, supple and direct - for example, there is the capacity to change the external form, the visible form, according to the inner state you are in. But you can make an appointment with someone and be at the appointed place and find the same being again, with certain differences that have come about during your absence; it is entirely concrete with results entirely concrete. One must have at least a little of this experience in order to understand these things. Otherwise, those who are convinced that all this is mere human imagination and mental formation, who believe that these gods have such and such a form because men have thought them to be like that, and that they have certain defects and certain qualities because men have thought them to be like that - all those who say that God is made in the image of man and that he exists only in human thought, all these will not understand; to them this will appear absolutely ridiculous, madness. One must have lived a little, touched the subject a little, to know how very concrete the thing is. Naturally, children know a good deal if they have not been spoilt. There are so many children who return every night to the same place and continue to live the life they have begun there. When these faculties are not spoilt with age, you can keep them with you. At a time when I was especially interested in dreams, I could return exactly to a place and continue a work that I had begun: supervise something, for example, set something in order, a work of organisation or of discovery, of exploration. You go until you reach a certain spot, as you would go in life, then you take a rest, then you return and begin again - you begin the work at the place where you left off and you continue it. And you perceive that there are things which are quite independent of you, in the sense that changes of which you are not at all the author, have taken place automatically during your absence. But for this, you must live these experiences yourself, you must see them yourself, live them with sufficient sincerity and spontaneity in order to see that they are independent of any mental formation. For you can do the opposite also, and deepen the study of the action of mental formation upon events. This is very interesting, but it is another domain. And this study makes you very careful, very prudent, because you become aware of how far you can delude yourself. So you must study both, the dream and the occult reality, in order to see what is the essential difference between the two. The one depends upon us; the other exists in itself; entirely independent of the thought that we have of it. When you have worked in that domain, you recognise in fact that once a subject has been studied and something has been learnt mentally, it gives a special colour to the experience; the experience may be quite spontaneous and sincere, but the simple fact that the subject was known and studied lends a particular quality. Whereas if you had learnt nothing about the question, if you knew nothing at all, the transcription would be completely spontaneous and sincere when the experience came; it would be more or less adequate, but it would not be the outcome of a previous mental formation. Naturally, this occult knowledge or this experience is not very frequent in the world, because in those who do not have a developed inner life, there are veritable gaps between the external consciousness and the inmost consciousness; the linking states of being are missing and they have to be constructed. So when people enter there for the first time, they are bewildered, they have the impression they have fallen into the night, into nothingness, into non-being! I had a Danish friend, a painter, who was like that. He wanted me to teach him how to go out of the body; he used to have interesting dreams and thought that it would be worth the trouble to go there consciously. So I made him "go out" - but it was a frightful thing! When he was dreaming, a part of his mind still remained conscious, active, and a kind of link existed between this active part and his external being; then he remembered some of his dreams, but it was a very partial phenomenon. And to go out of one's body means to pass gradually through all the states of being, if one does the thing systematically. Well, already in the subtle physical, one is almost de-individualised, and when one goes farther, there remains nothing, for nothing is formed or individualised. Thus, when people are asked to meditate or told to go within, to enter into themselves, they are in agony - naturally! They have the impression that they are vanishing. And with reason: there is nothing, no consciousness! These things that appear to us quite natural and evident, are, for people who know nothing, wild imagination. If, for example, you transplant these experiences or this knowledge to the West, well, unless you have been frequenting the circles of occultists, they stare at you with open eyes. And when you have turned your back, they hasten to say, "These people are cranks!" Now to come back to the gods and conclude. It must be said that all those beings who have never had an earthly existence - gods or demons, invisible beings and powers - do not possess what the Divine has put into man: the psychic being. And this psychic being gives to man true love, charity, compassion, a deep kindness, which compensate for all his external defects. In the gods there is no fault because they live according to their own nature, spontaneously and without constraint: as gods, it is their manner of being. But if you take a higher point of view, if you have a higher vision, a vision of the whole, you see that they lack certain qualities that are exclusively human. By his capacity of love and self-giving, man can have as much power as the gods and even more, when he is not egoistic, when he has surmounted his egoism. If he fulfils the required condition, man is nearer to the Supreme than the gods are. He can be nearer. He is not so automatically, but he has the power to be so, the potentiality. If human love manifested itself without mixture, it would be all-powerful. Unfortunately, in human love there is as much love of oneself as of the one loved; it is not a love that makes you forget yourself. - 4 November 1958 ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III 355
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40:Mental EducationOF ALL lines of education, mental education is the most widely known and practised, yet except in a few rare cases there are gaps which make it something very incomplete and in the end quite insufficient. Generally speaking, schooling is considered to be all the mental education that is necessary. And when a child has been made to undergo, for a number of years, a methodical training which is more like cramming than true schooling, it is considered that whatever is necessary for his mental development has been done. Nothing of the kind. Even conceding that the training is given with due measure and discrimination and does not permanently damage the brain, it cannot impart to the human mind the faculties it needs to become a good and useful instrument. The schooling that is usually given can, at the most, serve as a system of gymnastics to increase the suppleness of the brain. From this standpoint, each branch of human learning represents a special kind of mental gymnastics, and the verbal formulations given to these various branches each constitute a special and well-defined language. A true mental education, which will prepare man for a higher life, has five principal phases. Normally these phases follow one after another, but in exceptional individuals they may alternate or even proceed simultaneously. These five phases, in brief, are: (1) Development of the power of concentration, the capacity of attention. (2) Development of the capacities of expansion, widening, complexity and richness. (3) Organisation of one's ideas around a central idea, a higher ideal or a supremely luminous idea that will serve as a guide in life. (4) Thought-control, rejection of undesirable thoughts, to become able to think only what one wants and when one wants. (5) Development of mental silence, perfect calm and a more and more total receptivity to inspirations coming from the higher regions of the being. It is not possible to give here all the details concerning the methods to be employed in the application of these five phases of education to different individuals. Still, a few explanations on points of detail can be given. Undeniably, what most impedes mental progress in children is the constant dispersion of their thoughts. Their thoughts flutter hither and thither like butterflies and they have to make a great effort to fix them. Yet this capacity is latent in them, for when you succeed in arousing their interest, they are capable of a good deal of attention. By his ingenuity, therefore, the educator will gradually help the child to become capable of a sustained effort of attention and a faculty of more and more complete absorption in the work in hand. All methods that can develop this faculty of attention from games to rewards are good and can all be utilised according to the need and the circumstances. But it is the psychological action that is most important and the sovereign method is to arouse in the child an interest in what you want to teach him, a liking for work, a will to progress. To love to learn is the most precious gift that one can give to a child: to love to learn always and everywhere, so that all circumstances, all happenings in life may be constantly renewed opportunities for learning more and always more. For that, to attention and concentration should be added observation, precise recording and faithfulness of memory. This faculty of observation can be developed by varied and spontaneous exercises, making use of every opportunity that presents itself to keep the child's thought wakeful, alert and prompt. The growth of the understanding should be stressed much more than that of memory. One knows well only what one has understood. Things learnt by heart, mechanically, fade away little by little and finally disappear; what is understood is never forgotten. Moreover, you must never refuse to explain to a child the how and the why of things. If you cannot do it yourself, you must direct the child to those who are qualified to answer or point out to him some books that deal with the question. In this way you will progressively awaken in the child the taste for true study and the habit of making a persistent effort to know. This will bring us quite naturally to the second phase of development in which the mind should be widened and enriched. You will gradually show the child that everything can become an interesting subject for study if it is approached in the right way. The life of every day, of every moment, is the best school of all, varied, complex, full of unexpected experiences, problems to be solved, clear and striking examples and obvious consequences. It is so easy to arouse healthy curiosity in children, if you answer with intelligence and clarity the numerous questions they ask. An interesting reply to one readily brings others in its train and so the attentive child learns without effort much more than he usually does in the classroom. By a choice made with care and insight, you should also teach him to enjoy good reading-matter which is both instructive and attractive. Do not be afraid of anything that awakens and pleases his imagination; imagination develops the creative mental faculty and through it study becomes living and the mind develops in joy. In order to increase the suppleness and comprehensiveness of his mind, one should see not only that he studies many varied topics, but above all that a single subject is approached in various ways, so that the child understands in a practical manner that there are many ways of facing the same intellectual problem, of considering it and solving it. This will remove all rigidity from his brain and at the same time it will make his thinking richer and more supple and prepare it for a more complex and comprehensive synthesis. In this way also the child will be imbued with the sense of the extreme relativity of mental learning and, little by little, an aspiration for a truer source of knowledge will awaken in him. Indeed, as the child grows older and progresses in his studies, his mind too ripens and becomes more and more capable of forming general ideas, and with them almost always comes a need for certitude, for a knowledge that is stable enough to form the basis of a mental construction which will permit all the diverse and scattered and often contradictory ideas accumulated in his brain to be organised and put in order. This ordering is indeed very necessary if one is to avoid chaos in one's thoughts. All contradictions can be transformed into complements, but for that one must discover the higher idea that will have the power to bring them harmoniously together. It is always good to consider every problem from all possible standpoints so as to avoid partiality and exclusiveness; but if the thought is to be active and creative, it must, in every case, be the natural and logical synthesis of all the points of view adopted. And if you want to make the totality of your thoughts into a dynamic and constructive force, you must also take great care as to the choice of the central idea of your mental synthesis; for upon that will depend the value of this synthesis. The higher and larger the central idea and the more universal it is, rising above time and space, the more numerous and the more complex will be the ideas, notions and thoughts which it will be able to organise and harmonise. It goes without saying that this work of organisation cannot be done once and for all. The mind, if it is to keep its vigour and youth, must progress constantly, revise its notions in the light of new knowledge, enlarge its frame-work to include fresh notions and constantly reclassify and reorganise its thoughts, so that each of them may find its true place in relation to the others and the whole remain harmonious and orderly. All that has just been said concerns the speculative mind, the mind that learns. But learning is only one aspect of mental activity; the other, which is at least equally important, is the constructive faculty, the capacity to form and thus prepare action. This very important part of mental activity has rarely been the subject of any special study or discipline. Only those who want, for some reason, to exercise a strict control over their mental activities think of observing and disciplining this faculty of formation; and as soon as they try it, they have to face difficulties so great that they appear almost insurmountable. And yet control over this formative activity of the mind is one of the most important aspects of self-education; one can say that without it no mental mastery is possible. As far as study is concerned, all ideas are acceptable and should be included in the synthesis, whose very function is to become more and more rich and complex; but where action is concerned, it is just the opposite. The ideas that are accepted for translation into action should be strictly controlled and only those that agree with the general trend of the central idea forming the basis of the mental synthesis should be permitted to express themselves in action. This means that every thought entering the mental consciousness should be set before the central idea; if it finds a logical place among the thoughts already grouped, it will be admitted into the synthesis; if not, it will be rejected so that it can have no influence on the action. This work of mental purification should be done very regularly in order to secure a complete control over one's actions. For this purpose, it is good to set apart some time every day when one can quietly go over one's thoughts and put one's synthesis in order. Once the habit is acquired, you can maintain control over your thoughts even during work and action, allowing only those which are useful for what you are doing to come to the surface. Particularly, if you have continued to cultivate the power of concentration and attention, only the thoughts that are needed will be allowed to enter the active external consciousness and they then become all the more dynamic and effective. And if, in the intensity of concentration, it becomes necessary not to think at all, all mental vibration can be stilled and an almost total silence secured. In this silence one can gradually open to the higher regions of the mind and learn to record the inspirations that come from there. But even before reaching this point, silence in itself is supremely useful, because in most people who have a somewhat developed and active mind, the mind is never at rest. During the day, its activity is kept under a certain control, but at night, during the sleep of the body, the control of the waking state is almost completely removed and the mind indulges in activities which are sometimes excessive and often incoherent. This creates a great stress which leads to fatigue and the diminution of the intellectual faculties. The fact is that like all the other parts of the human being, the mind too needs rest and it will not have this rest unless we know how to provide it. The art of resting one's mind is something to be acquired. Changing one's mental activity is certainly one way of resting; but the greatest possible rest is silence. And as far as the mental faculties are concerned a few minutes passed in the calm of silence are a more effective rest than hours of sleep. When one has learned to silence the mind at will and to concentrate it in receptive silence, then there will be no problem that cannot be solved, no mental difficulty whose solution cannot be found. When it is agitated, thought becomes confused and impotent; in an attentive tranquillity, the light can manifest itself and open up new horizons to man's capacity. Bulletin, November 1951 ~ The Mother, On Education ,
41:One little picture in this book, the Magic Locket, was drawn by 'Miss Alice Havers.' I did not state this on the title-page, since it seemed only due, to the artist of all these (to my mind) wonderful pictures, that his name should stand there alone.The descriptions, of Sunday as spent by children of the last generation, are quoted verbatim from a speech made to me by a child-friend and a letter written to me by a lady-friend.The Chapters, headed 'Fairy Sylvie' and 'Bruno's Revenge,' are a reprint, with a few alterations, of a little fairy-tale which I wrote in the year 1867, at the request of the late Mrs. Gatty, for 'Aunt Judy's Magazine,' which she was then editing.It was in 1874, I believe, that the idea first occurred to me of making it the nucleus of a longer story.As the years went on, I jotted down, at odd moments, all sorts of odd ideas, and fragments of dialogue, that occurred to me--who knows how?--with a transitory suddenness that left me no choice but either to record them then and there, or to abandon them to oblivion. Sometimes one could trace to their source these random flashes of thought--as being suggested by the book one was reading, or struck out from the 'flint' of one's own mind by the 'steel' of a friend's chance remark but they had also a way of their own, of occurring, a propos of nothing --specimens of that hopelessly illogical phenomenon, 'an effect without a cause.' Such, for example, was the last line of 'The Hunting of the Snark,' which came into my head (as I have already related in 'The Theatre' for April, 1887) quite suddenly, during a solitary walk: and such, again, have been passages which occurred in dreams, and which I cannot trace to any antecedent cause whatever. There are at least two instances of such dream-suggestions in this book--one, my Lady's remark, 'it often runs in families, just as a love for pastry does', the other, Eric Lindon's badinage about having been in domestic service.And thus it came to pass that I found myself at last in possession of a huge unwieldy mass of litterature--if the reader will kindly excuse the spelling --which only needed stringing together, upon the thread of a consecutive story, to constitute the book I hoped to write. Only! The task, at first, seemed absolutely hopeless, and gave me a far clearer idea, than I ever had before, of the meaning of the word 'chaos': and I think it must have been ten years, or more, before I had succeeded in classifying these odds-and-ends sufficiently to see what sort of a story they indicated: for the story had to grow out of the incidents, not the incidents out of the story I am telling all this, in no spirit of egoism, but because I really believe that some of my readers will be interested in these details of the 'genesis' of a book, which looks so simple and straight-forward a matter, when completed, that they might suppose it to have been written straight off, page by page, as one would write a letter, beginning at the beginning; and ending at the end.It is, no doubt, possible to write a story in that way: and, if it be not vanity to say so, I believe that I could, myself,--if I were in the unfortunate position (for I do hold it to be a real misfortune) of being obliged to produce a given amount of fiction in a given time,--that I could 'fulfil my task,' and produce my 'tale of bricks,' as other slaves have done. One thing, at any rate, I could guarantee as to the story so produced--that it should be utterly commonplace, should contain no new ideas whatever, and should be very very weary reading!This species of literature has received the very appropriate name of 'padding' which might fitly be defined as 'that which all can write and none can read.' That the present volume contains no such writing I dare not avow: sometimes, in order to bring a picture into its proper place, it has been necessary to eke out a page with two or three extra lines : but I can honestly say I have put in no more than I was absolutely compelled to do.My readers may perhaps like to amuse themselves by trying to detect, in a given passage, the one piece of 'padding' it contains. While arranging the 'slips' into pages, I found that the passage was 3 lines too short. I supplied the deficiency, not by interpolating a word here and a word there, but by writing in 3 consecutive lines. Now can my readers guess which they are?A harder puzzle if a harder be desired would be to determine, as to the Gardener's Song, in which cases (if any) the stanza was adapted to the surrounding text, and in which (if any) the text was adapted to the stanza.Perhaps the hardest thing in all literature--at least I have found it so: by no voluntary effort can I accomplish it: I have to take it as it come's is to write anything original. And perhaps the easiest is, when once an original line has been struck out, to follow it up, and to write any amount more to the same tune. I do not know if 'Alice in Wonderland' was an original story--I was, at least, no conscious imitator in writing it--but I do know that, since it came out, something like a dozen storybooks have appeared, on identically the same pattern. The path I timidly explored believing myself to be 'the first that ever burst into that silent sea'--is now a beaten high-road: all the way-side flowers have long ago been trampled into the dust: and it would be courting disaster for me to attempt that style again.Hence it is that, in 'Sylvie and Bruno,' I have striven with I know not what success to strike out yet another new path: be it bad or good, it is the best I can do. It is written, not for money, and not for fame, but in the hope of supplying, for the children whom I love, some thoughts that may suit those hours of innocent merriment which are the very life of Childhood; and also in the hope of suggesting, to them and to others, some thoughts that may prove, I would fain hope, not wholly out of harmony with the graver cadences of Life.If I have not already exhausted the patience of my readers, I would like to seize this opportunity perhaps the last I shall have of addressing so many friends at once of putting on record some ideas that have occurred to me, as to books desirable to be written--which I should much like to attempt, but may not ever have the time or power to carry through--in the hope that, if I should fail (and the years are gliding away very fast) to finish the task I have set myself, other hands may take it up.First, a Child's Bible. The only real essentials of this would be, carefully selected passages, suitable for a child's reading, and pictures. One principle of selection, which I would adopt, would be that Religion should be put before a child as a revelation of love--no need to pain and puzzle the young mind with the history of crime and punishment. (On such a principle I should, for example, omit the history of the Flood.) The supplying of the pictures would involve no great difficulty: no new ones would be needed : hundreds of excellent pictures already exist, the copyright of which has long ago expired, and which simply need photo-zincography, or some similar process, for their successful reproduction. The book should be handy in size with a pretty attractive looking cover--in a clear legible type--and, above all, with abundance of pictures, pictures, pictures!Secondly, a book of pieces selected from the Bible--not single texts, but passages of from 10 to 20 verses each--to be committed to memory. Such passages would be found useful, to repeat to one's self and to ponder over, on many occasions when reading is difficult, if not impossible: for instance, when lying awake at night--on a railway-journey --when taking a solitary walk-in old age, when eyesight is failing or wholly lost--and, best of all, when illness, while incapacitating us for reading or any other occupation, condemns us to lie awake through many weary silent hours: at such a time how keenly one may realise the truth of David's rapturous cry "O how sweet are thy words unto my throat: yea, sweeter than honey unto my mouth!"I have said 'passages,' rather than single texts, because we have no means of recalling single texts: memory needs links, and here are none: one may have a hundred texts stored in the memory, and not be able to recall, at will, more than half-a-dozen--and those by mere chance: whereas, once get hold of any portion of a chapter that has been committed to memory, and the whole can be recovered: all hangs together.Thirdly, a collection of passages, both prose and verse, from books other than the Bible. There is not perhaps much, in what is called 'un-inspired' literature (a misnomer, I hold: if Shakespeare was not inspired, one may well doubt if any man ever was), that will bear the process of being pondered over, a hundred times: still there are such passages--enough, I think, to make a goodly store for the memory.These two books of sacred, and secular, passages for memory--will serve other good purposes besides merely occupying vacant hours: they will help to keep at bay many anxious thoughts, worrying thoughts, uncharitable thoughts, unholy thoughts. Let me say this, in better words than my own, by copying a passage from that most interesting book, Robertson's Lectures on the Epistles to the Corinthians, Lecture XLIX. "If a man finds himself haunted by evil desires and unholy images, which will generally be at periodical hours, let him commit to memory passages of Scripture, or passages from the best writers in verse or prose. Let him store his mind with these, as safeguards to repeat when he lies awake in some restless night, or when despairing imaginations, or gloomy, suicidal thoughts, beset him. Let these be to him the sword, turning everywhere to keep the way of the Garden of Life from the intrusion of profaner footsteps."Fourthly, a "Shakespeare" for girls: that is, an edition in which everything, not suitable for the perusal of girls of (say) from 10 to 17, should be omitted. Few children under 10 would be likely to understand or enjoy the greatest of poets: and those, who have passed out of girlhood, may safely be left to read Shakespeare, in any edition, 'expurgated' or not, that they may prefer: but it seems a pity that so many children, in the intermediate stage, should be debarred from a great pleasure for want of an edition suitable to them. Neither Bowdler's, Chambers's, Brandram's, nor Cundell's 'Boudoir' Shakespeare, seems to me to meet the want: they are not sufficiently 'expurgated.' Bowdler's is the most extraordinary of all: looking through it, I am filled with a deep sense of wonder, considering what he has left in, that he should have cut anything out! Besides relentlessly erasing all that is unsuitable on the score of reverence or decency, I should be inclined to omit also all that seems too difficult, or not likely to interest young readers. The resulting book might be slightly fragmentary: but it would be a real treasure to all British maidens who have any taste for poetry.If it be needful to apologize to any one for the new departure I have taken in this story--by introducing, along with what will, I hope, prove to be acceptable nonsense for children, some of the graver thoughts of human life--it must be to one who has learned the Art of keeping such thoughts wholly at a distance in hours of mirth and careless ease. To him such a mixture will seem, no doubt, ill-judged and repulsive. And that such an Art exists I do not dispute: with youth, good health, and sufficient money, it seems quite possible to lead, for years together, a life of unmixed gaiety--with the exception of one solemn fact, with which we are liable to be confronted at any moment, even in the midst of the most brilliant company or the most sparkling entertainment. A man may fix his own times for admitting serious thought, for attending public worship, for prayer, for reading the Bible: all such matters he can defer to that 'convenient season', which is so apt never to occur at all: but he cannot defer, for one single moment, the necessity of attending to a message, which may come before he has finished reading this page,' this night shalt thy soul be required of thee.'The ever-present sense of this grim possibility has been, in all ages, 1 an incubus that men have striven to shake off. Few more interesting subjects of enquiry could be found, by a student of history, than the various weapons that have been used against this shadowy foe. Saddest of all must have been the thoughts of those who saw indeed an existence beyond the grave, but an existence far more terrible than annihilation--an existence as filmy, impalpable, all but invisible spectres, drifting about, through endless ages, in a world of shadows, with nothing to do, nothing to hope for, nothing to love! In the midst of the gay verses of that genial 'bon vivant' Horace, there stands one dreary word whose utter sadness goes to one's heart. It is the word 'exilium' in the well-known passageOmnes eodem cogimur, omniumVersatur urna serius ociusSors exitura et nos in aeternumExilium impositura cymbae.Yes, to him this present life--spite of all its weariness and all its sorrow--was the only life worth having: all else was 'exile'! Does it not seem almost incredible that one, holding such a creed, should ever have smiled?And many in this day, I fear, even though believing in an existence beyond the grave far more real than Horace ever dreamed of, yet regard it as a sort of 'exile' from all the joys of life, and so adopt Horace's theory, and say 'let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'We go to entertainments, such as the theatre--I say 'we', for I also go to the play, whenever I get a chance of seeing a really good one and keep at arm's length, if possible, the thought that we may not return alive. Yet how do you know--dear friend, whose patience has carried you through this garrulous preface that it may not be your lot, when mirth is fastest and most furious, to feel the sharp pang, or the deadly faintness, which heralds the final crisis--to see, with vague wonder, anxious friends bending over you to hear their troubled whispers perhaps yourself to shape the question, with trembling lips, "Is it serious?", and to be told "Yes: the end is near" (and oh, how different all Life will look when those words are said!)--how do you know, I say, that all this may not happen to you, this night?And dare you, knowing this, say to yourself "Well, perhaps it is an immoral play: perhaps the situations are a little too 'risky', the dialogue a little too strong, the 'business' a little too suggestive.I don't say that conscience is quite easy: but the piece is so clever, I must see it this once! I'll begin a stricter life to-morrow." To-morrow, and to-morrow, and tomorrow!"Who sins in hope, who, sinning, says,'Sorrow for sin God's judgement stays!'Against God's Spirit he lies; quite stops Mercy with insult; dares, and drops,Like a scorch'd fly, that spins in vainUpon the axis of its pain,Then takes its doom, to limp and crawl,Blind and forgot, from fall to fall."Let me pause for a moment to say that I believe this thought, of the possibility of death--if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.But, once realise what the true object is in life--that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, 'that last infirmity of noble minds'--but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man--and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!One other matter may perhaps seem to call for apology--that I should have treated with such entire want of sympathy the British passion for 'Sport', which no doubt has been in by-gone days, and is still, in some forms of it, an excellent school for hardihood and for coolness in moments of danger.But I am not entirely without sympathy for genuine 'Sport': I can heartily admire the courage of the man who, with severe bodily toil, and at the risk of his life, hunts down some 'man-eating' tiger: and I can heartily sympathize with him when he exults in the glorious excitement of the chase and the hand-to-hand struggle with the monster brought to bay. But I can but look with deep wonder and sorrow on the hunter who, at his ease and in safety, can find pleasure in what involves, for some defenceless creature, wild terror and a death of agony: deeper, if the hunter be one who has pledged himself to preach to men the Religion of universal Love: deepest of all, if it be one of those 'tender and delicate' beings, whose very name serves as a symbol of Love--'thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women'--whose mission here is surely to help and comfort all that are in pain or sorrow!'Farewell, farewell! but this I tellTo thee, thou Wedding-Guest!He prayeth well, who loveth wellBoth man and bird and beast.He prayeth best, who loveth bestAll things both great and small;For the dear God who loveth us,He made and loveth all.' ~ Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno ,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:go to schools with no ~ Ben Carson,
2:schoolteacher. ~ Laura Hillenbrand,
3:I did drop out of school. ~ Don Was,
4:I was a dummy in school. ~ Alan Ladd,
5:Johnson Middle School, ~ Jake Maddox,
6:lower, until school ~ Betty G Birney,
7:My body is no schoolboy. ~ Anne Rice,
8:I didn't love school. ~ Kim Kardashian,
9:Treat the past as a school. ~ Jim Rohn,
10:Foggy Bottom Law School. ~ John Grisham,
11:I swam in high school. ~ Jimmie Johnson,
12:I go to school by bus ~ Franklin W Dixon,
13:I was in choir [at school]. ~ Jon Gordon,
14:School's-out-for-summer!! ~ Alice Cooper,
15:Schwartz High School ~ A P J Abdul Kalam,
16:Tell tales out of school. ~ John Heywood,
17:Don't peak in high school. ~ Lizzy Caplan,
18:High school is the worst. ~ Jessica Brody,
19:High school sweethearts, ~ Jake Remington,
20:I hated school. Hated it. ~ Ozzy Osbourne,
21:I was going to like school. ~ R J Palacio,
22:The human heart is my school. ~ Anne Rice,
23:back to school on Monday. ~ Teresa Burrell,
24:Don't go to business school. ~ Paul Hawken,
25:I did plays in grade school. ~ Colin Hanks,
26:I'm for prayer in schools. ~ Charles Evers,
27:I schooled in the Boston area. ~ Teju Cole,
28:I was a high school throw-out. ~ Alan King,
29:Old-school as in Dark Ages. ~ Laird Barron,
30:Schools teach ignorance. ~ Eduardo Galeano,
31:I got PTSD from high school. ~ Tom Perrotta,
32:I'm a believer in film school. ~ Sean Durkin,
33:I'm an old-school guy. ~ LaDainian Tomlinson,
34:School is the cheapest police. ~ Horace Mann,
35:His public school scholarship had ~ Anonymous,
36:I didn't go to school a lot. ~ Victoria Abril,
37:I'd love to design a school. ~ Nolan Bushnell,
38:I'm an old-school type of guy. ~ Kevin Durant,
39:I never went to drama school. ~ Matthew Lewis,
40:well-you-did-break-school-rules ~ J K Rowling,
41:Adversity is a good school. ~ Charlotte Bronte,
42:Creeds and schools in abeyance, ~ Walt Whitman,
43:I prefer the school of life. ~ Cassandra Clare,
44:Marriage is not a reform school. ~ Ann Landers,
45:I almost failed out of high school. ~ J D Vance,
46:I was a smart kid, but I hated school. ~ Eminem,
47:I was never very happy at school. ~ Dan Stevens,
48:I was quite naughty at school. ~ Gemma Arterton,
49:Private school girls are scary. ~ Reki Kawahara,
50:Respect movements, flee schools. ~ Jean Cocteau,
51:Schooling is so important. ~ Haile Gebrselassie,
52:School was not a place I enjoyed. ~ Sean Harris,
53:There’s a bomb under the school. ~ Stuart Gibbs,
54:Art-school girls are very nice. ~ Anthony Mackie,
55:Comin' from the school of hard knocks, ~ Chuck D,
56:DavidGoldberg@WillowFallsSchool.edu ~ Wendy Mass,
57:Heresie is the school of pride. ~ George Herbert,
58:I hated school with a passion. ~ Natasha Preston,
59:I loved doing problems in school. ~ Andrew Wiles,
60:I started drama in high school. ~ Daniel Cudmore,
61:I was a good student in school. ~ Kenan Thompson,
62:I was such a geek in school. ~ Katherine Jenkins,
63:I was terrible at school. ~ Kristin Scott Thomas,
64:I was very popular in high school. ~ NeNe Leakes,
65:Life is nothing but high school. ~ Kurt Vonnegut,
66:I always remember liking school. ~ Damon Lindelof,
67:I just didn't like going to school. ~ Justin Long,
68:I left school on my 15th birthday. ~ David Bailey,
69:I love school. I was a great student. ~ Joan Jett,
70:I'm too old-school to tweet. ~ Julianna Margulies,
71:In Kansas I have a chess school. ~ Anatoly Karpov,
72:Life is a school of probability. ~ Walter Bagehot,
73:School is cool. Thats why it rhymes ~ Terry Crews,
74:Solitude is the school for genius ~ Edward Gibbon,
75:Suffering is wisdom’s schoolteacher ~ Lauren Kate,
76:We learn not in the school, but in life. ~ Seneca,
77:When it comes to problems at school, ~ Robyn Carr,
78:his school lessons had been unusually ~ Lois Lowry,
79:I like reading. I just hate school. ~ Armie Hammer,
80:I'm quite dyslexic in school. ~ Georgia May Jagger,
81:I never liked group work in school. ~ Brendan Fehr,
82:I used to like doing school plays. ~ Jamie Waylett,
83:I was a loser in high school. ~ Sean William Scott,
84:I went to school on Senior Skip Day. ~ Derek Jeter,
85:school before me, and we’d see her ~ Carolyn Brown,
86:Schools teach the need to be taught. ~ Ivan Illich,
87:The problem with education is school. ~ Mark Twain,
88:Time is the school in which we learn ~ Joan Didion,
89:what happened at school,” she said. ~ Barbara Park,
90:High school popularity is so fickle. ~ Kathy Reichs,
91:I treat Hollywood as my high school. ~ Charlie Puth,
92:I was a complete outsider in high school. ~ Karen O,
93:Life is a school of the spirit. ~ Stephen R Lawhead,
94:No brain, no gain. Stay in school. ~ Michael Jordan,
95:Play it cool, that's the old school rule man. ~ Nas,
96:School gets in the way of my learning. ~ Mark Twain,
97:School is pure psycology warfare. ~ Benjamin Lebert,
98:Suffering is wisdom's school teacher. ~ Lauren Kate,
99:Time is the school in which we learn. ~ Joan Didion,
100:You’re sending me to whore school, ~ Jason Matthews,
101:his old school that if there’d been ~ Jeffrey Archer,
102:I never worked on the school newspaper. ~ Jeff Bezos,
103:I was the hallway clown in high school. ~ J B Smoove,
104:I was voted most artistic in school. ~ Ryan McGinley,
105:Many more schools can be outstanding. ~ Michael Gove,
106:Pranks vs school= pranks win all day ~ Justin Bieber,
107:School is the path, not the point. ~ Will Richardson,
108:School is very demanding these days. ~ Ross W Greene,
109:You’re such a school teacher. ~ Benjamin Alire S enz,
110:At school I was an anti-magnet for women. ~ Nick Cave,
111:Commerce is the school of cheating. ~ Luc de Clapiers,
112:High school was great when it ended. ~ Jennifer Stone,
113:New Dorp High School on Staten Island. ~ Andrew Gross,
114:School didn't work for me. I hated it. ~ Gary Paulsen,
115:School should be the best party in town ~ Peter Kline,
116:So far magic school was rubbish. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
117:Time is the school in which we learn.   ~ Joan Didion,
118:We were cruel, reptilian high school kids. ~ Otsuichi,
119:What did you ASK at school today? ~ Richard P Feynman,
120:What do they teach them at these schools? ~ C S Lewis,
121:Call school, tell them I'm lovesick. ~ Ellen Schreiber,
122:Don't do drugs, kids. Stay in school. ~ Jamie Zawinski,
123:I founded this school for the masses. ~ Atiku Abubakar,
124:I'm Jewish. Went to a Jewish school. ~ Jonathan Glazer,
125:I teach Sunday school, motherf*****. ~ Stephen Colbert,
126:London an’ buy all yer stuff fer school. ~ J K Rowling,
127:Must's a schoolroom in the month of may ~ e e cummings,
128:School should be the best party in town. ~ Peter Kline,
129:Skip business school. Educate yourself. ~ Josh Kaufman,
130:The first day of school is bullshit ~ Lauren Barnholdt,
131:There's no better school than real life. ~ Lisa Genova,
132:What are you? An after school special? ~ Richelle Mead,
133:When schools flourish, all flourishes. ~ Martin Luther,
134:A schoolboy's tale, the wonder of an hour! ~ Lord Byron,
135:Girls in my school were always prettier. ~ Bridget Hall,
136:I didn't go to prom - I was homeschooled. ~ Brie Larson,
137:I have always loved going to school. ~ Rudolph A Marcus,
138:I've never been to veterinary school. ~ Stephenie Meyer,
139:I was not the popular kid in school. ~ Gabriel Iglesias,
140:Love was life's hardest school of all. ~ Ivan Goncharov,
141:Lucifer is God in the public school system ~ Vinnie Paz,
142:Philosophy! the lumber of the schools. ~ Jonathan Swift,
143:Schools resemble the culture of prisons. ~ Henry Giroux,
144:School was finally out and I was standing ~ Jack Gantos,
145:than any other school. I spent the next few ~ J D Vance,
146:THE ADVENTURE OF THE PRIORY SCHOOL ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
147:With the “SWAB JOB” school prank sign ~ Walter Isaacson,
148:You can pay for school, but you can't buy class ~ Jay Z,
149:If we are wise, we never leave school. ~ Horace Fletcher,
150:I hated school, didn't like the discipline. ~ Gary Gygax,
151:In every high school, there is a clique. ~ Janel Parrish,
152:I stay dipped like the first day of school. ~ Cappadonna,
153:It is better to support schools than jails. ~ Mark Twain,
154:My boarding school roommate was a mafia princess ~ Tijan,
155:Sunday school don't make you cool forever... ~ Sly Stone,
156:You never grow out of high school sadly. ~ Kate Bosworth,
157:Boarding school is a wicked thing. ~ Kristin Scott Thomas,
158:Expansion Leads To Fewer High School Dropouts ~ Anonymous,
159:High school was enough of a bitch as it was. ~ Jay McLean,
160:Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. ~ J K Rowling,
161:I didn’t have much school. Three years. ~ Pinetop Perkins,
162:I excelled in English while I was at school. ~ Jamie Bell,
163:I was not the hot, popular girl in school. ~ Alexis Knapp,
164:I went to art school when I was little. ~ Amanda Seyfried,
165:I wish I had more time to visit schools. ~ Cornelia Funke,
166:Part 3 BACK TO SCHOOL (THE NORMAL KIND) ~ James Patterson,
167:reviewed all the school’s security tapes. ~ Melinda Leigh,
168:To every class we have a school assign'd, ~ George Crabbe,
169:To the extent a school is like a factory, ~ Warren Berger,
170:A modern school where football is taught. ~ Ambrose Bierce,
171:Educated fools; from uneducated schools. ~ Curtis Mayfield,
172:He who opens a school door, closes a prison. ~ Victor Hugo,
173:I learned nothing while I was in school. ~ Lorraine Bracco,
174:I taught high school students Spanish. ~ Daniela Bobadilla,
175:I think you can go to school at any age. ~ AnnaSophia Robb,
176:It was called Nine Gates Mystery School. ~ Timothy Ferriss,
177:I used to play tenor sax in high school, man. ~ Sean Price,
178:I was never really unpopular in high school. ~ Tyler Posey,
179:Life is the most effective school ever created ~ Anonymous,
180:School doesn’t help with real life. ~ Jewell Parker Rhodes,
181:School was a drag. Honestly, when is it not? ~ N M Lambert,
182:the Massachusetts School for Idiotic Children ~ John Lloyd,
183:The Stealthy School of Criticism. ~ Dante Gabriel Rossetti,
184:to school that morning. On cue - that is, late ~ Dee Ernst,
185:We shouldn't need riot police at schools. ~ Noel Gallagher,
186:When I was in high school I was 250 pounds. ~ Adam Lambert,
187:For digital natives, public schools are jails ~ Bing Gordon,
188:I educated myself. To me, school was boring. ~ Van Morrison,
189:I never dated much in high school or college. ~ David Spade,
190:I was home schooled, so I never got a yearbook. ~ Lucy Hale,
191:I wasn't the most popular kid in school. ~ Daniel Radcliffe,
192:Most people had high school. I had Breaking Bad. ~ RJ Mitte,
193:Scratch a schoolboy and you find a savage. ~ Terry Eagleton,
194:Self-reflection is the school of wisdom. ~ Baltasar Gracian,
195:So far magic school was total rubbish. ~ Sarah Rees Brennan,
196:War is the only proper school of the surgeon. ~ Hippocrates,
197:Well, I believe in God. I taught Sunday school. ~ Kay Hagan,
198:A human life is a schooling for eternity. ~ Gottfried Keller,
199:Don't let school interfere with your education. ~ Mark Twain,
200:He who graduates the harshest school, succeeds. ~ Thucydides,
201:I dated the same girl all through high school. ~ Mark Hoppus,
202:I don't really know why I went to law school. ~ Emily Giffin,
203:I go to school the youth to learn the future. ~ Robert Frost,
204:In school [I wanted] to be an English teacher. ~ Nancy Grace,
205:I played sports growing up in high school. ~ Erin Heatherton,
206:I was a scam artist in high school for a while. ~ Scott Caan,
207:I wish I wasn't famous. I wish I was still in school ~ Drake,
208:Nature is an admirable schoolmistress. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
209:School's a weird thing. I'm not sure it works. ~ Johnny Depp,
210:School should be eleven months of the year. ~ Nikki Giovanni,
211:School was pretty hard for me at the beginning. ~ Steve Jobs,
212:There is only one school: that of talent. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
213:The stage was our school, our home, our life. ~ Lillian Gish,
214:Whether I went to school or not, I would always study. ~ RZA,
215:Being too cool for school was Jace's thing. ~ Cassandra Clare,
216:High school to went I, school High to went Y'all ~ Snoop Dogg,
217:I come from the school of That Horse is Not Dead. ~ Tom Hanks,
218:If he'd been looked like that in high school, ~ Stylo Fantome,
219:I knew school was stupid since the fifth grade. ~ Schoolboy Q,
220:In high school, I played in a Rush cover band. ~ Sam Trammell,
221:I played sports in high school and in college. ~ Jon Bernthal,
222:I read a lot of 'Spark Notes' in high school. ~ Lauren Conrad,
223:I see a schoolboy when I think of him, ~ William Butler Yeats,
224:I threw all my clothes away from high school. ~ Iman Shumpert,
225:It's hard for parents just to measure schools. ~ David Brooks,
226:Life is nothing but high school.” —Kurt Vonnegut ~ Alice Pung,
227:Necessity is a violent school-mistress. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
228:Shoot up everything except a school or a playground ~ Birdman,
229:teacher’s class in his all-boys’ high school ~ John Lescroart,
230:This school is enough to make anyone a communist. ~ Jo Walton,
231:We believe in a whole-school approach to ICT. ~ Adrian Wilson,
232:We learn not in the school, but in life. ~ Seneca the Younger,
233:Don't Let them fool you or even try to school you ~ Bob Marley,
234:Film school was a privilege I could not afford. ~ Ava DuVernay,
235:had almost twice as far to school as Joanna. ~ Jostein Gaarder,
236:I didnt go to film school, i went to films ~ Quentin Tarantino,
237:I didn't leave business school to go bankrupt. ~ Steve Ballmer,
238:I had died and woken up in High School Musical ~ Jamie McGuire,
239:I miss school.
What’s wrong with me? ~ Wendelin Van Draanen,
240:In high school and college, I was an athlete. ~ David Duchovny,
241:I played a lot of character parts in school. ~ Matthew Ashford,
242:I still think of Heaven as a liberal-arts school. ~ Mike White,
243:It's easy to lose your soul in high school. ~ Faith Erin Hicks,
244:I was home schooled starting in seventh grade. ~ Austin Butler,
245:I went through a lot of battles in high school. ~ LeBron James,
246:I went to drama school at New York University. ~ Molly Shannon,
247:I would only date a 15 year old high school girl. ~ Seth Rogen,
248:Junior colleges are high schools with ashtrays. ~ Adam Carolla,
249:Lovely. Imprisoned in a nursery school dungeon. ~ Rick Riordan,
250:My family and school life are important to me. ~ Anna Chlumsky,
251:Praise the Lord for Catholic girls schools … ~ William F Brown,
252:Schools often get the teachers they deserve! ~ Andy Hargreaves,
253:The world is nothing but a school of love; ~ Swami Muktananda,
254:They didn’t have guns in school. It was ludicrous. ~ C L Stone,
255:When I was at school, I wanted to be a lawyer. ~ Frank Lampard,
256:Don't let school get in the way of your education. ~ Mark Twain,
257:Don't let schooling interfere with your education. ~ Mark Twain,
258:Going to car racing school was phenomenal. ~ Michelle Rodriguez,
259:I don't remember one thing I learned in school. ~ Bobby Fischer,
260:If there's a Hell on Earth, it's high school. ~ Lisa Desrochers,
261:I got kicked out of every school I ever went to. ~ Shia LaBeouf,
262:I had my schooling right there in the Cotton Club. ~ Lena Horne,
263:I never let school get in the way of my education! ~ Mark Twain,
264:I was a good student, but I didn't like school. ~ Ashley Benson,
265:I went to public school up until junior high. ~ Kristen Stewart,
266:Poetry makes people nervous. Especially in schools. ~ Sarah Kay,
267:Public school system status quo is indefensible. ~ Barack Obama,
268:Rap is still an art, and no-one's from the Old School ~ KRS One,
269:School always makes me want to hibernate. - Emma ~ Sara Shepard,
270:schoolchildren. Plus he has erectile dysfunction. ~ J A Konrath,
271:School plays are fine. Theater in school is fine. ~ Ben Affleck,
272:Schools should be places to learn, not to teach. ~ Don Tapscott,
273:That day at school I prayed for the world to end. ~ Dave Pelzer,
274:The school is the manufactory of humanity. ~ John Amos Comenius,
275:The world is our school for spiritual discovery. ~ Paul Brunton,
276:At school I was very shy. I wasn't funny really. ~ Michel Gondry,
277:Humor is anger that was sent to finishing school. ~ Richard Peck,
278:In high school I went on about three dates. ~ Sean William Scott,
279:I used to walk to school with my nose buried in a book. ~ Coolio,
280:I wasn't bad at school, but I was never a bookworm. ~ Idris Elba,
281:Kids flourish if we get them to school every day. ~ Connie Smith,
282:Now Elisabeth would be home from nursing school ~ Pam Mu oz Ryan,
283:Please, we're in high school. Hook up and move on. ~ Rachel Vail,
284:Poetry is so vital to us until school spoils it. ~ Russell Baker,
285:Schools are not exam factories for the rat race. ~ Johann Lamont,
286:that school over the years,’ he said, pointing ~ Patricia Gibney,
287:The proper school to learn art is not life but art ~ Oscar Wilde,
288:The Psalter is the great school of prayer. ~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer,
289:They should kick it old school with the Bard.> ~ Kevin Hearne,
290:By the time I left school, I had a lot of tenacity. ~ Halle Berry,
291:I always enjoyed myself a lot in pre-school. ~ Valentino Garavani,
292:I havent really eaten breakfast since high school. ~ Domo Genesis,
293:In 1970, you went to school to find your husband. ~ Rush Limbaugh,
294:I sang in art school, just to get money to smoke. ~ Joni Mitchell,
295:I was planning on going to Yale to theater school. ~ Shia LaBeouf,
296:I went to the Goodman School of Drama in Chicago. ~ Harvey Korman,
297:I won! I won! I don't have to go to school anymore. ~ Eddy Merckx,
298:Loving long novels plays havoc with going to school ~ John Irving,
299:One father is more than a hundred schoolmasters. ~ George Herbert,
300:schoolkids laughing and horsing around. ~ Oxford University Press,
301:School taught him how much he loved being home. ~ Brian K Vaughan,
302:School - You can get all A's and still flunk life. ~ Walker Percy,
303:Somehow it always comes back to coal at school. ~ Suzanne Collins,
304:you go to school every morning and sit there for ~ David Grossman,
305:You think school ends when it ends, but it doesn't. ~ Kevin James,
306:A good mother is worth hundreds of schoolmasters. ~ George Herbert,
307:At school my nickname is the National Anthem girl. ~ Diana DeGarmo,
308:High School is the place where poetry goes to die. ~ Billy Collins,
309:I do after-school ballet and also hip-hop and jazz. ~ Elle Fanning,
310:If you liked school, you're gonnnnna lovvvvve work! ~ Jello Biafra,
311:I love an art-school girl. I mean dont we all? ~ Theophilus London,
312:in public schools. Economically, Reagan’s followers— ~ Jon Meacham,
313:I've never let my school interfere with my education. ~ Mark Twain,
314:I was the only one at stage school who wasn't white. ~ Leona Lewis,
315:My school is very lucky. We have an Olympic-size pool. ~ R L Stine,
316:School will bring you more success than marriage. ~ Nnedi Okorafor,
317:The mother's heart is the child's schoolroom. ~ Henry Ward Beecher,
318:The school of hard knocks is an accelerated curriculum. ~ Menander,
319:All these niggas that have good music have longevity. ~ Schoolboy Q,
320:Back to school, to prove to Dad that I'm not a fool. ~ Adam Sandler,
321:CALUMNUS, n. A graduate of the School for Scandal. ~ Ambrose Bierce,
322:Do Kids Create Because of School—or in Spite of It? ~ George Couros,
323:Experience is a good school. But the fees are high ~ Heinrich Heine,
324:Folk can’t learn their lessons if they skip school. ~ Peter V Brett,
325:Gets SCHOOLED By Transgender Caller The Huffington Post ~ Anonymous,
326:gone from the school when none here are loyal to him, ~ J K Rowling,
327:High school is a dark place; I hung out with ‘freaks.’ ~ Jared Leto,
328:Id been bumming around in bands since my school days. ~ Rick Astley,
329:I'll tell you right now. I'm for prayer in school. ~ Kinky Friedman,
330:In a lot of ways, work was my graduate school. ~ Christopher Bollen,
331:It’s like they can smell the public school on me. ~ Caroline Kepnes,
332:I was the bad kid in school. I was usually in trouble. ~ Scott Caan,
333:Music is the school and the hospital of the emotions. ~ Neel Burton,
334:My awkward stage extended well into high school. ~ Rachelle Lefevre,
335:School's out forever, school's been blown to pieces. ~ Alice Cooper,
336:Schools should be integrated by race and by class. ~ Nikki Giovanni,
337:Talking to him is rather like talking to a school play. ~ Zo Heller,
338:The bulk of mankind are schoolboys through life. ~ Thomas Jefferson,
339:The council is old school. Really, really old school. ~ Jim Butcher,
340:The family is the school of duties - founded on love. ~ Felix Adler,
341:The first lesson in Christ's school is self-denial. ~ Matthew Henry,
342:The nation that has the schools has the future. ~ Otto von Bismarck,
343:We schoolmasters must temper discretion with deceit. ~ Evelyn Waugh,
344:We've got to have good schools in every zip code. ~ Hillary Clinton,
345:What did school matter compared to a sister? ~ Benjamin Alire S enz,
346:20 years of schooling and they put you on the day shift. ~ Bob Dylan,
347:Being an actress doesn't make you popular in school. ~ Kirsten Dunst,
348:Experience is a good school. But the fees are high. ~ Heinrich Heine,
349:Failure in school does not mean failure in Iife. ~ Stephen J Cannell,
350:Girls were always my biggest distraction in school. ~ Channing Tatum,
351:I haven't done improv since I was in middle school. ~ Gillian Jacobs,
352:I'm mostly self-taught. I didn't learn much in school. ~ Agnes Denes,
353:I very much support financial education in schools. ~ George Osborne,
354:I went to a Catholic school but did not really fit in. ~ Amber Heard,
355:Love – Gunner Nash left town the day after high school ~ Erin Wright,
356:More depended on the student than on the school. ~ Robert A Heinlein,
357:School is a place were you go to eat your lunch ~ Rodney Dangerfield,
358:This ain't going to be no goddamn Sunday school picnic. ~ Kent Haruf,
359:This was middle school, the age of miracles, ~ Karen Thompson Walker,
360:We are taught for the schoolroom, not for life. ~ Seneca the Younger,
361:What we look for in the school is unrealized potential. ~ Donna Reed,
362:When I was in middle school, I liked to make cartoons. ~ Pete Docter,
363:You can finish school as soon as you finish the GCSE's. ~ Tom Felton,
364:Elementary school children are very impressionable ~ David J Anderson,
365:Every since high school I've been drawn to magazines. ~ Robert Benton,
366:found it empty of any school materials. “It is good to ~ Sejal Badani,
367:Grammar schools are public schools without the sodomy. ~ Tony Parsons,
368:In high school, the hardest years, she salted her bath water. ~ Dessa,
369:I was confirmed at my prep school at the age of 13. ~ Richard Dawkins,
370:Please, don’t drive a school bus blindfolded. ~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb,
371:Rocknroll and high school are kind of the same thing, ~ Imogen Binnie,
372:Schoolhouses are the republican line of fortifications. ~ Horace Mann,
373:Sheep. I'm stuck in a boarding school filled with sheep. ~ Libba Bray,
374:These are the secrets you learn only in clown school. ~ James Hamblin,
375:Transparency in the traditional school might destroy it. ~ Seth Godin,
376:Age 10. I joined the school marching band as a drummer. ~ Adrian Belew,
377:As a teenager at high school, I felt like an outsider. ~ Shawn Ashmore,
378:Baby, high school's over. High school's never over. ~ Karen Joy Fowler,
379:Every German child learns to speak English in school. ~ Cornelia Funke,
380:I actually just started home schooling. And it is great. ~ Robert Iler,
381:I didn't get lessons of any kind I slept through school. ~ Joel Madden,
382:I didn't study Greek mythology in school and I wish I had. ~ Eric Bana,
383:I'd like to work on putting art programs back in schools. ~ Chaka Khan,
384:I don't want to go to school and learn solemn things. ~ James M Barrie,
385:I loved school. I studied like crazy. I was a Class A nerd. ~ Maya Lin,
386:I've won. Hurray! I don't have to go to school any more. ~ Eddy Merckx,
387:I was sometimes called 'coconut' when I was at school. ~ David Oyelowo,
388:I was still in school after I dropped my first solo album. ~ Lil Wayne,
389:Life is not a fairground, but a school. -- Franz Bardon ~ Franz Bardon,
390:Mom, thanks for letting me drop out of high school. Haha! ~ Dave Grohl,
391:Most of my schooldays were the worst day of my life. ~ Terry Pratchett,
392:My education was interrupted only by my schooling. ~ Winston Churchill,
393:Private scholarships for students at hopeless schools. ~ Newt Gingrich,
394:School might have been shit, but at least it was simple. ~ Mark Haddon,
395:Schools did not reveal truths, they concealed them. ~ Ta Nehisi Coates,
396:Some people do piano lessons after school; I do movies. ~ Elle Fanning,
397:The average schoolmaster is, and always must be, an ass. ~ H L Mencken,
398:The New York School poets are my godfathers creatively. ~ Jim Jarmusch,
399:The time has come to end social promotion in our schools. ~ Roy Barnes,
400:This isn't some after-school feel-good movie special. ~ Meagan Spooner,
401:To dance is to live. What I want is a school of life. ~ Isadora Duncan,
402:We spend our whole lives recovering from high school. ~ Paula Danziger,
403:You gotta school these young macks comin' up today... ~ Big Daddy Kane,
404:1) "school isn't where the real learning happens." (3). ~ Gloria Naylor,
405:Access to a school library results in more reading. ~ Stephen D Krashen,
406:A-PLUS Act - allow states to operate like charter schools. ~ Jim DeMint,
407:Education is what you learn after you leave school. ~ Robert T Kiyosaki,
408:Government-run schools can't instill morals and character. ~ Jim DeMint,
409:I came in on the tail end of the old school of Hollywood ~ Tom Berenger,
410:I can't even remember not wanting to go to film school. ~ Danny McBride,
411:I didn't go to film school, I went to acting school. ~ Charles S Dutton,
412:I do not allow my schooling to interfere with my education ~ Mark Twain,
413:If you're going to school, you should do what you enjoy. ~ April Bowlby,
414:I go to school, but I never learn what I want to know. ~ Bill Watterson,
415:I have never let my schooling interfere with my education. ~ Mark Twain,
416:In fourth grade, I missed 82 days of school. Out of 160. ~ LeBron James,
417:I struggled academically throughout elementary school ~ Benjamin Carson,
418:I was not popular. I was the kid in school that was bullied. ~ Tom Ford,
419:I wasn't the most popular girl in school by any means. ~ Cindy Crawford,
420:John Denver I listened to when I was in elementary school. ~ Eric Close,
421:Kids who go to normal school are so teenagery, so angsty. ~ Jaden Smith,
422:Legislators could certainly do with a school of morals. ~ Simon Bolivar,
423:My kids are now the most popular kids in their school. ~ Chris Daughtry,
424:My mum is a school teacher and my dad is an electrician. ~ Jai Courtney,
425:My top priority is to stop the cuts to our public schools. ~ Fred DuVal,
426:No star fades faster than that of a high school athlete. ~ John Grisham,
427:Old School has humongous laughs all the way through it. ~ Thomas Lennon,
428:Support charters; insist on change for failing schools. ~ Newt Gingrich,
429:There is a lot of hype about drama school, I think. ~ Eleanor Tomlinson,
430:The school felt more mine than in all my four years there. ~ John Green,
431:What doesn’t kill us sharpens us. Hardens us. Schools us. ~ Rick Yancey,
432:years, it showed real results: the high school ~ Hillary Rodham Clinton,
433:Close Dept. of Education, but don't dismantle public schools. ~ Ron Paul,
434:Freedom is a school of responsibility for human beings. ~ Dinesh D Souza,
435:High school is depressing enough."
I tend to agree. ~ Alecia Whitaker,
436:Home schooling as an idea is on a par with home dentistry. ~ Dick Cavett,
437:I dropped out of school and I never took acting classes. ~ Alice Englert,
438:If there is hell, it was modeled after junior high school. ~ Lewis Black,
439:I got eight O-levels at school...zero in every subject. ~ Paul Gascoigne,
440:I got expelled from every school I went to in Sydney. ~ Poppy Montgomery,
441:In an art school it's very hard to tell who is the best. ~ Daniel Clowes,
442:In middle school, I had an '87 Regal. That was unheard of. ~ Young Jeezy,
443:In the school of the woods, there is no graduation day. ~ Horace Kephart,
444:It's [Jail's] like being at school. Except you can't leave. ~ Boy George,
445:It was a terrible school, no matter how you looked at it. ~ J D Salinger,
446:I used to sit in school and dream about getting into films. ~ Cary Elwes,
447:I went to a private arts school. We had to wear cloaks. ~ Claire Forlani,
448:I went to boarding school at seven and cried and cried. ~ Rupert Everett,
449:I went to school on the Internet. I was not a cheerleader. ~ Emmy Rossum,
450:I went to the Conservatory of Music in school in Rome. ~ Cecilia Bartoli,
451:My education was interrupted only by my schooling. ~ Winston S Churchill,
452:My mom did what school didn't. She taught me how to think. ~ Trevor Noah,
453:My school is attended by near three hundred scholars. ~ Joseph Lancaster,
454:School prepares you for the real world... which also bites. ~ Jim Benton,
455:Stay in school. Lie to your teachers, but stay in school. ~ Billy Corgan,
456:The home is the chief school of human virtues. ~ William Ellery Channing,
457:The last thing I wanted to do was blow up another school. ~ Rick Riordan,
458:The only thing they can't teach you at art school is art. ~ David Bailey,
459:the routine of education in the schools of ~ Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley,
460:We should throw the Epistle of James out of this school. ~ Martin Luther,
461:Before leaving school I consorted with The Oracle: Google. ~ Jandy Nelson,
462:book variables, student variables, and school variables. ~ Teri S Lesesne,
463:Every time you stop a school, you will have to build a jail. ~ Mark Twain,
464:he was coming while in the elementary school classroom, ~ Haruki Murakami,
465:I failed angst in high school. They let me graduate anyway. ~ John Scalzi,
466:If you're in high-school and you're not having fun, quit. ~ Doug Stanhope,
467:I like a lot of old-school R&B, soul, and classic rock. ~ Wiz Khalifa,
468:I most likely be in school, so don't tell my teacher."
-KD ~ Unknown,
469:I still had a normal childhood with my friends from school. ~ Demi Lovato,
470:I used to spend every morning in detention at my old school. ~ Jake Lloyd,
471:I visualized high school as being like ‘Saved By the Bell.’ ~ Vanessa Ray,
472:I was dyslexic, so I was put in the silly class at school. ~ David Bailey,
473:I was very unsure about what I wanted to do in high school. ~ Aaron Tveit,
474:I went to an all white school where I dealt with racism. ~ Chaske Spencer,
475:Mean girls go far in high school. Kind women go far in LIFE. ~ Mandy Hale,
476:Out of the public schools comes the greatness of the nation. ~ Mark Twain,
477:School’s important at the moment.
Unsexiest statement ever. ~ A S King,
478:The government gave me enough money to go to acting school. ~ Tony Curtis,
479:The secret school is our silent protest,” she told us. ~ Malala Yousafzai,
480:This is the Wilderness School. 'Where the Kids are animals ~ Rick Riordan,
481:A child educated only at school is an uneducated child. ~ George Santayana,
482:All schools will end up using game metrics in the future. ~ Nolan Bushnell,
483:Graduate school is a place to hide for a couple of years. ~ Michael Eisner,
484:I bake my daughter cupcakes for her school. I'm very hands-on. ~ Greg Bryk,
485:I believe that religious faith schools are highly dubious. ~ Bjorn Ulvaeus,
486:I hated school, but I was a good student. I made straight A's. ~ Lucy Hale,
487:I'm 18, I'm going to graduate high school in a few months. ~ Camilla Belle,
488:I'm still the fat kid from high school who never had a date. ~ Nathan Lane,
489:I never went to college - I barely got out of high school. ~ Dave Matthews,
490:In high school, I always dressed to impress the girls. ~ Theophilus London,
491:I played basketball and soccer my freshman year in high school. ~ Mia Hamm,
492:I play guitar and sing when I'm not busy with school and acting. ~ Kaitlyn,
493:I think you should fall in love at least twice in high school. ~ Jenny Han,
494:I wanted to be an elementary school teacher my whole life. ~ Steve Wozniak,
495:I was a musical theatre geek in high school and college. ~ Toks Olagundoye,
496:I was fortunate to attend a school with an excellent library ~ Syrie James,
497:I was going to go to school to become a neurological surgeon. ~ Angel Haze,
498:I was just average, I’m afraid. Too dreamy. After school, ~ Liane Moriarty,
499:Like everything else in life, it was kind of like high school. ~ Anonymous,
500:On the morning of the exorcism, I stayed home from school. ~ Paul Tremblay,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



50

   33 Occultism
   12 Yoga
   12 Philosophy
   7 Christianity
   5 Integral Yoga
   3 Hinduism
   3 Buddhism


   32 Aleister Crowley
   18 Sri Aurobindo
   17 Sri Ramakrishna
   13 The Mother
   7 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   6 Swami Vivekananda
   6 Swami Krishnananda
   6 Friedrich Nietzsche
   6 Aldous Huxley
   4 Thubten Chodron
   4 Satprem
   3 Jorge Luis Borges
   3 Bokar Rinpoche
   2 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   2 Patanjali
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta


   26 Magick Without Tears
   20 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   11 The Mothers Agenda
   9 Liber ABA
   8 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   8 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   7 The Life Divine
   7 Talks
   7 Savitri
   6 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 The Perennial Philosophy
   6 Essays On The Gita
   5 Words Of Long Ago
   5 Walden
   5 Twilight of the Idols
   4 The Blue Cliff Records
   4 The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
   4 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   4 Letters On Yoga I
   4 How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator
   4 Essays Divine And Human
   4 Collected Poems
   4 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah
   3 The Integral Yoga
   3 Tara - The Feminine Divine
   3 Raja-Yoga
   3 Isha Upanishad
   2 The Secret Of The Veda
   2 Theosophy
   2 Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   2 Patanjali Yoga Sutras
   2 On Education
   2 Letters On Yoga II
   2 Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
   2 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   2 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   2 Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin
   2 Advanced Dungeons and Dragons 2E


0.01_-_Life_and_Yoga, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  HERE are two necessities of Nature's workings which seem always to intervene in the greater forms of human activity, whether these belong to our ordinary fields of movement or seek those exceptional spheres and fulfilments which appear to us high and divine. Every such form tends towards a harmonised complexity and totality which again breaks apart into various channels of special effort and tendency, only to unite once more in a larger and more puissant synthesis. Secondly, development into forms is an imperative rule of effective manifestation; yet all truth and practice too strictly formulated becomes old and loses much, if not all, of its virtue; it must be constantly renovated by fresh streams of the spirit revivifying the dead or dying vehicle and changing it, if it is to acquire a new life. To be perpetually reborn is the condition of a material immortality. We are in an age, full of the throes of travail, when all forms of thought and activity that have in themselves any strong power of utility or any secret virtue of persistence are being subjected to a supreme test and given their opportunity of rebirth. The world today presents the aspect of a huge cauldron of Medea in which all things are being cast, shredded into pieces, experimented on, combined and recombined either to perish and provide the scattered material of new forms or to emerge rejuvenated and changed for a fresh term of existence. Indian Yoga, in its essence a special action or formulation of certain great powers of Nature, itself specialised, divided and variously formulated, is potentially one of these dynamic elements of the future life of humanity. The child of immemorial ages, preserved by its vitality and truth into our modern times, it is now emerging from the secret Schools and ascetic retreats in which it had taken refuge and is seeking its place in the future sum of living human powers and utilities. But it has first to rediscover itself, bring to the surface
  

0.02_-_The_Three_Steps_of_Nature, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  But in order that we may be wisely guided in our effort, we must know, first, the general principle and purpose underlying this separative impulse and, next, the particular utilities upon which the method of each School of Yoga is founded. For the general principle we must interrogate the universal workings of Nature herself, recognising in her no merely specious and illusive activity of a distorting Maya, but the cosmic energy and working of God Himself in His universal being formulating and inspired by a vast, an infinite and yet a minutely selective
  Wisdom, prajna prasr.ta puran. of the Upanishad, Wisdom that went forth from the Eternal since the beginning. For the particular utilities we must cast a penetrative eye on the different methods of Yoga and distinguish among the mass of their details the governing idea which they serve and the radical force which gives birth and energy to their processes of effectuation.

0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Mind finds fully its force and action only when it casts itself upon life and accepts equally its possibilities and its resistances as the means of a greater self-perfection. In the struggle with the difficulties of the material world the ethical development of the individual is firmly shaped and the great Schools of conduct are formed; by contact with the facts of life Art attains to vitality, Thought assures its abstractions, the generalisations of the philosopher base themselves on a stable foundation of science and experience.
  
  --
  
  The Schools of Indian Yoga lent themselves to the compromise. Individual perfection or liberation was made the aim, seclusion of some kind from the ordinary activities the condition, the renunciation of life the culmination. The teacher gave his knowledge only to a small circle of disciples. Or if a wider movement was attempted, it was still the release of the individual soul that remained the aim. The pact with an immobile society was, for the most part, observed.
  

0.04_-_The_Systems_of_Yoga, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  HESE relations between the different psychological divisions of the human being and these various utilities and objects of effort founded on them, such as we have seen them in our brief survey of the natural evolution, we shall find repeated in the fundamental principles and methods of the different Schools of Yoga. And if we seek to combine and harmonise their central practices and their predominant aims, we shall find that the basis provided by Nature is still our natural basis and the condition of their synthesis.
  
  --
  
  For if, leaving aside the complexities of their particular processes, we fix our regard on the central principle of the chief Schools of Yoga still prevalent in India, we find that they arrange themselves in an ascending order which starts from the lowest rung of the ladder, the body, and ascends to the direct contact between the individual soul and the transcendent and universal
  Self. Hathayoga selects the body and the vital functionings as its instruments of perfection and realisation; its concern is with the gross body. Rajayoga selects the mental being in its different parts as its lever-power; it concentrates on the subtle body. The triple Path of Works, of Love and of Knowledge uses some part of the mental being, will, heart or intellect as a starting-point and seeks by its conversion to arrive at the liberating Truth,

0.05_-_The_Synthesis_of_the_Systems, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Y THE very nature of the principal Yogic Schools, each covering in its operations a part of the complex human integer and attempting to bring out its highest possibilities, it will appear that a synthesis of all of them largely conceived and applied might well result in an integral Yoga. But they are so disparate in their tendencies, so highly specialised and elaborated in their forms, so long confirmed in the mutual opposition of their ideas and methods that we do not easily find how we can arrive at their right union.
  
  An undiscriminating combination in block would not be a synthesis, but a confusion. Nor would a successive practice of each of them in turn be easy in the short span of our human life and with our limited energies, to say nothing of the waste of labour implied in so cumbrous a process. Sometimes, indeed,
  Hathayoga and Rajayoga are thus successively practised. And in a recent unique example, in the life of Ramakrishna Paramhansa, we see a colossal spiritual capacity first driving straight to the divine realisation, taking, as it were, the kingdom of heaven by violence, and then seizing upon one Yogic method after another and extracting the substance out of it with an incredible rapidity, always to return to the heart of the whole matter, the realisation and possession of God by the power of love, by the extension of inborn spirituality into various experience and by the spontaneous play of an intuitive knowledge. Such an example cannot be generalised. Its object also was special and temporal, to exemplify in the great and decisive experience of a master-soul the truth, now most necessary to humanity, towards which a world long divided into jarring sects and Schools is with difficulty labouring, that all sects are forms and fragments of a single integral truth and all disciplines labour in their different ways towards one supreme experience. To know, be and possess
  
  --
  Yogic system which is in its nature synthetical and starts from a great central principle of Nature, a great dynamic force of
  Nature; but it is a Yoga apart, not a synthesis of other Schools.
  
  --
  
  If, however, we leave aside, here also, the actual methods and practices and seek for the central principle, we find, first, that Tantra expressly differentiates itself from the Vedic methods of Yoga. In a sense, all the Schools we have hitherto examined are Vedantic in their principle; their force is in knowledge, their method is knowledge, though it is not always discernment by the intellect, but may be, instead, the knowledge of the heart expressed in love and faith or a knowledge in the will working out through action. In all of them the lord of the Yoga is the Purusha, the Conscious Soul that knows, observes, attracts, governs. But in Tantra it is rather Prakriti, the Nature-Soul, the Energy, the
  Will-in-Power executive in the universe. It was by learning and applying the intimate secrets of this Will-in-Power, its method, its Tantra, that the Tantric Yogin pursued the aims of his discipline, - mastery, perfection, liberation, beatitude. Instead of drawing back from manifested Nature and its difficulties, he confronted them, seized and conquered. But in the end, as is the general tendency of Prakriti, Tantric Yoga largely lost its principle in its machinery and became a thing of formulae and occult mechanism still powerful when rightly used but fallen from the clarity of their original intention.
  --
  
  But in either case it is always through something in the lower that we must rise into the higher existence, and the Schools of
  Yoga each select their own point of departure or their own gate of escape. They specialise certain activities of the lower

01.04_-_Motives_for_Seeking_the_Divine, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Let us look on it as a sort of infants' School for the unready.
  

01.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_King_The_Yoga_of_the_Spirits_Freedom_and_Greatness, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    This dusk room with its dark internal stair,
    The infant soul in its small nursery School
    Mid objects meant for a lesson hardly learned

02.01_-_Metaphysical_Thought_and_the_Supreme_Truth, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  In the East, especially in India, the metaphysical thinkers have tried, as in the West, to determine the nature of the highest Truth by the intellect. But, in the first place, they have not given mental thinking the supreme rank as an instrument in the discovery of Truth, but only a secondary status. The first rank has always been given to spiritual intuition and illumination and spiritual experience; an intellectual conclusion that contradicts this supreme authority is held invalid. Secondly, each philosophy has armed itself with a practical way of reaching to the supreme state of consciousness, so that even when one begins with Thought, the aim is to arrive at a consciousness beyond mental thinking. Each philosophical founder (as also those who continued his work or School) has been a metaphysical thinker doubled with a Yogi. Those who were only philosophic intellectuals were respected for their learning but never took rank as truth discoverers. And the philosophies that lacked a sufficiently powerful means of spiritual experience died out and became things of the past because they were not dynamic for spiritual discovery and realisation.
  

02.03_-_The_Glory_and_the_Fall_of_Life, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  To him who serves with a free equal heart
  Obedience is his princely training's School,
  His nobility's coronet and privilege,

02.06_-_The_Integral_Yoga_and_Other_Yogas, #The Integral Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  I know very well also that there have been seemingly allied ideals and anticipations - the perfectibility of the race, certain
  Tantric sadhanas, the effort after a complete physical siddhi by certain Schools of Yoga, etc. etc. I have alluded to these things myself and have put forth the view that the spiritual past of the race has been a preparation of Nature not merely for attaining to the Divine beyond this world, but also for this very step forward which the evolution of the earth-consciousness has still to make.
  

02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  At will she spaces in thin air of mind
  Like maps in the School-house of intellect hung,
  Forcing wide Truth into a narrow scheme,

02.11_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Greater_Mind, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  King-children born on Wisdom's early plane,
  Taught in her School world-making's mystic play.
  Archmasons of the eternal Thaumaturge,

04.02_-_The_Growth_of_the_Flame, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Adept of truth, initiate of bliss,
  A mystic acolyte trained in Nature's School,
  Aware of the marvel of created things
  --
  In a small circle of young eager hearts,
  Her being's early School and closed domain,
  Apprentice in the business of earth-life,
  She Schooled her heavenly strain to bear its touch,
  Content in her little garden of the gods

07.03_-_The_Entry_into_the_Inner_Countries, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The Spirit's almighty freedom was not here:
  A Schoolman mind had captured life's large space,
  But chose to live in bare and paltry rooms

1.001_-_The_Aim_of_Yoga, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The whole of our life is a successive series of efforts whether it is the effort that I put forth, or that which someone else puts forth. All these efforts have a common background, although the efforts of human beings are variegated and there is also an apparent diversity of the aims behind the efforts. The farmer's effort is towards producing harvest in the field; the industrialist's effort is towards production of goods and such other items in his field; the effort of the Schoolmaster or the professor is in another direction; and so on and so forth. We have an apparent diversity of aims, motivated by a diversity of efforts.
  

10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Or the technique of a brief hour's success
  She teaches, an usher in utility's School.
  

1.00a_-_Introduction, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  3. Now then to your old Pons Asinorum about the names of the Gods! Stand in the corner for half an hour with your face to the wall! Stay in after School and write Malka be-Tharshishim v-Ruachoth b-Schehalim 999 times!
  

1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  have confined their attention more or less exclusively to the experience of those
  whom the theologians of an older School called the unregeneratethat is to say,
  the experience of people who have not gone very far in fulfilling the necessary

1.00c_-_INTRODUCTION, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  dream in the air. Another theory in modern times has been
  presented by several Schools, that mans destiny is to go on
  always improving, always struggling towards, and never
  --
  Now the question arises, is going back to God the higher state,
  or is it not? The philosophers of the Yoga School answer
  emphatically that it is. They say that mans present state is a

1.00_-_Gospel, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  Gaddhar grew up into a healthy and restless boy, full of fun and sweet mischief. He was intelligent and precocious and endowed with a prodigious memory. On his father's lap he learnt by heart the names of his ancestors and the hymns to the gods and goddesses, and at the village School he was taught to read and write. But his greatest delight was to listen to recitations of stories from Hindu mythology and the epics. These he would afterwards recount from memory, to the great joy of the villagers. Painting he enjoyed; the art of moulding images of the gods and goddesses he learnt from the potters. But arithmetic was his great aversion.
  
  --
  
  Gaddhar himself now organized a dramatic company with his young friends. The stage was set in the mango orchard. The themes were selected from the stories of the Ramayana and the Mahabharata. Gaddhar knew by heart almost all the roles, having heard them from professional actors. His favourite theme was the Vrindvan episode of Krishna's life, depicting those exquisite love-stories of Krishna and the milkmaids and the cowherd boys. Gaddhar would play the parts of Rdh or Krishna and would often lose himself in the character he was portraying. His natural feminine grace heightened the dramatic effect. The mango orchard would ring with the loud kirtan of the boys. Lost in song and merry-making, Gaddhar became indifferent to the routine of School.
  
  --
  
  The first effect of the draught on the educated Hindus was a complete effacement from their minds of the time-honoured beliefs and traditions of Hindu society. They came to believe that there was no transcendental Truth. The world perceived by the senses was all that existed. God and religion were illusions of the untutored mind. True knowledge could be derived only from the analysis of nature. So atheism and agnosticism became the fashion of the day. The youth of India, taught in English Schools, took malicious delight in openly breaking the customs and traditions of their society. They would do away with the caste-system and remove the discriminatory laws about food. Social reform, the spread of secular education, widow remarriage, abolition of early marriage -
  
  --
  
  By far the ablest leader of the Brhmo movement was Keshab Chandra Sen (1838-1884). Unlike Rj Rmmohan Roy and Devendranth Tgore, Keshab was born of a middle-class Bengli family and had been brought up in an English School. He did not know Sanskrit and very soon broke away from the popular Hindu religion. Even at an early age he came under the spell of Christ and professed to have experienced the special favour of John the Baptist, Christ, and St. Paul. When he strove to introduce Christ to the Brhmo Samj, a rupture became inevitable with Devendranth. In 1868
  
  --
  
  Mahendranth Gupta, known as "M.", arrived at Dakshinewar in February 1882. He belonged to the Brhmo Samj and was headmaster of the Vidysgar High School at ymbazr, Calcutta. At the very first sight the Master recognized him as one of his "marked" disciples. Mahendra recorded in his diary Sri Ramakrishna's conversations with his devotees. These are the first directly recorded words, in the spiritual history of the world, of a man recognized as belonging in the class of Buddha and Christ. The present volume is a translation of this diary. Mahendra was instrumental, through his personal contacts, in spreading the Master's message among many young and aspiring souls.
  
  --
  
  Two more young men, Srad Prasanna and Tulasi, complete the small band of the Master's disciples later to embrace the life of the wandering monk. With the exception of the elder Gopl, all of them were in their teens or slightly over. They came from middle-class Bengli families, and most of them were students in School or college. Their parents and relatives had envisaged for them bright worldly careers. They came to Sri Ramakrishna with pure bodies, vigorous minds, and uncontaminated souls. All were born with unusual spiritual attributes. Sri Ramakrishna accepted them, even at first sight, as his children, relatives, friends, and companions. His magic touch unfolded them. And later each according to his measure reflected the life of the Master, becoming a torch-bearer of his message across land and sea.
  

1.00_-_Gospel_Preface, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  Sri Mahendra Nath Gupta, familiary known to the readers of the Gospel by his pen name M., and to the devotees as Master Mahashay, was born on the 14th of July, 1854 as the son of Madhusudan Gupta, an officer of the Calcutta High Court, and his wife, Swarnamayi Devi. He had a brilliant scholastic career at Hare School and the Presidency College at Calcutta. The range of his studies included the best that both occidental and oriental learning had to offer. English literature, history, economics, western philosophy and law on the one hand, and Sanskrit literature and grammar, Darsanas, Puranas, Smritis, Jainism, Buddhism, astrology and Ayurveda on the other were the subjects in which he attained considerable proficiency.
  
  
  He was an educationist all his life both in a spiritual and in a secular sense. After he passed out of College, he took up work as headmaster in a number of Schools in succession Narail High School, City School, Ripon College School, Metropolitan School, Aryan School, Oriental School, Oriental Seminary and Model School. The causes of his migration from School to School were that he could not get on with some of the managements on grounds of principles and that often his spiritual mood drew him away to places of pilgrimage for long periods. He worked with some of the most noted public men of the time like Iswar Chandra Vidysgar and Surendranath Banerjee. The latter appointed him as a professor in the City and Ripon Colleges where he taught subjects like English, philosophy, history and economics. In his later days he took over the Morton School, and he spent his time in the staircase room of the third floor of it, administering the School and preaching the message of the Master. He was much respected in educational circles where he was usually referred to as Rector Mahashay. A teacher who had worked under him writes thus in warm appreciation of his teaching methods: "Only when I worked with him in School could I appreciate what a great educationist he was. He would come down to the level of his students when teaching, though he himself was so learned, so talented. Ordinarily teachers confine their instruction to what is given in books without much thought as to whether the student can accept it or not. But M., would first of all gauge how much the student could take in and by what means. He would employ aids to teaching like maps, pictures and diagrams, so that his students could learn by seeing. Thirty years ago (from 1953) when the question of imparting education through the medium of the mother tongue was being discussed, M. had already employed Bengali as the medium of instruction in the Morton School." (M The Apostle and the Evangelist by Swami Nityatmananda Part I. P. 15.)
  
  --
  
  Sri Ramakrishna was a teacher for both the Orders of mankind, Sannysins and householders. His own life offered an ideal example for both, and he left behind disciples who followed the highest traditions he had set in respect of both these ways of life. M., along with Nag Mahashay, exemplified how a householder can rise to the highest level of sagehood. M. was married to Nikunja Devi, a distant relative of Keshab Chander Sen, even when he was reading at College, and he had four children, two sons and two daughters. The responsibility of the family, no doubt, made him dependent on his professional income, but the great devotee that he was, he never compromised with ideals and principles for this reason. Once when he was working as the headmaster in a School managed by the great Vidysgar, the results of the School at the public examination happened to be rather poor, and Vidysgar attributed it to M's preoccupation with the Master and his consequent failure to attend adequately to the School work. M. at once resigned his post without any thought of the morrow. Within a fortnight the family was in poverty, and M. was one day pacing up and down the verandah of his house, musing how he would feed his children the next day. Just then a man came with a letter addressed to 'Mahendra Babu', and on opening it, M. found that it was a letter from his friend Sri Surendra Nath Banerjee, asking whether he would like to take up a professorship in the Ripon College. In this way three or four times he gave up the job that gave him the wherewithal to support the family, either for upholding principles or for practising spiritual Sadhanas in holy places, without any consideration of the possible dire worldly consequences; but he was always able to get over these difficulties somehow, and the interests of his family never suffered. In spite of his disregard for worldly goods, he was, towards the latter part of his life, in a fairly flourishing condition as the proprietor of the Morton School which he developed into a noted educational institution in the city. The Lord has said in the Bhagavad Git that in the case of those who think of nothing except Him, He Himself would take up all their material and spiritual responsibilities. M. was an example of the truth of the Lord's promise.
  
  --
  
  After the Master's demise, M. went on pilgrimage several times. He visited Banras, Vrindvan, Ayodhy and other places. At Banras he visited the famous Trailinga Swmi and fed him with sweets, and he had long conversations with Swami Bhaskarananda, one of the noted saintly and scholarly Sannysins of the time. In 1912 he went with the Holy Mother to Banras, and spent about a year in the company of Sannysins at Banras, Vrindvan, Hardwar, Hrishikesh and Swargashram. But he returned to Calcutta, as that city offered him the unique opportunity of associating himself with the places hallowed by the Master in his lifetime. Afterwards he does not seem to have gone to any far-off place, but stayed on in his room in the Morton School carrying on his spiritual ministry, speaking on the Master and his teachings to the large number of people who flocked to him after having read his famous Kathmrita known to English readers as The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna.
  
  --
  
  Even as a boy of about thirteen, while he was a student in the 3rd class of the Hare School, he was in the habit of keeping a diary. "Today on rising," he wrote in his diary, "I greeted my father and mother, prostrating on the ground before them" (Swami Nityatmananda's 'M The Apostle and the Evangelist' Part I. P 29.) At another place he wrote, "Today, while on my way to School, I visited, as usual, the temples of Kli, the Mother at Tharitharia, and of Mother Sitala, and paid my obeisance to them." About twenty-five years after, when he met the Great Master in the spring of 1882, it was the same instinct of a born diary-writer that made him begin his book, 'unique in the literature of hagiography', with the memorable words: "When hearing the name of Hari or Rma once, you shed tears and your hair stands on end, then you may know for certain that you do not have to perform devotions such as Sandhya any more."
  
  --
  
  Besides the prompting of his inherent instinct, the main inducement for M. to keep this diary of his experiences at Dakshineswar was his desire to provide himself with a means for living in holy company at all times. Being a School teacher, he could be with the Master only on Sundays and other holidays, and it was on his diary that he depended for 'holy company' on other days. The devotional scriptures like the Bhagavata say that holy company is the first and most important means for the generation and growth of devotion. For, in such company man could hear talks on spiritual matters and listen to the glorification of Divine attributes, charged with the fervour and conviction emanating from the hearts of great lovers of God. Such company is therefore the one certain means through which Sraddha (Faith), Rati (attachment to God) and Bhakti (loving devotion) are generated. The diary of his visits to Dakshineswar provided M. with material for re-living, through reading and contemplation, the holy company he had had earlier, even on days when he was not able to visit Dakshineswar. The wealth of details and the vivid description of men and things in the midst of which the sublime conversations are set, provide excellent material to re-live those experiences for any one with imaginative powers. It was observed by M.'s disciples and admirers that in later life also whenever he was free or alone, he would be pouring over his diary, transporting himself on the wings of imagination to the glorious days he spent at the feet of the Master.
  
  --
  
  M. was, in every respect, a true missionary of Sri Ramakrishna right from his first acquaintance with him in 1882. As a School teacher, it was a practice with him to direct to the Master such of his students as had a true spiritual disposition. Though himself prohibited by the Master to take to monastic life, he encouraged all spiritually inclined young men he came across in his later life to join the monastic Order. Swami Vijnanananda, a direct Sannysin disciple of the Master and a President of the Ramakrishna Order, once remarked to M.: "By enquiry, I have come to the conclusion that eighty percent and more of the Sannysins have embraced the monastic life after reading the Kathmrita (Bengali name of the book) and coming in contact with you." ( M
  
  --
  
  In 1905 he retired from the active life of a Professor and devoted his remaining twenty-seven years exclusively to the preaching of the life and message of the Great Master. He bought the Morton Institution from its original proprietors and shifted it to a commodious four-storeyed house at 50 Amherst Street, where it flourished under his management as one of the most efficient educational institutions in Calcutta. He generally occupied a staircase room at the top of it, cooking his own meal which consisted only of milk and rice without variation, and attended to all his personal needs himself. His dress also was the simplest possible. It was his conviction that limitation of personal wants to the minimum is an important aid to holy living. About one hour in the morning he would spend in inspecting the classes of the School, and then retire to his staircase room to pour over his diary and live in the divine atmosphere of the earthly days of the Great Master, unless devotees and admirers had already gathered in his room seeking his holy company.
  

1.00_-_Main, #Book of Certitude, #Baha u llah, #Baha i
  
  Exile and imprisonment are decreed for the thief, and, on the third offence, place ye a mark upon his brow so that, thus identified, he may not be accepted in the cities of God and His countries. Beware lest, through compassion, ye neglect to carry out the statutes of the religion of God; do that which hath been bidden you by Him Who is compassionate and merciful. We School you with the rod of wisdom and laws, like unto the father who educateth his son, and this for naught but the protection of your own selves and the elevation of your stations. By My life, were ye to discover what We have desired for you in revealing Our holy laws, ye would offer up your very souls for this sacred, this mighty, and most exalted Faith.
  
  --
  
  We have not entered any School, nor read any of your dissertations. Incline your ears to the words of this unlettered One, wherewith He summoneth you unto God, the Ever-Abiding. Better is this for you than all the treasures of the earth, could ye but comprehend it.
  
  --
  
  O Pen of the Most High! Move Thou upon the Tablet at the bidding of Thy Lord, the Creator of the Heavens, and tell of the time when He Who is the Dayspring of Divine Unity purposed to direct His steps towards the School of Transcendent Oneness; haply the pure in heart may gain thereby a glimpse, be it as small as a needle's eye, of the mysteries of Thy Lord, the Almighty, the Omniscient, that lie concealed behind the veils. Say: We, indeed, set foot within the School of inner meaning and explanation when all created things were unaware. We saw the words sent down by Him Who is the All-Merciful, and We accepted the verses of God, the Help in Peril, the Self-Subsisting, which He+F1 presented unto Us, and hearkened unto that which He had solemnly affirmed in the Tablet. This we assuredly did behold. And We assented to His wish through Our behest, for truly We are potent to command.
  
  --
  
  O people of the Bayan! We, verily, set foot within the School of God when ye lay slumbering; and We perused the Tablet while ye were fast asleep. By the one true God! We read the Tablet ere it was revealed, while ye were unaware, and We had perfect knowledge of the Book when ye were yet unborn. These words are to your measure, not to God's. To this testifieth that which is enshrined within His knowledge, if ye be of them that comprehend; and to this the tongue of the Almighty doth bear witness, if ye be of those who understand. I swear by God, were We to lift the veil, ye would be dumbfounded.
  
  --
  
  Take heed that ye dispute not idly concerning the Almighty and His Cause, for lo! He hath appeared amongst you invested with a Revelation so great as to encompass all things, whether of the past or of the future. Were We to address Our theme by speaking in the language of the inmates of the Kingdom, We would say: "In truth, God created that School ere He created heaven and earth, and We entered it before the letters B and E were joined and knit together." Such is the language of Our servants in Our Kingdom; consider what the tongue of the dwellers of Our exalted Dominion would utter, for We have taught them Our knowledge and have revealed to them whatever had lain hidden in God's wisdom. Imagine then what the Tongue of Might and Grandeur would utter in His All-Glorious Abode!
  

1.01_-_An_Accomplished_Westerner, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  
  but also with an English governess, Miss Pagett, and then sent off at the age of five to an Irish convent School in Darjeeling among the sons of British administrators. Two years later, the three Ghose boys would leave for England. Sri Aurobindo was seven. Not until the age of twenty would he learn his mother tongue, Bengali. He would never see his father again, who died just before his return to India, and barely his mother, who was ill and did not recognize him on his return. Hence, this is a child who grew up outside every influence of family, country, and tradition a free spirit. The first lesson Sri Aurobindo gives us is perhaps, precisely, a lesson of freedom.
  Sri Aurobindo and his two brothers were entrusted to an Anglican clergyman of Manchester, with strict instruction that they should not be allowed the acquaintance of any Indian or undergo any Indian influence.4 Dr. Ghose was indeed a peculiar man. He also ordered Pastor Drewett not to give his sons any religious instruction, so they could choose a religion themselves, if they so wished, when they came of age. He then left them to their fate for thirteen years. He believed his children should become men of character. Dr. Ghose may appear to have been a hardhearted man, but he was nothing of the kind; not only did he donate his services as a doctor but also gave his money to poor Bengali villagers (while his sons had hardly anything to eat or wear in London), and he died of shock when he was mistakenlyinformed that his favorite son, Aurobindo, had died in a shipwreck.
  --
  When he began his life in London, at the age of twelve, Sri Aurobindo knew Latin and French thoroughly. The headmaster of St.
  Paul's School, where he had enrolled, was so surprised at the aptitude of his young student that he personally coached him in Greek. Three years later, Sri Aurobindo could skip half his classes and spend most of his time engrossed in his favorite occupation:reading. Nothing seemed to escape this voracious adolescent (except cricket, which held as little interest for him as Sunday School.) Shelley and "Prometheus Unbound," the French poets, Homer, Aristophanes, and soon all of European thought for he quickly came to master enough German and Italian to read Dante and Goethe in the original peopled a solitude of which he has said nothing. He never sought to form relationships, while Manmohan, the second brother, roamed through London in the company of his friend Oscar Wilde and would make a name for himself in English poetry. Each of the three brothers led his separate life. However, there was nothing austere about Sri Aurobindo, and certainly nothing of the puritan (the prurient,8 as he called it); it was just that he was "elsewhere," and his world was 6
  7
  --
  Indeed, perhaps this is the true meaning of Sri Aurobindo's humor: a refusal to see things tragically, and, even more so, a sense of inalienable royalty.
  Whether St. Paul's School appreciated his sense of humor we do not know, but it certainly appreciated his astonishing culture;he was awarded a scholarship to attend Cambridge (just in time; the family remittances had practically stopped), which was not enough, however,
  to relieve him from cold and hunger since his older brothers also partook heartily of the windfall. He was just eighteen. What was he going to that nursery-of-gentlemen for? For one reason, he was fulfilling his father's wishes though not for long. In his first year at King's College, he won all the prizes in Greek and Latin verse, but his heart was no longer in it. It was Joan of Arc, Mazzini, the American Revolution that haunted him in other words, the liberation of his country. India's independence, of which he would become one of the pioneers. This unforeseen political calling was to hold him for almost twenty years, even though at the time he did not exactly know what an Indian was, let alone a Hindu! But he learned fast. As with Western 9

1.01_-_Economy, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  We know not much about them. It is remarkable that _we_ know so much of them as we do. The same is true of the more modern reformers and benefactors of their race. None can be an impartial or wise observer of human life but from the vantage ground of what we should call voluntary poverty. Of a life of luxury the fruit is luxury, whether in agriculture, or commerce, or literature, or art. There are nowadays professors of philosophy, but not philosophers. Yet it is admirable to profess because it was once admirable to live. To be a philosopher is not merely to have subtle thoughts, nor even to found a School, but so to love wisdom as to live according to its dictates, a life of simplicity, independence, magnanimity, and trust. It is to solve some of the problems of life, not only theoretically, but practically. The success of great scholars and thinkers is commonly a courtier-like success, not kingly, not manly. They make shift to live merely by conformity, practically as their fathers did, and are in no sense the progenitors of a nobler race of men. But why do men degenerate ever?
  What makes families run out? What is the nature of the luxury which enervates and destroys nations? Are we sure that there is none of it in our own lives? The philosopher is in advance of his age even in the outward form of his life. He is not fed, sheltered, clothed, warmed, like his contemporaries. How can a man be a philosopher and not maintain his vital heat by better methods than other men?
  --
  
  For more than five years I maintained myself thus solely by the labor of my hands, and I found, that by working about six weeks in a year, I could meet all the expenses of living. The whole of my winters, as well as most of my summers, I had free and clear for study. I have thoroughly tried School-keeping, and found that my expenses were in proportion, or rather out of proportion, to my income, for I was obliged to dress and train, not to say think and believe, accordingly, and I lost my time into the bargain. As I did not teach for the good of my fellow-men, but simply for a livelihood, this was a failure. I have tried trade; but I found that it would take ten years to get under way in that, and that then I should probably be on my way to the devil. I was actually afraid that I might by that time be doing what is called a good business. When formerly I was looking about to see what I could do for a living, some sad experience in conforming to the wishes of friends being fresh in my mind to tax my ingenuity, I thought often and seriously of picking huckleberries; that surely I could do, and its small profits might suffice,for my greatest skill has been to want but little,so little capital it required, so little distraction from my wonted moods, I foolishly thought. While my acquaintances went unhesitatingly into trade or the professions, I contemplated this occupation as most like theirs; ranging the hills all summer to pick the berries which came in my way, and thereafter carelessly dispose of them; so, to keep the flocks of Admetus. I also dreamed that I might gather the wild herbs, or carry evergreens to such villagers as loved to be reminded of the woods, even to the city, by hay-cart loads. But I have since learned that trade curses everything it handles; and though you trade in messages from heaven, the whole curse of trade attaches to the business.
  

1.01_-_Foreward, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  The tradition, then, was there and it was prolonged after the
  Vedic times. Yaska speaks of several Schools of interpretation of
  the Veda. There was a sacrificial or ritualistic interpretation,

1.01_-_Historical_Survey, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
   that its philosophy apparently emanated from one of the
  Hebrew prophetic Schools. Mordell finally hazards the opinion that the Sepher Yetsirah represents the genuine fragments of Philolaus, who was the first to publish the
  Pythagorean philosophy, and that Philolaus seems to correspond in very curious ways to Joseph ben Uziel who wrote down the Sepher Yetsirah. If the latter theory can be maintained, then we may claim for the Sepher Yetsirah a pre-Talmudic origin - probably the second century prior to the Christian era.
  --
  Be that as it may, and ignoring the sterile aspects of con- troversy, the public appearance of the Zohar was the great landmark in the development of the Qabalah, and we to-day are able to divide its history into two main periods, pre- and post-Zoharic. While it is undeniable that there were
  Jewish prophetic and mystical Schools of great proficiency and possessing much recondite knowledge in Biblical times, such as that of Samuel, the Essenes, and Philo, yet the first
  Qabalistic School of which we have any accurate public record was known as the School of Gerona in Spain (the twelfth century a.d.), so-called because its founder Isaac the Blind and many of his disciples were born there. Of the founder of the School practically nothing is known.
  Two of his students were Rabbi Azariel and Rabbi Ezra.
  --
  
  Next in succession was the School of Segovia and its disciples, among whom was one Todras Abulafia, a physi- cian and financier occupying an important and most dis- tinguished position in the Court of Sancho IV, King of
  Castile. The characteristic predisposition of this School was its devotion to exegetical methods ; its disciples endeavour- ing to interpret the Bible and the Hagadah in accordance with the doctrinal Qabalah.
  
  A contemporary School believed that Judaism of that day, taken from an exclusively philosophical standpoint, did not show the "right way to the Sanctuary", and endeavoured to combine philosophy and Qabalah, illustrating their various theorems by mathematical forms.
  
  --
  
  The Zohar is the next major development. This book combining, absorbing, and synthesizing the different features and doctrines of the previous Schools, made its ddbut, creating a profound sensation in theological and philosophical circles by reason of its speculations concerning
  God, the doctrine of Emanations, the evolution of the
  --
  
  Luria founded a School the precise opposite to that of
  Cordovero. He himself was a zealous and brilliant student both of the Talmud and Rabbinic lore, but found that the simple retirement of a life of study did not satisfy him.
  --
  Eliphaz Levi Zahed, a Roman Catholic deacon of remark- able perspicuity, in 1852 published a brilliant volume,
  Doctrine et Rituel de la Haute Magie, in which we find clear and unmistakable symptoms of an understanding of the underlying basis of the Qabalah- its ten Sephiros and the twenty-two letters of the Hebrew Alphabet as a suitable framework for the construction of a workable system for philosophical comparison and synthesis. It is said that he published this work at a time when information on all occult matters was strictly prohibited, for various reasons of its own, by the Esoteric School to which he belonged.
  We find, then, a companion volume issued but a short while after, La Histoire de la Magie, wherein - undoubtedly to protect himself from the censure levelled at him, and throw unsuspecting enquirers off the track - he contradicts his former conclusions and theorizations.

1.01_-_MAXIMS_AND_MISSILES, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  
  _From the military School of life._--That which does not kill me, makes
  me stronger.

1.01_-_Our_Demand_and_Need_from_the_Gita, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  HE WORLD abounds with scriptures sacred and profane, with revelations and half-revelations, with religions and philosophies, sects and Schools and systems. To these the many minds of a half-ripe knowledge or no knowledge at all attach themselves with exclusiveness and passion and will have it that this or the other book is alone the eternal Word of
  God and all others are either impostures or at best imperfectly inspired, that this or that philosophy is the last word of the reasoning intellect and other systems are either errors or saved only by such partial truth in them as links them to the one true philosophical cult. Even the discoveries of physical Science have been elevated into a creed and in its name religion and spirituality banned as ignorance and superstition, philosophy as frippery and moonshine. And to these bigoted exclusions and vain wranglings even the wise have often lent themselves, misled by some spirit of darkness that has mingled with their light and overshadowed it with some cloud of intellectual egoism or spiritual pride. Mankind seems now indeed inclined to grow a little modester and wiser; we no longer slay our fellows in the name of God's truth or because they have minds differently trained or differently constituted from ours; we are less ready to curse and revile our neighbour because he is wicked or presumptuous enough to differ from us in opinion; we are ready even to admit that Truth is everywhere and cannot be our sole monopoly; we are beginning to look at other religions and philosophies for the truth and help they contain and no longer merely in order to damn them as false or criticise what we conceive to be their errors. But we are still apt to declare that our truth gives us the supreme knowledge which other religions or philosophies
  --
  Essays on the Gita
   striking speculations of a philosophic intellect, but rather enduring truths of spiritual experience, verifiable facts of our highest psychological possibilities which no attempt to read deeply the mystery of existence can afford to neglect. Whatever the system may be, it is not, as the commentators strive to make it, framed or intended to support any exclusive School of philosophical thought or to put forward predominantly the claims of any one form of Yoga. The language of the Gita, the structure of thought, the combination and balancing of ideas belong neither to the temper of a sectarian teacher nor to the spirit of a rigorous analytical dialectics cutting off one angle of the truth to exclude all the others; but rather there is a wide, undulating, encircling movement of ideas which is the manifestation of a vast synthetic mind and a rich synthetic experience. This is one of those great syntheses in which Indian spirituality has been as rich as in its creation of the more intensive, exclusive movements of knowledge and religious realisation that follow out with an absolute concentration one clue, one path to its extreme issues. It does not cleave asunder, but reconciles and unifies.
  
  --
  9
   comprehensiveness. Its aim is precisely the opposite to that of the polemist commentators who found this Scripture established as one of the three highest Vedantic authorities and attempted to turn it into a weapon of offence and defence against other Schools and systems. The Gita is not a weapon for dialectical warfare; it is a gate opening on the whole world of spiritual truth and experience and the view it gives us embraces all the provinces of that supreme region. It maps out, but it does not cut up or build walls or hedges to confine our vision.
  
  --
  
  We of the coming day stand at the head of a new age of development which must lead to such a new and larger synthesis. We are not called upon to be orthodox Vedantins of any of the three Schools or Tantrics or to adhere to one of the theistic religions of the past or to entrench ourselves within the four corners of the teaching of the Gita. That would be to limit ourselves and to attempt to create our spiritual life out of the being, knowledge and nature of others, of the men of the past, instead of building it out of our own being and potentialities. We do not belong to the past dawns, but to the noons of the future. A mass of new material is flowing into us; we have not only to assimilate the influences of the great theistic religions of India and of the world and a recovered sense of the meaning of Buddhism, but to take full account of the potent though limited revelations of modern knowledge and seeking; and, beyond that, the remote and dateless past which seemed to be dead is returning upon us with an effulgence of many luminous secrets long lost to the consciousness of mankind but now breaking out again from behind the veil. All this points to a new, a very rich, a very vast synthesis; a fresh and widely embracing harmonisation of our gains is both an intellectual and a spiritual necessity of the future.
  

1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  this case, the person will practice this yidam
  regardless of the School it is associated with. It can
  also happen, although it is not frequent, that a lama,

1.01_-_The_First_Steps, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  After one has learned to have a firm erect seat, one has to perform, according to certain Schools, a practice called the purifying of the nerves. This part has been rejected by some as not belonging to Raja-Yoga, but as so great an authority as the commentator Shankarchrya advises it, I think fit that it should be mentioned, and I will quote his own directions from his commentary on the Shvetshvatara Upanishad: "The mind whose dross has been cleared away by Pranayama, becomes fixed in Brahman; therefore Pranayama is declared. First the nerves are to be purified, then comes the power to practice Pranayama. Stopping the right nostril with the thumb, through the left nostril fill in air, according to capacity; then, without any interval, throw the air out through the right nostril, closing the left one. Again inhaling through the right nostril eject through the left, according to capacity; practicing this three or five times at four hours of the day, before dawn, during midday, in the evening, and at midnight, in fifteen days or a month purity of the nerves is attained; then begins Pranayama."
  

1.01_-_The_Highest_Meaning_of_the_Holy_Truths, #The Blue Cliff Records, #Yuanwu Keqin, #Zen
  not two is the highest meaning of the holy truths. This is the
  most esoteric, most abstruse point of the doctrinal Schools.
  Hence the Emperor picked out this ultimate paradigm to ask

1.01_-_What_is_Magick?, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
   [AC04] i.e. except possibly in the case of logically absurd questions, such as the Schoolmen discussed in connection with "God."
  

1.01_-_Who_is_Tara, #How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator, #Thubten Chodron, #unset
  careful to avoid it.
  For example, one part of us may hold a child-like Sunday School conception of God as an old man in the sky, who sometimes is benevolent and at
  other times jealous and wrathful. We must be careful not to impute those

1.020_-_The_World_and_Our_World, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  The subject of our discussion is the mental cognition of objects. In the experience of an object, does the mind influence the object, or does the object influence the mind? This is the central issue in all philosophical Schools, which has led to various divergent doctrines such as idealism, realism, materialism, subjectivism, etc. There has been very little progress towards an answer to this query because, just as we cannot know whether the beauty that we see in an object is in our own mind or if it is really in the object, so there is the question is the mind influencing the object, or is the object influencing the mind? The difficulty arises on account of the position of the perceiving subject itself. To hold that the mind entirely influences the object, that it determines it in every manner, would be another way of saying that we have created the world and everything is in our hands which does not seem to be the truth of things.
  

1.02.2.1_-_Brahman_Oneness_of_God_and_the_World, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  These three attitudes correspond to three truths of the
  2 The positions, in inverse order, of the three principal philosophical Schools of
  Vedanta, Monism, Qualified Monism and Dualism.

1.02_-_Meditating_on_Tara, #How to Free Your Mind - Tara the Liberator, #Thubten Chodron, #unset
  universes? We must progress gradually and consistently. Our practice of the
  Dharma path resembles a child going to School. When we are in kindergarten,
  we do what kindergartners are capable of. When were in rst grade, we
  --
  fth grade abilities. In this way, we gradually advance as we go through
  School. If we dont do kindergarten and rst and second grade, theres no
  way we reach high School and university.
  Similarly, in learning the Dharma, we have to practice at our own level.

1.02_-_Pranayama,_Mantrayoga, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  Some Schools advocate practising a mantra with the aid of instrumental music and dancing. Certainly very remarkable effects are obtained in the way of "magic" powers; whether great spiritual results are equally common is a doubtful point. Persons wishing to study them may remember that the Sahara desert is within three days of London; and no doubt the Sidi Aissawa would be glad to accept pupils. This discussion of the parallel science of mantra-yoga has led us far indeed from the subject of Pranayama.
  

1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA, #Patanjali Yoga Sutras, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  higher things behind them. The whole of life is not for
  Schoolboy fights and debating societies. By surrendering
  the fruits of work to God is to take to ourselves neither credit

1.02_-_Self-Consecration, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  8:The difficulty of the task has led naturally to the pursuit of easy and trenchant solutions; it has generated and fixed deeply' the tendency of religions and of Schools of Yoga to separate the life of the world from the inner life. The powers of this world and their actual activities, it is felt, either do not belong to God at all or are for some obscure and puzzling cause, Maya or another, a dark contradiction of the divine Truth. And on their own opposite side the powers of the Truth and their ideal activities are seen to belong to quite another plane of consciousness than that, obscure, ignorant and perverse in its impulses and forces, on which the life of the earth is founded. There appears at once the antinomy of a bright and pure kingdom of God and a dark and impure kingdom of the devil; we feel the opposition of our crawling earthly birth and life to an exalted spiritual God-consciousness; we become readily convinced of the incompatibility of life's subjection to Maya with the soul's concentration in pure Brahman existence. The easiest way is to turn away from all that belongs to the one and to retreat by a naked and precipitous ascent into the other. Thus arises the attraction and, it would seem, the necessity of the principle of exclusive concentration which plays so prominent a part in the specialised Schools of Yoga; for by that concentration we can arrive through an uncompromising renunciation of the world at an entire self-consecration to the One on whom we concentrate. It is no longer incumbent on us to compel all the lower activities to the difficult recognition of a new and higher spiritualised life and train them to be its agents or executive powers. It is enough to kill or quiet them and keep at most the few energies necessary, on one side, for the maintenance of the body and, on the other, for communion with the Divine.
  

1.02_-_Taras_Tantra, #Tara - The Feminine Divine, #Bokar Rinpoche, #Buddhism
  own point of view. In buddh ism itself, durin g the
  course of time, various philosophical Schools have
  been oppos ed to each other. Only a highe r point of

1.02_-_The_7_Habits_An_Overview, #The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, #Stephen Covey, #unset
  
   them running. Or a person endlessly going to School, never producing, living on other people's golden eggs -- the eternal student syndrome.
  

1.02_-_The_Divine_Teacher, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  The Vaishnava form of Vedantism which has laid most stress upon this conception expresses the relation of God in man to man in God by the double figure of Nara-Narayana, associated historically with the origin of a religious School very similar in its doctrines to the teaching of the Gita. Nara is the human soul which, eternal companion of the Divine, finds itself only when it awakens to that companionship and begins, as the Gita would say, to live in God. Narayana is the divine Soul always present in our humanity, the secret guide, friend and helper of the human being, the "Lord who abides within the heart of creatures" of the Gita; when within us the veil of that secret sanctuary is withdrawn and man speaks face to face with God, hears the divine voice, receives the divine light, acts in the divine power, then becomes possible the supreme uplifting of the embodied human conscious-being into the unborn and eternal. He becomes capable of that dwelling in God and giving up of his whole consciousness into the Divine which the Gita upholds as the best or highest secret of things, uttamam rahasyam. When
  1
  --
   the name first in the Chhandogya Upanishad where all we can gather about him is that he was well known in spiritual tradition as a knower of the Brahman, so well known indeed in his personality and the circumstances of his life that it was sufficient to refer to him by the name of his mother as Krishna son of Devaki for all to understand who was meant. In the same Upanishad we find mention of King Dhritarashtra son of Vichitravirya, and since tradition associated the two together so closely that they are both of them leading personages in the action of the
  Mahabharata, we may fairly conclude that they were actually contemporaries and that the epic is to a great extent dealing with historical characters and in the war of Kurukshetra with a historical occurrence imprinted firmly on the memory of the race. We know too that Krishna and Arjuna were the object of religious worship in the pre-Christian centuries; and there is some reason to suppose that they were so in connection with a religious and philosophical tradition from which the Gita may have gathered many of its elements and even the foundation of its synthesis of knowledge, devotion and works, and perhaps also that the human Krishna was the founder, restorer or at the least one of the early teachers of this School. The Gita may well in spite of its later form represent the outcome in Indian thought of the teaching of Krishna and the connection of that teaching with the historical Krishna, with Arjuna and with the war of
  Kurukshetra may be something more than a dramatic fiction. In the Mahabharata Krishna is represented both as the historical character and the Avatar; his worship and Avatarhood must therefore have been well established by the time - apparently from the fifth to the first centuries B.C. - when the old story and poem or epic tradition of the Bharatas took its present form. There is a hint also in the poem of the story or legend of the Avatar's early life in Vrindavan which, as developed by the Puranas into an intense and powerful spiritual symbol, has exercised so profound an influence on the religious mind of

1.02_-_The_Eternal_Law, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  
  alone, all this magnificent universe." (Mundaka Upanishad II, 12) At long last, the dichotomy that is tearing this poor world apart between God and the Devil as if one always had to choose between heaven and earth, and could never be saved except when mutilated was healed for good. Yet, in practice, for the last three thousand years, the entire religious history of India has taken the view that there is a true Brahman, as it were, transcendent, immobile, forever beyond this bedlam, and a false Brahman, or rather a minor one (there are several Schools), for an intermediate and more or less questionable reality (i.e., life, the earth, our poor mess of an earth). "Abandon this world of illusion," exclaimed the great Shankara. 17 "Brahman is real, the world is a lie," says the Nirlamba Upanishad: brahman satyam jaganmithya.
  Try as we might, we just don't understand through what distortion or oversight "All is Brahman" ever became "All, except the world, is Brahman."

1.02_-_The_Philosophy_of_Ishvara, #Bhakti-Yoga, #Swami Vivekananda, #Hinduism
  
  We shall now try to understand what the great representative of the Advaita School has to say on the point. We shall see how the Advaita system maintains all the hopes and aspirations of the dualist intact, and at the same time propounds its own solution of the problem in consonance with the high destiny of divine humanity. Those who aspire to retain their individual mind even after liberation and to remain distinct will have ample opportunity of realising their aspirations and enjoying the blessing of the qualified Brahman. These are they who have been spoken of in the Bhgavata Purna thus: "O king, such are the, glorious qualities of the Lord that the sages whose only pleasure is in the Self, and from whom all fetters have fallen off, even they love the Omnipresent with the love that is for love's sake." These are they who are spoken of by the Snkhyas as getting merged in nature in this cycle, so that, after attaining perfection, they may come out in the next as lords of world-systems. But none of these ever becomes equal to God (Ishvara). Those who attain to that state where there is neither creation, nor created, nor creator, where there is neither knower, nor knowable, nor knowledge, where there is neither I, nor thou, nor he, where there is neither subject, nor object, nor relation, "there, who is seen by whom?" such persons have gone beyond everything to "where words cannot go nor mind", gone to that which the Shrutis declare as "Not this, not this"; but for those who cannot, or will not reach this state, there will inevitably remain the triune vision of the one undifferentiated Brahman as nature, soul, and the interpenetrating sustainer of both Ishvara. So, when Prahlda forgot himself, he found neither the universe nor its cause; all was to him one Infinite, undifferentiated by name and form; but as soon as he remembered that he was Prahlada, there was the universe before him and with it the Lord of the universe "the Repository of an infinite number of blessed qualities". So it was with the blessed Gopis. So long as they had lost sense of their own personal identity and individuality, they were all Krishnas, and when they began again to think of Him as the One to be worshipped, then they were Gopis again, and immediately Bhakti, then, can be directed towards Brahman, only in His personal aspect.
  

1.02_-_The_Pit, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  
  The contrary philosophical argument of the idealistic Schools is that in studying the laws of Nature, we only study the laws of our own minds; that it would be quite simple to demonstrate that, after all, we really attach very little meaning to such ideas as matter, motion, and weight, etc., other than a purely idealistic one; that they are mere phases of our thought.
  
  Qabalists and all the various Schools of Mystics generally begin from a still more absolute point of view, arguing that the whole controversy is a purely verbal one; for all such ontological propositions can, with a little ingenuity, be reduced to one form or another. There is in consequence of this observation in the realm of modern Philosophy what is
  
  --
  Victorians so simple, objective, and intelligible-such as matter, energy, space, etc.-have completely failed to resist analysis. A few modern thinkers, seeing clearly the absolute debacle in which the old positivist science was bound to lead them, the breaking up of this icy expanse of frozen thought, determined at all costs to find a modus vivendi for
  Athena. This necessity was emphasized in the most surprising way by the result of the Michelson-Morley experiments, when Physics itself calmly and frankly offered a contradiction in terms. It was not the metaphysicians this time who were picking holes in a vacuum. It was the mathematicians and the physicists who found the ground completely cut away from under their feet. It was not enough to replace the geometry of Euclid by those of Riemann and Lobatchevsky and the mechanics of Newton by those of Einstein, so long as any of the axioms of the old thought and the definitions of its terms survived. They deliberately abandoned positivism and materialism for an indeterminate mysticism, creating a new mathematical philosophy and a new logic, wherein infinite-or rather transfinite-ideas might be made commensurable with those of ordinary thought in the forlorn hope that all might live happily ever after. In short, to use a Qabalistic nomenclature, they found it incumbent upon themselves to adopt for inclusion of terms of Ruach (intellect) concepts which are proper only to Neschamah (the organ and faculty of direct spiritual apperception and intuition). This same process took place in Philosophy years earlier. Had the dialectic of Hegel been only. half understood, the major portion of philosophical speculation from the Schoolmen to
  Kant's perception of the Antinomies of Reason would have been thrown overboard.

1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Theosophy
   p. 36
   a higher strictly disciplined School bears to the incidental training. But impatient dabbling, devoid of earnest perseverance, can lead to nothing at all. The study of Spiritual Science can only be successful if the student retain what has already been indicated in the preceding chapter, and on the basis of this proceed further.
  
  --
  
  The would-be initiate must bring with him a certain measure of courage and fearlessness. He must positively go out of his way to find opportunities for developing these virtues. His training should provide for their systematic cultivation. In this respect, life itself is a good School-possibly the best School. The student must learn to look danger calmly in the face and try to overcome difficulties unswervingly. For instance, when in the presence of some peril, he must swiftly come to the conviction that fear is of no possible use; I must not feel afraid; I must only think of what is to be done. And he must improve to the extent of feeling, upon occasions which formerly inspired him with fear, that to be frightened, to be disheartened, are things that are out of the question as far as his own inmost self is concerned. By self-discipline in this direction, quite definite qualities are develop which are necessary for initiation into the higher mysteries. Just as man requires nervous force in his physical being in order to use his physical sense, so also he
   p. 75

1.02_-_The_Two_Negations_1_-_The_Materialist_Denial, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  16:If modern Materialism were simply an unintelligent acquiescence in the material life, the advance might be indefinitely delayed. But since its very soul is the search for Knowledge, it will be unable to cry a halt; as it reaches the barriers of senseknowledge and of the reasoning from sense-knowledge, its very rush will carry it beyond and the rapidity and sureness with which it has embraced the visible universe is only an earnest of the energy and success which we may hope to see repeated in the conquest of what lies beyond, once the stride is taken that crosses the barrier. We see already that advance in its obscure beginnings.
  17:Not only in the one final conception, but in the great line of its general results Knowledge, by whatever path it is followed, tends to become one. Nothing can be more remarkable and suggestive than the extent to which modern Science confirms in the domain of Matter the conceptions and even the very formulae of language which were arrived at, by a very different method, in the Vedanta, - the original Vedanta, not of the Schools of metaphysical philosophy, but of the Upanishads. And these, on the other hand, often reveal their full significance, their richer contents only when they are viewed in the new light shed by the discoveries of modern Science, - for instance, that Vedantic expression which describes things in the Cosmos as one seed arranged by the universal Energy in multitudinous forms.6 Significant, especially, is the drive of Science towards a Monism which is consistent with multiplicity, towards the Vedic idea of the one essence with its many becomings. Even if the dualistic appearance of Matter and Force be insisted on, it does not really stand in the way of this Monism. For it will be evident that essential Matter is a thing non-existent to the senses and only, like the Pradhana of the Sankhyas, a conceptual form of substance; and in fact the point is increasingly reached where only an arbitrary distinction in thought divides form of substance from form of energy.
  18:Matter expresses itself eventually as a formulation of some unknown Force. Life, too, that yet unfathomed mystery, begins to reveal itself as an obscure energy of sensibility imprisoned in its material formulation; and when the dividing ignorance is cured which gives us the sense of a gulf between Life and Matter, it is difficult to suppose that Mind, Life and Matter will be found to be anything else than one Energy triply formulated, the triple world of the Vedic seers. Nor will the conception then be able to endure of a brute material Force as the mother of Mind. The Energy that creates the world can be nothing else than a Will, and Will is only consciousness applying itself to a work and a result.

1.032_-_Our_Concept_of_God, #The Study and Practice of Yoga, #Swami Krishnananda, #Yoga
  
  There is an internal dichotomy subtly pressing itself forward, even in the organic concept of God; and how can there be an unconditioned love of God, a perpetual feeling for God, when the relationship of oneself with God is not clear? "I don't understand you and, therefore, I cannot love you. So my love for you depends upon my understanding of you, and the more I understand you, the more I love you." Here, the understanding is nothing but an appreciation of the real connection that exists between oneself and the other. "I must know, first of all, what my relationship with you is, then I can tell you how much love I have for you. Are you my father? Are you my brother? Are you my boss? Are you my servant? Are you my friend? Are you my enemy? What are you? If you tell me what you are, I can tell you how much love I have for you, because your context in relation to my presence is what determines my feeling for you." Likewise, I may ask this question: "How am I related to God?" This question was completely brushed aside by certain Schools of devotion. They never wanted to answer this question at all, and kept it aside in cold storage. "We shall love God as we love anything else in this world.
  

1.03_-_Reading, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  What does our Concord culture amount to? There is in this town, with a very few exceptions, no taste for the best or for very good books even in English literature, whose words all can read and spell. Even the college-bred and so called liberally educated men here and elsewhere have really little or no acquaintance with the English classics; and as for the recorded wisdom of mankind, the ancient classics and Bibles, which are accessible to all who will know of them, there are the feeblest efforts any where made to become acquainted with them. I know a woodchopper, of middle age, who takes a French paper, not for news as he says, for he is above that, but to keep himself in practice, he being a Canadian by birth; and when I ask him what he considers the best thing he can do in this world, he says, beside this, to keep up and add to his English. This is about as much as the college bred generally do or aspire to do, and they take an English paper for the purpose. One who has just come from reading perhaps one of the best
  English books will find how many with whom he can converse about it? Or suppose he comes from reading a Greek or Latin classic in the original, whose praises are familiar even to the so called illiterate; he will find nobody at all to speak to, but must keep silence about it. Indeed, there is hardly the professor in our colleges, who, if he has mastered the difficulties of the language, has proportionally mastered the difficulties of the wit and poetry of a Greek poet, and has any sympathy to impart to the alert and heroic reader; and as for the sacred Scriptures, or Bibles of mankind, who in this town can tell me even their titles? Most men do not know that any nation but the Hebrews have had a scripture. A man, any man, will go considerably out of his way to pick up a silver dollar; but here are golden words, which the wisest men of antiquity have uttered, and whose worth the wise of every succeeding age have assured us of;and yet we learn to read only as far as Easy Reading, the primers and class-books, and when we leave School, the Little Reading, and story books, which are for boys and beginners; and our reading, our conversation and thinking, are all on a very low level, worthy only of pygmies and manikins.
  
  --
  
  We boast that we belong to the nineteenth century and are making the most rapid strides of any nation. But consider how little this village does for its own culture. I do not wish to flatter my townsmen, nor to be flattered by them, for that will not advance either of us. We need to be provoked,goaded like oxen, as we are, into a trot. We have a comparatively decent system of common Schools, Schools for infants only; but excepting the half-starved Lyceum in the winter, and latterly the puny beginning of a library suggested by the state, no School for ourselves. We spend more on almost any article of bodily aliment or ailment than on our mental aliment. It is time that we had uncommon Schools, that we did not leave off our education when we begin to be men and women. It is time that villages were universities, and their elder inhabitants the fellows of universities, with leisureif they are indeed so well offto pursue liberal studies the rest of their lives.
  
  Shall the world be confined to one Paris or one Oxford forever? Cannot students be boarded here and get a liberal education under the skies of
  Concord? Can we not hire some Abelard to lecture to us? Alas! what with foddering the cattle and tending the store, we are kept from School too long, and our education is sadly neglected. In this country, the village should in some respects take the place of the nobleman of
  Europe. It should be the patron of the fine arts. It is rich enough. It wants only the magnanimity and refinement. It can spend money enough on such things as farmers and traders value, but it is thought Utopian to propose spending money for things which more intelligent men know to be of far more worth. This town has spent seventeen thousand dollars on a town-house, thank fortune or politics, but probably it will not spend so much on living wit, the true meat to put into that shell, in a hundred years. The one hundred and twenty-five dollars annually subscribed for a Lyceum in the winter is better spent than any other equal sum raised in the town. If we live in the nineteenth century, why should we not enjoy the advantages which the nineteenth century offers?
  Why should our life be in any respect provincial? If we will read newspapers, why not skip the gossip of Boston and take the best newspaper in the world at once?not be sucking the pap of neutral family papers, or browsing Olive-Branches here in New England. Let the reports of all the learned societies come to us, and we will see if they know any thing. Why should we leave it to Harper & Brothers and
  Redding & Co. to select our reading? As the nobleman of cultivated taste surrounds himself with whatever conduces to his culture,geniuslearningwitbookspaintingsstatuarymusic philosophical instruments, and the like; so let the village do,not stop short at a pedagogue, a parson, a sexton, a parish library, and three selectmen, because our pilgrim forefathers got through a cold winter once on a bleak rock with these. To act collectively is according to the spirit of our institutions; and I am confident that, as our circumstances are more flourishing, our means are greater than the noblemans. New England can hire all the wise men in the world to come and teach her, and board them round the while, and not be provincial at all. That is the _uncommon_ School we want. Instead of noblemen, let us have noble villages of men. If it is necessary, omit one bridge over the river, go round a little there, and throw one arch at least over the darker gulf of ignorance which surrounds us.
  

1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii, #Beating the Cloth Drum Letters of Zen Master Hakuin, #Hakuin Ekaku, #Zen
  
  "When you consider it, present-day Zen teachers act in much the same way in guiding their students. I've seen and heard how they take young people of exceptional talent-those destined to become the very pillars and ridgepoles of our School-and with their extremely ill-advised and inopportune methods, end up turning them into something half-baked and unachieved. This is the primary reason for the decline of our Zen School, why the Zen groves are withering away.
  
  --
  Zen teachers with their box-shrub Zen will carry the day. 4 If that happens, the supreme teaching of the
  Buddha-mind School will plunge to earth forever, and its true and rigorous traditions will disappear from the ancestral groves."
  I gave a sigh, and said, "Boku, come over here. I want you to listen to what I say. In studying Zen, it is necessary to pierce completely through when you penetrate to the source. It is the same with all the workings of heaven and earth. The wonderful transformation of springtime does not take place without the winter's severity, the intense cold that makes the hundred plants and grasses fade and shrivel, the bamboo split and shatter. But with the advent of spring, the ten thousand buds and blossoms emerge, rivaling one another with their charms and beauties. Hence the saying, 'To make something grow and develop, you must cut it back. To make something flourish, you must check its progress.'
  --
  
  "First you have the students who, after engaging in genuine Zen practice for a long time until principles and wisdom are gradually exhausted, emotions and views eliminated, techniques and verbal resources used up, wither into a perfect and unflappable serenity, their bodies and minds completely dispassionate. Suddenly, satori comes. They are liberated. Like the phoenix that soars up from its golden cage. Like the crane that breaks free of its pen. Releasing their hands from the cliffside, they die the great death and are reborn into life anew. These are students who have thoroughly penetrated, who have bored through all forms and penetrated all sounds and can see their self-nature as clearly as if it was in the palm of their hand. After painstakingly working their way through the final barrier koans set up by the patriarchal teachers, their minds, in one single vigorous effort, abruptly transform. Such students are possessed of deep discernment and innate ability that enables them to enter liberation at a single blow from the iron hammer. They are foremost among all the outstanding seeds and buds of our School. The only thing they lack is the personal confirmation of a genuine teacher.
  
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  "There are also students who spend much time and effort tenaciously engaged in hidden practice and secret activity until, one day, owing to the guidance of a teacher, they finally are able to reach a state of firm belief. We can call them the believers. They understand without any doubt about essential principles such as the self-nature being apart from birth-and-death and the true body transcending past and present. However, the great and essential matter of the Zen School is beyond them. They can't see it even dimly in their dreams. They are not only powerless to save others, they
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  "As the priest Nan-t'ang declared, 'You must see your self-nature as clearly as if you are looking at it in the palm of your hand, so that each and every thing becomes perfectly and unmistakably your own wondrously profound field of Dharma truth.'y It is a matter demanding the greatest care. For this reason, the Zen School declares: 'Clarifying your self but not the things before your eyes gets you only half, and clarifying the things before your eyes but not your self gets you only half as well. You must know that if you press on, the time will come when it will all be yours.'z It also says, 'If students of the Way want to confirm whether they have truly entered realization, they must examine their mind
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  2. Dead otter (shi-katsudatsu) Zen, according to a glossary of Zen terms dating from shortly after
  Hakuin's time, refers to quietist practices employed in the St School's silent illumination Zen. The
  Sung master Ta-hui speaks of "bands of miscreant shavepates who have not yet opened their own eyes, but who nonetheless strive to lead others into a state of quietistic stagnation in the realm of the blind otters" (Ta-hui's Letters, third Letter to Cheng Shih-lang). In his work Krju, the Tokugawa scholar-priest Mujaku Dch concludes that the term does not refer to an otter (he suggests instead a red-haired, wolflike animal): "Although I have been unable to discover precisely what this creature is, it is said to 'play possum,' pretending to be dead to draw people near so it can seize and devour them."

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