classes ::: Question, Interrogative, adverb, exclamation, noun,
children ::: MISSING NAME - related to why read Savitri and Savitri (ode)
branches ::: Why, Why God, why remembrance

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object:Why
class:Question
class:Interrogative
word class:adverb
word class:exclamation
word class:noun

why?
why is?


see also :::

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now begins generated list of local instances, definitions, quotes, instances in chapters, wordnet info if available and instances among weblinks


OBJECT INSTANCES [0] - TOPICS - AUTHORS - BOOKS - CHAPTERS - CLASSES - SEE ALSO - SIMILAR TITLES

TOPICS
SEE ALSO


AUTH

BOOKS
Advanced_Integral
A_Treatise_on_Cosmic_Fire
Awaken_the_Giant_Within
Big_Mind,_Big_Heart
City_of_God
DND_DM_Guide_5E
Enchiridion_text
Essential_Integral
Evolution_II
Full_Circle
General_Principles_of_Kabbalah
God_Exists
Heart_of_Matter
Infinite_Library
Integral_Life_Practice_(book)
Know_Yourself
Letters_On_Yoga
Letters_On_Yoga_IV
Liber_157_-_The_Tao_Teh_King
Life_without_Death
Magick_Without_Tears
Meditation__The_First_and_Last_Freedom
Modern_Man_in_Search_of_a_Soul
My_Burning_Heart
On_Belief
On_Interpretation
On_Thoughts_And_Aphorisms
Philosophy_of_Dreams
Plotinus_-_Complete_Works_Vol_01
Process_and_Reality
Questions_And_Answers_1953
Questions_And_Answers_1954
Questions_And_Answers_1957-1958
Savitri
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(toc)
Spiral_Dynamics
The_Act_of_Creation
The_Bible
The_Blue_Cliff_Records
the_Book
The_Book_of_Light
The_Diamond_Sutra
The_Divine_Companion
The_Divine_Milieu
The_Divinization_of_Matter__Lurianic_Kabbalah,_Physics,_and_the_Supramental_Transformation
The_Essential_Songs_of_Milarepa
The_Gateless_Gate
The_Heros_Journey
The_Imitation_of_Christ
The_Interpretation_of_Dreams
The_Republic
The_Seals_of_Wisdom
The_Tibetan_Yogas_of_Dream_and_Sleep
The_Use_and_Abuse_of_History
The_Way_of_Perfection
The_Wit_and_Wisdom_of_Alfred_North_Whitehead
The_Yoga_Sutras
Toward_the_Future

IN CHAPTERS TITLE
07.17_-_Why_Do_We_Forget_Things?
07.20_-_Why_are_Dreams_Forgotten?
1.48_-_Morals_of_AL_-_Hard_to_Accept,_and_Why_nevertheless_we_Must_Concur
1.50_-_A.C._and_the_Masters;_Why_they_Chose_him,_etc.
1.76_-_The_Gods_-_How_and_Why_they_Overlap
1.77_-_Work_Worthwhile_-_Why?
1954-08-04_-_Servant_and_worker_-_Justification_of_weakness_-_Play_of_the_Divine_-_Why_are_you_here_in_the_Ashram?
1956-12-12_-_paradoxes_-_Nothing_impossible_-_unfolding_universe,_the_Eternal_-_Attention,_concentration,_effort_-_growth_capacity_almost_unlimited_-_Why_things_are_not_the_same_-_will_and_willings_-_Suggestions,_formations_-_vital_world
1957-01-09_-_God_is_essentially_Delight_-_God_and_Nature_play_at_hide-and-seek_-__Why,_and_when,_are_you_grave?
1957-01-16_-_Seeking_something_without_knowing_it_-_Why_are_we_here?
1.bsf_-_Why_do_you_roam_the_jungles?
1.hcyc_-_24_-_Why_should_this_be_better_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hs_-_Why_Carry?
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Why_Did_I_Laugh_Tonight?
1.kbr_-_Friend,_Wake_Up!_Why_Do_You_Go_On_Sleeping?
1.kbr_-_Hey_Brother,_Why_Do_You_Want_Me_To_Talk?
1.kbr_-_Hey_brother,_why_do_you_want_me_to_talk?
1.kbr_-_I_Talk_To_My_Inner_Lover,_And_I_Say,_Why_Such_Rush?
1.mb_-_Why_Mira_Cant_Come_Back_to_Her_Old_House
1.okym_-_25_-_Why,_all_the_Saints_and_Sages_who_discussd
1.okym_-_29_-_Into_this_Universe,_and_Why_not_knowing
1.okym_-_46_-_later_edition_-_Why,_be_this_Juice_the_growth_of_God,_who_dare_Why,_be_this_Juice_the_growth_of_God,_who_dare
1.okym_-_51_-_later_edition_-_Why,_if_the_Soul_can_fling_the_Dust_aside
1.okym_-_62_-_Another_said_--_Why,_neer_a_peevish_Boy
1.rb_-_Why_I_Am_a_Liberal
1.rmpsd_-_Meditate_on_Kali!_Why_be_anxious?
1.rmpsd_-_Why_disappear_into_formless_trance?
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_LXXXI_-_Why_Do_You_Whisper_So_Faintly
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_XXI_-_Why_Did_He_Choose
1.rt_-_When_And_Why
1.wby_-_Why_Should_Not_Old_Men_Be_Mad?
2.09_-_SEVEN_REASONS_WHY_A_SCIENTIST_BELIEVES_IN_GOD
CASE_4_-_WAKUANS_WHY_NO_BEARD?
ENNEAD_02.08_-_Of_Sight,_or_of_Why_Distant_Objects_Seem_Small.

IN CHAPTERS CLASSNAME

IN CHAPTERS TEXT
0_0.01_-_Introduction
00.01_-_The_Approach_to_Mysticism
00.01_-_The_Mother_on_Savitri
00.02_-_Mystic_Symbolism
0_0.02_-_Topographical_Note
00.03_-_Upanishadic_Symbolism
000_-_Humans_in_Universe
0.00_-_INTRODUCTION
0.00_-_The_Book_of_Lies_Text
0.00_-_THE_GOSPEL_PREFACE
0.01f_-_FOREWARD
0.01_-_Letters_from_the_Mother_to_Her_Son
0.02_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.03_-_Letters_to_My_little_smile
0.04_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.05_-_Letters_to_a_Child
0.06_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Sadhak
0.07_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.08_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
0.09_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Teacher
01.01_-_The_Symbol_Dawn
01.02_-_Natures_Own_Yoga
01.02_-_Sri_Aurobindo_-_Ahana_and_Other_Poems
01.03_-_Mystic_Poetry
01.04_-_The_Poetry_in_the_Making
01.04_-_The_Secret_Knowledge
01.07_-_Blaise_Pascal_(1623-1662)
01.07_-_The_Bases_of_Social_Reconstruction
01.08_-_Walter_Hilton:_The_Scale_of_Perfection
0.10_-_Letters_to_a_Young_Captain
01.10_-_Principle_and_Personality
01.12_-_Goethe
0.11_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0.12_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0.13_-_Letters_to_a_Student
0.14_-_Letters_to_a_Sadhak
0_1954-08-25_-_what_is_this_personality?_and_when_will_she_come?
0_1955-04-04
0_1955-06-09
0_1956-03-19
0_1956-05-02
0_1956-09-14
0_1956-10-07
0_1956-12-26
0_1957-07-03
0_1957-09-27
0_1957-10-08
0_1958-01-01
0_1958-06-06_-_Supramental_Ship
0_1958-07-05
0_1958-07-06
0_1958-08-07
0_1958-09-16_-_OM_NAMO_BHAGAVATEH
0_1958-10-04
0_1958-10-10
0_1958-10-25_-_to_go_out_of_your_body
0_1958-11-04_-_Myths_are_True_and_Gods_exist_-_mental_formation_and_occult_faculties_-_exteriorization_-_work_in_dreams
0_1958-11-08
0_1958-11-11
0_1958-11-15
0_1958-11-26
0_1958-11-27_-_Intermediaries_and_Immediacy
0_1958-12-15_-_tantric_mantra_-_125,000
0_1958_12_-_Floor_1,_young_girl,_we_shall_kill_the_young_princess_-_black_tent
0_1959-01-21
0_1959-03-10_-_vital_dagger,_vital_mass
0_1959-04-07
0_1959-05-28
0_1959-06-07
0_1959-06-09
0_1959-06-13a
0_1959-10-06_-_Sri_Aurobindos_abode
0_1959-10-15
0_1960-01-31
0_1960-03-03
0_1960-04-20
0_1960-05-16
0_1960-05-21_-_true_purity_-_you_have_to_be_the_Divine_to_overcome_hostile_forces
0_1960-05-24_-_supramental_flood
0_1960-05-28_-_death_of_K_-_the_death_process-_the_subtle_physical
0_1960-06-04
0_1960-06-07
0_1960-07-23_-_The_Flood_and_the_race_-_turning_back_to_guide_and_save_amongst_the_torrents_-_sadhana_vs_tamas_and_destruction_-_power_of_giving_and_offering_-_Japa,_7_lakhs,_140000_per_day,_1_crore_takes_20_years
0_1960-08-10_-_questions_from_center_of_Education_-_reading_Sri_Aurobindo
0_1960-09-20
0_1960-10-08
0_1960-10-11
0_1960-10-15
0_1960-10-19
0_1960-10-22
0_1960-10-25
0_1960-10-30
0_1960-11-08
0_1960-11-15
0_1960-11-26
0_1960-12-17
0_1960-12-31
0_1961-01-10
0_1961-01-12
0_1961-01-24
0_1961-01-31
0_1961-02-04
0_1961-02-11
0_1961-02-18
0_1961-02-25
0_1961-03-04
0_1961-03-11
0_1961-03-17
0_1961-03-21
0_1961-03-25
0_1961-03-27
0_1961-04-07
0_1961-04-08
0_1961-04-15
0_1961-04-18
0_1961-04-25
0_1961-04-29
0_1961-05-02
0_1961-05-12
0_1961-05-19
0_1961-06-02
0_1961-06-06
0_1961-06-17
0_1961-06-20
0_1961-06-24
0_1961-06-27
0_1961-07-04
0_1961-07-07
0_1961-07-15
0_1961-07-18
0_1961-07-28
0_1961-08-02
0_1961-08-05
0_1961-08-08
0_1961-08-25
0_1961-09-10
0_1961-09-16
0_1961-09-30
0_1961-10-02
0_1961-10-15
0_1961-10-30
0_1961-11-05
0_1961-11-07
0_1961-11-12
0_1961-12-16
0_1961-12-20
0_1962-01-09
0_1962-01-27
0_1962-02-03
0_1962-02-06
0_1962-02-09
0_1962-02-17
0_1962-02-24
0_1962-02-27
0_1962-03-06
0_1962-03-11
0_1962-05-15
0_1962-05-18
0_1962-05-27
0_1962-05-29
0_1962-05-31
0_1962-06-06
0_1962-06-09
0_1962-06-12
0_1962-06-23
0_1962-06-27
0_1962-06-30
0_1962-07-04
0_1962-07-07
0_1962-07-11
0_1962-07-14
0_1962-07-21
0_1962-07-25
0_1962-08-04
0_1962-08-08
0_1962-08-14
0_1962-08-25
0_1962-08-28
0_1962-08-31
0_1962-09-05
0_1962-09-08
0_1962-09-15
0_1962-09-26
0_1962-10-06
0_1962-10-12
0_1962-10-16
0_1962-10-27
0_1962-10-30
0_1962-11-07
0_1962-11-14
0_1962-11-17
0_1962-11-20
0_1962-11-27
0_1962-12-04
0_1962-12-08
0_1962-12-12
0_1962-12-15
0_1962-12-25
0_1963-01-02
0_1963-01-12
0_1963-01-14
0_1963-01-30
0_1963-02-15
0_1963-02-19
0_1963-02-23
0_1963-03-06
0_1963-03-09
0_1963-03-13
0_1963-03-23
0_1963-03-27
0_1963-04-20
0_1963-05-11
0_1963-05-15
0_1963-05-18
0_1963-05-25
0_1963-05-29
0_1963-06-08
0_1963-06-15
0_1963-06-19
0_1963-06-22
0_1963-06-26a
0_1963-06-29
0_1963-07-03
0_1963-07-06
0_1963-07-10
0_1963-07-13
0_1963-07-17
0_1963-07-27
0_1963-08-03
0_1963-08-07
0_1963-08-10
0_1963-08-13a
0_1963-08-13b
0_1963-08-24
0_1963-08-31
0_1963-09-04
0_1963-09-07
0_1963-09-18
0_1963-09-25
0_1963-09-28
0_1963-10-05
0_1963-10-16
0_1963-10-19
0_1963-11-04
0_1963-11-13
0_1963-11-20
0_1963-11-23
0_1963-11-27
0_1963-12-03
0_1963-12-11
0_1963-12-14
0_1963-12-21
0_1964-01-04
0_1964-01-15
0_1964-01-18
0_1964-01-22
0_1964-01-28
0_1964-02-26
0_1964-03-04
0_1964-03-07
0_1964-03-18
0_1964-03-25
0_1964-03-28
0_1964-04-04
0_1964-04-08
0_1964-05-02
0_1964-05-17
0_1964-06-28
0_1964-07-18
0_1964-07-22
0_1964-07-25
0_1964-07-28
0_1964-08-11
0_1964-08-14
0_1964-08-22
0_1964-08-26
0_1964-08-29
0_1964-09-12
0_1964-09-16
0_1964-09-23
0_1964-09-26
0_1964-10-07
0_1964-10-14
0_1964-10-24a
0_1964-10-30
0_1964-11-14
0_1964-11-21
0_1964-11-25
0_1964-11-28
0_1964-12-07
0_1965-01-12
0_1965-02-04
0_1965-02-19
0_1965-02-24
0_1965-03-03
0_1965-03-06
0_1965-03-10
0_1965-03-20
0_1965-03-24
0_1965-04-21
0_1965-04-28
0_1965-04-30
0_1965-05-08
0_1965-05-19
0_1965-05-29
0_1965-06-02
0_1965-06-18_-_supramental_ship
0_1965-06-30
0_1965-07-03
0_1965-07-07
0_1965-07-10
0_1965-07-14
0_1965-07-17
0_1965-07-21
0_1965-07-24
0_1965-07-31
0_1965-08-04
0_1965-08-07
0_1965-08-14
0_1965-08-18
0_1965-08-21
0_1965-08-31
0_1965-09-08
0_1965-09-11
0_1965-09-15a
0_1965-09-18
0_1965-09-25
0_1965-10-10
0_1965-10-16
0_1965-10-20
0_1965-11-06
0_1965-11-13
0_1965-11-15
0_1965-11-20
0_1965-11-23
0_1965-11-27
0_1965-12-10
0_1965-12-18
0_1965-12-31
0_1966-01-14
0_1966-01-19
0_1966-01-22
0_1966-01-31
0_1966-02-11
0_1966-02-19
0_1966-02-26
0_1966-03-04
0_1966-03-09
0_1966-03-26
0_1966-03-30
0_1966-04-13
0_1966-04-16
0_1966-04-27
0_1966-05-07
0_1966-05-14
0_1966-05-22
0_1966-05-25
0_1966-06-02
0_1966-06-04
0_1966-06-15
0_1966-06-18
0_1966-06-25
0_1966-07-09
0_1966-07-27
0_1966-07-30
0_1966-08-03
0_1966-08-27
0_1966-08-31
0_1966-09-07
0_1966-09-14
0_1966-09-17
0_1966-09-21
0_1966-09-28
0_1966-09-30
0_1966-10-08
0_1966-10-12
0_1966-10-22
0_1966-10-29
0_1966-11-03
0_1966-11-09
0_1966-11-15
0_1966-11-19
0_1966-11-23
0_1966-11-26
0_1966-11-30
0_1966-12-07
0_1966-12-17
0_1966-12-31
0_1967-01-18
0_1967-01-25
0_1967-01-28
0_1967-02-04
0_1967-02-08
0_1967-02-18
0_1967-02-22
0_1967-03-02
0_1967-03-04
0_1967-03-07
0_1967-03-11
0_1967-03-29
0_1967-04-03
0_1967-04-05
0_1967-04-22
0_1967-05-03
0_1967-05-24
0_1967-05-27
0_1967-05-30
0_1967-06-03
0_1967-06-07
0_1967-06-14
0_1967-06-21
0_1967-06-24
0_1967-07-05
0_1967-07-15
0_1967-07-19
0_1967-07-22
0_1967-07-26
0_1967-07-29
0_1967-08-02
0_1967-08-12
0_1967-08-16
0_1967-08-19
0_1967-08-30
0_1967-09-03
0_1967-09-06
0_1967-09-13
0_1967-09-16
0_1967-09-20
0_1967-09-30
0_1967-10-04
0_1967-10-07
0_1967-10-11
0_1967-10-14
0_1967-10-21
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0_1967-10-30
0_1967-11-08
0_1967-11-22
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0_1967-12-06
0_1967-12-08
0_1967-12-16
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0_1967-12-30
0_1968-01-12
0_1968-02-03
0_1968-02-10
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0_1968-02-28
0_1968-03-02
0_1968-03-13
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0_1970-10-21
0_1970-10-31
0_1970-11-14
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0_1971-01-16
0_1971-01-27
0_1971-03-03
0_1971-03-24
0_1971-04-17
0_1971-04-21
0_1971-05-01
0_1971-05-05
0_1971-05-08
0_1971-05-12
0_1971-05-15
0_1971-05-19
0_1971-05-22
0_1971-05-26
0_1971-06-03
0_1971-06-30
0_1971-07-03
0_1971-07-10
0_1971-07-17
0_1971-07-21
0_1971-07-31
0_1971-08-04
0_1971-08-07
0_1971-08-14
0_1971-08-28
0_1971-09-01
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0_1971-09-14
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0_1971-09-22
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0_1971-10-30
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0_1971-11-27
0_1971-12-01
0_1971-12-04
0_1971-12-11
0_1971-12-18
0_1971-12-25
0_1972-01-08
0_1972-01-12
0_1972-01-15
0_1972-02-09
0_1972-02-16
0_1972-03-01
0_1972-03-24
0_1972-03-29a
0_1972-03-29b
0_1972-04-02b
0_1972-04-05
0_1972-04-15
0_1972-04-19
0_1972-04-26
0_1972-05-06
0_1972-05-13
0_1972-05-17
0_1972-05-31
0_1972-06-28
0_1972-07-19
0_1972-07-22
0_1972-07-26
0_1972-08-02
0_1972-08-30
0_1972-09-06
0_1972-09-13
0_1972-12-20
0_1973-01-03
0_1973-01-20
0_1973-02-08
0_1973-02-14
0_1973-02-18
0_1973-02-28
0_1973-04-07
0_1973-04-14
0_1973-04-25
02.01_-_A_Vedic_Story
02.01_-_Our_Ideal
02.01_-_The_World_War
02.02_-_Lines_of_the_Descent_of_Consciousness
02.02_-_Rishi_Dirghatama
02.03_-_The_Shakespearean_Word
02.04_-_The_Kingdoms_of_the_Little_Life
02.04_-_Two_Sonnets_of_Shakespeare
02.05_-_Robert_Graves
02.05_-_The_Godheads_of_the_Little_Life
02.06_-_Boris_Pasternak
02.06_-_The_Integral_Yoga_and_Other_Yogas
02.10_-_The_Kingdoms_and_Godheads_of_the_Little_Mind
02.11_-_Hymn_to_Darkness
02.12_-_Mysticism_in_Bengali_Poetry
02.13_-_On_Social_Reconstruction
02.13_-_Rabindranath_and_Sri_Aurobindo
02.14_-_Appendix
03.01_-_Humanism_and_Humanism
03.01_-_The_New_Year_Initiation
03.02_-_The_Philosopher_as_an_Artist_and_Philosophy_as_an_Art
03.02_-_Yogic_Initiation_and_Aptitude
03.03_-_Arjuna_or_the_Ideal_Disciple
03.03_-_The_House_of_the_Spirit_and_the_New_Creation
03.04_-_The_Vision_and_the_Boon
03.05_-_Some_Conceptions_and_Misconceptions
03.05_-_The_Spiritual_Genius_of_India
03.06_-_Divine_Humanism
03.08_-_The_Standpoint_of_Indian_Art
03.09_-_Art_and_Katharsis
03.09_-_Sectarianism_or_Loyalty
03.14_-_From_the_Known_to_the_Unknown?
03.14_-_Mater_Dolorosa
03.15_-_Origin_and_Nature_of_Suffering
03.17_-_The_Souls_Odyssey
04.01_-_The_March_of_Civilisation
04.05_-_The_Immortal_Nation
04.06_-_To_Be_or_Not_to_Be
04.09_-_Values_Higher_and_Lower
05.03_-_Satyavan_and_Savitri
05.03_-_The_Body_Natural
05.04_-_The_Immortal_Person
05.05_-_In_Quest_of_Reality
05.06_-_Physics_or_philosophy
05.08_-_True_Charity
05.09_-_Varieties_of_Religious_Experience
05.10_-_Children_and_Child_Mentality
05.11_-_The_Soul_of_a_Nation
05.12_-_The_Revealer_and_the_Revelation
05.12_-_The_Soul_and_its_Journey
05.28_-_God_Protects
05.29_-_Vengeance_is_Mine
05.31_-_Divine_Intervention
05.34_-_Light,_more_Light
06.01_-_The_End_of_a_Civilisation
06.01_-_The_Word_of_Fate
06.02_-_The_Way_of_Fate_and_the_Problem_of_Pain
06.07_-_Total_Transformation_Demands_Total_Rejection
06.08_-_The_Individual_and_the_Collective
06.16_-_A_Page_of_Occult_History
06.19_-_Mental_Silence
06.22_-_I_Have_Nothing,_I_Am_Nothing
06.26_-_The_Wonder_of_It_All
06.27_-_To_Learn_and_to_Understand
06.36_-_The_Mother_on_Herself
07.01_-_Realisation,_Past_and_Future
07.02_-_The_Parable_of_the_Search_for_the_Soul
07.05_-_This_Mystery_of_Existence
07.06_-_Nirvana_and_the_Discovery_of_the_All-Negating_Absolute
07.11_-_The_Problem_of_Evil
07.12_-_This_Ugliness_in_the_World
07.13_-_Divine_Justice
07.16_-_Things_Significant_and_Insignificant
07.17_-_Why_Do_We_Forget_Things?
07.18_-_How_to_get_rid_of_Troublesome_Thoughts
07.19_-_Bad_Thought-Formation
07.20_-_Why_are_Dreams_Forgotten?
07.21_-_On_Occultism
07.36_-_The_Body_and_the_Psychic
07.37_-_The_Psychic_Being,_Some_Mysteries
07.40_-_Service_Human_and_Divine
07.42_-_The_Nature_and_Destiny_of_Art
07.45_-_Specialisation
08.01_-_Choosing_To_Do_Yoga
08.02_-_Order_and_Discipline
08.04_-_Doing_for_Her_Sake
08.05_-_Will_and_Desire
08.07_-_Sleep_and_Pain
08.08_-_The_Mind_s_Bazaar
08.09_-_Spirits_in_Trees
08.15_-_Divine_Living
08.16_-_Perfection_and_Progress
08.17_-_Psychological_Perfection
08.18_-_The_Origin_of_Desire
08.19_-_Asceticism
08.20_-_Are_Not_The_Ascetic_Means_Helpful_At_Times?
08.21_-_Human_Birth
08.22_-_Regarding_the_Body
08.23_-_Sadhana_Must_be_Done_in_the_Body
08.30_-_Dealing_with_a_Wrong_Movement
08.33_-_Opening_to_the_Divine
08.34_-_To_Melt_into_the_Divine
08.35_-_Love_Divine
08.38_-_The_Value_of_Money
09.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
09.04_-_The_Divine_Grace
09.05_-_The_Story_of_Love
09.06_-_How_Can_Time_Be_a_Friend?
09.09_-_The_Origin
09.13_-_On_Teachers_and_Teaching
09.14_-_Education_of_Girls
09.17_-_Health_in_the_Ashram
09.18_-_The_Mother_on_Herself
100.00_-_Synergy
10.01_-_A_Dream
1.001_-_The_Aim_of_Yoga
10.02_-_Beyond_Vedanta
1.002_-_The_Heifer
1.003_-_Family_of_Imran
10.03_-_The_Debate_of_Love_and_Death
10.04_-_The_Dream_Twilight_of_the_Earthly_Real
1.004_-_Women
1.005_-_The_Table
1.006_-_Livestock
1.007_-_Initial_Steps_in_Yoga_Practice
1.007_-_The_Elevations
1.008_-_The_Principle_of_Self-Affirmation
1.008_-_The_Spoils
1.009_-_Perception_and_Reality
1.009_-_Repentance
1.00a_-_Introduction
1.00b_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00c_-_INTRODUCTION
1.00d_-_Introduction
1.00g_-_Foreword
1.00_-_PREFACE
1.00_-_PREFACE_-_DESCENSUS_AD_INFERNOS
1.00_-_PRELUDE_AT_THE_THEATRE
1.00_-_The_Constitution_of_the_Human_Being
10.10_-_A_Poem
1.010_-_Self-Control_-_The_Alpha_and_Omega_of_Yoga
10.11_-_Savitri
10.12_-_Awake_Mother
1.012_-_Joseph
1.012_-_Sublimation_-_A_Way_to_Reshuffle_Thought
1.013_-_Defence_Mechanisms_of_the_Mind
1.013_-_Thunder
1.014_-_Abraham
1.015_-_The_Rock
1.018_-_The_Cave
1.019_-_Mary
1.01_-_Adam_Kadmon_and_the_Evolution
1.01_-_A_NOTE_ON_PROGRESS
1.01_-_Appearance_and_Reality
1.01_-_Archetypes_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.01_-_Description_of_the_Castle
1.01_-_Economy
1.01f_-_Introduction
1.01_-_Historical_Survey
1.01_-_How_is_Knowledge_Of_The_Higher_Worlds_Attained?
1.01_-_MAPS_OF_EXPERIENCE_-_OBJECT_AND_MEANING
1.01_-_MASTER_AND_DISCIPLE
1.01_-_MAXIMS_AND_MISSILES
1.01_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Authors_first_meeting,_December_1918
1.01_-_Necessity_for_knowledge_of_the_whole_human_being_for_a_genuine_education.
1.01_-_Newtonian_and_Bergsonian_Time
1.01_-_NIGHT
1.01_-_On_knowledge_of_the_soul,_and_how_knowledge_of_the_soul_is_the_key_to_the_knowledge_of_God.
1.01_-_On_renunciation_of_the_world
1.01_-_ON_THE_THREE_METAMORPHOSES
1.01_-_Prayer
1.01_-_Principles_of_Practical_Psycho_therapy
1.01_-_SAMADHI_PADA
1.01_-_Seeing
1.01_-_Soul_and_God
1.01_-_Tara_the_Divine
1.01_-_THAT_ARE_THOU
1.01_-_the_Call_to_Adventure
1.01_-_The_Dark_Forest._The_Hill_of_Difficulty._The_Panther,_the_Lion,_and_the_Wolf._Virgil.
1.01_-_The_First_Steps
1.01_-_The_Highest_Meaning_of_the_Holy_Truths
1.01_-_The_Human_Aspiration
1.01_-_The_King_of_the_Wood
1.01_-_The_Mental_Fortress
1.01_-_THE_OPPOSITES
1.01_-_The_Path_of_Later_On
1.01_-_The_Three_Metamorphoses
1.01_-_The_True_Aim_of_Life
1.01_-_The_Unexpected
1.01_-_To_Watanabe_Sukefusa
1.01_-_What_is_Magick?
1.01_-_Who_is_Tara
1.020_-_Ta-Ha
1.020_-_The_World_and_Our_World
1.024_-_Affiliation_With_Larger_Wholes
10.24_-_Savitri
1.024_-_The_Light
10.25_-_How_to_Read_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
1.025_-_Sadhana_-_Intensifying_a_Lighted_Flame
1.025_-_The_Criterion
1.027_-_The_Ant
1.028_-_Bringing_About_Whole-Souled_Dedication
1.029_-_The_Spider
1.02_-_BEFORE_THE_CITY-GATE
1.02_-_BOOK_THE_SECOND
1.02_-_Groups_and_Statistical_Mechanics
1.02_-_In_the_Beginning
1.02_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES
1.02_-_Karmayoga
1.02_-_MAPS_OF_MEANING_-_THREE_LEVELS_OF_ANALYSIS
1.02_-_Meditating_on_Tara
1.02_-_On_detachment
1.02_-_On_the_Knowledge_of_God.
1.02_-_On_the_Service_of_the_Soul
1.02_-_Outline_of_Practice
1.02_-_Prana
1.02_-_Priestly_Kings
1.02_-_SADHANA_PADA
1.02_-_Skillful_Means
1.02_-_SOCIAL_HEREDITY_AND_PROGRESS
1.02_-_Substance_Is_Eternal
1.02_-_Taras_Tantra
1.02_-_The_7_Habits__An_Overview
1.02_-_The_Child_as_growing_being_and_the_childs_experience_of_encountering_the_teacher.
1.02_-_The_Concept_of_the_Collective_Unconscious
1.02_-_The_Descent._Dante's_Protest_and_Virgil's_Appeal._The_Intercession_of_the_Three_Ladies_Benedight.
1.02_-_The_Development_of_Sri_Aurobindos_Thought
1.02_-_The_Human_Soul
1.02_-_The_Magic_Circle
1.02_-_THE_NATURE_OF_THE_GROUND
1.02_-_The_Necessity_of_Magick_for_All
1.02_-_The_Philosophy_of_Ishvara
1.02_-_The_Pit
1.02_-_THE_POOL_OF_TEARS
1.02_-_THE_PROBLEM_OF_SOCRATES
1.02_-_The_Recovery
1.02_-_The_Ultimate_Path_is_Without_Difficulty
1.02_-_What_is_Psycho_therapy?
1.02_-_Where_I_Lived,_and_What_I_Lived_For
1.031_-_Intense_Aspiration
10.31_-_The_Mystery_of_The_Five_Senses
1.035_-_The_Recitation_of_Mantra
10.36_-_Cling_to_Truth
1.036_-_The_Rise_of_Obstacles_in_Yoga_Practice
1.036_-_Ya-Seen
1.037_-_Preventing_the_Fall_in_Yoga
1.037_-_The_Aligners
10.37_-_The_Golden_Bridge
1.038_-_Impediments_in_Concentration_and_Meditation
1.03_-_A_CAUCUS-RACE_AND_A_LONG_TALE
1.03_-_A_Parable
1.03_-_Bloodstream_Sermon
1.03_-_BOOK_THE_THIRD
1.03_-_Concerning_the_Archetypes,_with_Special_Reference_to_the_Anima_Concept
1.03_-_Fire_in_the_Earth
1.03_-_Hieroglypics__Life_and_Language_Necessarily_Symbolic
1.03_-_Invocation_of_Tara
1.03_-_Master_Ma_is_Unwell
1.03_-_Meeting_the_Master_-_Meeting_with_others
1.03_-_On_exile_or_pilgrimage
1.03_-_PERSONALITY,_SANCTITY,_DIVINE_INCARNATION
1.03_-_Preparing_for_the_Miraculous
1.03_-_Reading
1.03_-_.REASON._IN_PHILOSOPHY
1.03_-_Some_Aspects_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.03_-_Some_Practical_Aspects
1.03_-_Sympathetic_Magic
1.03_-_Tara,_Liberator_from_the_Eight_Dangers
1.03_-_The_Desert
1.03_-_THE_EARTH_IN_ITS_EARLY_STAGES
1.03_-_The_Gods,_Superior_Beings_and_Adverse_Forces
1.03_-_THE_GRAND_OPTION
1.03_-_The_House_Of_The_Lord
1.03_-_The_Human_Disciple
1.03_-_THE_ORPHAN,_THE_WIDOW,_AND_THE_MOON
1.03_-_The_Phenomenon_of_Man
1.03_-_The_Psychic_Prana
1.03_-_The_Sephiros
1.03_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Exorcism)
1.03_-_The_Uncreated
1.03_-_The_Void
1.03_-_To_Layman_Ishii
1.03_-_VISIT_TO_VIDYASAGAR
1.03_-_YIBHOOTI_PADA
1.040_-_Re-Educating_the_Mind
1.041_-_Detailed
1.043_-_Decorations
1.045_-_Piercing_the_Structure_of_the_Object
1.046_-_The_Dunes
1.04_-_ADVICE_TO_HOUSEHOLDERS
1.04_-_A_Leader
1.04_-_BOOK_THE_FOURTH
1.04_-_Communion
1.04_-_Feedback_and_Oscillation
1.04_-_KAI_VALYA_PADA
1.04_-_Magic_and_Religion
1.04_-_On_blessed_and_ever-memorable_obedience
1.04_-_On_Knowledge_of_the_Future_World.
1.04_-_ON_THE_DESPISERS_OF_THE_BODY
1.04_-_Religion_and_Occultism
1.04_-_Sounds
1.04_-_Te_Shan_Carrying_His_Bundle
1.04_-_The_Aims_of_Psycho_therapy
1.04_-_THE_APPEARANCE_OF_ANOMALY_-_CHALLENGE_TO_THE_SHARED_MAP
1.04_-_The_Control_of_Psychic_Prana
1.04_-_The_Core_of_the_Teaching
1.04_-_The_Crossing_of_the_First_Threshold
1.04_-_The_Discovery_of_the_Nation-Soul
1.04_-_The_Divine_Mother_-_This_Is_She
1.04_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda
1.04_-_The_Need_of_Guru
1.04_-_The_Origin_and_Development_of_Poetry.
1.04_-_The_Qabalah__The_Best_Training_for_Memory
1.04_-_THE_RABBIT_SENDS_IN_A_LITTLE_BILL
1.04_-_The_Silent_Mind
1.04_-_THE_STUDY_(The_Compact)
1.04_-_To_the_Priest_of_Rytan-ji
1.04_-_Wake-Up_Sermon
1.04_-_What_Arjuna_Saw_-_the_Dark_Side_of_the_Force
1.04_-_Wherefore_of_World?
1.05_-_2010_and_1956_-_Doomsday?
1.052_-_Yoga_Practice_-_A_Series_of_Positive_Steps
1.053_-_A_Very_Important_Sadhana
1.057_-_Iron
1.057_-_The_Four_Manifestations_of_Ignorance
1.058_-_The_Argument
1.05_-_ADVICE_FROM_A_CATERPILLAR
1.05_-_AUERBACHS_CELLAR
1.05_-_BOOK_THE_FIFTH
1.05_-_Buddhism_and_Women
1.05_-_CHARITY
1.05_-_Christ,_A_Symbol_of_the_Self
1.05_-_Consciousness
1.05_-_Hsueh_Feng's_Grain_of_Rice
1.05_-_Mental_Education
1.05_-_Morality_and_War
1.05_-_On_painstaking_and_true_repentance_which_constitute_the_life_of_the_holy_convicts;_and_about_the_prison.
1.05_-_On_the_Love_of_God.
1.05_-_Pratyahara_and_Dharana
1.05_-_Problems_of_Modern_Psycho_therapy
1.05_-_Qualifications_of_the_Aspirant_and_the_Teacher
1.05_-_Ritam
1.05_-_Solitude
1.05_-_Splitting_of_the_Spirit
1.05_-_The_Activation_of_Human_Energy
1.05_-_The_Belly_of_the_Whale
1.05_-_The_Creative_Principle
1.05_-_THE_HOSTILE_BROTHERS_-_ARCHETYPES_OF_RESPONSE_TO_THE_UNKNOWN
1.05_-_THE_MASTER_AND_KESHAB
1.05_-_The_New_Consciousness
1.05_-_THE_NEW_SPIRIT
1.05_-_The_Second_Circle__The_Wanton._Minos._The_Infernal_Hurricane._Francesca_da_Rimini.
1.05_-_The_Universe__The_0_=_2_Equation
1.05_-_The_Ways_of_Working_of_the_Lord
1.05_-_War_And_Politics
1.05_-_Work_and_Teaching
1.05_-_Yoga_and_Hypnotism
1.060_-_Tracing_the_Ultimate_Cause_of_Any_Experience
1.061_-_Column
1.066_-_Prohibition
1.06_-_Being_Human_and_the_Copernican_Principle
1.06_-_BOOK_THE_SIXTH
1.06_-_Confutation_Of_Other_Philosophers
1.06_-_Dhyana
1.06_-_Dhyana_and_Samadhi
1.06_-_LIFE_AND_THE_PLANETS
1.06_-_Man_in_the_Universe
1.06_-_MORTIFICATION,_NON-ATTACHMENT,_RIGHT_LIVELIHOOD
1.06_-_On_Induction
1.06_-_On_remembrance_of_death.
1.06_-_ON_THE_PALE_CRIMINAL
1.06_-_On_Thought
1.06_-_PIG_AND_PEPPER
1.06_-_Quieting_the_Vital
1.06_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Sacrifice_2_The_Works_of_Love_-_The_Works_of_Life
1.06_-_The_Breaking_of_the_Limits
1.06_-_The_Desire_to_be
1.06_-_THE_FOUR_GREAT_ERRORS
1.06_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES
1.06_-_The_Third_Circle__The_Gluttonous._Cerberus._The_Eternal_Rain._Ciacco._Florence.
1.06_-_The_Transformation_of_Dream_Life
1.06_-_WITCHES_KITCHEN
1.06_-_Yun_Men's_Every_Day_is_a_Good_Day
1.070_-_The_Seven_Stages_of_Perfection
1.074_-_The_Enrobed
1.078_-_Kumbhaka_and_Concentration_of_Mind
1.07_-_A_MAD_TEA-PARTY
1.07_-_A_Song_of_Longing_for_Tara,_the_Infallible
1.07_-_A_STREET
1.07_-_BOOK_THE_SEVENTH
1.07_-_Bridge_across_the_Afterlife
1.07_-_Cybernetics_and_Psychopathology
1.07_-_Hui_Ch'ao_Asks_about_Buddha
1.07_-_Incarnate_Human_Gods
1.07_-_Medicine_and_Psycho_therapy
1.07_-_On_mourning_which_causes_joy.
1.07_-_On_Our_Knowledge_of_General_Principles
1.07_-_ON_READING_AND_WRITING
1.07_-_Samadhi
1.07_-_Savitri
1.07_-_The_Farther_Reaches_of_Human_Nature
1.07_-_The_Fourth_Circle__The_Avaricious_and_the_Prodigal._Plutus._Fortune_and_her_Wheel._The_Fifth_Circle__The_Irascible_and_the_Sullen._Styx.
1.07_-_THE_GREAT_EVENT_FORESHADOWED_-_THE_PLANETIZATION_OF_MANKIND
1.07_-_The_Ideal_Law_of_Social_Development
1.07_-_THE_.IMPROVERS._OF_MANKIND
1.07_-_THE_MASTER_AND_VIJAY_GOSWAMI
1.07_-_The_Primary_Data_of_Being
1.07_-_The_Psychic_Center
1.07_-_The_Three_Schools_of_Magick_2
1.07_-_TRUTH
1.080_-_Pratyahara_-_The_Return_of_Energy
1.081_-_The_Application_of_Pratyahara
1.083_-_Choosing_an_Object_for_Concentration
1.089_-_The_Levels_of_Concentration
1.08a_-_The_Ladder
1.08_-_Attendants
1.08_-_BOOK_THE_EIGHTH
1.08_-_EVENING_A_SMALL,_NEATLY_KEPT_CHAMBER
1.08_-_Independence_from_the_Physical
1.08_-_Introduction_to_Patanjalis_Yoga_Aphorisms
1.08_-_On_freedom_from_anger_and_on_meekness.
1.08_-_ON_THE_TREE_ON_THE_MOUNTAINSIDE
1.08_-_Origin_of_Rudra:_his_becoming_eight_Rudras
1.08_-_Psycho_therapy_Today
1.08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_Descent_into_Death
1.08_-_Stead_and_the_Spirits
1.08_-_The_Change_of_Vision
1.08_-_The_Depths_of_the_Divine
1.08_-_The_Four_Austerities_and_the_Four_Liberations
1.08_-_The_Gods_of_the_Veda_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.08_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY_CELEBRATION_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.08_-_THE_QUEEN'S_CROQUET_GROUND
1.08_-_The_Splitting_of_the_Human_Personality_during_Spiritual_Training
1.08_-_The_Supreme_Discovery
1.08_-_The_Synthesis_of_Movement
1.08_-_THINGS_THE_GERMANS_LACK
1.094_-_Understanding_the_Structure_of_Things
1.095_-_The_Fig
1.096_-_Powers_that_Accrue_in_the_Practice
1.097_-_Sublimation_of_Object-Consciousness
1.098_-_The_Transformation_from_Human_to_Divine
1.09_-_ADVICE_TO_THE_BRAHMOS
1.09_-_BOOK_THE_NINTH
1.09_-_Concentration_-_Its_Spiritual_Uses
1.09_-_FAITH_IN_PEACE
1.09_-_Fundamental_Questions_of_Psycho_therapy
1.09_-_Of_the_signs_by_which_it_will_be_known_that_the_spiritual_person_is_walking_along_the_way_of_this_night_and_purgation_of_sense.
1.09_-_On_remembrance_of_wrongs.
1.09_-_ON_THE_PREACHERS_OF_DEATH
1.09_-_(Plot_continued.)_Dramatic_Unity.
1.09_-_SELF-KNOWLEDGE
1.09_-_SKIRMISHES_IN_A_WAY_WITH_THE_AGE
1.09_-_Sleep_and_Death
1.09_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Big_Bang
1.09_-_Talks
1.09_-_Taras_Ultimate_Nature
1.09_-_The_Absolute_Manifestation
1.09_-_The_Ambivalence_of_the_Fish_Symbol
1.09_-_The_Greater_Self
1.09_-_The_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.09_-_The_Secret_Chiefs
1.09_-_The_Worship_of_Trees
1.09_-_To_the_Students,_Young_and_Old
1.1.01_-_Seeking_the_Divine
1.1.02_-_Sachchidananda
11.03_-_Cosmonautics
1.107_-_The_Bestowal_of_a_Divine_Gift
11.08_-_Body-Energy
1.10_-_ALICE'S_EVIDENCE
1.10_-_BOOK_THE_TENTH
1.10_-_Concentration_-_Its_Practice
1.10_-_Conscious_Force
1.10_-_Farinata_and_Cavalcante_de'_Cavalcanti._Discourse_on_the_Knowledge_of_the_Damned.
1.10_-_Foresight
1.10_-_GRACE_AND_FREE_WILL
1.10_-_Harmony
1.10_-_Laughter_Of_The_Gods
1.10_-_Life_and_Death._The_Greater_Guardian_of_the_Threshold
1.10_-_Relics_of_Tree_Worship_in_Modern_Europe
1.10_-_The_Absolute_of_the_Being
1.10_-_THE_FORMATION_OF_THE_NOOSPHERE
1.10_-_THE_MASTER_WITH_THE_BRAHMO_DEVOTEES_(II)
1.10_-_Theodicy_-_Nature_Makes_No_Mistakes
1.10_-_The_Secret_of_the_Veda
1.10_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Intelligent_Will
1.10_-_THINGS_I_OWE_TO_THE_ANCIENTS
1.1.1.07_-_Aspiration,_Opening,_Recognition
11.10_-_The_Test_of_Truth
11.14_-_Our_Finest_Hour
11.15_-_Sri_Aurobindo
1.11_-_Correspondence_and_Interviews
1.11_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Problem
1.11_-_FAITH_IN_MAN
1.11_-_GOOD_AND_EVIL
1.11_-_Higher_Laws
1.11_-_Legend_of_Dhruva,_the_son_of_Uttanapada
1.11_-_Oneness
1.11_-_On_talkativeness_and_silence.
1.11_-_Powers
1.11_-_The_Broken_Rocks._Pope_Anastasius._General_Description_of_the_Inferno_and_its_Divisions.
1.11_-_The_Change_of_Power
1.11_-_The_Influence_of_the_Sexes_on_Vegetation
1.11_-_The_Kalki_Avatar
1.11_-_The_Reason_as_Governor_of_Life
1.11_-_The_Second_Genesis
1.11_-_The_Soul_or_the_Astral_Body
1.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.12_-_BOOK_THE_TWELFTH
1.12_-_Brute_Neighbors
1.1.2_-_Commentary
1.12_-_Delight_of_Existence_-_The_Solution
1.12_-_God_Departs
1.12_-_Independence
1.1.2_-_Intellect_and_the_Intellectual
1.12_-_Sleep_and_Dreams
1.12_-_The_Astral_Plane
1.12_-_The_Divine_Work
1.12_-_THE_FESTIVAL_AT_PNIHTI
1.12_-_The_Herds_of_the_Dawn
1.12_-_The_Left-Hand_Path_-_The_Black_Brothers
1.12_-_The_Sacred_Marriage
1.12_-_The_Sociology_of_Superman
1.12_-_The_Superconscient
1.12_-_TIME_AND_ETERNITY
1.12_-_Truth_and_Knowledge
1.13_-_A_Dream
1.13_-_BOOK_THE_THIRTEENTH
1.13_-_Conclusion_-_He_is_here
1.13_-_Gnostic_Symbols_of_the_Self
1.1.3_-_Mental_Difficulties_and_the_Need_of_Quietude
1.13_-_Posterity_of_Dhruva
1.13_-_Reason_and_Religion
1.13_-_The_Divine_Maya
1.13_-_THE_HUMAN_REBOUND_OF_EVOLUTION_AND_ITS_CONSEQUENCES
1.13_-_The_Kings_of_Rome_and_Alba
1.13_-_THE_MASTER_AND_M.
1.13_-_The_Wood_of_Thorns._The_Harpies._The_Violent_against_themselves._Suicides._Pier_della_Vigna._Lano_and_Jacopo_da_Sant'_Andrea.
1.13_-_Under_the_Auspices_of_the_Gods
1.14_-_Descendants_of_Prithu
1.14_-_FOREST_AND_CAVERN
1.14_-_IMMORTALITY_AND_SURVIVAL
1.14_-_INSTRUCTION_TO_VAISHNAVS_AND_BRHMOS
1.14_-_On_the_clamorous,_yet_wicked_master-the_stomach.
1.14_-_(Plot_continued.)_The_tragic_emotions_of_pity_and_fear_should_spring_out_of_the_Plot_itself.
1.14_-_The_Book_of_Magic_Formulae
1.1.4_-_The_Physical_Mind_and_Sadhana
1.14_-_The_Sand_Waste_and_the_Rain_of_Fire._The_Violent_against_God._Capaneus._The_Statue_of_Time,_and_the_Four_Infernal_Rivers.
1.14_-_The_Secret
1.14_-_The_Stress_of_the_Hidden_Spirit
1.14_-_The_Structure_and_Dynamics_of_the_Self
1.14_-_The_Succesion_to_the_Kingdom_in_Ancient_Latium
1.14_-_The_Victory_Over_Death
1.14_-_TURMOIL_OR_GENESIS?
1.15_-_In_the_Domain_of_the_Spirit_Beings
1.15_-_LAST_VISIT_TO_KESHAB
1.15_-_On_incorruptible_purity_and_chastity_to_which_the_corruptible_attain_by_toil_and_sweat.
1.15_-_ON_THE_THOUSAND_AND_ONE_GOALS
1.15_-_THE_DIRECTIONS_AND_CONDITIONS_OF_THE_FUTURE
1.15_-_The_Possibility_and_Purpose_of_Avatarhood
1.15_-_The_Supramental_Consciousness
1.15_-_The_Suprarational_Good
1.15_-_The_Value_of_Philosophy
1.15_-_The_world_overrun_with_trees;_they_are_destroyed_by_the_Pracetasas
1.1.5_-_Thought_and_Knowledge
1.16_-_Advantages_and_Disadvantages_of_Evocational_Magic
1.16_-_Inquiries_of_Maitreya_respecting_the_history_of_Prahlada
1.16_-_Man,_A_Transitional_Being
1.16_-_MARTHAS_GARDEN
1.16_-_ON_LOVE_OF_THE_NEIGHBOUR
1.16_-_PRAYER
1.16_-_THE_ESSENCE_OF_THE_DEMOCRATIC_IDEA
1.16_-_The_Season_of_Truth
1.16_-_The_Suprarational_Ultimate_of_Life
1.16_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.17_-_Astral_Journey__Example,_How_to_do_it,_How_to_Verify_your_Experience
1.17_-_AT_THE_FOUNTAIN
1.17_-_DOES_MANKIND_MOVE_BIOLOGICALLY_UPON_ITSELF?
1.17_-_Legend_of_Prahlada
1.17_-_M._AT_DAKSHINEWAR
1.17_-_On_poverty_(that_hastens_heavenwards).
1.17_-_Religion_as_the_Law_of_Life
1.17_-_SUFFERING
1.17_-_The_Seven-Headed_Thought,_Swar_and_the_Dashagwas
1.17_-_The_Spiritus_Familiaris_or_Serving_Spirits
1.17_-_The_Transformation
1.18_-_DONJON
1.18_-_FAITH
1.18_-_Hiranyakasipu's_reiterated_attempts_to_destroy_his_son
1.18_-_M._AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.18_-_On_insensibility,_that_is,_deadening_of_the_soul_and_the_death_of_the_mind_before_the_death_of_the_body.
1.18_-_ON_LITTLE_OLD_AND_YOUNG_WOMEN
1.18_-_THE_HEART_OF_THE_PROBLEM
1.18_-_The_Human_Fathers
1.18_-_The_Perils_of_the_Soul
1.19_-_GOD_IS_NOT_MOCKED
1.19_-_Life
1.19_-_NIGHT
1.19_-_The_Act_of_Truth
1.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_HIS_INJURED_ARM
1.200-1.224_Talks
1.201_-_Socrates
1.2.01_-_The_Call_and_the_Capacity
1.2.01_-_The_Upanishadic_and_Purancic_Systems
1.2.03_-_The_Interpretation_of_Scripture
1.2.04_-_Sincerity
1.2.05_-_Aspiration
1.2.07_-_Surrender
1.2.08_-_Faith
1.2.09_-_Consecration_and_Offering
1.20_-_RULES_FOR_HOUSEHOLDERS_AND_MONKS
1.20_-_Tabooed_Persons
1.20_-_Talismans_-_The_Lamen_-_The_Pantacle
1.20_-_TANTUM_RELIGIO_POTUIT_SUADERE_MALORUM
1.20_-_The_Fourth_Bolgia__Soothsayers._Amphiaraus,_Tiresias,_Aruns,_Manto,_Eryphylus,_Michael_Scott,_Guido_Bonatti,_and_Asdente._Virgil_reproaches_Dante's_Pity.
1.20_-_Visnu_appears_to_Prahlada
1.2.1.06_-_Symbolism_and_Allegory
1.2.11_-_Patience_and_Perseverance
1.21_-_A_DAY_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.21_-_Chih_Men's_Lotus_Flower,_Lotus_Leaves
1.21_-_FROM_THE_PRE-HUMAN_TO_THE_ULTRA-HUMAN,_THE_PHASES_OF_A_LIVING_PLANET
1.21_-_My_Theory_of_Astrology
1.21_-_Tabooed_Things
1.21_-_WALPURGIS-NIGHT
1.22_-_ADVICE_TO_AN_ACTOR
1.22_-_EMOTIONALISM
1.22_-_How_to_Learn_the_Practice_of_Astrology
1.22_-_OBERON_AND_TITANIA's_GOLDEN_WEDDING
1.22_-_ON_THE_GIFT-GIVING_VIRTUE
1.22_-_Tabooed_Words
1.22_-_THE_END_OF_THE_SPECIES
1.22_-_The_Necessity_of_the_Spiritual_Transformation
1.2.2_-_The_Place_of_Study_in_Sadhana
1.23_-_DREARY_DAY
1.23_-_FESTIVAL_AT_SURENDRAS_HOUSE
1.23_-_On_mad_price,_and,_in_the_same_Step,_on_unclean_and_blasphemous_thoughts.
1.2.3_-_The_Power_of_Expression_and_Yoga
1.240_-_1.300_Talks
1.240_-_Talks_2
1.24_-_Matter
1.24_-_Necromancy_and_Spiritism
1.24_-_On_meekness,_simplicity,_guilelessness_which_come_not_from_nature_but_from_habit,_and_about_malice.
1.24_-_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.24_-_RITUAL,_SYMBOL,_SACRAMENT
1.2.4_-_Speech_and_Yoga
1.24_-_The_Killing_of_the_Divine_King
1.25_-_ADVICE_TO_PUNDIT_SHASHADHAR
1.25_-_DUNGEON
1.25_-_Fascinations,_Invisibility,_Levitation,_Transmutations,_Kinks_in_Time
1.25_-_On_the_destroyer_of_the_passions,_most_sublime_humility,_which_is_rooted_in_spiritual_feeling.
1.25_-_The_Knot_of_Matter
1.25_-_Vanni_Fucci's_Punishment._Agnello_Brunelleschi,_Buoso_degli_Abati,_Puccio_Sciancato,_Cianfa_de'_Donati,_and_Guercio_Cavalcanti.
1.26_-_Continues_the_description_of_a_method_for_recollecting_the_thoughts._Describes_means_of_doing_this._This_chapter_is_very_profitable_for_those_who_are_beginning_prayer.
1.26_-_FESTIVAL_AT_ADHARS_HOUSE
1.26_-_Mental_Processes_-_Two_Only_are_Possible
1.26_-_On_discernment_of_thoughts,_passions_and_virtues
1.26_-_Sacrifice_of_the_Kings_Son
1.27_-_AT_DAKSHINESWAR
1.27_-_On_holy_solitude_of_body_and_soul.
1.27_-_Structure_of_Mind_Based_on_that_of_Body
1.27_-_Succession_to_the_Soul
1.28_-_Need_to_Define_God,_Self,_etc.
1.28_-_On_holy_and_blessed_prayer,_mother_of_virtues,_and_on_the_attitude_of_mind_and_body_in_prayer.
1.28_-_The_Killing_of_the_Tree-Spirit
1.29_-_Concerning_heaven_on_earth,_or_godlike_dispassion_and_perfection,_and_the_resurrection_of_the_soul_before_the_general_resurrection.
1.29_-_Continues_to_describe_methods_for_achieving_this_Prayer_of_Recollection._Says_what_little_account_we_should_make_of_being_favoured_by_our_superiors.
1.29_-_Geri_del_Bello._The_Tenth_Bolgia__Alchemists._Griffolino_d'_Arezzo_and_Capocchino._The_many_people_and_the_divers_wounds
1.300_-_1.400_Talks
1.3.02_-_Equality__The_Chief_Support
1.3.03_-_Quiet_and_Calm
1.30_-_Other_Falsifiers_or_Forgers._Gianni_Schicchi,_Myrrha,_Adam_of_Brescia,_Potiphar's_Wife,_and_Sinon_of_Troy.
1.31_-_Continues_the_same_subject._Explains_what_is_meant_by_the_Prayer_of_Quiet._Gives_several_counsels_to_those_who_experience_it._This_chapter_is_very_noteworthy.
1.32_-_Expounds_these_words_of_the_Paternoster__Fiat_voluntas_tua_sicut_in_coelo_et_in_terra._Describes_how_much_is_accomplished_by_those_who_repeat_these_words_with_full_resolution_and_how_well
1.32_-_The_Ninth_Circle__Traitors._The_Frozen_Lake_of_Cocytus._First_Division,_Caina__Traitors_to_their_Kindred._Camicion_de'_Pazzi._Second_Division,_Antenora__Traitors_to_their_Country._Dante_questions_Bocca_degli
1.33_-_Count_Ugolino_and_the_Archbishop_Ruggieri._The_Death_of_Count_Ugolino's_Sons.
1.33_-_The_Golden_Mean
1.33_-_Treats_of_our_great_need_that_the_Lord_should_give_us_what_we_ask_in_these_words_of_the_Paternoster__Panem_nostrum_quotidianum_da_nobis_hodie.
1.34_-_Continues_the_same_subject._This_is_very_suitable_for_reading_after_the_reception_of_the_Most_Holy_Sacrament.
1.34_-_The_Myth_and_Ritual_of_Attis
1.34_-_The_Tao_1
1.3.5.03_-_The_Involved_and_Evolving_Godhead
1.35_-_Attis_as_a_God_of_Vegetation
1.35_-_Describes_the_recollection_which_should_be_practised_after_Communion._Concludes_this_subject_with_an_exclamatory_prayer_to_the_Eternal_Father.
1.36_-_Treats_of_these_words_in_the_Paternoster__Dimitte_nobis_debita_nostra.
1.37_-_Death_-_Fear_-_Magical_Memory
1.37_-_Describes_the_excellence_of_this_prayer_called_the_Paternoster,_and_the_many_ways_in_which_we_shall_find_consolation_in_it.
1.37_-_Oriential_Religions_in_the_West
1.38_-_The_Myth_of_Osiris
1.39_-_Prophecy
1.39_-_The_Ritual_of_Osiris
1.400_-_1.450_Talks
1.4.01_-_The_Divine_Grace_and_Guidance
14.02_-_Occult_Experiences
1.4.02_-_The_Divine_Force
14.04_-_More_of_Yajnavalkya
14.05_-_The_Golden_Rule
14.06_-_Liberty,_Self-Control_and_Friendship
14.08_-_A_Parable_of_Sea-Gulls
1.40_-_Coincidence
1.40_-_Describes_how,_by_striving_always_to_walk_in_the_love_and_fear_of_God,_we_shall_travel_safely_amid_all_these_temptations.
1.41_-_Isis
1.41_-_Speaks_of_the_fear_of_God_and_of_how_we_must_keep_ourselves_from_venial_sins.
1.42_-_Osiris_and_the_Sun
1.42_-_This_Self_Introversion
1.439
1.43_-_Dionysus
1.43_-_The_Holy_Guardian_Angel_is_not_the_Higher_Self_but_an_Objective_Individual
1.44_-_Serious_Style_of_A.C.,_or_the_Apparent_Frivolity_of_Some_of_my_Remarks
1.450_-_1.500_Talks
1.45_-_Unserious_Conduct_of_a_Pupil
1.46_-_Selfishness
1.46_-_The_Corn-Mother_in_Many_Lands
1.47_-_Lityerses
1.47_-_Reincarnation
1.48_-_Morals_of_AL_-_Hard_to_Accept,_and_Why_nevertheless_we_Must_Concur
1.48_-_The_Corn-Spirit_as_an_Animal
1.49_-_Ancient_Deities_of_Vegetation_as_Animals
1.50_-_A.C._and_the_Masters;_Why_they_Chose_him,_etc.
1.50_-_Eating_the_God
1.51_-_Homeopathic_Magic_of_a_Flesh_Diet
1.51_-_How_to_Recognise_Masters,_Angels,_etc.,_and_how_they_Work
1.52_-_Family_-_Public_Enemy_No._1
1.52_-_Killing_the_Divine_Animal
1.53_-_Mother-Love
1.53_-_The_Propitation_of_Wild_Animals_By_Hunters
1.54_-_On_Meanness
1.550_-_1.600_Talks
1.56_-_Marriage_-_Property_-_War_-_Politics
1.56_-_The_Public_Expulsion_of_Evils
1.57_-_Beings_I_have_Seen_with_my_Physical_Eye
1.57_-_Public_Scapegoats
1.58_-_Do_Angels_Ever_Cut_Themselves_Shaving?
1.58_-_Human_Scapegoats_in_Classical_Antiquity
1.60_-_Between_Heaven_and_Earth
1.60_-_Knack
1.61_-_Power_and_Authority
1.61_-_The_Myth_of_Balder
1.62_-_The_Elastic_Mind
1.62_-_The_Fire-Festivals_of_Europe
1.63_-_Fear,_a_Bad_Astral_Vision
1.64_-_Magical_Power
1.64_-_The_Burning_of_Human_Beings_in_the_Fires
1.65_-_Balder_and_the_Mistletoe
1.65_-_Man
1.66_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Tales
1.66_-_Vampires
1.67_-_Faith
1.67_-_The_External_Soul_in_Folk-Custom
1.68_-_The_God-Letters
1.68_-_The_Golden_Bough
1.69_-_Farewell_to_Nemi
17.03_-_Agni_and_the_Gods
1.72_-_Education
1.73_-_Monsters,_Niggers,_Jews,_etc.
1.74_-_Obstacles_on_the_Path
1.75_-_The_AA_and_the_Planet
1.76_-_The_Gods_-_How_and_Why_they_Overlap
1.77_-_Work_Worthwhile_-_Why?
1.78_-_Sore_Spots
18.04_-_Modern_Poems
18.05_-_Ashram_Poets
1.80_-_Life_a_Gamble
1.81_-_Method_of_Training
1.82_-_Epistola_Penultima_-_The_Two_Ways_to_Reality
1.83_-_Epistola_Ultima
19.11_-_Old_Age
1912_11_28p
1913_06_18p
1913_08_02p
1913_08_17p
1913_11_29p
1914_02_07p
1914_03_06p
1914_03_14p
1914_03_18p
1914_03_21p
1914_04_18p
1914_05_12p
1914_05_16p
1914_06_23p
1914_06_25p
1914_06_27p
1914_07_07p
1914_07_10p
1914_07_11p
1914_07_12p
1914_07_13p
1914_07_15p
1914_08_08p
1914_08_16p
1914_09_05p
1914_10_11p
1915_01_02p
1915_01_11p
1915_04_19p
1916_12_07p
1916_12_08p
1916_12_10p
1916_12_12p
1916_12_20p
1916_12_21p
1916_12_30p
1917_09_24p
1918_07_12p
1929-04-07_-_Yoga,_for_the_sake_of_the_Divine_-_Concentration_-_Preparations_for_Yoga,_to_be_conscious_-_Yoga_and_humanity_-_We_have_all_met_in_previous_lives
1929-04-14_-_Dangers_of_Yoga_-_Two_paths,_tapasya_and_surrender_-_Impulses,_desires_and_Yoga_-_Difficulties_-_Unification_around_the_psychic_being_-_Ambition,_undoing_of_many_Yogis_-_Powers,_misuse_and_right_use_of_-_How_to_recognise_the_Divine_Will_-_Accept_things_that_come_from_Divine_-_Vital_devotion_-_Need_of_strong_body_and_nerves_-_Inner_being,_invariable
1929-04-21_-_Visions,_seeing_and_interpretation_-_Dreams_and_dreaml_and_-_Dreamless_sleep_-_Visions_and_formulation_-_Surrender,_passive_and_of_the_will_-_Meditation_and_progress_-_Entering_the_spiritual_life,_a_plunge_into_the_Divine
1929-04-28_-_Offering,_general_and_detailed_-_Integral_Yoga_-_Remembrance_of_the_Divine_-_Reading_and_Yoga_-_Necessity,_predetermination_-_Freedom_-_Miracles_-_Aim_of_creation
1929-05-05_-_Intellect,_true_and_wrong_movement_-_Attacks_from_adverse_forces_-_Faith,_integral_and_absolute_-_Death,_not_a_necessity_-_Descent_of_Divine_Consciousness_-_Inner_progress_-_Memory_of_former_lives
1929-05-12_-_Beings_of_vital_world_(vampires)_-_Money_power_and_vital_beings_-_Capacity_for_manifestation_of_will_-_Entry_into_vital_world_-_Body,_a_protection_-_Individuality_and_the_vital_world
1929-05-19_-_Mind_and_its_workings,_thought-forms_-_Adverse_conditions_and_Yoga_-_Mental_constructions_-_Illness_and_Yoga
1929-05-26_-_Individual,_illusion_of_separateness_-_Hostile_forces_and_the_mental_plane_-_Psychic_world,_psychic_being_-_Spiritual_and_psychic_-_Words,_understanding_speech_and_reading_-_Hostile_forces,_their_utility_-_Illusion_of_action,_true_action
1929-06-09_-_Nature_of_religion_-_Religion_and_the_spiritual_life_-_Descent_of_Divine_Truth_and_Force_-_To_be_sure_of_your_religion,_country,_family-choose_your_own_-_Religion_and_numbers
1929-06-16_-_Illness_and_Yoga_-_Subtle_body_(nervous_envelope)_-_Fear_and_illness
1929-06-23_-_Knowledge_of_the_Yogi_-_Knowledge_and_the_Supermind_-_Methods_of_changing_the_condition_of_the_body_-_Meditation,_aspiration,_sincerity
1929-06-30_-_Repulsion_felt_towards_certain_animals,_etc_-_Source_of_evil,_Formateurs_-_Material_world
1929-07-28_-_Art_and_Yoga_-_Art_and_life_-_Music,_dance_-_World_of_Harmony
1950-12-25_-_Christmas_-_festival_of_Light_-_Energy_and_mental_growth_-_Meditation_and_concentration_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams_-_Playing_a_game_well,_and_energy
1951-01-04_-_Transformation_and_reversal_of_consciousness.
1951-01-08_-_True_vision_and_understanding_of_the_world._Progress,_equilibrium._Inner_reality_-_the_psychic._Animals_and_the_psychic.
1951-01-13_-_Aim_of_life_-_effort_and_joy._Science_of_living,_becoming_conscious._Forces_and_influences.
1951-01-15_-_Sincerity_-_inner_discernment_-_inner_light._Evil_and_imbalance._Consciousness_and_instruments.
1951-01-20_-_Developing_the_mind._Misfortunes,_suffering;_developed_reason._Knowledge_and_pure_ideas.
1951-01-25_-_Needs_and_desires._Collaboration_of_the_vital,_mind_an_accomplice._Progress_and_sincerity_-_recognising_faults._Organising_the_body_-_illness_-_new_harmony_-_physical_beauty.
1951-01-27_-_Sleep_-_desires_-_repression_-_the_subconscient._Dreams_-_the_super-conscient_-_solving_problems._Ladder_of_being_-_samadhi._Phases_of_sleep_-_silence,_true_rest._Vital_body_and_illness.
1951-02-03_-_What_is_Yoga?_for_what?_-_Aspiration,_seeking_the_Divine._-_Process_of_yoga,_renouncing_the_ego.
1951-02-05_-_Surrender_and_tapasya_-_Dealing_with_difficulties,_sincerity,_spiritual_discipline_-_Narrating_experiences_-_Vital_impulse_and_will_for_progress
1951-02-08_-_Unifying_the_being_-_ideas_of_good_and_bad_-_Miracles_-_determinism_-_Supreme_Will_-_Distinguishing_the_voice_of_the_Divine
1951-02-10_-_Liberty_and_license_-_surrender_makes_you_free_-_Men_in_authority_as_representatives_of_the_divine_Truth_-_Work_as_offering_-_total_surrender_needs_time_-_Effort_and_inspiration_-_will_and_patience
1951-02-12_-_Divine_force_-_Signs_indicating_readiness_-_Weakness_in_mind,_vital_-_concentration_-_Divine_perception,_human_notion_of_good,_bad_-_Conversion,_consecration_-_progress_-_Signs_of_entering_the_path_-_kinds_of_meditation_-_aspiration
1951-02-17_-_False_visions_-_Offering_ones_will_-_Equilibrium_-_progress_-_maturity_-_Ardent_self-giving-_perfecting_the_instrument_-_Difficulties,_a_help_in_total_realisation_-_paradoxes_-_Sincerity_-_spontaneous_meditation
1951-02-19_-_Exteriorisation-_clairvoyance,_fainting,_etc_-_Somnambulism_-_Tartini_-_childrens_dreams_-_Nightmares_-_gurus_protection_-_Mind_and_vital_roam_during_sleep
1951-02-24_-_Psychic_being_and_entity_-_dimensions_-_in_the_atom_-_Death_-_exteriorisation_-_unconsciousness_-_Past_lives_-_progress_upon_earth_-_choice_of_birth_-_Consecration_to_divine_Work_-_psychic_memories_-_Individualisation_-_progress
1951-02-26_-_On_reading_books_-_gossip_-_Discipline_and_realisation_-_Imaginary_stories-_value_of_-_Private_lives_of_big_men_-_relaxation_-_Understanding_others_-_gnostic_consciousness
1951-03-03_-_Hostile_forces_-_difficulties_-_Individuality_and_form_-_creation
1951-03-05_-_Disasters-_the_forces_of_Nature_-_Story_of_the_charity_Bazar_-_Liberation_and_law_-_Dealing_with_the_mind_and_vital-_methods
1951-03-08_-_Silencing_the_mind_-_changing_the_nature_-_Reincarnation-_choice_-_Psychic,_higher_beings_gods_incarnating_-_Incarnation_of_vital_beings_-_the_Lord_of_Falsehood_-_Hitler_-_Possession_and_madness
1951-03-10_-_Fairy_Tales-_serpent_guarding_treasure_-_Vital_beings-_their_incarnations_-_The_vital_being_after_death_-_Nightmares-_vital_and_mental_-_Mind_and_vital_after_death_-_The_spirit_of_the_form-_Egyptian_mummies
1951-03-12_-_Mental_forms_-_learning_difficult_subjects_-_Mental_fortress_-_thought_-_Training_the_mind_-_Helping_the_vital_being_after_death_-_ceremonies_-_Human_stupidities
1951-03-14_-_Plasticity_-_Conditions_for_knowing_the_Divine_Will_-_Illness_-_microbes_-_Fear_-_body-reflexes_-_The_best_possible_happens_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_True_knowledge_-_a_work_to_do_-_the_Ashram
1951-03-24_-_Descent_of_Divine_Love,_of_Consciousness_-_Earth-_a_symbolic_formation_-_the_Divine_Presence_-_The_psychic_being_and_other_worlds_-_Divine_Love_and_Grace_-_Becoming_consaious_of_Divine_Love_-_Finding_ones_psychic_being_-_Responsibility
1951-03-26_-_Losing_all_to_gain_all_-_psychic_being_-_Transforming_the_vital_-_physical_habits_-_the_subconscient_-_Overcoming_difficulties_-_weakness,_an_insincerity_-_to_change_the_world_-_Psychic_source,_flash_of_experience_-_preparation_for_yoga
1951-04-02_-_Causes_of_accidents_-_Little_entities,_helpful_or_mischievous-_incidents
1951-04-05_-_Illusion_and_interest_in_action_-_The_action_of_the_divine_Grace_and_the_ego_-_Concentration,_aspiration,_will,_inner_silence_-_Value_of_a_story_or_a_language_-_Truth_-_diversity_in_the_world
1951-04-07_-_Origin_of_Evil_-_Misery-_its_cause
1951-04-09_-_Modern_Art_-_Trend_of_art_in_Europe_in_the_twentieth_century_-_Effect_of_the_Wars_-_descent_of_vital_worlds_-_Formation_of_character_-_If_there_is_another_war
1951-04-12_-_Japan,_its_art,_landscapes,_life,_etc_-_Fairy-lore_of_Japan_-_Culture-_its_spiral_movement_-_Indian_and_European-_the_spiritual_life_-_Art_and_Truth
1951-04-14_-_Surrender_and_sacrifice_-_Idea_of_sacrifice_-_Bahaism_-_martyrdom_-_Sleep-_forgetfulness,_exteriorisation,_etc_-_Dreams_and_visions-_explanations_-_Exteriorisation-_incidents_about_cats
1951-04-17_-_Unity,_diversity_-_Protective_envelope_-_desires_-_consciousness,_true_defence_-_Perfection_of_physical_-_cinema_-_Choice,_constant_and_conscious_-_law_of_ones_being_-_the_One,_the_Multiplicity_-_Civilization-_preparing_an_instrument
1951-04-19_-_Demands_and_needs_-_human_nature_-_Abolishing_the_ego_-_Food-_tamas,_consecration_-_Changing_the_nature-_the_vital_and_the_mind_-_The_yoga_of_the_body__-_cellular_consciousness
1951-04-21_-_Sri_Aurobindos_letter_on_conditions_for_doing_yoga_-_Aspiration,_tapasya,_surrender_-_The_lower_vital_-_old_habits_-_obsession_-_Sri_Aurobindo_on_choice_and_the_double_life_-_The_old_fiasco_-_inner_realisation_and_outer_change
1951-04-23_-_The_goal_and_the_way_-_Learning_how_to_sleep_-_relaxation_-_Adverse_forces-_test_of_sincerity_-_Attitude_to_suffering_and_death
1951-04-26_-_Irrevocable_transformation_-_The_divine_Shakti_-_glad_submission_-_Rejection,_integral_-_Consecration_-_total_self-forgetfulness_-_work
1951-04-28_-_Personal_effort_-_tamas,_laziness_-_Static_and_dynamic_power_-_Stupidity_-_psychic_and_intelligence_-_Philosophies-_different_languages_-_Theories_of_Creation_-_Surrender_of_ones_being_and_ones_work
1951-05-03_-_Money_and_its_use_for_the_divine_work_-_problems_-_Mastery_over_desire-_individual_and_collective_change
1951-05-05_-_Needs_and_desires_-_Discernment_-_sincerity_and_true_perception_-_Mantra_and_its_effects_-_Object_in_action-_to_serve_-_relying_only_on_the_Divine
1951-05-11_-_Mahakali_and_Kali_-_Avatar_and_Vibhuti_-_Sachchidananda_behind_all_states_of_being_-_The_power_of_will_-_receiving_the_Divine_Will
1951-05-14_-_Chance_-_the_play_of_forces_-_Peace,_given_and_lost_-_Abolishing_the_ego
1953-03-18
1953-04-08
1953-04-29
1953-05-06
1953-05-13
1953-05-20
1953-05-27
1953-06-03
1953-06-10
1953-06-17
1953-06-24
1953-07-01
1953-07-08
1953-07-15
1953-07-22
1953-07-29
1953-08-05
1953-08-12
1953-08-19
1953-09-16
1953-09-23
1953-09-30
1953-10-07
1953-10-14
1953-10-21
1953-10-28
1953-11-04
1953-11-11
1953-11-18
1953-11-25
1953-12-09
1953-12-16
1953-12-23
1953-12-30
1954-02-03_-_The_senses_and_super-sense_-_Children_can_be_moulded_-_Keeping_things_in_order_-_The_shadow
1954-02-10_-_Study_a_variety_of_subjects_-_Memory_-Memory_of_past_lives_-_Getting_rid_of_unpleasant_thoughts
1954-02-17_-_Experience_expressed_in_different_ways_-_Origin_of_the_psychic_being_-_Progress_in_sports_-Everything_is_not_for_the_best
1954-03-03_-_Occultism_-_A_French_scientists_experiment
1954-03-24_-_Dreams_and_the_condition_of_the_stomach_-_Tobacco_and_alcohol_-_Nervousness_-_The_centres_and_the_Kundalini_-_Control_of_the_senses
1954-04-07_-_Communication_without_words_-_Uneven_progress_-_Words_and_the_Word
1954-04-28_-_Aspiration_and_receptivity_-_Resistance_-_Purusha_and_Prakriti,_not_masculine_and_feminine
1954-05-05_-_Faith,_trust,_confidence_-_Insincerity_and_unconsciousness
1954-05-12_-_The_Purusha_-_Surrender_-_Distinguishing_between_influences_-_Perfect_sincerity
1954-05-19_-_Affection_and_love_-_Psychic_vision_Divine_-_Love_and_receptivity_-_Get_out_of_the_ego
1954-05-26_-_Symbolic_dreams_-_Psychic_sorrow_-_Dreams,_one_is_rarely_conscious
1954-06-02_-_Learning_how_to_live_-_Work,_studies_and_sadhana_-_Waste_of_the_Energy_and_Consciousness
1954-06-16_-_Influences,_Divine_and_other_-_Adverse_forces_-_The_four_great_Asuras_-_Aspiration_arranges_circumstances_-_Wanting_only_the_Divine
1954-06-23_-_Meat-eating_-_Story_of_Mothers_vegetable_garden_-_Faithfulness_-_Conscious_sleep
1954-06-30_-_Occultism_-_Religion_and_vital_beings_-_Mothers_knowledge_of_what_happens_in_the_Ashram_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Drawing_on_Mother
1954-07-07_-_The_inner_warrior_-_Grace_and_the_Falsehood_-_Opening_from_below_-_Surrender_and_inertia_-_Exclusive_receptivity_-_Grace_and_receptivity
1954-07-14_-_The_Divine_and_the_Shakti_-_Personal_effort_-_Speaking_and_thinking_-_Doubt_-_Self-giving,_consecration_and_surrender_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Ornaments_and_protection
1954-07-21_-_Mistakes_-_Success_-_Asuras_-_Mental_arrogance_-_Difficulty_turned_into_opportunity_-_Mothers_use_of_flowers_-_Conversion_of_men_governed_by_adverse_forces
1954-07-28_-_Money_-_Ego_and_individuality_-_The_shadow
1954-08-04_-_Servant_and_worker_-_Justification_of_weakness_-_Play_of_the_Divine_-_Why_are_you_here_in_the_Ashram?
1954-08-11_-_Division_and_creation_-_The_gods_and_human_formations_-_People_carry_their_desires_around_them
1954-08-18_-_Mahalakshmi_-_Maheshwari_-_Mahasaraswati_-_Determinism_and_freedom_-_Suffering_and_knowledge_-_Aspects_of_the_Mother
1954-08-25_-_Ananda_aspect_of_the_Mother_-_Changing_conditions_in_the_Ashram_-_Ascetic_discipline_-_Mothers_body
1954-09-08_-_Hostile_forces_-_Substance_-_Concentration_-_Changing_the_centre_of_thought_-_Peace
1954-09-15_-_Parts_of_the_being_-_Thoughts_and_impulses_-_The_subconscient_-_Precise_vocabulary_-_The_Grace_and_difficulties
1954-09-22_-_The_supramental_creation_-_Rajasic_eagerness_-_Silence_from_above_-_Aspiration_and_rejection_-_Effort,_individuality_and_ego_-_Aspiration_and_desire
1954-09-29_-_The_right_spirit_-_The_Divine_comes_first_-_Finding_the_Divine_-_Mistakes_-_Rejecting_impulses_-_Making_the_consciousness_vast_-_Firm_resolution
1954-10-06_-_What_happens_is_for_the_best_-_Blaming_oneself_-Experiences_-_The_vital_desire-soul_-Creating_a_spiritual_atmosphere_-Thought_and_Truth
1954-10-20_-_Stand_back_-_Asking_questions_to_Mother_-_Seeing_images_in_meditation_-_Berlioz_-Music_-_Mothers_organ_music_-_Destiny
1954-11-03_-_Body_opening_to_the_Divine_-_Concentration_in_the_heart_-_The_army_of_the_Divine_-_The_knot_of_the_ego_-Streng_thening_ones_will
1954-11-10_-_Inner_experience,_the_basis_of_action_-_Keeping_open_to_the_Force_-_Faith_through_aspiration_-_The_Mothers_symbol_-_The_mind_and_vital_seize_experience_-_Degrees_of_sincerity_-Becoming_conscious_of_the_Divine_Force
1954-11-24_-_Aspiration_mixed_with_desire_-_Willing_and_desiring_-_Children_and_desires_-_Supermind_and_the_higher_ranges_of_mind_-_Stages_in_the_supramental_manifestation
1954-12-08_-_Cosmic_consciousness_-_Clutching_-_The_central_will_of_the_being_-_Knowledge_by_identity
1954-12-15_-_Many_witnesses_inside_oneself_-_Children_in_the_Ashram_-_Trance_and_the_waking_consciousness_-_Ascetic_methods_-_Education,_spontaneous_effort_-_Spiritual_experience
1954-12-22_-_Possession_by_hostile_forces_-_Purity_and_morality_-_Faith_in_the_final_success_-Drawing_back_from_the_path
1954-12-29_-_Difficulties_and_the_world_-_The_experience_the_psychic_being_wants_-_After_death_-Ignorance
1955-02-09_-_Desire_is_contagious_-_Primitive_form_of_love_-_the_artists_delight_-_Psychic_need,_mind_as_an_instrument_-_How_the_psychic_being_expresses_itself_-_Distinguishing_the_parts_of_ones_being_-_The_psychic_guides_-_Illness_-_Mothers_vision
1955-02-16_-_Losing_something_given_by_Mother_-_Using_things_well_-_Sadhak_collecting_soap-pieces_-_What_things_are_truly_indispensable_-_Natures_harmonious_arrangement_-_Riches_a_curse,_philanthropy_-_Misuse_of_things_creates_misery
1955-02-23_-_On_the_sense_of_taste,_educating_the_senses_-_Fasting_produces_a_state_of_receptivity,_drawing_energy_-_The_body_and_food
1955-03-02_-_Right_spirit,_aspiration_and_desire_-_Sleep_and_yogic_repose,_how_to_sleep_-_Remembering_dreams_-_Concentration_and_outer_activity_-_Mother_opens_the_door_inside_everyone_-_Sleep,_a_school_for_inner_knowledge_-_Source_of_energy
1955-03-09_-_Psychic_directly_contacted_through_the_physical_-_Transforming_egoistic_movements_-_Work_of_the_psychic_being_-_Contacting_the_psychic_and_the_Divine_-_Experiences_of_different_kinds_-_Attacks_of_adverse_forces
1955-03-23_-_Procedure_for_rejection_and_transformation_-_Learning_by_heart,_true_understanding_-_Vibrations,_movements_of_the_species_-_A_cat_and_a_Russian_peasant_woman_-_A_cat_doing_yoga
1955-04-06_-_Freuds_psychoanalysis,_the_subliminal_being_-_The_psychic_and_the_subliminal_-_True_psychology_-_Changing_the_lower_nature_-_Faith_in_different_parts_of_the_being_-_Psychic_contact_established_in_all_in_the_Ashram
1955-04-13_-_Psychoanalysts_-_The_underground_super-ego,_dreams,_sleep,_control_-_Archetypes,_Overmind_and_higher_-_Dream_of_someone_dying_-_Integral_repose,_entering_Sachchidananda_-_Organising_ones_life,_concentration,_repose
1955-04-27_-_Symbolic_dreams_and_visions_-_Curing_pain_by_various_methods_-_Different_states_of_consciousness_-_Seeing_oneself_dead_in_a_dream_-_Exteriorisation
1955-05-04_-_Drawing_on_the_universal_vital_forces_-_The_inner_physical_-_Receptivity_to_different_kinds_of_forces_-_Progress_and_receptivity
1955-05-18_-_The_Problem_of_Woman_-_Men_and_women_-_The_Supreme_Mother,_the_new_creation_-_Gods_and_goddesses_-_A_story_of_Creation,_earth_-_Psychic_being_only_on_earth,_beings_everywhere_-_Going_to_other_worlds_by_occult_means
1955-05-25_-_Religion_and_reason_-_true_role_and_field_-_an_obstacle_to_or_minister_of_the_Spirit_-_developing_and_meaning_-_Learning_how_to_live,_the_elite_-_Reason_controls_and_organises_life_-_Nature_is_infrarational
1955-06-01_-_The_aesthetic_conscience_-_Beauty_and_form_-_The_roots_of_our_life_-_The_sense_of_beauty_-_Educating_the_aesthetic_sense,_taste_-_Mental_constructions_based_on_a_revelation_-_Changing_the_world_and_humanity
1955-06-08_-_Working_for_the_Divine_-_ideal_attitude_-_Divine_manifesting_-_reversal_of_consciousness,_knowing_oneself_-_Integral_progress,_outer,_inner,_facing_difficulties_-_People_in_Ashram_-_doing_Yoga_-_Children_given_freedom,_choosing_yoga
1955-06-15_-_Dynamic_realisation,_transformation_-_The_negative_and_positive_side_of_experience_-_The_image_of_the_dry_coconut_fruit_-_Purusha,_Prakriti,_the_Divine_Mother_-_The_Truth-Creation_-_Pralaya_-_We_are_in_a_transitional_period
1955-06-22_-_Awakening_the_Yoga-shakti_-_The_thousand-petalled_lotus-_Reading,_how_far_a_help_for_yoga_-_Simple_and_complicated_combinations_in_men
1955-06-29_-_The_true_vital_and_true_physical_-_Time_and_Space_-_The_psychics_memory_of_former_lives_-_The_psychic_organises_ones_life_-_The_psychics_knowledge_and_direction
1955-07-06_-_The_psychic_and_the_central_being_or_jivatman_-_Unity_and_multiplicity_in_the_Divine_-_Having_experiences_and_the_ego_-_Mental,_vital_and_physical_exteriorisation_-_Imagination_has_a_formative_power_-_The_function_of_the_imagination
1955-07-13_-_Cosmic_spirit_and_cosmic_consciousness_-_The_wall_of_ignorance,_unity_and_separation_-_Aspiration_to_understand,_to_know,_to_be_-_The_Divine_is_in_the_essence_of_ones_being_-_Realising_desires_through_the_imaginaton
1955-07-20_-_The_Impersonal_Divine_-_Surrender_to_the_Divine_brings_perfect_freedom_-_The_Divine_gives_Himself_-_The_principle_of_the_inner_dimensions_-_The_paths_of_aspiration_and_surrender_-_Linear_and_spherical_paths_and_realisations
1955-08-03_-_Nothing_is_impossible_in_principle_-_Psychic_contact_and_psychic_influence_-_Occult_powers,_adverse_influences;_magic_-_Magic,_occultism_and_Yogic_powers_-Hypnotism_and_its_effects
1955-09-21_-_Literature_and_the_taste_for_forms_-_The_characters_of_The_Great_Secret_-_How_literature_helps_us_to_progress_-_Reading_to_learn_-_The_commercial_mentality_-_How_to_choose_ones_books_-_Learning_to_enrich_ones_possibilities_...
1955-10-05_-_Science_and_Ignorance_-_Knowledge,_science_and_the_Buddha_-_Knowing_by_identification_-_Discipline_in_science_and_in_Buddhism_-_Progress_in_the_mental_field_and_beyond_it
1955-10-12_-_The_problem_of_transformation_-_Evolution,_man_and_superman_-_Awakening_need_of_a_higher_good_-_Sri_Aurobindo_and_earths_history_-_Setting_foot_on_the_new_path_-_The_true_reality_of_the_universe_-_the_new_race_-_...
1955-10-19_-_The_rhythms_of_time_-_The_lotus_of_knowledge_and_perfection_-_Potential_knowledge_-_The_teguments_of_the_soul_-_Shastra_and_the_Gurus_direct_teaching_-_He_who_chooses_the_Infinite...
1955-10-26_-_The_Divine_and_the_universal_Teacher_-_The_power_of_the_Word_-_The_Creative_Word,_the_mantra_-_Sound,_music_in_other_worlds_-_The_domains_of_pure_form,_colour_and_ideas
1955-11-02_-_The_first_movement_in_Yoga_-_Interiorisation,_finding_ones_soul_-_The_Vedic_Age_-_An_incident_about_Vivekananda_-_The_imaged_language_of_the_Vedas_-_The_Vedic_Rishis,_involutionary_beings_-_Involution_and_evolution
1955-11-09_-_Personal_effort,_egoistic_mind_-_Man_is_like_a_public_square_-_Natures_work_-_Ego_needed_for_formation_of_individual_-_Adverse_forces_needed_to_make_man_sincere_-_Determinisms_of_different_planes,_miracles
1955-11-16_-_The_significance_of_numbers_-_Numbers,_astrology,_true_knowledge_-_Divines_Love_flowers_for_Kali_puja_-_Desire,_aspiration_and_progress_-_Determining_ones_approach_to_the_Divine_-_Liberation_is_obtained_through_austerities_-_...
1955-11-23_-_One_reality,_multiple_manifestations_-_Integral_Yoga,_approach_by_all_paths_-_The_supreme_man_and_the_divine_man_-_Miracles_and_the_logic_of_events
1955-12-07_-_Emotional_impulse_of_self-giving_-_A_young_dancer_in_France_-_The_heart_has_wings,_not_the_head_-_Only_joy_can_conquer_the_Adversary
1955-12-14_-_Rejection_of_life_as_illusion_in_the_old_Yogas_-_Fighting_the_adverse_forces_-_Universal_and_individual_being_-_Three_stages_in_Integral_Yoga_-_How_to_feel_the_Divine_Presence_constantly
1956-01-04_-_Integral_idea_of_the_Divine_-_All_things_attracted_by_the_Divine_-_Bad_things_not_in_place_-_Integral_yoga_-_Moving_idea-force,_ideas_-_Consequences_of_manifestation_-_Work_of_Spirit_via_Nature_-_Change_consciousness,_change_world
1956-01-11_-_Desire_and_self-deception_-_Giving_all_one_is_and_has_-_Sincerity,_more_powerful_than_will_-_Joy_of_progress_Definition_of_youth
1956-01-18_-_Two_sides_of_individual_work_-_Cheerfulness_-_chosen_vessel_of_the_Divine_-_Aspiration,_consciousness,_of_plants,_of_children_-_Being_chosen_by_the_Divine_-_True_hierarchy_-_Perfect_relation_with_the_Divine_-_India_free_in_1915
1956-01-25_-_The_divine_way_of_life_-_Divine,_Overmind,_Supermind_-_Material_body__for_discovery_of_the_Divine_-_Five_psychological_perfections
1956-02-01_-_Path_of_knowledge_-_Finding_the_Divine_in_life_-_Capacity_for_contact_with_the_Divine_-_Partial_and_total_identification_with_the_Divine_-_Manifestation_and_hierarchy
1956-02-08_-_Forces_of_Nature_expressing_a_higher_Will_-_Illusion_of_separate_personality_-_One_dynamic_force_which_moves_all_things_-_Linear_and_spherical_thinking_-_Common_ideal_of_life,_microscopic
1956-02-15_-_Nature_and_the_Master_of_Nature_-_Conscious_intelligence_-_Theory_of_the_Gita,_not_the_whole_truth_-_Surrender_to_the_Lord_-_Change_of_nature
1956-02-22_-_Strong_immobility_of_an_immortal_spirit_-_Equality_of_soul_-_Is_all_an_expression_of_the_divine_Will?_-_Loosening_the_knot_of_action_-_Using_experience_as_a_cloak_to_cover_excesses_-_Sincerity,_a_rare_virtue
1956-02-29_-_Sacrifice,_self-giving_-_Divine_Presence_in_the_heart_of_Matter_-_Divine_Oneness_-_Divine_Consciousness_-_All_is_One_-_Divine_in_the_inconscient_aspires_for_the_Divine
1956-03-14_-_Dynamic_meditation_-_Do_all_as_an_offering_to_the_Divine_-_Significance_of_23.4.56._-_If_twelve_men_of_goodwill_call_the_Divine
1956-03-21_-_Identify_with_the_Divine_-_The_Divine,_the_most_important_thing_in_life
1956-03-28_-_The_starting-point_of_spiritual_experience_-_The_boundless_finite_-_The_Timeless_and_Time_-_Mental_explanation_not_enough_-_Changing_knowledge_into_experience_-_Sat-Chit-Tapas-Ananda
1956-04-04_-_The_witness_soul_-_A_Gita_enthusiast_-_Propagandist_spirit,_Tolstoys_son
1956-04-11_-_Self-creator_-_Manifestation_of_Time_and_Space_-_Brahman-Maya_and_Ishwara-Shakti_-_Personal_and_Impersonal
1956-04-18_-_Ishwara_and_Shakti,_seeing_both_aspects_-_The_Impersonal_and_the_divine_Person_-_Soul,_the_presence_of_the_divine_Person_-_Going_to_other_worlds,_exteriorisation,_dreams_-_Telling_stories_to_oneself
1956-04-25_-_God,_human_conception_and_the_true_Divine_-_Earthly_existence,_to_realise_the_Divine_-_Ananda,_divine_pleasure_-_Relations_with_the_divine_Presence_-_Asking_the_Divine_for_what_one_needs_-_Allowing_the_Divine_to_lead_one
1956-05-02_-_Threefold_union_-_Manifestation_of_the_Supramental_-_Profiting_from_the_Divine_-_Recognition_of_the_Supramental_Force_-_Ascent,_descent,_manifestation
1956-05-09_-_Beginning_of_the_true_spiritual_life_-_Spirit_gives_value_to_all_things_-_To_be_helped_by_the_supramental_Force
1956-05-23_-_Yoga_and_religion_-_Story_of_two_clergymen_on_a_boat_-_The_Buddha_and_the_Supramental_-_Hieroglyphs_and_phonetic_alphabets_-_A_vision_of_ancient_Egypt_-_Memory_for_sounds
1956-06-06_-_Sign_or_indication_from_books_of_revelation_-_Spiritualised_mind_-_Stages_of_sadhana_-_Reversal_of_consciousness_-_Organisation_around_central_Presence_-_Boredom,_most_common_human_malady
1956-06-13_-_Effects_of_the_Supramental_action_-_Education_and_the_Supermind_-_Right_to_remain_ignorant_-_Concentration_of_mind_-_Reason,_not_supreme_capacity_-_Physical_education_and_studies_-_inner_discipline_-_True_usefulness_of_teachers
1956-06-20_-_Hearts_mystic_light,_intuition_-_Psychic_being,_contact_-_Secular_ethics_-_True_role_of_mind_-_Realise_the_Divine_by_love_-_Depression,_pleasure,_joy_-_Heart_mixture_-_To_follow_the_soul_-_Physical_process_-_remember_the_Mother
1956-06-27_-_Birth,_entry_of_soul_into_body_-_Formation_of_the_supramental_world_-_Aspiration_for_progress_-_Bad_thoughts_-_Cerebral_filter_-_Progress_and_resistance
1956-07-11_-_Beauty_restored_to_its_priesthood_-_Occult_worlds,_occult_beings_-_Difficulties_and_the_supramental_force
1956-07-18_-_Unlived_dreams_-_Radha-consciousness_-_Separation_and_identification_-_Ananda_of_identity_and_Ananda_of_union_-_Sincerity,_meditation_and_prayer_-_Enemies_of_the_Divine_-_The_universe_is_progressive
1956-07-25_-_A_complete_act_of_divine_love_-_How_to_listen_-_Sports_programme_same_for_boys_and_girls_-_How_to_profit_by_stay_at_Ashram_-_To_Women_about_Their_Body
1956-08-01_-_Value_of_worship_-_Spiritual_realisation_and_the_integral_yoga_-_Symbols,_translation_of_experience_into_form_-_Sincerity,_fundamental_virtue_-_Intensity_of_aspiration,_with_anguish_or_joy_-_The_divine_Grace
1956-08-08_-_How_to_light_the_psychic_fire,_will_for_progress_-_Helping_from_a_distance,_mental_formations_-_Prayer_and_the_divine_-_Grace_Grace_at_work_everywhere
1956-08-15_-_Protection,_purification,_fear_-_Atmosphere_at_the_Ashram_on_Darshan_days_-_Darshan_messages_-_Significance_of_15-08_-_State_of_surrender_-_Divine_Grace_always_all-powerful_-_Assumption_of_Virgin_Mary_-_SA_message_of_1947-08-15
1956-08-22_-_The_heaven_of_the_liberated_mind_-_Trance_or_samadhi_-_Occult_discipline_for_leaving_consecutive_bodies_-_To_be_greater_than_ones_experience_-_Total_self-giving_to_the_Grace_-_The_truth_of_the_being_-_Unique_relation_with_the_Supreme
1956-08-29_-_To_live_spontaneously_-_Mental_formations_Absolute_sincerity_-_Balance_is_indispensable,_the_middle_path_-_When_in_difficulty,_widen_the_consciousness_-_Easiest_way_of_forgetting_oneself
1956-09-05_-_Material_life,_seeing_in_the_right_way_-_Effect_of_the_Supermind_on_the_earth_-_Emergence_of_the_Supermind_-_Falling_back_into_the_same_mistaken_ways
1956-09-12_-_Questions,_practice_and_progress
1956-09-19_-_Power,_predominant_quality_of_vital_being_-_The_Divine,_the_psychic_being,_the_Supermind_-_How_to_come_out_of_the_physical_consciousness_-_Look_life_in_the_face_-_Ordinary_love_and_Divine_love
1956-09-26_-_Soul_of_desire_-_Openness,_harmony_with_Nature_-_Communion_with_divine_Presence_-_Individuality,_difficulties,_soul_of_desire_-_personal_contact_with_the_Mother_-_Inner_receptivity_-_Bad_thoughts_before_the_Mother
1956-10-03_-_The_Mothers_different_ways_of_speaking_-_new_manifestation_-_new_element,_possibilities_-_child_prodigies_-_Laws_of_Nature,_supramental_-_Logic_of_the_unforeseen_-_Creative_writers,_hands_of_musicians_-_Prodigious_children,_men
1956-11-14_-_Conquering_the_desire_to_appear_good_-_Self-control_and_control_of_the_life_around_-_Power_of_mastery_-_Be_a_great_yogi_to_be_a_good_teacher_-_Organisation_of_the_Ashram_school_-_Elementary_discipline_of_regularity
1956-11-21_-_Knowings_and_Knowledge_-_Reason,_summit_of_mans_mental_activities_-_Willings_and_the_true_will_-_Personal_effort_-_First_step_to_have_knowledge_-_Relativity_of_medical_knowledge_-_Mental_gymnastics_make_the_mind_supple
1956-11-28_-_Desire,_ego,_animal_nature_-_Consciousness,_a_progressive_state_-_Ananda,_desireless_state_beyond_enjoyings_-_Personal_effort_that_is_mental_-_Reason,_when_to_disregard_it_-_Reason_and_reasons
1956-12-05_-_Even_and_objectless_ecstasy_-_Transform_the_animal_-_Individual_personality_and_world-personality_-_Characteristic_features_of_a_world-personality_-_Expressing_a_universal_state_of_consciousness_-_Food_and_sleep_-_Ordered_intuition
1956-12-12_-_paradoxes_-_Nothing_impossible_-_unfolding_universe,_the_Eternal_-_Attention,_concentration,_effort_-_growth_capacity_almost_unlimited_-_Why_things_are_not_the_same_-_will_and_willings_-_Suggestions,_formations_-_vital_world
1956-12-26_-_Defeated_victories_-_Change_of_consciousness_-_Experiences_that_indicate_the_road_to_take_-_Choice_and_preference_-_Diversity_of_the_manifestation
1957-01-02_-_Can_one_go_out_of_time_and_space?_-_Not_a_crucified_but_a_glorified_body_-_Individual_effort_and_the_new_force
1957-01-09_-_God_is_essentially_Delight_-_God_and_Nature_play_at_hide-and-seek_-__Why,_and_when,_are_you_grave?
1957-01-16_-_Seeking_something_without_knowing_it_-_Why_are_we_here?
1957-02-06_-_Death,_need_of_progress_-_Changing_Natures_methods
1957-02-20_-_Limitations_of_the_body_and_individuality
1957-03-13_-_Our_best_friend
1957-03-22_-_A_story_of_initiation,_knowledge_and_practice
1957-03-27_-_If_only_humanity_consented_to_be_spiritualised
1957-04-17_-_Transformation_of_the_body
1957-04-24_-_Perfection,_lower_and_higher
1957-05-08_-_Vital_excitement,_reason,_instinct
1957-05-15_-_Differentiation_of_the_sexes_-_Transformation_from_above_downwards
1957-05-29_-_Progressive_transformation
1957-06-19_-_Causes_of_illness_Fear_and_illness_-_Minds_working,_faith_and_illness
1957-07-03_-_Collective_yoga,_vision_of_a_huge_hotel
1957-07-10_-_A_new_world_is_born_-_Overmind_creation_dissolved
1957-07-17_-_Power_of_conscious_will_over_matter
1957-07-24_-_The_involved_supermind_-_The_new_world_and_the_old_-_Will_for_progress_indispensable
1957-08-07_-_The_resistances,_politics_and_money_-_Aspiration_to_realise_the_supramental_life
1957-08-21_-_The_Ashram_and_true_communal_life_-_Level_of_consciousness_in_the_Ashram
1957-08-28_-_Freedom_and_Divine_Will
1957-09-04_-_Sri_Aurobindo,_an_eternal_birth
1957-09-11_-_Vital_chemistry,_attraction_and_repulsion
1957-09-18_-_Occultism_and_supramental_life
1957-10-02_-_The_Mind_of_Light_-_Statues_of_the_Buddha_-_Burden_of_the_past
1957-10-09_-_As_many_universes_as_individuals_-_Passage_to_the_higher_hemisphere
1957-10-16_-_Story_of_successive_involutions
1957-10-23_-_The_central_motive_of_terrestrial_existence_-_Evolution
1957-10-30_-_Double_movement_of_evolution_-_Disappearance_of_a_species
1957-11-27_-_Sri_Aurobindos_method_in_The_Life_Divine_-_Individual_and_cosmic_evolution
1957-12-04_-_The_method_of_The_Life_Divine_-_Problem_of_emergence_of_a_new_species
1957-12-11_-_Appearance_of_the_first_men
1958-01-01_-_The_collaboration_of_material_Nature_-_Miracles_visible_to_a_deep_vision_of_things_-_Explanation_of_New_Year_Message
1958-01-08_-_Sri_Aurobindos_method_of_exposition_-_The_mind_as_a_public_place_-_Mental_control_-_Sri_Aurobindos_subtle_hand
1958-01-22_-_Intellectual_theories_-_Expressing_a_living_and_real_Truth
1958-01-29_-_The_plan_of_the_universe_-_Self-awareness
1958-03-12_-_The_key_of_past_transformations
1958-03-19_-_General_tension_in_humanity_-_Peace_and_progress_-_Perversion_and_vision_of_transformation
1958-03-26_-_Mental_anxiety_and_trust_in_spiritual_power
1958-04-09_-_The_eyes_of_the_soul_-_Perceiving_the_soul
1958-04-16_-_The_superman_-_New_realisation
1958-05-07_-_The_secret_of_Nature
1958-05-14_-_Intellectual_activity_and_subtle_knowing_-_Understanding_with_the_body
1958-06-04_-_New_birth
1958-06-25_-_Sadhana_in_the_body
1958-08-13_-_Profit_by_staying_in_the_Ashram_-_What_Sri_Aurobindo_has_come_to_tell_us_-_Finding_the_Divine
1958-08-27_-_Meditation_and_imagination_-_From_thought_to_idea,_from_idea_to_principle
1958-09-03_-_How_to_discipline_the_imagination_-_Mental_formations
1958-09-10_-_Magic,_occultism,_physical_science
1958_09_12
1958-09-17_-_Power_of_formulating_experience_-_Usefulness_of_mental_development
1958_09_19
1958-09-24_-_Living_the_truth_-_Words_and_experience
1958_10_03
1958_10_10
1958-10-22_-_Spiritual_life_-_reversal_of_consciousness_-_Helping_others
1958-11-12_-_The_aim_of_the_Supreme_-_Trust_in_the_Grace
1958-11-26_-_The_role_of_the_Spirit_-_New_birth
1958_12_05
1960_01_20
1960_03_16
1960_03_23
1960_06_03
1960_06_16
1960_06_22
1960_07_13
1960_07_19
1960_08_24
1960_08_27
1960_11_11?_-_48
1960_11_12?_-_49
1960_11_13?_-_50
1961_01_28
1961_02_02
1961_03_11_-_58
1961_03_17_-_57
1961_05_22?
1961_07_18
1962_02_27
1962_10_12
1963_03_06
1963_05_15
1963_08_11?_-_94
1963_11_04
1964_09_16
1965_03_03
1965_05_29
1965_12_26?
1966_07_06
1967-05-24.1_-_Defining_the_Divine
1969_08_15?_-_133
1969_08_19
1969_08_28
1969_10_10
1969_10_29
1969_12_05
1969_12_28
1969_12_31
1970_01_13?
1970_01_23
1970_01_30
1970_02_12
1970_03_17
1970_04_01
1970_04_03
1970_04_06
1970_04_07
1970_04_08
1970_04_13
1970_05_02
1970_05_13?
1970_05_23
1970_06_04
1.ac_-_A_Birthday
1.ac_-_On_-_On_-_Poet
1.ac_-_The_Hawk_and_the_Babe
1.anon_-_If_this_were_a_world
1.anon_-_Others_have_told_me
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_II
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_III
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_IV
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_TabletIX
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_VII
1.anon_-_The_Epic_of_Gilgamesh_Tablet_X
1.anon_-_The_Poem_of_Antar
1.anon_-_The_Song_of_Songs
1.at_-_The_Higher_Pantheism
1.bsf_-_Fathom_the_ocean
1.bsf_-_Raga_Asa
1.bsf_-_Why_do_you_roam_the_jungles?
1.bsf_-_You_must_fathom_the_ocean
1.bs_-_One_Point_Contains_All
1.bs_-_What_a_carefree_game_He_plays!
1.bts_-_Love_is_Lord_of_All
1f.lovecraft_-_A_Reminiscence_of_Dr._Samuel_Johnson
1f.lovecraft_-_Ashes
1f.lovecraft_-_At_the_Mountains_of_Madness
1f.lovecraft_-_Beyond_the_Wall_of_Sleep
1f.lovecraft_-_Cool_Air
1f.lovecraft_-_Dagon
1f.lovecraft_-_Deaf,_Dumb,_and_Blind
1f.lovecraft_-_Discarded_Draft_of
1f.lovecraft_-_Facts_concerning_the_Late
1f.lovecraft_-_From_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_Herbert_West-Reanimator
1f.lovecraft_-_Hypnos
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Vault
1f.lovecraft_-_In_the_Walls_of_Eryx
1f.lovecraft_-_Medusas_Coil
1f.lovecraft_-_Memory
1f.lovecraft_-_Nyarlathotep
1f.lovecraft_-_Out_of_the_Aeons
1f.lovecraft_-_Pickmans_Model
1f.lovecraft_-_Sweet_Ermengarde
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Alchemist
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Book
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Call_of_Cthulhu
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Case_of_Charles_Dexter_Ward
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Cats_of_Ulthar
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Challenge_from_Beyond
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Colour_out_of_Space
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Curse_of_Yig
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Descendant
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Diary_of_Alonzo_Typer
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Disinterment
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Doom_That_Came_to_Sarnath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dream-Quest_of_Unknown_Kadath
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dreams_in_the_Witch_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Dunwich_Horror
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Electric_Executioner
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Evil_Clergyman
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Ghost-Eater
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Haunter_of_the_Dark
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hoard_of_the_Wizard-Beast
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_at_Red_Hook
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Burying-Ground
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Horror_in_the_Museum
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Hound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Last_Test
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Loved_Dead
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Lurking_Fear
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Man_of_Stone
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Moon-Bog
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mound
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Music_of_Erich_Zann
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Mystery_of_the_Grave-Yard
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Nameless_City
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Night_Ocean
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Rats_in_the_Walls
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_out_of_Time
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shadow_over_Innsmouth
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Shunned_House
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Statement_of_Randolph_Carter
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Thing_on_the_Doorstep
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Transition_of_Juan_Romero
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Trap
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Tree_on_the_Hill
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Unnamable
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Very_Old_Folk
1f.lovecraft_-_The_Whisperer_in_Darkness
1f.lovecraft_-_Through_the_Gates_of_the_Silver_Key
1f.lovecraft_-_Till_A_the_Seas
1f.lovecraft_-_Two_Black_Bottles
1f.lovecraft_-_Under_the_Pyramids
1f.lovecraft_-_Winged_Death
1.fs_-_Cassandra
1.fs_-_Fortune_And_Wisdom
1.fs_-_My_Antipathy
1.fs_-_My_Faith
1.fs_-_Pompeii_And_Herculaneum
1.fs_-_Shakespeare's_Ghost_-_A_Parody
1.fs_-_The_Alpine_Hunter
1.fs_-_The_Difficult_Union
1.fs_-_The_Fight_With_The_Dragon
1.fs_-_The_Fortune-Favored
1.fs_-_The_Lay_Of_The_Bell
1.fs_-_The_Youth_By_The_Brook
1.fs_-_To_Laura_(Mystery_Of_Reminiscence)
1.fua_-_The_peacocks_excuse
1.fua_-_The_Pupil_asks-_the_Master_answers
1.hcyc_-_14_-_The_best_student_goes_directly_to_the_ultimate_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_24_-_Why_should_this_be_better_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hcyc_-_56_-_The_hungry_are_served_a_kings_repast_(from_The_Shodoka)
1.hs_-_I_Know_The_Way_You_Can_Get
1.hs_-_Mystic_Chat
1.hs_-_Naked_in_the_Bee-House
1.hs_-_Not_Worth_The_Toil!
1.hs_-_O_Cup_Bearer
1.hs_-_Several_Times_In_The_Last_Week
1.hs_-_The_Pearl_on_the_Ocean_Floor
1.hs_-_There_is_no_place_for_place!
1.hs_-_True_Love
1.hs_-_Why_Carry?
1.ia_-_Listen,_O_Dearly_Beloved
1.ia_-_Reality
1.ia_-_The_Hand_Of_Trial
1.jk_-_An_Extempore
1.jk_-_Ben_Nevis_-_A_Dialogue
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_I
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_II
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_III
1.jk_-_Endymion_-_Book_IV
1.jk_-_Epistle_To_My_Brother_George
1.jk_-_Fragment_-_Modern_Love
1.jk_-_Hymn_To_Apollo
1.jk_-_Hyperion,_A_Vision_-_Attempted_Reconstruction_Of_The_Poem
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_I
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_II
1.jk_-_Hyperion._Book_III
1.jk_-_Isabella;_Or,_The_Pot_Of_Basil_-_A_Story_From_Boccaccio
1.jk_-_I_Stood_Tip-Toe_Upon_A_Little_Hill
1.jk_-_King_Stephen
1.jk_-_La_Belle_Dame_Sans_Merci
1.jk_-_La_Belle_Dame_Sans_Merci_(Original_version_)
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_I
1.jk_-_Lamia._Part_II
1.jk_-_Ode_On_A_Grecian_Urn
1.jk_-_Ode_On_Indolence
1.jk_-_Ode_To_Fanny
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_I
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_II
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_III
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_IV
1.jk_-_Otho_The_Great_-_Act_V
1.jk_-_Sleep_And_Poetry
1.jk_-_Song._I_Had_A_Dove
1.jk_-_Song_Of_The_Indian_Maid,_From_Endymion
1.jk_-_Sonnet._To_A_Young_Lady_Who_Sent_Me_A_Laurel_Crown
1.jk_-_Sonnet._Why_Did_I_Laugh_Tonight?
1.jk_-_Stanzas_To_Miss_Wylie
1.jk_-_The_Cap_And_Bells;_Or,_The_Jealousies_-_A_Faery_Tale_.._Unfinished
1.jk_-_The_Eve_Of_St._Agnes
1.jk_-_To_Charles_Cowden_Clarke
1.jk_-_To_Some_Ladies
1.jk_-_Two_Sonnets_On_Fame
1.jlb_-_The_Golem
1.jr_-_A_World_with_No_Boundaries_(Ghazal_363)
1.jr_-_Body_of_earth,_dont_talk_of_earth
1.jr_-_Book_1_-_Prologue
1.jr_-_I_See_So_Deeply_Within_Myself
1.jr_-_look_at_love
1.jr_-_Lord,_What_A_Beloved_Is_Mine!
1.jr_-_Lovers
1.jr_-_On_the_Night_of_Creation_I_was_awake
1.jr_-_The_Ravings_Which_My_Enemy_Uttered_I_Heard_Within_My_Heart
1.jr_-_The_Taste_Of_Morning
1.jr_-_Who_Is_At_My_Door?
1.jr_-_You_are_closer_to_me_than_myself_(Ghazal_2798)
1.jt_-_As_air_carries_light_poured_out_by_the_rising_sun
1.jt_-_How_the_Soul_Through_the_Senses_Finds_God_in_All_Creatures
1.jt_-_Love_beyond_all_telling_(from_Self-Annihilation_and_Charity_Lead_the_Soul...)
1.jwvg_-_Anniversary_Song
1.jwvg_-_April
1.jwvg_-_Book_Of_Proverbs
1.jwvg_-_From
1.jwvg_-_Growth
1.jwvg_-_Prometheus
1.jwvg_-_The_Reckoning
1.jwvg_-_The_Sea-Voyage
1.jwvg_-_The_Wanderer
1.kaa_-_The_Friend_Beside_Me
1.kbr_-_Friend,_Wake_Up!_Why_Do_You_Go_On_Sleeping?
1.kbr_-_Hey_Brother,_Why_Do_You_Want_Me_To_Talk?
1.kbr_-_Hey_brother,_why_do_you_want_me_to_talk?
1.kbr_-_How_Humble_Is_God
1.kbr_-_I_Talk_To_My_Inner_Lover,_And_I_Say,_Why_Such_Rush?
1.kbr_-_Oh_Friend,_I_Love_You,_Think_This_Over
1.kbr_-_Tentacles_of_Time
1.ki_-_First_firefly
1.lb_-_Atop_Green_Mountains_by_Li_Po
1.lb_-_A_Vindication
1.lb_-_Bringing_in_the_Wine
1.lb_-_Green_Mountain
1.lb_-_In_Spring
1.lb_-_Nefarious_War
1.lb_-_Talk_in_the_Mountains_[Question_&_Answer_on_the_Mountain]
1.lb_-_The_River-Merchant's_Wife:_A_Letter
1.lla_-_I_made_pilgrimages,_looking_for_God
1.lla_-_I_traveled_a_long_way_seeking_God
1.lla_-_Just_for_a_moment,_flowers_appear
1.lovecraft_-_An_Epistle_To_Rheinhart_Kleiner,_Esq.,_Poet-Laureate,_And_Author_Of_Another_Endless_Day
1.lovecraft_-_Fungi_From_Yuggoth
1.lovecraft_-_Poemata_Minora-_Volume_II
1.lovecraft_-_Psychopompos-_A_Tale_in_Rhyme
1.lovecraft_-_The_Conscript
1.lovecraft_-_The_Teutons_Battle-Song
1.mb_-_Why_Mira_Cant_Come_Back_to_Her_Old_House
1.ml_-_Realisation_of_Dreams_and_Mind
1.nmdv_-_Laughing_and_playing,_I_came_to_Your_Temple,_O_Lord
1.okym_-_20_-_Ah,_my_Beloved,_fill_the_Cup_that_clears
1.okym_-_25_-_Why,_all_the_Saints_and_Sages_who_discussd
1.okym_-_29_-_Into_this_Universe,_and_Why_not_knowing
1.okym_-_37_-_Ah,_fill_the_Cup-_--_what_boots_it_to_repeat
1.okym_-_46_-_later_edition_-_Why,_be_this_Juice_the_growth_of_God,_who_dare_Why,_be_this_Juice_the_growth_of_God,_who_dare
1.okym_-_51_-_later_edition_-_Why,_if_the_Soul_can_fling_the_Dust_aside
1.okym_-_62_-_Another_said_--_Why,_neer_a_peevish_Boy
1.pbs_-_Adonais_-_An_elegy_on_the_Death_of_John_Keats
1.pbs_-_Epigram_III_-_Spirit_of_Plato
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion
1.pbs_-_Epipsychidion_-_Passages_Of_The_Poem,_Or_Connected_Therewith
1.pbs_-_Fragments_Of_An_Unfinished_Drama
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_Sufficient_Unto_The_Day
1.pbs_-_Fragment_-_To_Byron
1.pbs_-_From
1.pbs_-_Ghasta_Or,_The_Avenging_Demon!!!
1.pbs_-_Hymn_to_Intellectual_Beauty
1.pbs_-_Hymn_To_Mercury
1.pbs_-_Julian_and_Maddalo_-_A_Conversation
1.pbs_-_Letter_To_Maria_Gisborne
1.pbs_-_Love
1.pbs_-_Loves_Philosophy
1.pbs_-_Melody_To_A_Scene_Of_Former_Times
1.pbs_-_Ode_To_Liberty
1.pbs_-_Oedipus_Tyrannus_or_Swellfoot_The_Tyrant
1.pbs_-_On_An_Icicle_That_Clung_To_The_Grass_Of_A_Grave
1.pbs_-_Peter_Bell_The_Third
1.pbs_-_Prometheus_Unbound
1.pbs_-_Queen_Mab_-_Part_III.
1.pbs_-_Rosalind_and_Helen_-_a_Modern_Eclogue
1.pbs_-_Scenes_From_The_Faust_Of_Goethe
1.pbs_-_Song_To_The_Men_Of_England
1.pbs_-_St._Irvynes_Tower
1.pbs_-_The_Boat_On_The_Serchio
1.pbs_-_The_Cenci_-_A_Tragedy_In_Five_Acts
1.pbs_-_The_Cyclops
1.pbs_-_The_Devils_Walk._A_Ballad
1.pbs_-_The_First_Canzone_Of_The_Convito
1.pbs_-_The_Revolt_Of_Islam_-_Canto_I-XII
1.pbs_-_The_Triumph_Of_Life
1.pbs_-_The_Witch_Of_Atlas
1.pbs_-_To_Edward_Williams
1.pbs_-_To_The_Men_Of_England
1.pbs_-_To_The_Moonbeam
1.pbs_-_Ugolino
1.pbs_-_When_The_Lamp_Is_Shattered
1.poe_-_Al_Aaraaf-_Part_2
1.poe_-_Eureka_-_A_Prose_Poem
1.poe_-_Sonnet_-_To_Science
1.poe_-_Tamerlane
1.poe_-_The_Conversation_Of_Eiros_And_Charmion
1.poe_-_The_Power_Of_Words_Oinos.
1.poe_-_The_Sleeper
1.poe_-_To_The_River
1.rb_-_Abt_Vogler
1.rb_-_A_Lovers_Quarrel
1.rb_-_Andrea_del_Sarto
1.rb_-_An_Epistle_Containing_the_Strange_Medical_Experience_of_Kar
1.rb_-_Another_Way_Of_Love
1.rb_-_Any_Wife_To_Any_Husband
1.rb_-_A_Pretty_Woman
1.rb_-_Before
1.rb_-_Bishop_Blougram's_Apology
1.rb_-_Caliban_upon_Setebos_or,_Natural_Theology_in_the_Island
1.rb_-_Childe_Roland_To_The_Dark_Tower_Came
1.rb_-_Cleon
1.rb_-_Evelyn_Hope
1.rb_-_Fra_Lippo_Lippi
1.rb_-_In_A_Gondola
1.rb_-_In_A_Year
1.rb_-_Introduction:_Pippa_Passes
1.rbk_-_He_Shall_be_King!
1.rb_-_Old_Pictures_In_Florence
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_III_-_Paracelsus
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_II_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_I_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_IV_-_Paracelsus_Aspires
1.rb_-_Paracelsus_-_Part_V_-_Paracelsus_Attains
1.rb_-_Pauline,_A_Fragment_of_a_Question
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_III_-_Evening
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_II_-_Noon
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_I_-_Morning
1.rb_-_Pippa_Passes_-_Part_IV_-_Night
1.rb_-_Popularity
1.rb_-_Rabbi_Ben_Ezra
1.rb_-_Rhyme_for_a_Child_Viewing_a_Naked_Venus_in_a_Painting_of_'The_Judgement_of_Paris'
1.rb_-_Song
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fifth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_First
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Fourth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Second
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Sixth
1.rb_-_Sordello_-_Book_the_Third
1.rb_-_The_Flight_Of_The_Duchess
1.rb_-_The_Glove
1.rb_-_The_Laboratory-Ancien_Rgime
1.rb_-_The_Last_Ride_Together
1.rb_-_The_Pied_Piper_Of_Hamelin
1.rb_-_Waring
1.rb_-_Why_I_Am_a_Liberal
1.rmd_-_Raga_Basant
1.rmpsd_-_Love_Her,_Mind
1.rmpsd_-_Meditate_on_Kali!_Why_be_anxious?
1.rmpsd_-_Mother_this_is_the_grief_that_sorely_grieves_my_heart
1.rmpsd_-_Why_disappear_into_formless_trance?
1.rmr_-_Childhood
1.rmr_-_Elegy_X
1.rmr_-_Girl_in_Love
1.rmr_-_The_Neighbor
1.rmr_-_The_Poet
1.rmr_-_To_Lou_Andreas-Salome
1.rmr_-_World_Was_In_The_Face_Of_The_Beloved
1.rt_-_At_The_End_Of_The_Day
1.rt_-_Authorship
1.rt_-_Babys_Way
1.rt_-_Colored_Toys
1.rt_-_Defamation
1.rt_-_Distant_Time
1.rt_-_Gitanjali
1.rt_-_I
1.rt_-_Listen,_can_you_hear_it?_(from_The_Lover_of_God)
1.rt_-_Lord_Of_My_Life
1.rt_-_Maran-Milan_(Death-Wedding)
1.rt_-_My_Present
1.rt_-_Our_Meeting
1.rt_-_Stray_Birds_31_-_40
1.rt_-_The_Flower-School
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_IV_-_Ah_Me
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_LXXV_-_At_Midnight
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_LXXXI_-_Why_Do_You_Whisper_So_Faintly
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_XIV_-_I_Was_Walking_By_The_Road
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_XIX_-_You_Walked
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_XXI_-_Why_Did_He_Choose
1.rt_-_The_Gardener_XXVIII_-_Your_Questioning_Eyes
1.rt_-_The_Hero
1.rt_-_The_Hero(2)
1.rt_-_The_Homecoming
1.rt_-_The_Portrait
1.rt_-_The_Wicked_Postman
1.rt_-_Twelve_OClock
1.rt_-_Ungrateful_Sorrow
1.rt_-_Untimely_Leave
1.rt_-_Unyielding
1.rt_-_When_And_Why
1.rvd_-_Upon_seeing_poverty
1.rwe_-_Compensation
1.rwe_-_Gnothi_Seauton
1.rwe_-_May-Day
1.rwe_-_Quatrains
1.rwe_-_Seashore
1.rwe_-_Sursum_Corda
1.rwe_-_The_Days_Ration
1.rwe_-_The_Problem
1.rwe_-_The_Rhodora_-_On_Being_Asked,_Whence_Is_The_Flower?
1.rwe_-_The_Titmouse
1.rwe_-_Uriel
1.rwe_-_Woodnotes
1.sig_-_Ecstasy
1.sk_-_Is_there_anyone_in_the_universe
1.snt_-_In_the_midst_of_that_night,_in_my_darkness
1.srm_-_The_Marital_Garland_of_Letters
1.stav_-_Oh_Exceeding_Beauty
1.tr_-_First_Days_Of_Spring_-_The_sky
1.tr_-_Too_Lazy_To_Be_Ambitious
1.wb_-_Hear_the_voice_of_the_Bard!
1.wby_-_A_Dialogue_Of_Self_And_Soul
1.wby_-_A_Dramatic_Poem
1.wby_-_A_First_Confession
1.wby_-_A_Friends_Illness
1.wby_-_A_Nativity
1.wby_-_An_Image_From_A_Past_Life
1.wby_-_A_Woman_Young_And_Old
1.wby_-_Before_The_World_Was_Made
1.wby_-_Coole_Park_1929
1.wby_-_Coole_Park_And_Ballylee,_1931
1.wby_-_Cuchulains_Fight_With_The_Sea
1.wby_-_Ego_Dominus_Tuus
1.wby_-_Her_Vision_In_The_Wood
1.wby_-_No_Second_Troy
1.wby_-_Supernatural_Songs
1.wby_-_The_Black_Tower
1.wby_-_The_Grey_Rock
1.wby_-_The_Hour_Before_Dawn
1.wby_-_The_Man_Who_Dreamed_Of_Faeryland
1.wby_-_The_Old_Age_Of_Queen_Maeve
1.wby_-_The_Phases_Of_The_Moon
1.wby_-_The_Shadowy_Waters_-_The_Shadowy_Waters
1.wby_-_The_Statues
1.wby_-_The_Two_Kings
1.wby_-_The_Wanderings_Of_Oisin_-_Book_I
1.wby_-_The_Winding_Stair
1.wby_-_To_A_Squirrel_At_Kyle-Na-No
1.wby_-_To_A_Young_Beauty
1.wby_-_Why_Should_Not_Old_Men_Be_Mad?
1.whitman_-_A_Boston_Ballad
1.whitman_-_As_I_Ebbd_With_the_Ocean_of_Life
1.whitman_-_As_I_Sat_Alone_By_Blue_Ontarios_Shores
1.whitman_-_Carol_Of_Occupations
1.whitman_-_Elemental_Drifts
1.whitman_-_Ethiopia_Saluting_The_Colors
1.whitman_-_Facing_West_From_Californias_Shores
1.whitman_-_Miracles
1.whitman_-_Native_Moments
1.whitman_-_O_Hymen!_O_Hymenee!
1.whitman_-_On_Journeys_Through_The_States
1.whitman_-_On_Old_Mans_Thought_Of_School
1.whitman_-_Proud_Music_Of_The_Storm
1.whitman_-_Respondez!
1.whitman_-_Sea-Shore_Memories
1.whitman_-_Sing_Of_The_Banner_At_Day-Break
1.whitman_-_Song_of_Myself
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XLVIII
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XX
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_Myself-_XXV
1.whitman_-_Song_Of_The_Open_Road
1.whitman_-_Starting_From_Paumanok
1.whitman_-_The_Centerarians_Story
1.whitman_-_The_Sleepers
1.whitman_-_To_A_Certain_Civilian
1.whitman_-_To_Rich_Givers
1.whitman_-_To_The_States
1.whitman_-_To_You
1.whitman_-_Virginia--The_West
1.whitman_-_Weave_In,_Weave_In,_My_Hardy_Life
1.whitman_-_What_Weeping_Face
1.whitman_-_When_I_Read_The_Book
1.whitman_-_Year_Of_Meteors,_1859_60
1.ww_-_1-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_20_-_Who_goes_there?_hankering,_gross,_mystical,_nude
1.ww_-_3-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_6-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_7-_The_White_Doe_Of_Rylstone,_Or,_The_Fate_Of_The_Nortons
1.ww_-_Anecdote_For_Fathers
1.ww_-_An_Evening_Walk
1.ww_-_Book_Eleventh-_France_[concluded]
1.ww_-_Book_Fifth-Books
1.ww_-_Book_First_[Introduction-Childhood_and_School_Time]
1.ww_-_Book_Fourth_[Summer_Vacation]
1.ww_-_Book_Second_[School-Time_Continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Sixth_[Cambridge_and_the_Alps]
1.ww_-_Book_Tenth_{Residence_in_France_continued]
1.ww_-_Book_Thirteenth_[Imagination_And_Taste,_How_Impaired_And_Restored_Concluded]
1.ww_-_By_The_Seaside
1.ww_-_Expostulation_and_Reply
1.ww_-_Extempore_Effusion_upon_the_Death_of_James_Hogg
1.ww_-_Guilt_And_Sorrow,_Or,_Incidents_Upon_Salisbury_Plain
1.ww_-_Louisa-_After_Accompanying_Her_On_A_Mountain_Excursion
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803
1.ww_-_Memorials_of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803_I._Departure_From_The_Vale_Of_Grasmere,_August_1803
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803_XII._Yarrow_Unvisited
1.ww_-_Memorials_Of_A_Tour_In_Scotland-_1803_X._Rob_Roys_Grave
1.ww_-_Michael-_A_Pastoral_Poem
1.ww_-_Ode_on_Intimations_of_Immortality
1.ww_-_The_Affliction_Of_Margaret
1.ww_-_The_Brothers
1.ww_-_The_Complaint_Of_A_Forsaken_Indian_Woman
1.ww_-_The_Cottager_To_Her_Infant
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_II-_Book_First-_The_Wanderer
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_IV-_Book_Third-_Despondency
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_V-_Book_Fouth-_Despondency_Corrected
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_VII-_Book_Sixth-_The_Churchyard_Among_the_Mountains
1.ww_-_The_Excursion-_X-_Book_Ninth-_Discourse_of_the_Wanderer,_and_an_Evening_Visit_to_the_Lake
1.ww_-_The_French_Army_In_Russia,_1812-13
1.ww_-_The_Idiot_Boy
1.ww_-_The_Morning_Of_The_Day_Appointed_For_A_General_Thanksgiving._January_18,_1816
1.ww_-_The_Oak_And_The_Broom
1.ww_-_The_Pet-Lamb
1.ww_-_The_Prioresss_Tale_[from_Chaucer]
1.ww_-_The_Recluse_-_Book_First
1.ww_-_The_Tables_Turned
1.ww_-_The_Thorn
1.ww_-_The_Waggoner_-_Canto_First
1.ww_-_The_Waterfall_And_The_Eglantine
1.ww_-_The_Wishing_Gate_Destroyed
1.ww_-_To_A_Distant_Friend
1.ww_-_To_a_Highland_Girl_(At_Inversneyde,_upon_Loch_Lomond)
1.ww_-_Translation_Of_Part_Of_The_First_Book_Of_The_Aeneid
1.ww_-_Troilus_And_Cresida
1.ww_-_With_Ships_the_Sea_was_Sprinkled_Far_and_Nigh
1.ww_-_Written_In_A_Blank_Leaf_Of_Macpherson's_Ossian
1.ww_-_Yarrow_Unvisited
1.ww_-_Yarrow_Visited
20.01_-_Charyapada_-_Old_Bengali_Mystic_Poems
20.03_-_Act_I:The_Descent
2.00_-_BIBLIOGRAPHY
2.01_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE
2.01_-_Habit_1__Be_Proactive
2.01_-_Indeterminates,_Cosmic_Determinations_and_the_Indeterminable
2.01_-_Isha_Upanishad__All_that_is_world_in_the_Universe
2.01_-_Mandala_One
2.01_-_On_Books
2.01_-_THE_ADVENT_OF_LIFE
2.01_-_THE_ARCANE_SUBSTANCE_AND_THE_POINT
2.01_-_The_Attributes_of_Omega_Point_-_a_Transcendent_God
2.01_-_THE_CHILD_WITH_THE_MIRROR
2.01_-_The_Mother
2.01_-_The_Road_of_Trials
2.01_-_The_Two_Natures
2.01_-_The_Yoga_and_Its_Objects
2.01_-_War.
2.02_-_Brahman,_Purusha,_Ishwara_-_Maya,_Prakriti,_Shakti
2.02_-_Habit_2__Begin_with_the_End_in_Mind
2.02_-_On_Letters
2.02_-_THE_DURGA_PUJA_FESTIVAL
2.02_-_THE_EXPANSION_OF_LIFE
2.02_-_The_Ishavasyopanishad_with_a_commentary_in_English
2.03_-_Atomic_Forms_And_Their_Combinations
2.03_-_DEMETER
2.03_-_Karmayogin__A_Commentary_on_the_Isha_Upanishad
2.03_-_On_Medicine
2.03_-_ON_THE_PITYING
2.03_-_Renunciation
2.03_-_THE_ENIGMA_OF_BOLOGNA
2.03_-_The_Eternal_and_the_Individual
2.03_-_THE_MASTER_IN_VARIOUS_MOODS
2.03_-_The_Mother-Complex
2.03_-_The_Pyx
2.04_-_Absence_Of_Secondary_Qualities
2.04_-_ADVICE_TO_ISHAN
2.04_-_On_Art
2.04_-_Positive_Aspects_of_the_Mother-Complex
2.04_-_The_Divine_and_the_Undivine
2.04_-_The_Forms_of_Love-Manifestation
2.04_-_The_Scourge,_the_Dagger_and_the_Chain
2.04_-_The_Secret_of_Secrets
2.05_-_Habit_3__Put_First_Things_First
2.05_-_Infinite_Worlds
2.05_-_On_Poetry
2.05_-_The_Tale_of_the_Vampires_Kingdom
2.05_-_Universal_Love_and_how_it_leads_to_Self-Surrender
2.05_-_VISIT_TO_THE_SINTHI_BRAMO_SAMAJ
2.06_-_On_Beauty
2.06_-_Reality_and_the_Cosmic_Illusion
2.06_-_The_Wand
2.06_-_WITH_VARIOUS_DEVOTEES
2.07_-_BANKIM_CHANDRA
2.07_-_I_Also_Try_to_Tell_My_Tale
2.07_-_On_Congress_and_Politics
2.07_-_The_Mother__Relations_with_Others
2.07_-_The_Supreme_Word_of_the_Gita
2.07_-_The_Triangle_of_Love
2.07_-_The_Upanishad_in_Aphorism
2.08_-_ALICE_IN_WONDERLAND
2.08_-_AT_THE_STAR_THEATRE_(II)
2.08_-_On_Non-Violence
2.08_-_ON_THE_FAMOUS_WISE_MEN
2.08_-_The_Sword
2.08_-_Three_Tales_of_Madness_and_Destruction
2.09_-_Human_representations_of_the_Divine_Ideal_of_Love
2.09_-_On_Sadhana
2.09_-_SEVEN_REASONS_WHY_A_SCIENTIST_BELIEVES_IN_GOD
2.09_-_THE_MASTERS_BIRTHDAY
2.0_-_THE_ANTICHRIST
2.1.01_-_God_The_One_Reality
2.1.01_-_The_Central_Process_of_the_Sadhana
21.01_-_The_Mother_The_Nature_of_Her_Work
2.1.02_-_Classification_of_the_Parts_of_the_Being
2.1.02_-_Combining_Work,_Meditation_and_Bhakti
2.1.02_-_Love_and_Death
2.1.02_-_Nature_The_World-Manifestation
2.1.03_-_Man_and_Superman
2.10_-_On_Vedic_Interpretation
2.10_-_THE_DANCING_SONG
2.10_-_THE_MASTER_AND_NARENDRA
2.10_-_The_Vision_of_the_World-Spirit_-_Time_the_Destroyer
2.1.1.04_-_Reading,_Yogic_Force_and_the_Development_of_Style
2.11_-_On_Education
2.11_-_The_Guru
2.1.1_-_The_Nature_of_the_Vital
2.11_-_The_Shattering_And_Fall_of_The_Primordial_Kings
2.11_-_THE_TOMB_SONG
2.11_-_WITH_THE_DEVOTEES_IN_CALCUTTA
2.12_-_On_Miracles
2.12_-_THE_MASTERS_REMINISCENCES
2.12_-_The_Origin_of_the_Ignorance
2.1.2_-_The_Vital_and_Other_Levels_of_Being
2.12_-_The_Way_and_the_Bhakta
2.1.3.1_-_Students
2.1.3.2_-_Study
2.1.3.4_-_Conduct
2.13_-_Exclusive_Concentration_of_Consciousness-Force_and_the_Ignorance
2.13_-_On_Psychology
2.13_-_Psychic_Presence_and_Psychic_Being_-_Real_Origin_of_Race_Superiority
2.13_-_THE_MASTER_AT_THE_HOUSES_OF_BALARM_AND_GIRISH
2.1.3_-_Wrong_Movements_of_the_Vital
2.1.4.1_-_Teachers
2.1.4.2_-_Teaching
2.1.4.5_-_Tests
2.14_-_AT_RAMS_HOUSE
2.14_-_On_Movements
2.14_-_ON_THE_LAND_OF_EDUCATION
2.1.4_-_The_Lower_Vital_Being
2.14_-_The_Origin_and_Remedy_of_Falsehood,_Error,_Wrong_and_Evil
2.14_-_The_Unpacking_of_God
2.1.5.1_-_Study_of_Works_of_Sri_Aurobindo_and_the_Mother
2.1.5.2_-_Languages
2.1.5.4_-_Arts
2.15_-_CAR_FESTIVAL_AT_BALARMS_HOUSE
2.15_-_On_the_Gods_and_Asuras
2.16_-_ON_SCHOLARS
2.16_-_The_15th_of_August
2.16_-_VISIT_TO_NANDA_BOSES_HOUSE
2.1.7.05_-_On_the_Inspiration_and_Writing_of_the_Poem
2.1.7.08_-_Comments_on_Specific_Lines_and_Passages_of_the_Poem
2.17_-_December_1938
2.17_-_ON_POETS
2.17_-_THE_MASTER_ON_HIMSELF_AND_HIS_EXPERIENCES
2.18_-_January_1939
2.18_-_ON_GREAT_EVENTS
2.18_-_SRI_RAMAKRISHNA_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.18_-_The_Soul_and_Its_Liberation
2.19_-_Feb-May_1939
2.19_-_Out_of_the_Sevenfold_Ignorance_towards_the_Sevenfold_Knowledge
2.19_-_THE_MASTER_AND_DR._SARKAR
2.19_-_The_Planes_of_Our_Existence
2.19_-_THE_SOOTHSAYER
2.2.01_-_The_Problem_of_Consciousness
2.2.01_-_Work_and_Yoga
2.2.02_-_Becoming_Conscious_in_Work
2.2.02_-_Consciousness_and_the_Inconscient
2.2.02_-_The_True_Being_and_the_True_Consciousness
2.2.03_-_The_Divine_Force_in_Work
2.2.03_-_The_Psychic_Being
2.2.03_-_The_Science_of_Consciousness
2.2.04_-_Practical_Concerns_in_Work
2.2.05_-_Creative_Activity
22.07_-_The_Ashram,_the_World_and_The_Individual[^4]
2.20_-_Nov-Dec_1939
2.20_-_ON_REDEMPTION
2.20_-_The_Lower_Triple_Purusha
2.20_-_THE_MASTERS_TRAINING_OF_HIS_DISCIPLES
2.20_-_The_Philosophy_of_Rebirth
2.2.1.01_-_The_World's_Greatest_Poets
2.21_-_1940
2.2.1_-_Cheerfulness_and_Happiness
2.21_-_IN_THE_COMPANY_OF_DEVOTEES_AT_SYAMPUKUR
2.21_-_ON_HUMAN_PRUDENCE
2.21_-_Towards_the_Supreme_Secret
2.22_-_1941-1943
2.22_-_Rebirth_and_Other_Worlds;_Karma,_the_Soul_and_Immortality
2.2.2_-_Sorrow_and_Suffering
2.22_-_THE_MASTER_AT_COSSIPORE
2.22_-_THE_STILLEST_HOUR
2.2.3_-_Depression_and_Despondency
2.23_-_Man_and_the_Evolution
2.23_-_Supermind_and_Overmind
2.23_-_The_Core_of_the_Gita.s_Meaning
2.23_-_THE_MASTER_AND_BUDDHA
2.2.4_-_Sentimentalism,_Sensitiveness,_Instability,_Laxity
2.2.4_-_Taittiriya_Upanishad
2.24_-_THE_MASTERS_LOVE_FOR_HIS_DEVOTEES
2.25_-_AFTER_THE_PASSING_AWAY
2.25_-_List_of_Topics_in_Each_Talk
2.25_-_Mercies_and_Judgements_of_Knowledge
2.25_-_The_Triple_Transformation
2.2.7.01_-_Some_General_Remarks
2.28_-_Rajayoga
2.3.01_-_Aspiration_and_Surrender_to_the_Mother
2.3.01_-_Concentration_and_Meditation
2.3.02_-_Mantra_and_Japa
2.3.02_-_Opening,_Sincerity_and_the_Mother's_Grace
2.3.02_-_The_Supermind_or_Supramental
2.3.03_-_The_Mother's_Presence
2.3.04_-_The_Higher_Planes_of_Mind
2.3.04_-_The_Mother's_Force
2.3.05_-_Sadhana_through_Work_for_the_Mother
2.3.05_-_The_Lower_Nature_or_Lower_Hemisphere
2.3.06_-_The_Mind
2.3.06_-_The_Mother's_Lights
2.3.07_-_The_Mother_in_Visions,_Dreams_and_Experiences
2.3.07_-_The_Vital_Being_and_Vital_Consciousness
2.3.08_-_The_Mother's_Help_in_Difficulties
2.3.08_-_The_Physical_Consciousness
2.3.1.06_-_Opening_to_the_Force
2.3.1.09_-_Inspiration_and_Understanding
2.3.10_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Inconscient
2.3.1_-_Ego_and_Its_Forms
2.3.2_-_Desire
2.3.3_-_Anger_and_Violence
2.4.01_-_Divine_Love,_Psychic_Love_and_Human_Love
2.4.02_-_Bhakti,_Devotion,_Worship
24.05_-_Vision_of_Dante
2.4.1_-_Human_Relations_and_the_Spiritual_Life
2.4.2_-_Interactions_with_Others_and_the_Practice_of_Yoga
2.4.3_-_Problems_in_Human_Relations
25.03_-_Songs_of_Ramprasad
27.01_-_The_Golden_Harvest
29.06_-_There_is_also_another,_similar_or_parallel_story_in_the_Veda_about_the_God_Agni,_about_the_disappearance_of_this
30.01_-_World-Literature
30.02_-_Greek_Drama
3.00.2_-_Introduction
30.03_-_Spirituality_in_Art
30.04_-_Intuition_and_Inspiration_in_Art
30.05_-_Rhythm_in_Poetry
30.06_-_The_Poet_and_The_Seer
30.07_-_The_Poet_and_the_Yogi
30.08_-_Poetry_and_Mantra
30.09_-_Lines_of_Tantra_(Charyapada)
3.00_-_Introduction
3.00_-_The_Magical_Theory_of_the_Universe
30.10_-_The_Greatness_of_Poetry
30.11_-_Modern_Poetry
30.13_-_Rabindranath_the_Artist
30.14_-_Rabindranath_and_Modernism
30.15_-_The_Language_of_Rabindranath
30.17_-_Rabindranath,_Traveller_of_the_Infinite
30.18_-_Boris_Pasternak
3.01_-_Fear_of_God
3.01_-_Natural_Morality
3.01_-_THE_BIRTH_OF_THOUGHT
3.01_-_Towards_the_Future
3.02_-_Aridity_in_Prayer
3.02_-_Nature_And_Composition_Of_The_Mind
3.02_-_ON_THE_VISION_AND_THE_RIDDLE
3.02_-_SOL
3.02_-_The_Great_Secret
3.02_-_The_Motives_of_Devotion
3.02_-_The_Practice_Use_of_Dream-Analysis
3.02_-_The_Psychology_of_Rebirth
3.03_-_Faith_and_the_Divine_Grace
3.03_-_On_Thought_-_II
3.03_-_SULPHUR
3.03_-_The_Ascent_to_Truth
3.03_-_The_Consummation_of_Mysticism
3.03_-_The_Formula_of_Tetragrammaton
3.03_-_THE_MODERN_EARTH
3.03_-_The_Soul_Is_Mortal
3.04_-_Folly_Of_The_Fear_Of_Death
3.04_-_LUNA
3.04_-_On_Thought_-_III
3.04_-_The_Spirit_in_Spirit-Land_after_Death
3.05_-_Cerberus_And_Furies,_And_That_Lack_Of_Light
3.05_-_ON_VIRTUE_THAT_MAKES_SMALL
3.05_-_SAL
3.05_-_The_Conjunction
3.05_-_The_Physical_World_and_its_Connection_with_the_Soul_and_Spirit-Lands
3.06_-_Death
3.07_-_ON_PASSING_BY
3.07_-_The_Adept
3.07_-_The_Ascent_of_the_Soul
3.07_-_The_Formula_of_the_Holy_Grail
3.08_-_Purification
3.09_-_Of_Silence_and_Secrecy
3.09_-_The_Return_of_the_Soul
3.0_-_THE_ETERNAL_RECURRENCE
3.1.01_-_Distinctive_Features_of_the_Integral_Yoga
31.01_-_The_Heart_of_Bengal
3.1.01_-_The_Problem_of_Suffering_and_Evil
3.1.02_-_Asceticism_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.1.02_-_Spiritual_Evolution_and_the_Supramental
31.02_-_The_Mother-_Worship_of_the_Bengalis
31.04_-_Sri_Ramakrishna
31.05_-_Vivekananda
3.1.08_-_To_the_Sea
3.10_-_The_New_Birth
3.1.14_-_Vedantin.s_Prayer
3.1.24_-_In_the_Moonlight
3.1.2_-_Levels_of_the_Physical_Being
3.12_-_Of_the_Bloody_Sacrifice
3.12_-_ON_OLD_AND_NEW_TABLETS
3.1.3_-_Difficulties_of_the_Physical_Being
3.14_-_Of_the_Consecrations
3.18_-_Of_Clairvoyance_and_the_Body_of_Light
31_Hymns_to_the_Star_Goddess
3.2.01_-_The_Newness_of_the_Integral_Yoga
32.01_-_Where_is_God?
3.2.02_-_The_Veda_and_the_Upanishads
32.03_-_In_This_Crisis
3.2.03_-_Jainism_and_Buddhism
32.04_-_The_Human_Body
3.2.05_-_The_Yoga_of_the_Bhagavad_Gita
3.2.06_-_The_Adwaita_of_Shankaracharya
32.06_-_The_Novel_Alchemy
32.07_-_The_God_of_the_Scientist
3.2.08_-_Bhakti_Yoga_and_Vaishnavism
32.12_-_The_Evolutionary_Imperative
3.2.1_-_Food
3.21_-_Of_Black_Magic
3.2.2_-_Sleep
3.2.3_-_Dreams
3.2.4_-_Sex
33.01_-_The_Initiation_of_Swadeshi
3.3.02_-_All-Will_and_Free-Will
33.02_-_Subhash,_Oaten:_atlas,_Russell
33.03_-_Muraripukur_-_I
3.3.03_-_The_Delight_of_Works
33.05_-_Muraripukur_-_II
33.06_-_Alipore_Court
33.07_-_Alipore_Jail
33.09_-_Shyampukur
33.10_-_Pondicherry_I
33.11_-_Pondicherry_II
33.12_-_Pondicherry_Cyclone
33.13_-_My_Professors
33.14_-_I_Played_Football
33.15_-_My_Athletics
33.16_-_Soviet_Gymnasts
33.17_-_Two_Great_Wars
33.18_-_I_Bow_to_the_Mother
3.3.1_-_Illness_and_Health
3.3.2_-_Doctors_and_Medicines
3.3.3_-_Specific_Illnesses,_Ailments_and_Other_Physical_Problems
3.4.01_-_Evolution
3.4.1.01_-_Poetry_and_Sadhana
3.4.1.05_-_Fiction-Writing_and_Sadhana
3.4.1_-_The_Subconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3.4.2.04_-_Dance_and_Sadhana
3.4.2_-_Guru_Yoga
3.4.2_-_The_Inconscient_and_the_Integral_Yoga
3-5_Full_Circle
3.6.01_-_Heraclitus
36.07_-_An_Introduction_To_The_Vedas
36.08_-_A_Commentary_on_the_First_Six_Suktas_of_Rigveda
37.01_-_Yama_-_Nachiketa_(Katha_Upanishad)
37.02_-_The_Story_of_Jabala-Satyakama
37.03_-_Satyakama_And_Upakoshala
37.04_-_The_Story_Of_Rishi_Yajnavalkya
37.05_-_Narada_-_Sanatkumara_(Chhandogya_Upanishad)
37.06_-_Indra_-_Virochana_and_Prajapati
3.7.1.04_-_Rebirth_and_Soul_Evolution
3.7.1.05_-_The_Significance_of_Rebirth
3.7.1.07_-_Involution_and_Evolution
3.7.1.08_-_Karma
3.7.1.09_-_Karma_and_Freedom
3.7.1.12_-_Karma_and_Justice
3.7.2.02_-_The_Terrestial_Law
3.7.2.04_-_The_Higher_Lines_of_Karma
3.7.2.06_-_Appendix_II_-_A_Clarification
38.01_-_Asceticism_and_Renunciation
38.05_-_Living_Matter
38.06_-_Ravana_Vanquished
38.07_-_A_Poem
3.8.1.05_-_Occult_Knowledge_and_the_Hindu_Scriptures
3_-_Commentaries_and_Annotated_Translations
4.01_-_Circumstances
4.01_-_THE_COLLECTIVE_ISSUE
4.01_-_THE_HONEY_SACRIFICE
4.01_-_The_Principle_of_the_Integral_Yoga
4.02_-_Autobiographical_Evidence
4.02_-_BEYOND_THE_COLLECTIVE_-_THE_HYPER-PERSONAL
4.02_-_Difficulties
4.02_-_Existence_And_Character_Of_The_Images
4.02_-_Humanity_in_Progress
4.02_-_THE_CRY_OF_DISTRESS
4.02_-_The_Psychology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_Mistakes
4.03_-_Prayer_of_Quiet
4.03_-_The_Meaning_of_Human_Endeavor
4.03_-_The_Senses_And_Mental_Pictures
4.03_-_The_Special_Phenomenology_of_the_Child_Archetype
4.03_-_THE_ULTIMATE_EARTH
4.04_-_Conclusion
4.04_-_In_the_Total_Christ
4.04_-_THE_LEECH
4.04_-_THE_REGENERATION_OF_THE_KING
4.04_-_Weaknesses
4.05_-_THE_MAGICIAN
4.06_-_RETIRED
4.06_-_THE_KING_AS_ANTHROPOS
4.07_-_THE_RELATION_OF_THE_KING-SYMBOL_TO_CONSCIOUSNESS
4.08_-_THE_RELIGIOUS_PROBLEM_OF_THE_KINGS_RENEWAL
4.08_-_THE_VOLUNTARY_BEGGAR
4.09_-_REGINA
4.09_-_The_Liberation_of_the_Nature
4.09_-_THE_SHADOW
4.0_-_NOTES_TO_ZARATHUSTRA
4.1.01_-_The_Intellect_and_Yoga
4.1.1.04_-_Foundations_of_the_Sadhana
4.1.1.05_-_The_Central_Process_of_the_Yoga
4.1.1_-_The_Difficulties_of_Yoga
4.11_-_THE_WELCOME
4.1.2_-_The_Difficulties_of_Human_Nature
4.12_-_THE_LAST_SUPPER
4.12_-_The_Way_of_Equality
4.1.3_-_Imperfections_and_Periods_of_Arrest
4.1.4_-_Resistances,_Sufferings_and_Falls
4.15_-_ON_SCIENCE
4.18_-_THE_ASS_FESTIVAL
4.19_-_THE_DRUNKEN_SONG
4.1_-_Jnana
4.2.01_-_The_Mother_of_Dreams
4.2.1_-_The_Right_Attitude_towards_Difficulties
4.2.2_-_Steps_towards_Overcoming_Difficulties
4.2.3.02_-_Signs_of_the_Psychic's_Coming_Forward
4.2.3.04_-_Means_of_Bringing_Forward_the_Psychic
4.2.3.05_-_Obstacles_to_the_Psychic's_Emergence
4.2.3_-_Vigilance,_Resolution,_Will_and_the_Divine_Help
4.2.4.03_-_The_Psychic_Fire
4.2.4.04_-_The_Psychic_Fire_and_Some_Inner_Visions
4.2.4.05_-_Agni
4.2.4_-_Time_and_CHange_of_the_Nature
4.2.5_-_Dealing_with_Depression_and_Despondency
4.2_-_Karma
4.3.1.06_-_A_Vision_of_the_Universal_Self
4.3.1.09_-_The_Self_and_Life
4.3.3_-_Dealing_with_Hostile_Attacks
4.3.4_-_Accidents,_Possession,_Madness
4.3_-_Bhakti
4.4.1.03_-_Both_Ascent_and_Descent_Necessary
4.4.1.06_-_Ascent_and_Descent_and_Problems_of_the_Lower_Nature
4.4.2.01_-_Contact_with_the_Above
4.42_-_Chapter_Two
4.4.3.02_-_Calling_in_the_Higher_Consciousness
4.4.3.03_-_Preparatory_Experiences_and_Descent
4.4.3.04_-_The_Order_of_Descent_into_the_Being
4.43_-_Chapter_Three
4.4.4.02_-_Peace,_Calm,_Quiet_as_a_Basis_for_the_Descent
4.4.4.10_-_The_Descent_of_Ananda
5.01_-_ADAM_AS_THE_ARCANE_SUBSTANCE
5.01_-_The_Dakini,_Salgye_Du_Dalma
5.02_-_Against_Teleological_Concept
5.02_-_THE_STATUE
5.03_-_ADAM_AS_THE_FIRST_ADEPT
5.03_-_The_Divine_Body
5.03_-_The_World_Is_Not_Eternal
5.04_-_Formation_Of_The_World
5.04_-_THE_POLARITY_OF_ADAM
5.04_-_Three_Dreams
5.05_-_Supermind_and_Humanity
5.06_-_THE_TRANSFORMATION
5.07_-_Beginnings_Of_Civilization
5.08_-_ADAM_AS_TOTALITY
5.1.01.1_-_The_Book_of_the_Herald
5.1.01.3_-_The_Book_of_the_Assembly
5.1.01.4_-_The_Book_of_Partings
5.1.01.7_-_The_Book_of_the_Woman
5.1.02_-_Ahana
5.2.01_-_The_Descent_of_Ahana
5.2.02_-_The_Meditations_of_Mandavya
5.4.01_-_Notes_on_Root-Sounds
5.4.01_-_Occult_Knowledge
5.4.02_-_Occult_Powers_or_Siddhis
5_-_The_Phenomenology_of_the_Spirit_in_Fairytales
6.01_-_THE_ALCHEMICAL_VIEW_OF_THE_UNION_OF_OPPOSITES
6.02_-_Great_Meteorological_Phenomena,_Etc
6.03_-_Extraordinary_And_Paradoxical_Telluric_Phenomena
6.04_-_THE_MEANING_OF_THE_ALCHEMICAL_PROCEDURE
6.05_-_THE_PSYCHOLOGICAL_INTERPRETATION_OF_THE_PROCEDURE
6.06_-_Remembrances
6.06_-_SELF-KNOWLEDGE
6.07_-_THE_MONOCOLUS
6.08_-_Intellectual_Visions
6.08_-_THE_CONTENT_AND_MEANING_OF_THE_FIRST_TWO_STAGES
6.09_-_Imaginary_Visions
6.09_-_THE_THIRD_STAGE_-_THE_UNUS_MUNDUS
6.0_-_Conscious,_Unconscious,_and_Individuation
6.10_-_THE_SELF_AND_THE_BOUNDS_OF_KNOWLEDGE
7.01_-_The_Soul_(the_Psychic)
7.02_-_The_Mind
7.03_-_Cheerfulness
7.04_-_Self-Reliance
7.05_-_The_Senses
7.06_-_The_Simple_Life
7.07_-_Prudence
7.07_-_The_Subconscient
7.08_-_Sincerity
7.09_-_Right_Judgement
7.10_-_Order
7.11_-_Building_and_Destroying
7.13_-_The_Conquest_of_Knowledge
7.15_-_The_Family
7_-_Yoga_of_Sri_Aurobindo
Aeneid
Apology
Big_Mind_(non-dual)
Big_Mind_(ten_perfections)
Blazing_P1_-_Preconventional_consciousness
Blazing_P2_-_Map_the_Stages_of_Conventional_Consciousness
Blazing_P3_-_Explore_the_Stages_of_Postconventional_Consciousness
Book_1_-_The_Council_of_the_Gods
BOOK_I._-_Augustine_censures_the_pagans,_who_attributed_the_calamities_of_the_world,_and_especially_the_sack_of_Rome_by_the_Goths,_to_the_Christian_religion_and_its_prohibition_of_the_worship_of_the_gods
BOOK_II._-_A_review_of_the_calamities_suffered_by_the_Romans_before_the_time_of_Christ,_showing_that_their_gods_had_plunged_them_into_corruption_and_vice
BOOK_III._-_The_external_calamities_of_Rome
BOOK_II._--_PART_I._ANTHROPOGENESIS.
BOOK_II._--_PART_III._ADDENDA._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_II._--_PART_II._THE_ARCHAIC_SYMBOLISM_OF_THE_WORLD-RELIGIONS
BOOK_I._--_PART_I._COSMIC_EVOLUTION
BOOK_I._--_PART_III._SCIENCE_AND_THE_SECRET_DOCTRINE_CONTRASTED
BOOK_I._--_PART_II._THE_EVOLUTION_OF_SYMBOLISM_IN_ITS_APPROXIMATE_ORDER
BOOK_IV._-_That_empire_was_given_to_Rome_not_by_the_gods,_but_by_the_One_True_God
BOOK_IX._-_Of_those_who_allege_a_distinction_among_demons,_some_being_good_and_others_evil
Book_of_Exodus
Book_of_Genesis
Book_of_Imaginary_Beings_(text)
Book_of_Psalms
BOOK_VIII._-_Some_account_of_the_Socratic_and_Platonic_philosophy,_and_a_refutation_of_the_doctrine_of_Apuleius_that_the_demons_should_be_worshipped_as_mediators_between_gods_and_men
BOOK_VII._-_Of_the_select_gods_of_the_civil_theology,_and_that_eternal_life_is_not_obtained_by_worshipping_them
BOOK_VI._-_Of_Varros_threefold_division_of_theology,_and_of_the_inability_of_the_gods_to_contri_bute_anything_to_the_happiness_of_the_future_life
BOOK_V._-_Of_fate,_freewill,_and_God's_prescience,_and_of_the_source_of_the_virtues_of_the_ancient_Romans
BOOK_XI._-_Augustine_passes_to_the_second_part_of_the_work,_in_which_the_origin,_progress,_and_destinies_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_are_discussed.Speculations_regarding_the_creation_of_the_world
BOOK_XIII._-_That_death_is_penal,_and_had_its_origin_in_Adam's_sin
BOOK_XII._-_Of_the_creation_of_angels_and_men,_and_of_the_origin_of_evil
BOOK_XIV._-_Of_the_punishment_and_results_of_mans_first_sin,_and_of_the_propagation_of_man_without_lust
BOOK_XIX._-_A_review_of_the_philosophical_opinions_regarding_the_Supreme_Good,_and_a_comparison_of_these_opinions_with_the_Christian_belief_regarding_happiness
BOOK_X._-_Porphyrys_doctrine_of_redemption
BOOK_XVIII._-_A_parallel_history_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_from_the_time_of_Abraham_to_the_end_of_the_world
BOOK_XVII._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_the_times_of_the_prophets_to_Christ
BOOK_XVI._-_The_history_of_the_city_of_God_from_Noah_to_the_time_of_the_kings_of_Israel
BOOK_XV._-_The_progress_of_the_earthly_and_heavenly_cities_traced_by_the_sacred_history
BOOK_XXII._-_Of_the_eternal_happiness_of_the_saints,_the_resurrection_of_the_body,_and_the_miracles_of_the_early_Church
BOOK_XXI._-_Of_the_eternal_punishment_of_the_wicked_in_hell,_and_of_the_various_objections_urged_against_it
BOOK_XX._-_Of_the_last_judgment,_and_the_declarations_regarding_it_in_the_Old_and_New_Testaments
BS_1_-_Introduction_to_the_Idea_of_God
CASE_1_-_JOSHUS_DOG
CASE_4_-_WAKUANS_WHY_NO_BEARD?
CASE_5_-_KYOGENS_MAN_HANGING_IN_THE_TREE
City_of_God_-_BOOK_I
Conversations_with_Sri_Aurobindo
COSA_-_BOOK_I
COSA_-_BOOK_II
COSA_-_BOOK_III
COSA_-_BOOK_IV
COSA_-_BOOK_IX
COSA_-_BOOK_V
COSA_-_BOOK_VI
COSA_-_BOOK_VII
COSA_-_BOOK_VIII
COSA_-_BOOK_X
COSA_-_BOOK_XI
COSA_-_BOOK_XII
COSA_-_BOOK_XIII
Cratylus
DM_2_-_How_to_Meditate
DS2
DS3
DS4
ENNEAD_01.02_-_Of_Virtues.
ENNEAD_01.04_-_Whether_Animals_May_Be_Termed_Happy.
ENNEAD_01.05_-_Does_Happiness_Increase_With_Time?
ENNEAD_01.06_-_Of_Beauty.
ENNEAD_01.08_-_Of_the_Nature_and_Origin_of_Evils.
ENNEAD_02.01_-_Of_the_Heaven.
ENNEAD_02.02_-_About_the_Movement_of_the_Heavens.
ENNEAD_02.03_-_Whether_Astrology_is_of_any_Value.
ENNEAD_02.04a_-_Of_Matter.
ENNEAD_02.05_-_Of_the_Aristotelian_Distinction_Between_Actuality_and_Potentiality.
ENNEAD_02.06_-_Of_Essence_and_Being.
ENNEAD_02.07_-_About_Mixture_to_the_Point_of_Total_Penetration.
ENNEAD_02.08_-_Of_Sight,_or_of_Why_Distant_Objects_Seem_Small.
ENNEAD_02.09_-_Against_the_Gnostics;_or,_That_the_Creator_and_the_World_are_Not_Evil.
ENNEAD_03.01_-_Concerning_Fate.
ENNEAD_03.02_-_Of_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.03_-_Continuation_of_That_on_Providence.
ENNEAD_03.04_-_Of_Our_Individual_Guardian.
ENNEAD_03.05_-_Of_Love,_or_Eros.
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Entities_(Soul_and_and_Matter).
ENNEAD_03.06_-_Of_the_Impassibility_of_Incorporeal_Things.
ENNEAD_03.07_-_Of_Time_and_Eternity.
ENNEAD_03.08b_-_Of_Nature,_Contemplation_and_Unity.
ENNEAD_03.09_-_Fragments_About_the_Soul,_the_Intelligence,_and_the_Good.
ENNEAD_04.02_-_How_the_Soul_Mediates_Between_Indivisible_and_Divisible_Essence.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Problems_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.03_-_Psychological_Questions.
ENNEAD_04.04_-_Questions_About_the_Soul.
ENNEAD_04.05_-_Psychological_Questions_III._-_About_the_Process_of_Vision_and_Hearing.
ENNEAD_04.06a_-_Of_Sensation_and_Memory.
ENNEAD_04.07_-_Of_the_Immortality_of_the_Soul:_Polemic_Against_Materialism.
ENNEAD_04.08_-_Of_the_Descent_of_the_Soul_Into_the_Body.
ENNEAD_04.09_-_Whether_All_Souls_Form_a_Single_One?
ENNEAD_05.01_-_The_Three_Principal_Hypostases,_or_Forms_of_Existence.
ENNEAD_05.02_-_Of_Generation,_and_of_the_Order_of_things_that_Rank_Next_After_the_First.
ENNEAD_05.03_-_Of_the_Hypostases_that_Mediate_Knowledge,_and_of_the_Superior_Principle.
ENNEAD_05.03_-_The_Self-Consciousnesses,_and_What_is_Above_Them.
ENNEAD_05.04_-_How_What_is_After_the_First_Proceeds_Therefrom;_of_the_One.
ENNEAD_05.05_-_That_Intelligible_Entities_Are_Not_External_to_the_Intelligence_of_the_Good.
ENNEAD_05.07_-_Do_Ideas_of_Individuals_Exist?
ENNEAD_05.08_-_Concerning_Intelligible_Beauty.
ENNEAD_05.09_-_Of_Intelligence,_Ideas_and_Essence.
ENNEAD_06.01_-_Of_the_Ten_Aristotelian_and_Four_Stoic_Categories.
ENNEAD_06.02_-_The_Categories_of_Plotinos.
ENNEAD_06.03_-_Plotinos_Own_Sense-Categories.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_Is_Everywhere_Present_As_a_Whole.
ENNEAD_06.04_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_and_Identical_Being_is_Everywhere_Present_In_Its_Entirety.345
ENNEAD_06.05_-_The_One_Identical_Essence_is_Everywhere_Entirely_Present.
ENNEAD_06.06_-_Of_Numbers.
ENNEAD_06.07_-_How_Ideas_Multiplied,_and_the_Good.
ENNEAD_06.08_-_Of_the_Will_of_the_One.
ENNEAD_06.09_-_Of_the_Good_and_the_One.
Epistle_to_the_Romans
Euthyphro
For_a_Breath_I_Tarry
Gods_Script
Gorgias
Guru_Granth_Sahib_first_part
Ion
Liber_111_-_The_Book_of_Wisdom_-_LIBER_ALEPH_VEL_CXI
Liber_46_-_The_Key_of_the_Mysteries
Liber_71_-_The_Voice_of_the_Silence_-_The_Two_Paths_-_The_Seven_Portals
Medea_-_A_Vergillian_Cento
Meno
Partial_Magic_in_the_Quixote
Phaedo
r1913_01_14
r1914_03_28
r1914_06_11
Sayings_of_Sri_Ramakrishna_(text)
Sophist
Story_of_the_Warrior_and_the_Captive
Symposium_translated_by_B_Jowett
Tablet_1_-
Tablets_of_Baha_u_llah_text
Talks_001-025
Talks_026-050
Talks_051-075
Talks_076-099
Talks_100-125
Talks_125-150
Talks_151-175
Talks_176-200
Talks_225-239
Talks_500-550
Talks_600-652
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_1
Talks_With_Sri_Aurobindo_2
The_Act_of_Creation_text
Theaetetus
The_Aleph
The_Anapanasati_Sutta__A_Practical_Guide_to_Mindfullness_of_Breathing_and_Tranquil_Wisdom_Meditation
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P1
The_Book_of_Certitude_-_P2
The_Book_of_Job
The_Book_of_Joshua
The_Book_of_Sand
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Isaiah
The_Book_of_the_Prophet_Micah
The_Book_(short_story)
The_Coming_Race_Contents
The_Divine_Names_Text_(Dionysis)
The_Dream_of_a_Ridiculous_Man
The_Dwellings_of_the_Philosophers
The_Egg
the_Eternal_Wisdom
The_First_Epistle_of_Paul_to_the_Corinthians
The_First_Epistle_of_Peter
The_Five,_Ranks_of_The_Apparent_and_the_Real
The_Garden_of_Forking_Paths_1
The_Gold_Bug
The_Gospel_According_to_John
The_Gospel_According_to_Luke
The_Gospel_According_to_Mark
The_Gospel_According_to_Matthew
The_Gospel_of_Thomas
The_Hidden_Words_text
The_Immortal
The_Last_Question
The_Library_of_Babel
The_Logomachy_of_Zos
The_Monadology
The_One_Who_Walks_Away
The_Pilgrims_Progress
The_Poems_of_Cold_Mountain
The_Riddle_of_this_World
The_Shadow_Out_Of_Time
The_Zahir
Thus_Spoke_Zarathustra_text
Timaeus
Verses_of_Vemana

PRIMARY CLASS

God
Interrogative
lecture
Question
question
Questions
remember
Savitri
trigram
why
SIMILAR TITLES
MISSING NAME - related to why read Savitri and Savitri (ode)
Why
Why am I here
Why am I not reading Savitri always
Why build the website
Why does one do something
Why does one read Savitri
Why do I forget
Why do I forget Savitris Divine status and splendor
Why Do We
Why God
Why is there suffering
Why read The Life Divine
why remembrance

DEFINITIONS


TERMS STARTING WITH

why ::: adv. --> For what cause, reason, or purpose; on what account; wherefore; -- used interrogatively. See the Note under What, pron., 1.
For which; on account of which; -- used relatively.
The reason or cause for which; that on account of which; on what account; as, I know not why he left town so suddenly; -- used as a compound relative. ::: n.


whydah bird ::: --> Alt. of Whydah finch

whydah finch ::: --> The whidah bird.

why-not ::: n. --> A violent and peremptory procedure without any assigned reason; a sudden conclusive happening.

WHY should we weep or mourn, Angelic boy,


TERMS ANYWHERE

Abhiniskramanasutra. (T. Mngon par 'byung ba'i mdo; C.Fo benxing ji jing; J. Butsuhongyojukkyo; K. Pul ponhaeng chip kyong 佛本行集經). In Sanskrit, "Sutra of the Great Renunciation"; this scripture relates the story of Prince SIDDHARTHA's "going forth" (abhiniskramana; P. abhinikkhamana) from his father's palace to pursue the life of a mendicant wanderer (sRAMAnA) in search of enlightenment. There are no extant Sanskrit versions of the SuTRA, but the work survives in Tibetan and in several distinct recensions available in Chinese translation, one dating to as early as the first century CE. The best-known Chinese translation is the Fo benxing ji jing, made by JNANAGUPTA around 587 CE, during the Sui dynasty. The text claims to be a DHARMAGUPTAKA recension of the JATAKA, or past lives of the Buddha. (Franklin Edgerton has suggested that this text may instead be a translation of the MAHAVASTU, "The Great Account," of the LOKOTTARAVADA offshoot of the MAHASAMGHIKA school.) JNAnagupta's recension has sixty chapters, in five major parts. The first part is an introduction to the work as a whole, which relates how rare it is for a buddha to appear in the world and why people should take advantage of this opportunity. Reference is made to the various meritorious roots (KUsALAMuLA) that sAKYAMUNI acquired throughout his many lifetimes of training, in order to prepare for this final life when he would finally attain enlightenment. The second part enumerates the entire lineage of the buddhas of antiquity, a lineage that sAkyamuni would soon join, and the third part follows with a genealogy of the sAKYA clan. The fourth part describes the decisive stages in sAkyamuni's life, from birth, through his awakening, to the first "turning of the wheel of the DHARMA" (DHARMACAKRAPRAVARTANA). The last part gives extended biographies (going even into their past lives) of his prominent disciples, of which the stories involving his longtime attendant, ANANDA, are particularly extensive. In 1876, SAMUEL BEAL translated this Chinese recension of the sutra into English as The Romantic Legend of sAkya Buddha.

abhiprAya. (T. dgongs pa; C. yiqu; J. ishu; K. ŭich'wi 意趣). In Sanskrit, "hidden intention" or "purpose"; a term used in hermeneutics to refer to the concealed intent the Buddha had in mind when he made a statement that was not literally true (see also ABHISAMDHI). In the MAHAYANASuTRALAMKARA, there are four abhiprAyas. (1) The Buddha may say that two things are the same when in fact they are similar in only one, albeit important, feature. Thus, sAKYAMUNI Buddha says that he is the past buddha VIPAsYIN, thinking of the fact that there is not the slightest difference in their DHARMAKAYAs. This is called the intention of sameness (samatAbhiprAya). (2) The Buddha may say one thing while intending something else (arthAntarAbhiprAya). This category is often invoked in YOGACARA exegesis to explain why the Buddha proclaimed the nonexistence of all phenomena in the PRAJNAPARAMITA sutras when he in fact did not intend this statement to be taken literally, thinking instead of the three natures (TRILAKsAnA) of all phenomena propounded by the YogAcAra. (3) The buddha may make a statement intending another time (kAlAntarAbhiprAya) than that suggested by his words. For example, he may assure lazy persons who are incapable of any virtuous practice whatsoever that they will be reborn in SUKHAVATĪ, the paradise of AMITABHA, if they will simply call on that buddha. He does this in order to encourage them to accumulate a modest amount of merit, although he knows that they will not be reborn there immediately or even in their next lifetime, but at some other time in the future. (4) The Buddha adjusts his teaching to the capacities of his students based on their dispositions (pudgalAntarAbhiprAya). For example, the Buddha will extol the benefits of the practice of charity (DANA) to a person who is disposed toward the accumulation of merit (PUnYA) but will underplay the importance of charity to a person who becomes complacently attached to that practice. See ABHISAMDHI; SANDHYABHAsA.

“About the subconscient—it is the sub-mental base of the being and is made up of impressions, instincts, habitual movements that are stored there. Whatever movement is impressed in it, it keeps. If one impresses the right movement in it, it will keep and send up that. That is why it has to be cleared of old movements before there can be a permanent and total change in the nature. When the higher consciousness is once established in the waking parts, it goes down into the subconscient and changes that also, makes a bedrock of itself there also.” Letters on Yoga

Acintyastava. (T. Bsam gyis mi khyab par bstod pa). In Sanskrit, "In Praise of the Inconceivable One"; an Indian philosophical work by the MADHYAMAKA master NAGARJUNA written in the form of a praise for the Buddha. In the Tibetan tradition, there are a large number of such praises (called STAVAKAYA) in contrast to the set of philosophical texts (called YUKTIKAYA) attributed to NAgArjuna. Among these praise works, the Acintyastava, LOKATĪTASTAVA, NIRAUPAMYASTAVA, and PARAMARTHASTAVA are extant in Sanskrit and are generally accepted to be his work; these four works together are known as the CATUḤSTAVA. It is less certain that he is the author of the DHARMADHATUSTAVA or DHARMADHATUSTOTRA ("Hymn to the Dharma Realm") of which only fragments are extant in the original Sanskrit. The Acintyastava contains fifty-nine stanzas, many of which are addressed to the Buddha. The first section provides a detailed discussion of why dependently originated phenomena are empty of intrinsic nature (NIḤSVABHAVA); this section has clear parallels to the MuLAMADHYAMAKAKARIKA. The forty-fifth verse makes reference to the term PARATANTRA, leading some scholars to believe that NAgArjuna was familiar with the LAnKAVATARASuTRA. The second section describes wisdom (JNANA); the third section sets forth the qualities of the true dharma (SADDHARMA); the fourth and final section extols the Buddha as the best of teachers (sASTṚ).

Acorn Online Media "company" A company formed in August 1994 by {Acorn Computer Group} plc to exploit the {ARM} RISC in television {set-top box} decoders. They planned to woo {British Telecommunications} plc to use the box in some of its {video on demand} trials. The "STB1" box was based on an {ARM8} core with additional circuits to enable {MPEG} to be decoded in software - possibly dedicated instructions for interpolation, inverse {DCT} or {Huffman} table extraction. A prototype featured audio {MPEG} chips, Acorn's {RISC OS} {operating system} and supported {Oracle Media Objects} and {Microword}. Online planned to reduce component count by transferring functions from boards into the single RISC chip. The company was origianlly wholly owned by Acorn but was expected to bring in external investment. [Article by nobody@tandem.com cross-posted from tandem.news.computergram, 1994-07-07]. In 1996 they releasd the imaginatively titled "Set Top Box 2" (STB20M) with a 32 MHz {ARM 7500} and 2 to 32 MB {RAM}. There was also a "Set Top Box 22". {(http://www.khantazi.org/Archives/MachineLst.html

Adopting such common parlance, it is not uncustomary to speak of the realms of spirit as being negative and the realms of manifestation as being positive; but in nature the masculine is no stronger or weaker than the feminine: they are coequal, reciprocal, interacting, always conjoined during manifestation, and paradoxically during manifestation continuously separate, but always in action and reaction, the one upon the other. Polarity is sometimes defined by the terms male and female; but, while using these symbolically, we must refrain from qualifying them by ideas drawn from merely physiological sex. Hence we see why it is to be regretted that these two terms have become so fixed in the language, and how much better had it been had the simple term polar been adopted.

A_forex_trading_robot ::: is a computer program based on a set of forex trading signals that helps determine whether to buy or sell a currency pair at a given point in time. Forex​ robots are designed to remove the psychological element of trading, which can be detrimental. While trading systems can be purchased online, traders should exercise caution when buying them this way. Forex trading robots are automated software programs that generate trading signals. Most of these robots are built with MetaTrader, using the MQL scripting language, which lets traders generate trading signals or place orders and manage trades.  Automated forex trading robots are available for purchase over the Internet, but traders should exercise caution when buying any such trading system. Often times, companies will spring up overnight to sell trading systems with a money back guarantee before disappearing a few weeks later. These companies may cherry-pick their successful trades or use curve fitting to generate great results when backtesting a system, but are not legitimate systems for assessing risk and opportunity. There is no such thing as a "holy grail" for trading systems, because if someone did develop a money making system that was fail proof, they would not want to share it with the general public. This is why institutional investors and hedge funds keep their "black box" trading programs under lock and key. --- Developing Your Own Forex Trading Robot https://www.investopedia.com/terms/forex/f/forex-trading-robot.asp

Again, “both the heathen wand and the Jewish ‘serpent’ are one and the same, namely, the Caduceus of Mercury, son of Apollo-python. It is easy to comprehend why the Jews adopted the ophidian shape for their ‘seducer.’ With them it was purely physiological and phallic” (SD 2:208).

agency theory: theory developed by Milgram to explain why people obey orders that go against the conscience. When people see themselves as mere agents of another person, they will obey that person's orders, feeling themselves free of individual responsibility.

Agnishvatta(s) ::: (Sanskrit) ::: A compound of two words: agni, "fire"; shvatta, "tasted" or "sweetened," from svad, verb-rootmeaning "to taste" or "to sweeten." Therefore, literally one who has been delighted or sweetened by fire.A class of pitris: our solar ancestors as contrasted with the barhishads, our lunar ancestors.The kumaras, agnishvattas, and manasaputras are three groups or aspects of the same beings: thekumaras represent the aspect of original spiritual purity untouched by gross elements of matter. Theagnishvattas represent the aspect of their connection with the sun or solar spiritual fire. Having tasted orbeen "sweetened" by the spiritual fire -- the fire of intellectuality and spirituality -- they have beenpurified thereby. The manasaputras represent the aspect of intellectuality -- the functions of higherintellect.The agnishvattas and manasaputras are two names for the same class or host of beings, and set forth orsignify or represent two different aspects or activities of this one class of beings. Thus, for instance, aman may be said to be a kumara in his spiritual parts, an agnishvatta in his buddhic-manasic parts, and amanasaputra in his purely manasic aspect. Other beings could be called kumaras in their highest aspects,as for instance the beasts, but they are not imbodied agnishvattas or manasaputras.The agnishvattas are the solar spiritual-intellectual parts of us, and therefore are our inner teachers. Inpreceding manvantaras, they had completed their evolution in the realms of physical matter, and whenthe evolution of lower beings had brought these latter to the proper state, the agnishvattas came to therescue of these who had only the physical "creative fire," thus inspiring and enlightening these lowerlunar pitris with spiritual and intellectual energies or "fires."When this earth's planetary chain shall have reached the end of its seventh round, we, as then havingcompleted the evolutionary course for this planetary chain, will leave this planetary chain asdhyan-chohans, agnishvattas; but the others now trailing along behind us -- the present beasts -- will bethe lunar pitris of the next planetary chain to come.While it is correct to say that these three names appertain to the same class of beings, nevertheless eachname has its own significance in the occult teaching, which is why the three names are used with threedistinct meanings. Imagine an unconscious god-spark beginning its evolution in any one solar ormaha-manvantara. We may call it a kumara, a being of original spiritual purity, but with a destinythrough karmic evolution connected with the realms of matter.At the other end of the line, at the consummation of the evolution in this maha-manvantara, when theevolving entity has become a fully self-conscious god or divinity, its proper appellation then isagnishvatta, for it has been "sweetened" or purified by means of the working through it of the spiritualfires inherent in itself.Now then, when such an agnishvatta assumes the role of a bringer of mind or of intellectual light to alunar pitri which it overshadows and in which a ray from it incarnates, it then, although in its own realman agnishvatta, functions as a manasaputra or child of mind or mahat. A brief analysis of the compoundelements of these three names may be useful.Kumara is from ku meaning "with difficulty" and mara meaning "mortal." The significance of the wordtherefore can be paraphrased as "mortal with difficulty," and the meaning usually given to it by Sanskritscholars as "easily dying" is wholly exoteric and amusing, and doubtless arose from the fact that kumarais a word frequently used for child or boy, everybody knowing that young children "die easily." The ideatherefore is that purely spiritual beings, although ultimately destined by evolution to pass through therealms of matter, become mortal, i.e., material, only with difficulty.Agnishvatta has the meaning stated above, "delighted" or "pleased" or "sweetened," i.e., "purified" byfire -- which we may render in two ways: either as the fire of suffering and pain in material existenceproducing great fiber and strength of character, i.e., spirituality; or, perhaps still better from thestandpoint of occultism, as signifying an entity or entities who have become one in essence throughevolution with the aethery fire of spirit.Manasaputra is a compound of two words: manasa, "mental" or "intellectual," from the word manas,"mind," and putra, "son" or "child," therefore a child of the cosmic mind -- a "mind-born son" as H. P.Blavatsky phrases it. (See also Pitris, Lunar Pitris)

Aiken code "data" An alternative form of the {Binary Coded Decimal} (BCD) system for encoding numbers. Where BCD encodes each decimal digit in normal binary, Aiken code uses the encoding shown below. This is supposed to be less prone to corruption. The following table shows the encoding of each decimal digit, D, in BCD and Aiken code: D BCD Aiken 0 0000 0000 1 0001 0001 2 0010 0010 3 0011 0011 4 0100 0100 5 0101 1011 (inverted 4) 6 0110 1100 (inverted 3) 7 0111 1101 (inverted 2) 8 1000 1110 (inverted 1) 9 1001 1111 (inverted 0) The Aiken code was probably designed by {Howard Aiken} in the 1940s or 1950s for use in data transmission. Compare: {Gray code}. [What is it good for and why?] (2007-07-16)

AI koan ::: (humour) /A-I koh'an/ One of a series of pastiches of Zen teaching riddles created by Danny Hillis at the MIT AI Lab around various major figures of the Lab's culture.See also ha ha only serious, mu.In reading these, it is at least useful to know that Marvin Minsky, Gerald Sussman, and Drescher are AI researchers of note, that Tom Knight was one of the Lisp machine's principal designers, and that David Moon wrote much of Lisp Machine Lisp. * * * A novice was trying to fix a broken Lisp machine by turning the power off and on.Knight, seeing what the student was doing, spoke sternly: You cannot fix a machine by just power-cycling it with no understanding of what is going wrong.Knight turned the machine off and on.The machine worked. * * * better garbage collector. We must keep a reference count of the pointers to each cons.Moon patiently told the student the following story: One day a student came to Moon and said: `I understandhow to make a better garbage collector... [Pure reference-count garbage collectors have problems with circular structures that point to themselves.] * * * In the days when Sussman was a novice, Minsky once came to him as he sat hacking at the PDP-6.What are you doing?, asked Minsky.I am training a randomly wired neural net to play Tic-Tac-Toe, Sussman replied.Why is the net wired randomly?, asked Minsky.I do not want it to have any preconceptions of how to play, Sussman said.Minsky then shut his eyes.Why do you close your eyes?, Sussman asked his teacher.So that the room will be empty.At that moment, Sussman was enlightened. * * * A disciple of another sect once came to Drescher as he was eating his morning meal.I would like to give you this personality test, said the outsider, because I want you to be happy.Drescher took the paper that was offered him and put it into the toaster, saying: I wish the toaster to be happy, too. (1995-02-08)

AI koan "humour" /A-I koh'an/ One of a series of pastiches of Zen teaching riddles created by {Danny Hillis} at the {MIT AI Lab} around various major figures of the Lab's culture. See also {ha ha only serious}, {mu}. In reading these, it is at least useful to know that {Marvin Minsky}, {Gerald Sussman}, and Drescher are {AI} researchers of note, that {Tom Knight} was one of the {Lisp machine}'s principal designers, and that {David Moon} wrote much of Lisp Machine Lisp. * * * A novice was trying to fix a broken Lisp machine by turning the power off and on. Knight, seeing what the student was doing, spoke sternly: "You cannot fix a machine by just power-cycling it with no understanding of what is going wrong." Knight turned the machine off and on. The machine worked. * * * One day a student came to Moon and said: "I understand how to make a better garbage collector. We must keep a reference count of the pointers to each cons." Moon patiently told the student the following story:   "One day a student came to Moon and said: `I understand   how to make a better garbage collector... [Pure reference-count garbage collectors have problems with circular structures that point to themselves.] * * * In the days when Sussman was a novice, Minsky once came to him as he sat hacking at the PDP-6. "What are you doing?", asked Minsky. "I am training a randomly wired neural net to play Tic-Tac-Toe", Sussman replied. "Why is the net wired randomly?", asked Minsky. "I do not want it to have any preconceptions of how to play", Sussman said. Minsky then shut his eyes. "Why do you close your eyes?", Sussman asked his teacher. "So that the room will be empty." At that moment, Sussman was enlightened. * * * A disciple of another sect once came to Drescher as he was eating his morning meal. "I would like to give you this personality test", said the outsider, "because I want you to be happy." Drescher took the paper that was offered him and put it into the toaster, saying: "I wish the toaster to be happy, too." (1995-02-08)

Akasmika: Without a why; causeless.

AlayavijNAna. (T. kun gzhi rnam par shes pa; C. alaiyeshi/zangshi; J. arayashiki/zoshiki; K. aroeyasik/changsik 阿賴耶識/藏識). In Sanskrit, "storehouse consciousness" or "foundational consciousness"; the eighth of the eight types of consciousness (VIJNANA) posited in the YOGACARA school. All forms of Buddhist thought must be able to uphold (1) the principle of the cause and effect of actions (KARMAN), the structure of SAMSARA, and the process of liberation (VIMOKsA) from it, while also upholding (2) the fundamental doctrines of impermanence (ANITYA) and the lack of a perduring self (ANATMAN). The most famous and comprehensive solution to the range of problems created by these apparently contradictory elements is the AlayavijNAna, often translated as the "storehouse consciousness." This doctrinal concept derives in India from the YOGACARA school, especially from ASAnGA and VASUBANDHU and their commentators. Whereas other schools of Buddhist thought posit six consciousnesses (vijNAna), in the YogAcAra system there are eight, adding the afflicted mind (KLIstAMANAS) and the AlayavijNAna. It appears that once the SarvAstivAda's school's eponymous doctrine of the existence of dharmas in the past, present, and future was rejected by most other schools of Buddhism, some doctrinal solution was required to provide continuity between past and future, including past and future lifetimes. The alAyavijNAna provides that solution as a foundational form of consciousness, itself ethically neutral, where all the seeds (BIJA) of all deeds done in the past reside, and from which they fructify in the form of experience. Thus, the AlayavijNAna is said to pervade the entire body during life, to withdraw from the body at the time of death (with the extremities becoming cold as it slowly exits), and to carry the complete karmic record to the next rebirth destiny. Among the many doctrinal problems that the presence of the AlayavijNAna is meant to solve, it appears that one of its earliest references is in the context not of rebirth but in that of the NIRODHASAMAPATTI, or "trance of cessation," where all conscious activity, that is, all CITTA and CAITTA, cease. Although the meditator may appear as if dead during that trance, consciousness is able to be reactivated because the AlayavijNAna remains present throughout, with the seeds of future experience lying dormant in it, available to bear fruit when the person arises from meditation. The AlayavijNAna thus provides continuity from moment to moment within a given lifetime and from lifetime to lifetime, all providing the link between an action performed in the past and its effect experienced in the present, despite protracted periods of latency between seed and fruition. In YogAcAra, where the existence of an external world is denied, when a seed bears fruit, it bifurcates into an observing subject and an observed object, with that object falsely imagined to exist separately from the consciousness that perceives it. The response by the subject to that object produces more seeds, either positive, negative, or neutral, which are deposited in the AlayavijNAna, remaining there until they in turn bear their fruit. Although said to be neutral and a kind of silent observer of experience, the AlayavijNAna is thus also the recipient of karmic seeds as they are produced, receiving impressions (VASANA) from them. In the context of Buddhist soteriological discussions, the AlayavijNAna explains why contaminants (ASRAVA) remain even when unwholesome states of mind are not actively present, and it provides the basis for the mistaken belief in self (Atman). Indeed, it is said that the klistamanas perceives the AlayavijNAna as a perduring self. The AlayavijNAna also explains how progress on the path can continue over several lifetimes and why some follow the path of the sRAVAKA and others the path of the BODHISATTVA; it is said that one's lineage (GOTRA) is in fact a seed that resides permanently in the AlayavijNAna. In India, the doctrine of the AlayavijNAna was controversial, with some members of the YogAcAra school rejecting its existence, arguing that the functions it is meant to serve can be accommodated within the standard six-consciousness system. The MADHYAMAKA, notably figures such as BHAVAVIVEKA and CANDRAKĪRTI, attacked the YogAcAra proponents of the AlayavijNAna, describing it as a form of self, which all Buddhists must reject. ¶ In East Asia, the AlayavijNAna was conceived as one possible solution to persistent questions in Buddhism about karmic continuity and about the origin of ignorance (MOHA). For the latter, some explanation was required as to how sentient beings, whom many strands of MAHAYANA claimed were inherently enlightened, began to presume themselves to be ignorant. Debates raged within different strands of the Chinese YogAcAra traditions as to whether the AlayavijNAna is intrinsically impure because of the presence of these seeds of past experience (the position of the Northern branch of the Chinese DI LUN ZONG and the Chinese FAXIANG tradition of XUANZANG and KUIJI), or whether the AlayavijNAna included both pure and impure elements because it involved also the functioning of thusness, or TATHATA (the Southern Di lun school's position). Since the sentient being has had a veritable interminable period of time in which to collect an infinity of seeds-which would essentially make it impossible to hope to counteract them one by one-the mainstream strands of YogAcAra viewed the mind as nevertheless tending inveterately toward impurity (dausthulya). This impurity could only be overcome through a "transformation of the basis" (AsRAYAPARAVṚTTI), which would completely eradicate the karmic seeds stored in the storehouse consciousness, liberating the bodhisattva from the effects of all past actions and freeing him to project compassion liberally throughout the world. In some later interpretations, this transformation would then convert the AlayavijNAna into a ninth "immaculate consciousness" (AMALAVIJNANA). See also DASHENG QIXIN LUN.

A lemming ::: refers to the act of an investor following the crowd into an investment, without doing research themselves; this usually results in losses. These investors are emotional and easily swayed by short-term market performance. This "herd" mentality can increase the chance of losing money, because investors either leave the market too early or get into it too late, when prices are already too high to make a profit. n the animal kingdom, a lemming is a rodent known for periodic mass migrations that occasionally end in drowning. To contradict the "herd" mentality, many proactive investors react in an opposite fashion than what the majority of investors are doing. For example, if investors are in a buying frenzy, anti-"herd" investors will sell and when the crowd sells, these investors will go against the lemmings by buying stocks, instead. The antidote to becoming a lemming investor is to keep emotions separate from trading judgment. Instead, concentrate on spotting lemming activity and consider exploiting it for gain by moving in a contrarian fashion. Here's why this is a better strategy that succumbing to the lemming mentality: extreme optimism often coincides with market tops. People think the sky's the limit and send stock prices flying. However, savvier investors know that the time to sell is when prices are high. Likewise, extreme pessimism can be bullish for a contrarian investor. Toward the end of a big decline, the last bulls throw in the towel and sell with a vengeance. Cooler heads in such situations can see the fire sale happening and buy. Studies have found that investors are most influenced by current events – market news, political events, earnings, etc. – and ignore long-term investment and economic fundamentals. Furthermore, if a movement starts in one direction, it tends to pick up more and more investors with time and momentum. The impact of such lemming-like behavior has been made worse in recent years because of more quantity of more sensationalist financial, economic, and other news than ever before. This proliferation of financial media inevitable affects investor psychology.

“All birds of that region are relatives. But this is the bird of eternal Ananda, while the Hippogriff is the divinised Thought and the Bird of Fire is the Agni-bird, psychic and tapas. All that however is to mentalise too much and mentalising always takes most of the life out of spiritual things. That is why I say it can be seen but nothing said about it.”

"All birds of that region are relatives. But this is the bird of eternal Ananda, while the Hippogriff is the divinised Thought and the Bird of Fire is the Agni-bird, psychic and tapas. All that however is to mentalise too much and mentalising always takes most of the life out of spiritual things. That is why I say it can be seen but nothing said about it.” ::: "The question was: ‘In the mystical region, is the dragon bird any relation of your Bird of Fire with ‘gold-white wings" or your Hippogriff with ‘face lustred, pale-blue-lined"? And why do you write: ‘What to say about him? One can only see"?” Letters on Savitri

"All disease is a means towards some new joy of health, all evil & pain a tuning of Nature for some more intense bliss & good, all death an opening on widest immortality. Why and how this should be so, is God"s secret which only the soul purified of egoism can penetrate.” Essays Divine and Human

“All disease is a means towards some new joy of health, all evil & pain a tuning of Nature for some more intense bliss & good, all death an opening on widest immortality. Why and how this should be so, is God’s secret which only the soul purified of egoism can penetrate.” Essays Divine and Human

  And do you want to know why he is always represented as a child? It is because he is in constant progression. To the extent that the world is perfected, his play is also perfected — what was the play of yesterday will no longer be the play of tomorrow; his play will become more and more harmonious, benign and joyful to the extent that the world becomes capable of responding to it and enjoying it with the Divine.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 15.

And do you want to know why he is always represented as a child? It is because he is in constant progression. To the extent that the world is perfected, his play is also perfected—what was the play of yesterday will no longer be the play of tomorrow; his play will become more and more harmonious, benign and joyful to the extent that the world becomes capable of responding to it and enjoying it with the Divine.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 15.

AOS ::: 1. /aws/ (East Coast), /ay-os/ (West Coast) A PDP-10 instruction that took any memory location and added 1 to it. AOS meant Add One and do not Skip. Why, you then skipped if the result was Not 0; AOSA added 1 and then skipped Always; and so on. Just plain AOS didn't say when to skip, so it never skipped.For similar reasons, AOJ meant Add One and do not Jump. Even more bizarre, SKIP meant do not SKIP! If you wanted to skip the next instruction, you had to JRST (Jump and ReSTore flag with no flag specified) was actually faster and so was invariably used. Such were the perverse mysteries of assembler programming.2. /A-O-S/ or /A-os/ A Multics-derived operating system supported at one time by Data General.A spoof of the standard AOS system administrator's manual (How to Load and Generate your AOS System) was created, issued a part number, and circulated as photocopy folklore; it was called How to Goad and Levitate your CHAOS System.3. Algebraic Operating System, in reference to those calculators which use infix operators instead of postfix notation.[Jargon File] (1995-11-26)

AOS 1. "programming" /aws/ (East Coast), /ay-os/ (West Coast) A {PDP-10} instruction that took any memory location and added 1 to it. AOS meant "Add One and do not Skip". Why, you may ask, does the "S" stand for "do not Skip" rather than for "Skip"? Ah, here was a beloved piece of PDP-10 folklore. There were eight such instructions: AOSE added 1 and then skipped the next instruction if the result was Equal to zero; AOSG added 1 and then skipped if the result was Greater than 0; AOSN added 1 and then skipped if the result was Not 0; AOSA added 1 and then skipped Always; and so on. Just plain AOS didn't say when to skip, so it never skipped. For similar reasons, AOJ meant "Add One and do not Jump". Even more bizarre, SKIP meant "do not SKIP"! If you wanted to skip the next instruction, you had to say "SKIPA". Likewise, JUMP meant "do not JUMP"; the unconditional form was JUMPA. However, hackers never did this. By some quirk of the 10's design, the {JRST} (Jump and ReSTore flag with no flag specified) was actually faster and so was invariably used. Such were the perverse mysteries of assembler programming. 2. "operating system" /A-O-S/ or /A-os/ A {Multics}-derived {operating system} supported at one time by {Data General}. A spoof of the standard AOS system administrator's manual ("How to Load and Generate your AOS System") was created, issued a part number, and circulated as photocopy folklore; it was called "How to Goad and Levitate your CHAOS System". 3. "operating system" Algebraic Operating System, in reference to those calculators which use {infix} {operators} instead of {postfix notation}. [{Jargon File}] (1995-11-26)

Apart from mythological considerations, in physical life manifestations of the number seven occur continuously: “if the mysterious Septenary Cycle is a law in nature, and it is one, as proven; if it is found controlling the evolution and involution (or death) in the realms of entomology, ichthyology and ornithology, as in the Kingdoms of the Animal, mammalia and man — why cannot it be present and acting in Kosmos, in general, in its natural (though occult) divisions of time, races, and mental development?” (SD 2:623n).

apocrypha. (C. yijing/weijing; J. gikyo/gikyo; K. ŭigyong/wigyong 疑經/僞經). Buddhist scholars have appropriated (though not without some controversy) the Judeo-Christian religious term "apocrypha" to refer to indigenous sutras composed outside the Indian cultural sphere, but on the model of translated Indian or Serindian scriptures. Such scriptures were sometimes composed in conjunction with a revelatory experience, but many were intentionally forged using their false ascription to the Buddha or other enlightened figures as a literary device to enhance both their authority and their prospects of being accepted as authentic scriptures. Many of the literary genres that characterize Judeo-Christian apocrypha are found also in Buddhist apocrypha, including the historical, didactic, devotional, and apocalyptic. Both were also often composed in milieus of social upheaval or messianic revivalism. As Buddhism moved outside of its Indian homeland, its scriptures had to be translated into various foreign languages, creating openings for indigenous scriptures to be composed in imitation of these translated texts. Ferreting out such inauthentic indigenous scripture from authentic imported scripture occupied Buddhist bibliographical cataloguers (see JINGLU), who were charged with confirming the authenticity of the Buddhist textual transmission. For the Chinese, the main criterion governing scriptural authenticity was clear evidence that the text had been brought from the "Outer Regions" (C. waiyu), meaning India or Central Asia; this concern with authenticating a text partially accounts for why Chinese translations of Buddhist scriptures typically included a colophon immediately following the title, giving the name of the translator (who was also sometimes the importer of the scripture), along with the place where, and often the imperial reign era during which the translation was made. Scriptures for which there was no such proof were in danger of being labeled as texts of "suspect" or "suspicious" authenticity (yijing) or condemned as blatantly "spurious" or "counterfeit" scriptures (weijing). The presence of indigenous cultural elements, such as yin-yang cosmology, local spirits, or rituals and liturgies associated with folk religion could also be enough to condemn a scripture as "spurious." In Tibet, "treasure texts" (GTER MA) were scriptures or esoteric teachings attributed to enlightened beings or lineage holders that purported to have been buried or hidden away until they could be rediscovered by qualified individuals. Because of their association with a revelatory experience, such "treasure texts" carried authority similar to that of translated scripture. Different classifications of apocryphal scriptures have been proposed, based on genre and style, social history, and doctrinal filiations. In one of the ironies of the Buddhist textual transmission, however, many of the scriptures most influential in East Asian Buddhism have been discovered to be indigenous "apocrypha," not translated scriptures. Such indigenous scriptures were able to appeal to a native audience in ways that translated Indian materials could not, and the sustained popularity of many such "suspect" texts eventually led cataloguers to include them in the canon, despite continuing qualms about their authenticity. Such "canonical apocrypha" include such seminal scriptures as the FANWANG JING ("BrahmA's Net Sutra"), RENWANG JING ("Humane Kings Sutra"), and the YUANJUE JING ("Perfect Enlightenment Sutra"), as well as treatises like the DASHENG QIXIN LUN ("Awakening of Faith"). Similar questions of authenticity can be raised regarding scriptures of Indian provenance, since it is virtually impossible to trace with certainty which of the teachings ascribed to the Buddha in mainstream canonical collections (TRIPItAKA) such as the PAli canon can be historically attributed to him. Similarly, the MAHAYANA sutras, which are also attributed to the Buddha even though they were composed centuries after his death, are considered apocryphal by many of the MAINSTREAM BUDDHIST SCHOOLS, including the modern THERAVADA tradition; however, modern scholars do not use the term "Buddhist apocrypha" to describe MahAyAna texts.

ASANA. ::: Fixed posture habituating the body to certain attitudes of immobility. The system of Asana has at its basis two profound ideas ::: control by physical immobility, power by immobility.

The sitting motionless posture is the natural posture for concentrated meditation - walking and standing are active conditions. It is only when one has gained the enduring rest and passivity of the consciousness that it is easy to concentrate and receive when walking or doing anything. A fundamental passive condition of the consciousness gathered into itself is the proper poise for concentration and a seated gathered immobility in the body is the best position for that. It can be done also lying down, but that position is too passive, tending to be inert rather than gathered. This is the reason why yogis always sit in an āsana. One can accustom oneself to meditate walking. standing, lying but sitting is the first natural position.


ascends to Heaven and asks Gabriel why they

  "As for prayer, no hard and fast rule can be laid down. Some prayers are answered, all are not. You may ask, why should not then all prayers be answered? But why should they be? It is not a machinery: put a prayer in the slot and get your asking. Besides, considering all the contradictory things mankind is praying for at the same moment, God would be in a rather awkward hole if he had to grant all of them; it wouldn"t do.” *Letters on Yoga

“As for prayer, no hard and fast rule can be laid down. Some prayers are answered, all are not. You may ask, why should not then all prayers be answered? But why should they be? It is not a machinery: put a prayer in the slot and get your asking. Besides, considering all the contradictory things mankind is praying for at the same moment, God would be in a rather awkward hole if he had to grant all of them; it wouldn’t do.” Letters on Yoga

Ashmogh (Pahlavi) Demon with disheveled hair of the race of wrath; Ahriman’s disciple who encourages Azhi-Dahak (Bevar-Aspa) to rise up in order to destroy mankind and shouts: “Now it is nine thousand years that Fereydun is not living; why do you not rise up, although thy fetters are not removed, when this world is full of people and they have brought them the enclosure which Yima formed?” (SBE 5:234).

A stone is an organism enshrining a divine spark or monad. The difference between the stone and the man consists largely in the fact that what is expressed in man is latent in the stone. Why then should not the hierophants of genuine magic or occult science have been able to evoke from the stone its latent potencies? Why should not particular stones, like particular plants, animals, or men, possess particular virtues?

As universal space, it is also known as Aditi, in which lies inherent the eternal and continuously active ideation of the universe producing its ever-changing aspects on the planes of matter and objectivity; and from this ideation radiates the First Logos. This is why the Puranas state that akasa has but one attribute, namely sound, for sound is but the translated symbol of logos (speech) in its mystic sense. Akasa as primordial spatial substance is thus the upadhi (vehicle) of divine thought. Further, it is the playground of all the intelligent and semi-intelligent forces in nature, the fountainhead of all terrestrial life, and the abode of the gods.

A thought entertained by one person may pass inwardly through planes of consciousness until it reaches a point where minds are no longer separate, and from thence it may travel outwardly to the brain of another person. It may even be said that what we require is not so much an explanation of thought transference as an explanation of why thoughts are so seldom transferred — why our minds are so separate; and the explanation is the concentration of each individual’s normal daily consciousness upon affairs immediately concerning himself. This clothes the individual in a mental shell of interests, around which rush the radiatory influences emanating from the thinker. Universality of sympathy therefore is the key to successful telepathic communication.

Axiom of Comprehension "logic" An {axiom schema} of {set theory} which states: if P(x) is a {property} then {x : P} is a set. I.e. all the things with some property form a set. Acceptance of this axiom leads to {Russell's Paradox} which is why {Zermelo set theory} replaces it with a restricted form. (1995-03-31)

Axiom of Comprehension ::: (mathematics) An axiom schema of set theory which states: if P(x) is a property then {x : P} is a set. I.e. all the things with some property form a set.Acceptance of this axiom leads to Russell's Paradox which is why Zermelo set theory replaces it with a restricted form. (1995-03-31)

babbling error "networking" An {Ethernet} node attempting to transmit more than 1518 data bytes - the largest allowed Ethernet {packet}. This is why the {Maximum Transmission Unit} for {IP} traffic on Ethernet is 1500. [Why 1518?] (1998-03-13)

babbling error ::: (networking) An Ethernet node attempting to transmit more than 1518 data bytes - the largest allowed Ethernet packet. This is why the Maximum Transmission Unit for IP traffic on Ethernet is 1500.[Why 1518?] (1998-03-13)

babel ::: “The legend of the Tower of Babel speaks of the diversity of tongues as a curse laid on the race; but whatever its disadvantages, and they tend more and more to be minimised by the growth of civilisation and increasing intercourse, it has been rather a blessing than a curse, a gift to mankind rather than a disability laid upon it. The purposeless exaggeration of anything is always an evil, and an excessive pullulation of varying tongues that serve no purpose in the expression of a real diversity of spirit and culture is certainly a stumbling-block rather than a help: but this excess, though it existed in the past, is hardly a possibility of the future. The tendency is rather in the opposite direction. In former times diversity of language helped to create a barrier to knowledge and sympathy, was often made the pretext even of an actual antipathy and tended to a too rigid division. The lack of sufficient interpenetration kept up both a passive want of understanding and a fruitful crop of active misunderstandings. But this was an inevitable evil of a particular stage of growth, an exaggeration of the necessity that then existed for the vigorous development of strongly individualised group-souls in the human race. These disadvantages have not yet been abolished, but with closer intercourse and the growing desire of men and nations for the knowledge of each other’s thought and spirit and personality, they have diminished and tend to diminish more and more and there is no reason why in the end they should not become inoperative.” The Human Cycle

babel ::: "The reference is to the mythological story of the construction of the Tower of Babel, which appears to be an attempt to explain the diversity of human languages. According to Genesis, the Babylonians wanted to make a name for themselves by building a mighty city and tower ‘with its top in the heavens". God disrupted the work by so confusing the language of the workers that they could no longer understand one another. The tower was never completed and the people were dispersed over the face of the earth.” (Encyclopaedia Britannica) Glossary and Index of Proper Names in Sri Aurobindo"s Works     Sri Aurobindo: "The legend of the Tower of Babel speaks of the diversity of tongues as a curse laid on the race; but whatever its disadvantages, and they tend more and more to be minimised by the growth of civilisation and increasing intercourse, it has been rather a blessing than a curse, a gift to mankind rather than a disability laid upon it. The purposeless exaggeration of anything is always an evil, and an excessive pullulation of varying tongues that serve no purpose in the expression of a real diversity of spirit and culture is certainly a stumbling-block rather than a help: but this excess, though it existed in the past, is hardly a possibility of the future. The tendency is rather in the opposite direction. In former times diversity of language helped to create a barrier to knowledge and sympathy, was often made the pretext even of an actual antipathy and tended to a too rigid division. The lack of sufficient interpenetration kept up both a passive want of understanding and a fruitful crop of active misunderstandings. But this was an inevitable evil of a particular stage of growth, an exaggeration of the necessity that then existed for the vigorous development of strongly individualised group-souls in the human race. These disadvantages have not yet been abolished, but with closer intercourse and the growing desire of men and nations for the knowledge of each other"s thought and spirit and personality, they have diminished and tend to diminish more and more and there is no reason why in the end they should not become inoperative.” The Human Cycle

banns ::: n. pl. --> Notice of a proposed marriage, proclaimed in a church, or other place prescribed by law, in order that any person may object, if he knows of just cause why the marriage should not take place.

bearing: A way of representing directions (horizontal directions: perpendicular to up and down) in navigation where a direction is represented by a three-digit number between 000 and 360, measured from the North clockwise. (So that 000 is North, 090 is East, 180 is South and 270 is West.) Note that conventionally, the number is given in 3 digits even if it is less than 100. And while theoretically, there is no reason why the system be limited to integers, it is most often not needed beyond the degree of accuracy given by integer value bearings.

Bhairava. (T. 'Jigs byed; C. Buwei; J. Fui; K. P'ooe 怖畏). In Sanskrit, "Fierce," "Frightening," "Horrible"; the name of a saivite Hindu and Buddhist deity. Bhairava first appears as one of the emanations of the Hindu god siva. Many stories appear in the Hindu tradition explaining how and why siva first took this wrathful form. In Buddhism, Bhairava, or commonly VAJRABHAIRAVA, is closely related to YAMANTAKA, "He who Brings an End (antaka) to Death (yama)." Vajrabhairava and YamAntaka are understood to be emanations of the BODHISATTVA MANJUsRĪ. Bhairava is particularly popular in Nepal and Tibet. In Tibetan Buddhism, Bhairava is both a meditative deity (YI DAM), where his wrathful appearance is said to frighten away the mistaken belief in a self (ATMAN), as well as a protector of the dharma (DHARMAPALA) who frightens away baleful spirits with his terrifying appearance. In Buddhist art, Bhairava is typically depicted with black or dark-blue skin, a single head (often that of a buffalo), and multiple arms brandishing a variety of weapons. He may also have a necklace made of skulls, a mouth stained with blood, and have his feet holding down a prone figure he has vanquished.

BhAvaviveka. (T. Legs ldan 'byed; C. Qingbian; J. Shoben; K. Ch'ongbyon 清辯) (c. 500-570). Also known as BhAviveka and Bhavya, an important Indian master of the MADHYAMAKA school, identified in Tibet as a proponent of SVATANTRIKA MADHYAMAKA and, within that, of SAUTRANTIKA-SVATANTRIKA-MADHYAMAKA. He is best known for two works. The first is the PRAJNAPRADĪPA, his commentary on NAGARJUNA's MuLAMADHYAMAKAKARIKA; this work has an extensive subcommentary by AVALOKITAVRATA. Although important in its own right as one of the major commentaries on the central text of the Madhyamaka school, the work is most often mentioned for its criticism of the commentary of BUDDHAPALITA on the first chapter of NAgArjuna's text, where BhAvaviveka argues that it is insufficient for the Madhyamaka only to state the absurd consequences (PRASAnGA) that follow from the position of the opponent. According to BhAvaviveka, the Madhyamaka must eventually state his own position in the form of what is called an autonomous inference (svatantrAnumAna) or an autonomous syllogism (SVATANTRAPRAYOGA). In his own commentary on the first chapter of NAgArjuna's text, CANDRAKĪRTI came to the defense of BuddhapAlita and criticized BhAvaviveka, stating that it is inappropriate for the Madhyamaka to use autonomous syllogisms. It is on the basis of this exchange that Tibetan exegetes identified two schools within Madhyamaka: the SvAtantrika, which includes BhAvaviveka, and the PrAsangika, which includes BuddhapAlita and Candrakīrti. ¶ The other major work of BhAvaviveka is his MADHYAMAKAHṚDAYA, written in verse, and its prose autocommentary, the TARKAJVALA. The Madhyamakahṛdaya is preserved in both Sanskrit and Tibetan, the TarkajvAlA only in Tibetan. It is a work of eleven chapters, the first three and the last two of which set forth the main points in BhAvaviveka's view of the nature of reality and the Buddhist path, dealing with such topics as BODHICITTA, the knowledge of reality (tattvajNAna), and omniscience (SARVAJNATA). The intervening chapters set forth the positions (and BhAvaviveka's refutations) of various Buddhist and non-Buddhist schools, including the sRAVAKA, YOGACARA, SAMkhya, Vaisesika, VedAnta, and MīmAMsA. These chapters (along with sANTARAKsITA's TATTVASAMGRAHA) are an invaluable source of insight into the relations between Madhyamaka and other contemporary Indian philosophical schools, both Buddhist and non-Buddhist. The chapter on the srAvakas, for example, provides a detailed account of the reasons put forth by the sRAVAKAYANA schools of mainstream Buddhism as to why the MahAyAna sutras are not the word of the Buddha (BUDDHAVACANA). BhAvaviveka's response to these charges, as well as his refutation of YOGACARA in the subsequent chapter, are particularly spirited, arguing that reality (TATHATA) cannot be substantially existent (dravyasat), as those rival schools claim. However, BhAvaviveka made extensive use of both the logic and epistemology of DIGNĂGA, at least at the level of conventional analysis. BhAvaviveka appears to have been the first Madhyamaka author to declare that the negations set forth by the Madhyamaka school are nonaffirming (or simple) negations (PRASAJYAPRATIsEDHA) rather than affirming (or implicative) negations (PARYUDASAPRATIsEDHA). Also attributed to BhAvaviveka is the Karatalaratna ("Jewel in Hand Treatise"; Zhangzhen lun), a work preserved only in the Chinese translation of XUANZANG. BhAvaviveka's MADHYAMAKARTHASAMGRAHA is a brief text in verse. As the title suggests, it provides an outline of the basic topics of MADHYAMAKA philosophy, such as the middle way (S. MADHYAMAPRATIPAD) between the extremes of existence and nonexistence, Madhyamaka reasoning, and the two truths (SATYADVAYA). The MADHYAMAKARATNAPRADĪPA is likely the work of another author of the same name, since it makes reference to such later figures as Candrakīrti and DHARMAKĪRTI.

bit-paired keyboard "hardware" (Obsolete, or "bit-shift keyboard") A non-standard keyboard layout that seems to have originated with the {Teletype} {ASR-33} and remained common for several years on early computer equipment. The ASR-33 was a mechanical device (see {EOU}), so the only way to generate the character codes from keystrokes was by some physical linkage. The design of the ASR-33 assigned each character key a basic pattern that could be modified by flipping bits if the SHIFT or the CTRL key was pressed. In order to avoid making the thing more of a Rube Goldberg {kluge} than it already was, the design had to group characters that shared the same basic {bit pattern} on one key. Looking at the {ASCII} chart, we find: high low bits bits 0000 0001 0010 0011 0100 0101 0110 0111 1000 1001 010    !  "  

black magic "jargon" (Or "{FM}") A technique that works, though nobody really understands why. More obscure than {voodoo programming}, which may be done by {cookbook}. Compare {black art}, {deep magic}, and {magic number}. (2001-04-30)

black magic ::: (jargon) (Or FM) A technique that works, though nobody really understands why. More obscure than voodoo programming, which may be done by cookbook.Compare black art, deep magic, and magic number.(2001-04-30)

blue dot syndrome "graphics, jargon" The inability to display an {image} {file} or {text} embedded in an image file on your monitor. [Why?] (2002-05-28)

blue dot syndrome ::: (graphics, jargon) The inability to display an image file or text embedded in an image file on your monitor.[Why?](2002-05-28)

Bobo the Webmonkey "web" What {B1FF} was to {BITNET} users, Bobo the Webmonkey is to {webmonkeys} - the mythical prototype of incompetent web designers everywhere. In fact, Bobo may be what B1FF became when he grew up. Bobo knows about {HTML} only what he has learned from viewing the source of other people's Web pages. Bobo doesn't know what a {MIME type} is, even though someone gave him a hardcopy of the {FOLDOC} entry for it. Bobo may have used an HTML code validator {(http://validator.w3.org/)} before, but isn't sure. Bobo doesn't know what the difference between {GIF} and {JPEG} is. He thinks {PNG} is a foreign country. All the pages Bobo has designed say "Welcome to [organisation] online!" at the top, and say "click here!" at least three times per page. Bobo has used {Photoshop} before; he doesn't understand why people keep asking if he's ever been tested for color-blindness. Bobo never got that "its" / "it's" distinction real clear, as you can tell from his pages. Bobo likes "BLINK". (1998-04-04)

Bobo the Webmonkey ::: (World-Wide Web) What B1FF was to BITNET users, Bobo the Webmonkey is to webmonkeys - the mythical prototype of incompetent web designers everywhere. In fact, Bobo may be what B1FF became when he grew up.Bobo knows about HTML only what he has learned from viewing the source of other people's Web pages.Bobo doesn't know what a MIME type is, even though someone gave him a hardcopy of the FOLDOC entry for it.Bobo may have used an HTML code validator before, but isn't sure.Bobo doesn't know what the difference between GIF and JPEG is. He thinks PNG is a foreign country.All the pages Bobo has designed say Welcome to [organisation] online! at the top, and say click here! at least three times per page.Bobo has used Photoshop before; he doesn't understand why people keep asking if he's ever been tested for color-blindness.Bobo never got that its / it's distinction real clear, as you can tell from his pages.Bobo likes BLINK>. (1998-04-04)

Bodhidharma. (C. Putidamo; J. Bodaidaruma; K. Poridalma 菩提達磨) (c. late-fourth to early-fifth centuries). Indian monk who is the putative "founder" of the school of CHAN (K. SoN, J. ZEN, V. THIỀN). The story of a little-known Indian (or perhaps Central Asian) emigré monk grew over the centuries into an elaborate legend of Bodhidharma, the first patriarch of the Chan school. The earliest accounts of a person known as Bodhidharma appear in the Luoyang qielan ji and XU GAOSENG ZHUAN, but the more familiar and developed image of this figure can be found in such later sources as the BAOLIN ZHUAN, LENGQIE SHIZI JI, LIDAI FABAO JI, ZUTANG JI, JINGDE CHUANDENG LU, and other "transmission of the lamplight" (CHUANDENG LU) histories. According to these sources, Bodhidharma was born as the third prince of a South Indian kingdom. Little is known about his youth, but he is believed to have arrived in China sometime during the late fourth or early fifth century, taking the southern maritime route according to some sources, the northern overland route according to others. In an episode appearing in the Lidai fabao ji and BIYAN LU, after arriving in southern China, Bodhidharma is said to have engaged in an enigmatic exchange with the devout Buddhist emperor Wu (464-549, r. 502-549) of the Liang dynasty (502-557) on the subject of the Buddha's teachings and merit-making. To the emperor's questions about what dharma Bodhidharma was transmitting and how much merit (PUnYA) he, Wudi, had made by his munificent donations to construct monasteries and ordain monks, Bodhidharma replied that the Buddha's teachings were empty (hence there was nothing to transmit) and that the emperor's generous donations had brought him no merit at all. The emperor seems not to have been impressed with these answers, and Bodhidharma, perhaps disgruntled by the emperor's failure to understand the profundity of his teachings, left for northern China, taking the Yangtze river crossing (riding a reed across the river, in a scene frequently depicted in East Asian painting). Bodhidharma's journey north eventually brought him to a cave at the monastery of SHAOLINSI on SONGSHAN, where he sat in meditation for nine years while facing a wall (MIANBI), in so-called "wall contemplation" (BIGUAN). During his stay on Songshan, the Chinese monk HUIKE is said to have become Bodhidharma's disciple, allegedly after cutting off his left arm to show his dedication. This legend of Bodhidharma's arrival in China is eventually condensed into the famous Chan case (GONG'AN), "Why did Bodhidharma come from the West?" (see XILAI YI). Bodhidharma's place within the lineage of Indian patriarchs vary according to text and tradition (some list him as the twenty-eighth patriarch), but he is considered the first patriarch of Chan in China. Bodhidharma's name therefore soon became synonymous with Chan and subsequently with Son, Zen, and Thièn. Bodhidharma, however, has often been confused with other figures such as BODHIRUCI, the translator of the LAnKAVATARASuTRA, and the Kashmiri monk DHARMATRATA, to whom the DHYANA manual DAMODUOLUO CHAN JING is attributed. The Lidai fabao ji, for instance, simply fused the names of Bodhidharma and DharmatrAta and spoke of a BodhidharmatrAta whose legend traveled with the Lidai fabao ji to Tibet. Bodhidharma was even identified as the apostle Saint Thomas by Jesuit missionaries to China, such as Matteo Ricci. Several texts, a number of which were uncovered in the DUNHUANG manuscript cache in Central Asia, have been attributed to Bodhidharma, but their authorship remains uncertain. The ERRU SIXING LUN seems to be the only of these texts that can be traced with some certainty back to Bodhidharma or his immediate disciples. The legend of Bodhidharma in the Lengqie shizi ji also associates him with the transmission of the LankAvatArasutra in China. In Japan, Bodhidharma is often depicted in the form of a round-shaped, slightly grotesque-looking doll, known as the "Daruma doll." Like much of the rest of the legends surrounding Bodhidharma, there is finally no credible evidence connecting Bodhidharma to the Chinese martial arts traditions (see SHAOLINSI).

Boycott Apple "legal" Some time before 1989, {Apple Computer, Inc.} started a lawsuit against {Hewlett-Packard} and {Microsoft}, claiming they had breeched Apple's {copyright} on the {look and feel} of the {Macintosh user interface}. In December 1989, {Xerox} failed to sue {Apple Computer}, claiming that the software for Apple's {Lisa} computer and {Macintosh} {Finder}, both copyrighted in 1987, were derived from two {Xerox} programs: {Smalltalk}, developed in the mid-1970s and {Star}, copyrighted in 1981. Apple wanted to stop people from writing any program that worked even vaguely like a {Macintosh}. If such {look and feel} lawsuits succeed they could put an end to {free software} that could substitute for commercial software. In the weeks after the suit was filed, {Usenet} reverberated with condemnation for Apple. {GNU} supporters {Richard Stallman}, {John Gilmore} and Paul Rubin decided to take action against Apple. Apple's reputation as a force for progress came from having made better computers; but The {League for Programming Freedom} believed that Apple wanted to make all non-Apple computers worse. They therefore campaigned to discourage people from using Apple products or working for Apple or any other company threatening similar obstructionist tactics (e.g. {Lotus} and {Xerox}). Because of this boycott the {Free Software Foundation} for a long time didn't support {Macintosh} {Unix} in their software. In 1995, the LPF and the FSF decided to end the boycott. [Dates? Other events? Why did Xerox's case against Apple fail?] (1995-04-18)

Boycott Apple ::: Some time before 1989, Apple Computer, Inc. started a lawsuit against Hewlett-Packard and Microsoft, claiming they had breeched Apple's copyright on Xerox programs: Smalltalk, developed in the mid-1970s and Star, copyrighted in 1981.Apple wanted to stop people from writing any program that worked even vaguely like a Macintosh. If such look and feel lawsuits succeed they could put an end to free software that could substitute for commercial software.In the weeks after the suit was filed, Usenet reverberated with condemnation for Apple. GNU supporters Richard Stallman, John Gilmore, and Paul Rubin decided to or any other company threatening similar obstructionist tactics (e.g. Lotus and Xerox).Because of this boycott the Free Software Foundation for a long time didn't support Macintosh Unix in their software. In 1995, the LPF and the FSF decided to end the boycott.[Dates? Other events? Why did Xerox's case against Apple fail?] (1995-04-18)

B. The Probability-Relation. Considering the general grounds of probability, it is pertinent to analyze the proper characteristics of this concept and the valid conditions of its use in inferential processes. Probability presents itself as a special relation between the premisses and the conclusion of an argument, namely when the premisses are true but not completely sufficient to condition the truth of the conclusion. A probable inference must however be logical, even though its result is not certain, for its premisses must be a true sign of its conclusion. The probability-relation may take three aspects: it is inductive, probable or presumptive. In strict induction, there is an essential connection between the facts expressed in the premisses and in the conclusion, which almost forces a factual result from the circumstances of the predication. This type of probability-relation is prominent in induction proper and in statistics. In strict probability, there is a logical connection between the premisses and the conclusion which does not entail a definite factual value for the latter. This type of probability-relation is prominent in mathematical probability and circumstantial evidence. In strict presumption, there is a similarity of characteristics between the fact expressed in the conclusion and the real event if it does or did exist. This type of probability-relation is prominent in analogy and testimony. A presumptive conclusion should be accepted provisionally, and it should have definite consequences capable of being tested. The results of an inductive inference and of a probable inference may often be brought closer together when covering the same field, as the relations involved are fundamental enough for the purpose. This may be done by a qualitative analysis of their implications, or by a quantitative comparison of their elements, as it is done for example in the methods of correlation. But a presumptive inference cannot be reduced to either of the other two forms without losing its identity, because the connection between its elements is of an indefinite character. It may be said that inductive and probable inferences have an intrinsic reasonableness, while presumptive inferences have an extrinsic reasonableness. The former involve determinism within certain limits, while the latter display indeterminacy more prominently. That is why very poor, misleading or wrong conclusions are obtained when mathematical methods are applied to moral acts, judiciary decisions or indirect testimony The activity of the human will has an intricate complexity and variability not easily subjected to calculation. Hence the degree of probability of a presumptive inference can be estimated only by the character and circumstances of its suggested explanation. In moral cases, the discussion and application of the probability-relation leads to the consideration of the doctrines of Probabilism and Probabiliorism which are qualitative. The probability-relation as such has the following general implications which are compatible with its three different aspects, and which may serve as general inferential principle: Any generalization must be probable upon propositions entailing its exemplification in particular cases; Any generalization or system of generalizations forming a theory, must be probable upon propositions following from it by implication; The probability of a given proposition on the basis of other propositions constituting its evidence, is the degree of logical conclusiveness of this evidence with respect to the given proposition; The empirical probability (p = S/E) of a statement S increases as verifications accrue to the evidence E, provided the evidence is taken as a whole; and Numerical probabilities may be assigned to facts or statements only when the evidence includes statistical data or other numerical information which can be treated by the methods of mathematical probability. C. Mathematical Probability. The mathematical theory of probability, which is also called the theory of chances or the theory of relative possibilities, is concerned with the application of mathematical methods to the determination of the likelihood of any event, when there are not sufficient data to determine with certainty its occurrence or failure. As Laplace remarked, it is nothing more than common sense reduced to calculation. But its range goes far beyond that of common sense for it has not only conditioned the growth of various branches of mathematics, such as the theory of errors, the calculus of variations and mathematical statistics, but it has also made possible the establishment of a number of theories in the natural and social sciences, by its actual applications to concrete problems. A distinction is usually made between direct and inverse probability. The determination of a direct or a priori probability involves an inference from given situations or sets of possibilities numerically characterized, to future events related with them. By definition, the direct probability of the occurrence of any particular form of an event, is the ratio of the number of ways in which that form might occur, to the whole number of ways in which the event may occur, all these forms being equiprobable or equally likely. The basic principles referring to a priori probabilities are derived from the analysis of the various logical alternatives involved in any hypothetical questions such as the following: (a) To determine whether a cause, whose exact nature is or is not known, will prove operative or not in certain circumstances; (b) To determine how often an event happens or fails. The comparison of the number of occurrences with that of the failures of an event, considered in simple or complex circumstances, affords a baisis for several cases of probable inference. Thus, theorems may be established to deal with the probability of success and the probability of failure of an event, with the probability of the joint occurrence of several events, with the probability of the alternative occurrence of several events, with the different conditions of frequency of occurrence of an event; with mathematical expectation, and with similar questions. The determination of an a posteriori or inverse probability involves an inference from given situations or events, to past conditions or causes which rnay have contributed to their occurrence. By definition, an inverse probability is the numerical value assigned to each one of a number of possible causes of an actual event that has already occurred; or more generally, it is the numerical value assigned to hypotheses which attempt to explain actual events or circumstances. If an event has occurred as a result of any one of n several causes, the probability that C was the actual cause is Pp/E (Pnpn), when P is the probability that the event could be produced by C if present, and p the probability that C was present before the occurrence of that event. Inverse probability is based on general and special assumptions which cannot always be properly stated, and as there are many different sets of such assumptions, there cannot be a coercive reason for making a definite choice. In particular, the condition of the equiprobability of causes is seldom if ever fulfilled. The distinction between the two kinds of probability, which has led to some confusion in interpreting their grounds and their relations, can be technically ignored now as a result of the adoption of a statistical basis for measuring probabilities. In particular, it is the statistical treatment of correlation which led to the study of probabilities of concurrent phenomena irrespective of their direction in time. This distinction may be retained, howe\er, for the purpose of a general exposition of the subject. Thus, a number of probability theorems are obtained by using various cases of direct and inverse probability involving permutations and combinations, the binomial theorem, the theory of series, and the methods of integration. In turn, these theurems can be applied to concrete cases of the various sciences.

buddhaksetra. (T. sangs rgyas zhing; C. focha; J. bussetsu; K. pulch'al 佛刹). In Sanskrit, "buddha field," the realm that constitutes the domain of a specific buddha. A buddhaksetra is said to have two aspects, which parallel the division of a world system into a BHAJANALOKA (lit. "container world," "world of inanimate objects") and a SATTVALOKA ("world of sentient beings"). As a result of his accumulation of merit (PUnYASAMBHARA), his collection of knowledge (JNANASAMBHARA), and his specific vow (PRAnIDHANA), when a buddha achieves enlightenment, a "container" or "inanimate" world is produced in the form of a field where the buddha leads beings to enlightenment. The inhabitant of that world is the buddha endowed with all the BUDDHADHARMAs. Buddha-fields occur in various levels of purification, broadly divided between pure (VIsUDDHABUDDHAKsETRA) and impure. Impure buddha-fields are synonymous with a world system (CAKRAVAdA), the infinite number of "world discs" in Buddhist cosmology that constitutes the universe; here, ordinary sentient beings (including animals, ghosts, and hell beings) dwell, subject to the afflictions (KLEsA) of greed (LOBHA), hatred (DVEsA), and delusion (MOHA). Each cakravAda is the domain of a specific buddha, who achieves enlightenment in that world system and works there toward the liberation of all sentient beings. A pure buddha-field, by contrast, may be created by a buddha upon his enlightenment and is sometimes called a PURE LAND (JINGTU, more literally, "purified soil" in Chinese), a term with no direct equivalent in Sanskrit. In such purified buddha-fields, the unfortunate realms (APAYA, DURGATI) of animals, ghosts, and hell denizens are typically absent. Thus, the birds that sing beautiful songs there are said to be emanations of the buddha rather than sentient beings who have been reborn as birds. These pure lands include such notable buddhaksetras as ABHIRATI, the buddha-field of the buddha AKsOBHYA, and SUKHAVATĪ, the land of the buddha AMITABHA and the object of a major strand of East Asian Buddhism, the so-called pure land school (see JoDOSHu, JoDO SHINSHu). In the VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA, after the buddha reveals a pure buddha land, sARIPUTRA asks him why sAKYAMUNI's buddha-field has so many faults. The buddha then touches the earth with his toe, at which point the world is transformed into a pure buddha-field; he explains that he makes the world appear impure in order to inspire his disciples to seek liberation.

Cavalieri’s principle: Two geometrical figures whose cross sections are the same as each other, at the same distance away from some reference line/lines (plane/planes) have the same area (volume). As an example, this explains why triangles whose bases have the same length, and have the same height, have also the same area, regardless of its shape.

chad "jargon, printer" /chad/ (Or "selvage" /sel'v*j/ (sewing and weaving), "{perf}", "perfory", "snaf"). 1. The perforated edge strips on paper for {sprocket feed} printers, after they have been separated from the printed portion. The term {perf} may also refer to the perforations themselves, rather than the chad they produce when torn. [Why "snaf"?] 2. (Or "chaff", "computer confetti", "keypunch droppings") The confetti-like bits punched out of {punched cards} or {paper tape} which collected in the {chad box}. One of the {Jargon File}'s correspondents believed that "chad" derived from the {chadless keypunch}. [{Jargon File}] (1997-07-18)

chad ::: (jargon, printer) /chad/ (Or selvage /sel'v*j/ (sewing and weaving), perf, perfory, snaf). 1. The perforated edge strips on paper for sprocket feed printers, after they have been separated from the printed portion.The term perf may also refer to the perforations themselves, rather than the chad they produce when torn.[Why snaf?]2. (Or chaff, computer confetti, keypunch droppings) The confetti-like bits punched out of punched cards or paper tape which collected in the chad box.One of the Jargon File's correspondents believed that chad derived from the chadless keypunch.[Jargon File] (1997-07-18)

Chitta ::: Chitta is ordinarily used for the mental consciousness in general, thought, feeling, etc. taken together with a stress now on one side or another, sometimes on the feelings as in citta-pramathı, sometimes on the thought-mind—that is why I translated it [on p. 75 (maccittah. )] "heart and mind" in its wider sense.
   Ref: CWSA Vol. 13, Page: 92


cittaviprayuktasaMskAra. (T. sems dang ldan pa ma yin pa'i 'du byed; C. xin buxiangying fa; J. shinfusoobo; K. sim pulsangŭng pop 心不相應法). In Sanskrit, "conditioned forces dissociated from thought"; forces that are associated with neither materiality (RuPA) nor mentality (CITTA) and thus are listed in a separate category of factors (DHARMA) in ABHIDHARMA materials associated with the SARVASTIVADA school and in the hundred-dharmas (BAIFA) list of the YOGACARA school. These conditioned forces were posited to account for complex moral and mental processes (such as the states of mind associated with the higher spheres of meditation, where both physicality and mentality were temporarily suspended), and anomalous doctrinal problems (such as how speech was able to convey meaning or how group identity was established). A standard listing found in the DHARMASKANDHA and PRAKARAnAPADA, two texts of the SarvAstivAda abhidharma canon, includes sixteen dissociated forces: (1) possession (PRAPTI); (2) equipoise of nonperception (ASAMJNASAMAPATTI); (3) equipoise of cessation (NIRODHASAMAPATTI); (4) nonperception (AsaMjNika); (5) vitality (JĪVITA); (6) homogeneity (sabhAgatA); (7) acquisition the corporeal basis (*AsrayapratilAbha); (8) acquisition of the given entity (*vastuprApti); (9) acquisition of the sense spheres (*AyatanaprApti); the four conditioned characteristics (SAMSKṚTALAKsAnA), viz., (10) origination, or birth (JATI); (11) continuance, or maturation (STHITI); (12) senescence, or decay (JARA); and (13) desinence, or death (anityatA); (14) name set (nAmakAya); (15) phrase set (padakAya); 16) syllable set (vyaNjanakAya). The later treatise ABHIDHARMAKOsABHAsYA includes only fourteen, dropping numbers 7, 8, 9 and adding nonpossession (APRAPTI). These listings, however, constituted only the most generic and comprehensive types employed by the VAIBHAsIKA school of SarvAstivAda abhidharma; the cittaviprayuktasaMskAras thus constituted an open category, and new forces could be posited as the need arose in order to resolve thorny doctrinal issues. The four conditioned characteristics (saMskṛtalaksana) are a good example of why the cittaviprayuktasaMskAra category was so useful in abhidharma-type analysis. In the SarvAstivAda treatment of causality, these four characteristics were forcesthat exerted real power over compounded objects, escorting an object along from origination, to continuance, to senescence or decay, until the force "desinence," or death finally extinguishes it; this rather tortured explanation was necessary in order to explain how factors that the school presumed continued to exist in all three time periods (TRIKALA) of past, present, and future nevertheless still appeared to undergo change. The YOGACARA school subsequently includes twenty-four cittaviprayuktasaMskAras in its list of one hundred dharmas (see BAIFA), including such elements as the state of an ordinary being (pṛthagjanatva), time (KALA), place (desa), and number (saMkhyA).

C+- ::: (language) (C More or Less) A subject-oriented language (SOL). Each C+- class instance, known as a subject, holds hidden members, known as prejudices, agendas or undeclared preferences, which are impervious to outside messages; as well as public members, known as boasts or claims.The following C operators are overridden as shown: > better than worse than why-not interactions are aided by the special conditional EVENIFNOT X THEN Y.C+- supports information hiding and, among friend classes only, rumor sharing. Borrowing from the Eiffel lexicon, non-friend classes can be killed by arranging contracts. Note that friendships are intransitive, volatile and non-Abelian.Operator precedence rules can be suspended with the directive

C+- "language, humour" (C More or Less) A subject-oriented language (SOL). Each C+- {class} instance, known as a subject, holds hidden {members}, known as prejudices, agendas or undeclared preferences, which are impervious to outside messages; as well as public members, known as boasts or claims. The following {C} {operators} are overridden as shown: "  better than "  worse than "" way better than "" forget it !  not on your life == comparable, other things being equal !== get a life, guy! C+- is {strongly typed}, based on stereotyping and self-righteous logic. The {Boolean} {variables} TRUE and FALSE (known as constants in other, less realistic languages) are supplemented with CREDIBLE and DUBIOUS, which are fuzzier than Zadeh's traditional {fuzzy logic} categories. All Booleans can be declared with the modifiers strong and weak. Weak implication is said to "preserve deniability" and was added at the request of the DoD to ensure compatibility with future versions of {Ada}. Well-formed falsehoods (WFFs) are {assignment}-compatible with all Booleans. What-if and why-not interactions are aided by the special conditional EVENIFNOT X THEN Y. C+- supports {information hiding} and, among {friend classes} only, rumor sharing. Borrowing from the {Eiffel} lexicon, non-friend classes can be killed by arranging contracts. Note that friendships are {intransitive}, {volatile} and non-{Abelian}. {Operator precedence} rules can be suspended with the dwim {pragma}, known as the "{Do what I mean}". {ANSIfication} will be firmly resisted. C+-'s slogan is "Be Your Own Standard." [{Jargon File}] (1999-06-15)

class hierarchy "programming" In {object-oriented programming}, a set of {classes} related by {inheritance}. Each class is a "subclass" of another class - its "superclass". The subclass contains all the features of its superclass, but may add new features or redefine existing features. The features of a class are the set of {attributes} (or "properties") that an object of that class has and the {methods} that can be invoked on it. If each class has a just one superclass, this is called {single inheritance}. The opposite is {multiple inheritance}, under which a class may have multiple superclasses. Single inheritance gives the class hierarchy a {tree} structure whereas multiple inheritance gives a {directed graph}. Typically there is one class at the top of the hierarchy which is the "object" class, the most general class that is an ancestor of all others and which has no superclass. In computing, as in genealogy, trees grow downwards, which is why subclasses are considered to be "below" their superclasses. When {invoking a method} on an {object}, the method is first looked for in the object's class, then the superclass of that class, and so on up the hierarchy until it is found. Thus a class need only define those methods which are specific to it and it will inherit all other methods from all its superclasses. An object of the subclass can do everything that an object of the superclass can and possible more. {C++} calls the superclass the "base class" and the subclass the "derived class" (not to be confused with a {derived type}). (2014-09-06)

Comet [from Greek komet long-haired, alluding to the cometary tail] A stage in the formation of globes from the primordial world-stuff, following the state known as the comic curds and preceding the formation of suns and planets. “What does Science know of Comets, their genesis, growth, and ultimate behaviour? Nothing . . . And what is there so impossible that a laya centre — a lump of cosmic protoplasm, homogeneous and latent, when suddenly animated or fired up — should rush from its bed in Space and whirl throughout the abysmal depths in order to strengthen its homogeneous organism by an accumulation and addition of differentiated elements? And why should not such a comet settle in life, live, and become an inhabited globe!” (SD 1:204). They are called wanderers, and some of them become suns, others planets. Some become attracted to solar systems and pursue closed orbits because they are reimbodying planets; others have not yet assumed periodic form; more are either broken up or absorbed by the influence of neighboring suns or globes. The matter of which they are composed, though on the same plane albeit in its higher portions, as our senses (otherwise they would not be visible to us), is not of the same kind as our terrestrial matter, but they are on their way towards it during their ages of condensation.

comment "programming" (Or "remark") Explanatory text embedded in program {source} (or less often data) intended to help human readers understand it. Code completely without comments is often hard to read, but code with too many comments is also bad, especially if the comments are not kept up-to-date with changes to the code. Too much commenting may mean that the code is over-complicated. A good rule is to comment everything that needs it but write code that doesn't need much of it. Comments that explain __why__ something is done and how the code relates to its environment are useful. A particularly irksome form of over-commenting explains exactly what each statement does, even when it is obvious to any reasonably competant programmer, e.g. /* Open the input file */ infd = open(input_file, O_RDONLY); (2007-02-19)

Common ISDN Application Programming Interface "networking" (CAPI, Common-ISDN-API) A programming interface standard for an application program to communicate with an {ISDN} card. Work on CAPI began in 1989, focussing on the German ISDN protocol, and was finished in 1990 by a CAPI working group consisting of application providers, ISDN equipment manufacturers, large customers, user groups and DBP Telekom, resulting in COMMON-ISDN-API Version 1.1. Following completion of the international protocol specification, almost every telecommunication provider offers {BRI} and {PRI} with {protocols} based on {Q.931} / ETS 3009 102. Common-ISDN-API Version 2.0 was developed to support all Q.931 protocols. {(http://capi.org/)}. [Why not CIAPI?] (1998-09-07)

Common ISDN Application Programming Interface ::: (networking) (CAPI, Common-ISDN-API) A programming interface standard for an application program to communicate with an ISDN card.Work on CAPI began in 1989, focussing on the German ISDN protocol, and was finished in 1990 by a CAPI working group consisting of application providers, offers BRI and PRI with protocols based on Q.931 / ETS 3009 102. Common-ISDN-API Version 2.0 was developed to support all Q.931 protocols.Latest version: 2.0, as of 1998-09-07. .[Why not CIAPI?] (1998-09-07)

computer ethics "philosophy" Ethics is the field of study that is concerned with questions of value, that is, judgments about what human behaviour is "good" or "bad". Ethical judgments are no different in the area of computing from those in any other area. Computers raise problems of privacy, ownership, theft, and power, to name but a few. Computer ethics can be grounded in one of four basic world-views: Idealism, Realism, Pragmatism, or Existentialism. Idealists believe that reality is basically ideas and that ethics therefore involves conforming to ideals. Realists believe that reality is basically nature and that ethics therefore involves acting according to what is natural. Pragmatists believe that reality is not fixed but is in process and that ethics therefore is practical (that is, concerned with what will produce socially-desired results). Existentialists believe reality is self-defined and that ethics therefore is individual (that is, concerned only with one's own conscience). Idealism and Realism can be considered ABSOLUTIST worldviews because they are based on something fixed (that is, ideas or nature, respectively). Pragmatism and Existentialism can be considered RELATIVIST worldviews because they are based or something relational (that is, society or the individual, respectively). Thus ethical judgments will vary, depending on the judge's world-view. Some examples: First consider theft. Suppose a university's computer is used for sending an e-mail message to a friend or for conducting a full-blown private business (billing, payroll, inventory, etc.). The absolutist would say that both activities are unethical (while recognising a difference in the amount of wrong being done). A relativist might say that the latter activities were wrong because they tied up too much memory and slowed down the machine, but the e-mail message wasn't wrong because it had no significant effect on operations. Next consider privacy. An instructor uses her account to acquire the cumulative grade point average of a student who is in a class which she instructs. She obtained the password for this restricted information from someone in the Records Office who erroneously thought that she was the student's advisor. The absolutist would probably say that the instructor acted wrongly, since the only person who is entitled to this information is the student and his or her advisor. The relativist would probably ask why the instructor wanted the information. If she replied that she wanted it to be sure that her grading of the student was consistent with the student's overall academic performance record, the relativist might agree that such use was acceptable. Finally, consider power. At a particular university, if a professor wants a computer account, all she or he need do is request one but a student must obtain faculty sponsorship in order to receive an account. An absolutist (because of a proclivity for hierarchical thinking) might not have a problem with this divergence in procedure. A relativist, on the other hand, might question what makes the two situations essentially different (e.g. are faculty assumed to have more need for computers than students? Are students more likely to cause problems than faculty? Is this a hold-over from the days of "in loco parentis"?). {"Philosophical Bases of Computer Ethics", Professor Robert N. Barger (http://nd.edu/~rbarger/metaethics.html)}. {Usenet} newsgroups: {news:bit.listserv.ethics-l}, {news:alt.soc.ethics}. (1995-10-25)

COSMIC CONSCIOUSNESS Different kinds of omniscience in worlds 1- 42 belonging to the cosmos (atomic worlds 43-
49 make up the material of the solar system, and that is why they are not counted as being part of the cosmos). The lowest kind of cosmic consciousness (42) thus has the highest kind of solar systemic consciousness (43) as its precondition. The &


cosmic Self ::: Sri Aurobindo: "When one has the cosmic consciousness, one can feel the cosmic Self as one"s own self, one can feel one with other beings in the cosmos, one can feel all the forces of Nature as moving in oneself, all selves as one"s own self. There is no why except that it is so, since all is the One.” Letters on Yoga (See also Cosmic Spirit)

"Impersonality is the first character of cosmic self; . . . .” *The Life Divine

"An eternal infinite self-existence is the supreme reality, but the supreme transcendent eternal Being, Self and Spirit, — an infinite Person, we may say, because his being is the essence and source of all personality, — is the reality and meaning of self-existence: so too the cosmic Self, Spirit, Being, Person is the reality and meaning of cosmic existence; the same Self, Spirit, Being or Person manifesting its multiplicity is the reality and meaning of individual existence.” The Life Divine

"But this cosmic self is spiritual in essence and in experience; it must not be confused with the collective existence, with any group soul or the life and body of a human society or even of all mankind.” The Synthesis of Yoga

"It is the Cosmic Self and Spirit that is in and behind all things and beings, from which and in which all is manifested in the universe — although it is now a manifestation in the Ignorance.” Letters on Yoga*


C Programmer's Disease ::: (programming) The tendency of the undisciplined C programmer to set arbitrary but supposedly generous static limits on table sizes (defined, if cannot comprehend why each fix of this kind seems only to further disgruntle the user.[Jargon File](2001-12-31)

C Programmer's Disease "programming" The tendency of the undisciplined {C} programmer to set arbitrary but supposedly generous static limits on table sizes (defined, if you're lucky, by constants in header files) rather than taking the trouble to do proper dynamic storage allocation. If an application user later needs to put 68 elements into a table of size 50, the afflicted programmer reasons that he or she can easily reset the table size to 68 (or even as much as 70, to allow for future expansion) and recompile. This gives the programmer the comfortable feeling of having made the effort to satisfy the user's (unreasonable) demands, and often affords the user multiple opportunities to explore the marvellous consequences of {fandango on core}. In severe cases of the disease, the programmer cannot comprehend why each fix of this kind seems only to further disgruntle the user. [{Jargon File}] (2001-12-31)

Cry from the Cross The cry of the expiring Jesus — given in the Gospels as “Eli, Eli, lama, sabachthani” (Matt 27:46) [in Mark it is Eloi]; translated in Greek “Theemou, Theemou, hinati me ’egkatelipes”; and then translated into English as “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” — is a curious instance of mistranslation, for the Hebrew words as quoted mean, “My God, my God, how thou hast glorified me!” On the other hand, Psalms 22:1 has the words, “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” but here the Hebrew for forsaken is ‘azabtani (forsaken me). There seems to have been a desire to represent the cry from the cross as a fulfillment of these words of Psalms. What Jesus really uttered, according to the Hebrew, was a cry of ecstasy over the peace of attainment, clarification, and liberation. The cry in Psalms is that of the candidate for initiation left to his unaided resources, to achieve or fail by them and them alone — which is the only fair and certain test of ability.

CUCH ::: CUrry-CHurch.Lambda-calculus[A Type-Theoretical Alternative to CUCH, ISWIM, OWHY, Dana Scott, Oxford U 1969].[Introduction to the CUCH, C. Bohm et al, in Automata Theory, E.R. Caianiello ed, A-P 1966, pp.35-65]. (1994-12-02)

CUCH CUrry-CHurch. {Lambda-calculus} ["A Type-Theoretical Alternative to CUCH, ISWIM, OWHY", Dana Scott, Oxford U 1969]. ["Introduction to the CUCH", C. Bohm et al, in Automata Theory, E.R. Caianiello ed, A-P 1966, pp.35-65]. (1994-12-02)

Culavedallasutta. (C. Fale biqiuni jing; J. Horaku bikunikyo; K. Pomnak piguni kyong 法樂比丘尼經). In PAli, "Shorter Discourse on Points of Doctrine"; the forty-fourth sutta in the MAJJHIMANIKAYA (a separate SARVASTIVADA recension appears as the 210th sutra in the Chinese translation of the MADHYAMAGAMA; the entire discourse is also subsumed in the Tibetan translation of samathadeva's commentary to the ABHIDHARMAKOsABHAsYA), expounded by the nun DhammadinnA (S. DHARMADINNA) to her former husband, the householder VisAkha, at the Veluvana (S. VEnUVANAVIHARA) bamboo grove in RAjagaha (S. RAJAGṚHA). VisAkha approached DhammadinnA and questioned her concerning a number of points of doctrine preached by the Buddha. These questions included: what is the nature of this existing body (P. sakkAya; S. satkAya); what is its origin (SAMUDAYA), its cessation (NIRODHA), and the path (P. magga; S. MARGA) leading to its cessation; how does wrong view concerning this body (P. sakkAyaditthi; S. SATKAYADṚstI) arise and how is it removed; what is the noble eightfold path; what is concentration (SAMADHI); what are bodily, verbal, and mental formations; what is the attainment of cessation (nirodha); what is sensation (VEDANA); what are the underlying tendencies with regard to pleasant, painful, and neutral sensations and how should these be overcome; and what are the counterparts of pleasant, painful, and neutral sensations. DhammadinnA answered all of the questions put to her to the satisfaction of the householder VisAkha-proving why the Buddha considered her foremost among his nun disciples in the gift of preaching.

Cursing ::: The process of casting curses, which are an intent to mess up or make difficult the life of another or, in more exigent circumstances, to maim, injure, or kill. Generally these should be a last resort. Why is described in terms of Martial magic (which itself will link to the Saturnian reasons why). See also Crossed.

cycle ::: (unit) A basic unit of computation, one period of a computer clock.Each instruction takes a number of clock cycles. Often the computer can access its memory once on every clock cycle, and so one speaks also of memory cycles.Every hacker wants more cycles (noted hacker Bill Gosper describes himself as a cycle junkie). There are only so many cycles per second, and when you are faster your program will run. That's why every hacker wants more cycles: so he can spend less time waiting for the computer to respond.The use of the term cycle for a computer clock period can probably be traced back to the rotation of a generator generating alternating current though Interestingly, the earliest mechanical calculators, e.g. Babbage's Difference Engine, really did have parts which rotated in true cycles.[Jargon File] (1997-09-30)

cycle "unit" A basic unit of computation, one period of a computer {clock}. Each {instruction} takes a number of clock cycles. Often the computer can access its memory once on every clock cycle, and so one speaks also of "memory cycles". Every {hacker} wants more cycles (noted hacker {Bill Gosper} describes himself as a "cycle junkie"). There are only so many cycles per second, and when you are sharing a computer the cycles get divided up among the users. The more cycles the computer spends working on your program rather than someone else's, the faster your program will run. That's why every hacker wants more cycles: so he can spend less time waiting for the computer to respond. The use of the term "cycle" for a computer clock period can probably be traced back to the rotation of a generator generating alternating current though computers generally use a clock signal which is more like a {square wave}. Interestingly, the earliest mechanical calculators, e.g. Babbage's {Difference Engine}, really did have parts which rotated in true cycles. [{Jargon File}] (1997-09-30)

Dasheng qixin lun. (S. *Mahāyānasraddhotpādasāstra; J. Daijo kishinron; K. Taesŭng kisin non 大乗起信論). In Chinese, "Treatise on the Awakening of Faith According to the MAHĀYĀNA"; attributed to the Indian author AsVAGHOsA, but now widely assumed to be an indigenous Chinese text (see APOCRYPHA) composed in the sixth century; typically known in English as simply the "Awakening of Faith." Since its composition, the text has remained one of the most influential treatises in all of East Asian Buddhism. The earliest and most widely used "translation" (c. 550) is attributed to the famous YOGĀCĀRA scholar PARAMĀRTHA, although some scholars have speculated that Paramārtha may in fact have composed the treatise after his arrival in China, perhaps even in Sanskrit, and then translated it into Chinese. The author of the Dasheng qixin lun sought to reconcile two of the dominant, if seemingly incompatible, strands in Mahāyāna Buddhism: TATHĀGATAGARBHA (embryo or womb of the buddhas) thought and the ĀLAYAVIJNĀNA (storehouse consciousness) theory of consciousness. Tathāgatagarbha thought taught that all sentient beings have the potential to achieve enlightenment because that enlightenment is in fact inherent in the minds of sentient beings. What that doctrine did not seem to explain well to the East Asians, however, was why sentient beings who were inherently enlightened would have become deluded in the first place. ĀlayavijNāna theory, by contrast, posited that the foundational recesses of the mind serve as a storehouse of the essentially infinite numbers of potentialities or seeds (BĪJA) of all past actions, including unsalutary deeds; this interpretation suggested to the East Asians that mental purity was not innate and that enlightenment therefore had to be catalyzed by some external source, such as "hearing the dharma," which would then prompt a "transformation of the basis" (ĀsRAYAPARĀVṚTTI) that could lead to purity of mind. The ālayavijNāna thus explained the intractability of ignorance and delusion, but did not seem to offer ready accessibility to enlightenment. In its search for common ground between these two doctrines, the Dasheng qixin lun instead describes the mind as being comprised of two distinct, but complementary, aspects: true thusness (ZHENRU; S. TATHATĀ) and production-and-cessation (shengmie), which correspond respectively to ultimate truth (PARAMĀRTHASATYA) and conventional truth (SAMVṚTISATYA) or the unconditioned (ASAMSKṚTA) and conditioned (SAMSKṚTA) realms. Since the mind that is subject to production and cessation (which the treatise identifies with ālayavijNāna) remains always grounded on the mind of true thusness (which the treatise identifies with tathāgatagarbha), the mind is therefore simultaneously deluded and enlightened. This distinction between this enlightened essence of the mind as "true thusness" and its various temporal manifestations as "production and cessation" is also described in terms of "essence" (TI) and "function" (YONG). From the standpoint of the buddhas and sages, the mind of the sentient being is therefore seen as being perpetually in a state of "original enlightenment" or "intrinsic enlightenment" (BENJUE; see also HONGAKU), while from the standpoint of sentient beings that same mind is seen as being deluded and thus in need of purification through a process of "actualizing enlightenment" (SHIJUE). Actualizing enlightenment involves the cultivation of calmness (ji; S. sAMATHA) and insight (guan; S. VIPAsYANĀ), as well as the development of no-thought (WUNIAN), aspects of training that receive extensive discussion in the treatise. Once the process of actualizing enlightenment is completed, however, the student realizes that the enlightenment achieved through cultivation is in fact identical to the enlightenment that is innate. Hence, the difference between these two types of enlightenment is ultimately a matter of perspective: the buddhas and sages see the innate purity of the tathāgatagarbha as something intrinsic; ordinary persons (PṚTHAGJANA) see it as something that must be actualized through practice. Some East Asian Buddhists, such as WoNHYO (617-686), seem to have presumed that the KŬMGANG SAMMAE KYoNG (S. *Vajrasamādhisutra) was the scriptural source of the Dasheng qixin lun's emblematic teaching of the one mind and its two aspects, even though we now know that that scripture was a Korean apocryphon that was not composed until over a century later. The most important commentaries to the Dasheng qixin lun are Wonhyo's TAESŬNG KISIN NON SO and TAESŬNG KISIN NON PYoLGI, FAZANG's DASHENG QIXIN LUN YI JIs, and JINGYING HUIYUAN's Dasheng qixin lun yishu.

dashi. (J. daiji; K. taesa 大事). In Chinese, the "great enterprise" or "great matter"; often seen also as the "one great matter" (C. yidashi). The Chinese term dashi appears in KUMĀRAJĪVA's translation of the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra") regarding the reason why the buddhas appear in the world, but has no precise relation there to a specific Sanskrit term; possible equivalencies might be mahākṛtya, "the great action," or mahānusaMsa, "the great blessing." According to the MAHĀYĀNA tradition, the Buddha taught most of his teachings as provisional, transitional, and adaptive instructions that catered to the special contingencies of the spiritually less advanced. However, the Buddha's ultimate concern is the revelation of an ultimate and overriding message, the "great enterprise." Different Mahāyāna scriptures and schools interpret this ultimate message differently and often purport uniquely to convey that message. For example, according to the Saddharmapundarīkasutra and the TIANTAI ZONG, the "great enterprise" is the revelation of the one vehicle (EKAYĀNA), through which all individuals without exception are able to enter the Mahāyāna path and realize the knowledge and vision of perfect buddhahood. According to the MAHĀPARINIRVĀnASuTRA, it is the eternal, absolute characteristics of the buddha-nature (FOXING; BUDDHADHĀTU). According to the SUKHĀVATĪVYuHASuTRA and the PURE LAND schools, it is the revelation of the paradisiacal pure land of SUKHĀVATĪ and the "original vows" of AMITĀBHA Buddha. And, finally, in the CHAN ZONG, the "great enterprise" refers to the general process of awakening to one's own original nature and becoming a buddha (JIANXING CHENGFO).

date ::: (convention, data) A string unique to a time duration of 24 hours between 2 successive midnights defined by the local time zone. The specific e.g., Gregorian, Islamic, Japanese, Chinese, Hebrew etc. as well as local ordering conventions such as UK: day/month/year, US: month/day/year.Inputting and outputting dates on computers is greatly complicated by these localisation issues which is why they tend to operate on dates internally in some unified form such as seconds past midnight at the start of the first of January 1970.Many software and hardware representations of dates allow only two digits for the year, leading to the year 2000 problem.Unix manual page: date(1), ctime(3). (1997-07-11)

date "convention, data" A string unique to a time duration of 24 hours between 2 successive midnights defined by the local time zone. The specific representation of a date will depend on which calendar convention is in force; e.g., Gregorian, Islamic, Japanese, Chinese, Hebrew etc. as well as local ordering conventions such as UK: day/month/year, US: month/day/year. Inputting and outputting dates on computers is greatly complicated by these {localisation} issues which is why they tend to operate on dates internally in some unified form such as seconds past midnight at the start of the first of January 1970. Many software and hardware representations of dates allow only two digits for the year, leading to the {year 2000} problem. {Unix manual page}: date(1), ctime(3). (1997-07-11)

Devanagari (Sanskrit) Devanāgarī “Divine city writing,” the alphabetic script of Aryan India, in which the Sanskrit language is usually written. The Devanagari alphabet and the art of writing it were kept secret for ages, and the dvijas (twice-born) and the dikshitas (initiates) alone were originally permitted to use this literary art. In India, as in many other countries which have been the seat of archaic civilizations, sacred and secret records were committed to the tablets of the mind, rather than to material tablets. Alone the priesthood invariably had, in addition to the mnemonic records, an ideographic or syllabic script which was used when considered convenient or necessary, mainly for intercommunication between themselves and brother-initiates speaking other tongues. This applied to ideographic characters which can be read with equal facility by those acquainted with them, whatever their spoken mother-tongue may be, and to written characters imbodying an archaic or sacred language, as was the case with the ancient Sanskrit. This is the main reason why these ancient peoples have so few allusions — and sometimes no allusions at all — to writing; in the civilizations of those far past times writing was not found to be a need and was kept as a sacred art for the temple scribes.

Dharmadinnā. (P. Dhammadinnā; T. Chos kyis sbyin; C. Tanmotina biqiuni/Fale biqiuni; J. Donmadaina bikuni/Horaku bikuni; K. Tammajena piguni/Pomnak piguni 曇摩提那比丘尼/法樂比丘尼). An eminent ARHAT nun, declared by the Buddha to be foremost among his nun disciples in the gift of preaching. According to Pāli sources, she was married to a rich merchant of Rājagaha (S. RĀJAGṚHA) named VISĀKHA. Visākha was a lay disciple of the Buddha, but his behavior toward his wife changed after he became a nonreturner (ANĀGĀMIN). When he explained why, Dhammadinnā requested permission to renounce the world and become a Buddhist nun. So highly did Visākha regard his wife's piety that he informed Bimbisāra, the king of MAGADHA, who arranged for her to be carried to the nuns' convent on a golden palanquin. Dhammadinnā dwelled in solitude and soon became an arhat of the highest degree, equipped with the four analytical knowledges (patisambhidā; S. PRATISAMVID), which included knowledge of the entire Buddhist canon. When she returned to Rājagaha to venerate the Buddha, her former husband Visākha approached her with questions on doctrine, which she easily answered. Visākha reported this to the Buddha, who praised Dhammadinnā's proficiency in preaching. Dhammadinnā's preeminence in preaching was a result of a vow she made during the time of the past buddha Padumuttara, when she witnessed a nun who was praised for her eloquence and vowed to achieve the same.

dharmasarīra. (T. chos sku'i ring bsrel; C. fa[shen] sheli; J. hosshinshari/hoshari; K. pop[sin] sari 法[身]舍利). In Sanskrit, "relics of the dharma [body]"; the Buddha's incorporeal relics, viz., his scriptures, verses, and doctrines, or the immutable truth "embodied" therein. "Relics" (sARĪRA) literally means "body," but in Buddhist usage comes to refer most often to the sacred physical relics found in the cremated remains of the Buddha or of an eminent monk. In contrast to these physical relics remaining after cremation, "the relics of the dharma [body]" refers to the corpus of Buddhist literature and/or the DHARMAVINAYA embodied therein that were left behind by the Buddha as his incorporeal legacy; therefore they can be worshiped as sarīra. As the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"), for example, notes, "Wherever this sutra is spoken, read, recited, written out, or stored, one should build a STuPA of the seven jewels (RATNA), making it high, broad, and adorned. It is not necessary to place sarīra in it. Why is this? Within it already is the complete body of the TATHĀGATA. To this stupa one should make offerings of all kinds of flowers, incenses, beads, silk canopies, banners, vocal and instrumental music, honoring and praising it."

dianyan. (J. tengen; K. choman 點眼). In Chinese, lit. "dotting the eyes," also known as "opening the eyes" (KAIYAN; T. spyan phye); a consecration ceremony for a buddha image (BUDDHĀBHIsEKA) that serves to make the icon come alive. The term refers to a ceremony, or series of ceremonies, that accompanies the installation of a buddha image or painting, which specifically involves dotting the pupils onto the inert eyes of the icon in order to animate it. Until this ceremony is performed, the icon remains nothing more than an inert block of wood or lump of clay; once its eyes are dotted, however, the image is thought to become invested with the power and charisma of a living buddha. The related term kaiyan has the same denotation, but may in some contexts it refer more broadly to "opening up the eyes" of an image by ritually dropping eye drops into its eyes. Both dianyan or kaiyan occurred in conjunction with esoteric Buddhist rituals. The Yiqie rulai anxiang sanmei yigui jing provides an elaborate set of instructions on how to consecrate buddha images, in which "dotting the eyes" accompanies the performance of other esoteric practices, such as MANTRA and MUDRĀ. When a bodhisattva wonders why buddha images are installed if the DHARMAKĀYA of a buddha has no physical form, the Buddha replies that images are used as an expedient for guiding neophytes who have first aroused the thought of enlightenment (BODHICITTOTPĀDA). In Korea, where this term choman is typically used for this ceremony rather than kaean (C. kaiyan), there were different "dotting the eyes" consecrations for different types of Buddhist images and requisites, including images of a buddha, ARHAT, the ten kings of hell (shiwang), and the kings of heaven, as well as in conjunction with ceremonies for erecting a STuPA or offering robes (KAsĀYA). Through these choman ceremonies, Buddhist artifacts are transformed from mere physical objects into spiritually sanctioned religious items imbued with spiritual efficacy. The Korean Chinon chip ("Mantra Anthology"), extant in several editions of which the oldest is dated 1476, includes a "mantra for dotting the eyes" (choman mun) along with its Sanskrit and Chinese transliterations. In Japan, this ceremony is usually called kaigen (C. kaiyan) rather than tengen. In Chinese CHAN texts, "dotting the eyes" of a buddha image is also sometimes used as a metaphor for a Chan adept's final achievement of awakening. See also NETRAPRATIstHĀPANA.

disciples ::: “In considering the action of the Infinite we have to avoid the error of the disciple who thought of himself as the Brahman, refused to obey the warning of the elephant-driver to budge from the narrow path and was taken up by the elephant’s trunk and removed out of the way; ‘You are no doubt the Brahman,’ said the master to his bewildered disciple, ‘but why did you not obey the driver Brahman and get out of the path of the elephant Brahman?’” The Life Divine

Divination ::: A process through which one attempts to gain insight into a situation or tries to answer a question through ritualistic or symbolic means. Cartomancy is one such form of divination that is especially used in modern practice. The Tarot is an application of that. But there are other forms of divination as well including augury and runecasting. How and why these systems work will be discussed in a future article or section.

Earthquakes Physical phenomena such as earthquakes are generally the end-products of a chain of causation operating not only on the physical plane but also on other cosmic planes. A study of the geology of the earth’s crust as regards the lie of the rocks, the position of faults, the presence of volcanic activities, etc., may indicate the places most likely to be affected, and the relation between earthquakes and the positions of the heavenly bodies is now receiving some consideration from scientists; but they still do not recognize any connection between the cause of earthquakes and events on the mental plane of the earth. “But when they understand that there is no such thing as accident in the universe, that every event which appears to us as accident, is the effect of a force on the mental plane, then they will be able to understand why the superstitious Hindus look upon earthquakes as the effect of accumulated sins committed by men.” (Theos 6:285, "Earthquakes" by K. D. M.)

eigenvector ::: (mathematics) A vector which, when acted on by a particular linear transformation, produces a scalar multiple of the original vector. The scalar in question is called the eigenvalue corresponding to this eigenvector.It should be noted that vector here means element of a vector space which can include many mathematical entities. Ordinary vectors are elements of a linear transformations on the space of such functions; quantum-mechanical states are vectors, and observables are linear transformations on the state space.An important theorem says, roughly, that certain linear transformations have enough eigenvectors that they form a basis of the whole vector states. This is why Fourier analysis works, and why in quantum mechanics every state is a superposition of eigenstates of observables.An eigenvector is a (representative member of a) fixed point of the map on the projective plane induced by a linear map. (1996-09-27)

eigenvector "mathematics" A {vector} which, when acted on by a particular {linear transformation}, produces a scalar multiple of the original vector. The scalar in question is called the {eigenvalue} corresponding to this eigenvector. It should be noted that "vector" here means "element of a vector space" which can include many mathematical entities. Ordinary vectors are elements of a vector space, and multiplication by a matrix is a {linear transformation} on them; {smooth functions} "are vectors", and many partial differential operators are linear transformations on the space of such functions; quantum-mechanical states "are vectors", and {observables} are linear transformations on the state space. An important theorem says, roughly, that certain linear transformations have enough eigenvectors that they form a {basis} of the whole vector states. This is why {Fourier analysis} works, and why in quantum mechanics every state is a superposition of eigenstates of observables. An eigenvector is a (representative member of a) {fixed point} of the map on the {projective plane} induced by a {linear map}. (1996-09-27)

Ekādasamukhāvalokitesvara. (T. Spyan ras gzigs bcu gcig zhal; C. Shiyimian Guanyin; J. Juichimen Kannon; K. Sibilmyon Kwanŭm 十一面觀音). In Sanskrit, "Eleven-Headed AVALOKITEsVARA," one of the most common iconographic forms of the BODHISATTVA of compassion. While theories abound about why he has eleven heads, it is likely that the ten small bodhisattva heads topped by a buddha head represent the ten stages (DAsABHuMI) of the bodhisattva path, along with the final attainment of buddhahood. The facial expressions of these heads range from kind to ferocious and were meant to symbolize the bodhisattva's various abilities to destroy illusions and help all sentient beings attain liberation. According to legend, Avalokitesvara was so exhausted and desperate after trying to save innumerable beings that his skull shattered. AMITĀBHA came to help him and formed new heads from the pieces, which he then arranged on AVALOKITEsVARA's head like a crown, finally putting an image of his own head at the very top. While this eleven-headed form is frequently found in later Buddhist art in Tibet, Nepal, and East Asia, an image from the Indian cave site of KĀNHERI is the only extant artistic evidence that this iconographic form is originally of Indian provenance.

Electronic Performance Support System "tool" (EPSS) A system that provides electronic task guidance and support to the user at the moment of need. EPSS can provide {application} help, reference information, guided instructions and/or tutorials, subject matter expert advice and hints on how to perform a task more efficiently. An EPSS can combine various technologies to present the desired information. The information can be in the form of text, {graphical displays}, sound, and {video} presentations. ["Electronic Performance Support Systems: How and Why to Remake the Workplace Through the Strategic Application of Technology", Gloria Gerry, Weingarten Press]. (1997-10-24)

Electronic Performance Support System ::: (tool) (EPSS) A system that provides electronic task guidance and support to the user at the moment of need. EPSS can provide application help, reference technologies to present the desired information. The information can be in the form of text, graphical displays, sound, and video presentations.[Electronic Performance Support Systems: How and Why to Remake the Workplace Through the Strategic Application of Technology, Gloria Gerry, Weingarten Press]. (1997-10-24)

elvish "character" 1. The Tengwar of Feanor, a table of letterforms resembling the beautiful Celtic half-uncial hand of the "Book of Kells". Invented and described by J.R.R. Tolkien in "The Lord of The Rings" as an orthography for his fictional "elvish" languages, this system (which is both visually and phonetically {elegant}) has long fascinated hackers (who tend to be intrigued by artificial languages in general). It is traditional for graphics printers, plotters, window systems, and the like to support a Feanorian typeface as one of their demo items. By extension, the term might be used for any odd or unreadable typeface produced by a graphics device. 2. The typeface mundanely called "B"ocklin", an art-decoish {display font}. [Why?] [{Jargon File}] (1998-04-28)

elvish ::: (character) 1. The Tengwar of Feanor, a table of letterforms resembling the beautiful Celtic half-uncial hand of the Book of Kells. Invented and their demo items. By extension, the term might be used for any odd or unreadable typeface produced by a graphics device.2. The typeface mundanely called Bocklin, an art-decoish display font. [Why?][Jargon File] (1998-04-28)

engine ::: (jargon) 1. A piece of hardware that encapsulates some function but can't be used without some kind of front end. Today we have, especially, print engine: the guts of a laser printer.2. An analogous piece of software; notionally, one that does a lot of noisy crunching, such as a database engine, or search engine.The hackish senses of engine are actually close to its original, pre-Industrial-Revolution sense of a skill, clever device, or instrument (the which explains why he named the stored-program computer that he designed in 1844 the Analytical Engine.[Jargon File] (1996-05-31)

engine "jargon" 1. A piece of {hardware} that encapsulates some function but can't be used without some kind of {front end}. Today we have, especially, "{print engine}": the guts of a {laser printer}. 2. An analogous piece of software; notionally, one that does a lot of noisy {crunching}, such as a "database engine", or "{search engine}". The hackish senses of "engine" are actually close to its original, pre-Industrial-Revolution sense of a skill, clever device, or instrument (the word is cognate to "ingenuity"). This sense had not been completely eclipsed by the modern connotation of power-transducing machinery in {Charles Babbage}'s time, which explains why he named the stored-program computer that he designed in 1844 the "{Analytical Engine}". [{Jargon File}] (1996-05-31)

:::   Equality means a quiet and unmoved mind and vital, it means not to be touched or disturbed by things that happen or things said or done to you, but to look at them with a straight look, free from the distortions created by personal feeling, and to try to understand what is behind them, why they happen, what is to be learnt from them, what is it in oneself which they are cast against and what inner profit or progress one can make out of them; it means self-mastery over the vital movements, — anger and sensitiveness and pride as well as desire and the rest, — not to let them get hold of the emotional being and disturb the inner peace, not to speak and act in the rush and impulsion of these things, always to act and speak out of a calm inner poise of the spirit.” *Letters on Yoga

Equality means a quiet and unmoved mind and vital, it means not to be touched or disturbed by things that happen or things said or done to you, but to look at them with a straight look, free from the distortions created by personal feeling, and to try to understand what is behind them, why they happen, what is to be learnt from them, what is it in oneself which they are cast against and what inner profit or progress one can make out of them; it means self-mastery over the vital movements,—anger and sensitiveness and pride as well as desire and the rest,—not to let them get hold of the emotional being and disturb the inner peace, not to speak and act in the rush and impulsion of these things, always to act and speak out of a calm inner poise of the spirit.” Letters on Yoga

Equality means a quiet and unmoved mind and vital, it means not to be touched or disturbed by things that happen or things satd or done to you, but to look at them with a straight look, free from the distortions created by personal feelings, and to try to understand what is behind them, why they happen, what is to be learnt from them, what is it in oneself which they are cast against and what inner profit or progress one can make out of them ; it means self-mastery over the vital movements,

Ethical rule: See Rule. Ethics: (Gr. ta ethika, from ethos) Ethics (also referred to as moral philosophy) is that study or discipline which concerns itself with judgments of approval and disapproval, judgments as to the rightness or wrongness, goodness or badness, virtue or vice, desirability or wisdom of actions, dispositions, ends, objects, or states of affairs. There are two main directions which this study may take. It may concern itself with a psychological or sociological analysis and explanation of our ethical judgments, showing what our approvals and disapprovals consist in and why we approve or disapprove what we do. Or it may concern itself with establishing or recommending certain courses of action, ends, or ways of life as to be taken or pursued, either as right or as good or as virtuous or as wise, as over against others which are wrong, bad, vicious, or foolish. Here the interest is more in action than in approval, and more in the guidance of action than in its explanation, the purpose being to find or set up some ideal or standard of conduct or character, some good or end or summum bonum, some ethical criterion or first principle. In many philosophers these two approaches are combined. The first is dominant or nearly so in the ethics of Hume, Schopenhauer, the evolutionists, Westermarck, and of M. Schlick and other recent positivists, while the latter is dominant in the ethics of most other moralists.

Ethics ::: The theosophical teachings are essentially and wholly ethical. It is impossible to understand the sublimewisdom of the gods, the archaic wisdom-religion of the ancients, without the keenest realization of thefact that ethics run like golden threads throughout the entire system or fabric of doctrine and thought ofthe esoteric philosophy. Genuine occultism, divorced from ethics, is simply unthinkable becauseimpossible. There is no genuine occultism which does not include the loftiest ethics that the moral senseof mankind can comprehend, and one cannot weigh with too strong an emphasis upon this great fact.Ethics in the theosophical philosophy are not merely the products of human thought existing as aformulation of conventional rules proper for human conduct. They are founded on the very structure andcharacter of the universe itself. The heart of the universe is wisdom-love, and these are intrinsicallyethical, for there can be no wisdom without ethics, nor can love be without ethics, nor can there be ethicsdeprived of either love or wisdom.The philosophic reason why the ancients set so much store by what was commonly known as virtusamong the Latins, from which we have our modern word "virtue," is because by means of the teachingoriginating in the great Mystery schools, they knew that virtues, ethics, were the offspring of the moralinstinct in human beings, who derived them in their turn from the heart of the universe -- from thekosmic harmony. It is high time that the Occidental world should cast forever into the limbo of explodedsuperstitions the idea that ethics is merely conventional morality, a convenience invented by man tosmooth the asperities and dangers of human intercourse.Of course every scholar knows that the words morals and ethics come from the Latin and Greekrespectively, as signifying the customs or habits which it is proper to follow in civilized communities.But this fact itself, which is unquestionable, is in a sense disgraceful, for it would almost seem that wehad not yet brought forth a word adequately describing the instinct for right and truth and troth andjustice and honor and wisdom and love which we today so feebly express by the words ethics or morals."Theosophist is who Theosophy does," wrote H. P. Blavatsky, and wiser and nobler words she neverwrote. No one can be a theosophist who does not feel ethic-ally and think ethically and live ethically inthe real sense that is hereinbefore described. (See also Morals)

:::   "Even Science believes that one day death may be conquered by physical means and its reasonings are perfectly sound. There is no reason why the supramental Force should not do it. Forms on earth do not last (they do in other planes) because these forms are too rigid to grow expressing the progress of the spirit. If they become plastic enough to do that there is no reason why they should not last.” Letters on Yoga

“Even Science believes that one day death may be conquered by physical means and its reasonings are perfectly sound. There is no reason why the supramental Force should not do it. Forms on earth do not last (they do in other planes) because these forms are too rigid to grow expressing the progress of the spirit. If they become plastic enough to do that there is no reason why they should not last.” Letters on Yoga

factor tree: A graphical representation usually for caluculation or representation of the prime factorisation of a positive integer. It can of course be used for factorisation of polynomials in a similar fashion, though this usage is relatively rare. The different routes that a positive is broken down means that different trees can be produced from a number, though the unique factorisation of integers into prime numbers guarantee that the numbers at the tip of all branches together form a unique set of prime factors. For this reason there's no reason why this graphical tool cannot be used for mathematical objects where unique factorisation does not exist.

Faith: According to St. Augustine, faith means, to believe that which one does not see. (Fides ergo est, quod non vides credere.) That is the reason why faith is praiseworthy.

Fibonacci sequence "mathematics" The {infinite} sequence of numbers beginning 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, ... in which each term is the sum of the two terms preceding it. The ratio of successive Fibonacci terms tends to the {golden ratio}, namely (1 + sqrt 5)/2. [Why not "Fibonacci {series}"?] (2002-10-15)

Fibonacci sequence ::: (mathematics) The infinite sequence of numbers beginning 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, ... in which each term is the sum of the two terms preceding it.The ratio of successive Fibonacci terms tends to the golden ratio, namely (1 + sqrt 5)/2.[Why not Fibonacci series?](2002-10-15)

Fides: Faith, according to St. Augustine, means, to believe that which one does not see: Fides ergo est, quod non vides credere. That is the reason why faith is praiseworthy. Haec est enim laus fidei, si quod creditur non videtur. -- J.J.R.

field "data, database" An area of a {database} {record}, or {graphical user interface} {form}, into which a particular item of data is entered. Example usage: "The telephone number field is not really a numerical field", "Why do we need a four-digit field for the year?". A {database} {column} is the set of all instances of a given field from all records in a {table}. (1999-04-26)

field ::: (data, database) An area of a database record, or graphical user interface form, into which a particular item of data is entered.Example usage: The telephone number field is not really a numerical field, Why do we need a four-digit field for the year?.A database column is the set of all instances of a given field from all records in a table. (1999-04-26)

Flames Largely interchangeable with fire, both being borrowed from the Fire-philosophers in an attempt to render the ancient teachings. Often the same distinction is made as in ordinary usage: that flame is a portion of fire, or that fire is a more abstract and general term and flame a more concrete and particular. Thus, the intellectual and guiding cosmic spirits, as well as the astrally and physically creative builders, are spoken of as being a hierarchy of flames. The Lords of the Flame are the agnishvatta-pitris, or the intelligent architects cosmically; as the givers of mind to humanity they are alluded to as those whose fire is too pure for the production of physical mortal mankind. The Asiatic Qabbalists or Shemitic initiates meant by Holy Flame what is called the anima mundi or world-soul, and this is why adepts were called sons of the holy flame. Flame is also a projection of fire, as when a flame of the divine fire descends into matter, or flames of fire descend upon one inspired by the Holy Spirit or encircle the head of an initiate.

For calendar years, the rule is to have an extra day is February (i.e. the 29th) every four years. So as to prevent the tiny difference between a calendar year and a sidereal year from allowing them to drift too far apart. Although since a sidereal year is not exactly 365.25 solar days, there are addtional rules that govern the placement of leap years on top of the "multiple of four" rule. For example, despite being a multiple of 4, years that are multiples of 100 would not be a leap year (this is why the year 1900 was not a leap year), and yet, if it is a multiple of 400, then it is a leap year again (and this is why the year 2000 was still a leap year.).

"Forms on earth do not last (they do in other planes) because these forms are too rigid to grow expressing the progress of the spirit. If they become plastic enough to do that there is no reason why they should not last.” Letters on Yoga

“Forms on earth do not last (they do in other planes) because these forms are too rigid to grow expressing the progress of the spirit. If they become plastic enough to do that there is no reason why they should not last.” Letters on Yoga

:::   "For there seems to be no reason why Life should evolve out of material elements or Mind out of living form, unless we accept the Vedantic solution that Life is already involved in Matter and Mind in Life because in essence Matter is a form of veiled Life, Life a form of veiled Consciousness.” The Life Divine

“For there seems to be no reason why Life should evolve out of material elements or Mind out of living form, unless we accept the Vedantic solution that Life is already involved in Matter and Mind in Life because in essence Matter is a form of veiled Life, Life a form of veiled Consciousness.” The Life Divine

forwhy ::: conj. --> Wherefore; because.

four-colour glossies 1. Literature created by {marketroids} that allegedly contains technical specs but which is in fact as superficial as possible without being totally {content-free}. "Forget the four-colour glossies, give me the tech ref manuals." Often applied as an indication of superficiality even when the material is printed on ordinary paper in black and white. Four-colour-glossy manuals are *never* useful for finding a problem. 2. [rare] Applied by extension to manual pages that don't contain enough information to diagnose why the program doesn't produce the expected or desired output.

four-colour glossies ::: 1. Literature created by marketroids that allegedly contains technical specs but which is in fact as superficial as possible without being totally content-free. paper in black and white. Four-colour-glossy manuals are *never* useful for finding a problem.2. [rare] Applied by extension to manual pages that don't contain enough information to diagnose why the program doesn't produce the expected or desired output.

From these considerations it is readily seen why the Masters or mahatmas in Blavatsky’s time stated that the scientific theory of the conservation of energy was wrong in concept and therefore untrue in fact, although workable enough as a mere hypothesis for laboratory studies and the then closely restricted scientific theorizing of the day.

FUBAR 1. (WWII military slang) Fucked up beyond all recognition (or repair). See {foobar}. 2. "hardware" The Failed UniBus Address Register in a {VAX}. A good example of how jargon can occasionally be snuck past the {suits}. Larry Robinson "lrobins@indiana.edu" reports the following nonstandard use for FUBAR: One day somebody got mad at the {card reader} (or card eater that day) on our {Univac 3200}. He taped a sign, "This thing is FUBAR", on the metal weight that sits on the stack of unread cards. The sign stayed there for over a year. One day, somebody said, "Don't forget to put the fubar on top of the stack". It stuck! We called that weight the fubar until they took away the machine. The replacement card reader had two spring loaded card clamps, one for the feed and one for the return, and we called THOSE fubars until we dumped punch cards. Incidently, the way he taped the sign on the weight made up for the lack of a little nylon piece that was missing from it, and fixed the card reader. That's why the sign stayed there. [{Jargon File}] (1997-03-18)

FUBAR ::: 1. (WWII military slang) Fucked up beyond all recognition (or repair).See foobar.2. (hardware) The Failed UniBus Address Register in a VAX. A good example of how jargon can occasionally be snuck past the suits.Larry Robinson reports the following nonstandard use for FUBAR:One day somebody got mad at the card reader (or card eater that day) on our Univac 3200. He taped a sign, This thing is FUBAR, on the metal weight that replacement card reader had two spring loaded card clamps, one for the feed and one for the return, and we called THOSE fubars until we dumped punch cards.Incidently, the way he taped the sign on the weight made up for the lack of a little nylon piece that was missing from it, and fixed the card reader. That's why the sign stayed there.[Jargon File] (1997-03-18)

Grapevine ::: A distributed system project.[Who? Where? Why?]

Grapevine A distributed system project. [Who? Where? Why?]

grimreaper ::: Grim Reaper The anthropomorphism of Death, normally as a skeleton carrying a scythe, who exists in mythology and popular culture. The actual reality of death has had a tremendous influence on the human psyche throughout time, which explains why the personification of 'Death' as a living entity has existed in most societies since history began.

hack mode "jargon" Engaged in {hack}ing. A Zen-like state of total focus on The Problem that may be achieved when one is hacking (this is why every good hacker is part mystic). Ability to enter such concentration at will correlates strongly with wizardliness; it is one of the most important skills learned during {larval stage}. Sometimes amplified as "deep hack mode". Being yanked out of hack mode (see {priority interrupt}) may be experienced as a physical shock, and the sensation of being in hack mode is more than a little habituating. The intensity of this experience is probably by itself sufficient explanation for the existence of hackers, and explains why many resist being promoted out of positions where they can code. See also {cyberspace}. Some aspects of hackish etiquette will appear quite odd to an observer unaware of the high value placed on hack mode. For example, if someone appears at your door, it is perfectly okay to hold up a hand (without turning one's eyes away from the screen) to avoid being interrupted. One may read, type, and interact with the computer for quite some time before further acknowledging the other's presence (of course, he or she is reciprocally free to leave without a word). The understanding is that you might be in {hack mode} with a lot of delicate state in your head, and you dare not {swap} that context out until you have reached a good point to pause. See also {juggling eggs}. [{Jargon File}] (1996-07-31)

hack mode ::: (jargon) Engaged in hacking. A Zen-like state of total focus on The Problem that may be achieved when one is hacking (this is why every good hacker with wizardliness; it is one of the most important skills learned during larval stage. Sometimes amplified as deep hack mode.Being yanked out of hack mode (see priority interrupt) may be experienced as a physical shock, and the sensation of being in hack mode is more than a little explanation for the existence of hackers, and explains why many resist being promoted out of positions where they can code. See also cyberspace.Some aspects of hackish etiquette will appear quite odd to an observer unaware of the high value placed on hack mode. For example, if someone appears at your in your head, and you dare not swap that context out until you have reached a good point to pause. See also juggling eggs.[Jargon File] (1996-07-31)

hard link ::: (file system) One of several directory entries which refer to the same Unix file. A hard link is created with the ln (link) command: ln old name> new name> pathnames. They all refer to the same inode and the inode contains all the information about a file.The standard ln command does not usually allow you to create a hard link to a directory, chiefly because the standard rm and rmdir commands do not allow you direct access to the system calls of the same name, for which no such restrictions apply.Normally all hard links to a file must be in the same file system because a directory entry just relates a pathname to an inode within the same file system. The only exception is a mount point.The restrictions on hard links to directories and between file systems are very common but are not mandated by POSIX. Symbolic links are often used instead of hard links because they do not suffer from these restrictions.The space associated with a file is not freed until all the hard links to the file are deleted. This explains why the system call to delete a file is called unlink.Microsoft Windows NTFS supports hard links via the fsutil command.Unix manual page: ln(1). .(2004-02-24)

hard link "file system" One of several directory entries which refer to the same {Unix} {file}. A hard link is created with the "ln" (link) command: ln "old name" "new name" where "old name" and "new name" are {pathnames} within the same {file system}. Hard links to the same file are indistinguishable from each other except that they have different pathnames. They all refer to the same {inode} and the inode contains all the information about a file. The standard ln command does not usually allow you to create a hard link to a directory, chiefly because the standard {rm} and {rmdir} commands do not allow you to delete such a link. Some systems provide link and {unlink} commands which give direct access to the {system calls} of the same name, for which no such restrictions apply. Normally all hard links to a file must be in the same {file system} because a directory entry just relates a pathname to an inode within the same file system. The only exception is a {mount point}. The restrictions on hard links to directories and between file systems are very common but are not mandated by {POSIX}. {Symbolic links} are often used instead of hard links because they do not suffer from these restrictions. The space associated with a file is not freed until all the hard links to the file are deleted. This explains why the system call to delete a file is called "unlink". {Microsoft Windows} {NTFS} supports hard links via the {fsutil} command. {Unix manual page}: ln(1). {(http://microsoft.com/windowsxp/home/using/productdoc/en/fsutil_hardlink.asp)}. (2004-02-24)

Harvard architecture "architecture" A computer {architecture} in which program instructions are stored in different memory from data. Each type of memory is accessed via a separate {bus}, allowing instructions and data to be fetched in parallel. Contrast: {von Neumann architecture}. [Why Harvard?] (2004-01-14)

Harvard architecture ::: (architecture) A computer architecture in which program instructions are stored in different memory from data. Each type of memory is accessed via a separate bus, allowing instructions and data to be fetched in parallel.Contrast: von Neumann architecture.[Why Harvard?](2004-01-14)

health psychology: area of psychology that aims to understand why people become ill, how they stay healthy and how they respond and cope with illness.

Hera corresponds to the personalized prakriti of the Hindus, as Zeus in so many respects is a Greek counterpart of Brahma. This explains why the functions, high and low, of Hera were generative and productive, in general the fecund producer of all things throughout the drama of manvantara.

Higher Triad ::: The imperishable spiritual ego considered as a unity. It is the reincarnating part of man's constitutionwhich clothes itself in each earth-life in a new personality or lower quaternary. The higher triad, speakingin the simplest fashion, is the unity of atman, buddhi, and the higher manas; and the lower quaternaryconsists of the lower manas or kama-manas, the prana or vitality, the linga-sarira or astral model-body,and the physical vehicle.Another manner of considering the human constitution in its spiritual aspects is that viewed from thestandpoint of consciousness, and in this latter manner the higher triad consists of the divine monad, thespiritual monad, and the higher human monad. The higher triad is often spoken of in a collective sense,and ignoring details of division, as simply the reincarnating monad, or more commonly the reincarnatingego, because this latter is rooted in the higher triad.Many theosophists experience quite unnecessary difficulty in understanding why the human constitutionshould be at one time divided in one way and at another time divided in another way. The difficulty liesin considering these divisions as being absolute instead of relative, in other words, as representingwatertight compartments instead of merely indefinite and convenient divisions. The simplestpsychological division is probably that which divides the septenary constitution of man in three parts: anuppermost duad which is immortal, an intermediate duad which is conditionally immortal, and a lowertriad which is unconditionally mortal. (See Fundamentals of the Esoteric Philosophy, 1st ed., pp. 167,525; 2nd rev. ed., pp. 199, 601).

HiLog A {higher-order logic} programming language. An extension of normal {logic programming} where {predicate} symbols may be variable or structured. This allows {unification} to be performed on the predicate symbols themselves in addition to their arguments. {(ftp://sbcs.sunysb.edu/SB-hilog)}. ["HiLog as a Platform for Database Languages (Or Why Predicate Calculus is Not Enough)", W. Chen et al, Stony Brook, 2nd Intl Workshop on Database Prog Langs, Morgan Kaufmann, 1989]. (1994-12-07)

HiLog ::: A higher-order logic programming language. An extension of normal logic programming where predicate symbols may be variable or structured. This allows unification to be performed on the predicate symbols themselves in addition to their arguments. .[HiLog as a Platform for Database Languages (Or Why Predicate Calculus is Not Enough), W. Chen et al, Stony Brook, 2nd Intl Workshop on Database Prog Langs, Morgan Kaufmann, 1989]. (1994-12-07)

Huanglong Huinan. (J. oryo/oryu Enan; K. Hwangnyong Hyenam 龍慧南) (1002-1069). Song-dynasty Chan monk who is regarded as the founder of the HUANGLONG PAI collateral lineage of the LINJI ZONG. He ordained as a monk at the age of eleven, eventually becoming a disciple of Shishuang Chuyuan (986-1039), a sixth-generation successor in the Linji school. He spent much of his life teaching at Mt. Huanglong in Xiushui county of Jiangxi province, whence he acquired his toponym. Huanglong was famous for employing three crucial questions to challenge his students and encourage their cultivation; these are known as "Huanglong's Three Checkpoints" (Huanglong sanguan): What conditioned your birth (viz., why were you born)? Why are my hands like the Buddha's? Why are my feet like a donkey's? His Huanglong lineage lasted for about one hundred fifty years, before being reabsorbed into the rival YANGQI PAI.

Huayan shiyi. (J. Kegon no jui; K. Hwaom sibi 華嚴十異). In Chinese, "Ten Distinctions of the AVATAMSAKASuTRA," ten reasons why HUAYAN exegetes consider the AvataMsakasutra to be superior to all other scriptures and thus the supreme teaching of the Buddha. (1) The "time of its exposition" was unique (shiyi): the sutra was supposedly the first scripture preached after the Buddha's enlightenment and thus offers the most unadulterated enunciation of his experience. (2) The "location of its exposition" was unique (chuyi): it is said that the BODHI TREE under which the sutra was preached was the center of the "oceans of world systems of the lotus womb world" (S. padmagarbhalokadhātu; C. lianhuazang shijie; cf. TAIZoKAI). (3) The "preacher" was unique (zhuyi): The sutra was supposedly preached by VAIROCANA Buddha, as opposed to other "emanation buddhas." (4) The "audience" was unique (zhongyi): only advanced BODHISATTVAs-along with divinities and demigods who were in actuality emanations of the Buddha-were present for its preaching; thus, there was no division between MAHĀYĀNA and HĪNAYĀNA. (5) The "basis" of the sutra was unique (suoyiyi): its teaching was based on the one vehicle (EKAYĀNA), not the other provisional vehicles created later within the tradition. (6) The "exposition" of the sutra was unique (shuoyi): the AvataMsakasutra preached in this world system is consistent with the sutra as preached in all other world systems; this is unlike other sutras, which were provisional adaptations to the particular needs of this world system only. (7) The "status" of the vehicles in the sutra were unique (weiyi): no provisional categorization of the three vehicles of Buddhism (TRIYĀNA) was made in this sutra. This is because, according to the sutra's fundamental theme of "unimpeded interpenetration," any one vehicle subsumes all other vehicles and teachings. (8) Its "practice" was unique (xingyi): the stages (BHuMI) of the BODHISATTVA path are simultaneously perfected in this sutra's teachings, as opposed to having to be gradually perfected step-by-step. (9) The enumeration of "dharma gates," or list of dharmas, was unique (famenyi): whereas other sutras systematize doctrinal formulas using different numerical schemes (e.g., FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS, eightfold path, etc.), this sutra exclusively employs in all its lists the number "ten"-a mystical number that symbolizes the sutra's infinite scope and depth. (10) Its "instantiation" was unique (shiyi): even the most mundane phenomena described in the AvataMsakasutra (such as trees, water, mountains, etc.) are expressions of the deepest truth; this is unlike other sutras that resort primarily to abstract, philosophical concepts like "emptiness" (suNYATĀ) or "suchness" (TATHATĀ) in order to express their profoundest truths.

huguo Fojiao. (J. gokoku Bukkyo; K. hoguk Pulgyo 護國佛敎). In Chinese, "state-protection Buddhism," referring to the sociopolitical role Buddhism played in East Asia to protect the state against war, insurrection, and natural disasters. The doctrinal justification for such a protective role for Buddhism derives from the "Guanshiyin pusa pumen pin" ("Chapter on the Unlimited Gate of the BODHISATTVA AVALOKITEsVARA") and the "Tuoluoni pin" (DHĀRAnĪ chapter) of the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA ("Lotus Sutra"), the "Huguo pin" ("Chapter on Protecting the State") of the RENWANG JING ("Scripture for Humane Kings"), and the "Zhenglun pin" ("Chapter on Right View") of the SUVARnAPRABHĀSOTTAMASuTRA ("Golden Light Sutra"). For example, the Suvarnaprabhāsottamasutra states that a ruler who accepts that sutra and has faith in the dharma will be protected by the four heavenly kings (CĀTURMAHĀRĀJAKĀYIKA); but if he neglects the dharma, the divinities will abandon his state and calamity will result. The "Huguo pin" of the Renwang jing notes that "when the state is thrown into chaos, facing all sorts of disasters and being destroyed by invading enemies," kings should set up in a grand hall one hundred buddha and bodhisattva images and one hundred seats, and then invite one hundred eminent monks to come there and teach the Renwang jing. This ritual, called the "Renwang Assembly of One-Hundred Seats" (C. Renwang baigaozuo hui; J. Ninno hyakukozae; K. Inwang paekkojwa hoe) would ward off any calamity facing the state and was held in China, Japan, and Korea from the late sixth century onward. In Japan, these three scriptures were used to justify the role Buddhism could play in protecting the state; and the Japanese reformist NICHIREN (1222-1282) cites the Suvarnaprabhāsottamasutra in his attempts to demonstrate that the calamities then facing Japan were a result of the divinities abandoning the state because of the government's neglect of the true teachings of Buddhism. The notion of state protection also figured in the introduction of ZEN to Japan. In 1198, the TENDAI and ZEN monk MYoAN EISAI (1141-1215) wrote his KoZEN GOKOKURON ("Treatise on the Promulgation of Zen as a Defense of the State"), which explained why the new teachings of Zen would both protect the state and allow the "perfect teachings" (see JIAOXIANG PANSHI) of Tendai to flourish. ¶ "State-protection Buddhism" has also been posited as one of the defining characteristics of Korean Buddhism. There are typically four types of evidence presented in support of this view. (1) Such rituals as the Inwang paekkojwa hoe (Renwang jing recitation) were held at court at least ten times during the Silla dynasty and increased dramatically to as many as one hundred twenty times during the succeeding Koryǒ dynasty. (2) Monasteries and STuPAs were constructed for their apotropaic value in warding off calamity. During the Silla dynasty, e.g., HWANGNYONGSA and its nine-story pagoda, as well as Sach'onwangsa (Four Heavenly Kings Monastery), were constructed for the protection of the royal family and the state during the peninsular unification wars. During the succeeding Koryo dynasty, the KORYo TAEJANGGYoNG (Korean Buddhism canon) was carved (twice) in the hopes that state support for this massive project would prompt the various buddhas and divinities (DEVA) to ward off foreign invaders and bring peace to the kingdom. (3) Eminent monks served as political advisors to the king and the government. For example, Kwangjong (r. 949-975), the fourth monarch of the Koryǒ dynasty, established the positions of wangsa (royal preceptor) and kuksa (state preceptor, C. GUOSHI), and these offices continued into the early Choson dynasty. (4) Monks were sometimes at the vanguard in repelling foreign invaders, such as the Hangmagun (Defeating Māra Troops) in twelfth-century Koryo, who fought against the Jurchen, and the Choson monks CH'oNGHo HYUJoNG (1520-1604) and SAMYoNG YUJoNG (1544-1610), who raised monks' militias to fight against the Japanese during the Hideyoshi invasions of the late sixteenth century. In the late twentieth century, revisionist historians argued that the notion of "state-protection Buddhism" in Korea may reflect as much the political situation of the modern and contemporary periods as any historical reality, and may derive from the concept of "chingo kokka" (protecting the state) advocated by Japanese apologists during the Buddhist persecution of the Meiji period (1868-1912).

IBM PC XT ::: (computer) An IBM PC with a (slow) hard disk. The XT was released in March 1983. It had an Intel 8088 CPU. The XT/370, released in October 1983, added IBM 370 mainframe emulation, and the XT 286 followed in September 1986 with an Intel 80286 CPU [Why?]. (1996-05-21)

IBM PC XT "computer" An {IBM PC} with a (slow) {hard disk}. The XT was released in March 1983. It had an {Intel 8088} {CPU}. The XT/370, released in October 1983, added {IBM 370} {mainframe} {emulation}, and the XT 286 followed in September 1986 with an {Intel 80286} CPU [Why?]. (1996-05-21)

Ideal of Reason: (Ger. Ideal der Vernunft) Kant: The idea of an all-comprehending reality, God, containing the determination of all finite existence. In the Cr. of Pure Reason Kant shows how and why the mind hypostatizes this Ideal, the source of "transcendental illusion" (q.v.). He concluded that while the traditional proofs of God's existence were all fallacious, the idea of God had a regulative use for reason, and was a necessary postulate for practical reason (q.v.). See Kantianism. -- O.F.K.

If the West possessed a genuine psychology, stigmata would not be looked upon with awe as miracles or quasi-miracles or considered to be inexplicable phenomena. They could be reproduced at will by the adept on his own body, but why should he do so useless a thing, involving not only an unnatural condition of his constitution, but possibly suffering of the body itself? The whole matter of stigmata in human subjects is but an intensification in very unusual circumstances of what biological science knows to occur commonly and automatically in the bodies of the lower creatures, which not merely change color, but undergo curious transformations under conditions of fright, anger, etc.

I laid the book aside and asked myself: who are these seven holy ones that stand before God? Has any biblical scholar identified them? Are they of the order of seraphim, cherubim, principalities, powers? And are they always the same seven who enjoy the privilege and eminence of closest proximity to the throne of Glory? And why seven? Were the seven planets the prototype? Or did the notion derive from the well-known chapter in Ezekiel 9: 2-11 which gives a terrifying picture of six “men” and a seventh “clothed in linen” whom God summoned to Jerusalem to “slay without pity”? Challenging, even intimidating, questions and ones that, I felt, ought not to be left unanswered. Meantime, the pursuit led me down many a heavenly brook. Over the years it served to unlock realms of gold I never suspected existed in Heaven or on earth.

In all these cases the condition results from a compression of the astral fluid already existing “about a person, so as to form an elastic shell, absolutely non-penetrable by any physical object” (IU 1:378). Nor does ordinary heat register, as such, on astral substance. This invisible shell of compressed astral fluid also accounts for the instances where the person so protected cannot be shot. In these cases the bullets appear just beyond the muzzle of the weapon, quiver in the air, and fall to the ground, as if meeting an impenetrable barrier. This protecting, elastic shell also explains why heavy blows and attacks with sharp instruments will make no impression upon “convulsionaries” as was shown by the historic records in the cases of the convulsionaries of St. Medard (IU 1:373-6).

in-band ::: (communications) (bit-robbing) The exchange of call control information on the same channel as the telephone call or data transmission. Since one bit in a frame is periodically used for signalling instead of data, this is often referred to as bit robbing.This is the reason why a D1 channel in the T-carrier system can only carry 56 Kbps of usable data instead of the 64 Kbps carried by the D0 channel in the E-carrier system.(2000-03-10)

in-band signalling "communications" (Or CAS, channel associated signaling) Transmission of control signals in the same channel as data. This is commonly used in the {Public Switched Telephone Network} where the same pair of wires carry both voice and control signals (e.g. dialling, ringing). Another example is the use on a computer {serial line} of Control-S and Control-Q characters for {flow control} as opposed to {hardware flow control} which would be out-of-band signalling. In digital communications, in-band signalling often uses "bit-robbing" where, for example, one {bit} in each {frame} is used for signalling instead of data. This is the reason why a {D1} channel in the T-carrier system can only carry 56 Kbps of usable data instead of the 64 Kbps carried by the {D0} channel in the E-carrier system. (2007-01-26)

In each case, the name of the realm indicates the object of meditation of the beings reborn there. Hence, in the first, for example, the beings perceive only infinite space. Rebirth in these different spheres is based on mastery of the corresponding four immaterial meditative absorptions (ĀRuPYĀVACARADHYĀNA; ārupyasamāpatti) in the previous life. While the devas of the sensuous realm and the realm of subtle materiality come to have larger and ever more splendid bodies at the more advanced levels of their heavens, the devas of the immaterial realm do not have even the subtlest foundation in materiality; their existence is so refined that it is not even possible to posit exactly where they dwell spatially. In some schools, such as the Sarvāstivāda, the immaterial realm does not even exist as a discrete place: rather, when a being who has mastered the immaterial absorptions dies, he is reborn at the very same location where he passed away, except now he is "immaterial" or "formless" and thus invisible to coarser beings. According to the Theravāda, even a mind-made body (MANOMAYAKĀYA) is excluded from this realm, for the devas here possess only the mind base (MANĀYATANA), mental objects (P. dhammāyatana), the elements of mental consciousness (P. manoviNNānadhātu), and the element of mental objects (P. dhammadhātu), needing only three nutriments (ĀHĀRA) to survive-contact (P. phassa), mental cognition (P. manosaNcetana), and consciousness (P. viNNāna). The Buddha claims to have lived among the devas of the immaterial realm in certain of his previous lives, but without offering any detailed description of those existences. ¶ In all realms, devas are born apparitionally. In the sensuous realm, devas are born in their mother's lap, appearing as if they are already five to ten years old at birth; by contrast, devas of the subtle-materiality and immaterial realms appear not to need the aid of parents; those in the subtle-materiality realm appear fully grown, while those in the immaterial realm do not appear at all, because they have no form. It is also said that, when devas are reborn, they are aware of their prior existence and of the specific KARMAN that led to their rebirth in the heavenly realms. The different deva realms are also distinguished by differences in nutriment, sexuality, requisites, and life span. The devas of the lower heavens of the sensuous realm consume ordinary food; those in the upper spheres of the sensuous realm and the lower levels of the realm of subtle materiality feed only on sensory contact; the devas of the upper levels of the realm of subtle materiality feed only on contemplation; those in the immaterial realm feed on cognition alone. Sexual differentiation remains only in the sensuous realm: in the heaven of the four heavenly kings and the heaven of the thirty-three, the devas engage in physical copulation, the devas of the yāma heaven engage in sexual union by embracing one another, the devas of the tusita heaven by holding hands, those of the nirmānarati heaven by smiling at one another, and those of the paranirmitavasavartin heaven by exchanging a single glance. Clothes are said to be used in all deva worlds except in the immaterial realm. The life spans of devas in the sensuous realm range from five hundred years for the gods of the heaven of the four heavenly kings to one thousand years for the trāyastriMsa gods, two thousand years for the yāma gods, four thousand years for the tusita gods, eight thousand years for the nirmānarati gods, and sixteen thousand years for the paranirmitavasavartin gods. However, there is a range of opinion of what constitutes a year in these heavens. For example, it is said that in the tusita heaven, four hundred human years equal one day in the life of a god of that heaven. The life spans of devas in the realm of subtle materiality are measured in eons (KALPA). The life spans of devas in the immaterial realm may appear as essentially infinite, but even those divinities, like all devas, are subject to impermanence (ANITYA) and will eventually die and be subject to further rebirths once the salutary meditative deed that caused them to be reborn there has been exhausted. The sutras say that for a deva of the sensuous realm, there are five portents of his impending death: the garlands of flowers he wears begin to fade, his clothes become soiled and his palace dusty, he begins to perspire, his body becomes opaque and loses its luster, and his throne becomes uncomfortable. At that point, the deva experiences a vision of his next place of rebirth. This vision is said to be one of the most horrible sufferings in saMsāra, because of its marked contrast to the magnificence of his current life. There are also said to be four direct reasons why devas die: exhaustion of their life spans, their previous merit, their food, and the arising of anger. ¶ Rebirth as a deva is presumed to be the reward of virtuous karman performed in previous lives and is thus considered a salutary, if provisional, religious goal. In the "graduated discourse" (P. ANUPUBBIKATHĀ; S. ANUPuRVIKATHĀ) taught by the Buddha, for example, the Buddha uses the prospect of heavenly rebirth (svargakathā), and the pleasures accruing thereto, as a means of attracting laypersons to the religious life. Despite the many appealing attributes of these heavenly beings, such as their physical beauty, comfortable lives, and long life span, even heavenly existence is ultimately unsatisfactory because it does not offer a definitive escape from the continued cycle of birth and death (saMsāra). Since devas are merely enjoying the rewards of their previous good deeds rather than performing new wholesome karman, they are considered to be stagnating spiritually. This spiritual passivity explains why they must be reborn in lower levels of existence, and especially as human beings, in order to further their cultivation. For these reasons, Buddhist soteriological literature sometimes condemns religious practice performed solely for the goal of achieving rebirth as a deva. It is only certain higher level of devas, such as the devas belonging to the five pure abodes (suddhāvāsa), that are not subject to further rebirth, because they have already eliminated all the fetters (saMyojana) associated with that realm and are destined to achieve arhatship. Nevertheless, over the history of Buddhism, rebirth in heaven as a deva has been a more common goal for religious practice, especially among the laity, than the achievement of nirvāna. ¶ The sutras include frequent reference to "gods and men" (S. devamanusya; C. tianren) as the objects of the Buddha's teachings. Despite the fact that this is how most Buddhist traditions have chosen to translate the Sanskrit compound, "gods" here is probably meant to refer to the terrestrial divinities of "princes" or "kings," rather than heavenly beings; thus, the compound should be more properly (if, perhaps, pedantically) rendered "princes and peoples." Similarly, as the "divinities" of this world, buddhas, bodhisattvas, and arhats are also sometimes referred to as devas. See also DEVALOKA; DEVATĀ.

Intel 487SX "processor" A version of the {Intel 486DX} {microprocessor} with an extra pin, for use in the {coprocessor} socket of an {Intel 486SX} system. The 487SX provides the {FPU} which is missing in the 486SX. Although the 486SX is completely disabled when you install a 487SX, the 487SX design requires that you leave the 486SX in your PC [why?], rather than use it elsewhere. Intel admits that in some systems you can unplug the 486SX and fit a 487SX in its place but they don't guarantee that it will always work. See {Intel 486}. (1995-05-10)

Intel 487SX ::: (processor) A version of the Intel 486DX microprocessor with an extra pin, for use in the coprocessor socket of an Intel 486SX system. The 487SX provides the FPU which is missing in the 486SX.Although the 486SX is completely disabled when you install a 487SX, the 487SX design requires that you leave the 486SX in your PC [why?], rather than use it elsewhere. Intel admits that in some systems you can unplug the 486SX and fit a 487SX in its place but they don't guarantee that it will always work.See Intel 486. (1995-05-10)

Intel 8086 "processor" A sixteen bit {microprocessor} chip used in early {IBM PCs}. The {Intel 8088} was a version with an eight-bit external data bus. The Intel 8086 was based on the design of the {Intel 8080} and {Intel 8085} (it was {source compatible} with the 8080) with a similar {register set}, but was expanded to 16 bits. The Bus Interface Unit fed the instruction stream to the Execution Unit through a 6 byte {prefetch} queue, so fetch and execution were concurrent - a primitive form of {pipelining} (8086 instructions varied from 1 to 4 bytes). It featured four 16-bit general {registers}, which could also be accessed as eight 8-bit registers, and four 16-bit {index registers} (including the {stack pointer}). The data registers were often used implicitly by instructions, complicating {register allocation} for temporary values. It featured 64K 8-bit I/O (or 32K 16 bit) ports and fixed {vectored interrupts}. There were also four {segment registers} that could be set from index registers. The segment registers allowed the CPU to access 1 meg of memory in an odd way. Rather than just supplying missing bytes, as most segmented processors, the 8086 actually shifted the segment registers left 4 bits and added it to the address. As a result, segments overlapped, and it was possible to have two pointers with the same value point to two different memory locations, or two pointers with different values pointing to the same location. Most people consider this a {brain damaged} design. Although this was largely acceptable for {assembly language}, where control of the segments was complete (it could even be useful then), in higher level languages it caused constant confusion (e.g. near/far pointers). Even worse, this made expanding the address space to more than 1 meg difficult. A later version, the {Intel 80386}, expanded the design to 32 bits, and "fixed" the segmentation, but required extra modes (suppressing the new features) for compatibility, and retains the awkward architecture. In fact, with the right assembler, code written for the 8008 can still be run on the most recent {Intel 486}. The {Intel 80386} added new {op codes} in a kludgy fashion similar to the {Zilog Z80} and {Zilog Z280}. The {Intel 486} added full {pipelines}, and {clock doubling} (like the {Zilog Z280}). So why did {IBM} chose the 8086 series when most of the alternatives were so much better? Apparently IBM's own engineers wanted to use the {Motorola 68000}, and it was used later in the forgotten {IBM Instruments} 9000 Laboratory Computer, but IBM already had rights to manufacture the 8086, in exchange for giving Intel the rights to its {bubble memory} designs. Apparently IBM was using 8086s in the IBM {Displaywriter} {word processor}. Other factors were the 8-bit {Intel 8088} version, which could use existing {Intel 8085}-type components, and allowed the computer to be based on a modified 8085 design. 68000 components were not widely available, though it could use {Motorola 6800} components to an extent. {Intel} {bubble memory} was on the market for a while, but faded away as better and cheaper memory technologies arrived. (1994-12-23)

Intel 8086 ::: (processor) A sixteen bit microprocessor chip used in early IBM PCs. The Intel 8088 was a version with an eight-bit external data bus.The Intel 8086 was based on the design of the Intel 8080 and Intel 8085 (it was source compatible with the 8080) with a similar register set, but was expanded Unit through a 6 byte prefetch queue, so fetch and execution were concurrent - a primitive form of pipelining (8086 instructions varied from 1 to 4 bytes).It featured four 16-bit general registers, which could also be accessed as eight 8-bit registers, and four 16-bit index registers (including the stack pointer). bit) ports and fixed vectored interrupts. There were also four segment registers that could be set from index registers.The segment registers allowed the CPU to access 1 meg of memory in an odd way. Rather than just supplying missing bytes, as most segmented processors, the 8086 different values pointing to the same location. Most people consider this a brain damaged design.Although this was largely acceptable for assembly language, where control of the segments was complete (it could even be useful then), in higher level languages retains the awkward architecture. In fact, with the right assembler, code written for the 8008 can still be run on the most recent Intel 486.The Intel 80386 added new op codes in a kludgy fashion similar to the Zilog Z80 and Zilog Z280. The Intel 486 added full pipelines, and clock doubling (like the Zilog Z280).So why did IBM chose the 8086 series when most of the alternatives were so much better? Apparently IBM's own engineers wanted to use the Motorola 68000, and it rights to its bubble memory designs. Apparently IBM was using 8086s in the IBM Displaywriter word processor.Other factors were the 8-bit Intel 8088 version, which could use existing Intel 8085-type components, and allowed the computer to be based on a modified 8085 design. 68000 components were not widely available, though it could use Motorola 6800 components to an extent.Intel bubble memory was on the market for a while, but faded away as better and cheaper memory technologies arrived. (1994-12-23)

International Electrotechnical Commission "standard, body" (IEC) A {standard}isation body at the same level as {ISO}. [Relationship? Why separate?] (1995-04-21)

International Electrotechnical Commission ::: (standard, body) (IEC) A standardisation body at the same level as ISO.[Relationship? Why separate?] (1995-04-21)

interrogative ::: a. --> Denoting a question; expressed in the form of a question; as, an interrogative sentence; an interrogative pronoun. ::: n. --> A word used in asking questions; as, who? which? why?

In the earlier third root-races, the Sons of Wisdom produced by kriyasakti a progeny called the Sons of Ad, Sons of the Fire-mist, or Sons of Will and Yoga. This was not a race, but “at first a wondrous Being, called the ‘Initiator,’ and after him a group of semi-divine and semi-human beings. ‘Set apart’ in Archaic genesis for certain purposes, they are those in whom are said to have incarnated the highest Dhyanis, ‘Munis and Rishis from previous Manvantaras’ — to form the nursery for future human adepts, on this earth and during the present cycle” (SD 1:207). This Wondrous Being, who descended in the early part of the Third Age, is the tree from which have come the great historically known sages and hierophants, and it holds spiritual sway over the initiated adepts. “He is the ‘Initiator,’ called the ‘great sacrifice.’ For, sitting at the threshold of light, he looks into it from within the circle of Darkness, which he will not cross, nor will he quit his post till the last day of this life-cycle. Why does the solitary Watcher remain at his self-chosen post? Why does he sit by the fountain of primeval Wisdom, of which he drinks no longer, as he has naught to learn which he does not know . . .? Because the lonely, sore-footed pilgrims on their way back to their home are never sure to the last moment of not losing their way in this limitless desert of illusion and matter called Earth-Life. Because he would fain show the way to that region of freedom and light, from which he is a voluntary exile himself, to every prisoner who has succeeded in liberating himself from the bonds of flesh and illusion. Because, in short, he has sacrificed himself for the sake of mankind, though but a few Elect may profit by the great sacrifice” (SD 1:208).

In the world of matter, Brahma, Vishnu, and Siva are each personified by earth, water, and fire, i.e., each of these divinities combines in itself these three elements, one predominating when the divinity manifests one of its three fundamental gunas. “In Indian Puranas it is Vishnu, the first, and Brahma, the second logos, or the ideal and practical creators, who are respectively represented, one as manifesting the lotus, the other as issuing from it” (SD 1:381n). But Brahma, for instance, because of the significance of expansion inherent in the name, could equally well be looked upon as the source of Vishnu, manifesting as the cosmic waters or Second Logos. This perhaps is the reason why in this Trimurti, Brahma is called the emanator or evolver, and Vishnu the sustainer or preserver.

It reminds me sometimes of that experience Nolini da had near the Samadhi. He saw a figure. It was standing by the Samadhi. It was late at night, the Ashram was empty and he saw a figure that looked exactly like Sri Aurobindo. He was about to fall at his feet when he saw the feet were different. This was actually a force of darkness and it was actually so powerful it was standing near the Samadhi. He stopped. If he had fallen at its feet it would have dragged him down, even someone so conscious. He (Nolini) would not have fallen down because he was always vigilant and that is why he noticed, but someone less conscious, less vigilant might be trapped, thinking ‘I am following the light.’ It is why this happens very often when one thinks one is speaking for God or speaking for the Divine.

“It thus becomes clear why the Agnishwatta, devoid of the grosser creative fire, hence unable to create physical man, having no double, or astral body, to project, since they were without any form, are shown in exoteric allegories as Yogis, Kumaras (chaste youths), who became ‘rebels,’ Asuras, fighting and opposing gods . . . Yet it is they alone who could complete man, i.e., make of him a self-conscious, almost a divine being — a god on Earth. The Barhishad, though possessed of creative fire, were devoid of the higher mahat-mic element. Being on a level with the lower principles — those which precede gross objective matter — they could only give birth to the outer man, or rather to the model of the physical, the astral man” (SD 2:78-9). The barhishads “could only create, or rather clothe, the human Monads with their own astral Selves, but they could not make man in their image and likeness. ‘Man must not be like one of us,’ say the creative gods, entrusted with the fabrication of the lower animal but higher; . . . Their creating the semblance of men out of their own divine Essence means, esoterically, that it is they who became the first Race, and thus shared its destiny and further evolution. They would not, simply because they could not, give to man that sacred spark which burns and expands into the flower of human reason and self-consciousness, for they had it not to give” (SD 2:94-5).

IV. Probability as a Primitive Notion: According to this interpretation, whicn is due particularly to Keynes, probability is taken as ultimate or undefined, and it is made known through its essential characteristics. Thus, probability is neither an intrinsic property of propositions like truth, nor an empty concept, but a relative property linking a proposition with its partial evidence. It follows that the probability of the same proposition varies with the evidence presented, and that even though a proposition may turn out to be false, our judgment that it is probable upon a given evidence can be correct. Further, since probability belongs to a proposition only in its relation to other propositions, probability-inferences cannot be the same as truth-inferences as they cannot break the chain of relations between their premisses, they lack one of the essential features usually ascribed to inference. That is why, in particular, the conclusions of the natural sciences cannot be separated from their evidence, as it may be the case with the deductive sciences. With such assumptions, probability is the group name given to the processes which strengthen or increase the likelihood of an analogy. The main objection to this interpretation is the arbitrary character of its primitive idea. There is no reason why there are relations between propositions such that p is probable upon q, even on the assumption of the relative character of probability. There must be conditions determining which propositions are probable upon others. Hence we must look beyond the primitive idea itself and place the ground of probability elsewhere.

Jenga Code "humour, programming" A style of programming which results in the whole thing collapsing when you touch a single block of code. Named after the game where players try to remove wooden blocks from a tower without it falling down. Also known as Crispy Noodle Code. [{Dodgy Coder (http://www.dodgycoder.net/2011/11/yoda-conditions-pokemon-exception.html)}]. [Why crispy noodle?] (2013-12-25)

JFCL ::: /jif'kl/, /jaf'kl/, /j*-fi'kl/ (obsolete) To cancel or annul something. Why don't you jfcl that out? The fastest do-nothing instruction on older models of on the licence plate of his BMW for years. Usage: rare except among old-time PDP-10 hackers.[Jargon File] (1994-11-22)

JFCL /jif'kl/, /jaf'kl/, /j*-fi'kl/ (obsolete) To cancel or annul something. "Why don't you jfcl that out?" The fastest do-nothing instruction on older models of the {PDP-10} happened to be JFCL, which stands for "Jump if Flag set and then CLear the flag"; this does something useful, but is a very fast no-operation if no flag is specified. Geoff Goodfellow, one of the jargon-1 co-authors, had JFCL on the licence plate of his BMW for years. Usage: rare except among old-time PDP-10 hackers. [{Jargon File}] (1994-11-22)

Jhumur: “– There is a very clear pattern, in a way, in the darkness. It follows a certain line of action just like an idea governs a line of action and proceeds expression. Even in the Inconscient there is a force that works itself out. This is also an expression of the supreme force that has involved itself and works its way out in a supremely slow conscious way and knows exactly how it wants to grow, that is why it controls so much of the universe because it has spread itself along very clearly worked out lines.”

Jhumur: “You have the same word in French, capte—like a receiver that catches signals. I believe Sri Aurobindo often uses French words with the French connotation. Particularly I have noticed that sometimes he uses the word amour instead of love. When I asked myself why did he have to use a French word here, perhaps because it was a different kind of love, not the usual, something other. Time’s amour-song he says, and not a love song. There is something different about that song. It is not just a love song. It suggests something other when he uses a word from another language. It is not love that we ordinarily understand, he has added a quality of something special or rare or unusual by utilizing the same word but in another language. It gives it another colour.”

jiaoxiang panshi. (J. kyoso hanjaku; K. kyosang p'ansok 教相判釋). In Chinese, lit., "classification and interpretation of the characteristics of the doctrine"; also known as jiaopan or PANJIAO (tenet classification). Tenet classification was a fundamental exegetical practice in East Asian Buddhism, in which scriptures or Buddhist teachings were ranked in order of their supposed relative profundity. The practice flourished in East Asia, especially during the fifth, sixth, and seventh centuries. As more translations of Buddhist texts became available in East Asia, indigenous exegetes struggled with the question of why this plethora of scriptural material, all of which purported to have been spoken by the Buddha himself, offered such differing presentations of Buddhist thought and practice. Drawing on the notion of UPĀYA, or skill in means, exegetes began to reflect on the context and intent of the different Buddhist scriptures that were now available to them. The origin of scriptures and their teachings were analyzed and evaluated comparatively; after which the texts were organized in a hierarchical or, in some cases, chronological, order. Different exegetical traditions adopted different classification criteria. The TIANTAI ZONG, for example, based its classification schema on the different (chronological) stages of the Buddha's teaching career, the content of those teachings, and the varying methods he used in preaching to his audience (see WUSHI BAJIAO). The HUAYAN ZONG, following the lead of FAZANG and CHENGGUAN, divided scriptures into five levels based on the profundity of their respective teachings: HĪNAYĀNA (viz., the ĀGAMAs), elementary MAHĀYĀNA (viz., YOGĀCĀRA and MADHYAMAKA), advanced Mahāyāna (SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA), sudden teachings (typically CHAN), and perfect teachings (AVATAMSAKASuTRA). Most exegetes placed the central scripture of their schools at the apex of their classificatory hierarchy, thereby using the tenet-classification system as a polemical tool to demonstrate the superiority of their own traditions. See also SIDDHĀNTA.

Jingtu shiyi [lun]. (J. Jodo jugi[ron]; K. Chongt'o sibŭi [non] 淨土十疑[論]). In Chinese, "Ten Doubts regarding the PURE LAND"; a popular text on pure land beliefs and practices composed by TIANTAI ZHIYI. As the title suggests, the treatise is an apologia for the practice and verity of the pure land, even though it is exclusively directed at AMITĀBHA's pure land of SUKHĀVATĪ. The "doubts" that Zhiyi addresses in his treatise include: "Doesn't it show a lack of compassion to seek rebirth in the pure land (and thus leave behind those who are suffering in this world)?" "Isn't seeking rebirth in the pure land contradictory to the teaching of non-production (which nullifies the prospect of further rebirths)?" "Why focus on Amitābha and his pure land (as one's sole choice of devotion)?" "How is it that unenlightened beings who are entangled in the fetters (SAMYOJANA) are capable of being reborn in the pure land (and thereby transcend the rounds of rebirth)?" "How could it be that the pure land of sukhāvatī (being entirely male) has no women and no one with HĪNAYĀNA inclinations?"

justification ::: n. --> The act of justifying or the state of being justified; a showing or proving to be just or conformable to law, justice, right, or duty; defense; vindication; support; as, arguments in justification of the prisoner&

karman. (P. kamma; T. las; C. ye; J. go; K. op 業). In Sanskrit, "action"; in its inflected form "karma," it is now accepted as an English word; a term used to refer to the doctrine of action and its corresponding "ripening" or "fruition" (VIPĀKA), according to which virtuous deeds of body, speech, and mind produce happiness in the future (in this life or subsequent lives), while nonvirtuous deeds lead instead to suffering. In Vedic religion, karman referred especially to ritual actions. The term came to take on wider meanings among the sRAMAnA movements of wandering ascetics, to which Buddhism belonged. The JAINAs, for example, have a theory of karman as a physical substance created through unwholesome actions, which hinder the soul's ability to achieve liberation; in order to free the soul from the bonds created through past actions, the body had to be rigorously cleansed of this karmic substance through moral discipline and asceticism. Although the Buddhists accepted the notion of moral causality, as did the Jainas, they redefined karman instead as mental intention (CETANĀ) or intentional (cetayitvā) acts: the Buddha specifically says, "Action is volition, for after having intended something, one accomplishes action through body, speech, and mind." These actions are of four types: (1) wholesome (KUsALA), which lead to wholesome results (vipāka); (2) unwholesome (AKUsALA), which lead to unwholesome results; (3) mixed, with mixed results that may be partially harmful and partially beneficial; and (4) indeterminate (AVYĀKṚTA), which are actions done after enlightenment, which yield no result in the conditioned realm. The term karman describes both the potential and kinetic energy necessary to sustain a process; and, just as energy is not lost in a physical process, neither is it lost in the process of moral cause and effect. The Buddhists assert that there is a necessary relationship that exists between the action and its fruition, but this need not manifest itself in the present life; rather, when the complex of conditions and the appropriate time for their fruition come together, actions will bear their retributive fruit, even after an interval of hundreds of millions of eons (KALPA). The fruition of action is also received by the mental continuum (CITTASAMTĀNA) of the being who initially performed the action, not by another; thus, in mainstream Buddhism, one can neither receive the fruition of another's karman nor redeem another's actions. The physical universe (BHĀJANALOKA) and all experience within it are also said to be the products of karman, although in a passive, ethically neutral sense (viz., upapattibhava; see BHAVA). The goal of the Buddhist path is to be liberated from the effects of karman and the cycle of rebirth (SAMSĀRA) by destroying attachment to the sense of self (ĀTMAN). The doctrine of karman is meant to counter the errors of antinomianism (that morality is unnecessary to salvation), annihilationism, and materialism. Actions do, in fact, matter, even if there is ultimately no self that is the agent of action. Hence, karman as representing the continuity between action and result must be understood in conjunction with the teaching of discontinuity that is ANĀTMAN: there is indeed a causal chain connecting the initiator of action and the recipient of its result, but it is not the case that the person who performs the action is the same as the person who experiences the result (the wrong view of eternality) or that the agent is different from the experiencer (the wrong view of annihilationism). This connection is likened to milk changing to its different forms of curds, butter, and ghee: the milk and the ghee are neither identical nor different, but they are causally connected. The process that connects karmic cause and effect, as well as the process by which that connection is severed, is detailed in the twelvefold chain of dependent origination (PRATĪTYASAMUTPĀDA). Enlightened beings, such as a buddha or an ARHAT, have destroyed this chain and thus have eradicated all attachment to their past karmic continuums; consequently, after their enlightenment, they can still perform actions, but those will not lead to results that would lead to additional lifetimes in saMsāra. Although the Buddha acknowledges that the connections between karman and its effect may seem so complex as to appear unfathomable (why, for example, does the evil person who harms others live in wealth, while the good Samaritan who helps others lives in poverty?), he is adamant that those connections can be known, and known with perfect precision, through the experience of awakening (BODHI). Indeed, two of the three kinds of knowledge (TRIVIDYĀ; P. tevijja) and one of the superknowledges (ABHIJNĀ) that are by-products of enlightenment involve insight into the validity of the connection between karmic cause and effect for both oneself and for all beings: viz., the ability to remember one's own former lives (PuRVANIVĀSĀNUSMṚTI: P. pubbenivāsānunssati) in all their detail; and the insight into the karmic destinies of all other beings as well (CYUTYUPAPATTIJNĀNA; P. cutupapātānuNāna). Distinguish KARMAN, "ecclesiastical proceeding," s.v.; see also ĀNANTARYAKARMAN; ANINJYAKARMAN; ER BAO; KARMĀVARAnA.

kim karmani ghore mam niyojayasi ::: why dost Thou appoint me to a dreadful work. [Gita 3.1]

Known Lazy Bastard "abuse" (KLB) A term, used among technical support staff, for a user who repeatedly asks for help with problems whose solutions are clearly explained in the documentation, and persists in doing so after having been told to {RTFM}. KLBs are singled out for special treatment (i.e. ridicule), especially if they have been heard to say "It's so boring to read the manual! Why don't you just tell me?". The deepest pit in Hell is reserved for KLBs whose questions reveal total ignorance of the basic concepts (e.g., "How do I make a font in {Excel}?", "Where do I turn on my {RAM}?"), and who refuse to accept that their questions are neither simple nor well-formed. (1998-09-07)

Known Lazy Bastard ::: (abuse) (KLB) A term, used among technical support staff, for a user who repeatedly asks for help with problems whose solutions are clearly explained in the documentation, and persists in doing so after having been told to RTFM.KLBs are singled out for special treatment (i.e. ridicule), especially if they have been heard to say It's so boring to read the manual! Why don't you just Where do I turn on my RAM?), and who refuse to accept that their questions are neither simple nor well-formed. (1998-09-07)

Krishna’s colours ::: Violet is the colour of Krishna's face. It is also the radiance of Krishna’s protection. Blue is bis special and significant colour, the colour of his aura when he manifests ; that is why he is called Nila Kr^na.

Locke, John: (1632-1714) The first great British empiricist, denied the existence of innate ideas, categories, and moral principles. The mind at birth is a tabula rasa. Its whole content is derived from sense-experience, and constructed by reflection upon sensible data. Reflection is effected through memory and its attendant activities of contemplation, distinction, comparison in point of likeness and difference, and imaginative recompositon. Even the most abstract notions and ideas, like infinity, power, cause and effect, substance and identity, which seemingly are not given by experience, are no exceptions to the rule. Thus "infinity" confesses our inability to limit in fact or imagination the spatial and temporal extension of sense-experience; "substance," to perceive or understand why qualities congregate in separate clumps; "power" and "cause and effect," to perceive or understand why and how these clumps follow, and seemingly produce one another as they do, or for that matter, how our volitions "produce" the movements that put them into effect. Incidentally, Locke defines freedom as liberty, not of choice, which is always sufficiently motivated, but of action in accordance with choice. "Identity" of things, Locke derives from spatial and temporal continuity of the content of clumps of sensations; of structure, from continuity of arrangement in changing content; of person, from continuity of consciousness through memory, which, incidentally, permits of alternating personalities in the same body or of the transference of the same personality from one body to another.

lotus (as chakra) ::: Sri Aurobindo: "This arrangement of the psychic body is reproduced in the physical with the spinal column as a rod and the ganglionic centres as the chakras which rise up from the bottom of the column, where the lowest is attached, to the brain and find their summit in the brahmarandhra at the top of the skull. These chakras or lotuses, however, are in physical man closed or only partly open, with the consequence that only such powers and only so much of them are active in him as are sufficient for his ordinary physical life, and so much mind and soul only is at play as will accord with its need. This is the real reason, looked at from the mechanical point of view, why the embodied soul seems so dependent on the bodily and nervous life, — though the dependence is neither so complete nor so real as it seems. The whole energy of the soul is not at play in the physical body and life, the secret powers of mind are not awake in it, the bodily and nervous energies predominate. But all the while the supreme energy is there, asleep; it is said to be coiled up and slumbering like a snake, — therefore it is called the kundalinî sakti, — in the lowest of the chakras, in the mûlâdhâra.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

Macintosh user interface ::: (operating system) The graphical user interface used by Apple Computer's Macintosh family of personal computers, based on graphical representations of familiar office objects (sheets of paper, files, wastepaper bin, etc.) positioned on a two-dimensional desktop workspace.Programs and data files are represented on screen by small pictures (icons). An object is selected by moving a mouse over the real desktop which correspondingly moves the pointer on screen. When the pointer is over an icon on screen, the icon is selected by pressing the button on the mouse.A hierarchical file system is provided that lets a user drag a document (a file) icon into and out of a folder (directory) icon. Folders can also contain can icon. For people that are not computer enthusiasts, managing files on the Macintosh is easier than using the MS-DOS or Unix command-line interpreter.The Macintosh always displays a row of menu titles at the top of the screen. When a mouse button is pressed over a title, a pull-down menu appears below it. With the mouse button held down, the option within the menu is selected by pointing to it and then releasing the button.Unlike the IBM PC, which, prior to Microsoft Windows had no standard graphical user interface, Macintosh developers almost always conform to the Macintosh basic tasks are always performed in the same way. Apple also keeps technical jargon down to a minimum.Although the Macintosh user interface provides consistency; it does not make up for an application program that is not designed well. Not only must the for experienced typists, the mouse is a cumbersome substitute for well-designed keyboard commands, especially for intensive text editing.Urban legned has it that the Mac user interface was copied from Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center. Although it is true that Xerox's smalltalk had a GUI and which are now considered fundamental, such as dragging objects and pull-down menus with the mouse, were actually invented at Apple.Pull-down menus have become common on IBM, Commodore and Amiga computers. Microsoft Windows and OS/2 Presentation Manager, Digital Research's GEM, and operating environments also incorporate some or all of the desktop/mouse/icon features.Apple Computer have tried to prevent other companies from using some GUI concepts by taking legal action against them. It is because of such restrictive refused to support ports of their software to Apple machines, though this ban has now been lifted. [Why? When?] (1996-07-19)

Macintosh user interface "operating system" The {graphical user interface} used by {Apple Computer}'s {Macintosh} family of {personal computers}, based on graphical representations of familiar office objects (sheets of paper, files, wastepaper bin, etc.) positioned on a two-dimensional "{desktop}" workspace. Programs and data files are represented on screen by small pictures ({icons}). An object is selected by moving a {mouse} over the real desktop which correspondingly moves the {pointer} on screen. When the pointer is over an icon on screen, the icon is selected by pressing the button on the mouse. A {hierarchical file system} is provided that lets a user "{drag}" a document (a file) icon into and out of a {folder} (directory) icon. Folders can also contain other folders and so on. To delete a document, its icon is dragged into a {trash can} icon. For people that are not computer enthusiasts, managing files on the Macintosh is easier than using the {MS-DOS} or {Unix} {command-line interpreter}. The Macintosh always displays a row of menu titles at the top of the screen. When a mouse button is pressed over a title, a {pull-down menu} appears below it. With the mouse button held down, the option within the menu is selected by pointing to it and then releasing the button. Unlike the {IBM PC}, which, prior to {Microsoft Windows} had no standard {graphical user interface}, Macintosh developers almost always conform to the Macintosh interface. As a result, users are comfortable with the interface of a new program from the start even if it takes a while to learn all the rest of it. They know there will be a row of menu options at the top of the screen, and basic tasks are always performed in the same way. Apple also keeps technical jargon down to a minimum. Although the Macintosh user interface provides consistency; it does not make up for an {application program} that is not designed well. Not only must the application's menus be clear and understandable, but the locations on screen that a user points to must be considered. Since the mouse is the major selecting method on a Macintosh, mouse movement should be kept to a minimum. In addition, for experienced typists, the mouse is a cumbersome substitute for well-designed keyboard commands, especially for intensive text editing. {Urban legned} has it that the Mac user interface was copied from {Xerox}'s {Palo Alto Research Center}. Although it is true that Xerox's {smalltalk} had a GUI and Xerox introduced some GUI concepts commercially on the {Xerox Star} computer in 1981, and that {Steve Jobs} and members of the Mac and {Lisa} project teams visited PARC, Jef Raskin, who created the Mac project, points out that many GUI concepts which are now considered fundamental, such as dragging objects and pull-down menus with the mouse, were actually invented at Apple. {Pull-down menus} have become common on {IBM}, {Commodore} and {Amiga} computers. {Microsoft Windows} and {OS/2} {Presentation Manager}, {Digital Research}'s {GEM}, {Hewlett-Packard}'s {New Wave}, the {X Window System}, {RISC OS} and many other programs and operating environments also incorporate some or all of the desktop/mouse/icon features. {Apple Computer} have tried to prevent other companies from using some {GUI} concepts by taking legal action against them. It is because of such restrictive practises that organisations such as the {Free Software Foundation} previously refused to support ports of their software to Apple machines, though this ban has now been lifted. [Why? When?] (1996-07-19)

Madhav: “The brief perpetual sign refers to the Dawn. Now the dawn is always brief but why is it perpetual? Perpetual because it is constant, it comes again and again. …always at some point on earth there is the break of dawn. That is why it is a perpetual feature of this earth; the dawn recurs again and again.” Sat-Sang Vol. VIII

Madhav: “The powers that create and fashion this world in accordance with the Truth with which they are charged, are not involved, lost in the world-movement. They stand above, governing, shaping, directing the growing world-complex. They know precisely what takes place and why. They are not misled by appearances of phenomena; each event is seen by them as developing from its veiled cause which they perceive undeceived by apparent sequences on the surface.” Readings in Savitri, Vol. II.

Madhav: “This is a very important line. Name, secret name, name of a God, name of a Deity, name of the Divine, is a key to the Power, the qualities that are embodied in that Form. So, when that Name is uttered, all that Power, all that consciousness, is evoked. That is why the Seers keep this Name secret, give it only to those who are ready, who have been initiated, who have purified themselves.” The Book of the Divine Mother

Madhyamakahṛdaya. (T. Dbu ma'i snying po). In Sanskrit, "Essence of the Middle Way"; the major work of the sixth-century Indian MADHYAMAKA (and, from the Tibetan perspective, SVĀTANTRIKA) master BHĀVAVIVEKA (also referred to as Bhavya and Bhāviveka). The text is written in verse, accompanied by the author's extensive prose commentary, entitled the TARKAJVĀLĀ. The Madhyamakahṛdaya is preserved in both Sanskrit and Tibetan, the TARKAJVĀLĀ only in Tibetan. The work is in eleven chapters, the first three and the last two of which set forth the main points in Bhāvaviveka's view of the nature of reality and the Buddhist path, dealing with such topics as BODHICITTA, the knowledge of reality (tattvajNāna), and omniscience (SARVAJNĀTĀ). The intervening chapters set forth the positions (and Bhāvaviveka's refutations) of various Buddhist and non-Buddhist schools, including the sRĀVAKA, YOGĀCĀRA, SāMkhya, Vaisesika, Vedānta, and MīmāMsā. These chapters (along with sĀNTARAKsITA's TATTVASAMGRAHA) are a valuable source of insight into the relations between Madhyamaka and the other Indian philosophical schools of the day. The chapter on the srāvakas, for example, provides a detailed account of the reasons put forth by the mainstream Buddhist schools as to why the Mahāyāna SuTRAs are not the word of the Buddha. Bhāvaviveka's response to these charges, as well as his refutation of Yogācāra in the subsequent chapter, are particularly spirited.

magic ::: 1. As yet unexplained, or too complicated to explain; compare automagically and (Arthur C.) Clarke's Third Law: Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. magically computes the parity of an 8-bit byte in three instructions.2. Characteristic of something that works although no one really understands why (this is especially called black magic).3. (Stanford) A feature not generally publicised that allows something otherwise impossible or a feature formerly in that category but now unveiled.Compare wizardly, deep magic, heavy wizardry.For more about hackish magic see Magic Switch Story.4. magic number.[Jargon File](2001-03-19)

magic ::: 1. As yet unexplained, or too complicated to explain; compare automagically and (Arthur C.) Clarke's Third Law: Any sufficiently advanced technology isindistinguishable from magic. magically computes the parity of an 8-bit byte in three instructions.2. Characteristic of something that works although no one really understands why (this is especially called black magic).3. (Stanford) A feature not generally publicised that allows something otherwise impossible or a feature formerly in that category but now unveiled.Compare wizardly, deep magic, heavy wizardry.For more about hackish magic see Magic Switch Story.4. magic number.[Jargon File](2001-03-19)

magic 1. As yet unexplained, or too complicated to explain; compare {automagically} and (Arthur C.) Clarke's Third Law: Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. "TTY echoing is controlled by a large number of magic bits." "This routine magically computes the parity of an 8-bit byte in three instructions." 2. Characteristic of something that works although no one really understands why (this is especially called {black magic}). 3. (Stanford) A feature not generally publicised that allows something otherwise impossible or a feature formerly in that category but now unveiled. Compare {wizardly}, {deep magic}, {heavy wizardry}. For more about hackish "magic" see {Magic Switch Story}. 4. {magic number}. [{Jargon File}] (2001-03-19)

Mahālisutta. In Pāli, the "Discourse to Mahāli"; the sixth sutta of the DĪGHANIKĀYA (there is no equivalent recension in the Chinese translations of the ĀGAMAs); preached by the Buddha to the Licchavi chief Mahāli at the Kutāgārasālā in Vesāli (S. VAIsĀLĪ). Mahāli tells the Buddha that the ascetic Sunakkhatta claimed to be able to see heavenly forms but was not able to hear heavenly sounds. Mahāli asks whether such attainments are possible, whereupon the Buddha explains how through meditative absorption (P. JHĀNA; S. DHYĀNA) they indeed can be developed. He further explains to Mahāli that these supernatural powers are not the reason why people join the Buddhist order, but rather to attain the four degrees of sanctity, namely, those stream-enterer (P. sotāpanna; S. SROTAĀPANNA), once-returner (P. sakadagāmi; S. SAKṚDĀGĀMIN), nonreturner (P. anāgāmi; S. ANĀGĀMIN), and arahant (S. ARHAT). These are to be attained by following the noble eightfold path (P. ariyātthangikamagga; see S. AstĀnGIKAMĀRGA). The question is then raised as to whether the soul and body are the same or different. This leads to another discussion of Buddhist practice and attainments, beginning with taking refuge in the three jewels, observing the precepts, renouncing the world to become a Buddhist monk, and controlling the senses with mindfulness (P. sati; S. SMṚTI), to cultivating the four meditative absorptions (P. jhāna; S. dhyāna), and developing the six superknowledges (P. abhiNNā; S. ABHIJNĀ), which culminate in enlightenment and liberation from the cycle of rebirth.

Mallikā. [alt. Mālikā] (P. Mallikā; T. Ma li ka; C. Moli; J. Matsuri/Mari; K. Malli 末利). In Sanskrit and Pāli, "Jasmine"; a prominent disciple of the Buddha and the wife of King PRASENAJIT of KOsALA. She was the daughter of a lower-caste garland maker who one day offered the Buddha a basket of fermented rice, without knowing his identity. The Buddha predicted that day that she would become queen of Kosala, which indeed came true. Her faith in the Buddha led to her royal husband becoming a disciple of the Buddha, which occurred when she suggested that the king visit the Buddha to have him interpret some disturbing dreams he had had. Despite her lack of education, she gained extensive knowledge of the dharma from ĀNANDA, who visited the palace to teach. As queen, Mallikā was a generous supporter of the SAMGHA, sponsoring the construction of a hall, lined with ebony, that was used for sermons. In the Mallikāsutta, she asks the Buddha why some women are beautiful and some ugly, some rich and some poor, some powerful and some powerless. The Buddha explains that beauty is the result of gentleness and calmness, wealth is the result of generosity, and power is the result of a lack of envy. The commentary to the DHAMMAPADA (DHAMMAPADAttHAKATHĀ) relates a story in which Mallikā was mounted by her dog while drying herself after a bath. She allowed the dog to continue, not knowing that she was being observed by the king. When he accused her of bestiality, she lied, saying that the window in the bathhouse prevented one from seeing clearly. To prove her point, she told the king to go into the bathhouse. When he returned, she falsely accused him of having intercourse with a goat. As a result of these two misdeeds-the bestiality and the lie-after her death, she was reborn in the AVĪCI hell for seven days, a fact that the Buddha hid from her bereaved husband Prasenajit. After seven days, she was reborn in TUsITA, at which point the Buddha informed the king that his wife had been reborn in a divine realm. In the sRĪMĀLĀDEVĪSIMHANĀDASuTRA, Queen srīmālā is the daughter of Mallikā and Prasenajit.

MANKIND OF OUR PLANET The number of individuals counted among our planet's mankind, causalized here or transferred hither, amounts to some 60 thousand million. They are in the physical, emotional, mental, and causal worlds of our planet, most of them asleep in their causal envelopes - since they have no possibility of causal consciousness - pending a new incarnation. K 1.34.7

Of these, some 24 billion causalized (transmigrated from the animal to the human kingdom by acquiring causal envelopes of their own) in Lemuria, beginning in the year
21,686,420 B.C. The other 36 billion have been transferred to our planet at different turns. The causal envelopes of the latter are of very different ages. This explains why the individuals in mankind are at such widely different stages of development, and how it is that many have now passed to higher kingdoms.

Most generally, one can say that mankind&


Man ::: Man is in his essence a spark of the central kosmic spiritual fire. Man being an inseparable part of theuniverse of which he is the child -- the organism of graded consciousness and substance which thehuman constitution contains or rather is -- is a copy of the graded organism of consciousnesses andsubstances of the universe in its various planes of being, inner and outer, especially inner as being by farthe more important and larger, because causal.Human beings are one class of "young gods" incarnated in bodies of flesh at the present stage of theirown particular evolutionary journey. The human stage of evolution is about halfway between theundeveloped life-atom and the fully developed kosmic spirit or god.From another point of view, man is a sheaf or bundle of forces or energies. Force and matter, or spiritand substance being fundamentally one, hence, man is de facto a sheaf or bundle of matters of variousand differing grades of ethereality, or of substantiality; and so are all other entities and thingseverywhere.Man's nature, and the nature of the universe likewise, of which man is a reflection or microcosm or "littleworld," is composite of seven stages or grades or degrees of ethereality or of substantiality; or,kosmically speaking, of three generally inclusive degrees: gods, monads, and atoms. And so far as man isconcerned, we may take the New Testament division of the Christians, which gives the same triformconception of man, that he is composed of spirit, soul, body -- remembering, however, that all these threewords are generalizing terms.Man stands at the midway point of the evolutionary ladder of life: below him are the hosts of beings lessthan he is; above him are other hosts greater than he is only because older in experience, riper in wisdom,stronger in spiritual and in intellectual fiber and power. And these beings are such as they are because ofthe evolutionary unfoldment of the inherent faculties and powers immanent in the individuality of theinner god -- the ever-living, inner, individualized spirit.Man, then, like everything else -- entity or what is called "thing" -- is, to use the modern terminology ofphilosophical scientists, an "event," that is to say, the expression of a central consciousness-center ormonad passing through one or another particular phase of its long, long pilgrimage over and throughinfinity, and through eternity. This, therefore, is the reason why the theosophist often speaks of themonadic consciousness-center as the pilgrim of eternity.Man can be considered as a being composed of three essential upadhis or bases: first, the monadic ordivine-spiritual; second, that which is supplied by the Lords of Light, the so-called manasa-dhyanis,meaning the intellectual and intuitive side of man, the element-principle that makes man Man; and thethird upadhi we may call the vital-astral-physical.These three bases spring from three different lines of evolution, from three different and separatehierarchies of being. This is the reason why man is composite. He is not one sole and unmixed entity; heis a composite entity, a "thing" built up of various elements, and hence his principles are to a certainextent separable. Any one of these three bases can be temporarily separated from the two others withoutbringing about the death of the man physically. But the elements that go to form any one of these basescannot be separated without bringing about physical dissolution or inner dissolution.These three lines of evolution, these three aspects or qualities of man, come from three differenthierarchies or states, often spoken of as three different planes of being. The lowest comes from thevital-astral-physical earth, ultimately from the moon, our cosmogonic mother. The middle, the manasicor intellectualintuitional, from the sun. The monadic from the monad of monads, the supreme flower oracme, or rather the supreme seed of the universal hierarchy which forms our kosmical universe oruniversal kosmos.

Maya, are extraordinarily skilful ; the reason is an insufficient guide and often turns traitor ; vital desire is always with us tempting to follow any alluring call. This is the reason why in this yoga we insist so much on what we call samarpaifa — rather inadequately rendered by the English word surrender. If the heart centre is fully opened and the psychic is always in control, then there is no question ; all is safe. But the psychic can at any moment be veiled by a lower upsurge. It is only a few who are exempt from these dangers and it is precisely those to whom surrender is easily possible. The guidance of one who is himself, by identity or represents the Divine is in this difficult endeavour imperative and indispensable.

Megalithic monuments, more or less similar to Stonehenge, are found widely scattered over the globe, even in the wild Triobrand Islands near New Guinea. To know why such buildings were erected we should need far more knowledge than we have of the actual builders, their ideas and aims, and innumerable other conditions. The subject is connected with what is said about a lost science which could avail itself of the normal latent magical properties of stones.

MENTAL ENVELOPE The monad&

MENTAL LIBERATION FROM EMOTIONALITY During incarnation the emotional and mental envelopes coalesce so as to form, as it were, one single envelope from the functional point of view. Since the emotional is incomparably more developed, it completely dominates the mental. A prerequisite of liberating the mental from the dependence on the emotional is that the coalescence be discontinued. This also results in mental objective consciousness. The method will remain esoteric until mankind has become humanized. Until then, the lowest mental (47:7) can at best dominate the two lowest emotional ones (48:6,7) and the two lowest mental ones (47:6,7) the four lower emotional
(48:4-7). K 6.8.8

From this it follows that only 47:5, perspective thinking, can control the higher emotionality (48:2,3). This explains why the great majority of people have difficulty in discovering the untenability of fictions that appeal to wishful thinking.


Micro$oft "abuse, company" {Microsoft} written with a dollar sign, as though there was any doubt that they are a money-making enterprise. This little witticism was probably created before Microsoft's founder, {Bill Gates} established the philanthropic {Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation}. {Why I hate Microsoft (http://www.vanwensveen.nl/rants/microsoft/IhateMS.html)}. (2013-12-30)

Microeconomics ::: is the social science that studies the implications of individual human action, specifically about how those decisions affect the utilization and distribution of scarce resources. Microeconomics shows how and why different goods have different values, how individuals make more efficient or more productive decisions, and how individuals best coordinate and cooperate with one another. Generally speaking, microeconomics is considered a more complete, advanced and settled science than macroeconomics.

Motivation - Why employees want to work effectively for the business.

mudhead "games" A {MUD} player who eats, sleeps, and breathes MUD. Mudheads have been known to fail their degrees, drop out, etc. with the consolation, however, that they made wizard level. When encountered in person, on a MUD or in a chat system, all a mudhead will talk about is three topics: the tactic, character, or wizard that is supposedly always unfairly stopping him/her from becoming a wizard or beating a favourite MUD; why the specific game he/she has experience with is so much better than any other; and the MUD he or she is writing or going to write because his/her design ideas are so much better than in any existing MUD. See also {wannabee}. To the anthropologically literate, this term may recall the Zuni/Hopi legend of the mudheads or "koyemshi", mythical half-formed children of an unnatural union. Figures representing them act as clowns in Zuni sacred ceremonies. [{Jargon File}] (1994-11-29)

Music of the Spheres ::: Every sphere that runs its course in the abysmal depths of space sings a song as it passes along. Everylittle atom is attuned to a musical note. It is in constant movement, in constant vibration at speeds whichare incomprehensible to the ordinary brain-mind of man; and each such speed has its own numericalquantity, in other words its own numerical note, and therefore sings that note. This is called the music ofthe spheres, and if man had the power of spiritual clairaudience, the life surrounding him would be onegrand sweet song: his very body would be as it were a symphonic orchestra, singing some magnificent,incomprehensible, musical symphonic composition. The growth of a flower, for instance, would be like achanging melody running along from day to day; he could hear the grass grow, and understand why itgrows; he could hear the atoms sing and see their movements, and hear the unison of the songs of allindividual atoms, and the melodies that any physical body produces; and he would know what the stars intheir courses are constantly singing.

Nakulapitṛ and Nakulamātṛ. (P. Nakulapitā and Nakulamātā; T. Ne'u le'i pha, Ne'u le'i ma; C. Nayouluo fu, Nuoguluo zhangzhe mu; J. Naura fu, Nakora choja mo; K. Naura pu, Nakkora changja mo 那憂羅父, 諾酤羅長者母). In Sanskrit, "Nakula's Father" and "Nakula's Mother"; lay followers of the Buddha, declared by him to be foremost among laypersons who are intimate companions. According to the Pāli account, they were a married couple who lived in the village of SuMsumāragiri in Bhagga country. Once on a visit to their village, the Buddha was staying at a grove called Bhesakalāvana. The couple went to pay their respects and, upon seeing the Buddha, immediately fell at his feet, calling him their son and asking why he had been away so long. This spontaneous reaction was a consequence of their past existences: for five hundred lifetimes they had been the Buddha's parents, and for many more lives they were his close relatives. The Buddha preached to them, and they immediately became stream-enterers (sotāpanna; S. SROTAĀPANNA). Once when Nakulapitā was gravely ill, he began to fret about the fate of his wife and family, should he die. Nakulamātā, noticing his condition, consoled him in such a way that his anxiety was removed and he recovered his health. Later, he recounted what had transpired to the Buddha, who congratulated him on his wife's good qualities. Nakulapitā's conversations with the Buddha are recorded in the Pāli SAMYUTTANIKĀYA. The Buddha again visited their village many years later when the couple was old. They invited him to their home for his morning meal. There, they related to him their devotion to one another and asked for a teaching that would keep them together through their future lives. It was on the basis of this discussion that the Buddha declared Nakulapitā and Nakulamātā foremost among those who live intimately. In a former life, Nakulapitā had resolved to attain this type of preeminence: during the time of the buddha Padumuttara, as a householder in the city of HaMsavatī, he overheard the Buddha praise a lay couple for their intimacy.

no why to its action ; it acts in a particular way because it as

Nyquist Theorem "communications" A theorem stating that when an {analogue} waveform is digitised, only the frequencies in the waveform below half the {sampling frequency} will be recorded. In order to reconstruct (interpolate) a signal from a sequence of samples, sufficient samples must be recorded to capture the peaks and troughs of the original waveform. If a waveform is sampled at less than twice its frequency the reconstructed waveform will effectively contribute only {noise}. This phenomenon is called "aliasing" (the high frequencies are "under an alias"). This is why the best digital audio is sampled at 44,000 Hz - twice the average upper limit of human hearing. The Nyquist Theorem is not specific to digitised signals (represented by discrete amplitude levels) but applies to any sampled signal (represented by discrete time values), not just sound. {Nyquist (http://geocities.com/bioelectrochemistry/nyquist.htm)} (the man, somewhat inaccurate). (2003-10-21)

Nyquist Theorem ::: (communications) A theorem stating that when an analogue waveform is digitised, only the frequencies in the waveform below half the sampling noise. This phenomenon is called aliasing (the high frequencies are under an alias).This is why the best digital audio is sampled at 44,000 Hz - twice the average upper limit of human hearing.The Nyquist Theorem is not specific to digitised signals (represented by discrete amplitude levels) but applies to any sampled signal (represented by discrete time values), not just sound. (the man, somewhat inaccurate).(2003-10-21)

Ouyi Zhixu. (J. Goyaku/Guyaku Chigyoku; K. Uik Chiuk 益智旭) (1599-1655). One of the four eminent monks (si da gaoseng) of the late-Ming dynasty, along with YUNQI ZHUHONG (1535-1615), HANSHAN DEQING (1546-1623), and DAGUAN ZHENKE (1543-1604); renowned for his mastery of a wide swath of Confucian and Buddhist teachings, particularly those associated with the TIANTAI, PURE LAND, and CHAN traditions. In his youth, he studied Confucianism and despised Buddhism, even writing anti-Buddhist tracts. He had a change of heart at the age of seventeen, after reading some of Zhuhong's writings, and burned his previous screeds. According to his autobiography, Zhixu had his first "great awakening" at the age of nineteen while reading the line in the Lunyu ("Confucian Analects") that "the whole world will submit to benevolence" if one restrains oneself and returns to ritual. After his father's death that same year, he fully committed himself to Buddhism, reading sutras and performing recollection of the Buddha's name (NIANFO) until he finally was ordained under the guidance of Xueling (d.u.), a disciple of Hanshan Deqing, at the age of twenty-four. At that time, he began to read extensively in YOGĀCĀRA materials and had another great awakening through Chan meditation, in which he experienced body, mind, and the outer world suddenly disappearing. He next turned his attention to the bodhisattva precepts and the study of vinaya. Following his mother's death when he was twenty-seven, Zhixu rededicated himself to Chan meditation, but after a serious illness he turned to pure land teachings. In his early thirties, he devoted himself to the study of Tiantai materials, through which he attempted to integrate his previous research in Buddhism and began to write commentaries and treaties on Buddhist scriptures and on such Confucian classics as the Zhouyi ("Book of Changes"). In the late-sixteenth century, Jesuit missionaries such as Michele Ruggieri (1543-1607) and Matteo Ricci (1552-1610) had reintroduced Christianity to China and sought "to complement Confucianism and to replace Buddhism." This emerging religious challenge led Zhixu to publish his Bixie ji ("Collected Essays Refuting Heterodoxy") as a critique of the teachings of Christianity, raising specifically the issue of theodicy (i.e., why a benevolent and omnipotent god would allow evil to appear in the world); Zhixu advocates instead that good and evil come from human beings and are developed and overcome respectively through personal cultivation. After another illness at the age of fifty-six, his later years were focused mostly on pure land teachings and practice. In distinction to Japanese pure land teachers, such as HoNEN (1133-1212) and SHINRAN (1173-1262), who emphasized exclusively Amitābha's "other-power" (C. tali; J. TARIKI), Zhixu, like most other Chinese pure land teachers, advocated the symbiosis between the other-power of Amitābha and the "self-power" (C. jiri; J. JIRIKI) of the practitioner. This perspective is evident in his equal emphasis on the three trainings in meditation (Chan), doctrine (jiao), and precepts (lü) (cf. TRIsIKsĀ). Ouyi's oeuvre numbers some sixty-two works in 230 rolls, including treatises and commentaries on works ranging from Tiantai, to Chan, to Yogācāra, to pure land. His pure land writings have been especially influential, and his Amituojing yaojie ("Essential Explanations" on the AMITĀBHASuTRA) and Jingtu shiyao ("Ten Essentials on the Pure Land") are regarded as integral to the modern Chinese Pure Land tradition.

Overmind ::: Above the mind there are several levels of conscious of the Truth. But in between is what he has distinguished as the Overmind, the world of the cosmic Gods. Now it is this Overmind that has up to the present governed our world: it is the highest that man has been able to attain in illumined consciousness. It has been taken for the Supreme Divine and all those who have reached it have never for a moment doubted that they have touched the true Spirit. For, its splendours are so great to the ordinary human consciousness that it is absolutely dazzled into believing that here at last is the crowning reality. And yet the fact is that the Overmind is far below the true Divine. It is not the authentic home of the Truth. It is only the domain of the formateurs , all those creative powers and deities to whom men have bowed down since the beginning of history. And the reason why the true Divine has not manifested and transformed the earth-nature is precisely that the Overmind has been mistaken for the Supermind.being, among which the really divine world is what Sri Aurobindo has called the Supermind, the world. The cosmic Gods do not wholly live in the Truth-Consciousness: they are only in touch with it and represent, each of them, an aspect of its glories.

OWHY "language" An early {functional language}(?). ["A Type-Theoretical Alternative to CUCH, ISWIM, OWHY", Dana Scott, Oxford U 1969]. (1995-01-19)

OWHY ::: (language) An early functional language(?).[A Type-Theoretical Alternative to CUCH, ISWIM, OWHY, Dana Scott, Oxford U 1969]. (1995-01-19)

Padma gsal. (Pemasel) (fl. c. eighth century). The daughter of the Tibetan King KHRI SRONG LDE BTSAN, to whom PADMASAMBHAVA entrusted a lineage of RDZOGS CHEN instructions known as MKHA' 'GRO SNYING THIG. She died at the age of eight. When the Tibetan king brought her body before the Indian master at the Brag dmar ke'u tshang (Drakmar Ke'utsang) cave at CHIMS PHU, he asked why someone with the great merit to be both a princess and a disciple of Padmasambhava had to die while still a child. The Indian master revealed she had been a bee who stung one of the four brothers involved in the completion of the great BODHNĀTH STuPA. Thereafter Padmasambhava miraculously revived her, transmitted the instructions of the Mkha 'gro snying thig, and prophesied that she would reveal the teachings as a treasure (GTER MA) in a future rebirth as PADMA LAS 'BREL RTSAL. Some traditions describe a lineage of five pure incarnations of the royal princess Padma gsal (lha lcam padma gsal gyi dag pa'i skye ba lnga), including several important lamas of the RNYING MA sect of Tibetan Buddhism:

pamful, first, because it is obscure and docs not understand and, secondly, because there arc parts of it that want to be left to their crude notions and not to change. That is why the inter- vention of a psychic attitude is so heJpfuI. For the psychic has the happy confidence, the ready understanding and response, the spontaneous surrender ; it knows that the touch of the Guru is meant to help and not to hurt, or, like Radha in the poem, that whatever the Beloved does is meant to lead to the Divine

Panic_selling ::: refers to wide-scale selling of an investment, causing a sharp decline in price. In most instances of panic selling, investors just want to get out of the investment, with little regard for the price at which they sell.  BREAKING DOWN 'Panic Selling'   Panic selling can be caused by various factors. It can also range in severity. In some instances, panic selling may also be known as a selloff.  Panic Selling Catalysts  Panic selling is often triggered by an event that significantly decreases investor confidence in a stock. Events can be related to a variety of factors including sales growth, revenue levels, earnings, management changes or decisions, and more. Initial selling of an investment is typically triggered by decreased strength in its fundamentals. Further losses can accumulate from price point levels that trigger programmed market trading from stop loss orders. (See also: How to Profit from Panic Selling) A significant factor in panic selling can be irrational exuberance or highly emotional trading. These trades can be driven by fear, market sentiment and overreaction to news that may only have short-term affects.  Most major stock exchanges will use trading curbs and halts to limit panic selling. This allows people to digest information on why the selling is occurring. It also limits the downside losses an investor can incur in a single day and restores some degree of normalcy to the market.  Financial Market Selloffs  Selloffs are also a common occurrence in the financial markets that may be typically less severe than dramatic panic selling. In a selloff a particular sector may see widespread selling due to the negative press from only a few companies. Selloffs also occur broadly across the market when trends in various asset classes are reported. For example, higher yielding Treasuries can lead to a selloff in equities.  Opportunities in Losses  In some cases, panic selling and broad market selloffs can create buying opportunities. This is especially true when selling is caused by short-term indicators or uncertainty. Markets are often extremely volatile and views on unfolding events can alter the outlook drastically from day to day.  Many market traders watch for selling opportunities that may make the investment more attractive at its lower price. In technical analysis, the Exhausted Selling Model is one technique traders can use to identify the price trading trough for which a reversal is likely to follow. Prices will go through a number of phases as they descend from panic selling so this model relies on following a stock’s downward trend and skillfully identifying the trough buying opportunity.

Pascal "language" (After the French mathematician {Blaise Pascal} (1623-1662)) A programming language designed by {Niklaus Wirth} around 1970. Pascal was designed for simplicity and for teaching programming, in reaction to the complexity of {ALGOL 68}. It emphasises {structured programming} constructs, data structures and {strong typing}. Innovations included {enumeration types}, {subranges}, sets, {variant records}, and the {case statement}. Pascal has been extremely influential in programming language design and has a great number of variants and descendants. ANSI/IEEE770X3.97-1993 is very similar to {ISO Pascal} but does not include {conformant arrays}. ISO 7185-1983(E). Level 0 and Level 1. Changes from Jensen & Wirth's Pascal include name equivalence; names must be bound before they are used; loop index must be local to the procedure; formal procedure parameters must include their arguments; {conformant array schemas}. An ALGOL-descended language designed by Niklaus Wirth on the CDC 6600 around 1967--68 as an instructional tool for elementary programming. This language, designed primarily to keep students from shooting themselves in the foot and thus extremely restrictive from a general-purpose-programming point of view, was later promoted as a general-purpose tool and, in fact, became the ancestor of a large family of languages including Modula-2 and {Ada} (see also {bondage-and-discipline language}). The hackish point of view on Pascal was probably best summed up by a devastating (and, in its deadpan way, screamingly funny) 1981 paper by Brian Kernighan (of {K&R} fame) entitled "Why Pascal is Not My Favourite Programming Language", which was turned down by the technical journals but circulated widely via photocopies. It was eventually published in "Comparing and Assessing Programming Languages", edited by Alan Feuer and Narain Gehani (Prentice-Hall, 1984). Part of his discussion is worth repeating here, because its criticisms are still apposite to Pascal itself after ten years of improvement and could also stand as an indictment of many other bondage-and-discipline languages. At the end of a summary of the case against Pascal, Kernighan wrote: 9. There is no escape This last point is perhaps the most important. The language is inadequate but circumscribed, because there is no way to escape its limitations. There are no casts to disable the type-checking when necessary. There is no way to replace the defective run-time environment with a sensible one, unless one controls the compiler that defines the "standard procedures". The language is closed. People who use Pascal for serious programming fall into a fatal trap. Because the language is impotent, it must be extended. But each group extends Pascal in its own direction, to make it look like whatever language they really want. Extensions for {separate compilation}, Fortran-like COMMON, string data types, internal static variables, initialisation, {octal} numbers, bit operators, etc., all add to the utility of the language for one group but destroy its portability to others. I feel that it is a mistake to use Pascal for anything much beyond its original target. In its pure form, Pascal is a toy language, suitable for teaching but not for real programming. Pascal has since been almost entirely displaced (by {C}) from the niches it had acquired in serious applications and systems programming, but retains some popularity as a hobbyist language in the {MS-DOS} and {Macintosh} worlds. See also {Kamin's interpreters}, {p2c}. ["The Programming Language Pascal", N. Wirth, Acta Informatica 1:35-63, 1971]. ["PASCAL User Manual and Report", K. Jensen & N. Wirth, Springer 1975] made significant revisions to the language. [BS 6192, "Specification for Computer Programming Language Pascal", {British Standards Institute} 1982]. [{Jargon File}] (1996-06-12)

Philosophy ::: An operation of the human spirit-mind in its endeavor to understand not merely the how of things, but thewhy of things -- why and how things are as they are. Philosophy is one phase of a triform method ofunderstanding the nature of nature, of universal nature, and of its multiform and multifold workings, andphilosophy cannot be separated from the other two phases (science and religion), if we wish to gain atrue and complete picture of things as they are in themselves. It is a capital mistake of Western thought tosuppose that science, religion, and philosophy are three separate and unrelated operations of thought. Theidea when pondered upon is immediately seen to be ludicrously false, because all these three are butphases of operations of human consciousness. Not one of these three -- philosophy, religion, or science -can be divorced from the other two, and if the attempt be made so to divorce them, the result is spiritualand intellectual dissatisfaction, and the mind senses an incompleteness. Consequently any philosophywhich is unscientific and irreligious, or any religion which is unscientific and unphilosophical, and anyscience which is unphilosophical and unreligious, is de facto erroneous because incomplete. These threeare simply three aspects or phases of a fundamental reality which is consciousness.Philosophy is that aspect of the human consciousness which is correlative, and which seeks the bonds ofunion among things and exposes them, when found, as existing in the manifold and diverse forms ofnatural processes and the so-called laws which demonstrate their existence. (See also Religion, Science)

Phra Malai. (P. Māleyya). A legendary arahant (S. ARHAT) and one of the most beloved figures in Thai Buddhist literature. According to legend, Phra Malai lived on the island of Sri Lanka and was known for his great compassion and supramundane abilities, including the power to fly to various realms of the Buddhist universe. On one of his visits to the hells, he alleviated the suffering of hell beings and then returned to the human realm to advise their relatives to make merit on their behalf. One day as he was on his alms round, he encountered a poor man who presented him with eight lotus blossoms. Phra Malai accepted the offering and then took the flowers to tāvatimsa (S. TRĀYASTRIMsA) heaven to present them at the Culāmani cetiya (S. caitya), where the hair relic of the Buddha is enshrined. Phra Malai then met the king of the gods, INDRA, and asked him various questions: why he had built the caitya, when the future buddha Metteya (S. MAITREYA) would come to pay respects to it, and how the other deities coming to worship had made sufficient merit to be reborn at such a high level. The conversation proceeded as one divinity after another arrived, with Indra's explanation of the importance of making merit by practicing DĀNA (generosity), observing the precepts and having faith. Eventually Metteya himself arrived and, after paying reverence to the chedi, asked Phra Malai about the people in the human realm. Phra Malai responded that there is great diversity in their living conditions, health, happiness, and spiritual faculties, but that they all hoped to meet Metteya in the future and hear him preach. Metteya in response told Phra Malai to tell those who wished to meet him to listen to the recitation of the entire VESSANTARA-JĀTAKA over the course of one day and one night, and to bring to the monastery offerings totaling a thousand flowers, candles, incense sticks, balls of rice, and other gifts. In the northern and northeastern parts of Thailand, this legend is recited in the local dialects (Lānnā Thai and Lao, respectively) as a preface to the performance or recitation of the Vessantara-Jātaka at an annual festival. In central and south Thailand, a variant of the legend emphasizing the suffering of the hell denizens was customarily recited at funeral wakes, a practice that is becoming less common in the twenty-first century.

Physical Sequential "file format" (PS, QSAM, Queued Sequential Access Method) The simplest {data set} on an {IBM} {mainframe}. Sequential files can only be read or written from the beginning: they do not support {random access}. [Why "Queued"?] (2003-12-05)

Physical Sequential ::: (file format) (PS, QSAM, Queued Sequential Access Method) The simplest data set on an IBM mainframe. Sequential files can only be read or written from the beginning: they do not support random access.[Why Queued?](2003-12-05)

Pieh Mo: Neo-Mohists; heretical Mohists. See Mo che and Chinese philosophy. Pien: Argumentation or dialectics, which "is to make clear the distinction between right and wrong, to ascertain the principles of order and disorder, to make clear the points of similarity and difference, to examine the laws of names and actualities, to determine what is beneficial and what is harmful, and to decide what is uncertain and doubtful. It describes the ten thousand things as they are, and discusses the various opinions in their comparative merits. It uses names to specify actualities, propositions to express ideas, and explanations to set forth reasons, including or excluding according to classes." It involves seven methods: "The method of possibility is to argue from what is not exhausted. The method of hypothesis is to argue from what is not actual at present. The method of imitation is to provide a model. What is imitated is taken as the model. If the reason agrees with the model, it is correct. If it does not agree with the model, it is incorrect. This is the method of imitation. The method of comparison is to make clear about one thing by means of another. The method of parallel is to compare two propositions consistently throughout. The method of analogy says, 'You are so. Why should I not be so?" The method of induction is to grant what has not been accepted on the basis of its similarity to what has already been accepted. For example, when it is said that all the others are the same, how can I say that the others are different?" (Neo-Mohism.) -- W.T.C.

Pindola-Bhāradvāja. (T. Bha ra dhwa dza Bsod snyoms len; C. Bintoulu Poluoduo zunzhe; J. Binzuruharada sonja; K. Pinduro Pallat'a chonja 賓頭盧頗羅墮尊者). Sanskrit and Pāli proper name of a prominent monk-disciple of the Buddha, born as the son of a brāhmana priest in the service of King Udāyana of Kausāmbī. He was a successful teacher of the Vedas, first encountering the Buddha when his travels took him to RĀJAGṚHA. Gluttonous by nature, he was impressed by all the offerings the Buddha's disciples received and so resolved to enter the order. For this reason, he carried with him an exceptionally large alms bowl (PĀTRA) made from a gourd. After he was finally able to conquer his avarice, he became an ARHAT and uttered his "lion's roar" (SIMHANĀDA) in the presence of the Buddha, for which reason he was declared the foremost lion's roarer (siMhanādin) among the Buddha's disciples. In a famous story found in several recensions of the VINAYA, the Buddha rebuked Pindola for performing the following miracle before a crowd. A rich merchant had placed a valuable sandalwood alms bowl (pātra) atop a pole and challenged any mendicant to retrieve it with a magical display. Encouraged by MAHĀMAUDGALYĀYANA, Pindola entered the contest and used his magical powers to rise into the air and retrieve the bowl. The Buddha rebuked Pindola for his crass exhibitionism, and ordered that the bowl be ground into sandalwood powder (presumably for incense). The incident was the occasion for the Buddha to pass the "rule of defeat" (PĀRĀJIKA), forbidding monks from displaying supernatural powers before the laity. Sanskrit sources state that the Buddha rebuked Pindola for his misdeed and ordered him not to live in JAMBUDVĪPA, but to move to aparagodānīya (see GODĀNĪYA) to proselytize (where he is said to reside with a thousand disciples). The Buddha also forbade him from entering PARINIRVĀnA so that he would remain in the world after the Buddha's demise and continue to serve as a field of blessings (PUnYAKsETRA) for sentient beings; for this reason, Pindola is also known in Chinese as the "World-Dwelling Arhat" (Zhushi Luohan). This is the reason why some traditions still today invoke his name for protection and why he is traditionally listed as the first of the sixteen ARHAT elders (sOdAsASTHAVIRA), who are charged by the Buddha with protecting his dispensation until the advent of the next buddha, MAITREYA. According to the DIVYĀVADĀNA, Pindola was given the principal seat at the third Buddhist council (SAMGĪTI) called by Emperor AsOKA (see COUNCIL, THIRD); at that point, he was already several hundred years old, with long white hair and eyebrows that he had to hold back in order to see. In China, DAO'AN of the Eastern Jin dynasty once had a dream of a white-haired foreign monk, with long, flowing eyebrows. Later, Master Dao'an's disciple LUSHAN HUIYUAN read the SARVĀSTIVĀDA VINAYA and realized that the monk whom his teacher had dreamed about was Pindola. From that point on, Dao'an offered Pindola food every day, and, for this reason, a picture or image of Pindola is often enshrined in monastic dining halls in China. This is also why Pindola was given another nickname in Chinese, the "Long-Browed Monk" (Changmei Seng). In CHANYUE GUANXIU's standard Chinese depiction of the sixteen arhats, Pindola-Bharadvāja is portrayed as squatting on a rock, holding a staff in his left hand, leaning on a rock with his right, with a text placed on his knees. In Tibetan iconography Pindola holds a pātra; other East Asian images depict him holding a text and either a chowrie (C. FUZI; S. VĀLAVYAJANA) or a pātra.

plea ::: n. --> That which is alleged by a party in support of his cause; in a stricter sense, an allegation of fact in a cause, as distinguished from a demurrer; in a still more limited sense, and in modern practice, the defendant&

Polar Cells, Polar Globules, or Polar Bodies Two minute cells thrown off by the unfertilized ovum in its process of maturation. Blavatsky speaks of the first stages of a germ-cell’s development when the nuclear changes include the formation of double cone or spindle “within the cell. This spindle approaches the surface of the cell, and one half of it is extruded in the form of what are called the ‘polar cells.’ These polar cells now die, and the embryo develops from the growth and segmentation of the remaining part of the nucleus which is nourished by the substance of the cell. Then why could not beings have lived thus, and been created in this way — at the very beginning of human and mammalian evolution” The death of the polar cells “would now correspond to the change introduced by the separation of the sexes, when gestation in utero, i.e., within the cell, became the rule” (SD 2:117).

Powers undivine in their nature present themselves as the Sup- reme Lord or as the Divine Mother and claim the being’s service and surrender. 1C these (hiags are accepted, there will be an extremely disastrous consequence. If indeed there is the assent of the sSdhaka to the Divine working alone and the submission or surrender to that guidance, then all can go smoothly. This assent and a rejection of all egoistic force or forces that appeal to the ego are the safeguard throughout the sadhana. But the ways of nature are full of snares, the disguises of the ego are innumerable, the ilfusions of the Powers of Darkness, Rakshasi Maya, are e.ttraordinariIy skilful ; the reason is an insulBdent guide and often turns traitor; vital desire is ahvays with us tempting to follow any alluring call. This is the reason why in this Yoga we insist so much on what we call samarpana — rather inade- quately rendered by the Engikh word surrender. If the heart centre is fully opened and the psychic is always in control, then there is no question ; all fe Safe. But the psychic can at any moment be veiled by a lower upsurge. It is only a few who arc exempt from these dangers and it is precisely those to whom surrender is easily possible. The guidance of one who is himself

prahānasālā. (T. spong khang; C. chanfang; J. zenbo; K. sonpang 禪房/禪坊). In Sanskrit, lit. "hall for religious exertion"; a "meditation hall." Prescriptions as to how and why to build such a structure are found in various literary sources, but most often in the VINAYA. For example, in the MuLASARVĀSTIVĀDA VINAYA, the Buddha orders a prahānasālā built so that monks will have some degree of privacy during their meditative practice. In the Abhisamācārikā Dharmāḥ, the Buddha lists the prahānasālā as an appropriate place for the bimonthly confession and recitation of precepts (UPOsADHA) and explains how the hall is to be maintained from day to day. See also SENGTANG.

Pranava (Sanskrit) Praṇava [from pra-ṇu to utter a droning or humming sound, as during the proper pronunciation of the word Om or Aum] The mystical, sacred syllable Om or Aum, pronounced by Brahmins, Yogis, and others during meditation. In Vedanta philosophy and the Upanishads, used in another sense: “In one sense Pranava represents the macrocosm and in another sense the microcosm. . . . The reason why this Pranava is called Vach is this, that these four principles of the great cosmos correspond to these four forms of Vach” (N on G 25, 26) — vaikhari, madhyama, pasyanti, para. These are called the four matras of pranava.

Principle of sufficient reason: According to Leibniz, one of the two principles on which reasoning is founded, the other being the principle of Contradiction. While the latter is the ground of all necessary truths, the Principle of Sufficient Reason is the ground of all contingent and factual truths. It applies especially to existents, possible or factual, hence its two forms actual sufficient reasons, like the actual volitions of God or of the free creatures, are those determined by the perception of the good and exhibit themselves as final causes involving the good, and possible sufficient reasons are involved, for example, in the perception of evil as a possible aim to achieve. Leibniz defines the Principle of Sufficient Reason as follows: It is the principle "in virtue of which we judge that no fact can be found true or existent, no judgment veritable, unless there is a sufficient reason why it should be so and not otherwise, although these reasons cannot more than often be known to us. . . . There must be a sufficient reason for contingent truths or truths of fact, that is, for the sequence of things which are dispersed throughout the universe of created beings, in which the resolution into particular reasons might go into endless detail" (Monadology, 31, 32, 33, 36). And again, "Nothing happens without a sufficient reason; that is nothing happens without its being possible for one who should know things sufficiently to give a reason showing why things are so and not otherwise" (Principles of Nature and of Grace). It seems that the account given by Leibniz of this principle is not satisfactory in itself, in spite of the wide use he made of it in his philosophy. Many of his disciples vainly attempted to reduce it to the Principle of Contradiction. See Wolff.

psyton "humour" /si:'ton/ (From {TMRC}) The elementary particle carrying the sinister force. The probability of a process losing is proportional to the number of psytons falling on it. Psytons are generated by observers, which is why demos are more likely to fail when lots of people are watching. This term appears to have been largely superseded by {bogon}; see also {quantum bogodynamics}. (1997-04-26)

psyton ::: (humour) /si:'ton/ (From TMRC) The elementary particle carrying the sinister force. The probability of a process losing is proportional to the why demos are more likely to fail when lots of people are watching. This term appears to have been largely superseded by bogon; see also quantum bogodynamics. (1997-04-26)

quote :::The religious activity of the Sufi Movement is called the Universal Worship, or the Church of All. Why is it so named? Because it contains all different ways of worship and all Churches...

real operating system ::: (operating system, abuse) The sort the speaker is used to. People from the BSDophilic academic community are likely to issue comments like System V? a *real* operating system?, and people from IBM object Unix? Why don't you use a *real* operating system?See holy wars, religious issues, proprietary, Get a real computer!.[Jargon File] (1997-03-12)

real operating system "operating system, abuse" The sort the speaker is used to. People from the {BSD}ophilic academic community are likely to issue comments like "{System V}? Why don't you use a *real* operating system?", people from the commercial/industrial {Unix} sector are known to complain "BSD? Why don't you use a *real* operating system?", and people from {IBM} object "Unix? Why don't you use a *real* operating system?" See {holy wars}, {religious issues}, {proprietary}, {Get a real computer!}. [{Jargon File}] (1997-03-12)

Real Programmers Don't Use Pascal ::: (humour) Back in the good old days - the Golden Era of computers, it was easy to separate the men from the boys (sometimes called Real Men and out that Real Men don't relate to anything, and aren't afraid of being impersonal.)But, as usual, times change. We are faced today with a world in which little old ladies can get computers in their microwave ovens, 12-year-old kids can blow danger of becoming extinct, of being replaced by high-school students with TRASH-80s.There is a clear need to point out the differences between the typical high-school junior Pac-Man player and a Real Programmer. If this difference is why it would be a mistake to replace the Real Programmers on their staff with 12-year-old Pac-Man players (at a considerable salary savings).LANGUAGESThe easiest way to tell a Real Programmer from the crowd is by the programming language he (or she) uses. Real Programmers use Fortran. Quiche Eaters use need all these abstract concepts to get their jobs done - they are perfectly happy with a keypunch, a Fortran IV compiler, and a beer.Real Programmers do List Processing in Fortran.Real Programmers do String Manipulation in Fortran.Real Programmers do Accounting (if they do it at all) in Fortran.Real Programmers do Artificial Intelligence programs in Fortran.If you can't do it in Fortran, do it in assembly language. If you can't do it in assembly language, it isn't worth doing.STRUCTURED PROGRAMMINGThe academics in computer science have gotten into the structured programming rut over the past several years. They claim that programs are more easily in the world won't help you solve a problem like that - it takes actual talent. Some quick observations on Real Programmers and Structured Programming:Real Programmers aren't afraid to use GOTOs.Real Programmers can write five-page-long DO loops without getting confused.Real Programmers like Arithmetic IF statements - they make the code more interesting.Real Programmers write self-modifying code, especially if they can save 20 nanoseconds in the middle of a tight loop.Real Programmers don't need comments - the code is obvious.Since Fortran doesn't have a structured IF, REPEAT ... UNTIL, or CASE statement, Real Programmers don't have to worry about not using them. Besides, they can be simulated when necessary using assigned GOTOs.Data Structures have also gotten a lot of press lately. Abstract Data Types, Structures, Pointers, Lists, and Strings have become popular in certain circles. Languages, as we all know, have implicit typing based on the first letter of the (six character) variable name.OPERATING SYSTEMSWhat kind of operating system is used by a Real Programmer? CP/M? God forbid - CP/M, after all, is basically a toy operating system. Even little old ladies and grade school students can understand and use CP/M.Unix is a lot more complicated of course - the typical Unix hacker never can remember what the PRINT command is called this week - but when it gets right systems: they send jokes around the world on UUCP-net and write adventure games and research papers.No, your Real Programmer uses OS 370. A good programmer can find and understand the description of the IJK305I error he just got in his JCL manual. A great outstanding programmer can find bugs buried in a 6 megabyte core dump without using a hex calculator. (I have actually seen this done.)OS is a truly remarkable operating system. It's possible to destroy days of work with a single misplaced space, so alertness in the programming staff is people claim there is a Time Sharing system that runs on OS 370, but after careful study I have come to the conclusion that they were mistaken.PROGRAMMING TOOLSWhat kind of tools does a Real Programmer use? In theory, a Real Programmer could run his programs by keying them into the front panel of the computer. Back the first operating system for the CDC7600 in on the front panel from memory when it was first powered on. Seymore, needless to say, is a Real Programmer.One of my favorite Real Programmers was a systems programmer for Texas Instruments. One day he got a long distance call from a user whose system had includes a keypunch and lineprinter in his toolkit, he can get along with just a front panel and a telephone in emergencies.In some companies, text editing no longer consists of ten engineers standing in line to use an 029 keypunch. In fact, the building I work in doesn't contain a system is called SmallTalk, and would certainly not talk to the computer with a mouse.Some of the concepts in these Xerox editors have been incorporated into editors running on more reasonably named operating systems - Emacs and VI being two. The the Real Programmer wants a you asked for it, you got it text editor - complicated, cryptic, powerful, unforgiving, dangerous. TECO, to be precise.It has been observed that a TECO command sequence more closely resembles transmission line noise than readable text [4]. One of the more entertaining will probably destroy your program, or even worse - introduce subtle and mysterious bugs in a once working subroutine.For this reason, Real Programmers are reluctant to actually edit a program that is close to working. They find it much easier to just patch the binary object Programmer to do the job - no Quiche Eating structured programmer would even know where to start. This is called job security.Some programming tools NOT used by Real Programmers:Fortran preprocessors like MORTRAN and RATFOR. The Cuisinarts of programming - great for making Quiche. See comments above on structured programming.Source language debuggers. Real Programmers can read core dumps.Compilers with array bounds checking. They stifle creativity, destroy most of the interesting uses for EQUIVALENCE, and make it impossible to modify the operating system code with negative subscripts. Worst of all, bounds checking is inefficient.Source code maintenance systems. A Real Programmer keeps his code locked up in a card file, because it implies that its owner cannot leave his important programs unguarded [5].THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT WORKWhere does the typical Real Programmer work? What kind of programs are worthy of the efforts of so talented an individual? You can be sure that no Real or sorting mailing lists for People magazine. A Real Programmer wants tasks of earth-shaking importance (literally!).Real Programmers work for Los Alamos National Laboratory, writing atomic bomb simulations to run on Cray I supercomputers.Real Programmers work for the National Security Agency, decoding Russian transmissions.It was largely due to the efforts of thousands of Real Programmers working for NASA that our boys got to the moon and back before the Russkies.Real Programmers are at work for Boeing designing the operating systems for cruise missiles.Some of the most awesome Real Programmers of all work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Many of them know the entire operating system of the bytes of unused memory in a Voyager spacecraft that searched for, located, and photographed a new moon of Jupiter.The current plan for the Galileo spacecraft is to use a gravity assist trajectory past Mars on the way to Jupiter. This trajectory passes within 80 +/-3 kilometers of the surface of Mars. Nobody is going to trust a Pascal program (or a Pascal programmer) for navigation to these tolerances.As you can tell, many of the world's Real Programmers work for the U.S. Government - mainly the Defense Department. This is as it should be. Recently, programmers and Quiche Eaters alike.) Besides, the determined Real Programmer can write Fortran programs in any language.The Real Programmer might compromise his principles and work on something slightly more trivial than the destruction of life as we know it, providing Fortran, so there are a fair number of people doing graphics in order to avoid having to write COBOL programs.THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT PLAYGenerally, the Real Programmer plays the same way he works - with computers. He is constantly amazed that his employer actually pays him to do what he would be breath of fresh air and a beer or two. Some tips on recognizing Real Programmers away from the computer room:At a party, the Real Programmers are the ones in the corner talking about operating system security and how to get around it.At a football game, the Real Programmer is the one comparing the plays against his simulations printed on 11 by 14 fanfold paper.At the beach, the Real Programmer is the one drawing flowcharts in the sand.At a funeral, the Real Programmer is the one saying Poor George, he almost had the sort routine working before the coronary.In a grocery store, the Real Programmer is the one who insists on running the cans past the laser checkout scanner himself, because he never could trust keypunch operators to get it right the first time.THE REAL PROGRAMMER'S NATURAL HABITATWhat sort of environment does the Real Programmer function best in? This is an important question for the managers of Real Programmers. Considering the amount of money it costs to keep one on the staff, it's best to put him (or her) in an environment where he can get his work done.The typical Real Programmer lives in front of a computer terminal. Surrounding this terminal are:Listings of all programs the Real Programmer has ever worked on, piled in roughly chronological order on every flat surface in the office.Some half-dozen or so partly filled cups of cold coffee. Occasionally, there will be cigarette butts floating in the coffee. In some cases, the cups will contain Orange Crush.Unless he is very good, there will be copies of the OS JCL manual and the Principles of Operation open to some particularly interesting pages.Taped to the wall is a line-printer Snoopy calendar for the year 1969.Strewn about the floor are several wrappers for peanut butter filled cheese bars - the type that are made pre-stale at the bakery so they can't get any worse while waiting in the vending machine.Hiding in the top left-hand drawer of the desk is a stash of double-stuff Oreos for special occasions.Underneath the Oreos is a flowcharting template, left there by the previous occupant of the office. (Real Programmers write programs, not documentation. Leave that to the maintenance people.)The Real Programmer is capable of working 30, 40, even 50 hours at a stretch, under intense pressure. In fact, he prefers it that way. Bad response time project done on time, but creates a convenient excuse for not doing the documentation. In general:No Real Programmer works 9 to 5 (unless it's the ones at night).Real Programmers don't wear neckties.Real Programmers don't wear high-heeled shoes.Real Programmers arrive at work in time for lunch [9].A Real Programmer might or might not know his wife's name. He does, however, know the entire ASCII (or EBCDIC) code table.Real Programmers don't know how to cook. Grocery stores aren't open at three in the morning. Real Programmers survive on Twinkies and coffee.THE FUTUREWhat of the future? It is a matter of some concern to Real Programmers that the latest generation of computer programmers are not being brought up with the same ever learning Fortran! Are we destined to become an industry of Unix hackers and Pascal programmers?From my experience, I can only report that the future is bright for Real Programmers everywhere. Neither OS 370 nor Fortran show any signs of dying out, one of them has a way of converting itself back into a Fortran 66 compiler at the drop of an option card - to compile DO loops like God meant them to be.Even Unix might not be as bad on Real Programmers as it once was. The latest release of Unix has the potential of an operating system worthy of any Real in - like having the best parts of Fortran and assembly language in one place. (Not to mention some of the more creative uses for

Real Programmers Don't Use Pascal "humour" Back in the good old days - the "Golden Era" of computers, it was easy to separate the men from the boys (sometimes called "Real Men" and "Quiche Eaters" in the literature). During this period, the Real Men were the ones that understood computer programming, and the Quiche Eaters were the ones that didn't. A real computer programmer said things like "DO 10 I=1,10" and "ABEND" (they actually talked in capital letters, you understand), and the rest of the world said things like "computers are too complicated for me" and "I can't relate to computers - they're so impersonal". (A previous work [1] points out that Real Men don't "relate" to anything, and aren't afraid of being impersonal.) But, as usual, times change. We are faced today with a world in which little old ladies can get computers in their microwave ovens, 12-year-old kids can blow Real Men out of the water playing Asteroids and Pac-Man, and anyone can buy and even understand their very own Personal Computer. The Real Programmer is in danger of becoming extinct, of being replaced by high-school students with {TRASH-80s}. There is a clear need to point out the differences between the typical high-school junior Pac-Man player and a Real Programmer. If this difference is made clear, it will give these kids something to aspire to -- a role model, a Father Figure. It will also help explain to the employers of Real Programmers why it would be a mistake to replace the Real Programmers on their staff with 12-year-old Pac-Man players (at a considerable salary savings). LANGUAGES The easiest way to tell a Real Programmer from the crowd is by the programming language he (or she) uses. Real Programmers use {Fortran}. Quiche Eaters use {Pascal}. Nicklaus Wirth, the designer of Pascal, gave a talk once at which he was asked how to pronounce his name. He replied, "You can either call me by name, pronouncing it 'Veert', or call me by value, 'Worth'." One can tell immediately from this comment that Nicklaus Wirth is a Quiche Eater. The only parameter passing mechanism endorsed by Real Programmers is call-by-value-return, as implemented in the {IBM 370} {Fortran-G} and H compilers. Real programmers don't need all these abstract concepts to get their jobs done - they are perfectly happy with a {keypunch}, a {Fortran IV} {compiler}, and a beer. Real Programmers do List Processing in Fortran. Real Programmers do String Manipulation in Fortran. Real Programmers do Accounting (if they do it at all) in Fortran. Real Programmers do {Artificial Intelligence} programs in Fortran. If you can't do it in Fortran, do it in {assembly language}. If you can't do it in assembly language, it isn't worth doing. STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING The academics in computer science have gotten into the "structured programming" rut over the past several years. They claim that programs are more easily understood if the programmer uses some special language constructs and techniques. They don't all agree on exactly which constructs, of course, and the examples they use to show their particular point of view invariably fit on a single page of some obscure journal or another - clearly not enough of an example to convince anyone. When I got out of school, I thought I was the best programmer in the world. I could write an unbeatable tic-tac-toe program, use five different computer languages, and create 1000-line programs that WORKED. (Really!) Then I got out into the Real World. My first task in the Real World was to read and understand a 200,000-line Fortran program, then speed it up by a factor of two. Any Real Programmer will tell you that all the Structured Coding in the world won't help you solve a problem like that - it takes actual talent. Some quick observations on Real Programmers and Structured Programming: Real Programmers aren't afraid to use {GOTOs}. Real Programmers can write five-page-long DO loops without getting confused. Real Programmers like Arithmetic IF statements - they make the code more interesting. Real Programmers write self-modifying code, especially if they can save 20 {nanoseconds} in the middle of a tight loop. Real Programmers don't need comments - the code is obvious. Since Fortran doesn't have a structured IF, REPEAT ... UNTIL, or CASE statement, Real Programmers don't have to worry about not using them. Besides, they can be simulated when necessary using {assigned GOTOs}. Data Structures have also gotten a lot of press lately. Abstract Data Types, Structures, Pointers, Lists, and Strings have become popular in certain circles. Wirth (the above-mentioned Quiche Eater) actually wrote an entire book [2] contending that you could write a program based on data structures, instead of the other way around. As all Real Programmers know, the only useful data structure is the Array. Strings, lists, structures, sets - these are all special cases of arrays and can be treated that way just as easily without messing up your programing language with all sorts of complications. The worst thing about fancy data types is that you have to declare them, and Real Programming Languages, as we all know, have implicit typing based on the first letter of the (six character) variable name. OPERATING SYSTEMS What kind of operating system is used by a Real Programmer? CP/M? God forbid - CP/M, after all, is basically a toy operating system. Even little old ladies and grade school students can understand and use CP/M. Unix is a lot more complicated of course - the typical Unix hacker never can remember what the PRINT command is called this week - but when it gets right down to it, Unix is a glorified video game. People don't do Serious Work on Unix systems: they send jokes around the world on {UUCP}-net and write adventure games and research papers. No, your Real Programmer uses OS 370. A good programmer can find and understand the description of the IJK305I error he just got in his JCL manual. A great programmer can write JCL without referring to the manual at all. A truly outstanding programmer can find bugs buried in a 6 megabyte {core dump} without using a hex calculator. (I have actually seen this done.) OS is a truly remarkable operating system. It's possible to destroy days of work with a single misplaced space, so alertness in the programming staff is encouraged. The best way to approach the system is through a keypunch. Some people claim there is a Time Sharing system that runs on OS 370, but after careful study I have come to the conclusion that they were mistaken. PROGRAMMING TOOLS What kind of tools does a Real Programmer use? In theory, a Real Programmer could run his programs by keying them into the front panel of the computer. Back in the days when computers had front panels, this was actually done occasionally. Your typical Real Programmer knew the entire bootstrap loader by memory in hex, and toggled it in whenever it got destroyed by his program. (Back then, memory was memory - it didn't go away when the power went off. Today, memory either forgets things when you don't want it to, or remembers things long after they're better forgotten.) Legend has it that {Seymore Cray}, inventor of the Cray I supercomputer and most of Control Data's computers, actually toggled the first operating system for the CDC7600 in on the front panel from memory when it was first powered on. Seymore, needless to say, is a Real Programmer. One of my favorite Real Programmers was a systems programmer for Texas Instruments. One day he got a long distance call from a user whose system had crashed in the middle of saving some important work. Jim was able to repair the damage over the phone, getting the user to toggle in disk I/O instructions at the front panel, repairing system tables in hex, reading register contents back over the phone. The moral of this story: while a Real Programmer usually includes a keypunch and lineprinter in his toolkit, he can get along with just a front panel and a telephone in emergencies. In some companies, text editing no longer consists of ten engineers standing in line to use an 029 keypunch. In fact, the building I work in doesn't contain a single keypunch. The Real Programmer in this situation has to do his work with a "text editor" program. Most systems supply several text editors to select from, and the Real Programmer must be careful to pick one that reflects his personal style. Many people believe that the best text editors in the world were written at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center for use on their Alto and Dorado computers [3]. Unfortunately, no Real Programmer would ever use a computer whose operating system is called SmallTalk, and would certainly not talk to the computer with a mouse. Some of the concepts in these Xerox editors have been incorporated into editors running on more reasonably named operating systems - {Emacs} and {VI} being two. The problem with these editors is that Real Programmers consider "what you see is what you get" to be just as bad a concept in Text Editors as it is in women. No the Real Programmer wants a "you asked for it, you got it" text editor - complicated, cryptic, powerful, unforgiving, dangerous. TECO, to be precise. It has been observed that a TECO command sequence more closely resembles transmission line noise than readable text [4]. One of the more entertaining games to play with TECO is to type your name in as a command line and try to guess what it does. Just about any possible typing error while talking with TECO will probably destroy your program, or even worse - introduce subtle and mysterious bugs in a once working subroutine. For this reason, Real Programmers are reluctant to actually edit a program that is close to working. They find it much easier to just patch the binary {object code} directly, using a wonderful program called SUPERZAP (or its equivalent on non-IBM machines). This works so well that many working programs on IBM systems bear no relation to the original Fortran code. In many cases, the original source code is no longer available. When it comes time to fix a program like this, no manager would even think of sending anything less than a Real Programmer to do the job - no Quiche Eating structured programmer would even know where to start. This is called "job security". Some programming tools NOT used by Real Programmers: Fortran preprocessors like {MORTRAN} and {RATFOR}. The Cuisinarts of programming - great for making Quiche. See comments above on structured programming. Source language debuggers. Real Programmers can read core dumps. Compilers with array bounds checking. They stifle creativity, destroy most of the interesting uses for EQUIVALENCE, and make it impossible to modify the operating system code with negative subscripts. Worst of all, bounds checking is inefficient. Source code maintenance systems. A Real Programmer keeps his code locked up in a card file, because it implies that its owner cannot leave his important programs unguarded [5]. THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT WORK Where does the typical Real Programmer work? What kind of programs are worthy of the efforts of so talented an individual? You can be sure that no Real Programmer would be caught dead writing accounts-receivable programs in {COBOL}, or sorting {mailing lists} for People magazine. A Real Programmer wants tasks of earth-shaking importance (literally!). Real Programmers work for Los Alamos National Laboratory, writing atomic bomb simulations to run on Cray I supercomputers. Real Programmers work for the National Security Agency, decoding Russian transmissions. It was largely due to the efforts of thousands of Real Programmers working for NASA that our boys got to the moon and back before the Russkies. Real Programmers are at work for Boeing designing the operating systems for cruise missiles. Some of the most awesome Real Programmers of all work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Many of them know the entire operating system of the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft by heart. With a combination of large ground-based Fortran programs and small spacecraft-based assembly language programs, they are able to do incredible feats of navigation and improvisation - hitting ten-kilometer wide windows at Saturn after six years in space, repairing or bypassing damaged sensor platforms, radios, and batteries. Allegedly, one Real Programmer managed to tuck a pattern-matching program into a few hundred bytes of unused memory in a Voyager spacecraft that searched for, located, and photographed a new moon of Jupiter. The current plan for the Galileo spacecraft is to use a gravity assist trajectory past Mars on the way to Jupiter. This trajectory passes within 80 +/-3 kilometers of the surface of Mars. Nobody is going to trust a Pascal program (or a Pascal programmer) for navigation to these tolerances. As you can tell, many of the world's Real Programmers work for the U.S. Government - mainly the Defense Department. This is as it should be. Recently, however, a black cloud has formed on the Real Programmer horizon. It seems that some highly placed Quiche Eaters at the Defense Department decided that all Defense programs should be written in some grand unified language called "ADA" ((C), DoD). For a while, it seemed that ADA was destined to become a language that went against all the precepts of Real Programming - a language with structure, a language with data types, {strong typing}, and semicolons. In short, a language designed to cripple the creativity of the typical Real Programmer. Fortunately, the language adopted by DoD has enough interesting features to make it approachable -- it's incredibly complex, includes methods for messing with the operating system and rearranging memory, and Edsgar Dijkstra doesn't like it [6]. (Dijkstra, as I'm sure you know, was the author of "GoTos Considered Harmful" - a landmark work in programming methodology, applauded by Pascal programmers and Quiche Eaters alike.) Besides, the determined Real Programmer can write Fortran programs in any language. The Real Programmer might compromise his principles and work on something slightly more trivial than the destruction of life as we know it, providing there's enough money in it. There are several Real Programmers building video games at Atari, for example. (But not playing them - a Real Programmer knows how to beat the machine every time: no challenge in that.) Everyone working at LucasFilm is a Real Programmer. (It would be crazy to turn down the money of fifty million Star Trek fans.) The proportion of Real Programmers in Computer Graphics is somewhat lower than the norm, mostly because nobody has found a use for computer graphics yet. On the other hand, all computer graphics is done in Fortran, so there are a fair number of people doing graphics in order to avoid having to write COBOL programs. THE REAL PROGRAMMER AT PLAY Generally, the Real Programmer plays the same way he works - with computers. He is constantly amazed that his employer actually pays him to do what he would be doing for fun anyway (although he is careful not to express this opinion out loud). Occasionally, the Real Programmer does step out of the office for a breath of fresh air and a beer or two. Some tips on recognizing Real Programmers away from the computer room: At a party, the Real Programmers are the ones in the corner talking about operating system security and how to get around it. At a football game, the Real Programmer is the one comparing the plays against his simulations printed on 11 by 14 fanfold paper. At the beach, the Real Programmer is the one drawing flowcharts in the sand. At a funeral, the Real Programmer is the one saying "Poor George, he almost had the sort routine working before the coronary." In a grocery store, the Real Programmer is the one who insists on running the cans past the laser checkout scanner himself, because he never could trust keypunch operators to get it right the first time. THE REAL PROGRAMMER'S NATURAL HABITAT What sort of environment does the Real Programmer function best in? This is an important question for the managers of Real Programmers. Considering the amount of money it costs to keep one on the staff, it's best to put him (or her) in an environment where he can get his work done. The typical Real Programmer lives in front of a computer terminal. Surrounding this terminal are: Listings of all programs the Real Programmer has ever worked on, piled in roughly chronological order on every flat surface in the office. Some half-dozen or so partly filled cups of cold coffee. Occasionally, there will be cigarette butts floating in the coffee. In some cases, the cups will contain Orange Crush. Unless he is very good, there will be copies of the OS JCL manual and the Principles of Operation open to some particularly interesting pages. Taped to the wall is a line-printer Snoopy calendar for the year 1969. Strewn about the floor are several wrappers for peanut butter filled cheese bars - the type that are made pre-stale at the bakery so they can't get any worse while waiting in the vending machine. Hiding in the top left-hand drawer of the desk is a stash of double-stuff Oreos for special occasions. Underneath the Oreos is a flowcharting template, left there by the previous occupant of the office. (Real Programmers write programs, not documentation. Leave that to the maintenance people.) The Real Programmer is capable of working 30, 40, even 50 hours at a stretch, under intense pressure. In fact, he prefers it that way. Bad response time doesn't bother the Real Programmer - it gives him a chance to catch a little sleep between compiles. If there is not enough schedule pressure on the Real Programmer, he tends to make things more challenging by working on some small but interesting part of the problem for the first nine weeks, then finishing the rest in the last week, in two or three 50-hour marathons. This not only impresses the hell out of his manager, who was despairing of ever getting the project done on time, but creates a convenient excuse for not doing the documentation. In general: No Real Programmer works 9 to 5 (unless it's the ones at night). Real Programmers don't wear neckties. Real Programmers don't wear high-heeled shoes. Real Programmers arrive at work in time for lunch [9]. A Real Programmer might or might not know his wife's name. He does, however, know the entire {ASCII} (or EBCDIC) code table. Real Programmers don't know how to cook. Grocery stores aren't open at three in the morning. Real Programmers survive on Twinkies and coffee. THE FUTURE What of the future? It is a matter of some concern to Real Programmers that the latest generation of computer programmers are not being brought up with the same outlook on life as their elders. Many of them have never seen a computer with a front panel. Hardly anyone graduating from school these days can do hex arithmetic without a calculator. College graduates these days are soft - protected from the realities of programming by source level debuggers, text editors that count parentheses, and "user friendly" operating systems. Worst of all, some of these alleged "computer scientists" manage to get degrees without ever learning Fortran! Are we destined to become an industry of Unix hackers and Pascal programmers? From my experience, I can only report that the future is bright for Real Programmers everywhere. Neither OS 370 nor Fortran show any signs of dying out, despite all the efforts of Pascal programmers the world over. Even more subtle tricks, like adding structured coding constructs to Fortran have failed. Oh sure, some computer vendors have come out with Fortran 77 compilers, but every one of them has a way of converting itself back into a Fortran 66 compiler at the drop of an option card - to compile DO loops like God meant them to be. Even Unix might not be as bad on Real Programmers as it once was. The latest release of Unix has the potential of an operating system worthy of any Real Programmer - two different and subtly incompatible user interfaces, an arcane and complicated teletype driver, virtual memory. If you ignore the fact that it's "structured", even 'C' programming can be appreciated by the Real Programmer: after all, there's no type checking, variable names are seven (ten? eight?) characters long, and the added bonus of the Pointer data type is thrown in - like having the best parts of Fortran and assembly language in one place. (Not to mention some of the more creative uses for

Reduplicatively: (in Schol.) a term is taken reduplicatively or there is reduplication when to a term there is added as, just as, as though, inasmuch as, or some similar expression, either in order to double the same term, or in ordei to add another so as to indicate the meaning in which the first term is to be taken, or so as to indicate a reason why the predicate belongs to the subject. E.g. animal as animal cannot reason; Christ as man has suffered; Paul as a priest is worthy of honor. -- H.G.

Religion ::: An operation of the human spiritual mind in its endeavor to understand not only the how and the why ofthings, but comprising in addition a yearning and striving towards self-conscious union with the divineAll and an endlessly growing self-conscious identification with the cosmic divine-spiritual realities. Onephase of a triform method of understanding the nature of nature, of universal nature, and its multiformand multifold workings; and this phase cannot be separated from the other two phases (science andphilosophy) if we wish to gain a true picture of things as they are in themselves.Human religion is the expression of that aspect of man's consciousness which is intuitional, aspirational,and mystical, and which is often deformed and distorted in its lower forms by the emotional in man.It is usual among modern Europeans to derive the word religion from the Latin verb meaning "to bindback" -- religare. But there is another derivation, which is the one that Cicero chooses, and of course hewas a Roman himself and had great skill and deep knowledge in the use of his own native tongue. Thisother derivation comes from a Latin root meaning "to select," "to choose," from which, likewise, we havethe word lex, "law," i.e., the course of conduct or rule of action which is chosen as the best, and istherefore followed; in other words, that which is the best of its kind, as ascertained by selection, by trial,and by proof.Thus then, the meaning of the word religion from the Latin religio, means a careful selection offundamental beliefs and motives by the higher or spiritual intellect, a faculty of intuitional judgment andunderstanding, and a consequent abiding by that selection, resulting in a course of life and conduct in allrespects following the convictions that have been arrived at. This is the religious spirit.To this the theosophist would add the following very important idea: behind all the various religions andphilosophies of ancient times there is a secret or esoteric wisdom given out by the greatest men who haveever lived, the founders and builders of the various world religions and world philosophies; and thissublime system in fundamentals has been the same everywhere over the face of the globe.This system has passed under various names, e.g., the esoteric philosophy, the ancient wisdom, the secretdoctrine, the traditional teaching, theosophy, etc. (See also Science, Philosophy)

resolution 1. "hardware" the maximum number of {pixels} that can be displayed on a {monitor}, expressed as (number of horizontal pixels) x (number of vertical pixels), i.e., 1024x768. The ratio of horizontal to vertical resolution is usually 4:3, the same as that of conventional television sets. 2. "logic" A mechanical method for proving statements of {first order logic}, introduced by J. A. Robinson in 1965. Resolution is applied to two {clauses} in a {sentence}. It eliminates, by {unification}, a {literal} that occurs "positive" in one and "negative" in the other to produce a new clause, the {resolvent}. For example, given the sentence: (man(X) =" mortal(X)) AND man(socrates). The literal "man(X)" is "negative". The literal "man(socrates)" could be considered to be on the right hand side of the degenerate implication True =" man(socrates) and is therefore "positive". The two literals can be unified by the binding X = socrates. The {truth table} for the implication function is A | B | A =" B --+---+------- F | F | T F | T | T T | F | F T | T | T (The implication only fails if its premise is true but its conclusion is false). From this we can see that A =" B == (NOT A) OR B Which is why the left hand side of the implication is said to be negative and the right positive. The sentence above could thus be written ((NOT man(socrates)) OR mortal(socrates)) AND man(socrates) Distributing the AND over the OR gives ((NOT man(socrates)) AND man(socrates)) OR mortal(socrates) AND man(socrates) And since (NOT A) AND A == False, and False OR A == A we can simplify to just mortal(socrates) AND man(socrates) So we have proved the new literal, mortal(socrates). Resolution with {backtracking} is the basic control mechanism of {Prolog}. See also {modus ponens}, {SLD Resolution}. 3. "networking" {address resolution}. (1996-02-09)

roach "jargon" A {Bell Labs} term meaning destroy, especially of a data structure. Hardware gets {toast}ed or {fried}, software gets roached. [Why?] [{Jargon File}] (1999-02-08)

roach ::: (jargon) A Bell Labs term meaning destroy, especially of a data structure. Hardware gets toasted or fried, software gets roached.[Why?][Jargon File] (1999-02-08)

saga "jargon" (WPI) A {cuspy} but bogus raving story about N {random} broken people. Here is a classic example of the saga form, as told by {Guy Steele} (GLS): Jon L. White (login name JONL) and I (GLS) were office mates at {MIT} for many years. One April, we both flew from Boston to California for a week on research business, to consult face-to-face with some people at {Stanford}, particularly our mutual friend {Richard Gabriel} (RPG). RPG picked us up at the San Francisco airport and drove us back to {Palo Alto} (going {logical} south on route 101, parallel to {El Camino Bignum}). Palo Alto is adjacent to Stanford University and about 40 miles south of San Francisco. We ate at The Good Earth, a "health food" restaurant, very popular, the sort whose milkshakes all contain honey and protein powder. JONL ordered such a shake - the waitress claimed the flavour of the day was "lalaberry". I still have no idea what that might be, but it became a running joke. It was the colour of raspberry, and JONL said it tasted rather bitter. I ate a better tostada there than I have ever had in a Mexican restaurant. After this we went to the local Uncle Gaylord's Old Fashioned Ice Cream Parlor. They make ice cream fresh daily, in a variety of intriguing flavours. It's a chain, and they have a slogan: "If you don't live near an Uncle Gaylord's - MOVE!" Also, Uncle Gaylord (a real person) wages a constant battle to force big-name ice cream makers to print their ingredients on the package (like air and plastic and other non-natural garbage). JONL and I had first discovered Uncle Gaylord's the previous August, when we had flown to a computer-science conference in {Berkeley}, California, the first time either of us had been on the West Coast. When not in the conference sessions, we had spent our time wandering the length of Telegraph Avenue, which (like Harvard Square in Cambridge) was lined with picturesque street vendors and interesting little shops. On that street we discovered Uncle Gaylord's Berkeley store. The ice cream there was very good. During that August visit JONL went absolutely bananas (so to speak) over one particular flavour, ginger honey. Therefore, after eating at The Good Earth - indeed, after every lunch and dinner and before bed during our April visit --- a trip to Uncle Gaylord's (the one in Palo Alto) was mandatory. We had arrived on a Wednesday, and by Thursday evening we had been there at least four times. Each time, JONL would get ginger honey ice cream, and proclaim to all bystanders that "Ginger was the spice that drove the Europeans mad! That's why they sought a route to the East! They used it to preserve their otherwise off-taste meat." After the third or fourth repetition RPG and I were getting a little tired of this spiel, and began to paraphrase him: "Wow! Ginger! The spice that makes rotten meat taste good!" "Say! Why don't we find some dog that's been run over and sat in the sun for a week and put some *ginger* on it for dinner?!" "Right! With a lalaberry shake!" And so on. This failed to faze JONL; he took it in good humour, as long as we kept returning to Uncle Gaylord's. He loves ginger honey ice cream. Now RPG and his then-wife KBT (Kathy Tracy) were putting us up (putting up with us?) in their home for our visit, so to thank them JONL and I took them out to a nice French restaurant of their choosing. I unadventurously chose the filet mignon, and KBT had je ne sais quoi du jour, but RPG and JONL had lapin (rabbit). (Waitress: "Oui, we have fresh rabbit, fresh today." RPG: "Well, JONL, I guess we won't need any *ginger*!") We finished the meal late, about 11 P.M., which is 2 A.M Boston time, so JONL and I were rather droopy. But it wasn't yet midnight. Off to Uncle Gaylord's! Now the French restaurant was in Redwood City, north of Palo Alto. In leaving Redwood City, we somehow got onto route 101 going north instead of south. JONL and I wouldn't have known the difference had RPG not mentioned it. We still knew very little of the local geography. I did figure out, however, that we were headed in the direction of Berkeley, and half-jokingly suggested that we continue north and go to Uncle Gaylord's in Berkeley. RPG said "Fine!" and we drove on for a while and talked. I was drowsy, and JONL actually dropped off to sleep for 5 minutes. When he awoke, RPG said, "Gee, JONL, you must have slept all the way over the bridge!", referring to the one spanning San Francisco Bay. Just then we came to a sign that said "University Avenue". I mumbled something about working our way over to Telegraph Avenue; RPG said "Right!" and maneuvered some more. Eventually we pulled up in front of an Uncle Gaylord's. Now, I hadn't really been paying attention because I was so sleepy, and I didn't really understand what was happening until RPG let me in on it a few moments later, but I was just alert enough to notice that we had somehow come to the Palo Alto Uncle Gaylord's after all. JONL noticed the resemblance to the Palo Alto store, but hadn't caught on. (The place is lit with red and yellow lights at night, and looks much different from the way it does in daylight.) He said, "This isn't the Uncle Gaylord's I went to in Berkeley! It looked like a barn! But this place looks *just like* the one back in Palo Alto!" RPG deadpanned, "Well, this is the one *I* always come to when I'm in Berkeley. They've got two in San Francisco, too. Remember, they're a chain." JONL accepted this bit of wisdom. And he was not totally ignorant - he knew perfectly well that University Avenue was in Berkeley, not far from Telegraph Avenue. What he didn't know was that there is a completely different University Avenue in Palo Alto. JONL went up to the counter and asked for ginger honey. The guy at the counter asked whether JONL would like to taste it first, evidently their standard procedure with that flavour, as not too many people like it. JONL said, "I'm sure I like it. Just give me a cone." The guy behind the counter insisted that JONL try just a taste first. "Some people think it tastes like soap." JONL insisted, "Look, I *love* ginger. I eat Chinese food. I eat raw ginger roots. I already went through this hassle with the guy back in Palo Alto. I *know* I like that flavour!" At the words "back in Palo Alto" the guy behind the counter got a very strange look on his face, but said nothing. KBT caught his eye and winked. Through my stupor I still hadn't quite grasped what was going on, and thought RPG was rolling on the floor laughing and clutching his stomach just because JONL had launched into his spiel ("makes rotten meat a dish for princes") for the forty-third time. At this point, RPG clued me in fully. RPG, KBT, and I retreated to a table, trying to stifle our chuckles. JONL remained at the counter, talking about ice cream with the guy b.t.c., comparing Uncle Gaylord's to other ice cream shops and generally having a good old time. At length the g.b.t.c. said, "How's the ginger honey?" JONL said, "Fine! I wonder what exactly is in it?" Now Uncle Gaylord publishes all his recipes and even teaches classes on how to make his ice cream at home. So the g.b.t.c. got out the recipe, and he and JONL pored over it for a while. But the g.b.t.c. could contain his curiosity no longer, and asked again, "You really like that stuff, huh?" JONL said, "Yeah, I've been eating it constantly back in Palo Alto for the past two days. In fact, I think this batch is about as good as the cones I got back in Palo Alto!" G.b.t.c. looked him straight in the eye and said, "You're *in* Palo Alto!" JONL turned slowly around, and saw the three of us collapse in a fit of giggles. He clapped a hand to his forehead and exclaimed, "I've been hacked!" [My spies on the West Coast inform me that there is a close relative of the raspberry found out there called an "ollalieberry" - ESR] [Ironic footnote: it appears that the {meme} about ginger vs. rotting meat may be an urban legend. It's not borne out by an examination of mediaeval recipes or period purchase records for spices, and appears full-blown in the works of Samuel Pegge, a gourmand and notorious flake case who originated numerous food myths. - ESR] [{Jargon File}] (1994-12-08)

Sahasrāksa. (P. Sahassākkha; T. Mig stong can; C. Qianyan; J. Sengen; K. Ch'onan 千眼). In Sanskrit, "One-Thousand Eyes," an epithet of INDRA. In Sanskrit and Pāli sources, Indra is known by several names, the most frequent being sAKRO DEVĀNĀM INDRAḤ (P. Sakko devānām indo), meaning "sAKRA, king of the gods." A number of Indra's various epithets are explained in one section of the Pāli SAMYUTTANIKĀYA; there, the name "One-Thousand Eyes" (P. Sahassākkha) is explained by saying that in one instant Indra can consider one thousand different matters. The broader Indian religious tradition, from which Buddhism appropriated the divinity Indra, also has a number of stories explaining why Indra is called "One-Thousand Eyes." In the most popular of these stories, Indra seduces the wife of a famous seer (ṛsi). The ṛsi punishes Indra with a curse-causing one thousand vulvas (S. bhaga) to appear on his body. The ṛsi is later persuaded to remove the curse and he turns each one of the vulvas into an eye.

SakkapaNhasutta. (C. Di-Shi suowen jing; J. Taishaku shomongyo; K. Che-Sok somun kyong 帝釋所問經). In Pāli, "Discourse on Sakka's Question"; the twenty-first sutta of the DĪGHANIKĀYA (there are three separate recensions in Chinese: an independent sutra translated by FAXIAN; a SARVĀSTIVĀDA recension that appears as the fourteenth sutra in the Chinese translation of the DĪRGHĀGAMA; and a SARVĀSTIVĀDA recension that appears as the 134th sutra in the Chinese translation of the MADHYAMĀGAMA). The sutra is preached to sAKRA (P. Sakka), king of the gods, by the Buddha while he dwelt in the Indrasāla [alt. Indrasaila] (P. Indasāla) cave near RĀJAGṚHA. sakra inquired as to why there was so much hostility between beings. The Buddha explained that hostility is caused by selfishness; that selfishness is caused by likes and dislikes, and that likes and dislikes, in turn, are caused by desire. Desire is produced by mental preoccupations (S. VITARKA, P. vitakka) born from the proliferation of concepts (S. PRAPANCA, P. papaNca) that gives rise to SAMSĀRA. The Buddha then delineates a practice to be pursued and a practice to be abandoned for subduing this conceptual proliferation.

saMskṛta. (T. 'dus byas; C. youwei; J. ui; K. yuwi 有爲). In Sanskrit, "conditioned," a term that describes all impermanent phenomena, that is, all conditioned factors (saMskṛtadharma) that are produced through the concomitance of causes and conditions; these phenomena are subject to the four characteristics (CATURLAKsAnA) governing all conditioned objects (SAMSKṚTALAKsAnA), viz., "origination," or birth (JĀTI), "continuance," or maturation (STHITI), "senescence," or decay (JARĀ), and "desinence," or death (ANITYA). SaMskṛta is contrasted with ASAMSKṚTA, "unconditioned," a common adjective of NIRVĀnA, but also a category that in some traditions includes space (ĀKĀsA) and other types of absence and cessation. The fact that the objects of ordinary experience are conditioned is commonly cited as a reason why they are unreliable and thus should be abandoned, and why the unconditioned state should be sought. See also SAMSKĀRA.

*sāstrapitaka. (C. lunzang; J. ronzo; K. nonjang 論藏). In Sanskrit reconstruction, "treatise basket," a more inclusive designation for the ABHIDHARMAPItAKA, the third "basket" of the Buddhist canon (TRIPItAKA), which expands this section of the canon to take in scholastic treatises (sĀSTRA) from the MAHĀYĀNA exegetical schools in addition to the ABHIDHARMA texts of the MAINSTREAM BUDDHIST SCHOOLS. The Sanskrit term appears in Western literature on the canon, but seems not to be attested in Indian sources (or in their Tibetan translation) and may be a back-translation from the Chinese locution lunzang. Since virtually the inception of Buddhism in China, the Mahāyāna tradition dominated. This allegiance is apparently why Chinese scriptural catalogues (JINGLU), since at least the time of the definitive KAIYUAN SHIJIAO LU (730), had listed Mahāyāna materials first in their respective rosters of SuTRA and sāstra texts. This same order is subsequently followed in the traditional printed versions of the Chinese Buddhist canon (DAZANGJING; see also KORYo TAEJANGGYoNG). To the Chinese, who proudly identified with the Mahāyāna, it must have seemed anathema to treat as canonical ABHIDHARMA works by the ARHAT-ĀBHIDHARMIKAs (such as KĀTYĀYANĪPUTRA or VASUMITRA) but not the scholastic treatises by the Indian BODHISATTVA-exegetes of Mahāyāna (such as NĀGĀRJUNA and ASUBANDHU) who were much more renowned to the Chinese. In order to give pride of place to the works of these influential Mahāyāna scholiasts, the Chinese listed them before abhidharma texts in the roster of sāstra materials collected in the Chinese Buddhist canon, and referred to this third basket more expansively as a "treatise basket" (lunzang) rather than merely an abhidharmapitaka.

scire facias ::: --> A judicial writ, founded upon some record, and requiring the party proceeded against to show cause why the party bringing it should not have advantage of such record, or (as in the case of scire facias to repeal letters patent) why the record should not be annulled or vacated.

Self-Realization ::: The process through which one begins to unravel who they are, what they are, and why they are. Many grow into an idea of this that evolves as one's understanding matures and changes due to experiences. It is best complemented through a solid and consistent meditation practice. It is a journey of many flavors and stages that leads to revelations about the nature of self, the reasons for existing, and the purpose underlying one's particular path.

Senchakushu. (選擇集). In Japanese, "Collection of Selections," composed by the Japanese PURE LAND monk HoNEN in 1198; also known as Senjakushu or Senchaku hongan nenbutsushu ("Collection of Selections on Nenbutsu and the Original Vow"). Honen's Senchakushu is one of the most influential texts in Japan on the practice of nenbutsu (see NIANFO), i.e., the invocation of the name of the buddha AMITĀBHA; it is also traditionally regarded as the founding scripture of the JoDOSHu tradition of Japanese pure land. Relying on the three pure land sutras (JINGTU SANBUJING, viz., the longer and shorter SUKHĀVATĪVYuHASuTRA and the GUAN WULIANGSHOU JING) and a number of important commentaries by SHANDAO and TANLUAN, Honen attempted to elucidate the importance of the practice of nenbutsu in the context of Amitābha's original vows as described in the Sukhāvatīvyuhasutra. He first cites DAOCHUO's division of Buddhist practice into that of the sacred path (that is, the traditional Buddhist path) and the pure land path, and then cites SHANDAO's division into proper and miscellaneous. These divisions are used as an argument for the practice of exclusive nenbutsu. Honen then demonstrates that exclusive nenbutsu is the practice advocated by Amitābha in his original vows. In the next few sections of his text, Honen also mentions the benefits of exclusive nenbutsu and explains why this practice is most appropriate for those in the age of the final dharma (J. mappo; see MOFA). The other sections of the Senchakushu provide further scriptural evidence for the importance of nenbutsu and discuss the proper method for practicing it. At Honen's request, the work was not widely circulated until after his death. Numerous commentaries on this text exist in Japanese.

Sensoji. (淺草寺). In Japanese, "Low Grass Monastery," located in the Asakusa (lit. Low Grass) district of Tokyo; it is the oldest monastery in the current Japanese capital. Legend says that in 628 a statue of the BODHISATTVA Kannon (AVALOKITEsVARA) was found by fishermen in the Sumida River and the village elder turned his home into a shrine for the image; this image remains an important object of veneration in Japanese Buddhism. Originally called Komagatado, the current monastery was built in 645 and is the oldest in Tokyo. Sensoji was formerly associated with the TENDAISHu (C. TIANTAI ZONG), but has been independent since after World War II. The monastery is entered through the Kaminarimon, or Thunder Gate, which is graced by a gigantic paper lantern that is vividly painted to evoke storm clouds and lightning. This gate was built by the governor of the Musashi District, Tairano Kinmasa, in 942, as was the inner Hozo gate; both have subsequently been reconstructed following fires. The main Kannondo hall at Sensoji is devoted to Avalokitesvara; it burned down during a World War II air raid but has been rebuilt. The monastery grounds also include a five-story pagoda, a beautiful garden, and many oracle stalls (omikuji). Next door is an important SHINTo shrine, the Asakusa Jinja, which may partially explain why Sensoji is the site of the biggest festival in Tokyo, the Sanja Matsuri, which is held annually in the late spring.

Six is also present in the double triangles, which when interlaced form a six-pointed star; “this is the reason why Pythagoras and the ancients made the number six sacred to Venus, since ‘the union of the two sexes, and the spagyrisation of matter by triads are necessary to develop the generative force, that prolific virtue and tendency to reproduction which is inherent in all bodies’ ” (SD 2:592). See also SENARY

SLD resolution "logic, programming" (Selected, Linear, Definite) {Linear resolution} with a {selection function} for {definite sentences}. A definite sentence has exactly one {positive literal} in each {clause} and this literal is selected to be resolved upon, i.e. replaced in the {goal} clause by the {conjunction} of {negative literals} which form the body of the clause. [Why is SLD resolution important?] (2003-12-04)

SLD resolution ::: (logic, programming) (Selected, Linear, Definite) Linear resolution with a selection function for definite sentences.A definite sentence has exactly one positive literal in each clause and this literal is selected to be resolved upon, i.e. replaced in the goal clause by the conjunction of negative literals which form the body of the clause.[Why is SLD resolution important?](2003-12-04)

&

SNAFU principle /sna'foo prin'si-pl/ [WWII Army acronym for "Situation Normal: All Fucked Up"] "True communication is possible only between equals, because inferiors are more consistently rewarded for telling their superiors pleasant lies than for telling the truth." - a central tenet of {Discordianism}, often invoked by hackers to explain why authoritarian hierarchies screw up so reliably and systematically. The effect of the SNAFU principle is a progressive disconnection of decision-makers from reality. This lightly adapted version of a fable dating back to the early 1960s illustrates the phenomenon perfectly: In the beginning was the plan,    and then the specification; And the plan was without form,    and the specification was void. And darkness    was on the faces of the implementors thereof; And they spake unto their leader,    saying: "It is a crock of shit,    and smells as of a sewer." And the leader took pity on them,    and spoke to the project leader: "It is a crock of excrement,    and none may abide the odor thereof." And the project leader    spake unto his section head, saying: "It is a container of excrement,    and it is very strong, such that none may abide it." The section head then hurried to his department manager,    and informed him thus: "It is a vessel of fertilizer,    and none may abide its strength." The department manager carried these words   to his general manager, and spoke unto him   saying: "It containeth that which aideth the growth of plants,   and it is very strong." And so it was that the general manager rejoiced   and delivered the good news unto the Vice President. "It promoteth growth,   and it is very powerful." The Vice President rushed to the President's side,   and joyously exclaimed: "This powerful new software product   will promote the growth of the company!" And the President looked upon the product,   and saw that it was very good. After the subsequent disaster, the {suits} protect themselves by saying "I was misinformed!", and the implementors are demoted or fired. [{Jargon File}]

sojae toryang. (消災道場). In Korean, "calamities-solving ritual"; one of the four most important annual rituals performed at court during the Koryo dynasty (918-1392), second only to the YoNDŬNGHOE (lantern ritual). The sojae toryang is a representative of the esoteric Buddhist rituals that became popular in Korea during the Koryo dynasty. The first record of the ritual's performance dates from 1046, the last from 1399, a short time after the demise of the dynasty. This ritual to prevent natural calamities probably derives originally not from Buddhist cosmology but from the theory of heavenly retribution that was foundational in traditional East Asian thought. Koryo's ritual system, modeled after that of Tang China, presumed that cosmological influences dominated human life and activities. Since droughts, floods, and epidemics were considered "calamities from Heaven" (Ch'onjae), and indicated Heaven's dissatisfaction with the quality of terrestrial governance, the sojae toryang sought to draw on various religious and astral powers in order to ward off these threats and to enhance the longevity of its royal sponsors. Koryo kings lavished riches on the monasteries whose monks performed these rituals, particularly when Koryo was threatened by foreign invasion or occupation. This concern explains why the majority of the recorded performances of the sojae toryang occurred during the reigns of kings Kojong (1231-1259), Wonjong (1259-1274), and Ch'ungnyol (1274-1308), who all ruled during the period of Mongol domination in Korea. During King Wonjong's thirteen-year reign, for example, the sojae toryang was performed twenty-three times, or about three times every two years. Historical sources provide little information on how the ritual was actually performed, but its conduct can be inferred from esoteric Buddhist sources. These sources require the monks to establish a purified ritual venue, install a buddha image there, and then make offerings of incense, flowers, and lanterns; once the site is prepared, they are then to recite various codes or spells (DHĀRAnĪ) in order to invoke the power of the BODHISATTVAs, the seven stars of the Big Dipper (see BEIDOU QIXING), the gods of the zodiacal mansions and the constellations, the sun and moon, etc., to overcome calamities and transform disasters into blessings. In the case of the Koryo dynasty, the ritual was always held at court, and the king himself was both participant and presider at the ritual, indicating the close association between court and the religion during this period in Korean history.

soul ::: Sri Aurobindo: "The word ‘soul", as also the word ‘psychic", is used very vaguely and in many different senses in the English language. More often than not, in ordinary parlance, no clear distinction is made between mind and soul and often there is an even more serious confusion, for the vital being of desire — the false soul or desire-soul — is intended by the words ‘soul" and ‘psychic" and not the true soul, the psychic being.” *Letters on Yoga


  "The word soul is very vaguely used in English — as it often refers to the whole non-physical consciousness including even the vital with all its desires and passions. That was why the word psychic being has to be used so as to distinguish this divine portion from the instrumental parts of the nature.” *Letters on Yoga

  "The word soul has various meanings according to the context; it may mean the Purusha supporting the formation of Prakriti, which we call a being, though the proper word would be rather a becoming; it may mean, on the other hand, specifically the psychic being in an evolutionary creature like man; it may mean the spark of the Divine which has been put into Matter by the descent of the Divine into the material world and which upholds all evolving formations here.” *Letters on Yoga

  "A distinction has to be made between the soul in its essence and the psychic being. Behind each and all there is the soul which is the spark of the Divine — none could exist without that. But it is quite possible to have a vital and physical being supported by such a soul essence but without a clearly evolved psychic being behind it.” *Letters on Yoga

  "The soul and the psychic being are practically the same, except that even in things which have not developed a psychic being, there is still a spark of the Divine which can be called the soul. The psychic being is called in Sanskrit the Purusha in the heart or the Chaitya Purusha. (The psychic being is the soul developing in the evolution.)” *Letters on Yoga

  "The soul or spark is there before the development of an organised vital and mind. The soul is something of the Divine that descends into the evolution as a divine Principle within it to support the evolution of the individual out of the Ignorance into the Light. It develops in the course of the evolution a psychic individual or soul individuality which grows from life to life, using the evolving mind, vital and body as its instruments. It is the soul that is immortal while the rest disintegrates; it passes from life to life carrying its experience in essence and the continuity of the evolution of the individual.” *Letters on Yoga

  ". . . for the soul is seated within and impervious to the shocks of external events. . . .” *Essays on the Gita

  ". . . the soul is at first but a spark and then a little flame of godhead burning in the midst of a great darkness; for the most part it is veiled in its inner sanctum and to reveal itself it has to call on the mind, the life-force and the physical consciousness and persuade them, as best they can, to express it; ordinarily, it succeeds at most in suffusing their outwardness with its inner light and modifying with its purifying fineness their dark obscurities or their coarser mixture. Even when there is a formed psychic being able to express itself with some directness in life, it is still in all but a few a smaller portion of the being — ‘no bigger in the mass of the body than the thumb of a man" was the image used by the ancient seers — and it is not always able to prevail against the obscurity or ignorant smallness of the physical consciousness, the mistaken surenesses of the mind or the arrogance and vehemence of the vital nature.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

". . . the soul is an eternal portion of the Supreme and not a fraction of Nature.” The Life Divine

"The true soul secret in us, — subliminal, we have said, but the word is misleading, for this presence is not situated below the threshold of waking mind, but rather burns in the temple of the inmost heart behind the thick screen of an ignorant mind, life and body, not subliminal but behind the veil, — this veiled psychic entity is the flame of the Godhead always alight within us, inextinguishable even by that dense unconsciousness of any spiritual self within which obscures our outward nature. It is a flame born out of the Divine and, luminous inhabitant of the Ignorance, grows in it till it is able to turn it towards the Knowledge. It is the concealed Witness and Control, the hidden Guide, the Daemon of Socrates, the inner light or inner voice of the mystic. It is that which endures and is imperishable in us from birth to birth, untouched by death, decay or corruption, an indestructible spark of the Divine.” The Life Divine

*Soul, soul"s, Soul"s, souls, soulless, soul-bridals, soul-change, soul-force, Soul-Forces, soul-ground, soul-joy, soul-nature, soul-range, soul-ray, soul-scapes, soul-scene, soul-sense, soul-severance, soul-sight, soul-slaying, soul-space,, soul-spaces, soul-strength, soul-stuff, soul-truth, soul-vision, soul-wings, world-soul, World-Soul.



Space-time A concept taken over by Einstein from Minkowski, in which time (considered as a vector) is no longer regarded as independent of spatial extension, but is made a fourth coordinate in determining the position of an event. Our ordinary threefold spatial extension is a concept due to our physical experience, so that there is no reason why we cannot adopt a concept of another order if we find it suits our purposes better. We can view the universe under the form of a threefold spatial extension and an independent time, or we can view it under the form of a four-dimensional continuum, wherein a coordinate representing position in time takes its place along with three others representing position in space. The points of light form distant stars which we view in the sky are separated from each other not only by spatial distances but also by distances in time, owing to the time taken by light to travel. Space-time is a mathematical conception, useful in certain measurements demanded by modern science, but not answering to anything of which we can form a clear mental image. It is difficult to picture a line drawn from the American President in Washington to Cicero in the Roman Forum; or vice versa, but such a line in either direction would according to modern mathematical theory traverse space-time.

Sraddhalu: “… at the very height of creation, at the very roots of creation, there is a spontaneous movement, a selfborn Word, a concept, an idea, which has not been given an overt expression. It is in the state of pure vibration. This is why ‘Word’ is put with a capital ‘W’. It is pure vibration of consciousness which is put out.”

srāvaka. (P. sāvaka; T. nyan thos; C. shengwen; J. shomon; K. songmun 聲聞). In Sanskrit, lit. "listener"; viz., a direct "disciple" of the Buddha who "listened" to his teachings (and sometimes seen translated over-literally from the Chinese as "sound-hearer"). In the MAHĀYĀNA, the term was used to describe those who (along with PRATYEKABUDDHAs) sought their own liberation from suffering as an ARHAT by following the HĪNAYĀNA path (see ER SHENG), and was contrasted (negatively) to the BODHISATTVAs who seeks buddhahood for the sake of all beings. There is an issue in the Mahāyāna concerning whether srāvakas will eventually enter the bodhisattva path and become buddhas, or whether arhatship is a final state where no further progress along the path (MĀRGA) will be possible (see sRĀVAKAGOTRA). The SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA, for example, declares that they will, and in the sutra the Buddha makes prophecies about the future buddhahood of several famous srāvakas. In many Mahāyāna sutras, srāvakas are often described as being in the audience of the Buddha's teaching, and certain srāvakas, such as sĀRIPUTRA, play important roles as interlocutors. In the third chapter of the VIMALAKĪRTINIRDEsA, a series of srāvakas explain why they are reluctant to visit the bodhisattva VIMALAKĪRTI, because of the insurmountable challenge his profound understanding of the dharma will present to them.

Sri Aurobindo: "In considering the action of the Infinite we have to avoid the error of the disciple who thought of himself as the Brahman, refused to obey the warning of the elephant-driver to budge ::: from the narrow path and was taken up by the elephant"s trunk and removed out of the way; ‘You are no doubt the Brahman," said the master to his bewildered disciple, ‘but why did you not obey the driver Brahman and get out of the path of the elephant Brahman?"” *The Life Divine

Sri Aurobindo: “The legend of the Tower of Babel speaks of the diversity of tongues as a curse laid on the race; but whatever its disadvantages, and they tend more and more to be minimised by the growth of civilisation and increasing intercourse, it has been rather a blessing than a curse, a gift to mankind rather than a disability laid upon it. The purposeless exaggeration of anything is always an evil, and an excessive pullulation of varying tongues that serve no purpose in the expression of a real diversity of spirit and culture is certainly a stumbling-block rather than a help: but this excess, though it existed in the past, is hardly a possibility of the future. The tendency is rather in the opposite direction. In former times diversity of language helped to create a barrier to knowledge and sympathy, was often made the pretext even of an actual antipathy and tended to a too rigid division. The lack of sufficient interpenetration kept up both a passive want of understanding and a fruitful crop of active misunderstandings. But this was an inevitable evil of a particular stage of growth, an exaggeration of the necessity that then existed for the vigorous development of strongly individualised group-souls in the human race. These disadvantages have not yet been abolished, but with closer intercourse and the growing desire of men and nations for the knowledge of each other’s thought and spirit and personality, they have diminished and tend to diminish more and more and there is no reason why in the end they should not become inoperative.” The Human Cycle. Babel-builders’.

St. Thomas was a teacher and a writer for some twenty years (1254-1273). Among his works are: Scriptum in IV Libros Sententiarum (1254-1256), Summa Contra Gentiles (c. 1260), Summa Theologica (1265-1272); commentaries on Boethius. (De Trinitate, c. 1257-1258), on Dionysius the Pseudo-Areopagite (De Divinis Nominibus, c. 1261), on the anonymous and important Liber de Causis (1268), and especially on Aristotle's works (1261-1272), Physics, Metaphysics, Nicomachean Ethics, Politics, On the Soul, Posterior Analytics, On Interpretation, On the Heavens, On Generation and Corruption; Quaestiones Disputatae, which includes questions on such large subjects as De Veritate (1256-1259); De Potentia (1259-1263); De Malo (1263-1268); De Spiritualibus Creaturis, De Anima (1269-1270); small treatises or Opuscula, among which especially noteworthy are the De Ente et Essentia (1256); De Aeternitate Mundi (1270), De Unitate Intellecus (1270), De Substantiis Separatis (1272). While it is extremely difficult to grasp in its entirety the personality behind this complex theological and philosophical activity, some points are quite clear and beyond dispute. During the first five years of his activity as a thinker and a teacher, St. Thomas seems to have formulated his most fundamental ideas in their definite form, to have clarified his historical conceptions of Greek and Arabian philosophers, and to have made more precise and even corrected his doctrinal positions, (cf., e.g., the change on the question of creation between In II Sent., d.l, q.l, a.3, and the later De Potentia, q. III, a.4). This is natural enough, though we cannot pretend to explain why he should have come to think as he did. The more he grew, and that very rapidly, towards maturity, the more his thought became inextricably involved in the defense of Aristotle (beginning with c. 1260), his texts and his ideas, against the Averroists, who were then beginning to become prominent in the faculty of arts at the University of Paris; against the traditional Augustinianism of a man like St. Bonaventure; as well as against that more subtle Augustinianism which could breathe some of the spirit of Augustine, speak the language of Aristotle, but expound, with increasing faithfulness and therefore more imminent disaster, Christian ideas through the Neoplatonic techniques of Avicenna. This last group includes such different thinkers as St. Albert the Great, Henry of Ghent, the many disciples of St. Bonaventure, including, some think, Duns Scotus himself, and Meister Eckhart of Hochheim.

subconscient ::: Sri Aurobindo: "In our yoga we mean by the subconscient that quite submerged part of our being in which there is no wakingly conscious and coherent thought, will or feeling or organised reaction, but which yet receives obscurely the impressions of all things and stores them up in itself and from it too all sorts of stimuli, of persistent habitual movements, crudely repeated or disguised in strange forms can surge up into dream or into the waking nature. No, subliminal is a general term used for all parts of the being which are not on the waking surface. Subconscient is very often used in the same sense by European psychologists because they do not know the difference. But when I use the word, I mean always what is below the ordinary physical consciousness, not what is behind it. The inner mental, vital, physical, the psychic are not subconscious in this sense, but they can be spoken of as subliminal.” *The Synthesis of Yoga.

"The subconscient is a concealed and unexpressed inarticulate consciousness which works below all our conscious physical activities. Just as what we call the superconscient is really a higher consciousness above from which things descend into the being, so the subconscient is below the body-consciousness and things come up into the physical, the vital and the mind-nature from there.

Just as the higher consciousness is superconscient to us and supports all our spiritual possibilities and nature, so the subconscient is the basis of our material being and supports all that comes up in the physical nature.” Letters on Yoga

  "That part of us which we can strictly call subconscient because it is below the level of mind and conscious life, inferior and obscure, covers the purely physical and vital elements of our constitution of bodily being, unmentalised, unobserved by the mind, uncontrolled by it in their action. It can be held to include the dumb occult consciousness, dynamic but not sensed by us, which operates in the cells and nerves and all the corporeal stuff and adjusts their life process and automatic responses. It covers also those lowest functionings of submerged sense-mind which are more operative in the animal and in plant life.” *The Life Divine

"The subconscient is a thing of habits and memories and repeats persistently or whenever it can old suppressed reactions, reflexes, mental, vital or physical responses. It must be trained by a still more persistent insistence of the higher parts of the being to give up its old responses and take on the new and true ones.” Letters on Yoga

"About the subconscient — it is the sub-mental base of the being and is made up of impressions, instincts, habitual movements that are stored there. Whatever movement is impressed in it, it keeps. If one impresses the right movement in it, it will keep and send up that. That is why it has to be cleared of old movements before there can be a permanent and total change in the nature. When the higher consciousness is once established in the waking parts, it goes down into the subconscient and changes that also, makes a bedrock of itself there also.” Letters on Yoga

"The sub-conscious is the evolutionary basis in us, it is not the whole of our hidden nature, nor is it the whole origin of what we are. But things can rise from the subconscient and take shape in the conscious parts and much of our smaller vital and physical instincts, movements, habits, character-forms has this source.” Letters on Yoga

"The subconscient is the support of habitual action — it can support good habits as well as bad.” Letters on Yoga

"For the subconscient is the Inconscient in the process of becoming conscious; it is a support and even a root of our inferior parts of being and their movements.” The Life Divine *subconscient"s.


Substitute "character" (SUB) {ASCII} character 26. [Why?] (1996-06-28)

Substitute ::: (character) (SUB) ASCII character 26.[Why?] (1996-06-28)

Sumedha. [alt. Sumegha] (C. Shanhui; J. Zen'e; K. Sonhye 善慧). Sanskrit and Pāli name of the BODHISATTVA who would become GAUTAMA Buddha. He was an ascetic at the time of DĪPAMKARA Buddha. Sumedha was born into a wealthy brāhmana family of AMARĀVATĪ. Disenchanted with the vanities of the householders' life, he renounced the world and took up his abode in the Himalaya mountains as an ascetic. There, he practiced assiduously and ultimately gained great yogic power. Once, when flying over the town of Ramma Nagara, he saw a crowd. He landed and asked a member of the crowd why they had gathered and was told that DīpaMkara Buddha was approaching. When he heard the word "buddha," he was overcome with joy. Seeing that people of the town were festooning the road DīpaMkara would be using with decorations, Sumedha decided to prepare and decorate a portion of the road himself. The Buddha arrived before his work was completed and, seeing that the Buddha was walking toward a mud puddle, Sumedha lay facedown and spread his long matted locks over the mud. While lying in the mud, Sumedha realized that, were he to follow DīpaMkara's teachings, he could become an ARHAT in that very lifetime. However, he resolved instead to achieve enlightenment at a time when there was no other buddha in the world, vowing to become a fully enlightened buddha (SAMYAKSAMBUDDHA) like DīpaMkara himself. DīpaMkara, using his supranormal powers, looked into the future and confirmed that Sumedha's vow (PuRVAPRAnIDĀNA) would be fulfilled and he would one day become GAUTAMA Buddha, the fourth of five perfect buddhas of the present age. It was with this vow, and with this confirmation by DīpaMkara Buddha, that the bodhisattva began the path to buddhahood, which, according to the Pāli tradition, he would complete four innumerable plus one hundred thousand eons later.

sunspots ::: 1. Notional cause of an odd error. Why did the program suddenly turn the screen blue? Sunspots, I guess.2. Also the cause of bit rot - from the myth that sunspots will increase cosmic rays, which can flip single bits in memory. See also phase of the moon.[Jargon File]

sunspots 1. Notional cause of an odd error. "Why did the program suddenly turn the screen blue?" "Sunspots, I guess." 2. Also the cause of {bit rot} - from the myth that sunspots will increase {cosmic rays}, which can flip single bits in memory. See also {phase of the moon}. [{Jargon File}]

“Surely there must have been some very good reasons why the Sadducees, who furnished almost all the high Priests of Judea, held to the Laws of Moses and spurned the alleged ‘Books of Moses,’ the Penateuch of the Synagogue and the Talmud” (SD 1:320-1n) — doubtless because they rejected the literal rendering of the Pentateuch, and in the beginning at least preferred their own interpretations of the Hebrew scriptures.

Suspense account- A temporary account used to force a trial balance to balance if there is only a small discrepancy (or if an account's balance is simply wrong, and you don't know why). A typical example would be a small error in petty cash. In this case a transfer would be made to a suspense account to balance the cash account. Once the person knows what happened to the money, a transfer entry will be made in the journal to credit or debit the suspense account back to zero and debit or credit the correct account.

Synchronous idle "character" (SYN) The {mnemonic} for {ASCII} character 22. [Why?] (1996-06-28)

Synchronous idle ::: (character) (SYN) The mnemonic for ASCII character 22.[Why?] (1996-06-28)

tail circuit "communications" A circuit which connects the {serial lines} of two {modems} together. [Why do that?] (1996-10-16)

tail circuit ::: (communications) A circuit which connects the serial lines of two modems together.[Why do that?] (1996-10-16)

Tantric: Adjective to Tantra (q.v.) Tao: The Way, principle, cosmic order, nature. "The Tao that can be expressed in words is not the eternal Tao." It is "vague and eluding," "deep and obscure," but "there is in it the form" and "the essence." "In it is reality." It "produced the One, the One produced the two, the two produced the three, and the three produced all things." Its "standard is the Natural." (Lao Tzu).   "Tao has reality and evidence but no action nor form. It may be transmitted, but cannot be received. It may be attained, but cannot be seen. It is its own essence, and its own root." "Tao operates, and results follow." "Tao has no limit." "It is in the ant," "a tare," "a potsherd," "ordure." (Chuang Tzu, between 399 and 295 B.C.). The Confucian "Way;" the teachings of the sage; the moral order, the moral life, truth, the moral law; the moral principle. This means "the fulfillment of the law of our human nature." It is the path of man's moral life. "True manhood (jen) is that by which a man is to be a man. Generally speaking, it is the moral law" (Mencius, 371-289 B.C.). "To proceed according to benevolence and righteousness is called the Way." (Han Yu, 767-824). The Way, which means following the Reason of things, and also the Reason which is in everything and which everything obeys. (Neo-Confucianism). The Way or Moral Law in the cosmic sense, signifying "what is above the realm of corporeality," and the "successive movement of the active (yang) and the passive principles (yin)." In the latter sense as understood both in ancient Confucianism and in Neo-Confucianism, it is interchangeable with the Great Ultimate (T'ai Chi). Shao K'ang-chieh (1011-1077) said that "The Moral Law is the Great Ultimate." Chang Heng-ch'u (1022-1077) identified it with the Grand Harmony (Ta Ho) and said that "from the operation of the vital force (ch'i) there is the Way." This means that the Way is the principle of being as well as the sum total of the substance and functions of things. To Ch'eng I-ch'uan (1033-1107) "There is no Way independent of the active (yang) principle and the passive (yin) principle. Yet it is precisely the Way that determines the active and passive principles. These principles are the constituents of the vital force (ch'i), which is corporeal. On the other hand, the Way transcends corporeality." To Chu Hsi (1130-1200), the Way is "the Reason why things are as they are." Tai Tung-yuan (1723-1777) understood it to mean "the incessant transformation of the universe," and "the operation of things in the world, involving the constant flow of the vital force (ch'i) and change, and unceasing production and reproduction."

Tarkajvālā. (T. Rtog ge 'bar ba). In Sanskrit, the "Blaze of Reasoning"; the extensive prose autocommentary on the MADHYAMAKAHṚDAYA, the major work of the sixth-century Indian MADHYAMAKA (and, from the Tibetan perspective, *SVĀTANTRIKA) master BHĀVAVIVEKA (also referred to as Bhavya and Bhāviveka). The Madhyamakahṛdaya is preserved in both Sanskrit and Tibetan; the Tarkajvālā only in Tibetan. It is a work of eleven chapters, the first three and the last two of which set forth the main points in Bhāvaviveka's view of the nature of reality and the Buddhist path, dealing with such topics as BODHICITTA, the knowledge of reality (tattvajNāna), and omniscience (SARVAJNATĀ). The intervening chapters set forth the positions (and Bhāvaviveka's refutations) of various Buddhist and non-Buddhist schools, including the sRĀVAKA, YOGĀCĀRA, SāMkhya, Vaisesika, Vedānta, and MīmāMsā. These chapters (along with sĀNTARAKsITA's TATTVASAMGRAHA) are an invaluable source of insight into the relations between Madhyamaka and the other Indian philosophical schools of the day. The chapter on the srāvakas, for example, provides a detailed account of the reasons put forth by the srāvaka schools as to why the MAHĀYĀNA sutras are not the word of the Buddha (BUDDHAVACANA). Bhāvaviveka's response to these arguments, as well as his refutation of Yogācāra in the subsequent chapter, are particularly spirited.

tathāgatagarbha. (T. de bzhin gshegs pa'i snying po; C. rulaizang; J. nyoraizo; K. yoraejang 如來藏). In Sanskrit, variously translated as "womb of the TATHĀGATAs," "matrix of the tathāgatas," "embryo of the tathāgatas," "essence of the tathāgatas"; the term probably means "containing a tathāgatha." It is more imprecisely interpreted as the "buddha-nature," viz., the potential to achieve buddhahood that, according to some MAHĀYĀNA schools, is inherent in all sentient beings. The tathāgatagarbha is the topic of several important Mahāyāna sutras, including the TATHĀGATAGARBHASuTRA (with its famous nine similes about the state), the sRĪMĀLĀDEVĪSIMHANĀDASuTRA, the MAHĀPARINIRVĀnASuTRA, and the LAnKĀVATĀRASuTRA (where it is identified with the ĀLAYAVIJNĀNA), as well as the important Indian sĀSTRA, the RATNAGOTRAVIBHĀGA (also known as the Uttaratantra), with a commentary by ASAnGA. The concept is also central to such East Asian apocryphal scriptures as the DASHENG QIXIN LUN and the KŬMGANG SAMMAE KYoNG. The concept of tathāgatagarbha seems to have evolved from a relatively straightforward inspiration that all beings are capable of achieving buddhahood to a more complex doctrine of an almost genetic determination that all beings would eventually become buddhas; the Lankāvatāra goes so far as to describe the tathāgatagarbha itself as possessing the thirty-two marks of a superman (MAHĀPURUsALAKsAnA). Tathāgatagarbha thought seeks to answer the question of why ignorant beings are able to become enlightened by suggesting that this capacity is something innate in the minds of all sentient beings, which has become concealed by adventitious afflictions (ĀGANTUKAKLEsA) that are extrinsic to the mind. "Concealment" (S. saMdhi/abhisaMdhi; C. yinfu) here suggests that the tathāgatagarbha by the presence of the afflictions; or, second, it is an active agent of liberation, which secrets itself away inside the minds of sentient beings so as to inspire them toward enlightenment. The former passive sense is more common in Indian materials; the latter sense of tathāgatagarbha as an active soteriological potency is more typical of East Asian presentations of the concept. Tathāgatagarbha thought could thus claim that enlightenment need involve nothing more rigorous than simply relinquishing the mistaken notion that one is deluded and accepting the fact of one's inherent enlightenment (see also BENJUE; HONGAKU). The notion of tathāgatagarbha was a topic of extensive commentary and debate in India, Tibet, and East Asia. It was not the case, for example, that all Mahāyāna exegetes asserted that all sentient beings possess the tathāgatagarbha and thus the capacity for enlightenment; indeed, the FAXIANG ZONG, an East Asian strand of YOGĀCĀRA, famously asserted that some beings could so completely lose all aspiration for enlightenment that they would become "incorrigible" (ICCHANTIKA) and thus be forever incapable of liberation. There was also substantial debate as to the precise nature of the tathāgathagarbha, especially because some of its descriptions made it seem similar to the notion of a perduring self (ĀTMAN), a doctrine that is anathema to most schools of Buddhism. The srīmālādevīsiMhanāda, for example, described the tathāgatagarbha as endowed with four "perfect qualities" (GUnAPĀRAMITĀ): permanence, purity, bliss, and self, but states that this "self" is different from the "self" (ĀTMAN) propounded by the non-Buddhists. In an effort to avoid any such associations, CANDRAKĪRTI explains that the tathāgatagarbha is not to be understood as an independent quality but rather refers to the emptiness (suNYATĀ) of the mind; it is this emptiness, with which all beings are endowed, that serves as the potential for achieving buddhahood. In Tibet, Candrakīrti's view was taken up by the DGE LUGS sect, while the more literal view of the tathāgatagarbha as an ultimately real nature obscured by conventional contaminants was asserted most famously by the JO NANG. Both the extensive influence of the doctrine and the controversy it provoked points to an ongoing tension in the Mahāyāna between the more apophatic discourse on emptiness, found especially in the PRAJNĀPĀRAMITĀ sutras, and the more substantialist descriptions of the ultimate reality implied by such terms as tathāgatagarbha, DHARMADHĀTU, and DHARMAKĀYA. The term is also central to the larger question of whether enlightenment is something to be achieved through a sequence of practices or something to be revealed in a flash of insight (see DUNWU). See also HIHAN BUKKYo.

tending “Why should a son of fire [i.e., an angel]

TeX point "unit, text" The variant of the {point} used by {TeX}, equal to 0.3514598035 mm, or 1/72.27 inch. [Why yet another variant?] (2002-03-11)

TeX point ::: (unit, text) The variant of the point used by TeX, equal to 0.3514598035 mm, or 1/72.27 inch.[Why yet another variant?](2002-03-11)

The Divine in the beginning docs not impose himself — he asks for recognition, for acceptance. That is one reason why the mind must fall silent, not put tests, not make claims ; there must be room for the true intuition which recognises at once the true touch and accepts it.

The kama-rupic shades, whether mere shells or not, are usually invisible but they are sometimes seen by clairvoyants. The more coherent ones are the shells of gross or wicked people and are influences of sensual or evil trend which instinctively haunt the atmosphere of persons and places whose characters or conditions are congenial to them and therefore magnetically attract them. Even well-meaning sensitives and persons of mediumistic or psychic type, being relatively negative physically because more or less aware on the astral plane, are susceptible, at times, to some of these strangely perverse and obsessing influences. The ancient teachings show why people’s instinctive dread of the ghostly dregs or remnants of the personal self is well founded.

  “The lack of any mutual agreement between writers in the use of this word has resulted in dire confusion. It is commonly made synonymous with soul; and the lexicographers countenance the usage. In Theosophical teachings the term ‘Spirit’ is applied solely to that which belongs directly to Universal Consciousness, and which is its homogeneous and unadulterated emanation. Thus, the higher Mind in Man or his Ego (Manas) is when linked indissolubly with Buddhi, a spirit; while the term ‘Soul,’ human or even animal (the lower Manas acting in animals as instinct), is applied only to Kama-Manas, and qualified as the living soul. This is nephesh, is Hebrew, the ‘breath of life.’ Spirit is formless and immaterial, being, when individualised, of the highest spiritual substance — Suddasatwa [Suddha-sattva], the divine essence, of which the body of the manifesting highest Dhyanis are formed. Therefore, the Theosophists reject the appellation ‘Spirits’ for those phantoms which appear in the phenomenal manifestation of the Spiritualists, and call them ‘shells,’ and various other names. (See Suksham Sarira [sukshma-sarira].) Spirit, in short, is no entity in the sense of having form; for, as Buddhist philosophy has it, where there is a form, there is a cause for pain and suffering. But each individual spirit — this individuality lasting only throughout the manvantaric life-cycle — may be described as a centre of consciousness, a self-sentient and self-conscious centre; a state, not a conditioned individual. This is why there is such a wealth of words in Sanskrit to express the different States of Being, Beings and Entities, each appellation showing the philosophical difference, the plane to which such unit belongs, and the degree of its spirituality or materiality. Unfortunately these terms are almost untranslatable into our Western tongues” (TG 306-7).

The Mother: “Krishna represents both the universal Godhead and the immanent Godhead, he whom one can meet within one’s being and in all that constitutes the manifested world. And do you want to know why he is always represented as a child? It is because he is in constant progression. To the extent that the world is perfected, his play is also perfected—what was the play of yesterday will no longer be the play of tomorrow; his play will become more and more harmonious, benign and joyful to the extent that the world becomes capable of responding to it and enjoying it with the Divine.” Words of the Mother, MCW Vol. 15.

The names of the seven principal rays of the sun are: Sushumna, Harikesa, Visvakarman, Visvatryarchas, Sannaddha, Sarvavasu, and Svaraj. “These seven rays are the entire gamut of the seven occult forces (or gods) of nature, as their respective names well prove. . . . As each stands for one of the creative gods or Forces, it is easy to see how important were the functions of the sun in the eyes of antiquity, and why it was deified by the profane” (TG 315). These principal rays of Surya are from another standpoint the seven solar logoi, each one of the seven having its respective home in the seven sacred planets; equally, there may be said to be twelve rays of the sun, and twelve sacred planets, each one a home or mansion of one of the solar logoi.

Theodicy: (Gr. theos, god, dike, justice) The technical term for the problem of justifying the character of a good, creative and responsible God in the face of such doubts as arise by the fact of evil. If God is good, why evil? -- V.F.

“The question was: ‘In the mystical region, is the dragon bird any relation of your Bird of Fire with ‘gold-white wings’ or your Hippogriff with ‘face lustred, pale-blue-lined’? And why do you write: ‘What to say about him? One can only see’?” Letters on Savitri

  “There were Annedoti who came after him, five in number (our race being the fifth) — ‘all like Oannes in form and teaching the same’; but Musarus Oannes was the first to appear, and this he did during the reign of Ammenon, the third [fourth] of the ten antediluvian Kings whose dynasty ended with Xisuthrus, the Chaldean Noah. . . . This allegory of Oannes, the Annedotus, reminds us of the ‘Dragon’ and ‘Snake-Kings’; the Nagas who in Buddhist legends instruct people in wisdom on lakes and rivers, and end by becoming converts to the good Law and Arhats. The meaning is evident. The ‘fish’ is an old and very suggestive symbol in the Mystery-language, as is also ‘water.’ Ea or Hea was the god of the sea and Wisdom, and the sea serpent was one of his emblems, his priests being ‘serpents’ or Initiates. Thus one sees why Occultism places Oannes and the other Annedoti in the group of those ancient ‘adepts’ who were called ‘marine’ or ‘water dragons’ — Nagas. Water typified their human origin (as it is a symbol of earth and matter and also of purification), in distinction to the ‘fire Nagas’ or the immaterial, Spiritual Beings, whether celestial Bodhisattvas or Planetary Dhyanis, also regarded as the instructors of mankind. The hidden meaning becomes clear to the Occultist, once he is told that ‘this being (Oannes) was accustomed to pass the day among men, teaching; and when the Sun had set, he retired again into the sea, passing the night in the deep, ‘for he was amphibious,’ i.e., he belonged to two planes: the spiritual and the physical. For the Greek word amphibios means simply ‘life on two planes,’ . . . The word was often applied in antiquity to those men who, though still wearing a human form, had made themselves almost divine through knowledge, and lived as much in the spiritual supersensuous regions as on earth. Oannes is dimly reflected in Jonah, and even in John, the Precursor, both connected with Fish and Water” (TG 236-7).

The story of Mel, a Real Programmer "programming, person" A 1983 article by Ed Nather about {hacker} {Mel Kaye}. The full text follows. A recent article devoted to the macho side of programming made the bald and unvarnished statement, "Real Programmers write in FORTRAN". Maybe they do now, in this decadent era of Lite beer, hand calculators and "user-friendly" software but back in the Good Old Days, when the term "software" sounded funny and Real Computers were made out of {drums} and {vacuum tubes}, Real Programmers wrote in {machine code} - not {Fortran}, not {RATFOR}, not even {assembly language} - {Machine Code}, raw, unadorned, inscrutable {hexadecimal} numbers, directly. Lest a whole new generation of programmers grow up in ignorance of this glorious past, I feel duty-bound to describe, as best I can through the generation gap, how a Real Programmer wrote code. I'll call him Mel, because that was his name. I first met Mel when I went to work for {Royal McBee Computer Corporation}, a now-defunct subsidiary of the typewriter company. The firm manufactured the {LGP-30}, a small, cheap (by the standards of the day) {drum}-memory computer, and had just started to manufacture the RPC-4000, a much-improved, bigger, better, faster -- drum-memory computer. Cores cost too much, and weren't here to stay, anyway. (That's why you haven't heard of the company, or the computer.) I had been hired to write a {Fortran} compiler for this new marvel and Mel was my guide to its wonders. Mel didn't approve of compilers. "If a program can't rewrite its own code," he asked, "what good is it?" Mel had written, in {hexadecimal}, the most popular computer program the company owned. It ran on the {LGP-30} and played blackjack with potential customers at computer shows. Its effect was always dramatic. The LGP-30 booth was packed at every show, and the IBM salesmen stood around talking to each other. Whether or not this actually sold computers was a question we never discussed. Mel's job was to re-write the blackjack program for the {RPC-4000}. ({Port}? What does that mean?) The new computer had a one-plus-one addressing scheme, in which each machine instruction, in addition to the {operation code} and the address of the needed {operand}, had a second address that indicated where, on the revolving drum, the next instruction was located. In modern parlance, every single instruction was followed by a {GO TO}! Put *that* in {Pascal}'s pipe and smoke it. Mel loved the RPC-4000 because he could optimize his code: that is, locate instructions on the drum so that just as one finished its job, the next would be just arriving at the "read head" and available for immediate execution. There was a program to do that job, an "optimizing assembler", but Mel refused to use it. "You never know where its going to put things", he explained, "so you'd have to use separate constants". It was a long time before I understood that remark. Since Mel knew the numerical value of every operation code, and assigned his own drum addresses, every instruction he wrote could also be considered a numerical constant. He could pick up an earlier "add" instruction, say, and multiply by it, if it had the right numeric value. His code was not easy for someone else to modify. I compared Mel's hand-optimised programs with the same code massaged by the optimizing assembler program, and Mel's always ran faster. That was because the "{top-down}" method of program design hadn't been invented yet, and Mel wouldn't have used it anyway. He wrote the innermost parts of his program loops first, so they would get first choice of the optimum address locations on the drum. The optimizing assembler wasn't smart enough to do it that way. Mel never wrote time-delay loops, either, even when the balky {Flexowriter} required a delay between output characters to work right. He just located instructions on the drum so each successive one was just *past* the read head when it was needed; the drum had to execute another complete revolution to find the next instruction. He coined an unforgettable term for this procedure. Although "optimum" is an absolute term, like "unique", it became common verbal practice to make it relative: "not quite optimum" or "less optimum" or "not very optimum". Mel called the maximum time-delay locations the "most pessimum". After he finished the blackjack program and got it to run, ("Even the initialiser is optimised", he said proudly) he got a Change Request from the sales department. The program used an elegant (optimised) {random number generator} to shuffle the "cards" and deal from the "deck", and some of the salesmen felt it was too fair, since sometimes the customers lost. They wanted Mel to modify the program so, at the setting of a sense switch on the console, they could change the odds and let the customer win. Mel balked. He felt this was patently dishonest, which it was, and that it impinged on his personal integrity as a programmer, which it did, so he refused to do it. The Head Salesman talked to Mel, as did the Big Boss and, at the boss's urging, a few Fellow Programmers. Mel finally gave in and wrote the code, but he got the test backward, and, when the sense switch was turned on, the program would cheat, winning every time. Mel was delighted with this, claiming his subconscious was uncontrollably ethical, and adamantly refused to fix it. After Mel had left the company for greener pa$ture$, the Big Boss asked me to look at the code and see if I could find the test and reverse it. Somewhat reluctantly, I agreed to look. Tracking Mel's code was a real adventure. I have often felt that programming is an art form, whose real value can only be appreciated by another versed in the same arcane art; there are lovely gems and brilliant coups hidden from human view and admiration, sometimes forever, by the very nature of the process. You can learn a lot about an individual just by reading through his code, even in hexadecimal. Mel was, I think, an unsung genius. Perhaps my greatest shock came when I found an innocent loop that had no test in it. No test. *None*. Common sense said it had to be a closed loop, where the program would circle, forever, endlessly. Program control passed right through it, however, and safely out the other side. It took me two weeks to figure it out. The RPC-4000 computer had a really modern facility called an {index register}. It allowed the programmer to write a program loop that used an indexed instruction inside; each time through, the number in the index register was added to the address of that instruction, so it would refer to the next datum in a series. He had only to increment the index register each time through. Mel never used it. Instead, he would pull the instruction into a machine register, add one to its address, and store it back. He would then execute the modified instruction right from the register. The loop was written so this additional execution time was taken into account -- just as this instruction finished, the next one was right under the drum's read head, ready to go. But the loop had no test in it. The vital clue came when I noticed the index register bit, the bit that lay between the address and the operation code in the instruction word, was turned on-- yet Mel never used the index register, leaving it zero all the time. When the light went on it nearly blinded me. He had located the data he was working on near the top of memory -- the largest locations the instructions could address -- so, after the last datum was handled, incrementing the instruction address would make it overflow. The carry would add one to the operation code, changing it to the next one in the instruction set: a jump instruction. Sure enough, the next program instruction was in address location zero, and the program went happily on its way. I haven't kept in touch with Mel, so I don't know if he ever gave in to the flood of change that has washed over programming techniques since those long-gone days. I like to think he didn't. In any event, I was impressed enough that I quit looking for the offending test, telling the Big Boss I couldn't find it. He didn't seem surprised. When I left the company, the blackjack program would still cheat if you turned on the right sense switch, and I think that's how it should be. I didn't feel comfortable hacking up the code of a Real Programmer." [Posted to {Usenet} by its author, Ed Nather "utastro!nather", on 1983-05-21]. {Jargon File (http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/story-of-mel.html)}. [{On the trail of a Real Programmer (http://www.jamtronix.com/blog/2011/03/25/on-the-trail-of-a-real-programmer/)}, 2011-03-25 blog post by "jonno" at Jamtronix] [When did it happen? Did Mel use hexadecimal or octal?] (2003-09-12)

The story of Mel, a Real Programmer ::: (programming, person) An article devoted to the macho side of programming made the bald and unvarnished statement, Real Programmers write in Fortran. language - Machine Code. Raw, unadorned, inscrutable hexadecimal numbers, directly.Lest a whole new generation of programmers grow up in ignorance of this glorious past, I feel duty-bound to describe, as best I can through the generation gap, how a Real Programmer wrote code. I'll call him Mel, because that was his name.I first met Mel when I went to work for Royal McBee Computer Corporation, a now-defunct subsidiary of the typewriter company. The firm manufactured the faster -- drum-memory computer. Cores cost too much, and weren't here to stay, anyway. (That's why you haven't heard of the company, or the computer.)I had been hired to write a Fortran compiler for this new marvel and Mel was my guide to its wonders. Mel didn't approve of compilers.If a program can't rewrite its own code, he asked, what good is it?Mel had written, in hexadecimal, the most popular computer program the company owned. It ran on the LGP-30 and played blackjack with potential customers at every show, and the IBM salesmen stood around talking to each other. Whether or not this actually sold computers was a question we never discussed.Mel's job was to re-write the blackjack program for the RPC-4000. (Port? What does that mean?) The new computer had a one-plus-one addressing scheme, in which drum, the next instruction was located. In modern parlance, every single instruction was followed by a GO TO! Put *that* in Pascal's pipe and smoke it.Mel loved the RPC-4000 because he could optimize his code: that is, locate instructions on the drum so that just as one finished its job, the next would be was a program to do that job, an optimizing assembler, but Mel refused to use it.You never know where its going to put things, he explained, so you'd have to use separate constants.It was a long time before I understood that remark. Since Mel knew the numerical value of every operation code, and assigned his own drum addresses, every pick up an earlier add instruction, say, and multiply by it, if it had the right numeric value. His code was not easy for someone else to modify.I compared Mel's hand-optimised programs with the same code massaged by the optimizing assembler program, and Mel's always ran faster. That was because the they would get first choice of the optimum address locations on the drum. The optimizing assembler wasn't smart enough to do it that way.Mel never wrote time-delay loops, either, even when the balky Flexowriter required a delay between output characters to work right. He just located practice to make it relative: not quite optimum or less optimum or not very optimum. Mel called the maximum time-delay locations the most pessimum.After he finished the blackjack program and got it to run, (Even the initialiser is optimised, he said proudly) he got a Change Request from the Mel to modify the program so, at the setting of a sense switch on the console, they could change the odds and let the customer win.Mel balked. He felt this was patently dishonest, which it was, and that it impinged on his personal integrity as a programmer, which it did, so he refused program would cheat, winning every time. Mel was delighted with this, claiming his subconscious was uncontrollably ethical, and adamantly refused to fix it.After Mel had left the company for greener pa$ture$, the Big Boss asked me to look at the code and see if I could find the test and reverse it. Somewhat reluctantly, I agreed to look. Tracking Mel's code was a real adventure.I have often felt that programming is an art form, whose real value can only be appreciated by another versed in the same arcane art; there are lovely gems and reading through his code, even in hexadecimal. Mel was, I think, an unsung genius.Perhaps my greatest shock came when I found an innocent loop that had no test in it. No test. *None*. Common sense said it had to be a closed loop, where the it, however, and safely out the other side. It took me two weeks to figure it out.The RPC-4000 computer had a really modern facility called an index register. It allowed the programmer to write a program loop that used an indexed instruction address of that instruction, so it would refer to the next datum in a series. He had only to increment the index register each time through. Mel never used it.Instead, he would pull the instruction into a machine register, add one to its address, and store it back. He would then execute the modified instruction right taken into account -- just as this instruction finished, the next one was right under the drum's read head, ready to go. But the loop had no test in it.The vital clue came when I noticed the index register bit, the bit that lay between the address and the operation code in the instruction word, was turned on-- yet Mel never used the index register, leaving it zero all the time. When the light went on it nearly blinded me.He had located the data he was working on near the top of memory -- the largest locations the instructions could address -- so, after the last datum was instruction set: a jump instruction. Sure enough, the next program instruction was in address location zero, and the program went happily on its way.I haven't kept in touch with Mel, so I don't know if he ever gave in to the flood of change that has washed over programming techniques since those that I quit looking for the offending test, telling the Big Boss I couldn't find it. He didn't seem surprised.When I left the company, the blackjack program would still cheat if you turned on the right sense switch, and I think that's how it should be. I didn't feel comfortable hacking up the code of a Real Programmer.[Posted to USENET by its author, Ed Nather utastro!nather>, on 1983-05-21]. .[When did it happen? Did Mel use hexadecimal or octal?](2003-09-12)

The subconscient is universal as well as individual like all the other main parts of the Nature. But there are different parts or planes of the subconscient. All upon earth is based on the Inconscient as it is called, though it is not really inconscient at all, but rather a complete "sub"-conscience, a suppressed or involved consciousness, in which there is everything but nothing is formulated or expressed. The subconscient lies between this Inconscient and the conscious mind, life and body. It contains the potentiality of all the primitive reactions to life which struggle out to the surface from the dull and inert strands of Matter and form by a constant development a slowly evolving and self-formulating consciousness; it contains them not as ideas, perceptions or conscious reactions but as the fluid substance of these things. But also all that is consciously experienced sinks down into the subconscient, not as precise though submerged memories but as obscure yet obstinate impressions of experience, and these can come up at any time as dreams, as mechanical repetitions of past thought, feelings, action, etc., as "complexes" exploding into action and event, etc., etc. The subconscient is the main cause why all things repeat themselves and nothing ever gets changed except in appearance. It is the cause why people say character cannot be changed, the cause also of the constant return of things one hoped to have got rid of for ever. All seeds are there and all Sanskaras of the mind, vital and body,—it is the main support of death and disease and the last fortress (seemingly impregnable) of the Ignorance. All too that is suppressed without being wholly got rid of sinks down there and remains as seed ready to surge up or sprout up at any moment.
   Ref: SABCL Vol. 22-23-24, Page: 354


  "The truest reason why we must seek liberation is not to be delivered, individually, from the sorrow of the world, though that deliverance too will be given to us, but that we may be one with the Divine, the Supreme, the Eternal.” *The Synthesis of Yoga

“The truest reason why we must seek liberation is not to be delivered, individually, from the sorrow of the world, though that deliverance too will be given to us, but that we may be one with the Divine, the Supreme, the Eternal.” The Synthesis of Yoga

The vital spirit or spirit of life runs throughout all the seven principles whether human or cosmic, so that there is a direct and distinct application of this word even to the highest or spiritual part of any being. Indeed, life itself which permeates the entire human and cosmic constitution is derived originally from the spiritual monad, which explains why hayyah is connected in meaning with neshamah (spirit), being equivalent to buddhi.

“The word soul is very vaguely used in English—as it often refers to the whole non-physical consciousness including even the vital with all its desires and passions. That was why the word psychic being has to be used so as to distinguish this divine portion from the instrumental parts of the nature.” Letters on Yoga

“This arrangement of the psychic body is reproduced in the physical with the spinal column as a rod and the ganglionic centres as the chakras which rise up from the bottom of the column, where the lowest is attached, to the brain and find their summit in the brahmarandhra at the top of the skull. These chakras or lotuses, however, are in physical man closed or only partly open, with the consequence that only such powers and only so much of them are active in him as are sufficient for his ordinary physical life, and so much mind and soul only is at play as will accord with its need. This is the real reason, looked at from the mechanical point of view, why the embodied soul seems so dependent on the bodily and nervous life,—though the dependence is neither so complete nor so real as it seems. The whole energy of the soul is not at play in the physical body and life, the secret powers of mind are not awake in it, the bodily and nervous energies predominate. But all the while the supreme energy is there, asleep; it is said to be coiled up and slumbering like a snake,—therefore it is called the kundalinî sakti,—in the lowest of the chakras, in the mûlâdhâra.” The Synthesis of Yoga

This dynamic and orderly character of the universe is due to Reason and the vital force. As the Ch'eng brothers (I-ch'uan, 1033-1077, and Min-tao, 1032-1086) said, "All things have the same Reason in them." Thus, Reason combines the Many into One, while the vital force differentiates the One into the Many, each with its own "determinate nature." The two principles, however, are not to be sharply contrasted, for neither is independent of the other. Reason operates through, and is embodied in, the vital force. It is this cooperative functioning of theirs that makes the universe a cosmos, a harmonious system of order and sequence. "Centrality is the order of the universe and harmony is its unalterable law." As such the cosmos is a moral order. This is the main reason why the greatest of the Neo-Confucians, Chu Hsi (1130-1200) said that "the Great Ultimate is nothing but the Reason of ultimate goodness."

This is why a person has less weight on the moon, not so much because some parts of us are "gone", but because the moon exerts less gravity. While a person, or anything else, would have exactly the same mass on Earth as it has on the moon. (Or anywhere else, for that matter.)

tingqian boshuzi. (J. teizen no hakujushi; K. chongjon paeksuja 庭前柏樹子). In Chinese, "cypress tree in front of the courtyard"; a CHAN expression that becomes a popular meditative topic (HUATOU) and is used in Chan questioning meditation (KANHUA CHAN). The phrase appears in a GONG'AN exchange attributed to the Tang-dynasty monk ZHAOZHOU CONGSHEN (778-897): Once when Zhaozhou was asked, "Why did Bodhidharma come from the West?" (XILAI YI), he replied, "Cypress tree in front of the courtyard," suggesting that enlightenment, the reason that Bodhidharma traveled to China, is to be found in everyday experience. This gong'an appears as case no. 37 in the WUMEN GUAN ("Gateless Checkpoint"). See also XILAI YI.

toolsmith The software equivalent of a tool-and-die specialist; one who specialises in making the {tools} with which other programmers create applications. Many hackers consider this more fun than applications per se; to understand why, see {uninteresting}. Jon Bentley, in the "Bumper-Sticker Computer Science" chapter of his book "More Programming Pearls", quotes Dick Sites from DEC as saying "I'd rather write programs to write programs than write programs". [{Jargon File}]

Toshodaiji. (唐招提寺). In Japanese, "Monastery for a Tang Wanderer"; located in the ancient Japanese capital of Nara and the head monastery of the VINAYA school (J. Risshu). Toshodaiji was originally a residence for Prince Niitabe, who donated it to the Tang-Chinese monk GANJIN (C. Jianzhen; 688-763), the founder of the vinaya school (RISSHu) in Japan. Ganjin came to Japan in 759 at the invitation of two Japanese monks who had studied with him in China at his home monastery of Damingsi (J. Daimyoji) in present-day Yangzhou. Ganjin tried to reach Japan five times before finally succeeding; then sixty-six and blind, he established an ordination platform at ToDAIJI before moving to Toshodaiji, where he passed away in 763. The monastery's name thus refers to Ganjin, a "wandering monk from Tang." The kondo, the golden hall that is the monastery's main shrine, was erected after Ganjin's death and finished around 781, followed three decades later by the monastery's five-story pagoda, which was finished in 810. The kondo is one of the few Nara-period temple structures that has survived and is one of the reasons why the monastery is so prized. It was built in the Yosemune style, with a colonnade with eight pillars, and enshrines three main images: the cosmic buddha VAIROCANA at the center, flanked by BHAIsAJYAGURU, and a thousand-armed AVALOKITEsVARA (see SĀHASRABHUJASĀHASRANETRĀVALOKITEsVARA), only 953 of which remain today, with images of BRAHMĀ and INDRA at the sides and statues of the four heavenly king protectors of Buddhism standing in each corner. The kodo, or lecture hall, was moved to the monastery from Heijo Palace and is the only extant structure that captures the style of a Tenpyo palace; it houses a statue of the bodhisattva MAITREYA. A kyozo, or SuTRA repository, holds the old library. The monastery also includes a treasure repository, a bell tower, and an ordination platform in the lotus pond. In 763, as Ganjin's death neared, he had a memorial statue of himself made and installed in his quarters at Toshodaiji. This dry-lacquer statue of a meditating Ganjin is enshrined today in the mieido (image hall), but is brought out for display only on his memorial days of June 5-7 each year; it is the oldest example in Japan of such a memorial statue. Toshodaiji was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1998.

To summarize: what modern usage calls heredity, the transmission of characteristics from parents to children, is not a merely physiologic or biologic mechanism acting automatically or fortuitously; but actually is brought about because of the attraction to certain families, or certain parents, of reimbodying egos possessing in greater or larger degree the same characteristics which the parents themselves have. On identic lines is to be explained the reason why races and even nations continue with their respective characteristics; egos are drawn to similar fields for incarnation. Thus it is that the transmission of type and characteristics continues both racially and individually from generation to generation, always modified by the individualities of the reimbodying egos.

Tragedy of the Commons - A parable that illustrates why common resources get used more than is desirable from the standpoint of society as a whole.

Transmigration ::: This word is grossly misunderstood in the modern Occident, as also is the doctrine comprised under theold Greek word metempsychosis, both being modernly supposed to mean, through the commonmisunderstanding of the ancient literatures, that the human soul at some time after death migrates into thebeast realm and is reborn on earth in a beast body. The real meaning of this statement in ancient literaturerefers to the destiny of what theosophists call the life-atoms, but it has absolutely no reference to thedestiny of the human soul, as an entity.Theosophy accepts all aspects of the ancient teaching, but explains and interprets them. Our doctrine inthis respect unless, indeed, we are treating of the case of a "lost soul,"is "once a man, always a man." Thehuman soul can no more migrate over and incarnate in a beast body than can the psychical apparatus of abeast incarnate in human flesh. Why? Because in the former case, the beast vehicle offers to the humansoul no opening at all for the expression of the spiritual and intellectual and psychical powers andfaculties and tendencies which make a man human. Nor can the soul of the beast enter into a humanbody, because the impassable gulf of a psychical and intellectual nature, which separates the twokingdoms, prevents any such passage from the one up into another so much its superior in all respects. Inthe former case, there is no attraction for the man beastwards; and in the latter case there is theimpossibility of the imperfectly developed beast mind and beast soul finding a proper lodgment in whatto it is truly a godlike sphere which it simply cannot enter.Transmigration, however, has a specific meaning when the word is applied to the human soul: the livingentity migrates or passes over from one condition to another condition or state or plane, as the case maybe, whether these latter be in the invisible realms of nature or in the visible realms, and whether the stateor condition be high or low. The specific meaning of this word, therefore, implies nothing more than achange of state or of condition or of plane: a migrating of the living entity from one to the other, butalways in conditions or estates or habitudes appropriate and pertaining to its human dignity.In its application to the life-atoms, to which are to be referred the observations of the ancients withregard to the lower realms of nature, transmigration means briefly that the particular life-atoms, which intheir aggregate compose man's lower principles, at and following the change that men call death migrateor transmigrate or pass into other bodies to which these life-atoms are attracted by similarity ofdevelopment -- be these attractions high or low, and they are usually low, because their own evolutionarydevelopment is as a rule far from being advanced. Nevertheless, it should be remembered that theselife-atoms compose man's inner -- and outer -- vehicles or bodies, and that in consequence there arevarious grades or classes of these life-atoms, from the physical upwards (or inwards if you please) to theastral, purely vital, emotional, mental, and psychical.This is, in general terms, the meaning of transmigration. The word means no more than the specificsenses just outlined, and stops there. But the teaching concerning the destiny of the entity is continuedand developed in the doctrine pertaining to the word metempsychosis.

Twin Vector Quantization ::: (audio, compression) (VQF) Part of the MPEG-4 standard dealing with time domain weighted interleaved vector quantization.[Why VQF?](2001-12-17)

Twin Vector Quantization "audio, compression" (VQF) Part of the {MPEG-4} {standard} dealing with time domain weighted interleaved {vector quantization}. [Why "VQF"?] (2001-12-17)

twm ::: Tab Window Manager.A window manager for the X Window System. Twm provides titlebars, shaped windows, several forms of icon management, user-defined macro functions, click-to-type and pointer-driven keyboard focus, and user-specified key and pointer button bindings. It can be extensively configured by a startup file.Twm was written by Tom LaStrange, Solbourne Computer; Jim Fulton, MIT X Consortium; Steve Pitschke, Stardent Computer; Keith Packard, MIT X Consortium; Dave Sternlicht, MIT X Consortium; Dave Payne, Apple Computer.An extended version, vtwm, provides a virtual desktop.[Why Tab?] (1995-02-14)

twm Tab Window Manager. A {window manager} for the {X Window System}. Twm provides {titlebars}, shaped windows, several forms of icon management, user-defined macro functions, {click-to-type} and pointer-driven {keyboard focus}, and user-specified key and pointer button bindings. It can be extensively configured by a startup file. Twm was written by Tom LaStrange, {Solbourne Computer}; Jim Fulton, MIT {X Consortium}; Steve Pitschke, {Stardent Computer}; Keith Packard, MIT X Consortium; Dave Sternlicht, MIT X Consortium; Dave Payne, {Apple Computer}. An extended version, {vtwm}, provides a {virtual desktop}. [Why "Tab"?] (1995-02-14)

upāyakausalya. (P. upāyakosalla; T. thabs mkhas; C. fangbian shanqiao; J. hobenzengyo; K. pangpy'on son'gyo 方便善巧). In Sanskrit, "skillful means," "skill-in-means," or "expedient means," a term used to refer to the extraordinary pedagogical skills of the buddhas and advanced BODHISATTVAs; indeed, upāyakausalya is listed as one of the ten perfections (PĀRAMITĀ) mastered on the bodhisattva path. (The rare Pāli form refers specifically to the Buddha's teaching proficiency.) The notion of skillful means is adumbrated in the famous "simile of the raft" from the ALAGADDuPAMASUTTA, where the Buddha compares his teachings to a makeshift raft that will help one get across a raging river to the opposite shore: after one has made it across that river of birth and death to the "other shore" of NIRVĀnA, the teachings have served their purpose and may be abandoned; in one sense, therefore, all his teachings are merely an expedient. The notion of skill-in-means also suggests that the Buddha intentionally fashions different versions of his teachings to fit the predelictions and aptitudes of his audience. Because of a buddha's direct understanding of his disciples' abilities, he is able to teach what is most appropriate for each of them, like a doctor prescribing a treatment for a specific malady. Skillful means may also be used to justify why certain acts perceived as immoral by beings of lesser capacity become virtues when performed by a bodhisattva, who has their best interests at heart (see UPĀYAKAUsALYASuTRA). ¶ The Buddha's skill-in-means is often used to reconcile apparent contradictions in his teaching, since those teachings ultimately are provisional expressions of his realization. The notion of skillful means has also been put to polemical use, especially in the MAHĀYĀNA (and most famously in the SADDHARMAPUndARĪKASuTRA), when previous teachings of the Buddha, such as the three vehicles (TRIYĀNA), are declared by him to have been merely expedients that he employed to instruct disciples who were unable to comprehend the more profound teaching of the one vehicle (EKAYĀNA) of buddhahood. The concept of skillful means may thus also be deployed as a hermeneutical or polemical device to critique earlier, and implicitly inferior, formulations of Buddhist doctrine as expedient teachings given to those who are temporarily incapable of understanding and benefitting from the Buddha's more advanced teachings (as variously identified by different Buddhist schools).

Vasudeva (Sanskrit) Vāsudeva The son of Vasudeva — Krishna. The Mahabharata, however, gives another explanation why Krishna was given this name: as the divinity is present, or has its dwelling (vasana), in all beings, so does Krishna, for he issued as a Vasu from a divine womb. This reference to Krishna is not so much to the imbodied human semblance of the divinity, but to the divinity itself working in and through this imbodiment.

Vichara: Enquiry into the nature of the Self, Brahman or Truth; ever-present reflection on the why and wherefore of things; enquiry into the real meaning of the Mahavakya Tat-tvam-asi; discrimination between the Real and the unreal; enquiry of Self.

Vital joy ::: Though it is a very helpful thing for the ordinary human life, vital joy is something excited, eager, mobile wnfhout a settled basis — that is why it soon gels tired and cannot con- tinue. Vital joy has to be replaced by a quiet settled psychic gladness with the mind and vital very clear and very peaceful.

voodoo programming ::: (jargon) (From George Bush's voodoo economics) The use by guess or cookbook of an obscure or hairy system, feature, or algorithm that one does not doesn't, one will never know why. Almost synonymous with black magic, except that black magic typically isn't documented and *nobody* understands it.Compare magic, deep magic, heavy wizardry, rain dance, cargo cult programming, wave a dead chicken.[Jargon File] (1995-03-10)

voodoo programming "jargon" (From George Bush's "voodoo economics") The use by guess or cookbook of an obscure or {hairy} system, feature, or algorithm that one does not truly understand. The implication is that the technique may not work, and if it doesn't, one will never know why. Almost synonymous with {black magic}, except that black magic typically isn't documented and *nobody* understands it. Compare {magic}, {deep magic}, {heavy wizardry}, {rain dance}, {cargo cult programming}, {wave a dead chicken}. [{Jargon File}] (1995-03-10)

"We speak of the evolution of Life in Matter, the evolution of Mind in Matter; but evolution is a word which merely states the phenomenon without explaining it. For there seems to be no reason why Life should evolve out of material elements or Mind out of living form, unless we accept the Vedantic solution that Life is already involved in Matter and Mind in Life because in essence Matter is a form of veiled Life, Life a form of veiled Consciousness.” The Life Divine

“We speak of the evolution of Life in Matter, the evolution of Mind in Matter; but evolution is a word which merely states the phenomenon without explaining it. For there seems to be no reason why Life should evolve out of material elements or Mind out of living form, unless we accept the Vedantic solution that Life is already involved in Matter and Mind in Life because in essence Matter is a form of veiled Life, Life a form of veiled Consciousness.” The Life Divine

Whatever movement is impressed in it, it keeps. If one impresses the right movement in it, it will keep and send up that. That is why it has to be cleared of old movements, before there can be a permanent and total change in natuce. When the higher consciousness Is once established in the waking parts, it goes down into the subconsclent and changes that also, makes a bed- rock of itself there also. Then no further trouble from the subconsclent will be possible. But even before that one can minimise the trouble by putting the right will and the right habit of reaction in the subconsclent parts.

*What is meant here is the Divine in its essential manifestation which reveals itself to us as Light and Consciousness, Power, Love and Beauty. But in its actual cosmic manifestation the Supreme, being the Infinite and not bound by any limitation, can manifest in itself, in its consciousness of innumerable possibilities, something that seems to be the opposite of itself, something in which there can be Darkness, Inconscience, Inertia, Insensibility, Disharmony and Disintegration. It is this that we see at the basis of the material world and speak of nowadays as the Inconscient—the inconscient Ocean of the Rigveda in which the One was hidden and arose in the form of this Universe,— or, as it is sometimes called, the non-being, Asat. The Ignorance which is the characteristic of our mind and life is the result of this origin in the Inconscience. Moreover, in the evolution out of inconscient existence there rise up naturally powers and beings which are interested in the maintenance of all negations of the Divine, error and unconsciousness, pain, suffering, obscurity, death, weakness, illness, disharmony, evil. Hence the perversion of the manifestation here, its inability to reveal the true essence of the Divine. Yet in the very base of this evolution all that is divine is there involved and pressing to evolve, Light, Consciousness, Power, Perfection, Beauty, Love. For in the Inconscient itself and behind the perversions of the Ignorance Divine Consciousness lies concealed and works and must more and more appear, throwing off in the end its disguises. That is why it is said that the world is called to express the Divine.

“When one has the cosmic consciousness, one can feel the cosmic Self as one’s own self, one can feel one with other beings in the cosmos, one can feel all the forces of Nature as moving in oneself, all selves as one’s own self. There is no why except that it is so, since all is the One.” Letters on Yoga (See also Cosmic Spirit)

when the rabbi asks Judas Iscariot why the dogs

Whereas temples or fanes of initiation were found among all peoples, as much on the plains as in the mountains, it was almost invariably the custom for centers of occult training, especially the higher branches, to be found on the lofty plateaus of mountain chains, and not solely because of the need of separation from the hurly-burly of human life as found in populated districts and their cities. An important reason why mountains or secluded spots are invariably chosen for secret training centers is that the currents and waves of the astral light become quieter and more peaceful the higher one ascends above the surface of the earth.

wherefore ::: 1. For what purpose or reason; why? 2. For what reason? Why?

wherefore ::: adv. & conj. --> For which reason; so; -- used relatively.
For what reason; why; -- used interrogatively. ::: n. --> the reason why.


whidah bird ::: --> Any one of several species of finchlike birds belonging to the genus Vidua, native of Asia and Africa. In the breeding season the male has very long, drooping tail feathers. Called also vida finch, whidah finch, whydah bird, whydah finch, widow bird, and widow finch.

why ::: adv. --> For what cause, reason, or purpose; on what account; wherefore; -- used interrogatively. See the Note under What, pron., 1.
For which; on account of which; -- used relatively.
The reason or cause for which; that on account of which; on what account; as, I know not why he left town so suddenly; -- used as a compound relative. ::: n.


whydah bird ::: --> Alt. of Whydah finch

whydah finch ::: --> The whidah bird.

why-not ::: n. --> A violent and peremptory procedure without any assigned reason; a sudden conclusive happening.

WHY should we weep or mourn, Angelic boy,

wicca ::: Wicca A modern witchcraft religion founded in 1954 by Gerald Gardner, who called his new religion Wicca. He likened it to a resurgence of European witchcraft, which he believed was a collection of ancient Pagan religions. Gerald Gardner claimed to have been initiated into a secret witch cult which had been in existence for over 300 years, which is why Wicca is often referred to as The Old Religion. Many believe the development of Wicca was influenced by Gardner's association with Aleister Crowley as many of his original 'Wiccan' rituals were copied from Crowley's Thelemic rituals. See also Alexandrian Wicca.

wisecraft ::: Jhumur: “– Instead of saying witchcraft he says wisecraft. It is an interesting thing because witch, the word comes from ‘wit’ and that I think originally is the same root as wisdom. It has associations of evil and so here he uses the idea of magic but it is something that is magic beyond our comprehension which it is why it is some kind of wisecraft. It is wisdom beyond our understanding which is what we call ‘magic’.”

WTF ::: who/what/why the fuck? The universal interrogative particle. Also WTH.

WTF who/what/why the fuck? The universal interrogative particle. Also {WTH}.

WTH ::: who/what/why the hell? Also WTF.

WTH who/what/why the hell? Also {WTF}.

wu gong'an. (J. mukoan; K. mu kongan 無公案). In Chinese, "the case 'no'"; an influential CHAN case or precedent (GONG'AN) associated with the Tang-dynasty Chan master ZHAOZHOU CONGSHEN (778-897). In this exchange, once a student came to Zhaozhou and asked, "Does a dog have the buddha-nature (FOXING), or not?" Zhaozhou answered, "No" (lit., "It does not have it"). The complete exchange from which this gong'an is drawn continues: "Everything has buddha-nature, from the buddhas above, to the ants below. Why wouldn't a dog have it?" Zhaozhou replied: "Because he has the nature of karmically conditioned consciousness." This response seems to be associated with Chan debates concerning the Sinitic Buddhist doctrine of the "buddha-nature of the insentient" (wuqing foxing), which presumed that all insentient things, including rocks and tiles, trees, and grass, were also endowed with the buddha-nature; thus, if even rocks have the buddha-nature, why not dogs? Since the answer to the student's question should unequivocally be "Yes, a dog does have the buddha-nature," Zhaozhou's enigmatic response, which Wumen calls a "checkpoint of the patriarchs," seems to challenge one of the foundational beliefs of East Asian Buddhism; in so doing, it engenders a question in the student's mind, which will help to foster inquiry and ultimately a sense of doubt (YIQING). This answer "WU" ("no") became a popular meditative topic (HUATOU) in the Chan meditation practice of "questioning meditation" (KANHUA CHAN) and is one of the most important gong'ans used in kanhua Chan training, especially in the Chinese LINJI ZONG and Japanese RINZAISHu lineages, as well as in the Korean CHOGYE CHONG. The wu gong'an is the first case collected in the gong'an anthology WUMEN GUAN ("Gateless Checkpoint"), and its use in kanhua practice was popularized by the Chinese Linji teacher DAHUI ZONGGAO (1089-1163). See also GOUZI WU FOXING.

Xiangyan Zhixian. (J. Kyogen Chikan; K. Hyangom Chihan 香嚴智閑) (d. 898). Chinese CHAN master in the GUIYANG ZONG of the Chan tradition. Zhixian entered the monastery under BAIZHANG HUAIHAI and later became a student of YANGSHAN HUIJI. Zhixian dwelled for a long time at Mt. Xiangyan, whence his toponym. One day while he was sweeping the garden, Zhixian is said to have attained awakening when he heard the bamboo brush against the roof tiles. He is best known for the GONG'AN case "Xiangyan Hanging from a Tree": A man is dangling by his mouth from the branch of a tall tree, his hands tied behind his back and nothing beneath his feet. Someone comes under the tree branch and asks, "Why did BODHIDHARMA come from the West?" If he keeps his mouth clenched and refuses to answer, he is rude to the questioner; but if he opens his mouth to answer, he will fall to his death. How does he answer? Upon Zhixian's death, he was given the posthumous title Chan master Xideng (Inheritor of the Lamplight).

xilai yi. (J. seiraii; K. sorae ŭi 西來意). In Chinese, lit. "the meaning of coming from the west"; in CHAN literature, a common allusion to the question "What was the meaning of [Bodhidharma's] coming from the west?" (xilai yi ruohe), i.e., "Why did BODHIDHARMA, the founding patriarch of Chan, come from India to propagate Chan?" This question was commonly asked in Chan GONG'AN exchanges to test the spiritual depth of a teacher or disciple and as a meditative topic in "questioning meditation" (KANHUA CHAN). The phrase is found in HUANGBO XIYUN's (d. c. 850) CHUANXIN FAYAO, and the use of the question is well displayed in a famous exchange involving MAZU DAOYI (709-788) and his disciple Hongzhou Shuiliao (d.u.): when Shuiliao asks Mazu this question, Mazu encourages him to come closer, whereupon he kicks him to the ground, and Shuiliao immediately jumps up, enlightened. ZHAOZHOU CONGSHEN's (778-897) answer to this question is the famous gong'an: "Cypress tree in front of the courtyard" (TINGQIAN BOSHUZI). Some of the other answers that appear in Chan literature include "sitting for a long time is a bother" (BIYAN LU, case no. 17), "there is no meaning in Bodhidharma's coming from the west" (Biyan lu, case no. 20), and "Zang's head is white, Hai's head is black" (Biyan lu, case no. 73).

yogipratyaksa. (T. rnal 'byor mngon sum; C. dingguan zhi; J. jokanchi; K. chonggwan chi 定觀知). In Sanskrit, "yogic direct perception"; a specific variety of direct perception (PRATYAKsA) that is typically presumed to derive from meditative practice (BHĀVANĀ; YOGA). A direct intuition of the real obtained through meditative practice, this type of understanding was accepted as a valid means of knowledge by most of the traditional Indian religious schools. In Buddhism, the psychological analysis of the notion of yogipratyaksa and the related yogijNāna (yogic knowledge or cognition) was undertaken by DHARMAKĪRTI (c. 600-670) in his PRAMĀnAVĀRTTIKA and NYĀYABINDU, as well as by his commentators. Dharmakīrti's predecessor DIGNĀGA (c. 480-540) had posited that there were only two reliable sources of knowledge (PRAMĀnA): direct perception (PRATYAKsA) and logical inference (ANUMĀNA). Dharmakīrti, however, subdivided direct perception (pratyaksa) into four subtypes, viz., sensory cognition (indriyajNāna), mental discrimination (MANOVIJNĀNA), self-awareness (SVASAMVEDANA), and yogic cognition (yogijNāna). In Dharmakīrti's analysis, yogic cognition (yogijNāna) is a form of yogic perception (yogipratyaksa), because it fulfills the two conditions of perception (pratyaksa): (1) it is devoid of conceptual construction (KALPANĀ); and (2) it is a cognition that is "nonerroneous" (abhrānta), viz., real. The treatment of yogipratyaksa in the literature thus focuses on how yogipratyaksa fulfills these two conditions of perception. Yogic knowledge is devoid of conceptual construction (kalpanā), Dharmakīrti maintains, because it is nonconceptual (akalpa; NIRVIKALPA) and thus "vivid" or "distinct" (spasta). This type of perception is therefore able to perceive reality directly, without the intercession of mental images or concepts. Since yogic cognition is said to be devoid of conceptual construction, this raises the issue of its second condition, its lack of error. Why is meditatively induced perception true and reliable? How does a meditator's yogic perception differ from the hallucinations of the deranged, since both of them presume they have a vivid cognition of an object? The reason, Dharmakīrti maintains, is that the objects of yogic knowledge are "true" or "real" (bhuta; sadbhuta), whereas hallucinations are "false" or "unreal" objects (abhuta; asadbhuta). The only true objects of yogic knowledge offered by Dharmakīrti are the FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS: that is, the perception of these truths is true and reliable because they enable one to reach the goal of enlightenment, not because they involve a perception of an ultimate substance. In this sense, Dharmakīrti's understanding of yogijNāna is more focused on the direct realization of the soteriological import of the four noble truths than on extraordinary sensory ability. Therefore, yogic direct perception is qualitatively different from the various forms of clairvoyance that are the byproducts of deep states of concentration that may be achieved by both Buddhist and non-Buddhist practitioners. Yogipratyaksa is a form of insight (VIPAsYANĀ) posssessed only by noble persons (ĀRYAPUDGALA); and among the five paths it occurs only on the path of vision (DARsANAMĀRGA) and above. See also DARsANA.

zeroth "jargon" First. Since zero is the lowest value of an {unsigned} {integer}, which is one of the most fundamental types in programming and {hardware} design, it is often natural to count from zero rather than one, especially when the integer is actually an {index} or {offset}, as used when addressing {hardware} and {arrays}. Hackers, computer scientists and pure mathematicians often like to call the first chapter of a publication "Chapter 0", especially if it is of an introductory nature (one of the classic instances was in the First Edition of {K&R}). Zero-based numbering tends to reduce {fencepost errors}, though it cannot eliminate them entirely. Logically, the next item after the zeroth should be the "oneth" but this is never used. [Dijkstra, "Why Numbering Should Start at Zero" {(http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/EWD/transcriptions/EWD08xx/EWD831.html)}]. [{Jargon File}] (2010-02-28)

Zoolatry [from Greek zoon animal + latreia worship] Animal worship; animal symbols are found in all religions, as in the religions of ancient Egypt and in Christianity, as the dove and the lamb. The Maharajas of the four quarters of space are sometimes represented as elephants; most of the zodiacal signs are animals, as the name implies. These symbols should not be regarded as arbitrarily chosen on account of a fancied resemblance: the animals are actually emblems, if not in all cases manifestations, of the powers in question. It is the same with plants and stones: they are not emblems only but actually enshrine certain occult qualities. If plants may have medicinal virtues, and stones possess magical powers, why may not animals have the same? The phrase animal worship implies that the veneration has often been transferred from the power to its symbol or emblem, as in the case of idolatry.



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   68 The Mother
   15 Sri Ramakrishna
   14 Sri Aurobindo
   10 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   9 Saint Thomas Aquinas
   7 Sri Sarada Devi
   5 Aleister Crowley
   4 Swami Akhandananda
   3 Taigu Ryokan
   3 Sri Ramana Maharshi
   3 Jordan Peterson
   3 Jalaluddin Rumi
   3 Hermes
   3 Bill Hicks
   2 Thomas A Kempis
   2 Swami Ramakrishnananda
   2 Stephen King
   2 Sri Ramakrishna
   2 Saint Leo the Great
   2 Saint Ambrose
   2 Robert Anton Wilson
   2 Omar Khayyam
   2 Noam Chomsky
   2 Nikola Tesla
   2 Lao-Tse: Tao-te-King
   2 Ken Wilber
   2 Joseph Campbell
   2 Jiddu Krishnamurti
   2 James S A Corey
   2 Charles F Haanel
   2 Chamtrul Rinpoche
   2 Carl Jung
   2 Bertrand Russell
   2 Alfred Korzybski
   2 Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
   2 Meister Eckhart
   2 Kabir
   1 William Faulkner
   1 Wilfred Owen
   1 Wayne Dyer
   1 Viktor Frankl
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   1 Vemara
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   1 Tolstoy
   1 Tolstoi
   1 Thomas Keating
   1 Thich Nhat Hanh
   1 The Mother
   1 the last color to stand out was yellow because it is the most vivid of colors. That's why you have the Yellow Cab Company in the United States. At first they thought of making the cars scarlet. Then somebody found out that at night or when there was a fog that yellow stood out in a more vivid way than scarlet. So you have yellow cabs because anybody can pick them out. Now when I began to lose my eyesight
   1 Tertullian
   1 Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche
   1 Tauler; Institutions
   1 Sylvia Plath
   1 Swami Turiyananda
   1 SWAMI PREMANANDA
   1 SWAMI BRAHMANANDA
   1 Swami Adbhutananda
   1 Sufi saying
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   1 Sri Ramama Maharshi
   1 Sri Ramakrishna: One has to realize the Supreme Self. One has to attain Self-knowledge. After that the body may remain or go. Till then the body has to be taken care of.
   1 Socrates
   1 Simone Weil
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   1 Robert Heinlein
   1 Robert Adams
   1 Roald Dahl
   1 Richard P Feynman
   1 Richard Feynman
   1 Rene Descartes
   1 Reddit
   1 really fast. I'm puzzling over something
   1 Quodvultdeus
   1 Philip K Dick
   1 Petrarca
   1 Owen Barfield
   1 Our Lady how this thread
   1 Nolini Kanta Gupta
   1 M Scott Peck
   1 Mother Teresa of Calcutta
   1 Mortimer Jerome Adler
   1 Montaigne
   1 Mohyiddin in Arabi
   1 Miriam
   1 Michio Kaku
   1 Michel de Montaigne
   1 Matthew XX
   1 MATA AMRITANANDAMAYI
   1 Martin Luther King
   1 Martin Heidegger
   1 Mark Twain
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   1 J Michael Straczynski
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   1 Huang Po
   1 Howard Gardner
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   1 Hazrat Inayat Khan
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   1 Hakuin Ekaku
   1 G K Chesterton
   1 Georg C Lichtenberg
   1 Gabor Mate
   1 Fyodor Dostoevsky
   1 Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling
   1 Friedrich Nietzsche
   1 Fo-shu-hing-tsan-king
   1 Ezra Pound
   1 Elon Musk
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   1 Eddie Cantor
   1 Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse
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   26 Anonymous
   22 William Shakespeare
   12 John Green
   11 Simon Sinek
   9 Rumi
   8 Rick Riordan
   7 Stephen King
   7 Richelle Mead
   7 George Carlin
   7 Friedrich Nietzsche
   6 J K Rowling
   6 E L James
   6 David Whyte
   6 Cassandra Clare
   5 Tarryn Fisher
   5 Steven Wright
   5 Stephenie Meyer
   5 Lewis Carroll
   5 John C Maxwell
   5 Carl Jung

1:Not why the addiction, but why the pain. ~ Gabor Mate,
2:Why fit in when you were born to stand out?" ~ Dr. Seuss,
3:Thinking is difficult, that's why most people judge. ~ Carl Jung,
4:That is why it is falling apart. ~ Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina,
5:Why are there beings at all, instead of Nothing? ~ Martin Heidegger,
6:Are you not the Self? Why trouble about other matters? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
7:Why does God allow evil in the world? To thicken the plot. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
8:He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how.
   ~ Friedrich Nietzsche,
9:My own thoughts are struggling against me. Why am I drawn to the bait? ~ Petrarca,
10:Dreams have only one owner at a time. That's why dreamers are lonely. ~ William Faulkner,
11:Many live like angels in the midst of the world. Why not you?" ~ Saint Josemaria Escriva,
12:Dead yesterdays and unborn tomorrows, why fret about it, if today be sweet." ~ Omar Khayyam,
13:All a poet can do today is warn. That is why the true Poets must be truthful. ~ Wilfred Owen,
14:Why read? Because we are given more than we are. ~ James V. Schall, Another Sort of Learning,
15:This is why, like E.M. Forster, I do not believe in belief ~ Karl Popper, 'Objective Knowledge',
16:You see this and that. Why not see God? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
17:No one really knows why they are alive until they know what they'd die for. ~ Martin Luther King,
18:Why seek a doctrine? As soon as you have a doctrine, you fall into dualistic thought." ~ Huang Po,
19:But why am I so favored, that the mother of my Lord should come to me? (Luke 1:43) ~ Saint Elizabeth,
20:Why stand ye here all the day idle? ~ Matthew XX, the Eternal Wisdom
21:Why entertain any fear? All conditions can turn favourable by the will of the Master. ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
22:Within your own house dwells the treasury of joy; so why do you go begging door to door." ~ Sufi saying,
23:Being perfect, why do you feel yourself imperfect? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
24:There is no reason why the same man should like the same books at eighteen and at forty-eight ~ Ezra Pound
25:The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why. ~ Mark Twain,
26:Why did Jordan Peterson cross the road?
The answer isn't obvious. It's no joke man. ~ Reddit, hardlygospel,
27:Yesterday is history, tomorrow is mystery, today is God's gift, that why we call it the present." ~ Joan Rivers,
28:If you press me to say why I loved him, I can say no more than because he was he, and I was I. ~ Michel de Montaigne,
29:An optimist may see a light where there is none, but why must the pessimist always run to blow it out? ~ Rene Descartes,
30:You are the children of the Master; why should you be drowned? No, never. The Master will protect you. ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
31:You have left Your Beloved and are thinking of others:
and this is why your work is in vain. ~ Kabir,
32:Drink ! For you know not whence you came, nor why; Drink ! For you know not why you go nor where.
   ~ Omar Khayyam, Rubaiyat,
33:When I feed the hungry, they call me a saint. When I ask why people are hungry, they call me a Communist. ~ Dom Helder Camara,
34:Why, then, do you fear to take up the cross when through it you can win a kingdom? ~ Thomas A Kempis, The Imitation of Christ,
35:Why analyze and see the evil? Move toward the Lord! Through His grace you will be freed from all passions. ~ Swami Turiyananda,
36:Why are you so enchanted by this world, when a mine of gold lies within you?
   ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
37:The treasure of joy is closer to you than you are to yourself-so why should you go searching from door to door?
   ~ Sufi Proverb,
38:we do not have knowledge of a thing until we have grasped its why, that is to say, its cause.
   ~ Aristotle,
39:Why do you so earnestly seek the truth in distant places? Look for delusion and truth in the bottom of your own heart." ~ Taigu Ryokan,
40:Why go on pruning the ego? That is just what it wants — to be the center of attraction. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Conscious Immortality,
41:The question "why?" asks for a cause ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on Metaphysics 7, lect. 17).,
42:Why was I born, O God, if not to find Thee?
   Why do I die, O God, if not to come to Thee?
   ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan, Sayings of Hazrat Khan,
43:God is in all people, but all people are not in God -- that is the reason why they suffer. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
44:Why do we not doubt whether our thoughts and actions are not another sort of dreaming, and our waking a certain kind of sleep? ~ Montaigne,
45:Know that you are a God and consequently the Lord of the senses. Why should you allow the senses to lord over you? ~ Swami Ramakrishnananda,
46:Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than the imagination when awake?
   ~ Leonardo da Vinci,
47:Clarity of mind means clarity of passion; this is why a great and clear mind loves ardently and sees distinctly what it loves.
   ~ Blaise Pascal,
48:Know that you have already achieved liberation in this very birth. Why do you fear? In time the Master will do everything for you. ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
49:I have realized why corrupt politicians do nothing to improve the quality of public school education. They are terrified of educated voters. ~ Miriam,
50:We have not understood the present. Why should we seek to know the future? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Day By Day, 10-2-46,
51:Slow down and enjoy life. It's not only the scenery you miss by going too fast - you also miss the sense of where you are going and why." ~ Eddie Cantor,
52:There is such a thing as loving God without knowing why. If this comes, there is nothing more to desire. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
53:Tell me why you should be in search of a goal? Why are you not content with the present condition? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
54:To live is to choose. But to choose well, you must know who you are and what you stand for, where you want to go and why you want to get there. ~ Kofi Annan,
55:That is why I have summoned you all to enter into the intimacy of my Heart in order to work this veritable transformation in you." ~ Our Lady how this thread,
56:If it were possible to meet the Beloved while laughing and in a state of comfort, why should one suffer the anguish of separation? ~ Kabir,
57:If you pray hard enough, you can make water run uphill. How hard? Why, hard enough to make water run uphill, of course!
   ~ Robert Heinlein, Expanded Universe.,
58:A Great Silence overcomes me,
and I wonder why I ever thought
to use language.
~ Jalaluddin Rumi, @Sufi_Path
59:The saint does not seek to do great things; that is why he is able to accomplish them. ~ Lao-Tse: Tao-te-King, the Eternal Wisdom
60:Why should human frailty fear to go to Mary? In her there is no austerity, nothing terrible: she is all sweetness, offering milk and wool to all. ~ Saint Bernard,
61:Do Japa and meditation as you like, provided you keep your mind steadfast in the Lord. You will attain to your goal in this way. Why do you worry? ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
62:Why do we put people who are on drugs in jail? They're sick, they're not criminals. Sick people don't get healed in prison. You see? It makes no sense. ~ Bill Hicks,
63:If God assigns to me my place in Hell, I do not know why I should aspire to Heaven. He knows best what is for my welfare. ~ Sri Aurobindo,
64:Why do you say you are troubled and so on? You could as well remain quiet. Why do you rise out of your composure? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
65:Knowing that the train carries all the weight, why should we carry our luggage instead of sitting at perfect ease? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
66:The good of the universe is the reason why God wills each and every particular good in the universe ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (ScG 1.86).,
67:Why do you wonder that globetrotting does not help you, seeing that you always take yourself with you? The reason that set you wandering is ever at your heels. ~ Socrates,
68:A person is a fool to become a writer. His only compensation is absolute freedom. He has no master except his own soul, and that, I am sure, is why he does it
   ~ Roald Dahl,
69:Being in it, why search for it? The ancients say: Making the vision absorbed in jnana, one sees the world as Brahman. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
70:To question too much is not good. It is difficult to properly assimilate even one thought. Now why should you trouble your mind by harbouring ten thoughts? ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
71:Why do you amass stones and construct great temples? Why do you vex yourselves thus when God dwells within you ? ~ Vemara, the Eternal Wisdom
72:Knowing the train carries the weight, why carry our luggage instead of putting them aside and sitting at perfect ease? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
73:Mother, why do I lose things so often?

   Because you do not keep things sufficiently in your consciousness.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
74:There are two reasons why one may question something: Some question because of disbelief, as did Zechariah ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Lk 1:18).,
75:Before I was myself, I was God in God, that is why I can again become that when I shall be dead to myself. ~ Angelus Silesius, the Eternal Wisdom
76:That is why it is permitted to him who has attained to the truty within, to say, "I am the true Divine." ~ Mohyiddin in Arabi, the Eternal Wisdom
77:The nearest thing Common Lisp has to a motto is the koan-like description, the programmable programming language.
   ~ ?, http://www.gigamonkeys.com/book/introduction-why-lisp.html,
78:Why does the devotee take such delight in addressing the Deity as mother? Because the child is free with its mother -- the dearest. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
79:Cast off hypocrisy. It is because of this that you do not progress. If your devotion is genuine, there is no reason why you should not progress and realize God. ~ Swami Adbhutananda,
80:Why talk of sin and hell-fire all the days of your life? Chant the name of God. Have faith in God and you will be purged of all sins. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
81:It is God who constantly inspires thought and sentiment in the heart of devotees, that is why they never lack in what is new and wise. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
82:Why are we on earth?

   To find the Divine who is in each of us and in all things.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II, The True Aim of Life [3],
83:The Master used to say, 'Don't jump into the ocean of Maya, for you may be eaten up by sharks and crocodiles.' But why should you worry? You have the Master with you. ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
84:The vain main of intellect is busy finding out the why and wherefore of creation, while the humble man acquaints himself with the creator. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
85:Why is it that people are fed at religious feasts? It is the same as offering a sacrifice to God, who is the Living Fire in all creatures. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
86:The new law requires you to keep perpetual sabbath, and you, because you are idle for one day, suppose you are pious, not discerning why this has been commanded you. ~ Saint Justin Martyr,
87:I am weeping without knowing why.

   Weep if you like, but do not worry. After the rain the sun shines more bright.
   ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother,
88:Where there is Isness, there God is. Creation is the giving of isness from God. And that is why God becomes where any creature expresses God. ~ Meister Eckhart,
89:Run to his feet - He is standing close to you head right now You have slept for millions and millions of years. Why not wake up this morning." ~ Kamir, 15th-cent. Indian mystic poet, Wikipedia,
90:So often, science fiction helps to get young people interested in science. That's why I don't mind talking about science fiction. It has a real role to play: to seize the imagination. ~ Michio Kaku,
91:The reason you want to be better is the reason why you aren't, shall I put it like that? We aren't better because we want to be. Because the road to hell is paved with good intentions. ~ Alan Watts,
92:Pray: 'O Lord, give unto me this yearning, make me mad for You.' Let people say, so-and-so has become mad for God. People may become mad for so many things. Why not you for God? ~ Swami Akhandananda,
93:312. Each man of us has a million lives yet to fulfil upon this earth. Why then this haste and clamour and impatience?
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human, Karma[53],
94:Why do you not spend the time which you have free from your duties in the church in reading? Why do you not go back again to see Christ? Why do you not address Him, and hear His voice? ~ Saint Ambrose,
95:There is a greater accumulation of divinity in man. Man is Narayana Himself. If God can manifest Himself through an image, then why not through man also? ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
96:43. If God assigns to me my place in Hell, I do not know why I should aspire to Heaven. He knows best what is for my welfare.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human, Jnana,
97:Why do men want to worship?

   It is far better to become than to worship. It is the reluctance to change that makes one worship.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III, [T5],
98:The foundation of man's life is the dwelling in him of the divine Spirit equal in all men. And that is why men among themselves are all equal. ~ Tolstoy, the Eternal Wisdom
99:30. If Will stops and cries Why, invoking Because, then Will stops & does nought.
31. If Power asks why, then is Power weakness. ~ Aleister Crowley, The Book of the Law,
100:Read the gospel attentively and you will see that Jesus sacrificed even charity for prayer. And do you know why? To teach us that, without God, we are too poor to help the poor. ~ Mother Teresa of Calcutta,
101:Why do you believe in what the astrologers say? It is the belief that brings the trouble.

   Sri Aurobindo says that a man becomes what he thinks he is.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
102:While repeating the name of the Lord, you will see His form - effulgent and smiling. You will also smile and then weep, and say, ' Why did You not appear before? Why have You come so late?' ~ Swami Akhandananda,
103:That is one of the many reasons why I avoid speaking as much as possible. For I always say either too much or too little, which is a terrible thing for a man with a passion for truth like mine... ~ Samuel Becket,
104:The ego doesn't exist. You think it exists and that's why you think you have to do all these techniques to get rid of it. If you just realized all of a sudden that it doesn't exist, you'd be free. ~ Robert Adams,
105:God with form and the formless God are both equally true. One cannot keep one's mind on the formless God a long time. That is why God assumes form for His devotees. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
106:If you belonged to the world, it would love you as its own. As it is, you do not belong to the world, but I have chosen you out of the world. That is why the world hates you.
   ~ Anonymous, The Bible, John, 15:19,
107:Only, intelligence has to recognize by the methods proper to it... the pre-eminence of love. It must not yield unless it knows why, and it must know this quite precisely and clearly. ~ Simone Weil, Gravity & Grace,
108:If you give God something, you receive it back a thousand times over. That is why after doing meritorious deeds one offers a handful of water to God. It is the symbol of offering the fruit to God. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
109:You are here to contact your soul, and that is why you live. Aspire persistently and try to silence your mind. The aspiration must come from the heart.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
110:The reason why in his Church he made some apostles, some confessors, and others martyrs, is for the beauty and completion of the Church ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on John 6).,
111:This is why I would put to profit the present moment, penetrated with the conviction that now has come the right moment to seek for the Truth. ~ Fo-shu-hing-tsan-king, the Eternal Wisdom
112:Why think merely of your disease and ill health? Know always, and under all circumstances, 'I belong to the Lord. The Lord is my eternal treasure; He is the one Reality, the source of my well-being.' ~ SWAMI PREMANANDA,
113:Why was not man created good from the beginning?

   It is not God who made man wicked. It is man who makes himself wicked by separating himself from God.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
114:The idea of the future, pregnant with an infinity of possibilities, is thus more fruitful than the future itself, and this is why we find more charm in hope than in possession, in dreams than in reality.
   ~ Henri Bergson,
115:Q.: Sir, why does one take so much care of his body? ~ Sri Ramakrishna: One has to realize the Supreme Self. One has to attain Self-knowledge. After that the body may remain or go. Till then the body has to be taken care of.,
116:We have no choice but to be cosmopolitans and patriots, which means to fight for the kind of patriotism that is open to universal solidarities against other, more closed kinds. ~ Charles Taylor, Why Democracy Needs Patriotism,
117:All things are divinely arranged in a proportionate way. This is why it is said in the Book of Wisdom ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (11:20) that God made all things, "in weight, number and measure.",
118:Why does it take many people such a long time to realize Him? - MASTER: The truth is that a man doesn't feel restless for God unless he is finished with his enjoyments and duties. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
119:That is why the incorporeal eye** should be raised to contemplate not the figure, not the body, not the appearance, but that which is calm, tran quil, solid, immutable. ~ Hermes, the Eternal Wisdom
120:Be thou ashamed, O Sidon, for the sea speaketh. And if you ask why, listen to the cause: for a small gain they travel far; for eternal life many will scarcely lift a foot from the ground. ~ Thomas A Kempis, The Imitation of Christ,
121:There is every reason why the standards in our civilization are so low, because we have "poisoned," in a literal sense of the word, our minds with the physico-chemical effects of wrong ideas. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
122:Why are we all joy when we have done a good action ? Because each good action assures us that our true "I" is not limited to our own person, but exists in all that lives. ~ Tolstoi, the Eternal Wisdom
123:Anyone who is honestly trying to be a Christian will soon find his intelligence being sharpened: one of the reasons why it needs no special education to be a Christian is that Christianity is an education itself." ~ C. S. Lewis, p. 78,
124:Essentially there is but one single true reason for living: it is to know oneself. We are here to learn - to learn what we are, why we are here, and what we have to do. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954,
125:Language is different but man is the same everywhere. That is why spoken Reason is one, and through its translation we see it to be the same in Egypt, in Persia and in Greece. ~ Hermes, the Eternal Wisdom
126:Why do you stay in prison when the door is wide open? Be empty of worrying. Think of who created thought. Move outside the tangle of fear-thinking. Live in silence. Flow down and down in always widening rings of being. ~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
127:There is no reality except the one contained within us. That is why so many people live such an unreal life. They take the images outside of them for reality and never allow the world within to assert itself. ~ Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf,
128:If you make much of mind you make much of doubt. People are skeptics. Why? Because they make much of this little mind. But the mind never directs man properly. Go beyond the mind and you will go beyond all doubts. ~ Swami Ramakrishnananda,
129:Why do you so earnestly seek the truth in distant places? Look for delusions and truth in the bottom of your own hearts." ~ Taigu Ryokan, (1758-1831) eccentric Sōtō Zen Buddhist monk, remembered for his poetry and calligraphy, Wikipedia.,
130:'Why do you turn your face away?' We think that God has turned his face away from us when we find ourselves suffering, so that shadows overwhelm our feelings and stop our eyes from seeing the brilliance of the truth. ~ Saint Ambrose of Milan,
131:But most men, I know not why, love better to deceive themselves and fight obstinately for an opinion which is to their taste than to seek without obduracy the truth ~ Cicero, "Academy" II. 13, the Eternal Wisdom
132:First there is a time when we believe everything, then for a little while we believe with discrimination, then we believe nothing whatever, and then we believe everything again - and, moreover, give reasons why we believe. ~ Georg C Lichtenberg,
133:There is no help in changing your environment. The obstacle is the mind, which must be overcome, whether at home or in the forest. If you can do it in the forest, why not in the home? Therefore, why change the environment? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi,
134:The supreme virtue does not consider itself a virtue and that is why it is virtue: the inferior positively believes itself to be virtue and that is why it is not virtue. ~ Lao-Tse: Tao-te-King, the Eternal Wisdom
135:Instead of trying to produce a programme to simulate the adult mind, why not rather try to produce one which simulates the child's? If this were then subjected to an appropriate course of education one would obtain the adult brain. ~ Alan Turing,
136:My heart feels arid, sad and gloomy, Mother.

   Why don't you try to read something beautiful and interesting and turn your attention away from yourself? That is the best remedy.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
137:Love loves Being in an a priori way, for it knows that no science will ever track down the ground of why something exists rather than nothing at all. It receives it as a free gift and replies with free gratitude. ~ Hans Urs von Balthasar, GL V.647,
138:Why not improve life for the world's poorest first. Is it so impossible to move business from private greed to public good?" ~ Anita Lucia Roddick, (1942 -2007) a British businesswoman, human rights activist and environmental campaigner, Wikipedia.,
139:When his life was ruined, his family killed, his farm destroyed, Job knelt down on the ground and yelled up to the heavens, Why god? Why me? and the thundering voice of God answered, There's just something about you that pisses me off. ~ Stephen King,
140:Why is intuition superior to reason?
   - Because it does not depend upon experience or memory and frequently brings about the solution to our problems by methods concerning which we are in entire ignorance.
   ~ Charles F Haanel, The Master Key System,
141:His will be done! He is omnipotent! What power has man? All that you can do is to love God. Have intense yearning for Him. The whole world is mad for something; why run mad after fleeting objects of this world? Better be mad for God. ~ SWAMI BRAHMANANDA,
142:In this life no one can fulfill his longing, nor can any creature satisfy man's desire. Only God satisfies, he infinitely exceeds all other pleasures. That is why man can rest in nothing but God." ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
143:If a man is detested by the crowd, you must examine, before you judge him, why they condemn, and if a man is venerated by the crowd, equally must you, before you judge, examine why they admire. ~ Confucius, the Eternal Wisdom
144:He who is not angry when there is just cause for anger is immoral. Why? Because anger looks to the good of justice. And if you can live amid injustice without anger, you are immoral as well as unjust. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas,
145:If you're not happy with what you have, then why would you want more." ~ Wayne Dyer, (1940-2015), an American self-help author and a motivational speaker. His first book, "Your Erroneous Zones", (1976), is one of the best-selling books of all time, Wikipedia.,
146:If you, in a surge of initial enthusiasm, do japa and meditation indiscriminately for long hours, your head may get heated and many other problems may arise. That is why it is advised that one should learn these practices from a Satguru. ~ MATA AMRITANANDAMAYI,
147:How many times... have you encountered the saying, 'When the student is ready, the Master speaks?' Do you know why that is true? The door opens inward. The Master is everywhere, but the student has to open his mind to hear the Masters Voice. ~ Robert Anton Wilson,
148:There is no need for the younger clergy to go to the houses of widows or virgins, except for the sake of a definite visit, and in that case only with the elder clergy, that is, with the bishop. . . . Why should we give room to the world to revile? ~ Saint Ambrose,
149:For true success ask yourself these four questions: Why? Why not? Why not me? Why not now?" ~ James Allen, (1864 - 1912) British philosopher, wrote inspirational books and poetry, pioneer of the self-help movement. His best known work, "As a Man Thinketh," Wikipedia.,
150:Nor does she believe it loss of honour that she is soon to be the Mother of God. For why should she be in despair over the novelty of such conception, to whom the power of the most High has promised to effect it. Her implicit faith is confirmed. ~ Saint Leo the Great,
151:Why should you be helpless? Does not the Master guide you through good and bad? Why should you be so worried? I have deposited you at His holy feet. You will have to move about within that circle; you can't go beyond it. He is always protecting you. ~ Sri Sarada Devi,
152:Children are nowhere taught, in any systematic way, to distinguish true from false, or meaningful from meaningless, statements. Why is this so? Because their elders, even in the democratic countries, do not want them to be given this kind of education. ~ Aldous Huxley,
153:No one can obtain felicity by pursuit. This explains why one of the elements of being happy is the feeling that a debt of gratitude is owed, a debt that cannot be repaid... To be conscious of gratitude is to acknowledge a gift. ~ Josef Pieper, Happiness & Contemplation,
154:The Word of the Father, which is a certain concept of His intellect, is the splendor and wisdom by which He knows Himself. That is why the Apostle calls the Son, the splendor of glory ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, (Commentary on Hebrews 1).,
155:The light of Christ is eternally glowing with luminous radiance and can never be extinguished by the darkness of sin. This is why John the evangelist says: "The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has never been able to overpower it." ~ Saint Maximus of Turin,
156:Because of our wisdom, we will travel far for love. All movement is a sign of thirst. Most speaking really says "I am hungry to know you." Every desire of your body is holy. Dear one, why wait until you are dying to discover that divine Truth? ~ Hafiz,
157:All books will tell you the same truth, perhaps in slightly different ways. Instead of wasting time reading book after book why not realize for yourself what was obvious from the very first book. ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, From the Mounth Path,
158:Every family has to be traced back to its origins. That is why we can say that all these great churches constitute that one original Church of the apostles; for it is from them that they all come. They are all primitive, all apostolic, because they are all one. ~ Tertullian,
159:Philosophy explains by distinguishing... [I]t works with distinctions, it brings them out and dwells on them, dwells with them, showing how and why the things that it has distinguished must be distinguished one from the other. ~ Robert Sokolowski, 'The Method of Philosophy',
160:Your eyes are blindfolded; because there is the cloud of Maya before you. Your mind is dirty. Wash it, cleanse it - this is Sadhana. Faith and conviction of mind will grow according to your surroundings. That is why the company of holy men is necessary. ~ Swami Akhandananda,
161:Why are you afraid, Herod, when you hear of the birth of a king? He does not come to drive you out, but to conquer the devil. But because you do not understand this you are disturbed and in a rage, and to destroy one child whom you seek, you show your cruelty. ~ Quodvultdeus,
162:Many times we despise someone without any reason. Why? Simply, because that person personifies some errors that we carry well hidden within and we do not like that person exhibiting them. In fact, deep within us, we carry the errors that we blame others for. ~ Samael Aun Weor,
163:Why do we exist at all?…If there is a meaning or significance to it all [i.e human life], where do we find it? When we come to doubt the meaning of our existence in this way, when we have become a question to ourselves, the religious quest awakens within us. ~ Keiji Nishitani,
164:Things happen without cause and reason and, after all, what does it matter, who is who? Your high opinion of me is your opinion only. Any moment you may change it. Why attach importance to opinions, even your own? ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
165:Sometimes I would like to cry. I close my eyes. Why weren't we designed so that we can close our ears as well? (Perhaps because we would never open them.) Is there some way that I could accelerate my evolution and develop earlids?" ~ Kate Atkinson, Behind the Scenes at the Museum,
166:Whenever the state... becomes a tyranny, lying and falsehood grow proportionately [and] truth is deprived of its value; it ceases to be the norm and is replaced by success. Why? Because it is through truth that the person is reassured of his dignity and freedom. ~ Romano Guardini,
167:But it is not only the martyrs who share in his passion by their glorious courage; the same is true, by faith, of all who are reborn through baptism. That is why we are to celebrate the Lord's paschal sacrifice with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth. ~ Saint Leo the Great,
168:If Christ thought it necessary to send out his intimate disciples in this fashion, just as the Father had sent him, then surely it was necessary that they whose mission was to be modeled on that of Jesus should see exactly why the Father had sent the Son. ~ Saint Cyril of Alexandria,
169:Too lazy to be ambitious, I let the world take care of itself. Ten days' worth of rice in my bag; a bundle of twigs by the fireplace. Why chatter about delusion and enlightenment? Listening to the night rain on my roof, I sit comfortably, with both legs stretched out." ~ Taigu Ryokan,
170:I feel a darkness obstructing the back of my head. My head feels heavy and dark. Why has this happened to me and what is it?

   Most often these attacks are the result of bad thoughts you have had, which fall back on you.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
171:How many times... have you encountered the saying, 'When the student is ready, the Master speaks?' Do you know why that is true? The door opens inward. The Master is everywhere, but the student has to open his mind to hear the Masters Voice.
   ~ Robert Anton Wilson, Masks of the Illuminati,
172:And so because I too am, why am I asking you to come into me, who would not be unless you were in me? I am not hell, after all; and yet even in hell, you are present; for if I descend into hell, you are there ~ Saint Augustine of Hippo, Confessions 1.2).,
173:Studies strengthen the mind and turn its concentration away from the impulses and desires of the vital. Concentrating on study is one of the most powerful ways of controlling the mind and the vital; that is why it is so important to study.
   ~ The Mother, On Education,
174:Why don't you give your power of attorney to God? Rest all your responsibilities on Him. If you entrust an honest man with your responsibilities, will he misuse his power over you? God alone knows whether or not He will punish you for your sins. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
175:Desire to have Him. Be angry with Him. Ask Him, 'Why are You not coming to me?' Direct all emotions - love, anger, etc., towards Him. Be greedy to taste His playful life, His name and form. Be infatuated with His beauty. Feel proud that you have loved Him and got His assurance ~ Swami Akhandananda,
176:The world is but a reflection of my imagination. Whatever I want to see, I can see. But why should I invent patterns of creation, evolution and destruction? I do not need them and have no desire to lock up the world in a mental picture. ~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj,
177:If a man repeats the name of God, his body, mind, and everything become pure. Why should one talk only about sin and hell, and such things? Say but once, 'O Lord, I have undoubtedly done wicked things, but I won't repeat them.' And have faith in His name. ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
178:The study of truth requires a considerable effort - which is why few are willing to undertake it out of love of knowledge - despite the fact that God has implanted a natural appetite for such knowledge in the minds of men. ~ Saint Thomas Aquinas, Summa Contra Gentiles,
179:A man who becomes conscious of the responsibility he bears toward a human being who affectionately waits for him, or to an unfinished work, will never be able to throw away his life. He knows the 'why' for his existence, and will be able to bear almost any 'how'.
   ~ Viktor Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning,
180:Why should you be in safety when the whole world is in danger? What is your special virtue, your special merit for which you should be so specially protected?

   In the Divine alone is there safety. Take refuge in Him and cast away all fear.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III,
181:The truest reason why we must seek liberation is not to be delivered, individually, from the sorrow of the world, though that deliverance too will be given to us, but that we may be one with the Divine, the Supreme, the Eternal. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga, The Divine Work,
182:Tell us, Mother, why do things go against us?

   You must not worry about these little things, and above all do not believe in fatality. These little failures always have a cause that can be avoided with a little more experience, which is sure to come.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
183:I love you. "I" is before "you" . I love you for what you bring to I. If the I is before you, that's a selfish love. Allah ta alaa teaches us a selfless love. That's why in the Fatiha you say "You we seek, You we beseech... Welcome to the Book of Love." ~ Shaykh Ninowy, @Sufi_Path
184:If you wish to know why we must renounce all semblances, the reason is this that they are only mean to lead us to the simple and naked truth. If I wish, then, to arrive at that truth I must leave behind by little by little the road which leads me to it. ~ Tauler; Institutions, the Eternal Wisdom
185:I can never read all the books I want; I can never be all the people I want and live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all the skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live and feel all the shades, tones and variations of mental and physical experience possible in life. And I am horribly limited. ~ Sylvia Plath,
186:My desire and wish is that the things I start with should be so obvious that you wonder why I spend my time stating them. This is what I aim at because the point of philosophy is to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it. ~ Bertrand Russell,
187:But, nevertheless, if there is even the slightest recognition, liberation is easy. Should you ask why this is so-it is because once the awesome, terrifying and fearful appearances arise, the awareness does not have the luxury of distraction. The awareness is one-pointedly concentrated.
   ~ Karma-glin-pa, The Tibetan Book of the Dead,
188:Why, O men born from the earth, do you yield yourselves to death, when it is permitted to you to obtain immortality? Return to yourselves, O you who walk in error and languish in ignorance, withdraw from the light that is darkness, renounce corruption, take part in immortality. ~ Hermes, the Eternal Wisdom
189:Sciences omnipotent in vain
By which men learn of what the suns are made,
Transform all forms to serve their outward needs,
Ride through the sky and sail beneath the sea,
But learn not what they are or why they came; ~ Sri Aurobindo, Savitri, The Dream Twilight of the Earthly Real,
190:Warriors I we call ourselves warriors? But of what fashion of warriors, tell me then, are we? We battle, O disciple, that is why we are called warriors. Why do we battle, O Master? For lofty virtue, for high discernment, for sublime wisdom,-that is why we are called warriors. ~ Anguttara Nikaya, the Eternal Wisdom
191:There is much wisdom in the words of Nietzsche: "He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how." I can see in these words a motto which holds true for any psychotherapy. In the Nazi concentration camps, one could have witnessed that those who knew that there was a task waiting for them to fulfill were most apt to survive. ~ Viktor E Frankl,
192:Why is there this dark and idiotic personality in me? Does it lie hidden in everyone or am I an especially difficult case?

   Certainly you are not the only one. Many are like this. Only those who have centered their whole being around the conscious control of the psychic can cure themselves of it.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
193:When a thought is expressed in speech, the vibration of the sound has a considerable power to bring the most material substance into contact with the thought, thus giving it a concrete and effective reality. That is why one must never speak ill of people or things or say things which go against the progress of the divine realisation in the world. This is an absolute general rule. August 1953. ~ The Mother
194:Why do men cling to a religion?

   Religions are based on creeds which are spiritual experiences brought down to a level where they become more easy to grasp, but at the cost of their integral purity and truth. The time of religions is over. We have entered the age of universal spirituality, of spiritual experience in its initial purity.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III,
195:The mind is sharper and keener in seclusion and uninterrupted solitude. No big laboratory is needed in which to think. Originality thrives in seclusion free of outside influences beating upon us to cripple the creative mind. Be alone, that is the secret of invention; be alone, that is when ideas are born. That is why many of the earthly miracles have had their genesis in humble surroundings. ~ Nikola Tesla,
196:He who knows that He is the supreme Lord, becomes that, and the gods themselves cannot prevent him...He who adores any other divinity, has not the knowledge. He is as cattle for the gods. Even as numerous cattle serve to nourish men, so each man serves to nourish the gods...That is why the gods love not that a man should know That. ~ Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, the Eternal Wisdom
197:... The undivine, therefore, is all that is unwilling to accept the light and force of the Mother. That is why I am always telling you to keep yourself in contact with the Mother and with her Light and Force, because it is only so that you can come out of this confusion and obscurity and receive the Truth that comes from above. ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Mother With Letters On The Mother,
198:Far from it being true that man and his activity makes the world comprehensible, he is himself the most incomprehensible of all, and drives me relentlessly to the view of the accursedness of all being, a view manifested in so many painful signs in ancient and modern times. It is precisely man who drives me to the final despairing question: Why is there something? Why not nothing? ~ Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling,
199:To put it all very plainly, evolution can continue. It has already brought forth humans from amoebas- why on earth should we think that after that prodigious feat lasting billions of years, evolution just petered out and wound down? And if the ratio "amoeba to human" is repeated, the result could only be God. The mystics simply show us the stages of higher evolution leading to that Summit. ~ Ken Wilber, The Atman Project,
200:The real meaning of persona is a mask, such as actors were accustomed to wear on the ancient stage; and it is quite true that no one shows himself as he is, but wears his mask and plays his part. Indeed, the whole of our social arrangements may be likened to a perpetual comedy; and this is why a man who is worth anything finds society so insipid, while a blockhead is quite at home in it. ~ Arthur Schopenhauer, Essays Vol 4,
201:It's a wonderful thing to be able to create your own world whenever you want to. Writing is very pleasurable, very seductive, and very therapeutic. Time passes very fast when I'm writing~really fast. I'm puzzling over something, and time just flies by. It's an exhilarating feeling. How bad can it be? It's sitting alone with fictional characters. You're escaping from the world in your own way and that's fine. Why not? ~ Woody Allen,
202:It is an invaluable possession for every living being to have learnt to know himself and to master himself. To know oneself means to know the motives of one's actions and reactions, the why and the how of all that happens in oneself. To master oneself means to do what one has decided to do, to do nothing but that, not to listen to or follow impulses, desires or fancies. ~ The Mother, On Education, Teachers [T3],
203:If I work I feel all right, but the fatigue comes after that. Why? What to do?

   It is because you are receptive to the force when you work and that sustains you. But when you are not under the strain of the work you are less receptive. You must learn to be receptive in all circumstances and always - especially when you take rest - it must not be the 'rest' of inertia but a true rest of receptivity.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
204:The best protection against propaganda of any sort is the recognition of it for what it is. Only hidden and undetected oratory is really insidious. What reaches the heart without going through the mind is likely to bounce back and put the mind out of business. Propaganda taken in that way is like a drug you do not know you are swallowing. The effect is mysterious; you do not know afterwards why you feel or think the way you do. ~ Mortimer Jerome Adler, How to Read a Book,
205:Good and evil both increase at compound interest. That is why the little decisions you and I make every day are of such infinite importance. The smallest good act today is the capture of a strategic point from which, a few months later, you may be able to go on to victories you never dreamed of. An apparently trivial indulgence in lust or anger today is the loss of a ridge or railway line or bridgehead from which the enemy may launch an attack otherwise impossible. ~ C S Lewis,
206:One must find out for oneself, and make sure beyond doubt, 'who' one is, 'what' one is, 'why' one is... Being thus conscious of the proper course to pursue, the next thing is to understand the conditions necessary to following it out. After that, one must eliminate from oneself every element alien or hostile to success, and develop those parts of oneself which are specially needed to control the aforesaid conditions. ~ Aleister Crowley, Liber ABA, [T4],
207:Why does an apple fall when it is ripe? Is it brought down by the force of gravity? Is it because its stalk withers? Because it is dried by the sun, because it grows too heavy, or because the boy standing under the tree wants to eat it? None of these is the cause.... Every action of theirs, that seems to them an act of their own freewill is in the historical sense not free at all but is bound up with the whole course of history and preordained from all eternity.
   ~ Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace,
208:Thus, I came to the conclusion that the designer of a new system must not only be the implementor and the first large-scale user; the designer should also write the first user manual. The separation of any of these four components would have hurt TeX significantly. If I had not participated fully in all these activities, literally hundreds of improvements would never have been made, because I would never have thought of them or perceived why they were important. ~ Donald Knuth, The Errors Of TeX,
209:What is the good of words if they aren't important enough to quarrel over? Why do we choose one word more than another if there isn't any difference between them? If you called a woman a chimpanzee instead of an angel, wouldn't there be a quarrel about a word? If you're not going to argue about words, what are you going to argue about? Are you going to convey your meaning to me by moving your ears? The Church and the heresies always used to fight about words, because they are the only thing worth fighting about. ~ G K Chesterton,
210:You are here now, I mean on earth, because you once chose to be - you don't remember it, but I know; that's why you are here. Well, you must stand up to the task. You must make an effort, you must conquer pettiness and limitations, and above all tell the ego: your time is over. We want a race without ego, with the divine consciousness in place of the ego. That's what we want: the divine consciousness, which will enable the race to develop and the superman to be born.
   ~ The Mother, Agenda Vol 13, Satprem,
211:I was in Nashville, Tennesee last year. After the show I went to a Waffle House. I'm not proud of it, I was hungry. And I'm alone, I'm eating and I'm reading a book, right? Waitress walks over to me: 'Hey, whatcha readin' for?' Isn't that the weirdest fuckin' question you've ever heard? Not what am I reading, but what am I reading FOR? Well, godammit, ya stumped me! Why do I read? Well . . . hmmm . . . I dunno . . . I guess I read for a lot of reasons and the main one is so I don't end up being a fuckin' waffle waitress. ~ Bill Hicks,
212:Whoever has seen the universe, whoever has beheld the fiery designs of the universe, cannot think in terms of one man, of that man's trivial fortunes or misfortunes, though he be that very man. That man has been he and now matters no more to him. What is the life of that other to him, the nation of that other to him, if he, now, is no one? This is why I do not pronounce the formula, why, lying here in the darkness, I let the days obliterate me.~ Jorge Luis Borges, Labyrinths, Selected Stories and Other Writings,
213:I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong. I have approximate answers and possible beliefs and different degrees of uncertainty about different things, but I am not absolutely sure of anything, and there are many things I don't know anything about, such as whether it means anything to ask why we're here. I don't have to know an answer. I don't feel frightened not knowing things, by being lost in a mysterious universe without any purpose, which is the way it really is as far as I can tell. ~ Richard Feynman,
214:Few of us can escape being neurotic or character disordered to at least some degree (which is why essentially everyone can benefit from psychotherapy if he or she is seriously willing to participate in the process). The reason for this is that the problem of distinguishing what we are and what we are not responsible for in this life is one of the greatest problems of human existence. It is never completely solved; for the entirety of our lives we must continually assess and reassess where our responsibilities lie in the ever-changing course of events. ~ M Scott Peck,
215:Divine Mother, I want to realise Your Presence in all the parts of my being, penetrating even the body - only I don't know how to do it. You are the very reason of my being; why then do I live now without feeling Your Presence even in the cells of my body?

   The physical nature is obscure and recalcitrant everywhere; it is very difficult for it to become conscious of the divine Presence. That is why we must be patient and keep on aspiring with the certitude of Victory. My blessings are always with you.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother II,
216:Elon Musks Reading List
   J. E. Gordon - Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down
   Walter Isaacson - Benjamin Franklin: An American Life
   Walter Isaacson - Einstein: His Life and Universe
   Nick Bostrom - Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies
   Erik M. Conway & Naomi Oreskes - Merchants of Doubt
   William Golding - Lord of the Flies
   Peter Thiel - Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future
   Isaac Asimov - The Foundation Trilogy
   ~ Elon Musk, CNBC,
217:God is the one goal of all our passions and emotions. If you want to be angry, be angry with Him. Chide your Beloved, chide your Friend. Whom else can you safely chide? Mortal man will not patiently put up with your anger; there will be a reaction. If you are angry with me I am sure quickly to react, because I cannot patiently put up with your anger. Say unto the Beloved, "Why do You not come to me; why do You leave me thus alone?" Where is there any enjoyment but in Him? What enjoyment can there be in little clods of earth? ~ Swami Vivekananda,
218:Student debt is structured to be a burden for life. The indebted cannot declare bankruptcy, unlike Donald Trump. Current student debt is estimated to be over $1.45 trillion. There are ample resources for that simply from waste, including the bloated military and the enormous concentrated private wealth that has accumulated in the financial and general corporate sector under neoliberal policies. There is no economic reason why free education cannot flourish from schools through colleges and university. The barriers are not economic but rather political decisions. ~ Noam Chomsky,
219:But you must remember one thing. One cannot see God sporting as man unless one has had the vision of Him. Do you know the sign of one who has God-vision? Such a man acquires the nature of a child. Why a child? Because God is like a child. So he who sees God becomes like a child.

God-vision is necessary. Now the question is, how can one get it? Intense renunciation is the means. A man should have such intense yearning for God that he can say, 'O Father of the universe, am I outside Your universe? Won't You be kind to me, You wretch? ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
220:Savitri", the poem, the word of Sri Aurobindo is the cosmic Answer to the cosmic Question. And Savitri, the person, the Godhead, the Divine Woman is the Divine's response to the human aspiration.
The world is a great question mark. It is a riddle, eternal and ever-recurring. Man has faced the riddle and sought to arrive at a solution since he was given a mind to seek and interrogate.
What is this universe? From where has it come? Whither is it going? What is the purpose of it all? Why is man here? What is the object of his existence? ~ Nolini Kanta Gupta, Savitri,
221:Never underestimate the long-term consequences of your actions. For as long as the mind has the obscurration of grasping at an inherently existing "me", then there will be karma. No matter how far on the path one is, no matter how realised one is, no matter how many miraculous powers one has attained, for as long as there is even a subtle trace of this obscurration, karma is there.
   That is why Padmasambhava, an enlightened being not even affected by it, had skilfully told ordinary beings, "My realization is higher than the sky, but my observance of karma is finer than grains of flour." ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
222:The reason why you do not touch fire is because you know that it will cause you to suffer. Likewise, if you truly understand karma, you will not commit a single negative action, because unless that negative karma is purified, you know that it will eventually ripen into suffering.
You might forget this natural process, or you might not believe in it, because the ripening does not always happen immediately. But your karma will follow you like your shadow, that gets closer and closer without you realising, until you are eventually touched by it. Please, I urge you to always remember this. ~ Chamtrul Rinpoche,
223:The other day I happened to be reading a careful, interesting account of the state of British higher education. The government is a kind of market-oriented government and they came out with an official paper, a 'White Paper' saying that it is not the responsibility of the state to support any institution that can't survive in the market. So, if Oxford is teaching philosophy, the arts, Greek history, medieval history, and so on, and they can't sell it on the market, why should they be supported? Because life consists only of what you can sell in the market and get back, nothing else. That is a real pathology. ~ Noam Chomsky,
224:The real human division is this: the luminous and the shady. To diminish the number of the shady, to augment the number of the luminous,-that is the object. That is why we cry: Education! science! To teach reading, means to light the fire; every syllable spelled out sparkles. However, he who says light does not, necessarily, say joy. People suffer in the light; excess burns. The flame is the enemy of the wing. To burn without ceasing to fly,-therein lies the marvel of genius. When you shall have learned to know, and to love, you will still suffer. The day is born in tears. The luminous weep, if only over those in darkness. ~ Victor Hugo,
225:Krishna represents both the universal Godhead and the immanent Godhead, he whom one can meet within one's being and in all that constitutes the manifested world.
   And do you want to know why he is always represented as a child? It is because he is in constant progression. To the extent that the world is perfected, his play is also perfected - what was the play of yesterday will no longer be the play of tomorrow; his play will become more and more harmonious, benign and joyful to the extent that the world becomes capable of responding to it and enjoying it with the Divine.
   ~ The Mother, Words Of The Mother III, 33,
226:At this point it may be objected: well, then, if even the crabbed sceptics admit that the statements of religion cannot be confuted by reason, why should not I believe in them, since they have so much on their side:­ tradition, the concurrence of mankind, and all the consolation they yield? Yes, why not? Just as no one can be forced into belief, so no one can be forced into unbelief. But do not deceive yourself into thinking that with such arguments you are following the path of correct reasoning. If ever there was a case of facile argument, this is one. Ignorance is ignorance; no right to believe anything is derived from it. ~ Sigmund Freud,
227:As gnostic knowledge, will and ananda are a direct instrumentation of spirit and can only be won by growing into the spirit, into divine being, this growth has to be the first aim of our Yoga. The mental being has to enlarge itself into the oneness of the Divine before the Divine will perfect in the soul of the individual its gnostic outflowering. That is the reason why the triple way of knowledge, works and love becomes the key-note of the whole Yoga, for that is the direct means for the soul in mind to rise to its highest intensities where it passes upward into the divine oneness.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis Of Yoga,
228:Mother, Why didn't You return the letter to me (the one You wrote to me) after I sent it to You this morning with my letter? I want to lie on Your lap, Mother.

   Poor little one, I very gladly take you on my lap and cradle you to my heart to soothe this heavy sorrow which has no cause and to quell this great revolt which has no reason. Let me take you in my arms, bathe you in my love and wipe away even the memory of this unfortunate incident. I kept the letter to show it to Sri Aurobindo along with your letter of this morning. I am returning it to you in this notebook. - February 27th, 1934
   ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother,
229:Now as always-humility and terror. Fear that the working of my pen cannot capture the grinding of my brain. It is so easy to understand why the ancients prayed for the help of a Muse. And the Muse came and stood beside them, and we, heaven help us, do not believe in Muses. We have nothing to fall back on but our craftsmanship and it, as modern literature attests, is inadequate. May I be honest; may I be decent; may I be unaffected by the technique of hucksters. If invocation is required, let this be my invocation-may I be strong and yet gentle, tender and yet wise, wise and yet tolerant. May I for a little while, only for a little while, see with the inflamed eyes of a God. ~ John Steinbeck,
230:The obstacles that we may face include having expectations, lack of self-confidence, indifference, and unwholesome distractions and activities. If we keep entertaining these negative acts and not believing in ourselves, thinking, "I'm not doing the practice well enough," "I'm not capable," "Everything is fated, so why should I try?"-at best, these acts and thoughts will divert us from our goal and slow down our spiritual progress. At worst, indulging in distractions, unwholesome activities, and negative attitudes will drag us on the wrong track and slowly lead us into the worst possible way of living, destroying all the possible fruits that this amazing human life could bring us.~ Tulku Thondup,
231:Sweet Mother,
   It is much easier for me to approach You than to approach Sri Aurobindo. Why? You are all that Sri Aurobindo is for us, as well as a divine and loving Mother. So is it necessary to try to establish the same relation with him?
   You yourself have answered your own question. I am for you a mother who is very close to you, who loves and understands you; that is why it is easy for you to approach me with a loving confidence, without fear and without hesitation. Sri Aurobindo is always there to help you and guide you; but it is natural that you should approach Him with the reverence due to the Master of Yoga. 3 July 1960
   ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother, 243,
232:Why do we go through the struggle to be educated? Is it merely in order to pass some examinations and get a job? Or is it the function of education to prepare us while we are young to understand the whole process of life?

And what does life mean? Is not life an extraordinary thing? The birds, the flowers, the flourishing trees, the heavens, the stars, the rivers and the fish therein-all this is life. Life is the poor and the rich; life is the constant battle between groups, races and nations; life is meditation; life is what we call religion, and it is also the subtle, hidden things of the mind-the envies, the ambitions, the passions, the fears, fulfilments and anxieties. All this and much more is life. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
233:During this degenerate age in the outer world, there are many natural disasters due to the upsetting of the four elements. Also, demonic forces come with their many weapons to incite the fighting of wars. All of those forces have caused the world to come to ruin and led all to tremble - so terrified that their hair stands up on end. Still, the demonic forces find it necessary to come up with new types of weapons. If we were called on to confront them, there is no way we Dharma practitioners could defeat them. That is why we make supplication prayers to the three jewels, do the aspiration prayers, the offering prayers and the prayers of invocation. We are responsible for those activities. This is what I urge you to do. ~ Chatral Rinpoche,
234:Alas! I find no customers who want anything better than kalai pulse. No one wants to give up 'woman and gold'. Man, deluded by the beauty of woman and the power of money, forgets God. But to one who has seen the beauty of God, even the position of Brahma, the Creator, seems insignificant.
A man said to Ravana, 'You have been going to Sita in different disguises; why don't you go to her in the form of Rama?' 'But', Ravana replied, 'when I meditate on Rama in my heart, the most beautiful women - celestial maidens like Rambha and Tilottama - appear no better than ashes of the funeral pyre. Then even the position of Brahma appears trivial to me, not to speak of the beauty of another man's wife.' ~ Sri Ramakrishna,
235:It's like chopping down a huge tree of immense girth. You won't accomplish it with one swing of your axe. If you keep chopping away at it, though, and do not let up, eventually, whether it wants to or not, it will suddenly topple down. When that time comes, you could round up everyone you could find and pay them to hold the tree up, but they wouldn't be able to do it. It would still come crashing to the ground. . . . But if the woodcutter stopped after one or two strokes of his axe to ask the third son of Mr. Chang, Why doesn't this tree fall? And after three or four more strokes stopped again to ask the fourth son of Mr. Li, Why doesn't this tree fall? he would never succeed in felling the tree. It is no different for someone who is practicing the Way.
   ~ Hakuin Ekaku,
236:Q:How shall I realise God?
M.: God is an unknown entity. Moreover He is external. Whereas, the Self is always with you and it is you. Why do you leave out what is intimate and go in for what is external?
D.: What is this Self again?
M.: The Self is known to everyone but not clearly. You always exist. The Be-ing is the Self. 'I am' is the name of God. Of all the definitions of God, none is indeed so well put as the Biblical statement "I AM THAT I AM" in EXODUS (Chap. 3). There are other statements, such as Brahmaivaham, Aham Brahmasmi and Soham. But none is so direct as the name JEHOVAH = I AM. The Absolute Being is what is - It is the Self. It is God. Knowing the Self, God is known. In fact God is none other than the Self. ~ Sri Ramama Maharshi, Collected Works,
237:In Malkus, the lowest of the Sephiros, the sphere of the physical world of matter, wherein incarnate the exiled Neschamos from the Divine Palace, there abides the Shechinah, the spiritual Presence of Ain Soph as a heritage to mankind and an ever-present reminder of spiritual verities. That is why there is written " Keser is in Malkus, and Malkus is in Keser, though after another manner The Zohar would imply that the real Shechinah, the real Divine Presence, is allocated to Binah whence it never descends, but that the Shechinah in Malkus is an eidolon or Daughter of the Great Supernal Mother. Isaac Myer suggests that : " It is considered by Qabalists as the executive energy or power of Binah, the Holy Spirit or the Upper Mother." ~ Israel Regardie, A Garden of Pomegrantes,
238:The most important things are the hardest to say. They are the things you get ashamed of, because words diminish them -- words shrink things that seemed limitless when they were in your head to no more than living size when they're brought out. But it's more than that, isn't it? The most important things lie too close to wherever your secret heart is buried, like landmarks to a treasure your enemies would love to steal away. And you may make revelations that cost you dearly only to have people look at you in a funny way, not understanding what you've said at all, or why you thought it was so important that you almost cried while you were saying it. That's the worst, I think. When the secret stays locked within not for want of a teller but for want of an understanding ear. ~ Stephen King,
239:When we are concentrated in mental movements or intellectual pursuits, why do we sometimes forget or lose touch with the Divine?

You lose it because your consciousness is still divided. The Divine has not settled in your mind; you are not wholly consecrated to the Divine Life. Otherwise you could concentrate to any extent upon such things and still you would have the sense of being helped and supported by the Divine. In all pursuits, intellectual or active, your one motto should be, Remember and Offer. Let whatever you do be done as an offering to the Divine. And this too will be an excellent discipline for you; it will prevent you from doing many foolish and useless things.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931, [T0],
240:Sweet Mother,
One day in class you said, with your hands wide open, that we should give you everything, even our defects and vices and all the dirt in us. Is this the only way to get rid of them, and how can one do it?


One keeps one's defects because one hangs on to them as if they were something precious; one clings to one's vices as one clings to a part of one's body, and pulling out a bad habit hurts as much as pulling out a tooth. That is why one does not progress.

   Whereas if one generously makes an offering of one's defect, vice or bad habit, then one has the joy of making an offering and one receives in exchange the force to replace what has been given, by a better and truer vibration. 13 June 1960 ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother,
241:18. Of the devotees, who is the greatest?

He who gives himself up to the Self that is God is the most excellent devotee. Giving one's self up to God means remaining constantly in the Self without giving room for the rise of any thoughts other than that of the Self. Whatever burdens are thrown on God, He bears them. Since the supreme power of God makes all things move, why should we, without submitting ourselves to it, constantly worry ourselves with thoughts as to what should be done and how, and what should not be done and how not? We know that the train carries all loads, so after getting on it why should we carry our small luggage on our head to our discomfort, instead of putting it down in the train and feeling at ease? ~ Sri Ramana Maharshi, Who am I,
242:so you distill these stories great authors distill stories and we have soties that are very very very old they are usually religious stories they could be fairy tales because some people ahve traced fairy tales back 10 000 years ... a story that has been told for 10000 years is a funny kind of story its like people have remembered it and obviously modified it, like a game of telephone that has gone on for generations and all that is left is what people remember and maybe they remember whats important, because you tend to remember what's important and its not necessarily the case that you know what the hell it means ... and you dont genereally know what a book that you read means not if its profound it means more than you can understand because otherwise why read it? ~ Jordan Peterson, Maps of Meaning 2017 - 1,
243:Why does one feel afraid?

   I suppose it is because one is egoistic.
   There are three reasons. First, an excessive concern about one's security. Next, what one does not know always gives an uneasy feeling which is translated in the consciousness by fear. And above all, one doesn't have the habit of a spontaneous trust in the Divine. If you look into things sufficiently deeply, this is the true reason. There are people who do not even know that That exists, but one could tell them in other words, 'You have no faith in your destiny' or 'You know nothing about Grace' - anything whatever, you may put it as you like, but the root of the matter is a lack of trust. If one always had the feeling that it is the best that happens in all circumstances, one would not be afraid
   ~ The Mother,
244:Why level downward to our dullest perception always, and praise that as common sense? The commonest sense is the sense of men asleep, which they express by snoring. Sometimes we are inclined to class those who are once-and-a-half witted with the half-witted, because we appreciate only a third part of their wit. Some would find fault with the morning-red, if they ever got up early enough. "They pretend," as I hear, "that the verses of Kabir have four different senses; illusion, spirit, intellect, and the exoteric doctrine of the Vedas;" but in this part of the world it is considered a ground for complaint if a man's writings admit of more than one interpretation. While England endeavors to cure the potato-rot, will not any endeavor to cure the brain-rot, which prevails so much more widely and fatally? ~ Henry David Thoreau,
245:So, it is a basic function of education to help you to find out what you really love to do, so that you can give your whole mind and heart to it, because that creates human dignity, that sweeps away mediocrity, the petty bourgeois mentality. That is why it is very important to have the right teachers, the right atmosphere, so that you will grow up with the love which expresses itself in what you are doing. Without this love your examinations, your knowledge, your capacities, your position and possessions are just ashes, they have no meaning; without this love your actions are going to bring more wars, more hatred, more mischief and destruction. All this may mean nothing to you, because outwardly you are still very young, but I hope it will mean something to your teachers-and also to you, somewhere inside. ~ Jiddu Krishnamurti,
246:Why do you indulge in these exaggerated feelings of remorse and despair when these things come up from the subconscient? They do not help and make it more, not less difficult to eliminate what comes. Such returns of an old nature that is long expelled from the conscious parts of the being always happen in sadhana. It does not at all mean that the nature is unchangeable. Try to recover the inner quietude, draw back from these movements and look at them calmly, reducing them to their true proportions. Your true nature is that in which you have peace and ananda and the love of the Divine. This other is only a fringe of the outer personality which in spite of these returns is destined to drop away as the true being extends and increases. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV, Dealing with Depression and Despondency,
247:Ask the Divine :::
If, for example, one wants to know something or one needs guidance, or something else, how can one have it from the Divine, according to one's need?
By asking the Divine for it. If you do not ask Him, how can you have it?
If you turn to the Divine and have full trust and ask Him, you will get what you need - not necessarily what you imagine you need; but the true thing you need, you will get. But you must ask Him for it. You must make the experiment sincerely; you must not endeavour to get it by all sorts of external means and then expect the Divine to give it to you, without even having asked Him. Indeed, when you want somebody to give you something, you ask him for it, don't you? And why do you expect the Divine to give it to you without your having asked Him for it? ~ The Mother, [T5],
248:It is the Divine in the inconscient who aspires for the Divine in the consciousness. That is to say, without the Divine there would be no aspiration; without the consciousness hidden in the inconscient, there would be no possibility of changing the inconscience to consciousness. But because at the very heart of the inconscient there is the divine Consciousness, you aspire, and necessarily - this is what he says - automatically, mechanically, the sacrifice is made. And this is why when one says, "It is not you who aspire, it is the Divine, it is not you who make progress, it is the Divine, it is not you who are conscious, it is the Divine" - these are not mere words, it is a fact. And it is simply your ignorance and your unconsciousness which prevent you from realising it. (Meditation) ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1956,
249:For the last three weeks I've been working on a open world game in Inform 7. The initial seed for my idea came when I was playing Rune Factory 3 a game for my DS. And I thought, Hey look if I can run a farm here why can't I somehow implement this in a interactive fiction. So I sat myself down and began to type away furiously at my keyboard. And the more I sat the more complicated my farming implementation got, requiring water and fertilizer, levels of sunlight ect

And then, finally, I finished it. And my mind began to wander. Why just stop there why not keep going. And soon I was adding mining, weather and a form of crafting items. Now if I get this done, and don't fall into the trap of to create everything, of which I am slowly making the maddening descent, I could have a open world IF game ready within a few months. Maybe more than a few. ~ KGentle, intfiction.org,
250:The only truth in your other experience - which, you say, seems at the time so true to you, - is that it is hopeless for you or anyone to get out of the inferior consciousness by your or his unaided effort. That is why when you sink into this inferior consciousness, everything seems hopeless to you, because you lose hold for a time of the true consciousness. But the suggestion is untrue, because you have an opening to the Divine and are not bound to remain in the inferior consciousness. When you are in the true consciousness, then you see that everything can be done, even if at present only a slight beginning has been made; but a beginning is enough, once the Force, the Power is there. For the truth is that it can do everything and only time and the soul's aspiration are needed for the entire change and the soul's fulfilment. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Letters On Yoga - IV,
251:
   Often, when I read Sri Aurobindo's works or listen to His words, I am wonderstruck: how can this eternal truth, this beauty of expression escape people? It is really strange that He is not yet recognised, at least as a supreme creator, a pure artist, a poet par excellence! So I tell myself that my judgments, my appreciations are influenced by my devotion for the Master - and everyone is not devoted. I do not think this is true. But then why are hearts not yet enchanted by His words?

Who can understand Sri Aurobindo? He is as vast as the universe and his teaching is infinite...
   The only way to come a little close to him is to love him sincerely and give oneself unreservedly to his work. Thus, each one does his best and contributes as much as he can to that transformation of the world which Sri Aurobindo has predicted. 2 December 1964
   ~ The Mother, On Education, 396,
252:And He will judge and will forgive all, the good and the evil, the wise and the meek . . . And when He has done with all of them, then He will summon us. 'You too come forth,' He will say, 'Come forth ye drunkards, come forth, ye weak ones, come forth, ye children of shame!' And we shall all come forth, without shame and shall stand before him. And He will say unto us, 'Ye are swine, made in the Image of the Beast and with his mark; but come ye also!' And the wise ones and those of understanding will say, 'Oh Lord, why dost Thou receive these men?' And He will say, 'This is why I receive them, oh ye wise, this is why I receive them, oh ye of understanding, that not one of them believed himself to be worthy of this.' And He will hold out His hands to us and we shall fall down before him . . . and we shall weep . . . and we shall understand all things! Then we shall understand everything! . . . and all will understand ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky,
253:10.: I do not know whether I have put this clearly; self-knowledge is of such consequence that I would not have you careless of it, though you may be lifted to heaven in prayer, because while on earth nothing is more needful than humility. Therefore, I repeat, not only a good way, but the best of all ways, is to endeavour to enter first by the room where humility is practised, which is far better than at once rushing on to the others. This is the right road;-if we know how easy and safe it is to walk by it, why ask for wings with which to fly? Let us rather try to learn how to advance quickly. I believe we shall never learn to know ourselves except by endeavouring to know God, for, beholding His greatness we are struck by our own baseness, His purity shows our foulness, and by meditating on His humility we find how very far we are from being humble. ~ Saint Teresa of Avila, The Interior Castle, 1.02,
254:Sri Ramakrishna has described the incident: "The Divine Mother revealed to me in the Kāli temple that it was She who had become everything. She showed me that everything was full of Consciousness. The image was Consciousness, the Altar was Consciousness, the water-vessels were Consciousness, the door-sill was Consciousness, the marble floor was Consciousness - all was Consciousness. I found everything inside the room soaked, as it were, in Bliss - the Bliss of God. I saw a wicked man in front of the Kāli temple; but in him also I saw the power of the Divine Mother vibrating. That was why I fed a cat with the food that was to be offered to the Divine Mother. I clearly perceived that all this was the Divine Mother - even the cat. The manager of the temple garden wrote to Mathur Bābu saying that I was feeding the cat with the offering intended for the Divine Mother. ~ Sri Ramakrishna, Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna,
255:During an individual's immersion in a domain, the locus of flow experiences shifts: what was once too challenging becomes attainable and even pleasurable, while what has long since become attainable no longer proves engaging. Thus, the journeyman musical performer gains flow from the accurate performance of familiar pieces in the repertoire; the youthful master wishes to tackle the most challenging pieces, ones most difficult to execute in a technical sense; the seasoned master may develop highly personal interpretations of familiar pieces, or, alternatively, return to those deceptively simple pieces that may actually prove difficult to execute convincingly and powerfully. Such an analysis helps explain why creative individuals continue to engage in the area of their expertise despite its frustrations, and why so many of them continue to raise the ante, posing ever-greater challenges for themselves, even at the risk of sacrificing the customary rewards. ~ Howard Gardner,
256:
   Sweet Mother,
   Why has the Divine made His path so difficult? He can make it easier if He wants, can't He?

First of all, one should know that the intellect, the mind, can understand nothing of the Divine, neither what He does nor how He does it and still less why He does it. To know something of the Divine, one has to rise above thought and enter into the psychic consciousness, the consciousness of the soul, or into the spiritual consciousness.
   Those who have had the experience have always said that the difficulties and sufferings of the path are not real, but a creation of human ignorance, and that as soon as one gets out of this ignorance one also gets out of the difficulties, to say nothing of the inalienable state of bliss in which one dwells as soon as one is in conscious contact with the Divine. So according to them, the question has no real basis and cannot be posed. ~ The Mother, Some Answers From The Mother, 21 September 1959,
257:Now, on the other hand, there is an entirely different type of angel; and here we must be especially careful to remember that we include gods and devils, for there are such beings who are not by any means dependent on one particular element for their existence. They are microcosms in exactly the same sense as men and women are. They are individuals who have picked up the elements of their composition as possibility and convenience dictates, exactly as we do ourselves... I believe that the Holy Guardian Angel is a Being of this order. He is something more than a man, possibly a being who has already passed through the stage of humanity, and his peculiarly intimate relationship with his client is that of friendship, of community, of brotherhood, or Fatherhood. He is not, let me say with emphasis, a mere abstraction from yourself; and that is why I have insisted rather heavily that the term 'Higher Self' implies a damnable heresy and a dangerous delusion. ~ Aleister Crowley, Magick Without Tears,
258:Elric: We are dreamers, shapers, singers, and makers. We study the mysteries of laser and circuit, crystal and scanner, holographic demons and invocation of equations. These are the tools we employ, and we know many things.

John Sheridan: Such as?

Elric: The true secrets, the important things. Fourteen words to make someone fall in love with you forever. Seven words to make them go without pain. How to say good-bye to a friend who is dying. How to be poor. How to be rich. How to rediscover dreams when the world has stolen them. That is why we are going away-to preserve that knowledge.

Sheridan: From what?

Elric: There is a storm coming, a black and terrible storm. We would not have our knowledge lost or used to ill purpose. From this place we will launch ourselves into the stars. With luck, you will never see our kind again in your lifetime. I know you have your orders, Captain. Detain us if you wish. But I cannot tell you where we are going. I can only ask you to trust us. ~ J Michael Straczynski,
259:When I began to lose my sight, the last color I saw, or the last color, rather, that stood out, because of course now I know that your coat is not the same color as this table or of the woodwork behind you~the last color to stand out was yellow because it is the most vivid of colors. That's why you have the Yellow Cab Company in the United States. At first they thought of making the cars scarlet. Then somebody found out that at night or when there was a fog that yellow stood out in a more vivid way than scarlet. So you have yellow cabs because anybody can pick them out. Now when I began to lose my eyesight, when the world began to fade away from me, there was a time among my friends… well they made, they poked fun at me because I was always wearing yellow neckties. Then they thought I really liked yellow, although it really was too glaring. I said, 'Yes, to you, but not to me, because it is the only color I can see, practically!' I live in a gray world, rather like the silver-screen world. But yellow stands out. ~ Jorge Luis Borges,
260:
   But why does the Divine want to manifest Himself on earth in this chaos?


Because this is why He has created the earth, not for any other motive; the earth is He Himself in a deformation and He wants to establish it back again in its truth. Earth is not something separated from Him and alien to Him. It is a deformation of Himself which must once again become what it was in its essence, that is, the Divine.

   Then why is He a stranger to us?

But He is not a stranger, my child. You fancy that He is a stranger, but He is not, not in the least. He is the essence of your being - not at all alien. You may not know Him, but He is not a stranger; He is the very essence of your being. Without the Divine you would not exist. Without the Divine you could not exist even for the millionth part of a second. Only, because you live in a kind of false illusion and deformation, you are not conscious. You are not conscious of yourself, you are conscious of something which you think to be yourself, but which isn't you.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955,
261:Always that same LSD story, you've all seen it. 'Young man on acid, thought he could fly, jumped out of a building. What a tragedy.' What a dick! Fuck him, he's an idiot. If he thought he could fly, why didn't he take off on the ground first? Check it out. You don't see ducks lined up to catch elevators to fly south-they fly from the ground, ya moron, quit ruining it for everybody. He's a moron, he's dead-good, we lost a moron, fuckin' celebrate. Wow, I just felt the world get lighter. We lost a moron! I don't mean to sound cold, or cruel, or vicious, but I am, so that's the way it comes out. Professional help is being sought. How about a positive LSD story? Wouldn't that be news-worthy, just the once? To base your decision on information rather than scare tactics and superstition and lies? I think it would be news-worthy. 'Today, a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration. That we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively. There is no such thing as death, life is only a dream and we're the imagination of ourselves' . . . 'Here's Tom with the weather. ~ Bill Hicks,
262:15. The Crossing of the Return Threshold:The returning hero, to complete his adventure, must survive the impact of the world. Many failures attest to the difficulties of this life-affirmative threshold. The first problem of the returning hero is to accept as real, after an experience of the soul-satisfying vision of fulfillment, the passing joys and sorrows, banalities and noisy obscenities of life. Why re-enter such a world? Why attempt to make plausible, or even interesting, to men and women consumed with passion, the experience of transcendental bliss? As dreams that were momentous by night may seem simply silly in the light of day, so the poet and the prophet can discover themselves playing the idiot before a jury of sober eyes. The easy thing is to commit the whole community to the devil and retire again into the heavenly rock dwelling, close the door, and make it fast. But if some spiritual obstetrician has drawn the shimenawa across the retreat, then the work of representing eternity in time, and perceiving in time eternity, cannot be avoided" The hero returns to the world of common day and must accept it as real. ~ Joseph Campbell,
263:Here I want to make it very clear that mathematics is not what many people think it is; it is not a system of mere formulas and theorems; but as beautifully defined by Professor Cassius J. Keyser, in his book The Human Worth of Rigorous Thinking (Columbia University Press, 1916), mathematics is the science of "Exact thought or rigorous thinking," and one of its distinctive characteristics is "precision, sharpness, completeness of definitions." This quality alone is sufficient to explain why people generally do not like mathematics and why even some scientists bluntly refuse to have anything to do with problems wherein mathematical reasoning is involved. In the meantime, mathematical philosophy has very little, if anything, to do with mere calculations or with numbers as such or with formulas; it is a philosophy wherein precise, sharp and rigorous thinking is essential. Those who deliberately refuse to think "rigorously"-that is mathematically-in connections where such thinking is possible, commit the sin of preferring the worse to the better; they deliberately violate the supreme law of intellectual rectitude. ~ Alfred Korzybski, Manhood of Humanity,
264:I think one of the most important thing is to know why one meditates; this is what gives the quality of the meditation and makes it of one order or another.
You may meditate to open yourself to the divine Force, you may meditate to reject the ordinary consciousness, you may meditate to enter the depths of your being, you may meditate to learn how to give yourself integrally; you may meditate for all kinds of things. You may meditate to enter into peace and calm and silence - this is what people generally do, but without much success. But you may also meditate to receive the Force of transformation, to discover the points to be transformed, to trace out the line of progress. And then you may also meditate for very practical reasons: when you have a difficulty to clear up, a solution to find, when you want help in some action or another. You may meditate for that too.
I think everyone has his own mode of meditation. But if one wants the meditation to be dynamic, one must have an aspiration for progress and the meditation must be done to help and fulfill this aspiration for progress. Then it becomes dynamic. ~ The Mother,
265:...the present terms are there not as an unprofitable recurrence, but in active pregnant gestation of all that is yet to be unfolded by the spirit, no irrational decimal recurrence helplessly repeating for ever its figures, but an expanding series of powers of the Infinite. What is in front of us is the greater potentialities, the steps yet unclimbed, the intended mightier manifestations. Why we are here is to be this means of the spirit's upward self-unfolding. What we have to do with ourselves and our significances is to grow and open them to greater significances of divine being, divine consciousness, divine power, divine delight and multiplied unity, and what we have to do with our environment is to use it consciously for increasing spiritual purposes and make it more and more a mould for the ideal unfolding of the perfect nature and self-conception of the Divine in the cosmos. This is surely the Will in things which moves, great and deliberate, unhasting, unresting, through whatever cycles, towards a greater and greater informing of its own finite figures with its own infinite Reality.
   ~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays In Philosophy And Yoga,
266:A Community of the Spirit

There is a community of the spirit.
Join it, and feel the delight
of walking in the noisy street
and being the noise.

Drink all your passion and be a disgrace.
Close both eyes to see with the other eye.
Open your hands if you want to be held.

Consider what you have been doing.
Why do you stay
with such a mean-spirited and dangerous partner?

For the security of having food. Admit it.
Here is a better arrangement.
Give up this life, and get a hundred new lives.

Sit down in this circle.

Quit acting like a wolf,
and feel the shepherd's love filling you.

At night, your beloved wanders.
Do not take painkillers.

Tonight, no consolations.
And do not eat.

Close your mouth against food.
Taste the lover's mouth in yours.

You moan, But she left me. He left me.
Twenty more will come.

Be empty of worrying.
Think of who created thought.

Why do you stay in prison
when the door is so wide open?

Move outside the tangle of fear-thinking.
Live in silence.

Flow down and down
in always widening rings of being.
~ Jalaluddin Rumi,
267:One perceives the true nature of existence. One discovers the why and the raison d'être of existence, not by the mind and the scientific pursuit, but by the knowledge of the self and the discovery of one's soul which is all-powerful.

This is the true method for knowing, for understanding and for realising the secrets of Nature, of the universe and the path which leads to the Divine. One can do everything with this realisation, one can know everything and finally become the master of one's existence. Nothing will be impossible … nothing will be left out. One has only to see with another sense which is within us, develop another faculty by a rigourous sadhana, to discover the secrets of all existence. Voilà.

The means are in you, the path opens up more and more, gets clearer and clearer, and with the help which is at your disposal, you have only to make an effort and you shall be crowned with a Knowledge, a Light and an Ananda which surpass all existence. Whether it be to see the functioning of the atom, or to know the process of thought or the flights of imagination or even the unknown … to know oneself is to know all. It is this that one must find. ~ The Mother,
268:I have a friend who's an artist and has sometimes taken a view which I don't agree with very well. He'll hold up a flower and say "look how beautiful it is," and I'll agree. Then he says "I as an artist can see how beautiful this is but you as a scientist take this all apart and it becomes a dull thing," and I think that he's kind of nutty. First of all, the beauty that he sees is available to other people and to me too, I believe. Although I may not be quite as refined aesthetically as he is ... I can appreciate the beauty of a flower. At the same time, I see much more about the flower than he sees. I could imagine the cells in there, the complicated actions inside, which also have a beauty. I mean it's not just beauty at this dimension, at one centimeter; there's also beauty at smaller dimensions, the inner structure, also the processes. The fact that the colors in the flower evolved in order to attract insects to pollinate it is interesting; it means that insects can see the color. It adds a question: does this aesthetic sense also exist in the lower forms? Why is it aesthetic? All kinds of interesting questions which the science knowledge only adds to the excitement, the mystery and the awe of a flower. It only adds. I don't understand how it subtracts. ~ Richard P Feynman,
269:Sometimes when an adverse force attacks us and we come out successful, why are we attacked once again by the same force?
   Because something was left inside. We have said that the force can attack only when there is something which responds in the nature - however slight it may be. There is a kind of affinity, something corresponding, there is a disorder or an imperfection which attracts the adverse force by responding to it. So, if the attack comes, you must keep perfectly quiet and send it back, but it does not necessarily follow that you have got rid of that small part in you which allows the attack to come.
   You have something in you which attracts this force; take, for example (it is one of the most frequent things), the force of depression, that kind of attack of a wave of depression that falls upon you: you lose confidence, you lose hope, you have the feeling you will never be able to do anything, you are cast down.
   It means there is in your vital being something which is naturally egoistic, surely a little vain, which needs encouragement to remain in a good state. So it is like a little signal for those forces which intimates to them: "You can come, the door is open." But there is another part in the being that was watching when these forces arrived; instead of allowing them to enter, the part which... ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953,
270:What is one to do to prepare oneself for the Yoga?
   To be conscious, first of all. We are conscious of only an insignificant portion of our being; for the most part we are unconscious.
   It is this unconsciousness that keeps us down to our unregenerate nature and prevents change and transformation in it. It is through unconsciousness that the undivine forces enter into us and make us their slaves. You are to be conscious of yourself, you must awake to your nature and movements, you must know why and how you do things or feel or think them; you must understand your motives and impulses, the forces, hidden and apparent, that move you; in fact, you must, as it were, take to pieces the entire machinery of your being. Once you are conscious, it means that you can distinguish and sift things, you can see which are the forces that pull you down and which help you on. And when you know the right from the wrong, the true from the false, the divine from the undivine, you are to act strictly up to your knowledge; that is to say, resolutely reject one and accept the other. The duality will present itself at every step and at every step you will have to make your choice. You will have to be patient and persistent and vigilant - "sleepless", as the adepts say; you must always refuse to give any chance whatever to the undivine against the divine. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
271:5. Belly of the Whale:The idea that the passage of the magical threshold is a transit into a sphere of rebirth is symbolized in the worldwide womb image of the belly of the whale. The hero, instead of conquering or conciliating the power of the threshold, is swallowed into the unknown and would appear to have died. This popular motif gives emphasis to the lesson that the passage of the threshold is a form of self-annihilation. Instead of passing outward, beyond the confines of the visible world, the hero goes inward, to be born again. The disappearance corresponds to the passing of a worshipper into a temple-where he is to be quickened by the recollection of who and what he is, namely dust and ashes unless immortal. The temple interior, the belly of the whale, and the heavenly land beyond, above, and below the confines of the world, are one and the same. That is why the approaches and entrances to temples are flanked and defended by colossal gargoyles: dragons, lions, devil-slayers with drawn swords, resentful dwarfs, winged bulls. The devotee at the moment of entry into a temple undergoes a metamorphosis. Once inside he may be said to have died to time and returned to the World Womb, the World Navel, the Earthly Paradise. Allegorically, then, the passage into a temple and the hero-dive through the jaws of the whale are identical adventures, both denoting in picture language, the life-centering, life-renewing act. ~ Joseph Campbell,
272:38 - Strange! The Germans have disproved the existence of Christ; yet his crucifixion remains still a greater historic fact than the death of Caesar. - Sri Aurobindo.

To what plane of consciousness did Christ belong?

In the Essays on the Gita Sri Aurobindo mentions the names of three Avatars, and Christ is one of them. An Avatar is an emanation of the Supreme Lord who assumes a human body on earth.

I heard Sri Aurobindo himself say that Christ was an emanation of the Lord's aspect of love.

The death of Caesar marked a decisive change in the history of Rome and the countries dependent on her. It was therefore an important event in the history of Europe.

But the death of Christ was the starting-point of a new stage in the evolution of human civilisation. This is why Sri Aurobindo tells us that the death of Christ was of greater historical significance, that is to say, it has had greater historical consequences than the death of Caesar. The story of Christ, as it has been told, is the concrete and dramatic enactment of the divine sacrifice: the Supreme Lord, who is All-Light, All-Knowledge, All-Power, All-Beauty, All-Love, All-Bliss, accepting to assume human ignorance and suffering in matter, in order to help men to emerge from the falsehood in which they live and because of which they die.

16 June 1960 ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms, volume-10, page no.61-62),
273:Sometimes fate is like a small sandstorm that keeps changing directions. You change direction but the sandstorm chases you. You turn again, but the storm adjusts. Over and over you play this out, like some ominous dance with death just before dawn. Why? Because this storm isn't something that blew in from far away, something that has nothing to do with you. This storm is you. Something inside of you. So all you can do is give in to it, step right inside the storm, closing your eyes and plugging up your ears so the sand doesn't get in, and walk through it, step by step. There's no sun there, no moon, no direction, no sense of time. Just fine white sand swirling up into the sky like pulverized bones. That's the kind of sandstorm you need to imagine.

An you really will have to make it through that violent, metaphysical, symbolic storm. No matter how metaphysical or symbolic it might be, make no mistake about it: it will cut through flesh like a thousand razor blades. People will bleed there, and you will bleed too. Hot, red blood. You'll catch that blood in your hands, your own blood and the blood of others.

And once the storm is over you won't remember how you made it through, how you managed to survive. You won't even be sure, in fact, whether the storm is really oveR But one thing is certain. When you come out of the storm you won't be the same person who walked in. That's what this storm's all about.~ Haruki Murakami,
274:The necessary and needful reaction from the collective unconscious expresses itself in archetypally formed ideas. The meeting with oneself is, at first, the meeting with one's own shadow. The shadow is a tight passage, a narrow door, whose painful constriction no one is spared who goes down to the deep well. But one must learn to know oneself in order to know who one is. For what comes after the door is, surprisingly enough, a boundless expanse full of unprecedented uncertainty, with apparently no one inside and no one outside, no above and no below, no here and no there, no mine and no thine, no good and no bad. It is a world of water, where all life floats in suspension; where the realm of the sympathetic system, the soul of everything living, begins; where I am indivisibly this and that; where I experience the other in myself and the other-than-myself experiences me.No, the collective unconscious is anything but an encapsulated personal system; it is sheer objectivity, as wide as the world and open to all the world. There I am the object of every subject, in complete reversal of my ordinary consciousness, where I am always the subject that has an object. There I am utterly one with the world, so much a part of it that I forget all too easily who I really am. ""Lost in oneself"" is a good way of describing this state. But this self is the world, if only a consciousness could see it. That is why we must know who we are. ~ Carl Jung, Archetypes of the Collective Unconscious,
275:
   If one is too serious in yoga, doesn't one become obsessed by the difficulty of the task?

There is a limit to be kept!... But if one chooses one's obsession well, it may be very useful because it is no longer quite an obsession. For example, one has decided to find the Divine within oneself, and constantly, in every circumstance, whatever happens or whatever one may do, one concentrates in order to enter into contact with the inner Divine. Naturally, first one must have that little thing Sri Aurobindo speaks about, that "lesser truth" which consists in knowing that there is a Divine within one (this is a very good example of the "lesser truth") and once one is sure of it and has the aspiration to find it, if that aspiration becomes constant and the effort to realise it becomes constant, in the eyes of others it looks like an obsession, but this kind of obsession is not bad. It becomes bad only if one loses one's balance. But it must be made quite clear that those who lose their balance with that obsession are only those who were quite ready to lose their balance; any circumstance whatever would have produced the same result and made them lose their balance - it is a defect in the mental structure, it is not the fault of the obsession. And naturally, he who changes a desire into an obsession would be sure to go straight towards imbalance. That is why I say it is important to know the object of the obsession. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1950-1951,
276:So," she said. "I've been thinking of it as a computing problem. If the virus or nanomachine or protomolecule or whatever was designed, it has a purpose, right?"
"Definitely," Holden said.
"And it seems like it's trying to do something-something complex. It doesn't make sense to go to all that trouble just to kill people. Those changes it makes look intentional, just... not complete, to me."
"I can see that," Holden said. Alex and Amos nodded along with him but stayed quiet.
"So maybe the issue is that the protomolecule isn't smart enough yet. You can compress a lot of data down pretty small, but unless it's a quantum computer, processing takes space. The easiest way to get that processing in tiny machines is through distribution. Maybe the protomolecule isn't finishing its job because it just isn't smart enough to. Yet."
"Not enough of them," Alex said.
"Right," Naomi said, dropping the towel into a bin under the sink. "So you give them a lot of biomass to work with, and see what it is they are ultimately made to do."
"According to that guy in the video, they were made to hijack life on Earth and wipe us out," Miller said.
"And that," Holden said, "is why Eros is perfect. Lots of biomass in a vacuum-sealed test tube. And if it gets out of hand, there's already a war going on. A lot of ships and missiles can be used for nuking Eros into glass if the threat seems real. Nothing to make us forget our differences like a new player butting in." ~ James S A Corey, Leviathan Wakes,
277:
   Mother, aren't these entities afraid of you?

Ah, my child, terribly afraid! (Laughter) All those which are ill-willed try to hide, and usually do you know what they do? They gather together behind the head of the one who comes (laughter) in order not to be seen. But this is useless, because, just think, I have the capacity to see through. (Laughter) Otherwise - they always do this, instinctively. When they can manage to get in, they try to get in. But then... I intervene with greater force, because that is nasty. These are people who have the instinct to hide, you see. So I pursue them, there inside. With others very little is needed, very little; but there are some - there are such people, you know, they themselves have told me - when they are about to come to me, it is as though there were something which pulled them back, which told them: "No, no, no, it's not worthwhile, why go there? There are so many people for Mother to see, why add one more?" And they draw back, like that, so that they don't come. So I always tell them what it is: 'It would be better not to listen to that, for it's not something with a very good conscience.' Some people cannot bear it. There have been instances like this, of people who were obliged to run away, because they themselves were too attached to their own formations and did not want to get rid of them. Naturally there is only one way, to run away!
   There we are! We shall stop now for today.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954,
278:People think of education as something that they can finish. And what's more, when they finish, it's a rite of passage. You're finished with school. You're no more a child, and therefore anything that reminds you of school - reading books, having ideas, asking questions - that's kid's stuff. Now you're an adult, you don't do that sort of thing any more.

You have everybody looking forward to no longer learning, and you make them ashamed afterward of going back to learning. If you have a system of education using computers, then anyone, any age, can learn by himself, can continue to be interested. If you enjoy learning, there's no reason why you should stop at a given age. People don't stop things they enjoy doing just because they reach a certain age.

What's exciting is the actual process of broadening yourself, of knowing there's now a little extra facet of the universe you know about and can think about and can understand. It seems to me that when it's time to die, there would be a certain pleasure in thinking that you had utilized your life well, learned as much as you could, gathered in as much as possible of the universe, and enjoyed it. There's only this one universe and only this one lifetime to try to grasp it. And while it is inconceivable that anyone can grasp more than a tiny portion of it, at least you can do that much. What a tragedy just to pass through and get nothing out of it. ~ Isaac Asimov, Carl Freedman - Conversations with Isaac Asimov-University Press of Mississippi (2005).pdf,
279:Why God sometimes allows people who are genuinely good to be hindered in the good that they do. God, who is faithful, allows his friends to fall frequently into weakness only in order to remove from them any prop on which they might lean. For a loving person it would be a great joy to be able to achieve many great feats, whether keeping vigils, fasting, performing other ascetical practices or doing major, difficult and unusual works. For them this is a great joy, support and source of hope so that their works become a prop and a support upon which they can lean. But it is precisely this which our Lord wishes to take from them so that he alone will be their help and support. This he does solely on account of his pure goodness and mercy, for God is prompted to act only by his goodness, and in no way do our works serve to make God give us anything or do anything for us. Our Lord wishes his friends to be freed from such an attitude, and thus he removes their support from them so that they must henceforth find their support only in him. For he desires to give them great gifts, solely on account of his goodness, and he shall be their comfort and support while they discover themselves to be and regard themselves as being a pure nothingness in all the great gifts of God. The more essentially and simply the mind rests on God and is sustained by him, the more deeply we are established in God and the more receptive we are to him in all his precious gifts - for human kind should build on God alone. ~ Meister Eckhart,
280:The great men of the past have given us glimpses of what is possible in the way of personality, of intellectual understanding, of spiritual achievement, of artistic creation. But these are scarcely more than Pisgah glimpses. We need to explore and map the whole realm of human possibility, as the realm of physical geography has been explored and mapped. How to create new possibilities for ordinary living? What can be done to bring out the latent capacities of the ordinary man and woman for understanding and enjoyment; to teach people the techniques of achieving spiritual experience (after all, one can acquire the technique of dancing or tennis, so why not of mystical ecstasy or spiritual peace?)...
   The zestful but scientific exploration of possibilities and of the techniques for realizing them will make our hopes rational, and will set our ideals within the framework of reality, by showing how much of them are indeed realizable. Already, we can justifiably hold the belief that these lands of possibility exist, and that the present limitations and miserable frustrations of our existence could be in large measure surmounted. We are already justified in the conviction that human life as we know it in history is a wretched makeshift, rooted in ignorance; and that it could be transcended by a state of existence based on the illumination of knowledge and comprehension, just as our modern control of physical nature based on science transcends the tentative fumblings of our ancestors, that were rooted in superstition and professional secrecy. ~ Julian Huxley, Transhumanism,
281:Why Ubuntu: If I were you I'd just install Ubuntu into a dual-boot partition (the Ubuntu website has instructions for this) and learn as you go. Ubuntu is similar enough to Windows that you should be able to start using it right away without much difficulty.
   For running your Python scripts you'll want to drop into the shell (Ctrl + Alt + T If memory serves me right). As you become more comfortable with Ubuntu, you can start using the shell more and more. The shell is what gives you access to the power of Unix; every time you need to do something tedious and repetitive, try to find out how to do it through the shell.
   Eventually you will find yourself using the shell constantly. You'll wonder how you ever managed without it, and deride other operating systems for their lack of sensible programming tools. One day you'll realise that desktop window managers are a needless distraction. You start using xmonad or awesomewm. Eventually you realise that this, too, is a bastardisaton of the Unix vision and start using tmux exclusively. Then suddenly it hits you - every computer, every operating system, no matter how insignificant or user-friendly, has the Unix nature. All of them are merely streams from where you can ssh back into the ocean of Unix. Having achieved enlightenment you are equally content using an iPad as your main work computer, using powershell in Windows or SSH into a Digital Ocean droplet from your parent's computer. This is the Zen of Unix.
   ~ JohnyTex, https://www.reddit.com/r/learnprogramming/comments/38zytg/is_it_worth_my_time_to_learn_linux_while_learning,
282:Instruction about Sadhana to a disciple:
   Disciple: What is the nature of realisation in this yoga?
   Sri Aurobindo: In this yoga we want to bring down the Truth-consciousness into the whole being - no part being left out. This can be done by the Higher Power itself. What you have to do is to open yourself to it.
   Disciple: As the Higher Power is there why does it not work in all men - consciously?
   Sri Aurobindo: Because man, at present, is shut up in his mental being, his vital nature and physical consciousness and their limitations. You have to open yourself. By an opening I mean an aspiration in the heart for the coming down of the Power that is above, and a will in the Mind, or above the Mind, open to it.
   The first thing this working of the Higher Power does is to establish Shanti - peace - in all the parts of the being and an opening above. This peace is not mere mental Shanti, it is full of power and, whatever action takes place in it, Samata, equality, is its basis and the Shanti and Samata are never disturbed. What comes from Above is peace, power and joy. It also brings about changes in various parts of our nature so that they can bear the pressure of the Higher Power.
   Knowledge also progressively develops showing all in our being that is to be thrown out and what is to be retained. In fact, knowledge and guidance both come and you have constantly to consent to the guidance. The progress may be more in one direction than in another. But it is the Higher Power that works. The rest is a matter of experience and the movement of the Shakti. ~ Sri Aurobindo, EVENING TALKS WITH SRI AUROBINDO, RECORDED BY A B PURANI (28-09-1923),
283:[4:131] A human being is a material system which time, a form of energy, enters. Probably time enters him also as noos-Mind. Time, the future, contains in it all the events which are going to occur. Therefore when time enters a person as energy, and acting as noos to him, it brings with it in potentium all that will happen to him, like a window shade unrolling to display an unfolding pattern. Events in the future pop into being, into actualization, the present, but until they do, they are not truly real-not yet actualized-but there in an encoded form, like the grooves of an LP before the needle reaches it; the only "music" is where the needle touches-ahead lies only an encoded wiggle along a helical spiral. Thus, dreams deal with the future lying direct ahead, as during the night, the next series of encoded future events begin to move toward actualization: i.e., the present. What is hard to realize is that in a certain very real way these events are inside the person, within his head, so to speak; but only in their potential, encoded form; the arena in which they are actualized is that of space; time, in the present, flows out to fill space-i.e., the spatial universe. This is why we experience déjà vu. We have somehow caught a glimpse now and then of the script unrolling in our head-caught a glimpse in advance, so we feel "I know exactly what I'm going to say next, and what gestures he'll make," etc. Sure; they're encoded-encased, waiting-in time, and time, being energy, has entered you; is burning bright inside, like Blake's tyger. Tyger, tyger, burning bright In the forests of the night. . . . Who framed thy awful symmetry?
   ~ Philip K Dick, Exegesis Of Philip K Dick,
284:35 - Men are still in love with grief; when they see one who is too high for grief or joy, they curse him and cry, "O thou insensible!" Therefore Christ still hangs on the cross in Jerusalem.

36 - Men are in love with sin; when they see one who is too high for vice or virtue, they curse him and cry, "O thou breaker of bonds, thou wicked and immoral one!" Therefore Sri Krishna does not live as yet in Brindavan.(5)
- Sri Aurobindo

I would like to have an explanation of these two aphorisms.

When Christ came upon earth, he brought a message of brotherhood, love and peace. But he had to die in pain, on the cross, so that his message might be heard. For men cherish suffering and hatred and want their God to suffer with them. They wanted this when Christ came and, in spite of his teaching and sacrifice, they still want it; and they are so attached to their pain that, symbolically, Christ is still bound to his cross, suffering perpetually for the salvation of men.

As for Krishna, he came upon earth to bring freedom and delight. He came to announce to men, enslaved to Nature, to their passions and errors, that if they took refuge in the Supreme Lord they would be free from all bondage and sin. But men are very attached to their vices and virtues (for without vice there would be no virtue); they are in love with their sins and cannot tolerate anyone being free and above all error.

That is why Krishna, although immortal, is not present at Brindavan in a body at this moment.
3 June 1960

(5 The village where Shri Krishna Spent His Childhood, and where He danced with Radha and other Gopis.) ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms, volume-10, page no.59-60,
285:
   Why do some children take interest in things only when there is some excitement?

They are tamasic. It is due to the large proportion of tamas in their nature. The more tamasic one is, the more does one need something violent and exciting circumstances. When the physical is tamasic, unless one eats spices and highly flavoured food, one does not feel nourished. And yet these are poisons. They act exactly like poison on the nerves. They do not nourish. But it is because people are tamasic, because their body's consciousness is not sufficiently developed. Well, mentally it is the same thing, vitally the same thing. If they are tamasic, they always need new excitements, dramas, murders, suicides, etc. to feel anything at all, otherwise.... And there is nothing, nothing that makes one more wicked and cruel than tamas. For it is this need of excitement which shakes you up a little, makes you come out of yourself. And one must also learn, there, to distinguish between those who are exclusively tamasic and those who are mixed, and those who are struggling within themselves with their different parts. One can, one must know in what proportion their nature is constituted, so as to be able to insist at need on one thing or another. Some people constantly need a whipping from life in order to move, otherwise they would spend their time sleeping. Others, on the contrary, need soothing things, silence, a retreat in the country-side - all things that do a lot of good but which must disappear as soon as one needs to make an effort for progress or to realise something or struggle against a defect, conquer an obstacle.... It is complicated, don't you think so? ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953,
286:She"
  
   How shall I welcome not this light
   Or, wakened by it, greet with doubt
   This beam as palpable to sight
   As visible to touch? How not,
   Old as I am and (some say) wise,
   Revive beneath her summer eyes?
  
   How not have all my nights and days,
   My spirit ranging far and wide,
   By recollections of her grace
   Enlightened and preoccupied?
   Preoccupied: the Morning Star
   How near the Sun and yet how far!
  
   Enlightened: true, but more than true,
   Or why must I discover there
   The meaning in this taintless dew,
   The dancing wave, this blessed air
   Enchanting in its morning dress
   And calm as everlastingness?
  
   The flame that in the heart resides
   Is parcel of that central Fire
   Whose energy is winds and tides-
   Is rooted deep in the Desire
   That smilingly unseals its power
   Each summer in each springing flower.
  
   Oh Lady Nature-Proserpine,
   Mistress of Gender, star-crowned Queen!
   Ah Rose of Sharon-Mistress mine,
   My teacher ere I turned fourteen,
   When first I hallowed from afar
   Your Beautyship in avatar!
  
   I sense the hidden thing you say,
   Your subtle whisper how the Word
   From Alpha on to Omega
   Made all things-you confide my Lord
   Himself-all, all this potent Frame,
   All save the riddle of your name.
  
   Wisdom! I heard a voice that said:
   "What riddle? What is that to you?
   How! By my follower betrayed!
   Look up-for shame! Now tell me true:
   Where meet you light, with love and grace?
   Still unacquainted with my face?"
  
   Dear God, the erring heart must live-
   Through strength and weakness, calm and glow-
   That answer Wisdom scorns to give.
   Much have I learned. One problem, though,
   I never shall unlock: Who then,
   Who made Sophia feminine?
   ~ Owen Barfield, 1978,
287:We have all a ruling defect, which is for our soul as the umbilical cord of its birth in sin, and it is by this that the enemy can always lay hold upon us: for some it is vanity, for others idleness, for the majority egotism. Let a wicked and crafty mind avail itself of this means and we are lost; we may not go mad or turn idiots, but we become positively alienated, in all the force of the expression - that is, we are subjected to a foreign suggestion. In such a state one dreads instinctively everything that might bring us back to reason, and will not even listen to representations that are opposed to our obsession. Here is one of the most dangerous disorders which can affect the moral nature. The sole remedy for such a bewitchment is to make use of folly itself in order to cure folly, to provide the sufferer with imaginary satisfactions in the opposite order to that wherein he is now lost. Endeavour, for example, to cure an ambitious person by making him desire the glories of heaven - mystic remedy; cure one who is dissolute by true love - natural remedy; obtain honourable successes for a vain person; exhibit unselfishness to the avaricious and procure for them legitimate profit by honourable participation in generous enterprises, etc. Acting in this way upon the moral nature, we may succeed in curing a number of physical maladies, for the moral affects the physical in virtue of the magical axiom: "That which is above is like unto that which is below." This is why the Master said, when speaking of the paralyzed woman: "Satan has bound her." A disease invariably originates in a deficiency or an excess, and ever at the root of a physical evil we shall find a moral disorder. This is an unchanging law of Nature. ~ Eliphas Levi, Transcendental Magic,
288:39 - Sometimes one is led to think that only those things really matter which have never happened; for beside them most historic achievements seem almost pale and ineffective. - Sri Aurobindo

I would like to have an explanation of this aphorism.

Sri Aurobindo, who had made a thorough study of history, knew how uncertain are the data which have been used to write it. Most often the accuracy of the documents is doubtful, and the information they supply is poor, incomplete, trivial and frequently distorted. As a whole, the official version of human history is nothing but a long, almost unbroken record of violent aggressions: wars, revolutions, murders or colonisations. True, some of these aggressions and massacres have been adorned with flattering terms and epithets; they have been called religious wars, holy wars, civilising campaigns; but they nonetheless remain acts of greed or vengeance.

Rarely in history do we find the description of a cultural, artistic or philosophical outflowering.

That is why, as Sri Aurobindo says, all this makes a rather dismal picture without any deep significance. On the other hand, in the legendary accounts of things which may never have existed on earth, of events which have not been declared authentic by "official" knowledge, of wonderful individuals whose existence is doubted by the scholars in their dried-up wisdom, we find the crystallisation of all the hopes and aspirations of man, his love of the marvellous, the heroic and the sublime, the description of everything he would like to be and strives to become.

That, more or less, is what Sri Aurobindo means in his aphorism.
22 June 1960 ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms, volume-10, page no.62),
289:Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. These passions, like great winds, have blown me hither and thither, in a wayward course, over a great ocean of anguish, reaching to the very verge of despair.
   I have sought love, first, because it brings ecstasy - ecstasy so great that I would often have sacrificed all the rest of life for a few hours of this joy. I have sought it, next, because it relieves loneliness--that terrible loneliness in which one shivering consciousness looks over the rim of the world into the cold unfathomable lifeless abyss. I have sought it finally, because in the union of love I have seen, in a mystic miniature, the prefiguring vision of the heaven that saints and poets have imagined. This is what I sought, and though it might seem too good for human life, this is what--at last--I have found.
   With equal passion I have sought knowledge. I have wished to understand the hearts of men. I have wished to know why the stars shine. And I have tried to apprehend the Pythagorean power by which number holds sway above the flux. A little of this, but not much, I have achieved.
   Love and knowledge, so far as they were possible, led upward toward the heavens. But always pity brought me back to earth. Echoes of cries of pain reverberate in my heart. Children in famine, victims tortured by oppressors, helpless old people a burden to their sons, and the whole world of loneliness, poverty, and pain make a mockery of what human life should be. I long to alleviate this evil, but I cannot, and I too suffer.
   This has been my life. I have found it worth living, and would gladly live it again if the chance were offered me. ~ Bertrand Russell,
290:THE PSYCHOLOGY OF YOGA
Initial Definitions and Descriptions
Yoga has four powers and objects, purity, liberty, beatitude and perfection. Whosoever has consummated these four mightinesses in the being of the transcendental, universal, lilamaya and individual God is the complete and absolute Yogin.
All manifestations of God are manifestations of the absolute Parabrahman.
The Absolute Parabrahman is unknowable to us, not because It is the nothingness of all that we are, for rather whatever we are in truth or in seeming is nothing but Parabrahman, but because It is pre-existent & supra-existent to even the highest & purest methods and the most potent & illimitable instruments of which soul in the body is capable.
In Parabrahman knowledge ceases to be knowledge and becomes an inexpressible identity. Become Parabrahman, if thou wilt and if That will suffer thee, but strive not to know It; for thou shalt not succeed with these instruments and in this body.
In reality thou art Parabrahman already and ever wast and ever will be. To become Parabrahman in any other sense, thou must depart utterly out of world manifestation and out even of world transcendence.
Why shouldst thou hunger after departure from manifestation as if the world were an evil? Has not That manifested itself in thee & in the world and art thou wiser & purer & better than the Absolute, O mind-deceived soul in the mortal? When That withdraws thee, then thy going hence is inevitable; until Its force is laid on thee, thy going is impossible, cry thy mind never so fiercely & wailingly for departure. Therefore neither desire nor shun the world, but seek the bliss & purity & freedom & greatness of God in whatsoever state or experience or environment.
~ Sri Aurobindo, Essays Divine And Human,
291:Hence, it's obvious to see why in AA the community is so important; we are powerless over ourselves. Since we don't have immediate awareness of the Higher Power and how it works, we need to be constantly reminded of our commitment to freedom and liberation. The old patterns are so seductive that as they go off, they set off the association of ideas and the desire to give in to our addiction with an enormous force that we can't handle. The renewal of defeat often leads to despair. At the same time, it's a source of hope for those who have a spiritual view of the process. Because it reminds us that we have to renew once again our total dependence on the Higher Power. This is not just a notional acknowledgment of our need. We feel it from the very depths of our being. Something in us causes our whole being to cry out, "Help!" That's when the steps begin to work. And that, I might add, is when the spiritual journey begins to work. A lot of activities that people in that category regard as spiritual are not communicating to them experientially their profound dependence on the grace of God to go anywhere with their spiritual practices or observances. That's why religious practice can be so ineffective. The real spiritual journey depends on our acknowledging the unmanageability of our lives. The love of God or the Higher Power is what heals us. Nobody becomes a full human being without love. It brings to life people who are most damaged. The steps are really an engagement in an ever-deepening relationship with God. Divine love picks us up when we sincerely believe nobody else will. We then begin to experience freedom, peace, calm, equanimity, and liberation from cravings for what we have come to know are damaging-cravings that cannot bring happiness, but at best only momentary relief that makes the real problem worse. ~ Thomas Keating, Divine Therapy and Addiction,
292:There is a story I would like to tell you about a woman who practices the invocation of the Buddha Amitabha's name. She is very tough, and she practices the invocation three times daily, using a wooden drum and a bell, reciting, "Namo Amitabha Buddha" for one hour each time. When she arrives at one thousand times, she invites the bell to sound. (In Vietnamese, we don't say "strike" or "hit" a bell.) Although she has been doing this for ten years, her personality has not changed. She is still quite mean, shouting at people all the time.

A friend wanted to teach her a lesson, so one afternoon when she had just lit the incense, invited the bell to sound three times, and was beginning to recite "Namo Amitabha Buddha," he came to her door, and said, "Mrs. Nguyen, Mrs. Nguyen!" She found it very annoying because this was her time of practice, but he just stood at the front gate shouting her name. She said to herself, "I have to struggle against my anger, so I will ignore that," and she went on, "Namo Amitabha Buddha, Namo Amitabha Buddha."

The gentleman continued to shout her name, and her anger became more and more oppressive. She struggled against it, wondering, "Should I stop my recitation and go and give him a piece of my mind?" But she continued chanting, and she struggled very hard. Fire mounted in her, but she still tried to chant "Namo Amitabha Buddha." The gentleman knew it, and he continued to shout, "Mrs. Nguyen! Mrs. Nguyen!"

She could not bear it any longer. She threw away the bell and the drum. She slammed the door, went out to the gate and said, "Why, why do you behave like that? Why do you call my name hundreds of times like that?" The gentleman smiled at her and said, "I just called your name for ten minutes, and you are so angry. You have been calling the Buddha's name for ten years. Think how angry he must be! ~ Thich Nhat Hanh,
293:When, in last week's aphorism, Sri Aurobindo opposed - as one might say - "knowledge" to "Wisdom", he was speaking of knowledge as it is lived in the average human consciousness, the knowledge which is obtained through effort and mental development, whereas here, on the contrary, the knowledge he speaks of is the essential Knowledge, the supramental divine Knowledge, Knowledge by identity. And this is why he describes it here as "vast and eternal", which clearly indicates that it is not human knowledge as we normally understand it.
Many people have asked why Sri Aurobindo said that the river is "slender". This is an expressive image which creates a striking contrast between the immensity of the divine, supramental Knowledge - the origin of this inspiration, which is infinite - and what a human mind can perceive of it and receive from it.
Even when you are in contact with these domains, the portion, so to say, which you perceive, is minimal, slender. It is like a tiny little stream or a few falling drops and these drops are so pure, so brilliant, so complete in themselves, that they give you the sense of a marvellous inspiration, the impression that you have reached infinite domains and risen very high above the ordinary human condition. And yet this is nothing in comparison with what is still to be perceived.
I have also been asked if the psychic being or psychic consciousness is the medium through which the inspiration is perceived.
Generally, yes. The first contact you have with higher regions is a psychic one. Certainly, before an inner psychic opening is achieved, it is difficult to have these inspirations. It can happen as an exception and under exceptional conditions as a grace, but the true contact comes through the psychic; because the psychic consciousness is certainly the medium with the greatest affinity with the divine Truth. ~ The Mother, On Thoughts And Aphorisms,
294:Why are some people intelligent and others not? Why can some people do certain things while others can't?"

It is as though you asked why everybody was not the same! Then it would mean that there would only be one single thing, one single thing indefinitely repeated which would constitute the whole universe.... I don't know, but it seems to me that it wouldn't be worth the trouble having a universe for that, it would be enough to have just one thing!

But the moment one admits the principle of multiplicity and that no two things are alike in the universe, how can you ask why they are not the same! It is just because they are not, because no two things are alike.

Behind that there is something else which one is not conscious of, but which is very simple and very childish. It is this: "Since there is an infinite diversity, since some people are of one kind and others of a lesser kind, well" - here of course one doesn't say this to oneself but it is there, hidden in the depths of the being, in the depths of the ego - "why am I not of the best kind?" There we are. In fact it amounts to complaining that perhaps one is not of the best kind! If you look attentively at questions like this: "Why do some have much and others little?" "Why are some wise and not others? Why are some intelligent and not others?" etc., behind that there is "Why don't I have all that can be had and why am I not all that one can be?..." Naturally, one doesn't say this to oneself, because one would feel ridiculous, but it is there.

There then. Now has anyone anything to add to what we have just said?... Have you all understood quite well? Everything I have said? Nobody wants to say...

(A teacher) Our daily routine seems a little "impossible" to us.

Well, wait a century or two and it will become possible! (Laughter)

You are told that today's impossibility is the possibility of tomorrow - but these are very great tomorrows! ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers, Volume-8, page no. 387-388,
295:My method is different. I do not rush into actual work. When I get an idea, I start at once building it up in my imagination. I change the construction, make improvements and operate the device in my mind. It is absolutely immaterial to me whether I run my turbine in thought or test it in my shop. I even note if it is out of balance. There is no difference whatever; the results are the same. In this way I am able to rapidly develop and perfect a conception without touching anything. When I have gone so far as to embody in the invention every possible improvement I can think of and see no fault anywhere, I put into concrete form this final product of my brain. Invariably my device works as I conceived that it should, and the experiment comes out exactly as I planned it. In twenty years there has not been a single exception. Why should it be otherwise? Engineering, electrical and mechanical, is positive in results. There is scarcely a subject that cannot be examined beforehand, from the available theoretical and practical data. The carrying out into practice of a crude idea as is being generally done, is, I hold, nothing but a waste of energy, money, and time. My early affliction had however, another compensation. The incessant mental exertion developed my powers of observation and enabled me to discover a truth of great importance. I had noted that the appearance of images was always preceded by actual vision of scenes under peculiar and generally very exceptional conditions, and I was impelled on each occasion to locate the original impulse. After a while this effort grew to be almost automatic and I gained great facility in connecting cause and effect. Soon I became aware, to my surprise, that every thought I conceived was suggested by an external impression. Not only this but all my actions were prompted in a similar way. In the course of time it became perfectly evident to me that I was merely an automation endowed with power OF MOVEMENT RESPONDING TO THE STIMULI OF THE SENSE ORGANS AND THINKING AND ACTING ACCORDINGLY.

   ~ Nikola Tesla, The Strange Life of Nikola Tesla,
296:How often there is a kind of emptiness in the course of life, an unoccupied moment, a few minutes, sometimes more. And what do you do? Immediately you try to distract yourself, and you invent some foolishness or other to pass your time. That is a common fact. All men, from the youngest to the oldest, spend most of their time in trying not to be bored. Their pet aversion is boredom and the way to escape from boredom is to act foolishly.
   Well, there is a better way than that - to remember.
   When you have a little time, whether it is one hour or a few minutes, tell yourself, "At last, I have some time to concentrate, to collect myself, to relive the purpose of my life, to offer myself to the True and the Eternal." If you took care to do this each time you are not harassed by outer circumstances, you would find out that you were advancing very quickly on the path. Instead of wasting your time in chattering, in doing useless things, reading things that lower the consciousness - to choose only the best cases, I am not speaking of other imbecilities which are much more serious - instead of trying to make yourself giddy, to make time, that is already so short, still shorter only to realise at the end of your life that you have lost three-quarters of your chance - then you want to put in double time, but that does not work - it is better to be moderate, balanced, patient, quiet, but never to lose an opportunity that is given to you, that is to say, to utilise for the true purpose the unoccupied moment before you.
   When you have nothing to do, you become restless, you run about, you meet friends, you take a walk, to speak only of the best; I am not referring to things that are obviously not to be done. Instead of that, sit down quietly before the sky, before the sea or under trees, whatever is possible (here you have all of them) and try to realise one of these things - to understand why you live, to learn how you must live, to ponder over what you want to do and what should be done, what is the best way of escaping from the ignorance and falsehood and pain in which you live. 16 May 1958
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1929-1931,
297:For centuries and centuries humanity has waited for this time. It is come. But it is difficult.

I don't simply tell you we are here upon earth to rest and enjoy ourselves, now is not the time for that. We are here..... to prepare the way for the new creation.

The body has some difficulty, so I can't be active, alas. It is not because I am old, I am not old, I am younger than most of you. If I am here inactive, it is because the body has given itself definitely to prepare the transformation. But the consciousness is clear and we are here to work - rest and enjoyment will come afterwards. Let us do our work here.

So I have called you to tell you that. Take what you can, do what you can, my help will be with you. All sincere effort will be helped to the maximum.

It is the hour to be the heroic. Heroism is not what it is said to be; it is to become wholly unified - and the Divine help will always be with those who have resolved to be heroic in full sincerity.

There!

You are here at this moment that is to say upon earth, because you chose it at one time - you do not remember it any more, but I know it - that is why you are here. Well, you must rise to the height of the task. You must strive, you must conquer all weakness and limitations; above all you must tell your ego: "Your hour is gone." We want a race that has no ego, that has in place of the ego the Divine Consciousness. It is that which we want: the Divine Consciousness which will allow the race to develop itself and the Supramental being to take birth.

If you believe that I am here because I am bound - it is not true. I am not bound, I am here because my body has been given for the first attempt at transformation. Sri Aurobindo told me so. Well, I am doing it. I do not wish anyone to do it for me because.... Because it is not very pleasant, but I do it willingly because of the result; everybody will be able to benefit from it. I ask only one thing: do not listen to the ego.

If there is in your hearts a sincere Yes, you will satisfy me completely. I do not need words, I need the sincere adhesion of your hearts. That's all. ~ The Mother, (This talk was given by the Mother on April 2,1972,
298:Accumulating Prostrations

Why Prostrate at All?

Why fling yourself full-length on an often filthy floor, then get up and do it again hundreds of thousands of times?

Prostrations are a very immediate method for taking refuge and one of the best available for destroying pride. They are an outer gesture of surrender to the truth of dharma, and an expression of our intention to give up and expose our pride.

So, as we take refuge, we prostrate to demonstrate our complete surrender by throwing ourselves at the feet of our guru and pressing the five points of our body — forehead, hands and knees — to the floor as many times as we can.

(In the Tibetan tradition there are two ways of doing prostrations: one is the full-length and the other the half-length prostration, and we usually accumulate the full-length version.)

Prostrations are said to bring a number of benefits, such as being reborn with an attractive appearance, or our words carry weight and are valued, or our influence over friends and colleagues is positive, or that we are able to manage those who work for us.

It is said that practitioners who accumulate prostrations will one day keep company with sublime beings and as a result become majestic, wealthy, attain a higher rebirth and eventually attain liberation.

For worldly beings, though, to contemplate all the spiritual benefits of prostrations and the amount of merit they accumulate is not necessarily the most effective way of motivating ourselves. The fact that prostrations are good for our health, on the other hand, is often just the incentive we need to get started.

It's true, doing prostrations for the sake of taking healthy exercise is a worldly motivation, but not one I would ever discourage.

In these degenerate times, absolutely anything that will inspire you to practise dharma has some value, so please go ahead and start your prostrations for the sake of the exercise. If you do, not only will you save money on your gym membership, you will build up muscle and a great deal of merit.
~ Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse, Not for Happiness - A Guide to the So-Called Preliminary Practises, Shambhala Publications,
299:Many Blows are Needed:

Mother, even when one tries to think that one is powerless, there is something which believes one is powerful. So?

Ah, yes, ah yes! Ah, it is very difficult to be sincere.... That is why blows multiply and sometimes become terrible, because that's the only thing which breaks your stupidity. This is the justification of calamities. Only when you are in an acutely painful situation and indeed before something that affects you deeply, then that makes the stupidity melt away a little. But as you say, even when there is something that melts, there is still a little something which remains inside. And that is why it lasts so long... How many blows are needed in life for one to know to the very depths that one is nothing, that one can do nothing, that one does not exist, that one is nothing, that there is no entity without the divine Consciousness and the Grace. From the moment one knows it, it is over; all difficulties have gone. When one knows it integrally and there is nothing which resists... but till that moment... And it takes very long.

   Why doesn't the blow come all at once?

   Because that would kill you. For if the blow is strong enough to cure you, it would simply crush you, it would reduce you to pulp. It is only by proceeding little by little, little by little, very gradually, that you can continue to exist. Naturally this depends on the inner strength, the inner sincerity, and on the capacity for progress, for profiting by experience and, as I said a while ago, on not forgetting. If one is lucky enough not to forget, then one goes much faster. One can go very fast. And if at the same time one has that inner moral strength which, when the red-hot iron is at hand, does not extinguish it by trying to pour water over it, but instead goes to the very core of the abscess, then in this case things go very fast also. But not many people are strong enough for this. On the contrary, they very quickly do this (gesture), like this, like this, in order to hide, to hide from themselves. How many pretty little explanations one gives oneself, how many excuses one piles up for all the foolishnesses one has committed.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954,
300:outward appearances..." I did not quite understand "the egoistic state of consciousness absorbed in the outward People are occupied with outward things. That means that the consciousness is turned towards external things - that is, all the things of life which one sees, knows, does - instead of being turned inwards in order to find the deeper truth, the divine Presence. This is the first movement. You are busy with all that you do, with the people around you, the things you use; and then with life: sleeping, eating, talking, working a little, having a little fun also; and then beginning over again: sleeping, eating, etc., etc., and then it begins again. And then what this one has said, what that one has done, what one ought to do, the lesson one ought to learn, the exercise one ought to prepare; and then again whether one is keeping well, whether one is feeling fit, etc.

   This is what one usually thinks about.

   So the first movement - and it is not so easy - is to make all that pass to the background, and let one thing come inside and in front of the consciousness as the important thing: the discovery of the very purpose of existence and life, to learn what one is, why one lives, and what there is behind all this. This is the first step: to be interested more in the cause and goal than in the manifestation. That is, the first movement is a withdrawal of the consciousness from this total identification with outward and apparent things, and a kind of inward concentration on what one wants to discover, the Truth one wants to discover.

   This is the first movement.

   Many people who are here forget one thing. They want to begin by the end. They think that they are ready to express in their life what they call the supramental Force or Consciousness, and they want to infuse this in their actions, their movements, their daily life. But the trouble is that they don't at all know what the supramental Force or Consciousness is and that first of all it is necessary to take the reverse path, the way of interiorisation and of withdrawal from life, in order to find within oneself this Truth which has to be expressed.

   For as long as one has not found it, there is nothing to ~ The Mother,
301:It is your birthday tomorrow?
Yes, Mother.

How old will you be?
Twenty-six, Mother.

I shall see you tomorrow and give you something special. You will see, I am not speaking of anything material- that, I shall give you a card and all that- but of something...You will see, tomorrow, now go home and prepare yourself quietly so that you may be ready to receive it.
Yes, Mother.

You know, my child, what "Bonne Fete" signifies, that is, the birthday we wish here?
Like that, I know what it means, Mother, but not the special significance you want to tell me.

Yes, it is truly a special day in one's life. It is one of those days in the year when the Supreme descends into us- or when we are face to face with the Eternal- one of those days when our soul comes in contact with the Eternal and, if we remain a little conscious, we can feel His Presence within us. If we make a little effort on this day, we accomplish the work of many lives as in a lightning flash. That is why I give so much importance to the birthday- because what one gains in one day is truly something incomparable. And it is for this that I also work to open the consciousness a little towards what is above so that one may come before the Eternal. My child, it is a very, very special day, for it is the day of decision, the day one can unite with the Supreme Consciousness. For the Lord lifts us on this day to the highest region possible so that our soul which is a portion of that Eternal Flame, may be united and identified with its Origin.

This day is truly an opportunity in life. One is so open and so receptive that one can assimilate all that is given. I can do many things, that is why it is important.

It is one of those days when the Lord Himself opens the doors wide for us. It is as though He were inviting us to rekindle more powerfully the flame of aspiration. It is one of those days which He gives us. We too, by our personal effort, could attain to this, but it would be long, hard and not so easy. And this- this is a real chance in life- the day of Grace.

It is an occult phenomenon that occurs invariably, without our knowledge, on this particular day of the year. The soul leaves behind the body and journeys up and up till it merges into the Source in order to replenish itself and absorb from the Supreme Its Power, Light and Ananda and comes down charged for a whole year to pass. Then again and again... it continues like this year after year. ~ The Mother, Sweet Mother, Mona Sarkar,
302:Why do we forget things?

   Ah! I suppose there are several reasons. First, because one makes use of the memory to remember. Memory is a mental instrument and depends on the formation of the brain. Your brain is constantly growing, unless it begins to degenerate, but still its growth can continue for a very, very long time, much longer than that of the body. And in this growth, necessarily some things will take the place of others. And as the mental instrument develops, things which have served their term or the transitory moment in the development may be wiped out to give place to the result. So the result of all that you knew is there, living in itself, but the road traversed to reach it may be completely blurred. That is, a good functioning of the memory means remembering only the results so as to be able to have the elements for moving forward and a new construction. That is more important than just retaining things rigidly in the mind.
   Now, there is another aspect also. Apart from the mental memory, which is something defective, there are states of consciousness. Each state of consciousness in which one happens to be registers the phenomena of a particular moment, whatever they may be. If your consciousness remains limpid, wide and strong, you can at any moment whatsoever, by concentrating, call into the active consciousness what you did, thought, saw, observed at any time before; all this you can remember by bringing up in yourself the same state of consciousness. And that, that is never forgotten. You could live a thousand years and you would still remember it. Consequently, if you don't want to forget, it must be your consciousness which remembers and not your mental memory. Your mental memory will be wiped out inevitably, get blurred, and new things will take the place of the old ones. But things of which you are conscious you do not forget. You have only to bring up the same state of consciousness again. And thus one can remember circumstances one has lived thousands of years ago, if one knows how to bring up the same state of consciousness. It is in this way that one can remember one's past lives. This never gets blotted out, while you don't have any more the memory of what you have done physically when you were very young. You would be told many things you no longer remember. That gets wiped off immediately. For the brain is constantly changing and certain weaker cells are replaced by others which are much stronger, and by other combinations, other cerebral organisations. And so, what was there before is effaced or deformed.
   ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1954,
303:This is true in a general way; when those born scattered over the world at great distances from one another are driven by circumstances or by an impulsion to come and gather here, it is almost always because they have met in one life or another (not all in the same life) and because their psychic being has felt that they belonged to the same family; so they have taken an inner vow to continue to act together and collaborate. That is why even though they are born far from one another, there is something which compels them to come together; it is the psychic being, the psychic consciousness that is behind. And only to the extent the psychic consciousness is strong enough to order and organise the circumstances or the life, that is, strong enough not to allow itself to be opposed by outside forces, outside life movements, can people meet.

It is profoundly true in reality; there are large "families of beings" who work for the same cause, who have gathered in more or less large numbers and who come in groups as it were. It is as though at certain times there were awakenings in the psychic world, as though lots of little sleeping children were being called to wake up: "It is time, quick, quick, go down!" And they hurry down. And sometimes they do not drop at the same place, they are dispersed, yet there is something within which troubles them, pushes them; for one reason or another they are drawn close and that brings them together. But it is something deep in the being, something that is not at all on the surface; otherwise, even if people met they would not perhaps become aware of the bond. People meet and recognise each other only to the extent they become conscious of their psychic being, obey their psychic being, are guided by it; otherwise there is all that comes in to oppose it, all that veils, all that stupefies, all those obstacles to prevent you from finding yourself in your depths and being able to collaborate truly in the work. You are tossed about by the forces of Nature.

There is only one solution, to find your psychic being and once it is found to cling to it desperately, to let it guide you step by step whatever be the obstacle. That is the only solution. All this I did not write but I explained it to that lady. She had put to me the question: "How did I happen to come here?" I told her that it was certainly not for reasons of the external consciousness, it was something in her inner being that had pushed her. Only the awakening was not strong enough to overcome all the rest and she returned to the ordinary life for very ordinary reasons of living. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1953,
304:30. Take the same position as heretofore and visualize a Battleship; see the grim monster floating on the surface of the water; there appears to be no life anywhere about; all is silence; you know that by far the largest part of the vessel is under water; out of sight; you know that the ship is as large and as heavy as a twenty-story skyscraper; you know that there are hundreds of men ready to spring to their appointed task instantly; you know that every department is in charge of able, trained, skilled officials who have proven themselves competent to take charge of this marvelous piece of mechanism; you know that although it lies apparently oblivious to everything else, it has eyes which see everything for miles around, and nothing is permitted to escape its watchful vision; you know that while it appears quiet, submissive and innocent, it is prepared to hurl a steel projectile weighing thousands of pounds at an enemy many miles away; this and much more you can bring to mind with comparatively no effort whateveR But how did the battleship come to be where it is; how did it come into existence in the first place? All of this you want to know if you are a careful observer.
   31. Follow the great steel plates through the foundries, see the thousands of men employed in their production; go still further back, and see the ore as it comes from the mine, see it loaded on barges or cars, see it melted and properly treated; go back still further and see the architect and engineers who planned the vessel; let the thought carry you back still further in order to determine why they planned the vessel; you will see that you are now so far back that the vessel is something intangible, it no longer exists, it is now only a thought existing in the brain of the architect; but from where did the order come to plan the vessel? Probably from the Secretary of Defense; but probably this vessel was planned long before the war was thought of, and that Congress had to pass a bill appropriating the money; possibly there was opposition, and speeches for or against the bill. Whom do these Congressmen represent? They represent you and me, so that our line of thought begins with the Battleship and ends with ourselves, and we find in the last analysis that our own thought is responsible for this and many other things, of which we seldom think, and a little further reflection will develop the most important fact of all and that is, if someone had not discovered the law by which this tremendous mass of steel and iron could be made to float upon the water, instead of immediately going to the bottom, the battleship could not have come into existence at all. ~ Charles F Haanel, The Master Key System,
305:The last sentence: "...in the Truth-Creation the law is that of a constant unfolding without any Pralaya." What is this constant unfolding?

The Truth-Creation... it is the last line? (Mother consults the book) I think we have already spoken about this several times. It has been said that in the process of creation, there is the movement of creation followed by a movement of preservation and ending in a movement of disintegration or destruction; and even it has been repeated very often: "All that begins must end", etc., etc.

In fact in the history of our universe there have been six consecutive periods which began by a creation, were prolonged by a force of preservation and ended by a disintegration, a destruction, a return to the Origin, which is called Pralaya; and that is why this tradition is there. But it has been said that the seventh creation would be a progressive creation, that is, after the starting-point of the creation, instead of its being simply followed by a preservation, it would be followed by a progressive manifestation which would express the Divine more and more completely, so that no disintegration and return to the Origin would be necessary. And it has been announced that the period we are in is precisely the seventh, that is, it would not end by a Pralaya, a return to the Origin, a destruction, a disappearance, but that it would be replaced by a constant progress, because it would be a more and more perfect unfolding of the divine Origin in its creation.

And this is what Sri Aurobindo says. He speaks of a constant unfolding, that is, the Divine manifests more and more completely; more and more perfectly, in a progressive creation. It is the nature of this progression which makes the return to the Origin, the destruction no longer necessary. All that does not progress disappears, and that is why physical bodies die, it's because they are not progressive; they are progressive up to a certain moment, then there they stop and most often they remain stable for a certain time, and then they begin to decline, and then disappear. It's because the physical body, physical matter as it is at present is not plastic enough to be able to progress constantly. But it is not impossible to make it sufficiently plastic for the perfecting of the physical body to be such that it no longer needs disintegration, that is, death.

Only, this cannot be realised except by the descent of the Supermind which is a force higher than all those which have so far manifested and which will give the body a plasticity that will allow it to progress constantly, that is, to follow the divine movement in its unfolding. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955, 207-209,
306:Mother of Dreams :::

Goddess supreme, Mother of Dream, by thy ivory doors when thou standest,
Who are they then that come down unto men in thy visions that troop, group upon group, down the path of the shadows slanting?
Dream after dream, they flash and they gleam with the flame of the stars still around them;
Shadows at thy side in a darkness ride where the wild fires dance, stars glow and glance and the random meteor glistens;
There are voices that cry to their kin who reply; voices sweet, at the heart they beat and ravish the soul as it listens.

What then are these lands and these golden sands and these seas more radiant than earth can imagine?
Who are those that pace by the purple waves that race to the cliff-bound floor of thy jasper shore under skies in which mystery muses,
Lapped in moonlight not of our night or plunged in sunshine that is not diurnal?
Who are they coming thy Oceans roaming with sails whose strands are not made by hands, an unearthly wind advances?
Why do they join in a mystic line with those on the sands linking hands in strange and stately dances?

Thou in the air, with a flame in thy hair, the whirl of thy wonders watching,
Holdest the night in thy ancient right, Mother divine, hyacinthine, with a girdle of beauty defended.
Sworded with fire, attracting desire, thy tenebrous kingdom thou keepest,
Starry-sweet, with the moon at thy feet, now hidden now seen the clouds between in the gloom and the drift of thy tresses.
Only to those whom thy fancy chose, O thou heart-free, is it given to see thy witchcraft and feel thy caresses.

Open the gate where thy children wait in their world of a beauty undarkened.
High-throned on a cloud, victorious, proud I have espied Maghavan ride when the armies of wind are behind him;
Food has been given for my tasting from heaven and fruit of immortal sweetness;
I have drunk wine of the kingdoms divine and have healed the change of music strange from a lyre which our hands cannot master,
Doors have swung wide in the chambers of pride where the Gods reside and the Apsaras dance in their circles faster and faster.

For thou art she whom we first can see when we pass the bounds of the mortal;
There at the gates of the heavenly states thou hast planted thy wand enchanted over the head of the Yogin waving.
From thee are the dream and the shadows that seem and the fugitive lights that delude us;
Thine is the shade in which visions are made; sped by thy hands from celestial lands come the souls that rejoice for ever.
Into thy dream-worlds we pass or look in thy magic glass, then beyond thee we climb out of Space and Time to the peak of divine endeavour. ~ Sri Aurobindo, Collected Poems,
307:Sri Aurobindo tells us that surrender is the first and absolute condition for doing the yoga. Therefore it is not merely one of the required qualities, it is the very first indispensable attitude for commencing the yoga.

If you are not decided to make a total surrender, you cannot begin. But to make your surrender total, all the other qualities are necessary: sincerity, faith, devotion and aspiration.

And I add another one : endurance. Because if you are not able to face difficulties without getting discouraged, without giving up under the pretext that it is too difficult, if you are not able to receive blows and continue all the same, to "pocket" them, as it is said,—you receive blows because of your defects : you put them into your pocket and continue to march on without faltering; if you cannot do that with endurance, you will not go very far; at the first turning, when you lose sight of the little habitual life, you despair and give up the game.

The most material form of endurance is perseverance. Unless you are resolved to begin the same thing over again a thousand times if needed, you will arrive nowhere.

People come to me in despair : "But I thought it had been done, and I have to begin again !" And if they are told, "But it is nothing, you have to begin probably a hundred times, two hundred times, a thousand times", they lose all courage.

You take one step forward and you believe you are solid, but there will be always something that will bring about the same difficulty a little farther ahead.

You believe you have solved the problem, but will have to solve it again, it will present itself with just a little difference in its appearance, but it will be the same problem.

Thus there are people who have a fine experience and they exclaim, "Now, it is done !" Then things settle down, begin to fade, go behind a veil, and all on a sudden, something quite unexpected, a thing absolutely commonplace, that appears to be of no interest at all, comes before them and closes up the road. Then you lament: "Of what use is this progress that I have made, if I am to begin again !

Why is it so? I made an effort, I succeeded, I arrived at something and now it is as if I had done nothing. It is hopeless". This is because there is still the "I" and this "I" has no endurance.

If you have endurance, you say : "All right, I will begin again and again as long as necessary, a thousand times, ten thousand times, a million times, if necessary, but I will go to the end and nothing can stop me on the way".

That is very necessary.

Now, to sum up, we will put at the head of our list surrender. That is to say, we accept the fact that one must, in order to do the integral yoga, take the resolution of surrendering oneself wholly to the Divine. There is no other way, it is the way. ~ The Mother,
308:reading :::
   50 Psychology Classics: List of Books Covered:
   Alfred Adler - Understanding Human Nature (1927)
   Gordon Allport - The Nature of Prejudice (1954)
   Albert Bandura - Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control (1997)
   Gavin Becker - The Gift of Fear (1997)
   Eric Berne - Games People Play (1964)
   Isabel Briggs Myers - Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type (1980)
   Louann Brizendine - The Female Brain (2006)
   David D Burns - Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy (1980)
   Susan Cain - Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (2012)
   Robert Cialdini - Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (1984)
   Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Creativity (1997)
   Carol Dweck - Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (2006)
   Albert Ellis & Robert Harper - (1961) A Guide To Rational Living(1961)
   Milton Erickson - My Voice Will Go With You (1982) by Sidney Rosen
   Eric Erikson - Young Man Luther (1958)
   Hans Eysenck - Dimensions of Personality (1947)
   Viktor Frankl - The Will to Meaning (1969)
   Anna Freud - The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defense (1936)
   Sigmund Freud - The Interpretation of Dreams (1901)
   Howard Gardner - Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1983)
   Daniel Gilbert - Stumbling on Happiness (2006)
   Malcolm Gladwell - Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005)
   Daniel Goleman - Emotional Intelligence at Work (1998)
   John M Gottman - The Seven Principles For Making Marriage Work (1999)
   Temple Grandin - The Autistic Brain: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Succeed (2013)
   Harry Harlow - The Nature of Love (1958)
   Thomas A Harris - I'm OK - You're OK (1967)
   Eric Hoffer - The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951)
   Karen Horney - Our Inner Conflicts (1945)
   William James - Principles of Psychology (1890)
   Carl Jung - The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (1953)
   Daniel Kahneman - Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011)
   Alfred Kinsey - Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953)
   RD Laing - The Divided Self (1959)
   Abraham Maslow - The Farther Reaches of Human Nature (1970)
   Stanley Milgram - Obedience To Authority (1974)
   Walter Mischel - The Marshmallow Test (2014)
   Leonard Mlodinow - Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (2012)
   IP Pavlov - Conditioned Reflexes (1927)
   Fritz Perls - Gestalt Therapy: Excitement and Growth in the Human Personality (1951)
   Jean Piaget - The Language and Thought of the Child (1966)
   Steven Pinker - The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature (2002)
   VS Ramachandran - Phantoms in the Brain (1998)
   Carl Rogers - On Becoming a Person (1961)
   Oliver Sacks - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat (1970)
   Barry Schwartz - The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less (2004)
   Martin Seligman - Authentic Happiness (2002)
   BF Skinner - Beyond Freedom & Dignity (1953)
   Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton & Sheila Heen - Difficult Conversations (2000)
   William Styron - Darkness Visible (1990)
   ~ Tom Butler-Bowdon, 50 Psychology Classics,
309:Our culture, the laws of our culture, are predicated on the idea that people are conscious. People have experience; people make decisions, and can be held responsible for them. There's a free will element to it. You can debate all that philosophically, and fine, but the point is that that is how we act, and that is the idea that our legal system is predicated on. There's something deep about it, because you're subject to the law, but the law is also limited by you, which is to say that in a well-functioning, properly-grounded democratic system, you have intrinsic value. That's the source of your rights. Even if you're a murderer, we have to say the law can only go so far because there's something about you that's divine.

Well, what does that mean? Partly it means that there's something about you that's conscious and capable of communicating, like you're a whole world unto yourself. You have that to contribute to everyone else, and that's valuable. You can learn new things, transform the structure of society, and invent a new way of dealing with the world. You're capable of all that. It's an intrinsic part of you, and that's associated with the idea that there's something about the logos that is necessary for the absolute chaos of the reality beyond experience to manifest itself as reality. That's an amazing idea because it gives consciousness a constitutive role in the cosmos. You can debate that, but you can't just bloody well brush it off. First of all, we are the most complicated things there are, that we know of, by a massive amount. We're so complicated that it's unbelievable. So there's a lot of cosmos out there, but there's a lot of cosmos in here, too, and which one is greater is by no means obvious, unless you use something trivial, like relative size, which really isn't a very sophisticated approach.

Whatever it is that is you has this capacity to experience reality and to transform it, which is a very strange thing. You can conceptualize the future in your imagination, and then you can work and make that manifest-participate in the process of creation. That's one way of thinking about it. That's why I think Genesis 1 relates the idea that human beings are made in the image of the divine-men and women, which is interesting, because feminists are always criticizing Christianity as being inexorably patriarchal. Of course, they criticize everything like that, so it's hardly a stroke of bloody brilliance. But I think it's an absolute miracle that right at the beginning of the document it says straightforwardly, with no hesitation whatsoever, that the divine spark which we're associating with the word, that brings forth Being, is manifest in men and women equally. That's a very cool thing. You got to think, like I said, do you actually take that seriously? Well, what you got to ask is what happens if you don't take it seriously, right? Read Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. That's the best investigation into that tactic that's ever been produced. ~ Jordan Peterson, Biblical Series, 1,
310:Something happened to you before you were born, and this is what it was:
   STAGE ONE: THE CHIKHAI
   The events of the 49-day Bardo period are divided into three major stages, the Chikhai, the Chonyid, and the Sidpa (in that order). Immediately following physical death, the soul enters the Chikhai, which is simply the state of the immaculate and luminous Dharmakaya, the ultimate Consciousness, the BrahmanAtman. This ultimate state is given, as a gift, to all individuals: they are plunged straight into ultimate reality and exist as the ultimate Dharmakaya. "At this moment," says the Bardo Thotrol, "the first glimpsing of the Bardo of the Clear Light of Reality, which is the Infallible Mind of the Dharmakaya, is experienced by all sentient beings.''110 Or, to put it a different way, the Thotrol tells us that "Thine own consciousness, shining, void, and inseparable from the Great Body of Radiance, hath no birth, nor death, and is the Immutable Light-Buddha Amitabha. Knowing this is sufficient. Recognizing the voidness of thine own intellect to be Buddhahood ... is to keep thyself in the Divine Mind."110 In short, immediately following physical death, the soul is absorbed in and as the ultimate-causal body (if we may treat them together).
   Interspersed with this brief summary of the Bardo Thotrol, I will add my commentaries on involution and on the nature of the Atman project in involution. And we begin by noting that at the start of the Bardo experience, the soul is elevated to the utter heights of Being, to the ultimate state of Oneness-that is, he starts his Bardo career at the top. But, at the top is usually not where he remains, and the Thotrol tells us why. In Evans-Wentz's words, "In the realm of the Clear Light [the highest Chikhai stage] the mentality of a person . . . momentarily enjoys a condition of balance, of perfect equilibrium, and of [ultimate] oneness. Owing to unfamiliarity with such a state, which is an ecstatic state of non-ego, of [causal] consciousness, the . . . average human being lacks the power to function in it; karmic propensities becloud the consciousness-principle with thoughts of personality, of individualized being, of dualism, and, losing equilibrium, the consciousness-principle falls away from the Clear Light."
   The soul falls away from the ultimate Oneness because "karmic propensities cloud consciousness"-"karmic propensities'' means seeking, grasping, desiring; means, in fact, Eros. And as this Erosseeking develops, the state of perfect Oneness starts to "break down" (illusorily). Or, from a different angle, because the individual cannot stand the intensity of pure Oneness ("owing to unfamiliarity with such a state"), he contracts away from it, tries to ''dilute it," tries to extricate himself from Perfect Intensity in Atman. Contracting in the face of infinity, he turns instead to forms of seeking, desire, karma, and grasping, trying to "search out" a state of equilibrium. Contraction and Eros-these karmic propensities couple and conspire to drive the soul away from pure consciousness and downwards into multiplicity, into less intense and less real states of being. ~ Ken Wilber, The Atman Project,
311:28 August 1957
Mother, Sri Aurobindo says here: "Whether the whole of humanity would be touched [by the Supramental influence] or only a part of it ready for the change would depend on what was intended or possible in the continued order of the universe."
The Supramental Manifestation, SABCL, Vol. 16, p. 56

What is meant by "what was intended or possible"? The two things are different. So far you have said that if humanity changes, if it wants to participate in the new birth...

It is the same thing. But when you look at an object on a certain plane, you see it horizontally, and when you look at the same object from another plane, you see it vertically. (Mother shows the cover and the back of her book.) So, if one looks from above, one says "intended"; if one looks from below, one says "possible".... But it is absolutely the same thing, only the point of view is different.

But in that case, it is not our incapacity or lack of will to change that makes any difference.

We have already said this many a time. If you remain in a consciousness which functions mentally, even if it is the highest mind, you have the notion of an absolute determinism of cause and effect and feel that things are what they are because they are what they are and cannot be otherwise.

It is only when you come out of the mental consciousness completely and enter a higher perception of things - which you may call spiritual or divine - that you suddenly find yourself in a state of perfect freedom where everything is possible.

(Silence)

Those who have contacted that state or lived in it, even if only for a moment, try to describe it as a feeling of an absolute Will in action, which immediately gives to the human mentality the feeling of being arbitrary. And because of that distortion there arises the idea - which I might call traditional - of a supreme and arbitrary God, which is something most unacceptable to every enlightened mind. I suppose that this experience badly expressed is at the origin of this notion. And in fact it is incorrect to express it as an absolute Will: it is very, very, very different. It is something else altogether. For, what man understands by "Will" is a decision that is taken and carried out. We are obliged to use the word "will", but in its truth the Will acting in the universe is neither a choice nor a decision that is taken. What seems to me the closest expression is "vision". Things are because they are seen. But of course "seen", not seen as we see with these eyes.

(Mother touches her eyes...) All the same, it is the nearest thing.
It is a vision - a vision unfolding itself.
The universe becomes objective as it is progressively seen.

And that is why Sri Aurobindo has said "intended or possible". It is neither one nor the other. All that can be said is a distortion.

(Silence)

Objectivisation - universal objectivisation - is something like a projection in space and time, like a living image of what is from all eternity. And as the image is gradually projected on the screen of time and space, it becomes objective:

The Supreme contemplating His own Image.
~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1957-1958,
312:If the Divine that is all love is the source of the creation, whence have come all the evils abounding upon earth?"

   "All is from the Divine; but the One Consciousness, the Supreme has not created the world directly out of itself; a Power has gone out of it and has descended through many gradations of its workings and passed through many agents. There are many creators or rather 'formateurs', form-makers, who have presided over the creation of the world. They are intermediary agents and I prefer to call them 'Formateurs' and not 'Creators'; for what they have done is to give the form and turn and nature to matter. There have been many, and some have formed things harmonious and benignant and some have shaped things mischievous and evil. And some too have been distorters rather than builders, for they have interfered and spoiled what was begun well by others." - Questions and Answers 1929 - 1931 (30 June 1929)

   You say, "Many creators or rather 'formateurs', formmakers, have presided over the creation of the world." Who are these 'formateurs'?

   That depends. They have been given many names. All has been done by gradations and through individual beings of all kinds. Each state of being is inhabited by entities, individualities and personalities and each one has created a world around him or has contributed to the formation of certain beings upon earth. The last creators are those of the vital world, but there are beings of the Overmind (Sri Aurobindo calls this plane the Overmind), who have created, given forms, sent out emanations, and these emanations again had their emanations and so on. What I meant is that it is not the Divine Will that acted directly on Matter to give to the world the required form, it is by passing through layers, so to say, planes of the world, as for example, the mental plane - there are so many beings on the mental plane who are form-makers, who have taken part in the formation of some beings who have incarnated upon earth. On the vital plane also the same thing happens.

   For example, there is a tradition which says that the whole world of insects is the outcome of the form-makers of the vital world, and that this is why they take such absolutely diabolical shapes when they are magnified under the microscope. You saw the other day, when you were shown the microbes in water? Naturally the pictures were made to amuse, to strike the imagination, but they are based on real forms, so magnified, however, that they look like monsters. Almost the whole world of insects is a world of microscopic monsters which, had they been larger in size, would have been quite terrifying. So it is said these are entities of the vital world, beings of the vital who created that for fun and amused themselves forming all these impossible beasts which make human life altogether unpleasant.

   Did these intermediaries also come out of the Divine Power?
   Through intermediaries, yes, not directly. These beings are not in direct contact with the Divine (there are exceptions, I mean as a general rule), they are beings who are in relation with other beings, who are again in relation with others, and these with still others, and so on, in a hierarchy, up to the Supreme.(to be continued....) ~ The Mother, Question and Answers,
313:Sweet Mother, here it is written: "It is part of the foundation of Yoga to become conscious of the great complexity of our nature, see the different forces that move it and get over it a control of directing knowledge." Are these forces different for each person?

Yes. The composition is completely different, otherwise everybody would be the same. There are not two beings with an identical combination; between the different parts of the being and the composition of these parts the proportion is different in each individual. There are people, primitive men, people like the yet undeveloped races or the degenerated ones whose combinations are fairly simple; they are still complicated, but comparatively simple. And there are people absolutely at the top of the human ladder, the e ́lite of humanity; their combinations become so complicated that a very special discernment is needed to find the relations between all these things.

There are beings who carry in themselves thousands of different personalities, and then each one has its own rhythm and alternation, and there is a kind of combination; sometimes there are inner conflicts, and there is a play of activities which are rhythmic and with alternations of certain parts which come to the front and then go back and again come to the front. But when one takes all that, it makes such complicated combinations that some people truly find it difficult to understand what is going on in themselves; and yet these are the ones most capable of a complete, coordinated, conscious, organised action; but their organisation is infinitely more complicated than that of primitive or undeveloped men who have two or three impulses and four or five ideas, and who can arrange all this very easily in themselves and seem to be very co-ordinated and logical because there is not very much to organise. But there are people truly like a multitude, and so that gives them a plasticity, a fluidity of action and an extraordinary complexity of perception, and these people are capable of understanding a considerable number of things, as though they had at their disposal a veritable army which they move according to circumstance and need; and all this is inside them. So when these people, with the help of yoga, the discipline of yoga, succeed in centralising all these beings around the central light of the divine Presence, they become powerful entities, precisely because of their complexity. So long as this is not organised they often give the impression of an incoherence, they are almost incomprehensible, one can't manage to understand why they are like that, they are so complex. But when they have organised all these beings, that is, put each one in its place around the divine centre, then truly they are terrific, for they have the capacity of understanding almost everything and doing almost everything because of the multitude of entities they contain, of which they are constituted. And the nearer one is to the top of the ladder, the more it is like that, and consequently the more difficult it is to organise one's being; because when you have about a dozen elements, you can quickly compass and organise them, but when you have thousands of them, it is difficult. ~ The Mother, Questions And Answers 1955, 215-216,
314:Sometimes one cannot distinguish adverse forces from other forces.

That happens when one is quite unconscious. There are only two cases when this is possible: you are either very unconscious of the movements of your being - you have not studied, you have not observed, you do not know what is happening within you - or you are absolutely insincere, that is, you play the ostrich in order not to see the reality of things: you hide your head, you hide your observation, your knowledge and you say, "It is not there." But indeed the latter I hope is not in question here. Hence it is simply because one has not the habit of observing oneself that one is so unconscious of what is happening within.

Have you ever practised distinguishing what comes from your mind, what comes from your vital, what comes from your physical?... For it is mixed up; it is mixed up in the outward appearance. If you do not take care to distinguish, it makes a kind of soup, all that together. So it is indistinct and difficult to discoveR But if you observe yourself, after some time you see certain things, you feel them to be there, like that, as though they were in your skin; for some other things you feel you would have to go within yourself to find out from where they come; for other things, you have to go still further inside, or otherwise you have to rise up a little: it comes from unconsciousness. And there are others; then you must go very deep, very deep to find out from where they come. This is just a beginning.

Simply observe. You are in a certain condition, a certain undefinable condition. Then look: "What! how is it I am like that?" You try to see first if you have fever or some other illness; but it is all right, everything is all right, there's neither headache nor fever, the stomach is not protesting, the heart is functioning as it should, indeed, all's well, you are normal. "Why then am I feeling so uneasy?"... So you go a little further within. It depends on cases. Sometimes you find out immediately: yes, there was a little incident which wasn't pleasant, someone said a word that was not happy or one had failed in his task or perhaps did not know one's lesson very well, the teacher had made a remark. At the time, one did not pay attention properly, but later on, it begins to work, leaves a painful impression. That is the second stage. Afterwards, if nothing happened: "All's well, everything is normal, everything usual, I have nothing to note down, nothing has happened: why then do I feel like that?" Now it begins to be interesting, because one must enter much more deeply within oneself. And then it can b