classes ::: Title,
children :::
branches ::: Saint, Saint Paul, the Saint
see also :::

Instances, Classes, See Also, Object in Names
Definitions, . Quotes . - . Chapters .


object:Saint
class:Title

Saint Ambrose
Saint Anselm of Canterbury
Saint Augustine
Saint Augustine of Hippo
Saint Basil the Great
Saint Benedict of Nursia
Saint Bernard of Clairvaux
Saint Bonaventure
Saint Bruno
Saint Charles Borromeo
Saint Dionysius the Areopagite
Saint Ephrem of Syria
Saint Francis
Saint Francis de Sales
Saint Francis of Assisi
Saint Francis of Assisi
Saint Germain
Saint Gianna Beretta Mola
Saint Gregory of Nazianzus
Saint Isaac of Syria
Saint Jerome
Saint John Bosco
Saint John Chrysostom
Saint John Climacus
Saint John Henry Newman
Saint John of the Cross
Saint Josemaria Escriva
Saint Luke
Saint Mother Teresa of Calcutta
Saint Padre Pio
Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina
Saint Patrick
Saint Paul
Saint Porphyrios
Saint Robert Bellarmine
Saint Seraphim of Sarov
Saint Seraphim of Sarov in Georgia
Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross
Saint Teresa of Avila
Saint Teresa of Calcutta
Saint Thrse of Lisieux
Saint Thomas Aquinas
Saint Vincent de Paul




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--- OBJECT INSTANCES [74]


1.01_-_On_renunciation_of_the_world
1.02_-_On_detachment
1.03_-_On_exile_or_pilgrimage
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.05_-_On_painstaking_and_true_repentance_which_constitute_the_life_of_the_holy_convicts;_and_about_the_prison.
1.06_-_On_remembrance_of_death.
1.07_-_On_mourning_which_causes_joy.
1.08_-_On_freedom_from_anger_and_on_meekness.
1.09_-_On_remembrance_of_wrongs.
1.10_-_On_slander_or_calumny.
1.11_-_On_talkativeness_and_silence.
1.12_-_On_lying.
1.13_-_On_despondency.
1.14_-_On_the_clamorous,_yet_wicked_master-the_stomach.
1.15_-_On_incorruptible_purity_and_chastity_to_which_the_corruptible_attain_by_toil_and_sweat.
1.16_-_On_love_of_money_or_avarice.
1.17_-_On_poverty_(that_hastens_heavenwards).
1.18_-_On_insensibility,_that_is,_deadening_of_the_soul_and_the_death_of_the_mind_before_the_death_of_the_body.
1.19_-_On_sleep,_prayer,_and_psalm-singing_in_chapel.
1.20_-_On_bodily_vigil_and_how_to_use_it_to_attain_spiritual_vigil_and_how_to_practise_it.
1.21_-_On_unmanly_and_puerile_cowardice.
1.22_-_On_the_many_forms_of_vainglory.
1.23_-_On_mad_price,_and,_in_the_same_Step,_on_unclean_and_blasphemous_thoughts.
1.24_-_Describes_how_vocal_prayer_may_be_practised_with_perfection_and_how_closely_allied_it_is_to_mental_prayer
1.24_-_On_meekness,_simplicity,_guilelessness_which_come_not_from_nature_but_from_habit,_and_about_malice.
1.25_-_On_the_destroyer_of_the_passions,_most_sublime_humility,_which_is_rooted_in_spiritual_feeling.
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.27_-_On_holy_solitude_of_body_and_soul.
1.28_-_On_holy_and_blessed_prayer,_mother_of_virtues,_and_on_the_attitude_of_mind_and_body_in_prayer.
1.29_-_Concerning_heaven_on_earth,_or_godlike_dispassion_and_perfection,_and_the_resurrection_of_the_soul_before_the_general_resurrection.
1.30_-_Concerning_the_linking_together_of_the_supreme_trinity_among_the_virtues.
CHAPTER_25_-_Describes_the_great_gain_which_comes_to_a_soul_when_it_practises_vocal_prayer_perfectly._Shows_how_God_may_raise_it_thence_to_things_supernatural.
CHAPTER_26_-_Continues_the_description_of_a_method_for_recollecting_the
CHAPTER_27_-_Describes_the_great_love_shown_us_by_the_Lord_in_the_first_words
CHAPTER_28_-_Describes_the_nature_of_the_Prayer_of_Recollection_and_sets_down
CHAPTER_29_-_Continues_to_describe_methods_for_achieving_this_Prayer_of
CHAPTER_30_-_Describes_the_importance_of_understanding_what_we_ask_for_in
CHAPTER_31_-_Continues_the_same_subject._Explains_what_is_meant_by_the_Prayer
CHAPTER_32_-_Expounds_these_words_of_the_Paternoster__"Fiat_voluntas_tua_sicut
CHAPTER_33_-_Treats_of_our_great_need_that_the_Lord_should_give_us_what_we
CHAPTER_34_-_Continues_the_same_subject._This_is_very_suitable_for_reading_after
CHAPTER_35_-_Describes_the_recollection_which_should_be_practised_after
CHAPTER_36_-_Treats_of_these_words_in_the_Paternoster__"Dimitte_nobis_debita
CHAPTER_37_-_Describes_the_excellence_of_this_prayer_called_the_Paternoster,
CHAPTER_38_-_Treats_of_the_great_need_which_we_have_to_beseech_the_Eternal
CHAPTER_39_-_Continues_the_same_subject_and_gives_counsels_concerning
CHAPTER_40_-_Describes_how,_by_striving_always_to_walk_in_the_love_and_fear_of
CHAPTER_41_-_Speaks_of_the_fear_of_God_and_of_how_we_must_keep_ourselves
CHAPTER_42_-_Treats_of_these_last_words_of_the_Paternoster__"Sed_libera_nos_a
City_of_God
COSA_-_BOOK_II
COSA_-_BOOK_III
COSA_-_BOOK_IV
COSA_-_BOOK_IX
COSA_-_BOOK_V
COSA_-_BOOK_VI
COSA_-_BOOK_VII
COSA_-_BOOK_VIII
COSA_-_BOOK_X
COSA_-_BOOK_XI
COSA_-_BOOK_XII
COSA_-_BOOK_XIII
Dark_Night_of_the_Soul
On_the_Free_Choice_of_the_Will
Saint_Augustine_of_Hippo
Saint_John_of_the_Cross
Saint_Josemaria_Escriva
Saint_Teresa_of_Avila
Saint_Thomas_Aquinas
Sri_Ramakrishna
The_Confessions_of_Saint_Augustine
The_Interior_Castle_or_The_Mansions
The_Ladder_of_Divine_Ascent
The_Way_of_Perfection

--- PRIMARY CLASS


author
person
Saint
Saint
Title

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [10]


Saint
Saint Augustine of Hippo
Saint Benedict of Nursia
Saint Bernard of Clairvaux
Saint Francis of Assisi
Saint John of the Cross
Saint Josemaria Escriva
Saint Paul
Saint Teresa of Avila
Saint Thomas Aquinas
The Confessions of Saint Augustine
the Saint
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards (table), project, project 0001, Savitri, the Temple of Sages, three js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the Bad, the God object, the Good, the most important, the Ring, the source of inspirations, the Stack, the Tarot, the Word, top priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


saint ::: a person of exceptional holiness or goodness.

sainthood (’s) ::: the status, character or condition, of being a saint.

saintdom ::: n. --> The state or character of a saint.

sainted ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Saint ::: a. --> Consecrated; sacred; holy; pious.
Entered into heaven; -- a euphemism for dead.

saintess ::: n. --> A female saint.

sainthood ::: n. --> The state of being a saint; the condition of a saint.
The order, or united body, of saints; saints, considered collectively.

sainting ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Saint

saintish ::: a. --> Somewhat saintlike; -- used ironically.

saintism ::: n. --> The character or quality of saints; also, hypocritical pretense of holiness.

saintlike ::: a. --> Resembling a saint; suiting a saint; becoming a saint; saintly.

saintliness ::: n. --> Quality of being saintly.

saintly ::: superl. --> Like a saint; becoming a holy person.

saintologist ::: n. --> One who writes the lives of saints.

saint ::: n. --> A person sanctified; a holy or godly person; one eminent for piety and virtue; any true Christian, as being redeemed and consecrated to God.
One of the blessed in heaven.
One canonized by the church. ::: v. t.

saintship ::: n. --> The character or qualities of a saint.

saint-simonianism ::: n. --> The principles, doctrines, or practice of the Saint-Simonians; -- called also Saint- Simonism.

saint-simonian ::: n. --> A follower of the Count de St. Simon, who died in 1825, and who maintained that the principle of property held in common, and the just division of the fruits of common labor among the members of society, are the true remedy for the social evils which exist.

Saint-Simon, Claude Henry, Count De: (1760-1825) French philosopher who fought with the French army during the American Revolution. He supported the French Revolution. He advocated what he termed a new science of society to do away with inequalities in the distribution of property, power and happiness. Love for the poor and the lowly was basic for the reform he urged. He greatly influenced Comte and Positivism. -- L.E.D.

SAINT
1. {Symbolic Automatic INTegrator}.
2. {Security Administrator's
Integrated Network Tool}.

Saint Andrews Static Language
{St Andrews Static Language}

saintdom ::: n. --> The state or character of a saint.

sainted ::: imp. & p. p. --> of Saint ::: a. --> Consecrated; sacred; holy; pious.
Entered into heaven; -- a euphemism for dead.

saintess ::: n. --> A female saint.

sainthood ::: n. --> The state of being a saint; the condition of a saint.
The order, or united body, of saints; saints, considered collectively.

sainting ::: p. pr. & vb. n. --> of Saint

saintish ::: a. --> Somewhat saintlike; -- used ironically.

saintism ::: n. --> The character or quality of saints; also, hypocritical pretense of holiness.

saintlike ::: a. --> Resembling a saint; suiting a saint; becoming a saint; saintly.

saintliness ::: n. --> Quality of being saintly.

saintly ::: superl. --> Like a saint; becoming a holy person.

saintologist ::: n. --> One who writes the lives of saints.

saint ::: n. --> A person sanctified; a holy or godly person; one eminent for piety and virtue; any true Christian, as being redeemed and consecrated to God.
One of the blessed in heaven.
One canonized by the church. ::: v. t.

saintship ::: n. --> The character or qualities of a saint.

saint-simonianism ::: n. --> The principles, doctrines, or practice of the Saint-Simonians; -- called also Saint- Simonism.

saint-simonian ::: n. --> A follower of the Count de St. Simon, who died in 1825, and who maintained that the principle of property held in common, and the just division of the fruits of common labor among the members of society, are the true remedy for the social evils which exist.

Saint George Patron saint of England; the universal allegory of the dragonslayer reappears in Christian ecclesiasticism as the archangel Michael who slays the red dragon, and again as St. George. It is a historical mystery both how this apocryphal legend came to be attached to the name of George of Cappadocia, the ecclesiastic put to death by Diocletian for opposing him in the persecution of the Christians; and that the Roman Catholic Church should have canonized so rabid an Arian. His is another form of the story of Bel and the dragon, Apollo and Python, Osiris and Typhon, etc., which denote the fallen angels or kumaras who, by bringing intellectual life to earth, thereby truly conquer death.

Saint-Germain, Count

Saint-Martin, Louis Claude de. See MARTINISTS

Saint Francis —pictured as an angel of mercy

Saints —an order of angels in Jewish Talmud

saints and she-saints, by all thine angels and arch¬

SAINT ::: 1. (language) Symbolic Automatic INTegrator.2. (networking, security, tool) Security Administrator's Integrated Network Tool.(2000-07-11)

Saint Andrews Static Language ::: (language) [Is this the same as Single ASsignment Language?](2001-08-24)

SAINT Emotional genius, man on the highest level of the higher emotional stage, or the stage of culture. The saint has attained the emotional ideal of a loving relationship to all living things. However, it remains to realize the mental ideal - knowledge of reality and the purpose of action - before the self is finished with the human kingdom. (K 1.34.17)

When the self can maintain itself in the highest emotional consciousness (48:2), the individual is what Christian mysticism calls a saint. K 7.17.12




saint ::: a person of exceptional holiness or goodness.

sainthood (’s) ::: the status, character or condition, of being a saint.


--- QUOTES [310 / 310 - 500 / 12025] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

   56 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   43 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   35 Saint Teresa of Avila
   18 Saint Augustine
   17 Saint John of the Cross
   12 Vincent van Gogh
   10 Leo Tolstoy
   9 Saint Francis of Assisi
   8 Sri Aurobindo
   6 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux
   5 Saint Benedict of Nursia
   3 Vikings
   3 Saint Vincent de Paul
   3 Saint Paul
   3 John
   2 The Mother
   2 Saint Padre Pio
   2 Saint John Chrysostom
   2 Saint John Bosco
   2 Saint Jerome
   2 Saint Francis de Sales
   2 Porphyry
   2 Mother Teresa
   2 Joseph Campbell
   2
   1 William Shakespeare
   1 Vivekananda
   1 The Book of Wisdom
   1 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   1 Sri Ramakrishna
   1 Sri Chidananda
   1 Soren Kierkegaard
   1 site
   1 Seraphim of Sarov
   1 Saint Thérèse of Lisieux
   1 Saint Teresa of Calcutta
   1 Saint Seraphim of Sarov in Georgia
   1 Saint Seraphim of Sarov
   1 Saint Robert Bellarmine
   1 Saint Porphyrios
   1 Saint Patrick
   1 Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina
   1 Saint Mother Teresa of Calcutta
   1 Saint Luke
   1 Saint Josemaria Escriva
   1 Saint John Henry Newman
   1 Saint Isaac of Syria
   1 Saint Gregory of Nazianzus
   1 Saint Gianna Beretta Mola
   1 Saint Germain
   1 Saint Francis
   1 Saint Ephrem of Syria
   1 Saint Dionysius the Areopagite
   1 Saint Charles Borromeo
   1 Saint Bruno
   1 Saint Bonaventure
   1 Saint Basil the Great
   1 Saint Anselm of Canterbury
   1 Saint Ambrose
   1 Saadi
   1 Pope Pius XII
   1 Pope Leo XIII
   1 Pope John Paul II
   1 Petrarch
   1 Peter J Carroll
   1 Nichiren
   1 Napoleon
   1 Napoleon Bonaparte
   1 Molière
   1 Magghima Nikaya
   1 Lowell
   1 Laura Whitcomb
   1 Jordan Peterson
   1 John of the Cross
   1 John of Salisbury
   1 John Milton
   1 Hugh of Saint Victor
   1 Howard Gardner
   1 Edith Stein
   1 David
   1 Bukowski
   1 BHAGAVAD GITA Bertrand Russell
   1 Antoine de Saint-Exupery

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   93 Saint Augustine
   40 Antoine de Saint Exup ry
   31 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   28 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   27 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints
   25 Saint Jerome
   21 Saint Teresa of Avila
   16 Saint John Chrysostom
   15 Saint Francis de Sales
   15 Antoine de Saint Exupery
   9 Lilith Saintcrow
   8 Yves Saint Laurent
   8 Saint Ignatius of Loyola
   7 Saint Therese of Lisieux
   7 Saint John of the Cross
   6 Saint Francis of Assisi
   6 Saint Catherine of Siena
   5 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux
   4 Anonymous
   3 Thomas Merton
   3 Saint Vincent de Paul
   3 Saint Benedict of Nursia
   3 Saint Basil
   3 Emile Verhaeren
   2 Saint Patrick
   2 Saint John Perse
   2 Saint Alphonsus Liguori
   2 Peter Kreeft
   2 Louis Antoine de Saint Just
   2 John Milton
   2 John Bunyan
   2 Charles Cros
   2 Celia Aaron
   2 Aphra Behn
   2 Alexandre Dumas
   2 Alexander Pope

1:God is Love. ~ John,
2:God is Light. ~ John,
3:Hope does not disappoint. ~ Saint Paul,
4:No man hath seen God at any time. ~ John,
5:Make friends with angels. ~ Saint Augustine,
6:For in our hope we are saved. ~ Saint Augustine,
7:He who complains, sins. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
8:He who labours, prays. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
9:Love God, and do what you like. ~ Saint Augustine,
10:What a man loves, a man is. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
11:Beware the man of a single book. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
12:The most dangerous moment comes with victory ~ Napoleon,
13:Understanding is the reward of faith. ~ Saint Augustine,
14:War is ninety percent information. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte,
15:Tolle, lege: take up and read. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
16:Truth is not private property. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
17:Every infinity... is made finite to God. ~ Saint Augustine,
18:Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ. ~ Saint Jerome,
19:I require of you no more than to look. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
20:The possession of wisdom leadeth to true happiness. ~ Porphyry,
21:Give me chastity and continence, but not yet. ~ Saint Augustine,
22:The worst prison would be a closed heart. ~ Pope John Paul II,
23:Things are solved by walking around. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
24:We come to God by love and not by navigation. ~ Saint Augustine,
25:We speak, but it is God who teaches. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
26:I would rather die of passion than of boredom ~ Vincent van Gogh,
27:Purity of soul cannot be lost without consent. ~ Saint Augustine,
28:We joke and laugh otherwise we would start screaming. ~ Bukowski,
29:Don't let your sins turn into bad habits. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
30:Faith is the union of God and the soul. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
31:Habit, if not resisted, soon becomes necessity. ~ Saint Augustine,
32:I dream of painting and then I paint my dream. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
33:Art is to console those who are broken by life. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
34:Carnal lust rules where there is no love of God. ~ Saint Augustine,
35:Christ has no body now on earth but yours. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
36:God is a dark night to man in this life. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
37:Humility is the mark of a genuine disciple. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
38:Love takes up where knowledge leaves off. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
39:We should never use the truth to wound. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
40:By your work you show what you love and what you know. ~ Saint Bruno,
41:My fondness for good books was my salvation. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
42:During the night we must wait for the light. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
43:One earns Paradise with one's daily task. ~ Saint Gianna Beretta Mola,
44:The things that we love tell us what we are. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
45:The two most powerful warriors are patience and time. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
46:What we are looking for is what is looking. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
47:Anyone who truly loves God travels securely. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
48:Only those who do not fight are never wounded. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
49:Rarely affirm, seldom deny, always distinguish. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
50:A school without music is like a body without a soul ~ Saint John Bosco,
51:God loves each of us as if there were only one of us. ~ Saint Augustine,
52:True friendship ought never to conceal what it thinks. ~ Saint Jerome,
53:Before God can deliver us we must undeceive ourselves. ~ Saint Augustine,
54:Complete abstinence is easier than perfect moderation. ~ Saint Augustine,
55:Put no faith in salvation through the political order. ~ Saint Augustine,
56:He who would travel happily must travel light. ~ Antoine de Saint-Exupery,
57:To find our real being and know it truly is to acquire wisdom. ~ Porphyry,
58:Without God, man cannot, and without man, God will not. ~ Saint Augustine,
59:In my deepest wound I saw your glory, and it dazzled me. ~ Saint Augustine,
60:The hour I have long wished for is now come. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
61:What does it take to become a saint? Will it. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
62:Anything done against faith or conscience is sinful. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
63:The best thing must be to flee from all to the All. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
64:Beauty without intelligence is like a hook without bait. ~ Molière, Tartuffe ,
65:The feeling remains that God is on the journey, too. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
66:I am seeking, I am striving, I am in it with all my heart. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
67:Never affirm anything unless you are sure it is true. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
68:Guard the threshold and prevent troops of fantasies from entering. ~ Petrarch,
69:What a strange illusion it is to suppose that beauty is goodness. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
70:Is any man skillful enough to have fashioned himself? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
71:It is only mercenaries who expect to be paid by the day. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
72:Whatever you do, think of the Glory of God as your main goal. ~ Saint John Bosco,
73:Whoever has God lacks nothing. God alone suffices. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
74:Are you a god? ... No. But who would not wish such a thing. - Harbard ~ Vikings,
75:In the name of God, stop a moment, cease your work, look around you. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
76:All, everything that I understand, I only understand because I love. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
77:All my words are but chaff next to the faith of a simple man. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
78:A man does not always choose what his guardian angel intends. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
79:However softly we speak, God is near enough to hear us. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
80:If you want to be saved look at the face of your Christ. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
81:The knowledge of God is received in divine silence. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
82:Humility is nothing but truth, and pride is nothing but lying. ~ Saint Vincent de Paul,
83:Silence is the cross on which we must crucify our ego. ~ Saint Seraphim of Sarov,
84:I always think that the best way to know God is to love many things. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
85:La tristesse durera toujours.[The sadness will last forever.] ~ Vincent van Gogh,
86:God is a being than which nothing greater can be conceived. ~ Saint Anselm of Canterbury,
87:For what is faith unless it is to believe what you do not see? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
88:Let us sing a new song, not with our lips, but with our lives. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
89:No one can begin a new life, unless he repent of the old. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
90:There is no greater invitation to love than loving first. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
91:Angels surround and help the priest when he is celebrating Mass. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
92:Never do anything which you could not do in the sight of all. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
93:The most terrible poverty is loneliness and the feeling of being unloved. ~ Mother Teresa,
94:One needs a vision of the promised land in order to have the strength to move. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
95:Pride changes angels into devils, humility makes man into angels. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
96:Settle yourself in solitude, and you will come upon God in yourself. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
97:All the darkness in the world cannot extinguish the light of a single candle. ~ Saint Francis,
98:There is nothing in the desert and no man needs nothing. ~ David, Prometheus Aliens: Covenant,
99:Characteristics which define beauty are wholeness, harmony and radiance. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
100:Let this consciousness be in you which was in Christ Jesus that we all may be one. ~ Saint Paul,
101:Solitude is as needful to the imagination as society is wholesome for the character. ~ Lowell,
102:Faith is a dark night for man, but in this very way it gives him light. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
103:God had one son on earth without sin, but never one without suffering. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
104:How is it, Lord, that we are cowards in everything save in opposing thee? ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
105:We speak to God when we pray; we listen to Him when we read the Scriptures. ~ Saint Ambrose,
106:A free curiosity is more effective in learning than a rigid discipline. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
107:The company of saints and sages is one of the chief agents of spiritual progress. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
108:The greatest kindness one can render to any man is leading him to truth. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
109:Yet we must say something when those who say the most are saying nothing. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
110:If there were no suffering, man would not know his limitations, would not know himself. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
111:The words printed here are concepts. You must go through the experiences. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
112:Never let life's hardships disturb you. No one can avoid problems, not even saints or sages. ~ Nichiren,
113:The first degree of humility is prompt obedience. ~ Saint Benedict of Nursia, The Rule of Saint Benedict ,
114:Better is the sinner who hath thoughts about God, than the saint who hath only the show of sanctity. ~ Saadi,
115:Through the study of books one seeks God; by meditation one finds him. ~ Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina,
116:I know God won't give me anything I can't handle. I just wish he didn't trust me so much. ~ Mother Teresa,
117:He who has God has everything; he who has everything but God has nothing. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
118:Beside each believer stands an Angel as protector and shepherd, leading him to life. ~ Saint Basil the Great,
119:Not everyone who is enlightened by an angel knows that he is enlightened by him. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
120:All great literature is one of two stories; a man goes on a journey or a stranger comes to town. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
121:Compassion to all creatures is the condition of sainthood. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Swaraj,
122:In deliberation we may hesitate; but a deliberated act must be performed swiftly. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
123:Faith has to do with things that are not seen and hope with things that are not at hand. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
124:The world is a great book, of which they that never stir from home read only a page. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
125:All truth and understanding is a result of a divine light which is God Himself. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
126:Pray as though everything depended on God. Work as though everything depended on you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
127:The true religion has always been one from the beginning, and will always be the same. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
128:Whatever good work you begin to do, beg of God with most earnest prayer to perfect it. ~ Saint Benedict of Nursia,
129:What you are must always displease you, if you would attain to that which you are not. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
130:A scrap of knowledge about sublime things is worth more than any amount about trivialities. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
131:Each of our good thoughts tears the veil behind which appears the pure, the infinite, God, our self. ~ Vivekananda,
132:God is more truly imagined than expressed, and He exists more truly than He is imagined. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
133:Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. ~ , 1 Corinthians 13:7,
134:Practical sciences proceed by building up; theoretical science by resolving into components. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
135:How can we live in harmony? First we need to know we are all madly in love with the same God. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
136:It is not fitting, when one is in God's service, to have a gloomy face or a chilling look. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
137:He who is drawn to something desirable does not desire to have it as a thought but as a thing. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
138:In failing to confess, Lord, I would only hide You from myself, not myself from You. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
139:Yearning: It needs to hurt in order to be worthy of the word. Otherwise it is just wanting. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
140:For those with faith, no evidence is necessary; for those without it, no evidence will suffice. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
141:Flee idleness... for no one is more exposed to such temptations than he who has nothing to do. ~ Saint Robert Bellarmine,
142:Though I am often in the depths of misery, there is still calmness, pure harmony and music inside me. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
143:To love is to be transformed into what we love. To love God is therefore to be transformed into God. ~ John of the Cross,
144:If you are looking for the way by which you should go, take Christ, because he himself is the way. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
145:In all created things discern the providence and wisdom of God, and in all things give Him thanks. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
146:Fear not that thy life shall come to an end, but rather fear that it shall never have a beginning. ~ Saint John Henry Newman,
147:Do not wander far and wide but return into yourself. Deep within man there dwells the truth. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
148:Start by doing what's necessary, then what's possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
149:To dye oneself with paints in order to have a rosier or a paler complexion is a lying counterfeit. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
150:We always find that those who walked closest to Christ were those who had to bear the greatest trials. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
151:Beloved, all that is harsh and difficult I want for myself, and all that is gentle and sweet for thee. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
152:He who denies the existence of God, has some reason for wishing that God did not exist. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
153:I know by myself how incomprehensible God is, seeing I cannot comprehend the parts of my own being. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
154:Two works of mercy set a person free: Forgive and you will be forgiven, and give and you will receive. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
155:When regard for truth has been broken down or even slightly weakened, all things will remain doubtful. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
156:If you knew what the Gods have in store for you, you would run naked and dance on the beach. ~ Vikings, The Seer to Rollo Vikings,
157:It is requisite for the relaxation of the mind that we make use, from time to time, of playful deeds and jokes. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
158:Learn the lesson that, if you are to do the work of a prophet, what you need is not a sceptre but a hoe. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
159:Better to illuminate than merely to shine; to deliver to others contemplated truths than merely to contemplate. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
160:If we wish to make any progress in the service of God we must begin every day of our life with new eagerness. ~ Saint Charles Borromeo,
161:Let nothing disturb you. Let nothing frighten you. Everything passes away except God. God alone is sufficient. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
162:The Study of philosophy is not that we may know what men have thought, but what the truth of things is. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
163:God desires the smallest degree of purity of conscience in you more than all the works you can perform. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
164:We can only learn to know ourselves and do what we can - namely, surrender our will and fulfill God's will in us. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
165:Mental prayer is nothing else but being on terms of friendship with God, frequently conversing in secret with Him. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
166:Seek in reading and thou shalt find in meditation; knock in prayer and it shall be opened in contemplation. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
167:It is of great importance, when we begin to practise prayer, not to let ourselves be frightened by our own thoughts. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
168:For where I found Truth, there found I my God, the Truth itself; which since I learnt, I have not forgotten. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
169:Many often err and accomplish little or nothing because they try to become learned rather than to live well. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
170:Even if the vilest sinner worships me with exclusive devotion, he should be accounted a saint, for he has rightly resolved. ~ BHAGAVAD GITA Saint_Paul.php">Saint Paul, 16).php">(Eph..php">16) ,
172:In sorrow and suffering, go straight to God with confidence, and you will be strengthened, enlightened and instructed. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
173:The more I contemplate God, the more God looks on me. The more I pray to him, the more he thinks of me too. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
174:You have been called to heal wounds, to unite what has fallen apart, and to bring home those who have lost their way. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
175:Live as though only God and yourself were in this world, so that your heart may not be detained by anything human. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
176:Learn to self-conquest, persevere thus for a time, and you will perceive very clearly the advantage which you gain from it. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
177:The least insight that one can obtain into sublime things is more desirable than the most certain knowledge of lower things. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
178:In light of heaven, the worst suffering on earth will be seen to be no more serious than one night in an inconvenient hotel. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
179:Of all the pursuits open to men, the search for wisdom is most perfect, more sublime, more profitable and more full of joy. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
180:Should you ask me what is the first thing in religion, I should reply that the first, second, and third thing therein is humility. ~ Saint Augustine,
181:But hail, thou Goddess, sage and holy, Hail, divinest melancholy, Whose saintly visage is too bright To hit the Sense of human sight. ~ John Milton,
182:To wisdom belongs the intellectual apprehension of eternal things; to knowledge, the rational knowledge of temporal things. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
183:To wisdom belongs the intellectual apprehension of things eternal; to knowledge, the rational apprehension of things temporal. ~ Saint Augustine,
184:In the twilight of life, God will not judge us on our earthly possessions and human successes, but on how well we have loved. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
185:They can be like the sun, words.They can do for the heart what light can for a field. ~ Saint John of the Cross, The Poems of St. John of the Cross ,
186:And he departed from our sight that we might return to our hearts and find him there. For he left us, and behold, he is here. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
187:Do you wish to rise? Begin by descending. You plan a tower that will pierce the clouds? Lay first the foundation of humility. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
188:How can you draw close to God when you are far from your own self? Grant, Lord, that I may know myself that I may know thee. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
189:We are always in the presence of God, yet it seems to me that those who pray are in His presence in a very different sense. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
190:Love God and do whatever you please: for the soul trained in love to God will do nothing to offend the One who is Beloved. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
191:God bestows more consideration on the purity of the intention with which our actions are performed than on the actions themselves. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
192:Accurate reading on a wide range of subjects makes the scholar; careful selection of the better makes the saint. ~ John of Salisbury, Bishop of Chartres ,
193:For it is in giving that we receive, It is in pardoning that we are pardoned, and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
194:Being but one, she is capable of all; immutable in herself, she renews all things; she diffuses herself among the nations in saintly souls. ~ The Book of Wisdom,
195:Blessed is the man who knows his own weakness, because this knowledge becomes to him the foundation, root, and beginning of all Goodness. ~ Saint Isaac of Syria,
196:By faithfulness we are collected and wound up into unity within ourselves, whereas we had been scattered abroad in multiplicity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
197:If you do not learn to deny yourself, you can make no progress in perfection. ~ Saint John of the Cross, The Collected Works of Saint John of the Cross (1991) ,
198:To fall in love with God is the greatest romance; to seek him the greatest adventure; to find him, the greatest human achievement. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
199:Advance our standards, set upon our foes;Our ancient word of courage, fair Saint George,Inspire us with the spleen of fiery dragons! ~ William Shakespeare,
200:Never relax, for you will not attain to the possession of true spiritual delights if first you do not learn to deny your every desire. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
201:When the soul, through its own fault... becomes rooted in a pool of pitch-black, evil smelling water, it produces nothing but misery and filth. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
202:Union is as if in a room there were two large windows through which the light streamed in; it enters in different places but it all becomes one. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
203:The dayspring from on high has visited us, to give light to them that sit in the darkness and in the shadow of death, to guide our feet in the way of peace. ~ Saint Luke,
204:Even the saint and the sage continue to have difficulties and to be limited by their human nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV The Difficulties of Yoga,
205:There often beams in our eye that we know not of. Let us therefore ask that our eye may become single, for then we ourselves shall become wholly single. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
206:In order to be an image of God, the spirit must turn to what is eternal, hold it in spirit, keep it in memory, and by loving it, embrace it in the will. ~ Edith Stein,
207:Arrive at knowledge over small streamlets, and do not plunge immediately into the ocean, since progress must go from the easier to the more difficult. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
208:Behind each priest, there is a demon fighting for his fall. If we have the language to criticize them, we must have twice as much to pray for them. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
209:For then alone do we know God truly, when we believe that He is far above all that man can possibly think of God. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, Summa contra Gentiles I,
210:It is more important that we should remember God than that we should breathe: indeed, if one may say so, we should do nothing else besides. ~ Saint Gregory of Nazianzus,
211:O Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console, to be understood as to understand, to be loved, as to love. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
212:I have to create a circle of reading for myself: Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Lao-Tzu, Buddha, Pascal, The New Testament. This is also necessary for all people. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
213:Bestow upon me, O Lord my God, understanding to know thee, diligence to seek thee, wisdom to find thee, and a faithfulness that may finally embrace thee. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
214:Keep thyself from all evil in thought, in word, in act. If thou transgress not these three frontiers of wisdom, thou shalt find the way pursued by the saints. ~ Magghima Nikaya,
215:Try to acquire the virtues you believe lacking in your brothers. Then you will no longer see their defects, for you will no longer have them yourself. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
216:Three things are necessary for the salvation of man : to know what he ought to believe, to know what he ought to desire, and to know what he ought to do. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
217:For loving draws us more to things than knowing does, since good is found by going to the thing, whereas the true is found when the thing comes to us. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
218:Let your old age be childlike, and your childhood like old age; that is, so that neither may your wisdom be with pride, nor your humility without wisdom. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
219:Our hands imbibe like roots,so I place them on what is beautiful in this world.And I fold them in prayer, and they draw from the heavens, light. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
220:And the memories of all we have loved stay and come back to us in the evening of our life. They are not dead but sleep, and it is well to gather a treasure of them. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
221:The most powerful weapon to conquer the devil is humility. For, as he does not know at all how to employ it, neither does he know how to defend himself from it. ~ Saint Vincent de Paul,
222:God creates out of nothing. Wonderful you say. Yes, to be sure, but he does what is still more wonderful: he makes saints out of sinners. ~ Soren Kierkegaard, The Journals of Kierkegaard ,
223:We must be on our guard against giving interpretations which are hazardous or opposed to science, and so exposing the word of God to the ridicule of unbelievers. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
224:Late have I loved you, O Beauty ever ancient, ever new, late have I loved you! You were within me, but I was outside, and it was there that I searched for you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
225:A Christian is: a mind through which Christ thinks, a heart through which Christ loves, a voice through which Christ speaks, and a hand through which Christ helps. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
226:Desire to see God, be fearful of losing Him, and find joy in everything that can lead to Him. If you act in this way, you will always live in great peace. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
227:An Angel can illuminate the thought and mind of man by strengthening the power of vision and by bringing within his reach some truth which the Angel himself contemplates. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
228:Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
229:His spirit by spiritual ego sink,Or his soul dream shut in sainthood’s brilliant cellWhere only a bright shadow of God can come. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
230:Humility is the foundation of all the other virtues hence, in the soul in which this virtue does not exist there cannot be any other virtue except in mere appearance. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
231:Practice is the act of rehearsing a behavior over and over, or engaging in an activity again and again, for the purpose of improving or mastering it, as in the phrase practice makes perfect. ~ ,
232:Do not be afraid to throw yourself on the Lord! He will not draw back and let you fall! Put your worries aside and throw yourself on him; He will welcome you and heal you. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
233:Here 'neath veils, my Saviour darkly I behold; To my thirsting spirit all thy light unfold; Face to face in heaven let me come to thee, And the blessed vision of thy glory see. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
234:Music, that is the science or the sense of proper modulation, is likewise given by God's generosity to mortals having rational souls in order to lead them to higher things. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
235:Out of suffering comes the serious mind; out of salvation, the grateful heart; out of endurance, fortitude; out of deliverance faith. Patient endurance attends to all things. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
236:Pain and suffering have come into your life, but remember pain, sorrow, suffering are but the kiss of Jesus - a sign that you have come so close to Him that He can kiss you. ~ Saint Mother Teresa of Calcutta,
237:Three things are necessary for the salvation of man: to know what he ought to believe; to know what he ought to desire; and to know what he ought to do. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, Two Precepts of Charity (1273) ,
238:The good man, though a slave, is free; the wicked, though he reigns, is a slave, and not the slave of a single man, but- what is worse - the slave of as many masters as he has vices. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
239:Angels transcend every religion, every philosophy, every creed. In fact Angels have no religion as we know it... Their existence precedes every religious system that has ever existed on Earth. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
240:I am so angry with myself because I cannot do what I should like to do, and at such a moment one feels as if one were lying bound hand and foot at the bottom of a deep dark well, utterly helpless. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
241:It is necessary that the Holy Spirit enter our heart. Everything good that we do, that we do for Christ, is given to us by the Holy Spirit, but prayer most of all, which is always available to us. ~ Seraphim of Sarov,
242:See that you are not suddenly saddened by the adversities of this world, for you do not know the good they bring, being ordained in the judgments of God for the everlasting joy of the elect. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
243:Every judgement of conscience, be it right or wrong, be it about things evil in themselves or morally indifferent, is obligatory, in such wise that he who acts against his conscience always sins. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
244:Have courage and do not fear the assaults of the Devil. Remember this forever; it is a healthy sign if the devil shouts and roars around your conscience, since this shows that he is not inside your will. ~ Saint Padre Pio,
245:Virtues are formed by prayer. Prayer preserves temperance. Prayer suppresses anger. Prayer prevents emotions of pride and envy. Prayer draws into the soul the Holy Spirit, and raises man to Heaven. ~ Saint Ephrem of Syria,
246:He who labors as he prays lifts his heart to God with his hands. Whenever you begin any good work you should first of all make a most pressing appeal to Christ our Lord to bring it to perfection. ~ Saint Benedict of Nursia,
247:Wherefore let us consider how it behoveth us to be in the sight of God and the angels, and so let us take our part in the psalmody that mind and voice accord together. ~ Saint Benedict of Nursia, The Rule of Saint Benedict ,
248:He who is not angry when there is just cause for anger is immoral. Why? Because anger looks to the good of justice. And if you can live amid injustice without anger, you are immoral as well as unjust. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
249:Just as all men naturally desire to know the truth, so there is inherent in men a natural desire to avoid errors, and refute them when they are able to do so. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, De Unitate Intellectus Contra Averroistas ,
250:Do you know when people really become spiritual? It is when they become the slaves of God and are branded with His sign, which is the sign of the Cross, in token that they have given Him their freedom. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
251:Once more in the land of the saints and sages will burn up the fire of the ancient Yoga and the hearts of her people will be lifted up into the neighbourhood of the Eternal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Swaraj,
252:However high be your endeavors, unless you renounce and subjugate your own will - unless you forget yourself and all that pertains to yourself - not one step will you advance on the road to perfection. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
253:What is reprehensible is that while leading good lives themselves and abhorring those of wicked men, some, fearing to offend, shut their eyes to evil deeds instead of condemning them and pointing out their malice. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
254:When we receive with an entire and perfect resignation the afflictions which God sends us they become for us favors and benefits; because conformity to the will of God is a gain far superior to all temporal advantages. ~ Saint Vincent de Paul,
255:There are those who seek knowledge for the sake of knowledge; that is curiosity. There are those who seek knowledge to be known by others; that is vanity. There are those who seek knowledge in order to serve; that is Love. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
256:When people are empty of Christ, a thousand and one other things come and fill them up: jealousies, hatreds, boredom, melancholy, resentment, a worldly outlook, worldly pleasures. Try to fill your soul with Christ so that it's not empty. ~ Saint Porphyrios,
257:For those who use their intelligence and their study as a weapon, the Rosary is most effective. Because that apparently monotonous way of beseeching Our Lady as children do their Mother, can destroy every seed of vainglory and pride. ~ Saint Josemaria Escriva,
258:God has to work in the soul in secret and in darkness because if we fully knew what was happening, and what Mystery, transformation, God and Grace will eventually ask of us, we would either try to take charge or stop the whole process. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
259:Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love, Where there is injury, pardon; Where there is doubt, faith; Where there is despair, hope; Where there is darkness, light; And where there is sadness, joy. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
260:No one can attain to truth by himself. Only by laying stone on stone with the cooperation of all, by the millions of generations from our forefather Adam to our own times, is that temple reared which is to be a worthy dwelling place of the Great God. ~ Leo Tolstoy,
261:Whoever, then, thinks that he understands the Holy Scriptures, or any part of them, but puts such an interpretation upon them as does not tend to build up this twofold love of God and our neighbor, does not yet understand them as he ought. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
262:For it is necessary in every practical science to proceed in a composite (i.e. deductive) manner. On the contrary in speculative science, it is necessary to proceed in an analytical manner by breaking down the complex into elementary principles. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
263:The study of truth requires a considerable effort - which is why few are willing to undertake it out of love of knowledge - despite the fact that God has implanted a natural appetite for such knowledge in the minds of men. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, Summa Contra Gentiles ,
264:Again, it is self-evident that truth exists. For truth exists if anything at all is true, and if anyone denies that truth exists, he concedes that it is true that it does not exist, since if truth does not exist it is then true that it does not exist. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
265:'In order for an individual to consciously let go of a thing, he must have something that he feels is stronger to which he can anchor. As students become conscious of this, the confidence and strength will come to them to take the step.' ~ Saint Germain, The I am discourses ,
266:Almighty God, give me wisdom to perceive You, intelligence to understand You, diligence to seek You, patience to wait for You, eyes to behold You, a heart to meditate upon You and life to proclaim You, through the power of the Spirit of our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. ~ Saint Benedict of Nursia,
267:For just as the first general precepts of the law of nature are self-evident to one in possession of natural reason, and have no need of promulgation, so also that of believing in God is primary and self-evident to one who has faith: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
268:In the silence of the heart God speaks. If you face God in prayer and silence, God will speak to you. Then you will know that you are nothing. It is only when you realize your nothingness, your emptiness, that God can fill you with Himself. Souls of prayer are souls of great silence. ~ Saint Teresa of Calcutta,
269:the priest and the mage, the man of piety, the just man, the man of wisdom, the saint, the prophet, the Rishi, the Yogi, the seer, the spiritual sage and the mystic ... the saint, the devotee, the spiritual sage, the seer, the prophet, the servant of God, the soldier of the spirit ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
270:Do you realizethat Jesus is therein the tabernacleexpressly for you-for you alone? Heburns with thedesire to come intoyour heart... don'tlisten to the demon,laugh at him, andgo without fear toreceive the Jesus ofpeace and love..." ~ Saint Thérèse of Lisieux, Story of a Soul ,
271:A beginner must look on himself as one setting out to make a garden for his Lord's pleasure, on most unfruitful soil which abounds in weeds. His Majesty roots up the weeds and will put in good plants instead. Let us reckon that this is already done when the soul decides to practice prayer and has begun to do so. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
272:Give me yourself, O my God, give yourself back to me. Lo, I love you, but if my love is too mean, let me love more passionately. I cannot gauge my love, nor know how far it fails, how much more love I need for my life to set its course straight into your arms, never swerving until hidden in the covert of your face. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
273:Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil; may God rebuke him, we humbly pray; and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God, cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen. ~ Pope Leo XIII, Leonine Prayers Prayer to Saint Michael,
274:Christ with me, Christ before me,Christ behind me, Christ in me,Christ beneath me, Christ above me,Christ on my right, Christ on my left,Christ when I lie down... Christ when I arise,Christ in the heart of every man who thinks of me, Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks of me, Christ in every eye that sees me,Christ in every ear that hears me. ~ Saint Patrick,
275:Let us not believe that it is enough to read without unction, to speculate without devotion, to investigate without wonder, to observe without joy, to act without godly zeal, to know without love, to understand without humility, to strive without divine grace, or to reflect as a mirror without divinely inspired wisdom. ~ Saint Bonaventure, The Journey of the Mind into God / Feast Day July 15th ,
276:The crisis we are experiencing is unique in history. It is a world which must burst out of a crucible in which so many different energies are working. Let us thank God that He makes us live among the present problems... it is no longer permitted to anyone to be mediocre. All men have the imperative duty to remember that they have a mission to fulfill, that of doing the impossible. ~ Pope Pius XII,
277:Before prayer, endeavour to realise Whose Presence you are approaching and to Whom you are about to speak, keeping in mind Whom you are addressing. If our lives were a thousand times as long as they are we should never fully understand how we ought to behave towards God, before Whom the very Angels tremble, Who can do all He wills, and with Whom to wish is to accomplish. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
278:The whole year will be fortunate for you, not if you are drunk on the new-moon [New Year' Day], but if both on the new-moon [Jan 1st], and each day, you do those things approved by God. For days come wicked and good, not from their own nature; for a day differs nothing from another day, but from our zeal and sluggishness. ~ Saint John Chrysostom, A Homily for the New Year / Karl Gebhardt Spilled Spirits,
279:Bjorn: I'm sorry to hear of Helga's death. We knew each other a long time. Since I was a boy. Floki: I too am dead, Bjorn. A part of me died with my daughter, Angrboda, a second part with Ragnar, and the last part of what was Floki died with my sweet, sad Helga. What I am now is nothing. And all this nothing I give to the gods to do with as they please. And I shall be an empty ship with no rudder set upon their endless sea. And where they take me, I shall go. ~ Vikings,
280:If Confucius can serve as the Patron Saint of Chinese education, let me propose Socrates as his equivalent in a Western educational context - a Socrates who is never content with the initial superficial response, but is always probing for finer distinctions, clearer examples, a more profound form of knowing. Our concept of knowledge has changed since classical times, but Socrates has provided us with a timeless educational goal - ever deeper understanding. ~ Howard Gardner,
281:Far be it from us to doubt that all number is known to Him 'Whose understanding is infinite' (Ps. 147:5). The infinity of number, though there be no numbering of infinite numbers, is yet not incomprehensible by Him Whose understanding is infinite. And thus, if everything which is comprehended is defined or made finite by the comprehension of him who knows it, then all infinity is in some ineffable way made finite to God, for it is comprehensible by His knowledge. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
282:To seek the greatest good is to live well, and to live well is nothing other than to love God with the whole heart, the whole soul, and the whole mind: It is therefore obvious that this love must be kept whole and uncorrupt, that is temperance; it should not be overcome with difficulties, that is fortitude, it must not be subservient to anything else, that is justice; it must discriminate among things so as not to be deceived by falsity or fraud, that is prudence. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
283:Why does an apple fall when it is ripe? Is it brought down by the force of gravity? Is it because its stalk withers? Because it is dried by the sun, because it grows too heavy, or because the boy standing under the tree wants to eat it? None of these is the cause.... Every action of theirs, that seems to them an act of their own freewill is in the historical sense not free at all but is bound up with the whole course of history and preordained from all eternity. ~ Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace ,
284:The basis of internal peace is samata, the capacity of receiving with a calm and equal mind all the attacks and appearances of outward things, whether pleasant or unpleasant, ill-fortune and good-fortune, pleasure and pain, honour and ill-repute, praise and blame, friendship and enmity, sinner and saint, or, physically, heat and cold etc. There are two forms of samata, passive and active, samata in reception of the things of the outward world and samata in reaction to them. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Record Of Yoga ,
285:Many people seem to think it foolish, even superstitious, to believe that the world could still change for the better. And it is true that in winter it is sometimes so bitingly cold that one is tempted to say, 'What do I care if there is a summer; its warmth is no help to me now.' Yes, evil often seems to surpass good. But then, in spite of us, and without our permission, there comes at last an end to the bitter frosts. One morning the wind turns, and there is a thaw. And so I must still have hope. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
286:Help yourself during this troubled period by reading holy books. This reading provides excellent food for the soul and conduces to great progress along the path of perfection. By no means is it inferior to what we obtain through prayer and holy meditation. In prayer and meditation it is ourselves who speak to the Lord, while in holy reading it is God who speaks to us. Before beginning to read, raise your mind to the Lord and implore Him to guide your mind Himself, to speak to your heart and move your will. ~ Saint Padre Pio,
287:The higher we soar in contemplation, the more limited become our expressions of that which is purely intelligible; even as now, when plunging into the Darkness which is above the intellect, we pass not merely into brevity of speech, but even into absolute silence, of thoughts as well as of words ... and, according to the degree of transcendence, so our speech is restrained until, the entire ascent being accomplished, we become wholly voiceless, inasmuch as we are absorbed in Him who is totally ineffable. ~ Saint Dionysius the Areopagite,
288:nabla9 on July 15, 2018 [-] \n\nCommon Lisp as hackish vs protective is nice way to describe it.\n\nAnother way to describe it exploratory vs implementatory.\n\nIn some ways Common Lisp is like Mathematica for programming. It's a language for a computer architect to develop and explore high level concept. It's not a accident that early Javascript prototype was done in common lisp or that metaobject protocols, aspect-oriented programming, etc. were first implemented and experimented with Common Lisp. ~ site, https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17533341 ,
289:Creator of all things, true source of light and wisdom, origin of all being, graciously let a ray of your light penetrate the darkness of my understanding. Take from me the double darkness in which I have been born, an obscurity of sin and ignorance. Give me a keen understanding, a retentive memory, and the ability to grasp things correctly and fundamentally. Grant me the talent of being exact in my explanations and the ability to express myself with thoroughness and charm. Point out the beginning, direct the progress, and help in the completion. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
290:Now let us return to our beautiful and charming castle and discover how to enter it. This appears incongruous: if this castle is the soul, clearly no one can have to enter it, for it is the person himself: one might as well tell some one to go into a room he is already in! There are, however, very different ways of being in this castle; many souls live in the courtyard of the building where the sentinels stand, neither caring to enter farther, nor to know who dwells in that most delightful place, what is in it and what rooms it contains. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila, The Interior Castle ,
291:The library smells like old books - a thousand leather doorways into other worlds. I hear silence, like the mind of God. I feel a presence in the empty chair beside me. The librarian watches me suspiciously. But the library is a sacred place, and I sit with the patron saint of readers. Pulsing goddess light moves through me for one moment like a glimpse of eternity instantly forgotten. She is gone. I smell mold, I hear the clock ticking, I see an empty chair. Ask me now and I'll say this is just a place where you can't play music or eat. She's gone. The library sucks. ~ Laura Whitcomb,
292:Talk 15.A question was asked about the Upanishadic passage, "The Supreme Spirit is subtler than the subtlest and larger than the largest."M.: Even the structure of the atom has been found by the mind. Therefore the mind is subtler than the atom. That which is behind the mind, namely the individual soul, is subtler than the mind.Further, the Tamil saint Manickavachagar has said of the specks dancing in a beam of sunlight, that if each represents a universe, the whole sunlight will represent the Supreme Being. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi Sri Ramanasramam,
293:What art Thou then, my God? what, but the Lord God? For who is Lord but the Lord? or who is God save our God? Most highest, most good, most potent, most omnipotent; most merciful, yet most just; most hidden, yet most present; most beautiful, yet most strong; stable, yet incomprehensible; unchangeable, yet all-changing; never new, never old; all-renewing, and bringing age upon the proud, and they know it not; ever working, ever at rest; still gathering, yet nothing lacking; supporting, filling, and overspreading; creating, nourishing, and maturing; seeking, yet having all things. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
294:In dangers, in doubts, in difficulties, think of Mary, call upon Mary. Let not her name depart from your lips, never suffer it to leave your heart. And that you may obtain the assistance of her prayer, neglect not to walk in her footsteps. With her for guide, you shall never go astray; while invoking her, you shall never lose heart; so long as she is in your mind, you are safe from deception; while she holds your hand, you cannot fall; under her protection you have nothing to fear; if she walks before you, you shall not grow weary; if she shows you favor, you shall reach the goal. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
295:8. Now let us turn at last to our castle with its many mansions. You must not think of a suite of rooms placed in succession, but fix your eyes on the keep, the court inhabited by the King.23' Like the kernel of the palmito,24' from which several rinds must be removed before coming to the eatable part, this principal chamber is surrounded by many others. However large, magnificent, and spacious you imagine this castle to be, you cannot exaggerate it; the capacity of the soul is beyond all our understanding, and the Sun within this palace enlightens every part of it. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila, The Interior Castle ,
296:Those who love much, do much and accomplish much, and whatever is done with love is done well.... Love is the best and noblest thing in the human heart, especially when it is tested by life as gold is tested by fire. Happy is he who has loved much, and although he may have wavered and doubted, he has kept that divine spark alive and returned to what was in the beginning and ever shall be.If only one keeps loving faithfully what is truly worth loving and does not squander one's love on trivial and insignificant and meaningless things then one will gradually obtain more light and grow stronger. ~ Vincent van Gogh,
297:It is the devil's greatest triumph when he can deprive us of the joy of the Spirit. He carries fine dust with him in little boxes and scatters it through the cracks in our conscience in order to dim the soul's pure impulses and its luster. But the joy that fills the heart of the spiritual person destroys the deadly poison of the serpent. But if any are gloomy and think that they are abandoned in their sorrow, gloominess will continuously tear at them or else they will waste away in empty diversions. When gloominess takes root, evil grows. If it is not dissolved by tears, permanent damage is done. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
298:Out of all the sciences... the ancients, in their studies, especially selected seven to be mastered by those who were to be educated. These seven they considered so to excel all the rest in usefulness that anyone who had been thoroughly schooled in them might afterward come to knowledge of the others by his own inquiry and effort rather than by listening to a teacher. For these, one might say, constitute the best instruments, the best rudiments, by which the way is prepared for the mind's complete knowledge of philosophic truth. Therefore they are called by the name trivium and quadrivium, because by them, as by certain ways (viae), a quick mind enters into the secret places of wisdom. ~ Hugh of Saint Victor, Didascalicon ,
299:There is no part of one's beliefs about oneself which cannot be modified by sufficiently powerful psychological techniques. There is nothing about oneself which cannot be taken away or changed. The proper stimuli can, if correctly applied, turn communists into fascists, saints into devils, the meek into heroes, and vice-versa. There is no sovereign sanctuary within ourseles which represents our real nature. There is nobody at home in the internal fortress. Everything we cherish as our ego, everything we believe in, is just what we have cobbled together out of the accident of our birth and subsequent experiences. With drugs, brainwashing, and other techniques of extreme persuasion, we can quite readily make a man a devotee of a different ideology, the patriot of a different country, or the follower of a different religion. ~ Peter J Carroll,
300:11. The Ultimate Boon:The gods and goddesses then are to be understood as embodiments and custodians of the elixir of Imperishable Being but not themselves the Ultimate in its primary state. What the hero seeks through his intercourse with them is therefore not finally themselves, but their grace, i.e., the power of their sustaining substance. This miraculous energy-substance and this alone is the Imperishable; the names and forms of the deities who everywhere embody, dispense, and represent it come and go. This is the miraculous energy of the thunderbolts of Zeus, Yahweh, and the Supreme Buddha, the fertility of the rain of Viracocha, the virtue announced by the bell rung in the Mass at the consecration, and the light of the ultimate illumination of the saint and sage. Its guardians dare release it only to the duly proven. ~ Joseph Campbell,
301:Drink water from the spring where the horse drinks. A horse will never drink bad water.Make your bed where the cat sleeps.Eat the fruit that was touched by the worm.Freely pick the mushrooms on which the insects sit.Plant your tree where the mole digs.Build your house where the snake suns itself.Dig your well where the birds build their nests in hot weather.Go to sleep and wake up with the chickens and you will reap the golden grain of the day.Eat more green vegetables, and you will have strong legs and an enduring heart.Swim more often and you will feel on land like a fish in the water.Look at the skies more often and not at your feet, and your thoughts will be clear and light.Keep silent more often, speak less, and silence will reign in your soul, and your spirit will be calm and peaceful. ~ Saint Seraphim of Sarov in Georgia,
302:10.: I do not know whether I have put this clearly; self-knowledge is of such consequence that I would not have you careless of it, though you may be lifted to heaven in prayer, because while on earth nothing is more needful than humility. Therefore, I repeat, not only a good way, but the best of all ways, is to endeavour to enter first by the room where humility is practised, which is far better than at once rushing on to the others. This is the right road;-if we know how easy and safe it is to walk by it, why ask for wings with which to fly? Let us rather try to learn how to advance quickly. I believe we shall never learn to know ourselves except by endeavouring to know God, for, beholding His greatness we are struck by our own baseness, His purity shows our foulness, and by meditating on His humility we find how very far we are from being humble. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila, The Interior Castle 1.02,
303:Part 3 - Return12. Refusal of the Return:When the hero-quest has been accomplished, through penetration to the source, or through the grace of some male or female, human or animal, personification, the adventurer still must return with his life-transmuting trophy. The full round, the norm of the monomyth, requires that the hero shall now begin the labor of bringing the runes of wisdom, the Golden Fleece, or his sleeping princess, back into the kingdom of humanity, where the boon may redound to the renewing of the community, the nation, the planet or the ten thousand worlds. But the responsibility has been frequently refused. Even Gautama Buddha, after his triumph, doubted whether the message of realization could be communicated, and saints are reported to have died while in the supernal ecstasy. Numerous indeed are the heroes fabled to have taken up residence forever in the blessed isle of the unaging Goddess of Immortal Being. ~ Joseph Campbell,
304:Turn your thoughts now, and lift up your thoughts to a devout and joyous contemplation on sage Vyasa and Vasishtha, on Narda and Valmiki. Contemplate on the glorious Lord Buddha, Jesus the Christ, prophet Mohammed, the noble Zoroaster (Zarathushtra), Lord Mahavira, the holy Guru Nanak. Think of the great saints and sages of all ages, like Yajnavalkya, Dattatreya, Sulabha and Gargi, Anasooya and Sabari, Lord Gauranga, Mirabai, Saint Theresa and Francis of Assisi. Remember St. Augustine, Jallaludin Rumi, Kabir, Tukaram, Ramdas, Ramakrishna Paramhamsa, Vivekananda and Rama Tirtha. Adore in thy heart the sacred memory of Mahatma Gandhi, sage Ramana Maharishi, Aurobindo Ghosh, Gurudev Sivananda and Swami Ramdas. They verily are the inspirers of humanity towards a life of purity, goodness and godliness. Their lives, their lofty examples, their great teachings constitute the real wealth and greatest treasure of mankind today. ~ Sri Chidananda, Advices On Spiritual Living ,
305:Many are God's forms by which he grows in man; They stamp his thoughts and deeds with divinity, Uplift the stature of the human clay Or slowly transmute it into heavens gold. He is the Good for which men fight and die, He is the war of Right with Titan wrong; He is Freedom rising deathless from her pyre; He is Valour guarding still the desperate pass Or lone and erect on the shattered barricade Or a sentinel in the dangerous echoing Night. He is the crown of the martyr burned in flame And the glad resignation of the saint And courage indifferent to the wounds of Time And the heros might wrestling with death and fate. He is Wisdom incarnate on a glorious throne And the calm autocracy of the sages rule. He is the high and solitary Thought Aloof above the ignorant multitude: He is the prophets voice, the sight of the seer. He is Beauty, nectar of the passionate soul, He is the Truth by which the spirit lives. He is the riches of the spiritual Vast Poured out in healing streams on indigent Life; He is Eternity lured from hour to hour, He is infinity in a little space: He is immortality in the arms of death. These powers I am and at my call they come. Thus slowly I lift mans soul nearer the Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
306:Here the formula of the supreme knowledge comes to our help; we have nothing to do in our essential standpoint with these distinctions, for there is no I nor thou, but only one divine Self equal in all embodiments, equal in the individual and the group, and to realise that, to express that, to serve that, to fulfil that is all that matters. Self-satisfaction and altruism, enjoyment and indifference are not the essential thing. If the realisation, fulfilment, service of the one Self demands from us an action that seems to others self-service or self-assertion in the egoistic sense or seems egoistic enjoyment and self-indulgence, that action we must do; we must be governed by the guide within rather than by the opinions of men. The influence of the environment works often with great subtlety; we prefer and put on almost unconsciously the garb which will look best in the eye that regards us from outside and we allow a veil to drop over the eye within; we are impelled to drape ourselves in the vow of poverty, or in the garb of service, or in outward proofs of indifference and renunciation and a spotless sainthood because that is what tradition and opinion demand of us and so we can make best an impression on our environment. But all this is vanity and delusion. We may be called upon to assume these things, for that may be the uniform of our service; but equally it may not. The eye of man outside matters nothing; the eye within is all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
307:Concentrating the Attention: Whatever you may want to do in life, one thing is absolutely indispensable and at the basis of everything, the capacity of concentrating the attention. If you are able to gather together the rays of attention and consciousness on one point and can maintain the concentration with a presistent will, nothing can resist it - whatever it may be, from the most material physical development to the highest spiritual one. But this discipline must be followed in a constant and, it may be said, imperturbable way; not that you should always be concentrated on the same thing - thats not what I mean, I mean learning to concentrate. And materially, for studies, sports, all physical or mental development, it is absolutely indispensble. And the value of an individual is proportionate to the value of his attention. And from the spiritual point of view it is still more important. There is no spiritual obstacle which can resist a penetrating power of concentration. For instance, the discovery of the psychic being, union with the inner Divine, opening to the higher spheres, all can be obtained by an intense and obstinate power of concentration - but one must learn how to do it. There is nothing in the human or even in the superhuman field, to which the power of concentration is not the key. You can be the best athlete, you can be the best student, you can be an artistic, literary or scientific genius, you can be the greatest saint with that faculty. And everyone has in himself a tiny little beginning of it - it is given to everybody, but people do not cultivate it. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958 ,
308:Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. These passions, like great winds, have blown me hither and thither, in a wayward course, over a great ocean of anguish, reaching to the very verge of despair. I have sought love, first, because it brings ecstasy - ecstasy so great that I would often have sacrificed all the rest of life for a few hours of this joy. I have sought it, next, because it relieves loneliness--that terrible loneliness in which one shivering consciousness looks over the rim of the world into the cold unfathomable lifeless abyss. I have sought it finally, because in the union of love I have seen, in a mystic miniature, the prefiguring vision of the heaven that saints and poets have imagined. This is what I sought, and though it might seem too good for human life, this is what--at last--I have found. With equal passion I have sought knowledge. I have wished to understand the hearts of men. I have wished to know why the stars shine. And I have tried to apprehend the Pythagorean power by which number holds sway above the flux. A little of this, but not much, I have achieved. Love and knowledge, so far as they were possible, led upward toward the heavens. But always pity brought me back to earth. Echoes of cries of pain reverberate in my heart. Children in famine, victims tortured by oppressors, helpless old people a burden to their sons, and the whole world of loneliness, poverty, and pain make a mockery of what human life should be. I long to alleviate this evil, but I cannot, and I too suffer. This has been my life. I have found it worth living, and would gladly live it again if the chance were offered me. ~ Bertrand Russell,
309:The ancient Mesopotamians and the ancient Egyptians had some very interesting, dramatic ideas about that. For example-very briefly-there was a deity known as Marduk. Marduk was a Mesopotamian deity, and imagine this is sort of what happened. As an empire grew out of the post-ice age-15,000 years ago, 10,000 years ago-all these tribes came together. These tribes each had their own deity-their own image of the ideal. But then they started to occupy the same territory. One tribe had God A, and one tribe had God B, and one could wipe the other one out, and then it would just be God A, who wins. That's not so good, because maybe you want to trade with those people, or maybe you don't want to lose half your population in a war. So then you have to have an argument about whose God is going to take priority-which ideal is going to take priority.What seems to happen is represented in mythology as a battle of the gods in celestial space. From a practical perspective, it's more like an ongoing dialog. You believe this; I believe this. You believe that; I believe this. How are we going to meld that together? You take God A, and you take God B, and maybe what you do is extract God C from them, and you say, 'God C now has the attributes of A and B.' And then some other tribes come in, and C takes them over, too. Take Marduk, for example. He has 50 different names, at least in part, of the subordinate gods-that represented the tribes that came together to make the civilization. That's part of the process by which that abstracted ideal is abstracted. You think, 'this is important, and it works, because your tribe is alive, and so we'll take the best of both, if we can manage it, and extract out something, that's even more abstract, that covers both of us.'I'll give you a couple of Marduk's interesting features. He has eyes all the way around his head. He's elected by all the other gods to be king God. That's the first thing. That's quite cool. They elect him because they're facing a terrible threat-sort of like a flood and a monster combined. Marduk basically says that, if they elect him top God, he'll go out and stop the flood monster, and they won't all get wiped out. It's a serious threat. It's chaos itself making its comeback. All the gods agree, and Marduk is the new manifestation. He's got eyes all the way around his head, and he speaks magic words. When he fights, he fights this deity called Tiamat. We need to know that, because the word 'Tiamat' is associated with the word 'tehom.' Tehom is the chaos that God makes order out of at the beginning of time in Genesis, so it's linked very tightly to this story. Marduk, with his eyes and his capacity to speak magic words, goes out and confronts Tiamat, who's like this watery sea dragon. It's a classic Saint George story: go out and wreak havoc on the dragon. He cuts her into pieces, and he makes the world out of her pieces. That's the world that human beings live in.The Mesopotamian emperor acted out Marduk. He was allowed to be emperor insofar as he was a good Marduk. That meant that he had eyes all the way around his head, and he could speak magic; he could speak properly. We are starting to understand, at that point, the essence of leadership. Because what's leadership? It's the capacity to see what the hell's in front of your face, and maybe in every direction, and maybe the capacity to use your language properly to transform chaos into order. God only knows how long it took the Mesopotamians to figure that out. The best they could do was dramatize it, but it's staggeringly brilliant. It's by no means obvious, and this chaos is a very strange thing. This is a chaos that God wrestled with at the beginning of time.Chaos is half psychological and half real. There's no other way to really describe it. Chaos is what you encounter when you're blown into pieces and thrown into deep confusion-when your world falls apart, when your dreams die, when you're betrayed. It's the chaos that emerges, and the chaos is everything it wants, and it's too much for you. That's for sure. It pulls you down into the underworld, and that's where the dragons are. All you've got at that point is your capacity to bloody well keep your eyes open, and to speak as carefully and as clearly as you can. Maybe, if you're lucky, you'll get through it that way and come out the other side. It's taken people a very long time to figure that out, and it looks, to me, that the idea is erected on the platform of our ancient ancestors, maybe tens of millions of years ago, because we seem to represent that which disturbs us deeply using the same system that we used to represent serpentile, or other, carnivorous predators. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series 1,
310:Intuition And The Value Of Concentration ::: Mother, how can the faculty of intuition be developed? ... There are different kinds of intuition, and we carry these capacities within us. They are always active to some extent but we don't notice them because we don't pay enough attention to what is going on in us. Behind the emotions, deep within the being, in a consciousness seated somewhere near the level of the solar plexus, there is a sort of prescience, a kind of capacity for foresight, but not in the form of ideas: rather in the form of feelings, almost a perception of sensations. For instance, when one is going to decide to do something, there is sometimes a kind of uneasiness or inner refusal, and usually, if one listens to this deeper indication, one realises that it was justified. In other cases there is something that urges, indicates, insists - I am not speaking of impulses, you understand, of all the movements which come from the vital and much lower still - indications which are behind the feelings, which come from the affective part of the being; there too one can receive a fairly sure indication of the thing to be done. These are forms of intuition or of a higher instinct which can be cultivated by observation and also by studying the results. Naturally, it must be done very sincerely, objectively, without prejudice. If one wants to see things in a particular way and at the same time practise this observation, it is all useless. One must do it as if one were looking at what is happening from outside oneself, in someone else. It is one form of intuition and perhaps the first one that usually manifests. There is also another form but that one is much more difficult to observe because for those who are accustomed to think, to act by reason - not by impulse but by reason - to reflect before doing anything, there is an extremely swift process from cause to effect in the half-conscious thought which prevents you from seeing the line, the whole line of reasoning and so you don't think that it is a chain of reasoning, and that is quite deceptive. You have the impression of an intuition but it is not an intuition, it is an extremely rapid subconscious reasoning, which takes up a problem and goes straight to the conclusions. This must not be mistaken for intuition. In the ordinary functioning of the brain, intuition is something which suddenly falls like a drop of light. If one has the faculty, the beginning of a faculty of mental vision, it gives the impression of something coming from outside or above, like a little impact of a drop of light in the brain, absolutely independent of all reasoning. This is perceived more easily when one is able to silence one's mind, hold it still and attentive, arresting its usual functioning, as if the mind were changed into a kind of mirror turned towards a higher faculty in a sustained and silent attention. That too one can learn to do. One must learn to do it, it is a necessary discipline. When you have a question to solve, whatever it may be, usually you concentrate your attention here (pointing between the eyebrows), at the centre just above the eyes, the centre of the conscious will. But then if you do that, you cannot be in contact with intuition. You can be in contact with the source of the will, of effort, even of a certain kind of knowledge, but in the outer, almost material field; whereas, if you want to contact the intuition, you must keep this (Mother indicates the forehead) completely immobile. Active thought must be stopped as far as possible and the entire mental faculty must form - at the top of the head and a little further above if possible - a kind of mirror, very quiet, very still, turned upwards, in silent, very concentrated attention. If you succeed, you can - perhaps not immediately - but you can have the perception of the drops of light falling upon the mirror from a still unknown region and expressing themselves as a conscious thought which has no connection with all the rest of your thought since you have been able to keep it silent. That is the real beginning of the intellectual intuition. It is a discipline to be followed. For a long time one may try and not succeed, but as soon as one succeeds in making a mirror, still and attentive, one always obtains a result, not necessarily with a precise form of thought but always with the sensations of a light coming from above. And then, if one can receive this light coming from above without entering immediately into a whirl of activity, receive it in calm and silence and let it penetrate deep into the being, then after a while it expresses itself either as a luminous thought or as a very precise indication here (Mother indicates the heart), in this other centre. Naturally, first these two faculties must be developed; then, as soon as there is any result, one must observe the result, as I said, and see the connection with what is happening, the consequences: see, observe very attentively what has come in, what may have caused a distortion, what one has added by way of more or less conscious reasoning or the intervention of a lower will, also more or less conscious; and it is by a very deep study - indeed, almost of every moment, in any case daily and very frequent - that one succeeds in developing one's intuition. It takes a long time. It takes a long time and there are ambushes: one can deceive oneself, take for intuitions subconscious wills which try to manifest, indications given by impulses one has refused to receive openly, indeed all sorts of difficulties. One must be prepared for that. But if one persists, one is sure to succeed. And there comes a time when one feels a kind of inner guidance, something which is leading one very perceptibly in all that one does. But then, for the guidance to have its maximum power, one must naturally add to it a conscious surrender: one must be sincerely determined to follow the indication given by the higher force. If one does that, then... one saves years of study, one can seize the result extremely rapidly. If one also does that, the result comes very rapidly. But for that, it must be done with sincerity and... a kind of inner spontaneity. If one wants to try without this surrender, one may succeed - as one can also succeed in developing one's personal will and making it into a very considerable power - but that takes a very long time and one meets many obstacles and the result is very precarious; one must be very persistent, obstinate, persevering, and one is sure to succeed, but only after a great labour. Make your surrender with a sincere, complete self-giving, and you will go ahead at full speed, you will go much faster - but you must not do this calculatingly, for that spoils everything! (Silence) Moreover, whatever you may want to do in life, one thing is absolutely indispensable and at the basis of everything, the capacity of concentrating the attention. If you are able to gather together the rays of attention and consciousness on one point and can maintain this concentration with a persistent will, nothing can resist it - whatever it may be, from the most material physical development to the highest spiritual one. But this discipline must be followed in a constant and, it may be said, imperturbable way; not that you should always be concentrated on the same thing - that's not what I mean, I mean learning to concentrate. And materially, for studies, sports, all physical or mental development, it is absolutely indispensable. And the value of an individual is proportionate to the value of his attention. And from the spiritual point of view it is still more important. There is no spiritual obstacle which can resist a penetrating power of concentration. For instance, the discovery of the psychic being, union with the inner Divine, opening to the higher spheres, all can be obtained by an intense and obstinate power of concentration - but one must learn how to do it. There is nothing in the human or even in the superhuman field, to which the power of concentration is not the key. You can be the best athlete, you can be the best student, you can be an artistic, literary or scientific genius, you can be the greatest saint with that faculty. And everyone has in himself a tiny little beginning of it - it is given to everybody, but people do not cultivate it. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958 ,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:An Aesthetic Saint ~ J D Salinger,
2: Les Saints
~ Emile Verhaeren,
3:O Lord my God, ~ Saint Augustine,
4:Who. Hit. You? ~ Lilith Saintcrow,
5:I'm far from a saint. ~ Clay Guida,
6: Sainte Cécile
~ Émile Nelligan,
7: Saint Sébastien
~ Charles Cros,
8:Werth. I ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
9:First one's free. ~ Lilith Saintcrow,
10: La Saint-Jean
~ Emile Verhaeren,
11:Dedication ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
12:Haste is of the Devil. ~ Saint Jerome,
13:It is our part to seek, ~ Saint Jerome,
14:My weight is my love. ~ Saint Augustine,
15: Tableau De Sainteté
~ Charles Cros,
16:A virgin? Yes. A saint? No ~ Celia Aaron,
17:By and by never comes. ~ Saint Augustine,
18:He who labours, prays. ~ Saint Augustine,
19:Saint Noah is never wrong ~ Jenn Bennett,
20:This world's a bubble. ~ Saint Augustine,
21:You are what you love. ~ Saint Augustine,
22:Poetry is devil's wine. ~ Saint Augustine,
23:The saint, we are told, ~ Nissim Ezekiel,
24:Beware of bad Catholics. ~ Saint Augustine,
25:Custom is second nature. ~ Saint Augustine,
26:For the saint there is no death. ~ Tolstoy,
27:Love and do as you will. ~ Saint Augustine,
28:The things we love ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
29:Who God possesseth ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
30:Fallor Ergo Sum. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
31:Love knows nothing of order. ~ Saint Jerome,
32:Make friends with angels. ~ Saint Augustine,
33:Make this man a saint now, OK? ~ Elton John,
34:One never knows. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
35:Saint-Saëns’s “Danse Macabre. ~ Neil Gaiman,
36:To sing is to pray twice. ~ Saint Augustine,
37:[...]all saints need sinners. ~ Alan W Watts,
38:Great saints are never wimps. ~ Peter Kreeft,
39:I am a Count, Not a Saint. ~ Alexandre Dumas,
40:I am a count, not a saint. ~ Alexandre Dumas,
41:Impreso en México ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
42:Quick enough, if good enough. ~ Saint Jerome,
43:Saint Delphi my ass. ~ Jennifer L Armentrout,
44:The argument is at an end. ~ Saint Augustine,
45:A saint belongs to all humanity. ~ Elif Safak,
46:God and Hell both damn it, ~ Lilith Saintcrow,
47:I'm an angel not a frickin' saint. ~ J R Ward,
48:Poetry is the Devil's wine. ~ Saint Augustine,
49:Saint Anthony the Anchorite? ~ Robert Masello,
50:Singing is a lover's thing. ~ Saint Augustine,
51:Veritas filia temporis ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
52:When we pray we speak to God; ~ Saint Jerome,
53:Woman is the root of all evil. ~ Saint Jerome,
54:Be crazy dumbsaint of the mind. ~ Jack Kerouac,
55:Every city is a living body. ~ Saint Augustine,
56:Every saint has a bee in his halo. ~ E V Lucas,
57:Fasting is a medicine. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
58:In search of my Love ~ Saint John of the Cross,
59:Love draws forth love. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
60:Love follows knowledge. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
61:Saint Mark, chapter 16, verse 6. ~ Terry Hayes,
62:The Devil invented gambling. ~ Saint Augustine,
63:The only menace is inertia. ~ Saint John Perse,
64:Children understand. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
65:Dios es la primera causa ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
66:Dressing is a way of life. ~ Yves Saint Laurent,
67:For in our hope we are saved. ~ Saint Augustine,
68:I don't really like knees. ~ Yves Saint Laurent,
69:My father was a saint. I'm not. ~ Indira Gandhi,
70:Sin, but sin boldly. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
71:You’d test the patience of a saint. ~ Ken Bruen,
72:Each lost day has its patron saint! ~ Bret Harte,
73:God save us from gloomy saints! ~ Teresa of vila,
74:He who complains, sins. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
75:Hominem unius libri timeo ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
76:Laugh and grow strong ~ Saint Ignatius of Loyola,
77:My weight is my love. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
78:Pain is never permanent. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
79:Saintliness is also a temptation. ~ Jean Anouilh,
80:Such a Saint, such an offering. ~ George Herbert,
81:To be a saint is to be yourself. ~ Thomas Merton,
82:Tolle, lege: take up and read. ~ Saint Augustine,
83:Truth is not private property. ~ Saint Augustine,
84:You raise us upright. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
85:Anger is a weed; hate is a tree ~ Saint Augustine,
86:A saint abroad and a devil at home. ~ John Bunyan,
87:I err, therefore I am. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
88:I'm so secluded. Very alone. ~ Yves Saint Laurent,
89:Ite, inflammate omnia. ~ Saint Ignatius of Loyola,
90:It's the martyrdom of Saint Me. ~ Chuck Palahniuk,
91:Laugh and grow strong. ~ Saint Ignatius of Loyola,
92:Love and say it with your life. ~ Saint Augustine,
93:Love God, and do what you like. ~ Saint Augustine,
94:Love is the beauty of the soul. ~ Saint Augustine,
95:One does not cross-examine a saint. ~ Victor Hugo,
96:•saints. 9 And they sang a new song:  ~ Anonymous,
97:Saints can spring from any soil. ~ John Steinbeck,
98:The one who sings, prays twice. ~ Saint Augustine,
99:Unjust laws aren't laws at all. ~ Saint Augustine,
100:What are you doing, becoming a saint? ~ Anonymous,
101:Whoever possesses God is happy. ~ Saint Augustine,
102:Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam. ~ Saint Ignatius of Loyola,
103:Are you listening, little bird? ~ Lilith Saintcrow,
104:A saint abroad, and a devil at home. ~ John Bunyan,
105:Believe that you may understand. ~ Saint Augustine,
106:Desiderium sinus cordis ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
107:He who plants kindness gathers love. ~ Saint Basil,
108:I believe in order to understand ~ Saint Augustine,
109:If faith fails, prayer perishes. ~ Saint Augustine,
110:Love God, then do what you will. ~ Saint Augustine,
111:Love me, love my dog. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
112:Love turns work into rest. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
113:The best saints swear fluently. ~ Barbara Cleverly,
114:The devil never sleeps. ~ Saint Catherine of Siena,
115:The great thing is to become Saints. ~ Philip Neri,
116:Virginity can be lost by a thought. ~ Saint Jerome,
117:Attract them by the way you live. ~ Saint Augustine,
118:Every saint has a bee in his halo. ~ Elbert Hubbard,
119:Heaven is along the way. ~ Saint Catherine of Siena,
120:If you comprehend, it is not God. ~ Saint Augustine,
121:If you understand, it is not God. ~ Saint Augustine,
122:Labor: a powerful medicine. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
123:Love does not stay idle. ~ Saint Catherine of Siena,
124:Love makes saints or sinners out of men. ~ J D Robb,
125:There is no sinner like a young saint. ~ Aphra Behn,
126:The world is passing away. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
127:To read without writing is to sleep. ~ Saint Jerome,
128: Vieille Ferme À La Toussaint
~ Emile Verhaeren,
129:We must sow the seed, not hoard it. ~ Saint Dominic,
130:Whole prayer is nothing but love. ~ Saint Augustine,
131:Beauty is the brilliance of truth. ~ Saint Augustine,
132:Begin now what you will be hereafter. ~ Saint Jerome,
133:Ex Malo Bounum (good out of evil). ~ Saint Augustine,
134:Grow where you are planted. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
135:Have contempt for contempt. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
136:Hell was made for the inquisitive. ~ Saint Augustine,
137:He pleaseth God whom God pleaseth. ~ Saint Augustine,
138:He that is jealous is not in love. ~ Saint Augustine,
139:He who sows courtesy reaps friendship. ~ Saint Basil,
140:Men who ape the saint and play the sinner. ~ Juvenal,
141:Modo, et modo, non habebent modum. ~ Saint Augustine,
142:No great saint lived without errors. ~ Martin Luther,
143:Patience obtains everything. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
144:Run, jump, shout, but do not sin. ~ Saint John Bosco,
145:saints here and there have been looking. ~ A W Tozer,
146:So dear to Heaven is saintly chastity, ~ John Milton,
147:Suffering saints are living seed. ~ Charles Spurgeon,
148:The purpose of all wars, is peace. ~ Saint Augustine,
149:The world's verdict is conclusive. ~ Saint Augustine,
150:This woman could make a saint sin. ~ Carrie Ann Ryan,
151:What do I love when I love my God? ~ Saint Augustine,
152:Will you draw me a sheep? ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
153:You could tempt a saint into ruin. ~ Vivienne Lorret,
154:A comprehended god is no god. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
155:But a dauntless faith believes ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
156:Every cell in us worships God. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
157:Expertus potest credere. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
158:Faith is God's work within us. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
159:Fashions fade, style is eternal. ~ Yves Saint Laurent,
160:Finding God in All Things. ~ Saint Ignatius of Loyola,
161:Forgiveness is a game only saints play Kabir. ~ Kabir,
162:His ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
163:I am a fox", the fox said. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
164:I am a fox", the fox said. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
165:Love, then do as you like. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
166:Methought I saw my late espoused saint. ~ John Milton,
167:My sole occupation is love. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
168:Never trust a dog to watch your food. ~ Saint Patrick,
169:result,1 the first focuses on ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
170:Sin is Energy in the wrong channel. ~ Saint Augustine,
171:The greatest evil is physical pain. ~ Saint Augustine,
172:The reward of patience Is patience. ~ Saint Augustine,
173:This disease of curiosity. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
174:To forget a friend is sad. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
175:Watch out for the Baobabs! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
176:You learn to love by loving. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
177:All times are dangerous times. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
178:been ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
179:Between urine and filth we are born. ~ Saint Augustine,
180:Even the most saintly among us can slip. ~ Karen Perry,
181:Hurry ruins saints as well as artists. ~ Thomas Merton,
182:It is idle to play the lyre for an ass. ~ Saint Jerome,
183:My yoke is easy, and my burden light. ~ Saint Boniface,
184:Patience is the companion of wisdom. ~ Saint Augustine,
185:saints are just sinners who keep trying ~ J T Lawrence,
186:The soul is known by it's acts. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
187:The tired ox treads with a firmer step. ~ Saint Jerome,
188:Things are solved by walking around. ~ Saint Augustine,
189:To reach satisfaction in all ~ Saint John of the Cross,
190:Truth suffers, but never dies. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
191:Understanding is the wages of faith. ~ Saint Augustine,
192:We speak, but it is God who teaches. ~ Saint Augustine,
193:What I know of the divine ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
194:Your wisdom should be without pride. ~ Saint Augustine,
195:1917, ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
196:1924, ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
197:1943, ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
198:1980, ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
199:Beware of the person of one book ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
200:Beware the man of a single book. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
201:Death is the gate of life. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
202:enter ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
203:Flowers are so inconsistent! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
204:Glory be to God for all things! ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
205:God gives where he finds empty hands. ~ Saint Augustine,
206:God is best known in not knowing him. ~ Saint Augustine,
207:Make sickness itself a prayer. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
208:Only He who made man makes man happy. ~ Saint Augustine,
209:Practice humility and patience. ~ Saint Vincent de Paul,
210:Punishment is justice for the unjust. ~ Saint Augustine,
211:Si comprehendis non est Deus ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
212:Small minds cannot grasp great subjects. ~ Saint Jerome,
213:smite ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
214:Teach by works more than words. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
215:The Lord preserve us from sainthood ~ Nikos Kazantzakis,
216:To ignore Scripture is to ignore Christ. ~ Saint Jerome,
217:Understanding is the reward of faith. ~ Saint Augustine,
218:What cannot be changed cannot be blamed. ~ Saint Jerome,
219:Why do you not practise what you preach. ~ Saint Jerome,
220:A fat stomach never breeds fine thoughts. ~ Saint Jerome,
221:A saint? Tanner Stone was the anti-Christ. ~ Amy Andrews,
222:Beware of the person of one book. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
223:Charity is the root of all good works. ~ Saint Augustine,
224:Do It. ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
225:Doubt is but another element of faith. ~ Saint Augustine,
226:For in our hope we are saved. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
227:For me to be a saint means to be myself. ~ Thomas Merton,
228:Give, expecting nothing there of. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
229:I cannot grasp all that I am. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
230:In everything, love simplicity. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
231:It is love alone that counts. ~ Saint Therese of Lisieux,
232:It's hard to be a saint in the city. ~ Bruce Springsteen,
233:Liberta o homem, e ele criará ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
234:[L]ove is inventive to infinity. ~ Saint Vincent de Paul,
235:My ultimate goal is to become a saint. ~ Marisa Berenson,
236:Não olheis de onde vem a verdade. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
237:Nash and Saint’s story to be continued . ~ Jay Crownover,
238:Never judge a philosophy by its abuse. ~ Saint Augustine,
239:Oh, beauty, ever ancient and ever new. ~ Saint Augustine,
240:O Master, make me chaste, but not yet! ~ Saint Augustine,
241:One loving heart sets another on fire. ~ Saint Augustine,
242:Saints are only sinners who keep trying. ~ Mother Teresa,
243:The meaning of life is to become a saint. ~ Peter Kreeft,
244:The worst of madmen is a saint run mad. ~ Alexander Pope,
245:Three years couldn’t turn Satan to a saint ~ Celia Aaron,
246:To live is to be slowly born. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
247:To live is to be slowly born. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
248:To saints their very slumber is a prayer. ~ Saint Jerome,
249:Unbelief is the greatest of sins. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
250:Water is the mirror of nature. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
251:You could seduce a saint with that smile. ~ Eloisa James,
252:You just talk like grown-ups! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
253:Beauty when unadorned is adorned the most. ~ Saint Jerome,
254:Be who you are and be that well. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
255:Be who you are and do that well. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
256:C'est triste d'oublier un ami. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
257:dinner celebrating the patron saint of ~ James A Michener,
258:Dios es el más noble de los seres. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
259:Gold hath no lustre of its own. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
260:He is rich enough who does not want bread. ~ Saint Jerome,
261:Honest speech does not seek secret places. ~ Saint Jerome,
262:I believe in myself and in Saint Therese. ~ Tara Lipinski,
263:i understand that i understand ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
264:I was born with a nervous breakdown. ~ Yves Saint Laurent,
265:I will send a shower of roses. ~ Saint Therese of Lisieux,
266:Let all find COMPASSION in YOU. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
267:Love has reasons that reason knows not. ~ Saint Augustine,
268:Love is the beauty of the soul ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
269:neither ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
270:Nondum amabam, et amare amabam ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
271:One always goes on as one begins. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
272:She is more Mother than Queen. ~ Saint Therese of Lisieux,
273:Silence does good to the soul. ~ Saint Therese of Lisieux,
274:Small minds can never handle great themes. ~ Saint Jerome,
275:The verdict of the world is conclusive. ~ Saint Augustine,
276:Tolle, lege: take up and read. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
277:We should never use the truth to wound. ~ Saint Augustine,
278:Wonder is the desire of knowledge. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
279:10 years ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
280:An unjust law is no law at all. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
281:aureole of Saint Patrick banishing snakes, ~ Jennifer Egan,
282:directly ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
283:Discouragement is not from God. ~ Saint Ignatius of Loyola,
284:Every infinity... is made finite to God. ~ Saint Augustine,
285:God is even kinder than you think. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
286:He who prays most receives most. ~ Saint Alphonsus Liguori,
287:I dislike the thought of damage to you. ~ Lilith Saintcrow,
288:I married a saint - well, a saint who curses. ~ Ray Romano,
289:I'm no saint but I do believe in what is right. ~ Kid Rock,
290:I'm not easy to live with. My wife is a saint. ~ Bill Burr,
291:In the end, we know God as unknown. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
292:I say nothing to him I love him ~ Saint Therese of Lisieux,
293:I still fall for your everyday. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
294:It is a sin to judge any man by his post ~ Saint Augustine,
295:Love and say it with your life. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
296:Marriage fills the Earth, virginity Heaven. ~ Saint Jerome,
297:Never is a man wholly a saint or a sinner. ~ Hermann Hesse,
298:No problem, Goth Boy. First one's free. ~ Lilith Saintcrow,
299:O Lord, help me to be pure, but not yet. ~ Saint Augustine,
300:One who knows more, loves more. ~ Saint Catherine of Siena,
301:Saints cannot exist without a community ~ Stanley Hauerwas,
302:Silence is God's first language. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
303:Slander is worse than cannibalism. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
304:stars will be looking up to you ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
305:The Jews were God's chosen people. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
306:There is no leisure about politics. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
307:We hope someday to be saints, but not martyrs ~ Mario Puzo,
308:Who teaches the soul if not God? ~ Saint John of the Cross,
309:A little saint best fits a little shrine, ~ Robert Herrick,
310:A saint in crape is twice a saint in lawn. ~ Alexander Pope,
311:A saint is good when nobody is looking. ~ Leonard Ravenhill,
312:A vice in the heart is an idol on the altar. ~ Saint Jerome,
313:A world to be born under your footsteps. ~ Saint John Perse,
314:Do you wish to rise? Begin by descending. ~ Saint Augustine,
315:Except he be willing, man cannot believe. ~ Saint Augustine,
316:God answered the prayers of animals. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
317:God asks little, but He gives much. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
318:God, deliver me from sullen saints. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
319:Hell is paved with priests' skulls. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
320:Les échecs fortifient les forts. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
321:Lo más importante es invisible”. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
322:Nothing is small if God accepts it. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
323:One is never happy where one is. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
324:Pride dies 20 minutes after death. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
325:righteous ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
326:The drunken man is a living corpse. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
327:There is no salvation outside the church. ~ Saint Augustine,
328:The scars of others should teach us caution. ~ Saint Jerome,
329:the sixth ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
330:The sleepy like to make excuses. ~ Saint Benedict of Nursia,
331:To be a saint is to will the one thing. ~ Soren Kierkegaard,
332:Where dance is, there is the devil. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
333:You're no saint. We taste it in your heart. ~ Tessa Gratton,
334:1907, June ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
335:Cast from your heart the bitterness. ~ Saint Vincent de Paul,
336:Elegance and beauty have been banished. ~ Yves Saint Laurent,
337:En iyi yüreğiyle görebilir insan. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
338:Every sinner needs a saint to balance them out, ~ K Bromberg,
339:Idleness is an enemy of the soul. ~ Saint Benedict of Nursia,
340:I have played a few lay saints in my time. ~ Pauline Collins,
341:I recommend to you holy simplicity. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
342:I want to be like the patron saint of reality. ~ Fiona Apple,
343:Let us not overlook so great a gain. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
344:Love the sinner and hate the sin. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
345:medal. A religious medal to some kind of saint. ~ Rhys Bowen,
346:My sin grew sleek on my excesses. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
347:Never stop wanting for your magic ~ Saint Therese of Lisieux,
348:O my God, teach me to be generous ~ Saint Ignatius of Loyola,
349:Our Lord said. Be yourself with the good Lord. ~ Saint Peter,
350:SAINT, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. ~ Ambrose Bierce,
351:The law detects, grace alone conquers sin. ~ Saint Augustine,
352:The only sure way to maturity is through pain. ~ Steve Saint,
353:There is only one misery . . . not to be saints. ~ L on Bloy,
354:They talk like angels but they live like men. ~ Saint Jerome,
355:After you die, you wear what you are. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
356:Be kind to all and severe to thyself. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
357:by humiliation alone can Saints be made, ~ Th r se de Lisieux,
358:Christ moves along the pots and pans. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
359:Christ was born of a woman without the man. ~ Saint Augustine,
360:God made saints out of far worse people than you. ~ Mark Hart,
361:He that is jealous is not in love. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
362:If you understood him, it would not be God. ~ Saint Augustine,
363:I saw the sunset forty-four times! ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
364:Jesus took His flesh from the flesh of Mary ~ Saint Augustine,
365:Love needs to be proved by action. ~ Saint Therese of Lisieux,
366:loyal people have a mom they think is a saint. ~ Duff McKagan,
367:Make me an instrument of thy peace. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
368:Man is, above all, he who creates. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
369:o essencial é invisível aos olhos. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
370:One can't reach the Truth but through Love. ~ Saint Augustine,
371:One must observe the proper rites. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
372:Out of darkness is born the light. ~ Saint Catherine of Siena,
373:Saturday 13 September 2014 Saint John Chrysostom, ~ Anonymous,
374:Solo los niños saben lo que buscan ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
375:The essential is invisible to eyes ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
376:This is the world of sixty billion dollars saint. ~ Toba Beta,
377:Truly unexpected tidings make both ears tingle. ~ Saint Basil,
378:What do I love when I love my God? ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
379:What do you possess if you possess not God? ~ Saint Augustine,
380:Willmore: There is no sinner like a young saint. ~ Aphra Behn,
381:You have to leave room in life to dream. ~ Buffy Sainte Marie,
382:1978, June 8 ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
383:1981 to 1985 ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
384:A saint is a sinner who never gave up. ~ Paramahansa Yogananda,
385:be deceived, ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
386:Chanel freed women, and I empowered them. ~ Yves Saint Laurent,
387:Endurance is the queen of all virtues. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
388:Eternity is the now that does not pass away. ~ Saint Augustine,
389:[Fashion is] a kind of vitamin for style. ~ Yves Saint Laurent,
390:For it is in giving that we receive. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
391:for nothing is so faithless as wealth; ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
392:Go forth and set the world on fire. ~ Saint Ignatius of Loyola,
393:Great writers are the saints for the godless. ~ Anita Brookner,
394:I'd rather get eaten by an epileptic shark. ~ Lilith Saintcrow,
395:It's useful because it's beautiful. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
396:May God protect me from gloomy saints. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
397:Mount Calvary is the academy of love. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
398:My flower is somewhere out there... ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
399:My love is my weight. Because of it, I move. ~ Saint Augustine,
400:On ne sait jamais! One never knows! ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
401:Our heart is restless until it rests in You. ~ Saint Augustine,
402:Peacemakers. ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
403:Repentant tears wash out the stain of guilt. ~ Saint Augustine,
404:Saints are sinners who kept on going. ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
405:Saints are usually killed by their own people. ~ Eric Sevareid,
406:Sin is Energy in the wrong channel. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
407:Take up and read, take up and read. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
408:The desire for fame tempts even noble minds. ~ Saint Augustine,
409:The land of tears is so mysterious. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
410:There are secret saints with strange destinies. ~ Iris Murdoch,
411:to be judged ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
412:To love is to will the good of another. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
413:What can be hoped for which is not believed? ~ Saint Augustine,
414:You’re beautiful, but you’re empty. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
415:1981, July 23 ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
416:A bad man becomes worse when he apes a saint. ~ Publilius Syrus,
417:A goal without a pan is just a wish. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
418:A light heart is a magnet for all that you love ~ Saint Germain,
419:All the stars are a riot of flowers. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
420:Better to be strong than pretty and useless. ~ Lilith Saintcrow,
421:Can you nominate someone’s tongue for sainthood? ~ Elle Kennedy,
422:Give me chastity and continence, but not yet. ~ Saint Augustine,
423:Grown-ups really are decidedly odd", ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
424:he determined ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
425:I'm regarded as the patron saint of manicurists. ~ Tippi Hedren,
426:it remains for us to treat of His image, ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
427:L'essenziale è invisibile agli occhi ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
428:Lo esencial es invisible a los ojos. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
429:Lord, how Thou dost afflict Thy lovers! ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
430:Monday, June 29 Saints and Peter and Paul, Apostles ~ Anonymous,
431:No one is ever satisfied where he is ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
432:nothing can be known, save what is true; ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
433:One only really sees with the heart. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
434:Patience is the companion of wisdom. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
435:St. Soren, Bastard Patron Saint of Manipulation ~ Tiffany Reisz,
436:the first one ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
437:There was a hole inside her, and it twisted. ~ Lilith Saintcrow,
438:The whole world is not worth one soul. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
439:We come to God by love and not by navigation. ~ Saint Augustine,
440:We speak, but it is God who teaches. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
441:You are beautiful, but you are empty ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
442:You're not a man, you're a mushroom! ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
443:You're not a man, you're a mushroom! ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
444:1916, December ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
445:1972, April 12 ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
446:A goal without a plan is just a wish. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
447:Art is right reason in the doing of work. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
448:A true servant of Mary cannot be lost. ~ Saint Alphonsus Liguori,
449:Be neither saint nor sophist-led, but be a man. ~ Matthew Arnold,
450:Charity is love; not all love is charity. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
451:Charity is no substitute for justice withheld. ~ Saint Augustine,
452:Christ before me, Christ behind me,Christ in me. ~ Saint Patrick,
453:Christ was either liar, lunatic, or Lord! ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
454:Don't change the world, change worlds. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
455:From moment to moment one can bear much. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
456:God gives where he finds empty hands. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
457:God measures out affliction to our need. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
458:Grown ups are certainly very strange. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
459:Grown ups are certainly very strange. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
460:Happiness is a new idea in Europe. ~ Louis Antoine de Saint Just,
461:If He is with me I care not where I go. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,
462:Le langage est source de malentendus. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
463:Love is ever new because it never groweth old. ~ Saint Augustine,
464:Love takes up where knowledge leaves off. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
465:Morality is stronger than tyrants. ~ Louis Antoine de Saint Just,
466:No one is ever satisfied where he is. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
467:No one is ever satisfied where he is. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
468:O essencial é invisível para os olhos ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
469:One can covert only a sinner, never a saint. ~ Carlos Ruiz Zaf n,
470:Patient endurance attends to all things. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
471:Pure logic is the ruin of the spirit. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
472:Pure logic is the ruin of the spirit. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
473:Purity of soul cannot be lost without consent. ~ Saint Augustine,
474:Run while you have the light of life! ~ Saint Benedict of Nursia,
475:Saints are not allowed to lie, not even to demons. ~ Eoin Colfer,
476:Straight ahead you can't go very far. ~ Antoine de Saint Exupery,
477:Straight ahead you can't go very far. ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
478:The happy man in this life needs friends. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
479:The Holy Scriptures are our letters from home. ~ Saint Augustine,
480:The journey is essential to the dream. ~ Saint Francis of Assisi,
481:To love is to will the good of the other. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
482:We trust and believe in what we love. ~ Saint Catherine of Siena,
483:Who loves me will love my dog also. ~ Saint Bernard of Clairvaux,
484:Why be a saint unless you could also be a martyr? ~ Louise Penny,
485:Will is to grace as the horse is to the rider. ~ Saint Augustine,
486:You're not a saint. You're a demon. Own up to it. ~ Julie Kagawa,
487:Yves Saint Laurent hated fashion. He loved style. ~ Pierre Berge,
488:1977, August 24 ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
489:1982, October 3 ~ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints,
490:219Take up and read, take up and read. ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
491:a last glimmer of intelligence (p. 79) ~ Antoine de Saint Exup ry,
492:Anyone wants to be true what one loves ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo,
493:Be gentle to all and stern with yourself. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
494:Better to illuminate than merely to shine. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
495:Can any praise be worthy of the Lord's majesty? ~ Saint Augustine,
496:Don't ask who said it? Ask what they said. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
497:Don't let your sins turn into bad habits. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila,
498:Faith is the union of God and the soul. ~ Saint John of the Cross,
499:Fasting of the body is food for the soul. ~ Saint John Chrysostom,
500:Fear is a greater evil than evil itself. ~ Saint Francis de Sales,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



5

   50 Integral Yoga
   27 Philosophy
   21 Yoga
   17 Occultism
   13 Christianity
   5 Poetry
   4 Hinduism
   2 Mythology
   1 Kabbalah
   1 Integral Theory
   1 Education
   1 Buddhism
   1 Alchemy


   79 Sri Aurobindo
   30 Saint John of Climacus
   25 The Mother
   22 Aldous Huxley
   20 Saint Teresa of Avila
   12 Satprem
   12 Saint Augustine of Hippo
   11 Aleister Crowley
   10 Swami Vivekananda
   7 Swami Krishnananda
   6 Sri Ramakrishna
   5 Friedrich Nietzsche
   4 Swami Sivananda Saraswati
   4 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   4 Franz Bardon
   3 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   2 Patanjali
   2 Ovid
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   2 Carl Jung


   30 The Ladder of Divine Ascent
   22 The Perennial Philosophy
   19 The Way of Perfection
   13 The Confessions of Saint Augustine
   12 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   10 The Mothers Agenda
   10 Letters On Yoga II
   9 Essays Divine And Human
   8 Talks
   8 Liber ABA
   7 The Study and Practice of Yoga
   7 The Interior Castle or The Mansions
   7 The Human Cycle
   7 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   7 Essays On The Gita
   6 The Secret Doctrine
   6 The Life Divine
   6 The Divine Comedy
   6 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   6 Questions And Answers 1957-1958
   6 On the Way to Supermanhood
   6 Magick Without Tears
   6 Letters On Yoga IV
   6 Dark Night of the Soul
   4 Twilight of the Idols
   4 Raja-Yoga
   4 Essays In Philosophy And Yoga
   4 Bhakti-Yoga
   4 Amrita Gita
   3 Walden
   3 The Hero with a Thousand Faces
   3 Sex Ecology Spirituality
   3 Questions And Answers 1956
   3 Questions And Answers 1929-1931
   3 Faust
   2 Words Of Long Ago
   2 The Practice of Magical Evocation
   2 The Bible
   2 Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   2 Savitri
   2 Questions And Answers 1954
   2 Patanjali Yoga Sutras
   2 Metamorphoses
   2 Kena and Other Upanishads
   2 Isha Upanishad
   2 Initiation Into Hermetics
   2 Aion
   2 A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah


0.01_-_Introduction, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  We landed there, one day in February 1954, having emerged from our Guianese forest and a certain number of dead-end peripluses; we had knocked upon all the doors of the old world before reaching that point of absolute impossibility where it was truly necessary to embark into something else or once and for all put a bullet through the brain of this slightly superior ape. The first thing that struck us was this exotic Notre Dame with its burning incense sticks, its effigies and its prostrations in immaculate white: a Church. We nearly jumped into the first train out that very evening, bound straight for the Himalayas, or the devil. But we remained near Mother for nineteen years. What was it, then, that could have held us there? We had not left Guiana to become a little Saint in white or to enter some new religion. 'I did not come upon earth to found an ashram; that would have been a poor aim indeed,' She wrote in 1934. What did all this mean, then, this 'Ashram' that was already registered as the owner of a great spiritual business, and this fragile, little silhouette at the center of all these zealous worshippers? In truth, there is no better way to smother someone than to worship him: he chokes beneath the weight of worship, which moreover gives the worshipper claim to ownership. 'Why do you want to worship?' She exclaimed. 'You have but to become! It is the laziness to become that makes one worship.' She wanted so much to make them
   become this 'something else,' but it was far easier to worship and quiescently remain what one was.
  
  She spoke to deaf ears. She was very alone in this 'ashram.' Little by little, the disciples fill up the place, then they say: it is ours. It is 'the Ashram.' We are 'the disciples.' In Pondicherry as in Rome as in Mecca. 'I do not want a religion! An end to religions!' She exclaimed. She struggled and fought in their midst - was She therefore to leave this Earth like one more Saint or yogi, buried beneath haloes, the 'continuatrice' of a great spiritual lineage? She was seventy-six years old when we landed there, a knife in our belt and a ready curse on our lips.
  

0.03_-_The_Threefold_Life, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  But if it is often difficult for the mental life to accommodate itself to the dully resistant material activity, how much more difficult must it seem for the spiritual existence to live on in a world that appears full not of the Truth but of every lie and illusion, not of Love and Beauty but of an encompassing discord and ugliness, not of the Law of Truth but of victorious selfishness and sin? Therefore the spiritual life tends easily in the Saint and Sannyasin to withdraw from the material existence and reject it either wholly and physically or in the spirit. It sees this world as the kingdom of evil or of ignorance and the eternal and divine either in a far-off heaven or beyond where there is no world and no life. It separates itself inwardly, if not also physically, from the world's impurities; it asserts the spiritual reality in a spotless isolation. This withdrawal renders an invaluable service to the material life itself by forcing it to regard and even to bow down to something that is the direct negation of its own petty ideals, sordid cares and egoistic self-content.
  

0.06_-_INTRODUCTION, #Dark Night of the Soul, #Saint John of the Cross, #Christianity
  respect to its passivity. 1
  This 'fourth part' is the Dark Night. Of it the Saint writes in a passage which
  follows that just quoted:
  --
  union. The combined description of the two nights completes the presentation of
  active and passive purgation, to which the Saint limits himself in these treatises,
  although the subject of the stanzas which he is glossing is a much wider one,
  --
  of the soul transformed in God through love.
  The stanzas expounded by the Saint are taken from the same poem in the two
  treatises. The commentary upon the second, however, is very different from that
  --
  prepared, for the reception of Divine influences and illuminations in greater
  abundance than before. The Saint here postulates a principle of dogmatic theology
  that by himself, and with the ordinary aid of grace, man cannot attain to that
  --
  Divine aid more abundantly. 'However greatly the soul itself labours,' writes the
  Saint, 'it cannot actively purify itself so as to be in the least degree prepared for the
  Divine union of perfection of love, if God takes not its hand and purges it not in that
  --
  God. 4
  Before explaining the nature and effects of this Passive Night, the Saint touches, in
  passing, upon certain imperfections found in those who are about to enter it and
  --
  from frailty or lukewarmness of spirit, or even from indisposition or 'humours' of the
  body. The Saint is particularly effective here, and we may once more compare this
  chapter with a similar one in the Ascent (II, xiii)that in which he fixes the point
  --
  mathematical, rather than of spiritual operations.
  In Chapter x, the Saint describes the discipline which the soul in this Dark
  Night must impose upon itself; this, as might be logically deduced from the Ascent,
  --
  from this aridity, while Chapter xiv briefly expounds the last line of the first stanza
  and brings to an end what the Saint desires to say with respect to the first Passive
  Night.
  --
  which have preceded it. This, nevertheless, is the Dark Night par excellence, of
  which the Saint speaks in these words: 'The night which we have called that of
  sense may and should be called a kind of correction and restraint of the desire
  --
  before doing so,10 for they still have many imperfections, both habitual and actual
  (Chapter ii). After a brief introduction (Chapter iii), the Saint describes with some
  fullness the nature of this spiritual purgation or dark contemplation referred to in
  --
  Chapter xviii is compared to the 'staircase' of the poem. This comparison suggests to
  the Saint an exposition (Chapters xviii, xix) of the ten steps or degrees of love which
  comprise St. Bernard's mystical ladder. Chapter xxi describes the soul's 'disguise,'
  --
  and prepared for the desired union with the Spouse, a union which is the subject
  that the Saint proposed to treat in his commentary on the five remaining stanzas.
  As far as we know, this commentary was never written. We have only the briefest
  outline of what was to have been covered in the third, in which, following the same
  effective metaphor of night, the Saint describes the excellent properties of the
  spiritual night of infused contemplation, through which the soul journeys with no

07.04_-_The_Triple_Soul-Forces, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  He is the crown of the martyr burned in flame
  And the glad resignation of the Saint
  And courage indifferent to the wounds of Time
  --
  
  Or his soul dream shut in Sainthood's brilliant cell
  Where only a bright shadow of God can come.

10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Delight, God's sweetest sign and Beauty's twin,
  Dreaded by aspiring Saint and austere sage,
  Is shunned, a dangerous and ambiguous cheat,

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