classes ::: subject,
children ::: 1.22 - (Poetic Diction continued.) How Poetry combines elevation of language with perspicuity., 1.24 - (Epic Poetry continued.) Further points of agreement with Tragedy., Epic Poetry (by alpha), Epic Poetry (ranked), Poetry (quotes)
branches ::: Poetry, romantic poetry

Instances, Classes, See Also, Object in Names
Definitions, . Quotes . - . Chapters .


object:Poetry
class:subject

--- AUTHORS FROM LIB
  Alighieri
  Baudelaire
  Blake
  Borges
  Browning
  Byron
  Cervantes
  Clough
  Eliot
  Frost
  Gibran
  Goethe
  Hafiz
  Hemingway
  Homer
  Hugo
  Longfellow
  Others
  Ovid
  Pindar
  Poe
  Rilke
  Rumi
  Tagore
  Tennyson
  Thomas
  Virgil
  Voltaire
  Whitman
  Wordsworth
  Yeats



questions, comments, suggestions/feedback, take-down requests, contribute, etc
contact me @ integralyogin@gmail.com or via the comments below
or join the integral discord server (chatrooms)
if the page you visited was empty, it may be noted and I will try to fill it out. cheers



--- OBJECT INSTANCES [42]


3rd_Pass_through_Savitri
Aleister_Crowley
Auguries_of_Innocence
Edgar_Allan_Poe
Epic_Poetry_(by_alpha)
Ernest_Hemingway
Hafiz
Hamlet
Hazrat_Inayat_Khan
Henry_David_Thoreau
Jalaluddin_Rumi
James_Joyce
Johann_Wolfgang_von_Goethe
Jorge_Luis_Borges
Kahlil_Gibran
Kobayashi_Issa
Labyrinths.
Leaves_of_Grass
Masaoka_Shiki
Pindar
Rabindranath_Tagore
Ralph_Waldo_Emerson
Robert_Browning
Sappho
Saul_Williams
Sky_Above
Songs_of_God
Songs_of_Kabir
Songs_of_Spiritual_Experience
The_Divine_Comedy
The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh
The_Gift
The_Prophet
The_Tempest
T_S_Eliot
Twelfth_Night
Virgil
William_Blake
William_Butler_Yeats
William_Shakespeare
William_Wordsworth
Yosa_Buson

--- PRIMARY CLASS


josh
media
quote
subject
subject

--- SEE ALSO


--- SIMILAR TITLES [3]


1.01 - 'Imitation' the common principle of the Arts of Poetry.
1.04 - The Origin and Development of Poetry.
1.22 - (Poetic Diction continued.) How Poetry combines elevation of language with perspicuity.
1.23 - Epic Poetry.
1.24 - (Epic Poetry continued.) Further points of agreement with Tragedy.
1.25 - Critical Objections brought against Poetry, and the principles on which they are to be answered.
1.26 - A general estimate of the comparative worth of Epic Poetry and Tragedy.
Classical Chinese Poetry An Anthology
Epic Poetry (by alpha)
Epic Poetry (ranked)
God and POETRY
Leaning Toward the Poet Eavesdropping on the Poetry of Everyday Life
Letters On Poetry And Art
Poetry
Poetry (quotes)
romantic poetry
The Future Poetry
select ::: Being, God, injunctions, media, place, powers, subjects,
favorite ::: cwsa, everyday, grade, mcw, memcards (table), project, project 0001, Savitri, Savitri (extended toc), the Temple of Sages, three js, whiteboard,
temp ::: consecration, experiments, knowledge, meditation, psychometrics, remember, responsibility, temp, the Bad, the God object, the Good, the most important, the Ring, the source of inspirations, the Stack, the Tarot, the Word, top priority, whiteboard,

--- DICTIONARIES (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)


poetry ::: Sri Aurobindo: “All poetry is an inspiration, a thing breathed into the thinking organ from above; it is recorded in the mind, but is born in the higher principle of direct knowledge or ideal vision which surpasses mind. It is in reality a revelation. The prophetic or revealing power sees the substance; the inspiration perceives the right expression. Neither is manufactured; nor is poetry really a poiesis or composition, nor even a creation, but rather the revelation of something that eternally exists. The ancients knew this truth and used the same word for poet and prophet, creator and seer, sophos, vates, kavi.” Essays Human and Divine :::

poetry ::: n. --> The art of apprehending and interpreting ideas by the faculty of imagination; the art of idealizing in thought and in expression.
Imaginative language or composition, whether expressed rhythmically or in prose. Specifically: Metrical composition; verse; rhyme; poems collectively; as, heroic poetry; dramatic poetry; lyric or Pindaric poetry.

poetry ::: n. --> The art of apprehending and interpreting ideas by the faculty of imagination; the art of idealizing in thought and in expression.
Imaginative language or composition, whether expressed rhythmically or in prose. Specifically: Metrical composition; verse; rhyme; poems collectively; as, heroic poetry; dramatic poetry; lyric or Pindaric poetry.

poetry: A literary genre characterized by rhythmical patterns of language and figurative language. Poetry is also created with a sense of the musicality, and is not just written for meaning.

poetry ::: Sri Aurobindo: “All poetry is an inspiration, a thing breathed into the thinking organ from above; it is recorded in the mind, but is born in the higher principle of direct knowledge or ideal vision which surpasses mind. It is in reality a revelation. The prophetic or revealing power sees the substance; the inspiration perceives the right expression. Neither is manufactured; nor is poetry really a poiesis or composition, nor even a creation, but rather the revelation of something that eternally exists. The ancients knew this truth and used the same word for poet and prophet, creator and seer, sophos, vates, kavi.” Essays Human and Divine :::


--- QUOTES [1500 / 5623 - 500 / 7602] (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



KEYS (10k)

1025 Sri Aurobindo
   64 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   32 Jalaluddin Rumi
   26 Voltaire
   24 Aristotle
   23 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   23 Kabir
   20 Aleister Crowley
   17 C S Lewis
   15 Swami Vivekananda
   15 Jorge Luis Borges
   14 Rabindranath Tagore
   14 Edgar Allan Poe
   13 Santoka Taneda
   13 Hafiz
   12 William Blake
   9 William Shakespeare
   9 G K Chesterton
   8 Sappho
   8 Khalil Gibran
   8 Homer
   8 Dante Alighieri
   7 Matsuo Basho
   6 Pablo Neruda
   6 Ernest Hemingway
   5 Pindar
   5 Hazrat Inayat Khan
   4 Virgil
   4 T S Eliot
   4 Percy Bysshe Shelley
   4 Novalis
   4 J R R Tolkien
   4 Charles Dickens
   3 William Wordsworth
   3 Sophocles
   3 Saul Williams
   3 Robert Browning
   3 Lord Byron
   3 James Joyce
   3 Izumi Shikibu
   3 Cervantes
   2 Omar Khayyam
   2 Mary Shelley
   1 William Butler Yeats
   1 Walt Whitman
   1 Vivekananda
   1 Shakespeare
   1 Robert Frost
   1 Petrarch
   1 Matsuo basho
   1 Mary Oliver
   1 Lucan
   1 Lewis Carroll
   1 Kahlil Gibran
   1 Horace
   1 Goethe
   1 Friedrich Schiller
   1 Ezra Pound
   1 Emily Dickinson
   1 Charles Baudelaire
   1 Allen Ginsberg
   1

NEW FULL DB (2.4M)

   73 Atticus Poetry
   8 Wallace Stevens
   8 Carl Sandburg
   6 Ralph Waldo Emerson
   5 Stephen King
   4 W H Auden
   4 Thomas Carlyle
   4 Rumi
   4 Jane Austen
   4 Ezra Pound
   4 Amy King
   3 Robert Frost
   3 Paul Simon
   3 Oscar Wilde
   3 Muriel Rukeyser
   3 Maya Angelou
   3 Marianne Moore
   3 Lord Byron
   3 John Keats
   3 John Green
   3 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
   3 J D Salinger
   3 Jalaluddin Rumi
   3 Charles Bukowski
   3 Anne Sexton
   2 William Hazlitt
   2 William Butler Yeats
   2 Washington Irving
   2 T S Eliot
   2 Theodor W Adorno
   2 Theodor Adorno
   2 Steve Maraboli
   2 Stephen Spender
   2 Seamus Heaney
   2 Sanober Khan
   2 Samuel Johnson
   2 Saint Augustine
   2 Roberto Bola o
   2 Robert Louis Stevenson
   2 Robert Hass
   2 Robert Bly
   2 Richard Dawkins
   2 Rachel Zucker
   2 Pablo Neruda
   2 Ovid
   2 Nicholson Baker
   2 Naomi Shihab Nye
   2 Margaret Atwood
   2 Mahmoud Darwish
   2 Leonard Cohen
   2 John F Kennedy
   2 Jean Cocteau
   2 Henry David Thoreau
   2 Gwendolyn Brooks
   2 Gustave Flaubert
   2 George Eliot
   2 Gayle Forman
   2 Ernesto Cardenal
   2 David Whyte
   2 David Walliams
   2 Charles Baudelaire
   2 Audre Lorde
   2 Anonymous
   2 Anne Carson
   2 Alphonse de Lamartine
   2 Allan Wolf

1:And empty words are evil. ~ Homer,
2:Hope is a waking dream. ~ Aristotle,
3:Well begun is half done. ~ Aristotle,
4:Student, tell me, what is God? ~ Kabir,
5:To begin, begin. ~ William Wordsworth,
6:Too many kings can ruin an army ~ Homer,
7:Who has begun has half done. ~ Horace,
8:Lord help my poor soul. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
9:Love truth but pardon error. ~ Voltaire,
10:Each man suffers his own destiny. ~ Virgil,
11:The best is yet to be. ~ Robert Browning,
12:What cannot be said will be wept. ~ Sappho,
13:Nature is the art of God. ~ Dante Alighieri,
14:To hold a pen is to be at war. ~ Voltaire,
15:Wherever you are is the entry point ~ Kabir,
16:Further up and further in. ~ C S Lewis,
17:Whatever one loves most is beautiful. ~ Sappho,
18:A friend to all is a friend to none. ~ Aristotle,
19:I sell mirrors in the city of the blind. ~ Kabir,
20:What is God? Everything. ~ Pindar, Fragment 140d ,
21:What you seek is seeking you ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
22:Beauty awakens the soul to act. ~ Dante Alighieri,
23:Life itself is a quotation. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
24:What we give to the poor, we lend to God. ~ Homer,
25:Every man is the son of his own works. ~ Cervantes,
26:I know not what to do, my mind is divided ~ Sappho,
27:In the distance someone is singing. ~ Pablo Neruda,
28:The essence of life is in remembering God. ~ Kabir,
29:A flute with no holes is not a flute. ~ Matsuo Basho,
30:Always desire to learn something useful. ~ Sophocles,
31:He listens well who takes notes. ~ Dante Alighieri,
32:Listen, my friend. He who loves understands. ~ Kabir,
33:The best way out is always through. ~ Robert Frost,
34:Even in the grave, all is not lost. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
35:Humankind cannot bear very much Reality. ~ T S Eliot,
36:In solitude, where we are least alone. ~ Lord Byron,
37:We were together. I forget the rest. ~ Walt Whitman,
38:And all I loved,I loved alone. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
39:And what he greatly thought, he nobly dared. ~ Homer,
40:Awake, my Little ones, and fill the Cup ~ Omar Khayyam,
41:Give your weakness to one who helps. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
42:God bears with the wicked but not forever. ~ Cervantes,
43:Let yourself become living poetry. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
44:Poetry heals the wounds inflicted by reason. ~ Novalis,
45:Do not peer too far. ~ Pindar, Olympian Odes I,
46:Faith is a passionate intuition. ~ William Wordsworth,
47:Pardon my sanity in a world insane. ~ Emily Dickinson,
48:Intolerance is evidence of impotence. ~ Aleister Crowley,
49:My course is set for an uncharted sea. ~ Dante Alighieri,
50:The whole is more than the sum of its parts. ~ Aristotle,
51:I'm alone and nobody is in the mirror ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
52:There is no friend as loyal as a book. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
53:I am a writer. Therefore. I am not sane. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
54:I am yours. Don't give myself back to me. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
55:I gave in, and admitted that God was God. ~ C S Lewis,
56:The true method of knowledge is experiment. ~ William Blake,
57:Whenever God lays His glance, Life starts clapping! ~ Hafiz,
58:One great use of words is to hide our thoughts. ~ Voltaire,
59:To enjoy life we must touch much of it lightly. ~ Voltaire,
60:What is now proved was once only imagined. ~ William Blake,
61:Be still my heart; thou hast known worse than this. ~ Homer,
62:Excess of sorrow laughs. Excess of joy weeps. ~ William Blake,
63:Invoke often! Inflame thyself with prayer! ~ Aleister Crowley,
64:Marriage is an adventure, like going to war. ~ G K Chesterton,
65:Suffering is a gift. In it is hidden mercy. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
66:The ego is a veil between humans and God. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
67:Wisdom is only found in truth. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
68:I come to a world of iron to make a world of gold. ~ Cervantes,
69:It never troubles the wolf how many the sheep may be. ~ Virgil,
70:It's drizzling. Here I am, still alive. ~ Santoka Taneda,
71:Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom. ~ Aristotle,
72:Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work. ~ Aristotle,
73:There is no river at all, and no boat, and no boatman. ~ Kabir,
74:The road goes ever on and on. ~ J R R Tolkien, Bilbo Baggins ,
75:When you really look for me you will see me instantly. ~ Kabir,
76:Poets, like the blind, can see in the dark. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
77:Quotations every day of the year. ~ James Joyce, Finnegans Wake ,
78:All life is Yoga. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
79:Although only breath, words which I speak are immortal. ~ Sappho,
80:As soon as you trust yourself, you will know how to live. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust First Part,
81:We do not have to visit a madhouse to find disordered minds; our planet is the mental institution of the universe. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
82:If I love you, what business is it of yours? ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
83:A man sees in the world what he carries in his heart. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust First Part,
84:Accept the world as God's theater; be thou the mask of the Actor and let Him act through thee; and take God within for thy only critic and audience. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
85:Learn what you are and be such. ~ Pindar,
86:For lawless joys a bitter ending waits. ~ Pindar,
87:The Psychic’s Choice at the Time of DeathThe psychic being at the time of death chooses what it will work out in the next birth and determines the character and conditions of the new personality. Life is for the evolutionary growth by experience in the conditions of the Ignorance till one is ready for the higher light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, 532.php">CWSA.php">532 ,
88:I know you're tired but come, this is the way. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
89:Never forget the lonely taste of the white dew. ~ Matsuo Basho,
90:Writing is nothing more than a guided dream. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
91:A minute's success pays the failure of years. ~ Robert Browning,
92:A sympathetic friend can be quite as dear as a brother. ~ Homer,
93:Eternity is in love with the productions of time. ~ William Blake,
94:Tis time to fear when tyrants seem to kiss. ~ William Shakespeare,
95:Out of suffering have emerged the strongest Souls; ~ Kahlil Gibran,
96:Self-trust is the first secret of success. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
97:Show the readers everything, tell them nothing. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
98:The more you know, the more you know you don't know. ~ Aristotle,
99:We all have the right to ask for Grace ~ Swami Vivekananda,
100:What I aspired to be and was not, comforts me. ~ Robert Browning,
101:A hero is one who knows how to hang on one minute longer. ~ Novalis,
102:Better to shun the bait than struggle in the snare. ~ William Blake,
103:Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful. ~ Mary Shelley,
104:If winter comes, can spring be far behind? ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley,
105:on the waterthe reflectionof a wanderer ~ Santoka Taneda,
106:Stay close to anything that makes you glad you are alive. ~ Hafiz,
107:Year after year/On the monkey's face/A monkey's mask ~ Matsuo Basho,
108:A prosperous man is never sure that he is loved for himself. ~ Lucan,
109:the most massive characters are seared with scars. ~ Khalil Gibran,
110:The sound of the rain-drops also Has grown older. ~ Santoka Taneda,
111:How I long to see among dawn flowers, the face of God. ~ Matsuo Basho,
112:It is said that the present is pregnant with the future. ~ Voltaire,
113:Poets are damned... but see with the eyes of angels. ~ Allen Ginsberg,
114:The man who knows how will always have a job. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
115:There is no great genius without some touch of madness. ~ Aristotle,
116:Everything is ceremony in the wild garden of childhood. ~ Pablo Neruda,
117:Good poetry ... makes the universe ... reveal its ... 'secret' ~ Hafiz,
118:To see God is the one goal. Power is not the goal. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
119:He did each single thing as if he did nothing else. ~ Charles Dickens,
120:It is difficult to free fools from the chains they revere. ~ Voltaire,
121:there is nothing else I can do;I walk on and on ~ Santoka Taneda,
122:Anything worth doing is worth doing poorly -- at first. ~ G K Chesterton,
123:Follow my tracks in the sand that lead Beyond thought and space. ~ Hafiz,
124:Have more than you show, speak less than you know. ~ William Shakespeare,
125:Her greatest progress is a deepened need. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri ,
126:Live with your century; but do not be its creature. ~ Friedrich Schiller,
127:No problem can withstand the assault of sustained thinking. ~ Voltaire,
128:Sometimes things become possible if we want them bad enough. ~ T S Eliot,
129:The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet. ~ Aristotle,
130:Wet with morning dewI go in the direction I want ~ Santoka Taneda,
131:What we have to learn to do we learn by doing. . . ~ Aristotle, Ethics ,
132:Happiness is a mediorce sin for a middle class existence. ~ Saul Williams,
133:I love those who yearn for the impossible. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
134:Jesus wouldn't be caught dead in your church. ~ Saul Williams, Experiment ,
135:All spirits are enslaved which serve things evil. ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley,
136:Am I allowed to ask my book / whether it's true I wrote it? ~ Pablo Neruda,
137:Come what may, all bad fortune is to be conquered by endurance. ~ Virgil,
138:God is the answer to every question. ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan,
139:pickingthe nameless flowerI offer it to buddha ~ Santoka Taneda,
140:At the ancient pond the frog plunges into the sound of water ~ Matsuo Basho,
141:Believe nothing you hear, and only one half that you see. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
142:Devotion to duty is the highest form of worship of God. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
143:Devotion to duty is the highest form of worship of God. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
144:For us, there is only the trying. The rest is not our business. ~ T S Eliot,
145:I have no home :::I have no home autumn deepens ~ Santoka Taneda,
146:Missing its aim is all that it can speak ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 1:4,
147:The artist belongs to his work, not the work to the artist. ~ Novalis,
148:There are muffled throbs of laughter's undertones, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri ,
149:There are truths which are not for all men, nor for all times. ~ Voltaire,
150:If God did not exist, it would be necessary for us to invent Him. ~ Voltaire,
151:In skating over thin ice our safety is in our speed. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
152:Let us go singing as far as we go: the road will be less tedious. ~ Virgil,
153:Nature is the living, visible garment of God. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
154:sleeping on a soft futonI dream of my native village ~ Santoka Taneda,
155:The eye could never see the sun,If it had not a sun-like nature ~ Goethe,
156:The miserable have no other medicine. But only hope. ~ William Shakespeare,
157:today again,soaking wetI walk on an unknown road ~ Santoka Taneda,
158:What draws people to be friends is that they see the same truth. ~ C S Lewis,
159:Chance is a word void of sense; nothing can exist without a cause. ~ Voltaire,
160:For I am divided for love's sake, for the chance of union. ~ Aleister Crowley,
161:I must keep silent. Silent. And let Love describe itself. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
162:It is the supermind we have to bring down, manifest, realise. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
163:Thinking in isolation and with pride ends in being an idiot. ~ G K Chesterton,
164:To believe in God is impossible not to believe in Him is absurd. ~ Voltaire,
165:Better a witty fool than a foolish wit. ~ William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night ,
166:Cherish those who seek the truth but beware of those who find it. ~ Voltaire,
167:For millions of years you have slept. This morning, will you not wake? ~ Kabir,
168:How can we manage to illuminate the pathos of our lives? ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
169:You carry all the ingredients to turn your existence into joy. Mix them. ~ Hafiz,
170:If your eyes are opened, you'll see the things worth seeing. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
171:It is terrible to contemplate how few politicians are hanged. ~ G K Chesterton,
172:Life and death have been lacking in my life. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, On Writing ,
173:Set your life on fire. Seek those who fan your flames. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
174:Think as the wise men think, but talk like the simple people do. ~ Aristotle,
175:What it lies in our power to do, it lies in our power not to do. ~ Aristotle,
176:You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream. ~ C S Lewis,
177:Even if God did not exist it would continue to be sacred ~ Charles Baudelaire,
178:Guard the threshold and prevent troops of fantasies from entering. ~ Petrarch,
179:He laid experience at the Godhead's feet; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.02 - Satyavan,
180:The best is the enemy of the good. (Le mieux est lennemi du bien.) ~ Voltaire,
181:The more we study, the more we discover our ignorance. ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley,
182:We spend our lives waiting for our book and it never comes. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
183:Whoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god. ~ Aristotle,
184:You are, I think, an evening star, the fairest of all the stars. ~ Sappho,
185:All Art is interpretation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings Art,
186:I blush, I burn, I shudder, while I pen the damnable atrocity. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
187:I like this place and could willingly waste my time in it. ~ William Shakespeare,
188:And God said, Love your Enemy so I Obeyed Him and Loved Myself. ~ Khalil Gibran,
189:A true friend is somebody who can make us do what we can. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
190:A truth can walk naked, but a lie always needs to be dressed. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
191:A voice cried, 'Go where none have gone! Dig deeper, deeper yet ~ Sri Aurobindo,
192:Character is nothing but habit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Book III,
193:Happiness is the settling of the soul into its most appropriate spot. ~ Aristotle,
194:Look at you, you madman! Screaming you are thirsty and dying in a desert, ~ Kabir,
195:Man lifted up the burden of his fate ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
196:Some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again. ~ C S Lewis,
197:The imagination is not a state: it is the human existence itself. ~ William Blake,
198:To the living we owe respect, but to the dead we owe only the truth. ~ Voltaire,
199:Wisdom is oftentimes nearer when we stoop than when we soar. ~ William Wordsworth,
200:Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all. ~ Aristotle,
201:Every man is a divinity in disguise, a god playing the fool. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
202:God is a circle whose center is everywhere and circumference nowhere. ~ Voltaire,
203:If you would create something, you must be something. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
204:In all things it is better to hope than to despair. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
205:Numberless are the worlds wonders, but none more wonderful than man. ~ Sophocles,
206:The key to the flaming doors of ecstasy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
207:The sun's light when he unfolds itDepends on the organ that beholds it ~ William Blake,
208:Yet when he is most near, she feels him far. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06,
209:All renews itself, nothing perishes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.06 - The Transformation of Dream Life,
210:Dance represents the triumph of the spirit over the flesh. ~ Aleister Crowley,
211:Guard your own spare moments. They are like uncut diamonds. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
212:How much better is it to weep at joy, than to joy at weeping? ~ William Shakespeare,
213:The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again. ~ Charles Dickens,
214:Where the light is brightest, the shadows are deepest. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
215:A man sees in the world what he carries in his heart. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
216:By men is mightiness achieved ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Baji Prabhou,
217:Death is our road to immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
218:Doubt is a pain too lonely to know that faith is his twin brother. ~ Khalil Gibran,
219:Friendship is . . . the sort of love one can imagine between the angels. ~ C S Lewis,
220:I'm a wandererso, let that be my name -the first winter rain. ~ Matsuo basho,
221:The desire to know your own soul will end all other desires. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
222:The one exclusive sign of thorough knowledge is the power of teaching. ~ Aristotle,
223:Where your talents and the needs of the world cross lies your calling. ~ Aristotle,
224:But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange. ~ William Shakespeare,
225:Death is an evil; the gods have so judged; had it been good, they would die. ~ Sappho,
226:Life ran to gaze from every gate of sense: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.02 - Satyavan,
227:Pain is the breaking of the shell which encloses your understanding ~ Khalil Gibran,
228:Sing such a song with all of your heart that you'll never have to sing again. ~ Kabir,
229:The criterion is within. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.05 - Renunciation,
230:When I saw you I fell in love, and you smiled because you knew. ~ William Shakespeare,
231:When spirituality is lost all is lost. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Ourselves,
232:A Godhead stands behind the brute machine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.02 - The Issue,
233:All can be done if the god-touch is there ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
234:A look, a turn decides our ill-poised fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.02 - Satyavan,
235:He sees within the face of deity, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
236:The godhead greater by a human fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
237:Uncertainty is an uncomfortable position. But certainty is an absurd one. ~ Voltaire,
238:You are not a drop in the ocean. You are the entire ocean in a drop. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
239:A fathomless zero occupied the world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
240:And in her bosom nursed a greater dawn ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 12.01 - The Return to Earth,
241:Be as a tower firmly set Shakes not its top for any blast that blows. ~ Dante Alighieri,
242:Each dawn opens into a larger Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
243:Insist on yourself; never imitate... Every great man is unique. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
244:Our sympathies become our torturers. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
245:The butterfly counts not months but moments, and has time enough. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
246:The Church tries to fit Christ into it, not the Church into Christ. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
247:The words that enlighten the soul are more precious than jewels. ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan,
248:We meet no ordinary people in our lives. ~ C S Lewis, Inspirational Christian Library ,
249:All that we meet is a symbol and gateway ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.02 - Ahana,
250:Death stays the journeying discoverer, Life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.02 - The Issue,
251:Do what you will, this world's a fiction and is made up of contradiction ~ William Blake,
252:Mind flowed unknowing in the sap of life ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.01 - The World-Stair,
253:Only a little the god-light can stay: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
254:The palace woke to its own emptiness; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.03 - The Call to the Quest,
255:You put your lips upon my forehead, and lit a Holy lamp inside my heart. ~ Hafiz,
256:A powerless spirit is no spirit ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
257:Charm is the seal of the gods upon woman. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
258:God is our name for the last generalization to which we can arrive. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
259:I'm afraid I can't explain myself, sir. Because I am not myself, you see? ~ Lewis Carroll,
260:Optimism is the madness of insisting that all is well when we are miserable. ~ Voltaire,
261:Still round the corner there may wait, A new road or a secret gate. ~ J R R Tolkien,
262:The difficult is not the impossible. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Baha i Faith,
263:The lover never despairs. For a committed heart everything is possible. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
264:The world being what it is, it could not be otherwise. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
265:To know is best, however hard to bear. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
266:We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit. ~ Aristotle,
267:When you work, you are a flute that turns the whisper of hours into music ~ Khalil Gibran,
268:After ‘tis cold, none heeds, none hinders. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
269:Although, the cricket's song has no words, still, it sounds like sorrow. ~ Izumi Shikibu,
270:Always the Ideal beckoned from afar. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.12 - The Heavens of the Ideal,
271:A still identity their way to know, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
272:Daily torn and tatteredturning to shredsmy robe for travelling ~ Santoka Taneda,
273:Each year a mile upon the heavenly Way, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
274:Let yourself be drawn by the stronger pull of that which you truly love. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
275:There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts. ~ Charles Dickens,
276:There is no fear in the higher Nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Fear,
277:Thy youth is but a noon, of night take heed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Translations 3.1.11 - Appeal,
278:A formless spirit became the soul of form. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.14 - The World-Soul,
279:A gate of dreams ajar on mystery’s verge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
280:At play with him as with her child or slave, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
281:Education is not the filling of a pail but the lighting of a fire. ~ William Butler Yeats,
282:Experience: that most brutal of teachers. But you learn, my God do you learn. ~ C S Lewis,
283:For others’ bliss who lives, he lives indeed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Translations 3.1.11 - Appeal,
284:Her acts became gestures of sacrifice. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.02 - The Growth of the Flame,
285:I do believe God gave me a spark of genius, but he quenched it in misery. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
286:It is very simple to be happy, but it is very difficult to be simple. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
287:Must fire always test the great of soul? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
288:No one I am, I who am all that is. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Liberation - I,
289:The invariable mark of wisdom is to see the miraculous in the common. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
290:What is a weed? A plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
291:Although you appear in earthly form, your essence is pure consciousness. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
292:A million lotuses swaying on one stem, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.12 - The Heavens of the Ideal,
293:Both read the Bible day and night, but thou read black where I read white. ~ William Blake,
294:Even fall has its perverted joy ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Glory and Fall of Life,
295:If you are irritated by every rub, how will your mirror be polished? ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
296:Ignorance is not a state of innocence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Purity,
297:Milky Way :::the milky way at midnight a drunkard dances ~ Santoka Taneda,
298:Never out of evil one plucked good: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.07 - The Descent into Night,
299:On the bare peak where Self is alone with Nought ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.02 - The Issue,
300:Our smallness saves us from the Infinite ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
301:See God everywhere and be not frightened by masks ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
302:Space is himself and Time is only he. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
303:Surrender is the best way of opening. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 1.2.10 - Opening,
304:The gods make use of our forgotten deeds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
305:The temple bell stops but I still hear the sound coming out of the flowers. ~ Matsuo Basho,
306:A dire duality is our way to be. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Glory and Fall of Life,
307:Assent to thy high self, create, endure. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
308:If even then we make mistakes, yet God makes none. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
309:Only in human limits man lives safe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 09.01 - Towards the Black Void,
310:Our error crucifies Reality ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
311:Perhaps the blindness of our will is Fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
312:Run my dear, From anything That may not strengthen Your precious budding wings. ~ Hafiz,
313:Swift and easy is the downward path. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.07 - The Descent into Night,
314:The enemy of faith is doubt. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Faith and Shakti,
315:The naked woman's body is a portion of eternity too great for the eye of man. ~ William Blake,
316:While God waits for his temple to be built of love, Men bring stones. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
317:Are you looking for the Holy One? I am in the next seat. My shoulder is against yours. ~ Kabir,
318:Desire, the troubled seed of things. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
319:Do not be afraid; our fate Cannot be taken from us; it is a gift. ~ Dante Alighieri, Inferno ,
320:Habit is nothing but an operation of memory. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Book III,
321:I have always imagined that Paradise as a kind of library. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, Seven Nights ,
322:IT was for delightHe sought existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 3.1.23 - The Rishi,
323:Our life is a paradox with God for key. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
324:Out of the darkness we still grow to light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
325:See this morning for the first time as a new-born child that has no name ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
326:The flower which is single need not envy the thorns that are numerous. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
327:To be really sorry for one's errors is like opening the door of heaven. ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan,
328:All, even pain, was the soul’s pleasure here; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.01 - The World-Stair,
329:All things too great end soon. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
330:... a single word that breaks the seals of the mind... ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
331:Be silent, be silent; savour this timeless moment, speak no more of longing ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
332:But still the invisible Magnet drew his soul ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.01 - The World-Stair,
333:Hard is it to persuade earth-nature’s change; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
334:I am stronger than death and greater than my fate ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
335:I felt in need of a great pilgrimage, so I sat still for three days and God came to me. ~ Kabir,
336:I remembered you with my soul clenchedin that sadness of mine that you know. ~ Pablo Neruda,
337:My life is a throb of Thy eternity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Bliss of Identity,
338:No matter how subtle the sleeper’s thoughts become, his dreams will not guide him home. ~ Hafiz,
339:Our life is a paradox with God for key. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
340:The inmost is the infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Power of the Spirit,
341:The Knowledge brings also the Power and the Joy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
342:A dual Nature covered the Unique. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
343:But thou hast come and all will surely change: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.03 - Satyavan and Savitri,
344:Convincing the abyss by heavenly form ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.02 - The Kingdom of Subtle Matter,
345:Death has no reality except as a process of life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.06 - The Transformation of Dream Life,
346:Do not meddle in the affairs of wizards, for they are subtle and quick to anger. ~ J R R Tolkien,
347:I carry the fire that never can be quenched. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
348:If you want to know who controls you, look at who you are not allowed to criticize. ~ Voltaire,
349:Imagination the free-will of Truth, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Glory and Fall of Life,
350:Only the Eternal's strength in us can dare ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.12 - The Heavens of the Ideal,
351:The laws of the Unknown create the known. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
352:Time's sun-flowers' gaze at gold Eternity: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.12 - The Heavens of the Ideal,
353:Why are you so enchanted by this world, when a mine of gold lies within you? ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
354:You cannot see things till you know roughly what they are. ~ C S Lewis, Out of the Silent Planet ,
355:You can't cross the sea merely by standing and staring at the water. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
356:A deep surrender is their source of might, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
357:And leaves its huge white stamp upon our lives. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
358:A short story must have a single mood and every sentence must build towards it. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
359:A single ego is an absurdly narrow vantage point from which to view the world. ~ Aleister Crowley,
360:A thinking entity appeared in Space. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.04 - The Kingdoms of the Little Life,
361:Beauty of our dim soul is amorous. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Our godhead calls us,
362:Calling the adventure of consciousness and joy ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
363:Each in himself is sole by Nature’s law. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
364:Faith is the bird that feels the light when the dawn is still dark. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
365:He moves there as the Soul, as Nature she. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
366:He who knows the secret of sound, knows the mystery of the whole universe. ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan,
367:I have wanted to kill myself a hundred times but somehow I am still in love with life. ~ Voltaire,
368:Let's ask God to help us to self-control for one who lacks it, lacks his grace. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
369:Life always seeks immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.03 - The Threefold Life,
370:Our plans may fail, God’s purpose cannot. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
371:Out of the unknown we move to the unknown. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
372:The Bliss that is creation’s splendid grain ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.13 - In the Self of Mind,
373:The zero covers an immortal face. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
374:To be outspoken is easy when you do not wait to speak the complete truth. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
375:Truth of oneness creates its own order. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
376:A faith she craves that can survive defeat, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
377:A god come down and greater by the fall. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
378:And drinks experience like a strengthening wine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
379:An idea, like a ghost, must be spoken to a little before it will explain itself. ~ Charles Dickens,
380:Beauty is truth's smile when she beholds her own face in a perfect mirror. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
381:Daybreak is a never-ending glory; getting out of bed is a never ending nuisance." ~ G K Chesterton,
382:Devotion is the key which opens the door to liberation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
383:Each part in us desires its absolute. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
384:Every child comes with the message that God is not yet discouraged of man. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
385:Every one goes astray, but the least imprudent are they who repent the soonest. ~ Voltaire,
386:Force is a self-expression of Existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.13 - The Divine Maya,
387:If any man hopes to do a deed without God's knowledge, he errs. ~ Pindar, Olympian Odes I,
388:Lift the veil that obscures the heart, and there you will find what you are looking for. ~ Kabir,
389:Necessity rules all the infinite world, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 4.2.03 - The Birth of Sin,
390:Our waking thoughts the output of its dreams. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Descent of Night,
391:The Enigma’s knot is tied in human kind. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
392:The speech that labels more than it lights; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
393:We never find out the strength of the evil impulse inside us until we try to fight it. ~ C S Lewis,
394:Work without ideals is a false gospel. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Work and Ideal,
395:Almighty powers are shut in Nature’s cells. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.03 - The Call to the Quest,
396:As if in a struggle of the Void to be. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.04 - The Kingdoms of the Little Life,
397:A struggling ignorance is his wisdom’s mate: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
398:Eternity speaks, none understands its word; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.03 - The Call to the Quest,
399:Everything in the world can be endured, except continual prosperity. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
400:He has need of darkness to perceive some light ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
401:If you knew the secret of life, you too would choose no other companion but love. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
402:Immortality assured itself by death; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
403:Knowledge is power and mastery. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.07 - The Ego and the Dualities,
404:Man’s mind is the dupe of his animal self. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems A God’s Labour,
405:Night a process of the eternal light ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
406:One who loves God finds the object of his love everywhere. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
407:Speak not my secret name to hostile Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
408:The best thermometer to the progress of a nation is its treatment of its women. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
409:The body is the chrysalis of a soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
410:There is no better way to exercise the imagination than the study of the law. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
411:The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
412:The world has seen thousands of prophets, and the world has yet to see millions ~ Swami Vivekananda,
413:Time is a factory where everyone slaves away earning enough love to break their own chains. ~ Hafiz,
414:Unity is a means and not an end in itself. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II About Unity,
415:What it knew was an image in a broken glass, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.13 - In the Self of Mind,
416:A casual passing phrase can change our life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.03 - The Call to the Quest,
417:[...] a darkness shining in brightness which brightness could not comprehend. ~ James Joyce, Ulysses ,
418:A prey to the staring phantoms of the gloom ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.07 - The Descent into Night,
419:Aversion is not equality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.11 - The Perfection of Equality,
420:Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know. ~ Ernest Hemingway, The Garden of Eden ,
421:Harmony is the natural rule of the spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
422:His hunger for the eternal thou must nurse ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
423:Love must be turned singly towards the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Desire,
424:Man is fortunately inconsistent. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga Materialism,
425:The child of the Void shall be reborn in God, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.03 - Satyavan and Savitri,
426:The keenest sorrow is to recognize ourselves as the sole cause of all our adversities. ~ Sophocles,
427:' . . . the supreme Mage, the divine Magician, . . .' [the Lord] ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
428:The Wise who know see but one half of Truth, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.03 - The Call to the Quest,
429:To copy on earth’s copies is his art. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.02 - The Kingdom of Subtle Matter,
430:An outer renunciation by itself does not liberate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV The Second Sex,
431:An unseen Presence moulds the oblivious clay. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
432:A saviour gesture stretched her lifted arm, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.05 - The Finding of the Soul,
433:A subtle link of union joins all life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.02 - The Kingdom of Subtle Matter,
434:Awake from dream, the truth is known: awake from waking. The truth is: The Unknown ~ Aleister Crowley,
435:Books cannot teach God, but they can destroy ignorance; their action is negative. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
436:Even if there is real danger, fear does not help. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Fear,
437:He who is not everyday conquering some fear has not learned the secret of life. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
438:I am an epitome of opposites. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 1.03 - The Spiritual Being of Man,
439:If there is no creation, there must be disintegration. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Ourselves,
440:Infinity wore a boundless zero’s form. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
441:Its signs stare at us like an unknown script, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
442:I've written this to keep from crying. But I am crying, only the tears won't come. ~ Aleister Crowley,
443:Let us read, and let us dance; these two amusements will never do any harm to the world. ~ Voltaire,
444:Limitation is mortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret of the Veda 1.02 - The Doctrine of the Mystics,
445:Often the idea creates the need. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Oligarchy or Democracy?,
446:Only a consciousness full of light can be pure. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Purity,
447:Our outward happenings have their seed within, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
448:Plastic and passive to the all-shaping Fire ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.02 - The Kingdom of Subtle Matter,
449:Solitude wrapped him in its voiceless folds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.07 - The Descent into Night,
450:That Godhead's seed might flower in mindless Space. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
451:Abandon all hope, ye who enter here. ~ Dante Alighieri, The Divine Comedy Inferno,
452:And all grows beautiful because Thou art. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Divine Hearing,
453:And seeing ignorance is the curse of God, Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven. ~ Shakespeare,
454:A vast surrender was his only strength ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
455:Concentration of the powers of the mind is our only instrument to help us see God. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
456:Dare greatly and thou shalt be great. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
457:Hateful to me as are the gates of hell Is he who hiding one thing in his heart Utters another. ~ Homer,
458:He has need of death to find a greater life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
459:Here was a quiet country of fixed mind ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.03 - The Entry into the Inner Countries,
460:If all forms, quantities, qualities were to disappear, this would remain. ~ Sri Aurobindo, TLD 1.09-08 ,
461:Let us be prepared for death but work for life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I The Crisis,
462:Once kindled, never can its flamings cease. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.12 - The Heavens of the Ideal,
463:The Eternal’s quiet holds the cosmic act: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Glory and Fall of Life,
464:When all has been explained nothing is known. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
465:Adore and what you adore attempt to be. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - I Act V,
466:All is a wager and danger, all is a chase and a battle. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.02 - Ahana,
467:All know that the drop merges into the ocean, but few know that the ocean merges into the drop. ~ Kabir,
468:All men are born with a nose and five fingers, but no one is born with a knowledge of God. ~ Voltaire,
469:By its breath of grace our lives abide. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.01 - The Pursuit of the Unknowable,
470:Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law. Love is the law, love under will. ~ Aleister Crowley,
471:Each part in us desires its absolute. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
472:His little hour is spent in little things. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
473:His thought labours, a bullock in Time’s fields; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
474:In Death’s realm repatriate immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
475:Many are God’s forms by which he grows in man; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
476:My body a dot in the soul’s vast expanse. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Self’s Infinity,
477:Peace was a thrilled voluptuous purity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.09 - The Paradise of the Life-Gods,
478:Sorrow if indulged becomes a habit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Jainism and Buddhism,
479:Spiritually there is nothing big or small. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Work and Yoga,
480:The eye of man outside matters nothing; the eye within is all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
481:You have left Your Beloved and are thinking of others:and this is why your work is in vain. ~ Kabir,
482:A thinking puppet is the mind of life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
483:A thousand aspects point back to the One. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
484:Even the body has its intuitions. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.05 - The Divine Personality,
485:Hopes that soon fade to drab realities ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
486:If you want people to believe in God, let people see what God can make you like. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
487:In my heart’s chamber lives the unworshipped God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.56 - Omnipresence,
488:In silence there is eloquence.Stop weaving and seehow the pattern improves. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
489:It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. ~ Aristotle,
490:I want to sing like the birds sing, not worrying about who hears or what they think. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
491:Make the abysm a road for Heaven's descent, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
492:Man is too weak to bear the Infinite’s weight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
493:Mind is a passage, not a culmination. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.14 - The Supermind as Creator,
494:One man’s perfection still can save the world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.05 - The Finding of the Soul,
495:Our greatest glory is not in never failing, but in rising up every time we fail. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
496:Real poetry is to lead a beautiful life.To live poetry is better than to write it. ~ Matsuo Basho,
497:Whenever you are alone, remind yourself that God has sent everyone else away so that there is only you and Him. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
498:Each victory gained over oneself means new strength to gain more victories. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga IV ,
499:Most people spend the greatest part of their time working in order to live, and what little freedom remains so fills them with fear that they seek out any and every means to get rid of it. Oh, the destiny of man ! ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther ,
500:We must always change, renew, rejuvenate ourselves; otherwise, we harden. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
501:More light! ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
502:Tis Lilith. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
503:We see only what we know. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
504:Writing is busy idleness. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
505:Do not hurry; do not rest. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
506:Time itself is an element. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
507:Doubt grows with knowledge. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
508:I will be lord over myself. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
509:Beware of a man of one book. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
510:Collectors are happy people. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
511:Architecture is frozen music. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
512:Leap and the net will appear. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
513:Only law can give us freedom. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
514:Duty is the demand of the hour. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
515:All our knowledge is symbolic. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
516:What is fruitful alone is true. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
517:Love can do much, but duty more. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
518:The present is a powerful deity. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
519:The present moment is a powerful goddess. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
520:An unused life is an early death. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
521:Every second is of infinite value. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
522:Faith is hidden household capital. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
523:Miracle is the pet child of faith. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
524:One must keep repeating the Truth. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
525:Willing is not enough, we must do. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
526:All understanding begins in wonder! ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
527:Mastery is often taken for egotism. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
528:Mystery is truth's dancing partner. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
529:Nature has neither kernel Nor shell ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
530:The eternal female draws us onward. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
531:The unnatural, that too is natural. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
532:Unrest and uncertainty are our lot. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
533:Colors are light's suffering and joy ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
534:Doubt can only be removed by action. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
535:Beauty is everywhere a welcome guest. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
536:Chess is the touchstone of intellect. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
537:Plunge boldly into the thick of life! ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
538:To have more, you must first be more. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
539:Wishes are premonitions of abilities. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
540:Colour itself is a degree of darkness. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
541:Every form correctly seen is beautiful ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
542:Thou shalt abstain, Renounce, refrain. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
543:Nothing is worse than active ignorance. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
544:The rogue has everywhere the advantage. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
545:Nothing is more dangerous than solitude. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
546:Beauty can never really understand itself. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
547:The moon floated, a luminous waif through heaven ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.03 - The Call to the Quest,
548:The more a thing is perfect, the more it feels pleasure and pain. ~ Dante Alighieri, The Divine Comedy ,
549:There is nothing but quotations left for us. Our language is a system of quotations. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
550:The riddles of God are more satisfying than the solutions of man. ~ G K Chesterton, In Defense of Sanity ,
551:An immutable Power has made this mutable world; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
552:Being with you and not being with you is the only way I have to measure time. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
553:But all power is in the end one, all power is really soul-power. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
554:ekas tisthati viras tisthati - he stands alone, he stands as a hero. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Glossary of terms ,
555:For the man who is beautiful is beautiful to see but the good man will at once also beautiful be ~ Sappho,
556:Her smile could persuade a dead lacerated heart ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
557:Ignorance was a thin shade protecting light, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Glory and Fall of Life,
558:It is the East that must conquer in India’s uprising. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
559:Masked the high gods act; the doer is hid by his working. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
560:Maybe you are searching among the branches, for what only appears in the roots. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
561:Mountains and trees stood there like thoughts from God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.03 - Satyavan and Savitri,
562:Necessity fashionsAll that the unseen eye has beheld. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
563:The gnosis does not seek, it possesses. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.22 - Vijnana or Gnosis,
564:The golden virgin, Usha, mother of life,Yet virgin. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Urvasie,
565:The past cannot bind the future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 1.2.01 - The Call and the Capacity,
566:There is a zero sign of the Supreme. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
567:Uniformity is death, not life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Inadequacy of the State Idea,
568:We laugh at honor and are shocked to find traitors in our midst. ~ C S Lewis, The Abolition of Man (1943) ,
569:What is that, knowing which we will know everything? - Vedas? ~ Swami Vivekananda, Rajayoga 36,
570:A contradiction founds the base of life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.04 - The Kingdoms of the Little Life,
571:All was a limitless sea that heaved to the moon. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
572:Asia has always initiated, Europe completed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Asiatic Role,
573:Between two worlds life hovers like a star, twixt night and morn, upon the horizon's verge. ~ Lord Byron,
574:By Light we live and to the Light we go. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.01 - The Dream Twilight of the Ideal,
575:Experience comes through many errors. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Spiritual Aim and Life,
576:God is at once impersonal and personal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.04 - The Secret of Secrets,
577:God’s long nights are justified by dawn. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.01 - The Dream Twilight of the Ideal,
578:I never give answers. I lead on from one question to another. That is my leadership. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
579:Inner happiness can only come by right living. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Deva and Asura,
580:It is lamentable, that to be a good patriot one must become the enemy of the rest of mankind. ~ Voltaire,
581:Man was moulded from the original brute. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
582:Nothing in this world is created, all is manifested. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings Art,
583:Our souls deputed selves of the Supreme. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
584:Pain grew a trembling undertone of bliss ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.01 - The Dream Twilight of the Ideal,
585:Peace is a sign of mukti—Ananda moves towards siddhi. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II the Divine Peace,
586:Rhythm is the subtle soul of poetry. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry Recent English Poetry - I,
587:Seek the wisdom that will untie your knot. Seek the path that demands your whole being ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
588:The eye of Faith is not one with the eye of Knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
589:The spiritual fullness of the being is eternity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
590:This world is God fulfilled in outwardness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
591:What devours must also be devoured. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 3.04 - The Spirit in Spirit-Land after Death,
592:While life remains, action is unavoidable. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.12 - The Divine Work,
593:All stability is a fixed equilibrium of rhythm. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad The Isha Upanishad,
594:All the world's possibilities in manAre waiting as the tree waits in its seed: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri ,
595:Deep in our being inhabits the voiceless invisible Teacher; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.02 - Ahana,
596:Every one interprets everything in terms of there own experience, belief and perception. ~ Aleister Crowley,
597:Her greatest progress is a deepened need. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.04 - The Kingdoms of the Little Life,
598:He who chooses the Infinite has been chosen by the Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
599:Knowledge is incomplete without action. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Action and the Divine Will,
600:Material Nature is not ethical. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Delight of Existence,
601:None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
602:One age has seen the dreams another lives. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
603:Quality and quantity differ, the self is equal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.09 - The Pure Existent,
604:So I keep 7 o'clock in the bank and gain interest in the hour of God ~ Saul Williams, Penny for a Thought ,
605:The external is an internal raised to the level of mystery - maybe it is also the other way round ~ Novalis,
606:The intellectual ages sing less easily. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Form and the Spirit,
607:The perfect man is a divine child! ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga Heraclitus - VII,
608:The simple approach means trust. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Bhakti Yoga and Vaishnavism,
609:Thought the great-winged wanderer paraclete ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.2.04 - Thought the Paraclete,
610:To our gaze God’s light is a darkness, His plan is a chaos. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
611:Truth is the secret of life and power. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Civilisation and Barbarism,
612:we do not have knowledge of a thing until we have grasped its why, that is to say, its cause. ~ Aristotle,
613:A Calm that cradles Fate upon its knees. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.29 - The Universal Incarnation,
614:A cave of darkness guards the eternal Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.01 - The Pursuit of the Unknowable,
615:Action solves the difficulties which action creates. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
616:All quarrels proceed from egoism. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Problems in Human Relations,
617:All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
618:Alone the wise Can walk through fire with unblinking eyes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Epigram,
619:Even in inanimate Matter Mind is at work. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.03 - The Threefold Life,
620:Eviller fate there is none than life too long among mortals. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
621:From a veiled God-joy the worlds were made ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
622:If you pray, trust that he hears. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Bhakti Yoga and Vaishnavism,
623:Instinct was hers, the chrysalis of Truth, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.04 - The Kingdoms of the Little Life,
624:Like one who wakes to find his dreams were true ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.01 - The Dream Twilight of the Ideal,
625:One can be free only by living in the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I 5.4.01 - Occult Knowledge,
626:Our minds are starters in the race to God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
627:Sight is the essential poetic gift. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
628:That is the divine Brahman and not this which men here adore. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
629:The earth you tread is a border screened from heaven ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.03 - The Call to the Quest,
630:The Mind creates the chain and not the body. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Conclusion and Summary,
631:The One by whom all live, who lives by none, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.01 - The Pursuit of the Unknowable,
632:The pure intellect cannot create poetry. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry New Birth or Decadence?,
633:There is no last certitude in which thought can pause ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
634:The vital does not like waiting. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Wrong Movements of the Vital,
635:Truth is bare like stone and hard like death; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
636:All absoluteness is pure delight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Delight of Existence,
637:All here can change if the Magician choose. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
638:All in the cosmos has a divine origin. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.05 - The Divine Personality,
639:Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
640:Dreams that are hints of unborn Reality, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.03 - The Entry into the Inner Countries,
641:Ego is the principal knot. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.04 - The Perfection of the Mental Being,
642:Here to fulfil himself was God’s desire. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
643:If desire comes up, the Ananda is obliged to draw back. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Desire,
644:In the divine consciousness there is no ego. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Ego and Its Forms,
645:Let Him choose for thee a king's palace or the bowl of the beggar. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
646:Love is a seeking for mutual possession. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.03 - The Godward Emotions,
647:Mind hushes stilled in eternity; waves of the Infinite wander ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.02 - Ahana,
648:My life is a silence grasped by timeless hands; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Self’s Infinity,
649:One cannot demand or compel grace. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Bhakti Yoga and Vaishnavism,
650:Reach high, for stars lie hidden in you. Dream deep, for every dream precedes the goal. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
651:The Bliss whose rapture dreamed the worlds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
652:The heart is wiser than the thought. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.01 - Love and the Triple Path,
653:The mind pre-eminently is man; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 5.02 - Perfection of the Body,
654:There can be no firm foundation in sadhana without equality, samata. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
655:There is a purpose in each stumble and fall. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
656:We are the heirs of infinite widenesses. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Call of the Impossible,
657:All this is the Brahman; this Self is the Brahman and the Self is fourfold. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
658:All time is one body, Space a single look. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
659:As knowledge grows Light flames up from within. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
660:Compassion to all creatures is the condition of sainthood. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Swaraj,
661:Delight, God’s sweetest sign and Beauty’s twin. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
662:Even when laws have been written down, they ought not always to remain unaltered. ~ Aristotle, Politics Words Of The Mother II,
663:Heavy is godhead to bear with its mighty sun-burden of lustre. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.02 - Ahana,
664:Himself was to himself his only scene. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.15 - The Kingdoms of the Greater Knowledge,
665:Hope not to hear truth often in royal courts. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
666:It is from unsatisfied desire that all suffering arises. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Desire,
667:It is not sufficient to see and to know the beauty of a work. We must feel and be affected by it. ~ Voltaire,
668:Man, human, follows in God’s human steps. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.03 - The Entry into the Inner Countries,
669:Mind is born from that which is beyond mind. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.22 - Vijnana or Gnosis,
670:Only those who sympathise can help. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Problems in Human Relations,
671:Study cannot take the same or a greater importance than sadhana. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV ,
672:There none was weak, so falsehood could not live; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Glory and Fall of Life,
673:The Supermind alone commands unity in diversity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.22 - The Problem of Life,
674:The Yogi eats not out of desire, but to maintain the body. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Food,
675:Thus, then now as ever, I enter the Path of Darkness, if haply so I may attain the Light. ~ Aleister Crowley,
676:To feed death with her works is here life’s doom. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Glory and Fall of Life,
677:To feed death with her works is here life’s doom. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Glory and Fall of Life,
678:Truth born too soon might break the imperfect earth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
679:Whatever our hearts conceive, our heads create, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.02 - The Kingdom of Subtle Matter,
680:You can't go back and change the beginning, but you can start where you are and change the ending. ~ C S Lewis,
681:Aggression is necessary for self-preservation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Awakening Soul of India,
682:All things shall change in God's transfiguring hour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
683:An awful Silence watches tragic Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
684:A serpent Power twinned the insensible Force. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
685:God is love and beauty as well as purity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Religion as the Law of Life,
686:Heavenly voices to us are a silence, those colours a whiteness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
687:I have never agreed with my other self wholly. The truth of the matter seems to lie between us. ~ Khalil Gibran,
688:Immortal bliss lives not in human air. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
689:I wish I could show you, when you are lonely or in darkness, the astonishing light of your own being. ~ Hafiz,
690:Liberation is self-possession, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 5.7.1.07 - Involution and Evolution,
691:Man out of Nature wakes to God’s complexities, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
692:Poetry like everything else in man evolves. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry New Birth or Decadence?,
693:Realisations are the essence of knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV 4.22 - The supramental Thought and Knowledge,
694:Spiritual force can always raise up material force to defend it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Ourselves,
695:The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance. ~ Aristotle,
696:The occult is a part of existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.15 - Reality and the Integral Knowledge,
697:The principle of the Yoga is rejection-throwing out of the being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
698:Vision only opens, it does not embrace. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.02 - The Status of Knowledge,
699:All existence here is a universal Life that takes form of Matter. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.06 - The Transformation of Dream Life,
700:All self-fulfilment is satisfaction of being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.14 - The Supermind as Creator,
701:All that denies must be torn out and slain ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
702:Alone she is equal to her mighty task. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
703:An eternal instant is the cause of the years. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
704:Death fosters life that life may suckle death. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act II,
705:Each is a mass of forces thrown in shape. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Discoveries of Science - III,
706:Even an hour of the soul can unveil the Unborn, the Everlasting, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.02 - Ahana,
707:God is to be worshiped as the one Beloved, dearer than everything in this and the next life. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
708:God still keepsNear to a paler world the hour ere dawn ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Chitrangada,
709:His soul was freed and given to her alone. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
710:If you wish to forget anything on the spot, make a note that this thing is to be remembered. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
711:I love you as certain dark things are to be loved,in secret, between the shadow and the soul. ~ Pablo Neruda,
712:It is the essentials alone that matter. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 1.2.01 - The Call and the Capacity,
713:It is the soul in us which turns always towards Truth, Good and Beauty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
714:Joy that throbs behindThe marvel and the mystery of pain. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
715:Knowledge gropes, but meets not Wisdom’s face. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.04 - The Kingdoms of the Little Life,
716:Life’s wholeTremendous theorem is Thou complete. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 1.18 - The Divine Worker,
717:Open God’s door, enter into his trance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.02 - The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
718:Our lives are God’s messengers beneath the stars. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
719:Our souls are moved by powers behind the wall. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
720:She held their hands, she chose for them their paths: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.02 - The Growth of the Flame,
721:Sincerity in Yoga means to respond to the Divine alone. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Sincerity,
722:The greatest have their limitations. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad A Commentary on the Isha Upanishad,
723:The ground's generosity takes in our compost and grows beauty! Try to be more like the ground. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
724:The ideal never yet was real made. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.02 - The Gospel of Death and Vanity of the Ideal,
725:The Inconscient is the Superconscient’s sleep. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.01 - The Dream Twilight of the Ideal,
726:The Inconscient is the Superconscient’s sleep. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.01 - The Dream Twilight of the Ideal,
727:There is an hour for knowledge, an hour to forget and to labour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
728:There should be no big I, not even a small one. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Ego and Its Forms,
729:The soul is a figure of the Unmanifest, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
730:We can construct nothing which goes beyond our nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
731:We think according to what we are. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art Bertrand Russell,
732:When someone beats a rug, the blows are not against the rug, but against the dust in it. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
733:A fiery portion of the Wonderful, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King The Yoga of the Souls Release,
734:All evil is in travail of the eternal good. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.04 - The Divine and the Undivine,
735:All great poetic utterance is discovery. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
736:Always the blood is wiser and knows what is hid from the thinker. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
737:And all the while within us works His love. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.2.02 - The Meditations of Mandavya,
738:And crying for a direction in the void ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
739:And have I not told you that what you mistake for madness is but over-acuteness of the sense? ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
740:Aspiring he transcends his earthly self. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.02 - The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
741:Calm is self’s victory overcoming fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
742:Escape, however high, redeems not life, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
743:Eternal truth lives not with mortal men. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
744:Faith is not intellectual belief but a function of the soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Baha i Faith,
745:Hard are God’s terms and few can meet them of men who are mortal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
746:His knowledge dwells in the house of Ignorance; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
747:Is here and in the pleasant house He choseTo harbour God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 3.1.23 - The Rishi,
748:Knowledge is not complete without works. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.01 - Love and the Triple Path,
749:Men have made kings that folly might have food. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act II,
750:Mind is His wax to write and, written, raseForm and name. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 3.1.23 - The Rishi,
751:Mortal delight has its mortal danger. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret of the Veda The Guardians of the Light,
752:The dim subconscient is his cavern base. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.02 - The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
753:The spiritual man is one who has discovered his soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.27 - The Gnostic Being,
754:The sweet vast centre and the cave divineCalled Paradise, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 3.1.23 - The Rishi,
755:Those who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
756:Time is a manifestation of the Eternal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.06 - Reality and the Cosmic Illusion,
757:299. Turn all things to honey; this is the law of divine living. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human 3.1.10 - Karma,
758:Accord and concord are the true normality of the spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
759:All action is surrounded by a complexity of forces. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I 5.4.01 - Occult Knowledge,
760:All evil shall perforce change itself into good. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.24 - Gnosis and Ananda,
761:All impurity is a confusion of working. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.03 - The Purified Understanding,
762:All is an episode in a meaningless tale. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
763:And in the heart of the worst the best shall be born by my wisdom. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
764:Art’s brilliant gleam is a pastime for his eyes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
765:Doubt is the mind’s persistent assailant. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 7.05 - Patience and Perseverance,
766:Each of our good thoughts tears the veil behind which appears the pure, the infinite, God, our self. ~ Vivekananda,
767:Ego is the reason of the difficulty in everybody. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Ego and Its Forms,
768:Even in the worm is a god and it writhes for a form and an outlet. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
769:He who is himself in bonds cannot easily free others. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.05 - Renunciation,
770:He who to some gives victory, joy and good,To some gives rest. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems To R.,
771:His good and evil, sin and virtue, tillHe bids thee leave. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 3.1.23 - The Rishi,
772:In absolute silence sleeps an absolute Power. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
773:In IslamAll men are equal underneath the King. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - I Act I,
774:It reveals itself rather than is learned. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.03 - The Eternal and the Individual,
775:Let the beauty we love be what we do. There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
776:Mire is the man who hears not the gods when they cry to his bosom. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
777:Powers of his godhead we live; the Creator dwells in the creature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.02 - Ahana,
778:She is the golden bridge, the wonderful fire. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
779:Successful assimilation depends on mastery. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine and Human On Original Thinking,
780:Supermind is the vast self-extension of the Brahman that contains and develops. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
781:The end of all Science is Agnosticism. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad A Commentary on the Isha Upanishad,
782:The goal of evolution is also its cause. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.02 - The Three Steps of Nature,
783:The moments are Fate’s thoughtsWatching me. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act III,
784:This too must now be overpassed and left ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
785:Thou art thyself the author of thy pain. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
786:Unity is as strong a principle in Nature as division. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.21 - The Ascent of Life,
787:We must live as a nation before we can live in humanity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
788:When Love desires Love,    Then Love is born. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
789:With pain and labour all creation comes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
790:Words are but ghosts unless they speak the heart. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
791:Yoga is the science which teaches us how to get these perceptions [direct experiences of God]. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
792:Absence is a house so vast that inside you will pass through its walls and hang pictures on the air. ~ Pablo Neruda,
793:All this is true and false; and it is true and false to say that it is true and false. ~ Aleister Crowley,
794:A secret Will compels us to endure. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
795:A thrill that smites the nerves is music’s spell. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
796:A whole mysterious world is locked within. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.02 - The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
797:Clouds from Zeus come and pass; his sunshine eternal survives them. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
798:Each soul is the great Father’s crucified Son, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.03 - The Entry into the Inner Countries,
799:Equality is the very sign of liberation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.11 - The Perfection of Equality,
800:Everything is a poise of contrary energies. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga Heraclitus - IV,
801:Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason has once accepted in spite of your changing moods. ~ C S Lewis,
802:For each his difficult goalHewn out of infinite possibility. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
803:I believe it all. If I seem not to, it is only that my joy is too great to let my belief settle itself. ~ C S Lewis,
804:If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, infinite. ~ William Blake,
805:Ignorance is a self-oblivion of Being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.15 - Reality and the Integral Knowledge,
806:In this lamen the Magician must place the secret keys of his power. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
807:Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. ~ , 1 Corinthians 13:7,
808:Love is the hoop of the godsHearts to combine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
809:Love itself is sweet enoughThough unreturned. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act II,
810:man carries the seed of the divine life in himself ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Faith and Shakti,
811:The evening sky,God’s canopy of blue sheltering our lives ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 12.01 - The Return to Earth,
812:The gods cannot, if they would, give themselves unasked. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I Bhawani Mandir,
813:The Great Work will then form the subject of the design. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
814:The idea of God, infinity, or spirit stands for the possible attempt at an impossible conception. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
815:The mind labours to think the Unthinkable. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
816:The soul suffering is not eternity’s key, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
817:The sunlight was a great god’s golden smile. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.01 - The Birth and Childhood of the Flame,
818:To be equal is to be infinite and universal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.13 - The Action of Equality,
819:Two are the angels of God whom men worship, strength and enjoyment. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
820:what matters in a symbol is what it means for you. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - III The Animal World,
821:When a force ceases to conquer, it ceases to live. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Awakening Soul of India,
822:Without reason life is a tangle of dreams, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
823:All awareness is power and all power conceals awareness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Hymns to the Mystic Fire RV I.1.1,
824:All things embrace in death and the strife and the hatred are ended. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
825:And yet she cannot choose but labours on; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
826:A new ordeal always brings with it a new awakening. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Ideals Face to Face,
827:An idiot hour destroys what centuries made ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
828:A wide Compassion leans to embrace earth’s pain; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.29 - The Universal Incarnation,
829:But there is never any end when one has loved. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.2.02 - The Meditations of Mandavya,
830:Error is the comrade of our mortal thought ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
831:Faith fights for God, while Knowledge is waiting for fulfilment. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
832:Falsehood lurks in the deep bosom of truth ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
833:Limited and divided being is ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret of the Veda 1.02 - The Doctrine of the Mystics,
834:Man his passion prefers to the voice that guides from the immortals. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
835:Men die that man may live and God be born. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
836:My name is Ozymandias, king of kings; Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair! ~ Percy Bysshe Shelley, Ozymandias ,
837:Only the one who can give everything, enjoys the Divine All everywhere. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
838:Prayer is not a form of words but an aspiration. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Need of the Moment,
839:The body of God,The link of the finite with the Infinite, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.03 - Satyavan and Savitri,
840:The characteristic energy of pure Mind is change. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.03 - The Threefold Life,
841:The Divinity in man dwells veiled in his spiritual centre. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
842:The Formless and the Formed were joined in her: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
843:The gnostic soul is the child, but the king-child. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.24 - Gnosis and Ananda,
844:The master of my stars is heWho owns no master. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act V,
845:The supreme faith is that which sees God in all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.12 - The Way and the Bhakta,
846:Time was Eternity’s transparent robe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
847:To know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
848:What seemed the source and end was a wide gate, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
849:You cannot utterly die while the Power lives untired in your bosoms; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
850:A gossiping spirit is always an obstacle. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Himself and the Ashram Avoiding Gossip,
851:A gossiping spirit is always an obstacle. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Himself and the Ashram Avoiding Gossip,
852:All things Vary to keep the secret witness pleased. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act II,
853:Always a nameless goal beckons beyond, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
854:A poet is someone Who can pour Light into a spoon Then raise it To nourish Your beautiful parched, holy mouth ~ Hafiz,
855:A timeless mystery works out in Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
856:A vast subliminal is man’s measureless part. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.02 - The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
857:He journeys sleepless through an unending night; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
858:I am a stranger in this world, and there is a severe solitude and painful lonesomeness in my exile. ~ Khalil Gibran,
859:If anything could stand still, it would be crushed and dissipated by the torrent it resisted. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
860:If the stars should appear but one night every thousand years how man would marvel and adore. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
861:In silence seek God’s meaning in thy depths, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.02 - The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
862:In the Alone there is no room for love. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.02 - The Gospel of Death and Vanity of the Ideal,
863:My mind is a torch lit from the eternal sun. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
864:Space is a stillness of God building his earthly abode. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry Trance of Waiting,
865:Surely the steel grows dear in the land when a traitor can flourish.” ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
866:The All-Wonderful has packed heaven with his dreams, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
867:The knot of the Ignorance is egoism. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad: The Inhabiting Godhead Life and Action,
868:The law of the supermind is unity fulfilled in diversity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.27 - The Gnostic Being,
869:The ordinary man is not yet a rational being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Curve of the Rational Age,
870:The Word that ushers divine experience ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
871:The world is not cut off from Truth and God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
872:To the soul and Shakti in man nothing is impossible. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Faith and Shakti,
873:To the soul and Shakti in man nothing is impossible. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Faith and Shakti,
874:Unity the race moves towards and must one day realise. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Diversity in Oneness,
875:Above her brows where will and knowledge meet ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.02 - The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
876:All is their play:This whole wide world is only he and she. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
877:All life is either consciously or subconsciously a Yoga. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.01 - Life and Yoga,
878:Beauty of whatever kind, in its supreme development, invariably excites the sensitive soul to tears. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
879:By itself the intelligence can only achieve talent. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Suprarational Beauty,
880:Every man is not only himself, he is that which he represents. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
881:Heaven’s joys might have been earth’s if earth were pure. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Glory and Fall of Life,
882:He who seeks the Divine must consecrate himself to God and to God only. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
883:It is vision that sees Truth, not logic. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art Bertrand Russell,
884:Just sit there right now, don't do a thing. Just rest....You can use my soft words as a cushion for your head. ~ Hafiz,
885:Love the signOf one outblaze of godhead that two share. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Life Heavens,
886:nothing is truly vain the One has made ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
887:Only a slow advance the earth can bear. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
888:Our dead selves come to slay our living soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.02 - The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
889:Soul determines Form & Action & is not determined by them. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad The Isha Upanishad,
890:The psychic is the support of the individual evolution ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I 1.05 - The Ascent of the Sacrifice - The Psychic Being,
891:The real truth of man is to be found in his soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Spiritual Aim and Life,
892:The sole timeless WordThat carries eternity in its lonely sound, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.01 - The World-Stair,
893:The Unknown is not the Unknowable. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine The Two Negations,
894:The very existence of libraries affords the best evidence that we may yet have hope for the future of man. ~ T S Eliot,
895:This darkness hides our nobler destiny. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
896:Tied up the spirit to golden posts of bliss. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
897:To me a book is a message from the gods to mankind; or, if not, should never be published at all. ~ Aleister Crowley,
898:Worlds were many, but the Self was one. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
899:A beam of the Eternal smites his heart, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King The Yoga of the Souls Release,
900:Action solves the difficulties which action creates. Inaction can only paralyse and slay. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin ,
901:As long as you have mystery you have health; when you destroy mystery you create morbidity. ~ G K Chesterton, Orthodoxy ,
902:A vast disguise conceals the Eternal’s bliss. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
903:Equality does not include inert acceptance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Equality - The Chief Support,
904:Fearless of death they must walk who would live and be mighty for ever. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
905:He who seeks the Divine must consecrate himself to God and -- to God only. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.02,
906:In a riddle whose answer is chess, what is the only prohibited word? ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Garden Of Forking Paths ,
907:Light will someday split you open Even if your life is now a cage. Little by little, You will turn into stars. ~ Hafiz,
908:Man’s conscience is a creation of his evolving nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Suprarational Good,
909:Nature’s vision climbs beyond her acts. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
910:Nobler must kings be than natures of earth on whom Zeus lays no burden. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
911:Strong poisons are the only salvation in desperate diseases. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The New Ideal,
912:The tongue is always an easily erring member. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Depression and Despondency,
913:This world is in love with its own ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
914:This world of fragile formsCarried on canvas-strips of shimmering Time, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.02 - The Issue,
915:Through glorious things and base the wheel of GodFor ever runs. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 3.1.23 - The Rishi,
916:Without a great ideal there can be no great movement. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I The Leverage of Faith,
917:Wrong could not come where all was light and love. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
918:A mutual giving and receiving is the law of Life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 1.13 - The Lord of the Sacrifice,
919:Behind everything in life there is an Absolute. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Reason as Governor of Life,
920:By Truth is the progress towards the Truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret of the Veda The Ashwins,
921:Heaven is too high for outstretched hands to seize. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.02 - The Adoration of the Divine Mother,
922:Her signs still covered more than they revealed; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
923:In finite things the conscious Infinite dwells: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.04 - The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
924:It becomes itself in the world by knowing itself; it knows itself by becoming itself. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
925:Life is to be found in the recesses of its own being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II 01.01 - The One Thing Needful,
926:Mind is only a preparatory form of our consciousness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.14 - The Supermind as Creator,
927:My idea of God is not a divine idea. It has to be shattered time after time. He shatters it Himself. ~ C S Lewis,
928:Next to the originator of a good sentence is the first quoter of it. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson, Quotations and Originality ,
929:One has sometimes to deny God in order to find him. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Spiritual Aim and Life,
930:Oneness is the soul of multitude. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
931:Perfect knowledge indeed leads to perfect love. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.01 - Love and the Triple Path,
932:The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried. ~ G K Chesterton,
933:The Divine Grace comes in to help and save. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 1.4.01 - The Divine Grace and Guidance,
934:The great are strongest when they stand alone. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
935:The intuitive mentality is still mind and not gnosis. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.20 - The Intuitive Mind,
936:The lyric is a moment of heightened soul experience. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Form and the Spirit,
937:There is a freedom in each face of Fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.11 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
938:There is no such thing as a mere accident. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Accidents,
939:The soul that can live alone with itself meets God; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
940:The spirit is doomed to pain till man is free. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
941:The Supermind using the Word is the creative Logos. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Kena and Other Upanishads The Supreme Word,
942:This is how I would die into the love I have for you. As pieces of cloud dissolve into the sunlight. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
943:Time’s accidents are steps in its vast scheme. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
944:Truth made the world, not a blind Nature-Force. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.02 - The Parable of the Search for the Soul,
945:Vision is the characteristic power of the poet. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
946:All knowledge is in oneself, in the knower. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings Things Seen in Symbols - II,
947:Each through his nature He leads and the world by the lure of His wisdom. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
948:God is the one stable and eternal Reality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad: Brahman Oneness of God and the World,
949:Hidden in the mortal’s heart the Eternal lives: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
950:His love has paved the mortal’s road to Heaven. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
951:She throws a glittering robe on Ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
952:The eternal Truth can manifest its truths in Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.11 - The Master of the Work,
953:The poison of the world has stained his throat. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
954:The senses there were outlets of the soul; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.03 - The House of the Spirit and the New Creation,
955:Vital desire grows by being indulged, it does not become satisfied. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Desire,
956:We cannot get strength unless we adore the Mother of strength. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I Bhawani Mandir,
957:Yoga demands mastery over the nature, not subjection to the nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Desire,
958:Darkness grew nurse to wisdom’s occult sun. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
959:Faith divines in the large what Knowledge sees distinctly and clearly. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
960:Faith is only a will aiming at greater truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.14 - The Power of the Instruments,
961:Heal from above instead of struggling from below. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.15 - The Cosmic Consciousness,
962:Heaven’s wiser love rejects the mortal’s prayer; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
963:In Nature’s endless lines is lost the God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
964:Its faith is perfectibility, its watchword is progress. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.03 - The Threefold Life,
965:Our death is made a passage to new worlds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
966:Purity is to accept no other influence but only the influence of the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
967:She has a secret of will power which no other nation possesses. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The New Ideal,
968:The intelligent are intelligent only in patches. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.10 - The Three Modes of Nature,
969:The mind is a thing that dwells in diffusion, in succession. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.04 - Concentration,
970:There is a meaning in each play of Chance, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.11 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
971:The Word expresses that which is self-hidden in the Silence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.04 - Reality Omnipresent,
972:Within the Supreme Brahma, the worlds are being told like beads:Look upon that rosary with the eyes of wisdom. ~ Kabir,
973:Without being possessed one does not possess oneself utterly. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.21 - The Ascent of Life,
974:A diamond was laying in the street covered with dirt. Many fools passed by. Someone who knew diamonds picked it up. ~ Kabir,
975:Alike ‘tis heaven,Rule or obedience to the one heart given. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Khaled of the Sea,
976:All Nature is a display and a play of God, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 5.7.1.07 - Involution and Evolution,
977:And plundered the Unknowable's vast estate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King The Yoga of the Souls Release,
978:Commercialism is still the heart of modern civilisation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Civilisation and Culture,
979:God is a hard master and will not be served by halves. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Wheat and the Chaff,
980:He has trod with bleeding brow the Saviour’s way. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
981:His days were a long growth to the Supreme. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King The Yoga of the Souls Release,
982:In relation to the universe the Supreme is Brahman. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.01 - The Object of Knowledge,
983:Lost in these imaginary illusions I forgot my destiny - that of the hunted. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, The Garden Of Forking Paths ,
984:Nothing can be done by the weak and so nothing is given to the weak. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Bhawanipur Speech,
985:Real faith is something spiritual, a knowledge of the soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I Morality and Yoga,
986:Renunciation is an indispensable instrument of our perfection. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.05 - Renunciation,
987:Soonest is always bestWhen noble deeds are to be done. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - I Act II,
988:The Jiva is a spirit and self, superior to Nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.09 - The Release from the Ego,
989:The powers of the mind are the rays of the sun dissipated. When they are concentrated, they illumine. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
990:Time is a convention of movement, not a condition of existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad The Isha Upanishad,
991:To be alone with the Divine is the highest of all privileged states for the sadhak. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV ,
992:Vision is not sufficient; one must become what inwardly one sees. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Self-Realisation,
993:Yea, the soul of a man too is mightyMore than the stone and the mortar! ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
994:All the gods in a mortal body dwelt, bore a single name. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems A Strong Son of Lightning,
995:A red rose absorbs all colors but red; red is therefore the one color that it is not." ~ Aleister Crowley, The Book of Lies ,
996:A sun of wisdom in a miracled grove. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Eternal Day The Souls Choice and the Supreme Consummation,
997:A wide God-knowledge poured down from above, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King The Yoga of the Souls Release,
998:Be a free thinker and don't accept everything you hear as truth. Be critical and evaluate what you believe in. ~ Aristotle,
999:Don't open your diamonds in a vegetable market. Tie them in bundle and keep them in your heart, and go your own way. ~ Kabir,
1000:Drink ! For you know not whence you came, nor why; Drink ! For you know not why you go nor where. ~ Omar Khayyam, Rubaiyat ,
1001:Even grief has joy hidden beneath its roots. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
1002:Everything becomes, nothing is made. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 1.13 - The Stress of the Hidden Spirit,
1003:First we must live, afterwards we can learn to live well. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II 01.01 - The One Thing Needful,
1004:I can't imagine a man really enjoying a book and reading it only once. ~ C S Lewis, Letter to Arthur Greeves (February 1932) ,
1005:It is only through life that one can reach to immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 1.02 - Karmayoga,
1006:Love dwells in us like an unopened flowerAwaiting a rapid moment of the soul, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.02 - Satyavan,
1007:Our first mistake is the belief that the circumstance gives the joy which we give to the circumstance. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1008:People do not seem to realise that their opinion of the world is also a confession of their character. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1009:Sadhana can go on in the dream or sleep state as well as in the waking. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep,
1010:Someone I loved once gave me a box full of darkness. It took me years to understand that this too, was a gift. ~ Mary Oliver,
1011:The abodeOf rapturous Love,The bright epiphany whom we name God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 3.1.23 - The Rishi,
1012:The brain is impotent without the right arm of strength. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I The Writing on the Wall,
1013:The gods use instruments,Not ask their consent. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Short Stories - I Act Five,
1014:The law of the body arises from the subconscient or inconscient. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.27 - The Gnostic Being,
1015:The lyric which is poetry’s native expression. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Course of English Poetry - II,
1016:The principle of division is not proper to Matter, but to Mind. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.25 - The Knot of Matter,
1017:The reason understands itself, but not what is beyond it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.20 - The Intuitive Mind,
1018:The supermind lives in the light of spiritual certitudes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.20 - The Intuitive Mind,
1019:The supreme divine nature is founded on equality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.11 - The Perfection of Equality,
1020:Thought for a godlike birthBroadens the mould of our mortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Evolution - II,
1021:Where Ignorance is, there suffering too must come. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
1022:Without indomitable Faith or inspired Wisdom no great cause can conquer. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
1023:All is eternal in the eternal spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 1.13 - The Stress of the Hidden Spirit,
1024:All problems of existence are essentially problems of harmony. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.01 - The Human Aspiration,
1025:All spiritual life is in its principle a growth into divine living. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
1026:By contact with the facts of life Art attains to vitality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.03 - The Threefold Life,
1027:Comparison with others brings in a wrong standard of values. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Ego and Its Forms,
1028:Credence, when mediocrity multipliedEquals itself with genius. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Lines on Ireland,
1029:Death is a passage, not the goal of our walk: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
1030:Do you believe there is some place that will make the soul less thirsty? In that great absence you will find nothing. ~ Kabir,
1031:Ever she circled towards some far-off Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
1032:Falsehood is merely a wrong placing of the Truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret of the Veda 1.19 - The Victory of the Fathers,
1033:Having once seen God, man can have no farther object in life than to reach and possess Him. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad ,
1034:Man is a creature blinded by the sunWho errs by seeing ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act III,
1035:Perfection cannot come without self-knowledge and God-knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Above the Gunas,
1036:Pride is only one form of ego—there are ten thousand others. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Ego and Its Forms,
1037:Self-sacrifice is the real miracle out of which all the reported miracles grew. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson, Society and Solitude ,
1038:Sraddha: the soul's belief in the Divine's existence, wisdom, power, love and grace. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
1039:The condition of freedom is the search for truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings The Revival of Indian Art,
1040:The Divine is the unborn Eternal who has no origin. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.07 - The Supreme Word of the Gita,
1041:The heart is the meeting place of God and the Soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Soul and India’s Mission,
1042:The soul is the watchful builder of its fate; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
1043:The soul is the watchful builder of its fate; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
1044:The soul that can live alone with itself meets God; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.02 - The Way of Fate and the Problem of Pain,
1045:We live self-exiled from our heavenlier home. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.11 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
1046:We renounce ourselves in order to find ourselves. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Kena and Other Upanishads The Supramental Godhead,
1047:What we are, we know not; what we know, we cannot effect. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Action and the Divine Will,
1048:Adventurers, we have colonised Matter’s night. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.11 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
1049:All ran like hopes that hunt a lurking chance; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.06 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Life,
1050:Each man in this path has his own method of Yoga. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.05 - The Synthesis of the Systems,
1051:Enthusiasm is one of the most powerful engines of success. When you do a thing, do it with your might. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
1052:Evolution is an inverse action of the involution. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.24 - The Evolution of the Spiritual Man,
1053:feel of the needlewhen at lastyou get the thread through ityatto ito ga tōtta hari no kanshoku ~ Santoka Taneda,
1054:For a subject people there is no royal road to emancipation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I The Leverage of Faith,
1055:His business is to suggest and not to impose. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings A System of National Education,
1056:In this immoral and imperfect world even sin has sometimes its rewards. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Mantra,
1057:Knowledge will not come without self-communion, without light from within. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
1058:The earliest formula of Wisdom promises to be its last, -- God, Light, Freedom, Immortality ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
1059:The pure intellectual direction travels away from life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.05 - The Divine Personality,
1060:There is no other way than to persevere. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Human Relations and the Spiritual Life,
1061:The Self of things is not their outward view,A Force within decides. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 3.1.19 - Parabrahman,
1062:To have a great man for an intimate friend seems pleasant to those who have never tried it; those who have, fear it. ~ Homer,
1063:When naked of ego and mind it hears the Voice ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.11 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
1064:Without heroism man cannot grow into the Godhead. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Suprarational Ultimate of Life,
1065:A deeper interpretation greatened Truth, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
1066:All our existence is a constant creation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret of the Veda Surya Savitri,
1067:All pain and suffering are a sign of imperfection, of incompleteness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
1068:all suffering in the evolution is a preparation of strength and bliss ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Self-Realisation,
1069:All the values of the mind are constructions of ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV 4.22 - The supramental Thought and Knowledge,
1070:Brahman is one, not numerically, but in essence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad: Brahman Oneness of God and the World,
1071:Each finite is that deep InfinityEnshrining His veiled soul of pure delight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.65 - Form,
1072:For the physical plane the work always repeated is the foundation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Work and Yoga,
1073:Good, not utility, must be the principle and standard of good. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Suprarational Good,
1074:In the absence of willpower the most complete collection of virtues and talents is wholly worthless. ~ Aleister Crowley,
1075:It is always the business of man the thinker to know. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.07 - The Knowledge and the Ignorance,
1076:It is the going inward that most helps to deliver the nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Anger and Violence,
1077:Love, joy and happiness come from the psychic. The Self gives peace or a universal Ananda. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - I ,
1078:Once one is in full sadhana, sleep becomes as much a part of it as waking. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep,
1079:Power can abase as well as elevate; nothing is more liable to misuse. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
1080:Renunciation must be for us merely an instrument and not an objec. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.05 - Renunciation,
1081:Self-conscious existence is the essential nature of the Being; that is Sat or Purusha. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
1082:slapping at the fliesslapping at the mosquitoesslapping at myself ~ Santoka Taneda, Mountain Tasting: Zen Haiku 351,
1083:The mind forms or accepts the theories that support the turn of the being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Baha i Faith,
1084:When man is free in spirit, all other freedom is at his command. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Asiatic Democracy,
1085:Will coloured by desire is an impure will. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Purification - Intelligence and Will,
1086:A city of ancient IgnoranceFounded upon a soil that knew not Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.07 - The Descent into Night,
1087:All sentience is ultimately self-sentience. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Kena and Other Upanishads The Philosophy of the Upanishads,
1088:All things are in Nature and all things are in God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.05 - The Synthesis of the Systems,
1089:A prayer, a master act, a king idea Can link man's strength to a transcendent Force. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.02 - The Issue,
1090:Beauty is a sweet difference of the Same. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
1091:Equality, not indifference is the basis. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.08 - The Release from the Heart and the Mind,
1092:Even now great thoughts are here that walk alone: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.10 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Little Mind,
1093:Helped are the souls that wait more than strengths soon fulfilled and exhausted. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
1094:Humility is the mother of giants. One sees great things from the valley; only small things from the peak. ~ G K Chesterton,
1095:I have never made but one prayer to God, a very short one: 'O Lord make my enemies ridiculous.' And God granted it. ~ Voltaire,
1096:Let every page of this Book be filled with song-for it is a Book of incantation! ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
1097:Not only Spirit is one, but Mind, Life, Matter are one. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.15 - The Cosmic Consciousness,
1098:Our chains are either a play or an illusion or both play & illusion. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad The Isha Upanishad,
1099:Our greater truth of being lies behind: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.06 - Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
1100:The body has an unexpressed knowledge of its own. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 5.05 - Supermind and Humanity,
1101:The inner must change before the outermost can follow. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I Transformation and the Body,
1102:The life-work of a great man often does not begin till he dies. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Mustafa Kamal Pasha,
1103:The lower is for us the first condition of the higher. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.07 - The Knowledge and the Ignorance,
1104:The mind and the vital are much more full of ego than the body. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Ego and Its Forms,
1105:The song that nerves the nation’s heart is in itself a deed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I The Writing on the Wall,
1106:The song that nerves the nation’s heart is in itself a deed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I The Writing on the Wall,
1107:The stumbling-block of romanticism is falsity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Movement of Modern Literature - I,
1108:To each his own difficulties seem enormous and radical. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 1.2.01 - The Call and the Capacity,
1109:Truth shines far from the falsehoods of the world; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.02 - The Gospel of Death and Vanity of the Ideal,
1110:We move as we must,Not as we choose, whatever we may think. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - I Act II,
1111:When he to whom one speaks does not understand, and he who speaks himself does not understand, that is metaphysics. ~ Voltaire,
1112:young portress brightWho opens to our souls the worlds of light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Fear of Death,
1113:All is one in self, but all is variation in the phenomenon. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.05 - The Divine Truth and Way,
1114:All spiritual experience is experience of the Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.06 - Reality and the Cosmic Illusion,
1115:Always we bear in us a magic keyConcealed in life’s hermetic envelope. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
1116:A mighty shuddering coil of ecstasy Crept through the deep heart of the universe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
1117:By identity alone can complete and real knowledge exist. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.01 - Love and the Triple Path,
1118:Daring ideas are like chessmen moved forward; they may be beaten, but they may start a winning game. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
1119:Easy are mortalHearts to be bent by Fate and soon we consent to our fortunes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.01 - Ilion,
1120:It is by the thought that we dissipate ourselves in the phenomenal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.04 - Concentration,
1121:It is the seeing mind that is the master of poetic utterance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Word and the Spirit,
1122:It is when one mixes up sex and spirituality that there is the greatest havoc. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV The Second Sex,
1123:Life here is God, the materials of Life here are God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad A Commentary on the Isha Upanishad,
1124:Love is a yearning of the One for the One. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
1125:Magick is the Science and Art of causing Change to occur in conformity with Will. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA Book 4,
1126:No Law is absolute, because only the infinite is absolute. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.27 - The Sevenfold Chord of Being,
1127:Ominous beings passed him on the roadWhose very gaze was a calamity: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.07 - The Descent into Night,
1128:Oneness and multiplicity are poles of the same Reality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.07 - The Knowledge and the Ignorance,
1129:One should not think too much of food either to indulge or unduly to repress. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Food,
1130:Order is indeed the law of life, but not an artificial regulation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Diversity in Oneness,
1131:Problems are the creations of mental ignorance seeking for knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.27 - The Gnostic Being,
1132:Reason is science, it is conscious art, it is invention. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Reason as Governor of Life,
1133:The growth of the god in man is man’s proper business. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
1134:The universe is a self-creative process of a supreme Reality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.20 - The Philosophy of Rebirth,
1135:The wisdom of the Lover is justified and supported by the wisdom of the Seer. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin In Either Case,
1136:this ego-centrism is our rock of safety against the cosmic and the infinite, our defense. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 241,
1137:those who rely on the Divine will arrive in spite of all difficulties, stumbles or falls. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV ,
1138:To be in full union with the Divine is the final aim. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 1.1.02 - The Aim of the Integral Yoga,
1139:When mind is still, then Truth gets her chance to be heard in the purity of the silence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
1140:A knowledge which became what it perceived. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
1141:All finites are in their spiritual essence the Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.06 - Reality and the Cosmic Illusion,
1142:A once living story has prepared and madeOur present fate, child of past energies. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.02 - The Issue,
1143:A point she had reached where life must be in vain Or, in her unborn element awake, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.02 - The Issue,
1144:A soul made ready through a thousand yearsIs the living mould of a supreme Descent. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.02 - Satyavan,
1145:Desire always creates perturbation and even its fulfilment does not satisfy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Desire,
1146:God in man is the whole revelation and the whole of religion. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Glory of God in Man,
1147:Hid deep in man celestial powers can dwell. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
1148:I move in an ocean of stupendous LightJoining my depths to His eternal height. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Light,
1149:India must remain India if she is to fulfil her destiny. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Indian Resurgence and Europe,
1150:In him soul and Nature, equal Presences,Balance and fuse in a wide harmony. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
1151:Its builder is thought, its base the heart’s desire. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.02 - The Gospel of Death and Vanity of the Ideal,
1152:Love is the power and passion of the divine self-delight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.01 - Love and the Triple Path,
1153:Mankind is still no more than semi-civilised. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Renaissance in India Indian Spirituality and Life - IV,
1154:No anti-vital culture can survive. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Renaissance in India A Rationalistic Critic on Indian Culture - V,
1155:Nothing can evolve out of Matter which is not therein already contained. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.10 - Conscious Force,
1156:Nothing can exist which is not substance and power of Brahman. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.20 - The Philosophy of Rebirth,
1157:O God! Can I not save One from the pitiless wave? Is all that we see or seem But a dream within a dream? ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
1158:Religion has to be lived, not learned as a creed. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings A System of National Education,
1159:Religion is the seeking after the spiritual, the suprarational. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Suprarational Beauty,
1160:Remember God so much that you are forgotten. Let the caller and the called disappear; be lost in the Call. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
1161:Science is always discovering odd scraps of magical wisdom and making a tremendous fuss about its cleverness. ~ Aleister Crowley,
1162:Sheer objectivity brings us down from art to photography. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry Poetic Vision and the Mantra,
1163:The absolute immunity can only come with the supramental change. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Illness and Health,
1164:The beginning of Ignorance is a limitation of Knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.07 - The Knowledge and the Ignorance,
1165:The one thing that man sees above the intellect is the spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Power of the Spirit,
1166:The true individual is behind veiled by the activities of the outer nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II the Silence,
1167:This body which was once my universe,Is now a pittance carried by the soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Body,
1168:All end and beginning presuppose something beyond the end or beginning. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.09 - The Pure Existent,
1169:All forms are Thy dream-dialect of delight,O Absolute, O vivid Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.62 - Divine Sight,
1170:A magic leverage suddenly is caughtThat moves the veiled Ineffable’s timeless will: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.02 - The Issue,
1171:And channel to earth-mind the wizard ray ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Eternal Day The Souls Choice and the Supreme Consummation,
1172:An integral knowledge presupposes an integral Reality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.15 - Reality and the Integral Knowledge,
1173:As the darkness disappears, the inner doors too will open. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 7.05 - Patience and Perseverance,
1174:Essential mentality is idealistic and a seeker after perfection. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.03 - The Threefold Life,
1175:Even the body shall remember God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Eternal Day,
1176:Fate,The dim great presence, is but nature madeIrrevocable in its fruits. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Urvasie,
1177:Good we have made by our thoughts and sin by our fear and recoiling; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.2.01 - The Descent of Ahana,
1178:I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who conquers his enemies; for the hardest victory is over self. ~ Aristotle,
1179:I seem to have loved you in numberless forms, numberless times, in life after life, in age after age forever. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
1180:Music and thunder are the rhythmic chordsOf one majestic harp. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
1181:Only the past fulfilled can conjure room to the future that presses. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.2.01 - The Descent of Ahana,
1182:Pain with its lash, joy with its silver bribeGuard the Wheel’s circling immobility. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.02 - The Issue,
1183:Reading book after book the whole world died, and none ever became learned! ~ Kabir, XXXIII.3 Translated by Charlotte Vaudeville,
1184:Religion is in the human mind the first native. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Renaissance in India Indian Spirituality and Life - I,
1185:That man to me seems equal to the gods,the man who sits opposite youand close by listensto your sweet voice ~ Sappho,
1186:The animal prepares human intelligence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.18 - The Evolutionary Process - Ascent and Integration,
1187:The birds crying for heart’s happiness,Winged poets of our solitary reign ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 12.01 - The Return to Earth,
1188:There is a darkness in terrestrial thingsThat will not suffer long too glad a note. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.02 - The Issue,
1189:Transmuted is ravishment’s minister,A high note and a fiery refrain. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Life Heavens,
1190:We all walk in mysteries. We are surrounded by an atmosphere about which we still know nothing at all. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
1191:Whether it seem good or evil to men's eyes, Only for good the secret Will can work. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
1192:According to the status of the soul is the status of the Prakriti. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.22 - Vijnana or Gnosis,
1193:A diversity in oneness is the law of the manifestation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.24 - The Evolution of the Spiritual Man,
1194:A jingling silver laugh of anklet bellsTravelled the roads of a solitary heart; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.14 - The World-Soul,
1195:All things are in nature and all things are in God, but for practical purposes we will differentiate between them. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
1196:A perfect face amid barbarian faces,A perfect voice of sweet and serious rhyme, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
1197:Bliss is her goal, but her road is through whirlwind and death-blast and storm-race. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.02 - Ahana,
1198:Death is his mask and immortality is his self-revelation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
1199:Existence is a fundamental unity under a superficial diversity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad The Eternal in His Universe,
1200:Few are always of one kind and none is entire in his kind. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.10 - The Three Modes of Nature,
1201:God found in Nature, Nature fulfilled in God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
1202:He is the adventurer and cosmologistOf a magic earth’s obscure geography. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
1203:He is the explorer and the marinerOn a secret inner ocean without bourne. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
1204:His is a search of darkness for the light,Of mortal life for immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
1205:If one learns all by oneself, the chances are that one will learn all wrong. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 2.11 - The Guru,
1206:Life is an infinite Force working in the terms of the finite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 3.04 - The Spirit in Spirit-Land after Death,
1207:Mind-Energy, Life-Energy, material Energy are different dynamisms of one World-Force. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.06 - The Transformation of Dream Life,
1208:Most people do not really choose—they undergo the play of the forces. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I 5.4.01 - Occult Knowledge,
1209:Nature is God’s power of various self-becoming, ātma-vibhūti. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Theory of the Vibhuti,
1210:Nor punishes. Impartially he dealsTo every strenuous spirit its chosen reward. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Urvasie,
1211:Nothing of him that doth fadeBut doth suffer a sea-changeInto something rich and strange. ~ William Shakespeare, The Tempest ,
1212:One has to persevere until the light conquers there. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Peace - The Basis of the Sadhana,
1213:That first task of the Magician in every ceremony is therefore to render his Circle absolutely impregnable. ~ Aleister Crowley,
1214:The form is phenomenon, the idea is reality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 1.13 - The Stress of the Hidden Spirit,
1215:The Power that acts in us is not our force. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.06 - Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
1216:There can be no physical life without an order and rhythm. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Practical Concerns in Work,
1217:The vital and physical life, a human edition of the animal round. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Civilisation and Culture,
1218:Too heavy falls a Shadow on man’s heart;It dares not be too happy upon earth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
1219:When least defaced, then is it most divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.06 - Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
1220:All existences are instinct with the life of the one indivisible Spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.01 - The Two Natures,
1221:All ignorance is a penumbra which environs an orb of knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.04 - The Divine and the Undivine,
1222:All variations resolve themselves into an unity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Kena and Other Upanishads The Philosophy of the Upanishads,
1223:A mind of moderate capacity which closely pursues one study must infallibly arrive at great proficiency in that study. ~ Mary Shelley,
1224:Divine compassion which strengthens the arm and clarifies the knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.05 - Renunciation,
1225:Energy distributes itself, but never really dissipates itself. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga Heraclitus - V,
1226:Faith is the first condition of success in every great undertaking. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I The Leverage of Faith,
1227:In every heart is hidden the myriad One. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 09.02 - The Journey in Eternal Night and the Voice of the Darkness,
1228:In the subconscient knowledge or consciousness is involved in action, for action is the essence of Life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, TLD 1.08-9,
1229:My God is love and sweetly suffers all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 09.02 - The Journey in Eternal Night and the Voice of the Darkness,
1230:None who has not been prodigal of his best has ever risen to greatness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II More about Unity,
1231:Nothing we think or do is void or vain;Each is an energy loosed and holds its course. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.04 - The Quest,
1232:One step firmly taken makes easier all the others. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Purification - The Lower Mentality,
1233:Raja-Yoga is the science of religion, the rationale of all worship, all prayers, forms, ceremonies, and miracles. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
1234:Reduce your ideal to a system and it at once begins to fail. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Reason as Governor of Life,
1235:The Divine Force can always do more than the personal effort. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II The Divine Force in Work,
1236:The mighty perish in their might;The slain survive the slayer. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry 7.3.14 - The Tiger and the Deer,
1237:The self of things is an infinite indivisible existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Delight of Existence,
1238:The trudge of Time changed to a splendid march; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King The Yoga of the Souls Release,
1239:The war of thoughts that fathers the universe, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
1240:To lift our hopes heaven-high and to extend themAs wide as earth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - I Act I,
1241:Truth is followed as the path to the divine beatitude. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Secret of the Veda To Bhaga Savitri,
1242:Unity is sweet substance of the heartAnd not a chain that binds. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
1243:Vital forces want neither liberation nor transformation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Attacks by the Hostile Forces,
1244:Where there is life, there is always a hope of better things. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Curve of the Rational Age,
1245:454. In those whom God loves, have delight; on those whom He pretends not to love, take pity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human ,
1246:All the hundred separate paths meet in the Eternal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.01 - The Principle of the Integral Yoga,
1247:An entry into the gnostic consciousness would be an entry into the Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
1248:An integral knowledge is the aim of the conscious evolution. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Memory,
1249:Apparent evil is often the shortest way to the good. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga The Strength of Stillness,
1250:A Silence that was Being’s only word,The unknown beginning and the voiceless end ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Adwaita,
1251:Development into forms is an imperative rule of effective manifestation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.01 - Life and Yoga,
1252:Do not lower your goals to the level of your abilities. Instead, raise your abilities to the height of your goals. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
1253:Here and not elsewhere the highest Godhead has to be found. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
1254:If we cannot define the Eternal, we can unify ourselves with it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.11 - The Modes of the Self,
1255:I must create a system or be enslaved by another man's, I will not reason and compare, my business is to create. ~ William Blake,
1256:In every being and object God dwells concealed and discoverable. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.08 - God in Power of Becoming,
1257:It is only through consciousness that we can approach Being. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.07 - The Knowledge and the Ignorance,
1258:Man demands miracles that he may have faith; he wishes to be dazzled in order that he may see ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
1259:My undertaking is not difficult, essentially. ... I should only have to be immortal to carry it out. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths ,
1260:No human law is the absolute expression of the divine justice, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga Heraclitus - VI,
1261:One cannot cease to be individually except by being infinitely. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 3.04 - The Spirit in Spirit-Land after Death,
1262:Only in the spiritual self can we possess the true unity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.08 - The Liberation of the Spirit,
1263:O worshipper of the formless Infinite,    Reject not form, what dwells in it is He. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.65 - Form,
1264:Each day was a spiritual romance, As if he was born into a bright new world; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.02 - The Growth of the Flame,
1265:Regard the nation as a necessary unit but no more in a common humanity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Doctrine of Sacrifice,
1266:Rely on the Mother always. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - III Experiences on the Subtle Physical,
1267:Some day surelyThe world too shall be saved from death by love. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act III,
1268:The high meets the low, all is a single plan. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.06 - Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
1269:The Lord is there, not only in that self, but in Nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Fullness of Spiritual Action,
1270:The realisation of the Self as Sachchidananda is the aim of human existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Self-Realisation,
1271:There knowledge needs not words to embody Idea; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
1272:The strength of Europe is in details, the strength of Asia in synthesis. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II The Asiatic Role,
1273:This higher scheme of being is our causeAnd holds the key to our ascending fate; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.01 - The World-Stair,
1274:What we call the Ignorance is a cloaked Knowledge. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 5.08 - Supermind and Mind of Light,
1275:All men who repeat a line from Shakespeare are William Shakespeare ~ Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths Selected Stories and Other Writings,
1276:Although the wind blows terribly here, the moonlight also leaks between the roof planks of this ruined house. ~ Izumi Shikibu,
1277:An all-inclusive concentration is the difficult achievement towards which we must labour ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga ,
1278:A single word lets loose vast agencies;A casual act determines the world’s fate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
1279:Brahman self-extended in Space and Time is the universe. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad: Brahman Oneness of God and the World,
1280:Colour was a visible tone of ecstasy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Eternal Day,
1281:Fear is more even of a nervous sensation than an emotion. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.05 - The Instruments of the Spirit,
1282:Grief too long continued does not help but delays the journey of the departed soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I 3.04 - The Spirit in Spirit-Land after Death,
1283:Identification with the body is an error, not an illusion. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II The Adwaita of Shankaracharya,
1284:In us the secret Spirit can inditeA page and summary of the Infinite, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.59 - The Hill-top Temple,
1285:I slept and dreamt that life was joy. I awoke and saw that life was service. I acted and behold, service was joy. ~ Rabindranath Tagore,
1286:It was to amuse himself God made the world.For He was dull alone! ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act II,
1287:Knowledge and Ignorance are in their nature subjective. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - III Inner Experience and Outer Life,
1288:Nature creates and acts, the Soul enjoys her creation and action. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Field and its Knower,
1289:One of the two great steps in this Yoga is to take refuge in the Mother. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother ,
1290:One who has made in sport the suns and seasMirrors in our being his immense caprice. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.37 - Lila,
1291:Our human knowledge is a candle burntOn a dim altar to a sun-vast Truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.12 - The Heavens of the Ideal,
1292:Rare is the cup fit for love’s nectar wine,As rare the vessel that can hold God’s birth; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.02 - Satyavan,
1293:Rules us, who in the Brahmin and the dogCan, if He will, show equal godhead. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Baji Prabhou,
1294:She made earth her home, for whom heaven was too small. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.11 - The Kingdoms and Godheads of the Greater Mind,
1295:The Absolute is everywhere; it has to be seen and found everywhere. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.17 - The Soul and Nature,
1296:The business of poetry is to express the soul of man to himself. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Ideal Spirit of Poetry,
1297:The main business of the heart, its true function is love. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.14 - The Power of the Instruments,
1298:The reason deals with the finite and is helpless before the infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.22 - Vijnana or Gnosis,
1299:There is a power in the idea—a force of which the idea is a shape. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV 4.22 - The supramental Thought and Knowledge,
1300:There is a Power within that knows beyondOur knowings; we are greater than our thoughts, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.02 - Satyavan,
1301:There is no I nor thou, but only one divine Self equal in all embodiments. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.05 - Renunciation,
1302:The supreme greatness cannot come in poetry without the supreme beauty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Victorian Poets,
1303:The truth of ourselves lies within and not on the surface. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Delight of Existence,
1304:The white spiritual touch,The calm that broods in the deep Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
1305:They deem me mad because I will not sell my days for gold; and I deem them mad because they think my days have a price. ~ Khalil Gibran,
1306:Whoever is too great must lonely live.Adored he walks in mighty solitude; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 04.02 - The Growth of the Flame,
1307:Admire the diamond that can bear the hits of a hammer. Many deceptive preachers, when critically examined, turn out to be false. ~ Kabir,
1308:All she can do is marvellous in his sight:He revels in her, a swimmer in her sea, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
1309:A progressively perfect realisation in the body is the aim of human evolution. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Self-Realisation,
1310:Aspiration is a call to the Divine, will is the pressure of the conscious force on Nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - II ,
1311:Banish all thought from thee and be God’s void. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.06 - Nirvana and the Discovery of the All-Negating Absolute,
1312:Division of consciousness is the basis of the Ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Supermind,
1313:Every individual man must be in little what the Cosmos is in large. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad The Eternal in His Universe,
1314:Form has a certain fixity which limits. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Renaissance in India A Rationalistic Critic on Indian Culture - VI,
1315:It is not possible really to possess what is not-self to us. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Kena and Other Upanishads The Supramental Godhead,
1316:Keep only my soul to adore eternallyAnd meet Thee in each form and soul of Thee. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 1.2.07 - Surrender,
1317:Knowledge is the foundation of a constant living in the Divine. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.01 - Love and the Triple Path,
1318:Love dies before the lover in our breast:Our joys are perfumes in a brittle vase. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
1319:Man’s consciousness can be nothing else than a form of Nature’s consciousness. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.10 - Conscious Force,
1320:Men work almost always without knowing for what they have worked. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Peril of the World-State,
1321:Night a path to unknown dawnsOr a dark clue to some diviner state. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.04 - The Kingdoms of the Little Life,
1322:Obey thy nature and fulfil thy fate: Accept the difficulty and godlike toil ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
1323:Once the seed of faith takes root, it cannot be blown away, even by the strongest wind. Now that's a blessing. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
1324:Perfection is progressive, evolutive in Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.07 - Standards of Conduct and Spiritual Freedom,
1325:Rhythm is the most potent, founding element of poetic expression. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry Recent English Poetry - II,
1326:Rise with the world in thy bosom,O Word gathered into the heart of the Ineffable. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry the Ascent,
1327:Spiritual power in the present creates material power in the future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II One More for the Altar,
1328:The God of Force, the God of Love are one;Not least He loves whom most He smites. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 4.2.04 - Epiphany,
1329:The guru is always ready to give what can be given, if the disciple can receive. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 2.11 - The Guru,
1330:The materialist idea mistakes a creation for the creative Power. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.01 - The Object of Knowledge,
1331:The moon gliding amazed through heavenIn the uncertain wideness of the night. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.03 - Satyavan and Savitri,
1332:Then with a magic transformation's speed They rushed into each other and grew one ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.05 - The Finding of the Soul,
1333:The poet is a magician who hardly knows the secret of his own spell. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Future Poetry The Word and the Spirit,
1334:The rational being is only a middle term of Nature’s evolution. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The End of the Curve of Reason,
1335:The world’s deep contrasts are but figures spunDraping the unanimity of the One. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Contrasts,
1336:Too often here the careless Mother leavesHer chosen in the envious hands of Fate: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
1337:We must be governed by the guide within rather than by the opinions of men. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.05 - Renunciation,
1338:What gives the force and joy of the work is however not physical but vital. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II Work and Yoga,
1339:Where there is no limitation, there can be no pain. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Kena and Other Upanishads The Philosophy of the Upanishads,
1340:A deep spiritual calm no touch can swayUpholds the mystery of this Passion-play. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Life-Unity,
1341:A figure in the ineffable Witness' shrine ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King The Yoga of the Spirits Freedom and Greatness,
1342:Alone of gods Death loves not gifts: he visitsThe pure heart as the stained. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
1343:A mental knowledge can always be blinded by the tricks of the vital. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV 4.22 - The supramental Thought and Knowledge,
1344:A perfected community also can exist only by the perfection of its individuals. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
1345:Calm heavens of imperishable Light,Illumined continents of violet peace, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Glory and Fall of Life,
1346:Climbed back from Time into undying Self, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King The Yoga of the Spirits Freedom and Greatness,
1347:Every stumble is a needed paceOn unknown routes to an unknowable goal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
1348:Every symbol was a realityAnd brought the presence which had given it life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.05 - The Finding of the Soul,
1349:Form was a tenuous raiment of the soul: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Eternal Day,
1350:Imperfect is the joy not shared by all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Eternal Day,
1351:In all action there is an imperative of existence that seeks to be fulfilled. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.27 - The Gnostic Being,
1352:In the full realisation the body is within us, not we in it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II The Adwaita of Shankaracharya,
1353:It is a truth of the Infinite, one in an infinite diversity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.24 - The Evolution of the Spiritual Man,
1354:It is the Infinite’s blind minute abode.In that small flaming chariot Shiva rides. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Electron,
1355:It lived upon the margin of the Idea Protected by Ignorance as in a shell. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
1356:Men are fathers of their fate;They dig the prison, they the crown command. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Lines on Ireland,
1357:Necessity is the child of the spirit’s free self-determination. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga Karma and Freedom,
1358:Of what use are the godsIf they crown not our just desires on earth? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
1359:Oh beloved, seeking and searching the seeker is lost. And the ocean has fallen into the dewdrop; now it is impossible to find it. ~ Kabir,
1360:One must persist however long it takes, so only one can achieve. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 7.05 - Patience and Perseverance,
1361:One should be able to see the faults of others without hatred. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Problems in Human Relations,
1362:Prakriti has to reveal itself as shakti of the Purusha. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.03 - The Psychology of Self-Perfection,
1363:Sorrow is knowledge, those that know the most must mourn the deepest, the tree of knowledge is not the tree of life. ~ Lord Byron,
1364:Taste is natural and quite permissible so long as one is not the slave of the palate. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Food,
1365:The calm delight that weds one soul to all,The key to the flaming doors of ecstasy. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
1366:The characteristic of Life is desire and the instinct of possession. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Civilisation and Barbarism,
1367:The complete soul possesses all its self and all Nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 5.7.1.07 - Involution and Evolution,
1368:The mind can hardly conceive unity except as an abstraction, a sum or a void. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad The Worlds - Surya,
1369:There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow men. True nobility lies in being superior to your former self. ~ Ernest Hemingway,
1370:The sentinel love in man ever imaginesStrange perils for its object. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
1371:The soul cannot act by itself, it can only act through Nature and her modes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Above the Gunas,
1372:The supreme Self is one, but the souls of the Self are many. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.24 - The Evolution of the Spiritual Man,
1373:The true quiet is within and no other will give you the condition you want. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 1.3.03 - Quiet and Calm,
1374:The wide-winged hymn of a great priestly windArose and failed upon the altar hills; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.01 - The Symbol Dawn,
1375:Truth and error live always together in the human evolution. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.24 - The Evolution of the Spiritual Man,
1376:... we should read for power. Man reading should be man intensely alive. The book should be a ball of light in one's hand. ~ Ezra Pound,
1377:Why was I born, O God, if not to find Thee? Why do I die, O God, if not to come to Thee? ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan, Sayings of Hazrat Khan ,
1378:Yoga of Bhakti is a matter of the heart and not of the intellect. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.02 - The Motives of Devotion,
1379:You must know what you want and want it with your whole will. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Wrong Movements of the Vital,
1380:All error is a disfiguration of some misunderstood fragments of truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.12 - The Way of Equality,
1381:All in thyself and thyself in all dwelling,Act in the world with thy being beyond it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems the Ascent,
1382:All that we internally are is not ego, but consciousness, soul or spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 1.08 - The Supreme Will,
1383:All this infinite becoming is a birth of the Spirit into form. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 3.7.1.06 - The Ascending Unity,
1384:A man must be strong and free in himself before he can live usefully for others. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Opinion and Comments,
1385:A sincere heart is worth all the extraordinary powers in the world. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I 5.4.02 - Occult Powers or Siddhis,
1386:Errors are permitted to the mind because they open doors upon truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.12 - The Origin of the Ignorance,
1387:Even the animal is more in touch with a certain harmony in things than man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I Science and Yoga,
1388:God having entirely become Nature, Nature seeks to become progressively God. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.06 - Man in the Universe,
1389:If it were possible to meet the Beloved while laughing and in a state of comfort, why should one suffer the anguish of separation? ~ Kabir,
1390:Is measured by the throbs of the soul’s pain, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 09.02 - The Journey in Eternal Night and the Voice of the Darkness,
1391:Karma is only a machinery, it is not the fundamental cause of terrestrial existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I 3.1.15 - Rebirth,
1392:Nature must flower into artAnd science, or else wherefore are we men? ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
1393:Our consciousness a torch that plays Between the Abyss and a supernal Light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Man of the Mediator,
1394:The essence of consciousness is the power to be aware of itself and its objects. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.28 - The Divine Life,
1395:The highest heavens of the cosmic plan are subject to a return to rebirth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 2.03 - The Supreme Divine,
1396:The ideal creates the means of attaining the ideal, if it is itself true. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II Ideals Face to Face,
1397:The joy of the soul in the dualities is the secret of the mind’s pleasure in living. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita 1.19 - Equality,
1398:The malady of the world is that the individual cannot find his real soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.23 - The Double Soul in Man,
1399:The mind is an inveterate divider of the indivisible. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.13 - The Difficulties of the Mental Being,
1400:The miraculous Inconscient,A subtle wizard skilled, was at its task. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
1401:The original Desire born in the VoidPeered out. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
1402:The real difficulty is always in ourselves, not in our surroundings. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings The Real Difficulty,
1403:The root of the past is the source from which the future draws its sap. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II 01.01 - The One Thing Needful,
1404:This cosmic Nature’s balance is not oursNor the mystic measure of her need and use. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
1405:We must not only see God and embrace Him, but become that Reality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.02 - The Status of Knowledge,
1406:What do people mean when they say, 'I am not afraid of God because I know He is good'? Have they never even been to a dentist? ~ C S Lewis,
1407:What is expressed is always only a part of what is behind. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV The Power of Expression and Yoga,
1408:A dry and strong or even austere logic is not a key to Truth. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Poetry and Art Bertrand Russell,
1409:And the Name, foundation of eternity, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The World of Falsehood,
1410:A World-adventurer borne on Destiny’s wingGambles with death and triumph, joy and grief. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.37 - Lila,
1411:Brahman is in this world to represent Itself in the values of Life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.05 - The Destiny of the Individual,
1412:Desire is limitation and insecurity in a hunger for pleasure and satisfaction. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.05 - Renunciation,
1413:I have beheld the princes of the SunBurning in thousand-pillared homes of light. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.03 - Satyavan and Savitri,
1414:It is not despair, for despair is only for those who see the end beyond all doubt. We do not. ~ J R R Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring ,
1415:It is the Absolute who is all these relativities. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine The Progress to Knowledge - God,
1416:I wear the face of Kali when I kill,I trample the corpses of the demon hordes. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 07.04 - The Triple Soul-Forces,
1417:Life creates institutions; institutions do not create, but express and preserve life. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Passing Thoughts,
1418:Life-force is the dynamisation of a consciousness which exceeds it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 2.01 - The Object of Knowledge,
1419:Love is a passion and it seeks for two things, eternity and intensity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.03 - The Godward Emotions,
1420:Man moves towards something which fulfils the universe by transcending it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Knowledge and Ignorance,
1421:Mind cannot possess the infinite, it can only suffer it or be possessed by it. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 1.18 - Mind and Supermind,
1422:Moral evil is in reality a form of mental disease or ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Delight of Existence,
1423:Music deepens the emotions and harmonises them with each other. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Early Cultural Writings The National Value of Art,
1424:Neither the ethical being nor the aesthetic being is the whole man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle Aesthetic and Ethical Culture,
1425:No power can slay my soul; it lives in Thee.Thy presence is my immortality. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 1.18 - The Divine Worker,
1426:One has not only to be sincere but to be faithful through all. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - II 1.4.01 - The Divine Grace and Guidance,
1427:One who is not self-ruler, cannot be master of his surroundings. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.11 - The Perfection of Equality,
1428:Perfect love is inconsistent with the admission of the motive of fear. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 3.03 - The Godward Emotions,
1429:Reason can only establish half-lights and a provisional order. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Suprarational Ultimate of Life,
1430:The infinity of the One pours itself out and possesses itself. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.15 - Reality and the Integral Knowledge,
1431:The Master of man and his infinite Lover,He is close to our hearts, had we vision to see. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 3.1.02 - Who,
1432:The one close to me now,even my own body-these toowill soon become clouds,floating in different directions. ~ Izumi Shikibu,
1433:The physical consciousness is constitutionally ignorant. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Difficulties of the Physical Nature,
1434:There is no need to build a labyrinth when the entire universe is one. ~ Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths Selected Stories and Other Writings,
1435:The soul in man is greater than his fate: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Eternal Day,
1436:The strength of every particular individual is the strength of God and not his own. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin Facts and Opinions,
1437:The touch of his hands is the alchemist of a miraculous transformation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga The Mystery of Love,
1438:The universe is an endless masquerade:For nothing here is utterly what it seems; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
1439:The way to liberation is to turn from the outward to the inward. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works,
1440:To whatsoever living form I turnI see my own body with another face. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Indwelling Universal,
1441:Transform reason into ordered intuition; let all thyself be light. This is thy goal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays In Philosophy And Yoga ,
1442:Yoga is the unravelling of the knot of Life’s difficulty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.03 - The Psychology of Self-Perfection,
1443:Yoga is the unravelling of the knot of Life’s difficulty. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 4.03 - The Psychology of Self-Perfection,
1444:252. I have failed, thou sayest. Say rather that God is circling about towards His object. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human 3.1.10 - Karma,
1445:265. Care not for time and success. Act out thy part, whether it be to fail or to prosper. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human 3.1.10 - Karma,
1446:Above the world the world-creators stand,In the phenomenon see its mystic source. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 01.04 - The Secret Knowledge,
1447:A man must be considered as a tool of a higher world-order, a vessel found worth to receive divine influence. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
1448:An opulent beauty of passionate differenceThe recurring beat that moments God in Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.01 - The World-Stair,
1449:As with the figure of a symbol danceThe screened Omniscient plays at Ignorance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems The Dual Being,
1450:Bhakti and Karma cannot be perfect and enduring unless they are based upon Jnana. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I Bhawani Mandir,
1451:Each finite thing I see is a façade;From its windows looks at me the Illimitable. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.56 - Omnipresence,
1452:Fate revealed a chain of seeing Will; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
1453:Form cannot unveil the indwelling Power;Only it throws its symbols at our hearts. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.03 - Satyavan and Savitri,
1454:Freedom and not a skilful subjection is the true means of mastery. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga 0.02 - The Three Steps of Nature,
1455:From light lips and casual thoughtsThe gods speak best as if by chance. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - II Act I,
1456:God is Beauty and Delight hidden in the variation of his masks and forms. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Suprarational Beauty,
1457:Heart feels for heart, limb cries for answering limb;All strives to enforce the unity all is. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 05.02 - Satyavan,
1458:Here chaos sorts itself into a world, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
1459:Hidden in an earthly garment that survives,I am the worldless being vast and free. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Conscious Immortality,
1460:If the body is left insufficiently nourished, it will think of food more than otherwise. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Food,
1461:Impose not on the mortal’s tremulous breastThe dire ordeal that foreknowledge brings; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
1462:INDIA MUST BE REBORN, BECAUSE HER REBIRTH IS DEMANDED BY THE FUTURE OF THE WORLD. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I Bhawani Mandir,
1463:It is the mind that turns concrete realities into abstractions. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - III Experiences and Realisations,
1464:It is the Self who has become all these becomings. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine The Progress to Knowledge - God,
1465:Man’s virtue, a coarse-spun ill-fitting dress,Apparels wooden images of Good; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.12 - The Heavens of the Ideal,
1466:Memory is only a process of consciousness, a utility. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Memory,
1467:Outward circumstances are only a cover for the real workings of the spirit. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga Faith and Shakti,
1468:That is always the end at which we arrive and we can only escape it by refusing to complete the journey. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
1469:The destiny of India will not wait on the falterings and failings of individuals. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - I Bhawani Mandir,
1470:The free spirit can stand fearless before even the biggest forces of Nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I Morality and Yoga,
1471:The reason deals successfully only with the settled and the finite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Human Cycle The Reason as Governor of Life,
1472:The sattwic quality is a first mediator between the higher and the lower nature. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita Deva and Asura,
1473:The truth above shall wake a nether truth, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Eternal Day,
1474:To break up the form is to injure the spirit’s self-expression. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Renaissance in India “Is India Civilised?” - I,
1475:Violence in ordinary Nature does not justify violence in a spiritual work. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - IV Anger and Violence,
1476:A dream of favours, a favourable dream. They know how they believe that they believe that they know. Wherefore they wail. ~ James Joyce,
1477:All grief is born of the shrinking of the ego from the contacts of existence. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Conclusion and Summary,
1478:All the terrestrial past of the world is there summarised in man. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays in Philosophy and Yoga 3.7.1.06 - The Ascending Unity,
1479:All we have done is ever still to do.All breaks and all renews and is the same. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 03.04 - The Vision and the Boon,
1480:A lying reality is falsehood’s crownAnd a perverted truth her richest gem. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 10.03 - The Debate of Love and Death,
1481:A pure intuition is a rare occurrence in our mental activity. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine Supermind,
1482:... a shadow depends on light for its existence, but light does not depend for its existence on the shadow ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine ,
1483:Behind all eyes I meet Thy secret gazeAnd in each voice I hear Thy magic tune: ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 7.5.61 - Because Thou Art,
1484:Earth’s pains were the ransom of its prisoned delight. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Yoga of the King,
1485:For the most part men are the slaves of their associations. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Kena and Other Upanishads On Translating the Upanishads,
1486:Here dreadfully entangled love and hateMeet us blind wanderers mid the perils of Time. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 06.01 - The Word of Fate,
1487:In a small corner of infinity,Our lives are inlets of an ocean’s force. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri 02.05 - The Godheads of the Little Life,
1488:It is only the Grace that can bring the real supramental change. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I The Supramental Transformation,
1489:Kali (Iron Lords of Time)Am love, am passion; I create the world.I am the only Brahma. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems Kama,
1490:Nothing happens in the cosmic playBut at its time and in its foreseen place. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Destined Meeting-place,
1491:Ravenous waves that marchWith blue fierce nostrils quivering for prey, ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Plays and Stories - I Flower Adornment Sutra (Avatamsaka Sutra) Prologue,
1492:The ally who helps, may also covet. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest To Motilal Roy,
1493:The beginning of wisdom, perfection and beatitude is the vision of the One. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad Self-Realisation,
1494:The limbs were trembling densities of soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri The Eternal Day,
1495:The nation must exist before it can sacrifice its interests for a higher good. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Karmayogin The Doctrine of Sacrifice,
1496:There can be no immortality of the body without supramentalisation. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters on Yoga - I Transformation and the Body,
1497:There is no body without soul, no body that is not itself a form of soul. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Life Divine 2.20 - The Philosophy of Rebirth,
1498:The spiritual life of India is the first necessity of the world’s future. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Bande Mataram - II One More for the Altar,
1499:The Will is mightier than any law, fate or force. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Isha Upanishad The Ishavasyopanishad with a Commentary in English,
1500:Vainly man, crouched in his corner of safety, shrinks from the fatalLure of the Infinite. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems 5.1.02 - Ahana,

*** NEWFULLDB 2.4M ***

1:The poetry of speech. ~ Lord Byron,
2:Poetry is a mug's game. ~ T S Eliot,
3:POETRY SHAPES MY GENDER. ~ Amy King,
4:She wore poetry. ~ Vladimir Nabokov,
5:Poetry is God's work. ~ Katy Lederer,
6:Dancing is silent poetry. ~ Simonides,
7:I love to write poetry. ~ Shayne Ward,
8:~ Jalaluddin Rumi#poetry#mysticpoetry,
9:O. A. Manning’s poetry ~ Charles Todd,
10:Painting is silent poetry. ~ Plutarch,
11:Poetry is fired by love. ~ Erica Jong,
12:Poetry is not a luxury. ~ Audre Lorde,
13:Poetry to me is prayer. ~ Anne Sexton,
14:You call that poetry? ~ Andrew Peterson,
15:Only poetry isn't shit. ~ Roberto Bola o,
16:Poetry is mostly hunches. ~ John Ashbery,
17:Poetry keeps longing alive. ~ Robert Bly,
18:Poetry makes nothing happen. ~ W H Auden,
19:The poetry is myself. ~ Gwendolyn Brooks,
20:I love romantic poetry. ~ Richard Dawkins,
21:It's history. It's poetry. ~ J D Salinger,
22:It’s history. It’s poetry. ~ J D Salinger,
23:Let yourself become living poetry. ~ Rumi,
24:Only poetry can address grief. ~ Starhawk,
25:Poetry is an act of peace. ~ Pablo Neruda,
26:Poetry is devil's wine. ~ Saint Augustine,
27:STUFF POETS STILL LIKE: POETRY ~ Amy King,
28:Beaches are God's poetry. ~ Steve Maraboli,
29:I like to write poetry. ~ Rebecca Ferguson,
30:Let yourself becoming living poetry ~ Rumi,
31:Poetry became my doctor, my lover. ~ J Ivy,
32:Poetry’s not made of words ~ Ariana Reines,
33:Fucking was poetry unbound. ~ Emily Maguire,
34:History is the new poetry. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
35:It's not easy to define poetry. ~ Bob Dylan,
36:Dancing is very like poetry. ~ Martha Graham,
37:I'm not a great poetry fan. ~ Rupert Everett,
38:I read poetry to save time. ~ Marilyn Monroe,
39:Love her but leave her Wild ~ Atticus Poetry,
40:Money is a kind of poetry. ~ Wallace Stevens,
41:Poetry can magnify experience. ~ May Swenson,
42:Poetry gave me back my voice. ~ Maya Angelou,
43:Poetry is a sort of homecoming. ~ Paul Celan,
44:Poetry is language in orbit. ~ Seamus Heaney,
45:Poetry is life distilled. ~ Gwendolyn Brooks,
46:Poetry is the breath of beauty. ~ Leigh Hunt,
47:Poetry's a mere drug, Sir. ~ George Farquhar,
48:All poetry is a call to action. ~ Amor Towles,
49:Every day is a poetry day. ~ Naomi Shihab Nye,
50:Is not poetry the food of love? ~ Jane Austen,
51:Love her but leave her wild. ~ Atticus Poetry,
52:Love her but leave her wild  ~ Atticus Poetry,
53:Mad Ireland hurt you into poetry. ~ W H Auden,
54:Poetry = Anger x Imagination ~ Sherman Alexie,
55:Poetry cannot be translation ~ Samuel Johnson,
56:Poetry is the Devil's wine. ~ Saint Augustine,
57:Poetry was alive and dangerous. ~ Terry Jones,
58:Science is the poetry of reality. ~ Anonymous,
59:Wine is poetry in a bottle. ~ Clifton Fadiman,
60:In poetry, only emotion endures. ~ X J Kennedy,
61:Love her, but leave her wild. ~ Atticus Poetry,
62:Love is a strange dark magic. ~ Atticus Poetry,
63:Music is poetry with personality. ~ Ross Lynch,
64:Poetry is impervious to bullets. ~ Sholeh Wolp,
65:Poetry is talking on tiptoe. ~ George Meredith,
66:Poetry is the scholar's art. ~ Wallace Stevens,
67:Poetry's object is truth. ~ Christine de Pizan,
68:Language is fossil poetry ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
69:Love is poetry plus biology. ~ Lawrence Durrell,
70:Poetry is all nouns and verbs. ~ Marianne Moore,
71:Poetry is an orphan of silence. ~ Charles Simic,
72:Poetry lies its way to the truth. ~ John Ciardi,
73:Slogan-making is not poetry. ~ Ernesto Cardenal,
74:The secret of poetry is cruelty. ~ Jon Anderson,
75:Time is all we have and don’t. ~ Atticus Poetry,
76:Wine is bottled poetry ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
77:You can't have adventures without poetry. ~ Avi,
78:All poetry comes from repetition. ~ Kenneth Koch,
79:—and poetry, surely, is a crisis. ~ J D Salinger,
80:Dancing is the poetry of the foot. ~ John Dryden,
81:Habit has a kind of poetry. ~ Simone de Beauvoir,
82:Language is fossil Poetry. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
83:Poetry is a life-cherishing force. ~ Mary Oliver,
84:Poetry should only occupy the idle. ~ Lord Byron,
85:Proper names are poetry in the raw. ~ W H Auden,
86:The man was poetry in motion. ~ Danielle Bourdon,
87:Time is all we have and don’t.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
88:What can be explained is not poetry. ~ W B Yeats,
89:Wine is bottled poetry. ~ Robert Louis Stevenson,
90:After a full belly all is poetry. ~ Frank McCourt,
91:All poetry is misrepresentation. ~ Jeremy Bentham,
92:Before now poetry has taken notice ~ Robert Frost,
93:For poetry, he's past his prime, ~ Jonathan Swift,
94:I find I cannot exist without Poetry ~ John Keats,
95:I'm only interested in poetry. ~ Charles Bukowski,
96:Made poetry a mere mechanic art. ~ William Cowper,
97:Poetry and I fit together. ~ Lee Bennett Hopkins,
98:Poetry dovetails contradictions. ~ Marilyn Hacker,
99:Poetry is a religion with no hope. ~ Jean Cocteau,
100:Poetry is prose in slow motion. ~ Nicholson Baker,
101:Poetry is the enemy of the poem. ~ Stanley Kunitz,
102:Prose talks and poetry sings. ~ Franz Grillparzer,
103:Songs live longer than kingdoms. ~ Atticus Poetry,
104:The fear of poetry is the fear. ~ Muriel Rukeyser,
105:Adjectives are the potbelly of poetry. ~ W H Auden,
106:Explanations are such cheap poetry. ~ Stephen King,
107:I just need you and some sunsets. ~ Atticus Poetry,
108:In me the heart of poetry bleeds. ~ Vladim r Holan,
109:It is poetry that changes everything. ~ Bell Hooks,
110:Only poetry inspires poetry. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
111:Poetry is a big space and I love it. ~ Selima Hill,
112:Poetry is a finikin thing of air ~ Wallace Stevens,
113:Poetry is a means of redemption. ~ Wallace Stevens,
114:Poetry is a mode of consciousness. ~ Fred Chappell,
115:Poetry is fact given over to imagery. ~ Rod McKuen,
116:Poetry is good for unleashing images. ~ Paula Rego,
117:Poetry is the memory of language ~ Jacques Roubaud,
118:Poetry - poiesis means a thing made. ~ Anne Carson,
119:She wore moonlight like lingerie. ~ Atticus Poetry,
120:Songs live longer than kingdoms.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
121:The fatal problem with poetry: poems. ~ Ben Lerner,
122:But the truth is poor poetry ~ Christopher Ruocchio,
123:Her lips write silent poetry upon mine. ~ B L Berry,
124:I am the great illusion of myself. ~ Atticus Poetry,
125:I don't think I've ever read poetry, ever. ~ Eminem,
126:I just need you and some sunsets.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
127:"Let yourselfbecomelivingpoetry." ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
128:Love is the poetry of the senses! ~ Honor de Balzac,
129:Love is the reality, and poetry is the drum. ~ Rumi,
130:One can be well-bred and write bad poetry ~ Moliere,
131:Patriarchal Poetry makes mistakes. ~ Gertrude Stein,
132:Poetry comes fine spun from a mind at peace. ~ Ovid,
133:Poetry comes fine-spun from a mind at peace. ~ Ovid,
134:Poetry contains nothing haphazard. ~ William Empson,
135:Poetry drives out or suspends lust. ~ Javier Mar as,
136:POETRY HAS A PEPTIC PRESENCE. PRESENTLY. ~ Amy King,
137:Poetry isn't math was our battle cry ~ Gayle Forman,
138:Prose is walking; poetry is flying ~ Galway Kinnell,
139:Science is the poetry of reality. ~ Richard Dawkins,
140:The poetry of the earth is never dead. ~ John Keats,
141:All poetry is experimental poetry. ~ Wallace Stevens,
142:Deprivation is the mother of poetry. ~ Leonard Cohen,
143:I'll love you, but just this twice. ~ Atticus Poetry,
144:Indignation leads to the making of poetry. ~ Juvenal,
145:Let yourself become living poetry. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
146:Love is the poetry of the senses. ~ Honore de Balzac,
147:Poetry is an abstraction bloodied. ~ Wallace Stevens,
148:Poetry is telling something to someone. ~ Marie Howe,
149:Poetry is the ultimate democracy. ~ Brendan Kennelly,
150:Poetry reveals that there is no empty space. ~ Hafez,
151:She lives the poetry she cannot write. ~ Oscar Wilde,
152:She was so beautiful with kindness. ~ Atticus Poetry,
153:She wore compliments like diamonds. ~ Atticus Poetry,
154:All art is in revolution of tyranny. ~ Atticus Poetry,
155:Banksy is a poet, but so was hitler. ~ Atticus Poetry,
156:Explanations are such cheap poetry. My ~ Stephen King,
157:Gently touching with the charm of poetry. ~ Lucretius,
158:I have my books and poetry to protect me ~ Paul Simon,
159:I’ll eat you to live: that’s poetry. ~ Terrance Hayes,
160:I see poetry as spiritual medicine. ~ Mahmoud Darwish,
161:No one ever expects poetry to sell... ~ Alan Lightman,
162:Poetry and prayer are very similar. ~ Carol Ann Duffy,
163:Poetry is a game of loser-take-all. ~ Jean Luc Godard,
164:Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history. ~ Plato,
165:Poetry is queer really, just by nature. ~ Will Walton,
166:Poetry is the deification of reality. ~ Edith Sitwell,
167:Poetry must be as well written as prose. ~ Ezra Pound,
168:She wore his love like a loaded gun. ~ Atticus Poetry,
169:That was not sex. That was naked poetry. ~ Hank Moody,
170:Time gives poetry to a battlefield... ~ Graham Greene,
171:When power corrupts, poetry cleanses ~ John F Kennedy,
172:…wisely mingled poetry and prose. ~ Louisa May Alcott,
173:Zen is poetry; poetry is Zen. ~ Reginald Horace Blyth,
174:Find someone and live in awe of them. ~ Atticus Poetry,
175:Good memories are my retirement plan. ~ Atticus Poetry,
176:Her eyes are classic novels and poetry. ~ Isaac Marion,
177:History after all is the true poetry. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
178:It takes a brave man to be truly mad. ~ Atticus Poetry,
179:Love is the poetry of the senses.” Some ~ Jillian Dodd,
180:More people write poetry than read it. ~ George Carlin,
181:No time for poetry but exactly what is. ~ Jack Kerouac,
182:Poetry heals the wounds inflicted by reason. ~ Novalis,
183:Poetry is a kind of ingenious nonsense. ~ Isaac Newton,
184:Poetry is itself a thing of God; ~ Philip James Bailey,
185:Poetry is the most bodily of the arts. ~ Robert Pinsky,
186:Poets are fools until they are kings. ~ Atticus Poetry,
187:She wore his love like a loaded gun.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
188:She wore the moonlight like lingerie. ~ Atticus Poetry,
189:There’s poetry in nature. A symmetry. ~ Saffron A Kent,
190:When power corrupts, poetry cleanses. ~ John F Kennedy,
191:Why then we should drop into poetry. ~ Charles Dickens,
192:Ye stars! which are the poetry of heaven! ~ Lord Byron,
193:Chase your stars fool, life is short.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
194:Our best history is still poetry. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
195:Poetry, after all, milks the unconscious. ~ Anne Sexton,
196:Poetry fettered fetters the human race. ~ William Blake,
197:Poetry is a presentiment of the truth. ~ Anna Kamienska,
198:Poetry is to hold judgment on your soul. ~ Henrik Ibsen,
199:Poetry is what gets lost in translation. ~ Robert Frost,
200:Poetry led me by the hand out of madness. ~ Anne Sexton,
201:She wore the moonlight like lingerie.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
202:The crown of literature is poetry. ~ W Somerset Maugham,
203:This poetry. I never know what I'm going to say. ~ Rumi,
204:Why should poetry have to make sense? ~ Charlie Chaplin,
205:Adventure runs on all sorts of whiskey. ~ Atticus Poetry,
206:Forget math and peotry. Especially poetry. ~ C J Redwine,
207:How poetry comes to the poet is a mystery. ~ John Lennon,
208:I didn't choose poetry: poetry chose me. ~ Philip Larkin,
209:I have my books and my poetry to protect me ~ Paul Simon,
210:Obsessions are nine tenths of my flaws. ~ Atticus Poetry,
211:Poetry and music I have banished, ~ William Butler Yeats,
212:Poetry is a lot harder to sell than corn. ~ Eloisa James,
213:Poetry is what makes my toenails twinkle. ~ Dylan Thomas,
214:The difference between poetry and rhetoric ~ Audre Lorde,
215:The primary pigment of poetry is the IMAGE. ~ Ezra Pound,
216:The real thing creates its own poetry. ~ Anzia Yezierska,
217:You cannot spell Poetry without try ~ Brandon Villasenor,
218:Adventure runs on all sorts of whiskey.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
219:Flip had written many volumes of poetry: ~ David Walliams,
220:I can recite poetry, but I cannot write it. ~ Irrfan Khan,
221:I have my books and my poetry to protect me. ~ Paul Simon,
222:Lonely you linger in a league above poetry. ~ Mie Hansson,
223:One must read poetry with one's nerves. ~ Wallace Stevens,
224:poetry as a language within a language, ~ Walter Isaacson,
225:poetry.
is the fire leaving my body. ~ Nayyirah Waheed,
226:Poetry is everywhere; it just needs editing. ~ James Tate,
227:Poetry is the mysticism of mankind. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
228:Poetry is what is gained in translation. ~ Joseph Brodsky,
229:religion is poetry, - poetry is religion. ~ Marie Corelli,
230:Remember, we are mortal, but poetry is not. ~ Patti Smith,
231:Songwriting is an art distinct from poetry. ~ Nick Hornby,
232:You are enough, a thousand times enough. ~ Atticus Poetry,
233:All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. ~ Oscar Wilde,
234:breathe in experience breathe out poetry ~ Muriel Rukeyser,
235:Dancing is poetry with arms and legs. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
236:Even almost bad poetry is better than life ~ Malcolm Lowry,
237:Honesty and Poetry are the same thing ~ Arthur Conan Doyle,
238:I find a lot of poetry to be narcissistic. ~ Joni Mitchell,
239:I think poetry is best read to oneself. ~ Rickie Lee Jones,
240:It was her chaos that made her beautiful. ~ Atticus Poetry,
241:My atoms love you atoms, it’s chemistry.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
242:My atoms love your atoms, it’s chemistry. ~ Atticus Poetry,
243:Poetry helps my soul escape its encasement. ~ Maya Angelou,
244:Poetry is language playing with itself. ~ Harryette Mullen,
245:Poetry is the sound of the human animal. ~ Suniti Namjoshi,
246:Poetry is to prose as dancing is to walking. ~ Paul Val ry,
247:poetry is where the language is renewed. ~ Margaret Atwood,
248:The poetry of country music will survive. ~ Rodney Crowell,
249:Writing poetry is a state of free float. ~ Margaret Atwood,
250:You campaign in poetry. You govern in prose. ~ Mario Cuomo,
251:campaign in poetry and govern in prose”—and ~ David Axelrod,
252:Hip-hop is a perfect mix between poetry and boxing. ~ Jay Z,
253:I am a self-appointed ambassador for poetry. ~ Anne Waldman,
254:It was her chaos that made her beautiful.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
255:My idea of good poetry is any dog doing anything. ~ J Boone,
256:Poetry increases the feeling for reality. ~ Wallace Stevens,
257:Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance. ~ Carl Sandburg,
258:Poetry is music written for the human voice. ~ Maya Angelou,
259:Poetry is nothing but healthy speech. ~ Henry David Thoreau,
260:Poetry is what Milton saw when he went blind. ~ Don Marquis,
261:Poetry stumbled upon never seems accidental. ~ Sheridan Hay,
262:Poetry was a secret vice, and properly so. ~ John Steinbeck,
263:Points are not the point. The point is poetry. ~ Allan Wolf,
264:The flavor of wine is like delicate poetry. ~ Louis Pasteur,
265:There is no poetry where there are no mistakes. ~ Joy Harjo,
266:There is poetry of sailing as old as the world, ~ E L James,
267:Thinking of you is a poison I drink often. ~ Atticus Poetry,
268:To elevate the soul, poetry is necessary. ~ Edgar Allan Poe,
269:we have let rhetoric do the job of poetry. ~ Cherrie Moraga,
270:What can be explained is not poetry. ~ William Butler Yeats,
271:You can't write poetry on the computer. ~ Quentin Tarantino,
272:A grain of poetry suffices to season a century. ~ Jose Marti,
273:Breathe-in experience, breathe-out poetry. ~ Muriel Rukeyser,
274:Drink wine, drink poetry, drink virtue. ~ Charles Baudelaire,
275:I really came to literature through poetry. ~ Cheryl Strayed,
276:Just enough madness to make her interesting ~ Atticus Poetry,
277:Poetry cannot take sides except with life. ~ Stephen Spender,
278:Poetry is an echo, asking a shadow to dance. ~ Carl Sandburg,
279:Poetry is a packsack of invisible keepsakes. ~ Carl Sandburg,
280:Poetry is as precise a thing as geometry. ~ Gustave Flaubert,
281:Poetry is a totally different art than film. ~ Stan Brakhage,
282:Poetry is a way of taking life by the throat. ~ Robert Frost,
283:Poetry surprises us with what we already know. ~ John Fuller,
284:She made gentle the wild oceans of my soul. ~ Atticus Poetry,
285:Sometimes, to be alone is the best company. ~ Atticus Poetry,
286:The essence of poetry is will and passion. ~ William Hazlitt,
287:The unpleasant, acrid smell of burnt poetry. ~ P G Wodehouse,
288:Thinking of you is a poison I drink often.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
289:We are surrounded by poetry on all sides. ~ Vincent Van Gogh,
290:Writing poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric. ~ Theodor Adorno,
291:I like the way the prose and poetry interact. ~ Rachel Zucker,
292:In the afternoon I drank Coke and wrote poetry. ~ Don DeLillo,
293:I wait on my fix:
I am a poetry junkie. ~ Charles Bukowski,
294:Just enough madness to make her interesting. ~ Atticus Poetry,
295:May poetry and God's name have mercy on us! ~ Mahmoud Darwish,
296:Poetry and art are the breath of life to her. ~ Edith Wharton,
297:Poetry is a verdict rather than an intention. ~ Leonard Cohen,
298:Poetry is to a painting what life is to man. ~ Georges Braque,
299:She was not for everyone but she was for me. ~ Atticus Poetry,
300:The finest poetry was first experience. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
301:The truest poetry is the most feigning. ~ William Shakespeare,
302:We are all wolves, howling to the same moon. ~ Atticus Poetry,
303:A grain of poetry suffices to season a century.
~ Jos Mart,
304:Conscious writing can be the death of poetry. ~ Marianne Moore,
305:Here let dead poetry rise once more to life. ~ Dante Alighieri,
306:His voice reminded me of poetry and sex. ~ Francesca Lia Block,
307:If you want to understand poetry, ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
308:I make no distinction between poetry and painting. ~ Joan Miro,
309:It’s always safe to do nothing when it rains. ~ Atticus Poetry,
310:Maybe all pain in the world requires poetry. ~ Sandra Cisneros,
311:Poetry and philosophy will become friends. ~ Swami Vivekananda,
312:Poetry and prison have always been neighbors. ~ Roberto Bolano,
313:Poetry and prison have always been neighbors. ~ Roberto Bola o,
314:Poetry a riprap on the slick rock of metaphysics ~ Gary Snyder,
315:Poetry cannot be defined, only experienced ~ Christopher Logue,
316:Poetry is a subject as precise as geometry. ~ Gustave Flaubert,
317:Poetry is as vital to thinking as knowledge. ~ Brooks Atkinson,
318:Poetry is the key to the hieroglyphics of nature. ~ David Hare,
319:Poetry is ... the physical enactment of a process ~ Mark Doty,
320:Poetry is what makes the invisible appear. ~ Nathalie Sarraute,
321:She was always wild but he had made her free. ~ Atticus Poetry,
322:She was not for everyone but she was for me.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
323:Sometimes,
to be alone is the best company ~ Atticus Poetry,
324:There is poetry in a pork chop to a hungry man. ~ Philip Gibbs,
325:Writing poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric. ~ Theodor W Adorno,
326:A sky full of stars and he was staring at her. ~ Atticus Poetry,
327:Cosmos and its stars; poet and his poetry! ~ Mehmet Murat ildan,
328:Dying is the easy part
living is the trick. ~ Atticus Poetry,
329:Fire will run like poetry through your blood. ~ Rachel Neumeier,
330:he found poetry more comforting than Scripture ~ Paul Kalanithi,
331:If food is poetry, is not poetry also food? ~ Joyce Carol Oates,
332:It is good sometimes for poetry to disenchant us. ~ Robert Hass,
333:Jealousy, like poetry, is incomprehensible to me. ~ Kij Johnson,
334:Never let the mud puddle get lost in the poetry ~ Valerie Worth,
335:#Poetry atrophies when it gets too far from music. ~ Ezra Pound,
336:Poetry comes alive to me through recitation. ~ Natalie Merchant,
337:Poetry is a controlled refinement of sobbing. ~ Nicholson Baker,
338:Poetry is a good medium for revolutionary hope. ~ Susan Griffin,
339:Poetry is a language pared down to its essentials. ~ Ezra Pound,
340:Poetry is evidently a contagious complaint. ~ Washington Irving,
341:Poetry is the language of a state of crisis. ~ St phane Mallarm,
342:Poetry makes people nervous. Especially in schools. ~ Sarah Kay,
343:Poetry must be as new as foam & old as rock. ~ Delmore Schwartz,
344:Poetry must be simple, sensuous, or impassioned. ~ Emma Lazarus,
345:Reason cannot produce the poetry disorder does. ~ Angela Carter,
346:The points are not the point; the point is poetry. ~ Allan Wolf,
347:There is no hierarchy in Japanese Buddhist poetry. ~ Robert Bly,
348:The truth is sometimes you can both do better. ~ Atticus Poetry,
349:To write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric. ~ Theodor W Adorno,
350:You have to have been in love to write poetry. ~ Raymond Carver,
351:Your brain amazes me. Your thoughts are poetry. ~ Jamie McGuire,
352:Auntie Flip had written many volumes of poetry: ~ David Walliams,
353:Coding like poetry should be short and concise. ~ Santosh Kalwar,
354:I believe poetry has very little to do with memory. ~ Nick Flynn,
355:It is barbaric to write poetry after Auschwitz. ~ Theodor Adorno,
356:It's a sad thing, protecting a breakable heart. ~ Atticus Poetry,
357:I've always resented mirrors for their honesty. ~ Atticus Poetry,
358:Music and art and poetry attune the soul to God. ~ Thomas Merton,
359:My poetry definitely comes out of a female body. ~ Rachel Zucker,
360:Poetry and art and knowledge are sacred and pure. ~ George Eliot,
361:Poetry, a speaking picture to teach and delight. ~ Philip Sidney,
362:Poetry is a sky dark with a wild-duck migration. ~ Carl Sandburg,
363:Poetry is so vital to us until school spoils it. ~ Russell Baker,
364:Poetry is the language of a state of crisis. ~ Stephane Mallarme,
365:Poetry ... is the music and painting of the mind. ~ Sonia Orwell,
366:Poetry is what happens when nothing else can. ~ Charles Bukowski,
367:Reading someone's poetry is like seeing them naked. ~ John Green,
368:Reading someone’s poetry is like seeing them naked. ~ John Green,
369:Superstition is the poetry of life. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
370:The best poetry, then, comes in the roughest speech? ~ C S Lewis,
371:The words he writes to his music, they’re poetry. ~ Gayle Forman,
372:This is why there is poetry. For days like these. ~ Paula McLain,
373:To have ruined one's self over poetry is an honour ~ Oscar Wilde,
374:What good are wings without the courage to fly? ~ Atticus Poetry,
375:A lot of innovation in language comes from poetry. ~ Jim Jarmusch,
376:felt, because it was structured poetry. There were ~ Stephen King,
377:I've got magic. I've got poetry at my fingertips. ~ Charlie Sheen,
378:My brain hums with scraps of poetry and madness. ~ Virginia Woolf,
379:Poetry can cause irreparable harm when misapplied ~ Gail Carriger,
380:Poetry is a fireplace in summer or a fan in winter. ~ Robert Hass,
381:Poetry is indispensable - if I only knew what for. ~ Jean Cocteau,
382:Poetry is ordinary language raised to the Nth power. ~ Paul Engle,
383:poetry is the sung voice of accurate perception. ~ Patricia Hampl,
384:Poetry: Language against which we have no defences. ~ David Whyte,
385:Poetry, therefore, we will call Musical Thought. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
386:The prettiest girls shine brightest in the dark. ~ Atticus Poetry,
387:These bits of poetry that stick to her like burrs. ~ Jenny Offill,
388:Thinking is always the stumbling stone to poetry. ~ Khalil Gibran,
389:Truth is poetry; it is the grandest poetry. ~ Edwin Hubbel Chapin,
390:WRITING POETRY IS an unnatural act,” Elizabeth Bishop ~ Anonymous,
391:Accuracy is sacrificed in the name of better poetry. ~ N K Jemisin,
392:A vein of poetry exists in the hearts of all men. ~ Thomas Carlyle,
393:Break my heart and you will find yourself inside. ~ Atticus Poetry,
394:High School is the place where poetry goes to die. ~ Billy Collins,
395:History is still in large measure poetry to me. ~ Jacob Burckhardt,
396:It’s a lonely thing protecting a breakable heart. ~ Atticus Poetry,
397:I've never met a strong person with an easy past. ~ Atticus Poetry,
398:I've written some poetry I don't understand myself ~ Carl Sandburg,
399:On no account allow a Vogon to read poetry at you. ~ Douglas Adams,
400:Poetry -- even bad poetry -- may be our final hope. ~ Edward Abbey,
401:Poetry has been the longest pleasure of my life. ~ Shirley Hazzard,
402:Poetry is all that is worth remembering in life. ~ William Hazlitt,
403:Poetry is everything that headline news is not. ~ Naomi Shihab Nye,
404:Poetry is the art of uniting pleasure with truth. ~ Samuel Johnson,
405:Poetry is the synthesis of hyacinths and biscuits. ~ Carl Sandburg,
406:Poetry will die when love and pain cease to exist. ~ Kellie Elmore,
407:Protest poetry -- could there be consensus poetry? ~ William Edgar,
408:She had the whisky licking, skinny dipping smile. ~ Atticus Poetry,
409:Sometimes his words were like single lines of poetry. ~ Kiera Cass,
410:The prettiest girls shine brightest in the dark.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
411:To poetry they prefer paradise.
Matter of taste. ~ Louis Aragon,
412:What she lacks in poetry she makes up for in venom ~ Sarra Manning,
413:Whenever God lays His glance, Life starts clapping! ~ Hafiz#poetry,
414:Writing poetry and reading books causes brain damage. ~ Pat Conroy,
415:Break my heart and you will find yourself inside.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
416:Confession may well be a dirty word in poetry. ~ Lucie Brock Broido,
417:Don’t find her and lose you. Find her to find you. ~ Atticus Poetry,
418:Don’t find her and lose you. Find you to find her. ~ Atticus Poetry,
419:Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood. ~ T S Eliot,
420:He who improvises can never make a perfect line of poetry. ~ Titian,
421:I am not interested in poetry for poetry's sake. ~ Ernesto Cardenal,
422:I never had much education in English poetry as such. ~ Anne Carson,
423:It's not poetry. It's not metaphor. It's instructions. ~ John Green,
424:It was at that age that poetry came in search of me. ~ Pablo Neruda,
425:I've written some poetry I don't understand myself. ~ Carl Sandburg,
426:LIFE
IS THE ART
OF FAILING
MAGNIFICENTLY. ~ Atticus Poetry,
427:Poetry helps heal wounds.
Makes them tangible. ~ Isabel Quintero,
428:Poetry is emotion recollected in tranquillity. ~ William Wordsworth,
429:Poetry is the morning dream of great minds. ~ Alphonse de Lamartine,
430:Poetry is thoughts that breathe, and words that burn. ~ Thomas Gray,
431:Poetry should be made by all and not by one. ~ Comte de Lautr amont,
432:Poetry: the best words in the best order. ~ Samuel Taylor Coleridge,
433:Robert Louis Stevenson called wine “bottled poetry, ~ Bianca Bosker,
434:Sentiment is the poetry of the imagination. ~ Alphonse de Lamartine,
435:The blood jet is poetry and there is no stopping it. ~ Sylvia Plath,
436:the comfort of reclusion, the poetry of hibernation ~ Marcel Proust,
437:The doubters are just dreamers with broken hearts. ~ Atticus Poetry,
438:There is but one poetry,--true poetry. ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
439:the ugly and alien logic of predestination. Poetry ~ G K Chesterton,
440:We are made of those who have built and broken us. ~ Atticus Poetry,
441:Well, I like to write poetry. I'm a published poet. ~ Misha Collins,
442:You deserve to be the person you were meant to be. ~ Atticus Poetry,
443:All the poetry in the world is in that face. ~ Christopher Isherwood,
444:Country music is the poetry of the American spirit. ~ Steve Maraboli,
445:he will taste
like the poetry
i wish i could write ~ Rupi Kaur,
446:I credit poetry for making this space-walk possible. ~ Seamus Heaney,
447:I keep trying to define poetry, but its so difficult. ~ Jack Gleeson,
448:I want a fever, in poetry: a fever, and tranquillity. ~ James Dickey,
449:I write all the time - I write poetry, I love to write ~ Colin Quinn,
450:...one expects poetry, if it is Poetry, to offend. ~ Gregory Maguire,
451:Poetry is a kinetic arrangement of static syllables. ~ Carl Sandburg,
452:Poetry is language against which you have no defenses. ~ David Whyte,
453:Poetry is not something you have to retire from ~ John Cooper Clarke,
454:Poetry is the mother-tongue of the human race. ~ Johann Georg Hamann,
455:She had just enough madness to make her interesting ~ Atticus Poetry,
456:SHE WASN’T BORED, JUST RESTLESS BETWEEN ADVENTURES. ~ Atticus Poetry,
457:The poetry of fashion lies in the creation of illusion ~ Coco Chanel,
458:They say pu$$y and paper is poetry power and pistols. ~ Tupac Shakur,
459:To a poet every curve of her was a well place word. ~ Atticus Poetry,
460:What a strange world, we trade our days for things. ~ Atticus Poetry,
461:When we share - that is poetry in the prose of life. ~ Sigmund Freud,
462:You deserve to be the person you were meant to be.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
463:All emotions are the ore from which poetry may be sifted. ~ T E Hulme,
464:don't get too close,
i'll turn you
into poetry ~ Orion Carloto,
465:i am permanently
tanned
in the summer of poetry. ~ Sanober Khan,
466:I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love ~ Jane Austen,
467:I have nothing to say. And I am saying it. That's poetry. ~ John Wain,
468:Only that is poetry which cleanses and mans me. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson,
469:Poetry contains philosophy as the soul contains reason. ~ Victor Hugo,
470:Poetry had breathed over and sanctified the land. ~ Washington Irving,
471:Poetry has never been a favorite American pastime. ~ Natalie Goldberg,
472:Poetry has saved me on occasions when people couldn't. ~ Sanober Khan,
473:Poetry is a peerless proficiency of the imagination. ~ Marianne Moore,
474:Poetry is not the record of an event: it is an event. ~ Robert Lowell,
475:Poetry is not the thing said, but the way of saying it. ~ A E Housman,
476:Poetry is the connecting link between body and mind. ~ Camille Paglia,
477:She was everything real in a world of make-believe.  ~ Atticus Poetry,
478:The Bible is to religion what the Iliad is to poetry ~ Joseph Joubert,
479:The death of childhood is the beginning of poetry. ~ Andrei Tarkovsky,
480:The unconscious mind writes poetry if it's left alone. ~ Stephen King,
481:the unconscious mind writes poetry if it’s left alone. ~ Stephen King,
482:Water is the ink that writes the poetry of life. ~ Alexandra Cousteau,
483:American poetry is a mess. Long live American poetry. ~ David Biespiel,
484:ASK NOT IF POETRY IS DEAD, ASK HOW YOU CAN LIVE FOR POETRY. ~ Amy King,
485:Dante, or the hyena that writes poetry in tombs. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
486:Everything since Homer has improved, except poetry. ~ Giacomo Leopardi,
487:genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood ~ Adam Nicolson,
488:Great poetry does not have to be technically intricate. ~ James Fenton,
489:I believe that poetry is a primal impulse within us all. ~ Stephen Fry,
490:I blessed the power which has filled my life with poetry. ~ Mary Butts,
491:I feel like girls who drink whisky tell good stories. ~ Atticus Poetry,
492:If poetry does not come as naturally as leaves to a tree, ~ John Keats,
493:If Rilke cut himself shaving, he would bleed poetry. ~ Stephen Spender,
494:I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love, ~ Jane Austen,
495:I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love. ~ Jane Austen,
496:It is always fatal to have music or poetry interrupted. ~ George Eliot,
497:Only poetry or madness could do justice to the noises. ~ H P Lovecraft,
498:Other than fiction and poetry I tend to read history. ~ Stephen Dobyns,
499:Pare down to the essence, but don't remove the poetry. ~ Leonard Koren,
500:Poetry calls into question what it means to be human ~ Sandra Alcosser,

--- IN CHAPTERS (in Dictionaries, in Quotes, in Chapters)



100

   12 Occultism
   9 Philosophy
   6 Integral Yoga
   1 Yoga
   1 Hinduism


   11 Aleister Crowley
   8 The Mother
   8 Sri Aurobindo
   6 Satprem
   5 Aldous Huxley
   3 Friedrich Nietzsche
   2 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   2 Jorge Luis Borges


   14 Poetics
   7 The Mothers Agenda
   6 Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness
   6 Magick Without Tears
   6 Liber ABA
   6 Letters On Yoga I
   5 Walden
   5 The Perennial Philosophy
   4 The Secret Doctrine
   4 Letters On Yoga II
   3 Twilight of the Idols
   3 The Secret Of The Veda
   3 The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna
   2 The Synthesis Of Yoga
   2 The Life Divine
   2 Talks With Sri Aurobindo
   2 Sex Ecology Spirituality
   2 On Education
   2 Letters On Yoga III
   2 Hymns to the Mystic Fire
   2 Essays Divine And Human


00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri, #Sweet Mother - Harmonies of Light, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  
  All this is His own experience, and what is most surprising is that it is my own experience also. It is my sadhana which He has worked out. Each object, each event, each realisation, all the descriptions, even the colours are exactly what I saw and the words, phrases are also exactly what I heard. And all this before having read the book. I read Savitri many times afterwards, but earlier, when He was writing He used to read it to me. Every morning I used to hear Him read Savitri. During the night He would write and in the morning read it to me. And I observed something curious, that day after day the experiences He read out to me in the morning were those I had had the previous night, word by word. Yes, all the descriptions, the colours, the pictures I had seen, the words I had heard, all, all, I heard it all, put by Him into Poetry, into miraculous Poetry. Yes, they were exactly my experiences of the previous night which He read out to me the following morning. And it was not just one day by chance, but for days and days together. And every time I used to compare what He said with my previous experiences and they were always the same. I repeat, it was not that I had told Him my experiences and that He had noted them down afterwards, no, He knew already what I had seen. It is my experiences He has presented at length and they were His experiences also. It is, moreover, the picture of Our joint adventure into the unknown or rather into the Supermind.
  
  --
  
  And I think that man is not yet ready to receive it. It is too high and too vast for him. He cannot understand it, grasp it, for it is not by the mind that one can understand Savitri. One needs spiritual experiences in order to understand and assimilate it. The farther one advances on the path of Yoga, the more does one assimilate and the better. No, it is something which will be appreciated only in the future, it is the Poetry of tomorrow of which He has spoken in The Future Poetry. It is too subtle, too refined, - it is not in the mind or through the mind, it is in meditation that Savitri is revealed.
  
  And men have the audacity to compare it with the work of Virgil or Homer and to find it inferior. They do not understand, they cannot understand. What do they know? Nothing at all. And it is useless to try to make them understand. Men will know what it is, but in a distant future. It is only the new race with a new consciousness which will be able to understand. I assure you there is nothing under the blue sky to compare with Savitri. It is the mystery of mysteries. It is a *super-epic,* it is super-literature, super-Poetry, super-vision, it is a super-work even if one considers the number of lines He has written. No, these human words are not adequate to describe Savitri. Yes, one needs superlatives, hyperboles to describe it. It is a hyper-epic. No, words express nothing of what Savitri is, at least I do not find them. It is of immense value - spiritual value and all other values; it is eternal in its subject, and infinite in its appeal, miraculous in its mode and power of execution; it is a unique thing, the more you come into contact with it, the higher will you be uplifted. Ah, truly it is something! It is the most beautiful thing He has left for man, the highest possible. What is it? When will man know it? When is he going to lead a life of truth? When is he going to accept this in his life? This yet remains to be seen.
  

0.06_-_1956, #Agenda Vol 1, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  So when an answer has been given to every question, what place remains for the work of art?
  When all is metamorphosized through Transcendence, what place remains for artistic metamorphosis? When all is supreme harmony, can this harmony be expressed otherwise than through silence, a smile, a radiance or 'inspired' Poetry - of which Sri Aurobindo is the sole example; even so, his Poetry is not drawn from the human level, it surpasses the human, it issues from elsewhere.
  

02.01_-_The_World-Stair, #Savitri, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
    The absoluteness of their single cry
    And the sovereign sweetness or violent Poetry
    Of their beautiful or terrible delight.

1.00_-_Gospel, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  As his love for God deepened, he began either to forget or to drop the formalities of worship. Sitting before the image, he would spend hours singing the devotional songs of great devotees of the Mother, such as Kamalknta and Rmprasd. Those rhapsodical songs, describing the direct vision of God, only intensified Sri Ramakrishna's longing. He felt the pangs of a child separated from its mother. Sometimes, in agony, he would rub his face against the ground and weep so bitterly that people, thinking he had lost his earthly mother, would sympathize with him in his grief. Sometimes, in moments of scepticism, he would cry: "Art Thou true, Mother, or is it all fiction - mere Poetry without any reality? If Thou dost exist, why do I not see Thee? Is religion a mere fantasy and art Thou only a figment of man's imagination?" Sometimes he would sit on the prayer carpet for two hours like an inert object. He began to behave in an abnormal manner, most of the time unconscious of the world. He almost gave up food; and sleep left him altogether.
  

1.01_-_An_Accomplished_Westerner, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  When he began his life in London, at the age of twelve, Sri Aurobindo knew Latin and French thoroughly. The headmaster of St.
  Paul's School, where he had enrolled, was so surprised at the aptitude of his young student that he personally coached him in Greek. Three years later, Sri Aurobindo could skip half his classes and spend most of his time engrossed in his favorite occupation:reading. Nothing seemed to escape this voracious adolescent (except cricket, which held as little interest for him as Sunday school.) Shelley and "Prometheus Unbound," the French poets, Homer, Aristophanes, and soon all of European thought for he quickly came to master enough German and Italian to read Dante and Goethe in the original peopled a solitude of which he has said nothing. He never sought to form relationships, while Manmohan, the second brother, roamed through London in the company of his friend Oscar Wilde and would make a name for himself in English Poetry. Each of the three brothers led his separate life. However, there was nothing austere about Sri Aurobindo, and certainly nothing of the puritan (the prurient,8 as he called it); it was just that he was "elsewhere," and his world was 6
  7
  --
  
  replete. He even had a way of jesting with a straight face, which never left him: Sense of humour? It is the salt of existence. Without it the world would have got utterly out of balance it is unbalanced enough already and rushed to a blaze long ago. 9 For there is also Sri Aurobindo the humorist, and that Sri Aurobindo is perhaps more important than the philosopher whom Western universities speak of so solemnly. Philosophy, for Sri Aurobindo, was only a way of reaching those who could not understand anything without explanations; it was only a language, just as Poetry was another, clearer and truer language. But the essence of his being was humor, not the sarcastic humor of the so-called spiritual man, but a kind of joy that cannot help dancing wherever is passes. Now and then, in a flash that leaves us somewhat mystified, we sense behind the most tragic, the most distressing human situations an almost facetious laughter, as if a child were playing a tragedy and suddenly made a face at himself because it is his nature to laugh, and ultimately because nothing in the world and no one can affect that place inside ourselves where we are ever a king.
  Indeed, perhaps this is the true meaning of Sri Aurobindo's humor: a refusal to see things tragically, and, even more so, a sense of inalienable royalty.

1.01_-_Economy, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  We might try our lives by a thousand simple tests; as, for instance, that the same sun which ripens my beans illumines at once a system of earths like ours. If I had remembered this it would have prevented some mistakes. This was not the light in which I hoed them. The stars are the apexes of what wonderful triangles! What distant and different beings in the various mansions of the universe are contemplating the same one at the same moment! Nature and human life are as various as our several constitutions. Who shall say what prospect life offers to another? Could a greater miracle take place than for us to look through each others eyes for an instant? We should live in all the ages of the world in an hour; ay, in all the worlds of the ages. History, Poetry,
  Mythology!I know of no reading of anothers experience so startling and informing as this would be.

1.01_-_Foreward, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  N ANCIENT times the Veda was revered as a sacred book
  of wisdom, a great mass of inspired Poetry, the work of
  Rishis, seers and sages, who received in their illumined minds
  --
  
  That was the general aspect of the ancient worship in Greece, Rome, India and among other ancient peoples. But in all these countries these gods began to assume a higher, a psychological function; Pallas Athene who may have been originally a Dawn-Goddess springing in flames from the head of Zeus, the Sky-God, Dyaus of the Veda, has in classical Greece a higher function and was identified by the Romans with their Minerva, the Goddess of learning and wisdom; similarly, Saraswati, a river Goddess, becomes in India the goddess of wisdom, learning and the arts and crafts: all the Greek deities have undergone a change in this direction - Apollo, the Sun-God, has become a god of Poetry and prophecy, Hephaestus the Fire-God a divine smith, god of labour. In India the process was arrested half-way, and the Vedic Gods developed their psychological functions but retained more fixedly their external character and for higher purposes gave place to a new pantheon. They had to give precedence to Puranic deities who developed out of the early company but assumed larger cosmic functions, Vishnu, Rudra, Brahma - developing from the Vedic Brihaspati, or Brahmanaspati, - Shiva, Lakshmi, Durga. Thus in India the change in the gods was less complete, the earlier deities became the inferior divinities of the Puranic pantheon and this was largely due to the survival of the Rig Veda in which their psychological and their external functions co-existed and are both given a powerful emphasis; there was no such early literary record to maintain the original features of the Gods of Greece and Rome.
  
  --
  for it is only so that we can find out the actual thoughts of
  these ancient mystics. But any rendering of such great Poetry as
  the hymns of the Rig Veda, magnificent in their colouring and

1.01_-_'Imitation'_the_common_principle_of_the_Arts_of_Poetry., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  object:1.01 - 'Imitation' the common principle of the Arts of Poetry.
  
  
  I propose to treat of Poetry in itself and of its various kinds, noting the essential quality of each; to inquire into the structure of the plot as requisite to a good poem; into the number and nature of the parts of which a poem is composed; and similarly into whatever else falls within the same inquiry. Following, then, the order of nature, let us begin with the principles which come first.
  
  Epic Poetry and Tragedy, Comedy also and Dithyrambic: Poetry, and the music of the flute and of the lyre in most of their forms, are all in their general conception modes of imitation. They differ, however, from one: another in three respects,--the medium, the objects, the manner or mode of imitation, being in each case distinct.
  
  --
  
  There are, again, some arts which employ all the means above mentioned, namely, rhythm, tune, and metre. Such are Dithyrambic and Nomic Poetry, and also Tragedy and Comedy; but between them the difference is, that in the first two cases these means are all employed in combination, in the latter, now one means is employed, now another.
  

1.02_-_The_Stages_of_Initiation, #Knowledge of the Higher Worlds, #Rudolf Steiner, #Occultism
   p. 91
   the most dangerous enemies on the way to knowledge of the higher worlds lurk in such fantastical reveries and superstitions. Yet no one need to believe that the student loses all sense of Poetry in life, all power of enthusiasm because the words: You must be rid of all prejudice, are written over the portal leading to the second trial of initiation, and because over the portal at the entrance to the first trial he read: Without normal common sense all thine efforts are in vain.
  

1.02_-_The_Three_European_Worlds, #The Ever-Present Origin, #Jean Gebser, #Integral
  
  Besides their first suggestions of landscape painting, the murals are the first examples of what has come to be known as the "still life," i.e., the objectification of nature already expressed in the Roman garden designs of the same period and heralded by the pastoral scenes of late Bucolic Poetry such as Virgil's Ecloges. It was principally by incorporating these novel elements of ancient culture and realizing their implications that the Renaissance was able to create the three-dimensional perspectival world from a two-dimensional and unperspectival culture.
  
  --
  
  This psychic inner-space breaks forth at the very moment that the Troubadours are writing the first lyric "I"-Poems, the first personal Poetry that suddenly opens an abyss between man, as poet, and the world or nature (1250 A.D.). Concurrently at the University of Paris, Thomas Aquinas, following the thought of his teacher Albertus Magnus, asserts the validity of Aristotle, thereby initiating the rational displacement of the predominantly psychic-bound Platonic world.
  
  --
  
  Aperspectivity, through which it is possible to grasp and express the new emerging consciousness structure, cannot be perceived in all its consequences be they positive or negative unless certain still valid concepts, attitudes, and forms of thought are more closely scrutinized and clarified. Otherwise we commit the error of expressing the "new" with old and inadequate means of statement. We will, for example, have to furnish evidence that the concretion of time is not only occurring in the previously cited examples from painting, but in the natural sciences and in literature, Poetry, music, sculpture, and various other areas. And this we can do only after we have worked out the new forms and modes necessary for an understanding of aperspectivity.
  

1.02_-_Where_I_Lived,_and_What_I_Lived_For, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  Every morning was a cheerful invitation to make my life of equal simplicity, and I may say innocence, with Nature herself. I have been as sincere a worshipper of Aurora as the Greeks. I got up early and bathed in the pond; that was a religious exercise, and one of the best things which I did. They say that characters were engraven on the bathing tub of king Tching-thang to this effect: Renew thyself completely each day; do it again, and again, and forever again. I can understand that. Morning brings back the heroic ages. I was as much affected by the faint hum of a mosquito making its invisible and unimaginable tour through my apartment at earliest dawn, when I was sitting with door and windows open, as I could be by any trumpet that ever sang of fame. It was Homers requiem; itself an Iliad and Odyssey in the air, singing its own wrath and wanderings. There was something cosmical about it; a standing advertisement, till forbidden, of the everlasting vigor and fertility of the world. The morning, which is the most memorable season of the day, is the awakening hour. Then there is least somnolence in us; and for an hour, at least, some part of us awakes which slumbers all the rest of the day and night. Little is to be expected of that day, if it can be called a day, to which we are not awakened by our Genius, but by the mechanical nudgings of some servitor, are not awakened by our own newly-acquired force and aspirations from within, accompanied by the undulations of celestial music, instead of factory bells, and a fragrance filling the airto a higher life than we fell asleep from; and thus the darkness bear its fruit, and prove itself to be good, no less than the light. That man who does not believe that each day contains an earlier, more sacred, and auroral hour than he has yet profaned, has despaired of life, and is pursuing a descending and darkening way. After a partial cessation of his sensuous life, the soul of man, or its organs rather, are reinvigorated each day, and his Genius tries again what noble life it can make. All memorable events, I should say, transpire in morning time and in a morning atmosphere. The Vedas say, All intelligences awake with the morning. Poetry and art, and the fairest and most memorable of the actions of men, date from such an hour. All poets and heroes, like Memnon, are the children of Aurora, and emit their music at sunrise. To him whose elastic and vigorous thought keeps pace with the sun, the day is a perpetual morning. It matters not what the clocks say or the attitudes and labors of men. Morning is when I am awake and there is a dawn in me. Moral reform is the effort to throw off sleep.
  
  --
  Shams and delusions are esteemed for soundest truths, while reality is fabulous. If men would steadily observe realities only, and not allow themselves to be deluded, life, to compare it with such things as we know, would be like a fairy tale and the Arabian Nights
  Entertainments. If we respected only what is inevitable and has a right to be, music and Poetry would resound along the streets. When we are unhurried and wise, we perceive that only great and worthy things have any permanent and absolute existence,that petty fears and petty pleasures are but the shadow of the reality. This is always exhilarating and sublime. By closing the eyes and slumbering, and consenting to be deceived by shows, men establish and confirm their daily life of routine and habit everywhere, which still is built on purely illusory foundations. Children, who play life, discern its true law and relations more clearly than men, who fail to live it worthily, but who think that they are wiser by experience, that is, by failure. I have read in a Hindoo book, that there was a kings son, who, being expelled in infancy from his native city, was brought up by a forester, and, growing up to maturity in that state, imagined himself to belong to the barbarous race with which he lived. One of his fathers ministers having discovered him, revealed to him what he was, and the misconception of his character was removed, and he knew himself to be a prince. So soul, continues the Hindoo philosopher, from the circumstances in which it is placed, mistakes its own character, until the truth is revealed to it by some holy teacher, and then it knows itself to be _Brahme_. I perceive that we inhabitants of New England live this mean life that we do because our vision does not penetrate the surface of things. We think that that _is_ which _appears_ to be.
  
  --
  Let us spend one day as deliberately as Nature, and not be thrown off the track by every nutshell and mosquitos wing that falls on the rails. Let us rise early and fast, or break fast, gently and without perturbation; let company come and let company go, let the bells ring and the children cry,determined to make a day of it. Why should we knock under and go with the stream? Let us not be upset and overwhelmed in that terrible rapid and whirlpool called a dinner, situated in the meridian shallows. Weather this danger and you are safe, for the rest of the way is down hill. With unrelaxed nerves, with morning vigor, sail by it, looking another way, tied to the mast like Ulysses. If the engine whistles, let it whistle till it is hoarse for its pains. If the bell rings, why should we run? We will consider what kind of music they are like. Let us settle ourselves, and work and wedge our feet downward through the mud and slush of opinion, and prejudice, and tradition, and delusion, and appearance, that alluvion which covers the globe, through
  Paris and London, through New York and Boston and Concord, through church and state, through Poetry and philosophy and religion, till we come to a hard bottom and rocks in place, which we can call _reality_, and say, This is, and no mistake; and then begin, having a _point dappui_, below freshet and frost and fire, a place where you might found a wall or a state, or set a lamp-post safely, or perhaps a gauge, not a Nilometer, but a Realometer, that future ages might know how deep a freshet of shams and appearances had gathered from time to time. If you stand right fronting and face to face to a fact, you will see the sun glimmer on both its surfaces, as if it were a cimeter, and feel its sweet edge dividing you through the heart and marrow, and so you will happily conclude your mortal career. Be it life or death, we crave only reality. If we are really dying, let us hear the rattle in our throats and feel cold in the extremities; if we are alive, let us go about our business.
  

1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  The will is free and we are at liberty to identify our being either exclusively with our selfness and its interests, regarded as independent of indwelling Spirit and transcendent Godhead (in which case we shall be passively damned or actively fiendish), or exclusively with the divine within us and without (in which case we shall be saints), or finally with self at one moment or in one context and with spiritual not-self at other moments and in other contexts (in which case we shall be average citizens, too theocentric to be wholly lost, and too egocentric to achieve enlightenment and a total deliverance). Since human craving can never be satisfied except by the unitive knowledge of God and since the mind-body is capable of an enormous variety of experiences, we are free to identify ourselves with an almost infinite number of possible objectswith the pleasures of gluttony, for example, or intemperance, or sensuality; with money, power or fame; with our family, regarded as a possession or actually an extension and projection of our own selfness; with our goods and chattels, our hobbies, our collections; with our artistic or scientific talents; with some favourite branch of knowledge, some fascinating special subject; with our professions, our political parties, our churches; with our pains and illnesses; with our memories of success or misfortune, our hopes, fears and schemes for the future; and finally with the eternal Reality within which and by which all the rest has its being. And we are free, of course, to identify ourselves with more than one of these things simultaneously or in succession. Hence the quite astonishingly improbable combination of traits making up a complex personality. Thus a man can be at once the craftiest of politicians and the dupe of his own verbiage, can have a passion for brandy and money, and an equal passion for the Poetry of George Meredith and under-age girls and his mother, for horse-racing and detective stories and the good of his countrythe whole accompanied by a sneaking fear of hell-fire, a hatred of Spinoza and an unblemished record for Sunday church-going. A person born with one kind of psycho-physical constitution will be tempted to identify himself with one set of interests and passions, while a person with another kind of temperament will be tempted to make very different identifications. But these temptations (though extremely powerful, if the constitutional bias is strongly marked) do not have to be succumbed to; people can and do resist them, can and do refuse to identify themselves with what it would be all too easy and natural for them to be; can and do become better and quite other than their own selves. In this context the following brief article on How Men Behave in Crisis (published in a recent issue of Harpers Magazine) is highly significant. A young psychiatrist, who went as a medical observer on five combat missions of the Eighth Air Force in England says that in times of great stress and danger men are likely to react quite uniformly, even though under normal circumstances, they differ widely in personality. He went on one mission, during which the B-17 plane and crew were so severely damaged that survival seemed impossible. He had already studied the on the ground personalities of the crew and had found that they represented a great diversity of human types. Of their behaviour in crisis he reported:
  

1.03_-_Reading, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  What does our Concord culture amount to? There is in this town, with a very few exceptions, no taste for the best or for very good books even in English literature, whose words all can read and spell. Even the college-bred and so called liberally educated men here and elsewhere have really little or no acquaintance with the English classics; and as for the recorded wisdom of mankind, the ancient classics and Bibles, which are accessible to all who will know of them, there are the feeblest efforts any where made to become acquainted with them. I know a woodchopper, of middle age, who takes a French paper, not for news as he says, for he is above that, but to keep himself in practice, he being a Canadian by birth; and when I ask him what he considers the best thing he can do in this world, he says, beside this, to keep up and add to his English. This is about as much as the college bred generally do or aspire to do, and they take an English paper for the purpose. One who has just come from reading perhaps one of the best
  English books will find how many with whom he can converse about it? Or suppose he comes from reading a Greek or Latin classic in the original, whose praises are familiar even to the so called illiterate; he will find nobody at all to speak to, but must keep silence about it. Indeed, there is hardly the professor in our colleges, who, if he has mastered the difficulties of the language, has proportionally mastered the difficulties of the wit and Poetry of a Greek poet, and has any sympathy to impart to the alert and heroic reader; and as for the sacred Scriptures, or Bibles of mankind, who in this town can tell me even their titles? Most men do not know that any nation but the Hebrews have had a scripture. A man, any man, will go considerably out of his way to pick up a silver dollar; but here are golden words, which the wisest men of antiquity have uttered, and whose worth the wise of every succeeding age have assured us of;and yet we learn to read only as far as Easy Reading, the primers and class-books, and when we leave school, the Little Reading, and story books, which are for boys and beginners; and our reading, our conversation and thinking, are all on a very low level, worthy only of pygmies and manikins.
  

1.04_-_GOD_IN_THE_WORLD, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  It is in the literature of Mahayana and especially of Zen Buddhism that we find the best account of the psychology of the man for whom Samsara and Nirvana, time and eternity, are one and the same. More systematically perhaps than any other religion, the Buddhism of the Far East teaches the way to spiritual Knowledge in its fulness as well as in its heights, in and through the world as well as in and through the soul. In this context we may point to a highly significant fact, which is that the incomparable landscape painting of China and Japan was essentially a religious art, inspired by Taoism and Zen Buddhism; in Europe, on the contrary, landscape painting and the Poetry of nature worship were secular arts which arose when Christianity was in decline, and derived little or no inspiration from Christian ideals.
  

1.04_-_Sounds, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  But while we are confined to books, though the most select and classic, and read only particular written languages, which are themselves but dialects and provincial, we are in danger of forgetting the language which all things and events speak without metaphor, which alone is copious and standard. Much is published, but little printed. The rays which stream through the shutter will be no longer remembered when the shutter is wholly removed. No method nor discipline can supersede the necessity of being forever on the alert. What is a course of history, or philosophy, or Poetry, no matter how well selected, or the best society, or the most admirable routine of life, compared with the discipline of looking always at what is to be seen? Will you be a reader, a student merely, or a seer? Read your fate, see what is before you, and walk on into futurity.
  

1.04_-_The_Origin_and_Development_of_Poetry., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  object:1.04 - The Origin and Development of Poetry.
  
  
  Poetry in general seems to have sprung from two causes, each of them lying deep in our nature. First, the instinct of imitation is implanted in man from childhood, one difference between him and other animals being that he is the most imitative of living creatures, and through imitation learns his earliest lessons; and no less universal is the pleasure felt in things imitated. We have evidence of this in the facts of experience. Objects which in themselves we view with pain, we delight to contemplate when reproduced with minute fidelity: such as the forms of the most ignoble animals and of dead bodies. The cause of this again is, that to learn gives the liveliest pleasure, not only to philosophers but to men in general; whose capacity, however, of learning is more limited. Thus the reason why men enjoy seeing a likeness is, that in contemplating it they find themselves learning or inferring, and saying perhaps, 'Ah, that is he.' For if you happen not to have seen the original, the pleasure will be due not to the imitation as such, but to the execution, the colouring, or some such other cause.
  
  Imitation, then, is one instinct of our nature. Next, there is the instinct for 'harmony' and rhythm, metres being manifestly sections of rhythm. Persons, therefore, starting with this natural gift developed by degrees their special aptitudes, till their rude improvisations gave birth to Poetry.
  
  Poetry now diverged in two directions, according to the individual character of the writers. The graver spirits imitated noble actions, and the actions of good men. The more trivial sort imitated the actions of meaner persons, at first composing satires, as the former did hymns to the gods and the praises of famous men. A poem of the satirical kind cannot indeed be put down to any author earlier than Homer; though many such writers probably there were. But from Homer onward, instances can be cited,--his own Margites, for example, and other similar compositions. The appropriate metre was also here introduced; hence the measure is still called the iambic or lampooning measure, being that in which people lampooned one another. Thus the older poets were distinguished as writers of heroic or of lampooning verse.
  
  --
  
  Moreover, it was not till late that the short plot was discarded for one of greater compass, and the grotesque diction of the earlier satyric form for the stately manner of Tragedy. The iambic measure then replaced the trochaic tetrameter, which was originally employed when the Poetry was of the Satyric order, and had greater affinities with dancing. Once dialogue had come in, Nature herself discovered the appropriate measure.
  

1.04_-_The_Paths, #A Garden of Pomegranates - An Outline of the Qabalah, #Israel Regardie, #Occultism
  " The Transparent Intelligence ", partakes of both the nature of Chokmah and Hod, both of which are Mercurial.
  The alchemical conception of the universal Mercury was that of a flowing, shifting, and unstable principle, ever changing. This may account for the baboon or monkey ever in attendance upon Thoth, for the monkey is restless, ever moving, and never still, typifying the human Ruach, which must be quieted. The Norwegian Odin - the infinite wanderer, would possibly be attributed here for precisely this reason. He is the spirit of life who, according to the legends, does not create the world himself, but only plans and arranges it. All knowledge issues from him, and he too is the inventor of Poetry and the Norse runes.
  
  --
  The Orphic congregations at certain of their holiest secret convocations solemnly partook of the blood of a bull, according to Murray, which bull was, by some mystery, the blood of Dionysius-Zagreus himself, the " Bull of God " slain in sacrifice for the purification of man. And the
  Msenads of Poetry and mythology, among more beautiful proofs of their superhuman character, have always to tear bulls in pieces and taste of the blood. The reader will also recall to mind the fair promise of Lord Dunsany's most interesting story, The Blessing of Pan.
  

1.04_-_Vital_Education, #On Education, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  But still the direction in which the effort has to be made can be known only by the training of the mind and by the opening of the secret knowledge that is within our psychic being. To develop therefore in the vital the habit to open to this light and to. act in that light would be to place the vital in its proper place as a will-force executing the inner and higher knowledge.
  Vital education is greatly aided by stress on different kinds of fine arts and crafts. Sri Aurobindo has written at length on the contribution that Art can make to the integral education in his important book, "The National Value of Art". He has pointed out that the first and the lowest use of Art is the purely aesthetic, the second is the intellectual and the third and the highest is the spiritual. He has even stated that music, art and Poetry are a perfect education for the soul; they make and keep its movement purified, deep and harmonious. He has added, "These, therefore, are agents which cannot profitably be neglected by humanity on its onward march or degraded to the mere satisfaction of sensuous pleasure which will disintegrate rather than build the character. They are, when properly used, great educating, edifying and civilizing forces."1
  A great lesson in vital education is to develop the will of the individual and to encourage the exercise of the will in which what is valued most is not the result, but application and doing one's best.

1.05_-_CHARITY, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  The distinguishing marks of charity are disinterestedness, tranquillity and humility. But where there is disinterestedness there is neither greed for personal advantage nor fear for personal loss or punishment; where there is tranquillity, there is neither craving nor aversion, but a steady will to conform to the divine Tao or Logos on every level of existence and a steady awareness of the divine Suchness and what should be ones own relations to it; and where there is humility there is no censoriousness and no glorification of the ego or any projected alter-ego at the expense of others, who are recognized as having the same weaknesses and faults, but also the same capacity for transcending them in the unitive knowledge of God, as one has oneself. From all this it follows that charity is the root and substance of morality, and that where there is little charity there will be much avoidable evil. All this has been summed up in Augustines formula: Love, and do what you like. Among the later elaborations of the Augustinian theme we may cite the following from the writings of John Everard, one of those spiritually minded seventeenth-century divines whose teachings fell on the deaf ears of warring factions and, when the revolution and the military dictatorship were at an end, on the even deafer ears of Restoration clergymen and their successors in the Augustan age. (Just how deaf those ears could be we may judge by what Swift wrote of his beloved and morally perfect Houyhnhnms. The subject matter of their conversations, as of their Poetry, consisted of such things as friendship and benevolence, the visible operations of nature or ancient traditions; the bounds and limits of virtue, the unerring rules of reason. Never once do the ideas of God, or charity, or deliverance engage their minds. Which shows sufficiently clearly what the Dean of St. Patricks thought of the religion by which he made his money.)
  

1.05_-_Definition_of_the_Ludicrous,_and_a_brief_sketch_of_the_rise_of_Comedy., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  
  Epic Poetry agrees with Tragedy in so far as it is an imitation in verse of characters of a higher type. They differ, in that Epic Poetry admits but one kind of metre, and is narrative in form. They differ, again, in their length: for Tragedy endeavours, as far as possible, to confine itself to a single revolution of the sun, or but slightly to exceed this limit; whereas the Epic action has no limits of time. This, then, is a second point of difference; though at first the same freedom was admitted in Tragedy as in Epic Poetry.
  
  Of their constituent parts some are common to both, some peculiar to Tragedy, whoever, therefore, knows what is good or bad Tragedy, knows also about Epic Poetry. All the elements of an Epic poem are found in Tragedy, but the elements of a Tragedy are not all found in the Epic poem.
  

1.05_-_The_Universe_The_0_=_2_Equation, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  It seems to me that this doctrine is based upon a sorites of doubtful validity. To tell you the hideously shameful truth, I hate this doctrine so rabidly that I can hardly trust myself to present it fairly! But I will try. Meanwhile, you can study it in the Upanishads, in the Bhagavad-Gita, in Ernst Haeckel's The Riddle of the Universe, and dozens of other classics. The dogma appears to excite its dupes to dithyrambs. I have to admit the "Poetry" of the idea; but there is something in me which vehemently rejects it with excruciating and vindictive violence. Possibly, this is because part of our own system runs parallel with the first equations of theirs.
  

1.06_-_Definition_of_Tragedy., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  
  Of the Poetry which imitates in hexameter verse, and of Comedy, we will speak hereafter. Let us now discuss Tragedy, resuming its formal definition, as resulting from what has been already said.
  
  --
  
  The Spectacle has, indeed, an emotional attraction of its own, but, of all the parts, it is the least artistic, and connected least with the art of Poetry. For the power of Tragedy, we may be sure, is felt even apart from representation and actors. Besides, the production of spectacular effects depends more on the art of the stage machinist than on that of the poet.
  

1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi, #Raja-Yoga, #Swami Vivkenanda, #unset
  
  All ethics, all human action and all human thought, hang upon this one idea of unselfishness. The whole idea of human life can be put into that one word, unselfishness. Why should we be unselfish? Where is the necessity, the force, the power, of my being unselfish? You call yourself a rational man, a utilitarian; but if you do not show me a reason for utility, I say you are irrational. Show me the reason why I should not be selfish. To ask one to be unselfish may be good as Poetry, but Poetry is not reason. Show me a reason. Why shall I be unselfish, and why be good? Because Mr. and Mrs. So-and-so say so does not weigh with me. Where is the utility of my being unselfish? My utility is to be selfish if utility means the greatest amount of happiness. What is the answer? The utilitarian can never give it. The answer is that this world is only one drop in an infinite ocean, one link in an infinite chain. Where did those that preached unselfishness, and taught it to the human race, get this idea? We know it is not instinctive; the animals, which have instinct, do not know it. Neither is it reason; reason does not know anything about these ideas. Whence then did they come?
  

1.06_-_Dhyana, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  2:We shall treat of Dhyana as a result rather than as a method. Up to this point ancient authorities have been fairly reliable guides, except with regard to their crabbed ethics; but when they get on the subject of results of meditation, they completely lose their heads.
  3:They exhaust the possibilities of Poetry to declare what is demonstrably untrue. For example, we find in the Shiva Sanhita that "he who daily contemplates on this lotus of the heart is eagerly desired by the daughters of Gods, has clairaudience, clairvoyance, and can walk in the air." Another person "can make gold, discover medicine for disease, and see hidden treasures." All this is filth. What is the curse upon religion that its tenets must always be associated with every kind of extravagance and falsehood?
  4:There is one exception; it is the A.'.A.'., whose members are extremely careful to make no statement at all that cannot be verified in the usual manner; or where this is not easy, at least avoid anything like a dogmatic statement. In Their second book of practical instruction, Liber O, occur these words:

1.06_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_2_The_Works_of_Love_-_The_Works_of_Life, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  This physical mind of inertia believes in no divinity other than its own small earth-gods; it aspires perhaps to a greater comfort, order, pleasure, but asks for no uplifting and no spiritual deliverance. At the centre we meet a stronger Will of life with a greater gusto, but it is a blinded Daemon, a perverted spirit and exults in the very elements that make of life a striving turmoil and an unhappy imbroglio. It is a soul of human or Titanic desire clinging to the garish colour, disordered Poetry, violent tragedy or stirring melodrama of this mixed flux of good and evil, joy and sorrow, light and darkness, heady rapture and bitter torture.
  

1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature, #Sex Ecology Spirituality, #Ken Wilber, #Philosophy
  Further, the actual experience of seeing a dog is not itself a merely linguistic experience. The signifier, the word dog, is not the actual dog, not the actual referent. Obviously, the total experience of the real dog cannot itself be put into words, put into signifiers. But the fact that the real dog can't be fully captured in words does not mean that the real dog doesn't exist or isn't real. It means only that the signifier has sense only if you and I have had a similar experience, a common shared lifeworld experience, and then I will know what you mean when you say, "That dog scared me."
  In short, no direct experience can be fully captured in words.13 Sex can't be put into words; you've either had the experience or you haven't, and no amount of Poetry will take its place. Sunsets, eating cake, listening to Bach, riding a bike, getting drunk and throwing up-believe me, none of those are captured in words.
  And thus, so what if spiritual experiences can't be captured in words either? They are no more and no less handicapped in this regard than any other experience. If I say "dog" and you've had the experience, you know exactly what I mean. If a Zen master says "Emptiness," and you've had that experience, you will know exactly what is meant. If you haven't had the experience "dog" or the experience "Emptiness," merely adding more and more words will never, under any circumstances, convey it.

1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine, #Sex Ecology Spirituality, #Ken Wilber, #Philosophy
  Thus, the centaur could integrate the physiosphere and the biosphere and the noosphere, but the Over-Soul becomes, or is directly one with, the physiosphere and biosphere and noosphere. It is simple continuation of the deepening and widening of identity, grounded in an awareness very much within, and very much beyond, me.
  And Emerson means this literally! According to Emerson, this cosmic consciousness is not Poetry (though he often expresses it with unmatched poetic beauty)-rather, it is a direct realization, a direct apprehension, and "in that deep force, the last fact behind which analysis cannot go, all things find their common origin. It is one light which beams out of a thousand stars. It is one soul which animates all."
  For the Over-Soul is also experienced as the World Soul, since self and world are here finding a "common fountain, common source."8 The Over-Soul (or World Soul) is an initial apprehension of the pure Witness or aboriginal Self, which starts to emerge, however haltingly, as an experiential reality at this psychic stage.9 (We will see how Emerson treats this Witness in a moment.)
  --
  Empty yourself of everything. That is to say, empty yourself of your ego [or any sort of separate-self sense, soul, or oversoul] and empty yourself of all things and of all that you are in yourself and consider yourself as what you are in God. God is a being beyond being and a nothingness beyond being. Therefore, be still and do not flinch from this emptiness.46
  This "emptiness" is not a theory. Even less is it "Poetry" (which I have often heard). Nor is it a philosophical suggestion. It is a direct apprehension (direct "experience" is not quite right, since it is free of the duality of subject and object, and since it never enters the stream of time and thus is never "experiential" in any typical sense)-free of thoughts, free of dualities, free of time and temporal succession:
  I speak therefore of a Godhead from which as yet nothing emanates and nothing moves or is thought about.

1.09_-_(Plot_continued.)_Dramatic_Unity., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  
  It is, moreover, evident from what has been said, that it is not the function of the poet to relate what has happened, but what may happen,--what is possible according to the law of probability or necessity. The poet and the historian differ not by writing in verse or in prose. The work of Herodotus might be put into verse, and it would still be a species of history, with metre no less than without it. The true difference is that one relates what has happened, the other what may happen. Poetry, therefore, is a more philosophical and a higher thing than history: for Poetry tends to express the universal, history the particular. By the universal, I mean how a person of a certain type will on occasion speak or act, according to the law of probability or necessity; and it is this universality at which Poetry aims in the names she attaches to the personages. The particular is--for example--what
  Alcibiades did or suffered. In Comedy this is already apparent: for here the poet first constructs the plot on the lines of probability, and then inserts characteristic names;--unlike the lampooners who write about particular individuals. But tragedians still keep to real names, the reason being that what is possible is credible: what has not happened we do not at once feel sure to be possible: but what has happened is manifestly possible: otherwise it would not have happened. Still there are even some tragedies in which there are only one or two well known names, the rest being fictitious. In others, none are well known, as in

1.09_-_Saraswati_and_Her_Consorts, #The Secret Of The Veda, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Punjab. The psychological significance of Saraswati carries with it a psychological significance for the whole symbol of the Vedic waters.2
  Saraswati is not only connected with other rivers but with other goddesses who are plainly psychological symbols and especially with Bharati and Ila. In the later Puranic forms of worship Saraswati is the goddess of speech, of learning and of Poetry and Bharati is one of her names, but in the Veda Bharati and Saraswati are different deities. Bharati is also called Mahi, the Large, Great or Vast. The three, Ila, Mahi or Bharati and
  Saraswati are associated together in a constant formula in those hymns of invocation in which the gods are called by Agni to the

1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  or the return to nature, _in impuris naturalibus._--Schiller, or the
  Moral-Trumpeter of Sackingen.--Dante, or the hyna that writes Poetry
  in tombs.--Kant, or _cant_ as an intelligible character.--Victor

1.1.01_-_Seeking_the_Divine, #Letters On Yoga II, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  As for James' statement1 it is of course true except in so far as the politician can indulge in other things as hobbies for his leisure hours, but if he wants to succeed as a politician he must give his best energies to politics. Conversely if Shakespeare or
  Newton had spent part of their energies in politics they would not have been able to reach such heights in Poetry and in science or even if they had they would have done much less. The main energies have to be concentrated on one thing; the others can only be minor pursuits at leisure or for distraction or interests rather than pursuits useful for keeping up a general culture.
  

1.10_-_The_Image_of_the_Oceans_and_the_Rivers, #The Secret Of The Veda, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  "These move" says Vamadeva "from the heart-ocean; penned by the enemy in a hundred enclosures they cannot be seen; I look towards the streams of the clarity, for in their midst is the Golden Reed. Entirely they stream like flowing rivers becoming purified by the heart within and the mind; these move, waves of the clarity, like animals under the mastery of their driver. As if on a path in front of the Ocean (sindhu, the upper ocean) the mighty ones move compact of forceful speed but limited by the vital force (vata, vayu), the streams of clarity; they are like a straining horse which breaks its limits, as it is nourished by the waves." On the very face of it this is the Poetry of a mystic concealing his sense from the profane under a veil of images which occasionally he suffers to grow
  

1.10_-_The_Revolutionary_Yogi, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  
  Such are the mental, vital, physical and psychic discoveries that Sri Aurobindo pursued alone, step by step, between the ages of twenty and thirty, simply by following the thread of consciousness. The remarkable thing is that he practiced yoga in circumstances and places where one would usually not do yoga: while giving his lectures in French or English at the State College of Baroda, during his work at the court of the Maharaja, and more and more in the midst of his secret revolutionary activities. The hours of the night that were not devoted to studying his mother tongue or Sanskrit or to political work were spent writing Poetry. "Aurobindo had the habit of writing Poetry till late into the night," his Bengali teacher recalls, "and consequently he did not get up very early in the morning. . . . He would concentrate for a minute before starting, then the Poetry would flow from his pen like a stream." From writing Poetry, Sri Aurobindo would pass to his experimental sleep. In 1901, at the age of twenty-nine, he married Mrinalini Devi and tried to share his spiritual life with her. I am experiencing all the signs and symptoms, he wrote to her in a letter found in the archives of the British police. I should like to take you with me along this path. But Mrinalini did not understand him, and Sri Aurobindo would remain alone. We could search Sri Aurobindo's life in vain for those moving or miraculous anecdotes that adorn the lives of great sages and mystics, in vain for sensational yogic methods;
  everything seemed so ordinary, apparently, that nothing attracted one's attention, just as in life itself. Perhaps he had found more miracles in the ordinary than in the extraordinary: With me all is different, all is uncommon, he wrote in a letter to Mrinalini. All is deep and strange to the eyes that see.103 And perhaps that is what he wants us to discover through his example, his work, his yoga all those unknown riches beneath the ordinary crust. Our lives [are] a deeper mystery than we 103

1.10_-_The_Scolex_School, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  (I am giving you credit for very unusual ability; this test is not easy to make; and, obviously, you may have spoilt the whole composition, especially where its value depends on its form rather than on its substance. But we are not considering Poetry, or poetic prose; all we want is intelligible meaning.)
  

1.10_-_THINGS_I_OWE_TO_THE_ANCIENTS, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  thereby achieved--all this is Roman, and, if you will believe me, noble
  _par excellence._ By the side of this all the rest of Poetry becomes
  something popular,--nothing more than senseless sentimental twaddle.

1.11_-_Higher_Laws, #Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience, #Henry David Thoreau, #Philosophy
  
  Yet, for my part, I was never unusually squeamish; I could sometimes eat a fried rat with a good relish, if it were necessary. I am glad to have drunk water so long, for the same reason that I prefer the natural sky to an opium-eaters heaven. I would fain keep sober always; and there are infinite degrees of drunkenness. I believe that water is the only drink for a wise man; wine is not so noble a liquor; and think of dashing the hopes of a morning with a cup of warm coffee, or of an evening with a dish of tea! Ah, how low I fall when I am tempted by them! Even music may be intoxicating. Such apparently slight causes destroyed Greece and Rome, and will destroy England and America. Of all ebriosity, who does not prefer to be intoxicated by the air he breathes? I have found it to be the most serious objection to coarse labors long continued, that they compelled me to eat and drink coarsely also. But to tell the truth, I find myself at present somewhat less particular in these respects. I carry less religion to the table, ask no blessing; not because I am wiser than I was, but, I am obliged to confess, because, however much it is to be regretted, with years I have grown more coarse and indifferent. Perhaps these questions are entertained only in youth, as most believe of Poetry. My practice is
  nowhere, my opinion is here. Nevertheless I am far from regarding myself as one of those privileged ones to whom the Ved refers when it says, that he who has true faith in the Omnipresent Supreme Being may eat all that exists, that is, is not bound to inquire what is his food, or who prepares it; and even in their case it is to be observed, as a Hindoo commentator has remarked, that the Vedant limits this privilege to the time of distress.

1.12_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Solution, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  13:Pain of mind and body is a device of Nature, that is to say, of Force in her works, meant to subserve a definite transitional end in her upward evolution. The world is from the point of view of the individual a play and complex shock of multitudinous forces. In the midst of this complex play the individual stands as a limited constructed being with a limited amount of force exposed to numberless shocks which may wound, maim, break up or disintegrate the construction which he calls himself. Pain is in the nature of a nervous and physical recoil from a dangerous or harmful contact; it is a part of what the Upanishad calls jugupsa, the shrinking of the limited being from that which is not himself and not sympathetic or in harmony with himself, its impulse of self-defence against "others". It is, from this point of view, an indication by Nature of that which has to be avoided or, if not successfully avoided, has to be remedied. It does not come into being in the purely physical world so long as life does not enter into it; for till then mechanical methods are sufficient. Its office begins when life with its frailty and imperfect possession of Matter enters on the scene; it grows with the growth of Mind in life. Its office continues so long as Mind is bound in the life and body which it is using, dependent upon them for its knowledge and means of action, subjected to their limitations and to the egoistic impulses and aims which are born of those limitations. But if and when Mind in man becomes capable of being free, unegoistic, in harmony with all other beings and with the play of the universal forces, the use and office of suffering diminishes, its raison d'etre must finally cease to be and it can only continue as an atavism of Nature, a habit that has survived its use, a persistence of the lower in the as yet imperfect organisation of the higher. Its eventual elimination must be an essential point in the destined conquest of the soul over subjection to Matter and egoistic limitation in Mind.
  14:This elimination is possible because pain and pleasure themselves are currents, one imperfect, the other perverse, but still currents of the delight of existence. The reason for this imperfection and this perversion is the self-division of the being in his consciousness by measuring and limiting Maya and in consequence an egoistic and piecemeal instead of a universal reception of contacts by the individual. For the universal soul all things and all contacts of things carry in them an essence of delight best described by the Sanskrit aesthetic term, rasa, which means at once sap or essence of a thing and its taste. It is because we do not seek the essence of the thing in its contact with us, but look only to the manner in which it affects our desires and fears, our cravings and shrinkings that grief and pain, imperfect and transient pleasure or indifference, that is to say, blank inability to seize the essence, are the forms taken by the Rasa. If we could be entirely disinterested in mind and heart and impose that detachment on the nervous being, the progressive elimination of these imperfect and perverse forms of Rasa would be possible and the true essential taste of the inalienable delight of existence in all its variations would be within our reach. We attain to something of this capacity for variable but universal delight in the aesthetic reception of things as represented by Art and Poetry, so that we enjoy there the Rasa or taste of the sorrowful, the terrible, even the horrible or repellent;2 and the reason is because we are detached, disinterested, not thinking of ourselves or of self-defence (jugupsa), but only of the thing and its essence. Certainly, this aesthetic reception of contacts is not a precise image or reflection of the pure delight which is supramental and supra-aesthetic; for the latter would eliminate sorrow, terror, horror and disgust with their cause while the former admits them: but it represents partially and imperfectly one stage of the progressive delight of the universal Soul in things in its manifestation and it admits us in one part of our nature to that detachment from egoistic sensation and that universal attitude through which the one Soul sees harmony and beauty where we divided beings experience rather chaos and discord. The full liberation can come to us only by a similar liberation in all our parts, the universal aesthesis, the universal standpoint of knowledge, the universal detachment from all things and yet sympathy with all in our nervous and emotional being.
  15:Since the nature of suffering is a failure of the consciousforce in us to meet the shocks of existence and a consequent shrinking and contraction and its root is an inequality of that receptive and possessing force due to our self-limitation by egoism consequent on the ignorance of our true Self, of Sachchidananda, the elimination of suffering must first proceed by the substitution of titiks.a, the facing, enduring and conquest of all shocks of existence for jugupsa, the shrinking and contraction: by this endurance and conquest we proceed to an equality which may be either an equal indifference to all contacts or an equal gladness in all contacts; and this equality again must find a firm foundation in the substitution of the Sachchidananda consciousness which is All-Bliss for the ego-consciousness which enjoys and suffers. The Sachchidananda consciousness may be transcendent of the universe and aloof from it, and to this state of distant Bliss the path is equal indifference; it is the path of the ascetic. Or the Sachchidananda consciousness may be at once transcendent and universal; and to this state of present and all-embracing Bliss the path is surrender and loss of the ego in the universal and possession of an all-pervading equal delight; it is the path of the ancient Vedic sages. But neutrality to the imperfect touches of pleasure and the perverse touches of pain is the first direct and natural result of the soul's self-discipline and the conversion to equal delight can, usually, come only afterwards. The direct transformation of the triple vibration into Ananda is possible, but less easy to the human being.

1.12_-_The_Superconscient, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  
  Those who have exceeded, or think they have exceeded, the stage of religious forms will jump to the conclusion that all personal forms are deceptive, or of a lower order, and that only impersonal forces are true, but this is an error of our human logic, which always tries to reduce everything to a uniform concept. The vision of Durga is no more false and imaginary than Shelley's poem or Einstein's equations, which were confirmed ten years later. Error and superstition begin with the assertion that only the Virgin is true, or only Durga, or only Poetry. The reconciling truth would be in seeing that all these forms come from the same divine Light, in different degrees.
  
  --
  
  This luminous flood will translate differently in different people (one is always too quick to give it a form instead of letting it quietly permeate the being and do its work of clarification). For some, there will be a sudden poetic blossoming, others will see new architectural forms, others will pursue new scientific discoveries, while still others will worship their God. Generally, the access to this new consciousness is accompanied by a spontaneous flowering of creative energies, particularly in the poetic field. It is interesting to note the number of poets of all languages Chinese, Indian, English, etc. among Sri Aurobindo's disciples, as if Poetry and art were the first practical result of his yoga: I have seen both in myself and others a sudden flowering of capacities in every kind of activity come by the opening of consciousness, so that one who laboured long without the least success to express himself in rhythm becomes a master of poetic language and cadences in a day. It is a question of the right silence in the mind and the right openness to the Word that is trying to express itself for the Word is there ready formed in those inner planes where all artistic forms take birth, but it is the transmitting mind that must change and become a perfect channel and not an obstacle.192
  
  Poetry is the most convenient means of conveying what these higher planes of consciousness are. In a poem's rhythm one can easily perceive vibrations. We will therefore use Poetry to convey a sense of what these higher planes are, even though the Superconscient is not the sole privilege of poets. In his vast correspondence on Poetry and in his Future Poetry, Sri Aurobindo has given numerous instances of Poetry issuing from the illumined mind. It is naturally Shakespeare who would give us the most abundant examples, provided we let go of the external meaning and listen to what vibrates behind the words; for Poetry and all the arts are ultimately a means of capturing a tiny ineffable note, a mere nothing, a "nothing" that still constitutes life's very essence: . . . that his virtues
  
  --
  
  Along with its beauty, we are also discovering the limits of the illumined mind: illumined Poetry produces streams of images and revelatory words (because vision, and even hearing, often open at this stage), almost an avalanche of luxuriant, sometimes incoherent images, as if the consciousness were hard put to contain the flood of light and unaccustomed intensity; it is overwhelmed. Enthusiasm easily changes into exhilaration, and if the rest of the being has not been sufficiently prepared and purified, any of the lower parts can seize hold of the descending light and force and use them for their own ends; this is a frequent snare. Whenever the lower parts of the being, especially the vital, seize upon the luminous flood, they harden it, dramatize it, distort it. There is still power, but compelling and hard while the essence of the illumined mind is joy. Here we could cite the names of many poets and creative geniuses. 193 Furthermore, the substance of the illumined mind is not truly transparent, but only translucent; its light is diffused, somewhat as if it could feel the truth everywhere without concretely touching it; hence the frequent instances of incoherence and vagueness. It is only the beginning of a new birth. Before going higher, more purification is necessary, and above all more peace, more natural equilibrium, and more silence. The higher we ascend in consciousness, the sturdier the equilibrium required.
  
  --
  
  Unfortunately, artists and creators too often have a considerable ego standing in the way, which is their main difficulty. The religious man, who has worked to dissolve his ego, finds it easier, but he rarely attains universality through his own individual efforts, leaping instead beyond the individual without bothering to develop all the intermediate rungs of the personal consciousness, and when he reaches the "top" he no longer has a ladder to come down, or he does not want to come down, or there is no individual self left to express what he sees, or else his old individual self tries its best to express his new consciousness, provided he feels the need to express anything at all. The Vedic rishis, who have given us perhaps the only instance of a systematic and continuous spiritual progression from plane to plane, may be among the greatest poets the earth has ever known, as Sri Aurobindo has shown in his Secret of the Veda. The Sanskrit word kavi had the double meaning of "seer of the Truth" and "poet." One was a poet because one was a seer. This is an obvious and quite forgotten reality. It may be worthwhile, then, to say a few words about art as a means of ascent of the consciousness, and, in particular, about Poetry at the overmental level.
  
  --
  
  

Mantric Poetry


  
  The planes of consciousness are characterized not only by different intensities of luminous vibrations, but by different sound-vibrations or rhythms one can hear when one has that "ear of ears" the Veda speaks of. Sounds or images, lights or forces or beings are various aspects of the same Existence manifesting differently and in varying intensities according to the plane. The farther one descends the ladder of consciousness, the more fragmented become the sound-vibrations, as well as the light, the beings, and the forces. On the vital plane, for example, one can hear the discordant and jarring vibrations of life, like certain types of music issuing from this plane or certain types of vital painting or Poetry, which all express that broken and highly colored rhythm. The higher one rises, the more harmonious, unified and streamlined the vibrations become, such as certain great notes of Beethoven's string quartets, which seem to draw us upward, breathlessly, to radiant heights of pure light. The force of the music is no longer a matter of volume or multi-hued outbursts, but of a higher inner tension. The higher frequency of vibration turns the multi-hued rainbow to pure white, to a note so high that it seems motionless, as if captured in eternity, one single sound-light-force which is perhaps akin to the sacred Indian syllable OM [the] Word concealed in the upper fire.35 "In the beginning was the Word," the Christian Scriptures also say.
  
  There exists in India a secret knowledge based upon sounds and the differences of vibratory modes found on different planes of consciousness. If we pronounce the sound OM, for example, we clearly feel its vibrations enveloping the head centers, while the sound RAM affects the navel center. And since each of our centers of consciousness is in direct contact with a plane, we can, by the repetition of certain sounds (japa), come into contact with the corresponding plane of consciousness.200 This is the basis of an entire spiritual discipline, called "tantric" because it originates from sacred texts known as Tantra. The basic or essential sounds that have the power to establish the contact are called mantras. The mantras, usually secret and given to the disciple by his Guru,201 are of all kinds (there are many levels within each plane of consciousness), and may serve the most contradictory purposes. By combining certain sounds, one can at the lower levels of consciousness generally at the vital level come in contact with the corresponding forces and acquire many strange powers: some mantras can cause death (in five minutes, with violent vomiting), some mantras can strike with precision a particular part or organ of the body, some mantras can cure, some mantras can start a fire, protect, or cast spells. This type of magic, or chemistry of vibrations, derives simply from a conscious handling of the lower vibrations. But there is a higher magic, which also derives from handling vibrations, on higher planes of consciousness. This is Poetry, music, the spiritual mantras of the Upanishads and the Veda, the mantras given by a Guru to his disciple to help him come consciously into direct contact with a special plane of consciousness, a force or a divine being. In this case, the sound holds in itself the power of experience and realization it is a sound that makes one see.
  
  Similarly, Poetry and music, which are but unconscious processes of handling these secret vibrations, can be a powerful means of opening up the consciousness. If we could compose conscious Poetry or music through the conscious manipulation of higher vibrations, we would create masterpieces endowed with initiatory powers. Instead of a Poetry that is a fantasy of the intellect and a nautch-girl of the mind,202 as Sri Aurobindo put it, we would create a mantric music or Poetry to bring the gods into our life. 203 For true Poetry is action; it opens little inlets in the consciousness we are so walled in, so barricaded! through which the Real can enter. It is a mantra of the Real,204 an initiation. This is what the Vedic rishis and the seers of the Upanishads did with their mantras, which have the power of communicating illumination to one who is ready. 205 This is what Sri Aurobindo has explained in his Future Poetry and what he has accomplished himself in Savitri.
  
  Mantras, great Poetry, great music, or the sacred Word, all come from the overmind plane. It is the source of all creative or spiritual activity (the two cannot be separated: the categorical divisions of the intellect vanish in this clear space where everything is sacred, even the profane). We might now attempt to describe the particular vibration or rhythm of the overmind. First, as anyone knows who has the capacity to enter more or less consciously in contact with the higher planes a poet, a writer, or an artist it is no longer ideas one perceives and tries to translate when one goes beyond a certain level of consciousness: one hears. Vibrations, or waves, or rhythms, literally impose themselves and take possession of the seeker, and subsequently garb themselves with words and ideas, or music, or colors, during the descent. But the word or idea, the music or color is merely a result, a byproduct: it only gives a body to that first, highly compelling vibration. If the poet, the true one, next corrects and recorrects his draft, it is not to improve the form, as it were, or to find a more adequate expression, but to capture the vibrating life behind more accurately; if the true vibration is absent, all the magic disintegrates, as a Vedic priest mispronouncing the mantra of the sacrifice. When the consciousness is transparent, the sound can be heard distinctly, and it is a seeing sound, as it were, a sound-image or a sound-idea, which inseparably links hearing to vision and thought within the same luminous essence. All is there, self-contained, within a single vibration. On all the intermediate planes higher mind, illumined or intuitive mind the vibrations are generally broken up as flashes, pulsations, or eruptions, while in the overmind they are great notes.
  
  --
  
  Poetry is restored to its true role, which is not to please but to make the world more real by infusing more Reality into it.
  
  --
  202 - The Human Cycle, 15:5
  203 - The Future Poetry, 9:233
  204 - The Future Poetry, 9:9
  205 - Unfortunately, these texts have reached us in translation, such that all the magic of the original sound has vanished. The remarkable thing, however, is that if one hears the original Sanskrit text chanted by someone who has knowledge, one can receive an illumination without understanding a word of what has been chanted.

1.13_-_SALVATION,_DELIVERANCE,_ENLIGHTENMENT, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  Much of the literature of Sufism is poetical. Sometimes this Poetry is rather strained and extravagant, sometimes beautiful with a luminous simplicity, sometimes darkly and almost disquietingly enigmatic. To this last class belong the utterances of that Moslem saint of the tenth century, Niffari the Egyptian. This is what he wrote on the subject of salvation.
  

1.13_-_Under_the_Auspices_of_the_Gods, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  say that these lofty thoughts, these poems and quartets and divine visionary moments are worth far more than all the hours of our life put together, and they are right . . . which is just the point! This in itself is the acknowledgment that life is woefully lacking, that life's very goal is not in life. We need a truth of body and of the earth, not just a truth above our heads. We do not seek recreation but a re-creation.
  Until now, it is as if the individual's progress in evolution has been to discover higher planes of consciousness, and once there, to build his own private nest apart from the rest of creation, an island of light in the midst of economic philistinism: this one with music, that one with Poetry, another with mathematics or religion, and yet another on a sailboat or in a monk's cell, as if the sole purpose of life in a body were to escape from both life and the body. Indeed, we need only look at our own life; we are never in it! We are before or after, engrossed in memories or in hopes; but the here-and-now is so miserable and dull . . . we do not even know if it exists, except in those moments that no longer belong to life as such. We cannot blame the churches,
  because we all live in the beyond, all the time; they merely preach a larger beyond. Even Rimbaud said it: "True life is elsewhere."

1.14_-_(Plot_continued.)_The_tragic_emotions_of_pity_and_fear_should_spring_out_of_the_Plot_itself., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  
  The action may be done consciously and with knowledge of the persons, in the manner of the older poets. It is thus too that Euripides makes Medea slay her children. Or, again, the deed of horror may be done, but done in ignorance, and the tie of kinship or friendship be discovered afterwards. The Oedipus of Sophocles is an example. Here, indeed, the incident is outside the drama proper; but cases occur where it falls within the action of the play: one may cite the Alcmaeon of Astydamas, or Telegonus in the Wounded Odysseus. Again, there is a third case,-- when some one is about to do an irreparable deed through ignorance, and makes the discovery before it is done. These are the only possible ways. For the deed must either be done or not done,--and that wittingly or unwittingly. But of all these ways, to be about to act knowing the persons, and then not to act, is the worst. It is shocking without being tragic, for no disaster follows. It is, therefore, never, or very rarely, found in Poetry. One instance, however, is in the
  Antigone, where Haemon threatens to kill Creon. The next and better way is that the deed should be perpetrated. Still better, that it should be perpetrated in ignorance, and the discovery made afterwards. There is then nothing to shock us, while the discovery produces a startling effect. The last case is the best, as when in the Cresphontes Merope is about to slay her son, but, recognising who he is, spares his life. So in the Iphigenia, the sister recognises the brother just in time. Again in the Helle, the son recognises the mother when on the point of giving her up. This, then, is why a few families only, as has been already observed, furnish the subjects of tragedy. It was not art, but happy chance, that led the poets in search of subjects to impress the tragic quality upon their plots. They are compelled, therefore, to have recourse to those houses whose history contains moving incidents like these.

1.15_-_Index, #Aion, #Carl Jung, #Psychology
  The Type Problem in Human Character
  The Type Problem in Poetry
  The Type Problem in Psychopathology
  --
  Richard Wilhelm: In Memoriam (1930)
  On the Relation of Analytical Psychology to Poetry (1922)
  Psychology and Literature (1930/1950)

1.15_-_The_element_of_Character_in_Tragedy., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  
  These then are rules the poet should observe. Nor should he neglect those appeals to the senses, which, though not among the essentials, are the concomitants of Poetry; for here too there is much room for error.
  But of this enough has been said in our published treatises.

1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  The single sign interpreting every sign.302
  Day after day, quietly, Sri Aurobindo filled his pages. Anyone else would have been exhausted, but he did not "think" about what he was writing. I have made no endeavour in writing, he explains to a disciple, I have simply left the higher Power to work and when it did not work, I made no effort at all. It was in the old intellectual days that I had sometimes tried to force things and not after I started development of Poetry and prose by Yoga. Let me remind you also that when I was writing the Arya and also whenever I write these letters or replies, I never think. . . . It is out of a silent mind that I
  write whatever comes ready-shaped from above.303 Often, those among his disciples who were writers or poets would ask him to explain the yogic process of literary creation. He would explain it at great length, knowing that creative activities are a powerful means of pushing back the superconscious boundary and precipitating into Matter the luminous possibilities of the future. His letters are quite instructive: The best relief for the brain, he writes in one of them, is when the thinking takes place outside the body and above the head (or in space or at other levels but still outside the body). At any rate it was so in my case; for as soon as that happened there was an immense relief; I have felt body strain since then but never any kind of brain fatigue.304 Let us stress that "thinking outside the body" is not at all a supramental phenomenon, but a very simple experience accessible with the onset of mental silence. The true method,

1.16_-_On_Concentration, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  (I know I'm a poor contemptible Lowbrow; but I refuse to be ashamed for finding Kipling's If and Henley's Don't remember-the title; they may not be Poetry but they are honest food and damned good beer for the plebeian wayfarer. It was such manhood, not the left-wing high-brow Bloomsbury sissies, that kept London through the blitz. Pray forgive the digression!)
  

1.17_-_Practical_rules_for_the_Tragic_Poet., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  
  Again, the poet should work out his play, to the best of his power, with appropriate gestures; for those who feel emotion are most convincing through natural sympathy with the characters they represent; and one who is agitated storms, one who is angry rages, with the most life-like reality. Hence Poetry implies either a happy gift of nature or a strain of madness. In the one case a man can take the mould of any character; in the other, he is lifted out of his proper self.
  
  --
  
  After this, the names being once given, it remains to fill in the episodes. We must see that they are relevant to the action. In the case of Orestes, for example, there is the madness which led to his capture, and his deliverance by means of the purificatory rite. In the drama, the episodes are short, but it is these that give extension to Epic Poetry.
  Thus the story of the Odyssey can be stated briefly. A certain man is absent from home for many years; he is jealously watched by Poseidon, and left desolate. Meanwhile his home is in a wretched plight--suitors are wasting his substance and plotting against his son. At length, tempest-tost, he himself arrives; he makes certain persons acquainted with him; he attacks the suitors with his own hand, and is himself preserved while he destroys them. This is the essence of the plot; the rest is episode.

1.17_-_The_Divine_Birth_and_Divine_Works, #Essays On The Gita, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Hinduism which rejected Buddha, his sangha and his dharma, bears the ineffaceable imprint of the social and ethical influence of Buddhism and its effect on the ideas and the life of the race, while in modern Europe, Christian only in name, humanitarianism is the translation into the ethical and social sphere and the aspiration to liberty, equality and fraternity the translation into the social and political sphere of the spiritual truths of
  Christianity, the latter especially being effected by men who aggressively rejected the Christian religion and spiritual discipline and by an age which in its intellectual effort of emancipation tried to get rid of Christianity as a creed. On the other hand the life of Rama and Krishna belongs to the prehistoric past which has come down only in Poetry and legend and may even be regarded as myths; but it is quite immaterial whether we regard them as myths or historical facts, because their permanent truth and value lie in their persistence as a spiritual form, presence, influence in the inner consciousness of the race and the life of the human soul. Avatarhood is a fact of divine life and consciousness which may realise itself in an outward action, but must persist, when that action is over and has done its work, in a spiritual influence; or may realise itself in a spiritual influence and teaching, but must then have its permanent effect, even when the new religion or discipline is exhausted, in the thought, temperament and outward life of mankind.
  

1.17_-_The_Transformation, #Sri Aurobindo or the Adventure of Consciousness, #Satprem, #Integral Yoga
  gardens; rice fields; workshops for cars, tractors and trucks; an X-ray department and an operating room. Every conceivable human activity was represented. The Ashram was a microcosm. One could be a baker,
  too, or wash dishes, or try one's hand at carpentry, if one believed in the virtues of simple work. But there was no hierarchy among these activities; none was remunerated, nor was any considered superior to any other. All the practical necessities of life were provided for by the Mother to each person according to his or her needs. The only essential task was to discover the truth of one's being, for which the external work was merely a pretext or a means. It was remarkable, in fact, to observe people changing activities as their consciousness awakened; soon, all the values attached to the former profession would fall away, and because money no longer had any meaning, one who considered himself a doctor, say, found that he was really more comfortable as an artisan, while a man with no particular education might discover that he had a talent for Poetry or painting, or might
  
  --
  
  4 - Literature-Poetry-Drama Views and Reviews, 'Arya' 1914-1920 1st ed. 1941
  Letters, third series 1st ed. 1949
  --
  Vyasa and Valmiki, 1893-1905 (Baroda) 1st ed. 1956
  The Future Poetry, 'Arya' Dec. 1917-July 1920 1st ed. 1953
  Collected Poems and Plays, 2 volumes 1st ed. 1942

1.19_-_Thought,_or_the_Intellectual_element,_and_Diction_in_Tragedy., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  
  Next, as regards Diction. One branch of the inquiry treats of the Modes of Utterance. But this province of knowledge belongs to the art of Delivery and to the masters of that science. It includes, for instance,--what is a command, a prayer, a statement, a threat, a question, an answer, and so forth. To know or not to know these things involves no serious censure upon the poet's art. For who can admit the fault imputed to Homer by Protagoras,--that in the words, 'Sing, goddess, of the wrath,' he gives a command under the idea that he utters a prayer? For to tell some one to do a thing or not to do it is, he says, a command. We may, therefore, pass this over as an inquiry that belongs to another art, not to Poetry.
  

1.201_-_Socrates, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Can you give me another example? I asked.
  Yes, there is this one. You realise that the word Poetry [originally meant creation and that creation]171 is a term of wide application.
  When something comes into existence which has not existed before, the
  --
  That is so.
  But you also know, she went on, that they are not all called creators. They have other names, and only that one part of creation which is separated off from the rest and is the part that is concerned with song and verse is called by the original name of the whole class, which is Poetry, and only those to whom this part of creation belongs are called poets.
  That is so.
  --
  The words in brackets are not in the Greek but are needed in the translation because modern
  English has no word equivalent to Greek poiesis, which means both Poetry and creation. poietai; see poiesis. 173 eudaimonein.
  Apparently a poetic quotation, from a source unknown to us.
  --
  Perhaps the confidence of her answer was thought characteristic of sophists (see sophistes).
  A line of Poetry from an unknown source. 185 Or courage; see arete. arete. 187 doxa. 188 The verb supplied is missing in the Greek.
  

1.20_-_The_Hound_of_Heaven, #The Secret Of The Veda, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Such is this remarkable hymn, the bulk of which I have translated because it both brings into striking relief the mystic and entirely psychological character of the Vedic Poetry and by so doing sets out vividly the nature of the imagery in the midst of which Sarama figures. The other references to Sarama in the Rig
  Veda do not add anything essential to the conception. We have a brief allusion in IV.16.8, "When thou didst tear the waters out of the hill, Sarama became manifest before thee; so do thou as our leader tear out much wealth for us, breaking the pens, hymned by the Angirases." It is the Intuition manifesting before the Divine Mind as its forerunner when there is the emergence of the waters, the streaming movements of the Truth that break out of the hill in which they were confined by Vritra (verse 7); and it is by means of the Intuition that this godhead becomes our leader to the rescue of the Light and the conquest of the much wealth hidden within in the rock behind the fortress gates of the Panis.

1.2.11_-_Patience_and_Perseverance, #Letters On Yoga II, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  There - that is my counterblast to your variations on
  Schopenhauer. I conclude - drive out dark despair and go bravely on with your Poetry, your novels - and your Yoga. As the darkness disappears, the inner doors too will open.
  

1.22_-_(Poetic_Diction_continued.)_How_Poetry_combines_elevation_of_language_with_perspicuity., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  object:1.22 - (Poetic Diction continued.) How Poetry combines elevation of language with perspicuity.
  
  
  The perfection of style is to be clear without being mean. The clearest style is that which uses only current or proper words; at the same time it is mean:--witness the Poetry of Cleophon and of Sthenelus. That diction, on the other hand, is lofty and raised above the commonplace which employs unusual words. By unusual, I mean strange (or rare) words, metaphorical, lengthened,--anything, in short, that differs from the normal idiom. Yet a style wholly composed of such words is either a riddle or a jargon; a riddle, if it consists of metaphors; a jargon, if it consists of strange (or rare) words. For the essence of a riddle is to express true facts under impossible combinations. Now this cannot be done by any arrangement of ordinary words, but by the use of metaphor it can. Such is the riddle:--'A man I saw who on another man had glued the bronze by aid of fire,' and others of the same kind. A diction that is made up of strange (or rare) terms is a jargon. A certain infusion, therefore, of these elements is necessary to style; for the strange (or rare) word, the metaphorical, the ornamental, and the other kinds above mentioned, will raise it above the commonplace and mean, while the use of proper words will make it perspicuous. But nothing contributes more to produce a clearness of diction that is remote from commonness than the lengthening, contraction, and alteration of words. For by deviating in exceptional cases from the normal idiom, the language will gain distinction; while, at the same time, the partial conformity with usage will give perspicuity. The critics, therefore, are in error who censure these licenses of speech, and hold the author up to ridicule. Thus
  Eucleides, the elder, declared that it would be an easy matter to be a poet if you might lengthen syllables at will. He caricatured the practice in the very form of his diction, as in the verse: '{Epsilon pi iota chi alpha rho eta nu / epsilon iota delta omicron nu / Mu alpha rho alpha theta omega nu alpha delta epsilon / Beta alpha delta iota zeta omicron nu tau alpha}, or, {omicron upsilon kappa / alpha nu / gamma / epsilon rho alpha mu epsilon nu omicron sigma / tau omicron nu / epsilon kappa epsilon iota nu omicron upsilon /epsilon lambda lambda epsilon beta omicron rho omicron nu}. To employ such license at all obtrusively is, no doubt, grotesque; but in any mode of poetic diction there must be moderation. Even metaphors, strange (or rare) words, or any similar forms of speech, would produce the like effect if used without propriety and with the express purpose of being ludicrous. How great a difference is made by the appropriate use of lengthening, may be seen in Epic Poetry by the insertion of ordinary forms in the verse. So, again, if we take a strange (or rare) word, a metaphor, or any similar mode of expression, and replace it by the current or proper term, the truth of our observation will be manifest. For example Aeschylus and Euripides each composed the same iambic line. But the alteration of a single word by Euripides, who employed the rarer term instead of the ordinary one, makes one verse appear beautiful and the other trivial. Aeschylus in his
  Philoctetes says: {Phi alpha gamma epsilon delta alpha iota nu alpha / delta / eta / mu omicron upsilon / sigma alpha rho kappa alpha sigma / epsilon rho theta iota epsilon iota / pi omicron delta omicron sigma}.
  --
  Of the various kinds of words, the compound are best adapted to
  Dithyrambs, rare words to heroic Poetry, metaphors to iambic. In heroic Poetry, indeed, all these varieties are serviceable. But in iambic verse, which reproduces, as far as may be, familiar speech, the most appropriate words are those which are found even in prose. These are,--the current or proper, the metaphorical, the ornamental.
  

1.23_-_Epic_Poetry., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  object:1.23 - Epic Poetry.
  

1.240_-_1.300_Talks, #Talks, #Sri Ramana Maharshi, #Hinduism
  But you cannot escape the Self. You want to see God in all, but not in yourself? If all are God, are you not included in that all? Yourself being God, is it a wonder that all are God? There must be a seer and thinker for even the practice. Who is he?
  D.: Through Poetry, music, japa, bhajan, beautiful landscapes, reading the lives of spiritual heroes, etc., one sometimes experiences a true sense of all-unity. Is that feeling of deep blissful quiet (wherein the personal self has no place) the "entering into the heart" whereof
  Bhagavan speaks? Will practice of that lead to a deeper samadhi, and so ultimately to a full vision of the Real?

1.240_-_Talks_2, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  But you cannot escape the Self. You want to see God in all, but not in yourself? If all are God, are you not included in that all? Yourself being God, is it a wonder that all are God? There must be a seer and thinker for even the practice. Who is he?
  D.: Through Poetry, music, japa, bhajan, beautiful landscapes, reading the lives of spiritual heroes, etc., one sometimes experiences a true sense of all-unity. Is that feeling of deep blissful quiet (wherein the personal self has no place) the entering into the heart whereof
  Bhagavan speaks? Will practice of that lead to a deeper samadhi, and so ultimately to a full vision of the Real?

1.24_-_(Epic_Poetry_continued.)_Further_points_of_agreement_with_Tragedy., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  object:1.24 - (Epic Poetry continued.) Further points of agreement with Tragedy.
  
  
  Again, Epic Poetry must have as many kinds as Tragedy: it must be simple, or complex, or 'ethical,' or 'pathetic.' The parts also, with the exception of song and spectacle, are the same; for it requires Reversals of the Situation, Recognitions, and Scenes of Suffering.
  
  --
  
  Epic Poetry differs from Tragedy in the scale on which it is constructed, and in its metre. As regards scale or length, we have already laid down an adequate limit:--the beginning and the end must be capable of being brought within a single view. This condition will be satisfied by poems on a smaller scale than the old epics, and answering in length to the group of tragedies presented at a single sitting.
  
  Epic Poetry has, however, a great--a special--capacity for enlarging its dimensions, and we can see the reason. In Tragedy we cannot imitate several lines of actions carried on at one and the same time; we must confine ourselves to the action on the stage and the part taken by the players. But in Epic Poetry, owing to the narrative form, many events simultaneously transacted can be presented; and these, if relevant to the subject, add mass and dignity to the poem. The Epic has here an advantage, and one that conduces to grandeur of effect, to diverting the mind of the hearer, and relieving the story with varying episodes. For sameness of incident soon produces satiety, and makes tragedies fail on the stage.
  
  --
  
  The element of the wonderful is required in Tragedy. The irrational, on which the wonderful depends for its chief effects, has wider scope in Epic Poetry, because there the person acting is not seen. Thus, the pursuit of Hector would be ludicrous if placed upon the stage--the Greeks standing still and not joining in the pursuit, and Achilles waving them back. But in the Epic poem the absurdity passes unnoticed.
  

1.25_-_Critical_Objections_brought_against_Poetry,_and_the_principles_on_which_they_are_to_be_answered., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  object:1.25 - Critical Objections brought against Poetry, and the principles on which they are to be answered.
  
  --
  The poet being an imitator, like a painter or any other artist, must of necessity imitate one of three objects,--things as they were or are, things as they are said or thought to be, or things as they ought to be.
  The vehicle of expression is language,--either current terms or, it may be, rare words or metaphors. There are also many modifications of language, which we concede to the poets. Add to this, that the standard of correctness is not the same in Poetry and politics, any more than in Poetry and any other art. Within the art of Poetry itself there are two kinds of faults, those which touch its essence, and those which are accidental. If a poet has chosen to imitate something, through want of capacity, the error is inherent in the Poetry. But if the failure is due to a wrong choice if he has represented a horse as throwing out both his off legs at once, or introduced technical inaccuracies in medicine, for example, or in any other art the error is not essential to the Poetry. These are the points of view from which we should consider and answer the objections raised by the critics.
  

1.26_-_A_general_estimate_of_the_comparative_worth_of_Epic_Poetry_and_Tragedy., #Poetics, #Aristotle, #Christianity
  object:1.26 - A general estimate of the comparative worth of Epic Poetry and Tragedy.
  
  --
  The question may be raised whether the Epic or Tragic mode of imitation is the higher. If the more refined art is the higher, and the more refined in every case is that which appeals to the better sort of audience, the art which imitates anything and everything is manifestly most unrefined. The audience is supposed to be too dull to comprehend unless something of their own is thrown in by the performers, who therefore indulge in restless movements. Bad flute-players twist and twirl, if they have to represent 'the quoit-throw,' or hustle the coryphaeus when they perform the 'Scylla.' Tragedy, it is said, has this same defect. We may compare the opinion that the older actors entertained of their successors. Mynniscus used to call Callippides
  'ape' on account of the extravagance of his action, and the same view was held of Pindarus. Tragic art, then, as a whole, stands to Epic in the same relation as the younger to the elder actors. So we are told that Epic Poetry is addressed to a cultivated audience, who do not need gesture; Tragedy, to an inferior public. Being then unrefined, it is evidently the lower of the two.
  
  Now, in the first place, this censure attaches not to the poetic but to the histrionic art; for gesticulation may be equally overdone in epic recitation, as by Sosi-stratus, or in lyrical competition, as by
  Mnasitheus the Opuntian. Next, all action is not to be condemned any more than all dancing--but only that of bad performers. Such was the fault found in Callippides, as also in others of our own day, who are censured for representing degraded women. Again, Tragedy like Epic Poetry produces its effect even without action; it reveals its power by mere reading. If, then, in all other respects it is superior, this fault, we say, is not inherent in it.
  
  --
  
  If, then, Tragedy is superior to Epic Poetry in all these respects, and, moreover, fulfils its specific function better as an art for each art ought to produce, not any chance pleasure, but the pleasure proper to it, as already stated it plainly follows that Tragedy is the higher art, as attaining its end more perfectly.
  
  Thus much may suffice concerning Tragic and Epic Poetry in general; their several kinds and parts, with the number of each and their differences; the causes that make a poem good or bad; the objections of the critics and the answers to these objections.
  

1.27_-_CONTEMPLATION,_ACTION_AND_SOCIAL_UTILITY, #The Perennial Philosophy, #Aldous Huxley, #Philosophy
  
  At this point it is worth remarking parenthetically that God is by no means the only possible object of contemplation. There have been and still are many philosophic, aesthetic and scientific contemplatives. One-pointed concentration on that which is not the highest may become a dangerous form of idolatry. In a letter to Hooker, Darwin wrote that it is a cursed evil to any man to become so absorbed in any subject as I am in mine. It is an evil because such one-pointedness may result in the more or less total atrophy of all but one side of the mind Darwin himself records that in later life he was unable to take the smallest interest in Poetry, art or religion. Professionally, in relation to his chosen specialty, a man may be completely mature. Spiritually and sometimes even ethically, in relation to God and his neighbours, he may be hardly more than a foetus.
  

1.3.03_-_Quiet_and_Calm, #Letters On Yoga II, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  *
  You have to become conscious [in writing Poetry] as in Yoga.
  

1.4.01_-_The_Divine_Grace_and_Guidance, #Letters On Yoga II, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  I could illustrate my meaning more concretely from my own first experience of the Self, long before I knew even what Yoga was or that there was such a thing, at a time when I had no religious feeling, no wish for spiritual knowledge, no aspiration beyond the mind, only a contented agnosticism and the impulse towards Poetry and politics. But it would be too long a story, so
  I do not tell it here.

1.44_-_Serious_Style_of_A.C.,_or_the_Apparent_Frivolity_of_Some_of_my_Remarks, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  To this rule there is, as usual with rules, an exception. Some states of mind are of the same structure as Poetry, where the "one step from the sublime to the ridiculous" is an easy and fatal step. But even so, pedantry is as bad as ribaldry. Personally, I have tried to avoid the dilemma by the use of poetic language and form; for instance, in AHA!
  

1.69_-_Original_Sin, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  It was at Dover. I had passed the Customs Inspector. Turning back, I said: "But perhaps I ought to have declared my Browning?" Much agitated, he muttered: "How ever did I come to miss that?" and began all over again. I helped him out: "You see, you were thinking of pistols, I of Poetry." (There is a lesson in that!)
  

1.72_-_Education, #Magick Without Tears, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  Firstly, accustom his ear from the start to noble sounds; the music of nature and the rhythm of great Poetry. Do not aim at his understand- ing, but at his subconscious mind. Protect him from cacophonous noise; avoid scoring any cheap success with him by inflicting jingles; do not insult him by "baby-talk."
  
  --
  
  Books are not the only medium even of learning; more, what they teach is partial, prejudiced, meagre, sterile, uncertain, and alien to reality. It follows that all the best books are those which make no pretence to accuracy: Poetry, theatre, fiction. All others date. Another point is that Truth abides above and aloof from intellectual expression, and consequently those books which bear the Magic Keys of the Portal of the Intelligible by dint of inspiration and suggestion come more nearly to grips with Reality than those whose appeal is only to the Intellect. "Didactic" Poetry, "realistic" plays and novels, are contradictions in terms.
  

2.02_-_Meeting_With_the_Goddess, #The Hero with a Thousand Faces, #Joseph Campbell, #Mythology
  ness: aware ("gentle sympathy") it was named in the romantic
  courtly Poetry of tenth- to twelfth-century Japan.
  35

2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English, #Isha Upanishad, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  my liking also will begin to fade away. This sort of liking too
  is persistently given the great name and celebrated in Poetry &
  romance. Then if aesthetic gratification were all, my liking for a
  --
  are but dreams & imaginations. Human nature conscious of its
  divinity throws back the libel in scorn, and Poetry blesses &
  history confirms its verdict. That Love is nothing but the Self

2.03_-_VISIT_TO_VIDYASAGAR, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  PUNDIT ISWAR CHANDRA VIDYASAGAR was born in the village of Beersingh, not far from Kamarpukur, Sri Ramakrishna's birthplace. He was known as a great scholar, educator, writer, and philanthropist. One of the creators of modern Bengali, he was also well versed in Sanskrit grammar and Poetry. His generosity made his name a household word with his countrymen, most of his income being given in charity to widows, orphans, indigent students, and other needy people. Nor was his compassion limited to human beings: he stopped drinking milk for years so that the calves should not be deprived of it, and he would not drive in a carriage for fear of causing discomfort to the horses. He was a man of indomitable spirit, which he showed when he gave up the lucrative position of principal of the Sanskrit College of Calcutta because of a disagreement with the authorities. His affection for his mother was especially deep. One day, in the absence of a ferryboat, he swam a raging river at the risk of his life to fulfil her wish that he should be present at his brother's wedding. His whole life was one of utter simplicity. The title Vidyasagar, meaning "Ocean of Learning", was given him in recognition of his vast erudition.
  

2.1.02_-_Classification_of_the_Parts_of_the_Being, #Letters On Yoga I, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  *
  Higher Mind is one of the planes of the spiritual mind, the first and lowest of them; it is above the normal mental level. Inner mind is that which lies behind the surface mind (our ordinary mentality) and can only be directly experienced (apart from its vrittis in the surface mind such as philosophy, Poetry, idealism
  

2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman, #Essays Divine And Human, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  If man's knowledge and his way of knowledge are imperfect, still more imperfect are his living and his doing. [His] works sometimes attain perfection. Some men have done well in Poetry and the arts and crafts, more have done badly, most are conventional copyists or botchers. In science and works with a scientific basis, men have certainly done well and their works were often efficient or masterly, for there all is method and rule and there the human mind seeks to master and execute what he has to do and that he can always do. Few have insight in works, fewer have any originality.
  

2.17_-_The_Soul_and_Nature, #The Synthesis Of Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  This is the result of the integral knowledge taken in its mass; its work is to gather up the different strands of our being into the universal oneness. If we are to possess perfectly the world in our new divinised consciousness as the Divine himself possesses it, we have to know also each thing in its absoluteness, first by itself, secondly in its union with all that completes it; for so has the Divine imaged out and seen its being in the world. To see things as parts, as incomplete elements is a lower analytic knowledge. The Absolute is everywhere; it has to be seen and found everywhere. Every finite is an infinite and has to be known and sensed in its intrinsic infiniteness as well as in its surface finite appearance. But so to know the world, so to perceive and experience it, it is not enough to have an intellectual idea or imagination that so it is; a certain divine vision, divine sense, divine ecstasy is needed, an experience of union of ourselves with the objects of our consciousness. In that experience not only the Beyond but all here, not only the totality, the All in its mass, but each thing in the All becomes to us our self, God, the Absolute and Infinite, Sachchidananda. This is the secret of complete delight in God's world, complete satisfaction of the mind and heart and will, complete liberation of the consciousness. It is the supreme experience at which art and Poetry and all the various efforts of subjective and objective knowledge and all desire and effort to possess and enjoy objects are trying more or less obscurely to arrive; their attempt to seize the forms and properties and qualities of things is only a first movement which cannot give the deepest satisfaction unless by seizing them perfectly and absolutely they get the sense of the infinite reality of which these are the outer symbols. To the rational mind and the ordinary sense-experience this may well seem only a poetic fancy or a mystic hallucination; but the absolute satisfaction and sense of illumination which it gives and alone can give is really a proof of its greater validity; we get by that a ray from the higher consciousness and the diviner sense into which our subjective being is intended eventually, if we will only allow it, to be transfigured.
  

2.2.01_-_The_Problem_of_Consciousness, #Essays Divine And Human, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  281
   sentient and conscient being who not only becomes relatively aware of self and things, but can study them, discover their nature and process, determine and develop the possibilities of his own consciousness and the possibilities of the world's forces and processes, can will and can create, can ponder and philosophise, can write Poetry and create works of art, can use [?
  ] to modify and alter the world around him and make for himself a different life-environment, can look beyond Matter, can tend towards the heights of consciousness not yet developed, can envisage the Superconscient. If the consciousness that can do all this is not a force, a power in itself, it at least looks strangely like it. And we have the right, at least hypothetically, to study it as such a power or force and find out how far that leads us.

2.20_-_2.29_-_RULES_FOR_HOUSEHOLDERS_AND_MONKS, #The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, #Sri Ramakrishna, #Hinduism
  
  Proceeding to explain the verse he said: "The study of philosophy is indeed edifying, but Poetry is more fascinating than philosophy. People listening to good poems think of the study of philosophy-Vednta, Nyaya, Samkhya, and so forth as dry and insipid. Again, music is more attractive than Poetry. Music melts even a heart of stone. But a beautiful woman has an even greater attraction for a man's heart than music. Such a woman, passing by, diverts a man's attention from both Poetry and music. But when a man feels the pangs of hunger, everything else Poetry, music and woman appears as of no consequence. Thus, hunger is the most arresting thing."
  

2.2.03_-_The_Psychic_Being, #Letters On Yoga I, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  In ordinary parlance we may sometimes use the word psychic in the looser popular sense or in Poetry, which is not bound to intellectual accuracy, we may speak of the soul sometimes in the ordinary and more external sense or in the sense of the true psyche.
  

2.24_-_The_Evolution_of_the_Spiritual_Man, #The Life Divine, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  IN THE earliest stages of evolutionary Nature we are met by the dumb secrecy of her inconscience; there is no revelation of any significance or purpose in her works, no hint of any other principles of being than that first formulation which is her immediate preoccupation and seems to be for ever her only business: for in her primal works Matter alone appears, the sole dumb and stark cosmic reality. A Witness of creation, if there had been one conscious but uninstructed, would only have seen appearing out of a vast abyss of an apparent non-existence an Energy busy with the creation of Matter, a material world and material objects, organising the infinity of the Inconscient into the scheme of a boundless universe or a system of countless universes that stretched around him into Space without any certain end or limit, a tireless creation of nebulae and star-clusters and suns and planets, existing only for itself, without a sense in it, empty of cause or purpose. It might have seemed to him a stupendous machinery without a use, a mighty meaningless movement, an aeonic spectacle without a witness, a cosmic edifice without an inhabitant; for he would have seen no sign of an indwelling Spirit, no being for whose delight it was made. A creation of this kind could only be the outcome of an inconscient Energy or an illusion-cinema, a shadow play or puppet play of forms reflected on a superconscient indifferent Absolute. He would have seen no evidence of a soul and no hint of mind or life in this immeasurable and interminable display of Matter. It would not have seemed to him possible or imaginable that there could at all be in this desert universe for ever inanimate and insensible an outbreak of teeming life, a first vibration of something occult and incalculable, alive and conscious, a secret spiritual entity feeling its way towards the surface.
  But after some aeons, looking out once more on that vain panorama, he might have detected in one small corner at least of the universe this phenomenon, a corner where Matter had been prepared, its operations sufficiently fixed, organised, made stable, adapted as a scene of a new development, - the phenomenon of a living matter, a life in things that had emerged and become visible: but still the Witness would have understood nothing, for evolutionary Nature still veils her secret. He would have seen a Nature concerned only with establishing this outburst of life, this new creation, but life living for itself with no significance in it, - a wanton and abundant creatrix busy scattering the seed of her new power and establishing a multitude of its forms in a beautiful and luxurious profusion or, later, multiplying endlessly genus and species for the pure pleasure of creation: a small touch of lively colour and movement would have been flung into the immense cosmic desert and nothing more. The Witness could not have imagined that a thinking mind would appear in this minute island of life, that a consciousness could awake in the Inconscient, a new and greater subtler vibration come to the surface and betray more clearly the existence of the submerged Spirit. It would have seemed to him at first that Life had somehow become aware of itself and that was all; for this scanty new-born mind seemed to be only a servant of life, a contrivance to help life to live, a machinery for its maintenance, for attack and defence, for certain needs and vital satisfactions, for the liberation of life-instinct and life-impulse. It could not have seemed possible to him that in this little life, so inconspicuous amid the immensities, in one sole species out of this petty multitude, a mental being would emerge, a mind serving life still but also making life and matter its servants, using them for the fulfilment of its own ideas, will, wishes, - a mental being who would create all manner of utensils, tools, instruments out of Matter for all kinds of utilities, erect out of it cities, houses, temples, theatres, laboratories, factories, chisel from it statues and carve cave-cathedrals, invent architecture, sculpture, painting, Poetry and a hundred crafts and arts, discover the mathematics and physics of the universe and the hidden secret of its structure, live for the sake of mind and its interests, for thought and knowledge, develop into the thinker, the philosopher and scientist and, as a supreme defiance to the reign of Matter, awake in himself to the hidden Godhead, become the hunter after the invisible, the mystic and the spiritual seeker.
  But if after several ages or cycles the Witness had looked again and seen this miracle in full process, even then perhaps, obscured by his original experience of the sole reality of Matter in the universe, he would still not have understood; it would still seem impossible to him that the hidden Spirit could wholly emerge, complete in its consciousness, and dwell upon the earth as the self-knower and world-knower, Nature's ruler and possessor. "Impossible!" he might say, "all that has happened is nothing much, a little bubbling of sensitive grey stuff of brain, a queer freak in a bit of inanimate Matter moving about on a small dot in the Universe." On the contrary, a new Witness intervening at the end of the story, informed of the past developments but unobsessed by the deception of the beginning, might cry out,

2.3.05_-_Sadhana_through_Work_for_the_Mother, #The Mother With Letters On The Mother, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  I do not know to what you refer as regards X, - his Poetry was inspired by us and he felt it and it certainly helped several people; to that extent he was an effective instrument for the work so long as he was in the right attitude. Naturally, it is for the work that one can be an instrument, not for things like sex which have nothing to do with the Yoga or the work. But the real instrumentality begins when the consciousness of the Force
  30 October 1935 working begins within.
  --
  *
  The little experience I have of sadhana through works makes me incline to the view that work as sadhana is the most difficult of all. I don't remember any experience got through it nor can I remember that I am doing the Mother's work; whereas in Poetry, though I may be unlucky as regards experiences, when one writes a poem one does try to think of her, at least mentally. I can even say that it is only by thinking of her that
  I can compose the lines.

2.3.10_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Inconscient, #Letters On Yoga I, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  *
  What he [a correspondent] has written about the subconscient and the outer nature is true. But the role of subliminal forces cannot be said to be small, since from there come all the greater aspirations, ideals, strivings towards a better self and better humanity without which man would be only a thinking animal - as also most of the art, Poetry, philosophy, thirst for knowledge which relieve if they do not yet dispel the ignorance.
  

3.01_-_Towards_the_Future, #On Education, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
   splendour of union towards the conquest of earthly immortality. It will be beautiful and truly universal, don't you think?
  It is high time that art should stop being a justification for ugliness and defeat... What a happy day it will be when Poetry, painting and music express only beauty, victory and joy, leading the way towards the realisation of the future, towards the advent of a world in which falsehood and suffering, ugliness and death will be no more... But meanwhile, how much misery still for man, how much pain and anguish and bitter solitude... It is terrible! Each one has his burden to bear, come what may, whether he wants it or not. (He stands deep in thought.)
  SHE (approaching him affectionately and putting her hand on his arm)
  --
  PAINTER
  What a wonderful coincidence! Yesterday evening I was introduced to this young lady and she seems to be very charming indeed. We had a long chat together and in the course of the conversation she expressed her admiration for your Poetry, which she seems to read with enthusiasm. She also told me that she is all alone in life, that she has to fend for herself and that sometimes she finds it difficult to pull through, and so on. She dreams of becoming a concert-singer. I immediately thought of you and all your connections. Everyone knows how obliging you are. So I volunteered to speak to you about her and to ask
  458

3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  One feels like a schoolboy caught red-handed in the act of writing
  Poetry. There is the same sort of feeling as one has when one finds
  a faded photograph or a lock of hair twenty years old among the

3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  
  1. First-rate Poetry is easily memorized because the ideas and the musical values
  correspond to mans mental and sensory structure.
  --
  We may therefore admit quite cheerfully that Magick is
  as mysterious as mathematics, as empirical as Poetry, as
  uncertain as golf, and as dependent on the personal equation

3.1.01_-_The_Problem_of_Suffering_and_Evil, #Letters On Yoga I, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Letters on Yoga - I
   of the present and "No farther" and when the fixed line of the present is unfixed and overpassed, it again erects a new line and cries "No farther". If an "elemental" who had attained to the physical mind had been present at the different stages of the earth-history he would have argued like that. When only matter was there and there was no life, if told that there would soon be life on earth embodied in matter, he would have cried out, "What is that? It is impossible, it cannot be done. Life is possible only in a subtle body. It has never been and never will be embodied in gross matter. What, this mass of electrons, gases, chemical elements, this heap of mud and water and stones and inert metals, how are you going to get life in that? Will the metal walk? can the stone live? will you take mud and water and make out of it a body that can move, feel, act, desire?" But life came in spite of the impossibility and living forms were developed - plant and tree and living bodies were built out of the protoplasm and molecule; some ingenious force or being evolved slowly out of that through millions of years with an amazing patience, using chemical and biological elements alike, gene and gland and heart and brain and nerve and cell and living tissue and the animal walked and bounded and man arose evolving through tens of thousands, perhaps millions of years in the body of an erect two-footed animal. There again the physical-minded elemental would have intervened and cried out, "What is this that is being attempted? No, no, impossible. Such a thing has never been done. Reflexes, memories, associations, instinctive combinations of life and action, these things of course are possible; but reason, intelligent will, conscious planning and creation, art, Poetry, philosophy in this savage shambling creature? An animal cannot evolve powers and activities which have never been possessed except by the gods and the Asuras. How can this material animal organism ever be capable of such a [incomplete]
  

3.16.1_-_Of_the_Oath, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  4. There is also the question of the identity of the two impulses, implied in much
  classical Poetry; half stated by Schopenhauer, and declared openly and with much
  grotesque distortion, by Freud and his school. The biologists also discovered the

3.19_-_Of_Dramatic_Rituals, #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
  long periods of silence.
  It will be noticed that in these Rites Poetry and music were
  largely employedmostly published pieces by well-known authors
  --
  
  1. [Large quantities of Crowleys own Poetry were also used.]
  2. PERHAPS! One can think of certain Awful Consequences. But, after all,

3-5_Full_Circle, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  30. The giant corporations and monopolistic trade unions are fully as disintegrative, intensifying the system's malfunction (see Mintz, Morton, and J. S. Cohen, with a preface by Ralph Nader, "America, Inc.--Who Owns and Operates the United States," Dial Press, New York, 197I.)
  31. Nicolson, Marjorie Hope, The Breaking of the Circle--Studies in the E,~"ect of the `New Science' upon Seventeenth Century Poetry. pp. XXI, Northwestern Univ. Press, Evanston, Illinois, I950.
  32. "In this Satanic world, the false always appears first and imitates the truth, thus confusing people." Young Oon Kim. (See Kim, Young Oon, Divine Principle and its Application, H.S.A.U.W.C., 1611 Upshur St., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20011, 1969.

3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations, #Hymns to the Mystic Fire, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  deserves it" will make a good grammatical sense, but very poor
  Poetry & no philosophical significance. The Buddhist Arhat certainly did not mean merely a deserving person; it meant one
  extremely exalted, or one who had risen high above the world.
  --
  as in Greek mythology Apollo the Sungod is also the Master of
  Poetry and of prophecy. Ghrita means clarified butter, but also
  the bright thing; soma means the wine of the moon plant, but
  --
  food and material wealth? This is not only wilfully to degrade
  and materialize the lofty language of the Poetry, but to make the
  whole sense and expression clumsy, blundering and incoherent,

4.0_-_NOTES_TO_ZARATHUSTRA, #Twilight of the Idols, #Friedrich Nietzsche, #Philosophy
  (Premonitions of the future! We must celebrate the future and no longer
  the past! We must compose the myth Poetry of the future! We must live
  in hopes!) Blessed moments I And then we must once again pull down the

4.1.01_-_The_Intellect_and_Yoga, #Letters On Yoga I, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Art, Poetry, music are not Yoga, not in themselves things spiritual any more than philosophy either is a thing spiritual or science. There lurks here another curious incapacity of the modern intellect - its inability to distinguish between mind and spirit, its readiness to mistake mental, moral and aesthetic idealisms for spirituality and their inferior degrees for spiritual values. It is mere truth that the mental intuitions of the metaphysician or the poet for the most part fall far short of a concrete spiritual experience; they are distant flickers, shadowy reflections, not rays from the centre of Light. It is not less true that, looked at from the peaks, there is not much difference between the high mental eminences and the lower climbings of this external existence. All the energies of the Lila are equal in the sight from above, all are disguises of the Divine. But one has to add that all can be turned into a first means towards the realisation of the Divine. A philosophic statement about the Atman is a mental formula, not knowledge, not experience: yet sometimes the Divine takes it as a channel of touch; strangely, a barrier in the mind breaks down, something is seen, a profound change operated in some inner part, there enters into the ground of the nature something calm, equal, ineffable. One stands upon a mountain ridge and glimpses or mentally feels a wideness, a pervasiveness, a nameless Vast in Nature; then suddenly there comes the touch, a revelation, a flooding, the mental loses itself
  
  --
   in the spiritual, one bears the first invasion of the Infinite. Or you stand before a temple of Kali beside a sacred river and see what?
  - a sculpture, a gracious piece of architecture, but in a moment mysteriously, unexpectedly there is instead a Presence, a Power, a Face that looks into yours, an inner sight in you has regarded the World-Mother Similar touches can come too through art, music, Poetry to their creator or to one who feels the shock of the word, the hidden significance of a form, a message in the sound that carries more perhaps than was consciously meant by the composer. All things in the Lila can turn into windows that open on the hidden Reality. Still so long as one is satisfied with looking through windows, the gain is only initial; one day one will have to take up the pilgrim's staff and start out to journey there where the Reality is for ever manifest and present.
  
  Still less can it be spiritually satisfying to remain with shadowy reflections; a search imposes itself for the Light which they strive to figure. But since this Reality and this Light are in ourselves no less than in some high region above the mortal plane, we can in the seeking for it use many of the figures and activities of Life; as one offers a flower, a prayer, an act to the Divine, one can offer too a created form of beauty, a song, a poem, an image, a strain of music, and gain through it a contact, a response or an experience. And when that divine Consciousness has been entered or when it grows within, then too its expression in life through these things is not excluded from Yoga; these creative activities can still have their place, though not intrinsically a greater place than any other that can be put to divine use and service. Art, Poetry, music, as they are in their ordinary functioning, create mental and vital, not spiritual values; but they can be turned to a higher end, and then, like all things that are capable of linking our consciousness to the Divine, they are transmuted and become spiritual and can be admitted as part of a life of Yoga. All takes new values not from itself, but from the consciousness that uses it; for there is only one thing essential, needful, indispensable, to grow conscious of the Divine Reality and live in it and live it always.
  

4.1.1.05_-_The_Central_Process_of_the_Yoga, #Letters On Yoga III, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  The real Self is not anywhere on the surface but deep within and above. Within is the soul supporting an inner mind, inner vital, inner physical in which there is a capacity for universal wideness and with it for the things now asked for, - direct contact with the Truth of self and things, taste of a universal bliss, liberation from the imprisoned smallness and sufferings of the gross physical body. Even in Europe the existence of something behind the surface is now very frequently admitted, but its nature is mistaken and it is called subconscient or subliminal, while really it is very conscious in its own way and not subliminal but only behind the veil. It is, according to our psychology, connected with the small outer personality by certain centres of consciousness of which we become aware by Yoga. Only a little of the inner being escapes through these centres into the outer life, but that little is the best part of ourselves and responsible for our art, Poetry, philosophy, ideals, religious aspirations, efforts at knowledge and perfection. But the inner centres are, for the most part, closed or asleep - to open them and make them awake and active is one aim of Yoga. As they open, the powers and possibilities of the inner being also are aroused in us; we awake first to a larger consciousness and then to a cosmic consciousness; we are no longer little separate personalities with limited lives but centres of a universal action and in direct contact with cosmic forces. Moreover, instead of being unwilling playthings of the latter, as is the surface person, we can become to a certain extent conscious and masters of the play of nature
  - how far this goes depending on the development of the inner being and its opening upward to the higher spiritual levels. At the same time the opening of the heart centre releases the psychic being which proceeds to make us aware of the Divine within us and of the higher Truth above us.

4.2.3.05_-_Obstacles_to_the_Psychic's_Emergence, #Letters On Yoga III, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  When the time comes for the definite opening and removal of the purdah between the inner and the outer man, I think I can promise you that you will find your power of Yoga and
  Yogic experience at least as unexpectedly complete as you, and others, have found your power for Poetry - though necessarily its working out will take time, because it is not a detail but the whole life and the whole nature in which there must be the divine victory.
  

5.02_-_Perfection_of_the_Body, #Essays In Philosophy And Yoga, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  
  Here the lower perfection will not disappear; it will remain but will be enlarged and transformed by the higher perfection which only the power of the spirit can give. This will be evident if we consider Poetry and art, philosophic thought, the perfection of the written word or the perfect organisation of earthly life: these have to be taken up and the possibilities already achieved or whatever perfection has already been attained included in a new and greater perfection but with the larger vision and inspiration of a spiritual consciousness and with new forms and powers. It must be the same with the perfection of the body.
  

5.4.02_-_Occult_Powers_or_Siddhis, #Letters On Yoga I, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
   or abnormal, but rather their normal way of seeing and acting, part of the consciousness - and how can they be forbidden or refuse to act according to their consciousness and its nature?
  I suppose I have had myself an even more completely European education than you and I have had too my period of agnostic denial, but from the moment I looked at these things I could never take the attitude of doubt and disbelief which was for so long fashionable in Europe. Abnormal, otherwise supraphysical experiences and powers, occult or Yogic, have always seemed to me something perfectly natural and credible. Consciousness in its very nature could not be limited by the ordinary physical human-animal consciousness; it must have other ranges. Yogic or occult powers are no more supernatural or incredible than is supernatural or incredible the power to write a great poem or compose great music. Few people can do it, as things are, - not even one in a million; for Poetry and music come from the inner being and to write or to compose true and great things one has to have the passage clear between the outer mind and something in the inner being. That is why you got the poetic power as soon as you began Yoga - Yoga-force made the passage clear. It is the same with Yogic consciousness and its powers; the thing is to get the passage clear, - for they are already there within you.
  

Aeneid, #unset, #Sri Aurobindo, #Integral Yoga
  Man's Notebook) appeared with an additional 27 "Final Choruses
  for the Promised Land." In the mid-50's I had translated and introduced the 1950 Promised Land in Poetry and then in a volume of
  Ungaretti's selected poems called Life of a Man; and the final
  --
  others, but then speaks only as himself. Yeats, at a critical point in
  his own work, in 1909, noted that: "Our modern Poetry is imaginative. It is the Poetry of the young. The Poetry of the greatest periods
  is a sustained expression of the appetites and habits. Hence we select where they exhausted." Virgil does not swarm with the "appetites and habits" that pack Homer and Dante and Shakespeare. He
  --
  casts. He seems to lie on the nearnot farside of Wordsworth's
  watershed for modern Poetry: "The feeling therein developed gives
  importance to the action and situation, and not the action and situation to the feeling." But he is "sustained," and is not "of the young"
  --
  of his selection and imagination seems to involve what I think of as
  premature stripping, where the other world of Poetry takes over before this world is known: Virgil selects after his knowing this
  world. For this, he is a name-giver whose letters and syllables seem
  --
  Fortunate pair! If there be any power
  within my Poetry, no day shall ever
  erase you from the memory of time;
  --
  the site of a cult of Juno, vn, 959.
  Calli'ope muse of epic Poetry, ix, 696.
  Ca'lybe aged priestess of Juno at Juno's Rutulian temple; her
  --
  
  E 'rato a Muse whose principal association is with love Poetry. It
  has been suggested that she is involved in Book vn because the
  --
  1952), and Duckworth's recent Vergil and Classical Hexameter
  Poetry: A Study in Metrical Variety (Ann Arbor, 1969); Kenneth
  Quinn, * Latin Explorations (London 1963), for Chapter 2 on Dido
  --
  Worstbrock, Elemente einer Poetik der Aeneis (Miinster, Westf.
  1963); Brooks Otis, * Virgil, A Study in Civilized Poetry (Oxford
  1963 on title page, 1964 on copyright page); Georg Nicolaus Knauer,
  --
  Introduzione alia lettura di Virgilio (Naples 1965); Michael C. J.
  Putnam, * The Poetry of the Aeneid (Cambridge, Mass. 1966), on
  Books 2, 5, 8, 12; Steele Commager, ed., * Virgil: A Collection of
  --
  Bantam); the Odyssey of Homer (now Bantam); the Metamorphoses
  of Ovid, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry; Ovid in Sicily;
  Selected Poems of Giuseppe Ungaretti; Selected Writings ofSalvatore
  Quasimodo; and David Maria Turoldo. Mandelbaum is co-editor
  with Robert Richardson of Three Centuries of American Poetry
  (Bantam Books) and was co-editor, with Yehuda Amichai, of the
  eight volumes of the JPS Jewish Poetry Series. After his Ph.D. from
  Columbia, he was in the Society of Fellows at Harvard. While

Agenda_Vol_11, #The Mothers Agenda, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Because you are the body of the earth!... Because this is really the Hope.
  Oh, isnt that Poetry?
  Of course not, Mother! Thats how it IS. One just has to see: the outer world is more and more

Agenda_Vol_2, #The Mothers Agenda, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  O lucky man! What joy!
  You know, Savitri is an exact description - not literature, not Poetry (although the form is very
  poetical) - an exact description, step by step, paragraph by paragraph, page by page; as I read, I relived
  --
  But in this 'Sri Aurobindo,' you understand, I would like to make his whole poetic aspect stand out,
  that Poetry which is like the Veda, like a revelation, so a bit of space is required: it can't be
  squeezed into a few lines, or reduced to a skeleton.
  This analogy between the ancient form of spiritual revelations and Savitri, this blossoming into Poetry
  of his prophetic revelation is... what could be called the most exceptional part of his work. And what is
  --
  could let go of something (I don't know what), then suddenly it would be: ah! It's done, it's all done,
  255Not including Poetry.
  

Agenda_Vol_3, #The Mothers Agenda, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  Maya. Form is there because it is indispensable. We do not want to rule out any activity of the world as
  beyond our province. Politics, industry, society, Poetry, literature, art will all remain, but we must give
  them a new soul and a new form.
  --
  atmosphere, for I love that atmosphere. It will give me an hour of concentration, and I'll see if by
  chance.... I have no gift for Poetry, but I'll see if it comes! (It surely won't come from a mentality
  developed in this present existence - there's no poetic gift!) So it's interesting, I'll see if anything
  --
  It comes.
  It would be all right if I was writing stories or Poetry, but to write something that has to hang
  together....

Agenda_Vol_4, #The Mothers Agenda, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  of her translation)
  It isn't thought out, it just comes. It's probably not Poetry, not even free verse, but it does contain
  something.
  --
  in the rhythm of the sound. I don't know what rhythm they use now, nor have I read what Sri
  Aurobindo wrote in The Future Poetry. They tell me that Savitri's verse follows a certain rule he
  explained on the number of stresses in each line (and for this you should pronounce in the pure English
  --
  there were two morons here who fancied correcting him - while he was alive! (A. especially, he's a
  poet.) Hence all those Letters on Poetry Sri Aurobindo wrote. I've always refused to read them - I find
  it outrageous. He was forced to explain a whole "poetic technique" - the very idea! It's just the

Agenda_Vol_5, #The Mothers Agenda, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  been a mixture.
  Oh, if we wanted to make Poetry (it's no longer a philosophical or spiritual way of seeing, but a
  pictorial way), we could imagine a Lord who is a totality of all the possible and impossible
  --
  able to change that, another Power is needed. I will nonetheless write that Sannyasin, but afterwards
  nothing but tales or Poetry.
  

Agenda_Vol_6, #The Mothers Agenda, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  (Mother shows a box of candy-pink writing paper she has just received.)
  Pretty paper... to write Poetry on!
  Will you write?
  Me! I am no poet!
  The first Poetry I was able to appreciate in my life was Savitri. Previously, I was closed. To me it
  was always words: hollow, hollow, hollow, just words - words for words' sake. So as a sound it's

Agenda_Vol_7, #The Mothers Agenda, #The Mother, #Integral Yoga
  saw F. and Pavitra embracing each other! Just like that. Then F. entered him. And the interesting thing
  is that Pavitra had no liking for Poetry and very little interest in art, and after that boy united with him,
  he began having a very special understanding of Poetry and showing interest in art! He really felt a
  change in him (I hadn't told him what had happened).
  --
  at the top of the forehead), than the metaphysical expression ("metaphysical" is a way of putting it).
  Images. That is, Poetry. There is in it an almost more direct access to that inexpressible Vibration. I see
  Sri Aurobindo's expression in its poetic form, it has a charm and a simplicity - a simplicity and a
  --
  intellectual way, which appeals to people's intellectual consciousness, I'd like to say it in a deeper
  way, which is a rhythm (people call it "Poetry," but as for me I don't understand a thing about
  Poetry). What I'd like is to express an inner rhythm, to touch another layer of the being, deeper
  than those things of the intellect. "The Adventure of Consciousness" appeals to people's intellectual

APPENDIX_I_-_Curriculum_of_A._A., #Liber ABA, #Aleister Crowley, #Philosophy
      Oriental Classics generally.
      Sufi Poetry generally.
      Scandinavian and Teutonic Sagas generally.

change font "color":
change "background-color":
change "font-family": 44661 site hits